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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog / University of Maryland at College Park"

The University of Maryland C:oIIege Park 




Undergraduate Catalog 1986-1987 



Special Notice 

All course offerings and other curricular informa- 
tion contained in this catalog were updated in 
February, 1986 for the 1986-8"' school year. However, 
on July 1 . 1986 the College Park Campus will undergo 
an academic reorganization. This reorganization is not 
reflected in this catalog since the publication schedule 
of the Undergraduate Catalog required all revisions to 
be completed before a final decision on academic 
reorganization was made by the Board of Regents. 

Under the new plan, the five academic divisions will 
be replaced by schools and colleges, but departmental 
requirements and course offerings will not change. 
Students with questions about the implications of the 
change in academic structure for particular majors or 
programs of study should conuct the appropriate dean 
or department head. 




Maryland 

The University of Maryland College Park 




Undergraduate Catalog 1986-1987 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecat1986tenn 



Contents 



1 GENERAL INFORMATION 

CatupusUmversity Ollicers 

College Park Campus Administration 

Central Administration of the University 

Board ol Regents 

Academic Calendar 

Undergraduate Majors and Programs of Study 

University Policy Statement 

Fee and Expenses Information 

Policies on Nondiscrimination 

Legal Requirements 

Human Relations Code 

Title IX Compliance Statement 

Section 504 Compliance Statement 

Gender Reference 

Academic Information (Publications) 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 

7 

7 
7 
7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

The College Park Campus 8 

Goals 8 

Universities in General 8 

The Campus and the University 8 

Libraries 8 

Area Resources 8 

Research Facilities 8 

Summer Sessions 8 

Accreditation 9 

Code of Student Conduct 9 

Human Relations Code 15 

Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 18 

Smoking Policy and Guidelines 19 

Administrative Offices 20 

Office of the Chancellor 20 

Office of Administrative Affairs 20 

Office of Student Affairs 20 

Office of Academic Affairs 24 

2 ADMISSIONS, FEES, AND ACADEMIC 
REQUIREMENTS 28 

Admission Requirements for Undergraduates •. 28 

Graduate Student Admission 35 

Orientation Programs 35 

Fees and Expenses 35 

Financial Aid 37 

Scholarships and Grants '. 37 

Loans 40 

Part-time Employment 40 

Awards and Prizes 40 

Academic Regulations and Requirements 44 

3 ACADEMIC DIVISIONS AND CAMPUS-WIDE 
PROGRAMS 56 

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURAL AND LIFE SCIENCES 56 

College of. Agriculture 56 

Agricultural and Extension Education 57 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 58 

Agricultural Chemistry 58 

Agricultural Engineering 58 

Agriculture — General Curriculum 59 

Agronomy 59 

Animal Sciences 60 

Food Science Program 60 

Horticulture 61 

Natural and Resources Management Program 61 

Pre-Forestry 62 

Combined Degree Curriculum — College of Agriculture and 

Veterinary Medicine 62 

Institute of Applied Agriculture. Two-year Program 62 

Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary 

Medicine — Maryland Campus 63 



Other Agricultural and Life Sciences Departments, Program* 

and Curricula . 63 

Biological Sciences Program , . . 63 

Botany . 64 

Chemistry and Biochemistry ....', . 64 

Entomology 65 

Geology 65 

Microbiology 66 

Zoology 66 

Agriculture Experiment Station 67 

Cooperative Extension Service 67 

DIVISION OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES T 67 

School of Architecture 69 

College of Journalism 70 

Other Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and 

Curricula 72 

American Studies 72 

Art 72 

Classics 73 

Communication Arts and Theatre 73 

Comparative Literature Program 73 

Dance Program 73 

English Language and Literature 74 

French and Italian Languages and Literatures 74 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures 74 

Hebrew and East Asian Languages and Literatures 75 

History 75 

Jewish Studies Program 76 

Linguistics Program 76 

Maryland English Institute 76 

Music 77 

Philosophy 77 

Philosophy and Public Policy 78 

Renaissance and Baroque Studies 78 

Romance Languages 78 

Russian Area Studies Program 78 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 78 

Women's Studies Program 79 

DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 79 

School of Public Affairs 80 

College of Business and Management 80 

Other Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs 

and Curricula 84 

Afro-American Studies Program 84 

Anthropology 85 

Business and Economic Research 85 

Criminal Justice and Criminology 85 

Division Computer Laboratory 86 

Economics 86 

Geography 87 

Governmental Research 88 

Government and Politics 88 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 89 

Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center 89 

International Development 89 

Philosophy and Public Policy 90 

Psychology 90 

Sociology 90 

Survey Research Center 91 

Urban Studies 91 

DIVISION OF HUMAN AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES 92 

Center on Aging 92 

Intensive Educational Development Program 92 

Upward Bound Program 92 

College of Education 92 

Counseling and Personnel Services 94 

Curriculum and Instruction 94 

Education Policy. Planning, and Administration 101 

Human Development (Institute for Child Development) 102 

Industrial. Technological and Occupational Education 102 

Measurement. Statistics and Evaluation 105 

Special Education 105 

College of Human Ecology 107 

Family and Community Development 108 

Food. Nutrition and Institution Administration 108 

Housing and Design 110 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 112 

College of Library and Information Services 113 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 114 

Health Education 115 

Physical Education 116 

Recreation 116 



DIVISION OF MATHEMATICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND 

ENGINEERING 117 

College of Engineering ; 118 

Aerospace Engineering 120 

Agricultural Engineering 120 

Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 121 

Civil Engineering 122 

Electrical Engineering 122 

Engineering Sciences 123 

Rre Protection Engineering 123 

Mechanical Engineering 123 

Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering 124 

Engineering Materials Program 125 

Nuclear Engineering Program 126 

Other Mathematical and Physical Sciences Departments, 

Programs and Curricula 126 

App ed Ma'hematics Program 126 

Astronomy Program 126 

Computer Science 127 

Institute for Physical Science and Technology 128 

Mathematics 128 

Mathematics Education 129 

Meteorology 129 

Physical Sciences Program 130 

Physics and Astronomy 130 

Science Communications 131 

Statistics and Probability 131 

CAMPUS-WIDE PROGRAMS AND CERTIFICATES 131 

Air Force Aerospace Studies Program 131 

Undergraduate Certificates 132 

Afro-American Studies 132 

Applied Social Science 132 

East Asian Studies 132 

Liberal Arts in Business " 132 

Women's Studies 132 



Bachelor of General Studies Program 1 33 

Individual Studies Program 133 

Study Abroad Programs 133 

General Honors Program 133 

Pre-Professional Programs 134 

Pre-Dental Hygiene 134 

Pre-Dentistry 134 

Pre-Forestry 135 

Pre-Law 135 

Pre-Medical Techrology 135 

Pre-Medicine 136 

Pre-Nursing 136 

Pre-Optometry 137 

Pre-Osteopathic Medicine 137 

PrePharmacy '. 137 

Pre-Physical Therapy 138 

Pre-Podiatric Medicine .' 138 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 138 

4 UNIVERSITY STUDIES PROGRAM 139 

5 COURSE OFFERINGS m 

6 FACULTY LISTING 223 

7 INDEX 251 



1 General Information 



Campus and 
University Officers 

College Park Campus Administration 

Chancellor 

John B Slaughter 

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

William E Kirwan 

Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 

Charles F Stunz 

Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement 

A. H Edwards 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

William L. Thomas. Jr. 

Central Administration of the University 

President 

John S. Toll 

Executive Vice President 

Albert H Bowker 

Vice President lor Academic Affairs 

Rita R Coiwell 

Vice President for Agricultural Affairs 

Raymond J Miller 

Vice President for General Administration 

Donald L. Myers 

Vice President for Governmental Relations 

Patricia S Florestano 

Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research 

David S Sparks 

Vice President for Policy and Planning 

Leroy Keith 

Vice President for University Relations 

Robert G. Smith 



Board of Regents, 1985-1986 

Chairman 

Mr Allen L Schwait (term expires 1989) 

Vice Chairman 

Mr Ralph W Frey (term expires 1986) 

Secretary 

Mr A Paul Moss (term expires 1988) 

Treasurer 

Mrs Constance C Stuart (term expires 1990) 

Assistant Secretary 

Mrs Betty R Coss (term expires 1988) 

Assistant Treasurer 

Ms Claudia Ordonez (term expires 1986) 

Members 

The Hon Wayne A Cawley. Jr (ex officio) 

Dr Joel A Carringlon (term expires 1987) 

Mr A James Clark (term expires 1986) 

Mr Frank A Gunther, Jr (term expires 1987) 

Mr George V McGowan (term expires 1989) 

Mr, Albert W, Turner (term expires 1990) 

Mr J Benjamin Unkle. Jr (term expires 1986) 

Mr. John W. T. Webb (term expires 1990J 



1986-87 Academic Calendar 

Summer Session, 1986 



Session I 



June 2 


Monday 


Rrst Day of Classes 


July 4 


Friday 


Independence Day 


July 11 


Friday 


Last Day of Classes 


Fall Semester, 1986 






August 28-29 


Thursday-Friday 


Registration 


September 1 


Monday 


Labor Day Holiday 


September 2 


Tuesday 


First Day of Classes 


Nov 27-30 


Thursday-Sunday 


Thanksgiving Recess 


December 12 


Friday 


Last Day of Classes 


December 13 


Saturday 


Exam Study Day 


December 15-22 


Monday-Monday 


Final Examinations 


December 23 


Tuesday 


Commencement 


December 25 


Thursday 


Christmas Holiday 


Dec. 26-Jan. 1 


Friday-Thursday 


Mid-year Recess 



Session II 



July 14 
August 22 



Monday 
Friday 



Spring Semester, 1987 



Rrst Day of Classes 
Last Day of Classes 



January 15 


Thursday 


M L King Birthday 


January 22-23 


Thursday-Friday 


Registration 


January 26 


Monday 


First Day of Classes 


March 16-22 


Monday-Sunday 


Spring Recess 


May 14 


Thursday 


Last Day of Classes 


May 15 


Friday 


Exam Study Day 


May 16-23 


Saturday-Saturday 


Final Examinations 


May 25 


Monday 


Memorial Day Holiday 


May 26 


Tuesday 


Ck)mmencement 



6 Undergraduate Majors and Programs of Study 



Undergraduate Majors and Programs of Study 



Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agriculture — General 

AgricultureA/etennary Medicine 

Agronomy— Crop Science 

Agronomy— Soil Science 

Agronomy— Tuii and Urban 

Agronomy— Conservation of Soil, Water, and Environment 

Animal Sciences 

Applied Agriculture 

Biochemistry 

Food Science 

General Biological Sciences 

Horticulture 

Natural Resources Management 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Geology 

Microbiology 

Zoology 



Division of Arts and Humanities 

Architecture 

Architecture— Urban Studies 

Journalism 

American Studies 

Art History 

An Studio 

Classical Languages and Literatures 

Dance 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 

English 

French Language and Literature 

Germanic Language and Literature 

History 

Italian (courses only) 

Jewish Studies 

Linguistics 

Music 

Music Composition 

Music Performance 

Music Theory 

Philosophy 

Portuguese (courses only) 

Radio. Television, and Film 

Romance Languages 

Russian Area Studies 

Russian Language and Literature 

Slavic Languages and Literatures 

Spanish Language and Literature 

Speech Communication 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 



Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Accounting 

Business/Law 

Business Management— General 

Finance 

Management Science and Statistics 

Marketing 

Personnel and Labor Relations 

Production Management 

Transportation 

Alfo-American Studies 



Anthropology 

Criminal Justice 

Criminology 

Economics 

Geography 

Government and Politics 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Urban Studies 



Division of Human and Community Resources 

Counseling and Personnel Services (courses only) 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Education Policy. Planning and Administration (courses only) 

Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 

Industrial Technology 

Measurement. Statistics, and Evaluation in Education (courses only) 

Special Education 

Advertising Design 

Apparel Design 

Community Nutrition 

Community Studies 

Consumer Economics 

Dietetics 

Experiential Foods 

Family Studies 

Housing 

Institution Administration 

Interior Design 

Management and Consumer Studies 

Nutrition Research 

Textile Marketing/Fashion Merchandising 

Textiles 

Health Education 

Kinesioiogicai Sciences 

Physical Education 

Recreation 



Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences 
and Engineering 

Astronomy 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Physical Sciences 

Statistics 

Aerospace Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering— Undesignated 

Engineering Materials 

Nuclear Engineering 
Fire Protection Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 



Office of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies 

Arts/Dentistry 
Arls'Law 
Ans' Medicine 
General Honors 
General Studies 
Individual Studies 



Academic Information 7 



Preprofessional Options 

Pre-Denlai Hygiene 

Pre-Deniislry 

PfeFotestry 

Pre-Law 

PreMedical Technology 

P'eMedicine 

Pre-Nursing 

PreOptometry 

Pre-Osieopaihic Medicine 

PrePharmacy 

Pre-Physical Therapy 

Pre-Podiatnc Medicme 

Pre-Veiennary Medicine 



Certificate Programs 

Afro-American Studies 
Applied Social Science 
East Asian Studies 
Liberal Arts in Business 
Women's Studies 

Note: Course code prefixes may be found with individual program descriptions 
in Part 3 of this catalog. 



University Policy Statement 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and The University ot Maryland Changes are 
effected from time to time in the general regulations and in the academic 
requirements- There are established procedures for making changes, 
procedures which protect the institution's integrity and the individual student's 
interest and wellare A curriculum or graduation requirement, when altered, is 
not made retroactive unless the alteration is to the student's advantage and 
can be accommodated within the span of years normally required for 
graduation When the actions of a student are judged by competent authority, 
using established procedure, to be detrimental to the interests of the University 
community, that person may be required to withdraw from the University 



Important Information on Fees and Expenses 

All Students Who Pre-Register Incur a Financial Obligation to the 
University. Those students who pre-register and subsequently decide not to 
attend must notify the Registrations Office. Room 1130A. North Administration 
Building, in writing, prior to the first day of classes If this office has not 
received a request for cancellation by 4 30 p m ot the last day before classes 
begin, the University will assume the student plans to attend and accepts his 
or her financial obligation 

After classes begin, students who wish to terminate their registration must 
follow the withdrawal procedures and are liable lor charges applicable at the 
time of withdrawal. 

Disclosure of Information. In accordance with "The Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act ot 1974" (PL. 93-380), popularly referred to as the "Buckley 
Amendment," disclosure of student information, including financial and 
academic, is restncted. Release to anyone other than the student requires a 
written waiver from the student (For complete University Policy on access to 
and release of student data/informalion, see page 18.) 

State of Maryland legislation has established a State Central Collections Unit 
and in accordance with State law the University is required to turn over all 
delinquent accounts to them for collection and legal foiiow-up. These are 
automatically done on a monthly basis by computer read-out. 

Collection Costs. Collection costs incurred in collecting delinquent accounts 
will be charged to the student. The minimum collection fee is 15%. plus any 
attorney and/or courl costs 



Policies on Nondiscrimination 

Legal Requirements 

The University ot Maryland is an equal opportunity institution with respect 
to both education and employment The University's prog'ams and policies 
are consistent with pertinent federal and state laws and regulations on 
nondiscrimination regarding race, color, religion, age. national origin, sex, and 
handicap Inquiries concerning this policy should be directed to the Office of 
Human Relations Programs. 1107 Hornbake Library, The University of 
Maryland. College Park. MD 20742 



Human Relations Code 

Under its Human Relations Code, adopted in 1976. The University of 
Maryland College Park alfirms its commitments to a policy of eliminating 
discrimination on the basis ol race, color, creed, sex. mantai status, personal 
appearance, age. national origin, political atliliation. or on the basis ol the 
exercise ol rights secured by the First Amendment ol the United States 
Constitution Inquiries concerning the provisions ot the Code should be 
directed to the Office of Human Relations Programs. 1107 Hornbake Library. 
The University ol Maryland. College Park. MD 20742 



Title IX Compliance Statement 

The University ol Maryland College Park does not discriminate on the basis 
ol sex in its educational programs and activities The policy ol 
nondiscrimination extends to employment in the institution and academic 
admission to the institution Such discrimination is prohibited by Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U S C 1681 . el seq ) and 45 C F R 86. 
and this notification is required under the Federal regulations pursuant to 20 
use 1681. et seq 

Inquiries concerning the application ol Title IX and Pan 86 ot 45 C F R to 
The University ol Maryland College Park may be directed to the Office ol 
Human Relations Programs. 1107 HornbaVe Library. The University ol 
Maryland, College Park 20742. or to the Director ot the Office ol Civil Rights of 
the Department ot Education. Washington. D C. 

Section 504 Compliance Statement 

The University ot Maryland College Park does not discriminate on the basis 
of handicap in admission or access to its educational programs and activities. 
This policy of nondiscrimination extends to employment in the institution Such 
discrimination is prohibited by Section 504 ol the Rehabilitation Act ot 1973 (29 
use 706) and 45 C.F.R 84, and this notification is required pursuant to 45 
CFR 84 8. 

Inquiries concerning the application of Section 504 and part 84 of C F R to 
The University of Maryland College Park may be directed to the Campus 
Coordinator on the Handicapped. Main Administration Building, The University 
of Maryland. College Park. MD 20742. 

Gender Reference 

The masculine gender whenever used in this document is intended to 
include the feminine gender as well. 



Academic Information 

Undergraduate 

Mini-catalog 

College Park publishes a free mini-catalog and application packet (or 
prospective undergraduate students. For a copy of this tjooklet. call 
301 '454-5550 or write to Office of Undergraduate Admissions. North 
Administration Bidg,, The University of Maryland, College Park. Maryland 
20742. 

Departmental Brochures 

Small brochures of many of the departments at College Park are available 
free Write to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, The University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. 

Undergraduate Catalog 

The Undergraduate Catalog is available free to all undergraduates and to 
all faculty at College Park before each academic year Copies are available in 
libraries and m high schools m Maryland, D C and Virginia Copies are for sale 
for $2 50 each Send a check (payable to the University Book Center) to the 
University Book Center, The University of Maryland, College Park. MD 20742. 
Write "Catalog" on the check. Allow tour weeks lor delivery. 

Graduate Catalog 
Graduate Bulletin 

For information about the Graduate Catalog or the Graduate Bulletin, call 
301/454-4006 or write the Graduate Offices. The University of Maryland. South 
Administration Building. College Park, MD 20742. 

Summer Sessions Catalog 

For information call 454-3347 or write to the Summer Programs Office. The 
University of Maryland. Reckord Armory, College Park. MD 20742. 



8 The College Park Campus 



The College Park Campus 

Goals 



Our objectives are simply stated to enrich our students: to encourage 
them to develop the harmonious ideals and Ime relationships that characterize 
cultured individuals, to provide an atmosphere for seil-eniighienmeni and 
community service, and to promote beneficial research for the welfare of the 
State, of the Nation and of the community of knowledge everywhere. 



Universities in General 



The contemporary university is a comprehensive educational institution 
offering many undergraduate programs. 

Universities as we know them in the United Slates have existed for less 
than a century, but their roots can be traced back to medieval history The 
English college system served as a model lor earliest American efforts at 
higher education Aspects of Ihe ancient German university tradition were 
adapted and combined with the English model in the 1870s to form basic 
outlines of our present institutions. Practical studies were grafted onto these 
more classically and theoretically oriented traditions by the agricultural 
emphasis of the land grant movement 

With the explosion of scientific and technological knowledge in the early 
twentieth century, the role of the university in American society attained 
increased importance, and today almost ail aspects of national life— social, 
economic, scientific, and cultural— benefit from its educational, research and 
service functions. 



The Campus and The University of Maryland 

The University of Maryland College Park was chartered in 1856 as the 
Maryland Agricultural College under a provision secured by a group of 
Maryland planters After a disastrous fire in 1912. the State acquired control of 
the college and bore the cost of rebuilding The present form of The University 
of Maryland dates from the 192Q act of the Maryland state legislature, which 
united the State-owned institution at College Park and the professional schools 
In Baltimore, creating The University of Maryland College Park (UMCP) and 
The University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB) campuses. Later, the 
University added three other campuses: Baltimore County (UMBC) at 
Catonsviiie: Eastern Shore (UMES) at Princess Anne, and the worldwide 
University College (UMUC), headquartered at College Park. 



Libraries 



The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the main library of the UMCP library 
system, containing reference works, periodicals, circulating books, special 
collections and other materials to support research and instruction Branch 
libraries include the Hornoake (Undergraduate) Library, the Engineering and 
Physical Sciences Library, the Architecture Library, the White (Chemistry) 
Library, the Art Library, and the Music Library, 

The libraries on the College Park Campus include over 16 million volumes, 
approximately 2 3 million microfilm units, and approximately 19.800 current 
periodicals and newspapers as well as 566.000 government documents. 
91.000 maps, 36.000 phonorecords, films and lilmslrips, slides, prints, and 
music scores 

The Hornbake Library, opened in 1973. seats 3.600 students and has a 
book capacity of 200 000 volumes The Nonpnnt Media Services Department 
on the fourth floor features color video tape players and playback units. 
enclosed rooms equipped with instructor's consoles for the use of nonpnnt 
media matenals. and wireless headsets for tapes of lectures, plays, speeches. 
and music In adaition. the buiidmg houses reference services aimed for 
undergraduates, circulation and reserve services, a study room open 24 hours 
a day and the Music Library on the third floor (which contains such special 
collections as the Waiienstem Collection of musical scores: research 
collections of the American Bandmasters Association, the Music Educators 
National Conference, the National Association of College Wmd and Percussion 
Instructors, and the International Piano Archives at Maryland) The McKeidm 
Library supports the g'aduate and research programs of the University, and is 
also open to undergraduates Special collections include the Kathenne Anne 
Porter Collection, the East Asia Collection containing the Gordon W Prange 
Collection of Japanese language materials from the penod of the Allied 
Occupation of Japan. 1945-49, and Maryland related Ixxjks and manuscripts 
The libraries also contain U S government publications publications of the 
United Nations, the League of Nations, and other miemaiionai organ-zations, 
agricultural experiment station and extension service publications, maps from 
the U S Army Map Service and U S Geological Survey, files on the inoustnai 
Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America and other Industrial and 
craft unions. 



Other Area Resources 

The College Park Campus is in a region rich in research collections In the 
Washington area are the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Foiger 
Library, the National Library of Medicme. the National Agricultural Library, and 
various academic and special libraries in the Baltimore area, m addition to the 
University s own libraries at UMBC and on the professional campus, are the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library and the Maryland Historical Association Library The 
Maryland Hall of Records is located in Annapolis 

Research Facilities 

The research programs at the University denve their existence and vigor 
from a faculty comprised of internationally recognized scholars and scientists. 
It is an advantage lor undergraduate students to be aware of the University's 
research facilities as they plan their programs 

Among the exceptional research facilities on the campus are a computer 
vision laboratory, a scale model nuclear reactor for research and training, a 
full-scale low velocity wind tunnel, several smaller hypersonic helium wind 
tunnels, computer-assisted cartog'aphic laboratories, a comfort perception 
laboratory, a quiescent plasma device (0 machine) for plasma research, 
satellite remote sensing facilities, transmission and scanning electron 
microscopes, laboratories for radiation and biochemical reaction research, 
complete laboratories for the dynamic studies of soils and soil structure, a 
photomechanics lab. a precision encoder and pattern recognition device, a 
psychopharmacoiogy laboratory, rotating tanks lor laboratory studies of 
meteorological phenomena, computer simulation and gaming facilities. 
specialized sound chambers for audiology research, a criminal torensics 
laboratory, the Astronomy Observatory, a facility for plasma and energy fusion 
studies, and the Water Resources Center The University also operates one of 
the largest and most sophisticated long-wavelength radioteiescopes at Clark 
Lake in California, as well as a cosmic ray laboratory in New Mexico 

The College Park Campus also received a five-year. $16 miihon grant from 
the National Science Foundation to create a new Systems Research Center to 
facilitate research m artificial intelligence and computer-aided engineering The 
Center complements an active program of basic and applied research m 
computer science supported by four separate IBM and Sperry Univac 
computer networks 

In addition to these research facilities, the campus supports a number of 
organized research activities, many of which have received national and 
International recognition for the quality of their research work Among the 
maior organized research units on campus are the Bureaus of Business and 
Economic Research, and Governmental Research, the Center on Agmg and 
Centers for Automation Research. Consumer Research. Educational Research 
and Development: Family. Housing and Community. Industrial Relations and 
Labor Studies. Information Sciences Research. Philosophy and Public Policy. 
Productivity and Quality' of Working Life. Renaissance and Baroque Studies; 
Study and Research m Business and Public Policy. Young Children, and the 
Engineering Research Center and Survey Research Center, and Institutes for 
Exceptional Children and 'Vouth, Physical Sciences and Technology, and 
Research in Higher and Adult Education 

Investigation in agriculture is an important aspect of University research. 
The Agricultural Experiment Station, which has its headquarters on the College 
Park Campus, uses its personnel and laboratories at UMCP and UMES. as well 
as the oH-campus research farms (totalling over 3.000 acres) to conduct 
research in the areas of natural resources and forestry, plants and crops, 
animals and poultry, economics and rural life, and general resource 
technology 



Summer Sessions 

The College Pa'k Campus offers two summer sessions o1 six weeks each 
year The dates of the Summer Sessions can be found m the pnnted Schedule 
of Classes for the Summer Session and m the Academic Calendar m Part i of 
this catalog New fresnman applicants who have met the regular University 
admission requirements for fail enrollment may tDegm their studies dunng the 
summer rather than wait for the next fall term By taking advantage of this 
opportunity and continuing to attend summer sessions, the time required for 
completion of a baccalaureate degree can be shortened by a year or more, 
depending upon the requirements of Ihe chosen cumculum and the rate ol 
progress 

Many new students have found that attendance during tlie summer 
sessions facilitates the transition from secondary school to conege Courses 
offered during the summer are the same in content and instruction as those 
offered during the fall and spring semesters 

The Summer Cultural and Recreational Program is an important part of 
"Summer at Maryland ' The Maryland Summer Institute for the Creat've and 
Performing Arts Offers a senes of programs in art. dance, drama. Mm and 
music, and outstanding pe'formers m these media appear on the Co'iege Park 
Campus Facilities for most sports and an mtramurai program in several team 
and individual spons are available to the students 

For additional information write for a Summer Sessions Catalog, which may 
be obtained from the Administrative Dean for Summer Programs, College ParK. 
MD 20742 



Code of Student Conduct 9 



Accreditation 

The University ot Maryland is accredited by the Middle Slates Association 
of CoHeges and Secondary Sctiools and is a nDember ol the Association ot 
American Universities In addition, individual schools and departments are 
accredited by such groups as the American Association ol Collegiate Schools 
of Business, the American Chemical Society, the National Association ol 
Schools ot Music, the Section ol Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar ol 
the American Bar Association, the Accrediting Council on Education in 
Journalism and Mass Communications, the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education, the Council on Dental Education ol the American 
Dental Association, the Committee on Accreditation ot the American Library 
Association, the American Psychological Association, the Commission on 
Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education, the Council on Medical 
Education ol the American Medical Associaiion. the Engineers Council lor 
Professional Development, the National Council lor Accreditation of Teacher 
Education, the National League for Nursing, the National Architectural 
Accrediting Board, the American Association for Accreditation ol Laboratory 
Animal Care, and the American Dietetic Association. 



Code of Student Conduct and 
Annotations 

proved by the Board of Regents January 25, 1980 

Note: Students subject to disciplinary charges should request a copy of the 
document Prepanng lor a Hearing, available in the Judicial Programs Office. 

(Footnotes which appear throughout the Code of Student Conduct refer to the 
Annotations beginning on page 12) 

Rationale 

1. The primary purpose for the imposition of discipline in the University setting 
is to protect the campus community. Consistent with that purpose, 
reasonable efforts will also be made to foster the personal and social 
development of those students who are held accountable for violations ol 
University regulations.'*' 

Definitions 

2. When used in this code ''* 

(a) the term "aggravated violation" means a violation which resulted or 
foreseeably could have resulted in significant damage to persons or 
properly or which otherwise posed a substantial threat to the stability 
and continuance of normal University or University sponsored activities. 

(b) the term "cheating" means intentionally using or attempting to use 
unauthorized materials, information or study aids in any academic 
exercise. 

(c) the term "distribution" means sale or exchange for personal profit. 

(d) the term "fabrication" means intentional and unauthorized falsification or 
invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. 

(e) the term "group" means a number of persons who are associated with 
each other and who have not complied with University requirements for 
registration as an organization, 

(f) the terms "institution" and "university" mean The University of Maryland 
College Park. 

(g) the term "organization" means a number ol persons who have 
complied with University requirements for registration. 

(h) the term "plagiarism" means intentionally or knowingly representing the 
words or ideas of another as one s own in any academic exercise 

(i) the term "reckless" means conduct which one should reasonably be 
expected to know would create a substantial risk of harm to persons or 
property or which would otherwise be likely to result in interference with 
normal University or University sponsored activities '^' 

G) the term "student" means a person taking or auditing courses at the 
institution either on a full or part-time basis.''' 

(k) the term "University premises" means buildings or grounds owned, 
leased, operated, controlled or supervised by the University 

(I) the term "weapon" means any obiect or substance designed to inflict a 
wound, cause injury, or incapacitate, including, but not limited to. all 
firearms, pellet guns, switchblade knives, knives with blades five or 
nrtore inches in length, and chemicals such as "Mace" or tear-gas. 

(m) the term "University sponsored activity" means any activity on or off 
campus which is initiated, aided, authorized or supervised by the 
University. 

(n) the terms "will" or "shall" are used in the imperative sense. 



Interpretation of Regulations 

3 Disciplinary regulations at the University are set forth in writing in order to 
give students general notice ol prohibited conduct The regulations should 
be read broadly and are not designed to delme misconduct in exhaustive 
terms. 

Inherent Authority 

4 The University reserves the right to lake necessary and appropriate action 
to protect the safety and well-being ol the campus community.'^' 

Student Participation 

5 Students are asked to assume positions ol responsibility in the University 
judicial system m order that they might contribute their skills and insights to 
the resolution ol disciplinary cases Final authority in disciplinary matters, 
however, is vested In the University administration and in the Board ot 
Regents. 

Standards of Due Process 

6. Students subiect to expulsion, suspension"" or disciplinary renx)val from 
University housing"' will be accorded a ludicial board heanng as specified 
in part 28 of this code Students subject to less severe sanctions will be 
entitled to an informal disciplinary conference*', as set forth in parts 30 
and 31. 

7. The focus of inquiry in disciplinary proceedings shall be the guilt or 
Innocence of those accused of violating disciplinary regulations Formal 
rules of evidence shall not be applicable, nor shall deviations from 
prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision or proceeding, 
unless significant prejudice to a student respondent or the University may 
result,'" 

Violations of Law and Disciplinary Regulations 

8. Students may be accountable to both civil authorities and to the University 
lor acts which constitute violations of law and of this code '"" Disciplinary 
action at the University will normally proceed dunng the pendency of 
criminal proceedings and will not be subject to challenge on the ground 
that criminal charges involving the same Incident have been dismissed or 
reduced. 

Prohibited Conduct 

9. The following misconduct is subject to disciplinary action: 

(a) intentionally or recklessly causing physical harm to any person on 
University premises or at University sponsored activities, or intentionally 
or recklessly causing reasonable apprehension of such harm. 

(b) unauthorized use. possession or storage of any weapon on University 
premises or at University sponsored activities. 

(c) intentionally initiating or causing to be initiated any false report, warning 
or threat of fire, explosion or other emergency on University premises 
or at University sponsored activities. 

(d) intentionally or recklessly interfering with normal University or University 
sponsored activities, including, but not limited to. studying, leaching, 
research. University administration, or lire, police or emergency 
services. 

(e) knowingly violating the terms of any disciplinary sanction imposed in 
accorOance with this code. 

(f) intentionally or recklessly misusing or damaging fire safety equipment, 
(g) unauthorized distribution or possession for purposes of distribution of 

any controlled substance or illegal drug'"' on University premises or at 

University sponsored activities 
(h) intentionally furnishing false information to the University, 
(i) forgery, unauthorized alteration, or unauthorized use of any University 

document or instrument of identification. 
(j) all forms of academic dishonesty, including cheating, fabrication. 

facilitating academic dishonesty and plagiarism.' 
(k) intentionally and substantially interfering with the freedom of expression 

of others on University premises or at University sponsored 

activities''^' 
(I) theft of property or of sen/ices on University premises or at University 

sponsored activities, knowing possession of stolen property on 

University premises or at University sponsored activities. 
(m) intentionally or recklessly destroying or damaging the property of others 

on University premises or at University sponsored activities, 
(n) failure to comply with the directions of University officials, including 

campus police officers, acting in performance of their duties, 
(o) violation of published University regulations or policies, as approved 

and compiled by the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.''^' Such 

regulations or policies may include the residence hall contract, as well 

as those regulations relating to entry and use of University facilities, 

sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages, use of vehicles" and 

amplifying equipment, campus demonstrations, and misuse of 

identification cards. 



10 Code of Student Conduct 



(p) use or possession of any controlled substance or illegal dfug on 

University premises or at University sponsored activities'"' 
(q) unauthorized use or possession ol lireworks on University premises. 

* Allegations of academic dishonesty are processed in accordance 
with the procedures set forth in graduate and undergraduate catalogs. 

" Parking and Traffic Violations may be processed in accordance with 
procedures established by the Vice Chancellor tor Student Affairs. 

Sanctions 

10 Sanctions for violations of disciplinary regulations consist of: 

(a) EXPULSION permanent separation ol the student from the University. 
Notification will appear on the student's transcript The student will also 
be barred from University premises (Expulsion requires administrative 
review and approval by the Chancellor and may be altered, deferred or 
withheld ) 

(b) SUSPENSION: separation of the student from the University for a 
specified penod of time Permanent notification will appear on the 
students transcript The student shall not participate in any University 
sponsored activity and may be barred from University premises. 
Suspended time will not count against any time limits of the Graduate 
School for completion of a degree (Suspension requires administrative 
review and approval by the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs and may 
be altered, deferred or withheld ) 

(c) DISCIPLINARY PROBATION the student shall not represent the 
University in any extracurricular activity or run for or hold office in any 
student group or organization Additional restrictions or conditions may 
also be imposed Notification will be sent to appropriate University 
offices, including the Office of Campus Activities 

(d) DISCIPLINARY REPRIIvlAND; the student is warned that further 
misconduct may result in more severe disciplinary action 

(e) RESTITUTION the student is required to make payment to the 
University or to other persons, groups, or organizations for damages 
incurred as a result of a violation of this code 

(f) OTHER SANCTIONS other sanctions may be imposed instead ol or in 
addition to those specified in sections (a) through (e) of this part For 
example, students may be subiect to dismissal Irom University housing 
for disciplinary violations which occur in the residence halls Likewise, 
students may be subiect to restrictions upon or denial of driving 
privileges for disciplinary violations involving the use or registration of 
motor vehicles Work or research protects may also be assigned 

11. Violations of sections (a) through (g) in part nine of this code may result in 
expulsion from the University.' ' unless specific and significant mitigating 
factors are present Factors to be considered in mitigation shall be the 
present demeanor and past disciplinary record of the offender, as well as 
the nature of the offense and the severity of any damage, injury, or harm 
resulting from it, 

12- Violations ol sections (h) through (I) in part nine of this code may result in 
suspension from the University, unless specific and significant mitigating 
factors as specified in part eleven are present. 

13 Repeated or aggravated violations of any section of this code may also 
result in expulsion or suspension or in the imposition of such lesser 
penalties as may be appropriate 

14 Attempts to commit acts prohibited by this code shall be punished to the 
same extent as completed violations.''*' 



Interim Suspension '^''^ 



15 The Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs or a designee may suspend a 
student for an interim period pending disciplinary proceedings or medical 
evaluation, such interim suspension to become immediately effective 
without prior notice, whenever there is evidence that the continued 
presence of the student on the University campus poses a substantial 
threat to himself or to others or to the stability and continuance ol normal 
University functions 

16 A student suspended on an interim basis shall be given an opporlunily to 
appear personally before the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs or a 
designee withm five business days from the effective date of the interim 
suspension in order to discuss the following issues only. 

(a) the reliability of the information concerning the student's conduct, 
including the matter of his identity. 

(b) whether the conduct and surrounding circumstances reasonably 
indicate that the continued presence of the student on the University 
campus poses a substantial threat to himself or to others or the stability 
and continuance of normal University functions. 

The Judicial Programs Office 

1 7 The Judicial Programs OHice directs the efforts of students and staff 
members m matters involving student discipline The responsibilities of the 
office include 

(a) determination of the disciplinary charges to be filed pursuant to this 
code 

(b) interviewing and advising parlies''" involved in disciplinary 



proceedings, 

(c) supervising, training, and advising all judicial boards. 

(d) reviewing the decisions of ail judicial boards ''*' 

(e) maintenance of all student disciplinary records. 

(f) development of procedures for conflict resolution. 

(g) resolution of cases Of student misconduct, as specified in parts 30 and 

31 of this code 
(h) collection and dissemination of research and analysis concerning 

student conduct 
(i) submission of a statistical report each semester to the campus 

community, reporting the number of cases referred to the office, the 

number of cases resulting in disciplinary action, and the range of 

sanctions imposed *'"' 



Judicial Panels 



18 Hearings or other proceedings as provided in this code may be held 
belore the loHowing boards or committees 

(a) CONFERENCE BOARDS, as appointed in accordance with pan 31 ol 
this code 

(b) RESIDENCE BOARDS, as established and approved by the Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs '''' Students residing m group living units 
owned, leased, operated or supervised by the University may petition 
the Vice Chancellor for authority to establish ludiciai boards Such 
boards may be empowered to hear cases involving violations ol this 
code, as prescribed by the Vice Chancellor lor Student Affairs. 

(c)THE CENTRAL BOARD hears cases involving disciplinary violations 
which are not referred to Residence Boards or resolved in accordance 
with pans 30 and 31 of this code The Central Board is composed ol 
five full-time students, including at least two graduate students 

(d) THE APPELLATE BOARD hears appeals from Residence boards, the 
Central Board, and ad hoc boards, in accordance with part 39 of this 
code The Appellate Board is composed ol live lull-time students, 
including at least two graduate students. 

(e) AD HOC BOARDS may be appointed by the Director ol Judicial 
Programs when a Conference Board, a Residence Board, the Central 
Board, the Appellate Board or the Senate Adjunct Committee are 
unable to obtain a quorum or are otherwise unable to hear a case '^' 
Each ad hoc board shall be composed of three members, including at 
least one student 

(f) THE SENATE COMIvlinEE ON STUDENT CONDUCT hears appeals as 
specilied in part 38 of this code The committee also approves the 
initial selection of all judicial board members, except members ol 
conference and ad hoc iDoards '"' 

19 The presiding officer of each judicial board and of the Senate Ad|unct 
Committee on Student Conduct may develop bylaws which are not 
inconsistent with any provision in this code Bylaws must be approved by 
the Director ol Judicial Programs.'"' 



Selection and Removal of Board Members 



20 Members ol the various judicial boards are selected in accordance with 
procedures developed by the Director of Judicial Programs 

21 fyfembers ol conference and ad hoc boards are selected in accordance 
with parts 31 and 18 (e). respectively 

22 Prospective members of the Central Board and the Appellate Board are 
subiect to confirmation by the Senate Committee on Student Conduct 

23 Members of the Senate Committee on Student Conduct are selected in 
accordance with the bylaws of the University Senate 

24 Prior to participating in board or committee deliberations, new rr>embers ol 
the Senate Adjunct Committee on Student Conduct and ol all ludicial 
boards, except conference and ad hoc boards, will participate in one 
orientation session offered at least once each- academic year by the 
Judicial Programs Office, 

25 Student members of any judicial board or committee who are charged with 
any violation ol this code or with a criminal offense '"' may be suspended 
Irom their judicial positions by the Director of Judicial Programs during the 
pendency ol the charges against them Students convicted lor any such 
violation or oHense may be disqualified from any further participation m the 
University judicial system by the Director of Judicial Programs AdditKXial 
grounds and procedures for renxival may also be set forth in V\e bylaws ol 
the various judicial panels. 



Case Referrals 



26 Any person"*' may refer a student or a student group or organization 
suspected of violating this code to ttie Judicial Programs OHice Persons 
making such referrals are required to provide information pertinent to the 
case and will normally be expected to appear before a judicial board as 
the complainant '"' 



Code of student Conduct 11 



Deferral of Proceedings 

27 The Director ot Judicial Programs may defer disciplinary proceedings (or 
alleged violations ol this code (or a period not to exceed ninety days 
Pending charges may be withdrawn thereader. dependent upon the good 
behavior ot the respondent. 

Hearing Referrals 

28 Stall members m the Judicial Programs 0((ice will review case referrals to 
deletmme whether the alleged misconduct might result in expulsion, 
suspension, or disciplinary removal Irom University housing"" Students 
subiecl to those sanctions shall be accorded a hearing belo'e the 
appropriate judicial board All other cases shall be resolved m the Judicial 
Programs Oltice after an informal disciplinary conference, as set forth in 
parts 30 and 31 of this code 

29 Students referred to a judicial board hearing may elect instead to have 
their case resolved in accordance with parts 30 and 31 The lull range of 
sanctions authorized by this code may be imposed, although the right of 
appeal shall not be applicable 

Disciplinary Conferences ^^^ 

30 Students subiect to or electing to participate in a disciplinary conference in 
the Judicial Programs Office are accorded the following procedural 
protections 

(a) written notice of charges at least three days prior to the scheduled 
conference. 

(b) reasonable access to the case file™" prior to and during the 
conference 

(c) an opportunity to respond to the evidence against them and to call 
appropriate witnesses in their behalf, 

(d) the right to be accompanied and assisted by a representative, in 
accordance with Part 33 ot this code. 

31 Disciplinary conlerences shall be conducted by the Director of Judicial 
Programs or a designee '^'' Complex or contested cases may be referred 
by the Director to a conference board, consisting ol one member of the 
Central Board, one member of the Appellate Board, and a staff member in 
the Division of Student Affairs Conference Board members shall be 
selected on a rotating basis by the Director of Judicial Programs. 

Hearing Procedures 

32 The following procedural guidelines shall be applicable in disciplinary 
hearings 

(a) respondents shall be given notice of the hearing date and the specific 
charges agamst them at least five days in advance and stiall be 
accorded reasonable access to the case file, which will be retained in 
the Judicial Programs Office. 

(b) the presiding officer of any board may subpoena witnesses upon the 
nxstion of any board member or of either party and shall subpoena 
witnesses upon request of the board advisor Subpoenas must be 
approved by the Director of Judicial Programs and shall be personally 
delivered or sent by certified mail, return receipt requested University 
students and employees are expected to comply with subpoenas 
issued pursuant to this procedure, unless compliance would result in 
significant and unavoidable personal hardship or substantial 
interference with normal University activities '^' 

(c) respondents who fail to appear after proper notice will tje deemed to 
have pleaded guilty to the charges pending against them. 

(t) hearings will be closed to the public, except for the immediate 
members ot the respondent's family and for the respondent's 
representative An open hearing may be held, in the discretion of the 
presiding officer, if requested by the responOent. 

(e) the presiding officer of each tward shall exercise control over the 
proceedings to avoid needless consumption of time and to achieve the 
orderly completion of the hearing Except as provided m section (o) of 
this part, any person, including the respondent, who disrupts a hearing 
may be excluded by the presiding officer or by the board aOvisor. 

(f) hearings may be tape recorded or transcribed If a recording or 
transcription is not made, the decision of the board must include a 
summary of the testimony and shall be sufficiently detailed to permit 
review by appellate bodies and by staff members in the Judicial 
Programs Office 

(g) any parly or the board advisor may challenge a board member on the 
grounds of personal bias Board members may be disqualified upon 
majority vote of the remaining members of the board, conducted by 
secret ballot. '^' or by the Director of Judicial Programs. 

(h) witnesses shall be asked to affirm that their testimony is truthful and 
may be subject to charges of perjury, pursuant to part 9 (h) of this 
code, 
(i) prospective witnesses, other than the complainant and the respondent, 
may be excluded from the hearing during the testimony of other 
witnesses All parties, the witnesses, and the public shall be excluded 
dunng board deliberations. 
(j) the burden of proof shall be upon the complainant, who must establish 



the guilt of the respondent by a preponderance of the evidence '■"' 

(k) formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable m disciplinary 
proceedings conducted pursuant to this code The presiding officer ol 
each txjaro shall give effect to the rules of confidentiality and privilege, 
but shall otherwise admit an matters into evidence which reasonable 
persons would accept as havmg probative value m the conduct of their 
affairs Unduly repetitious or irrelevant evidence may be excluded '*'' 

(1) respondents shall be accorded an opportunity to question those 
witnesses who testify (or the complainant at the hearing 

(m) affidavits shall not be admitted into evidence unless signed by the 
affiant and witnessed by a University employee, or by a person 
designated by the Director of Judicial Programs 

(n) board members may take judicial notice of matters which would be 
within the general experience ol University student's '*' 

(0) board advisors may comment on questions ol procedure and 
admissibility ol evidence and will othenwise assist m the conduct ol the 
hearing Advisors will be accorded all the pnviieges ol board 
members, and the additional responsibilities set forth m this code but 
shall not vote All advisors are responsible to ihe Director ol Judicial 
Programs and shall not be excluded from hearings or board 
deliberations by any board or by the presiding officer of any board 

(p) the Director ol Judicial Programs may appoint a special presiding 
officer to any board in complex cases or in any case in which the 
respondent is represented by an attorney Special presiding officers 
may participate in board deliberations, but shall not vote ''" 

(q) a determination of guilt shall be followed by a supplemental proceeding 
in which either party and the board advisor may submit evidence or 
make statements concerning the appropriate sanction to be imposed 
The past disciplinary record™' of the respondent shall not be supplied 
to the board by the advisor prior to the supplementary proceeding 

(r) final decisions of all judicial panels shall be by majority vote of the 
members present and voting A tie vote will result in a recommended 
acquittal in an original proceeding A tie vote in an appellate 
proceeding will result in an affirmation of the original decision. 

(s) final decisions of all boards, except conference boards, shall be 
accompanied by a brief written opinion. 

Attorneys and Representatives 

33. Respondents or complainants participating in any disciplinary proceeding 
may be accompanied by a representative, who may be an attorney'^ 
Parties who wish to be represented by an attorney in a disciplinary 
proceeding must so inform the Judicial Programs Office in writing at least 
two business days prior to the scheduled date of the proceeding 
Representatives may not appear in lieu of respondents. . 

Student Groups and Organizations 

34 Student groups and organizations may be charged with violations of this 
code 

35 A student group or organization and its officers may be held collectively 
'*°' or individually responsible when violations of this code by those 
associated with'*'' the group or organization have received the tacit or 
oven consent or encouragement of the group or organization or o( Ihe 
group's or organization's leaders, officers, or spokesmen. 

36 The officers or leaders or any identifiable spokesmen '*^' for a student 
group or organization may be directed by the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs or a designee to take appropriate action designed to prevent or end 
violations of this code by the group or organization or by any persons 
associated with the group or organization who can reasonably be said to 
be acting in the group's or organization's behalf Failure to make 
reasonable efforts to comply with the Vice Chancellor's directive shall be 
considered a violation of part 9 (n) of this code, both by the officers, 
leaders or spokesmen for the group or organization and by the group or 
organization itself 

37. Sanctions for group or organization misconduct may include revocation or 
denial ol recognition or registration, as well as other appropriate sanctions, 
pursuant to part 10 (f) of this code. 

Appeals 

38 Any disciplinary determination resulting in expulsion or suspension'*^' may 
be appealed by the respondent to the Senate Committee on Student 
Conduct The Senate Committee shall also hear appeals from denials of 
petitions to void disciplinary records, pursuant to part 48 of this code 

39 Final decisions ot residence boards, the Central Board and ad hoc boards, 
not involving Ihe sanctions specified in part 38, may be appealed by the 
respondent to the Appellate Board '"' 

40. Requests for appeals must be submitted in writing to the Judicial Programs 
Office within seven business days from the date of the letter notifying the 
respondent of the original decision Failure to appeal within the allotted 
time will render the original decision final and conclusive '*^' 

41 A written bnef in support of the appeal must be submitted to the Judicial 
Programs Office within ten business days from the date of the letter 
notifying the respondent ot the original decision Failure to submit a written 
brief within the allotted time will render the deoslon ot the lower board final 



12 Code of Student Conduct 



and conclusive "^' 

42 Appeals shall be decided upon the record of the original proceeding and 
upon written bnels submitted by the parties. De novo hearings shall not be 
conducted 

43 Appellate bodies may: 

(a) affirm the finding and the sanction imposed by the original board. 

(b) affirm the finding and reduce, but not eliminate, the sanction, in 
accordance with parts 44 and 44 (a) of this code. 

(c) remand the case to the original board, in accordance with parts 44 and 
44 (b) 

(d) dismiss the case, in accordance with parts 44 and 44 (c) 

44 [Deference shall be given to the determinations of lower txiards '"' 

(a) sanctions may only be reduced if found to be grossly disproportionate 
to the offense. 

(b) cases may be remanded to the original board if specified procedural 
errors or errors in interpretation of University regulations were so 
substantial as to effectively deny the respondent a fair hearing, or if 
new and significant evidence became available which could not have 
been discovered by a properly diligent respondent before or during the 
original hearing '"'" The decision of the lower board on remand shall be 
final and conclusive. 

(c) cases may be dismissed only if the finding is held to be arbitrary and 
capricious '''^' 

(d) decisions of the Appellate Board shall be recommendations to the 
Director of Judicial Programs '*"' Decisions of the Senate Committee on 
Student Conduct shall be recommendations to the Vice Chancellor for 
Student Affairs. 

45 The imposition of sanctions will normally be deferred during the pendency 
of appellate proceedings, in the discretion of the Director of Judicial 
Programs. 

Disciplinary Files and Records 

46 Case referrals may result in the development of a disciplinary file in the 
name of the respondent, which shall be voided if the respondent is found 
innocent of the charges '^'' The files of respondents found guilty of any of 
the charges against them will be retained as a disciplinary record for three 
years from the date of the letter providing notice of final disciplinary 
action.!*^' Disciplinary records may be retained for longer periods of time 
or permanently, if so specified in the sanction. 

47. Disciplinary records may be voided'"' by the Director of Judicial Programs 
for good cause, upon written petition of respondents. Factors to be 
considered in review of such petitions shall include: 

(a) the present demeanor of the respondent. 

(b) the conduct of the respondent subsequent to the violation. 

(c) the nature of the violation and the seventy of any damage, injury, or 
harm resulting from it. 

48. Denials of petitions to void disciplinary records shall be appealable to the 
Senate Committee on Student Conduct, which will apply the standard 

of review specified in parts 44 and 44 (c) The requirements for appeals as 
set forth m parts 40 and 41 shall be applicable '^' 
49 Disciplinary records retained for less than ninety days or designated as 
"permanent' shall not be voided without unusual and compelling 
justification.'^' 

Annotations: 

1. The University is not designed or equipped to rehabilitate or incapacitate 
persons who pose a substantial threat to themselves or to others It may be 
necessary, therefore, to remove those individuals from the campus and to 
sever the institutional relationship with them, as provided in this code of 
conduct and by other University regulations.* 

Any punishment imposed in accordance with the code may have the value 
of discouraging the offender and others from engaging in future 
misbehavior In cases of minor disciplinary violations, the particular form of 
punishment may also be designed to draw upon the educational resources 
of the University in order to bnng about a lasting and reasoned change in 
behavior The underlying rationale for punishment need not rest on 
deterrence or "reform" alone, however A |ust punishment may also be 
imposed because it is "deserved" and because punishment for willful 
offenses affirms the autonomy and integrity of the offender The latter 
concept was well expressed by D J B Hawkins in his essay "Punishment 
and Moral Responsibility" in 7 Modem Law Review 205; 

The vice of regarding punishment entirely from the points of view o( 
reformation and deterrence lies precisely in forgetting that a |ust 
punishment is deserved The punishment of men then ceases to be 
essentially different from the training of animals, and the way is open 
for the totalitarian state to undertake the forcible improvement of its 
citizens without regard to whether their conduct has made them morally 
liable to social coercion or not But ment and dement, reward and 
punishment, have a different significance as applied to men and as 
applied to animals A dog may be called a good dog or a bad dog. but 
his goodness or badness can be finally explained in terms of heredity 
and environment A man. however, is a person, and we instinctively 



recognise that he has a certain ultimate personal responsibility for at 
least some of his actions Hence ment and dement, reward and 
punishment, have an irreducible individual significance as applied to 
nrien. This is the dignity and the tragedy of the human person 

A similar view was expressed by Justice Powell, dissenting in Goss v. 
iopez (42 L Ed 2d 725. 745): 

Education in any meaningful sense includes the Inculcation of an 
understanding in each pupil of the necessity of rules and obedience 
thereto This understanding is no less important than learning to read 
and write One who does not comprehend the meaning and necessity 
of discipline is handicapped not merely in his education but throughout 
his subsequent life In an age when the home and church play a 
diminishing role in shaping the character and value judgments of the 
young, a heavier responsibility falls upon the schools When an 
immature student merits censure for his conduct, he is rendered a 
disservice if appropriate sanctions are not applied ... 

2. An effort is made in the code to use a simplified numbering and lettering 
system, without use of Roman numerals or subsets of letters and numbers 
Any pan of the code can be found by reference to one number and one 
letter (eg., part 10 (a) explains the meaning of expulsion). 

3. Culpable conduct should include conscious acts posing a substantial risk 
of harm to others (e g throwing a heavy obiect out a tenthtfloor window 
above a sidewalk) If the act itself, however, is unintended (eg one is 
distracted by a noise while climbing a flight of stairs and drops a heavy 
obiect) the individual may have failed to use reasonable care, but is not 
normally deserving of the moral stigma associated with a "conviction" lor a 
disciplinary offense. 

4. Former students may be charged for violations which allegedly occurred 
during their enrollment at the University. 

5. Colleges and Universities are not expected to develop disciplinary 
regulations which are written with the scope or precision ol a criminal 
code. Rare occasions may arise when conduct is so inherently and 
patently dangerous to the individual or to others that extraordinary action 
not specifically authorized in the rules must be taken. 

6. The terms "suspension" and "interim suspension" are to be distinguished 
throughout the code and are not interchangeable. 

7. Disciplinary removal from University housing should be distinguished from 
administrative removal for violations of the residence contract The latter 
does not leave students with a disciplinary record and does not come 
under the purview of this code. 

8. The standard set forth here represents the minimal procedural protection to 
be accorded to students charged with most disciplinary violations. 
Students who are subiect to lengthy suspensions or to expulsion may be 
entitled to more formal procedures, including a hearing with a nght to 
cross-examine the witnesses against them Goss v. Lopez 4i9 US 565 
(1975). 

9. The Supreme Court has recently rejected the theory that state schools are 
bound by principles ol federal administrative law requiring agencies to 
follow their own regulations Board ol Curators, University ol Missouri v. 
Horowitz 55 L Ed 2d 124. 136 See. generally. "Violations by Agencies of 
Their Own Regulations" 87 Harvard l^w Review 629 (1974). 

10 Respondents in disciplinary proceedings may be directed to answer 
questions concerning their conduct Students who refuse to answer on 
grounds of the Fifth Amendment privilege may be informed that the hearing 
panel could draw negative inferences from their refusal which might result 
in their suspension or dismissal If the student then elects to answer, his 
statements could not be used against him in either state or federal court 
Gamty v. New Jersey 385 U S 493 (1967) See also Funjtani v. Ewigleben 
297 F. Supp 1 163 (N D cal 1969) 

1 1 The "controlled substances' or "illegal drugs" prohibited in this section are 
set forth in Schedules I through V in Article 27, pari 279 of the Annotated 
Code ol Maryland. 

12 Colleges and Universities should be a lorum lor the free expression ot 
ideas In the recent past, however, unpopular speakers have tseen 
prevented from addressing campus audiences by students wtx) effectively 
"shouted them down " Both Yaie and Stanford Universities have treated 
such actions (which are to be distinguished from minor and occasional 
heckling) as serious disciplinary violations See the "Report from the 
Committee on Freedom ol Expression ai Yale University' which is available 
in the Judicial Programs Office. 

The following language from the Yale report may be used to elaborate 
upon the intent ana scope ol pan 9 (k) of this code 

1 "There IS no right to protest withm a University buiidmg in such a way 
that any University activity is disrupted The administration, however. 



Code of student Conduct 13 



may wish to pe'mii some symbolic dissent wiihm a buiiamg but outs'de 
the meeting room, lor example, a single picket or a distributor of 
handbills". 

2. "(A) member of the audience may protest In a silent, symbolic fashion, 
for example, by wearing a black arm band More active forms of 
protest may be tolerated such as briefly boomg, clapping hands or 
heckling But any disruptive activity must stop |and not be repeated] 
when the chair or an appropriate University official requests silence. 

3. "Nor are racial insults or any other 'fighting words' a valid ground for 
disruption or physical attack ... The banning or obstruction of 
lawful speech can never be justified on such grounds as that the 
speech or the speaker is deemed Irresponsible, offensive, unschoiarly, 
or untrue." 

13 A compilation of published regulations which have been reviewed and 
approved by the Vice Chancellor shall be available for public inspection 
dunng normal business hours in the Judicial Programs Otiice. 

14. The "controlled substances" or "illegal drugs" prohibited in this section are 
set forth in Schedules I through V in Article 27, paa 279 of the Annotated 
Code ol Maryland. 

15. This part and parts twelve and thirteen represent an attempt to give 
needed guidance to those who are assessing penalties Moreover, the 
direction of the guidance is toward imposition ol more severe disciplinary 
sanctions in senous cases Nonetheless, the language concerning 
"mitigating factors" is broad enough to give decisionmakers considerable 
leeway to "do justice", depending upon the facts in each case The burden 
of establishing facts in mitigation should, of course, be upon the 
respondent. 

16 There does not seem to be any rational basis for imposing less severe 
penalties for attempts than for completed violations. The authors of the 
Model Penal Code, for example, have written that: 

To the extent that sentencing depends upon the antisocial disposition 
of the actor and the demonstrated need lor a corrective action, there is 
likely to be little difference in the gravity of the required measures 
depending on the consummation or the failure of the plan. 

See LaFave, Criminal Law Treatise p 453. 

17. These procedures are analogous to those found in the "emergency" 
disciplinary rules adopted by the Board of Regents in 1971 and are 
consistent with the formal opinion of the Maryland Attorney General on this 
subject, dated January 23, 1969. See also Goss v. Lopez, 419 US. 565 
(1975). 

Nothing in this provision would prohibit the Vice Chancellor from modifying 
the terms of an interim suspension, so long as the hearing requirement 
specified in part 16 was met For example, a suspended student might be 
allowed to enter University premises solely for the purpose of attending 
classes. 

18 Staff members in the Judicial Programs Office should endeavor to arrange 
a balanced presentation before the various judicial boards and may assist 
both complainants and respondents. 

19. This language does not effect any change in previous policy concerning 
the powers of judicial boards. All board decisions, including those 
rendered by Conference Boards, shall be treated as recommendations. 

20. See annotation one. supra. The deterrent effect of punishment is 
diminished if the community is unaware of the number and general nature 
of sanctions imposed The Director of Judicial Programs may, for example, 
arrange for publication of the statistical report in the campus press each 
semester. 

21 . Boards established pursuant to this section might include modified 
versions of the present "Greek" or residence hall boards. 

22. It is intended that a quorum will consist of three members (out of five). The 
authority to appoint ad hoc boards should be broadly construed and might 
be especially useful, for example, when a ludiciai board or the Senate 
Committee is charged with hearing a case involving one of its own 
members. The final determination as to whether a panel is "unable to hear 
a case" should be withm the discretion of the Director of Judicial Programs. 

23 The power of confirmation represents a significant grant of authority to the 
Senate Committee. The committee is presently underutilized and might 
best contribute to the judicial system by becoming more intimately involved 
with it. Moreover, confirmation procedures will give committee members 
direct contact with board members and will also allow the committee to 
exercise more control over the quality of Judicial Board decisions. 

24. Proposed bylaws must be submitted to the Attorney General for review. 

25. It could be a public embarrassment for the University to have a student 



charged with or convicied of a senous cnme sit m judgment over other 
students in disciplinary proceedings The various state criminal codes are 
usually so broad and archaic, however, that automatic suspension or 
removal should not result from any violation of any law (e g , New York 
makes it a criminal misdeameanor for anyone 'to dance continuously In a 
dance contest for twelve or more hours without respite"), 

26 Case referrals should not be limited to members of the "campus 
community " A student who assaults another person on campus should not 
escape University judicial action merely because the person assaulted was 
a visitor (or. as in a recent case, a former student who had just withdrawn 
from the University ) 

27. The Director of Judicial Programs may appoint a trairfed volunteer from the 
campus community to serve as the complainant It would be preferable, 
however, to employ a "community advocate" to present all disciplinary 
cases. 

Several measures in the code are designed to restore balance In 
disciplinary proceedings, even in those cases in which the complainant Is 
inexperienced with administrative adjudication: 

(a) a hearing officer may be appointed in complex or serious cases. See 
part 32 (p). 

(b) the role of attorneys or advisors may be restricted. See part 33 and 

annotation 39. 

(c)the "disciplinary conference" procedure is designed to eliminate 
adversary proceedings in minor cases. See parts 30-31 and annotation 
29. 

28 Staff members may consider the mitigating factors specified in part 11 to 
determine the permissible sanction to be imposed if the respondent is 
found guilty ol charges For example, a student involved in a minor 
altercation might be charged pursuant to part 9 (a), but referred to a 
disciplinary conference, thereby precluding the possibility of expulsion or 
suspension for the alleged misconduct. 

29. The hearing procedures specified at part 32 need not be followed in 
disciplinary conterences Instead a disciplinary conference would normally 
consist of an informal non-adversarial meeting between the respondent and 
a staff member in the Judicial Programs Office. Complainants would not 
be required to parti'^.ipate, unless their personal testimony was essential to 
the resolution of a dispositive factual issue in the case. Documentary 
evidence and written statements could be relied upon, so long as the 
respondent was given access to them in advance and allowed to respond 
to them at the conference Respondents would also be allowed to bring 
appropriate witnesses with them and might be accompanied by a 
representative, who may participate in discussions, although not in lieu of 
participation by the respondent. 

The conference procedure is designed to reduce the steady grovrth of 
unnecessary legalism in disciplinary proceedings. The worst features of the 
adversary system (including the concept that ludicial proceedings are a 
"contest" to be "won" by clever manipulation of procedural rules) 
undermine respect for the rule ol law Colleges and universities can and 
should be a testing ground for development of carefully reasoned 
alternatives to current procedural excesses in the larger society." 

Procedures comparable to the disciplinary conference (referred to as 
"structured conversations") are suggested by David L. Kirp in his 1976 
Stanford Law Review article "Proceduraiism and Bureaucracy: Due Process 
in the School Setting" 38 Stanford Law Review 841 : 

The benefits of such conversations in the school setting may better be 
appreciated by contrasting them with the typical due process hearing. 
Hearings are designed to determine the facts of a particular 
controversy, and apply predetermined rules to the facts thus found At 
that point, the function of the hearing is at an end. The wisdom of the 
underlying substantive rules has no relevance, nor is broader 
discussion of grievances generally encouraged, unless it is somehow 
pertinent to the dispute at hand. 

Conversation knows no such limits. It too serves as a vehicle for 

resolving what are likely to be factually uncomplicated disputes, but it 
does more than that It enables students to feel that they are being 
listened to and may encourage them to raise underlying grievances. It 
provides administrators with a relatively inexpensive vehicle for 
monitoring, and hence a basis for reshaping institutional relationships. 
The outcome of these 'orderly thoughtful conversations' may well be 
decisions different in their particulars from what might otherwise have 
been anticipated, repeated conversations which touch upon similar 
student grievances may ultimately lead disciplinarians to reassess 
whether control is so vital, and collaboration so improbable, as a 
means of assuring institutional order. 

The Conference procedure would not be used in any case which might 
result in any form of separation from the University. Accordingly, the 



14 Code Of Student Conduct 



procedure appears to meet or eKceed the due process requirements set 
forth by the United Stales Supreme Court tor cases involving suspensions 
ol ten days or less In Goss v. Lopez ttie Court held: 

we stop short of construing the Due Process Clause to require, 
countrywide, that hearings m connection with short suspensions must 
afford the student the opportunity to secure counsel, to conlroni and 
cross-examine witnesses supporting the charge, or to call his own 
witnesses to verify his version ol the incident Brief disciplinary 
suspensions are almost countless. To impose in each such case even 
truncated tnal-type procedures might well overwhelm administrative 
facilities in many places and, by diverting resources, cost more than it 
would save in educational effectiveness Moreover, further formalizing 
the suspension process and escalating its formality and adversary 
nature may not only make it too costly as a regular disciplinary tool but 
also destroy its effectiveness as part ol the teaching process. 

On the other hand, requiring effective notice and an informal hearing 
permitting the student to give his version of the events will provide a 
meaningful hedge against erroneous action At least the disciplinarian 
will be alerted to the existence of disputes about facts and arguments 
about cause and effect He may then determine himself to summon the 
accuser, permit cross-examination, and allow the student to present his 
own witnesses In more difficult cases, he may permit counsel In any 
event, his discretion will be more informed and we think the risk of error 
substantially reduced (42 L, Ed. 2d 725. 740), 

30 The case file consists of materials which would be considered "education 
records", pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 
Personal notes of University staff members or complainants are not 
included, 

31 Determinations made in accordance with parts 30 and 31 are not 
appealable, 

32 Internal subpoenas may be desirable, since cases have arisen in which 
complainants or respondents were unable to present an effective case due 
to the indifference and lethargy of potential witnesses. A student who 
refuses to respond to a subpoena may be charged with a violation ol part 
9(n) ol the code. 

The Director of Judicial Programs should not approve a subpoena unless 
the expected testimony would be clearly relevant Likewise, a subpoena 
designed to embarrass or harass a potential witness should not be 
authonzed. 

The subpoena power specified here is not designed to reach documents 
or other materials, 

33 Board members should be disqualified on a case by case basis only; 
permanent removal should be accomplished in accordance with Part 25, 
Board members should not be readily disqualified The term "personal 
bias" involves animosity toward a party or favoritism toward the opposite 
party See, generally. Davis, Administrative Law Treatise "Bias" Section 
12,03, 

34 See Bernstein v. Real Estate Commission 221 Md 221 (1959), which 
established the "preponderance" standard for state administrative 
proceedings. 

35 Testimony containing hearsay may be heard, if relevant A final 
determination should not be based on hearsay alone. 

36 Every statement or assertion need not be proven For example, board 
members may take notice that many students commute to the University, 

37 Student presiding officers are often at a disadvantage when the 
respondent is represented by an attorney The proceedings might progress 
nrore rapidly and efficiently if a special presiding officer were appointed. 
Generally, a staff member in the Judicial Programs Office would be 
selected for such a responsibility, although other University employees with 
legal training might also be called upon. 

38 Information pertaining to prior findings of disciplinary and residence hall 
violations might be reported, as well as relevant cnminal convictions Prior 
allegations of misconduct should not be disclosed. 

39 A disciplinary hearing at the University is not analogous to a criminal trial. 
The presiding officer and the board advisor are authorized to exercise 
active control over the proceedings in order to elicit relevant facts and to 
prevent the harassment or intimidation of witnesses No party or 
representative may use threatening or abusive language, engage in 
excessive argumentation, interrupt the proceedings with redundant or 
frivolous obieclions, or othenAiise disrupt the hearing. 

Students have not been determined to have a constitutional right to full 
legal representation m University disciplinary hearings The privilege ol 
legal representation, granted in this part, should tie carefully reviewed in 
any subsequent revision ol the code. 



40 Punishment ol one or several individuals for the acts of others should be 
avoided if the identities of the specific offenders can be readily 
ascertained. 

41 Association does not require formal membership Individuals wtio might 
reasonably be regarded as regular participants in group or organization 
activities may be held to be associated with the group or organization. 

42 Leaders or spokesmen need not be officially designated or elected For 
example, il a group or organization accepted or acquiesced m the act or 
statement of an individual associated with il. that individual might 
reasonably be regarded as a leader or a spokesman lor the group or 
organization. 

43 "Suspension" includes deferred suspension but not interim suspension or 

suspension which is withheld See annotation six. 

44 Students left with a disciplinary record after a disciplinary conference may 
request that their record be voided, in accordance with part 47. Denials 
may be appealed, pursuant to part 48. 

45 The decision will be "final and conclusive" on the pan of the iudiciai board. 
but will remain a recommendation to the Director of Judicial Programs. 

46 This part is intended to discourage frivolous appeals Respondents who 
are genuinely interested in pursuing an appeal can reasonably be 
expected to prepare a written brief. 

47. Appellate bodies which do not give deference (i e , a presumption of 
validity) to lower board decisions will distort the entire disciplinary system. 
Respondents would be encouraged to "test their strategy" and "perfect 
their technique" before lower boards, since the matter would simply be 
heard again before a "real" board with linal auttiority. 

Lower board members usually have the best access to the evidence, 
including an opportunity to observe the witnesses and to ludge their 
demeanor Members ol appellate bodies should be especially careful not 
to modify a sanction or to remand or dismiss a case simply because they 
may personally disagree with the lower board's decision. 

The opportunity to appeal adverse decisions has not been determined to 
be a requirement of constitutional "due process" in student disciplinary 
cases ■" There is presently rx3 legal obstacle to adopting an amendment 
to the code which would eliminate the appellate system altogether. 

48 Respondents who obtain information at the hearing which might lead to 
new evidence are required to request an ad)Ournment rather than wait to 
raise the matter for the first time on appeal. 

49 An arbitrary and capricious decision would be a decision "unsupported by 
any evidence" The cited language has been adopted by the Federal 
Courts as the proper standard of judicial review, under the due process 
clause, of disciplinary determinations made by state boards or agencies. 
See McDonald v. Board of Trustees ol the University of lllirtois 375 F. 
Supp. 95, 108 (N.D- III., 1974). 

50 See annotation 19. 

51 Voided files will be so marked, shall not be kepi with active disciplinary 
records, and shall not leave any student with a disciplinary record. 

52 Disciplinary records may be reported to third parties, in accordance with 
University regulations and applicable state and federal law, 

53 Void records shall be treated in the manner set lorth in annotation 51, 

54 The scope of review shall be limited to the factors specified at pan 47 An 
inquiry into the initial determination of guilt or innocence is not permitted. 
For example, when considering the "nature" of the violation, pursuant to 
pan 47 (c). it is to be assumed that the violation occurred and that the 
respondent was responsible for it. 

55 Some discretion must be retained to void even "permanent" disciplinary 
records It may be unnecessary, for example, to burden a graduating 
senior with a lifelong stigma for an act committed as a freshman Social 
norms also change rapidly "Unacceptable" conduct in one generation may 
t)ecome permissabie and commonplace m the next 

• See the procedures tor mandatory nyedical withdrawal developed by the 
Vice Chancellor lor Student Atlairs. 

" See Macklin Fleming. The Pnce of Perfect Justice: In our pursuit of . . 
periectibility. we necessaniy neglect ott\er elements ol an eliective 
procedure, notably the resolution ol controversies within a reasonable lime 
at a reasonable cost, with reasonable umiormity ... we impair ifie 
capacity ol the legal order to achieve the basic values lor which it was 
created, that is. to settle disputes promptly and peaceably, to restrain the 
strong, to protect the weak, and to contorm the conduct ol all to settled 
rules ol law. 

'" See the due process standard set lorth in Dixon v Alabama 294 F.Zd 
150. I5a-I59 (Filth dr., 1961). Cert. dan. 368 U.S. 930. 



Human Relations Code 15 



Human Relations Code 



Article I Purpose 



A The University of Maryland College Park afdrms its commitments to a policy 
ol eliminating discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, sex. manial 
status, personal appearance, age. national ongm. political ailiiiaiion, 
physical or menial handicap, or on the basis ot the exercise ol rights 
secured by the First Amendmenl ot the United Slates Constitution This 
Code IS established to prevent or eradicate such discrimination in 
accordance with due process within the Campus community In doing so 
the Campus recognizes that ii must strive actively and creatively to build a 
community in which opportunity is equalized 
•3 Accordingly, the Campus Senate ol The University ot Maryland. College 
Park Campus, establishes this Human Relations Code to 
V prohibit discrimination as detined in this document within the College 
Park campus community both by educational programs and. to the 
extent specilied herein, by a totmal grievance procedure. 

2. establish the responsibilities ot the Adjunct Committee on Human 
Relations ol the Senate General Committee on Campus Allairs. 

3. establish the responsibilities ol the Ollice ot Human Relations Programs 
in connection with this Code; 

4 establish mediation and grievance vehicles within the Divisions of the 
Campus, in conformity with the Campus Affirmative Action Plan; 

5 establish the responsibilities ot Equal Education and Employment 
Opportunity (EEEO) Officers. 

0. Every effort will be made to make students and potential students, 
employees and potential employees, faculty members and potential faculty 
members aware of the opportunities which the Campus provides for every 
individual to develop and utilize his talents and skills II is the intent of the 
Campus to enhance among its students and employees respect by each 
person for that person s own race, ethnic background or sex. as well as 
appreciation and respect for the race, ethnic background or sex of other 
individuals. 

D- Development of a positive and productive atmosphere of human relations 
on the Campus shall be encouraged through effective dialogue and 
broadening of communications channels The Adiunct Committee on 
Human Relations and the Office of Human Relations Programs shall 
provide suppon and assistance, as authorized, to any individual or g'oup 
deemed by them to have a positive probable impact in working toward 
increased understanding among all individuals and groups on the Campus- 

E. The Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations shall advise the Office 
ol Human Relations Programs in recommending policies which fulfill the 
provisions ot this Code In particular: 

1 . The Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations shall be an adjunct 
committee of the standing Senate General Committee on Campus 
Affairs. 

2. The purpose of the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations 
shall be to foster better human relations among all individuals and 
groups on the Campus, to advise in the development ot positive and 
creative human relations programs, to advise in the prevention and 
eradication of all forms of discrimination prohibited by this Code, and to 
make regular assessments ol the state of human relations within the 
purview of this Campus, 

3 The functions ot the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations 
may include but are not limited to: requesting the Office of Human 
Relations Programs to conduct investigations of complaints ol 
discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, maniai status, 
personal appearance, age, national origin, political affiliation, physical 
or mental handicap, or on the basis of the exercise of rights secured 
by the First Amendment of the United Slates Constitution, providing an 
"open forum" for effective dialogue among all segments of the Campus 
community, recommending to appropriate Campus bodies educationa' 
programs and activities to promote equal rights and understanding; 
periodically reviewing such programs and activities, initiating studies ol 
Campus-sponsored or recognized programs and activities to determine 
how improvement can be made in respect to human relations; 
continually reviewing progress toward these ends and making such 
lurlher recommendations as experience may show to be needed, and 
participating to the extent set lorth herein in lormal human relations 
grievance actions 

F. There shall be an Oflice of Human Relations Programs directly responsible 
to the Chancellor This Office shall plan, develop, give direction to and 
coordinate the overall Campus effort to prevent and eliminate 
discrimination based on race, color, creed, sex, maniai status, personal 
appearance, age, national ongm. political affiliation, physical or mental 
handicap, or on the basis of the exercise ol nghts secured by the Fust 
Amendment of the United States Constitution, in all areas of Campus life 
(this overall effort is referred to herein as the "Human Relations Program'). 
The Office shall represent, and have direct access to. the Chancellor, and 
shall cooperate with the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations on 
substantive matters concerning human relations. The office shall assist and 



coordinate the human relations activities ol the Equal Employment and 
Educational OpooMuniiy OHicers and the equity oHicers representing the 
various units ol the Campus 

The duties and responsibilities ol the Office ol Human Relations 
Programs shall include but no\ be limited to the loHowmg working with 
Divisional Provosts. Deans. Directors and Depanment Chairmen to ensure 
lull compliance, in spmt as well as in letter, with laws relating lo 
discrimination and with the Campus Human Relations Code, advising 
Campus offices in their eltoh to assist personnel to recognize and take 
advantage of career opportunities within the Campus, working with 
appropriate ollices in the surrounding community on such issues as 
ollcampus housing practices alleclmg Campus students and employees, 
transportation, etc . recommending to the OH-Catnpus Housing Ollice 
removal Irom or reinstatement upon lists ol ollcampus housing, so as to 
ensure that listed housing is available on a nondiscriminatory basis (N B 
any linal action taken by the University shall be preceded by proper notice 
to the property owner involved, and an opportunity to be heard), 
conducting reviews ol compliance with the Campus Atfirmative Action Plan, 
initiating and carrying out programs for the elimination and prevention of 
racism and sexism on Campus, distributing this Code and informing the 
Campus community ol the interpretations of its provisions sending periodic 
reports to the Chancellor and to the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human 
Relations concerning the Human Relations Programs, and participating to 
the extent set forth herein in formal human relations grievance actions 
G For each of the academic Divisions ol the Campus, the Division ol 
Administrative Affairs and the Division of Student Affairs, there shall be an 
equity officer, who is designated in accordance with the Allirmative Action 
Plan and who has the duties specified by the Campus AHirmative Action 
Plan and like duties with respect to the forms ot discrimination prohibited 
by this Code 

Article II Coverage 

A. Kinds of Discrimination Prohibited: 

1 Discrimination in employment, job placement, promotion, or other 
economic benefits on the basis ol race, color, creed, sex. marital 
status, personal appearance, age. national ongm. political affiliation, 
physical or mental handicap, or on the basis of the exercise ot nghts 
secured by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. 

2- Discrimination in criteria ol eligibility for access to residence, or for 
admission to and otherwise in relation to educational, athletic, social. 
cultural or other activities of the Campus because of race, color, creed, 
sex, marital status, personal appearance, age. national origin, political 
affiliation, physical or mental handicap, or on the basis of the exercise 
of rights secured by the First Amendment ot the United States 
Constitution 

B. For the purposes of this Code, "personal appearance" means the outward 
appearance of any person, irrespective of sex. with regard to bodily 
condition or charactenstics. manner or style ol dress, and manner or style 
ot personal grooming, including, but not limited to. hair style and beards It 
shall not relate, however, to the requirement of cleanliness, uniforms, or 
prescribed standards, when uniformly applied tor admittance to a campus 
facility, or when uniformly applied to a class of employees, or when such 
bodily conditions or characteristics, or manner or style of dress or personal 
grooming presents a danger to the health, welfare or safety ot any 
individual. 

C This Code shall apply to the Campus community The term "Campus 
community" is limited to Campus students, faculty, and staff, and to 
departments, committees, offices and organizations under the supen/ision 
and control of the Campus administration. 
D Exceptions 

1 . The enforcement of Federal. State or County laws and regulations does 
not constitute prohibited discnmination for purposes of this Code 
Separate housing or other facilities lor men and women, mandatory 
retirement-age requirements, separate athletic teams when required by 
athletic conference regulations and political, religious and 
ethnic/cultural clubs are not prohibited. 

2 Discrimination is not prohibited where based on a bona fide job 
qualification or a qualification required for the lulliilmeni of bona fide 
educational or other institutional goals Complaints concerning the 
legitimacy of such qualifications may be the subject of human relations 
grievance actions. 

3 The provisions ol this Code shall not apply to potential students or 
potential employees of the University. However, applicants for 
admission or employment who believe they have been discriminated 
against by any pah of the Campus community may convey such belief 
together with all relevant facts to the Office ot Human Relations 
Programs, for informational purposes. 

4 The grievance procedures under this Code shall not apply to 
judgments concerning academic performance ol students (eg, 
graaes. dissertation defenses), pending further study and action by the 
College Park Senate and University Administration 

5 The Campus, with the advice and approval of the Attorney General's 
Office, shall review on a continuing basis all new laws and regulations 
which apply to this Campus to determine if any shall require changes 
in the coverage or exceptions to coverage ol this Code. 



16 Human Relations Code 



E This Code shall apply to the Campus community m relation to. but not only 
to. the following 

1. All educational, athletic, cultural and social activities occurring on the 
Campus or in another area under its jurisdiction; 

2. All services rendered by the Campus to students, (acuity and slatf, 
such as lob placement and |ob recruitment programs and oti-campus 
listings ot housing. 

3. University-sponsored programs occurring off campus. Including 
cooperative programs, adult education, athletic events, and any 
regularly scheduled classes, 

4. Housing supplied, regulated, or recommended by the Campus (or 
students, stall and visitors, including fraternities and so'onlies; 

5. Employment relations between the Campus and all of its employees, 
including matters of promotion in academic rank, academic salary and 
termination ot faculty status, as limited in III M. 

Article III Human Relations Enforcement Procedures 

A In order to identify policies or practices which may reflect discrimination, 
the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations may request the Office 
of Human Relations Programs to conduct periodic review of the operation 
of any unit ot the Campus Units shall provide the information necessary for 
carrying out such reviews This information shall be submitted through the 
Chancellor's Office Any such review under the authority granted m this 
statement of policy shall be undertaken only after specific authorization of 
the Chancellor In the event that the Chancellor fails to authorize an 
investigation within a reasonable time of the request by the Senate Adjunct 
Committee on Human Relations, the Chairman of the Committee shall 
report that fact, together with reasons as he'she may have received from 
the Chancellor concerning the matter, to the Senate. 

B The Office of Human Relations Programs on its own motion shall identify 
policies, practices or patterns of behavior which may reflect discrimination 
prohibited by this Code or which may conflict with any other Campus 
policy concerning human relations or with the Campus Affirmative Action 
Plan, and shall call these to the attention of the appropriate officials of the 
unit involved and recommend appropriate action Those subieci to 
allegations of discrimination shall be afforded all the protections of due 
process The Office shall endeavor by negotiation to eliminate the alleged 
discrimination Where such efforts fail, the Office may on its own motion 
report the matter to the Chancellor and to the Senate Adiunct Committee 
on Human Relations Documentation of the recommendations by the Office 
in all such cases shall be maintained on file by the Office 

C To the maximum extent consistent with the purposes of this Code, the 
confidentiality of personal papers and other records and the principle of 
privileged communication shall be respected by all persons involved m the 
enforcement procedures of this Code Nothing in this Code shall be 
construed so as to conflict with the requirements of Article 76A of the 
Maryland Annotated Code Persons giving information in connection with 
the procedures described in this Code shall be advised by the person 
receiving such information of the limits of confidentiality which may prope'iy 
be observed in Code procedures and that all documents may be subject 
to subpoena in subsequent administrative or judicial proceedings 

D Any member of the Campus community who believes that he or she has 
been or is being discriminated agamst in ways prohibited by this Code 
may consult informally and confidentially with the unit EEEO Officer and'or 
the equity officer and/or the Office of Human Relations Programs prior to 
filing a formal complaint. 

E The Office of Human Relations Programs shall receive formal complaints 
from any member or group within the Campus community claiming to be 
aggrieved by alleged discrimination prohibited by this Code and/or any 
other Campus document or policy relating to human relations practices. 
Such complaints should give in writing the names ot complainants) and 
respondent(s) and the time, the place, and a specific description of the 
alleged discrimination Complaints shall be submitted to the Office o( 
Human Relations Programs, or else to the unit EEEO Officer or the equity 
officer. Complaints must be submitted within one hundred and twenty 
(120) days of the alleged discrimination act(s). or wilhm one hundred and 
twenty (120) days of the first date by which the complainant reasonably 
has knowledge thereof Complaints not submitted directly to the Office of 
Human Relations Programs shall be forwarded to the Office of Human 
Relations Programs within five (5) working days ot their receipt Copies of 
the complaint shall be (onwarded by the Office ot Human Relations 
Programs to the respondent and to the appropriate unit Chairman or 
Director. Dean. Provost or Vice Chancellor. 

F Complainants under this Code shall be required, as a condition precedent, 
to waive any alternative Campus administrative procedure that may then be 
available A complaint which has been heard under some alternative 
Campus procedure cannot subsequently be heard under the procedure of 
this Code In the case of a complaint heard under the Classified 
Employees Grievance Procedure, this restriction shall apply only when the 
complaint has entered Step Three of that procedure 

G The Office of Human Relations Programs and/or the equity officer shall 
ensure that each complainant is informed of histier nght to file the 
complaint with the appropriate State and Federal agencies Forms for 
complaints to State and Federal agencies will be provided or the 
complainant will be informed where they are available 



H All complaints of discrimination which are not connected with the official 
(unctions of the Campus or not tailing within the scope ot discrimination 
prohibited by this Code shall be referred to the aopropnaie Campus, 
Municipal. County. State, or Federal agencies by the Office of Human 
Relations Programs 
I. After a complaint has been filed, the Of(ice of Human Relations Programs 
shall promptly undertake an informal investigation in order to make a 
preliminary determination as to whether or not the subject matter ot the 
complaint fails within the Code, and whether or not there is probable cause 
(or the complaint This finding shall be reported to the complainant, the 
respondent, the Chancellor and the Chairman of the Senate Adiunct 
Committee on Human Relations The burden o( proo( m this investigation 
and throughout these enforcement procedures rests with the complainant 
J If the finding is that there is not probable cause to believe that 
discrimination has been or is being committed withm the scope of this 
Code, the Office of Human Relations Programs may dismiss the complaint. 
Such dismissal shall be reported to the complainant, the respondent, the 
Chancellor and the Chairman of the Senate Adiunct Committee on Human 
Relations. The complainant in such a case may appeal the dismissal of the 
case to the Senate Adiunct Committee on Human Relations, which may 
direct that a Human Relations Grievance Committee conduct a grievance 
hearing according to the procedures set forth herein, if in the ludgment of 
the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations there is probable 
cause to believe that discrimination has been or is being committed within 
the scope of this Code The Senate Adjunct Committee on Human 
Relations shall have access to the compiamt file for this purpose A record 
of Its deliberations shall be placed m the f'le according to the procedures 
established by the Office of Human Relations Programs If the Committee 
finds no probable cause, it may dismiss the compiamt. and report such 
dismissal to the complainant, the respondent, and the Chancellor 
K. If the finding is that there is probable cause to believe that discrimination 
has been or is being committed within the scope of this Code, the Office of 
Human Relations Programs shall endeavor to eliminate the alleged 
discrimination by conference conciliation and persuasion If by this 
process, an agreement is reached (or elimination of the alleged 
discrimination, the agreement shall be reduced to wnimg and signed by 
the respondent, the complainant and the Director of the Office of Human 
Relations Programs. The agreement shall be available to the Chancellor, 
the equity officer, and to the Chairman o( the Senate Adjunct Committee on 
Human Relations, upon request 
L If a finding of probable cause is made but no mutually satisfactory sotutioo 
can be reached under the procedures outlined in Section K immediately 
preceding, the Office of Human Relations Programs shall initiate the 
following procedure the Office shall notify the Senate Adjunct Committee 
on Human Relations of the failure to reach a mutually satisfactory solution. 
whereupon, providing the complainant requests in writing a Human 
Relations Grievance Hearings, a Human Relations Grievance Committee 
shall be selected according to the procedures described m Article IV 
following Grievance hearing shall be dosed unless both parties to the 
dispute agree that the hearing, or any part thereof, shall be open to ttie 
public Ai! parlies to the dispute shall be sent withm five (5) working days 
of the written request of such a hearing, wntten notification of the time and 
place of the beginning of the hearing and a specific statement of the 
charges Heanngs shall be held as promptly as is consistent with allowing 
adequate time for the parlies to prepare their cases Continuances may be 
granted withm the discretion of the Office of Human Relations Programs All 
parties shall have ample opportunity to present their facts and a'guments 
in full during the hearing All findings, recommendations and conclusions 
by the Grievance Committee shall be based soieiy on the evidence 
presented dunng the hearing, and shall be based on a preponderance of 
the evidence having probative effect 

The burden of proof rests with the complainant The Grievance 
Committee may be assisted by an adviser All the parties to the dispute 
and the Grievance Committee may invite persons to testify dunng the 
hearing Each Side shaii have the right to cross-examine witnesses Each 
party has the right to be represented by counsel or other representative, 
but the University has no obligation to provide such counsel for any party 
to the dispute if a party intends to be represented by legai counsel du'mg 
the hearing, he/she shall inform the Office of Human Relations Programs of 
this fact no later than 72 hours pnor to the hearing, and that Office shall 
provide that information to the other party or parties A verbatim record 
shall be kept ot an sessions m which testimony and evidence is presented 
regarding the case, and this record shall be made available to an parties to 
the dispute at the conclusion of the proceedings Upon request the 
Chairman of the Gnevance Committee may. m his discretion, recess the 
hearing to permit review ot the record by one or more parties in tfie 
conduct of their case 

The Chairman of a Human Relations Grievance Committee wrfh the 
advice of the adviser, if there is one. shall rule on an matters of procedure 
and admissibility of evidence Any member of the Committee rxM 
concurring in the ruling of the Chair may request a Closed session of the 
Committee (or debate on the point A maionty vote ot the Committee will 
determine the fmai decision 

Formal 'uies of evidence shall riot be applicable to any hear>r>g before 
a Human Relations Grievance Committee and any evidence or testimony 
which the Committee t>eiieves to be relevant to a (air determination of the 



Human Relations Code 17 



complaint may be admitted The Committee reserves the right to exclude 
incompetent, irrelevant, immaterial and repetitious evidence 

M In cases ol allegations regarding prohibited discrimination concerning 

academic employment matters, a Human Relations Grievance Committee 

sha'l not substitute its ludgment ot academic competence tor the ludgmenl 

ol the appropriate colleagues ol the compiamani The lunction ol the 

Grievance Committee shall be to determine 

a whether there were dearly enunciated University. Campus and 

Departmental standards, policies, procedures and priorities by which to 

assess the merit ol the complaint, and whether the complainant was 

given a reasonable opportunity to demonstrate his/her academic merit, 

b whether the stated standards, policies, procedures and priorities were 

applied to the complainant m a nondiscriminatory manner 

N Within ten (10) working days alter hearing all the evidence and arguments, 
the Human Relations Grievance Committee shall prepare a written decision 
based solely on the evidence presented at the heanng This decision shall 
include a summary ol the evidence beiore the Committee and the 
Committee's tmdmgs as to whether or not a violation ol the Code has 
occurred, and the recommendations ol the Committee Grievance 
Committees may recommend whatever forms ol reiiel they deem 
appropriate, but must lake due cognizance ol the limitations imposed by 
State law and by the procedures established by the Board of Regents, lor 
example, the procedures by which promotion in academic rank is 
achieved Withm five (5) working days alter the decision has been filed in 
the Office of Human Relations Programs, the Director ot that Office will 
formally notify all parties to the dispute, the Chancellor and the Senate 
Adjunct Committee on Human Relations of the decision, 

The Chancellor shall within ten (10) working days ol his receipt of the 
decision ol the Human Relations Grievance Committee issue an order 
specilying what actions, it any. must be taken by individuals or groups 
found 10 be guilty ol violating the provisions ol this Code. 

P. When a hearing has been scheduled by an outside agency or court, the 
Olfice of Human Relations Programs may, with the approval of the Senate 
Adiunct Committee on Human Relations, prior to the convening of a Human 
Relations Grievance Committee to hear a case, postpone or terminate the 
Campus grievance proceedings when such postponement or termination is 
in Its judgment warranted by administrative considerations such as staff 
limitations and workload, or at the request of a party upon a showing that 
the Campus hearing will either conflict with the oil-Campus hearing, or that 
participation in the Campus hearing will unreasonably burden a party's 
preparation ol his/her case or othenAiise work to his'her prejudice Such 
postponement or termination shall be reported to the complainant, 
respondent and Chancellor, In any case where a complaint has been the 
subject ol prior administrative or judicial resolution or where a complaint 
becomes the subject ol such resolution dunng the course of proceedings 
under this Code, the procedures of this Code will not be applicable or will 
terminate, as the case may be. 

Q The Chancellor shall provide a written explanation of his order whenever 
that order is not in keeping with the findings and recommendations of the 
Human Relations Grievance Committee This explanation shall be sent to 
all parties to the dispute, to the Chairman of the Senate Adjunct Committee 
on Human Relations, to the Director of the Human Relations Programs and 
to the Chairman of the Senate. The Chairman of the Senate Adjunct 
Committee on Human Relations shall report to the Senate Executive 
Committee concerning the order and explanation at the next meeting of the 
Executive Committee, and that body shall put the matter on the agenda of 
the next meeting of the Senate 

R. When required by law, copies of the Human Relations Grievance 
Committee's findings and recommendations and of the Chancellor's order 
and explanation, if any, shall be sent to the State and Federal agencies 
charged with enforcement of Article 49B of the Annotated Code of 
Maryland and the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1968 or their 
successors. 

S. When a complainant receives a decision on his'her charge of 
discrimination from a Human Relations Grievance Committee that decision 
shall not be subject to review under any gnevance procedure in force on 
the Campus 

T. No affirmative relief shall be made to a complainant by the University 
unless the complainant executes the following release as part of a 
settlement agreement: 

The complainant hereby waives, releases and covenants not to sue The 

University ol Maryland or its otiicers. agents or employees with respect to 
any matters which were or might have been alleged as charges tiled under 
the Human Relations Code in the instant case, subject to performance by 
The University ol Maryland, its otiicers. agents and employees, ol the 
promises contained in this settlement agreement. 

Article IV Constitution of Human Relations Grievance 
Committee 

A A Human Relations Grievance Committee shall consist of five (5) members 

selected by an affirmative vote of at least two (2) members of a Selection 

Panel consisting of 

1 . The Vice Chancellor of the unit of the Campus within which the alleged 

discrimination fails. In cases of disputed jurisdiction, decisions as to 



which Vice Chancellor shall participate will be made by the several 
Vice Chancellors 

2 The Director ol the Office of Human Relations Programs 

3 The Chairman of the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations 

If any of these persons is unable to participate, he or she shall 
designate a suitable replacement 

B The selection of a Human Relations Grievance Committee shall be made in 
such a way as to promote a lair and impartial judgment An elfort shall be 
made to constitute the Grievance Committee of persons reasonably familiar 
with the kind of employment or other situation which the case concerns, 

C A determined effort shall be made to gam the consent of compiamani and 
respondent concerning the membership of the Grievance Committee II m 
the judgment of the Selection Panel such efforts tsecome unreasonably 
prolonged, membership will be determined by majority vote ot the 
Selection Panel 

D None of the members of a Grievance Committee shall have been involved 
in the action which is the subject of the complaint This Selection Panel 
shall remove a member ol a Grievance Committee whenever they Imd that 
member to have a personal involvement m that case, and may excuse a 
member from sen/mg on the Grievance Committee on grounds ol illness or 
on other reasonable grounds 

E Members of the Senate Adjunct Committee on Human Relations shall not 
be eligible concurrently for inclusion on Human Relations Grievance 
Committees. 

F The Chairman of a Human Relations Grievance Committee shall be elected 
by the members of the Committee 

G Members ot a Human Relations Grievance Committee and those officially 
involved in a hearing shall not be penalized either academically or 
financially lor time missed Irom work or classes during oHicial meetings ot 
the Committee. 

Article V The Equal Education and Employment 
Opportunity Officer 

A. Equal Education and Employment Opportunity Officers shall be 
instrumental in the implementation ol the Human Relations Code within 
each unit of the College Park campus. 
B Employees on all levels within each unit ol the Campus will have access to 
the assistance ol an EEEO Olticer In non-academic divisions, EEEO 
Officers shall be elected by unit employees under the supervision of the 
equity officer within whose responsibility the unit falls, or shall be selected 
by the unit Director in consultation with the appropriate equity officer, in 
either case in accordance with the Affirmative Action Plan ol that unit. 
EEEO Officers in the academic Divisions shall be chosen in the manner 
prescribed by the divisional council of each division. 
C. The functions of EEEO Officers shall include but not be limited to: 

1, Advising unit administrators with respect to the preparation plans, 
procedures, regulations, reports, and other matters pertaining to the 
Campus Human Relations Program. 
2 Evaluating periodically the effectiveness and sufficiency of unit 
Affirmative Action Plans and other unit plans in relation to the goals ol 
this Code, and reporting these to unit administrators with 
recommendations as to what improvements or corrections are needed. 

3. Participating in the development of policies and programs within units 
with respect to hiring and recruitment, training and upgrading, and in 
all matters pertaining to the elimination of discrimination prohibited by 
this Code. If a unit fails to develop policies and programs of this nature, 
it is the task of the EEEO Officer to act in an advocacy role and call 
this fact first to the attention of the unit administrator, and if no 
responsive action ensues, then to the Divisional Assistant lor Alfirmative 
Action The EEEO Olficer is free at all times to report such cases 
directly to the Office of Human Relations Programs and the Senate 
Adjunct Committee on Human Relations. 

4. Serving in a liaison capacity between the unit to which he/she is 
assigned and all segments of its personnel and attempting to remedy 
problems brought to his/her attention regarding alleged discrimination. 

5 Advising students or employees ot the unit who have reason to believe 
that discrimination as defined in this Code is occurring At the request 
of the aggrieved person the EEEO Officer shall keep any or all aspects 
of the grievance confidential until a formal complaint has been filed II 
the aggrieved so requests, the EEEO Officer shall attempt to resolve 
the matter, calling upon the assistance ol the equity otiicer where 
appropriate The EEEO Officer will keep a record of such advisory and 
conciliatory activities and periodically bnef the equity officer. 

6 Advismg and otherwise aidmg complainants in making formal 
complaints under this Code When a complaint is filed with an EEEO 
Oflicer, the complaint shall be lorwarded by that olficer within five (5) 
working days to the equity oflicer and the Office of Human Relations 
Programs. The EEEO Officer shall be available to assist in a 
preliminary investigation of the complaint conducted under the general 
supervision of the Office of Human Relations Programs, to determine 
whether there is probable cause to believe that prohibited 
discnmination has occurred. 

' Making recommendations to the Office ol Human Relations Programs to 
help facilitate human relations programs on Campus. 



18 University Policy on Disclosure of Student Records 



8 Assisting units in publicizing the functions o) EEEO OHicers 
9. Collecting pertinent mlofmation regarding tiinng. upgrading and 
promotion opportunities within units and disseminating sucli inlormation 
to appropriate personnel 
D The EEEO Otticer shall have the full support of the unit administration, the 
Divisional administration and the Office of Human Relations Programs The 
EEEO Officer shall be afforded reasonable time from other regular duties to 
perform the functions of the office These functions shall duality as part ol 
a workday in the case of a staff member and as partial fulfillment ot 
required committee loads in the case of faculty The EEEO Officer shall be 
free from interference, coercion, harassment, discrimination or 
unreasonable restraints in connection with the performance of the duties 
specified m this Code. 

Article VI Effective Date 

This Code shall be effective as of October 18. 1976. and shall apply only 
to those complaints alleging discriminatory acts which occurred on or after that 
date 

University Policy on Disclosure of 
Student Records 

Buckley Amendment 

The University of Maryland adheres to a policy of compliance with the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment) As such, it is 
the policy of the University (1) to permit students to inspect their education 
records. (2) to limit disclosure to others of personally identifiable information 
from education records without students' pnor written consent, and (3) to 
provide students the opportunity to seek correction of their education records 
where appropriate. 

/. Definitions 

A. "Student" means an individual who is or who has been in attendance at 
The University ot fvlaryiand It does not include any applicant for 
admission to the University who does not matnculate. even if he or she 
previously attended the University (Please note, however, that such an 
applicant would be considered a "student" with respect to his or her 
records relating to that previous attendance ) 

B. "Education records" include those records which contain information 
directly related to a student and which are maintained as olficial 
working files by the University The following are not education records; 

(1) records about students made by professors and administrators for 
their own use and not shown to others; 

(2) campus police records maintained solely for law enforcement 
purposes and kept separate from the education records described 
atxjve. 

(3) employment records, except where a currently enrolled student Is 
employed as a result ot his or her status as a student. 

(4) records of a physician, psychologist, or other recognized 
professional or paraprofessionai made or used only for treatment 
purposes and available only to persons • providing treatment. 
However, these records may be reviewed by an appropriate 
professional of the student's choice. 

(5) records which contain only information relating to a person's 
activities after that person is no longer a student at the University. 

//. It is the policy of The University of Maryland to permit students to inspect 
their education records. 

A. Right ot Access 

Each student has a right of access to his or her education records, 
except confidential letters of recommendation received prior to January 
1. 1975. and financial records of the student s parents. 

B. Waiver 

A student may. by a signed writing, waive his or her right of access to 
confidential recommendations in three areas admission to any 
educational institution, )ob placement, and receipt of honors and 
awards The University will not require such waivers as a condition for 
admission or receipt of any service or benefit normally provided to 
students It the student chooses to waive his or her right of access, he 
or she will be notified, upon written request, of the names of a" pe'sons 
making confidential recommendations Such recommendations will be 
used only for the purpose for which they were specifically intended A 
waiver may be revoked m writing at any time, and the revocation will 
apply to all subsequent recommendations, but not to recommenaations 
rece'ved while the wawer was m effect 

C. Types and Locations of Education Records, Titles of Records 
Custodians 

Please note that ail requests for access to records should be routed 
through the Registrations Office (see 11 D below) 
(1) Admissions 

Applications and transcripts from institutions previously attended 
a Undergraduate— Director ot Undergraduate Admissions, North 



Administration 
b Graduate— Director of Graduate Records. South Administration 

(2) Regislralions 

All on going academic and biographical records Graduate and 
Undergraduate— Director of Registrations, North Administration. 

(3) Departments 

Departmental offices. Chairmen (Check first with the Director of 
Registrations) (Miscellaneous records kept vary with the 
department ) 

(4) Deans and Provosts 

Deans and Provosts offices of each school Miscellaneous records. 
^5,1 Resident Lite 

North Administration. Director ot Resident Life Student's housing 
records. 

(6) Advisors 

Pre-Law Advisor Hornbake Library 

Pre-Dental Advisor: Turner Laboratory 

Pre-Medical Advisor Turner Latxiraiory 

Letters of evaluation, personal inlormation sheet, transcript, lest 

scores (if student permits) 

(7) Judicial Affairs 

North Administration Building. Director of Judicial Affairs. Students' 
judicial and disciplinary records. 

(8) Counseling Center 

Shoemaker Hall, Director Biographical data, summaries of 
conversations with students test results (Where records are made 
and used only for treatment purposes, they are not education 
records and are not subject to this policy ) 

(9) Financial Aid 

Underg'aduate— North Administration. Director of Financial Aid. 
Graduate and Professional Schools— Located m Dean's Offices 
Financial aid applications, needs analysts statements, awards made 
(no student access to parents' confidential statements). 

(10) Career Development Center 

Undergraduate Library, Director Recommendations, copies of 
academic records (unofficial) (note WAIVER section). 

(1 1) Business Services 

South Administration Building. Director. All student accounts 
receivable, records of students' financial charges, and credits with 
the University 
D. Procedure to be Followed 

Requests lor access should be made in writing to the Office of 
Registrations The University will comply with a request for access 
within a reasonable time, at least withm 45 days In the usual case. 
arrangements will be made for the student to read his or her records in 
the presence of a staff memtjer If facilities permit, a student may 
ordinarily obtain copies of his or her records by paying reproduction 
costs The fee for- copies is $ 25 per page No campus will provide 
copies of any transcripts in the students records other than the 
student's current University transcript from that campus Official 
University transcripts (with University seal) will be provided at a higher 
charge. 

///. It is the policy of The University of Maryland to limit disclosure of personally 
identifiable information from education records unless it has the student's 
prior written consent, subject to the following limitations and exclusions. 
A. Directory Information 

(l)The following categories of information have been designated 
directory information; 
Name 
Address 

Telephone listing 
Date and place of birth 
Photograph 
Maior field of study 

Participation m officially recognized activities and sports 
Weight and height of members of athletic teams 
Dates of attendance 
Degrees and awards received 
Most recent previous educational institution attended 

(2) This information will be disclosed even m the absence of consent 
unless the student files written notice informing the University not to 
disclose any or all of the categories withm three weeks of the first 
day ot the semester in which the student begins each school year. 
This notice must be filed annually withm the atx)ve anoted time to 
avoid automatic disclosure of directory information The notice 
should be filed with the campus registrations office See II C 

(3) The University will give annual public notice to students of the 
categories of information designated as directory information 

(4) Directory information may appear m public documents aixJ 
otherwise be disclosed without student consent unless the student 
obiecis as provided above 

(5) All requests for nondisclosure of directory information will be 
implemented as soon as publication schedules will reasonably 
allow 

(6) The University will use its best efforts to maintain the confidentiality 



Smoking Policy and Guidelines 19 



of ihose categories ot difectory inlormation which a student 
P'ope'ly requests not be publically Oisdosed The Unwe'sity, 
however, makes no representations, warranties or guarantees that 
directory intormation designated lor non-disclosure will not appear 
in puhiic aocumenis 

B. Prior Consent not Required 

Prior consent will not be required tor disclosure ol education records to 
the lollowing parties 

(1) School otticiais ot The University ot Maryland who have been 
deternnned to have legitimate educational interests. 

