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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland at College Park"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecat1977tenn 



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UNDERGRADUATE 
CATALOG 




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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT COLLEGE PARK 






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UNDERGRADUATE 



CATALOG 



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The University iv 



Campus University Officers 
Board of Regents 
Special Announcement 
Calendar. Academic 
Undergraduate Programs of Study 



University Policy Statement 
Fee and Expenses Information 
Title IX Compliance Policy 
Rehabilitation Act Compliance 
Academic Information (Catalogs) 



General Information 

Description, Goals. Resources. UMCP 
Admission and Orientation 
Fees and Expenses 
Financial Aid 



Regulations and Requirements Academic 

Administrative Offices 

Awards Prizes 

Student Data Information (Disclosure) 



Academic Divisions, Colleges, Schools, & Departments 32 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES . 
College of Agriculture 

Agncultural and Extension Education 

Agncultural and Resource Economics 

Agncultural Chemistry 

Agncultural Engineering 

Agriculture — General Curriculum 

Agronomy 

Animal Sciences (Dairy, Poultry. Veterinary) 

Applied Agriculture Two-year Program. Institute of 

Biological Sciences Program 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Conservation and Resource Development Programs 

Entomology 

Food Science Program 

Geology 

Horticulture 

Microbiology 

Pre- Forestry 

Pre- Theology 

Pre- Veterinary Medicine 

Zoology 

DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

College of Journalism 

School of Architecture 

American Studies Program 

Art. Department of 

Chinese Program 

Classical Languages and Literature 

Comparative Literature Program 

Dance 

English Language and Literature 

French and Italian Languages and Literatures 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 

Hebrew Program 

History 

Japanese 

Music 

Philosophy 

Russian Area Program 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Speech and Dramatic An 
DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES . . 
College of Business and Management 

Afro-American Studies 

Anthropology 

Business and Economic Research 

Criminal Justice and Criminology 

Economics 

Geography 

Governmental Research. ... 

Government and Politics 

Heanng and Speech Sciences 

Information Systems Management 

Linguistics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Urban Studies 
DIVISION OF HUMAN AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES . 
College of Education 

Administration. Supervision and Curriculum 

Child Study 

Counseling and Personnel Services 



Early Childhood-Elementary Education 



Industrial Education 73 

Measurement and Statistics 75 

Secondary Education 75 

Social Foundations of Education 84 

Special Education 84 

College of Human Ecology 85 

Family and Community Development 86 

Foods. Nutrition and Institution Administration 88 

Home Economics Education 90 

Housing and Applied Design 90 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 92 

College of Library and Information Services 93 

College of Physical Education. Recreation and Health 93 

Health Education 95 

Physical Education 96 

Recreation 98 

DIVISION OF MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL 

SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING 99 

College of Engineering 99 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering 102 

Aerospace Engineering 103 

Agricultural Engineering 104 

Chemical Engineering 104 

Civil Engineering 105 

Electrical Engineering 106 

Engineering Materials 107 

Engineering Sciences 107 

Fire Protection Engineering 108 

Fire Science — Urban Studies 108 

Mechanical Engineering ... 108 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 1 09 

Nuclear Engineering 110 

Wind Tunnel Operations Department 110 

Other Mathematical and Physical Science Departments, 

Programs and Curricula 110 

Applied Mathematics Program 110 

Astronomy Program 1 1 1 

Computer Science 111 

Mathematics 113 

Meteorology 114 

Physical Science and Technology. Institute of 112 

Physical Sciences 115 

Physics and Astronomy 115 

Science Communications 116 

Science or Math Education 116 

Additional Campus Programs 116 



f Force Aerospace Studies 
Bachelor of General Studies Degree 
Individual Studies Program 
General Honors Program 
Pre-Professional Programs 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 

Pre-Dentistry 

Pre-Forestry 

Pre-Law 



116 

117 
117 
117 
118 
118 
119 
119 
119 
Pre-Medical Technology 120 

Pre-Medicine 1 20 

Pre-Nursing 121 

Pre-Optometry 121 

Pre-Pharmacy 122 

Pre-Physical Therapy 122 

Pre-Radiologic Technology 123 

Pre-Theology 124 

Pre-Vetennary Medicine .124 



COUrSe Offerings (Alphabetical Order by Course Code) 127 4 

Faculty Listing 21 7 5 



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College Park Campus Administration 



Central Administration of the University Campus and 



Chancellor 

Robert L Gluckstern 



Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Nancie L Gonzalez 



Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
John A Bielec (Acting) 



Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
William L Thomas, Jr 



President 
Wilson H. Elkins 

Vice President for General Administration 
Donald W O'Connell 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
R. Lee Horn bake 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs and 
Legislative Relations 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr 

Vice President for University Development 
Robert G Smith 



University 
Officers 



Board of Regents 

Chairman 

B Herbert Brown 

Vice Chairman 
Hugh A. McMullen 

Mrs Mary H Broadwater 

Young D Hance, ex officio 

Wilbur G. Valentine 



Secretary 
Samuel H Hoover 



Treasurer 

N. Thomas Whittington. Jr. 



Assistant Secretary 
Mrs. Mary H. Broadwater 



Assistant Treasurer 
John C Scarbath 



Members: 

Percy M Chaimson 

Robert M Coultas, Jr. 

Ralph W. Frey 

Young D Hance ex officio 

A Paul Moss 

James W. Motsay 

Peter F. O'Malley 

Joseph D Tydings 

Wilbur G.Valentine 



The General University Requirements. The Board of 
Regents has approved a major revision of the under- 
graduate requirements. What has been known as 
"General Education Requirements." referred to in 
academic programs in previous editions of this 
Catalog, is henceforth replaced by "General University 
Requirements ." 

Any student who entered the University prior to 
August, 1973. has the option of completing either the 
General Education Requirements or the General 
University Requirements. Students first entering the 
University in August. 1 973. or after must comply with 
the new General University Requirements. 



Special 
Announcement 



1977-78 

Academic 

Calendar 



Summer Session, 1977 



Session I 

May 23 
May 24 
May 30 
July 1 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Monday 
Friday 



Registration 
Classes begin 
Holiday, Memorial Day 
Term ends 



Session II 

July 4 
July 5 
July 6 
August 1 2 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Friday 



Holiday. Independence Day 
Registration 
Classes begin 
Term ends 



Fall Semester, 1977 



August 22, 23 
August 24 

August 29-September 7 
September 5 
September 7 
November 1 
November 23-27 
December 9 
December 10 
December 12-19 
December 1 9 



Monday-Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Monday- Wednesday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday-Sunday 

Friday 

Saturday-Sunday 

Monday- Monday 

Monday 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Late Registration 

Holiday, Labor Day 

End of Schedule Adjustment Period 

Last day to drop a course 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Last day of classes 

Exam study day 

Final exam period 

Commencement 7 30 pm 



Spring Semester, 1978 

January 16.17 
January 1 8 
January 23-31 
January 31 
March 20-26 
April 4 
May 9 
May 10 
May 11-18 
May 19 



Monday- Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Monday-Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Monday-Sunday 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday-Thursday 

Friday 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Late Registration 

End of Schedule Adjustment Penod 

Spring Recess 

Last day to drop a course 

Last day of classes 

Exam study day 

Final exam period 

Commencement, 2 00 p m 



Programs within the Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 



Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agncultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy 

Animal Science 

Biochemistry 

Conservation and Resource Development 

Dairy Science 

General Agriculture 

General Biological Sciences 



Horticulture 

Institute of Applied Agriculture 

Poultry Science 

Veterinary Science 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Geology 

Microbiology 

Zoology 



University of 
Maryland 
Undergraduate 
Programs 
of Study 



Programs within the Division of Arts and Humanities 



Architecture 

Journalism 

American Studies 

Art 

Classical Languages 

Dance 

English 

French and Italian 



German and Slavic 

History 

Music 

Oriental and Hebrew 

Philosophy 

Spanish and Portuguese 

Speech and Dramatic Art 

Russian Area Studies 



Programs within the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 



Afro-American Studies 

Anthropology 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research 

Bureau of Governmental Research 

Business and Management 

Business Law 

Economics 

Geography 



Government and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Information Systems Management 

Institute for Urban Studies 

Institute of Criminal Justice and Criminology 

Linguistics 

Psychology 

Sociology 



Programs within the Division of Human and Community Resources 



Administration. Supervision and Curriculum 
Counseling and Personnel Services 
Early Childhood-Elementary Education 
Industrial Education 
Institute for Child Study 
Measurement and Statistics 
Secondary Education 
Special Education 



Family and Community Development 
Foods, Nutrition and Institution Administration 
Housing and Applied Design 
Textiles and Consumer Economics 
Library and Information Services 
Health Education 
Physical Education 
Recreation 



Programs within the Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineering 



Center for Materials Research 

Computer Science 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology 

Meteorology 

Mathematics 

Physics and Astronomy 

Physical Sciences 



Aero-Space Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Fire Protection Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Engineering Technology 



Programs within the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies 



Arts Dentistry 
Arts Law 
Arts Medicine 



General Honors 
General Studies 
Individual Studies 



Other Pre-Professional Programs 

Pre-Nursing 
Pre-Pharmacy 
Pre-Medical Technology 
Pre-Medicine 
Pre-Optometry 
Pre-Radiotogical Technology 



Pre-Physical Therapy 
Pre-Dental Hygiene 
Pre- Forestry 
Pre-Law 

Pre-Vetermary Medicine 
Pre-Theology 



VII 



University 

Policy 

Statement 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as 
an irrevocable contract between the student and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Changes are effected from time to time in 
the general regulations and in the academic requirements 
There are established procedures for making changes, 
procedures which protect the institution's integrity and the 
individual student's interest and welfare. A curriculum or 
graduation requirement, when altered, is not made retroac- 
tive unless the alteration is to the student's advantage and 
can be accommodated within the span of years normally 
required for graduation When the actions of a student are 
judged by competent authority, using established procedure. 



to be detrimental to the interests of the University com- 
munity, that person may be required to withdraw from the 
University 

The University of Maryland, in all its branches and 
divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal educational and em- 
ployment opportunity for people of every race, creed, ethnic 
origin, and sex 

It is University policy that smoking in classrooms is 
prohibited unless all participants agree to the contrary Any 
student has the right to remind the instructor of this policy 
throughout the duration of the class 



Important 
Information on 
Fees and 
Expenses 



All Students Who Pre-Reglster Incur a Financial 
Obligation to the University. Those students who pre- 
register and subsequently decide not to attend must notify 
the Registrations Office, Room 1 130A, North Administration 
Building, in writing, prior to the first day of classes If this of- 
fice has not received a request for cancellation by 4:30 p.m 
of the last day before classes begin, the University will 
assume the studerjt plans to attend and accepts his or her 
financial obligation. 

After classes begin, students who wish to terminate their 
registration must follow the withdrawal procedures and are 
liable for charges applicable at the time of withdrawal 

Disclosure of Information. In accordance with "The Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974" (PL 93-380). 
popularly referred to as the "Buckley Amendment," 



disclosure of student information, including financial and 
academic, is restricted Release to anyone other than the 
student requires a written waiver from the student (For com- 
plete University Policy on access to and release of student 
data/information, see page 30 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Central 
Collections Unit and in accordance with State law the Univer- 
sity is required to turn over all delinquent accounts to them 
for collection and legal follow-up These are automatically 
done on a monthly basis by computer read-out 

Collection Costs. Collection costs incurred in collecting 
delinquent accounts will be charged to the student The nor- 
mal collection fee is 15V plus any attorney and/or court 
costs 



Title IX 

Compliance 

Policy 



The University of Maryland at College Park does not 
discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs 
and activities. The policy of nondiscrimination extends to 
employment in the institution and academic admission to the 
institution. Such discrimination is prohibited by Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681, et seq .) 
and 45 C F.R. 86. and this notification is required under the 
Federal regulations pursuant to 20 U.S.C. 1681 etseq. 

Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX and Part 86 
of 45 CFR. to the University of Maryland, College Park, may 



be directed to the Office of Human Relations Programs. Main 
Administration Building, University of Maryland. College Park; 
or to the Director of the Office of Civil Rights of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and Welfare. Washington. D C 

Gender Reference 

The masculine gender whenever used in this document is 
intended to include the feminine gender as well 



Non- 
discrimination 
on the Basis 
of Handicap 



Nondiscrimination on the Basis of 
Handicap 

The University of Maryland at College Park does not 
discriminate on the basis of handicap in admission or access 
to its educational programs and activities. This policy of non- 
discrimination extends to employment in the institution. 
Such discrimination is prohibited by Section 504 of the 



Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 USC 706) and 45 CFR 84. 
and this notification is required pursuant to 45 CFR 84 8 

Inquiries concerning the application of Section 504 and 
part 84 of 45 CFR to the University of Maryland, College 
Park, may be directed to the Campus Coordinator on the 
Handicapped, Main Administration Building. University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 



Academic 
Information 



Prospectus 

College Park publishes a free booklet, Maryland, for 
prospective undergraduate students For a copy of this 
booklet, call 301/454-5550 or write to Admissions Office. 
North Administration Bldg , College Park. Maryland 20742. 

Departmental Brochures 

Small brochures are available free from the Admissions Of- 
fice of many of the departments at College Park Write to Ad- 
missions, University of Maryland, College Park. Maryland 
20742. 

Undergraduate Catalog 

The Undergraduate Catalog is available free to all un- 
dergraduates and to all faculty at College Park before each 



academic year Copies are available in libraries and in high 
schools in Maryland, DC and Virginia Copies are for sale for 
$2 00 each Send a check payable to the 'University of 
Maryland,' to the UMporium, College Park, Maryland 20742 
Write Catalog' on the check Allow four weeks for delivery 

Graduate Catalog, Graduate Bulletin 

For information about the Graduate Catalog or ttie 
Graduate Bulletin, call 301 454-3141 or wnte the 
Graduate Offices. South Administration Building. College 
Park, Maryland 20742 

Summer Sessions Catalog 

For information call 454-3347 or wnte to Summer 
Sessions Offices. Turner Lab. College Park. Maryland 
20742 



VIII 



The University 



Goals For College Park 

Our objectives are simply stated: to enrich our students: to encourage 
them to develop the harmonious ideals and fine relationships which 
characterize cultured individuals: to provide an atmosphere for self- 
enlightenment: and to promote beneficial research for the welfare of the 
State, of the nation and of the community of knowledge everywhere. 

Universities in General 

The contemporary university is a comprehensive educational in- 
stitution offering many undergraduate programs. 

Universities as we know them in the United States have existed for 
less than a century, but their roots can be traced back to medieval 
history The English college system served as a model for earliest 
American efforts at higher education. The ancient German university 
tradition was joined with this in the 1870's to form basic outlines of our 
present institutions Practical studies were grafted onto these more 
classically and theoretically oriented traditions by the agricultural em- 
phasis of the land grant movement. 

With the explosion of scientific and technological knowledge in the 
early twentieth century, the role of the university in American society at- 
tained increased importance, and today almost all aspects of national life 
— social, economic, scientific, and cultural — benefit from its 
educational, research and service functions. 

College Park and the University of Maryland 

The College Park Campus of the University of Maryland was opened in 
1 859 as the Maryland Agricultural College under a charter secured by a 
group of Maryland planters. After a disastrous fire in 1912, the State 
acquired control of the college and bore the cost of rebuilding. In 1 920 
the State took over the faculty-owned University of Baltimore founded in 
1 807. merging it with the State-owned institution at College Park to form 
the present-day University of Maryland 

In 1886 the Delaware Conference Academy was founded by the 
Methodist Church in Princess Anne, Maryland. Title to the institution was 
acquired by the State of Maryland in 1 926. and it became a division of the 
University of Maryland in 1 948. It was made an integral part of the Univer- 
sity system with the name. University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) 
in 1970 

A third campus, the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) 
was opened at Catonsville in 1 966 

Another administrative unit of the University is University College 
(UMUC) which offers degree and non-degree educational programs held 
usually in the late afternoon, evening, or on weekends both at College 
Park, and elsewhere in the state, nation, and abroad. Administratively and 
academically UMUC is an integral part of the University, but its course of- 
ferings are not included in the programs of the College Park Campus. 

Libraries at College Park 

The Theodore R McKeldin Library is the general library of the Univer- 
sity, containing reference works, periodicals, circulating books, and other 
materials in all fields of research and instruction Branch libraries include 
the Undergraduate Library, the Engineering and Physical Sciences 
Library, the Architecture Library, and the Chemistry Library 



The libraries on the College Park Campus include approximately 
1.563.000 volumes, nearly 984.500 microfilm units, c.id approximately 
1 1 .000 subscriptions to periodicals and newspapers, as well as many 
government documents, phonorecords. films, slides, prints, and music 
scores. 

The Undergraduate Library, opened in 1973, seats 4,000 students 
and has a book capacity of 200.000 volumes It features a recreational 
reading collection of 5.000 paperbacks, a quadrophonic concert room, 
color video tape players and playback units, enclosed rooms equipped 
with instructor's consoles for the use of nonprint media materials, and 
wireless stereo headsets for tapes and lectures, plays, speeches, and 
music. The McKeldin Library mainly supports the graduate and research 
programs of the University, but is also open to undergraduates. 

Special collections in the library system include those of Richard Van 
Mises in mathematics and applied mechanics; Max Bom in the physical 
sciences; Thomas I. Cook in political science; Romeo Mansueti in the 
biological sciences: Katherine Anne Porter; Maryland; U.S. government 
publications (for which the University is a regional depository); docu- 
ments of the United Nations, the League of Nations, and other inter- 
national organizations; agricultural experiment station and extension serv- 
ice publications; maps from the U.S. Army Map Service; the files of the 
Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America: the 
Wallenstein collection of musical scores; the Andre Kostelanetz Music 
Library; and research collections of the American Bandmasters 
Association, the National Association of Wind and Percussion Instructors 
and the Music Educators National Conference. In addition, the collections 
include microfilm productions of government documents, rare books, 
early journals, and newspapers. 

Other Area Resources 

The College Park Campus area is in a region rich in research collec- 
tions. In the Washington area are the Library of Congress, the National Ar- 
chives, the Folger Library, the National Library of Medicine, the National 
Agricultural Library, and various academic and special libraries In the 
Baltimore area, in addition to the University's own libraries at UMBC and 
on the professional campus, are the Enoch Pratt Free Library and the 
Maryland Historical Association Library. The Maryland Hall of Records is 
located in Annapolis. 

Campus Research Facilities 

The research programs at the University derive their existence and 
vigor from a faculty comprised of internationally recognized scholars and 
scientists. It is an advantage for undergraduate students to be aware of 
the University's research facilities as they plan their programs. 

Among the exceptional research facilities are: a 140 MeV cyclotron; a 
nuclear reactor; scanning electron microscopes; subsonic and hyper- 
sonic wind tunnels; an electron ring accelerator; a precision encoder and 
pattern recognition device: a gravitational radiation detection system in- 
cluding a gravimeter on the moon; a quiescent plasma device (Q 
machine); a psycho-pharmacology laboratory: three retro-reflector arrays 
on the moon; rotating tanks for laboratory studies of meteorological 
phenomena; Van de Graff accelerators; a laboratory for basic behavioral 
research; an assortment of computers: and the Astronomy Observatory. 

The College Park Campus also owns and operates one of the largest 
and most sophisticated long-wavelength radio telescopes (located in 



GENERAL INFORMATION /1 



Clark Lake, Calif.) and a cosmic ray laboratory (located in New Mexico) 

In additon to these research opportunities in biological, mathematical 
and physical sciences, research programs in the behavioral sciences, 
social sciences and education exist in many bureaus and institutes in- 
cluding: the Bureau of Business and Economic Research, Bureau of 
Educational Research and Field Services, Bureau of Governmental 
Research, Institute for Child Study, Institute of Criminal Justice and 
Criminology, and the Institute for Urban Studies 

Investigation in agriculture is an important aspect of University re- 
search University farms total more than 2.000 acres Breeding, selection 
in farm crops, and soil research are a part of the program. Work in these 
areas is augmented by X-ray equipment and an electron microscope. 



Summer Sessions 

The College Park Campus offers two summer sessions of six weeks 
each during 1 977. The first session begins May 23 and ends July 1 The 
second session runs from July 5 to August 1 2. New freshmen applicants 
who have met the regular University admission requirements for fall 
enrollment may begin their studies during the summer rather than await 
the next fall term. By taking advantage of this opportunity and continuing 
to attend summer sessions the time required for completion of a bac- 
calaureate degree can be shortened by a year or more, depending upon 
the requirements of the chosen curriculum and the rate of progress 

Many new students have found that attendance during the summer 
sessions facilitates the transition from secondary school to college 
Courses offered during the summer are the same in content and 
instruction as those offered during the fall and spring semesters. 



The Summer Cultural and Recreational Program is an important part of 
"Summer at Maryland ." A Fine Arts Festival offers a series of programs in 
art, dance, drama, film, and music, and outstanding performers in these 
media appear on the College Park Campus Facilities for most sports and 
an intramural program in several team and individual sports are available 
to the students. 

For additional information write for a Summer Sessions Catalog, which 
may be obtained from the Administrative Dean for Summer Programs. 
College Park. Md 20742 

Accreditation 

The University of Maryland is accredited by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and is a member of the 
Association of American Universities In addition, individual schools and 
departments are accredited by such groups as the American Association 
of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American Chemical Society, the 
National Association of Schools of Music, the Section of Legal Education 
and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Association, the American 
Council of Education for Journalism, the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education, the Council on Dental Education of the American 
Dental Association, the Committee on Accreditation of the American 
Library Association, the American Psychological Association, the Com- 
mission on Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education the 
Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association, the 
Engineers Council for Professional Development, the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education, the National League for Nursing, the 
National Architectural Accrediting Board, the American Association for 
Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care, and the American Dietetic 
Association. 



Admission and Orientation 



Undergraduate Admission 

The University of Maryland actively subscribes to a policy of equal 
educational and employment opportunity. 

The University of Maryland is required by Title IX of the Education 
Amendments of 1972 not to discriminate on the basis of sex in ad- 
mission, treatment of students, or employment. 

Admissions Requirements 

The University of Maryland is a publicly-supported land grant institution 
dedicated primarily to the educational needs of Maryland residents. 
Within its responsibilities as a State facility, the University attracts a 
cosmopolitan student body, and each year offers admission to a number 
of promising men and women from other states and jurisdictions. Curren- 
tly, 46 states and 93 foreign nations are represented in the un- 
dergraduate population. 

Freshman Admission 

Maryland Residents 

In order to be admitted, freshmen applicants who are Maryland 
residents must meet ONE of the following THREE criteria for admission: 
FIRST: Have a C average in academic subjects in the 10th and 1 1th 
grades and rank in the top half of the high school graduation class. OR, 
SECOND: Satisfy the requirements outlined in the chart below. The 
chart indicates the combination of academic grade point average and 
total SAT scores required to be eligible for admission 

If the applicant has taken the SAT several times, the University will use 
the highest set of scores for a single test date. 

To determine your eligibility for admission based on the chart below: 
1 Calculate your academic grade point average in the 1 0th and 1 1 th 
grades. A list of courses which the College Park Campus uses in 
computing the high school academic grade point average is provided 
below 
2. Locate the line on the chart which indicates your highest total SAT 
scores for a single test date For example, if you took the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test twice and earned the following scores: 
1 st test date Verbal 50 

Math 5 1 
2nd test date Verbal 53 

Math 50 
you would use the test scores for the second test date 



3. If your academic grade point average is equal to or higher than the 
grade point average listed on the chart beside your highest total SAT 
score, you will be admitted to the College Park Campus 

Minimum Requirements for Maryland Freshmen Applicants Using 
Total SAT Scores and Academic Grade Point Average as Criteria. 



Academic 
Total Grade 

SAT Point 

Score Average 

40 2 48 

41 2 47 

42 2.45 

43 2 44 

44 2.43 

45 2.42 

46 2 40 

47 2.39 

48 2 38 

49 2.37 

50 2 35 

51 2 34 

52 2 33 

53 2 32 

54 2 30 

55 2 29 

56 2.28 

57 2 27 

58 2.25 

59 2 24 

60 2 23 

61 . 222 

62 2 20 

63 2 19 

64 218 

65 217 

66 2 15 

67 2 14 

68 2 13 

69 212 

70 2 10 

71 2 09 

72 2 08 



Academic 
Total Grade 

SAT Point 
Score Average 

73 2 07 

74 2 05 

75 2 04 

76 2 03 

77 2 02 

78 2.01 

79 1 99 

80 1 98 

81 1 97 

82 1 96 
83 1 94 

84 1 93 

85 1 92 

86 191 

87 1 89 

88 1 88 

89 1 87 

90 1 86 

91 1 84 

92 1 83 

93 1 82 

94 1 81 

95 1 79 

96 1 78 

97 1 77 

98 1 76 

99 1 74 

100 1 73 

101 1 72 

102 171 

1 03 169 

104 168 

105 167 



2 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Total 
SAT 
Score 

106 


Academic 

Grade 

Point 

Average 

1 66 


Total 
SAT 
Score 

133 


107 


1 64 




108 


1 63 




109 


1 62 


136 


1 10 


1 61 


137 


1 1 1 


1 59 


138 


112 
1 13 


1 58 

1 57 


139 
140 


1 14 


1 56 


141 


1 15 


1 54 


142 


1 16 


1.53 


143 


1 1 7 


1 52 


144 


1 18 


1 51 


145 


1 19 


1 49 


146 


120 


. 1 48 


147 


121 


1 47 


148 


122 


1 46 


149 


123 


1.44 


150 


124 


1 43 


151 


125 


1 42 


152 


126 


1.41 


153 . 


127 


.1.39 


154 


128 


. . 1 38 


155 


129 


1 37 


156 . 


130 


1 36 


157 


131 


1 .34 


158 . 


132 


1.33 


159 . 



Academic 




Academic 




Academic 


Grade 


Class 


Grade 


Class 


Grade 


Point 


Rank 


Point 


Rank 


Point 


Average 


Percentile 


Average 


Percentile 


Average 



1 32 
1 31 
1 29 
1.28 
1 27 
1.26 
1 24 
1 23 
1.22 
1.21 
1.20 
1 18 
1 17 
1.16 
1 15 
1 13 
1 12 
1 11 
1 10 
1.08 
1 07 
1.06 
1.05 
1.03 
1.02 
1.01 
1.00 



OR, THIRD: Satisfy the requirements outlined in the chart below 
The chart indicates the combination of academic grade point average 
and high school class rank required to be eligible for admission. 

To determine your eligibility for admission based on the chart below: 

1 . Calculate your academic grade point average in the 1 0th and 1 1 th 
grades. A list of the courses which the College Park Campus utilizes 
in computing the academic grade point average is provided below 

2. Compute your class rank. Class rank is expressed as a percentile in 
the chart To determine your percentile, divide the number of 
students in your graduating class into your class rank and subtract 
the result from 1 00 For example, a student who ranks 1 0th in a class 
of 1 00 would ran k at the 90th percentile ( 1 00 divided into 10 equals 
1 0, 1 00 less 1 equals 90th percentile). 

3 Locate the line on the chart which indicates your class rank 
percentile. 

4. If your academic grade point average is equal to or higher than the 
grade point average listed on the chart beside your class rank 
percentile, you will be admitted to the College Park Campus. 



Minimum Requirements for Maryland Freshmen Applicants Using 
High School Class Rank and Academic Grade Point Average as 
Criteria 





Academic 




Academic 


Class 


Grade 


Class 


Grade 


Rank 


Point 


Rank 


Point 


Percentile 


Average 


Percentile 


Average 


1 . . . 


2.58 


21 


. 2.38 


2 


2 57 


22 


2.37 


3 


2.56 


23 


2.36 


4 


2 55 


24 


2.35 


5 


2.54 


25 


2.34 


6 


2.53 


26 


2 33 


7 


2.52 


27 


2.32 


8 


2 51 


28 


2.31 


9 


2.50 


29 


2.30 


10 


2 49 


30 

31 . . 


. . 2.29 


11 


2.48 


2 28 


12 


2 47 


32 

33 

34 

35 


2 27 


13 . . 


2 46 


2 26 


14 . 


2 45 


2 25 


15 


2.44 


2.24 


16 


2.43 


36 


2.23 


17 


2.42 


37 

38 

39 


2 22 


18 . 


. . 2.41 


2 21 


19 


: 2.40 


2.20 


20 


2.39 


40 


2.19 



41 218 

42 2 17 

43 2 16 

44 215 

45 2 14 
46 2 13 

47 212 

48 2 11 

49 2.10 
50 2.09 



51 2 08 

52 2 07 

53 2 06 

54 205 

55 2 04 

56 2 03 

57 2.02 

58 2 01 

59 2 00 

60 1.99 



Use of Mid-Year Grades. The University will reserve a decision on the 
applications of Maryland residents who do not meet the criteria outlined 
above until mid-year grades are available for the senior year in high 
school. The College Park Campus is unable to utilize the final high school 
marks in rendering decisions for applicants who are applying for ad- 
mission directly from high school. 

If your mid-year grades for the senior year in high school are available 
when your application is initially considered by the College Park ad- 
missions staff, they will be used in determining your eligibility for ad- 
mission. 



Subjects Used for Computation of the High School Academic Grade 
Point Average. Because of variations in course titles in the secondary 
school systems, this listing is not inclusive It does, however, provide you 
with examples of the types of courses the College Park Campus utilizes 
in computing the high school academic grade point average 
English. Composition. Communications. Creative Writing, Con- 
versational Language, Debate, Expressive Writing, Journalism, Language 
Arts, Literature. Public Speaking, Speech. World Literature. 
Foreign Languages. French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Latin, 
Russian, Spanish. Other. 

Mathematics. Advanced Topics, Algebra I, Algebra II. Analysis (or 
Elementary Analysis), Analytic Geometry. Calculus. Computer Math, 
Functions, Geometry, Mathematics II, Mathematics III. Mathematics IV. 
Matrices Probabilities, Modern Geometry. Probability and Statistics. 
E.A.M. (Rev Acad Math), S M S.G., Modern Math, Trigonometry. 
Science. Advanced Biology. Advanced Chemistry, Biology. Chemistry, 
Earth Science, General Science, Genetics. Geology, Laboratory Science. 
Physical Science. Physics, Space Science, Zoology 
Social Studies. Afro-American Studies, American History, Ancient 
History, Anthropology, Child Development, Civics-Citizenship. Con- 
temporary Issues (C.I .S.S.), Cultural Areas, Cultural Heritage. Economics. 
Economic Citizenship, Ethics (if considered to be Religion, not counted), 
European History, European History and Survey, Family Living, Far East, 
Pan American. Geography, Government, Humanities, International Affairs, 
Medieval History, Modem History. Modern Problems, National Govern- 
ment, Philosophy, Political Science, Problems of Democracy, Problems 
of 20th Century, Psychology. Sociology. State History, U.S. History. 
World Civilization. World Cultures 

Special Admissions Options 

To serve students who are not typical freshmen, the College Park cam- 
pus has developed a variety of non-traditional admissions options: 

Concurrent Enrollment. High school seniors who have earned a 
minimum 3 00 (B) average in academic subjects during grades ten and 
eleven may enroll on the College Park campus for two courses or seven 
credits They must file a "concurrent admissions" application and tran- 
scripts. The permission of the high school is required and students must 
live within commuting distance. Fees are assessed on a per-credit hour 
basis. 

Summer Enrollment. High school students with minimum 300 (B) 
averages may enroll for courses during the summer preceding their junior 
or senior year. They must file a regular application and transcripts Fees 
are assessed on a per-credit hour basis. 

Early Admission. Although the University of Maryland generally 
requires applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to their first 
registration, the College Park Campus will admit well-qualified students 
without this document provided: 

1 . they have a minimum B (3.0) average in academic subjects. 

2. the student is within four semester courses (two credits) of high 
school graduation. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 3 



3. the student has the endorsement of the high school and the 
superintendent of schools, when appropnate 

High school Equivalence Examination. Maryland residents who are 
at least 1 7 years of age and have not received a high school diploma 
can be considered for admission by presenting the high school General 
Education Equivalency certificate In order to be admitted the applicant 
must present an average score of 50 with no score below 40 on any of 
the five parts of the test or a minimum score of 45 on each of the five 
parts of the test 

Veterans and Mature Adults. Maryland residents who have had 
military experience or have been out of school for more than two years 
may find that our published admissions standards are not applicable We 
urge applicants in these categories to contact an Admissions Counselor 
to discuss their educational plans. 
OutofState Freshmen 

The University is very pleased to consider applications from students 
who are not residents of the State of Maryland Because the primary 
obligation of the University is to Maryland residents, however, the number 
of out-of-state students who can be admitted is limited The typical fresh- 
man applicant presents better than average SAT scores and high school 
grades. 

Other Requirements for All Freshmen Applicants 

In general the College Park campus requires freshman applicants to 
earn a high school diploma prior to their first registration at the university. 

The SAT examination is required of all freshmen applicants. Test 
results must be submitted directly to the College Park Campus by the 
Educational Testing Service. You are strongly urged to include your 
social security number when registering for the SAT. This will expedite 
processing of your application for admission by the College Park Cam- 
pus. The reporting code for the College Park Campus is 5814. The 
University strongly recommends that the SAT be taken as early as 
possible The January test is generally the latest acceptable examination 
for fall applicants Further information on the SAT may be obtained from 
high school guidance offices or directly from the Educational Testing Ser- 
vice. Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

School of Architecture. Admission to the School of Architecture is 
competitive with selection based on previous academic achievement. 

All Architecture applicants must file an application by March 1 to be 
assured of consideration. Because of severe space limitations, admission 
to this program is subject to closure at any time. 

Applications for the School of Architecture are accepted for the fall 
semester only. 

Transfer Student Admission 
General Statement 

A student who has attended any institution of higher learning following 
graduation from high school and attempted nine or more credits must be 
considered for admission as a transfer student. 

The University will use the average stated on the transcript by the 
sending institution In cases where there is more than one previous in- 
stitution, the averages of all institutions attended will be cumulative. 

Where the number of students desiring admission exceeds the number 
that can be accommodated in a particular professional or specialized 
program, admission will be based on criteria developed by the University 
to select the best qualified students 

Transfer applicants must be in good academic and disciplinary stand- 
ing at their previous institutions to be eligible for possible transfer to the 
College Park Campus 

Maryland Residents 

Those Admissible as High School Seniors. Students who were 
eligible for admission as high school seniors and who are in good 
academic and disciplinary standing at their previous institutions are 
eligible to be considered for transfer Maryland residents must have a C 
average in all previous college-level work to be admitted 

Those Not Admissible as High School Seniors. Maryland residents 
who are not admissible as high school seniors must complete at least 28 
semester hours with a C or better cumulative average at another in- 
stitution. 

Transfer Students from Maryland Public Community Colleges. 
Maryland residents who attend Maryland public community colleges 
regardless of their eligibility for admission directly from high school, will 
be admitted after they have received the Associate of Arts degree or 
completed 56 semester hours with a C or better cumulative average 
Where the number of students desiring admission exceeds the number 
that can be accommodated in a particular professional or specialized 



program, admission will be based on criteria developed by the University 
to select the best qualified students 

Exception to the 56 hour/A A degree rule will be made for a student 
attempting to transfer into a program which is not available at the 
student's community college in a full two-year program In order to be ad- 
mitted to the College Park Campus as an exception to the two-year rule, 
the applicant must obtain a letter from the transfer advisor at his/her 
community college recommending that the University waive the two-year 
requirement in his/her case because of problems with obtaining suf- 
ficient major program courses 

Out-of-State Transfer Students 

The University is very pleased to consider applications from students 
who are not residents of the State of Maryland Because the primary 
obligation of the University is to Maryland residents, however, the number 
of out-of-state students who can be admitted is limited The typical trans- 
fer presents better than average credentials in his or her previous 
college-level work 

Undergraduate Students Transferring from Within the University System 

A student seeking to move from one campus of the University to 
another must have been a regular degree-seeking student eligible to 
return to his or her original campus. 

Students who were special or non-degree students or students who 
have been academically dismissed by one campus must contact the ad- 
missions office of the receiving campus. 

Students must apply within the normal deadlines and. where space is 
limited, admission to the new campus will be based on criteria designed 
to select the best qualified students. 

School of Architecture. Admission to the School of Architecture in the 
Division of Arts and Humanities is competitive with selection based on the 
transfer student's previous academic achievement All Architecture ap- 
plicants must file an application by March 1 to be assured consideration 
Because of severe space limitations, admission to this program is 
subject to closure at any time 

Applications for the School of Architecture are accepted for the fall 
semester only Transfer applications for the School of Architecture are 
not evaluated until the early summer 

Foreign Student Admission 

The foreign student applying for admission to the undergraduate 
schools of the University of Maryland should make application at least six 
months in advance of the term for which he or she is applying He or she 
will be required to submit (1 ) an application for admission on a form fur- 
nished by the Admissions Office of the University upon request. (2) of- 
ficial copies of the secondary school preparation, (3) certificates of com- 
pletion of state secondary school examinations, and (4) records of 
college or university studies completed in schools in the United States or 
elsewhere (documents indicated in [2J. (3], and |4] must be accompanied 
by certified English translations when original documents are in 
languages other than English) The applicant will also be required to fur- 
nish proof of adequate finances (students on F visas are not permitted to 
work) Further proof must be furnished of ability to read, write, speak, and 
understand English sufficiently well to pursue satisfactory an approved 
course of study in one of the colleges divisions of the University In- 
formation can be obtained from the Office of the Director of International 
Education Services regarding the administration of the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) both in the United States and abroad. 
TOEFL is the standard test used by the University to determine English 
proficiency. 

Because the University of Maryland is a state university, it is limited in 
the number of foreign students whom it can admit each year Con- 
sequently, admission is extremely competitive and offered only to those 
applicants who are most highly qualified 

The foreign student accepted for admission to the University will 
receive from the Director of International Education Services the ap- 
propriate immigration form needed to secure a student visa from the 
American consul 

Every foreign student is expected to notify the Office of the Director of 
International Education Services as to the approximate date ol arrival at 
the University and arrange to arrive in time for the special orientation 
program that precedes registration The Office of the Director is located 
in the North Administration Building Room 2115 

Non-Degree (Special) Student Admission 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not desire to worX toward a 
baccalaureate degree may be admitted as non-degree seeking (special) 
students 



4 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Special students who have received a baccalaureate degree are ad- 
vised that no credit earned while enrolled as special students may be ap- 
plied at a later date to a graduate program These post-baccalaureate 
students may enroll in undergraduate courses tor which they possess 
the necessary prerequisites, but may not enroll In courses restricted to 
graduate students only Students who wish to take courses at the 
graduate level (600 and above) must contact the Graduate School tor In- 
formation concerning admission requirements tor Advanced Special 
Student status , 

Non-degree seeking (special) students who do not have a bac- 
calaureate degree or an R.N must submit transcripts and meet regular 
admission standards Transcripts are not required from students with 
baccalaureate degrees or an R.N 

Because ot space limitation, several departments require permission In 
advance to enroll as a non-degree student Please contact the Office of 
Admissions for further information. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

The College Park Campus offers pre-professional programs In Dental 
Hygiene, Dentistry, Forestry, Law, Medical Technology, Medicine, Nurs- 
ing, Optometry, Osteopathy, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Radiologic 
Technology, Theology, and Veterinary Medicine. 

The College Park Campus does not offer degrees in these areas. The 
Campus does, however, offer specific course advisement that will 
prepare the student for a possible transfer to another branch of the 
University of Maryland or other institutions that do offer degrees in these 
fields Admission to a pre-professional program on the College Park Cam- 
pus does not guarantee admission to another branch ol the University or 
another Institution. 

Students who have already earned more than 30 semester hours at 
another college-level Institution, and who seek admission to pre- 
professional programs in Nursing, Pharmacy, Dental Hygiene, Physical 
Therapy. Medical Technology, Radiologic Technology, and Forestry, 
should contact an academic advisor for the pre-professional programs at 
College Park before filing an application for the College Park Campus. 
Please address your correspondence to the academic advisor of the 
specific pre-professional program to which you are applying, for example, 
Academic Advisor, Pre-Nursing Program, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 



Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program 

The purpose of the Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program (EORP) is 
to attract and enroll minorities into the undergraduate level of the Univer- 
sity. Through EORP the University seeks to achieve a more represen- 
tative minority student population among Blacks, Spanish-speaking 
Americans, American Indians (Native Americans), and Asian Americans. 
Students receive admissions, financial aid, and general University in- 
formation from this office. This office also provides information con- 
cerning the determination of in-state status. 

To aid in attracting minority students to the College Park Campus and 
to get a more racially balanced campus student resident population, an 
allocation of resident hall spaces are made available for a percentage of 
newly entering minority students through EORP. 

For more information contact: Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program, 
Room 1 07, North Administration Building; Phone (30 1 ) 454-4844. 

After working hours a recording system providing general information 
can be called (301 ) 454-4847. 

Application Procedures 

Application Forms. Application forms may be obtained by writing to: 
Office of Admissions, North Administration Building, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

Application forms are available in high school guidance offices and 
college counseling centers. 

All applicants must comply fully with the directions printed on the ap- 
plication form Incomplete forms cannot be processed. 

Application Fee. A non-refundable $15.00 application fee is required 
with each application. 

Application Deadlines. The University strongly urges an early ap- 
plication lor all applicants! 

Summer and Fall 1 977 Semesters 

September 1 , 1 976 — Applications accepted for Summer and Fall 1977. 

November 15, 1976 — Deadline for receipt of applications, transcripts, 
and SAT results (freshmen only) for freshmen and transfer students who 



wish to be considered for an early decision for fall 1 977 Students who 
meet this deadline and are eligible for admission will receive their ap- 
plication for on-campus housing In the first mailing from the Office of 
Resident Life. This mailing will occur approximately mid-February, 1 977. 
Because demand lor campus housing exceeds available supply, an early 
decision does not guarantee housing. 

March 1 , 1977 — Deadline for foreign student applications Applicants to 
the School of Architecture must file an application by this date to be 
assured consideration 

July 1 , 1 977 — Deadline for all undergraduate applications for Fall 1977 

July 15, 1977 — Deadline for receipt of transcripts and SAT results 
(freshmen only) for freshmen and transfer applicants for Fall 1 977 

Spring 1 978 Semester 

Junel , 1977 — Applications accepted for Spring 1978. 

August 1 , 1977 — Deadline for foreign student applications 

November 15, 1977 — Deadline for all undergraduate applications for 
Spring 1978. 

December 1, 1977 — Deadline for receipt of all transcripts for Spring 
1978. 

The University reserves the right to return the unprocessed ap- 
plications of out-of-state freshmen and transfer students when our 
quotas for these students have been filled. Because ol space limitations 
the University cannot offer admission to all qualified out-of-state ap- 
plicants nor can It provide housing for a great many of those who are ad- 
mitted. 

Readmission and Reinstatement 

Students who do not maintain continuous registration must apply for 
readmission or reinstatement when they desire to return to the Univer- 
sity. See sections on Withdrawals from the University and Minimum 
Requirements for Retention and Graduation on page 20. 

Readmission. A student who has interrupted registration for one or more 
semesters and who was in good academic standing or on scholastic 
probation at the conclusion of the last semester registered must apply for 
readmission. 

Reinstatement. A student must apply for reinstatement if he or she has 
been academically dismissed, is ineligible for readmission. or has of- 
ficially withdrawn from all courses in the last previous semester. 

Deadlines. Dismissed students who wish to apply for reinstatement must 
observe the following deadlines: 

Fall semester— July 1 

Spring semester — November 1 

Summer Session I— April 1 5 

Summer Session II— May 1 5 

Exceptions. Students dismissed at the end of the fall semester may ap- 
ply for immediate reinstatement no later than seven days before the first 
day of spring semester registration. Students dismissed at the end of the 
spring semester who wish to attend the first or second summer session 
must check with the Office of Admissions regarding current policy for 
summer sessions. 

There are no deadlines for readmission or for reinstatement after an of- 
ficial withdrawal but students are encouraged to apply early. (All ap- 
plications from withdrawn students are subject to review by the Faculty 
Petition Board.) 

Any student whose application will require clearance from the Judicial 
Affairs Office, Health Center, or International Education Services Office 
should file according to the above deadlines for reinstatement. 

Applications. Application forms for readmission and reinstatement may 
be obtained from the Office of Admissions. 

Additional Information. For additional information contact the Office of 
Admissions, North Administration Building, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742; (301 ) 454-5550. 

Transfer of Credits 

Maryland Council for Higher Education Articulation Agreement. The 

University of Maryland fully ascribes to the Maryland Council for Higher 

Education Articulation Agreement. The complete text of the agreement 

follows: 

Preamble. The initial over-reaching objective of this committee has been 

to relate in operational ways the undergraduate programs offered in the 



GENERAL INFORMATION/ 5 



public sector of higher education in Maryland including the Community 
Colleges, the State Colleges, and the campuses of the University 

The intended principal benefactor is the student who is best served by 
current information about programs and protected by firm arrangements 
among the public segments of higher education in Maryland which per- 
mits him to plan a total degree program from the outset With successful 
academic performance, he or she can make uninterrupted progress even 
though transfer is involved. The measure of the plan is maximum trans- 
ferability of the college level credits. Essentially, the transfer and native 
students are to be governed by the same academic rules and regulations 
It is recognized that the guidance data essential to the implementation of 
transfer arrangements go well beyond the scope of the present report 

In a complementary way the State's interests are served by having its 
higher education resources used optimally by reducing the time taken to 
complete a degree through the avoidance of repeated class experiences. 

The institutional interests are protected also by the systematic ap- 
proach: they are relieved of the uncertainties of unplanned articulation 
without becoming production line enterprises. 

The dynamics of higher education preclude once-and-for-all time 
curriculums and perpetual grading and retention systems as cases in 
point. However, within the general structure of this plan there is op- 
portunity for continual updating of the details. 

In more specific ways the Committee has proceeded ( 1 ) to recommend 
specific areas of agreement among the public Community Colleges, the 
State Colleges, and the State University pertaining to facilitating the 
transfer of students within the segments of public higher education in the 
State; (2) to provide for a continuous evaluation and review of programs, 
policies, procedures, and relationships affecting transfer of students; and 
(3) to recommend such revisions as are needed to promote the academic 
success and general well-being of the transfer student. 

Policies 

1 Public four-year colleges and campuses of the University shall 
require attainment of an overall "C" average by Maryland resident 
transfer students as defined by the sending institutions as one 
standard for admission. If the student has two or more institutions, 
the overall "C" (2.0) will be computed on grades received in 
courses earned at all institutions attended, unless the student 
presents an Associate in Arts degree. 

(a) Efforts shall be intensified among the sending institutions to 
counsel students on the basis of their likelihood of success in 
various programs and at various institutions based on shared 
information (See par. 1 (b) and par. 9). 

(b) Procedures for reporting the progress of students who transfer 
within the State shall be regularized as one means of improving 
the counseling of prospective transfer students. In additon, 
each public institution of higher education shall establish a 
position of student transfer coordinator to assist in accom- 
plishing the policies and procedures outlined in this plan. 

2. Admission requirements and curriculum prerequisites shall be 
stated explicitly. 

(a) Course and semester hour requirements which students must 
meet in order to transfer with upper division standing shall be 
clearly stated. 

(b) The establishment of articulated programs is required in 
professional and specialized curricula. 

(c) Students shall be strongly encouraged to complete the 
requirements for the award of an Associate in Arts Degree or to 
complete successfully 56 semester hours of credit before 
transfer. 

3. Information about transfer students who are capable of honors 
work or independent study shall be transmitted to the receiving 
institution. 

4. Transfer students from newly established public colleges which are 
functioning with the approval of the State Department of Education 
shall be admitted on the same basis as applicants from regionally 
accredited colleges 

5. (a) Students from Maryland Community Colleges who have been 

awarded the Associate in Arts degree or who have successfully 
completed 56 semester hours of credit, in either case in college 
and university-parallel courses (see par 6), and who attained an 
overall "C" (2 0) average, shall be eligible for transfer Normally 
they will transfer without loss of credits and with junior standing 
provided they have met the requirements and prerequisites 
established by the receiving institution within the major 
Parenthetically, junior standing does not assure graduation 
within a two-year period of full-time study by a native student or 
by a transfer student 
* (b) The Associate in Arts degree shall serve as the equivalent of the 
lower division general education requirements at the receiving 
institution where the total number of credits required in the 



general education program in the sending institution is equal to 
or more than that required in the receiving institution and where 
the credits are distributed among the arts and sciences 
disciplines, 
(c) The determination of the major program requirements for a 
baccalaureate degree, including courses in the major taken in 
the lower division, shall be the responsibility of the institution 
awarding the degree 

6. Credit earned at any public institution shall be transferable to any 
other public institution as long as that credit was designed 
specifically for a college or university-parallel program, and 
providing its acceptance is consistent with the policies of the 
receiving institution governing native students following the same 
program Transfer of credits from terminal (career) programs shall 
be evaluated by the receiving institution on a course by course 
basis Credits applied towards a specific major and minor shall be 
determined by the receiving institution in these cases 

7. Credit earned in or transferred from a community college shall 
normally be limited to approximately half the baccalaureate degree 
program requirement and to the first two years of the under- 
graduate educational experience 

8. Transfer students shall be given the option of satisfying graduation 
requirements which were in effect at the receiving institution at the 
time they enrolled as freshmen at the sending institution, subject to 
conditions or qualifications which apply to native students. 

9. Institutions shall notify each other as soon as possible of impending 
curriculum changes which may affect transferring students When a 
change made by one institution necessitates some type of change 
at another institution, sufficient lead time shall be provided to effect 
the change with minimum disruption. The exchange data 
concerning such academic matters as grading systems, student 
profiles, grading profiles, etc., is required. 

10. Community college students shall be encouraged to choose as 
early as possible the institution and program into which they expect 
to transfer 

1 1 Innovative programs in all institutions are encouraged Proposed 
programs which would have system-wide implications or which 
would affect student transfers to more than one institution must be 
reported to the Maryland Council for Higher Education. 

12 The Maryland Council for Higher Education Articulation Committee 
shall continue to review and evaluate current articulation policies 
and shall set additional policies as needed In addition, the Maryland 
Council will publish a brochure periodically listing the prerequisites 
within the major and professional programs of all public four-year 
colleges and universities in the State. 

13. In the event a transfer student believes he or she has not been 
accorded the consideration presented in this policy statement, he 
or she shall have the opportunity to have the situation explained or 
reconciled. 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award of 
transfer credit shall be resolved between the student and the 
institution to which he is transferring. If a difference remains 
unresolved, the student shall present his or her evaluation of the 
situation to the institution from which he or she is transferring 
Representatives from the two institutions shall then have the 
opportunity to resolve the differences 

The sending institution has the right to present an unresolved 
case to the Committee on Articulation by addressing the Maryland 
Council for Higher Education The Committee on Articulation shall, 
through an appointed subcommittee, receive relevant documenta- 
tion, opinions, and interpretations in written form from the sending 
and receiving institution and from the student Subcommittee 
deliberations will be confined to this written documentation The full 
committee shall act on the subcommittee recommendation 

Copies of the committee recommendation shall be forwarded to 
the institutions involved through the Maryland Council for Higher 
Education The Council shall then be advised of the institutional 
action within a ten-day period 

A complaint on transfer status must be initiated by the student 
within the first semester of his enrollment in the receiving 
institution 
14 The State of Maryland should support four-year institutions so that 
all students in an articulated transfer program who are awarded an 
Associate in Arts degree from a public community college shall be 
admitted with full junior standing to a public four-year institution. 
unless either the number of students desmng admission exceeds 
the number that can be accommodated in a particular professional 
or specialized program or certain circumstances exist which 
require a limitation being placed on the size of |unior programs In 
such instances, admission will be based on cntena developed by 
the receiving institution to select the best qualified students 



6 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



General Statement. In general, credit from academic courses taken at 
an accredited institution in areas that can be considered part ot the 
student's University program and in which the student earned a grade ot 
C or better will transfer 

Credits Taken at Community Colleges. Credits earned in or transferred 
from a two-year college shall normally be limited to half of the four-year 
baccalaureate degree requirement Credits transferred from two-year 
colleges are accepted as lower division credits. 

Foreign Language Credit. Transfer foreign language credit is usually 
acceptable in meeting requirements Prospective students should con- 
sult the appropriate sections of this catalog to determine the specific 
requirements of various colleges and curricula 

Credit by Examination 

Advanced Placement Program. Students entering the University from 
secondary schools may obtain advanced placement and college credit 
on the basis of their performance on the College Entrance Examination 
Board Advanced Placement Program examinations These examinations 
are normally given to eligible high school seniors during the May 
preceding matriculation in college. 

The University will award advanced placement or college credit for ap- 
propriate scores on the following examinations: biology, chemistry 
English French, German, Spanish, American history, European history, 
Latin, mathematics, and physics. The College Park campus specifies that 
these tests may not be taken after matriculation at a collegiate institution. 

Students with specific questions about the University's policy con- 
cerning the Advanced Placement Program should contact the Office of 
the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies. Detailed information 
about the examinations and registration procedures may be obtained 
from your high school guidance counselor or from the Director of Ad- 
vanced Placement Program, College Entrance Examination Board, 888 
Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 1 001 8. 

Other Credit by Examination Options. Students are encouraged to 
refer to other sections of this catalog for information on additional credit 
by examination options 

Determination of In-State Status for Admission, Tuition and Charge- 
Differential Purposes. The Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland approved new regulations for the determination of in-state 
status for admission, tuition and charge-differential purposes at its 
meeting on September 21,1 973. The new regulations became effective 
with the January 1 974 term. 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and 
charge-differential purposes will be made by the University at the time a 
student's application for admission is under consideration. The deter- 
mination made at that time, and any determination made thereafter shall 
prevail in each semester until the determination is successfully 
challenged. The deadline for meeting all requirements for in-state status 
and for submitting all documents for reclassification is the last day of late 
registration for the semester the student wishes to be classified as an in- 
state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may necessitate a delay in 
completing the review process. It is hoped that a decision in each case 
will be made within ninety (90) days of receipt of a request for redeter- 
mination and all necessary documentation. During this period of time, or 
any further period of time required by the University, fees and charges 
based on the previous determination must be paid. If the determination is 
changed, any excess fees and charges will be refunded. 

Petitions for review of eligibility, related documents and questions con- 
cerning the policy of the University of Maryland for the determination of 



in-state status should be directed to the Office of Admissions, North Ad- 
ministration Building, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742; Phone (301 ) 454-41 37 

Students Classified as In-State for Admission, Tuition and Charge- 
Differential Purposes. Students classified as instate for admission, 
tuition and charge-differential purposes are responsible for notifying the 
Office of Admissions in writing within 1 5 days of any change in their cir- 
cumstances which might in any way affect their classification at the 
College Park Campus 

The written notice of change in circumstances or questions con- 
cerning the policy of the University of Maryland for the determination of 
m-state status should be directed to: Office of Admissions. Ground Floor, 
North Administration Building 



Graduate Student Admission 

Admission to graduate study at the University of Maryland is the 
responsibility of the Graduate School Correspondence concerning ap- 
plication for admission to The Graduate School should be addressed to 
The Graduate School, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742 

Orientation Programs 

Upon final admission to the University the new student will receive 
materials about the Orientation and Registration Program All entering 
students are encouraged to attend. The primary goals of the program are 
to inform the student about the University, and to help the student 
register for the first semester Through this program the entering student 
receives a personalized and individual introduction to the University. 

Parents also have an opportunity to learn about University life through 
the Parent Orientation Program. Office location: Student Union Building. 
Telephone: 454-5752. 

Readmission and Reinstatement 

Readmission 

1. A student whose continuous attendance at the University has been 
interrupted, but who was in good academic standing, or on academic 
probation, at the end of the last regular semester for which he or she 
was registered, must apply to the Office of Admissions for 
readmission. The student will be readmitted to the program in which 
he or she was last registered. 

Reinstatement 

1 . A student who withdraws from the University must apply for 
reinstatement to the Secretary of the Petition Board. Office of 
Admissions. 

2. A student who has been dismissed for academic reasons may appeal 
in writing to the Secretary of the Faculty Petition Board, Office of 
Admissions, for reinstatement. The committee is empowered to grant 
reinstatement to the University if the circumstances warrant such 
action. 

3. A student who has been dismissed from the University for academic 
reasons, and whose petition for reinstatement is denied, may again 
apply for reinstatement any subsequent semester. It is recommended 
that the student give serious consideration to the previous 
recommendations of the Petition Board. 

Applications. Application forms.for readmission and reinstatement may 
be obtained from the Office of Admissions. 



Fees & Expenses 



Registration is not completed or official until all financial obligations are 
satisfied. Returning students will not be permitted to complete 
registration until all financial obligations to the University including library 
fines, parking violation assessments and other penalty fees and service 
charges are paid in full. 

Although the University regularly mails bills to students, starting with an 
estimated bill approximately one month prior to registration, it cannot 
assume responsibility for their receipt. If any student does not receive a 
bill before or shortly after the start of each semester, it is his/her respon- 
sibility to obtain a copy of the bill by coming to Room 1 103, South Ad- 
ministration Building, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. 



All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University 
of Maryland for the exact amount due. Student name and student social 
security number should be written on the front side of the check. In cases 
where the University has awarded a grant, scholarship, or workship. the 
appropriate amount will be deducted on the first actual bill, mailed ap- 
proximately one month after the start of the semester. However, the first 
estimated bill mailed at the start of each semester may not include these 
deductions. 

Students will be severed from University services for delinquent in- 
debtedness to the University. In the event that severance occurs, the in- 
dividual may make payment during the semester in which services were 
severed and all these services except housing will be restored. Students 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 7 



removed from housing because of delinquent indebtedness will be 
placed at the bottom of the waiting list after the financial obligation is 
satisfied and after reapplying for housing Students who are severed from 
University services and who fall to pay the Indebtedness during the 
semester in which severance occurs will be Ineligible to preregister for 
subsequent semesters until the debt is cleared. In the event of actual 
registration In a subsequent semester by a severed student who has not 
settled his student account prior to that semester, such registration will 
be cancelled and no credit will be earned for the semester. 

No degree will be conferred, no grade Issued, nor any diploma, 
certificate, or transcript of record issued to a student who has not made 
satisfactory settlement of his/her account. 

Transcript of Records 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of their scholastic records 
from the Registrations Office. There is a charge of $2 00 for each tran- 
script. Checks should be made payable to the University of Maryland. 
Transcripts of records should normally be requested In writing at least 
two weeks in advance of the date when the records are actually needed. 
No transcript of a student's record will be furnished any student or alum- 
nus whose financial obligations to the University have not been satisfied. 
Except where required by law, no transcripts are released without written 
authorization of the student. 

A. Undergraduate Fees: 

1. Fees for Full-time Undergraduate Resident and Non- 
Resldent Students 1977-78 Academic Year: 

a. Maryland Residents 





Total Academic Year Cost 


General Fee* 


$784.00 


Board Contract** 




1) 7 day a wk. contract food plan: 


810.00 


2) 5 day plan: 


750.00 


3) 10 meals a week plan: 


710.00 


Lodging** 


878.00 



b. Residents of the District of Columbia, other states 
and other countries: 



General Fee* 
Board Contract* * 

1) 7 day a wk. contract food plan: 

2) 5 day plan: 

3) 10 meals a week plan: 
Lodging* * 



Total Academic Year Cost 
$2,174.00 

810.00 
750.00 
710.00 
958.00 



• General Fee includes fixed fee of $620 00 for Maryland Residents or 
$2,010.00 for Residents of the District of Columbia, other states and other 
countries plus mandatory fees for the following: instructional materials, 
athletics, student activities, recreational facilities, auxiliary facilities, 
health services and registration. 

•• Increases in board and lodging charges for 1977-78 are under 
consideration by the Board of Regents at the time ot this printing, 

2. Fees for Part-time Undergraduate Students 



Credit Hour Fee: 
Registration Fee: 
Health Fee: 
Athletic Fee: * 



$44.00 per credit hour 
5.00 per semester 
5.00 per semester 
5 00 per semester 



The term part-time undergraduate student is interpreted to mean an 
undergraduate student taking 8 semester credit hours or less Students 
carrying 9 semester hours or more are considered to be full-time and 
must pay the regular full-time fees (' (Charged to students registered for 
more than 4 and fewer than 9 credit hours 

B. Graduate Fees: 



1 Maryland Residents 
2. Residents of the District 
of Columbia, other states 
and other countries 



$60 00 per credit hour 



$95 00 per credit hour 



Graduate students are also charged $5 00 a semester for registration 
fee and $10 00 a semester for health services (9 cr hr. or more), or 



$5 00 a semester for health services (8 cr hr or less), and an athletic 
fee of $5.00 per semester If they are registered for more than 4 credit 
hours. 

An Important Fee Notice. Although changes In fees and charges 
ordinarily will be announced In advance, the University reserves the right 
to make such changes without prior announcement 

NOTE: New additional Information on Financial Obligations of Student. 
Disclosure of Information: Delinquent Accounts: and Special Fees, can 
be found on page vill. 

Explanation of Fees 

The application fee for the undergraduate programs and the summer 
sessions partially defrays the cost of processing applications for ad- 
mission to the University. If a student enrolls for the term for which he or 
she applied, the fee Is accepted In lieu ol the matriculation fee Applicants 
who have enrolled with the University of Maryland In its Evening Division 
at College Park or Baltimore, or at one of Its off-campus centers are not 
required to pay the fee since they have already paid a matriculation fee 
This fee is not subject to refund or cancellation. 

The Fixed Charge Fee is charged to help defray the cost of operating 
the University's program at College Park 

The Instructional Materials Fee represents a charge for instructional 
materials and/or laboratory supplies furnished to students 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of In- 
tercollegiate Athletics. All students are encouraged to participate in all of 
the activities of this department or to attend the contests if they do not 
participate. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request 
of the Student Government Association. It is used in sponsoring various 
student activities, student publications and cultural programs 

The Recreational Facilities Fee is paid into a fund which will be used to 
expand the recreational facilities on the College Park Campus. 

The Auxiliary Facilities Fee is paid into a fund which is used for ex- 
pansion and operation of various facilities such as roads, walks, campus 
lighting and other campus facilities. These facilities are not funded or are 
funded only in part from other sources. 

Other Fees 

Application Fee: $15.00 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration Fee: $31.00 (two-day 
program). $18.00 (one day program). 

Registration Fee: $5.00 (Charged as a separate fee for all registrants ex- 
cept full-time undergraduates). 

Late Application Fee: $25.00 

Matriculation Fee: $15.00 

Graduation Fee for Bachelor's Degree: $15.00 

Room Deposit Fee payable upon application for dormitory room; $50.00 
(to be deducted from the first semester room charges at or after 
registration). 

Student Health Fee (each semester): $10.00 (Charged to all full-time 
students each semester Full-time employees and staff may not use 
Health Service Facilities and are not charged the Student Health Fee 
Graduate Assistants are not full-time employees ) Five dollars a semester 
for all part-time students 

Vehicle Registration Fee: $1 2.00 ($ 1 2 00 for first vehicle and $3 00 for 
each additional vehicle in accordance with published regulations 
Payable each academic year by all students registered for classes on the 
College Park Campus and who drive on the Campus For cars registered 
for the spring semester only the fee is $6 00 on the first car and $3 00 
for each additional vehicle 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation In 
Mathematics (MATH 001) per semester: $75.00 (Required of students 
whose curriculum calls lor MATH 1 10 or 115 and who fail in qualifying 
examination for these courses ) This Special Math Fee is m addition to 
course charge Students enrolled in this course and concurrently 
enrolled for 6 or more credit hours will be considered as full-time 
students for purposes of assessing fees Students taking only MATH 
001 pay for 3 credits plus $75 A 3 credit course plus MATH 001 results 
in a charge for 6 credits plus $75 A full-time student pays full-time 
fees plus $75 

Fees for Auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as those 
charged for courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels Audited credit hours will be added to hours taken for 



8 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



credit to determine whether or not an undergraduate student is lull-time 
or part-time for lee assessment purposes 

Special Students are assessed lees in accordance with the schedule 
for the comparable undergraduate or graduate classification 

Late Registration Fee: S20.00 (All students are expected to complete 
their registration, including the filing of Schedule Adjustment Forms on 
the regular registration days Those who do not complete their 
registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee ) Registration is 
not completed until all fees, including outstanding SAR (Student Ac- 
counts Receivable) balances have been paid in full Any payment which is 
insufficient to discharge the existing balance plus new fees leaves tuition 
unpaid and registration incomplete The $20 late tee will therefore be ap- 
plied to all students who register and who have an outstanding in- 
debtedness to the University 

Change of Registration Fee: $2.00 (for each course dropped or added 
after the Schedule Adjustment Period) 

Special Examination Fee: $30.00 per course for full-time students: the 
part-time credit hour charge for part-time students, see part-time credit 
hour charges on prior schedule (above) 

Cooperative Education Program in Liberal Arts and Business (CO-OP 
208-209) $30.00 

Transcript of Record Fee: $2.00 (each copy) 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to 
property or equipment Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, 
the individual student will be billed for it; where responsibility cannot be 
fixed, the cost of repairing the damage or replacing equipment will be 
prorated, among the individuals involved. 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks: Payable for each check 

which is returned upaid by the drawee bank on initial presentation 

because of insufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating drawn 

against uncollected items, etc. 

For checks up to $50.00: $5.00 

For checks from $50.01 to $100.00: $10.00 

For checks over $100.00: $20.00 

Library Charges: $ 25 — Fine for failure to return book from General 
Library before expiration of loan period per day Fine for failure to return 
book from Reserve Shelf before expiration of loan period: First hour over- 
due on first day: $1.00; After first hour on first day: $2.00; Each ad- 
ditional day: $2 00 In case of loss or mutilation of a book, satisfactory 
restitution must be made. 

Motor Vehicle Penalties: These are described in Traffic Rules and 
Regulations. (See Page 1 9.) 

Textbooks and Supplies: Textbooks and classroom supplies — These 
costs vary with the course pursued, but will average $85.00 per 
semester. 

Payment of Fees: All checks, money orders, of postal notes should be 
made payable to the University of Maryland Write student name and 
student social security number on the face of the check. 



Withdrawal or Refund of Fees: Any student compelled to leave the 
University at any time during the academic year should file an application 
for withdrawal, bearing his or her proper signature, in the Office of 
Registrations If this is not done, the student will forfeit his or her right 
to any refund which he or she would otherwise be entitled The date 
used in computing refunds is the date the application for withdrawal is 
filed in the Office of Registrations The Stop Payment on a check does 
not constitute withdrawal 

A request for a refund must be processed by the student with the 
Division of Business Services, otherwise any student account credit will 
automatically be carried over to the next semester 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be permitted only with the written 
consent of the student's parent or guardian 

Full time students withdrawing from the University will be credited for 
all academic fees charged to them in accordance with the following 
schedule: 



Period from Date 

Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 0% 



No part of the charges for room and board is refundable except when 
the student officially withdraws from the University or when he/she is 
given permission by the appropriate officials of the University to move 
from the residence halls and/or to discontinue dining hall privileges In 
these cases, the room refund will be computed by multiplying the number 
of periods remaining times the pro rata weekly rate after adjusting for a 
service charge Refunds to students having full board contracts will be 
calculated in a similar manner No room and/or board refunds will be 
made after the fourteenth week of the semester 

The Food Service identification cards (FSID) must be surrendered to 
the Office of Registrations before any refund will be processed. 

In computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of 
scholarships and loans from University Funds, the computation will be 
made in such a way as to return the maximum amount to the scholarship 
and loan accounts without loss to the University. 

A student who registers as a full-time undergraduate will receive no 
refund of the General Fee when courses are dropped (irrespective of the 
number of credit hours dropped) unless the student withdraws from the 
University Hence, a student changing from full-time to part-time after the 
first day of classes receives no refund 

A student who registers as a part-time undergraduate student will be 
given a refund of the credit hour fee for courses dropped during the first 
week of classes No refund will be made for courses dropped thereafter 

A special refund schedule applies to full-time students who are drafted 
into the Armed Services or called up as Reservists. 



Financial Aid 



The Office of Student Aid provides advice and assistance in the formu- 
lation of student financial plans and. in cooperation with other Univer- 
sity offices, participates in the awarding of scholarships, loans, and part- 
time employment to deserving students. Scholarships, grants and loans 
are awarded on the basis of evident academic ability and financial needs. 
In making awards, consideration is also given to character, achievement, 
participation in student activities, and to other attributes which may in- 
dicate success in college It is the intent of the committee to make 
awards to those qualified students who might not otherwise be able to 
pursue college studies. Part-time employment opportunities on campus 
are open to all students, but are dependent upon the availability of jobs 
and the student's particular skills and abilities 

Additional information is available from the Director. Office of Student 
Aid. Room 2130. North Administration Building. University of Maryland, 
College Park. Maryland 20742. 

Scholarships and Grants 

Most scholarships and grants are awarded to students before they en- 
ter the University However, students who have completed one or more 



semesters, and have not received such an award, are eligible to apply. It 
is usually inadvisable for a student to apply for a specific scholarship. 
Each applicant will receive consideration for all scholarships for which he 
or she is eligible. Most scholarships are awarded to students who have 
earned a cumulative grade point average of 3 (B) or better. Entering 
freshmen must submit application before March 1 ; students already 
enrolled in the University may submit applications between January 1 5 
and May 1 in order to receive consideration for scholarship assistance 
for the ensuing year. Scholarship award letters are normally mailed be- 
tween March 1 5 and July 1 5. Any applicant who does not receive an 
award letter during this period should assume that he or she has not been 
selected for a scholarship. 

Regulations and procedures for the awarding of scholarships and 
grants are formulated by the Committee on Financial Aids All re- 
cipients are subject to the academic and non-academic regulations and 
requirements of the University. 

The recipient of the scholarship or grant is expected to make at least 
normal progress toward a degree, as defined by the Academic 
Regulations, and to maintain a credit load of 1 4 semester credit hours 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 9 



The committee reserves the right to review the scholarship program 
annually and to make adjustments in the amount and recipients of awards 
in accordance with the funds available and scholastic achievement 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. Under the provisions 
of the Education Amendments of 1 972, grants are available to encourage 
youth of exceptional financial needs to continue their post secondary 
school education A recipient must be a United States citizen enrolled as 
a full-time undergraduate. The amount of the grant must be matched by 
an equal amount of some other type of aid provided through the Univer- 
sity. 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants. The federal government 
provides grants to approved students who need it to attend post high 
school educational institutions The maximum award is $1 400 minus the 
expected family contribution In those years when Congressional ap- 
propriations are less than needed, eligible students will receive a per- 
centage of their entitlement Applications are available in senior high 
schools and post high school institutions. 

Maryland State Scholarships. The General Assembly of Maryland has 
created several programs of scholarships for Maryland residents who 
need financial help to obtain a college education The undergraduate 
programs are (1 ) General State scholarships, (2) Senatorial scholarships, 
and (3) House of Delegates scholarships Students wishing to apply for 
these scholarships should contact their guidance counselor if a high 
school senior or the Office of Student Aid if presently attending the 
University of Maryland. Students who are entering college for the first 
time must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test in November or December of 
their senior year. The test is not required of college students who have 
completed at least 24 semester hours. A general application and a 
Parent's Confidential Statement should be filed with College Scholarship 
Service in Princeton, N.J and a senatorial application with the student's 
state senator by December 1 for the following academic year For ad- 
ditional information, contact the Maryland State Scholarship Board. 2100 
Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 

Local and National Scholarships. In addition to the scholarships 
provided by the University of Maryland, a student should give careful 
consideration to scholarship aid provided by local and national scholar- 
ship programs. Ordinarily, the high school principal or counselor will be 
well informed as to these opportunities. 



Alumni Scholarships. A limited number of scholarships are made 
possible through the gifts of alumni and fnends to the Alumni Annual 
Giving Program of the Office of Endowment and Gifts 

Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy Scholarships. The 
Alumni Association of the School of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland makes available annually scholarships to qualified prepharmacy 
students on the basis of character, achievement and need These 
scholarships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland Each 
scholarship not exceeding $500 per academic year is applied to ex- 
penses at College Park 

Alumni Band Scholarship. A limited number of awards to freshmen are 
sponsored by the University of Maryland Band Alumni Organization 
Recipients are recommended by the Music Department after a com- 
petitive audition held in the spring 

Mildred L. Anglin Scholarship. This scholarship is made available from 
an endowed fund sponsored by the Riverdale Elementary School Parents 
and Teachers Association in honor of Mrs. Anglin who served that school 
with distinction for forty years as a teacher and administrator. 

Ethel R. Arthur Memorial Scholarship. This memorial scholarship fund 
has been established by Irving J Cohen. M.D At least one $250 award is 
made each year by the Scholarship Committee A preference is given to 
students from Baltimore 

Alvln L. Aublnoe Student Aid Program. Scholarship grants up to $500 
per school year to students in engineering, preferably those studying for 
careers in civil engineering, architecture or light construction 

Baltimore Panhellenic Association Scholarship. A scholarship is 
awarded annually by the Baltimore Panhellenic Association to a student 
entering the junior or senior class, who is an active member of a sorority. 
who is oustanding in leadership and scholarship and who needs financial 
assistance. 

Baltimore Sunpapers Scholarship In Journalism. The Board of 

Trustees of the A. S. Abell Foundation, Inc.. contributes funds to provide 
one or more $500 scholarships to students majonng in editorial jour- 
nalism. 

Bayshore Foods, Inc. Scholarship. A grant of $500 is made available 
annually to sons and daughters of employees of Bayshore Foods, Inc of 
Easton, Md 



Endowed and Annual Scholarships 
and Grants 

Advertising Association of Baltimore Work Experience Scholarship. 

This award is available to an outstanding sophomore or junior interested 
in an advertising career. 

AFROTC College Scholarship Program. Four-year AFROTC scholar- 
ships are available to incoming freshmen who qualify. One thousand 
scholarships are awarded annually to qualified freshmen on a nationwide 
basis. Application for the Four-Year scholarship is normally accomplished 
during the senior year of high school. The AFROTC program also 
provides Two-Year and Three-Year scholarships for selected cadets in 
the AFROTC program. Those selected receive money for full tuition, 
laboratory expenses, incidental fees, and an allowance for books during 
the period of the scholarship In addition, they receive nontaxable pay of 
$100 per month. Any student accepted by the University of Maryland 
may apply for these scholarships AFROTC membership is required if 
one receives an AFROTC scholarship. 

Air Force Warrant Officers Association Student Aid Program. 

Scholarship aid has been made available by the Air Force Warrant Of- 
ficers Association for worthy male or female undergraduate or graduate 
students in good standing, with preference given to children of Air Force 
Warrant Officers or other military personnel 

Albright Scholarship. The Victor E Albright Scholarship is open to 
graduates of Garrett County high schools who were bom and reared in 
that county 

Agricultural Development Foundation. A number of awards are made 
to agricultural -students from a fund contributed by donors for general 
agricultural development. 

ALCOA Foundation Scholarships Awards of $750 are given to out- 
standing students majoring in mechanical engineering, civil engineering, 
electrical engineering and fire protection engineering. 



Belva H. Hopkins Memorial Scholarship. An endowed fund has been 
established to provide a scholarship to a deserving student from Prince 
George's County who has expressed an interest in teaching mathematics 
in public schools The recipient may be entitled to renew the scholarship 
for three more years (or the normal graduating time) provided there is 
financial need. Financial need may be considered but is not a 
requirement for the initial award. 

Capital Milk Producers Cooperative, Inc. Scholarship. A scholarship 
of $500 is awarded annually in the College of Agriculture, preferably to a 
student preparing for a career in the dairy industry 

Dr. Ernest N. Cory Scholarship. This award is made annually to an out- 
standing junior or senior recommended by the College of Agriculture, 
preferably one majoring in Entomology. 

Dairy Technology Scholarship and Grants. The Dairy Technology 
Society of Maryland and the District of Columbia provides a limited num- 
ber of scholarships and grants-in-aid for students maionng in dairy 
products technology 

Delaware-Maryland Plant Food Association Scholarship. A $200 an- 
nual award is made to an undergraduate who has an interest in agronomy 
and soil fertility work 

Delmarva Traffic Club Scholarship. An award of $260 to an out- 
standing junior or senior student, preferably from the Eastern Shore of 
Maryland, majonng in Transportation in the College of Business and 
Management 

Delta Nu Alpha Fraternity Chesapeake Chapter — No. 23. Traffic and 
Transportation Award. An award of $400 to an outstanding senior 
member of the University of Maryland chapter maionng in Transportation 
in the College of Business and Management 

Exel Scholarship. A substantial grant for endowed scholarships was 
made by Deborah B Exel 

James R. Ferguson Memorial Fund. A scholarship award is made an- 
nually to a student enrolled in Animal Science on the basis of academic 
achievement and financial need 



10 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Anne Arundel County Volunteer Firemen's Association Grant. This 
tuition and fees grant is awarded to a high school graduate who will enroll 
in the lire protection curriculum in the College of Engineering The award 
is normally for four years 

Baltimore County Volunteer Firemen's Association Grant. This tuition 
and fees grant is awarded to a student who will enroll in the fire protection 
curnculum in the College of Engineering This award is normally for four 
years 

Ladles Auxiliary to The Maryland State Firemen's Association Grant. 

This $750 grant is awarded to an outstanding high school graduate who 
will enroll in the fire protection curnculum in the College of Engineering. 
The award is normally available for four years 

Maryland State Firemen's Association Grant. A tuition and fees 
scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding high school student 
who enrolls in the fire protection curriculum of the College of 
Engmeenng This scholarship is for four years 

Prince Georges County Volunteer Firemen's Association Grant. An 
annual tuition and fees scholarship is awarded to an outstanding high 
school student who enrolls in the fire protection curriculum of the College 
of Engineering 

Food Fair Stores Foundation Scholarships. Several scholarships are 
available for $250 per academic year. 

J. Homer Remsberg Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship of $300 is 
awarded annually to a resident of Frederick County enrolled in the 
College of Agriculture 

Victor Frenkil Scholarship. A scholarship of $250 is granted annually 
by Mr Victor Frenkil of Baltimore to a student from Baltimore City in the 
freshman class of the University 

John D. Gilmore Scholarship has been established for the purpose of 
assisting deserving student athletes to obtain an education and par- 
ticipate in varsity athletics at the University of Maryland The recipients 
should possess as does John D Gilmore, outstanding dedication, deter- 
mination and an undeniable will to win in athletic competition and to 
succeed in life 

Goddard Memorial Scholarship. Several scholarships are available an- 
nually under the terms of the James and Sarah E.R. Goddard Memorial 
Fund established through the wills of Morgan E Goddard and Mary Y 
Goddard 

John William Guckeyson Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship of 
$100 is granted annually by Mrs Hudson Dunlap as a memorial to John 
William Guckeyson, an honored Maryland alumnus, 

Staiey and Eugene Hahn Memorial Scholarship Fund. Annual awards 
of $500 are made by Mr. and Mrs Walter J. Hahn in memory of their 
sons to aid outstanding agricultural students from Frederick County. 

Robert Half Personnel Accounting and Tax Awards. Two awards of 
$100 each to outstanding students majoring in Accounting in the College 
of Business and Management. 

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Scholarships. These scholar- 
ships are made available through a gift of the Baltimore News American, 
one of the Hearst newspapers, in honor of William Randolph Hearst 
Scholarships up to $1,000 are awarded annually to undergraduates 
pursuing a program of study in journalism Scholarships up to $1 ,000 are 
awarded annually for graduate study in history. 

Robert Michael Higgenbotham Memorial Award Fund. This Fund has 
been endowed by Mr and Mrs. Charles A. Higgenbotham in memory of 
their son who was killed in Vietnam. Annual awards are made to promis- 
ing junior students majoring in mathematics. 



A.M. Hoffman Memorial Grant. This gift of $250 per year is normally 
awarded as a supplement to some other type of student aid to a student 
with exceptional need. A preference is given to students from Mont- 
gomery County. The gift is made available by Mr. and Mrs. David B 
Schwartz 

Dr. H. C. Byrd Memorial Fund — An endowed fund has been estab- 
lished by the many friends of "Curley" in memory of his many years of 
outstanding service to the University. His period of service lasted from 
1 905 when he enrolled as a freshman from Crisfield, until 1 954 when he 
retired after serving as President of the University for 1 9 years Prior to 
that he had served 19 years as head football coach with a record of 
109-37-7. 



Hyattsville-Hortlcultural Society Scholarship. A scholarship of $200 
is awarded to a student enrolled in Horticulture 

George Hyman Construction Company Scholarship. A tuition scholar- 
ship is awarded to a freshman student in civil engineering The scholar- 
ship may be renewed for three more years 

Inter-State Milk Producers' Cooperative, Inc. Scholarship. A 
memorial scholarship of $300 is made available to a student in agri- 
culture in honor of F Bennett Carter 

Paul H. Kea Memorial Scholarship Fund. This fund was established by 
the Potomac Valley Chapter of the American Institute of Architects in 
memory of Paul H Kea. a highly respected member of the chapter 

Venia M. Keller Grant. The Maryland State Council of Homemakers' 
Club makes available this grant of $100 which is open to a Maryland 
young man or woman of promise who is recommended by the College 
of Human Ecology 

Mary Anne and Frank A. Kennedy Scholarship. Presented to out- 
standing journalism students, from the estate of Mary Anne and Frank A 
Kennedy 

Klnghorne Fund Scholarship. A scholarship in honor of Mr Joseph W 
Kmghorne of the Class of 191 1 of the College of Agriculture shall be 
awarded to the student specializing in poultry science having the highest 
general average at the end of his or her sophomore year. The amount of 
the scholarship shall equal the tuition on the College Park Campus 

Kiwanis Scholarship. The J Enos Ray Memorial Scholarship covering 
tuition is awarded by the Prince George's Kiwanis Club to a male resident 
of Prince George's County. Maryland, who. in addition to possessing the 
necessary qualifications for maintaining a satisfactory scholarship record 
must have a reputation of high character and attainment in general all- 
around citizenship. 

Gary Lee Lake Memorial Scholarship. This endowed fund provides 
scholarships for students majoring in pre-veterinary science in the 
College of Agriculture. It was established by his family and friends. 

Laurel Race Course, Inc. Scholarship. This fund has been established 
to provide scholarships for students who are participating in the 
University Band. 

Leidy Foundation Scholarships. A $1500 fund has been established 
by the John H. Leidy Foundation, Inc. to provide scholarships for 
educational expenses to worthy students who have financial need. 

Leidy Foundation Scholarship. A scholarship of $500 is granted 
annually to a graduate or undergraduate student preparing for a career 
in the general field of chemistry. 

Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarship. These scholarships, several in 
number, were established through the benefaction of the late Mrs Aletta 
Linthicum. widow of the late Congressman Charles J. Linthicum. who 
served Congress from the Fourth District of Maryland for many years. 

Lions Club of Silver Spring Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship 
covering tuition and fees is available to a worthy graduate of one of the 
following high schools; Montgomery Blair. Northwood. orSpringbrook 

Lions International Scholarship. An award of $500 is available to a 
freshman who competes in the Lions Club (District 22-C) Annual Band 
Festival. A recipient is recommended by the Music Department after a 
competitive audition in the spring. 

Prince George's Plaza Lions Club Scholarship. This $300 scholarship 
is given in memory of Lion John L. Kensinger, Sr The award is made to a 
student from Prince George's County whose area of academic con- 
centration is in the field of creative writing. 

M Club Grants. The M Club of the University of Maryland provides each 
year a limited number of awards 

Glenn L. Martin Aerospace Engineering Scholarship. Two scholar- 
ships are available to freshmen to cover tuition and fees. 

Maryland Cooperative Milk Producers, Inc. Scholarships. A scholar- 
ship of $500 is awarded annually in the College of Agriculture, preferably 
to a student preparing for a career in the dairy industry. 

Maryland-District of Columbia Association of Physical Plant Ad- 
ministrators Scholarship. A scholarship for fixed charges and fees is 
made available to a junior or senior who is interested in making the ad- 
ministration of a physical plant his career. The recipient must be a 
resident of Maryland or the District of Columbia. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 11 



Maryland Educational Foundation Grants. This fund has been 
established to provide assistance to worthy students 

Maryland Electrification Council Scholarship. This scholarship of 
$300 is awarded annually to an entering freshman or junior college 
transfer student enrolled in the agricultural engineering curriculum in 
either the College of Agriculture or the College of Engineering 

Maryland Holsteln Association Scholarship. The scholarship will be 
awarded to a deserving student in the College of Agriculture who has had 
a holstein project in 4-H or FFA. The award will be based on financial 
need, scholastic ability and leadership 

Maryland and Virginia Milk Producers Association Scholarship. A 

scholarship of $500 is awarded annually in the College of Agriculture 
preferably to a student preparing for a career in the dairy industry 

Maryland Pharmaceutical Association Scholarships. The Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Association makes available annually scholarships to pre- 
pharmacy students on the basis of character, achievement and need. 
Each scholarship not exceeding $500 per academic year is used in par- 
tial defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park These scholarships 
are open only to residents of the State of Maryland 

Maryland State Golf Association Scholarship. A limited number of 
$500 scholarships are available to undergraduates in the Agronomy 
Department who have an interest in golf turf work. 

Maryland Turfgrass Association Scholarship. A $250 annual award is 
made to an undergraduate who has an interest in agronomy and com- 
mercial sod production. 

George R. Merrill, Jr. Memorial Scholarship. Friends of former 
professor George R. Merrill, Jr. have established this endowed scholar- 
ship fund to benefit students in Industrial Education 

Montgomery County Press Association Scholarship. Presented to an 
outstanding journalism senior residing in Montgomery County. 

Loren L. Murray and Associates Scholarships. This fund has been 
created to provide scholarships for Maryland residents who are admitted 
to the College of Education. 

Dr. Ray A. Murray Scholarship. The award, sponsored by Maryland 
Chapter No 32 of the National Institute of Farm and Land Brokers, is to 
be made to a worthy sophomore in the Department of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics. College of Agriculture. 

Noxell Foundation Scholarships. Two scholarships are awarded to 
senior chemistry majors nominated by the Department of Chemistry. 

Douglas Howard Phillips Memorial Scholarships. This scholarship 
fund has been endowed by Mr and Mrs. Albanus Phillips, Jr. in honor of 
their son who met his untimely death in the spring before he was 
scheduled to attend the University, in order that worthy young male 
graduates of Cambridge, Maryland High School may have the opportunity 
he missed. 

Pilot Freight Carriers, Inc., Scholarship. An award of $500 to an out- 
standing student majoring in Transportation in the College of Business 
and Management. 

William H. Price Scholarship. This award is made annually to a worthy 
student who is already working to defray part of his college expenses. 

Presser Foundation Scholarship. Awards are made to undergraduate 
students who are pursuing their studies with the intention of becoming 
music teachers. 

Ralston Purina Scholarship. A scholarship of $500 is awarded annually 
to an incoming senior or junior of the College of Agriculture. 

Ensign Richard Turner Rea Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship 
fund has been established by Captain and Mrs. Richard F Rea in honor of 
their late son who gave his life while on active duty in the U S Coast 
Guard Two scholarships up to $500 each are awarded annually to 
students in engineering 

Read's Drug Stores Foundation Scholarships. The Read's Drug Stores 
Foundation contributes annually several scholarships to prepharmacy 
students on the basis of achievement, character and need. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500 per academic year is applied to the fees and 
expenses at College Park Recipients must be residents of the State of 
Maryland 

Mary Elizabeth Roby Memorial Scholarship. An endowed scholarship 
has been established by the University Park Republican Women's Club 
Limited awards are made to women entering the junior or senior years 
who are studying in the field of political science A preference is given to 
residents of Prince George's County 

12 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Vivian F. Roby Scholarships. This endowed fund was established 
through a bequest to the University of Maryland by Evalyn S Roby in 
memory of her husband, class of 1912. to provide undergraduate 
scholarships to needy boys from Baltimore City and Charles County. 

Jack B. Sacks Foundation Scholarship. An award of $1000 on behalf 
of the Advertising Club of Metropolitan Washington, Inc. to an out- 
standing senior Marketing student in the College of Business and 
Management planning a career in advertising. 

Schluderberg Foundation Scholarship Grant. This grant of $500 is 
awarded in the College of Agriculture to a student enrolled in the animal 
science or food science curriculum 

Dr. Fern Duey Schneider Grant. A $100 grant is available to a foreign 
woman student enrolled in the College of Education, who has completed 
at least one semester in residence at the University. Funds for the grant 
are contributed by the Montgomery and Prince George's County Chap- 
ters of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society. 

Arthur H. Seidenspinner Scholarship. An endowed memorial scholar- 
ship fund has been established by Mrs Seidenspinner to assist deser- 
ving student athletes to obtain an education at the University. Both Mr. 
and Mrs Seidenspinner have been long-time contributors to numerous 
student aid programs at the University. 

Southern States Cooperative Scholarships. Two scholarships are 
awarded each year to sons of Southern States members — one for out- 
standing work in 4-H Club and the other for outstanding work in FFA The 
amount of each scholarship is $300 per year and will continue for four 
years. 

Dr. Mabel S. Spencer Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded in 
honor of Dr. Spencer, distinguished former Professor in the College of 
Education. A preference shall be given to students in Home Economics 
Education. 

T. B. Symons Memorial Fund. A scholarship award is made annually to a 
student enrolled in agriculture on the basis of academic achievement 
and financial need. 

Charles A. Taff Scholarship. An award of $500 to an outstanding 
student majoring in Transportation in the College of Business and 
Management. 

Thomas H. Taliaferro Scholarship. Under the terms of the will of the 
late Jane G. S Taliaferro a bequest has been made to the University of 
Maryland to provide scholarship aid to worthy students. 

Tau Beta Pi Scholarship Fund. A limited number of scholarships are 
made available each year to worthy engineering students by members 
and alumni of Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi Association. Inc.. 
national engineering honor society. 

Veterinary Science Scholarship. A scholarship of $300. provided by 
the veterinarians of Maryland, will be awarded to a student enrolled in 
Veterinary Science, selected on the basis of leadership, academic com- 
petence and financial need 

Joseph M. Vial Memorial Scholarship In Agriculture. Scholarships 
totaling $600 per year are made available by Mrs A H Seidenspinner to 
be awarded upon the recommendation of the College of Agriculture 

Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission Scholarships. Four 
scholarships are available that pay tuition and fees. Minorities and women 
will be given a preference Awardees may be offered an opportunity for 
summer employment by the WSSC 

Western Electric Scholarship. Two scholarships are awarded to 
students in the College of Engineering The amount of the scholarship 
covers cost of tuition, books and fees not to exceed $800 nor to be less 
than $400 

Weslinghouse Aerospace Division Scholarship. The Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation has established a scholarship to encourage out- 
standing students of engineering and the physical sciences The scholar- 
ship is awarded to a sophomore student and is over a penod of three 
years in six installments of $250 Students in electrical or mechanical 
engineering, engineering physics or applied mathematics are eligible for 
the award. 

Women's Architectural League Scholarship. This fund has been 
established to aid worthy students in the School of Architecture 

Women's Club of Bethesda Scholarship. Several scholarships are 
available to young women residents of Montgomery County Recipients 
must be accepted in the College ol Education or the School of Nursing 

Nicholas Brice Worthlngton Scholarship. A $500 memonal scholar- 
ship is made available to a student in the College of Agriculture by the 
descendants of Nicholas Brice Worthmgton. one of the founders of the 
Agncultural College 



Loans 

Loan lunds to meet educational expenses are available (or students 
enrolled in the University The extent ot financial need must be clearly 
established by providing a complete statement of the applicant's financial 
resources and estimated expenses for the academic year 

Loan awards are normally granted on a yearly basis, although short- 
term and emergency loans are granted for shorter periods. 

To apply for a long-term loan, an application should normally be filed 
before May 1 for the ensuing year. If funds are available, applications may 
be considered at other times, but the student should bear in mind that it 
generally takes about six weeks to process a loan 

Students applying for a loan must have a 2 (C) average for courses 
taken the preceding semester New freshmen students need a 2.5 
average In academic sub|ects for the previous two years of school. 

Loans are not available for non-educational expenses nor are they 
available for repayment of previously Incurred Indebtedness. 

National Direct Student Loan Program. This loan fund was established 
by the federal government in agreement with the University of Maryland 
to make low-interest loans available to students with clearly established 
financial need. Applicants must be United States nationals (citizens and 
permanent resident status) and must be enrolled for eight or more credit 
hours at day school on the College Park Campus 

Approved loans are usually less than $1000 per year The borrower 
must sign a note Repayment begins nine months after the borrower 
leaves school and must be completed within ten years thereafter. No in- 
terest is charged until the beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest 
after that date is charged at the rate of three percent per annum. 

Cancellation provisions are available for qualified service as a teacher 
of the handicapped and in low income schools, or for military service in 
areas of hostility. 

Institutional Student Loans. Institutional loan funds have been 
established through the generosity of University organizations, alumni, 
faculty, staff, and friends. These loans are normally available at low in- 
terest rates to upperclassmen only. For specific information, the student 
should inquire at the Office of Student Aid. 

Nursing Student Loans and Scholarships. Under provisions of the 
federal Health Manpower Act of 1 968, financial aid in the form of loans or 
scholarships is available to qualified students. The recipient must be a 
full-time student in pursuit of a baccalaureate or graduate degree in nur- 
sing, and able to establish financial need. Students submitting ap- 
plications for financial aid will automatically be considered for both 
scholarship and loan. 

On loans, repayment begins one year after the borrower ceases to be 
a full-time student and must be completed within ten years. No interest is 
charged until the beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after that 
date accrues at the rate of three percent per annum. Cancellation 
provisions are available if the borrower is employed as a nurse in a public 
or non-profit institution or agency; or in the event of permanent disability 
or death of the borrower. 

Law Enforcement Education Program Loan and Grant. Loans: 
Qualified full-time pre-service students in approved fields may apply for 
loan assistance up to $2,200 per academic year (not to exceed the cost 
of tuition and fees). Loan funds are not always available each academic 
year. The loan is cancelled at the rate of 25 percent per year of full-time 
employment in criminal justice or repaid at the rate of 7 percent simple in- 
terest, commencing six months after termination of full-time study. 
Grants: In-service employees of police, courts and corrections agencies 
enrolled in courses related to law enforcement can receive up to $400 
per semester (not to exceed cost of tuition and fees). Grant recipients 



must agree to remain In the service of their employing law enforcement 
agency for at least two years following completion of their courses Any 
student who meets the eligibility requirements for both a loan and a grant 
may receive both concurrently. Interested students should contact either 
the dean, University College, or director, Institute of Cnmlnal Justice and 
Criminology, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Guaranteed Student Loans. Loan programs have been established 
through the Maryland Higher Education Loan Corporation and the United 
Student Aid Fund which permit students to borrow money from their 
hometown banks or other financial institutions. The programs enable un- 
dergraduates in good standing to borrow up to $2,500, depending upon 
the particular state's program Notes may not bear more than seven per- 
cent simple interest, and monthly repayments begin ten months after 
graduation or withdrawal from school. The federal government will pay 
the Interest for eligible students, while the student Is in school Further 
details regarding this program may be secured from trie Office of Student 
Aid. 



Part-time Employment 

More than one-half of the students at the University of Maryland earn a 
portion of their expenses The Office of Student Aid serves without 
charge as a clearinghouse for students seeking part-time work and em- 
ployers seeking help. Many jobs are available in the residence halls, 
dining halls, libraries, laboratories and elsewhere on and off campus. 

Working during college years may offer advantages in addition to the 
obvious one of financing a college education The employed student has 
a special opportunity to learn new skills, to develop good work habits, and 
to learn how to get along with people. Sometimes part-time employment 
experience helps a student choose a vocation or is helpful later in 
following his or her vocation 

Freshman students who do not need financial aid probably should not 
attempt to work during the first year at the University However, students 
who need to work in order to attend the University are advised to con- 
sider employment in one of our dining halls through the Dining Hall 
Workshop program. Under this program a student may earn ap- 
proximately one-half of his or her board and room by working ten hours 
per week. After one successful semester the work load may be in- 
creased to full room and board at the request of the student 

For positions other than dining service, a student normally cannot 
make arrangements for employment until he or she is on campus at the 
beginning of a school session. Application must be made in person and 
the applicant should have a schedule of classes and study hours so that 
he or she can seek employment best suited to his or her free time. 

The Office of Student Aid welcomes the opportunity to counsel a 
student about the best type of employment for him or her. However, 
securing a position through intelligent application and retaining that 
position through good work is the responsibility of the individual. 



College Work-Study Program 

Under provisions of the Educational Amendments of 1972, em- 
ployment may be awarded as a means of financial aid to students who, (1 ) 
are in need of the earnings from such employment in order to pursue a 
course of study at a college or university, and (2) are capable of main- 
taining good standing in the course of study while employed. Under the 
work-study program, students may work up to fifteen hours per week 
during the school year and a maximum of 40 hours during the summer. 

A preference is given to those students with the greatest financial 
need after the application of all public and private grants. 



Academic Regulations and 
Requirements 

General University Requirements 

In order to provide educational breadth for all students, there have 
been established the General University Requirements. These 
requirements consist of 30 semester hours of credit distributed among 
the three areas listed below. (For an exception to this regulation, see the 
Bachelor of General Studies Program. See page 126.) At least 6 hours 
must be taken in each area. At least 9 of the 30 hours must be taken at 
the 300 level or above. None of the 30 hours may be counted toward 
published departmental, college or divisional requirements for a degree. 
Area A. 6-12 hours elected in the Divisions of Agricultural and Life Scien- 
ces; Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineering. Area B. 6-1 2 



hours in the Divisions of Behavioral and Social Sciences; Human and 
Community Resources. Area C. 6-12 hours in the Division of Arts and 
Humanities. 

In meeting these area requirements, students may choose from among 
any undergraduate courses for which they are qualified. The student may 
select either the pass-fail or letter grading option for these courses as 
outlined on page 1 8. Students are urged to consult with academic ad- 
visors for guidance in determining which courses in each area best fit in- 
dividual needs and interests. 

Demonstration of competency in English composition: unless the 
student has been exempted for English composition, at least one course 
in the subject will be required. Exemption is granted if the student earns 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 13 



an acceptable score on the SAT Verbal (score announced annually) or an 
acceptable score on the English Advanced Placement Test (score an- 
nounced annually), or by satisfactory completion ot a similar writing 
course at another institution. 

Students taking a course to satisfy this requirement may apply the 
credits toward the 30-hour General University Requirement but may not 
count these credits toward the satisfaction of the minimum 6-hour 
requirement m any of the three designated areas Credit for such a 
course may be in addition to the 1 2-hour maximum in any area. 

Students who entered the University prior to June, 1 973 have the op- 
tion of completing requirements under the former General Education 
"Yogram rather than the new General University Requirements. Each 
student is responsible for making certain that the various categories of 
either set of requirements have been satisfied prior to certification for the 
degree. Assistance and advice may be obtained from the academic ad- 
visor or the Office of the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Stu- 
dents 

Special note tor foreign students 

The foreign student is required to take a special classification test in 
English before registering for the required English courses. He may be 
required to take Foreign Language 001 and 002 — English for Foreign 
Students — before registering for English 101. 



Registration 

1 To attend classes at the University of Maryland it is necessary to 
process an official registration. Registration is final and official when 
all fees are paid. Instructions concerning registration are given in the 
Schedule of Classes issued at the beginning of each new semester. 

2. The schedule adjustment period shall be the first 10 days of 
classes. During that period, the student may drop or add courses or 
change sections with no charge. Courses dropped during this 
period will be made available to other students desiring to add 
Courses so dropped during this registration period will not appear 
on the student's permanent record. Courses may be added, where 
space is available, during this period and will appear on the 
student's permanent record along with other courses previously 
listed. After this schedule adjustment period, courses may not be 
added without special permission of the instructor and the dean or 
provost of the academic unit in which the student is enrolled. 

3 After this schedule adjustment period, all courses for which the 
student is enrolled (or subsequently adds) shall remain as a part of 
the student's permanent record.The student's status shall be con- 
sidered as full-time if the number of credit hours enrolled at this time 
is 9 or more. Courses may be dropped with no academic penalty for 
a total period of 1 weeks in which there are classes, starting from 
the first day of classes. The permanent record will be marked W to 
indicate this. (See Marking System below.) After this initial schedule 
adjustment period a charge shall be made for each course dropped 
or added. (See Schedule of Fees above.) 

4 An official class list for each course being offered is issued each 
semester to the appropriate department by the Office of 
Registrations. No student is permitted to attend a class if his name 
does not appear on the class list. Instructors must report discrepan- 
cies to the Office of Registrations At the end of the semester, the 
Office of Registrations issues to each department official grade 
cards The instructors mark the final grades on the grade cards, 
sign the cards and return them to the Office of Registrations. 

5. Courses taken at another campus of the University or at another in- 
stitution concurrent with regular registration on the College Park 
Campus may not be credited without approval in advance by the 
provost of the division from which the student expects a degree 
The same rule applies to off-Campus registration or registration in 
the summer school of another institution. 

6 A student who is eligible to remain at the College Park Campus may 
transfer among curricula, colleges, divisions, or other academic 
units except where limitations on enrollments have been approved 
by the Board of Regents 

7. In all cases of transfer from one division to another on the College 
Park Campus, the provost of the receiving division, with the ap- 
proval of the student, shall indicate which courses, if any. in the 
student's previous academic program are not applicable to his or ' 
her new program, and shall notify the Office of Registrations of the 
adjustments which are to be made in determining the student's 
progress toward a degree Deletions may occur both in credits at- 
tempted and correspondingly in credits earned This evaluation 
shall be made upon the student's initial entry into a new program. 
not thereafter If a student transfers within one division from one 



program to another, his or her record evaluation shall be made by 
the provost in the same way as if he or she were transferring 
divisions. If the student subsequently transfers to a third division, 
the provost of the third division shall make a similar initial ad- 
justment, courses marked "nonapplicable" by the second provost 
may become applicable in the third program. 
8 In the cases of non-divisional students, the Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies shall assume the responsibilities normally delegated to 
provosts. 



Degrees and Certificates 

The College Park Campus awards the following degrees: Bachelor of 
Architecture, Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of General Studies, Bachelor o' 
Music, Bachelor of Science. Master of Arts, Master of Business Ad- 
ministration, Master of Fine Arts, Master of Education, Master of Library 
Science. Master of Music, Master of Science, Doctor of Business Ad- 
ministration, Doctor of Education, Doctor of Musical Arts, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. 

Students in specified two-year curricula may be awarded certificates 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has had 
less than one year (30 credits) of resident work at the College Park Cam- 
pus of the University. The last 30 semester credits in any curricula 
leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at the 
College Park Campus Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in 
curricula which combine work at College Park and Baltimore must com- 
plete a minimum of 30 semester credits at College Park. 

The requirements for graduation vary according to the character of 
work in the different colleges, divisions and schools. Full information 
regarding specific college and division requirements for graduation will 
be found in Section III of this catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application 
for it with the Office of Registrations This must be done by the end of the 
third week of the semester or the second week of the summer session at 
the end of which he or she expects to graduate. 

Credit Unit and Load 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a 
subject pursued one period a week for one semester Two or three 
periods of laboratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation period The student is expected to devote three hours a week 
in classroom or laboratory or in outside preparation for each credit hour in 
any course. 

In order for an undergraduate student to complete most curricula in 
four academic years the semester credit load must range from 1 2 to 1 9 
hours, so that he would complete from 30 to 36 hours each year toward 
the degree. A student registering for more than 1 9 hours per semester 
must have the special approval of his or her dean or provost. 

Classification of Students 

No baccalaureate curriculum requires less than 1 20 semester hours. 
Actual classifications run as follows freshman, 1 -27 semester hours; 
sophomore, 28-55; junior, 56-85; and senior. 86 to at least 1 20 

A student is permitted to register for upper division courses when 
granted Junior Standing by his college This permission shall be based 
upon earning a minimum of 56 academic hours toward his degree, com- 
pleting such course requirements as the college may direct, and 
possessing the minimum required grade point average to remain in the 
University. 

Exceptional students having completed forty-eight (48) semester 
hours of academic credit and having the approval of the department in- 
volved will be permitted to enroll for sufficient upper division courses to 
complete a normal program That is. such students must carry lower 
division courses to total fifty-six (56) semester hours of academic credits 
and the remainder may be in courses numbered in the 300-499 range 

Examinations 

1 A final examination shall be given in every undergraduate course. 
Exceptions may be made with the wntten approval of the chairman 
of the department and the dean or provost In order to avoid basing 
too much of the semester grade upon the final examination, ad- 
ditional tests, quizzes, term papers, reports and the like should be 
used to determine a student's comprehension of a course The or- 
der of procedure in these matters is left to the discretion of depart- 
ments or professors and should be announced to a class at the 
beginning of a course All final examinations must be held on the 
examination days of the Official Final Examination Schedule No 



14 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



final examination shall be given at a time other than that scheduled in 
the Official Examination Schedule without written permission of the 
department chairman 

2 To expedite arrangements for commencement, final grades of un- 
dergraduate candidates for degrees are based on evaluations 
available at the time grades are required to be submitted 

3. A file of all final examination questions must be kept by the chairman 
of each department 

4 The chairman of each department is responsible for the adequate 
administration of examinations in courses under his or her jurisdic- 
tion. The deans and provosts should present the matter of 
examinations for consideration in staff conferences from time to 
time and investigate examination procedures in their respective 
colleges and divisions. 

5. Every examination shall be designed to require for its completion 
not more than the regularly scheduled period 

6 A typewritten, mimeographed or printed set of questions shall be 
placed in the hands of every examinee in every test or examination 
requiring at least one period, unless the dean or provost has 
authorized some other procedure 

7. Each instructor must safeguard examination questions and all trial 
sheets, drafts and stencils 

8. Each instructor should avoid the use of examination questions 
which have been included in recently given examinations and 
should prepare examinations that will make dishonesty difficult. 

9. Only clerical help approved by the department chairman shall be 
employed in the preparation or reproduction of tests or examination 
questions. 

10. Proctors must be in the examination room at least ten minutes 
before the hour of a final examination. Provisions should be made 
for proper ventilation, lighting and a seating plan At least one of the 
proctors present must be sufficiently cognizant of the subject mat- 
ter of the examination to deal authoritatively with inquiries arising 
from the examination. 

1 1 . Books, papers, etc., belonging to the student, must be left in a place 
designated by the instructor before the student takes his or her 
seat, except in such cases where books or work sheets are per- 
mitted. 

12. Students should be seated at least every other seat apart, or its 
equivalent, i.e., about three feet. Where this arrangement is not 
possible some means must be provided to protect the integrity of 
the examination. 

13. "Blue books" only must be used in periodic or final examinations, 
unless special forms are furnished by the department concerned. 

1 4. If mathematical tables are required in an examination, they shall be 
furnished by the instructor. If textbooks are used, this rule does not 
apply. 

15. Proctors must exercise all diligence to prevent dishonesty and to 
enforce proper examination decorum, including abstention from 
smoking. 

1 6. Where an instructor must proctor more than 40 students, he or she 
should consult the chairman of the department concerning proc- 
torial assistance. An instructor should consult the department chair- 
man if in his or her opinion a smaller number of students for an 
examination requires the help of another instructor. 

17. No student who leaves an examination room will be permitted to 
return, except in unusual circumstances, in which case permission 
to do so must be granted by the proctor prior to the student's depar- 
ture. 

18. All conversation will cease prior to the passing out of examination 
papers, and silence will be maintained in the room during the entire 
examination period. 

19. Examination papers will be placed face down on the writing surface 
until the examination is officially begun by the proctor. 

