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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705-1087 



Non-profit Org. 
U.S. Postage 

Paid 

Permit No. 198 

Indiana, PA 15701 



ate ,. Jr 





Undergraduate uatalog 

1994-1995 

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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This bulletin contains announcements of courses for the academic year 1994-95. IUP reserves the 
right to repeal, change, or amend the rules, regulations, courses, and programs contained in tins 
bulletin at any time. Tuition and fees are also subject to change. 

According to IUP's Mission Statement, "...The university community must be supportive of and open 
to all scholars regardless of race, religion, creed, age, sex, disability, or ethnic heritage..." Full 
participation from each member of the university community in activities that support this mission is 
encouraged. Each member of the university community has a right to study and work in an 
environment free from any form of racial, ethnic, and sexual discrimination. In accordance with 
federal and state laws, the university will not tolerate racial or ethnic discrimination or discrimination 
on the basis of disability. 

IUP is committed to providing leadership in taking affirmative action to attain equal educational and 
employment rights to all persons without regard to race, religion, national origin, ancestry, sex, 
physical handicap, or affectional or lifestyle preference. This policy is placed in this document in 
accordance with state and federal laws including Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 
Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 
1973, and the Americans With Disabilities Act, as well as federal and state executive orders. This 
policy extends to disabled veterans and veterans of the Vietnam era. Please direct inquiries 
concerning equal opportunity and affirmative action to the following administrators: 
Management and University Concerns: 

Dr. Cynthia Cronk 

Director. Human Resources 

G-30 Sutton Hall. IUP. Indiana. PA 15705 
Faculty Concerns: 

Dr. Alphonse N. Novels 

Assistant Provost and Director of Minority Affairs 

359 Sutton Hall, IUP, Indiana, PA 1 5705 
Student Concerns: 

Ms. Rhonda Luckey 

Pechan Health Center 

TD: Telecommunications Device available in the 

Advising and Testing Center. (412) 357-4067 
(VITD) (8:00-4:30, M-F) 
Office of Human Resources, (412) 357-248 1 
(TD) (24 hours) 



Credits 

Editor: Diane L. Duntley 
Designer: Diane Staszkiewicz 
Cover Photography: BRT Photo 

James Rogers, FOTOGRAFIX 

IUP file photos 
General Photography: James Wakefield 



Indiana University 

of Pennsylvania Bulletin 

1994-95 
Undergraduate Catalog 



IUP 

Indiana, Pennsylvania 15705 




2 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



The University — 3 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar 04 

The University 05 

The Branch Campuses 07 

Admission and Registration 08 

Finances 1 1 

Student Programs and Services 23 

Academic Policies 27 

Requirements for Graduation 38 

Academic Affairs Division Areas 42 

The Eberly College of Business 45 

The College of Education 51 

The College of Fine Arts 59 

The College of Health and Human Services 65 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences 75 

The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 96 

The School of Continuing Education 112 

Course Descriptions 115 

Directory 193 



4 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



University Calendar 

Fall Semester, 1994 

Registration Aug. 30 

Classes begin Aug. 31 

Labor Day (no classes) Sept. 5 
Thanksgiving recess begins 

at end of night classes Nov. 22 

Classes resume (8:00 a.m.) Nov. 28 

Reading Day Dec. 13 
Final exams Dec. 14-21 

December Commencement Dec. 18 

Spring Semester, 1995 

Registration Jan. 16 

Classes start Jan. 17 

Spring vacation starts/p.m. Mar. 4 

Classes resume (8:00 a.m.) Mar. 13 

Easter Apr. 16 

No classes Apr. 17 

Monday classes held Apr. 18 

Reading Day May 2 

Final exams May 3-10 

May Commencement May 13 

Summer sessions, 1995* 

First session registration June 5 

First session classes begin/p.m. June 5 

First session ends July 7 

Second session registration July 10 

Second session classes begin/p.m. July 10 

Second session ends Aug. 11 



The University 



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TTie University 

A University Education 

As an institution of higher learning. IUP is a community of scholars of both 
faculty and students, committed to discover, preserve, and impart truth in all 
its forms. Our primary concern is with the intellectual, moral, cultural, 
physical, social, and aesthetic development and maturation of our students. 
To this end we are charged with providing a liberal education of both 
general and specialized studies which will allow our students to liberate 
themselves from narrow interests and prejudices, to broaden their 
intellectual horizons by increased cultural perspective, to develop the ability 
to think logically, critically, and creatively, and to communicate their 
judgments clearly and forcefully. The curriculum involves a body of 
knowledge about the universe and about people, their nature, behavior, and 
values. It also provides an opportunity to gain specialized knowledge as a 
preparation for graduate study and entry into professional life. Beyond this 
breadth and depth of know ledge, the university recognizes that such an 
education is only a beginning and hopes to stimulate its students to pursue 
continuous development in the areas of human knowledge, to seek wisdom, 
to challenge the mysteries of life and examine its ultimate meaning, and to 
become useful members of society by embracing careers which will touch 
the whole community. 

Approved by the University Senate in May, 1979. 

History of the University 

IUP has witnessed a history rich in accomplishment. Since 1875. when it 
served only 225 students in a single building, it has experienced continuous 
growth, becoming Pennsylvania's fifth largest university. The current 
enrollment is over 14,000. with students from thirty-six states and over fifty- 
five countries. 

The first building, named John Sutton Hall in honor of the first president of 
the Board of Trustees, was opened for students on May 17. 1875. 



In April. 1920, control and ownership of the school passed to the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In May, 1927, by authority of the General 
Assembly, the State Normal School became a college, with the right to grant 
degrees. The name was then changed to the State Teachers College at 
Indiana. Pennsylvania. In 1959. the legislature approved a change of name 
to Indiana State College; in the 1960s there followed a rapid growth in the 
liberal arts program. 

In December. 1965, Indiana was redesignated Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania and given the authority to expand its curriculum and to 
grant degrees at the master's level. At this time the first doctoral program 
was initiated. 

The following publications have all recognized IUP for its high academic 
standards and competitive costs: Arco's Dollarwise Guide to American 
Colleges: Barron's 300: Best Buys in College Education. The Best Buys in 
College Education by Edw ard Fiske, education editor of the Yen Yoi k 
Times: Changing Tones. Hon to Get an Ivy League Education at a State 
University by Martin Nemko; Money magazine's Money Guide: Two 
Hundred Most Selective Colleges: The Definitive Guide to America'.', First- 
Choice Schools: and U.S. News and World Report. 

Accreditation 

IUP is a state-owned institution for higher education as a member of the 
Slate System of Higher Education. It is an approved and fully accredited 
member of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the American 
Home Economics Association, the American Chemical Society, the 
American Psychological Association, the National League for Nursing, the 
American Society of Safety Engineers, the Committee on Allied Health 
Education and Accreditation, the National Association of Schools of Music, 
the National Association of School Psychologists, the National Accrediting 
Agency for Clinical Sciences, and the Council on Hotel. Restaurant, and 
Institutional Education. 

Buildings and Grounds 

The main campus, originally consisting of twelve acres and one building, is 
now composed of a total of 204 acres on which are located seventy-two 
major buildings owned by the state and seven athletic fields. Two of the 
buildings, Breezedale and John Sutton Hall, have been entered in the 
National Register of Historic Places. The Co-op Recreational Park, located a 
few miles from the campus, consists of 280 acres and several buildings 
including a lodge and ski hut. The wooded hillsides offer opportunities for 
nature study and such outdoor recreational activities as hiking, skiing, and 
exercise trails. 

Institute for Research and Community Service 

In September, 1989. the Institute for Research and Community Service was 
created w ithin the Research Division of the Graduate School to replace the 
Center for Community Affairs and the Institute for Applied Research and 
Public Policy Studies. 

The Institute for Research and Community Service serves as the primary 
outreach office of the university to link community effort and need with the 
diverse resources of the university and to encourage research activities 
among the faculty. Major areas of responsibility include: 1 ) To expand 
economic development and public service initiatives within the university's 
research mission; 2) To provide a coordinating function for all IUP 
research centers; and 3) To provide leadership and support for the Applied 
Research Lab. 

A wide variety of services is offered through outreach efforts to community 
leaders in government, business, education, human service, and health care 
agencies and organizations. Typical services include policy analysis for local 
governments, needs assessments, survey research, computer projects, 
software development, digital mapping, land use and site studies, and 
archaeological services including Phase I and II surveys. Through affiliation 
with the Pennsylvania State Data Center, a variety of specialized census and 
economic data reports are developed upon request. 

Staff of the institute includes a director, fiscal assistant, graduate assistant, 
several undergraduate students, and numerous faculty associates. 

Information Systems and Communications Center 

The Information Systems and Communications Center (ISCC). established 
in 1963. is located on the ground floor of Stright Hall. The ISCC provides 



6 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



computational support for undergraduate and graduate courses, faculty and 
student research, and the administrative requirements of the university. 

The primary computing capacity of the center is provided by a DEC 
VAXcluster running VMS which supports both timesharing and batch 
processing services. A campus network provides 9600 baud terminal access, 
with ethernet connectivity available in selected locations. IUP is connected 
to both the BITNET and Internet wide area networks. 

Student access to computing is provided, for the most part, through the 
public computing laboratories. The primary public labs are strategically 
placed around campus to maximize their availability and impact. Several 
departments maintain computing facilities that are of a focused nature and 
which are intended to support specific programs. 

Through implementation of its strategic computing plan, which is part of the 
university long-range planning process, the university is committed to 
providing the level of computing and information technology necessary for 
a modem institution of higher education. Guidance in this area is provided 
from both an Academic and Administrative Computing Advisory 
Committee. Undergraduate and Graduate students are represented on the 
Academic Computing Advisory Committee. 

Library and Media Services 

Patrick J. Stapleton. Jr.. Library, the central library for IUP, was completed 
and dedicated in 1981. It adjoins Rhodes R. Stabley Library, which results in 
a combined structure of 156,000 square feet. The Cogswell Music Library, 
the University School Library, and the branch campus libraries at Armstrong 
Center in Kittanning and in Punxsutawney are the other components of the 
IUP library system. Nineteen library faculty members, twenty-two support 
and technical staff members, and over two hundred students are employed in 
the Libraries and Media Resources Division of the university. The book 
collection contains in excess of 700.000 volumes; there are 4,500 periodical 
subscriptions, 1.7 million items of microforms, over 100,000 bound 
periodicals, and in excess of 24,000 volumes of governmental publications. 
(IUP is a designated Select Depository for federal and state publications.) 
The libraries' media holdings in all formats are extensive. Resources are 
supplemented through membership in OCLC for interlibrary loan, the 
Health Sciences Consortium (North Carolina), and the Laurel Highlands 
Consortium and associate membership in the Center for Research Libraries. 
The central library is open ninety-three hours a week during regular terms. 
The Cogswell Music Library, located on the top floor of Cogswell Hall, 
contains approximately 6,000 books, 70,000 scores, and 10,000 recordings. 
Holdings of monumental editions are substantial. Sound recordings circulate 
only to faculty, but listening stations are available for use by all patrons. The 
University School Library's 6,500 volumes support the curriculum of grades 
K-6 at the University School. The Armstrong County campus library has 
more than 22.000 volumes, and the recently renovated Punxsutawney library 
contains more than 13,000 books as well as 150 periodicals and recordings 
of music, poetry, and drama. 

University Senate 

Purpose 

The purpose of the University Senate is to provide a formal means through 
which the student body, faculty, and administration, working as a unified 
group, shall have a representative share in the governance of the university. 

Nothing relating to the organization and administration of the University 
Senate shall be construed so as to limit the authority of the Council of 
Trustees or the president of the university with respect to the administration 
of the university as prescribed by law. 

Composition and Elective Procedures 

The University Senate shall consist of a number of faculty double the 
number of departments of the university, an administrative segment one- 
third the size of the faculty segment, and a student segment one-half the size 
of the faculty segment. The Senate shall also include one Alumni 
Association representative and four representatives from staff. Faculty, 
administrative, and staff members must hold full-time contracts at the time 
of election or appointment, and students must be full-time and in good 
standing. "Student" refers to both the undergraduate and graduate student 
bodies. The student segment shall consist often times as many 
undergraduate students as graduate students, each delegation to be elected 
by its representative student body. Undergraduate students shall be elected 
under the auspices of the recognized student association (as defined by 



Pennsylvania state Act 1982-188) and graduate students through elections 
arranged by their comparable body. In both cases, the officiating body shall 
call for and accept voluntary nominations for election to the Senate. Student 
members of the University Senate serve on most of the Senate committees. 

The Foundation for IUP 

The Foundation for IUP is a nonprofit agency established in 1967 to develop 
and maintain private support for IUP. It is governed by a twenty-four- 
member Board of Directors. The offices are located on campus in John 
Sutton Hall. 

Funds raised through contributions from alumni, friends, faculty and staff, 
corporations, and foundations are used to support scholarships, academic 
and athletic enrichment, departmental programs, and other priority needs of 
the university. In 1993-94 contributions received totaled over $6 million, 
and the foundation's endowments are valued at $9 million. 

Interim University Policy on Sexual Harassment 

IUP affirms that sexual harassment is a violation of basic human rights, 
inconsistent with the purpose and principles of an academic community. 
Sexual harassment of students and employees is unacceptable conduct 
and will not be tolerated. 

Any university community member who engages in sexual harassment is 
subject to the disciplinary process appropriate to his/her classification as an 
employee or student. 

The right to confidentiality of all parties involved in a sexual harassment 
complaint shall be strictly adhered to insofar as it does not interfere with the 
university's legal obligation to investigate allegations of misconduct and to 
take appropriate corrective action. 

IUP prohibits retaliatory action against individuals filing either informal or 
formal complaints of sexual harassment. Nothing contained in this policy 
protects an individual who maliciously makes false accusations. While 
seeking to protect those whose dignity might be compromised, it must be 
emphasized that false accusations of sexual harassment will not be tolerated. 

Definition: Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that is 
reprehensible and unlawful. Title IX of the education amendments of 1972 
prohibits sex discrimination in employment. Sexual harassment is defined as: 

a. making unwelcome sexual advances 

b. requesting sexual favors 

c. verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature — which submission to such 
conduct is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of a 
person's employment or education 

d. verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature — which has the purpose or 
effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's academic, 
personal, or professional performance 

e. verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature — which has the purpose or 
effect of unreasonably creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive 
educational, social, or work environment 

f. basing employment or academic decisions upon a person's submission to 
or rejection of verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature 

Sexual harassment occurs in a variety of situations. Many of these situations 
have two circumstances in common: 

the inappropriate introduction of sexual activities into relationships of 

unequal power 
• an element of coercion — so that compliance with requests for sexual 

favors becomes a criterion for granting employment or academic 

benefits. 

Sexual harassment may also involve relationships among equals. In these 
cases repeated sexual advances or demeaning verbal behavior have a 
harmful effect on one's ability to study, live, or work within the academic 
community. 

Questions regarding the Sexual Harassment Policy or complaint procedures 
may be directed to the Director of Human Resources, G-30 Sutton Hall, IUP. 
Policy approved by University Senate. May 1, 1990; pending final approval 
by Council of Trustees. 



The Branch Campuses — 7 




The Branch Campuses 

Robert H. Doerr, Director, Armstrong Branch 
Norman T. Storm, Director, Punxsutawney 
Branch 

IUP operates two branch campuses, one in Punxsutawney, twenty-eight 
miles north of the Indiana campus, and one in Kittanning, twenty-eight 
miles west of the Indiana campus. The first branch campus was established 
in 1962 in Punxsutawney. The following year the Armstrong campus in 
Kittanning was opened. The Punxsutawney campus accommodates 200-225 
students and the Armstrong campus accommodates 450-550 students. 

Control of the branch campuses is directly vested with the IUP 
administration and Council of Trustees. Advisory boards from the respective 
areas identify local needs. Both branch campuses carry full accreditation as 
integral parts of the undergraduate programs of IUP. This means that course 
offered at the branch campuses are of the same quality as those offered at 
the Indiana campus. 

Programs of Study 

The branch campuses of IUP offer basic liberal studies courses for most 
majors in the various undergraduate colleges of the university. Students may 
schedule a full program for the freshman year and many sophomore-level 
courses. No student accepted at either of the branch campuses is eligible for 
transfer to the Indiana campus until he/she has completed two semesters. 

Faculty advisers and administrators at the branch campuses are available to 
advise students on their instructional programs and the proper time for 
continuing at the Indiana campus, whether it be after two, three, or 
four semesters. 



Business Associate Degree Program 

The two-year Associate of Arts degree in Business is based upon a broad 
liberal arts program as well as professional competencies needed in the field 
nt business. The program is offered at the Armstrong campus and the 
Punxsutawney campus. A student accepted for this program may 
concentrate in computer and office information systems. Most of the credits 
earned in the two-year program may apply toward a four-year degree 
program in business. 

Criminology Associate Degree Program 

A two-year program in criminology is offered only at the Punxsutawney 
branch campus and is not offered at the Indiana campus of IUP. The credits 
earned in the two-year program will apply toward the four-year degree 
program in criminology. 

Admission 

Any prospective student who wishes to attend either of the branch campuses 
instead of the Indiana campus may apply for admission by requesting an 
application from the Admissions Office or from the director of either branch 
campus. Students admitted into an Associate of Arts Degree Program must 
reapply for admission if they choose to pursue a bachelor's degree at IUP. 
The same standards and requirements used for admission at the Indiana 
campus are applied at both university branch campuses. The mailing 
addresses for the respective branch campuses follow: 



Punxsutawney Branch Campus 

IUP 

Punxsutawney, PA 15767 



Armstrong County Branch Campus 

IUP 

Kittanning, PA 16201 

Housing 

The Punxsutawney branch campus has privately owned residence halls for 
students living beyond commuting distance, while the Armstrong County 
branch campus operates university-owned residence halls. Students are free 
to choose their housing from all available sources, which include the 
residence halls and private homes or apartments in the community. A list of 
rooms and apartments is available in each campus director's office. 

Food Service 

Each branch campus has its own dining hall within the residence hall. Meals 
are served seven days a week during the time the university is in session. 
Residence hall students as well as students living in private homes and 
apartments may make arrangements to take meals in the dining halls. The 
dining service is operated by the same food service contractor as on the 
Indiana campus. 

Rules and Regulations Concerning Student Behavior 

Students at the branch campuses are subject to the same rules and 
regulations as students on the Indiana campus. 

Fees 

Branch campus students pay the same basic fees as Indiana campus students 
except for the health fee. 

Continuing Education 

The School of Continuing Education plays a significant role in programming 
Community-University Studies classes (noncredit), academic workshops, 
and institutes in the Punxsutawney and Kittanning areas. The school is 
also responsive to the needs of the local community through credit and 
noncredit activities. 



8 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 




Admissions and Registration 

Undergraduate Admissions Policy 

Graduates of an accredited four-year high school or holders of a GED 
equivalency diploma are qualified to apply for admission to IUP. Students 
who have completed the junior year of high school may file an application 
any time after July 1. 

Requests for applications and catalogs should be addressed to 
Office of Admissions 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
216 Pratt Hall 
Indiana, PA 15705 

The Admissions Committee, giving equal opportunity to all students, will 
take the following criteria into consideration when reviewing each 
application: SAT/ ACT scores, class rank, grades, guidance counselor 
recommendations, faculty recommendations, extracurricular activities and 
other pertinent information that would be helpful to the Admissions 
Committee in making decisions. SAT/ACT scores are not required for 
transfers, veterans, or applicants who have graduated from high school more 
than five years before applying. However, high school and all previous 
college transcripts are required. 

Although the university does not require a specific number of high school 
credits in particular subject areas, applicants are strongly urged to take the 
usual college preparatory program in high school. Applicants should also 
take any available high school courses in the field of their intended major. 
Applicants should be aware that certain majors at IUP require completion of 
a foreign language at the intermediate level in order to earn a bachelor "s 
degree. However, the Admissions Committee does not require an applicant 
to take a foreign language in high school for admission to these majors. 



Applications are considered by the Admissions Committee on a rolling 
basis. Under a rolling admissions policy, applications are reviewed as they 
become complete. Decisions can range from automatic acceptance, to 
request for additional information, to other alternatives, with a May 1 
deadline for tuition deposits. 

Academically qualified applicants to the departments of Art. Music, and 
Theater will be admitted to the university by the Admissions Committee. 
However, admission to the requested major will be subject to the acceptance 
by the Department of Art after a portfolio review and by the Departments of 
Music and Theater after an audition. Students will receive information 
from the Art. Music and Theater departments concerning auditions and 
portfolio reviews. 