(a) "School oMiciais" include instructional or administrative 
personnel who are or may be in a position to use the 
inlormation in furtherance ol a legitimate obiective. 

(b) "Legjtimate educational interests" include Ihose interests 
directly related to the academic environment. 

(2) Otiiciais ol other schools in which a student seeks or intends to 
enroll or is enrolled Upon request, and at his or her expense, the 
student will be provided with a copy ol the records which have 
been translerred. 

(3) Authorized representatives of the Comptroller General ol the U S . 
the Secretary ol Education, the Secretary ol the Department ol 
Health and Human Services, the Director ol the National institute ol 
Education, the Administrator ol the Veterans' Administration, but 
only in connection with the audit or evaluation of lederaliy 
supported education programs, or in connection with the 
entorcement ol or compliance with federal legal requirements 
relating to these programs Subiect to controlling Federal law or 
prior consent, these otiiciais will protect inlormation received so as 
not to permit personal identification ot students to outsiders. 

(4) AuttKirized persons and organizations which are given work in 
connection with a student's application for. or receipt of. financial 
aid. but only lo the extent necessary lor such purposes as 
determining eligibility, amount, conditions and entorcement ol terms 
and conditions; 

(5) State and local officials to which such information is specifically 
required to be reported by effective state law adopted prior to 
November 19. 1974. 

(6) Organizations conducting educational studies lor the purpose of 
developing, validating, or administering predictive tests, 
administering student aid programs, and improving instruction The 
Studies shall be conducted so as not to permit personal 
identification of students to outsiders, and the inlormation will be 
destroyed when no longer needed lor these purposes. 

(7) Accrediting organizations for purposes necessary to carry out their 
functions. 

(8) Parents of a student wtw is a dependent for income tax purposes. 
(Note; The University may require documentation of dependent 
status such as copies of income tax forms ) 

(9) Appropriate parties in connection with an emergency, where 
knowledge ot the information is necessary to protect the health or 
safety ot the student or other individuals. 

(10) In response to a court order or subpoena. The University will make 
reasonable efforts to notify the student before complying with the 
court order 

C. Prior Consent Required 

In all other cases, the University will not release personally identifiable 
information in education records or allow access to those records 
without prior consent ol the student. Unless disclosure is to the student 
himself or herself, the consent must be written, signed, and dated, and 
must specify the records to be disclosed, the identity ol the recipient, 
and the purpose of disclosure A copy of the record disclosed will be 
provided to the student upon request and at his or her expense. 
0. Record of Disclosures 

The University will maintain with the student's education records a 
record lor each request and each disclosure, except lot the lollowing; 

(1 ) disclosures to the student himselt or hersell; 

(2) disclosures pursuant to the written consent of the student (the 
written consent itself will suffice as a record); 

(3) disclosures to instructional or administrative officials ot the 
University. 

(4) disclosures of directory information. 

This record of disclosures may be inspected by the student, the official 
custodian of the records, and other University and governmental 
officials. 

(V. It is the policy of The University of Maryland to provide students the 
opportunity 10 seek correction of their education records. 
A. Request to Correct Records 

A stuoent who believes that information contained in his or her 
education records is inaccurate, misleading, or violative of privacy or 
other rights may submit a written request to the Office of Registrations 
specifying the Oocumeni(s) bemg challenged and the basis for the 
complaint The request will be sent to the person responsible for any 
amendments to the record in question Withm a reasonable penod ol 
time of receipt of the request, the University will decide whether to 
amend the records in accordance with the request II the decision is to 



reiuse lo amend the student will be so rKdilied and will be advised ol 
the righi to a hearing He Or She may then exercise that right by written 
request to the OHice ol the Chancellor. 

B. Right to a Hearing 

Upon request by a student. Itie University will provide an opportunity 
lor a hearing to challenge the content of the students records A 
request lor a heanng should be m writing and submitted to the Olfice 
ol Registrations Wiltiin a reasonable lime ol receipt of the request, the 
student will be notified m wntmg ol the date, place, and iinte 
reasonably m advance of the hearing 

(1) Conduct ot the Hearing 

The hearing will be conducted by a University official who does not 
have a direct interest m the outcome The student will have a lull 
and fair opportunity lo present evidence relevant lo the issues 
raised and may be assisted or represented by individuals ol his or 
her choice at his or her own expense, including an attorney. 

(2) Decision 

Within a reasonable period of time after the conclusion ol the 
hearing, the University will notify Ihe student in writing of its 
decision The decision will be based solely upon evidence 
presented at the hearing and will include a summary of the 
evidence and the reasons lor the decision II the University decides 
thai the inlormation is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in 
violation of the privacy or other rights ol students, the University will 
amend the records accordingly 

C. Right to Place an Explanation In the Records 

If. as a result of the heanng. the University decides that the information 
is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of Ihe student's 
rights, the University will inform the student ol the right to place in his 
or her record a statement commenting on the inlormation and'or 
explaining any reasons lor disagreeing with Ihe University's decision. 
Any such explanation will be kept as part ol the student's record as 
long as the contested portion of the record is kept and will be 
disclosed whenever the contested portion ol the record is disclosed. 

v. Right to File Complaint 

A student alleging University noncompliance with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act may file a written complaint with the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA). Department ot 
Education. 400 Maryland Avenue. SW. Room 4074. Swilzer Building, 
Washington. D C 20202, 

Smoking Policy and Guidelines 

Effective Spring Semester 1986 

Policy 

It is hereby established as the policy of Ihe College Park Campus lo 
achieve a public environment as close to smoke-lree as practicably possible. 
Obtaining and maintaining this result will require the willingness, 
understanding, and patience of all members ol the campus community working 
together. 

Guidelines 

The following guidelines shall sen/e to implement the Campus Smoking 
Policy 

A Smoking is prohibited in indoor locations where smokers and 
rK}n-srTK>kers occupy the same area. Such areas include; 

1. Academic areas classrooms, lecture halls, seminar rooms, 
laDoratories. libraries computing facilities. 

2, Conference rooms, auditona. exhibition areas, indoor athletic 
facilities, theaters, pavilions, and retail stores. 

3 health facilities. 

4. Common'public areas (shared spaces not fully enclosed by floor to 
ceiling partitions and doors) including stainA/eils, elevators, 
escalators, lobbies, hallways, waiting rooms, reception areas, 
restrooms. and custonier service areas 
5 Any area in which a lire or safety hazard exists 
B Unit heads, or their designees, may estatjiish the following kxations as 
'Smoking Permitted Areas': 

1 Up to one-third ot dining, large lounge and other large open 
spaces, as long as ventilation is adequate Smoking ol cigars and 
pipes, however, is prohibited 

2 Rooms that have closed doors and floor-to-ceiling partitions as long 
as ventilation is adequate and non-smokers in adiaceni areas are 
not exposed to second hand or side-stream smoke 

3 The Director ol the Stamp Union may. at his/her discretion, allow 
groups and organizations with permanent offices in the Union lo 
determine the smoking policy in those offices Such individual 
policies must adhere to Ihe restnctions set lorth in Section ill. B. 2 
ol this policy 

The Director ol the Stamp Union may. at hisiher discretion, allow 



20 Administrative Offices 



cigafelle smoking by Q'oups making use of the G'and Ballroom. 

the Colony Ballfoom. line Alnum. and other rooms in the Union if 

tie'she determines that it is appropriate to the nature of the event 

scheduled 
C As a general rule, preferential consideration shall be given to 
non-smokers whenever it is clear that they are tieing exposed 
involuntarily to smoke. 

Compliance 

This policy relies on the thoughtfulness. consideration, and cooperation of 
smokers and non-smokers for its Success, it is the responsibility of ail 
members of the campus community to observe this Smoking Policy and 
Guidelines and to direct those who choose to smoke to designated Smoking 
Permitted areas. 

Complaints or concerns regarding this policy or disputes regarding its 
Implementation should be referred to the immediate supervisor for resolution If 
a resolution cannot be reached, the matter will be referred by the supervisor to 
the appropriate Department Head or Vice Chancellor for mediation. 

Other Policies 

This Smoking Policy does not supersede more restrictive policies which 
may be in force in compliance with federal, state, or local laws and 
ordinances, but shall be in addition thereto. 

Administrative Offices 

Office of the Cfiancellor 

The Office of the Chancellor is the chief academic and administrative office 
of the College Park Campus. 

Athletics 

The Department of Athletics is responsible for directing intercollegiate 
athletic programs for both women and men. 

Women s intercollegiate athletic teams include cross country, field hockey, 
and volleyball m the fall, basketball, swimming, indoor track, and gymnastics 
during the winter, and lacrosse and track in the spring Tennis competition is 
scheduled in both the fall and the spring seasons Both men s and women's 
teams compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference and the tvJational Collegiate 
Athletic Association (IMCAA). 

The University of Maryland Department of fntercoHegiate Athletics has 
mens teams in football, soccer, and cross country in the fall, basketball, 
swimming, wrestling, and indoor track during the winter, and baseball, golf, 
tennis, lacrosse, and outdoor track in the spring Maryland is a member of the 
Atlantic Coast Conference and the National Collegiate Athletic Association 
(NCAA). 

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Requirements for Student 
Athletes 

■> NCAA eligibility for regular season competition is based upon satisfactory 
completion of 24 semester hours of acceptable degree credits smce the 
beginning of the Student athlete's last season of competition. 

2 The calculation of credit hours shall be based upon hours accepted for 
degree credit at the institution, 

3 Hours earned in summer school may be utilized to satisfy academic credit 
requirements 

4 Students participating in sports which start competition in the fall semester 
have that fall, spring, and summer semesters to earn 24 credits 

5 Students participating in sports which start competition in the spring 
semester have that spring, summer, and fail semesters to earn 24 credits 

6 Credits in courses repeated which were previous F's will count toward the 
24 credits 

7. Credits in courses repeated which were previous D's will not count toward 
the 24 credits. 

Office of Human Relations Programs 

The Human Relations Office (HRO) is responsible for initiating action in 
compliance with campus, state, and federal directives designed to provide 
equal education and employment opportunities for College Park students and 
employees It also monitors the outcomes of actions taken m this regard, 
reporting its findings to the Chancellor, the Campus Senate and to the campus 
communily-at-iarge 

The HRO both sponsors programs which promote cross-cultural 
appreciation and processes complaints of discrimination, following procedures 
set forth in the Campus Human Relations Code Copies of the Code a'e 
available from the HRO and from the Offices of the Vice Chancellors and 
provosts of the ma)or divisions Divisional Equity Officers will provide them on 
request. 

Any student or employee having a concern about possible inequities in 
educational or employment matte's, or who wishes to register a complaint, may 
also contact a divisional eou>t" officer (see listing below). He/she may also 



contact the HRO Office in Room 1107 of the Hornbake Library 

(454-4707/4124) 

Minority and/or women students and staff wanting specific information 
about programs and opportunities available to them wiihm a particular 
academic or administrative division may contact that division s equity officer. 
The HRO will provide students and staff with general information on divisional 
equity efforts and on the status of equity and compliance matters 
campus-wide. 

Campus Equity Officer* 

HRO Campus Compliance Officer 454-4707/5924 

Ms Gladys Brown— 1 107 Hornbake Library 
Academic Affairs, OHice of 454-2052 

Dr Mane Davidson— 1 119 Main Administration Buiiding 
Administrative Affairs. Office of 454-4641 

Mr Lawrence Waters— 1 132 Main Administration Building 
Agricultural and Life Sciences. Division of 

Dr Amel Anderson— 1110 Symons Hall 454-5981 

Dr Robert S Beaie— 2222 Symons Hall 454-5206 

Arts and Humanities, Division of 454-6795 

Mr Kent Cartwnght- 1101 Francis Scott Key Hall 
Behavioral and Social Sciences, Division of 454-5272 

Dr Caroline Cody— 2141 Tydmgs Hall 
Human and Community Resources, Division of 454-6064 

Dr Thomas Coiey— 1120 Francis Scott Key Hall 
Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineering, Division of , . .454-4596 

Dr James Wallace— 2300 Mathematics Building 
Student Affairs. Office of 454-2925 

Ms Sharon L Fries— 2108 North Administration Building 

Office of Institutional Advancement 

The Office of Institutional Advancement conducts a variety of programs to 
develop greater understanding and support for UMCP among its many publics. 
Under the direction of the Vice Chancellor for Institutional Advancement, the 
office reports to ihe Chancellor. 

Units of this office include Development. Public Reiations'Public 
Information. Creative Services/Publications, and Alumni Programs These 
offices are responsible for all official campus-wide advancement proo'ams 
such as fund raising, alumni affairs, production of official campus pubi'Cations, 
films and video presentations, media relations, and management of mapr 
campus events and the Speakers Bureau. 



Office of Administrative Affairs 

Administrative Affairs is responsible for the effective management of the 
physical, fiscal, and staff support resources of the campus it also provides 
campus safety and security, materials management, administrative computing, 
and other necessary support services Of particular interest to students are 
Ihe community awareness and security programs offered by the University 
Police and the information and assistance services provided by the Bursar for 
concerns of students regarding University biihngs. 



Office of Student Affairs 

Office of Campus Activities 

The Office of Campus Activities provides advising, consultation, and 
assistance to campus student organizations tor Ihe primary purpose of 
enhancing the educational growth of leaders, members, and associates Efforts 
locus on encouragement of involvement m student lite activities on campus, 
establishing vanous campus programs for the benefit of the University 
community, and providing various leadership development opportunities The 
office maintains records pertaining to student activities and organizations 
coordinates the reservation of campus facilities for scheduled activities and 
manages the funds allocated from the student activities fee This office also 
serves as the liaison between Maryland s 50 fraternity and soronty chapters 
and the University administration. Office location. 1191 Stamp Union, 
Telephone 454-5605 

Office of Commuter Affairs 

The Office of Commuter Affairs, located in Room 1 195 of the Stamp Union, 
has established services to work on behalf, with and lor the commuter students 
at The University of Maryland In addition to the services descntjed be'ow, the 
office is actively involved m several research proiects and houses the National 
Clearinghouse for Commuter Programs Telephone 454-2255 

Oft-Campus Housing Service maintains up-to-date computerized listings of 
roor^s apartments and houses (both vacant and to share) Area maps 
apartment directories, and brochures concerning topics of interest to 
commuter students are available m the office Telephone 454-3645. 



Administrative Offices 21 



Carpooling . Students interested m forming a carpool can |oin the individual 
match up program by liUmg out an application at the OMice ol Commuter 
Affairs Studenl-fun regional carpoois are given assistance from OCA Students 
who carpool with three or more people may apply at OCA for preferred 
parking 

Shuttle Bus System is operated by the Office of Commuter Affairs for the 
security and convenience of all students The bus system otters live distinct 
programs Daytime commuter routes, evening security routes, evening security 
caiia-ride. transit service for the Disabled and charter service Schedules are 
available at the Stamp Union information Desk, the Office ol Commuter Affairs, 
and the Shuttie-Ulyl Ollice Telephone 454-5375 

Settling In. UMaps serve as a unique guide to the campus, helping students 
match their own interests with courses, careers, and opportunities (or 
involvement on campus Personal copies of Ul^^aps are available in the Ottice 
ao Commuter Aflairs 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center provides consultation to a variety of groups and 
individuals pertaining to educational or psychological issues of concern to 
them Available in the reception lobby are occupational and educational 
information as well as tape-recorded conversations with academic department 
chairpersons about maionng m their departments The Counseling Center 
includes five divisions listed below Brochures describing these programs and 
other written materials are available at the Center Records kept as part of 
providing counseling services are confidential and not part of the University's 
educational records. Counseling Center offices are located in the Shoemaker 
Building 

Counseling Service. Psychologists provide professional individual and group 
counseling services for students with educational-vocational and 
emotional-social adjustment concerns The service also offers a large variety 
of special counseling workshop programs on such topics as assertion trammg, 
reducing smoking, vocational planning, and stress management. Telephone: 
454-2931. 

Disabled Student Service. Professionals in this office provide sen/ices for 
disabled students including general campus information, assistance in locating 
interpreters, readers lor the bimd, and access guides to various buildings and 
facilities on campus Telephone 454-5028 (and TTY 454-5029). 

Parent Consultation and Child Evaluation Service. Professionals provide 
consultation, testing, and counseling for youngsters ages 5-14 and families. 
Telephone: 454-7203. 

Reading and Study Skills Laboratory. Educational specialists provide 
individual and group work for improving academic skills such as reading, 
wnting. listening, notetaking, and how to learn mathematics and science 
matenai Workshops offered by this unit cover such topics as study skills, time 
management, learning math skills, and exam anxiety. Telephone: 454-2935. 

Testing, Research and Data Processing Unit. National testing programs 
such as the CLEP. GRE and Mnier Analogies are administered through this 
office as well as testing for counseling purposes In addition, the staff 
members produce a wide variety of research reports on characteristics of 
students and the campus environment. Telephone: 454-3126. 

Dining Services 

Dining Sen/ices offers several meal plan alternatives to provide flexibility 
and convenience to students The plans include the Traditional Board Plan, the 
Point System. D S. Cash, and Charge-Ulvl. 

Traditional Meal Plan. A choice of 19. 15, or 10 meal plans is available for 
students who regularly eat in the Dining Halls. 

Point System Meal Plan. The Point System is designed for the student who 
does not eat m the dining halls often, and who wants to choose wliere, when, 
how often, and how much he or she wants to eat. 

D. S. Cash Card offers variety and an automatic discount of 10% on all Dining 
Services locations when an opening deposit of $300 or more is made into the 
D. S Cash account. 

Charge-UM is Dining Services' new interest-free charge plan A Charge-UM 
card offers dming at all Dining Services locations, including the Rossborough 
Inn. but paying only one bill 

In addition a number of eateries, snack bars, restaurants, and convenience 
stores are available to ail campus students, faculty and staff 

Students may apply for a meal plan in the Contract Office of Dining 
Services. Room 0144, South Campus Dining Hall. For additional inlormation, 
call 454-2905. 



Health Center 

The University Health Center, located on Campus Drive directly across 
(rom the Stamp Union, is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week Hours vary 
during semester breaks and holidays 

Students may be seen at the Health Center, by appointment between 8 
a m and 5pm Monday through Friday Urgent problems will be treated at 
any lime without an appointment 

Any currently registered student who has paid the health (ee is eligible (or 
care The health fee is included on the student s biH and covers routine health 
care costs tor the semester However, there are additional charges for special 
services such as X ray. laboratory tests, dental treatment, allergy injections, 
physical therapy, casts, and medication from the pharmacy. 

Health services provided by the Center include general medical care, skin 
care clinic, allergy cimic. sports medicme clmic. men s clmic. women s health 
clinic, laboratory services, X-ray. social services, pharmacy services, physical 
therapy clmic. dental ciimc. and mental health services Group and individual 
health education/counseling is available on topics such as stress, sexual 
health, alcohol and other drugs, and nutrition C P R framing, peer education 
and volunteer involvement are also available For information call 454-4922 

All care and treatment are absolutely confidential Access to medical 
records is limited to authorized Health Center personnel, unless wntten consent 
for release of information is obtained from the patient 

It is strongly recommended that students maintain some type of health 
insurance coverage For those who have no health insurance there is a policy 
available through the Health Center which covers mapr medical expenses, 
including a large portion of hospital costs. Contact the insurance clerk at the 
Health Center for further information 454-6750 

For more information concerning Health Center services call 454-3444. 

Intramural Sports and Recreation 

In their leisure time, thousands of undergraduate and graduate students. 
faculty and staff members take advantage of the many physical recreation 
programs conducted by the Intramural Sports and Recreation Staff. 

For those who enioy organized competitive tournaments, men and women 
(competing separately) may choose from bowling, box lacrosse, cross country, 
flag football, foul shooting, golf, one-on-one basketball, one-pitch softball, 
indoor and outdoor soccer, squash singles, weightiittmg. and wrestling. 

Sports offered for men and for women, as well as on a coed basis, include: 
badminton (singles and doubles), basketball, handball (8 & D). horseshoes (S 
&D). racquetball (S & D). softball. swimming and diving, table tennis (8 & D), 
tennis (S & D). track and field, and volleyball. 

Ivlost of the students living on campus compete for their residence 
unit — dormitory, fraternity, or sorority — while commuters either compete 
unaffiliated or with friends from their high school, neighborhood, or classes. 
The ISR staff helps players looking for teams to |Oin and coaches looking for 
players Graduate students, faculty and staff may play in the Coed 
Grad-Fac-Staff League, the Ivlen's Open League, or the Women's League. 

For purely recreational purposes, the PERH Building has badminton, 
basketball, handball, racquetball. squash and volleyball courts available along 
with weightiifting and matted rooms The Armory has basketball, volleyball and 
tennis courts and a ten-iaps-to-the-mile running track There are two swimming 
pods— in Cole and Preinkert field houses There are 38 outdoor tennis courts, 
32 of which are lighted. Aerobics sessions are conducted daily on a 
pay-as-you-go basis 

Student employment opportunities abound in ISR as game officials, 
tournament coordinators, recreation supervisors and utility personnel are 
needed regularly. No experience necessary Training is provided. 

Special events such as roller skating mghts, home-run derby, all-comers 
Indoor track and field meets, and a sports trivia bowl round out the fun-fnied 
program provided by the ISR staff. Mee\ them in Room 1104 of Reckord 
Armory or call 454-3124/5454. 

Judicial Programs 

General Policy 

The primary purpose for the imposition of discipline in the University setting 
is to protect the campus community and to create an atmosphere of personal 
freedom, in which the rights of all students and staff members are fully 
protected. 

Students may be accountable to both civil authorities and to the University 
for acts which constitute violations ol law and of University regulations. 
Likewise, an act constituting a violation ol the resident hall contract and 
University regulations may result in removal from University housing, the 
imposition of disciplinary sanctions, or both. 

General Statement of Student Responsibility 

Students are expected to conduct themselves at all times in a manner 
consistent with the tjmversity responsibility of ensuring to all members of the 
community the opportunity to pursue their educational objectives, and of 
protecting the safety, welfare, nghts, and property of all members of the 
community and of the University itself. 



22 Administrative Offices 



Judicial Programs Oftice 

The Judicial Programs Office directs tlie efforts of students and staff 
members m matters involving student discipline The responsibilities of the 
oltice include 1 ) determination of the disciplinary charges to be tiled against 
individual students or groups ot students. 2) interviewing and advising parties 
Involved in disciplinary proceedings. 3) supervising, training and advising the 
various ludicial boards, 4) reviewing the decisions of the ludicial boards. 5) 
maintenance ot all student disciplinary records, 6) collection and dissemination 
of research and analysis concerning student conduct. 

Student ludicial board members are invited to assume positions of 
responsibility in the University discipline system in order that they might 
contribute their insights to the resolutions ot disciplinary cases Final authority 
in disciplinary matters, however, is vested in the campus administration and in 
the Board ot Regents. 

Disciplinary Procedures 

Students accused of violating University regulations are accorded 
fundamental due process in disciplinary proceedings Formal rules of 
evidence, however, shall not be applicable, nor shall deviations from 
prescribed procedures necessarily invalidate a decision or proceeding, unless 
significant preiudice to one of the parties may result University hearing 
procedures are outlined in the document. Preparing lor a Hearing, available in 
the Judicial Programs Office. 

Motor Vehicle Administration 

Campus Parking Regulations. These regulations are designed to control the 
flow ot trattic. to prelect pedestrians, to permit access of emergency vehicles, 
and to provide parking spaces as fairly and conveniently as possible for 
students, faculty and staff, and campus visitors These regulations apply to 
anyone operating a motor vehicle on the College Park Campus. 

The Ivlotor Vehicle Administration— The University of (Maryland College Park 
(UfviCP MVA) is the office responsible tor administering the provisions of these 
regulations. 

Vehicle Registration 

Any motor vehicle (other than a moped) operated on campus by anyone 
(student, faculty, staff) affiliated with the University must be registered with the 
UMCP-MVA regardless of the legal ownership of the vehicle. This includes 
vehicles parked at gray parking meters. 

Student Registration 

Student vehicle permits will expire on date indicated on permits Student 
I D card and current state vehicle registration card will be required with 
applications for permits All student vehicles mus( display valid permits 

Resident students who have earned fewer than 56 Ufvl accepted semester 
credits are prohibited from operating a motor vehicle on the College Park 
Campus and from registering a vehicle, except with special permission. 
Details are available at the UMCP-MVA Office. 

Handicapped Parking 

Only vehicles displaying valid state issued handicapped license tags 
and/or window permits, identifying person or passenger as handicapped will 
be authorized to park in designated handicapped spaces, unpaid parking 
meters or any ungated parking area on this campus DAV tags or any locally 
issued tags, windshield permits or decais will not be recognized for this 
purpose Contact the UMCPMVA Office for details All persons associated with 
the University displaying sfafe issued handicapped parking identification must 
also display valid UfVICP-MVA permits. 

Based upon information available to the UMCP-MVA Office, there are 
instances wherein students are driving vehicles displaying handicapped 
identification and utilizing designated handicapped parking spaces, meters, 
and other areas to park even though the student is not handicapped in any 
manner Specific information concerning such abuses should be brought to the 
attention of the UMCP MVA Office for transmittal to State authorities. The 
person providing this information should be aware that he/she may be required 
to provide wntten/oral information to the investigating agency. 

Registration Fees 

Vehicles must be registered for the current academic year during the 
applicable registration penod A registration charge will be made (or each 
vehicle This lee is not relundable. 





Resident 


Commuter 




Students 


Students 


Fall Semester: 






First vehicle 


$25 00 


$20 00 


Each additional 






vehicle 


$1000 


$1000 


Spring Semester 






First vehicle 


$1300 


$1000 


Each additional 






vehicle 


$1000 


$10 00 


Summer Semester: 






First vehicle 


$7 00 


$5 00 


Each additional 






vehicle 


$1000 


$1000 



Motorcycles are consiaered in Ihe same category as any other vehicle lor Ihe purpose of 
registration. 

Trallic Regulations 

All motor vehicles are subiect to Maryland Department ol Transportation 
Articles while on the University campus Maryland State Uniform Citations may 
be issued by police personnel lor violations. 

Parking Regulations 

a The fact that a vehicle is parked in violation ol any regulation and does not 
receive a violation notice does not mean that the regulation is no longer in 
eltect. 

b Parking is authorized only in designated parking areas. It is impossible to 
mark with signs all areas ot University property where parking is prohibited. 
Parking is absolutely prohibited on grass plots, construction areas, or any 
place which will mar the landscaping, create a safety hazard or interfere 
with the use of University facilities (i e . loading zones, service areas, etc ). 
Vehicles parked in violation ol this section may be cited and lowed at 
owners expense. 

c Unauthorized vehicles parked in handicapped spaces amlfor adjacent 
transfer areas may be cited and towed at owners expense. Only those 
vehicles displaying valid state handicapped identification are authorized to 
park in handicapped spaces. 

d. Any motor vehicle parked in violation of towable offenses of The University 
of Maryland College Park regulations or abandoned on campus is subiect 
to removal and impoundment at the expense of the owner or operator The 
term abandonment, as it relates to motor vehicles parked on properly 
owned or leased by The University of Maryland, is defined by any of the 
following conditions: 

(1)Any vehicle which has not been moved for forty-eight (48) hours and 
whose owner or other claimant the University Police Department is 
unable to locate 

(2) Any vehicle which has not been moved for forty-eight (48) hiours and 
whose identifieo owner or other claimant refuses to move it 

(3) Any vehicle on which current license plates are not displayed and 
which has not been moved lor forty-eight (48) hours. 

(4) Any vehicle which has not been moved lor forty-eight (48) hours due to 
an inoperative condition caused by the removal of necessary parts or a 
wrecked condition. 

(5) Vehicles in inoperative condition must be immediately rerrroved from 
handicapped spaces, fire lanes, roadways and unpaid meters 

e All UMCP-MVA parking regulations must be observed during registration 
and examination periods, except as may be otherwise indicated by oflicial 
control signs Published notifications during certain exam periods and 
summer school sessions will be made which would allow student vehicles 
displaying UMCP-MVA permit to park in any numbered area (except Area 
19 which IS restricted at all times and Lot 8 which may be utilized dunng 
these times by compact vehicles only) Throughout the academic year 
faculty/staff must utilize their assigned area or authorized overflow area 
except during official UMCP observed holidays Restricted areas are in 
etiect at all times (this would include such areas as handicapped spaces. 
fire lanes, roadways, grassy areas, service areas, etc ). Parking meters 
must be paid as indicated on each meter at all times 

f. All vehicles operated on campus must be parked in assigned or authorized 
overflow areas only, between 7 am and 4 pm. Monday through Fnday. 
and in any numbered lot or unrestricted faculty-staff lot after 4pm daily 
and on weekends All persons must comply with the parking area usage 
and times which are posted on the signs at the entrance of each area 

g A vehicle must be parked in one space only, between two parallel wtiite 
lines, leaving clear access to adiacent spaces, and without blocking 
vehicles and driving lanes or creating a hazard tor other drivers 

h Parking or stopping is not permitted in driving lanes, on crosswalks Of 
pedestrian ways. 

I Parking or Standing on any campus road is prohibited at all limes. 
Unattended vehicles parked in violation of this section may be towed al 
owner's expense 

j. Parking or standing in any marked fire lane is prohibited at all tinnes 
Unattended vehicles parked in violation ot this section may be towed at 
owners expense 

k Parking or standing in a service area is prohibited at all times 

I Attended as utilized in these regulations means that the vehicle must be 
occupied by a licensed driver who would be prepared to move the vehicle 
should it become necessary 
m In cases where individuals are permitted to register more than one vehicle 
for parking on the UMCP campus, only one ot these vehicles may be 
parked on campus at any time 

n. Transfer of parking gate entrance cards is not authorized and could result 
in revocation of parking privileges in gated areas 

Violation Fees and Penalties 
a Any person associated with the University who operates an unregistered 

vehicle on the campus will be subiect to a payment of an eighteen dollar 

($18 00) penalty in addition to Ihe penalty tor any other regulation vidaiion 

connected therewith 
b Any person who registers a vehicle or displays decais or any olhef 

UMCP-MVA issued parking permits obtained contrary to the provisions of 



Administrative Offices 23 



these regulations or provides incorrect mlormalion to UMCPMVA will be 
subiect to payment ol a $50 00 penalty per violation 
c Violation ol any campus parking regulation ottier Itian improper registration 
will result in penalties as listed below 

(1) Parking an unauttiorized vetiide in a handicapped space or adjacent 

transler area, or m a marked lire lane $20 00 

(2) Parking in a designated Service Area $20 00 

(3) Parking in an area other than an assigned or designated overflow 

area $1000 

(4) Parking in a roadway $10 00 

(5) Parking on pedestrian ways, grass areas, plazas, loading zones. 

driving lanes, and any other places not designated lor 

parking $1500 

(6) Parking m expired meter spaces (per each meter period) $5 00 

(7) Unauthorized use ol blue visitor meters (UMCP altilialed persons 

parking at Wue meters) $15 00 

(8) Unauthorized use of Courier Meters $15 00 

d Violations are payable within fifteen (15) calendar days from the date of 
Issue at the UMCP-MVA Otiice during normal hours of operation and at 
drop boxes located at the Stamp Union Information d-^sk and UMCP-MVA. 
An additional penalty of $2 00 will be imposed for failure to pay violations 
and towing expenses within fifteen (15) calendar days from date of issue. 

e Unresolved parking violation notices may be referred to the appropriate 
slate MVA for flagging action and'or lowing at the owner's expense 

f. Flagrant violators of the parking regulations may be referred to the Office of 
Judicial Programs or appropriate administrative office for action. 

Appeals 

University of Maryland College Park and Univ^ersity College students may 
request a Student Traffic Appeals Board (STAB) review by completing and 
returning the parking violation notice m person to the STAB Office. 2112 North 
Administration Building. The University of Maryland College Park, Decisions of 
the Student Traffic Appeals Board will be final. Parking meter viotalions and 
towing lees will be reviewed by the UMCP MVA Office Alternatively, students 
may appeal to ttie Prince George's County District Court (PGCDC) by 
appropriately completing ttie necessary information on the back of the parking 
violation notice to (7/WCP-/WI//1, College Park, MD 20742 within 15 calendar 
days from date of issue. 

Parking violation notices issued to bona fide visitors, persons not students 
or employees of The University of Maryland College Park may be voided at the 
discretion of UMCP-MVA Visitors should complete all relevant information on 
the back of the parking violation notice and return it. within 15 calendar days of 
issue, to UMCP-MVA, College Park, MD 20742 All decisions of the MVA 
Director will be final Visitors may request a PGCDC trial in lieu of the written 
appeal by returning the PVN to UfACP-MVA, College Park. MD 20742 within 15 
calendar days from date of issue. 

Unattended vehicles parked or stopped in handicapped/transfer areas 
(without proper and current state issued handicapped identification), fire lanes, 
roadways and designated tow areas are subject to being towed at the owner's 
expense. 



Orientation 



By early April, or at the time of admission to the University, students will 
receive material on a program sponsored by the Office of Orientation. The 
pnmary purposes of the Orientation program are to provide new students with 
a general orientation to the University, and to coordinate iheir academic 
advisement and course registration Dunng the program students have the 
opportunity to interact formally and informally with faculty, administrators, 
undergraduate student advisors and other new students. 

Freshman students may elect to attend a one-day or two-day program. 
Programs tor freshmen are offered during the months of June, July, August 
and January. 

Transfer students are encouraged to attend a one-day program offered in 
the months prior to the semester of enrollment. 

Parents of new students are invited to attend a one-day program 
specifically designed to introduce parents to the academic, social and cultural 
milieu of the University These programs are ottered during the months of June, 
July. August, and January. 



Religious Programs 



A broad range of religious traditions is represented by the several 
chaplains and religious advisors at the University Individually and 
cooperatively, they offer many services including counseling, worship, student 
opportunities here and abroad, personal growth groups, and opportunities for 
service and involvement. Office locations: University Memorial Chapel and 
1148 Stamp Union. Telephone: 454-6532. 



Resident Life 

On. campus housing is available in 36 undergraduate residence halls which 
are near academic, cultural, social and recreational resources of the campus 
All-male, ail-lemale and coeducational livmg arrangements are available m the 
halls, which accommodate Irom 35 to 550 residents Traditional "dormitory 
style" residence haiis. apartment suites lor four or six students, and kiicheniess 
suites lor lour to seven students are available 

No student may be required to live on campus Once accommodated, a 
student may remain m residence hails throughout his or her undergraduate 
career Preference is given to smgle, full-time undergraduates, although 
graduate and paniime undergraduate students may apply An application is 
required Most of the 8000 available spaces each year are reserved by 
returning upperclass students The number of entering students from whom 
applications are received each year exceeds the approximately 3.000 spaces 
which remain. Applicants who cannot be accommodated at the start of 
classes each fall semester are placed m residence halls throughout the 
academic year as vacancies are identified Soon after application is made for 
housing services, each student is informed of the likelihood of securing 
accommodations for the start of classes and the advisability ol considering 
other housing alternatives 

The Department of Resident Life is responsible lor management of the 
residence halls as well as for cultural, educational, recreational, and social 
programming activities A staff of full-time, graduate and undergraduate 
employees in each ol five residential communities helps to meet community 
programming, physical environment and administrative needs These staffs 
work with other campus and State agencies to provide services and programs 
in accordance with University and State expectations. 

Inquiries should be directed to Information Services. 3118 North 
Administration Building. Department ol Resident Life, The University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, Telephone (301) 454-2711. 

Stamp Union 

The Adele H Stamp Union is the community center of the College Park 
Campus for all members of the University students, faculty, staff, alumni, and 
their guests The Union is not |ust a building; it is also an organization and a 
program The Union provides for the sen/ices. conveniences, and amenities of 
the University, 

The Union was built and furnished without the help of state or federal funds 
and is operated as a seif-supponmg facility, drawing its income from 
revenue-producing areas and student fees. 

Building Hours: 

Monday— Thursday 7an>-12 midnight 

Friday 7am-1am 

Saturday 8am-1am 

Sunday 12 noorv-12 midnight 

Stamp Union Services and Facilities: 

Services include: 

Art Gallery. Parents Association 

Bank Citizens Bank and Trust Co of Maryland 

Bookstore University Book Center 

Bulletin Boards 

Camping Equipment Rentals: Outhaus 

Campus Reservations 

Copy Machines 

Cralt Center 

Display Showcases 

Flower Cart 

Food Services 

Bakery Stop 

Banquets and Catering 

Butcher's Block 

Cook's Corner 

Dory's (Ice Cream) 

Farmers' Market 

Food Co-op 

Maryland Deli and Sandwich Factory 

Oasis 

Pizza 'n Pasta 

Pizza Shop 

Roy Rogers Family Restaurant 

This n That 

Vending Room 

W/hat's Your Beef Restaurant 
Information Center 
Lounges 

Meeting Rooms (Size from 8-1000 people) 
Piano Practice Rooms 
Record Coop 
Recreation (ienter 



24 Administrative Offices 



Billiards Room 

Bowling Lanes 

Pin Ball and Video Machines 

Table Games Room 
STAR (Student Tutorial Academic and Referral) Center 
Student Offices 
TV Room 
Ticket Ottice 

Campus Concerts 

Ticket Center 

Selected Off-Campus Events 
Union Stiop (snacks, tobacco, newspapers) 
US Postal Service Automated Facility 
William L. Hoff IVIovie Tfieater 

Directory: 

Information Center 454-2801 

Administration 454-2807 

Bowling and Billiards 454-2804 

Dial-an-Event 454-4321 

Program Office 454-4987 

Reservations— Campus/Cfiapel 454-4409 

Reservations— Union 454-2809 

Student Entertainment Enterprises 454-4546 

Ticket Office 454-2803 

Union l^ovie Scliedule 454-2594 

University Book Center 

Tfie University Book Center provides an on-campus textbook and supplies 
retail operation to meet tfie educational needs of tfie campus community The 
Center also sells cloltiing and otfier soft goods, plus novelties, computers, 
convenience foods, and personal fiygiene items. 

The University Book Center is located on the basement level of the Stamp 
Union and is open Monday through Thursday from 8 30 a m. to 7 30 p m , 
Friday from 8 30 a m to 4 30 p m . Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm,, and 
Sunday from noon to 5 p m. For additional information, call 454-3222 



Office of Academic Affairs 

Undergraduate Admissions 

The services offered by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions are 
designed to meet the individual needs of both prospective and enrolled 
students For prospective students, the office provides general information 
about the College Park Campus through brochures, letters, personal 
interviews, and campus tours It also evaluates the applications of both 
freshman and transfer students in order to select qualified students The Office 
of Reenroiiment reviews all applications for readmission and reinstatement. 
Services for enrolled students include acting as a liaison with the academic 
departments for the evaluation of transfer credits, advanced placement and 
CLEP scores, and providing any additional general information requested by 
enrolled students Please refer to page 28 for more information concerning 
undergraduate admission. 

Office location: Lower level, North Administration Building Telephone: 
454-5550 

Student Financial Aid 

The Office of Student Financial Aid administers a variety of financial 
assistance and student employment opportunities, primarily based on the need 
of the applicant The staff of the office is available for individual counseling on 
matters pertinent to financial planning for college expenses by the students 

See page 37 for more detailed information on opportunities for financial 
assistance Office location. Room 2130, North Administration Building, 
Telephone 454-3046 

International Education Services 

International students and faculty receive a wide variety of services 
designed to help tnem benefit from their experience in the United States 
International Education Services works very closely with the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions by evaluating academic records from overseas 
and processing applications for English proficiency, visa and financial 
requirements Other services provided to the prospective student include 
special advising and orientations, help with securing housing information 
about programs of special international interest, and assistance with the forms 
that are required for compliance with immigration and other governmental 
regulations 

Study Abroad Office. American students and faculty receive advisement 
and inloimation about study, travel and work in other countries Students may 
obtam assistance with transfer credits, reenroiiment. pre-registration and 
housing for the semester they return to campus The University of Maryland 



offers study abroad programs in Israel and London Information and 
advisement are also available about programs through other universities to 
most areas of the world 

Englist) Language Instniction to Non-native Speakers. The University of 
Maryland, through the Maryland English Institute, offers two programs ol 
English language instruction lor those who are not native speakers of English, 
For those students who are admissable but require part-time English 
instruction, the Maryland English Institute offers semi-intensive (pan-time) 
instruction Semi-intensive study would also require the student to enroll in a 
half-time academic program Applicants who need more instruction take an 
intensive (lull-time) program before beginning an academic program These 
programs are offered on a semester basis and are also available dunng the 
Summer During the summer only, semi-intensive instruction is also available to 
students not admitted to the College Park Campus For information regarding 
admission to the intensive Maryland English Institute, contact the International 
Education Services Office, 

The Office of International Education Services is located in Room 2115. 
North Administration Building Telephone: 454-3043. 

Minority Student Education 

The Office pf Minority Student Education (OMSE) was officially created oo 
July 1. 1972, as a result ol proposals and recommendations submitted to the 
Chancellor from the Campus Black Community and the Study Commission oo 
Student Life The office exists to enhance the personal and social development 
and the academic success of minority students The office mission is to work 
together with other resources on campus to provide support services for 
minority students throughout their college career at The University of Maryland, 

Throughout the year OMSE implements several key programs that have as 
their obiective enhancing the recruitment, retention, and graduation of minority 
students at The University of Maryland, Some of the programs, which 
constitute a supplemental support system, are the Personai/Sociai/Acaoemic 
(PSA) Program. Tutorial Program, Job Fair, and Minority Pre-Professional 
Academic Societies Program, 

The PSA Program is designed to utilize a team approach to prepare 
minority students for their academic and social experience at The University of 
Maryland College Park, OMSE. in coniunction with the various divisions and 
campus units, develops support teams with each consisting of a facuity'siafi 
member, a peer advisor and approximately fifteen students who meet twice a 
month These meetings consist of an orientation, rap sessions, workshops. 
and presentations by resources personnel, all in an effort to provide a sense of 
community and support for minority students. 

The OMSE Tutorial and Advisement Programs are designed to provide 
assistance to minority students on a walk-in or appointment basis 

The Job Fair, an annual event sponsored by OMSE in coniunction with the 
Career Development Center, brings representatives from local and national 
companies to interview students tor permanent positions, summer positions, 
and'or internships Workshops in resume writing and interviewing techniques 
are also available for students pnor to the Job Fair 

The Minority Pre-Proiessionai Academic Societies Program provides 
administrative, planning, organizational, and some financial support to eghi 
preprofessionai academic societies Their activities range from high scfxx}l 
visits, to workshops, to guest speakers m the respective disciplines 

Another component of the Office ol Minority Student Education is the 
Nyumburu Community Center. The Nyumburu (Swahili word meaning "freedom 
house") Center functions throughout the year to present a wide range of 
cultural events through a variety of art forms and the humanities Programs and 
activities presented by Nyumbu'u include symposia and workshops conducted 
by visiting artists and scholars in the areas of creative writing and literature, 
art. music, drama, and dance In addition to these activities Nyumburu Center 
sen/es as the sponsor ol several student clubs and activities 

The OMSE Office Complex contains a study-iounge which offers a relaxed, 
social atmosphere for students OMSE is located m Room IIOI, Hornbake 
Library Telephone 454-4901 For information about Nyumburu contact 
Nyumburu Community Center, South Campus Dmmg Hall, The University ot 
Maryland. College Park. MD 20742 Telephone 454-5774. 

Records and Registrations 

This oHice provides services to students and academic departments 
related to the processes of registration, scheduling, withdrawal, and 
graduation The office also maintains the students academic records and 
issues transcripts Telephone 454-5559 Siati members are available to 
students for consultation Location Registration counter, 1st floor. North 
Administration Buiidmg 

Office of the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate 

Studies 

General. The OHice of the Dean for Undergraduate Studies has overall 

responsibility for undergraduate advisement on the departmental, college and 
divisional levels The office maintains the Undergraduate Aovisement Center 
with a staff of advisors for students wtx5 have not yet decided upon a major 
Advisors are likewise available for students interested m p'epro'esS'Onal 
preparation lor medicine, dentistry and law Transfer or handicapped students 



Administrative Offices 25 



with special academic problems may also be advised through the otiice 

This oKice supervises a number ol special academic programs, including 
the Bachelor of General Studies Degree Program the General Honors Program 
and the Individual Studies Program The ollice interprets and entorces 
academic requirements and regulations (or undergraduates and administers 
Ihe program ol Credit by Exammaiion 

Acaaemic service components ol this office Include the Career 
Development Center, and the Office of Expenental Learning Programs 
(Cooperative Education, internships, volunteer programs (PACE)) 

The Office of the Dean tor Undergraduate Studies is located in Room 1115 
of the Hornbake Library. 

Degree Programs. Two undergraduate majors are directly administered by the 
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies General Studies and InOividuai 
Studies Both are designed to provide an alternative academic structure for 
students whose educational interests, process, o' goals do not readily coincide 
with the requirements of an existing departmental maior Both programs are 
particularly appropriate lor transfer students, older students, and others whose 
past credits and'or current interests span several fields of study 

The Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) program permits students to obtain 
an education m a broad range of disciplines Course selection is flexible, but 
there are limitations on the number of credits allowed from any one department 
and division 

The Individual Studies Program (ISVP) is for students with a clearly 
defined, wen-focused area of interest which crosses departmental lines The 
proposed maior must be outlined in detail and accepted by a faculty review 
committee 

More information on both programs can be found under "Campus-wide 
Programs" in this catalog or from the Office of the Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies, 1115 Hornbake Library, 454-2530/31, 

Career Development Center 

General The Career Development Center (CDC) supoons and assists 
students from all departments m early and systematic consideraiion of career 
Questions and concerns Wtiat are my interests, skills and values? What career 
areas are consistent with these characteristics? How do I select a career 
objective? Once decided, what are etiective strategies in securing a job or 
graduate school position? Ca'eer Development Center programs and services 
are designed to be used most effectively by students beginning in the 
freshman year and continuing through the college years Students who begin 
to plan their education and career early in their college experience will be in 
the best position to place themselves in a meaningful and rewarding position 
upon leaving The University of Maryland The Career Development Center is 
located in Rooms 3112, 3120 and 3121 of the Hornbake Library, South Wing, 
Phone 454-2813/14 

Career Development Center Programs 

Course: EDCP 108D — Career Planning and Decision Making. This course 
emphasizes the learning of the lifelong process of career planning. 
Assignments are chosen to facilitate self and career exploration, to teach 
effective decision-makmg applicable to college majors, career and future life 
and to develop job seeking skills. 

Placement Manual and Handouts. The Placement Manual provides detailed, 
comprehensive information regarding the services offered by the Career 
Development Center Career planning. |ob seeking strategies including resume 
writing and interviewing techniques are discussed and employers taking part in 
the On-Campus Recruiting Program are listed There are also numerous 
handouts, available to all students, covenng a wide variety of career planning 
topics. 

Credentials Service. Credentials are a student's permanent professional record 
including letters ol recommendation and course and resume information. All 
underg'aduate and graduate students are encouraged to develop a file prior to 
g-aduaiion to assist their |0b or graduate school application process. All senior 
education majors are required to file credentials. 

On-Campus Recruiting Program (OC.RP.) Each year 500-600 employers 
come to campus to interview interested students who are within two semesters 
of graduation They primarily represent career fields in business, accounting, 
computer science, engmeenng. and saies/markeimg Graduating students 
seeking placement in other career fields should meet with a career counselor 
prior to or as early as possible in their final two semesters to map out an 
effective job search strategy. 

Career Library. The Career Library is a fundamental resource for career 
exploration, decision-making, graduate school planning and jOb seeking It 
contains comprehensive reference material on ail aspects of work, education, 
and career exploration, as well as listings of |0b vacancies, employer and 
graduate school information, job seeking guides and videotapes of career 
workshops. 



Career Counselors Career counselors wiii assist students m identifying career 
I.- 1 , ,.ind educational programs suited to their interests and skills, and m 
ai'.i'ung the skills needed for their job search or career change 
Couiibeiors are available with or without an appointment. 



Group Programs and Campus-wide Events. Group programs on a wide vanety 
of career development topics run continuously throughout each semester Job 
Seeking Skills. The Summer Job Search. Orientation to O C R P and Interview 
Preparation are examples Campus-wide programs including career panels. 
Employers Forum and Graduate/Professional School Day and Job Fair bring 
students and representatives together tor information exchange and contact 

Office of Experiential Learning Programs 

The Office of Experiential Learning Programs (ELP) provides a number ol 
learning opportunities which involve students m the work of the community and 
the campus These programs encourage students to test classroom learning m 
work situations, explore career possibilities by direct participation, and 
enhance their personal development through work and volunteer experiences 
The programs mciude the following: 

Cooperative Education Program In LItieral Arts and Business. This 
progiam allows students to alternate semesters of on-campus study with 
semesters of fuii-time paid work experience in business or government To be 
eligible, a student must have completed 36 semester hours ol undergraduate 
work with at least a 2 grade pomi average While positions are competitive, 
and while opportunities are greatest in technical lields. placements are often 
available in areas ol traditional liberal arts majors. 

Internships and Field Experience. There are several ways for students to 
earn academic credit, usually 3-6 hours, through a work experience Two 
internship courses, 386 (Field Experience) and 387 (Analysis ol Field 
Experience), are used across the campus These courses allow students to 
develop individualized work and learning plans with a sponsoring faculty 
member After departmental approval, students must register for these courses 
concurrently Students may take the 386387 sequence only once in any 
department for a maximum of six credits, and may only take this sequence 
once in any given semester In addition, the student must prepare and submit 
a learning proposal to Experiential Learning Programs by the fourth week ol 
classes the semester of the internship The maximum number ol 386/387 
credits applicable toward a baccalaureate degree is 24. 

In addition, many academic departments offer their own internship 
programs ELP will help students match their interests with existing courses 
and nearly 2,000 local placements. 

Volunteer Service. The ELP Office maintains a listing of nearly 1 ,000 agencies 
and organizations which have expressed an interest in having interns or 
volunteers from The University of Maryland People Active in Community Effort 
(PACE) is a student-organized program which provides educationally valuable 
volunteer service opportunities. 

Information about all these programs may be obtained through the Office 
ol Experiential Learning Programs, 01 19 Hornbake Library. 454-4767. 

Undergraduate Advising Center 

Many University students choose to be "undecided" about choice of major. 
Some want more information about job opportunities before choosing: some 
may be considering several possible majors, some are trying out a variety ol 
courses, some really don't know what to choose 

Whatever their reason for wanting to be "undecided", these students have 
an administrative home in the Undergraduate Advising Center From the 
centers staff of advisors they can obtain much of the assistance they'll need 
for career decision-making, academic planning, scheduling, course selection, 
and a variety of other sen/ices. 

Preprofessional Advising: offering preprolessional advising (or Pre-Law 

students For further information on preprofessional advising for Pre-Medical. 
Pre-Dentai and Pre-Aliied Health students, consult the Campus-wide Programs 
section ol this catalog. 

Trouble Shooting: trouble shooting for individual students who are having 

ditt'Cjlty with administrative procedural problems, such as transfer-credit 
evaluation, schedule revisions, changing Divisions/Colleges'Depariments. 
errors in office records, etc. 

Policy Interpretation: keeping advisors inlormed about new academic policies 
and helping to interpret existing policies and practices. This service is 
available to individual students when they come to see us. 

Information, maintaining a central file of information about academic programs 
and requirements on the College Park Campus. 

Coordinated Problem-Solving: coordinating the campus-wide system of 
aovising. including helping individual students with specific advising problems. 



26 Administrative Offices 



the campus wide progtam of Honors Programs 



Credit-By-Exam: admimslenng 
credit by exairiinalion 

General Assistance— giving assistance to a lot of students with different 
kinds of problems and concerns Undergraduate Advising Center, Room 
1117, Hornbake Library. Phone 454-2733 or 454-3040. Health Professions 
Advising Office (PreDent/Pre-Med, Allied Health Programs), 454-2540: 
Credii-by-Exam/CLEP/Advanced Placement. 454-2731. 

General Academic Advising 

Academic advismg is available to all students al College Park It is the 
responsibility of the student to make arrangements for advising with the 
appropriate person 

Advising IS an essential part of an undergraduate's educational 
experiences at The University of Maryland From orientation to graduation, it 
can provide the kind of concerned assistance that helps students interpret, 
often enrich, their perceptions of "being in college " With its emphasis on 
decision-making planning, constructive action, effective advising highlights the 
connections between coursework and career, between learning and doing, 
between accepting advice and accepting responsibility. 

Advantages for Students. As an active and regular participant in existing 
advising programs, any student can reasonably expect — 

(1) to better understand his'her purposes for attending the University; 

(2) to develop insights about personal behavior which promotes improved 
adiustmeni to the campus setting. 

(3) to increase his/her awareness of academic programs and course offerings 
at College Park, 

(4) to more freauently explore opportunities outside the classroom for 
intellectual and cultural development: 

(5) to acquire some decision-makmg skills that can accelerate academic— and 
career-planning. 

(6) to more realistically evaluate his/her academic progress and its relationship 
to successful planning. 

Required Advising. For most students, advising is not required This allows 
individual students to decide, on the basis of personal circumstances and 
needs, whether or not to see an advisor. Certain categories of students, 
however, must obtain advising assistance. 

Students in their first semester registration at College Park. Students who are in 
their first semester of registration at College Park are urged to meet with an 
advisor pnor to scheduling their courses. 

Students Receiving an Academic Warning Students who receive an "Academic 
Warning" at the end of any semester will be u'ged. in writing, to meet with an 
advisor prior to the beginning of the next semester Students who do not meet 
with an advisor will not be allowed to drop or add courses or to register for the 
following semester. 

Students Dismissed from the University. Each student dismissed from the 
University for academic reasons must, as a condition of reinstatement, meet 
with an academic advisor According to the student s individual needs, this 
meeting may occur before or after reinstatement is granted, in no case, 
however, may a reinstated student complete registration until the fact of this 
meeting has been acknowledged/recorded by the advisor. 

Students Who Withdraw. Given circumstances deemed appropriate by the 
Office of Reenrollmenl. certain students applying for reinstatement following 
withdrawal may be required to meet with an advisor as a condition of their 
reinstatement When this occurs, the fact of the meeting must be 
acknowledged/recorded by an advisor before registration can be completed. 
The intent is to require advismg of those students who have a record of 
consecutive withdrawals, withdrawal dunng a semester following probation, 
and various other reasons for similar concern. 

Students Nearing Senior Status. After a student has earned between seventy 
and eighty credits toward a baccalaureate degree, that same student shall be 
urged in writing to meet with an advisor This meeting is for the express 
purpose of reviewing the student's progress toward the degree and, at a 
minimum, requires the advisor to detail, m writing, all coursework yet to be 
completed m fulfillment of the degree requirements 

Each division, college, and department will have available one or more 
advisors to meet with these students at the appropriate times. 

Finding an Advisor. Undergraduate students at the College Park Campus are 
encouraged to use the many advisement opportunities that are available to 
them At all academic levels — divisional, college, and departmental— at least 
one person had been designated to coordinate advismg A list of these 
persons, providing name, room number, and telephone extension is published 
each semester m the Schedule of Classes. Students who are unable to locale 
an advisor or who have questions about campus advismg programs should 
visit or call the Undergraduate Advising Center. Room 1117. Hornbake Library, 
454-2733 or 454-3040. 



A number of special opoonuniiies are available to energetic, academically 
talented students through the establishment of Honors Programs The General 
Honors Program is available to qualified students throughout the campus In 
addition there are Department Honors Programs in approximately 30 academic 
departments and colleges 

General Honors is intended to allow the students to pursue their general 
education at a challenging, demanding level Students can engage, with others 
of similar ability and varied interests, in a prrgram whose emphasis is on 
interdisciplinary and educationally broadening activity These studies 
complement the students' specialized work in whatever field Departmental 
Honors Programs offer students the opportunity to pursue more deeply their 
studies in their chosen fields of concentration 

Both programs offer challenging academic experiences characterized by 
small classes, active student participation, and an Honors faculty that 
encourages dialogue Individually guided research, field experience and 
independent study are important aspects of Honors work 

Many students enter the General Honors Program as freshmen They are 
selected on the basis of high school records, standardized test scores. 
personal achievements, and other evidences of ability and motivation. 
Undergraduates already on campus, maionng m any department, college, or 
division, and transfer students, are also encouraged to apply for admission. 
Departmental Honors Programs usually begin in the junior year, though some 
start earlier. 

Students who successfully complete the Honors curriculum graduate with a 
citation in General or Departmental Honors, or both. For information atxiut 
Departmental Programs, students should contact the department, lor 
information about the General Honors Program write to Or John Howarth, 
Director. Honors Program, The University of Maryland, College Park, MD 
20742, 



l-ionor Societies. 



Students who excel in scholarship and leadership may be invited to join 
the appropriate honor society For information, contact the Administrative Dean 
for Undergraduate Studies or the Undergraduate Advising Center. Honor 
societies at the College Park Campus include the following; 

Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engmeenng) 

•Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 

•Alpha Lambda Delta (Scholarship — Freshman) 

Alpha Zela (Agriculture) 

Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting Major in Business and Management) 

Beta Gamma Sigma (Business and Management) 

Delta Nu Alpha (Transportation) 

Delta Phi Alpha (National German Honors Society^ 

Eta Beta Rho (Hebrew) 

•Eta Kappa Nu (Electrical Engineering) 

Gamma Thela Upsiion (Geography) 

lota Lambda Sigma (Industnai Education) 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

Kappa Tau Alpha (Journalism) 

•Mortar Board (Scholarship and Leadership) 

Omega Chi Epsilon (Chemical Engineering) 

Omega Rho (Business and Management) 

Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

•Omicron Delta Kappa (Scholarship and Leadership) 

Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (Physical Education. Recreation and Health) 

•Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Phi Beta Kappa (Liberal Arts and Sciences) 

•Phi Eta Sigma (Scholarship — Freshman) 

•Phi Kappa Phi (Senior and Graduate Scholarship) 

•Phi Sigma (Biology) 

•Phi S'oma lota (French and Italian) 

Pi Alpha Xi (Floriculture) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 

Pi Pi (Slavic Languages) 

Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 

•Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Salamander (Fire Protection Engineering) 

Sigma Delta Chi (Society of Professional Journalists) 

Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish) 

S gma Gamma Tau (Aerospace Engineering) 

Sigma Phi Alpha (Dental Hygiene) 

•Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 



Members of Association of College Honor Societies 



Administrative Offices 27 



Election to Phi Beta Kappa 

O'QAiiizecl in 1776. Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely 
respected honoraty society in the United States Only twelve percent of 
Amefican colleges and universities have been granted chapters and thus can 
elect their graduates to membership 

Invitation to membership is based on outstanding scholastic achievement 
in studies of the liberal arts and sciences Student members are chosen 
entirely on the basis of academic excellence, neither extracurricular 
leadership nor service to the community is considered 

New members are nominated by a committee of six faculty members who 
represent in equal number the natural sciences, the social sciences and the 
humanities Final election to membership is by vole of the resident members 
of the University of Maryland Gamma Chapter (that is. faculty members who 
are members of Phi Beta Kappa) No more than ten percent of the liberal arts 
and sciences graduates may be elected each year 

Requirements for consideration include the following; 

1 Residence. At least half the credit hours required for graduation must be 
taken at The University of Maryland College Park 

2 Liberal Courses. Three-fourths of the hours required for graduation (i e . 90 
hours) must be in liberal arts or liberal sciences Liberal courses means 
courses that are theoretical and academic, not professional or applied 

3 Required Courses. One semester of mathematics and two semesters of a 
foreign language are required unless equivalent know'edge is shown 
through examination, 

4. Grade Point Average. The student must have attained a grade point 
average of at least 3 5 in all the liberal courses taken, 

5, Distribution of Courses. The credit hours presented for graduation must be 
more evenly distributed among the natural sciences, the social sciences, 
and the humanities than the University requires for graduation under the 
University Studies Program Minimal qualifications in more than one area 
may preclude election Students with strong courses, broad distribution. 
and moderately high grade point averages are preferred to those with a 
very high grade point average in a narrow range of courses. 



At least one laboratory course in the natural sciences is desirable Harder 
courses will count more than easy ones in the social sciences and the 
humanities, some traditional courses which require reading books and 
writing papers are expected Internships may be counted as professional, 
rather than liberal, courses 
6 Junior Election. A very small number of students are elected at the end of 
their lumor year instead of the semester in which they are graduated They 
must have at least a 3 75 grade point average, and fulfill the same 
distribution requirements as seniors 

Meeting the above requirements does not guarantee election to Phi 
Beta Kappa. The judgment of the Committee on the quality, depth and 
breadth ot the student's record Is the deciding factor in every case. 

Students who are in doubt about equivalency examinations in math and 
foreign language or about what courses are counted as liberal should visit the 
Phi Beta Kappa Office, Room 21 10. South Administration Building, or 
telephone 454-4981 

Commencement Honors 

Honors for excellence in scholarship are determined by the highest 2 
percent (Summa cum Laude). the next 3 percent (Magna cum Laude), and the 
following 5 percent (cum Laude) of the students of the preceding three 
commencements of each degree-granting unit. To be eligible for this 
recognition, a total of at least 60 semester credits earned at The University of 
Maryland is required Of these 60 credits, at least 30 credits must have been 
earned at the College Park Campus The computation ol the cumulative grade 
point average does not include grades for courses taken during the last 
semester of registration before graduation, although the hours earned for that 
semester will apply toward the 60-hour requirement. No student with a grade 
point average less than 3 000 will be considered. 



28 



Admissions, Fees, 
and Acadennic 
Requirennents 



Admission Requirements for 
Undergraduates 

Fall 1986 and Spring 1987 

The University of Maryland is a publidy-supporled land grant institution 
dedicated primarily to the educational needs of Maryland residents. Within its 
responsibilities as a State facility, the University attracts a cosmopolitan student 
body and each year offers admission to a number of promising men and 
women from other slates and jurisdictions Currently. 50 states, the District of 
Columbia. 2 territories, and 100 foreign countries are represented in the 
undergraduate population Admissions policies for the upcoming semesters 
are determined by the Board of Regents. 

Freshman Admissions Criteria: Maryland Residents 

Admission to the College Park Campus is competitive. The admissions 
decision is based primarily on grades earned in academic subjects beginning 
with the ninth grade. SAT composite scores on any single administration, and 
completion of specific high school courses. 

All freshmen are expected to have completed a rigorous high school 
curriculum Applicants meeting preferred admissions standards, which 
generally require a minimum of a 3 academic grade point average and a 
SAT composite score of at least 1.000. are encouraged to apply and are 
guaranteed admission. All other freshmen are urged to apply as early as 
possible to ensure full consideration for admission and other services. 

Individual Admissions 

Maryland residents who do not meet the established criteria may be 
considered via the Individual Admission Program The evaluation will take into 
account personal histories and extracurricular accomplishments Application 
forms for this program will be sent to all appropriate individuals. Personal 
recommendations from high school personnel and responsible members of the 
community will also be reviewed. Individual admissions shall be limited to 15 
percent of the new freshman class University-wide Each campus of the 
University will develop the criteria by which individual admissions will be 
administered For information pertaining to this category, please contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Use of Mid-Year Grades 

The University will reserve a decision on the applications of Maryland 
residents who do not meet the criteria outlined above until mid-year grades are 
available for the senior year in high school The College Park Campus is 
unable to utilize the final high school marks in rendering decisions for 
applicants who are applying for admission directly from high school 

If mid-year grades for the senior year in high school are available when an 
application is initially considered by the College Park admissions staff, they will 
be used in determining eligibility for admission. 

Subjects Used for Computation of the High School 
Academic Grade Point Average 

Because of variations in course titles in the secondary school systems, this 
listing is not inclusive It does, however, provide examples of the types of 
courses the College Park Campus utilizes in computing the high school 
academic grade point average. , 

English. Composition, Communications. Creative Writing, Conversational 
Language. Debate. Expressive Writing. Journalism, Language Arts, Literature, 
Public Speaking, Speech, World Literature. 

Foreign Languages. French, German, Greek. IHebrew, Italian, Latin, Russian, 

Spanish. Other 

Mathematics. Advanced Topics. Algebra I. Algebra 11. Analysis (or Elementary 
Analysis). Analytic Geometry. Calculus. Computer Math. Functions. Geometry. 
Mathematics II. Mathematics III, Mathematics IV. Matrices Probabilities. Modem 
Geometry. Probability and Statistics. EAM (Rev Acad Math), SMSG.. 
Modern Math, Trigonometry. 



Science. Advanced Bio'ogy. Advanced Chemistry. Bioiogy. Chemistry. Earth 
Science. General Science, Genetics, Geology, Laboratory Science, Physical 
Science, Physics. Space Science, Zoology 

Social Studies. Afro-American Studies, American History, Ancient History. 

Anthropology. Child Development. Civics-Citizenship, Contemporary Issues 
(CIS S ). Cultural Areas. Cultural Heritage, Economics. Economic Citizenship, 
Ethics (if considered to be Religion, not counted). European History. European 
History and Survey. Family Living. Far East. Pan American. Geography, 
Government. Humanities. International Affairs. Medieval History. Modem 
History. Modern Problems. National Government, Philosophy. Political Science, 
Problems of Democracy. Problems of 20th Century, Psychology, Sociology, 
State History, US. History, World Civilization, World Cultures 



Special Admission Options 



To serve students who are not typical freshmen, the College Park Campus 
has developed a variety of non-traditional admissions options: 

Admission Options for High Achieving High School Students 

1. Concurrent Enrollment. High school seniors who have earned a minimum 
3 50 (B-t-) average in academic subiects during grades ten and eleven 
may enroll on the College Park Campus for two courses or seven credits 
each semester. They must file a "concurrent admissions" application and 
transcripts. The permission of the high school is required and students 
must live within commuting distance. Fees are assessed on a per-credit 
hour basis. 

2 Summer Enrollment. High school students with minimum 3 00 (B) averages 
may enroll lor courses during the summer preceding their |unior or senior 
year They must file a regular application and transcripts. Fees are 
assessed on a per-credit hour basis 

3. Early Admission. Although The University of Maryland generally requires 
applicants to earn a high school diploma prior to their first registration, the 
College Park Campus will admit well-qualified students without this 
document provided: 

a they have a minimum B (3 0) average in academic subiects. 

b the student is within four semester courses (two credits) of high school 
graduation. 

c. the student has the commitment of the high school and tfie 
superintendent of schools, when appropriate, to award a high school 
diploma after successfully completing the freshman year 

4. Gifted Student Admission.Jhe University admits a limited number of gifted 
students who have completed at least the seventh grade, have an SAT 
combined score of 1200. and have a superior academic record Students 
must have an initial admissions conference with a member ol the 
Undergraduate Admissions staff The Admissions staff may. if it is deemed 
helpful to the admissions decision, make referrals for further assessment to 
campus counseling services. 

High School Equivalence Examination 

Maryland residents who are at least 16 years of age and who have not 
received a high school diploma may be considered for admission, provided 
they have earned the high school General Education Equivalency (GEO) 
certificate In order to be admitted, the applicant must present an average 
score ol 50 with no score below 40 on any of the five parts of the test. 
Alternately, a minimum score of 45 on each of the five pans of ihe test is also 
acceptable 

Non-Accredited Maryland High Schools 

There are specific SAT and GPA requirements tor applicants from 
non-accredited Maryland high schools 

All students who are admitted to the University from noo-accredited high 
schools will be enrolled with a "conditional status" Conditional status will be 
rerrioved. providing the student completes 24 credits and maintains at least a 
2 cumulative grade point average For more information, contact an 
admissions counselor 



Admission Requirements for Undergraduates 29 



Freshman Admission Requirements: 
Out-of-state Freshman 

The University is commiiied to developing a cosmopolitan student body. 
The'etore. applications trom lunsdiciions oitie' than Maryland are welcome. 
Generally, a successful out-ot-state applicant must have higher than average 
SAT scores and high school grades. 

Other Requirements for All Freshman Applicants 

In general the College Park Campus requires freshman applicants to earn 
a high school diploma prior to their first registration at the University 
Applicants should see that their final high school transcripts are sent to the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions prior to enrolling All admissions are 
contingent upon satisfactory completion ol current work. 

The SAT examination is required of all freshman applicants Test results 
must be submitted directly to the College Park Campus by the Educational 
Testing Service The applicant is strongly urged to include his/her social 
security number when registering for the SAT. This will expedite processing of 
the application for admission by the College Park Campus The reporting 
code tor the College Park Campus is 5814 The University strongly 
recommends that the SAT be taken as early as possible. The January test is 
generally the latest acceptable examination tor fall applicants Further 
jnlormation on the SAT may be obtained from high school guidance offices or 
directly from the Educational Testing Service, Princeton. New Jersey 08540. 

Designated Preparation for Admission 

Students will be required to successfully complete specified high school 
courses as a prerequisite for admission to the University Beginning with the 
summer and fall of 1984, and thereafter, a program of required high school 
academic coursework will be phased in. This will be a condition for both 
Preferred and Regular -Admission. Each undergraduate campus of the 
University may choose to exceed the minimum requirements outlined below: 

Fall 1986 

English — 4 years 

Social Science/History— 3 years 

Science — 2 years, one of which must be laboratory based 

Mathematics— 2 years, equivalent at least to Algebra I and Plane Geometry 

Fall 1987 

English — 4 years 

Social Science/History— 3 years 

Science— 2 years, both courses will be laboratory based 

Mathematics — 2 years, equivalent at least to Algebra I and Plane Geometry 

Fall 1988 

English — 4 years 

Social Science/History — 3 years 

Science — 2 years, both courses will be laboratory based 

Mathematics— 3 years, at least equivalent to Algebra I, II and Plane 

Geometry 

Students are strongly encouraged to take at least 2 years of a foreign 
language and a fourth year of mathematics. Please contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions for further information. 

Proficiency Examination Programs 

Whether you are a new student, a continuing or returning student, the 
College Park Campus offers several opportunities to earn college credit 
through satisfactory achievement m a variety of examinations. Proficiency 
examinations are considered as resident credits. 

Currently, undergraduate students may earn credit through various 
proficiency examination programs up to a total of one-half of the credits 
required for their degree. It is the student's responsibility to consult with the 
appropriate divisional officer, dean and advisor with regard to applicability of 
any credit earned by examination to a specific degree program and to 
determine courses which should not be elected in order to avoid duplication A 
student will not receive credit for twtti passing an examination in a course and 
completing the same course. 

Stuaents with specific questions about the University's policy may contact 
the Director, Special Advising Programs. Room 1117, Hornbake Library 
(454-2731) 

Three proficiency examination programs are recognized for credit by the 
College Park Campus: College Level Examination Program (CLEP), 
Departmental Proficiency Examinations (Credit by Examination), and the 
Advanced Placement (A P ) Program Credits earned under the Credit by 
Examination Program are consiOered to be resident credits while credits 
earned through the CLEP and AP programs are treated as transfer credits For 
descriptions of CLEP and the Credit by Examination Programs, please consult 
the descriptions of these programs under Academic Regulations and 
Requirements. 



Advanced Placement Program (A.P.). Students must take A P examinations 
before graouating from high school, testing for the A P program is conoucted 
in late April or May of each year The Advanced Placement Program of the 
College Entrance Examination Board is accepted by the College Park Campus 
Detailed information concerning the examinations and registration may be 
obtained from the high school guidance counselor or from the Director ol 
Advanced Placement Program, College Entrance Examination Board, 888 
Seventh Avenue. New York. NY 10018 

Students intending to enroll at College Park should have the results of their 
A P examinations forwarded to the Office ol Admissions. University of 
Maryland, College Park 20742. 

A.P. Examinations Accepted for Credit at UUCP 

General Statement If Advanced Placement credits are already on a student 
record from an institution outside The University of Maryland System, the score 
must be equivalent to a minimum University score, otherwise, the credit will not 
be considered for transfer. 

Biology. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4. eight hours of credit are 
granted The student may not take BOTN 101 or ZOOI 101 lor credit: the 
student may take any course for which BOTN 101 or ZOOL 101 is prerequisite. 
For achievement of a score of 3. four hours ol credit are granted A student 
who wishes to go further in botany or zoology should consult with his advisor 
or the appropriate department head about his exact placement in his individual 
curriculum. 



Chemistry. For achievement of a score of 5 
granted The student may not take CHEM 101 
credit, the student may take any course for whi 
For achievement of a score of 3. four hours of 
may not take CHEM 101, 102, 103, or 105 for 
for which CHEM 103 or 105 is a prerequisi 
additional courses in chemistry should consult 
concerning his exact placement in a sequence 



or 4, eight hours of credit are 
, 102, 103, 105, 113 or 115 tor 
ich CHEM 113 IS a prerequisite, 
credit are granted The student 
credit, he may take any course 
te A student desiring to take 
with the Chemistry Department 
appropnate to his curriculum. 



Computer Science. Upon achieving a score of 4 or 5, four hours ol credit will 
be granted. The student may not take CMSC 120 for credit. 

English. Upon achieving a score of 4 or 5. irrespective of one's SAT Verbal 
Score, or a score of 3 plus a SAT Verbal Score of 600 or above, six hours of 
credit will be granted (three for English 101 and three for English 102) For a 
score of 3 with a SAT Verbal Score below 600. three hours of credit will be 
given for English 102, but this does not exempt a student from the required 
English 101. A score of 4 or 5 exempts one from the junior level requirement. 

Music Listening and Literature. Upon achieving a score of 3 or better, three 
hours of credit will be granted. The student may not take MUSC 130 for credit. 

Music Theory. Upon achieving a score of 3 non-music majors only will be 
granted 3 credits for MUSC 140 For a score of 4 or better non majors on/y will 
be granted 6 credits, and may not take MUSC 140 and 141 Upon achieving a 
score of 4 music majors only will receive 3 credits and may not take MUSC 
150 for credit For a score of 5 music majors only will receive 6 credits and 
may not take either MUSC 150 or 151 for credit. 

Mathematics. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on the calculus BC test. 
eight hours of credit are granted The student who wishes to take further 
mathematics will be placed (usually) in MATH 240 or 241 . For achievement of 
a score of 3, either four or eight hours of credit are granted four hours to a 
student placed in MATH 141 and eight hours to a student placed in MATH 
240 

For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 in the calculus AB test, four or eight 
hours credit are granted four hours to a student placed in MATH 141 and 
eight hours to a student placed in MATH 250. For achievement ol a score of 
3, either three or four hours of credit are granted three hours to a student 
placed in MATH 221 and four hours to a student placed in MATH 141. 

In any case, a student may not take for credit any course of lower level 
than that of his placement. However, any student given permission to register 
in MATH 150 may do SO without loss of the credit granted him. 

Actual placement will follow from a personal interview of each qualifying 
student with the Chairman, Advanced Placement Committee of the Department 
of Mathematics. 

Physics. Placement in physics is necessarily related to the student's level of 
mathematical sophistication, consequently, scores on the mathematics test are 
considered in coniunction with those on the physics test. Specific placement 
and credit arrangements are: 

a. For achievement of a score of 4 or better on the calculus BC test and a 
score of 4 or better on each part of the physics course C test the student 
may receive credit for courses 161-262 or 141-142. For those interested in 
the physics maior sequence 191-192. 293-294, eight credits will be 
granted and the student will be placed in a course appropriate to his level 
after consultation with his advisor. 
b For achievement of a score of 4 or better on the calculus BC test, and a 
score of 4 or better only on part I (II) of the physics course C test the 
student may receive credit for courses 161 (262) or 141 (142) Those 
interested in the 191-192. 293-294 sequence will receive four credits and 



30 Admission Requirements for Undergraduates 



be placed in a course alter discussion with their adviso's 
c Three hours ot credit will be granted lor each pan ol the physics course C 

test passed with a score ol 3 or better Six hours ol credit will be granted 

lor a score ol 4 or better on the physics course B test In both these cases 

the granting ol credit is independent ol the score on the calculus BC test 
d A student with 3 or 6 advanced placement credits in PHYS 121 or 122. but 

needing additional credits lor the laboratory work should contact the 

Associate Chairman, Department ol Physics. 454-3403 
e Physics and astronomy majors should consult with their advisors and all 

others with the advanced placement advisor about how best to use 

advanced placement and credit. 

American History. Students who attain a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced 
Placement examination in American history are given six hours ol lower-level 
credit in history, they may not take HIST 156 or 157 lor credit, but may take 
any courses for which these are prerequisites Students who attain a score ol 3 
on this examination are given three hours of lower-level credit m history they 
may not take both HIST 156 and 157 lor credit, but may take any courses lor 
which these are prerequisite. Elective credit only. 

European History. Students who attain a score ol 4 or 5 on the Advanced 
Placement examination in European history are given six hours of lower-level 
credit in history, they may not take HIST 130. 131. 132 or 133 for credit, but 
may take any courses lor which these are prerequisite Students who attain a 
score ol 3 are given three hours ol credit, they may not take HIST 130. 131, 
132 or 133 but may take any courses lor which these are prerequisites. 
Elective credit only. 

Latin. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on the Virgil test, six hours of credit 
are granted, however, only three ot these may be applied toward meeting the 
requirements lor a maior in Latin For achievement of a score of 3. three hours 
ol credit are granted A student receiving credit on the basis of the Advanced 
Placement examination may not take LAIN 305 or any lower numbered 
courses for credit A student who wishes to take further work in Latin should 
register for LATN 351 (No advanced placement credit is given for 
performance on the comedy, lyric, or prose examination.) 

French. For achievement of a score of 3 on the French language examination. 
three hours of credit are earned The student may take either FREN 201 or 21 1 
for credit For achievement of a score of 4 or 5 on the French language 
examination, six hours of credit are earned The student may not take FREN 
201 or 211 for credit (Native speakers of French, i e . those whose language 
of instruction in elementary school was French may not earn credit by means 
ol this examination ) 

For achievement of a score ot 3 or better on the French literature 
examination, three hours of credit are earned The student may not take more 
than one of the following for credit FREN 251 . 252 For achievement of a score 
of 4 or 5 on the French literature examination, six hours of credit are earned. 
The student may not take FREN 251 or 252 for credit. 

Students who wish to continue in French must consult with the Deparlment 
of French regarding placement. 

German. For achievement of a score of 3 or better, six hours of credit are 
granted The student may not take GERM 111. 112. 114 or 115 for credit. A 
student who wishes to continue with German should take GERM 301 or 221. 

Spanish. For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on the Spanish language 
examination, six hours of credit are granted If the student wishes to continue 
in Spanish, he must begin with courses on the 300 level, alter consultation with 
a departmental advisor. 

For achievement ol a score ot 3 on the language examination, three hours 
of credit are granted A student who wishes to continue in Spanish must begin 
with courses on the 200 level. 

For achievement of a score of 5 or 4 on the Spanish literature examination, 
six hours of credit are granted For a score ot 3 on the literature examination, 
three hours of credit are granted A student wishing lo continue in Spanish 
literature must lake SPAN 221 or higher. 

Art. For achievement ot a score ot 3. three hours of credit are granted for 
ARTH 100 For a score of 4 or 5, Six hours of credit are granted for ARTH 260 
and 261. 

Transfer Admission Requirements 

A student wtx5 has attended any institution ot higher learning following 
graduation from high school and attempted nine or more credits must be 
considered tor admission as a transfer student In calculating eligibility, the 
University will use the average stated on the transcript by the sending 
institution When an applicant has attended more than one institution, a 
cumulative average lor all previous college work attempted will be used 
Transfer applicants must be in good academic and disciplinary standing at 
their previous institutions to be eligible for possible transfer lo the College Park 
Campus 

Where the numlDer of students desiring admission exceeds the number that 
can be accommodated in a particular professional or specialized program, 
admission will be based on criteria developed by the University to select the 
best qualified students. 



Requirements 

Those Admissible as High School Seniors. Students who are eligible lor 
admission as high school seniors and who are in good academic and 
disciplinary standing at their previous institutions are eligible to be considered 
lor transier Transfer applicants must have a C average in ail previous 
college-level work to be admitted. 

Those Not Admissible as High School Seniors. Students who are not 
admissible as high school seniors must complete at least 28 semester hours 
with a C or better cumulative average at another institution. 

Undergraduate Students Transferring from Within the 
University System 

A student seeking to move Irom one campus ot the University to another 
must have been a regular degree-seeking student eligible to return to his or 
her original campus. 

Students who were special or non-degree students or undergraduate 
students who have been academically dismissed by one campus must contact 
the admissions ollice ol the receiving campus. 

Students must comply with the normal deadlines and. where space is 
limited, admission ro the new campus will be based on cntena designed to 
select the best quaiilied students. 

Transfer Students from Maryland Community Colleges 

Currently. Maryland residents who attend Maryland public community 
colleges may be admitted in accordance with the cntena outlined in the 
general statement above The University subscribes to the policies set forth in 
the Maryland State Board ol Higher Education Transier Policies Where the 
number ol students desinng admission exceeds the number that can be 
accommodated in a particular professional or specialized program, admission 
will be based on cnteria developed by the University to select the best 
qualified students. 

Transfer of Credits 

General Statement. In general, credit from academic courses taken at 

institutions of higher education accredited by a Regional Accrediting 
Association will transier. provided that the appropriate academic officials at 
this campus consider such courses pan ol the student's curncuiar program 
and that the student earned at least grades of C in those courses An 
academic advisor will discuss this and other matters dunng the period of 
registration, 

Maryland Public Colleges and Universities. Transfer of coursework 

completed at Maryland public colleges and universities is covered by ttie 
Maryland State Board for Higher Education Transfer Policies, 

Community College Articulated Programs. An anicuiated transfer program is 

a list of community college courses which best prepare the applicant tor a 
panicuiar course of study at College Park If the applicant takes appropriate 
courses which are specified m the articulated program guide, and earns an 
acceptable grade, he/she is guaranteed transfer with no loss ot credit 

Amcuiated career program guides help students plan their new programs 
after changing career obiectives The guides are available at the Office oJ 
Undergraduate Admissions on the College Park Campus and in the transier 
advisor s office at each of the community colleges if the applicant checks this 
guide he'she can eliminate all doubt concerning transfer ot courses by 
following a program outlined m the guide. 

University of Maryland System. Credits and grades tor undergraduate 

courses will transfer to the College Park Campus Irom other University o( 
Maryland campuses The applicability ol these courses to the particular 
program chosen at College Park will be determined by an academic 
advisorevaiuator in the ollice ol the dean or provost (see section on 
Orientation Programs, below). 

Other Universities and Colleges. Credit will transier irom institutions ot higher 
education accredited by a Regional Accrediting Association (i e , M'ddie States 
Association ol Colleges and Schools. New England Association ol Schools arxJ 
Colleges. Nonh Central Association ol Colleges and Schools. Nonhwest 
Association ot Colleges and Schools. Southern Association ol Colleges ar>d 
Schools, Western Association ot Colleges and Schools), provided that the 
course is completed with at least a grade of C and the course is similar In 
content to work offered at College Park The applicability ol these courses lo 
the particular course ol study chosen at Conege Park will t>e determined t>y an 
academic advisor'evaiuator m the office ol the appropnate dean or provost. 

Foreign Language Credit. Transier foreign language credit is usually 
acceptable m meeimg requirements Prospective students should consult ttie 
appropriate sections ol this catalog to determine the specific requirements ol 
various colleges and curricula 

Advanced Placement Credit, it Advanced Placement credits are already on a 

student record Irom an institution outside The University ol Maryland System. 



Admission Requirements for Undergraduates 31 



the score must be equivalent to a minimum University score or the credit will 
not be considered tor transfer. 

State Board for Higher Education Transfer Poiicies 

The Universitv ol Waryiand tuHy subscribes to the Maryland Stale Board fof 
Higher Education Transfer Policies A complete text ol the policy lonows 

These Student Transfer Policies, developed by a special task force of the 
Segmental Advisory Committee, were adopted by ttie Maryland Stale Board lor 
Higher Education on hJovember 1. 1979 In view ol the Boards sensitivity to the 
need ol the institutions and segment txards to have suUicient lead time to 
make these policies operational, the new policies shall be ellective and 
applicable to students enrolling in Maryland's public poslsecondary education 
institutions in fall. 1980, and ihereatter At that time they will supersede SBHE 
student transler policies in effect since 1972. 

Preamble 

The major obieclive of these policies is to relate in operational ways the 
undergraduate programs offered in the public sector ot higher education in 
Maryland These policies aim at equal treatment of native and transfer 
students The etiectiveness of these policies, since their promulgation in 
December 1972. has been confirmed by the minimal loss of credits 
experienced by students transferring within the public sector, by the apparent 
satisfaction of these students, and by the absence of appeals concerning the 
transferring of credits 

The intended principal benefactor is the student, who is best served by 
current information atx)ut programs and protected by lirm arrangements 
among the public segments ot higher education in Maryland which permit him 
to plan a total degree program from the outset With successful academic 
performance, he or she can make uninterrupted progress even though transfer 
is involved The measures of the eftectiveness of the plan is maximum 
transferability of college level credits withm the parameters of this agreement. 
Essentially, transfer and native students are to be governed by the same 
academic rules and regulations. 

In a complementary way the State's interests are served by having its 
higher education resources used optimally by reducing the time taken to 
complete a degree through the avoidance of repeated class experience. 

The institutional interests are protected also by the systematic approach; 
institutions are relieved ot the uncertainties of unplanned articulation without 
becoming production line enterprises. 

The dynamics of higher education preclude one-and-for-all time curricula 
and perpetual grading and retention systems However, within the general 
structure ol this plan there is opportunity tor continual updating of the details. 

In more specific ways this document's purpose is (1) to recommend 
specific areas of agreement among the public two-year and four-year 
institutions of higher education pertaining to facilitating the transfer of students 
within these segments, (2) to provide for a continuous evaluation and review of 
programs, policies, procedures, and relationships affecting transfer of 
students. (3) to recommend such revisions as are needed to promote the 
academic success and general well-being of the transfer student, and (4) to 
provide a system tor appeals. 

Policies 

1 . Public four-year colleges and universities shall require attainment of an 
overall 2 average on a tour-pomt scale by Maryland resident transfer 
students as one standard for admission It the student has attended two or 
nxjre institutions, the overall 2 will be computed on grades received in 
courses earned at all institutions attended unless the student presents an 
Associate in Arts degree 

(a) Each public institution of higher education shall designate a person 
responsible for coordinating transferability to assist m accomplishing 
the policies and procedures outlined in this plan The State Board for 
Higher Education will support requests by a public institution of higher 
education to establish the position of transler coordinator. 

(b) Ettons shall be intensified among the sending institutions, based on 
shared information, to counsel students on the basis of their likelihood 
of success in various programs and at various institutions. (See par. 1 
(c) and par 9). 

(c) Procedures for reporting the progress of students who transfer within 
the State shall be developed as one means ot improving the 
counseling of prospective transfer students 

2. Admission requirements and curriculum prerequisites shall be stated 
explicitly in institutional publications Students who enroll at Maryland 
Community Colleges shall be encouraged to complete the Associate in 
Arts degree or to complete 56 hours in a planned sequence of courses 
which relate to general education and the selection of a maior before 
transfer Subsequent graduation from the receiving four-year institution is 
not assured withm a two-year period of full-time study. 

(a) Students from Maryland Community Colleges who were admissible to 
the four-year institution as high school seniors and who have attained 
an overall 2 ave'age in college and university parallel courses shall 
be eligible tor transler at any time, regardless of the number ol credits. 
Those students who have been awarded the Associate in Aas degree 



or who have successfully completed 56 hours of credit with an overall 
2 average, m either case m college and university parallel courses. 
shall not be denied transfer to an institution It the number ol students 
desiring admission exceeds the number that can be accommodated in 
a particular professional or specialized program or certain 
circumstances exist which require a limitation bemg placed on the size 
of an upper division program or on the total enrollment, admission will 
be on criteria developed and published by the receiving institution, 
which provides equal treatment for native and transfer students 

(b) Course semester hour requirements which students must meet in order 
to transfer with upper division standing shall be cieatly stated by the 
receiving institution. 

(c) The establishment of articulated programs is required in professional 
and specialized curricula 

3 Information about transfer students who are capable of honors work or 
independent study shall be transmitted to the receiving institution 

4 Transfer students from newly established public colleges which are 
functioning with the approval of the State Board for Higher Education shall 
be admitted on the sarT>e basis as applicants from regionally accredited 
colleges 

5 (a) Credit earned at any other public institution in Maryland shall be 
transferable to any other public institution provided: 

(1) the credit is from a college or university parallel program: 

(2) the grades in the block ol courses transterred average 2 or 
higher, and 

(3) the acceptance of the credit is consistent with the policies of the 
receiving institution governing students following the same 
program 

(b) Credit for the CLEP general examinations will be considered for transler 
only for scores at the 50th percentile, and above, of the combined 
national men-women sophomore norms The exact number of credits 
awarded, if any. in transfer will be determined by the same regulations 
that pedam to native students in the receiving institution The percentile 
needed to transler credit lor the CLEP subject examination will be 
determined by the receiving institution. Segmental/lnstitutional 
governing boards shall submit to the State Board for Higher Education 
by December 1st ol each year data collected from the institutions 
concerning the credit given, minimum scores and equivalent courses of 
the CLEP subiect examinations. This data will be distributed annually 
by the State Board for Higher Education to transfer advisors at all 
institutions In order to facilitate the transfer of Advanced Placement 
and CLEP credit, the achievement score lor Advanced Placement and 
the scaled score, percentile rank and the type ol examinations (General 
or Subiect) lor the CLEP shall be reported on the transcript when credit 
is awarded. 

(c) The Associate in Arts degree shall serve the equivalent ol the lower 
division general education requirements at the receiving institution 
where the total number ol credits required in the general education 
program m the sending institution is equal to or trxsre than that required 
in the receiving institution and where the credits are distnbuted among 
the arts and sciences disciplines. 

(d)The determination ol the major program requirements lor a 
baccalaureate degree, including courses m the major taken in the 
lower division, shall be the responsibility ol the institution awarding the 
degree. 

6 Transler ol credits from the following areas shall be consistent with the 
Slate minimum standards and shall be evaluated by the receiving 
institution on a course-by-course basis: 

(a) Courses from technical (career) programs. 

(b) Orientation courses. 

(c) Remedial courses. 

(d) Courses credited by a university or college which has no direct 
academic and administrative control over the students or the faculty 
involved in the courses, 

(e) Credit lor work experiences. 

7. Credit earned in or transferred from a community college shall rwrmally be 
limited to approximately half the baccalaureate degree program 
requirement, but in no case more than 70 credits, and to the lirst two years 
ol the undergraduate educational experience. 

8. Transfer students shall be given the option of satisfying graduation 
requirements which were in ellect at the receiving institution at the time 
they enrolled as Ireshmen at the sending institution, subject to conditions 
or qualifications which apply to native students. 

9. Institutions shall notify each other as soon as possible ol impending 
curricular changes which may aftect translernng students. When a change 
made by one institution necessitates some type ol change at another 
institution, suHicient lead time shall be provided to ellect the change with 
minimum disruption. 

10. Community college students are encouraged to choose as early as 
possible the institution and program into which they expect to transler. 

11. The Segmental Advisory Committee shall continue to review articulation 
issues and shall recommend policy changes as needed to the State Board 
for Higher Education. 

12. In the event a transler student believes he or she has not been accorded 
the consideration presented in this policy statement, the student shall have 
the opportunity to have the situation explained or reconciled. 



32 Admission Requirements for Undergraduates 



Initially. cWlefences of intefprelation regafdmg the awa'd of transfer 
credit shall be resolved between the student and the institution to which he 
is transferring If a difference remains unresolved, the student shall present 
his'her evaluation of the situation to the institution from which the student Is 
transferring Representatives from the two institutions shall then have the 
opportunity to resolve the differences 

The sending institution has the right to present an unresolved case to 
the Segmental Advisory Committee through a written appeal to the Slate 
Board for Higher Education The SAC shall receive relevant documentation, 
opinions and interpretations in written form from the sending and receiving 
institutions and from the student The Segmental Advisory Committee will 
send the written documentation to a pre-estabiished articulation committee 
which, after review, will submit its recommendations to the Segmental 
Advisory Committee 

Copies of the recommendation shall be forwarded by the State Board 
for Higher Education to the segments for distribution to the appropriate 
institutions 

A complaint on transfer status must be initialed by the student within 
one calendar year of his/her enrollment in the receiving institution. 

Special Applicants 

Minority Students 

In keeping with the University Affirmative Action Program, special 
consideration will be given to minority students who demonstrate the potential 
for academic success, f^monty students are urged to contact both an 
admissions counselor and the Office of Minority Student Education. 

Returning Students and Veterans 

Maryland residents who have not attended school for more than 5 years, or 
who have had military experience, may find that the published standards for 
freshman and transfer admissions are not applicable To discuss educational 
plans, returning students and veterans should contact both an admissions 
counselor and the Returning Students Program. 

Students returning to the College Park Campus after a separation of five 
calendar years may petition their appropriate dean or provost to have a 
number of grades and credits from courses previously taken at College Park 
removed from the calculation of their cumulative grade point averages and 
from the credits applied toward graduation requirements For more 
information, consult the section on Academic Regulations and Requirements. 

International Undergraduate Student Admissions 

General Requirements. The University of Maryland values the contribution 
international students make to the College Park community Therefore, 
applications from the international community are welcomed- However, due to 
the differences between foreign educational systems and education in the 
United States, international students will face a number of challenges in 
adapting to study at the University Students who have received, throughout 
their secondary school and university level work, marks or examination results 
considered to be "very good" to "excellent" are those who are most likely to 
succeed at our institution Admission for international students is competitive 
and offered only to those who are considered by the University to be better 
than average in their own educational setting Students also have to 
demonstrate, in their secondary level studies, that they have successfully 
completed a diversity of subiects representing language, mathematics, 
physical or biological science and social sciences Because of the keen 
competition at The University of Maryland, we suggest applicants apply early 

Those who will hold the following vfsa types. A, E. F. G. H. I. J. and L. will 
be admitted on the basis of their academic backgrounds and must present 
records with marks of "very good" to "excellent" However, non-immigrants. 
Other than F or J visa holders, who have completed four years of U S 
secondary education (grades 9 through 12). will be evaluated on the same 
basis as U S Citizens and Permanent Residents/Immigrants International 
applicants who present one full year of acceptable university level credit will 
be considered for admission as transfer students Those with less than one full 
year of acceptable credit must also meet the freshman admission requirements 
tor international applicants. 

International students applying for admission to undergraduate programs at 
The University of Maryland must submit (1) an application and fee for 
admission. (2) copies of official secondary school records (including any 
secondary external examinations, such as the G C E "Ordinary" level 
examinations, or the Baccaiaureat). (3) transcripts of any university level 
studies completed in the United States or elsewhere Original documents 
wntten in a language other than English must be accompanied by an English 
translation 

International students who have completed grades 10. 11 and 12 in a U S 
high school must also take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and submit the 
results All freshman applicants to the College of Engineering, regardless of 
where they have studied, must present SAT scores Admission to selective 
tnaiors (see "Admissions to Selective Maiors" on page 33 for identification of 
these maiors) requires international students to have marks of no less than 
'excellent' in previous education in order to be considered for admission mio 



the selective mapr 

International students on F-1 Student visas accepted for admission to the 
University will receive the 1-20 form from the Office of International Education 
Services (lES), this form is needed to secure, transfer, and extend the Student 
visa after applicants have certified their financial support and submitted 
evidence of satisfactory English proficiency to the lES Office 

International students accepted for admission wiii be expected to plan their 
arrival sufficiently in advance of the registration penod to secure housmg and 
attend the special orientation program tor international students that is held tt>e 
week prior to registration, 

English Proficiency. All applicants must demonstrate a satisfactory fevel o< 
English proficiency Such proficiency is necessary m order to pursue a lull 
course of study at The University of Maryland College Park All non-native 
speakers of English must submit a score report from the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) during the application process Non-native 
speakers who have received a degree from a tertiary level institution in the 
U S . English-speaking Canada, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia. New 
Zealand, or Commonwealth Caribbean are exempt from the TOEFL 
requirement Native speakers of English are defined as those educated entirety 
in the U S . English-speaking Canada. United Kingdom, Ireland, Austraiig, New 
Zealand, or Commonwealth Caribbean Applicants who are unsure as to 
whether or not they need to take the TOEFL should contact the Office of 
International Education Services Non-native speakers of English who have 
graduated from U S high schools must submit TOEFL examination results For 
information and a TOEFL application brochure, write to TOEFL. Box 2896, 
Princeton. N J 08540. 

Application Deadlines 
1 , Those applicants who would be studying under F (Student) or J (Exchange 
Visitor) visas must meet the following deadlines: 

Fall semester— March 1 
Spring semester— August 1 

2 Non-Immigrants (A. E. G. H. I. L visas) must have complete applications 
submitted by the following deadlines (complete applications must include 
all academic records and transcripts for work completed, and TOEFL 
scores if the applicant is a non-native speaker ot English): 

Fall semester — April 30 
Spring semester— November 1 

3- All applicants must submit all foreign educational credentials, and certified 
English translations of Such records in languages other than English, at 
least three months in advance of the first day of classes in order to be 
given full consideration for admission. 

Return of Foreign Records. Transcripts (records, marksheets) of applicants 
with foreign credentials are maintained by the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions for two years If these documents are ongmai copies, the student 
must request their return withm two years of application At the end of this 
period, the records are destroyed. 

Immigrant Student Admission 

Immigrant applicants for admission at the undergraduate level are 
admissible under the same guidelines as U S citizens EXCEPT that applicants. 
including transfer applicants, whose native language is other than English must 
ALSO demonstrate a satisfactory level of English proficiency to pursue an 
approved course of study. 

Non-Degree (Special) Student Admission 

Applicants who qualify for admission but do not desire to work toward a 
baccalaureate degree may be admitted as non-degree seeking (special) 
students 

Special students who have received a baccalaureate degree are advised 
that no credit earned while enroKed as special students may tje applied at a 
later date to a graduate program These post-baccaiaureate students may 
enroll in undergraduate courses lor which they possess the necessary 
prerequisites, but may not enroll in courses restncted to graduate students 
only Students wfx) wish to take courses at the graduate levei (600 and atx>ve) 
must contact the Graduate School for information concerning admission 
requirements for Advanced Special Student status 

Non-degree seeking (special) students who do not have a tjaccaiaureate 
degree must submit transcripts and meet regular adm^sson standards. 
Transcripts are not required from students with baccalaureate oeg-ees 

Because of space limitation, several departments require permission in 
advance to enroll as a non-degree student Please contact the Office d 
Undergraduate Admissions tor further information. 



Admission Requirements for Undergraduates 33 



Preprofessional Programs and Options 

The College Park Campus otters prep'olessional advising In Dental 
Hygiene. Dentistry. Forestry. Law. Medical Tectinology, Medicine. Nursing. 
ODtometry. Osteopattiy. Ptiaimacy. Physical Therapy. Podiatry, and Veterinary 
Medicine This advismg will guide the student to the best preparation lor 
advanced study and training m these (lelds For additional inlormaiion. see the 
section on Campus-wide Programs 

Participation in a preprotessional program on the College Park Campus 
does not guarantee admission to another branch o1 the University or to another 
institution 

The Radiologic Technology program previously offered at The University of 
Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB) is no longer available Students choosmg the 
preprofessional program in this field will receive training that should prepare 
them for transfer to other institutions 

Students who have already earned more than 30 semester hours at another 
college-level institution, and who seek admission to preprofessional programs 
in Nursing, Pharmacy, Dental Hygiene. Physical Therapy, Medical Technology, 
and Forestry, should contact the academic advisor for the prepro'essional 
programs at College Park before filing an application for the College Park 
Campus Please address correspondence to the academic advisor of the 
specific preprofessional program to which the applicant is applying, for 
example. Advisor for Pre-Nursmg Program, 3103 Turner Laboratory, The 
University ot Maryland. College Park. MD 20742, 

Golden Identification Card Program 

The College Park Campus participates in The University of Maryland's 
Golden Identification Card Program The campus will make available courses 
and various services to persons who are 60 years of age or older, who are 
residents of the State of Maryland and who are retired (not engaged in gainful 
employment for more than 20 hours per week), or who are under 60 years of 
age and are retired and disabled as defined by the Social Security or Railroad 
Retirement Act When persons eligible for this Program apply for the Program 
and receive their Golden Identification Cards, they may register for credit 
courses as regular or special students in any session Tuition and most other 
fees will be waived The Golden Identification Card will entitle eligible persons 
to certain academic services, including the use of the libraries, as well as 
certain other non-academic services Such services will be available during any 
session only to persons who have registered for one or more courses for that 
session. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

Admissions to Selective Majors 

Certain colleges, schools, and departments within the University have 
taken steps to limit their enrollment in order to maintain guality programs. 
These include School of Architecture. College of Business and Management. 
College of Engineering. Department of Computer Science. Department of 
Electrical Engineering. Department of Housing and Design. College of 
Journalism. t5eoartment of Special Education, and all teacher education 
maiors Enrollment is competitive, and except for a select number of 
outstanding freshmen, students must complete a particular set of requirements 
tiefore admission. 

Students not admitted directly as freshmen may still enroll on the campus 
as pre-business. pre-computer science, pre-engineenng, or other pre-ma|ors. 
However, admission as a preprofessional student does not guarantee 
subsequent admission in any of the maprs. To assess your chances of being 
admitted at a later date, contact an academic advisor within the appropriate 
program 

Selective admissions for the major in radio-television-film have been 
proposed and may be in effect for fall semester. 1986. 

For specific requirements not detailed m the following sections applicants 
are urged to contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

Arcliitecture 

Admission to the School of Architecture is generally limited to students who 
enroll as lumors 

To be considered for admission, all applicants— whether they are currently 
enrolled on the College Park campus or transfer students — must submit a 
portfolio The portfolio should be organized in an 8'/5" x 11" loose leaf 
notebook, and it must demonstrate strong creative ability In addition, students 
will be considered for admission only if they have at least a 3 grade pomt 
average They should have completed freshrpan English and appropriate 
coursework in calculus and physics. Architecture survey and history courses 
are recommended. 

Business and IVIanagement 

Admission to the College of Business and Management is generally limited 
to students who enroll as luniors. 

To be eligible for admission, all currently enrolled College Park students 
must meet the minimum grade point average established for the semester 
during which they anticipate initial enrollment. To dale, this competitive grade 
point average has not been lower than 2 5 and is expected to be higher 



beginning May. 1985 Applicants to the Co'iege of Business and Management 
must have completed 56 semester hours by the lime ot enrollment These 
hours must include six hours of accounting and economics, three hours eacti 
of statistics and speech, and nine hours ot math. 

Computer Science 

Admission to the Department of Computer Science is competitive A small 
number of academically laiemed. entering freshmen will be ottered admission, 
however, admission is generally limited to students who have met the following 
requirements 

a. Successful completion ol CMSC 112, CMSC 122, MATH 140 and 141, 

and 
b Completion of a minimum of 28 college credits, and 
c Achievement of a grade pomt average winch meets the competitive 
requirements in effect for the semester of anticipated enrollment in the 
department While the department has decided that ttie grade pomt 
average will be at least 2 30. it is expected that the actual grade point 
average required for a given semester will be significantly higher 
A few potentially qualified students who are unable to meet these criteria 
will be considered on a case-by-case basis by a special committee within the 
department. 

Applicants to the Department of Computer Science, who are eligible for 
admission to the College Park Campus but who do not meet the department's 
selective admission requirements, will be offered admission to the University as 
pre-computer science maprs Designation as a pre-computer science maior 
does not assure eventual admission to the Department of Computer Science 

Because of space limitations, the College Park Campus may not be able to 
offer admission to all qualified applicants. Interested students are urged to 
apply early. 

Engineering 

The College of Engineering admits a larger number of qualified freshmen 
than the other programs described in this section. Still, enrollment is limited 
and competition for available openings is stiff, especially in Electrical 
Engineering All applications will be reviewed on a space-available basis 

Freshmen will be considered on the basis of their academic grade point 
average and SAT score Particular emphasis is placed on the mathematics 
section of the SAT. The requirements for direct admission to Electrical 
Engineering are more stringent than for other engineering maiors. 

All transfer students, as well as students presently enrolled on the College 
Park Campus, must meet the competitive grade point average (currently 3 0) in 
effect for the semester during which the student anticipates initial enrollment In 
addition, applicants must have completed at least 28 semester hours including 
eight hours each of calculus and chemistry and three hours of physics. 
Engineering science and statics are also strongly recommended. 

Transfer students who wish to maior in Electrical Engineering will encounter 
additional course requirements Prospective applicants to this maior should 
contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions (301-454-<l009) or the 
Student Affairs Office in the College of Engineering (301^54-2421) for details. 

Housing and Design 

Admission to the programs of Interior Design and Advertising Design is 
competitive A small number of academically talented, entering freshmen will 
be admitted to these programs To be admitted, a freshman must have a 3 00 
high school grade point average and a combined SAT score of 1200 or above, 
or be a National Ment and National Achievement Scholarship finalist or 
semifinaiist. or be a recipient of a Chancellors Scholarship, Benjamin Banneker 
Scholarship, or a Maryland Distinguished Scholar Award. 