20. Examination papers will be kept flat on the writing surface at all 
times. 



Irregularities in Examinations 

1 . In cases involving charges of academic irregularities or dishonesty 
in an examination, class work or course requirements by an un- 
dergraduate student, the instructor in the course shall report to the 
instructional department chairman any information received and the 
facts within his or her knowledge. If the chairman of the instructional 
department determines that there is any sound reason for believing 
that academic dishonesty may be involved, he or she shall refer the 
matter to the dean or provost. The dean or provost will then confer 
with the student's dean or provost and will check the Judiciary Of- 
fice records to determine if the student has any record of prior of- 
fenses involving academic dishonesty. The dean or provost will 



then consult with the student involved, and if the alleged academic 
dishonesty is admitted by the student and is the first offense of this 
nature, the dean or provost may authorize the department chairman 
to dispose of the charges, limiting the maximum penalty to 
disciplinary probation and a grade of F in the course, provided the 
penalty is accepted by the student in writing. In such case the 
department chairman will make a written report of the matter, in- 
cluding the action taken, to the student's dean or provost and to the 
Judiciary Office. 

If the case is not disposed of in the above manner, the dean or 
provost of the instructional department will appoint an ad hoc Com- 
mittee of Academic Dishonesty consisting of one member from the 
faculty of the college or division administered by the dean or 
provost as chairman, one undergraduate student, and one member 
from the faculty of the student's college or division appointed by the 
dean of that college or division. If the student's dean or provost and 
the dean or provost administering the instructional department are 
the same, a second member of the faculty of the college or division 
concerned is appointed. 

The dean or provost of the instructional department will refer the 
specific report of alleged academic dishonesty to this ad hoc com- 
mittee and the committee will hear the case The hearing 
procedures before this committee will in general conform to those 
required for student judicial boards. The committee may impose the 
normal disciplinary actions and/or impose a grade of F in the 
course. 

The chairman of the committee will report its actions to the dean 
or provost of the student's college or division and to the Judiciary 
Office The dean or provost of the instructional department will ad- 
vise the student in writing of the disciplinary action of the commit- 
tee, and also advise the student of the right to file an appeal to the 
Adjunct Committee on Student Conduct. 

The student may file the appeal in accordance with the normal 
procedures to the Adjunct Committee with the dean or provost of 
the instructional department and the latter will forward it to the chair- 
man of the Adjunct Committee The chairman of the Adjunct Com- 
mittee will notify the student in writing of the time, date, and place of 
the hearing. 
2 In cases involving charges of academic irregularities or dishonesty 
in an examination, class work or course requirements by a graduate 
student, the above procedure will be followed except that: 

a. The chairman of the instructional department will refer the matter 
to the Dean for Graduate Studies. 

b. The ad hoc Committee on Academic Dishonesty will be ap- 
pointed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and will consist of two 
members of the Graduate School faculty, one serving as chair- 
man, and one graduate student. 

Marking System 



1 . The following symbols are used on the student's permanent record 
for all courses in which he or she is enrolled after the initial 
registration and schedule adjustment period: A, B, C. D. F, I. P, S, 
and W. These marks remain as part of the student's permanent 
record and may only be changed by the original instructor on cer- 
tification, approved by the department chairman and the dean or 
provost, that an actual mistake was made in determining or record- 
ing the grade. 

2. The mark of A denotes excellent mastery of the subject. It denotes 
outstanding scholarship. In computations of cumulative or semester 
averages, a mark of A will be assigned a value of 4 quality points per 
credit hour. (See Minimum Requirements for Retention and 
Graduation below.) 

3. The mark of B denotes good mastery of the subject. It denotes good 
scholarship. In computation of cumulative or semester averages a 
mark of B will be assigned 3 quality points per credit hour. 

4. The mark of C denotes acceptable mastery. It denotes the usual 
achievement expected. In computation of cumulative or semester 
averages a mark of C will be assigned a value of 2 quality points per 
credit hour. 

5. The mark of D denotes borderline understanding of the subject. It 
denotes marginal performance, and it does not represent satisfac- 
tory progress toward a degree. In computations of cumulative or 
semester averages a mark of D will be assigned a value of 1 quality 
point per credit hour. 

6. The mark of F denotes failure to understand the subject It denotes 
unsatisfactory performance. In computations of cumulative or 
semester averages a mark of F will be assigned a value of quality 
points per credit hour. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 15 



7. The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to A, B. C. or D. 
(See Pass-Fall option below. ) The student must inform the Office of 
Registrations of the selection of this option by the end of the 
schedule adjustment period h computation of cumulative averages 
a mark of P will not be included. In computation of quality points 
achieved lor a semester, a mark of P will be assigned a value of 2 
quality points per credit hour. (See Minimum Requirements lor 
Retention and Graduation below.) 

8 The mark ol S Is a department option mark which may be used to 
denote satisfactory performance by a student In progressing thesis 
projects, orientation courses, practice teaching and the like. In com- 
putation of cumulative averages a mark of S will not be included In 
computation of quality points achieved for a semester, a mark of S 
will be assigned a value of 2 quality points per credit hour. 

9. The mark I Is an exceptional mark which Is an instructor option. It is 
given only to a student whose work In a course has been 
qualitatively satisfactory, when, because of illness or other cir- 
cumstances beyond his control, he or she has been unable to com- 
plete some small portion of the work of the course. In no case will 
the mark I be recorded for a student who has not completed the 
major portion of the work of the course. The student will remove the 
I by completing work assigned by the Instructor; It is the student's 
responsibility to request arrangements for completion of the work. 
The work must be completed by the end of the next semester in 
which the course is again offered and in which the student is in at- 
tendance at the College Park Campus; otherwise the I becomes ter- 
minal (equivalent to W). Exceptions to the time period cited above 
may be granted by the student's dean or provost upon the written 
request of the student if circumstances warrant further delay. If the 
instructor is unavailable, the department chairman will, upon request 
of the student, make appropriate arrangements for the student to 
complete the course requirements. It is the responsibility of the in- 
structor or department chairman concerned to return the ap- 
propriate supplementary grade report to the Office of Registrations 
promptly upon completion of the work. The I cannot be removed 
through re-registration for the course or through the technique of 
"credit by examination". In any event this mark shall not be used in 
any computations 

1 0. The mark W is used to denote that the student withdrew from a 
course in which he or she was enrolled at the end of the schedule 
adjustment period. This mark shall not be used in any computation, 
but for information and completeness is placed on the permanent 
record by the Office of Registrations. The Office of Registrations 
will promptly notify the instructor that the student has withdrawn 
from the course 

1 1 . Audit. A student may register to audit a course or courses in which 
space is available. The notation AUD will be placed on the transcript 
for each course audited. A notation to the effect that this symbol 
does not imply attendance or any other effort In the course will be 
Included on the transcript in the explanation of the grading system. 

Pass-Fail Option 

1 . An undergraduate who has completed 1 5 or more credit hours at 
the College Park Campus and has a cumulative average of at least 
2.00 may register for courses on the Pass-Fall option during any 
semester or summer session. 

2. Certain divisional requirements, major requirements or field of con- 
centration requirements do not allow the use of the Pass-Fall option. 
Certain courses within a department may be designated by that 
department as not available under the Pass-Fall option. It Is the 
responsibility of each student electing this option to ascertain In 
conjunction with his or her dean, provost, department or major ad- 
visor, whether the particular courses will be applicable to his degree 
requirements under the Pass-Fall option. 

3. No more than 20 percent of the College Park Campus credits of- 
fered toward the degree may be taken on the Pass-Fall option basis. 

4 Students registering for a course under the Pass-Fall option are 
required to complete all regular course requirements Their work 
will be evaluated by the Instructor by the normal procedure for letter 
grades. The instructor will submit the normal grade. The grades A, B, 
C, or D will be automatically converted by the Office of Registrations 
to the grade P on the student's permanent record. The grade F will 
remain as given. The choice of grading option may be changed only 
during the schedule adjustment period for courses in which the 
student is currently registered 

Credit by Examination for 
Undergraduate Studies 

1 . Credit may be earned by examination for any undergraduate course, 
for which a suitable examination has been adopted or prepared by 



the department granting the credit When standanzed CLEP 
(College Level Examination Program) examinations are available 
they may be used Students who desire to determine which courses 
may be taken by examination should consult the Office of the Ad- 
ministrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies. 
2 Any student may take a course by examination by obtaining an ap- 
plication form from the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies, paying the requisite fees, and taking the examination at a 
time mutually agreeable to the student and the department offering 
the course 

3. The applicant must be formally admitted to the University of 
Maryland, and be In good academic standing. Posting of credit, 
however, will be delayed until the student is registerad 

4. Application for credit by examination Is equivalent to registration for 
a course; however, the following conditions apply: 

a. A student may cancel the application at any time prior to com- 
pletion of the examination with no entry on the permanent 
record. (Equivalent to the registration adjustment period.) 

b. The instructor makes the results of the examination available to 
the student prior to formal submission of the grade. Before for- 
mal submission of the grade, a student may elect not to have this 
grade recorded. In this case a symbol of W is recorded 
(Equivalent to the drop procedure ) 

c. No course may be attempted more than twice. 

d. The instructor must certify on the report of the examination 
submitted to the Registrations Office that copies of the 
examination questions or identifying information in the case of 
standardized examinations, and the student's answers have 
been tiled with the chairman of the department offering the 
course. 

5. Letter grades earned on examinations to establish credit (if ac- 
cepted by the student) are entered on the student's transcript and 
used in computing the cumulative grade point average A student 
may elect to take an examination for credit on a "Pass-Fail" basis 
under the normal "Pass-Fail" regulations. 

6. Undergraduate students may earn by examination no more than half 
the credits required for the degree. 

7. Fees for Credit by Examination as follows: 

a. Fees for CLEP and other standardized examinations are deter- 
mined externally and are not altered by the University. These 
credits are treated as transfer credits. 

b. Full-time students are charged $30 00 for each course 
examination regardless of the number of credits This fee is paid 
upon application for the examination and is not refundable re- 
gardless of whether or not the student completes the examina- 
tion. 

c. Part-time students are charged on the same cost-per-credit- 
hour basis as though they were taking the course in the regular 
manner. 

Degree Requirements 

1 . It is the responsibility of departments, colleges, divisions, or ap- 
propriate academic units to establish and publish clearly defined 
degree requirements Responsibility for knowing and meeting all 
degree requirements for graduation in any curriculum rests with the 
student Not later than the close of the junior year, the student 
should check with the proper authorities to ascertain his or her 
standing in this respect. For this purpose the student should be 
sure to preserve the copy of the semester grade report issued by 
the Office of Registrations at the close of each semester 

2. In order to earn a baccalaureate degree the last 30 semester credits 
of any curriculum must be taken In residence at the College Park 
Campus Candidates for degrees In pre-professional combined 
programs must complete at least 30 semester hours; nothing stated 
below modifies In any way this basic requirement Included in these 
30 semester hours will be a minimum of 1 5 semester hours in cour- 
ses numbered 300 or above, including at least 1 2 semester hours 
required In the major field (in curricula requiring such concentration) 
All candidates for degrees should plan to take their senior year in 
residence since the advanced work of their major study normally 
occurs in the last year of the undergraduate course At least 24 of 
the last 30 credits must be done in residence at the College Park 
Campus; I.e., a student who at the time of graduation will have com- 
pleted 30 semester hours in residence may be permitted to do not 
more than 6 semester hours of the final 30 credits of record in 
another institution, provided written permission is secured in ad- 
vance from the dean or provost The student must be enrolled in 
the program from which he or she plans to graduate when register- 
ing for the last 15 credits of the program These requirements 
apply also to the third year of pre-professional combined degree 
programs 



16 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



3 While many University curricula require more semester hours than 
1 20. no baccalaureate curriculum requires less than 1 20 credit 
hours It is the students responsibility to familiarize himselt or her- 
self with the requirements of the curriculum The student is urged to 
take advantage of the advice on these matters in the departments, 
colleges, divisions, or Office of Academic Affairs 

4 A student who has completed requirements for and has received 
one baccalaureate degree must satisfactorily complete enough ad- 
ditional credits so that the total, including all applicable credits 
earned at College Park or elsewhere, is at least 1 50 credits. In no 
case, however, will a second baccalaureate be awarded to a stu- 
dent who has not completed the last 30 credits at the University of 
Maryland. College Park 

5 A student who wishes to receive simultaneously two baccalaureate 
degrees from the University of Maryland. College Park, must 
satisfactorily complete a minimum of 1 50 credits (161 credits if one 
of the degrees is the B Arch degree in the School of Architecture) 
The regularly prescribed requirements of both degree programs 
must be completed As early as possible and in any case no later 
than the beginning of the second semester before the expected 
date of graduation the student must file with the departments or 
programs involved and also with the appropriate deans and provosts 
a formal program showing the courses to be offered to meet major, 
supporting area, college, division and General University and elec- 
tive requirements of both curricula. No course used in either 
curriculum to satisfy a major, supporting area, or college or division 
requirement may be used to satisfy the General University 
Requirements If two divisions are involved in the double degree 
program, the student must designate which division is responsible 
for the maintenance of records 

6. A general C (2 00) average is required for graduation in all curricula 
(See Minimum Requirements for Retention and Graduation.) 

7 Applications for diplomas must be filed with the Office of 
Registrations during the registration period or not later than the end 
of the second week of classes of the regular semester or at the end 
of the second week of the summer session, at the end of which the 
candidate expects to receive his or her degree. Applications filed 
after the third week of classes of a regular semester or Friday of the 
second week of a summer session will be retained until the next 
semester (session) when degrees will be awarded 



Attendance 

1 The University expects each student to take full responsibility for 
his or her academic work and academic progress. The student, to 
progress satisfactorily, must meet the quantitative and qualitative 
requirements of each course for which he or she is registered. 
Students are expected to attend classes regularly, for consistent at- 
tendance offers the most effective opportunity open to all students 
to gain a developing command of the concepts and materials of their 
course of study. However, attendance in class, in and of itself, is not 
a criterion for the evaluation of the student's degree of success or 
failure Furthermore, absences (whether excused or unexcused) do 
not alter what is expected of the student qualitatively and quan- 
titatively Except as provided below, absences will not be used in 
the computation of grades, and the recording of student absences 
will not be required of the faculty. 

2 In certain courses in-class participation is an integral part of the 
work of the course A few examples would be courses in public 
speaking and group discussion, courses emphasizing conversation 
in foreign languages, certain courses in physical education, and cer- 
tain laboratory sessions Each department shall determine which of 
its courses fall into this category It shall be the responsibility of the 
instructor in such courses to inform each class at the beginning of 
the semester that in-class participation is an integral part of the work 
of the course and that absences will be taken into account in the 
evaluation of the student's work in the course. 

3. Laboratory meetings require special preparation of equipment and 
materials by the staff A student who is not present for a laboratory 
exercise has missed that part of the course and cannot expect that 
he or she will be given an opportunity to make up this work later in 
the term 

4. Special provision for freshmen: the freshman year is a transitional 
year. Absences of freshmen in the basic freshman courses will be 
reported to the student's dean or division officer when the student 
has accumulated more than three unexcused absences 

5. Excuses for absences (in basic freshman courses and in courses 
where in-class participation is a significant part of the work of the 
course) will be handled by the instructor in the course in accordance 
with the general policy of his or her department and college. 



6. Examinations and tests it is the responsibility of the student to keep 
himself or herself informed concerning the dates of announced 
quizzes, tests and examinations An instructor is not under 
obligation to give a student a make-up examination unless the 
student can present evidence that the absence was caused by 
illness or by participating in University activities at the request of 
University authorities A make-up examination, when permitted, is 
given at the convenience of the instructor, but must not interfere 
with the student's regularly scheduled classes 

Deficiency Reports 

1 Reports of unsatisfactory work (less than C) will be made only for 
freshmen in the basic freshman courses It wiH be the obligation of 
all students to assume full responsibility for their academic progress 
without depending upon receiving official warning of unsatisfactory 
work 

2. Reports of unsatisfactory work for freshmen in the basic freshman 
courses will be submitted to the student's dean or provost at the 
end of the seventh week of the semester. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental 
to his or her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not 
satisfactory to the authorities of the University Specific scholastic 
requirements are set forth in the Minimum Requirements for Retention 
and Graduation. 



Withdrawals From the University 

1 . Should a student desire or be compelled to withdraw from the 
University at any time, he or she must secure a notice of withdrawal 
from his or her provost, obtain the proper signatures, and submit the 
notice along with University identification cards to the Office of the 
Vice* Chancellor for Student Affairs. This office will file the with- 
drawal with the Office of Registrations which will record a mark of W 
for all courses and notify the instructors of the withdrawal. 

2 The effective date of withdrawal as far as refunds are concerned is 
the date that the notice is received by the Office of the Vice Chan- 
cellor for Student Affairs. The Office of Registrations will record the 
effective date of withdrawal on the student's permanent record 

Readmission and Reinstatement 

See page 8 for information regarding deadlines. 

Readmission 

1 A student whose continuous attendance at the University has been 
interrupted, but who was in good academic standing, or on 
academic probation, at the end of the last regular semester for 
which he or she was registered, must apply to the Office of Ad- 
missions for readmission. The student will be readmitted to the 
program in which he was last registered. 

Reinstatement 

1 A student who withdraws from the University must apply for rein- 
statement to the Secretary of the Petition Board, Office of Ad- 
missions 

2. A student who has been dismissed for academic reasons may ap- 
peal in writing to the Secretary of the Faculty Petition Board, Office 
of Admissions, for reinstatement. The committee is empowered to 
grant reinstatement to the University if the circumstances warrant 
such action. 

3. A student who has been dismissed from the University for academic 
reasons, and whose petition for reinstatement is denied, may again 
apply for reinstatement any subsequent semester It is recom- 
mended that the student give serious consideration to the previous 
recommendations of the Petition Board. 

Minimum Requirements for 
Retention and Graduation 

1 A minimum of 1 20 credits of successful completed (not I, F. or W) 
course credits are required for graduation in any degree curriculum. 

GENERAL INFORMATION / 17 



(See Degree Requirements and Credit by Examination above) 
Credits transferred, or earned during prior admissions terminating in 
academic dismissal or withdrawal and followed by readmission. will 
be applicable toward meeting credit requirements for a degree (See 
Readmission and Reinstatement above.) 

2. A full-time student will be placed on academic probation at the end 
of any semester in which he or she does not achieve a total of 24 
quality points for that semester, except that he or she will not be 
placed on academic probation for this reason if he or she earns at 
least 1 8 quality points on a registration (at the end of the schedule 
adjustment period) of 9 credits. 20 quality points on a registration 
of 10 credits, or 22 quality points on a registration of 1 1 credits 
Exceptions are also allowed for all full-time students in their first 
semester of registration on the College Park Campus, who must 
earn at least 18 quality points for that semester This exception 
does not apply to students who have earned more than 8 credits 
through previous registration in the University. 

3 Any student, full- or part-time, who fails to maintain a minimum 
cumulative average of 1 95 at the end of any semester following 
that in which the total of credits completed at the College Park Cam- 
pus (with grades A. B, C, D. P. S or F), plus any credits transferred, is 
45 credits, will be placed on academic probation Credits completed 
with grades of A. B, C, D, and F, but not S, P, or I will be used in the 
computation of the cumulative average The 1 95 requirement ap- 
plies to first semester transfer students who transfer 45 or more 
credits. 



4 A student who does not meet the academic standards for any given 
semester will be placed on probation and must display acceptable 
performance in quality points and cumulative average (if applicable) 
during the next semester in order to regain good academic stand- 
ing. A student will be dismissed at the end of the second con- 
secutive, or fourth total, semester of unacceptable performance 
Courses for which the mark W is recorded are excluded from all 
such computations of cumulative average 

5 A student who has been academically dismissed and who is rein- 
stated, will be academically dismissed again if he or she does not 
meet the academic standards for any two additional semesters after 
return In the computation of the cumulative average after return, all 
credits earned at the University of Maryland will be used 

6 When a student is placed on academic probation or is academically 
dismissed, the action shall be entered on the student's oflicial and 
permanent record 

7. Any course may be repeated, but if a student repeats a course in 
which he or she has already earned a mark of A B C D. P or S. the 
subsequent attempt shall not increase the total hours earned toward 
the degree Only the higher mark will be used in computation of the 
student's cumulative average However, the student's quality points 
in a given semester shall be determined by that semester's grades 

8 Any appeal from the regulations governing academic probation or 
academic dismissal shall be directed to the Petition Board, which 
shall be empowered to grant relief in unusual cases, if the cir- 
cumstances warrant such action 



Administrative Offices 
Office of the Chancellor 

Athletics 

The University of Maryland Department of Intercollegiate Athletics fields 
men's teams in football, soccer, and cross country in the fall; basketball, 
fencing, swimming, wrestling, and indoor track during the winter; and 
baseball, golf, tennis, lacrosse, and outdoor track in the spring. Maryland 
is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference and the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association (NCAA) in the men's programs 

Women's intercollegiate athletic teams include field hockey and 
volleyball in the fall; basketball, swimming and gymnastics during the win- 
ter: and lacrosse and track in the spring. Tennis competition is scheduled 
in both the fall and the spring seasons Maryland is a member of the 
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) in the 
women's programs 

Office of the Director of 
Human Relations Programs 

Campus-level programmatic efforts are increasingly emphasized by 
this Office The Offices of Provost and the Offices of Vice Chancellor are 
structured to be directly responsible for affirmative action towards equal 
opportunity for employees and the implementation of desegregation and 
Title IX efforts with respect to undergraduate and graduate students The 



Human Relations Office performs a Campus-level monitoring function for 
the Chancellor directly It facilitates the operations of the Academic 
Divisions and Vice Chancellors Offices by organizing workshops, con- 
ducting organizational development activities, documenting, analyzing 
and distributing pertinent information and by consulting with each of 
these and other offices 

The Human Relations Office also has a liaison relationship to the Cam- 
pus Senate which has a standing Committee on Human Relations 
Finally, this is the Campus-level office to which employee or student 
grievances based on discrimination are referred after previous settlement 
efforts by Provost or Vice Chancellor offices have failed to resolve them 

Office of University Relations 

The Office of University Relations has responsibility for the official 
campus public information program including publications and media 
relations as well as campus efforts in fund raising and alumni affairs The 
office, which reports to the chancellor, is also charged with responsibility 
for internal relations and major campus events 

Units in the Office of University Relations include the Speakers 
Bureau. Photography. Film Unit. Audio Visual Services. Microfilming, the 
Division of Photographic Services, and Publication design and production 
as well as writing and editorial services. 



Office of Administrative Affairs 

Dining Services 

The goal of the University Dining Services is to provide nutritionally 
balanced and tastefully prepared meals, served in a pleasant and relaxing 
atmosphere 

Dining Services offer varied meal plans both to Resident Hall students 
and apartment dwellers In addition, there are several cash facilities con- 
veniently located on the Campus To apply for a meal plan come to the 
Business Office. Hill Area Dining Hall. Telephone 454-2905 

Department of University Police 

General Responsibilities. The general responsibilities of this depart- 
ment relate to providing law enforcement and fire and life safety to the 
College Park Campus The director of this department advises the public 
safety of police units on other campuses in the development of con- 
sistent operating policies and procedures. 

The prime functions of the Police Department within its tunsdiction. are 
the preservation of peace and order; the protection of all persons and 
property and the prevention and detection of crime Vitally concerned 
with human life and property, the members of the Police Department en- 

18/ GENERAL INFORMATION 



force both the laws of the State of Maryland and the regulations of the 
University 

The Safety Division concerns itself primarily with fire prevention and life 
safety to insure the well-being of members of the College Park Campus 
and the preservation ol property Inspection of University buildings and 
facilities for compliance with state and federal fire codes, maintenance of 
fire alarms and detection devices, and supervision of fire dnlls and 
evacuation practices are integral functions of the Safety Division 

Campus Traffic Rules and Regulations. These regulations apply to all 
who drive motor vehicles on any part of the campus at College Park 

1. Purpose of Traffic Regulations: 

a To facilitate the work of the University by providing parking space 
for those who need it most 

b To provide parking space for University visitors and guests 

c To protect pedestrian traffic 

d To assure access at all times of ambulances and firefighting ap- 
paratus 

e To control vehicular traffic on the Campus 



2. Registration of Vehicles 

a All motor vehicles, including motorcycles and scooters, operated 
on campus by a person associated with the University, must be 
registered with the Vehicle Registration Office regardless of 
ownership, except as noted in Regulation 2c All student vehicles 
must be registered in the name of the student who is the legal 
operator of the vehicle 

b. Student vehicles must be registered for the current academic year 
during the applicable registration period A registration charge will 
be made for each vehicle This fee cannot be refunded. 

( 1 ) Fall Semester beginning in August 

for first vehicle $ 1 2 00 

each additional vehicle $3 00 

(2) Spring Semester beginning in January 

* for first vehicle $6 00 

each additional vehicle $3 00 

(3) Summer Semester $3 00 

each additional vehicle $3 00 

All registrations will expire on the next following August 31 . Proof 
of ownership or legal control will be required for multiple 
registrations Students applying lor registration of additional 
vehicles must present the State vehicle license number and the 
University of Maryland registration number of their initially 
registered vehicle for the current academic year. No charge will 
be made for replacement of registration sticker required due to 
damaged bumper of a registered vehicle or because of a 
replacement for a registered vehicle Remnants of stickers to be 
replaced must be turned in at the Motor Vehicle Registration Desk 

c. Resident students who have earned less than 56 semester 
credits shall be prohibited from operating a motor vehicle on the 
College Park Campus, and from registering a vehicle under 
provisions of these regulations, except with special permission 
Details are available at the Motor Vehicle Administration Office 

d Vehicle registration in no way guarantees a convenient parking 
space The fact that all parking spaces convenient to any specific 
location are filled is not an acceptable excuse for parking 
violations. Parking Area 4 is overflow space for all student parking 
areas Any registered student vehicle operators who are unable to 
find spaces in their assigned area may park in Area 4 at any time 
without penalty Supervisory personnel in the MVA Office are 
available to discuss parking problems with any student or 
faculty staff member 

e Parking permits for faculty and staff are issued initially at the time 
of employment All permits expire on August 31 of each year 
Vehicle registration for the following school year may be ac- 
complished by the faculty or staff member's respective depart- 
ment at any time after July 1 of each year. All vehicles must 
display permits for the current school year after September 30 of 
each year Permit decals must be permanently applied on wind- 
shield and rear window of vehicle. 

f Vehicle registration is required for control purposes. Vehicle 
registration does not necessarily insure that parking space will be 
available. Only one set of parking permits for each vehicle is 
authorized 

g. Student vehicles are not considered officially registered until per- 
mits are affixed on driver's side of front and rear bumpers or on 
metal plates affixed to license plates, plainly visible. 

h. Temporary parking permits for visiting groups and for special 
reasons and conditions are available. Requests should be made to 
the Motor Vehicle Administration Section— Telephone 454-4242 

i. Parking permits must not be transferred to any vehicle other than 
the one for which they were originally issued. 

j. Parking permits must not be defaced or altered in any manner. 

k. Temporary and permanent special permits for medical reasons are 
available Details are available from the Motor Vehicle Ad- 
ministration Office— Telephone 454-4242. 



3. Traffic Regulations: 

a. All motor vehicles are subject to University traffic regulations while 
on the University Campus The University assumes no respon- 
sibility for bss or damage to private property. 

b All traffic and parking signs must be obeyed. Between the hours of 
1 1 p.m. and 6 a.m., signs at unmanned security gates and officials 
posted at security entrances must be obeyed. 

c It is impossible to mark with signs all areas of University property 
where parking is prohibited. Parking or driving is definitely 
prohibited on grass plots, tree plots, construction areas, or any 
place which will mar the landscaping of the campus, create a 
safety hazard, or interfere with the use of University facilities. 



d All regulations must be observed during Registration and 
Examination periods, except as may be otherwise indicated by of- 
ficial signs During registration, periods between semesters, final 
examination periods and summer school sessions, registered 
vehicles may park in any numbered parking area 

e Operation of any motor vehicle in such a manner as to create ex- 
cessive noise or smoke, or operation of any vehicle which is in an 
unsafe condition, will result in revocation of parking permit and 
issuance of a Maryland State Summons for violation of Article 66 1 
Annotated Code of Maryland 

f Pedestrians shall have the right-of-way at all times 

g The maximum speed on campus roads is 20 miles per hour 
During changes of classes and in areas of pedestrian traffic cars 
must be driven more slowly 

h Vehicles operated by faculty/staff and students, including motor- 
cycles and scooters, must be parked in assigned areas only Cer- 
tain parking areas are restricted to Faculty and Academic Staff at 
all times This restriction is indicated on the official sign at the en- 
trance to the area. In all other parking areas, unrestricted parking 
is permitted from 4 00 p.m. to 7:00 am. Monday through Thurs- 
day, and from 4:00 pm Friday to 7:00a m Monday 

i. Any motor vehicle parked in violation of University Traffic 
regulations or abandoned on Campus is subject to removal and 
impounding at the expense of the owner or operator (See 
Regulation 4c.) 

j. Specific spaces in parking areas shall not be reserved or marked 
for any department or individual. 

k If an unregistered vehicle is used as an emergency substitute for a 
registered vehicle, it must be parked in the regularly assigned area 
and an immediate report made to the Motor Vehicle Administration 
Section, Ext 4242 

I In parking areas which have marked spaces and lanes, a vehicle 
must be parked in one space only, leaving clear access to ad- 
jacent spaces, and without blocking driving lanes or creating a 
hazard for other drivers. 

m. Parking is not permitted at crosswalks. 

n. Parking or standing is prohibited on all campus roads and fire 
lanes at all times. 

o. In cases where individuals are permitted to register more than one 
vehicle for parking on the campus, only one of these vehicles may 
be parked in the assigned area at any time. 

p. Metered parking spaces must be used in accordance with 
requirements as stated on official signs Non-registered student 
vehicles parked in metered spaces will be in violation of Section 
2A 

q. The fact that a vehicle is parked in violation of any regulation and 
does not receive a violation notice does not mean that the 
regulation is no longer in effect 

4. Traffic Information: 

a. The Office of the University Police is located in the Service 
Building and may be reached on University campus telephone ex- 
tension 3555. 

b The Cashier's Office and the Motor Vehicle Administration Section 
are in the Service Building, Campus Telephone Ext. 4242 

c. The term abandonment, as it relates to automobiles parked on 
property owned or leased by the University of Maryland, shall 
mean any one or more of the following conditions: 

(1) Any vehicle which has not been moved for thirty (30) days 
and whose owner or other claimant the University is unable to 
locate 

(2) Any vehicle which has not been moved for thirty (30) days 
and whose identified owner or other claimant refuses to move 
it. 

(3) Any vehicle on which current license plates are not displayed 
and which has not been moved for ten (1 0) days. 

(4) Any vehicle which has not been moved in seven (7) days due 
to an inoperative condition caused by the removal of 
necessary parts or a wrecked condition. 

Preferred parking areas for car pools are available Formation of 
car pools is encouraged: three or more people constitute a J 
car pool. Additional information may be obtained from the Com- 
muter Student Affairs Office. Room 1 2 1 H, Student Union Building. 

5. Penalties: 

a. Any person connected with the University who operates an 
unregistered vehicle on the Campus, or who registers such a 
vehicle in any way contrary to the provisions of these regulations, 
will be subject to payment of a fifteen ($ 1 5.00) dollar penalty in ad- 
dition to the penalty for any other regulation violation connected 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 19 



therewith. Unregistered vehicles on which five or more outstand- 
ing violation notices have been issued are subject to being towed 
at owner's expense 
b Violation of any campus traffic regulation other than improper 
registration or overtime meter parking, will result in penalty as 
listed below: 

( 1 ) Penalty for parking a registered vehicle in a parking area other 
than properly assigned area $5 00 

(2) Parking a registered vehicle on a roadway, in a posted fire 
lane or posted no parking area $5 00 

(3) Parking any vehicle, including cycles, on walks, grass area, 
plazas, and any other places not designated as areas for 
parking or driving without special permit signed by head of 

Grounds Division $5 00 

Violator will be additionally liable for amount of any specific 
damage caused by such action. 

(4) Minimum penalty for parking in violation of section 3c 

6:00 a m.-6:00 p.m $20 00* 

600p.m.-6:00a.m $25.00* 

•Towing fee on vehicles with locked steering column $15.00 
additional. Penalty and towing fee may be adjusted to reflect 
actual expenses. 

c Overtime parking in metered space will result in a penalty of two 
dollars ($2.00) for each maximum time period on the meter 

d Violations are payable within ten (10) calendar days from date of 
issue at the office of the Cashier in the General Services Building 
and an additional penalty of $2.00 will be imposed for failure to 
settle violations on time. 

e Traffic violation notices issued to University visitors must be 
signed and returned either in person or by mail with explanation to 
the Vehicle Administration Office, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. or to the University Official visited. 
Violation notices must be returned within 10 days after date ot 
issue. The violation may be voided at the discretion of the Vehicle 
Administration Office, and if not voidable, will be returned for 
payment. 

f Violations involving an unregistered vehicle owned by a member 
of the immediate family of a student may be charged to the 
student's account unless settled by the individual receiving the 
ticket, in accordance with stated privileges granted to Visitors and 
Guests 

g. Persistent violators of traffic regulations will be referred to the 
Judiciary Office for appropriate action. 

h. Vehicles parked in roadways, fire lanes and other areas as 
described in Section 3c are subject to being towed at owner's ex- 
pense 

6. Appeals: 

a. An Appeals Board composed of students who are members of the 
Student Traffic Board meets regularly to consider appeals from 
students charged with violations. Students wishing to appeal a 
violation must register at the appeals table, 2nd floor. North Ad- 
ministration Building Traffic tickets must be appealed within ten 
(10) calendar days from the date of issuance. Overtime parking 
meter violations are not subject to appeal 

b. A special Board composed of designated members of the traffic 
committee will consider and act upon requests for exceptions to 
any traffic regulation All actions of this Board will be final 

7. Parking Areas for Students: 

Area 1 —West of Cole Activities Building, between Stadium Drive 

and Campus Drive 
2— North of Denton Hall Dorm Complex 
3— Southwest Corner of Campus 



4— North of Heavy Research Laboratory 
7— East of U.S. 1 . at North Gate 

• 9— Vicinity of Cambridge Dorm Complex 
1 1 — Northeast of Asphalt Institute Building 
1 2— South of Allegany Hall 

1 4 — Loop Roads Front and Rear of Houses on Fraternity Row 
1 5— Rear 7402 Princeton Aenue 

rklng Areas for Faculty and Staff: 

• A— West End of BPA Building 
AA— West of Fine Arts and Education Classroom Building 

• B— Adjacent to Computer Science Center 
BB— West of Chemistry Building 

C— Adjacent to Turner Laboratory (Dairy) 
CC— Barn area 

• D— Rear of Journalism Building 
DD— East of Space Sciences Building 

• E — Adjacent to Engineering Buildings 
EE— North of Engineering Laboratory Building 
' F— Adjacent to Fire Service Extension Building 
FF — East of Animal Science Building 

• G — Between Silvester Hall and Skinner Building 
GG— South Center of Adult Education 

• H— Adjacent to Symons Hall and Holzapfel Hall 
HH— ADjacent to H. J Patterson Hall — Botany 

I— Rear of Molecular Physics Building 
J — West of Annapolis Hall 
K— Adjacent to General Service Building 
KK— Rear Chemical Engineering Building 
L — Administration- Armory Loop 

• M — Adjacent to Infirmary 

• N— North of Dining Hall # 5 and East of Elkton Hall 
NN— Adjacent to Building # 201 

O— East and West of School of Architecture Undergraduate 
Library 
( * OO— West Portion Only) 
OO — Adjacent to Zoology- Psychology Building and 
Undergraduate Library 
P — East of Wind Tunnel 
* * PP— Between Math Building and Cyclotron 
Q— Rear of Jull Hall 

• R— Circle in front of Byrd Stadium Field House. 

Stadium Garage and adjacent to Premkert Field House 
RR— East of Asphalt Institute 
*S— Special Food Service 

T— North of Engineering Laboratory Building 
TT — Service Area West of Physics Building 
U— Rear of McKeldin Library 
UU— East of J. M. Patterson 
V— South of Main Food Service Facility and West of Building 
CC 

• W— Between Skinner Building and Taliaferro Hall 

X — Rear of Chemistry Building 

* XX— West — New Chemistry Wing 

Y— West of Chapel 

* YY— West of Cumberland Hall 

Z— Adjacent to Cole Field House. West Side 
*Z— Rear Cole Held House 

Z— Annex — West of New Physical Education Building 
LC— Lord Calvert Apartments 
UH— University Hills Apartments 
1 7— Special Parking for use of Center for Adult Education 

' Restricted at all times 



Office of Student Affairs 



The Division of Student Affairs is responsible for coordinating 
programs and services which enhance the life and welfare of students 

Commuter Affairs. Resident Life, Orientation. Greek Affairs. Counseling 
Center. Judicial Programs. Veterans Affairs. Office of Campus Activities. 
the Health Center, and the Student Union are organized to facilitate in- 
dividual student development by meeting specific student needs In ad- 
dition. Student Affairs offices strive to develop a Campus environment 
which fosters positive learning experiences and individual growth 

Office location: 2108 North Administration Building Telephone 454- 
2925 



Office of Campus Activities 

The Office of Campus Activities provides advising, consultation, and 
assistance to Campus organizations, in order to enhance the educational 
growth of leaders, members, and associates Efforts focus on 
establishing various Campus programs for the benefit of the University 
community The office maintains records pertaining to student activities 
and coordinates the resources of student groups and other Campus 
agencies to promote ongoing functions 

Office location: 1121 Student Union Building Telephone 454-5605 



20 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Commuter Affairs Office 

The Commuter Affairs Office has been established to assist, advocate, 
and assess commuter students' desires, needs, and problems while at- 
tending the University of Maryland. 

The office has established services which provide assistance in 
helping the commuter become more a part of the University community. 

Off-Campus Housing aids the student, faculty or staff member who Is 
seeking off-Campus housing, with listings. Information, free phone ser- 
vice and counsel on landlord-tenant problems. 

Car Pools. A car pool program has been established as a low cost alter- 
native to each student driving his own car. The students can sign up for 
the program at the beginning of each semester. If the car pool has three 
or more participants the students are eligible for preferred parking 
spaces The car pool can help to provide financial gains for the commuter 
and also provides the opportunity for social contact with other com- 
muters 

University Commuters Association. The Commuter Affairs Office 
serves as the advisor to the University Commuters Association which 
occupies a unique position in the structure of the University as the official 
undergraduate student organization which represents the commuters' in- 
terests. UCA has the responsibility of providing social, athletic, and ex- 
perimental programs for the commuters. 

Peer Commuter Counselors. This is a program to help new commuter 
students work through the problems and alienation often inherent in com- 
muting Upper class student volunteers have been trained as trouble 
shooters and helpers for the commuting student. Peer counselors are 
always present to assist other students with any concern. 

Shuttle Bus. The Campus Shuttle Bus system is operated by the Office 
of Commuter Affairs for the security and convenience of all students. 
Schedules are available at the Student Union Information Desk. The Of- 
fice of Commuter Affairs is located in Room 1 1 95 in the Student Union. 
Telephone: 454-5274. 

Counseling Center 

Psychologists provide professional counseling services for students 
with educational-vocational and emotional-social adjustment concerns. 
Educational specialists provide individual and group work for improving 
reading and study skills Call or come in to arrange an initial conference. 

The Center also offers a large variety of special counseling workshop 
programs on such topics as assertion training, exam skills, reducing 
smoking, vocational planning, and anxiety reduction. Other programs in- 
clude a series of self understanding and development groups. Brochures 
describing all these are available in the Center. 

Available in the reception lobby are occupational and educational in- 
formation, plus tape recorded conversations with academic department 
chairpersons about their disciplines. The Center provides consultation 
to a variety of groups and individuals concerning organizational develop- 
ment and group productivity. 

The Center produces a wide variety of research reports on charac- 
teristics of students and the campus environment. 

National testing programs (the CLEP, GRE, Miller Analogies, etc.) are 
administered by the Counseling Center as well as testing for counseling 
purposes. 

Office location: Shoemaker Building. Telephone: Counseling Services 
- 454-293 1 ; Reading & Study Skills Lab • 454-2935. 

Greek Life Office 

This office serves as the liaison between Maryland's 49 fraternity and 
sorority chapters and the University administration. The Office of Greek 
Life assists in the development of programs and operations for the 
Panhellenic and Interfraternity Councils. Through the utilization of total 
University resources, the staff assists the students with leadership and 
management training, the coordination of philanthropic projects, mem- 
bership recruitment, public relations and the participation of the Greek 
system within the total education of the University community. 

Office location: Student Union, Rm. 1115. Telephone: 454-2736. 

Health Services 

The University Health Center is located on Campus Drive directly 
across from the Student Union. Both graduate and undergraduate 
students are eligible for health care at the Health Center. Services 
provided include both emergency and routine medical care, mental health 
evaluation and treatment, health education, laboratory, x-ray, and 



gynecological services, and upon referral from a Health Center physician, 
dermatological and orthopedic services. 

Students can best be seen by calling the Health Center for an ap- 
pointment Students who are injured or are too III to wait for an ap- 
pointment can be seen on a walk-in basis Walk-in patients may en- 
counter a longer wait than appointment patients; however, emergencies 
always receive highest priority. 

The Health Center Is open 8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. weekdays, with a 
physician available in the building until 1 p.m. for urgent care. Weekend 
and summer school hours are posted, and emergencies are seen twenty- 
four hours a day During extended breaks and holidays, the Health Center 
is usually closed. 

In paying the health fee at registration, a student becomes eligible for 
routine medical care and professional services at the Health Center 
Charges however, are made for certain laboratory tests, all x-rays, casts 
and allergy injections. It should be noted that the mandatory health fee is 
not a form of health insurance 

It Is strongly recommended that each student maintain some type of 
Health Insurance coverage. Recognizing that many family medical plans 
do not provide coverage for college age students, the University has 
negotiated with a local insurance company to provide a voluntary com- 
prehensive student insurance for illness and accident in the range of up 
to $1,000 with a major medical provision of $15,000 for serious cases. 
These coverages are based generally on 80% of the direct cost. This 
policy provides benefits for hospital, surgery, emergency, laboratory, x- 
ray, and limited coverage for mental and nervous disorders. Family and 
maternity options are also available at an increased premium. 

For information call: 454-3444. Appointments: 454-4923. Mental 
Health: 454-4925. Women's Health: 454-4921. Health Education: 
454-4922. 



Judicial Programs Office 

The campus Judicial Programs Office effects discipline of un- 
dergraduate and graduate students on the College Park Campus. The 
Board of Regents has established the framework of a judiciary program 
which emphasizes personal growth and development The goals of 
judicial actions are largely educative and preventive. Office staff mem- 
bers review reports of alleged misconduct, contact those individuals in- 
volved, and, if necessary, schedule the case for an administrative 
hearing. In addition, the office lends assistance to different offices of the 
University In various policy and administrative matters, particularly those 
related to Student Affairs. The Office staff acts in a liaison capacity with 
the State Court System and various law enforcement and medical 
authorities as required. Office bcation: Second Floor North Ad- 
ministration Building. Telephone: 454-2927. 

General Policy. The University of Maryland Is a large educational in- 
stitution. It is also a community, and as such has the inherent right to 
preserve order and maintain stability by setting standards of conduct and 
prescribing procedures of the enforcement of those standards. The 
University of Maryland embraces the tenet that the exercise of individual 
rights must be accompanied by corresponding Individual responsibility. 
Thus, by accepting membership in the University community, the student 
acquires rights in, as well as responsibilities to, the entire University com- 
munity. 

University students are at once citizens in the larger community and 
members of an academic community. In the role as citizen, the student is 
free to exercise fundamental constitutional rights. Rights and respon- 
sibilities under local, state and national laws are neither abridged nor ex- 
tended by status as a student at the University of Maryland. However, as 
a member of an academic community, he or she is expected particularly 
to meet these behavioral requirements which attend his/her membership 
and which are required by the University's pursuit of its objectives. The 
fulfillment of the University's purpose can be carried on only in an at- 
mosphere of personal and academic freedom, one in which the rights and 
responsibilities of all members of the academic community are fully 
protected. The maintenance and/or restoration of such an atmosphere is 
the basis for a disciplinary structure within the University. 

Official University sanctions will be imposed or other appropriate action 
taken only when a student's observable behavior distinctly and 
significantly interferes with the University's primary educational ob- 
jectives and/or to the University's responsibilities for protecting the 
safety, welfare, rights, and property of all members of the University com- 
munity, persons coming on to the University property and of the Univer- 
sity itself. 

Students charged with violating University regulations or policies are 
guaranteed fundamental fairness in the handling of the charges, the con- 
duct of hearing, the imposition of sanctions, and the rights of appeal. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 21 



The University Judiciary Program. Discipline is properly the concern of 

the entire University community — the student body, the faculty, the 
staff, and the administration Particular provision is made in the Judiciary 
Program for students to adjudicate cases of student misconduct 

The staff of the Judicial Programs Office trains, directs and advises the 
efforts of students, faculty and staff in disciplinary concerns so as to 
meet the unique personal needs and legal rights of the student involved, 
as well as responding to the requirements of the community. In meeting 
that responsibility the Office's main functions are (1) interviewing and 
counseling students involved in disciplinary situations; (2) processing 
reports and correspondence which deal with disciplinary matters; (3) 
scheduling, coordinating and supervising activities of the various Judicial 
Boards; (4) reviewing and/ or approving the recommendations of these 
boards; (5) maintaining a central file of student disciplinary records 

Cases may be disposed of by administrative courts, termed Judicial 
Boards, or by Office staff The Judicial Boards are comprised of selected 
outstanding students who are empowered by the University to hear 
cases and recommend sanctions. 

General Statement of Student Responsibility. Students are expected 
to conduct themselves at all times in a manner consistent with the Univer- 
sity responsibility of ensuring to all members of its community the op- 
portunity to pursue their educational objectives, and of protecting the 
safety, welfare, rights, and property of all members of the community and 
of the University itself. 

Suspension of a Student From Class. Discipline in the classroom is the 
responsibility of the faculty member in charge of the class. Misbehavior 
which disrupts or interferes with the educational efficiency of a class is 
considered sufficient cause for suspending the student from that class. If 
a student is suspended from a class for disciplinary reasons, he/she 
must report immediately to the department chairperson. The department 
chairperson will investigate the incident and report it to the academic 
dean or division provost, and to the Judicial Affairs Office in order to 
determine whether past disciplinary action has been taken against the 
student. The department head will then write a letter to the student in- 
dicating the disposition of the case. The student is required to present 
this letter to his/her instructor for readmission to the class. A copy of this 
letter is sent to the Judicial Affairs Office for maintenance in its central 
disciplinary files. Disruption of a class by a student not enrolled in that 
class can be referred to the Judicial Affairs Office. Disruption by a non- 
student can be referred to the Campus Police. 

Suspension of a Student from Activities or University Facilities. The 

individual or group of individuals in charge of any department, division, 
organization, building, facility or any other area of the University (e.g.. 
dining hall, Student Union, etc.), shall be responsible for student 
discipline within such units. The person responsible for each such unit 
may suspend the student or student organization from the unit. The 
suspended student or representative of the student organization will be 
referred immediately to the Judicial Affairs Office. A file of such action 
shall be maintained in the Judicial Affairs Office. 

Transaction Plates. Official University of Maryland transaction plates are 
issued to all registered undergraduate and graduate students. The plate 
is for use only by the student to whom issued and may not be transferred 
or loaned to another for any reason. Violations will be referred to the 
Judicial Affairs Office. Loss of the transaction plate must be reported im- 
mediately to the ID. card section, Office of Admissions and Registrations 
A charge of $3 00 is made for duplicate cards. 



Orientation — Maryland Preview 

Upon admission to the University, the student will receive materials 
about Maryland Preview, the registration program offered by the Office of 
Orientation The primary goals of the program are to inform the student 
about the University and provide advisement and registration for the first 
semester Maryland Preview is conducted on the College Park Campus 
during the summer months and at other times during the year Each fresh- 
man will attend with a group of future classmates 

The new student will engage in: 

1. Formal and informal discussions about University life, and the stan- 
dards of performance that the University expects 

2. A conference with an academic advisor who will assist him or her in 
selecting and registering for courses 

Through this program, the entering student receives a personalized 
and individual introduction to the University Many of the sessions offered 
will be presented by undergraduate student advisors who have been 
carefully selected and trained to assist new students 

All entering freshmen are urged to attend 



Transfer Preview. A special program is offered for transfer students 
This Program includes a conference with advisors to explain academic 
requirements, registration for classes, and a general onentation to Cam- 
pus itself The program is particularly geared to the needs of up- 
perclassmen and their special concerns 

Parent Preview. Running concurrently with the summer programs for 
freshmen and transfer students is an orientation program for the parents 
of new students Here, parents have an opportunity to learn about the 
academic, cultural, and social aspects of University life from administra- 
tors and staff, as well as from the student advisors who lead the student 
group. 

Religious Programs 

A broad range of religious traditions is represented by the several 
chaplains and religious advisors at the University Individually and 
cooperatively, they offer many services including counseling, worship, 
student opportunities here and abroad, personal growth groups, and op- 
portunities for service and involvement Office location; University 
Memorial Chapel Telephone; 454-5783 

Resident Life 

This office administers, supervises and coordinates all aspects of the 
Campus residence halls facilities, including management operation and 
educational-social-recreational programming. 

Accommodations are in semi-autonomous residential communities 
which vary considerably with respect to hall architecture and facilities 
available. Each community is directed by a full-time professional and a 
staff of full- and part-time professional and para-professional personnel 
who help to insure that community programming, physical plant and ad- 
ministrative needs are met Staff work closely with supporting Campus 
agencies to provide services in accord with University and State ex- 
pectations Each community enjoys considerable freedom to develop in a 
manner which reflects the personalities, interests and needs of its 
residents 

Spaces made available by departing upperclass-persons are available 
to new students for housing Each year the number of spaces available to 
freshpersons and transfer students is limited and may not exceed 2 500 
spaces. Application is required, though any assumption that admission to 
the Campus or submission of a residence halls application guarantees or 
implies housing space is unwarranted. The likelihood of receiving a 
space by the start of classes and the advisability of pursuing other 
housing alternatives is provided each individual shortly after application 

Inquiries should be directed to Information Unit Department of 
Resident Life. 3117 North Administration Building. University of 
Maryland, College Park, 20742, (301 ) 454-271 1 . 



The Maryland Student Union 

The Maryland Student Union is the community center of the College 
Park Campus for all members of the University — students, faculty, staff 
alumni, and their guests The Union is not just a building; it is also an 
organization and a program The Union provides for the services, con- 
veniences, and amenities of the University. 

The Union was built and furnished without the help of state or federal 
funds. The building and furnishings with each stage of construction came 
from student fees Funds for operating expenses and additional fur- 
nishings came from student fees and various Union revenue producing 
avenues The Union pays for its own utilities and maintenance expenses 
It is. therefore, a self-supporting enterprise 
Building Hours: 

Monday-Thursday 7 am -12 Midnight 

Friday 7 am -1 am 

Saturday 8am -1 am 

Sunday 12 Noon- 12 Midnight 

Student Union Services and Facilities 
Services include 
Bookstore 
Bulletin Boards 
Campus Reservations 
Check Cashing 
Display Showcases 
Food Service 

Cafetena 

TortuQa Room 

Vending Room 

Banquets and Catering 



22 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Information Center 
Lounges 
Meeting Rooms 

Size trom 8-1 000 people 
Notary Publlc(s) 
Recreation Center 

Bowling Lanes 

Billards Room 

Table Games Rooms 

Pin Ball Machines 
Sign Shop 

Signs — plastic, letterpress, embossograt 

Duplicating — ditto, mmeograph offset 

Copy Machine 
Student Offices 

TV Room 

Ticket Office 
Campus Concerts 
Selected oft Campus events 

Tobacco Shop 

U S Postal Service Automated Facility 

William L Hoft Movie Theater 

Directory 

Information Center 454-2801 

Administrative 454-2807 

Bowling-Billiards 454-2804 



Program Office 

Reservations-Union 

Reservatlons-Campus/Chapel 

Sign Shop 

Ticket Office 

University Program Board 

Veterans Affairs 



454-4987 
454-2809 
454-4409 
454-5928 
454-2803 
454-4546 



Under a new program, three Veterans Administration counselors now 
work on Campus full time to assist veterans, their dependents, and ser- 
vice men with all VA related questions and problems These represen- 
tatives can otter you help in getting your monthly educational assistance 
checks, as well as other less known but available benefits Some of the 
other benefits you may be interested in are up to $720 in tutoring 
assistance; low-cost group life insurance; vocational rehabilitation ser- 
vices; educational loans of up to $800 per year; guaranteed home loans; 
and compensation for service-connected disabilities 

Related information, such as facts on individual state bonuses, removal 
of SPN codes from your military discharge (DD214). and University of 
Maryland Veterans Club activities, is also available for you. 

The counselors are available on a walk-in basis during normal office 
hours in Rooms 1130 or 2108, North Administration Building 
Telephone 454-5276. and 454-5734 



Office of Academic Affairs 



Student Aid 

The Office of Student Aid administers a variety of financial assistance 
and student employment opportunities, primarily based on the need of 
the applicant. The staff of the office is available for individual counseling 
on matters pertinent to the financial planning of the student body. 

See page 10 for more detailed information on opportunities for 
financial assistance. 

International Education Services 

The Office of International Education Services provides a wide variety 
of services designed to assist foreign students to make the necessary 
adjustment to American university and community life and to help them 
derive the maximum benefit from their experience in the United States. 
Services include advising on admission to the University, issuance of 
immigration documents, special orientation programs, emergency loans, 
assistance with securing housing, information about educational, cultural, 
and social opportunities, and personal advising. Some of these services 
are available also for visiting foreign faculty. For American students, the 
office provides information about opportunities for travel and study 
abroad. 

Information, forms and assistance in making necessary arrangements 
for complying with immigration regulations are available at the Office of 
International Education Services. Information regarding the filing of 
income tax returns may also be secured from the same office. 

Foreign students are subject to the same regulations that govern the 
academic life and personal conduct of American students enrolled in the 
University. Office location: 2nd floor, North Administration Building. 
Telephone: 454-3043/4. 



Office of the Administrative Dean 
for Undergraduate Studies 

General. The Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies has overall 
responsibility for undergraduate advisement on the departmental, college 
and divisional levels. The office maintains the Undergraduate Advisement 
Center with a staff of advisors for students who have not yet decided 
upon a major. Advisors are likewise available for students interested in 
pre-professional preparation for medicine, dentistry and law. Transfer of 
handicapped students with special academic problems can also be ad- 
vised through the office 

This office supervises a number of special academic programs, in- 
cluding the Bachelor of General Studies Degree Program, the General 
Honors Program and the Individual Studies Program. The office interprets 
and enforces academic requirements and regulations for undergraduates 
and administers the program of Credit by Examination. 

Academic service components of this office include the Office of 
Minority Student Education, the Career Development Center, and the Of- 



fice of Experiential Learning Programs (Cooperative Education, in- 
ternships, volunteer programs (PACE). 

The Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies is located in Room 
1 1 1 5 of the Undergraduate Library 

UMCP Career Development Center 

GENERAL The Career Development Center (CDC) encourages, sup- 
ports and assists students from all departments in considering early and 
systematically the questions which are central to career concerns: What 
is important to me? What career areas are possible lor me? What career 
areas are probable forme? 

Career Development Center programs and services are designed to be 
used most effectively by students beginning in the freshman year, and 
continuing throughout the college years. The student who begins early to 
put his or her Career Education options together will be in the best 
position to place himself/herself in a meaningful and rewarding position 
upon leaving the University of Maryland, College Park. 

The Career Development Center is located in Terrapin Hall. Telephone: 
454-2813 

CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

Educational - a course in Career Development and Decision Making 
(EDCP 108-D, 1 credit). Designed primarily for freshmen and sopho- 
mores, the course has the following objectives: to enable students to 
build a basis for effective career and life planning by increasing self- 
understanding, learning decision-making skills, identifying and utilizing 
career-related informational resources. 

Career Information -a basic resource for career exploration and 
decision making is the Career Library (Phone 454-4840). It contains 
comprehensive reference materials on varied aspects of work, 
education, lifestyles, career planning, career exploration and placement. 
Utilized by approximately 1 9,000 persons annually in recent years, the 
Career Library draws on the realism of the larger off-campus community. 
The Career Development Center also generates numerous printed and 
video-taped career materials available at the CDC, in Academic Division 
offices, and in the Non-Print Media Center on the fourth floor of the Un- 
dergraduate Library. 

The Career Development Center sponsors programs bringing em- 
ployers (full-time and summer) and graduate school representatives to 
Campus for informal discussions of opportunities. 

Career Advising -Experienced professionals assist students in iden- 
tifying career questions, strengths, interests, in developing career 
strategies and utilizing resources advantageously. Phone the Career 
Development Center at 454-281 3 to learn of intake advising hours or to 
arrange an appointment CDC Career Advisors also may be reached 
through the five Academic Division offices. 

Placement — The placement aspect of CDC services is designed to 
optimize the individual's effective transition from the University to another 
sector of society, whether it be work, specialized training, 
graduate /professional school, etc Placement services include: 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 23 



1. Workshops and/or Information In |ob-seeklng skills, resume' 
preparation, Interviewing skills. 

2. On-campus Interviews by employers, graduate schools, and em- 
ploying school systems (Phone 454-4582 for information) 

3. Job Listings In the Career Library 

4. Credentials Service for seniors In the College of Education and for 
graduate students seeking jobs In education administration or 
research. 

5. Comprehensive Job strategy Information In the Career Library 

Bachelor of General Studies Degree Program 

WHA T IS THE BQS PROGRAM? The Bachelor of General Studies degree 
(BQS) differs from other degrees In that It Is a degree without a con- 
centration In a specific discipline or department. It permits the student to 
obtain an education In as broad a set of disciplines or thought patterns as 
are offered at the College Park Campus, without Insisting that he or she 
adhere to a previously defined curriculum with a departmental or 
divisional orientation. 

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS? To receive a Bachelor of General 
Studies degree, a student must satisfy the following requirements: 

1 . A minimum of 1 20 credits must be accumulated with a grade point 
average of at least 2.0 in all courses. 

2. No more than 30 credits in any one department may be applied 
toward the required 1 20 credits. 

3. The courses taken must be distributed over at least three divisions 
with a maximum of 60 credits In any one division counted toward the 
required 120 credits. 

4. At least 45 credits must be taken at the upper level (courses num- 
bered 300 or higher); a 2.0 average must be obtained In all upper 
level courses. 

5. The student must be registered as only a Bachelor of General Studies 
major for at least the last 30 credits immediately preceding the award- 
ing of the degree. 

6. The student pursuing the BGS program shall be advised by a faculty 
member either appointed by or acceptable to the Dean of Un- 
dergraduate Studies. 

No other University degree requirements, such as General University 
Requirements, physical education, health, etc. apply to the BGS. 

WHAT KIND OF STUDENTS ARE IN THE BGS PROGRAM? Many of the 
over 600 BGS students are genuinely exploratory students — people 
who wish the broadest possible education and who wish to pick and 
choose their courses from a wide range of disciplines. Others are in- 
terested in a particular set of courses which are not available within a 
given major, and are essentially "designing their own major" within the 
broad framework of the BGS. Most of the BGS students are interested 
in the flexibility which the BGS program allows them. 

WHAT HAPPENS TO BGS STUDENTS WHEN THEY GRADUATE? The 
BGS is not designed to meet graduate school admission requirements or 
professional employment requirements. Therefore, the reception of an In- 
dividual student by graduate schools and employers depends on the 
student, what kind of a BGS program he or she has put together, and 
what type of school or employment he or she is applying for. A recent 
study of the first BGS graduates indicated that a large percentage went 
into business or government, some went on to professional school and 
the remainder were in a variety of occupations. 

HOW DO I APPLY? See Dr. Judith Sorum, Assistant Dean for Un- 
dergraduate Studies, in 1 1 1 5 Undergraduate Library, X2530/31 . 

Office of Experiential Learning Programs. The Office of Experiential 
Learning Programs (ELP) supervises three types of learning opportunities 
Involving participation in the work of the community and the Campus. 
These programs encourage students to test classroom learning in work 
situations, explore career possibilities by direct participation, or enhance 
their personal development through work and volunteer experiences 
The programs Include: 

1. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM IN LIBERAL ARTS AND 
BUSINESS. This program allows students to alternate on-campus 
study with between sixteen and twenty weeks of paid work ex- 
perience in business, industry, and government agencies To be 
eligible, students must have completed 36 hours of undergraduate 
work with a 2.0 grade point average It should be noted, however, that 
most employees select on a competitive basis 

2. INTERNSHIPS AND FIELD EXPERIENCE COURSES. Many academic 
departments offer opportunities for students to earn academic credit 
(usually 3-6 hours) through participation in activities m the community, 
accompanied by an appropriate academic product stemming from the 
experience. ELP will help students to match their interests with 



existing courses and community placements and find departments 
willing to sponsor activities proposed by students The Office also 
assists departments In finding suitable placements for students 

3 PACE (PEOPLE ACTIVE IN COMMUNITY EFFORT). PACE Is a 
student-organized program which provides educationally valuable 
volunteer community service projects With funding from the Student 
Government Association, PACE arranges for transportation to the 
volunteer site, develops student leadership, and acts as a liaison with 
the community, PACE'S focus Is upon fulfilling students' needs 
through service/ learning projects. 

Information about all three of these programs may be obtained through 
the Office of Experiential Learning Programs Undergraduate Library 
4767 

Individual Studies Program 

WHAT IS INDIVIDUAL STUDIES? Individual Studies is often called the 
"design your own major" program It is open to students at UMCP who 
can, with faculty assistance, design a sequence of formal and/or informal 
learning experiences, satisfactory completion of which Is appropriate for 
the awarding of a BA or BS degree, and whose educational goals cannot 
be reasonably achieved within an existing UMCP curriculum. A student 
who graduates In the program is awarded a degree in Individual Studies. 
with the name of the individualized major printed on the transcript. 

HOW DO I APPLY? You apply by submitting a wntten prospectus which 
has the support and approval of a faculty tutor, to the Individual Studies 
Review Committee Once the prospectus is approved by the committee, 
It becomes your "contract" for a degree. It Is to the Individual Studies 
student what the catalog is to other majors. 

WHAT ARE THE REQUIREMENTS? Students in the Individual Studies 
Program must: 

1 . Complete at least 1 20 academic credits with a grade point average of 
"C" or better 

2. Meet the General University Requirements 

3. Include in their program at least 1 2 hours of formal course work num- 
bered 300 or above, not including the General University 
Requirements nor IVSP 31 9 (tutorial report). 

4 Include in their program one credit of IVSP 319 (tutorial report) for 
each semester in which they are full-time students in the program 

5. If the program is 40% or more informal learning experiences (directed 
studies, internship, research, etc.) the student must complete a three 
credit Bachelor's paper (IVSP 320) The Bachelor's paper is strongly 
recommended for all IVSP students. 

Admission to the program must be officially approved by the Individual 
Studies Review Committee, made up of three faculty members, pnor to 
the final thirty semester hours of the proposed curriculum. 

WHAT ABOUT CHANGES? The student is free to change into or out of 
the Individual Studies Program at any time within the limits of the 
regulations for admission which are listed above To assure assignment 
of proper credit for students transferring out of the Individual Studies 
Program, all work will be graded on a semester-by-semester basis 

Change of tutor may become necessary because of changing staff at 
the University. Any change in program must be submitted in writing to the 
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies and approved in order to 
become part of the student's program 

IS INDIVIDUAL STUDIES AN HONORS PROGRAM? No ISP is open to 
any student who wishes to design his or her own major. There is no grade 
point requirement for admission The students who are in the program 
tend to be rather clear about their academic goals, self-motivated, able to 
work without a lot of direct supervision, and particularly interested m out- 
of-classroom learning experiences (research, directed studies, in- 
ternships, etc.). 

WHERE DO I START? Students Interested in applying to the program 
should discuss their ideas for a program with Dr Judith Sorum, Assistant 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies. Room 1115 Undergraduate Library. 
X2530/31. 

MINORITY STUDENT EDUCATION. The Office of Minority Student 
Education was officially created on July 1 . 1 972 as a result of proposals 
and recommendations submitted to the chancellor from the Campus 
Black Community and the Study Commission on Student Life It is 
responsible for addressing the needs of minority students during their ex 
perience at the University of Maryland This responsibility takes the Of 
flee of Minority Student Education through a broad range of concerns, 
from the introduction of minonty students to the University to special sup 
portive programs, with special emphasis on the areas of recruitment 
retention and graduation. 



24 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



OMSE seeks to develop a comprehensive academic articulation 
program that will facilitate better utilization of. and linkages with existing 
University resources This includes providing minority students with 
meaningful career advisement in areas that offer both good job op- 
portunities and good salaries For general program information, contact: 
Director. Office of Minority Student Education. Room 3151 Un- 
dergraduate Library, Phone 454-4901 . 

The office is directly responsible tor the administration of the 
Nyumburu Community and the Minority Advisement Program (MAP) 
Minority Advisement Program {MAP) 

The following is a brief description of the programs administered by the 
Office of Minority Student Education 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY RECRUITMENT PROGRAM The Equal 
Opportunity Recruitment Program (EORP) is the minority recruitment 
unit within the Office of Minority Student Education Primarily through 
EORP. the University seeks to achieve a more representative minority 
student population among blacks. Spanish-speaking, native Americans, 
and Asian Americans 

After making the admissions decision of student applications, EORP 
staff aids in processing students with information on financial aid and 
supportive services. EORP staff will provide any information to students 
interested in making application Contact: Equal Opportunity Recruitment 
Program. Office of Minority Student Education, Room 0107. North 
Administration Building. Phone: 454-4009/454-4844. 

NYUMBURU COMMUNITY CENTER. Nyumburu (Swahili word 
meaning "freedom house") Cente' functions throughout the year to 
present a wide range of cultural events through a variety of art forms and 
the humanities Programs and activities presented by Nyumburu focus on 
the black experience as it exists in the United States, Caribbean and 
Africa 

Cultural offerings at Nyumburu include symposia and workshops con- 
ducted by visiting artists and scholars in the areas of creative writing and 
literature, art. music, drama and dance. A Festival of Black Arts, and a 
Writer's Conference, held annually, highlight specific areas of cultural 
achievement and contribution by minority peoples. 

In cooperation with the Department of Afro-American Studies, Nyum- 
buru is engaged in research projects, such as examining the sources of 
black creativity and historical contributions, and the artist's conception of 
his or her role in the life of the community. 

In addition to these activities. Nyumburu Center serves as the 
host/sponsor of several student clubs and activities. 

For information concerning scheduled activities and events contact 
Nyumburu Community Center, Building CC. University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland 20742; Phone: 454-5774. 

THE MINORITY ADVISEMENT PROGRAM (MAP) is an advisement pro- 
gram that features minority peer advisors who are trained to assist stu- 
dents in choosing a major, planning a career, applying to graduate or 
professional school, or just plowing through red tape. Referral to specific 
offices and agencies both on and off campus is a major responsibility of 
MAP staff MAP staff are trained in a specially designed course de- 
veloped and taught by OMSE personnel. For information concerning 
MAP, contact the OMSE office at 454-4901 . 

Undergraduate Advisement Center. Many University students choose 
to be "undecided" about their choice of major. Some want a lot more in- 
formation about job opportunities before choosing: some may be con- 
sidering several possible majors; some are trying out a variety of cour- 
ses; some just really don't know what to choose. 

Whatever their reason for wanting to be "undecided", these students 
have an administrative home in the Undergraduate Advisement Center. 
From the center's staff of advisors they can obtain much of the as- 
sistance they'll need for career decision-making, academic planning, 
scheduling, course selection, and a variety of other services. 

OTHER SERVICES 

Pre-Professional Advising: offering pre-professional advising 
programs in the Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental, and Pre-Law areas; 

Trouble Shooting: trouble shooting for individual students who are 
having difficulty with administrative procedural problems, such as trans- 
fer-credit evaluation, schedule revisions, changing Divisions/ Colleges/ 
Departments, errors in official records, etc; 

Policy Interpretation: keeping advisors informed about new academic 
policies and helping to interpret existing policies and practices. This ser- 
vice is available to individual students when they come to see us; 

Information: maintaining a central file of information about academic 
programs and requirements on the College Park Campus; 

Coordinated Problem-Solving: coordinating the campus-wide system 
of advising, including helping individual students with specific advising 
problems; 



Credit-By-Exam: administenng the campus-wide program of credit- 
by-exam in ation 

General Assistance: giving assistance to a lot of students with dif- 
ferent kinds of problems and concerns 

Undergraduate Advisement Center. Room 3151, Undergraduate 
Ubrary, Phone 454-2733 or 454-3040; Pre-Professional Programs (Pre- 
Dent/Pre-Med. Pre-Law) 454-5425. Credit-By-Exam/CLEP/Advanced 
Placement, 454-2731 

Undergraduate Degree Programs. One r,,ajor advantage of attending a 
university campus is the broad range of programs available This diversity 
allows the student to change from one major to another without leaving 
the institution, to choose from a wide spectrum of elective courses, and 
to benefit from daily contact with students of diverse academic interests 
and backgrounds. 



The undergraduate majors available at the College Park are as follows 



Accounting 

Aerospace Engineering 

Afro-American Studies 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agricultural, General 

Agronomy 

American Studies 

Animal Sciences 

Anthropology 

Architecture 

Art History 

An Studio 

Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Business, General 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry 

Civil Engineering 

Comparative Literature 

Computer Science 

Conservation and Resource Development 

Cooperative Engineering Program 

Dance 

Early Childhood and Elementary Education 

Economics 

Education 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering, Undesignated 

English 

Entomology 

Family and Community Development 

Finance 

Fire Protection 

Food, Nutrition and Institutional Administration 

Food Science 

French 

General Studies 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Government and Politics 

Health Education 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

History 

Home Economics Education 

Horticulture 

Housing and Applied Design 

Industrial Education 

Industrial Technology 

Information Systems Management 

Journalism 

Kinesiological Sciences 

Latin 

Library Science Education 

Law Enforcement and Criminology 

Management Science-Statistics 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Engineering 

Microbiology 

Music 



Personnel and Labor Relations 

Philosophy 

Production Management 

Psychology 

Physical Education 

Physical Sciences 

Physics 

Recreation 

Russian 

Russian Area Studies 

Secondary Education 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Special Education 

Speech and Dramatic Art 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 

Transportation 

Urban Studies 

Zoology 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 25 



Special Opportunities 

Advanced Placement. Students entering the University from secondary 
school may obtain advanced placement and college credit on the basis of 
their performance on the College Board Advanced Placement 
examinations These examinations are normally given to eligible high 
school seniors during the May preceding matriculation in college 

For achievement ot a score of five or four on a given examination, the 
student will be granted Advanced Placement and the credit equivalent of 
two semester courses in that field; for achievement of a score of three, 
Advanced Placement and the credit equivalent of either one or two 
semester courses, depending upon the field of the examination, will be 
granted 

Credit earned by Advanced Placement may be used to meet major, 
minor, elective or General University Requirements. The University ac- 
cepts the Advanced Placement Examinations in the following areas: 
biology, chemistry, English, French. German, history, Latin, mathematics, 
physics and Spanish 

Questions about the program may be addressed to the Director of Ad- 
missions and Registrations, or the Dean for Undergraduate Studies For 
detailed information about examinations and procedures in taking them, 
write to Director of Advanced Placement Program, College Entrance 
Examination Board, 475 Riverside Drive. New York. New York 10027. 

Concurrent Undergraduate-Graduate. A senior at the University of 
Maryland who is within seven hours of completing the requirements for 
the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his or her provost 
or dean, the chairman of the department concerned, and the Graduate 
School, register in the undergraduate division for graduate courses, 
which may later be counted for graduate credit toward an advanced 
degree at this University. The total of undergraduate and graduate 
courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the semester. Excess credits 
in the senior year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper pre- 
arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to take advantage of this oppor- 
tunity must formally apply for admission to the Graduate School. 

Honors Programs. A number of unusual opportunities are available to the 
superior student through the establishment of Honors Program's Under 
the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies, a General Honors 
Program is available to qualified students throughout the Campus. In ad- 
dition, departmental honors programs are offered to qualified majors in 27 
academic departments. 

General Honors, as its name suggests, enlarges the breadth of the 
student's generalized knowledge; Departmental Honors increases the 
depth of the student's knowledge in his or her major discipline. Both offer 
the student challenging academic experiences characterized by small 
sections, active student participation, and an Honors faculty that en- 
courages dialogue Individually guided research, field experience and in- 
dependent study are important aspects of Honors work. 

Each year a selected group of entering freshmen is invited into the 
General Honors Program on the basis of high school records, standard- 
ized test scores, and personal attachments. Students majoring within 
any department, college, or division are eligible to apply to General 
Honors 

Departmental Honors Programs ordinarily begin in the junior year, 
although a few programs begin as early as the freshman year. 

The student who completed his Honors curriculum successfully is 
graduated with a citation in General or Departmental Honors, or with both. 

The student who completed his or her Honors curriculum successfully 
is graduated with a citation in General or Departmental Honors, or with 
both 

Interested high school students should write to Dr. John Portz. Direc- 
tor. Honors Office, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742 



Honor Societies. Students who excel in scholarship and leadership may 
be invited to join the appropriate honor society These include 

• Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociologyl 

• Alpha Lambda Delta (Scholarship — Freshman Women) 
Alpha Sigma Lambda (Adult Education) 

Alpha Zeta (Agnculture) 

Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting Major in Business and Management) 

Beta Gamma Sgma (Business and Management) 

• Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 
Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

• Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 
Gamma Theta Upsilon (Georgraphy) 
lota Lambda Sigma (Industrial Education) 
Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

• Mortar Board (Women's Scholarship and Leadership) 
Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

• Omicron Delta Kappa (Men's Scholarship and Leadership) 
Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Phi Alpha Epsibn (Physical Education, Recreation and Health) 

• Phi Alpha Theta (History) 
Phi Beta Kappa (Uberal Arts) 
Phi Delta Kappa (Educational) 

• Phi Eta Sigma (Scholarship — Freshmen Men) 

• Phi Kappa Phi (Senior and Graduate Scholarship) 
"Phi Sigma (Biology) 

• Phi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 

Pi Sigma Phi (Business and Management) 

Pi Alpha Xi (Floriculture) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 

Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 
•Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) 
•Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering) 

Sgma Alpha Iota (Women's Music) 

Sigma Alpha Omicron (Microbiology) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Society ot Professional Journalists) 

Sigma Phi Alpha (Dental Hygiene) 

• Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics) 
"Tau Beta Pi (Engmeenng) 

• Members of Association of College Honor Societies 

Commencement Honors. Honors for excellence in scholarship are 
awarded to not more than ten percent (10%) of the graduating class in 
each degree granting unit Summa Cum Laude is offered to the highest 
two percent (2%) Magna Cum Laude to the next three percent (3%), and 
Cum Laude to the next five percent (5%) To be eligible for this 
recognition, a total of at least five percent (5%). To be eligible for this 
recognition, a total of at least two years of residence (60 semester hours) 
is required (The computation does not include grades for courses taken 
during the last semester of registration before graduation.) No student 
with an average less than 3.00 will be considered. 

Women's Studies 

The Office of Women's Studies was created in January 1974 to en- 
courage and assist departments in developing course offenngs in wom- 
en's studies and in publicizing such courses The coordinator also advises 
students wishing to plan individual programs incorporating Women's 
Studies courses In cooperation with staff members of McKeldm 
and the Undergraduate libraries, the Office for Women's Studies en- 
courages acquisition of holdings in this new field of research and helps 
in publicizing library services to students and faculty working in this field 

The office also maintains liaison with various women's organizations 
both on- and off-Campus and assists with programs and conferences of 
particular interest to women All of these activities are supported by the 
Advisory Committee on Women's Studies, a policy-making body whose 
membership includes students, faculty, and library staff 

The office is located at 4102 Foreign Languages Building Phone 
454-3841. 



Awards and Prizes 

Academic Awards 



Milton Abramowitz Memorial Prize in Mathematics. A prize is awar- 
ded annually to a junior or senior student majoring in mathematics who 
has demonstrated superior competence and promise for future develop- 
ment in the field of mathematics and its applications 

Agricultural Alumni Award. Presented to a senior who during his or 
her college career contributed most toward the advancement of the 
College of Agriculture 



Agricultural Engineering Department's Outstanding Senior Award 

is presented to a student in Agricultural Engmeenng on the basis of 
scholastic performance, participation in ASAE National Student Branch, 
and other extra-curricular activities 

AIA Medal. Awarded annually by the Amencan Institute of Architects 
to a graduating student of Architecture for outstanding overall academic 
achievement 

AIA Certificate. Awarded annually by the Amencan Institute of Ar 
chitects to a graduating student of Architecture for academic achieve- 
ment 



26 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Allied Chemical Scholarship Award is presented to a student in 
Chemical Engineering on the basis of intellectual capacity, scientific 
ability, breadth of interest and leadership qualities 

Alpha Chi Sigma Award. The Alpha Rho Chapter ot the Alpha Chi 
Sigma Honorary Fraternity otters annually a year's membership in the 
American Chemical Society to a senior majoring in Chemistry or 
Chemical Engineering whose average has been above 3 for three and 
one-half years 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. Presented to the senior member of the 
group who has maintained the highest average for three and a half years 
She must have been in attendance in the institution for the entire time 

Alpha Lambda Delta Senior Certificate Award. Senior members of 
Alpha Lambda Delta, honorary scholastic society for women, who have 
maintained an average of 3 5 receive this certificate 

Alpha Rho Chi Medal. Awarded annually by the Alpha Rho Chi frater- 
nity for architecture and the allied professions to a graduating student of 
architecture who has made a distinctive contribution to school life, em- 
bodying the ideaJs of professional service and leadership 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Professional Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha 
Zeta awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman 
class who maintains the highest average in academic work 

Alumni Hamilton Award. This award is offered by the Engineering 
Alumni Chapter to the graduating senior in the College of Engineering 
who has most successfully combined proficiency in his or her major field 
of study with achievements — either academic, extra-curricular, or both 
— in the social sciences of humanities. 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Award. Free 
memberships in the Institute for one year and cash prizes for the best 
paper presented at a Student Branch meeting and for the graduating 
aeronautical senior with the highest academic standing. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award. A certificate, pin 
and magazine subscription are awarded to the junior member of the 
Student Chapter who attained the highest overall scholastic average 
during his or her freshman and sophomore years. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award is presented by 
the National Capital Section to an outstanding sophomore chemical 
engineering student 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Professional 
Achievement Award is presented by the National Capital Section to an 
outstanding senior chemical engineering student. 

American Institute of Chemists Award. Presented for outstanding 
scholarship in chemistry and for high character. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually the first year's 
dues of an associate membership in the Society to a senior member of 
the Student Chapter on recommendation of the faculty of the Department 
of Civil Engineering. 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers Senior Award. Pre- 
sented to the senior member who has contributed most to the local 
chapter 

American Society for Testing Materials. Two student awards are 
given annually to engineering seniors in recognition of superior 
scholastic ability and demonstrated interest in engineering materials and 
their evaluation. 

Appleman-Norton Award in Botany to a senior major in Botany who is 
considered worthy on the basis of demonstrated ability and excellence in 
scholarship. 

Awards for Excellence in Teaching Spanish. Presented by the 
Department of Spanish and Portuguese to the three graduate assistants 
who have most distinguished themselves by the excellence of their 
teaching. 

Awards for Excellence in the Study of Spanish. Presented by the 
Department of Spanish and Portuguese to the three members of the 
graduating class who have most distinguished themselves as students 
of Spanish language and literature. 

David Arthur Berman Memorial Award is presented to two students 
majoring in Chemical Engineering with the highest cumulative scholastic 
averages at the end of the first semester of their junior year and who 
have been elected to Tau Beta Pi. 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest 
scholastic average of his or her class in the College of Engineering This 
medal is given by Mr. Benjamin Berman. 

B'nai B'rith Award. The B'nai B'nth Women of Prince George's Coun- 
ty present a Book award for Excellence in Hebrew Studies 

The Donald T. Booney Honors Award is presented to the Chemical 
Engineering student who has made the most outstanding contribution to 
the profession as a member of the Honors Society, Omega Chi Epsilon. 

Business Education Award of Merit to a student in Business 
Education in recognition of outstanding achievement as a student 

Citizenship Prize For Men. An award presented annually as a 
memorial to the late President Emeritus H. C. Byrd to that male member of 



the senior class who during his collegiate career has most nearly typified 
the model citizen and has contributed significantly to the general ad- 
vancement of the interests of the University 

Citizenship Prize For Women. An award presented annually as a 
memorial to Sally Sterling Byrd to that female member of the senior class 
who during her collegiate career has most nearly typified the model 
citizen and has contributed significantly to the general advancement of 
the interests of the University 

CRC Engineering Science Achievement Award is presented to a 
junior in the College of Engineering for outstanding scholarship, leader- 
ship, and service 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers 
awards a cash prize of twentv-five dollars to the senior in the Collerje of 
Engineering who. in the opinion of the faculty, has made the greatest 
improvement in scholarship during his or her stay at the University 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the 
woman who attains the highest average in academic work during the 
sophomore year. 

Delta Gamma Scholarship Award. This award is offered to the 
woman member of the graduating class who has maintained the highest 
average during three and one-half years at the University 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. Awarded to the senior with the 
highest overall scholastic average in the College of Business and 
Management 

Distinguished Accounting Student Awards. Awarded by the University 
of Maryland chapter of Beta Alpha Psi and the accounting faculty to the 
ten senior accounting students with the highest scholastic average in Ac- 
counting in the College of Business and Management. 

Nathan L. Drake Award. Presented by the Alpha Rho Chapter of 
Alpha Chi Sigma to the most promising student who is majoring in 
chemistry and has completed the sophomore year. 

Education Alumni Award. Presented to the outstanding senior man 
and senior woman in the College of Education 

Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Association Award is 
presented to an undergraduate in Electrical Engineering in recognition of 
outstanding service and leadership. 

Engineering Alumni Chapter Award is presented to a senior in the 
College of Engineering for outstanding scholarship and service to the 
College of Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Senior Award is presented to a senior in 
Electrical Engineering for outstanding scholastic achievement and ser- 
vice to the society and department. 

Wesley Gewehr Award. Phi Alpha Theta, History honorary, offers a 
cash award each year for the best undergraduate paper and the best 
graduate paper written on an historical topic. The entrance paper must be 
recommended by the history faculty of the University of Maryland. 

Forbes Chocolate Leadership Award of Cleveland. Ohio, presents a 
$1 00 leadership award to a major in Food Science 

Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the male resident of Prince George's County born 
therein, who makes the highest average in his studies and who at the 
same time embodies the most manly attributes. The medal is given by 
Mrs. Anne G. Goddard James of Washington, DC. 

Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards. The University Theatre 
recognizes annually the man and woman members of the senior class 
who have done most for the advancement of dramatics at the University. 

P. Arne Hansen Memorial Award. Presented to the Outstanding 
Departmental Honors Student in Microbiology 

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Awards. Categones; general 
news, features, editorials, investigative reporting, spot news 

Robert M. Higginbotham Memorial Award. Award to an outstanding 
lunior student majoring in Mathematics. 

Home Economics Alumni Award. Presented to the female student 
outstanding in application of home economics in her present living and 
who shows promise of carrying these into her future home and com- 
munity. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Award. The 
Washington Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers defrays the expenses of a year's membership as an associate 
in the institute for the senior doing the most to promote student branch 
activities. 

Joe Elbert James Memorial Award. Gold watch annually awarded to 
the graduating senior in horticulture on basis of scholarship and promise 
of future achievement. 

Charles Manning Prize in Creative Arts. Awarded annually Jo a 
University of Maryland student for achievement in the creative or per- 
forming arts. 

Maryland-Delaware Press Association Annual Citation. Presented 
to the outstanding senior in journalism. 

GENERAL INFORMATION / 27 



Maryland Recreation and Parks Society Award to outstanding senior 
majoring in recreation 

The Men's League Award to the male senior who gave the most to 
sports. 

Men's League Certificates. Offered for outstanding achievement, 
character and service to the University. 

Merf's League Cup. This award is offered by the Men's League to the 
graduating male senior who has done the most for the male student body 

Motor Fleet Supervisors Award to a student majoring in transportation 
in the College of Business and Management 

National Society of Fire Protection Engineers Awards. Presented to 
the most outstanding senior and sophomore in the fire protection 
curriculum 

Omlcron Nu Sorority Medal. This honorary society awards a medal 
annually to the freshman woman in the College of Home Economics who 
attains the highest scholastic average during the first semester. 

L. W. Parker Memorial Award. Presented annually to a graduating 
student of Architecture for outstanding architectural craftsmanship 

Phi Beta Kappa Junior Award. An award to be presented to the junior 
initiate into Phi Beta Kappa who has attained the highest academic 
average 

Phi Beta Kappa — Leon P. Smith Award. The award of the Gamma of 
Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa is presented to the initiate senior 
with the highest cumulative scholastic average whose basic course 
program has been in the liberal studies. 

Phi Chi Theta Key. The Phi Chi Theta Key is awarded to the out- 
standing graduating senior woman in the College of Business and 
Management on the basis of scholarship, activities and leadership. 

Phi Sigma Awards for outstanding achievement in biological sciences 
to an undergraduate student and a graduate student. 

Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Sophomore Award. Presented to the 
most outstanding sophomore in Mechanical Engineering on the basis of 
scholastic average and instructors' ratings. 

Pi Tau Sigma Memorial Award. Presented to the senior in 
Mechanical Engineering who has made the most outstanding contribution 
to the University 

Public Relations Society of America. The Baltimore Chapter of PRSA 
presents an annual citation to the outstanding senior majoring in public 
relations 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This award is presented to a senior 
student majoring in microbiology for high scholarship, character and 
leadership. 

Sigma Delta Chi Citation. For Achievement at the University of 
Maryland. 

Sigma Delta Pi Award. Presented by the Department of Spanish and 
Portuguese to the graduating member of Sigma Delta Pi (National Spanish 
Honor Society) who has rendered the greatest service to the Delta 
(University of Maryland) Chapter 

Dr. Leo and Rita Sklar General Honors Awards. Dr. Leo Sklar, A&S 
'37, and his wife, Rita Sklar, annually fund awards for excellence in the 
General Honors Program These awards are given to outstanding stu- 
dents in the General Honors Program 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. The New York Southern Society, 
in memory of its first president, awards annually medallions and certifi- 
cates to one man and one woman in the graduating class and one non- 
student who evince in their daily life a spirit of love for and helpfulness to 
other men and women. 

Tau Beta Pi Sophomore Improvement Award is presented to the 
junior in the College of Engineering who during the sophomore year has 
made the greatest percentage of possible improvement in scholarship 
over that of his or her freshman year. 

Tau Beta PI Award. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi 
Association, national engineering honor society, awards an engineer's 
handbook to the junior in the College of Engineering who during his or 
her sophomore year has made the greatest improvement in scholarship 
over that of his or her freshman year. 

The Homer Ulrich Award. The Homer Ulrich Honors Awards in Per- 
formance are presented each spring in honor of Homer Ulrich Professor 
Emeritus and former Chairman of the Music Department Three un- 
dergraduate and three graduate performers are selected in a depart- 
mental competition to appear in a specially designated honors recital and 
to receive an honorarium. 

Wall Street Journal Achievement Award. An award to the out- 
standing student in investments and security analysis in the College of 
Business and Management 

James P. Wharton Art Award Fund. This fund was endowed by the 
former head of the Art Department, Colonel James P Wharton An annual 
award of $200 00 is given to a senior for special achievement in Studio 
Art 



Athletic Awards 

Atlantic Coast Conference Award. A plaque is awarded each year to 
a senior m each conference school for excellence in scholarship and 
athletics 

The Alvln L. Aublnoe Basketball Trophy. This trophy is given in 
memory of Alvin L Aubinoe for the senior who has contributed most to 
the squad 

The Alvin L. Aubinoe Football Trophy. This trophy is given in 
memory of Alvin L Aubinoe for the unsung hero of the current season 

The Alvin L. Aubinoe Track Trophy. This trophy la given in memory ot 
Alvin L Aubinoe for the senior who has contributed most to the squad 
during the time the student was on the squad 

Bob Beall-Tommy Marcos Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the best 
football lineman of the year 

John T. Bell Swimming Award. To the year's outstanding swimmer or 
diver 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. Presented to the outstanding senior 
baseball player 

Andrew M. Cohen Tennis Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the 
member of the tennis team who, judged by members ot the team, con- 
tributed the most to tennis. 

William P. Cole, III, Memorial Lacrosse Award. This award, offered 
by the teammates of William P Cole. Ill, and the coaches of the 1940 
National Champion team, is presented to the outstanding midfielder 

The George C. Cook Memorial Scholarship Trophy. Awarded an- 
nually to a member of the football team with the highest scholastic 
average. 

Joe Deckman-Sam Silver Trophy. This trophy is offered by Joseph H 
Decker and Samuel L. Silver to the most improved defense lacrosse 
player 

Geary F. Eppley Award. Offered by Benny and Hotsy Alperstem to 
the graduating male senior athlete who during his three years of varsity 
competition, lettered at least once and attained the highest over-all 
scholastic average. 

Halbert K. Evans Memorial Track Award. This award, given in 
memory of "Hermie" Evans, of the Class of 1 940, by his friends, is 
presented to a graduating member of the track team 

Jack Faber-AI Heagy Unsung Hero Award. Presented to the player 
who best exemplifies determination, will to win, and pride in ac- 
complishment 

Tom Fields Award. This award is given to the most important member 
of the Cross Country team based on the qualities ol leadership, 
dedication to excellence, attitude, and personal achievement 

Herbert H. Goodman Memorial Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the 
most outstanding wrestler of the year. 

Jim Kehoe Ring Award. A Maryland Ring is awarded to the member of 
the track team whose dedication to excellence most closely exemplifies 
that of Jim Kehoe. one of Maryland's greatest trackmen 

Charles Leroy Mackert Trophy. This trophy is offered by William K 
Krouse to the Maryland student who has contributed most to wrestling 
whille at the University. 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is offered as a memonal to Charles 
L Linhardt. of the Class of 1 91 2. to the Maryland man who is adjudged 
the best athlete of the year. 

Charles P. McCormick Trophy. This trophy is given in memory of 
Charles P. McCormick to the senior member of the swimming team who 
has contributed most to swimming during the swimmer's collegiate 
career. 

Edwin Powell Trophy. This trophy is offered by the Class ot 1 9 1 3 to 
the player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the 
year. 

Silvester Watch for Excellence in Athletics. A gold watch given in 
honor of former President of the University. R W Silvester, is offered an- 
nually to "the man who typifies the best in college athletics ." 

TEKE Trophy. This trophy is offered by the Maryland Chapter of Tau 
Kappa Epsilon Fraternity to the student who during four years at the 
University has rendered the greatest service to football 

Robert E. Theofeld Memorial. This trophy is presented by Dr and 
Mrs Harry S Hoffman and is awarded to the goiter who most nearly 
exemplifies the competitive spirit and strong character of Robert E 
Theofeld. a former member of the boxing team 

The Dr. Reginald Van Trump Truitt Award. This award is given to a 
senior attackman in lacrosse (midfield or attack) tor scholastic at- 
tainments and team performance 

University of Maryland Swimming Association Scholar Athlete 
Award. This award is given to the swimmer who has compiled the best 
combination academic and aquatic record 



28 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



Air Force ROTC Awards 

Aerospace Education Foundation W. Randolph Lovelace Memorial 
Award: Recognizes the most outstanding Air Force Association Award 
winner from each ot the seven geographical areas 

Air Force Association Award to the outstanding senior cadet who has 
excelled In field training, possesses individual leadership characteristics, 
ranks in the upper 1 0% ot his or her class in the university and the upper 
5% ot his or her ROTC class, and has outstanding promotion potential. 

Air Force Historical Foundation Award to an AFROTC cadet/com- 
missionee in recognition ot leadership, citizenship, academic 
achievement, and military performance Award Is a $1 000 scholarship for 
graduate study in a field beneticial to Air Force and American Aviation 
Technology. 

Air Force ROTC Field Training Awards: Awarded at field training for 
outstanding performance in specific areas of field training Awards in- 
clude AFROTC Commandant's Award; AFROTC Vice Commandant's 
Award; AFROTC Athletic Award; AFROTC Marksmanship Award; 
AFROTC Academic Achievement Award Air Force ROTC Sponsored 
Awards to cadets who have excelled in specific areas. Included are; 
AFROTC Superior Performance Ribbon; AFROTC Leadership Ribbon; 
AFROTC Distinctive GMC Cadet Ribbon; AFROTC Honors Ribbon; 
College Scholarship Recipient Ribbon; and Category IP, IN, and IM Rib- 
bons. 

Air Force ROTC Valor Awards to cadets for voluntary act of valor (Gold 
valor award) involving physical risk without regard to personal safety or to 
a cadet for voluntary act of valor (Silver valor award) requiring strength of 
mind or spirit to react promptly and correctly in a critical situation. 

Alumni Cup presented to the second semester Air Science senior 
cadet who has achieved the highest cumulative grade point average 
within the Corps of Cadets. 

American Defense Preparedness Association Award: Presented to 
the outstanding senior cadet who has an academic average which places 
him or her in the upper half of his or her entire class at the University, has 
received no grade in the advanced ROTC courses less than B, is in upper 
20% of total senior enrollment at the University of Maryland, has par- 
ticipated actively in athletics and/ or campus activities, and has demon- 
strated outstanding leadership qualities. 

American Fighter Aces Award recognizes the outstanding graduating 
cadet pilot in each geographical area based on his or her performance 
and achievements as an AFROTC cadet and his or her performance in 
the flight instruction program. 

American Legion Outstanding Senior Cadet: This award is spon- 
sored by the American Legion, Department of Maryland, and is presented 
to the cadet best described as the "Outstanding ROTC Senior." 

American Legion ROTC General Military Excellence Awards to a 
senior (Gold award) and a junior (Silver award) in the upper 25% of his or 
her AFROTC class demonstrating outstanding qualities in military leader- 
ship, discipline, and character. 

American Legion ROTC Scholastic Award to an outstanding senior 
(Gold award) and junior (Silver award) who are in the upper 10% of their 
class in the University and have demonstrated high qualities in military 
leadership 

Angel Flight Freshman Award to the distinctive freshman cadet in the 
General Military Course. 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association 
Award to the outstanding senior cadet who is preparing for a career in 
this technical area and has demonstrated outstanding qualities of military 
leadership, high moral character, and definite aptitude for military service. 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association 
Scholarship Award of one $500 scholarship annually to a sophomore 
AFROTC cadet for undergraduate or University study in electrical 
engineering, communications engineering and/or technical photography. 

Arnold Air Society GMC Cadet Award to the freshman or 
sophomore cadet who has demonstrated outstanding quality in areas of 
attitude, personal appearance, and military knowledge. 

Captain Fred H. Jones Award. Presented to the most outstanding 
member of the Maryland Honor Guard. 

Civil Air Patrol Awards: Presented by the Prince George's Composite 
Squadron to the Corps of Cadets. Maryland Honor Guard and the Arnold 
Air Society in appreciation for instructional aid donated. 

Coblentz Memorial Cup to the commander of the best drilled flight 
within the Corps of Cadets. 

Commandant of Cadets Award to the senior cadet whose increased 
officership potential has been significantly reflected in a Cadet Corps ac- 
tivity under his or her management 

Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America Award to a qualified 
sophomore cadet who has demonstrated qualities of dependability, good 
character, adherence to military discipline, leadership potential, 



patriotism, and understanding of the Importance of the Amencan heritage 
and Is also in the upper 1 0% of the sophomore cadets 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award to the senior cadet 
who has demonstrated high qualities of dependability, good character, 
adherence to military discipline, and leadership ability 

Disabled American Veterans Cup to the senior cadet who has 
displayed outstanding leadership, scholarship, and citizenship 

George M. Relley Award to the member of the flight instruction 
program showing the highest aptitude for flying as demonstrated by his or 
her performance in the program 

Governor's Cup to the one cadet chosen as Cadet of the Year in com- 
petition with all other cadets in the corps within the Corps of Cadets 

Kitty Hawk Youth Award fo individual or team of individuals who has 
performed, demonstrated, or contributed a notable achievement in the 
field of aviation, aerospace, or related allied areas of endeavor. 

Legion of Valor Bronze Cross for Achievement Award recognizes 
one cadet from each geographical area for his performance and 
achievements as an AFROTC cadet 

Lt. Col. Virgil I. Grlssom Memorial Award to junior cadets who have 
demonstrated outstanding academic ability and military achievements 
Award consists of a $2000 scholarship, with $ 1 000 granted annually. 

Military Order of World Wars Award to the Aerospace Studies cadets 
recognized as the most improved within his year category (freshman, 
sophomore, and junior or senior gets bronze, silver and gold award 
respectively.) 

National Defense Transportation Association Award to the out- 
standing senior cadet majoring in transportation. 

National Sojourners Award to an outstanding sophomore or junior 
cadet who has contributed the most to encourage and demonstrate 
Americanism within the Corps of Cadets and on the campus. 

Professor of Aerospace Studies Award to the senior cadet who has 
distinguished himself through excellence of leadership in the Corps of 
Cadets. 

Reserve Officer Association Awards to the senior cadet (Gold 
award), junior cadet (Silver award), and sophomore cadet (Bronze award) 
demonstrating outstanding academic achievement in AFROTC subject 
matter and highest officer potential. Ribbons of merit are presented to 
members of the freshman and the sophomore classes. 

Retired Officers Association of Maryland, Prince George's County, 
Award. Presented to the sophomore cadet who. by living example, best 
typifies the term "Outstanding Officer Potential." 

Society of American Military Engineers Award to recognize 20 
junior or senior cadets nationally displaying outstanding scholastic 
achievement and leadership and majoring in the field of engineering. 

Sons of the American Revolution Award to a junior cadet in the Two- 
Year Program or a freshman cadet in the Four-Year Program who has 
shown a high degree of merit in his or her leadership qualities, soldierly 
bearing and all around excellence in the AFROTC program studies and 
activities. 

Sun Newspaper Award to the best drilled sophomore cadet in the 
Corps of Cadets. 

Tuskegee Airman, East Coast Chapter, Award. Presented for 
leadership in the field of academics. 



Music Awards 

Director's Award to the outstanding member of the Marching Band. 

Composition Prize to the outstanding student composition of the year. 

Homer Ulrich Performance Awards. Undergraduate; Piano. Voice, In- 
struments. Graduate: Piano. Voice, Instruments. 

Kappa Kappa Psl Award to the most outstanding band member of the 
year. 

Sigma Alpha lota Alumnae Award for outstanding musical per- 
formance. 

Sigma Alpha lota Dean's Honor Award for service and dedication. 

Sigma Alpha lota Honor Certificate to the senior with the highest 
scholastic average. 

Sigma Alpha lota Leadership Award based on personality, student 
activities, fraternity service, and scholarship. 

Tau Beta Sigma Award to the outstanding band-sorority member of 
the year. 



Student Government Awards 

Certificates of Appreciation are awarded to the members of the S.G.A. 
legislature and Keys to the members of the Cabinet. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 29 



Student Data Information 



Policy of the University of Maryland on 
Access to and Release of Student 
Data/Information 

General Statement. The University of Maryland has the responsibility for 
effectively supervising any access to and/or release of official data/in- 
formation about its students. Certain items of information about individual 
students are fundamental to the educational process and must be re- 
corded. This recorded information concerning students must be used 
only for clearly-defined purposes, must be safeguarded and controlled to 
avoid violations of personal privacy, and must be appropriately disposed 
of when the justification for its collection and retention no longer exists. 

Inthis regard, the University is committed to protecting to the maximum 
extent possible the right of privacy of all individuals about whom it holds 
information, records and files Access to and release of such records is 
restricted to the student concerned, to others with the student's written 
consent, to officials within the University, to a court of competent jurisdic- 
tion and otherwise pursuant to law. 

Access. All official information collected and maintained in the University 
identifiable with an individual student will be made available for inspection 
and review at the written request of that student subject to certain ex- 
ceptions 

For purposes of access to records at the University of Maryland, a 
student enrolled (or formerly enrolled) for academic credit or audit at any 
campus of the University shall have access to official records concerning 
him on any campus on which he or she is or has been enrolled. 

The personal files of members of the faculty and staff which concern 
students, including private correspondence, and notes which refer to 
students, are not regarded as official records of the University. This in- 
cludes notes intended for the personal use of the faculty and never in- 
tended to be official records of the University. 

A request for general access to all official records, files and data main- 
tained by a campus, must be made in writing to the coordinator of records 
or to other person(s) as designated by the chancellor at that particular 
campus. A request for access to official data maintained in a particular of- 
fice may be made to the administrative head of that office. 

When a student (or former student) appears at a given office and 
requests access to the University records about himself, 

1 . The student must provide proper identification verifying that he or 
she is the person whose record is being accessed. 

2. The designated staff person(s) must supervise the review of the con- 
tents of the record with the student. 

3. Inspection and review shall be permitted within a period not to exceed 
45 days from the date of the student's request. 

4. The student will be free to make notes concerning the contents but 
no material will be removed from the record at the time. 

Under normal circumstances, the student is entitled to receive a copy 
only (jf his or her permanent academic record. A reasonable administra- 
tive fee may be charged for providing copies of this or other items 

Record keeping personnel and members of the faculty and staff with 
administrative assignments may have access to records and files for in- 
ternal educational purposes as well as for routinely necessary clerical, 
administrative and statistical purposes as required by the duties of their 
jobs The name and position of the official responsible for the main- 
tenance of each type of educational record may be obtained from the 
coordinator of records or other person appointed by the chancellor on 
each campus. 

Any other access allowed by law must be recorded showing the 
legitimate educational or other purpose and the signature of the person 
gaining access. The student concerned shall be entitled to review this in- 
formation. 



Release of Information. Except with the prior written consent of the 
student (or former student) concerned, or as required by federal and 
state law. no information in any student file may be released to any in- 
dividual (including parents, spouse, or other students) or organization 
with the exception of information defined as "Public Information " 

When disclosure of any personally identifiable data /information from 
University records about a student is demanded pursuant to court order 
or lawfully issued subpoena, the staff member receiving such order shall 
immediately notify the student concerned in writing prior to compliance 
with such order or subpoena. 



Data /information from University records about students will be 
released for approved research purposes only if the identity of the 
student involved is fully protected. 

A record will be kept of all such relases 

Information from University records may be released to appropriate 
persons in connection with an emergency if the knowledge of such in- 
formation is necessary to protect the health or safety of a student or 
other persons. 

Public Information. The following items are considered public data in- 
formation and may be disclosed by the University in response to inquiries 
concerning individual students, whether the inquiries are in person, in 
writing or over the telephone. 

1 . Name 

2. Affirmation of whether currently enrolled 
3 Campus location 

Unless the student has officially filed a request with the campus 
registrar that disclosure not be made without his or her written permis- 
sion, the following items In addition to those above are considered public 
information and may be included in appropriate University/campus direc- 
tories and publications and may be disclosed by designated staff mem- 
bers on each campus in response to inquiries concerning individual 
students, whether the inquiries are in person, in writing, or over the 
telephone 

1 . School, college, department, major or division 

2 . Dates of enrollment 
3 Degrees received 

4. Honors received 

5. Local address and phone number 

6 Home address (permanent) 

7 Participation in officially recognized activities and sports 
8. Weight and height of members of athletic teams 

The release of public information as described above may be limited by 
an individual campus policy. 

Letters of Appraisal. Candid appraisals and evaluations of performance 
and potential are an essential part of the educational process Clearly, the 
provision of such information to prospective employers, to other 
educational institutions, or to other legitimately concerned outside in- 
dividuals and agencies is necessary and in the interest of the particular 
student. 

Data/information which was part of University records prior to January 
1, 1975 and which was collected and maintained as confidential in- 
formation, will not be disclosed to students Should a student desire ac- 
cess to a confidential letter of appraisal received pnor to January 1 . 
1975, the student shall be advised to have the writer of that appraisal 
notify, in writing, the concerned records custodian of the decision as to 
whether or not the writer is willing to have the appraisal made available for 
the student's review Unless a written response is received approving a 
change of status in the letter, the treatment of the letter as a confidential 
document shall continue. 

Documents of appraisal relating to students collected by the University 
or any department or office of the University on or after January 1 , 1 975 
will be maintained confidentially only if a waiver of the right of access has 
been executed by the student In the absence of such a waiver, all such 
documents will be available for student inspection and review 

All references, recommendations, evaluations and other written 
notations or comments, originated prior to January 1, 1975. where the 
author by reason of custom, common practice, or specific assurance 
thought or had good reason to believe that such documents or matenals 
would be confidential, will be maintained as confidential unless the 
author consents in writing to waive such confidentiality 

If a student files a written waiver with the department or office con- 
cerned, letters of appraisal received pursuant to that waiver will be main- 
tained confidentially Forms will be available for this purpose 

Challenges to the Record. Every student shall have the opportunity to 
challenge any Hern in his or her file which he or she considers to be 
inaccurate, misleading or otherwise inappropriate data A student shall 
initiate a challenge by submitting a request in writing for the deletion or 
correction of the particular item The request shall be made to the cus- 
todian of the particular record in question 

If the custodian and the student involved are unable to resolve the 
matter to the satisfaction of both parties, the written request for deletion 
or correction shall be submitted by the student to the coordinator of 



30 / GENERAL INFORMATION 



records, or other such person as designated by the chancellor, who shall 
serve as the hearing officer The student shall be given the opportunity 
for a hearing, at which the student may present oral or written justifica- 
tion for the request for deletion or correction The hearing officer may 
obtain such other information as he or she deems appropriate for use in 
the hearing and shall give the student a written decision on the matter 
within thirty (30) days from the conclusion of the hearing If the decision 
of the hearing officer is to deny the deletion or correction of an item In 
the student's file, the student shall be entitled to submit a written state- 
ment to the hearing officer presenting his or her position with regard to 
the item Both the written decision of the hearing officer and the state- 
ment submitted by the student shall be inserted in the student's file. The 
decision of the hearing officer shall be final 

Grades may be challenged under this procedure only on the basis of 
the accuracy of their transcription. 

Exceptions to the Policy. It is the position of the University that certain 
data information maintained in various offices of the University is not 
subject to the provisions of this policy with regard to inspection, review, 
challenge, correction or deletion. 

(a) Statements submitted by parent guardian or spouse in support of 
financial aid or residency determinations are considered to be con- 
fidential between those persons and the University, and are not sub- 
ject to the provisions of this policy except with the written consent of 
the persons involved. Such documents are not regarded as part of 
the student's official record 

(b) University employment records of students are not included in this 
policy, except as provided under Article 76A of the Annotated Code 
of Maryland 



(c) With regard to general health data, only that data/information which 
Is used by the University in making a decision regarding the 
student's status is subject to review by the student under this policy 
Written psychiatric or psychological case notes which form the basis 
for diagnoses, recommendations, or treatment plans remain privi- 
leged information not accessible to the student Such case notes 
are not considered to be part of official University records To 
ensure the availability or correct and helpful interpretations of any 
psychological test scores, notes or other evaluative or medical 
materials, the contents of these files for an individual student may 
be reviewed by that student only in consultation with a professional 
staff member of the specific department involved 

(d) Records relating to a continuing or active investigation by the cam- 
pus security office, or records of said office not relating to the 
student's status with the University are not subject to this policy 

(e) No student is entitled to see information or records that pertain to 
another student, to parents, or to other third parties A student is en- 
titled to review only that portion of an official record or file that per- 
tains to him or her. 

Notice: Notice of these policies and procedures will be published by the 
University. 

The foregoing statement of University policy becomes effective im- 
mediately, but should be regarded as tentative pending the issuance of 
federal regulations and guidelines or amendments in the applicable laws 

The masculine gender of personal pronouns in this document includes 
the feminine gender. 