Freshman Applications 

Applications for admission will be available after July 1 following the 
student's junior year of high school. 

All persons expecting to apply for freshman admission to IUP should plan 
to take the SAT or ACT test during their junior and/or early part of their 
senior year. The Admissions Committee recommends that students take the 
tests more than once. The committee considers the highest scores from all 
tests taken. 

Arrangements to take the SAT or ACT tests can be made through the high 
school principal or counselor, or by writing to the College Entrance 
Examination Board. Box 592. Princeton. NJ 08540 or American College 
Testing, P.O. Box 168. Iowa City. Iowa. 52243 for an information pamphlet 
and test registration form. 

In order for the test scores to be received by IUP, IUP must be designated on 
the registration form as one of the universities to receive the scores. 

The applicant should give the completed application form and the 
nonrefundable $20 application fee payable to IUP to his/her high school 
principal or counselor. The principal or counselor should mail the 
application and complete packet of admissions materials to the IUP Office 
of Admissions. 216 Pratt Hall. Indiana. PA 15705. 

Early Admission 

The Early Admissions Program permits students to enroll as a college 
freshman after completing the junior year in high school. Student 
applications for acceptance must originate with the student's high school 
counselor and principal. Admission consideration will be given to those 
applications which contain a statement indicating explicit approval by the 
high school principal. Applicants are considered on an individual basis. The 
university Admissions Committee will exercise the final judgment as to 
university acceptance after a personal interview with the applicant. The 
university strongly recommends prior summer school attendance by all 
students admitted through the Early Admissions Program. 

Processing the Application 

1) The Admissions Committee reviews, with care and understanding, each 
of the several thousand applications that are submitted each year. 

2) Decisions on applications are made on a rolling basis. 

3) Applicants who are admitted to IUP will be invited to attend an 
orientation program on campus to receive general information and 
discuss their academic and career plans with the college dean, faculty 
representative of their respective major, and other advisers. 

4) Attendance at the orientation and payment of the $30 orientation fee 
signifies the applicant's interest but not commitment to attend IUP. 

5) A $75 nonrefundable tuition deposit is due from all incoming students. 
This advance deposit payment will be credited to the applicant's tuition. 

Transfer Admission 

A student who has been attending another institution of higher education 
and wishes to transfer to IUP must submit an application, official transcripts 
of all postsecondary educational work, and an official high school transcript. 

All admissions decisions are made on a "rolling" basis by the Admissions 
Committee. Under a rolling admissions policy, applications are reviewed as 
they become complete. Decisions can range from automatic acceptance, to 
request for additional information, to other alternatives. The application 
deadline depends on the number of available vacancies in the transfer 
program and the number of applications received. 



Admissions and Registration 



Transfer applications ( 12 or more postsecondary, college credits attempted) 
arc reviewed on the basis of college coursework completed. Transfers arc 
required to have al least a cumulative 2.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale 

(C average) from all schools previously attended lor admission to most 
programs. The teacher certification program requires a cumulative minimum 
2.5 grade point average Irom all schools previously attended. 

A nonrefundable registration fee of $30 is required of all accepted students. 
Attendance at Transfer Registration Day in August is highly recommended. 
If waiver Of attendance at summer registration is approved by the 
Admissions Office, the student will schedule courses as available in late 
registration the day before the start of classes 

The evaluation of credits from other institutions of higher education is the 
responsibility of the Office of Academic Information Systems and the 
academic college dean who has jurisdiction over the student's desired major. 
Normally, courses considered for transfer ate only those taken from 
institutions which are accredited by the six regional accrediting agencies. 
Each course is usually evaluated separately. The evaluation normally 
includes a review of the description, semester hours, and grade of each 
course along with the applicability of the course to the student's major at 
1UP. However, only credits transfer, not grade-point average. It has been the 
policy of the university that only courses with a "C" or higher grade will be 
accepted, except for two-year associate degree graduates of state-supported 
community colleges in Pennsylvania. No matter how many credits are 
transferable, the student must satisfy all of the degree requirements falling 
into the categories of ( 1 ) university requirements, (2) college requirements, 
and (3) department requirements. 

University requirements: Since all students are obliged to fulfill a basic 
program in Liberal Studies consisting of 53-58 semester credit hours and 
there is a reasonable degree of flexibility in the Liberal Studies 
requirements, the transfer evaluator and the college deans will look to this 
area first for applicable credits for transfer. Most introductory courses are 
generally equivalent. 

Residency requirements: The university requires that at least forty-five 
credits, generally including the last thirty credits in a student's curriculum, 
must be earned by enrollment in courses at IUP. It should also be noted that 
for community college graduates a maximum of sixty credit hours is 
transferable to this institution for the purpose of fulfilling a specific program 
of study. Excess credits, if any. may be transferred but cannot be used for 
fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. 

Transfer students, to remain in good academic standing, must meet the same 
quality-point average requirements as those specified for all other 
undergraduate students. See section entitled "Criteria Governing 
Continuance at IUP." 

The university accepts credits associated with "D" grades only when they 
are part of a completed Associate Degree earned at a publicly owned 
community college in Pennsylvania. These "D" grades will be treated in the 
same manner as those earned at IUP. This articulation policy was adopted by 
the Board of State College and University Directors in 1973. 

Part-Time Study (Nondegree) 

Part-Time Studies Program — Undergraduate 

Part-time undergraduate study is available through the School of Continuing 
Education to any high school graduate, holder of a GED Equivalency 
Diploma, or adult over twenty-five years of age. No SAT scores are 
required. Note: A TOEFL Score is required as part of the application for an 
individual whose native language is other than English. Those who are not 
U.S. citizens must submit a notarized copy of their current visa and 1-94 
card or alien resident card. 

Applications are available from the Part-time Studies Program and must be 
submitted with documentation directly to the School of Continuing 
Education by August 15 for the fall semester and December 1 5 for the 
spring semester. A $20 application fee is required. Applications submitted 
after established dates are not guaranteed consideration. 

Transfer students may also apply to the School of Continuing Education for 
part-time study and must submit official transcripts for all previous college 
work attempted. An overall 2.0 GPA is required. 



A student in the Part-time Studies Program is limited to a semester 
enrollment of no more than 1 1 credits and must apply for formal admission 
to a degree program before 30 IUP credits have been earned. Applications 
for degree candidacy must be filed by the midterm point of the fall or spring 
semester preceding candidacy. Specific requirements for grade-point 
average and IUP credit vary by degree program. The minimum credit 
criteria to apply for consideration for degree candidacy are as follows: 
High School Diploma or GED 15 IUP Credits 2.0 GPA 

Veteran (DD-214 required) 9 IUP Credits 2.0 GPA 

Transfer (with 12 or more credits) 9 IUP Credits 2.0 GPA 

Transfer (with II or less credits) 15IUPCredits 2.0GPA 

Note: A student who has applied and has been admitted by the Office of 
Admissions to a branch campus is not eligible to apply to the School of 
Continuing Education. 

Program for Visiting High School Students 

IUP permits the exceptional high school student to preview university life 
and earn regular college credit on a limited nondegree basis. The student 
must have completed the sophomore year with a minimum of a "B" average 
and have the written support of the high school principal or guidance 
counselor. The parameters of the student's enrollment are defined in 
consultation with appropriate high school official and are limited to a 
maximum of nine credits per semester. For further information, contact the 
School of Continuing Education. 

Post Baccalaureate Studies (Undergraduate) 

The Post Baccalaureate Studies Program provides access to undergraduate 
courses to individuals who have an earned baccalaureate degree. Students 
may be seeking a second bachelor's degree, an additional teacher 
certification, or personal enrichment. Students may enroll on a full or part- 
time basis based on personal preference and availability of coursework. 

Applications are available from the School of Continuing Education. A 
completed application and official transcripts of all previous undergraduate 
coursework must be submitted for review by August 15 for fall semester and 
December 15 for spring semester. Applications not submitted by established 
dates are not guaranteed consideration. A $20 application fee is required. 
The fee is waived for graduates of IUP. 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 

A student with an earned baccalaureate degree who wishes to complete the 
requirements for a second or subsequent bachelor's degree must make 
application and submit official transcripts indicating degree(s) awarded. The 
student must complete a minimum of thirty additional IUP credits and meet 
the requirements for graduation established by the academic department and 
college in which the new degree is to be earned. 

Teacher Certification 

A student with an earned nonteaching baccalaureate degree who wishes to 
complete the requirements for Instructional Level I certification must apply 
as a second bachelor's degree student. A minimum cumulative grade-point 
average of 2.50 is required for consideration for admission. To earn 
Instructional Level I the student must satisfactorily complete the 
prescribed courses in an IUP degree certification program at a minimum 
cumulative grade-point average of 2.50 and successfully pass the National 
Teacher Examination. 

A currently Pennsylvania-certified teacher who wishes to add a new area of 
certification may apply to the School of Continuing Education under the 
category teacher certification. Individuals admitted to add an additional 
teacher certification will follow an individually planned and approved 
course of study. 

Immunization Requirements 

Students entering effective Fall. 1991. are required to complete a Student 
Health Form documenting immunization status. See Health Services 
information in section "Student Programs and Services." 

Readmission Policy for Students Who Withdraw from the 
University Voluntarily 

A student who withdrew from the university on a voluntary basis for reasons 
of health, financial difficulty, etc.. and who wishes to reenter must notify, in 
writing, the dean of the college in which the student was enrolled at the time 
of his/her withdrawal, before July 1 for the fall semester (starting in 
September) or before November 1 for the spring semester (starting 
in January). 



10 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



The Summer Sessions 

The summer school program at IUP is designed to meet the needs of many 
students. Courses, workshops, and seminars are offered in the liberal arts, in 
teacher education, and in other fields of study. 

Continuing university students, including newly admitted freshmen, who 
wish to accelerate their program of studies will find both Liberal Studies and 
special courses in all fields of study. Students from other colleges and 
universities may take courses at IUP; however, they are advised to first 
ensure that their home institution will transfer such credits earned at IUP. 



Teachers-in-service will find courses in the summer program to serve a 
variety of needs. They may enroll to qualify for permanent certification, take 
refresher courses in their field of specialization, or take courses for the 
purpose of extending their certification to a new field. 

The Summer Sessions Schedule, which contains information regarding 
courses and activities offered during the summer sessions, is usually 
available after March 1 and can be obtained by contacting the Registrar's 
Office. Room G5, Sutton Hall (412-357-2217), or the Graduate School. 
Room 128, Stright Hall (412-357-2222). 

Attendance at summer sessions is open to all students but does not constitute 
admission or readmission for continuing registration in the fall and/or spring 
semesters. Students in good standing who desire admission must obtain an 
application through the Office of Admissions or the School of Continuing 
Education, as appropriate. Students who desire readmission for a fall 
semester must apply to the office of their college dean by the preceding 
July 1. 

American Language Institute (ALI) 

The American Language Institute offers intensive programs in English for 
international students and visitors from beginning through advanced levels 
each semester. 

The English for Academic Purposes Program (EAP) is for applicants 
seeking to prepare themselves for study at any U.S. college or university. 
Depending on proficiency, enrollment is for ten weeks of intensive study, 
beginning first summer session, including twenty-five hours per week of 
classroom instruction. Students completing this program may earn three 
semester hours of university credit. Students may apply to IUP for 
conditional admission, pending completion of this program. The ALI also 
offers two shorter programs: English for Specific Purposes (ESP) for 
graduate students entering specialized fields and English for International 
Visitors (EIV) for visiting professionals who seek improvement in English 
proficiency while experiencing life in the U.S. 

For further information about the ALI programs, contact Assistant Director, 
American Language Institute, 212 Eicher Hall. IUP. Indiana, PA 15705 
USA; (412) 357-2402. 




Finances — / / 





Finances 



♦Tuition Fees (as of May, 1994) 

The tuition and fees set forth in this section were those in effect in May, 
1994. The fee schedule is subject to change; these figures are to be 
considered simply as an estimate. A current fee schedule may be obtained by 
writing to the Admissions Office, IUP, or by phoning (412) 357-2230. 

The tuition for all full-time in-state students is $1,477 per semester. This 
covers registration and the keeping of student records, use of the library, 
student welfare, and laboratory facilities. An additional $123 per credit will 
be charged for undergraduate credits scheduled in excess of eighteen. 

Out-of-state full-time students pay tuition of $3,676 per semester. An 
additional $306 per credit will be charged for credits in excess of eighteen. 
The tuition for part-time in-state undergraduate students is $123 per 
semester hour. A part-time undergraduate student is one taking eleven or 
fewer semester hours. See the sections on Admission and Registration and 
on University Policies for further information concerning part-time students. 

The tuition for part-time out-of-state students is $306 per semester hour. An 
in-state student is defined as one who is a bona fide resident of and 
domiciled within the state of Pennsylvania for a reasonable period, not less 
than one year, immediately preceding his or her registration for a term or 
semester in any state-supported college or university in the state of 
Pennsylvania. A minor will generally be presumed to be a resident of the 
place of his/her parents' or guardian's domicile. 

The establishment of domicile is primarily a matter of continued residence 
and intention. Generally, Pennsylvania domicile is considered to be 
established upon the completion of at least twelve months of continuous 
residence within the state at the time of registration for courses. 

*The university reserves the right to change its fees without notice. 



*()ther Fees 

Audit Fee — Full standard Ices will be assessed for each course audited, 
exception being persons on Social Security or equivalent retirement benefit, 
who will be given remission of basic fees for such classes where space 
is available. 

Orientation Fee — A nonrefundable fee of $30 must be paid by each student 
accepted for enrollment. This fee will be used to cover the cost incurred by 
the university on the student's behalf during Freshman Orientation Day on 
campus and Fall Freshman Orientation. Payment of this fee signifies the 
student's interest but not commitment to attend IUP. 

Testing Fee — Each entering freshman must participate in placement testing 
during the summer immediately preceding the student's matriculation on 
campus. A fee of $65 is assessed for this overnight, two-day experience for 
students admitted to the main campus. Parents pay a nominal fee for their 
participation in the accompanying parent orientation program. Branch 
campus students participate in a summer one-day diagnostic testing 
experience only with a fee of $40. Students receive information about the 
summer testing program prior to the testing date(s). Fees are included in the 
regular billing and are nonrefundable. Please see the catalog section on 
Orientation for further information about the Orientation Phase II program. 

Health Fee — The student health fee of $58 per semester is assessed for 
each full-time undergraduate or graduate student at the main campus. All 
students enrolled in summer sessions will be assessed a student health fee of 
$19 for each of the two sessions. This fee covers services, medications, lab 
tests, and procedures provided by the IUP Health Center. Part-time 
undergraduate students taking six to eleven credit hours will be assessed a 
$29 per semester health service fee. Undergraduate students taking less than 
six credits have the option of paying the $58 per semester fee, or they may 
choose the Fee-for-Service schedule available at the IUP Health Center. 
Students attending branch campuses have health fee options. The fee is 
waived for students living more than sixty miles from campus or on 
internship at a site more than thirty miles from campus. For further 
information on health fees, contact the University Health Service at 
(412) 357-6475. 

Educational Services Fee — All students are charged a fee to support 
academic equipment and library resources. For full-time students the fee is 
$75 per semester; for part-time students the fee is $35 per semester, and all 
students are charged $35 per summer session. 

Housing Fee — The room fee for students living in university residence 
halls for the 1994-95 academic year is $91 1 per semester for most double- 
occupancy rooms and $1,372 per semester for single-occupancy rooms. 
Resident students are required to take meals in university dining halls and 
can select from either Plan A or Plan B. Exceptions are made only for 
residents of university-owned apartments. 

Meal Fee — Meal fees that went into effect June, 1994, are as follows: 



Plan A - 



Plan B — 
Plan C — 

Plan D — 

Plan E — 



20 meals per week 

(breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Monday 

through Saturday, brunch and dinner on 

Sunday) $657/sem 

Any 14 meals per week $618/sem 

10 meals per week 

(lunch and dinner, Monday through Friday) $490/sem 

5 meals per week 

(lunch only. Monday through Friday) $242/sem 

Any 10 meals per week $531/sem 



Student Activity Fee — An activity fee is collected from all students and 
administered through the Student Cooperative Association under regulations 
approved by the Council of Trustees. This fee of $107.50 per semester 
covers the cost of student activities in athletics, lectures, entertainment, 
student publications, etc., and is payable in one sum for the semester. The 
Student Activity Fee is $43.50 for part-time students. These fees apply to 
main campus students only. Students attending the Armstrong or 
Punxsutawney campuses pay $104 per semester full-time and $40 part-time. 
(These fees are subject to change without notice during the academic year.) 

Facilities Fee — All students are charged a fee to support maintenance and 
repair projects, recreational facilities, and the advancement of technologies. 
For full-time students the fee is $75 per semester; for part-time students 
the fee is $35 per semester, and all students are charged $35 per 
summer session. 



12 — Ituliana University of Pennsylvania 



Late Registration Fee — Students who desire to register on the day prior to 
the start of classes, designated by the university as the Late Registration 
Day, will be assessed a Late Registration Fee of $50. Students who register 
for classes after completion of the university's Late Registration Day will be 
assessed a Late Registration Fee of $100. Exceptions to this fee may be 
granted by the provost or designee for students admitted late to the 
university for reasons deemed appropriate by the provost. 

Bad Check Charge — Students making checks payable to "Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania" which are not acceptable to the bank for any 
reason will be charged $10 for each bad check in the amount of $.01 to 
$49.99 and $20 forbad checks written lor $50 or more. 

Military Science Fee — An activity fee of $5 is required for ROTC cadets to 
cover the cost of Cadet Corps functions. This fee is payable directly to the 
military science department. 

Students Studying Abroad — Students enrolled in the studies abroad 
program will pay a program fee per semester to the university. All other fees 
assessed by the foreign institution will be paid directly to the foreign 
institution by the student. 

Med-Tech Students — During the clinical year a fee may be levied and 
collected by the participating hospital. The only other cost to these students 
shall be an administrative fee of $150 to be collected by the university. 
Room and board shall be the responsibility of the student. 

Financial Delinquency Policy — Registration is not in fact complete until a 
student pays the fee for such registration and the university reserves for 
itself the right to bar such a student from classes. When it has been 
determined during the course of a semester that a student's account has 
become delinquent from accrued charges, the Registrar's Office will be 
notified of this delinquency and advised to refrain from reporting the 
student's grades and from issuing any transcripts for that student's work 
until the delinquent account has been satisfied. Faculty members will 
continue to submit a grade for the financially delinquent student; however, 
requests from students will not be honored, and official reports will be 
released by the Registrar's Office only after the student has cleared his or 
her account or has established a payment plan satisfactory to the Accounts 
Receivable Office. 

Miscellaneous Costs — In some courses students are required to obtain 
supplies and materials to complete course projects. In many courses, a 
student may make a voluntary contribution to a cooperative fund established 
for the purpose of obtaining these supplies and/or services at a lower cost. 
Examples are art courses. Field trips, etc. 

Estimated Expenses Per Semester 



Instructional Fee 

Housing 

Meals 

Student Activity Fee 

Health Fee 

Facilities Fee 

Books and Supplies* 



Miscellaneous and travel expenses would be in addition to the above. 

*Cost of books and supplies may vary depending on major and class 
enrollment. 

Summer Sessions Fees 

Basic Fee — The basic fee for students enrolled for any of the regular 
summer sessions is $123 per semester hour for undergraduate students. 

Housing Fee — Room rates for the 1994 summer sessions are 

Double occupancy — $61 per week 

Single occupancy — $91 per week 
Students are charged for each session according to the number of weeks they 
will require housing. Resident students are required to take meals in 
university dining halls and can select from Plan A or Plan B. 



Meal Fee — I 


Plan A — 


Plan B — 


Plan C — 


Plan D — 


Plan E — 



Meal rates for 1994 summer sessions are 



20 meals per week 
14 meals per week 
10 meals per week 
5 meals per week 
Any 10 meals per week 



$42 per week 
$39 per week 
$32 per week 
$16 per week 
$34 per week 



In-State 


Out-of-State 


5 1,477.00 


$ 3.676.00 


911.00 


'Ml 00 


657.00 


657.00 


107.50 


107.50 


58.00 


58.00 


75.00 


75.00 


500.00 


500.00 


$ 3785.50 


$ 5984.50 



Student Activity Fee — For each of the two summer sessions, this fee is $35. 

Student Health Fee — Each undergraduate and graduate student enrolled in 
IUP summer sessions will be assessed $19 for each session for Student 
Health Services. 

Special Fees 

Degree Fee — A fee of $30 will be charged each candidate for a degree at 
the time of approval of application for graduation. This fee is to cover costs 
of preparing diplomas and the graduation ceremony. 