Admission to these programs is generally limited to students who will enroll 
at the sophomore level and who have met the following requirements; 
a Completion ol a minimum of 29 college credits, and 
b Successful completion of four required courses (APDS 101A, APDS 

102. APDS 103 and EDIT 160). and 
c. Submission of a Design Work Portfolio for review Students with a grade 
ol B or higher in each of the four required courses are exempt from the 
portfolio requirement. 
All transfer students must submit a Design Work Portfolio Tfie portfolio may 
be submitted to the department at the time of application for admission to the 
University or later, but no later than the application deadline set by the 
department- 

Potentiaiiy talented students who are unable to meet the above criteria may 
be admitted after special review by the department. 

Eligible applicants who do not meet the selective admissions requirements 
for the programs of interior design and advertising design will be ottered 
admission as pre-design maprs While this designation does not assure 
eventual admission to the des'gn maior. pre-design students will be given 
preferential treatment when registering for departmental courses in which there 
IS an enrollment limitation. 



34 Admission Requirements for Undergraduates 



Journalism 

Admission to the College of Journalism is competitive, and generally limited 
to students who enroll as sophomores A small number of academically 
talented freshmen will be admitted directly into the College if they have a 3 00 
cumulative grade point average in high school academic subjects and a 
combined SAT score of at least 1200 Students will also be admitted to the 
College if they are National Merit finalists and semi-fmaiisis. National 
Achievement finalists and semi-finaiists. Chancellor's Scholars. Banneker 
Scholars, or Maryland Dishnguished Scholars. 

To qualify for provisional admission to the major, students must: 

a. complete at least 28 credits and achieve a cumulative grade point 
average which meets the competitive requirements in effect tor the 
semester of anticipated enrollment in the College While the College 
has decided that the grade point average will be at least 2 30. it is 
expected the actual grade point average required for a given semester 
will be significantly higher. 

b. complete ENGL 101 or its equivalent with at least a grade of C (unless 
students have exempted ENGL 101), and 

c. complete satisfactorily a standardized test of language proficiency and 
demonstrate a typing ability of at least 30 words per minute. 

To qualify for full admission to the ma)or, students must 
a complete JOUR 201 with a grade of C or better and 
b maintain at least the same cumulative grade point average required 
when they received provisional admission 
Students whose applications for provisional or full admission have been 
reiected may appeal in writing to a faculty committee within the College of 
Journalism The same committee will also consider, on a case-by-case basis, 
applications from a few potentially qualified students who do not meet the 
above critena but who show other evidence of ability. 

Transfer students will be treated in the same way as native students. 
However, if they have completed the equivalent of JOUR 201 at an institution 
not included by ACEJfviC a special proficiency exam will be required for 
admission to the ma|or. 

Special Education 

Admission to the Department of Special Education is generally limited to 
students who enroll as sophomores. 

To be eligible lor admission, currently enrolled College Park students must 
have a 2 grade point average and have completed approximately 30 credit 
hours, including the following introductory psychology, sociology, statistics, 
mathematics, hearing and speech sciences, and six hours of specified 
education courses A grade of C in EDSP 210 is required. 

Applicants must submit an application specific for the selective admissions 
program and each will be reviewed on the basis of academic record, 
experiences with handicapped persons, and the appropriateness and danty of 
a professional goal statement An appeals process has been established for 
students who do not meet the competitive grade point average lor admission 
but who are applying in connection with special ijniversity programs such as 
affirmative action or selection for academic promise. 

Transfer students from Maryland community colleges or Northern Virginia 
Community College should contact their transfer coordinator for specific 
information All other students should contact the Department of Special 
Education. 

Teacher Education 

Pre-education maiors apply for admission to teacher education through The 
University of Maryland College Park (UMCP) Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions (OUA) upon the completion of 45 semester hours of credit 
Transfer students with 45 or more semester hours of acceptable credit must 
apply at time of transfer Post-graduate certification students must apply at the 
beginning of their program. Application forms may be obtained from the OUA. 

For admission into a teacher education program, a student must (1) 
complete the USP Fundamental Studies requirements (6 credits), (2) earn 45 
semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point average of at least 2 5 
on a 4 scale (granted by UMCP or other institution) in all coursework prior to 
enrollment in EDHD 300. and (3) have satisfactory scores on the language and 
mathematics segments of the California Achievement Test Level 20 Individuals 
who do not initially meet the criteria for admission to teacher education will be 
given an additional semester in which to become eligible During that semester 
the student will follow a plan for attaining eligibility developed by the student 
and the department advisor 

Application Procedures 

Application Forms. Application forms may be obtained by wnting to Office ot 
Unde'graduale Admissions. North Administration Building, University of 
Maryland. College Park. MD 20742 Application forms are also available in 
high school guidance offices and college counseling centers 

All applicants must comply fuHy with the directions printed on the 
application form Incomplete forms cannot be processed. 

Application Fee. A non-retundable S20 00 application fee is required with 
each application. 



Application Deadlines 

The College Park Campus strongly urges that all applicants apply early. 
Staled deadlines assure consideration for admission The campus must 
reserve the right to change deadlines without notice Because of space 
limitations, the campus may not be able to offer admission to all qualified 
applicants. 

For each term, applications will be processed on a space-avaiiabie basis. 
The campus, however, reserves the right to return applications received after 
the announced deadline for each term. 

Fall 1986 Matriculation 

July 30. 1986— Transfer applicants' deadline (or submission of applications 
and all other required documents. 

Spring 1987 Matriculation 

December 15, f9S6— Undergraduate applicants' deadline for receipt of 

applications and an other documents. 

Fall 1987 Matriculation 

December 1, J9S6— Applications, transcripts, and SAT results (freshmen only) 
must be received for freshman and transfer students who are eligible for 
admission and who wish to receive first consideration for housing within their 
own priority group for Fall, 1987, " 

February 1, r9fl7— Architecture applicants must apply by Ihis date to be 
assured of consideration. 

April 30. f987— Estimated freshman applicants' deadline for receipt of 
applications and all other required documents Please note space may not be 
available to accommodate all qualified freshmen who apply by this date. 

My 30. r987— Transfer applicants' deadline for submission ot applications 

and all other required documents. 

* Transfer applicants who are enrolled as first semester freshmen during the 
Fall 1986 semester (enrolled in a college or university for the first time) are 
eligible to receive first consideration for housing within their own priority group 
if; (1) the application and high school transcript are received in the Office ot 
Undergraduate Admissions by December 1, 1986 and (2) the applicant's 
college or university transcript reflecting Fall 1986 grades is received in this 
office by January 1. 1987. 

Determination of In-State Status for Admission, 
Tuition, and Charge Differential Purposes 

An initial determination of in-state status for admission, tuition and 
charge-differential purposes will be made by the University at the lime a 
student's application for admission is under consideration The determination 
made at that time, and any determination made thereafter shall prevail m each 
semester until the determination is successfully challenged Students may 
challenge their classification by submitting a petition Petitions are available m 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions The deadline tor meeting all 
requirements lor in-state status artd lor submitting all documents lor 
reclassification is the last day of late registration lor Itie semester it the student 
wishes to Ce classilied as an in-state student. 

The volume of requests for reclassification may r>ecessitate a delay in 
completing the review process II is hoped that a decision in each case wiii be 
made within ninety (90) days of receipt of a request for redetermination and ail 
necessary documentation During this period of time, or any further penod of 
time required by the University, fees and charges based on the prevous 
determination must be paid II the determination is changed, any excess lees 
and charges will be refunded 

Petitions, related documents and questions concerning the policy of The 
University of Maryland for the determination of m-siate status should be 
directed to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, North Administration 
Building, The University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, Phone (301) 
454-4137 

Students Classified as In-State for Admission, Tuition and 

Charge-Differential Purposes. Students classified as instate for aomisson. 

tui! u'l .ii'j C'd'qe aitie'eriiiai purposes are responsible for notifying tf>e O'tice 
ot Unde'U'ajudle Admissions m writing within 15 days of any change m ihetr 
circumstances which might in any way affect their ciassitication at the College 
Park Campus 

The written notice of change in circumstances or questions concerning the 
policy of The University of Maryland for the determination ot msiaie status 
should be directed to Ot'ice ot Undergraduate Admissions. Ground Floor. 
North Administration Building 



Fees & Expenses 35 



Graduate Student Admission 

In ce'iam circumsiances. a semoi may register lot graduate courses Fof 
inlo'malion, consul! the regulations concerning "Concurrent 
Unaergraduale-Gtaduaie Registration," under Academic Regulations and 
Requirements. 

Admission to graduate study at The University of Maryland is the 
responsibility of The Graduate School. College Park Requests lor information 
about graduate programs or correspondence concerning application for 
admission to The Graduate School. College Park should be addressed to the 
Admissions Office. The University of Maryland Graduate School, South 
Administration Building College Park. MD 20742 



Orientation Programs 



Upon final admission to the University the new student will receive 
materials about the Orientation and Registration Program This program is 
offered by the Office of Student Affairs, and all entering students are 
encouraged to attend The primary goals of the program are to inform the 
student about the University and to help the student register for the first 
semester Through this program the entering student receives a personalized 
and individual introduction to the University plus individual advising about 
course selection for the Inst semester During this Orientation Program, new 
students register lor courses lor their initial semester on campus 

Parents also have an opportunity to leam about University lile through the 
Parent Orientation Program More mlormaiion about this program may be tound 
under "Orientation." elsewhere in this catalog 

For more inlormation. contact the Orientation Office, 1195 Stamp Union, 
telephone (301)454-5752 



Fees & Expenses 



Charges incurred during a semester are payable immediately Returning 
students will not be permitted to complete registration until all financial 
obligations to the University including library fines, parking violations, and other 
penalty lees and service charges are paid in full. 

The University ol Maryland does not have a deferred payment plan. 
Payment for past due balances and current semester tees are due on or 
before the first day of classes. Students wfio register in advance must pay 
their bills in lull prior to the general registration period Students who register 
alter the initial registration period are required to make lull payment by the 
close ol business the following working day to avoid cancellation of their 
enrollment and loss of their classroom seats to other students 

It IS the policy of the University not to deter payment on the basis of a 
pending application lor financial assistance to an outside agency, including 
Veterans Administration benefits, bank loans, guaranteed student loan 
programs, etc. 

Although the University regularly mails bills to students, it cannot assume 
responsibility for their receipt If a student bill is not received on or before the 
beginning of each semester, it is the student s responsibility to obtain a copy 
ol fhe bill at Room 1103. South Administration Building, between the hours ol 
8 30 a m and 4.15 p m . Monday through Friday 

All checks or money orders should be made payable to the University ol 
Maryland lor the exact amount due Student name and student Social Security 
number should be written on the front side of the check. University grant, 
scholarship, or workship awards, will be deducted on the first bill, mailed 
approximately one month after the start ol the semester However, the first bill 
mailed prior to the beginning ol each semester may not include these 
deductions. 

Students will be severed from University sen/ices for delinquent 
indebtedness to the University In the event that severance occurs, the 
individual may make payment during the semester in which services were 
severed and all services except housing will be restored A $25 00 severance 
tee will be assessed in addition to payment for the total past due amount 

Students removed from housing because ol delinquent indebtedness will 
be required to reapply for housing after they have satisfied their financial 
obligation Students who are severed from University services and who fail to 
pay the indebtedness during the semester in which severance occurs will be 
ineligible to preregister lor subsequent semesters until the debt and the $25 00 
severance fee are cleared. 

In the event of actual registration for a subsequent semester by a severed 
student who has not settled his student account prior to that semester, such 
registration will be cancelled and no credit will be earned for the semester. 

The Slate has established, under legislative mandate, a Central Collections 
Unit within the Department of Budget and Fiscal Planning The University is 
required by State Law to refer all delinquent accounts to the State Collections 
Unit Please note that changes in Maryland law allow the Central Collections 
Unit to intercept state income tax refunds for individuals with delinquent 
accounts 

All Accounts Due from Students, Faculty, Staff, Non-Students, etc., are 
Included within these Guidelines 

Collection costs incurred m collecting delinquent accounts will be charged 
to the student. The minimum collection lee is 15% plus attorney and/or court 



costs 

No degree, grades, diploma, certificate, or transcript ol record will be 
Issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement ol his or her 
account 

An Important Fee Notice. Although changes in lees and charges ordinarily 
will be announced in advance, the University reserves the right to make such 
changes witfxjut prior announcement. 

NOTE: Additional Information on Student Rnancial Obligations, Disclosure ol 
Inlormation. Delinquent Accounts, and Special Fees, can t>e tound on page 7, 

A. Undergraduate Fees 

1. Full-time Undergraduate Students 
1986-67 Academic Year 

a Maryland Residents 

Total Academic Year Cost 

Tuition $1344 00 

Registration Fee 1 (X) 

Mandatory Fees (see Explanation ol Fees below) 247 00 

Board Contract (FY 85-86) ' 

1) All 19 meals a week plan $1578 00 

2) Any 15 meals a week plan 1471 00 

3) Any 10 meals a week plan 140000 

Lodging (FY 85-86) ' $1842 00 

b. Residents of the District of Columbia, other states, and other 
countries: 

Total Academic Year Cost 

Tuition $4220 00 

Registration Fee 10 00 

Mandatory Fees (see Explanation of Fees below) 247O0 

Board Contract (FY 85-86) * 
1)AII 19 meals a week plan $1578 00 

2) Any 15 meals a week plan 1471 00 

3) Any 10 meals a week plan 1400 00 

Lodging (FY 85-86) " $1842 00 

* Increases in tjoard and lodging tor 1986-87 are under consideration by the Board of 

Regents at ine lime ol iriis printing. 

2. Fees for Part-Time Undergraduate Students 

Tuition (per credit hour) $77 00 

Registration Fee (per semester) 5 00 

Mandatory Fees (per semester) 49 50 

Note: The term "paniime undergraduate student" is Interpreted to mean an undergraduate 
sludeni lakmg 8 semester ciedi! nours or less Students carrying 9 semester hours or more 
are considered to be lull-time and must pay the regular lull-time fees. 



B. Graduate Fees 

1 Maryland Residents (lee per credit hour) $92 00 

2 Residents ol the District ol Columbia, other states and other countries 

(lee per credit hour) 163 00 

3 Registration Fee (per semester) 5 00 

4 Mandatory Fees (per semester): 

Full-time (9 or more credit hours per semester) 73 50 

Part-time (8 or less credit hours per semester) 44 50 

Explanation of Fees 

Mandatory Fees 

The Registration Fee (Non-Refundable): The Registration Fee is charged to 
all registrants each semester. 

The Instructional Materials Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students lor 
instructional materials and/or laboratory supplies lurmsheo to students. 

The Student Activities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all unoergraduate 
students at the request of the Student Government Association It is used in 
sponsoring various student activities, student publications, and cultural 
programs. 

The Auxiliary Facilities Fee (Refundable): Charged to all students This fee is 
paid into a fund which is used for capital improvement, expansion and 
construction of various campus facilities such as open recreation areas (tennis 
courts, basketball couns. etc ), transportation alternatives (shuttle buses), and 
the Stamp Union These capital protects are not funded or are funded only in 
part from other sources. 



36 Fees & Expenses 



The Athletic Fee (Non-Refundable): Chafged to ail students lor the support ot 
the Department ol Intercollegiate Athletics All students are encou'aged to 
participate in all ol the activities ot this department, or to attend the contests if 
they do not participate. 

The Student Health Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all students for the 
support ol the Health Service facility. 

The Shuttle Bus Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to ail students for the 
support ol the Shuttle Bus transportation system. 

The Stamp Union and Recreational Fee (Non-Refundable): Charged to all 
students and is used to expand recreational facilities and Stamp Union 

services. 

Other Fees 

Payment ot Fees: All checks, money orders, or postal notes should be made 
pavaijie to the University ol Maryland, The student's social security number 
must tie written on the Iront ot the check. 

The Application Fee (Non-Refundable): $20.00. Charged to all new 
undergraduate students Applicants vwho have previously enrolled at any 
campus ol The University of Maryland including University College at College 
Park, Baltimore, or oil-campus centers are not required to pay this lee. 

Pre-College Orientation Program Registration Fee: 

$60 00 (two day program) 
$39 00 (one day proaram) 
$16 00 (one parent)/$32,00 (two parents) 

Late Registration Fee: $20.00. All students are expected to complete their 
registration including the lilmg ol Schedule Ad|ustment Forms on the regular 
registration days Those who do not complete their registration during the 
presdbed days must pay this fee. 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation In mathematics 
(MATH 001) per semester: S1 10.00. (Required ot students whose curriculum 
calls for MATH 110 or 115 and who fail in qualifying examination for these 
courses) This Special Math Fee is in addition to course charge Students 
enrolled in this course and concurrently enrolled for 6 or more credit hours will 
be considered as full-time students for purposes of assessing fees Students 
taking only MATH (X)1 pay for 3 credits plus $110 A 3-credit course plus 
MATH 001 results in a charge for 6 credits plus $110. A full-time student pays 
full-time fees plus $110. 

Special Fee for students requiring additional preparation In chemistry 
(CHEM 001) per semester: $70.00. CHEM 001 is recommended for students 
who do not qualify lor MATH 110 or higher, or who have no high school 
chemistry and must take CHEM 103 This course does not carry credit towards 
any degree at the University. This Special Chemistry Fee is in addition to 
course charge. 

Cooperative Education Program In Liberal Arts and Business (CO-OP 
208-209): S30.00 each. 

Engineering COOP Program (ENCO 40S-409): $30.00 each. 

Fees for Auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as those charged 
for courses tanen for credit at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. 
Audited credit hours will be added to hours taken for credit to determine 
full-time or part-time status for lee assessment purposes Special Students are 
assessed fees in accordance with the schedule for the comparable 
undergraduate or graduate classification. 

Change of Registration Fee: $2.00 for each course dropped or added after 
the schedule adiustment penod A $4.00 fee is charged for each section 
change ($2 00 for the section added, $2 00 lor the section dropped) alter the 
schedule adiustment period 

Graduation Fee for Bachelor's Degree: $15.00 

Transcript of Record Fee: $2,00 each copy. 

Special Examination Fee: $30.00 per course for all undergraduates and 
full-time graduate students, credit-hour charge lor part-time graduate students. 

Vehicle Registration Fees: Vehicles must be registered each academic year 

by all students enrolled lor classes on the College Park Campus and who dnve 
or park a vehicle anywhere or anytime on the campus For additional 
information, please refer to Motor Vehicle Administration. Administrative Offices 
Section, Office ot Student Affairs. 

Textbooks and Supplies: Textbooks and classroom supplies vary with the 
course pursued, but will average $160 00 per semester. 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks: Payable for each check which is 
returned unpa d by the drawee bank on initial presentation because of 
insufficient funds, payment stopped, post-dating, drawn against uncollected 
items, etc. 



For checks up to $50 00 $5 00 

For checks from $50 01 to $100 00 $1000 

For checks over $100 00 $20 (X) 

When a check is returned unpaid, the student must redeem the check and 
pay any outstanding balance in the account within 10 days or all University 
services may be severed and the account translerred to the State Central 
Collection Unit lor legal follow-up Additionally, a minimum 15% collection 
charge is added to the charges posted to the students account at the time the 
transfer is made When a check is returned unpaid due to an error made by 
the students bank, the student must obtain a letter from the branch manager 
ol the bank or a person of equivalent status admitting the error This letter must 
be submitted to the Office of the Bursar to have the service charged waived 

Library Charges: Fine for failure to return a book from General Library before 

expiration of loan period— $ 35 per day Fme for failure to return book from 
Reserve Shell before expiration of loan period— first hour overdue on first day, 
$1 00, after first hour on first day $ 50 per hour for each hour open up to a 
maximum ol $30 00 per item In case ol loss or mutilation of a book. 
satisfactory restitution must be made 

Maryland English Institute Fee: Semi-intensive. $928.00 (Fall) $976.00 
(Spring): Intensive, $1,856.00 (Fall) $1,936.00 (Spring): Students enrolled 
with the Maryland English Institute pay this tee m support ol the Institute 
Students enrolled in the semi-miensive program may also enroll lor regular 
academic courses and pay the tuition and fees associated with those offerings 
The prog'am also offers non-credit courses English Pronunciation. $175 00. 
and Workshop for Foreign Teaching Assistants, $165 00. 

Property Damage Charge: Students will be charged for damage to property 

or equipment Where responsibility for the damage can be fixed, the individual 
student will be biHed for it; where responsibility cannot be fixed, the cost of 
repairing the damage or replacing equipment will be prorated among the 

individuals involved. 

Severance of Services Fee: $25,00. Students who fail to pay the balance due 

on their accounts will have their University services severed and will be 
required to pay the total amount due plus a $25 00 severance fee. 

Withdrawal or Refund Fees: Any student compelled to leave the University at 

any time during the academic year should secure a form for withdrawal from 
the Records and Registrations Office The completed form and the semester 
Identification/Registration Card are to be submitted to the Records and 
Registrations Office The student will forteit his or her right to refund if the 
withdrawal action described above is not adhered to The effective date used 
in computing refunds is the date the withdrawal form is filed in the Records 
and Registrations Office Stop Payment on a check, failure to pay the semester 
bill, failure to attend classes, does not constitute withdrawal A request for a 
refund must be processed by the student with the Office of the Bursar, 
otherwise any credit on the student account will automatically be earned over 
to the next semester. 

Cancellation of Registration— Submitted to the Withdrawal 'Reenrollment Office 
before the official first day of classes entitles the student to a full credit of 
semester tuition. 

Undergraduate students withdrawing from the University will be credited for 
tuition in accordance with the following schedule: 

Prior to Classes beginning; 100% 

After Classes begin: 

Between one and two weeks 80% 

Between two and three weeks 60% 

Between three and four weeks 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks No Refund 

Prior to the first day of classes, if a full-time undergraduate student drops a 
course or courses, thereby changing the total number ol credits lor which the 
student is reregistered to eight or less, charges lor the semester will be 
assessed on the basis of the per credit hour fee for oart-time students 
However, if the student later adds a course or courses thereby changing the 
total number of credits for which the student is registered to nme or more, the 
student will be billed for the difference between per credit hour fees paid and 
the general lees for lun-time undergraduates 

II during the first five days of classes a lull-time undergraduate drops a 
course or courses thereby changing the total number ol credits for which 
he'she IS registered to eight or less, charges lor the semester will be assessed 
on the basis ol part-time charges plus 20% of the difference between the 
full-time lees and appropriate part-time charges After the first five days of 
classes, there is no refund lor changing from lull-time to part-time status 

A student who registers as a part-time undergraduate student and applies 
for a refund lor courses drooped during the first week of classes will be given 
a refund No refund will be made lor courses dropped thereafter 

No part of the charges lor room and board is relundabie except wtien the 
student officially withdraws Irom the University or when he or she is given 
permission by the appropriate officials of the University lo move from the 
residence haiis and/or to discontinue dming ftaii pnviieges. in these cases. Ifie 



Financial Aid 37 



room refund will be computed by multiplying the number of penods remammg 
limes the pro rata weekly rate alter adiustmg tor a service charge Refunds to 
students having full board contracts will be calculated m a similar manner No 
room and/or board refunds will be made after the fourteenth week of the 
semester 

in computing refunds to students who have received the benefit of 
scholarships and loans from University funds, the computation will be made to 
return the maximum amount :o the scholarship and loan accounts without loss 
to the University 

Financial Aid 

The Office of Student Financial Aid provides advice and assistance in the 
formulation of student financial plans and. in cooperation with other University 
offices, participates m the awarding of scholarships and grants to deserving 
students Scholarships, grants, loans and work-study positions are awarded 
on the basis of academic ability and financial need it is the intent of the 
Committee on Financial Aid to make awards to those qualified students who 
might not otherwise be able to pursue college studies Part-time employment 
opportunities on campus are open to ail students, but are dependent upon the 
availability of lobs and the student's particular skills and abilities 

Additional information is available from the Director. Office of Student 
Financial Aid. Room 2130. North Administration Buitdmg. The University of 
Maryland. College Park. tvlD 20742. telephone (301) 454-3046. 

Academic Requirements For Eligibility 

The federally appropriated programs require that students make "academic 
progress" toward a degree or diploma. Any student enrolled in a degree, 
certificate, or diploma program is considered to be making satisfactory 
progress for the purpose of the receipt of financial aid at the College Park 
Campus, with the following restrictions: 

Withdrawals. A student who withdraws from the University within the first two 
weeks of classes must repay to The University of Maryland all financial aid 
received If the withdrawal occurs after this period, a prorated share of the aid 
must be repaid after arrangements are made with the Office of Student 
Financial Aid 

A student receiving financial aid who has withdrawn prior to the completion 
of the semester on two occasions will forteit eligibility for assistance for the 
semester following the second withdrawal EligibJity will be reconsidered when 
the student either 1) has completed a course load equivalent to that of the 
semester from which he/she withdrew and for which aid was received or 2) 
documents the circumstances which necessitated the withdrawal, with support 
from such people as a physician, mental health professional, academic 
counselor, or religious or community leader. 

Extended Graduation Dates. An Undergraduate who does not complete 
his her program withm the prescribed 4 or 5 year period, and who has 
received 4 or 5 years, respectively, of financial aid from any school, will be 
considered for an additional year of loan and/or employment assistance only. 
An exception to this is the Pell Grant, which is available beyond four years. 
Since a student may exhaust eligibility for certain financial aid programs within 
four years, the student is advised to maintain course loads which will insure 
graduation within the appropriate time. Normally the student should average 15 
credits per semester, 

A student who is awarded a scholarship and/or grant from the University 
must enroll for and maintain at least 12 semester hours Any student who is 
contemplating dropping below 12 hours should contact this Office immediately. 
Since the aid is subject to cancellation at that pomt An undergraduate who 
enrolls for less than 6 credit hours will not be awarded any form of financial 
aid: a graduate student seeking consideration must be enrolled for a minimum 
of 24 academic units per semester. 

Scholarships and Grants 

Most scholarships and grants are awarded to students before they enter 
the University However, students who have completed one or more semesters, 
and have not received such an award, are eligible to apply Each applicant 
will receive consideration for all scholarships and grants administered by this 
office, for which he or she is eligible Students must submit an application by 
February 15, including all supporting documents, in order to be considered for 
scholarship assistance for the ensuing year. Award Letters are normally 
mailed by May 1 to on-time applicants- 
Regulations and procedures for the awarding of scholarships and grants 
are formulated by the Committee on Financial Aid. Ail recipients are subieci to 
the academic and non-academic regulations and requirements of the 
University 

The Committee reserves the right to review the scholarship program 
annually and to make adjustments in the amounts and the recipients of the 
awards in accordance with the funds available and the scholastic achievement 
of the recipients. 

Interest in any award that is recommended by a college or 
school/department should be directed to the Chairperson. Dean, or 
Department Head of the relevant college, school, or department. 



Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. Under the provisions of the 
Eaucdi'ondi Amefioinenis of 19H0 g'anis are available to students who 
demonstrate financial need to continue their post secondary education A 
recipient must be a United States citizen, or permanent res'deni. or a 
recognized refugee or paroiee and enrolled as a fuii-time undergraduate 
Annual awards may not exceed $2 (DOO Eligible students may receive SEGG S 
only tor their first undergraduate degree 

Pell Grant (Basic Educational Opportunity Grant). The federal government 
provides grant assistance to approved students who need it to attend post 
secondary institutions Eligible students may receive annual Pell Grants for the 
first undergraduate degree or certificate only An eligible" student must enroll 
tor at least 6 credit hours each semester a Pen award is received 

Maryland State Sctiolarships. The General Assembly of Maryland has 
created several programs of scholarships for Maryland residents who need 
financial help to obtam a conege education The undergraduate programs are 
(1) General State scholarships. (2) Senatorial scholarships, and (3) House of 
Delegates scholarships Students wishing to apply for these scholarships 
should contact their guidance counselor if a high-school senior or the Office of 
Student Financial Aid if presently attending The University of Maryland. 
Students who are entering college for the first time must take the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test in November or December of their senior year The test is not 
required of college students who have completed at least 24 semester hours. 
A Maryland State Financial Aid Form must be mailed to the College 
Scholarship Sen/ice in Princeton, NJ,, by February 15 for the upcoming 
academic year The deadline for applying for these scholarships is March 1 
each year For additional information, contact the Maryland State Scholarship 
Board, 2100 Guilford Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21218. 

Local and National Scholarships. In addition to the scholarships provided by 
The University of Maryland, a student should give careful consideration to 
scholarship aid provided by local and national scholarship programs The 
University maintains a database of these scholarships and will perform a 
Scholarship Search for students Contact OSFA for details. 

Endowed and Annual Scholarships and Grants 

Inte'est in a particular award which is recommended by a school college 
or department should be directed to the relevant Dean or Chairperson 

Advertising Association of Baltimore Work Experience Scholarship. This 
award is available to an outstanding sophomore or junior interested in an 
advertising career. The scholarship includes a summer internship and a 
$1,000 stipend, 

AFROTC College Scholarship Program. Four-year AFROTC scholarships are 
available to incoming freshmen who qualify One thousand scholarships are 
awarded annually to qualified freshmen on a nationwide basis. Application for 
the four-year scholarship is normally accomplished during the senior year of 
high school. The AFROTC program also provides two-year and three-year 
scholarships for selected cadets in the AFROTC program. Those selected 
receive money for full tuition, laboratory expenses, incidental fees, and an 
allowance for books during the period of the scholarship. In addition, they 
receive nontaxable pay of $100 per month. Any student accepted by The 
University of Maryland may apply for these scholarships, AFROTC membership 
is required if one receives an AFROTC scholarship. 

Agricultural Development Foundation. A number of awards are made to 

agricultural students from a fund contributed by donors for general agricultural 
development. Recipients are chosen by the Dean of the College of Agriculture. 

Arthur M. Ahalt Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship award is made annually 
to an undergraduate or graduate student majonng m agricultural education. 
Recipients are chosen by the Dean of the College of Agnculture, 

Air Force Warrant Officers Association Student Aid Program. Scholarship 

aid has been made available by the Air Force Warrant Officers Association for 
worthy male or female undergraduate or graduate students m good standing, 
with preference given to children of Air Force Warrant Officers or other military 
personnel. 

Albright Scholarship. The Victor E Albright Scholarship is a four-year 

scholarship open to graduates of Garrett County high schools who were bom 
and reared in that county, 

ALCOA Foundation Scholarships Awards of $750 are given to outstanding 
stuoents maio'ing m mechanical engmeenng, civil engineering, electrical 
engmeenng and fire protection engineering, 

Louis Allen Memorial Scholarship. An annual $500 grant to an 
undergraduate or graduate student interested in meteorology and weather 
forecasting The awardee will be expected to (jecome involved in the weather 
obsen/ing. forecasting and display activities of the Department of Meteorology, 

Alumni Scholarships. A limited number of scholarships are made possible 
through the gifts of aiumni and friends to the Alumni Annual Giving Program of 
the Office of Endowment and Gifts. 



38 Financial Aid 



Alumni Band Scholarship. A hmiled number ol awards to freshmen are 
sponsored by The University ot Maryland Band Alumni Organization 
Reciptenis are recommended by the Music Department alter a competitive 
audition held in the spring 

American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Condltloning 
Engineers, Inc. This scholarship is awarded to ouistanomg students maionng 
in mechanical engineering A preference is given to students from Baltimore. 
Recipients are selected by the Depaament ot Mechanical Engineering. 

American Society of Agricultural Engineering. Scholarships are awarded to 
agricultural engineering rnaiors with good scholarship and leadership qualities. 
Selection ol recipients is by the Department ot Agricultural Engineering. 

Mildred L Anglln Scholarship. This scholarship is made available from an 
endowed fund sponsored by the Riverdale Elementary School Parents and 
Teachers Association m honor of Mrs Anglin who served that school with 
distinction for forty years as a teacher and administrator To be eligible, send a 
letter to the Student Financial Aid Otfice indicating attendance at Riverdale 
Elementary School. 

Alvin L. Aubinoe Student Aid Program. Scholarship grants up to $500 per 
school year to students m engineering, preferably those studying for careers m 
civil engineering, architecture or light construction. Recipients are chosen by 
the Dean ol the College ol Engineering. 

Dr. Rot>ert W. Baker Memorial Scholarship. A $500 scholarship is awarded 
annually by the Professional Grounds Management Society to a student 
entering the final year at The University of Maryland in Ornamental Horticulture 
and who the faculty feels intends to follow a career in the "Green Industry". 

Baltimore Sunpapers Scholarship in Journalism. The Board of Trustees of 
the A S Abell Foundation. Inc . contributes tunas to provide one or more $500 
scholarships to students maionng in editorial journalism Recipients are chosen 
by the College of Journalism. 

Benjamin Banneker Scholarship. Merit awards are available to academically 
talented minority students, especially Blacks These awards, renewable for up 
to (our years of undergraduate study, provide funds to cover full-time, m-siate 
tuition and fees December 1 is the deadline for receipt of both the application 
for admission to the University as well as the nomination for this award. 
Automatic consideration is given to all National Achievement Finalists and 
Semi-Finalists. 

Dr. H.C. Byrd Memorial Fund. An endowed fund has been established by the 
many inenos of Curiey in memory of his many years of outstanding service to 
the University His penod of service lasted from 1905 when he enrolled as a 
freshman from Cnsfieid. until 1954 when he retired after serving as President ol 
the University for 19 years Prior to that he had served 19 years as head 
football coach with a record of 109-37-7 Income from the fund will be used to 
provide financial assistance to deserving student athletes. 

Capitol Milk Producers Cooperative, Inc., Scholarship. A scholarship of 
$750 IS awarded annually in the College ol Agriculture, prelerably to a student 
preparing lor a career in the dairy industry. 

Chancellor's Scholars Program. Scholarships, renewable lor four years of 
unoe'g'aduate study, are awarded on the basis ot ment The awardees are 
known as Chancellor s Scholars The awards provide funds to cover full-time, 
in-state tuition and fees, and Chancellor's Scholars receive preferential housing 
and other prerequisites Recipients are designated by the Chancellor upon the 
recommendation by a Committee which screens nominations submitted by 
high school guidance counselors and administrators of the University For 
consideration, applicants must be admitted to the University and nominated for 
this award by December 1. Automatic consideration is given to all National 
Merit Finalists and Semi-Fmaiists, all Distinguished Scholar Finalists. 
Semi-Finaiists. and Honorable Mentions. 

Dr. Ernest N. Cory Scholarship. This award is made annually to an 
outstanding lunior or senior recommended by the College ol Agriculture, 
preferably one maionng in entomology. 

Ernest T. Cullen Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship award is made 
annually to a deserving student in the College ol Agriculture Irom a high school 
on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. 

Dairy Technology Scholarship and Grants. The Dairy Technology Society ot 
Maryland and the District of Columbia provides a limited number ot 
scholarships and grants-in-aid lor students maionng in dairy products 
technology. 

Dairymen, Inc. Scholarship. To students pursuing a degree In dairy 
o'oduction. dairy manufacturing, or agncuiturai economics Available only to 
Maryland residents who are sons, daughters, grandsons, or granddaughters of 
members ol Dairymen. Inc. 

Delaware-Maryland Plant Food Association Scholarship. A $200 annual 
awa'd IS maae to a newiy aamittec unae'g'aduate who has an interest in 
agronomy ano soii tenuity work. 



Delmarva Corn and Soybean Scholarship. A $500 scholarship awarded each 

senif ster to a lunior (rem the Delmarva Peninsula (who is a U S citizen) 
enrolled m the College ol Agriculture Final selection is by the Delmarva Corn 
and Soybean Conference. 

Delta Nu Alpha Fraternity Chesapeake Chapter— No. 23, Traffic srtd 
Transportation Award. An award of $400 to an outstanding senior member ol 
The University of Ma'viand chapter majonng in transportation in the College of 

Business and Management 

Mylo S. Downey Memorial Scholarship. Awarded to a student in the Coltege 

of AgncuHu'e w'!h p'eie'ence to those with successlul achievement in 4-H 

Club work and Imanciai need 

James R. Ferguson Memorial Fund. Scholarship awards are made annually 
to incoming treshmen, enrolled in animal sciences, on the basis ot acadenrMc 
achievement and Imanciai need. 

Anne Arundel County Volunteer Firemen's Association Grant This tuition 

and fees grant is awarded to a high school g'aouaie who wiii enroll m the lire 
protection curriculum in the College ot Engineering The award is normally lor 
four years 

Baltimore County Volunteer Firemen's Association Grant. This tuition and 
fees grant is awaraeo to a siuaent wno wm enron m the fire protection 
curriculum m the College of Engineering This award is normally for foor years 

Ladles Auxiliary to The Maryland State Firemen's Association Grant This 

$750 grant is awarded to an outstanding high school graduate who will enroll 
in the lire protection curriculum in the College of Engineering The award is 
normally available for four years. 

Maryland State Firemen's Association Grant. A tuition and fees scholarship 

IS awarded annually to an outstanomg nign school student wtio enrolls in the 
fire protection curriculum of the College of Engineering This scholarship is lor 
four years. 

Prince George's County Volunteer Firemen's Association Grant. An annual 

tuition a«a tees scholarship is awaroed to an outstanomg nign school student 
who enrolls in the fire protection curriculum ol the College ol Engineering 

The Lester M. Fraley Honor Award to a Junior or Senior student of 

outstanding character maionng in the College ol Physical Education. 
Recreation, and Health who has demonstrated concern for citizenship and has 
shown superior scholarship in the University. 

John D. Gilmore Scholarship has been established for the purpose of 

assisting deserving stuoent athletes to obtain an education and participate m 
varsity athletics at The University ol Maryland The recipients should possess, 
as does John D Giimore. outstanding dedication, determination arx3 an 
undeniable will to win in athletic competition ana to succeed in life 

Goddard Memorial Scholarship of $5IX) each to students in the College of 
Agriculture Several scholarships are available annually under the terms ot the 
James and Sarah E R Goddard Memorial Fund established through the wills ot 
Morgan E Goddard ana Mary Y Goddard 

Manasses J. and Susanna Jart>oe Grove Memorial Scholarship. Awarded to 

a student entering the lunior or senior class preparing tor a career in 
agronomy, animai/dairy science, or horticulture Recipient must have been 
born and educated in, and must be a legal resident ol. Frederick County (Md ) 

John William Guckeyson Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship of $100 >s 
granted annually by Mrs Hudson Dunap as a memorial to John William 
Guckeyson. an honored Maryland alumnus 

Staley and Eugene Hahn Memorial Scholarship Fund. Annual awards of 
$500 a'e made Dy Mr and Mrs Wdle' J Hann in memory of their sons to aid 
Outstanding agricultural students from Frederick County 

William Randolph Hearst Foundation Scholarships. These scholarships are 
made avanaoie through a gift ot the Baltimore News American, one of If>e 
Hearst newspapers, m twior of William Randolph Hearst Scholarships up to 
$1 000 are awarded annually to undergraduates pursuing a program ol study 
in loumaiism Scholarships up to $1,000 are awarded annually lot graduate 
study in history 

Robert Michael HiggenlMtham Memorial Award Fund. This Fund has C>een 
endowed by Mr ana Mrs Charles A HiggeritX)tham in merTX)ry of their son 
who was killed m Vietnam Annual awards are made to promising lunor 
students maionng in mathematics Recipients are cfx»en by trie Department 

of Mathematics 

Belva H. Hopkins Memorial Schoolrship. An endowed fund f\as been 
established to provide a scholarship to a deserving student Irom Pnnce 
Georges County who has expressed an interest m teaching mathematics in 
public schools The recipient may be entitiea to renew the scholarship lor three 
more years (or the normal graduating time) provided there IS financial need 
Financial need may be considered but is not a requirement lor tfie rniiial 
award. 



Financial Aid 39 



George Hyman Construction Company Scholarship. A luiiion schoia'ship is 
awa^ncd to a Iresliman sluclenl m cvii enci.net"inq The scholarship may be 
renewed lot ih'ee moie yeais so long as ihe sludeni mamlains a grade point 
ave'age oi 2 b 

Paul H. Kea Memorial Scholarship Fund. This lund was established by the 
Potomac Valley Chapter ot the American institute ot Architects in memofy ol 
Paul H Kea. a highly respected member of the chapter. 

Venia M. Keller Grant. The Maryland Stale Council of Homemakers Club 
makes available this grant of $100 which is open to a Maryland young man or 
woman ot promise who is recommended by the College of Human Ecology 

Mary Anne and Frank A. Kennedy Scholarship. Presented to outstanding 

lournalism students. Irom the eslaie ol Mary Anne and Frank A Kennedy. 

KInghome Fund Scholarship. A scholarship in honor ol Mr Joseph W 
Kinghorne ol the Class ol 191 1 of the College of Agriculture shah be awarded 
to the student specializing m poultry science having the highest general 
average at the end ol his or her sophomore year The amount ol the 
scholarship shall equal the tuition on the College Park Campus Selection of 
recipients is made by the Chairperson ol the Department of Poultry Science. 

KIwanIs Scholarship. The J Enos Ray Memorial Scholarship covering tuition 
IS awarded by the Pnnce George s Kiwanis Club to a male resident ol Prince 
Georges County. Maryland, who. in addition to possessing the necessary 
guaiilicaiions lor maintaining a satisfactory scholarship record, must have a 
reputation of high character and attainment in general all-around citizenship. 

Gary Lee L^ke Memorial Scholarship. This endowed fund provides 
scholarships lor students maionng in pre-vetennary science in the College of 
Agriculture It was established by his family and friends. Recipients are 
selected by the College of Agriculture. 

Laurel Race Course. Inc., Scholarship. This fund has been established to 
provide scholarships lor students who are participating in the University Band. 

Leidy Foundation Scholarships. A $1,500 fund has been established by the 
John H Leidy Foundation, Inc to provide scholarships for educational 
expenses to worthy students who have linancial need. 

Leidy Foundation Scholarship. A scholarship of $500 is granted annually to a 
graduate or undergraduate student preparing for a career in the general field 
of chemistry Recipients are chosen by the Department of Chemistry. 

Ransom R. Lewis Memorial Fund. Established in 1975 to honor Mr Lewis, an 
alumnus and supporter of the athletic teams Assists athletes in need of 
financial aid. 

Helen Aletta Linthicum Scholarship. These scholarships, several in number, 
were established through the benefaction of the late Mrs Aietta Linthicum, 
widow of the late Congressman Charles J Linthicum, who served Congress 
from the Fourth District of Maryland for many years 

Lions Club of Silver Spring Memorial Scholarship. This scholarship covering 
tuition and fees is available to a worthy graduate of one of the following high 
schools Montgomery Blair, Norlhwood or Spnngbrook. 

Lions International Scholarship. An award of $500 is available to a freshman 
who competes in the Lions Club (District 22-C) Annual Band Festival A 
recipient is recommended by the Music Department after a competitive 
audition in the spring. 

Prince George's Plaza Lions Club Scholarship. This $300 scholarship Is 
given in memory of Lion John L Kensmger, Sr The award is made to a 
student from Prince George s County whose area of academic concentration is 
in the field ol creative wnting. 

The Alice Morgan Love Scholarship Fund is awarded to the Physical 
Education maior who best exhibits the qualities ol scholarship, leadership, and 
potential as a physical educator. 

M Club Grants. The M Club of The University of Maryland provides each year 
a limited number of awards Minta Martin Aeronautical Research Foundation 
Fund Two scholarships are available to freshmen to cover tuition and lees. 

Maryland-District of Columbia Association of Physical Plant 
Administrators Scholarship. A scholarship for fixed charges and fees is 
made available to a lunior or senior who is interested m making the 
administration of a physical plant his career. The recipient must be a resident 
of Maryland or the District of Columbia 

Maryland Educational Foundation Grants. This fund has been established to 
provide assistance to worthy students 

Maryland Holstein Association Scholarship. The scholarship will be awarded 
to a deserving student m the College of Agriculture who has had a hoistem 
proiect in 4-H or FFA The award will be based on financial need, scholastic 
ability and leadership. Recipients are chosen by the College ol Agncuiture. 



Maryland State Golf Association Scholarship. A limited number of $500 
sct^'oi,!".!! 11'. 110 avaiiatiie to undergraduates m the Agronomy Depanmeni who 
have an init- 'est m golf turf jvork 

Maryland Turfgrass Association Scholarship. A $250 annual award is made 

to an undKigiaOuaie wfio has an mieresl m agronomy and commercial SOd 
production 

Maryland and Virginia Milk Producers Association Scholarship. A 

scholarship ol $500 is awarded armuauy m the Conege ol Agriculture 
prelerabiy to a student preparing lor a career m the dairy industry 

George R. Merrill, Jr. Memorial Scholarship. Friends- of former Professor 
George R Memil. Jr . have established this endowed scholarship fund to 
benelit students m Industrial Education. 

Montgomery County Press Association Scholarship. Presented to an 

outstanding lOurnaiism residing m Montgomery County 

Loren L. Murray and Associates Scholarships. This fund has been created 

to provide scholarships lor Maryland residents who are admitted to the College 
of Education, 

Dr. Ray A. Murray Scholarship. The award, sponsored by Maryland Chapter 
No 32 of the National Institute ot Farm and Land Brokers, is to be made to a 
worthy sophomore in the Department ot Agricultural and Resource Economics. 
College of Agriculture. 

Noxell Foundation Scholarships. Two scholarships are awarded to senior 

chemistry maiors nominated by the Department ol Chemistry, 

Pantry Pride Foundation Scholarship. Scholarships of $600 are awarded to 

sons and daughters of company employees This scholarship is renewable for 
three years To apply, contact the Pantry Pride Foundation. 

Douglas Howard Phillips Memorial Scholarships. This scholarship fund has 
been endowed by Mr and Mrs Albanus Phillips. Jr . in honor of their son who 
met his untimely death in the spring before he was scheduled to attend the 
University, in order that worthy young male graduates ol Cambridge (Maryland) 
High School may have the opportunity he missed. 

Pilot Freight Carriers, Inc.. Scholarship. An award of $500 to an outstanding 
student maionng in Transportation in the College ot Business and 
Management, 

Poffenberger Scholarship. Awarded to a student in the College of Agriculture 
who snows the greatest potential for making significant contnbutions to 
education and development in agriculture, 

Ralston Purina Scholarship. A scholarship of $500 is awarded annually to an 
incoming senior or |unior ol the College of Agriculture, 

J. Homer Remsberg Memorial Scholarship. A scholarship of $300 is 
awarded annually to a resident ol Frederick County enrolled in the College of 

Agriculture, 

R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Scholarship. Scholarships are designed for students 
in agriculture who show high academic potential, are U S citizens with 
preference to those who have a background in tobacco, related business or 
who intend to pursue studies in these areas. 

Mary Elizabeth Roby Memorial Scholarship. An endowed scholarship has 
been established by the University Park Republican Women's Club Limited 
awards are made to women entering the lunior or senior years who are 
studying in the field of political science. A preference is given to residents of 
Prince George s County. 

Vivian F. Roby Scholarships. This endowed fund was established through a 
bequest to The University of Maryland by Evaiyn S, Roby in memory of her 
husband, class of 1912, to provide undergraduate scholarships to needy boys 
from Baltimore City and Chanes County, 

Jack B. Sacks Foundation Scholarship. An award of $1,000 on behalf of the 

Advertising Club ol Metropolitan Washington. Inc . to an outstanding senior 
Marketing student in the College of Business and Management planning a 
career in advertising. 

Schluderberg Foundation Scholarship Grant. This grant of $500 is awarded 
in the College ot Agriculture to a student enrolled in the animal science or food 
science curriculum. 

Dr. Fern Duey Schneider Grant. A $300 grant is available to a foreign wpoman 
student enrolled m the College of Education, who has completed at least one 
semester m residence at the University Funds for the grant are contnbuted by 
the Montgomery and Prince Georges County Chapters of the Delta Kappa 

Gamma Society, 

Arthur H. Seidenspinner Scholarship. An endowed memorial scholarship 
fund has been established by Mrs, Seidenspmner to assist deserving student 
athletes to obtain an education at the University Both Mr and Mrs 
Seidenspinner have been long-time contributors to numerous student aid 



40 Awards and Prizes 



programs at the Umversity^ 

Southern States Cooperative. Two scholarships are awarded each year to 
sons/daughiers o1 Southern States patrons — one lor outstanding work in 4-H 
and the other for outstanding work in FFA The amouni ol each scholarship is 
$800 for the first year and $600 per year for the succeeding three years. 

Dr. Mal>el S. Spencer Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded in honor ol 
Dr Spencer, distinguished former Professor in the College of Education. A 
preference shall be given to students in Home Economics Education. 

David N. Steger Scholarship Fund. An annual award made to a graduate 
from North Carroll High School who will be an entering freshman at The 
University of Maryland pursuing studies in the field ol agriculture. 

T. B. Symons Memorial Fund. A scholarship award is made annually to a 
student enrolled in agriculture on the basis of academic achievement and 
financial need. 

Charles A. Taff Scholarship. An award of $500 to an outstanding student 
maioring in Transportation in the College of Business and Management. 

Thomas H. Taliaferro Scholarship. Under the terms of the will of the late Jane 
G. S Taliaferro, a bequest has been made to The University of Maryland to 
provide scholarship aid to worthy students. 

Tau Beta Pi Scholarship Fund. A limited number of scholarships are made 
available each year to wonhy engineering students by members and alumni of 
Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi Association, Inc., national engineering 
honor society. 

Veterinary Science Scholarship. A scholarship of $300. provided by the 
veterinarians of Maryland, will be awarded to a student enrolled in Veterinary 
Science, selected on the basis of leadership, academic competence and 
financial need. 

Western Electric Scholarships. Two scholarships are awarded to students in 
the College of Engineering The amount of the scholarship covers the cost of 
tuition, books and fees not to exceed $800 nor to be less than $400, 

Westinghouse Aerospace Division Scholarship. The Westinghouse Electric 
Corporation has established a scholarship to encourage outstanding students 
of engineering and the physical sciences The scholarship is awarded to a 
sophomore student and is over a period of three years in six installments of 
$250 Students in electrical or mechanical engineering, engineering physics or 
applied mathematics are eligible for the award. 

Winslow Foundation Scholarship. Scholarships are awarded to deserving 
students in the College of Agriculture, in general areas ol agriculture or 
pre-veterinary science who are in need of financial aid and who are residents 
of Maryland (preferably Montgomery County), the Distnct of Columbia or North 
Carolina. 

Women's Architectural League Scholarship. This fund has been established 
to aid worthy students in the School ol Architecture 

Women's Club of Bethesda Scholarship. Several scholarships are available 
to young women residents of Montgomery County Recipients must be 
accepted m the College ol Education or the School of Nursing. 

Nicholas Brice Worthington Scholarship. A $500 memorial scholarship is 
made available to a student m the College of Agriculture by the descendants 
of Nicholas Bnce Worthington. one of the founders of the Agricultural College. 

ZONTA Scholarship. This scholarship of $500 is awarded annually to an 
incoming Ireshman woman maionng in aerospace engineering. This award is 
normally available for four years. 

Loans 

Loan funds are available to help meet the educational expenses of 
students enrolled at the University The exient of financial need must be clearly 
established by submission of appropriate application materials 

Loans are normally given on a yearly basis, although shon-term emergency 
loans are available Loans may not be used for non-educational expenses nor 
lor repayment ol previously incurred indebtedness. 

National Direct Student Loan Program. This loan fund was established by 
the federal government m agreement with The University ol Maryland to make 
low-interest loans to students with demonstrated financial need Applicants 
must be enrolled lor six or more credits To insure consideration, an application 
materials should be received by the Office ol Student Financial Aid by the 
February 15 prionty date, prior to the academic year for which the student is 
requesting funds Applications received alter this time will be considered on a 
funds available basis 

The borrower must Sign a note Repayment begins six months after the 
borrower leaves school and must be completed wiihm ten years thereafter 
Interests begin to accrue at the rate ol 5% per annum once the repayment 
period commences. 



Cancellation and deferment provisions are included (or teachers of the 
handicapped, those in military service and those involved In non-profit 
volunteer sen/ice. 

Institutional Student Loans. Institutional loan funds have been established 

through the generosity ol University organizations, alumni, faculty, staff, and 
Inends These loans are normally available at low interest rates to qualified 
students For specific information, contact the Office ol Student Financial Aid 

PLUS Program. This loan program is open to graduate students, independent 

undergraduates, and parents ol dependent undergraduate students The 
maximum amount that can be borrowed is $3,000 per student per academic 
year with an aggregate maximum of $15,000 per student Independent 
students, however, may borrow only $2,500 per year to a maximum of $12,500 
including amounts borrowed under the GSL program The interest rate is 12%, 
Repayment begins within 60 days Pnncipal payments may be deferred for 
parent borrowers These loans are obtained from participating lenders Allow at 
least two months for receipt of funds Applications are available from the Office 
ol Student Finnciai Aid or the lender. 

Guaranteed Student Loan Program. This federal program allows students to 

borrow money Irom their hometown banks or other participating financial 
institutions To quality, students must be US citizens, permanent residents, or 
relugees and be enrolled at least half-time The program enables 
undergraduates to borrow up to $2,500 per academic year depending upon 
the financial need and the policies ol the individual lenders These loans tjear 
an interest rate of eight percent, with interest and repayment commencing six 
months after the borrower leaves school Students with Guaranteed Student 
Loans outstanding at 7 and 9 percent may continue to borrow at those rates. 

Applications are available from the Qitice of Student Financial Aid or the 
local lender These forms should be completed at least two months before the 
funds are actually needed. 

Part-time Employment 

College Work-Study Program. Under provisions of the Educational 
Amendments of 1976, employment may be awarded as a means of financial 
aid to students who (1) are in need of earnings from such employment to 
pursue a course ol study at a college or university, and (2) are capable of 
maintaining good standing in the course of study while employed Under the 
Work-Study Program, students may work up to twenty hours per week during 
the school year and a maximum ol 40 hours during the summer The amount of 
money that may be earned is determined by the student's demonstrated need. 

Job Referral Service. The Office of Student Financial Aid through the Job 
Reterral Service located in Room 3120. Hornbake Library, serves without 
charge as a clearinghouse for students seeking part-time work and for 
employers seeking help Full-time summer employment opportunities are also 
available Many |obs are available on and off campus 

Working during college years may offer advantages in addition to the 
obvious one of financing a college education The employed student has a 
special opportunity to learn new skills, develop good work habits, and team 
how to get along with people Sometimes part-time employment helps 
students choose a vocation or acquire necessary experience. 

Dining Hall Workship Program. Under the Dining Hall Workship Program, 
students may earn their board by working approximately twelve hours per 
week After a successful semester, the workload may be increased at the 
student s request 

Students normally cannot make arrangements for employment until they are 
on campus at the beginning of the semester Application must be made m 
person and the applicants should have a schedule of classes and study hours 
so that they can seek employment best suited to their free lime. 

Library Worl(ship Program. Students may be awarded jobs under this 
program through the Otiice of Student Financial Aid Students must follow 
usual financial aid application procedures and show financial need The 
amount (generally about $1,200 per year) is credited to the students account 

Awards and Prizes 

Academic Awards 

Milton Abramowitz Memorial Prize in Mathematics. A prize is awarded 
annually 10 a |unior or senior Student maioring in mathematics wtx) has 
demonstrated superior competence and promise tor future development in the 
field of mathematics and its applications. 

Agricultural Alumni Award. Presented to a senior who dunng his or her 
college career contributed most toward the advancement of the College ot 

Agriculture 

Agricultural Engineering Department's Outstanding Senior Awrard is 

presented to a stuaent m Agricultural Engineering on the basis of scholastic 
performance, participation m ASAE National Student Branch, and other 
extra-curncuiar activities. 



Awards and Prizes 41 



AIA Certificate. Awafded annually by Ihe Amencan Inslilule ol Archilecls 10 a 
graOuatrng studeni ol architecture tor academic actiievement. 

AIA Medal. Awarded annually by the American Institute ol Architects to a 
graduating student ol architecture lor outstanding overall academic 
achievement. 

Allied Chemical Scholarship Award is presented to a student In Chemical 
Engineering on the basis ot mieiiectual capacity, scieniilic ability, breadth ol 
interest and leadership qualities 

Alpha Chi Sigma Award. The Alpha Rho Chapter of the Alpha Chi Sigma 
Honofary Fraiemity otters annually a year's membership in the American 
Chemical Society to a senior maionng in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering 
whose average has been above 3 lor three and one-hall years. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award. Presented to the senior member ol the group 
who has maintained the highest average (or three and a hall years She must 
have been in attendance in the institution lor the entire time. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Senior Certificate Award. Senior members of Alpha 
Lambda Delta, honorary scholastic society lor women, who have maintained an 
average ol 3 5 receive this ceriilicate. 

Alpha Rho Chi Medal. Awarded annually by the Alpha Rho Chi fraternity for 
architecture and the allied prolessions to a graduating student ol architecture 
who has made a distinctive contribution to school lite, embodying the ideals ol 
prolessional service and leadership. 

Alpha Zeta Medal. The Professional Agricultural Fraternity of Alpha Zeta 
awards annually a medal to the agricultural student in the freshman class who 
maintains the highest average in academic work. 

Alumni Hamilton Award. This award is offered by the Engineering Alumni 
Chapter to the graduating senior in the College ot Engineering who has most 
successfully combined proficiency in his or her maior field of study with 
achievements— either academic, extra-curricular, or both— in the social 
sciences and humanities. 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Award. Free 
memt>erships m the Institute tor one year and cash prizes for the best paper 
presented at a Student Branch meeting and (or the graduating aeronautical 
senior with the highest academic standing. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award. A certificate, pin and 
magazine subscription are awarded to the lunior member of the Student 
Chapter who attained the highest overall scholastic average dunng his or her 
(reshman and sophomore years. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award is presented by the 
National Capital Section to an outstanding sophomore chemical engineering 
student. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Professional Achievement 
Award IS presented by the National Capital Section to an outstanding senior 
chemical engineering student. 

American Institute of Chemists Award. Presented for outstanding 
scholarship in chemistry and tor high character. 

American Society of Civil Engineers Award. The Maryland Section of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers awards annually the first years dues of an 
associate membership in the Society to a senior member of the Student 
Chapter on recommendation of the faculty of the Department ot Civil 
Engineering. 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers Senior Award. Presented to the 
senior member who has contributed most to the local chapter, 

American Society for Testing Materials. Two student awards are given 
annually to engineering seniors m recognition of superior scholastic ability and 
demonstrated interest in engineering materials and their evaluation. 

James R. Anderson Award in Geography. Awarded at each spring 
commencement to an outstanding undergraduate student in geography (or 
high academic achievement. 

Appleman-Norton Award in Botany is presented to a senior major in Botany 
who IS considered worthy on the basis of demonstrated ability and excellence 
in scholarship. 

David Arthur Berman Memorial Award is presented to two students majoring 
in Chemical Engineering with the highest cumulative scholastic averages at the 
end o! the first semester of their junior year and who have been elected to Tau 
Beta Pi. 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal. The Dinah Berman Memorial Medal is 
awarded annually to the sophomore who has attained the highest scholastic 
average of his or her class in the College of Engineering. This medal is given 
by Mr. Benjamin Berman. 



B'nal B'rith Award. The B nai B rith Women o( Pnnce George s County present 
a Book award lor Excellence m Hebrew Studies. 

The Donald T. Booney Honors Award is presented to the Chemical 
Engineering student who has made the most outstanding contribution to the 
protession as a member ol the Honors Society. Omega Chi Epsiion. 

Business Education Award of Merit to a student In Business Education in 
recognition ot outstanding achievement as a student. 

Citizenship Prize For Men. An award presented annually as a memorial to the 
late President Emeritus H C Byrd to that male member ot the senior class who 
during his collegiate career has most nearly typided the model citizen and has 
contributed significantly to the general advancement ol the interests ol the 
University. 

Citizenship Prize for Women. An award presented annually as a memorial to 
Sally Sterling Byrd to that female member ol the senior class who during her 
collegiate career has most nearly typified the model citizen and has 
contributed significantly to the general advancement ol the interests ot the 

University. 

CRC Engineering Science Achievement Award is presented to a junior in the 
College ol Engineering lor outstanding scholarship, leadership, and sen/ice. 

Bernard L. Crozier Award. The Maryland Association of Engineers awards a 
cash prize of twenty-dye dollars to the senior in the College o( Engineering 
who. in the opinion ot the (acuity, has made the greatest improvement in 
scholarship during his or her stay at the University. 

Delta Delta Delta Medal. This sorority awards a medal annually to the woman 
who attains the highest average in academic work dunng the sophomore year. 

Delta Gamma Scholarship Award. This award is oKered to the woman 
member ot the graduating class who has maintained the highest average 
during three and one-haK years at the University. 

Delta Sigma PI Scholarship Key. Awarded to the senior with the highest 
overall scholastic average in the College of Business and Management. 

Distinguished Accounting Student Awards. Awarded by The University of 
Maryland chapter of Beta Alpha Psi and the accounting faculty to the ten 
senior accounting students with the highest scholastic average in Accounting 
in the College of Business and Management. 

Nathan L Drake Award. Presented by the Alpha Rho Chapter of Alpha Chi 
Sigma to the most promising student who is majoring in chemistry and has 
completed the sophomore year. 

Education Alumni Award. Presented to the outstanding senior man and 
senior woman in the College of Education. 

Electrical Engineering Undergraduate Association Award is presented to an 
undergraduate in Electrical Engineering in recognition of outstanding service 

and leadership. 

Engineering Alumni Chapter Award is presented to a senior in the College of 
Engineering (or outstanding scholarship and service to the College of 
Engineering. 

Eta Kappa Nu Outstanding Senior Award is presented to a senior in 
Electrical Engineering tor outstanding scholastic achievement and service to 
the society and department. 

Forbes Chocolate Leadership Award of Cleveland, Ohio, presents a $100 
leadership award to a major in Food Science. 

The Geieo Achievement Award is presented annually by the Government 
Employees Insurance Company (GEICO) to an outstanding sophomore or 
junior majoring in an insurance-related field such as Business Administration, 
Marketing or Economics. Nominations are made by Ihe faculty based on 
academic achievement. 

Wesley Gewehr Award. Phi Alpha Theta, History honorary, offers a cash 
award each year (or the best undergraduate paper and the best graduate 
paper written on an historical topic. The entrance paper must be 
recommended by the history (acuity ot The University of Maryland. 

Goddard Medal. The James Douglas Goddard Memorial Medal is awarded 
annually to the male resident of Prince George's County born therein, who 
makes the highest average m his studies and who at the same time embodies 
the most manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne G. Goddard 
James of Washington, D C. 

Charles B. Hale Dramatic Awards. The University Theatre recognizes 
annually the male and female members of the senior class who have done 
most for the advancement ot dramatics at the University. 

P. Arne Hansen Memorial Award. Presented to the Outstanding Departmental 

Honors Student m Microb oiogy. 



42 Awards and Prizes 



William Randolph Hearst Foundation Awards. Categories general news, 
fealures. edilonais. mvestigalive reporting, spot news 

Robert M. HIgglnbotham Memorial Award. Award to an outstanding junior 
student maioring m Mattiennatics 

Home Economics Alumni Award. Presented to the female student 
outstanding in application of home economics in her present living and who 
shows promise of carrying these into her future home and community 

The Joseph W. Houppert Memorial Fund. This fund will be the source of a 
cash pnze to be awarded to the undergraduate student who writes the best 
essay on Shakespeare during the academic year. 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Award. The Washington 
Section of the institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers defrays the 
expenses of a year's membership as an associate in the institute for the senior 
doing the most to promote student branch activities. 

Joe Elbert James Memorial Award. Gold watch annually awarded to the 
graduating senior in horticulture on basis of scholarship and promise of future 
achievement. 

Charles Manning Prize in Creative Arts. Awarded annually to a University of 
fvlaryiand student lor achievement in the creative or performing arts. 

Maryland-Delaware Press Association Annual Citation. Presented to the 
outstanding senior in lournalism. 

Maryland Recreation and Parks Society Award to the outstanding senior 
mapring in recreation 

The Men's League Award to the male senior who gave the most to sports. 

Men's League Certificates. Offered for outstanding achievement, character 
and service to the University 

Men's League Cup. This award is offered by the Men's League to the 
graduating male senior who has done the most for the male student body. 

Motor Fleet Supervisors Award to a student majoring in transportation in the 
College ol Business and Management. 

National Society of Fire Protection Engineers Awards. Presented to the 
nnost outstanding senior and sophomore in the fire protection curriculum. 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal. This honorary society awards a medal annually 
to the freshman woman in the College of Human Ecology who attains the 
highest scholastic average during the first semester. 

L W. ParKer Memorial Award. Presented annually to a graduating student of 
Architecture for outstanding architectural craftsmanship. 

Phi Beta Kappa Junior Award. An award to be presented to the junior initiate 
into Phi Beta Kappa who has attained the highest academic average. 

Phi Beta Kappa— Leon P. Smith Award. The award of the Gamma of 
Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa is presented to the initiate senior with the 
highest cumulative scholastic average whose basic course program has been 
in the liberal studies. 

Phi Chi Theta Key. The Phi Chi Theta Key is awarded to the outstanding 
graduating senior woman in the College of Business and Management on the 
basis of scholarship, activities and leadership. 

Phi Sigma Awards for outstanding achievement in biological sciences to an 
undergraduate student and a graduate student. 

Pi Tau Sigma Memorial Award. Presented to the senior in Mechanical 
Engineering who has made the most outstanding contribution to the University. 

Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Sophomore Award. Presented to the most 
outstanding sophomore m Mechanical Engineering on the basis of scholastic 
average and instructors' ratings. 

Public Relations Society of America. The Baltimore Chapter of PRSA 
presents an annual citation to the outstanding senior ma)oring m public 
relations. 

The Shipfeys of Maryland Award. Cash award given to (he graduating History 

maior with the best academic record. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award. This award is presented to a senior student 
maionng in microbiology for high scholarship, character and leadership. 

Sigma Delta Chi Citation. For Achievement at The University ol Maryland. 

Sigma Delta Pi Award. Presented by the Department of Spanish and 
Portuguese to the g'aduating member of Sigma Delta Pi (National Spanish 
Honor Society) who has rendered the greatest service to the Delta (University 
of Maryland) Chapter. 



Dr. Leo and Rita Sklar General Honors Awards. Dr Leo Skiar. A&S 37. and 
his wile. Rita Skiar. annually fund awards for excellence m the General Honors 
Program These awards ate given to outstanding students in the General 
Honors Program 

Awards for Excellence In Teaching Spanish. Presented by the Department 

of Spanish and Portuguese to the three graduate assistants who have most 
distinguished themselves by the excellence of their teaching. 

Awards for Excellence In the Study of Spanish. Presented by tfie 
Department of Spanish and Portuguese to the three members of the 
graduating class who have most distinguished themselves as students ol 

Spanish language and literature 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award. The New York Southern Society, in 

memory of its first president, awards annually medallions and certificates to 
one man and one woman in the graduating class and one non-student who 
evince in their daily lite a spirit ol love for and helpfulness to other men and 
women. 

Tau Beta PI Award. The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi Association. 

national engineering honor society, awards an engineer's handbook to the 
junior in' the College of Engineering who during his or her sophomore year has 
made the greatest improvement in scholarship over that of his or her freshman 
year. 

Tau Beta PI Sophomore Improvement Award is presented to the junior in the 

CoHege of Engineering who during the sophomore year has made the greatest 
percentage of possible improvement in scholarship over that ol his or her 

freshman year. 

Wall Street Journal Achievement Award. An award to the outstanding 
student in investments and security analysis In the College ol Business and 

Management. 

James P. Wharton Art Award Fund. This fund was endowed by the former 

head of the Art Department, Colonel James P Wharton An annual award of 
$200 00 IS given to a senior lor special achievement in Studio Aft. 

Athletic Awards 

Atlantic Coast Conference Award. A plague is awarded each year (o a senior 

in each conference school lor excellence in scholarship and athletics. 

The Alvln L Aublnoe Basketball Trophy. This trophy is given in menrwry of 

Alvin L Aubinoe lor the senior who has contnbuted most to the squad dunng 

the time the student was on the squad. 

The Alvin L Aubinoe Football Trophy. This trophy Is given in menrwry of 

Alvin L Aubinoe for the unsung hero of the current season. 

The Alvln L Aubinoe Track Trophy. This trophy is given in memory of Alvin 
L Aubinoe for the senior who has contributed most to the squad during the 
time the student was on the squad. 

Bob Beall-Tommy Marcos Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the best football 

lineman of the year. 

John T. Bell Swimming Award. To the year's outstanding swimmer or diver. 

Louis W. Berger Trophy. Presented to the outstanding senior baseball player 

Andrew M. Cohen Tennis Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the member of 
the tennis team who, judged by members oi the team, contributed the most to 

tennis. 

William P. Cole, III, Memorfai Lacrosse Award. This award, offered by the 

teammates of Wiiham P Coie. m. and the coaches ol the 1940 National 
Champion team, is presented to the outstanding midfielder. 

The George C. Cook Memorial Scholarship Trophy. Awarded annually to a 

member of the football team with the higtiest scholastic average- 
Joe Deckman-Sam Silver Trophy. This trophy is offered by Joseph H 
Deckman and Samuel L Silver to the riKist improved defense lacrosse player 

Geary F. Eppley Award. Offered by Benny and Hotsy Aiperstein to the 
graduating male senior athlete who ounng his three years of varsity 
competition, lettered at least once and attained the highest over-all sctioiastic 
average 

Halbert K. Evans Memorfai Track Award. This award, given in memory of 
■Heimie" Evans of the Class of 1940, by his Inends, is presented to a 

graduating member of the track team 

Jack Fat>er-AI Heagy Unsung Hero Award. Presented to the player who best 
exemplifies determination, will to win, and pnoe m accomplishment. 

Tom Fields Award. This award is given to the most important member of ttie 
Cross Country team based on the qualifies of leadership, dedication to 
excellence, attitude, and personal achievement. 



Awards and Prizes 43 



Herbert H. Goodman Memorial Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the most 

OulsIdMdicig wrcsMer ol iMo year 

Jim Kehoe Ring Award. A Maryland Ring is awarded to the member ot the 
track teiini wtiose dedication to excellence most closely exemplifies that ol Jim 
Kehoe. one ol Maryland s greatest trackmen, 

Charles Leroy MacKerl Trophy. This trophy is ottered by William K Krouse to 
the Maiyiaiid sluUenl who lias contributed most to wrestling while at the 
University 

Maryland Ring. The Maryland Ring is ottered as a memorial to Charles L 
Linha'di Ol the Class ot 1912. to the Maryland man who is )udged the best 

altilele ot the year. 

Charles P. McCormlck Trophy. This trophy is given in memory of Charles P 
McCormick to the senior member ot the swimming team who has contributed 
most to swimming during the swimmer's collegiate career, 

Edwin Powell Trophy. This trophy is offered by the Class of 1913 to the 
player who has rendered the greatest service to lacrosse during the year. 

Silvester Watch for Excellence In Athletics. A gold watch, given in honor of 
former President ot the University. R W Silvester, is offered annually to "the 
man who typifies the best m college athletics ' 

TEKE Trophy. This trophy is offered by the Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa 
Epsiion Fraternity to the student who during lour years at the University has 
rendered the greatest service to football. 

Rol>ert E. Theofeld Memorial. This trophy is presented by Dr. and Mrs Harry 
S Hoffman and is awarded to the golfer who most nearly exemplifies the 
competitive spirit and strong character of Robert E, Theofeld, a former member 
of the boxing team. 

The Dr. Reginald Van Trump Truitt Award. This award is given to a senior 
attackman in lacrosse (midtieid or attack) for scholastic attainments and team 
performance 

University of Maryland Swimming Association Scholar Athlete Award. This 
award IS given to the swimmer who has compiled the best combination 
academic and aquatic record. 

Air Force ROTC Awards 

Aerospace Education Foundation W. Randolph Lovelace Memorial Award. 

Recognizes Ihe most oulsfandmg Air Force Association Award winner from 
each of the seven geographical areas. 

Air Force Association Award to the outstanding senior cadet who has 
excelled m field training, possesses individual leadership characteristics, ranks 
in the upper 10% of his or her class in the university and the upper 5% of his 
or her ROTC class, and has outstanding promotion potential. 

Air Force Historical Foundation Award to an AFROTC cadet/commissionee 
in recognition of leadership, citizenship, academic achievement, and military 
performance Award is a $1,000 scholarship for graduate Study in a field 
beneficial to Air Force and American Aviation Technology. 

Air Force ROTC Field Training Awards. Awarded at field training for 
outstanding performance in specific areas of field training Awards include 
AFROTC Commandants Award. AFROTC Vice Commandants Award, AFROTC 
Athletic Award, AFROTC Marksmanship Award, AFROTC Academic 
Achievement Award 

Air Force ROTC Sponsored Awards to cadets who have excelled in specific 
areas Included are AFROTC Superior Performance Ribbon, AFROTC 
Leadership Ribbon. AFROTC Distinctive CMC Cadet Ribbon; College 
Scholarship Recipient Ribbon; and Category IP. IN, and IM Ribbons. 

Air Force ROTC Valor Awards to cadets for voluntary act of valor (Gold valor 
award) involving physical risk without regard to personal safety or to a cadet 
for voluntary act of valor (Silver valor award) requiring strength of mind or spirit 
to react promptly and correctly in a critical situation. 

Alumni Cup. Presented to the second semester Air Science senior cadet who 
has achieved the highest cumulative grade point average within the Corps of 
Cadets, 

American Defense Preparedness Association Award. Presented to the 
outstanding senior cadel who has an academic average which places him or 
her in the upper half of his or her entire class at the University, has received no 
grade in the advanced ROTC courses less than B, is in upper 20% of total 
senior enrollment at The University ot Maryland, has participated actively in 
athletics and/or campus activities, and has demonstrated outstanding 
leadership qualities, 

American Defense Preparedness Association Scholarship. The $500 00 
scholarship is presented to the most outstanding sophomore cadet who 
demonstrates outstanding qualities ol a positive attitude, leadership potential 



as an officer, leadership performance as a cadet presents an outstanding 
personal appearance and demonstrates high ideals ot military tieanng and 
courtesy 

American Fighter Aces Award recognizes the outstanding graduating cadet 
piioi in each geographical area based on his or her performance and 
achievements as an AFROTC cadel and his or her performance m the Idghl 
instruction program. 

American Legion Outstanding Senior Cadet. This award is sponsored by the 
American Legion, Department ot Maryland, and is presented to the cadet best 
described as the "Outstanding ROTC Senior." 

American Legion ROTC General Military Excellence Awards to a senior 
(Gold award) and a lunior (Silver award) m the upper 25% ol his or her 
AFROTC class demonstrating outstanding qualities in military leadership, 
discipline, and character. 

American Legion ROTC Scholastic Award to an outstanding senior (Gold 
award) and junior (Silver award) who are in the upper 10% ol their class in the 
University and have demonstrated high qualities in military leadership. 

Angel Flight Freshman Award to the distinctive freshman cadet in the 

General Military Course 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Award to the 

outstanding senior cadel who is preparing lor a career in this technical area 
and has demonstrated outstanding qualities ot military leadership, high moral 
character, and definite aptitude lor military service 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Scholarship 
Award. Awarded lo a sophomore cadet ranked m the top 25 percent ol the 
university class, has financial need and is accepted into the Prolessional 
Officers Course. 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronic Association Scholarship 
Award of one $500 scholarship annually to a sophomore AFROTC caoet lor 
undergraduate or University study in electrical engineering, communications 
engineering and/or technical photography. 

Arnold Air Society GMC Cadet Award to the freshman or sophomore cadet 
who has oemonstraied outstanding quality in areas ol attitude, personal 
appearance, and military knowledge, 

Coblentz Memorial Cup to the commander of the best drilled flight within the 
Corps ot Cadets, 

Commandant of Cadets Award to a junior or senior cadet for outstanding 
performance as a staff officer. This cadet nrost successfully exemplifies the 
"complete staff officer," 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award to the senior cadet who has 

demonstrated high qualities of dependability, good character, adherence to 
military discipline, and leadership ability 

Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America Award to a qualified 
sophomore cadet who has demonstrated quaWies ol dependability, good 
character, adherence to military discipline, leadership potential, patriotism, and 
understanding of the importance ot the American heritage and is also in the 
upper 10% of the sophomore cadets. 

Disabled American Veterans Cup to the senior cadet who has displayed 

outstanding leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. 

General Dynamics Award. Presented to the sophomore cadet who 
demonstrates outstanding qualities, possesses a positive attitude, good 
personal appearance, high personal attnbutes, military courtesy and high 
officer potential. 

Governor's Cup to the one cadet chosen as Cadet of the Year in competition 
with all other cadets within the Corps. 

Lt. Col. Virgil I. Grissom Memorial Award to junior cadets who have 
demonstrated outstanding academic ability and military achievements. Award 
consists of a $2,000 scholarship, with $1,000 granted annually. 

Captain Fred H. Jones Award. Presented to the most outstanding member of 
the Maryland Honor Guard, 

Legion of Valor Bronze Cross for Achievement Award recognizes one 

cadet from each geographical area tor his performance and achievements as 
an AFROTC cadet. 

Military Order of World Wars Award to the Aerospace Studies cadets 
recognized as the most improved within their year category. 

National Sojourners Award to an outstanding sophomore or junior cadet who 
has contributed the most to encourage and demonstrate Americanism within 
the Corps ot Cadets and on the campus. 



44 Academic Regulations and Requirements 



Professor of Aerospace Studies Award to the senior cadel who has 
distinguished himself through excellence of leadership In the Corps o( Cadets 

George M. Reiley Award to the member of the flight instruction program 
showing the highest aptitude for flying as demonstrated by his or her 
performance in the program. 

Reserve Officer Association Awards to the senior cadet (Gold award), junior 
cadet (Sliver award), and sophomore cadet (Bronze award) demonstrating 
outstanding academic achievement in AFROTC subject matter and highest 
officer potential Ribbons of merit are presented to the top 10 percent of the 
freshman and the sophomore cadets. 

Retired Officers Association of Maryland, Prince George's County, Award. 

Presented to the sophomore cadet who. by living example, best typifies the 
term "Outstanding Officer Potential." 

Society of American Military Engineers Award to recognize 20 junior or 
senior cadets nationally displaying outstanding scholastic achievement and 
leadership and maioring In the field of engineering. 

Sons of the American Revolution Award to a junior cadet in the Two-Year 
Program or a freshman cadet in the Four-Year Program who has shown a high 
degree of merit in his or her leadership qualities, soldierly bearing and all 
around excellence in the AFROTC program studies and activities. 

Sun Newspaper Award to the best drilled sophomore cadet in the Corps of 
Cadets. , 

Tuskegee Airman Award. Presented to a cadet who exemplifies the 
"Tuskegee Spirit" of patriotism, pride and self-discipline by outstanding 
leadership, superior performance in the Aerospace Studies program. 

Music Awards 

Composition Prize to the outstanding student composition of the year. 

Director's Award to the outstanding member of the Ivlarching Band. 

Kappa Kappa Psi Award to the most outstanding band member of the year 

Pi Kappa Lambda Scfiolar Award to the outstanding undergraduate student 
newly elected to membership in Pi Kappa Lambda, 

Presser Scholar Award to the outstanding senior music major. 

Sigma Alpha lota Alumnae Award for outstanding musical performance. 

Sigma Alpha lota Dean's Honor Award for service and dedication, 

Sigma Alpha lota Honor Certificate to the senior with the highest scholastic 
average. 

Sigma Alpha Iota Leadership Award based on personality, student activities, 
fraternity service, and scholarship, 

Tau Beta Sigma Award to the outstanding band-sorority member of the year. 

The Homer Ulrich Honors Awards in Music Performance, are presented 
each spring in honor of Homer Ulrich, Professor Emeritus and former Chairman 
of the Music Department. Three undergraduate and three graduate performers 
in piano, voice, and instruments are selected in a departmental competition to 
appear in a specially designated honors recital and to receive an honorarium 

Student Government Awards 

Certificates of Appreciation are awarded to the members of the S.G.A, 
legislature and Keys to the members of the Cabinet 



Academic Regulations and 
Requirements 

The academic regulations and requirements of The University of Maryland 
College Park are designed to provide and enhance a maximum educational 
environment lor the entire campus academic community The success of the 
design depends upon the mutual respect, courteous treatment, and 
consideration of everyone involved The following statements contain 
procedures and expectations for both faculty and students For questions 
about the Interpretation of these statements, students should contact their 
academic advisor, department chair, or dean. 



Resolution on Academic Integrity 

Approved by Board of Regents: May 8. 1981 

WHEREAS, It IS the responsibility of The University of Maryland to maintain 
Integrity in teaching and learning as a fundamental pnnciple on which a 
university is built, and 

WHEREAS, all members of the university community share In the responsibility 
for academic integrity, therefore 

BE IT RESOLVED, that The University of Maryland Board of Regents hereby 
adopts the following Statement of Faculty, Student and Institutional Rights and 
Responsibilities lor Academic Integrity. 



Statement of Faculty, Student and Institutional 
Rights and Responsibilities for Academic Integrity 

Preamble 

At the heart of the academic enterprise are learning, teaching, and 
scholarship In universities these are exemplified by reasoned 
discussion between student and teacher, a mutual respect lor the 
learning and teaching process, and Intellectual honesty in the pursuit of 
new knowledge In the traditions of the academic enterpnse, students 
and teachers have certain rights and responsibilities which they bring 
to the academic community While the following statements do not 
Imply a contract between the teacher or the University and the student. 
they are nevertheless conventions which the University believes to be 
central to the learning and teaching process. 

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

1. Faculty shall share with students and administration the responsibility for 
academic integrity 

2. Faculty are accorded freedom in the classroom to discuss subject matter 
reasonably related to the course. In turn they have the responsibility to 
encourage free and honest inquiry and expression on the part of students 

3. Faculty are responsible for the structure and content ol their courses, but 
they have the responsibility to present courses that are consistent with their 
descriptions in the University catalog In addition, faculty have Ifie 
obligation to make students aware of the expectations in the course, the 
evaluation procedures, and the grading policy 

4. Faculty are obligated to evaluate students fairly and equitably In a manner 
appropriate to the course and its objectives. Grades shall be assigned 
without prejudice or bias 

5. Faculty shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occurrence of 
academic dishonesty through the appropriate design and administration of 
assignments and examinations, through the careful safeguarding of course 
materials and examinations, and through regular reassessment of 
evaluation procedures. 

6. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, faculty shall have 
the right and responsibility to see that appropnate action is taken in 
accordance with University regulations. 

Student Rigtits and Responsibilities 

1 . Students shall share with faculty and administration the responsibility for 
academic integrity 

2. Students shall have the right of inquiry and expression In their courses 
without prejudice or bias In addition, students shall have the right to know 
the requirements of their courses and to know the manner in which they will 
be evaluated and graded 

3. Students shall have the obligation to complete the requirements of their 
courses in the time and manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation ol 
their work, 

4. Students shall have the right to tie evaluated fairty and equitably in a 
manner appropriate to the course and its objectives 

5 Students shall not submit as their own vrork any work which tias t>een 
prepared by others Outside assistance in the preparation ol this work, 
such as librarian assistance, lutonal assistance, typing assistance, or such 
assistance as may be specified or approved by the instructor is allowed 

6 Students shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent tfve occurrence of 
academic dishonesty They shall by their own example erxxxirage 
academic integrity and shall themselves refrain Irom acts of cheating and 
plagiarism or other acts of academic d'Shonesty 

7 When instances ol academic dishonesty are suspected, students shall 
have the right and responsibility to bring this to the attention of the faculty 
or other appropnate authority 



Academic Regulations and Requirements 45 



Institutional Responsibility 

1 Campuses or appropriate adrnmislraiive units of The University ol Maryland 
shall take appropriate measures to foster academic integrity in the 
classroom 
2. Campuses or appropriate administrative units shall lake steps to define 
acts ol academic dishonesty, to insure procedures for due process for 
students accused or suspected of acts of academic dishonesty, and to 
impose appropriate sanctions on students guilty of acts of academic 
dishonesty 
3 Campuses or appropriate administrative units shall take steps to determine 
how admission or matriculation shall be affected by acts of academic 
dishonesty on another campus or at another institution No student 
suspended for disciplinary reasons at any campus ol The University ol 
Maryland shall be admitted to any other University of Maryland campus 
dunng the period of suspension. 
AND, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that campuses or appropriate 
administrative units ol the University of Maryland will publish the above 
Statement ol Faculty, Student and Institutional Rights and Responsibilities lor 
Academic Integrity in faculty handbooks and in student handbooks and 
catalogs, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents hereby directs each 
campus or appropriate administrative unit to review existing procedures or to 
implement new procedures for carrying out the institutional responsibilities for 
academic integrity cited in the above Statement, and 

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the Board of Regents hereby directs each 
campus or appropriate administrative unit to submit to the President or his 
designee for approval the campus' or unit's procedure for implementation of 
the institutional responsibility provisions of the above Statement, 



expected to have access 
B The academic units (programs, departments, colleges, schools, divisions) 
In cooperation with the Qifice ol the Dean for Undergraduate Studies and 
the Oliice ol Admissions and Registrations shall, whenever possible, 
provide the following 

1 Accurate mlormalion on academic requirements through designated 
advisors and referral to other parties for additional guidance 

2 Specific policies and procedures for the award ol academic honors 
and awards and the impartial application thereof, 

3 Equitable course registration in accordance with University policy and 
guioeiines 

C The scope of the matters which may constitute a grievance cognizable 
under this Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure is limited to 
believed violations ol ihe expectations ol faculty and academic units set 
forth above in paragraphs A and B of this section, 

///. Human Relations Code/Alternative Grievance 
Procedures 

A Human Relations Code, with an implementing Office of Human Relations 
Programs, presently exists for the campus The Undergraduate Student 
Grievance Procedure and the Human Relations Code may not be used 
simultaneously or consecutively with one another with respect to the same (or 
subsianlially the same) issue/complaint or with respect to issues/complamts 
arising out of or pertaining to the same set of facts The procedures of the 
Human Relations Code anO'or of any other University grievance/review process 
may not be utilized to challenge the procedures, actions, determinations or 
recommendations ol any person(s) or board(s) acting pursuant to Ihe authority 
and/or requirements ol the Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure. 



Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure 

Approved by Board ol Regents: April 14, 1981 

I. Purpose 

The following procedure provides a means for an undergraduate student to 
present a complaint resulting from a believed violation of the "Expectations of 
Faculty and Academic Units." set forth in Section II. below, to have that 
complaint examined as a matter of regular procedure, and to receive a final 
determination thereon This procedure offers a vehicle for seeking redress with 
respect to acts or omissions of individual faculty members, or of an academic 
department/program/cQiiege or division Redress may be sought under this 
procedure without tear of reprisal or discrimination, 

//. Scope of Grievances: Expectations of Faculty and 
Academic Units 

The academic regulations and requirements of the College Park campus are 
designed to provide and enhance a maximum educational environment for the 
entire campus academic community The success of the design depends upon 
the mutual respect, courteous treatment, and consideration of everyone 
involved. 

A The following are considered to be reasonable student expectations of 
faculty: 
1 . A written description at the beginning of each undergraduate course 
specifying in general terms the content, nature ol assignments, 
examination procedures, and the bases lor determining linai grades In 
cases where all or some of this information cannot be provided at the 
beginning of the course, a clear explanation of the delay and the bases 
ol course development shall be provided. 

2 Reasonable nonce ol maior papers and examinations in the course; 

3 A reasonable number of recitations, performances, quizzes, tests, 
graded assignments and/or student/instructor conlerences to permit 
evaluation ol student progress throughout the course, 

4. Unless prohibited by statute or contract, a reasonable opportunity to 
review papers and examinations after evaluation by the instructor, while 
the materials remain reasonably current, 

5. A reasoned approach to the subject which attempts to make the 
student aware of the existence of difterent points of view; 

6. Reasonable access to the instructor during announced regular office 
hours or by appointment, 

7. Regular attendance by assigned faculty and reasonable adherence to 
published campus schedules and location of classes and 
examinations Classes not specified in the schedules are to be 
arranged at a mutually agreeable time on campus, unless an 
off-campus meeting is clearly lustified. 

8 Reasonable confidentiality of information gained through student-faculty 

contact. 
9. Public acknowledgement of significant student assistance in Ihe 

preparation of materials, articles, books, devices and the like. 
10. Assignment of materials to which all students can reasonably be 



IV. General Limitations 

Notwithstanndng any provision of this Undergraduate Student Grievance 
Procedure to the contrary, the following matters do not constitute Ihe basis for 
a grievance and are not susceptible of challenge thereby. 
A. Policies, regulations, decisions, resolutions, directives and other acts of the 
Board of Regents of The University of Maryland, of the Office of the 
President of The University ol Maryland, and of the Chancellor of The 
University ol Maryland College Park. 
B Any statute or any regulation, directive or order of any departmeni or 
agency of the United Slates or the State of Maryland, and any other matter 
outside ol the control of The University of Maryland. 
C Course offerings 
D The staffing and structure of any academic department or program 

E. The fiscal management of The University of Maryland, and the allocation ol 
University resources. 

F. Any issue(s)/act(s) which does not affect the complaining party personally 
and directly 

G. Matters ol academic judgment relating to an evaluation of a student's 
academic performance and'or of his'her academic qualifications, except 
that the following matters of a procedural nature may be reviewed under 
this Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure if tiled as a formal 
grievance within thirty (30) days of the first meeting of the course to which 
they pertain: 

1. Whether reasonable notice has been given as to the relative value of all 
work considered in determining the final grade and'or assessment of 
performance in the course — eg. the relative value of examinations, 
papers, laboratories and other academic exercises and requirements. 
The remedy with respect to a grievance based upon this subsection 
shall be the giving ol notice by the faculty member. 

2. Whether a reasonably sufficient number of examinations, papers, 
laboratories and/or other academic exercises and requirements have 
been scheduled to present the student with a reasonable opportunity to 
demonstrate his'her academic merit The remedy with respect to a 
grievance based upon this subsection shall be the scheduling of such 
additional academic exercises as the faculty member, in consultation 
with the provost and upon consideration of the written opinion of the 
divisional hearing board, shall deem appropriate. 

Notwithstanding any language in this paragraph or elsewhere in this 
Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure, nothing herein shall be 
construed to permit a challenge, either directly or indirectly, to the award of a 
specific grade. 

No recommendation or decision may be made pursuant to the Undergraduate 
Student Grievance Procedure which conflicts with or modifies, directly or 
indirectly, any policy, statute, regulation or other matter set lorth in paragraphs 
A and B ol this section, 

'Class" grievances and concomitant remedies are not cognizable; however, a 
screening or hearing tjoard may, in its discretion, consolidate grievances 
presenting similar tacts and issues, and recommend such generally applicable 
relief as it deems warranted. 



46 Academic Regulations and Requirements 



V. Finality 

A student who elects to utilize the Undergraduate Student Grievance 
Procedure agrees that in doing so he/she shall abide by the final disposition 
arrived at thereunder, and shall not subiect this disposition to review under any 
other procedure within the University For the purpose ol this limitation, a 
student shall be deemed to have elected to utilize the Undergraduate Student 
Grievance Procedure when he/she tiles a written grievance as set forth in 
section VI A 2. and VI B below. 

VI. Procedure 

A Grievance Against Faculty Member, Academic Department, Program or 
College 

1 Resolution of grievance by informal means. 

The initial etiort in all cases shall be to achieve a resolution of the 

grievance through the following informal means: 
a. In the case of a grievance agamst an individual faculty member, 
the student should first contact the member, present the grievance 
in its entirety, and attempt a complete resolution, if any portion of 
the grievance thereafter remains unresolved, the student may 
present such part to the immediate administrative supervisor of the 
faculty member concerned A grievance may be initially presented 
directly to the administrative supervisor of the faculty member if he 
or she is not reasonably available to discuss the matter The 
supervisor shall attempt to mediate the dispute, should a resolution 
mutually satisfactory to both the student and the faculty member be 
achieved, the case shall be dosed 
b In the case of a grievance against an academic department, 
program or college, the student should contact the department 
head, director or dean thereof, present the grievance in its entirety, 
and attempt a complete resolution. 

2 Resolution of grievance by formal means. 

Should a student be dissatisfied with the disposition of his/her 
gnevance following the attempt to resolve it informally according to the 
steps set forth m subparagraph A 1 above, he/she may obtain a formal 
resolution thereof pursuant to the following procedure: 
a. The student shall file with the Screening Board for Academic 
Grievances of the Division (hereinafter "divisional screening board") 
from which the matter arises, a written grievance. The written 
grievance must set forth in detail: 
(i) the act. omission or matter complained of. 
(ii) all facts which the student believes to be relevant to the 

grievance; 
(iii) the resolution sought; 

(iv) all arguments upon which the student relies in seeking such 
resolution. 
b In order to be considered, a grievance must be filed in a timely 
manner To be filed m a timely manner, the written grievance (as 
set forth in subparagraph 2 a above) must be received by the 
appropriate divisional screening board within thirty (30) days of the 
act, omission or matter which constitutes the basis of the grievance, 
or within thirty (30) days of the date the student is first placed upon 
reasonable notice thereof, whichever is later. It is the responsibility 
of the student to insure timely filing 
c The divisional screening board shall immediately notify the faculty 
member against whom a grievance has been timely filed, or the 
head of the academic unit against which a grievance has been 
filed, and forward to them a copy of the grievance together with all 
other relevant material and information known to it The faculty 
member or head of the academic unit shall within ten (10) days 
after receipt thereof, make a complete written response to the 
divisional screening board; in the event the faculty member 
receives the written grievance and other relevant materials and 
information from the divisional screening board alter the last day of 
classes of the semester in which the grievance is filed, then the 
time for making a wntten response is extended to and includes ten 
(10) days after the first day of classes of the next succeeding 
semester in which the faculty member is teachmg/working on 
campus (however, this extension shall not be available to a faculty 
member whose appointment terminates on or before the last day of 
the semester in which the gnevance is filed) A copy of said 
response shall be sent by the divisional screening board to the 
student In its discretion, the divisional screening board may 
reguest further written submissions from the student, the faculty 
member and/or the head of the academic unit 
d. The divisional screening board shall review the case to determine if 
a formal hearing is warranted: 

(i) The divisional screening board shall dismiss all or part ol a 
grievance which it concludes: 

(a) is untimely. 

(b) is based upon a nongrievable matter; 

(c) is being pursued concurrently in another review/grievance 
procedure within the University and/or in a court ol law or 
equity; 

(d) has been previously decided pursuant to this or any other 



review/grievance procedure withm the University and/or by a 
court ol law or equity; 

(e) is fnvolous; 

(f) is intended to harass, embarrass, and/or has otherwise 
been filed m bad faith. 

(ii) The divisional screening board in its discretion may dismiss all 
or pan of a grievance which it concludes: 

(a) is unsufficiently supported; 

(b) is premature, 

(c) is otherwise inappropriate or unnecessary to present to the 
divisional hearing board 

e The divisional screening txiard shall meet and review grievances in 
private A decision to dismiss a gnevance shall require the maiority 
vote of at least three members II a grievance is dismissed either in 
whole or in pan. the student shall be so mlormed and given a 
concise statement as to the basis tor such action, however, the 
decision of the divisional screening txsard lo dismiss a grievance is 
final and is not subject to appeal. 
f. If the divisional screening board determines that a grievance is 
appropriately one lor a hearing, it will so inform the provost The 
provost shall thereafter within fifteen (15) days convene a divisional 
hearing board to hear the grievance, except that for good cause in 
the discretion of the provost, such time may t3e extended. 
g The following rules apply to the conduct of a heanng by the 
divisional hearing board 

(i) Reasonable notice of the time and place of the hearing shall be 

given to the student and the faculty member or head of an 

academic unit Notice shall include a bnef statement ol the 

violation(s) alleged and the remedy sought by the student 

(ii) A record of the hearing, including all exhibits, shall be kept; 

(iii) The hearing shall be dosed to the public unless a putJiic 

hearing is specifically requested by both parties, 
(iv) Each party shall have an opportunity lo make an opening 
statement, present evidence, present witnesses, cross-examine 
witnesses, offer personal testimony, and such other matenai as 
is relevant to the grievance It is the responsibility of each party 
to insure that those witnesses whom he/she wishes to present 
are available, as well as to have his/her case completely 
prepared at the time of the hearing 
(v) The student shall first present his/her case: the faculty memljer 
or head ol the academic unit shall then present his/her 
response 
(vi) Upon the completion of the presentation of all evidence, each 
party shall have an opportunity to present oral arguments and a 
closing statement The chairman of the divisional hearing board 
may in his discretion set time limits upon such arguments and 
statements, 
(vii) Upon the request of either party, all persons to be called as 

witnesses shall be sequestered, 
(viii) Incompetent, irrelevant. Immaterial and unduly repetitious 
evidence may be excluded in the discretion of the chairman ol 
the divisional hearing board, 
(ix) Each party may be assisted in the presentation ol his/her case 

by a student or faculty memberrf his/her choice. 

(x) It is the responsibility of the chairman of the divisional hearing 

board to manage the hearing and to decide all questions 

relating to the presentation of evidence and appropnaie 

procedure, and is the final authority on all such matters, except 

as are specifically established herein. 

(xi) All documents and materials filed with the divisional screening 

board by the student and the faculty member or the head ol an 

academic unit, shall be fonwarded to the divisional heanng 

board for Its consideration, and shall tsecome part of the record 

of the hearing 

(xii) The divisional hearing board shall have ttie right to examine any 

person or party testifying before It, and on its own nrnjiion. to 

request the presence of any person for the purpose of testifying 

and the production ol any evidence the chairman believes to be 

relevant 

(xiii) The above-enumerated procedures and powers of the divisional 

hearing board are non-exciusive. the chairman of the divisional 

hearing board may take such action as is necessary m his/her 

determination to facilitate the orderly and fair conduct of the 

hearing and as is not inconsistent with the pnDcedures set lorth 

herein. 

h Upon completion of the hearing, the divisional hearing board shall 

meet privately to consider the validity ol the grievance The burden 

of proof rests upon the student to establish a violation of the 

expectations of faculty and academic units, set forth m Section II. 

above, and any concomitant right to relief It must be shown by a 

preponderance of the evidence that a substantial departure from 

the expectations has occurred, and that such substantial departure 

has operated to the actual preiudice and miury of the student A 

decision by the divisional hearing board upholding the grievance, 

either in whole or part, shall require the maiority vote of at least 

three members. The decision of the divisional heanng tx)ard stiall 



Academic Regulations and Requirements 47 



address only the validity ol the grievance, and shall be (orwarded 

lo the provost in a wr'tten opinion 
i. In the event the divisional hearing board decided in pari or in whole 

on behall ol the student, it may submit an mloimal recommenaalion 

to the provost with respect lo such reiiel as il may believe is 

warranted by the lacis as proven in the hearing 
j. The provost shall immediately, upon receipl ol the written opinion. 

lorward copies lo Ihe student and the laculty member or head ol 

the academic unit Each party has ten (10) days Irom the date ol 

receipt to liie with the p'ovost an appeal ot the decision ol the 

divisional hearing board The sole grounds lor appeal shall be 
(i) a substantial prejudicial procedural error committed in the 
conduct ol Ihe hearing in violation ol the procedures 
established herein Discretionary decisions ol the chairman ol 
Ihe divisional hearing board shall not constitute the basis ol an 
appeal: 

(ii) the existence of new and relevant evidence of a significant 
nature which was not reasonably available, at the time ol the 
hearing The appeal shall be in writing and set lorlh in complete 
detail the grounds relied upon A copy ol the appeal shall also 
be sent to the opposite party, who shall have ten (10) days 
following receipt to lile a written response with the provost 
k. In the absence ol a timely appeal, or loiiowmg receipt and 

consideration ol all timely appeals and responses, the provost in 

his/her discretion may: 
(i) dismiss the grievance: 

(ii) grant such redress as he'she believes is appropriate, except 
that no alfirmalive relief shall be made to a stuoent unless the 
student executes the tollowing release: 

"The complainant hereby waives, releases and covenants not to 
sue The University ot Maryland or its ollicers. agents or 
employees with respect to any matters which were or might 
have been alleged as a grievance filed under the 
Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure in the instant 
case, subiect to performance by The University of Maryland, its 
Officers, agents and employees, of the promises contained in a 
final decision under this Procedure." 

(iii) reconvene the divisional hearing board to rehear the grievance 

in part or whole anO'cr to receive new evidence: 
(iv) convene a new divisional hearing board to rehear the case in 
its entirety 
I. The provost shall inform all parties of his/her decision in writing and 
the grievance shall thereafter be concluded The decision ot the 
provost shall be final and binding, and not subject to appeal or 
review 
B Grievance Against Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies, 
Divisional Provost 
1 Resolution of grievance by informal means. 
The initial ellort m all cases shall be to achieve a resolution of the 
grievance through informal means The student should first contact the 
administrative dean or provost, present the grievance in its entirely, 
and attempt a complete resolution, if any portion of the grievance 
thereafter remains unresolved, the student may present such part to the 
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs A Grievance may be initially 
presented directly to the Vice Chancellor if the administrative dean or 
provost is not reasonably available to discuss the matter. The Vice 
Chancellor shall attempt to mediate the dispute, should a resolution 
mutually satislaclory to both the student and the administrative 
dean/provost be achieved, the case shall be closed. 
2. Resolution of grievance by formal means. 
Should a student be dissatisfied with the disposition of his/her 
grievance following the attempt to resolve it informally according to the 
steps set forth in subparagraph B 1 above, he/she may obtain a formal 
resolution thereof pursuant to the following procedure: 
a The student shall file with the Chancellor a written grievance The 
written grievance must set forth in dettal: 
(i) the act. omission or matter complained of: 
(ii)ali facts which the student believes to be relevant to the 

grievance, 
(iii) the resolution sought: 

(iv) all arguments upon which the student relies in seeking such 
resolution 
b In order to be considered, a grievance must be filed in a timely 
manner To be Med m a timely manner, the wntten grievance (as 
set torth in 2 a above) must be received by the Chancellor within 
thirty (30) days of the act. omission or matter which constitutes the 
basis of the grievance, or within thirty (30) days of the date the 
student is first placed upon reasonable notice thereof, whichever is 
later It is the responsibility of Ihe student to insure timely tiling 
c. The Chancellor shall fonward the grievance to the divisional 
screening board of a division other than that from which the 
grievance has arisen, 
d The divisional screening board shall immediately notily the 
administrative dean/provost against whom a grievance has been 



timely Med. and lonward him/her a copy ol Ihe grievance with all 
other relevant material and inlormanon known to it The 
administrative dean/provosi shall within ten (10) days after receipt 
thereof, make a complete written response to the divisional 
screening board, in the event the administrative dean/provost 
receives the written grievance and other relevant maienais and 
information from the divisional screening board alter the last day ot 
classes of the semester m which the grievance is tiled, then the 
time lor making a written response is extended lo and includes ten 
(10) days after the lirsi day ol classes of the next succeeding 
semester A copy ol said response shall be sent by the divisional 
screening board to the student In its discretion, the divisional 
screening board may request lurlher written submissions Irom the 
student and/or the administrative dean/provost 
e The divisional screening board shall therealter review and act on 
the grievance in the same mariner and according lo the 
requirements set torth in subparagraphs A 2 d through A 2 e of 
this section, lor the review ol grievances against faculty members, 
academic departments, programs and colleges 
f. It the divisional screening board determines that a grievance is 
appropriately one for a hearing, it will so inform the Chancellor The 
Chancellor shall thereafter withm fifteen (15) days, convene a 
campus hearing board to hear the grievance, except that lor good 
cause in the discretion of Ihe Chancellor, such time may be 
extended 
g The campus hearing board shall conduct hearings in accordance 
with the rules established in subparagraph A2g above, for the 
conduct ot hearings by a divisional hearing board Upon 
completion of a hearing, the campus hearing board shall meet 
pnvately to consider the grievance in the same manner and 
according to the same rules as set forth in subparagraph A 2 h for 
the consideration ot grievances by a divisional hearing board, 
except that the boards decision shall be forwarded lo the 
Chancellor 
h. In the event the campus hearing board decides in part or in whole 
on behalf of Ihe student, it may submit an informal recommendation 
to the Chancellor with respecl to such relief as it may believe is 
warranted by the facts as proven in the hearing 
i. The Chancellor shall immediately, upon receipt of the written 
opinion, lorward copies to the student and the administrative 
dean/provost Each party has ten (10) days Irom the date of receipt 
to file with the Chancellor an appeal of the decision of Ihe campus 
hearing board. The sole grounds for appeal shall be: 
(i) a substantial prejudicial procedural error committed in the 

conduct of the hearing in violation of the procedures 

established herein Discretionary decisions of the Chairman of 

the campus hearing board shall not constitute the basis of an 

appeal, 
(ii) the existence of new and relevant evidence of a significant 

nature which was not reasonably available at the time of the 

hearing. 
The appeal shall be in writing and set forth in complete detail the 
grounds relied upon, A copy of the appeal shall also be sent to the 
opposite party, who shall have ten (10) days tollowing receipt to file 
a written response with the Chancellor, 
j. In the absence of a timely appeal, or following receipt and 
consideration of all timely appeals and responses, the Chancellor in 
his discretion may: 
(i) dismiss the grievance: 
(ii) grant such redress as he/she believes is appropriate, except 

that no affirmative relief shall be made to a student unless the 

student executes the tollowing release: 

"The complainant hereby waives, releases and covenants not to 
sue The University ot Maryland or its officers, agents or 
employees with respect to any matters which were or might 
have been alleged as a grievance filed under the 
Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure in the instant 
case, subiect to performance by The University ol Maryland, its 
officers, agents and employees, of the promises contained in a 
final decision under this Procedure " 

(iii) reconvene the campus heanng tx)ard to rehear the grievance in 
part or whole and/or to receive new evidence, 

(iv) convene a new campus hearing board to rehear the case in its 
entirety 
k The Chancellor shall inform all parties of his decision in writing, and 

the grievance shall thereafter be concluded The decision of the 

Chancellor shall be tinal and binding, and not subject to appeal or 

review. 