Approved by the President's Administrative Council, 2/3/75. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 31 



■■&&#** 



I 









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i 



Wil w au I u 



32 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



Division of Agricultural 
and Life Sciences 

The Division ol Agricultural and Lile Sciences oilers 
educational opportunities lor students in subject matter 
relating to living organisms and their interaction with one 
another and with the environment Education in all aspects 
of agriculture is included Programs of study include thbse 
involving the most fundamental concepts ol biological 
science and chemistry and the use ol knowledge in daily 
life as well as the application of economic' and engineering 
principles in planning the improvement of life In addition to 
pursuing the baccalaureate degree, a number of students in 
this Division engage in pre-professional education in such 
fields as Pre-Medicme. Pre-Dentistry. and Pre-Vetermary 
Medicine 

The student may obtain a Bachelor of Science Degree 
with a major in any of the departments and curricula- listed. 
Students in pre-professional programs may. under certain 
circumstances, obtain a B.S degree following three years 
on Campus and one successful year in a professional 
school 

Structure of the Division. The Division of Agricultural and 
Life Sciences includes the following departments and pro- 
grams 
1 Within the College of Agriculture. 

a. Departments: Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural 
and Extension Education, Agricultural and Resource 
Economics. Agronomy, Animal Science. Dairy 
Science. Horticulture. Poultry Science, and Vet- 
erinary Science, 
b Programs or Curricula: Agricultural Chemistry. Animal 
Sciences. Conservation and Resource Development. 
Food Science, General Agriculture. Pre-Forestry, 
Pre-Theology, and Pre- Veterinary Medicine. 
c. Institute of Applied Agriculture 
2. Divisional Units— Non-College. 

a Departments: Botany, Chemistry. Entomology. Ge- 
ology. Microbiology. Zoology, 
b Programs or Curricula: General Biological Sciences, 
Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Optometry. and Pre-Medicine. 

Admission. Requirements for admission to the Division are 
the same as those for admission to the other units of the 
University. Application must be made to the Director of 
Admissions. University of Maryland. College Park. Maryland. 

Students desiring a program of study in the Division of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences should include the following 
subjects in their high school program: English, four units: 
college preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane geometry), 
three or four units; biology, chemistry, or physics, two units: 
history and social sciences, one or more units. 

Students wishing to major in chemistry, botany, micro- 
biology, or zoology, or to follow a pre-medical or pre- 
dental program, should include four units of college 
preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane geometry, trigon- 
ometry, and more advanced mathematics, if available). They 
should also include chemistry and physics. 

Each entering student in this Division will be assigned a 
faculty advisor who will help select a course program 
designed to meet his her goals and objectives As soon as 
a student selects a major field of study an advisor repre- 
senting that department or program will be assigned. 

Students following pre-professional programs will be 
advised by knowledgeable individuals. 

In addition to the educational resources on the Campus, 
students with specific interests have an opportunity to 
utilize libraries and other resources of the several govern- 
ment agencies located close to the Campus. Research 
laboratories related to agriculture or marine biology are 
available to students with special interests. 

Degree Requirements. Students graduating from the 
Division must complete at least 120 credits with an 
average of 2.0 in all courses applicable towards the degree. 
Included in the 1 20 credits must be: 
1 . General University Requirements (30 credits) 



2 Division Requirements 

a. Chemistry Any one course of three or more credits 
in chemistry numbered 1 02 or higher; 

b Mathematics Any one course of three or more 
credits in mathematics numbered 1 00 or higher: 

c Biological Sciences: Any one course carrying three 
or more credits selected from offerings of the Depart- 
ments of Botany, Entomology. Microbiology or 
Zoology, or any interdepartmental course approved 
lor this purpose by the Division (e g . ALSC 101 ) 

3 Requirements ol the major and supporting areas, which 
are listed under individual program headings 

Honors Programs. Students may apply for admission to the 
honors programs of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
Botany, Chemistry, Microbiology, and Zoology. 

On the basis of the student's performance during 
participation in the Honors Program, the department may 
recommend the candidates for the appropriate degree with 
(departmental) honors, or for the appropriate degree with 
(departmental) high honors Successful completion of the 
Honors Program will be recognized by a citation in the 
Commencement Program and by an appropriate entry or the 
student's record and diploma 

College of 
Agriculture 

The College of Agriculture offers educational programs 
with a broad cultural and scientific base. Students are 
prepared for careers in agriculturally related sciences, 
technology and business. 

The application of knowledge to the solution of some of 
man's most critical problems concerning adequate amounts 
and quality of food, and the quality of the environment in 
which he lives, are important missions of the College. 

This original College of the University of Maryland at 
College Park was chartered in 1856 The College of Agri- 
culture has a continuous record of leadership in education 
since that date. It became the beneficiary of the Land-Grant 
Act of 1862. 

The College of Agriculture continues to grow and develop 
as part of the greater University, providing education and 
research activities enabling man to use his environment and 
natural resources to best advantage while conserving basic 
resources for future generations. 

Advantages of Location and Facilities. Educational oppor- 
tunities in the College of Agriculture are enhanced by the 
nearby location of several research units of the federal 
government. Of particular interest is the Agricultural 
Research Center at Beltsville and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture Headquarters in Washington, DC The National 
Agricultural Library at Beltsville is an important resource. 

Related research laboratories of the National Institutes of 
Health, military hospitals. National Aeronautics and Space 
Agency, and the National Bureau of Standards are in the 
vicinity. Interaction of faculty and students with personnel 
from these agencies is encouraged Teaching and research 
activities are conducted with the cooperation of scientists 
and professional people in government positions. 

Instruction in the basic biological and physical sciences, 
social sciences and engineering principles is conducted in 
well-designed classrooms and laboratories. The application 
of basic principles to practical situations is demonstrated for 
the student in numerous ways. 

Modern greenhouses are available for breeding and 
propagation of a wide variety of plants, work on the control 
of weeds and improved cultural practices. 

Herds of dairy and beef cattle and flocks of poultry are 
kept on the Campus for teaching and research purposes. 

Several operating research farms, located in central 
Maryland. Southern Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, 
support the educational programs in Agriculture by providing 
locations where important crops, animals and poultry can be 
grown and maintained under practical and research 
conditions. These farms add an important dimension to the 
courses offered in Agriculture Data from these operations 
and from cooperating producers and processors of 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 33 



agricultural products are utilized by students interested in 
economics, teaching, engineering, and conservation, as 
they relate to agriculture, as well as by those concerned 
with biology or management of agricultural crops and 
animals 

General Information. The College of Agriculture offers a 
variety of four year programs leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree 

Today's agriculture is a highly complex and extremely 
efficient industry which includes supplies and services used 
in agricultural production, the production process, and the 
marketing, processing and distribution of products to meet 
the consumers' needs and wants. 

Instruction in the College of Agriculture includes the 
fundamental sciences and emphasizes the precise 
knowledge that its graduates must employ in the 
industrialized agriculture of today, and helps develop the 
foundation for their role in the future. Course programs in 
specialized areas may be tailored to fit the particular needs 
of the individual student 

Previous training in agriculture is not a prerequisite for 
study in the College of Agriculture Careers for men and 
women with rural, suburban or urban backgrounds are 
available in agriculture and its allied industries 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture have an adequate 
educational background for careers and continued learning 
after college in business, production, teaching, research, 
extension, and many other professional fields 

Requirements for Admission. Admission requirements to 
the College of Agriculture are the same as those of the 
University. 

For students entering the College of Agriculture it is 
recommended that their high school preparatory course 
include English. 4 units; mathematics. 3 units; biological and 
physical sciences, 3 units: and history or social sciences. 2 
units Four units of mathematics should be elected by 
students who plan to major in agricultural engineering or 
agricultural chemistry 

Requirements for Graduation. Each student must 
complete at least 120 credit hours in academic subjects 
with a minimum grade point average of 2 (C) 

Honors Program. An Honors Program is approved for 
majors in Agricultural and Resource Economics. The 
objective of the Honors Program is to recognize superior 
scholarship and to provide opportunity for the excellent 
student to broaden his or her perspective and to increase 
the depth of his or her studies 

The programs in Honors are administered by Departmental 
Honors Committee and supervised by the College 
Committee on Honors Students in the College of 
Agriculture, who are in the top 20 percent of their class at 
the end of their first year may be considered for admission 
into the Honors Program. Of this group up to 50 percent 
may be admitted. 

Sophomores or first semester Juniors will be considered 
upon application from those students in the upper 20 
percent of their class While application may be made until 
the student enters the sixth semester, early entrance into 
the program is recommended Students admitted to the 
program enjoy certain academic privileges. 

Faculty Advisement. Each student in the College of 
Agriculture is assigned to a faculty advisor Advisors 
normally work with a limited number of students and are able 
to give individual guidance 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite 
choice of curriculum are assigned to departmental advisors 
for counsel and planning of all academic programs Students 
who have not selected a definite curriculum, are assigned to 
a general advisor who assists with the choice of electives 
and acquaints students with opportunities in the curnculums 
in the College of Agriculture and in other divisions of the 
University 

Scholarships. A number of scholarships are available for 
students enrolled in the College of Agriculture These 



include awards by the Agricultural Development Fund, 
Capitol Milk Producers Cooperative. Inc . Dairy Technology 
Society of Maryland and the District of Columbia. Delaware- 
Maryland Plant Food Association. Inc , Dr Ernest N Cory 
Trust Fund. Frederick County Holstein Association. The 
Staley and Eugene Hahn Memorial Scholarship Fund. 
Hyattsville Horticultural Society. Inter-State Milk Producers. 
The Kmghorne Fund, Lindback Foundation. Maryland 
Cooperative Milk Producers, Inc . Maryland Electrification 
Council, Maryland Holstein Association, Maryland Turf grass 
Association, Maryland State Golf Association, Maryland and 
Virginia Milk-Producers, Inc , Maryland Veterinarians. Dr Ray 
A Murray Scholarship Fund, Ralston Purina Company, The 
Schluderberg Foundation, Southern States Cooperative, 
Inc , the Joseph M Vial Memorial Scholarship Program in 
Agriculture and the Nicholas Brice Worthington Scholarship 
Fund. 

Student Organizations. Students find opportunity for 
varied expression and growth in the several voluntary 
organizations sponsored by the College of Agriculture 
These organizations are Agriculture Economics Club, Block 
and Bridle. Conservation & Resource Development Club, 
Dairy Science Club. Collegiate 4-H Club. The Equestrian 
Club. Future Farmers of America, Agronomy Club. 
Horticultural Club, and the Veterinary Science Club 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor fraternity Mem- 
bers are chosen from students in the College of Agriculture 
who have attained the scholastic requirements and displayed 
leadership in agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representa- 
tives from the various student organizations in the College of 
Agriculture Its purpose is to coordinate activities of these 
organizations and to promote work which is beneficial to the 
college 

Required Courses. Courses required for students in the 
College of Agriculture are listed in each curriculum The 
program of the freshman year is similar for all curriculums 
Variations in programs will be suggested based on students' 
interests and test scores 

Typical Freshmen Program — College of Agriculture 



ENGL 101 

BOTN 101 

MATH 

ANSC 101 

ZOOL 101 

AGRO 1 00 

AGRO 1 02 

AGRI 101 

SPCH 107 

General University Requirement 

Total Credits 



Agricultural and Life Sciences 

Departments, 

Programs and Curricula 

Agriculture— General Curriculum 

The General Agriculture curriculum provides for the 
development of a broad understanding in agriculture 

The flexibility of this curriculum permits selection of elec- 
tives that will meet individual vocational plans in agnculture 
and agriculturally related business and industry 



General Agriculture Requirements 



Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
30 



General University Requirements 

BOTN 101— General Botany* 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology *> 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I • ■> 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

MATH 100 level or higher' 3 

AGEN 1 00 — Basic Agricultural Engineering 

Technology 3 



34 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



AGEN 200— Intro to Farm Mechanics 2 

AGRO 100— Crop Production Laboratory 2 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

ANSC 101— Principles ol Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203— Feeds and Feeding 3 

ANSC -" 3 
AREC 250— Elements ol Agricultural 4 

Resource Economics 3 

AREC - • • 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases ot Plants 4 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT -•• 3 

RLED 464 —Rural Lite in Modern Society 3 
Community Development related. Lite Science 

related non-agriculture or Accounting 6 

Etectives ( 1 5 credit hours 300 or above) 26 

•Satisfy Divisional Requirements 
'•Student may select any coursefs) having required hours 
in the department ndicated 

Students will be encouraged to obtain summer positions 
which will give them technical laboratory or field experience 
in their chosen interest area 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Poffenberger 

Professors: Longest and Nelson. 

Assistant Professors: Glee (p t ), Klavon, Seibel, Sorter, 

Whaples, Wheatley, and Wright 

Programs are offered in education and other applied be- 
havioral sciences needed by persons preparing to teach 
agriculture or to enter extension work, community develop- 
ment, and other continuing education careers 

Three undergraduate curriculum options are available The 
agricultural education curriculum is designed primarily for 
persons who wish to prepare for teaching agriculture in the 
secondary schools. The extension education options are 
designed for those preparing to enter the Cooperative 
Extension Service or other agencies engaged in educational 
and developmental programs. Any option may lead to a 
variety of other career opportunities in public service, 
business and industry, communications, research, and 
college teaching 

Students preparing to become teachers of agriculture — 
including horticulture, agribusiness or other agriculturally 
related subjects — should have had appropriate experience 
with the kind of agriculture they plan to teach or should 
arrange to secure that experience during summers while in 
college 

In order to be able to serve as advisors of high school 
chapters of the FFA upon graduation, students in the 
agricultural education curriculum are expected to participate 
in the Collegiate Chapter of the Future Farmers of America. 



4.4 

3 



Departmental Requirements: All Options 

BOTN 101 —General Botany 

CHEM 1 03, 1 04— College Chemistry I, II 

MATH 105— Mathematical Ideas 

ZOOL 101 —General Zoology 

EDHD 300— Human Development and 

Learning* 

RLED 464— Rural Lite in Modern Society - 
RLED 303— Teaching Materials and 

Demonstrations 



•PSYC 1 00— Introduction to Psychology (3 credits) and EDHD 460— 
Educational Psychology (3 crec&ts) may be substituted by Extension 
Education students 

Agricultural Education Option 

EDSF 301 —Foundations of Education 3 

RLED 302— Introduction to Agricultural 

Education 2 

RLED 305— Teaching Young and Adult 

Farmer Groups 1 

RLED 31 1 —Teaching Secondary Vocational 

Agriculture 3 

RLED 313— Student Teaching 5 

RLED 31 5— Student Teaching 3 

RLED 398— Seminar in Agricultural 

Education 1 

AGEN 100— Basic Agricultural Engineering 

Technology 3 

AGEN 200— Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

AGEN 305— Farm Mechanics 2 



AGRO 100— Crops Laboratory 2 

AGRO 102— Crop Production 

or 
AGRO 406— Forage Crop Production 2 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

ANSC 101 —Principles ot Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203— Feeds and Feeding 3 

AREC 406— Farm Management 

or 
AREC 407 —Financial Analysis of 

Farm Business 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 

or 
HORT 23 1 —Greenhouse Management 

or 
HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

Extension Education: Agricultural Science and 
Youth Development Options 

PSYC 221— Social Psychology 3 

RLED 323— Developing Youth Programs 3 

RLED 325— Directed Experience in 

Extension Education 1-5 

RLED 327— Program Planning in 

Extension Education 3 

RLED 422— Extension Education 3 

RLED 423— Extension Communications 3 

Extension Education: Agricultural Science Option 

AGEN 1 00— Basic Agricultural Engineering 

Technology 3 

AGRO 100— Crops Laboratory 2 

AGRO 102— Crop Production 2 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

ANSC 1 1 —Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203— Feeds and Feeding 3 

AREC 406— Farm Management 

or 
AREC 407— Fiancial Analysis of the 

Farm Business 3 

AREC 452— Economics of Resource 

Development 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 

or 
HORT 231— Greenhouse Management 

or 
HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

Extension Education: Youth Development Option 

RLED 426— Development and Management 

of Extension Youth Programs 3 

EDHD 41 1— Child Growth and Development 3 

EDHD 413— Adolescent Development 3 

FMCD 105— Introduction to Family Living 3 
HLTH 450— Health Problems of 

Children and Youth 3 

PSYC 333— Child Psychology 3 

CRIM 450— Juvenile Delinquency 3 
RECR 460— Leadership Techniques and 

Practices 3 
RECR 490— Organization and Administration 

of Recreation 3 

RECR 420— Program Planning 3 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Lessley. 
Professors: F. Bender, Cain, Curtis. Foster, Ishee. 
Moore. Murray, Poffenberger, Smith, Stevens. Tuthill, 
and Wysong. 

Associate Professors: Beiter, Crothers, Hamilton 
(Emeritus) Hardie, Hoecker, Lawrence, Marasco, Via. 
Assistant Professor: Bellows, Strand 
Lecturer: Matteucci 
Instructor: N Bender 

This curriculum combines training in the business, 
economics and international aspects of agricultural 
production and marketing with the biological and 
physical sciences basic to agriculture Programs are 
available for students in agricultural economics, 
agricultural business, international agriculture, and 
resource economics. Students desiring to enter 
agricultural marketing or business affiliated with 
agriculture may elect the agricultural business option; 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 35 



and those interested in foreign service may elect the 
international agriculture option Students primarily 
interested in the broad aspects of production and 
management as it is related to the operation of a farm 
business may elect the agricultural economics option 
Those interested in training in the broad area of resource 
management and evaluation may elect the resource 
economics option. 

In these programs, students are trained for 
employment m agricultural business firms; for positions 
in sales or management; for local, state, or federal 
agencies; for extension work; for high school and 
college teaching; for research, and for farm operation or 
management 

Courses for the freshman and sophomore years are 
essentially the same for all students In the junior year 
the student selects the option of his or her choice 
Courses in this department are designed to provide 
training in the application of economic principles to the 
production, processing, distribution, and merchandising 
of agricultural products and the effective management 
of our natural and human resources, as well as the 
inter-relationship of business and industry associated 
with agricultural products The curriculum includes 
courses in general agricultural economics, marketing, 
farm management, prices, resource economics, 
agricultural policy, and international agricultural 
economics. 



Other courses in Agricultural ana 

Resource Economics 
Electives 



Required of Al Students" 



General University Requirements 

Biological Sciences* ■ 

Chemistry" *.......... 

AREC 404— Prices of Agricultural Products 
BSAD 220— Principles of Accounting 
BSAD 230— Business Statistics I 

or 
AGRI 301— Introduction to 

Agncultural Biometrics 
ECON 201 —Principles of Economics I 
ECON 203— Principles of Economics II 
ECON 401— National Income Analysis . . . 
ECON 403— Intermediate Price Theory 
MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics I* * 
MATH 1 1 1 —Introduction to Mathematics II 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus 

Technical Agriculture* * " 



Credit 

Hours 

30 

3 

3 

3 



"The student's total program must contain a i 

Agncultural and Resources Economics 
" " Satislies a Divison requirement 
■"A mrtfnum of n»ie hours of technical agriculture 

in consultation with the student's advisor 



of 15 credit hours m 



nust be selected 



Agribusiness Option 

Each student must take the following or the equivalent: 

AREC 406— Farm Management 3 

AREC 427— The Economics of 

Marketing Systems for 

Agncultural Commodities 3 

AREC 432— Introduction to Natural 

Resources Policy 3 

Other courses in Agricultural and 

Resource Economics 3 

Electives 33 

Agricultural Economics Option 

Each student must take the following or the equivalent 
AREC 406— Farm Management 3 

ECON 425— Mathematical Economics 

or 
ENGL 29 1 —Expository Writing 3 

MATH 221— Elementary Calculus 3 

Statistics 3 

Other courses in Agricultural and 

Resource Economics 9 

Electives 24 

International Agriculture Option 

Each student must take the following or the equivalent: 
AREC 445— World Agricultural Development 

and the Quality of Life 3 

ECON 415— Introduction to Economic 

Development of 

Underdeveloped Areas 3 

ECON 440— International Economics 3 



Resource Economics Option 

Each student must take the following or the equivalent 
AREC 240- Environment and Human Ecology 3 

AREC 452— Economics of Resource 

Development 3 

ECON 450— Introduction to Public Finance 3 

Other courses in Agricultural and 

Resource Economics 6 

Electives 30 

Course Code Prelix— AREC 

Agricultural Chemistry 

This curriculum insures adequate instruction in the 
fundamentals of both the physical and biological sciences 
It may be adjusted through the selection of electives to fit 
the student for work in agricultural experiment stations, soil 
bureaus, geological surveys, food laboratories, fertilizer in- 
dustries, and those handling food products 

Credit 
Hours 
General University Requirements 30 

Required of All Students: 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry lor CHEM 105* 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II or CHEM 106 4 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry III or CHEM 211 3 
CHEM 202— College Chemistry III 

Laboratory or CHEM 21 2 2 

CHEM 203— College Chemistry IV or CHEM 213 3 
CHEM 204— College Chemistry IV 

Laboratory or CHEM 21 4 2 

CHEM 321— Quantitative Analysis 4 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

GEOL 100— Introductory Physical Geology 3 

MATH 141— Analysis II* 4 

PHYS 141— Principles of Physics 4 

PHYS 142— Principles of Physics 4 

Electives in Biology" 6 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 1 

Electives 33 



Agricultural Engineering 

Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: Stewart 

Professors: Green. Harris. Krewatch (Emeritus), 

Winn, Jr (p t ) 

Associate Professors: Felton, fvterkel, Merrick (Emeritus), 

Wheaton 

Assistant Professors: Ayars. Grant, Johnson, Ross 

Specialist: Brodie 

Lecturer: Holton (p.t.) 

Instructor: Carr, Smith 

Adjunct Professor: Cowan 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Rebuck 

Agncultural engineering utilizes both the physical and 
biological sciences to help meet the needs of our increasing 
world population for food, natural fiber and improvement 
or maintenance of the environment Scientific and engineer- 
ing principles are applied to the conservation and utilization 
of soil and water resources for food production and recrea- 
tion; to the utilization of energy to improve labor efficiency 
and to reduce laborious and menial tasks: to the design of 
structures and equipment for housing or handling of plants 
and animals to optimize growth potential; to the design of 
residences to improve the standard of living for the rural 
population, to the development of methods and equipment 
to maintain or increase the quality of food and natural 
fiber; to the flow of supplies and equipment to the agncul- 
tural and aquacultural production units, and to the flow of 
products from the production units and the processing plants 
to the consumer Agricultural engineers place emphasis on 
maintaining a high quality environment as they work toward 
developing efficient and economical engineenng solutions 

The undergraduate curriculum provides opportunity to 
prepare for many interesting and challenging careers m de- 
sign, management, research, education, sales, consulting, 
or international service The program of study includes a 



36 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



broad base ol mathematical, physical and engineering 
sciences combined with basic biological sciences Twenty 
hours of electlves give flexibility so that a student may 
plan a program according to his ma|or interest. 

Count* Cod* Prefix— AOEN 

Departmental Requirements 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
AQEN 324— Engineering Dynamics 

of Biological Materials 3 

AQEN 424— Functional and Environmental 

Design of Agricultural Structures ... 3 

AQEN 343— Functional Design of 

Machinery and Equipment 3 

AQEN 421 —Power Systems 3 

AQEN 422— Soil and Water Engineering 3 

ENCE 350— Structural Analysis and Design I 3 

ENES 101— Intro Engineering Science 3 

ENES 1 10— Statics 3 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221 —Dynamics 3 

ENME 300— Materials Science and Engineering 

or 

ENCE 300— Fund of Engineering Materials 3 

ENME 216— Thermodynamics! 3 

ENME 342— Fluid Mechanics I 

or 

ENCE 330— Basic Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

MATH 140,141— Analysisl.il 4,4 

MATH 24 1 —Analysis III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists 
and Engineers 

or 

ENME 380— Applied Math in Engineering 3 

ZOOL 1 1 —General Zoology 

or 

BOTN 101— General Botany 4 

CHEM 103.104— CollegeChemistryl.il 4,4 

PHYS 161, 262, 263-General Physics 3,4,4 

Technical Electives* 14 

General University Requirements* * 30 

Electives 6 

"Technical electives related to field of concentration must be selected from a 
departmen tally approved list Eight credits must be 300 level and above 
"Students must consult with department advisors to ensure the selection of 
appropnate courses tor their particular program of study 

Agronomy 

Chairman and Professor: J. Miller. 

Professors: Axley, Clark, Decker, Foss, Hoyert, McKee, 

F. Miller, Rothgeb (Emeritus), Street (Emeritus). 

Strickling. 

Associate Professors: Aycock, Bandel, Burt, Fanning, 

Mulchi, Newcomer. Parochetti. 

Assistant Professors: Darrah, Hawes, Johnson, Kenworthy, 

Undersander, Wolf. 

Instructor: Rivard. 

Visiting Lecturer: Patterson 

Instruction is offered in crop science and soil science. 
A turf and urban agronomy option is offered under crop 
science and a conservation of soil, water and environment 
option is offered under soil science. These options appeal to 
students who are interested in urban problems or environ- 
mental science. The agronomy curricula are flexible and 
allow the student either to concentrate on basic science 
courses that are needed for graduate work or to select 
courses that prepare for employment at the bachelor's 
degree level as a specialist with park and planning commis- 
sions, road commissions, extension service, soil conserva- 
tion service, and other governmental agencies. Many grad- 
uates with the bachelor's degree are also employed by 
private corporations such as golf courses and seed, fertilizer, 
chemical, and farm equipment companies. 

Agronomy students who follow the Journalism-Science 
Communication option are prepared to enter the field of 
science communication. Opportunities in this area are 
challenging and diverse. Students who are interested in 
public relations may find employment with industry or govern- 
mental agencies. Others may become writers and, in some 
cases, science editors for newspapers, publishing houses, 
radio, and television. Technical and professional journals 



hire students trained In this field as editors and writers. 
Also, this training Is valuable to students who find employ- 
ment in university extension programs, as a large part of 
their work involves written communication with the public 

Students completing graduate programs are prepared for 
college teaching and research, or research and manage- 
ment positions with Industry and governmental 
agencies. 

Additional Information on opportunities In agronomy may 
be obtained by writing to the Department of Agronomy. 

Departmental Requirements. (22-23 semester hours) 

Semester 

Credit 

HO ITS 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I' - 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

MATH _• 3-4 

BOTN 1 1 —General Botany" 4 

AGRO 100— Crops Laboratory 2 

AGRO 202— General Soils 4 

AGRO 398— Senior Seminar 1 

'Satisfies Division of Agriculture and Life Sciences requirements 

Crop Science Curriculum (68 semester hours) 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 

AGRO —Advanced Crops Courses 6 

AGRO —Advanced Soils Courses 6 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 221 —Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 441 —Plant Physiology 4 

Electives 45 

Crop Science options are listed under Crop and Soil Science Options 

Soil Science Curriculum (68 semester hours) 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 

AGRO —Advanced Crops Courses 4 

AGRO 414— Soil Classification and 

Geography 4 

AGRO 417— Soil Physics 3 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemistry 3 

Electives 54 

Soil Science options are listed under Crop and Soil Science Options 

Crop and Soli Science Options 
Turf and Urban Agronomy Option 

Students following this option in the Crop Science 
curriculum must include the following courses among their 
electives: 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 

AGRO 405— Turf Management 3 

AGRO 415— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

HORT 1 60— Introduction to the Art 

of Landscaping 3 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Materials 3 

RECR 495— Planning, Design, and 

Maintenance of Park and 

Recreational Areas and 

Facilities 3 

Conservation of Soil, Water, and Environment Option 

Student following this option in the Soil Science 
curriculum must include the following courses among their 
electives: 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 

AGRO 413— Soil and Water Conservation 3 

AGRO 423— Soil-Water Pollution 3 

AGRO 415— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

BOTN 211— Principles of Conservation 3 

GEOG 445— Climatology 3 

Journalism-Science Communication Option 

A student following this option in the Crop Science or Soil 
Science curriculum must elect journalism and basic science 
and math courses in addition to the required curriculum 
courses Many combinations will be acceptable. The advisor 
can aid in helping the student plan an appropriate program. 

Course Code Prefix— AGRO 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 37 



Animal Sciences 

Department of Animal Science 

Professor and Chairman: Young. 

Professors: Foster (Emeritus), Green. Leffel. 

Associate Professors: Buric, DeBarthe, Goodwin 

(Extension) 

Assistant Professors: Kunkle (Extension), McCall. 

Instructor: Curry 

Department of Dairy Science 

Professor and Chairman: Davis 

Professors: Arbuckle (Emeritus), Cairns, Keeney. King, 

Mattick, Vandersall. Williams 

Associate Professors: Chance, Douglass, Morris, Westhoff 

Assistant Professors: Holdaway, Majeskie, Mather, Vijay, 

Department of Poultry Science 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Thomas 

Professors: Shaffner, Shorb (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Bigbee. Heath. Quigley (Emeritus). 

Soares, Wabeck. 

Assistant Professors: Kuenzel. 

Extension Assistant Professor: Nicholson. 

Department of Veterinary Science 

Professor and Chairman: Hammond. 

Professor: Mohanty. 

Associate Professors: Albert, Dutta, Johnson, Marquardt, 

Ward 

Assistant Professors: Campbell, Davidson, Ingling, 

Jacobson. 

The curriculum in animal sciences offers a broad back- 
ground in general education, basic sciences, and agricultural 
sciences, and the opportunity for students to emphasize 
that phase of animal agriculture in which they are specifically 
interested Each student will be assigned to an advisor 
according to the program he or she plans to pursue 

Curriculum requirements in Animal Sciences can be com- 
pleted through the Departments of Animal Science. Dairy 
Science or Poultry Science Programs of elective courses 
can be developed which provide major emphasis on beef, 
cattle, sheep, swine or horses, dairy or poultry. Each 
student is expected to develop a program of electives in 
consultation with an advisor by the beginning of the junior 
year. 

Objectives. The following specific objectives have been 
established for the program in animal sciences. 

1 . To acquaint students with the role of animal agriculture 
in our cultural heritage 

2. To prepare students for careers in the field of animal 
agriculture. These include positions of management and 
technology associated with animal, dairy, or poultry produc- 
tion enterprises; positions with markefing and processing 
organizations; and positions in other allied fields, such as 
feed, agricultural chemicals and equipment firms. 

3 To prepare students for entrance to veterinary schools. 

4. To prepare students for graduate study and sub- 
sequent careers in teaching, research and extension, both 
public and private. 

5. To provide essential courses for the support of other 
academic programs of the University 



Required of All Students: 



General University Requirements 
Required of All Students: 
ANSC 101— Principles ol Animal Science 
FDSC 1 1 1 —Contemporary Food Industry 

and Consumerism 
ANSC 20 1 —Basic Principles of Animal 

Genetics 
ANSC 21 1— Anatomy of Domestic Animals 
ANSC 2 1 2 —Applied Animal Physiology 
ANSC 401— Fundamentals ol Nutrition 



Semester 

Credit 

Hours 

30 



ANSC 4 1 2— Introduction to Diseases o! 

Animals 
CHEM 1 03— College Chemistry I ' 
CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 
MICB 200— General Microbiology 
ZOOL 101 —General Zoology* 
SPCH 107— Public Speaking 
MATH — • 

Two of the Following 
ANSC 221— Fundamentals of Animal 

Production 
ANSC 242— Dairy Production 
ANSC 262— Commercial Poultry 

Management 

One of the Following 

AGEN 1 00— Basic Agricultural Engineering 

Technology 
CHEM 20 1 —College Chemistry III 
MATH 
PHYS 121— Fundamentals ol Physics I 



• Satisfies Divisional Requirements 
"It is suggested that the electives include at least twelve credits tn upper- 
division courses in animal science 

Conservation and Resource 
Development Programs 

The development and use of natural resources (including 
water, soil, minerals, fresh water and marine organisms, 
wildlife, air and human resources) are essential to the full 
growth of an economy. 

The curriculum in Conservation and Resource Develop- 
ment is designed to instill concepts of the efficient 
development and judicious management of natural re- 
sources The study of the problems associated with use 
of natural resources will acquaint students with their role 
in economic development while maintaining concern for the 
environment. 

Students will prepare for professional and administrative 
positions in land and water conservation projects, for 
careers in operational, administrative, educational, and 
research work in land use, fish and wildlife management, 
natural resource management, recreational area develop- 
ment, and management, or for graduate study in any of the 
several areas within the biological sciences 

Students will pursue a broad education program and then 
elect subjects concentrated in a specific area of interest 
Students will be assigned an advisor according to their 
area of interest. 



Basic Curriculum Requirements 







Semester 






Credit 






Hours 




30 






4 


CHEM 


103— College Chemistry I • 


4 


CHEM 


104— College Chemistry II 


4 


ZOOL 


1 1 —General Zoology 


4 


AGRI 


301— Introduction to 






Agricultural Biometrics 


3 


AGRO 


202— General Soils 


4 


GEOL 


100— Introductory Physical Geology 


3 


ENTM 


204— General Entomology 


4 


ECON 


205 (or 201 or 203) 


3 


MATH 


110, 111. 220 or 115.140* 


9 42 


Option 


Requirements" ■ 




Fish and Wildlife Management 


9 


Zoology 


9 


Related Field 


3 


Electives 


28 49 


Plant Resource Management 






9 




9 




3 




28 49 


Pest Management 




Pest Management 


9 


En 


tomology 


9 


Related Field 


3 


Electives 


28 49 



38 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Water Resource Management 
Water Resource Management 
Agronomy and Agricultural Engineering 
Related Field 
Electives 

Resource Management 
Reeoun '■ Management 
Economics or Agricultural and 

Resource Economics 
Related Field 
Electives 



Food Science Program 

Professor and Coordinator King (Dairy Science) 
Professors: Bender (Agricultural and Resource Economics); 
Young (Animal Science); Davis, Kenney and Mattick (Dairy 
Science); Kramer. Twigg and Wiley (Horticulture) 
Associate Professors: Wheaton (Agricultural Engineering); 
Bunc (Animal Science); Westhoff (Dairy Science); Bigbee, 
Heath and Thomas (Poultry Science). 

Assistant Professors: Vijay (Dairy Science); Sobmos (Horti- 
culture) 

Food Science is concerned with all aspects of presenting 
food to the consumer in a manner that would satisfy man's 
needs both nutritionally and aesthetically. The Food Science 
Curriculum is based on the application of the fundamentals 
of the physical and biological sciences to the production, 
procurement, preservation, processing, packaging and 
marketing of foods. Specialization is offered in the areas of 
meats, milk and dairy products, fruits and vegetables, 
poultry and poultry products and seafood products 

Opportunities for careers in food science are available in 
industry, universities and government. Specific positions for 
food scientists include product development, production 
management, engineering, research, quality control, techni- 
cal sales and service, teaching, and environmental health. 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Division Requirements: 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry 1 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

MATH — 3 

Curriculum Requirements 

AGEN 313— Mechanics of Food Processing 4 

CHEM 1 04— College Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 203, 204— College Chemistry IV 

and College Chemistry 

Laboratory IV 3, 2 

FDSC 1 1 1 —Contemporary Food Industry 

and Consumerism 3 

FDSC 398— Seminar 1 

FDSC 412. 413— Principles of Food 

Processingl.il 3. 3 

FDSC 421 —Food Chemistry 3 

FDSC 422— Food Product Research 

and Development 3 

FDSC 423— Food Chemistry Laboratory 2 

FDSC 430— Food Microbiology 2 

FDSC 431— Food Quality Control 4 

FDSC 434— Food Microbiology Laboratory 2 
FDSC 442.451.461.471.482— 

Horticultural, Dairy, Poultry. 

Meat and Seafood Products 

Processing (2 required) 3, 3 

NUSC 402— Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

PHYS 402— Fundamentals of Physics 4 

Electives 27 

Course Code Prefix— FDSC 

Horticulture 

Professor and Chairman: Twigg. 

Professors: Kramer, Link, Reynolds, Rogers, Scott (Emeri- 
tus), Shanks. Stark, Thompson, Wiley. 
Associate Professors: Baker, Beste, Bouwkamp, Gouin, 
Schales. 



Assistant Prolessors: Funt. Gould. Kissida, Kundt. McClurg. 
Pitt. Stiles, Solomos 
Instructors: Todd, Wootton 

The horticulturist combines a knowledge of the basic 
sciences with an intimate knowledge of plants and their 
requirements in an effort to help meet the food needs of the 
world population and to help beautify man's surroundings 
The horticulturist, specifically, is involved with fruit pro- 
duction (pomology), vegetable production (olericulture), 
greenhouse plant production (floriculture), production of 
ornamental trees and shrubs, post-harvest horticulture, and 
the aesthetic and functional planning and design of 
landscapes for public and private facilities (Landscape 
Design) Horticultural principles are essential to designing 
the landscape for improvement of the human environment 
Post- harvest horticulture is involved with the storage and 
transportation of horticaltural products until they reach the 
consumer 

The curriculum in Horticulture prepares students for a 
future in commercial production of the horticultural crops, 
and for employment in the horticultural industries such as 
fruit and vegetable processing, seed production and sales, 
agricultural chemical sales and service, florist shops and 
garden centers, and as horticulturists for parks, highway 
systems, botanic gardens and arboretums. 

Majors may prepare for work with handicapped persons 
as horticultural therapists by electing appropriate courses 
in the social sciences and in recreation. The Horticultural 
Education option is designed for those who wish to teach 
horticulture in the secondary schools. It prepares the 
graduate with a basic knowledge of horticulture and includes 
the courses required for certification to teach in Maryland 
The Landscape Design option introduces the principles and 
practices of design and prepares the student for work in the 
area of commercial landscape design. 

Advanced studies in the Department, leading to the M.S. 
and Ph.D. degrees, are available to outstanding students 
having a strong horticultural motivation for research, 
university teaching and/or extension education. 

All students should meet with the option advisor before 
enrolling in courses for the option. 



Curriculum In Horticulture 



General University Requirements 
Departmental Requirements— All Options: 
AGRO 202— General Soils 

BOTN 1 01 —General Botany* 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry IV .. . 
CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 
HORT 271— Plant Propagation 

HORT 398— Seminar 

MATH* 



Credit 
Hours 



31 



•Satisfies Divisional Requirements. 

Complete the requirements in one of the following options: 

Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Option: 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 3 

HORT 1 32— Garden Management 2 

HORT 160— Introduction to the 

Art of Landscaping 3 

HORT 231 —Greenhouse Management 3 

HORT 260— Basic Landscape Composition 2 

HORT 274— Genetics of Cultivated Plants » 3 

HORT 451— Technology of Ornamentals 3 

HORT 453, 454— Woody Plant Materials 3. 3 

HORT 432— Fundamentals of Greenhouse 

Crop Production 
or 
HORT 456— Production and Maintenance 

of Woody Plants 3 

Electives 31 

59 

Horticultural Education Option: 

AGRO 405— Turf Management 3 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 

HORT 1 1 1 —Tree Fruit Production 3 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 39 



HORT 132— Garden Management 2 
HORT 1 60— Introduction to the 

Art of Landscaping 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 3 

HORT 231— Greenhouse Management 3 

HORT 260— Basic Landscape Composition 2 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Materials 3 
EDHD 300— Human Development and 

Learning 6 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education . . 3 
RLED 302— Introduction to 

Agricultural Education 2 
RLED 303— Teaching Materials and 

Demonstrations 2 
RLED 305— Teaching Young and 

Adult Farmer Groups 1 
RLED 31 1— Teaching Secondary 

Vocational Agriculture 3 

RLED 313— Student Teaching 5 

RLED 315— Student Teaching 1-4 

Electives 8-11 

59 

Pomology and Olericulture Option: 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 4 

HORT 1 1 1, 1 12— Tree Fruit Production 3,2 

HORT 21 2— Berry Production 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 3 

HORT 274— Genetics of Cultivated Plants 3 

HORT 4 1 1 —Technology of Fruits 3 

HORT 422— Technology of Vegetables 3 

HORT 4 74— Physiology of Maturation and 

Storage of Horticultural Crops . . 2 

Electives 33 

59 

Landscape Design Option: 



APDS 101— Fundamentals of Design 
EDIN 101— Mechanical Drawing I 
HORT 160— Introduction to the Art of 

Landscaping 

2 1 2— Plant Taxonomy 

240— Environment and Human 

Ecology 

260— Basic Landscape Composition 
341 —Masterpieces in Architecture . 
361 —Principles in Landscape Design 
362— Advanced Landscape Design 

364— Landscape Construction 

372— Remote Sensing 

4 1 5— Soil Survey and Land Use 

440— Geomorphology 

453, 454— Woody Plant Materials 
495— Planning. Design & Maintenance 
of Recreation Areas 



BOTN 
AREC 

HORT 
ARTH 
HORT 
HORT 
HORT 
GEOG 
AGRO 
GEOG 
HORT 
RECR 



Course Code Prefix— HORT 



3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3.3 

3 

13 
59 



Pre-professional Programs within 
the College of Agriculture 



Pre-Forestry 

Pre-forestry students are advised in the Department of 
Horticulture The State of Maryland has an agreement with 
the Southern Regional Education Board and North Carolina 
State University providing for six Maryland residents who 
have completed two years study in pre-forestry and have 
been accepted by the School of Forest Resources at North 
Carolina State University The State of Maryland will make 
payment toward the non-resident tuition for a period not to 
exceed two years (four semesters) in accordance with the 
funds appronated in the State budget for this purpose 

The Pre-Forestry Curriculum includes 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
6 



HORT 171 3 

MATH220, 221 6 

PHYS121.122 8 

Social Sciences* Humanities 12 

ZOOL101 4 
Other suggested courses include 
AGRO 202 BOTN 211. ENTM 200 

Pre-Theology 

The College of Agriculture cooperates with the officers of 
any theological seminary who desire to urge prospective 
students to pursue courses In agriculture as a preparation 
for the rural ministry. Such pre-theological students may 
enroll for a semester or more or for the usual four-year 
program of the College In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College of Agri- 
culture. Students desiring to pursue a pre-theological pro- 
gram in the College of Agriculture of the University of 
Maryland should consult with the president or admissions 
officer of the theological seminary which they expect to 
attend. 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

The pre-veterinary medicine program is based upon the 
requirements established by the Colleges of Veterinary 
Medicine where students who are residents of Maryland 
may be offered admission. 

There is no College of Veterinary Medicine in Maryland. 
However, the State of Maryland participates under an agree- 
ment with the Southern Regional Education Board for the 
education of Maryland residents in veterinary medicine. Up 
to four spaces a year in the College of Veterinary 
Medicine at the University of Georgia, up to five spaces a 
year at Tuskegee Institute and up to fifteen spaces a year 
at the University of Florida are reserved for qualified 
Maryland residents who may be offered admission by the 
respective institutions. 

The University of Maryland also has an agreement with 
The Ohio State University under which a maximum of six 
Maryland residents may be offered admission each year by 
the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State University 

The Colleges of Veterinary Medicine at the University of 
Georgia, The Ohio State University, The University of Florida 
and Tuskegee Institute have the final and exclusive authority 
on all matters related to admission. 

It is not possible for Colleges of Veterinary Medicine to 
admit all eligible applicants Therefore, pre-professional 
students are urged to consider alternate objectives in a 
program leading to the B S degree. 

Undergraduate students who have completed three years 
in the pre-veterinary program in the University of Maryland 
College of Agriculture and have not been admitted to a 
college of veterinary medicine may transfer to one of the 
curnculums at the University of Maryland in order to com- 
plete the B S degree 

No specific major is required for favorable consideration 
by a veterinary school admissions committee 

The course requirements listed represent the minimum 
requirements for admission to the Colleges of Veterinary 
Medicine. University of Georgia, Tuskegee Institute. Oho 
State and University of Florida 





Semester 




Credit 




Hours 




18 


Physics 


8 


Mathematics (calculus) 


3 


Biology (including genetics & microbiology) 


12 


Animal Science (2) 


6 




6 


Humanities and Social Studies 


14 


Electives (3| 


16 



ENGL 1 01 . 29 1 or 292 or 293 
English or Speech Elective 
BOTN101 212 
CHEM103. 104 
Economics 



Oho State University regures mat Bocnematry be included 
University ol Fionaa regures 6 credts n Arwnal Seance wnch must rckjde 
an introductory course r Animal Seance and a course m Arwnal Nutnton 
Students are encouraged to elect courses •< Arwnal Science Bochematry 
Animal Anatomy, and Physobgy 



40 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Combined Degree Curriculum— College of 
Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine. 

Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture who have 
completed at least 90 hours, including all University. Division 
and College requirements, plus additional credits in Animal 
Science, may qualify for the B S degree from the University 
of Maryland. College of Agriculture, upon successful com- 
pletion in a College of Veterinary Medicine of at least 30 
semester hours 

Combined Degree Requirements 

Semester 

Credit 
Hours 

General University Requirements 30 
ANSC 221— Fundamentals of 

Animal Production 3 

ANSC 21 1— Anatomy of Domestic Animals 4 

ANSC 212— Applied Animal Physiology 4 

BOTN 101— General Botany* 4 

ZOOL 101 —Gen eral Zoology 4 

Mathematics (must include at least 3 credits 

of Calculus) - 6 

CHEM 1 03— College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry III 3 

CHEM 202— College Chemistry Laboratory III 2 

CHEM 203— College Chemistry IV 3 

CHEM 204— College Chemistry Laboratory IV 2 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

PH YS 1 22 —Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

Electives . 9 

"Satisfies Divisional Requirements. 

Additional information about this program may be obtained 
from the Department of Veterinary Science. 

Institute of Applied Agriculture 
Two-Year Program. 

The programs of study offered by the Institute of Applied 
Agriculture will assist men and women interested in 
preparing for specific jobs in the broad fields of applied 
science and business in agriculture. 

Three major programs are currently offered: 

1 Business Farming — technical training for farm 
operation, or a career in business providing supplies and 
services to those in production agriculture 

2 Turfgrass and Golf Course Management — 
concentrates on the technical and management skills 
required for professional turf management and for 
occupations in the rapidly expanding field of turf 
maintenance. 

3. Ornamental Horticulture and Nursery Management — 
a program leading toward several occupational choices 
including greenhouse management, nursery management, 
landscape management, and floral shop management 

Courses taken in these programs are not transferable for 
degree credits at the University of Maryland. Students 
satisfactorily completing two years of study are awarded an 
appropriate certificate For additional information write: 
Director. Institute of Applied Agriculture. University of 
Maryland. College Park, Maryland 20742 

Biological Sciences Program 

This program is designed for the student who is interested 
in a broader education in the biological sciences than is 
available in the programs for majors in the various depart- 
ments of the Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences. The 
program is appropriate for the entering student who wishes 
to explore the various areas of biology before specializing 
in the program offered by a single department, or for the 
student desiring to specialize in a discipline which can best 
be constituted by the selection of courses from the various 
departments in the biological sciences. 

Preparation for graduate study in a specialized area of 
biology is readily accomplished under this program by the 
judicious selection of junior-senior level courses in the pro- 
posed area of graduate concentration Where the proposed 



area of graduate specialization lies within a single depart- 
mental discipline, it may be desirable for the student to 
transfer to the program for majors in that department 

Advising of students in this curnculum will be coordinated 
in a central advising office to be established by the Division 
of Agricultural and Life Sciences The student in this 
program may emphasize work in animal science, botany, 
entomology, microbiology, or zoology and will be advised by 
the department or curriculum in which most of the work is 
taken Alternatively, the student may concentrate in a spe- 
cialized area of biology (eg ecology, genetics, physiology, 
or marine biologyjwhich cuts across departmental bound- 
aries. In this case an advisor competent in the area of 
emphasis will be selected For careful planning and advising, 
the area of emphasis should be chosen as soon as possible, 
and must be declared before registration for the junior year 
Changes in emphasis normally cannot be made during the 
senior year without delaying graduation Students in this 
program who are also attempting to meet the 
requirements of a pre-professional program should also 
seek advice from advisers for the respective programs. 
Students in the program who wish to prepare for 
secondary school science teaching should contact the 
staff of the Science Teaching Center of the College of 
Education for information concerning requirements for 
certification. 

Curriculum. All students in the Biological Sciences Program 
must satisfy the requirements of the University of Maryland 
at College Park and the requirements of the Division of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences. 

Basic Course Requirements. 

1 A course in general biological principles, including 
laboratory, which may be satisfied by any one of the 
following courses: 

a. BOTN 101. General Botany for Agricultural and 
Science Students (4) 

b. ZOOL 101, General Zoobgy(4) 

2. Two courses in diversity of living organisms including 
BOTN 202, the Plant Kingdom (4). and either ENTM 
200, Introduction to Entomology (3). or ZOOL 293. 
Animal Diversity (4). 

3. MICB 200, General Microbiology (4). 

4. A basic course in genetics which may be satisfied by 
one of the following courses: 

a. ANSC 201. Basic Principles of Animal Genetics (3) 

b. BOTN 41 4, Plant Genetics (3). 

c. ZOOL 246. Genetics (4). 

d. HORT 274, Genetics of Cultured Plants (3). 

5. Required supporting courses in mathematics and 
physical sciences: 

a. MATH 1 10, 1 1 1, Introduction to Mathematics I, 
II (3.3) or MATH 115,1 40,lntroduction to 
Analysis and Analysis I (3,4) or any higher 
mathematics sequence for which these courses 
are prerequisite, (for many areas of biology, 
completion of a year of calculus. MATH 220. 221 
or MATH 140.141 is recommended.) 

b CHEM 103, 104 or CHEM 105, 106, College 
Chemistry I, II (4,4) CHEM 203, 204 or 
CHEM 213,214, College Chemistry IV (3,2). 
Students in certain programs will also need 
CHEM 20 1 . 202. College Chemistry III (3.2) 

c PHYS 121, 122 or 141, 1 42. Fundamentals of 
Physics (4,4). 

It is not necessary that all the required courses listed 
above be completed before registering for advanced 
courses; however, these courses are prerequisite to many 
of the advanced courses and should be completed early in 
the program. 

Advanced Program. In addition to the required courses 
listed above, the student must complete 22 hours of biolog- 
ical sciences selected from approved courses in animal 
science, botany, entomology, microbiology or zoology, or in 
other courses which have been specifically approved by the 
Biological Sciences Committee. Of these credits, at least 
two courses must involve laboratory or field work and at 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 41 



least 18 hours must be in courses numbered 300 or above 
Two of the five departments listed above must be repre- 
sented by at least one course in the 18 hours of 300-400 
level work Courses currently approved for the advanced 
program include 
AGRO 105.403, 422 and 423 
AGRI301 or 401 or an equivalent 

ANSC 211. 212. 252. 401. 406. 411. 412. 413. 414. 416. 446. 
452 and 466 

BOTN All courses except BO TN 1 00. 1 1 . 202 and 4 1 4 
CHEM 201 . 202. 261 . 461 . 462. 463 and 464 
ENTM All courses except ENTM 100 and 1 1 1 
HORT 171 and 271 

MICB All courses except MICB 200 and 322 
PSYC 400. 402. 403. 4 10. 4 1 2 and 479 
ZOOL All courses except ZOOL 1 01 , 1 46. 207 and 246 

Research experience in various fields of biology, bio- 
chemistry and psychology are possible under this plan by 
special arrangement with faculty research advisers Not 
more than 3 hours of special problems or research can 
be taken as part of the advanced program requirement 
of 22 hours. 

A Biological Sciences Honors Program is under consider- 
ation Inquiries about such a program should be directed to 
the Chairman of the Biological Sciences Committee 

Botany 

Professor and Chairman: Sisler. 

Protessors: Brown (Emeritus). Corbett, Galloway. 

Gauch (Emeritus), Kantzes. Klarman. Krusberg. 

D T. Morgan, O. D.. Morgan. Patterson. Sorokin 

(Emeritus). Stern. Weaver. 

Associate Professors: Barnett. Bean. Bottino. Curtis. 

Karlander. Lockard. Motta. Rappleye. Reveal. 

Assistant Professors: Blevins. Broome. Harrison, 

Stevenson. Van Valkenburg. 

Instructors: Grigg, Higgins. 

The Department offers work in the major fields of physi- 
ology, pathology, ecology, taxonomy, anatomy-morphology, 
and genetics 

The required courses for the freshman and sophomore 
years are the same for all students. In the junior and senior 
years, the student elects botany courses to suit his her 
particular interest Courses are required in other subjects to 
satisfy General University Requirements which contribute 
toward a broad cultural education, and to support the 
courses selected in the chosen field of botany 

The curriculum provides a complete survey of the field of 
botany, and lays a good foundation for graduate work in 
botany in preparation for teaching and for research in ex- 
periment stations or private research laboratories 

Students who wish to meet the requirements for certifi- 
cates in secondary education are required to meet the 
specific science and mathematics requirements for a 
biology science education major, in addition to the regular 
education block and student teaching Student teaching is a 
full-time semester commitment As long as the demand con- 
tinues, a series of advanced courses will be offered in rota- 
tion in the summer session, especially for teachers working 
toward the degree of Master of Education in science 
teaching. 

The Department of Botany has instituted an Honors 
Program which a student may enter if he/she desires and 
if he/she meets the requirements of the program 



Department of Botany Requirements 



BOTN 1 1 —General Botany 

BOTN 202— Plant Kingdom 

BOTN 2 1 2— Plant Taxonomy 

BOTN 221— Diseases ot Plants 

BOTN 398— Semnar 

BOTN 414— Hani Genetics 

BOTN 416— Principles of Plant Anatomy 

BOTN 44 1 —Plant Physiology 

dOTN 462— Plant Ecology 

Chem 103— College Chemistry I* 



Semester 
Credit 
Hours 



Chem 


1 04 —College Chemistry II 


4 


MATH 


110. 111 —Introduction to Mathematics 






or MATH 140.141* 


6 


MICB 


200— General Microbiology 


4 


PHYS 


121 — Fundamentals ot Physics 1 


4 


PHYS 


1 22— Fundamentals of Physics II 


4 


ZOOL 


1 1 —Gen er al Zoology ' 


4 


Botany 


elect ives or related courses 


10 


Electivi 


3S 


21 


Genera 


I University Requirements 


30 



Chemistry 



Acting Chairman: McNesby 

Associate Chairman: Castellan 

Professors: Adler, Ammon, Castellan. Freeman, Gardner, 

Goldsby. Gordon. Grim, Henery-Logan, Holmlund, Huheey. 

Jaquith. Keeney, Munn. Pickard. Ponnamperuma. Pratt 

(Emeritus). Reeve, Rollinson, Staley. Steward, C Stuntz. 

Svirbely (Emeritus), Vanderslice. Veitch (Emeritus). Viola 

Associate Professors: Alexander. Bellama, Boyd, 

Campagnoni, DeVoe. Hansen, Helz, Jarvis, Kasler, Khanna, 

Lakshmanan. Martin. Mazzocchi, Miller. Moore. Murphy. 

O'Haver. Sampugna, Walters. Zoller 

Assistant Protessors: Bergeron, Heikkinen, R Rowan. 

Tossell 

Reserach Professor: Bailey 

Visiting Professors: Breger (p.t .). Durst (p t .), McNesby. Rose 

(p t ).Trombka(p.t.) 

Lecturers: Chaiken (p t .). Driscoll. Fisher 

Instructors: Doherty, Gamble. Schiesler. Pettigrew, N Rowan 

(p.t), S. Stuntz. 

Visiting Associate Professor: Whited (p t ) 

The curriculum in chemistry is centered around a basic 
core of 30 credits (18 lower-division and 12 upper -division) 
in chemistry An additional two credits must be chosen from 
among other upper-division courses in chemistry The 
program is designed to provide the maximum amount of 
flexibility to students seeking preparation for either the 
traditional branches of chemistry or the interdisciplinary 
fields Students wishing a degree program specifically 
certified by the American Chemical Society must elect more 
than the minimum number of elective credits in chemistry and 
must choose judiciously among the upper-division courses 
offered In addition, the ACS-certified degree program 
presently recommends German or Russian 

A sample program listing only the required or 
recommended courses, is given below It is expected that 
each semester's electives will include courses intended to 
satisfy the general requirements of the University or of the 
Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences, plus others of the 
student's choice 



Chem 103 or 105 
Math 140* 
Electives 



FIRST YEAR 

4 Chem 104 or 106 

4 Math 141* 

7 Electives 

15 



'Students nmaly placed m MATH 115 will delay MATH 140 and 141 on* 



Chem 201 or 211 
Chem 202 or 21 2 
Physics 141 
Electives 



Chem 430 
Chem 481 
Electives 



SECOND YEAR 

3 Chem203or213 

2 Chem 204 or 21 4 

4 Physics 142 
6 Electives 

15 

THIRD YEAR 

3 Chem 431 
3 Chem 482 
9 Electives 

15 



FOURTH YEAR 
Electives 15 Electives 15 

For American Chemical Society certification the student 
should consult his or her advisor for course recommend- 
ations that will meet certification requirements 



42 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Agricultural Chemistry. A program In Agricultural 
Chemistry is ottered within the College of Agriculture. 
Seepage lor details. 

Biochemistry. The Chemistry Department also otters a 
maior in biochemistry In addition to the lower-division 
chemistry sequence, the program requires: 
Chemistry 461 and 462; Chemistry 481 and 482;Chemistry 
430 and 464, MATH 140 and 141; PHYS 141 and 142 
and nine credits ol approved biological science that must 
include at least one upper-division course A sample pro- 
gram, listing only the required courses, is given below It is 
expected that each semester's electives will include 
courses intended to satisfy the general requirements of the 
University or ot the Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences, 
plus others of the students choice 

FIRST YEAR 

Chem 103 or 105 4 Chem 104 or 106 4 

Math 140' 4 Math 141 4 

Electives" * 7 Electives 7 

15 15 

•Students mitialy placed in MATH 115 will delay MATH 140 and 141 one 
semestet 
'"It is suggested that the first year electives include at least one course in 
biological science 

SECOND YEAR 
Chem201or211 3 Chem 203or 213 3 

Chem 202 or 212 2 Chem 204 or 214 2 

Physics 141 .4 Physics 142 . .., 4 

Electives . . . 6 Electives 6 

15 15 

THIRD YEAR 

Chem 481 3 Chem 482 3 

Chem 430 3 Chem 464.. 2 

Chem 461 3 Chem 462 3 

Electives 6 Electives 7 

15 15 

FOURTH YEAR 
Electives 15 Electives 15 

The Chemistry Department's Honors Program begins in 
the junior year. Interested students should see the 
Departmental Honors Committee for further information. 



Entomology 

Professor and Chairman: Steinhauer 

Professors: Bickley, Cory (Emeritus). Davidson, Harding, 

Harrison, Jones, Menzer. Messersmith 

Associate Professors: Bissell (emeritus). Caron, 

Haviland (Emerita), Krestensen, 

Reichelderfer. Wood 

Assistant Professors: Armstrong. Denno, Dively 

Hellmon. Linduska.Nelson. 

Lecturers: Heimpel, Spangler, 

Visiting Professor: Wirth. 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Miller 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Gordh. 

This curriculum prepares students for various types of 
entomological positions or for graduate work in any of the 
specialized areas of entomology Professional entomolo- 
gists are engaged in fundamental and applied research in 
university, government, and private laboratories; regulatory 
and control activities with federal and state agencies; com- 
mercial pest control and pest management services; sales 
and development programs with chemical companies and 
other commercial organizations; consulting, extension work; 
and teaching. 

Most of the first two years of the curriculum is devoted 
to obtaining the essential background. In the junior and 
senior years there is an opportunity for some specialization 
or for electing courses in preparation for graduate work 
Students contemplating graduate work are strongly advised 
to elect courses in physics, modern foreign languages, 
mathematics, and biometrics. 



Sen '-■.'•■' 
Clean 
Hours 



3,2 
6 
3 



Department of Entomology Requirements 



General University Requirements 

ZOOL 293— Animal Diversity 
BOTN 101— General Botany" 
CHEM 103 104— College Chemistry III" 
CHEM 20 1 ,202 —College Chemistry III and 

Colege Chemistry Laboratory III 
MATH- 
GENETICS 
2 ot the following 3 courses 

BOTN 212 — Plant Taxonomy 

BOTN 221— Diseases ol Plants 

CHEM 461— Biochemistry I 
MICB 200— General Microbiology 
ENTM 204— General Entomology 
ENTM 421 —Insect Taxonomy and Biology 
ENTM 432— Insect Morphology 
ENTM 442— Insect Physiology 
2 of the following 3 courses 

ENTM 451— Economic Entomology 

ENTM 462-lnsect Pathology 

ENTM 472-Medical and Veterinary 
Entomology 
ENTM 498— Seminar 
ENTM 399— Special Problems 
Electives 



Geology 

Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: Siegrist. 
Associate Professors: Segovia, Sommer, Stifel, Weidner 
Assistant Professors: Ridky, Wylie. 

Geology is the basic ftdence of the earth In its broadest 
sense, geology concerns itself with planetary formation and 
modification with emphasis on the study of the planet Earth 
This study directs its attention to the earth's internal and 
external structure, materials, chemical and physical proc- 
esses and its physical and biological history. Geology con- 
cerns itself with the application of geological principles and 
with application of physics, chemistry, biology and mathe- 
matics to the understanding of our planet. 

Geological studies thus encompass understanding the 
development of life from the fossil record, the mechanics of 
crustal movement and earthquake production, the evolution 
of the oceans and their interaction with land, the origin and 
emplacement of mineral and fuel resources and the deter- 
mination of man's impact on the geological environment. 

Geological scientists find employment in government, 
industrial and academic establishments. In general, graduate 
training is expected for advancement to the most rewarding 
positions Most industrial positions require a MS degree 
Geology is enjoying a strong employment outlook at the 
present because of our mineral, fuel and environmental 
concerns. At this time, students with the B.S., particularly 
those with training in geophysics, can find satisfactory 
employment. However, graduate school is strongly recom- 
mended for those students desiring a professional career in 
the geosciences. 

The Geology Program includes a broad range of under- 
graduate courses to accommodate both geology majors and 
students interested in selected aspects of the science of 
the Earth Opportunities exist for undergraduate research 
projects, on a personal level, between students and faculty 
members. 

The Geology curricula is designed to meet the require- 
ments of industry, graduate school and government. How- 
ever, students may select, at their option, geology electives 
that are designed for a particular interest, rather than for the 
broad needs of a professional career. Courses required for 
the B.S in Geology are listed below: 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
General University Requirements 30 

Divisionat Requirements 
Biological Science . 
3 or 4 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 43 



MATH, CHEM (See Below) 
Departmental Requirements 
GEOL100(3) 
GEOL102(3) 
GEOL110(1) 
GEOL112(1) 
GEOL399(2) 
GEOL422(4) 
GEOL431 (4) 
GEOL441 (4) 
Geology Summer Camp (5) 

Supporting Re quirements 
CHEM 103, 104(4.4) 
MATH 140, 141 (4,4) 
PHYS 141. 142(4.4) 

Electives 



Microbiology 



35 
or 36 



Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: Roberson 

Prolessors: Colwell, Doetsch, Faber (Emeritus). Hetrick, 

Laffer. Pelczar, Young. 

Associate Professors: Cook, MacQuillan, Voll, Weiner. 

Assistant Professors: Howard 

Lecturers: Gherna(p.t). Morris (pt), Stadtman (pt.) 

Instructor: Howell 

The Department of Microbiology has as its primary aim 
providing the student with thorough and rigorous training in 
microbiology This entails knowledge of the basic concepts 
of bacterial cytology, physiology, taxonomy, metabolism, 
and genetics, as well as an understanding of the biology of 
infectious disease, immunology, general virology, and 
various applications of microbiological principles to public 
health and industrial processes. In addition, the department 
pursues a broad and vigorous program of basic research, 
and encourages original thought and investigation in the 
above-mentioned areas 

The department also provides desirable courses for 
students majoring in allied departments who wish to obtain 
vital, supplementary information. Every effort has been made 
to present the subject matter of microbiology as a basic core 
of material that is pertinent to all biological sciences. 

The curriculum outlined below, which leads to a bachelor's 
degree, includes the basic courses in microbiology and 
allied fields. 

A student planning a major in microbiology should consult 
a departmental advisor as soon as possible after deciding 
upon this action. The supporting courses should be chosen 
only from the biological and physical sciences. 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
major requirements. 

Information concerning the Honors Program may be 
obtained in the departmental office. 

The major in the department consists of minimum of 
twenty-four semester hours, including MICB 200 — General 
Microbiology (4), and MICB 440 — Pathogenic Micro- 
biology (4) In addition, at least sixteen additional hours 
must be selected from MICB 290 — Applied Microbiology 
(4). MICB 300 — Microbiological Literature (1). MICB 330 

— Microbial Ecology (2), MICB 378 — Honors Internship 
(3), MICB 379 — Honors Research (3), MICB 380 — 
Microbial Genetics (4). MICB 388 — Special Topics (1-4), 
MICB 399 — Microbiological Problems* (3). MICB 400 — 
Systematic Microbiology (2). MICB 410 — History of Micro- 
biology (1). MICB 420 — Epidemiology and Public Health 
(2). MICB 430 — Marine Microbiology (2), MICB 431 — 
Marine Microbiology Laboratory (2). MICB 450 — Im- 
munology (4). MICB 460 — General Virology (4). MICB 470 

— Microbial Physiology (4), MICB 490 — Microbial Fer- 
mentations (2). MICB 491 — Microbial Fermentations 
Laboratory (2) 

MICB 322 — Microbiology and the Public (3) is a general 
survey course and is not open to majors in the biological 
sciences 

*MICB 399 may be used only once towards meeting the 
major requirements 



Required as courses supporting the major are CHEM 
103. 104 (4, 4). 201 (3). 202 (2), 203 (3), 204 (2) College 
Chemistry (with laboratories) I, II. III. and IV; CHEM 461, 
462 (3, 3) Biochemistry; MATH 1 10, 1 1 1 — Introduction to 
Mathematics (3, 3) or equivalent; PHYS 121, 122 — Funda- 
mentals of Physics (4. 4); ZOOL 101 — General Zoology 
(4) and four additional semester hours in a biological science 
(MATH 220, 221 — Introductory Calculus (3. 3) or equiva- 
lent is strongly recommended but not required ) 

Course Code Prefix— MICB 

Zoology 

Professor and Chairman Corliss 

Professor and Assistant Chairman: Haley 

Professors: Anastos, Brinkley. Brown, Clark, Grollman, 

Highton, Jachowski. Morse. Schleidt 

Associate Professors: Allan, Barnett. Contrera, Gill. Goode, 

Imberski. Levitan. Under, Pierce. J Potter, Small, Vermeij. 

Assistant Professors: Bonar, Buchler. Higgins, Inouye. 

Reaka 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Smith-Gill 

Instructors: Bartberger, Cote. Knox. Piper, Spalding 

Adjunct Professors: Eisenberg, Otto, M Potter 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Heinle 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Morton 

I. Description of Program. The Department of Zoology 
offers a program leading to a B S with a major in Zoology. 
The program is planned to give each student an appreciation 
of the diversity of the problems studied by zoologists and an 
opportunity to explore, in detail, the kinds of problems 
delineating the specialized fields of Zoology and the nature 
of observation and experimentation appropriate to investiga- 
tions within these fields. The requirements of 26 hours in 
Zoology, including one course in each of four broad areas, 
together with supporting courses in Chemistry, Mathe- 
matics, and Physics, permit students to develop their 
interests in the general field of Zoology or to concentrate 
in a special area Courses in Zoobgy satisfying the broad 
area requirements are offered at the sophomore and junior- 
senior levels and may be taken upon completion of the 
prerequisites for a chosen course Majors are urged to 
complete the required supporting course in Chemistry, 
Mathematics, and Physics as early as possible since these 
courses are prerequisites for many courses in Zoology 

II. Curriculum For Zoology Majors. There are no specified 
courses in Zoology required of all majors ZOOL 101. 
General Zoology, is available for students who need an 
introductory course before proceeding to more advanced 
zoology courses Competence equivalent to the successful 
completion of ZOOL 101 is prerequisite to all zoology 
courses that are accepted for credit toward the major 
Credits earned in ZOOL 101 are not accepted for credit 
toward the major 

All majors are required to complete a minimum of 26 credit 
hours in Zoology with an average grade of C Fourteen of the 
twenty-six hours must be earned in 300-400 level courses 
and two of these courses must have accompanying 
laboratories. Most Zoology courses that are accepted for 
credit toward the major have been grouped into four broad 
areas based upon the level of biological organization 
studied The areas and their corresponding courses are 
I, cells and cell organelles; II. tissues, organs and organ 
systems; III. organisms, and IV, populations and communities 
of organisms One 3 or 4 credit course in each of these 
areas is required ZOOL 271 must accompany ZOOL 270. 
and ZOOL 471 must accompany ZOOL 470 for these 
courses to fulfill the Area IV requirement 



AREA I 

ZOOL 246- 
200L 411- 
ZOOL413- 
ZOOL415- 
ZOOL446- 
ZOOL447- 

AREAII 

ZOOL201- 
ZOOL202- 
Z00L421- 



Genetics(4) 
•Cell Biology (3| 
■Biophysics (3) 
•Cell Differentiation (3) 
•Molecular Genetics (3) 
Experimental Genetics (4) 

■ Human Anatomy and Physiology 1(4) 

■ Human Anatomy and Physiology 1(4) 
Neurophysiology (4) 



44 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology (4) 
ZOOL 426— General Endocrinology (3) 
ZOOL 495— Mammalian Histology (4) 
AREA III 

ZOOL 1 02— The Animal Phyla (4)' 

ZOOL 230— Developmental Biology (4) 

ZOOL 290— Comparative Vertetxite Morphology (4| 

ZOOL 293— Animal Overall ' (■*»* 

ZOOL 430— Vertebrate Fr- >ryotogy(4) 

ZOOL 4 7 2 — Protozoology (4 ) 

ZOOL 475— General Paao.iology (4) 

ZOOL 477— Symblolo gy (2) 

ZOOL 481 —Biology of Marine and Estuarlne 

lnvertebratos(4| 
ZOOL 482— Marine Vertebrate Zoology (4) 
ZOOL 483— Vertebrate Zoology (4) 
ZOOL 492— Form and Pattern in Organisms (3) 

•Credit lor only 1 course, either ZOOL 1 02 or ZOOL 293. is permitted 



AREA IV 

ZOOL 2 70— Population Biology and General Ecology (3) 
ZOOL 2 7 1 —Population Biology and General Ecology 

Laboratory (1) 
ZOOL 440— Evolution (3) 
ZOOL 444— Advanced Evolutionary Biology (3) 
ZOOL 460— Ethology (3) 
ZOOL 461 — Ethology Laboratory (3) 
ZOOL 470— Advanced Animal Ecology (2) 
ZOOL 471 —Laboratory and Field Ecology (2) 
ZOOL 480— Aquatic Biology (4) 



Additional courses to complete the required 26 hours in 
Zoology may be selected from any of the undergraduate 
courses in Zoology except ZOOL 101, General Zoology (4); 
ZOOL 146, Heredity and Man (3); ZOOL 181, Ecology of 
the Oceans (3); and ZOOL 207S. Development of the 
Human Body (2). 

In addition to the above courses, students may submit a 
total of seven credits earned in the following courses toward 
the 26 hour requirements. 

ZOOL 205 — History of Zoology ( 1 ) 

ZOOL 206— Zoological Literature ( 1 ) 

ZOOL 209— Basic Study in Zoology (1-4) 

ZOOL 31 9— Special Problems in Zoology (1 -2) 

ZOOL 328— Selected Topics in Zoobgy (1 -4) 
Up to seven hours of credit in ZOOL 319, Special 
Problems in Zoology, and ZOOL 328, Selected Topics in 
Zoology may be used to fulfill the fourteen required hours at 
the 300-400 level providing all other requirements are met 

Students participating in the General or Departmental 
Honors Programs may submit credits earned in the following 
courses toward the 26 hours requirement. 

ZOOL 308H— Honor Seminar ( 1 ) 

ZOOL 309H— Honors Independent Study (1 -4) 

ZOOL 31 8H— Honors Research (1 -2) 

III. Required Supporting Courses. 

1. CHEM 103, 104, College Chemistry I and II (4, 4)orCHEM 105, 
106, Principles of College Chemistry I and II (4, 4) 

2 CHEM 201. 202, College Chemistry III and Laboratory III (3, 2) or 
CHEM 211, 212, Principles of College Chemistry III and 
Laboratory III (3, 2) 

3 Mathematics through one year of calculus: I.e., completion of 
MATH 220. 221, Elementary Calculus (3. 3) or MATH 140. 141, 
Analysis I. II (4. 4) 

4. Physics 121. 122. Fundamentals of Physics (4. 4) or Physics 

141, 142, Principles of Physics (4, 4). 
5 One of the following courses 

AGRI 301— Introduction to Agricultural Biometrics (3) 

AGRI 401— Agricultural Biometrics (3) 

CHEM 203, 204— College Chemistry IV and Laboratory 
IV (3,2) 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra (4) 

PSYC 200— Statistical Methods in Psychology (3) 

SOC Y 20 1 —Introductory Statistics for Sociology (3) 

STAT 250— Introduction to Statistical Models (3) 

STAT 400— Applied Probability and Statistics I (3) 

STAT 464— Introduction to Biostatistics (3) 

IV. Advisement. Although sample programs for Zoology 
majors interested in different fields may be obtained from the 
Zoology office, it is strongly recommended that all majors 
consult a Zoology Department advisor at least once every 



year Majors planning to specialize in a particular field of 
Zoology should satisfy the area requirements during their 
freshman and sophomore years and take the 400 level 
courses In their chosen specialty Students desiring to 
enter graduate study in certain areas of Zoology should take 
Biochemistry, Physical Chemistry, Advanced Statistics, 
Advanced Mathematics, and/or Philosophy of Science as a 
part of their undergraduate electives Courses of interest to 
Zoology majors In Animal Science, Anthropology. Botany 
Electrical Engineering, Entomology, Geography. Geology. 
Microbiology, and Psychology are listed in the Under- 
graduate Catalogue under the appropriate departments 

V. Honors. The Department of Zoology also offers a special 
program for the exceptionally talented and premising 
student The Honors Program emphasizes the scholarly 
approach to independent study. Information regarding this 
program may be obtained from the departmental office or 
from the chairman of the Zoology Honors Program 

Course Code Prefix— ZOOL 

The Agricultural Experiment Station. The Maryland 
Agricultural Experiment Station is currently conducting more 
than 200 research projects. These are conducted by faculty 
who supervise and direct research assistants, graduate and 
undergraduate students and technicians. The research may 
be conducted in laboratories or at one of the nine field 
locations throughout Maryland operated by the Experiment 
Station or even in fields, herds or flocks of cooperating 
farmers. 

The overall objective of the Experiment Station is to 
enhance all aspects of Maryland agriculture for the benefit 
of farmers, farm-related business and consumers through 
optimal utilization, conservation and protection of soil and 
water resources Genetic principles are studied and applied 
in the improvement of turf and ornamentals, vegetable crops, 
field crops, poultry, dairy and other animals Similarly, 
pathological principles are of concern in improvement of 
methods of identification, prevention and/or control of 
plant and animal diseases. Biochemistry plays an important 
role in evaluating the nutritional quality of crops produced, 
the efficiency of feed conversion by poultry and animals or 
the quality of plant and animal products for human con- 
sumption. Research in progress is concerened with im- 
provement of processing systems to enhance food quality 
on one hand and the impact of nutritional deficiencies and 
means of remedying these on the other. Also directly in 
the consumer area is the study of clothing quality. 

Improved production techniques including waste utiliza- 
tion or disposal require studies involving soil-moisture- 
plant relationships and plant, bird, or animal-environment 
relationships and also studies of the applications of 
engineering for producing or maintaining the optimal 
environment for biobgical systems. 

Studies of biological and mechanical methods and im- 
proved chemical control of insects in the field, forests, 
food processing chain and the home are continuous 

The socio-economics of changing agricultural systems 
are a major research area and increasing attention is being 
oriented towards rural development, including resource 
utilization for non-farm residents and recreation 

The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station was estab- 
lished in 1888 to comply with the Hatch Act of 1887 
authorizing the establishment of an agricultural experiment 
station at the Land Grant Colleges. Actually, the charter of 
the Maryland Agricultural College in 1856 specifically 
authorized establishment of a demonstration farm. The 
Station is supported by federal funds under the Hatch Act 
as amended, State appropriations, grants and contracts with 
State and federal agencies and by gifts or other support 
from individuals and farm-related businesses and industry. 

Cooperative Extension Service. Cooperative Extension 
work, established by State and federal laws in 1914, 
extends practical information beyond the classrooms of the 
University of Maryland to young people and adults — both 
rural and urban — throughout the State of Maryland. Major 
program areas include agriculture and marine environment, 
family living, youth development, and community develop- 
ment. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 45 



The educational endeavors of the Cooperative Extension 
Service are financed jointly by federal, state and county 
governments In each county and in Baltimore City com- 
petent extension agents conduct educational work in pro- 
gram areas consistent with the needs of the citizenry and 
as funds permit The county staff is supported by a faculty 
of specialists in the Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
in College Park and the agricultural programs of University of 
Maryland Eastern Shore Through their mutual efforts, local 
people are assisted in finding solutions to their problems 

The Cooperative Extension Service works in close 
harmony and association with many groups and organiza- 
tions. In addition to work on farms and with agri-businesses, 
extension programs are aimed at many small and part time 
farmers, rural non-farm and urban family consumers as well 
as watermen and marine related businessmen. Both rural 
and urban families learn good food habits through the 
Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program. Thou- 
sands of boys and girls gain leadership knowledge and 
experience and are provided practical educational instruc- 
tion in 4-H clubs and other youth groups. 

To accomplish its mission, the Cooperative Extension 
Service works closely with teaching and research faculty 
of the University and with units of the University outside of 
agriculture, as well as state and federal agencies and private 
groups Thousands of short courses, workshops and con- 
ferences in various fields of interest are conducted on the 
College Park Campus and at other locations throughout the 
state A wide variety of publications and radio and tele- 
vision are used extensively to reach the people of Maryland 

The Division of 
Arts and 
Humanities 



The Division of Arts and Humanities offers its students a 
variety of educational opportunities in addition to the tradi- 
tional liberal education associated with humanistic studies, 
including possibilities for interdisciplinary and multi-disci- 
plinary programs, independent and general study programs, 
and special intensive programs designed to meet individual 
student needs. Students electing to major in one of the 
creative or performing arts may choose between an 
academically oriented and a professionally oriented program. 
The Division also serves the needs of students from the 
other four academic divisions who wish to elect courses in 
the arts and humanities. 

The units in the Division are: School of Architecture, 
College of Journalism. American Studies Program, Depart- 
ment of Art, Department of Classical Languages and Litera- 
tures. Department of Dance, Department of English, 
Department of French and Italian Languages and Literatures, 
Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Litera- 
tures, Department of History, Department of Music, Oriental 
and Hebrew Program, Department of Philosophy, Depart- 
ment of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures, 
and Department of Speech and Dramatic Art. 

Entrance Requirements. The student who intends to 
pursue a program of study in the Division of Arts and 
Humanities should include the following subjects in a high 
school program: College Preparatory Mathematics (Algebra, 
Plane Geometry), three or four units: Foreign Language, two 
units; History and Social Sciences, one or more units 
Students lacking such high school preparation may still 
pursue an education in the Division by making up for such 
deficiencies through course work or independent study on 
the College Park Campus Students wishing to major in one 
of the creative or performing arts are encouraged to seek 
training in the skills associated with such an area prior to 
matriculation Students applying for entrance to these pro- 
grams may be required to audition, present slides or a port- 
folio as a part of the admission requirements Entrance 
requirements for the School of Architecture and the College 
of Journalism are given below. 

Degrees. Students who satisfactorily complete Division 
requirements are awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



Those who complete satisfactorily a special pre-professional 
program in the Department of Music are awarded the degree 
of Bachelor of Music The School of Architecture awards the 
Bachelor of Architecture degree: the Bachelor of Science is 
awarded by the College of Journalism 

General Requirements for All Degrees: 

A. A minimum of 120 semester hours (161 in Architecture) 

with at least a C average 
B General University Requirements 
C Division, College, or School degree requirements 
D Major requirements 

The following Division requirements apply only to students 
earning Bachelor of Arts degrees from the Division of Arts 
and Humanities For information concerning other degree 
programs within the Division (Bachelor of Architecture and 
Bachelor of Science in the School of Architecture, Bachelor 
of Science in the College of Journalism, and Bachelor of 
Music in the Department of Music), the student should 
consult advisors in those units 

Division Requirements 

Note: These requirements are to apply until new policies 
of the Division of Arts and Humanities are published 

Foreign Language. Demonstration of proficiency equiva- 
lent to the level achieved by completion of the first 1 2 
semester hours study of a foreign language. 
a The requirement may be met by students who have 
successfully completed level three in high school in one 
foreign language or level two in each of two foreign 
languages, 
b. A student who does not meet the requirements under 
paragraph a, must show proficiency through the inter- 
mediate level of college language. This may be done as 
follows: 

1 . Take the placement examination in the language in 
which he has background, begin at the college level 
indicated by the test, and continue through the inter- 
mediate level; or 
2 Pass the proficiency test for intermediate level given 
by the respective language departments. 
The languages which may be offered to meet this require- 
ment are Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, 
Japanese, Latin. Portuguese, Russian and Spanish 

Normally a student shall not be permitted to repeat a 
foreign language course below the 200 level for credit if he 
has successfully completed a higher numbered course than 
the one he wishes to repeat. 

Speech. Successful completion of one of the following 
courses in speech communication: SPCH 100. 107, 125. 
220, or 230 Students who have successfully completed a 
full unit of speech in high school shall be deemed to have 
satisfied the speech requirement 

Major Requirements. Each student chooses a field of 
concentration (major). He may make this choice as early as 
he wishes; however, once he has earned 56 hours of 
acceptable credit he must choose a major before his next 
registration. 

In programs leading to the baccalaureate degree, the 
student must also have a secondary field of concentration 
(supporting courses) The courses constituting the major 
and the supporting courses must conform to the require- 
ments of the department in which the student majors 

The student must have an average of not less than C in 
the introductory courses in the field in which he intends to 
major 

A major shall consist, in addition to the lower division 
departmental prerequisites, of 24-40 hours, at least twelve 
of which must be in courses numbered 300 or 400 and at 
least twelve of which must be taken at the University of 
Maryland 

Each major program includes a group of "supporting 
courses." formerly called minors, that are designed to con- 
tribute a better understanding of the major The nature and 
number of these courses are under the control of the major 
department 

The average grade of the work taken for the major must be 
at least C: some departments will count toward satisfaction 



46 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



of the major requirement no course completed, with a grade 
o( less than C The average grade ot the work taken in the 
major and supporting courses combined must be at least C 
A general average ol C in courses taken at the University of 
Maryland is required for graduation 

Courses taken to fulfill General University Requirements 
may not be used toward divisional, maior, or supporting 
course requirements 

Advisors. Freshmen students will be assigned faculty 
advisors to assist them in the selection of courses and the 
choice of a major After selecting a major, sophomore stu- 
dents and above will be advised by faculty members in the 
major department 

Students in the School of Architecture and College of 
Journalism should consult their deans. 

Certification of High School Teachers. If courses are 
properly chosen in the field of education, a prospective high 
school teacher can prepare for high school positions, with a 
major and supporting courses in certain of the departments 
of this Division. A student who wishes to work for a 
teacher's certificate must consult the College of Education 
in the second semester of the sophomore year and apply for 
admission to the "Teacher Education" program 

Honors. Departmental Honors Programs are offered in the 
Departments of English, French. German, History, Music, 
Philosophy. Spanish, and Speech, Departmental Honors 
Programs are administered by an Honors Committee within 
each department Admission to a Departmental Honors Pro- 
gram ordinarily occurs at the beginning of the first or second 
semester of the student's junior year As a rule, only stu- 
dents with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3,0 
are admitted A comprehensive examination over the field of 
the major program is given to a candidate near the end of 
the senior year On the basis of the student's performance 
on the Honors Comprehensive Examination and in meeting 
such other requirements as may be set by the Departmental 
Honors Committee, the faculty may vote to recommend the 
candidate for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
honors or for the appropriate announcement in the com- 
mencement program and by citation on the student's 
academic record and diploma. 

Students in the Departmental Honors Programs enjoy 
some academic privileges similar to those of graduate 
students 

Kappa Tau Alpha. The Maryland chapter of Kappa Tau 
Alpha was chartered in 1961. Founded in 1910, this national 
honor society has 39 chapters at universities offering gradu- 
ate or undergraduate preparation for careers in professional 
journalism. It is dedicated to recognition and promotion of 
scholarship in journalism. Among its activities is an annual 
award for an outstanding piece of published research in 
journalism and mass communications. (Also see College of 
Journalism.) 

Phi Beta Kappa. Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most 
widely respected honorary fraternity in the United States. 
Invitation to membership is based not only on outstanding 
scholastic achievement, but also on breadth of liberal arts 
studies completed while enrolled at the University of 
Maryland. Gamma of Maryland chapter has liaison faculty 
members in the various departments in the Division of Arts 
and Humanities with whom students may discuss member- 
ship selection. It should be kept in mind that requirements 
for national honorary societies, such as completion of 
language and mathematics courses, often differ from the 
local college, division or university requirements. 

Schools and Colleges of the 
Division of Arts and Humanities 

School of Architecture 

The School of Architecture offers a five-year under- 
graduate professional program leading to the degree, 
Bachelor or Architecture and a four year degree program for 
a Bachelor of Science with a major in Urban Studies (see 



footnote * 1 ) Future plans include development of other 
environmental design programs at the graduate and under- 
graduate level 

The School was awarded accreditation by the National 
Architectural Accreditation Board. June 1972. insuring that 
past, present, and future students will be eligible for registra- 
tion in all 50 states upon meeting experience requirements 
and passing the standard examination The School is an 
associate member of the Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Architecture, and is assigned to that organization's 
northeastern region 

The curriculum presents the basic requisite skills and the 
opportunity to develop the knowledge to begin professional 
work. The School's goal is to prepare students for pro- 
fessional service in helping solve the nation's environmental 
problems. 

Opportunities In Architecture. A rapidly growing popula- 
tion, together with expanding industrial development, has 
taxed the resources of cities throughout the world Large 
segments of these urban populations are overcrowded, 
under-serviced and deprived of many of the amenities which 
city life has provided in the past 

The complexity of these problems, precluding easy attri- 
bution of causes and simple solutions, has generated great 
change in the environmental design professions and in the 
other social disciplines. Where they once stood apart, they 
are now committed to a common purpose. Each of them has 
come to recognize the worth and value of the techniques 
and insights of the others. 

In architecture, these exchanges have influenced pro- 
cedures, services and goals of the profession The scope of 
architectural services, once confined to the design, super- 
vision and construction of buildings, has been broadened to 
include programming, developmental planning operations 
research, project feasibility studies, and other new pro- 
fessional activities. The role of the architect is expanding 
from a narrow concern with building design to a broad 
concern for developmental change. 

These facts illustrate both the great need for educated 
and trained professionals, and the relevancy and excitement 
which characterize the profession today. Perhaps at no time 
in history has architecture posed as a great a challenge, or 
offered so great a promise of personal fulfillment to its 
practitioners. There are many opportunities for employment 
and careers in architectural practice. Additional education 
and experience also qualify a graduate for a career in city 
or regional planning. 

The general nature of an architectural education is such 
that some graduates elect and achieve successful careers 
in civil service, commerce or industry. 

Curriculum. The program permits students to enter the 
School of Architecture either directly from high school or 
after one year of general college work without extending the 
time required for completion of degree requirements. 

Students in the first year may take an introductory course 
in architecture as well as general courses. In the second 
year, the student begins professional education in basic 
design and building construction as well as continuing 
his/her general education. The basic environmental design 
studio explores specific architectural problems as well as 
the general problems inherent in making objects and spaces. 
In the third year, coordinated courses in building design and 
technology introduce the student to the ecological, physio- 
graphic, physiological, social, and physical generators of 
architectural design. In the fourth year, this process is 
continued, but the emphasis is on urban design: the environ- 
mental context, the historical and situational context, urban 
systems, and theoretical, aesthetic and sociological con- 
siderations. In the fifth year of design, the student is offered 
opportunities to choose comprehensive topical problems 
from several offered each year, and to work independently. 
Special studies in technical areas as well as building design 
and case studies in urban planning may be included. 

All of the design studio courses emphasize environmental 
design problem-solving experiences, as well as lectures, 
reading assignments, and field trips that advance the stu- 
dent's skills. In addition to the design and technical courses, 
the student is required to take architectural history, physics, 
mathematics, and a distribution of elective courses. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 47 



Any student enrolled In the School may elect to enter the 
program leading to the Bachelor of Science with a major in 
Urban Studies, and may receive the degree either in lieu of 
or in addition to the baccalaureate in Architecture. The 
program includes the first two years of the architecture 
program, and adds special requirements In the third and 
fourth years Procedures and course requirements for this 
program are available from the School of Architecture and 
from the Institute for Urban Studies. 

The general requirements of the University apply to the 
architecture program. In addition, students are specifically 
required to complete a mathematics series terminating with 
MATH 221 Most students find it necessary to begin college 
mathematics with MATH 115, followed by MATH 220 and 
221. In addition, architecture students are required to 
complete PHYS 121 

Location. The School is housed in a contemporary air- 
conditioned building on the campus about 10 miles from 
Washington, DC and 30 miles from Baltimore. Maryland 
This location, in the center of a large urban concentration, 
offers many opportunities for the School's program and the 
student's growth 

The School of Architecture building provides studio space, 
a library, exhibit space, a shop, a photo lab, classrooms, and 
lecture hall facilities. 

Library. The Architecture Library at present comprises 
some 17,000 volumes, providing resources in building 
technology, urban planning, and landscape architecture, as 
well as in architecture. It includes a rare book collection and 
a special collection on world expositions. It is expected that 
the library will number 21,000 volumes by 1979. This will 
make it one of the major architectural school libraries in the 
nation The library subscribes to about 150 foreign and 
domestic periodicals. 

Visual Aids. The visual aids library comprises about 75,000 
35-mm color slides in architecture, landscape architecture, 
and urban planning. Slides of student work, films, film-strips 
and photographs are included in the collection. Visual aid 
equipment is available for classroom use. 

Admission. Because there is a fixed limit to the number of 
candidates who can be admitted each year, it is important 
that the following instruction be carefully followed: 

1 . Students applying from high school: write the Director of 
Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Md. 
20742 for application instructions. 

2. Students who have completed work at other universities: 
write the Director of Admissions, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Md. 20742 for application instructions. 

3 Students transferring from other colleges or divisions of 

the University of Maryland: pick up an application form at 

the School of Architecture and return it to the assistant 

dean of the School, together with a record of all work 

taken at the University of Maryland and other institutions 

Deadlines: All application procedures should be submitted 

to the University by March 1 . Applications received after this 

date, but before the University deadline dates for new 

students and for transfer students, will be considered only 

on a space-available basis. 

Financial Assistance. For promising young men and 
women who might not otherwise be able to attend the 
University's School of Architecture, a number of grants and 
scholarships are available, some earmarked specifically for 
architectural students New students must apply before 
March 1 5, Students already enrolled may apply before May 
1 . All requests for information concerning these awards 
should be made to: Director. Student Aid, University of 
Maryland, College Park. Md. 20742. 



Architecture Faculty 

Professor and Dean: Hill. 

Assistant Dean: Fogle 

Prolessors: Cochran (Visiting). Schlesmger. Skiadaressis 

(Visiting). Wiebenson 



Associate Professors: Degelman. Hutton. Lazarls. Lewis. 

Schaefler. 

Assistant Professors: Bechhoefer. Cass. Fullenwider. Jadin. 

Pinnell, Senkevitch, Vann. 

Lecturers: Barna. Bullock, Cass, Field, Fogle, Kramer, W D 

Ports, W.H Potts. 

Students in architecture are required to complete a mini- 
mum of 1 61 credits of work for the Bachelor of Architecture 
degree In addition to prescribed courses in the School of 
Architecture, students are required to complete a number of 
credits in electives offered elsewhere in the University 
The requirements for graduation are tabulated below 



I si /ear 
Arch 1 70 Intro to Built 

Environment 3 GUR 2 

GUR 2 3 GUR 2 

GUR 2 3 GUR 2 

GUR 2 3 GUR 2 

Elective 3 Elective 

15 



2nd Year 



Arch 200 Basic 

Env Design 4 

Arch 220 Hist of Arch I 3 

Arch214Bldg Const I 2 

Phys121 4 

Math 221 3 

16 



Arch 300 Arch Studio I 4 

Arch 310 Arch Sci 

and Tech I 1 4 

Arch 360 Site Analysis 3 



Arch 201 Basic 

Env Design 
Arch 221 Hist of Arch I 
Arch215Bldg Const 
Elective. 
Elective 



Arch Hist or 

Theory Option 
Arch314orCMSC 103 



Arch 400 Arch Studio III .... 4 
Arch 410 Arch Sci. 

and Tech III 4 

Arch 350 Theory ol 

Urban Form 3 

GUR 2 3 

Elective 3 

17 



Arch 500 Advanced 

Topical Problems 6 

Arch 570 Prof Mgmt 2 

Arch 502 Thesis 

Pro-Seminar 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

17 



Arch 301 Arch Studio II 4 
Arch 311 Arch Sci. 

and Tech II 4 
Arch 342 Studies in 

Visual Design 3 
Arch Hist or 

Theory Option 3 

GUR 2 3 

17 



Arch 401 Arch Studio IV 4 

Arch 4 1 1 Arch Sci 
and Tech IV 4 



CUR ! 


3 




3 




3 


ar 

Arch 501 Advanced 
Topical Problems 
Elective 

Elective 


17 

6 
3 

3 
3 



Total Credits 161 



NOTE At least 12 ol the 39 elective credits must be taken outside the School 
ol Architecture and 12 taken Irom elective courses ottered in the School ol 
Architecture (not counting courses taken to meet the Arch History or Theory 

option) 



Physics 121 and Math 221 are prerequisites to Arch 310. Math 221 has a 

prerequisite ol Math 22 1 

GUR— General University Requirements 

Course Code Prefix— ARCH 



College of Journalism 

Journalism Faculty 

Professor and Dean: Hiebert 
Ass/sfan( Dean: McKerns 
Assistant to the Dean Truitt 
Professors: Martin. Newsom 



48 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Associate Professors: Grunig. Petnck 

Assistant Professors: Beasley. Geraci. Hesse. Lee. 

McElreath 

Instructors: Carroll, Hines. McKerns. Silver 

Part-time Lecturers Berman, Boyle. Dawson. Horowitz. 

Hymes. Kaplan. Leet. Merkowitz. Sarro. Schoettler. Smith 

The College ol Journalism at the University of Maryland 
stands at the doorstep of the Nation's Capitol and the 
worlds new center It is an ideal location for the study of 
journalism, public relations, and mass communications 
because many of the world's important journalists, great 
news events, and significant communications activities are 
near at hand 

The College is within easy reach of five of the nation's 
top 20 newspapers: the Baltimore Sun. the Baltimore 
News-American, the Washington Post, the Washington Star- 
News, and the production offices of the Wall Street Journal 
The College also has easy access to the Washington press 
corps — the large bureaus of the Associated Press, United 
Press International, New York Times, and many other 
American and foreign newspapers; also major networks and 
broadcasting news bureaus such as NBC. CBS, and ABC. 
also news, business, and special-interest magazines, and 
representatives of the book publishing industry. 

The College is close to the sources of news, including the 
White House, executive departments and agencies, 
Supreme Court, and Congress. It is near many major non- 
governmental representative bodies such as associations, 
scientific and professional organizations, foreign representa- 
tives, and international agencies. 

The College has six primary objectives: 1) to insure a 
liberal education for journalists and mass communicators: 2) 
to provide professional development, including training in 
skills and technique necessary for effective communication; 
3) to increase public understanding of journalism and mass 
communication; 4) to advance knowledge through research 
and publication; 5) to raise the quality of journalism through 
critical examination and study; and 6) to provide continuing 
relationship with professional journalists and their societies 

The College curricula in news editorial journalism and 
public relations are accredited by The American Council on 
Education for Journalism. The College is a member of the 
American Association of Schools and Departments of 
Journalism. The Association for Education in Journalism, 
and The American Society of Journalism School Ad- 
ministrators. 

Student journalism organization chapters include the 
Society of Professional Journalists (Sigma Delta Chi). 
Women in Communication. Pi Delta Epsilon, Kappa Tau 
Alpha, Kappa Alpha Mu, and a charter chapter of the Public 
Relations Student Society of America. 

The College offers specialized work in news reporting and 
editing, public relations, advertising, news broadcasting, 
news photography, and communication theory and research. 
The College maintains close liaison with student publica- 
tions and communications, including the student daily news- 
paper, yearbook, feature magazine, course guide, literary 
magazine, campus radio station, and campus television 
workshop 

The College also arranges summer internships in profes- 
sional work and part-time on-the-job training opportunities. 

Advanced journalism students have many opportunties for 
professional work in the journalism field. The Journalism 
Semester Program allows students to take a concentrated 
semester of work in journalism during which time they pro- 
duce a bi-weekly newspaper, the College Park Citizen Call. 
Advanced news reporting students have the opportunity to 
work on the Montgomery Journal covering real news assign- 
ments for publication. In addition, advanced and graduate 
students often use the Washington, DC. resources'for both 
study and professional work experience Some seminars 
meet at the National Press Club in downtown Washington 

Students may declare their intention to major in journalism 
at the beginning of any semester, but normally this is done 
before their junior year. Students select and work with one 
faculty member as their advisor during the course of their 
study at the University 

Typing ability and English proficiency are required of all 
students Majors must maintain a C average in courses taken 



in the College Students maust receive at least a C in 
Journalism 200 and 201 before they will be allowed to major 
in Journalism 

Requirements for the Journalism Major. The requirements 
for graduation are given below 
I General University Requirements. 
II. College Requirements: 

A MATH 1 10 (or other higher MATH course approved 
by advisor) 

B. Foreign Language: through intermediate level ( 1 04 or 
1 1 5) Instead of language, the student may wish to 
take the Math option, consisting of 9 hours — one 
course in intermediate Math, one in statistics, and 
one in Computer Science 

C. Speech Communication (three credits; orar com- 
munication preferred) 

D. Social Sciences (twelve credits, a minimum of three 
credits in each of the following categories: 

1 Sociology or Anthropology (preferably social 

problems or organization). 
2. Psychology (preferably general principles or 

social). 

3 Economics (preferably general principles) 

4 Government and Politics (preferably American 
government or principles of government) 

III Professional Requirements: 

JOUR 200 and 201 are required of all Journalism majors. 
In addition, 24 credit hours in upper division journalism 
courses, including JOUR 310, News Editing, are required. 

At least six credit hours should be taken in one of the 
following sequences for depth in a special field of journalism: 

JOUR 320 and 32 1 —News Editorial 
JOUR 330 and 331 —Public Relatiors 
JOUR 340 and 34 1 —Advertising 
JOUR 350 and 35 1 —News Photography 
JOUR 360 and 361 —News Broadcasting 

All journalism majors should elect at least six credit hours 
from the following courses for breadth in mass com- 
munication: 

JOUR 400— Law of Mass Communication 
JOUR 4 1 0— History of Mass Communication 
JOUR 420— Government and Mass Communication 
JOUR 430— Comparative Mass Communication Systems 
JOUR 440— Public Opinion and Mass Communication 



IV. Non- Journalism Requirements: 

12-18 credit hours in upper-division courses in one 
subject outside of the College of Journalism. 

12-18 credit hours of upper-division, non-journalism 
electives, to be spread or concentrated according to 
individual needs. 



Minimum upper-division credits for graduation 57 

Total Lower and Upper-Division 120 



Course Code Prefix— JOUR 

Departments, Programs 
and Currricula 

American Studies Program 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Lounsbury 
Professors: Beall, Browne. 
Associate Professor: Mintz, Pearson. 
Assistant Professor: Crocco. 

The program offers a comprehensive, interdisciplinary 
investigation of American culture as defined in historical and 
contemporary sources Majoring in a curriculum of generous 
breadth — ranging from creative self-expression to environ- 
mental studies and the mass media — the undergraduate 
student may benefit from the perspectives emphasized by 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 49 



specialists in both the humanities and the social sciences. 
In addition to gaining a general awareness of the multiple 
dimensions of American civilization, each major is expected 
to select an area of concentration in either American litera- 
ture or American history The program's faculty provide 
integrative courses, designed to offer a conceptual frame- 
work for the diversified materials of the traditional disci- 
plines, in the student's junior and senior years 

The undergraduate maior requires 48 semester hours 
(24 hours minimum at the 300-400 level), consisting of 
courses in American Studies and various related disciplines 
Courses applicable to American Studies are offered in the 
following departments, programs, schools and colleges: 

English. History, Government and Politics, Sociology. 
Afro-American Studies, Anthropology, Architecture. Art. 
Comparative Literature, Dramatic Arts, Economics, Educa- 
tion. Geography. Journalism, Music, Philosophy, Psychology. 
Radio-Television- Film, and Speech Communication 

No course with a grade lower than C may be counted 
towards the major 

A major in American Studies will follow this curriculum: 

1. AMST 201, 202 (Introduction to American Studies) in the 
freshman or sophomore year; AMST 426. 427 (Culture 
and the Arts in America) or AMST 436, 437 (Readings 
in American Studies) in the junior year: and AMST 446. 
447 (Popular Culture in America) in the senior year 

2. Twelve hours of either American literature or history. 

3 Nine hours in each of two of the remaining above listed 
departments 

Note: To meet one of the nine hour requirements, a stu- 
dent, with the approval of his advisor, may substitute related 
courses from one of the following sequences: 

Afro-American Studies. Courses in art. English, govern- 
ment, history and sociology 

Area Studies and Comparative Culture. The study of one 
foreign culture Courses must be drawn from at least two of 
the following fields: art, comparative literature. English, 
history, and a foreign language 

Creative and Performing Arts. Production, studio or tech- 
nical courses in art, English, music, radio and television 

Personality and Culture. Courses in anthropology, educa- 
tion, and psychology 

Philosophy and Fine Arts. Courses in art, music and 
philosophy 

Popular Arts and Mass Communications. Courses in 
dramatic arts, journalism, radio-television-film 

Urban and Environmental Studies. Courses in architecture, 
economics, government, sociology 

Women's Studies. Courses in English, government, 
history, and sociology 

Course Code Prefix— AMST 



Art 



Professor and Chairman: Levitine. 

Professors: Bunts, A deLeiris, Denny, Lembach, Lynch, 

Maril, Rearick. 

Associate Professors: Campbell, DiFedenco. Farquhar, 

Forbes. Gelman. Klank, Lapinski, Niese. Pemberton 

Assistant Professors: Bickley, DeMonte. Green. Johns Reid. 

Spiro. Weigl. Wheelock, Withers. 

Lecturers: Bersson. Clapsaddle. Craig, Ferraioli. Gossage, 

Hauptman, Hommel. Puryear. Truitt. Willis. 

Instructors M DeLeiris, Samuels. 

Two majors are offered in art: art history and studio The 
student who majors in art history is committed to the study 
and scholarly interpretation of existing works of art, from the 
prehistoric era to our times, while the studio major stresses 
the student's direct participation in the creation of works of 
art 

In spite of this difference, both majors are rooted in the 
concept of art as a humanistic experience, and share an 
essential common aim the development of aesthetic sensi- 
tivity, understanding, and knowledge For this reason, stu- 
dents in both majors are required to progress through a 
"common curriculum.'' which will ensure a broad grounding 
m both aspects of art. then each student will move into a 



"specialized curriculum'' with advanced courses in his own 
maior 

A curriculum leading to a degree in art education is 
offered in the College of Education with the cooperation of 
the Department of Art 

Common Curriculum 

(Courses required in major unless taken as part of support- 
ing area as listed below.) 
ARTH 1 00. Introduction to Art (3) 
ARTH 260. History of Art (3) 
ARTH 261. History of Art (3) 
ARTS 100. Design I (3) 
ARTS 110, Drawing I (3) 

Specialized Curricula 

Art History Major A 

5 |unior-senior level History of Art courses (one each from 
3 of the following areas: Ancient-Medieval, Renaissance- 
Baroque, 19th-20th century, non- Western) (15) 

1 additional Studio Art course (3) 

Supporting Area 

12 coherently related non-art credits approved by an 
advisor Six of these credits must be taken in one depart- 
ment, and must be at junior-senior level (12) 

Art History Major B 

5 junior-senior level History of Art courses (one each from 
3 of the following areas Ancient-Medieval. Renaissance- 
Baroque. 19th-20th century, non- Western) (15) 

3 additional courses in any level History of Art (9) 

Supporting Area 

ARTS 1 00, Design I (from common curriculum) (3) 

ARTS 1 1 0. Drawing I (from common curriculum) (3) 

2 Studio Art courses at junior-senior level (6) 

Total required credit hours, combined Major and Support- 
ing Area — 45. 

Studio Art Major A 

ARTS 200, Intermediate Design or alternative. (3) 

ARTS 2 10, Drawing II. (3) 

ARTS 220, Painting I (3) 

ARTS 310. Drawing III (3) 

ARTS 330, Sculpture I (3) 

ARTS 340, Printmaking I or ARTS 344, Pnntmaking II (3) 

1 additional junior-senior level Studio course. (3) 

1 advanced History of Art course (3) 

Supporting Area 

12 coherently related non- Art credits approved by an 
advisor Six of these credits must be taken in one 
department and must beat junior-senior level. (12) 

Studio Art Major B 

ARTS 200. Intermediate Design or alternative (3) 

ARTS 2 10. Drawing II (3) 

ARTS 220. Painting I. (3) 

ARTS 3 10, Drawing III (3) 

ARTS 330. Sculpture I (3) 

ARTS 340. Printmaking I or ARTS 344, Pnntmaking II (3) 

1 additional |unior-senior level Studio Art course (3) 

Supporting Area in History of Art 

ARTH 260. History of Art (from common curriculum) (3) 

ARTH 261, History of Art (from common curriculum) (3) 

2 History of Art courses at junior-senior level (6) 

Total required credit hours, combined Maior and Supporting 
Area — 5 1 in Major A, 45 in Maior B 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
major requirements 

Coure«Cod«Pioti«es— ARTE ARTH ARTS 



50 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Chinese Program 

Associate Professor Chin 
Assistant Professors: Adkins. Liang 
Lecturer: Loh 

The program offers two series of courses — the language 
series and the content series The language series consists 
of four levels of instruction the elementary, the intermediate, 
the advanced, and a level of specialized courses such as 
Readings in Chinese History and Literature, Classical 
Chinese, etc In addition, there is a course entitled Review 
of Elementary Chinese to bridge the gap between 
Elementary and Intermediate Chinese for those students 
who have had some exposure to the language but who are 
not ready for Intermediate Chinese A skills oriented course 
in interpretation and translation (Chinese-English and 
English-Chinese) is offered for intermediate and advanced 
students 

The content series contains courses in Chinese civiliza- 
tion, literature, and linguistics. Except for Chinese Linguis- 
tics, which is a sequence dealing with the sounds and 
grammatical system of the Chinese language and its com- 
parison with English, courses in the content series do not 
presuppose previous training in the Chinese language 
Since the illustrative materials for Chinese Linguistics 
(CHIN 421, 422) are in Chinese, CHIN 102 or equivalent is 
required for this sequence. 

The elementary Chinese course is intensified, meeting 6 
hours per week, for which students receive 12 credits in 
one year (6 per semester). The intensive program is designed 
to give students a solid foundation of the language in all four 
skills of speaking, hearing, reading, and writing (characters). 
This course is taught by a team of instructors who employ 
an audio-lingual and communication-oriented approach 

Presently the program offers a minor in Chinese. It consists 
of 1 8 credit hours of which 6 must be in Chinese Linguistics. 