Transcript Fees — Applications for transcripts must be made only in writing 
to the registrar, either by U.S. mail or on forms available at the transcript 
window in Sutton Hall-Ground Floor. Such requests must include 

( 1 ) Your full name and Social Security number as of your graduation or 
termination of enrollment at IUP. (Please note any name changes since 
graduation.) 

1 2 ) Your present address. 

(3) Whether you are requesting a transcript of your undergraduate and/or 
graduate work. 

(4) Whether you graduated or. if not, when you were enrolled. 

(5) The full and clearly stated name(s) and address) es) of person(s) to 
whom you wish the transcript(s) sent. 

The transcript fee is $3 for each copy requested. (Checks or money orders 
should be made out to Indiana University of Pennsylvania.) A charge of $6 
will be assessed for express transcript service. 

Any requests which are not accompanied by the proper fees or information 
will be returned to the senders for inclusion of them. No transcript requests 
will be processed without the payment of transcript fees. 

Official transcripts (containing signature and university seal) will not be 
issued to students directly. The university will attempt to mail official 
transcripts within a reasonable time. However, in the event of its failure to 
do so, damages will be limited to the fee, if any. paid by the student for the 
copy or copies of the transcript. In no case is the university responsible for 
consequential damages. 

Damage Fee — Students are responsible for damages, breakage, loss, or 
delayed return of university property. 

Billing and Payments 

All bills, including basic fee and housing fee, are payable as specified on the 
billing notice; students have several options for payment plans. Checks or 
money orders, in the exact amount of the billing notice, should be made 
payable to IUP unless otherwise specified. Book Store purchases are on a 
cash basis. 

It is desired that payments for the entire semester be made in August for the 
first semester and in December for the second semester; however, for a 
nominal charge an installment plan is available. 

Delinquent Accounts 

Students will not be permitted to enroll for any semester nor to graduate 
until all bills previously incurred have been paid; nor will credit be certified 
to any other institution or the Department of Education until all overdue 
accounts have been paid. A late payment fee of $10 for each day past the 
due date will be assessed for delinquent accounts up to a maximum of $50. 

Undergraduate students desiring to leave school before the close of a 
semester must report to the Advising and Testing Center and to the Accounts 
Receivable Office to settle all unpaid accounts. Graduate students report to 
the Graduate School dean. 



Finances — 13 



PUP Refund Policy 

The university must engage its Faculty, assign residence hall space, and 

;e Foi dining contracts in advance oi each term in accordance with the 
number oi students who expressed their intent to he enrolled. When students 
withdraw from the university. they create vacancies which cannot he tilled, 
and financial commitments for salaries and services by the university must 
be honored. The refund policy at Indiana University of Pennsylvania applies 
to all students enrolled in credit-producing programs at the university either 
full-time or part-time and is effective January 1 . 1993. ANY STUDENT 
CANCELING OR WITHDRAW INC, FROM HIS/HER FIRST 
SEMESTER/SESSION SHOULD REFER TO SECTION HC. 

I. Cancellation 

Students who have made prepayments to the university, who are unable to 
attend classes, and who notify IUP prior to University Check-in or earlier 
are entitled to a full refund of all fee paid, LESS APPLICABLE 
ADVANCE DEPOSITS. To be eligible for such a refund, the student must 
notify the Director of Accounts Receivable in writing prior to University 
Check-in. The Director of Accounts Receivable will forward to the registrar 
copies of cancellation notices and the registrar will cancel the student's 
registration and notify the appropriate university offices. Students who use 
university residence halls and/or dining services the week prior to the start 
of classes and cancel will forfeit an amount equal to one week"s fee for such 
sen ices plus the full amount of any advance deposit payment. 

II. Total Withdrawal from the University 

Students who register for classes and then withdraw from the university on 
or after University Check-in are subject to the following: 

A. Undergraduate students withdrawing from the university must process 
such withdrawal through the Advising and Testing Center. Pratt Hall. 
Graduate students must withdraw through the Graduate School Office. 
Stright Hall. The official withdrawal date will be established by the 
Advising and Testing Center (undergraduate) or the Graduate School 
Office (graduate). Advance deposit payments toward tuition shall be 
nonrefundable. 

B. Students totally withdrawing from courses, except for those attending 
his/her first semester/session at IUP upon receiving approval from the 
applicable office (Advising and Testing Center or Graduate School), will 
forfeit a portion of the semester charges in accordance with the 
following schedule. A student attending his/her first semester/session 
will be entitled to a reduction of charges as outlined in section IIC. 

Withdrawal on Calendar Percentage of Student's Total 

Day Basis Semester Charges to Be Forfeited 

— University Check-in 

through 14 days 20% 

— 15 through 2 1 30% 

— 22 through 28 40% 

— 29 through 35 50', 

— 36 or beyond 100% (no reduction of fees) 

The start of calendar days is defined as the first day of classes as 
scheduled on the university calendar. 

Refunds for students receiving financial assistance from scholarships, 
loans, and/or grants will be returned to the source of aid in accordance 
with the provisions prescribed by the funding source. 

C. First Semester/Session Students 

First semester/session students who cancel prior to University Check-in 
are entitled to 100 percent of fee paid, less applicable advance deposit. 

Students withdrawing during their first semester/session, upon receiving 
approval from the applicable office (Advising and Testing Center or 
Graduate School), will forfeit a portion of the semester charges in 
accordance with the following schedule: 



Time of Withdrawal 
Week Basis 

— First Week 

— Second Week 

— Third Week 

— Fourth Week 

— Fifth Week 

— Sixth Week 



Percentage of Student's Total 

Semester Charges to Be Forfeited 

7% 

13% 

20% 

27 f ; 

33% 
40% 



- Seventh Week 

- Eighth Week 

- Ninth Week 

Tenth Week and beyond 



47', 

53% 

mi'.; 

10091 (no reduction of fees) 



Students will be charged a full week of fees for any partial week of 
enrollment. Advance deposit payments shall not be refundable. 

Students withdrawing during summer sessions will forfeit a portion of the 
session charges in accordance with the following schedule: 



Percentage of Student's Total 
Semester Charges to Be Forfeited 

20', 



Time of W ithdrawal 
Week Basis 

— First Week 

— Second Week 

— Third Week 60% 

— Fourth Week and beyond 100% (no reduction of fees) 

D. During summer sessions, returning students totally withdrawing from the 
university, upon receiving approval from the applicable office (Advising 
and Testing or Graduate School), will forfeit a portion of the total 
session charges in accordance with the following schedule: 



Calendar Day 
of Withdrawal 

- First class day through 
fourth calendar day 

- Fifth calendar day 
and beyond 



Percentage of Student's Total 
Session Charges to Be Forfeited 

50% 

100% (no reduction of fees) 



E. The associate provost will determine the official start of classes for each 
semester or session. Refunds to students enrolled in credit-bearing 
summer conferences, institutes, workshops, or tours of less than five 
weeks' duration will be granted a 50-percent refund through the first day 
of the class (unless a no refund policy is required by the sponsor). 

III. Individual Course Withdrawal 

A student may cancel an individual course(s) up to University Check-in by 
notifying the registrar in writing. If a student cancels a course(s) prior to 
University Check-in, no penalty will be charged and the student will receive 
100-percent reduction of charges for the course(s) canceled. No reduction of 
charges will be made to full-time students who withdraw from individual 
courses after University Check-in. 

Individual course withdrawal is defined as a reduction in class load but not 
total withdrawal from the university. Example: a student who registers for 
three courses and then withdraws from one or two classes but continues with 
the other class or classes. 

Part-time students (undergraduate students who register for less than twelve 
credits and graduate students who register for less than nine credits) 
will forfeit a portion of the credit-hour fee in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

Calendar Day of Individual Percentage of Student's 



Course Withdrawal 

— First class day through 
fourth calendar day 

— Fifth calendar day 
and beyond 



Instructional Fee to Be Forfeited 



50% 



100% (no reduction of fees) 



Reduction of charges will be granted only for instructional fee. No reduction 
will be granted to students who drop and add like number of credit hours. 
Reductions will be granted to students for individual course withdrawals 
during summer sessions under the same basis as outlined under section IID. 

IV. Termination of Residence Hall or Dining Service 
Contract 

A. Academic Year (Fall and Spring Semesters) 

1 . Residence Hall Termination — Release from a residence hall 
contract is not granted except under those conditions outlined in the 
contract. Any student who meets the conditions for release and 
submits a written request for release to the Office of Housing and 
Residence Life through University Check-in will be assessed no 
forfeiture and will receive a 100-percent reduction of room fee. less 
applicable advance deposits. Requests received after University 



14 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Check-in will result in forfeiture of one week's room fee for each 
week, or portion thereof, the student is assigned to a residence hall. 
A week's rental charge is determined by dividing the semester room 
fee by the number of weeks in the semester. The specific date of 
release will be determined by the Office of Housing and Residence 
Life. The date a student moves into the residence hall should not be 
confused with University Check-in. 

Dining Service Termination — Any student who is released from 
his/her Dining Service Contract by the Office of Housing and 
Residence Life through University Check-in will be assessed no 
forfeiture and the student will receive a 100-percent reduction of 
charges of the dining service fee, less applicable advance deposit. 
Any student who requests in writing to terminate his/her university 
dining service contract after University Check-in and is granted a 
contract release from the Office of Housing and Residence Life will 
forfeit a portion of the semester charges in accordance with the 
following schedule: 



Date of Termination From 
Dining Service Contract 

— University Check-in 
through the 35th calendar day 

— 36th calendar day 
and beyond 



Percentage of Semester Fee 
to Be Forfeited 



50% 



100% (no reduction of fees) 



Summer Sessions 

Once a student applies for and receives a housing and/or food service 
assignment, he or she must request in writing and obtain a release of that 
assignment from the Office of Housing and Residence Life in order to be 
eligible for a reduction in charges in accordance with the following 
schedule: 



Date of Termination 

from Residence 

Halls/Dining Contracts 

- Check-in date* through fourth 
calendar day of classes 

- Fifth calendar day 
and beyond 



Percentage of 

Session Charges 

to Be forfeited 

50% 

100% (no reduction of fees) 



*The Office of Housing and Residence Life will publish the date students 
are to check into the residence halls for each summer session. The check-in 
date is the effective date of the student's contract. 

V. Other Provisions 

No reduction of charges will be granted unless formal withdrawal procedure 
has been initiated through the Advising and Testing Center by the student at 
the point of withdrawal. Written and dated notice is required by the student 
or the student's family in special circumstances, such as sickness, within 
thirty days of the student's withdrawal. In order to receive a reduction of 
charges for individual course withdrawal, documentation must be submitted 
to the Accounts Receivable Office prior to the close of the semester or 
session in which the course was offered. 

No reduction of charges will be granted by the university to students 
who are suspended or expelled from classes, residence halls, and/or 
dining service. 

The Advising and Testing Center (for undergraduate students) and the 
Graduate School (for graduate students) may request exceptions to these 
policies when circumstances (such as death and medical reasons) justify it. 

Students who are military reservists or members of the National Guard and 
are ordered to active military service by the President of the United States 
will receive a full reduction of charges for tuition. Other fees will 
be prorated. 

The Accounts Receivable Office. Administrative Annex, is responsible for 
implementing this refund policy. Students who wish to appeal the decision 
rendered by the Accounts Receivable Office may do so through the office of 
the treasurer to the vice president for Finance. 

Financial Aid 

The Financial Aid Office, located at 308 Pratt Hall, offers financial 
information and counseling to all students attending IUP. The types of 
financial assistance offered by the Financial Aid Office include student 



employment, loans, grants, and scholarships. The Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is used to determine eligibility for 
these programs. 

The Financial Aid Office of IUP is providing the following information in 
compliance with federal guidelines for the dissemination of financial 
aid information. 

In order to be considered for financial aid administered through the 
university, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA) must be 
submitted to PHEAA in Harrisburg. Students will be awarded assistance 
based on demonstrated financial need. In order to be eligible for continued 
funding, the applicant must be in satisfactory academic standing at the 
university, as defined in the Academic Standards Policy, and meet the 
standards of the Financial Aid Sufficient Progress Policy. 

Title IV Financial Assistance Programs include the following: Federal Pell 
Grant, Federal College Work Study Program, Federal Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Stafford 
Loan, and Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students. Maintaining 
satisfactory academic progress at IUP for Title IV assistance purposes is 
defined as being in compliance with both the university's Academic 
Standards Policy and the Financial Aid Sufficient Progress Policy. Inability 
to meet the guidelines of these two policies will result in a loss of funding 
from all Title IV programs. 

Financial Aid Sufficient Progress Policy 

The Financial Aid Sufficient Progress Policy applies to all undergraduate 
students enrolled in the university. 

A. Sufficient Progress 

To be in good standing on a sufficient progress basis, a student must 

have earned at least 75 percent of the cumulative number of registered 

credits at IUP. 

1 . "Registered credits" is the number of credits for which a student is 
enrolled at the end of the Drop/Add period (for a student who was 
originally registered and charged at full-time status, and who reduces 
during Drop/Add to part-time status, the registered credits will be 
calculated as twelve). 

Each student will be measured for sufficient progress annually in 
January after fall grade processing. This evaluation will determine if the 
student has a sufficient percentage of credits earned in order to be 
eligible for Title IV funding for the next financial aid award year (July 1 
through June 30). 

B. Financial Aid Eligibility Warning 

For a student who has not earned at least 75 percent of the cumulative 
number of registered credits at IUP. a one-time Financial Aid Eligibility 
Warning Period will be extended in order for deficiencies to be corrected. 
This extension period will permit the student to receive Title IV funding for 
the next financial aid award year (July 1 through June 30). 

C. Financial Aid Suspension 

If a student does not meet the sufficient percent of progress evaluation 
after the Financial Aid Eligibility Warning Period, then all Title IV aid 
for that student will be suspended in the next financial aid award year 
(July 1 through June 30). A student who is in this financial aid 
suspension status, however, will also be reviewed at the end of the 
spring semester and summer terms in order to evaluate whether or not 
the percentage of progress has been met through additional coursework. 
If this improvement to 75 percent in the percentage of progress is 
achieved, then the student's Title IV financial aid suspension will be 
rescinded beginning with the next term of enrollment. 

D. Appeal Process 

For students who have experienced unusual circumstances which have 
led to a lack of sufficient percentage of progress, such as medical 
emergencies or death of a family member, a written appeal may be 
submitted to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee for consideration of 
reinstatement of Title IV aid eligibility. 

Students who are notified during the annual January review period that 
their Title IV aid will be suspended in the next financial aid award year 
must submit a written appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee 
before June 30. This written appeal must specifically outline the 



Finances — 15 



reason(s) lor the percentage of progress deficiency and how the student 
will make up this deficiency. For students who miss the June 30 
deadline, an appeal tor reinstatement of Title IV aid for the spring term 
of the ncxl award year will be accepted for review if received before 
Novembei 10 

After reviewing the written appeal of a student in financial aid 
suspension, the Financial Aid Appeals Committee may decide to 
reinstate Title IV financial aid eligibility for specific periods of the next 
financial aid award year if the student had justifiable reasons for the lack 
of sufficient progress. All appeal letters will be answered in writing by 
the Financial Aid Appeals Committee as to the approval or denial of the 
requested financial aid reinstatement and the semesters which are 
involved with the decision. 

E. Reinstatement of Title IV Aid Eligibility 

For a student who has satisfactory academic progress deficiencies, one 
of the following must occur in order for that student to receive Title IV 
assistance: 

1 . The student can reestablish eligibility for Title IV assistance by 
meeting the minimum requirements for satisfactory academic 
progress. 

2. A student who is on academic probation and/or financial aid 
eligibility warning will be eligible to receive Title IV funding while 
classified in one or both of these categories. 

3. In the case of a student who has not met the minimum criteria for 
satisfactory academic progress due to unusual or mitigating 
circumstances and has filed an appeal(s) which has granted the 
student continuance of financial aid eligibility. Title IV aid funds 
may be reinstated. 

F. Summer Sessions 

Title IV Financial Assistance Programs may be available during summer 
session to eligible students. Students who lack sufficient progress only 
may enhance satisfactory academic progress through additional 
coursework during summer sessions and receive Title IV assistance. 
However, all students attending summer sessions must have a 
cumulative quality-point average of at least 1.5 in order to receive funds. 
Exceptions may be granted for special circumstances by obtaining an 
appeal form from the financial aid office. 

G. Time Frame for Degree Completion 

All students must complete their degree requirements within an 
established time frame. Since enrollment status may vary from semester 
to semester, the maximum time frame for degTee completion is measured 
in terms of credits registered at IUP. 

Under normal circumstances, an undergraduate student should complete 
the requirements for a bachelor's degree at the point of having 165 
registered credits at IUP. Since 75 percent of the registered credits must 
be earned in order to be maintaining satisfactory academic progress, 124 
credits (the number generally required for graduation) would be earned 
at the point of having 165 registered credits. 

For majors with graduation requirements in excess of 124 credits, the 
maximum number of registered credits would increase proportionally. 
For example, for degrees that require 130 credits, the maximum number 
of registered credits at IUP is 173 credits. 

Students who exceed these credit guidelines due to loss of transfer 
credits, change of major, or double majors will be screened by the 
Financial Aid Eligibility Review board for continuance. 

H. Treatment of Audits. Incompletes, and Other Grades 

In order that a student fully understands how various grades and 
enrollments impact upon the calculation of satisfactory academic 
progress, the following information is provided: 

1. Audits. "S." and "U" Grades 

Because course audits. "S," and "U" grades carry no credits, they are 
not reviewed or counted for sufficient progress purposes. 

2. Incompletes 

Grades of "I." "R." and "*" are treated as credits attempted/zero 
credits earned/no effect on QPA. However, these grades are treated 
as noncompleted credits and have an impact in the calculation of the 
percent of progress measure. (Note: The "*" is an administrative 



symbol indicating that a grade was not submitted at the time of 
grade processing.) 

3. "F" Repeat with Replacement 

An "F' repeat with replacement is treated as credits attempted/credits 
earned/with the quality points of the new grade replacing the 0.00 
QP of the original "F" grade. An "F" repeat has a positive effect on 
the QPA but represents an additional number of credits attempted in 
regard to the percent of progress measure. 

4. "D" Repeat with Replacement 

Repeated classes that are "D" replacements to a student's record are 
treated as credits attempted/zero credits eamed/with the quality 
points of the new grade replacing the 1 .00 QP of the D grade. A "D" 
repeated with replacement may improve a student's QPA but 
represents an additional number of credits attempted in regard to the 
percent of progress measure. 

5. Repeats with Averaging 

Courses that are repeated with averaging count as credits attempted/ 
credits eamed/with the quality points for the class averaged into the 
QPA. The maximum time frame for degree completion may be 
impacted by repeat with averaging classes. 

6. Withdrawals 

Grades of "Q ". "W". "WP," or "WF" are treated as credits attempted/ 
zero credits earned/no effect on QPA. Any type of "Q" or "W" grade 
is treated as noncompleted credits in the calculation of the student's 
percent of progress standing. 

7. Pass/Fail Grades 

Pass grades are treated as registered credits/credits earned/no effect 
on QPA. Fail grades are treated as registered credits/zero credits 
eamed/with zero QP averaged into the calculation of QPA. 

8. Noncredit Courses 

Noncredit classes, such as those with Continuing Education Units 
(CEUs). are not used in measuring sufficient progress, since these 
classes cannot be applied towards degree requirements and no 
financial aid may be received for enrollment. 

9. Institutional Credits 

Institutional credits are counted as registered credits/credits 
completed. The QP for the course is not averaged into the student's 
overall QPA. 

10. Canceled Semester 

All registered credits/credits completed are calculated in the 
determination of percent of progress. The QPA for a canceled 
semester is not averaged into the overall QPA of the student. 

The appeal process regarding financial aid decisions is through the vice 
president for Student Affairs. 

Payment of Financial Aid 

Payment of financial aid awards is done on a semester basis. All financial 
aid, with the exception of private scholarships, and work-study, and the 
guaranteed student loans, is credited to the student's bill in advance. The 
cost of attending IUP and the university's refund policy are listed in this 
catalog. Please refer to the index for further information. A financial aid fact 
sheet containing specific information about financial aid may be obtained at 
the Financial Aid Office. The Financial Aid Office recommends that 
students with questions contact the office at (412)357-2218. 