48 Academic Regulations and Requirements 



VII. Composition of Screening and Hearing Boards 

The following procedures shall govern the selection. comDOS'tion and 
establishment of the divisional sceening boards, and the divisional and 
campus hearing boards The procedures are directive only, and for the 
guidance and benefit of the provosts and Chancellor, The selection, 
composition and establishment of a board is not subiecl to challenge by a 
party as part of this grievance procedure or any other gnevance'review 
procedure in the University, except that at the start of a hearing, a party may 
challenge for good cause a member(s) of the divisional or campus hearing 
board before whom the party is appearing The chairman of the hearing board 
shall consider the challenge and may replace such member(s) if in his'her 
discretion it is believed such action is necessary to achieve an impartial 
hearing and decision, A challenge of the chairman shall be decided m the 
discretion of the most senior of the other faculty members on the board 
Decisions with respect to a challenge shall be final and not subject to further 
review or appeal 

A Divisional Screening Boards for Academic Grievances 
1 . Membership ol Screening Boards 

a Prior to the beginning ol each academic year, the divisional council 
of each division shall choose at least fifteen (15) faculty members 
and fifteen (15) students to be eligible to serve on boards 
considering academic grievances from that division Concurrently, 
it shall choose three (3) other faculty members to be eligible to 
serve on boards considering academic grievances for the 
Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies The names shall 
be forwarded to the provost and the Administrative Dean, 
b Prior to the beginning of each academic year, the Administrative 
Council of the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate Studies shall 
choose at least fifteen (15) students to be eligible to serve on a 
screening board to review grievances arising within academic units 
under the administration of the Administrative Dean for 
Undergraduate Studies, These names shall be forwarded to the 
Administrative Dean 
2 Establishment ol Screening Boards 

a. Upon receipt of the names of the designated faculty and students, 
the provost shall appoint a five-member divisional screening board 
which shall consist of three (3) faculty members and two (2) 
students, and each shall serve on the divisional screening board for 
the academic year or until a new board is appointed by the 
provost, whichever occurs later The provost shall also designate 
two (2) alternative faculty members and two (2) alternative students 
from the names presented by the division council to serve on the 
divisional screening board should a vacancy occur. The provost 
shall designate one of the faculty members to be chairman of the 
divisional screening board Members of the divisional screening 
board shall not serve on a divisional hearing board dunng the same 
year, except that alternative members may serve on a hearing 
board other than one considering a case in which the member had 
previously been involved in the screening process A member of 
the divisional screening board shall not review a grievance arising 
out of his/her own department or program, in such instance, an 
alternative member shall serve in his'her place, 

b. Upon receipt of the names of the faculty members designated by 
each divisional . council and the students designated by the 
administrative council, the Administrative Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies shall appoint a five-member screening board to review 
grievances ansmg within the academic units under his'her 
administration. This screening board shall thereafter be established 
and composed in accordance with the procedures set fonh in 
Subparagraph A 2 a of the section, for divisional screening boards, 

B Divisional Hearing Boards for Academic Grievances 

For each grievance referred by a divisional screening board, the provost 
shall appoint a five-member divisional hearing board The divsionai hearing 
board shall be composed of three (3) faculty members and two (2) 
students selected by the provost from among those names previously 
designated by the divisional council and not appointed to the divisional 
screening board The provost shall designate one (1) faculty member as 
chairman No faculty member or student shall be appointed to hear a 
grievance arising out ol his/her own department or program The 
Administrative Dean lor Undergraduate Studies shall appoint m the same 
manner, a heanng board to hear each grievance referred by the screening 
board reviewing gnevances arising from the academic units under his 
administration the members ot the heanng board shall be selected from 
among those names previously forwarded to the Administrative Dean by 
the divisional councils and from "those who had not been appointed to the 
screening board 

C Campus Hearing Board for Academic Grievances 

For each case referred by a divisional screening board to the Chancellor 
for a heanng, the Chancellor shall appoint a five-member campus hearing 
board The campus heanng board shaii be composed of three (3) faculty 
members and two (2) students selected by the Chancellor from among 
those names designated by the divisional councils and remaining after the 
establishment of screening boards The Chancellor shall designate one 
faculty member as chairman No faculty member or student shall be 
appointed to hear a grievance ansmg out of his/her own division or 



administrative unit 

VIII. Definitions 

A "Days" 

"Days" or "day" refer to days of the academic calendar, not including 
Saturdays, or Sundays 
B "Party" 
"Party" or "parties" refer to the student and the individual (acuity member 
or head of the academic unit against whom a grievance is made 



Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and 
Capricious Grading 

Approved by Board ol Regents: March 12. 1982 

Purpose 

1 The following procedures are designed to provide a means for 
undergraduate students to seek review of final course grades alleged to be 
arbitrary and capncious Before fiimg a formal appeal, students are urged 
to resolve grievances informally with the instructor and'or the administrator 
of the academic unit offenng the course Students who file a wntten appeal 
under the following procedures shall be expected to abide by the final 
disposition of the appeal, as provided m pan seven, and shall be 
precluded from seeking review of the matter under any other procedure 
within the University. 

Definitions 

2. When used in these procedures 

(a) the term "arbitrary and capricious" grading means i) the assignment of 
a course grade to a student on some basis other than performance in 
the course, or ii) the assignment of a course grade to a student by 
resorting to unreasonable standards different from those which were 
applied to other students in that course, or iii) the assignment ol a 
course grade by a substantial, unreasonable and unannounced 
departure from the instructor's previously articulated standards 

(b)the words "Day" or "Days" refer to working days at the University, 
excluding Saturdays. Sundays and University holidays 

(c) the word "administrator" is defined as the administrative head of the 
academic unit offering the course. 

Procedures 

3 A student who believes his'her final grade in a course is improper and the 
result of arbitrary and capricious grading should first confer promptly with 
the instructor of the course If the instructor has left the University or is on 
approved academic leave or cannot be reached by the student afier a 
reasonable effort, the student shall consult with the administrator If the 
student and the instructor or administrator are unable to amve at a mutually 
agreeable solution, the student may file an appeal within twenty days after 
the first day of instruction of the next semester (excluding summer terms) 
to a standing committee consisting of three tenured faculty members of the 
academic unit offering the course If the instructor of the course is a 
member of the committee, that instructor shall be disqualified and replaced 
by a tenured faculty member selected by the administrator 

4. The student shall file an appeal by submitting to the committee a wntten 
statement detailing the basis for the allegation that a grade was improper 
and the result of arbitrary and capncious grading, and presenting relevant 
evidence The appeal shall be dismissed if i) the student has submitted 
the same, or substantially the same, compiamt to any other fcmal 
grievance procedure ii) the allegations, even if true, would not constitute 
arbitrary and capncious grading, m) the appeal was not timely, or iv) the 
student has not conferred with the instructor or with the instructors 
immediate administrative supervisor, in accordance with pan three of these 
procedures 

5 If the appeal is not dismissed, the committee shall submit a copy of the 
student s written statement to the instructor with a request for a prompt 
written reply It it then appears that the dispute may be resolved witfxxjt 
recourse to the procedures specified m part six. the committee will attempt 
to arrange a mutually agreeable solution. 

6 If a mutually agreeable solution is not achieved, the committee shall 
proceed to hold an informal, rrenadversanai fact-finding meeting 
concerning the allegations Both the student and the instructor shall be 
entitled to be present throughout this meeting and to present any relevant 
evidence, except that the student shall not be present dunng the 
discussion of any other student Neither the student nor the faculty member 
shall be accompanied by an advocate or representative The meeting stiail 
not be open to the public 

7 The committee sha" deliberate privately at the close of the fact-findir>g 
meeting If a maionty of the committee fmds the allegation supported by 
clear and convincing evidence, the committee stiaii take any action wfuch 
they feel would bring about substantial justice, including, txjt not limited to 



Academic Regulations and Requirements 49 



i) directing the instruclor to grade the student's work anew, or li) directing 
the instructor to administer a new final examination or paper in the course. 
or ill) directing the cancellation ot the student s registration m the course, or 
iv) directing the award ol a grade ol pass" in the course, except that such 
a remedy should be used only il no other reasonable alternative is 
available The committee is not authorized to award a letter grade or to 
reprimand or otherwise take disciplinary action against the instructor The 
decision of the committee shall be Imal and shall be promptly reported m 
writing to the parties The administrator ol the academic unit shall be 
responsible lor implementing the decision of the committee 



The University Studies Program 

The University Studies Program is the general education requirement at 
The University ot Maryland College Park This program must be completed by 
all students beginning baccalaureate study after Ivlay. 1980 It is intended to 
provide students with the intellectual skills and conceptual background basic 
to an understanding of the universe, society and themselves The focus is not 
on any particular bodies of knowledge, for almost any subiect matter can lead 
to an awareness ol general modes ol understanding the world Thus, lor 
example, it does not matter whether the student studies physics or botany as 
long as he or she comes away Irom the course with some understanding ol the 
power of the empirical investigation that characterizes science 

The University Studies Program has three parts The "Fundamental Studies- 
section of the program is intended to establish the students ability to 
participate m the discourse of the university through demonstrated mastery of 
wniten English and mathematics. These requirements are to be completed 
early in the student's program in order to serve as a foundation for subsequent 
work 

The "Distributive Studies" requirement is intended, through study in 
particular disciplines, to acquaint students with the different ways ot analyzing 
and talking about the world that characterize the three areas into which the 
universitys knowledge is traditionally divided the physical and biological 
sciences, the social and behavioral sciences, and the arts and humanities The 
fourth category. "History and Culture." includes courses that lead to the 
consideration of historical and cultural differences and the relationship ol our 
own society to those ol other limes and places. 

In luililling "Distributive Studies" requirements, students will have gained 
some experience ol the way in which scholars in dillerent kinds ol disciplines 
make and organize observations about the world and arrive at general 
statements 

It is the purpose of ""Advanced Studies" courses to show how these 
different intellectual approaches compare with each other or may be used in 
complementary ways to analyze and solve problems "Development of 
Knowledge" courses deal with the basis upon which people who use these 
different approaches claim to know something and the different kinds of 
insights to which these intellectual strategies lead. "Analysis ol Human 
Problems" courses consider these matters in terms ol specific cultural, social, 
scientific or aesthetic problems which may be approached from several points 
of view Courses in both "Advanced Studies" categories require students to 
exercise critical thinking skills in the analysis of complex problems. 

The University Studies requirements, designed to be spread throughout the 
student s four years, represent a third of the total academic work required for 
graduation. It is the purpose of this program, in combination with the extensive 
work of the mapr. to help prepare students to become productive, aware and 
sensitive members of society, capable of understanding their world and the 
many kinds of people in it and of taking responsibility for their own decisions 
and their own lives. 

For a more specific outline of the Program requirements and the approved 
courses which may be selected to meet those requirements, see Part 4 of this 
catalog, entitled University Studies Program 



General University Requirements 

Students who began baccalaureate study prior to May. 1980 may elect to 
complete these requirements rather than ttie University Studies Program 
requirements (see above). 

In order to provide educational breadth for all students, there have been 
established the General University Requirements, These requirements consist 
of 30 semester hours of credit distributed among the three areas listed below, 
(For an exception to this regulation, see the Bachelor of Geneial Studies 
Program, page 133 ) At least 6 hours must be taken in each area Al least 9 of 
the 30 hours must be taken at the 300 level or above. None of the 30 hours 
may be counted toward published departmental, college or divisional 
requirements for a degree. Area A 6-12 hours elected in the Divisions of 
Agricultural and Life Sciences, fvlathematical and Physical Sciences and 
Engineering Area B 6-12 hours in the Divisions of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences. Human and Community Resources. Area C; 6-12 hours in the 
Division of Arts and Humanities, 

In meeting these area requirements, students may choose from among any 
undergraduate courses for which they are qualified The students may select 
either the pass-fail or letter grading option for these courses as outlined on 
page 52. Students are urged to consult with academic advisors for guidance 



in determining which courses in each area best fit individual needs and 
interests 

Demonsiralion ol competency in English composition unless the student 
has been exempted Irom English connposition. at least one course in the 
subieci will be required Exempiion is granted if the student earns an 
acceptable score on the SAT Verbal (score announced annually) or an 
acceptable score on the English Advanced Placement Test (score announcer 
annually), or by satislaclory completion ot a similar writing course at another 
Institution 

Students taking a course to satisfy this requirement may apply the credits 
toward the 30hour General University Requirement but may not count these 
credits toward the satisfaction of the minimum 6hour requirement in any of the 
three designated areas or the Scredil upper division requirement Credit lor 
such a course may be in addition to the 12-hour maximum in any area. 

NOTE: Students who began baccalaureate study after N^ay. 1978 must 
complete the English composition requirement specified in the Fundamental 
Studies section of the University Studies Program (see above) Only three 
hours ol this six hour requirement may be used to satisly General University 
Requirements 

Students who entered the University prior to June. 1973 have the option of 
completing requirements under the lormer General Education Program rather 
than the new General University Requirements, Each student is responsible lor 
making certain that the various provisions ol either set ol requirements have 
been satisfied prior to certification for the degree Assistance and advice may 
be obtained Irom the academic advisor or the Office of the Administrative 
Dean for Undergraduate Students, 



Degrees and Certificates 

The College Park Campus awards the following degrees Bachelor of 
Architecture. Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of General Studies. Bachelor ol Ivlusic. 
Bachelor of Science. Master of Applied Anthropology. Master of Architecture. 
Master of Arts. Master of Business Administration. Master of Education. Master 
of Fine Arts. Master of Library Science. Master of Music. Master of Public 
Management. Master of Public Policy. Master of Science. Doctor of Education, 
Doctor of Musical Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy 

Students in specified two-year curricula may be awarded certificates. 

The requirements lor graduation vary according to the character of work in 
the dillerent colleges, divisions and schools Full information regarding 
specific college and division requirements lor graduation will be found in Pari 3 
of this catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must file a formal application for 
it with the Office of Records & Registrations, This must be done by the 
deadline published in the Schedule ol Classes for the semester of graduation. 

Degree Requirements 

It is the responsibility of departments, colleges, divisions, or appropriate 
academic units to establish and publish clearly defined degree requirements. 
Responsibility for knowing and meeting all degree requirements for graduation 
in any curriculum rests with the student For requirements established by 
specific divisions, colleges and departments or other academic units, the 
student is referred to the appropriate descriptions in Part 3 of this catalog 

Each student should check with the proper academic authonties no later 
than the close of the lumor year to ascertain his or her standing with respect to 
advancement toward a degree For this purpose, each student should be sure 
to retain a copy ol the semester grade reports issued by the Office of Records 
and Registrations at the close of each semester. 

Second Degrees 

a Second Degree Taken Sequentially. A student who has completed 
requirements for and has received one baccalaureate degree and who 
wishes to earn a second baccalaureate degree from College Park must 
satisfactorily complete the requirements of the second degree and enough 
additional credits so that the total, including all applicable credits earned at 
College Park or elsewhere, is at least 150 credits In no case, however, will 
a second baccalaureate degree be awarded to a student who has not 
completed 30 credit hours m residence at College Park, Approval of the 
second degree will not be granted when there is extensive overlap 
between the two programs 

b Second Degree Taken Simultaneously. A student who wishes to receive 
simultaneously two baccalaureate degrees from College Park must 
satisfactorily complete a minimum of 150 credits (180 credits if one of the 
degrees is in Special Education) The regularly prescribed requirements of 
both degree programs must be completed As early as possible and. m 
any case, no later than the beginning of the second semester before the 
expected date of graduation, the student must file with the departments or 
programs involved, as well as with the appropriate Deans and Provosts, 
formal programs showing the courses to be offered to meet the mapr. 
supporting area, college, division and University Studies Program or 
General University Requirements If two divisions are involved in the double 
degree prog'am. the student must designate which division is responsible 
for the maintenance of records. Approval of the second degree will not be 
granted when there is extensive overlap between the two programs. 



50 Academic Regulations and Requirements 



Graduation Requirements 

Credit Requirements for Graduation 

While several unOergraOuate curficuia require more than 120 credits, no 
baccalaureate curriculum requires fewer than 120 No baccalaureate degree 
will be awarded m instances m which fewer than 120 credit hours have been 
earned it is the responsibility of each stuaent to familiarize himself or herself 
with the requirements of specific curriculum The sluoent is urged to seel< 
advice on these matters from the departments, colleges, divisions or the Office 
of Unaerqraduate Studies 

In order to earn a baccalaureate degree from College Park, a minimum of 
30 credits must tie taken in residence at the College Park Campus. I^ttiing 
staled C>elow modifies this basic requirement in any yiiay. 

Grade Point Average 

An overall C (2 00) grade point average is required tor graduation in all 
curricula. 

Off-Campus Courses 

Courses taken at another campus of The University of Maryland or at 
another institution concurrent with regular registration on the College Park 
Campus may not be credited toward a College Park degree without advance 
approval by the Provost of the Division or the Dean of the College from which 
the student expects to receive a degree For students not registered m any 
Division or College, the Dean for Undergraduate Studies shall assume the 
responsibilities normally delegated to Provosts and Deans, The same applies 
to off-campus registration In the summer program ol another institution. 

Residency Requirements — Final Thirty-Hour Rule 

a All candidates for College Park degrees should plan to take their final 30 
credits in residence since the advanced work of their mapr study normally 
occurs in the last year of the undergraduate course Included m these 30 
semester hours will be a minimum of 15 semester hours in cou'ses 
numbered 300 or above, including at least 12 semester hours required in 
the maior field (in curricula requiring such concentrations) 

b A student who at the time of graduation will have completed 30 hours in 
residence at College Park may. under unusual circumstances, be permitted 
to take a maximum of six of the final 30 credits of record at another 
institution In such cases, written permission must be obtained in advance 
from the dean or provost of the academic unit from which the student 
expects to receive the degree 

c For students in the combined three-year, preprofessional programs, the 
final 30 hours of the 90-hour program taken at College Park must be taken 
in residence. 

Enrollment In Majors 

a A student must be enrolled in the major program from which tie or she 
plans to graduate, when registering for the final 15 hours of the 
baccalaureate program This requirement also applies to the third year of 
the combined, preprofessional degree programs 

b A student who wishes to complete a second maior in addition to his or her 
primary ma|Or of record must obtam written permission in advance from the 
appropriate Deans anO'Or Provosts As early as possible, but m no case 
later than the beginning of the second semester before the expected date 
of graduation, the student must file with the departments or programs 
involved and with the appropriate Deans and'or Provosts, formal programs 
showing the courses to be ottered to meet requirements m each of the 
maiors and supporting areas as well as the college division and General 
University Requirements or University Studies Program requirements 
Approval will not be granted if there is extensive ovenap between the two 
programs Students enrolled in two maiors simultaneously must 
satisfactorily complete the regularly prescnbed requirements tor each of 
the programs Courses taken for one maior may be counted as part ot the 
degree requirements for the other and toward the requirements for the 
University Studies Program However, rx) course used m either curriculum 
to satisfy a maior. supporting area, college or divisional requirement may 
be used to satisfy the General University Requirements If two divisions are 
involved in the double maior program, the student must designate which 
division IS responsible for the maintenance of records. 

Diploma Applications 

Application tor diplomas must be filed with the Office ot Records and 
Registrations (a ) dunng the registration period, or (b ) not later than the end 
of the schedule adiustmeni period ot the regular semester, or (c ) at the end ol 
the first week of the second summer session In all cases, diploma 
applications must be filed at the beginning of the students final semester 
before receiving a degree 

If all degree requirements are not completed during the semester in which 
the diploma application was submitted, it is the responsibility ot the student to 
file a new diploma application with the Office of Records ano Registrations at 
the beginning of a subsequent semester when all degree requirements may tx 
completed 



Credit Unit and Load Each Semester 

The semester tx)ur. which is the unit of credit, is the equivalent of a subiect 
pursued one penod a week for one semester Two or three tx)urs ol iatx)ratory 
or field work are equivalent to one lecture or recitation penod The student is 
expected to devote three hours a week m classroom or iatx)ratory or m outside 
preparation tor each credit hour m any course 

In order lor an undergraduate student to complete rnost curricula in lour 
academic years, the semester credit load must range from 12 to 19 hours so 
that he would complete from 30 to 36 tiours each year toward the degree A 
student registering for more than 19 fxxjrs per semester must tiave ttie speoai 
approval of his or her dean or provost. 

Classification of Students 

No baccalaureate curriculum requires fewer than 120 semester fKJurs 
Actual classifications run as follows freshman. 1-27 semester fwurs. 
sophomore. 28-55, lunior. 56-85, and senior. 86 to at least 120. 

Registration 

1. To attend classes at The University ol Maryland it is necessary to process 
an official registration Registration is Imai and official when an fees are 
paid Instructions concerning registration are given in the Schedule ot 
Classes issued at the beginning of each new semester 

2 Students are expected to notify the Office of Records and Registrations of 
any change in their local or permanent address Procedures for rxjtification 
may be found in the current Sctwdule of Classes, under "Change ot 
Address Procedures " 

3. The schedule adiustment period shall be the first 10 days of classes for 
the fall and spring semesters, and a corresponding penod for summer 
semesters Dunng that penod. a fuii-time undergraduate may drop or add 
courses or change sections with rw charge Part-time undergraduate 
students may also drop or add courses or change sections, but they 
should consult the directions-deadimes m the SctKdule ol Classes to avoid 
incumng additional charges Courses so dropped dunng this schedule 
adiustment period will not appear on the students permanent record 
Courses may be added, where space is available, dunng this penoo and 
will appear on the student s permanent record aiong with ottier courses 
previously listed After this schedule adiustment penod, courses may not 
be added without special permission of the oepaan^ni and the dean or 
provost ot the academic unit m which the student is enrolled. 

Departments may identify courses or sections ol courses with ttie approval 
of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs which, after ttie 
first five days of the schedule adiustment penod. sfiall require faculty or 
depanmentai approval for students to add. 

4 After this schedule adiustment period, all courses lor which ttie student is 
enrolled (or subsequently adds) shall remain as a pan ol the student's 
permanent record The student's status shall be considered as full-time if 
the numtier of credit hours enrolled at this time is 9 or more 

5. Tfie drop period for undergraduate students will begin at ttie close of ttie 
schedule adjustment penod and terminate at the end of ttie tenth week ol 
classes dunng the fail and spnng semesters, and at a corresponding 
penod for summer sessions During the drop oenod a student may drop a 
maximum ot tour credits However, if the course that the student wishes to 
drop carries nnore than four credits, ttie student may drop the entire course 
or. in the case of a variable credit course, reduce the credit levet by up to 
lour credits Such a drop will be recorded on the students permanent 
record with the notation "W and win be considered to represent a smgie 
enrollment (one of three possible) in the course This mark shaii not tie 
used in any computation of cumulative grade pomt average Students 
wishing to withdraw from all courses must do so on or tietore the last day 
ot classes After the initial schedule adiustment period, a charge shall tx 
made lor each course dropped or added 

6 An official class iist for each course tiemg offered is issued each semester 
to the appropnate department by the Office of Records ana Registrations 
No student is permitted to attend a ciass if his or tier name does not 
appear on the class iist instructors must report discrepancies to the Qtlice 
of Records and Registrations At the end of the semester the Ottice of 
Records and Registrations issues to each deoanment ofi'Ciai grade iists 
The instructors mark the tmai grades on ttie grade lists, sign the lists and 
return them to the Office of Records and Registrations 

7 Courses taken at another campus of the University or at ano'hP' institiilon 
concur'ent with regular registration on the Co"ege Pa'' ~— - ^-e 
treated as otfcampus courses ano may not Xx credited w " 

advance by the provost of the division from which ttie s' i 

degree The same rule applies to otfcampus registration ur try s, d ui in 
the Summer school of another institution 

8 A Student who is eiigbie to remain at ttie College Park Campos may 
transfer among curricula, colleges, divisions or oltier academic units 
except where limitations on enrollments tiave tieen approved by the Board 
of Regents 

9 In all cases ol transfer from one diwsioo to anottier on ttie College Parti 
Campus, the provosi ot ttie receiving division, with ttie approval ol ttie 



Academic Regulations and Requirements 51 



student, shall indicate wliich courses, il any, in the student s previous 
academic program are not applicable to his or her new program, and shall 
notify the Otiice ot Records and Registrations ol the ad|ustmenis which are 
to be made m determining ihe students progress toward a degree 
Deletions may occur both in credits attempted and correspondingly in 
credits earned This evaluation shall be made upon the students initial 
entry into a new program, not thereafter If a student transfers wiihm one 
division from one program to another, his or her record evaluation shall be 
made by the provost m the same way as if he or she were translemng 
divisions If the student subsequently transfers to a third division, the 
provost of the third division shall make a similar initial adiustment, courses 
marked "nonappiicable" by the second provost may become applicable in 
Ihe third program 
10 In the cases of non-divisional students, the Dean for Undergraduate 
Studies shall assume the responsibilities normally delegated to provosts 

Concurrent Undergraduate-Graduate Registration 

A senior at The University of Maryland who is within seven hours of 
completing the requirements for the undergraduate degree may, with the 
approval of his or her provost or dean, the chairman of the department 
concerned, and the Graduate School, register m the undergraduate division for 
graduate courses, which may later be counted lor graduate credit toward an 
advanced degree at this University The total of undergraduate and graduate 
courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the semester Excess credits in the 
senior year cannot be used for graduate credit unless proper pre-arrangement 
is made Seniors who wish to take advantage ot this opportunity must lormally 
apply lor admission to the Graduate School. 

Undergraduate Credit for Graduate Level Courses 

Subject to requirements determined by the graduate faculty of the 
department or program ottering the course, undergraduate students may 
register tor graduate level courses, i e , those numbered from 600 to 898. with 
the exception of 799, for undergraduate credit 

A student seeking to utilize the option will normally be in the senior year, 
have earned an accumulated grade point average of at least 3 0, have 
successfully completed, with a grade ot B or better, the prerequisite and 
correlative courses, and be a mapr in the offering or a closely related 
depanment. The student will be required to obtain prior approval of the 
department ottering the course. 

Enrollment in a graduate level course does not in any way imply 
subsequent departmental or Graduate School approval for admission into a 
graduate program, nor may the course be used as credit for a graduate 
degree at The University of Maryland. 

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Programs 

In November 1983. tfie Board of Regents approved guidelines for 
combined bachelor's/master's programs. These programs will permit courses 
ol study which lead to the award of both bachelors and master's degrees 
following five years of study. For the superior student, this option lor a 
dual-degree program offers a wide range ol exciting and cnallenging 
opportunities on the College Park Campus 

A combined program is to be an integrated learning experience, not simply 
the completion of the required number of undergraduate and graduate credits. 
Since such a curriculum requires careful planning of courses in order to reflect 
the unique interests ot a student, consultation with a faculty advisor is 
Imperative 

The following conditions apply to a combined bachelor's/master's program: 
1. A combined degree program is available only to students whose academic 

performance is exceptional, i.e., meeting stipulated grade point average 

requirements. 

2 Faculty evaluations and recommendations may be required for admission 
to a combined degree program 

3 Students may apply to a combined program only after the completion of a 
sufficient number of credits to permit the evaluation ot academic 
performance, normally dunng the sophomore year and certainly before the 
completlion ol 60 credits. 

4 Students will work with faculty to develop a detailed academic and career 
pian which will include the final 60 credits ol the bachelor's work plus the 
graduate courses to be completed lor the master's degree 

5 Application for admission to the Graduate School should be made during 
the semester immediately prior to the completion of the credits in the 
bachelors program Admission to the Graduate School will be effective the 
semester after completing the credits required for the bachelor s degree 

6 The bachelor's degree requires a minimum of 120 credits, the master's 
degree requires a minimum of 30 credits. A maximum of 6 credits may be 
applied to both degrees 

7 Tuition and fees will be charged to the student in accordance with the 
student's admission status 

8 No more than one master's degree may be earned ttfiough a combined 
bachelor s/masters degree program. 

For further information, contact the departmental directors ol 
undergraduate and graduate programs. 



Identification Cards 

Photo Identification Cards are issued at the time the student lirst registers 
lor classes The card is to be used lor the enure duration ol enrollment and is 
valid each semester only when the student also possesses a current semester 
Registration Card. 

Students who preregister will receive a new Registration Card along with 
Iheir Class Schedule This card will validate their Photo Identilication Card. 
Both cards should be earned at all times. 

Students who do not preregister will receive identification cards when they 
do register 

Together the Photo Identilication Card and Registration Card can be used 
by all students to withdraw books Irom the libraries, for admission to most 
athletic, social, and cultural events, and as a general form of identification on 
campus Students who have food service contracts use a separate 
identification card issued by Ihe dining hails 

There is a replacement charge ol $1 00 for lost or stolert registration cards 
and $7 00 lor lost, stolen, or broken photo identilication cards (Note: the lee lor 
broken cards applies to new photo identilication cards issued alter the tail 1977 
semester) 

Questions concerning the identification system should be addressed to the 
Office of Records and Registrations (454-5365). 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington 
Metropolitan Area 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area 
consists of American University, The Catholic University of America, Galiaudet 
College, Georgetown University, George Washington University, Howard 
University, Ml Vernon College, Trinity College, University ol the District ot 
Columbia, and The University ol Maryland College Park (UMCP) Students 
enrolled in these institutions are able to attend certain classes at the other 
campuses and have the credit considered as "residence" credit at their own 
institutions. Payment ol tuition for courses will be made at the student s home 
campus. 

Degree-seeking UMCP undergraduates may participate in the Consortium 
program according to the following stipulations: 

1 The desired course must be one that is not offered at UMCP. Mere 
convenience is not adequate lustilication for permission to take courses 
at other consortium schools 

2 Practica, internships, workshops and similar experimental learning 
courses ccnnot be taken at other consortium schools. 

3 To be eligible, students must be degree-seeking students at UMCP 
and have lumor standing (56 credits) An exception to this policy is 
approval lor courses in Army and Navy ROTC programs. 

4. A student seeking to take courses at other consortium schools must 

have the prior written consent of the mapr department, the comparable 

department at UMCP if the course is outside the major depanment. and 

the students Dean. 

College Park Campus undergraduates interested in additional information 

about the Consortium Program should contact the Consortium Coordinator, 

Mary-Ann Granger, in the Office ot Records and Registrations, North 

Administration Building. 

Academic Clemency 

Undergraduate students returning to the College Park Campus after a 
separation ot a minimum of five calendar years may petition the appropriate 
dean or provost to have a number of previously earned grades and credits 
removed from the calculation of their cumulative grade point average Up to 
sixteen credits and corresponding grades from courses previously completed 
at any University of Maryland campus will be removed from calculation of the 
grade point average and will not be counted toward graduation requirements 
The petition lor clemency must be filed in the first semester of return to the 
campus Approval is neither automatic nor guaranteed. 

Veterans Benefits 

Students attending the University under the Veterans Education Assistance 
Act (Title 38, U S Code) may receive assistance and enrollment certification at 
the Registrations Office on the 1st floor of the North Administration Building. 
For current procedures regarding enrollment certification and computation of 
benefits for undergraduate and graduate students, consult the current 
Schedule ol Classes 

It IS the responsibility of veterans and dependents receiving VA benefits to 
notify the certification officials in the Registrations Office of every change of 
course or program, at the same time the change is submitted to the University 
The following types ot changes must be reported credit level or grade option 
change, change ot maior or division or college, change of address, 
graduation, academic dismissal reinstatement actions, and intent to ttansler 
Irom the College Park Campus, 



52 Academic Regulations and Requirements 



Attendance 

1 The Universily expects each student to take full responsibility for his or her 
academic work and academic progress The student, to progress 
satisfactorily, must meet the quantitative requirements of each course for 
which he or she is registered Students are expected to attend classes 
regularly, for consistent attendance offers the most effective opportunity 
open to all students to gam a developing command of the concepts and 
materials of their course of study However, attendance in class, in and of 
itself, is not a criterion for the evaluation of the student's degree of success 
or failure Furthermore, absences (whether excused or unexcused) do not 
alter what is expected of the student qualitatively and quantitatively Except 
as provided below, absences will not be used in the computation of 
grades, and the recording of student absences will not be required ol the 
faculty 

2. In certain courses in-class participation is an integral part of the work of the 
course A lew examples would be courses in public speaking and group 
discussion, courses emphasizing conversation in foreign languages, 
certain courses in physical education, and certain laboratory sessions. 
Each department shall determine which of its courses fall into this 
category It shall be the responsibility of the instructor in such courses to 
inform each class at the beginning of the semester that in-dass 
participation is an integral part of the work of the course and that absences 
will be taken Into account in the evaluation of the student's work in the 
course 

3 Laboratory meetings require special preparation of equipment and 
materials by the staff. A student who is not present for a laboratory 
exercise has missed that part of the course and cannot expect that he or 
she will be given an opportunity to make up this work later in the term, 

4 Special provision for freshmen the freshman year is a transitional year. 
Absences of freshmen in the basic freshman courses will be reported to 
the student's dean or division officer when the student has accumulated 
more than three unexcused absences 

5, Excuses for absences (m basic freshman courses and in courses where 
in-class participation is a significant part of the work of the course) will be 
handled by the instructor in the course in accordance with the general 
policy of his or her department and college. 

Marking System 

1 , The following symbols are used on the student's permanent record for all 
courses in which he or she is enrolled after the initial registration and 
schedule adiustment period A. B. C. D. F, I, P. S. and W. These marks 
remain as part of the student's permanent record and may be changed 
only by the original instructor on certification, approved by the department 
chairman and the dean or provost, that an actual mistake was made in 
determining or recording the grade. 

2 The mark of A denotes excellent mastery of the subject. It denotes 
outstanding scholarship In computations of cumulative or semester 
averages, a mark of A will be assigned a value of 4 quality points per 
credit hour. (See Minimum Requirements lor Retention and Graduation 
below ) 

3 The mark of B denotes good mastery of the subject. It denotes good 
scholarship In computation of cumulative or semester averages a mark ol 
B will be assigned 3 quality points per credit hour. 

4 The mark of C denotes acceptable mastery. It denotes the usual 
achievement expected In computation ol cumulative or semester averages 
a mark of C will be assigned a value of 2 quality points per credit hour 

5, The mark of D denotes borderline understanding ol the subiect. It denotes 
marginal performance, and it does not represent satisfactory progress 
toward a degree In computations of cumulative or semester averages a 
mark of D will be assigned a value ol 1 quality point per credit hour. 

6 The mark ol F denotes failure to understand the subiect It denotes 
unsatisfactory performance In computations ol cumulative or semester 
averages a mark of F will be assigned a value of quality points per credit 
hour 

7. The mark of P is a student option mark, equivalent to A. B. C, or D (See 
Pass-Fail option below ) The student must inform the Office of Registrations 
ol the selection of this option by the end of the schedule adiustment 
period 

8 The mark of S is a department option mark which may be used to denote 
satisfactory performance by a student in progressing thesis proiects, 
onentation courses, practice teaching and the like In computation of 
cumulative averages a mark of S will not t3e included In computation of 
quality points ach<eved lor a semester, a mark ol S will be assigned a 
value of 2 quality points per credit hour 

9. The mark of I is an exceptional mark which is an instructor option It is 
given only to a student whose work in a course has been qualitatively 
satisfactory, when, because of illness or other circumstances beyond the 
students control, he or she has been unable to complete some small 
portion ol the work of the course In no case will the mark I be recorded lor 
a student who has not completed the maior portion ol the work of the 
course The student will remove the I by completing work assigned by the 
instructor, it is the student's responsibility to request arrangements for 
completion of the work These arrangements must be documented in an 
Incomplete Contract, signed by both the student and the instructor. (See 



"Incomplete Contracts," below ) The I cannot be removed through 
re-registration for the course or through the technique ol "credit by 
examination " In any event this mark shall not be used in any computation 
of quality points or cumulative averages 

10 The mark ol W is used to indicate withdrawal from a course in which the 
student was enrolled at the end of the schedule adiustment penod For 
information and completeness, the mark of W IS placed on the student's 
permanent record by the Office of Records and Registration The Office ol 
Registrations will promptly notify the instructor that the Student has 
withdrawn from the course This mark shall not be used in any computation 
of quality pomts or cumulative average totals at the end of the semester 

1 1 . Audit A student may register to audit a course or courses m which space 
is available The notation AUD wiii be placed on the transcript for each 
course audited A notation to the effect that this symbol does not imply 
attendance or any other effort in the course will be included on the 
transcript in the explanation ol the grading system. 

Pass-Fail Option 

1,An undergraduate who has completed 15 or more credit hours at the 
College Park Campus and has a cumulative average ol at least 2 00 may 
register for courses on the Pass-Fail option during any semester or summer 
session. 

2, Certain divisional requirements, major requirements or feld of 
concentration requirements do not allow the use of the Pass-Fail optioo 
Certain courses withm a department may be designated by that 
department as not available under the Pass-Fail option It is the 
responsibility ol each student electing this option to ascertain in 
coniunction with his or her dean, provost, department or maior advisor 
whether the particular courses will be applicable to his degree 
requirements under the Pass-Fail option, 

3, No more than 20 percent of the College Park Campus credits offered 
toward the degree may be taken on the Pass-Fail option basis 

4, Students registering for a course under the Pass-Fail option are required to 
complete all regular course requirements Their work will be evaluated by 
the instructor by the normal procedure for letter grades. The instructor will 
submit the normal grade The grades A. B, C. or D will be automatically 
converted by the Office of Records and Registrations to the grade P on the 
students permanent record. The grade F will remain as given The choice 
of grading option may be changed only during the schedule adjustment 
period for courses in which the student is currently registered. 

Incomplete Contracts 

1 An "Incomplete Contract" is an agreement between a student and an 
instructor for the completion of coursework under conditions descnbed in 
Item 9 of the section on the Marking System (see above) It is the student's 
responsibility to request that an "Incomplete (Contract" be wntten 

2, Arrangements for the completion of coursework must be documented in an 
"Incomplete Contract" signed by the instructor and the student, A copy ol 
the signed agreement should be filed in the Department Office 

3, All coursework required by an "Incomplete Contract" must be completed 
by the end of the next semester in which the course is again offered and m 
which the student is in atiendance at the College Park Campus If the 
instructor is unavailable, the department chairperson will, upon the request 
of the student, make the arrangements for the student to complete tiie 
coursework according to the requirements for an "Incomplete Contract" 
outlined above 

4 Exceptions to the time period cited above may be granted by the students 
Dean or Provost upon the written request of the student if circumstances 
are deemed to warrant further delay The new completion date must again 
be specified and agreed to in writing by the student and the Dean or 
Provost 

5 It is the responsibility of the instructor or the department chairperson 
concerned to return the appropriate supplementary grade report, both to 
the appropriate Dean or Provost and to the Office of Records and 
Registrations, upon completion of the conditions m the "Incomplete 
Contract." 

Minimum Requirements for Retention and 
Graduation 

1, A minimum of 120 credits of successfully completed (not I. F. or W) course 
credits IS required for graduation in any degree curriculum (See Degree 
Requirements and Credit by Examination above ) Credits transferred, c 
earned dunng prior admissions terminating in academic dismissal or 
withdrawal and followed by readmiss'on. wiii be applicable toward meeimg 
credit requirements lor a degree. (See Readrmssion and Reinstaierrient 
atxjve.) 

2 Academic retention is based solely upon grade pomt average (G P A ) The 
Significance of the cumulative grade pomt average (cumulative G PA ) 
vanes according to the numper of credits attempted 

a Semester Academic Honors will be awarded to a student who 
completes withm any given semester 12 or more credits (excluding 
courses with grades of P and S) with a semester G P A. ol 3 500 or 



Academic Regulations and Requirements 53 



higher This nolaiion will be placed on ihe individual's permanent 
recofd 
b Satisfactory Peiiorrnance applies to those students with a cumulative 
G P A between 4 000 and 2 000 
3 Students with cumulative G P A of less than 2 000 fall into three 
categories Unsatislactory Peiiorrnance. Academic Warning, and Academic 
Dismissal. These notations will be placed on the students permanent 
record The cumulative G P A that defines each ol the categories varies 
according to the credit level as noted below. 



Credit 


Unsatislactory 


Academic 


Academic 


Level 


Pertormance 


Warning 


Dismissal 


0-13 


1 999-1 290 


1289-0 230 


229-0 000 


14-28 


1 999-1 780 


1 779-1280 


1279-0 000 


29-56 


1 999-1 860 


1 859-1 630 


1 629-0 000 


57-74 


1999-1940 


1 939-1 830 


1 829-0 000 


75-more 





1999-1940 


1939-0 000 



4 Credits completed with grades of A, B. C. D and F, but not P and S. will be 
used in computation of the semester and cumulative G P A with values of 
4 000. 3 000, 2 000. 1 000 and 000 respectively Marks of I. W and NGR 
will not be used in the computation of semester and cumulative G PA. 

5 Students with an unsatisfactory performance for any semester will be urged 
in writing to consult their advisors 

6 Students on academic warning will have this fact noted on their transcripts 
and will be urged in writing to consult with their advisors prior to the 
beginning of the next semester. Students who receive an academic 
warning in any semester will not be allowed either to add or drop courses 
or to register during the semester following the receipt of the academic 
warning without seeing an advisor. 

7. Any student with 60 credits or more attempted and who thereafter received 
academic warning for two consecutive semesters will be academically 
dismissed Students who are academically dismissed will have this action 
entered on their transcript. 

8 No student transferring to The University of Maryland College Park from 
outside The University of Maryland System will be subject to Academic 
Dismissal at the end of the first semester as long as the student obtains a 
cumulative GPA. of 23 or more (A student who would otherwise be 
subject to Academic Dismissal will receive an Academic Warning ) 
Thereafter, such a student will be subiect to the normal standards of 
academic progress This provision does not apply to students reinstated or 
readmitted to the College Park Campus. 

9. A student who has been academically dismissed and who is reinstated will 
be academically dismissed agam if minimum academic standards are not 
met by the end of the first semester after reinstatement (see below) In the 
computation of the cumulative G.P.A., all credits attempted at The 
University of Maryland will be used. 

10. Under unusual circumstances, the Faculty Petition Board may set more 
rigorous requirements for the semester in which a reinstated student 
returns, or may allow a lengthened period (not to exceed two semesters) to 
reach the minimum or set academic standards. 

11. Any appeal from the regulations governing academic warning or academic 
dismissal shall be directed to the Faculty Petition Board which shall be 
empowered to grant relief in unusual cases if the circumstances warrant 
such action. 

12. A student may repeat any course: however no student may be registered 
for a course more than three times If a student repeats a course in which 
he or she has already earned a mark of A, B, C, D, P or S, the subsequent 
attempt shall not increase the total hours earned toward the degree Only 
the highest mark will be used in compulation of the student's cumulative 
average. Under unusual circumstances, the student's dean or provost may 
grant an exception to this policy. 

Dismissal of Delinquent Students 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal of a 
student who cannot or does not maintain the required standard of scholarship, 
or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental to his or her 
health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the 
authorities of the University Specific scholastic requirements are set forth in 
the Minimum Requirements for Retention and Graduation. Additional 
information about the dismissal of delinquent students may be found in the 
Code ol Student Conduct 

Withdrawal From the University 

1. Should a student desire or be compelled to withdraw from the University at 
any time, he or she must secure a form for withdrawal from the Records 
Office, and submit the form along with the semester 
Identification/Registration card. 

2. The effective dale of withdrawal as far as refunds are concerned is the 
date that the withdrawal form is received by the Records Office A notation 
of Withdrawn and the effective date of the withdrawal will be posted to the 
permanent record The instructors and the Divisional Offices will be notified 
of all withdrawn students The deadline date for submitting the withdrawal 
form for each semester is the last day of classes. 



Readmisslon and Reinstatement 

Students who do not mamiam continuous registration must apply for 
readmission or reinstatement when they desire to return to the University. See 
sections on Minimum Requirements for Retention and Graduation, 

Readmisslon. A student who has Interrupted registration for one or more 

semesters and who was in good academic standing or on academic probation 
at the conclusion ol the last semester registered must apply lor readmission. 

Reinstatement 

1 A student who withdraws from the University must apply lor reinstatement 
to the Reenroiiment Office The applications are subject to review by the 
Faculty Petition Board 

2. A student who has been dismissed lor academic reasons must file an 
application for reinstatement Applications may be filed the semester 
imm.ediateiy following the dismissal All applications are reviewed by the 
Faculty Petition Board whose members are empowered to grant 
reinstatement to Ihe University if the circumstances warrant such action. 

3 A student who has been dismissed from the University for academic 
reasons and whose petition for reinstatement is denied may apply for 
reinstatement any subsequent semester It is recommended that the 
student give serious consideration to the previous recommendations ol the 
Faculty Petition Board. 

Deadlines. Dismissed students who wish to apply for reinstatement must 
observe the following deadlines: 

Fall semester— June 15 
Spring semester— November 1 
Summer Session I— April 15 
Summer Session II — May 15 

There are no deadlines lor readmission but students are encouraged to 

apply early. 

Exceptions. Students dismissed at the end of the fall or spring semester may 

apply for immediate reinstatement. Information will be provided to all 
dismissed students by the Office of Reenroiiment Students who are dismissed 
at the end of the fall semester and who are denied reinstatement for the spnng 
semester are not eligible to attend Summer School Students dismissed at the 
end of the spring semester may attend the first or second summer session. 
They must be reinstated, however, in order to attend during the fall semester. 
Students requiring clearance from Judicial Affairs Office, Health Center or 
International Education Office must submit the required lorms with their 
application. 

Any student who was previously admitted to the University and did not 
register for that semester must apply for admission. Also, any student who was 
previously admitted to the University, registered, but cancelled the only 
registration, must apply for admission. 

Applications. Application forms for readmission and reinstatement may be 
obtained from the Office of Reenroiiment, Room 1117, North Administration 

Building. 

Additional Information. For additional information contact the Reenroiiment 
Office. North Admmistraiton Building, The University of Maryland, College Park, 
MD 20742. Telephone. (301) 454-2734. 

Examinations 

1. All examinations and tests shall be given during class hours in accordance 
with the regularly scheduled (or officially "arranged") time and place of 
each course listed in the Sctiedule ol Classes and/or the Undergraduate 
Catalog Unpublished changes in the scheduling or location of 
classes/tests must be approved by the department chairman and reported 
to the Provost. It is the responsibility of the student to be informed 
concerning the dates of announced quizzes, tests and examinations. 

2. It is the policy of the University to excuse the absences of students that 
result from religious obsen/ances and to provide without penalty for the 
rescheduling of examinations and other written tests that fall on religious 
holidays Examinations and other written tests may not be scheduled on 
Rosh Hashannah. Yom Kippur, or Good Friday An instructor is not under 
obligation to give a student a make-up examination unless the absence 
was caused by illness, religious observance, participation in University 
activities at the request of University authorities, or compelling 
circumstances beyond the student's control In cases of dispute, the 
student may appeal to the chair of the department offering the course 
within one week from the date of the refusal of the right to lake a make-up 
exam, 

A make-up examination, when permitted, must be given on campus, unless 
the published schedule and course descnpiion require other 
arrangements The make-up examination must be at a time and place 
mutually agreeable to the instructor and student, cover only the material for 
which the student was originally responsible, and be given within a time 
limit that retains currency of the material The make-up must not interfere 
with the student's regularly scheduled classes. In the event that a group of 



54 Academic Regulations and Requirements 



students require the same make-up examination, one make-up time may 
be scheduled at the convenience ol the instructor and the largest possitjie 
number ol students involved Under the same guidelines students shall 
have equal access to all inlormation and drills missed due to the reasons 
listed 

3 A final examination shall be given in every undergraduate course. 
Exceptions may be made with the written approval of the chairman ol the 
department and the dean or provost In order to avoid basing too much ot 
the semester grade upon the final examination, additional tests, quizzes, 
term papers, reports and the like should be used to determine a student's 
comprehension of a course The order of procedure in these matters is left 
to the discretion of departments or professors and should be announced to 
a class at the beginning of a course All final examinations must be held on 
the examination days of the Official Final Examination Schedule No final 
examination shall be given at a time other than that scheduled in the 
Official Examination Schedule without written permission of the department 
chairman. 

4 As ot fall semester, 1980, graduating seniors will be expected to take final 
exams dunng the regular examination period However, graduating seniors 
are not required to take final examinations on the day of graduation or on 
any regularly scheduled examination day following graduation In courses 
with exams scheduled on those days, graduating seniors are expected to 
see their instructors early in the semester to make alternate arrangements. 

5 A file of all final examination questions must be kept by the chairman of 
each department. 

6 The chairman of each department is responsible for the adequate 
administration ot examinations in courses under his or her jurisdiction The 
deans and provosts should present the matter of examinations for 
consideration in staff conferences from time to time and investigate 
examination procedures in their respective colleges and divisions. 

7 Every examination shall be designed to require lor its completion not more 
than the regularly scheduled period 

8 A typewritten, mimeographed or printed set of questions shall be placed in 
the hands of every examinee in every test or examination requiring at least 
one period, unless the dean or provost has authorized some other 
procedure, 

9 Each instructor must safeguard examination questions and all trial sheets, 
drafts and stencils. 

10 Each instructor should avoid the use of examination questions which have 
been included in recently given examinations and should prepare 
examinations that will make dishonesty difficult. 

11 Only clerical help approved by the department chairman shall be 
employed in the preparation or reproduction ol tests or examination 
questions. 

12 Proctors must be in the examination room at least ten minutes before the 
hour of a final examination Provisions should be made for proper 
ventilation, lighting and a seating plan At least one ot the proctors present 
must be sufficiently cognizant of the subject matter of the examination to 
deal authoritatively with inquiries arising from the examination. 

13 Books, papers, etc belonging to the student, must be left in a place 
designated by the instructor before the student takes his or her seat, 
except in such cases where books or work sheets are permitted 

14 SiuOents should be seated at least every other seat apart, or its equivalent, 
i e . about three feet Where this arrangement is not possible some means 
must be provided to protect the integrity ol the examination. 

15 "Blue books" only must be used m periodic or tmai examinations, unless 
special forms are furnished by the department concerned 

16 II mathematical tables are required m an examination, they shall be 
lurnished by the instructor If textbooks are used, this rule does not apply 

17 Proctors must exercise all diligence to prevent dishonesty and to enlorce 
proper examination decorum, including abstention Irom smoking 

18 Where an instructor must proctor more than 40 students, he or she should 
consult the chairman ol the department concerning proctorial assistance 
An instructor should consult the department chairman it in his or her 
opinion a smaller number of students lor an examination requires the help 
of another instructor 

19 No student who leaves an examination room will be permitted to return, 
except m unusual circumstances, in which case permission to do so must 
be granted by the proctor prior to the students departure 

20 All conversation will cease prior to the passing out ol examination papers, 
and silence will be maintained in the room during the entire examination 
period 

21 Examination papers will be placed lace down on the writing surface until 
the examination is otficialiy begun by the proctor 

22 Examination papers will be kept flat on the writing surface at all times. 

Examinations on Religious Holidays 

The reader is referred to item two (2 ) under Examinations atx)ve lor 
inlormation about University policy on examinations on religious holidays 



Proficiency Examination Programs 

Whether you are a new. a continuing, or a returning student, the College 
Park Campus offers several opportunities to earn college credit through 
satisfactory achievement m a variety of examinations 

Currently, undergraduate students may earn credit through the various 
proficiency examination programs up to a total ol one-hall of the credits 
required for their degree It is the students responsibility to consult with the 
appropriate divisional officer, dean and advisor with regard to applicability ot 
any credit earned by. examination to a specific degree program and to 
determine courses which should not be elected m order to avoid duplication 
A student will not receive credit for both passing an examination in a course 
and completing fhe same course. 

Students with specific questions about the University's policy may contact 
the Director, Special Advising Programs. Room 1117, Hornbake bbrary 
(454-2731), 

Three proficiency examination programs are recognized lor credit by the 
College Park Campus; 

Advanced Placement Program (A.P.). Please consult the description of this 

program uuner Aamissions and Orientation. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP). This program exists lor the 
purpose ot awarding prpliciency credit, or of otherwise recognizing college 
level competence, achieved outside the college classroom Two types of CLEP 
tests are available General Examinations, which cover the content ol a broad 
lield of study, and Subject Examinations, which cover the specific content of a 
college course Credit can be earned and will tye recognized by the College 
Park Campus for some CLEP General or Subieci Examinations, provided 
satisfactory scores are attained. Credits earned under CLEP are not 
considered as residence credit. 

Policies and Administration of the Examinations 

These tests are aamimsiered at CLEP testing centers throughout the 
country Written applications must be completed and on file at the testing 
center selected, usually not later than three working weeks prior to the 
intended testing date The University of Maryland is a CLEP Test Center (Test 
Center Code 5814). giving tests the third Saturday of the month 

The fees for these examinations are listed on the standard CLEP 
application form To obtain an application or additional information, contact Ms. 
Williams in the Counseling Center. Shoemaker Halt (Room 0106A). or write to 
the Program Director, College Level Examination Program, Box 1821. 
Princeton. |vj J 08540 

Students who desire to earn credit through CLEP must have their official 
score reports sent to the Office of Aomissions. fvJorth Administration Building, 
The University of Maryland. College Park 20742 

A student must matriculate at College Park before requesting the posting ol 
CLEP credits Such posting will not be done until a student has established a 
transcript, i e . earned credit through regularly taken courses Each campus ot 
the University establishes stanoards lor acceptance ol CLEP and AP 
exemptions and credits Students must check with the campus to which they 
will transfer to learn if they will lose, maintain or gam credit 

The College Park Campus will award credit tor a CLEP examination 
provided the examination was being accepted lor credit on this campus on the 
date the examination was taken by the student 

Credit will not be given lor both completing a course and passing an 
examination covering substantially the same material 

CLEP examinations posted on transcripts Irom other institutions will be 
accepted if the examination has been approved by the College Park Campus 
and the scores reported are equal to or greater than those required by this 
campus If the transcript from the prior institution does not carry the scores, it 
will be the responsibility ol the student to request the Educational Testing 
Service to forward a copy of the official report to the Office of Admissions 

The College Park Campus CLEP Advisor is Dr Helen Clarke Telephone: 
454-2731. 

General Examinations 



Examination 

English Composition— Acceptable for ENGL 101 (if taken prior 
to 7/1/77). ENGL 102 (if taken between 7/1/77 

& 7/1/78) Not acceptable after 7 1 78 

Natural Science— AcceptaDie tor general science credit, no 

specific course 

Mathematics— Acceptable for general math credit (il taken 

prior to 9/1/77) Not acceptable after 9/1/77 . . . 

Humanities 

Sub Scores « 

Fine Arts— Acceptable lor ARTH 1(X) (if taken prior to 

9/1^79) Not acceptable alter 9 f-79 

Literature— Acceptable tor general English credit, no 

specific course 

Social Science/History 

Sub Scores • 

Social Sciences— Acceptable for general social science 

credit 



Mini- 

fTtUfTI 

Score 


Crs 
Awd. 


489 


3 


489 


6 


497 
469 


3 
6 



(50) (3) 



(50) 
488 



(3) 
6 



(50) (3) 



Academic Regulations and Requirements 55 



History— Acceptable for general history credit (il taken 
prior to 12/31/79) Not acceptable after 
1Z3179 (50) (3) 

• Sub scoces wiH be used ir approving 3 cedils wtien only one lest is acceptable 

Subject Examinations 

Mini- 
mum Crs. 
Examination [and Related Course(s)l Score Awd. 

American Government 

(l^one) 50 3 

Analysis and Interpretation of Literature 

(ENGL 102) 51 3 

Biology. General 

(ZOOL101) 49 6 

Calculus and Elementary Functions 

(MATH 140) 50 6 

Chemistry. General 

(CHEM 103) 48 6 

College Algebra 

(iMone) 49 3 

College Algebra — Trigonometry 

(MATH 115) 49 3 

College Composition, with essay questions 

(ENGL 101) 51 3 

Introductory Macroeconomics 

(ECON201) 50 3 

Introductory Microeconomics 

(ECON 203) 50 3 

Introductory Micro- and Macroeconomics 

(ECON 205) 49 3 

Introductory Sociology 

(SOCY 100) 51 6 

Psychology. General 

(PSYC 100) 50 3 

TriQonomelry 

(None) 50 3 

Departmental Proficiency Examinations (Credit by Examination). College 
Park Departmental Proficiency Examinations, cusiomaniy retened to as 
"credit-by-examination". are ottered m a number of University courses, and are 
comparable to comprehensive final examinations m those courses These 
examinations are given at a lime mutually agreed upon by the student and the 
department Department offices will provide information regarding place and 
administration, type of examination, and material which might be helpful in 
preparing for examinations 

An undergraduate who passes a departmental proficiency examination is 
given credit and quality points toward graduation in the amount regularly 
allowed in the course, provided such credits do not duplicate credit obtained 
by some other means (e.g.. earned in high school or another collegiate 
institution) 

Although the mathematics and foreign language departments receive the 
most applications for credit-by-exammation. most departments will provide 
examinations for a number of their courses Any student who wishes more 
information or to apply for an examination should see the Director of Special 
Advising Programs. Room 3151. Hornbake Library. 

Policies 

The applicant must be formally admitted to the College Park Campus. 
Posting of credit, however, will be delayed until the student is registered 

Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be taken for courses in 
which the student has been registered beyond the schedule ad|ustment period 
(the first 10 days of classes) 

Departmental Proficiency Examinations may not be used to change grades, 
Including incompletes 

Application for credit-by-examination is equivalent to registration for a 
course, however, the following conditions apply 
a A student may cancel the application at any time prior to completion of the 

examination with no entry on his/her permanent record. (Equivalent to the 

schedule adjustment period ) 
b. The instructor makes the results of the examination available to the student 

pnor to formal submission of the grade Before formal submission of the 

grade, a student may elect not to have this grade recorded. In this case, a 

symbol of W is recorded (Equivalent to the drop procedure.) 



c No course may be attempted rrx)re than twice 

d The instructor must certify on the report of the examination submitted to the 
Registrations Ollice that copies of the examination questions or identifying 
Information in the case ol standardized examinations, and the students 
answers have been tiled with the chairman ol the department olfenng the 
course 

Letter grades earned on examinations to establish credit, if accepted by 
the student, are entered on the student's transcript and used in computing 
his'her cumulative grade pomt average A student may elect to take an 
examination lor credit on a "Pass-Fail" basis under the normal 'Pass-Fail* 
regulations 

Academic Dishonesty 

Academic dishonesty is prohibited by the Code ol Student Conduct and 

may result in a severe sanction, including expulsion from the University. The 
Code defines academic dishonesty as follows 
a Cheaftrrg.intentionaiiy using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, 

inlo'maiion or Study aids in any academic exercise 
b Fabr/cafionlntenlional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any 

information or citation in an academic exercise 
c Facilitating Academic Dishonesty Intentionally or knowingly helping or 

attempiing lo help another to commit an act of academic dishonesty 
d Plagiarism. Intentionally or knowingly representing the words or ideas of 

another as one s own m any academic exercise. 

In cases involving charges of academic dishonesty, the instructor in the 
course or person in charge of the activity shall repon to the instructional 
department chairperson or dean (if there is no chairperson) any information 
received and the facts within his or her knowledge, II the chairperson ol the 
instructional department determines that there is any sound reason for 
believing that academic dishonesty may be involved, he or she shall refer the 
matter to the dean or provost The dean or provost will then confer with the 
student's dean or provost and will check the Judiciary Office records to 
determine if the student has any record of prior offenses involving academic 
dishonesty The dean or provost will then consult with the student involved, 
and if the alleged academic dishonesty is admitted by the student and is his 
first offense of this nature, the dean or provost may authorize the department 
chairperson to resolve the charges, provided the penalty is accepted by the 
student in writing In such case the department chairperson will make a written 
report of the matter, including the action taken, to the students dean or 
provost and to the Judiciary Office 

If the case is not resolved in the above manner, the dean or provost of the 
Instructional department will appoint an ad hoc Committee of Academic 
Dishonesty The Committee will consist of one member from the faculty ol the 
college or division administered by the dean or provost as chairperson, one 
undergraduate student, and one member from the faculty of the student's 
college or division appointed by the dean of that college or provost of the 
division If the student's dean or provost and the dean or provost administering 
the instructional department are the same, a second member of the faculty of 
the college or division concerned is appointed If within jurisdiction of the 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies that Dean will appoint the ad hoc Committee 
on Academic Dishonesty consisting of two faculty having experience in the 
General Studies Program, one serving as chairperson, and one student in that 
program 

The dean or provost of the instructional department will refer the specific 
report of alleged academic dishonesty to this ad hoc committee and the 
committee will hear the case The hearing procedures before this committee 
will in general conform to those required for student judicial boards The Code 
of Student Conduct provides that any act of academic dishonesty, including a 
first offense, will place the student in jeopardy of "suspension from the 
University, unless specific and significant mitigating factors are present" (part 
eleven) A repeated violation, or the more senous first offense, may result in 
expulsion Also, disciplinary records for any act of academic dishonesty are 
retained in the Judicial Programs Office for at least three years from the date ol 
final adjudication. 

The chairman of the committee will report its actions to the dean or 
provost, the student's dean or provost, and to the Judiciary Office The dean or 
provost of the instructional department will advise the student in wntmg of the 
disciplinary action of the committee and. if it has been determined that the 
student should be suspended or expelled, advise the student of the right to file 
an appeal, in accordance with Parts 38 and 40 through 45 of the Code of 
Student Conduct. 

Students accused of academic dishonesty should request a copy of the 
University document "Preparing for an Academic Dishonesty Hearing". 
Contact the Judicial Proarams Office at 454-2927 

TO REPORT ACADEMIC DISHONESTY, DIAL 454-4746 AND ASK FOR 
THE "CAMPUS ADVOCATE". 



56 



Academic Divisions 
and Campus-wide 
Programs 



Division of Agricultural and Life 
Sciences 

Provost: Miller 

The Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers educational 
opportunities for students in subiect matter relating to living organisms and 
their interaction with one another and with the environment Education in all 
aspects of agriculture is included. Programs of study include those involving 
the most fundamental concepts of biological science and chemistry and the 
use of knowledge in daily life as well as the application of economic and 
engineering principles in planning the improvement of life. In addition to 
pursuing the baccalaureate degree, a number of students in this Division 
engage in preprolessional education in such fields as pre-medicine. 
pre-dentistry, and pre-veterinary medicine. 

The student may obtain a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in any 
of the departments and curricula listed Students in preprofessional programs 
may, under certain circumstances, obtain a B S degree following three years 
on campus and one successful year in a professional school. 

Structure of the Division. The Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences 
includes the following departments and programs; 

1. Within the College of Agriculture: 

a. Departments Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural and Extension 
Education, Agricultural and Resource Economics, Agronomy. Animal 
Sciences, Horticulture, and Poultry Science. 

b. Programs or Curricula: agricultural chemistry, animal sciences, food 
science, general agriculture, natural resources management, and 
pre-forestry. 

c. Institute of Applied Agriculture. 

2. Divisional Units: 

a Departments: Botany. Chemistry, Entomology, Geology, Microbiology, 
Zoology 

b. Programs or Curricula: biochemistry, general biological sciences. 

Admission. Requirements for admission to the Division are the same as those 
for admission to the other units of the University. Application must be made to 
the Director ol Admissions, The University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

Students desiring a program of study in the Division of Agricultural and Life 
Sciences should include the following subjects in their high school program: 
English, four units; college preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane geometry), 
three or four units, biological and physical sciences, two units, history and 
social sciences, one unit. 

Students wishing to major in chemistry, botany, microbiology, or zoology. 
or to follow a pre-medical or pre-denial program, should include four units of 
college preparatory mathematics (algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry, and 
more advanced mathematics, if available). They should also include chemistry 
and physics. 

A faculty advisor will be designated to help select and design a program of 
courses to meet the needs and objectives of each entering student As soon 
as a student selects a maior field of study, an advisor representing that 
department or program will be assigned. All students are urged to see their 
advisor at least once each semester 

Students following preprolessional programs will be advised by 
i<nowledgeabie faculty. 

In addition to the educational resources on the campus, students with 
specific interests have an opportunity to utilize libraries and other resources of 
the several government agencies located close to the campus Research 
laboratories related to agriculture or marine biology are available to students 
with special interests. 

Degree Requirements. Students graduating from the Division must complete 
at least 120 credits with an average ol 2 in all courses applicable towards 
the degree Included in the 120 credits must be the following; 

1. University Studies Program Requirements (40 credits). 

2. Division Requirements 

a Chemistry Any one course of three or more credits in chemistry 

numbered 102 or higher; 
b Mathematics or any course that satisfies the University Studies 

Program. 

c. Biological Sciences Any one course carrying three or rrwre credits 



selected from offerings of the Departments of Botany. Entomology. 
Microbiology or Zoology, or any interdepartmental course approved for 
this purpose by the Division. 
3. Requirements of the maior and supporting areas, which are listed under 
individual program headings. 

Honors Programs. Students may apply for admission to the honors programs 

of Agricultural and Resource Economics. Botany, Chemistry, General Biological 
Sciences, Microbiology, and Zoology. 

On the basis of the students performance during participation in the 
Honors Program, the department may recommend the candidates for the 
appropriate degree with (departmental) honors, or for the appropriate degree 
with (departmental) high honors Successful completion of the Honors Program 
will be recognized by a citation in the Commencement Program and by an 
appropriate entry on the student's record and diploma 



College of Agriculture 



Dean: Hegwood 

The College of Agriculture offers educational programs with a broad 
cultural and scientific base Students are prepared for careers in agriculturally 
related sciences, technology and business. 

The application of knowledge to the solution of some of the world's most 
critical problems concerning adequate amounts and quality of food and the 
quality of the environment in which we live are important missions of the 
(ioliege. 

This original College of The University of Maryland College Park was 
chartered in 1856 The College of Agriculture has a continuous record ol 
leadership in education since that date. It became the beneficiary of the 
Land-Grant Act of 1862. 

The College of Agriculture continues to grow and develop as part of the 
greater University, providing education and research activities enabling us to 
use our environment and natural resources to best advantage while conserving 
basic resources for future generations. 

Advantage of Location and Facilities. Educational opportunities in the 

College ol Agriculture are enhanced by the nearby location of several research 
units of the federal government. 01 particular interest are the Agricultural 
Research Center at Beitsvilie and the U S Department of Agriculture 
Headquarters in Washington. DC. The National Agricultural Library at 
Beitsvilie is an important resource. 

Related research laboratories of the National Institutes of Health, military 
hospitals. National Aeronautics and Space Agency, and the National Bureau ol 
Standards are in the vicinity Interaction of faculty and students with personnel 
from these agencies is encouraged Teaching and research activities are 
conducted with the cooperation of scientists and prolessional people in 
government positions. 

Instruction in the basic biological and physical sciences, social sciences 
and engineering principles is conducted in well-designed classrooms and 
laboratories The application ol basic principles to practical situations is 
demonstrated for the student in numerous ways. 

Modern greenhouses are available lor teaching and research on a wide 
variety of plants, plant pests, and crop cultural systems 

Herds of dairy and beef cattle and flocks ol poultry are kept on the 
campus lor teaching and research purposes 

Several operating research farms, located in Central. Western and 
Southern Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, support the educational 
programs in agncullure by providing locations where important crops, animals 
and poultry can be grown and maintained unoer practical and research 
conditions These farms add an important dimension to the courses offered in 
agriculture Data from these operations and from cooperating producers and 
processors of agricultural products are utilized by students interested in 
economics, teaching, engineering, and conservation, as they relate to 
agriculture, as well as by those concerned with biology or management o) 
agricultural crops and animals. 

General Information. Today's agriculture is a highly complex and extremely 
eliicient industry which includes supplies and services used m agricultural 
production, and the marketing, processing and distribution of products to meet 
the consumers' needs ana wants The College of Agriculture strives to 
accomplish the task of providing an agricultural education that fits all the 



College of Agriculture Departments, Programs and Curricula 57 



needs o( todays most advanced science o( agriculture 

Instruction in ttie College ol Agriculture includes llie fundamental sciences 
and emptiasizes ttie precise knowledge ttiat graduates must employ m itie 
industrialized agriculture ol today, and tielps develop ttie foundation for their 
role in the future Course programs in specialized areas may be tailored to fit 
the particular needs ol the individual student. 

Previous training in agriculture is not a prerequisite for study in the College 
of Agriculture, students with rural, suburban and urban backgrounds comprise 
the student body 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture have an adequate educational 
background for careers and continued learning after college in business, 
production, teaching, research, extension, and many other professional fields. 

Requirements for Admission. Admission requirements to the College of 
Agriculture are the same as those of the University 

For students entering the College of Agriculture it is recommended that 
their high school preparatory course include English, 4 units, mathematics. 3 
units, biological and physical sciences. 3 units, and history or social sciences. 
2 units Four units of mathematics should be elected by students who plan to 
maior m agricultural engineering or agricultural chemistry. 

Requirements for Graduation. Each student must complete at least 120 
credit hours in academic subjects with a minimum grade point average of 
20(C), 

Honors Program. An Honors Program is approved for majors in agricultural 
and resource economics The obieclive of the Honors Program is to recognize 
superior scholarship and to provide opportunity lor the excellent student to 
broaden his or her perspective and to increase the depth of his or her studies. 

The programs in honors are administered by Departmental Honors. 
Students in the College ol Agriculture who are in the top 20 percent of their 
class at the end of their first year may be considered for admission into the 
Honors Program 01 this group up to 50 percent may be admitted. 

Sophomores or first semester juniors will be considered upon application 
from those students m the upper 20 percent of their class. While application 
may be made until the student enters the sixth semester, early entrance into 
the program is recommended. Students admitted to the program enjoy certain 
academic privileges. 

Faculty Advisement. Each student in the College of Agriculture is assigned to 
a faculty advisor Advisors normally work with a limited number ol students and 
are able to give individual guidance 

Students entering the freshman year with a definite choice of curriculum 
are assigned to departmental advisors for counsel and planning of all 
academic programs Students who have not selected a definite curriculum are 
assigned to a general advisor who assists with the choice of electives and 
acquaints students with opportunities in the curricula in the College of 
Agriculture and in other divisions of the University. 

Scholarships. A number of scholarships are available for students enrolled in 
the College of Agriculture These include awards by the Agricultural 
Development Fund. American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Arthur M Ahalt 
Memorial Scholarship, Capitol Milk (Producers Cooperative, Inc . Dr Ernest N, 
Cory Trust Fund. Ernest T Culien Memorial Scholarship. Dairymen. Inc, 
Scholarship. Dairy Technology Scholarships and Grants. Delmarva Corn and 
Soybean Scholarship. Delaware-Maryland Plant Food Association, Mylo S. 
Downey Memorial Scholarship. James R Ferguson Memorial Scholarship. 
Goddard Memorial Scholarship, Manasses J, and Susanna Grove Memorial 
Scholarship. The Kmghorne Fund. Gary Lee Lake Memorial Scholarship. 
Maryland Holstein-Freisian Association Scholarship. Maryland Turfgrass 
Association. Maryland State Golf Association. Maryland and Virginia 
Milk-Producers. Inc . Dr Ray A Murray Scholarship Fund. Paul R Poffenberger 
Scholarship Fund. R, J Reynolds Tobacco Scholarship. Ralston Punna 
Company. J Homer Remsberg Memorial Scholarship. The Schluderberg 
Foundation. Southern States Cooperative. Inc . the David N Steger Scholarship 
Fund. T B Symons Memorial Scholarship. Veterinary Science Scholarship, 
Winslow Foundation and the Nicholas Brice Wonhington Scholarship Fund. 

Student Organizations. Students find opportunity for varied expression and 
growth in the several voluntary organizations sponsored by the College of 
Agriculture These organizations are Agriculture and Resource Economics 
Club. Agronomy Club. American Society of Agricultural Engineers. Animal 
Husbandry Club. Collegiate 4-H Club. Collegiate Future Farmers of America. 
Conservation and Forestry Club. Equestrian Association. Food Science Club. 
Horticultural Club. INAG Club. Poultry Science Club, and Veterinary Science 
Club 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor fraternity Members are chosen 
from students in the College of Agriculture who have attained the scholastic 
requirements and displayed leadership in agriculture 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of representatives from the 
various student organizations in the College of Agriculture Its purpose is to 
coordinate activities of these organizations and to promote work which is 
beneficial to the college- 
Required Courses. Courses required for students in the College of Agriculture 
are listed in each curnculum The program of the freshman year is similar for 
all curricula. Variations in programs will be suggested based on students' 



interests and test scores 



Typical Freshmen Program — College ol Agriculture 



ENGL 101 . 

BOTN 101 , . 

MATH 

ANSC 101 

ZOOL 101 

AGRO 100 

AGRO 102 

SPCH 107 

University Studies Program Requirement 

Tota: 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 
4 

3 3 

3 



College of Agriculture Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Prolessor and Chairman: Nelson 

Prolessors: Longest. Ryden (Emeritus) 

-4ssoc/a(e Prolessors: Cooper, Rivera, Seibel. Smith 

Alliliate Associate Prolessor: CoHmdaffer 

Assistant Prolessors: Gibson. Glee 

AHiliate Assistant Prolessor: Booth 

Instructor: Sieling 

The program is designed to prepare persons to teach agriculture at the 
secondary or postsecondary levels. It also prepares persons to enter 
community development and other agriculturally related careers which 
emphasize working with people, 

A degree in agricultural and extension education may lead to career 
opportunities in educational and developmental programs, public service. 
business and industry, communications, research, or college teaching. 

Students preparing to become teachers of agriculture, including 
horticulture, agribusiness and other agriculturally related subjects, should have 
had appropriate experience with the kind of agriculture they plan |p teach or 
should arrange to secure that experience during summers while in college. 

Students in the agricultural education curriculum are expected to 
participate in the Collegiate Chapter of the Future Farmers of America for the 
purpose of developing skills necessary for advising. 

Agricultural and Extension Education Program 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements 40 

AGRO 100— Crops Laboratory 2 

AGRO 102— Crop Production or 

AGRO 40&-Forage Crop Production (3) 2 

AGRO 302— General Soils 4 

ANSC 101— Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 203— Feeds and Feeding 3 

AREC 406— Farm Management or 

AREC 407— Financial Analysis of Farm Business 3 

BOTN 101— General Botany 4 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 4 

CHEM 103. 104 — General Chemistry I. Fundamentals of Organic and 

Biochemistry 4, 4 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 6 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

ENAG 100— Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

ENAG 200— Introduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

ENAG 30S— Farm Mechanics , 2 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 3 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production or 
HORT 231 — Greenhouse Management or 

HORT 271— Plant Propagation 3 

MATH 1 10— Introduction Mathematics I 3 

AEED 302— Introduction to Agricultural Education 2 

AEED 303 — Teaching Materials and Demonstrations , 2 

AEED 305 — Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups , , 1 

AEED 311— Teaching Secondary Vocational Agnculture 3 

AEED 31 3— Student Teaching 5 

AEED 31 5— Student Teaching 3 

AEED 398 — Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 

AEED 464— Rural Life in Modern Society 3 

SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication 3 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

Electives 6 



58 College of Agriculture Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Prolessor and Chairman: Huelh 

Prolessors Brown, Cam, Chambers. Cuftis (Emeritus). Foster, Gardner. Just. 

Lessiev. Moo'e Norton. Poftenberger (Emeritus). Stevens. Tuthili. Wysong 

Associate Prolessors: Bockstaei. CJhern (Afliiiate), Hamilton (Emeritus). Hardie. 

Lawrence, Lopez. McConneli. Strand 

Assistant Prolessors: Favero (Affiliate), Ganguly (Adjunct), Levins, Pliipps 

Principal Specialists: Beiter, Crothers 

Instructor: Dagher 

The curriculum combines training in the business, economics and 
international aspects of agricultural production and mart^etmg and natural 
resource use with the biological and physical sciences Programs are 
available for students in several areas. Students desiring to enter agricultural 
marketing or business affiliated with agriculture may elect the agricultural 
business option, and those interested in foreign service may elect the 
international agriculture option Students primarily interested in the broad 
aspects of production and management in the agricultural sector may elect the 
agricultural economics option Those interested in framing in resource 
management and evaluation may e.lect the resource economics option 

In these programs, students are framed for employment m agricultural 
business firms, for positions in sales or management, for local, state, or federal 
agencies, for extension work; for research, and for farm operation or 
management 

Courses for the freshman and sophomore years are essentially the same 
for all students However, freshmen and sophomores are encouraged to fulfill 
the math and business requirements in their first two years fn the lumor year 
the student selects the option of his or her choice Courses in this department 
are designed to provide framing in the application of economic principles to 
the production, processing, distribution, and merchandising of agricultural 
products and the effective management of our natural and human resources. 
The curriculum includes courses in general agricultural economics, marketing, 
farm management, prices, resource economics, agricultural policy, and 
international agricultural economics. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements* 39 

Biological Sciences 3 

Chemistry 3 

AREC 250 — Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 3 

AREC 404 — Prices of Agricultural Products 3 

AREC 405»-Economics of Agricultural Production 3 

AREC 427— l\^arketing Agricultural Products 3 

AREC 484 — Introduction to Econometrics in Agriculture 3 

BMGT 220— Principles of Accounting 3 

CI^SC 103— Introduction to Computing 3 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics I 3 

ECON 203— Principles Of Economics II 3 

ECON 401— National Income Analysis 3 

ECON 403— Intermediate Price Theory 3 

(yiATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics I 3 

IWATH 1 1 1— Introduction to Mathematics II 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus 3 

Statistics" 3 

Technical Agriculture" 9 

■ 12 credits may also satisfy deoanmeniai reaui'emems 

" Specific courses must be selected m consuiiaiion with the student's advisor. 

AgrltMJSiness Option 

Each student must take the following or the equivalent: 

AREC 306— Farm Management 3 

AREC 407— Agricultural Finance 3 

AREC 414 — Agribusiness Management 3 

BMGT 340— Business Finance 3 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles 3 

BMGT 364 — Management and Organization Theory 3 

BMGT 380— Business Law 3 

Agricultural Economics Option 
Each student must take the following or the equivalent: 

AREC 306— Farm Management 3 

AREC 407— Agrrr-.ultural Finance 3 

ECON 425— Mathematical Economics 3 

Other courses in Agricultural Economics Option 6 

International Agriculture Option 

Each student must fake the following c the equivalent 

AREC 445— World Agricultural Development and the Quality of Life ... 3 

ECON 440 — International Economics 3 

Other courses m International Agriculture Option 12 

Language Requirements 6 

Resource Economics Option 
Each student must take the following or the equivalent 
AREC 453— Economic Analysis of Natural Resources 3 

ECON 425 — Mathematical Econonncs 3 

Other courses m Resource Economics Option 15 

Course Code Prefix— AREC 



Agricultural Chemistry 

This curriculum combmes the fundamentals of chemistry with flexibility 
through electives to prepare the student for graduate work in agricultural and 
life sciences programs, technical work in government and pnvate research and 
quality control laboratories, and production and sales work in specialized 
chemical industries and food production and processing industries 

Program revisions are under consideration Each student should see an 
advisor. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements* 30 

Major Requirements: 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I or CHEM 105 4 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II or CHEM 115 4 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I or CHEM 235 4 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II or CHEM 245 4 

CHEM 321— Quantitative Analysis 4 

Eight Credits Irom the Following Courses: 

AGRO 302— General Soils 4 

BOTN 221— Plant Pathology 4 

ENTM 204 — Genera' Entomology 4 

GEOL 100— Physical Geology 3 

GEOL 1 10— Physical Geology Laboratory 1 

Additional Requirements: 

MATH 140— Analysis I 4 

MATH 141— Analysis II 4 

PHYS 141— Principles of Physics 4 

PHYS 142— Principles of PhySiCS 4 

Electives in Biology 6 

Approved Agricultural Electives, chosen from the following any 4(X) 
level courses in CHEM or BCHM, FDSC 421 or 423. or 

ENTM 452* 12 

Electives** 28 

■ Ttiese courses stiould be selected aHer consultation wilti it>e Agricultural Oemistry 
Advisor The advisor may approve Other courses, in special cases, lo meet tf)e career 
objectives ol the student 

" Six lo ten ol the elective credits must be for upper-division courses lo meet the 
curriculum feguiremeni of 35 credits ol total upper-division work. 

Course Code Prefix— CHEM 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chairman: Stewart 

Prolessors: Feiton (Emeritus). Green (Emeritus). Harris. Krewalch (Emeritus). 

Whealon 

Associate Professors: Grant. Johnson. Merrick (Emeritus). Ross. Stewart 

Assistant Prolessors: Magette. Muiier 

Instructors: Carr, Gird, Hochheimer, Smith 

Visiting Prolessor: Yeck 

Adjunct Assistant Prolessor: Sager 

Affiliate Assistant Professor: Bnnsfield 

Principal Specialist: Brodie 

Agricultural engineering utilizes both the physical and biological sciences 
to help meet the needs of our increasing world population for food, natural 
fiber and improvement or maintenance of the environment Scientific and 
engineering principles are applied to the conservation and utilization of soil 
and water resources for food production and recreation, to the utilization ol 
energy to improve labor efficiency and to reduce latxjrious and menial tasks, 
to the design of structures and equipment for frousmg or handling of plants 
and animals to optimize growth potential, to the design of residences lo 
Improve the standard of living for the rural population, to the development ol 
methods and equipment to maintain or increase the quality of food and natural 
liber, to the flow of supplies and equipment to the agricultural and aquacuiturai 
production units, and to the flow of products from ttie production units and the 
processing plants to the consumer Agricultural engineers p'ace emphasis on 
maintaining a high quality environment as they work toward developing 
efficient and economical engineering solutions 

The undergraduate curriculum provides opportunity to prepare for many 
interesting and challenging careers in design, management, research, 
education, sales, consulting or international service The program of study 
includes a broad base of mathematical, physical and engineering sciences 
combined with basic biological sciences Twenty-two hours of eieciives give 
flexibility so that a student may plan a program according to his maior interest 

S&rnest9f 
Freshman Year I II 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I. II 4 4 

CHEM 103. 104'— General Chemistry I. Fundamentals ol 

Organic and Biochemistry 4 4 

BOTN 101 or ZOOL 101 4 

ENES 101— Intro Engineering Science 3 

ENES 110— Statics , 3 



College of Agriculture Departments, Programs and Curricula 59 



PHYS 161— General Physics I 

University Studies Program Requirements" 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

MATH241— Analysis 111 

MATH 246— Dilterentiai Equations (or Scientists & Engineers 

PHYS 262. 263— General Physics 

ENES 220— Mechanics ol Materials 

ENES 221— Dynamics 

ENME 21 7— Thermodynamics 

Free Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements" 

Total ... 

Junior Year 

ENME 300 (or ENCE 300)— Materials Science & Engineering 

ENME 342 (or ENCE 330)— Fluid Mechanics 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical Engineering 

ENCE 350— Structural Analysis 

ENAG 454— Biological Process Engineering 

Technical Eieclives*" 

University Studies Program Requirements" 

Total 

Senior Year 

ENAG 421— Power Systems 

ENAG 444— Functional Design of Machines and Equipment . 

ENAG 422— Soil and Water Engineering 

ENAG 424 — Functional and Environmental Design of 

Agricultural Structures 

Technical Eiectives"' 

Free Eiectives 

University Studies Program Requirements** 

Total 



Minimum Degree Credits— 103 + 27 U S P. 

• CHEM 1 1 3 may be substituted for CHEIul 1 04. 

" ApDroved and required University Sludies Program courses are listed in the Sctiedule ol 

Classes each semester Students should consult with departmental advisor to ensure 

selection ol courses to meet program requirements Agricultural engineering students are 

exempt from ENGL 391. 393 Students matriculating beiore May 1980 must meet General 

University Requirements and should consult depanmenial advisors lor proper course 

selection. 

••■ Technical eiectives. 16 credits, related to field ol conceniralion. must be selected from 

a departmentally approved list. Nine credits must be 300 level and above. 

Course Code Prefix— EI^AG 

Agriculture — General Curriculum 

The General Agriculture curriculum provides for the development of a 
broad understanding in agriculture. 

The flexibility of this curriculum permits selection of eiectives that will meet 
individual career plans in agriculture and agriculturally related business and 
industry 

Students will be encouraged to obtain summer positions which will give 
them technical laboratory or field experience in their chosen interest area. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

30 

4 

4 

4 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

BOTN 101— General Botany* 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology* 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

or CHEM 113— General Chemistry II 

MATH 110 level or higher" 

ENAG 100— Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 

ENAG 200— Introduction to Farm Mechanics 

AGRO 100— Crop Production Laboratory 

AGRO 302— General Soils 

ANSC 101 — Principles of Animal Science 

ANSC 203— Feeds and Feeding 

ANSC or AGRO — ** 

AREC 250— Elements of Agricultural and Resource Economics 

AREC — ** 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 

or ANSC 412— Introduction to Diseases of Animals 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 

HORT — " 

AEED 464 — Rural Life in Modern Society 

Community Development Related. Non-agricultural Life Science, 
Biometrics. Computer Science, or Accounting 



Student may select any coursefs) having required hours in the departrnbnt indicated. 



'7 Agronomy 



Proiessnr and Acting Chairman: Aycock 

Prolessors Bandel. Clark (Emeritus). Decker. Fanning. Hoyen (Emeritus). Kuhn 

(Emeritus), McKee. MiHer (Emeritus). Street (Emeritus) 

Associate Prolessors: Kenwonhy. Mcintosh, Muichi, Samrrwns, Turner. Vough, 

Weil. Weismiller 

^ss(S(ar7f Prolessors: Angle. Bruns. Caldwell. Dernoeden, Glenn, Hill, 

Rabenhorsi, Ritter, Thomison, Welterlen 

Adjunct Prolessor: Meismger 

Agronomy instruction combines the principles of basic sciences with an 
intimate knowledge of plants and soils This amalgamation of basic and 
applied sciences provides the basis for improved programs to conserve soil 
resources and improve environmental quality while providing programs for 
improved crop production to meet the ever increasing need for food 

The agronomy curricula are flexible and allow the student either to 
concentrate on basic science courses that are needed for graduate work or to 
select courses that prepare lor employment at the bachelor s degree level as a 
specialist with park and planning commissions, road commissions, extension 
service, soil conservation service, and other governmental agencies Many 
graduates with the bachelor's degree are also employed by private 
corporations such as golf courses and seed, fertilizer, chemical, and farm 
equipment companies. 

Agronomy students who follow the Journalism-Science Communication 
option are prepared to enter the field of science communication Opportunities 
in this area are challenging and diverse Students who are interested in public 
relations may lind employment with industry or governmental agencies Others 
may become writers and. in some cases, science editors for newspapers, 
publishing houses, radio, and television Technical and professional journals 
hire students trained in this field as editors and writers Also, this training is 
valuable to students who lind employment in University extension programs, as 
a large part of their work involves written communication with the public 

Students completing graduate programs are prepared for college teaching 
and research, or research and management positions with industry and 
governmental agencies. 

Additional information on opportunities in agronomy may be obtained by 
writing to the Department of Agronomy. 

Agronomy Curricula 

University Studies Program Requirements (39 semester hours) math and 
science requirements (9 hours) are satisfied by departmental requirements. 

Department Requirements 
(31 semester hours) 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

All Agronomy students must have a total of at least 40 hours of upper level 
(300 or 400) courses in the 120 hours approved for graduation. These 40 
hours may include upper level courses taken to satisfy part of the University 
Studies Program Requirement. 

2 

2 

4 

1 



AGRO 100— Crops Laboratory 

AGRO 102— Crop Production 

AGRO 302— General Soils 

AGRO 398— Senior Seminar 

BOTN 101— Genera! Botany 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry* 
MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 



MATH 115 — Pre-calculus (consult advisor) 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 

SPCH 100— Basic Pnnciples of Speech Communication 

or 

SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication 



Eiectives (18 credit hours 300 or above) 23-24 

* includes 1 1 required credits listed below. 



• Students intending to take additional chemistry should substitute CHEM 1 13. followed by 
CHEM 233 and CHEM 243. 

Crop Science Currlculuin 

University and departmental requirements 61 

AGRO —Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Adviser) 8 

AGRO —Advanced Soils Courses (Consult Adviser) 6 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 4 

One ol the lollowing: 3-4 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy (4) 

BOTN 414— Plant Genetics (3) 

BOTN 416— Pnnciples of Plant Anatomy (4) 
Eiectives . . . . 37-38 

Soli Science Curriculum 

University and departmental requirements 61 

AGRO —Advanced Soils Courses (Consult Adviser) ... . 3 

AGRO —Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Adviser) ... 6 



60 College of Agriculture Departments, Programs and Curricula 



AGRO 414 — Soil Classification and Geography 

AGRO 41 7— Soil Physics 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemistry 

GEOL 100— introduction to Physical Geology . 

WICB 200— General Microbiology 

Eiectives 



Turf and Urban Agronomy Curriculum 

University and Departnneniai Requirements 

AGRO 41 1— Soil Fertility Principles 

AGRO 405— Turl Management 

AGRO 453— Weed Control 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 

BOTN 425 — Diseases ol Ornamentals and Turf* 

ENTM 453— Insect Pests ot Ornamentals and Turf* 

HORT 160— Introduction to the Art of Landscaping* 

AGRO 415— Soil Survey and Land Use 

Eiectives (HORT 453, HORT 454, and RECR 495 suggested) 



BOTN 221, ENTM 204, and BOTN 212 serve as prerequisiles. 

Conservation of Soii, Water and Environment Curriculum 



61 



University and Departmental Requirements 
AGRO 4 17— Soil Physics or 

AGRO 421— Soil Chemistry 3 

AGRO 413— Soil and Water Conservation 3 

AGRO 41 1— Soil Fertility Principles 3 

AGRO 414 — Soil Classification and Geography 4 

AGRO 415— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

AGRO 423— Soil-Water Pollution 3 

AGRO —Advanced Crops Courses (Consult Adviser) 5-6 

Select one ot the lollowing courses: 3 

BOTN 21 1— Principles of Conservation (3) 

GEOG 445— Climatology (3) 

AREC 432— Introduction to Natural Resources Policy (3) 
Eiectives 31-32 

Journalism-Science Communication Option 

A student toHowmg this option in the crop science or soil science 
curriculum must elect loumalism and basic science and math courses in 
addition to the required curriculum courses. Many combinations will be 
acceptable. The adviser can aid in helping the student plan an appropriate 
program. 

Course Code Prefix— AGRO 

Animal Sciences 

Department of Animal Sciences 

Prolessor and Chairman: Westhoff 

Protessors: Arbuckle (Emeritus). Flyger. Foster (Emeritus). Green (Emeritus). 

Leflei (Emeritus). Mather. Vandersall, Vi|ay. Williams, Young 

Associate Professors: DeBarihe, Douglass, Erdman, Goodwin, Hartsock, 

Maieskie. Russek, Stnckiin 

Assistant Professors: Alston-Mills, Barao, Cassel, Franl<, Hudson, Leighton, 

Marshall, Peters, Vamer 

Principal Specialist: Morris (Emeritus) 

Associate Specialist: Curry 

Department of Poultry Science 

Professor and Chairman: Thomas 

Professors: Heath. Kuenzel. Shorb (Emerita). Soares 

Associate Professors: Doerr, Johnson, Otiinger. Ouigley (Emeritus), Wabec(< 

Assistant Professor: Mench 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Augustine 

The curriculum in animal sciences offers a broad background in general 
education, basic sciences, and agricultural sciences, and the opportunity for 
students to emphasize that phase of animal agriculture in which they are 
specilicaiiy interested Each student will be assigned to an advisor according 
to the program he or she plans to pursue 

Curriculum requirements in animal sciences can be completed through the 
Departments of Ammai Sciences or Poultry Science Programs of elective 
courses can be developed which provide maior emphasis on beet cattle. 
sheep, swine or horses, dairy or poultry Each student is expected to develop 
a program of eiectives in consultation with an advisor by the beginning ot the 
junior year. 

Objectives. The following specific objectives have been established lor the 
program in animal sciences 

1 To acquaint students with the role ol animal agriculture in our cultural 
heritage 

2 To prepare students for careers in the field of animal agriculture These 
include positions of management and technology associated with animal, 
dairy, or poultry production enterprises, positions with marketing and 
processing organizations, and positions in other allied fields, such as feed, 
agricultural chemicals and equipment firms. 



3. To prepare students tor entrance to veterinary schools 

4 To prepare students for graduate study and subsequent careers in 
leaching, research and extension, both public and private 

5 To provide essential courses for the support of other academic 
programs of the University 

Required of All Students 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

University Studies Program Requirements* 40 

ANSC 101— Principles of Animal Science 3 

FDSC 1 1 1— Contemporary Food Industry and Consumerism 3 

Af>JSC 201— Basic Principles ol Animal Genetics 3 

ANSC 21 1— Anatomy ol Domestic Animals 4 

ANSC 212— Applied Ammal Physiology 3 

ANSC 214 — Applied Animal Physiology Laboratory 1 

ANSC 401— Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

ANSC 412— Introduction to Diseases of Animals 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 104— Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

SPCH 107— Public Speaking 3 

Two of the Following 

ANSC 221— Fundamentals of Animal Production 3 

ANSC 242— Dairy Production 3 

ANSC 262— Commercial Poultry Management 3 

One ol the Following 

ENAG 100— Basic Agricultural Engineering Technology 3 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry 1"* 4 

MATH 1 1 1— Introduction to Mathematics II 3 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

**Electives 39-40 

* includes 1 1 required credits listed below. 

" eiectives must include at least twelve credits in upper-division courses In anltnal 

science, 

*" CHEIi< 113 or 115 is a prerequisite. 

Course Code Prefix— ANSC 

Food Science Program 

Professor and Coordinator: Wiley (Horticulture) 

Professors: Wheaton (Agricultural Engineering). Arbuckle Emeritus. Keeney 

(Chemistry), Vi|ay, Westhott (Animal Sciences), Bean (Botany). Quebedeaux, 

Twigg Emeritus. Soiomos (Horticulture). Heath (Poultry Science) 

Associate Professors: Stewart (Agricultural Engineering), Schlimme 

(Horticulture). Doerr (Poultry Science). Chai (UMCEES) 

Assistant Professors: J Marshall (Ammal Sciences), Choi (Food. Nutrition and 

Institution Management) 

/.ecfurers.- Bednarczyk. C Marshall, Park, Solomon, Weeks 

Visiting Prolessor: Malevski 

Food science is a relatively new branch ol science concerned with the 
application of the fundamental principles of the physical, biological and 
behavioral sciences and engineering to better understand the complex and 
heterogeneous materials recognized as food The contemporary food industry 
is highly dependent on this accumulating body of knowledge and especially on 
the people who are able to apply it — the food scientists or the food 
technologists, terms that are used interchangeably 

Courses include the general areas of production, distribution, preparation, 
evaluation and utilization of foods in order to provide a better and more 
plentiful food supply for mankind 

Specialization is offered in the areas of flavor and food chemistry, food 
microbiology, including industrial fermentation, food processing technology 
including freezing, thermal and aseptic processing, quality assurance and the 
commodity areas of red meats, milk and dai-v products, fruits and vegetables. 
poultry and poultry products and seafood products 

Opportunities for careers in food science are available in industry. 
universities and government Specific positions for food scientists mciuoe 
product development, production management, quality control and quality 
assurance, technical sales and service, ingredient management, food 
engineering, research and teaching. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
40 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

Division Requirements 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

MiCB 200— General Microbiology 

MATH 110 or 115— 

Curriculum Reouirements; 

ENGL 393-Technical Wntmg 

ENAG 414— Mechanics Ol Food Processing 

CHEM 104 or CHEM 233 

CHEM 1 13— General Chemistry II 

FDSC 1 1 1— Contemporary Food Industry and Consumensm 



College of Agriculture Departments, Programs and Curricula 61 



FDSC 39&— Seminar 1 

FDSC 412, 413— Principles Of Food Processing I. II 3. 3 

FDSC 421— Food Chemistry 3 

FDSC 422— Food Product Research and Development 3 

FDSC 423— Food Chem.stry Laboratory 2 

FDSC 430— Food Microbiology 2 

FDSC 431— Food Quality Control 4 

FDSC 434— Food Microbiology Laboratory 2 

FDSC 442. 451. 461. 471. 482— Horticulture. Dairy. Poultry. Meat and 

Seafood Products Processing (2 required) 3. 3 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 3 

BCHM 261— Elements of Biochemistry 3 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics 4 

Electives 28-29 

* includes 1 1 required credits listed below. 

Course Code Prefix— FDSC 

Horticulture 

Prolessor and Chairman: Quebedeaux 

Professors: Goum, Hegwood, Link (Emeritus). Oliver. Scott (Emeritus). Shanks 

(Emeritus), Solomos, Stark (Emeritus), Thompson (Emeritus), Twigg (Emeritus), 

Wiley 

AdjurKt Professor: Galleta 

Visitmg Professor: Faust 

Associate Professors: Beste. Bouwkamp. Gould. Kundl, McClurg, Ng, Pitt, 

Schales. Schhmme. Stimart. Swarlz. Walsh 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Kretchmer 

Assistant Professors: Healy, LaSota, Stutte, 

Lecturer: Mityga 

The horticulturist combines a knowledge of the basic sciences with an 
intimate knowledge of plants and their requirements in an effort to help meet 
the food needs of the world population and to help beautify man's 
surroundings The horticulturist specifically, is involved with fruit production 
(pomology), vegetable production (olericulture), greenhouse plant production 
(floriculture), production of ornamental trees and shrubs, post-harvest 
horticulture, and the aesthetic and functional planning and design of 
landscapes for public and private facilities (landscape design) Horticultural 
principles are essential to designing the landscape for improvement of the 
human environment Post-harvest horticulture is involved with the storage and 
transportation of horticultural products until they reach the consumer. 

The curriculum in horticulture prepares students for a future in commercial 
production of the horticultural crops, and for employment in the horticultural 
indust'ies such as fruit and vegetable processing, seed production and sales, 
agricultural chemical sales and service, florist shops and garden centers, and 
as horticulturists for parks, highway systems, botanic gardens and arborelums. 

Maprs may prepare for work with handicapped persons as horticultural 
therapists by electing appropriate courses in the social sciences and in 
recreation The horticultural education option is designed for those who wish to 
teach horticulture in the secondary schools It prepares the graduate with a 
basic knowledge of horticulture and includes the courses required for 
certification to teach in Maryland The landscape design option introduces the 
principles and practices of design and prepares the student for work in the 
area of residential and small-scale landscape design. 

Advanced studies in the Department, leading to the M S. and Ph D. 
degrees, are available to outstanding students having a strong horticultural 
motivation for research, university teaching and/or extension education. 

All students should meet with the option advisor before enrolling in courses 
for the option. 



Curriculum In Horticulture 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

Departmental Requirements — All Options; 

AGRO 302— General Soils 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

BOTN 221— Diseases of Plants 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104— Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemist^ . 

HORT 271— Plant Propagation 

HORT 39&— Seminar 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics ". . . . 

• includes all applicable required credits listed below. 
Complete the requirements in one of the following options: 

Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture Option: 



Servester 

Credit Hours 

39 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 

HORT 132— Garden Management 

HORT 160— Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 

HORT 231 — Greenhouse Management 

HORT 260— Basic Landscape Composition 



HORT 274— Genetics of Cultivated Plants 

HORT 451— Technology of Ornamentals 

HORT 453, 454— Woody Plant Materials 

HORT 432— Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop Production or 
HORT 456— Production and Maintenance of Woody Plants . . . 
Electives 

Horticultural Education Option: 

AGRO 405— Turf Management 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 

HORT 1 1 1— Tree Fruit Production 

HORT 132— Garden Management 

HORT 160— Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 

HORT 231— Greenhouse Management 

HORT 260— Basic Landscape Composition 

HORT 453— Woody Plant Materials 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

EDSF 301— Foundations of Education 

AEED 302— Introduction to Agricultural Education 

AEED 303 — Teaching Materials and Demonstrations 

AEED 305— Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 

AEED 31 1— Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 

AEED 313— Student Teaching 



3 

3 

3.3 

3 
31 

3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
6 
3 
2 
2 
1 
3 
5 

AEED 315— Student Teaching 1-4 

SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication 3 

Electives 4-7 

Pomology and Olericulture Option: 

ENTM 252— Agricultural Insect Pests 

HORT 111. 112— Tree Fruit Production 

HORT 212— Small Fruit Production 

HORT 222— Vegetable Production 

HORT 274— Genetics of Cultivated Plants 

HORT 41 1— Technology of Fruits 

HORT 422— Technology of Vegetables 

HORT 474— Physiology of Maturation and Storage of Horticultural 

Crops 

Electives 



Landscape Design Option: 

APDS 101— Fundamentals of Design 

EDIT 160— Design Illustrating I 

HORT 160— Introduction to the Art Of Landscaping . . 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 

HORT 260— Basic Landscape Composition 

HORT 361 — Principles in Landscape Design 

HORT 362— Advanced Landscape Design 

HORT 3&A — Landscape Construction 



4 
3.2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

2 

34 

3 
2 
3 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 

HORT 453, 454— Woody Plant Materials 3. 3 

Select one of the following: 

AGRO 415— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

AGRO 405— Turf Management 3 

BOTN 462 and 464— Plant Ecology and Plant Ecology Laboratory 2.2 

ENTM 453— Insect Pests of Ornamental Plants 3 

GEOG 340— Geomorphology 3 

Electives 26-27 

Course Code Prefix— HORT 

Natural Resources Management Program 

The responsible development and use of natural resources are essential to 
the full growth and stability of an economy. 

The curriculum in natural resources management is a preprofessional 
program designed to teach students balanced concepts of the efficient use 
and ;udicious management of natural resources. It identifies their roie in 
economic development while maintaining concern for society and the 
environment, through a comprehensive approach involving natural sciences, 
economics, and social sciences It prepares students for careers in technical, 
administrative, educational, and research work in such areas as water and 
land use, fish and wildlife management, and other areas of natural resources 
management Course options also include preparation for graduate study in 
any of several areas within the biological and social sciences 

Students will pursue a broad education program and then elect subjects 
concentrated in one of three management areas of interest Plant and Wildlife 
Resource Management, Land and Water Resource Management, or 
Environmental Education and Park Management. 



Basic Curriculum Requirements 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

CHEM 103. 113— General Chemistry I, General Chemistry II 

GEOL 100. 110— Introductory Physical Geology. Physical Geology 
Laboratory 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

40 



62 College of Agriculture Departments. Programs and Curricula 



OR 

GEOG 201 . 21 1— Geography o) Environmental Systems. Geograptiy of 

Environmental Systems Laboratory 4 

AGRO 302— General Soils 4 

AREC 240— Environment and Human Ecology 3 

MATH 140 or 220— Calculus I or Elementary Calculus I 3-4 

BIOM 301— Introduction to Biometrics 3 

ECON 201 or 205— Economics 3 

AREC 453— Economic Analysis o( Natural Reources 3 

BOTN 462/464— Plant Ecology and Plant Ecology Laboratory 4 

HORT 171— Elements of Forestry 3 

MICB 20O— General Microbiology 3 

PHYS 1 1 7— Introduction to Physics 4 

ZOOL 212— Ecology. Evolution and Behavior 4 

AEED 499G— Principles of Natural Resources Management 3 

AGRO 415— Soil Survey and Land Use 3 

AREC 432— Introduction to Natural Resource Policy 3 

BMGT 360 or 364— Personnel Management or Management and 

Organization Theory 3 

CMSC 103— Introduction to Computing for Non-majors 

OR 

EDCI 487— Introduction to Computers in Instructional Settings 3 

• This curriculum includes 12 ol trie required 40 University Studies Program credits 
(DislriCulive Sludies Areas "B" and "D"). 

Management Areas (23 hours) 

Plant and WiidMe Resource Management 

Science Area 

Management Area 

Related Coursework 



Land and Water Resource Management 

Science Area 

Management Area 

Related Coursevi/ork 



Environmental Education and Park Management 

Science Area 

Management and Education Area 

Related Coursework 



Of the total credits apDlied toward the degree (120). at least 40 hours must be in upper 
division (300-400) courses. 