Classical Languages and Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: Avery 
Associate Professor: Hubbe 
Assistant Professor: Boughner 
Instructor: Clapper. 

Major in Latin: LATN 101, 102, 203 and 204 or their 
equivalent must have been completed before a student may 
begin work on a major. A major consists of a minimum of 
twenty-four hours beginning with LATN 305, twelve hours 
of which must be taken in 400-level courses. In addition, a 
student majoring in Latin will be required to take as support- 
ing courses LATN 170, HIFN 456, and HIFN 457 The 
student is urged to pursue a strong supporting program in 
Greek The following courses are recommended as elec- 
tives: HIST 151 and 152. ARTH 402 and 403, and PHIL 
310. No course in the Latin language with a grade less 
than C may be used to satisfy major requirements. 

Normally no placement tests are given in the classical 
languages. The following schedule will apply in general in 
determining the course level at which students will register 
for Latin. 

Students offering or 1 unit of Latin will register for 
LATN 101 

Students offering 2 units of Latin will register for 
LATN 203 

Students offering 3 units of Latin will register for 
LATN 204. 

Students offering 4 units of Latin will register for 
LATN 305. 

However, those presenting 2. 3, or 4 units of prepara- 
tory work may register initially for the next higher course by 
demonstrating proficiency through a placement test. Stu- 
dents whose stage of achievement is not represented here 
are urgently invited to confer with the chairman of the 
department Students who wish to continue the study of 
Greek should likewise confer with the chairman of the 
department 

CourseCode Prefix— LATN. GP.EK 



Comparative Literature Program 

Program Director: Fuegi 

Advisory Committee on Comparative Literature: Avery, Fink. 
Fuegi. Goodwyn. Russell. Stern 

Professors: Avery, Freedman. Fuegi, Goodwyn. Hering. 
Jones, Salamanca, Stern 

Associate Professors: Barry. Berry. Coogan. Fleck, Green- 
wood. Mack, Smith, Walt 

Undergraduates may emphasize Comparative Literature 
as they work toward a degree in one of the departments of 
literature Each student will be formally advised by the 
faculty of his "home" department in consultation with the 
Director of the Comparative Literature Program In general, 
every student will be required to take CMLT 401 and 
CMLT 402, and during his last year, CMLT 496 The vari- 
ous literature departments concerned will have additional 
specific requirements 

Students emphasizing comparative literature are expected 
to develop a high degree of competence in at least one 
foreign language 

Course work may not be limited to the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. 

LATN 170 is highly recommended for those contem- 
plating graduate work in Comparative Literature. 

CourseCode Prelix— CMLT 

Dance 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Ince. 

Professor: Madden 

Associate Professors: Rosen. Ryder. A Warren. L Warren 

Instructors: Coles, Hodges. Rooney, Sloan 

Recognizing that dance combines both athleticism and 
artistry, the dance program offers comprehensive technique 
and theory courses as a foundation for the dance profes- 
sions. By developing an increasing awareness of the 
physical, emotional, and intellectual aspects of movement 
in general, the student eventually is able to integrate his own 
particular mind-body consciousness into a more meaningful 
whole. To facilitate the acquisition of new movement skills. 
as well as creative and scholarly insights in dance, the 
curriculum provides a structured breadth experience at the 
lower division level, while allowing the student to select 
from various areas of emphasis at the upper division level. 
These areas include performance, choreography, education, 
and general studies (including dance history and literature) 
Students selecting the education emphasis may obtain State 
of Maryland teacher certification. 

The dance faculty is composed of a number of distin- 
guished teachers, choreographers and performers, each 
one a specialist in his own field. Visiting artists, through- 
out the year and during the summer, make additional con- 
tributions to the program. There are several performance 
and choreographic opportunities for all dance students 
ranging from informal workshops to fully mounted concerts 
both on and off campus More advanced students may have 
the opportunity of working with Maryland Dance Theater, 
which is in residence in the Department. Supported in part 
by the Maryland Arts Council. Maryland Dance Theater is a 
member of the Dance Touring Program sponsored by the 
National Endowment for the Arts Company auditions are 
held each year in the Spring. 

The core program includes at least one modern technique 
class per semester, plus 24 semester hours of additional 
dance courses (including ballet), and 1 2 semester hours in 
dance related disciplines. 

Students desiring a performance emphasis are required 
to take a screening audition at the conclusion of the 
sophomore year. New. re-entering, and transfer students 
are expected to contact the department following admission 
to the University for instructions regarding advising, class 
placement auditions and registration procedures. The 
department strongly recommends that new dance majors 
enter only in the fall semester of the academic year 
Although entrance auditions are not required, some previous 
dance experience is highly desirable 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 51 



English Language and Literature 



Chairman and Professor: Kenny 

Professors: Andrews (Emeritus). Bode. Bryer. Cooley 
(Emeritus), Corrigan, Fleming (Emeritus). Freedman, Gravely 
(Emeritus). Hovey. Isaacs, Lawson. Lutwach, Manning 
(Emeritus). Mish. Murphy, Myers, Panichas. Peterson, 
Russell, Salamanca, Schoenbaum, Whittemore, Wlnton. 
Associate Professors: Barnes, Barry, Birdsall, S Brown. 
Coogan. Cooper. Fry, Greenwood, G. Hamilton, Herman, 
Holton. Houppert, Howard. Jellema. Kinnaird. Kleine. Mack. 
M Miller, Moore, Portz. Smith. Thorberg, Vitzhum. Walt, 
Ward. Weber (Emeritus). Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Beauchamp, Bolger, Cate, Chargois, 
Coletti, Donawerth, Dunn, D Hamilton, James, Kenney. 
Martin. Ousby. Rutherford, Sorum, Van Egmond, Vlach 
Lecturers: J Miller, Pearson 

Instructors: Buhlig, Demaree, Duffy, Gallagher, Gold, 
Stevenson. Townsend 

The English major requires 36 credits beyond the Univer- 
sity composition requirement. For the specific distribution 
requirements of these 36 credits, students should consult 
the English Department's advisors (room A2 1 25, ext 252 1 ) 
A student may pursue a major with emphasis in English, 
and American Literature; Comparative Literature, or linguis- 
tics; or in preparation for secondary school teaching. Stu- 
dents interested in secondary school teaching should make 
it known to the department as early in their college career 
as possible 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
major requirements. 

In selecting supporting or elective subjects, students 
majoring in English, particularly those who plan to do 
graduate work, should give special consideration to 
courses in French, German, Latin, philosophy, history and 
fine art 

Honors. The Department of English offers an honors pro- 
gram, primarily for maiors but open to others with the 
approval of the Departmental Honors Committee. Interested 
students should ask for detailed information from an English 
Department advisor no later than the beginning of their 
junior year. 

Course Code Prefix— ENGL 

French and Italian Languages and 
Literatures 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Therrien 
Professors: Bingham, MacBain, Quynn (Emeritus). Rosen- 
field 

Associate Professors: Demaitre, Fink, Hall, Tarica. 
Assistant Professors: Campagne. Gilbert. Hicks. Meijer, 
Russell. 

Lecturer: Lloyd-Jones. 
Instructors: Barrabmi. Bondurant 



student may enter as early as the sophomore year or as 
late as the second semester of the junior year Honors 
students are required to take at least two courses from 
those numbered 491 H, 492H. and 493H together with 
494H, Honors Independent Study, and 495H, Honors Thesis 
Research Honors students must take a final comprehensive 
examination based on the honors reading list Admission of 
students to the honors program, their continuance in the 
program and the final award of honors are the prerogative of 
the Departmental Honors Committee 

Course Code Prelixes-FREN, ITAL 



Germanic and Slavic Languages and 
Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: Stern 

Professors: Best, Fuegi. Hering, Hinderer, Jones 

Associate Professors: Beicken, Berry, Fleck, Hitchcock, 

Pfister. 

Assistant Professors: Fredenksen, Lee 

Instructor: Bilik. 

General. Two types of undergraduate majors are offered 
in German; one for the general student or the future teacher. 
and the other for those interested in a rounded study of a 
foreign area for the purpose of understanding another 
nation through its literature, history, architecture, and other 
aspects Both of these majors confer the B A degree The 
department also offers MA and Ph D degrees in German 
language and literature. 

An undergraduate major in either category consists of a 
total of 30 hours in German. 33 in Russian, with a C 
average, beyond the basic language requirement A mixed 
concentration in Comparative Literature is also possible. 

In selecting minor or elective subjects, students majoring 
in German or Russian, particularly those who plan to do 
graduate work, should give special consideration to courses 
in foreign languages, philosophy, history, English linguistics 
and Russian area. 

Language and Literature Major: 

German . Specific minimum requirements in the program are; 
two courses in advanced language (301-302); two semes- 
ters of the survey of literature courses (321-322); six 
literature courses on the 400 level, two of which may be 
taken in comparative literature These literature courses may 
be replaced by other departmental offerings on the 400 
level with the permission of the chairman and or advisor 
Taking honors courses as substitute for the 400 level 
courses requires special permission from the chairman of 
the department and in no case may more than two honors 
courses be selected for this purpose 

Russian. The specific minimum requirements are; one from 
each set; 201-202. 301-302. 311-312. 401-402. two 
semesters of the survey of literature courses (321-322), 
plus 1 5 hours of courses on the 400 level 



The Department offers a major in French which consists 
of a total of 33 credits of French courses at the 200 level 
or above The French major must complete FREN 201, 
or 250. 301. 302, any one of 211, 311, 312. one of 
401 . 405 and four French courses from those numbered 
400 to 499 — one of which must be a literature course 
(FREN 478 and 479 may not be counted among the five ) 
The French major is required to take a further 1 2 credits 
in supporting courses from a list approved by the Depart- 
ment An average grade of C is the minimum acceptable in 
the major field Students intending to apply for teacher 
certification should consult the Director of Undergraduate 
Advising as early as possible in order to plan their programs 
accordingly 

Honors. The department offers an honors program in French 
for students of superior ability Honors work normally begins 
in the first semester of the junior year, but a qualified 



Foreign Area Major: 

German. Specific requirements in this maior are two 
courses in advanced language (301-302); a 2-semester 
literature survey (321-322); two courses in civilization 
(421-422); four courses in German literature on the 400 
level, two of which may be replaced by two courses in 
Comparative Literature These literature courses may be 
replaced by other departmental offerings on the 400 level 
with the permission of the chairman and or advisor 
Supporting courses should be selected in consultation with 
the student's advisor 

Honors. A student majoring in German or Russian who. at 
the time of application, has a general academic average of 
at least 30 and 3 5 or above in his maior field, is eligible 
for admission to the Honors program of the department 
Application should be directed to the chairman of the 



52 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



Honors Committee Honors work normally begins In the tlrst 
semester ol the junior year but a qualified student may 
enter as early as the sophomore year or as late as the 
second semester ol the junior year 

Honors students are required to take two of the Honors 
reading courses 398H and the independent study course 
397H 

Besides completing an independent study project, all 
graduating seniors who are candidates for Honors must take 
an oral examination Admission of students to the Honors 
Program, their continuance in the program, and the final 
award of Honors are the prerogative of the Departmental 
Honors Committee 

Lower Division Courses. Students with only one year of 
high school language may take courses 1 1 1 and 1 1 2 in that 
language for credit. Students who have had two or more 
years of German or Russian in high school and wish to 
continue with that language must take the placement exam. 

Students in German who. as a result of the placement 
exam, place in 1 1 3 must complete 1 15 They may not take 
courses 111-112 for credit unless there has been a four- 
year lapse of time between their high school language 
course and their first college course in that language. Those 
who place above 115 have fulfilled the language require- 
ment for the B A degree in the Division of Arts and 
Humanities. 

Transfer students in German with college credit have the 
option of continuing at the level for which they are 
theoretically prepared, of taking a placement examination, or 
of electing courses 113 or 116 for credit. If a transfer 
student in German takes 1 1 3 for credit, he or she may retain 
transfer credit only for the equivalent of course 1 1 1 . If he or 
she takes 1 16. he or she may retain two courses for credit 
only for the equivalent of courses 111 through 114. A 
transfer student placing lower than his or her training 
warrants may ignore the placement but does so at his or her 
own risk. 

If a student has received a D in a course and completes 
the next higher course, he or she cannot go back to repeat 
the original 

Course Code Prefixes— GERM. RUSS 



Hebrew Program 



Director and Assistant Professor: Greenberg. 
Visiting Professor: Iwry. 
Instructors: Klein, Landa, Liberman. 

The Hebrew Program provides both beginners and those 
with previous study of the Hebrew Language an opportunity 
to become conversant with the 3,000-year development of 
Hebrew language, literature, and culture. 

Elementary and intermediate courses develop the ability 
to communicate effectively in modern Israeli Hebrew. 
Courses in composition and conversation emphasize 
vocabulary enrichment, grammar and syntax of the written 
and spoken language. On the advanced level the student 
analyzes the major texts of classical and modern Hebrew 
literature. 

In addition to the 54 credit hours currently offered by the 
Hebrew Program, the student has available a substantial 
number of related Jewish Studies courses in the depart- 
ments of history, English, sociology, etc. 

CourseCode Prefix— HEBR 



History 



Professor and Chairman: Evans. 

Professors: Bauer (Emeritus), Brush, Callcott. Cole, Duffy. 
Foust. Gilbert, Gordon, Haber, Harlan, Jashemski, Kent, 
Merrill, A. Olson, Prange, Rundell, E B. Smith, Sparks. Yaney 



Associate Professors: Belz. Berlin. Breslow. Cockburn, 
Farrell, Flack. Folsom. Giffin, Greenberg. Grimsted, Hoffman! 
Kaufman. Matossian. Mayo. McCusker. K Olson, Pennbam, 
Stowasser, Warren, Wright 

Assistant Professors: Benedict. Bradbury. Darden, Harris 
Holum. Lampe, Majeska. Moss, Nicklason, Rldgway. 
Ruderman. H Smith. Spiegel, Williams, Zilfi 

The Department of History seeks to broaden the student's 
cultural background through the study of history and to 
provide preparation for those interested in law, publishing, 
teaching, journalism, service, and graduate study 

A faculty advisor will assist each major m planning a 
curriculum to meet his personal interests. A "program plan," 
approved by the advisor, should be tiled with the Department 
as soon as possible Students should meet regularly with 
their advisors to discuss the progress of their studies. 

Major Requirements 

A Candidates for a B A in History are required to complete 
39 hours in History courses. 

B. The undergraduate major must attain a grade of C or 
higher in each of the courses submitted to fulfill the 39- 
hour requirement. 

C. A minimum of twelve of the 39 hours must be taken at 
the 300 or 400 level. 

D. The only mandatory course is HIST 389, Prosemina/ in 
Historical Writing (3 hours). 

E. Before registering for HIST 389, the student is required 
to have demonstrated proficiency in English composition 
by 

(1) passing (or getting credit by examination in) ENGL 
101 or 1 7 1 or equivalent, with a grade of C or higher; 
or 

(2) receiving an appropriate score on the Advanced 
Placement examination. 

Supporting Courses. History majors are required to take 
nine hours at the 300 or 400 levels in appropriate support- 
ing areas outside the History Department. These courses do 
not all have to be in the same department but the choice of 
courses must be approved in writing by a faculty advisor. 
The grade of C or higher is required in each of the courses 
submitted to fulfill this requirement. 

General University Requirements in History. All History 
courses on the 100, 200, 300 and 400 levels are open to 
students seeking to meet the University requirements in 
Area C (Division of Arts and Humanities) with the exception 
of HIST 256, 257. 389, 395, 396, 399. A few other courses 
are open only to students who satisfy specified 
prerequisites, but that does not limit them to history majors. 
It should be noted that Special Topics courses — HIST 298, 
389 and 498 — are offered on several different subjects of 
general interest each semester. Descriptions may be 
obtained from the History Department office. 

Honors in History. Students who major or minor in history 
may apply for admission to the History Honors Program 
during the second semester of their sophomore year. Those 
who are admitted to the program substitute discussion 
courses and a thesis for some lecture courses and take an 
oral comprehensive examination prior to graduation. 
Successful candidates are awarded either honors or high 
honors in history. 

The History Department offers pre-honors work in 
American history and in western civilization. Consult 
Schedule of Classes for specific offerings each semester. 
Students in these sections meet in a discussion group 
instead of attending lectures. They read widely and do 
extensive written work on their own. Pre-honors sections 
are open to any student and are recommended for students 
m General Honors, subject only to the instructor's approval. 
Students who intend to apply for admission to the History 
Honors Program should take as many of them as possible 
during their freshman and sophomore years 



Course Code Prefix 



-HIST HIFN. HIUS 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 53 



Japanese Program 

Chairman: Dr. Guy Stern 
Assistant Professor: Kerkham 

The Japanese Program now offers two and a hart years of 
language instruction. These elementary and intermediate 
courses concentrate on the spoken language with a gradually 
increasing emphasis on written Japanese. A directed study 
course provides continuing language instruction for more 
advanced students. 

Topic oriented courses in classical and modern literature 
in translation, which are open to all students, serve as intro- 
duction to Japanese literature and culture and as back- 
ground to the study of Japanese Buddhism, history, art, 
music, politics, etc 

Course Code Prefix— JAPN 



MUSC 250/251 4 

University Requirements 5 

15 

Junior Year Fall 

MUSP 415/416 4 

MUSC 330 331 3 

MUSC 328 2 

Elective 

University Requirements 6 

15 

Senior Year Fall 

MUSP 419 420 4 

MUSC 450 3 
MUSC 492 

MUSC 467 3 

Electives 6 

16 



Spring 



Spring 



Music 

Professor and Chairman: Troth. 

Professors: Berman. Bernstein, Folstrom, Gordon, Heim, 

Helm, Hudson, Johnson. Montgomery, Moss, Traver. 

Associate Professors: Barnett, Fanos, Fleming, Gallagher, 

Garvey, Head. McClelland, Meyer, Olson, Pennington, 

Schumacher, Serwer, Shelley, Snapp, Springmann, True, 

Wakefield. 

Assistant Professors: Beatty, Cooper, Davis, Elliston, Elsing, 

Etheridge, Gardner, Haley, Kuhn, Lenz, McDonald, Payerle, 

Signell, Sutherland, Tallman, Toliver. Turek, Wachhaus, 

Wexler, B. Wilson, M Wilson. 

Instructors: Jarvis. 

The objectives of the department are (1) to help the 
general student develop sound critical judgment and 
discriminating taste in the art of music; (2) to provide 
professional musical training based on a foundation in the 
liberal arts; (3) to prepare the student for graduate work in 
the field; and (4) to prepare the student to teach music in the 
public schools. To these ends, two degrees are offered; the 
professionally oriented Bachelor of Music, with a major in 
theory, composition, history and literature, or music 
performance; and the culturally oriented Bachelor of Arts, 
with a major in music. The Bachelor of Science degree, with 
a major in music education, is offered in the Department of 
Secondary Education in the College of Education; course 
offerings are described in the sections relating to that 
department. This degree program is administered within the 
Music Department. 

Courses in music theory, literature and music perform- 
ance are open to all students who have completed the 
specified prerequisites, or their equivalents, if teacher time 
and facilities permit. The University Bands. Chamber Singers, 
Chapel Choir, Madrigal Singers, Orchestra, University 
Chorale, and University Chorus, as well as the smaller 
chamber ensembles, are likewise open to all qualified 
students 



The Bachelor of Arts Degree. The curriculum leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music is designed for 
students whose interests are cultural rather than pro- 
fessional. A detailed description of the program and its 
options is available in the departmental office. A grade of C 
or above is required in each major course. 



Bachelor of Arts (Music) 



Typical Program of Elections 

Freshman Year 

MUSP 109/1 10 . ... 4 

MUSC 131 3 

MUSC 150/151 6 

MUSC 229 2 

Electives. Division and University 

Requirements 15 

Sophomore Year 

MUSP 207/208 4 

MUSC 250/251 8 

MUSC 229 2 

Electives, Division and University 

Requirements 16 

Junior Year 

MUSP 405 2 

MUSC 330 331 . .. 6 

MUSC 450 3 

MUSC 229 ... 1 
Electives, Division and University 

Requirements .18 

Senior Year 

Music Electives 10 

Electives. Division and University 
Requirements 20 



The Bachelor of Music Degree. The curriculum leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Music is designed for students 
who wish to prepare for a professional career in music. 
Extensive pre-college experiences in music are expected. A 
description of the variety of available majors is available in 
the departmental office. A grade of C or above is required in 
each major course. 

Bachelor of Music (Pert.: Piano) 

Sample Program 

Freshman Year Fall Spring 

MUSP119/120 4 4 

MUSC 128 2 2 

MUSC 131 3 

MUSC 150 151 3 3 

University Requirements 3 6 

15 15 

Sophomore Year Fall Spring 

MUSP217 218 4 4 

MUSC 228 » 2 2 



Course Code Prefixes— MUSC. MUED. MUSP 

Philosophy 

Professor and Chairman: Gorovitz. 

Professors: Pasch. Perkins. Schlaretzki. Shapere, Svenonius 

Associate Professors: J Brown. Celaner. Johnson. Lesher. 

Martin. Suppe. 

Assistant Professors: Ahern. Darden. Gardner. Kress. 

Levinson. Odell, Stern, Waldner 

Research Associates: P. Brown, Shue 

The undergraduate course offenngs of the Department of 
Philosophy are. as a group, intended both to satisfy the 
needs of persons wishing to make philosophy their maior 
field and to provide ample opportunity for other students to 
explore the subject In general, the study of philosophy can 
contribute to the education of the university student by 
giving him or her experience in critical and imaginative 
reflection on fundamental concepts and pnnciples. by 



54 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



acquainting him or her with some ot the philosophical beliefs 
which have influenced and are influencing his own culture, 
and by familiarizing him or her with some classic 
philosophical writings through careful reading and discus- 
sion of them The department views philosophy essentially 
as an activity, which cultivates articulateness. expository 
skill, and logical rigor Students in philosophy courses can 
expect their work to be subjected to continuing critical 
scrutiny Courses designed with these objectives primarily 
in mind include PHIL 100 (Introduction to Philosophy). PHIL 
170 (Elementary Logic and Semantics). PHIL 140 (Ethics). 
PHIL 236 (Philosophy of Religion), and the historical 
courses 207, 305, 310, 320. 325, and 326 

For students interested particularly in philosophical 
problems arising within their own special disciplines, a 
number of courses are appropriate: PHIL 233 (Philosophy in 
Literature). PHIL 246 (Philosophy of Education). PHIL 250 
(Philosophy of Science I). PHIL 345 (Social and Political 
Philosophy I). PHIL 360 (Philosophy of Language), PHIL 330 
(Philosophy of Art), PHIL 432 (Topics in Philosophical 
Theology). PHIL 450 and 451 (Scientific Thought I and II). 
PHIL 452 (Philosophy of Physics), PHIL 453 (Philosophy of 
Science II), PHIL 455 (Philosophy of the Social Sciences), 
PHIL 456 (Philosophy of Biology), PHIL 457 (Philosophy of 
History). PHIL 458 (Philosophy of Psychology), and PHIL 
474 (Induction and Probability) 

Pre-law students my be particularly interested in PHIL 1 40 
(Ethics). PHIL 345 and 445 (Political and Social Philosophy I 
and II). PHIL 440 (Ethical Theory), and PHIL 447 (Philosophy 
of Law). Pre-medical students may be particularly interested 
in PHIL 342 (Moral Problems in Medicine), and PHIL 456 
(Philosophy of Biology). 

The Department has established, jointly with the 
Government and Politics Department, a Center for 
Philosophy and Public Policy Center research associates 
offer courses, cross-listed in both departments on special 
topics such as: Famine and Affluence; Markets, Welfare and 
Distributive Justice: and Human Rights and Public Policy 

The departmental requirements for a major in philosophy 
are as follows: (1 ) a total of at least 30 hours in philosophy, 
not including PHIL 100; (2) PHIL 140. 271, 310, 320, 326 
and at least two courses numbered 399 and above; (3) a 
grade of C or better in each course counted toward the 
fulfillment of the major requirement. 

For students of exceptional ability and interest in 
philosophy, the department offers an honors program. 
Information regarding this special curriculum may be 
obtained from the departmental advisors. 

The department presents visiting speakers from this 
country and abroad in its colloquium series, scheduled 
throughout the academic year. In addition, members of the 
department and advanced graduate students lecture on 
topics of current significance in the Graduate Workshop and 
in the undergraduate Philosophy Club. 

Course Code Prefix— PHIL 

Russian Area Program 

Director and Student Advison: Foust, Yaney. 

The Russian Area Program offers courses leading to a B.A. 
in Russian studies. Students in the program study Russian 
and Soviet culture as broadly as possible, striving to 
comprehend it in all its aspects rather than focusing their 
attention on a single segment of human behavior. It is hoped 
that insights into the Russian way of life will be valuable not 
only as such but as a means to deepen the students' 
awareness of their own society and of themselves. 

Course offerings are in several departments: language and 
literature, government and politics, history, economics, 
geography, architecture, and sociology A student may plan 
his or her curriculum so as to emphasize any one of these 
disciplines, thus preparing for graduate work either in the 
Russian area or in the discipline. 

Students in the program must meet the general degree 
requirements of the University and division from which they 
graduate They must complete 1 2 hours of basic courses in 
Russian language (RUSS 111,1 12(orRUSS 121 in place of 
both 1 1 1 and 112.]. 114 and 1 1 5) or the equivalent of these 



courses taken elsewhere, and they must complete at least 
1 2 more hours in Russian language beyond the basic level 
(chosen from among RUSS 201. 202. 301. 302, 31 1, 312. 
321. and 322 or equivalent courses) In addition, students 
must complete 24 hours in Russian area courses on the 300 
level or above These 24 hours must be taken in at least 5 
different departments, if appropriate courses are available, 
and may include language- literature courses beyond those 
required above 

HIST 237. Russian Civilization, is recommended as a 
general introduction to the program but does not count 
toward the fulfillment of the program's requirements 

It is recommended but not required that the student who 
plans on doing graduate work complete at least 1 8 hours at 
the 300 level or above (which may include courses 
applicable to the Russian Area Program) in one of the above 
mentioned departments It is also recommended that 
students who plan on doing graduate work in the social 
sciences — government and politics, economics, 
geography, and sociology — take at least two courses in 
statistical methods 

The student's advisor will be the program director The 
student must receive a grade of C or better in all the above 
mentioned required courses. 

Course Code Prefix— RUSS 



Spanish and Portuguese 
Languages and Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: Mendeloff . 

Professors: Goodwyn, Gramberg. Marra-Lopez, Nemes. 

Rand (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Rovner, Sosnowski. 

Assistant Professors: Baird, Igel, Natella. 

Instructors: Barilla. Garcia, Hahn, Rentz. 

Majors. Two types of undergraduate majors are offered in 
Spanish: one for the general student or the future teacher; 
and the other for those interested in a rounded study of a 
foreign area for the purpose of understanding another nation 
through its literature, history, sociobgy, economics, and 
other aspects. Both of these majors confer the B.A. degree 

A C average is required for an undergraduate major in 
either language and literature or area studies. 

Language and Literature Major. Courses: SPAN 201 , 221 . 
301-302, 31 1 or 312, 321-322 or 323-324, 425-426 or 
446-447. plus four 400 level courses or pro-seminars in 
Spanish, Spanish American, or Luso-Brazilian literature, for a 
total of 39 credits Nine credits of supporting courses, six of 
which must be on the 300 or 400 level in a single area other 
than Spanish, for a combined total of 48 credits. Suggested 
areas: art, comparative literature, government and politics, 
history, philosophy, and Portuguese. All supporting courses 
should be germane to the field of specialization. 

Foreign Area Major. Courses: SPAN 201 , 301 -302, 31 1 or 
312. 315 or 316, 321-322 or 323-324, 425-426 or 446- 
447. plus three 400-level courses in Spanish. Spanish 
American, or Luso-Brazilian literature, for a total of 36 credits. 
Twelve credits of supporting courses, six of which must be 
on the 300 or 400 level in a single area other than Spanish, 
for a combined total of 48 credits. Suggested areas: anthro- 
pology, economics, geography, government and politics, 
history, Portuguese, and sociology. All supporting courses 
should be germane to the field of specialization. 

Honors in Spanish. A student whose major is Spanish and 
who, at the time of application, has a general academic 
average of 3.0 and 3.5 in his major field may apply to the 
Chairman of the Honors Committee for admission to the 
Honors Program of the department. Honors work normally 
begins the first semester of the junior year, but a qualified 
student may enter as early as the sophomore year or as late 
as the second semester of the junior year. Honors students 
are required to take two courses from those numbered 491 . 
492. 493. and the seminar numbered 496. as well as to meet 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 55 



other requirements for a major in Spanish. There will be a 
final comprehensive examination covering the honors 
reading list which must be taken by all graduating seniors 
who are candidates for honors Admission of students to the 
Honors Program, their continuance in the program, and the 
final award of honors are the prerogative of the Departmental 
Honors Committee. 

Elementary Honors. SPAN 102H is limited to specially 
approved candidates who have passed SPAN 101 with high 
grades, and will allow them to enter 1 04H or 201 . 

Lower Division Courses. The elementary and intermediate 
courses in Spanish and Portuguese consist of three 
semesters of four credits each (101, 102, 104). The 
language requirement for the B.A. degree in the Division of 
Arts and Humanities is satisfied by passing 104 or equiva- 
lent. 

Spanish 101 may be taken for credit by those students 
who have had two or more years of Spanish in high school, 
provided they obtain the permission of the Chairman of the 
Department. Students starting in SPAN 1 01 must follow the 
prescribed sequence of SPAN 1 01 , 1 02, and 1 04. 

Transfer students with college credit have the option of 
continuing at the next level of study, taking a placement 
examination, or electing courses 103 and 104 If a transfer 
student takes course 1 03 for credit, he retains transfer 
credit only for the equivalent of course 101. A transfer 
student placing lower than his training warrants may ignore 
the placement but DOES SO AT HIS OWN RISK. If he takes 
1 04 for credit, he retains transfer credit for the equivalent of 
courses 101 and 102. 

If a student has received a D in a course, advanced and 
completed the next higher course, he cannot go back and 
repeat the original D. 

Course Code Prefixes— SPAN, PORT 



Speech and Dramatic Art 

Professor and Chairman: Aylward 

Professors: Meersman, Pugliese, Strausbaugh (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Jamieson, Kirkley, Kolker, Linkow, 

Niemeyer, O'Leary, Vaughan, G.S. Weiss, Wolvin 

Assistant Professors: Elliott, Falcione, Freimuth, Hasenauer, 

Lea, McCaleb, Moore, Sadowski, Starcher, Thompson, 

Zelenka 

Instructors: Carter, Cokely, Doyle, Howard, Patterson, Paver, 

Pearson-Allen, Robinson, Sherry, Williams, Woodey. 

Lecturers: DuMonceau, Elko, Huggins, McCleary, Niles, 

Sandler. M. Weiss, W. Williams. 

The departmental curricula lead to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree and permit the student to develop a program with 
emphasis in one of the three areas of the department: (1) 
Speech communication (political communication, 
organizational communication, urban communication, educa- 
tional communication, and interpersonal communication); (2) 
Dramatic art (educational theater, acting, directing, 
producing, theater history, and technical theater); (3) Radio- 
television-film (broadcasting and film theory, production, 
history, criticism, and research in a full spectrum program). In 
cooperation with the Department of Secondary Education, 
the department provides an opportunity for teacher 
certification in the speech and drama education program. 

The curriculum is designed to provide: (1) a liberal 
education through special study of the arts and sciences of 
human communication: (2) preparation for numerous 
opportunities in business, government, media and related 
industries, and education 

Since communication is a dynamic field, the course 
offerings are under constant review and development, and 
the interested student should obtain specific information 
about a possible program from a departmental advisor. 

The major requirements are; 30 hours of course work in 
any one of the divisions, exclusive of those courses taken to 
satisfy University or Divisional requirements. Of the 30 
hours, at least 1 5 must be upper division in the 300 or 400 



series. No course with a grade less than C may be used to 
satisfy major requirements 

Each of the possible concentrations in the department 
requires certain courses in order to provide a firm foundation 
for the work in that area 

Speech Communication 

Required Courses: SPCH 125, 200, 220, 356, 400 and 
474. In addition, 12 semester credit hours in SPCH 
courses, at least six (6) must be at the 300-400 level 
Supporting Courses: Fifteen credit hours of supporting 
course work selected mconsultation with the maior 
adviser. 

Dramatic Art 
Required Courses: DART 120, 170, 252, 330, 490, and 
one of the following: 220, or 420 or 430 and one of 
the following: 375. or 476 or 480. In addition, five (5) 
DART courses of which at least two (2) must be at the 
300-400 level. 
Supporting Courses: Fifteen (15) credit hours from those 
Indicated below: 

Dramatic Literature— ENGL 403 or 404 or 405 and 
either 434 or 454. 
Dance — DANC 1 00 or 1 1 
Music — MUSC 1 00 or 1 30 or 208 
Art — Any related course offered in the department 
Radio-Television- Film 
Required Courses: RTVF 222 and 223 
Supporting Courses: Fifteen (15) credit hours of co- 
herently related subjects, selected in consultation with 
an adviser and considering the personal goals of the 
student 
The department offers numerous specialized opportunities 
for those interested through co-curricular activities in 
theater, film, television, radio, readers' theater, debate and 
forensics. For the superior student an Honors Program is 
available, and interested students should consult their 
adviser for further information no later than the beginning of 
their junior year. 

Course Code Prelixes— SPCH, DART. RTVF 



Division of 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 



The Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences consists 
of faculty and students who are involved in research and 
teaching relating to the analysis and solution of behavioral 
and social problems. The Division, organized in 1972. con- 
tains academic departments which were formerly adminis- 
tered by the College of Arts and Sciences and the College 
of Business and Public Administration, in addition to a new 
College of Business and Management The Division is 
designed to extend and support learning in the traditional 
disciplines while creating conditions for the development of 
interdisciplinary approaches to recurring social problems 
Divisional students may choose to concentrate their studies 
in the traditional fields, or may be interested for focusing on 
interdisciplinary study As part of University's response 
to society's need for resolution of the ever more 
complex problems of modern civilization, it must promote 
the utilization of knowledge generated by a cross fertiliza- 
tion of disciplines The Division will facilitate the grouping 
and regrouping of faculty across disciplinary lines for prob- 
lem-oriented research and teaching The interaction of 
faculty and students m overlapping fields will be encouraged 
and supported 

In order to promote the exchange of ideas, education, and 
knowledge, each unit of the Division, including the College 
of Business and Management, will be concerned with both 
applied and theoretical aspects of the resolution of social 
problems Practicums and internships will be utilized in- 
creasingly for the purpose of relating theoretical and 
empirical concepts in pursuit of the Division's concern with 
conditions m society 



56 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



The units in the Division are The College ol Business 
and Management. Departments ol Anthropology. Economics. 
Geography. Government and Politics, Inlormation Systems 
Management. Hearing and Speech Sciences. Sociology. 
Psychology. The Institutes of Criminal Justice and 
Criminology, and Urban Studies, and the programs in Afro- 
American Studies and Linguistics 

In addition to these departments, programs and 
institutes, the Division includes the Bureau of Business and 
Economics Research and the Bureau of Governmental 
Research 

Entrance Requirements. Requirements for admission to 
the Division are the same as the requirements for ad- 
mission to the University 

Degrees. The University confers the following degrees 
as appropriate, on students completing programs of study 
in the academe units in the Division Bachelor of Arts. 
Bachelor of Science. Master of Arts, Master of Science. 
Master of Business Administration, Doctor of Business 
Administration. Doctor of Philosophy Each candidate for a 
degree must file in the Office of Admissions and Registra- 
tions, prior to a date announced for each semester, a 
formal application for the appropriate degree. 

Graduation Requirements. Each student must complete a 
minimum of 120 hours of credit with no less than C 
Courses must include the 30 hours specified by the 
General University Requirements and the specific major and 
supporting course requirements of the College of Business 
and Management or of the programs in the academic units 
offering baccalaurate degrees 

Students who matriculated in departments originally in the 
College of Business and Public Administration or in depart- 
ments in the College of Arts and Sciences shall have the 
option of completing their degrees and requirements as 
stated under the old college requirements, including the 
previous General Education Requirements or under the new 
divisional requirements. 

Senior Residence Requirement. All candidates for de- 
grees should plan to take their senior year in residence 
since the advanced work of the major study normally occurs 
in the last year of the undergraduate course sequence. At 
least 24 of the last 30 credits must be done in residence. 
For example, a student, who at the time of residence may 
be permitted to do no more than 6 semester hours of the 
final 30 credits of record in another institution, provided 
the student obtains permission in advance from the dean or 
the Division Provost. University College credit is not con- 
sidered to be resident credit for purposes of the last 30 
hour rule. Students must be enrolled in the division from 
which they plan to graduate when registering for the last 15 
credits of his or her program. 

Honors: The Provost's List of Distinguished Students. 

Any student who has passed at least 1 2 hours of academic 
work in the preceding semester, without failure of any 
course, and with an overall average grade of at least 3.5 
will be placed on the Provost's List of Distinguished 
Students. 



College of Business 
and Management 



Dean: Lamone 

Assistant Deans: Haslem, Edelson 

Director of Doctoral Program: Pfaffenberger 

Director of M.S. A. Program: Poist 

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Mattingly 

Professor Emeritus: Clemens 

Professors: H. Anderson. Carroll. Dawson, Gannon, Gass, 

Greer, Haslem, Lamone, Levine, Locke, Loeb, Nash. Paine. 

Roberts. Taff, Wright 

Associate Professors: Ashmen. Bedingfield, Edelson. 

Edmister. Fromovitz. Hynes. Kuehl, Leete. Nickels, 



Pfaffenberger, Poist. Spivey. Thieblot. Widhelm 

Assistant Professors: C Anderson, Beard, Bloom. Bowers. 

Corsi, Ford. Formisano. Golden, Greene. Holmberg. Jolson. 

Kumar, May MayerSommer. Robeson. Schneier, Spekman, 

M Taylor 

Lecturers: Baker, Boisply. Chaires. Corwin. Donohue. 

Doyle. Enis, Franzak, Garbuny. Gillen. Gramlmg. Harman. 

Harvey. Hicks, Hoyle. Kraft, Lahne, Land. Levy, Lynn. 

Matthews. Moerdyk. Morash. Morns. Pearce, Pitta, Raben. 

Reckers. Roth, Rymer. Schilit, Schuster. Schweiger. Sohl. 

Stagliano, W Stewart, Stratton. O Taylor, Van Daniker. 

Walklmg. Zeithaml 

Assistant Instructors: Brown. Cannon. Egli. Harris. Hill, 

lannaconi. Jones. Knain, Schweiger. R Stewart, Strachman. 

Wolff 

The College of Business and Management is the 
accredited undergraduate and graduate collegiate school of 
business in the Maryland-Washington, D C area. This 
accreditation by the American Assembly of Collegiate 
Schools of Business recognizes the quality of programs 
and faculty in the College The College recognizes the 
importance of education in business and management to 
economic, social, and professional development through 
profit and nonprofit organizations at the local, regional, 
and national levels The faculty of the College have been 
selected from the leading doctoral programs in business 
They are scholars, teachers, and professional leaders with 
a commitment to superior education in business and 
management. 

The College has faculty specializing in Accounting; 
Finance; Management Science and Statistics: Marketing: 
Organizational Behavavior and Industrial Relations; and 
Transportation, Business and Public Policy. 

Undergraduate Program. The undergraduate program 
recognizes the need for professional education in business 
and management based on a foundation in the liberal arts. 
Modern society comprises intricate business, economic, 
social, and governmental institutions requiring a large num- 
ber of men and women trained to be effective and 
responsible managers. The College regards its program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science in business and manage- 
ment as one of the most important ways it serves this 
need. 

A student in business and management selects a con- 
centration in one of several curricula: (1) Accounting; (2) 
Finance; (3) General Curriculum in Business and Man- 
agement; (4) Management Science-Statistics; (5) Marketing; 
(6) Personnel and Labor Relations; (7) Production Manage- 
ment and; (8) Transportation. For students interested in 
Law as a career there is a combined Business and Law 
Program. 

Students interested in insurance, real estate, institutional 
management, or international business may plan with their 
advisor to elect courses to meet their specialized needs. 

At least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of aca- 
demic work required for graduation must be in business 
and management subjects. A minimum of 57 hours of the 
required 1 20 hours must be in 300 or 400 level courses. 
In additional to the requirement of an overall average of C 
in academic subjects, an average of C in business and 
management subjects is required for graduation Electives 
in the curricula of the college may be taken in any depart- 
ment of the University if the student has the necessary 
prerequisites. Business courses taken as electives may not 
be taken on a pass/fail basis by students of the College of 
Business and Management. 

Degrees. The University confers the following degrees on 
students successfully completing programs of study in the 
College: Bachelor of Science (B.S.); Master of Business 
Administration (MBA); Doctor of Business Administration 
(DBA). Each candidate for a degree must file in the 
Registrar's Office, prior to a date announced for each 
semester, a formal application for a degree Information 
concerning admissions to the M.B.A. and DBA. programs 
is available from the college director of graduate studies. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 57 



Academic Advisement. General advisement in the College 
of Business and Management is available in Room 5119, 
Tydings Hall It is recommended that students visit this 
office each year to ensure they are informed about current 
requirements and procedures Specific advisement pertain- 
ing to a particular curriculum (for example, accounting) is 
available from the chairman or other faculty in the particular 
area of study. Student problems concerning advisement 
should be directed to the Director of Undergraduate Studies 
in Room 3 1 36A. Tydings Hall. 

Transfer students entering the University can be advised 
during transfer orientation and first semester freshmen 
entering the University in the fall can receive advisement 
during the summer freshmen orientation program of the 
college 

Entrance Requirements. Requirements for admission to 
the college are those of the University To assure a likeli- 
hood of success in the college, it is recommended that the 
student have four units of English, three or preferably tour 
units of college preparatory mathematics (including a mini- 
mum of two units of algebra and one unit of geometry), 
one or more units of history and social science, two or more 
units of natural science, and two or more units of foreign 
language. Students expecting to enroll in the College of 
Business and Management should pursue the precollege 
program in high school. 

Statement of Policy on the Transfer of Credit from 
Community Colleges. The College of Business and Man- 
agement subscribes to the policy that a student's under- 
graduate program below the junior year should include 
no advanced, professional level courses This policy is 
based on the conviction that the value derived from these 
advanced courses is materially enhanced when based upon 
a sound foundation in the liberal arts. 

In adhering to the above policy, it is the practice of the 
College of Business and Management to accept in transfer 
from an accredited community college no more than 12 
semester hours of work in business administration courses 

The 1 2 semester hours of business administration 
acceptable in transfer are specifically identified as three (3) 
semester hours in an introductory business course, three 
(3) semester hours in business statistics, and six (6) 
semester hours of elementary accounting. Thus, it is antici- 
pated that the student transferring from another institution 
will have devoted the major share of his academic effort 
below the junior year, to the completion of basic require- 
ments in the liberal arts A total of 60 semester hours 
may be transferred from a community college and applied 
toward a degree from the College of Business and Man- 
agement 

Statement of Policy on the Transfer of Credits from 
Other Institutions. The College of Business and Manage- 
ment normally accepts transfer credits from accredited four- 
year institutions Junior- and senior level business 
courses are accepted from colleges accredited by the 
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business 
(AACSB) Junior- and senior level business courses from 
other than AACSB accredited schools are evaluated on a 
course-by-course basis to determine transferability 

Honor Societies 

Sera Alpha Psi. National scholastic and professional 
honorary fraternity in accounting Members are elected on 
the basis of excellence in scholarship and professional 
service from |unior and senior students majoring in Account- 
ing in the College of Business and Management 

8e(a Gamma Sigma. National scholastic honorary in 
business administration To be eligible students must rank 
in the upper five percent of their junior class or the upper 
ten percent of their senior class in the College of 
Business and Management 

Sigma Phi. National scholastic honorary sponsored by the 
Propeller Club of the United States Membership is elected 
from outstanding senior members of the University of 
Maryland chapter of the Propeller Club majoring in Trans- 
portation in the College of Business and Management 



Student Awards. Dean's List Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship 
Key. Distinguished Accounting Student Awards, and Wall 
Street Journal Student Achievement Award 

Scholarships. Alcoa Foundation Traffic Scholarship. 
Delmarva Traffic Club Scholarship; Delta Nu Alpha 
Cheasapeake Chapter No 23 Scholarship. Robert Half 
Personnel Accounting and Tax Awards, Pilot Freight 
Carriers, Inc Scholarship; Jack B Sacks Foundation 
Scholarship, and Charles A Taff Scholarship 

Student Professional Organizations. American Marketing 
Association; Delta Nu Alpha (Transportation). Delta Sigma 
Pi (business students); Phi Chi Theta (business students); 
Society for the Advancement of Management, and Propeller 
Club of America (Transportation) 



Freshman and Sophomore Requirements 



General University Requirements (GUR) 

Electives 

MATH 1 10. 11 1 and 220 or (140 and 141)' 

SPCH100 

BMGT1 10 

BMGT220Aand221A(220and221|" 

ECON201 and 203 

BMGT230|23ir 



Semester 
Hours 

21 
9(101 
9(8) 



• Required lor Management Science Statistics c 

IFSM optional for other curricula 
' Required for Accounting Curriculum 



culum and Stttjstti 



A Typical Program for Freshman and Sophomore Years. 

Required Courses and Semester Hours in Addition to 
General University Requirements. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
GUR and or electives 
BMGT110orSPCH100 
MATH1 10 (or 140) 

First semester total 

GUR and or electives 
SPCH 100orBMGT1 10 
MATH 111 (or 1 4 1 ) 

Second semester total 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

GUR and or electives 
BMGT220(220A) 
ECON201 
MATH 220- 
Th ird semester total 



GUR and or electives 
ECON203 
BMGT221 (221A) 
BMGT 230 (231) 



Semester 
Hours 



3(4) 
15-16 



3(4) 
15-16 



Fourth semester total 

Junior and Senior Requirements 



Semesier 
Hours 



( 1 ) The following required courses 
BMGT 340— Business Finance 

350 — Marketing Principles and 

Organization 
364— Management and Organizaton 
Theory 
BMGT 380— Business Law 
BMGT 495— Business Policies 



BMGT 



BMGT 



58 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



(2) Curnculum Concentration— see requirements 

tor each 16-24 

(3) Economics social sciences electives— 

see requirements tor each curriculum 3-6 

(4 ) GUR ( 9 semester hours! and electives— 

see each curriculum 15-21 

Total 60 



Curricula 

Accounting. Accounting, in a limited sense, is the 
analysis, classification and recording ol financial events and 
the reporting of the results of such events for an organiza- 
tion In a broader sense, accounting consists of all financial 
devices for planning, controlling and appraising performance 
of an organization In this broader sense, accounting in- 
cludes among its many facets financial planning, budgeting, 
accounting systems, financial management controls, finan- 
cial analysis of performance, financial reporting, internal 
and external auditing, and taxation of business 

The accounting curriculum provides an educational 
foundation for careers in accounting and a foundation for 
future advancement in other management areas whether in 
private business organizations, government agencies, or 
public accounting firms Students who select this curriculum 
will complete the freshman and sophomore requirements for 
all students in the College of Business and Management. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum con- 
centration in accounting are: 



( 1 ) The following required courses 

IFSM 401 —Electronic Data Processing 

BMGT 310.311 —Intermediate Accounting 

BMGT 321— Cost Accounting 

BMGT 323— Income Tax Accounting 



(2) three of the following courses 

BMGT 320— Accounting Systems 

BMGT 420, 421 —Undergraduate Accounting 

Seminar 
BMGT 422— Auditing Theory and Practice 
BMGT 424 — Advanced Accounting 
BMGT 425— CPA Problems 
BMGT 427— Advanced Auditing Theory 

and Practice 
BMGT 426— Advanced Cost Accounting 
Total 



The junior-senior requirements are: 
Junior-senior requirements for all 

college students 
Junior-senior curriculum concentration 

(mimimum) 
Electives in 400 level economics courses at least one 

of which must be ECON 401. 403. 430, or 440 
GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 

required for graduation (of which 1 2 semester hours 

must be in 300 or 400 level courses) 

Total 



Semester 



On or after July 1. 1974. the educational requirement 
of the Maryland State Board of Accountancy shall be a 
baccalaureate or higher degree with a major in accounting 
as defined by the Board, or with a non-accounting major 
supplemented by what the Board determines to be sub- 
stantially the equivalent of an accounting major. 

An accounting major shall be considered generally as 
constituting a minimum of (1) 30 semester hours in 
accounting subjects, which shall include (but shall not be 
limited to) courses in accounting principles, auditing, cost 
accounting and federal income tax; (2) 6 semester hours in 
commercial law: and (3) 4 semester hours in principles 
of economics. 

A student planning to take the CPA examination in a 
state other than Maryland should determine the course 
requirements, if any. for that state and arrange his or her 
program accordingly 



Finance. The finance curriculum is designed to familiarize 
the student with the institutions, theory and practice in- 
volved in the allocation of financial resources within the 
private sector, especially the firm II is also designed to 
incorporate foundation study in such related disciplines as 
economics and the quantitative areas 

The finance curriculum provides an educational founda- 
tion for careers involving financial analysis and manage- 
ment, investment analysis and portfolio management, in- 
vestment banking, insurance and risk management, banking, 
and mternatonal finance, it also provides a foundation for 
graduate study in business administration, quantitative areas, 
economics, and law 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum 
concentration in finance are 



( 1 ) the following required courses 

IFSM 401 —Electronic Data Processing 

ECON 430— Money and Banking 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management 

Decisions 
BMGT 343— Investments 



Semester 

Hours 

3 



(2) two of the following courses 



BMGT 
BMGT 
BMGT 
BMGT 



440— Financial Management 
443— Security Analysis and Valuation 
445 — Commercial Bank Management 
481— Public Utilities 



(3) one of the following courses (check prerequisites) 

IFSM 402— Electronic Data Processing Applications 
BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 
BMGT 431 —Design of Statistical Experiments in 

Business 
BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
BMGT 434— Operations Research I 
MATH three semester hours of mathematics beyond 

the college requirement 3 

Total 2 1 

The junior-senior requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements for all college students 1 5 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 21 

One course in economics selected from ECON 401. 

403, 431,440, 450 and 402* 3 

GUR and electives to complete the 1 20 semester 
hours required for graduation (of which 1 8 hours 
must be in 300 or 400 level courses) 21 

Total 60 

'especalty recommended 

General Curriculum in Business and Management. The 

general curriculum is designed for those who desire a 
broader course of study in business and management than 
offered in the other college curricula. The general curriculum 
is appropriate, for example, for those who plan to enter 
small business management or entrepreneurship where 
general knowledge of the various fields of study may be 
preferred to a more specialized curriculum concentration. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum con- 
centration in general business and management are: 



Accounting/Finance 

BMGT 321 —Cost Accounting 

or 
BMGT 440— Financial Management 

Management Science/Statistics 

BMGT 332— Operations Research tor Management 
Decisions 



BMGT 43 1 —Design of Statistical Experiments i 
Business 



Semester 
Hours 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS / 59 



BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
Marketing 

BMGT 35 1 —Marketing Management 

or 
BMGT 450— Marketing Research Methods 

or 
BMGT 452— Promotion Management 

Personnel/Labor Relations 

BMGT 360— Personnel Management 

or 
BMGT 362— Labor Relations 

Public Policy 

BMGT 481— Public Utilities 

or 
BMGT 482— Business and Government 

Transportation /Product ion Management 

BMGT 370— Principles of Transportation 

or 
BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distribution 
Management 
or 
BMGT 385— Production Management 
Total 



The junior-senior requirements are: 

Junior-sen'or requirements for all college students. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 

Electives in 400 level economics, psychology or 
sociology courses, at least one of which must be 
ECON401.403, 430, or440 

GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 
required for graduation (of which 1 8 semester hours 

must be in 300 or 400 level courses) 

Total 



Management Science-Statistics. In the management 
science-statistics curriculum, the student has the option of 
concentrating primarily in statistics or primarily in manage- 
ment science. The two options are described below 

Statistics option. Statistics consists of a body of methods 
for utilizing probability theory in decision-making processes 
Important statisticsl activities ancillary to the decision-mak- 
ing process are the systematization of quantitative data and 
the measurement of variability. Some specialized areas 
within the field of statistics are: sample surveys, forecasting, 
quality control, design of experiment, Bayesian decision 
processes, actuarial statistics, and data processing. 
Statistical methods— for example, sample survey techniques 
—are widely used in accounting, marketing, industrial man- 
agement, and government applications. An aptitude for 
applied mathematics and a desire to understand and apply 
scientific methods to significant problems are important 
prerequisites for the statistician. 

Students planning to major in statistics must take MATH 
140-141. 

Course requirements for the |unior-senior curriculum con- 
centration in the statistics option are: 



( 1 ) the following required courses 



BMGT 
BMGT 



BMGT 
BMGT 



430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 
432— Sample Surveys m Business and 

and Economics 
434— Operations Research I 
438— Topics m Statistical Analysis for 

Business and Management 



Semester 

Hours 

3 



(2) two of the lollowing courses 

IFSM 401 —Electronic Data Processing 

BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

BMGT 435— Operations Research II 

BMGT 436— Applications of Mathematical 

Programming in Management 

Science 
BMGT 450— Marketing Research Methods 
STAT 400— Probability and Statistics I 

Total 



Management Science option. Management Science 
(operations research) can be defined as the application of 
scientific methodology by interdisciplinary teams to prob- 
lems involving the control of organized man-machine sys- 
tems so as to provide solutions which best serve the 
purposes of the organization as a whole. Practitioners in this 
field are employed by large organizations (military, govern- 
mental, private industrial, private consulting), to analyze 
operations in the light of organizational goals and recom- 
mended changes requisite to goal fulfillment 

Students planning to major in this field must complete 
MATH 140-141 prior to |unior standing Students consider- 
ing graduate work in this field should complete MATH 
240-24 1 as early as possible in their careers 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum con- 
centration in the management science option are: 



(1 1 the following required courses 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 
BMGT 434— Operations Research I 
BMGT 435— Operations Research II 
BMGT 436— Applications of Mathematical 

Programming in Management 

Science 

(2) two of the following courses 

BMGT 432— Sample Surveys in Business and 

Economics 
BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
BMGT 438— Topics in Statistical Analysis for 

Business and Management 
STAT 400— Applied Probability and Statistics I 
IFSM 40 1 —Electronic Data Processing 
IFSM 410— Information Processing Problems of 

Administrative, Economic, and 

Political Systems 
IFSM 436— Introduction to System Analysis 
BMGT 385— Production Management 
BMGT 485— Advanced Production Management 
Total 

The junior-senior requirements for both options are: 

Junior-senior requirements for all college students 
Junior-senior curriculum concentration electives in 

400 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be ECON 401 , 403, 430 or 440 
GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 

required for graduation (of which 18 semester 

hours must be in 300 or 400 level courses or 

approved equivalent 

Total 



Semester 
Hours 



( 



Marketing. Marketing involves the functions performed in 
getting goods and services from producers to users Career 
opportunities exist in manufacturing, wholesaling and retail- 
ing and include sales administration, marketing research. 
advertising and merchandising 

Students preparing for work in marketing research are 
advised to elect additional courses in management 
science and statistics 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curnculum con- 
centration in marketing are 



( 1 1 the following required courses 



BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management 
Decisions 



Semester 
Hours 



60 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



BMGT 35 1 — Marketing Management 

BMGT 352— Advertising 

BMGT 450— Marketing Research Methods 

(2) and two ot the following courses 



IFSM 


401- 


-Electronic Data Processing 


BMGT 


353- 


-Retail Management 


BMGT 


372- 


-Traffic and Physical Distribution 
Management 


BMGT 


431- 


-Design of Statistical Experiments 
Business 


BMGT 


453- 


-Industrial Marketing 


BMGT 


451- 


-Consumer Analysis 


BMGT 


454- 


-International Marketing 


BMGT 


455- 


-Sales Management 


BMGT 


452- 


-Promotion Management 




Totat 



The junior-senior requirements are: 

Junor-senior requirements for all college students 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 

Electives in 400 level economics courses at least 

one ot which must be ECON 401 . 403, 430. 

or 440 
GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 

required tor graduation (of which 1 8 semester hours 

must be in 300 or 400 level courses) 

Total 



Personnel and Labor Relations. Personnel administration 
has to do with the direction of human effort. It is con- 
cerned with securing, maintaining and utilizing an effective 
working force. People professionally trained in personnel 
administration find career opportunities in business, in 
government, in educational institutions, and in charitable and 
other organizations. 

Course requirements for the junior-senor curriculum in 
personnel and labor relations are: 



(1 ) the following required courses 



BMGT 360— Personnel Management 

BMGT 362— Labor Relations 

BMGT 460— Personnel Management— Analysis 

and Problems 
BMGT 464— Organizational Behavior 
BMGT 462— Labor Legislation . 



(2) one of the following courses: 



Semester 

Hours 

3 



BMGT 
PSYC 

PSYC 
PSYC 
SOCY 
SOCY 
GVPT 
JOUR 



467— Undergraduate Seminar in Personnel 

Management 
385— Production Management 
46 1 —Personnel and Organizational 

Psychology 
45 1 —Principles of Psychological Testing 
452— Psychology of Individual Differences 
462— Industrial Sociology 
447— Small Group Analysis 
41 1 —Public Personnel Administration 
330— Public Relations 



Total 



The junior-senior requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements for all college students 15 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 

Electives in 400 level economics courses at least 

one of which must be ECON 401 , 403, 430, 

or 440 . ... 6 

GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 

required for graduation (of which 1 8 semester hours 

must be in 300 or 400 level courses) 21 

Total 60 

Production Management. This curriculum is designed to 
acquaint the student with the problems of organization and 
control in the field of production management. Theory and 



practice with reference to organization, policies, methods, 
processes and techniques are surveyed, analyzed and 
evaluated 

Course requirements for the Junior-senior curriculum con- 
centration in production management are 



( 1 ) the following required courses 



BMGT 32 1 —Cost Accounting 

BMGT 360— Personnel Management 

BMGT 385— Production Management 

BMGT 485— Advanced Production Management 

(2) two of the following courses 



Semester 
Hours 



BMGT 
BMGT 
BMGT 
BMGT 

BMGT 



433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

453— Industrial Marketing 

362— Labor Relations 

332— Operations Research lor Management 

Decisions 
372 —Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 

Total 



The junior-senior requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements tor all college students . 
Junior-senior curriculum concentration 
Electives in 400 level economics courses at least 

one of which must be ECON 401 . 403. 430. 

or 440 
GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 

required for graduation (of which 1 8 semester hours 

must be in 300 or 400 level courses) 

Total 



60 



Transportation. Transportation involves the movement of 
persons and goods in the satisfaction of human needs. The 
curriculum in transportation includes an analysis of the 
services and management problems, such as pricing, financ- 
ing, and organization, of the five modes of transport— air. 
motor, pipelines, railroads, and water— and covers the 
scope and regulation of transportation in our economy. The 
effective management of transportation involves a study of 
the components of physical distribution and the interaction 
of procurement, the level and control of inventories, ware- 
housing, material handling, transportation, and data process- 
ing. The curriculum in transportation is designed to prepare 
students to assume responsible positions and carriers, 
governmental agencies, and traffic and physical distribution 
management in industry. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum con- 
centration in transportation are: 



( 1 ) the following required courses: 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management 

Decisions 
BMGT 370— Principles of Transportation 
BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management 
BMGT 470— Land Transportation Systems 

or 
BMGT 471 —Air and Water Transportation Systems 
BMGT 473— Advanced Transportation Problems 

(2) one of the following courses: 

BMGT 385— Production Management 
IFSM 401 —Electronic Data Processing 
BMGT 470— Land Transportation Systems 

or 
BMGT 471 —Air and Water Transportation Systems 

(depending on choice under (1) 

above) 
BMGT 474— Urban Transportations 

Development 
BMGT 475— Advanced Logistics Management 
BMGT 48 1 —Public Utilities 
BMGT 482— Business and Government 



Semester 
Hours 



Total . 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 61 



The junior-senior requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements tor all college students 

Junir-senior curriculum concentration 

Electives in 400 level economics courses at least one 

or which must be ECON401, 403, 430, or 440 
GUR and electives to complete 1 20 semester hours 

required for graduation (ol which 1 8 semester hours 

must be in 300 or 400 level courses) . 

Total 



Combined Business and Law Program. The College of 
Business and Management offers a combined Business Law 
Curriculum in which the student completes three years in 
the chosen curriculum concentration in the college and a 
fourth year of work in the Law School of the University 
of Maryland Admission to the law school is contingent 
upon meeting the applicable standards of that school. Indi- 
vidual students are responsible to secure from the law 
school its current admission requirements. The student must 
complete all the courses required of students in the college, 
except BMGT 380 and BMGT 495. In addition, they must 
complete all courses normally required for one of the speci- 
fic curriculum concentrations in business and management 
and enough other credits to equal a minimum of 90 
semester hours. No business law course can be included 
in the 90 hours. The last year of college work before enter- 
ing the law school must be completed in resident at College 
Park. At least 30 hours of work must be in courses num- 
bered 300 or above. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred by the 
college upon students who complete the first year in the law 
school with an average grade of C or better. 

Insurance and Real Estate. Students interested in insur- 
ance or real estate may wish to concentrate in finance or 
general business and management and plan with their 
advisors a group of electives to meet their specialized 
needs College courses offered in insurance are: 



BMGT 390— Risk Management 

and 
BMGT 39 1 —Principles ot Risk and Insurance 



College courses offered in real estate are: 

BMGT 393— Real Estate Principles 
BMGT 490— Urban Land Management 

Institutional Management. Students interested in hotel- 
motel management or hospital administration may wish to 
concentrate in general business and management, finance, 
or personnel and labor relations and plan with their advisors 
a group of electives to meet their specialized needs. 

International Business. Students interested in international 
business may wish to concentrate in marketing or general 
business and management and plan with their advisors a 
group of electives to meet their specialized needs 



Behavioral and Social Sciences 
Departments, Programs 
and Curricula 

Afro-American Studies Program 

Associate Professor and Director: Gilmore. 

Associate Professor: Tsomondo. 

Assistant Professors: Landry. Williams. Yimenu. Daakmc, 

Nzuwah 

Lecturers: Mayfield. Smyley, Suggs, Osoln. Chayyelle 

The Afro-American Studies Program offers a Bachelor of 
Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree to students who 



declare a major in Afro-American Studies and who fulfill 
the acadmic requirements of this degree program 

Students who want to take a major in another depart- 
ment, as well as follow a concentration outside his major 
of 18 hours of upper division course work with an emphasis 
on black life and experiences, can receive a Certificate in 
Afro-American Studies. This work includes courses in art. 
African languages, economics, English, geography, history, 
music, political science, sociology, speech and education. 

Undergraduates in good standing may enroll in the pro- 
gram by contacting Professor Mariiyo Nzuwah. Professor 
Roosevelt Williams, Professor Bartholomew Landry or 
Beatrice Youngblood of the Afro-American Studies Pro- 
gram, in Room 0100, Woods Hall Students pursuing a 
major or certificate must meet the General University and 
division requirements. 

Students who plan to major in Afro-American Studies 
must complete a total of 36 hours of Afro-American 
Studies courses. At least 24 of the 36 hours must be in 
upper division courses (300-400 numbers). Twelve hours of 
basic courses are required To fulfill this requirement, all 
majors must take the twelve hours of basic courses: AASP 
1 00, AASP 200, AASP 202 and AASP 298A. A minimum of 
six hours of seminars (two courses) are required AASP 
401 to be taken after completing 15 hours of required 
courses, and AASP 397 to be taken during the student's 
senior year AASP 397 will include the writing of a senior 
thesis. The remaining 18 hours of upper division course 
work (300-400 numbers) should be concentrated in areas 
of specialization within the Program, but may not include 
AASP 397 or AASP 401. Related and supporting courses 
taken in other departments must be approved by a faculty 
advisor or the student's program plan. Each course counted 
for the above requirements must be passed with a grade of 
C or better. In addition to the program of courses indicated 
above, each student majoring in Afro-American Studies is 
strongly advised to utilize the remainder of the 120 hours 
required for graduation by concentrating his studies in areas 
such as African Studies, Technology, Fine Arts, Pre-Law. 
Pre-Medicine. Business Administration, Social Sciences, 
and Urban Studies, etc. Model four-year program for these 
and other areas of concentration are available from program 
advisors. 

To receive a Certificate in Afro-American Studies, the 
student must enroll and receive a satisfactory grade in 
AASP 100 plus at least three (3) of the required courses 
which must include AASP 401. Seminar in Afro- American 
Studies In addition, the student may also choose a num- 
ber of approved courses from a list of recommended 
electives to meet the minimum requirements of 18 credit 
hours. 



Anthropology 

Professor and Chairman: Kerley 

Professor: Williams. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Hoffman. Leone. Rosen 

Assistant Professors: Benjamin. Dessamt. Hounhan, 

Migliazza. Stuart 

Lecturers: Handsman, Ojikutu. 

The Anthopology Department offers beginning and ad- 
vanced course work in the four principal subdivisions of the 
discipline: physical anthropology, linguistics, archaeology 
and ethnology Courses in these subdivisions may be used 
to fulfill the minor or "supporting courses" requirement in 
some programs leading to the B A degree They also may, 
at the discretion of the Department of Sociology, be counted 
toward a major in Sociology. 

Anthropology Major: The fulfillment of the requirements 
for a major in anthropology leads to the B A degree All 
majors are required to take 30 hours in anthropology. 1 8 of 
which must be selected from the following courses ANTH 
101. 102. 401. 441. or 45 1.371 or 461. and 397 It should 
be noted, however, that if ANTH 101 is used to 
satisfy the General University requirement in Behavioral and 
Social Sciences, it may not be counted as a part of the 30 
required semester hours for the major The 18 hours of 



62 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



required courses insures that the major becomes familiar 
with all areas of anthropology No one area therefore, re- 
ceives special emphasis, for it is believed that such special- 
ization should occur during graduate study, preferably at the 
Ph D level. Thus the student is broadly prepared in the ways 
humans have evolved culturally and physically. A statement 
of course requirements and recommended sequences of 
courses is available in the departmental office 

No course with a grade of less than C may be used to 
satisfy major requirements. 

ANTH 101. and ANTH 102. or their equivalent, or per- 
mission of the instructor, are prerequisites to all other 
courses in Anthropology. 

Course Code Prefuc— ANTH 

Business and Economic Research 

Prolessor and Director: Cumberland 
Professors: Cumberland. Harris. 
Associate Prolessor: Fisher 
Assistant Prolessors: Clotfelter, King 

The functions of the Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research are research, education and public service 

The research activities of the bureau are primarily focused 
on basic research in the field of regional, urban and 
environmental studies Although the bureau's long-run 
research program is carried out largely by its own staff, 
faculty members from other departments also participate 
The bureau also undertakes cooperative research programs 
with the sponsorship of federal and state governmental 
agencies, research foundations and other groups. 

The educational functions of the bureau are achieved 
through active participation by advanced graduate and 
undergraduate students in the bureau's research program. 
This direct involvement of students in the research process 
under faculty supervision assists students in their degree 
programs and provides research skills that equip students 
for responsible posts in business, government and higher 
education. 

The bureau observes its service responsibilities to 
governments, business, and private groups primarily through 
the publication and distribution of its research findings. In 
addition, the bureau staff welcomes the opportunity to be of 
service to governmental and civic groups by consulting with 
them on problems.especially in the fields of regional 
and urban economic development and forecasting, state and 
local public finance, and environmental management. 



Criminal Justice and Criminology 

Professor and Director: Lejins. 

Criminology Program: 

Associate Professors: Maida, Tennyson. 

Assistant Professors: Butler, Debro, Minor 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Gluckstern. 

Lecturers: Block. 

Law Enforcement Curriculum: 

Associate Professors: Ingraham. 

Assistant Professors: B Johnson. K.Johnson 

Part-time Lecturers: Larkins, Verchot, Wolman. 

Part-time Instructors: Gentel, Holzman, Longmire. 

The purpose of the institute is to provide an organization 
and administrative basis for the interests and activities of the 
University, its faculty and students in the areas usually 
designated as law enforcement, criminology and corrections. 
The Institute is to promote study and teaching concerning 
the problems of crime and delinquency by offering and 
coordinating academic programs in the area of law 
enforcement, criminology and corrections; managing re- 
search in these areas; and conducting demonstration 
projects. 

The Institute comprises as its components parts: 
1. The Criminology Program. 
2 The Law Enforcement Curriculum. 



3 Graduate Program offering M A and Ph D degrees in 
Criminal Justice and Criminology 
The major in criminology comprises 30 hours of course 
work; 1 8 hours in Criminology. 6 hours in Law Enforcement 
and 6 hours in Sociology Eighteen hours in social or 
behavioral sciences disciplines are required as a supporting 
sequence In these supporting courses a social or be- 
havioral science statistics, and a social or behavioral science 
methods course are required Psychology 331 or 431 is 
also required In addition, two Psychology elective courses 
and a general social psychology course are required Re- 
garding the specific courses to be taken, the student is 
required to consult with an advisor No grade lower than C 
may be used toward the major 



Major 

Hours 

CRIM 220 3 CRIM 454 

CRIM 450 3 LENF 100 

CRIM 451 3 LENF 230 

CRIM 452 3 SOCY 433 

CRIM 453 3 SOCY 427 

Supporting 

PSYC331 or 431 

Social Psych— such as PSYC 221, SOCY 230, 

SOCY 430 or SOCY 447 . 
PSYC etectives 
Soc Sci statistics 
Soc Sci. methods 



General University Requirements 
Electives 



Hours 
3 
3 



42 
120 



The major in law enforcement comprises 30 hours of 
course work in law enforcement and criminology, the latter 
being offered as courses in the Criminology Program, 
divided as follows: 18, but not more than 24. hours in law 
enforcement; 6. but not more than 1 2. hours in criminology. 
Student may use an additional 6 hours to bring the major up 
to 36 hours. In addition to major requirements, a student 
must take 6 hours in methodology and statistics, and a 
supporting sequence of courses totalling 18 hours must be 
taken in government and politics, psychology or sociology 
(see recommended list in the Institute office). No grade 
lower than C may be used toward the major. 

Course Code Prefix— LENF 

Economics 

Professor and Chairman: Marris. 

Professors: Aaron, Adelman, Almon, Bailey. Bergmann, 

Cumberland, Dillard, Dorsey, Gruchy. Harris, Kelejian, 

McGuire, O'Connell, Olson. Schultze. Straszheim, Ulmer. 

Associate Professors: Adams, Bennett, Betancourt, Clague, 

Dodge, Fisher, Knight. McLoone* (Education). Meyer, 

Singer, Weinstein. 

Assistant Professors: Brown, Clotfelter. Dorman, Johnson' 

(Applied Math), King, Lieberman, Pelcovits, Snower, Tosini, 

Vavrichek, Weiss. West. Schiller. 

Lecturers: Dardis* (Home Economics). Fleisig. Measday, 

Tsien. Bolino, Quails. Dorrance, Anderson. 

instructors: Bumb, Chase. Grieves, Kahal, Krupnik, Larson, 

McCarthy, Rutherford, Schuyler, Snyder. 

•Joint appointment with indicated department 

The study of economics is designed to give students an 
understanding of the American economic system and our 
country's economic relations with the rest of the world, and 
the ability to analyze the economic forces which largely 
determine the national output of goods and services, the 
level of prices, and the distribution of income. It is also 
designed to prepare students for graduate study, and for 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 63 



employment opportunities In private business, the Federal 
government, state and local government, universities and 
research institutions. Demand (or college graduates trained 
in economics continues to be strong, and this Is among the 
fields of undergraduate study strongly recommended for 
students planning to study law, or enter public administra- 
tion, as well as those who plan to become professional 
economists. 

Requirements for the Economics Major. In addition to the 
thirty-hour General University Requirements, the require- 
ments for the Economics major are: 

{!) Mathematics. 

Six credit hours. No specific courses are required, but the 
combination of MATH 110 (Introduction to Mathematics) 
and MATH 220 (Elementary Calculus) is highly recom- 
mended for those who take only six hours. Students plan- 
ning to do graduate study in economics are strongly urged 
to take more than the minimum six-hour mathematics re- 
quirement, since graduate programs emphasize the applica- 
tion of mathematical and statistical techniques in the 
analysis of economic problems 

Economics majors should take mathematics courses early 
in their college careers in order to gain an understanding 
of mathematical principles which will assist them in later 
course work in Economics. The required 6 hours of math 
cannot be used for General University Requirements. 

(2) Upper Division Courses Outside of Economics. 

Twelve credit hours. Economics majors must earn credit 
for twelve hours of upper division work in non-economics 
courses (in addition to the nine hours of upper division 
courses required as part of the General University Require- 
ments). For purposes of this requirement, any of the follow- 
ing may count as an "upper division" course: any course 
numbered 300 or above; any course in mathematics beyond 
the six hours required of all economics majors; and any 
course in a department for which the prerequisites are the 
equivalent of one year of college-level work in that depart- 
ment. In particular, a second-year college course in foreign 
languages may be counted as "upper division." 

(3) Economics Courses. 

Thirty-six credit hours. Economics majors must earn 36 
credit hours in economics. Courses required of all majors 
are: ECON 201. 203. 310 (formerly 110). 401. 403, and 
421 

In lieu of Economics 421 (Economic Statistics), the stu- 
dent may take one of the following statistics courses: BMGT 
230. BMGT 231 . or STAT 400 A student who takes ECON 
205 before deciding to major in Economics may continue 
with ECON 203. without being required to take ECON 201. 

The remainder of the 36 hours may be chosen from 
among any other economics courses and from the following 
courses in Business Administration and Consumer Eco- 
nomics: BMGT 230, 231, 431, 432, 481, CNEC 435. 
(However, students who take ECON 421 may not also 
receive credit for BMGT 230 or BMGT 231 and students 
may not receive credit for ECON 105 if they have taken 
any two courses from among ECON 201 . 203. and 205 ) 

To graduate as majors, students must pass the minimum 
of 36 hours in economics The average grade in all 
economics courses must be not less than C 

Sequence of Courses. The Department of Economics does 
not specify a rigid sequence in which courses are to be 
taken, but it urges its majors to observe the following 
recommendations 

By the end of the sophomore year, the economics major 
should have at least completed 6 hours of mathematics. 
ECON 201 and 203. ECON 201 should be taken before 
ECON 203 Upon completion of ECON 203. the student 
should promptly take ECON 401, 403. or both. In the 
following semester, since these are intermediate theory 
courses of general applicability in later course work Maiors 
should take ECON 421 (or equivalent) at an early stage, 
since an understanding of statistical techniques will be 
helpful in other courses (ECON 421 may be completed 



before other 400-level economics courses, since its only 
prerequisite is MATH 1 1 or equivalent.) 

Economics majors should take ECON 401 prior to taking 
ECON 430 or 440, and ECON 403 prior to taking ECON 
450, 454,460, or 470 

Those students planning to pursue graduate study m 
economics should try to include ECON 422 (Quantitative 
Methods) and ECON 425 (Mathematical Economics) in their 
programs and should also consider entering the Depart- 
mental Honors Program, if qualified. 

Each economics major may select, or be assigned, a 
faculty member as an advisor, and Is encouraged to consult 
the advisor for course recommendations and other informa- 
tion. Economics majors are welcome, and should feel com- 
pletely free, to seek advice at any time from any other 
faculty member in the Department. 

Economics Honors Program. The Departmental Honors 
Program is a three-semester (9 credit hour) program which 
students enter at the beginning of their last three 
semesters at the University It emphasizes seminar dis- 
cussions of selected topics in economics and independent 
research and writing, with faculty supervision. The program 
culminates in the student's presentation of an honors thesis, 
in the final semester. To be eligible for the Honors Pro- 
gram, a student must have a cumulative grade point 
average of not less than 3.0 

Geography 



Professor and Chairman: Harper 

Professors: Deshler, Fonaroff. Hu. 

Associate Professors: Brodsky, Chaves. Groves, Mitchell, 

Thompson, Wiedel. 

Assistant Professors: Christian. Cirrmcione. Garst. Mueller. 

Roswell. Thorn, Yoshioka. 

Lecturer: Nicholas. 



Geography studies the spatial patterns and interactions of 
natural, cultural, and socio-economic phenomena on earth's 
surface. The field thus embraces aspects of both the 
physical and the social sciences, which are applied in the 
analysis of patterns of distribution of individual phenomena, 
to the study of complex interrelations of phenomena found 
in a given region, and to the synthesis of geographic regions 
A geographer should, therefore, acquire background 
knowledge in certain aspects of the physical as well as the 
social sciences. 

Field work and map analysis have been the basic tools of 
research for the geographer In recent years these have 
been augmented by the use of techniques of air photo 
interpretation and presently by the development of methods 
of interpreting data obtained from the remote sensing de- 
vices of space satellites Modern geography also is making 
increasing application of quantitative methods, including the 
use of statistics and systems analysis, so that mathematical 
training is becoming increasingly important for a successful 
career in geography 

Today geographers are employed in a wide range of posi- 
tions Geographers in the federal government work in the 
Departments of State. Interior, Defense. Agriculture. Housing 
and Urban Affairs, and Health. Education, and Welfare They 
are on the staffs of the legislative research branch, the 
Library of Congress and the National Archives At the state 
and local government level there is an increasing demand for 
geographers in planning positions And in recent years more 
and more geographers have found employment in private 
industry working on problems of industrial and commercial 
location and market analysis Teaching at all levels from 
elementary school through graduate work continues to 
employ more geographers each year Some have found 
geography to be an excellent background for careers in the 
military, journalism and general business, others have 
simply found the broad perspective of geography an excel- 
lent base for a general education Most professional posi- 
tions in geography require graduate training 



64 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



Requirements (or an Undergraduate Major. Within any ol 
the general major programs it is possible (or the student to 
adiust his program to (it his particular individual interests 
The maior totals 36 semester hours 
The required courses ol the geography major are 

Semester 
Hours 

1 Geography Core (GEOG 20 1 . 202. 203. 305. 

310 15 

2 An additional techniques course (selected trom 

370.372.376.380) 3 

3 A regional course 3 

4 Elective systematic and techniques courses 15 

Total 36 

The Geography Core— The following four courses form 
the minimum essential base upon which advanced work in 
geography can be built 

GEOG 201— Introductory Physical Geography 3 

GEOG 202— Introductory Cultural Geography 3 

GEOG 203— Introductory Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 305— Introduction to Geographic Techniques 3 

GEOG 310— Introduction to Research a Writing 3 



The three lower division courses are to be completed prior 
to GEOG 300 and all other upper division courses GEOG 
201 . 202, and 203 may be taken in any order and a student 
may register for more than one in any semester 
GEOG 305 is prerequisite to GEOG 310 GEOG 310 is 
specifically designed as a preparation to upper division 
work and should be taken by the end of the junior year. 
Upon consultation with a department advisor, a reasonable 
load of other upper division work in geography may be taken 
concurrently with GEOG 310. 

The techniques requirement may be fulfilled by taking 
one of the following: GEOG 370 — Cartography and graphics 
practicum. GEOG 372— Remote Sensing, GEOG 376— 
Quantitative Techniques in Geography and GEOG 380 — 
Focal Field Course. 
Introduction to Geography — Geography 1 00: 
Introduction to Geography is a general education course 
for persons who have had no previous contact with the 
discipline in high school or for persons planning to take only 
one course in geography. It provides a general overview of 
the field rather than of a single specialized subdivision 
Credit for this course is not applied to the major. 

Areas of Specialization. Although the major program is 
flexible and can be designed to fit any individual student's 
own interest, several specializations attract numbers of 
students They are: 

Urban Geography and Regional Development — Provides 
preparation for careers in planning and teaching. Majors 
electing this specialty take departmental courses in urban 
geography, industrial location, transportation, and economic 
geography among others and supporting courses in urban 
sociology, urban economics, urban transportation, and the 
urban studies program outside the department. 

Physical Geography — For students with special interest 
in the natural environment and in its interaction with the 
works of man. This specialization consists of departmental 
courses in geomorphology, climatology, and resources, and 
of supporting courses in geology, soils, meteorology, 
hydrology, and botany. 

Cartography — Prepares students for careers in map 
design, compilation and reproduction. The department offers 
various courses in thematic mapping, cartographic history 
and theory, map evaluation, and map and photo interpre- 
tation. For additional training students are advised to take 
supporting courses in art and civil engineering. 

Cultural Geography — Of interest to students particularly 
concerned with the geographic aspects of population, 
politics, and other social and cultural phenomena, and with 
historical geography. In addition to departmental course 
offerings this specialization depends on work in sociology, 
anthropology, government and politics, history, and eco- 
nomics. 



For further information on any of these areas of interest 
the student should contact a departmental advisor 

All math programs should be approved by a departmental 
advisor 



Suggested Study Program for Geography 



Semester 
Hours 



Freshman and Sophomore Years 

GEOG 1 00— Introduction to Geography (Does not 

count toward geography major) 
GEOG 20 1 —Introductory Physical Geography 
GEOG 202— Introductory Cultural Geography 
BEOG 203— Introductory Economic Geography 
General University Requirements and/or electives 



Junior Year 

GEOG 305— Introduction to Geographic Techniques 

GEOG 3 1 0— Introduction to Research and Writing in 

Geography 
GEOG —A regional geography course 

GEOG —Techniques (choice) 

GEOG —Elective 

General University Requirements and/or electives 



Senior Year 

GEOG— Courses to complete major 

Electives 



Geography Minor and Secondary Education Geography 
Specialization 

College of Education Majors. Secondary Education majors 
with a concentration in geography are required to take 27 
hours in the content field. Geography 201, 202. 203. 490 
The remaining 1 2 hours of the program consist of 3 hours of 
regional geography and 9 hours of upper-division systematic 
courses. For majors in Elementary Education and others 
needing a geography course for teaching certification. 
Geography 1 00 is the required course. 

Geography minors should take at least GEOG 201, 202 
and 203 in the Geography core and 300 is recommended. 
As with the major, these courses should be taken before 
any others. 

Course Code Prefix— GEOG 

Governmental Research 



Professor and Director: Bobrow 

Director Maryland Technical Advisory Service: Eppes 

Research Associate: Feldbaum. 

Lecturers: Azzaretto, Behre, Kelleher, Moore. Thompson. 

Activities of the Bureau of Governmental Research relate 
primarily to the problems of state and local government 
in Maryland. The bureau engages in research and publishes 
findings with reference to local, state and national govern- 
ments and their interrelationships. It undertakes surveys and 
offers its assistance and service to units of government in 
Maryland and serves as a clearinghouse of information for 
them. The bureau furnishes opportunities for qualified stu- 
dents interested in research and career development in 
state and local administration The Bureau also acts as 
Coordinator for the Annual School for Maryland Assessing 
Officers, 

Urban affairs have become a central focus with the estab- 
lishment of an Urban Research Group, which draws on a 
variety of interdisciplinary faculty interests within the 
University. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 65 



The Maryland Technical Advisory Service, a division of the 
bureau, provides consulting services to county and municipal 
governments of the state. Technical consultation and assist- 
ance are provided on specific problems in such areas as 
preparation of charters and codes or ordinances, fiscal 
management, personnel management, utility and other 
service operations, planning and zoning, and related local or 
intergovernmental activities. The staff analyzes and shares 
with governmental officials information concerning pro- 
fessional developments and opportunities for new or im- 
proved programs and facilities. 

Government and Politics 

Professor and Department Chairman: Bobrow 
Professors: Anderson. Harrison. Hathorn. Hsueh, Jacobs, 
McNelly, Murphy. Phillips. Piper, Plischke. Young. 
Associate Professors: Butterworth, Claude. Conway, Devine, 
Elkm, Glass. Glendening. Hardin. Heisler. Koury, Oppen- 
heimer. Pirages, Ranald. Reeves. Stone, Terchek, Wilkenfeld 
Assistant Professors: Christensen-Abel, Goodin. Lanning, 
McCarnck. Nzuwah, Oliver, Peroff. Postbrief. Uslaner. 
Werbos. Woolpert 

Lecturers: Brown, Feldbaum, Kupperman, Schick, Shue. 
Turner. Walker, Weinberg. 

The Department of Government and Politics offers pro- 
grams designed to prepare students for government service, 
politics, foreign assignments, teaching, a variety of graduate 
programs, and for intelligent and purposeful citizenship. 
Course Code Prefix— GVPT 



Assistant Professors: Bernthal. Oca**. Diggs. Doudna. 

McSpaden. Suter* * 

Research Associates: Punch. Schweitzer 

Instructors: Beck. Lohsen, Serota. Smit, Schwartz 

Assistant Instructors: Rickerson, Sonies 

Lecturers: Bennett. Sedge 



The departmental curriculum leads to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree and prepares the student to undertake graduate 
work in the fields of speech pathology, audiology. and 
speech and hearing science In other words, the under- 
graduate program in this department is a preprofessional 
one The student who wishes to work professionally as a 
speech pathologist or audiologist must complete at least 30 
semester hours of graduate course work in order to meet 
state and national certification requirements. 

A student majoring in Hearing and Speech Sciences must 
complete 21 semester hours of specified courses and 9 
semester hours of electives in the department to satisfy 
major course requirements No course with a grade less 
than C may count toward major course requirements In 
addition to the 30 semester hours needed for a major. 1 8 
semester hours of supporting courses in allied fields are 
required 

Major Courses. Specified courses for a major in Hearing 
and Speech Sciences are PHYS 1 02, HESP 202, 302, 305, 
400. 403. 411, and nine credits chosen from among HESP 
31 0, 31 2. 404, 406. 408. 4 1 0. 41 2. 4 1 4. and 499 



Requirements for the Government and Politics Major. 

Government and Politics majors must take a minimum of 36 
semester hours in government courses and may not count 
more than 42 hours in government toward graduation. No 
course in which the grade is less than C may be counted 
as part of the major No courses may be taken on a pass-fail 
basis • 

The government and politics fields are as follows: (1) 
American government and politics; (2) comparative govern- 
ment; (3) international affairs; (4) political theory; (5) public 
administration; (6) public law: and (7) public policy and 
political behavior. 

All government majors are required to take GVPT 100. 
170. 220, 441 or 442 and such other supporting courses 
as specified by the department They must take one course 
from three separate government fields as designated by the 
department. 

All departmental majors shall take ECON 205 or ECON 
201. In addition, the major will select courses from one of 
the following options: (a) methodology, (b) foreign language, 
(c) philosophy and history of science, or (d) pre-law. A list of 
courses which will satisfy each option is available in the 
departmental office. 

All students majoring in government must fulfill the 
requirements of a secondary area of concentration, which 
involves the completion of 1 5 semester hours from ap- 
proved departments other than GVPT At least six of the 
15 hours must be taken at the 300-400 level from a 
single department 

Students who major in government may apply for admis- 
sion to the GVPT Honors Program during the second 
semester of their sophomore year Additional information 
concerning the Honors Program may be obtained at the 
departmental offices 

Departmental majors who have completed at least 75 
hours towards a degree and at least 1 5 hours in GVPT are 
eligible to participate in the department's Academic Intern- 
ship Program 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Professor and Chairman: Newby 

Research Professor: Causey 

Associate Professors: Baker, Bankson, Hamlet* 



Supporting Courses. The undergraduate student with a 
major in Hearing and Speech Sciences will take a total of 
six courses. 1 8 credits, as designated in these supporting 
areas of study: 
Required — one of the following courses in statistics. 

EDMS 451— Introduction to Educational Statistics 3 

PSYC 200— Statistical Methods in Psychology 3 

SOCY 201— Introductory Statistics for Sociology 3 

The student will select 4 courses. 12 credits, in addition 
to Psychology 100, from offerings in the Department of 
Psychology The following are some suggested courses: 



PSYC 206— Developmental Psychology 

PSYC 22 1 —Social Psychology 

PSYC 301— Biological Basis ot Behavior 

PSYC 331 —Introduction to Abnormal Psychology* 

PSYC 333— Child Psychology* 

PSYC 335— Personality and Adjustment 

PSYC 400— Experimental Psychology Learning 

Motivation' 

PSYC 410— Experimental Psychology Sensory 

Processes I 

PSYC 422— Language and Social Communication 

PSYC 423— Advanced Social Psychology 

PSYC 431— Abnormal Psychology* 

PSYC 433— Advanced Topics in Child Psychology 

PSYC 435— Personality 

" Strongly recommended 



The student will select one additional 3 credit course The 
following are suggestions 

HLTH 450— Health Problems of Children and Youth 3 

EDCP 413— Behavior Modification 3 

EDHD 41 1 —Child Growth and Development 3 

EDHD 413— Adolescent Development 3 

EDHD 445— Guidance of Young Children 3 
EDSP 470— Introduction to Special Education 

(Non Maiors Section! 3 
EDSP 471— Characteristics of Exceptional Children 

—Mentally Retarded 3 

EDSP 475— Education of the Slow Learner 3 
EDSP 49 1 —Characteristics of Exceptional Children 

—Perceptual Learning 3 



66 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



LING 
LING 



1 00— Introduction to Linguistics 
1 1 —Language anrfCulture 



A course ot the student's choosing may be substituted 
with the approval ot an advisor 

Course Code Prefix— HESP 

Information Systems Management 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Sibley. 

Associate Professor: Courtright. 

Assistant Professors: W T, Hardgrave. Kerschberg, Sayani, 

Shneiderman 

Instructors: Chappell. Dougherty. AD Hardgrave 

Lecturer: McGarvey 

The program ot studies in information systems manage- 
ment is designed to meet the needs of those wishing to 
concentrate on the application of the digital computer to the 
analysis, design and administration of information systems 
Students who expect to enter business administration, 
public administration or organizations in other fields will find 
that this program offers a relevant preparation 

The student entering this program will place emphasis on 
the study of digital computer applications, relevant organi- 
zational and social implications, and mathematical methods 
With the aid of a faculty advisor, the student may wish to 
develop a secondary field of interest such as business and 
management administration, computer science, economics, 
mathematics, psychology, public administration, the social 
sciences, or related areas of his choice. 

Information Systems Management Curriculum. Require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Information 
Systems Management are summarized below 

Description Hours 

General University Requirements 30 

Information Systems Management 15 

IFSM401 (or equivalent). 402.410, 

420, 436. 
Mathematics 12 

A sequence of courses covering Differential 

and Integral Calculus and Linear Algebra such 

as: MATH 140.141.240. 
Business and Management 21 

BMGT 220. 221, 434. 435, 230 or 231, 

430. 438. 

Economics 12 

ECON 201. 203. and any two of the following 

401.403.430.440 

Computer Science 3 

CMSC 103 or 110. 

Electives 27 

Total 1 20 



Linguistics Program 

Associate Professor and Director: Dingwall 

This program is devoted to the investigation of the psy- 
chological and biological bases of human communication. 
Areas of concentration include the origin and evolution of 
human communication systems, their ontogenesis (develop- 
mental psycholinguistics). the psychological aspects of 
language production and comprehension (experimental 
phoenetics and experimental psycholinguistics) and the 
neurological bases for such processes (neurolinguistics). 
While any educated man will benefit from an understanding 
of human communication, those who expect to become 
scholars and teachers of anthropology, various areas of 
computer science and of education, philosophy, psychology 
and hearing and speech science will find a background in 
experimental linguistics invaluable. Although there is not an 
undergraduate major in linguistics at this time, courses in 
linguistics may be used to fulfill the supporting course re- 
quirements in some programs leading to the B.A or B.S. 
degree 



Psychology 

Chairman: Bartlett 

Professors: Anderson, Crites. Fretz, Goldstein, Gollub. 

Hodos, Horton, Levinson, Martin, Mclntire, Mills, Schneid. 

Scholnick. Steinman, Taylor, Tyler, Waldrop 

Associafe Professors: Barrett, Brown, Coursey. Dachler. 

Dies. Larkin, Penner, Sigall, Smith, Sternheim 

Assistant Professors: Barbarin. Bobko. Brauth. Gatz, 

Gormally. Hill, Johnson, Meltzer, Norman. Steele 

Lecturers: Frank, White 

Joint Appointment: Locke, Prof.. College of Business and 

Management 

Affiliated Faculty: Freeman, Assoc. Pof., Coun Cntr , Gelso. 

Assoc Prof , Coun Cntr, Magoon. Prof , Coun Cntr. Mills. 

Prof. Coun. Cntr . Pumroy. Prof . Coll Educ . Tanney, Asst 

Prof. Coun Cntr 

Psychology can be classified as a biological science 
(Bachelor of Science degree) and a social science (Bachelor 
of Arts degree) and offers academic programs related to both 
of these fields The undergraduate curriculum in psychology 
provides an organized study of the behavior of man and other 
organisms in terms of the biological conditions and social 
factors which influence such behavior In addition, the 
undergraduate program is arranged to provide opportunities 
for learning that will equip qualified students to pursue further 
study of psychology and related fields in graduate and 
professional schools. 

Students who are interested in the biological aspects of 
behavior tend to choose a program leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree, while those interested primarily in the social 
factors of behavior tend to choose the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. The choice of program is made in consultation with 
and requires the approval of an academic advisor 

Department requirements are the same for the Bachelor of 
Science and the Bachelor of Arts degrees. A minimum of 31 
hours of psychology course work is required: courses taken 
must include PSYC 1 00, 200, and eight additional courses 
must be selected from four different areas (two from each 
area) 

In order to assume breadth these additional courses must 
be selected from four different areas (two from each 
area). 

The areas and courses are as follows: 



Area 1 


Area II 


Area III 


Area IV 


206 


221 


331 


361 


301 




333 


451 


310 


420 


335 


452 


400 


422 


431 


461 


402 


423 


433 


462 


403 


440 


435 


467 


410 


441 






412 


Honors 430C 






453 









At least one course of these eight must be either PSYC 
400. 410. or 420. All majors are also required to take MATH 
1 1 1 or 140, or 220 and at least one laboratory science 
course outside of Psychology. "One additional, more 
advanced math or science course (selected from the list 
appearing in the Departmental Program Guide) must also be 
taken. 
* Approved courses include 

ZOOL 201 or higher, except ZOOL207S. 270 and 280 

MATH 1 4 1 or higher, except 2 1 0, 2 1 1 , and 220 

CHEM 201 or higher, except 302 

PHYS 141 or higher, except 181. 221 . 222. 400 and 

401 

MICB 200 or higher 

CMSC 210 or higher 

These math and science courses may be used as part of 
the General University Requirements or for the supporting 
course requirements described below, but not for both. 
Majors in psychology are urged to take their mathematics 
and science courses in their first two years. 

The supporting courses to supplement the work in the 
major for the Bachelor of Science degree must include 18 
hours in mathematics and science, beyond those courses 
required by the General University Requirements. A mini- 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 67 



mum of two courses must be laboratory courses, and at 
least three courses (or 9 hours) must be chosen at the 
advanced level (as described above) The particular 
laboratory and advanced courses must be approved by an 
academic advisor in the Department of Psychology 

The supporting courses for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
must include 18 hours which are chosen in related fields to 
supplement work in the major Of these 18 hours, six must 
be chosen at the 300 and 400 level This set of courses 
must be approved by an academic advisor in psychology. 

Although a minimum of thirty-one (3 1 ) horus of psychology 
course work is required for a Psychology major, each and 
every Psychology course taken by the major student must 
be counted as hours towards the Psychology major. The 
student majoring in Psychology cannot use any Psychology 
course towards the University or Divisional course 
requirements. 

A grade of C or better must be earned in the 31 credits of 
Psychology courses counted towards the major or a course 
must be repeated until a C or better is earned. If the course is 
not repeated then another Psychology course fulfilling the 
same major requirements would have to be substituted. The 
departmental grade point average will be a cumulative 
computation of all grades earned in Psychology and must be 
a 2.0 or above 

Students desiring to enter graduate study in certain areas 
of psychology are advised to take an additional laboratory 
course and or participate in individual research projects. 
Such students should consult an advisor for information 
about prerequisites for graduate study in psychology 

It should be noted that there are three course content 
areas that have two courses, one in the 300 sequence and 
one in the 400 sequence. These include abnormal (331 and 
431). personality (335 and 435), child psychology (333 and 
433). and industrial psychology (361 and 461 ). The courses 
in the 300 sequence provide general surveys of the field and 
are intended for non-majors who do not plan further in-depth 
study. The courses in the 400 sequence provide more 
comprehensive study with particular emphasis on research 
and methodology. The 400 series is itended primarily for 
psychology majors It should be further noted that a student 
may not receive credit for both 

PSYC331 andPSYC431 
PSYC333andPSYC433 
PSYC335andPSYC435 

or 
PSYC361 andPSYC461 

Honors. The Department of Psychology also offers a special 
program for the superior student which emphasizes 
independent study and research Students may be eligible to 
enter the Honors Program who have a 3.3 grade average in 
all courses or the equivalent, who are in the junior year, and 
who demonstrate interest and maturity indicative of success 
in the program. Students in their sophomore year should 
consult their advisor or the Departmental Honors Committee 
for further information 
Course Code Prefix— PSYC 

Sociology 

Professor and Chairman: Kammeyer 

Professors: Dager. Hoflsommer (Emeritus), Janes, Lejms 
(Joint appointment with Institute of Criminal Justice and 
Criminology), Presser. Ritzer. Rosenberg, D. Segal 
Associate Professors: Brown. Cussler. Finsterbusch. 
Henkel. Hirzel, Lengermann. Mclntyre. Meeker, Pease. 
Assistant Professors: Blair, Braddock, Greisman. Harper. 
Hornung, J. Hunt. L Hunt. Landry (Joint appointment with 
Afro- American Studies), Mayes. Miller, Parming, M Segaf 

The major in sociology offers: (1) a general education 
especially directed toward understanding the complexities of 
modern society and its social problems by using basic 
research and statistical skills:(2) a broad preparation for 
various types of professions, occupations, and services 
dealing with people: and (3) preparation of qualified students 
for graduate training in sociology 



The student in sociology must complete 45 hours of 
Departmental Requirements, none of which can be taken 
pass fail Thirty of these honors are in sociobgy course 
work which must be completed with a minimum grade 
average of C; 12 hours are in required core courses. 
and 1 8 hours are electives, of which 1 2 hours must be at the 
300-400 level Required core courses for all majors are 
SOCY 100 (Intro); SOCY 201 (Statistics); SOCY 202 
(Methods); SOCY 203 (Theory) 

SOCY 100 should be taken in the freshman or sophomore 
year followed by SOCY 203 After completion of the MATH 
requirements SOCY 201 should be taken followed by SOCY 
202 

Three hours of Mathematics (STAT 100; MATH 110. 111, 
1 15, 140, 220 or their equivalents) are required of majors 
and are a prerequisite for SOCY 201 

The supporting course requirement for majors is 1 2 hours 
of a coherent series of courses from outside of the 
department which relate to the major substantive or research 
interests in sociology These courses need not come from 
the same department, but at least 6 hours must be from the 
Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences The following are 
among those recommended by the Sociology 
Undergraduate Committee for majors ANTH 102, CMSC 
103 ECON 205, GVPT 100 170, 260; HIST 224. PHIL 
170, 250, 455; PSYC 100 Further information about sug- 
gested supporting courses can be obtained in the Under- 
graduate Office (Room 2108, Art/ Sociology Bldg.) 

Urban Studies Program 

Acting Director and Associate Professor: Marando 

Professors: Janes, Murphy 

Associate Professors: Arnold, Bish, Stone. 

Assistant Professors: Christian, Florestano, Manters. 

Wolken, McDonald. 

Lecturers: Bean. Knipe. Mann. Miller. Rathbun. Steinberg 



In 1920 53% of the U.S. population was urban, by 1975 
this percentage had jumped to 77%. The Institute for Urban 
Studies recognizes that this indicates a growing need not 
only for urban planners and managers, but also for people 
going into many diverse fields to have a firm grasp of the 
impact of the rapid urbanization process in this country 
The interdisciplinary program offered by the Institute for 
Urban Studies is therefore designed for students interested 
in urban oriented careers and graduate study in urban affairs, 
as well as for students who wish to understand urban 
society The faculty is drawn from six colleges and schools 
of the University on several campuses The B A and BS 
degrees in Urban Studies can be given by any of the 
colleges or schools on any of the campuses of the University 
of Maryland. 

The program assumes a comprehensive approach to 
urbanism and focuses on the total metropolitan area, includ- 
ing suburbs as well as central cities, their interrelationship, 
and state and federal policy In addition to an interdisciplinary 
or multi-disciplinary staff, the program includes students 
from a variety of disciplines The program centers around a 
set of seminars dealing with cities or urbanization as they 
involve economic factors, social problems, political and 
governmental activities, and environmental and physical 
aspects of urbanization Contemporary urban problems will 
be emphasized and modern methodological and analytical 
techniques will be considered In addition to the Urban 
Studies courses, an area of urban-related specialization from 
another discipline is selected Each student, working closely 
with the Urban Studies advising office, designs an individual- 
ized program of study bared on interests and future career 
plans. The advising office is located in Room 0104D. Woods 
Hall. x5718 

The Institute also offers an internship program The stu- 
dents selecting this program have an opportunity to work in 
an urban-related office, focusing on their particular area of 
interest The College Park Campus is well situated in an area 
including both major metropolitcan areas, their suburbs, 
several new towns, and many small towns which are cur- 
rently becoming urbanized In addition to the internship 
possibilities, these areas offer a great source of both re- 



68 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



search and professional work experience lor the advanced 
and graduate level student 

Requirements. In general, for a bachelor's degree in Urban 
Studies, a student should register in a division, college or 
school, satisfy University, division and college or school 
requirements, and complete course work in urban and 

urban-oriented subject matter. 
The major in Urban Studies requires 42 credits 
15-24 m URBS courses 

12-15 in urban oriented courses within a department 
or program selected as a disciplinary urban specializa- 
tion. 
9-12 within one of the three basic fields and from at 

least two departments. 
The URBS courses include the following: 
URBS 1 00— Introduction to Interdisciplinary Urban Studies 
URBS 210— Survey of the Field of Urban Studies 
URBS 220— Environmental and Technological Aspects of the 

Urban Community 
URBS 320— The City and the Developing National Culture of the 

United States 
URBS 350— Introduction to Urban Field Study 
URBS 395— Pro-Seminar in Urban Uterature 
URBS 399— Independent Study in Urban Topics 
URBS 430— Urban Internship (6 credits) 
URBS 450— Problems in Urban Law 
URBS 480— Urban Theory and Simulation 
URBS 499P— Selected Topics in Urban Studies 



munity health, recreation programs and activities: technical, 
public and school librarians, Information scientists, and 
educational Institutions 

The Division supports the development of research in 
areas of concern to faculty members In all the Departments 
and Colleges, and research teams which may cross depart- 
mental and College lines Also, the Division seeks to stimu- 
late the development of interdisciplinary courses and pro- 
grams and the extension of professional expertise to the 
University and community at large, including planning for 
cooperation in international activities The Center on Aging 
is an example of the multi- and inter-disciplinary program 
and research activity conducted by the Division 

Two teaching-support programs — Intensive Educational 
Development Program and Upward Bound Program — also 
operate within the Division which illustrate campus concern 
with and participation in a working relationship with under- 
graduates 

The Division offers bachelor's, master's, and doctorate 
degrees in most of its programs in addition to various 
professional certificates The professional programs are 
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education, the Maryland State Department of 
Education, the American Library Association Committee 
on Accreditation, and the American Home Economics 
Association. 

Specifically, the Colleges and their respective depart- 
ments in the Division are: 



Departments and programs currently offering sufficient 
urban oriented courses for the disciplinary urban specializa- 
tion include: Afro-American Studies, Agricultural and Exten- 
sion Education, Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
American Studies. Anthropology, Architecture, Business 
Administration. Chemical Engineering. Chemistry, Civil 
Engineering. Computer Science, Criminal Justice and 
Criminology, Economics, Education, English, Family and 
Community Development, Fire Protection, Geography, 
Government and Politics. Health, History, Information 
Systems Management. Journalism, Meteorobgy. Physical 
Sciences, Psychology, Recreation, Sociology, and Speech 
and Dramatic Art. In addition to the departmental specializa- 
tions, cross disciplinary specializations are available in Social 
Planning. Ecology of the Urban Environment, and Urban 
Management. 

The three basic fields and the departments whose courses 
meet the requirements are: 

1 Social-economic-behavioral: Afro-American Studies, 
Agricultural Extension Education, Agricultural and Resource 
Economics, Architecture, Business Administration. Criminal 
Justice and Criminology, Economics, Education Family and 
Community Development, Cultural Geography, Government 
and F'oHtics, Health, Information Systems Management, 
Journaism, Psychology, Recreation, and Sociology. 

2. Physical-Environmental: Chemical Engineering, Chemis- 
try. Civil Engineering. Computer Science. Fire Protection. 
Physical Geography, Geobgy, Health, Landscape, Architec- 
ture. Meteorology. Physical Sciences. 

3. Historical-cultural-humanistic: Afro-American Studies. 
American Studies, Anthropology, Architecture, Education, 
English. History. Journalism, Radio and TV, Recreation, 
Sociology, and Speech and Dramatic Art. 



Division of Human and 
Community Resources 



The Division of Human and Community Resources 
includes the faculties and programs of the College of 
Education, the College of Human Ecology, the College of 
Physical Education. Recreation and Health, and the College 
of Library and Information Services. The programs of the 
Division are essentially professional They are designed to 
prepare professionals interested in the quality of life of the 
individual and in the community factors which influence the 
interaction of people; those who are responsible for corn- 



College on Education. Department of Administration, 
Supervision and Curriculum, Department of Counseling and 
Personnel Services, Department of Early Childhood-Ele- 
mentary Education. Department of Industrial Education, 
Department of Measurement and Statistics, Department of 
Secondary Education, Department of Special Education, 
Institute for Child Study, Social and Foundation Area. 

College of Human Ecology. Department of Family and 
Community Development. Department of Food, Nutrition 
and Institution Administration, Department of Housing and 
Applied Design, Department of Textiles and Consumer 
Economics 

College of Library and Information Services. This College 
is a separate professional College committed solely to 
graduate study and research. 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

Department of Health Education, Department of Physical 
Education, and Department of Recreation. 

College of Education 

The College of Education offers programs for persons 
preparing for the following educational endeavors: 1 ) teach- 
ing in colleges, secondary schools, middle schools, ele- 
mentary schools, kindergarten and nursery schools: 2) 
teaching in special education programs; 3) school librarians 
and resource specialists; 4) educational work in trades and 
industries; 5) pupil personnel, counseling and guidance 
services; 6) supervision and administration; 7) curriculum 
development; 8) rehabilitation programs: 9) evaluation and 
research. 

Because of the location of the University in suburbs of the 
Nation's Capital, unusual facilities for the study of education 
are available to its students and faculty. The Library of 
Congress, the library of the United States Office of Educa- 
tion, and special libraries of other government agencies are 
accessible, as well as the information services of the National 
Education Association, the American Council on Education, 
United States Office of Education, and other organizations, 
public and private. The school systems of the District of 
Columbia, Baltimore and the counties of Maryland offer 
generous cooperation. 

The teacher education programs preparing early child- 
hood, elementary school and secondary school teachers at 
the bachelor's degree and master's degree levels, and the 
programs preparing school service personnel (elementary 
and secondary school principals, general school administra- 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 69 



tors, supervisors, curriculum coordinators, guidance coun- 
selors, student personnel administrators, and vocational 
rehabilitation counselors) at the master's, advanced gradu- 
ate specialist and doctoral degree levels are all fully 
accredited by the National Council tor Accreditation ot 
Teacher Education. 