Forms of Financial Assistance 

Employment provides an opportunity for students to eam money to help 
finance their educational expenses. The university encourages students to 
participate in the on-campus student employment program, since studies 
have demonstrated that part-time employment provides a positive stimulus 
to students in their adjustment to campus life and the maintenance of their 
academic averages. All campus employment is administered by the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Loans are a form of aid for which repayment must begin upon termination 
of the student's university education. 

Grants are funds which carry no obligation for repayment. These funds are 
aw arded to the student on the basis of financial need. 

Scholarships are funds which carry no obligation for repayment. They are 
gifts awarded to the student on the basis of ability. 

Federal aid administered through the university is available for both the 
regular academic year and the summer sessions. The application deadline 



16 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



for upperclassmen for these federal aid programs is normally May 1 for the 
following academic year. Freshmen may apply for aid upon acceptance to 
the university. For the summer sessions, the application deadline is also May 
1. Students must be enrolled at least half-time (6 credits for undergraduates) 
each semester to be eligible for financial aid consideration. 

Employment 

Employment programs provide an opportunity for students to earn money to 
help finance their educational expenses. Students may be employed at 
minimum wage on campus for up to twenty hours per week when classes are 
in session and forty hours per week during vacation periods. 

The Financial Aid Office, 308 Pratt Hall, posts known available jobs on the 
glass-enclosed bulletin board outside the office. Students are responsible for 
finding their own jobs, whether under the Federal College Work-Study 
(FCWSP) Program or University Employment (UE). 

Federal Work-Study (FWSP) — The Federal Work-Study Program is a form 
of federal aid awarded on the basis of need as measured by the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid. A FWSP award is not a guarantee of 
employment. FWSP is a nonrepayable source of aid that allows students to 
work and earn money performing on-campus jobs. Money earned from 
FCWSP jobs is to be used to help meet educational costs. Students are 
eligible to work until they have earned the amount listed on their 
award letter. 



University-Sponsored Loan Programs 

The Financial Aid Office, in conjunction with the Student Cooperative 
Association, administers the University Loan Fund in behalf of IUP 
students. Loans are available to assist students who are in financial need and 
have a financial aid refund coming to them. The maximum loan available 
will be $300 with repayment to be made in sixty days. No interest will be 
charged for these loans. Loans will be made to meet educational expenses 
only. Applications for the University Loan and additional information may 
be obtained at the Financial Aid Office. 

The University Loan Fund encompasses the following individual loan 
accounts: 

Jennie E. Ackerman Loan Fund — The Jennie E. Ackerman Loan Fund was 
established in 1962 in memory of Jennie E. Ackerman. who served as 
supervisor of student teachers at IUP for many years. 

Robert Bellis Loan Fund — This loan fund has been established at IUP by 
friends and relatives of a graduate of Indiana State College. 

Mary Edna Flegal Loan Fund — A loan fund has been established by Alpha 
Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma Society International in memory of Mary 
Edna Flegal. who graduated from Indiana Normal School in 1899 and 
served as director of Art. Upperclass students enrolled in the College of 
Education are eligible to receive these funds. 



University Employment (UE) — Many students who are not eligible for 
FCWSP find on-campus employment through IUP's University 
Employment Program. UE does not require an application and is not based 
on financial need. 



Colette Cromer Gershman Loan Fund — Family and friends of Colette 
Cromer Gershman established this fund in memory of a home economics 
education graduate. Upperclass students enrolled in the College of Health 
and Human Services are eligible for the loan. 



ARA Food Service Employment — Students interested in working in the 
dining halls (Folger and Foster), the Underground Express, Itza Pizza, the 
Oak Room, or ARA Catering should inquire about jobs from the managers 
of these dining facilities. 

Loans 

Government-Sponsored Loan Programs 

Federal Perkins Loan — The application for the Federal Perkins Loan is the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The loan is awarded to students on 
the basis of financial need. It is interest free and nonrepayable until nine 
months after termination of education, at which time it becomes repayable at 
five percent interest with a minimum forty-dollar payment per month and up 
to ten years to repay. 

Federal Stafford Loan — Applications for the Federal Stafford Loan are 
obtained from lending institutions. These include banks, savings and loan 
associations, credit unions, etc. Through this program, freshmen may 
borrow up to $2,625 per academic year, sophomores may borrow up to 
$3,500 per academic year, and junior and seniors may borrow up to $5,500 
per academic year. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans are awarded on the 
basis of need as measured by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
and require no payment of interest or principal until six months after 
students cease half-time enrollment (six credits per term). Unsubsidized 
Federal Stafford Loans substitute for family contribution and require 
payment only of interest during periods of enrollment and the six month 
grace period. Following the grace period, both kinds of Federal Stafford 
Loans are repayable directly to the lending institution at a variable interest 
rate not to exceed eight and a quarter (8.25) percent. 

Additional unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan funds are available to 
independent undergraduate students. Freshmen and Sophomores may 
request up to $4000 while Juniors and Seniors may request up to $5000. 
Dependent students whose parents cannot obtain a Federal PLUS Loan may 
also apply for these additional unsubsidized funds. 

Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS) are obtained 
from lending institutions such as banks and credit unions and administered 
in conjunction with the federal government. Parents may borrow up to the 
cost of education minus other financial aid. The loans are repaid at a 
variable interest rate not to exceed nine percent per year starting sixty days 
after the first check is issued. 



Margaret Flegal Harte Loan Fund — The primary purpose of this fund is to 
aid students who are in temporary need of assistance. 

Suzanne Marshall Hartman Loan Fund — A loan fund has been established 
by family and friends of Suzanne M. Hartman, a home economics graduate 
of IUP. This loan is granted to deserving students in their sophomore, junior, 
and senior years. 

John Hays Memorial Fund — This loan fund is in memory of Dr. John Hays 
of IUP's educational psychology department. Dr. Hays was a faculty 
member at IUP for twenty-one years. 

Oliver W. Helmrich Memorial Loan Fund — The Heimlich Memorial Loan 
Fund was established by family and friends in memory of an IUP faculty 
member. Eligibility is limited to seniors and graduate students enrolled in 
the College of Education. 

William Henzelmann Memorial Fund — This loan provides assistance to 
junior and senior students enrolled in German or Russian in the Department 
of Foreign Languages. It was established in memory of William J. 
Henzelmann. a faculty member in German. 

Mary Anne Kolessar Loan Fund — Established in memory of Mary Anne 
Kolessar, a consumer services student at IUP. the fund aids students 
majoring in consumer services who are in temporary need of funds. 

Jane E. Leonard Memorial Loan Fund — The loan honors a faculty member 
at Indiana Normal School from 1875 to 1921. 

Mack Loan Fund — Established by the Mack family, the fund provides 
assistance to worthy students with financial need. 

Rusty Preisendefer Memorial Loan Fund — This fund was established by 
Suzanne Preisendefer Brickner in memory of her husband. Lt. Harold A. 
Preisendefer, who was killed in action in Vietnam. 

Flossie Wagner Sanford Student Loan Fund — The Pennsylvania Federation 
of Women's Clubs established this loan fund in honor of a past president of 
the club and former member of the faculty. 

Varsity I Loan Fund — Established by the Men's Varsity I Club, this loan is 
available for use by all IUP students. Preference is given to freshmen. 



Finances — 17 



Norah /.ink Loan Fund — The Zink Loan honors a former geography 
professor at [UP. Foreign students in then sophomore, junior, or senior year 
are eligible to receive these funds. 

Grants 

Federal Pell Grants are available for eligible students. Applications lor and 
information on deadlines For this program are available from the Financial 
Aid Office or high sehool counselors. All students are urged to apply for 
this grant. 

Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency Grants (PHEAA) are 
available for both the regular academic year and the summer sessions. 
Contact the Financial Aid Office to determine the application deadlines lor 
the PHEAA Grant Program. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) are 
available to eligible students who demonstrate exceptional financial need as 
determined by the analysis of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. 

Scholarships 

The Financial Aid Office administers various scholarship programs in behalf 
of the university. These scholarships have been established through the 
Foundation for IUP and the University by alumni and friends of the 
University to recognize outstanding students and assist them in financing 
their educational expenses. Unless otherwise noted, no application is 
required for consideration. 

Freshmen Scholarships: 

American Field Service (AFS) Scholarship — One full-tuition scholarship 
will be offered to an AFS student for one year. Letters of application should 
include a brief description of the student's AFS experience. 

Board of Governors Scholarship — Up to thirty-five full-tuition 
scholarships are awarded each year to academically talented minority 
students who have scored approximately 1000 on SATs and who are in the 
top twenty-five percent of their high school class. The BOG scholarships are 
renewable for a maximum of eight fall/spring semesters for recipients who 
maintain a satisfactory grade-point average. 

Gloria June Croft Bolinger Memorial Scholarship — The scholarship is 
awarded annually to a graduate of Tussey Mountain High School. Recipients 
are selected by the Tussey Mountain administration and faculty. 

Jemima S. Boyd Scholarship — This scholarship was established from the 
estate of Grace Noble Lacock. Each year, the interest from the account is 
awarded to female students who intend to teach in schools in Pennsylvania. 
The scholarships, ranging from $200 to full tuition, are granted to students 
who will be entering their freshman year at IUP. Eligible applicants will be 
invited to apply. 

Braman Music Scholarship Fund — Interest earned from this fund will be 
granted as a single scholarship to an eligible prospective freshman music 
major whose performing area is one of the following: violin, viola, cello, or 
double bass. Selection of grantee is made by the string area music 
department faculty, and the scholarship is awarded for the second semester. 
Application and information are available from the music department. 

George M. Burke Memorial Scholarship — A four-year scholarship is 
awarded to a freshman enrolled in the Eberly College of Business on a full- 
time basis who demonstrates financial need and who is a permanent resident 
of Pennsylvania. 

M. Vashti Burr Memorial Award — A scholarship is awarded annually to an 
entering student who is deemed to be most deserving, having in mind his or 
her economic need and the excellence of his or her industry and scholarship. 
This award is given through the generosity of William V. Whittington. 
Eligible applicants will be invited to apply. 

Roy A. Daugherty Scholarship — Scholarships will be given to worthy first- 
year students with preference given to sons and daughters of members of 
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity who attended IUP with Mr. Daugherty. Eligible 
applicants will be invited to apply. 



Eberly Family Scholarships — The Eberly family supports the Foundation 
Distinguished Scholars Program by funding a recipient from Fayette. 
Greene, Washington, or Westmoreland counties. The Foundation 
Distinguished Scholars application must he on file in the Admissions Office 
by February 1 . 

The Natalie S. Fassett Scholarship Fund — This fund supports the 
Foundation Distinguished Scholars program. Preference will be given to 
students who attended Homer-Center High School. 

Foundation Distinguished Scholars Program — The IUP Foundation 
Distinguished Scholars program was established to honor outstanding 
students who rank in the top tenth of their high school classes and/or who 
score at least 1 100 on the junior SATs. Consideration is given to school and 
community leadership, entrepreneurship. music, art. theater, forensics, and 
other special accomplishments. The scholarships are valued at $2,000 per 
year for four years. Applications and further information are available 
through the IUP Admissions Office. 

Freshman Music Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to incoming 
music majors who demonstrate significant talent during auditions. 

Margaret Flegal Harte Scholarship — Margaret Flegal Harte Scholarships 
ranging from $200 to full tuition are awarded to top students of each 
freshman class for the first year. Eligibility is based on academic- 
achievement and financial need. Scholastic achievement is measured by the 
computation of high school rank and College Entrance Examination Board 
scores. Financial need is determined through the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid. Eligible applicants will be invited to apply. 

Ann Moon Hayward Scholarship — Scholarships will be awarded to 
incoming music majors with superior vocal potential for their first year. 

Robert L. Hite Scholarship — The Hite scholarship is awarded to a full-time 
freshman majoring in accounting, finance, or management from specified 
counties in Pennsylvania and New York. 

Patti Hurley Scholarship — A four-year scholarship of $150 per year is 
awarded to a female graduate of Indiana Area High School attending the 
university, based upon academic achievement, participation in school 
activities, and economic need. This memorial scholarship was established by 
the family and friends of a 1971 graduate of Indiana Area High School who 
was killed in an automobile accident two weeks after high school 
graduation. 

Judy Kovalchick Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded each year to a 
graduate of St. Mary's High School who attends IUP for the freshman year. 
Applications are available in the Guidance Office of St. Mary's High 
School. 

Joanne P. Lovette Memorial Fund — Awards are made to entering freshman 
students who demonstrate outstanding artistic talent as determined by a 
portfolio review by the Department of Art Faculty Scholarship Committee. 

Kim and Mary Jo Lyttle Scholarship — A $500 award is made to an entering 
freshman who has demonstrated leadership. Preference is given to students 
from Venango or Indiana counties. 

A. Laura Mateer Scholarship — Scholarships are awarded to talented 
students enrolling in the Department of Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional 
Management. An application to the department along with a letter of 
recommendation from a high school teacher must be submitted by May I for 
the following fall semester. 

Regis McKnight Scholarship Fund — The scholarship is awarded to male 
high school graduates excelling in athletics as a tribute to Regis "Peck" 
McKnight. who for many years was head basketball coach. Selection of 
recipients will be made by the athletic director and the head basketball 
coach. 

Arveta DeGaetano McNaughton Scholarship — A scholarship is awarded 
each year to a graduate of Indiana Area Senior High School who enrolls in 
the Eberly College of Business as a full-time freshman. 



18 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



John W. McNaul Scholarship — The McNaul memorial scholarship is 
awarded to a graduating senior from Somerset High School who will attend 
IUP as a full-time student and who demonstrates financial need. 



Sons of Italy Recreative Club, Inc.. Scholarships — Scholarships are 
awarded to graduates of Indiana County schools with the exception of 
Homer Center, who enroll as full-time students at IUP. 



Colonel Leonard A. and Mary D. McQuown Memorial Fund — This fund 
supports the Foundation Distinguished Scholars program. Preference will be 
given to graduates of Punxsutawney High School. 

Carol L. Moorhead Scholarship — This award is made to incoming 
freshman students enrolled in the primary, preferably early childhood, 
education curriculum in the College of Education. 

The Morino Scholars Program — This program is established on behalf of 
the Morino, Calvetti, Zambotti and Sgro families. Scholarship support will 
be given to academically promising and financially deserving undergraduate 
students. Preference is given to students from historically mining 
communities whose parents or grandparents are employees or retirees or 
expired while working in the mines. 

G. William Musser Scholarship — The Musser Scholarship is awarded to an 
incoming freshman majoring in pre-law. It is renewable for four years if the 
recipient maintains a 3.0 average. 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Scholarship — Established by an 
anonymous donor, the Natural Sciences and Mathematics scholarship is 
awarded each year to a freshman who has graduated from Indiana Area High 
School and enrolls in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 
Eligible applicants to IUP will be invited to apply. This scholarship is 
renewable for four years. 

Carl E. Patchin Scholarship — The Patchin scholarship supports the 
Foundation Distinguished Scholars program by funding a recipient who will 
enroll in the Eberly College of Business. Foundation Distinguished Scholars 
applications must be on file in the Admissions Office by February 1. 

Margaret M. Patton Foundation Scholarship — This scholarship has been 
established at IUP to assist students attending the university who are worthy 
and in need of such assistance. Preference will be given to students 
attending the Armstrong Campus. 

Everett and Lavina Peterman Scholarship — A four-year scholarship is 
awarded every four years to a business education or management 
information systems major who has graduated from an Indiana County high 
school. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Phillips Scholarship Fund — This fund supports the 
Foundation Distinguished Scholars program. Preference will be given to 
residents of Butler, Clarion, Forest. Jefferson. Lawrence. Mercer, and 
Venango counties. 

Edna B. Pierce Memorial Fund — An Indiana Area High School student, 
accepted at IUP and enrolled in a teacher education curriculum, will be 
awarded a one-year scholarship. 

President 's/Wahr Scholarship — A $1000 scholarship is awarded to entering 
freshmen who are valedictorians of their high school at the end of their 
junior year. No application is required. 

Savings and Trust Bank Excellence in Business Scholarship — This 
scholarship program provides 20 awards of $1000 each to entering freshman 
students enrolled in the Eberly College of Business. Recipients are selected 
by demonstrated academic promise and residency with the Savings and 
Trust Bank service area. 

Joseph W. Serene Scholarship — Established in memory of a former 
president of the IUP Council of Trustees, this scholarship is awarded to a 
graduating senior from Indiana Area High School who has enrolled at IUP. 
has achieved good academic standing, is active in school and/or community 
groups, and demonstrates good citizenship. 

Ethel Seavey Simpson Scholarship — The Ethel Seavey Simpson 
scholarships are awarded to academically talented freshmen at IUP who 
demonstrate financial need. Eligible applicants will be invited to apply. 



Spadafora Family Endowment — Cecil and Ann Spadafora of Indiana and 
their entire family have established a scholarship to be awarded to one 
football player each year who has graduated from an Indiana County high 
school, a Mt. Pleasant High School, or a Bentworth High School. The 
student will be selected by a committee consisting of the IUP athletic 
director, head football coach, and a representative of the family. The 
recipient will be a high school graduate excelling in athletics and a credit 
to the fund. 

Michael J. Supinka, Jr.. Memorial Scholarship — A scholarship is awarded 
to a graduate of Homer-Center High School who has demonstrated academic 
excellence and leadership qualities and who enrolls at IUP as full-time 
freshmen. 

The Barbara Thomas Scholarship Fund — This fund provides support to 
deserving and worthy students who have graduated from high schools in 
Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, and who enroll in IUP to study elementary 
education. The scholarship is renewable providing the recipient maintains at 
least a 2.5 grade-point average. 

The Tomb Family Scholarships — These scholarships provide support to 
deserving and talented students enrolled at IUP. 

Vaughn Foundation Scholarships — Two $500 scholarships are awarded 
each year to students who are incoming freshmen demonstrating academic 
promise and a willingness to give a portion of their time to community 
service. Preference will be given to students enrolling in the Eberly College 
of Business. Students must also participate in men's football, men's 
basketball, or women's basketball. 

Corrine Menk Wahr Scholarship — Awarded to the top students of each 
incoming freshman class, this scholarship ranges from $200 to full tuition 
for the first year without regard to financial need. Scholarship achievement 
is established by the computation of high school rank and SAT scores. 
Eligible applicants will be invited to apply. 



Florence Wallace Scholarship Fund - 
Distinguished Scholars Program. 



- This fund supports the Foundation 



West Branch Area High School (Larson) Scholarship — The scholarship is 
awarded to a graduate of that high school in Clearfield County, 
Pennsylvania, who demonstrates financial need and positive academic 
achievements. Applications are made through the Guidance Office of the 
West Branch Area High School. 

Luhelen Grace Whisner Scholarship — This award is established by Robert 
C. Whisner, a 1951 IUP graduate, in memory of his mother, a graduate from 
the Class of 1922. The scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate 
academic promise, good citizenship and financial need. Preference is given 
to students from Westmoreland County. 

Upperclass Scholarships: 

ALCOA Scholarship — A scholarship is awarded each year to a student 
majoring in management information systems. The recipient is selected by 
the MIS faculty. Students in their sophomore, junior, or senior year are 
eligible to receive these funds. 

Grace Johnson Allman Safety Science Scholarship — The Allman 
scholarship is awarded to a student chosen by the chairperson of the Safety 
Sciences Department who is worthy, deserving, and a credit to the 
scholarship. 

American Association of University Women Scholarship — Scholarships are 
awarded annually to nontraditional female residents of Indiana County, 
based upon financial need and successful completion of at least six credits 
leading to a degree. 

APSCUF Scholarships — The IUP APSCUF Scholarships are awarded to 
students who have earned between twenty-nine and forty-six credits and 
who have shown involvement in IUP and community activities. 



Finances — 19 



ARA Scholarship — Ten $1,000 scholarships and seventeen meal waivers 
are awarded each year to sophomores who have attained at least a 3.5 grade- 
point average and who demonstrate need as determined by the Free 
Application tor Federal Student Aid. Meal waivers are awarded to students 
living on campus; cash scholarships are presented to students living 
oil campus. 

Ida X. Anns Excellence Scholarship — This scholarship is awarded to an 
outstanding member of Kappa Mu Epsilon. Applications are available in the 
Mathematics Department. Deadline for receipt of application is March 15. 

J. Donald Bartolomucci Scholarship — This fund awards scholarships to 
uppcrclass students in the Eberly College of Business who are deemed 
worthy by the Scholarship Committee. 

Ella C. Bendix Home Economics Scholarships — Bendix Scholarships are 
awarded to worthy students with financial need who are juniors, seniors, or 
first-year graduate students. Selection is made by the Home Economics 
Scholarship Committee 

Israel and Birdye Brody Scholarship — Scholarships are awarded each year 
to juniors who have at least a 3.8 average and who have served the 
university and/or community. Eligible applicants will be invited to apply. 