Pre-Forestry 

The pre-lorestry curriculum offers a number of opportunities to the student 
interested in pursuing a continued education in forestry, conservation-related 
subjects, or other disciplines related to the biological/ natural life sciences The 
curriculum is strongly oriented in the sciences and is composed of foundation 
courses which transfer rather readily into related curricula at The University of 
Maryland and other universities There are approximately fifty other universities 
which offer accredited undergraduate degrees m forestry 

Pre-foresiry Students are advised m the Department of Horticulture The 
University of Maryland has an agreement with Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University (VPI/SU) and with West Virginia University (WVU) whereby 
Maryland residents accepted into forestry programs at VPI/SU or WVU will be 
eligible for m-state tuition at those universities The student must remain 
enrolled in a forestry program. The student may transfer any time from 
Maryland to VPI/SU or to WVU. 



Pre-Forestry Curriculum 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



ENGL 101. 393* 

BOTN 101 

CHEM 103. 104 

ECON 205 or AREC 250 .... 

HORT 171 

HORT 489K. 489L 

MATH 220. 221 

PHYS 121. 122 

Social Sciences & Humanities 

SPCH 100 

ZOOL 101 

PHED 

Total 



Other suggested courses include AGRO 302. BOTN 211. BOTN 221. CMSC 
103. ENTM 100. ENTM 204. GEOL 100. 120. STAT 100. 

• This course can be laKen by preloreslry students in Iheir last semester ol the program, 
although they may not be luniors 



Combined Degree Curriculum — College of 
Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine 

Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture who have completed at least 
90 hours, including all University. Division and College requirements, may 
qualify for the B S degree from The University of Maryland. College ol 
Agriculture, upon successful completion in an accredited College of Veterinary 
Medicine ol at least 30 semester hours It is strongly recommended that the 
90 hours include credits in animal science- 



Combined Degree Requirements 



University Studies Program Requirements* 

ANSC 221— Fundamentals of Animal Production 

ANSC 21 1— Anatomy of Domestic Animals 

ANSC 212— Applied Animal Physiology 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

Mathematics (must include at least 3 credits of Calculus) 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 

Eiectives 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

40 

3 

4 

4 



• includes 1 1 required credits listed below. 

Additional information atxiut this program may be obtained from the College ol 
Veterinary Medicine, 

Institute of Applied Agriculture— Two- Year Program 

The Institute of Applied Agriculture, a two-year college-level program 
offered as an alternative to the four-year program, prepares students tor 
specific occupations in technical agriculture 

The Institute offers three mapr programs with twelve specific curriculum 
options 

I, Business Farming 

A Farm Production and Management 
B Agricultural Business Management 

II. Ornamental Horticulture 

A General Ornamental Horticulture 
B Nursery Management 
C Garden Center Management 
D Greenhouse Management 
E Florist Shop Management 
F Landscape Management 
G Interior Piantscapmg Management 
III Turfgrass Management 
A Golf Course Management 
B Lawn Care Management 
C Lawn Care Technician (a one-year option) 

The business farming program develops skills needed lor larm operation or 
for employment in agricultural service and supply business such as teed, 
seed, fertilizer and machinery companies and farmers' cooperatives. 

Options in ornamental horticulture prepare students for employment in or 
management of greenhouses, nurseries, garden centers, florist shops, 
landscape maintenance companies or interior piantscapmg companies 

The turtgrass management program concentrates on the technical and 
management skills needed to work as a golf course superintendent, to work in 
commercial or residential lawn care companies or in other turlgrass-onented 
industries such as parks and cemeteries 

To enhance a student's occupational experience, the Institute requires 
participation in a Supervised Work Experience program, usually completed 
before taking second-year courses 

A graduate of the Institute is awarded a Certificate in Agriculture specifying 
the students area ol specialization Graduation requires the successful 
completion of 60 credit hours of a recognized program option, completion ol 
Supervised Work Experience, and a 2 00 cumulative grade pomt average 

Though designed as a two-year terminal program, the Institute does r)ol 
restrict continuing education In general all Institute courses are transferrable 
to the UMCP and UMES campuses The extent to which the courses can be 
applied to a baccalaureate degree will depend on ttie irxlividuai department in 
which a student is planning to maior 



Courses Basic to All Programs 



COMM 1-1 — Oral Communication* . . 

COMM 1-2— Written Communication* . . . 
AGMA 1-1- Agricultural Mathematics* . . 
BOTN 1-1— Introduction to Plant Science* 
HORT 1-5— Diseases ol Ornamentals . . . 

AGRO 1-1— Soils and Fertilizers* 

AGRO 1-6— Weed Control 



other Agricultural and Life Sciences Departments. Programs and Curricula 63 

SMtpTsnodeTe^^'d'^S .:::::::::: I Other Agricultural and Life Sciences 

S!:2irerrM'L^c'^^^^^^^^^ 'l Departments, Programs and 

AGEN I-3A— Land Measurement and Surveying 1 CurrlCUla 

AGEN I-3B— Drainage Praclices 1 

A^N \f-:il:xro%':i:^i^,^r,- ::::::::::::::;:::::::; 1 Biological sciences program 

Arcr J'^^'^^'"^^^ )?'*'' ■ 3 This p'ogram is designed (or the student who is interested in a broader 

Tncr- Q n ^'"^^^ Operations ... 3 education m the biological sciences than is available in the programs lor 

Arcr IT^ p"^ i^omputeis in Agriculture 1 maprs in the various departments ol the Division o) Agricultural and Lite 

APPr MP A '^°T^ Management 3 Sciences It is appropriate tor the entering student who wishes to explore the 

^^ \ \'k_^' » \ Heiaiiing 3 various areas ol biology before specializing in the program ottered by a single 

A^n^ ■ 13— Agricultural *"'narice . . 3 department, or for the student desiring to concentrate on a broad area ol 

AGEC l-14-Supervised Work Experience" 1 biology such as genetics or marine biology 

• Required tor all managemem opiions Advising ot Students in the General Biological Sciences Program is 

coordinated in a central advising otiice established by the D»vision ot 

Courses for Farm Production and Agribusiness Management Majors Agricultural and Lite Sciences There are three parts to this maior (1) basic 

ANSC 1-1— Introduction to Animal Science 3 introductory courses in biology. (2) supporting courses in math, chemistry, and 

ANSC 1-2— Feeds and Feeding 3 physics, and (3) the advanced program In the advanced program, students 

ANSC 1-3— Animal Health 3 select one ol several areas to emptiasize, including marine biology, genetics. 

ANSC 1-4— Dairy Production 3 ecology, physiology, zoology, botany, microbiology, chemistry, ammal 

ANSC l-5-Genetic Improvement of Livestock ".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.".'" 3 sciences, and entomology Alternatively, the student may elect to remain broad 

ANSC 1-8— Livestock Management 1-3 °' '^^ entire program, in which case the student is said to be a generahst. 

ANSC 1-10 Seminar 1 Individual programs to meet specific career goals may be developed between 

ENTM 1-1— Insect Control '. 3 "^^ student and the Coordinator Advisor In each case, advising will be earned 

AGRO 1-7 Gram and Forage Production 1 3 out m the department in which most of the work Is to be taken For careful 

AGRO 1-10— Gram and Forage Production II 3 planning and advising, students are urged to determine their emphasis early 

AGEC l-5-Financial Records and Analysis .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'".'.'".'" 3 ^"'^ "° '3"^' "^3" '^^ beginning of the |unior year Changes in emphasis 

AGEC 1-7— Agricultural Marketing 3 normally cannot be made during the senior year without delaying graduation 

AGEC 1-11 Farm Management 3 ^^® General Biological Sciences Honors Program is a special program for 

exceptionally talented and promising students It emphasizes the scholarly 

Courses for Ornamental Horticulture and Turfgrass Majors approach to independent study information about this tionors program may be 

uriDT I o \/u«^^H n . I 1 o obtained from the Coordinating Advisor, 

HORT I tw 1 p '-'^"^'^f "'^'^ ' ^ Preparation for graduate study in a specialized area of biology is readily 

una\ I fZi rt °P^9a °" ^ accomplished under this program by the ludicious selection of lumor-senior 

MORT rZw " ^^Tf '^" , ^ level courses in the proposed area of graduate concentration. Students in the 

unHT '^^p!^'*®'^ Management . . 3 program who are attempting to meet the reguirements of a preprofessional 

mHT aZa h^" 1^^ Management 2 program should also seek advice from advisors ot those respective programs. 

Lj^n-r ■?— ™'^"cul'ure 3 Students in the program who wish to prepare for secondary school science 

MORT '^^F^ m^^ Contracting Management 3 ,eaching should contact the staff of the Science Teaching Center of the 

Lj^o-r ]x~n, '^ i;®®'^^ V^ ■ ■; ^ College ot Education for information concerning requirements for certification. 

HORT 1-12— Floral Crop Production 2 

HORT 1-13— Floral Design II 2 Basic Introductory Courses In Biology. A grade of C or better is required in 

HORT 1-14— Landscape Maintenance 3 these courses 

HORT 1-15 — Intenor Plant Culture 2 1. One course in general biological principles, including laboratory, which 

HORT 1-17— Floral Design III 2 may be satisfied by either ot the following courses. BOTN 101. General 

HORT 1-18— Woody Ornamentals II 2 Botany (4); or ZOOL 101. General Zoology (4). 

HORT 1-19— Interior Ornamentals 2 2. Two courses in the diversity of living organisms: BOTN 202. the Plant 

HORT 1-20— Interior Piantscape Design 2 . Kingdom (4). and ZOOL 210 Animal Diversity (4) 

HORT 1-21— Interior Piantscape Contracting 2 3. One course on microorganisms MICB 200. General Microbiology (4). 

HORT 1-22 — Seminar 1 4. One course in basic genetics which may be satisfied by one of the 

HORT 1-23 — Landscape Construction 3 following 

EtvlTM 1-2— Pests of Ornamental Plants 3 a ANSC 201 . Basic Principles of Animal Genetics (3). 

AGRO 1-2— Turf Management I, II 2, 2 b BOTN 414. Plant Genetics (3) 

AGRO 1-3— Lawn Care Management 3 c HORT 274. Genetics of Cultivated Plants (3). 

AGRO 1-4— Golf Course Management I 3 d ZOOL 213, Genetics and Development (4). 

AGRO 1-5— Golf Course Management II 3 e MICB 380. Bacterial Genetics (4). 

For additional information, write Director, Institute of Applied Agriculture, Required Supporting Courses. An average of C or better is required in these 

The University of Maryland. College Park. MD 20742. courses 

1, Chemistry (16 credits) A minimum of four semesters of chemistry is 

... • ■ ■■ I _i 11 • I AN II required CHEM 103. 113. 233, 243 

VirQinla~lvlaryland HeglOnal college 2 Mathematics (O-e credits) two semesters of calculus are required MATH 

of Veterinary Medicine Maryland 3- Physics is credits) two semesters of physics are required: PHYS 121. 

/^omnilQ 122. or PHYS 141. 142 

\^a\ i ipuo It is not necessary that all of the basic and supporting courses listed above 

Professor and Acting Associate Dean: Mohanty t« completed before registering for advanced courses However, the above 

Professor: Marquardt courses are prerequisite to many ot the advanced courses and should be 

Assocrare Professors: Dutta, Mallinson. Manspeaker completed early in the program. 

Assistant Professors: Inglmg. Penney. Robl. Snyder Advanced Program. In addition to the required courses listed above, students 

The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine is a College must compieie an approved curriculum that includes one course in statistics 

operated by Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and The (BlOM 301, BlOM 401, STAT 250. STAT 400. STAT 464. or PSYC 200) and 19 

University of Maryland Each year 50 Virginia and 30 Maryland students credits of biological sciences selected from the courses listed below or 

comprise the entering class of a four-year program leading to a Doctor of courses which have been specifically approved by the General Biological 

Veterinary Medicine (DVM) Sciences Program Committee A minimum ot ten of these credits must be 

The first two and one-half years of instruction are given at Virginia laKen m the area of emphasis At least two courses must involve laboratory or 

Polytechnic Institute and Stale University in Blacksburg. Virginia The final one deio work at the 300-400 level. At least 15 of the 19 credits of biological 

and one-half years ol instruction are given at several locations, including The sciences must be completed in courses numbered 300 or above Two 

University of Maryland College Park panicipatmg departments must be represented by at least one course in the 

A student desiring admission to the College must complete the 15 credits of 300-400 level work No 386387 credits (experiential learning) 

pre-veterinary requirements and apply for admission to the professional vvill be accepted Courses currently approved for the advanced program 

curriculum. Admission to this program is competitive and open to all Maryland Include: 
residents. 



64 Other Agricultural and Life Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 



AGRI411. 

AGRO 105, 403. 422. 423 

ANSC 211. 212, 252, 350, 401, 406, 411, 412, 413. 416, 425, 446. 452, 466. 

BIOL 398. 399 

All BOTN courses except BOTN 100, 101, 200, 202, 211, 414. 

BCHM 261, 461. 462, 463, 464, 

All ENTM courses excepf ENTM 100, 111. 252. 

GEOL 102, 331. 431, 432. 434, 452. 

HORT 171 and 271. 

All Mice courses except MICB 100, 200, 322. 

NUSC 402. 403. 450. 

NUTR 300. 430. 450, 

PSYC 400. 402, 403. 410. 412, 479 

All ZOOL courses excepfZOOL 101. 146. 181. 207. 210, 213, 301. 346, 381. 

ZOOL 328 requires prior approval ol Coordinating Advisor. 

Research experience in the various areas of biology, biochemistry, and 
psychology are possible under this plan by special arrangement with faculty 
research advisors and prior approval of Coordinating Advisor, Not more than 
three hours of special problems or research can be taken as part of the 
advanced program requirement. All advanced program curricula are sub)ect 
to the approval of the General Biological Sciences Program Committee. 



Botany * 



Professor and Chairman: Patterson 

Professors: Bean. Corbelt. Kantzes, Krusberg, Lockard, Reveal, Sister 

Associate Professors: Barnett, Bottino, Cooke, Karlander, Molta, Racusen, 

Stemer, Sze, Teramura 

Assistant Professors: Collmer, Forseth, Grybauskas, Hutcheson, Millay, Van 

Vaikenburg, Woiniak 

Lecturer: Berg 

Instructors: Higgins, Koines 

Because there is such a diverse range of career possibilities for students 
who maior in botany, or plant biology, this maior is designed to give students a 
broad background in supporting areas of biological sciences, chemistry, math 
and physics as well In addition to the txJtany courses required of all maprs 
(such as plant ecology, plant physiology, and plant genetics), this program 
allows students to take a number of botany or related electives to develop the 
student's area of interest within botany. 

The Department offers instruction in the fields of physiology, pathology, 
ecology, taxonomy, anatomy-morphology, genetics, mycology, marine botany. 
Hematology, virology, phycology and general botany. 

All students^ regardless of their areas of interest, must complete the 
Department of Botany requirements listed below. All required courses, 
including botany-related electives and supporting courses, must be passed 
with at least a grade of C, Botany-related electives may include no more than 
one lower-division course and must be approved by the advisor. In some 
areas of botany, an introductory course in geology or soils is highly 
recommended. 

The Botany Department also offers a special program for exceptionally 
talented and promising students through the Honors Program which 
emphasizes the scholarly approach to independent study Information 
concerning this program may be obtained from the Botany Honors Program 
Advisor. 



Department of Botany Requirements 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



BOTN 101— General Botany 

BOTN 202— Plant Kingdom 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 

BOTN221— Diseases of Plants 

BOTN 398— Seminar 

BOTN 414— Plant Genetics 

BOTN 416— Principles of Plant Anatomy 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 

BOTN 462— Plant Ecology 

BOTN 464— Plant Ecology Laboratory . 
Botany Electives or related electives . . 



1 
3 
4 
4 
2 
2 
8-10 



Total 40-42 

Required Supportive Courses: 

CHEM 103. 1 13— General Chemistry I. II (4, 4) 8 

CHEM 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I and II (4, 4) 8 

MATH 140, 141— Calculus I. II (4, 4) or 

MATH 220, 221— Elementary Calculus (3, 3) 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

PHVS 121, 122— Fundamentals of Physics I and II or 

RHYS 141. 142— Pnnciplesof Physics 

A laboratory or field course in zoology or entomology 



8-8 

4 



Total Supporting Course 38-40 

• Requirements ol this major are under review ana may be changed priof to the 1986-87 
academic year 

Course Code Prefix— BOTN 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 



Professor and Chiairman: Mazzocchi 
Associate Chairman: Walters 

Professors: Adier, Alexander, Ammon. Bailey. Bellama. Castellan. Freeman. 
Gerll. Gordon. Greer. Grim. Hansen, Heiz, Henery-Logan, Holmiund. Huheey, 
Jaquith. Jarvis. Keeney (Emeritus), Khanna. Kozanch, Mariano, Mazzocchi, 
McNesby (Emeritus). Miller. Moore. Munn, O'Haver, Ponnamperuma, Pratt 
(Emeritus), Roiimson (Emeritus), Stewart, C Stuntz (Emeritus), Svirbely 
(Emeritus), Tossell. Vandersiice (Emeritus). Veitch (Ementus), Waiters, Weiner 
/Associate Professors.- Armstrong. Boyd. DeShong. Devoe. Dunaway-Manano. 
Heikkinen, Kasier. Mignerey. Murphy, Ondov. Sampugna 
Assistant Professors: Brusilow. Herndon, Thirumaiai 
Research Professor: Baiiey 

The maior in chemistry requires 39 credits in chemistry, of which 16 are 
lower-division and 23 are upper-division. Six credits of the 23 upper-division 
requirements must be selected from approved chemistry courses The 
program is designed to provide the maximum amount of flexibility to students 
seeking preparation for either the traditional branches ol chemistry or the 
interdisciplinary fields In order to meet requirements for a degree to be 
certified by the American Chemical Society, students must complete two 
additional laboratory courses selected from CHEM 433, 443. 425. and BCHM 
463. 

A sample program, listing only the required or recommended courses, is 
given below It is expected that each semesters electives will include courses 
intended to satisfy the general requirements of the University or of the Division 
of Agricultural and Lite Sciences, plus others of the students choice 

Each required chemistry course must be passed with a minimum grade of 
C. Required supporting courses must be passed with a C average. 



First Year 

"CHEM 103 

"MATH 140* 

Electives 

"CHEM 113 

MATH 141' 

Approved Biological Science Elective 
Electives 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

I II 

4 

4 

7 

4 
4 
4 
3 



Total 15 

■ students initially placed in MATH 115 will delay MATH 140 and 141 one semester. 
Second Year 

CHEM 233 4 

PHYS 141 4 

Electives 7 

CHEM 243 

PHYS 142 

Total 15 

Third Year 

CHEM 321 4 

CHEM 481 3 

CHEM 483 2 

Electives 6 

CHEM 482 

CHEM 484 

Electives 



15 



Total 

Fourth Year 

CHEM 401 

Other 400-level CHEM 

Electives 

Electives 



Total 15 15 

" May satisfy a Divisional and/or a Universitv Studies Program HeQuiremenl All other 
Otvisional and University Studies Program Requirements will replace electives. 

The Department's Honors Program begins in the junior year Interested 
students should contact the Director ol Undergraduate Studies tor further 
information 

The Department also offers a major in biochemistry In addition to the 16 
credits ol lower-divis'on chemistry, the program requires CHEM 321 arxJ 
BCHM 461. 462. and 464. CHEM 481. 482 and 483. MATH 140 and 141. PHYS 
141 and 142. and nine credits of approved biological science that must 
include at least one upper-division course A sample program, hsimg only the 
required courses, is given below It is expected that each semester s eiectives 
will include courses intended to satisfy the general requirements of the 
University or of the Division ol Agncuiturai and Life Sciences, plus others of tlie 
student s choice. 



Each required chemistry and biochemisify course must be passed with a 
minimum grade ol C Required supporting courses must be passed with a C 
average. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
First Year / // 

"CHEM 103or 105 4 

"MATH 140* 4 

Electives 7 

"CHEM 113 4 

MATH 141 4 

Approved Biological Science Elective 4 

Electives 3 



Total 15 15 

■ Students initially placed in MATH 1 15 will delay l\^ATH 140 and 141 one semester. 
" May satisly a Divisional and'or a University Studies Program Requirement. All oltier 
Divisional and University Studies Program Requirements will replace electives. 
Second Year 

CHEM 233 or 235 4 

PHYS 141 4 

Electives 7 

CHEM 243 or 245 4 

PHYS 142 4 

Approved Biological Science Elective 1-4 

Electives 6 

Total 15 15-18 

Third Year 

CHEM 321 4 

CHEM 481 ■ 3 

CHEM 483 2 

Electives 6 

CHEM 482 3 

BCHM461 3 

Electives 9 



Other Ag ricultural and Life Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 65 

BICM 401— Agricultural Biometrics .3 

STAT 464— Introduction to Biostatistics 3 

ZOOL 213— Genetics and Development or BOTN 414— Plant Genetics 4 (3) 

200L 212— Ecology. Evolution and Behavior 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology" 4 

2 of the loHowing 6 courses 

BCHM 461— Biochemistry I 3 

BOTN 212— Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 221— Diseases ol Plants 4 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 4 

Z00L411— Cell Biology 4 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology . 4 

ENTM 205 — An Introduction to Entomology 4 

ENTM 432— Insect Physiology 4 

ENTM 398 — General Colloquium in Entomology 1 

ENTM 399— Special Problems 2 

ENTM 423 — Insect Morphology and Classification . . 4 

ENTM 451— Insect Pests ol Agricultural Crops " . . 4 

Electives "' 22-27 



Total 
Fourth Year 

BCHM 462 

Approved Upper Level Biological Science 

Electives 

BCHM 464 

Electives 

Total 



15 



15 



Course Code Prefix— BCHM, CHEM 

Agricultural Chemistry 

A program in Agricultural Chemistry is offered within the College of 
Agriculture See page 58 for details. 

Entomology 

Professor and Chairman: Steinhauer 

Professors: Barbosa, Bickley (Emeritus), Bottrell, Davidson. Denno. Harrison, 

Jones (Emeritus), Menzer, Messersmith, Wood 

Associate Professors: Armstrong, Bissell (Emeritus). Dively, Hellman. Linduska, 

Ma. Nelson. Reichelderfer 

Assistant Professors: Lamp. Mitter. Raupp. Scott 

This curriculum prepares students for various types of entomological 
positions or for graduate work in any of the specialized areas of entomology. 
Professional entomologists are engaged in fundamental and applied research 
in university, government, and private laboratories, regulatory and control 
activities with federal and state agencies, commercial pest control and pest 
management services, sales and development programs with chemical 
companies and other commercial organizations, consulting, extension work; 
and teaching 

Students should work closely with their advisors in choosing electives The 
curriculum is designed to allow majors intending to go to graduate school to 
broaden their preparation Those intending to begin a career after the 
baccalaureate would be advised to concentrate on a more defined curriculum. 



Department of Entomology Requirements 



University Studies Program Requirements 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology or* 

ZOOL 210— Animal Diversity 

BOTN 101— General Botany * 

CHEM 103, 1 13— General Chemistry I, II , 
CHEM 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I, II . 
2 ol the following 4 courses 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I* . . 

MATH 221— Elementary Calculus II . . 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
40 



120 

* May satisfy Divisional Requirements and/or a University Studies Requirement. 

•■ In addition to ENTM 451. students pursuing an applied program are encouraged to take 

ENTM 351 as an elective 

"■ Students who intend to pursue a career in applied entomology should elect the 

following courses BOTN 212, BOTN 221, AGRI 401, ZOOL 422, BOTN 441, AGRO 453 

(Weed Control), AGRO 423 (Soil and Water Pollution). These 7 courses are prerequisite to 

the M.S. program in pest management. 

Course Code Prefix— ENTM 

Geology 

Professor and Chairman: Chang 

Professor: Adler 

Associate Professors: Ridky, Segovia, Siegrist, Stifel. Weidner. Wylie 

Assistant Professors: Candela. McLellan. Nielsen 

Geology is the basic science of the earth. In its broadest sense, geology 
concerns itself with planetary formation and modification with emphasis on the 
study of the planet Earth This study directs its attention to the earth's internal 
and external structure, materials, chemical and physical processes and its 
physical and biological history Geology concerns itself with the application of 
geological principles and with application of physics, chemistry, biology and 
mathematics to the understanding of our planet 

Geological studies thus encompass understanding the development of life 
from the fossil record, the mechanics of crustal movement and earthquake 
production, the evolution of the oceans and their interaction with land, the 
origin and emplacement of mineral and fuel resources and the determination of 
man's impact on the geological environment 

Geological scientists find employment in government, industrial and 
academic establishments. In general, graduate training is expected for 
advancement to the most rewarding positions Most industrial positions require 
an M S degree Geology is enioying a strong employment outlook at the 
present because of our mineral, fuel and environmental concerns At this time, 
students with the BS. particularly those with training in geophysics, can find 
satisfactory employment However, graduate school is strongly recommended 
for those students desiring a professional career in the geosciences. 

The Geology Program includes a broad range of undergraduate courses to 
accommodate both geology majors and students interested in selected 
aspects of the science of the Earth Opportunities exist for undergraduate 
research projects, on a personal level, between students and faculty members. 

The geology curriculum is designed to meet the requirements of industry, 
graduate school and government However, students may select, at their 
option, geology electives that are designed for a particular interest, rather than 
for the broad needs of a professional career All required geology courses 
must be completed with a grade of C or better An average of C is required in 
the supporting courses. Courses required for the B S in geology are listed 
below. 



University Studies Program Requirements* 
Departmental Requirements 

GEOL 100 (3) 

GEOL 102 (3) 

GEOL 110(1) 

GEOL 112(1) 

GEOL 321 (3) 

GEOL 322 (4) 

GEOL 331 (4) 

GEOL 341 (4) 

GEOL 393 (3) 

GEOL 394 (3) 

GEOL 490 (6) 

Three of the following six courses: 
GEOL 340 (4) 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
30 
44-46 



66 Other Agricultural and Life Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 

GEOL 342 (4) 
GEOL 423 (3) 
GEOL 443 (3) 
GEOL 445 (3) 
GEOL 446 (3) 

Supporting Requirements 27-28 

CHEM 103. 113(4.4) 
MATH 140. 141 (4, 4) 
PHYS 141. 142(4, 4) 
Biological Science (3 or 4)" 

Electives 16-19 

■ Of the normal USP reQuirements (40 credit tiours). at least ten credits are met by tfie 
maior requirements in mainemalics, chemistry or geology (basic mathematical sKill and 
Distributive Studies Area B). 



•■ BIOL 101. 124. BOTN 100 or MICB 100 may not be used to meet this requirement. 
Students should consult with their advisor (or approved biological science courses. 



Course Code Prefix— GEOL 

Microbiology 

Professor and Chairman: Joseph 

Prijtessors: Coiweil. Cook. Doetsch (Emeritus), Faber (Emeritus), Helrick, 

PelC-'df (Emeritus) 

Associate Prolessors: MacQuillan, Voll, Weiner 

Assistant Professor: Stem 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Stern 

Associate Research Scientists: Grimes. Hamilton 

Instructor: Powell 

The Department of Microbiology has as its primary aim providing the 
student with thorough and rigorous training in microbiology This entails 
krx)wledge ol the basic concepts o1 bacterial cytology, physiology, taxonomy, 
metabolism, ecology, and genetics, as well as an understanding of the biology 
of infectious disease, immunology, general virology, and various applications of 
microbiological principles to public health and industnal processes In addition, 
' the department pursues a broad and vigorous program of basic research, and 
encourages original thought and investigation in the above-mentioned areas. 

The department also provides desirable courses for students maionng in 
allied departments who wish to obtain vital, supplementary information Every 
effort has been made to present the subiect matter of microbiology as a basic 
core of material that is pertinent to all biological sciences. 

The curriculum outlined below, which leads to a bachelor's degree, 
includes the basic courses m microbiology and allied fields. 

A student planning a maior in microbiology should consult a departmental 
advisor as soon as possible after deciding upon this action The supporting 
courses should be chosen only from the biological and physical sciences 

No microbiology course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy 
maior requirements. In addition, for graduation, students must achieve an 
overall C average in the mapr courses plus required supporting courses. 

Information concerning the Honors Program may be obtained in the 
departmental office. 

The maior m the department consists of a minimum of twenty-four semester 
hours These must include MICB 200— General Microbiology (4). and MiCB 
440 — Pathogenic Microbiology (4) In addition, at least sixteen additional hours 
must be selected from the following MICB 310 — Applied Microbiology (4). 
MICB 30a-Microbiological Literature (1), MICB 330— Microbial Ecology (2). 
MICB 360— Medical Virology (3). MICB 379— Honors Research (3). MiCB 
380— Microbial Genetics (4). MICB 388— Special Topics" (1-4). MICB 
399— Microbiological Problems" (3). MICB 400— Systematic Microbiology (2), 
MICB 410— History of Microbiology (1), MICB 420— Epidemiology and Public 
Health (2), MiCB 430— Marine Microbiology (2), MiCB 431— Marine 
Microbiology Laboratory (2). MICB 450— Immunology (4). MiCB 460— General 
Virology (3). MICB 470-Microbial Physiology (3). MICB 490— Microbial 
Fermentations (2). MICB 491— Microbial Fermentations Laboratory (2) 

MICB 100. Basic Microbiology (3) is a University Studies course and may 
not be used to fulfill the twenty-four semester ctedils required for a major in 
microbiology. 

* MICB 388— A maximum of 4 semester hours may be applied toward the maior 

requirements 

•• Either MICB 399 or MICB 388. but not both, to meet the mapr requirements. 

Required as courses supporting the maior are CHEM 103 (4), 113 (4). 233 
(4). 243 (4)— General Chemistry I and M. Organic Chemistry I and II (with 
laboratories). BCHM 461. 462. (3. 3)— Biochemistry. MATH 110. Ill (3. 
3)— Introduction to Mathematics I. II. or MATH 115 (3) and one course m 
statistics (3-4). of Physics (4. 4). ZOOL 101— General Zoology (4) or BOTN 
101 — General Botany (4). and four additional semester hours m a biological 
science (with laboratory) (MATH 220. 221— Introductory Calculus (3. 3) or 
equivalent is strongly recommended but not requited ) 



Course Code Prefix— MiCB 



Zoology 

Professor and Chairman: Corliss 

Professors: Allan, Brinkley, Cartet-Porges. Clark. Gill. Highlon. Levitan, Pierce, 

Vermeil 

Associate Professors: Bamen. Bonar, Colombini. Goods. Higgins, Imberski, 

Inouye. Linde'. Reaka, Small. Smith-Gill 

Assistant Professors: Aoes Borgia, Coyne, OIek, Shapiro 

Instructors: Edds. Piper. Spalding 

Adjunct Professors: Kleiman. Manning, Morton, O'Brien. Potter 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Kelly, Wemmer 

Visiting Lecturer: Kapp 

Associate Research Scientist: Zipser 

Oescrlption of Program. The Department of Zoology offers a program leading 

to a B S with a maior in zoology This program is designed to give each 
student an appreciation of the diversity of problems studied by zoologists, an 
opportunity to explore in depth nnore restricted areas of zoology, and an 
appreciation of the nature of observation or experimentation appropriate to 
investigations within these fields The requirements of 30 hours in zoology 
(including one core course in each of four broad areas) and the required 
supporting courses in chemistry, mathematics and physics permit students to 
develop their interest in the general field ol zoology or to concentrate in an 
area of specialization. 

Currfculum for Zoology Majors. All majors are required to complete a 

minimum of 30 credit hours m zoology with a grade of C in their maior and an 
average grade ol C m the supporting courses Four required core courses 
provide the prerequisite background information for |unior-senior level courses 
in the mapr. It is not necessary to complete all four core courses before 
registering for jumor-senior level courses, but it is strongly recommended that 
all lour be completed by the end ol the )unlor year. These required core 
courses are: 

ZOOL 210— Animal Diversity (4) 

ZOOL 211— Cell Biology & Physiology (4). prerequisite one semester ol 

general chemistry (CHEM 103) 

ZOOL 212— Ecology. Evolution and Behavior (4) 

ZOOL 313— Genetics (4). prerequisite one semester ol organic chemistry 

Fourteen hours ol junior-senior level courses, including two courses with 
laboratory, must be taken to complete the maior Students may specialize at 
this level by registering for those courses particularly appropnate to their 
academic obiecuves ZOOL 101. 181. 201. 202. 301. 328Z. 330. 346. 361. 
and 381 do not satisfy mapr requirements. ZOOL 308H. 309H. 318H and up 
to 3 credits of ZOOL 319. Special Problems in Zoology, may be used lo luiliil 
the required 14 hours at the junior-senior level but not the laboratory 
requirements 

Required Supporting Courses 

I.ChEM 103, 113— General Chemistry I, 11 (4. 4) 
OR CHEM 105. 115— Principles ol General Chemistry I. II (4, 4) 

2. CHEM 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I. II (4. 4) 

OR CHEM 235. 245— Principles ol Organic Chemistry I. II (4. 4) 

3. Mathematics through one year ol calculus, i e . completion ol MATH 220. 
221 Elementary Calculus (3.3) or MATH 140. 141. Analysis I. II (4.4) 

4 Physics 121. 122. Fundamentals ol Physics (4. 4) or Physics 141. 142. 

Principles ol Physics (4.4) 
5. One of the following courses: 

BCHM 461— Biochemistry I (3) 

BlOM 301— Introduction to Biometrics (3) 

BIOM 401— Biostatistics (4) 

MATH 240— Linear Algebra (4) 

MATH 400— Vectors and Matrices (3) 

PSYC 200— Statistical Methods m Psychology (3) 

STAT 250— Introduction to Statistical Models (3) 

STAT 400— Applied Probability and Statistics I (3) 

STAT 464— Introduction to Biostatistics (3) 

Note: Requirements lor the zoology mapr may change prior to the 1986-67 

academic year. 

Advisement. Sample programs for zoology majors interested in different fields 
may be obtained from the zoology office. 2227 Zooiogy-PsycfXDiogy Buiiomg 
All maprs are required to consult with their assigned Zoology Department 
Advisor at least once every semester Students desinng to enter graduate 
study in certain areas ol zoology stx)uld take biochemistry physical cnemistry. 
advanced statistics, advanced mathematics, and/or philosophy ol science as a 
pan ol their undergraduate eiectives Courses ol interest to zoology maprs are 
also ollered in the Departments ol Animal Sciences. Anthropology Botany. 
Electrical Engineering. Entomology. Geography. Geology. MicrobioHsgy. and 
Psychology 

Honors. The Department ol Zoology also offers a special program lor the 
exceptionally talented and promising student The Honors Program 
emphasizes the scholarly approach to independent study lnlormati(X> 
regarding this program may be obtained Irom the departmental oHice oi Uom 
the chairman ol the Zoology Honors Program. 

Course Code Prefix- ZOOL 



Division of Arts and Humanities 67 



The Agricuitural Experiment Station 

The Wafyiand Agricultural Experiment Station is currently conducting nnoro 
than i?uo researcti pioiecis These are conaucled by faculty who supervise 
and direct research assistants, graduate and undergraduate students and 
technicians The research may be conducted in laboratories at UMCP or UMES 
or at one of the nine field locations throughout Maryland operated by the 
Exp)enment Station or even In fields, herds or flocks of cooperating farmers 

The overall obiective of the Experiment Station is to enhance all aspects of 
Maryland agriculture for the benefit of farmers, farm-related business and 
consumers through optimal utilization, conservation and protection of soil and 
water resources Genetic principles are studied and applied in the 
improvement of luil and ornamentals, vegetable crops, field crops, poultry. 
dairy and other animals Similarly, pathological principles are of concern in 
Improvement of methods of identification, prevention and/or control of plant 
and animal diseases Biochemistry plays an important role in evaluating the 
nutntionai quality of crops produced, the efficiency of feed conversion by 
poultry and animals or the quality of plant and animal products for human 
consumption Research in progress is concerned with improvement of 
processing systems to enhance food quality on one hand and the impact of 
nutntionai deficiencies and means of remedying these on the other. Also 
directly in the consumer area is the study of clothing quality 

Improved production techniques including waste utilization or disposal 
require studies involving soii-moisture-piant relationships and plant, bird, or 
animal-environment relationships and also studies of the applications of 
engineering for producing or maintaining the optimal environment for biological 
systems 

Studies of biological and mechanical methods and improved chemical 
control of insects in the field, forests, food processing chain and the home are 
continuous. 

The socio-economics of changing agricultural systems are a major 
research area and increasing attention is being oriented towards rural 
development, Including resource utilization for non-farm residents and 
recreation. 

The Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station was established in 1888 to 
comply with the Hatch Act of 1887 authorizing the establishment of an 
agncuiturai experiment station at the Land Grant Colleges Actually, the charter 
of the Maryland Agricultural College in 1856 specifially authorized 
establishment of a demonstration farm The Station is supported by federal 
funds under the Hatch Act as amended. State appropriations, grants and 
contracts with State and federal agencies and by gifts or other support from 
individual and farm-related businesses and industry. 



Cooperative Extension Service 

As pan of the total university, the Cooperative Extension Service takes The 
University of Maryland to the people of Maryland, wherever they are In its role 
as the "off-campus, non-credit, out-of-classroom" arm of the University, it 
extends the classroom to all parts of the Slate With its uniquely effective 
educational delivery system, the Cooperative Extension Service helps people 
to help themselves, to define their problems, to evaluate reasonable 
alternatives, and to generate action to solve their problems 

The Cooperative Extension Service was authorized by Congress in 1914 
under the Smith-Lever Act and is funded by a three-way partnership Support 
comes from the federal government for both 1862 and 1890 Land Grant 
institutions, and from the Slate and all 23 counties and Baltimore City in 
Maryland 

General administrative offices of the Maryland Cooperative Extension 
Service are located at The University of Maryland College Park (UMCP) and 
the administration of the 1890 Program (an integral part of the total MCES 
effort) IS from offices at The University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES) 

Otf-campus faculty, located in each county and in Baltimore City, are the 
■front lines" that deliver University resources in ways people can use them 
effectively These field faculty rely on campus based Cooperative Extension 
specialists at both UMCP and UMES to provide up-to-date, meaningful 
information and for aid in planning and conducting relevant educational 
programs Many of the Cooperative Extension Service faculty at the State level 
carry )oint appointments with teaching and research, especially in the UMCP 
Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences. 

The Maryland Cooperative Extension Service is known for its programs in 
agnculture and natural resources (including care of urban home grounds and 
gardens), home economics, 4-H and youth, community and resource 
development and energy, and marine science Working through organized 
groups such as homemakers' clubs, farmers' groups and cooperatives, 
agnbusiness firms, watermen's organizations, civic and social organizations, 
governmental agency personnel and elected officials, the Cooperative 
Extension Service multiplies its effects It maintains a close working relationship 
with the Maryland Department of Agriculture and other Slate agencies and 
organizations More than 22.0(XI volunteers in Maryland give generously of 
their time and energy 

Time-tested, informal educational methods used are farm and home visits, 
phone and office conferences, and structured events such as meetings, 
institutes, workshops and framing conferences Carefully planned teaching 
events include tours, field days, and demonstrations. Indirect communications 



utilize circular letters, radio and television programs, newspaper articles and 
columns, articles in specialized publications, and exhibits to reach a statewide 
audience 

The Cooperative Extension Sen/ice is committed to making its programs 
available to all people without regard to race, color, creed, sex. mantai status, 
personal appearance, age, national origin, political affiliation, or handicap 

In each county and in Baltimore City competent extension agents conduct 
educational work in program areas consistent with the needs of the citizenry 
and as funds permit The county staff is supported by a faculty of specialists m 
the Division of Agricultural and Life Sciences at UMCP and the agncuiturai 
programs at UMES Through these efforts, local people are assisted in finding 
solutions to their problems 

The Cooperative Extension Service works in close harnrrony and association 
with many groups and organizations In addition to work on farms and with 
agri-businesses, extension programs are aimed at many small and part-time 
farmers, rural non-farm and urban family consumers as well as watermen and 
marine-related businessmen Both rural and urban families learn good food 
habits through the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program 
Thousands of boys and girls gain leadership knowledge and experience and 
are provided practical educational instruction in 4-H clubs and other youth 
groups 

To accomplish its mission, the Cooperative Extension Service works closely 
with teaching and research faculty of the University and with units of the 
University outside of agriculture, as well as state and federal agencies and 
private groups Short courses, workshops and conferences in various fields of 
interest are conducted at UMCP and other locations throughout the stale A 
wide variety of publications and radio and television programs also are used to 
reach the people of Maryland. 



Division of Arts and Humanities 

Provost: Brecht (acting) 

The Division of Arts and Humanities offers courses and programs for both 
maprs and non-majors Students interested in the traditional fields of the liberal 
arts will find many offerings in the Departments of An, Music, Communication 
Arts and Theatre. English and the foreign languages. History, and Philosophy. 
Here they will study the artifacts and documents of the past and the present, 
reflecting both western and non-weslern civilizations. 

The Division also offers instruction in the creative and performing 
areas— studio art, music, dance, theatre, creative wnting. and film — as wel>as 
professional training in architecture and modern communications (tournalism, 
radio-teievision-film). 

Arts and Humanities encourages its students to take several approaches to 
the study of human cultural behavior Maiors are available in American. East 
Asian. Jewish, linguistics, and Russian studies Faculty representing various 
disciplines will advise students on such area studies as Latin America Or a 
student, with faculty help, may devise coherent programs in. for example, 
women's studies, popular culture, the history and philosophy of science, and 
the classical, medieval, or renaissance world All of these programs, and many 
others that a student's imagination and interest may suggest, are strengthened 
by courses from other divisions. 

Many of the maior programs in Arts and Humanities make excellent pre-iaw 
preparation In fact, with a ludicious choice of electives in this and other 
divisions, students with any maior in Arts and Humanities may prepare 
themselves for careers or advanced training in business, government law. 
teaching, publishing, library work, and museum work, among others Internship 
opportunities throughout the Division should enhance this process- 

Most careers in which the graduates of Arts and Humanities will eventually 
find themselves require and reward the abilities fostered by a liberal education: 
the ability to write clear, carefully organized, readable English, to speak 
forcefully and persuasively, and to think logically and critically The programs 
in the Division of Arts and Humanities, therefore, are concerned with 
developing the qualities of verbal facility and adaptability needed for career 
success 

The chief administrative officer of the Division of Arts and Humanities is the 
Provost Staff in the Provost s office serve as ombudsmen for students The 
Provost's office IS responsible for certifying that students have met all degree 
requirements The staff evaluates transfer credits and coordinates the advising 
of newly admitted students It maintains a liaison with the various faculty 
advisors and academic programs withm the Division, The office of the Provost 
is the place where students can go when they are lost or have any question 
about academic policies or procedures The staff can adjust courses or 
schedules, providing it is ethically justifiable The Provost's office can interpret 
existing regulations and. where it again feels ethically justified, can make 
certain exceptions Students majonng in architecture and journalism will work 
directly with the staffs of the School of Architecture and the College of 
Journalism During registration, students are usually seen on a first-come, 
first-served basis On other occasions, if the problem is an emergency or is 
truly important, the Provost, deans, and advisors will stay as long as 
necessary 

Each entering student in this Division will be assigned a faculty advisor 
who will help select courses and programs relevant to the student's academic 
objectives As soon as a student selects a major field of study, a faculty 
advisor representing that area will be assigned. 



68 Division of Arts and Humanities 



The Division is comprised of the following academic units. 

School of Architecture 

College of Journalism 

American Studies Department 

Art Department 

Center for Mediterranean Archeology 

Center for Philosophy and Public Policy 

Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies 

Classics Department 

Communication Arts and Theatre Department 

Comparative Literature Program 

Dance Department 

English Language and Literature Department 

French and Italian Languages and Literatures Department 

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures Department 

Hebrew and East Asian Languages and Literatures Department 

History Department 

Jewish Studies Program 

Linguistics Program 

Maryland English Institute 

Music Department 

Philosophy Department 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures Department 

Women's Studies Program 

All of these units, with the exception of the Women's Studies Program and 
the various centers, offer mapr programs which lead to a degree. Each has 
assigned faculty to serve as academic advisors. 

Entrance Requirements. The student who intends to pursue a program of 
study in the Division of Arts and Humanities includes the following subiecis in 
high school English, four units; college preparatory mathematics (algebra, 
plane geometry), three or four units, biological and physical sciences, two or 
three units, foreign language, four units, history and social sciences, two or 
more units Students wishing to maior in one of the creative or performing arts 
are encouraged to seek training in the skills associated with such an area prior 
to matriculation Students applying for entrance to these programs may be 
required to audition, present slides or submit a portfolio as a part of the 
admission requirements Entrance requirements for the School of Architecture 
and the College of Journalism are given below. 

Degrees. Students who satisfactorily complete division requirements are 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Arts Those who complete satisfactorily a 
special preprofessional program in the Department of Music are awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Music The School of Architecture and the College of 
Journalism award the Bachelor of Science degree 

General Requirements for All Degrees 

A A minimum of 120 semester hours with at least a C average 

B General University Requirements or University Studies Program 
Requirements 

C Division, College, or School degree requirements 

D Mapr requirements 

The following divisional requirements apply only to students earning Bachelor 
of Arts degrees from the Division of Arts and Humanities For information 
concerning other degree programs withm the Division (B S, in the School of 
Architecture. B S in the College of Journalism, and B Mus. in the Department 
of Music), the student should consult advisors in those units. 

Division Requirements 

Note 

Should there be any question as to whether a course meets a specified 
divisional requirement, it shall be resolved by the divisional office in 
consultation with the department offering the course. 

Distribution 

A minimum of 45 semester hours of the total of 120 must be upper-level 
(i e . courses numbered 300-499) work. 

Foreign Language 

Demonstration of proficiency equivalent to the level achieved by 
completion of the first 12 semester hours study ol a foreign language 

(a) This requirement may be met by students who have successfully 
completed level lour in high school in one foreign language or level two in 
each of two foreign languages 

(b) Students who. by virtue of residence abroad or independent study or any 
other means, have attained the standard ordmaniy reached on completion 
of the first 12 semester hours of foreign language study at The University of 
Maryland, shall be deemed to have satisfied this requirement on 
achievement ot a sufficiently high score in an examination acceptable to 



the foreign language department or program concerned 

Speech 

Successful completion ol one of the following courses in speech 
communication SPCH 100. 107, 125. 220, or 230 

Students who have successfully completed a lull unit of speech In high 
school shall be deemed to have satisfied the speech requirement 

Major Requirements 

Completion of a program of study consisting of a ma|Or and supporting 
courses as specified by one of the academic units of the division No program 
of study shall require in excess of 60 semester hours 

Students should consult the unit in which they will major for specific details 

Each student chooses a field of concentration (maior) He may make this 
choice as early as he wishes, however, once he has earned 56 hours o( 
acceptable credit, he must choose a maior before his next registration 

In programs leading to the baccalaureate degree, the student must also 
have a secondary lieid of concentration (supporting courses) The courses 
constituting the maior and the supporting courses must conform to the 
requirements of the department in which the student maprs. 

The student must have an average of not less than C in the introductory 
courses in the field in which he intends to maior, 

A major shall consist, in addition to the lower division departmental 
prerequisites, of 24-40 hours, at least twelve of which must be in courses 
numbered 300 or 400 and at least twelve of which must be taken at The 
University of Maryland 

Each mapr program includes a group of "supporting courses." formerly 
called minors, that are designed to contribute a better understanding of the 
mapr The nature and number ol these courses are under the control of the 
mapr department. 

The average grade of the work taken for the major must be at least C. 
some departments will count toward satisfaction of the mapr requirement no 
course completed with a grade ol less than C The average grade of the work 
taken in the major and supporting courses combined must be at least C A 
general average of C in courses taken at The University ot Maryland is 
required for graduation. 

Courses taken to fullill General University Ftequirements may not be used 
toward divisional, mapr, or supporting course requirements However, courses 
taken to fulfill University Studies Program Requirements may be used toward 
the divisional, mapr. and supporting course requirement. 

Advisors. Freshmen students will be assigned advisors to assist them In the 
selection of courses and the choice of a mapr After selecting a mapr. 
sophomore students and above will be advised by faculty members in the 
mapr department. 

Students in the School of Architecture and College of Journalism should 
consult their deans. 

Certification of High School Teachers. II courses are properly chosen in the 

field of education, a prospective high school teacher can prepare lor high 
school positions, with a mapr and supporting courses in certain of the 
departments of this division A student who wishes to work for a teacher's 
certificate must consult the College of Education in the second semester of the 
sophomore year and apply lor admission to the "Teacher Education" program 

Honors. Departmental Honors Programs are offered in the Departments of 
English. French, German, History, Music, Philosophy, Spanish, and 
Communication Arts and Theatre Departmental Honors Programs are 
administered by an Honors Committee withm each department Admission to a 
Departmental Honors Program ordmaniy occurs at the beginning of the first or 
second semester of the student's pnior year As a oiie, only students with a 
cumulative grade pomi average of at least 3 are admitted A comprehensive 
examination over the field of the mapr program is given to a candidate near 
the end ol the senior year On the basis ol the student's performance on the 
Honors Comprehensive Examination and m meeting such other requirements 
as may be set by the Departmental Honors Committee, the faculty may vote to 
recommend the candidate for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
honors or for the appropriate announcement m the commencement program 
and by citation on the student s academic record and diploma 

Students in the Departmental Honors Programs enpy some academic 
privileges similar to those of graduate students. 

Kappa Tau Alpha. The Maryland chapter of Kappa Tau Alpha was chartered 
in 1961 Founded in 1910, this national honor society has 39 chapters at 
universities offering graduate or undergraduate preparation for careers m 
professional journalism It IS dedicated to recognition and promoinxi of 
scholarship in pumaiism Among its activities is an annua) award lor an 
outstanding piece of published research in journalism and mass 
communications (Also see College ol Journalism ) 

Phi Beta Kappa. Consult the description of Phi Beta Kappa in Pan 1 ot this 
catalog, unaer Oilice ol Academic Affairs, Special Opportunities 



School of Architecture 69 



School of Architecture 

Professor and Dean S'eiti;in 

Lecturer and Associate Dean: Sachs 

Assistant to the Dean: Lapanne 

Professors: Hill, Loss. Lu. Schlesinger 

Associate Professors: Bechhoeler, Bennett, DuPuy, Etiin, Fogle. Johns. Lewis, 

Schumacher. Vann 

Assistant Professors: Berke. Mcinlurff. Wiedemann 

Lecturers: Dynerman, Kennelt. l\/tcNi1ichaei, IVIcWhorter 

Location. The School of Architecture of The University of Maryland is located 
between Washington. D C . and the city of Baltimore, in the midst of a large 
number of historic communities and a varied physical environment. The 
resulting opportunity for environmental design study is unique. 

Degree Programs. The School offers a graduate program leading to the 
degree. Waster of Architecture, and four-year undergraduate programs leading 
to Bachelor of Science degrees in two major fields of study: architecture and 
urban studies The undergraduate maior in architecture is designed to 
minimize the time required to complete the curriculum leading to the 
professional degree. Master of Architecture The urban studies program is 
designed for students admitted to the School who desire strong academic 
preparation in architecture and urban studies subiects at the undergraduate 
level, but who do not plan to pursue a career in architecture. 

Pre-Archltecture. Through a selective admissions process, students are 
generally aamitled to the baccalaureate programs in architecture in the lunior 
year, or after completing 56 college credits. Occasionally, outstanding students 
may be admitted directly from high school. 

Prior to admission to the baccalaureate programs as juniors, students at 
The University of Maryland College Park (UMCP) may enroll in a two-year 
pre-architecture program coordinated in the Office of the Provost of the 
Division of Arts and Humanities Pre-architecture is open to any UMCP student 
and provides a program of study for the first two years which includes the 
basic requirements of the University Studies Program plus other 
pre-architecture requirements (EI^GL 101. MATH 220, PHVS 121, PHYS 122, 
ARCH 170, ARCH 222. ARCH 242) Students completing the pre-archilecture 
program may apply to the School by following the admissions procedures 
described below. 

Objectives of the Curriculum. The School's basic mission is to provide 
general education and professional training and to develop the skills required 
by the graduate architect. Its curriculum in architecture is organized around 
courses in architectural and urban design, architectural history and theory, and 
architectural science and technology. Although its program is demanding, 
many eiectives— both in architecture and related fields and in the sciences and 
humanities — are also available Courses in design studio involve the student in 
a series of design case studies, often drawn from actual situations in the 
surrounding environment Both science/technology and design courses utilize 
field trips, "hands-on" experience, and the expertise of visiting critics and 
lecturers as well as regular faculty. 

Career Opportunities. The B S, degrees in architecture and urban studies will 
qualify the graduate to pursue a career in any of a number of fields, such as 
construction, real estate development, public administration or historic 
preservation, or to continue in graduate work in professional fields such as 
architecture, urban planning or law. 

The graduate of the Master's degree program in architecture will be 
qualified to enter the profession of architecture in private practice, as an 
employee of a public agency at the local, state or federal level, or to enter any 
one of a number of other career paths. 

Although the changing patterns of world and national problems can be 
expected to have maior impacts on the practice of architecture and urban 
planning in the coming decades, it is clear that well-prepared environmental 
designers and architects will continue to be in demand as the physical 
environment in which we live and work is adapted to suit new circumstances. 
Architecture as a field of activity will continue to provide personal challenges of 
the highest order, the opportunity for varied work and for public service, and 
the chance to see others benefiting from and enjoying the products of one's 
efforts. 

The School's professional program is accredited by the National 
Architectural Accreditation Board. Inc., enabling graduates to qualify for 
licensure in all fifty stales, and by reciprocal agreement, in several foreign 
countries. 

Faculty. The faculty of the School staff the four main curriculum areas' design; 
science-technology, history-theory and urban plannmg-urban design All faculty 
members are active in professional practice and/or research in their respective 
areas of interest For example, all design faculty members maintain active 
interests in professional practice, ranging from small residential work to large 
scale urban proiects. Several members of the faculty have been retained as 
design consultants to local communities. Many faculty design projects have 
been recognized through local, national and international awards programs 
and publications History faculty are active in classical field archeology in the 
Middle East and North Africa, in research in American and modern architecture 
and in medieval architectural scholarship. Science-technology faculty are 



active in research in solar energy and hazard mitigation, research grants have 
been awarded by national agencies. 

Facilities. The School is housed in a modern, air-conditioned building 
providing work stations for each student, a large auditorium, and seminar and 
classroom facilities A well-equipped woodworking and model shop, darkroom 
facilities, a lab equipped with testing machines and various instruments used 
in studying the ambient environment, and computer terminal facilities are also 
provided The Architecture Library, one of the finest in the nation, contains 
some 24,000 volumes and 150 current periodicals A special collection room of 
12,000 books includes 5,000 volumes on world expositions A visual resources 
facility includes a reserve slide collection of 180,000 si«3es on architecture, 
landscape architecture, urban planning, architectural science and technology 
as well as audio-visual equipment for classroom and studio use. 

Special Resources and Opportunities. The School is a member of The 

Architectural Research Centers Consortium. Inc. a group of over twenty five 
schools and centers whose obiective is to increase the quality and quantity of 
architectural research Current research is in process through fundmg by 
agencies such as the National Science Foundation, providing research 
opportunities for faculty and students. 

The School provides learning experiences through CADRE Corporation, a 
non-profit Center for Architectural Design and Research housed in the School, 
which provides an organizational framework for faculty and students to 
undertake contract research and design proiects appropriate to the School's 
fundamental education mission, CADRE Corporation proiects include building 
and urban design, urban studies, building technology, historic preservation. 
architectural archaeology, studies in energy conservation, or other work for 
which the School's resources and interests are uniquely suited. 

The School supports The University of Maryland Caesarea Project, an 
on-going archaeological excavation at Caesarea Mantima in Israel. Qualified 
students may participate here as they have m the past at Carthage (Tunisia) 
and Humayma (Jordan) as well as on the underwater excavations at Herod's 
Harbor in Caesarea, 

A summer workshop for historic preservation is sponsored by the School 
each year in Cape May. N,J,. a designated national historic landmark district 
Students may earn credit doing hands-on restoration work with the city's 
unique collection of Victorian structures and by attending lectures presented 
by visiting architects, preservationists and scholars. 

Financial Assistance. For promising prospective applicants who might not 
otherwise be able to attend the University's School of Architecture, a number of 
grants and scholarships are available, some earmarked specifically for 
architecture students. New students and those already enrolled must apply 
before February 15 All requests for information concerning these awards 
should be made to Director, Student Financial Aid, The University of Maryland, 
College Park, MD 20742. 

Admissions. Admission to the School of Architecture is selective. Students 
are normally admitted to the undergraduate maprs in architecture and in urban 
studies after completing 56 credits of general and prerequisite work Early 
admission is possible directly from high school for outstanding students who 
meet one of the following standards (1)3 5 GPA in high school and combined 
SAT score of 1200. (2) National Merit Scholarship finalist or (3) recipient of 
Maryland Distinguished. Banneker. Chancellor's Scholarship or equivalent 
award. Such students need not submit the portfolio described below. 

Program prerequisites are English composition, one semeter of calculus, 
two semesters of physics, and one semester each of the history of 
architecture, a general survey of architecture, and drawing. The required 
architecture courses may be taken alter admission as a transfer student, but 
that may extend the time required for the degree. 

The School of Architecture normally accepts transfer credits from regionally 
accredited four-year institutions. Transfer credits for technical and professional 
courses, however, are normally accepted only from institutions which are also 
accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). 

Application Procedures. Exceptionally well-qualified students applying for 

early admission from high school should write the Director of Undergraduate 
Admissions. The University of Maryland. College Park, MD 20742 The deadline 
for such application is February 1 Earlier applications are encouraged. 

Transfer students who have completed work at other colleges and 
universities should write the Director of Undergraduate Admissions. The 
University of Maryland. College Park. MD 20742 Students applying for 
admissions from pre-architecture or from other academic units of The 
University of Maryland College Park should contact the Director of Admissions, 
School of Architecture, The University of Maryland. College Park. MD 20742. 
Deadline for application for transfer student admission is February 1. A 3.0 
GPA is normally recommended for admission to the School of Architecture. 
Detailed information is available from the School of Architecture. 

In addition to the required high school and college transcripts, letters of 
recommendation, and other information, a portfolio of creative work must be 
submitted by all transfer and pre-architecture student applicants. The required 
portfolio of student work may include copies of drawings, photographs, and 
other evidence of creative work, submitted in 8V' x 11" format, for example, 
in a standard three-nng notebook. The portfolio should be submitted to the 
Director of Admissions. School of Architecture (Please see the more detailed 
information in "Notice to Applicants for Admission to Architecture," available 



70 College of Journalism 

from the School ot Architecture ) The portfolio will be returned only if 
requested, in which case a self-addressed, stamped mailing envelope should 
be included with the portloiio for this purpose. 

Curriculum Description and Requirements: Pre-Archltecture. In the first two 
years of college, pre-atchiiecture students should toiiow the following 
curnculum: 

First Semester 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I 3 

ARCH 1 70— Introduction to the Built Environment 3 

USP (2 courses) 6 

Total 15 

Second Semester 

fvl ATM 221— Elementary Calculus II (recommended) 3 

USP (at least 3 courses) 10 

Total 13 

Third Semester 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

ARCH 222- History of Western Architecture 3 

ARCH 242— Drawing I 2 

USP (2 courses) 6 

Total 15 

Fourtt) Semester 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

USP (3 courses) 9 

Total 13 

Total Credits: 56 

Curriculum Description and Requirements: Bachelor of Science, Major In 

Architecture. To quality lor admission to the baccalaureate degree program 
in architecture, students are required to complete 56 credits In the final two 
years, students are expected to complete the following requirements for a total 
ot 121 credits: 

First Semester' 

ARCH 302— Architecture Studio I 6 

ARCH 375— Construction and l\/1aterials 3 

ARCH 4xx— Arch History/Area A" 3 

USP 3 

Total 15 

Second Semester 

ARCH 303— Architecture Studio II 6 

ARCH 460— Site Analysis 3 

ARCH 343— Drawing II 2 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 3 

USP 3 

Total 17 

Ttiird Semester 

ARCH 402— Architecture Studio III 6 

ARCH 445— Visual Analysis of Architecture 3 

ARCH 312— Architectural Structures I 3 

ARCH 31 3 — Thermal and Acoustical Technology 3 

Total 15 

Fourtt) Semester 

ARCH 403— Architecture Studio IV 6 

ARCH 454— Theory of Urban Form 3 

ARCH 412— Architectural Structures II 3 

ARCH 415— Illumination. Electrical and Systems Technology 3 

ARCH 4xx— Arch. Hislory/Area B" 3 

Total 18 

Total Credits: 121 

• Courses are to be taken m sequence as indicated by Roman numerals in course lilies 

•• Archiieclure hisIOfy courses Area A. ARCH 422. 423. 432 and 436. Area B. ARCH 433. 
434 and 420. 

Curriculum Description and Requirements: Bachelor of Scief>ce, Ma|or in 
Architecture Urijan Studies. In addition to programs leaomg to the 
professional degree m architecture, the School offers a Bachelor of Science 
degree with an urban planning focus, combining requirements of the School of 
Architecture and the Institute for Urban Studies To enter this baccalaureate 
program, students must follow special application procedures for selective 
admission Students are required to complete 56 credits in the fmai two 
years, students are expected to complete the following requirements, providing 



a total of 120 credits. 

First Semester 

ARCH 302— Architecture Studio I 6 

Basic Field 6 

Urban Studies 3 

Total 15 

Second Semester 

ARCH 303— Architecture Studio II 6 

ARCH 460— Site Analysis 3 

Urban Studies 3 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 3 

USP or Elective 3 

Total 18 

Third Semester 

ARCH 454— Theories of Urban Form 3 

ARCH 450— Introduction to Urban Planning 3 

ARCH 375— Construction and Malenals I 3 

Urban Studies 6 

Total 15 

Fourth Semester 

ARCH 453— Urban Problems Seminar 3 

Urban Studies 6 

Bas'C Field 3 

USP or Elective 3 

Total 15 

rofa/Cred/te.-i20 

USP— University Studies Program Requirement (may also be used to satisfy maior 

requirement) 

IWTE: Urban studies requirements and basic field reauirements rpust be approved lor each 
candidate by trie insiiiule lor Urban Studies. All otner requirements are approved by the 
School ot Architecture. 

Course Code f>relix— ARCH 



College of Journalism 



Professor and Dean: Ciegtxjrn 

Associate Dean: Kelly 

Director ot Undergraduate Studies: Theus 

Prolessors: Biumler. Cieghom. Crowell (Emeritus). Gurevitch. J GrunIg, 

Hiebert, Hoiman. Martm 

Associate Professors: Barkin, Beasley. Franklin, Geraci. Levy. Sahin. Zand 

Assistant Professors: L Grunig. Stepp 

Lecturers: Greenfield. Kelly. Smith 

Instructors: Kay. Paterson, Theus 

The College of Journalism aa The University of Maryland stands at the 
doorstep ot the nations capital and the worlds news center It is an ideal 
location for the stuoy ot lOumaiism. public relations, and mass communications 
because many ot the worlds impoiant lOumaiists. great news'events. and 
significant communications activities are near at hand 

The College is wilhm easy reach of four of the nation's top 20 newspapers. 
including the Baltimore Sun. the Baltimore Ne*/s-AmerKan, the Washington 
Post, ana the production offices of the Wall Street Journal The Conege aiso 
has easy access to the Washington press co'os — the la'ge bureaus of ttie 
Associated Press. United Press international. New York Times. Los Artgeies 
Times, and many other American and foreign newspapers, mapr networks and 
broadcasting news bureaus such as NBC. CBS. and ABC. many news. 
business, and special-interest magazines, and representatives ot the book 
publishing industry 

The College is close to the sources of news, including the White Noose, 
executive departments and agencies. Supreme Coun. arx3 Congress II is near 
many maior non-govemmentai representative bodies such as associations. 
scientific and professional organizations, foreign representatives, arxl 
international agencies 

The College has six pnmary obiectives (1) to provide profess'or^l 
development, including framing m skills and techniques necessary for effective 
communication. (2) to insure a iitierai education tor lOurnaiists arx3 mass 
communicators. (3) to increase public understanding of (ournaiism and rnass 
communication. (4) to advance knowledge through research and publication. 

(5) to raise the quality of loumaiism through critical examination and study and 

(6) to provide a continuing relationship with professional journalists and their 
societies 

The College is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in 
Journalism and Mass Communications Tr>e Ccmege is a nf>emC)ei of the 
Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and the 
Association for Education m Journalism and Mass Communication 

Student [ournaiism otganization chapters include the Society d 
Professional Journalists (Sigma Delta Chi), Kappa Tau Alpha, the Public 



College of Journalism 71 

employment Students can arrange their programs to enable themselves to 
lullill the fequitements in more than one sequence 

News Editorial Sequence 

Credit Hours 

JOUR 001— Professional Orientation 1 

JOUR 201— Writing (of the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 202— Editing (or the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 320— News Reporting 3 

JOUR 400— Law ol Mass Communication 3 

Any JOUR course numbered between 410 and 480 3 

And completion ot one ol the (oilowing specializations: 

A Wetvs Specialization 

Either JOUR 373— Graphics or JOUR 350— Photoiournalism 3 

Either JOUR 321— Advanced Reporting Public Atfairs or JOUR 

322— Advanced Reporting Beats and Investigations . . 3 
At least one of the loHowmg 

JOUR 323— Newspaper Editing 

JOUR 326— News Commentary and Critical Writing 

JOUR 328— Specialized News Reporting 

JOUR 371— Magazine Article and Feature Writing 

JOUR 38ID — Journalism for Science and Technology 3 

Electives (JOUR 396 Internship recommended) 6 

B Magazine Specialization 

JOUR 371— Magazine Article and Feature Writing 3 

JOUR 373— Graphics 3 

JOUR 487— Literary Journalism 3 

JOUR 396— Internship 3 

Electives 3 

C Science Communication Specialization 

JOUR 380 — Journalism lor Science and Technology 3 

JOUR 371— Magazine Article and Feature Writing 3 

JOUR 481— Advanced Science Wnting 3 

JOUR 396— Internship 3 

Electives (JOUR 330 recommended) 3 

D Ptiolojournalism Specialization 

JOUR 350— Photoiournalism 3 

JOUR 351— Advanced Phototournalism 3 

JOUR 373— Graphics 3 

JOUR 396— Internship 3 

Electives 3 

Minor in one field, upper division 12 

Public Relations Sequence 

JOUR 001— Professional Orientation 1 

JOUR 201— Wnting for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 202— Editing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 330— Public Relations Theory 3 

JOUR 331— Public Relations Techniques 3 

JOUR 396— Supervised Internship 3 

JOUR 480— Mass Communication Research 3 

Advanced writing course (JOUR 320. 360, 371, or 380) 3 

JOUR 400 — Law of Mass Communication 3 

Journalism electives (JOUR 333. 335 [483] and 350 recommended) . . 3 

Minor in one field, upper division 12 

Advertising Sequence 

JOUR 001— Professional Orientation 1 

JOUR 201— Writing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 202— Editing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 340— Advertising Communication 3 

JOUR 341— Advertising Techniques 3 

JOUR 396— Supervised Internship 3 

JOUR 480— Mass Communication Research 3 

JOUR 400— Law of Mass Communication 3 

At least one additional journalism course numbered 410-480 3 

Journalism electives (JOUR 330. 345 [484). 350. and 372 

recommended) 3 

Minor in one field, upper division (must be an approved field related to 

advertising 12 

Broadcast News Sequence 

JOUR 001— Professional Orientation 1 

JOUR 201— Writing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 202— Editing for the Mass Media 3 

JOUR 360— Broadcast News I 3 

JOUR 361— Broadcast News II 3 

JOUR 365— Theory of Broadcast Journalism 3 

JOUR 400— Law ol Mass Communication 3 

At least one additional lournaiism course numbered 410-480 3 

Journalism and Radio-TV-Film electives (chosen with permission of 

advisor) 9 

Minor in one field, upper division (may not be in Radio-TV-Film) 12 

Non-Journalism Requirements: 

Twelve (12) credit hours m upper-division courses in one subject outside of the 



Relations Student Society ot America, and The University ol Maryland 
Advertising Club 

The College maintains dose relations with student publications, 
communications and media organizations including The Diamondback. the 
daily nevKspaper. Eclipse, mmonty student newspaper. Terrapin, yearbook. 
Argus, the monthly leaiure magazine. Mitzpeh. the Jewish student newspaper. 
and WMUC AM-FM. the radio station 

Students interested in participating in the internship program have their 
choice of more than 400 opportunities each semester to gam ontheiob 
training A competitive summer internship program is also sponsored by the 
College 

Advanced journalism students have many opDorlunities for professional 
work in the lOurnaiism field Tuesday Weekly, a student-produced live news 
show, is televised each week for cable television News-editonai students 
must write lor campus or community newspapers In addition, advanced and 
graduate students otten use the Washington. DC resources lor both study 
and proiessional work experience. Some seminars meet in downtown 
Washington 

Students may seek an advisor's help in Room 2109. Journalism Building, 
the olfice ol the Director ol Undergraduate Studies. 454-2228 

The College oKers sequences in advertising, broadcast news, public 
relations and news-editonal (which provides emphases in news reporting and 
editing, magazine writing, photoiournalism, and science communication) 

Admission to the College is competitive Belore applying for admission to 
the College, students who wish to become provisional maiors in lournaiism 
must earn 28 credits, make at least a C m English 101 or its equivalent, pass a 
test of language skills and earn the grade pomt average (GPA) set by the 
College for admission Provisional maiors must earn at least a C in JOUR 201 
and maintain the GPA set for provisional admission to gam full admission to the 
major Contact the College lor details of the selective admission process 

Typing ability of at least 30 words per mmute is required ot all students, 
Maiors must earn a C or better in all journalism courses applied toward the 
degree No more than 12 transler credits may be approved by the College to 
apply toward the maior Regardless ot transler credits, at least one course 
within a chosen specialization must be taken in the College, eg JOUR 321. 
322. 326, or 328, 330 or 331. 340 or 341. 350 or 351. 360 or 361. 371 or 487, 
380 or 481 

Accredited journalism programs follow a policy which requires journalism 
maiors to take about three-fourths of their coursework in areas other than 
journalism and related forms of communication. The College of Journalism 
follows this nationwide policy In practical terms, this means that a journalism 
maior may include no more than 30 credits of journalism and communications 
(such as radio-lelevision-film or speech, with the exception ot the required 
speech course in public speaking) among the 120 required for the 
undergraduate degree. If a student offers nxjre than 120 credits for 
graduation, the number of journalism and communications credits may be 
higher 

Journalism majors may not minor in radio-television-tilm or speech. 

Requirements for the Journalism Major. The requirements for graduation are 
given below: 

See University Studies Program or General University Requirements in ttiis 
catalog, wtiichever is applicable. 

College Requirements: 

1 MATH 1 10 or any more advanced course in finite mathematics, 

2- Foreign language proficiency through the intermediate level Three years 

of foreign language in high school does not automatically waive the loreign 

language requirement tor the College of Journalism. 

OR 

Math Option to the Foreign Language Requirement. Instead of language, 
the student takes 

A. MATH 140. 150 or 220 or any MATH course for which any of these 
courses is prerequisite, except MATH 143. 

B. One statistics course (SOCY 201. BMGT 230, BMGT 231. PSYC 200. 
MATH 111. EDMS 451. ECON 421. GVPT 422 or GEOG 305) Credit 
toward the degree will be given tor the successful completion ol only 
one of the above 

C Computer Science 103 or 110. 
3 A course in public speaking chosen from SPCH 100. 107. 200 or 230. 
4. One of the following: 

A. Sociology (recommended for public relations, advertising and science 
communication sequences or emphases). SOCY 100 or 105. 

B. Anthropology. ANTH 101. 

C- U.S. History (recommended for news-editorial sequence). HIST 156 or 
157 

5 A course in principles of psychology. PSYC 100. 

6 Economics— ECON 201, 203 or 205 

7, Government and Politics 170 For the news-editorial sequence, GVPT 260 
or GVPT 460 are also recommended. 

Specific Journalism Requirements 

Each journalism major is reauired to fulfill the requirements in at least one 
of the following sequences A sequence is an area ot concentration which 
allows students to prepare themselves in depth for entry level proiessional 



72 Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 



College of Journalism. This is the minor. 

Twenty-one (21) credit hours in upper-division, non-journalism electives, to be 
spread or concentrated according to individual needs Minimum upper-division 
credits for graduation — 57. Total lower and upper-division— 120. 

Course Code Prefix— JOUR 

Arts and Humanities Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

American Studies 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Kelly 

Associate Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator: Mintz 

Associate Professors: Caughey, Johns. Lounsbury 

Assistant Professor: Diner 

Lecturer: Keesing 

The department offers an interdisciplinary focus on American culture and 
society in both historical and contemporary sources. Undergraduate maprs. 
with the help of faculty advisors, design a program which includes courses 
offered by the American Studies faculty, and sequences of courses in the 
disciplines usually associated with American studies (i e . history, literature, 
sociology, anthropology, political science, and others), or pertinent courses 
grouped thematicaiiy (e g , Afro-Amencan studies, women s studies, ethnic 
studies, comparative cultures, popular culture, urban and environmental 
studies, and so forth). 

The maior requires 45 hours, at least 24 of which must be at the 300-400 
level Of those 45 hours, 21 must be in AMST courses, with the remaining 24 in 
two 12-hour core areas outside the regular AMST offerings. 

No grade lower than a C may be applied toward the major. The 
department recommends that students fulfill the Division's history requirement 
with an American history course, particularly if American history is not one of 
the core areas in the student's program Lists of courses applicable to the 
major for each of the core areas are available from the departmental office. 
No courses other than those on the lists will be accepted for credit toward the 
maior unless an advisor's permission has been granted in writing and placed 
in the student's file. 

Distribution of the 45 Hours: 

AMST Courses (21 hours required) 

1 AMST 201— Introduction to American Studies (3) required of majors. 

2 AMST 203— Popular Culture in America, AMST 205— Material Aspects of 
American Life, AMST 207 — Contemporary American Cultures three (3) 
hours minimum from this group, six (6) hours maximum may be applied 
toward the 21 -hour AMST requirement, 

3 AMST 330— Critics of American Culture (3) required of majors. 

A AMST 418— Cultural Themes in America, AMST 426— Culture and the Arts 
in America, AMST 428— American Cultural Eras, AMST 429— Perspectives 
on Popular Culture. AMST 432— Literature and American Society majors 
will take 6-9 hours (depending upon number of hours tal<.en at 200 level) of 
these courses. No more than six (6) hours of a repeatable number may be 
applied to the maior. AMST 298, 498 (special topics): AMST 398 
(inaependent study), or AMST 386-387 (internship) may sometimes be 
substituted for maior requirements with advisor approval 

5 AMST 450 — Seminar in American Studies (3): required of majors. 

Core Areas Outside At^ST (24 tiours required): 

Student maiors will choose two outside core areas of 12 hours each. One of 
the core areas may be interdisciplinary in nature (see interdisciplinary core 
suggestions) All interdisciplinary cores must be approved by an advisor in 
writing, they may not be organized merely by grouping courses from the 
approved-course list 

Departmental Cores 

Courses chosen from the approved list or accepted by an advisor in American 
History. American Literature, Sociology, Anthropology, Government and 
Politics. Psychology. Art History. Architecture. Geography. Radio-TV-Fiim. 
Economics. Education. Journalism. Philosophy. 

Interdisciplinary Cores 

Afro-Amencan Studies. Women's Studies. Urban and Environmental Studies. 
Popular Culture. Personality and Culture, Creative and Pe'^forming Arts, 
Comparative Cultures, Ethnic Studies, Business and Industry, Material Culture. 
Foil^iore 

Individual cores may also be designed wilti advisor assistance and 
approval 

Course Code Prefix— AMST 



Art 

Professor and Chairman: Bumham 

Professors. deLeiris (Emeritus). DiFederico. Denny. Driskell. Levitine (Emeritus). 

Lapinski, Miller. Morrison. Reanck, Stafford. Truitt 

Associate Professors: Craig, DeMonte, Farquhar, Forbes, Gelman, Hargrove, 

Kiank. Krushemck. Niese. Pogue, Spiro, Wheeiock. Withers 

Assistant Professors: Caswell. Kehoe. Kim, Meizlik, Richardson. Van Alstine. 

Venit 

Lecturers: Gossage. Peters-Campbell 

Slide Curator: Bonneii 

Gallery Director: Wright (acting) 

Two maiors are offered in art art history and studio The student wtxj 
maiors in art history is committed to the study and scholarly interpretation of 
existing works of art, from the prehistoric era to our times, while the studio 
maior stresses the students direct participation in the creation of works of an 

In spite of this difference, both maiors are rooted m the concept of an as a 
humanistic experience, and share an essential common aim the development 
of aesthetic sensitivity, understanding, and knowledge For this reason, 
students in both maiors are required to progress through a "comnrxxi 
curriculum," which will ensure a broad grounding in both aspects of art. then 
each student will move into a "specialized curriculum" with advanced courses 
in his own mapr, 

A curriculum leading to a degree in art education is offered m the College 
of Education with the cooperation of the Department of Art. 

Coivmon Curriculum 

Courses required in major unless taken as part of supporting area are listed 

below. 

ARTH 100. Introduction to Art (3) 
ARTH 260. History ot Art (3) 
ARTH 261 . History of Art (3) 
ARTS 100. Elements of Design (3) 
ARTS 110. Elements of Drawing (3) 

Specialized Curricula 

Art History Major A 

Five luniorsenior level History of Art courses (a minimum of one each from at 

least three of the following areas Ancient-Medieval. Renaissance-Baroque. 

19lh-20th century. non-Western) (15) 

One additional Studio Art course, any level (3) 

Supporting Area: 

Twelve coherently related non-art credits approved by an advisor Six of these 

credits must be taken in one department and must be at junior-senior level (12) 

An History Major B 

Five lunior-senior level History of Art courses (a minimum of one each from at 

least three of the following areas: Ancient-Medieval. Renaissance-Baroque. 

19th-20th century. non-Western) (15) 

Three additional courses in any level History of Art (9) 

Supporting Area in Studio Art: 

ARTS 100. Elements of Design (from common curnculum) (3) 

ARTS 110, Elements of Drawing (from common curriculum) (3) 

Two Studio Art courses at junior-senior level (6) 

Total required credit hours for Art History Major A or B. combined major and 
supporting area— 45 

Studio Art Major A 

ARTS 208. Intermediate Design or alternate course at 200 level or atxjve (3) 

ARTS 210. Intermediate Drawing (3) 

ARTS 320, Elements of Paintmg (3) 

ARTS 418, Advanced Drawing (3) 

One course from the Elements of Sculpture Series (330, 334. 335) (3) 

One course from the Elements of Pnntmakmg series (340. 341. 342. 343. 344) 

(3) 

One additional junior-senior level Studio course (3) 

One advanced History of Art course (3) 

Supporting Area: 

Twelve coherently related non-art credits approved by an advisor Six of these 

credits must be taken in one department and must be at junior-senior level 

(12) 

Studio Art Major B 

ARTS 208. Intermediate Design or alternate course at 200 level or atxjve (3) 

ARTS 210. Intermediate Drawing (3) 

ARTS 320. Elements of Pamimg (3) 

ARTS 418. Advanced Drawing (3) 

One course from the Elements of Sculpture Series (330. 334. 335) (3) 

One course from the Elements ot Pnntmaking series (340, 341, 342. 343 344) 

(3) 

One additional junior-senior level Studio Art course (3). 

Supporting Area in History of Art 

ARTH 260, History Of Art (from common curriculum) (3) 

ARTH 261. History of Art (from common curnculum) (3) 



Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 73 



Two HIslory ot Art courses at lumor-senior level (6) 

Toial required credit hours for Studio Art Ma|or, combined major and 
supporting area — 51 in Maior A, 42 in Maior B 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major 
requirements. 

Coorse Code Prefixes— ARTE. ARTH, ARTS 

Classics 

Prolessor and Chairman: Rowland 

Associate Prolessors: Dulty, Haiiett. Hubbe. Staley 

Visiting Associate Prolessor: Perkell 

Assistant Prolessor: Lee 

Visiting Assistant Prolessor: Doherty 

Inslniclors: Pittman. Shive 

Classics is the study of the languages, literature, culture and thought of 
ancient Greece and Rome. At present students at Maryland may mapr in 
classical languages and literatures, with options m Greek. Latin or Greek/Latin 
combined, and enroll in a variety of courses on the classical world In addition 
to the regular sequence of Greek and Latin courses, the Department oilers 
Intensive Latin (LAIN 120 and 220). Vocabulary Building (CLAS 280, 290). 
Greek and Roman Mythology (CLAS 170, 470), Greek and Latin Literature in 
Translation (CLAS 370. 371). Women in Greece and Rome (CLAS 320). Greek 
Tragedy (CLAS 374), and special topics courses (CLAS 309) on ancient 
education, ancient literature, ancient sports, etc. Courses on other classical 
subiects (history, art, philosophy, architecture) are taught by allied faculty on 
the Committee on Classical Studies. 

Students who have had Latin in high school are encouraged to work at the 
highest level of which they feel capable. The departmental advisor will help 
students identify the appropriate courses in which to enroll. Normally students 
with less than one year ot high school Latin take LAIN 101. Those who enter 
with a full year of high school Latin register for LATN 102. with two full years, 
LATlvi 203 College credit is given to students who have earned a 3, 4, or 5 on 
the Advanced Placement test in Latin. 

Maior in Classical Languages, with three options: (A) Greek, (B) Latin, (C) 
Greek and Latin Both option A and option B require a total of 30 credit hours, 
including 6 credit hours in the given language at the 200 level and 24 
additional credit hours m upper level courses in the same language, of which 
at least 12 must be at the 400 level A student who enters the program at the 
300 level is excused from the 6 credits at the 200 level Option C requires 12 
hours of the second language in addition to the 30 hours of the first language. 
These 12 hours begin at the level which the Department ludges appropriate to 
the student in virtue of previous training A student with no previous training in 
the second language is allowed to count first year work in the second 
language toward the mapr requirement Each option also requires 9 credit 
hours of supporting courses as follows: CLAS 170 (Greek and Roman 
Mythology). HIST 130 (The Ancient World), and one 300 level specialized 
course in Greek or Roman History (HIST 324, 325, 326, or 327). No course in 
the Latin language with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major 
requirements. 

Course Code Prefixes— CLAS, GREK, LATN 

Communication Arts and Theatre 

Prolessor and Chairman: Gillespie 

Professors: Ayiward, Bentiey. Jamieson, Kolker, Meersman. Pugliese, 

Strausbaugh (Emeritus), Wolvin 

Associate Prolessors: Falcione, Fink, Freimuth, Gomery. Kirkley, McCaleb, 

O Leary, Toiaro, Weiss 

Assistant Prolessors: Blum, Carlson, Coleman, Elam, Kriebs, Parks, Patterson, 

Robinson, Shyies, Webster 

Instructors: Brownlee, Donahue, Sincell, Tavares 

Lecturers: Brown, Doyle, Macarthur, Niles (pt ), Novelli (pt). Smith, Wilson 

The departmental curricula lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree and permit 
the student to develop a program with emphasis in one of the three areas of 
the department: (1) speech communication (political communication, 
organizational communication, health communication, educational 
communication, and interpersonal communication). (2) theatre (history, design 
and pertormance. production in a liberal arts theatre program), (3) 
radio-television-film (broadcasting and film theory, production, history, criticism, 
and research in a comprehensive program) In cooperation with the 
Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the department provides an 
opportunity for teacher certification in the speech and drama education 
program. 

The curriculum is designed to provide: (1) a liberal education through 
special study of the arts and sciences of human communication: (2) 
preparation for numerous opportunities in business, government, media and 
related industries, education, and the performing arts. 

Since communication and theatre are dynamic fields, the course offerings 
are under constant review and development, and the interested student should 
obtain specific information about a possible program from a departmental 
advisor. 



The maior requi'emenis are 30 hours of coursework in speech 
communication and radio-teievision-film. or 36 hours of coursework in theatre, 
exclusive ol those courses taken to satisfy divisional requirements Of the 30 
hours, at least 15 must be upper level (300 or 400 senes) No course with a 
grade less than C may be used to satisfy maior requirements. For RTVF, this 
provision also applies to the supporting program 

Each of the possible concentrations in the department requires certain 
courses m order to provide a firm foundation for the work in that area. 



Speech Communication 



Required Ma|or Courses (total of 30 credits): SPCH 2Q0. 230. 356. 400 and 

474 Three ceOits chosen from the following SPCH 450. 471 or 435 Twelve 

semester credit hours in SPCH courses, at least nine of which must be at the 
300-^00 level. 

Supporting Courses: 15 credit hours of supporting coursework selected in 
consultation with the mapr advisor. 

Tfieatre 

Required Core Courses for All Majors: THET 120, 170, 282, 330, 479. 490 
and 491, For further requirements in the design or pertorming options and the 
supporting course requirements for each option, contact the maior advisor. 

Radio- Tele vision- Film 

Required Courses: RTVF 222 and either 223 or 314. 

Supporting Courses: 15 graded credit hours of coherently related subjects, 
selected m consultation with an advisor and considering the personal goals of 
the student. 

The department offers numerous specialized opportunities for those 
interested through co-curricuiar activities in theatre, film, television, and radio. 
For the superior student an Honors Program is available, and interested 
students should consult their adviser for further information no later than the 
beginning of their junior year. 

Course Code Prefixes— SPCH. RTVF. THET 

Comparative Literature Program 

Program Director: Fuegi 

Advisory Committee on Comparative Literature: Chairpersons of the 

Departments of English. French and Italian, Spanish and Portuguese, and 

Germanic and Slavic Languages 

Prolessors: Beck, Beniiey, Best, Bryer, Damrosch. Freedman. Fuegi. Gillespie, 

Henng, Hoiton, Jones, MacBain, Oster, Pamchas, Patterson, Rowland, Russell, 

Schoenbaum, Sosnowski 

Associate Prolessors: Barry, Beicken, Caramelio, Coogan, Fink, Flieger, 

Hanoeiman, Haiieii, Kerkham, Mintz, Peterson, Tarica, Russell 

Assistant Prolessor: Felaco 

Undergraduates may emphasize Comparative Literature as they work 
toward a degree in one of the departments of literature. Each student will be 
formally advised by the faculty of his "home" department in consultation with 
the Director ot the Comparative Literature Program. In general, every student 
will be required to take CMLT 401 and CMLT 402. The vanous literature 
departments concerned will have additional specific requirements. 

Students emphasizing comparative literature are expected to develop a 
high degree of competence in at least one foreign language. 

Coursework may not be limited to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

LATN 170 is highly recommended for those contemplating graduate work 
in comparative literature. 

Course Code Prefix— CMLT 

Dance 

Prolessor and Chairman: Wiltz 
Prolessors: fulaaaen (Emerita). L. Warren 
Associate Prolessors: Rosen. Ryder. A Warren 
Instructors: Fieilell, Haigler, Mayes. Rutter 
Lecturers: Butler (p t ). Covey. Druker, Jackson 

Recognizing that dance combines both athleticism and artistry, the dance 
program offers comprehensive technique and theory courses as a foundation 
for the dance professions By developing an increasing awareness of the 
physical, emotional and intellectual aspects of movement in general, the 
student eventually is able to integrate his own particular mind-body 
consciousness into a more meaningful whole. To facilitate the acquisition of 
new movement skills, as well as creative and scholarly insights in dance, the 
curriculum provides a structured breadth experience at the lower division level. 
At the upper division level the student may either involve himself in various 
general university electives. or he may concentrate his energies in a particular 
area of emphasis m dance Although an area of emphasis is not mandatory, 
many third and fourth year students are interested in studying a singular 
aspect of dance in depth, such as performance, choreography. 



74 Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 

production/management, education or general studies (encompassing dance The unde'q'adurile maioi m French consists ol 36 tx»urs ot French courses 

history, literature and criticism). at the 200 level and above Two options, both having the same core, lead lo 

The dance faculty is composed of a number of distinguished teachers, the B A degree (1) French language and literature, and (2) French language 

choreographers and performers, each one a specialist in his or her own field, and culture No grade lower than C may be used toward the maior Students 

Visiting artists, throughout the year and during the summer, make additional intending to apply for teacher certification should consult the Director ol 

contributions to the program There are several performance and Undergraduate Advising as early as possible lor proper planning, 
choreographic opportunities for all dance students, ranging from informal 

workshops to fully mounted concerts both on and off campus Students may French Language and Literature Option. Required core courses FREN 204. 

have the opportunity of working with Maryland Dance Theater or with 250. 301. 351, 352, and one ot 211, 311, 312, 404 Specialization either 401 

Improvisations Unlimited, both in residence in the Department °' '•O^' either 302 or 402, four additional 400level courses (excluding 404. 

Students must complete 59 semester hours of dance credits Of these, 18 ''^5, 478, 479), of which three must be in literature Additional requirements 

hours of rrxxfern technique and four (4) hours Of ballet technique are required, outside French 12 credits m supponmg courses chosen from a list approved 

A minimum ol 15 semester hours ol dance must be taken at the upper level by the department, or at least 12 credits (six credits at 200 level and six 

Maprs may not use more than 72 DANC credits toward the total of 120 credits at 300-400 level) in one specific area, representing a coordinated plan 

needed lor graduation In addition to the 22 technique credits required. o' study, 

students must distribute the remaining 37 credits as follows: P^^^^^, L^^g^gge and Culture Option. Required core courses: FREN 204. 

Thnrponranhv I II III 9 250, 301, 351, 352 and one of 211, 31 1, 312, 404 Specialization one of 302. 

RhWhmic Trainina 2 ''°^- "O^- either 471 or 472, 473, three additional 400-ievei courses (excluding 

Improvisation 2 '^^^- ^^^' ^^^- ^^^' Additional requirements outside French 12 credits in 

Dance Notation 3 supporting courses chosen from a list approved by the department, or at least 

Introduction to Dance 3 ^^ credits (six credits at 200-levei and six credits at 300-400 level) in one 

Movement Integration ....................................... 2 specific area, representing a coordinated plan ot study. 

Principles ol Teaching 3 Honors. The department offers an honors program in French (or students o( 

Dance History _ 3 superior ability Honors students must take a total of 36 credits in French. 

Kmesio^gy for Dance 4 including 494H (preparation for the final comprehensive examination) and 

Dance Production 3 ^^^^ (Honors Thesis), For further information see the Director of the French 

Philosophy of Dance 3 ^^^,3 p,og,am. 

A grade of C Of higher must iDe attained in all dance courses. ,, „ , ,„.,, .. , ^ . . . . ,, ■ ,. ,• 

Italian Language. While the department does not yet offer a maior m Italian. 

New. re-entering and transfer students are expected to contact the Italian is one of the three component languages in the Romance Languages 

department following admission to the University for instructions regarding major, described below. 

advising and registration procedures Although entrance auditions are not 

required, some previous dance experience is highly desirable Further Course Code Prefix— f REN, ITAL 

information may be obtained from the Dance Department Student Handbook, 

Course Code Preiix-DANC Germanlc and Slavic Languages and Literatures 

/*cf/ng Cha/rman and /4ssoc/afe Professor Pfister 

English Language and Literature Professors: Best Fuegi Henn, Jones. Oster 

_. „ , « Associate Professors: Beicken, Berry, Biiik, Fleck, Frederiksen, Glad. Hitchcock 

Chairman arxl Proessor: Lross ^ , ,^ ,. , . . ..„ Assistant Professors: Fagan, Merrill, Schalleri, Strauch 

Professors: Bode (Emeritus). Bryer. Cooley (Emeritus), Damrosch, Dillon, ^ . 

Fleming (Emeritus), Freedman, Gravely (Emeritus), Holton, Hovey, Isaacs, . 

Kenny, Kerrigan. Lawson, Lutwack (Emeritus), McWiiiiams, Mish (Emeritus), Gerivanic Language and Literature 

Murphy (Emeritus), Myers, Panichas, Patterson, Peterson, Russell, Salamanca, 

Schoenbaum Vitzthum Whittemore (Emeritus) Winton, Wittreich The undergraduate mapr in Germanic Language and Literature consists ol 

Associate Professors: Barry, Bennett, Birdsall, Caramello, Carretta, Cafe. 36 hours beyond the basic language acquisition sequence (GERM 

Coletti. Coogan. Cooper. Donawerth. Flieger. Fraistat. Fry. D Hamilton. G, 101/102/104) No course completed with a grade lower than C may be used 

Hamilton. Hammond. Handelman. Herman. Howard. Jellema. Joyce. Kleme, 'o satisfy the maior requirements Three program options lead to the B A. 

Mack. Marcuse. Miller. Pearson, C. Peterson, Robinson, Smith, Trousdale, degree 1) German language. 2) German literature, and 3) Germanic area 

Weber (Emeritus) Wilson studies Secondary concentration and supportive electives are encouraged in 

Assistant Professors: Auchard. Auerbach. Beauchamp. Coleman, David, 'fie other foreign languages, comparative literature, English, history, and 

Dobin, Dungey Dunn Fahnestock, James. Komblatt, Leinwand, Levine, philosophy Maprs intending to go on to graduate study in the discipline are 

Loizeaux. Rutherford, Seidel, Slater, Van Egmond iJ'ged to develop a strong secondary concentration m a further area ol 

Lecturer- J Miller Germanic studies, such "internal minors" are available in German language. 

Instructors: Buhlig. Demaree. Stevenson. Townsend German literature, Scandinavian studies, and Indo-European and Germanic 

The English major requires 39 credits beyond the University composition 

requirement For the specific distribution of these 39 credits, students should Major Requirements 
consult the English Department's advisors (Room A1122. ext 2521) A student 

may pursue a maior with emphasis in English and American Literature: German Language Option 

Comparative Literature, English Language and Linguistics, or English Core 220, 301 , 302, and both 321 and 322 Specialization 401, 403, 405 and 

Education (preparation for secondary school teaching) Students interested in lour 300/4(X) level courses in Germanic languages and literatures, 
secondary school teaching should inform the department as early in their 

college career as possible German Literature Option 

No course with a grade less than C may be used to satisfy major Core 220 two further German language courses (301, 302, 401, 403, or 405); 

requirements and 321, 322 Specialization seven 400-levei courses in German literature. 

In selecting supporting or elective subiects. students majoring in English, Germanic Area Studies Option 

particularly those who plan to do graduate work should give special ^ 220, two further German language courses (301. 302. 401. 403. or 405); 

consideration to courses in French, German, Latin, philosophy, history and the 3^^ 32, 322 Specialization two upper-level courses in Germanic area slud.es 

""® ^"^' (348, 358, 368, 381, 382, 383, 384, or 389) and five upper-level courses m a 

Honors. The Department of English offers an honors program, primarily for specialization, such as Scandinavian studies or Indo-European and Germanic 

majors but open to others with the approval ol the Departmental Honors philology. 

Committee. Interested students should ask for detailed information from an o( ' / H I 't t 

English Department advisor no later than the beginning ot the junior year. olaviC Languages ano Literatures 

^e undergraduate maior in Slavic languages and literatures consists ol 33 

Course Code Pretix-€NGL ^,^^,5 beyond the basic language acquisition sequences (SLAV 101/102/104) 

, , .. . No course completed with a grade lower than C may be used to satisfy Ihia 

French and Italian Languages and Literatures maior requirements secondary concentrations and supportive eiectives are 

Associate Profe^-;or and Chairman l^'<c^ encouraged in the other foreign languages, comparative literature. English. 

/^sociate professor ana cna-rrnari ' a ica ^^ philosophy, and Russian studies. 

Professors Bingham (Emeritus). MacBain, Therrien ^"yt' ^o^h 7. " - "~" 

Associate Professors: Black, Demaiire, Fmk, Mei|er, C C Russell Major Requirements 

Assistant Professors: Hage, Feiaco, Mossman, Rubin. Verdaguer Four courses m advanced language (one from each set 201-202, 301-302, 

Instructors: Barrabini Bondurant, C P Russell 401-402. 403-404), the two-semester Survey ol Russian Literature (321 and 

Alliliate Assistant Professor: Jacoby 322), five additional courses on the 400-ievel, no more than two of which may 



Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 75 



be literature in translation. 
Course Code Prefix— GERM. SLAV 



History 



Hebrew and East Asian Languages and Literatures 

Associate Professor arxi Actirtg Chairman: Ramsey 

Assoctale Prolessors: Berlin, Chin, Kerkliam, Mintz, Sargent, Walton 

Assislaril Professor: Manekin 

Instructors: Levy, Liberman 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 

Major. A student may maior In East Asian languages and literatures with a 
concentration in Chinese or Japanese Either concentration provides the 
training and cultural background needed (or entering East Asia-related careers 
in higher education, the arts, business, government, international relations, 
agriculture, media, etc Students may also want to consider a double maior in 
East Asian languages and literatures and airother discipline, such as business, 
international relations, economics, lournalism. etc 

After completing the prerequisite of one year of language (12 credits): 
CHIN 101 (Elementary Chinese, six hours per week. fall). CHIN 102 
(Elementary Spoken Chinese, three hours per week, spring), and CHIN 103 
(Elementary Written Chinese: three hours per week, spnng) or JAPN 101 
(Elementary Japanese I. six hours per week, fall) and JAPN 102 (Elementary 
Japanese II, six hours per week, spring), students must complete 36 credits for 
the major course requirements (18 language, 6 civilization/history, 12 elective). 

Chinese Course Requirements. Language: CHIN 201, 202, 203, 204, 301, 
302. CiwfearronH/sfory.- Option 1— HIST 284 and 481 (or 485). Option 2— HIST 
285 and 480. four eiectives at the 300 level or above in Chinese language, 
literature, linguistics, or other East Asian subjects, subject to the approval of 
student's advisor. 

Japanese Course Requirements. Language: JAPN 201. 202. 203, 204. 301, 
302, Civilization History: Option 1— HIST 284 and 483, Option 2— HIST 285 and 
482, four eiectives at the 300 level or above in Japanese language, literature, 
linguistics, or other East Asian subjects, subject to the approval of student's 
advisor. 

Supporting Courses for Cfiinese or Japanese. Students are strongly urged 
to take additional courses in a discipline relating to their particular field of 
interest, such as linguistics, literary criticism, or comparative literature. The 
range of supporting courses can be decided upon In consultation with the 
student's advisor. 

Special Language Courses. In addition to the more traditional courses in 
literature in translation, linguistics, and advanced language acquisition, 
courses in both Chinese and Japanese business language at the third-year 
level are offered Students are also encouraged to spend at least one summer 
or semester in China (Taiwan or the People's Republic of China) or Japan in 
intensive language study under one or another of the University's exchange 
programs with foreign universities or at other approved centers of higher 
education. 

Internship Program. This program allows students to gain practical 
experience by working in Washington/Baltimore area firms, corporations, and 
social service organizations that are East Asia-related, as well as in various 
branches of the federal government. 

Hebrew Language and Literature 

While the department does not yet offer a major in Hebrew language and 
literature, it does provide both beginners and those with previous study of the 
Hebrew language an opportunity to become conversant with the 3.000-year 
development of Hebrew language, literature, and culture. 

Elementary and intermediate courses develop the ability to communicate 
effectively in modern Hebrew Courses in composition and conversation 
emphasize vocabulary enrichment, grammar and syntax of the written and 
spoken language On the advanced level the student analyzes the major texts 
of classical and modern Hebrew literature. 

Courses are also offered in English on topics such as the Bible. Rabbinic 
Thought, Jewish f«1ysticism, Jewish Law. Ancient Near Eastern Civilization, 
Hebrew Literature m Translation, Women in Jewish Literature, and other 
Special Topics courses. 

Hebrew may be used to fulfill the requirements of the Foreign Language 
Education curriculum of the Department of Secondary Education. Students 
wishing to emphasize Hebrew as a major subject may do so within the 
framework of the Jewish studies major See the entry on the Jewish Studies 
Program or consult the Hebrew Office for requirements. 

Course Code Prefix— CHIN. HEBR, JAPN. RLST 



Professor and Cfiairman: Evans 

Prolessors Bauer (Emeritus). Belz. Berlin. Brush. Callcotl. Cockburn. Cole. 

DuUy (Emeritus). Fousl. Gilbert. Goodbiatt. Gordon (Emeritus). Haber. Harlan. 

Henrelta. Jashemski (Ementa). Kent. Lampe. McCusker. Mernll (Emeritus). A. 

Olson. K Olson, Price, E B Smith, Sparks, Warren. Yaney 

Associate Prolessors: Breslow, Garden. Eckstein. Farrell, Flack, Folsom, 

Friedel, Giffm, Gnmsted, Gullickson, Hams, Hoffman. Holum. Kaufman. 

Maieska. Maiossian. Mayo. Moss. Pennbam, Ridgway, Rozenblit. Spiegel. 

Stowasser, Weissman. Wright. Zilfi 

Assistant Professors: Bradbury, Nicklason, Sumida, Williams 

Adjunct: Carr, Papenfuse 

Affiliate: Perry 

The Department of History seeks to broaden the student's cultural 
background through the study of history and to provide preparation for those 
interested in law, publishing, teaching, journalism, government service, and 
graduate study. 

A faculty advisor will assist each major in planning a curriculum to meet his 
personal interests A "program plan." approved by the advisor, should be filed 
with the Department as soon as possible Students are required to meet with 
an assigned advisor once every semester or sign a waiver during 
preregistration. 

Major Requirements. Minimum requirements for undergraduate history majors 
consist of 39 hours of coursework distributed as follows 12 hours in 100-200 
level survey courses selected from at least two fields of history (United States. 
European, and Non-Western): 15 hours, including HIST 309 in one major area 
(see below), 12 hours of history in at least two maior areas other than the area 
of concentration Without regard to area. 15 hours of the 39 total hours must be 
at the lunior-senior (300-400) level. Note; All majors must take HIST 309. 

I. Survey Courses 

1. The requirement is 12 hours at the 100-200 level taken in at least two 
fields. 

2. Fields are defined as United States. European, and Non-Western 
history All survey courses have been assigned to one of these fields. 
See departmental advisor 

3. In considering courses which will fulfill this requirement, students are 
encouraged to: 

a select at least two courses in a sequence 

b. select at least one course before AD. 1500 and one course after 

AD. 150O 
c sample both regional and topical course offerings 

4. Students will normally take survey courses within their major area of 
concentration. 

II. Major Area of Concentration 

I.The requirement is 15 hours including HIST 309 in a major area ol 

concentration, 
2. An area is defined as a series of related topical, chronological, or 

regional courses, such as: 



Topical 

History & Philosophy 

of Science 
Social 
Intellectual 
Economic 
Religious 
Diplomatic 
Women's History 
Afro-Amencan 
Constitutional 
Jewish 



Region 

Latin American 

Middle Eastern 

European 

United States 

Early Modern Europe 

Medieval 

Ancient 

East Asia 

African 



Country 

Russia 
Britain 
Continental Europe 



3 The major area may be chronological, regional or topical. 

4. Students may select both lower and upper division courses. 

5. A combination of chronological-topical courses or regional-topical 
courses is desirable 

6 The proseminar, HIST 309, should nomnally be taken in the major area 
of concentration 
III. Twelve Hours of History in at least Two Other Areas than the Area of 
Concentration. 

1 . Students may select either lower or upper division courses. 

2. Students are encouraged to consider regional diversity 

3. Students are encouraged to take at least two elective courses in 
chronological periods other than that of their major area of 
concentration. 

Grade of C or tiigtier is required in each course included in the 39 required 

hours. 

For students matriculating after December, 1979, credit may not be earned 

from the CLEP general history exam, for students matriculating after September 

1, 1981, history credit may not be earned from any CLEP exam. Advanced 

Placement credit will be granted as elective, but will not apply toward major 

requirements. 

Supporting courses. Nine credits at the 300-400 level in appropriate 
supporting courses, the courses do not all have to be in the same department. 



76 Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 



The choice of courses must be approved in writing— before attempted, if 
possible— by the departmental advisor. 

General University Requirements In History. All History courses on the 100. 
200, 300 and 400 levels are open to students seeking to meet the University 
requirements in Area C (Division of Arts and Humanities) with the exception of 
HIST 214. 215, 309. 316. 317. 318. A few other courses are Open only to 
students who satisfy specified prerequisites, but that does not limit them to 
history maiors. It should be noted that special topics courses— HIST 219. 319 
and 419— are offered on several different subjects of general interest each 
semester Descriptions may be obtained from the History Department office. 

Honors in History. Students who major or minor in history may apply for 
admission to the History Honors Program during the second semester of their 
sophomore year. Those who are admitted to the program substitute discussion 
courses and a thesis for some lecture courses and lake an oral comprehensive 
examination prior to graduation. Successful candidates are awarded either 
honors or high honors in history. 

The History Department offers pre-honors work in American history and in 
European history courses Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific 
offerings each semester Students in these sections meet in a discussion 
group instead of attending lectures. They read widely and do extensive written 
work on their own. Pre-honors sections are open to any student and are 
recommended for students in General Honors, subject only to the instructor's 
approval Students who intend to apply for admission to the History Honor 
Program should take as many of them as possible during their freshman and 
sophomore years. 