Requirements for Admission. All students desiring to 
enroll in the College of Education must apply to the Director 
of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College 
Park and meet the admissions requirements detailed in 
Section I of this catalog. There are no specific secondary 
school course requirements for admission, but a foreign 
language is desirable in some of the programs, and courses 
in fine arts, trades, and vocational subjects are also 
desirable for some programs. 

Candidates for admission whose high school or college 
records are consistently low are strongly advised not to 
seek admission to the College of Education. 

Students with baccalaureate degrees who have applied 
for admission as special students must have received prior 
permission from the appropriate department. 

Guidance in Registration. Students who intend to teach 
(except agriculture and physical education) should register 
in the College of Education in order that they may have 
the continuous counsel and guidance of the faculty 
directly responsible for teacher education at the University 
of Maryland At the time of matriculation each student is 
assigned to a member of the faculty who acts as the 
student's advisor. The choice of subiect areas within which 
the student will prepare to teach will be made under 
faculty guidance during the freshman year. The student will 
confer regularly with the faculty advisor in the College of 
Education responsible for his teaching major. 

While students on the College Park Campus may transfer 
into an Education major at any time, it is recommended 
that this transfer occur prior to the junior year because 
of the required sequence of professional courses and 
experiences. Articulated programs have been developed 
with most of Maryland's community colleges to accommo- 
date transferring to College Park after the completion of an 
Associate Arts degree in the community college. 

General Requirements of the College. Minimum require- 
ments for graduation are 120 semester hours. Specific pro- 
gram requirements for more than the minimum must be 
fulfilled. 

In addition to the General University Requirements and 
the specific requirements for each curriculum, the College 
requires a minimum of 20 semester hours of education 
courses and 3 semester hours of speech. 

Marks in all required upper division courses in education 
and in subjects In major and minor fields must be C or higher. 
except in the case of student teaching where a grade of S 
is required A general average of C or higher must be 
maintained. (See Admission to Teacher Education.) 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the 
College of Education must be recommended by the stu- 
dent's advisor, and department chairperson, and approved 
by the dean. 

Students who are not enrolled in the College of Education 
but, who through an established cooperative program with 
another college, are preparing to teach and wish to register 
in professional education courses required for certification 
must meet all curricular and scholastic requirements of the 
College of Education 

Majors and Minors. There is no College requirement for a 
minor although many majors require an area of concentration 
to provide depth in a specific area of teaching specialty 
Specific program requirements should be consulted 

Admission to Teacher Education. Students enrolled in an 
education major should confirm the status of their admis- 
sion to Teacher Education with the Student Service Office 
of the College of Education when they enroll in the first 
education course or at the beginning of the semester 



immediately after earning 42 hours Transfer students with 
42 or more hours of acceptable transfer credit must apply 
at time of transfer Transfer students must complete a 
minimum of 1 2 hours at Maryland before their applications 
will be processed Post-graduate certification students and 
those working for certification only must apply at the begin- 
ning of their program Application forms may be obtained 
from the College of Education Student Service Office 

In considering applications, the following guidelines have 
been established. 
1 No student will be allowed to enroll in EDHD 300 and 

methods classes until he or she has received approval 
2. A successful field experience in EDHD 300 is a pre- 
requisite to continuation in the teacher education 
course sequence 
3 Applicants must be of good moral and ethical char- 
acter This will be determined as fairly as possible from 
such evidence as advisors' recommendations and 
records of serious Campus delinquencies 

4. Applicants must be physically and emotionally capable 
of functioning as teachers. This will mean freedom from 
serious chronic illness, emotional instability and com- 
municable diseases, as determined in cooperation with 
the Health Service and the Counseling Center 

5. Applicants must be free of serious speech handicaps. A 
health certificate certifying absence of communicable 
disease is required for participation in any education 
course with a field experience component. 

The purpose of the screening procedure associated with 
admission to teacher education is to insure that graduates 
of the teacher education program will be well prepared for 
teaching and can be recommended for certification with 
confidence. 

Student Teaching. In order to be admitted to a course in 
student teaching, a student must have been admitted to the 
Teacher Education Program (see above), have a physician's 
certificate indicating that the applicant is free of communi- 
cable diseases, and the consent of the department Applica- 
tion must be made with the Director of Laboratory Experi- 
ences by the middle of the semester which precedes the 
one in which student teaching will be done. Any applicant 
for student teaching must have been enrolled previously at 
the University of Maryland for at least one semester 

Certification of Teachers. The Maryland State Department 
of Education certifies to teach in the approved public 
schools of the state only graduates of approved colleges 
who have satisfactorily fulfilled subject-matter and profes- 
sional requirements. The curricula of the College of Educa- 
tion fulfill State Department requirements for certification. 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of 
Science are conferred by the College of Education The 
determination of which degree is conferred is dependent 
upon the amount of liberal arts study included in a particular 
degree program 

Organization. The College of Education is organized into 
seven departments and an institute as listed under the 
Division of Human and Community Resources The non- 
departmental area of Social Foundations offers courses in 
history, philosophy, and sociology of education 

Unique specialized services for students, faculty, teachers 
and schools are offered through the following centers 

Arithmetic Center. The Arithmetic Center provides a 
Mathematics Laboratory for undergraduate and graduate 
students, and a program of clinical diagnostic and correc- 
tive remedial services for children Clinic services are a part 
of a program in elementary school mathematics at the 
graduate level 

Bureau of Educational Research and Field Services. The 

Bureau of Educational Research and Field Services has 
been established to (1) encourage and stimulate basic 
research bearing on different aspects of the educative 



70 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



process; (2) provide assistance in designing, implementing 
and evaluating research projects initiated by local school 
systems, and (3) coordinate school systems' requests lor 
consultants with the rich and varied professional com- 
petencies that are available on the University (acuity 

Curriculum Laboratory. The Curriculum Laboratory pro- 
vides students, faculty and teachers in the field with 
materials and assistance in the area of curriculum An up- 
to-date collection of curriculum materials includes texts, 
simulations, learning packages, programs, resource kits, 
charts, study guides, curriculum studies, and bibliographies 

Educational Technology Center. The center is designed 
as a multi-media facility for students and faculty of the 
College It distributes closed-circuit television throughout 
the building, provides audio-visual equipment and service, a 
computer terminal, a learning lab. and instruction in all 
aspects of instructional materials, aids, and new media 
Production and distribution rooms and a studio are avail- 
able for closed-circuit television and a video tape system. 
Laboratories are available for graphic and photographic 
production with facilities for faculty research and develop- 
ment in use of instructional media Supporting the pro- 
fessional faculty in the operation of the center are media 
specialists 

Office of Laboratory Experiences. The Office of Laboratory 
Experiences is designed to accommodate the laboratory 
experiences of students preparing to teach by arranging for 
all field experiences It also serves functions of program 
liaison, staff development, and research as they pertain to 
field experiences. This office administers the Teacher 
Education Centers in conjunction with the respective public 
school systems and serves as one of the liaison units 
between the College and the community. Student applica- 
tions for field experiences, including student teaching, are 
processed through this office 

Music Educators National Conference Historical Center. 

The University of Maryland and the Music Educators 
National Conference established the MENC Historical Cen- 
ter in 1965 for the purpose of building and maintaining 
a research collection which would reflect the development 
and current practices in music education. Located in 
McKeldin Library, the center includes study space and is 
prepared to assist scholars in the field. Materials in the 
following categories are collected: archival documents of 
MENC; instructional materials; professional publications: 
curncular, administrative, and philosophical materials; manu- 
scripts, personal letters and other historical materials. 

Center for Young Children. A demonstration nursery- 
kindergarten program (1) provides a center in which 
individual professors or students may conduct research; 

(2) serves as a unit» for undergraduate student to have 
selected experiences with young children, such as student 
teaching, child study, and observation of young children; 

(3) provides a setting in which educators from within and 
without the University can come for sources of ideas relative 
to the education of young children. 

Reading Center. The Reading Center provides clinical 
diagnostic and corrective services to a limited number of 
children These services are a part of the program in 
corrective remedial reading offered to teachers on the 
graduate level. 

Science Teaching Center. The Science Teaching Center 
has been designed to serve as a representative facility of 
its type to fulfill its functions of undergraduate and 
graduate science teacher education, science supervisor 
training, basic research in science education, aid to mserv- 
ice teachers and supervisors, and consultative services, on 
all levels, kindergarten through community college. Its refer- 
ence library features relevant periodicals, science and 
mathematics textbooks, new curriculum materials, and works 
on science subjects and their operational aspects. Its fully 



equipped research laboratory, in addition to its teaching 
laboratories for science methods courses, provides protect 
space for both faculty and students 

Since 1 962 the Science Teaching Center has served as 
the headquarters for the activities of the Science Teaching 
Materials Review Committee of the National Science Teach- 
ers Association The Information Clearinghouse on Science 
and Mathematics Curncular Developments, the International 
Clearinghouse for A A A S . N S F and UNESCO, started 
here that year also Within the center is gathered the 
software" and "hardware" of science education in what is 
considered to be one of the most comprehensive collec- 
tions of such materials in the world. 

Student and Professional Organizations. The College 
sponsors a chapter of the Student National Education 
Association A student chapter of the Council for 
Exceptional Children is open to undergraduate and graduate 
students in Special Education A student chapter of the 
Music Educators National Conference (MENC) is sponsored 
by the Department of Music, and the Industrial Education 
Department has a chapter of the American Society of Tool 
and Manufacturing Engineers and a chapter of the American 
Industrial Arts Association 

In several departments there are informal organizations of 
students 

Career Development Center University Credentials Serv- 
ice. All seniors graduating in the College of Education 
(except Industrial Technology majors) are required to file 
credentials with the Career Development Center Credentials 
consist of the permanent record of a student's academic 
preparation and recommendations from academic and pro- 
fessional sources. An initial registration fee enables the 
Career Development Center to send a student's credentials 
to interested educational employers, as indicated by the 
student 

Students who are completing teacher certification require- 
ments, advanced degrees and are interested in a teaching, 
administrative or research position in education, or who are 
completing advanced degrees in library science, may also 
file credentials. 

Other services include vacancy listing in secondary 
schools and institutions of higher learning, notifications of 
interest-related positions, on-campus interviews with state 
and out-of-state school systems, and descriptive information 
on school systems throughout the country. 

This service is also available to alumni For further informa- 
tion contact Mrs. Anna Tackett. Assistant Director, Career 
Development Center. Terrapin Hall, or phone 454-281 3 



College of Education 

Departments, Programs and Curricula 

Administration, Supervision and Curriculum 

Professor and Chairman: Stephens. 

Professors: J P. Anderson, V. E. Anderson (Emeritus). 
Berman, Carbone. Dudley, James. McClure. McLoone. 
Newell, van Zwoll (Emeritus), Wiggin (Emerita). 
Associate Professors: Goldman, Kelsey 
Assistant Professors: Chandler. Clague, Clemson. Goodrich, 
Splaine, Statom. 

Lecturers: Crosson (pt). Holt (pt). Pearman (pt). Schneider 
(pt). 

Instructors: Hamlin, Richardson (pt). Rothkopf (pt). William- 
son (pt). 



The program in this department are all at the graduate 
level and include preparation of school superintendents, 
principals, supervisors, curriculum directors, and administra- 
tive specialists in the areas of finance and business adminis- 
tration, personnel administration, public relations, and 
educational facilities. In addition, there are programs for the 
preparation of professors and research workers in all of the 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 71 



above areas. Preparation programs leading to administrative 
positions In community colleges and other institutions ol 
higher learning are available through a joint major in 
administration-higher education 

Child Study, Institute for 

Director and Professor: Morgan. 

Professors: Bowie (Emerita). Chapin, Dittmann, Goering, 

Kurtz, Perkins. Thompson (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Bennett. Eliot, Flatter, Gardner, 

Hardy. Hatfield. Huebner. Kyle. Matteson, Milhollan 

Rogolsky, Tyler, Wolk. 

Assistant Professors: Davidson, Green, Hunt Koopman, 

Marcus, Shiflett, Svoboda. 

Lecturers: Brandon, Long, Telleen, 



The Institute for Child Study carries on the following 
activities: (1) It undertakes basic research in human devel- 
opment; (2) It synthesizes research findings from many 
sciences that study human beings; (3) It plans, organizes 
and provides consultant service programs of direct child 
study by in-service teachers in individual schools or in 
municipal, county or state systems; (4) It offers course 
programs and field training to qualified graduate students, 
preparing them to render expert consultant service to 
schools and for college teaching of human development. 

Undergraduate courses and workshops are designed for 
prospective teachers, in-service teachers and other persons 
interested in human development Major purposes of under- 
graduate programs in human development are: (1) offering 
experiences which facilitate the personal growth of the 
individual, and (2) preparing people for vocations and devel- 
oping programs, both of which seek to improve the quality 
of human life These offerings are designed to help pro- 
fessionals and paraprofessionals acquire a positive 
orientation toward people and basic knowledge and skills for 
helping others. 

Counseling and Personnel Services 

Professor and Chairman: Marx. 

Professors: Byrne. Hoyt, Magoon, Pumroy. Schlossberg. 

Associate Professors: Allan, Birk, Greenberg, Lawrence, 

Medvene, Ray, Rhoads. 

Assistant Professors: Boyd. Cambridge, Chasnoff. Kahn, 

Knefelkamp, Leonard, Levine, McMullan, Thomas, Vander- 

goot. Westbrook. 

Lecturers: Elsmore (p.t.). Engram (p.t.). Everly (p.t), Forrer 

(p.t .), Harden (p.t.), Kneipp (p.t). 



Programs of preparation are offered by the Department of 
Counseling and Personnel Services at the master's degree, 
advanced graduate specialist, and doctoral degree levels for 
counselors in elementary and secondary schools, rehabilita- 
tion agencies, community agencies, college and university 
counseling centers It also offers programs of preparation for 
other personnel services: college student personnel admin- 
istration, visiting teacher and psychological services in 
schools 

Course Code Prefix— EDCP 

Early Childhood-Elementary Education 

Professor and Chairman: Sublett 

Early Childhood Education: 

Professors: Leeper 

Associate Professors: Amershek, Church, Heidelbach, 

Seefeldt 

Assistant Professor: Stant (Emeritus) 

Elementary Education: 

Professors: Ashlock. Duffey. Lembach. O'Neill, Weaver, 

Schindler (Emeritus). J Wilson. R Wilson 

Associate Professors: Dietz. Eley. Gantt. Herman. Jantz 

Johnson. Roderick. Sullivan. Williams 



Assistant Professors: Cole, Evans, Hill, Knifong. Madison. 

Shelley. Sunal 

Head Stan Training Officers: Goldsmith, Lujan, Mallory 

The Department of Early Childhood-Elementary Education 
offers two undergraduate curricula leading to the Bachelor 
of Science degree: 

1 Early Childhood Education — for the preparation of 
teachers in nursery school, kindergarten and primary 
grades (grades one, two and three) 

2 Elementary Education — for the preparation of teachers 
of grades one through six 

Students who wish to become certificated teachers for 
nursery school and/or kindergarten must follow the early 
childhood education curriculum (1, above) Students who 
seek certification for teaching the intermediate grades must 
follow the elementary education curriculum (2 above). 
Students who plan to teach in the primary grades can 
achieve certification in either 1 . or 2. 

Graduation Requirements. One hundred twenty (120) 
credits are necessary for graduation in Elementary Educa- 
tion and the Early Childhood program. 

Early Childhood Education. (Nursery-Kindergarten-Pri- 
mary) The Early Childhood Education curriculum has as its 
primary goal the preparation of nursery school, kindergarten 
and primary teachers. 

Observation and student teaching are done in the Univer- 
sity Nursery-Kindergarten School on the Campus and in 
approved schools in nearby communities. 

Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and 
meet the requirements for certification for teaching kinder- 
garten, nursery school and primary grades in Maryland, the 
District of Columbia, Baltimore and many states Students 
should have had extensive experience in working with 
children prior to the junior year. 



Freshman Year 



ENGL 101— Composition 



ENGL 1 71— Honors Composition 



General University Requirements alternative 
SPCH 100— Public Speaking 



SPCH 1 10— Voice and Oction 



HESP 



Semester 



PSYC 
MUSC 



ARTE 



202— Fundamentals of Hearing and 

Speech Science . 
1 00— Introduction to Psychology 
1 55— Fundamentals tor the 
Classroom Teacher 
1 00--Fundamentals ot Art Education 
Biological Science with Lab Irom BOTN. ZOOL 

MICB. orENTM 
Physical Science with Lab from ASTR. GEOL 

CHEMPHYS. orENES 
Social Science or History course from ANTH, 
GEOG. ECON, GVPT, SOCY. HIUS. HIFN 
or HIST 
General University Requirements 



3 

6 

16 16 



Sophomore Year 

MATH 210— Elements ot Mathematics 

MATH 21 1— Elements ot Geometry 

LING 1 00— Introduction to Linguistics 

EDEL 299— School Service Semester" 

U S History 

Social Science or History course from ANTH. GEOG 

ECON GVPT. SOCY. HIUS. HIFN. or HIST 
General University Requirements 



"Volunteer Service Semester may be substituted it so one |i | addftionai 
semester hour will be required to complete 1 20 semester hours 



Junior and Senior Years 
Semester V 

EDHD 300E— Human Development and 
Learning" 



72 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



MATH or Science trom ASTR, BOTN. CHEM ENES. 

ENTM. GEOL. MICB PHYS. or ZOOL 
PYSC 333— Child Psychology 

or 
FMCD 332— The Child and the Family 
General University Requirements 



Semester VI 

EDEL 424— Literature tor Children and Young 

People— Advanced 
Elective trom courses with "ED" in the prelix and 

which are not listed in Professional Semesters 

A or B 
General University Requirements 



Semester VII' 

Professional Semester A" 
EDEL 340— Teaching Strategies for 

Young Children 3 

EDEL 341— The Young Child in His Social 

Environment 3 

EDEL 342— The Teaching of Reading— Early 

Childhood 3 

EDEL 332— Student Teaching. K-3 6 

15 
• Prerequisite to Professional Semester B 

Semester VIII 

Professional Semester B 
EDEL 343— The Young Child in His Physical 

Environment 3 

EDEL 344— Creative Activities and Materials for the 

Young Child 3 

EDEL 330— Student Teaching Nursery School 3 

MUED 450— Music in Early Childhood Education 3 

EDSF 301— Foundation of Education 3 

15 
•Interchangeable with Semesters VI and VIII 

Elementary Education. This curriculum is designed for 
regular undergraduate students who wish to qualify for 
teaching positions in elementary schools. Students who 
complete the curriculum will receive the Bachelor of 
Science degree, and they will meet the Maryland State 
Department of Education requirements for the Standard 
Professional Certificate in Elementary Education. The 
curriculum also meets certification requirements in many 
other states. Baltimore and the District of Columbia. 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

ENGL 101— Composition 

or 
ENGLV 171 —Honors Composition 

or 
General University Requirements alternative 3 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 

or 
SPCH 1 1 0— Voice and Diction 

or 
HESP 202— Fundamentals of Hearing and Speech 

Science 3 

MUSC 1 55— Fundamentals for the Classroom 

Teacher 3 

ARTE 100— Fundamentals of Art Education 3 

Biological Science with Lab from BOTN. ZOOL 

MICB. or ENTM . ... 4 

Pysical Science with Lab from ASTR. GEOL. 

CHEM, PHYS. or ENES 4 

Social Science or History course from ANTH. GEOG. 

ECON. GVPT. SOCY. HIUS. HIFN. or HIST 3 

General University Requirements 9 

16 16 

Sophomore Year 

EDEL 299— School Service Semester - .... 2 

MATH 210— Elements of Mathematics 4 

MATH 21 1 —Elements of Geometry 4 

LING 100— Introduction to Linguistics 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

US History 

Social Science or History course from ANTH. GEOG 3 

ECON. GVPT, SOCY. HIUS, HIFN. or HIST 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 



* Prerequisite to Professional Semester 



Junior and Senor Years 
Semester V 

EDHD 300E— Human Development and Learning 
MATH or Science from ASTR, BOTN. CHEM ENES 

ENTM GEOL, MICB PHYS, or ZOOL 
PSYC 333— Child Psychology 

or 
FMCD 332— The Child and the Family 
General University Requirements 

• Prerequisite to student teaching 

Semester VI 
Professional Semester ' 

EDEL 350— The Teaching of Language Arts- 
Elementary 

EDEL 35 1 —The Teaching of Mathematics- 
Elementary 

EDEL 352— The Teaching of Reading 
Elementary 

EDEL 353— The Teaching of Science 
Elementary 

EDEL 354— The Teaching of Social Studies 
Elementary 



• 3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

15 



Courses are blocked; i.e. one section of students remains 
together for all five methods courses. Students spend two 
days each week in school classrooms applying concepts 
and methods presented in methods courses 

•These 5 courses must be taken as a block They are not offered separately 
The Professional Semester is considered a full undergraduate load requiring all 
of a student's energies Attendance is required for all field activities Absences 
will be made up 

Semester VII 

EDEL 333— Student Teaching . 11 

Semester VIM 

EDEL 424— Uterature for Children and Young 

People — Advanced 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

General University Requirements 6 

Elective 14 

16 
* Interchangeable with Semesters VI and VII 



Industrial Education 

Professor and Chairman: Maley. 

Professors: Harrison, Luetkemeyer. 

Associate Professor: Beatty, Herschback, Mietus. Stough 

Tierney. 

Assistant Professors: Elkms, Starkweather. 

Instructors: Baird, Berge (p.t.), Daly (p.t.), Davis (p.t.), 

Gemmill, Giglin. Hastings, Hayman, Higgins (p.t.). Kemmery 

(p.t). Littlehales (p.t), Martin, Schuma (p.t), Smith (p.t), 

Weires (p.t). Winek, Wright, Lee (p.t.). 

The Department of Industrial Education otters programs 
leading to teacher certification in industrial arts and voca- 
tional-industrial education. It also offers a program in In- 
dustrial Technology which prepares individuals for super- 
visory and industrial management positions, and a technical 
education program for persons with advanced technical 
preparation who wish to teach in technical institutes or 
junior colleges. 

Three curricula are administered by the Industrial 
Education Department: (1) Vocational-Industrial Education: 
(2) Industrial Arts Education, and (3) Industrial Technology. 
The overall offering includes both undergraduate and 
graduate programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Science, Master of Education, Master of Arts, Doctor of 
Educaiton, and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The vocational-industrial curriculum may lead either to 
certification as a vocational-industrial teacher with no 
degree involved or to a Bachelor of Science degree, includ- 
ing certification. The University of Maryland is designated 
as the institution which shall offer the "Trade and Indus- 
trial" certification courses and hence the courses which are 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 73 



offered are those required for certification in Maryland The 
vocational-industrial curriculum requires trade competence 
as specified by the Maryland State Plan for Vocational 
Education A person who aspires to be certified should 
review the state plan and may well contact the Maryland 
State Department of Education officials If the person has in 
mind teaching in a designated city or county, he or she may 
discuss his or her plans with the vocational-industrial official 
of that city or county inasmuch as there are variations in 
employment and training procedures. 

Industrial Arts Education. The Industrial Arts Education 
curriculum prepares persons to teach industrial arts at the 
secondary school level. It is a four-year program leading to 
a Bachelor of Science degree While trade or industrial 
experience contributes significantly to the background of 
industrial arts teacher, previous work experience is not a 
condition of entrance into this curriculum Students who are 
enrolled in the curriculum are encouraged to obtain work in 
industry during the summer months Industrial arts as a 
secondary school subject area is a part of the general 
education program characterized by extensive laboratory 
experiences. 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirements 

CHEM 102— or 103— General Chemistry 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 

EDIN 101— Mechanical Drawing 
EDIN 102— Elementary Woodworking 
EDIN 1 1 2— Shop Calculations 
EDIN 262— Machine Shop Practice 
EDIN 121 —Mechanical Drawing 

EDIN 122— Woodworking II 

EDIN 134— Graphic Arts 

Total 



Sophomore Year I 

General University Requirements 6 

PHYS 1 1 1 or 1 12— Elements of Physics 3 

EDIN 127— Elec -Electronics I 3 

EDIN 1 33— Power Transportation 3 

EDIN 241— Architectural Drawing .... 2 

ECON 205— Fundamentals ot Economics 

MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics 

EDIN 247— Elec. -Electronics I 

EDIN 223— Arc and Gas Welding 

EDIN 210— Foundry . . 

Total 17 



17 



Semester 
Junior Year I II 

General University Requirements (upper level) 3 6 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 6 

EDIN 226— General Metals 3 

EDIN Elective (Laboratory) 4 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDIN 31 1 —Lab Practicum in Industrial Arts 3 

EDIN 450— Training Aids Development 3 

Total 16 15 

Semester 



EDIN 340— Cur , Instr & Observ 

EDIN 347— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 

EDSE 330— Principles S Methods of Secondary 

Education 
EDIN 464— Shop Organization and Management 
EDIN Elective 
EDIN 466— Educational Foundations of Industrial 

Arts 
Total 



14 15 



Vocational-Industrial Education. The vocational-industrial 
curriculum is a four-year program of studies leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in education It is intended to 
develop the necessary competencies for the effective per- 
formance of the tasks of a vocational teacher In addition to 
establishing the adequacy of the student's skills in a par- 
ticular trade and the development of instructional efficiency, 
the curriculum aims at the professional and cultural devel- 
opment of the individual Courses are included which would 
enrich the person's scientific, economic, psychological and 



sociological understandings The vocational-certification 
courses for the State of Maryland are a part of the curricu- 
lum requirements- 
Persons pursuing this curriculum must present docu- 
mentary evidence of having an apprenticeship or comparable 
learning period and journeyman experience This evidence 
of background and training is necessary in order that the 
trade examination phase of the curriculum may be accom- 
plished 

Persons having completed the necessary certification 
courses prior to working on the degree program may use 
such courses toward meeting graduation requirements 
However, after certification course requirements have been 
met, persons continuing studies toward a degree must 
take courses in line with the curriculum plan and Univer- 
sity regulations For example, junior level courses cannot be 
taken until the student has reached full |unior standing 



Sen estei 



Freshman Year I 

General University Requirements 6 

SPCH 100— Public Speaking 3 
ECON 205— Fundamentals ol Economics 

EDIN 1 12— Shop Calculations 3 
MATH 1 1 0— Introduction to Mathematics 



or 



MATH 



1 05— Fundamentals ol Mathematics 
Total 



Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

Physical Sciences 

PSYC 1 00— Introduction to Psychology 
CHEM 103 or equivalent 
EDIN Elective (Laboratory) 

Total 
Trade Examination 





3 


12 


12 


Semester 


1 


II 


3 


6 


3 


3 


3 






4 


3 




1? 


13 



EDIN 
EDHD 
EDIN 



EDIN 
EDIN 



Junior Year 

EDIN 450— Training Aids 

465— Modern Industry 

300— Human Development and Learning 

462— Occupational Analysis and Course 
Construction 
General University Requirements (upper level) 
EDIN 471 —Principles and History of Vocational 
Education 

357— Tests and Measurements 

Elective (Professional) 

Total 



Senior Year I II 

EDIN 350— Methods of Teaching 3 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 3 

EDIN 347— Student Teaching in Secondary 

Schools 8 

EDIN Electives (Professional) 6 

EDSF 301— Social Foundations of Education 
EDIN 464— Shop Organization and Management 
General University Requirements (upper level) 

Total 14 15 

'Student Teaching Requirement in 
Vocational Education. 

Persons currently teaching in the secondary schools with 
three or more years of satisfactory experience at that level 
are not required to take EDIN 347 — Student Teaching 
in Secondary Schools Evidence of satisfactory teaching 
experience shall be presented in the form of written state- 
ments from the principal area supervisor and department 
head in the school where such teaching is done Instead of 
the eight credits required for student teaching, the indi- 
vidual meeting the above qualifications will have eight addi- 
tional semester hours of elective credits 

Elective Credits. Courses in history and philosophy of 
education, sociology, speech, psychology, economics, 
business administration and other allied areas may be taken 
with the permission of the student's advisor 



74 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Elective courses in the technical area (shop and draw- 
ing) will be limited to courses and subjects not covered 
in the trade training experience Courses dealing with ad 
vanced technology and recent improvements in field 
practices will be acceptable 

Vocational-Industrial Certification. To become certified as 
a trade industrial and service occupations teacher in the 
State of Maryland a person must successfully complete 18 
credit hours of instruction 

The following courses must be included in the 18 credit 
hours of instruction: 



EDIN 
EDIN 



EDIN 
EDIN 



350— Methods of Teaching 
464— Laboratory Organization and 

Management 
457— Tests and Measurements 
462— Occupational Analysis and Course 

Construction 



The remainder of the credit hours shall be met through 
the election of the following courses: 

EDIN 450— Training Aids Development 
EDIN 46 1 —Principles of Vocational Guidance 
EDIN 465— Modern Industry 
EDIN 4 7 1 —History and Principles of Vocational 

Education 
EDCP 4 1 0— Introduction to Counseling and 

Personnel Services 
EDCP 41 1 —Mental Hygiene in the Classroom 
Educational Psychology or its equivalent 

A person in Vocational-Industrial Education may use his or 
her certification courses toward a Bachelor of Science 
degree In doing so the general requirements of the 
University and the college must be met. A maximum of 20 
semester hours of credit may be earned through examina- 
tion in the trade in which the student has competence 
Prior to taking the examination, the student shall provide 
documentary evidence of his or her apprenticeship or learn- 
ing period and journeyman experience For further infor- 
mation about credit by examination refer to the academic 
regulations. 

Industrial Technology. The Industrial Technobgy curricu- 
lum is a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree. The purpose of the program is to prepare 
persons for jobs within industry and, as such, it embraces 
four major areas of competence: (a) technical competence; 
(b) human relations and leadership competence; (c) com- 
munications competence; and (d) social and civic com- 
petence 

Semester 
I II 

ty Requirements 6 6 

Sociology of American Life. 3 

Mechanical Drawing I or (Transfer) 2 

Shop Calculations or (Transfer) 3 

Mechanical Drawing II 2 

Woodworking II 

Electricity-Electronics I . . 3 

Arch and Gas Welding 1 

Machine Shop Practice I 3 

Foundry 1 

Introduction to Mathematics 

Introductory Analysis 3 



Semester I 

General University Requirements 3 

EDIN 124— Sheet Metal Work 2 

BMGT 1 10— Business Enterprise 3 

SPCH 107— Public Speaking 

PHYS 111-11 2— Elements of Physics (Mechanics 
and Heat and Sound). (Magnetism, 

Electricity and Optics) 3 

or 
PHYS 121-122— Fundamentals of Physics 

(Mechanics and Heat). (Sound, 

Optics, Magnetism, Electricity) 4 



Freshman Year 


General Universil 


SOCY 


100—! 


EDIN 


101—1 


EDIN 


112—! 


EDIN 


121—1 


EDIN 


122—1 




or 


EDIN 


127—1 


EDIN 


223— i 


EDIN 


262—1 


EDIN 


210-1 


MATH 


110—1 




or 


MATH 


115—1 




Total, , 



ECON 201— Principles of Economics 

or 
ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 
PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 
EDIN 184— Organized and Supervised Work 
Experience - 



Junior Year 

General University Requirements (upper level) 

PSYC 36 1 —Survey of Industrial Psychology 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 

EDIN Elective 

EDIN Shop Elective or (Transfer) 

EDIN 324— Organized and Supervised Work 

Experience* 
EDIN 443— Industrial Safety Education I 
EDIN 444— Industrial Safety Education II 
BMGT 360— Personal Management 
SOCY 462— Industrial Sociology 

Total 

Senior Year 

General University Requirements (upper level) . 

BMGT 362— Industrial Relations 

BMGT 385— Production Management 

EDIN 465— Modern Industry 

or 
EDIN 425— Industrial Training in Industry 



17 18 14-15 
Semester 



20 16 
Semester 



EDIN 475— Recent Technological 

Developments in Products and 
Processes 3 3 

EDIN Elective . 2 

EDIN Shop Elective or (Transfr) 2 

6 3 
Total 15 13 

'Summer Session 

"Translr" refers to technical credit to be transferred by A. A degree students 
• 'refers to technical credit for A A degree students or Option Courses for 
regular students 

option courses is available in the Industrial Education 

Measurement and Statistics 

Chairman: 

Professors: Dayton, Giblette, Stunkard. 

Associate Professors: Johnson, Macready, Schafer, 

Sedlacek. 

Assistant Professor: Wilson. 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. Programs 
available in the Department of Measurement and Statistics 
lead to the Master of Arts degree (thesis or non-thesis 
option) and to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The 
master's level program is designed to provide individuals 
with the necessary skills to serve as research associates in 
various fields and to provide test administration, scoring, 
and interpretation services. The doctoral major program is 
intended primarily to produce individuals qualified to teach 
courses at the college level in educational measurement, 
statistics, and evaluation, advise in the conduct of research 
studies; and serve as measurement or research design 
specialists in school systems, industry, and government. At 
the doctoral level, a student may choose a specialty within 
one of three areas: applied measurement, applied statistics, 
and education evaluation. 

Persons interested in majoring in the department must 
display above average aptitude and interest in quantitative 
methods as applied in the behavioral sciences 

Course Code Prefix— EDMS 



Secondary Education 

Professor and Chairman: Risinger. 
An Education — 

Professor: Lembach. 

Associate Professors: Craig, Longley, McWhinnie. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 75 



Business Education- 
Associate Professors: Anderson, Peters 
Instructors: Hall, Vlgnone. 

Lecturer: Baker. 
Dance Education- 
Instructor- Sloan. 
Distributive Education — 

Assistant Professor: Ricci 
English Education — 
Professor: Wool) 
Assistant Professor: James 
Foreign Language Education- 
Associate Professor: Pfister. DeLorenzo. 
Assistant Professor: Baird 
Home Economics Education- 
Assistant Professors: Brewster, Baird. 
Instructor: Straw. 
Lecturer: Westerberg 
Library Science Education- 
Professor: James. 
Assistant Professor: Fitzgibbons 
Mathematics Education — 
Associate Professors: Davidson, Fey, Henkelman. 
Assistant Professor: Cole 
Music Education- 
Professor: Folstrum 

4ss/s(anf Professors: Shelley, Kuhn, Lenz, 
Physical Education (Men) — 

Lecturer: Vaccaro. 
Physical Education (Women) — 

Lecturer: Croft. 
Reading Education — 
Associate Professor: Brigham. 
Assistant Professor: Davey 
Instructor: Cole 
Science Education — 
Professors: Gardner, Lockard 
Associate Professor: Layman 

Assistant Professors: Heikkinen. Ridky, Wheatley. Wright 
Social Studies Education- 
Professors: Campbell, Grambs. 

Associate Professors: Adkins, Cirrincione, Farrell, Funaro. 
Assistant Professor: Ruchkin. 
Speech Education- 
Associate Professor: Carr. 
Assistant Professor: McCaleb. 
Secondary Education. The Department of Secondary 
Education is concerned with the preparation of teachers of 
middle schools, junior high schools, and senior high schools 
in the following areas: art, dance, distributive education, 
English, foreign languages, general business, home eco- 
nomics, library science, mathematics, music, secretarial 
education, science, social studies, and speech and drama. 

In the areas of art, music, dance, and library science, 
teachers are prepared to teach in both elementary and 
secondary schools. Majors in physical education and agri- 
culture are offered in the College of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health and the College of Agriculture in 
cooperation with the College of Education. Majors in reading 
are offered only at the graduate level, requiring a bachelor's 
degree, certification, and at least two years of successful 
teaching experience as prerequisites 

All students who pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
secondary education are required to complete two years 
(12 semester hours) or the equivalent of a foreign language 
on the college level If a student has had three years of one 
foreign language or two years of each of two foreign 
languages as recorded on his or her high school transcripts, 
he or she is not required to take any foreign languages in the 
college, although he or she may elect to do so 

If a student is not exempt from the foreign language 
requirements, he or she must complete courses through the 
104 level of a modern foreign language or 204 level of a 
classical language 

In the modern languages. French. German, and Spanish, 
the student should take the placement test in the language 
in which he or she has had work if he or she wishes to 
continue the same language; his or her language instruction 
would start at the level indicated by the test With classical 



languages, the student would start at the level indicated in 
the catalog 

For students who come under the provisions above, the 
placement test may also serve as a proficiency test and 
may be taken by a student any time (once a semester) to try 
to fulfill the language requirement. 

Students who have studied languages other than French, 
German, or Spanish, or who have lived for two or more 
years in a foreign country where a language other than 
English prevails, shall be placed by the chairman of the 
respective language section, if feasible, or by the chair- 
men of the foreign language departments Native speakers 
of a foreign language shall satisfy the foreign language 
requirements by taking 1 2 semester hours of English 

All students who elect the secondary education curriculum 
will fulfill the preceding general requirements and also pre- 
pare to teach one or more school subjects which will involve 
meeting specific requirements in particular subject matter 
fields. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is offered in the teaching 
fields of art, English, foreign languages, mathematics, social 
studies, and speech and drama The Bachelor of Science 
degree is offered in art. dance, distributive education, gen- 
eral business, home economics, library science, mathe- 
matics, music, science, secretarial education, and speech 
and drama. 

The student teaching semester is a full-time commitment 
and interference with this commitment because of employ- 
ment is not permitted. 

Living arrangements, including transportation for the stu- 
dent teaching assignments, are considered the responsibility 
of the student. 

Student must have completed EDHD 300. EDSE 330, and 
most of their other major requirements In addition, the 
student must have completed the specific methods course 
for their subject area (or in some programs, be concurrently 
enrolled). Consult your advisor for help in planning your 
schedule in this regard. 

Art Education. Students in art education may select one of 
three programs: elementary (K-6), secondary (6-12). or dual 
(K-1 2) Art Education. The three programs are shown below. 

Elementary Art Education (K-6) 

Semester 

Freshman Year I II 

General University Requirements 6 6 

ARTH 100— Introduction to Art 3 

ARTS 110— Drawing I 3 

ARTS 100— Design lor APDS 101 or ARTE 100 3 
SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communications or 125 or 220 3 

Elective 3 3 



15 15 
Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 

EDSE 260— Introduction to Art Education - 3 

General University Requirements 6 3 

ARTH 260 and 261— An History 

ARTS 220— Painting I 

CRAF 220— Ceramics 

Elective 



Junior Year 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

General University Requirements 

ARTS 330— Sculpture 

EDSE 441— Practicum in Art Education - - 

Electives 

ARTS 340— Printmakmg 



3 


3 




3 




3 


3 


3 


15 


15 


Semester 


I 


II 


6 




3 


6 


3 






3 


3 





01 



APDS 
APDS 



230— Silkscreen Printing 
103— Three Dimensional Design or 
ARTS 200 or APDS 102 



Senior Year 

EDSF 301— Foundations ot Education 

EDSE 4 70— Teaching ot Art Criticism ■ - 

Electives 



Semester 
I II 
3 



76 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Elective In Crafts 3 

EDEL 412— Art In the Elementary School 3 

Education Elective 3 

EDEL 411— The Child and Curriculum or EDEL 322 3 

EDEL 337— Student Teaching in Elementary 

Schools — Art 8 

15 17 
* Admission to Ttacher Education processed in this course Fail only 
• 'Spnng only 
•■•Fa" only 

Secondary Art Education (6-12) 

Freshman Year Semestei 

I II 
SPCH 100— Basle Principles ol Speech 

Communications or 125 or 220 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ARTH 100— Introduction to Art .......... 3 

ARTS 100— Desifjn I or APDS 100 or ARTE 100 3 

ARTS 1 10— Drawing I 3 

Foreigh Language or electlves 3 3 

APDS 103— Three Dimension Design or 

ARTS 200 or APDS 102 3 

Electlves 3 



Sophomore Year 



* Required foreign language credit. 2 years or equivalent 
(Seep 84) 
Sophomore Year 



Semester 
I II 



EDSE 260— Introduction to Art Education' 3 

General University Requirements 6 6 

Foreign Language or Electlves 3 3 

ARTH 260,261— Art History 3 3 

ARTS 220-Paintingl 3 

ARTS 2 1 0— Drawing II 3 

18 15 
Junior Year Semester 

I II 
EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 6 

General University Requirements 6 6 

ARTS 340— Printmaking I 
or 

APDS 230— Silkscreen Printing 3 

ARTS 330— Sculpture I 3 

Electives 3 

EDSE 441— Practicum in Art Education** 3 



EDSE 260— Introduction to Art Education* 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

CRAF 220 — Ceramics 3 

ARTH 261— Art History 3 

ARTS 220— Painting I 3 

Elective in Cratta 3 

Elective 3 3 

ARTS 200-DealgnllorAPDS102orAPDS103 3 

15 15 

Junior Year Semeste 



General University Requirements 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

ARTS 330— Sculpture 

EDEL Child and Curriculum or 

EDEL 322 
EDEL 41 2— Art In the Elementary School ... 
EDEL 337— Student Teaching in 

Elementary Schools— Art 



EDSF 301 —Foundations of Education 

Electives 

ARTS 340— Printmaking 



15 15 
Semester 



APDS 230- 
EDSE 340- 



EDSE 330- 
EDSE 360- 



EDSE 470- 
EDSE 441- 



■Silkscreen Printing 
•Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation in Art 
■Principles and Methods 

in Secondary Education 
•Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools— Art 
■Teaching of Art Criticism * " ' 
-Practicum in Art Education* 



3 

3 
15 15 



•Aomlsson to Teacher Education processed in this course Fall onfy 



Senior Year Ser 

I 

EDSF 301 —Foundations of Education 3 

CRAF 220— Ceramics 3 

Elective in Crafts 3 

EDSE 470— Teaching of Art Criticism* * * 

EDSE 340— Curriculum, Instruction, 

Observation in Art 

Education Elective 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods 

in Secondary Education 

EDSE 360— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 

12 



Business Education. Three curricula are offered for 
preparation of teachers of business subjects. The General 
Business Education curriculum qualifies for teaching all 
business subjects except shorthand. Providing thorough 
training in general business, including economics, this 
curriculum leads to teaching positions on both junior and 
senior high school levels. 

The Secretarial Education curriculum is adapted to the 
needs of those who wish to become teachers of shorthand 
as well as other business subjects. 

The Distributive Education curriculum prepares students 
for vocational teaching requirements in cooperative 
marketing and merchandising programs. 



• Admisson to Teacher Education processed in this course fall onty 
Dual K through 12 Art Education (K-12) 

Freshman Year Ser 

I 

General University Requirements 6 

ARTH 100— Introduction to Art 3 

ARTH 260— Art History 

ARTS 100— Design I or ARTE 100 or APDS 101 3 

ARTS 1 1 0— Drawing I 3 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 



General Business Education 

Freshman Year 



Semester 
I II 



General University Requirements 9 6 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech, 

Communication or 125 or 220 3 

BMGT 1 10— Elements of Business Enterprise . 3 

MATH 1 10. 111— Introduction to Mathematics 3 3 
EDSE 100, 101— Principles of Typewriting 

and Intermediate Typewriting 2 2 

Total 14 17 

Sophomore Year Semester 

i II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ECON 105— Economic Developments 3 

ECON 201. 203— Principles of Economics 3 3 

EDSE 200— Office Typewriting Problems 2 

Business Electives 3 

EDSE 201— Survey of Office Machines 2 

BMGT 220, 221— Principles of Accounting 3 3 

GEOG 203— Introductory Economic Geography .... 3 

Total 16 15 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 77 



Junior Year 



Semester 



II 



EDHD 300S— Human Development and 

Learning . 6 

IFSM 401— Electronic Data Processing 3 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles 

and Organization 3 

BMGT 380— Business Law 3 

Elective 300 or 400 level course in Economics 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 

Electives 6 

Total 18 15 

Semester 



Senior Year 


EDSF 
IFSM 


301- 
402- 


EDSE 


341- 


EDSE 


330- 


EDSE 


300- 


EDSE 


361- 


EDSE 


415- 


EDSE 


416- 




Total 


•Fall only 
"Spring only 



II 



-Foundations of Education 
-Electronic Data Processing 

Applications 
-Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation— Business Subjects' 
-Principles and Methods 

ol Secondary Education 
-Techniques ot Teaching 

Office Skills- * 
-Student Teaching in 

the Secondary Schools 
-Financial and 

Economic Education 
-Financial and 

Economic Education 



Distributive Education 

Freshman Year 



General University Requirements 
BMGT 1 10— Business Enterprise 

1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 

201— Principles of Economics 

203— Principles of Economics 

Total 



SPCH 



ECON 
ECON 



Sophomore Year 

BMGT 220— Principles of Accounting 
BMGT 221— Principles of Accounting 
Business Electives 
General University Requirements 
Total 



Junior Year 

EDHD 300S— Human Development 

and Learning 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles 
and Organization 

BMGT 351— Marketing Management 

BMGT 360— Personnel Management I 

BMGT 353— Retailing , . 

BMGT 380— Business Law 

EDSE 423B— Field Experience — DE 

General University Requirements 

(Upper Division) 

Total 



Semester 
I II 
9 9 
3 



3 
15 15 

Semester 
I II 

3 

3 
9 12 
3 
15 15 

Semester 



EDSF 
EDSE 



BMGT 
EDSE 



301 —Foundations ot Education 
420— Organization and Coordination of 

Distributive Education Programs' 
352— Advertising 
343— Curriculum. Instruction 

and Observation • 
330— Principles and Methods 

of Secondary Education 
363— Student Teaching 

in Secondary Schools 



Total 

•Fall only 
* 'Soring only 

Secretarial Education 



Freshman Year 



3 


6 


18 


15 


Semester 


3 




3 




3 






3 




3 




8 


6 




IS 


14 



General University Requirements 9 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 
EDSE 100— Principles of Typewnting (if exempt. 

BMGT 1101 2 

EDSE 101— Intermediate Typewriting 

EDSE 102. 103— PrlnciplesofShorthandl.il 3 

General University Requirements 3 

Total 1 7 

Sophomore Year Ser 

I 
Business Electives 3 

BMGT 220, 221— Principles of Accounting 3 

ECON 201, 203— Principles of Economics . 3 

EDSE 200— Office Typewriting Problems 2 

EDSE 201— Survey of Office Machines 
EDSE 204— Advanced Shorthand 

and Transcription 3 

EDSE 205— Problems in Transcription 

Total 14 

Junior Year 



Semester 



II 



EDHD 300S— Human Development 

and Learning 6 

EDSE 304— Administrative Secretarial 

Procedures' 3 

BMGT 380— Business Law 3 

Electives 3 3 

IFSM 401— Electronic Data Processing 3 

Elective in General University Requirements 
(Upper Division) 3 6 

Total 15 15 

Senior Year Semester 

I II 
EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDSE 305— Secretarial Office Practice 3 

EDSE 300— Techniques of 

Teaching Office Skills' ' 3 

EDSE 34 1 —Curriculum. Instruction and 

Observation — Business Subnets' 3 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods 

of Secondary Education 3 

EDSE 361— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

Electives — 300 or 400 Level 6 3 

Total 15 17 

" Fall only 
' 'Spnngonly 

Dance Education: The Dance Education curriculum pre- 
pares students for teaching in the public schools, for 
graduate study and for possible teaching In college The 
requirements for this dual, K-1 2 program are as follows. 



Freshman Year 



Semester 
1 II 



DANCE 1 00X 2 

DANCE 104X 

MUSC 130. or 150, or 155 3 

SPCH 100, or 110, or 125 

DANCE 200 3 

General University Requirements 6 

DANCE 290 



Sophomore Year 

DANC 248 

DANC 348 

DANC 102 

DANC 208 

General University Requirements 

Electives 

PHED 489D 



DANC 
DANC 
DANC 
DANC 
EDHO 



348 or 389 
305" 
482 or 483 
492 
300 



78 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



EDEL 411 or 322 
General University Requirements 
(Upper Division) 



Senior Year 


DANC 


389 or 499 


DANC 


470* 


DANC 


488* 


DANC 


498 


DANC 


484 


EOSE 


330B 


EDSF 


301 


EDSE 


342" 


EDEL 


331" 


EDSE 


362 " 




Total 120S 


"Falonly 


"Spring 


Dnly 



2 
3 
3 
.• 
3 
3 



English Education. A major in English 202 requires 45 
semester hours as follows: ENGL 201 or 202: 211 or 
212: 481; 403 or 404 or 405: or 221 or 222: 482; 493; 
three hours each in a type, and period; 9 hours electlves. 
Related Fields SPCH 1 00 and 240. 



Semester 

I II 
12 6 

3 
3 3 



Freshman Year 



General University Requirements 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles ot Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220. 

Foreign Language 

Elective 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

or 
ENGL 1 7 1 —Honors Composition 



Sophomore Year I || 

General University Requirements 3 

ENGL 201 or 202— World Literature 3 

SPCH 240— Oral Interpretation 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Elective 3 3 

ENGL —(type) 3 

ENGL —(period) 3 

ENGL 211 or212 3 

15 15 

Semester 
Junior Year I n 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and 

Learning 6 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education ... 3 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 3 

EDSE 288— Field Experience (optional) 1 

ENGL 221 or 222 3 

ENGL 403,404. or 405 3 

ENGL 481— Introduction to English Grammar 3 

General University Requirements (upper level) 3 3 

ENGL 482— History of the English Language 3 

ENGL Elective . . . 3 

18 16 

Semester 
Senior Year I n 

EDSE 489— Field Experience 1 1 

EDSE 344— Curriculum Instruction and 

Observation— English 3 

EDSE 453— The Teaching of Reading in the 

Secondary School 3 

EDSE 364— Student Teaching— English . .. '8 

ENGL 493— Advanced Expository Writing 3 

ENGL Electives 6 

General University Requirements (upper level) ... 3 

16 12 
Foreign Language Education. The Foreign Language 
Education curriculum is designed for prospective foreign- 
language teachers in secondary schools 

Classical Language-Latin. A minor for teaching Latin 
requires 24 prescribed semester hours based upon two 



years of high school Latin These students should take 
LATN 203, 204. 305. 351, 352, 361, 401, 402 Students 
who have had four years of high school Latin should begin 
with LATN 305 and should select two additional courses 
from among LATN 403, 404, 405 

Prospective Latin teachers are urged to elect courses 
which will lead to a second area of concentration 
Modern Foreign Languages. All prospective modern 
foreign language teachers must take a minimum of 30 
semester hours in a foreign language plus 12 hours of 
electives in a related area for a total of 42 hours; the 
foreign language education advisor must approve the 1 2 
hours of "related area" credit. The following requirements 
must be met within the 30 required hours: one year of 
advanced conversation, one year of advanced grammar and 
composition, one year of survey of literature, one year of 
advanced literature (400 level) and one semester of 
advanced civilization (300 or 400 level). Equivalents to the 
above must be approved by the appropriate education 
advisor. 



Secondary Foreign Language Education 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirements ....... 96 

SPCH 100, 125, or 220 Basic Principles of 3 

Speech Communication 
Intermediate Foreign Language (or appropriate level as 

determined by placement exam) 3 3 

Electives* . . 3 3 

Total 15 15 

Semester 

Sophomore Year | li 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Foreign Language— Grammar and Composition 3 3 

Foreign Language— Survey of Literature 3 3 

Foreign Language— Advanced Conversation 3 3 

Electives* 3 3 

Total 15 15 



Junior Year 

General University Requirements (upper level) 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

Foreign Language— Literature (400 level) 

Foreign Language— Civilization 

Electives in Foreign Language or Related Area (i.e . 

advanced language courses, second language. 

introduction to Linguistics. Cultural Anthropology. 

Historic Geography of the Hispanic World, etc.)* 

Foreign Language— Elective (400 level) 

Total ................ 



Senior Year 

EDSF 301 — Foundations of Education 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of Secondary 
Education 

EDSE 345— Curriculum Observation* * 

EDSE 365— Student Teaching in the Secondary 
Schools 

Elective from EDAD 440— Audio Visual Education, 
EDSE 488B— Foreign Languages and Career 
Education. EDSE 499H— Creating Cross-Cultural 
Contrasts EDSE 499T— Teaching English as a 
Second Language. EDSE 499X— Bilingual Education 
or EDSE 453— The Teaching of Reading in the 
Secondary School 

General University Requirements (upper level) 

Electives* 
Total . . 



Semester 



17 15 



'Foreign Language Education majors and Arts and Humanities certification 
students are strongly advised to elect courses which will enhance their 
professional preparation (i e . EDSE 288A. EDSE 488F EDSE 499H, EDSE 
499T etc ), as well as those which will lead to a second area of concentration 
(i e a second foreign language, teaching English to speakers of other languages, 
English, social studies, etc ) 

Students who plan to teach a foreign language must contact an education 
advisor during the freshman year in order to plan an integrated program of 
specialized professonal and liberal education 
* * Must be taken concurrently with student teaching 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 79 



Home Economics Education. The Home Economics Edu- 
cation curriculum is designed for students who are pre- 
paring to teach home economics. It includes study of each 
area of home economics and the supporting disciplines. 

Fifteen hours of the total curriculum include an area of 
concentration which must be unified in content and which 
will be chosen by the student. * 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

FMCD 250— Decision Making in Family Living 3 

FMCD 105— Introduction to Family Living 3 

FOOD 1 1 0— Food and Nutrition of Individuals and 
Family 
or 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 3 

EDSE 151— Bases tor Home Economics Curricula 1 

TEXT 105— Textiles in Contemporary Living 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 

APDS 101— Fundamentals of Design 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

Total 16 15 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communications or 126 or 220 3 

TXAP 22 1 —Apparel I (if exempted, may take 

TXAP222orTXAP425) 3 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 4 

General University Requirements 6 6 

HSAD 240— Design and Furnishings in the Home 
or 

HSAD 241— Family Housing 3 

EDSE 2 1 0— Teaching Roles In Home Economics 

Education 1 

FOOD 200— Scientific Principles of Food 3 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family 
or 

EDHD 4 1 1 —Child Growth and Development 3 

Total 16 16 



Junior Year I II 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 6 

FMCD 280— Household Equipment and Space 
Utilization 
or 
FMCD 443— Consumer Problems 
or 

FMCD 341— Personal and Family Finance 3(4) 

FOOD 260— Meal Management 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

FMCD 344— Resident Experience in Home 
Management 
or 
FMCD 343B— Practicum in Home Management 3 

EDSE 380— Field Experience in Organization and 

Administration of a Child Development 

Laboratory 1 

EDSE 425— Curriculum Development in Home 

Economics 3 

Area of Concentration 6 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 

18(19)19 

Semester 
Senior Year I II 

EDSE 347— Curriculum. Instruction, and 

Observation-Home Economics 3 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods ol Secondary 

Education 3 

EDSE 489— Field Experience 1 

EDSE 370— Student Teaching in Secondary 

School— Home Economics 8 

FMCD 260— Family Relations 

or 
SOCY 443— The Family and Society 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

or 
MICR 200— General Microbiology 4 

Area of Concentration 9 

Total 14 19 

• Area ot Concentration 1 5 semester hours 



A) Including maximum ot two home economics courses m applied area with the 
remainder of the 15 hours in supporting behavioral, physical and biological 
sciences, philosophy, geography, and history 

B) Ot the 1 5 hours, nine must be upper divisions! courses 

Library Science Education. All students anticipating work 
in library science education should consult with advisors in 
this area at the beginning of the freshman year. Students 
enrolled in this curriculum will pursue a Bachelor of Arts 
degree with an area of concentration of 36 hours in one of 
the following: Arts and Humanities, Behavioral and Social 
Sciences, or Mathematics and Science Students may 
concentrate in a subject area subsumed under one of these 
fields, or they may choose a broad spectrum of courses In 
one of the areas under the guidance of their advisors The 
minor of 18 hours will be library science education 

Students in library science education will complete eight 
semester hours in directed library experience as their stu- 
dent teaching requirement It will Involve two and a half 
days per week, for 1 6 weeks. This period will be divided into 
two sections, with eight weeks each in a secondary and 
elementary school A concurrent seminar will also be a part 
of this experience. Students completing this curriculum will 
be eligible for certification as an Educational Media Asso- 
ciate, Level I, and will qualify to work in school media centers 
under the supervision of a Media Generalist, Level II 

Semester 

I II 
6 6 

3 

6 3 
6 

15 15 

Semester 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirements 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 

Electives 

Area of Concentration 
Total 



Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

Electives 

Area of Concentration 

Total 



II 



6 3 

3 3 

6 9 

15 15 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

General University Requirements 

(300 and above level) 3 6 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 6 

LBSC 331 —Introduction to Educational Media 

Services' . . 3 

LBSC 38 1 —Basic Reference and Information 

Sources 3 

LBSC 382— Cataloging and Classification of 

Materials 3 

LBSC 383— Library Materials for Children and Youth. 3 

EDEL 322— Curriculum and Instruction— Elementary 3 

Total 15 15 

•Prerequisite to EDSE 381 

Semester 
Senior Year I II 

Area of Concentration 12 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDAD 441— Graphic Materials for Instruction 3 

LBSC 385— Media Center Administration and 

Services 3 

EDSE 386— Student Teaching in School Media 

Centers— Elementary 4 

EDSE 387— Student Teaching in School Media 

Centers— Secondary 4 

Total 18 14 



Mathematics Education. A major in mathematics education 
requires the completion of MATH 241 or its equivalent, and 
a minimum of 15 semester hours of mathematics at the 400 
level (excluding MATH 490); 400 level courses beyond 
those prescribed (450. 402 or 403. 430 or 431 ) should be 
selected in consultation with the mathematics education 
advisor The mathematics education major must be sup- 
ported by one of the following science sequences CHEM 
103 and 104. or 105 and 106; PHYS221 and 222. or 161 
and 262. or 191 and 192. or 141 and 142. BOTN 101 
and three additional hours in BOTN courses; ZOOL 101 and 
three additional hours in ZOOL courses. ASTR 1 80 and 1 1 



80 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



and three additional hours in ASTR (none ol which include 
ASTR 100 or 105) Also a course in Computer Science 
(CMSC 1 10 or 103) is required The following sample pro- 
gram is one way to fulfill requirements 



Freshman Year 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 
MATH 140. 141 —Analysis I II 
Science Requirement 
General University Requirements 



Semestei 



3-5 
3 



Sophomore Year 

MATH 240, 24 1 — Linear Algebra. Analysis III 

General University Requirements 

CMSC 103 or 1 10 Introductory Computer 

Programming 
Electives 



2-4 5-7 
15-17 15-17 



Junior Year I II 

MATH 430— Geometric Transformations 

or 
MATH 431 —Foundations of Geometry 3 

MATH 402— Algebraic Structures 

or 
MATH 403— Introduction to Abstract Algebra 3 

MATH 450— Fundamental Concepts of 

Mathematics 3 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning. 6 

EDSE 350— Curriculum, Instruction. 

Observation— Mathematics 3 

Mathematics Electives (400 level) 3 

General University Requirements 3 6 

15 15 

Semester 
Senior Year I II 

Mathematics Electives (400 level) 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education ... 3 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 3 

EDSE 372 —Student Teaching in Secondary School 

Mathematics 8 

EDSE 484— Field Experiences 3 

Electives 10 

14 » 16 



Music Education. The curriculum in music leads to a 
Bachelor of Science degree in education with a major in 
music education. It is planned to meet the demand for 
specialists, supervisors and resource teachers in music in 
the schools. The program provides training in the teaching of 
vocal and instrumental music and leads to certification to 
teach music at both elementary and secondary school 
levels in Maryland and many other states. There are two 
options. The vocal option is for students whose principal 
instrument is voice or piano; the instrumental option is for 
students whose principal instrument is an orchestral or 
band instrument. 

All students are carefully observed at various stages of 
their programs by members of the Music Education faculty. 
This is intended to insure the maximum development and 
growth of each student's professional and personal com- 
petencies Each student is assigned to an advisor who 
guides him or her through the various stages of advance- 
ment in the program of music and music education. 



MUSC 229— Ma|or Ensemble 
Total 

Sophomore Year 

MUSP 207, 208— Applied Music (principal 

instrument 
MUSC 250, 251— Adv Theory of Music 
MUSC 113. 121 —Class Study of Instruments 
MUSC 330, 331— History of Music 
General University Requirements 
EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 
MUSC 229— Maior Ensemble 
Total 

Junior Year 

MUSP 405, 406— Applied Music (principal 

instrument! 
MUSC 490. 491— Conducting 
MUSC 1 20. 1 1 4 —Class Study of Instruments 
MUED 470— Music in Secondary Schools 
MUED 420— Band& Orch Technique 
General University Requirements 
MUSC 229— Major Ensemble 
Total 



Senior Year 

MUSP 409— ApdMus(Prm Inst) 
MUSC 486— Orchestration 
EDSE 373. EDEL 335— Stud Tchng 
EDSF 301— Foundations of Educ 
EDSE 330— Pnns MethsSec Ed . 
General University Requirements 
MUSC 229— Major Ensemble. . 
Total 

Vocal Option 



18 18 
Semester 



Semester 



II 



Instrumental Option 



Freshman Year 

MUSP 1 09. 1 1 0— Applied Music (Principal 

Instrument) 2 2 
MUSC 131— Intro to Music 3 

MUSC 150, 151— Theory of Music 3 3 
MUSC 1 00— Class Voice. MUSC 200 Adv Class 

Voice or MUSC 102. 103— Class 

Diano 2 2 

MUED 197 1 

SPCH Requirement 3 

General University Requirements 6 3 

MUSC 329— Major Ensemble 1 1 

Total 17 15 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I II 
MUSP 207. 208— Applied Music (principal 

instrument) 2 2 

MUSC 330. 331 3 3 

MUSC 202. 203— Adv Class Piano 2 2 

MUSC 250, 251— Adv Theory of Muse 4 4 

EDHD 300S— Human Dev & Learning 6 

General University Requirements , 6 

MUSC 329— Major Ensemble. 1 1 

Total 18 18 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 
MUSP 405, 409— Applied Music (principal 

instrument) 2 2 

MUSC 453 2 

MUED 472 2 

MUSC 490, 491— Conducting 2 2 

MUED 478— Spec Topics in MuEd 1 

MUED 470— Music in Sec Schools 4 

General University Requirements 6 6 

MUSC 329— Major Ensemble 1 1 

Total 15 16 



Freshman Year I 

MUSP 1 09, 1 1 0— Applied Music (principal 

instrument) 2 

MUSC 131 —Intro to Music 

MUSC 150. 151— Theory of Music 3 

MUSC 102, 103— Class Piano 2 

MUSC 116 2 

SPCH Requirement 3 

General University Requirements 3 

MUED 197 



Senior Year 
MUSP 410- 



MUED 478 
EDSE 330 
EDSF 301 



■Applied Music (Principal 
instrument) 



Pnn& MethsSec Ed 
Foundations of Educ 
EDEL 375, EDSE 373— Student Tchng 
General University Requirements 
MUSC 329— Major Ensemble 
Total 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 81 



Physical Education and Health Education. This curriculum 
is designed to prepare students for teaching physical educa- 
tion in elementary and secondary schools To obtain full 
particulars on course requirements, the student should refer 
to the sections on the Department of Physical Education and 
the Department of Health Education. 

Science Education. A science major consists of 52 
semester hours study in the academic sciences 

The following courses are required for all Science Educa- 
tion majors BOTN 101; CHEM 103; CHEM 104, PHYS 
121-122 or 221-222; ZOOL 101. and a year of mathe- 
matics Additional courses are selected from the academic 
sciences, with the approval of the student's advisor, so as to 
provide a minimum of 36 hours in a particular science teach- 
ing area, e.g., biology, chemistry, physics, and earth 
sciences, as noted below. 

Preparation for biology teaching will include BOTN 202; 
ZOOL 293; MICB 200; genetics (ZOOL 246 or BOTN 
414); human anatomy and physiology (ZOOL 201 and or 
202); a field course in both botany and zoology (BOTN 
212. 462-464. or 417, ZOOL 270-271 . 480 or ENTM 204), 
CHEM 201, 202 

Preparation for chemistry teaching will include CHEM 
103, 104. 201. 202, 203, 204, 481, 482, 498 and upper 
division courses such as CHEM 321, 401, 403, 421, 440, 
46 1 Math preparation should include MATH 115. 140, 141 
MATH 240 and 241 or 246 are also recommended 

Preparation for physics teaching will include math through 
at least MATH 240, and 241 and 246 are also recom- 
mended. Physics courses will include introductory physics 
with calculus (PHYS 141,142), lab courses (PHYS 285. 
286). intermediate theoretical physics (PHYS 404. 405). 
and modern physics (PHYS 420). In addition, a physics 
teacher should take course work in Astronomy (ASTR 1 10. 
180) Participation in PSSC or Harvard Project Physics 
courses (when offered) would be desirable. 

Preparation for earth science teaching will include one 
year of biology (BOTN 101 and ZOOL 101). one year of 
chemistry (CHEM 103 and 104). one year of physics 
(PHYS 221. 222 preferred), MATH 115 and 140, and at 
least 30 hours of earth sciences with 1 8 hours concen- 
tration in one of the earth science fields and six hours 
minimum in each of two other earth science areas: GEOL 
100. 102, 110. 112, 421, 422, 431. 441. 460. 489. 499. 
ASTR 100 and 105. 110. 180. 410.498; GEOG 440, 445. 
446.441.370.372,462. 

Biology 



Freshman Year I 

BOTN 101— General Botany 4 

ZOOL 101 —Gen eral Zoology 

MATH 1 1 0— Introduction to Mathematics 1 3 

MATH 1 1 1 —Introduction to Mathematics II 

CHEM 1 03— College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II. 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 
General University Requirements 3 

Total 1 4 



Sophomore Year 

BOTN 202— The Plant Kingdom 
ZOOL 293— The Animal Phyla 
MICB 200— General Microbiology 
CHEM 201 —College Chemistry III 
CHEM 202— College Chemistry Laboratory III 
General University Requirements 
Total 



Junior Year 

ZOOL 246otBOTN414— Genetics 
ZOOL 201— Human Anatomy and Physiology 
PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 
PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 
EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 
General University Requirements 
Total 



Senior Year 

BOTN 21 2 or BOTN 41 7 or BOTN 462-464 — 

Field Studies 
ZOOL 270-271 or ZOOL 480 or ENTM 200— 

Field Studies 
Biology Elective 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 
EOSE 330— Principles and Methods of 

Secondary Education 
EDSE 352— Curriculum. Instruction and 

Observation — Science 
EDSE 375— Student Teaching in Secondary 

Schools 
Total 
Chemistry 



Semester 

I II 



8 
15 11 



SemeetM 



Freshman Year I II 

BOTN 101— General Botany 4 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 4 

MATH 140— Analysis I 3 

MATH 141— Analysis II 4 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles ol Speech 

Communication or 125 or 220 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Total 14 18 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

CHEM 201— College Chemistry III 3 

CHEM 202— College Chemistry Laboratory III 2 

CHEM 203— College Chemistry IV 

CHEM 204— College Chemistry Laboratory IV 2 

Mathematics or Chemistry Elective 3 

General University Requirements 12 6 

Total 17 14 

Semester 

Junior Year I II 

CHEM 481— Physical Chemistry I 3 

CHEM 482— Physical Chemistry II 3 

CHEM 498— Special Topics in Chemistry (IAC) 3 3 

PHYS 221— General Physics I 5 

PHYS 222— General Physics II 5 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 6 

Mathematics or Chemistry Elective 3 

Total 17 14 

Semester 
Senior Year I II 

Chemistry Elective 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDSE 300— Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 3 

EDSE 352— Curriculum, Instruction and 

Observation — Science 3 

EDSE 375— Student Teaching m Secondary 

Schools 8 

General University Requirements 6 

Total 15 11 

Earth Science 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

BOTN 1 1 —General Botany 

ZOOL 1 1 —General Zoology 

GEOL 100— Physical Geology 

GEOL 1 1 0— Physical Geology Laboratory 

GEOL 102— Historical Geology 

GEOL 1 1 2— Historical Geology Laboratory 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 
MATH 1 1 0— Introduction to Mathematics I 
MATH 1 1 1 —Introduction to Mathematics II 
General University Requirements 

Total 
Sophomore Year 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 
CHEM 104— College Chemistry II 
GEOL 422— Minerology 
GEOL 441— Structural Geology 
PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 
PHYS 122 Fundamentals of Physics II 
General University Requirements 

Total 



II 



82 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



Junior Year 

GEOG 440— Geomorphology 

ASTR 1 00— Introduction to Astronomy 

ASTR 1 05 — Modern Astronomy 

ASTR 1 10— Modern Astronomy Laboratory 

EOHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

General University Requirements 

Geology Electives 

Total 
Senior Year 
GEOL 460— Earth Science 

301 —Foundations ot Education 

330— Principles and Methods ol Secondary 
Education 

352— Curriculum. Instruction and 
Observation — Science 

375— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 
General University Requirements 
Earth Science Electives 
Total 

Physics 



EDSF 
EDSE 



EDSE 



EDSE 



Freshman Year 

CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 

104— College Chemistry II 

140— Analysis I 

1 4 1 —Analysis II 

221 —General Physics I* 

222— General Physics II* 

1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 1 25 or 220 

General University Requirements 

Total 



CHEM 
MATH 
MATH 
PHYS 
PHYS 
SPCH 



3 

3 
15 15 



•The physics major sequence (181. 182. 293, 284) or the engineering 
sequence 1161 162 263) may be used and appropriate course changes in the 
remainder ot the program will be made 

Sophomore Year 

PHYS 285— Intermediate Physics Experiments I 2 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

BOTN 101 —General Botany I 4 

PHYS 286— Intermediate Physics Experiments II 2 

ASTR 181— Astronomy and Astrophysics 3 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

General University Requirements 3 9 

Total ,16 15 

Junior Year 

PHYS 404— Intermediate Theoretical Mechanics 3 

PHYS 405— Intermediate Theoretical Electricity and 

Magnetism 3 

PHYS 420— Modern Physics for Engineers 3 

PHYS 305— Physics Shop Techniques . . 1 

ASTR 181— Introduction to Astrophysics II 3 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning. . . 6 

General University Requirements 9 3 

Total 15 16 



Senior Year 

PHYS 406— Optics 

PHYS 499— Special Problems in Physics 

ASTR 210— Practical Astronomy 

General University Requirements 

EDSF 301 —Foundations of Education 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 

EDSE 352— Curriculum. Instruction and Observation 
Science 
375— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 
489— Seminar in Science Teaching 



EDSE 
EDSE 
Total 



Social Studies Education 

Option I (History Concentration). Requires 54 semester 
hours of which at least 27 must be in history usually 
including HIST 221, 222. 241,242, and 12 hours of 300 or 
400 level history courses including HIST 389; 27 hours of 
related social sciences as outline below: 

At least one course in each of the following areas 
geography, sociology (or ANTH 101). government and 
politics; and two courses in economics. Twelve semester 
hours of social science electives are required of which nine 
hours must be in the upper division (300-400 level) These 
courses may be in a given concentration such as geography, 
psychology, sociology, economics, anthropology, or com- 



bination of relevant fields The selection of the courses or 
fields is at the discretion of the advisor as a defensible area 
ol study For those students with a minor in geography. 
GEOG 490 is required 

Semester 
Freshman Year I II 

General University Requirements 6 6 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles ot Speech 

Communication or 125 or 220 3 

22 1 . 222— History of the United States to 
1865;Historyofthe United States 
since 1 865 (or 6 hours of any U S 
History approved by advisor) 3 3 

100— Introduction to Geography 3 

1 70— American Government 3 

1 00— Introduction to Sociology (or ANTH 101) 3 

15 is 



HIST 



GEOG 

GVPT 
SOCY 



Sophomore Year 

HIST 6 hours ot any non-US History 

approved by advisor 3 3 

ECON 31 0— Evolution of Modern Capitalism in 

Western Europe and the United 

States 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

Social Science Electives 3 3 

History Electives . . . 3 3 

15 15 
Junior Year 
Social Science Elective 3 

History Electives 3 3 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning. 6 

General University Requirements 3 9 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 3 

EDSE 353— Curriculum. Instruction and 

Observation — History* 3 

15 18 
Senior Year 

EDSE 376— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 8 
EDSF 301 —Foundations of Education 3 

EDSE 453— The Teaching of Reading in Secondary 

Schools* * 3 

HIST 389— Proseminar in Historical Writing 3 

Social Science Electives 3 3 

Electives 6 



•EDSE 353 will be ottered Spring Semester 
Student Teaching 
"Evening Course Only 



nty and must be taken pnor to 



Option II (Geography Concentration). Requires 54 se- 
mester hours of which 27 hours must be in geography 
GEOG 201 , 202. 203, 409, and one field experience course 
is required. The remaning hours in geography must be upper 
division systematic geography courses with one course in 
regional geography included. Fifteen semester hours of 
social science and history courses must include at least one 
course in sociology (or anthropology), one in government 
and politics, two courses in economics, and two courses in 
American history. Fifteen semester hours of social science 
and history electives are required of which nine hours must 
be upper division courses. These courses may be in a given 
concentration such as history, psychology, economics, 
anthropology or combination of relevant fields The State of 
Maryland requires 18 hours of History courses, including 6 
semester hours in U.S. History (to obtain additional 
certification as a social studies teacher). The selection of 
courses or fields is at the discretion of the advisor as a 
defensible area of study 



Freshman Year 



General University Requirements 6 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication or 125 or 220 3 

GEOG 201— Physical Geography 3 

GEOG 202— Cultural Geography 

U S History 3 

SOCY or ANTH 

15 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 83 



Sophomore Year 

GEOG 203— Economic Geography 

GEOG Field Course (GEOG 38 1 382 383) 

GEOG Electives 

Economics 

General University Requirements 

Social Science Electives 



Junior Year 

GEOG 490— Geography Concepts and 

Source Material 
GEOG Electives 

General University Requirements 
EDHD 300S— Human Development 

and Learning 
EOSE 353— Curriculum. Instruction 

Observation — Social Studies' 
EDSE 330— Principles and Methods 

ot Secondary Education 



Senior Year 

EDSE 376— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

EDSE 489— Field Experience 3 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDSE 453— Teaching of Reading 

m Secondary Schools' ' 3 

Social Science Elective 1 2 

Elective 1 

14 16 
'EDSE 353 will be ottered Spnng Semester only and must be taken pnor 
to student teaching 
" ' Evening Course Only 

Speech and Drama Education. A major in speech and 
drama education requires 37 semester hours of speech and 
drama content. The program provides for designing a pro- 
gram of study appropriate to prospective teachers in the 
communication field. The 24 hour English minor is to be 
selected in consultation with the advisor. The 24 hour 
English minor students desiring a Bachelor of Arts degree 
must also meet departmental foreign language require- 
ments- 



Speech and Drama Education 

Freshman Year 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of 

Speech Communication 
DART 1 1 0— Introduction to the Theatre 
DART 1 20— Acting 
SPCH 1 10— Voice and Diction 
RTVF 1 24— Mass Media in the 20th Century 
General University Requirements 

Total 



Sophomore Year 
General University Requirements 
SPCH 350— Foundations of Communication 
SPCH 200— Advanced Public Speaking 
SPCH 220— Group Discussion 
Major Area Electives in Speech and Drama 
Minor Area English suggested 
Total 



Junior Year 

SPCH 477— Speech Communication and the 

Study of Language Acquisition 
SPCH 489— Speech Communication Workshop 
EDHD 300S— Human Development 

and Learning 
Minor Area English suggested 
General University Requirements 
(upper level) 
Total 

Senior Year 
Electives 

HESP 401 —Survey of Speech Disorders 
EDSE 330— Principles and Methods 
of Secondary Education 
Minor Area English suggested 
EDSE 354— Curriculum Instruction, and 

Observation— Speech • 



3 6 
15 16 



EDSE 377— Student Teaching In 

Speech Drama 8 

Education Elective 3 

Total 15 14 

'Fall only 

Social Foundations of Education Area 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Noll 
Professor Male 

Associate Professors: Agre, Finkelstein, Hopkins.. 
Huden, Lindsay 

The Social Foundations area in the College of Education 
offers courses in the history, philosophy and sociology of 
education and the Foundations and Education course 
required of all students majoring in Education (EDSF 301) 
These courses treat the educational enterprise as it relates 
to the political, social, and economic structure of society and 
the values which underlie a particular society "Freedom in 
Education" and "Existentialism and Education" are 
examples of topics offered through workshops in this area. 
Other timesly courses on such subjects as sexism, the 
history of childhood, the future of education, the foundations 
of educational and life-long learning are offered under a 
special topcis designation (EDSF 409) A broad perspective 
is sought both for classroom teachers and prospective 
leaders in the profession. 

The area also offers the master's degree and doctorates 
in comparative education (the study of educational systems 
in other regions of the world); history of education; 
philosophy of education; and sociology of edcuation 
CourseCode Prefix — EDSF 

Special Education 

Chairman: Vacant 

Professors: Hebeler, Simms 

Associate Professor: Seidman 

Assistant Professors: Bluth. Harber, Malouf. McNeely. 

Shroyer 

The Special Education Department offers an under- 
graduate program which prepares students for a teaching 
position in either an elementary or secondary level special 
education program Students who complete the under 
graduate program receive the Bachelor of Science degree 
and meet Maryland State Department of Education 
requirements for the standard professional certificate in 
special education and in elementary education 

Students at the undergraduate level pursue a sequential 
comprehensive special education program concentrating 
either in the area of the mentally retarded or learning 
disabilities Progress through the program is dependent 
upon the student's achieving the requisite special teaching 
competencies required for graduation Field experiences are 
required of all students in the department prior to their 
student teaching experiences 

The student consults with his advisor regarding specific 
details of his program, alternatives, etc The following 
represents a "typical" program 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirements 

ARTE 1 0ODFundamentals of Art Education 

MUSC 155— Fundamentals tor the 

Classroom Teacher 
SPCH 100 or 202 or 110 
General Electives 
Supporting Academic Content 
Total 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

MATH 210. 21 1— Elements of Math. 

Elements of Geometry 
EDSP 288— Field Placement m 

Special Education 
Supporting Academic Content 
Total 



Credits 
12 
3 

3 
3 
3 
6 
30 



84 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



Junior Year 

General University Requirements 

(upper level) 
EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 
Supporting Academic Content 
EDEL 426— Teaching ot Reading 
405— Language Arts in the 
Elementary School 
407— Social Studies m the 
Elementary School 
4 70— Introduction to Special Education 

471 or 491— Characteristic sot 
Exceptional Children 

472 or 492— Education ot 
Exceptional Children . 

Total 



EDEL 



EDEL 



EDSP 
EDSP 



EDSP 



Senior Year 

EDEL 414— Mathematics in the 

Elementary School 
EDEL 402— Science in the 

Elementary School 

EDSF 301— Foundations ot Education 
EDSP 473— Curriculum tor 

Exceptional Children . . 
EDSP 489— Field Placement In 

Special Education . 
EDSP 349— Student Teaching ot 

Exceptional Children 
EDEL 334— Student Teaching m 

the Elementary School 
Total 
Total Credits 



30 
120 



The College of Human Ecology 

The College of Human Ecology focuses in Its programs on 
the needs of individuals and society. The College shares in 
the obligation of all higher education to provide a broad 
based education for every individual as preparation for living 
in close harmony with the environment in both the immediate 
and long-range future. 

Human Ecology is an interdisciplinary, problem-focused 
field of study dealing with the interactions of man and his 
environment: how man impinges upon the environment and 
how the environment impinges upon man. In the broad 
context, the term environment includes physical-natural, 
socioeconomic, and esthetic concerns. Thus, Human 
Ecology must draw upon and integrate basic disciplines of 
the natural and behavioral sciences along with the arts and 
humanities in the definition and solving of societal problems. 
The several programs of the College are directed toward 
these problems and toward the improvement of the quality of 
life. 

The College seeks to provide the proper balance of 
educational experiences which prepare an individual in the 
professional context with those experiences which benefit 
him personally as a fully functioning and contributing member 
of society. This balance includes grounding in basic and 
applied skills, as well as providing an atmosphere where 
creativity may flourish to enhance our potential for 
developing innovative solutions to societal problems. 

The faculty utilizes existing knowledge and generates new 
knowledge, techniques and methods based on research, 
while providing opportunities through laboratory, practical 
and field experiences for making knowledge and innovative 
discovery more meaningful to the individual. Through these 
experiences the faculty experiments with varying relevant 
techniques and methods by which the individual can transfer 
to the society-at-large new ideas and methods for more 
effective interaction within the social and physical 
ecosystems in which we function. 

Through teaching, research and service the College 
provides appropriate, comprehensive, quality education 
programs that prepare students for professional positions 
directed toward the improvement of conditions contributing 
to: 

1 . The individual's psycho-social development. 

2. The quality and availability of community resources 
which enrich family life (in all its various forms). 

3 Effective resource utilization including consumer 
competence. 



4 The individual's physiological health and development 
5. The physical and aesthetic components of man's 

environment 
6 Effective use of leisure time 

In accordance with the philosophy of this College all four 
departments are interrelated and cooperate in the 
achievement of these goals The activities of the Department 
of Family and Community Development emphasize mainly 
goals 1 through 3, the Department of Food, Nutrition and 
Institution Administration, 2 through 4; and with different foci 
and priorities, the activities of the Departments of Textiles 
and Consumer Economics, and Housing and Applied Design 
emphasize goals 2, 3 and 5 Goal 3 is concerned with 
consumer competence in areas such as food clothing, 
shelter, transportation, insurance, health, leisure, etc It is an 
integrative, interdisciplinary, educational concept which 
necessitates and receives contributions from all four 
departments. Goal 6 is becoming increasingly important with 
a reduced work week, earlier retirement and increases in the 
over-65 population, suggesting interdepartmental and 
interdisciplinary programs 
Objectives: 

1 . Offer appropriate comprehensive bachelor, master and 
doctoral programs that address the six goals stated 
above. 

2. Maximize resources and resource utilization in order to 
accomplish the six goals stated above. 

3. Act as a resource to the University community to 
stimulate awareness and interest in the problems of 
applying knowledge for improving the quality of life 

Special Facilities and Activities. The College of Human 
Ecology building follows the Campus tradition in style, and a 
construction program has been initiated to provide expanded 
facilities. A management center is maintained on the Campus 
for resident expereinces in management activities of family 
life. 

Located betweeen two large cities, the College provides 
unusual opportunities for both faculty and students. In 
addition to the University's general and specilized libraries, 
Baltimore and Washington furnish added library facilities. The 
art galeries and museums, the government bureaus and city 
institutions stimulate study and provide enriching 
experiences for students. 
Student Organizations 

AATT-Student Chapter. The Student Chapter of the 
American Association of Textile Technology provides 
students with an early opportunity to become associated 
with the professional orgainzation of AATT, and to advance at 
the local level the aims and goals of the parent national 
association. 

Through Speakers from the textiles and apparel industry, 
members are kept abreast of the latest techniques and ideas 
in textiles, as well as coming in contact with prospective 
future employers. 

The chapter hopes to establish several intern programs to 
provide its members with an opportunity to gain some 
vocational expereince before graduation. 

All undergraduate students, including freshmen, are 
eligible to join AATT if their curriculum includes at least one 
major course in the field of textiles. 

ASID-Student Chapter. The University of Maryland Student 
Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers is 
associated with the professional chapter of ASID in 
Washington, DO. Student members have the opportunity for 
contacts with professional and fellow students at meetings 
sponsored by both groups. These can help to orient the 
student to the job market and to new directions in the 
profession. 

Collegiate Home Economics Organization. The University 
of Maryland Collegiate Home Economics Organization is 
the student affiliate of the American Home Economics 
Association. Welcoming any Human Ecology major into its 
membership, the organization meets once a month, and links 
the professional world to the college student through 
different programs. 

The Collegiate Home Economics Organization is the 
student's opportunity to join a professional group prior to 
graduation and to participate on a student level in the 
national association. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 85 



Each speaker or demonstrator provides the Collegiate 
Home Economics Organization member with ideas and 
suggestions for professional preparation by introducing the 
member to the many facets of Human Ecology. 

The Organization gives both students and faculty a chance 
to work together and meet on an informal basis and to open 
up better channels of communication among themselves as 
well as the outside professional world. 

Student Representatives to college committees are 
nominated by this group. 

Omicron Nu. A national honor society whose objectives 
are to recongize superior scholarship, to promote leadership 
and to stimulate an appreciation for graduate study and 
research in the field of home economics and related areas. 
Graduate students, seniors and second semester juniors are 
eligible for election to membership. 

Financial Aid. A Loan Fund, composed of contributions by 
the District of Columbia Home Economics Association, 
Maryland Chapter of Omicron Nu, and personal gifts, is 
available through the University Office of Student Aid. 

Admission. All students desiring to enroll in the College of 
Human Ecology must apply to the Director of Admissions of 
the University of Maryland at College Park. 

Degrees. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for 
the satisfactory completion, with an average of C or better, of 
a prescribed curriculum of 120 academic semester hour 
credits. No grade below C is acceptable in the departmental 
courses which are required for a departmental major. 

Student Load. The student load in the College of Human 
Ecology varies from 15-18 credits per semester. A student 
wishing to carry more than 1 8 credits must have a "B" grade 
average and permission of the dean. 

A minimum of 1 20 academic credits is required for 
graduation. However, for certification in some professional 
organizations, additional credits are required. Consult your 
advisor. 

General Information. Specific inquiries concerning 
undergraduate or graduate programs in the College of 
Human Ecology may be directed to the chairman of the 
appropriate department or the Dean, College of Human 
Ecology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

Curricula. A student may elect one of the following curricula, 
or a combination of curricula: food, nutrition, dietetics, or 
institution administration (food service); family, community, or 
management and consumer studies; home economics 
education; housing, advertising design, interior design, 
costume, or crafts; textile science, textile marketing, 
textiles and apparel, or consumer economics. A student may 
register in home economics education in the College of 
Human Ecology under the Department of Family and 
Community Development or in the College of Education. 

Required Courses. The curricula leading to a major in the 
College of Human Ecology are organized into four broad 
professional categories: (1 ) scientific and technical areas, (2) 
educational, community and family life areas, (3) consumer 
service areas, and (4) design areas. These represent the 
broad professional fields which graduates are eligible to 
enter and pursue their chosen work. The positions vary in 
nature, scope and title, but require similar general studies 
background and fundamentals for specialization. 

Individual programs of study are developed cooperatively 
with faculty advisors to provide a balanced and sequential 
arrangment of studies in preparation for the chosen field 
University. College and departmental requirements are 
identified for curricula in each of the departments. 

All students in the College of Human Ecology, in addition 
to meeting the General University Requirements, are 
required to complete a series or sequence of courses to 
satisfy University. College and departmental requirements 
The remaining courses needed to complete a program of 
study are elected by the student with the approval of his 
advisor 

The final responsibilty of meeting all the requirements for a 
specific major rests with each individual student 



College of Human Ecology Requirements 
(For every student depending on the major) 

APDS 101— Fundamentals ol Design OR 

Human Ecology Elective* 3 

TEXT 1 05— Textiles in Contemporary Living 

OR Human Ecology Elective" 3 

FOOD 1 1 0— Food and Nutrition ot Individuals 

and Families OR NUTR 1 00— 

Elements ot Nutrition OR 

Human Ecology Elective" 3 

FMCD 250— Decision Making in Family bving 

OR Human Ecology Elective" 3 

Root Discipline Requirements Outside the College 
SOCY or ANTH Course 3 

PSYC Course 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics or 201 3 

SPCH Course 3 

•Human Ecology Elective to be taken in departments other than maior 
department 



College of Human Ecology 
Departments, Programs and 
Curricula 

Family and Community Development 

Professor and Chairman: Gaylin. 

Associate Professors: Brabble, Myricks. Rubin, Wilson. 

Assistant Professors: Churaman, Garrison. Orvedal. 

Instructors: Cohen, Waugaman 

Lectures: Greenwald, Tourigny 

The Department of Family and Community Development 
integrates and applies aspects of the natural and social 
sciences as well as the human arts — all of which enhance 
man's quest for a more fully functioning life It places 
particular emphasis upon the allied departments within the 
College of Human Ecology which in turn addresses itself to 
the problems of man and his immediate environment. 

Specifically, Family and Community Development provides 
the applied human science integrationist with a firm 
foundation of knowledge of family and community dymanics 
leading to service, teaching, and research vocations. It also 
serves the University community by offering general courses 
germane to problems of living in a complex society, and 
stresses the concept of the family as the working interface 
between man, his society, and the world around him. 

There are four specific though related foci within the 
program leading to specialized areas of endeavor within the 
applied human sciences. 

I. Family Studies. This course of study stresses a 
working knowledge of the growth of individuals throughout 
the life span with particular emphasis on intergenerational 
aspects of family living. It examines the pluralistic family 
forms and life styles within our post-technological complex 
society and the development of the individual within the 
family within the community. 

II. Community Studies. This program emphasizes the 
processes of social change and the individual as agent within 
that process It is grounded upon the knowledge of 
community structure and the workings and interactions of 
the various subsystems Its summary goals are the 
identification and utilization of community resources for the 
enhancement of a beter life for families. 

Ill Management and Consumer Studies. This program 
focuses upon the use of resources of the home and its 
impact upon the community It examines the integration of 
individual, familial and societal values of our technological 
society for the purposes of goal implementation within that 
society It is an area of study directly concerned with quality 
of life and the preparing of the individual for effective 
consumer decisions through the understanding of the 
interrelationship of consumers, business, social 
organizations, and government 

IV. Home Economics Education Although often narrowly 
perceived as delimited to the role of educator within a 
secondary school setting. Home Economics Education has a 



86 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



larger purview and responsibility, 1.6, that of introducing and 
implementing through education at all levels, the theories, 
skills and philosophy of the attainment of a better life for all 
men. women and children Thus it is the major interpreter of 
the ramifications and potential impact of Home Economics — 
the applied human sciences 

These areas of concentration will prepare students for 
roles as family life educators, extension specialists, 
consumer consultants, mental health team members, and 
teachers of home economics at the secondary level 

Family Studies Curriculum. Supportive courses will be 
selected from either Human Ecology, Sociology, 
Psychology. Health, Anthropology, or Human Development 

Typical Semester 
Freshman Year Hours 

ENGL 101— Composition 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

FMCD 1 05— The Individual and the Family 3 

Human Ecology Courses (outside FMCD) 9 

SOCY or ANTH 3 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 30 

Sophomore Yea/ 

SPCH 3 

ECON 201 or 205 3 

FMCD 250— Decision Making in 

Family Living 3 

FMCD 260— Interpersonal Lifestyles 3 

FMCD 270— Pre- Professional Seminar 3 

Supportive Courses 6 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 30 

Junior Year 

FMCD 330— Family Patterns 3 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family 3 

FMCD 348— Practicum in Family and 

Community Development* 
or 

FMCD 446— Living Experiences with Families 3 

FMCD 349— Analysis of Practicum * 2 

EDHD 306. 41 1. 41 3 or Developmental Courses 6 

Supportive Courses 6 

General University Requirements 9 

Total 32 

•The 5-credit combination of practicum (FMCD 348) and practicum 
analysis (FMCD 349) is a mandatory requirement of the program. In 
consultation with the practicum coordinator, the practicum experience 
(FMCD 348) may be extended to 12 credits During any semester m which 
the practicum is taken, a minimum of 1 credit of practicum analysis 
(FMCD 349) must accompany the practicum. 

Senior Year 

FMCD 431 —Family Crisis and Rehabilitation 3 

FMCD 487— Legal Aspects of Family Problems 3 

FMCD Elective 3 

Supportive courses 6 

Electives (to complete 1 20 credits) 13 

Total 



28 



Community Studies Curriculum. Supportive courses will 
be chosen from the following areas: 9 credits in College of 
Human Ecology courses; 6 credits in government and 
politics, economics or urban studies courses; 6 credits in 
sociology or psychology courses. The following is a typical 
four-year program: 

Freshman Year Semester 

Hours 

SOCY or ANTH 3 

Human Ecology Courses (outside FMCD) 9 

FMCD 201— Concepts in 

Community Development 3 

PSYC 1 00— Introduction to Psychology 3 

General University Requirements 12 

Total 30 

Sophomore Year 

ECON 201 or 205 3 

FMCD 250— Decision Making in 

Family Living 3 

SPCH 3 

FOOD 200 or Elective 3 

FMCD 270— Pre-Professional Seminar 3 



General University Requirements 3 

Supportive courses 15 

Total 33 

Junior Year 

FMCD 330— Family Patterns 3 

FMCD 341— Personal and Family Finance 3 

SOCY 230— Dynamics of Social Interaction 

or 
SOCY 330— Community Organization 3 

FOOD 260— Meal Management 

or 
FOOD 300— Economics of Food Consumption 3 

Supportive courses 3 

General University Requirements 9 

FMCD 348— Practicum in Family and 

Community Development* 3 . 

FMCD 349— Analysis of Practicum* 2 

Total 29 

"The 5-credlt combination of practicum (FMCD 348) and practicum 
analysis (FMCD 349) is a mandatory requirement of the program In 
consultation with the practicum coordinator, the practicum expenence 
(FMCD 348) may be extended to 12 credits During any semester m 
which the practicum is taken a minimum of 1 credrt of practicum 
analysis (FMCD 349) must accompany the practicum 

Senior Year 

FMCD 370— Communications Skills 

and Techniques 3 

FMCD 381— Low Income Families 

and the Community 3 

FMCD 453— Family-Community Advocacy 3 

Supportive courses 3 

General University Requirements 6 

Electives (to complete 1 20 credits) ,10 

Total, 28 

Management and Consumer Studies Curriculum. Sup- 
portive courses will be selected in blocks from economics, 
business administration, public relations, sociobgy. psy- 
chology, family life, or consumer economics. 



Typical Freshman Year 

SOCY or ANTH 

PSYC 

Human Ecology Courses (outside FMCD) 

SPCH 

General University Requirements 

Total 



Semester 
Hours 
3 



12-15 
30-33 



Typical Sophomore Year 

FMCD 250— Decision Making in 

Family Uving 

270— Pre-Professional Seminar, . 

201 and 203 

221— Social Psychology 

230— Dynamics of Social Interaction . 
280— The Household 
as an Ecosystem 



FMCD 
ECON 
SOCY 
SOCY 
FMCD 



HSAD 251— Family Housing 
General University Requirements 
Electives 



Total 

Typical Junior Year 

FMCD 330— Family Patterns 

FMCD 34 1 —Personal and Family Finances 

FOODorNUTR 

Statistics 

FMCD 443— Consumer Problems 

FMCD 343 or 344— Home Management 
Residence or Applied 
Management Course 

FMCD 348— Practicum in Family 

and Community Development* 

FMCD 349— Analysis of Practicum* 

General University Requirements 

Electives 

Total 



Typical Senior Year 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family . 

CNECorTXAP 

Supportive Courses 

Electives (to complete 1 20 hours) 

Total 



6-9 
3-6 



2 

6-9 

6 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 87 



•The 5-crodtt practicum is s mandatory requirement ot the program |i e 
FMCD 348 lor 3 credits coupled with FMCD 349 tor 2 credital In 
consultation with the precticum coordinator the oracticum expenence 
(FMCD 3481 may be extended lor a maximum ol 12 credits Ounng any 
semester taken a minknum ol i credit ol anaryais, (FMCD 3491 must 
accompany the expenence 

Food, Nutrition and Institution 
Administration 

Professor and Chairman: Prather. 

Professors: Ahrens. Beaton 

Associate Professors: Butler, Cox, Williams. 

Assistant Professors: Poplla, Wodarski. 

Instructors: Bouwkamp, Graham, Mclntyre. Smith, 

Visiting Lecturers: Blyler, Brown. Evans, Miller, Naranjo. 

Adjunct Professors: Stewart, Trout. 

The area of food nutrition and institution administration Is 
broad and offers many diverse professional opportunities. 
Courses introduce the student to the principles of selection, 
preparation and utilization of food for human health and the 
welfare of society. Emphasis Is placed on the scientific, 
cultural and professional aspects of this broad area of food 
and nutrition. The department offers six areas of emphasis: 
experimental foods, community nutrition, nutrition research, 
dietetics, institution administration, and coordinated dietetics. 
Each program provides for competencies in several areas of 
work; however, each option Is designed specifically for 
certain professional careers. 

All areas of emphasis have In common several courses 
within the department, and the University; the curricula are 
Identical in the freshman year. 

Experimental foods is designed to develop competency in 
the scientific principles of food and their reactions. Physical 
and biological sciences In relation to foods are emphasized. 
The program is planned for students who are interested in 
product development, quality control and technical research 
in foods. The nutrition research program Is designed to 
develop competency in the area of nutrition for students 
who wish to emphasize physical and biological sciences. 
The community nutrition program emphasizes applied 
community nutrition. Dietetics develops an understanding 
and competency in food, nutrition and management as 
related to problems of dietary departments; the curriculum is 
approved by the American Dietetic Association. The 
coordinated dietetic program includes clinical experience 
coordinated with the didactic components and the students 
are eligible for membership in the American Dietetic 
Association upon graduation. The coordinated program is 
accredited by the Commission on Evaluation of Dietetic 
Education of the American Dietetic Association. Institution 
administration emphasis is related to the administration of 
quantity food service in university and college residence 
halls and student unions, school lunch programs in 
elementary and secondary schools, restaurants, coffee 
shops, and industrial cafeterias. This program is approved by 
the American Dietetic Association. 
Coordinated Dietetics Emphasis 

Freshman Year Semester 

I II 

General University Requirements 7 11 

NUTR 1 00— Elements of Nutrition 3 

SOCY 100orANTH102 3 

MATH 1 1 or 1 1 5 3 

SPCH 100or107 3 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 1 

FOOD 240— Science ol Food Preparation I 3 

Total . 17 17 

Sophomore Year Semester 

I II 
CHEM 281— Introductory Biochemistry 3 

FOOD 250— Science ol Food Preparation II 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

ZOOL 201. 202— Anatomy and Physiology 4 4 

General University Requirements 3 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

Human Ecology Core Courses 3 3 

PSYC 100 3 

Total 17 16 

Junior Year Semester 



IADM 300— Food Service Organization 

and Management 4 

IADM 430— Quantity Food Production 3 

IADM 460. 470— Administrative Dietetics, I. II 3 3 

IADM 440— Food Service 

Personnel Administration 2 

IADM 420— Quantity Food Purchasing 2 

General University Requirements 3 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 3 

Total 14 16 

Senior Year Semester 

I II 
Human Ecology Core Requirement 3 

Data Processing or Statistics Course 3 3 

NUTR 460— Therapeutic Human Nutrition 3 

NUTR 480— Applied Diet Therapy 3 

Elective 3 4 

NUTR 470— Community Nutrition 3 

NUTR 485— Applied Community Nutrition 3 

Total 15 16 

Dietetics Emphasis 

Freshman Year Semester 

I II 

General University Requirements 1 4 8 

NUTR 100— Elements ol Nutrition 3 

MATH 1 1 or 1 1 5 3 

SPCH 100 or 107 .3 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 1 

FOOD 240— Science of Food Preparation I 3 

SOCY 100orANTH102 3 

Total. 14 14 

Sophomore Semester 

I II 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

FOOD 250— Science of Food Preparation II 3 

PSYC 100 3 

ZOOL 201, 202— Anatomy and Physiology . . 4 4 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

CHEM 261— Introductory Biochemistry 3 

General University Requirements 3 

Human Ecology Core Course 3 

Total 14 16 

Junior Year Semester 

l II 
NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition 4 

IADM 300— Food Service Organization 

and Management. 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Human Ecology Core Course 3 3 

IADM 420— Quantity Food Purchasing 
NUTR 450— Advanced Human Nutrition 3 

Elective 3 3 

Total. 15 17 

Senior Year 



II 



NUTR 460— Therapeutic Human Nutrition 
General University Requirements 
IADM 430— Quality Food Production 
IADM 440— Food Service Personnel 

Administration 
EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 
Electives 

Data Processing or Statistics Course 3 
Total 

Experlemental Food Emphasis 
Freshman Year 



Semester 
I II 



NUTR 
NUTR 



300— Science of Nutrition 
450— Advanced Human Nutrition 



MATH 110 or 115 
NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

General University Requirements 1 4 4 

Human Ecology Core Courses 3 3 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 1 

SPCH 100or107 3 

PSYC 100 3 

SOCY 100orANTH102 3 

Total K 16 

Sophomore Year ■ Semester 

I II 
CHEM 201.202— College Chemistry III 
FOOD 240 250— Science of Food 

Preparationl.il 3 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

CHEM 261— Introductory Biochemistry 3 



8B / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



MICB 200— General Microbiology 
General University Requirements' 
Human Ecology Core Course 

Total 
Junior Year 

General University Requirements 

i I.' |lVl 

NUTR 300— Science ot Nutrition 

FOOD 440. 450— Advanced and Experimental 

Food Science 
FDSC 412 or 413— Principles of Food 
Processing I. II 
Total 

Senior Year 

PHYS 1 11— Elements of Physics 
FDSC 422— Food Product Research 

and Development 
FDSC 431— Food Quality Control 
Electives 2 
General University Requirements 

Total 
Institution Administration Emphasis 

Freshman Year 
MATH 1 10or 1 15 
General University Requirements' 
NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 
FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 
CHEM 104— Chemistry II 
SOCY 100orANTH102 
FOOD 240— Science of Food Preparation I 
SPCH 100 or 107 
Total 



Sophomore Year 

FOOD 250— Science of Food Preparation I 

Human Ecology Core Course 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 
ZOOL 201. 202— Anatomy, Physiology 
ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 

General University Requirements 

PSYC 100 

Total 



15 15 
Semester 



3 7 
16 13 



Junior Year 

General University Requirements 

NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition 

IADM 300— Food Service Organization and 

Management 

Human Ecology Core Course 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 

Data Processing or Statistics 

IADM 420— Quantity Food Purchasing 

Electives 

Total 



Senior Year 

IADM 430— Quantity Food Production 

IADM 440— Food Service 

Personnel Administration 
IADM 450— Food Service Equipment and 

Planning 

BMGT 362 or ECON 470— Labor Relations or 

Labor Economics 

IADM 350 or 490— Special Problems or 

Practicum in Administration 

General University Requirements 

Electives 

Total 



Community Nutrition Emphasis 

Freshman Year 

General University Requirements 

MATH 1 10 or 115 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation. . 

Human Ecology Core Course 

FOOD 240— Science of Food Preparation I 
SPCH 100 or 107 ... 
Total 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 201.202— Chemistry III. 



PSYC 100 

FOOD 250— Science of Food Preparation I 
ZOOL 20 1 . 202— Anatomy & Physiology 
General University Requirements 
FOOD 260— Meal Management 
CHEM 261 —Introductory Biochemistry 
Total 



Junior Year 

NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition 

SOCY 100orANTH102 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

NUTR 450— Advanced Nutrition 

Human Ecology Core Course 

General University Requirements 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 

Elective 

Total 



14 



1'. 



Semester 

Senior Year I II 

NUTR 460— Therapeutic Human Nutrition 3 

NUTR 470— Community Nutrition 3 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 3 

Methods of Teaching Course 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Electives 6 5 

Total 15 14 

Nutrition Research Emphasis 



Semester 



Freshman Year 

General University Requirements' 

MATH 1 1 or 1 1 5 . . 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 
SPCH 100 or 107 

FOOD 240— Science of Food Preparation I 
Total 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 203. 204— Chemistry IV 

PSYC 1 00 

FOOD 250— Science of Food Preparation II 
ZOOL 201, 202— Anatomy and Physiology 
General University Requirements 
Human Ecology Core Course 
MICB 200— General Microbiology 
SOCY 100orANTH102 
Total 



II 



Semester 



Junior Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Human Ecology Core Course. 3 3 

CHEM 461,462— Biochemistry 3 3 

CHEM 463. 464— Biochemistry Lab 2 2 

NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition 4 

NUTR 450— Advanced Human Nutrition 3 

Total 15 14 

Semester 

Senior Year I II 

AGRI 401 —Agricultural Biometrics 3 

NUTR 490— Special Problems in Nutrition 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

General University Requirements 3 

Electives 8 8 

Total 14 14 



General University Requirements include 30 hours Maiors must be careful to 
select prerequisites for major courses For example, if FOOD 240 is required, 
the student must select CHEM 103 and 1 04 and these can be used to meet 
the General University Requirements If ZOOL 201 is required. ZOOL 101 
must be elected 

Nine hours ol the 17 electives must be selected from the following 1st 
AGRI 401 — Agncultural Biometrics (3) 
Any 300 or 400 level NUTR course 
FOOD 260— Meal Management (3) 
FOOD 300— Economics of Food Consumption |3| 
FOOD 445— Advanced Food Science Lab (1 1 
FOOD 480— Food Additives (3| 
FOOD 490— Special Problems in Foods (2-3) 
FDSC 430— Food Microbiology (3) 
FDSC 4 1 2 or 4 1 3 it not taken above 
IADM 430— Quantity Food Production (4) 

FMCD 370 — Communications Skills and Techniques in Home Economics (31 
3 Select from this list AGRI 301. 401, BMGT 301 . IFSM 401 , CMSC 103, 110 
EDMS451. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 89 



Home Economics Education 

The Home Economics Education curriculum is designed 
for students who are preparing to teach home economics in 
the secondary schools It includes study of each area of 
home economics and the supporting disciplines. 

Fifteen hours of the total curriculum include an area of 
concentration which must be unified in content and will be 
chosen by the student * 



Freshman Year 

FMCD 250— Decision Making in Family Living 

FMCD 105— The Individual in the Family 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

EDSE 1 5 1 —Freshman Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 
TEXT 105— Textiles in Contemporary Living 
General University Requirements 
APDS 101— Fundamentals of Design 
PSYC 1 00— Introduction to Psychology 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 

Total 



Sophomore Year 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication 

TEXT 221— Apparel I (if exempted, may take 

TEXT 222 or TEXT 425) 
CHEM 103— College Chemistry I 
General University Requirements 
HSAD 240— Design and Furnishings in the Home 



HSAD 251— Family Housing 

EDSE 210— Sophomore Seminar in Home 

Economics Education 
FOOD 200— Scientific Principles of Food 
FMCD 332— The Child in the Family 



41 1 —Child Growth and Development 
Total 



Junior Year I 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 6 

FMCD 280— The Household as an Ecosystem 

or 
FMCD 443— Consumer Problems 
or 

FMCD 341— Personal and Family Finance 3 

FOOD 260— Meal Management 3 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 

FMCD 344— Resident Experience in Home 
Management 
or 

FMCD 344B— Practicum in Home Management 3 

EDSE 380— Field Experience in Organization 
and Administration of a Child 

Development Laboratory 

EDSE 425— Curriculum Development in Home 

Economics 

Area of Concentration 

General University Requirements 

Total 18 



Senior Year 

EDSE 347— Curriculum. Instruction, and 

Observation 
EDSE 330— Principles and Methods of Secondary 

Education 
EDSE 370— Student Teaching in Secondary 

Schools — Home Economics 
FMCD 260— Interpersonal Lifestyles 

or 
SOCY 443— The Family and Society 
EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 
ZOOL 1 1 —General Zoology 

or 
MICB 200— General Microbiology 
Area of Concentration 

Total 
•Areaot Concentration 1 5 semester hours 



A) Including maximum ot two home economcs courses or m applied area, with 
the remarider ot the 15 hours m supporting behavioral physical and biological 
sciences, philosophy, geography and hetory 



8) Of the 1 5 hours, nne must be upper drviscnal courses 
Course Code Prefixes— FMCD. HOEC 

Housing and Applied Design 

Professor and Chairman: Shearer 

Associate Professor; McWhinnie 

Assistant Professors Fish, Holvey. Irby. Nelson, Olsen. 

Ritzmann, Roper 

Instructors: Dean, Erdahl. Hillerman. Odland 

Lecturers: Davis, Ribalta. 