Edward N. Brown Memorial Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to 
an IUP chemistry major who has completed at least four semesters of 
chemistry. Selection is made by the Brown Scholarship Steering Committee. 

Maude O. Brungard Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to Speech- 
Language Pathology majors. The recipient must be a senior and a resident of 
Pennsylvania with outstanding academic achievement. Selection is made by 
the Brungard scholarship committee. 

Howard B. Buterbaugh Scholarship Fund — A gift to the university from 
Dr. Howard Buterbaugh 's estate, the scholarship is to be given to upperclass 
students based on their academic performance. 

Carino Queen Evergreen Scholarship — A scholarship is awarded to Indiana 
County's Queen Evergreen if she is accepted at IUP and attends on a full- 
time basis. 

Clark Scholarship — The Lt. Alpheus Bell Clark Memorial Scholarship was 
established by Mr. and Mrs. Steele Clark in memory of their son. 
Scholarships are awarded each year to young men or women who are 
seniors in the university, who, in the opinion of a committee, best qualify for 
the honor in terms of academic ability, leadership, and service to the 
university, with preference going to veterans or sons or daughters 
of veterans. 

Beverly Sue Clark Memorial Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to a 
junior or senior preparing for a career in teaching. Preference is given to 
residents of Indiana, Cambria. Westmoreland, and Armstrong counties and 
to survivors of casualties of the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Selection is made by 
the College of Education. 



Charles Davis Scholarship — This scholarship is awarded each year to a 
music major who has shown outstanding ability. The amount of the award 
will be determined by the funds available from Phi Mu Alpha, the 
professional music fraternity at IUP. 

Owen J. and Virginia Dougherty Memorial Scholarship — This scholarship 
fund provides assistance to worthy, deserving, and talented student athletes 
at IUP. 

Alexa J. Boyer Emerick Nursing Scholarship — Scholarships are awarded 
to outstanding and deserving junior and/or senior students enrolled in the 
nursing curriculum at IUP. Eligible recipients will be invited to apply. 

Thomas V. Frazier Memorial Scholarship — A senior student interested in 
the theater arts is the recipient of this award. The student may be a drama 
student or just active in off-stage roles. Financial need will be a 
consideration, with the chairperson of the theater department selecting 
the recipient. 

Fredericks Family Scholarship Funds — Established by David Fredericks, a 
1972 graduate of IUP, this scholarship is awarded to students enrolled in the 
Eberly College of Business who study international business and/or finance 
and who have completed 24 credits and attained a 3.0 cumulative grade 
point average. Preference is given to students who have served in the United 
States military or who come from a family military background. 

Fredericks Michael and Company Scholarship Fund — This scholarship is 
awarded to undergraduate students who have completed at least 60 credits or 
graduate students who have maintained a cumulative 3.0 grade point 
average who are enrolled in the Eberly College of Business and are studying 
international business and/or finance. Preference is given to students who 
have served in the United States military or who come from a family 
military background. 

Michael Gendich Scholarships for Athletes — The scholarships are 
awarded to worthy and deserving student athletes by the director of 
Intercollegiate Athletics. 

Dr. F. Philip Gorman Scholarship — The Gorman Scholarship is awarded to 
a junior in a major relating to the health profession. The recipient must have 
a minimum QPAof 3.0 and be involved in university activities. Eligible 
candidates will be invited to apply. 

Theresa Hart Gramley Memorial Scholarship — Established by bequest of 
Mrs. Gramley, a 1927 graduate of Indiana Normal School, this scholarship 
provides financial assistance to academically promising students. 

William Heard Scholarship — Established as a memorial by friends and 
colleagues of William Heard, formerly a professor at IUP, the scholarship is 
awarded each year to a junior chemistry major for his/her senior year. The 
recipient is selected by the chemistry department steering committee on the 
basis of contributions to the department and the university, financial need, 
academic record, and interview. Applications are available each spring in the 
chemistry department office. 



Continuing Education Part-time Scholarship — The scholarships are 
awarded to part-time nontraditional students admitted to or enrolled in 
degree-seeking programs in the School of Continuing Education. 
Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office and the Part-time 
Studies Program Office two months before the beginning of each semester. 

Dr. Charles L. Cooper Accounting Scholarship — In honor of a retired 
professor, accounting firms and friends of Dr. Cooper have established a 
scholarship to be awarded to a senior accounting major. To be eligible, a 
student must complete ninety credits (at least seventy-five credits completed 
at IUP) by the end of the preceding spring semester including fifteen credits 
in accounting and, specifically, intermediate accounting II and cost 
accounting. Students must have an overall 3.5 average and complete an 
application that includes a narrative description of their plans for the future. 
The scholarship will not exceed the amount of tuition, fees, room, and 
board. Selection is made by the Accounting Department. 

Jack Crossan Memorial Scholarship Fund — Established by fellow athletes, 
classmates, and friends, this scholarship shall be awarded at the discretion 
and good judgment of the head basketball coach to a basketball player of 
good character and sound academic standing. 



Dr. Willard W. Hennemann. Jr., Memorial Scholarship — Scholarships are 
awarded to deserving and worthy undergraduate and/or graduate students 
with a strong commitment in the field of mathematics education at the 
elementary or middle school level. Recipients are selected by a committee 
of members of the mathematics department. 

Isolde A. Henninger Endowment for Achievement — Friends and family 
members have established the endowment to provide support for foreign 
language students and the Critical Language Program. Foreign language 
majors who have demonstrated significant improvement in their studies are 
welcome to apply to the chairman of the foreign languages department. 

Hoss's Steak and Seafood House Scholarship — Awarded each year to 
students in the hotel, restaurant, and institutional management department. 

H. Eugene Hulbert Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to junior 
music majors each year on the basis of academic excellence and financial 
need. The recipient i^ selected by a scholarship committee. Applications are 
available in the music department office during the second week of classes 
in the fall. 



20 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Eileen Quinn Hall Scholarship — This fund provides scholarship support to 
students in the Eberly College of Business who have completed at least 60 
credits and maintain a 3.0 grade point average in business courses and an 
overall 2.8 GPA. Preference is given to students enrolled in the business 
education curriculum. 

Gloria Bryan Johnson Memorial Endowment — In memory of wife and 
mother. Gloria Bryan Johnson, Dr. Hugh Johnson and his family have 
established a memorial scholarship endowment for music students. The 
scholarship committee of the Department of Music will make the yearly 
selection of the student. 

Sally Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund — This scholarship will go to a 
female junior student, based upon her outstanding athletic abilities. 
Information and applications are available through the physical education 
department. 

Junior Miss Scholarship — A $500 scholarship is awarded to the winner of 
the Indiana County Junior Miss Pageant if the winner applies and is 
accepted to IUP on a full-time basis. 

Kaufmann's/The May Department Store Scholarship — A scholarship is 
awarded to a student for the senior year who has been selected to intern at 
the store for the summer prior to the senior year. 

Eugene E. Lepley Memorial Scholarships — These scholarships are 
awarded to two junior or senior students majoring in health and physical 
education or sports science. 



Arthur G. Morrell Memorial Scholarship — The Arthur G. Morrell 
Memorial Scholarship is awarded to a mathematics major completing his/ 
her junior year at IUP who best reflects the character and interests of Capt. 
Arthur G. Morrell. a graduate in mathematics. United States Marine pilot, 
and IUP football captain. The recipient is selected by the Morrell 
Scholarship Committee. Students may apply for the award (applications are 
available at the mathematics department office) or be nominated by a 
mathematics faculty member. 

Morris Scholarship — The Helen Wood Morris scholarship was established 
by Lieutenant Colonel L. M. Morris in memory of his wife, a graduate of the 
university. The scholarship is awarded annually to students majoring in 
education who have earned more than forty-five but fewer than seventy-five 
credits at IUP, who have a grade-point average of at least a 3.80. and who 
have made special contributions to the university and community. The 
scholarships are awarded in the spring for use in the fall and spring 
semesters. Students will be invited to apply. 

Russel C. Nelson Scholarship — This scholarship is awarded each year to 
an upperclass music education major deemed worthy by the Music 
Scholarship Committee. Further information is available in the music 
department office. 

Esko E. Newhill Award for Excellence — Awarded annually to a major in 
the anthropology or sociology department. 



Louis J. Nocco Scholarships - 
members of the football team. 



These are awarded to deserving and talented 



Dr. Yu-Chen Liu Memorial Endowment — An endowment has been 
established in Dr. Liu's memory by friends and family. The interest earned 
on the endowment will be used to sponsor scholarships for Chinese- 
American students. The Asian Studies Committee will make the selection of 
the scholarship awardee. 

Stanley W. Lore Scholarship — A scholarship is awarded annually to a 
junior psychology major. Recipients are selected on the basis of academic 
achievement by members of the psychology department. 

Mary Helen Krouse MacDonald Memorial Scholarship — The MacDonald 
scholarship fund was established to encourage and reward exceptionally 
gifted students enrolled at IUP who are majoring in art. The scholarships are 
awarded to winners of the student entries in the juried art exhibitions held in 
the Community Arts Center of Cambria County in Johnstown. Pennsylvania. 

Ronald L. Marks Scholarship Fund — Awards shall be presented to students 
enrolled with a major in chemistry who demonstrate outstanding academic 
achievement and promise in the field. One award is presented to a second 
semester freshman student and one to an upperclass student as 
recommended by the students' advisors. 

McFarland Scholarships — McFarland scholarships are awarded each year 
to honor upperclass students who have earned more than forty-five but 
fewer than seventy-five credits at IUP, who have grade-point averages of at 
least 3.80, and who have made special contributions to the university and 
community. The scholarships are awarded in the spring for use in the fall 
and spring of the junior year. Students will be invited to apply. 

Alan P. Mewha Memorial Fund — This scholarship is for students in the 
Geography and Regional Planning department; scholarship selection will be 
made by a three-member geography and regional planning scholarship 
committee. The scholarships are unrestricted as to use or purpose and 
flexible in the amount awarded and time presented. For further information, 
contact the geography and regional planning department. 

Benjamin T. Miller Drawing Award — To memorialize Benjamin T. Miller, 
colleagues, students, and friends have established the Drawing Award. 

Miss IUP Scholarship — A $500 scholarship is awarded to the winner of the 
Miss IUP pageant for use in the subsequent academic year. 

William P. Moorhead Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to a student 
studying organ in the Department of Music. It was established as a memorial 
to Mrs. William P. Moorhead. 



Tom Norman Scholarship — This award is available to a soccer player in 
financial need. All disbursements will be controlled by the soccer coach in 
the amount he or she feels necessary. 

Ethyl V. Oxley, Opal T. Rhodes, and Helen C. Merriman Scholarships — 
Each year the Home Economics Alumni Association honors three former 
faculty members by awarding $200 scholarships. The Opal T. Rhodes 
Scholarship is awarded to a home economics education major, the Ethyl V. 
Oxley Scholarship to a food and nutrition major, and the Helen C. Merriman 
Scholarship to a consumer services major. Announcements concerning 
applying for these scholarships are made in the College of Health and 
Human Services during the fall semester. 

Albert Pechan Scholarship — This is a scholarship for a science major. The 
amount of the award depends on the money available in the scholarship 
tund. Selection of a recipient is made by the science department faculty. 

Lenora Pechan Scholarship — The Lenora Pechan Scholarship was 
established by the late Dr. Albert R. Pechan. a former member of the Senate 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and of the Board of Trustees of IUP. 
to provide funds for students who are members of the Reserve Officer 
Training Corps, who have been outstanding students in the ROTC. and 
whose other academic work is satisfactory. First priority will be given to 
students from Armstrong County, selected by the officers of the ROTC and 
the Faculty Scholarship and Loan Committee. 

Phi Delta Theta Scholarship Fund — This scholarship fund was established 
in memory of Randy Colalella and Jeffrey Diez. Funds are awarded to 
students who are members in good standing of Phi Delta Theta and who 
have a grade-point average of at least a 3.0. 

William E. Pierce Scholarship — This scholarship has been established to 
award a one-year grant to the junior ROTC cadet having the highest 
standing in his/her sophomore ROTC class. 

Pittsburgh Home Economics Teachers Scholarship Fund — An award of is 
given to an undergraduate student majonng in a program in the College of 
Health and Human Services who graduated from one of the Pittsburgh 
public schools. Preference is given to students majoring in home economics 
education and seniors, but the award may be given to a junior or a 
sophomore student enrolled in any human services major who is deserving 
both scholastically and financially. Eligible students should apply for this 
scholarship through the dean of the college. 



Ruth Podbielski Scholarships - 
women athletes at IUP. 



- These scholarships are awarded to worthy 



Finances — 21 



Shelly G. Portman Memorial Scholarship — The scholarship, established by 
the Portman family, will be awarded each year to juniors excelling in 
concert dance. Selection will he made by the director of concert dance. 

PPG Computer Science Scholarship — The PPG Computer Science 
scholarship is awarded annually to a foreign student who is majoring in 
computet st lence Applu alions are available in the computer science 
department in the spring. Deadline lor applying is March IS. 

The John J. Prandy Memorial Scholarship — This scholarship provides 
support to a worthy and deserv nig student majoring in criminology who has 
achieved junior standing and has expressed interest in pursuing a career in 
law enforcement. 

Willis E. Pratt Award — The Savings and Trust Company of Pennsylvania 
has established an athletic scholarship in the name of the late Dr. Willis E. 
Pratt, chancellor emeritus and president of IUP from 1948 to 1968. It will be 
awarded to athletes chosen on the basis of scholastic and athletic ability and 
financial need. 

The Mildred M. Reigh Memorial Scholarship — This scholarship provides 
encouragement and financial assistance to students pursuing a degree in 
mathematics education or elementary education with a mathematics 
concentration. Recipients must have reached a minimum of junior standing, 
carry at least a 3.0 grade-point average, and participate in one or more 
organizations for teachers of mathematics. Selection is made by the 
Mathematics Department. 

Ralph Reynolds Memorial Scholarship — Through the generosity of Nancy 
Race Warner, the Ralph Reynolds Memorial scholarship recognizes students 
enrolled in the bachelor of fine arts program with an emphasis in painting. 
Selection is made by the art department. 

Frank Ross Memorial Scholarship — The scholarships are awarded each 
year to upperclass students of ceramics who are deemed worthy by the 
Scholarship Committee. The awards are presented in memory of a former 
ceramics faculty member. 

The David J. Rovnan Memorial Scholarship — This scholarship is awarded 
each year to an IUP student who is a member of the staff of the Penn. 
Selection is made by the journalism department. 

SACO Excelling Greek Scholarship — Scholarships are awarded to 
outstanding Greek juniors named at the spring Greek awards banquet. 

David Schwartz Memorial Journalism Scholarship — The scholarship is 
established in memory of David Schwartz, a graduate of IUP, by his parents, 
the Indiana Gazette, the journalism department, and friends at IUP. The 
scholarship is available to outstanding students majoring in journalism. 
Contact the journalism department for further information. 

Ella B. Seanor Leadership in Nursing Award — This award is presented to a 
graduating senior who has successfully completed the requirements for a 
degree in nursing and who has demonstrated exemplary leadership and 
commitment to the high standards of professional practices in the field 
of nursing. 

Senior Class Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded to a student who 
has earned seventy-five to ninety credits at the end of the first semester of 
the junior year, has a QPA of at least 3.5. and is involved with campus 
affairs, organizations, and activities. Eligible students will be invited 
to apply. 

The Patricia Shields Memorial Scholarship — This $500 scholarship is 
awarded each year to a full-time student who has achieved junior standing 
and carries at least a 3.0 grade-point average. Preference may be given to 
students who originally attended the Armstrong branch campus of IUP. 

The Susan E. Shubra Memorial Scholarship — The scholarship is awarded 
to a junior or senior having at least one remaining term to be completed as a 
major in the Department of Human Development and Environmental 
Studies. Applicants must have a minimum 3.0 grade-point average, be of 
good character, and demonstrate outstanding achievement in academics and 
leadership in university/community services. Selection is made by the 
Department of Human Development and Environmental Studies. 



Sam Smith Football Scholarship Fund — The solicited funds are to be used 
for football scholarships. All the funds are to be distributed as scholarships 
in accordance with the rules and regulations of the university. 

Gregory Spinelli Memorial Fund — This fund provides a meaningful award 
and recognition for students with exceptional promise and commitment to a 
career in the criminal justice system. An award of $100 will be made 
annually to a second-semester senior enrolled in the IUP criminology 
department. Greg Spinelli was an F.B.I, agent killed in the line of duty. 

Bea States Scholarship Fund — This fund provides scholarship support to a 
nontraditional female resident of Indiana County who is enrolled at IUP as 
an undergraduate student. Preference will be given to students with 
dependent children who demonstrate financial need. 

Gerald E. Stossel Football Scholarship — Stossel scholarships are awarded 
to deserving and needy student athletes. 

Howard E. Tompkins Computer Science Scholarship — The Tompkins 
scholarship is awarded to a computer science major entering the junior year 
who has completed at least nine credits of computer science. 

Murray M. Varner Scholarship — Murray M. Varner was an alumnus and 
professor at IUP. This scholarship has been established by his friends and 
family as a fitting memorial to a dynamic educator. The scholarship is 
awarded each year to an upperclass (at least twenty-seven credits at IUP) 
student in the Eberly College of Business who is a permanent resident of 
Indiana County. The recipient must be academically stable, personable, 
enthusiastic, and motivated. Applications are to be submitted to the 
Financial Aid Office by October 30. Winners will be announced during 
the fall. 

Saul and Louise Waxier Memorial Scholarships — These provide funding 
for football grants-in-aid. 

Wienken and Associates Scholarship — Awards are made to upper-level 
students in College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics who have 
successfully completed at least 30 credits and have achieved a 2.75 
cumulative grade point average. Applications are available in the 
Mathematics Department office. Deadline for receipt of application is 
March 15. 

David Willard Memorial Scholarship — This award is presented to a student 
within the Department of Industrial and Labor Relations who demonstrates 
outstanding academic achievement and professional promise. 

Betty Wood Scholarship — This scholarship is awarded annually to a 
student representing the Department of Human Development and 
Environmental Studies in the highest professional manner. Awards are made 
by the department. 

Zucchelli Scholarship Fund — This $100 scholarship will be awarded to a 
female IUP student majoring in physical education. Information and 
applications are available through the health and physical education 
department. 

Other Resources 

Athletic Grants-in-Aid — IUP participates in intercollegiate athletics as a 
Division II institution and awards Athletic Grants-in-Aid in accordance with 
NCAA rules and regulations. Interested students should contact the Athletic 
Director. Memorial Field House, IUP, Indiana, PA 15705. 

Residence Assistants — Upperclass students and freshmen at the end of 
their first year may apply to become residence assistants at IUP. Students 
earn a room and board waiver, as well as a small stipend, by working as 
residence assistants in IUP residence halls. Application timetables and 
deadlines are advertised in the Penn and posted in the residence halls and 
other spots around campus. The application process requires references and 
individual and group interviews. Residence assistants are selected on the 
basis of leadership and interpersonal skills and the willingness and ability to 
perform as role models. Residence assistants must have and maintain a 2.2 
quality-point average. For further information, please contact present 
residence assistants or residence directors or the Office of Housing and 
Residence Life, G14 Sutton Hall, IUP, Indiana. PA 15705. 



-Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Paul Douglas Teacher Scholarship — Scholarships of up to $5,000 per year 
are awarded lo superior students who will pursue teaching careers. 
Recipients must teach for two years for each year they receive the 
scholarship. Applications are available in the Office of Student Teaching and 
must be submitted by May 1 for the following year. 

Private Scholarships — Various service clubs, organizations, churches, 
schools, and industries offer scholarships to students. High school guidance 
offices, libraries, and hometown newspapers are often excellent sources for 
information concerning private scholarships. 

ROTC Scholarships — One-, two-, and three-year scholarships are available 
to both male and female students who are enrolled in the Reserve Officer 
Training Corps program. The scholarships pay for tuition, fees, and books, 
plus $100 per month for ten months per school year. Interested students may 
obtain applications and criteria information by contacting the ROTC 
department in Pierce Hall at IUP. 

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Assistance (OVR) — Students who have 
physical or learning handicaps may receive educational benefits through the 
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. In order to be eligible, students must 
satisfy the physical and financial requirements of the agency. For further 
information regarding OVR. students should contact their county office of 
vocational rehabilitation. 