Course Code Prefix- HIST 



Jewish Studies Program 



Associate Professor and Director: Mintz 

Professor: Goodbiatt 

Associate Professors: Berlin, Bilik, Handeiman 

Assistant Professor: Rozenblit 

Instructors: Levy, Liberman 

The Jewish Studies major provides undergraduate students with a 
framework for organized and interdisciplinary study of the history, philosophy, 
and literature of the Jews from antiquity to the present. Jewish Studies draw 
on a vast literature in a number of languages, especially Hebrew and Aramaic 
and includes the Bible, the Talmud, medieval and modem Hebrew literature. 
Yiddish language and literature comprise an important sub-field. 

The undergraduate major requires 48 semester hours (24 hours minimum 
at 300-400 level) consisting of courses in the Hebrew Program and the History 
Department as well as other courses in the Departments of Germanic and 
Slavic Languages and Literatures, English. Geography, Philosophy and 
Sociology 

A minimum grade of C Is required in all courses offered toward major 
requirements. A major in Jewish Studies will normally conform to the following 
curriculum: 

1 . Prerequisite HEBR 1 1 1 , 112, 21 1 , 212 (or placement exam) 

2. Required courses HEBR 313, 314, HIST 282, 283, and either HIST 309 
or research-oriented course in Hebrew approved by advisor (at 300 
level or above), a Hebrew course in classical Jewish literature (200 
level), and an additional upper level course in Hebrew literature in 
Hebrew (21 credit hours). 

3. Electives: 15 credits in Jewish Studies courses in Hebrew language 
and literature, Jewish history, and Yiddish language and literature. At 
least 9 credits must be at the 300-400 level. 

4. 12 credits of supporting courses in areas outside Jewish Studies such 
as history, sociology, philosophy, psychology, or literature, including at 
least 6 credits at the 300-400 level, to be selected with the approval of 
a faculty advisor. 

Linguistics Program 

Professor and Director: Lightfoot 
Assistant Professor: Hornstein 
Lecturer: Weinberg 
Affiliate: McKay 

The Linguistics Program offers courses on many aspects of language study 
and an interdisciplinary major leading to a B A Language is basic to many 
human activities and linguistics relates to many other disciplines which include 
work on language 

Work on language has provided one of the main research probes in 
philosophy and psychology lor nrwst of the 20th century It has taken on a new 
momentum in the last 25-30 years and language research has proven to be a 
fruitful means to cast light on the nature of the human mmd and on general 
cognitive capacity Several courses focus on a research program which takes 
as a central question How do children master their native language' Children 
hear many styles of speech, variable pronunciations and incomplete 
expressions, but. despite this flux of experience, they come to speak and 
understand speech effortlessly, instantaneously and subconsciously Research 
aims to discover how this happens, how a persons linguistic capacity is 
represented in the mind, and what the genetic basis for it is. Students team 



how various kinds of data can be brought to bear on their central question, 
how that question influences the shape of technical analyses 

The maior program in Linguistics is designed for students who are primarily 
interested in human language per se, or m describing particular languages m 
a systematic and psychologically plausible way, or in usmg language as a tool 
to reveal some aspect of human mental capacities Such a maior provides 
useful preparation for professional programs in foreign languages, language 
teaching, communication, psychology, speech pathology, artificial intelligence 
(and thus computer work). 

Major Requirements. Students obtain a B A in Linguistics by following one of 
two tracks. "Grammars and Cognition" or "Grammatical Theory and a 
Language" In each case, students take a common core of LiNG courses 
LING 200, 240, 31 1-312. 321-322 Beyond this core, students must specialize 
by completing an additional 9 hours in LING plus one of the following either 
18 hours from selected courses in HESP. PHIL and PSYC, or 18 hours In a 
particular language. The specializations in detail are: 

Grammars and Cognition 

LING 440— Grammars and Cognition 

Two 300/400 LING electives 

PHIL 466— Philosophy of IVlind 

HESP 400— Speech and Language Development in Children 

OR 

HESP 498 — Seminar in Psycholinguislics 

PSYC 440— Introduction to Cognitive Psychology 

OR 

PSYC 422— Psychology of Language 

Three 300/400 electives m HESP. PHIL, PSYC or CMSC 

Grammatical Theory and a Language 

LING 410/41 1 — Grammars and Meaning/Comparative Synteuc 

OR 

LING 420/421— Word Formation/Advanced Phonology 

LING 300/400 elective 

Five required courses in the language of specialization. 

A course in the history or structure of the language of specialization. 

When possible, the language of specialization should be the same as the 
one used to satisfy the Divisional Foreign Language Requirement The 
specialization normally includes those courses which make up the designated 
requirement for a maior in the chosen language Special provision may be 
made for students who are native speakers of a language other than English 
and wish to conduct analytical work on the grammar of that language A 
student may also study grammatical theory and English, the 18 hour 
concentration in English consists of courses in the history and structure of 
English to be selected m consultation with the student's Linguistics advisor 

For a double maior. students need 27 credits m Linguistics, which normally 
include the LING courses for one ol the two specializations. 

Course Code Prefix— LING 

Maryland English Institute 

Director: Palmer 

Instructors: Butler. Rorito. Groft, Hughes, Kameraas Lanier. LJakos, Lipov^itz. 

Poirer. Sahin, Salus, Sprague 

The (Maryland English Institute (MEI) offers special instruction in English to 
University of Maryland Students who need to improve their competence m the 
language before they are able to undertake a full program of academic work. 
Two programs are Offered — a half-time semi-intensive course and a full-time 
Intensive course 

Semi-intensive. This program is open only to University of Maryland students. 
both graduate and undergraduate, who fall withm a TOEFL score range ol 
450—549 Candidates in this proficiency range may tie admitted to The 
University of Maryland on a provisional basis, requiring them to satisfactoniy 
complete the MEI Semi-mtensive program in order to t>ecome full-time 
students Classes meet two hours per day. five days per week during regular 
terms, four fiours per day, live days per week during Summer Session ii In 
addition, students have two hours per week of assigned work m the language 
laboratory The program is designed especially to perfect the language skills 
necessary for academic study at The University of Maryland Enrollment is by 
permission of the Director and no credit is given toward einy degree at the 
University. 

Intensive. This full-time Engiish-as-a-Fbreign-Language program is open to 
non-native speakers of English who need substantial improvement m their 
English competence t)efore they can undertake any academic study at a 
college or university in the United States On the basis of an entrance 
examination, students will be assigned to classes at their particular proficiency 
levels They will have four hours of English language instruction per day p'us 
one hour of assigned work m the language latjo'atory. five days per weeK 
during the regularly scheduled semester and summer school sesswis The 

program is intended primarily tor students who W'Sh to enroll at The University 
of Maryland alter completing the" language instruction However, satisfactory 
completion of the language program does not guarantee acceptance at the 
University Enrollment is by permission of the Director and no credit is given 
toward any degree at the University. 



Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 77 



Music 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Traver 

Associate Chairman and Lecturer: Cooper 

Professors: Berman. Bemslem. Folslrom. Garvey, Guarneri String Quaflet 

(Daiiey. Soyer. Stemhardt. Tree), Head. Heim. Helm. Hudson, Johnson, 

Montgomery, Moss, Schumacher, Shirley, Troth, True 

Associate Professors: Barnetl. Davis, Deiio. Eihston, Elsing, Fanos, Fleming. 

Gallagher, Gowen. Mabbs, McClelland. McDonald. Olson, Pennington, 

Robertson. Rodnques, Ross, Shelley, Wakedeid, Wexier, Wilson 

Assistant Professors: Gibson, Mangold, McCoy, Payerle, Sparks 

Lecturers Beicken, McFarlane 

Instructor: Walters 

The obiectives of the department are (1) to provide professional musical 
training based on a foundation in the liberal arts; (2) to help the general 
student develop sound critical judgment and discriminating taste in the 
performance and literature of music, (3) to prepare the student for graduate 
work in the field, and (4) to prepare the student to leach music in the public 
schools To these ends, three degrees are ottered the Bachelor of Music, with 
maiors in theory, composition, and music performance, the Bachelor of Arts, 
with a maior in music: the Bachelor of Science, with a major in music 
education, offered in conjunction with the College of Education. 

Music courses and private lessons are open to all majors who have 
completed the specified prerequisites, or their equivalents Lessons are also 
available for non-maprs, if teacher time and facilities permit. The University 
Bands, University Orchestra, University Cho'aie, University Chorus, Jazz 
Ensemble, and other ensembles, are likewise open to all qualified students by 
audition. 

The Bachelor of Music Degree. Designed for qualified students with extensive 
pre-coiiege training and potential for successful careers in professional music. 
Recommendation for admission is based on an audition before a faculty 
committee. A description of the audition requirements and prerequisites is 
available in the departmental office. A grade of C or above is required in all 
major courses. 

Bachelor of Music (Perf.: Piano) 
Sample Program 



Freshman Year 

MUSP 119/120 

MUSC 128 

MUSC 150/151 

University Studies Program 

Sophomore Year 

MUSP 217/218 

MUSC 228 

MUSC 230 

MUSC 250/251 

University Studies Program 



Junior Year 

MUSP 315/318 ■. . 

MUSC 330/331 

MUSC 328 

MUSC 450 

Elective 

University Studies Program 

Senior Year 

MUSP 419/420 

MUSC 492 

MUSC 467 

Elective 

University Studies Program 



15 



The Bachelor of Arts Degree. Designed for qualified students whose interests 
Include broader career alternatives. Recommendation lor admission is based 
on an audition before a faculty committee. A descnpiion of the audition 
requirements, prerequisites, and program options is available in the 
departmental ollice. A grade of C or above is required in all mapr courses. 



Bachelor of Arts (Music) 
Sample Program 



Freshman Year 
MUSP 109/110 
MUSC 150/151 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



MUSC 129 

Eiectives, Division and USP Requirements 

Sophomore Year 

MUSP 207/208 

MUSC 250/251 

MUSC 229 

Eiectives, Division and USP Requirements 

Junior Year 

MUSP 305 

MUSC 330/331 

MUSC 450 

MUSC 329 

Eiectives, Division and USP Requirements 

Senior Year 

Music Eiectives 

Eiectives, Division and USP Requirements 



2 
16 

2 

6 

3 

1 

18 

10 
20 

120 



30 



30 
120 



Special Programs. The Department of Music actively cooperates with other 
departments in double majors, double degrees, and Individual Studies 
programs. Details are available on request. 
Course Code Prefixes— IVIUSC, MUED, MUSP 

Philosophy 

Professor and Chairman: Slote 

Professors: Gorovilz. Lesher. Pasch, Perkins, Stich, Suppe, Svenonius 

Associate Professors: J Brown, Celarier, Cherniak, Garden. Greenspan. 

Johnson. Levinson, Martin, Odell. Stairs 

Assistant Professors: Tolliver, Woll 

Research Associates: Fullmwider, Lichtenberg, Luban. Maclean, Sagoff, Shue 

The Department of Philosophy seeks to develop students' logical and 
expository skills and their understanding of the foundations of human 
knowledge and of value, in accordance with its conception of philosophy as 
essentially an activity rather than a body of doctrine Thus in all courses 
students can expect to receive concentrated training in thinking clearly and 
inventively and in expressing themselves exactly about philosophical issues. 
This training has general applicability to all professions in which intellectual 
qualities are highly valued, such as law. medicine, government and business 
management. With this in view the major in philosophy is designed to serve 
the interests of those in the majority who are preparing for careers outside of 
philosophy as well as those in the minority who are preparing for graduate 
study in philosophy. 

The following are among the courses giving the general student training in 
rigorous thinking, experience in critical and imaginative rellection on 
philosophical problems or lamiliarity with the philosophical foundations of 
Western and other cultures: PHIL 100 (Introduction to Philosophy), PHIL 110 
(Plato's Republic), PHIL 142 (Ethics), PHIL 170 (Introduction to Logic), PHIL 
173, PHIL 174 (Logic and the English Language I and II), PHIL 236 
(Philosophy of Religion), and the historical courses: 310. 316. 320. 325. 326. 
327, 328. 

For students interested particularly in philosophical problems arising within 
their own special disciplines, a number of courses are appropriate: PHIL 233 
(Philosophy in Literature), PHIL 250 and 453 (Philosophy of Science I and II). 
PHIL 245 and 445 (Social and Political Philosophy I and II), PHIL 360 
(Philosophy ol Language), PHIL 308B (Philosophy of Beauty), PHIL 308C 
(Philosophy of Art), PHIL 334 (Philosophy of Music), PHIL 438 (Topics in 
Philosophical Theology), PHIL 450 and 451 (Scieniilic Thought I and II), PHIL 
452 (Philosophy of Physics). PHIL 454 (Philosophy of Economics), PHIL 455 
(Philosophy of the Social Sciences). PHIL 456 (Philosophy of Biology). PHIL 
457 (Philosophy of History). PHIL 458 (Topics in the Philosophy of Science, 
e g Philosophy of Psychology. Historical and Conceptual Foundations of 
Mathematics), and PHIL 474 (Induction and Probability). 

Pre-law students may be particularly interested in PHIL 140 (Contemporary 
Moral Problems). PHIL 345 and 445 (Political and Social Philosophy I and II). 
and PHIL 447 (Philosophy of Law). Pre-medical students may be particularly 
interested in PHIL 342 (Moral Problems in Medicine), and PHIL 456 
(Philosophy of Biology). 

The Department's curriculum is enriched by courses in philosophy and 
public policy issues taught by research associates in the Center lor Philosophy 
and Public Policy under the repeatable designations PHIL 308 (Studies in 
Contemporary Philosophy) and PHIL 408 (Topics in Contemporary Philosophy), 
cross-listed under similar headings in Government and Politics Topics include 
such subjects as Business Ethics. Weilafe and Distributive Justice, 
Responsibility of Professionals, Environmental Ethics and the Morality of Forced 
Military Draft. 

The departmental requirements for a major in philosophy are as follows: (1) 
a total of at least 30 hours in philosophy, not including PHIL 100, (2) PHIL 142, 
371, 310, 320. 326 and at least two courses numbered 399 or above, (3) a 
grade of C or better in each course counted toward the fulfillment of the major 
requirement. 

Fifteen (15) hours of supporting courses are required. 
Course Code Prefix— PHIL 



78 Arts and Humanities Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Philosophy and Public Policy 



Director: Maclean 

Research Associates: Fullmwider, Lichienberg, Luban. Sagofl. Segal, Shue 

The Center (or Philosophy and Public Policy conducts research into ttie 
values and concepts thai underlie public policy formulation. Most research 
efforts— on topics expected to be a focus of public policy debate during the 
next decade— are conducted cooperatively by interdisciplinary working groups 
composed of philosophers, policymakers and analysts, other experts from 
within and without the government, and Center staff. In its research and 
curriculum development, the Center seeks to create an improved 
understanding of the normative principles that are basic to an assessment ol 
public policies. 

The Center's curriculum development seeks to bring philosophical issues 
before future policymakers and citizens Courses dealing with contemporary 
normative issues m the national and international arena are offered through the 
Departments of Philosophy and of Government and Politics, and through the 
Honors Program Courses which have been offered include tHunger and 
Affluence, Human Rights and US. Foreign Policy. Distributive Justice and 
Public Policy. Philosophical issues in Public Policy. The fvloraWy of Compulsory 
Military Service. Environmental Ethics. Energy Policy and the Constraints of 
Justice. Ethics and the New International Order. Risk and Consent, and the 
Endangered Species Problem A Philosophical Approach 

The Center is sponsored jointly by the Divisions of Arls and Humanities and 
of Behavioral and Social Sciences. 

Renaissance and Baroque Studies 

Director: Schoenbaum 
Executive Director: Zimmerman 

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies promotes teaching and 
research in the Renaissance and Baroque periods in all disciplines of the arts 
and humanities, as well as m such allied fields as the history of science, the 
philosophy of science, and the history ol law 

The Centers scholarly programs are designed primarily for faculty and 
graduate students, and include lacully conlerences and coHoquia. lectures and 
lecture-demonsiralions by visiting speakers, concerts and other performances, 
exhibitions, and an annual Schoiar-m-Residence program The Center also 
sponsors programs of national significance, often in connection with area 
libraries, museums, and performing arts organizations These events, which are 
open to the general public as well as to the academic community, include the 
annual Maryland Handel Festival and Symposium, and the Centers annual 
interdisciplinary symposium. 

The Center is sponsored by the Division of Arts and Humanities, and is 
administered by its Director and Executive Director in coniunction with an 
Advisory Board of outside consultants, and a faculty Advisory Committee of 
representatives from 15 departments in Arts and Humanities. 

Romance Languages Program 

Advisory Committee: Russell (Italian), Chair, Gramberg (Spanish), Black 
(French) 

The Romance Language Program is intended for students who wish to 
nnajor in more than one romance language Students selecting this maior must 
take a total of 45 credits selected from courses m two of the three components 
listed below French, Italian and Spanish The first four courses listed under 
each group are required for that particular language component, exceptions or 
substitutions may be made only with the approval of the student's advisor in 
consultation with the Romance Language Advisory Committee, To achieve the 
total of 45 credits, 21 credits are taken in each of the two languages, as 
specified, and three additional credits are taken at the 4(X) level m either of the 
languages chosen. There are no requirements for support courses for the 
romance language maior No grade lower than C may be used toward the 
maior Students who wish to apply for Teacher's Certification should consult 
the College of Education 

Requirements for each language are as follows French— 20A. 301, 351, 
352; one additional language course at the 300 or 400 level, two additional 
literature or civilization courses at the 400 level. Italian— 204. 301 351. 352; 
three additional literature or civilization courses ai the 400 level. Spanisfr— 204, 
301. 321-322 or 323-324, one additional language course at the 300 or 400 
level, two additional literature or civilization courses at the 400 level 

Russian Area Studies Program 

Associate Professor. Director and Student Advisor: Lampe 

Professors: Harper (Geography), Foust, Yaney (History) 

/Associate Prolessors: Murreii (Economics), Maieska (History), Berry. Brecht, 

Glad. Hitchcock (Slavic). Parming (Sociology) 

Assistant Prolessors: Oliver (Government and Politics), Merrill, Schaliert (Slavic) 

Instructor: Brin 

The Russian Area Studies Program offers courses leading to a BA in 
Russian studies Students in the program study Russian and Soviet culture as 
broadly as possible, striving to comprehend it in all its aspects rather than 
focusing their attention on a single segment of human behavior II is hoped 
that insights into the Russian way of life will be valuable not only as such but 
as a means to deepen the students awareness of their own society and of 



themselves 

Course offerings are in several departments language and literature. 
government and politics, history, ecorxxnics. geography, philosophy, and 
sociology A student may plan his or her curriculum so as to emphasize any 
one of these disciplines, thus preparing for graduate work either in the Russian 
area or in the discipline 

Students in the program must meet the general degree requirements ol the 
University and division from which they graduate They must complete 12 
hours ol basic courses in Russian language normally through SLAV 104 or the 
equivalent ol these courses taken elsewhere, and they must complete al least 
12 rTKire hours m Russian language beyond the basic level (chosen from 
among SLAV 201. 202. 301. 302, 321, 322, 401, 402. and 403 or equivalent 
courses) In addition, students must complete 24 hours in Russian area 
courses on the 300 level or above These 24 t>ours must be taken m ai least 5 
different departments, if appropriate courses are available, and may include 
language-literature courses beyond those required above 

It is recommended but not required that the student who plans on doing 
graduate work complete at least 18 hours at the 300 level or above (which may 
include courses applicable to the Russian Area Program) in one of the 
above-mentioned departments It is also recommended that students virfio plan 
on doing graduate work in the social sciences — government and politics, 
economics, geography, and sociology— take at least two courses m statistical 
methods 

The student's advisor will be the program director or his designate The 
student must receive a grade of C or better in all the above-mentioned 
required courses 

In addition to the courses in Russian language, literature and culture taught 
in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. tf>e 
following Russian Area courses are regularly offered; 

ECON 380 — Comparative Economic Systems 

ECON 482— Economics Of the Soviet Union 

GEOG 325— Soviet Union 

GVPT 445— Russian Political Thought 

GVPT 451— Foreign Policy of the U S S R. 

GVPT 481— Government and Administration of the Soviet Union 

HIST 305— The Eastern Orthodox Church Its Cultural History 

HIST 340— Eastern Europe Under Communism 

HIST 344— The Russian Revolutions of 1917 

HIST 424— History of Russia to 1801 

HIST 425— History Of Russia from 1801-1917 

HIST 442— The Soviet Union 

HIST 443— Modern Balkan History 

PHIL 328— Studies in the History of Philosophy 

SOCY 474— Soviet Ethnic Issues 

The various cooperating departments also offer occasional special courses 
in the Russian and Soviet field 

HIST 237. Russian Civilization, is recommended as a general introduction 
to the program but does not count toward the fulfillment ol the program's 

requirements. 

Course Code Prefix— SLAV 

Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures 

Professor and Chairman: Sosnowski 

Professors: Gramberg. Marra-Lopez. Nemes. Pacheco 

Visiting Professor: Martinez 

Associate Professors: Diz. Igel 

Assistant Professors: Aguilar-Mora. Kristal, Zappala 

Instructors: Garcia, Reniz 

Majors. Undergraduate majors can benefit from a wide range of courses in 
Spanish and Latin American literature and civilization, technical courses in 
translation, linguistics and commercial uses of Spanish Area studies programs 
are also available m coniunction with other disciplines in order to provide the 
student with a solid knowledge ol the Spanish and Latm American worlds The 
maior in literature prepares the student for graduate studies in Spanish and 
opportunities in vanous fields of study and work 

A grade of at least C is required m all maior and supporting area courses. 

Language and Literature Ma|or. Courses SPAN 204. 221. 301-302 311 or 
312. 321-322 or 323-324. 425-426 or 446-447. plus lour 400-level courses or 
pro-seminars m literature Spanish. Spanish American, or Luso Brazilian, lor a 
total ol 39 credits Nine credits of supponmg courses, six ot which must be on 
the 300 or 400 level m a smgie area other than Spanish, for a combined total 
of 48 credits uggested areas art. comparative literature, government and 
politics history philosophy and Portuguese All supporting courses should be 
germane to the field of specialization. 

Foreign Area Ma)or. Courses SPAN 204. 301-302. 311 or 312. 315. 316 or 
317. 321-322 or 323-324. 425-^26 or 446-447. plus three 400-level courses 
in literature Spanish. Spanish American, or Luso-Braziiian. lor a total of 36 
credits Twelve credits of supporting courses, six of which must be on the 300 
or 400 level in a single area other than Spanish, lor a combined total ot 43 
credits Suggested areas anthropology, economics, geography, government 



Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 79 



and politics, history, Portuguese, and sociology All supporling courses Should 
be germane to the lield ol specialization 

Translation Option. Courses SPAN 301-302. 311 or 312. five courses Irom 
316. 317. 318. 356. 357. 416. 417. 321-322 or 323-324. one course Ironn 425. 
426. 446. 447. plus two 400-level courses or pro-seminats in Spanish. Spanish 
American, or Luso-Braziiian literature, (or a total ol 39 credits Nine credits ol 
supporting courses, six ol which must be on the 300 or 400 level in a single 
area other than Spanish, lor a combined total ol 48 credits Suggested areas; 
art. comparative literature, government and politics, history, philosophy, and 
Portuguese 

Students interested in majoring In a combination ol two Romance 
languages should see the description ol the Romance Languages Program, 
above 

Honors In Spanish. A student whose major is Spanish and who, at the lime ol 
application, has a general academic average ol 3 and 3 5 in his maior deld 
may apply to the Chairman of the Honors Committee for admission to the 
Honors Program ol the department Honors work normally begins the first 
semester ot the lumor year, but a qualified student may enter as early as the 
sophomore year or as late as the second semester of the lunior year Honors 
students are required to take two courses from those numbered 491 . 492. 493, 
and the seminar numbered 496 or equivalent, as well as to meet other 
requirements for a maior in Spanish There will be a final comprehensive 
examination covering the honors reading list which must be taken by all 
graduating seniors who are candidates for honors Admission of students to 
the Honors Program, their continuance in the program, and the final award of 
honors are the prerogative ol the Departmental Honors Committee, 

Elementary Honors. SPAN 102H is limited to specially approved candidates 
who have passed SPAN 101 with high grades, and will allow them to enter 
203H. SPAN 203H is limited to students who have received high grades in 
102. 102H or 103 or the equivalent Upon completion of 203H, with the 
recommendation of the instructor, a student may skip 204. 

Lower Division Courses. The elementary and intermediate courses in Spanish 
and Portuguese consist of three semesters of four credits each (101. 102. 
203) The language requirement for the B,A degree in the Division ol Arts and 
Humanities is satisfied by passing 203 or equivalent. 

Students who have had two years of Spanish in high school should enroll 
in SPAN 103 Those with three years should enroll in SPAN 203. and those with 
four years in SPAN 203H or higher. 

Transfer students with college credit have the option of continuing at the 
next level ot study, taking a placement examination, or electing courses 103 or 
203 If a transfer student takes course 103 for credit, he retains transfer credit 
only for the equivalent of course 101 A transfer student placing lower than his 
training warrants may ignore the placement but does so at his own risk. If he 
takes 203 for credit, he retains transfer credit for the equivalent of courses 101 
and 102. 

If a student has received a D in a course, advanced and completed the 
next higher course, he cannot go back and repeat the original course in which 
he received a D A student who has earned credits for Spanish 204 may not 
subsequently earn credit for any lower level course. 

Course Code Prefixes— SPAN. PORT 



Women's Studies Program 



Director: Beck 

Faculty: Ivloses. Pratt 

Pan-time Lecturers: Biren, Strasburg, Zeiger 

Women's Studies is an interdisciplinary academic program in the Division 
of Arts and Humanities which is designed to provide students with an 
academic balance to traditional curricula which have ignored or distorted the 
role of women in society To this end. the program promotes research on 
women, facilitates the introduction of research findings on women into all 
relevant university courses, offers core courses on women, and encourages 
the offering of courses on women m other departments and programs Among 
the many departments that offer courses on women are Afro-American 
Studies, American Studies. English, the Foreign Languages. Government, 
Health, History. Psychology, and Sociology- 
Women s Studies courses provide a critical analysis of sex-biased theories 
and methodologies current in mapr disciplines and encourage the study of the 
contributions of women The Womens Studies Program is committed to 
promoting education free, not only from sexism, but also from racism, 
anti-semitism. class bias, ageism, heterosexual bias, and all the ideologies and 
attitudes which constrict our understanding of reality. Women's Studies oilers 
the following core courses: 

WrvlST 200 Introduction to Women's Studies 
WMST 250 Women. An, and Culture 
WMST 298 Special Topics m Women's Studies 
WMST 386/387 Field Work/Field Work Analysis 
WMST 400: Theories of Feminism 
WMST 498 Special Topics in Women's Studies 
WMST 498D/498E Feminist Education Practicum/Feminist 
Education Analysis 



WMST 499 Independent Study 

The Women's Studies Certificate Program. Students may earn a Women's 
Studies Certificate by completing 21 credits selected from required womens 
studies core courses and eiectives chosen according to the student s interests 
Any student in good standing in a division of the University may enroll in the 
certificate program by signing up with the women's studies undergraduate 
advisor For a description ol this certilicate. see "Campus-Wide Programs and 
Certificates " 



Division of Behavioral and Social 
Sciences 

Provost: Polakoff 

The Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences Is comprised of a diverse 
group of disciplines that emphasize a broad liberal ails education as a 
foundation lor understanding the environmental, social and cultural forces that 
shape our world At the heart of the behavioral and social sciences is the 
attempt to understand human beings, both individually and in groups; this 
understanding is developed using approaches that range from the scientific to 
the philosophical, from the experimental to the theoretical The greatest 
strength of the behavioral and social sciences, however, is that the techniques 
of problem-solving are taught within the context of strong academic skills This 
provides students with the intellectual breadth necessary to understand the 
world around them, and with the skills necessary to think analytically and 
critically, and to speak and write clearly and persuasively. 

Students interested in human behavior and in solving human and social 
problems will find many exciting opportunities through the programs and 
courses offered by the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences. The 
Division is composed of the following academic units; 

School of Public Affairs 

College of Business and Management 

Afro-American Studies Program 

Department of Anthropology 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research 

Center for Philosophy and Public Policy 

Center for International Development 

Department of Economics 

Division Computer Laboratory 

Department of Geography 

Department of Government and Politics 

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center 

Institute for Urban Studies 

Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice 

Department of Psychology 

Depanment of Sociology 

Survey Research Center 

All of these units, with the exception of the Bureau. Centers, and the Division 
Computer Laboratory, offer ma|or programs which lead to a degree. Each has 
faculty assigned to serve as academic advisors. 

Pre-professional training and professional opportunities in the behavioral 
and social sciences are available in many fields. The College of Business and 
Management offers programs in accounting, finance, management science, 
marketing, production management, transportation, and personnel and labor 
relations. The Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences offers training for 
students interested in careers as speech pathologists Students interested in 
urban planning will find academic and professional training through courses 
offered by the Institute for Urban Studies, the Department of Geography, and 
the Afro-American Studies Program, Students may choose government and 
politics, criminal justice and criminology, or sociology for preparation for 
careers in the law and related fields The internship programs offered by many 
departments in the Division provide students with practical experience working 
in governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, corporations and research 
centers 

The Division believes strongly in the importance of computer training as a 
necessary pan of undergraduate education in the behavioral and social 
sciences The Division Computer Laboratory provides undergraduate students 
in the Division with the facilities and staff assistance to satisfy a wide range of 
computer-related needs The laboratory's facilities include a DEC PDP 
computer, access to the campus UNIVAC and IBM computers, a Prime 550 
computer, a micro-computer class-laboratory, and classrooms of terminals for 
both in- and out-of-ciass student use. 

Entrance Requirements. Requirements for admission to the Division are the 
same as the requirements for admission to the University. The College of 
Business and Management does have a selective admissions policy. For 
funher information, see the description of the Colleges programs. 

Degrees. The University confers the following degrees as appropriate, on 
stuoents completing programs of study in the academic units in the Division: 
Bachelor of Ans. Bachelor of Science, Master ol Applied Anthropology, Master 



80 School of Public Affairs 



of Arts. Master ol Science. Master of Public Management. Master of Public 
Policy. Master of Business Administration, and Doctor of Phiiosoptiy €ach 
candidate for a degree must file in the Office of Records and Registrations, 
prior to a dale announced for each semester, a formal application for the 
appropriate degree- 
Graduation Requirements. Eacli student must complete a minimum of 120 
hours of credit with at least a 2 cumulative average Courses must include 
either the 30 hours specified by the General University Reguirements or the 
credits required in the University Studies Program, and the specific maior and 
supporting course requirements of the College of Business and Management 
or of the programs in the academic departments offering baccalaureate 
degrees. 

General Information and Student Advisement. The BSOS Undergraduate 
Advising Office (Room 2115 Tvdmgs Building) coordinates advising and 
maintains student records for BSOS students not in the College of Business 
and Management, Divisional advisors are available to provide information 
concerning University requirements and regulations, transfer credit evaluations 
and other general information about the University. 

Undergraduate departmental advisors are designated for each major. 
These advisors are available to assist students in selecting courses and 
educational experiences in their maior area of study consistent with maior 
requirements and students' educational goals These undergraduate advisors 
are located at the various departmentai'unit offices 

Admission to the College of Business and Management is competitive at 
the junior level, except for a small number of academically talented freshmen. 
Students who are admitted to the University with an interest in business but 
who do not meet the requirements for admission to the College are admitted to 
the Division as "pre-business " Advisement for pre-business majors is available 
in the BSOS Undergraduate Advisement Office. Room 2115. Tydmgs Hall 

General advisement in the College of Business and Management is 
available through the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Room 2136, 
Tydings Hall 

The Division maintains a Learning Center in LeFrak Hall which provides 
individual tutoring for students The Center is staffed by retired professionals, 
graduate and undergraduate students. 

Honors. Undergraduate Honors Programs are offered in the College of 
Business and Management, the Departments of Anthropology, Economics, 
Geography. Government and Politics, Psychology and Sociology, and in the 
Institutes of Cnminal Justice and Criminology and Urban Studies 

Any student who has passed at least 12 hours of academic work in the 
preceding semester, without failure of any course and with an overall average 
grade of at least 3.5 will be placed on the Provost's List of Distinguished 
Students 

Senior Residence Requirements. All candidates for degrees should plan to 
lake their senior year in residence since the advanced work of the maior study 
normally occurs in the last year of the undergraduate course sequence The 
last 30 credits must be done in residence A student must be enrolled in the 
Division from which he/she plans to graduate when registering for the last 15 
credits of his or her program. 

School of Public Affairs 

Professor ar)d Dean: Eads 

Professors: Bowker. Brown. Kelleher, Levy, Schick, Young 

Associate Professor: Nacht 

Assistant Professors: Houseman, Winer 

Lecturer: Slater 

Faculty Research Associate: Cohen 

Faculty Researcti Assistant: Harbour 

The School of Public Affairs provides graduate-level, professional education 
to men and women of distinction of both mmd and character. Five disciplines 
are emphasized: accounting, statistics, economics, politics, and ethics. 
Students specialize in issues of govemment'pnvate sector interaction, 
international secuniy, or public sector financial management The program is 
open to pre-career and mid-career graduate students and builds on the 
School's location in the BaltimoreWashmgton corridor. 

The School offers two degrees the Master of Public Management (MPM) 
and the Master of Public Policy (MPP) The School also offers lomt degree 
programs with the College of Business and Management (MPM/MBA) and the 
School of Law (MPM/JD). In addition, several certificates are offered 

Master of Public Management. The MPM is a two-year, 54-credit, full-time 
professional degree, combining a rigorous applied course ol study with 
practical, hands-on experience 

About 35 students enter the program each fall Although this number is 
small, candidates come from a wide variety of undergraduate schools and 
maiors During the first year, students fulfill the core requirements which 
emphasize the tools of policy analysis: accounting, statistics, economics, 
politics, and ethics. In addition they are introduced to the policymaking 
process and future job contacts through structured interviews with national 
policy makers Except lor an elective course option dunng the second 
semester, first-year students take all of the core requirements together. 



During the summer between the first and second years, students obtain 
employment in federal, state or local government agencies or m units of private 
firms which deal with government agencies In addition to gammg practical 
experience and utilizing the skills acquired dunng the first year, this 
opportunity provides Contacts and relationships useful for future projects and 
job placement. 

During the second year, students specialize in one of three concentrations 
Public Policy and Private Enterprise. Public Sector Financial Management, or 
l^ational Security Policy They also complete their core curriculum requirements 
by taking Macro-Economics Theory and Policy Analysis 

Each concentration requires participation in a proiecl course Students, 
working individually or in small groups, conduct research at sponsoring 
government agencies or private firms on problems ol interest to the sponsor 
and themselves. 

Master of Public Policy. The MPP is a 36-credit degree program designed for 

mid-career students. This degree recognizes that individuals at the mid-state of 
their careers need to update their knowledge of today's complex public issues 
in order to move into positions of greater authority and responsibility 

The typical MPP candidate has worked in the public or public-related 
sector for a minimum of three years and is capable of handling a ngorous 
academic program as wen as excelling in his/her professional career The 
candidates enter the School with vaned academic as well as professional 
backgrounds Most have a minimum of a 30 from their undergraduate school 
with some college level math and economics Admission of candidates without 
these courses in their background is contingent upon the successful 
completion of appropriate coursework. 

The MPP degree consists of two components: the core curriculum in 
Methods of Policy Analysis and a selected area of concentration m Public 
Sector Financial Management, Public Policy and Private Enterpnse. or National 
Security Policy 

The courses are typically offered in the early morning or late afternoon It 
is expected that the program will be completed in a maximum of three years 
with all students taking two courses each fall and spnng semester. 

Certificate Programs. The School offers Certificate Programs in four areas: 
Methods of Policy Analysis. Public Policy and Private Enterpnse, Public Sector 
Financial Management, and National Secunty Policy Each program consists 
of 18 credits (six courses) and should be completed in a maximum of three 
semesters. 

Further information can be obtained by calling Mrs Lyn Chasen. 454-7238 

College of Business and 
Management 

Professor and Dean: Lamone 
Professor and Associate Dean: Carter 
Assistant Dean: B'own 

Associate Professor and Director of Doctoral Program: Alt 
Director of trie Masters' Programs: Waikart 
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Mattmgly 
Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies: Zager 
Professors: Bartoi. Bodin. Bradford. Carroll. Dawson. Gannon, Gass. Golden. 
Gordon. Greer. Hasiem. Joison. Koiodny. Kotz. Leete. Levme, Locke* 
(Psychology). S. Loeb, Masi (affiliated), Polakotf* (Economics), Preston. 
Simon. Taff 

Associate Professors: Assad, Ball. Bedmgfieid. Chen. Corsi. Courthght, 
Edeison. Edmisier. Fromovitz, Hynes, M Loeb, Nickels, Poist, Schneiderrran 
(affiliated). Schneier. Spekman. Widhelm. Yao 

Assistant Professors: Ahad. Barbera. Chnstofi. Eun. Goidenberg. Grimm. 
Hevner. Hoicomb. Huss, Krapiei. Mattmgiy (affiliated). Meismger (affiliated). 
Oiian. Power. Roussooouiis (affiliated). Shick. K Smith, R B. Smith, Soubra 
Stark. Stephens (visitmg). Sutton. Trader, Taylor. Wardlow 
Lecturers (full-time): Basu. Everett, Odie, Zieha 

Lecturers (pan-time): Borra. Black. Dahi, Donahue, Embersit. Fischetti, Gandhi. 
Garbuny. Gardner. Hardy. Harman, Harris, Hicks. Hirsch. Kovach. Lynagh. 
Manchester, McLaughlin, Pantalone, Pearce. Quigiey, Roseckv, Rymer, Spear. 
Swope 
• Joint appointment witti unit indicated. 

The College of Business and Management recognizes the importance of 
education m business and management to economic, social, and professional 
development through profit and nonprofit organizations at the local, regional, 
and national levels The faculty of the Conege have been selected from the 
leading doctoral programs m business They are scholars, teachers, and 
professional leaders with a commitment to superior education m business and 
management The Conege is one of two business schools m Maryland 
accedited by the American Assembly of Cotiegiate Schools of Business, trie 
official national accrediting organization lor business schools 

The College has faculty specializing m accounting, finance, management 
science and statistics; marketing, organizational behavior and industrial 
relations, and transportation, business and public pdicy. 

Undergraduate Program. The undergraduate program recognizes the need 
for prolessionai education m business and management based on a foondaiion 



College of Business and Management 81 



in the liberal arts Modern society comprises intricate business, economic, 
social, and government institutions requiring a large number of men and 
women trained to be ellective and responsible managers The College regards 
its program leading to the Bachelor of Science in business and management 
as one of the most important ways it serves this need 

A student in business and management selects a major in one of several 
curricula (1) accounting. (2) finance. (3) general curriculum in business and 
management: (4) management science-statistics: statistics option, decision 
and information sciences option, and management science option. (5) 
marl<eting. (6) personnel and labor relations. (7) production management and. 
(8) transportation For students interested in law as a career there is a 
combined business and law program. (The Bachelor of Science degree in one 
of the above curricula is awarded after 90 semester hours and one year at The 
University of Maryland School of Law, See specific requirements at the end of 
curricula section below ) 

Students interested in insurance, real estate, or international business may 
plan with their advisors to select elective courses to meet their specialized 
needs, however, this interest is in addition to completion of one of the above 
maiors 

Al least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of academic work required for 
graduation must be in business and management subjects A minimum ol 57 
hours of the required 120 hours must be in 300 or 400 level courses In 
addition to the requirement of an overall cumulative grade point average of 
2.00 (C average) in all College Park coursework, an average of C in business 
and management subjects is required for graduation Electives m the curricula 
of the College may be taken in any department of the University if the student 
has the necessary prerequisites Business courses taken as electives may not 
be taken on a pass/tail basis by students of the College of Business and 
Management. 

Degrees. The University confers the following degrees on students 
successfully completing programs of study in the College Bachelor of Science 
(B.S.). Master of Business Administration (MB A ). Master of Science (M S ): 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph D ). Each candidate for a degree must file in the 
Office of Records and Registrations, prior to a date announced for each 
semester, a formal application for a degree. Information concerning admissions 
to the MBA. program is available from the College's Director ol the Masters' 
Programs. 

Academic Advisement. General advisement in the College of Business and 
Management is available Monday through Friday in the Office of 
Undergraduate Studies in Room 2136. Tydings Hall (telephone 454-4314). It is 
recommended that students visit this office each semester to ensure that they 
are informed about current requirements and procedures. Student problems 
concerning advisement should be directed to the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies. 

Transfer students entering the University can be advised during spring, 
summer and fall transfer orientation programs. Contact the Orientation Office 
for further information (telephone 454-5752) 

General advisement of pre-business students is available in the BSOS 
Undergraduate Advisement Office, in Room 2115, Tydings Hall (telephone 
454-2301). 

Entrance Requirements. Admission to the College is on a competitive basis at 
the junior level, except for a small number of academically talented freshmen. 
In order to be admitted as a junior, an applicant must have earned at least 56 
semester credits, completed the required pre-business courses (i e . 
freshman-sophomore core requirements), and meet the competitive 
accumulative grade point average (GPA) in effect for the semester for which 
he/she is applying. This GPA will always be between 2.3 and 3.0 (on 4.0 
scale), however, for Spring 1986 this competitive accumulative GPA was set at 
2,7. All coursework completed at UMCP and other colleges counts toward the 
computation of the cumulative GPA for Business College Admission regardless 
of whether the courses have been accepted for transfer credit to UMCP 

Students who are admitted to the University with an interest in business but 
who do not meet the requirements for admission to the College are designated 
as "pre-business" majors in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences 
(BSOS) 

Statement of Policy on the Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges. 

The College of Business and Management subscribes to the policy that a 
student's undergraduate program below the junior year should include no 
advanced, professional level courses. This policy is based on the conviction 
that the value derived from these advanced courses is materially enhanced 
when based upon a sound foundation in the liberal arts. 

In adhering to the above policy, it is the practice of the College of Business 
and Management to accept in transfer from a regionally accredited community 
college no more than 12 semester hours of work in business administration 
courses. The 12 semester hours of business administration acceptable in 
transfer are specifically identified as three (3) semester hours in an introductory 
business course, three (3) semester hours in business statistics, and six (6) 
semester hours of elementary accounting. Thus, it is anticipated that the 
student transferring from another regionally accredited institution will have 
devoted the major share of his academic effort below the junior year to the 
completion of basic requirements in the liberal arts A total of 60 semester 
hours may be transferred from a community college and applied toward a 
degree from the College of Business and Management. 



Statement of Policy on the Transfer of Credits from Other Institutions. 

The College of Business and Management normally accepts transfer credits 
from regionally accredited four-year institutions Junior and senior level 
business courses are accepted from colleges accredited by the American 
Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) Junior and senior level 
business courses from other than AACSB accredited schools are evaluated on 
a course-by-course basis to determine transferability. 

Honor Societies 

Beta Alpha Psi. National scholastic and professional honorary fraternity in 
accounting Members are elected on the basis of excellence in scholarship 
and professional service from junior and senior students majoring in 
accounting in the College of Business and Management 

Beta Gamma Sigma. National scholastic honorary in business 
administration To be eligible students must rank in the upper five percent of 
their junior class or the upper ten percent ol their senior class in the College of 
Business and Management Students are eligible the semester after they have 
earned 45 credits on the College Park Campus, and have earned a total of 75 
credits 

FMA Honor Society. National scholastic honorary sponsored by the 
Financial Management Association. To be eligible, students must be finance 
majors with a cumulative grade point average of 35 for a minimum of 90 
credits. 

Omega Rho. National scholastic honorary in operations research, 
management, and related areas. Members are elected on the basis of 
excellence in scholarship from junior and senior students majoring in 
appropriate quantitative areas 

Pi Sigma Phi. National scholastic honorary sponsored by the Propeller Club 
of the United States Membership is elected from outstanding senior members 
of The University of Maryland chapter of the Propeller Club majoring in 
transportation in the College of Business and Management. 

Student Awards. Dean's List: Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key: Distinguished 
Accounting Student Awards, and Wall Street Journal Student Achievement 
Award. 

Scholarships. Alcoa Foundation Traffic Scholarship: Delta Nu Alpha 
Cheasapeake Chapter No 23 Scholarship. Delta Nu Alpha Rappahannock. VA 
Chapter No, 288 Scholarship. Delta Nu Alpha Washington. DC Chapter No. 
84 Scholarship: Eastern Shipper — Motor Carrier Council Scholarship: William F. 
Holin Scholarship. National Defense Transportation Association Scholarship. 
Washington. D C, Chapter: Propeller Club Scholarship: Warren Reed 
Scholarship (accounting), Jack B Sacks Foundation Scholarship (marketing); 
and Charles A, Taff Scholarship (transportation). 

Student Professional Organizations. American Marketing Association: 
American Society for Personnel Administration (personnel): Beta Alpha Psi 
(accounting). Dean's Undergraduate Advisory Council: Delta Nu Alpha 
(transportation): Delta Sigma Pi (business students): Finance. Banking and 
Investments Society (finance): The Maryland University Minority Business 
Association: National Association of Accountants: National Defense 
Transportation Association (transportation). Phi Chi Theta (business students): 
Society for the Advancement of Management (all business majors), and 
Propeller Club of America (transportation). 

Summary of Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements (all curricula) 

Freshman-Sophomore Core Requirements (Prebusiness Requirements) 

MATH noor 115. Ill, and220or (140'and 14r)" 9(8) 

BMGT 220 and 221 6 

BMGT230(23r) 3 

ECON 201 and 203 6 

SPCH100or107 3 

Tofa; 27(26) 

* Required for management science-statistics curricula. 

" Students ready for calculus may take l\/IATH 221 in lieu of fvlATH 110 and 111. 

Junior-Senior Core Requirements 

BMGT 340. Business Finance (Prerequisite BMGT 221 and 230) . . 3 
BMGT 350. Marketing Principles and Organization (Prerequisite 

ECON 203) 3 

BMGT 364. Management and Organizational Theory (junior 

standing recommended) 3 

BMGT 380. Business Law (junior standing recommended) 3 

BMGT 495 or 495A. Business Policies (open OWL/ to Seniors) ... 3 

Economics (see below) , 6 



Total 



Economics Requirements 

Finance Curriculum ECON 430 or ECON 431. Plus one course from ECON 
401. 402 (especially recommended). 403. 440. or 450 

General Business Curriculum. One course from ECON 401. 403, 430 or 
440 Plus one course from an approved list of ECON. GEOG. PSYC. or 
SOCY courses. The appioved list is available in the Undergraduate Studies 
Office, College of Business and Management. 



82 College of Business and Management 



All other curricula One course from ECON 401 , 403. 430, or 440 Plus one 
of the following courses ECON 311. 316. 317. 361, 370. 374. 375. 380. or 
any 400 level ECON course except 421 . 422. or 425. 



Junior-Senior Major Curriculum Concentration 

See specific curriculum below (accouriling and decision and 
information sciences maprs take 24 semester hrs,) 

Total 



University Studies Program (USPs) 

Fundamental Studies Fresfiman Composition (ENGL 101. 171)' 

Upper Level Composition (ENGL 391. 393)" 

Distributive Studies, 4 firs. Area B (Lab Sci); 6 hrs. Areas A & C"' 
Advanced Studies: 

Development of Knowledge and Analysis of [Human Problems; 
from two different academic departments 



Total 



.1 8(24) 
.18(24) 

3 
3 
16 

, 6 

28 



* Students exempt Irofn ENGL 101 may lake a 3-credit elective ol any level in its place, 

" Students exempt from ENGL 391/393 must take a 3-credit upper level elective in its 

place 

■■■ Students with an approved 3-credit lab science course or a 4-credil Area A USP 

course may ctiange the USP total (above) and the elective total (below) accordingly, 

Electives 

BMGT 110 or other non-required upper level BMGT course for total 
of 45 hours in business (accounting and decision and 
information sciences majors may take a non-BlvlGT 
course) 3 

The remaining electives must bring the degree total to 120 
semester hours The student must have sufficient 
upper level electives to bring the total UL courses (300 
and 400 level) to 57 semester hours ? 



Grand Total 



120 



A Typical Program for Prebuslness Freshman and Sophomore Years 

SerDesler 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year 

USPS and/or electives 9 (8) 

English 101 or equivalent 3 

IVIATH 1 10 or 1 15. 220, or (140*) 3 (4) 



First semester total 



15 



USPs and/or electives 9 (8) 



SPCH 100 or 107 
MATH 111. 221. or (141*) 

Second semester total 



Sophomore Year 

USPs and/or electives" 

BMGT 220 

ECON 201 

MATH 220" 



3 

3(4) 



Third semester total 



USPs and/or electives 6 

ECON 203 3 

BMGT 221 3 

BMGT 230 (or 231') 3 

Fourth semester total 15 

" Required lor management science-statistics curricula. 

— Management science-statistics maprs should replace MATH 220 with 3 additional hours 
ot uSPs/eiectives (total of 9). 



Curricula 

Accounting. Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, classification and 
recording of financial events and the reporting of the results ol such events for 
an organization In a broader sense, accounting consists of all financial 
systems for planning, controlling and appraising performance of an 
organization Accounting includes among its many facets financial planning, 
budgeting, accounting systems, financial management controls, financial 
analysis ol performance, financial reporting, internal and external auditing, and 
taxation 

The accounting curriculum provides an educational foundation for careers 
in accounting and other management areas whether in private business 
organizations, government and nonprofit agencies, or public accounting firms 

Course requirements lor the ^inior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Accounting are as follows: 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing 3 

BMGT 310. 311— Intermediate Accounting I and II 6 

BMGT 321— Cost Accounting 3 

BMGT 323— Income Tax Accounting 3 

Three ol the lollowing courses: 

BMGT 326— Accounting Systems 

BMGT 410— Fund Accounting 

BMGT 417— Advanced Tax Accounting 

BMGT 420, 421— Undergraduate Accounting Seminar 

BMGT 422— Auditing Theory and Practice 

BMGT 424 — Advanced Accounting 

BMGT 426— Advanced Cost Accounting 

BMGT 427 — Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice 9 

Total 24 

The educational requirement ol the Maryland State Board of Accountancy 
for certification is a baccalaureate or higher degree with a major in accounting, 
or with a non-accounting degree supplemented by coursework the Board 
determines to be substantially the equivalent ol an accounting maior. 

Major in accounting shall be considered generally as constituting a 
minimum of (1) 30 semester hours in accounting which shall include (but shall 
not be limited to) courses in financial accounting, auditing, cost accounting 
and federal income tax. (2) 6 semester hours in commercial law 

A student planning to take the CPA examination for certification and 
licensing in a state other than Maryland should determine the educational 
requirements for that state and arrange his or her program accordingly. 

Finance. The finance curriculum is designed to familiarize the student with the 
institutions, theory and practice involved in the allocation of financial resources 
within the private sector, especially the firm. It is also designed to irKorporate 
foundation study in such related disciplines as economics and the quantitative 
areas 

The finance curriculum provides an educational foundation lor careers 
involving financial analysis and management, investment analysis and portfolio 
management, investment banking, insurance and nsk management, banking, 
and international finance, it also provides a foundation for graduate study m 
business administration, quantitative areas, economics, and law. 

Course requirements (or the junior-senior curriculum concentration in 
Finance are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing 3 

BMGT 343— Investments 3 

One ol the lollowing courses: 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 434— Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

Tivo ol the lollowing courses: 

BMGT 440 — Financial Management 

BMGT 445 — Commercial Bank Management 

BMGT 443— Security Analysis and Valuation 

OR 

BMGT 444— Futures Contracts and Options 6' 

One ol the lollowing courses (check prerequisites): 

BMGT 302 — Information Systems Implementation Techniques 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 

BMGT 431— Design of Statistical Experiments in Business 

BMGT 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

BMGT 435— Introduction to Applied Probability Models 

MATH XXX— three semester hours ol advanced mathematics 

beyond the College requirement 3 

Total 18 

• Both BMGT 443 and 444 cannot be taken to complele these 6 hours 

General Curriculum in Business and Management. The general curriculum 
is designed for those who desire a broader course of study in business and 
management than ottered m the other Coi'ege curncuia The general 
curriculum is appropriate, lor example, for those who plan to enter small 
business management or entrepreneurship where general knowledge ot the 
various fields ot study may be preferred to a more specialized curriculum 
concentration 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentratkyi in 
general business and management are as follows 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Accounting Finance 
One ol the following courses: 
BMGT 321— Cost Accounting 
OR 
BMGT 440— Financial Management 3 



College of Business and Management 83 



Management Science Statistics 
One of the following courses: 

BMGT 332 — Operations Research lor Management Decisions 

OR 

BMGT 385— Production Management 

OR 

BMGT 431— Design of Statistical Experiments in Business 

OR 

BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

Marlteting 
One of the following courses: 
BMGT 353— Retail Management 
OR 
Higher numbered marketing course (checl< prerequisites) . . 

Personnel'Lat>or Relations 
One of the following courses: 

BMGT 360 — Personnel Management 

OR 

BMGT 362— LatX)r Relations 



Public Policy 

One of the following courses: 
BMGT 481— Public Utilities 
OR 
BMGT 482— Business and Government . . . 



Transportation/Physical Distribution 

One of the following courses: 

BMGT 370 — Principles of Transportation 

OR 

BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 



Total 



Management Science-Statistics. In the management science-statistics 
cu'riculum, the student has the option of concentrating primarily in statistics, 
decision and information sciences, or in management science. The three 
options are described below. 

Statistics Option. Statistics consists of a body of methods for utilizing 
probability theory in decision-making processes Imponant statistical activities 
ancillary to the decision-making process are the systematization of quantitative 
data and the measurement of variability Some specialized areas within the 
field of statistics are. sample surveys, forecasting, quality control, design of 
expenment, Bayesian decision processes, actuarial statistics, and data 
processing Statistical methods— for example, sample survey techniques— are 
widely used in accounting, marketing, industrial management, and government 
applications An aptitude for applied mathematics and a desire to understand 
and apply scientific methods to significant problems are important 
prerequisites for the statistician 

Students planning to major in statistics must take MATH 140-141. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior cumculum concentration in the 
statistics option are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 432 — Sample Survey Design lor Business and Economics ... 3 

BMGT 434 — Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 438 — Topics in Statistical Analysis for Business and 

Management 3 

Two of the following courses: 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 

BMGT 433 — Statistical Decision Theory in Business 

BMGT 435— Introduction to Applied Probability Models 

BMGT 436 — Applications of Mathematical Programming in 

Management Science 
BMGT 450— Marketing Research Methods 
STAT 400— Probability and Statistics I 6 

Total 18 

Decision and Information Sciences Option. Computer based information 
systems are an integral pan of nearly all businesses, large and small. The 
decision and inlormation sciences option provides the data processing skills, 
the managerial and organizational skills, and the analysis skills required to 
design and manage business information processing systems The program 
gives the student a firm basis in the business functional areas, marketing, 
finance, production, and accounting In addition it provides an in-depth 
knowledge in information processing technology, information processing 
implementation techniques, and management science and statistics These 
skills furnish the student with the expertise to analyze business problems both 
qualitatively and quantitatively, to propose computer based solutions, and to 
implement those solutions There are many diverse employment opportunities 
available to graduates of this program. The typical )ob areas include 



application programmer/analyst, systems analyst, and computer system 
marketing analyst Such positions are available in both large and small 
corporations, management consulting firms, and government agencies 

Students planning to maior in this field must complete MATH 140 and 141 
prior to lunior standing Students considering graduate work in this field should 
complete MATH 240 or 400 as early as possible m their career It is 
recommended that lor the upper level English composition requirement, 
students choose ENGL 393— Technical Writing. 

Course requirements lor the jumorsemor curriculum concentration in the 
decision and inlormation sciences option are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing 3 

BMGT 302— Information Systems Implementation Techniques 3 

BMGT 402— Database and Data Communication Systems 3 

BMGT 403— Systems Analysis 3 

BMGT 404— Seminar in Decision Support Systems 3 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 434 — Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 435— Iniroduciion to Applied Probability Models 3 

Total 24 



Management Science Option. Management science (operations research) is 
the application of scientific methods to decision problems, especially those 
involving the control of organized man-machine systems, to provide solutions 
which best sen/e the goals and objectives of the organization as a whole. 
Practitioners in this field are employed in industry and business, and federal, 
slate and local governments. 

Students planning to maior in this field must complete MATH 140-141 prior 
to junior standing Students considering graduate work in this field should 
complete MATH 240-241 as early as possible in their career. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in the 
management science option are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BMGT 430— Linear Statistical Models in Business 3 

BMGT 434 — Introduction to Optimization Theory 3 

BMGT 435— Introduction to Applied Probability Models 3 

BMGT 436 — Applications of Mathematical Programming in 

Management Science 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites): 
BMGT 385 — Production Management 

BMGT 432 — Sample Survey Design for Business and Economics 
BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business 
BMGT 438— Topics in Statistical Analysis for Business and 

Management 
BMGT 485— Advanced Production Management 
BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing 
BMGT 402— Database and Data Communication Systems 
BMGT 403— System Analysis 
STAT 400— Applied Probability and Statistics I 6 

Total 18 

Marketing. Marketing, the study of exchange activities, involves the functions 
performed in getting goods and services from producers to users. Career 
opportunities exist in manufacturing, wholesaling, retailing, service 
organizations, government, and non-profit organizations and include sales 
administration, marketing research, advertising, merchandising, physical 
distribution, and product management 

Students preparing for work in marketing research are advised to elect 
additional courses m management science and statistics. 

Course requirements for the lunior-senior curriculum concentration in 
marketing are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BMGT 354 — Promotion Management 3 

BMGT 450— Marketing Research Methods 3 

BMGT 451 — Consumer Analysis 3 

BMGT 457— Marketing Policies and Strategies 3 

Two of the following courses (check prerequisites): 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 

BMGT 353— Retail Management 

BMGT 372— Tratlic and Physical Distribution Management 

BMGT 431— Design of Statistical Expenments in Business 

BMGT 453— Industrial Marketing 

BMGT 454 — International Marketing 

BMGT 455 — Sales Management 

BMGT 456— Advertising 6 

Total 18 



84 Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 

Personnel and Labor Relations. Personnel admimslralion has to do with ihe Business and Law, Combined Program. The College ol Business and 

direction of human eflort It is concerned with securing, maintaining and Management offers a combined business-law curnculum in which the student 

utilizing an effective worthing force People professionally trained in personnel completes three years in the chosen curriculum concentration in the College 

administration find career opportunities in business, in government, in and a fourth year of worl< at The University of Maryland School of Law 

educational institutions, and in charitable and other organizations Admission to the law school is contingent upon meeting the applicable 

Course requirements lor the junior-senior curriculum in personnel and labor standards of that school Individual students are responsible for securing from 

relations are as follows: the law school its current admission requirements The student must complete 

all the courses required of students in the College, except BMGT 380 and 

Semester BMGT 495 This means the student must complete all Ihe pre-busmess 

Credit Hours courses, both upper level ECON courses, BMGT 340, 350, and 364, all lower 

BMGT 360-Personnel Management 3 level and upper level USP requirements, the 18-24 hours m the student's 

BMGT 362 Labor Relations 3 specific business ma)or, and enough additional electives to equal a minimum 

BMGT 460— Personnel Management— Analysis and Problems 3 of 90 semester hours, 30 ol which must be numbered 300 or above No 

BMGT 462— Labor Legislation 3 business law course can be included m the 90 hours The fast year ol college 

BMGT 464— Organizational Behavior 3 work before entering the law school must be completed in residence at 

One of the following courses (check prerequisites): College Park 

BMGT 385— Production Management The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred by the College upon students 

BMGT 467— Undergraduate Seminar in Personnel Management who complete the first year in the law school with an average grade of C or 

GVPT 41 1— Public Personnel Administration better. 

JOUR 330— Public Relations . j„..-.. ~. ^.,. . ^ , ■ ,.. 

PSYC 361— Survey ol Industrial and Organizational Psychology Insurance and Real Estate. Students interested In insurance or real estate 

PSYC 451 Principles of Psychological Testing ^^V wish to concentrate in finance or general business and management and 

PSYC 452— Psychology of Individual Differences Pla" wi'^ 'heir advisors a group of electives to meet their specialized needs. 

SOCY 447— Small Group Analysis „ „ . „ „ ^ . ■ 

SOCY 462— Industrial Socioloav 3 College courses occasionally offered in insurance are: 

BMGT 345— Property and Liability Insurance 

Total 18 AND 

BMGT 34&— Risk Management 
AND 
Production Management. This curriculum is designed to acquaint the student BMGT 347 — Life Insurance 

with the problems of organization and control in the field of production College courses occasionally offered in real estate are: 

management Theory and practice with reference to organization, policies, BMGT 393 Real Estate Principles 

methods, processes and techniques are sun/eyed, analyzed and evaluated. ^^jp 

Course requirements for the lunior-semor curriculum concentration in BMGT 490-Urban Land Management 

production management are as follows: 

Semester Institutional lUanagement. Students interested in hotel-motel management or 

Credit Hours hospital administration may wish to concentrate in general business and 

BMGT 321 — Cost Accounting 3 management, finance, or personnel and labor relations and should plan with 

BMGT 360— Personnel Management 3 their advisors a group of electives to meet their specialized needs. 

BMGT 385 — Production Management 3 

BMGT 485— Advanced Production Management 3 International Business. Students interested in international business may 

Two ol the following courses: wish to concentrate in marketing, finance, transportation, or general business 

BMGT 433— Statistical Decision Theory in Business and management and should plan with their advisors a group ol electives to 

BMGT 453— Industrial Marketing meet their specialized needs. 

BMGT 362— Labor Relations 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions Course Code Prefix— BI^GT 

BMGT 372— Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 6 

^°'" '^ Behavioral and Social Sciences 

Transportation. Transportation involves the movement of persons and goods UeparilTieniSj rrOQiamS allQ 

in the satisfaction of human needs. The curriculum in transportation includes dirrJPLllfl 

an analysis of the services and management problems, such as pricing. \/UI I lUUia 

financing, and organization, of the five modes of transport — air, motor. _ o -j- n 

pipelines, railroads, and water— and covers the scope and regulation of AfrO-AmeriCan StUdieS Program 

transportation in our economy. The effective management of transportation . . . ^. r, „ , .,o , > 

involves a study of the components of physical distribution and the interaction Professor and Acting Director: 8. mgsley (Sociology) 

ol procurement, the level and control of inventories, warehousing, material Professor: M Williams (Anthropology) 

handling, transportation, and data processing The curriculum in transportation Associate Professor: Landry (Sociology) 

is designed to prepare students to assume responsible positions with carriers. Assistant Professors: Brooks^ Har ey 

governmental agencies, and in traffic and physical distribution management in Lecturers: Gittens. Smead. U. Williams 

industry • Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior curriculum concentration in j^^ Afro-American Studies Program offers a Bachelor ol Arts degree to 

transportation are as follows: students who declare a maior in Afro-Amencan studies and who fulfill the 

. academic requirements of this degree program Afro-American studies otters 

r w'l w ^° 3'eas of specialization the general concentration and the public policy 

-.,„^,^ ^ .■ r, u. .. .n ■ credit Hours and planning concentration 

BMGT 332— Operations Research for Management Decisions 3 Students who want to take a major in another department, and wish a 

BMGT 370— Principles of Transportation ... 3 concentration outside their maior can take 21 credit hours of coursework with 

BMGT 372-Traffic and Physical Distribution Management 3 g^ emphasis on black life and experience and receive a Certilicate in 

BMGT 473— Advanced Transportation Problems 3 Alro-American Studies (see Undergraduate Certificates) 

One of the following courses: Undergraduates m good standing may enroll in Ihe program by contacting 

BMGT 470-Land Transportation Systems ,hg Director ol Afro-Amencan Studies in Room 2169. LeFrak Hall, or at (301) 

BMGT 471— Air and Water Transportation Systems 3 454-6676 Students pursuing a maior or certificate must meet the University 

°"^,?J,!!^S to/toiv/ng courses; Studies Program and division requirements. 
BMGT 385— Production Management ^ 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing RequlremenU for a IMalor in the General Concentration 

BMGT 470 or BMGT 471 (depending on choice above) Semester 

BMGT 474 — Urban Transportation and Development Credit Hours 

BMGT 475— Advanced Logistics Management Basic Core Courses AASP 100. 200. 202, 300 12 

BMGT 481— Public Utilities AASP Upper Division Electives (300-400 numbers) 18 

BMGT 482— Business and Government 3 Seminars— AASP 401 and 397 6 

Total 18 j-o,a, 36 



Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 85 

Requirements for a Major In Public Policy and Planning b Twelve (12) hours ol elective courses in anihropoiogy ol which nine (9) 

Semester hours musi be al the 300 level or above, 

Credit Hours c Eighteen (18) hours ol supporting courses (courses outside of 

Basic Core Courses A ASP 100. 202. 300. 428J 12 anthropology oHenngs in (lelds which are complementary to the maior's 

Elementary Statistics (STAT 100 or SOCY 201) 3 specific anthropological interest) Supporting courses are to be chosen by 

Elementary Economics (ECON 201 or 205) 3 the student and approved by a lacuHy advisor 

Electives (300-400 level) in Policy Area 9 In addition to the above requirements anthropology majors must meet 

Internship '. . . 3 those ol the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences specifying general 

Seminars — AASP 428K and 397 6 courses, grade point average, course load and the forty (40) credit hours ol 

University Studies Program approved courses required ol every 

Total 36 degree-seeking student of the University. 

Each course counted for the above requirements must be passed with a t».« a^..i.i_» e...<._ t>,« A„.^„«„/^l«ow n,,,,, ,.„,««. -,««..,» .ho et,,Hon. t^ 

^.^M^ «i 1^ «, K„..«r D„i,.«H ,„^ ,..7„„„,.v,- -„ .— .rL„„ „ „.!,„, The Advis 00 System. The Anthropology Department allows the student to 

grade ol C or better Related and supporting courses taken in other » » ^ fit particular interests and needs All 

departments must be approved by a laculty advisor ol the students program |n„,opoicgy faculty members are ad^sors (and should be contacted 

^ individually) who help plan each student's program All maprs are expected to 

Course Code Prefix— AASP ^^^^ °"' ^ 'acuity advisor and consult with him/her on a regular basis For 

additional inlormation. students should contact the Undergraduate Studies 

Anthrnnolnav Coordinator. Dr Richard Dent. Room 1 106. Woods Hall, telephone 454-5354. 

/(ssodate Professor and Cha/rman; Chambers I*'* »°"°'» Program. The Anthropology Department also offers an Honors 

Professors: Agar, Gonzalez. Kerley. A, Williams. M, Williams*(Afro-American P'°9'a";' *^'=^ P'o^/>ties the student an opportunity to pursue in-depth study ol 

Studies) ^^' °' ^'^ interests. Acceptance is contingent upon a 3 5 GPA in anthropology 

Associate Professor Leone courses and a 3 overall average Members of this program are encouraged 

Assistant Professors' Dent Stuart '° '^'^^ ^^ "^^"^ departmental honors courses as possible The citation is 

Lecturers: Cassidy (p t ). Eidson (p t ). Kedar (p t.) awarded upon completion and review of a thesis to be done withm the field of 

. , . ' 7 ,u ■. ^ . .. anthropology Details and applications are available in the Anthropology Office. 

Joint appointment with unit indicated. o, contact your advisor for further information. 

Anthropology has been defined as "the study of humanity" because it is ANTH 101 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor is prerequisite for all 

the only discipline which tries to understand humans as a whole— as an upper division archeology or physical anthropology courses ANTH 102 (or 

animal, as a social being, as a literate being— from the very beginning ol time equivalent), or permission of instructor is prerequisite for all upper division 

and all over the world Anthropologists try to explain differences among cultural anthropology and linguistics courses, 
humans — differences in their physical characlenstics as well as their customs, 

behavior, and attitudes Since children learn their culture from the older Anthropology Student Association. An anthropology student association 

generation, who in turn learned it from the preceding generation, culture is a meets regularly to plan student events and to help coordinate various student 

product of the past Anthropologists study the way human culture has grown and faculty activities. Meeting times are posted outside Room 0133. Woods 

and changed through time, and the way the species has spread over the Hall, 
earth This is not the history ol kings and great women or men or of wars and 

treaties, it is the history, including the present, and science of human Course Code Prefix— ANTH 

knowledge and behavior. . , 

The cross-cultural experience gives us not only specific knowledge of other BUSineSS and ECOnOmiC RGSearCn 

cultures, which may be important in a variety of public health, business. Professor and Director- Cumberland 

agricultural and diplomatic endeavors, but also an appreciation of how strongly professors: Hams. Oates" (Economics). Mueller' (Economics) 

people feel about the cultural patterns wUh which they grew up. The four „ssoc-afe Professor Cropper' (Econoriiics) 

subfields of anthropology (cultural anthropology, aichaeology. physical v,si(-ng /Iss-slant Professor: Hovis 

anthropology and linguistics) have proven valuable in understanding not only ^ ' ■ w =w 

foreign cultures, but also segments of our own society, as in urban ghettos or * '^oint appointment with unit indicated. 

in institutions such as hospitals and schools They all deal with people and The functions of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research are 

culture, and thus contribute to the development of the holistic view which, more research, education and public service, 

than any other element, characterizes anthropology as a discipline The research activities of the Bureau are primarily focused on basic 

It is becoming increasingly clear that anthropology has been a definite research and applied research in the fields of regional, urban, public finance 

asset in finding |obs in a variety of fields ranging from business to the fine arts. and environmental studies Although the bureau's long-run research program is 

Whether one goes on to a Masters or a Ph D.. striving to advance the frontiers carried out largely by its own staff, faculty members from other depanments 

of knowledge concerning our species and the cultural process, or combines also participate The Bureau also undertakes cooperative research programs 

the anthropology B A with other specific knowledge and goes out as a city with the sponsorship of federal and stale governmental agencies, research 

planner, development consultant, program evaluator. or whatever, is up to the foundations and other groups. 

individual Anthropology at UMCP olfers a solid and rigorous background for a The educational functions of the Bureau are achieved through active 

variety of career options. participation by advanced graduate and undergraduate students in the 

The Anthropology Department offers beginning and advanced coursework Bureau's research program This direct involvement of students in the research 

in the four pnncipal subdivisions of the discipline, physical anthropology, process under faculty supen/ision assists students in their degree programs 

linguistics, archaeology and cultural anthropology Within each area, the and provides research skills that equip students for responsible posts in 

Department offers some degree of specialization and provides a variety of business, government and higher education. 

opportunities within the curriculum Laboratory courses are offered in physical The Bureau observes its service responsibilities to governments, business, 

anthropology and archaeology, field schools are offered in archaeology and and private groups pnmanly through the publication and distribution of its 

ethnography. Instruction is available in both Old World and New World research findings. In addition, the Bureau staff welcomes the opportunity to be 

archaeology and ethnology, and lab courses include human evolution, human of service to governmental and civic groups by consulting with them on 

population biology, forensic anthropology, osteology, and archaeological problems, especially in the fields of regional and urban economic development 

analysis The interrelationship of all branches of anthropology is emphasized. and forecasting, state and local public finance, and environmental 

Courses in these subdivisions may be used to fulfill the minor or "supporting management, 
courses" requirement in some programs leading to the B A degree. 

The Anthropology Department has a total of four laboratories located in Criminal JUStiCe and CrimiPOlOgy 
Woods Hall, which are divided into teaching labs and research labs At 

present, there are two physical anthropology labs one osteological research Director and Professor; Wellford 

lab. and one "wet" lab for teaching and research in serology, histology, and Professor Emeritus: Lejms (Sociology) 

anatomy These laboratories contain radiographic. histoNc. and Criminal Justice Curriculum 

eiectrophonetic equipment, and the osteological lab is centered around an Professor.' Sherman 

extensive research collection. The Department's two archaeology labs. Associate Professor Ingraham 

containing materials collected from field schools of the past several years, Assistant Professors Paternoster. Uchida 

serve as both teaching and research labs. Part-time Lecturers: Maunelio, Wolman 

Anthropology Wajor. A student who declares a major in anthropology will be Profe«o°^of'n°^'^"' 

awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree upon fulfilment of the requirements of the Associate Professor Maida 

f l^'ee program The student must complete at least 30 hours of courses ^ Professors: Smith. Young 

labeled ANTH with a grade of C or better in each course. The courses are , , . . ^ . ^ 

distributed as follows; ''<""' appointment with unit indicated. 

a Eighteen (18) hours of required courses which must include ANTH 101. The purpose of the Institute is to provide an organization and administrative 

102, 397, 401, 441 or 451 and 371 or 461 or 361. basis for the interests and activities of the University, its faculty and students in 



86 Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



the areas usually designated as criminal lustice. cnmmology and corrections. 
The Institute is to promote study and teaching concerning the problems of 
crime and delinquency by otlenng and coordinating academic programs in the 
area of criminal lustice. criminology and corrections, managing research in 
these areas, and conducting demonstration proiecls. 
The institute comprises as its component parts; 

1, The Criminology Program, leading to a B A degree. 

2, The Criminal Justice Curriculum, leading to a B A degree 

3, Graduate Program offering (VIA. and Ph.D. degrees in Criminal Justice 
and Criminology. 

The maior in criminology comprises 30 hours of coursework in Criminology 
and Criminal Justice Eighteen hours in social or behavioral science 
disciplines are required as a supporting sequence, in these supporting 
courses a social or behavioral science statistics and a social or behavioral 
science methods course are required Psychology 331 or 431 is also required. 
In addition, two psychology elective courses and a general social psychology 
course are required Regarding the specific courses to be taken, the student is 
required to consult with an advisor No grade lower than C may be used 
toward the major or the supporting courses. 

Course Code Prefix— CRII\^ 

Major 

CRIM 220 

CRIM450 

CRIM 451 

CRIM 452 

CRIM 453 

CRIM 454 

CRIM/CJUS Elective 

CJUS 100 

CJUS 230 



Total 

Supporting 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

6 

3 

3 



30 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

PSYC 331 or 431 3 

Social Psych— such as PSYC 221 , SOCY 230, SOCY 430 or SOCY 447 3 

PSYC eiectives 6 

Soc Sci statistics 3 

CRIM/CJUS 300 3 

18 
Total for Major and Supporting 48 

The major in criminal lUStice comprises 30 hours of course work in criminal 
justice and criminology, the latter being offered as courses in the Criminology 
Program, divided as follows 18, but not more than 24. hours in criminal lustice; 
6, but not more than 12, hours in criminology In addition to major 
requirements, a student must take 6 fx)urs in methodology and statistics, and a 
supporting sequence of courses totalling 18 hours must be taken in 
government and politics, psychology, sociology, business management or 
counseling No grade lower than C may be used toward the major, or to 
satisfy the statistics-methodology requirement. An average of C is required in 
the suppoaing sequence courses 

Course Code Prefix— CJUS 



Major 
(Required) 

CJUS 100 
CJUS 230 
CJUS 234 
CJUS 340 
CRIM 220 
CRIM 450 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



(Select 4 courses from) 

CJUS 220 

CJUS 320 

CJUS 330 

CJUS 350 

CJUS 360 

CJUS 398 

CJUS 399 

CJUS 444 

CJUS 462 

CRIM 432 

CRIM 451 

CRIM 453 

CRIM 454 

CRIM 455 

Total 



Supporting 

Social Science Statistics 

CRIM'CJUS 300 

Supporting sequence: 18 credit hours of specific recommended 
courses in GVPT, SOCY. BMGT and PSYC (see 
recommended list in Institute Office) 



Total for Major and Supporting 



54 



Criminal Justice/Criminology Honors Program 

The Honors Program provides superior students the opportunity for 
advanced study m both a seminar format and independent study under the 
direction ol the faculty The Honors Program is a three-semester (9 credit hour) 
sequence which a student begins in the spnng semester, three or four 
semesters prior to graduation CRIM/CJUS 388H. the first course in the 
sequence, is offered only during the spring semester The second and third 
courses in the sequence consist of a year-long research project (6 credits. 3 
each semester) or an honors thesis (one semester. 3 credits) followed by a 
graduate seminar in the Institute (one semester. 3 credits) Honors students 
may count their Honors courses toward satisfaction of their curriculum 
requirements if they are criminal justice majors, they may count Iheir Honors 
courses toward satisfaction of the basic 30-hour requirement, if they are 
criminology majors, they may count their Honors courses in place of the 
psychology eiectives and social psychology supporting course requirements 
Requirements for admission to the Honors Program include a cumulative 
grade-pomt-average of at least 3 25, no grade lower than B for any cnminology 
or criminal justice course, and evidence of satisfactory writing ability. 

Division Computer Laboratory 

Director: Bennett 

The Division Computer Laboratory provides support services to faculty. 
staff and students in the use of computers for learning, teaching and research. 
It provides microcomputers and terminals in classrooms and offices. 
minicomputers for specialized research and instruction, short courses on 
computer use. lecturers for special meetings of regular classes, and a general 
programming-consuiting service The Laboratory also maintains a data 
archiving service, regularly-updated databases of social and economic data, a 
small library, and a computer graphics laboratory. 

Economics 

Professor and Chairman: Hulten 

Professors: Aaron, Adams, Almon. Bergmann. Betancourt. Brechling. Clague. 

Cumberland, Dillard (Emeritus). Hams. Keiejian. McGuire. Mueller. Gates. 

Olson, Schultze. Straszheim. Ulmer (Emeritus). Wonnacott 

Associate Professors: Bennett. Coughlin, Cropper. Knight. Meyer, Murrell. 

Panagariya, Wemstem 

Assistant Professors: Kessides. Kiguel. Kole. Prucha. Succar. Wallis 

The undergraduate economics program is designed to give students an 
understanding of the American economic system and our country's economic 
relations with the rest of the world, and the ability to analyze the economic 
forces which determine the production of goods and services, the level of 
prices, the distribution of income, and other economic factors which influence 
the quality of life Such study includes an analysis of current economic 
problems and the merits of alternative public policies which influence social 
outcomes The program for majors prepares students for employment alter 
college as well as tor work toward advanced degrees. 

Requirements for the Economics IWajor. In addition to the University Studies 
Program Requirements, the requirements for economics majors are as follows 

(1) Economic Courses (30 hours) 

Economics majors must earn 30 credit hours in economics with an average 
grade m all economics courses of not less than C Courses required of all 
majors are ECON 201. ECON 203. ECON 310. ECON 401. ECON 403. and 
ECON421 

In heu of ECON 401 . the student may take ECON 405. m lieu of ECON 403. 
the student may take ECON 406 In lieu of ECON 421. the student may take 
one of the following statistics courses BMGT 230, BMGT 231 . or STAT 400 A 
student who takes ECON 205 (Fundamentals ol Economics) before deeding lo 
mapr in economics may continue with ECON 203. without being required to 
take ECON 201 

The remainder of the 30 hours may be chosen from among any other 
upper division economics courses Students who lake ECON 421 may not also 
receive credit to BMGT 230 or BMGT 231 The Oepartment urges students lo 
take more than the minimum of 30 hours, especially it the student is going to 
graduate school The required 30 hours of economics courses may not De 
^aken Pass'Faii 

(2) Mathematics Supporting Courses (6 hours) 

Six creoit hours of mathematics are required including one serriester of 
calculus No specific courses are required but the combination of MATH 110 
(Introduction 10 Mathematics) and MATH 220 (Elementary Calculus) is the 
minimum Students completing MATH 220 or its equivalent have satisfied the 



Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 87 



mathematics requirements Students planning to do graduate study m 

economics are strongly urged to take more than the minimum sixhour 

mathematics requirement Mathematics supporting courses may not be taken 

PassFaii 

(3) Additional Supporting Courses (IS hours) 

Economics maiors must earn credit lor eighteen hours of upper division 
work in addition to the 30 hours ol economics courses listed above For 
purposes ol this requirement, any of the loliov»ing may count as an "upper 
division" course any course numbered 300 or above, any second year course 
in mathematics beyond the six hours required ol all economics maiors, and 
any course m a department lor which the prerequisites are the eguivalent ol 
one year ol coiiege-ievei work m that department In particular, second year 
college courses m loreign languages and sciences may be counted as "upper 
division" Students may include as part ol their 18 hours ol supporting courses. 
any upper division ecorKDmics courses which are not counted among their 30 
hours ol economics courses Supporting courses may not be taken Pass/Fail. 

Study Sequences and Plans of Study. While the regulations allow students 
very considerable latitude m their choice ol courses, the Department urges that 
the student take ECON 201. 203 and begm m the required mathematics 
courses as soon as possible Upon completion ol ECON 203. the student 
should promptly take ECON 401, 403, or both, in the following semester, since 
these are intermediate theory courses of general applicability in the later 
coursework Maiors Should take ECON 421 (or equivalent) after calculus is 
completed ECON 310 may be taken any time after completing ECON 203 

Courses in applied areas at the 300 and 400 level may begin at any point 
after ECON 203. though there is some benefit to completing the intermediate 
theory courses first While the Depanmeni does not require any particular set 
of electives. students can benelit trom giving some attention to delmmg 
sub-specialties withm economics of interest or of imponance for subsequent 
career plans, and completing the several relevant courses to that 
sub-specialty Courses making extensive use of the computer include ECON 
398D (Computer Methods in Economics) and ECON 402 (Business Cycles) 

Students seeking advising should consult the Advising Office. 31150 
Tydmgs Hall (454-5443) 

Those students planning to pursue graduate study in economics must 
begin to prepare themselves analytically for graduate work by focusing on 
theory, statistics, and mathematics in their undergraduate curriculum This 
should include ECON 422(Quantitative Methods) and ECON 425 (Mathematical 
Economics) in their program Additional mathematics, including more calculus 
and linear algebra, is recommended. 

Economics Honors Program. The Honors Program provides economics 
maiors with the opportunity for advanced study in a seminar format, with 
faculty supervision of seminar papers and an honors thesis It is designed for 
students intending to attend graduate school or those who seek an in-depth 
study of economic theory and its application to economic problems. 

The Honors Program is a twelve-hour sequence, culminating in the 
completion of a senior thesis Students must complete ECON 396 (Honors 
Workshop) and ECON 397 (Honors Thesis) in their senior year, as well as two 
of the following four courses ECON 405. 406. 422. and 425. Students must 
complete these twelve hours with a G P A. of 3 5 ECON 396 is offered only in 
the fall term. To be eligible for admission, a student must have completed 15 
hours of economics with a G PA of 3 25. 

Interested students should meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies 
at the earliest possible date to review their curriculum plans and to apply for 
admission to the program. 

Course Code Prefix— ECON 

Geography 

Professor and Chairman: Corey 

Professors: Fonaroff. Harper 

Associate Professors: Brodsky. Chaves, Christian* (Urban Studies). 

Cirrincione* (Secondary Education), Groves. Leatherman, Mitchell, Thompson. 

Wiedei 

Assistant Professors: Kearney. Lai. Petzold. Sawyer 

Part-time Lecturers: Broome. Frieswyk, Monte 

Adjunct Professor: Mornson 

Affiliated Faculty: Corsi. Pemberton 

Visiting Professor: Deshler 

Assistant Researcti Scliolar: Goward 

* Joint appointment witli unit indicated. 

Geography is an interdisciplinary lield that offers a wide range of career 
options The central question in geographical study is "where'" Geographers 
research locational questions of the natural environment, of social and 
economic systems, and of past human activity on the land Modern 
geographical knowledge is useful to policy makers, as well as to program 
planners and managers Students of geography must master a variety of 
methods and techniques that are useful m locational analysis, including 
computer applications and mapping, map making or cartography, airphoto 
Interpretation and remote sensing. Iield observation, statistical analysis, 
computer applications and mapping, and mathematical modelling In addition 
to methodological knowledge, students of geography also must master 
substantive knowledge — either in the physical/natural sciences or the 



behaviorai'sociai sciences The ability to write clearly and to synthesize 
inlormation and concepts are valued highly in geographical education and 
practice International interests are best pursued with complementary study 
emphases m loreign languages and area studies 

Increasingly, geographers today use their combined methodological and 
substantive knowledge towards the solution of society's problems Many 
graduate geographers take positions In planning, natural resources 
management, and policy analysis 

Geographers m the federal government work in the Departments ol State. 
Interior, Defense, Agriculture. Housing and Urban Development. Health and 
Human Services, and the Central Intelligence Agency They are on the staffs ol 
the legislative research branch, the Library of Congress and the National 
Archives At the state and local government level there is an increasing 
demand for geographers m planning positions And m recent years more and 
more geographers also are employed in the private sector working oo 
problems of industrial and commercial location ana market analysis Teaching 
at all levels from elementary school through graduate work continues to employ 
many geographers each year Some find geography to be an excellent 
background for careers in the military, loumalism. law. travel and tounsm. the 
nonprofit sector, and general business, others find the multiple perspectives of 
geography an excellent base lor a general education For those interested in 
the future, the field has high potential lor belter understanding and planning for 
the economic transformation to an information-services economy, 
knowledge-intensive society Most professional positions in geography require 
graduate training. 

Requirements for an Undergraduate Major. Within any of the general major 
programs it is possible for the student to adiust his/her program to fit his/her 
particular individual interests The maior totals 37 semester hours. In addition 
to the 37 semester hours, the geography major is required to take an 
additional 15 semester hours of supporting coursework outside of the 
Department The hours can be either in one department or in an area of 
concentration An area of concentration requires that a written program of 
courses be reviewed and placed on file by the Department advisor See 
Professor Cirrincione. 1125 LeFrak Hall, telephone 454-2244 Supporting 
courses generally are related to the area of specialty in geography Pass-fail 
option is not applicable to maior or supporting courses A minimum grade ol C 
in each course is required for maior and supporting courses 
The required courses of the geography majors are as follows: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

Geography Core (GEOG 201. 202. 203. 211.305. 310) 16 

An additional techniques course (selected from 370. 372, 380) 3 

A regional course 3 

Elective systematic and techniques courses 15 

Total 37 

The Geography Core — The following six courses form the minimum essential 
base upon which advanced work in geography can be built: 

GEOG 201— Environmental Systems in Geography 3 

GEOG 202— Introductory Cultural Geography 3 

GEOG 203— Introductory Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 211— Environmental Systems in Geography Laboratory 1 

GEOG 305— Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 

GEOG 310— Research and Writing in Geography 3 

The three lower division courses are to be completed prior to GEOG 310 and 
all other upper division courses GEOG 201/21 1. 202. and 203 may be taken in 
any order and a student may register for more than one in any semester 
GEOG 211 may be taken concurrent with, or after taking GEOG 201. GEOG 
305 IS prerequisite to GEOG 310 GEOG 310 is specifically designed as a 
preparation to upper division work and should be taken by the end of the 
junior year Upon consultation with a department advisor, a reasonable load of 
other upper division work in geography may be taken concurrently with GEOG 
310 Completion of GEOG 310 satisfies for geography maprs only the upper 
level English composition requirement. 

The techniques requirement may be fulfilled by taking one of the following: 
GEOG 370— Cartographic Principles. GEOG 372— Remote Sensing. GEOG 
373— Computer Mapping and GEOG 380— Local Field Course. 

Suggested Program of Study for Geography 

Semester 
Freshman and Sophomore Years Credit Hours 

GEOG 100, 110. 120. 130. 140 150. 160. 170 or 171 

(1)— Introductions to Geography (Does not count 

toward geography maior) 3-1-1 

GEOG 201— Environmental Systems m Geography 3 

GEOG 202— Introductory Cultural Geography 3 

GEOG 203— Introductory Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 21 1 -Environmental Systems in Geography Laboratory 1 

General University, or University Studies Program Requirements and/or 

electives 47 

60 



88 Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Junior Year 

GEOG 305— Quantitative Methods in Geography 3 

GEOG 310— Research and Writing in Geography 3 

GEOG— A regional geography course 3 

GEOG— Techniques (choice) 3 

GEOG— Elective 3 

General University, or University Studies Program Requirements and/or 

electives 15 

30 
Senior Year 

GEOG— Courses to complete major 12 

Electives 18 

30 

Total 120 

Introduction to Geography. The 100-level geography courses are general 
education courses lor persons who have had no previous contact wiih ihe 
discipline in high school or for persons planning to take only one course in 
geography They provide general overviews of the field or one of its ma|or 
topics Credit for these courses is not applied to the maior. 

Areas of Specialization. Although the major program is flexible and can be 
designed to fit any individual student's own interest, several specializations 
attract numbers of students They are: 

Urban Geography and Regional Development— Provides preparation for 
careers in planning, development, research, and teaching Maiors electing this 
specialty take departmental courses in urban geography, location, theory and 
spatial analysis, transportation, and economic geography among others, and 
supporting courses in urban sociology, urban economics, urban transportation, 
housing and design, family and community development, architecture, and the 
urban studies program outside the department. 

Environmental Analysis, Resources Management and Physical 
Geography— for students with special interest in the natural environment and 
in Its interaction with the works of man This specialization consists of 
departmental courses in geomorphology, climatology, and energy, pollution 
and water resources, and of supporting courses in geology, soils, meteorology, 
civil engineering hydrology, and botany 

Computer Mapping. Cartography and Spatial Analysis— Prepares students 
for careers in map design, compilation and reproduction. The Department 
offers various courses in thematic mapping, cartographic history and theory, 
map evaluation, map. photo, and image interpretation, computer-assisted 
cartography, spatial statistics, and geographic information systems Students 
concentrating in cartography are not required to take GEOG 305 and are 
limited to nine hours of upper level systematic geography courses. Students 
must complete fifteen hours in Cartography/Geographic Techniques, 
Supporting area courses must be taken from a list provided by the 
Department. All math programs should be approved by a departmental 
advisor 

Human and Historical Cultural Geography— 0\ interest to students 
particularly concerned with the geographic aspects of population, politics, and 
other social and cultural phenomena, and with historical and ideational 
processes in cities and in colonial settlement. In addition to departmental 
course offerings this specialization depends on work in sociology, 
anthropology, government and politics, history, and economics. 

For further information on any of these areas of interest the student should 
contact a departmental advisor. 

All math programs should be approved by a departmental advisor- 
Internship. The Department offers a one-semester internship program for 
undergraduates (GEOG 384 and 385) The goal of the program is to enhance 
Ihe intellectual growth and the career opportunities of undergraduates The 
internship provides Ihe students with an opportunity to expand their 
understanding of the field by linking the theoretical aspects of geography 
acquired in the classroom to the applied aspects operating in a working 
situation The internship program is open only to Geography juniors and 
seniors All interns must have the following prerequisites GEOG 201. 202, 203. 
211. 305 and 310 An application form from the undergraduate Geography 
advisor must be submitted one semester before the internship is desired. 

Honors and Geography Club. For information on the geography honors 
program contact the undergraduate advisor Gamma Theta Upsiion. the 
geography undergraduate organization, operates a peer-advising service 
during registration periods. 

Special Facilities. In addition to the Department's laboratories in 
environmental analysis and physical geography, and cartographic and remote 
sensing instruction, the Department lomtly operates, with the Division of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences, a weH-equipped Computer Mapping and 
Spatial Analysis Laboratory This facility contains a number of Tektronix 
graphic workstations recently enhanced with ihe acquisition of two 41136 and 
one 4107 color raster graphics terminals, a Tektronix BASIC language 
programmable graphics micro-computer, and small graphic tablets Other 
equipment m the laboratory includes two digitizing tables. 2 pen-plotters, and 
paper copy devices. The terminals connect lo a PRIME 9650 mini-computer 



which is utilized pnmaniy for graphics applications and instructional 
simulations Other acquisitions include (1) an IBM microcomputer 
color-graphics workstation consisting of the new Advanced Personal Computer 
with plotter and printer, and (2) four other IBM micro-computer color graphics 
workstations equipped with a variety of hardware and software options, A 
comprehensive range of readily-accessible and working software (or mapping 
and spatial analysis supports instructional, service, and research needs The 
software library includes ESRI/GIS. GIMMS. USGS-CAM, SYMAP, GEOSYS, 
FLOW. SURFACE II. and locally-developed software for digitizing, shore-line 
measurement, and districting mapping Map production sen/ices are available 
through a fully-equipped Cartographic Services Laboratory including lour 
photographic darkrooms. 

Geography Minor and Secondary Education Geography Specialization. 

Secondary Education maprs with a concentration in geography are required to 
take 27 hours in the content field. GEOG 201. 202. 203, 211. 305 and 490. or 
another upper-level course reflecting interest The remaining 12 hours of the 
program consists of 3 hours of regional geography and 9 hours of 
upper-division systematic courses. For maiors in elementary education and 
others needing a geography course for teaching certification, GEOG 100 is the 
required course. 

Geography minors should take at least GEOG 201. 202 and 203 in the 
geography core and 310 is recommended. As with the mapr, these courses 
should be taken before any others. 

Course Code Prefix— GEOG 

Governmental Research 

Director: Eads (acting) 

Faculty Research Associate: Cohen 

The Bureau of Governmental Research is the research component of the 
School of Public Affairs Its program is designed to fit closely with the School's 
teaching program Accordingly, its research is expected to emphasize the 
relationship between local, state and the federal government, the interaction 
between government and the pnvate economy, national security, the 
international contexts of domestic policy problems, as well as normative issues 
that arise m the public sector. 

The Bureau's research is typically oriented lo addressing specific public 
sector problems. Through the School's emphasis on intergovernmental 
relations, the Bureau will continue its study of state and local government 
problems in Maryland. 

Government and Politics 

Professor and Chairman: Quester 

Professors: Azar, Bobrow, Butterworth. Claude. Conway. Dawisha. Dillon 

(Emeritus), Glass, Harrison (Emeritus), Hathom (Emeritus), Hsueh, McNelly, 

Oppenheimer. Phillips. Piper, Plischke (Emeritus), Stone'(Urban Studies), 

Wilkenfeid 

Associate Professors: Elkin, Glendening, Heisler. Pirages. Ranald, Reeves, 

Terchek, Usianer 

Assistant Professors: Alford. Edelstein (affiliate). Foreman. Kaiser. Kaminski, 

Lanning, Mason, McCarnck. Mcintosh, Meisinger (affiliate), Solian 

Lecturer: \/ie[r\, Weinberg 

■ Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

The Department of Government and Politics offers programs designed lo 
prepare students for government service, politics, foreign assignments, 
teaching, and a variety of graduate programs, law schools, and for intelligent 
and purposeful citizenship Satisfactory completion of requirements leads to a 
B A degree m government and pontics. 

The study of politics is both an ancien, discipline and a modern social 
science The origin of the discipline can be 'raced back to the earliest times 
when philosophers, statesmen, and citizens studied the nature of government. 
justice, responsibility, and the consequences of government's action More 
recently, the study of politics has also emphasized scientific observations 
about politics Today, the discipline reflects a broad effort to collect data atxxjt 
politics and governments utilizing relatively new techniques developed by all of 
the social sciences 

The Department of Government and Politics combines both philosophical 
and scientific concerns in its overall program as well as in specific courses 
and emphasizes such broad areas as political development, policy analysis. 
social lustice. political economy, conflict, and human nghts These broad 
conceptual areas are integral components of the formal fields in the 
Department The formal fields are (1) American government and politics. (2) 
comparative government. (3) political theory, (4) international affairs. (5) public 
administration, (6) public law. and (7) public policy and political behavior 

Areas of Specialization. The program in government and politics is highly 
flexible, ano a variety of advising programs have been developed which meet 
Ihe academic and career interests ol departmental maiors The tracts listed 
below are arTX)ng the more popular ones m the department, and students can 
construct their own program with an advisor. 

Pre-Law. Provides Ihe student with a strong liberal arts background 
emphasized by law schools, includes at least one course m law. additional 



Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 89 



courses in the political and social context ol law. a pre-law skill package as 
well as appropriate courses outside ol the depanmeni. 

Public Sector Employment. Within this broad category are advising programs in 
general public administration leading to careers at entry-level positions in 
federal, state, and local governments, public linance and budgeting, public 
policy analysis, and public personnel management Ouantiiauve skills are 
highly recommended in this area, and maprs are advised to select a strong 
substantive minor to complement their work in public administration, American 
politics, and public law. 

International Relations Combines courses in the department in international 
relations and comparative politics along with a strong substantive minor, such 
as economics, business, or resource management In addition, a strong 
background in a foreign language is highly recommended. 

Public Interest A broadly defined area emphasizing the American political 
system, organizing, campaigning, lobbying, policy analysis, and public sector 
management 

In addition, the department also offers strong programs in political theory, 
comparative human rights, environmental politics, women and politics, and 
urban politics. 

Requirements for the Government and Politics Major. Government and 
Politics maiors must take a minimum of 36 semester hours in government 
courses and may not count more than 42 hours in government toward 
graduation No government course in which the grade is less than C may be 
counted as part of the major. No government courses in the major may be 
taken on a pass-fail basis. 

All government majors are required to take GVPT 100. 170, 441 or 442 and 
such other supporting courses as specified by the department. They must take 
one course from three separate government fields as designated by the 
department. 

All departmental majors shall take ECON 205 or ECON 201. In addition, the 
major will select courses from one ol the following options, (a) methodology, 
(b) loreign language, (c) philosophy and history of science, or (d) pre-law A 
list ol courses which will satisfy each option is available in the departmental 
office 

All students majoring in government must lulfill the requirements of a 
secondary area of concentration, which involves the completion of 15 semester 
hours from approved departments other than GVPT At least six of the 15 hours 
must be taken at the 300-400 level from a single department. 

Students who mapr in government may apply for admission to the GVPT 
Honors Program Additional mtormation concerning the Honors Program may 
be obtained at the departmental olfices. 

The department olfers students the opportunity to observe government 
agencies and political groups in action through a variety ol internship 
experiences. Only nine (9) hours ol GVPT credit will apply to the 36 hours 
needed in the major In no case may more than 15 GVPT internship credits be 
counted toward the 120 credits needed to graduate. 

Academic advising is available daily on a walk-in basis in the 
Undergraduate Advising Oifice (2181J LeFrak Hail). 

Course Code Prefix— GVPT 

Hearing and Speech Sciences 

Professor and Acting Chairman: McCall 

Professors: J Baker (affiliate). HaH (alliiiate), Lightloot (alfiliate). Newby 

(Emeritus). Penner (allihale). Yeni-Komshian 

Associate Professors: D Baker. Dingwall. Hamlet 

Assistant Professors: Bernstein-Ratner. Cicci (affiliate). Gordon-Salant. Roth. 

Soli (affiliate). Spekman (affiliate), Suter (affiliate) 

Instructors: Daniel. Klevans, McCabe. Patrick. Perlroth. W/agner 

Hearing and speech sciences is an inherently interdisciplinary field, 
integrating knowledge from the physical and biological sciences, medicine, 
psychology, linguistics, and education toward understanding human 
communication and its disorders. The department curriculum leads to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree An undergraduate major in this field is an 
appropriate background for graduate training in speech-language pathology or 
audioiogy. as well as lor graduate work m other disciplines requiring a 
knowledge ol normal or disordered speech, language or hearing The student 
who wishes to work professionally as a speech-language pathologist or 
audiologist must complete additional graduate coursework in order to meet 
State licensure and national certification requirements 

The department operates a Hearing and Speech Clinic (telephone: 
454-2546), which serves the campus and surrounding area, and provides an 
in-house opportunity for the clinical training of students Department lacilities 
also include an integrated audio-visual listening and viewing laboratory, and 
several well-equipped research laborato'ies Hearing and speech majors are 
invited to join the departmental branch ol the National Student 
Speech-Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA). 

The hearing and speech sciences curriculum is designed in part to provide 
supporting coursework tor majors in related lields. so most course ollenngs are 
available to both departmental majors and non-majors Permission ol instructor 
may be obtained lor waiver ol course prerequisites lor non-majors wishing to 
take hearing and speech courses ol interest. 



A student majoring in hearing and speech sciences must complete 30 
semester hours ol specilied courses and six (6) semester hours ol eieciives in 
the department to satisly major course requirements No course with a grade 
less than C may count toward major course requirements In addition to the 36 
semester hours needed for a major. 12 semester hours o( supporting courses 
in statistics, allied and other related fields are required. For these 12 hours, a 
C average is required. 

Ma|or Courses. Specilied courses for a major in hearing and speech 
sciences (30 credits) are: 

HESP 202— Introduction to Hearing and Speech Sciences (Introduction 

to Communication and Its Disorders) 
HESP 300— Introduction to Psycholmguistics 
HESP 31 1— Anatomy. Pathology and Physiology of the Auditory 

System 
HESP 400 — Speech and Language Development in Children 
HESP 402— Speech Pathology I (Childhood Language and Articulation 

Disorders) formerly HESP 302 
HESP 403— Introduction to Phonetic Science 
HESP 404 — Speech Pathology II (Stuttering and Oro-facial Anomalies) 
OR 

HESP 406— Speech Pathology III (Aphasia and Neuromotor Disorders) 
HESP 407— Basis of Hearing Science 
HESP 411— Introduction to Audioiogy 



Electives in the department (6 credits) may be taken from among the following: 

HESP 417— Principles and Methods in Speech-Language Pathology 

and Audioiogy 
HESP 418— Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology and 

Audioiogy 
HESP 498 — Seminar (various topics — check current listings) 
HESP 499— Independent Study 

The sequence of courses may vary. The student Is encouraged to consult 
with a faculty advisor in the preparation ol an individualized program plan of 
study. Information on advising lor hearing and speech sciences may be 
obtained by calling the department oifice: 454-5831. 

Supporting Courses. The undergraduate student with a major in hearing and 
speech sciences will take twelve (12) semester hours in supporting areas of 
study, including one of the following courses in statistics EDMS 451. PSYC 
200. or SOCY 201. The remainder ol supporting courses are from allied lields 
such as psychology, linguistics, sociology, education, health, and anthropology 
(3 to 6 credits), and other related lields such as physics, zoology, engineering, 
philosophy, computer science, and biochemistry (3 to 6 credits) The student 
should see a laculty advisor in the Hearing and Speech Sciences Department 
for advice and approval of a supporting course sequence. 



Course Code Prefix— HESP 

Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center 

Director: Weinstein 

The Industrial Relations and Labor Studies Center was organized in 1978 
at UMCP and is concerned with two kinds of activity. The first is 
interdisciplinary research directed primarily toward the study of 
labor-management relations, employment, wages and related problems, the 
labor market, occupational safety and health, comparative studies and 
manpower problems The Center draws on the expertise and interests of 
faculty from the College of Business and Management, the School of Law and 
the Departments ol Economics, History, Psychology and Sociology The 
second main activity consists ol educational projects serving management, 
unions, the public and other groups interested in industrial relations and 
labor-related activities These projects consist ol public lectures, conlerences, 
and symposia as well as non-credit courses. 

International Development and Conflict 
Management 

Director: Azar 

The Center for International Development and Conflict Management is a 
research center focusing on the management and resolution ol protracted 
conflict in the world today Established in 1961, the Center has a stalf 
composed of University laculty. visiting lellows and associates involved in 
study ol contemporary international and mtercommunal conilicts — their causes, 
dynamics, management strategies and peaceful resolution. The Center is 
located in the Mill Building. 



90 Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Philosophy and Public Policy 

Direcior: Maclean 

Research Associates: Fulimwider. Lichtenberg. Luban, SagoH. Segal, Shue 

The Cenier for Philosophy and Public Policy conducts resea'ch into the 
values and concepts that underlie public policy tormuiatioo Most reseatch 
efforts — 00 topics expected to be a focus of public policy debate during the 
next decade— are conducted cooperatively by interdisciplinary working groups 
composed of philosophers, policymakers and analysts, other experts from 
within and without the government, and Center staff In its research and 
curriculum development, the Center seeks to create an improved 
understanding of the normative principles that are basic to an assessment of 
public policies. 

The Center's curriculum development seeks to bring philosophical issues 
before future policymakers and citizens Courses dealing with contemporary 
normative issues m the national and international arena are offered through the 
Departments of Philosophy and of Government and Politics, and through the 
Honors Program Courses which have been offered include Hunger and 
Affluence, Human Rights and U S Foreign Policy, Distributive Justice and 
Public Policy. Philosophical Issues in Public Policy, The Morality of Compulsory 
Military Service, Environmental Ethics, Energy Policy and the Constraints of 
Justice, Ethics and the New International Order, Risk and Consent, and the 
Endangered Species Problem A Philosophical Approach 

The Center is sponsored lomtly by the Divisions of Arts and Humanities and 
of Behavioral and Social Sciences, 

Psychology 

Professor and Chairman: Goldstein 

Professors: Anderson. Carta-Porges (affiliate). Dies, Fein (affiliate), Fretz, 

Geiso, Goiiub, Gross, Hall, Hili, Hodos, Horton, Isen (affiliate), Levinson. 

Lightfool (affiliate), Ussitz (affiliate), Locke* (Business and Management). 

Lonon, Magoon, Martin, Mclntire, J Mills, Penner, Porges (affiliate), Pumroy. 

Schneider, Scfx)inick, Sigall, B Smith, Stemman, Sternheim, Taylor, 

Tornev-Purta (affiliate), Tnckett. Tyler, Waldrop (Emeritus) 

Associate Professors: Brauth, R Brown, Coursey, Pooling, Egel (affiliate). 