The Department of Housing and Applied Design offers 
programs of concentration in five areas of design Adver- 
tising; Costume, Crafts. Housing; Interiors 

The goal is that of providing a broad general education in 
addition to individually and professionally oriented instruc- 
tion in design. Programs include instruction in the philosophy 
and methods common to the various areas of design and 
thus provide theoretical and technical bases pertinent to 
each. This foundation is basic to specific problem-solving 
activities which are applicable to the demands of each 
chosen design area. 

Advertising Design. The Advertising-Design curriculum is 
constructed to establish a foundation in the field of graphic 
communication. The courses are structured and arranged to 
provide students with the ability to conceptualize imagina- 
tively and to acquire and apply a discriminating introspection 
for visual form Courses in Art History and related areas 
provide breadth as well as depth Opportunities to examine 
related fields are offered through elective courses Students 
graduating from this curriculum gain a broad educational 
experience which qualifies them to initiate a career in many 
areas of graphic communications. 

Costume Curriculum. The Costume curriculum is struc- 
tured to prepare students for employment in the many- 
faceted fashion industry Advanced courses encourage 
interviews and on-the-job contacts with working profes- 
sionals By careful selection of elective courses and the 
allied-area block the program may be tailored to the stu- 
dent's goals Graduates completing this major may choose 
careers in: fashion illustration and display and sales pro- 
motion, fashion reporting and public relations, fashion 
coordination, and photography 

Crafts Design. The Crafts curriculum provides the student 
with a wide range of art and design experience After 
exposure to studio work in several craft media, the student 
should become proficient in at least one area Opportunities 
for employment include: teaching in recreational and adult 
education programs, directing various forms of craft pro- 
grams for the government, and as a producing craftsman and 
as crafts therapists 

Housing Curriculum. This program is concerned with the 
exploration of factors which underlie housing problems, the 
extent of these problems as they exist today, and a pro 
jection to future trends and needs Through integration oi 
relevant research from sociology, economics, architecture 
psychology and design, the program provides a trans 
disciplinary framework within which is developed an under 
standing of social«and behavioral implications of housing 
processes and of effective design 

Interior Design. This curriculum, successfully completed, 
provides the student with background in design theory: in 
history of architecture, interiors and furnishings, in func- 
tional and imaginative problem solving; and in techniques of 
presentation A student chapter of the professional organ- 
ization A SID and internships provide meaningful contact 
with practicing professionals 

Advertising Design Curriculum 



Typical Freshman Year 
APDS 101A 
ARTS 1 1 0B 



Semester 
Hows 



90 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



SPEECH Course 

General University Requirement 

APDS 102 

APDS 102 

EDIN 101A 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

SOCY or ANTH Course 



Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 103 

PSYC 100 

General University Requirement 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

APDS 210 

APDS 237 

APDS 211 

APDS 230 

EDIN 134 



TypicalJumor Year 

General University Requirement 

ECON205 

APDS 320 

APDS 330 

ARTH 450 or other upper level Art Hist 

APDS 331 

APDS 332 

Supporting-Block Course 

Typical Senior Year 
APDS 430 
APDS 337 

Supporting-Block Course 

Elective 

APDS 380 

APDS 431 

General University Requirement 

Costume Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 
APDS 101 A 

ARTS 11 OB 

General University Requirement 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

APDS 102 

APDS 210 

SOCY or ANTH Course 



Typical Sophomore Year 
APDS 103 

APDS 21 1 

SPEECH Course 

General University Requirements 

APDS 220 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

APDS 330 or substitution 

Elective 



PSYC 100 

APDS 102 

SOCY or ANTH Course 

APDS 2 1 

Typical Sophomore Year 
APDS 103 
EDIN 102 

General University Requirement 
Elective 
APDS 21 1 
CRAF 240 
'SPEECH Course 
HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

Typical Junior Year 

CRAF 220 

CRAF 241 

APDS 230 

General University Requirement 

Supporting-Block Course 

CRAF 230 

CRAF 320 

APDS 237 

ECON205 

Elective 

Typical Senior Year 
CRAF 330 
CRAF 420 

CRAF 428 or 438 or 448 
General University Requirement 
Supporting-Block Course 
APDS 380 (CRAF Section) 
CRAF 428 or 438 or 448 
CRAFTS Elective 



Housing Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 

APDS101A 

SPEECH Course 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

SOCY or ANTH Course 

General University Requirement 

APDS 102 

APDS 210 

TEXT 150 

PSYC 100 

Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 103 

HSAD240 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 

HSAD246 

General University Requirement 

HSAD251. . . 

PSYC 221 



3 
30 



3 
3 
3 

3 

3 



Typical Junior Year 
APDS 320 
APDS 237 
PSYC 100 

Supporting-Block Course 

General University Requirement 

APDS 331 or substitution 

APDS 321 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 
ECON205 
Supporting Course 

Typical Senior Year 
APDS 322 

APDS 332 

Supporting-Block Course. 
General University Requirement 

Elective 

APDS 380 



Crafts Curriculum 

Typical Freshman Year 
APDS 101A 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 
General University Requirement 



Typical Junior Year 

HSAD 342 

FMCD 260 or substitution 

General University Requirement 

TEXT 221 or TEXT 355 

HSAD 343 
SOCY 230 

Supporting-Block Course- 
Elective 

Typical Senior Year 

FMCD 330 

ECON205 

General University Requirement 

Supporting-Block Course 

Elective 

FMCD 332 

HSAD 442 

Interior Design Curriculum 

(Interior Design courses must be taken in sequence ) 

Typical Freshman Year 

APDS101A 

General University Requirement 

EDIN 101 A 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 91 



SOCY or ANTH Course 

APDS 102 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core (TEXT 1 50] 

APDS 210 



Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 103 

SPEECH Course 

APDS 237 

HSAD246 

General University Requirement 

ECON205 

PSYC 100 

Supporting-8lock Course 



32 



Typical Junior Year 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core (TEXT 463) 3 

HSAD 340 3 

HSAD342 3 

General University Requirement 6 

Supporting-Block Course 3 

HSAD 34 1 3 

HSAD 343 3 

Elective 3 

ARTH Elective 3 

30 
Typical Senior Year 

HSAD 344 3 

Elective 9-10 

Supporting- Block Course 3 

General University Requirement 3 

HSAD 345 or 380 3 or 2 

HSAD 440 4 

HSAD 441 4 

29 
Course Code Prefixes— APDS, CRAF. HSAD 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 

Chairman and Professor: Smith. 

Professor: Dardis 

Associate Professors: Buck. Spivak. 

Assistant Professors: Block, Derrick, Hacklander, Heagney, 

Redman, Wilbur (Emeritus), Wulken, Yeh. 

Instructors: Marro, Paoletti. 

Visiting Professors: Emerson, Lin, Winger. 

Lecturers: Brannigan (p.t.), Funt (p.t.), Ruth (p.t.), Shapiro 

(p.t).Saltzman. 

Students may select one of four majors Each offers 
diverse professional opportunities Through supportive 
courses students add to their major studies a concentra- 
tion of work in an allied area such as art, business, 
economics, family services, journalism, sciences, or speech 
and dramatic art 

In the Textile Science major emphasis is placed on the 
scientific and technological aspects of the field Graduates 
will be qualified for employment in many facets of the textile 
industry including research and testing laboratories, con- 
sumer technical service and marketing programs, and in 
buying and product evaluation. 

There are three areas of concentration in the Textiles and 
Apparel major — Apparel Design, Fashion Merchandising, 
and Consumer Textiles Graduates in the first two areas may 
work as apparel designers, fashion coordinators, consultants 
to the home sewing industry and retail store buyers The 
Consumer Textiles area is designed to prepare students for 
careers in publicity, promotion, consumer information and 
extension. 

Graduates of the Textile Marketing major will be qualified 
for careers in business where they will function as com- 
municators between the textile producer and consumer in 
merchandising and fashion promotion, in consumer educa- 
tion programs and in textile production, promotion and 
development. 

Graduates completing the major in Consumer Economics 
will be able to provide liaison between the consumer and 
producers and distributors of goods and services utilized 
directly by families and may work in consumer education 
programs, in marketing and consumer relation divisions in 
business and industry, or in government agencies providing 
consumer services 



A department Honors Program permits outstanding under- 
graduates to expbre in depth on an individual basis a pro- 
gram of work which will strengthen their undergraduate 
program and their professional interests Students selected 
for the program must have a "B" average or better to be 
considered Students in the honors program participate in a 
junior honors seminar and present a senior thesis 

Freshman Year (Common to all Majors) 



English Requirement 

MATH 110 or 115 

SOCY 100 

SPCH100. 107 or 125 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

Textiles in Contemporary Living— TEXT 1 05 

(CNEC 1 00 for CNEC maiors) 
Physical Science (CHEM 103-104. PHYS 121-122. or 

CNEC ECON courses tor CNEC maiors) 
PSYC 



3-4 3-4 
3 
15 16 15-16 



Textiles and Apparel 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

Economics 201 and 203 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course (APDS 101) 

Apparel I & II TEXT 22 1 S 222 

Introduction to Textile Materials— TEXT 1 50 

Textile Materials Evaluation and Characterization 

TEXT 250 
Elective 



Junior Year 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

Textile Science Chemical Structure and Properties 

of Fibers— TEXT 452 or Environmental Textiles— 

TEXT 355 
General University Requirements 
Marketing BMGT 350 
Depart Elective 
Electives 



Senior Year 

TEXT 441— Clothing and Human Behavior 



CNEC 
TEXT 



437— Consumer Behavior 
465— Economics of the Textile and 
Apparel Industries 



CNEC 435— Economics of Consumption 

General University Requirements 
Dept Elective 
Electives 

Textile Marketing 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

Economics 201 and 203 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course (APDS 101 1 

TEXT 221 and 222 or Department Electives 

Introduction to Textile Materials TEXT 1 50 

Textile Materials Evaluation and Characterization 

TEXT 250 
Elective 

Junior Year 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 

Environmental Textiles TEXT 355 

BMGT 230 

General University Requirements 

Marketing BSAD 350 

BMGT Requirement * 

Electives 



Senior Year 

Clothing and Human Behavior TEXT 44 1 or 

Consumer Behavor CNEC 437 
Textile Science Chemical Structure and Properties 

ol Fibers TEXT 452 
Economics of the Textile and Apparel Industries 

TEXT 465 



92 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



General University Requirements '? 

BMGT Requirement • 3 

Elective9 4 

26 
•SehcWd from BMQT 38 1 352 353 360 450 tnd 452 

Textile Selene* 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 

Introduction to Textiles TEXT 150 3 

Textile Materials Evaluation and Characterization 

TEXT 250 3 

Chemistry 20 1 , 202, 203. 204 or 2 1 1 , 2 1 2. 

213.214 5 5 

Math 140, 141 or 110. 111 3-4 3-4 

14-15 17-18 

Junior Year 

Physics 141. 142or 121. 122 8 

Textile Science Chemical Structure and Properties 

ot Fibers TEXT 452 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course 3 

Statistics 3 

Economics 201 and 203 6 

General University Requirements 9 

32 
Senrar Year 
Textile Science Finishes TEXT 454 or Textile 

Science Chemistry and Physics of Fibers and 

Polymers TEXT 456 3 

Economics ol the Textile and Apparel Industries 

TEXT 465 or Economics of Consumption CNEC 435 3 

General University Requirements 15 

Electives 7 

28 
Consumer Economics 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

Economics 201 and 203 3 3 

HUMAN ECOLOGY Core Course (FOOD 1 10 or 

NUTR100) 3 

Introduction to Textile Materials TEXT 1 50 3 

HUMANECOLOGYCoreCourse(HSAD241) 3 

Math (1 1 1. 220. or 140) or Statistics 3-4 

Consumer Product Information 3 

Math (221 or 141) or Elective 3-4 

,5-16 15-16 

Junior Year 

Economics of Consumption CNEC 435 3 

General University Requirements 12 

Consumer Product Information 6 

Statistics 3 

Economics 401 and 403 6 

Senior Year 

Consumer Behavior CNEC 437 3 

The Consumer and the Law CNEC 431 3 

General University Requirements 12 

Marketing BMGT 350 3 

Electives 9 

30 
Course Code Prefixes— TEXT, CNEC 



College of Library and 
Information Services 

The College of Library and Information Services is a 

graduate program which draws its students from many 
undergraduate disciplines. Although many of the College of 
Library and Information Services students have degrees in 
the social sciences and humanities, there is an increasing 
interest in people with diverse backgrounds — in the 
sciences, for example. The continued influence of scientific 
advances, the variations in clientele and service patterns, 
and the constantly shifting character of the societal scene 
are among the factors which have significantly influenced 
and will doubtless influence all the more in the future the 
scope and character of library functions and responsibilities. 
The library and information professional in the 1970's must 



have competence in many disciplines if he or she is to serve 
well in the information centers, urban areas, public libraries, 
and school libraries The College of Library and Information 
Services is a visionary school, attempting to produce people 
to fill contemporary needs 

The library science education program at the 
undergraduate level fulfills the State of Maryland's 
requirements for the Educational Media Associate 
Certificate, Level I Its graduates are prepared to work in 
school media centers under the guidance of the Educational 
Media Generalise Level II, which is normally achieved with 
completion of the master's In library service degree. Fifteen 
hours of undergraduate library science courses are offered 
through the College of Library and Information Services. 

Because of the universal application of many principles of 
llbrarlanship and media, students other than education 
students interested In library . and media courses may 
register for the undergraduate library science courses 
without being enrolled in the certification program 

While the undergraduate program in library science 
education fulfills a great need in training school library and 
media personnel and persons to fill special roles, the 
master's degree program in the College of Library and In- 
formation Services is the recognized avenue for preparing 
fully qualified professionals in the library field 

For further information regarding the undergraduate library 
science education program, refer to the Index listing for: 
"Departments, Programs and Curricula, Library Science 
Education." 



College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

The College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health provides preparation leading to the Bachelor of 
Science degree in the following professional areas: physical 
education (three certification options), health education and 
recreation. The College also offers curricula in safety 
education, and kinesiological sciences. The College provides 
research laboratories for faculty members and graduate 
students who are interested in investigating various 
parameters of the fields of health, of physical education, and 
of recreation and leisure. 

The service section of each department offers a wide 
variety of courses for all University students. These courses 
may be used to fulfill the General University Requirements, 
and as electives. 

In addition to its various on-campus offerings, this College 
regularly conducts courses in physical education, health 
education and recreation in various parts of the State of 
Maryland and conducts workshops wherever requested by 
proper officials. 

Programs combining research, service and instruction are 
provided by the Children's Health and Development Clinic, 
the Adults' Health and Developmental Program, and the 
Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness Center. 

Indoor Facilities. Six separate buildings support the 
academic programs of the College plus the Intramural Sports 
Program for men and the WRA Program for women. 

Five separate buildings are used for the Intramural Sports 
Program for men, the WRA Program for women, the 
Professional Physical Education Program, the Health 
Education Program, and the Recreation Program. 

Cole Student Activities Building. This building houses the 
offices of the College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health and the Department of Intercollegiate Activities It 
contains six activity teaching stations: the main arena, the 
swimming pool, the small gym, the weight training room, the 
wrestling room, and the judo room. In addition, there are ten 
classrooms, a research laboratory, a safety and driver 
education center, and a conference room. 

The main arena of this building has 1 9,796 sq. ft. of floor 
space This arena provides facilties for class work in 
basketball, volleyball, and fencing. 

The swimming pool is divided into two areas by a 
permanent bulkhead The shallow end is 42 x 24 feet and the 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 93 



large area is 42 x 75 feet with a depth ranging from 4 to 1 3 
feet. 

The small gymnasium is used for gymnastics, including 
tumbling, trampolining and all types of apparatus work. The 
total floor sprace is 9,462 sq ft 

The weight-training classroom is equipped with sufficient 
weights for 1 1 stations of three persons each 

There is a wrestling room containing 8,056 sq. ft. 

Phenkert Field House. Preinkert Field House contains 
offices for faculty in physical education and health education. 
There is a regulation size swimming pool, 75 x 35 feet, 
equipped with two one-meter diving boards In the 
gymnasium. 90 x 50 feet, classes are held in badminton, 
volleyball, and basketball. An adjacent classroom is used for 
professional courses. The dance studio, used for dance and 
fundamentals of movement classes, is 40 x 60 feet 

In addition to the above areas, there are locker and shower 
rooms used by women enrolled in physical education and 
those participating in recreational activities, and a small 
lounge for major students. 

Armory. The Armory is used primarily for the intramural 
program. It houses the offices of the director of intramurals 
and an athletic equipment room from which students may 
secure equipment for recreational purposes The 28,880 sq. 
ft of floor space has four basketball courts, with badminton 
and volleyball courts superimposed on them. This facility is 
also used as an indoor track, with indoor vaulting, high and 
brad jump pits, a one-tenth mile track, and a 70 yard 
straightaway. 

Coliseum. The Coiseum is used as a supplementary facility 
for intramurals and physical education classes for men and 
women. Included in the facilities are an equipment issue 
room, shower and locker rooms for men and women, a 
classroom, an adapted physical education laboratory, and 
office space for physical education staff. 

The 6,555 square feet of floor space is used primarily for 
co-educational classes in square and social dance and as an 
intramural basketball court. 

New PERH Building. The first phase of a projected three- 
phase, multimillion dollar facility has been completed on the 
north campus near the Cambridge dorm complex. This initial 
building has two regulation basketball courts, ten badminton 
courts, three volleyball courts, eight handball courts, men's 
and women's locker rooms and the first portion of the 
research laboratory,. It includes some 40,000 square feet. 

Health Education Department /East Education Annex. This 
building provides offices for the department chairman and 
faculty and graduate assistants of Health Education. 

Outdoor Faclltles. The Stadium. The stadium, with a seating 
capacity of 33,536 has a one-quarter mile tartan track with a 
220-yard straightaway. Pits are available for pole vaulting 
and high and broad jumping. West of the stadium are facilities 
for the shot put. discus and javelin throw. The College of 
Physical Education. Recreation and Health uses these 
facilities for classes in track and field. Also east of the 
stadium are three practice football fields, the baseball 
stadium, and a practice baseball, lacrosse, and soccer field. 
The College uses some of these facilties for major skill 
classes in football, soccer, and baseball West of the stadium 
are four combination soccer-touch football play fields, 
complete with goal posts, and four softball fields with wire 
backstops for physical education classes and recreational 
use. 

Surrounding the Armory are four touch football fields and 
eight Softball fields, encompassing 18.4 acres. These fields, 
and the four in the Fraternity Row are used for intramurals. 

Immediately west of the Cole Activities Building are 1 4 all- 
weather tennis courts A modern 1 8-hole golf course was 
opened in 1957 This 204 acre course includes two lakes, 
and an additional 5.8-acre golf driving range for instructional 
purposes The golf driving range, equipped with lights, and 
the golf course greatly add to present recreational facilities 

The outdoor facilities of the new PERH Building include 
eight lighted tennis courts and an outdoor playing field 300 
feet by 600 feet for touch football, soccer, and lacrosse 

The outdoor facilities adjacent to the Preinkert Field House 
include four hard-surfaced tennis courts, and a combination 
hockey and lacrosse field 



General Information — Entrance Requirements. All 

students desiring to enroll in the College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health must apply to the Director 
of Admissions of the University of Maryland at College Park 

Sixteen units of high school credits are required for 
admittance to this College Recommended courses are four 
units of English, one unit of social science, one unit of natural 
science, two units in mathematics, and one unit of physical 
sciences 

Guidance. At the time of matriculation and first registration, 
each student is assigned to a member of the faculty of the 
College who acts as the student's academic advisor This 
faculty member will be in physical education, recreation or 
health education, depending on the student's choice of 
curriculum The student should confer regularly with his 
advisor prior to each registration 

Normal Load. The normal University load for students is 12- 
1 8 credit hours per semester No student may register for 
more than 19 hours unless he or she has a "b" average for 
the preceding semester and approval of the dean of the 
College 

Electlves. Electives should be planned carefully, and well in 
advance, preferably with the student's academic advisor It is 
important to begin certain sequences as soon as possible to 
prevent later conflict. Electives may be selected from any 
department of the University in accordance with a student's 
professional needs. 

Freshman and Sophomore Program. The work of the first 
two years in this College is designed to accomplish the 
following purpose: (1) provide a general basic or core 
education and prepare for later specialization by giving a 
foundation in certain basic sciences; (2) develop 
competency in those basic techniques necessary for 
successful participation in the professional courses of the 
last two years 

The technique courses will vary considerably in the 
different curriculums and must be satisfactorily completed, or 
competencies demonstrated before the student can be 
accepted for the advanced courses in methods and in 
student teaching. It is very important that each requirement 
be met as it occurs. 

Student Teaching. Opportunity is provided for student 
teaching experience in physical education and health educa- 
tion. The student devotes one semester in the senior year 
to observation, participation, and teaching under a qualified 
supervising teacher in an approved Teacher Education 
Center A University supervisor from the College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health visits the student 
periodically and confers with the student teacher, the coop- 
erating teacher, and the center coordinator, giving assist- 
ance when needed. 

To be eligible for student teaching, the student must: (1) 
have the recommendation of the University supervising 
teacher, and (2) must have fulfilled all required courses tor 
the B.S. degree except those in the Block Student Teaching 
Semester, excluding those exceptions approved by each 
department. The student must obtain a grade of C or better 
in all professional courses in his or her curriculum and must 
register for all courses in the "Block" concurrently. 

Field Work. Recreation major students are expected to 
carry out a number of field experiences during their Uni- 
versity career; volunteer or part-time recreation employment 
during the school year, summer employment in camps or at 
playgrounds, etc These experiences culminate m a senior 
semester of field work for which a student receives credit 
and during which the student works as a staff member (for 
20 hours per week) in the field of recreation in which he or 
she hopes to be employed, such as public recreation, 
recreation for the exceptional, agencies (Y's. scouts, etc ). 
military recreation, etc. 

Degrees. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred 
upon students who have met the conditions of their curricula 
as herein prescribed by the College of Physical Education. 
Recreation and Health 



94 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Each candidate for a degree must tile a (ormal application 
with the Registrations Office during the registration period, 
or not later than the end of the third week of classes of the 
regular semester, or at the end of the second week of the 
summer session, prior to the date of graduation 

Certification. The Maryland State Department of Education 
certifies for teaching only when an applicant has a tentative 
appointment to teach in a Maryland county school No cer- 
tificate may be secured by application of the student on 
graduation Course content requirements for certification 
are indicated with each curriculum A student intending to 
qualify as a teacher in Baltimore. Washington or other 
specific situations should secure a statement of certifica- 
tion requirements before starting work in the junior year and 
discuss them with his or her academic advisor 

Student Organizations and Activities 

Mayors' Club. All students enrolled in the College are 
eligible for membership in this organization It conducts 
various professional meetings, brings in speakers and pro- 
motes various corecreational activities It has sponsored 
trips to district and national conventions of the American 
Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, 
and is chartered as a student major club of that organiza- 
tion, 

Aquallners. This synchronized swimming club is open to 
all men and women registered in the University. Through 
weekly meetings the group concentrates on additional 
stroke perfection, individual and group stunts, diving, and 
experimentation with various types of accompaniment and 
choreographic techniques An original water show is pre- 
sented each spring and several demonstrations are given 
each year, Tryouts are held twice a year — once at the 
beginning of the fall semester, and again after the water 
show during the spring semester. 

University of Maryland Recreation and Parks Society. In 
the fall of 1 959 the University of Maryland Recreation and 
Parks Society was formed by the undergraduate and 
graduate major and minor students of the College. The 
society, an affiliate of the State and national recreation 
organizations, provides opportunities for University and 
community service, for rich practical experience, and for 
social experiences for those students having a mutual pro- 
fessional recreation interest. 

Gymkana Troupe. The Gymkana Troupe includes men and 
women students from all Colleges who wish to express 
themselves through the medium of gymnastics. These 
individuals coordinate their talents in order to produce an 
exhibitional performance that has been seen in many places 
including Bermuda, Iceland, the Azores, Idaho, Montana, and 
the eastern seaboard of the United States. The organiza- 
tion has three principal objectives: (1) to provide healthful, 
co-recreational activities that provide fun for the students 
during their leisure hours; (2) to promote gymnastics in this 
locality; and (3) to entertain our students and people in 
other communities. 

This organization is co-sponsored by the Physical Educa- 
tion Department and the Student Government Association, 
and it welcomes any student, regardless of the amount of 
experience, to join. 

Intramural Sports For Men. The Intramural Sports Depart- 
ment offers organized competition in 20 sports activities: 
touch football, soccer, golf, horseshoes, tennis, cross 
country and handball in the fall; basketball, bowling, weight- 
lifting, swimming, wrestling and chess during the winter; and 
badminton, table tennis, volleyball, foul shooting, racquetball, 
Softball and outdoor track in the spring. 

In these sports, competition is conducted as single elim- 
ination, best performance, or round robin tournaments for 
five separate classifications — open (commuters, etc.), 
dormitory residents, fraternity members/pledges, graduate 
students and faculty/staff members. The Intramural Sports 
Director meets regularly with an Advisory Council composed 
of a representative from each of these categories. 

Indoor facilities such as Reckord Armory and Ritchie 
Coliseum are also made available in the evenings and on the 
weekends for recreational use. 



Many good paying employment opportunities exist in the 
program as positions such as referees, tournament direc- 
tors, field liners, publicists and photographers are always 
available 

Call 454-5454, a 24-hour recording, for information con- 
cerning tournament entry dates, game results, hours for 
recreational facilities, inclement weather postponements or 
last minute changes. 

The Intramural Sports Office is located in No 1104 
Record Armory Pick up your copy of the Intramural Sports 
Handbook 

Women's Recreation Association All undergraduate 
women students ol the University are automatically mem- 
bers of the Women's Recreation Association. Under the 
leadership of its student officers, and representatives and 
sports managers, the WRA sponsors a program of intra- 
mural, extramural and interest group activities. These activi- 
ties seek to develop new interests and skills for leisure- 
time enioyment, provide opportunities for continuing both 
old and new interests, and provide a democratic atmos- 
phere for educational leadership experiences. Included are 
free and tournament play in tennis, badminton, basketball, 
bowling, fencing, field hockey, golf, Softball, swimming, 
table tennis, and volleyball. Co-recreational activities include 
bowling, badminton and volleyball. Intramural tournaments 
are organized through the dormitory, sorority, and day com- 
muter groups of the University. Opportunities are also pro- 
vided for officiating experience. 

Various special groups and clubs interested in recreation 
exist on campus outside the Women's Recreation Associa- 
tion program. Some of these are the Terrapin Trail Club. 
Chess Club, Sailing Club, Ski Club, and musical and 
dramatic groups. 

Unstructured Recreational Activities. Free play activities 
such as tennis, swimming, handball, racquetball, and basket- 
ball have become very popular with students, faculty and 
staff on the College Park Campus The College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health encourages these activi- 
ties by scheduling as many of its facilities available as 
possible for students who wish to participate on an informal 
basis. 

Bhi Aplha Epsilon. Honorary Society of the College of 
Physical Education. Recreation and Health 

The purpose of this organization is to recognize academic 
achievement and to promote professional growth by spon- 
soring activities in the fields of physical education, recrea- 
tion, health and related areas. 

Students shall qualify for membership at such times as 
they shall have attained junior standing in physical educa- 
tion, health or recreation, and have a minimum overall 
average of 2.7 and a minimum professional average of 
3.1. Graduate students are invited to join after 10 hours 
of work with a 3.3 average. The organization is open to 
both men and women. 

Sigma Tau Epsilon. This society, founded in 1 940, selects 
those women who have attained an overall 2.5 average and 
demonstrated outstanding leadership, service and sports- 
manlike qualities in the organization and activities of the 
Women's Recreation Association and its affiliated groups. 

Eta Sigma Gamma. Epsilon chapter was established at the 
University of Maryland in May of 1 969. This professional 
honorary organization for health educators was established 
to promote scholarship and community service for health 
majors at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. 
Students may apply after two consecutive semesters with 
a 2 75 cumulative average. 



College of Physical Education, 
Recreation & Health Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

Health Education 

Professor and Chairman: Burt. 

Professors: Johnson, Leviton. 

Associate Professors: Clearwater, DA. Girdano, 

Girdano, Miller. Tifft. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 95 



Assistant Professors: Althoff, Needle, Stone. Yarlan. 
Instructors: McCormack, McLaughlin. Pote. Sands 

The curriculum is designed to prepare the student to 
give leadership in the development of both school and 
community health. Graduates of the departmental program 
have placement opportunities as health educators In the 
public schools, community colleges, as well as In the 
public voluntary health agencies. 

Health Curriculum 

Freshman Year Semester 

I II 

ENGL— General University Requirements 3 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology . . 4 

CHEM 103, 104— General Chemistry 4 4 

HLTH 1 30— Introduction to Health 3 
HLTH 140— Personal and Community Health 3 

General University Requirement 3 3 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 17 



Sophomore Year 
ZOOL 



I 

201. 202— Human Anatomy 

and Physiology 4 

HLTH 1 06— Drug Use and Abuse 3 

HLTH 1 50— First Aid and Emergency 

Medical Services 

HLTH 270— Safety Education 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Electives 3 

Total 16 



Junior Year 



HLTH 480— Measurement in Health Education 
HLTH 3 1 0— Introduction to 

School Health Education 2 

HLTH 420— Methods and Materials 

in Health Education 

HLTH 477— Fundamentals of Sex Education 3 

HLTH 489— Independent Study 

EDHD 300S— Human Development 

and Learning 6 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 

General University Requirement 3 

Electives 3 

Total 17 



Senior Year 



HLTH 340— Curriculum, Instruction 

and OBservatlon 3 

HLTH 450— Health Problems of 

Children and Youth 3 

HLTH 390— Org 4 Adm of 

School Health Programs 3 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods 

of Secondary Education 3 

EDSE 367 —Student Teaching In 

Secondary Schools 8 

HLTH 489— Independent Studies 3 

General University Requirement 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 17 

Degree Requirements In Health Education. Require- 
ments for the Bachelor of Science degree in health 
education are as follows: 

Semester 
Credits 
Foundation science courses (ZOOL 101, 201. 202; 

CHEM 103. 104) 20 

General University Requirements 30 

Professional Health Education courses (HLTH 1 06. 
130, 140. 150, 270, 310 420 477 489,340. 

450. 480. 3901 40 

Education requirements (EDHD 300S EDSF 301 . 

EDSE 330 367) 20 

Electives 

Total 



21 

131 



Minor in Health Education — 24 Hour Minor. Twelve 
semester hours m health education (HLTH 140, 150. 310. 



420, 450). 

Twelve semester hours In related areas Six semester 
hours of biological science. Six semester hours of 
psychology or human development. 

Minor In Safety Eduction. Students wishing to obtain a 
minor In safety education and become certified to teach 
safety and driver education In Junior and senior high school 
should take the following courses: HLTH 1 50(2), HLTH 260 
(2), HLTH 270 (3), HLTH 280 (3), HLTH 305 (3), HLTH 345 
(3), ENFP 280 (3), and ENFP 290(2). In addition, six hours of 
psychology (other than the general education requirements) 
are required. 

Course Code Prefix— HLTH 

Physical Education 

Chairman and Professor: Husman. 

Professors: Clarke. Eyler. Humphrey, Husman. Ingram, 

Kelley, Kramer. Steel 

Associate Professors: K Church, Cronin. Dotson, Hult 

SantaMarle 

Assistant Professors: Arrighi, Dainis, Fellows. Freundschuh, 

Jackson, Johnson, Kesler, Kovalakldes. Krouse, Schmidt. 

Tyler, VanderVelden, Vaccaro, Wrenn 

Instructors: Balog. Bartley, Davis, Drum. Griffiths. Kizabeth. 

McHugh, Murray. Sigler, Tyler, Young. 

Lecturers: Fry, Redding. 

This curriculum, including three certification options, 
prepares students (1 ) for teaching physical education in the 
secondary school, (2) for coaching, and (3) for leadership in 
youth and adult groups which offer a program of physical 
activity. The first two years of this curriculum are considered 
to be an orientation period in which the student has an 
opportunity to gain an adequate background in general 
education as well as in those scientific areas closely related 
to ths field of specialization. In addition, emphasis is placed 
upon the development of skills in a wide range of motor 
activities. Further, students are encouraged to select related 
areas, especially In the fields of biology, social sciences, 
psychology, health education, and recreation as fields of 
secondary Interest. These materially increase the vocational 
opportunities which are available to a graduate In phylcal 
education. 

Equipment: Students may be required to provide Individual 
equipment for certain courses. 

Uniforms: Suitable uniforms, as prescribed by the College, 
are required for the activity classes and for student teaching. 
These uniforms should be worn only during professional 
activities. 

Departmental Requirements: All Certification Options 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
General University Requirements 30 

HLTH 1 50— First Aid and Safety 1 

PHYS 101or111or 

CHEM 102 or 103 or 105 3-4 

PHED 1 80— Introduction to Physical 

Education and Health 2 

PHED 181— Fundamentals of Movement 2 

ZOOL 201. 202— Human Anatomy 

and Physiology 8 

EDHD 300— Hunan Development and Learning 6 

EDSF 301 —Foundations of Education 3 

PHED 333— Adapted Physical Education 2 

PHED 400— Kinesiology 4 

PHED 480— Measurement in Physical 

Education and Health 3 

PHED • Skills Laboratories 22 

* Student should discuss this requirement with departmental advisor 

K-6 Certification Option 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
EDEL 336— Student Teachng in 

Elementary Physical Education 8 

EDHD 4 1 1 —Child Growth 

and Development 3 



96 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



PHED 420— Physical Education (or 

the Elementary School 3 

HLTH 4 70— The Health Program in 

the Elementarty School 3 

PHED 491— The Curriculum in Elementary 
School Physical Education 
or 
PHED 495— Organization and Administration ot 
Elementary School 

Physical Education 3 

PHED Electives (9 hours total). PHED 450, 

PHED 460 PHED 485, PHED 491 . 
PHED 493 or PHED 495 9 

Electives 12- '3 

7-12 Certification Option 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
SPCH 107— Public Speaking 2 

PHED 282— Techniques of Officiating 1 

PHED 31 4 —Methods in Physical Education 

tor Secondary Schools 3 

Theory of Coaching Elective 

(PHED 323, 324. 325 or 326) 2 

EDSE 330— Principles and Methods 

of Secondary Education 3 

PHED 38 1 —Advanced Training 

and Conditioning ........ 3 

EDSE 374— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

PHED 460— Theory of Exercise 3 

PHED 485— Motor Learning and 

Skilled Performance 3 

PHED 490— Organization and Administration 

of Physical Education 3 

PHED 493— History and Philosophy of Sport 

and Physical Education 3 

Electives 7-8 

K-12 Certification Option 

SPCH 107— Public Speaking 2 

PHED 31 4 —Methods in Physical Education 

for Secondary Schools 3 

Theory of Coaching Elective 

(PHED 323. 324, 325. or 326) . 2 

EDSE 330— Pnnciples and Methods 

of Secondary Education 3 

EDEL 336— Student Teaching in 

Elementary Schools. . . 8 

EDSE 374— Student Teaching in 

Secondary Schools 8 

PHED 420— Physical Education for 

the Elementary Schools 3 

PHED 460— Theory of Exercise 3 

PHED 490— Organization and Administration 

of Physical Education 3 

PHED 491— The Curriculum in Elementary 
School Physical Education 
or 
PHED 495— Organization and Administration 
of Elementary School 

Physical Education . . 3 

PHED 493— History and Philosophy of Sport 

and Physical Education 3 

Electives 0-1 

Kinesiological Sciences. A new degree curriculum is 

available for interested students from the Department of 

Physical Education. It is designed for those students who are 

vitally interested in the fascinating realm of sport and the 

human activity sciences, but not necessarily interested in 

preparing for teaching in the public schools. The body of 

knowledge explored by this curriculum may be described 

briefly as follows: 

The history of sport, both ancient and contemporary, 

its philosophical foundations and the study of social 

factors as they relate to human behavior. 

Biomechanics, exercise physiology, the theoretical bases 

and effects of physical activity, neuromotor learning and 

the psychological factors inherent in physical 

performance. 

The quantification and description of performance and 

the relation of these factors to human development. 

The program makes possible the broad use of elective 

credit so that various student interests may be combined on 

an interdisciplinary basis. With such possibilities available. 



graduates could reasonably set their sights on occupations 
in the paramedical fields, such as stress testing and human 
factors, athletic involvements such as trainers, scouts, sports 
publicists, or advance to further study in the therapies, as 
well as graduate work in physical education and allied fields 
Kinesiological Sciences Curriculum 



Freshman Year 

ZOOL 1 1 —General Zoology 

MATH 001 —Review of High School Algebra 

if required 
MATH 1 05— Fundamentals ol Mathematics 

or 
MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics 
PSYC 100— Introduction to Pschology 
PHED 1 80— Introduction Physical Education 
HLTH 140— Presonaland 

Community Health 
Activity Courses' 
General University Requirements 
Electives 

Total 
• Activity courses m the Freshman Year are limited to 200 level courses 

Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201. 202— Human Anatomy 

and Physiology 
PHED 287— Sport and American Society 
Activity Courses' 
General University Requirements 
Electives 

Total 



Junior Year 

PHED 400— Kinesiology 

PHED 480— Measurement in 

Physical Education 
PHED 455— Physical Fitness 

of the Individual 
General University Requirements 
Restricted Electives' ' 
Electives 

Total 
Senior Year 
PHED 450— Psychology of Sport 

460— Physiology of Exercise 

485— Motor Learning 

and Skilled Performance 

493— History and Philosophy of Sport 
and Physical Education 

496— Quantitative Methods . 

497— Independent Studies Seminar . 
General University Requirements 
Electives 

Total 



Credit 
Hours 



PHED 
PHED 



PHED 



PHED 
PHED 



7-9 
28-30 



Minimum hours required for graduation 



123 



'Activity Courses in the Soohomore Year may be chosen from 200 and 
300 level courses 
•'See departmental advisor for information regarding available options for 
for restricted electives 

The Honors Program in Physical Education. The aim of the 

Honors Program is to encourage superior students by 
providing an enriched program of studies which will fulfill 
their advanced interests and needs Qualified students are 
given the opportunity to undertake intensive and often 
independent studies wherein initiative, responsibility and 
intellectual discipline are fostered. To qualify for admission to 
the program: 

1 . A freshman must have a "B" average in academic 
(college prep) curriculum of an accredited high school. 

2. A sophomore must have an accumulative GPA of 3.00 
in all college courses of official registration. 

3. All applicants must have three formal recommendations 
concerning their potential, character, and other related 
matters 

4. All applicants must be accepted by the Faculty Honors 
Committee. 

In completing the program, all honors students must: 

1 . Participate in an honors seminar where theses and 
other reevant research topics are studied 

2. Pass a comprehensive oral examination covering subject 
matter background. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 97 



3 Successfully prepare and defend the honors thesis. 

On the basis of the students performance in the above 
program, the college may vote to recommend graduation 
without honors, with honors, or with high honors. 

Recreation 

Professor and Chairman: Humphrey. 

Associate Professors: Churchill, Strobell, Kuss 

Assistant Professors: Leedy. Thompson, Cotton, Fain, 

Anderson 

Instructor: Calloway 

Lecturer: Lutzm 

Research Assistant: Stewart 

The increased amount of leisure time existent in our 
society because of the rapid development of modern 
civilization, and the imperative need for guidance in the use 
of that leisure time, has made society cognizant of the need 
for trained recreation leaders. 

This curriculum, therefore, is designed to meet the needs 
of students who wish to qualify for the many positions in the 
field of recreation, parks and leisure services and the needs 
of those students who desire a background in skills which 
will enable them to render distinct contributions to 
community life The Department draws upon various other 
departments and colleges within the University for courses 
to balance and enrich its offerings for its recreation 
curriculum. 

Those majoring in the Department have opportunity for 
observation and practical experience in local, county, state 
and federal public recreation, parks, and leisure services 
agencies, in social and group work agency programs, and in 
the various programs of the Armed Forces, American Red 
Cross, local hospitals, etc. Major students are encouraged to 
select an option area' of interest around which to center 
their elective courses (for instance: public recreation 
administration, therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation- 
interpretive services, program planning, and resource 
planning and management). 

A very active student University of Maryland Recreation 
and Parks Society, an affiliate of the comparable state and 
national organizations, exercises degrees of leadership in 
selecting the annual "outstanding senior" and "outstanding 
alumnus" awards, in the granting of the various city, county 
and state society recreation scholarships, in the pro- 
gramming of the annual Maryland Recreation and Parks 
Association Conference, etc. It also provides opportunities 
for university and community services, for rich practical 
experience, and for social experiences for those students 
having a mutual professional recreation interest Many 
outstanding practitioners/ educators reside in the Metro- 
politan Washington, DC area It is the practice of the 
Department to enrich its course offerings through the 
use of these individuals as extensively as possible 
Recreation Curriculum 
Freshman Year Semester 

I II 
APDS 101— Fundamentals of Design 3 

HLTH 1 50— First Aid 2 

HLTH 1 40— Personal and 

Community Health 3 

PHED 182— Rhythmic Activities 2 

RECR 1 30— History and Introduction 

to Recreation 2 

PHED Elective Skills Laboratory 2 or 2 

SPCH 1 00— Basic Principles of 

Speech Communication 3 

GVPT 1 70— American Government 3 

General University Requirements 9 3 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

RECR 1 50— Camp Counseling 

(if no experience) 2 

RECR 220— Co-recreational Games 

and Programs 2 

RECR 221— Nature Lore 2 

CRAF 1 02 or EDtN 1 06— Recreational 

Crafts or Industnal Arts m 

the Elementary School 2 

SPCH 220— Group Discussion 3 

MUSC 155— Fundamentals for the 

Classroom Teacher 3 



Option Requirements 3 

General University Requirements 6 6 

Electives 3 3 

Total 16 19 

Junior Year 

PHED Elective Skills Laboratory 2 or 2 

RECR 420— Program Planning 3 

RECR 460— Leadership Techniques 

and Practices 3 

RECR 495— Planning. Design, and 

Maintenance of Park and 

Recreation Areas 

and Facilities 3 

RECR 450— Camp Management 

(if previous experience) 3 

PHED 420— Physical Education tor the 

Elementary School 

(or substitute) 3 

EDHD 306— Study ol Human Behavior 

(or substitute) 3 

Option Requirements 3 3 

General University Requirements 6 

Total 15-17 15-17 

Senior Year 

RECR 490— Organization and 

Administration of 

Recreation 3 

RECR 349— Observation and Field Work 

in Recreation 8 

SOCY 330— Community Organization 

(or substitute) 3 

DART 3 1 1 or 440— Play Production 

or Children's Dramatics 3 

Option Requirements 3 

Electives 8 3 

Total 17 14 

Total 1 30 

Intensive Educational Development Program 

The I ED program developed from a 1968 pilot proiect 
for twenty students and has expanded into a broad-based 
support program enrolling approximately 450 students each 
year 

The program is designed to serve students who, despite a 
rich cultural heritage and innate intellectual ability, have had 
limited opportunity to develop their potential in higher 
education LED. focuses on providing programs and 
services — including tutoring, reading, study and math skills, 
and special academic support services designed to enhance 
retention rates of program students 

During the summer program. IE D students who will enter 
school in the fall take courses in mathematics and English as 
part of their preparation for the fall semester 

Counseling, tutorial assistance, and other support services 
are available throughout the academic year to students who 
are enrolled in the program Support services are also 
available to the University community upon request 

Intensive Educational Development Program. Room 
01 1 1. Chemistry Building Phone: 454-4646 4647 

Upward Bound Program 

The University of Maryland Upward Bound Program is 
designed to provide academic and counseling assistance to 
capable but under-achieving high school students with the 
purpose of preparing them to pursue some form of post- 
secondary education Upward Bound serves as a 
supplement to its participants' secondary school 
experiences It provides the opportunity for each student to 
improve or develop the skills necessary for acquiring a 
positive self-image, broadening his her educational and 
cultrual perspective, and for identifying and actualizing 
undiscovered potentials 

Upward Bound students are selected from high schools in 
Prince George's and Montgomery Counties, and are 
recommended to the program through high school pnncipals. 
teachers, counselors, talent search, social service 
agencies, and individuals knowledgeable about the program 
The academic skills development and counseling service are 
available to students throughout the school year and during 
the summer program Academic instruction, tutonng. 
counseling and other related innovative educational 
experiences are provided for the purpose of developing 



98 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



basic academic skills and motivation necessary tor success 
In secondary schools and to assure that each student gains a 
minimum ot one year's growth in the basic skills areas ot 
communication and mathematics 

Persons interested in lurther information regarding the 
Upward Bound Program should contact The Director ot 
Upward Bound, Room 2101, West Education Annex, 
University ot Maryland, College Park. Maryland 20742 
Telephone Number — 454-21 16 



Division of Mathematical 
and Physical Sciences 
and Engineering 

The Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and 
Engineenng is like a technical institute within a large 
university Students majoring in any one of the disciplines 
encompassed by the Division have the opportunity ot 
obtaining an outstanding education in their field The Division 
caters both to students who continue as professionals in 
their area of specialization, either immediately upon 
graduation or after post graduate studies, and to those who 
use their college education as preparatory to careers or 
studies in other areas The narrow specialist as well as the 
broad "Renaissance person" can be accommodated 

Below are outlined the requirements for each major 
offered within the Division. Some of the University 
requirements and regulations are reiterated. 

The search for new knowledge is one of the most 
challenging activities of mankind The university is one of the 
key institutions in society where fundamental research is 
emphasized The Division of Mathematical and Physical 
Sciences and Engineering contributes very substantially and 
effectively to the research activities of the University. 

Many research programs include undergraduates either as 
paid student helpers or in forms of research participation 
Students in departmental honors programs are particularly 
given the opportunity to become involved in research Other 
students too may undertake research under the guidance of 
a faculty member. 

A major portion of the teaching program of the Division is 
devoted to serving students majoring in disciplines not 
encompassed by the Division Some of this teaching effort is 
in providing the skills needed in support of such majors or 
programs Other courses are designed as enrichment for 
non-science students, giving them the opportunity to explore 
the reality of science without the technicalities required of 
the major 

Structure of the Division. The College of Engineering is a 
major constituent of the MPSE Division, and is headed by its 
own Dean. All other departments and programs in the 
Division report directly to the Provost of the Division. 

The following departrments and programs comprise the 
Division of MPSE. 
Department of Computer Science 
Department of Mathematics 
Department of Physics and Astronomy 
Institute for Physical Science and Technology 
Applied Mathematics Program 
Astronomy Program 
Chemical Physics Program 
Meteorology Program 
Physical Sciences Program 

Within the College of Engineering: 
Department of Aerospace Engineering 
Department of Chemical Engineering 
Department of Civil Engineering 
Department of Electrical Engineering 
Fire Protection Engineering Program 
Department of Mechanical Engineering 
Nuclear Engineering Program 
Engineering Materials Program 
bngineenng Sciences Program 



Wind Tunnel Operations Department 
Cooperative Engineering Education Program 
Agricultural Engineering Program 

Degree Programs. The following Bachelor of Science 
Degree programs are offered by the departments and 
programs of the Division 

Astronomy. Computer Science. Mathematics. Physics. Phy- 
sical Sciences, Aerospace Engineering. Agricultural 
Engineering. Chemical Engineering. Civil Engineering. 
Electrical Engineering. Engineering (Applied Science Option 
or Engineering Option), Engineering Technology 
(Mechanical), Fire Protection Engineering, Fire Science- 
Urban Studies, and Mechanical Engineering 

General Information 

The MPSE Undergraduate Office. Y-1 1 10 (454-4596) is 
the central office for coordinating the advising, processing 
and updating of student records for students not in the 
College of Engineering Inquiries concerning University 
regulations, transfer credits and other general information 
should be addressed to this office Specific departmental 
information is best obtained directly from the departments 

The records of students in the College of Engineering are 
processed and kept in the Engineering Student Affairs 
Office, J-1107 (454-2421) Inquiries concerning 
Engineering curricula should be addressed there. 

The Division is strongly committed to making studies in the 
sciences and engineering available to all regardless of their 
background In particular, the Division is actively pursuing an 
affirmative action program to rectify the present under- 
representation of women and minorities in these fields. There 
are in fact many career opportunities for women and 
members of minorities in the fields represented by the 
Division. 

Degree Requirements. 

A. A minimum of 1 20 semester hours with at least a C 
average are required for all Bachelor of Science degrees 
from the Division. All B.S degrees conferred by the 
College of Engineering require more than 1 20 credits; 
the exact number varies with the department. 

B. 30 credits are specified under the General University 
Requirements. 

C Maior and supporting course work is specified under 
each department or program 

D. The final 30 semester hours must be completed at the 
College Park Campus Occasionally this requirement may 
be waived by the Provost or Dean for up to six of these 
30 credits to be taken at another institution. Such a 
waiver is granted only if the student already has 30 
credits in residence. 

E. Students must be enrolled in the program in which they 
plan to graduate by the time they register for the last 1 5 
hours. 

College of Engineering 

The College of Engineering offers four-year programs 
leading either to the degree of Bachelor of Science with 
curriculum designation in Aerospace Engineering, 
Agricultural Engineering. Chemical Engineering. Civil 
Engineering, Electrical Engineering. Mechanical Engineering, 
Fire Protection, or to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering with an Engineering option or an Applied 
Science option, or to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering Technology (Mechanical Engineering Option) or 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Urban Studies (Fire 
Science Option) In addition, each of the foregoing degree 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 99 



programs may be pursued through the five-year Maryland 
Plan for Cooperative Engineering Education The 
engineering programs integrate these elements: (1) basic 
sciences, including mathematics, physics, chemistry; (2) 
engineering sciences including mechanics of solids and 
fluids, engineering materials, thermo-dynamics. electricity, 
and magnetism; (3) professional studies in major fields of 
engineering specialization; and (4) general studies including 
liberal arts and social studies as part of the General 
University Requirements. 

Each program lays a broad base for continued learning 
after college in professional practice, in business or industry, 
in public service, or in graduate study and research 

Increasingly, the boundary between engineers and applied 
scientists or applied mathematicians becomes less distinct 
The various disciplines of engineering similarly interact with 
each other, as technical problems become more 
sophisticated, and require a combined attack from several 
disciplines. The engineer occupies an intermediate position 
between science and the public, because, in addition to the 
understanding of scientific principles, the engineer is 
concerned with the timing, economics and values that define 
the useful application of those principles. 
College Regulations. The responsibility for proper 
registration and for satisfying stated prerequisites for any 
course rests with the student — as does the responsibility 
for proper achievement in courses in which the student is 
enrolled. Each student should be familiar with the provisions 
of this catalog, including the Academic Regulations, con- 
tained in Section 1 

1 . General Information, and other pertinent regulations. 

2 Required courses in mathematics, physics and 
chemistry have highest priority; and it is strongly 
recommended that every engineering student register for 
mathematics and chemistry — or mathematics and physics 

— each semester until the student has fully satisfied require- 
ments of the College of Engineering in these subjects. 

3. To be eligible for a bachelor's degree in the College 
of Engineering, a student must have an average of at least C 

— 2.0 — (a) in all subjects applicable to the degree, and (b) 
in all junior-senior courses in the major field. Responsiility for 
knowing and meeting all degree requirements for graudation 
in any curriculum rests with the student. 

4. A student in the College of Engineering may audit a 
course only with the understanding that the course may not 
be taken for credit subsequent to the registration as audit. 
The student must also have the consent of the department 
offering the course. Forms requesting permission to audit 
courses are available in the Engineering Student Affairs 
Office. J-1 107. 

5. The College of Engineering requires that a minimum of 
eighteen (18) semester credit hours out of the 30 hour 
General University Requirements be taken in the general 
area of humanities and social sciences (H&SS). The pro- 
gram selected should be planned to reflect a rationale or to 
fulfill an objective appropriate to the engineering profes- 
sion and to increase the engineer's awareness of social 
responsibilities and improve the ability to consider related 
factors in the decision-making process. Skill, or profes- 
sionally onented courses treating such subjects as account- 
ing, industrial management, finance, personnel administra- 
tion, the performing arts, certain education courses, and 
introductory foreign languages normally do not fulfill this 
objective and may not be included in the eighteen (18) 
semester hour requirement of the College. Engineering 
students may obtain in the Engineering Student Affairs 
Office (J-1 107) a list of many courses which satisfy this 
requirement 

High School Preparation. Preparation for pursuing an 
engineering degree curriculum begins in the freshman or 
sophomore year of high school. The time required to com- 
plete the various degree programs may be extended beyond 
the four years cited in this catalog to the extent that an 
incoming student may be deficient in his or her high school 
preparation Pre-engineering students normally enroll in an 
academic program in high school The course of study 
should include 3'/j-4 years of college preparatory mathe- 
matics (including algebra, trigonometry, plane and solid 



geometry plus calculus or pre-calculus advanced mathe- 
matics) In addition, students should complete one year each 
of physics and chemistry. 

Structure of Engineering Curricula. Courses in the normal 
curriculum or program and prescribed credit hours leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science (with curriculum 
designation) are outlined in the sections pertaining to each 
department in the College of Engineering. No student may 
modify the prescribed number of hours without special 
permission from the dean of the college The courses in 
each curriculum may be classified in the following 
categories: 

1 . Courses in the General University Requirements— An 
engineering student must include eighteen credits of 
humanities and social sciences in the program of general 
studies. 

2. Courses in the physical sciences — mathematics, 
chemistry, physics. 

3. Collateral engineering courses — engineering sciences, 
and other courses approved for one curriculum but offered 
by another department 

4 Courses in the major department A student must 
obtain written approval for any substitution of courses from 
the department chairman and the dean of the college. 

The courses in each engineering curriculum, as classified 
above, form a sequential and developmental pattern in 
subject matter In this respect, curricula in engineering 
may differ from curricula in other colleges. Some regula- 
tions which are generally applicable to all students (see 
the Academic Regulations) may need clarification for pur- 
poses of orderly administration among engineering students 
Moreover, the College of Engineering establishes policies 
which supplement the University regulations. 

Basic Format of the Freshman-Sophomore Years in 
Engineering. The freshman and sophomore years in 
engineering are designed to lay a strong foundation in 
mathematics, physical sciences and the engineering 
sciences upon which the student will later develop a pro- 
fessional program during the upper division (junior and 
senior) years. The College course requirements for the 
freshman year are the same for all students, regardless of 
their intended academic program, and about 75% of the 
sophomore year course requirements are common, thus 
affording the student a maximum flexibility in choosing a 
specific area of engineering specialization Although the 
engineering student selects a major field at the start of the 
sophomore year, this intramural program commonality 
affords the student the maximum flexibility of choice or 
interdepartmental transfer up to the end of the sophomore 
year. 

General College Requirements for the Freshman and 
Sophomore Years 

Credit 
Hours 
A General University Requirements 15 

B Mathematics 15 

Four courses in mathematics are required to 
be selected from MATH 140. 141, 240, 241, 
and 246 
C Physical Sciences 19 

A minimum of 1 9 credit hou's in Physics and 
Chemistry must be completed, with not less 
than seven (7) in either field. 
D Engineering Sciences 9 

Nine (9) credit hours must be completed in the 
Engineering Sciences, to be selected from 
ENES 101. ENES 110. ENES 220 and ENES 
22 1 Each is a three (3| credit hour course 
E Engineering Sciences Mathematics, Physical 

Sciences or Major Field Engineering 8 

Eight (8) credit hours to complete the 
Ireshman-sophomore year requirements may 
be in any of the fields indicated, but no more 
than six (6) credit hours may have a maior field 
designation 
Total Minimum Academic Credits in 

freshman-sophomore years 66 

Basic Freshman Curriculum in Engineering. All freshmen 
in the College of Engineering are required to complete the 



100 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



following basic curriculum (or Ireshmen regardless ol 
whether the student plans to proceed through one of the 
major field designated baccalaureate degree programs or 
follow any of the multldlsclpllnary, non-designated degree 
curricula that are sponsored by the College 



Semester 



Course No and Title I 

CHEM 103, 104— General Chemistry* • 4 
PHYS 181— General Physics I 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I, II 4 

ENES 101— Intro Engr Science 3 

ENES 110— Statics 

General University Requirements 6 

Total Credits 



17 



Students who are not prepared to schedule MATH 140 
are advised to register for a preparatory course— MATH 1 1 5 
—as part of their General University Requirement These 
students are also advised to attend summer school following 
their freshman year to complete MATH 141 and PHYS 161 
prior to entrance into the sophomore year of study MATH 
141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites for many courses 
required in the sophomore year. 

• 'Qualified students may elect to take CHEM 105 and 108 (4 cr hra each) 
.nstead ot CHEM 1 03 and 1 04 

The Sophomore Year in Engineering. With the beginning 
of the sophomore year the student selects a sponsoring 
academic department (Aerospace, Agricultural, Chemical, 
Civil, Electrical, Fire Protection, or Mechanical Engineering) 
and this department assumes the responsibility for the 
student's academic guidance, counseling and program 
planning from that point until the completion of the degree 
requirements of that department as well as the College, 



Sophomore Curriculum In Engineering 



Semester 
I II 



General University Requirements 3 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262. 263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 3' 

ENES 221 —Dynamics 3* 

Major field or related courses 2 or 4 2 or 5* 

Total Credits 1 6 or 1 8 1 5 or 1 8 

•For specific requirements, see the curriculum listing In each engineering 
department 

Engineering Transfer Programs. Most of the community 
colleges in Maryland provide one or two-year programs 
which have been coordinated to prepare students to enter 
the sophomore or junior year in engineering at the University 
of Maryland. These curricula are identified as Engineering 
Transfer Programs in the catalogs of the sponsoring insti- 
tutions. The various associate degree programs in tech- 
nology do not provide the same degree of preparation and 
transferability into the professional degree curricula as the 
designated transfer programs (except for the Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering Technology. Mechanical option, or 
Fire Science-Urban Studies). 

There may be 6-8 semester hours of major departmental 
courses at the sophomore level which are not offered by 
the schools participating in the engineering transfer pro- 
gram. Students should investigate the feasibility of complet- 
ing these courses in summer school at the University of 
Maryland before starting their junior course work in the 
fall semester. 

Dual Degree Program. The Dual Degree Program is a 
cooperative arrangement between the College of Engineer- 
ing and selected liberal arts colleges which allows students 
to earn undergraduate degrees from both institutions in a 
five-year program. A student in the Dual Degree Program will 
attend the liberal arts college for approximately three (3) 
academic years (minimum 90 hours) and the University of 
Maryland. College of Engineering for approximately two (2) 
academic years (minimum hours required — determined 
individually, approximately 60 hours). 



Dual degree candidates may participate in any of the 
baccalaureate degree programs in the College of Engineer- 
ing. 

Bowie State College, Coppm State College, Frostburg 
State College, Notre Dame College, Trinity College and 
American University are participating Institutions In the Dual 
Degree Program. At the present time several other colleges 
are developing cooperative agreements to participate In the 
program A complete list of participating Institutions may be 
obtained from the Engineering Student Affairs Office 
(J-1 1 07) of the College of Engineering. 



Co-operative Engineering Education Program. The 

Maryland Plan for Co-operative Engineering Education at the 
University of Maryland, offered by the College of Engineer- 
ing, Is a four and one half to five calendar year program 
leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. The academic 
requirements for students following the Co-op Plan of 
Education are identical to the academic requirements for 
those students following the regular four-year program. In 
addition to the normal academic requirements, Co-op stu- 
dents have scheduled periods of professional internship 
which must be satisfactorily completed to qualify for the 
baccalaureate degree under the Co-op Plan. 

The Co-op Program begins after the student has com- 
pleted the freshman and sophomore requirements of a major 
field The structure of Engineering Co-op is an alternating 
sequence of study and internship. As far as Co-op is con- 
cerned, there are three sessions— fall and spring semesters 
(20 weeks each) and a summer session (10 weeks). This 
alternating plan of study and professional internship 
lengthens the last two academic years into three calendar 
years. Delaying entry into the Co-op Program until the 
junior year offers considerable educational advantages to 
the student. 

The student retains the normal freshman-sophomore pro- 
gram to afford time for the selection of a major field of 
engineering ... or to determine whether to continue in 
engineering . . . without a commitment to either the regular 
four-year or the Co-op Plan of Education. A more mature 
and meaningful series of professional internship assign- 
ments are possible to benefit both the student and the 
professional partner. Also, the plan is readily adaptable to 
the needs of the student transferring to the University from 
the engineering transfer programs of community or state 
colleges. 

Students need only meet two criteria for entry into the 
Engineering Co-op Program. They are (1), completion of the 
sophomore requirements (usually about 65 degree credits) 
and (2), the establishment of a cumulative grade point 
average at the University of Maryland of at least a 2 0/4.0. 

A typical study-intern schedule is shown below. The 
typical student begins the first internship in the summer 
immediately following the sophomore year (65 accumulated 
degree credits). The total internship is for two summers and 
two semesters (60 weeks). The student enrolls for 16 
semester hours each during the fall and spring semesters. 
1 2 semester hours during the summer and three semester 
hours in the evening during two internship periods. 

Typical Study-Intern Schedule 







Semester Hours 






Current Accumulated 


Summer* 


Intern (1)t 


— 65 


Fall Semester 


Study 


16 81 


Spring Semester 


Intern (2,3) 


3§ 84 


Summer 


Study 


12 96 


Fall Semesterf 


Intern (4,5) 


3§ 99 


Spring Semester 


Study 


16 115 


Summer* 


Intern (6) 


- 115 


Fall Semester 


Study 


16 131 
(Grad) 



* Students enroll tor ENCO 408 (6 non-degree credits) 

I These numbers refer to 10- week penods 

f Students enroll for ENCO 408 and 409 ( 1 2 non-degree credits) 

§These courses could possibly be taken during the evening at the University 
College, or at a college located near your employment 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 101 



Students make their own arrangements for board and 
lodging while on their periods of internship. Frequently the 
participating industrial company or governmental agency will 
assist the student in locating good inexpensive lodging. The 
internship wages are paid directly to the student by his or 
her employer. 

During the semesters or summer sessions in which the 
student attends school, the student pays the regular tuition 
and fees assessed by the University A $30 fee is charged 
for each 10-week period of professional internship. The 
professional intern fee is payable at the beginning of each 
intern period and is not refundable. 

Engineering Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering 

The "BS. -Engineering" program is designed to serve 
three primary functions: (1) to prepare those studnets who 
wish to use the breadth and depth of their engineering 
education as a preparatory vehicle for entry into post- 
baccalaureate study in such fields as medicine, law, or 
business administration; (2) to provide the basic professional 
training for those students who wish to continue their 
engineering studies on the graduate level in one of the 
newer interdisciplinary fields of engineering such as 
environmental engineering, bio-medical engineering, sys- 
tems engineering, and many others; and finally (3) to 
educate those students who do not plan a normal profes- 
sional career in a designated engineering field but wish to 
use a broad engineering education so as to be better able 
to serve in one or more of the many auxiliary or manage- 
ment positions of engineering related industries. The pro- 
gram is designed to give the maximum flexibility for tailor- 
ing a program to the specific future career plans of the 
student. To accomplish these objectives, the program has 
two optional paths: an engineering option and an applied 
science option. 

The "Engineering" option should be particularly attractive 
to those students contemplating graduate study or profes- 
sional employment in the interdisciplinary engineering fields, 
such as environmental engineering, bio-engineering, bio- 
medical engineering, and systems and control engineering, 
or for preparatory entry into a variety of newer or inter- 
disciplinary areas of graduate study. For example, a student 
contemplating graduate work in environmental engineering 
might combine chemical and civil engineering for his or her 
program; a student interested in systems and control 
engineering graduate work might combine electrical 
engineering with aerospace, chemical, or mechanical 
engineering. 

The "Applied Science" option should be particularly 
attractive to those students who do not plan on professional 
engineering careers, but wish to use the rational and 
developmental abilities fostered by an engineering educa- 
tion as a means of furthering career objectives. Graduates 
of the Applied Science Option may aspire to graduate 
work and an ultimate career in a field of science, law, 
medicine, business, or a variety of other attractive oppor- 
tunities which build on a combination of engineering and a 
field of science. Entrance requirements for Law and Medical 
Schools can be met readily under the format of this pro- 
gram In the applied science program, any field in the 
University in which the student may earn a BS degree is an 
acceptable secondary science field thus affording the 
student a maximum flexibility of choice for personal 
career planning. 

Listed below are the minimum requirements for the BS - 
Engineering degree with either an Engineering option or an 
Applied Science option. The 66 semester credit hours 
required for the completion of the junior and senior years 
is superimposed upon the freshman and sophomore 
curriculum of the chosen primary field of engineering. The 
student, thus, does not make a decision whether to take the 
designated or the undesignated degree in an engineering 
field until the beginning of the junior year In fact, the 
student can probably delay the decision until the spring term 



of the junior year with little or no sacrifice, thus affording the 
student ample time for decision Either program may be 
taken on the regular 4-year format or under the Maryland 
Plan for Cooperative Engineering Education. 

Junior-Senior Requirements for the Degree of BS- 
Engineering 



Engineering 
Option 

15sh 



Applied 
Science Option 
15sh 



Requirements 

General Umv Req 
Mathematics. Physical 

Sciences, req 3sh 3 sh 

Engineering Sciences ' 6 sh 6 sh. 

Primary Field 24sh(Engr) 18sh(Engr) 

Secondary Field 12sh(Engr) 1 2 sh (Science) 

Approved Electives 6 sh (Technical) 9or10sh 

Sr Research/ Proiect 3 or 2 sh 

66 66 

Engineering Fields of Concentration available under the 
B.S -Engineering program as primary fields within either the 
Engineering option or the Applied Science option are as 
follows: 



Aerospace Engineering 
Agncultural Engineenng 
Chemical Engmeenng 
Civil Engineenng 



Electncal Engineenng 
Engineenng Male nets 
Mechanical Engmeenng 
Nuclear Engineenng 



In addition, the field of Fire Protection is available within 
the applied science option as a primary field. All engineer- 
ing fields of concentration may be used as a secondary 
field within the engineering option. 

(1) Engineering sciences, for the purpose ol this degree, are those courses in 
the Engineering College prefixed by ENES, or. are in an engineering lieid not the 
pnmary or secondary tie Id ot engineenng concentration 

(2) Students following the "Engineering" option may use up to six sh ot course 
work at the 100 or 200 course number tevel m the pnmary or the secondary 
field of engineenng concentration as an engineenng science 



(3) A minimum of 50% of the course work in the mathematics, physical 
engineenng sciences and elective areas must be at the 300 or 400 course 
number tevel. 

(4| All of the courses used to fulfill the fields of concentration reoulrements (36 
sh in the engineenng option and 30 in the Applied Science option) must be at 
the 300 course number level or above 

(5) For the applied science option each student © required — unless specifically 
excused and if excused, 1 5 sh of approved electives will be required— to 
satisfactorily complete a senior level proiect or research assignment relating the 
engmeenng and science fields of concentration 

(6) In the Engineering option, the 6 sh of electives must be technical Imath. 
physical sciences, or engineenng sciences but may not be in the pnmary or 
secondary fields of concentration) In the Applied Sconce option, the approved 
electives should be selected to strengthen the student's program consistent witti 
career objectives Courses m the primary or secondary fields of concentration 
may be used to satisfy the approved electives requirement 

General Regulations for the B.S. -Engineering Degree. 

All undergraduate students in engineering will select their 
major field sponsoring department at the beginning of their 
second year regardless of whether they plan to proceed to 
a designated or an undesignated degree. A student wishing 
to elect the undesignated degree program may do so at any 
time following the completion of the sophomore year, or a 
minimum of 50 earned credits towards any engineering 
degree, and at least one semester prior to the time the 
student expects to receive the baccalaureate degree As 
soon as the student elects to seek an undesignated 
baccalaureate degree in engineering, the student's curricu- 
lum planning, guidance and counseling will be the responsi- 
bility of the "Undesignated Degree Program Advisor" in the 
primary field department At least one semester before the 
expected degree is to be granted, the student must file an 
"Application for Admission to Candidacy for the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering: with the Dean's Office 
of the College of Engineering The candidacy form must be 
approved by the chairman of the pnmary field department, 
the primary engineering and the secondary field advisors 
and the college faculty committee on "Undesignated 
Degree Programs ." This committee has the responsibility for 
implementing all approved policies pertaining to this program 
and reviewing and acting on the candidacy forms filed by 
the student 



102 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Specific University and College academic regulations 
apply to this undesignated degree program in the same 
manner as they apply to the conventional designated degree 
programs For example, the academic regulations of the 
University apply as stated in the College Park Catalog of the 
University of Maryland, and the College requirement of 2 00 
factor in the major field during the junior and senior years 
apply For the purpose of implementation of such academic 
rules, the credits in the primary engineering field and the 
credits in the secondary field are considered to count as 
"the Maior" for such academic purposes. 

Environmental Engineering. Environmental engineering is 
the application of basic engineering and science to the 
problems of the environment to ensure optimum environ- 
mental quality In recent years, humans have suffered a 
continually deteriorating environment A truly professional 
engineer involved in the study of environmental engineering 
must see the total picture and relate it to a particular 
mission whether this be air pollution, water quality control, 
environmental health or solid and liquid waste disposal. 
The total picture includes urban systems design, socio- 
economic factors, regional planning, transportation, recrea- 
tion, water resource development, and land and resource 
conservation 

A student who selects the BS -Engineering degree pro- 
gram can specialize in environmental engineering by proper 
selection of primary and secondary fields from the wide 
selection of courses related to environmental engineering 
given by the various departments in the College. 

Engineering — Medicine. Advanced technology is finding 
increasingly sophisticated applications in medical care 
delivery and research. Pacemakers, heart-assist pumps, 
kidney dialysis machines, and artificial limbs are only a few 
examples of the role of engineering and technology in 
medicine. In addition, diagnostic procedures and record- 
keeping have been greatly enhanced by the use of com- 
puters and electronic testing equipment. There is a growing 
need for physicians and researchers in the life sciences, 
having strong backgrounds in engineering, who can 
effectively utilize these technologies and who can work with 
engineers in research and development. 

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree provides 
the student an excellent opportunity to develop a pro- 
fessional level of competence in an engineering discipline 
while at the same time meeting the entrance requirements 
for medical school. Under the Applied Science option, the 
student could select any engineering field of most interest 
to him, and his or her secondary field would usually be 
Chemistry or Zoology. In addition to the medical school 
entrance requirements, he or she would complete 12 
credits of advanced work in his or her secondary field. 

Under the Engineering option, the student would 
generally combine Chemical Engineering (as either primary 
or secondary field) with another engineering discipline. This 
option allows the student to complete more advanced work 
in his primary field of engineering than does the Applied 
Science option. Either option can be completed in a four 
year period with careful planning and scheduling. 

Aerospace Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Anderson. 

Professors: Corning, Melnik, Pai, Rivelio, Sherwood. 

Associate Professors: Barlow, Donaldson, Jones, 

Plotkin. Schaeffer. 

Instructor: Greenwood. 

Lecturers: Billig (p.t.), Case (p.t.), Fleig (p.t.), 

Piaewonsky (p.t.), Hallion (p.t.). 

Aerospace engineering is focused on the physical 
understanding and design considerations of aircraft and 
space vehicles of all kinds. For example, consider the high- 
speed flight of NASA's future Space Shuttle. The airflow over 
the wings, fuselage and tail surfaces creates lift, drag and 
moments on the aircraft. If the velocity is high enough, such 
as during re-entry of the Apollo into the Earth's atmosphere, 
then the temperature of the airflow becomes extemely high, 
the air becomes chemically reacting, and heating of the 



vehicle's surface becomes a major problem The study of 
how and why the airflow produces these forces, moments 
and heating is called Aerodynamics. In turn, the motion of the 
aircraft or space vehicle will respond to, indeed will be 
determined by, the aerodynamic forces and moments The 
study of the motion and flight path of such vehicles is called 
Flight Mechanics. Of course, while executing this motion, the 
vehicle must be structurally sound, that is, its surface and 
internal structure must be able to withstand the severe 
forces and loads associated with flight. The study of the 
mechanical behavior of materials, stresses and strains, 
deflections and vibrations that are associated with the 
structure of the vehicle itself is called Flight Structures. In the 
same vein, the motion of any aircraft of space vehicle must 
be initiated and maintained by a propulsive mechanism such 
as the classic combination of a reciprocating engine with a 
propeller, or the more modern turbojets. ramjets and rockets 
The study of the physical fundamentals of how these 
engines work is called Flight Propulsion. Finally, all of the 
above are synthesized into one system with a specific 
application— such as a complete DC- 10 or a 
Skylab— through a discipline called Aerospace Vehicle 
Design. 

The Department of Aerospace Engineering at the 
University of Maryland offers a rigorous and balanced 
eduration which includes all of the above disciplines. The 
goal of this program is to create professionally oriented 
aerospace engineers with an understanding of the physical 
fundamentals underlying atmospheric and space flight, and 
with the capability of applying this knowledge for useful and 
exciting purposes. Moreover, the physical background and 
design synthesis that marks aerospace engineering 
education also prepares a student to work productively in 
other fields. For example, at this moment aerospace 
engineers are actively working on the solution of 
environmental and societal problems, on the energy crisis, 
and in the field of medicine. 

Aerospace Engineering Curriculum 

Semester 
Sophomore Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

MATH 240— Unear Algebra 4 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

PHYS 262.263— General Physics 4 4 

ENES 240— Algorithmic Analysis- 
Computer Programming. 3 
ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 3 
ENAE 201, 202— Introduction 
to Aerospace 

Engineering I. II 2 2 

ENAE 203— Technical Report Writing 1 

Total Credits 17 16 

Junior Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

MATH 246— Differential Equations .. . 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 

ENME 216— Thermodynamics' 3 

ENEE 300— Principles of 

Electrical Engineering . 3 

ENAE 305— Aerospace Laboratory 1 3 

ENAE 345— Introduction to Dynamics 
ENAE 345— Introduction to Dynamics 

of Aerospace Systems 3 

ENAE 451,452— FlightStructuresl.il 1 . . 4 3 

ENAE 371 —Aerodynamics 1 1 3 

Total Credits 16 18 

Senior Year Credits 

ENAE 471 —Aerodynamics II 1 3 

ENAE 475— Viscous Flow & 

Aerodynamic Heating 3 

ENAE 401 —Aerospace Laboratory II 2 

ENAE 402— Aerospace Laboratory III 1 

ENAE 461 —Flight Propulsion I 3 

General University Requirements 9 

Design Elective 2 3 

Applied Dynamics Elective 3 3 

Aerospace Elective 4 3 

Technical Elective 5 3 

Total Credits 33 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 103 



1 Those students who wish to take the elective course ENAE 462. 
Flight Propulsion II, should take the lollowlna sequence 

Sophomore (Fall Semester) EN AE 20 1 

Sophomore (Spring Semester) ENAE 202, ENME 2 1 6 

Junior (Fall Semester) ENAE 471 

Junior (Spring Semester) ENAE 461 

Senior (Fall Semester) ENAE 462 

For this sequence, ENAE 471, Aerodynamics II. can be taken before 
ENAE 37 1 , Aerodynamlca I. 

2 The student shall take one of the following design courses 
ENAE 4 1 1 —Aircraft Design 

ENAE 412— Design of Aerospace Vehicles 

3 The student shall take one course which utilizes dynamics In a 

system analysis. The following courses are offered 

ENAE 445— Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles 

ENAE 355— Aircraft Vibrations 

"Three credits must be taken from elective courses offered by the 

Aerospace Engineering Department Currently offered courses are 

ENAE 41 5— Computer-Aided Structural Design Analysis 

ENAE 453— Matrix Methods In Computational Analysis 

ENAE 457— Flight Structures III 

ENAE 462— Flight Propulsion II 

ENAE 472— Aerodynamics III 

ENAE 473— Aerodynamics of High Speed Flight 

ENAE 488— Topics in Aerospace Engineering 

ENAE 499— Elective Research 

Courses listed under 2 and 3 above and not used to meet the 
requirements of 2 and 3 may also be elected to fulfill requirement 4. 

5 Any 3 credit technical course with a course number of 300 or 
above may be taken as a technical elective. Courses available as 
Aerospacae Electives may be used as the technical elective. 

Course Code Prefix— ENAE 



Agricultural Engineering 



Departmental Requirements 

Semester 
Credit 
Hours 
AGEN 324— Engineering Dynamics of 

Biological Materials 3 
AGEN 424— Functional and Environmental 

Design of Agricultural Structures 3 
AGEN 343— Functional Design of Machinery 

and Equipment 3 

AGEN 421— Power Systems 3 

AGEN 422— Soil and Water Engineering 3 

ENCE 350— Structural Analysis and Design I 3 

ENES 101— Intro Engineering Science 3 

ENES 110— Statics 3 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 221— Dynamics 3 
ENME 300— Materials Science and Engineering 

or 

ENCE 300— Fund of Engineering Materials 3 

ENME 216— Thermodynamics 3 
ENME 342— Fluid Mechanics I 

or 

ENCE 330— Basic Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENEE 300— Prln of Electrical Engineering 3 

MATH 140, 141— Analysis I. II. . 4,4 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 
MATH 245— Differential Equations for 

Scientists and Engineers 3 
ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

or 

BOTN 101— General Botany ....... 4 

CHEM 103, 104— CollegeChemistryl.il , 4.4 

PHYS 161.262.263— General Physics . 34 4 

Technical Electives* 14 

General University Requirements* * 30 

Electives 6 



Associate Professor and Acting Chairman: Stewart 

Professors: Green. Harri9. Krewatch (Emeritus), Winn, Jr. 

Associate Professors: Felton, Merkel, Merrick (Emeritus), 

Stewart, Wheeton. 

Assistant Professors: Ayars, Grant, Johnson, Ross. 

Lecturer: Holton 

Instructor: Carr, Smith 

Adjunct Professor: Cowan 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Rebuck. 



Agricultural engineering utilizes both the physical and 
biological sciences to help meet the needs of our increasing 
world population for food, natural fiber and improvement or 
maintenance of the environment. Scientific and engineering 
principles are applied to the conservation and utilization of 
soil and water resources for food production and recreation; 
to the utilization of energy to improve labor efficiency and to 
reduce laborious and menial tasks; to the design of 
structures and equipment for housing or handling of plants 
and animals to optimize growth potential; to the design 
of residences to improve the standard of living for the rural 
population; to the development of methods and equipment to 
maintain or increase the quality of food and natural fiber; to 
the flow of supplies and equipment to the agricultural and 
aquacultural production units; and to the flow of products 
from the production units and the processing plants to the 
consumer. Agricultural engineers place emphasis on 
maintaining a high quality environment as they work toward 
developing efficient and economical engineering solutions. 

The undergraduate curiculum provides opportunity to 
prepare for many interesting and challenging careers In 
design, management, research, education, sales, consulting 
or international service The program of study includes a 
broad base of mathematical, physical and engineering 
sciences combined with basic biological sciences. Twenty 
hours of electives give flexibility so that a student may plan a 
program according to his major interest. 

Course Code Prefix— AGEN 



•Technical electives releted to Held of concentration, must be selected from a 
deoertmentally approved list Eignt credits must be 300 level and above 
* 'Students must consult with departmental advisors to ensure trie selection of 
appropriate courses for their particular program of study. 



Chemical Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Gomezplata. 

Program Director, Chemical Engineering: Cadman. 

Professors: Arsenault, Beckmann, Cadman, Duffey, 

Goldman (p. t.), Johnson, Marchello, Munno, Regan, 

Schroeder (p.t.), Silverman, Smith, Spain. 

Associate Professors: Almenas. Gentry, Roush, Sheaks 

Assistant Professors: Gasner, Hatch. King. 

Lecturer: Lois (p.t.). 



The Chemical Engineering Department offers programs in 
chemical, materials and nuclear engineering. In addition, 
study programs in the areas of applied polymer science, 
biological and environmental health engineering are avail- 
able. The latter programs are interdisciplinary with other 
departments of the University 

The departmental programs prepare an undergraduate for 
continued graduate study or immediate industrial 
employment following the baccalaureate degree 

The Chemical Engineering program involves the 
application of sound engineering and economic principles — 
and basic sciences of mathematics, physics and chemistry 
— to process industries concerned with the chemical 
transformation of matter The chemical engineer is primanly 
concerned with research and process development leading 
to new chemical process ventures or a better understanding 
of existing ones; with the efficient operation of the complete 
chemical plant or its component units: with the technical 
services engineering required for improving and 
understanding chemical plant operation and the products 
produced, with the chemical sales and economic distribution 
of the chemical plant product; and with the general 
management and executive direction of chemical process 
industry plants and industrial complexes 



104 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Because of this wide range of ultimate applications, the 
chemical engineer finds interesting and diverse career 
opportunities in such varied fields as chemical (inorganic and 
organic), food processing and manufacture, metallurgical, 
nuclear and energy conversion, petroleum (refining. 
production, or petrochemical), and pharmaceutical 
industries Additional opportunities are presented by the 
research and development activities of many public and 
private research institutes and allied agencies 



Chemical Engineering Curriculum 

Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

MATH 24 1 —Analysis III 

MATH 246— Dillerential Equations 

PHYS 262, 263— General Physics II. Ill 

ENES 220— Mechanics ol Materials 

CHEM 201. 203— College Chemistry III. IV. 

CHEM 204— College Chemistry 

Laboratory IV 
ENCH 215— Chemical Engineering 

Analysis I 
ENCH 250— Chemnical Engineering 

Analysis II 
Total 

Junior Year 

General University Requirements 

ENCH 440— Chemical Engr. Kinetics . 

ENCH 442— Chemical Engineering 

Systems Analysis 

CHEM 481.482— Physical Chemistry 
CHEM 430— Chemical Measurements 

Laboratory I 

Technical Elective 

ENCH 295— Chemical Process Thermo 
ENCH 425.427— Transfer and Transport 

Process I. II 

Total . 

Senior Year 

General University Requirements 

ENEE Electives 

ENCH 333— Seminar 
ENCH 437— Chemical Engineering Lab 
ENCH 445— Process Engr and Design 
ENCH 447— Chem Engineering Econ 
Technical Electives" 

Total 



'Technical Electives Requirements 

Twc courses must be selected from a single area of concentra- 
tion listed below One ot the courses must be a laboratory type 
course In addition, credits in ENCH 468 • Research must be taken 
in the area of concentration. 



Process Analysis and Optimization 
ENCH 452— Advanced Chemical 

Engineering Analysis 

(counts as Lab) (3) 

ENCH 453— Applied Mathematics in 

Chemical Engineering (3) 

ENCH 454— Chemical Process 

Analysis and 

Optimization (3) 



Civil Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Carter 

Professors: Allen (Emeritus). Birkner. Hems. Israel. Lepper. 

Otts, Ragan. Sternberg 

Associate Professors: Albrecht. Colville, Cournyn. Garber, 

Hall, McCuen. Piper, Witczak 

Assistant Professors: Derucher, Loutzenheiser, Mulinazzi. 

Vannoy. 

Visiting Professors: Austin, Rib (p.t.) 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Dickinson (p t ) 

Lecturer: Lord (p.t ). Wedding (p t ) 

Civil Engineering Curriculum. Civil engineering is 
concerned with the planning, design, construction and 
operation of large facilities associated with man's 
environment. Civil engineers specialize in such areas as 
environmental engineering, transportation systems, 
structures, water resource development, water supply and 
pollution control, urban and regional planning, construction 
management, and air pollution control. Many civil engineers 
enter private practice as consulting engineers or start their 
own businesses in the construction industry Others pursue 
careers with local, state, and federal agencies or with large 
corporations. 

The undergraduate program is founded on the basic 
sciences and emphasizes the development of a high degree 
of technical competence. The program orients the student 
toward computer aided design techniques and prepares him 
or her to incorporate new concepts that will develop during 
his or her professional career. Further, the program stresses 
the balance between technical efficiency and the needs of 
society. The graduate is prepared to enter one of the areas 
mentioned above, or he or she can move into new areas of 
specialization such as oceanographic engineering or the 
development of facilities for extra-terrestrial environments. 

At no time has man been more concerned with the quality 
of the environment Man is concerned with broad 
environmental problems such as pollution and the operation 
of transportation systems. Man is also concerned with 
problems such as a need for new approaches in the design 
and construction of buildings. The civil engineering 
profession faces the greatest challenge in its history as it 
assumes a central role in the solution of the physical 
problems facing the urban-regional complex. 



Biochemical Engineering 



ENCH 482— Biochemical Engineering . 
ENCH 485— Biochemical Engineering 

Laboratory 

Polymers 

ENCH 490— Introduction to Polymer 

Science 

ENCH 492— Applied Physical Chemistry 

of Polymers 

ENCH 494— Polymer Technology 

Laboratory 

Chemical Processing 

ENCH 450— Chemical Process 

Development 

ENCH 46 1 —Control of Air Pollution 

Sources 
ENCH 455— Chemical Process Laboratory 



Semester 

Credit 

Hours 

(3) 

(2) 



Sophomore Year 

MATH 241— Analysis III 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for 

Scientists and Engineers 
262, 263— General Physics II, III . 
220— Mechanics of Materials 
221— Dynamics 
280— Engineering Survey 

Measurements 
221— Introduction to 

Environmental Engineering 
General University Requirements 



PHYS 
ENES 
ENES 
ENCE 

ENCE 



(3) 




Total Credits 


(3) 


Junior 


Vear 




ENCE 


300— Fundamentals of 


(2) 




Engineering Materials 




ENCE 


330— Basic Fluid Mechanics 




ENCE 


340— Fundamentals of Soil 
Mechanics 


(3) 


ENCE 


350, 351— Structural Analysis 
and Design I, II 


(3) 


ENCE 


360— Engineering Analysis and 


(2) 




Computer Programming 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 105 



ENCE 370— Fundamentals ol 

Transportation Engineering 3 
ENME 215— Principles ot Mechanical 
Engineering 
or 
ENCH 295— Chemical Process 

Thermodynamics 3 

ENCE— Technical Electives (Group A, 

B.C.orD)" 3 

General University Requirements 6 

Total Credits 16 18 

" See notes concemrg electives 

Senior Year 

ENCE— Technical Elective (Group A. 

B.C.orD) - 7 3**' 

ENCE— Technical Elective (Group E. 

F orGI" 3"" 3""" 

ENEE 300— Principles ot Electrical 

Engineering 3 

Technical Elective" ■ 3 

General University Requirements 6 3 

Total Credits 16 15 

■ See notes concerning Technical Electives 
"'One course from the available Technical Electives in Civil Engmeenng or 
approved Technical Elective outside department 
"""These numbers represent three-semester-credit courses Additional 
semester credits will be involved to the extent that courses carrying more 
than three credits are selected 

Notes Concerning Technical Electives in Civil Engineer- 
ing. A minimum of 22 credit hours of technical electives are 
required as follows: 

( 1 ) All 3 courses from one area of concentration A, B. C. or 
D 

(2) 1 course in one other area of concentration A. B, C or 
D 

(3)6 hours in areas of concentration E, F. orG. 
(4) Any one course in the following list or approved 
technical course outside the department 



(E| Mechanics and Materials 
ENCE 410(31 
ENCE 411 (4) 

(F) Soil Mechanics 
ENCE 440 (3) 
ENCE 441 (3) 

(G) Systems Analysis 
and Planning 

ENCE 420 (3) 
ENCE 461 (3) 
ENCE 463 (3) 
(H) Special Studies 
(Max 3 credits) 
ENCE 489 (3) 



Areas of Concentration 
(A| Structures 

ENCE 450 (3) 

ENCE 451 (4) 

ENCE 460 (3) 

(B) Water Resources 
ENCE 430 (4) 
ENCE 431 (3) 
ENCE 432 (3) 

(C) Environmental 
ENCE 433 (3) 
ENCE 434 (3) 
ENCE 435 (4) 

(D) Transportation 
ENCE 470 (4) 
ENCE 471 (3) 
ENCE 472(31 

Course Code Pretix— ENCE 

Electrical Engineering 



Professor and Chairman: Harger. 

Professors: Chu, Davisson. DeClaris, Hochuli. Kim. 

Ligomenides. Lin, Newcomb. Rao. Reiser. Taylor, Wagner, 

Weiss 

Associate Professors: Basham, Emad. Ephremides, Lee. 

Levine. Pugsley, Rhee, Simons. Tretter, Zajac. Zaki 

Assistant Professors: Baras. Davis, Destler. Gallman. 

O'Grady. Paez. Silio. Striffler, Vaca, 

Lecturers Cheung (p t ). Mink (p t ). Pinkston (p t ), 

Schulman (p t ). Siahatager (p.t ) White (p.t.) 

Instructor: Wilhelm 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Leon-Garcia 

Flexibility is the main characteristic of the program in 
Electrical Engineering The student can specialize, or he or 
she can have a broader education, as he or she chooses 
This is established through broad elective structure both 
within and outside the Electrical Engineering Department 

Specialization areas available to the student are 
Biomedical. Circuits. Communications. Computers. Control. 



and Electrophysics These areas include such fields as 
Electronics, Integrated Circuits. Bioelectronics. Solid State 
Devices. Lasers, Radar, Radio. Space Navigation. Information 
Theory, Telemetry, Antennas. Automatic Control. System 
Theory. Cybernetics. Computer Software and Hardware, 
Particle Accelerators, Electromechanical Transducers, 
Energy Conversion, and many others 

Apprenticeship programs allow qualified undergraduate 
students to work with research laboratory directors in the 
Department, thus giving the student a chance for a unique 
experience in research and engineering design 

Projects in Electrical Engineering allow undergraduate 
students to do independent study under the guidance of a 
faculty member in an area of mutual interest 

A new Fundamentals Laboratory and several Specialty 
Laboratory courses have been established These are self 
contained and may be taken independently of related 
theoretical courses These laboratories provide theoretical 
and practical experience in classical and modern topics 
using up-to-date equipment 

The boundary between electrical engineering and applied 
mathematics or applied physics is becoming steadily less 
distinct, particularly at the research level Simultaneously, the 
technological problems and needs of society are becoming 
steadily more complex The engineer is the intermediary 
between science and society To solve the problems of 
modern society he or she must fully understand the most 
modern devices and methodologies available To find the 
best solution he or she must have a very broad 
interdisciplinary education To find a solution that is also 
acceptable to society he or she must be concerned with the 
economic, ecologic and human factors involved in the 
problem Finally, current research topics frequently require a 
thorough knowledge of advanced mathematics and physics 

The curriculum of the Electrical Engineering Department 
reflects the diverse requirements cited above A basic 
mathematical, physical and engineering sciences foundation 
is established in the first two years. Once this foundation is 
established, the large number of electrical engineering 
courses and the flexibility of the elective system allow a 
student to specialize or diversify and to prepare for a career 
either as a practicing engineer or for more theoretically 
oriented graduate work 

To go along with this freedom, the Department has a 
system of undergraduate advising The student is 
encouraged to discuss his or her program and career plans 
with his or her advisor in order to get maximum benefit from 
the curriculum. 



Sophomore Year 
General University Requirements 
MATH 246— Differential Equations 
MATH 241— Analysis III 
PHYS 262. 263— General Physics II. Ill 
ENES 240— Engineering Computation 
ENES 221— Dynamics 
ENEE 204— Systems and Circuits I 
ENEE 250— Computer Structures 
Total Credits 

Junior Year 

MATH —(Elective Advanced Math) 

ENEE 322— Signal and System Theory 
ENEE 380— Electromagnetic Theory 
ENEE 38 1 —Electromagnet Wave 

Propagation 
ENEE 304— Systems and Circuits II 
ENEE 305— Fundamental Laboratory 
ENEE 324— Engineering Probability 
ENEE 314— Electronic Circuits 
ENEE —Advanced Elective 

Laboratory 
Electives* 

General University Requirements 
Total Credits 

Senior Year 

ENEE —Specialty Electives 

■ es* 
General University Requirements 
Total Credits 



106 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



'Of (he eighteen elective credits, a mnmuim ot three credits must be Irom 
Electrical Engmeermg and a mnmum ot nne credits from other fields ot 
engineering mathematics, physics, or other suitable scientific disciplnes 
I'ifig su> credit hours are technical etectives and may be taken from 
Electrical Engineering or other engineering and technical areas (including 
mathematics, physics, or other scientific fields) 

Technical electees available in Electrical Engineering are 
described in the course listings Any Electrical Engineering 
course numbered 400 or 499 inclusive that is not 
specifically excluded in its description may be used as part 
ol a technical elective program All other technical electives 
must be of 300 level or higher If a lower level course (not 
specified as a degree requirement) is prerequisite to a 300 
or higher level technical elective, the student should plan to 
take such a lower level course under his General University 
Requirements, otherwise, less than 300 level courses do not 
count as technical electives towards a degree in Electrical 
Engineering In all cases the student's elective program must 
be approved by an Electrical Engineering advisor and, in 
addition, by the Oflice of Undergraduate Studies of the 
Electrical Engineering Department 

Throughout the year students are urged to contact the 
Electrical Engineering Office of Undergraduate Studies for 
advice or any other matters related to their studies 

The specialty electives for the six specialization areas are 
listed below Students who wish to specialize should plan to 
take both courses in the same area, plus the specialty 
laboratory in that area (if one exists) Students not interested 
in specialzing can take any two of the 1 2 specialty courses 
listed below and can take two credits of any 400 or higher 
level laboratory (specialty laboratory or otherwise) Consult 
departmental offerings each semester or consult the Office 
of Undergraduate Studies for plans on future offerings of 
these specialty elective courses. 

ENEE Specialty Electives 

Circuits: 

ENEE 4 1 4— Network Analysis (3) 

ENEE 4 1 6— Network Synthesis (3) 
Communications: 

ENEE 420— Communication Theory (3) 

ENEE 421— Introduction to Information Theory (3) 
Biomedical: 

ENEE 434— Introduction to Neural Networks and Signals 
(3) 

ENEE 435 — Electrodes and Electrical Processes in 
Biology and Medicine (3) 
Computers 

ENEE 444— Logic Design of Digital Systems (3) 

ENEE 446— Digital Computer Design (3) 
Control: 

ENEE 460— Control Systems (3) 

ENEE 462— Systems, Control and Computation (3) 
Electrophysics: 

ENEE 481— Antenna(3) 

ENEE 496— Introduction to Lasers and Electro-optic 
Devices (3) 

ENEE Advanced Elective Laboratories 

ENEE 407— Microwave-Circuits Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 413— Electronics Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 445— Computer Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 461 —Control Systems Laboratory (2) 

ENEE 483— Electromagnetic Measurements Laboratory 

(2) 
An approved laboratory research program (such as ENEE 

419— Apprenticeship) may be substituted for the advanced 

elective laboratory. 

Course Code Prefix— ENEE* 



Engineering Materials Program 

Professor and Program Director: Spain * * . 

Professors: Arsenault" *, Smith* V 

Associated Faculty: Armstrong* , Marcinkowski * , Park* * *. 

Engineering materials is the study of the relationship 
between structure and properties of materials The principles 



of physics, chemistry and mathematics are applied to metals, 
ceramics, polymers and composite materials used in 
industrial applications In addition to the traditional area of 
metallurgy, engineering materials includes the fields of solid 
state physics and polymer and materials science and their 
application to modern industrial problems Because of the 
extensive use of materials, the engineering student finds a 
wide variety of interesting career opportunities in many 
companies and laboratories Materials research is particularly 
important in the development of new energy-conversion 
systems 

Programs of study in engineering materials at the 
undergraduate and graduate level are ottered through the 
Chemical and Mechanical Engineering Departments 
Students may use Engineering Materials as a field of 
concentration in the Bachelor of Science in Engineering 
Program Students choosing engineering materials as their 
primary field may pursue the following example curriculum 
Students electing engineering materials as a secondary field 
should seek advice from a member of the engineering 
materials faculty 

Course Code Prefix— ENMA 

•Member of Mechanical Engineering Department 
• * Member ot Chemical Engineenng Department 
• ' " Member of Physics Department 



Sophomore 

General University Requirements 

MATH 241— Analysis III 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 

PHYS 262. 263— General Physics 

ENES 220— Mechanics. Materials 

CHEM 201. 203— College Chemistry III. IV 

ENES 230— Materials Science 

ENME 200— Intro to Mech Engineering 



Junior 

General University Requirements 

CHEM 481.482— Physical Chemistry 

ENMA 300— Materials Science & Engr 

ENMA 301— Materials Eng Lab 

ENMA 462— Deformation ot Eng Matl. 

ENMA 463— Chemical. Liquid and Powder 

Process of Eng Materials 
ENMA 464— Environmental Effects on 

Eng Materials 

Minor Courses 
Technical Electivjs 



Senior 

General University Requirements 
ENMA 470— Structure and Properties 
of Eng Materials 
471 —Physical Chemistry 
of Eng Materials 
4 72— Technology of Eng Matls 
473— Processing of Eng Matls 



ENMA 



ENMA 
ENMA 



Minor Courses . 
Technical Electives 



Engineering Sciences 

Engineering Science courses represent a common core of 
basic material offered to students of several different 
departments. All freshman and sophomore students of 
Engineering are required to takes ENES 101 and ENES 1 1 
Other ENES courses 220. 221, and 240. are specified by 
the different departments or taken by the student as 
electives. The responsibility for teaching the Engineering 
Science courses is divided among the Aerospace, Civil, 
Mechanical. Chemical and Electrical Engineering 
Departments. In addition to the core courses noted above, 
several courses of general interest to engineering or non- 
engineering students have been given ENES designations. 

Fire Protection Engineering Program 

Professor and Chairman: Bryan. 

Assistant Professor: Hickey 

Lecturers: Brannigan (p.t.). Walton (p.t.), Watts 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 107 



Fire protection is concerned with the scientific and 
technical problems ot preventing loss of life and property 
from fire, explosion and related hazards, and of evaluating 
and eliminating hazardous conditions 

The fundamental principles of fire protection are relatively 
well-defined and the application of these principles to a 
modern industrialized society has become a specialized 
activity Control of the hazards in manufacturing processes 
calls for an understanding not only of measures for the 
protection but of the processes themselves Often the most 
effective solution to the problem of safeguarding a hazardous 
operation lies in the modification of special extinguishing 
equipment The expert in fire protection must be prepared to 
decide in any given case what is the best and most 
economical solution of the fire prevention problem His or her 
recommendations are often based not only on sound 
principles of fire protection but on a thorough understanding 
of the special problems of the individual property. 

Modern fire protection utilizes a wide variety of 
mechanical and electrical equipment which the student must 
understand in principle before he or she can apply them to 
special problems The fire protection curriculum emphasizes 
the scientific, technical and humanitarian aspects of fire 
protection and the development of the individual student 

The problems and challenges which confront the 
specialist in fire protection include the reduction and control 
of fire hazards due to processes subject to fire or explosion 
in respect to design, installation and handling, involving both 
physical and human factors, the use of buildings and 
transportation facilities to restrict the spread of fire and to 
facilitate the escape of occupants in case of fire; the design, 
installation and maintenance of fire detection and 
extinguishing devices and systems; and the organization and 
education of persons for fire prevention and fire protection. 

Fire Protection Engineering Curriculum 



ENEE 



300— Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 
ENFP 414— Lite Safety Systems Analysis 
ENFP 4 1 1 —Fire Protection Hazard 

Analysis 
ENFP 415— Fire Protection System 

Design II 
ENFP 416— Problem Synthesis and 

Design 
Technical Electives* 
Total 

Total Credit Hours— 131 

• 3 credits ot technical electives must be m ENFP 

CoureeCode Prelix— ENFP 



Fire Science — Urban Studies 

The provision of a major field of specialization in Fire 
Science for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Urban Studies 
is designed to meet the professional educational needs and 
objectives of fire service personnel The broad inter- 
disciplinary nature of the Urban Studies program will provide 
public fire safety personnel with a technical background and 
understanding of urban considerations in public fire safety 

High school seniors interested in the field of fire science 
are encouraged to enroll in a community college program 
The Urban Studies — Fire Science Degree program requires 
that an individual complete an approved associate degree 
program in Fire Science The upper division of a four year 
program leading to a B S in Urban Studies — Fire Science is 
taken at the College Park Campus 

The upper division fire science courses are structured to 
build on fundamental concepts developed at the community 
college level The primary focus of these courses is the 
analysis of current technology in fire protection, urban fire 
service delivery criteria, and research for the improved 
provision of public fire safety. 



Sophomore Year 

General University Requirements 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra 

or 
MATH 241— Analysis III 
MATH 246— Differential Equations 
PHYS 262. 263— General Physics 
ENES 221— Dynamics 
ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials . . . . 
ENFP 251— Introduction to Fire 

Protection Engineering 
ENFP 280— Urban Fire Problem Analysis 
Total 

Junior Year 

General University Requirements 
CMSC 1 10— Elementary Algorithmic 
Analysis 



Typical Upper Division Program Example 

Junior Year 

ETFS 30 1 —Fire Safety Codes 

and Standards 
ETFS 302— Urban Fire Safety Analysis I 
URBS 210— Survey ol the Field of Urban 

Studies 
or 
URBS 260— Introduction to 

Urban Studies 
URBS 320— City and the Developing 

National Culture 
Physical Environmental Specialization 
General University Requirements 
General Electives 



ENES 240— Algorithmic Analysis and 

Computer Programming 
ENME 320— Thermodynamics 



ENCH 
ENCE 

ENME 


295- 

300- 

or 
300- 


-Ch em ical Process 
Thermodynamics 

-Fundamentals ot 

Engineenng Materials 


ENCE 


330- 
312- 
310- 

320- 
321- 


Engineering 


ENFP 
ENFP 

ENFP 
ENFP 


-Fire Protection Fluids 
-Fire Protection Systems 

Design I 
-Pyrometncs ot Materials 
-Functional and Structural 



Evaluation 
Approved Electives 
Total 

Senior Year 

General University Requirements 
ENNU 310— Environmental Aspects of 
Nuclear Energy 



Senior Year 
ETFS 303 



Urban Fire Problem 

Analysis II 
402— Fire Safety Research 

and Transfer 
350— Introduction to Urban 

Field Study 



URBS 
URBS 



395— Seminar in Urban Literature 
430— Urban Community and 
Urban Organization 
480— Urban Theory and Simulation 
405— Technical Problems Analysis 

Physical Environmental Specialization 

General University Requirements 



URBS 
ETFS 



Mechanical Engineering 

Professor and Chairman Cunniff 

Professors: Allen. Anand. Armstrong. Berger Dally Fourney. 
Hsu. Jackson (Emeritus). Marcinkowski. Sayre. Jr , Shreeve. 
Jr . Talaat. Weske (Emeritus). Wockenfuss. Yang. Sallet 
Associate Professors: Buckley. Jr . Hayleck. Jr . HoUoway. 
Marks. Walston 



108 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



Assistant Professors Hurdis, Kirk, Kobayashl, Matthew. 

Metcalf, Ostrowsk Tsui, Wallace, Collier, Dagaiakis 

Hannemann 

Lecturers: Christou (p t ), Dawson (p.t.), Smith (p.t.). 

Instructor: Keydel, Holmes 

Visiting Professors: Irwin (p.t.), Seigel 

Visiting Assistant Professors: Sadananda, Wu 

The primary function of the mechanical engineer is to 
create devices, machines, structures or processes which are 
used to advance the welfare of mankind. Design, analysis 
and testing are the essential steps In these developments Of 
particular importance are the aspects of engineering science 
and art relating to the generation and transmission of 
mechanical power, the establishment of both experimental 
and theoretical models of mechanical systems, the static and 
dynamic behavior of fluids and the optimization of materials in 
design Emphasis is also given to the proper co-ordination 
and management of facilities and personnel to achieve a 
successful product or service 

The responsibility of the Mechanical Engineering 
profession is extremely broad. The following divisions of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers indicate many of 
the technical areas in which the mechanical engineer may 
work air pollution, applied mechanics, automatic controls, 
aviation and space, biomechanical and human factors, design 
engineering, diesel and gas engine power, energetics, fluids 
engineering, fuels, gas turbine, heat transfer, management, 
materials handling, metals engineering, nuclear engineering, 
petroleum, power, pressure vessels and piping, process 
industries, railroad, rubber and plastics, safety, solar energy, 
textiles and underwater technology. 

There are many career opportunities in all of these fields. 
In particular, the areas of design, systems analysis, 
management, consulting, research, maintenance, production, 
teaching and sales offer challenging and rewarding futures. 

Because of the wide variety of professional opportunities 
available to the mechanical engineer, the curriculum is 
designed to provide the student with a thorough training in 
basic fundamentals including physics, chemistry, 
mathematics, mechanics, thermodynamics, materials, heat 
transfer, electronics, power and design. The curriculum leads 
to a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering 
which is usually sufficient for early career opportunities in 
industry or the government. Advanced graduate programs 
are available for continued study leading to Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Curriculum for the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Years 

Semester 

Sophomore Year I ll 

General University Requirements 3 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 3 

PHYS 262. 263— General Physics II, III . . . 4 4 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials. . 3 

ENES 22 1 —Dynamics 3 

ENME 205— Engr, Anal and Computer 

Programming 3 

ENME 21 7— Thermodynamics _ 3 

Total Credits 17 16 

Junior Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 6 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical 

Engineering 3 

ENEE 301— Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory 1 

ENME 300— Materials Engineering 3 

ENME 301— Materials Engineering 

Laboratory 1 

ENME 315— Intermediate Thermodynamics 3 

ENME 321— Transfer Processes 3 

ENME 342— Fluid Mechanics I 3 

ENME 343— Fluid Mechanics Laboratory 1 

ENME 360— Dynamics of Machinery , , 3 
ENME 381 —Measurements Laboratory . 3 

Total Credits . . . 17 16 

Senior Year I II 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ENME 400— Machine Design 3 



ENME 403— Automatic Controls 3 

ENME 404— Mechanical Engineering 

Syltems Design 4 

ENME 405— Energy Conversion Design 3 

ENME 480— Engineering Experimentation 3 

Tecnnical Elective (Design Group) 3 

Technical Elective 3 3' 

Total Credits 16 16 

■ Deifl- one" tea «»ct v» tpproved By !"• D»p«rtm»ni Cmmin 

Technical Electlves 

ENME 410— Operations Research I 3 

ENME 4 1 1 —Introduction to Industrial 

Engineering 3 

ENME 414— Solar Energy — Applications 

m Buildings 3 

ENME 422— Energy Conversion II 3 

ENME 423— Environmental Engineering 3 

ENME 424— Advanced Thermodynamics 3 

ENME 442— Fluid Mechanics II 3 

ENME 450— Mechanical Engineering Analysis tor 

the Oceanic Environment 3 

ENME 45 1 —Mechanical Engineering Systems for 

Underwater Operations 3 

ENME 452— Physical and Dynamical 

Oceanography 3 

ENME 453— Ocean Waves, Tides and 

Turbulences 3 

ENME 460— Elasticity and Plasticity I 3 

ENME 461— Dynamics II 3 

ENME 462— Introduction to Engineering 

Acoustics 3 

ENME 465— Introductory Fracture Mechanics 3 

ENME 488— Special Problems 3 

ENME 489— Special Topics in 

Mechanical Engineering 3 

In the Mechanical Engineering Department there are 
several divisions of specialization which include: design and 
system analysis, energy conversion, solid and fluid 
mechanics and materials. The undergraduate student may 
select technical electives from one or more of these areas of 
specialization. Students planning to continue on in the 
graduate program should preferably choose electives to 
provide the best background for their major area. The subject 
material of interest to each field of specialization is: 

I. Industrial and Systems Engineering 

a. Systems design 

b. Systems analysis 

c. Operations research 

d Engineering management 

II. Energy 

a. Thermodynamics 
b Heat transfer 

c. Energy conversion 

d. Solar energy 

III. Fluid Mechanics 

a. Compressible and incompressible flow 

b. Viscous flow 

c. Hydrodynamics 

d. Marine and ocean engineering 
IV Solid Mechanics 

a. Continuum mechanics 

b. Dynamics, vibrations and acoustics 

c. Elasticity, plasticity and viscoelasticity 

d. Plates, shells and structures 

e. Experimental mechanics 
V. Materials 

See listing under Engineering Materials section. 
Opportunities are also available for students to take 
advanced work in engineering management, operations 
research, marine and ocean engineering, bio-mechanical 
engineering, environmental engineering, acoustics, bio- 
mechanics and experimental stress analysis. 