Loan Forgiveness Programs 

Act 115 — The Urban and Rural Teacher Loan Forgiveness Act provides 
new teachers in approved school districts with the opportunity to apply for 
loan forgiveness of up to $2,500 per year of teaching to a maximum of 
$10,000 of guaranteed student loans obtained through PHEAA. Further 
information is available from PHEAA, Attn: Urban and Rural Loan 
Forgiveness Program, P.O. Box 8114, Harrisburg. P\ 17105-8114. 

Veterans Benefits — In addition to regular sources of financial aid. veterans 
and dependents of veterans may be eligible for V.A. benefits. For further 
information, veterans are urged to contact the Veterans Counselor. 308 Pratt 
Hall, IUP, Indiana. PA 15705. 




Student Programs and Services — 23 



TEXTBOOKS 




Student Programs and Services 

Orientation 

IUP offers a three-phase orientation program for all new students. Freshmen 
are expected to participate in each of the three programs, as they are 
intended to provide information and programs which are designed to insure 
a successful first-year experience. 

Orientation Phase I: Interview/Orientation Day occurs during the late fall or 
spring prior to students' matriculation on campus. During this day-long 
experience, accepted students and their parents visit the main or branch 
campuses, participate in major presentations describing academic and 
student life, and discuss academic program offerings with college deans and 
departmental representatives. This is an opportunity to assist students as 
they make informed choices regarding the appropriateness of IUP as their 
undergraduate college of choice. 

Orientation Phase II: Summer Preregistration Placement Testing, Advising, 
and Course Selection Program occurs during the summer immediately 
preceding students' matriculation on campus. This experience is designed to 
assess academic readiness for courses integral to the IUP curriculum, 
including English, mathematics, and foreign languages. Students admitted to 
the main campus or the Learning Center program participate in an 
overnight, two-day experience which includes testing, academic advising, 
and orientation to university curricular requirements and cocurricular 
opportunities. Students who are admitted as branch campus freshmen 
participate in a one-day program. Concurrent parent orientation programs 
are offered. 

Orientation Phase III: Fall Orientation occurs as students move on to 
campus immediately prior to the beginning of fall classes. Phase Three is 
designed to assure a smooth transition from the home environment to IUP's 
campus community. 



IUP views this three-phase orientation as unique and extremely important to 
freshman retention and satisfaction with the university. The freshman year is 
critical in regard to academic success. During this time, students must 
simultaneously develop academic competence in the college curriculum and 
adjust to the personal decision-making process college life affords. Each of 
the three programs is designed to assist in this important college adjustment 
process. Freshmen arc expected to participate fully in these three programs. 

Residence Life 

IUP is a residential campus. Its fourteen residence halls and two apartment 
buildings are structured on a geographical basis into five areas. Each 
residence hall is sponsored by a professional residence director with a 
background in student development or counseling or by a graduate residence 
director enrolled in the Student Affairs in Higher Education graduate 
program. Responsibilities include administrative functions of the building, 
programming and policy enforcement. Each residence hall also has 
undergraduate resident assistants, RAs, who are responsible for helping 
students, planning programs, carrying out administrative tasks, and 
providing leadership for the development of a community among the 
approximately thirty students living in their individual section of the 
residence hall. The university's two apartment buildings are staffed with a 
professional residence director and student managers. A student manager is 
similar to a resident assistant. 

It is the policy of IUP to offer full, equal, and nondiscriminatory assistance 
to all students without regard to their race, color, religion, national origin, 
sex. ancestry, sexual orientation, or physical ability in both the placement in 
university housing and in the furnishing of facilities and services in relation 
to that housing. 

Rooms are available to both undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at 
IUP. Each year the university reviews its housing policies and revises them 
according to its needs for the coming year. The Office of Housing and 
Residence Life is also responsible for making room assignments, 
contracting for dining service, and providing information and services 
related to off -campus housing. The Office of Housing and Residence Life is 
located in G14 Sutton Hall, 357-2696. 

University Residence Halls 

The specific programs and services provided within the residence halls are 
aimed at providing a residential program which supports the academic 
mission of the university and fostering the development of a community in 
which the rights and responsibilities of each individual are clearly defined 
and respected. Respect for the learning process as well as respect for self, 
others, and property is strongly emphasized. Students are encouraged to 
question and explore increasingly complex intellectual and personal 
challenges in their efforts to give meaning and direction to their lives. Staff 
members actively provide support and challenge students as they assume 
ownership and accept responsibility for their actions and important life 
decisions. The residence halls represent and reflect the daily challenges of 
what it is like to live in any community. It is the intention of the Office of 
Housing and Residence Life to teach students those skills which prepare 
them to be responsible community members so that when they leave the 
university, they will be contributing and productive citizens in the larger 
community in which they live. 

Because residence hall living is seen as a positive educational experience, 
first-year students are encouraged to live in residence halls unless they are 
commuting from home. In an effort to make residence hall living more 
responsive to individual needs, the university offers two living 
arrangements: single sex and coed. Students are encouraged to consider 
these options carefully and to select the one in which they would feel 
most comfortable. 

Student accommodations are based on double occupancy. Furnishings 
include beds, mattresses, desks, chairs, mirrors, and dressers. Students 
should bring their own blankets, bedspreads, towels, study lamps, and 
mattress pads. 

All IUP residence halls are equipped with study lounges, recreational 
equipment, laundry facilities, and locked mailboxes. In addition, computer 
terminals and other specialized equipment are located within each area for 
student use. Each resident has a card key for his/her building which provides 
entry after closing hours. 



24 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



IUP also operates two apartment buildings, providing single student housing 
in an apartment-style setting. The university provides telephone service, a 
stove, refrigerator, kitchen table and chairs, beds, and dressers in each 
apartment. Living room furniture is provided in Campus Towers only. 

Application for Housing 

New first-year and transfer students who have paid the tuition advanced 
deposit will receive a "Residence Hall Contract for Housing and Dining 
Service"; the contract acceptance form, a housing prepayment form, and 
prepayment of $75 must be completed and returned by May 1 or within two 
weeks of receipt. 

Continuing students may contract for university housing for each year in 
accordance with the procedure published and posted in February by the 
Office of Housing and Residence Life. 

Students being readmitted should contact the Office of Housing and 
Residence Life directly for housing applications and/or information. 

Dining Services 

Dining service is available to all students. Students residing in university 
residence halls are required to have a meal plan and may choose from Plan 
A or B. Students residing off campus, or in university apartments, may 
choose Plans A, B, C, D. or E. 

Plan A — 20 meals per week 

(breakfast, lunch, and dinner Monday through Saturday. 

brunch and dinner on Sunday) 
Plan B — Any 14 meals per week 

(Sunday through Saturday) 
Plan C — 10 meals per week 

(lunch and dinner Monday through Friday) 
Plan D — 5 meals per week 

(lunch only Monday through Friday) 
Plan E — Any 10 meals per week 

(Sunday through Saturday) 

Students and guests may purchase individual meals in either of IUP's dining 
halls at the current casual meal rate. Meals can also be purchased at 1 ) the 
Oak Room, an on-campus faculty/staff dining room; 2) the Underground 
Express, both of which are located within the lower level of Foster Hall; 3 ) 
Itza Pizza, located in the Underground Express; and 4) the HUB Rock Cafe, 
located in the Hadley Union Building. 

Insurance for Personal Belongings 

Students are encouraged to carry insurance that covers the loss or theft of 
money or property while residing in a residence hall/apartment housing. 
Students are encouraged to determine coverage available through their 
parents' homeowners policy and consider a rider if necessary to provide the 
appropriate coverage while at college. The university does not assume 
responsiblity for loss to students' belongings. 

Student Room Refrigerators 

Residents can rent refrigerators for their rooms on a one- or two-semester 
basis from the Office of Housing and Residence Life. Students directly 
benefit from this program, since the profits are used to upgrade special 
facilities in the residence halls. Residents can also use their own 
refrigerators as long as the unit does not draw more than three amps of 
electrical current and not does occupy more than 2.4 cubic feet of space. 

Student Room Telephone Service 

Touch-tone line service is provided for each student residence hall room and 
apartment. Students, however, are responsible for providing their own 
telephone instruments. A touch-tone telephone necessary. 

Telephone bills are mailed directly to students each month. Toll calls and 
telegram charges only appear on the bill. Both/all occupants of a room are 
responsible for all charges made to their Centrex extension. Payment is 
made directly to ACUS (AT&T College and University Services). 

Automobiles 

Students, faculty, and staff members who park vehicles in campus parking 
areas must register their vehicles with the Campus Police Office. Resident 
students will be issued parking permits for the following reasons: medical 
necessity, work assignments requiring a vehicle, student teaching, or other 
academic need for a vehicle. A written application must be submitted to and 



approved by the Parking Authority Review Board. Parking will be available 
to resident students not meeting the aforementioned criteria, for a fee, to 
park in the Robertshaw lot. The Campus Police Office located in Sutton Hall 
should be contacted for information on parking as well as copies of the 
current rules and regulations. 

Counseling and Student Development Center 

Counselors, psychologists, and student development specialists offer 
services and programs which facilitate the personal and emotional growth of 
students. Confidential counseling is available on an individual and small- 
group basis. The opportunity to develop skills for lifelong learning is 
provided through individual programs, workshops, ongoing groups, and 
computer-based instructional packages. Student leadership training, new 
student orientation, women's programs, student satisfaction research, and 
individualized programs for special populations are provided. 

The center is open from 8:00 a.m. through 4:30 p.m., Monday through 
Friday. Students may call 357-2621 to arrange for an appointment. After 
hours, staff may be contacted for emergencies by calling the Health Center 
at 357-2550. 

Learning Center/Act 101 

The Learning Center provides educational support services for all IUP 
students in the areas of reading, writing, mathematics, biological and 
physical sciences, foreign languages, social sciences, study skills, and 
related areas. These services are provided by both professional and 
undergraduate paraprofessional staff. Students are encouraged to participate 
in a broad array of program services including one-to-one and group 
tutorials, workshops, and formal classes. The main Learning Center office is 
located in 203 Pratt Hall. Further information can be obtained by calling 
357-2729. 

The Act 101 program, created as a result of the Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Equal Opportunity Act 101 in 1971 by the legislature of the 
commonwealth, focuses on servicing IUP students in order to make the ideal 
of "equal educational opportunity" a reality for all qualified students. 
Students matriculating through the LC/Act 101 program are provided 
assistance in the areas of academic tutoring, career counseling, financial aid 
information, personal counseling, academic advising related to curriculum 
concerns, the selection of an appropriate major, and course scheduling. The 
main Act 101 office is located in 203 Pratt Hall. Further information can be 
obtained by calling 357-2729. 

Health Services 

The University Health Service operates an outpatient clinic and provides 
routine health care to students while classes are in session. The outpatient 
clinic is staffed with physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and educators. 
For emergency care of students when the Health Center is closed, the local 
hospital emergency room is available. The university has a contract to cover 
the cost of transporting a student to the local hospital for an emergency, if 
the student's health insurance policy does not include coverage of 
ambulance services. 

In addition to primary medical care including minor surgery, some 
laboratory tests, allergy injections, and dispensing of medications, the 
University Health Service offers a self-care cold clinic, evening 
contraceptive clinic, and programs in chemical health, health education, 
wellness, and nutrition counseling. Free transportation to area medical 
facilities is available. 

Students pay a $58 per semester mandatory student health fee which entitles 
them to unlimited visits at the Health Center and includes: medications 
dispensed, laboratory tests, and other procedures. 

Effective Fall. 1991, IUP requires documentation of dates of immunizations 
from new students for the following vaccines: measles, mumps, rubella, 
tetanus toxoid-diphlheria, and polio. Individuals born after 1956 should 
receive a second measles immunization prior to entering college. It has 
always been important to update diphtheria and tetanus immunizations every 
ten years. The documentation must be included on the Student Health 
Form and can take the form of 

1 . dates of vaccinations by the health care provider who gave them or 

2. date of illness with the disease diagnosed by a physician or 

3. serum antibody level as determined by a blood test 



Student Programs and Services — 25 



Students will receive a copj ol the Student Health Form from the Health 
Service after they receive notification of admission to IUP. The form musi 
be returned to the University Health Seniles before starting classes. 

Student Health Insurance 

The university does no! sponsor a group student health insurance plan. 
Students are encouraged to obtain private insurance to cover the costs of 
hospital-related expenses. The University Health Service does not hill 
insurance companies for serv ices. However, students receive a copy of each 
visit which can he used it the individual chooses to bill his/her insurance 
company directly. 

Services for Students with Disabilities 

Disability Support Services (a unit of the Advising and Testing Center) is 
the primary agent lor the provision of access for RIP students with physical 
and learning disabilities. Students with disabilities are urged to register with 
the office. Services provided include early registration; assistance in 
locating accessible housing; equipment loan; test proctoring and reading; 
notetaking; recording of books; NCR paper; liaison with faculty. OVR. and 
BVS; and general advising and counseling. Further information may be 
obtained in 106 Pratt Hall or by calling (412) 357-4067 (V1TD). 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic, located in Davis Hall, offers diagnosis of 
speech problems, hearing tests and evaluations, and a regular program of 
therapy. The clinic also administers the speech clearance for teacher 
education programs. 

These services are made available without charge to students regularly 
enrolled at the university to give the necessary assistance to alleviate 
deficiencies which would interfere with successful performance and 
progress in the university and in future work. Students are encouraged to use 
the facilities provided for them and may of their own initiative come to the 
clinic for help, or they may be referred by any faculty member or 
university official. 

Career Services 

Career services are available to students who are graduating, students who 
are enrolled to obtain teacher certification, students who have been accepted 
as candidates for degrees in the Graduate School, and alumni. Additionally. 
career counseling is provided to students of all class levels as well as 
alumni. In addition to career counseling, the primary functions of the office 
are to transmit credentials to prospective employers, arrange for campus 
interviews, prepare a current file of job opportunities, maintain an extensive 
library of occupational information, conduct follow-up studies of graduates, 
conduct group counseling and orientation meetings, and provide general 
assistance in the career planning and job-seeking process. 

The Office of Career Services also receives and makes available to 
graduates and undergraduates information concerning summer employment. 

Positions are not guaranteed by the university, but IUP's record of 
placement is one of the very best in Pennsylvania. 

Veterans 

A prospective veteran student should contact the veterans counselor and 
submit to the counselor the veteran's certificate for Program of Education. 

Veterans eligible for the G.l. Bill should report to the office of the veterans 
counselor in Pratt Hall prior to registration for a semester or for summer 
sessions to be entered or continued in training for Veterans Administration 
benefits purposes. 

No veteran receiving G.I. benefits may change curriculum without clearance 
from the veterans counselor. All veterans must maintain normal class 
progression and report any change in course load to the veterans counselor. 

Any undergraduate receiving benefits from the Veterans Administration 
must carry at least twelve credit hours during a regular semester in order to 
be considered a full-time student by the Veterans Administration. The 
minimum full-time requirement for a graduate student is nine credit hours. 

Children of a deceased or disabled veteran whose death or injury was due to 
service-related causes may be eligible for educational assistance from the 
federal government under Public Law 634 (Dependents Educational 
Assistance Act). Immediately upon acceptance to IUP. men and women who 



qualify for such assistance should contact the veterans counselor to process 
then application for payment. 

Guidelines fur Student Conduct 

IUP is an academic community within the society at large. As a community, 
it has formulated a code ol standards and expectations which the university 
considers to be consistent with its purpose as an educational institution. IUP 
reaffirms the principle of students' freedom coupled w hh an acceptance of 
full responsibility for one's behavior and the consequences of such behavior. 
As a member of the academic community and of the larger society, a student 
retains the rights, protections, guarantees, and responsibilities which are 
held by all citizens. 

The judicial system of IUP exists to review all alleged academic violations 
as well as violations of university regulations and/or federal, state, and local 
ordinances. The primary intent of this educational system is to create a 
positive behavioral change in the students while also protecting the rights of 
the members of the university community. The system will hold the students 
accountable for their actions when regulations or statutes have been 
violated. A complete statement of regulations is available in the student 
handbook. 

Post Office 

The University Post Office is located on the ground floor of Folger Hall, at 
the corner of Pratt Drive and Maple Street. All United States and campus 
mail is picked up and delivered daily to administrative offices and residence 
halls from this location. As it is a contract station of the Indiana, 
Pennsylvania, post office, the University Post Office also provides a window 
service for university personnel for all postal services including box rentals. 

Student Cooperative Association 

The Student Cooperative Association has played an extremely broad role in 
the cocurricular life of the university for more than sixty years. All students, 
faculty, and staff, by virtue of paying the Activity Fee, are members of the 
association. Virtually all campuswide activities outside the instructional 
program are sponsored wholly or in part by the association. 

The Activity Fee is the chief source of income for the association's 
programs. The student's "I-Card" will admit him/her free of charge or at a 
reduced fee to university social, cultural, and athletic events. Other income 
for the association comes from the profits of the Co-op Store and income 
from events sponsored by the association. 

The Student Cooperative Association operates the Hadley Union Building, 
which houses the Co-op Store, and the Co-op Recreational Park. The Hadley 
Union Building, built by association members through the Activity Fee. 
offers many facilities for use by the university community. 

The Co-op Recreational Park comprises 270 acres of wooded hillsides and 
fields. Included are a lodge building which will accommodate groups of up 
to 200 people, a ski facility with two rope tows, toboggan run, cross-country 
skiing and nature trails, picnic shelter, and garden plots. 

Cocurricular Activities and Student Organizations 

As participating members of the IUP community, students occupy a 
responsible role in governance of the campus. Since a valuable part of 
education lies in participation in groups where experience in leadership. 
social and community responsibility, intellectual curiosity, and religious 
interests can be met, voluntary participation in varied organizations is 
available and encouraged. 

There are currently more than 180 active student organizations at IUP 
advised by faculty or staff selected by the students. Students are also 
encouraged to initiate and support new groups which reflect interests not 
represented by existing organizations. 

Student Congress 

The Student Congress is the representative and recognized voice of IUP's 
student body. The Student Congress was created in the spring of 1989 to be 
a unified student voice in a bicameral (two-house) arrangement. Seats are 
reserved in the House of Representatives for each of the eight students 
elected to the Student Cooperative Association's Board of Directors. The 
Congress is led by a president elected at-large in a spring general election; 
the president is a member of neither the House nor Senate. The sixty-four 
member House is led by an internally elected vice-president. Its primary 
responsibility lies with the student members of the Co-op Board of Directors 



26 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



and with their internal appointments to the Co-op Finance Committee which 
allocates the $300,000 supporting recognized organizations and activities on 
campus. The forty-two-member Senate is also led by an internally elected 
vice-president. This vice-president becomes the student nominee for the 
position of vice chair of the University Senate. Each student senator serves 
as a member of the University Senate, which is also composed of faculty 
and administration. The primary responsibilities of the student senators lie 
with their seats on University Senate committees, which address 1UP policy. 
The Student Congress meets twice monthly as an assembly. Every student 
enrolled at IUP is considered a member of the SC, and input is always 
sought and valued. 

Residence Hall Association 

The Residence Hall Association ( RHA ) is made up of all students living in 
university residence halls. The executive body of RHA is composed of 
elected representatives from each residence hall. The purpose of RHA is to 
provide educational, social, and community service programs for residents; 
to collect information on various aspects of residence hall life; and to assist 
in formulating housing policies and procedures. 

Activities 

Under the supervision of the Office of Student Activities and Organizations 
and funded for the most part by the Student Cooperative Association, IUP 
has many activities which are orchestrated by students and which offer 
entertainment and cultural programs for the entire university community. 
These activities provide a significant opportunity for students to become 
more involved with their campus as well as to experience the growth and 
personal development which involvement provides. 

Organizations and activities sponsoring the majority of IUP events include 
The Entertainment Network (TEN), Artist Series, Black Cultural Center, 
Black Emphasis Committee, Ideas and Issues Series, Summer Activities, and 
the University Concert Committee. Participation in these and other groups is 
strongly encouraged. 

Student Publications 

The Perm, IUP's campus newspaper, is published three times a week during 
the fall and spring semesters by students wishing to gain practical 
newspaper experience. Interested students are advised to attend 
organizational meetings held in the beginning of each semester. 

The Oak is the university yearbook, a pictorial and written review of the 
year's activities. Subscriptions may be purchased in the fall or early in the 
Spring Semester. The Penn will carry notices of subscription drives. 
Applications for staff positions may be obtained from the Oak office or from 
the adviser. 

The University Directory is distributed early in the fall term to students and 
faculty. It contains a listing of all properly registered students and of staff, 
faculty, and university offices. 

The Student Handbook is distributed to all students free of charge. It 
includes rules and regulations, the extracurricular program, and general 
information of interest to students. 