Freeman (affiliate. Counseling Center), Helms. Larkin. Norman. Schneiderman 

(affiliate). Steele, Yeni-Komshian (affiliate) 

Assistant Professors: Alien, Johnson, Kivlighan (affiliate. Counseling Center), 

OGrady. Piude. Schoorman. Soli. Zamostny (affiliate. Counseling Center) 

* Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

Psychology can be classified as a biological science (Bachelor of Science 
degree) and a social science (Bachelor of Arts degree) and offers academic 
programs related to both of these fields The undergraduate curriculum in 
psychology provides an organized study of the behavior of man and other 
organisms in terms of the biological conditions and social factors which 
influence such behavior In addition, the undergraduate program is arranged to 
provide opportunities for learning that will equip qualified students to pursue 
further study of psychology and related fields in graduate and professional 
schools 

Students who are interested in the biological aspects of behavior tend to 
choose a program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree, while those 
interested primarily in the social factors of behavior tend to choose the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. The choice of program is made in consultation with 
an academic advisor 

Department requirements are the same for the Bachelor of Science and the 
Bachelor of Arts degrees A minimum of 35 hours in psychology courses, 
including 14 hours at the 400 level, must be taken PSYC 478 and 479 may not 
be included in the 35 credit minimum or used to meet the 400 level 
requirement Courses taken must include PSYC 100, 200, and two latxiratory 
courses (PSYC 400. 410. 420 or 440) 

In order to assure breadth of coverage, courses in the department have 
been divided into four areas The 35 credit total must include at least two 
courses from each of at least two of (our areas and at least one course from 
each of the remaining areas. 

The areas and courses are: 

Area I: 206. 301. 310. 400. 401. 402. 403. 404. 405. 410. 412. 453. Area II: 
221. 420. 421. 422. 423. 424. 440. 441. 442. 443. 444. Honors 430C. Area III: 
331. 335. 337. 355. 356. 357. 431. 435. 456. 458 and Area IV: 336, 361, 451, 
452, 460. 461, 462, 463. 464, 465. 466. 467. 

Students who wish to receive the Bachelor of Science degree must 
complete a 15 credit supporting sequence m relevant math and'or science 
courses with a 20 average or above The 15 credits must include two 
laboratory courses and a total of 9 credits in mathematics and/or science at 
the advanced level The student should see an academic advisor in the 
Psychotogy Department for advice and approval of a course sequence 
Students should consult the current Psychology Undergraduate Program Guide 
for a list of approved advanced math-science courses This guide is available 
in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (Room ZP 1141) Advismg 
appointments may be made by calling (301) 454-6691 

A grade of C or better must be earned m the 35 credits of psychology 
courses counted toward the mapr or a course must be repeated until a C or 
better is earned if the course is not repeated then another psychology course 
fulfilling the same requirements would have to be substituted The 



departmental grade point average will be a cumulative computation of all 
grades earned m psychology and must be a 2 or atxsve 

Students desiring to enter graduate study in certain areas of psychology 
are advised to take an additional latxiratory course and'or participate in 
individual research proiects Ample opportunity is provided for students to 
gam experience by serving as research assistants to faculty members in the 
department Students interested m graduate study sfrauld consult an advisor 
to discuss various programs and their prerequisites 

It should be noted that there is one course content area which has two 
courses, one in the 300 sequence and one in the 400 sequence These 
courses are abnormal (33i and 431) and personality (335 and 435) The 
courses in the 300 sequence provide general surveys of the field and are 
intended for non-maprs who do not plan further m-depth study The courses m 
the 400 sequence provide more comprehensive study with particular emphasis 
on research and methodology The 400 senes is intended primarily for 
psychology majors It should be further noted that a student may not receive 
credit for both 

PSYC 331 and PSYC 431 
PSYC 335 and PSYC 435 

Honors. The Department of Psychology also offers a special program (or the 

superior Student which emphasizes independent study and research Students 
who have a 3 3 grade average m all courses, who are in the lunior year, and 
who demonstrate interest and maturity indicative of success in the program are 
encouraged to apply Students in their sophomore year should consult the 
director of the Psychology Honors Program for further information. 

Student Activities. The College Park Chapter of Psi Chi. the National Honor 
Society in Psychology, actively sponsors workshops, field Inps and social 
events open to all students. 

Special Facilities. Computer terminals, connected to the University computer 

system, are available in Room ZP 1 140 for student use. 

Course Code Prefix— PSYC. 

Sociology 

Professor and Acting Chairman: Dager 

Professors: Billmgsiey' (Afro-Amencan Studies). Clignet (affiliate). Goldsmitti 

(adiLinct). Janes (Emeritus). Hage. Kammeyer. Le|ins (Emeritus), Pressor, 

Riizer, Robinson, Rosenberg, D Segal, Siibergeid (adjunct) 

Associate Professors: Brown, Fmsterbusch, Henkel, Hirzel, J Hunt. L. Hunt, 

Landry" (Alro-Amencan Studies). Lengermann, Mclntyre. Meeker, Parming, 

Pease M Segal. Vanneman 

Assistant Professors: Canjar. Falabella, Reishman, Harper, Imamura. Snipp 

Lecturer: Altman 

* Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

Sociology is the scientific study of society, its institutions, organizations and 
groups Beginning with the simple interaction tsetween two or more people, 
sociology examines the social organization of society from the development of 
social order to the causes and impact of social change Sociology s subiect 
matter ranges from the study of the social factors that affect the seilconcept 
and the nature of sex roles at the individual level to group processes, to 
organizations designed to produce products or provide services to the maior 
institutions of society In the latter category the department has strengths m the 
study of the military, family, education, health, welfare, and political and 
economic organizations At the societal and wond system level, the department 
looks at social movements, the basis of stratification or inequality, sources of 
instability, war. technology, and a numt)er of other issues 

A mapr in sociology offers (i) a general education especially directed 
toward understanding the complexities of modern society and its social 
problems by using basic concepts, research and statistical skills. (2) a broad 
preparation for vanous types of professions, occupations, and services deaimg 
with people; and (3) preparation of qualified students for graduate irain.ng m 
sociology, social work. law. and business Sociology also forms a valuable 
background for those interested m other fields or majors Courses m sociology 
can be used as preparation for careers m government and pnvate research, 
urban planning, personnel work, human resources management, afxJ many 
other policy-making and administrative careers. 

Areas of Specialization. The program of instnjction in sociology offers course 

sequences m eight areas The strong emphasis on advismg m the deparlrnent 
allows the student to combine these areas mto individualized programs 
directed toward the students specific goals Specializations are available m 
social science research methodology, social psycfKiiogy. social demography. 
family sociology, organizations and occupations, military sociology, social 
stratification, and community 

Social Science Research MetfKidology This specialization provides ttie student 
with strong statistical and methodological t>ackground and hands-on computer 
skills needed for an forms of socai science research from evaluation research 
to opinion polls Additional courses from the social denx)graphy speciaiizairon 
prepare the student for employment m governmental organizations such as ttie 
Census Bureau or the National Cenier lor Health Statistics. 



Behavioral and Social Sciences Departments, Programs and Curricula 91 



Social Psychology. This option combines courses on Ihe sell concept, 
personality, collective behavior and small group analysis Such a concentration 
is valuable tor helping occupations in business organizations as well as social 
wellare agencies 

Social Demography. Demography focuses on careful, objective and systematic 
study ol the population, its size and characteristics, and how it changes in 
number, composition, and residence This information and the skills that 
produce it are valuable lor government or business to allow lor planning 
elfectively. 

Family Sociology. This specialty examines the development of sex roles, the 
organization and changes in our family institution as well as the relationship of 
the family to the social structure Specific coursework in areas of childhood 
socialization, agmg and disability locus on lamiiy problem areas Along with 
the social psychology specialization, family sociology is a good preparation for 
human services, counseling, and research occupations. 

Organizations and Occupations. This concentration is particularly useful to 
pursuit ot careers in the business world It involves theoretical instruction in 
format organization, bureaucracy, social stratification and is applicable to any 
Institution organized in bureaucratic form such as education, politics, business. 
military Another facet of this specialization is the broad area of work roles and 
occupations, their meaning, development, prolessionalization, and place in the 
social structure 

Military Sociology. Very closely associated with the organizations and 
occupations specialty, military sociology uses concepts associated with 
bureaucratic organization, social control, and even sex roles to examine our 
military institution With the importance of the military in the world today, this is 
a rapidly growing speciality area. 

Social Stratification. Provides students with a macro view of society 
emphasizing the social divisions of age. sex, race as well as occupation, 
wealth, power and prestige on the classification systems societies develop. 

Community. Coursework related to the organization and social structure of 
communities, both rural and urban, in present day society, addresses issues 
faced by local communities, the influence of community on social institutions, 
and the possible future of the community in the United States As with social 
demography, military sociology, and social stratification concentrations, 
community is a valuable specialization for policy-making occupations. 

These areas of concentration can be combined to advantage or can be 
taken as part of a double ma|or in conjunction with programs in other 
compatible areas such as economics, government and politics, psychology, 
business, etc This program versatility and the rich experiential learning 
possibilities of the Washington Metropolitan Area combine to make the 
sociology curriculum a valuable career choice. 

Requirements of the Sociology Major. The student in sociology must 
complete 47* hours of d'^partmental reguirements. none of which may be 
taken pass/fail Thirty-two' of these hours are in sociology coursework which 
must be completed with a minumum average of C. 14' hours are m required 
core courses and 18 hours are sociology electives, of which 9 are required at 
the 400 level and an additional 3 are required at either the 300 or 400 level. 
Required core courses for all maiors are SOCY 100 (Introduction), SOCY 201 
(Statistics), SOCY 203 (Theory), and SOCY 202 (Methods) 

SOCY 100 should be taken in the freshman or sophomore year followed by 
SOCY 203 Three hours of mathematics (STAT 100, MATH 110, 111, 115, 140, 
220 or their equivalents) are required of majors as a prerequisite of SOCY 201, 
SOCY 202 follows SOCY 201. 

The supporting course requirement for majors is 12 hours of a coherent 
series of courses from outside of the department which relate to the student's 
maior substantive or research interests. These courses need not come from the 
same department, but at least 6 hours must be from the Division of Behavioral 
and Social Sciences It is strongly recommended that the student work out an 
appropriate supporting sequence for the particular specialization with the 
departmental advisor. 

Internship. Although internships are not a requirement for a major, students 
are strongly urged to consider the internship program offered by the 
department or through the Experiential Learning Office located in Hombake 
Library. Ma|ors may receive up to six (6) credits in SOCY 386/387 by the 
combination of working in an internship/volunteer position plus doing some 
academic protect in coniunction with the work experience. 

Further information on coursework, internships, honors program, careers, 
and other topics may be obtained from the Sociology Undergraduate Advisor, 
Room 2108 Art/Sociology Buildmg, telephone number 454-5036. 

* 47 hours are required ttecause SOCY 201 and 202 are 4-hour courses. For 
transfer students or those with equivalent courses which are only 3-hour 
courses, exceptions to this 47-hour requirement may be made by the 
Coordinator ol the Sociology Undergraduate Program. 

Course Code Prefix— SOCY 



Survey Researcii Center 

Director Rohmson 
Field Coordinator: Dowden 
Faculty Research Assistant: Triplet! 
Data Manager: Holland 

The Survey Research Center was created in 1980 as a Division-wide 
research facility within the behavioral and social sciences The Center 
specializes m the design of questionnaires and the conduct ol surveys lor 
policy purposes, and has the capacity to conduct mim-surveys, survey 
experiments, and in-depth clinical interviews The Center annually conducts the 
Maryland Poll, a sampling ot public opinion across Ihe State on important 
issues to Maryland citizens, it also conducts periodic surveys of Ihe 
Baltimore-Washington region and shares results ol these surveys nationally 
through the Network ol State Polls The Center provides assistance to 
researchers m sample design, has technical expertise on the storage, 
manipulation, and analysis ol very large data sets, and provides support 
services to archive and maintain such data sets 

The Center supports graduate education by prroiding both technical 
training and practical experience to students Also, the Center has a strong 
community service mission through the provision of technical assistance on 
survey methods and survey design to units of state and local governments, 
and by conducting surveys on a contract or grant basis lor these governmental 
units. 

Urban Studies 

Professor and Director: Corey 

Professors: MaranOo, Stone' (Government and Politics) 

Associate Professor: Christian* (Geography) 

Assistant Professor: Howland 

Lecturers: Laidlaw. Williams 

Affiliate Faculty: Baum. Brower. Florestano, Fogle. Levin. Zeigler 

• Joint appointment with unit indicated. 

The Institute for Urban Studies offers a program of study leading to Ihe 
Bachelor of Arts degree in urban studies. The program is designed to 
encourage students either (1) to direct their learning toward planning and 
management careers in metropolitan-area organizations, or (2) to study 
urbanization processes and methods as a means toward earning a general 
education The undergraduate urban studies program is built on several 
introductory and methods courses that examine the city in its metropolitan, 
interregional, national and international policy contexts The problems of 
planning and management of the metropolis are stressed Students are 
encouraged by the multidisciplmary urban studies faculty to take advantage of 
the rich and extensive cross-departmental resources ol the University's College 
Park Campus. An urban-related specialization from another discipline is 
selected: in addition to coursework in the behavioral and social sciences, 
urban studies students should consider appropriate coursework in. 
Alro-Amencan Studies. Architecture, Civil Engineering, Family and Community 
Development, Geography, History, Housing and Design, Recreation. Computer 
Science. Government and Politics. Economics. Business, and other related 
departments Integrative metropolitan problem-solving, planning, and 
management experiences, such as an internship and a planning workshop, are 
provided Each student, working closely with the urban studies undergraduate 
advisor, designs a program of study based on interests and future career 
plans. Inasmuch as the Institute exists to serve the planning and management 
personnel and research needs of metropolitan organizations in the non-profit, 
for-profit and governmental sectors, career guidance and |0b placement have 
a high priority To that end. internships are encouraged. Students are 
provided with assistance in finding available vacancies, with resume writing 
and inten/iew preparation URBS majors are prepared to enter the professional 
arena or to continue with advanced study. Urban Studies graduates continue 
to have a high job placement rate The undergraduate advisor is located in 
Room 1 123, LeFrak Hall, the advisor's telephone is 454-2488. 

Requirements for an URBS Undergraduate Major. The Urban Studies major 
consists of a total of 42 semester credit hours in which the student must earn a 
C or better in each course. The division of requirements is as follows' 

Credit Hours 

1 5 URBS core courses 15 

II 2 URBS advanced specialization courses 6 

III 7 Supporting courses 22 

Total 42 

/. Required URBS Core Courses (5 courses. 15 credits): 

A URBS 100— Introduction to Urban Studies (or GEOG 150) 

B URBS 210— Behavioral and Social Dimensions of the Urban Community 

C URBS 220— Environmental and Technological Dimensions of the Urban 

Community 
D URBS 350— Quantitative Methods in Urban Studies 
E. URBS 410— The Development of the Amencan City (or URBS 320, or 

GEOG 350) 

OR 

URBS 450— Urban Law 
//, Required URBS Advanced Specialization Courses (2 courses. 6 credits): 



92 Division of Human and Community Resources 



URBS 440— City and Regional Economic Development Planning (or URBS 
488E by petition) 

URBS 470 — Management and Administration of Metropolitan Areas (or 
URBS 488M, or URBS 488B) 
///. Supporting Courses (7 courses. 21 credits): 

Choose from URBS 438, URBS 460. URBS 480, URBS 488 (Selected 
Topics), and additional upper-division courses from other departments 
throughout the campus which support the student's planned supporting 
specialization Supporting courses may be selected from Geography, 
Architecture. Family and Community Development, Housing and Design, 
Economics, Sociology, Criminology, or otfier urban-related units. 

There is encouragement of innovative supporting-course designs that are 
tailored individually to the particular needs of the student These designs 
are developed with an advisor in the Institute for Urban Studies. 

Internship In URBS. Given the career focus of the Institute, internships are 
encouraged Although the six credits for the internship do not count towards 
the URBS maior requirements, they are counted as elective credit However, 
concurrent registration for 399A is possible and the three credits for this 
independent study may be used towards fulfilling the supporting course 
requirement. The course is open both to maprs and non-ma|ors. however, at 
least second-semester sophomore status is required The Institute has an 
extensive Hst of over 130 possible placements for students In addition, 
students may seek out their own placements, contingent upon the approval of 
the Internship Coordinator Some of these organizations include the City of 
Rockville. The United Way. Montgomery County, the U S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development, the Maryland National Park and Planning 
Commission and the Maryland General Assembly More information and an 
application form may be obtained from the Institute, or from Mrs Barbara 
Williams, Intern Coordinator, Room 1113, LeFrak Hall, telephone 454-2662. 

Honors In URBS. For information on the Urban Studies Honors program, 
contact Professor Marando, 1119 LeFrak Hall, 454-6687 or the Undergraduate 
Advisor, 1 123 LeFrak Hall, 454-2488. 

Facilities. See the geography program description for the special facilities also 
available to urban studies students. 

Course Code Prefix— URBS 



Division of Human and Community 
Resources 

Provost: Sloan 

The Division of Human and Community Resources includes the faculties 
and programs of the College of Education, the College of Human Ecology, the 
College of Physical Education. Recreation and Health, and the College of 
Library and Information Services The programs of the Division are essentially 
professional They are designed to prepare professionals interested in the 
quality of life of the individual and in the community factors which influence the 
interaction of people, those who are responsible for community health, 
recreation programs and activities, technical, public and school libranans. 
information scientists, and educational institutions. 

The Division supports the development of research in areas of concern to 
faculty members in all the Departments and Colleges, and research teams 
which may cross departmental and College lines Also, the Division seeks to 
stimulate the development of interdisciplinary courses and programs and the 
extension of professional expertise to the University and community at large 

The Division offers bachelor's, master's, and doctorate degrees in most of 
its programs in addition to various professional certificates The professional 
programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education, the Maryland State Department of Education, the American Library 
Association Committee on Accreditation, and the American Home Economics 
Association, 

Specifically, the Colleges and their respective departments in the Division 
are; 

College of Education. Department of Education Policy, Planning and 
Aomm'siration. Department of Counseling and Personnel Services. Department 
of Curriculum and Instruction. Department of Industrial. Technological and 
Occupational Education. Department of Measurement. Statistics and 
Evaluation, Department of Special Education, and Institute for Child Study. 

College of Human Ecology. Department of Family and Community 
Development. Department of Food. Nutrition and Institution Administration, 
Department of Housing and Design, Department of Textiles and Consumer 
Economics. 

College of Library and Information Services. This College is a separate 

professional College committed soieiy to graduate study and research. 

College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. Department of Health 
Education. Department of Physical Education, and Department of Recreation, 



Center on Aging 

The Center on Aging stimulates and supports aging-related activities within 
existing departments, colleges, and schools throughout the various campuses 
of the University The Center coordinates the Graduate Gerontology Certificate 
(Masters and Doctoral levels), the University's first approved graduate 
certificate program The Center assists undergraduate and graduate students 
interested in the field of gerontology and helps them to devise educational 
programs to meet their goals The Center has become one of the nat'ons 
foremost applied-gerontology trainers It also sponsors a colloquium series on 
aging, conducts community education programs, assists faculty in pursuing 
research activities in the field of aging, publishes a newsletter, conducts 
conferences on adulthood and agmg-reiated topics, and provides on- and 
off-campus technical assistance to practitioners who serve older adults. 

Intensive Educational Development Program 

The Intensive Educational Development Program (lED) is a supix)rtive 
service program designed to provide comprehensive services to freshmen and 
sophomores currently enrolled in The University of Maryland College Park, and 
to high school seniors seeking admission to the University Specifically, the 
program is designed to provide sen/ices m the areas of English, study skills, 
math, counseling, academic advising and tutoring The program encourages 
students to utilize all program and University services which would enable 
them to develop their intellectual, personal, social, and economic potential 

All prospective students attempting to gam entrance to the University by 
participation in the program are required to participate in the six-weeks 
Summer Transitional Program that is designed to develop, expand, and 
improve the individual's skills in English, math, and study skills, provide a 
learning experience that will assist the students in the transition from high 
school to the University, and provide an opportunity to challenge and further 
evaluate each student's potential for success at this University 

Following the initial summer component and throughout the academic year, 
lED lends support for all students on the College Park Campus through a free, 
comprehensive tutonng program; sound academic advisement, continuing 
development of English, math, reading, and study skills, and personal 
counseling Hourly math exam reviews are scheduled, as well as workshops on 
time management, note taking and theme writing 

Intensive Educational Development Program, Room 0111. Chemistry 
Building, Phone 454-4646. 4647. 

Upward Bound Program 

The University of Maryland Upward Bound Program is designed to provide 
academic and counseling assistance to capable but underachieving high 
school students with the purpose of preparing them to pursue some form of 
post-secondary education Upward Bound serves as a supplement to its 
participants' secondary school experiences, it provides the opportunity for 
each student to improve or develop the skills necessary for acguinng a 
positive self-image, broadening his/her educational and cultural perspective, 
and for identifying and actualizing undiscovered potentials. 

Upward Bound students are selected from high schools in Prince George's 
and Montgomery Counties, and are recommended to the program through 
high school principals, teachers, counselors, talent search, social service 
agencies, and individuals knowledgeable about the program The academic 
skills development and counseling services are available to students 
throughout the school year and during the summer program Academic 
instruction, tutoring, counseling and Other related innovative educational 
experiences are provided for the purpose of developing basic academic skills 
and motivation necessary for success in secondary schools and to assure that 
each student gams a minimum of one year's growth in the basic skills areas of 
communication and mathematics 

Persons interested in further information regarding the Upward Bound 
Program should contact The Director of Upward Bound. Room 2101. West 
Education Annex. The University of Maryland. College Park, Maryland 20742. 
Telephone Number 454-2116 



College of Education 



Dean: Scannell 

The College of Education offers programs for persons preparing for the 
following educational endeavors (1) teaching m colleges, secondary schools. 
middle schools, elementary schools, kindergarten and nursery schools. (2) 
teaching in special education programs. (3) school librarians and resource 
specialists. (4) educational work m trades, industries and other non-schoo) 
settings. (5) pupil personnel counseling and guidance services. (6) supervision 
and administration. (7) curriculum development. (8) rehabilitation programs. (9) 
evaluation and research. (10) government agencies, policy groups, and 
professional associations 

The College is committed to continuous research and evaluation in relation 
to teaching and learning Undergraduate programs of the College of Educal.on 
contribute to the enhancement of research From time to time vanous 
experimental processes may be in place withm program components and 
students may be invited to actively participate with graduate students and 
faculty members in research undertakings and evaluation processes. 



College of Education 93 



Because of Ihe location ol Ihe University in a suburb ol the nation s capital, 
unusual laciiilies (or the study of education a'e available to its students and 
faculty The Library of Congress, the library of the United Slates Department ol 
Education, and special libraries of other government agencies are accessible, 
as well as the information services of the Mational Education Association, the 
American Council on Education, United Slates Department of Education, and 
Other organi<;ations, public and private The school systems of the District of 
Columbia. Baltimore and the counties ol Maryland offer generous cooperation. 

All bachelor-degree teacher preparation programs are accredited by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and have been 
approved by the Division ol Certification and Accreditation of the Maryland 
Slate Department of Education using standards of the National Association of 
Slate Directors of Teacher Education and Certification Accreditation provides 
for reciprocal certification with other stales that recognize national 
accreditation The graduate degree programs preparing school service 
personnel (elementary and secondary school principals, general school 
administrators, supervisors, curriculum coordinators, guidance counselors. 
student personnel administrators, and vocational rehabilitation counselors) at 
the master's, advanced graduate specialist and doctoral degree levels are fully 
accredited by the National Council tor Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Admission. All students desiring to enroll in the College of Education must 
apply to the Director of Undergraduate Admissions ot The University of 
Maryland College Park (UMCP) and meet the admissions requirements 
detailed below Students entering with less than 45 credit hours will be 
admitted as "pre-education maprs " Students who intend to teach (except 
agriculture, health, and physical education) should enroll in the College of 
Education in order that they may have continuous counsel and guidance from 
advisors who are responsible for teacher education at The University of 
Maryland Students desiring a major in agriculture and extension education 
should apply to the College of Agriculture, and those desiring a mapr in health 
or physical education should apply to the College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health, 

There are no specific secondary school course requirements for admission 
but a foreign language is desirable in some of the programs, and courses in 
fine arts, trades, and vocational subiecis are also desirable for some 
programs. Students with baccalaureate degrees who have applied for 
admission as special students must have received prior permission from the 
appropriate department, A student on the College Park Campus may become 
a pre-education major at any time, however, it is recommended that this 
transfer occur prior to the junior year because of the requirements established 
for admission to Teacher Education and the required sequence of professional 
courses and experiences. Students attending Maryland community colleges 
are encouraged to follow the articulated programs to accommodate 
transferring to UMCP. 

Admission to Teacher Education. Pre-education majors must make 
application for admission to teacher education at the UMCP Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions immediately upon completing 45 semester hours of 
credit. Transfer students with 45 or more semester hours of acceptable credit 
must apply at time of transfer. Post-graduate certification students must apply 
at the beginning of their program Application forms may be obtained from the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

For admission into a teacher education program, a student must (1) 
complete the USP Fundamental Studies requirements (6 credits). (2) earn 45 
semester hours with an overall cumulative grade point average of at least 2,5 
on a 4 scale (granted by UMCP or other institution) in all coursework prior to 
enrollment in EDHD 300: and (3) have a satisfactory score on the language 
and mathematics segments of the California Achievement Test Level 20, 
Individuals who do not initially meet the criteria for admission to teacher 
education will be given an additional semester in which to become eligible A 
plan for attaining eligibility will be developed by the student and the 
department advisor. 

Once the student has been admitted into the professional program, 
required courses must be completed in an appropriate sequence leading to 
the required teaching internship (student teaching experience) Prior to 
assignment to the internship, all students in teacher preparation programs 
must (1) have maintained an overall grade point average of at least 2 5 with a 
minimum grade of C in every course required for the maior, (2) submit to the 
Office of Laboratory Experiences an application for student teaching. (3) be 
recommended by their department, and (4) have on file favorable ratings from 
prior supervised experiences in school settings including evaluations on the 
EDHD 300 field experiences. 

A health certificate certifying absence of communicable disease is required 
for participation in any education course with a field experience The purpose 
of the screening procedures associated with admission to professional teacher 
preparation programs is to insure that graduates of the programs will be 
trained in a research environment, will be well prepared for leaching, and can 
be recommended for certification with confidence. 

The admission, advancement and retention criteria apply to all UMCP 
students following a teacher preparation program including the various maiors 
in the College of Education, the College of Agriculture, and the College of 
Physical Education. Recreation and Health as well as all maprs in other 
academic programs who are simultaneously fulfilling professional teacher 
program requirements along with requirements of their primary degrees, A 
Teacher Education Appeals Board will review appeals from students who do 



not meet the admission, advancement or retention criteria An appeal for 
admission review is submitted initially at the UMCP Olfice ol Undergraduate 
Admissions An appeal for advancement and retention review may be initiated 
with your program advisor. 

Student Teaching. The student teaching experience is for most students the 
linal experience in a professional program preparing them for the beginning 
teaching years This culminating phase of the teacher education program 
provides the prospective teacher with the opportunity to integrate theory and 
practice in a comprehensive, reality-based, experience. Student teaching 
placements, as wen as ail other field experiences, are arranged by Ihe Olfice 
of Laboratory Experiences Prior to receiving a student feaching placement, 
prospective student teachers must have been admitted to teacher education 
and have completed requirements as described in the previous section. 

Most student teaching placements and accompanying seminars are 
arranged in the Teacher Education Centers and other collaborative field sites 
jointly administered by the College of Education and participating school 
systems. Prospective student teachers are reminded that student teaching 
together with the seminar is a full time commitment, consequently students are 
restricted from outside employment or enrollment in other coursework during 
the student teaching experience Students should contact the Office of 
Laboratory Experiences if there are any questions regarding this policy. 

The Office of Laboratory Experiences is a service unit designed to provide 
quality field placements, in schools and other agencies, to students and faculty 
interested in the study of education This office serves the functions of program 
liaison, staff development, and research facilitation in regard to field 
experiences The office also arranges on-campus tuberculosis testing in the 
Beniamin Building for the convenience of students and faculty. Student 
teaching information and application meetings are held each semester. 
Placement assistants are always available to assist students with their 
questions or concerns regarding all field placement matters. 

Graduation Requirements of the College. Minimum requirements for 
graduation are 120 semester hours. Specific program requirements for more 
than the minimum must be fulfilled 

In addition to the University Studies Program requirements and the specific 
requirements for each curriculum, the College requires EDHD 300. EDPA 301, 
and 3 semester hours of an approved speech course. 

A grade of C or better is required in (1) every education course; (2) all 
academic courses required in the major and minor; and (3) the required 
speech course An overall grade point average of 2 5 must be maintained after 
admission to Teacher Education, A grade of S is required in student teaching. 

Exceptions to curricular requirements and rules of the College of Education 
must be recommended by the students advisor, and department chairperson, 
and approved by the dean. 

Students who arc not enrolled in the College of Education but. who through 
an established cooperative program with another college, are preparing to 
teach and wish to register in professional education courses required for 
certification must meet all admission, scholastic and curricular requirements of 
the College of Education. 

Certification of Teachers. The Maryland State Department of Education issues 
certilicaies to teach in the public schools of the State Graduates of approved 
programs within the College will automatically meet the requirements for State 
Department certification. The College of Education is also approved by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are 
conferred by the College of Education The determination of which degree is 
conferred is dependent upon the amount of liberal arts study included in a 
particular degree program. 

Center for Educational Research and Development (CERD). CERD provides 
opportunities for educators to conduct basic research projects which are 
intended to contribute to the store of knowledge about the purposes, functions, 
and operations of educational programs. The Center's applied research 
projects focus on current policy issues and educational problems. 

Curriculum Laboratory. The Curriculum Laboratory is a model learning 

resource center serving the information needs of preservice and inservice 
teacher education students Included in the collection are curriculum guides, 
reference and professional books, elementary and secondary textbooks, 
exemplary instructional materials, research documents, standardized test 
specimens, and professional journals. 

Educational Technology Center. The center is designed as a multi-media 
facility for students and faculty of the College, It distributes closed-circuit 
television throughout the building, provides audio-visual equipment and 
service, a computer terminal, a learning lab. and instruction in all aspects of 
instructional materials, aids, and new media Production and distribution rooms 
and a studio are available for closed-circuit television and a video tape system. 
Laboratories are available for graphic and photographic production with 
facilities for faculty research and development in use of instructional media. 
Supporting the professional faculty in the operation of the center are media 
specialists. 



94 College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Institute lor the Study of Exceptional Ctiildren and Youth. The Insiiiuie, 

adiunci to the Department ol Special Education, is a problem-centered 
organization engaged in innovation, research, and evaluation related to maior 
issues altecling the lives ol exceptional individuals— the gilted and talented as 
well as the handicapped Some of the current proiects address 
microcomputers and related technology, leadership policy personnel 
preparation, and programs for the gifted and talented. 

Mathematics Center. The Center provides a mathematics laboratory lor 
undergraduate and graduate students, and a program of clinical diagnostic 
and corrective/remedial services for children (jiimc services are a pan of a 
program in elementary school mathematics at the graduate level. 

Music Educators National Conference Historical Center. The University of 
lytaryiand and the Music Educates National Conference established the MENC 
Historical Center in 1965 for the purpose of buiidmg and maintaining a 
research collection which vi/ouid reflect the development and current practices 
in music education Located m McKeidm Library, the center includes study 
space and is prepared to assist scholars in the field Materials in the loliowmg 
categories are collected, archival documents of MENC. instructional materials, 
professional publications, curricular. administrative, and philosophical 
materials, manuscripts, personal letters and other historical materials. 

Center of Rehabilitation and Manpower Services. The Center of 
Rehabilitation and Manpower Services is one ol the operating Divisions ol the 
Department ol Industrial. Technological and Occupational Education The 
Center was established in 1968 as a lOint proiect of the Department of H E W. 
and the University The Center receives support from federal, state and private 
sources to carry out its mission of improving the vocational training and skills 
of mentally and physically handicapped students and adults in Maryland. 
Delaware. Virginia, Pennsylvania. West Virginia and the District ol Columbia. 
The Center conducts short-term training institutes lor teachers, administrators, 
counselors, vocational evaluators. and supervisors to upgrade their skills. 
Consultative services are provided to agencies and systems interested in 
improving their planning and management policies The (ienter also serves as 
a multi-media resource providing and developing materials specifically related 
to the career and vocational training of handicapped people 

Program content, professional issues and participant concerns are 
integrated into seminar designs to enable the greatest possible gam m new 
skills, information and insight in problem resolution This approach to learning 
requires limited enrollment to insure the quality ol learning Seminars utilize 
participative learning techniques such as simulations, role plays, small group 
exercises, brainstorming, lectures, practicums. case studies, demonstrations, 
in-baskets. games and critical instances. 

Center for Young Children. A dennonslration nursery-kindergarten program 
(1) provides a center m which individual professors or students may conduct 
research: (2) serves as a unit for undergraduate students to have selected 
experiences with young children, such as student teaching, child study, and 
observation of young children, (3) provides a setting in which educators from 
within and without the University can come for sources ol ideas relative to the 
education ol young children. 

Reading Center. The Reading Center provides clinical diagnostic and 
corrective services to a limited number ol children These services are a part 
of the program in corrective/remedial reading offered to teachers on the 
graduate level. 

Science Teaching Center. The Science Teaching Center has been designed 
to serve as a representative facility of its type to fulfill its functions ol 
undergraduate and graduate science teacher education, science supervisor 
training, basic research in science education, aid to inservice teachers and 
supervisors, and consultative services, on all levels, kindergarten through 
community college Its reference library features relevant periodicals, science 
and mathematics textbooks, new curriculum materials, and works on science 
subiects and their operational aspects Its fully equipped research laboratory, 
in addition to its teaching laboratories lor science methods courses, provides 
proiect space for both faculty and students 

Since 1962 the Science Teaching Center has served as the headquarters 
lor the activities ol the Science Teaching Matenais Review Committee ol the 
National Science Teachers Association, The Inlormation Clearinghouse on 
Science and Mathematics Curncuiar Developments, the International 
Cleannghouse for A A A S . N S F and UNESCO, started here that year also 
Within iiie center is gathered the "software" and "hardware" of science 
education in what is considered to be one of the most comprehensive 
collections of such materials m the world. 

Vocational Curriculum Research and Development Center. Located within 

the Depaameni ol industrial Education, the center provides leadership in 
research and development, resources, and supportive services lor individuals 
and groups engaged in industrial, vocational, and technical education 
curriculum development Available resources include curriculum guides, 
textbooks, course outlines, learning activity packages, teaching aids, 
professional lournais. reference books, and catalogs representing local, slate, 
and national curriculum trends 

Study carrels and instructional media facilities are provided for students, 
faculty, local teachers and specialists engaged in vocational curriculum 



research, development and assessment The center maintains linkages with 
similar regional and national agencies concerned with vocational curriculum 
research and development. 

Student and Professional Organizations. The College sponsors a chapter ol 
Phi Delta Kappa, a Student National Education Association and a Chapter ol 
Kappa Delta Pi, an Honorary Society in education A student chapter ol the 
Council for Exceptional Children is open lo undergraduate and graduate 
students in Special Education A student chapter ol the Music Educators 
National Conference (MENC) is sponsored by the Department of Music, and 
the Industrial Education Department has a chapter of the American Society ol 
Tool and Manufacturing Engineers and a chapter ol the American Industrial 
Arts Association 

In several departments there are mlormai organizations ol students. 

Career Development Center, University Credentials Service. All seniors 

graduating m the College ol Education (except industrial Technology maiors) 
are required to file credentials with the Career Development Center 
Credentials consist of the permanent record of a student's academic 
preparation and recommendations from academic and professional sources 
An initial registration lee enables the Career Development Center lo send a 
student s credentials to interested educational employers, as indicated by the 
student 

Students who are completing teacher certification requirements, advanced 
degrees and are interested in a teaching, administrative or research position in 
education, or who are completing advanced degrees m library science, may 
also file credentials 

Other services include vacancy listing in secondary schools and institutions 
of higher learning, notifications of interest-related positions, on-campus 
interviews with state and out-ol-state school systems, and descriptive 
inlormation on school systems throughout the country. 

This service is also available to alumni For further information contact the 
Career Development Center, Hombake Library, or phone 454-2813 

College of Education Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

Counseling and Personnel Services 

Professor and Chairman: Hershenson 

Professors: Birk Magoon, Marx, Pumroy, Schlossberg 

Associate Professors: Man. Freeman. (3reenberg. Hollman. Knefelkamp. 

Lawrence. Leonard, Medvene. Power, Rhoads, Scales, Spokane, Teglasi, 

Westbrook 

Assistant Professors: Boyd. Lucas. Mullison. Strein. Thomas. Waldo 

Programs of preparation are offered by the Department ol Counseling and 
Personnel Services at the master's degree, advanced graduate specialist, and 
doctoral degree levels for counselors in elementary and secondary scixwis. 
rehabilitation agencies, community agencies, business and industry, and 
college and university counseling centers. The Department also oilers 
graduate programs of preparation for other personnel services college student 
personnel administrators, pupil personnel workers, and school psychologists. 
The Department olfers a program lomtiy with the Department ol Psychology 
which leads to a Ph D in counseling psyclxjiogy. 

While the Department does not otter an undergraduate major, it does offer 
a number of courses which are open to undergraduates and are suggested lor 
students considering graduate work in counseling or other human service 
fields. 

Course Code Prefix— EDCP 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Professor and Ctiairperson: Arends 

Professors: E G Camppeii, Carr Fem, Fey. Foistrom. Guthrie. Holliday. 

Layman Lockard, Roderick. Subiett. Weaver. Wilson 

Associate Professors: Amershek. Borko. Bngham. Church. Cirnncione. Craig, 

Davey Davidson DeLorenzo, Dreher, Eiey. Farreii, Gambreii. Gamer, 

Heideibach. Henkeiman. Heikkinen, Herman, Jantz, Johnson, McCaieb. 

McWhinme, Saracho, D Williams 

Assistant Professors: P Campbell, Cole, Gillmgham, Markham, Shelley, Slater. 

H W'li.ams Young 

Emeritus Faculty: Biough, Dufley, Leeper. Risinger, Schindier, Slant 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers three undergraduate 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science degree 

1 Early Childhood Education— for the preparation ol teachers in 
preschool, kindergarten and primary grades (grades or>e, two and 
three) 

2 Elementary Education — for the preparation ol teachers ol grades one 

through Six 

3 Secondary Education— tor the preparation of teachers ol grades seven 
through twelve, in numerous specialization areas 

Advising is mandatory lor all students Before students can enroll in any ol 
the prolessionai courses in Curriculum and Instruction (except EDCi 280), ihey 



College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 95 



must lifsl gam admission to the College o1 Educations Teactier Education 
Program and arrange (or advising Admission procedures and criteria are 
explained m "Admission to Teacher Education" in the section headed College 
ol Education For more inlormation students should contact the Department's 
Advising Office, 454-7346 

The Department also has an experimental Teacher Education Program 
leading to certification and a master's degree Interested students should 
contact the Department's Advising Ofttce (or details. 

Early Childhood Education (Preschool-KindergartenPrimary) The Early 
Childhood Education curriculum has as its primary goal the preparation of 
preschool, kindergarten and primary teachers 

Observation and student teaching are done in the University Center for 
Young Children on the campus and in approved schools in nearby 
communities 

Graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree and meet the 
requirements for teaching ((indergarten. preschool and primary grades in 
Maryland, the District of Columbia, and many states Students should have had 
extensive experience m working with children prior to the junior year 

The following list of courses is presented as a sample program All 
departmental academic requirements listed in Semesters I through IV must be 
completed with a grade of C or better, prior to Semester V. Students should 
consult with an advisor each semester and must consult with their advisor for 
program completion ol Semesters V, VI, VII and VIII 

The professional semesters of the Early Childhood Program are very 
important and highly integrated learning experiences For full consideration 
students, including transfer students, must register with the Department of 
Curnculum and Instruction no later than lylay 1 of the year they plan to begin 
Semester V of the professional block 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Semesters I and II I II 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 1 . 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

Social Science or History course from ANTH, GEOG, ECON. 

GVPT. SOCY or HIST 3 

Biological Science with Lab from BOTN, ZOOL, MICB. or 

ENTM 4 

MUSC 155 — Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher 3 

U S History 3 

Total 16 12 

Semesters III and IV 

Creative Arts (ARTE 100: PHED 181, DANC 100. or THET 440) 2-3 

MATH 210— Elements of Mathematics 4 

MATH 21 1— Elements of Geometry 4 

Physical Science with Lab from ASTR. GEOL, CHEM, PHYS, 

OR ENES 4 

Social Science or History course from ANTH. GEOG, ECON, 

GVPT, SOCY or HIST 3 

EDCI 280— School Service Semester 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 3 

Electives 1-2 3 

Total 15 16 

Junior and Senior Years 

(Semesters labeled as V. VI, VII, and VIII in this sample 
program must be taken as a block) 

Semester V 

Professional Semester 1 

(prerequisite to Professional Semester 2) 

EDCI 313 — Creative Activities and Materials for Young 

Children 3 

EDCI 314 — Introduction to Teaching Reading. Language, 

Drama 3 

EDHD419A — Human Development and Learning in School ,. 3 

MUED 450— Music in Early Childhood Eduction 3 

EDCI 318A — Professional Development Seminar 2 

EDCI 488— Computers in Early Chldhood 1 

7b/a/ 15 

Semester VI 

Professional Semester 2 

(prerequisite to remaining student teaching experiences) 

EDCI 318B — Professional Development Seminar 2 

EDCI 315— The Young Child m the Social Environment 3 

EDCI 316— The Teaching of Reading in Early Childhood ..,, 3 

EDCI 317— The Young Child in the Physical Environment 3 

EDCI 443A— Children's Literature 3 

EDHD 419B — Human Development and Learning in School , , 3 

Total 17 



Semester VII 

Prolesstonal Semester 3 

FDCl -11 2 -Student Teaching— Kindergarten 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

University Studies Program Requirements . 
FMCD 332-The Child and the Family , , 

Total 

Semester VIII 

Professional Semester 4 

EDCI 411— Student Teaching — Preschool 

EDCI 413— Student Teaching— Primary 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

Total 



Elementary Education . This curriculum is designed for regular undergraduate 

students who wish to qualify for teaching positions in elementary schools. 
Students who complete the curriculum will receive the Bachelor of Science 
degree, and they will meet the Maryland State Department of Education 
requirements for the Standard Professional Certificate in Elementary Education. 
The curriculum also meets certification requirements in many other states and 
the District of Columbia 

The following list ol courses is presented as a sample program While there 
is some flexibility in the order in which courses may be taken, students must 
consult regularly with their EDCI advisor to insure that Professional Semester 
course prerequisites and graduation requirements are fulfilled. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Semesters I and II I II 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing . , 3 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 3 

MUSC 155 — Fundamentals for the Classroom Teacher 3 

ARTE 100 — Fundamentals of Art Education 3 

Biological Science with Lab from BOTN, ZOOL. MICB. or 

ENTM 4 

Physical Science with Lab from ASTR, GEOL, CHEM, PHYS, or 

ENES 4 

Social Science or History course from ANTH. GEOG. ECON. 

GVPT. SOCY or HIST 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 6 

7"o(a/ 16 16 

Semesters III & IV 

EDCI 280— School Service Semester' 3 

MATH 210— Elements of Mathematics* 4 

MATH 211— Elements of Geometry 4 

ENGL 280. LING 200 or ANTH 371— Introduction to Linguistics 3 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

U S History 3 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communicatiorr or 

SPCH 110— Voice and Diction or 

HESP 202 — Fundamentals of Hearing and Speech Science or 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 

SPCH 110— Voice and Diction or 

SPCH 125 — Introduction to Interpersonal Communication .... 3 

Social Science or History course from ANTH, GEOG, ECON. 

GVPT, SOCY or HIST 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 i 

Total 16 14 

* Prerequisite to Professional Semester, 

Junior and Senior Years 

Semester V 

EDHD 300E — Human Development and Learning* 6 

MATH or Science from ASTR, BOTN, CHEM, ENES. ENTM. 

GEOL, MICB, PHYS, or ZOOL 3 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 3 

Advanced Studies REquirement 3 

Total 15 

• Prerequisite to Professional Semester 
Semester VI 

FMCD 322— The Child and the Family or 

PSYC 355— Child Psychology 3 

EDCI 443 — Literature for Children and Young 

People— Advanced 3 

Advanced Studies Requirement 3 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 



96 College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Semester VII 

Professional Semester' 

EDCI 322— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary 

Education— Social Studies 

EDCI 342 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary 

Education- Language Arts 

EDCI 352 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary 

Education — Mathematics 

EDCI 362 — Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary 

Education— Reading 

EDCI 372— Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary 

Education — Science 

Total 

Courses are blocked: i e . one section of students remains together for all 
five methods courses Students spend two days each week in school 
classrooms applying concepts and methods presented in methods courses^ 

• These 5 courses must be taKen as a block They are not offered separately The 
Professional Semester is consiOered a full unoeigrafluaie toad requiring all ol a student's 
energies Attendance is required lor all field activities Absences will be made up. 

Semester VIII 

EDCI 481— Student Teaching 12 

EDCI 464 — Clinical Practices in Reading Diagnosis 3 

Total 15 



Course Code Prefix— EDCI 

Secondary Education . Secondary education Is concerned with the 

preparation ot teachers of middle schools, junior high schools, and senior high 
schools in the following areas art. English, foreign languages, library science, 
mathematics, music, science, social studies, and speech and drama 

In the areas of art, music, and library science, teachers are prepared to 
teach in bolh elementary and secondary schools Maprs in physical education 
and agriculture are ottered in the College of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health and the College of Agriculture in cooperation with the College of 
Education Maiors in reading are olfered only at the graduate level, reguinng a 
bachelor's degree, certification, and at least two years of successful teaching 
experience as prerequisites 

The Bachelor ot Arts degree is offered in the teaching fields of art. English, 
foreign languages, mathematics, social studies, and speech and drama The 
Bachelor of Science degree is offered in art. library science, mathematics, 
music, science, social studies and speech and drama. 

Before students can enroll in any ol the professional courses in secondary 
education (EDCI 390. Special Methods and Student Teaching), they must first 
gam admission to the College of Education s Teacher Preparation Program and 
arrange for advising with a faculty member in the area of specialization. 
Admission procedures and criteria are explained in 'Admission to Teacher 
Education" in the section headed College of Education Students should also 
note the sequence and prerequisite lor the professional teacher education 
classes: 

EDCI 390 prerequisite of. or concurrent enrollment in EDHD 300, 

Special Methods: prerequisite of, or concurrent enrollment in EDCI 390, 

Student Teaching prerequisite in EDCI 390. special methods courses, and 
completion of program subject matter requirements. 

All students who elect the secondary education curriculum will fulfill the 
preceding general requirements and also prepare to teach one or more school 
subiecis which will involve meeting specific requirements in particular subject 
matter fields 

The student teaching semester is a full-lime commitment and interference 
with this commitment because of employment is not permitted. 

Living arrangements, including transportation for the student teaching 
assignments, are considered the responsibility of the student. 

Foreign Language Requirement— Bachelor of Arts Degree. All students who 
pursue the Bachelor ol Ans degree m secondary education are required to 
complete two years (12 semester hours) or the equivalent of a foreign 
language at the conege level If a student has had three years of one foreign 
language or two years of each of two foreign languages as recorded on his or 
her high school transcripts, he or she is not required to take any foreign 
languages m the coHege. although he or she may elect to do so 

II a student is not exempt from the foreign language requirements, he or 
she must complete courses through the 104 level ol a modern language or 204 
level ol a classical language 

In the modern languages — French. German, and Spanish — the student 
should take the placement test in the language in which he or she has had 
work if he or she wishes to continue the same language, his or her language 
instruction would start at the level indicated by the test With classical 
languages, the student would start at the level indicated m this catalog 

For students who come under the provisions above, the placement test 
may also serve as a proficiency test and may be taken by a student any time 
(once a semester) to try to fulfill the language requirement. 



Students who have studied languages other than French, German, or 
Spanish, or who have lived for two or more years in a foreign country where a 
language other than English prevails, shall be piaced by the chairperson ol the 
respective language section, if leasibie, or by the chairpersons ol the foreign 
language departments Native speakers of a foreign language shall satisfy ttie 
foreign language requirements by taking 12 semester hours of English 

Art Education . Students in art education are prepared to teach at any level. 
K-12 



Visual Arts Education (K-12) 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics I 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ARTH 100— Introduction to Art 

ARTS 1 10— Drawing I 

ARTS 100— Design I 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech (Communications or 

125 or 220 

ARTH 260— History of Art I 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Sophomore Year 

ARTS 220— Intermediate Drawing 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ARTH 261-Hislory of Art II 

ARTS 320— Painting I 

EDIT 273— Practicum-Ceramics 

EDIT 106— Teaching Creative (Donstnjclion Activities 
ARTS 330— Sculpture I 



Total 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

ARTS 428— Painting II 

EDCI 406— Practicum— Two Dimensional 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

EDCI 480— Child and Curnculum— Elementary 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

Total 

Senior Year 

EDCI 403— Teaching of Art Criticism 

Eiectives 

EDCI 4C)0 — Seminar in An Education 

EDCI 300— Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education . . . 
EDCI 402— Student Teaching m Secondary Schools— Art . . 

EDCI 407— Praciicum— Three Dimensional 

ARTS 340— Printmaking I 

EDCI 401— Student Teaching in Elementary Schools— Art , . 

Total 



English Education . A major in English Education requires 45 semester hours 
in English and speech. All electives in English must be approved by the 
student s advisor. 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MATH 1 TO— Introduction to Mathematics 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 

SPCH 125 or 220 

Foreign Language* 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing or 

ENGL 101 H — Honors Composition 

Total 



* Intermediate mastery ot a moOem or classical language required 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 201— World Literature or ENGL 202 

ENGL 281— Standard English Grammar. Usage, and Diction 

ENGL 310-312— English Literature 

ENGL 301— Critical Methods in the Study ol Literature or 

ENGL 453 

LING 20O— Introductory Linguistics 

SPCH 230— Argumentation and Debate or 

SPCH 330. 350 or 356 

Electives 

Total 



College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 97 



Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 
ENGL 384 — Concepts o1 Grammar or 

ENGL 385. 482 or 484 

ENGL 304 — Shakespeare or 

ENGL 403 or 404 

ENGL 313 — American Literature or 

ENGL 430. 431 , 432 or 433 

EDHD 3(X3S — Human Development and Learning 

EDPA 301 — Foundations ol Education 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods ol Secondary Education 

EDCI466 — Literature (or Adolescents 

EDCI 467— Teaching Writing 

Total 



Senior Year 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition or 

ENGL 393 or 493 

ENGL Eiectives (Upper Level) 

EDCI 447 — Field Experience in English Teaching 

EDCI 340 — Curriculum Instruction and Observation— English 

Methods 

EDCI 463 — The Teaching of Reading in the Secondary School 

EDCI 441— Student Teaching— English 

EDCI 440 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary 

Education: English 

Total 



Grand Total Credits=127 



Foreign Language Education . The Foreign Language Education curriculum 
is designed for prospective foreign language teachers in secondary schools. 
The current focus is on Spanish, French and German. Students seeking 
certification in the areas of Hebrew. Italian. Latin. Portuguese or Russian must 
apply for certification through a "Credit Count' procedure, rather than a 
departmental "Approved Program". Further information can be obtained 
through a foreign language education advisor in the Curriculum and Instruction 
Office 

A minimum of 30 prescribed semester hours in a foreign language plus 9 
hours of eiectives in a related area for a total of 39 hours is required. The 
student is strongly advised to begin or continue a second foreign language. 
The foreign language education advisor must approve the 9 hours of "related 
area" credit. The following requirements must be met within the 30 required 
hours; one year of advanced conversation, one year of advanced grammar 
and composition, one year of survey of literature, one year of advanced 
literature (400 level), one semester of advanced civilization (300 or 400 level), 
and one semester of applied linguistics Equivalents to the above must be 
approved by the appropriate education advisor. 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 

SPCH 100. 125. or 220— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication 

Intermediate Foreign Language (or appropriate level as 

determined by placement exam) 

Eiectives* 



Semester 




Credit Hours 


1 


/; 


3 


6 


3 




3 






3 


3 


3 


3 


1 



Total 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements .... 
Foreign Language — Grammar and Composition 

Foreign Language — Survey of Literature 

Foreign Language — Advanced Conversation . . 

Total 



Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

Foreign Language — Literature (400 level) 

Foreign Language — Civilization 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 
Eiectives in Foreign Language, a second foreign language or 

advanced language course 

Foreign Language or English Applied Linguistics 



Senior Year 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

EDCI 430— Seminar in Student Teaching" 3 

EDCI 330 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education Foreign Language'" 3 

EDCI 431— Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools*" ... 12 

Elective from 400level courses in foreign language education. 
See appropriate education area advisor lor list 

of current offerings 3 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 3 

Eiectives* 6 

Total 18 15 

• Foreign Language Education maiors and Arts and Humanities ceniricalion students orly 

are strongly advised lo elect courses whicti lead to a second area ol concentration in a 

foreign language Foreign language education maiors must contact an education advisor in 

order lo plan an Integrated program o( speciali2ed professional and litieral education. 

Foreign language maiors seeking certification only should be advised by their foreign 

language advisor 

** Musi be taken concurrently with student teactiing .which occurs during a spring 

semester only This course is for foreign language student teachers only. 

**• EDCI 330 is offered fall semester only and must be taken In senior year preceding 

enrollment in EDCI 430 and 431. vvtilch are ottered in spring onfy. 



Library Science Education . All students anticipating work in library science 
education should consult with advisors in this area at the beginning of the 
sophomore year Students enrolled In this curriculum will pursue a Bachelor of 
Arts degree with an area of concentration of 36 hours In one of the following: 
Arts and Humanities. Behavioral and Social Sciences, or Mathematics and 
Science Students may concentrate In a subject area subsumed under one of 
these fields, or they may choose a broad spectrum of courses In one of the 
areas under the guidance of their advisors. The minor of 18 hours will be 
library science education. Students In library science education will complete 
fifteen semester hours in directed library experience as their student leaching 
requirement. The student teaching semester Is a full-time commitment to eight 
weeks each In a secondary and elementary school, A concurrent seminar will 
also be a part of this experience. Students completing this curriculum will be 
eligible for certification as an Educational Media Associate. Level I, and will 
qualify to work In school media centers under the supervision of a Media 
Generallst, Level II. The following list ol requirements is presented as a sample 
program. 

Semesfer 
Credit Hours 
I II 
6 9 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction lo Writing 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 125 

or 220 

Area of Concentration 

Total 



Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Eiectives 

Area of Concentration 

LBSC 331— Introduction to Educational Media Services 
LBSC 381 — Basic Reference and Information Sources 

Total 



Total 



Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

LBSC 382— Cataloging and Classification of Materials 
LBSC 383— Library Materials for Children and Youth. . 
EDCI 380— Curriculum and Instruction- Elementary . . 

EDPA 441 — Graphic Materials for Instruction 

Area of Concentration 

Total 

Senior Year 

Area of Concentration 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

LBSC 384 — Media Center Administration and Services 
EDCI 483— Student Teaching in School Media 

Centers — Elementary 

EDCI 493— Student Teaching in School Media 

Centers— Secondary 

EDCI 496— Student Teaching Seminar* 

7b(a/ 

* Must be taken concurrently with student teaching. 



98 College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Mathematics Education . A maior m malhematics education requires the 
completion ol MATH 241 or its equivalent, and a minimum of 15 semester 
hours ot mathematics at the 400 level {excluding MATH 490), 400 level 
courses beyond those prescribed {402 or 403, 430 or 431) should be selected 
in consultation with the mathematics education advisor The mathematics 
education maior must be supported by one ol the following science 
sequences CHEM 103 and 113, PHYS 221 and 222. or 161 and 262, or 191 
and 192, or 141 and 142, BOTN 101 and three additional hours in BOTN 
courses, ZOOL 101 and three additional hours in ZOOL courses, ASTR 180 
and 110 and three additional hours in ASTR (none ot which include ASTR 100 
or 105) Also a CMSC 110 is required The following sample program is one 
way to tullill requirements. 



Freshman Year 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 125 

or 220 

MATH 140. 141— Analysis I, II 

Science Requirement 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 



Total 

Sophomore Year 

MATH 240. 241— Linear Algebra. Analysis III 

University Studies Program Requirements 

CMSC 110— Introductory Computer Programming 

Eiectives 

Total 

Junior Year 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

MATH 430— Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries 
MATH 402— Algebraic Structures or 

MATH 403— Introduction to Abstract Algebra 

EOHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

Mathematics Eleciives (400 level) 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods ol Secondary Education 

Total 

Senior Year 

Mathematics Eiectives (400 level) 

EDCI 350 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education Mathematics 

EDPA 301— Foundations ot Education 

EDCI 451— Student Teaching in Secondary School 

Mathematics 

EDCI 450— Student Teaching Seminar in Mathematics 

Education 

Eiectives 

Total 




Music Education . The curriculum in music leads to a Bachelor ol Science 
degree m education with a mapr in music education It is planned to meet the 
demand for specialists, supervisors and resource teachers in music in the 
schools Ttie program provides training in the teaching of general music/choral 
and instrumental music and leads to certification to teach music at both 
elementary and secondary school levels in Maryland and nrost other slates 
There are two options The general music/choral option is for students whose 
principal instrument is voice or piano, the instrumental option is for students 
whose principal instrument is an orchestral or band instrument Students are 
able to develop proficiency in both certifications by taking additional courses 

All students teach and are carefully observed in clinical settings by 
members of the music education faculty This is intended to insure the 
maximum development and growth ol each students prolessional and 
personal competencies Each student is assigned to an advisor wfxs guides 
him or her through the various stages ot advancement in the program ot music 
and music education. 

Instrum«ntai Option 



Freshman Year 

MUSP 109. 110— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) 

MUSC 150. 151— Theory ot Music 

MUSC 102, 103— Class Piano 

MUSC 116. 11 7— Study ol Instruments 

Speech Requirement 

University Studies Program Requirements* 

MUED 197— PreProlessional Experience 

MUSC 229— Maior Ensemble , 

Total 




Sophomore Year 

MUSP 207, 208— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) 

MUSC 250. 251— Advanced Theory of Ivlusic 

MUSC 113. 121— Class Study ot Instruments 

MUSC 230— History of Music . . 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

MUSC 229— Maior Ensemble 

Total .■ 

Junior Year 

MUSP 305. 306— Applied Music (Principal Instrumeni) 

MUSC 490. 491— Conducting 

MUSC 120. 114— Class Study of Instruments 

MUED 470— General Concepts for Teaching Music 

MUED 41 1— Instrumental Music Elementary 

MUED 420— Instrumental Music Secondary 

University Siudies Program Requirements 

MUSC 229— Maior Ensemble 

MUED 410— Instrumental Arranging 

MUED 330, 331— History of Music 

Total 



Senior Year 

MUSP 409— Applied Music (Principal Instrumeni) 

EDCI 484/494— Student Teaching Music 

EDPA 301— Foundations ot Education 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MUSC 229— Mapr Ensemble 

Total 



Vanes according to incoming placement. 



General Music/Choral Option 



Freshman Year 

MUSP 109, 1 10— Applied Music (Principal Instrumeni) 

MUSC 150, 151— Theory of Music 

MUSC 100— Class Voice, MUSC 20O— Advanced Class Voice 

or MUSC 102, 103— Class Piano 

MUED 197— Pre-Professional Experiences 

Speech Requirement 

University Studies Program Requirements' 

MUSC 329— Mapr Ensemble 

Tb(a/ 



Sophomore Year 

MUSP 207. 208— Applied Music (Principal Instrumeni) 

MUSC 230— Music History 

MUSC 202. 203— Advanced Class Piano 

MUSC 250. 251— Advanced Theory of Music 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MUSC 329— Mapt Ensemble 

Total 



Junior Year 

MUSP 405. 409— Applied Music (Principal Instrument) 

MUSC 453— Guitar-Recorder Methods 

MUED 472— Secondary Choral Methods 

MUSC 490. 491— Conducting 

MUED 478— Special Topics in Music Joucation 

MUED 470— General Concepts for Teaching Music 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MUSC 329— Mapr Ensemble 

MUED 471— Elementary General Music Methods 

MUSC 330. 331— History ol Music 

Total 

Senior Year 

MUSP 410— Applied Music (Principal Instalment) 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods ol Secondary Education 

EDPA 301— Foundations ol Education 

EDCI 484/494— Student Teaching Music 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MUSC 329— Mapr Ensemble 

Total 



• Vanes according to HKwning placement 

Physical Education and Health Education . This curriculum is designed to 
prepare students lor teaching physical education and health in elementary and 
secondary schools To obtain full particulars on course requirements, the 
student should 'eler to the sections on the Department ol Physical Education 
and the Department ol Health Education. 



College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 99 



Science Education . A science maior consists ot a minimum ol 60 scmosler 
houfs sludy in the academic sciences and malhemalics 

The following courses are requited lor all science education maiors BOTN 
101. CHEM 103. CHEM 104 (except chemistry, physics, and earth science 
education maprs who take CHEM 113). GEOL 100-110, PHYS 121-122 or 
141-142. ZOOL 101; and six semester hours of mathematics Science 
education maiors must achieve a minimum grade ol C in all required 
mathematics, science and education coursework 

An area of specialization with a minimum of 33 semester hours, and the 
approval of the student's advisor, must be completed in biology, chemistry, 
physics, and geology, as noted below: 

Preparation for biology teaching will include Diversity (either ZOOL 210 or 
BOTN 202), Human Anatomy and Physiology I (ZOOL 201) or II (ZOOL 202): 
Plant Physiology (BOTN 441). Field Biology (ZOOL 480. BOTIM 212 or ENTM 
205, Ecology (ZOOL 212 or BOTN 462-464). l\/1icrobiology (MICB 200), 
Genetics (ZOOL 213 or BOTN 414) 

Preparation for chemistry teaching will include Organic Chemistry (CHEIVI 
233. 243). Quantitative Analysis (CHEM 321). Physical Chemistry (CHEM 481. 
482. 483); PHYS 141. 142. MATH 140. 141 and 3 credits ol upper division 
chemistry courses It is also recommended that the student consider MATH 
240. 241 or 246 as part of his/her program. Chemistry electives must be 
approved by the student's adviser. 

Preparation for physics teaching will include: math through MATH 240. or 
the equivalent. Physics courses will include introductory physics with calculus 
(PHYS 141. 142). lab courses (PHYS 295. 296). intermediate theoretical 
physics (PHYS 404. 405 or 406). and modern physics (PHYS 420) There is 
much flexibility in choosing these courses. In addition, it would be desirable to 
take coursework in astronomy (ASTR 100, 110. 181, 210 or the 300 series). 
Participation in PSSC or PP courses (when offered) would be desirable. 

Preparation for earth science teaching will include: Historical Geology 
(GEOL 102. 112). Mineralogy (GEOL 322). Structural Geology (GEOL 341); 
Geomorphology (GEOL 340); Astronomy (ASTR 100. 110) and 10 credits of 
earth science electives. of which 7 must be in upper division courses. The 
earth science electives must be approved by the student's adviser. 



Biology Education 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics I 

MATH 1 1 1 — Introduction to Mathematics II 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 
University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



14 14 



Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201— Human Anatomy and Physiology I 

OR 

ZOOL 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 (4) 

BOTN 202— The Plant Kingdom 
OR 

ZOOL 210— Animal Diversity 4 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 4 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 4 

GEOL 100/110— Introductory Physical Geology and Laboratory 4 

University Studies Program Requirements 2 4 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 125 

or 220 3 



Total 



14 15 



Jurjior Year 

ZOOL 213 or BOTN 414— Genetics 4 

BOTN 441— Plant Physiology 4 

BOTN 212, BOTN 41 7. ZOOL 480 or ENTM 205— Field Studies 4 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 4 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 6 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 6 

Total 17 17 

Senior Year 

BOTN 462-464 or ZOOL 212— Ecology 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition or an appropriate 

substitute 

EDCI 489 — Field Experience in Education 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 
EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education — Science 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science 
University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Chemistry Education 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 1 13— General Chemistry II 

MATH 140— Calculus I 

MATH 141— Calculus II 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles o( Speech Communication or 125 

or 220 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 

PHYS 141— Principles of Physics 

PHYS 142— Principles of Physics 

GEOL 100— Introductory Physical Geology 

GEOL 1 10— Physical Geology Laboratory 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Tb(a/ 

Junior Year 

CHEM 321— Quantitative Analysis 

CHEM 481— Physical Chemistry I 

CHEM 482— Physical Chemistr/ II 

CHEM 483— Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 

ENGL 391 — Advanced Composition or an appropriate 

substitute 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning 

Chemistry Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 

Senior Year 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 
EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education— Science 

EDCI 471— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science 

EDCI 489— Field Experience in Education 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total ■ 



Earth Science Education 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

GEOL 100— Introductory Physical Geology 

GEOL 1 10— Physical Geology Laboratory 

GEOL 102— Historical Geology 

GEOL 112— Historical Geology Laboratory 

BOTN 101— General Botany 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

MATH 110 or 140— Introduction to Mathematics I 
MATH 111 or 141— Introduction to Mathematics II 

University Studies Program Requirements 

SPCH Speech 100. 125 or 220 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 
3 
1 

3 
1 



Note MATH 140, 141 are strongly encouraged where student background permits. 
Sophomore Year 



GEOL 340— Geomorphology 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 113— General Chemistry II 

GEOL 322— Mineralogy 

ASTR 10O— Introduction to Astronomy . . . 

ASTR 1 1 — Astronomy Laboratory 

Earth Science Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Junior Year 

GEOL 341— Structural Geology 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics I 

PHYS 122— Fundamentals of Physics II 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



100 College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Senior Year 

EDCI 390— Principles & Methods of Secondary Education 

EDCI 370 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education — Science 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDCI 471— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools— Science 

EDCI 489— Field Experience in Education 

Earth Science Electives 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Physics Education 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEfvl 113— General Chemistry II 

(V1ATH 140— Calculus I 

MATH 141— Calculus II 

PHYS 141— Principal of General Physics I* .■ 

PHYS 142— Principal of General Physics II* 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 125 
or 220 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 



• The physics maior sequence (191. 192, 293. 294) or the engineering sequence (161, 
162, 263) may be used and appropriate course changes in Itie remainder of the program 
will be made 

Sophomore Year 

ASTR 1 1 1— Observational Astronomy Laboratory 1 

PHYS 295— Intro Lab in Electricity and Magneticism 2 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 4 

BOTN 101— General Botany I , . 4 

PHYS 296— Intro Lab in Electromagnetic Waves 2 

ASTR 100 — Introduction to Astronomy 3 

IvIATH 240— Linear Algebra 4 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 9 



Total 

Junior Year 

PHYS 404 — Intermediate Theoretical Mechanics 

PHYS 405— Intermediate Theoretical Electncity and Magnetism 

PHYS 420 — Modern Physics for Engineers 

PHYS 305— Physics Shop Techniques 

GEOL 100— Introductory Physical Geology 

GEOL 1 10— Physical Geology Laboratory I 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition or an appropriate 

substitute 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 

Senior Year 

PHYS 406— Optics 

PHYS 499— Special Problems in Physics 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education . 
EDCI 37(3 — Curriculum and Instruction In Secondary 

Education — Science 

EDCI 471 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Science 
EDCI 489— Field Experience in Education 

Total 



Soda! Studies Education 

Option I (History Concentration). Requires 54 semester hours of which at least 
27 must be in history, usually at least six hours in American history selected 
from HIST 156, 157. 210. 211. 255. 264. 265. 266. six hours of non-American 
history usually selected from 130-133. 141. 142. 144-145. 234. 235. 237, 281, 
285. 290; three hours in Pro-Seminar in Histoncal Writing— HIST 309. and 12 
hours of electives. nine hours must be 3(X) — 400 level. Twenty-seven hours of 
related social sciences as outlined below 

At least one course in each of the following areas: sociology (SOCY 100) or 
anthropology (ANTH 101). two courses in geography (GEOG 100 and GEOG 
201 or 202 or 203). in economics (ECON 205 and 310), and government and 
politics (GVPT 100 and 170) Six hours of upper level social science electives 
One of the courses must relate to ethnic and minorities studies and count as 
part of history and/or social science requirements. For those students with a 
minor in geography, GEOG 490 is required. 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 1 10— Introduclion to Mathematics 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 125 
or 220 

HIST 156. 157— History of the United Stales to 1865, History of 
the United States since 1865 (or 6 hours of any 
U S History approved by advisor) 

GEOG 100— Introduction to Geography 

GVPT 1 70 — American Government 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology (or ANTH 101) 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

6 
3 
3 



Sophomore Year 

HIST 6 hours of any non-U S History approved by advisor . 

ECON 310— Evolution of Modern Capitalism in Western Europe 

and the United States 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 

GVPT 100— Principles 

History Electives 

GEOG 201,202 or 203 

Total 

Junior Year 

Social Science Elective 

History Electives 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

Total 

Senior Year 

EDCI 320— Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education — Social Studies' 

EDCI 421— Student Teaching in Secondary Schools— Social 

Studies 

EDCI 463— The Teaching of Reading in Secondary Schools" 
EDCI 420 — Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary 

Education— Social Studies 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

HIST 309— Prosemmar in Historical Writing 

Social Science Electives 

Elective 

Total 



EDCI 320 will be offered fall semester only and must be taken prior to student leaching 
Evening Course Only 



Option II (Geography Concentration). Requires 54 semester hours of wtiich 27 
hours must be in geography GEOG 201, 202, 203. 490 are required The 
remaining 12 hours in geography must be upper division systematic courses 
with one course in regional geography included. Twenty-seven hours of related 
history and social sciences as outlined below 

At least one course m sociology (SOCY 100) or anthropology (ANTH 101). 
two courses in economics (ECON 205 and 310), in government and politics 
(GVPT 100 and 170), in history (one in U S history 156 or 157, and one in 
non-US history normally 101, 130-133, 144-145) Six hours of upper division 
history/social science electives One of the courses must relate to ethnic and 
minorities studies and can count for one of of the required courses The State 
of Maryland requires 18 hours of history (six in U S history) to obtain additional 
cenification as a history teacher. Social studies programs offers either a B S or 
8 A degree 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements . 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics 

SPCH 10O— Basic Principles ol Speech Corrimunlcatlon or 125 

or 220 

GEOG ?01— Physical Geography . 
GEOG ^02— Cultural Geography . 

U S History (156 or 157) 

Non-US History (101. 130-133. 144-145) 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 101 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

6 
3 
3 

3 
3 



College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 101 



Sophomore Year 

GEOG 203— Economic Geography 

GEOG 30&— Intfoduclion lo Geographic Techniques 

GEOG Elective 

ECON 205— Fundamentals ol Economics 

ECON 310— Evolution ol Modern Capitalism In W. Europe and 

the United States 

University Studies Program Requirements 

GVPT 100— Principles ol Government and Politics 

Total i 

Junior Year 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

GEOG 490— Geography Concepts and Source Material 

GEOG Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

EDCi 390— Principles and Methods ol Secondary Education . 

GEOG Elective 

GVPT 1 70 — American Government 

Total 15 Ts 

Senior Year 

EDCI 320 — Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education— Social Studies* 3 

EDCI 421— Student Teaching in Secondary Education— Social 

Studies 12 

EDCI 420— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary 

Education— Social Studies 3 

EDCI 463 — Teaching Reading in Secondary Schools" 3 

EDPA 301— Foundations ol Education 3 

Social Science/History Electives 6 

Electives 4 

Total 19 Tb 

■ EDCI 320 will be ottered fall semester only and must be taken prior lo student leactiing. 

" Evening Course Only 

Option III (Psychology Concentration). Requires 57 semester hours of social 
sciences of which 24 hours must be in psychology Psychology 100. 200. and 
one of the following (Psych 400, 410 or 420) are required Psychology 405, 
451. and 467 are strongly recommended, ten hours must be at the 400 level. 
Replication of 300-ievel courses at the 400 level is not allowed (i e.. not both 
361 and 461. nor 333 and 433, etc ) Independent studies 478 and 479 are 
also disallowed as credit in the 24 hour requirement 

Twelve semester hours of history are required, of which six semester hours 
must be United States history. 

Twenty-one semester hours of related social science courses are required 
and must include six hours of political science, six hours of geography, six 
hours of economics, and three hours of either sociology or anthropology One 
of the courses must be related to ethnic and minorities studies and can count 
for one of the required courses. 



Freshman Year 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication . . . 

GEOG 100— Introduction to Geography 

US History 

Sociology or Anthropology 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

PSYC 200— Statistical Methods in Psychology 

Psychology Elective 

Economics 

Government 

University Studies Program Requirements 

History 

Total 

Junior Year 

PSYC 400 or 410 or 420 

Psychology Electives 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning 

EDCI 320— Curncuium and Instruction in Education— Social 

Studies' 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

GEOG 201, 202 or 203 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Total 

Senior Year 

Psychology Electives 

EDCI 421— Student Teaching in Secondary Education— Social 

Studies 

EDCI 420— Student Teaching Seminar in Secondary 

Education— Social Studies 

EDCI 463— Teaching ol Reading m the Secondary School 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

University Studies Program Requirements .• . . . 

Government 

Total 

• EDCI 320 will be ottered tall semester only and must be taken prior to student leaching. 

Speech and Drama Education . A major in speech and drama education 
requires 37 semester hours of speech and drama content The program 
provides for designing a program of study appropriate to prospective teachers 
in the communication field A 24 hour English minor is to be selected in 
consultation with the advisor Students desiring a Bachelor ol Arts degree must 
also meet departmental foreign language requirements. 



18 



Speech and Drama Education 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

DART 1 10— Introduction to the Theatre 

DART 120— Acting 

SPCH 110— Voice and Diction 

Elective in Speech and Drama 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

3 

3 6 

15 15 



Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements . 
SPCH 350— Foundations of Communication 
SPCH 20O— Advanced Public Speaking . . . 

SPCH 220— Group Discussion 

Maior Area Electives in Speech and Drama 
Minor Area: English suggested 

Total 



Junior Year 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

SPCH 477— Speech Communication and the Study of 

Language Acquisition 

SPCH 489— Speech Communication Workshop 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning . . . 

Minor Area English suggested 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Senior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

HESP 401— Survey of Speech Disorders 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

Minor Area English suggested 

EDCI 340— Curriculum and Instruction in Secondary 

Education— Speech" 

EDCI 442— Student Teaching m Speech/Drama 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 



Total 15 18 

■ Fall only. 

Course Code Prefix- EDCI 

Education Policy, Planning, and Administration 

Professor and Chairman: Warren 

Professors: V E Anderson (Emeritus), Andrews, Berdahl. Berman. Carbone, 

Dudley. Finkeistem, McCiure (Emeritus), McLoone, Male, Newell (Emeritus), 

Stephens, van Zwoll (Emeritus). Wiggin (Ementa) 

Associate Professors: Agre, Clague, Goldman, Hopkins, Huden, Lindsay, Noll, 

Seiden, Sptaine 

Assistant Professors: Coiey. Intriligator. King. Schmidtlein, Slater 

Affiliate Assistant Professors: Edeistein, Giimour. Meismger, Teague 

The Deoartment offers undergraduate preparation in the Foundations of 
Education (EDPA 301) and in Education Communications (EDPA 440) The 
distributive studies requirement of the University Studies Program includes 
EDPA 201. Education in Contemporary American Society, and EDPA 210, 



102 College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Education The advanced studies 
requirement ot the University Studies Program includes EDPA 488G. 
Technology, Social Change, and Education Graduate programs at the 
master's degree, advanced graduate specialist, and doctoral degree levels 
include preparation tor administrators and policy analysts in education-related 
agencies, school superintendents, principals, supervisors, human relations 
specialists, curriculum directors, cumculum-media specialists, and 
administrative specialists in the areas of tmance, school personnel 
administration, collective bargaining, school law, and higher and adult 
education. Also ottered are graduate programs for the preparation of 
professors and researchers m the fields of comparative education (the study of 
educational systems in other regions of the world): curriculum theory; 
economics and finance of education, education administration, education law; 
education media, education policy, higher education, history ot education; 
philosophy of education, politics of education, and sociology ol education. 
Course Code Prelix— EDPA 

Human Development (Institute for Child 
Development) 

Professor and Director: Hardy 

Prolessors: Bowie (Emerita). Dittmann (Emerila), Eliot, Goering (Emeritus). 

Grambs, Hatfield. Kurtz (Ementus), Morgan {Emeritus). Perkins (Emeritus), 

Seefeidt Tomey-Purta 

Associate Professors: Bennett, Flatter, Gardner, Huebner. Koopman. Marcus, 

Matleson, Miihoilan, Robertson-Tchabo. Rogoisky, Tyler 

Assistarit Professors: Fox, Green, Holloway, Hunt, Taylor 

The Department of Human Development offers: (1) a variety of 
undergraduate courses in human development at the 300 and 400 levels, 
including the areas of development, learning and adjustment, (2) graduate 
programs leading lo the M A , M Ed and Ph D degrees and the AGS. 
certificate, and (3) field experiences and internships to develop competence in 
applying theory to educational practice in schools and other settings Areas of 
concentration in human development include infancy, early childhood, 
adolescence, adulthood, and aging Research in social, physiological, 
personality and cognitive areas with emphasis on the social aspects of 
development enhance the instructional program 

Through the Institute for Child Study, the faculty provide consultant 
services and staff development programs for school systems, parent groups, 
court systems, mental health agencies and other organizations involved with 
helping relationships. 

(Jndergraduate courses and workshops are designed for pre-service and 
in-service teachers as well as those preparing to enter tiuman services 
vocations The department does not offer an undergraduate maior However, 
undergraduate students may elect human development courses m forming an 
area of concentration such as (1) infancy and early childhood, (2) 
adolescence, (3) aging, and (4) human services (social service, recreation, 
corrections, etc ) Maior purposes of undergraduate offerings in human 
development are (1) providing experiences which facilitate the personal growth 
of the individual, and (2) preparing people for vocations and programs which 
seek to improve the quality of human life These offerings are designed to help 
professionals and paraprofessionals acquire a positive orientation toward 
people and basic krxDwiedge and skills tor helping others. 

Course Code Prefix— EDHD 

Industrial, Technological and Occupational 
Education 

Professor arid Chairman: Maiey 

Professors: Hombake (Emeritus). Luetkemeyer 

Associate Professors: Anderson, Beatty, Herschbach, Mietus. Peters, Stough 

Assistant Professors: Boyce, Elkins, Hultgren. Hunter, Inana, Sullivan 

Instructors: Ashley, Aumiller, Chin, Gnbbons, Mason, Milligan, Smith, Spear, 

Strenge 

The Department of Industrial, Technological and Occupational Education 
offers programs leading to teacher certification and degrees m five different 
fields of teacher preparation A sixth field of study, industrial technology, is not 
in teacher preparation it is designed to prepare individuals for supervisory and 
management positions in industry, business and government It also offers a 
program in industrial technology which prepares individuals for supervisory 
and industrial management positions m industry, business and government A 
technical education program is available for persons with advanced technical 
preparation who wish to teach in technical institutes or community colleges 

The six curricula administered by the Department include (1) business 
education, (2) home economics education, (3) industrial arts-technoiogy 
education, (4) industrial technology, (5) marketing and distributive education. 
and (6) vocational-technical education The overall offering includes both 
undergraduate and graduate programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor ol 
Science, Master of Education. Master of Arts, Doctor of Education, and Doctor 
of Philosophy An Advanced Graduate Specialist Program is also available m 
the teaching fields identified above 

The vocational-technical programs may lead either to certification as a 
vocational-industrial teacher with no degree involved or to a Bachelor ol 
Science degree, including certification. The University ol Maryland is 



designated as the institution which shall offer the "Trades and Industries" 
certification courses Many of the courses offered are those required for 
certification in Maryland The vocational-technical curriculum requires trade 
competence as specified by the Maryland State Plan for Vocational-industrial 
Education A person who aspires to be certified should review the state plan 
and contact the Maryland State Department ol Education II the person has in 
mmd teaching m a designated school system, he or she may discuss his or 
her plans with the vocational-industrial education representative of that school 
system inasmuch as there are variations in employment and certification 
requirements. 

Industrial Arts Education . The Industrial arts/technology education 
curriculum prepares persons to leach industrial arts/technology education at 
the middle and secondary school level It is a four-year program leading to a 
Bachelor of Science degree While trade or industrial experience contributes 
significantly to the background ol the industrial ans/iechnoiogy education 
teacher, previous work experience is not a condition ol entrance into this 
curncuium Siuoents who are enrolled in the curncuium are encouraged to 
obtain work in industry during the summer months Industrial arts/technology 
education as a middle and secondary school subject area is a part of the 
general education program characterized by extensive laboratory experiences 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 6 

4 

2 

3 

3 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

CHEIVl 102 or 103— Chemistry 

EDIT 101— Mechanical Drawing I 

EDIT 102 — Fundamentals of Woodworking 

EDIT 1 12— Technical Calculations 

EDIT 262— Basic Metal Machining 

EDIT 121— Mechanical Drawing II 

EDIT 202— Machine Woodworking 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles ol Speech Communication 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

PHYS 1 1 1 or 1 12— Elements ot Physics 

EDIT 127— Fundamentals of Eiectncity-Eiectronics . . . . 

EDIT 233— Fundamentals of Power Technology 

EDIT 241— Architectural Drawing 

EDIT 270— Field Experience 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 

MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics 

EDIT 227— Applications of Electronics 

EDIT 223— Arc and Gas Welding 

EDIT 210— Foundry 

Total 



.A;n/of Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDHD 30O— Human Development and Learning 

EDIT 226— Fundamental Metal-Working Processes 

EDIT Elective (Laboratory) 

EDIT Elective 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDIT 31 1— Lab Practicum in Industrial Arts 

EDCi 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 
EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications 

Total 

Senior Year 

EDIT 344- -Curriculum, Instruction and Observation 

EDIT 422— Student Teaching 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development 

EDIT 464— Latxjratory Organization and Management .... 

EDIT Elective 

EDIT 466— Educational Foundations ol Industnai Arts 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Compositon/Technical Writing 

Total 



15 



Vocational-Technical Education . The vocational-technical curriculum Is a 
fou' year program ol studies leading to a Bachelor ol Science degree m 
education it is intended to develop the necessary competencies lor tlie 
effective performance ol the tasks ol a vocational or occupational teacher In 
aodiiion to establishing the adequacy ol the students skills m a particular 
trade or technical area and the development of instructional etticiency the 
curriculum aims at the professional and cultural development of the individual 
Courses are included which would enrich the persons scientific, economic, 
psychological and sociological understandings The vocational-certification 
courses tor the State of Maryland are a part of the curriculum requirements 

Persons pursuing this curriculum must present documentary evidence ol 
having an apprenticeship or comparable learning penod and lOurneyman 
experience This evidence ol background and training is rtecessary m order 



College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 103 



thai the trade examination pfiase o1 the curriculum may be accomplished It 
sullicient trade experience is unavailable, suchi experience must be completed 
while pursuing the degree 

Persons having completed the necessary certilication courses prior to 
working on the degree program may use such courses toward meeting 
graduation requirements Hovvever, after certification course requirements have 
been met. (jersons continuing studies toward a degree must take courses in 
line with the curriculum plan and University regulations For example, junior 
level courses may not be taken until the student has reached full junior 
standing 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication . . . . 

EDIT 1 12— Technical Calculations 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

MATH 1 10 — Introduction to Mathematics or 

MATH 115 — Introduction to Analysis 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Physical Sciences 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

EDIT Elective 

EDIT 270— Field Experience 

Total 

Trade Examination 

Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

EDHD 300 — Human Development and Learning 

EDIT 462 — Occupational Analysis and Course Construction . 

EDIT 450 — Training Aids Development 

EDIT 465— Modern Industry 

EDIT 471 — Principles and History of Vocational Education 

EDIT 457— Tests and Measurements 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition/Technical Writing 

Total 

Senior Year 

EDIT 350— Methods of Teaching 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

EDIT 482— Student Teaching* 

EDIT 461 — Principles of Vocational Guidance 

EDIT 499 — Coordination of Co-op Work Experience 

EDPA 301 — Social Foundations of Education 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 6 

3 

3 

3 



15 



* Student Teaching Requirement In Vocational-Technical Education. 

Persons currently teaching in the secondary schools with three or more years 
of satisfactory experience at that level are not required to take EDIT 482. 
Evidence of satisfactory teaching experience shall be presented in the form of 
written statements from the principal area supervisor and department head in 
the school where such teaching is done Instead of the twelve credits required 
for student teaching, the individual meeting the above qualifications will have 
twelve additional semester hours of elective credits. 

Elective Credits. Courses in history and philosophy of education, sociology, 
speech, psychology, economics, business administration and other allied 
areas may be taken with the permission of the student's advisor. 

Elective courses in the technical area (shop and drawing) will be limited to 
courses and subjects not covered in the trade training experience. Courses 
dealing with advanced technology and recent improvements in field practices 
will be acceptable. 

Vocational-Industrial Certification. To become certified as a trade industrial 
and service occupations teacher in the State of Maryland a person must 
successfully complete 18 credit hours of instruction plus a three credit course 
in special education or mainstreaming. 

The following courses must be included in the 18 credit hours of 
instruction; 

EDIT 350— Methods of Teaching (3) 

EDIT 464 — Laboratory Organization and Management (3) 

EDIT 457 — Tests and Measurements (3) 

EDIT 462 — Occupational Analysis and Course Construction (3) 

The remainder of the credit hours shall be met through the election of any two 

of the following seven courses or completing one of the options: 
EECP 411— Mental Hygiene (3) 



EDIT 450-Trnin(ng Aids Development (3) 

EDIT 461— Principles of Vocational Guidance (3) 

EDIT 465— Modern Industry (3) 

EDIT 467— Problems in Occupational Education (3) 

EDIT 471— History and Principles of Vocational Education (3) 

EDIT 499D— Workshop in Vocational Education (3) 

Additional Options are: 

EDHD 300— Human Growth and Development (6) 

or PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology (3) 

and EDHD 360— Educational Psychology (3) 

A person in vocational-technical education may use his.or her certilication 
courses toward a Bachelor of Science degree A maximum of 20 semester 
hours of credit may be earned through examination in the trade in which the 
student has competence Prior to taking the examination, the student shall 
provide documentary evidence of his or her apprenticeship or learning period 
and journeyman experience For further information atiout credit by 
examination refer to the academic regulations or consult with the department 
staff. 

Industrial Technology. The Industrial Technology curriculum is a four-year 

program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree The purpose of the program 
is to prepare persons for jobs within industry It embraces four major areas of 
competence: (a) technical competence; (b) human relations and leadership 
competence; (c) communications competence; and (d) social and civic 
competence. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

EDIT 262— Basic Metal Machining 

EDIT 101— Mechanical Drawing I 

EDIT 112— Technical Calculations or EDIT Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements 

SPCH 107 — Technical Speech Communication 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Mathematics I or 

MATH 1 15 — Introductory Analysis 

EDIT 121— Mechanical Drawing II 

EDIT 210— Foundry 

EDIT 223-Arc and Gas Welding 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MATH 1 11 — Introduction to Mathematics I or 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus I 

PHYS 1 1 1— Physics in the Modern World 

CHEM 102— Chemistry of Man's Environment or 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 1 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

CMSC 103— Intro to Computing lor Non-Majors or 

CMSC 1 10— Introductory Computer Programming 

PHYS 1 12— Physics in the Modern World 

EDIT 127 — Fundamentals of Electricity Electronics 

EDIT 291 — Introduction to Plastics Technology 

Total 

Summer Session 

EDIT 224 — Organized and Supen/ised Work Experience . . . . 

Junior Year 

ENGL 391/393 — Advanced Composition or Technical Writing 

PSYC 361— Industrial Psychology 

EDIT 443— Industrial Safety Education I 

EDIT 465— Modern Industry 

EDIT 226— Fundamental Metalworking Processes or 
EDIT 233 — Fundamentals of Power Technology or 

EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications 

University Studies Program Requirements 

BMGT 360 — Personnel Management 

EDIT 444— Industrial Safety Education II 

EDIT 425— Analysis of Industrial Training Programs I 

Areas of Concentration (approved electives) 

Total 

Summer Session 

EDIT 324 — Organized & Supervised Work Experience 

Senior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

BMGT 362— Labor Relations 

BMGT 385— Production Management or App. BMGT Elect. . 

Industrial Technology Elective (Upper Level) 

Area of Concentration (approved electives) 



3/4 
3 
3 
3 



104 College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 



EDIT 360— Industrial Produclion Technology or Approved 

BMGT Elective 

Total 



15 



Business Education . Two curricula are offered for preparation of teachers of 
business subiects The general business education curriculum qualities for 
teaching all business subiects except shorthand Providing thorough training in 
general business, including economics, this curriculum leads to leaching 
positions on both junior and senior high school levels. 

The secretarial education curriculum is adapted to the needs of those who 
wish to become teachers of shorthand as well as other business subjects. 



General Business Education 



Freshman Year 

USP Requirements (Distributive) * 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing * 

MATH 1 10— Introduction to IWath I (USP Fundamental) * . . 

MATH 1 1 1— Introduction to Math II (USP Distributive) 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 
SPCH 125 — Introduction to Interpersonal Communication or 

SPCH 220— Group Discussion 

BMGT 1 10— Introduction to Business and Management . . . 

EDIT 114 — Principles of Typewriting 

EDIT 115 — Intermediate Typewriting 

Total 



Sophomore Year 

EDIT 270— Field Experience 

BMGT 220, 221— Principles of Accounting I & II 

ECON 201. 203— Principles of Economics I & II (USP 

Distributive) 

EDIT 214 — Office Typewriting Problems 

Business Electives 

USP Requirements (Distributive) ' 

EDIT 215— Survey of Office Machines 

Total 



Junior Year 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

BMGT 380— Business Law 

BMGT 301— Introduction to Data Processing 

BMGT 302— Information Systems Implementation Techniques 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization 

EDIT 40&— Word Processing 

USP Requirements (Advanced) * 

ENGL 391/393— Advanced Composition/Technical Writing * 

Total 



Senior Year 

EDIT 485 — Field Experiences in Business Education 

EDIT 301— Foundations of Education 

EDIT 340— Methods of Teaching Office Skills " 

EDIT 341 — Curriculum. Instruction and Observation — Business 

Education *" 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

EDIT 432— Student Teaching 

EDIT 415 — Financial and Economic Education I 

EDIT 416 — Financial and Economic Education II 



Total 



USP Requirements 
Spring semester ooly 
• Fall semester only 

Marketing and Distributive Education 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ENGL 101— Introduction lo Writing 

BMGT 1 1(D — Business Enterprise 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 

SPCH 125 or SPCH 220 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics I 

ECON 203— Principles Of Economics II 

Total 



Sophomore Year 

MATH 1 10 — Introduction to Mathematics , 
BMGT 220— Principles of Accounting I . . 
BMGT 221— Principles of Accounting II . . 

Business Electives 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Semester 

Credit Hours 
I II 

7 6 

3 
3 

3 



3 

3 3 

3 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

6 9 

3 
3 



Junior Year 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

BMGT 354 — Promotion Management 

BMGT 351— Marketing Management 

BMGT 360— Personnel Management I 

BMGT 353— Retailing 

BMGT 380— Business Law 

EDIT 486— Field Experience 

University Studies Program Requirements 

7b(a/ 



Senior Year 

ENGL 391/393— Advanced Composition or Technical Writing 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDIT 414 — Organization and Coordination of Distnbutive 

Education Programs" 

BMGT 455 — Sales Management 

EDIT 343 — Curriculum, Instruction and Observation' 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

EDIT 452— Student Teaching 

Business Electives 

Total 

■ Fall only 
" Spring only 

Secretarial Education 



Freshman Year 

USP Requirements (Distributive) * 
ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 
MATH 110— Introduction to Math I 

MATH 1 1 5— Introduction to Math II 

SPCH 100— Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 
SPCH 125 — Introduction to Interpersonal Communication or 

SPCH 220— Group Discussion 

EDIT 1 14— Principles of Typewriting (if exempt, BMGT 110) 

EDIT 115 — Intermediate Typewriting 

EDIT 116, 117— Principles of Shorthand I, II 

Total 



*or 



Sophomore Year 

EDIT 270 — Field Experiences in Education for Business and 

Industry 

Business Elective 

BMGT 220, 221— Principles of Accounting I & II 

ECON 201. 203— Principles of Economics I & II (USP 

Distributive) ■* 

EDIT 214 — Office Typewnting Problems 

EDIT 215— Survey Of Office Machines 

EDIT 216— Advanced Shorthand and Transcription 

USP Requirements (Distributive) 

7o(a/ 

Junior Year 

EDHD 300S— Human Development and Learning 

EDIT 304 — Administrative Secretarial Procedures'" 

BMGT 380— Business Law 

EDIT 406— Word Processing 

EDIT 405 — Business Communications 

BMGT 301— Introduction lo Data Processing 

USP Requirements (Advanced) 

ENGL 391/393— Advanced Composition/Technical / 'ting . 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

6 9 

3 



Senior Year 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDIT 485— Field Experiences in Business Education 

EDIT 340— Methods of Teaching Office Skills" 

EDIT 432— Curriculum, Instruction and Observatior>— Business 

Education"' 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education . 

EDIT 432— Student Teaching 

Business Elective 

Total 

• USP Reguiremenis 
•• Spring semester only 
— Fall semester only 



Home Economics Education . The home economics education curriculum is 

aesgned tor studenis who are preparing to teach home economics it includes 
study of each area of home economics and the supporting disciplines Twelve 
hours of the total curriculum include an area of concentration which must be 
unified in content and which will be chosen by the student ' 



College of Education Departments, Programs and Curricula 105 

Semester measuremeni. statistics and evaluation, gene'aie ofigmai research and serve 

Credit Hours as specialists in measurement, applied statistics or evaluation in schcx>l 

Freshman Year / // systems, industry or government The masters level program is designed to 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 provide individuals with a broad range of data management, analysis and 

SPCH 10O— Basic Principles ol Speech Communications or computer skills necessary to serve as research associates in academia. 

SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication government and business At the doctoral level, a student may choose a 

or SPCH 125— Introduction to Interpersonal specialty wiihm one of three areas: applied or theoretical measurement. 

Communication 3 applied statistics, and program evaluation. 

TEXT 150— Introduction to Textile Materials 3 r^„„r^„o„, cn.ic 

NUTR 1 00-Elements of Nutrition 3 ^°^"^ ^"^^ P-etix-£DMS 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

APDS lOIB-Fundamentals of Design or ARTE Special EdUCatJOH 

100— Introduction to Art Education 3 

SOCY 100— introduction to Sociology 3 Pro/essor and CTa/rman; Burke 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 Professors HeDe'er. Simms 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 3 /(ssoc/afe Protessors.' Egei. Kohl. Seidman 

MATH 1 10— Introduction to Mathematics '. . 3 Assistant Prolessors: Beckman. Cooper, Graham. Harris. Leifer. Leone. Speece 

Research Associates: Adger, Couison, Haynes. MacAnhur. Maloul. Noel, Ogle, 

Total 16 15 Piiaio, Spence, Ziatiow 

Sophomore Year hstructors Aieiio. Amoia. Zantai-Weiner 

BIOL 101— Organizalion and Interrelationship in the Biological ^^^""y (Research Assistants: Andrews. Davis, Dreifuss, Green, McCargo, 

World .... 3 Noble, Skarvoid, Slettner-Eaton, Wizer 

FMCD 250— Decision-Making in Family Living 3 The Special Education Department offers an Innovative and rigorous 

HSAD 240— Design and Furnishings in the Home or undergraduate program which prepares teachers of handicapped infants, 

HSAD 251 — Family Housing 3 children or young adults This program has been nationally recognized for 

FMCD 332— The Child in the Family or many of its exemplary features It is a five-year (10 semester) professional 

EDHD 41 1— Child Growth and Development -. . . . 3 cemfication program which graduates students with a Bachelor of Science 

EDIT 207— Bases for Curriculum Decisions in Home degree in special education with full special education teacher certification in 

Economics 3 the Slate of Maryland and certification reciprocity in over forty other slates. 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 3 Students enter the program as pre-speciai education maiors and enroll in 

FOOD 210— Scientific Principles of Food Preparation and courses which meet University and College requirements- At the same time, 

Management 4 students take supporting coursework designed to provide an understanding of 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 normal human development and basic psychological and sociological 

TEXT 221— Apparel or TEXT 222— Apparel II 3 principles ol human behavior. 

jQigl ,(5 1g Prior to formal acceptance as a special education major, all students are 

required to enroll in a special education introductory course (EDSP 210) which 

Junior Year provides a survey of the history and current issues in special education. Upon 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 6 successful completion of the introductory course and 30 semester hours of 

FMCD 330 — Family Patterns 3 requirements, pre-special education maiors apply for formal admission to the 

FMCD 341— Personal and Family Finance or Department of Special Education by submitting an application with a statement 

FMCD 443 Consumer Problems or of intent specifying their professional goals. 

FMCD 280— Families and Communities in the Ecosystem — 3 In Semester V and Vi students accepted as Special Education majors take 

EDIT 435 — Curriculum Development in Home Economics .... 3 a two-semester sequence of generic special education courses and practicum 

EDIT 436 — Field Expenence in Analysis of Child Development experiences. These courses provide the student with a solid foundation in 

Lab 3 theory and practice related to the education of all handicapped children 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 across a wide range of ages and disabilities. 

FMCD 260— Interpersonal Life Styles or At the completion of Semester V, students select one of the following four 

SOCY 443— The Family and Society 3 areas of specialization. 

Area of Concentration * 6 i Education of the Severely Handicapped (SH) 

ENGL 391/393— Advanced Composition/Technical Writing . . . 3 2 Early Childhood Special Education (EC) 

jQigl 1Q 15 3 Education of the Educationally Handicapped (EH) 

4. CareerA/ocationai Education of the Handicapped (CA/) 

Senior Year Coursework in each of these four areas is designed to develop expertise 

FMCD 344 — Resident Experience in Home Management with a specific handicapped population. Students work directly witfi 

(offered fall only) or handicapped children or youth during each semester, leading up to student 

FMCD 343— Applied Home Management (offered spring only) 3 teaching during the last semester. 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 3 

Area of Concentration " 6 Objectives, Special Education students receive specialized training in the 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 following areas language development, motor development, sociai-emotional 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education . 3 development, normal human behavior: social and educational needs of the 

EDIT 342 — Curriculum. Instruction, and Observation— Home handicapped: diagnostic and educational assessment procedures; 

Economics 3 instructional procedures and materials, curriculum development, classroom 

EDIT 442 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Home and behavior management, effective communication with the parents and 

Economics 12 families of handicapped children, community resource planning, and local. 

Yglgl ^ " ^Q State and federal laws concerning handicapped children and youth Graduates 

of the program are expected to master specific skills in each of these areas. 
• Area of Concentration: 12 semester hours. 

The Area of Conceniration is a block of 12 semester hours credit intended to give the Entrance Requirements. Acceptance to the major in special education is on a 

stuoeni expertise in some special facei ol riome economics. This Clock ol courses is ctiosen competitive basis during the sophomore year, except for a small number of 

by me student and approved by the advisor. academically talented freshmen A minimum grade point average of 2 5 is 

Course Code Prefix— fDiT required for consideration for admission to the department Specific 

requirements are defined under the specialized admissions section, below. 

Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation C^^,,,^ Bachelofs^Mastefs Program, selected undergraduate students 

Professor and Chairman: Ussilz maionng in special education will be eligible lor dual application of credit to 

Professors: Dayton. Stunkard both the bachelor s and master's degrees A student desiring graduate credit 

Associate Professors: Johnson, Macready, Schafer should apply tor admission to the Graduate School during the last semester of 

Assistant Professor: Benson the fourth year. If admitted to the Graduate School, the student may select up 

Affiliate Appointment: SeaiaceK to 12 credits (four courses) of specified coursework from the fifth year of the 

undergraduate program to be applied simultaneously toward the credits 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates. The Department of required for the master's degree in special education at The University of 

Measurement. Statistics and Evaluation offers programs at the master's and Maryland The selected courses may not include field practica or student 

doctoral level for persons with quantitative interests from a variety of social teaching experiences Students will be expected to fulfill supplemental 

science and professional backgrounds In aodition. a doctoral mmor is offered requirements in the selected courses To complete the master's degree, 

for students maionng in other areas The doctoral maior is intended primarily to students must fulfill all Graduate School requirements for the degree, with the 

produce individuals qualified to teach courses at the college level m applied exception of the selected 400-level courses. 



106 College of Education Departments. Programs and Curricula 



Academic Advisement. The Department of Special Education provides 
academic advisement through a faculty and a peer advisement program. 
Special education maprs are assigned a faculty advisor, who is carefully 
matched to the student s area of interest It is required that all students receive 
advisement on a semester basis Students are urged to use the Special 
Education Advisory Center, Room 1235 in the Beniamm Building. 

Student Organizations. The Department of Special Education encourages 
student participation in extra-curricular activities within and outside of the 
University. 

Council for Exceptional Children. The Department of Special Education 
sponsors Chapter 504 of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) The goals 
of the chapter include both professional development of the members and 
service to the University and community Activities include meetings on topics 
relevant to special education, tnps to state and national conventions, and 
student/faculty social events. 

Student Advisory Board. The department Student Advisory Board is made up 
of two undergraduate special education students, two graduate special 
education students, and one representative from CEC These members are 
elected by the student body. The purpose of the board is to represent the 
student body at departmental faculty meetings and to offer student opinions on 
matters of concern. 

Volunteer and Career Sen/ices. This service, coordinated by students, 
compiles and disseminates information regarding volunteer and part-time )0b 
opportunities for working with handicapped students. 

General Information. Specific inquiries concerning the undergraduate 
program in Special Education may be directed to the Department at (301) 
454-2118 All applications are processed through the UMCP Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

Specialized Admission Requirements. With the exception of academically 

talented students, all students declaring special education as a ma|or will be 

accepted as pre-speciai education maiors Consideration for admittance as a 

full special education maior requires the following: 

1. Completion of at least 30 semester credits of coursework including the 

following courses EDSP 210, PSYC 100. SOCY 100 or 105. STAT 100, 

EDHD 411 and 460, lylATH 110 and 210. HESP 202 and 400, and the 

required U S history. English literature and a laboratory science course. 