Course Code Prefix— ENME 



Mechanical Engineering Technology Program 

Mechanical Engineering is a part of the spectrum of 
technical education extending from the skilled craftsman to 
the professional mechanical engineer. The mechanical 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 109 



engineering technologist is located nearest the engineer and 
applies scientific and engineering principles in supporting 
engineering activities in both government and industries 
Students completing this program normally pursue their 
careers as engineering technologists working in production, 
maintenance, quality control, prototype testing or sales. 

High school seniors interested in Mechanical Engineering 
Technology are encouraged to enroll in a community college 
program The community colleges provide the first two years 
of the program and award students an Associate of Arts 
degree The second two years of a four year program leading 
to a B S in Mechanical Engineering Technology are taken at 
the College Park Campus. 

Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum 

Semester 
Junior Year I II 

CMSC 1 1 0— Introduction to Computer 

Programming 3 

ETME 380— Applied Math in Engineering 3 

ETME 210— Applied Thermodynamics 3 

ETME 320— Fluid Mechanics 

Technology 3 

ETME 343— Fluid Mechanics 

Laboratory 1 

ETME 330— Machine Design 

Technology I 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ETME 325— Instrumentation & 

Measurements 4 

ETME 335— Machine Design 

Technology II 3 

ETME 315— Heat Transfer Technology . , 3 

ETME 345— Vibrations _ _3_ 

Total Credits 16 16 

Senior Year 

ETME 350— Mechanical System Design 3 

ETME 370— Industrial Engineering Tech. . . 3 
ETME 360— Applications of Direct 

Energy Conversion 3 

ETME —Technical Elective 3 

General University Requirements 3 3 

ETME 355— Mechanical System 

Design Project 3 

ETME 375— Applied Operations 

Research 3 

ETME —Technical Elective 3 

ETME —Technical Elective _ 3 

Total Credits 15 15 

'Students transferring equivalent course as pan of their first two years credrt 
may make appropriate substitutions It is strongly recommended that students 
complete thermodynamics before entering the lumor year If this is not feasible 
they must take ETME 210 during the first semester It is recommended that 
students complete an equivalent computer programming course before starting 
the luncr year Students who have not taken computer programming by the end 
of their junior year must take programming m lieu of a technical elective 

Nuclear Engineering Program 

Professor and Program Director: Munno. 
Professors: Duffey, Silverman 
Associate Professors: Almenas, Sheaks 
Reactor Director: Belcher 



Nuclear Engineering deals with the practical use of nuclear 
energy from nuclear fission, fusion, and radioisotope 
sources. The major use of nuclear energy is in electric power 
generation Other uses are in the areas of chemical 
processing, medicine, instrumentation, and isotope tracer 
analysis The nuclear engineer is primarily concerned with 
the design and operation of energy conversion devices 
ranging from very large reactors to miniature nuclear 
batteries, and with the use of nuclear reactions in many 
environmental, biological and chemical processes Because 
of the wide range of uses for nuclear systems, the nuclear 
engineer finds interesting and diverse career opportunities in 
a variety of companies and laboratories 

Programs of study in nuclear engineering at the 
undergraduate and graduate level are offered through the 
Chemical Engineering Department Students may use 



nuclear engineering as a field of concentration in the 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering Program 

Students choosing nuclear engineering as their primary 
field may pursue the following example curriculum Students 
electing nuclear engineering as their secondary field should 
seek advice from a member of the nuclear engineering 
faculty. 

Nuclear Engineering Program 



Sophomore Year I 

General University Requirements 3 

MATH 241— Analysis III 4 

MATH 246— Differential Equations 
PHYS 262. 263— General Physics 4 

ENES 231— Material Science 3 

ENES 240— Algorithmic Analysis and 

Computer Programming , . 
Secondary Field Electives 3 

ENNU 215 

Total 1 7 

Junior Year 

General University Requirements 3 

ENNU 440— Nuc Tech Lab 3 

ENNU 450— Reactor Engl 3 

PHYS 420— Intro to Mod. Phys 3 

Secondary Field Courses 3 
ENNU 455— Reactor Engr II 
ENES Elective 

Total 15 



Senior Year 

General University Requirements 3 

ENNU Electives 3 
Secondary Field Courses . . 3 

Technical Electives 3 

ENNU 480— Rector Core Des 3 
ENNU 490— Nuc Fuel Cycle & 

Management 

ENES Elective 3 

Total 18 

Wind Tunnel Operations 
Department 

Wind Tunnel Operations Department 



Wind Tunnel Operations Department conducts a program 
of experimental research and development in cooperation 
with the aircraft industry, agencies of government and other 
industries with problems concerning aerodynamics Testing 
programs cover a variety of subjects including all types of 
aircraft, ships, parachutes, radar antennas, trucks, auto- 
mobiles, structures and exterior equipment subject to high 
winds. 

The department has a 7.75 x 1 1 foot wind tunnel that can 
be operated at speeds from to 240 m.p.h This facility 
has powered model drive equipment, and auxiliary vacuum 
and high pressure air supplies for boundary layer control 
studies Supporting shops include complete woodworking, 
machine shop, photographic, and instrumentation facilities. 

The full-time staff of the department includes engineering, 
computing, shop, and technical operations personnel This 
staff cooperates with other faculty and students in the 
College of Engineering on problems of mutual interest. 

Other Mathematical and 
Physical Science Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 
Applied Mathematics Program 

Director Professor W Rheinboldt 

Faculty: Seventy-seven members from eleven units of the 

campus 

The Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics Program 
provides the opportunity for graduate study and research in 



110 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



mathematics and its applications in the engineering, physical 
and social sciences 

The faculty ot the program includes members from the 
following participating units Departments of Aerospace 
Engineering. Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering. 
Computer Science. Economics. Electrical Engineering, 
Mathematics. Mechanical Engineering and Physics and 
Astronomy. College of Business and Management. Institute 
for Physical Science and Technology. 

The purpose of the program is to encourage the 
development of expertise in both mathematics and a 
particular field of application The course of study is very 
flexible and may vary considerably depending upon the 
student's interests and career aspirations 

For admission to the Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics 
Program a student is expected to have completed an 
undergraduate program which included a strong emphasis 
on mathematics A good background in some part of an 
applications area, such as the basic sciences, engineering, 
economics, business and management, etc is also highly 
recommended In addition, undergraduate students 
interested in preparing themselves for graduate study under 
the program are urged to acquire a good foundation in 
scientific computing 

Astronomy Program 

Professors: Bell. Enckson. Kundu. Rose. Smith. Wentzel, 

Westerhout. Zuckerman 

Professors (Adjunct or part time): Brandt. Musen, Opik 

Associate Professors: A'Hearn, Harrington, Matthews, Zipoy 

Associate Professors (Adjunct or part time): Clark, Trimble 

Assistant Professor: Scott 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Chen 

Lecturer: Deming 

Instructor: Grady 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers a major 
m Astronomy. The Astronomy Program office is located in 
the Space Sciences Building Astronomy students are given 
a strong undergraduate preparation in astronomy, physics 
and mathematics, as well as encouragement to take a wide 
range of other liberal arts courses. The Astronomy Program 
is designed to be quite flexible, in order to take advantage of 
students' special talents or interests after the basic 
requirements for a sound astronomy education have been 
met Students preparing for graduate studies will have an 
opportunity to choose from among many advanced courses 
available in astronomy, mathematics and physics. The 
program is designed to prepare students for positions in 
governmental and industrial laboratories and observatories, 
for graduate work in astronomy or related fields, and for non- 
astronomical careers such as in law or business. 

Students intending to major in astronomy who have a high 
school course in physics and who have adequate 
preparation in mathematics to qualify for admission to MATH 
140 will ordinarily take the introductory physics course 
PHYS 191, 192, 293 and 294 during their freshman and 
sophomore years. Those students who do not decide to 
major in astronomy or physics until after their freshman or 
sophomore year or enter as transfer students will often have 
taken other introductory courses in physics (e.g. PHYS 161, 
262. 263) Students will find further details in the pamphlet 
entitled Department Requirements for a B.S. degree in 
Astronomy, which is available from the Astronomy Program 
Office. This pamphlet outlines many different approaches for 
an astronomy major. 

ASTR 181, 182 (Introductory Astronomy and 
Astrophysics) is the introductory astronomy course required 
of astronomy majors. It may be taken in the freshman or 
sophomore year. It is followed by another required course, 
ASTR 210 (Practical Astronomy). Some students may not 
decide to major in astronomy until they have already taken 
ASTR 100 and 105 (Introduction to Astronomy and Modern 
Astronomy). Such students should, as a rule, still fulfill the 



ASTR 181, 182 requirement; only students with a grade of B 
or better in ASTR 100 and 105 will be encouraged to major 
m astronomy For those students with the appropriate 
physics background, it would be preferable to take a one 
semester introductory course, ASTR 350, instead of the 
ASTR 181. 182 sequence 

Astronomy majors are required to take the following 
physics courses PHYS 191. 192, 195. 196. 293. 294. 
295. 296, (161 . 262, 263 plus 404-405 may be substituted 
for this sequence in some cases) In addition, one of the 
following sequences is required PHYS 421-422 or 410- 
411 Required supporting courses are MATH 140, 141 and 
240 or 241 or 246 The introductory astronomy courses, 
ASTR 181. 182 (or ASTR 350) and 210 plus any two 400- 
level ASTR courses (6 credits) complete the requirements 
The program requires that the student maintain an average 
grade of C in all astronomy courses: moreover, the average 
grade of all the required physics and mathematics courses 
must also be C or better. Any student who wishes to be 
recommended for graduate work in astronomy must maintain 
a B average. He or she should also consider including 
several additional advanced courses, beyond the minimum 
required, to be selected from astronomy, physics and 
mathematics. 

Honors in Astonomy. The Honors Program offers students 
of exceptional ability and interest in astronomy an 
educational program with a number of special opportunities 
for learning. There are many opportunities for part-time 
research participation which may develop into full-time 
summer projects. An honors seminar is offered for advanced 
students, credit may be given for independent work or study; 
and certain graduate courses are open for credit toward the 
bachelor's degree. 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted by the 
Department's Honors Committee on the basis of 
recommendations from their advisors and other faculty 
members Most honors candidates submit a written report on 
their research project, which together with an oral 
comprehensive examination in the senior year, concludes 
the program which may lead to graduation "with Honors (or 
High Honors) in Astronomy." 

Courses for Non-Science Majors. There are a variety of 
Astronomy courses offered for those who are interested in 
learning about the subject but do not wish to major in it. 
These courses do not require any background in mathe- 
matics or physics and are geared especially to the non- 
science major. ASTR 100 is a general survey course that 
briefly covers all of the major parts of Astronomy ASTR 1 1 
is the lab that can be taken with or after ASTR 100. 
Several 300-level courses are offered primarily for non- 
science students who want to learn about a particular field 
in depth In ASTR 398 the subject matter will change each 
semester and will cover such topics as: Life in the Universe, 
Our Milky Way Galaxy, the New Astronomy. As a rule, 398's 
like ASTR 330 (Solar System) and ASTR 340 (Galaxies and 
the Universe), have no prerequisites beyond junior standing. 



Computer Science 

Professor and Chairman: Minker. 

Professors: Atchison, Chu 1 , Edmundson 2 , Kanal 2 , Rhein- 

boldt 3 , Rosenfeld 4 , Stewart 5 . 

Visiting Professor: H. Mills (p. t.) 

Associate Professors: Agrawala, Austing, Basili, Vandergraft, 

Zelkowitz. 

Assistant Professors: Gannun, Gilgar, Hagerty 5 , Hamlet, 

Hecht. Kim. McClellan, D. Mills, Rieger, Samet, Zave. 

Instructors: Knott (p. t.), Park (p. t), Underwood (p. t.) 



2 Jomrly with Electrical Engmeenng 
^Jointly with Mathematics 
.Also Director Applied Mathematics Program 
,-Jointiy with Computer Science Center 
Jointly with the Institute of Physical Sciences and Technology 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 111 



The Department of Computer Science otters a B S. degree 
in Computer Science The program is designed to meet the 
three broad objectives of service to the community, 
qualification for employment, and preparation for graduate 
work. If provides the student with the flexibility to select 
courses in areas of individual Interest and In line with the 
student's goals after graduation. 

Requirements for a Computer Science Major: 

1 . A minimum of 30 credit hours of CMSC courses, at least 
24 hours of which are at 300-400 levels, with an overall 
average of "C" or better. 

2 Either of the Mathematics calculus sequences (MATH 
1 40. 1 41 , or MATH 1 50, 1 51 ) with at least a "C" average as 
supporting course work. Additional mathematics and 
statistics courses are recommended but not required. 

3. 30 credit hours which satisfy the General University 
Requirements as presented in the University Catalog. None 
of these may be CMSC courses or specified prerequisites to 
CMSC courses. 

4. Electives to obtain at least the minimum 120 hours 
needed for graduation. Students may wish to choose their 
electives to satisfy the requirements of another department's 
degree program and. by so doing, qualify for a double major. 

Introductory Computer Science Courses. The Department 
offers a choice of courses, CMSC 103, 110, for students 
with little or no computer backgound. 

CMSC 103 is considered a terminal course for non- 
majors. It provides an introduction to the use of a computer 
and programming in the language FORTRAN. Students who 
complete CMSC 103 but want to take additional CMSC 
courses should contact an advisor as soon as possible to 
determine what additional work may be necessary to qualify 
for CMSC 120. 

Non-majors who may want to take additional CMSC 
courses should take CMSC 1 1 instead of CMSC 1 03. The 
two courses are of comparable difficulty, and the material is 
similar. As a terminal course, CMSC 103 attempts to cover 
more topics but at less depth than CMSC 1 1 

Majors should take the CMSC 110, 1 20 sequence in their 
first year. Those students who have programming 
background in a language such as FORTRAN should consult 
an advisor to determine if they need to take CMSC 1 1 or if 
they could obtain credit for it by examination. Credit by 
examination is possible for CMSC 110 or 120, or for any 
other undergraduate level computer science course for 
which transfer credit has not been given. 
Undergraduate Computer Science Courses. Beginning 
with courses at the 200 level each student may arrange an 
individualized program by choosing areas of interest within 
computer science and then taking courses appropriate to 
those areas. The Department offers the following 
undergraduate courses in the areas indicated: Applications: 
CMSC 475, 477, 480; Computer Systems: CMSC 210, 
410. 415: Information Processing: CMSC 220, 420, 424 
426; Numerical Analysis: CMSC 460, 470, 471; 
Programming Languages: CMSC 440. 445; and Theory of 
Computing; CMSC 250, 450, 452, 455. 

In addition special topics courses (CMSC 498) are offered 
in one or more areas each semester. (Graduate level courses 
are offered in all of these areas as part of the Department's 
MS. and PhD degree programs.) 

The student may choose from a large variety of computer 
science courses to satisfy the requirement of a minimum of 
30 credit hours of CMSC courses. A number of advanced 
courses in computer science have additional mathematics 
such as MATH 240 and 241 as prerequisites Students who 
anticipate continuing their studies in graduate school should 
complete the sequence MATH 140.141.240,241 



Sample Programs 

Sample programs indicating the variety of programs that are 
possible include*: 



Area 


CMSC Courses 


Electives 


Computer 


210,220 410,415 


Selected courses 


Systems 


420,424.440.445. 


In MATH. STAT. 




452/455.498 


ENEE. others 


Information 


210,220,250.410. 


Selected courses 


Processing 


420,424.426.440. 


In MATH. STAT. 




450, 498 


IFSM others 


Programming 


210.220,410.415, 


Selected courses 


Languages 


420,440.445.450. 
455.498 


in MATH 


Theory ot 


210.250,410.415/ 


Selected courses 


Computing 


445,440.450.452, 
455,475. 477 498. 


In MATH, STAT 


Numerical 


220.420.440,450, 


Selected courses 


Analysis 


470,471.475,477, 
498 


in MATH, STAT 


Applications 


220,420,426,450. 


Selected courses 


(Scientific) ' 


470.475,477,480, 
498 


In MATH. STAT 


Applications 


210,220,250,410, 


Selected courses 


(Business) 


415,420,424,440, 
445 498, 


In MATH. IFSM 


Applications 


210.220.250,410, 


Courses from e.g.. 


(Societal) 


415.420.424.440. 


BIOL. ECON. QVP 



• All of these programs Include the CMSC 
1 1 0. 1 20 sequence during the first year. 

Honors Program. 

A departmental honors program has been develped to 
provide an opportunity for selected undergraduate students 
in computer science to begin scholarly research by 
conducting suitable independent study in a direction and at a 
pace not possible in the customary lecture courses. 
Students are accepted into the program after their 
sophomore year based on their overall academic 
performance in computer science courses taken. 

At least one departmental honors course is offered each 
semester with enrollment and class size limited to honors 
students. An honors paper of expository or research nature, 
representing independent study on the part of the student. 
under guidance of and certified to by a member of the 
professorial faculty, must be completed in addition to other 
departmental requirements 

Computer Equipment. The Department maintains a 
minicomputer laboratory for instruction and research 
Currently, the laboratory contains a POP 1 1 /40 and two PDP 
1 1 /45 computer systems Students in advanced CMSC 
courses have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience 
through the use of these facilities and become involved m the 
development and modification of systems through 
programming. In addition , students use the UNIVAC 
1 108/1 106 computer system with remote units which are 
maintained by the Computer Science Center for all 
educational and research activities of the Campus 

Course Code Prefix— CMSC 

INSTITUTE OF 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Professor and Director: Silverman 

Professors: Antman 1 , Arsenault 2 . Auslander 1 . BabuskaV 

Benedetto 1 . Benedict. Benesch, Brush 3 . Cadman 2 . 

DeRocco. Dorfman 4 . Doughs 1 . Faller, Ginter. Gray 1 , 

Greenberg 1 , Hubbard \ Jones 1 . Karlovitz 1 . Kellogg 1 . 

Koopman. Lashinsky, Olver 1 , Osborn 1 . Pai. Park 4 . 

Rosenberg. Sengers. Spain 2 , Stewart 5 , Tidman. Weiss 6 . 

Wilkerson, Wu. Yorke 1 , Zwanzig 

Adjunct Professors <p.t.): Aziz 7 , Bhatia 7 , Northrop 

Associate Professors: Cooper 1 , Coplan. Gammon. 



112 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Guernsey, Johnson C 8 , Johnson R' Krisher, Markley'. 
Matthews. Mcllrath. Plotkm 9 

Adjunct Associate Professors (p.t): Bixon, Ogilvie. MiIIit 
Assistant Protessors: Cheung 10 . Gasner 2 , Hatch 2 . Razar' 
Assistant Professors (Visiting or part-time): McGee 
Research Associates: Das. Mahon, Schemm. Siebeneck 
Protessors Emeritus: Burgers, Elsasser, Landsberg. Martin 

'Joint with Mathematics 
2 Joint with Chemical Engineering 
•'Joint with History 
4 Jomt with Physics & Astronomy 
s Jomt with Computer Science Department 
6 Joint with Electrical Engineering 
'Joint with University ot Maryland Baltimore County 
8 Jomt with Economics 
9 Joint with Aerospace Engineering 
' °Jomt with Radiobgy. University ol Maryland School of Medicine 

The faculty members of the Institute for Physical Science 
and Technology are engaged in the study of pure and 
applied science problems that are at the boundaries between 
those areas served by the academic departments. These 
interdisciplinary problems afford challenging opportunities 
for thesis research and classroom instruction Courses and 
thesis research guidance by the faculty of the Institute are 
provided either through the graduate program in Applied 
Mathematics" or under the auspices of other departments 
Students interested in studying with Institute faculty 
members should direct inquiries to the Director, Institute for 
Physical Science and Technology, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

Current topics of research interest at the Institute are: 
atomic physics, a wide variety of problems in plasma physics, 
statistical mechanics of physical and living systems, physics 
of the upper atmosphere and magnetosphere, fluid 
dynamics, physical oceanography, various aspects of space 
and planetary science, theoretical and applied numerical 
analysis, control theory, epidemiology and biomathematics. 
chemical processes induced by ionizing radiation, and the 
history of science. They also include analysis of a number of 
current problems of interest to society such as mathematical 
models applied to public health, and many diverse efforts in 
basic mathematics. 

The Institute sponsors a wide variety of seminars in the 
various fields of its interest. Principal among these are the 
general seminars in plasma physics, applied mathematics, 
fluid dynamics, and in atomic and molecular physics. 
Information about these can be obtained by writing the 
Director or by calling (301 ) 454-2636 

Financial support for qualified graduate students is 
available through research assistantships funded by grants 
and contracts, and through teaching assistantships in 
related academic departments 

'See the separate listing for the Applied Mathematics 
Program 

Mathematics 

Professor and Chairman: Goldhaber. 

Professors: Adams. Antman, Auslander, Babuska***, 
Benedetto, Bernstein, Brace. Chu, Cook, Correl. Douglis. 
Edmundson*. Ehrlich, Goldberg, Goldstein, Good, Gray, 
Greenberg, Gulick, Heins, Horvath, Hubbard**". Hummel. 
Jackson. Karlovitz* * *, Kellogg***, Kirwan, Kleppner. 
Lehner, Lipsman, Lopez-Escobar, Mikulski, Olver***, 
Osborn. Pearl, Reinhart. Rheinboldt*, Stellmacher. Strauss. 
Syski, Vesentini. Wolfe. Yorke * * * . Zalcman, Zedek. 
Associate Professors: Alexander, Berg, Berenstein. J. 
Cohen. Cooper, Dancis, Ellis, Fey**, Green, Helzer, 
Henkelman**, Johnson. Kueker. Lay, Markley, Neri. 
Owings, Sather. Schafer, Schneider, Smith, Stewart, Sweet, 
Warner, Winkelnkemper, Yang. 

Assistant Professors: Cooke, Currier. Davidson**. 
Fitzpatrick. Garbanati. Kedem. King. Kirby. Lee, Liu, 
Neumann, Neibur. Razar. Shepherd. Slud, Wolpert 
Professor Emeritus: L. Cohen. 

instructors: Hildenbrand, Kilbourn. Lepson. McClay, Vander- 
slice(p.t). 



Instructor and Administrative Assistant: Sorensen 

"Joint Appointment Computer Science Center 
• "Joint Appointment Department ot Secondary Education 
* ' 'Joint Appointment IPST 

The program in mathematics leads to a degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and offers students 
training in mathematics and statistics in preparation for 
graduate work, teaching and positions in government or 
industry 

A student intending to maior in mathematics should com- 
plete the introductory sequence MATH 140, 141, 240. 241 
or the corresponding honors sequence MATH 150, 151. 
250. 251 and should have an average grade of at least 
B in these courses 

Upper Level Math Requirements: A mathematics major is 
required to complete MATH 410, 411, either 403 or 402 
and five other upper division courses to make a total of eight 
MATH. 'STAT MAPL courses (24 credits) A linear algebra 
course is also required and this requirement may be satisfied 
by one of the following: MATH 240, 400. 405. or 475 A 
grade of C or better must be presented for each course used 
to meet the MATH STAT MAPL maior requirements. With 
special written permission from the Undergraduate 
Chariman, given in advance, 2 upper level courses from 
selected Departments may be substituted for one of the 
upper level Math Requirements 

The requirements are detailed in a departmental brochure 
which is available through the Undergraduate Mathematics 
Office. Appropriate courses taken at other universities or 
through University College may be used to fulfill these 
requirements provided written permission is given in 
advance or transfer credit has been approved. However, 
at least four of the eight required upper division 
MATH STAT MAPL courses must be taken in the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics. 

In addition to the above, a mathematics major must include 
at least 10 credit hours of science supporting course work 
with a grade average of at least C. A list of approved 
science sequences may be obtained from the Mathematics 
Undergraduate Office. 

Within the Department of Mathematics there are a number 
of identifiable areas which a student can pursue to suit 
his/her own goals and interests. They are briefly described 
below Note that they do overlap and that a student need 
not confine himself, herself to one of them. 

1 . Pure Mathematics: the courses which clearly belong 
in this area are: MATH 402, 403, 404. 405. 406, 410, 
411. 413, 414, 415, 416, 417, 430, 431, 432, 433, 436, 
444, 446, 447, 450, 490; STAT: 410, 411. Students 
preparing for graduate school in mathematics should include 
MATH 403. 404 or 405. 410, 411, 413 (or 660). and 432 
(or 730) in their programs. Other courses from the above list 
and graduate courses are also appropriate. 

2. Secondary teaching: the following courses are par- 
ticularly suited for students preparing to teach mathematics 
at the secondary level: MATH 402, 406, 430, 431, 444, 
450, 490; STAT 400, and EDSE 372 (EDSE 372 is 
acceptable as one of the eight upper level math courses 
required for a mathematics major ) In addition EDHD 300, 
EDSF 301, EDSE 350, and 330 are necessary to teach. 
Immediately after completing at least 42 credits, you must 
apply for and be admitted to teacher education. 

3. Statistics: For a student with a B A seeking work 
requiring some statistical background, the minimal program 
is STAT 400-401. To work primarily as a statistician, one 
should combine STAT 400-401 with at least one more 
statistics course, most suitably STAT 450 A stronger 
sequence is STAT 410, 420. 450. This offers a better 
understanding and wider knowledge of statistics and is a 
general purpose program (i.e. does not specify one area of 
applications). For economics applications STAT 400, 401, 
450. and MAPL 477 should be considered For operations 
research MAPL 477 and/or STAT 41 1 should be added or 
perhaps substituted for STAT 450. To prepare for graduate 
work, STAT 410 and 420 give the best background, with 
STAT 41 1 . 421 , 450 and 460 added at some later stage. At 
least one computer science course is recommended. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 1 13 



4. Computational mathematics: there are a number of 
math courses which emphasize the computational aspects 
of mathematics including the use of the computer They are 
MAPL 460, 470, 471, 477: MATH 472. 474, 475 Stu- 
dents interested in this area should take CMSC 1 1 as early 
as possible, and CMSC 2 1 0. 420. 440 are also suggested. 

5. Applied mathematics the courses which lead most 
rapidly to applications are the courses listed above in 3 
and 4 and MATH 401. 413 or 463, 414. 415, 436. 462. 
463, 464 A student interested in applied mathematics 
should obtain, in addition to a solid training in mathematics, 
a good knowledge of at least one area in which mathe- 
matics is currently being applied. Concentration in this area 
is good preparation for employment in government and 
industry or for graduate study in applied mathematics 

Language. Since most of the non-English mathematical 
literature is written in French, German or Russian, students 
intending to continue studying mathematics in graduate 
school should obtain a reading knowledge of at least one of 
these languages. 

Honors in Mathematics. The Mathematics Honors Program 
is designed for students showing exceptional ability and 
interest in mathematics Its aim is to give a student the 
best possible mathematical education Participants are 
selected by the Departmental Honors Committee during the 
first semester of their junior year To graduate with honors 
in mathematics they must take four credits of MATH 398 
and pass a final written and oral comprehensive examination 
A graduate course of three credits of independent study 
may be substituted for two credits of MATH 398 The rest 
of the program is flexible. Independent work is encouraged 
and can be done in place of formal course work. A student 
need not major in mathematics to participate in the honors 
program. 

The Mathematics Department also offers a special 
Mathematics Departmental honors calculus sequence 
(MATH 150. 151, 250, 251) for promising freshmen with a 
strong mathematical background (usually including calculus). 
Enrollment in the sequence is normally by invitation but any 
interested student may apply to the Mathematics Depart- 
mental Honors Committee for admission. 

Participants in the General Honors Program may enroll in 
special honors sections of the regular calculus sequence 
(MATH 140H, 141 H, 240H, 241 H). They may enroll in the 
honors calculus sequence if invited by the Mathematics 
Departmental Honors Committee However, the Mathematics 
Departmental Honors calculus sequence and the General 
Honors Program are distinct, and enrollment in one does not 
imply acceptance in the other 

Neither honors calculus sequence is prerequisite for 
participating in the Mathematics Honors Program, and stu- 
dents in these sequences need not be mathematics majors. 

Pi Mu Epsilon. The local chapter of Pi Mu Epsilon. national 
honorary mathematics fraternity, meets frequently to discuss 
mathematical or educational topics of interest to under- 
graduates. The programs are open to the public 

Placement in Mathematics Courses. The department has 
a large offering to accommodate a great variety of back- 
grounds, interests and abilities The department permits a 
student to take any course for which he or she has the 
appropriate background regardless of formal course work 
For example, a student with a high school calculus course 
may be permitted to begin in the middle of the calculus 
sequence even if he or she does not have advanced stand- 
ing Students may obtain undergraduate credit for mathe- 
matics courses in any of the following ways: passing the 
appronate CEEB Advanced Placement Examination, passing 
standardized CLEP examinations, and through the depart- 
ment's Credit-by-Exammation Students are urged to consult 
with advisors from the Mathematics Department to assist 
with proper placements 

Statistics and Probability. Courses in statistics and prob- 
ability are offered by the Department of Mathematics These 
courses are open to non-majors as well as majors, and 



carry credit in Mathematics Students wishing to concentrate 
in statistics may do so by choosing an appropriate program 
under the Department of Mathematics. 

CourseCooe Prefixes— MATH. STAT MAPL 



Meteorology Program 

Acting Director: Thompson. 

Professor Emeritus; Landsberg 

Professors: Faller 1 , Israel 2 . Fritz (visiting) 

Associate Professors: Rodenhuis. Thompson. Vernekar 

Assistant Professor: Ellington 

Instructors: Schemm. Pinker 

Visiting Lecturer: Weil 

Inst lorPhys Sci. and Tech 
Joint with Civil Engineering 

The Meteorology Program offers a number of courses of 
interest to undergraduate students These courses provide 
an excellent undergraduate background for those students 
who wish to do graduate work in the fields of atmospheric 
and oceanic science, meteorology, air pollution, and other 
environmental sciences The interdisciplinary nature of 
studies in meteorobgy and physical oceanography assures 
that all science oriented students will gain a broadened 
view of physical science as a whole, as well as the manner 
in which the sciences may be applied to understand the 
behavior of our environment. 

Undergraduate students interested in pursuring a 
bachelors degree program preparatory to further study or 
work in meteorology are urged to consider the Physical 
Sciences Program, in which they can specialize in meteor- 
ology It is important that students who anticipate this 
specialization should consult the Physical Sciences Pro- 
gram advisor representing the Meteorology Program as 
early as possible in their studies 

Because of its interdisciplinary nature, the study of the 
atmosphere requires a firm background in the basic 
sciences and mathematics To be suitably prepared for 
400-level courses in meteorology, the student should have 
the following background: Either the physics major series 
PHYS 191-296 or the series PHYS 161, 262, 263: the 
mathematics series MATH 140. 141. 240, 241 and either 
the series CHEM 103. 104 or CHEM 105. 106 In addition, 
natural science background courses in astronomy (such as 
ASTR 181, 182, or 350). geology (such as GEOL 445. 
446) and METO 301 are highly recommended. 

Electives in meteorology are 

METO 301 —Atmospheric Environment 

METO 310— Meteorological Observations and Instruments 3 

METO 398— Topics in Atmospheric Science 3 

METO 410— Descriptive and Synoptic Meteorology I 3 

METO 4 1 1 —Descriptive and Synoptic Meteorology II 

METO 4 1 2— Physics and Thermodynamics ot the 

Atmosphere 3 

METO 413— Atmospheric Processes on Atomic and 

Molecular Scale 3 

METO 416— Introduction to Atmospheric Dynamics 
METO 420— Physical and Dynamical Oceanography 3 

METO 422— Oceanic Waves, Tides and Turbulence 
METO 434— Air Pollution 3 

METO 441 —Weather Map Discussion and Practice 

Forecasting I 
METO 442— Weather Map Discussion and Practice 

Forecasting II 
METO 460— Synoptic Laboratory I 
METO 401 —Synoptic Laboratory II 
METO 499— Special Problems in Atmospheric Science 



1 3 



Students who may be preparing for graduate education 
in meteorology are strongly advised to pursue further course 
work from among the areas of physics, mathematics, 
chemistry, computer science and statistics to supplement 
course work in meteorology 



114/ ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES. SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Physical Sciences Program 

Chairman EVP Smith 

Astronomy: Matthews. Chemistry: Jaquith. Computer 
Science: Wockentuss. Engineering: Vandergratt, Geotogy. 
Stitel. Mathematics Schneider. Meteorology: Ellingson. 
Physics: Hornyak 

Purpose. This program is suggested for many types ot 
students those whose interests cover a wide range ot the 
physical sciences: those whose interests have not yet 
centered on any one science; students interested in a 
career in an interdisciplinary area within the physical 
sciences, students who seek a broader undergraduate 
program than is possible in one of the traditional physical 
sciences, preprofessional students (prelaw, premedical); or 
students whose interests in business, technical writing. 
advertising or sales require a broad technical background 
This program can also be useful for those planning science- 
oriented or technical work in the urban field, some of the 
Urban Studies courses should be taken as electives Stu- 
dents contemplating this program as a basis for preparation 
for secondary school science teaching are advised to con- 
sult the Science Teaching Center staff of the College of 
Education for additional requirements for teacher certifi- 
cation 

The Physical Sciences Program consists of a basic set of 
courses in physics, chemistry and mathematics, followed by 
a variety of courses chosen from these and related disci- 
plines: astronomy, geology, meteorology, computer science, 
and the engineering disciplines. Emphasis is placed on a 
broad program as contrasted with a specialized one 

Students are advised by members of the Physical 
Sciences Committee This committee is composed of 
faculty members from each of the represented disciplines 
and some student representatives. Assignment of advisor 
depends on the interest of the student, e.g.. one interested 
principally in chemistry will be advised by the chemistry 
member of the committee. Students whose interests are too 
general to classify in this manner will normally be advised 
by the chairman of the committee. 

More detailed information concerning the Physical 
Sciences Program is available from the MPSE Under- 
graduate Office. Math Building, Y-1 10. 

The Curriculum. The basic courses include MATH 140. 
141 and one other math course for which MATH 141 is a 
prerequisite (11 or 1 2 credits); CHEM 1 03 and 1 04, or 1 05 
and 106 (8 credits); PHYS 162. 262. 263 (11 credits); or 
141. 142 (8 credits); or 191. 192293 294, 195. 196,295. 
296 (18 credits); or 221. 222 (10 credits); or PHYS 121, 
1 22 followed by PHYS 262 ( 1 2 credits). 

The choice of the physics sequence depends on the 
student's future aims and his her background. PHYS 161. 
262, 263 is the standard sequence recommended for most 
Physical Science majors This sequence will enable the 
student to continue with intermediate level and advanced 
courses. PHYS 141. 142 is available to students who wish 
a less extensive background in physics than is represented 
by PHYS 161-263 or 191-294 Students desiring a strong 
background in physics are urged to enroll in PHYS 1 91 -294. 
This is the sequence also used by Physics majors and leads 
directly into the advanced physics courses. PHYS 221 . 222 
is designed for Education majors, and therefore is suitable 
for students thinking in terms of a teaching career PHYS 
121, 122 plus 262 is offered as an option only for students 
who have already taken PHYS 121. 1 22 and then decide to 
major in Physical Sciences This sequence should not be 
selected by students already in or just starting the program 
The rationale for requiring PHYS 262 to follow 121, 122 is 
to ensure that students have some physics with calculus 
(121, 122 do not have a calculus corequisite). 

Beyond these basic courses the student must complete 
24 credits of which 1 2 must be at the 300 or 400 level, 
chosen from the following disciplines: Chemistry, physics, 
mathematics, astronomy, geology, meteorology, computer 
science, science, and one of the engineering disciplines, 
subject to certain limitations Students presenting PHYS 
294 as part of their basic curriculum may include these 



credits among the 24 credits The 24 credits must be so 
distributed that he or she has at least six credits in each ot 
any three of the above listed disciplines The program 
requires an average grade of at least C in courses counting 
toward the major including both the basic plus the broader 
set of courses 

Engineering courses used for one of the options must all 
be from the same department e g all must be ENEE courses, 
or a student may use a combination of courses in ENCH. 
ENNU and ENMA. which are all offered by the Chemical 
Engineering Department; courses offered as engineering 
sciences, ENES, will be considered as a department for 
these purposes Engineering Technology courses (ET prefix) 
are not applicable for a major in Physical Sciences 

Because of the wide choice and flexibility within the pro- 
gram, students are required to submit for approval a study 
plan during their junior year, specifying the courses they 
wish to use in satisfying the requirements of the major 

Students who wish to depart from the stipulated curricu- 
lum may present their proposed program for approval by the 
Physical Science Committee An honors program is available 
to qualified students in their senior year 

Certain courses offered in the fields included in the 
program are not suitable for Physical Science majors and 
cannot count as part of the requirements of the program 
These include any courses corresponding to a lower level 
than the basis courses specified above (e.g. MATH 1 1 5), 
some of the special topics courses designed for non- 
science, as well as other courses A complete listing of 
"excluded" courses is available from the MPSE Division 
office. 

Honors Program. The Physical Sciences Honors program 
offers students the opportunity for research and inde- 
pendent study Interested students should request details 
from their advisor. 

Physics and Astronomy 

Professor and Chairman: Dragt. 

Professor and Director of Astronomy Program: Kerr. 

Professors and Associate Chairmen: Falk. DeSilva. 

Professors: Alley. Banerjee, Bell. Bhagat. Brill, Currie. 

Davidson, Day, Dorfman, Earl, Erickson, Ferrell, Glasser. 

Glover III. Gluckstern, Greenberg. Griem, Griffin. Holmgren. 

Hornyak, H Kim, Kundu, Laster. Liu. MacDonald. Marion. 

Misner, Myers, Oneda. Park, Pati, Prange, Pugh, Reiser, 

Roos. Rose. Smith, Snow, P. Steinberg. Sucher. Trivelpiece, 

Wall. Weber, Wentzel. Westerhout. Woo, Yodh. B S. Zorn. 

G. T. Zorn, Zuckerman. 

Professors (Part-Time): Brandt. Opik. Z. Slawsky. 

Adjunct Professors: Bennett, Friedman, Hayward, McDonald, 

Papadopoulos, Rado 

Associate Professors: A. Hern. Anderson, Bardasis, Beall. 

C Y Chang. Drew. Fivel. Glick. Gloeckler, Goldenbaum. 

Harrington, Kacser, Y. S Kim. Korenman. Layman. 

Matthews. Redish, Richard. Roush. Zipoy. 

Associate Professor (Part-Time): Hammer. 

Visiting Associate Professor: Trimble. 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Clark, Dixon. Pechacek 

Assistant Professors: Bagchi, Boyd. C C Chang, R F. 

Chang. Chant. Y. G. Chen, Ellsworth, Gowdy, Guillory, Hill. 

Martin, McClellan. Scott. Wallace. 

Visiting Assistant Professors: H H Chen. Cowley. 

Dworzecka. Einstein. Padikal(p.t). 

Lecturers: Allgaier, Deming, M Slawsky, Wmeland. 

The Physics program includes a broad range of under- 
graduate courses designed to satisfy the needs of almost 
every student, from the advanced physics major to the 
person taking a single introductory physics course. In addi- 
tion, there are various opportunities for personally directed 
studies between student and professor, and many under- 
graduate "research" opportunities also are available For 
further information consult "Department Requirements for a 
B.S. degree in Physics." available from the Department. 

Courses for Non-Majors. The department offers several 
courses which are intended for students other than physics 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 115 



majors PHYS 101, 102, 106, 111 and 112 without a 
laboratory and PHYS 114. 117 and 1 20 with laboratory are 
designed to satisfy the General University distribution 
requirements. PHYS 121. 122, or 141. 142 satisfy the 
requirements for professional schools such as medical and 
dental, and PHYS 161, 262, 263 satisfy the introductory 
physics requirement for most engineering programs PHYS 
299 A provides background for PHYS 121 PHYS 318 is a 
one semester course stressing contemporary topics for 
those who have completed a year of one of the above 
sequences In addition, PHYS 420 is a one semester 
modern physics course for advanced students in science 
or engineering Either the course sequence 161, 262, 263, 
or the full sequence 191. 192, 293. 294 is suitable for 
mathematics students and those who major in other physical 
sciences 

The Physics Major. The way most physics majors will begin 
their work is with a two-year basic sequence of physics 
courses PHYS 191 A or B, 192, 293. and 294, accom- 
panied by the laboratory courses PHYS 1 95, 1 96 in the first 
year and 295, 296 in the second year. Transfer students 
who come with a different set of introductory courses either 
will be put into an appropriate course in this sequence or will 
take bridging courses, such as PHYS 404, 405. (if offered) 
and then go on to advanced courses. 

The requirement for a physics major includes six labora- 
tory courses and PHYS 410, 41 1. 421 and 422, plus MATH 
140, 141, 240, 241 (or 150. 151, 250) and one additional 
3 or 4 credit mathematics course. Students must have an 
overall average of at least 2.0 (C) in the required physics 
and required supporting mathematics courses After taking 
the basic sequence, the student will have some flexibility 
in his program, and he or she will be able to take specialty 
courses, such as those in nuclear physics or solid-state 
physics, or courses in related fields which are of particular 
interest to him or her. In addition, a student interested in 
doing research may choose to do a bachelor's thesis 
under the direction of a member of the faculty 

Honors in Physics. The Honors Program offers to students 
of good ability and strong interest in physics a greater 
flexibility in their academic programs, and a stimulating 
atmosphere through contacts with other good students and 
with individual faculty members. There are opportunities for 
part-time research participation which may develop into full- 
time summer projects. An honors seminar is offered for 
advanced students; credit may be given for independent 
work or study, and certain graduate courses are open for 
credit toward the bachelor's degree. 

Students are accepted by the department's Honors Com- 
mittee on the basis of recommendations from their advisors 
and other faculty members, usually in the second semester 
of their junior year. A final written or oral comprehensive 
examination in the senior year is optional, but those who 
pass the examination will graduate "with honors in physics." 

The Astronomy Major. Seepage 1 19-1 20 for details. 

Course Code Prelix— PHYS 

Science Communications 

The University of Maryland offers several interdisciplinary 
approaches to the training of science communicators, rang- 
ing from specialization in one science or engineering with 
background in communication to specializing in journalistic 
communication with background coursework in the 
sciences Each of the several program options can be 
tailored to the needs of individual students. 

Undergraduate students interested in science com- 
munications can choose from a wide range of possibilities. 
For example, some may want a career writing about the 
general happenings of the day in the physical and life 
sciences Or, some students may prefer writing about the 
span from a pure science to its applied technology Others 
may prefer writing about one field— such as agronomy, 
astronomy, geology — and its impact on society — in 
ecological problems, space exploration, and plate tectonics 



The following are several approaches Writing about the 
physical sciences: A recommended approach would be to 
take the Physical Sciences Program with a minor in 
Journalism The Physical Sciences Program consists of a 
basic set of courses in physics, chemistry and mathematics, 
followed by a variety of courses chosen from these and 
related disciplines Astronomy, geology, meteorology 
and computer science 

Writing about the life sciences: A recommended approach 
would be to take the Biological Sciences Program with a 
minor in Journalism The Biological Sciences Program 
includes work in botany, entomology, microbiology, and 
zoology, and introduces the student to the general prin- 
ciples and methods of each of these biological sciences 

Writing about engineering: A recommended approach 
would be to take the BS. -Engineering Program with a minor 
in Journalism. The B S -Engineering Program blends two or 
three fields of engineering or applied science. 

Writing about a specilic Held: A recommended approach 
would be to take a departmental major in any of the sciences, 
agriculture, or engineering and a minor in Journalism. 

Journalism combined with an overview of the sciences: 
A Journalism major could take selected science courses 
that provide a familiarity with scientific thought and applica- 
tion. 

Science or Math Education 

Students completing an undergraduate major in astron- 
omy, physics, physical sciences, or in math, or who may be 
enrolled in the College of Education, may prepare to teach 
astronomy, physics, physical science, or math Early contact 
should be made with either Dr. John Layman (astronomy, 
physics, physical sciences) or Dr Jim Henkelman (math). 



Additional Campus Programs 

Air Force Aerospace Studies Program 

The Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) 
provides a program for college men and women to earn a 
commissioning as a Second Lieutenant in the United States 
Air Force while completing their University degree require- 
ments. 

Two Programs Offered 

Four-Year Program — This program is composed of a 
General Military Course and a Professional Officer Course 
The first two years (the General Military Course) normally for 
freshman and sophomores, give a general introduction to the 
Air Force and the various career fields The final two years 
(the Professional Officer Course) are concentrated on the 
development of management skills and study of American 
Defense Policy. 

Students in the four-year program must attend four weeks 
of field training at a designated Air Force base during the 
summer after completing the sophomore year of college To 
enter the AFROTC program, one should inform his advisor 
and register for classes in the same manner as for other 
courses 

Two-Year Program — This program is normally offered to 
juniors and seniors but may be taken by graduate students 
The academic requirements for this program are identical to 
the final two years of the four-year program Evaluation of 
candidates is normally begun during the first semester of the 
sophomore year During the summer preceding entry into 
the program, all candidates must complete a six-week field 
training at a designated Air Force base 



The Curriculum 

General Military Course — Freshman year. ARSC 1 00 and 
ARSC 101. sophomore year. ARSC 200 and ARSC 201 
The courses for the freshman and sophomore years are 
General Military Course (Freshman) and General Military 



116/ ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Course (Sophomores). In the first two years, cadets attend 
academic classes once each week In addition, they 
receive one hour ol leadership training each week 

Professional Officer Course — Junior year, ARSC 300 
and ARSC 301 ; senior year ARSC 302 and ARSC 303 The 
courses for the junior and senior year are Professional 
Officer Course (Juniors) and Professional Officer Course 
(Seniors) These courses require three class hours plus one 
hour of leadership training per week 

The AFROTC College Scholarship Program provides 
scholarships for selected cadets each year in the AFROTC 
program Those selected receive money for tuition, labora- 
tory expenses, incidental fees, and books plus a non-taxable 
allowance of $100. 

To be accepted into the Professional Officer Course, the 
student must: complete the General Military Course and a 
four-week Field Training Session, or the six-week Field 
Training Session; pass the Air Force Officer Qualification 
Test; be physically qualified; enlist in the Air Force Reserve; 
be in good academic standing; and meet age requirements 
Successful completion of the Professional Officer Course 
and a bachelor's degree are prerequisites for a commission 
as a Second Lieutenant In the United States Air Force. 

Students who have prior military service or ROTC training 
with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or Air 
Force will be considered for appropriate credit toward 
meeting the requirements for the General Military Course. 
Professional Officer Course (Advanced) credits are trans- 
ferable 

Students who qualify to become Air Force pilots receive 
a free 25 -hour flight instruction program. Cadets are in- 
structed by both military and civilian instructors on all 
phases of flight, ground operations and FAA control/regula- 
tions. This program gives the student pilot a good start 
toward obtaining a private license. 

Undergraduate Studies 

Bachelor of General Studies 
Degree Program 

The Bachelor of General Studies degree program differs 
from other current degree programs in that it is a degree 
program without a concentration in a specific discipline or 
department. 

The BGS program permits the student to obtain an educa- 
tion in as broad a set of disciplines or thought patterns as 
are offered at the College Park Campus without insisting that 
he adhere to a previously defined curriculum with a depart- 
mental or divisional orientation. 

No other University degree requirements, such as General 
University Requirements, physical education, health, etc. will 
apply to the BGS. 

In this program, the burden for motivation and direction is 
on the student. Good advice will guide him, but institutional 
commands will not compel him. Although this program is 
clearly a significant departure from current practices at this 
campus, it does not depart from the high qualify academic 
standards required of other programs. 

The very concept of the BGS is predicated on broad 
ranging educational objectives and not on the more specific 
requirements of graduate school and professional employ- 
ment. Students who elect this program should specifically 
be aware that it is not designed to satisfy those require- 
ments. While the early BGS graduates have not experienced 
unusual problems with further education and employment, 
the individual student's experience may well depend on the 
quality of program which he designs within the parameters 
of the BGS requirements. 

Requirements 

To receive a Bachelor of General Studies degree, a stu- 
dent must satisfy the following requirements: 
1 . A minimum of 1 20 credits must be accumulated with a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. 



2 No more than 30 credits in any one department may be 
applied toward the required 1 20 credits 

3 The courses taken must be distributed over at least three 
divisions with a maximum of 60 credits in any one divi- 
sion counted toward the required 1 20 credits. 

4 At least 45 credits must be taken at the upper level 
(courses numbered 300 or higher); a 2.0 cumulative 
grade point average must be obtained In all upper level 
courses 

5. The student must be registered as only a Bachelor of 
General Studies major for at least the last 30 credits 
immediately preceding the awarding of the degree A 
student who wishes to earn a second baccalaureate 
must satisfy all University requirements for the earning of 
two degrees. 

6. The student pursuing the BGS program shall be advised 
by a faculty member either appointed by or acceptable to 
the Dean of Undergraduate Studies 

Additional information may be obtained from Dr Judith 
Sorum In the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
(Telephone: 454-2530/31). 

Individual Studies Program 

The individual Studies Program offers an individualized 
major for UMCP students who 

1 . have the ability to design, with faculty assistance, a 
sequence of formal and/or informal learning experiences, 
satisfactory completion of which is deemed adequate for 
the awarding of a bachelor's degree and who 

2. have a clearly defined academic goal which cannot 
reasonably be satisfied in an existing curriculum at 
College Park. 

Students may be admitted to the Individual Studies 
program after completion of one semester of residence at 
College Park and must be officially approved prior to the final 
thirty semester hours of the proposed curriculum. They must 
complete 1 20 credit hours with an average of C or better and 
satisfy the General University Requirements. 

Students receive a B.A. or B.S. in Individual Studies. The 
title of the individual program is indicated on the transcript. 

Students who wish to apply for the program should see the 
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate studies (Room 1115 
Undergraduate Library, Ext. 2530, 2531). If the student's 
enrollment in the program seems appropriate, the student 
will be given guidance in preparing a preliminary prospectus 
and in locating a suitable faculty tutor to assist in the 
preparation of the final prospectus. The prospectus is an 
outline of the student's educational objectives and when 
officially approved is filed with the Administrative Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies and becomes the curriculum under 
which the student will earn the degree. 

General Honors Program 

Director: Portz. 

The General Honors Program consists of about 750 
students. Members of the Program are permitted to enroll in 
small, honors sections of basic courses in many depart- 
ments and are given the opportunity of participating in 
special introductory colloquia, upper-level General Honors 
seminars, independent study, and field experience. Suc- 
cessful General Honors students are graduated with a 
citation in General Honors, and notation of this accomplish- 
ment is made upon their diplomas and transcripts. General 
Honors also involves an elaborate extra-curricular program. 
Student participation in decision-making in all aspects of 
General Honors is encouraged. 

Students from any Division or College on the College Park 
Campus are eligible to apply for admission to the program. 
Admission to the General Honors Program is ordinarily made 
at the same time as admission to the University, although 
a special and separate application form is required for 
General Honors. 

Admission requirements are not fixed, but relative to the 
background, accomplishments, and motivation of the appli- 
cant. Very generally it may be said that students are selected 
on the basis of grades, rank in class, national test scores, 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 1 17 



and recommendations from high school teachers and 
counselors. In addition, however, subjective factors are 
taken into very serious consideration. 

Students customarily apply during their senior year in high 
school, but in-University students are also admitted during 
their careers at the University, and students transferring 
from other institutions are accepted into General Honors 
upon presentation of a distinguished record, especially if 
they come to Maryland from another honors program. 

The College Park Campus also operates 25 Departmental 
Honors Programs designed primarily for the majoring student 
and administered by committees at the departmental level. 
Most of these programs begin in the junior year, although 
there are a few exceptions (Botany, English, History, 
Mathematics, and Psychology). For information, see the 
descriptions under the various departmental entries in this 
catalog, or contact the Honors Office, as below. 

The General Honors Program is a member of the National 
Collegiate Honors Council and of the Northeast Regional 
Honors Council. It participates regularly in student ex- 
changes and other inter-institutional programs. 

The General Honors Program is administered by the 
Director and the Advisory Committee on General Honors 
acts as an advisory and regulatory body. For application 
forms, brochure, and information, write to Dr. John Portz, 
Director, Honors Office, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 

Course Code Prelix— HONR 



Pre-Professional Programs 

There are a number of programs developed to prepare the 
pre-professional student. These curricula, some rather 
general and others quite specific, are designed to give the 
student the best background to succeed in his advanced 
training, to fulfill the undergraduate requirements of 
professional schools, and to fit in with the requirements 
established by the organizations associated with the 
respective professions. 

Pre-professional programs require that the student 
maintain a grade point average considerably higher than the 
minimum for graduation. The student may fulfill requirements 
by majoring in almost any discipline in some programs, 
provided the specific requirements of the pre-professional 
program are met. 

The successful completion of the pre-professional 
program does not guarantee admission to a professional 
school. Each school has its own admissions requirements 
and criteria, generally based upon the grade point average in 
the undergraduate courses, the scores in aptitude tests 
(Medical College Admission Test, Law Admission Test, 
Dental Aptitude Test, etc.), a personal interview, and letters 
sent by the Evaluation Committee of the college. For specific 
admissions requirements, the student is urged to study the 
catalog of the professional school of his choice. 

Although completion of the bachelor's degree is a normal 
prerequisite for admission for dental, law, and medical 
schools, three professional schools of the University of 
Maryland in Baltimore — Dentistry, Law, and Medicine— have 
arrangements whereby a student who meets requirements 
detailed below may be accepted for professional school after 
three years (90 academic hours). For the students to be 
eligible for the "combined degree," the final 30 hours prior to 
entry into the Schools of Dentistry, Law, and Medicine must 
be taken in residence. After the successful completion of 
thirty hours of work in professional school, the student may 
be eligible for a bachelor's degree. 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 

The Dental School at the University of Maryland offers a 
baccalaureate degree program in dental hygiene, as well as 
a postcertificate program for registered dental hygiemsts 
who have completed a two-year accredited dental hygiene 
program and are interested in completing the requirements 
for a baccalaureate degree A total of 124 credits are re- 



quired for the Bachelor of Science degree in dental hygiene. 

Completion of a two-year preprofessional curriculum at 
one of the three University of Maryland campuses (College 
Park, Baltimore County or Eastern Shore) or at another 
institution, is required for eligibility to apply for enrollment as 
a junior standing student in the Dental School on the 
Baltimore campus. 

For registered dental hygienists, completion of a two-year 
accredited dental hygiene program, completion of all re- 
quired preprofessional courses, and a minimum of one year 
of clinical experience as a dental hygienist are required for 
eligibility to apply for enrollment as a senior standing student 
in the Dental School on the Baltimore campus 

Enrollment as a predental hygiene student or a registered 
dental hygienist to complete preprofessional curriculum re- 
quirements at any University of Maryland campus does not 
guarantee admission to the dental hygiene program on the 
Baltimore campus. Enrollment In both programs Is limited. 

The first two years, constituting the preprofessional 
curriculum, include general educational requirements of the 
University of Maryland, dental hygiene education accredita- 
tion requirements and elective lower division courses in one 
of the recommended minor areas of study. A suggested 
sequence for required courses in the preprofessional seg- 
ment of the curriculum follows: 

Preprofessional Dental Hygiene 
Curriculum 

Freshman Year Credits 

1 st 2nd 
Sem Sem 

English Composition 3 

• * "Inorganic Chemistry 4 

• * 'Organic Chemistry 4 

General Zoology 4 

General Psychology 3 

General Sociology 3 

Public Speaking 3 

•Humanities .... 6 



Total 



Sophomore Year 



' * * Human Anatomy & Physiology 

' • 'Microbiology 

Principles of Nutrition 

* 'Social Science 

'Humanities 

Electives 



14 



16 



Credits 


1st 


2nd 


Sem. 


Sem 


4 


4 


4 






3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



Total 



• HUMANITIES Courses must be selected from at least three of the following 
areas literature, philosophy, history, 'me arts, speech, math or language 

' 'SOCIAL SCIENCES General psychology and socclogy are requred the 
remaining six credits should be selected from courses m psychology 
sociology, government and politics, geography, geology or anthropology 

'"These courses must include a laboratory and meet the requirements for 
science majors Survey or terminal courses for nonsoence majors are not 
acceptable for transfer 

Specific courses taken by students at College Park are: 

Freshman Year Credits 

ENGL 101 3 

ZOOL101 . 4 

CHEM 103& 104 8 

PSYC100 3 

SOCY100 3 

SPCH100 3 

Humanities 6 

Sophomore Year Credits 

ZOOL201S202 8 

MICB200 4 

NUTR 200 3 

Social Sciences 6 

Humanities 6 

Electives 6 



118/ ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



Although courses may be interchanged during the first 
two years, it is required that chemistry precede micro- 
biology and nutrition to enable its application to these two 
subjects It should be noted that Zoology 101 is a pre- 
requisite for Zoology 201. 202 (Human Anatomy and 
Physiology) at the University of Maryland 

Application & Admission Procedures 

Students are considered for admission to the University 
of Maryland Dental School without regard for race, color, 
creed or sex It is the objective of the school to enroll highly 
qualified students with diversified backgrounds in order to 
make the educational experience more meaningful for each 
individual as well as to provide dental health practitioners to 
all segments of the community 

Qualified men as well as women, and members of ethnic 
minority groups are encouraged to apply for admission to 
the dental hygiene program. 

High school students who wish to enroll in the predental 
hygiene curriculum should request applications directly from 
the Admissions Office of the University of Maryland, College 
Park. Md. 20742 

It is recommended that those preparing for a baccalaureate 
degree program in dental hygiene pursue an academic pro- 
gram in high school, including biology, chemistry, math and 
physics. 

Predental hygiene students who have completed three 
semesters of the preprofessional curriculum should request 
an application at the end of the third semester from the 
Director of Admissions and Registrations, Room 132, 
Howard Hall, University of Maryland at Baltimore, 660 W. 
Redwood St.. Baltimore. Md. 21201; or from the dental 
hygiene advisor on the College Park campus. Applications 
for the Baltimore campus should be received no later than 
February 1 prior to the fall semester for which the student 
wishes to enroll 

All applicants will be required to submit Dental Hygiene 
Aptitude Test (DHAT) scores. Information concerning the 
DHAT is available from the dental hygiene advisor on the 
College Park campus or the Dental School's Dental Hygiene 
Department. At the discretion of the Dental Hygiene 
Admissions Committee, applicants may also be required to 
appear for a personal interview. All potential applicants 
should meet regularly with the dental hygiene advisor on the 
College Park campus, 2109 Turner Laboratory. 
Registered dental hygienists who have completed a two- 
year accredited dental hygiene program, as well as one year 
of clinical experience as a dental hygienist. should contact 
the dental hygiene advisor on the College Park campus, 
Room 2109 Turner Lab. College Park, Md 20742, in order 
to determine the number of transferale credits and the 
number of additional preprofessional and lower division 
elective courses necessary for eligibility to apply for the post 
certificate program. If all preprofessional curriculum 
requirements have not been fulfilled, the student should 
apply for enrollment at the University of Maryland. If the 
preprofessional curriculum has been completed, the student 
should apply to the dental hygiene program no later than 
February 1 prior to the fall semester for which the student 
wishes to enroll. Prospective applicants should keep in mind 
that the last 30 credit hours toward a baccalaureate degree 
must be taken at the University of Maryland. 

Further Information. Information about the professional 
curriculum or the transfer program may be obtained from the 
Department of Dental Hygiene. 2109 Turner Laboratory. 
College Park, Maryland 20742 

Pre-Dentistry 

The pre-dental program is based upon the requirements 
and recommendations of the various dental schools, and the 
requirements for a baccalaureate degree from the College 
Park Campus, following either the four-year program or the 
combined Arts-Dentistry Program. The curriculum is de- 
signed to prepare the student for the Dental Aptitude Test, 
which is normally taken in the Spring of the junior year. 

Three-Year Arts-Dentistry Program. Students whose per- 



formance during the first two years is exceptional may seek 
admission to the University of Maryland School of Dentistry 
at the end of their third year By the end of the third year 
the student must have earned 90 academic credits, the last 
30 of which must have been earned at the University of 
Maryland at College Park No undergraduate major is required 
for this program; the work of the first year in the School of 
Dentistry is considered as the major Within the 90 credits 
the student must have completed all the requirements listed 
below. 

Hours 
A. General University Requirements 30 

B Chemistry (general, inorganic and organic) 18 

CHEM 103, 104,201,202, 203. 204 or 
CHEM 105,106.211.212,213.214 
C Zoology 16 

ZOOL 1 1 —(General Zoologyj or ZOOL 293 

(Animal Diversity 
ZOOL 246— (Genetics) 
ZOOL 290— (Comparative Vertebrate 
Morphology) 
One of the following 
ZOOL 422— (Vertebrate Physiology). 
ZOOL 426— (General Endocrinology). 
ZOOL 430— (Vertebrate Embryology), or 
ZOOL 495— (Mammalian Histology). 

D Mathematics 6-8 

(Mathematics through calculus (MATH 141 or 
221 ) is strongly recommended) 

E Physics 121. 122, or 141, 142 8 

F Supporting courses from any one of the following 6-10 

combinations 

1 Zoology— six hours on the 300-400 level 

2 Microbiology— eight hours on the 300-400 level 
3. CHEM 32 1 —(Quantitative Analysis) plus any 

three-credit course at the 300-400 level in the 
physical or biological sciences that is approved 
by the Assistant Dean for Pre-Dental 
Advisement. 

4 CHEM 461. 462. 463. and 464. 

5 Nine hours on the 300-400 level in any one 
department of the Division of Arts and 
Humanities or the Division of Behavioral and 
Social Sciences 

G Electives as needed to make at least 90 credits , ... 0-6 

90 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Dentistry pro- 
gram may receive the B.S degree (Arts-Dentistry) after 
satisfactory completion of the first year at the University of 
Maryland Dental School upon recommendation by the Dean 
of the Dental School and approval by the College Park 
Campus, the degree to be awarded in August following the 
first year of Dental School. The courses of the first year 
of Dental School constitute the major; the College Park 
courses listed above constitute the supporting area. 

Four-Year Program. No specific major is required for 
favorable consideration by a dental school admission com- 
mittee. By intelligent planning starting in the freshman or 
sophomore year, the student can meet the requirements for 
the B.S or B.A degree in most major programs and can 
include in his or her course work courses specifically 
prescribed by dental schools of choice. The courses listed 
in A through F above for the three-year Arts-Dentistry pro- 
gram will satisfy the minimum requirements of most dental 
schools and are strongly recommended. The four-year 
student's program must also include courses required to 
satisfy major, supporting area, college and division require- 
ments. The student is urged to work closely with pre-dental 
and major advisors in this planning. 

Pre-Forestry 

Pre-Forestry students are advised in the Department of 
Horticulture section. See page 47 for information about this 
program. 

Pre-Law 

Although some law schools will consider only applicants 
with a B.A. or B.S. degree, others will accept applicants who 
have successfully completed a three-year program of 
academic work. Most law schools do not prescribe specific 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 1 1 9 



courses which a student must present for admission, but do 
require that the student follow one of the standard programs 
offered by the undergraduate college. Many law schools 
require that the applicant take the Law School Admission 
Test, preferably in July or October of the academic year 
preceding his entry into professional school, 

Four-Year Program. The student who plans to complete 
the requirements for the B.A or B.S. degree before entering 
law school should select a major field of concentration. The 
pre-law student often follows a bachelor of arts program with 
a major In American studies, English, history, economics, 
political science (government and politics), psychology, 
sociology, or speech, a few pre-law students follow a 
bachelor of science program. 

Three-Year Arts-Law Program. The student who plans to 
enter law school at the end of his third year should complete 
the General University Requirements. By the end of his junior 
year he will complete the requirements for a "minor" (18 
semester hours in one department. 6 hours being at the 300- 
400 level). His program during the first three years should 
include all of the basic courses required for a degree 
(including the 18-hour "minor" course program) and all 
divisional and University requirements. The academic 
courses must total 90 hours, and must be passed with a 
minimum average of 2.0. To be acceptable to law schools, 
however, students in vertually all cases must have a 
considerably higher average. 

Students with exceptional records who are accepted to 
the School of Law of the University of Maryland under the 
Arts-Law program may receive a B.A. degree (Arts-Law) 
after satisfactory completion of the first year of law school, 
upon recommendation by the Dean of the University of 
Maryland Law School and approval by the College Park 
Campus. The degree is awarded In August following the first 
year of law school (or after 30 credit hours are completed). 



Medical Technology 

University of Maryland offers a baccalaureate degree 
program in Medical Technology to be completed in four 
academic years. Students who have been admitted into 'the 
Medical Technology Program study during the senior year at 
the School of Medicine and the University of Maryland 
Hospital In Baltimore. The program fulfills requirements set 
forth by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) and the Council on Medical 
Education of the American Medical Association (AMA). Upon 
successful completion of the program, graduates are eligible 
to take the Medical Technology national certification 
examination given by the Board of Registry of the American 
Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP). Students will not 
receive a degree in Medical Technology from the University 
of Maryland unless they attend the senior year at the 
Baltimore Campus. 

Pre-professional Curriculum. Students must complete at 
least 90 semester hours of academic preparation, exclusive 
of Health and Physical Education, before beginning the 
professional segment of the Medical Technology Program. A 
curriculum guide is included which will assist the student in 
planning the first three years of study which fulfills University 
of Maryland and National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Science requirements. 

Professional Curriculum. Students are accepted into the 
Medical Technology Program on a competitive basis. 
Successful completion of 90 semester hours does not 
guarantee admission to the professional segment of the 
program. 

The professional segment, of 12 months duration, is 
administered by the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine at the Baltimore Campus. Two classes are admitted 
each year (January and July). Full-time attendance is 
required during the senior year. The first six months of this 
year consist of lectures, didactic laboratories and simulated 
clinical laboratory instruction. The second half of the year 
involves rotation in each discipline of the clinical laboratories 
at the University of Maryland Hospital. 



Application and Admission. Applicants must meet all 
admission requirements of the University of Maryland At 
least three years of college preparatory mathematics and 
science, including chemistry and physics, are strongly 
recommended. 

Applications to the professional school will not be 
considered until the first semester of the junior year. At that 
time, the applicant submits an undergraduate Professional 
Application for Admission. All applications for admissions will 
be sent to the Director of Admissions, Howard Hall, Room 
132, 660 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
Advancement to the professional segment Is determined by 
criteria set by the "Committee on Admissions " 

Applicants are required to take the ALLIED HEALTH 
PROFESSIONS ADMISSION TEST. For further information. 
see your counselor or write to P O. Box 3540, Grand Central 
Station, New York, New York 1 001 7 

Pre-Medlcal Technology Program Requirements 

Credits 
CHEMISTRY ( 1 6-credit minimum) 

CHEM 103. 104— CollegeChemlstryl.il 4.4 

Additional 8 credits from the following courses 
CHEM 203.204— College Chemistry IV . 3 

and College Chemistry 

Laboratory IV 2 

CHEM 321— Quantitative Analysis 4 

or 
CHEM 461,463— Biochemistry I 3 

and Biochemistry Laboratory I 2 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE ( 1 6-credlt minimum) 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

Additional 8 credits from the following courses 
ZOOL 201, 202— Human Anatomy and 

Physiology 4 4 

ZOOL 246— Genetics 4 

ZOOL 290— Comparative Vertebrate 

Morphology 4 

ZOOL 41 1 —Cellular Biology 4 

MICB 440— Pathogenic Microbiology 4 

MATHEMATICS (6 credits) 

MATH 110 or 115 3 

MATH 111 3 

RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES 

CHEM 261, 302, and 462; ZOOL 475 and 495: MICB 450 and 

460; PHYS 121 and 1 22; PSYC 200 

Acceptable electees must be approved by the Medical 
Technology advisor. 

GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 

AREA A— not required for medical technology students 

AREA B— 6 credits required 
Any 6 credits from courses listed under either of the two 
divisions: Human and Community Resources; Behavioral 
and Social Sciences. 

AREA C— 1 2-credits required 

SPCH100 3 . . 

A minimum of 6 credits in English is required. An additional 
3 credits from any of the courses listed in the Division of 
Arts and Humanities (Students will be required either to 
show proficiency in English composition— the Illinois 
Rhetoric Test— or to take ENGL 101. Introduction to 
Writing). 

Pre-Medicine 

The pre-medical program is based upon the require- 
ments and recommendations of the American Medical 
schools, and the requirements for a baccalaureate degree 
from the College Park Campus, following either the four- 
year program or the combined Arts-Medicine Program The 
curriculum Is designed to prepare the student for the 
Medicine College Admission Test, which is normally taken 
in the Spring of the junior year. 

Three-Year Arts-Medlclne Program. Students whose 
performance during the first two years is exceptional may 
seek admission to the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine at the end of their third year By the end of the 
third year the student must have earned 90 academic 



120 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS 



credits, the last 30 of which must have been earned at the 
University of Maryland at College Park No undergraduate 
major is required for this program; the work of the first year 
in the School of Medicine is considered as the major Within 
the 90 credits the student must have completed all the 
requirements listed below It is strongly recommended that 
the General University Requirements include at least 3 
credits in English compostion and one other English Course 

Credits 
A General University Requirements 30 

8 Chemistry (general, inorganic and organic) 18 

CHEM 103.104.201,202.203.204 

or 
CHEM 105.106.211.212.213.214 
C Zoology 16 

ZOOL 101 (General Zoology) or ZOOL 293 

(Animal Diversity) 
ZOOL 246 (Genetics) 
ZOOL 290 (Comparative Vertebrate Morphology) 

One of the following 
ZOOL 422 (Vertebrate Physiology). 
ZOOL 426 (General Endocrinology). 
ZOOL 420 (Vertebrate Embryology). 

or 
ZOOL 495 (Mammalian Histology) 
D Mathematics 6-8 

(Mathematics through calculus (MATH 141 or 22 1| is 
strongly recommended) 
E Physics121. 122.or141. 142 8 

F Supporting courses from any one of the following 

combinations. 6-10 

1 Zoology— Six hours on the 300-400 level 

2 Microbiology— Eight hours on the 300-400 level 

3 CHEM 321 (Quantitative Analysis) plus any three- 

credit course at the 300-400 level in 
the physical or biological sciences 
that is approved by the Assistant 
Dean for Pre-Medical Advisement 

4 CHEM 461,462. 463, and 464 

5. Nine hours on the 300-400 level in any one 

department of the Division of Arts and Humanities or 
the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

G Electives as needed to make at least 90 credits . 0-6 

90 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Medicine 
program may receive the B.S. degree (Arts-Medicine) after 
satisfactory completion of the first year at the University of 
Maryland Medical School upon recommendation by the Dean 
of Medicine School and approval by the College Park 
Campus, the degree to be awarded in August following the 
first year of Medical School. The courses of the first year of 
Medical School constitute the major; the College Park 
courses listed above constitute the supporting area. 

Four- Year Program. No specific major is required for 
favorable consideration by a medical school admission 
committee. By intelligent planning starting in the freshman or 
sophomore year, the student can meet the requirements for 
the B.S, or B.A. degree in most major programs and can 
include in his or her course work courses specifically 
prescribed by medical schools of choice. The courses listed 
in A through F above for the three-year Arts-Medicine 
program will satisfy the minimum requirements of most 
medical schools and are strongly recommended. The four- 
year student's program must also include courses required 
to satisfy major, supporting area, college and division 
requirements. The student is urged to work closely with pre- 
medical and major advisors in this planning. 

Pre-Nursing 

The School of Nursing. The program in professional 
nursing leading to the baccalaureate degree in nursing, is 
available to qualified applicants without discrimination in 
regard to age. creed, ethnic origin, marital status, race, or 
sex. The School of Nursing is approved by the Maryland 
State Board of Examiners of Nurses and accredited by the 
National League for Nursing. 

Admission and Progression. It is recommended that 
students enroll in the college preparatory program in high 



school In addition to other academic subjects required for 
graduation, the following subjects are strongly 
recommended mathematics (college preparatory) (3 
credits); biology (1 unit); and chemistry (1 unit) Study in the 
subjects listed above provides a foundation for college pre- 
professional course requirements 

Admission to the upper division program in the School of 
Nursing on the Baltimore Campus is limited to the number of 
students that can be accommodated, and selection must be 
made from applicants who are judged to have the most 
potential for completing the professional program Academic 
performance in pre-professional courses is an important 
factor Also, the result of the Allied Health Professions 
Admission Test, given in the fall of the sophomore year, is an 
important admission factor It is important that students- who 
enroll in the freshman and sophomore years in preparing for 
nursing recognize that although every effort is made to 
continue to expand the enrollment of the professional 
program on the Baltimore Campus, there is no way in which 
the student can be guaranteed admission to the professional 
program. 

Information about lower division requirements may be 
obtained from Room 2109, Turner Laboratory, on the 
College Park Campus Upper division program information 
may be obtrained from the School of Nursing, 655 West 
Lombard Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 Applications to 
the upper division may be obtained by writing Director of 
Admissions, Rm 132 Howard Hall, 660 W Redwood St. 
Baltimore. MD 21 201. 

Pre-Nursing Requirements. It is required that all students, 
including registered nurses, enrolled in or transferring to the 
program in nursing use the following guidelines for the 
freshman and sophomore years: 

Lower Division Semester 

requirements Hours 

English Composition 3 

• • • Chemistry (including content in 

organic chemistry) 6-8 

*• 'Human Anatomy and Physiology 6-8 

•* 'Microbiology 3-4 

" "Social Sciences* 12 

Humanities* * . . 15 

Nutrition 3 

Electivies 11-7 

Minimum requirements for Junior status 59 

Social Sciences include Sociology, Psychology. Political Science. 
Economics. Geography, Anthropology 

Humanities include Literature, History. Philosophy, Foreign 
Languages. Mathematics, Fine Arts 

'Courses must include at least one in sociology and one in psychology 

* 'Courses must be selected form at least three departments 

'"Social, physical and natural sciences taken ten years prior to student's 
admission date will not be accepted, effective 1 977-1 978 

The specific lower division courses taken by students on the 
College Park Campus are: 

Semester 
Hours 

Chemistry 1 03, 1 04 4,4 

English 101 3 

Zoology 101 4 

Humanities (literature, history, philosophy, fine arts. 

language)* 15 

Psychology 1 00 3 

Sociology 1 00 3 

Other social sciences (sociology, psychology. 

anthropology, government and politics, 

economics, geography) 6 

Zoobgy 201 . 202 4 4 

Microbiology 200 4 

Nutrition 200 (recommended) 3 

Elective 2 

Minimum requirements for Junior status 59 

' Courses must be selected from at least three of the areas listed 

Pre-Optometry 

Requests for admission to schools and colleges of 
optometry vary, but in all schools emphasis is placed on 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 121 



mathematics (MATH 140, 141; or MATH 110. 111 with 
MATH 220, 221 also strongly recommended). Chemistry 
(CHEM 103. 140. with CHEM 201, 202, 203. 204 also 
strongly recommended), physics (PHYS 121. 122 or 141, 
142). and biology (ZOOL 101. 293) Most schools also 
require additional courses in such areas as English, 
psychology, social sciences, philosophy, foreign languages, 
and literature A minimum of two years of pre-optometry 
studies is required for admission to accredited schools, but 
at present better than 50% of successful applicants hold a 
bachelor's or higher degree Students who contemplate 
admission to optometry schools may major in any program 
that the University offers, but would be well-advised to write 
to the optometry schools of their choice for specific course 
requirements for admission. Students who seek further 
information should consult the pre-professional advisor in the 
Office of Undergraduate Studies. 

Pre-Pharmacy 

The purposes of the School of Pharmacy are to train 
students for the efficient, ethical practice of all branches of 
pharmacy; to instruct students in general scientific and 
cultural subjects so they can read critically, express 
themselves clearly and think logically as members of a 
profession and citizens of a democracy; and to guide 
students into productive scholarship and research for the 
increase of knowledge and techniques in the healing arts of 
pharmacy. 

The School of Pharmacy is accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education. The School holds 
membership in the American Associaton of Colleges of 
Pharmacy, 

Correspondence. All correspondence prior to entrance in 
the Pre-professional Program College Park should be 
addressed to the Director of Admissions. University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. 

All correspondence relative to entrance in the 
Professional Program should be addressed to the School of 
Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 636 W Lombard Street, 
Baltimore, Maryland 2 1 201 . 

On the College Park Campus the pharmacy student 
advisor's office is in the Turner Laboratory, Room 202, 
telephone number 454-2540. 

Five- Year Program. A minimum of five academic years of 
satisfactory college work is required for the completion of 
the present pharmacy curriculum of the University of 
Maryland This five-year curriculum meets the minimum 
requirements established by the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy and the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. 

At the University of Maryland the five-year program 
consists of two years of pre-professional and a three-year 
pharmacy program The pre-professional program is not 
available in Baltimore, but may be obtained at the College 
Park. Baltimore County (UMBC). or Eastern Shore (UMES) 
Campuses of the University of Maryland or at any other 
accredited university or junior or senior college where 
appropriate courses are offered 

Six- Year Program. In 1975. a Doctor of Pharmacy degree 
program will also be offered Applicants would be considered 
after the two-year pre-pharmacy program in two years of the 
professional program in Baltimore 

Interested secondary school students are invited to write 
to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy in Baltimore for a 
catalog concerning the School and for literature about the 
opportunities in the pharmacy profession. 

Recommended High School Preparation. The completion 
of an academic program containing the following courses is 
required for enrollment in the School of Pharmacy: 



Physical Sciences (Chemistry and 

Physics) 
History and Social Sciences 
Biological Sciences 
Foreign Language— German or French 
Unspecilied academic subjects 

Total 



Admission to the Professional Program at Baltimore. 
Only the three-year professional program is offered in 
Baltimore 

Students of all races, colors and creeds are equally 
admissible It is the objective of the University of Maryland 
Baltimore City Campus to enroll students with diversified 
backgrounds in order to make the educational experience 
more meaningful for each student 

From College Park Campus. Students who have 
completed the prescribed pre-professional program at 
College Park with a scholastic average of not less than 2 25, 
and who are in good standing will be considered for 
advancement to the pharmacy program in Baltimore, 
subject to the decision of the Admissions Committee of the 
School of Pharmacy Applicants should be aware that the 
2 25 is a minimum average for consideration and that the 
average for all successful applicants has been 3.0. 

In the semester preceding enrollment in the Baltimore 
division of the School of Pharmacy, each student will be 
required to file an application with the Baltimore Office of 
Admissions and Registrations 

The Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) is required 
of all applicants to the professional program in Baltimore. 



Pre-Pharmacy Curriculum. The pre-professional curriculum 
is designed to provide the student with those courses that 
satisfy the needs for a more liberal education as well as the 
scientific prerequisite courses for entrance into the 
professional program 



l 

First Year 

Chemistry 1 03, 1 04 

Mathematics 1 1 5, 220 (Introductory Analysis and 

Elementary Calculus) 

Zoology 101 (or Biology) 

English 101 (Composition) 

Elective (Social Sciences) 

Elective (non-specific) . 

Second Year 

Chemistry 201, 202. 203, 204 

Physics 121.122 (Fundamentals) 

Elective (Humanities) 

English (Literature) 

Elective (non-specitic) 

Elective (Social Science) 



Credits 
8 



•10 
8 
6 
3 
3 
3 

33 





Recommended 


Required 


Subjects 


Units 


Units 


English 


4 


4 


College Preparatory Mathematics- 






including algebra ( 1 ). plane geometry 






( 1 1 and additional units in advanced 






algebra, solid geometry, trigonometry. 






or advanced mathematics 


4 


2 



"Minimum requirement (or organic chemistry is 8 credits 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

The Department of Physical Therapy offers a four-year 
program divided into a pre-professional division and a 
professional division. The pre-professional requirements may 
be completed on any of the University of Maryland 
campuses, or any regionally accredited university or college 
The professional division courses are offered only on the 
Baltimore City Campus The physical therapy curnculum is 
approved by the Council of Medical Education of the 
American Medical Association in collaboration with the 
American Physical Therapy Association. 

The professional services of the physical therapist are 
offered to people who are disabled by illness or accident or 
were born with a handicap Clinical practitioners are 
responsible for the evaluation of each patient's ability, 
disability and potential for recovery The most common areas 
of disorder include neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, sensory 
motor, and related cardiovascular and respiratory lunctions 



122 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 



On the basis of test findings a treatment program is 
planned and implemented within the referral of the licensed 
physician or dentist with whom the contact is maintained 
regarding patient care and progress Treatment techniques 
include the therapeutic use of heat, cold, water, electricity, 
light, ultrasound, massage exercise and functional training 
Instruction is given to the patient, the family and others who 
might help during the treatment and convalescent period 

Most physical therapists are employed in hospital clinics, 
rehabilitation centers, private practice, schools for 
handicapped children and nursing homes 

Master's degree programs are available in a number of 
Universities and Colleges across the country The degree 
enables physical therapists to hold positions in education, 
research, administration and as consultants Ph D degrees 
may be earned in allied academic areas. 

Admission Information. High school students who are 
interested in physical therapy should enroll in the college 
preparatory program The subjects specifically 
recommended for adequate background are biology, 
chemistry, physics and three units of mathematics 
Completion of a year of high school public speaking will 
provide exemption from the college speech requirement. 

For an application for admission to the University of 
Maryland's College Park Campus, write to: Admissions 
Office. University of Maryland. College Park, Maryland 
20742 

Pre-professional. Admission to the lower division is open 
to all students meeting the University admission 
requirements. Advisement is avilable in preparation for 
transfer to the professional program on the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore Campus. Admission to the pre- 
professional division at College Park does not guarantee 
admission to the professioanl division at Baltimore. 

Professional. An admission committee is charged with 
selecting students annually for the fall semester. Minimum 
qualification at the junior level is the completion of 60 
designated credits with a grade of C or better in each of the 
required pre-professional courses. The minimum grade point 
average for admission is 2 on a 4.0 scale However, it is 
only realistic to assume that a higher average is needed for 
selection It is unlikely that non-resident candidates with less 
than a 3.0 average will be considered. There is no exclusion 
based on sex, age, ethnic background or prior completion of 
another academic degree. 

Application. Application for admission to the professional 
division is necessary. To obtain an application, address your 
request to: University of Maryland, Office of Admissions and 
Registrations, 660 W. Redwood Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. 

A student who can realistically meet the academic 
requirements and who wishes to be considered a candidate 
for the junior class should submit a request for an application 
after October 1 preceding the year of admission. Application 
receipt deadline is February 1 . and supporting documents 
must be received by March 1 of the year of admission 
Selection of applicants is based on academic achievement, 
an admission test and a personal interview. 

Further Information. Information may be obtained on the 
College Park Campus in the Turner Laboratory, Room 2109 

Information concerning the upper division may be obtained 
by contacting the Department of Physical Therapy, Allied 
Health Professions Building, 32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21 201 

Pre-Physical Therapy Requirements. The minimum 
requirements for entry into the junior year of the professional 
program total 60 credits. 

•MATH 110, 111 6 

or MATH 220 or MATH 1 40 (3 credits 

plus 3 electives) 

CHEM 103, 104 8 

PHYS121. 122 8 

ZOOL101 4 

ZOOL 201 (Fall only) 4 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 3 

(Afro- American Studies. Anthropology, 

Economics. Government and Politics, Urban 

Studies, Sociology, Geography) 
PSYC 100 3 

PSYC (one course above the intro level - 

Abnormal Developmental or Educational) 3 

ENGL 101 . ... 3 

(Students with advanced credit or exemption 

may substitute a 3 credit elective) 
SPCH 1 00 or a Communications Course 3 

(Students with one year of high school speech 

may substitute a 3 credit elective) 
ARTS AND HUMANITIES 6 

(Courses chosen from History. Literature, 

Foreign Language, Philosophy, Appreciation 
of Art, Music, Drama. Dance) 
Electives* 6 



* Selections may be made in any area with no more than 2 credits ot skills or 
activities courses accepted Introductory or review courses below the level 
required in Biology. Chemistry. Physics and MATHEMATICS, MAY NOT be 
used as electives 



Orientation Course. BTPT 001 — Physical Therapy 
Orientation (1 credit not towards a degree) In an effort to 
increase the knowledge and awareness of students 
interested in the field of physical therapy, a lecture series is 
offered during the fall semester. The areas of professional 
academics and clinical practice will be covered. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY experience (as a volunteer, aide, 
etc.) is strongly recommended 



Pre-Physical Therapy Curriculum 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

FALL 
MATH 

CHEM 103 

ENGL 101 

PSYC 1 00 or SPCH 1 00 

Elective 

Total Semester Credit Load 



3 
1-3 

14-16 



MATH 

CHEM 104 

PSYC 100 or SPCH 100 

ZOOL 101 

Elective 

Total Semester Credit Load. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

PHYS121 

ARTS& HUMANITIES 

PSYC 

ZOOL 

Elective 

Total Semester Credit Load 



PHYS122 

ARTS& HUMANITIES 
SOCIAL SCIENCE 
STATISTICS 
Elective 



1-4 
15-18 



3 

1-4 



Total Semester Credit Load 



Pre-Radiologic Technology 

The Radiologic Technology program of the University of 
Maryland is four year in duration, leading to a bachelor of 
science degree and qualifying the individual to take the 
certifying examination of the American Registry of Radiologic 
Technologists. The Radiologic Technology curriculum of the 
University of Maryland is aproved by the Joint Review 
Committee of the American Medical Association and the 
American Society of Radiologic Technologists. 



ACADEMIC DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, & DEPARTMENTS / 1 23 



The first two years of the program are devoted to fulfilling 
the pre-professional requirements, which enable the student 
to apply to the professional division at the Baltimore City 
Campus of the University of Maryland The pre-professional 
requirements (listed below) may be completed on any 
undergraduate campus of the University of Maryland or any 
regionally accredited College or University. 

The student who can realistically meet the academic 
requirements and who wishes to be considered a candidate 
for the junior class should submit a request for an application 
to the Baltimore City Campus after October 1 of the 
preceding year. Application deadline is April 1 preceding the 
expected date of entry. Students are selected on the basis of 
grade point average, interests and academic background. A 
grade point averge of 2.5 is the minimum for consideration 
for admission. 

The Radiologic Technologist is principally concerned with 
the utilization of sophisticated diagnostic imaging systems 
which are used in a wide variety of clinical procedures to 
provide the physician with images of the internal anatomy of 
th patient as an aid to diagnosis. The curriculum includes 
courses in Radiologic Physics, Radiation Protection and 
Radiobiology, and Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology as 
depicted on the x-ray film. Introductory courses in teaching 
and administration in Radiologic Technology, as well as 
peripheral areas such as Nuclear Medicine, Radiation 
Therapy and others are included in the curriculum. The 
Radiologic Technology Program of the Unviersity of 
Maryland is designed to produce an individual who is both 
clinically competent and academically qualified to function in 
a wide variety of positions in radiology and related fields. 
Additionally, the program is intended to provide an academic 
background sufficient to enable the qualified student to 
pursue a graduate degree in Radiology Administration^ 
Education, or the Radiological Sciences. 

Students desiring further information may contact an 
advisor through the Office of Allied Health Professions in 
Room 2109 of the Turner Laboratory on the College Park 
Campus, or may contact the advisor, Mr. Skip Zile, at 301- 
528-6272, Division of Radiologic Technology, Allied Health 
Professions Building, 32 S. Greene Street, Baltimore, 
Maryland 21 201. 



Pre-Veterinary Medicine 

The Pre-Veterinary Medicine program is located within the 
College of Agriculture See page 47 for information about 
this program. 



Pre-Radiological Technology Requirements. Students 
desiring to enter the program should contact the advisor as 
soon as possible. Students must complete 60 semester 
hours of academic work prior to being officially admitted to 
the Junior year at the Baltimore City Campus. Students 
should file an application after completion of 45 semester 
hours. 

The following Isit of courses should be closely adhered to 
for consideration for admission: 

Semester 
Hours 

English Composition 3 

Biology Zoology 8 

(Human Anatomy and Physiology are 

highly recommended) 
Chemistry 8 

(Should include Inorganic with lab and Organic 

with lab) 
Physics 8 

Math 6 

(Statistics is recommended) 
Behavioral and Social Sciences 12 

One psychology and one sociology course are 

required Other courses can be selected from 

economics, philosophy, Afro- American 

studies, anthropology, urban studies or 

additional psychology 
Speech 3 

Additional electives* 12 



Pre-Theology 

The Pre-Theology program is located within the 
College of Agriculture See page 47 for information about 
this program 



1 24 / ACADEMIC DIVISIONS. COLLEGES. SCHOOLS. & DEPARTMENTS 








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Afro-American Studies 
AASP 100 Introduction to Afro- American 
Studies. (3) A survey of significant aspects of 
black life and thought which are reflected in 
black literature, music and art. This in- 
terdisciplinary course examines the African 
cultural and historical backgrounds and traces 
the development of black culture In Africa, the 
United States and the Carribean from the fif- 
teenth century to contemporary times. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the social, political and 
economic changes in black life that have in- 
fluenced the ideas of black artists and 
spokesmen. 

AASP 101 Elementary Swahill. (3) An in- 
troductory course in the Swahili language. 
Study of linguistic structure and development 
of audiolingual ability Three recitations and 
one laboratory hour per week. 
AASP 102 Intermediate Swahill. (3) Three 
recitations and one laboratory per week. Fur- 
ther study of linguistic structure and develop- 
ment of audiolingual and writing ability, and in- 
troduction to the reading of literary texts. 
AASP 112 Advanced Swahill. (3) For stu- 
dents who wish to develop fluency and con- 
fidence in the speaking, reading and writing of 
Swahili language Discussions in Swahili. 
AASP 200 African Civilization (3) A survey of 
African civilizations from 4500 B.C to present. 
Analysis of traditional social systems. 
Discussion of the impact of European 
colonization on these civilizations. Analysis of 
the influence of traditional African social 
systems on modern African institutions as well 
as discussion of contemporary processes of 
Africanization. 

AASP 202 Black Culture In the United 
States. (3) The course examines important 
aspects of American Negro life and thought 
which are reflected in Afro-American literature, 
drama, music and art. Beginning with the cul- 
tural heritage of slavery, the course surveys 
the changing modes of black creative ex- 
pression from the nineteenth-century to the 
present 

AASP 298 Special Topics in Afro-American 
Studies. (3) An introductory multi-disciplinary 
and inter-disciplinary educational experience 
to explore issues relevant to black life, cultural 
experiences, and political, economic and ar- 
tistic development. May be repeated to a 
maximum of six credits if subject matter is dif- 
ferent 

AASP 300 The Black Community and Public 
Policy. (3) A study of the role and Impact of 
the black community in public policy for- 
mulation; scope and methods in public policy 
focusing on specific problems in the black 
community; analysis and review of relation- 
ships between the policy makers and the com- 
munity. With permission of the program, 



students may elect to devote time to specific 
community projects as part of the require- 
ments of the course. The student will not serve 
in an agency in which he is already employed. 

AASP 311 The African Slave Trade. (3) The 

relationship of the slave trade of Africans to the 
development of British capitalism and its in- 
dustrial revolution: and to the economic and 
social development of the Americas. 
AASP 312 Social and Cultural Effects of 
Colonization and Racism. (3) A comparative 
approach to the study of the social and cultural 
effects of colonization and racism on black 
people in Africa, Latin America and in the 
United States- -community and family life, 
religion, economic institutions, education and 
artistic expression. 

AASP 397 Senior Reading and Research 
Seminar in Afro- American Studies. (3) An in- 
terdisciplinary reading and research senior 
seminar for majors in Afro-American studies or 
majors in other departments or programs who 
have completed at least eighteen hours of 
Afro-American studies courses. Emphasis on 
research and writing methods in Afro- American 
studies. A senior thesis will be completed 
during the course. 

AASP 400 Directed Readings In Afro- 
American Studies. (3) The readings will be 
directed by the director of Afro-American 
studies. Topics to be covered: the topics will 
be chosen by the director to meet the needs 
and interests of individual students. 
AASP 401 Seminar In Afro-American 
Studies. (3) The theory and concepts of the 
social and behavioral sciences as they relate to 
Afro-American studies. Required for the cer- 
tificate in Afro-American studies. 
Prerequisites: at least 1 5 hours of Afro- 
American studies or related courses or per- 
mission of the director. 

AASP 403 The Development of a Black 
Aesthetic. (3) An analysis of selected areas of 
black creative expression in the arts for the 
purpose of understanding the informing prin- 
ciples of style, techniques, and cultural ex- 
pression which make up a black aesthetic. 
Prerequisite: completion of ENGL 443 or ASP 
302 or consent of instructor. 
AASP 410 Contemporary African Ideologies. 
(3) Analysis of contemporary African 
ideologies. Emphasis on philosophies of 
Nyerere, Nkrumah, Senghor, Sekou Toure, 
Kaunda, Cabral, et al. Discussion of the role of 
African ideologies on modernization and social 
change. 

AASP 411 Black Resistance Movements. (3) 

A comparative study of the black resistance 
movements In Africa and America: analysis of 
their interrelationships as well as their impact 
on contemporary Pan-Africanism. 



AASP 428 Special Topics In Black Develop- 
ment. (3) A multi-disciplinary and inter- 
disciplinary educational experience concerned 
with questions relevant to the development of 
black people everywhere Development im- 
plies political, economic, social, and cultural 
change among other things Consequently, a 
number of topics may be examined and 
studied. 

AASP 429 Special Topics In Black Culture. 
(3) An interdisciplinary approach to the role of 
black artists around the world Emphasis is 
placed upon contributions of the black man in 
Africa, the Caribbean and the United States to 
the literary arts, the musical arts, the per- 
forming arts, and the visual arts Course con- 
tent will be established in terms of those ideas 
and concepts which reflect the cultural climate 
of the era in which they were produced. At- 
tention to individual compositions and works of 
art through lectures, concepts, field trips, and 
audio-visual devices. 



Agricultural Engineering 

AGEN 100 Basic Agricultural Engineering 
Technology. (3) An introduction to the ap- 
plication of engineering concepts. Topics in- 
clude quantitation and measurement; 
mechanical, thermal, fluid and electrical prin- 
ciples and their relationship to biological 
systems and materials of agricultural and 
aquacultural products (for non-engineering 
majors). 
AGEN 200 Introduction to Farm Mechanics. 

(2) One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week. A study of the hand tools and power 
equipment and their safe use as it applies to 
mechanized farms. Principles and practice in 
arc and gas welding, cold metal and sheet 
metal work are provided Also, tool fitting, 
woodworking, plumbing, blue print reading and 
use of concrete 

AGEN 232 Water, a Renewable Resource. 

(3) Occurrence and distribution of water. 
Review of both natural and man-made water 
resource systems. Basics of water quality and 
waste water treatment 

AGEN 300 Energy and Food. (1) An ex- 
position of the energy inputs into the produc- 
tion, processing, marketing and consumption 
of our food supply. 

AGEN 305 Farm Mechanics. (2) Two 
laboratory periods a week, available only to 
seniors in agricultural education. This course 
consists of laboratory exercises in practical 
farm shop and farm equipment maintenance, 
repair, and construction projects, and a study 
of the principles of shop organization and ad- 
ministration. 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 127 



AGEN 313 Mechanics of Food Processing. 

(4) Three lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 111 or 121 . Applications in 
the processing and preservation of foods of 
power transmission, hydraulics, electricity, 
thermodynamics, refrigeration, instruments 
and controls, materials handling and, time and 
motion analysis, 

AGEN 324 Engineering Dynamics ol 
Biological Materials. (3) Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite: ENME 340. Investigates 
the physical parameters (impact, temperature, 
humidity, light, etc.) governing the response of 
biological materials. Analysis of unit operations 
and their effect on the physical and quality 
characteristics of agricultural products. 
AGEN 343 Functional Design of Machinery 
and Equipment. (3) Two lectures and one two 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ENES 
221. Theory and methods of agricultural 
machine design. Application of machine design 
principles and physical properties of soils and 
agricultural products in design of machines to 
perform specific tasks, 

AGEN 401 Agricultural Production Equip- 
ment. (3) Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: AGEN 100. Principles of 
operation and functions of power and 
machinery units as related to tillage; cutting, 
coveylng, and separating units; and control 
mechanisms. Principles of internal combustion 
engines and power unit components. 
AGEN 402 Agricultural Materials Handling 
and Environmental Control. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
AGEN 100. Characteristics of construction 
materials and details of agricultural structures. 
Fundamentals of electricity, electrical circuits, 
and electrical controls. Materials handling and 
environmental requirements of farm products 
and animals. 

AGEN 421 Power Systems. (3) Two lectures 
and one two hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: ENME 216, ENEE 300 and EN- 
ME 340. Analysis of energy conversion 
devices including internal combustion engines, 
electrical and hydraulic motors. Fundamentals 
of power transmission and coordination of 
power sources with methods of power tran- 
smission. 

AGEN 422 Soil and Water Engineering. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: ENME 
340. Applications of engineering and soil 
sciences in erosion control drainage, irrigation 
and watershed management. Principles of 
agricultural hydrology and design of water con- 
trol and coveyance systems. 
AGEN 424 Functional and Environmental 
Design of Agricultural Structures. (3) Two 
lectures and one hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: AGEN 324 An analytical ap- 
proach to the design and planning of functional 
and environmental requirements of plants and 
animals in semi- or completely enclosed struc- 
tures. 

AGEN 432 General Hydrology. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Qualitative aspects of basic 
hydrologic principles pertaining to the proper- 
ties, distribution and circulation of water as 
related to public interest in water resources 

AGEN 433 Engineering Hydrology. (3) Three 
lectures per week. Prerequisites: MATH 246, 
ENCE 330 or ENME 340. Properties, 
distribution and circulation of water from the 
sea and In the atmosphere emphasizing 
movement overland, in channels and through 
the soil profile. Qualitative and quantitative fac- 
tors are considered. 



AGEN 435 Aquacultural Engineering. (3) 

Prerequisite: consent of department A study 
of the engineering aspects of development, 
utilization and conservation of aquatic systems 
Emphasis will be on harvesting and processing 
aquatic animals or plants as related to other 
facets of water resources management. 
AGEN 488 Topics In Agricultural Engineer- 
ing Technology. (1-3) Prerequisite: per- 
mission of the instructor. Selected topics in 
agricultural engineering technology of current 
need and Interest. May be repeated to a 
maximum of six credits if topics are different. 
Not acceptable for credit towards major In 
agricultural engineering. 
AGEN 489 Special Problems In Agricultural 
Engineering. (1-3) Prerequisite: approval of 
department. Student will select an engineering 
problem and prepare a technical report. The 
problem may include design, experimentation, 
and/or data analysis. 

AGEN 499 Special Problems In Agricultural 
Engineering Technology. (1-3) Prerequisite 
approval of department. Not acceptable for 
majors In agricultural engineering. Problems 
assigned in proportion to credit. 

Agriculture 

AGRI 101 Introduction to Agriculture. (1) 

Required of all beginning .freshmen and 
sophomores In agriculture. Other students 
must get the consent of the instructor. A series 
of lectures Introducing the student to the broad 
field of agriculture. 

AGRI 301 Introduction to Agricultural 
Biometrics. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: 
university math requirement. Descriptive 
statistics, sampling, confidence interval 
estimation, introduction to hypothesis testing, 
simple, regression and correlation. Course em- 
phasis shall be on application of simple 
statistical techniques and on interpretation of 
the statistical results. 

AGRI 389 Internship In Conservation and 
Resource Development. (3) Prerequisites: 
permission of instructor. Students are placed in 
work experiences related to their stated career 
goals for a minimum of eight hours a week for a 
semester. Each student must do an in depth 
study in some portion of the work experience 
and produce a special project and report 
related to this study. A student work log is also 
required. This course may be repeated for a 
total of six credits. An evaluation from the ex- 
ternal supervisor of the project will be required. 
AGRI 401 Agricultural Biometrics. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisite: MATH 115 or equivalent. 
Probability, measures of central tendency and 
dispersion, frequency distributions, tests of 
statistical hypotheses, regression analysis, 
multiway analysis with emphasis on the use of 
statistical methods in agricultural research 
AGRI 489 Special Topics In Agriculture. (1- 
3) Credit according to time scheduled and 
organization of the course. A lecture series 
organized to study in depth a selected phase 
of agriculture not normally associated with one 
of the existing programs 

AGRONOMY 

AGRO 100 Crops Laboratory. (2) Two 

laboratory periods a week. Demonstration and 
application of practices in the identification, 
distribution and management of field crops 
AGRO 102 Crop Production. (2) Prerequisite 
AGRO 100 or concurrent enrollment therein. 



Culture, use. Improvement, adaptation, 
distribution, and history of field crops. 
AGRO 103 World Crops and Food Supply. 
(3) An Introduction to the relationship of crops 
with civilization. The past, present, and future 
interactions of the biology of crop plants with 
world affairs and population will be studied. 
The future impact of crops on world affairs will 
be emphasized. 

AGRO 105 Soil and the Environment. (3) 
A study of soils as an irreplaceable natural 
resource, importance of soils in the ecosys- 
tem, and analysis of land resource areas in the 
U.S. Discussion of soils as a pollutant and the 
pollution of soils by various agents and the role 
of soil as a medium for storage, decontamina- 
tion or inactivation of pollutants 
AGRO 202 General Soils. (4) Three lectures 
and one laboratory period a week Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 103 or permission of In- 
structor. A study of the fundamentals of soils 
including their origin, development, relation to 
natural sciences, effect on civilization, physical 
properties, and chemical properties. 
AGRO 398 Senior Seminar. (1) Reports by 
seniors on current scientific and practical 
publications pertaining to agronomy. 
AGRO 403 Crop Breeding. (3) Prerequisite: 
BOTN 414 or ZOOL 246. Principles and 
methods of breeding annual self and cross- 
pollinated plant and perennial forage species. 
AGRO 404 Tobacco Production. (3) 
Prerequisite: BOTN 100. A study of the 
history, adaptation, distribution, culture, and im- 
provement of various types of tobacco, with 
special emphasis on problems in Maryland 
tobacco production. Physical and chemical 
factors associated with yield and quality of 
tobacco will be stressed. 
AGRO 405 Turf Management. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisite: BOTN 100 A study of principles 
and practices of managing turf for lawns, golf 
courses, athletic fields, playgrounds, airfields 
and highways for commerical sod production. 
AGRO 406 Forage Crop Production. (3) 
Prerequisites: BOTN 101. and AGRO 100; or 
concurrent enrollment in these courses A 
general look at world grasslands; production 
and management requirements of major 
grasses and legumes for quality hay, silage and 
pasture for livestock feed; new cultwar 
development and release; seed production 
and distribution of improved cultivars 
AGRO 407 Cereal and Oil Crops. (3) 
Prerequisites: BOTN 101 and AGRO 100; or 
concurrent enrollment in these courses A 
study of principles and practices of com, small 
grains, rice, millets, sorghums, and soybeans 
and other oil seed crops A study of seed 
production, processing, distribution and 
federal and state seed control programs of 
com, small grains and soybeans 

AGRO 411 Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

Prerequisite. AGRO 202 A study of the 
chemical, physical, and biological charac- 
teristics of soils that are important in growing 
crops Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical, 
or biological nature and their correction by the 
use of lime, fertilizers, and rotations are 
discussed and illustrated 
AGRO 412 Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 
Prerequisite AGRO 202 or permission of in- 
structor A study of the manufacturing of com- 
mercial fertilizers and their use in soils for ef- 
ficient crop production 

AGRO 413 Soil and Water Conservation. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a 



128 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



week Prerequisite AGRO 202 or permission 
ol instructor A study of the importance and 
causes ol soil erosion, methods ol soil erosion 
control, and the effect ol conservation prac- 
tices on soil-moisture supply Special em- 
phasis is placed on farm planning for soil and 
water conservation The laboratory period will 
be largely devoted to field trips 
AGRO 414 Soil Classification and Geog- 
raphy. (4) Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week Prerequisite AGRO 202 or 
permission of instructor A study of the 
genesis, morphology, classification and 
geographic distribution of soils The broad prin- 
ciples governing soil formation are explained. 
Attention is given to the influence of 
geographic factors on the development and 
use of the soils in the United States and other 
parts of the world. The laboratory periods will 
be largely devoted to the field trips and to a 
study of soil maps of various countries. 
AGRO 415 Soil Survey and Land Use. (3) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. An introduction to soil survey in- 
terpretation as a tool in land use both in 
agricultural and urban situations. The im- 
plications of soil problems as delineated by soil 
surveys on land use will be considered. 
AGRO 41 7 Soil Physics. (3) Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week Prerequisite: 
AGRO 202 and a course in physics, or per- 
mission of instructor. A study of physical 
properties of soils with special emphasis on 
relationship to soil productivity. 
AGRO 421 Soil Chemistry. (3) One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite: AGRO 202 or permission of in- 
structor. A study of the chemical composition 
of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, 
alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil 
fixation of plant nutrients. Chemical methods of 
soil analysis will be studied with emphasis on 
their relation to fertilizer requirements. 
AGRO 422 Soil Biochemistry. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: AGRO 202, CHEM 104 or con- 
sent of instructor. A study of biochemical 
processes involved in the formation and 
decomposition of organic soil constitutents. 
Significance of soil-biochemical processes in- 
volved in plant nutrition will be considered. 
AGRO 423 Soil-Water Pollution. (3) 
Prerequisite: background in biology and CHEM 
104. Reaction and fate of pesticides, 
agricultural fertilizers, industrial and animal 
wastes in soil and water will be discussed. 
Their relation to the environment will be em- 
phasized. 

AGRO 451 Cropping Systems. (2) 
Prerequisite: AGRO 102 or equivalent. The 
coordination of information from various cour- 
ses in the development of balanced cropping 
systems, appropriate to different objectives in 
various areas of the state and nation 
AGRO 453 Weed Control. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: AGRO 1 02 or equivalent. A study 
of the use of cultural practices and chemical 
herbicides in the control of weeds. 
AGRO 499 Special Problems in Agronomy. 
(1-3) Prerequisites: AGRO 202, 406, 407 or 
permission of instructor A detailed study, in- 
cluding a written report of an important 
problem in agronomy. 

Agriculture and Life Science 
ALSC 101 Organization and Interrelation- 
ships in the Biological World. (3) An in- 



troductory lecture course for the non-science 
major emphasizing the fundamental 
organization, processes and interdependence 
of living organisms and the biological effects 
associated with human influences on the 
ecosystem 

ALSC 124 Cosmic Evolution. (3) 
Prerequisites high school chemistry and 
biology Three lectures per week Especially 
appropriate for non-science students The 
current scientific thinking on the sequence of 
events from the origin of the universe to the ap- 
pearance of man Emphasis on chemical and 
biological evolution 

American Studies 

AMST 201 Introduction to American Studies 

I. (3) Introduction to American cultural studies, 
examining the relationship between the self 
and society as revealed in autobiographical 
writing, 'new journalism' and personal ac- 
counts of American culture 

AMST 202 Introduction to American Studies 

II. (3) An investigation of the concepts of 
culture as defined by both the humanities and 
the social sciences and as illuminated by 
specific artifacts and documents from 
American civilization The strategies employed 
by individuals and academic disciplines to ob- 
serve and explain the mores, myths, and rituals 
of American society. 

AMST 298 Selected Topics in American 
Studies. (3) Cultural study of a specific theme 
or issue involving diversified artifacts and 
documents from both past and contemporary 
American experience. Course may be 
repeated to a maximum of six hours if the sub- 
ject is different. 

AMST 398 Independent studies. (1-3) 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides 
the student with the opportunity to pursue in- 
dependent, interdisciplinary research and 
reading in specific areas of American culture 
studies. May be repeated for a maximum of six 
credits. 