Athletics 

Frank Cignetti, Director; Frank Condino, Associate Director; 
Francis Nee, Acting Associate Director; Erika Renwick, Business and 
Compliance Officer 

Head Coaches: Kurt Kanaskie, Men's Basketball; Jan Kiger, Women's 
Basketball; Ed Fry, Men's and Women's Cross Country; 
Frank Cignetti, Football; Kofie Montgomery, Women's Field Hockey; 
Fred Joseph, Golf; Lori Henkemeyer, Gymnastics; Joyce Kanaski, 
Softball; Frances Nee, Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving; 
Jackie Albenze, Women's Tennis; Ed Fry, Men's and Women's Track 
and Field; Kofie Montgomery, Volleyball 

The university's men's and women's athletic teams compete at the Division 
II level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and in the 
Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference. 

Men's sports offered in the fall include cross country and football. The 
winter sports include basketball and swimming and diving. The spring 
sports are track and field, golf, and baseball. 

Women's fall sports are tennis, cross country, gymnastics, volleyball, and 
field hockey. In the winter, the sports of basketball and swimming and 
diving are offered. Spring sports include Softball and track and field. 

Intramurals 

A well-organized and varied program of intramural sports and athletic 
activities is conducted for both men and women and on a coeducational 
basis. Intramural handbooks are available from the intramural director, 
Room 101. Memorial Field House. 

Religious Life 

The religious life of students is cared for through the activities of some 
twelve organizations which comprise the IUP Interfaith Council. Three of 
these, the Newman Center, the United Campus Ministry, and the Lutheran 
Center, maintain private facilities near the campus. Others affiliate with and 
meet in local churches for worship and meetings. 

The Advising and Testing Center 

The Advising and Testing Center is available to provide assistance to both 
students and faculty. Among its functions are implementing the summer 
preregistration testing program; offering career planning classes and 
computer-assisted career counseling to undecided majors; co-conducting 
registration for January freshmen and branch campus students; processing 
total university withdrawals; serving the needs of students with disabilities; 
and assisting in providing advising information to students and advisers. The 
Advising and Testing Center may be contacted at 357-4067 ( VITD) ( 106 
Pratt Hall) for further information. 



Academic Policies — 27 




Academic Policies 



Classification of Students 

In order to be classified as full-time, undergraduate students attending any 
regular academic year semester must be currently enrolled in at least twelve 
semester hours of credit. 

In the IUP summer sessions, a student must be currently enrolled in at least 
six semester hours during either session in order to be certified as a full-time 
enrollee for either of those scheduled instructional periods. 

Full-time certification for students enrolled in instructional periods which do 
not conform to the regularly scheduled academic sessions will be based 
upon the number of enrolled semester hours during that period of enrollment 
(e.g., one semester hour in one week of instruction would equal the 
minimum full-time certification standard). 

For purposes of designating students by class, the following credit-hour 

classification ranges are used: 

Freshmen 28 semester hours or less 

Sophomores 29-56 semester hours 

Juniors 57-90 semester hours 

Seniors 91 semester hours or more 

Class designations are based on credits earned rather than credits attempted. 
Persons holding a degree and working for a second baccalaureate degree 
may be classified as seniors. 

Normal Semester Hour Loads 

A normal semester hour load is 15-17 semester hours. A student who wishes 
to schedule more than 17.5 semester hours must obtain approval from the 
dean of the college in which he/she is registered; approval will be predicated 
upon various criteria such as the student's demonstrated competencies, total 



courses, and specific conditions. The signed approval form must be 
submitted at registration or drop/add to schedule the crcdit(s) beyond 17.5. 
When taking nineteen or more credits, a student is responsible for paying a 
per-credit lee at the current rate for each credit beyond eighteen. 

Grades and Quality Points 

In the grading system, the following grades are used in reporting the 
Standing of students at the end of each semester or summer term: A, 
excellent; B. good; C, average; D, passed: F. failed; I, incomplete; R, 
deferred; P. pass/fail (option). Regarding the option of pass/fail courses, if a 
student fails the course, he/she will be awarded an F and the terms of 
"failing" a course will prevail. The grade of R is used to indicate deferred 
status for certain types of continuing study courses. It must be converted 
within one calendar year after issuance. 

The grade of I is used to record work which, so far as covered, is of passing 
grade but is incomplete because of personal illness or other unavoidable 
reason. It must be made up within 180 calendar days after issuance of the 
grade. The grade of W, designates that the student has voluntarily withdrawn 
from a course within a specified period after the beginning of any regular 
semester. The grade of Q is assigned to all courses in a semester or session 
when a student withdraws completely from registration in the university. 
The W and Q grades carry no credits or quality points for the courses in 
which they are reported but do appear on the student's record. 

Shortly after each semester or summer session, a full grade report is mailed 
to each student at his or her home address. 

Quality points are assigned as follows: Grade A, four quality points per 
semester hour; B, three quality points per semester hour; C, two quality 
points per semester hour; D, one quality point per semester hour; and F, no 
quality points. 

Quality points are not counted on grades from other schools, and a student 
transferring from another school is held responsible for quality points only 
on work taken in this university. 

Cumulative Quality-Point Average is determined by multiplying the credit 
hours per course by the grade in quality points received for that course, 
repeating this procedure for each course attempted, totaling the credit hour 
quality points thus obtained, and dividing by the total number of credit 
hours attempted. 

Institutional Credits are associated with remedial courses which are 
numbered below 100. Credits from institutional credit courses do not apply 
to degree requirements for graduation but are used in determining 
enrollment status (full or part time) including financial aid and athletic 
(NCAA) eligibility. 

Course Repeats 

The semester hours for a course repeated after January 1 , 1 974. shall be 
counted only once for all attempts; it is this number of hours that will be 
used in quality-point average (QPA) computation. (In the case where a 
course is repeated for a different number of hours of credit than when taken 
initially, the number of hours corresponding to the highest grade will be 
used in the QPA computations.) It should be noted that the transcript 
continues to carry the full, unabridged record, with no deletion of repeated 
courses from the visual record. 

The total quality points for all attempts of the repeated course will be the 
number assigned for the highest grade earned. 

The QPA for the repeated course will be determined by dividing the number 
of quality points by the number of semester hours earned. Only courses with 
a D or F grade may be repeated and then only with the approval of the 
student's adviser. Only six repeat attempts may be made subsequent to the 
adoption of this policy during a baccalaureate degree program. 

A course taken at another university will not be applicable to lUP's D/F 
Repeat Policy, and if credits are transferred they will block repeat of the 
course at IUP. 

To repeat a course in which a grade of 'D' or 'F' was received, a student 
must file a D/F repeat form prior to repeating a course. The D/F Repeat 
forms, available in departmental offices, must be filed by the specified 
deadline by validation in the Scheduling Center, G-8C Sutton. 



28 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Pass-Fail Policy 

The purpose of pass-fail is to permit a student to take an elective course in a 
field of personal interest where he/she may be competing with major 
students in the department in which the course is offered. When scheduled, 
such a course shall be included in the student's normal course load for 
the semester. 

A student may take courses on a pass-fail basis to a total of fifteen semester 
hours throughout his/her university career. The student is limited to one 
pass-fail course in any given semester during the sophomore, junior, and 
senior years. All courses in the student's Liberal Studies program and in his/ 
her major and minor fields are excluded from this prerogative. 

The student must declare his/her intent to choose pass-fail in a specific 
course no later than six weeks after the beginning of the semester or the 
equivalent timespan in a summer session. Once declared, this pass-fail 
option may not be revoked. Instructors will not be notified of the identity of 
pass-fail students in their courses; identification will be handled by the 
Computer Center through an appropriate coded control. 

A student shall be given academic credit without quality points for a course 
taken pass-fail upon receiving a passing mark in the course. The semester 
hours successfully completed under pass-fail ("passed"), within the overall 
fifteen semester hour limitation, shall be recorded as counting towards the 
total semester hours earned for graduation but not towards the semester- 
hours-attempted data used in calculation of the cumulative quality-point 
average. However, if a student fails a pass/fail course, he/she will receive 
the "F" grade and the corresponding quality-point average. An F earned 
under the pass/fail option may be repeated only under the graded option to 
provide the quality points to correspond to the "hours attempted" incurred 
with the F. 

The summer sessions, collectively or in any combination, shall be 
considered a unit similar to a spring or fall semester for pass-fail purposes. 
Hence, a student is permitted to take only one course during the summer on 
a pass-fail basis. 

Cancelled Semester Policy 

The Cancelled Semester Policy permits students returning after significant 
separation from the university to delete from the Cumulative Grade-Point 
Average (CGPAI calculation the results of one particularly unfortunate 
semester. A student who has not been enrolled in four consecutive semesters 
and the intervening summer sessions may apply upon application for 
readmission or w ithin one year of readmission for the application of this 
policy to any single semester completed before readmission. While 
readmission may be based on the application for cancelled semester, the 
transcript record will reflect this only after the student is enrolled and 
attending. [For cancellation purposes, a semester is defined as any semester 
of enrollment, whether full or part time, with sessions in a single summer 
together constituting one semester.] All grades — passing, failing, 
withdrawals — in that semester must be cancelled from the CGPA. There is 
no abridgment of the transcript; the courses and grades remain visible on the 
official transcript. Credit toward graduation remains for those credits 
associated with passing grades. A student may never cancel more than one 
semester from his/her CGPA under this policy. 

Audit Policy 

To audit an undergraduate course, a person must be admitted to the 
university and have met course prerequisites. Students wishing to audit a 
course for which they registered at registration should obtain a Course Audit 
Form from the department chairperson of the course. To audit a course not 
previously registered for at registration, students must first process an "add" 
for the course before filing a course audit form. All audit processing, 
including revocation of previously requested audit classification, must be 
completed during the regular drop/add period. Copies of the completed form 
are returned to the Scheduling Center, to the department chairperson, and to 
the student. Audit students have the same privileges as other students in all 
coursework. There is no limit on the number of courses which may 
be audited. 



Auditors will pay normal tuition and such other fees as may be required for 
the course. 

Advanced Placement and Credit/Exemption Examinations 

Courses taken by students prior to admission to college under the Advanced 
Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board may be 
recognized by the award of college credit or by exemption from required 
subjects. Those who earn a grade of 3, 4, or 5 in the Advanced Placement 
Examination will be granted credit toward the number of credit hours 
required for graduation. 

For students who have had other unusual opportunities for instruction or 
have advanced in a given field, an opportunity to gain credit and/or 
exemption from a course is afforded through examinations. The University 
Testing Services Office (302 Pratt Hall) offers credit options through the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP). 

Students have an opportunity to gain exemption or credit through successful 
completion of comprehensive examinations by requesting from the 
academic department an exam as a substitute for completing all the usual 
requirements of the course. 

A student who passes an exemption examination will be exempt from taking 
that course in his/her academic program. When a student receives credit for 
a course by examination, the credit will be applied to graduation 
requirements just as though the course had been taken. If a student is 
granted exemption only from a course, he/she will be permitted to take a 
free elective in place of that course. 

This enables the student to further specialize, to correct weaknesses outside 
his/her major field, to build his/her knowledge in an ancillary area, or to 
introduce himself/herself to an entirely different area. 

Courses for which credit or exemption are awarded by examination will not 
be used in the determination of quality-point averages. 

Schedule Changes (Drop/Add) 

The university registration system is characterized as one of continuous 
registration, using either TELREG (telephone registration) orTERMREG 
(terminal registration). From the student's initial registration time for a 
given semester until the beginning of classes for the semester (except for 
specified restricted times), a student may modify his/her schedule to the 
extent that classes are available or permission to register for a restricted 
section has been granted and entered into the computer system. Opportunity 
to drop or add sections extends to the third day of a semester, as announced. 
Each student is responsible for making the appropriate computer 
transactions to ensure schedule accuracy. Note particularly that while the 
department may enter permission to register for a section, the actual 
registration transaction must be entered by the student. The schedule of 
classes information includes specific directions for registration and 
modification for students. 

Individual Course Withdrawal Policy 

(effective until June 1, 1995) 

During the fall, spring, and summer sessions, students are permitted to 
withdraw from a course with a grade of "W" up to the midpoint of the 
course. Faculty members are required to inform students of their standing in 
the class prior to the midpoint of the course. 

For all individual course withdrawals, the student must complete a course 
withdrawal form, available in department offices. This form must be signed 
by both the student and the instructor. 

After the close of the prescribed withdrawal period, a student may w ithdraw 
from a course only with the approval of his/her adviser, department 
chairperson, and college dean (in that order), for such reasons as illness, 
accident, or extreme personal problems. Such withdrawal may occur no later 
than one week before the beginning of final examinations. 



All audited courses will be identified as such on the student's grade report 
and transcript. Work taken on an audit basis will not be graded and will not 
count toward the fulfillment of requirements for a degree to be awarded by 
IUP. Since credit hours attempted and quality points will not be awarded for 
audited courses, they will not affect the student's quality-point average in 
any way whatsoever. 



If a student fails to complete the requirements for a course but has not 
formally processed a withdrawal from the university, the instructor shall 
note in his/her course records the student's last attendance date and/or other 
activity and assign an "F" for the course. 



Academic Policies — 29 



Individual Course Withdrawal Policy 

(effective on June I, 1995) 

An undergraduate student is permitted five lniinuiu.il Course Withdrawals 
at 1UP. Exceptions for unusual circumstances, il any, will he by letter of 
petition to the dean ol the student's college, with appropriate documentation 
oi the circumstances. 

For all indiv idual course withdrawals, the student must complete a course 
withdrawal form, available in department offices. This form must he signed 
h\ the student, his/her ad\ iser. and the instructor. The completed form must 
be processed through the office of the dean of the student's college. (Check 
the Schedule of Classes Bulletin for specific information on how to process 
individual course withdrawals.) 

Indi\ idual course withdrawals may he processed only during the first two- 
thirds of the term. Instructors are required to inform students of their 
standing in class prior to this time. A student wishing to withdraw from a 
course after the deadline may request a waiver by filing an Emergency Late 
( ourse Withdraw al Request through the office of the dean of his/her college. 
Approval is contingent upon documentation of exceptional events of a 
catastrophic nature that could not have been anticipated. 

At the time of implementation, each continuing student will have five 
additional individual course withdrawal options, without regard to the 
number of his/her previous course withdrawals. 

Total University Withdrawal Policy 

An undergraduate student who does not register for the succeeding semester 
or, having registered, does not appear for classes at the beginning of the 
succeeding semester, is considered to have withdrawn from the university. 
Thereafter, he/she must apply for readmission as prescribed under 
"Admission and Registration." 

Any undergraduate student withdraw ing from the university during a 
semester or a summer session must secure a Withdrawal Form from the 
Advising and Testing Center. 106 Pratt Hall (357-4067). The student will 
clear the form with the appropriate offices listed in the form, securing their 
signatures as evidence of clearance. (Students seeking medical withdrawal 
must also provide the Advising and Testing Center with a physician's 
corroboration of a medical need to withdraw. ) The Withdraw al Form will 
then be returned to the Advising and Testing Center, which will notify the 
appropriate college dean, campus agencies, and instructors that an official 
withdrawal has been processed. No person shall be considered withdrawn 
from the university w ithm a semester or summer session unless such notice 
is received. Grades of Q will be assigned to all registered courses in the 
semester/session from which the student is withdrawing. 

Undergraduate Course Attendance Policy 

The university expects all students to attend class. 

Individual faculty members may define attendance standards appropriate to 
each course and the consequences of not meeting those standards, within the 
following guidelines: 

1 . Each policy must be distributed in writing during the first week of the 
course. Normally, it is expected that the information dealing with class 
attendance standards will be distributed with the Semester Course 
Syllabus. 

2. Each policy must recognize students' need to miss class because of 
illness or personal emergency. 

3. Each policy must define some limited level of allowable absence, 
normally at least a number of clock hours equal to course credit hours. 

Approved May 13. 1994. Council of Trustees 

Criteria Governing Continuance at IUP 

Continuance at IUP is determined according to the university's Academic 
Standards Policy as approved by University Senate December. 1987, and 
Council of Trustees in Februarv. 1988. This policv became effective 
July 1. 1988. 

Academic Standards Policy 

The Academic Standards Policy applies to all undergraduate degree 
candidates of the university. Academic standards for students enrolled in 
graduate courses and programs will be defined and administered through the 



Graduate School. Academic standards for participants in nondegree 
programs will be defined separately. 

Authority to administer the Academic Standards Policy is vested in the dean 
of the college which has jurisdiction for the student's primary major. That 
responsibility may he assigned to an appropriate designee. Students 
officially adv ised by the Learning Center are reviewed by the assistant vice 
president for Student Affairs. 

Academic Good Standing: 

Every undergraduate student must maintain a cumulative 2.00 GPA to be in 
academic good standing. There are two review periods: January and May. 
Continuation of enrollment is permitted under defined circumstances. 

1. January Review Period: 

The academic standing of each student is reviewed. A student whose 
cumulative GPA is below 2.00 is considered to be in a Probation status. 

2. May Review Period: 

The academic standing of each student is reviewed. A student must have 
a cumulative GPA of 2.00 to be in good academic standing. 

a. For a student who matriculated during the preceding summer or 
September, the following criteria apply: 

— if the cumulative GPA is between 1.80 and 1.99. the student is 
continued on probation. 

— if the cumulative GPA is below 1.80. the student is dismissed. 

b. For a student who matriculated through the Learning Center/ Act 101 
during the preceding summer or September, the following criteria 
apply: 

— if the cumulative GPA is between 1.80 and 1.99, the student is 
continued on probation. 

— if the cumulative GPA is below 1.80, and the student is in 
compliance with the participation requirements of the Learning 
Center program, the student is continued on probation. 

— if the cumulative GPA is below 1 .80, and the student is not in 
compliance with the participation requirements of the Learning 
Center program, the student is dismissed. 

c. For a student who matriculated in the immediately preceding 
semester, the following criteria apply: 

— if the cumulative GPA is below 2.00. the student is continued on 
probation. 

d. For all other continuing students, the following criteria apply: 

— if the cumulative GPA is below 2.00, the student is dismissed. 

Probation: 

1 . Definition: Probation status is that status of any student who has a 
cumulative GPA less than 2.00 and who has permission to enroll in 
the university. 

2. Student responsibilities: 

A student who is in Probation status is expected to meet w ith his/her 
adviser prior to or within the first w eek of each semester to review 
current course load and to establish a plan of contact for the semester. It 
is generally anticipated that a probation student will develop personal 
change strategies utilizing appropriate professional resources such as 
adviser, faculty. Counseling Center. Learning Center, Career Sen ices, 
workshops, tutoring programs, and other support systems. 

3. Additional conditions: 

As a condition of deferral of dismissal, a dean (or designee) may include 
specific conditions designed to promote improved academic performance. 

Dismissal: 

1. A student who does not meet minimum academic standards is subject to 
automatic dismissal in May. Dismissal is the normal consequence of 
cumulative performance below the academic standards as published: the 
office of the dean provides confirmation of dismissal status and 
additional information. 

2. Dismissal in May includes the cancellation of previously scheduled fall 
classes and the elimination of guarantees associated with fall housing 
and dining contracts. 

3. Appeal for deferral of dismissal: In certain cases extenuating 
circumstances may exist which in the professional judgment of the 
college dean or designee will warrant a brief extension of enrollment 



30 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



privilege at IUP. A student should understand that it is the student's 
responsibility to anticipate, to initiate, and to fully document and 
cooperate in all aspects of the process of appeal in a timely manner. The 
student must tile in the office of the dean (or designee) the completed 
application for appeal with all supporting documentation pertinent to 
review of the appeal. All material must be filed by 4:00 p.m.. June 15, to 
be considered for the fall semester. 

Readmission: 

1. All dismissed students seeking readmission must make application for 
readmission through the appropriate college office. A student who has 
been dismissed may use summer sessions at IUP in support of the 
application for readmission. The application will detail procedures 
including deadlines and information needed for consideration of 
readmission plan. 

Sufficient progress: 

The IUP Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy requires 
sufficient academic progress toward a degree on both academic good 
standing (GPA) and sufficient progress (percent of progress) bases. The 
standard of academic good standing is defined within the university's 
Academic Standards Policy. The standard of sufficient progress for financial 
aid eligibility is the successful completion of seventy-five percent (75 
percent) of the cumulative number of registered credits at IUP. "Registered 
credits" are the number of credits for which a student is enrolled at the end 
of the Drop/Add period. (For a student who was originally registered and 
charged at full-time status and who reduced during Drop/Add to part-time 
status, the registered credits will be calculated as twelve.) 