EDSP 210 should be completed with a grade of C or better 

2 A minimum of a 2 5 grade point average. Admission is competitive beyond 
the minimum required for consideration 

3 Submission of an application together with a statement of intent specifying 
the applicant s professional goals. 

Admittance will be based on the completion of the required courses, the 
grade pomt average, the applicant's expenence with handicapped persons, 
and the appropriateness and clanty of the professional goal statement 

An appeals process has been established for students who do not meet 
the competitive GPA for admission, but who are applying in connection with 
special University programs including affirmative action and academic 
promise 

Admission to the Department usually occurs during the sophomore year. 
Students then take general special education coursework during the third year 
and choose a specialty area sequence at that time. Students are accepted 
Into one of their top two specialty area choices. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



Freshman Year 

ENGM01— English Composition 3 

ENGL Literature* 

HIST United States* 

MATH 1 10 — Introduction to Mathematics 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology' 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology' 

OR 

SOCY 105— Introduction to Contemporary Social Problems' .. 3 

Science with Lab* 4 

HESP 202 — Fundamentals of Hearing and Speech Sciences 
University Studies Program Requirements 3 

Total 16 

Sophomore Year 

EDSP210— Introduction to Special Education 3 

STAT 10O— Introduction to Statistics* 3 

EDHD 41 1— Child Growth and Development 
OR 

PSYC 355— Child Psychology 3 

MATH 210— Elements ol Mathematics ' 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

HESP 400— Speech and Language Development 3 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 

Eieclives 3 

To.al 15 



■ Satisfies both University Studies Program ana supporting area of content requirements 

Junior Year 

EDSP 320— Introduction to Assessment in Special Education . 3 

EDSP 321 — Comparative Approaches to Behavior and 

Classroom Management in Special Education . 3 

EDSP 322— Field Placement m Special Education I 3 

EDSP 330— Families and the Education ol Handicapped 

Children 3 

EDSP 331— Introduction to Curriculum and Instructional 

Methods in Special Education 3 

EDSP 332— Interdisciplinary Communication in Special 

Education 3 

EDSP 333— Field Placement in Special Education II 3 

ENGL 391— English Composition 3 

EDPA 301— Foundations ol Education 3 

Advanced USP Requirement 3 

Total 15 15 

The Severely Handicapped Option 

Senior Year 

EDSP 400— Curriculum and Instructional Methods for Severely 

Handicapped Students 3 

EDSP 402— Field Placement Severely Handicapped I 5 

EDSP 403— Physical and Communication Development for 

Severely Handicapped Students 3 

EDSP 404— Education of Autistic Children 3 

EDSP 405— Field Placement Severely Handicapped II 5 

EDSP 410 — Community Functions for Severely Handicapped 

Students 3 

Advanced USP Requirements 3 

Elective 2 

EDSP 443— Assessment and Instructional Design for the 

Handicapped Reading and Wriilen 

Communication Disorders 3 

Tb(a/ 16 14 

Fifth Year 

EDSP 420— Developmental and Behavioral Characteristics ol 

Nonhandicapoed and Handicapped Infants 

and Young Children or 
EDSP 46ID — CareerA/ocational Education for the Handicapped 3 

EDSP 411— Field Placement Severely Handicapped III 5 

EDSP 412— Vocational Instruction for Severely Handicapped 

Students 3 

EDSP 417— Student Teaching: Severely Handicapped 11 

EDSP 418 — Seminar Special Issues and Research 

Implications in the Instruction of Severely 

Handicapped Students 3 

Elective 3 

Total 14 14 

The Educationally Handicapped Option 

Senior Year 

EDSP 440 — Assessment and Instructional Design for 

Educationally Handicapped Cognitive and 

Psychosocial Development 3 

EDSP 441— Assessment and Instructional Design lor the 

Handicapped Oral Language and 

Communication Disorders 3 

EDSP 442— Field Placement Educationally Handicapped I . . . 3 

EDSP 443 — Assessment and Instructional Design for the 

Educationally Handicapped Reading and 

Written Communication Disorders 3 

EDSP 445— Field Placement Educationally Handicapped II • • 4 

EDHD 413— Adolescent Development 3 

EDCI 456 — Diagnosis and Treatment ol Learning Disabilities in 

Mathematics 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 13 

Fifth Year 

EDSP 446— Instructional Design lor the Educationaify 

Handicapped Functional Living Skills 3 

EDSP 447— Field Placement Educationally Handicapped III . A 

EDSP 450— Program Management for the Educationally 

Handicapped 3 

EDSP 457— Student Teaching Educationally Handicapped 11 

EDSP 458 — Seminar Special Issues m Research ReiaieO to 

\he Educationally Handicapped 3 

EDCP 410— Introduction to Counseling and Personnel Services 3 

Elective 3 

Total 16 14 



College of Human Ecology 107 



The Career Vocational Education of the Handicapped Option 
Senior Year 
EDSP 443 — AssessmenI and Inslrucdonal Design (of the 

Handicapped Reading and Written 

Communication Disorders 

EDSP 460— CareerA/ocational Education (or the Handicapped 3 

EDSP 461— Field Placement CareerA/ocational I 3 

EDSP 462— CareerA/ocational Assessment and Instruction (or 

the l\/lild to Hiloderately Handicapped I 

EDSP 463— Field Placement Career/Vocational II 

EDIT 421— Industrial Arts in Special Education 3 

EDCI 456— Diagnosis and Treatment o( Learning Disabilities in 

(Vlathematics 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

Elective 3 

Total 15 

Fifth Year 

EDSP 450 — Program Ivlanagement (or the Educationally 

Handicapped 

EDSP 465— Field Placement CareerA/ocational III 3 

EDSP 467— Student Teaching: CareerA/ocational 

EDSP 468 — Special Topics Seminar in CareerA/ocational 

Education (or the Handicapped 

EDCP 410— Introduction to Counseling and Personnel Sen/ices 3 

Elective 3 

EDSP 446 — Instructional Design (or the Educationally 

Handicapped: Functional Living Skills 

Total 12 

The Early Childhood Special Education Option 
Sen/or Year 

EDSP 420 — Developmental and Behavioral Characteristics of 
Non-Handicapped and Handicapped Intants 

and Young Children 3 

EDSP 421— Field Placement: Early Childhood Special 

Education I 3 

EDSP 422 — Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood 

Special Education (lyjoderate to Mild: 3-8 yrs) . 
EDSP 424— Field Placement: Early Childhood Special 

Education 

EDCI 410— The Child and Curriculum— Early Childhood 3 

EDCI 416 — Ivlainstreaming in Early Childhood Educational 

Settings 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

Elective 3 

EDSP 443 — Assessment and Instructional Design (or the 
Handicapped: Reading and Written 
Communication Disorders 

Total 15 

Fifth Year 

EDSP 423 — Psychoeducational Assessment o( Preschool 

Handicapped Children 3 

EDSP 430— Intervention Techniques and Strategies for 

Preschool Handicapped Children (Severe to 

Ivloderate: Birth to Six Years) 3 

EDSP 431— Field Placement: Early Childhood Special 

Education (Severe to Moderate) 4 

EDSP 437— Student Teaching: Early Childhood Special 

Education 

EDSP 438— Seminar Special Issues in Early Childhood 

Education 

Elective 3 

EDSP 400 — Curriculum and Instructional (Methods (or Severely 

Handicapped Students or 
EDSP 441 — Assessment and Instructional Design (or the 

Educationally Handicapped — Oral Language 

and Communication Disorders 

7b(a/ 13 

Course Code Prefix— EDSP 



College of Human Ecology 

t3ean: Beaton 

The College of Human Ecology is an inlerdisciplinary professional school 
(ocused upon issues arising (rom the interrelationships and interactions 
between people and their environment Human ecology develops, integrates 
and applies know/ledge and methodologies in the natural and behavioral 
sciences, the arts and the humanities to the identilication, analysis and solution 
of societal problems 

The College o( Human Ecology shares in the obligation of all higher 
education to provide a broad-based education (or undergraduates and 
graduate students The College provides a balance o( pro(essional education 
as well as experiences which benetit the individual personally as a functioning 
and contributing member o( society 

Opportunities are provided through laboratory, practical and field 
experiences (or making knowledge and innovative discovery more meanmgtul 
to the individual Through these experiences the (acuity experiments with 
varying relevant techniques and methods by which the individual can transfer 
to the society-at-large new ideas and methods for more e((ective interaction 
within the social and physical ecosystems in which we function 

Fields o( study leading to a major in the College o( Human Ecology are 
organized into (our departments. Family and Community Development (FMCD). 
Food. Nutrition and Institution Administration (FNIA). Housing and Design 
(HSAD). and Textiles and Consumer Economics (TXCE). 

Objectives 

1 . Oder appropriate comprehensive bachelor, master and doctoral programs 
that address both a broad based education and technical expertise in the 
selected program area. 

2. Maximize resources and resource utilization in order to accomplish 
comprehensive professional programs. 

3. Act as a resource to the University community to stimulate awareness and 
interest in the problems o( applying knowledge for improving the quality of 
life. 

Special Facilities and Activities. The College of Human Ecology building 
follows the campus tradition in style, and a construction program has been 
completed to provide expanded facilities, with modern, well-equipped 
laboratories and classrooms. 

Student Organizations 

AATCC-Student Chapter The University o( Maryland Chapter o( the 
American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists provides students with 
an early opportunity to become associated with the national professional 
organization of /\ATCC and to advance at the local level the aims and goals of 
the parent national organization. Student members develop contacts with 
professionals and fellow students at AATCC meetings. These contacts help to 
orient the student to the job market and to new developments in the field. 
Students in textile science and in textile marketing should be interested in 
/\ATCC 

ASID-Student Chapter. The University of Maryland Student Chapter of the 
American Society of Interior Designers is associated with the professional 
chapter of ASID in Washington D C Student members have the opportunity (or 
contacts with professional and (ellow students at meetings sponsored by both 
groups. Tnese can help to orient the student to the |0b market and to new 
directions in the profession. 

Collegiate Home Economics Organization. The University of Maryland 
Collegiate Home Economics Organization is the student affiliate of the 
American Home Economics Association. Welcoming any human ecology major 
into its membership, the organization meets once a month, and links the 
professional world to the college student through different programs. 

The Collegiate Home Economics Organization is the student's opportunity 
to join a professional group prior to graduation and to participate on a student 
level in the national association. 

Elegant-Student Chapter The University of Maryland student chapter of 
Elegant provides students interested in apparel design, fashion merchandising 
and textile marketing an opportunity to develop contacts with professionals and 
(ellow students at Elegant meetings. These contacts help to orient the student 
to the job market and to new developments in the (ield. 

Craphix. The University o( Maryland Student Chapter o( Industrial Graphics 
International (I G I ) provides students with opportunities to meet, and benetit 
from, professionals in the field These contacts help insure continued updating 
o( pro(essional standards and exposure to diverse ideas. 

MClC-Student Chapter The University o( Maryland Student Chapter of the 
Maryland Consumer Interest Council gives students an opportunity to 
understand the operational side of consumer protection by interacting with 
state and local (igures in consumer education, consumer protection and 
consumer legislation. While composed primarily o( students maioring in 
consumer economics, it also includes consumer oriented students (rom other 
departments, schools and divisions on the campus. 

Omicron Wu. A national honor society whose objectives are to recognize 
superior scholarship, to promote leadership and to stimulate an appreciation 
(or graduate study and research in the (ield o( home economics and related 
areas Graduate students, seniors and second semester juniors are eligible for 
election to membership. 



108 College of Human Ecology Departments, Programs and Curricula 

Financial Aid. A Loan Fund, composed ol contributions by the District of Tne 'ccjs s upon the efficient ana effective utilization of organizational 

Coiumbia Home Economics Association. Maryland Chapter of Omicron Nu. ar;o c^e- cc^mumty resources 

and personal gifts, is available through the Office of Student Financial Aid. ///. Community Studies. This maior stresses community development, 

community organization and advocacy and their relevance to families. 
Admission. All students desiring to enroll in the College of Human Ecology In general there is an emphasis upon the processes and methods for 

must apply to the Director of Admissions of The University ol l^aryland College social change, as well as the individuals, organizations or groups which 

Park act as agents of change 

Degrees. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred for the satisfactory Each of these courses of study includes a set of major subject courses 

completion, with an average of C or (jetter, of a prescribed curriculum of 120 offered primarily withm the Department plus a sequence of supporting area 

academic semester hour credits No grade below C is acceptable in the courses which may be taken outside the Department or in an interdepartmental 

departmental courses which are required for a departmental major. combination Examples of supporting areas include the aging, the disabled, 

_ , _ . , business management, health, housing, public administration, rehabilitation. 

Student Load. The student load in the College of Human Ecology vanes from gnd urban affairs Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an 

12-18 credits per semester A student wishing to carry more than 18 credits appropriate advisor m developing their course ol study 
must have a B grade average and permiss'on of the dean. There are parallel requirements for each of the departments three maprs 

A minimum ol 120 academic credits is required for graduation. However, (,am,iy studies management and consumer studies and community studies) 

for certification m some professional organizations, additional credits are ggch mapr requires a 15-credit set of core courses (a department-wide core 

required. Consult your advisor. of 12 credits and a mapr-specilic 3-credit course), an additional 15 credits 

, ,_, ,,__ c -r- 1 ,-,„-„„, :„-,,-^ ,,<,„t„ «, «,,^,,„i« drawn from a list of maior-reievant departmental courses, and an i8-credit 

General Information. Specific inquiries concerning undergraduate or graduate ,.„ ,., ,„, „, ^„„^ ' ,,„, ,„ ,„„„ ">„ „,,^ .,,„ ,,. ^„„,, „.,„, ,.„„ _,^, 

„,„„,„„,. „ .*,„ /-~-ii„„„ -f u .„ c,„( , ~o., t,„ ^ ,„^.„H 1,^ .k„ -.K.^,™,., «i thematic set of supportive area courses. To graduate, students must also meet 

programs m the College of Human Ecology may be directed to the chairman ol . ,.n,,,.pmpnt<; nt thp camous (e a iho<;e soecified m the Umversitv Studies 

the appropriate department or the Dean, College ol Human Ecology, The d,L^^ rit I. ?hI r-^^^o -Vu ^rn' J^^^^^ 

1 ,_. „ , „, .,„ ,„i\ -„,i^ n_,i 11 1 1 on^xo Program) and of the College of Human Ecology Students should consult trie 

University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742. ^;;^^^^ Undergraduate Catalog and departmental Maiors Gu.de and also see 

Curricula. A student may elect one of the following curricula, or a combination a" appropriate departmental advisor. The major requirements are as follows 

of curricula: experirrental foods, community nutntion dietetics, nutrition p^^, Studies- (a) 15-credit required core FMCD 200. 202. 250. 330. 348. 
research, or institution administration food sen/ice), fannily sciences^ ^ ^^ ^^^ ,5 ,^g ^ 

advertising design, interior design, apparel design, textile marketing, fashion requirements must be selected: FMCD 105. 260. 332, 350. 370. 381. 430. 431, 

merchandising, textile science, or consumer economics^ 432 ^^ ^^^ ^^^ 4gO 4g5 ^g^ ^g^ ^ , approved 

All students ,n the College of Human Ecology, in addition to meeting the , ,^,,3 ^ ,g ^^^^,,3 ,„ supportive area constituting a common focus 

University Studies Requirements, are required to cornpiete a series or ' disabilities and the disabled, or sociology 

sequence of courses to satisfy College and departmental requirements. The » s m -< »» 

remaining courses needed to complete a program of study are elected by the lUanagement and Consumer Studies— (a) 15-credit required core FMCD 

student with the approval of his advisor 200. 202. 250. 348. 349. 444. (b) courses from which an additional 15 credits 

The final responsibility of meeting all the requirements for a specific mapr gf the major's requirements must be selected FMCD 280. 341. 350. 381. 443, 

rests with each individual student. 445 447 452, 453, 433, 434. and special topics courses— usually concerning 

_ ,, , u .Tin. • organizational management — approved for this maior, (c) 18 credits in a 

College of IHuman Ecology Requirements supportive area constituting a common focus or theme, eg , personnel and 

(for every studer^t depending on the mapr) ^^^^, ^3la„^^5 ^, p^^^,,^ administration. 

Credit Hours Community Studies— (a) 15-credit required core FMCD 200. 201. 202. 250. 

Human Ecology Electives " 9 348, 349, (b) courses from which an additional 15 credits of the majors 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 102 3 requirements must be selected FMCD 280, 381. 442. 444. 447. 450. 452. 453, 

f^YC 100 3 483. 484, and special topics courses — usually concerning housing — approved 

ECON 205— Fundamentals ol Economics or for this maior, (c) 18 credits in a supportive area constituting a comrrxjn focus 

ECON 201 — Principles Of Economics 3 or theme, eg, community psychology, international development, or urban 

SPCH 100, 107, or 125 3 Studies. 

ceX'^r^"^' '"""" '° '^ '*^ '" "* '^^' '" '^'^'^ '^ *'" '^'" Food, Nutrition and Institution Administration 

Professor and Chairman: Read 

Professors: Ah'ens Beaton. Prather 

f^r\l\ana r\f Miiman Fnr\\nn\i /Associate Professors.- Axeison. Moser. Williams 

V^UIIt^yt; Ul nUllldll Ct^UIUyy /^ssisranr Professors.- Cnol. Nobie. Richardson, Taylor 

Departments, PrOaramS and /nstn/crors McDonald (pDShipiey Moses (pD 

— ~ . I ' -^ Lecturer: Norton 

V/U rriCU la Adjunct Professors: Bodweil. Hamosh. Keisay. Reiser, Trout 

Adjunct Associate Professors: Goldberg, Reynolds 

Familv and Community Development /*d/unc/ /iss/stanf Professors.- Sehali, Halifnsch, James. Michaeils. Monagan, 

Associate Professor and Acting Chairperson: Rubin Adjunct Lecturers: Biyier Gehlhausen. Gong, Hartwick, Hosteller 

Professors: Gayim. Hanna Affiliate Assistant Professor: McKenna 

Associate Professors: Hula. Myricks. Wilson The area of food, nutrition and institution administration is broad and offers 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Churaman, Epstein. Leslie, Valadez many diverse professional opportun.ties Courses introduce the student to the 

Lecturer: Weri.nch principles of selection, preparation and utilization of food for human health and 

The Department of Family and Community Development is devoted to the welfare of society Emphasis is placed on the scientific, cultural and 

describing, explaining, and improving the quality of life by means ol research, professional aspects of this broad area ol food and nutrition The department 

education, community outreach, and public service The approach is holistic, offers five areas of emphasis experimental foods, community nutrition, nutntioo 

emphasizing human ecology The curriculum places special emphasis upon research, dietetics, and institution admimstraton Each program provides for 

the family and the community as mediating structures in determining life competencies in several areas of work, (xswever, each option is designed 

quality The jobs for which the curriculum is designed include counseling, specifically for certain professional careers 
program management, research, advocacy, and service delivery All areas of emphasis have m common several courses within ttie 

Graduates ol the Department obtain positions in human service agencies, department and the University, the cumcuia are identical m the freshman year 

consulting firms, voluntary organizations, and federal, state, and local Expehmental foods is designed to develop competency m the scientific 

governments Their specific jobs may be in areas, agencies or organizations principles of food and their reactions Physical and biological sciences m 

such as the Federal Drug Administration, Planned Parenthood, youth services, relation to foods are emphasized The program is planned for students wtxj are 

family services, or senior cil zens programs interested m product development, quality control and technical research m 

There are three interrelated maiors offered by the Department foods The nutntion research program is designed to develop r^ -^r^p'pn-v m 

/. Family Studies. This course of study stresses a vwrking knowledge of the area of nutrition for students wfx) wish to empha' "^d 

the growth of individuals througtiout the Me span with particular biological sciences The community nutrition program e'' ; -^d 

emphasis on intergenerational aspects of family living It examines the community nutrition, this program is approved by the -^ . _,--'c 

pluralistic family forms and life styles within our post-technological Association dietetics deveioi^s an understanding and competency .n tood, 

complex society and the development of the individual within the family nutntion and management as related to problems of dietary departments the 

within the community curriculum is approved by the American Dietetic Assoc atioo Instilution 

II. Management and Consumer Studies. Within this major are two administration emphasis is related to the administration ol quantity foodservice 

specializations (a) program management and (b) consumer affairs in university and college residerx^e hails and student unions, scfwoi lunch 



College of Human Ecology Departments, Programs and Curricula 109 



programs in elementary and secondary schools, restaurants, hospitals, nursmg 
homes, coffee shops, and industrial cafeterias. This program is approved by 
the American Dietetic Association. 

Grades: All students are required to earn a C grade or better In all courses 

applied toward satisfaction of the maior This includes all required courses with 
prefix of FOOD. NUTR. and lADM as well as certain required courses in 
supporting fields A list of these courses for each program may be obtained 
from the Department Office 



Dietetics Emphasis 



Freshman Year 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry 

CHEIyl 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

MATH 110— Introduction to Mathematics I or 

115 — Pre-calculus 

ENGL 101— Introductory Writing 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 

FOOD 240— Science of Food I 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology or ANTH 

102— Introduction to Anthropology-Cultural 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

FOOD 250— Science of Food II 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

ZOOL 201 . 202— Anatomy and Physiology 

ECON 205— Fundamentals of Economics 

BCHM 261— Introductory Biochemistry 

SPCH 100 — Basic Pnnciples of Speech Communications 

or SPCH 107— Technical Speech Communication 

Human Ecology Elective 

Total 



Junior Year 

NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition 

lADM 300 — Food Service Organization and Management 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Human Ecology Elective 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutrition 

Elective 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 



Senior Year 

NUTR 460 — Therapeutic Human Nutrition 
University Studies Program Requirements 

lADM 350 — Foodservice Operations I 

lADM 440 — Food Service Personnel Administration 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 

Electives 

Data Processing or Statistics Course' 

Total 



Experimental Foods Emphasis 

Freshman Year 

MATH 110 — Introductory Mathematics or 115 — Pre-Calculus 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

ENGL 101— Introductory Writing 

CHEM 103. 1 13— General Chemistry I. II 

MATH 220— Elementary Calculus 

PHYS 121— Fundamentals of Physics 

FOOD 105 — Professional Orientation 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology or ANTH 

102— Introduction to Anthropology-Cultural 

CHEM 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I. II 

FOOD 240. 250— Science of Food I. II 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology or BOTN 101— General Botany 

BCHM 261— Elements of Biochemistry 

Human Ecology Elective 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Junior Year 

Un;versity Studies Program Requirements 

FDSC 412 or 413— Principles of Food Processing I, II . 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

BIOM 301 or 401— Introduction to Biometrics Of Biostatistics I 

FDSC 430— Food Microbiology 

FDSC 434— Food Microbiology Lab . 
ENAG 314— Mechanics of Food Processing 
ENGL 393— Technical Wnting . 
Total 

Senior Year 

FOOD 440. 450— Advanced Food Science I, II 

FOOD 445— Advanced Food Science Lab 

SPCH 107 or 100— Technical Speech Communications or 

Basic Principles of Speech Communications . 
FDSC 422— Food Product Research and Development 

Electives 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Human Ecology Elective. 

Total 



institution Administration Emphasis 



Freshman Year 

MATH 1 10 or 11 5— Introduction to Mathematics I or 

Pre-Calculus 

University Studies Program Requirements 

SPCH 100 or 107— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communications or Techniques of Speech 

Communication 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 

ENGL 101— Introductory Writing 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 102— Introduction to Sociology or 

Introduction to Anthropology— Cultural 

Tofa; 



Sophomore Year 

MICB 200— General Microbiology ... 

FOOD 240. 250— Science Of Food I. 11 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ZOOL 202— Human Physiology and Anatomy II 

NUTR 200— Nutrition for Health Services 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

lADM 200— Introduction to Food Sen/ice 

Total . 

Junior Year 

lADM 300— Food Service Organization and Management 

Human Ecology Elective 

Electives 

lAMD 350. 355— Food Service Operations I. II 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing , 

BMGT 362 or ECON 370— Labor Relations or Labor 

Economics 

7b(a/ 

Senior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

lADM 450— Food Service Equipment and Planning 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology 

lADM 490 or 480— Special Problems or Practicum 

lADM 455 — Manpower Planning in Food Sen/ice 

Data Processing or Statistics' 

lADM 440 — Food Service Personnel Administration . . , 
Human Ecology Elective 

Total 



Community Nutrition Emphasis 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

MATH 110— Introduction to Mathematics i i 

115— Pre-Calculus 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

FOOD 1 05— Professional Orientation 

ENGL 101— Introductory Writing 



6 


3 


3 




4 




3 






2 




2 




4 




3 


16 


14 


3 
1 


3 


3 






3 




4 


3 


6 


3 




13 


16 


Semester 


Credit Hours 


1 


// 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 



110 College of Human Ecology Departments, Programs and Curricula 



CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry or 

CHEM 233— Ofganic Chemistry I 

PSYC 100— Introductory Psychology 

FOOD 240— Science of Food I 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

SPCH 100 — Basic Principles of Speech Communication or 

107 — Techniques of Speech Communication . . 

MICB 200— General Ivlicrobiology 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 102— Introduction to Sociology or Cultural 

Anthropology 

FOOD 250— Science of Food II 

ZOOL 213— Genetics and Development 

ZOOL 21 1— Cell Biology and Physiology 

University Studies Program Requirements 

BCHM 261— Introductory Biochemistry 



Total 

Junior Year 

NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition '. . 

lADM 300 — Food Service Organization and Ivlanagement 

EDHD 460— Educational Psychology " 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

NUTR 450— Advanced Nutrition 

Human Ecology Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

Elective 

Total 

Senior Year 

BlOfvl 301— Introduction to Biometrics or EDMS 

451 — Introduction to Educational Statistics 

lADM 340 — Food Service in the Community 

NUTR 460 — Therapeutic Human Nutrition 

NUTR 470— Community Nutrition 

NUTR 475 — Dynamics of Community Nutrition 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Human Ecology Electives 

Total 

Nutrition Research Emphasis 



Freshman Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MATH 110 — Introduction to Ivlathematics I or 

115— Pre-Calculus 

NUTR 100— Elements of Nutrition 

FOOD 105— Professional Orientation 

SPCH 100 or 107— Basic Principles of Speech Communication 

or Technical Speech Communication 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology or ANTH 

102— Introduction to Anthropology-Cultural . . . 

ENGL 101— Introductory Writing 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 

CHEM 1 13— General Chemistry II 

Human Ecology Elective 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

FOOD 240, 250— Science of Food I. II 

ZOOL 21 1— Cell Biology and Physiology 

ZOOL 213— Genetics and Development 

BCHM 261— Elements of Biochemistry 

MICB 200— General Microbiology 

Total 



Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Human Ecology Elective 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

ZOOL 422— Vertebrate Physiology 

NUTR 300— Science of Nutrition 

NUTR 450 — Advanced Human Nutrition 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 

3 
3 
1 

3 

3 

3 

4 

4 
3 



4 

3 

3 3 

4 

4 
3 



Senior Year 

BCHM 461 . 462— Biochemistry I. II 

BCHM 463. 464— Biochemistry Lab I. II 

BIOM 301 or 401— Introduction to Biometrics or Biostatistics I 

NUTR 490— Special Problems in Nutrition 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Electives 

Human Ecology Elective 

Total 

' Select from this list: BIOIul 301. 401. BMGT 301. CIvISC 103. 110. EDMS 451. 



Housing and Design 

Prolessor and Chair: Francescato 

Professors: Bonta. K|aer 

Associate Prolessor: McWhinnie 

Assistant Professors: Anseli. Chen, Gips. Roper. Thomas, Thorp 

Instructors: Dean, Odiand 

Lecturers: Bulger (p t ), Davis (p t). Elliott (p t ), Held (p t). Hoover (p.t ), Lee. 

Schurter (p t ) 

The Department of Housing and Design offers programs of concentration in 
three areas: housing, interior design, and advertising design. 

The Department seeks to provide professionally focused instruction in the 
theoretical foundation, methods, and skills pertinent to each concentration 
area In addition, students are encouraged to acquire a broad base of general 
education by enrolling in elective, recommended, and required courses 
outside of the Department. 

Housing. The housing curriculum is designed to reflect the multidisciplinary 
nature of the field as well as the varied interests of housing maprs 
Consequently, students under the close supervision and advisement of the 
faculty are given the opportunity to develop a program suitable to their 
interests and career goals. Aside from the required housing courses provided 
by the department, students are recommended to take courses which will 
emphasize the development of methodological skills (e g statistics, computer 
programming), as well as an understanding ol the political, social and 
economic environment in which housing is produced and consumed. 
Graduates will be qualified for employment in the housing industry, 
governmental housing agencies, housing authorities, and consumer 
organizations. They will also be qualified to pursue a program ol graduate 
studies in housing or urban affairs. 

Interior Design. This program provides the student with fundamental concepts 
and basic professional skills required to plan and design intenor environments 
These include not only aesthetic considerations, but also the integration of 
structural and mechanical building systems, the satisfaction ol functional 
requirements, an understanding of the needs and motivations ol the users and 
sponsors, considerations of cost, and compliance with codes and regulations 
Functional and imaginative applications of design skills to space planning and 
furnishing of commercial, institutional, and residential interiors are stressed 
Special courses include considerations of barner-lree design lor handicapped 
and elderly users, gaming simulation in design, and seminars in theoretical 
concerns A student chapter of the professional organization A S I D and 
internship opportunities provide contact with practicing professionals 
Graduates will be qualified for entry level employment with interior design firms 
and architectural firms Students with above average performance will be 
qualified to pursue graduate study After considerable experience has (seen 
gained in professional practice, some graduates will open their own firm or 
partnership. 

Advertising Design. This program provides a foundation in the fields ol 
graphic and visual communication Although some of the media used m visual 
communication are the same as those of the painter and the sculptor, the 
purposes and methods of the designer differ from those of the artist in that 
utility IS the focus of this endeavor Visual elements such as lines, planes. 
volume, texture, and color are used to generate information and to 
communicate messages. This process requires the acquisition ol specific 
professional skills such as page composition, type selection, illustration, 
photography, design of orientation systems, and the use ol complex 
technology in contemporary printing and electronic media Students graduating 
from this program will be qualified to begin a career as graphic designers and 
seek employment in publishing firms, advertising agencies, ttie film and 
television industry, the print media, the packaging industry, and m ttie graphic 
section of institutions and government agencies Students with atx}ve average 
performance will be qualified to pursue graduate study A student chapter ol 
the professional organization I G I and internship opportunities provide 
contacts with practicing professionals. 

Admission to the Pr*-D«slgn Ma|or. Any student wtx) has been admitted to 
the University may declare a pre-design maior However, admission to tt>e 
University or to the pre-design maior does not guarantee admission to ttie 
interior design or advertising design major Admission to tfiese two maiors is 
governed by the 'Selective Admission' procedure outlined t>eiow. 



College of Human Ecology Departments, Programs and Curricula 111 



Admission to the Interior Design and Advertising Design Majors 

1 Ailiii'ssioti to Ihe mniors ot inict'o' cirsijn and advertising design Is 
seleclivo Ordmanlv. students are admitted lo these ma|ors only alter a 
Design Work Porltolio. produced according lo minimum requirements sel 
lorlh below, has been reviewed and found satislaclory by Ihe Faculty 
Admission Committee composed ol Ihe three Area Coordinators and the 
Department Chairperson The porllolio must be submitted by the 
appropriate deadline Students will need a minimum ol 29 credit hours, 
including APDS 101. APDS 102, APDS 103, and EDIT 160, belore their 
poillolios are reviewed 

2 The following categories ol students are exempted from Ihe portfolio review 
requrrement 

(a) Freshmen having a 3 high school GPA and combined SAT score of 
1200 or above, or who are National Merit and National Achievement 
Scholarship finalists or semifmalisls, or recipients of the Chancellor's 
Scholarship, or ol Maryland Distinguished Scholar Award, or Benjamin 
Banneker Scholarship 

(b) Students with a minimum of 29 credit hours and a grade of B or higher 
in the following courses: APDS 101, APDS 102, APDS 103, and EDIT 
160 

3 Transfer students must submit their Design Work Portfolio at the time of 
their application for admission to The University of Maryland or later, but in 
any case by the appropriate deadline These students will be admitted to 
the maiors of inlenor design or advertising design alter the portfolio has 
been reviewed and found satisfactory. Transfer students who have not 
completed 29 credits, or who have not completed Ihe four required 
courses, or whose Design Work Portfolios have been found unsatisfactory 
may be admitted as "pre-design" students, 

4 Potentially talented students who are unable to meet the above criteria may 
be admitted provided they have applied as a "case-by-case" student and 
have been accepted by the Faculty Admission Committee composed of the 
three Area Coordinators and the Department Chairperson Examples of 
non-academic criteria on Ihe basis of which the Committee may grant 
admission are samples ol the applicants design work done in high school 
or community college, participation in portfolio preparation summer 
courses, leadership in extracurricular or community activities, hobby skills 
related to interior design and'or advertising design, job related experience 
in the design field. Armed Forces experience in design areas, etc, 

5 Students not yet admitted to the majors of interior design and advertising 
design are classified as "pre-design" students. Pre-design students will be 
granted preferential treatment when registering for departmental courses in 
which there is an enrollment limitation. 

6 A course in "Preparation of Design Portfolio" is offered in Summer Session I 
for all students in the pre-design category who have successfully 
completed 29 credit hours including APDS 101A, APDS 102. APDS 103, 
and ED'T 160 or who are transfer students with an equivalent level of 
preparation but who have not satisfactorily passed the portfolio review. 
Passing this course, however, is not equivalent to satisfactory completion of 
the portfolio review. 

7 Admission to the interior design or advertising design majors is not 
automatic, even when all relevant requirements have been fulfilled. It is the 
student's responsibility to file a "Change of Maior" form with the 
Department by the appropriate deadline prior to the beginning of the 
semester in which the student plans to take 200-level-and-above courses 
restricted to majors only. No exceptions will be made to this procedure. 
Students will be informed by mail of action taken. 

8 Deadlines: 

Admission application (filing "Change of Major" form) and portfolio 
submission must be received by: 

(a) For fall semester— May 23, 1986 

(August 15 for students enolled in "Preparation of Design Portfolio" or in 
Summer School) 

(b) For spring semester — January 6, 1987 



Advertising Design Curriculum 

(Advertising design courses must be taken In sequence.) 



Typical Freshman Year 

APDS 101 A— Fundamentals of Design 

ARTS 110— Drawing I 

Speech Course 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

MATH 110 or 1 1 5— Introduction to Mathematics or Pre-Calculus 

APDS 102— Design II 

EDIT 160— Design Illustrating I 

APDS 103— Design III 

Human Ecology Core 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 102 



Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

3 

6 

3 



Typical Sophomore Year 
APDS 210 — Presentation Techniques . . . 
PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology . 
University Studies Program Requirement 
Human Ecology Core 



APDS 237— Photography 

APDS 21 1 —Action Drawing 

HSAD 340— Period Homes and Their Furnishings 

OR 

HSAD 341— Contemporary Development , , . . 

EDIT 234 — Graphic Communications 

Total 

Typical Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirement 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical WrKing 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals ol Economics 

APDS 320— Fashion Illustration 

APDS 330— Typography and Lettering 

ARTH 450— 20lh Century Art or Other Upper Level Art History . 

APDS 331— Advertising Layout 

APDS 332— Display Design 

HSAD 362— Ideas in Design 

OR 

Allied Area Course 



Total 

Typical Senior Year 

APDS 430— Advanced Problems in Advertising Design 

APDS 337— Advanced Photography 

Allied Area Courses 

Elective 



APDS 380— Professional Seminar ' . . 

APDS 431— Advanced Problems in Advertising Design 
University Studies Program Requirement 



Interior Design Curriculum 

(Interior design courses must be taken In sequence.) 



Typical Freshman Year 

APDS 101 A— Fundamentals Of Design 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing 

EDIT 160— Design Illustrating I 

Speech Course 

MATH 1 10 or 115 — Introduction to Mathematics or Pre-Calculus 
PHYS 106— Light. Perception. Photography and Visual Phenomena 

SOCY 100 or ANTH 102 

APDS 102— Design II 

Human Ecology Elective (TEXT 150) 

APDS 103— Design III 

Tofay . 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Typical Sophomore Year 

APDS 210— Presentation Techniques 

PHYS 107— Laboratory (may be taken in freshman year concurrently 

with PHYS 106) 

HSAD 246— Materials of Interior Design 

University Studies Program Requirement 

ECON 205 — Fundamentals of Economics 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology ; 

Supporting-Block Courses 

Total 

Typical Junior Year 

Human Ecology Elective (TEXT 463) 

HSAD 340— Period Homes and their Furnishings 

HSAD 342— Space Development 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical Writing . . , . 

Supporting-Block Course 

HSAD 341— Contemporary Development 

HSAD 343— Interior Design I 

Elective 

HSAD 362— Ideas in Design 

OR 

ARTH Elective (300 or 400 level) 3 

7o(a/ 30 

Typical Senior Year 

HSAD 344— Interior Design II . . 3 

Elective 11-12 



Supporting-Block Course 

University Studies Program Requirement 

HSAD 345— Professional Aspects of Interior Design 
OR 

HSAD 380— Professional Seminar 

HSAD 440— Interior Design III 



112 College of Human Ecology Departments, Programs and Curricula 



HSAD 441— Interior Design IV 
Total 



Course Code Prefixes— APDS, HSAD 

Textiles and Consumer Economics 

Professor and Chairman: Smilh 

Professors: Da'dis. Hollies. Spivak. Yeh 

Associate Professors: Block, Branmgan, Chem 

Assistant Professors: Etienson, Hacklander, Paoletti. Pourdeyhimi, Wagner, 

Wi'Dur (Emeritus) 

Instructors: Anderson (p t ). Mihelcic (p t ) 

Lecturers: Femberg (pt ), FIse (pi ), Goldberg (pi ). Moms (pt ). Powell. Jr. 

(pt ). Stone (pt) 

Students in Textiles and Consumer Economics may select one of (our 
majors Each maior offers diverse professional opportunities In addition to the 
reQuiremenis of the mapr, students have the flexibility to take a concentration 
of courses in an area closely related to their maior such as business, 
economics, family services, loumaiism, sciences, art and art history, or speech 
and dramatic art by carefully utilizing their free electives and University Studies 
Program requirements. Students are encouraged to work closely with their 
facu'ty advisor 

In the textile major, emphasis is placed on the scientific and technological 
aspects of textiles Two options are open to men and women m this program, 
textile science or consumer textiles Graduates in textile science are prepared 
for textile industry positions in research and testing laboratories, in consumer 
technical service and marketing programs, in quality control, and m buymg 
and product evaluation Graduates m consumer textiles are prepared for 
careers in product development and consumer relations programs in business 
and industry, in consumer information and education programs in the public 
and private sector and in government regulatory agencies concerned with 
textile p'oducts 

The textile marketing'fasf^ion merchandising major emphasizes the 
marketing of textile products Students completing this program are prepared 
(or careers wih manufacturing, wholesale and retail organizations m buying, 
merchandising, fashion coordination, publicity, styling, personnel, sales or 
marketing Two options are open to students in this program, textile marketing 
or fashion merchandising Graduates comoieting the textile marketing option 
will be prepared to enter every level of textile marketing at the manufacturing, 
wholesale and retail levels Graduates m fashion merchandising will be 
prepared for careers in retailing with department or specialty stores A special 
internship in retailing is available for students in the textile marketing/fashion 
merchandising program. 

The apparel design major offers qualified students the opportunity to 
prepare for positions as designers, assistant designers, stylists, fashion 
executives, fashion coordinators, consultants to the home sewing industry, or 
extension and consumer education programs. 

The consumer economics mapr combines economics and marketing with a 
knowledge of basic consumer goods and services The program focuses on 
consumer decision-makmg and the degree to which the market place reflects 
consumer needs and preferences The subiect matter includes consumption 
economics, marketing, consumer behavior, consumer law, and consumer 
technology Graduates completing the consumer economics maior may work in 
the planning, marketing and consumer relations divisions of business and 
industry, in program development and analysis for government agencies 
providing consumer protection services or in extension and consumer 
education programs. 

An internship program is available to all students majoring in the 
Department of Textiles and Consumer Economics during their senior year. 
Students must apply for admission to the internship program including the 
retailing internship in the second semester of their junior year. 

A department honors program permits outstanding undergraduates to 
explore on an individual basis a program of work which wiii strengthen their 
undergraduate program and their professional interests Students selected (or 
the program must have at least a "B" ave'age to be considered Students m 
the honors program participate m a lunipr honors seminar and present a senior 
thesis. Students completing this program graduate with departmental honors 



Apparel Design 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101 Introduction to Writing. i( not exempt 

TEXT 105 — Textiles m Contemporary Living 

MATH 1 10 or 1 15— Introduction to Mathematics I or 

Pre-Caicuius 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 

SPCH 100. 107 or 125— Basic Pnnc pies of Speech 
Communication. Technical Speech 
Communication or Introduction to Interpersonal 
Speech Communication 

Human Ecology Elective (APDS I0i— Fundamentals of 

Design) 

TEXT 150— Introduction to Textile Materials 

CHEM 103. 102 or 1 1 1— General Chemistry I. Chemistry o» 

Man s Environment or Chemistry in Modem Life 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



CHEM 104 — Fundamenta's of O'ganic and Biochemistry or 

Department Elective" 3-4 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

Total 15-16 15-16 

Sophomore Year 

University Studes Program Requi'ements 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics I 

ECON 203— Principles of Economics II 

TEXT 221— Apparel I 

TEXT 222— Apparel II 

TEXT 250— Textile Materials Evaluation & Characterization . . 
Human Ecology Elective (APDS 102— Design II) 

Total 



Junior Year 

TEXT 347— History Of Costume II 

TEXT 355 — Textile Furnishings 

BMGT 350— Ma'ketmg Principles and Organization 

TEXT 365 — Fashion Merchandising 

TEXT 420 — Appa'ei Design Drapmg 

Department Elective' 

Human Ecology Elective (APDS 211) 

Electives 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical Writing 



Total 

Senior Year 

TEXT 441 — C'othing and Human Behavior 

TEXT 375 — Economics of Textile and Apparel Industries 

TEXT 425— Appa'ei Design. Advanced Problems 

Depanment Elective' 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Electives 



Total 

• Depanment Eieciives Seiec- ''om TEXT 3^5 363 365 358 ■I'D cy 496 



6 
3 
3 

3 

15 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
3 

30 

3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
10-12 

2&-30 



Textile Marketing fashion Merchandising 

Students in the textile marketing/fashion merchandising program must complete 
the common requirements of the program In additon. tfiey must select either 
the textie markeimg or the fashion merchandising option and complete the 
courses soec'fied for the option selected Textile marketing option CHEM 103. 
CHEM 104. TEXT 400 and TEXT 452 Fash'on merchandising ootkjn: CHEM 
103. CHEM 104. TEXT 221. TEXT 222 or BMGT 220. and TEXT 365. 

Serrtester 
Credrt Hours 
Freshman Year I II 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

TEXT 105— Textiles in Contemporary Living 3 

MATH 110 or 115— Introduction to Mathetnatics I or 

Pre-Caicuius 3 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 100. 107 or 125— Basic Principles of Speech 

Communication. Technical Speech 

Communication or Introduction to Interpersonal 

Speech Communication 

Human Ecology Elective (APDS 1O1 Fundamentals o( Design) 

TEXT 150— Introduction to Textiles 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychotogy 

CHEM 103— Gene'ai Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 — Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry .... 

Total 16 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements - 6 

ECON 201— Principles of Economics I 3 

ECON 203— Principles Of Economics il 

TEXT 250— Evaluation & Characterization of Textile Materials 

Human Ecology Elective 3 

TEXT 221— Apparel 1 or Department Elective' (See Option 

Selected) 3 

TEXT 222— Appa'ei 11 or BMGT 220 Accounting I or 

Department Elective' (See Option Selected) 

Total ii 

Junior Year 

Eie:vves 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles arx3 Organization 

TEXT 355— Textile Furnishings 

TEXT 400— Research Methods or Department Elective' (See Option 

Selected) 

Human Ecology Elective 

TEXT 365— Fashion Merchandising or Elective (See Option Selected) 
BMGT Requirement* 



College of Library and Information Services 113 



ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical Wniing 3 

Total 30 

Senior Year 

TEXT 441— Clothing and Human Behavior 

or CNEC 437— Consumer Behavior 3 

TEXT 375— Economics ol the Textile and Apparel Industries 3 

University Studies Program Requirements 6 

TEXT— 452 Textile Science Chemical Structure and Properties ot 

Fibers or Department Elective" (See Option Selected) 3 

BMGT Requirement" 3 

Eiectives 10 

Total 28 

• Deoartrnent Electives Select from CNEC 310. 410, 431 , 433. 435. 437. 455. 456. 457. Of 

TEXT 347. 363. 388 441. 470, 498 

•• BMGT Requireinenl Select trom BlvlGT 220. 221. 301. 353. 354. 360, 364. 454. 455 Of 

456 

Textiles 

Students in the textile program must complete the common requirements of the 
program In addition, they must select either the textile science or the 
consumer textile option and complete the courses specified for the option 
selected. Textile science option CHEM 113. CHEM 233. CHEM 243, PHYS 
141-142 or 121-122 and MATH 140-141 Consumer textile option: TEXT 355. 
CNEC 431 . CNEC 437, CNEC 455 and BMGT 350, 

Semesfer 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year I II 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 3 

TEXT 105 — Textiles in Contemporary Living 3 

MATH 110 or 115 — Introduction to Mathematics I or 

Pre-Caicuius 3 

SOCY lOO-lntroduction to Sociology 3 

SPCH 110. 107. or 125— Basic Principles of Speech 
Communication. Technical Speech 
Communication or Introduction to Interpersonal 

Speech Communication 3 

Human Ecology Elective 3 

TEXT 150— Introduction to Textile Materials 3 

CHEM 103— General Chemistry I 4 

CHEM 104 or 113 — Fundamentals of Organic and 

Biochemistry or General Chemistry II (See 

Option Selected) 4 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 3 

Total 16 16 

Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 6 

Elective (Consumer Textile Option) 3 

TEXT 250— Textile Materials Evaluation and Characterization . 3 

CHEM 233. 243— Organic Chemistry I. II or Electives (See 

Option Selected) 3-4 3-4 

MATH 140— Calculus I or Elective (See Option Selected) 3-4 

MATH 141— Calculus II or Elective (See Option Selected) 3-4 

TEXT 355 — Textile Furnishings (Consumer Textile Option) .... 3 

Total 14-15 14-15 

Junior Year 

ECON 201 and 203— Principles of Economics I and II 6 

PHYS 141 or 121— Principles of Physics or Fundamentals of Physics I 
or CNEC 431— The Consumer and the Law (See Option 

Selected) 3-4 

PHYS 142 or 122— Principles of Physics or Fundamentals of Physics II 
or CNEC 437 — Consumer Behavior (See Option 

Selected) 3-4 

CNEC 455— Product Standards or Elective (See Option Selected) — 3 

TEXT 452— Textile Science, Chemical Structure and Properties of 

Fibers 3 

Human Ecology Elective 6 

University Studies Program Requirements 3 

Elective (Consumer Textile Option) 3 

Total 29-30 

Senior Year 

ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical Writing* 3 

BMGT 350 — Marketing Principles and Organization or Elective (See 

Option Selected) 3 

TEXT 454 — Textile Science Finishes or 

TEXT 456— Textile Science Dyes and Dye Application 3 

TEXT 375 — Economics of the Textile and Apparel Industries 3 

TEXT 400— Research Methods 3 

CNEC 435 — Economics of Consumption or Elective (See Option 

Selected) 3 



Unive'sity Studies Program Requirements 
Electives 



Total 



ENGL 393 preieired 



Consumer Economics 



Freshman Year 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Writing, if not exempt 

MATH 1 10 or 1 15— Introduction to Mathematics I or 

Pre-Caiculus 

SOCY 100— Introduction to Sociology 

SPCH 100. 107 or 125-Basic Principles of Speech 
Communication. Technical Speech 
Communication or Introduction to interpersonal 
Speech Communication 

Human Ecology Elective 

CNEC 100— Introduction to Consumer Economics 

University Studies Program Requirements 

PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 

Elective 

Total 



6 

4-7 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

ECON 201 and 203— Principles of Economics I and II ... 
MATH 220 or 140— Elementary Calculus I or Calculus I . . 
MATH 221 or 141— Elementary Calculus II or Calculus II or 

Elective 

Elective , 

Human Ecology Elective 

Total , 

Junior Year 

CNEC 435— Economics of Consumption 

CNEC 310— Consumer Economics and Public Policy .... 
ENGL 391 or 393— Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

Consumer Product Information * 

Consumer Product Information * 

BMGT 350— Marketing Principles and Organization 

ECON 401 — National Income Analysis 

ECON 403— Intermediate Price Theory 

Elective 

7o(a/ 

Senior Year 

CNEC 400— Research Methods 

CNEC 437— Consumer Behavior 

CNEC 431— The Consumer and the Law 

University Studies Program Requirements 

CNEC 410 — Consumer Finance 

Consumer Product Information * 

Electives 



6 

3 
3-4 



3-4 

3 

3 3 

15-16 15-16 



Total 28-30 

• Consumer Product Information Select from CNEC 455. 456. 457: . TEXT 150. 250- 355. 
452, 454 FOOD 110, 30O. NUTR 100. HSAD 251. 460 and Other courses sut)|ecl to 

approval by Department, 

Course Code Prefixes— TEXT, CNEC 

College of Library and Information 
Services 

Dean: Waiston 

The College of Library and Information Services is a graduate program 
which draws its students from many undergraduate disciplines Although many 
of the College of Library and Information Services students have degrees in 
the social sciences and humanities, there is an increasing interest in people 
with diverse backgrounds — in the sciences, for example The continued 
influence of scientific advances, the variations in clientele and service patterns, 
and the constantly shifting character of the societal scene are among the 
factors which have significantly influenced and will doubtless influence all the 
more in the future the scope and character of library functions and 
responsibilities Library and information professionals in the 1980s must have 
competence in many disciplines in order to serve in information centers, 
corporation information management, public libraries, and school libraries The 
College of Library and Information Services designs its program to meet 
contempo'ary information management needs 

The library science education program at the undergraduate level fulfills 
the State of Maryland's requirements for the Educational Media Associate 
Certificate. Level I. This is the beginning level of educational media 



114 College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 



responsibiliiies The Associate is a professional person with introductory 
knowledge, understanding ol and competency m media services, with the 
particular emphasis on the operation of a unified media program Fifteen 
hours of undergraduate library science courses are offered through the 
College of Library and Information Services 

Because of the universal application of many principles of tibrarianship and 
media, students other than education students interested in library and media 
courses may register for the undergraduate library science courses without 
being enrolled in the certification program 

While the undergraduate program m library science education fulfills a 
great need in training school library and media personnel and persons to fill 
special roles, the masters degree program in the College of Library and 
Information Services is the recognized avenue for preparing fully qualified 
professionals m the library field. 

For further information regarding the undergraduate library science 
education program, refer to the Index listing for "Library Science Education " 

College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

Dean: Burt 

The College of Physical Education. Recreation and Health provides 
preparation leading to the Bachelor of Science degree m the following 
professional areas physical education {three certification options), health 
education and recreation The College also offers curricula m safety education, 
and l<inesioiogicai sciences The College provides research latxDratones for 
faculty members and graduate students who are interested m investigating 
various parameters of the fields of health education, of physical education, and 
of recreation and leisure The service section of each department offers a 
wide variety of courses for all University students These courses may be used 
to fulfill the General University Requirements, and as electives. 

In addition to its various on-campus offerings, this College regularly 
conducts courses in physical education, health education and recreation in 
various parts of the State of Maryland and conducts workshops wherever 
requested by proper officials. 

Programs combining research, service and instruction are provided by the 
Chiid'ens Health and Development Cimic. the Adults' Health and 
Developmental Program, and the Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness Center. 

Indoor and Outdoor Facilities. Four separate buildings and their adjacent 
playing fields and courts support the academic programs of the College plus 
the Intramural Sports and Recreation activities. 

PERM Building. This building houses the administrative offices of the College 
and most of Its faculty In addition to classrooms, indoor facilities include two 
gymnasia, three multipurpose rooms, a large gymnastic area, a lecture hall, 
research laboratories, handbaii-racquetbaii-squash courts, a weight lifting 
room and supporting locker and shower rooms Outdoor facilities include 16 
lighted tennis courts and a combination field hockey and lacrosse field. 

Cole Student Activities Building. This building is the center for intercollegiate 
athletics and also serves as a teaching station for classes in swimming and 
conditioning The swimming pool is divided into two areas by a permanent 
bulkhead The shallow end is 42x24 feet and the large area is 42x75 feet with 
a depth ranging from 4 to 13 feet The College maintains locker and shower 
facilities and an equipment room in this building The Safety Education 
Program of the Heanh Education Department also maintains classes and its 
programs in Cole There are 16 lighted tennis courts west of Cole and four 
soccer/touch-football fields to support class and intramural sports activities. 

Preinkert Field House. There is an additional 75x35 feet swimming pool in 
PremKen to serve physical education classes and recreational swimming 
Supporting locker and shower facilities are available Adjacent to this building 
are six tennis courts. 

Reckord Armory. The Armory gymnasium is used primarily for the intramural 
soo'ls program, and has 28 880 sq ft of floor space with court markings for 
basketball, badminton, volleyball, and tennis This facility is also used as an 
indoor track, with indoor vaulting, high and broad lump pits, a one-tenth mile 
track, and a 70-yard straightaway The Director and staff of the Intramural 
Sports and Recreation Program have their offices in this buiidmg Surrounding 
the Armory are four touch football freids and eight softbaii fields, 
encompassing 18 4 acres These fields, and the lour in the Fraternity Row are 
used for intramural sports. 

Outdoor Facilities. The Stadiunri The stadium, with a seating capacity of 
33 5J6 has a one-quarter mile tanan track with a 220-yard straightaway Pits 
are available for pole vaulting and high and broad lumping West ol the 
stadium are facilities for the shot put. discus and laveim throw The College ol 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health uses these facilities for classes in 
track and field 

A beautiful 204-acre. 18-hoie golf course and lighted driving range are 
located at the west entrance to the campus These facilities are used for 
campus golf classes and the ponds on the course are used for canoemg 
classes 



General Information— Entrance Requirements. Ail students des^mg to enroll 
in the College of Physical Education. Recreation and Health must apply to the 
Director ol Admissions of The University of Maryland College Park. 

Guidance. At the time ol matriculation and first registration, each student is 
assigned to a memtjer of the faculty of the College who acts as the students 
academic advisor This faculty member will be in physical education. 
recreation or health education, depending on the students choice ol 
curriculum The Student should confer regularly with his advisor prior to each 
registration. 

Normal Load. The normal University load for students is 12-18 credit hours 
per semester No student may register lor rrwre than 19 hours unless he or she 
has a 6 average for the preceding semester and approval of the dean ol the 

College. 

Electives. Electives should be planned carefully, and well in advance. 
preferably with the students academic advisor It is impoaani to begin certain 
sequences as soon as possible to prevent later conflict Electives may tie 
selected from any department of the University in accordance with a student s 
professional needs. 

Freshman and Sophomore Program. The work of the first two years in this 
College is designed to accomplish the following purpose (i) provide a general 
basic or core education and prepare for later specialization by giving a 
foundation in certain basic sciences. (2) develop competency m those t)asic 
techniques necessary for successful participation in the professional courses 
of the last two years 

The techniques courses will vary considerably in the different cumcuiums 
and must be satisfactorily completed, or competencies denx>nstraied before 
the student can be accepted for the advanced courses m methoos and m 
student teaching It is very important that each requirement tie met as it 
occurs. 

Student Teaching. Opportunity is provided for student teaching experience in 

physical education and school health education The student devotes one 
semester m the senior year to observation, participation, and teaching under a 
qualified supervising teacher in an approved Teacher Education Center A 
University Supervisor from the College of Physical Education. Recreation and 
Health visits the student periodically and confers with the student teacher, the 
cooperating teacher, and the center coordinator, giving assistance when 
needed. 

To be eligible for student teaching, the student must (1) have the 
recommendation of the University supervising teacher, and (2) must have 
fiitfilled all required courses lor ttie B.S. degree except ttiose in the Block 
Student Teaching Semester, excluding those exceptions approved by each 
department. The student must obtain a grade of C or better m a" professional 
cou'ses m his or her curriculum and must register lor all courses in itie 'Block" 
concurrently. 

Field Work. Recreation major students are expected to carry out a number of 
field experiences dunng their University career volunteer of part-time 
recreation employment during the school year, summer employment in camps 
or at playgrounds, etc. These experiences culminate m a senior semester ol 
field work for which a Student receives credit and during which iiie student 
works as a staff member (for 20 tvDurs per week) m the field ol recreation m 
which he or she hopes to be employed, such as public recreation, recreation 
lot the exceptional, agencies (Y's. scouts, etc ). military recreation, etc 

Community health education maiors are also expected to complete 
fieidvwrk during the fmai semester in the semester immediately preceding the 
final semester, arrangements are made for each student to work lor a lull 
semester under the direction of a staff member in a community health agency. 

Degrees. The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students who 
have met the conditions of their curricula as herein prescnped by the College 
of Physical Education. Recreation and Health 

Each candidate for a degree must file a fomal application with the 
Registrations Office during the registration period, or not later than tr)e end of 
the third week of classes ol the regular semester, or at the end ol the second 
week of the summer session, pnor to the date of graduation. 

Certification. The Maryland State Department of Education certifies for 
teaching only when an appiicani has a tentative appointment to teach in a 
Maryland couniy school No certificate may be secured by application of ttie 
student on graduation Course content requirements tor ceriitication are 
indicated with each curriculum A student intending to qualify as a teacher m 
Baltimore. Washington. D C . or other specific situations should secure a 
statement of certification requirements before starting work m the |untof year 
and discuss them with his or her academic advisor. 

Student Organizations arx) Activities 

Physical education Student Association (PESA). All students enroled in 
phvs'cai eoucaron as either teacner preparation or kmesioiogicai sciences 
maiors. are eiig'bie for membership m this organization The goals of PESA 
are (1) to encourage participation m local, state regional and national 
professional organizations. (2) to provide opportunities for leadership through 
involvement m campus, community and professional activities. (3) to promote 
the study and discussion ol current issues, problems, and trends. (4) to assist 



College of Physical Education, Recreation & Health Departments, Programs and Curricula 115 



In ihe acquisllion of career skill competencies by application in relevant (ieid 
experiences, (5) to loster a spirit ot service to others through volunteer 
proiecls. and (6) to sponsor social activities and to develop elleclive 
professional relationships 

PESA conducts regular professional meetings featuring guest speakers 
Topics explored have included career opponunilies m corporate fitness, sports 
management, education, biomechanics, and current issues, problems, and 
trends in the field of physical education 

Other PESA sponsored activities include the development of a career 
handbook, high school interaction and recruitment, intramural sports 
participation, and trips to state, district and national conventions of Ihe 
American Alliance for Health. Physical Education. Recreation and Dance 
PESA also promotes many corecrealional activities including camping, rafting, 
backpacking, sknng. and experiential education trips 

University ot Maryland Recreation and Parks Society. In the fall of 1959 The 
University ot Maryland Recreation and Parks Society was formed by Ihe 
undergraduate and graduate maior and minor students of the College The 
society, an affiliate of the Stale and national recreation organizations, provides 
opportunities for University and community service, for rich practical 
experience, and for social experiences for those students having a mutual 
professional recreation interest 

Gymliana Troupe. The Gymkana Troupe includes men and women 
students from all Colleges who wish to express themselves through the 
medium of gymnastics. These individuals coordinate their talents in order to 
produce an exhibitional perlormance that has been seen in many places 
including Bermuda. Iceland, the Azores. Idaho. Montana, and the eastern 
seaboard of the United States. The organization has three principal obiectives: 
(1) to provide healthful, co-recreational activities that provide fun for the 
students during their leisure hours, (2) to promote gymnastics in this locality: 
and (3) to entertain our students and people in other communities. 

This organization is co-sponsored by Ihe Physical Education Department 
and the Student Government Association, and it welcomes any student, 
regardless of the amount of experience, to join. 

Honor Societies 

Ptii Aiptia Epsilon. Honorary Society of the College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. 

The purpose of this organization is to recognize academic achievement 
and to promote professional growth by sponsoring activities in the fields of 
physical education, recreation, health and related areas. 

Students shall qualify for membership at such times as they shall have 
attained junior standing in physical education, health or recreation, and have a 
minimum overall average of 2.7 and a minimum professional average of 3-1. 
Graduate students are invited to join after 10 hours of work with a 3.3 average. 
The organization is open to both men and women. 

Eta Sigma Gamma. Epsilon chapter was established at The University of 
Maryland in May of 1969 This professional honorary organization for health 
educators was established to promote scholarship and community service for 
health majors at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Students may 
apply after two consecutive semesters with a 2 75 cumulative average 

College of Physical Education, 
Recreation & Health Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

Health Education 

Professor and Cliairman: Gilbert 

Professors: Burl, Greenberg. Leviton 

Associate Professors: Allen, Beck. Cleanwater, Feldman. Miller 

Assistant Professors: Hollander. McKay 

Lecturers: Mann, Sands, Schiraldi 

Instructors: Carney, Dotson, Ramsey 

Students majonng in health education have two tracks to choose from at 
the undergraduate level The first option is community health education which 
prepares students for entry level health education positions in community 
settings such as working with voluntary health associations, worksite health 
promotion programs, or other health agencies The second option is school 
health education which prepares a student for teaching health education in 
schools In addition to the two major tracks, a minor is available in school 
health education and two certificate options are available in driver education 



Health Education Curriculum 



Freshman Year— School and Community Options 
ENGL 101 — Introduction to Composition , 
MATH 110 or 102-3-4 or 115— Mathematics . 
HLTH 140 — Personal and Community Health , 

CHEM 1 1 1— Chemistry in Modern Life 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

JOUR 100— Introduction to Mass Communication 
PSYC 100— Introduction to Psychology 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



University Studies Program Requirements 

SCX;y too— Introduction to Sociology 

HLTH 150— First Aid and Emergency Medical Sen/ices 

Total 



Soptiomore Year— School and Community Optiorta 

HLTH 230— Introduction to Health Behavior 

PHIL 140 — Contemporary Moral Issues 

ZOOL 201 . 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II . 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Required Health Eiectives .-. 

PSYC 221— Social Psychology 

HLTH 105— Science and Theory of Health 

Total 

Junior Year— School Health Option 

ENGL 391 or 393 — Advanced Composition or Technical 

Writing 

HLTH 420— Methods and Materials in Health Education . . . 

EDHD 300S — Human Development and Learning 

EDCI 390 — Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

Required Health Elective 

EDHD 340— Human Development Aspects of the Helping 

Relationship 

HLTH 390— Organization and Administration of Health 

Programs 

EDMS 410— Principles of Testing and Evaluation 

EDCP 417— Group Dynamics and Leadership 

Total 



Senior Year— School Health Option 

HLTH 340 — Curriculum. Instruction and Observation 

Required Health Eiectives 

University Studies Program Requirements — Advanced Studies 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

EDCI 491 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools — Health , 

Total 



Junior Year — Community Health Option 

US P Junior English Requirement 

MICB 100— Basic Microbiology 

EDHD 340 — Human Development Aspects of the Helping 

Relationship 

EDMS 451 — Introduction to Educational Statistics 

HLTH 390— Organization and Administration of Health 

Programs 

HLTH 420— Methods and Materials in Health Education . 

HLTH 498— Introduction to Community Health 

SOCY 498A— Medical Sociology 

HLTH 430— Health Education in Ihe Workplace 

EDCP 417 — Group Dynamics and Leadership 

ro(a/ 



Senior Year — Community Health Option 

Required Health Eiectives 

HLTH 498C— Community Health Education 

FMCD 483 — Family and Community Service Systems 
HLTH 489— Field Laboratory Projects and Workshops 

HLTH 386— Field Work 

HLTH 387— Field Work Analysis 

Total 



Minor in Health Education: 27Hour Minor 

Thirteen semester hours in health education (HLTH 140, 150. 310. 420. 
450) 

Eight semester hours in human anatomy and physiology (ZOOL 201 , 202). 

Six semester hours of human behavioral science. At least one course 
should focus on children or youth 
Driver Education Instructors Certification Programs 
A, Classroom Instructor — 18 semester hours 

Twelve semester hours as follows HLTH 280, 305, 345 and 375: plus six 

semester hours selected from the following courses: HLTH 270, 498F. 

498L, or ENES 473 
B Laboratory Instructor— 12-15 semester hours, 

HLTH 280, 305. 345. plus an internship in driver education (usually six 

semester credits). 



Course Code Prefix— HLTH 



116 College of Physical Education, Recreation & Health Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Physical Education 

Professor and Chairman: Clarke 

Professors: Dolson, Ingfam. Keiiey. Sloan. Steel. Vaccaro 

Associale Professors: Church, Hult. Phillips. Sania Mana. Wrenn 

Assistant Professors: A<r\ghi. Clark, DiRocco. Goidlarb. Hatfield. Hurley, 

Kisabeih. Pike, Ryder, Struna. Tyler. VanderVeiden, Young 

fnstructors: Drum, McHugh. Owens 

Lecturers: Brown, Bush, Costello, Fellows, Hoffman, Nelligan 

Professional Preparation Curriculum. This curriculunn, including three 
cert ficaiion options, prepares students (1) for teaching physical education in 
the secondary school, (2) for coaching, and (3) for leadership in youth and 
adult groups which offer a program of physical activity The first two years of 
this curriculum are considered to be an orientation period in which the student 
has an opportunity to gam an adequate background in general education as 
well as in those scientific areas closely related to this field of specialization In 
addition, emphasis is placed upon the development of skills m a wide range of 
motor activities Further, students are encouraged to select related areas, 
especially in the fields of biology, social sciences, psychology, health 
education, and recreation as fields of secondary interest These materially 
increase the vocational opportunities which are available to a graduate in 
physical education. 

Eauipment: Students may be required to provide individual equipment for 
certain courses 

Uniforms: Suitable uniforms, as prescribed by the Department, are required 
for the activity classes and for student teaching. These uniforms should be 
worn only during professional activities. 

Departmental Requirements/All Certification Options 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



University Studies Program Requirements 

HLTH ISO—First Aid and Safety 

PHYS 101 or 111 or CHEfvl 102or 103or 105 

PHED 180— Foundations of Physical Education 

ZOOL 101— General Zoology 

ZOOL 201 . 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology . . . 

EDHD 300— Human Development and Learning 

PHED 300— Kinesiology 

EDPA 301— Foundations of Education 

PHED 314— Methods in Physical Education 

PHED 333— Physical Activity for Handicapped 

PHED 385 — Motor Learning and Skilled Performance . 
PHED 390— Practicum in Teaching Physical Education 

PHED 480 — Measurement in Physical Education 

PHED 491— Curriculum in Physical Education 

PHED Skills Laboratories* 



40 

2 

3-4 

3 



• Students should discuss this requiremeni wuh departmental advisors. 

K-€ Certification Option 

PHED 370— Motor Development 

EDHD 320 — Human Development Through the Lifespan 

EDCI 485 — Student Teaching in Elementary School— Physical 

Education 

PHED 421— Physical Education for Elementary School: A Movement 

Approach 

PHED Electives (6 hours total). PHED 350, PHED 360, or PHED 493 
Eiectives 

7-12 Certification Option 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

PHED 381— Prevention and Care of Athletic Injunes 

EDCI 495 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 

PHED 360— Physiology of Exercise 

PHED 490 — Organization and Administration of Physical Education . 
PHED 493— History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education 
Electives 

K-12 Certification Option 

EDCI 390— Principles and Methods of Secondary Education 

EDCI 485 — Student Teaching in Elementary Schools 

EDCI 495 — Student Teaching in Secondary Schools 

PHED 381— Prevention and Care of Athletic Iniuries 

PHED 421— Physical Education for Elementary School; A Movement 

Approach 

PHED 360— Physiology of Exercise 

PHED 370— Motor Development 

PHED 490— Organization and Administration of Physical Education , 
PHED 493 — History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education 



3 

6 

6-7 

3 
3 
8 
3 
3 
3 
4-5 

3 
6 
6 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Kinesiological Sciences Program. This curriculum offers students the 
opportunity to Study the body of knowledge of human movement and sport and 
to specifically choose programs of study which allow them to pursue a 
particular goal related to the discipline There is no intent to orient all students 
toward a particular specialized interest or occupation. 



This program provides a hierarchical approach to the study of human 
movement First, a core of knowledge is recognized as being necessary for all 
students in the curriculum These core courses are considered foundational to 
advanced and more specific courses Secondly, at the "options" level, 
students may select from two sets of courses which they believe will provide 
the knowledge to pursue whatever goal they set for themselves in the future. 
To further strengthen specific areas of interest, students should carefully select 
related studies courses and electives 

Goal and Objectives. The primary goal of the Kinesiological Sciences 
Program is to provide a well-rounded, scholarly understanding of the body of 
knowledge related 'o human movement The program core includes 
exploration of the scientific bases and philosophical and historical knowledges 
of movement From this broad knowledge base, the program is to provide for 
flexibility so that a student may pursue a variety of areas related to physical 
activity and sport. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



Fresfiman Year 

PHED 287— Spon and American Society 

PHED 293— History of Sport in America . 

Activity Courses * 

Electives 



Sophomore Year 

ZOOL 201 , 202— Human Anatomy and Physiology 

PHED 370— Motor Development 

Activity Courses * 

Electives 

Related Studies ' 



Junior Year 

PHED 30O-Kinesiology 

PHED 350— Psychology of Sports 

PHED 360— Physiology of Exercise 

PHED 362— Philosophy of Sport 

PHED 385— Motor Learning and Skilled Performance 

Option • 

Related Studies * 



3 
3 
6 
3 

4, 4 
3 
2 
9 



Senior Year 

PHED 495— Quantitative Methods 3 

PHED 497— Independent Studies Seminar 3 

Electives 7 

Option • 9 

Related Studies * 3 

In adamon to the above required courses, students must fultill the University Studies 
Program Requirement, Minimum number o1 semester hours lor degree is 120. 

• Students should discuss these requirements with departmental advisors. 

The Honors Program In Physical Education. The aim ol the Honors Program 

is to encourage superior students by providing an enriched program of studies 
which will fulfill their advanced interests and needs Qualified students are 
given the opportunity to undertake intensive and often independent studies 
wherein initiative, responsibility and intellectual discipline are fostered. To 
qualify for admission to the program 

1. A freshman must have a B average in academic (college prep) curriculum 
of an accredited high school. 

2. A sophomore must have an accumulative GPA of 3 00 in all college 
courses of official registration. 

3 All applicants must have three formal recommendations concerning ttieir 

potential, character, and other related matters. 
4. All applicants must be accepted by the Faculty Honors Committee. 

In completing the program, all honor students must: 
1 . Participate in an honors seminar where thesis and other relevant research 
topics are studied 

2 Pass a comprehensive oral examination covering subject matter 
background 

3 Successfully prepare and defend the honors thesis 

On the basis ol the student's performance in the alx>ve program, the 
college may vote to recommend graduation without honors, with honors, or 
with high honors. 

Recreation 

Professor and Chairman: Humphrey 

Professor: Iso-Ahola 

Associate Professors: Churchill, Kuss, Sfrobeil, Verhoven 

Assistant Professors: Fedier, Leedy, Richardson, Riddick 

Lecturers: Annand, Smith, Ward 

This curriculum is designed to meet the needs ol students wtio wish to 
qualify for oosit'ons m the leisure services fields, and tor the needs ol those 
stuoents who oesire a background which wiii enable them to render distmcl 
contributions to community life The Depaiment draws upon various other 
departments and colleges withm the University for courses to balance and 
enrich Its offerings for its leisure Studies curriculum A total of 120 credits are 
required lor the Bachelor ol Science Degree, with a limit ol 72 credits in RECR 



Division of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineering 117 



prefix coursework 

Those maiofing in leisure studies have opportunity lor observation and 
practical experience m local, county, state and federal public recreation 
programs, in social and group work agency programs, and in the various 
programs of the Armed (^orces. American Red Cross, local hospitals and 
commercial recreation establishments (e g . Disney World) Maiors are required 
to select an option area of interest around which to center their elective 
cou'sework These option areas are (1) program services. (2) outdoor 
recreation, and (3) therapeutic recreation The development ot an area of 
professional emphasis withm an option which is consistent with the student's 
career goals is encouraged This area should locus on a specific population, 
selling, or function within the more general option. 

Qualified students are encouraged to apply for membership in Phi Alpha 
Epsilon or Phi Kappa Phi academic honor societies 

An active student University of Ivlaryiand Recreation and Parks Society, an 
affiliate of Ihe comparable state and national organizations, provides 
opportunities for University and community service, lor practical experience. 
and lor social lellowship with those students having mutual prolessional 
interests 

iviany outstanding practitioners/educators reside in the Metropolitan 
Washington. D C . area It is the practice ol the Department to enrich its course 
offerings through the use of these individuals as extensively as possible. 



Recreation Curriculum 



Freshman Year 

RECR 130— History and Introduction to Recreation . . . . 
SPCH 100 — Basic Principles ol Speech Communication 

GVPT 100/170/273 

ENGL 101— Introduction to Composition 

University Studies Program Requirement 

MATH 1 10 or higher 

Total 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirement 

Option Elective 

Option Requirement 

Option Competency 

Elective" 

RECR 20O— Sophomore Seminar 

RECR 270— Special Populations 

Total 



RECR 340 — Sophomore Summer Field Experience 



Junior Year 

ENGL 391— Advanced Composition 

University Studies Program Requirement 

RECR 350— Recreational Use ol Natural Areas .... 
RECR 460— Leadership Techniques and Practices . 

RECR 420 — Program Planning and Analysis 

RECR 490— Organization and Administration 

Option Elective 

Option Competency 

EDHD— Human Development (Related Requirement) 

Total 



Senior Year 

University Studies Program Requirement . 

RECR 300— Senior Seminar 

Option Eiectives 

Option Requirement 

RECR 410— Measurement and Evaluation 
RECR 432— Philosophy ol Recreation . . . 
RECR 341 — Senior Field Experience . . . . 

Total 



• Due to variance in the nurrbers of credits required within individual oolion areas, not all 
stuoenis VKill have the same numoer ol University eiectives Students should conlact Ihe 
Deoanment lor the current Fact Sheet regarding coursework adjustments. 



Division of Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and Engineering 

Provost: Dorfman (acting) 

The Division ol Mathematical and Physical Sciences and Engineering is like 
a technical institute within a large university Students maionng m any one ol 
the disciplines encompassed by the Division have the opportunity ol obtaining 
an outstanding education m their lieid The Division caters both to students 
who continue as prolessionais in their area ol specialization, either immediately 
upon graduation or alter postgraduate studies, and to those who use their 
college education as preparatory to careers or studies in other areas The 
narrow specialist as well as the broad "Renaissance person' can be 
accommodated 

Below are outlined the requirements lor each major oHered within the 
Division, Some ol the University requirements and regulations are reiterated 

The search lor new knowledge is one ol the most challenging activities ol 
mankind The university is one of the key institutions in society where 
fundamental research is emphasized. The Division of Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences and Engineering contributes very substantially and 
ellectively to the research activities of the University 

Many research programs include undergraduates either as paid student 
helpers or in forms of research participation Students in departmental honors 
programs are particularly given the opportunity to become involved in 
research Other students too may undertake research under the guidance of a 
faculty member 

A maior portion of the teaching program of the Division is devoted to 
serving students maioring in disciplines not encompassed by the Division 
Some of this teaching effort is in providing the skills needed in support of such 
maiors or programs. Other courses are designed as enrichment for 
non-science students, giving them the opportunity to explore the reality Of 
science without the technicalities required of the major. 

Structure of the Division. The College of Engineering is a major constituent of 
the IVIPSE Division, and is headed by its own Dean All other departments and 
programs in the Division report directly to the Provost of the Division, 

The following departments and programs comprise the Division of MPSE: 

Department of Computer Science 
Department of Mathematics 
Department of Meteorology 
Depanmenl ot Physics and Astronomy 
Institute for Physical Science and Technology 
Applied Mathematics Program 
Astronomy Program 
Chemical Physics Program 
Physical Sciences Program 

Within the College ol Engineering: 

Department ol Aerospace Engineering 
Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 
Department ol Civil Engineering 
Department of Electrical Engineering 
Department of Fire Protection Engineering 
Department of Mechanical Engineering 
Engineering Materials Program 
Eng-neering Sciences Program 
Wind Tunnel Operations Department 
Coooerative Engineering Education Program 
Agricultural Engineering Program 

Degree Programs. The following Bachelor of Science degree programs are 
offered by the departments and programs of the Division: Astronomy, 
Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics, Physical Sciences. Aerospace 
Engineering. Agricultural Engineering. Chemical Engineering. Civil Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering. Engineering (Applied Science Option or Engineering 
Option). Fire Protection Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear 
Engineering. 

General Information. The MPSE Undergraduate Office. Y-2300 (454-4596) is 

the central office for coordinating the advising, processing and updating of 
student records for students not in the College of Engineering Inquiries 
concerning University regulations, transfer credits and other general 
inlormation should be addressed to this office. Specific departmental 
information is best obtained directly from the departments. 

The records of students m the College of Engineering are processed and 
kept in the Engineering Student Affairs Office. Room 1131. Engineering 
Classroom Building (454-2421). Inquiries concerning engineering curricula 
should be addressed there. 

The Division is strongly committed to making studies in the sciences and 
engineering available to all regardless of their background. In particular, the 
Division IS actively pursuing an affirmative action program to rectify the present 
under-reoresentation of women and minonties in these fields. There are in fact 
many career opportunities for women and members of minorities in the fields 
represented by the Division. 



118 College of Engineering 



Degree Requirements 

A A minimum ot 120 semester hours with al least a C average are required 
for all Bachelor ol Science degrees from the Division All B S degrees 
conferred by the College of Engineering require more than 120 credits, the 
exact number vanes with the department 

B 39 credit hours which satisfy the University Studies Program as presented 
under Academic Regulations and Requirements in this catalog Courses 
taken to satisfy these requirements may also be used to satisfy maior 
requirements Students who matriculated prior to Summer 1980 may satisfy 
this general studies requirement through the General University 
Requirement program All students who matriculated in the Summer 1978 
session or later, must complete six credits of English Composition 

C Maior and supporting coursework is specified under each department or 
O'ogram. 

D The final 30 semester hours must be completed at the College Park 
Campus Occasionally this requirement may be waived by the Provost or 
Dean for up to six of these 30 credits to be taken at another institution 
Such a waiver is granted only if the student already has 30 credits in 
residence 

E Students must be enrolled in the program in which they plan to graduate 
by the time they register for the last 15 hours. 

College of Engineering 

Dean: Dieter 

The College of Engineering offers four-year programs leading either to the 
degree of Bachelor ot Science with curriculum designation m Aerospace 
Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering. Civil Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering. Fire Protection Engineering, Ivtechanical Engineering, or 
to the degree ol Bachelor of Science m Engineering with an Engineering option 
or an Applied Science option One example of the Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering is Nuclear Engineering In addition, each of the foregoing degree 
programs may be pursued through the five-year Maryland Plan for Cooperative 
Engineering Education. The engineering programs integrate these elements: 
(I) basic sciences, including mathematics, physics, chemistry. (2) engineering 
sciences including mechanics of solids and fluids, engineering materials, 
thermodynamics, electricity, and magnetism, (3) professional studies in mapr 
fields of engineering specialization, and (4) general studies including liberal 
arts and social studies as pan of the University Studies Program Each 
program lays a broad base for continued learning alter college in professional 
practice, in business and industry, in public service, or in graduate study and 
research. 

General Information. Increasingly, the boundary between engineers and 
applied scientists or applied mathematicians becomes less distinct The 
various branches of engineering similarly interact with each other, as technical 
problems become more sophisticated, and require a combined attack from 
several disciplines The engineer occupies an intermediate position between 
science and the public, because, in aOdition to unoerstanoing the scientific 
principles of a situation, he is concerned with the timing, economics and 
values that define the useful application of those principles. 

High School Preparation. Preparation for pursuing an engineering degree 
curriculum begins m the freshman or sophomore year of high sctxjol The time 
required to complete the various degree programs may be extended beyond 
the four years cited in this catalog to the extent that an incoming student may 
be deficient in his'her high school preparation Pre-engmeenng students 
normally enroll in an academic program in high school The course of study 
should include 3-1/2 to 4 years ot college preparatory mathematics (including 
algebra, trigonometry, plane and solid geometry and pre-caiculus 
mathematics) In addition, students stxjuld complete one year each of physics 
and chemistry 

Curricula for the various engineering departments are given in this catalog 
to illustrate how the programs can be completed m four years These curricula 
are rigorous and relatively difficult for the average stuoent Surveys have 
sfKiwn that only about one-third to one-half of the students actually receive an 
engineering degree in four years The mapnty ol students (whether at 
Maryland or at other engineering schools nationwide) complete the engineering 
program m four and one-half to five years It is quite feasible for a student to 
stretch out any curriculum, this may be necessary or desirable for a variety ol 
reasons However, students should seek competent advising in order to 
ensure that courses are taken m the proper sequence 

Structure of Engineering Curricula. Courses in the normal curriculum or 
program and prescribed credit hours leading to the degree of Bachelor ot 
Sciepce (with curriculum designation) are outlined in the sections penammg to 
each department m the College ot Engineering No student may modify the 
prescribed number of hours without special permission from the Dean of the 
College The courses in each curncuium may be classified in the following 
categories 

1 Courses in the University Studies Program Requirements, 

2 Courses in the physical sciences— mathematics, chemistry, physics 

3 Collateral engineering courses— engineering sciences, and other courses 
approved for one curriculum but offered by another oepanmeni 

4 Courses in the major department A student should obtain written approval 



for any substitution of courses from the Department Chairman and the 

Dean of the College, 

The courses m each engineering curriculum, as classified above, form a 
sequential and developmental pattern in subject matter In this respect. 
curricula in engineering may differ from curricula in other colleges Some 
regulations which are generally applicable to all students (see the Academic 
Regulations) may need clarification for purposes of orderly administration 
among engineering students Moreover, the College ot Engineering establishes 
policies which supplement the University regulations 

Sample schedules are available as examples ol ways to fuHill graduation 
requirements m eight semesters Many students tind that it is necessary to 
extend their schedule to nine or ten semesters. 

Basic Format of the Freshman-Sophomore Years In Engineerlrtg. The 

freshman and soohonK)re years m engineering are designed to lay a strong 
founoation in mathematics, physical sciences and the engineering sciences 
upon which the student will later develop a professional program during the 
upper division (junior and senior) years The College course requirements lor 
the freshman year are the same for all students, regardless ol their intended 
academic program, and about 75% ot the sophomore year course 
requirements are common, thus affording the student a maximum flexibility in 
choosing a specific area of engineering specialization Although the 
engineering student selects a major field al the start ol the sophomore year. 
this intramural program comnKinaiity affords the student the maximum flexibility 
of choice of interdepartmental transfer up to the end of the sophomore year 

Admissions 

Freshman: Admission to the College of Engineering is competitive for both 
freshmen and transfers Applicants who have designated a major withm the 
College of Engineering will be selected for admission on the basis ol academic 
promise and available space Different admissions criteria may t>e in effect lor 
the various engineering departments Applicants admissible to the University 
but not to the College will be offered admission to pre-engmeenng A 
Pre-engineering major status does not assure eventual admission to the 
College of Engineering Because of space limitations the College of 
Engineering may not be able to offer admission to all qualified applicants. The 
College Park Campus strongly urges early application. 

Transfer: Admission to the College of Engineering is competitive for transfer 
students Applicants who have designated a major withm the College ol 
Engineering will be selected for admission on the basis of academic promise 
and available space Transfer applicants must compete for enrollment in the 
College based upon the criteria m effect for the semester dunng which tfie 
student wishes to enroll Because of space limitations ttie College of 
Engineering may not be able to offer admission to all qualified applicants. The 
College Park Campus strongly urges early application. 

College Regulations 

1 The responsibility for proper registration and lor satistying stated 
prerequisites for any course must rest with the student — as does the 
responsibility for proper achievement in courses in which the student Is 
enrolled Each student should be familiar with the provisions of this catalog, 
inciuomg the Academic Regulations 

2. Required courses in mathematics, physics and chemistry have highest 
priority, and it is strongly recommended that every engineering student 
register for mathematics and chemistry— or mathematics and 
physics — each semester until the student has tuiiy satisfied requirements ol 
the College of Engineering m these subjects 

3 To be eligible for a bachelor s degree m the College ol Engineering, a 
student must have an overall average ol at least a C— 2 and a grade ot 
C or better m all courses with an EN prefix Responsibility lor knowing and 
meeting all degree requirements for graduation in any curriculum rests with 
the student 

4 A University Studies Program is required ol students who entered UMCP 
beginning in May 1980 The University Studies Program replaces the 
General University Requirements for students who entered in May 1980 
and thereafter Students who matriculated pnor to that date may elect to 
satisfy either the General University Requirements or the new University 
Studies Program All students who matriculated m the Summer 1978 
session or later, must complete six credits of English composition 

5 All degree programs m the College of Engineering require a minimum o< 
120 credits plus satisfaction ot all department, college, division and 
University Studies Program requirements Students should be aware ttiat 
for all currently existing engineering programs the total number ol credits 
necessary for the degree will exceed 120 by some number that will 
depend on the specific major and the student s background, especially ir> 
English and mathematics 

Basic Freshman Curriculum In Engineering. All freshmen in the College of 

Engineering are required to complete the following basic curriculum lor 
Ireshmen regardless ol whether the student plans to proceed through one ol 
the major fields designated baccalaureate degree programs or foiiow any ol 
the muitidiscipimary non-designated degree curncuia that are sponsored by 
the College 



College of Engineering 119 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

CHEM 103 113 General Chemislry* 4 4 

PHYS 161 —General Physics 1 3 

MATH 140 141— Calculus I. II 4 4 

ENES 101— Introductory Engineering Science 3 

ENES 11&-Slatics 3 

University Studies Program flequiremenis 6 3 

Total Credits 17 17 

Students who are not prepared to schedule MATH 140 are advised to 
register lor a preparatory course— MATH 115 These students are also 
advised to attend summer school (oiiowing their freshman year to complete 
MATH 141 and PHYS 161 prior to entrance into the sophomore year ol sludy^ 
MATH 141 and PHYS 161 are prerequisites tor many courses required m the 
sophomore year ENES 110 should be taken in summer school or the fall 
semester. 

• Oualiiied students may elect to take CHEM t05 and 115 (4 cr hrs each) instead ol 
CHEM 103 and 113 

The Sophomore Year In Engineering. With the beginning of the sophomore 
year the student se'ecis a sponsoring academic department (Aerospace. 
Agricultural. Chemical. Civil. Electrical. Fire Protection, or Mechanical 
Engineering), and this department assumes the responsibility for the student's 
academic guidance, counseling and program planning from that point until the 
completion ol the degree requirements of that department as well as the 
College For the specific requirements, see the curriculum listing in each 
engineering department. 

Engineering science courses represent a common core of basic material 
offered to students of several different departments All freshman and 
sophomore students of engineering are required to take ENES 101. and ENES 
110 Other ENES courses 220. 221 . 230 and 240 are specified by the different 
departments or taken by the student as electives. The responsibility for 
teaching the engineering science courses is divided among the Aerospace, 
Civil. Mechanical. Chemical and Electrical Engineering Departments In 
addition to the core courses noted above, several courses of general interest 
to engineering or non-engineering students have been given ENES 
designations. 

Engineering Transfer Programs. Most of the community colleges in Maryland 
provide one- or two-year programs which have been coordinated to prepare 
students to enter the sophomore or lunior year in engineering at The University 
of Maryland. These curricula are identified as Engmeermg Transfer Programs 
In the catalogs of the sponsoring institutions The various associate degree 
programs in technology do not provide the preparation and transferability into 
the professional degree curricula as the designated transfer programs 

A maximum of one-half of the degree credits (approximately 60-65 
semester hours) may be transferred from a two-year community college 
program 

There may be 6-8 semester hours of major departmental courses at the 
sophomore level which are not offered by the schools participating in the 
engineering transfer program Students should investigate the feasibility of 
completing these courses in Summer School at The University of Maryland 
before starling their junior coursework in the fall semester. 

Dual Degree Program. The Dual Degree Program is a cooperative 
arrangement between the College of Engineering and selected liberal arts 
colleges which allows students to earn undergraduate degrees from both 
institutions in a five-year program A student m the Dual Degree Program will 
attend the liberal arts college for approximately three (3) academic years 
(minimum 90 hours) and The University of Maryland. College of Engineering for 
approximately two (2) academic years (minimum hours required— determined 
individually, approximately 60 hours). 

Dual degree candidates may participate in any of the baccalaureate 
degree programs m the College of Engineering 

At the present time the participating institutions in Maryland and the District 
of Columbia are American University, Bowie State College, Columbia Union 
College. Coppm State College, Frostburg State College, Morgan State 
University. College of Notre Dame of Maryland. St Mary s College of Maryland, 
Salisbury State College, Towson State University. Western Maryland College. 
Trinity College, and Washington College Also participating in the program are 
Kentucky State University. King College in Tennessee. Shippensburg State 
University in nearby Pennsylvania, and Xavier in Louisiana. 

Cooperative Engineering Education Program 

Program Director: Biair 

The Maryland Plan for Coooerative Engineering Education at The University 
of Maryland. College of Engineering, is a four and one-half to five calendar 
year program leadmg to a Bachelor of Scence degree The academic 
requirements for students following the Co-op Plan of Education are identical to 
the academic requirements for those students following the regular four-year 
program In addition to the normal academic requirements. Co-op students 
have scheduled penods of professional internship which must be satisfactorily 
completed to quality for the baccalaureate degree under the Co-op Plan 



The Coop Program beqms after the student has completed the freshman 
and sophorDore requirements of a mapr field The structure ot Engineering 
Co-op IS an alternating sequence ol study and internship As tar as Coop is 
concerned, there are three sessions — fall and spnnq semesters (20 weeks 
each) and a summer session (10 weeks) This alternating plan ot study and 
professional Internship lenqthens the lasl two academic years into three 
calendar years Delaying entry into the Co-op Program until the junior year 
otters considerable educational advantages to the student 

The student retains the normal Ireshman-sophorrKire program to afford time 
for the selection of a maior field ot engineering — or to determine whether to 
continue m engineering— without a commitment to either the regular four-year 
or the Co-op Plan of Education A rrxjre mature and meaningful series ot 
professional internship assignments are possible to benefit both the student 
and the professional partner Also, the plan is readily adaptable lo the needs 
ot the student transferring to the University from the engineering transfer 
programs of community or State colleges 

Students need only meet two criteria for entry into the Engineering Co-op 
Program They are (1) completion of the freshman and sophomore engineering 
requirements (usually about 65 degree credits) and (2) the establishment ot a 
cumulative grade point average at The University of Maryland ol at least 
2 0/4 

A typical study-intern schedule is sfiown below The typical student begins 
the first internship in the summer immediately following the sophomore year (65 
accumulated degree credits) The total internship is for two summers and two 
semesters (60 weeks) Fifty weeks is the required minimum The student 
enrolls for 16 semester hours each during the fail and spring semester. 12 
semester hours during the summer and three semester hours in the evening 
during two internship periods. 

Typical Study-Intern Schedule 

Semester Hours 
Current Accumulated 

Summer* Intern (1 )■»■-»- — 65 

Fall Semester Study 16 81 

Spring Semestert Intern (2.3) 3§ 84 

Summer . Study 12 96 

Fall Semestert Intern (4.5) 3§ 99 

Spring Semester Study 16 115 

Summer* Intern (6) — 115 

Fall Semester Study 16 131 

(Grad) 
' Students enroll for EKJCO 406 (6 non-degree credits). 
-f+ These numtjers refer to 10-week periods 
t Students enroll for ENCO 408 and 409 (12 non-degree credits). 

§ These courses could oossibiy be laKen during the evening at University College, or at a 
college locaied near your employment. 

Although ihe at)ove study-intern schedule depicts the student interning for 60 weeks, the 
required minimum numt)er is 50 weeks. 

Students make their own arrangements for tward and lodging whi'e on 
their periods of internship Frequently the participating industrial company or 
governmental agency v/ill assist the student in locating good, inexpensive 
lodging The internship wages are paid directly to the student by his employer. 

During the semesters or summer sessions in which the student attends 
school, he pays the regular tuition and fees assessed by the University A $30 
fee is charged for each 10-week period of professional internship The 
professional intern fee is payable at the beginning of each intern period and is 
not refundable 

Instructional Television System 

Director: Seigel 

The University of Maryland's Instructional Television System (ITV) is 
headquartered in the College of Engineering Each semester, over 50 
regularly scheduled graduate and undergraduate classes are held in iTV's 
studio classrooms, and broadcast "live" to government agencies and 
businesses m the greater Washington area Students m the remote classrooms 
watch the broadcasts on large TV monitors They are able to talk to the 
instructors and other students using a phone-line "talk back'" system. Through 
the ITV System, working adult students are able to progress toward graduate 
degrees, primarily in engineering and computer science, without leaving their 
places of work. 

Professional Societies. Each of the major departments sponsors a student 
chapter or student section of a national engineering society The student 
chapters sponsor a variety of activities including technical meetings, social 
gatherings and college or university service protects. Students who have 
selected a mapr are urged to affiliate with the chapter in their department. The 
names ot the organizations are; 

Alpha Nu Sigma 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers 

American Nuclear Society 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers 

American Society of Civil Engineers 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers 

Black Engineers Society 



120 College of Engineering Departments, Programs and Curricula 



Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 
Society of Asian Engineers 
Society ol Fire Protection Engineers 
Society of Women Engineers 

Engineering Honor Societies. The College of Engineering and each of the 

engineering departments sponsors an honors society Nominations or 
invitations for membership are usually extended to junior and senior students 
based on scholarship, service and'or other selective criteria Some ol the 
honors organizations are branches of national societies, others are local 
groups: 

Tau Beta Pi— College Honorary 

Alpha Epsiion— Agricultural Engineering 

Chi Epsilon— Civil Engineering 

Eta Kappa Nu— Electrical Engineering 

Omega Chi Epsilon— Chemical Engineering 

Pi Tau Sigma— Mechanical Engineering 

Salamander — Fire Protection Engineering 

Sigma Gamma Tau — Aerospace Engineering 

College of Engineering Departments, 
Programs and Curricula 

Aerospace Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Gessow 

Professors: Anderson. Donaldson. Melnik 

Associate Professors: Barlow, Chopra, Jones, Lee, Winkelmann 

Assistant Professor: Fabunmi 

Lecturers: Biiiig, Chander. Chien. Griffin, Hong, Jobanek, Korkegi, Regan, 

Smith, Vamos, Waltrup, Weissman 

Aerospace engineering is concerned with the physical understanding, 
analysis and design of aerospace vehicles operating wiihm and above the 
atmosphere Such vehicles range from helicopters and other vertical take-off 
aircraft at the low speed end of the flight spectrum to spacecraft operating at 
thousands of miles per hour during entry into the atmospheres of the earth and 
other planets In between are general aviation and commercial transports flying 
at speeds well below and close to the speed of sound, and supersonic 
transports, fighters and missiles which cruise at many times the speed of 
sound Although each speed regime and each vehicle type poses its own 
special research, analysis and design problems, each can be addressed by a 
common set of technical specialities or disciplines 

Consider the high-speed flight of NASA s Space Shuttle The airflow over 
the wings, fuselage and tail surfaces create lift, drag and moments on the 
aircraft. If the velocity is high enough, such as during reentry of the Space 
Shuttle into the earth's atmosphere, then the temperature of the airflow 
becomes extremely high, the air becomes chemically reactive, and heatmg of 
the vehicle's surface becomes a maior problem. The study of how and why the 
airflow produces these forces, moments and heating is called aerodynamics. In 
turn, the motion of the aircraft or space vehicle will respond to. indeed will be 
determined by. the aerodynamic forces and moments The study of the motion 
and flight path of such vehicles is called fligtit dynamics. Of course, while 
executing this motion, the vehicle must be structurally sound, that is. its 
surface and internal structure must be able to withstand the severe forces and 
loads associated with flight. The study of the mechanical behavior of 
materials, stresses and strains, deflections and vibrations that are associated 
with the structure of the vehicle itself is called fligt^t structures. In the same 
vein, the motion of any aircraft or space vehicle must be initiated and 
maintained by a propulsive mechanism such as the classic combination of a 
reciprocating engine with a propeller, or the more modern turboiets, ramiets 
and rockets The study of the physical fundamentals of how these engines 
work is called Wglit propulsion. Finally, all of the above are synthesized into 
one system with a specific application — such as a complete transport aircraft 
or a missile— through a discipline called aerospace vehicle design. 

The Department of Aerospace Engmeenng at The University of Ivlaryiand 
offers a rigorous and balanced education which includes all of the above 
disciplines The goal of this program is to create professional aerospace 
engineers with an understanding of the physical fundamentals underlying 
atmospheric and space flight, and with the capability of applying this 
knowledge for research, analysis and design purposes IVIoreover, the 
physical background and design synthesis that marks aerospace engineering 
education also prepares a student to work productively in other fields such as 
energy and surface transportation. 

The facilities of the department include three subsonic wind tunnels (with 
test sections ranging from 2 by 2 ft to 7 75 by 11 ft ). one supersonic tunnel, 
equipment for the static and dynamic testing of structural components, and a 
flight simulator A computational facility with remote terminals located in the 
department provides access to the University's central computer system 



Aerospace Engineering Curriculum 



MATH 240— Linear Algebra 

MATH 241— Calculus III 

PHYS 262, 263-General Physics 

ENES 240— Engineering Computation 

ENES 220— fvlechamcs of Materials 

ENAE 201, 202— Introduction to Aerospace Engineering I, II 

Total 

Junior Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 

MATH 24&— Differential Equations 

ENES 221— Dynamics 

ENME 217— Thermodynamics 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical Engineering 

ENAE 305— Aerospace Laboratory I 

ENAE 345— Introduction to Dynamics Of Aerospace Systems 

ENAE 451 , 452— Flight Structures 1,11 

ENAE 371— Aerodynamics I 

Total 



Sophomore Year 

University Studies Program Requirements 



Semester 
Credit Hours 
I II 

3 3 



Senior Year 

ENAE 471— Aerodynamics II 

ENAE 475— Viscous Flow and Aerodynamic Healing 

ENAE 401— Aerospace Laboratory II 

ENAE 402— Aerospace Laboratory III 

ENAE 461— Flight Propulsion I 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Design Elective' 

Applied Dynamics Elective^ 

Aerospace Elective^ 

Technical Elective* 

Total 33 

Minimum Degree Credits— 120 and the fulfillment of all 

Department, College, Division, and University 

requirements. 

' The student shall take one of the following design courses: 

ENAE 411 Aircraft Design (fall) 

ENAE 412 Design of Aerospace Vehicles (spring) 
^The student shall take one course which utilizes dynamics in a system 

analysis The following courses are offered; 

ENAE 445 Stability and Control of Aerospace Vehicles (fall) 

ENAE 355 Aircraft Vibrations (spring) 
^ Three credits must be taken from elective courses offered by the 

Aerospace Engineering Department Currently offered courses are; 

ENAE 415 Computer-Aided Struct Design Analysis (spnng) 

ENAE 453 Matrix Methods in Computational Analysis (fall) 

ENAE 457 Flight Structures 111 (fall) 

ENAE 462 Flight Propulsion II (spring) 

ENAE 472 Aerodynamics III (fall) 

ENAE 473 Aerodynamics of High Speed Flight (not offered every year) 

ENAE 488 Topics in Aerospace Engineering 

ENAE 499 Elective Research 

Courses listed under 2 and 3 above and which are not used to meet Itie 

requirements of 2 and 3 may be elected to fulfill requirement 4 
* Courses available as aerospace electives may be taken as the technical 

elective, or any other technical course with a number of 300 or atxjve it 

offered to maprs in the College of Engineering or in the Departments of 

Mathematics and Physics. 

Course Code Prelix— ENAE 

Agricultural Engineering 

Associate Professor and Chairman: Stewart 

Professors: Feiton (Emeritus). Green (Emeritus), Harris. Krewatcti (Emeritus). 

Wheaton 

Associate Professors: Grant. Johnson. Merrick (Emeritus). Ross 

Assistant Professors: Magette, Muller, Rebuck. Yaramanoglu 

Senior Specialist: Brodie 

Instructors Ca". Gird. Hochheimer. Smith 

Visiting Professor: Yeck 

Affiliate Assistant Professor: Brinsfield 

Agricultural engineering utilizes both the physical and biological sciences 
to help meet the needs of our increasing world population lor food natural 
fiber and improvement or maintenance of the environment Scientific and 
engineering principles are applied to the conservation and utilization ot soil 
and water resources for food production and recreation, to the utilization ot 
energy to improve labor efficiency and to reduce latxsnous and memai tasks, 
to the design of structures and equipment tor housing or handling of plants 
and animals to optimize growth potential, to the design of residences to 
improve the standard of living lor the rural population, to the devek)pment ol 
methods and equipment to mamiam or increase the quality of lood and natural 
fiber. 10 the flow of supplies and equipment to the agricultural and aquacuitural 
production units, and to the flow of products from the production units and the 
processing plants to the consumer The agricultural engineer places emphasis 



College of Engineering Departments, Programs and Curricula 121 



on maintaining a high quality environment as he works lowaid developing 
elticient and economical enginee.ing solutions 

The undergraduate curriculum provides opportunity to prepare for many 
interesting and challenging careers m design, management, research, 
education, sales, consulting, or international service The program of study 
includes a broad base ot mathematical, physical and engineering sciences 
combined with basic biological sciences Twenty-two hours ot electives gives 
flexibility so that a student may plan a program according to his maior interest 

Students with interest in agricultural engineering may enroll through either 
the College ol Engineering or the College of Agriculture. However, all 
agricultural engineering maiors must meet admission, progress and retention 
standards of the College of Engineering, 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Freshman Year I II 

MATH 140. 141— Calculus I, II .. 4 4 

CHEfy/1103. 113*— General Chemistry I. II 4 4 

BOTN 101 or ZOOL 101 4 

ENES 101— Introductory Engineering Science 3 

ENES 1 10— Statics 3 

PHYS 161— General Physics I 3 

Universily Studies Program Requirements'" 3 3 

Total 18 17 



Sophomore Year 

MATH 241— Calculus III 

MATH 246— Differential Equations for Scientists & Engineers 

PHYS 262. 263— General Physics 

ENES 220— Mechanics of Materials 

ENES 221— Dynamics 

ENME 217— Thermodynamics 

Free Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements*" 

7b/a/ 



Junior Year 

ENME 300 (or ENCE 300)— Materials Science and Engineering 

ENME 342 (or ENCE 330)— Fluid Mechanics 

ENEE 300— Principles of Electrical Engineering 

ENCE 350— Structural Analysis 

ENAG 454— Biological Process Engineering 

Technical Electives" 

University Studies Program Requirements"* 

Total 

Senior Year 

ENAG 421— Power Systems 

ENAG 444— Functional Design of Machines and Equipment . . 

ENAG 422— Soil and Water Engineering 

ENAG 424 — Functional and Environmental Design of 

Agricultural Structures 

Technical Electives" 

Free Elective 

University Studies Program Requirements*** 



Total 15 15 

Minimum Degree Credits— 120 credits and fulfillment of all 

Department. College, Division, and University 

requirements. 

• CHEM 104 may be substiljted for CHEM 113. Check with an advisor regarding the 
ctiemistry requirement betore registering. 

Technical electives. related to field of concentration, must be selected from a 
departmenially approved list Nine credits must be 300 level and above, 
"■ Students must consult with depanmenial advisors to ensure the selection of appropriate 
courses for their particular program of study. 

Course Code Prefix— ENAG 

Chemical and Nuclear Engineering 

Professor and Chairman: Roush 

Professors: Beckmann. Cadman. Gentry, Hsu. McAvoy. Regan. Schroeder 

(pt ). Smith 

Associate Professor: Gasner 

Assistant Professors: Caiabrese. Choi. Davisson 

The Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department offers programs in 
chemical, materials and nuclear engineering In addition, study programs in 
the areas of applied polymer science, biochemical engineering, and process 
Simulation and control are available The latter programs are interdisciplinary 
with other departments at the University The departmental programs prepare 
an undergraduate for graduate study or immediate industrial trial employment 
following the baccalaureate degree 

The Chemical Engineering Program emphasizes the application of basic 
engineering and economic principles— and basic sciences ot mathematics, 
physics and chemistry— to process industries concerned with the chemical 



transformation ol mailer Tfie chemical engineer is primarily concerned with 
research and process development leading to new chemical process ventures 
or a belter understanding of existing ones, with the efficient operation of the 
complete chemical plant or its component units, with the technical services 
engineering required for improving and understanding chemical plant 
operation and the products produced, with the chemical sales and economic 
distribution ol the chemical plant product, and with the general management 
and executive direction of chemical process industry plants and industrial 
complexes 

Because of this wide range of ultimate applications, the chemical engineer 
finds interesting and diverse career opportunities in such varied fields as 
chemical (morgamc and organic), food processing • and manufacture, 
metallurgical, nuclear and energy conversion, petroleum (refining, production, 
or pelrochernicai). and pharmaceutical industries Additional opporlunities are 
presented by the research and development activities of many public and 
private research institutes and allied agencies. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 



Sophomore Yelir 

MATH 241— Calculus III 

MATH 24&-Differential Equations 

PHYS 262. 263-Generai Physics 

ENES 230— Intro to Materials and Their Applications 

CHEM 233— Organic Chemistry I 

CHEM 243— Organic Chemistry II 

ENCH 215— Chem Engr Analysis 

ENCH 280— Transport Processes I: Fluid Mechanics 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 

Junior Year 

ENCH 300— Chemical Process Thermodynamics 

ENCH 440— Chemical Engr Kinetics 

ENCH 442— Chemical Engr Systems Analysis and Dynamics 

CHEM 481. 482— Physical Chemistry I. II 

CHEM 483— Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 

ENCH 425. 427— Transport Process II: Heat Transfer; III: Mass 

Transfer 

ENEE Elective* 

University Studies Program Requirements 

Total 

Sen/or Year 

ENCH 437 — Chemical Engineering Lab 

ENCH 444 — Process Engr, Economics and Design I 

ENCH 446— Process Engr, Econ. and Design II 

ENCH 333— Seminar 

Technical Electives 

University Studies Requirements 

Tbfa; 

Minimum Degree Credits— 120 credits and fulfillment of all 
Department. College, Division, and University 

requirements, 
' ENEE 300 IS recommended course. 



Technical Elective Guidelines 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Twelve (12) credits ol technical electives are required. It is recommended 
that they be taken during the senior year. 
Additional guidelines are as follows: 

1 , Two courses must be taken in one of the areas of specialization given 
below One of these two courses must be a lecture course, the other, a 
laboratory course 

2, The remaining technical electives will nominally also be chosen from the list 
given Upon the approval of your advisor and written permission of the 
Department Chairman or Program Director, a limited degree of substitution 
may be permitted Substitutes, including ENCH 468— Research (1-3 or.) 
must fit into an overall plan of study emphasis, 

3 As noted, several of the technical elective courses are sequenced. Check 
recommended prerequisites when pla