AMST 426 Culture and the Arts in America. 
(3) Prerequisite: junior standing A study of 
American institutions, the intellectual and 
esthetic climate from the colonial period to the 
present. 

AMST 427 Culture and the Arts in America. 
(3) Prerequisite: junior standing. A study of 
American institutions, the intellectual and 
esthetic climate from the colonial period to the 
present. 

AMST 436 Readings In American Studies. 
(3) Prerequisite; junior standing. An historical 
survey of American values as presented in 
various key writings. 

AMST 437 Readings in American Studies. 
(3) Prerequisite: junior standing. An historical 
survey of American values as presented in 
various key writings. 

AMST 446 Popular Culture In America. (3) 
Prerequisite: junior standing and permission of 
instructor. A survey of the historical develop- 
ment of the popular arts and modes of popular 
entertainment in America. 
AMST 447 Popular Culture in America. (3) 
Prerequisite: junior standing and AMST 446. 
Intensive research in the sources and themes 
of contemporary American popular culture. 
AMST 498 Special Topics in American 
Studies. (3) Prerequisite: a course in 
American history, literature, or government, or 
consent of the instructor. Topics of special in- 
terest. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits 
when topics differ. 



Animal Science 

ANSC 101 Principles of Animal Science. (3) 
Two lectures and one, two-hour laboratory 
period per week A comprehensive course, in- 
cluding the development of animal science, its 
contributions to the economy, characteristics 
of animal products, factors of efficient and 
economical production and distribution 
ANSC 201 Basic Principles of Animal 
Genetics. (3) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period per week The basic principles and laws 
of mendelian gentics as applied to 
economically important domestic animals In- 
cluded will be gene action and interaction, 
linkage and crossing over, recombination, 
cythological maps, chromosomal aberrations, 
mutations, structure of the genetic material and 
regulation of genetic information 
ANSC 203 Feeds and Feeding. (3) Credit not 
allowed for ANSC major Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week Prerequisites: 
CHEM 103, 104 Elements of nutrition, sour- 
ce, characteristics and ad-otability of the 
various feedstuffs to the several classes of 
livestock A study of the composition of feeds, 
the nutrient requirements of farm animals and 
the formulations of economic diets and rations 
for livestock. 

ANSC 211 Anatomy of Domestic Animals. 
(4) Three lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: ZOOL 101. A systematic 
gross and microscopic comparative study of 
the anatomy of the major domestic animals 
Special emphasis is placed on those systems 
important in animal production 
ANSC 212 Applied Animal Physiology. (3) 
Prerequisites: ANSC 211 or equivalent The 
physiology of domesticated animals with em- 
phasis on functions related to production, and 
the physiological adaptation to environmental 
influences. 

ANSC 214 Applied Animal Physiology 
Laboratory. (1) Pre- or corequisite: ANSC 
212. One three-hour laboratory per week. Ap- 
plication of physiological laboratory techniques 
to laboratory and domestic animals. Not open 
to students who have credit for ANSC 212 
prior to spring 1977. 

ANSC 221 Fundamentals of Animal Produc- 
tion. (3) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period per week. This course deals with the 
adaptation of beef cattle, sheep, swine and 
horses to significant and specific uses. 
Breeding, feeding, management practices and 
criteria for evaluating usefulness are em- 
phasized. 

ANSC 222 Livestock Evaluation. (3) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite: ANSC 221 or permission of in- 
structor. A study of type and breed charac- 
teristics of beef cattle, sheep and swine and 
the market classes of livestock which best 
meet present day demands. One field trip of 
about two days duration is made during which 
students participate in the annual eastern in- 
tercollegiate livestock clinic. 
ANSC 223 Career and Curriculum Planning 
Seminar. (1) One meeting per week. Presen- 
tation of information relating to all specialized 
areas of the animal sciences with orientation 
toward career development and curriculum 
planning. Discussions and reports will be in- 
cluded. 

ANSC 226 Man, Culture, Animals. (2) A 
general study of the importance of animals in 
the cultural development of man. Historical and 
contemporary uses of particular animal 
species will be explored. Environmental 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 129 



limitations to human development which have 
been overcome by man-animal relationships 
will be emphasized. 

ANSC 230 Introduction to Horse 
Management. (3) Two lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period per week. A general 
course in horse management for students who 
intend to work in activities closely related to 
the horse industry The basis tor the 
usefulness of horses to individuals and society 
will be developed by application of the prin- 
ciples of nutrition, physiology, anatomy, 
genetics, behavior, and environmental control. 
ANSC 242 Dairy Production. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite: ANSC 101 A comprehensive 
course in dairy cattle nutrients, feeding and 
management 

ANSC 244 Dairy Cattle Type Appraisal. (1) 
Freshmen, by permission of instructor Two 
laboratory periods Analysis of dairy cattle type 
with emphasis on the comparative judging of 
dairy cattle. 

ANSC 252 Introduction to the Diseases of 
Wildlife. (2) Two lectures per week. 
Prerequisite: ZOOL 101. The principal 
diseases of North American wildlife will be 
briefly considered For each disease, specific 
attention will be given to the following: signs 
evidenced by the aflected animal or bird, 
causative agent, means of transmission and ef- 
fects of the disease on the population of the 
species involved. Also included where ap- 
propriate is a consideration of the threat that 
each disease may pose to man or his domestic 
animals 

ANSC 261 Advanced Poultry Judging. (1) 
Prerequisite: ANSC 101. One lecture or 
laboratory period per week. The theory and 
practice of judging and culling by physical 
means is emphasized, including correlation 
studies of characteristics associated with 
productivity Contestants for regional 
collegiate judging competitions will be selec- 
ted from this class. 

ANSC 262 Commercial Poultry Manage- 
ment. (3) Prerequisite: ANSC 101. A sym- 
posium of finance, investment. Plant layout 
Specialization, purchase of supplies and 
management problems in baby chick, egg, 
broiler and turley production: foremanship. ad- 
vertising, selling By-products, production and 
financial records. Field trips required 
ANSC 265 Fundamentals of Pet Nutrition. 
(2) Two lecture hours per week A basic cour- 
se on the nutrition of those animals commonly 
kept as household pets. Designed to acquaint 
students with minimal science background 
with the basic principles and techniques of 
animal nutrition. 

ANSC 301 Advanced Livestock Evaluation. 
(2) Two laboratory periods per week 
Prerequisites: ANSC 222 and permission of in- 
structor An advanced course in meat animal 
evaluation designed to study the relationship 
and limitations that exist in evaluating breeding 
and market animals and the relationship bet- 
ween the live market animal and its carcass 
Evaluating meat carcesses, wholesale meat 
cuts and meat grading will be emphasized. The 
most adept students enrolled in this course are 
chosen to represent the University of Maryland 
in intercollegiate judging contests 

ANSC 305 Companion Animal Care. (3) 
Prerequisites: a semester of zoology or 
general biology General information, care, and 
management of the companion small animals 
Species covered include the cat. dog. rodents. 



lagomorphs. reptiles, amphibians, birds and 
others as class interest and schedule dictate 
Basic description, evolutionary development, 
breeding, nutritional and environmental 
requirements, and public health aspects will be 
presented for each species 
ANSC 332 Horse Management. (3) 
Prerequisite: ANSC 230 Major topics include 
nutrition, reproduction, breeding, performance 
evaluation, basic training and management 
techniques 

ANSC 337 The Science of Horse Training. 
(2) Summer only Prerequisites: ANSC 230, 
332. and permission of instructor Major topics 
include evaluation of behavioral repertory, use 
of positive and negative reinforcement, suc- 
cessive approximation, as techniques for the 
basic training of the horse. The basic training to 
include teaching an untrained horse to lunge, 
accept tack, drive, be mounted and perform 
certain movements while being ridden 
ANSC 350 Ornithology. (4) Three lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory period per 
week. Three mandatory field trips 
Prerequisites: ZOOL 290 or permission of in 
structor. Includes systematics, anatomy 
physilogy, behavior, life histories, ecology 
population dynamics, evolution and con 
servation of birds. May not be taken for credi: 
by students who have credit in ANSC 454. 
ANSC 398 Seminar. (1) Prerequisite: ap- 
proval of the staft. Presentation and discussion 
of current literature and research work in 
animal science, or in fish and wildlife 
management. Repeatable to a maximum of two 
hours. 

ANSC 399 Special Problems in Animal 
Science. (1-2) Prerequisite: approval of staff 
Work assigned in proportion to amount of 
credit. A course designed for advanced un- 
dergraduates in which specific problems 
relating to animal science will be assigned 
ANSC 401 Fundamentals of Nutrition. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 
104; ANSC 212 recommended. A study of the 
fundamental role of all nutrients in the body in- 
cluding their digestion, absorption and 
metabolism. Dietary requirements and 
nutritional deficiency syndromes of laboratory 
and farm animals and man will be considered 
ANSC 402 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisites: MATH 110, ANSC 401 or per- 
mission of instructor. A critical study of those 
factors which influence the nutritional 
requirements of ruminants, swine and poultry 
Practical feeding methods and procedures 
used in formulation of economically efficient 
rations will be presented 

ANSC 403 Applied Animal Nutrition. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisites: MATH 110, ANSC 402 or per- 
mission of instructor A critical study of those 
factors which influence the nutritional 
requirements of ruminants, swine and poultry 
Practical feeding methods and procedures 
used in formulation of economically efficient 
rations will be presented. 
ANSC 406 Environmental Physiology. (3) 
Prerequisites anatomy and physiology The 
specific anatomical and physiological 
modifications employed by animals adapted to 
certain stressful environments will be con- 
sidered Particular emphasis will be placed on 
the problems of temperature regulation and 
water balance Specific areas tor consideration 
will include: animals in cold (including hiber- 
nation), animals in dry heat, diving animals and 
animals in high altitudes 



ANSC 407 Advanced Dairy Production. (1) 

An advanced course primarily designed tor 
teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents It includes a study of the newer 
discoveries in dairy cattle nutrition, breeding 
and management 

ANSC 411 Biology and Management of 
Shellfish. (4) Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods each week Field trips Iden- 
tification, biology, management, and culture of 
commercially- important molluscs and 

Crustacea Prerequisite, one year of biology or 
zoology This course will examine the 
shellfishenes of the world, but will emphasize 
those of the northwestern Atlantic Ocean and 
Chesapeake Bay 

ANSC 412 Introduction to Diseases of 
Animals. (3) Prerequisite MICB 200 and 
ZOOL 101 Two lectures and one laboratory 
period per week This course gives basic in- 
struction in the nature of disease including 
causation, immunity, methods of diagnosis, 
economic importance, public health aspects 
and prevention and control of the common 
diseases of sheep, cattle, swine, horses and 
poultry 
ANSC 413 Laboratory Animal Management. 

(3) A comprehensive course in care and 
management of laboratory animals Emphasis 
will be placed on physiology, anatomy and 
special uses for the different species Disease 
prevention and regulations for maintaining 
animal colonies will be covered. Field Trips will 
be required 

ANSC 414 Biology and Management of Fish. 

(4) Prerequisite: one yer of biology and 
zoology Two lectues and two three-hour 
laboratories a week Fundamentals of in- 
dividual and population dynamics: theory and 
practice of sampling fish populations: 
management schemes 

ANSC 416 Wildlife Management. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory An introduction to 
the interrelationships of game birds and man- 
nals with their environment, population 
dynamics and the principles of wildlife 
management 

ANSC 422 Meats. (3) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period per week Prerequisite AN- 
SC 221 A course designed to give the basic 
facts about meat as a food and the factors in- 
fluencing acceptability, marketing, and quality 
of fresh meats It includes comparisons of 
characteristics of live animals with their car- 
casses, grading and evaluating carcasses as 
well as wholesale cuts, and the distribution and 
merchandising of the nation's meat supply 
Laboratory periods are conducted in packing 
houses, meat distribution centers, retail out- 
lets and university meats laboratory 

ANSC 423 Livestock Management. (3) One 
lecture and two laboratory periods per week 
Prerequisite ANSC 401 Application of various 
phases of animal science to the management 
and production of beef cattle, sheep and 
swine 

ANSC 424 Livestock Management. (3) One 
lecture and two laboratory periods per week 
Prerequisite ANSC 423 Applications of 
various phases of animal science to the 
management and production of beef cattle, 
sheep and swine 

ANSC 425 Herpetology. (3) Prerequisites 
ANSC 211 and ANSC 212; or equivalent 
Study of taxonomy, physiology, behavior, 
functional anatomy, evolution and distribution 
of present day amphibians and reptiles 
Common diseases and management under 



130 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



captive conditions Identification ot poisonous 
species with appropriate precautions 
ANSC 426 Principles of Breeding. (3) 
Second semester Three lectures per week 
Prerequisites ANSC 201 or equivalent. ANSC 
222, ANSC 423 or 424 Graduate credit [1-3 
hours) allowed with permission of instructor 
The practical aspects of animal breeding and 
pedigree study are considered 
ANSC 432 Horse Farm Management. (3) 
Prerequisite. ANSC 332 and AREC 410 One 
90-minute lecture and one four-hour labora- 
tory period per week A course to develop the 
technical and managerial skills necessary for 
the operation of a horse breeding farm Herd 
health programs, breeding programs and 
maintenance of records incidental to each of 
these activities 

ANSC 442 Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisites ANSC 242. and ANSC 201. A 
specialized course in breeding dairy cattle 
Emphasis is placed on methods of evaluation 
and selection, systems of breeding and 
breeding programs 

ANSC 443 Physiology and Biochemistry of 
Lactation. (3) Prerequisites ANSC 212 or 
equivalent and CHEM 261 or CHEM 461 
Three lectures per week The physiology and 
biochemistry of milk production in domestic 
animals, particularly cattle Mammary gland 
development and maintenance from the em- 
bryo to the fully developed lactating gland Ab- 
normalities of the mammary gland 
ANSC 444 Analysis of Dairy Production 
Systems. (3) Prerequisites. AGEC 446 
Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction. (3) 
Prerequisite: ZOOL 422 or ANSC212 
Anatomy and physiology of reproductive 
processes in domesticated and wild mammals. 
ANSC 446 Physiology of Mammalian Repro- 
duction. (3) Prerequisite ZOOL 422 or 
ANSC 212 Anatomy and physiology of repro- 
ductive processes in domesticated and wild 
mammals 

ANSC 447 Physiology of Mammalian 
Reproduction Laboratory. (1) Pre- or 
corequisites: ANSC 446 One three-hour 
laboratory per week. Animal handling, artificial 
insemination procedures and analytical 
techniques useful in animal management and 
reproductive research Not open to students 
who have credit for ANSC 446 prior to fall 
1976. 

ANSC 452 Avian Physiology. (2) (Alternate 
even years) one three-hour laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites: a basic course in 
animal physiology The basic physiology of the 
bird is discussed, excluding the reproductive 
system. Special emphasis is given to 
physiological differences between birds and 
other vertebrates. 

ANSC 462 Physiology of Hatchabillty. (1) 
Two lectures and one laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite: ZOOL 421 or 422. The 
physiology of embryonic development as 
related to principles of hatchability and 
problems of incubation encountered in the 
hatchery industry are discussed. 
ANSC 463 Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 
Prerequisite: ANSC/NUSC 401 or concurrent 
registration. Six hours of laboratory per week. 
Digestibility studies with ruminant and 
monogastric animals, proximate analysis of 
various food products, and feeding trails 
demonstrating classical nutritional deficiences 
in laboratory animals. 

ANSC 464 Poultry Hygiene. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week. 



Prerequisites MICB 200 and ANSC 101 
Virus, bacterial and protozoan diseases, 
parasitic diseases, prevention, control and 
eradication 

ANSC 466 Avian Anatomy. (3) Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per week 
Prerequisite: ZOOL 102 Gross and 
microscopic structure, dissection and 
demonstration 

ANSC 467 Poultry Breeding and Feeding. 
(1) This course is designed primarily for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and 
extension service workers The first half will be 
devoted to problems concerning breeding and 
the development of breeding stock The 
second half will be devoted to nutrition 
ANSC 477 Poultry Products and Marketing. 
(1) This course is designed primarily for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents. It deals with the factors affecting the 
quality of poultry products and with hatchery 
management problems, egg and poultry 
grading, preservation problems and market 
outlets for Maryland poultry. 
ANSC 480 Special Topics in Fish and 
Wildlife Management. (3) Three lectures. 
Analaysis of various state and federal 
programs related to fish and wildlife 
management This would include: fish stocking 
programs, Maryland deer management 
program, warm water fish management, acid 
drainage problems, water quality, water fowl 
management, wild turkey management and 
regulations relative to the administration of 
these programs. 

ANSC 487 Special Topics In Animal 
Science. (1) Prerequisite: permission of 
instructor. This course is designed primarily for 
teachers of vocational agriculture and 
extension service personnel. One primary 
topic to be selected mutually by the instructor 
and students will be presented each session 

Anthropology 

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology - 
Archaeology and Physical Anthropology. (3) 

May be taken for credit in the general 
education program. General patterns of the 
development of human culture; the biological 
and morphological aspects of man viewed in 
his cultural setting. 

ANTH 102 Introduction to Anthropology - 
Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics. (3) 
Social and cultural principles as exemplified in 
ethnographic descriptions. The study of 
language within the context of anthropology. 
ANTH 221 Man and Environment. (3) A 
geographical introduction to ethnology, em- 
phasizing the relations between cultural forms 
and natural environment. 
ANTH 241 Introduction to Archaeology. (3) 
A survey of the basic aims and methods of ar- 
cheological field work and interpretation, with 
emphasis on the reconstruction of prehistoric 
ways of life. 

ANTH 261 Introduction to Physical An- 
thropology. (3) The biological evolution of 
man, including the process of race formation, 
as revealed by the study of the fossil record 
and observation of modern forms. 
ANTH 271 Language and Culture. (3) A non- 
technical introduction to linguistics, with 
special consideration of the relations between 
language and other aspects of culture (Listed 
also as LING 101.) 

ANTH 298 Special Topics in Anthropology. 
(3) Anthropological perspectives on selected 
topics of broad general interest. Course may 



be repeated to a maximum of six credits when 
course differs 

ANTH 361 Human Evolution and Fossil Man. 
(3) A survey of the basic principles of human 
evolution as seen by comparative anatomic 
study of fossil specimens 
ANTH 371 Introduction to Linguistics. (3) In- 
troduction to the basic concepts of modern 
descriptive linguistics Phonology, mor- 
phology, syntax Examinations of the methods 
of comparative linguistics, internal recon- 
struction, dialect geography 
ANTH 389 Research Problems. (1-6) 
Prerequisite permission of instructor. In- 
troductory training in anthropological research 
methods The student will prepare a paper em- 
bodying the results of an' appropriate com- 
bination of research techniques applied to a 
selected problem in any field of anthropology 
ANTH 397 Anthropological Theory. (3) 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor A survey 
of the historical development and current em- 
phasis in the theoretical approaches of all 
fields of anthropology, providing an integrated 
frame of reference for the discipline as a 
whole. 

ANTH 401 Cultural Anthropology - Prin- 
ciples and Processes. (3) Prerequisite ANTH 

101 , 102, or 221 An examination of the nature 
of human culture and its processes, both 
historical and functional The approach will be 
topical and theoretical rather than descriptive 
ANTH 402 Cultural Anthropology - World 
Ethnography. (3) Prerequisite: ANTH 101, 

102, or 221 A descriptive survey of the 
culture areas of the world through an 
examination of the ways of selected represen- 
tative societies. 

ANTH 412 Peoples and Cultures of Oceania. 
(3) A survey of the cultures of Polynesia, 
Micronesia, Melanesia and Australia. 
Theoretical and cultural-historical problems will 
be emphasized. 

ANTH 414 Ethnology of Africa. (3) 
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and 102. The native 
peoples and cultures of Africa and their 
historical relationships, with emphasis on that 
portion of the continent south of the Sahara.f 
ANTH 417 Peoples and Cultures of the Far 
East. (3) A survey of the major sociopolitical 
systems of China, Korea and Japan. Major an- 
thropological questions will be dealt with in 
presenting this material. 
ANTH 423 Ethnology of the Southwest. (3) 
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and 102. Culture 
history, economic and social institutions, 
religion, and mythology of the Indians of the 
Southwest United States. 
ANTH 424 Ethnology of North America. (3) 
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and 102. The native 
people and cultures of North America north of 
Mexico and their historical relationships. In- 
cluding the effects of contact with European- 
derived populations. 

ANTH 426 Ethnology of Middle America. (3) 
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and 102. Cultural 
background and modern social, economic and 
religious life of Indian and Mesitzo groups in 
Mexico and Central America: processes of ac- 
culturation and currents in cutural develop- 
ment. 

ANTH 431 Social Organization of Primitive 
Peoples. (3) Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and 
1 02. A comparative survey of the structures of 
non-literate and folk societies, covering both 
general principles and special regional 
developments. 

ANTH 434 Religion of Primitive Peoples. (3) 
Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and 1 02 A survey of 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 131 



the religious systems of primitive and folk 
societies, with emphasis on the relation of 
religion to other aspects of culture 
ANTH 436 Primitive Technology and 
Economy. (3) A survey of technology, food 
economy and general economic processes in 
non-mdustnal societies. 
ANTH 437 Politics and Government in 
Primitive Society. (3) A combined survey of 
politics in human societies and of important an- 
thropological theories concerning this aspect 
of society. 

ANTH 441 Archaeology of the Old World. (3) 
Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or 241 A survey of 
the archaeological materials of Europe Asia 
and Africa, with emphasis on chronological and 
regional interrelationships. 
ANTH 451 Archaeology of the New World. 
(3) Prerequisite ANTH 101 or 241 A survey 
of the archaeological materials of North and 
South America with emphasis on chronological 
and regional interrelationships. 
ANTH 461 Human Osteology Laboratory. (3) 
Prerequisite: ANTH 101 A laboratory study of 
the human skeleton, its morphology, 
measurement, and anatomic relationships. 
ANTH 462 Primate Anatomy Laboratory. (3) 
Prerequisite: ANTH 101. The Gross anatomy 
of non-human primates Laboratory dissection 
of various primate cadavers under supervision 
Occasional lectures. 

ANTH 463 Primate Studies. (3) Prerequisite: 
ANTH 101. A combination lecture and labora- 
tory examination of non-human primates Major 
studies of various types that have been un- 
dertaken in the laboratory and in the field. 
ANTH 465 Human Growth and Constitution. 
(3) Prerequisite: ANTH 101 A laboratory 
study of the growth, development and age 
changes in the human body from conception 
through old age, including gross photographic, 
radiographic, and microscopic study of growth 
and variation. 

ANTH 466 Forensic Anthropology 
Laboratory. (3) Prerequisite ANTH 461 or 
permission of the instructor. A laboratory study 
of the methods used to identify human remains 
by anthropolgical techniques and discussion of 
the role of the anthropologist in medico-legal 
investigation 

ANTH 467 Human Population Biology 
Laboratory. (3) Prerequisite ANTH 101. A 
laboratory study of human population genetics, 
dynamics and variation, including an- 
thropological seriology, biochemistry, der- 
matoglyphics and hair microscopy. 
ANTH 498 Field Methods In Ethnology. (1-6) 
Field Training in the collection and recording of 
ethnological data 

ANTH 499 Field Methods In Archaelogy. (1- 
6) Field training in the techniques of ar- 
chaeological survey and excavation 

Applied Design 

APDS 101 Fundamentals of Design. (3) 

Knowledge of basic art elements and prin- 
ciples gained through design problems which 
employ a variety of media 
APDS 102 Design II. (3) Prerequisite APDS 
101 Continued exploration of design as a 
means of visual expression with added em- 
phasis on color and lighting 
APDS 103 Design III - Three-Dlmensional 
Design. (3) Three studio penods 
Prerequisites: APDS 101, 102 Creative ef- 
forts directed to discriminating use of form, 
volume, depth, and movement 



APDS 104 Survey of Art History. (3) A rapid 
survey of western culture expressed through 
and influenced by the visual arts monumental 
and residential architecture, furniture, textiles 
and costume; painting and sculpture 

APDS 210 Presentation Techniques. (3) 

Three studio periods Prerequisites APDS 

101, 1 02 or equivalent Comparative approach 
to basic presentation techniques used in the 
several areas of commercial design 

APDS 211 Action Drawing - Fashion Sket- 
ching. (3) Three studio periods Prerequisites 
APDS 101 and consent of instructor. Study of 
the balance and proportion of the human 
figure Sketch techniques applied to action 
poses and fashion drawing in soft and 
lithograph pencils, pastels, water color, ink 
Drawing from model. 

APDS 212 Design Workshop for Transfers. 
(5) Prerequisite: APDS 101 or equivalent 
Provides opportunity for transfer students to 
remove deficiences in lower-level design cour- 
ses Study of color, lighting and presentation 
techniques May be taken no later than one 
semester after transfer into department. 
APDS 220 Introduction to Fashion Design. 
(3) Three studio periods Prerequisite: APDS 
101 or equivalent. Basic fashion figure 
drawing Original designs rendered in tran- 
sparent and opaque water color, soft pencil, 
pastels, and ink. Primarily for nonmajors. 
APDS 230 Silk Screen Printing. (3) Three 
laboratory periods Prerequisites APDS 101. 

102. or equivalent Use of silk screen 
processes in execution of original designs for 
commercial production. 

APDS 237 Photography. (2) One lecture, 
three hours laboratory Prerequisites APDS 
101, 102, or equivalent. Study of fundamental 
camera techniques Exploration of the ex- 
pressive possibilities in relation to the field of 
design and visual communication. 
APDS 320 Fashion Illustration. (3) First 
semester Three studio periods Prerequisites: 
APDS 101. 102, 103, 210, 211. Fabric and 
clothing structure as they relate to illustration 
Opportunity to explore rendering styles and 
techniques appropriate to reproduction 
methods currently used in advertising. Guidan- 
ce m development of individuality in presen- 
tations 

APDS 321 Fashion Design and Illustration 
(3) Three studio periods. Prerequisite: APDS 
320. Design and illustration of fashions ap- 
propriate to the custom market and to mass 
production. 

APDS 322 Advanced Costume. (4) 
Prerequisite: APDS 320 or 321. Advanced 
problems in fashion illustration or design 
Problems chosen with consent of instructor 
APDS 330 Typography and Lettering. (3) 
Three studio periods. Prerequisites APDS 
101. 102. Experience in hand lettering 
techniques as a means of understanding let- 
tering styles in design composition 
Recognition of type faces used in ad- 
vertisement, book and magazine layout Effect 
of printing processes on design choices 
APDS 331 Advertising Layout. (3) Three 
studio periods Prerequisites: APDS 330. EDIN 
101 A Design of advertising layouts from initial 
idea to finished layout Typography and 
illustration as they relate to reproduction 
processes used in direct advertising 
APDS 332 Display Design (3) Three studio 
periods Prerequisites EDIN 101 A. APDS 330 
or equivalent Application of design principles 



to creative dispay appropriate to exhibits, 
design shows, merchandising Display con- 
struction 

APDS 337 Advanced Photography. (2) Two 
studio periods Prerequisite APDS 237 Com- 
position, techniques and lighting applicable to 
illustration, documentation, advertising design, 
and display 

APDS 380 Professional Seminar. (2) Two lec- 
ture-discussion periods. Prerequisite junior 
standing and consent of instructor Exploration 
of professional and career opportunities, 
ethics, practices Professional organizations 
Portfolio evaluation 

APDS 430 Advanced Problems In Ad- 
vertising Design. (3) Two studio periods 
Prerequisite APDS 331 Advanced problems 
in design and layout planned for developing 
competency in one or more areas of ad- 
vertising design 

APDS 431 Advanced Problems in Ad- 
vertising Design. (3) Two studio periods 
Prerequisite APDS 430 Advanced problems 
in design and layout planned for developing 
competency in one or more areas of ad- 
vertising design. 

APDS 437 Advanced Photography. (3) Three 
studio periods Continuation of APDS 337 
APDS 499 Individual Problems in Applied 
Design. (3-4) A — Advertising B — Costume 
Open only to advanced students who. with 
guidance, can work independently Written 
consent of instructor. 



Architecture 

ARCH 170 Introduction to the Built En- 
vironment. (3) Introduction of (1) conceptual, 
perceptual, behavioral and technical aspects 
of the environment; and. (2) methods of 
analysis, problem solving and implementation 
For students not majoring in architecture 
Prerequisite: none Lecture, seminar, 3 hours 
per week 

ARCH 200 Basic Environmental Design. (4) 
Introduction to the processes of visual and ar- 
chitectural design Including the study of visual 
design fundamentals Field problems involving 
the student in the study of actual develop- 
mental problems Lecture, studio. 9 hours per 
week 

ARCH 201 Basic Environmental Design. (4) 
Introduction to the processes of visual and ar- 
chitectural design Including the study of visual 
design fundamentals Field problems involving 
the student in the study of actual develop- 
mental problems Lecture, studio. 9 hours per 
week 

ARCH 214 Materials and Methods of Con- 
struction I. (2) Two lectures per week Ar- 
chitecture students only or permission of in- 
structor An introduction to the materials of 
construction, their properties attributes and 
deficiencies 

ARCH 215 Materials and Methods of Con- 
struction II. (2) Two lectures per week Ar- 
chitecture students only or permission of in- 
structor Describes the methods by which the 
architect combines matenals to produce struc- 
tural systems 

ARCH 220 History of Architecture I. (3) Sur- 
vey of architectural history Lecture. 3 hours 
per week 

ARCH 221 History of Architecture II. (3) 
Prerequisite ARCH 220 Continuation of sur- 
vey of architectural history Lecture three 
hours per week 



132 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



ARCH 240 Basic Photography. (2) Provides a 
student with the basic concepts of clarity and 
organization on a two-dimensional surface and 
stresses photography as a tool tor visual com- 
munication Lecture one hour per week, three 
hours of laboratory per week 
ARCH 242 Drawing I. (2) Introduces the 
student to basic techniques of sketching and 
use of various media 

ARCH 300 Architecture Studio I (4) 
Prerequisites ARCH 201 with a grade of C or 
better Corequisite: ARCH 310 Develops a 
basic understanding of the elements of en- 
vironmental control, basic structural systems, 
building processes materials, and the ability to 
manipulate them Lecture and studio. 9 hours 
per week 

ARCH 301 Architecture Studio II. (4) 
Prerequisite: ARCH 300 with a grade of C or 
better Corequisite - ARCH 31 1 Develops a 
basic understanding of the forms generated by 
different structural systems, environmental 
controls and methods of construction Lecture 
and studio. 9 hours per week. 
ARCH 310 Architectural Science and 
Technology I. (4) Prerequisite ARCH 201 
with a grade of C or better. ARCH 215, MATH 
221 . and PHYS 121 Corequisite - ARCH 300 
Introduction to architectural science and 
technology treating principles of structures, 
environmental mechanical controls, and con- 
struction Lecture and studio. 6 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 311 Architectural Science and 
Technology II. (4) Prerequisite; ARCH 300 
and ARCH 310 with a grade of C or better 
Corequisite: ARCH 301 Develops workina 
knowledge of the design principles and 
parameters of three areas of architectural 
science and technology structures. En- 
vironmental-mechanical controls, and con- 
struction Lecture and studio, 6 hours per 
week 

ARCH 314 Computer Applications in Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Prerequisite: ARCH 201 or 
permission of instructor Introduction to com- 
puter programming and utilization, with em- 
phasis on architectural applications. Lecture, 
laboratory 

ARCH 320 Studies in Ancient Architecture. 
(3) The origins and development of ar- 
chitecture of the ancient world from the 
earliest times through the fall of the Roman Em- 
pire with emphasis upon Egypt, the Near East 
and the classical world. 

ARCH 322 Studies in Medieval Architecture. 
(3) Limited to architecture students or by per- 
mission of the instructor. Architectural in- 
novations from the Carolingian through the 
Gothic periods Lecture. 3 hours per week. 
ARCH 324 Studies In Renaissance Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Limited to architecture studen- 
ts or by permission of the instructor. Study of 
renaissance architectural principles and their 
development in the Baroque period. Lecture 3 
hours per week. 

ARCH 326 Studies in Modern Architecture. 

(3) Limited to architecture students or by per- 
mission of the instructor Study of architectural 
problems from 1 750 to the present. Lecture, 3 
hours per week. 

ARCH 340 Advanced Photography. (2) 

Prerequisite: ARCH 240. Allows the student 
to investigate independently areas of 
photographic communication not covered in 
the basic course. Lecture, 1 hour per week; 3 
hours lab. 



ARCH 342 Studies In Visual Design. (3) 
Studio work at an intermediate level in visual 
design divorced from architectural problem 
solving Prerequisite ARCH 201 Lecture, 
studio work, 3 hours per week 
ARCH 350 Theory ot Urban Form. (3) Urban 
spatial forms of the past and present; theories 
of design of complexes of buildings, urban 
space and communities Lecture 3 hours per 
week 

ARCH 352 The Architect In the Community. 
(3) The architect's role in the social and 
political dynamics of urban environmental 
design decision-making processes, including 
study of determination and expression of user 
need? community aspirations, formal and in- 
formal program and design review processes. 
Seminar, 1 hour per week, field observation, 
approximately 3 hours per week. 
ARCH 360 Basic Site Analysis. (3) Study of 
criteria and principles essential to the support 
of natural systems In physical site develop- 
ment. For architecture students or by per- 
mission of instructor. Lecture-lab. 3 hours per 
week. 

ARCH 370 Theories and Literature of Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Limited to architecture studen- 
ts or by permission of the instructor. Provides 
an understanding of some historical and 
present theories of architectural design 
readings and seminar discussions. Lecture, 3 
hours per week. 

ARCH 372 Signs, Symbols and Messages In 
Architecture. (3) Limited to architecture 
students or by permission of the instructor. 
Class limited to 1 5-20 students. Signs and 
symbols in buildings and cities, messages con- 
veyed and purposes for conveying these 
messages. Readings, photographic reports 
and minor problem-solving assignments. 
ARCH 374 Computer Aided Environmental 
Design. (3) Applications of computer-aided 
design in architecture, using existing problem- 
solving routines and computer graphic 
techniques. Prerequisite: ARCH 201, CMSC 
1 03. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 376 The Architectural Program as 
Functional Form Generator. (3) A study of ar- 
chitectural programming as derived from func- 
tional needs of man in his environment. 
Analysis, synthesis and evaluation of 
categories of needs with concentration on 
human response to forms generated by 
programs with emphasis on non-quantifiable 
human needs. Architecture majors or by per- 
mission of the instructor. Lectures, seminars, 
field trips, 3 hours per week. 
ARCH 400 Architecture Studio III. (4) 
Prerequisites: ARCH 301 with a grade of C or 
better, and ARCH 311. Corequisite: ARCH 

410, except by permission of the dean. Con- 
tinuation of design studio, with emphasis on 
comprehensive building design and in- 
troduction to urban design factors. Lecture and 
studio 9 hours per week. 

ARCH 401 Architecture Studio IV. (4) 
Prerequisites: ARCH 400 with a grade of C or 
better and ARCH 410. Corequisite: ARCH 

411, except by permission of the dean. Con- 
tinuation of design studio with emphasis on ur- 
ban design factors. Lecture and studio, 9 hours 
per week. 

ARCH 410 Architectural Science and 
Technology III. (4) Prerequisites: ARCH 301 
and ARCH 31 1 with a grade of C or better. 
Corequisite - ARCH 400, except by per- 
mission of the dean. Application of principles in 
architectural structures, environmental con- 



trols and construction Lecture and studio, 6 
hours per week. 

ARCH 411 Architectural Science and 
Technology IV. (4) Prerequisites ARCH 400 
and ARCH 410 with a grade of C or better 
Corequisite - ARCH 401 except by permission 
of the dean Application of principles and fur- 
ther analysis of systems and hardware In ar- 
chitectural structures, environmental controls 
and construction Lecture and studio, 6 hours 
per week 

ARCH 413 Structural Systems In Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Theory and application of 
selected complex structural systems as they 
relate to architectural decisions Prerequisite, 
ARCH 410 or by permission of the instructor 
Seminar, 3 hours per week 
ARCH 414 Solar Energy Applications for 
Buildings. (3) Prerequisites: ARCH 311. or 
ENME 321, or permission of instructor. 
Methods of utilizing solar energy to provide 
heating, cooling, hot water, and electricity for 
buildings and related techniques for reducing 
energy consumption. Crossllsted as ENME 
414. 

ARCH 418 Selected Topics In Architectural 
Science. (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of In- 
structor Repeatable to a maximum of 7 credits, 
provided content is different. 
ARCH 419 Independent Studies In Ar- 
chitectural Science. (1-4) Proposed work 
must have a faculty sponsor and receive ap- 
proval of the curriculum committee. 
Repeatable to a maximum of 7 credits. 
ARCH 420 History of American Architecture. 
(3) Survey history of American architecture 
from the 1 7th century to the present. Lecture. 
3 hours per week. 

ARCH 421 Seminar In American Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Advanced investigation of 
historical problems in American architecture. 
Readings, discussions, and paper. 
Prerequisite: ARCH 420 or permission of in- 
structor. 

ARCH 422 French Architecture 1750-1800. 

(3) French architectural theory and practice of 
the second half of the eighteenth century A 
reading knowledge of French will be required. 
Colloquium and independent research. By per- 
mission of the instructor. 

ARCH 424 History of Russian Architecture. 

(3) Survey history of Russian architecture from 
the 10th century to the present. Lecture, 3 
hours per week. 

ARCH 426 Readings in Contemporary Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Prerequisite: - ARCH 326 
Readings and analysis of recent architectural 
criticism. Seminar, three hours per week. 
ARCH 428 Selected Topics in Architectural 
History. (1-3) Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. Repeatable to a maximum of 7 credits, 
provided the content is different. 
ARCH 429 Independent Studies In Ar- 
chitectural History. (1-4) Proposed work 
must have a faculty sponsor and receive ap- 
proval of the curriculum committee. 
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits. 
ARCH 430 Problems and Methods of Ar- 
chitectural Preservation. (3) Prerequisite: 
ARCH 420 or by permission of instructor. 
Examination of social, cultural, and economic 
values affecting the theory and practice of ar- 
chitectural preservation in America, with em- 
phasis upon the rationale and methods for the 
documentation, evaluation, and utilization of 
existing architectural resources. Field trips. 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 133 



ARCH 438 Selected Topics In Architectural 
Preservation. (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent ot 
instructor Repeatable to a maximum of 7 
credits, provided the content is different 
ARCH 439 Independent Studies In Ar- 
chitectural Preservation. (1-4) Proposed 
work must have a faculty sponsor and receive 
approval of the curriculum committee 
Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits 
ARCH 447 Advanced Seminar In Pho- 
tography. (3) Prerequisites: ARCH 340 or 
APDS 337 or JOUR 351 ; and consent of in- 
structor. Advanced study of photographic 
criticism through empirical methods, for 
students proficient in photographic skills 
Photographic assignments, laboratory, sem- 
inar. 3 hours per week 

ARCH 448 Selected Topics in Visual 
Studies. (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor Repeatable to a maximum of 7 credits, 
provided the content is different 
ARCH 449 Independent Studies in Visual 
Studies. (1-4) Proposed work must have a 
faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee Repeatable to a 
maximum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 450 Introduction to Urban Planning. 

(3) Introduction to city planning theory, 
methodology and techniques, dealing with nor- 
mative, urban, structural, economic, social 
aspects of the city; urban planning as a 
process Architectural majors or by permission 
of the instructor Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per 
week 

ARCH 451 Urban Design Seminar. (3) 
Prerequisite: ARCH 350 or permission of the 
instructor Advanced investigation into 
problems of analysis and evaluation of the 
design of urban areas, spaces and complexes 
with emphasis on physical and social con- 
siderations, effects of public policies, through 
case studies. Field observations. 
ARCH 453 Urban Problems Seminar. (3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A case 
study of urban development issues, dealing 
primarily with socio-economic aspects of 
changes in the built environment. 
ARCH 458 Selected Topics in Urban Plan- 
ning. (1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Repeatable to a maximum of 7 credits, 
provided the content is different. 
ARCH 459 Independent Studies in Urban 
Planning. (1-4) Proposed work must have a 
facufty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee Repeatable to a maxi- 
mum of 6 credits. 

ARCH 472 Economic Determinants of Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Introduction of economic 
aspects of present day architecture: Govern- 
ment policy, land evaluation, and project finan- 
cing; construction materials and labor costs; 
cost analysis and control systems. Ar- 
chitecture majors, except by permission of in- 
structor Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per week. 
ARCH 478 Selected Topics In Architecture. 
(1-4) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Re- 
peatable to a maximum of 7 credits, provided 
the content is different. 

ARCH 479 Independent Studies in Ar- 
chitecture. (1-4) Proposed work must have a 
faculty sponsor and receive approval of the 
curriculum committee Repeatable to a 
maximum of 6 credits 

ARCH 500 Advanced Topical Problems In 
Architecture I. (6) Prerequisite ARCH 401 
with a grade of C or better Offers several 
studio options in advanced topical problems 



from among which the student selects one 
Studies are structured under generic titles and 
includes lectures, field trips, and assigned 
readings as well as directed independent work 
Offered fall term only Lecture and studio 12 
hours per week. Architecture majors only. 
ARCH 501 Advanced Topical Problems In 
Architecture II. (6) Prerequisite ARCH 500 
with a grade of C or better Offers several 
studio options in advanced topical problems 
from among which the student selects one 
Studios are structured under generic titles and 
include lectures, field trips, assigned readings 
as well as directed independent work Offered 
spring term only Lecture and studio 12 hours 
per week 

ARCH 502 Thesis Proseminar. (3) Directed 
research and preparation of program for 
required under-graduate thesis to be un- 
dertaken in final semester of program 
Prerequisite: ARCH 401 with grade of 'C or 
better. Seminar, three hours per week 

ARCH 512 Advanced Structural Analysis in 
Architecture. (3) Qualitative and quantitative 
analysis and design of selected complex struc- 
tural systems and methods. Prerequisite: AR- 
CH 4 1 1 . Labs, field trips, 3 hours per week. 
ARCH 514 Environmental Systems in Ar- 
chitecture. (3) Qualitative analysis of selected 
environmental systems as design deter- 
minants Prerequisite: ARCH 411. Lecture, lab. 
3 hours per week. 

ARCH 570 Introduction to Professional 
Management. (2) Introduction to architectural 
professional practice management, including 
social, organizational project management, 
legal and cost-control aspects of the per- 
formance of complex, comprehensive en- 
vironmental design services. Prerequisite, AR- 
CH 401. Lecture, 2 hours per week. 
Prerequisite: ARCH 401 . 

Agricultural and Resource 

Economics 

AREC 240 Environment and Human Ecology. 

(3) Pollution and human crowding in the 
modern environment. Causes and ecological 
costs of these problems. Public policy ap- 
proaches to the solution of problems in en- 
vironment and human ecology 
AREC 250 Elements of Agricultural and 
Resource Economics. (3) An introduction to 
economic principles of production, marketing, 
agricultural prices and incomes, farm labor, 
credit, agricultural policies, and government 
programs. 

AREC 251 Marketing of Agricultural Prod- 
ucts. (3) The development of marketing, its 
scope, channels, and agencies of distribution, 
functions, costs, methods used and services 
rendered 

AREC 365 World Hunger. Population, and 
Food Supplies. (3) An introduction to the 
problem of world hunger and possible solu- 
tions to it. World demand, supply, and distribu- 
tion of food. Alternatives for leveling off world 
food demand, increasing the supply of food, 
and improving its distribution Environmental 
limitations to increasing world food production 

AREC 398 Seminar. (1) Students will obtain 
experience in the selection. Preparation and 
presentation of economic topics and problems 
which will be subjected to critical analysis 

AREC 399 Special Problems. (1-2) Con- 
centrated reading and study in some phase of 
problem in agricultural economics 



AREC 404 Prices of Agricultural Products. 
(3) An introduction to agricultural price 
behavior Emphasis is placed on the use of 
price information in the decision-making 
process, the relation of supply and demand in 
determining agricultural prices, and the relation 
of prices to grade, time, location, and stages 
of processing in the marketing system The 
course includes elementary methods of price 
analysis, the concept of parity and the role of 
price support programs in agricultural de- 
cisions 

AREC 406 Farm Management. (3) The 
organization and operation of the farm 
business to obtain an income consistent with 
family resources and objectives Principles of 
production economics and other related fields 
are applied to the individual farm business 
Laboratory period will be largely devoted to 
field trips and other practical exercises 
AREC 407 Financial Analysis of the Farm 
Business. (3) Application of economic prin- 
ciples to develop criteria for a sound farm 
business, including credit source and use. 
preparing and filing income tax returns, 
methods of appraising farm properties, the 
summary and analysis of farm records, leading 
to effective control and profitable operation of 
the farm business. 

AREC 410 Horse Industry Economics. (3) 
Prerequisite: ANSC 230 and 232 An in- 
troduction to the economic forces affecting the 
horse industry and to the economic tools 
required by horse farm managers, trainers, and 
others in the industry. 

AREC 414 Introduction to Agricultural 
Business Management. (3) The different 
forms of businesses are investigated Man- 
agement functions, business indicators, 
measures of performance, and operational 
analysis are examined Case studies are used 
to show applications of management 
techniques. 

AREC 427 The Economics of Marketing 
Systems for Agricultural Commodities. (3) 
Basic economic theory as applied to the 
marketing of agricultural products, including 
price, cost, and financial analysis Current 
developments affecting market structure in- 
cluding effects of contractual arrangement, 
vertical integration, governmental policies and 
regulation 

AREC 432 Introduction to Natural Resources 
Policy. (3) Development of natural resource 
policy and analysis of the evolution of public in- 
tervention in the use of natural resources 
Examination of present policies and of conflicts 
betwen private individuals, public interest 
groups, and government agencies 
AREC 445 World Agricultural Development 
and the Quality of Life. (3) An examination of 
the key aspects of the agricultural develop- 
ment of less developed countries related to 
resources, technology, cultural and social set- 
ting, population, infrastructure, incentives, 
education, and government Environmental im- 
pact of agricultural development, basic 
economic and social characteristics of peasant 
agriculture, theories and models of agricultural 
development, selected aspects of agncultural 
development planning 

AREC 452 Economics of Resource Develop- 
ment. (3) Economic, political, and institutional 
factors which influence the use of tend resour- 
ces Application of elementary economic pnn- 
ciples in understanding social conduct con- 
cerning the development and use of natural 
and man-made resources 



134 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



AREC 4S3 Economic Analysis of Natural 
Resources. (3) Rational use and reuse ol 
natural resources Theory and methodology ol 
the allocation of natural resources among alter- 
native uses Optimum state of conservation, 
market failure, safe minimum standard, and 
cost-benefit analysis 

AREC 484 Introduction to Econometrics in 
Agriculture. (3) An introduction to the ap- 
plication of econometric techniques to 
agricultural problems with emphasis on the 
assumptions and computational techniques 
necessary to derive statistical estimates, test 
hypotheses, and make predictions with the use 
of single equation models Includes linear and 
non-linear regression models, internal least 
squares, discriminant analysis and factor 
analysis 

AREC 485 Applications of Mathematical 
Programming In Agriculture, Business, and 
Economic Analysis. (3) This course is 
designed to tram students in the application of 
mathematical programming (especially linear 
programming) to solve a wide variety of 
problems in agnculture. business and 
economics The primary emphasis is on setting 
up problems and interpreting results. The com- 
putational facilities of the computer science 
center are used extensively. 
AREC 489 Special Topics in Agricultural and 
Resources Economics. (3) Repeatable to a 
maximum of 9 credits 

AREC 495 Honors Reading Course in 
Agricultural and Resource Economics I. (3) 
Selected readings in political and economic 
theory from 1700 to 1850. This course 
develops a basic understanding of the 
development of economic and political thought 
as a foundation for understanding our present 
society and its cultural heritage. Prerequisite: 
acceptance in the honors program of the 
department of agricultural and resource 
economics. 

AREC 496 Honors Reading Course in 
Agricultural and Resource Economics II. (3) 
Selected readings in political and economic 
theory from 1850 to the present This course 
continues the development of a basic un- 
derstanding of economic and political thought 
begun in AREC 495 by the examination of 
modern problems in agricultural and resource 
economics in the light of the material read and 
discussed in AREC 495 and AREC 496 
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AREC 
495 and registration in the honors program of 
the department and resource economics. 



Air Science 

ARSC 100 General Military Course (Fresh- 
men). (1) General military course - freshman 
year, ARSC 100 and 101 In the first two 
years, cadets meet academic classes once per 
week. In addition, they receive one hour of 
corps training each week. 

ARSC 101 General Military Course (Fresh- 
men). (1) General military course - freshman 
year, ARSC 100 and 101 in the first two 
years, cadets meet academic classes once per 
week. In addition, they receive one hour of 
corps training each week. 

ARSC 200 General Military Course 
(Sophomores). (1) General Military course - 
sophomore year, ARSC 200 and 201 In the 
first two years, cadets meet academic classes 
once per week. In addition, they receive one 
hour of corps training each week. 



ARSC 201 General Military Course 
(Sophomores). (1) General military course • 
sophomore year, ARSC 200 and 201 In the 
first two years, cadets meet academic classes 
once per week In addition, they receive one 
hour ot corps training each week 

ARSC 300 Professional Officer Course 
(Juniors). (3) The growth and development of 
aerospace power Requires three class hours, 
plus one hour of corps training per week 

ARSC 301 Professional Officer Course 
(Juniors). (3) The growth and development of 
aerospace power Requires three class hours, 
plus one hour of corps training per week. 

ARSC 302 Professional Officer Course 
(Seniors). (3) The professional officer 
Requires three class hours, plus one hour of 
corps training per week. 

ARSC 303 Professional Officer Course 
(Seniors). (3) The professional officer 
Requires three class hours, plus one hour of 
corps training per week. • 



Art Education 

ARTE 100 Fundamentals of Art Education. 

(3) Two hours of laboratory and two hours of 
lecture per week. Fundamental principles of 
the visual arts for teaching on the elementary 
level. Elements and principles of design and 
theory of color Studio practice in different 
media. 



Art History 

ARTH 100 Introduction to Art. (3) Basic tools 
of understanding visual art This course 
stresses major approaches such as 
techniques, subject matter, form, and 
evaluation. Architecture, sculpture, painting, 
and graphic arts will be discussed. Required of 
all art majors in the first year. 
ARTH 260 History of Art. (3) A survey of 
western art as expressed through architecture, 
sculpture and painting. Prehistoric times to 
Renaissance. 

ARTH 261 History of Art. (3) A survey of 
western art as expressed through architecture, 
sculpture and painting from Renaissance to the 
present 

ARTH 262 Arts of Asia. (3) The history of 
South and East Asian art from prehistory 
through the mid 1 9th Century. 
ARTH 284 Introduction to African Art. (3) 
General concepts preparing the student for a 
better understanding of African cultures 
through an appreciation of their art. 
ARTH 320 Masterpieces of Painting. (3) A 
study of the contributions of a few major 
painters, ranging from Giotto to Titian. 
ARTH 321 Masterpieces of Painting. (3) A 
study of the contributions of a few major 
painters ranging from El Greco to Picasso. 
ARTH 330 Masterpieces of Sculpture. (3) A 
study of the contributions of a few major sculp- 
tors, ranging from Polykleitos to Ghiberti. 
ARTH 331 Masterpieces of Sculpture. (3) A 
study of the contributions of a few major sculp- 
tors, ranging from Ghiberti to Moore. 

ARTH 338 Special Topics in Art and Music. 

(3) Open to non-major and majors in art or 
music: listed also as MUSC 338. Repeatable 
to a maximum of 6 credits. 



ARTH 340 Masterpieces of Architecture. (3) 

A study of great architecture from Stonehenge 

to the Cathedral at Pisa 

ARTH 341 Masterpieces of Architecture. (3) 

A study of great architecture from Abbaye- 

Aux-Hommes to Dulles Airport 

ARTH 402 Classical Art. (3) Architecture. 

sculpture and painting in the classical cultures 

First semester will stress Greece. 

ARTH 403 Classical Art. (3) Architecture, 

sculpture and painting in the classical cultures. 

Second semester will stress Rome 

ARTH 404 Bronze Age Art. (3) Art of the near 

East. Egypt and Aegean 

ARTH 406 Arts of the East- 1. (3) The arts of 

Japan and China from prehistory to 1 400 

ARTH 407 Arts of the East II. (3) The arts of 

Japan and China from the 1400's to the 

present 

ARTH 410 Early Christian - Early Byzantine 

Art. (3) Sculpture, painting, architecture, and 

the minor arts from about 312 to 726 AD 

ARTH 411 Byzantine Art: 726 - 1453. (3) 

Sculpture, painting, architecture and the minor 

arts from 726 to 1 453 AD 

ARTH 412 Medieval Art. (3) Architecture, 

sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. First 

semester will stress Romanesque 

ARTH 413 Medieval Art. (3) Architecture, 

sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. 

Second semester will stress the Gothic period. 

ARTH 416 Northern European Painting in 

the 15th Century. (3) Painting in the 

Netherlands. France and Germany. 

ARTH 417 Northern European Painting in 

the 16th Century. (3) Painting in the 

Netherlands. France and Germany 

ARTH 422 Early Renaissance Art in Italy . (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 

1 400 to 1 430. 

ARTH 423 Early Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 

1430 to 1475. 

ARTH 424 High Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 

1475 to 1500. 

ARTH 425 High Renaissance Art in Italy. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from about 

1500 to 1525. 

ARTH 430 European Baroque Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the 

major southern European centers in the 1 7th 

century 

ARTH 431 European Baroque Art. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the 

major northern European centers in the 1 7th 

century. 

ARTH 434 French Painting. (3) French 
Painting from 1400 to 1600. From Fouquet 
to Poussin. 

ARTH 435 French Painting. (3) French 
painting from 1600 to 1800. From Le Brun 
to David. 

ARTH 440 19th Century European Art. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting in Europe 
from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism. 
ARTH 441 19th Century European Art. (3) 
Architecture, sculpture and painting in Europe. 
From Realsim. to Impressionism and Sym- 
bolism. 

ARTH 445 Impressionism and Neo- 
Impresslonlsm. (3) Prerequisite: ARTH 260, 
261 or consent of instructor. History of Im- 
pressionism and Neo-lmpressionism: artists, 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 135 



styles, art theories, criticism, sources and in- 
fluence on 20th century. 
ARTH 450 20th Century Art. (3) Painting, 
sculpture and architecture from the late 1 9th 
century to 1 920. 

ARTH 451 20th Century Art. (3) Painting, 
sculpture and architecture from 1920 to the 
present 

ARTH 452 History ot Photography. (3) 
History of Photography as art from 1 839 to the 
present. 

ARTH 454 Nineteenth and Twentieth Cen- 
tury Sculpture. (3) Trends in sculpture from 
Neo-Classicism to the present Emphasis will 
be put on the redefinition of sculpture during 
the 20th century. 

ARTH 460 History of the Graphic Arts. (3) 
Prerequisite: ARTH 100, or ARTH 260 and 
261, or consent of instructor. Graphic 
techniques and styles in Europe from 1 400 to 
1800; contributions of ma|or artists. 
ARTH 462 African Art. (3) First semester, the 
cultures west of the Niger River (Nigeria 
through Mall) from 400 B.C to the present. 
The art is studied through its iconography 
and function in the culture and the intercultural 
influences upon the artists, including a study of 
the societies, cults and ceremonies during 
which the art was used. 

ARTH 463 African Art. (3) Second semester, 
the cultures east and south of Nigeria. The art 
is studied through its iconography and function 
in the culture and the intercultural influences 
upon the artists, including a study of the 
societies, cults and ceremonies during which 
the art was used. 

ARTH 464 African Art Research (3) Seminar 
with concentration on particular aspects of 
African art. the course is given at the museum 
of African art in Washington, D.C. 
ARTH 470 Latin American Art. (3) Art of the 
Pre-Hispanic and the Colonial Periods. 
ARTH 471 Latin American Art. (3) Art of the 
19th and 20th centuries. 
ARTH 476 History of American Art. (3) Ar- 
chitecture, sculpture and painting in the United 
States from the Colonial periods to about 
1875. 

ARTH 477 History of American Art. (3) Ar- 
chitecture, sculpture and painting in the United 
States from about 1 875 to the present. 
ARTH 489 Special Topics In Art History. (3) 
Prerequisite: consent of department head or 
instrtuctor May be repeated to a maximum of 
six credits. 

ARTH 498 Directed Studies In Art History I. 
(2-3) For advanced students, by permission of 
department chairman Course may be repeated 
for credit if content differs. 
ARTH 499 Directed Studies In Art History II. 
(2-3) 

Art Studio 

ARTS100 Design. (3) Principles and elements 
of design through manipulation and 
organization of materials in two and three 
dimensions. 

ARTS 110 Drawing I. (3) Six hours per week 
An introductory course with a variety of media 
and related techniques. Problems based on 
still life, figure and nature. 
ARTS 200 Intermediate Design. (3) Six hours 
per week Prerequisites ARTS 100. 110. A 
continuation of design I with more individually 
structured problems in terms of form, com- 
position and meaning. 



ARTS 210 Drawing II. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisites: ARTS 100, 110 Original com- 
positions from the figure and nature, sup- 
plemented by problems of personal and ex- 
pressive drawing. 

ARTS 215 Anatomical Drawing. (3) Six hours 
per week Prerequisites: ARTS 210 or per- 
mission of instructor. A drawing course based 
on the study of anatomical structure em- 
phasizing the human body. 
ARTS 220 Painting I. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisites: ARTS 100, 110 Basic tools and 
language of painting Oil and watercolor 
ARTS 277 Architectural Presentation. (3) Six 
hours per week. Prerequisites: ARTS 100, 
110. Techniques of wash and watercolor in ar- 
chitectural, interior and landscape ar- 
chitectural rendering. 

ARTS 310 Drawing III. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite: ARTS 210. Emphasis on un- 
derstanding organic form, as it is related to 
study from the human figure and to pictorial 
composition. 

ARTS 320 Painting II. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisites: ARTS 210, 220. Original com- 
positions based upon nature, figure and still 
life, supplemented by expressive painting 
Choice of media. 

ARTS 324 Painting III. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite: ARTS 320. Creative painting for 
advanced students. Problems require a 
knowledge of pictorial structure. Development 
of personal direction. Choice of media. 
ARTS 330 Sculpture I. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite: ARTS 210. (For students 
majoring in art history, by permission of depart- 
ment.) Volumes, masses and planes, based on 
the use of plastic earths. Simple armature con- 
struction and methods of casting. 
ARTS 334 Sculpture II. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite: ARTS 330. Nature as a 
point of developing ideas into organic and ar- 
chitectural forms. 

ARTS 335 Sculpture III. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite: ARTS 334. Problems in- 
volving plastic earths and other material 
capable of being modeled of cast. Choice of in- 
dividual style encouraged. 
ARTS 340 Prlntmaklng I. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite: ARTS 210. (For students 
majoring in art history, by permission of depart- 
ment.) Basic printmaking techniques in relief, 
intaglio, and planographic media. 
ARTS 344 Printmaking II. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite: ARTS 210. One print 
media including extensive study of color 
processes. Individually structured problems 
ARTS 404 Experiments In Visual Processes. 
(3) Six hours per week Prerequisites: either 
ARTS 220, 330 or 340 Investigation and 
execution of process onented art Group and 
individual experimental projects 
ARTS 41 Drawing IV. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite: ARTS 310 Advanced drawing, 
with emphasis on human figure, its structure 
and organic likeness to forms in nature Com- 
positional problems deriving from this relation- 
ship are also stressed 

ARTS 420 Painting IV. (3) Six hours per week 
Prerequisite: ARTS 324 Creative painting Em- 
phasis on personal direction and self-criticism 
Group seminars 

ARTS 430 Sculpture IV. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite ARTS 335 Problems and 
techniques of newer concepts, utilizing various 
materials, such as plastics and metals 
Technical aspects of welding stressed 



ARTS 440 Printmaking III. (3) Six hours per 
week Prerequisite ARTS 340 and 344 Con- 
temporary experimental techniques of one 
print medium with group discussions 
ARTS 441 Printmaking IV. (3) Six hours per 
week. Prerequisite. ARTS 440 Continuation of 
ARTS 440 

ARTS 489 Special Problems In Studio Arts. 
(3) Prerequisite consent of instructor 
Repeatable to a maximum of six hours 
ARTS 498 Directed Studies in Studio Art. (2- 
3) For advanced students, by permission of 
department chairman Course may be repeated 
for credit if content differs 



ASTRONOMY 

ASTR 100 Introduction to Astronomy. (3) 

Every semester An elementary course in 
descriptive astronomy, especially appropriate 
for non-science students. Sun, moon, planets, 
stars and nebulae, galaxies, evolution The 
course is illustrated with slides and demon- 
strations of instruments 

ASTR 105 Introduction to Modern 
Astronomy.' (3) Three lectures per week 
Prerequisite: ASTR 100. An elementary 
course in modern astronomy elaborating on 
some of the topics which could only be 
mentioned briefly in ASTR 100 Appropriate 
for non-science students 
ASTR 110 Astronomy Laboratory. (1) Two 
hours of laboratory work per week- Pre- 
requisite: previous or concurrent enrollment 
in ASTR 100 Exercises include use of 
photographs of moon, stars, nebulae and 
galaxies and spectra: experiments: demon- 
strating scientific concepts used in astronomy 
Daytime and nighttime observations if weather 
permits. Appropriate for non-science majors 

ASTR 181 Introductory Astronomy and 
Astrophysics I. (3) Corequisite MATH 140 
Three lectures per week. For science and 
mathematics majors Survey of several 
branches of astronomy such as the solar 
system, properties of stars and stellar sys- 
tems, and the galaxy ASTR 181 should not 
normally be taken by students who have 
already taken ASTR 1 00 and 1 05 

ASTR 182 Introductory Astronomy and 
Astrophysics II. (3) Prerequisites ASTR 181 
or consent of the instructor Three lectures per 
week For science and mathematics majors 
Aspects of astronomy not included in ASTR 
181 and in general more onented toward 
astrophysics The sun, stellar evolution, ex- 
tragalactic objects and cosmology Credit will 
be given only one course ASTR 1 82 or 350 
ASTR 210 Practical Astronomy. (2-3) 
Prerequisites ASTR 181 or 350 and MATH 
140 ASTR 100 and 105 may be substituted 
for ASTR 181 if approved by instructor One 
lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week 
2-3 credits, according to work done Designed 
primarily for astronomy majors to give the 
student familanty with techniques used by 
astronomers and an understanding of how 
astronomical data are obtained Students 
registered for 2 credits will not be required to 
do all the exercises Coordinate systems, op- 
tics, photometry, binary stars, distance deter- 
mination. Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, solar 
observations, moon, galactic structure and 
galaxies 

ASTR 288 Special Projects in Astronomy. (1- 
3) Prerequisite permission of the instructor 
Independent study, short research projects. 



136 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



tutorial reading, and assisting with faculty 
research and teaching under special super- 
vision Repeatable to a maximum of six credits 
ASTR 330 Solar-System Astronomy. (3) No 
prerequisites designed primarily for students 
not majonng in astronomy and suitable for non- 
science majors The structure of planets and of 
their atmospheres, the nature of comets, 
asteroids and satellites Comparison of various 
theories for the origin of the solar system Em- 
phasis on a description of recent data and in- 
terpretations 

ASTR 340 Galaxies and the Universe. (3) No 
prerequisite designed primarily for students 
not maionng in astronomy and suitable for non- 
science majors A study of galaxies including 
our own. radio galaxies, and quasars, the 
measurement of distances, the recession of 
galaxies, the microwave background and its 
relation to cosmology 

ASTR 350 Astronomy and Astrophysics. (3) 
Prerequisites Phys 192. 262. or 142. or the 
consent of the instructor (Recommended 
corequisites: PHYS 293 or 263) Three lec- 
tures per week Lecture survey course in 
astronomy and astrophysics, with strong em- 
phasis on physical concepts The student will 
use physics j n astronomical and astrophysical 
contexts but is not expected to have had 
any previous introduction to astronomy Credit 
will be given for only one course ASTR 182 
or3£0 

ASTR 398 Special Topics in Astronomy. (3) 

Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of in- 
structor This course is designed primarily for 
students not majoring in astronomy and is 
suitable for non-science students. It will con- 
centrate study in some limited field in 
astronomy which will vary from semester to 
semester Possible subjects for study are the 
solar system, extragalactic astronomy and 
cosmology, the inconstant universe. 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits. 
ASTR 399 Honors Seminar. (1-16) Credit ac- 
cording to work done. Enrollment is limited to 
students admitted to the honors program in 
astronomy. 

ASTR 400 Introduction to Astrophysics I. (3) 
Three lectures per week. Pre- or corequisite: 
PHYS 422 or consent of instructor Spec- 
troscopy, structure of the atmospheres of the 
sun and other stars Observational data and 
curves of growth. Chemical composition. 
ASTR 401 Introduction to Astrophysics II. 
(3) Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: 
ASTR 400. A brief survey of stellar structure 
and evolution, and of the physics of low- 
density gasses. such as the interstellar 
medium and the solar atmosphere. Emphasis is 
placed on a good understanding of a few 
theoretical concepts that have wide 
astrophysical applications. 
ASTR 410 Observational Astronomy. (3) 
Prerequisites: working knowledge of calculus, 
physics through PHYS 284. or 263, and 3 
credits of astronomy. An introduction to 
current methods of obtaining astronomical in- 
formation including radio, infrared, optical, 
ultra-violet, and x-ray astronomy. The 
laboratory work will involve photographic and 
photoelectric observations with the depart- 
ment's optical telescope and 21 -cm line spec- 
troscopy, flux measurements and in- 
terferometry with the department's 
radiotelescopes. 

ASTR 411 Observational Astronomy. (3) 
Prerequisites: ASTR 410. working knowledge 
of calculus, physics through PHYS 284. or 
263. and 3 credits of astronomy An in- 



troduction to current methods of obtaining 
astronomical information including radio, in- 
fared, optical, ultra-violet, and x-ray astronomy 
The laboratory work will involve photographic 
and photoelectric observations with the de- 
partment's optica telescope and 21 cm line 
spectroscopy, flux measurements and inter- 
ferometry with the department's radiotele- 
scopes Observatory work on individual 
proiects Every semester 
ASTR 420 Introduction to Galatic Re- 
search. (3) Three lectures per week Pre- 
requisite MATH 141 and at least 1 2 credits of 
introductory physics and astronomy courses 
Stellar motions, methods of galactic research, 
study of our own and nearby galaxies, clusters 
of stars 

ASTR 430 The Solar System. (3) Prerequisite 
MATH 246 and either PHYS 263 or PHYS 
294, or consent of instructor The structure of 
planetary atmospheres, radiative transfer in 
planetary atmospheres, remote sensing of 
planetary surfaces, interior structure of 
planets Structure of comets Brief discussions 
of asteroids, satellite systems, and solar 
system evolution 

ASTR 440 Introduction to Extra-Galactic 
Astronomy. (3) Prerequisite MATH 141 and 
at least 1 4 credits of introductory physics and 
astronomy including a background in 
astronomy at the ASTR 181-182 level, or con- 
sent of instructor. Properties of normal and 
peculiar galaxies, including radio galaxies and 
quasars, expansion of the universe and 
cosmology. 

ASTR 450 Celestial Mechanics (3) Three lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite: PHYS 41 or con- 
sent of instructor. Celestial mechanics, orbit 
theory, equations of motion. 
ASTR 498 Special Problems in Astronomy. 
(1-6) Prerequisite: major in physics or 
astronomy and /or consent of advisor. Re- 
search or special study. Credit according to 
work done. 



Business and Management 

BMGT 110 Business Enterprise. (3) A sur- 
vey course covering the internal and functional 
organization of a business enterprise, its 
organization and control 
BMGT 220 Principles of Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite: sophomore standing. The prin- 
ciples of accounting for business enterprise 
and the use of accounting data in making 
business decisions. 

A — Limited to non-accounting majors. See 
description above for BMGT 220. 
BMGT 221 Principles of Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisites: BMGT 220 or 220A. The prin- 
ciples of accounting for business enterprise 
and the use of accounting data in making 
business decisions. 

A — Limited to non-accounting majors. See 
description above for BMGT 22 1 
BMGT 230 Business Statistics I. (3) 
Prerequisite: MATH 220 or consent of in- 
structor. An introductory course in statistical 
concepts including probability from a naive set 
theory approach, random variables and their 
properties, and the probability distributions of 
selected discrete and continuous random 
variables. The concepts of sampling, sampling 
distributions, and the application of these con- 
cepts to estimation hypothesis testing are in- 
cluded as are brief surveys of the regression 
and anova models. This course may not be 
taken for credit by management science, 
statistics and IFSM majors. 



BMGT 231 Business Statistics I. (3) 

Prerequisite MATH 141 or consent of in- 
structor For management science, statistics 
and IFSM maiors An introductory course in 
statistical concepts including probability from a 
naive set theory approach, random variables 
and their properties, and the probability 
distributions of selected discrete and con- 
tinuous random variables The concepts of 
sampling, sampling distributions, and the ap- 
plication of these concepts to estimation 
hypothesis testing are included as are brief 
surveys of the regression and anova models 

BMGT 301 Electronic Data Processing. (3) 

Students enrolled in the college of business 
and management curricula will register for 
IFSM 401 For detailed information on pre- 
requisites and description of the course, 
refer to IFSM 401 The credits earned in IFSM 

40 1 may be included in the total credits earned 
in the area of concentration in business and 
management 

BMGT 302 Electronic Data Processing Ap- 
plications. (3) Students enrolled in the college 
of business and management curricula will 
register for IFSM 402 For detailed information 
on prerequisites and description of the course, 
refer to IFSM 402 The credits earned in IFSM 

402 may be included in the total credits earned 
in the area of concentration in business and 
management. 

BMGT 310 Intermediate Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite BMGT 221 or 221 A A com- 
prehensive study of the theory and problems 
of valuation of assets, application of funds, cor- 
poration accounts and statements, and the in- 
terpretation of accounting statements. 
BMGT 311 Intermediate Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 221 or 221 A A com- 
prehensive study of the theory and problems 
of valuation of assets, application of funds, cor- 
poration accounts and statements, and the in- 
terpretation of accounting statements. 
BMGT 320 Accounting Systems. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 220. A study of the factors 
involved in the design and installation of ac- 
counting systems: the organization, volume 
and types of transactions, charts of accounts, 
accounting manuals, the reporting system. 
BMGT 321 Cost Accounting. (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 221 or 221 A. A study of the basic con- 
cepts of product costing and cost analysis for 
management planning and control. Emphasis is 
placed on the role of the accountant in 
organizational management, analysis of cost 
behavior, standard cost, budgeting, respon- 
sibility accounting and relevant costs for 
decision making. 

BMGT 323 Income Tax Accounting. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 221 or 221 A. A study of 
the important provisions of the federal tax laws, 
using illustrative examples, selected questions 
and problems, and the preparation of returns. 
BMGT 332 Operations Research for Man- 
agement Decisions. (3) Prerequisite: MATH 
220, BMGT 230 Surveys the philosophy, 
techniques, and applications of operations 
research to managerial decision making. 
The course is designed primarily for stu- 
dents not majoring in management science, 
statistics, or IFSM. Techniques covered in- 
clude, linear programming, transportation and 
assignment models, markov processes, in- 
ventory and queueing models Emphasis is 
placed on formulating and solving decision 
problems in the functional areas of 
management. 



COURSEOFFERINGS/137 



BMGT 340 Business Finance. (3) 
Prerequisite BMGT 221 This course deals 
with principles and practices involved in the 
organization, financing, and rehabilitation of 
business enterprises; the various types of 
securities and their use in raising funds, ap- 
portioning income, risk, and control; in- 
tercorporate relations; and new developments 
Emphasis is on solution of problems of finan- 
cial policy faced by management 

BMGT 343 Investments. (3) Prerequisite; 
BMGT 340 An introduction to financial in- 
vestments Topics include securities and 
securities markets; investment risks, returns, 
and constraints; portfolio policies; and in- 
stitutional investment policies 
BMGT 350 Marketing Principles and 
Organization. (3) Prerequisite ECON 203 or 
205 This is an introductory course in the field 
of marketing Its purpose is to give a general 
understanding and appreciation of the forces 
operating institutions employed, and methods 
followed in marketing agricultural products, 
natural products, services and manufactured 
goods 

BMGT 351 Marketing Management. (3) 
Prerequisites BMGT 230 and 350 A study of 
the work of the marketing division in a going 
organization The work of developing 
organizations and procedures for the control of 
marketing activities is surveyed. The emphasis 
throughout the course is placed on the deter- 
mination of policies, methods, and practices for 
the effective marketing of various forms of 
manufactured products 

BMGT 352 Advertising. (3) Prerequisite: 
3MGT 350 A study of the role of advertising in 
the American economy; the impact of ad- 
vertising on our economic and social life, the 
methods and techniques currently applied by 
advertising practitioners; the role of the 
newspaper, magazine, and other media in the 
development of an advertising campaign, 
modern research methods to improve the ef- 
fectiveness of advertising and the organization 
of the advertising business. 
BMGT 353 Retail Management. (3) 
Prerequisites: BMGT 220 and 350. Retail 
store organization, location, layout and store 
policy; pricing policies, price lines, brands 
credit policies, records as a guide to buying 
purchasing methods; supervision of selling 
training and supervision of retail sales force 
and administrative problems 
BMGT 360 Personnel Management. (3) The 
basic course in personnel management in- 
cludes manpower planning, recruitment, selec- 
tion, development, compensation, and ap- 
praisal of employees Explores the impact of 
scientific management and unionism on these 
functions 

BMGT 362 Labor Relations. (3) A study of the 
development and methods of organized 
groups in industry with reference to the set- 
tlement of labor disputes An economic and 
legal analysis of labor union and employer 
association activities, arbitration, mediation, 
and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade 
agreements, strikes, boycotts, lockouts Com- 
pany unions, employee representation, and in- 
junctions 

BMGT 364 Management and Organization 
Theory. (3) The development of management 
and organization theory, nature of the 
management process and function and its 
future development. The rote of the manager 
as an organizer and director, the com- 
munication process, goals and responsibilities 



BMGT 370 Principles o» Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite ECON 203 or 205 A general 
course covering the five fields of tran- 
sportation Their development, service, and 
regulation 

BMGT 372 Traffic and Physical Distribution 
Management. (3) Prerequisite |unior stan- 
ding Examines the management aspects of 
the business firm in moving their raw materials 
and finished goods, through traffic, 
warehousing, industrial packaging, materials 
handling, and inventory A systematic 
examination of the trade-oft possibilities and 
management alternatives to minimize cost of 
product flow and maximizing customer service 
is provided Not open to students who have 
credit for BMGT 371 

BMGT 380 Business Law. (3) Legal aspects 
of business relationships, contracts, negtiable 
instruments, agency, partnerships, cor- 
porations, real and personal property, and 
sales 

BMGT 381 Business Law. (3) Legal aspects 
of business relationships, contracts, nego- 
tiable instruments, agency, partnerships, cor- 
porations, real and personal property, and 
sales 

BMGT 385 Production Management. (3) 
Studies the operation of a manufacturing en- 
terprise, concentrating on the economies of 
production Introduces a grounding in 
analytical method early so that the broad 
problem areas of system design, operation and 
control can be based upon the analytical 
method. 

BMGT 390 Risk Management. (3) Pre- 
requisite: MATH 111 Designed to acquaint 
the student with the nature and significance of 
risk in business enterprise The problems 
relating to both pure and speculative risk in 
business are considered, and methods of 
solution involving risk assumption, transfer. 
reduction, and the use of insurance are 
analyzed as aids in management decision 
making 

BMGT 391 Principles of Risk and Insurance. 
(3) Prerequisite: MATH 111 Emphasizes the 
use of insurance in resolving problems in- 
volving personal and business risks. Life, ac- 
cident and health, fire and casualty, 
automobile, and marine insurance are 
examined as means of dealing with these risks 
The theory and legal aspects of insurance 
are considered, as well as the quantitative 
measurement of risks 

BMGT 392 Introduction to International 
Business Management. (3) Prerequisite 
ECON 203 or 205. A study of the domestic 
and foreign environmental factors affecting the 
international operations of US business firms 
The course also covers the administrative 
aspects of international marketing, finance and 
management 

BMGT 393 Real Estate Principles. (3) 
Prerequisite ECON 203 or 205 This course 
covers the nature and uses of real estate, real 
estate as a business, basic principles, con- 
struction problems and home ownership, city 
planning, and public control and ownership of 
real estate 

BMGT 401 Introduction to Systems Analysis. 
(3) Students enrolled in the college of 
business and management curricula will 
register (or IFSM 436 For detailed information 
on prerequisites and descriptions of the cour- 
se, refer to IFSM 436 The credits earned in IF- 
SM 436 may be included in the total credits 
earned in the area of concentration in business 
and management 



BMGT 420 Undergraduate Accounting 
Seminar. (3) Prerequisite senior standing as 
an accounting maior or consent of instructor 
Enrollment limited to upper one-third of senior 
class Seminar coverage of outstanding 
current non-text literature, current problems 
and case studies in accounting 
BMGT 421 Undergraduate Accounting 
Seminar. (3) Prerequisite senior standing as 
an accounting major or consent of instructor 
Enrollment limited to upper one-third of senior 
class Semiar coverage of outstanding current 
non-text literature, current problems and case 
studies in accounting 

BMGT 422 Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Prerequisite BMGT 31 1 A study of the pnn- 
ciples and problems of auditing and application 
of accounting principles to the preparation of 
audit working papers and reports 

BMGT 423 Apprenticeship in Accounting. 
(0) Prerequisite minimum of 20 semester 
hours in accounting and the consent of the ac- 
counting staff A period of apprenticeship is 
provided with nationally known firms of cer- 
tified public accountants from about January 
1 5 to February 1 5 

BMGT 424 Advanced Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite BMGT 31 1 Advanced account- 
ing theory to specialized problems in partner- 
ships, ventures, consignments, installment 
sales, insurance, statement of affairs, re- 
ceiver's accounts, realization and liquidation 
reports, and consolidation of parent and sub- 
sidiary accounts 

BMGT 425 CPA Problems. (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 31 1 , or consent of instructor, a study of 
the nature, form and content of CPA. 
examinations by means of the preparation of 
solutions to, and an analysis of, a large sample 
of CPA. problems covering the various ac- 
counting fields 

BMGT 426 Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 321 A continuation of 
basic cost accounting with special emphasis 
on process costs, standard costs, joint costs, 
and by-product cost 

BMGT 427 Advanced Auditing Theory and 
Practice. (3) Prerequisite BMGT 422 Ad- 
vanced auditing theory and practice and report 
wnting 

BMGT 430 Linear Statistical Models in 
Business. (3) Prerequisite BMGT 230 or con- 
sent of instructor Model building involving an 
intensive study of the general linear stochastic 
model and the applications of this model to 
business problems The model is derived in 
matrix form and this form is used to analyze 
both the regression and anova formulations of 
the general linear model 
BMGT 431 Design of Statistical Experiments 
in Business. (3) Prerequisite BMGT 230 or 
231 Surveys anova models, basic and ad- 
vanced experimental design concepts Non- 
parametric tests and correlation are em- 
phasized Applications of these techniques to 
business problems in primarily the marketing 
and behavioral sciences are stressed 
BMGT 432 Sample Survey Design for 
Business and Economics. (3) Prerequisite 
BMGT 230 or 231 Design of probability sam- 
ples Simple random sampling, stratified ran- 
dom sampling, systematic sampling, and 
cluster sampling designs are developed and 
compared for efficiency under varying assum- 
ptions about the population sampled Ad- 
vanced designs such as multistage cluster 
sampling and replicated sampling are sur 



138 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



veyed Implementing these techniques in 
estimating parameters ot business models is 
stressed 

BMGT 433 Statistical Decision Theory In 
Business. (3) Prerequisite BMGT 231 or con- 
sent ol instructor Bayesian approach to the 
use of sample information in decisionmaking 
Concepts ol loss. nsk. decision criteria, ex- 
pected returns, and expected utility are 
examined Application of these concepts to 
decision-making in the firm in various contexts 
are considered 

BMGT 434 Operations Research I. (3) 
Prerequisite BMGT 230. MATH 240 or per- 
mission of instructor Designed pnmanly for 
students majoring in management science, 
statistics. and information systems 
management It is the first semester of a two 
semester introduction to the philosophy, 
techniques and applications of operations 
research Topics covered include linear 
programming, postoptimality analysis, network 
algorithms, dynamic programming, inventory 
and equipment replacement models 

BMGT 435 Operations Research II. (3) Pre- 
requisite BMGT 434, or permission of in- 
structor The second semester of a two-part in- 
troduction to operations research The pnmary 
emphasis is on stochastic models in 
management science. Topics include 
stochastic linear programming, probabilistic 
dynamic programming. Markov processes, 
probabilistic inventory models, queueing 
theory and simulation 

BMGT 436 Applications of Mathematical 
Programming in Management Science. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 434 or permission of in- 
structor Theory and applications of linear, in- 
teger, and nonlinear programming models to 
management decisions. Topics covered in- 
clude the basic theorems of linear program- 
ming; the matrix formulation of the simplex, and 
dual simplex algorithms; decomposition, cut- 
ting plane, branch and bound, and implicit 
enumeration algorithms; gradient based 
algorithms; and quadratic programming. 
Special emphasis is placed upon model for- 
mulation and solution using prepared computer 
algorithms. 

BMGT 438 Topics in Statistical Analysis for 
Business Management. (3) Prerequisite: 
BMGT 430 and MATH 240 or permission of 
the instructor Selected topics in statistical 
analysis which are relevant to management for 
students with knowledge of basic statistical 
methods. Topics include evolutionary 
operation and response surface analysis, 
forecasting techniques, pathologies of the 
linear model and their remedies, multivariate 
statistical models, and non-parametric models. 
BMGT 440 Financial Management. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 340 Analysis and 
discussion of cases and readings relating to 
financial decisions of the firm. The application 
of finance concepts to the solution of financial 
problems is emphasized. 
BMGT 443 Security Analysis and Valuation. 
(3) Prerequisite BMGT 343 Study and appli- 
cation of the concepts, methods, models, and 
empirical findings to the analysis, valuation, 
and selection of securities, especially com- 
mon stock 

BMGT 445 Commercial Bank Management. 
(3) Prerequisites: BMGT 340 and ECON 430 
Analysis and discussion of cases and readings 
in commercial bank management. The loan 
function is emphasized; also the management 
of liquidity reserves, investments for iRcome. 



and source of funds Bank objectives, func- 
tions, policies, organization, structure, serv 
ices, and regulation are considered 
BMGT 450 Marketing Research Methods. (3) 
Prerequisites BMGT 230 and 350 Recom- 
mended that BMGT 430 be taken prior to this 
course This course is intended to develop skill 
In the use of scientific methods in the 
acquisition, analysis and interpretation of 
marketing data It covers the specialized fields 
of marketing research, the planning of survey 
projects, sample design, tabulation procedure 
and report preparation 

BMGT 451 Consumer Analysis. (3) Pre- 
requisites BMGT 350 and 351 Recom- 
mended that PSYC 100 and 221 be taken 
prior to this course Considers the growing im- 
portance of the American consumer in the 
marketing system and the need to understand 
him. Topics include the foundation con- 
siderations underlying consumer behavior 
such as economic, social, psychological and 
cultural factors Analysis of the consumer in 
marketing situations - as a buyer and user of 
products and servics - and in relation to the 
various individual social and marketing factors 
affecting his behavior The influence of 
marketing communications is also considered 
BMGT 452 Promotion Management. (3) 
Prerequisites: BMGT 350 and 352. This 
course is concerned with the way in which 
business firms use advertising, personal 
selling, sales promotion, and other methods as 
part of their marketing program The case 
study method is used to present problems 
taken from actual business practice. Cases 
studied illustrate problems in the use and coor- 
dination of demand stimulation methods as 
well as analysis and planning. Research, 
testing and statistical control of promotional ac- 
tivities are also considered 
BMGT 453 Industrial Marketing. (3) 
Prerequisites: BMGT 350 plus one other 
marketing course. The industrial and business 
sector of the marketing system is considered 
rather than the household or ultimate con- 
sumer sector Industrial products range from 
raw materials and supplies to the major equip- 
ment in a plant, business office, or institution. 
Topics include product planning and in- 
troduction, market analysis and forecasting, 
channels, pricing, field sales force 
management, advertising, marketing cost 
analysis, and government relations. Particular 
attention is given to industrial, business and in- 
stitutional buying policies and practice and to 
the analysis of buyer behavior. 
BMGT 454 International Marketing. (3) 
Prerequisites: BMGT 350 plus any other 
marketing course. A study of the marketing 
functions from the viewpoint of the in- 
ternational executive. In addition to the 
coverage of international marketing policies 
relating to product adaptation, data collection 
and analysis, channels of distribution, pricing, 
communications, and cost analysis, con- 
sideration is given to the cultural, legal, finan- 
cial, and organizational aspects of international 
marketing. 

BMGT 455 Sales Management. (3) The role 
of the sales manager, both at headquarters and 
in the field, in the management of people, 
resources and marketing functions. An 
analysis of the problems involved in sales 
organization, forecasting, planning, com- 
municating, evaluating and controlling At- 
tention is given to the application of quan- 
titative techniques and pertinent behavioral 
science concepts in the management of the 
sales effort and sales force. 



BMGT 460 Personnel Management - 
Analysis and Problems. (3) Prerequisite 
BMGT 360 Recommended, BMGT 230 
Research findings, special readings, case 
analysis, stimulation, and field investigations 
are used to develop a better understanding of 
personnel problems, alternative solutions and 
their practical ramifications 
BMGT 462 Labor Legislation. (3) Case 
method analysis of the modern law of industrial 
relations Cases include the decisions of ad- 
ministrative agencies, courts and arbitration 
tribunals 

BMGT 463 Public Sector Labor Relations. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 362 or permission of in- 
structor Development and. structure of labor 
relations in public sector employment; federal, 
state, and local government responses to 
unionization and collective bargaining 
BMGT 464 Organizational Behavior. (3) 
Prerequisite: BMGT 364 An examination of 
research and theory concerning the forces 
which contribute to the behavior of 
organizational members. Topics covered in- 
clude: work group behavior, supervisory 
behavior, intergroup relations, employee goals 
and attitudes, communication problems, 
organizational change, and organizational goals 
and design. 

BMGT 467 Undergraduate Seminar in Per- 
sonnel Management. (3) Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. This course is open only to 
the top one-third of undergraduate majors in 
personnel and labor relations and is offered 
during the fall semester of each year. 
Highlights major developments. Guest lec- 
turers make periodic presentations. 

BMGT 470 Land Transportation Systems. (3) 

Prerequisite: BMGT 370 Overall view of 
managerial problems facing land carriers: em- 
phasis on rail and motor modes of tran- 
sportation. 

BMGT 471 Air and Water Transportation 
Systems. (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 370. Overall 
view of managerial problems facing air and 
water carriers: emphasis on international and 
domestic aspects of air and water modes of 
transportation Not open for credit to students 
who have credit for BMGT 472 

BMGT 473 Advanced Transportation 
Problems. (3) Prerequisite: BMGT 370. A 
critical examination of current government 
transportation policy and proposed solutions. 
Urban and intercity managerial transport 
problems are also considered. 
BMGT 474 Urban Transport and Urban 
Development. (3) Prerequisite: ECON 203 or 
205. An analysis of the role of urban trans- 
portation in present and future urban develop- 
ment. The interaction of transport pricing and 
sen/ice, urban planning, institutional restraints, 
and public land uses is studied. 
BMGT 475 Advanced Logistics Manage- 
ment. (3) Prerequisites: BMGT 370, 372. 
332 Application of the concepts of BMGT 
372 to problem solving arid special projects in 
logistics management: case analysis is 
stressed 

BMGT 480 Legal Environment of Business. 
(3) The course examines the principal ideas in 
law stressing those which are relevant for the 
modern business executive. Legal reasoning 
as it has evolved in this country will be one of 
the central topics of study. Several leading an- 
titrust cases will be studied to illustrate vividly 
the reasoning process as well as the interplay 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 139 



of business, philosophy, and the varius con- 
ceptions of the nature of law which give direc- 
tion to the process. Examination of con- 
temporary legal problems and proposed 
solutions, especially those most likely to affect 
the business community, are also covered 
BMGT 481 Public Utilities. (3) Prerequisite 
ECON 203 or 205 Using the regulated in- 
dustries as specific examples, attention is 
focused on broad and general problems in 
such diverse fields as constitutional law, ad- 
ministrative law, public administration, govern- 
ment control of business, advanced economic 
theory, accounting, valuation and depreciation, 
taxation, finance, engineering, and manage- 
ment 

BMGT 482 Business and Government. (3) 
Prerequisite: ECON 203 or 205. A study of the 
role of government in modern economic life 
Social control of business as a remedy for the 
abuses of business enterprise arising from the 
decline of competition Criteria of limitations on 
government regulation of private enterprise 
BMGT 485 Advanced Production Man- 
agement. (3) Prerequisite BMGT 385. A 
study of typical problems encountered by the 
factory manager. The objective is to develop 
the ability to analyze and solve problems in 
management control of production and in the 
formulation of production policies Among the 
topics covered are plant location, production 
planning and control, methods analysis, and 
time study. 

BMGT 490 Urban Land Management. (3) 
Covers the managerial and decision making 
aspects of urban land and property Included 
are such subjects as land use and valuation 
matters. 

BMGT 493 Honors Study. (3) First semester 
of the senior year. Prerequisite: candidacy for 
honors in business and management. The 
course is designed for honors students who 
have elected to conduct intensive study (in 
dependent or group). The student will work un- 
der the direct guidance of a faculty advisor and 
the chairman of the honors committee. They 
shall determine that the area of study is of a 
scope and intensity deserving of a candidate's 
attention. Formal written and or oral reports on 
the study may be required by the faculty ad- 
visor and or chairman of the honors program. 
Group meetings of the candidates may be 
called at the discretion of the faculty advisors 
and or chairman of the honors committee. 

BMGT 494 Honors Study. (3) Second 
semester of the senior year Prerequisite: 
BMGT 493, and continued candidacy for 
honors in business and management. The 
student shall continue and complete the 
research initiated in BMGT 493. additional 
reports may be required at the discretion of the 
faculty advisor and honors program chairman 
Group meetings may be held. 

BMGT 495 Business Policies. (3) Pre- 
requisites: BMGT 340, 350. 364. and 
senior standing. A case study course in which 
the aim is to have the student apply what they 
have learned of general management prin- 
ciples and their specialized functional ap- 
plications to the overall management function 
in the enterprise 

BMGT 496 Business and Society. (3) 

Prerequisite one course in BMGT or consent 
of ii structor Normative role of business in 
society: consideration of the sometimes con- 
flicting interests and claims on the firm and its 
objectives. 



BMGT 498 Special Topics In Business and 
Management. (3) Prerequisite permission of 
instructor Special topics in business and 
management designed to meet the changing 
needs and interests of students and faculty 
Repeatable to a maximum of six credits if the 
subject matter is different 



Botany 

BOTN 100 General Botany for Non-Science 
Students. (4) Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. A basic course in plant biology 
specifically designed to meet the educational 
needs of the general or non-science student 
Emphasis is placed on an ecological approach 
to studying fundamental concepts and proc- 
esses of plants, and stressing the importance 
of plant life to human welfare Credit not 
allowed for both BOTN 1 00 and 1 01 . 

BOTN 101 General Botany. (4) Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week A basic 
course in plant biology specifically designed to 
meet the educational needs of students 
majoring in the physical or biological sciences. 
This course prepares students for advanced 
courses in plant science. Emphasis is placed 
on fundamental biological principles and 
mechanisms governing higher plant life in the 
ecosystem (Credit not allowed for both BOTN 
100 and 101 ) 

BOTN 202 Plant Kingdom. (4) Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite: BOTN 100 or equivalent. A brief 
evolutionary study of algae, fungi, liverworts, 
mosses, ferns and their relatives, and the seed 
plants, emphasizing their structure, reproduc- 
tion, habitats, and economic importance 
BOTN 211 Principles of Conservation. (3) 
Three lectures per week. A study of the prin- 
ciples of economical use of our natural resour- 
ces including water, soil, plants, minerals, 
wildlife and man. 

BOTN 212 Plant Taxonomy. (3) Prerequisite: 
BOTN 100 or equivalent An introductory 
study of plant classification, based on the 
collection and identification of local plants 
BOTN 221 Diseases of Plants. (4) Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite: BOTN 100 or equivalent An in- 
troductory study of the symptoms and casual 
agents of plant diseases and measures for 
their control. 

BOTN 389 Tutorial Readings in Botany 
(Honors Course). (2-3) Prerequisite: ad- 
mission to the department of botany honors 
program. A review of the literature dealing with 
a specific research problem in preparation for 
original research to be accomplished in BOTN 
399 Papers will be assigned and discussed 
in frequent sessions with the instructor. 
BOTN 398 Seminar. (1) Repeatable to a 
maximum of two semester hours credit 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor 
Discussion and readings on special topics, 
current literature, or problems and progress in 
all phases of botany Minor experimental work 
may be pursued of facilities and the 
qualifications of the students permit For 
seniors only, majors and minors in botany or 
biological science 

BOTN 399 Research Problems in Botany. (1- 
3) Prerequisite twenty hours of botany cour- 
ses and permission of the instructor Research 
and or integrated reading in botany under the 
direction and close supervision of a member of 
the faculty May be repeated for a maximum of 
6 credits 



BOTN 401 Origins of Modern Botany. (1) 
Prerequisite: 20 credit hours in biological 
sciences including BOTN 100 or 101 or 
equivalent History of botany as a science, 
from ancient Greece through the 1 8th century. 
emphasis on botany as an intellectual and 
cultural pursuit 

BOTN 402 Plant Microtechnique. (3) 
Prerequisite BOTN 100 or 101. and consent 
of instructor One lecture and five hours of 
laboratory per week Preparation of temporary 
and permanent mounts, including selection ol 
material, killing and fixing, embedding, sec- 
tioning, and staining methods 
BOTN 403 Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. 
(2) Prerequisite BOTN 100 or 101 and CHEM 
104 Two lectures per week A study of plants 
important to man that have medicinal or poison- 
ous properties Emphasis on plant source. 
plant description, the active agent and its 
beneficial or detrimental physiological action 
and effects 

BOTN 405 Systematic Botany. (3) Two two- 
hour laboratory periods a week Prerequisite 
BOTN 212 or equivalent An advanced study 
of the principles of systematic botany 
Laboratory practice with difficult plant families 
including grasses, sedges, legumes, and com- 
posites. Field trips arranged 

BOTN 407 Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Four two-hour laboratory demonstration 
periods per week, for eight weeks 
Prerequisite: BOTN 100 or equivalent A study 
of the biological principles of common plants, 
and demonstrations, projects, and visual aids 
suitable for teaching in primary and secondary 
schools 

BOTN 411 Plant Anatomy. (3) Summer or 
university college Lectures and labs to be 
arranged. The origin and development of the 
organs and the tissue systems in the vascular 
plants 

BOTN 413 Plant Geography. (2) Prerequisite 
BOTN 100 or equivalent. A study of plant 
distribution throughout the world and the fac- 
tors generally associated with such 
distribution. 

BOTN 414 Plant Genetics. (3) Prerequisite 
BOTN 100 or equivalent The basic principles 
of plant genetics are presented: the 
mechanics of transmission of the hereditary 
factors in relation to the life cycle of seed 
plants, the genetics of specialized organs and 
tissues, spontaneous and induced mutations 
of basic and economic significance gene ac- 
tion, genetic maps, the fundamentals of 
polyploidy, and genetics in relation to methods 
of plant breeding are the topics considered 

BOTN 415 Plants and Mankind. (2) 

Prerequisite BOTN 100 or equivalent A sur- 
vey of the plants which are utilized by man. the 
diversity of such utilization, and their histonc 
and economic significance 
BOTN 416 Principles of Plant Anatomy. (4) 
Two lectures and two 2 -hour laboratory 
periods per week The origin and development 
of cells, tissues, and tissue systems of 
vascular plants with special emphasis on seed- 
bearing plants Particular stress is given to the 
comparative, systematic, and evolutionary 
study of the structural components of the 
plants Prerequisite general botany 
BOTN 417 Field Botany and Taxonomy (2) 
Prerequisite BOTN 100 or general biology 
Four two-hour laboratory periods a week for 
eight weeks The identification of trees, 
shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native 



140 /COURSE OFFERINGS 



plants of Maryland Manuals, keys, and other 
techniques will be used Numerous short field 
trips will be taken Each student will make an 
individual collection 

BOTN 419 Natural History of Tropical Plants. 
(2) Prerequisite one course in plant taxonomy 
or permission of instructor An introduction to 
tropical vascular plants with emphasis on their 
morphological, anatomical, and habital 
peculiarities and major taxonomic features, 
geographic distribution and economic 
utilization of selected families. Two. one-hour 
lectures per week 

BOTN 422 Research Methods In Plant 
Pathology. (2) Two laboratory periods a week 
Prerequisite BOTN 221 or equivalent Ad- 
vanced training in the basic research 
techniques and methods of plant pathology 
BOTN 424 Diagnosis and Control of Plant 
Diseases. (3) Prerequisite: BOTN 221 Three 
lectures per week A study of various plant 
diseases grouped according to the manner in 
which the host plants are affected Emphasis 
will be placed on recognition of symptoms of 
the various types of diseases and on methods 
of transmission and control of the pathogens 
involved 

BOTN 425 Diseases of Ornamentals and 
Turf. (2) Prerequisite: BOTN 221 Two lec- 
tures per week. Designed for those students 
who need practical experience in recognition 
and control of ornamentals and turf diseases 
The symptoms and current control measures 
for diseases in these crop areas will be 
discussed 

BOTN 426 Mycology. (4) Two lectures and 
two two-hour laboratory periods per week An 
introductory study of morphology, classifica- 
tion, life histories, and economics of the fungi. 

BOTN 427 Field Plant Pathology. (1) Sum- 
mer session: lecture and laboratory to be 
arranged. Prerequisite BOTN 221, or equiva- 
lent. The techniques of pesticide evaluation 
and the identification and control of diseases 
of Maryland crops are discussed. Offered in 
alternate years or more frequently with 
demand. 

BOTN 441 Plant Physiology. (4) Two lectures 
and one four-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite: BOTN 100 and general 
chemistry. Organic chemistry strongly recom- 
mended. A survey of the general physiological 
activities of plants. 

BOTN 462 Plant Ecology. (2) Prerequisite. 
BOTN 100. Two lectures per week. The 
dynamics of populations as affected by en- 
vironmental factors with special emphasis on 
the structure and composition of natural plant 
communities, both terrestial and aquatic. 

BOTN 463 Ecology of Marsh and Dune 
Vegetation. (2) Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites. BOTN 1 00. An examination of 
the biology of higher plants in dune and marsh 
ecosystems. 

BOTN 464 Plant Ecology Laboaratory. (2) 

Prerequisite: BOTN 462 or its equivalent or 
concurrent enrollment therein. One three-hour 
laboratory period a week. Two or three field 
trips per semester. The application of field and 
experimental methods to the qualitative and 
quantative study of vegation and ecosystems. 
BOTN 471 Marine and Estuarlne Botany. (3) 
Prerequisite, BOTN 441 or equivalent. An 
ecological discussion of plant life in the marine 
environment of sea coasts, salt marshes, 
estuaries and open seas. 



BOTN 475 General Phycology. (4) One lec- 
ture and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week Prerequisites BOTN 100 and BOTN 
202, or permission of Instructor An In- 
troductory study of both macro- and micro- 
algae, including the taxonomy, morphology, 
and life cycles of both fresh water and marine 
forms 

BOTN 477 Marine Plant Biology. (4) 
Prerequisite: BOTN 100 or general biology 
plus organic chemistry or the consent of the in- 
structor Five one-hour lectures and three, 3- 
hour laboratories each week for six weeks An 
introduction to the taxonomic, physiological 
and biochemical characteristics of marine 
plants which are basic to their role in the 
ecology of the oceans and estuaries 

BOTN 497 Special Problems In Marine 
Research. (1-3) Prerequisites BOTN 100 or 
general biology plus organic chemistry or con- 
sent of instructor. Recommended concurrent 
or previous enrollment in BOTN 477, marine 
plant biology An experimental approach to 
problems in marine research dealing primarily 
with phytoplankton, the larger algae, and 
marine spermatophytes. Emphasis will be 
placed on their physiological and biochemical 
activities. 



Behavioral and Social Sciences 

BSOS 101 Introduction to the Behavioral- 
Social Sciences. (3) An introduction to 
modern behavioral and social sciences: brief 
history, underlying principles, methods and 
trends of the major behavioral and social 
science diciplines. Selected contemporary 
problems and their handling by several ap- 
propriate disciplines of the behavioral-social 
sciences. 

BSOS 308 Contemporary Issues - In- 
terdisciplinary Approaches. (3) An in- 
terdisciplinary analysis of current public policy 
issue of international, national and community 
import. Senior standing recommended. This 
course may be repeated once for credit, 
provided a different topic is offered 



Physical Therapy 

BTPT 001 Orientation to Physical Therapy. 

(1) One hour lecture per week. Credit not ap- 
plicable towards any degree. A lecture series 
describing the academic and clinical aspects 
of physical therapy. Representatives of other 
allied health areas will be invited to speak. S/F 
grading only. 



Chemistry 

CHEM 101 Introductory College Chemistry. 

(2) Two lectures and one recitation per week. 
An introduction to the study of matter. This 
course is intended to be followed by CHEM 
1 03. This course may not be taken for credit 
by students with credit in CHEM 001, 003, 
005, 102, 103, or 105 or their equivalents. 
This course may not be taken to satisfy the 
general education science requirement. 
CHEM 102 Chemistry of Man's Environment. 
(4) Three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory per week. Non-mathematical 
presentation of basic chemical principles and 
applications in cosmochemistry, geochemistry, 
biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Particular 



emphasis is placed on the development of 
man's environment and his effect upon it This 
course is for the general student and does not 
satisfy the requirements of the professional 
schools 

CHEM 103 College Chemistry I. (4) Three 
lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour 
laboratory per week Prerequisite CHEM 101 
or satisfactory performance on qualifying test 
The first semester of a general chemistry 
sequence intended for students whose 
curricula require a year or more of chemistry to 
provide a working knowledge of the science, 
nature and composition of matter, chemical 
calculations: atomic structure: solutions, 
CHEM 104 College Chemistry II. (4) Three 
lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour 
laboratory per week Prerequisite CHEM 103 
or 105 A continuation of CHEM 103. The 
chemistry of carbon, aliphatic compounds; 
acids and bases, aromatic compounds: 
stereochemistry; halides; amines and amides; 
acids, esters; carbohydrates; natural products, 
CHEM 105 Principles of College Chemistry I. 
(4) Three lectures, one recitation, and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. A more 
rigorous treatment of the material of CHEM 
103. Admission by invitation of the chemistry 
department based on performance on a 
qualifying test 

CHEM 106 Principles of College Chemistry 
II. (4) Three lectures, one recitation, and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 103 or 105 and consent of the 
chemistry department A more rigorous treat- 
ment of the material of CHEM 1 04. 
CHEM 107 Chemistry and Man. (3) Lecture 
course intended for non-chemistry majors. The 
impact of chemistry on man. The chemistry of 
the universe around us, of life, of the body, of 
the mind, of food and drugs, of consumer 
goods, and of everyday living. Basic 
knowledge of chemistry helpful to the in- 
telligent citizen of today. 
CHEM 201 College Chemistry III. (3) Three 
lectures and one recitation per week. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or 106. A con- 
tinuation of CHEM 104. Organic chemistry, 
with emphasis on molecular structure, 
stereochemistry, conformational analysis; sub- 
stitution reactions; carbonium ions: spec- 
troscopy; aromaticity; synthetic processes. 
This course must be accompanied by CHEM 
202 unless credit for CHEM 202 has 
previously been established. 

CHEM 202 College Chemistry Laboratory III. 

(2) One lecture and one three-hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or 106 A 
laboratory course to accompany CHEM 201 
This course must be accompanied by CHEM 
201 

CHEM 203 College Chemistry IV. (3) Three 
lectures and one recitation per week 
Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or 106 Introductory 
analytical and theoretical chemistry. Bonding 
theory; electrochemistry; molecular ener- 
getics and structure; chemical dynamics; 
equilibrium; determination of composition of 
matter. This course must be accompanied by 
CHEM 204 unless credit for CHEM 204 has 
previously been established. 

CHEM 204 College Chemistry Laboratory IV. 

(2) One lecture and one three-hour laborabory 
per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1 04 or 1 06 A 
laboratory course to accompany CHEM 203. 
This course must be accompanied by CHEM 
203. 



COURSE OFFERINGS/ 141 



CHEM 211 Principles of College Chemistry 

III. (3) Three lectures and one recitation per 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or 106 and 
consent of the chemistry department A more 
rigorous treatment of the material of CHEM 
201. This course must be accompanied by 
CHEM 212 unless credit for CHEM 212 has 
previously been established. 

CHEM 212 Principles of College Chemistry 
Laboratory III. (2) One lecture and one three- 
hour laboratory per week Prerequisite: CHEM 
104 or 106 and consent of the chemistry 
department. A more rigorous treatment of the 
material of CHEM 202 This course must be 
accompanied by CHEM 211. 
CHEM 213 Principles of College Chemistry 

IV. (3) Three lectures and one recitation per 
week Prerequisite: CHEM 104 or 106 and 
consent of chemistry department A more 
rigorous treatment of the material of CHEM 
203. This course must be accompanied by 
CHEM 214 unless credit for CHEM 214 has 
previously been established 

CHEM 214 Principles of College Chemistry 
Laboratory IV. (2) One lecture and one three- 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 
104 or 106 and consent of the chemistry 
department A more rigorous treatment of the 
material of CHEM 204 This course must be 
accompanied by CHEM 2 1 3 
CHEM 261 Elements of Biochemistry. (3) For 
undergraduate students who desire a one- 
semester biochemistry course rather than a 
two-semester sequence Course covers basic 
chemistry and metabolism of most molecules 
of biological importance Not open to student 
with credit in CHEM 461. Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 104. 
CHEM 302 Radiochemical Safety 
Procedures. (1) One lecture per week A lec- 
ture and demonstration course. Radiation 
hazards, principles and practices of radiation 
safety, federal (AEC. ICC) codes and state 
public health 

CHEM 321 Quantitative Analysis. (4) Two 
lectures and two three-hours laboratory 
periods per week Prerequisites: CHEM 203- 
204 or 2 1 3-2 1 4. Volumetric, gravimetric, elec- 
trometric. and colorimetric methods. Intended 
for students in agricultural chemistry, general 
physical science, science education, etc. 
CHEM 398 Special Projects. (2) Honors 
projects for undergraduate students. 
CHEM 399 Introduction to Chemical Re- 
search. (1-2) Prerequisite: junior standing. 
Registration only upon consent of the course 
coordinator The course will allow students to 
conduct basic research under the supervision 
of a member of the department May be 
repeated for credit to a maximum of four credit 
CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry. (3) Three 
lectures per week Prerequisite: CHEM 48 1 
CHEM 403 Radiochemlstry. (3) Three lec- 
tures per week. Prerequisite: one year of 
college chemistry and one year of college 
physics Radioactive decay: introduction to 
properties of atomic nuclei; nuclear processes 
in cosmology; chemical, biomedical and en- 
vironmental applications of radioactivity; 
nuclear processes as chemical tools; in- 
teraction of radiation with matter. 

CHEM 421 Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 

(3) Three lectures per week Prerequisites: 
CHEM 430 and 482 or concurrent registration 
An examination of some advanced topics in 
quantitative analysis including nonaqueous 
titrations, precipitation phenomena, complex 



equilibria,