A student who meets the standard of academic good standing of the 
Academic Standards Policy but who does not meet the standard of sufficient 
quantitative progress may continue in university registration but without 
financial aid eligibility for the federal Title IV aid programs. 

A full statement of requirements for Satisfactory Academic Progress for 
Title IV Federal Student Assistance is available through the Financial 
Aid Office. 

All courses taken at IUP become a part of the student's permanent academic 
record. The record shall show hours attempted, hours earned, and quality 
points earned. 

The academic standing of all students is computed on the basis of courses 
attempted at this university only. Credit is granted for work completed in 
other institutions in accordance with the stipulations set forth under 
"Admission and Registration." 

Academic Honors 

IUP recognizes academic achievement through Dean's Lists, Provost's 
Scholars, and graduation honors. 

Dean's Lisr — Undergraduate students receive recognition on the Dean's 
List for each semester (or summer sessions cumulatively) in which they earn 
at least a 3.25 quality-point average based on at least twelve credits of 
graded (not P/F) coursework. 

Provost's Scholar — Sophomores and juniors who have a cumulative 
quality-point average of 3.50 and above at midyear are named Provost's 
Scholars and are recognized at an annual Honors Convocation, usually 
in April. 

Graduation Honors — Traditional Latin honors are awarded at graduation to 
bachelor's degree candidates with appropriate academic records. Calculation 
is based on all undergraduate credits and quality points earned at IUP. 
Graduation honors are not granted for second (subsequent) degrees. The 
distinctions are: 

Cum laude — 3.25 to 3.49 cumulative quality-point average 
Magna cum laude — 3.50 to 3.74 cumulative quality-point average 
Summa cum laude — 3.75 to 4.00 cumulative quality-point average 

Advisory Program 

A group of selected faculty members act as freshman advisers for entering 
freshmen in their departments. In some curriculums the advisers continue 
with the same group of advisees from year to year. In other curriculums the 
freshman advisers remain with their advisee groups only for the students' 



first year; under this program, the student is then assigned an academic 
adviser for the remaining years through to his/her degree in his/her 
chosen field. 

Faculty advisers counsel the students on academic achievement, dropping 
courses, changing curriculum, student activities, study schedules, and 
personal problems. The adviser receives a copy of the student's permanent 
record at the beginning of the academic year. 

Changes of Major 

To qualify for change of major, a student must be in academic good standing 
(2.00 GPA) and must meet any other requirements specific to the major. The 
following majors have requirements beyond 2.00 GPA: Criminology and all 
teacher certification programs. 

A student must indicate his/her desire to change to a new curriculum in the 
office of the dean of the college in which the student is registered if the 
curriculum change desired is from one department to another within the 
same college (for example, change from a mathematics major to a biology 
major) or in the office of the dean of the college to which the student wishes 
to transfer if the curriculum change is from one college to another (for 
example, secondary education major to biology major). In either case, the 
student will complete an application form that is available in the dean's 
office. Before seeking a curriculum change, it is advisable that the student 
consult with the chairpersons of both the "old" and "new" departments. 

When a student changes colleges, the dean of the college (or dean's agent) 
into which the transfer is sought will evaluate the student's credits before 
approving the transfer. A copy of the evaluation will be made available to 
the student and his/her new adviser if a change in curriculum is effected. 

In cases involving students who are veterans, the dean of the college into 
which transfer is sought (or dean's agent) shall give the veteran a statement 
of prospective approval and the effective date of the proposed changes. This 
statement shall also indicate the amount of extended training time the 
change of curriculum will entail and the amount of credit loss, if any. The 
veteran shall take this statement to the veteran's counselor at least one 
month prior to the effective date of the change. No transfer of curriculum 
shall be made by veterans until V.A. approval has been assured. 

Sophomore Screening for Junior Status Approval 

General policy at IUP permits each college to determine its own scheme for 
evaluating the development and progress of its major students. However, 
each college is expected to employ some effective procedure for such 
evaluation. 

Several of the colleges use a procedure called "Sophomore Screening for 
Junior Status Approval" with the following required: All students (in such a 
college) enrolled in their fourth semester or who will complete fifty-seven 
semester hours attempted by the end of the current semester must apply for 
Junior Status approval by filling out an application form by the deadline 
date designated and announced. 

All students should check with their faculty advisers to determine which 
colleges use "Junior Status" screening procedure and the criteria for Junior 
Status Approval. 

Admission to Teacher Education and Certification 

To improve the quality of teacher education, there is an evaluation and 
advisement of each student at four stages: 

A. Admission to the Certification Program 

Procedure 

By the end of the early registration period of the student's second 
semester in teacher education, he or she must file an application and 
personal goals essay with the major academic adviser. The adviser will 
review, recommend approval or denial, and forward the application to 
the Dean's Office, College of Education. Applications will be reviewed 
immediately after posting of semester grades. 

Requirements 

1 . Completion of at least 29 semester hours. Transfer students with 

sufficient credits must complete one semester ( 12sh minimum) at 

IUP to establish a GPA. 



Academic Policies — 31 



2. A 2.5 overall grade-point average. 

3. Clcaiam c on Act 34 (criminal record check). 

4. Completion oi initial speech/hearing screening test. 

5. Clearance on TB testing. 

6. Review and recommendation by the major academic adviser and/or 
departmental committee indicating completion of specific 
departmental requirements. 

Results 

If the requirements are met, the student will be sent a letter of admission 
to the Teacher Certification Program by the associate dean. College of 
Education. At this point, the student may consider enrolling in the 
following courses from the professional education core: ED242 (Pre- 
Student Teaching Clinical Experience I), FE202 (American Education in 
Theory and Practice), EP202 (Educational Psychology); and CM301 
(Technology for Learning and Instruction). 

If the requirements are not met. the student will not be permitted to 
continue work in professional education and will be administratively 
removed from those courses in the professional education core for which 
the student registered. The student must reapply for admission to teacher 
education. This can be done at any point at which the student believes 
that deficiencies identified have been corrected and meet with 
established requirements. 

B. Admission to Junior Standing 

Procedure 

The student must file an application with the office of the dean, College 
of Education by the end of the registration period during the semester in 
which he or she expects to satisfactorily complete at least fifty-seven 
semester hours. The adviser will review, recommend approval or denial, 
and forward the application to the dean's office. College of Education. 

Requirements 

1 . Admitted to Teacher Certification. 

2. Completion of at least 57 semester hours which may include 
accepted transfer credits. 

3. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.5. Transfer students 
with sufficient credits must complete one semester (12sh minimum) 
at IUP to establish a GPA. 

4. Completion of EN 101 or equivalency with a minimum grade of C. 

5. Completion of ED242 and EP202 with a minimum grade of C. 

6. Final speech/hearing clearance for students not cleared under initial 
evaluation. 

7. Submission of a personally planned program of study on an approved 
form. 

8. Review and recommendation by the major academic adviser and/or 
departmental committee indicating completion of specific 
departmental requirements. 

Results 

If the requirements are met, the student will be sent a letter of admission 
to Junior Standing by the associate dean. College of Education. At this 
point the student may take the junior-level professional educational 
courses which include ED342 (Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience 
II), EP377 (Educational Tests and Measurements), and ED442 (School 
Law) and courses in the methods of teaching. 

If the requirements are not met. the student will receive a letter from the 
associate dean, College of Education, at the end of the semester 
indicating that he/she has not achieved Junior Standing and may not take 
the junior-level professional education courses. Any of the junior level 
professional education courses scheduled during the registration process 
will be administratively removed from the student's schedule. Students 
must reapply for Junior Standing when they believe that deficiencies 
indicated in the denial have been removed from their academic record. 

C. Admission to Student Teaching 

Procedure 

The student must file an application with the office of Student Teaching 
and Field Experiences at least one semester before the actual experience. 



Requirements 

1 . Admission to Junior Standing. 

2. Satisfactory completion of at least 91 semester hours with a 
cumulative grade-point average of 2.5 or higher. Transfer students 
with sufficient credits must complete one semester ( 12sh minimum) 
at HIP to establish a GPA. 

3. Completion of the Liberal Studies science requirement courses with 
a minimum grade of C in each. 

4. Completion of the Liberal Studies mathematics requirement course 
with a minimum grade of C. 

5. Completion of all the required professional education core courses 
with a minimum grade of C in each. These include CM301 , FE202, 
EP202, ED242, ED342, EP377 (where required), and methods course 
in major area. 

6. Affirmative recommendation by the student's major departmental 
adviser or program coordinator. 

7. Completion of the Special Education Competency requirement (pass 
Special Education competency test or pass EX300: Education of the 
Exceptional in the Regular Classroom). 

8. Final clearance on Act 34 (criminal record check). (This clearance is 
good for one year and is required of all persons working with 
children in public school settings.) 

9. Satisfaction of supplemental department requirements, if any, as 
approved by Senate and described in the department section of the 
undergraduate catalog. 

10. Review and recommendation by the major academic adviser and/or 
departmental committee indicating completion of specific 
departmental requirements. 

Results 

If the requirements are met, the director of Student Teaching and Field 
Experiences will confirm approval by letter and process the student 
teaching placement. It is the student's responsibility to formally register 
for student teaching during the early registration process. 

If the requirements are not met, the student will be informed of the 
denial by letter and administratively removed from the student teaching 
placement. The student may not register for student teaching until 
deficiencies are removed from the student's academic record. 

D. Recommendation for Certification 

Procedure 

Complete application for the Pennsylvania Department of Education 
Certification and file with the office of Student Teaching and Field 
Experiences by the listed dates appropriate to the anticipated date 
of graduation. 

Requirements 

1 . A minimum grade of C in all professional education courses and an 
overall grade-point average of 2.5. 

2. Review and recommendation by the major academic adviser 
indicating completion of all departmental teacher education 
requirements. 

3. Completion of student teaching with a minimum grade of C. 

4. Successful completion of the NTE Core Battery and NTE Specialty 
Area tests. 

Appeal Provision 

A student who believes that any requirement of this policy has been 
inequitably applied or that he/she merits special consideration may 
appeal through the proper channels: academic adviser, chairperson, 
College of Education dean (or designee), teacher education appeals 
committee. Appeals must be made before the end of the next regular 
academic semester following the application. 

Every effort should be made to resolve the appeal through the process so 
described. If, at the conclusion, the student is still in disagreement with 
the findings, the student may request review before a special Teacher 
Education Appeals Committee. The committee will be composed of 
three voting members representing the faculty, cooperating teachers, and 
students to be elected each year by the Teacher Education Coordinating 
Committee. 



To initiate an appeal, the student must file a form obtained at the dean's 
office. College of Education. Appeals will be heard only during the 



-Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



regular academic semester. The student will be expected to submit 
written documentation of his/her complaint about the process of review 
for continuation or eligibility in the teacher education program. The 
committee will review the materials and make its recommendation to the 
dean. College of Education. A final decision rests with the dean of the 
college, who is the certification officer. 

End Notes 

In all cases where adviser action is required, a department may choose to 
use a committee or other departmentally approved process. In cases 
where recommendations are supplied by someone other than the 
academic adviser, the department needs to place a copy of its policy and 
procedures on file with the dean of the College of Education. 

Some departments have additional Junior Standing requirements in 
place. Departments may continue to apply those requirements but need 
to keep a current copy of these requirements on file with the dean of the 
College of Education. 

The policy as here stated applies to all students applying to Teacher 
Certification Programs on or after September 1. 1988, and includes 
updated procedures and editorial revisions as submitted to the University 
Senate in May, 1990, and May, 1992. 

E. Removal of a Student Teacher from a Student Teaching Placement 

Purpose: 

To establish reasons or a process for removal of a student teacher from 
the student teaching assignment. The first two items are consistent with 
Act 34. Criminal Record Check; item 3 establishes a procedure if student 
behavior is not consistent with appropriate expectations of the school 
district; item 4 establishes a process and assures that the student teacher 
learns of unsatisfactory progress as early as possible; and item 5 an 
appeal process. 

Policy: 

Student teachers are ultimately guests of the cooperating school districts 
and may be removed by the district officers. A student teacher may also 
be removed by IUP from the student teaching assignment for any of the 
following reasons: 

1 . If indicted for a felony which is covered in the School Code and Act 
34, there shall be a removal of the student teacher from the school 
assignment until the mattered is cleared. When the student is cleared 
of the indictment, the student teaching assignment will be extended 
to cover the time missed during student teaching. 

2. If convicted of a felony which is covered in the School Code and 
Act 34, the student teacher will be withdrawn from the student 
teaching assignment and will forfeit the time spent during the student 
teaching assignment. 

3. If the behavior exhibited by the student teacher is not acceptable to 
the school district, it should be documented by the school 
administrator/principal in collaboration with the cooperating teacher 
and the university supervisor/coordinator and director. Student 
Teaching Office. If after discussion with the student, improvement is 
evidenced, no further action will be taken by the Student 
Teaching Office. 

4. If it is determined either by the cooperating teacher or university 
supervisor that the teaching competency of the student teacher is at 
an unsatisfactory level based on the teaching competencies indicated 
on the evaluation form and not in the best interest of the students, a 
three-way conference of cooperating teacher, university supervisor, 
and student will be held to discuss the concern, possible, outcomes, 
and remedial strategies. If after consultation with university 
director of Student Teaching, removal from this student teaching 
placement is necessary, this action shall be done by the director 
of Student Teaching and the dean of the College of Education. 
This behavior should be documented and discussed as early in the 
student teaching experience as possible. 

Decisions made under this policy may be appealed to the dean. College 
of Education (certification officer). 

Internship/Cooperative Education 

Many departments of the university have developed internship/cooperative 
education programs which allow a student to participate in university- 
supervised work experiences for variable academic credit. Internships/co- 



ops are viewed as an integral part of a student's academic preparation. An 
internship/co-op gives the student an opportunity to apply theoretical and 
philosophical tenets of a discipline in a practical job experience related to 
the student's academic program. 

Students may apply for an internship if they have completed 57 semester 
hours and have at least a 2.0 QPA. Internship sites are normally located 
within a 500-mile radius of the campus. Overseas placements are located 
near an IUP center. Internships are available in state and federal offices; 
businesses at the local, state, and national level: state-related agencies; 
corporations; and foundations. 

Students may apply for a co-op if they have completed 30 semester hours 
and have at least a 2.0 QPA. Two experiences are required. Sites are national 
and international. Placements parallel those of the internship program. 

Students who are eligible for financial aid may receive federal and state 
funding while participating in an internship. Students must apply to the 
Relating Experience to Academic Learning Program (REAL). 

Because internships are viewed as an integral part of the student's academic 
program, students who are interested in specific internship programs should 
consult with the internship adviser in the department of their major. A 
maximum of 12 credits is applicable to an undergraduate degree program 
from any combination of co-op and internship experiences. 

For general information about university internships, placement options, and 
REAL and WCLA experiences, the student should consult the director of 
Experiential Education and the Employment section of the Financial Aid 
information in this catalog. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps 

The United States Army established a unit of the Reserve Officers Training 
Corps at the university in 1950. In fulfilling the university's three-credit 
Liberal Studies requirement in Health and Wellness for graduation, students 
may take four credits of Military Science and receive full credit for the 
Health and Physical Education requirement. Enrollment in the four-credit 
ROTC option incurs no military obligation whatsoever and allows the 
student the option of competing for a three-year ROTC Scholarship. 

Upon graduation from the university and successful completion of the 
Advanced Course ROTC program, the student will receive a commission as 
a second lieutenant and serve from three months to three years on active 
duty, depending on active Army requirements. As an alternative to active 
duty, the individual may either be chosen or volunteer to complete his/her 
service obligation with the Army Reserve or National Guard. 

Students seeking advanced degrees can be granted an educational delay by 
the Army following completion of their baccalaureate degrees. Upon 
completion of the advanced degree, students then enter active duty or Army 
Reserve/National Guard duty. 

Prior Learning Assessment Programs 

IUP offers several methods for earning university credit for college-level 
learning gained through work and life experience. Through the Office of 
Career Services, the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) offers 
standardized examinations in general and specific subjects. In addition, 
departmental examinations are also available in specific areas on a 
limited basis. 

Where examinations are not available, portfolio assessment may provide the 
student with the opportunity to present evidence of learning for evaluation 
by a university faculty member. Through portfolio assessment, work and life 
experiences are evaluated to determine their appropriateness and 
applicability for university credit. Credits earned through prior learning 
assessment may not be applied towards university residency requirements. 
In addition, no more than one-half of a major may be earned by CLEP. 
departmental examination, and portfolio assessment. Contact the School of 
Continuing Education for specific details. 

Policy on Prior Learning Assessment 

IUP has authorized a policy for assessment of prior learning that took place 
outside traditional classrooms in a procedure known as Portfolio 
Assessment. It is particularly designed for adults with extensive 
documentable knowledge from work experience, travel, independent study, 
or other out-of-class experiences. 



Academic Policies — 33 



Portfolio Evaluation: Principles 

1. Credit awarded through portfolio evaluation must conform to specific 
course titles listed in the [UP catalog. Credit awards lor general broad 
areas (block credit) will not be permitted. 

2. In order to request a portfolio evaluation, the student must be currently 
enrolled at IUP. Credit awarded must be intended for use as part of a 
degree or certification program. 

3. Each department will determine the maximum number of credits to be 
awarded for prior learning lor its major. In no case will more than one- 
half of the major be earned through CLEP, challenge examinations, and 
other forms of prior learning assessment. 

4. Credits earned through portfolio assessment may not apply as residency 
credit. 

5. Credit earned through portfolio assessment may be awarded only as 
regular course credit. 

6. If a related examination is available through CLEP or if a challenge 
examination has previously been established for the course, a portfolio 
assessment of those credits will not be accepted. 

7. Acceptance of portfolio assessment credits by the department will be 
indicated by the signature of the chairperson of the department offering 
the course. The dean of the appropriate IUP college and the dean of the 
School of Continuing Education must also indicate approval. 

8. Students may qualify solely for undergraduate credit — not graduate 
credit. 

9. The title of the course, the semester hours, as well as the indication that 
credit was earned through Assessment of Prior Learning, will be 
recorded on the academic record. An appropriate code to reflect a 
satisfactory grade will be assigned if the portfolio is acceptable. 

Portfolio Evaluation: Procedures 

1. Student meets with assistant dean for Credit Programs in the School of 
Continuing Education to determine the feasibility of earning credit 
through portfolio evaluation. Standard outlines of related courses are 
provided to student. 

2. Preliminary Application Form — Student must provide a resume and 
answer the following questions: 

a. What have you learned that relates to this course? 

b. Where and when have you learned it? 

c. What documentation do you have that supports the claim? 

3. A handbook to assist students in compiling a portfolio will be printed. It 
will show how to relate to the written portfolio learning gained through 
work experience, independent study, and other experiences. Evidence of 
learning through documentation of experience, completion of a project, 
and written examination will be explained. If there is sufficient demand, 
a workshop will be conducted to assist students. 

4. Fees 

Application Fee per Assessment: $15.00 

Assessment Fee: one half the current rate of tuition per credit for each 

credit requested: to be paid w hen portfolio is submitted for evaluation. 

5. The application will be submitted to the assistant dean for Credit 
Programs. Upon approval, the chairperson of the department offering the 
course will be requested to suggest the name of a faculty member to the 
dean of the college for approval. 

6. The faculty member will meet with the student to determine the 
technique of assessment or a combination of techniques to be used, 
including interviews, documentation, observation of performance, 
examination, etc. 

7. After the portfolio has been prepared by the student, it w ill be submitted 
to the dean of the School of Continuing Education for review, then 
forwarded to the appointed faculty member for assessment. 



8. The faculty member will evaluate the portfolio, then make a 
recommendation for or against the award of credit and the amount of 
credit in the form of a letter, which must be approved and countersigned 
by the chairperson of the department offering the course. The portfolio 
will be forwarded to the dean of the college which oversees the student's 
curriculum to approve and verify that the course will be accepted as part 
of the student's program. Finally, the portfolio is sent to the assistant 
dean of the School of Continuing Education, who will notify the student 
and the registrar. 

9. The registrar will list the course title, credit, and an indication that credit 
was earned through Assessment of Prior Learning. An appropriate code 
to reflect a satisfactory (S) grade will be assigned if the portfolio is 
acceptable. 

Academic Integrity Policy 

A. Introduction 

IUP is an academic community within the society at large. All members 
within this community are expected to accept the responsibility for 
academic integrity and honesty. Academic dishonesty seriously erodes 
the quality of educational pursuits and is unacceptable at IUP. The 
following policies and procedures have been established to preserve the 
academic integrity of the university community, while also providing a 
process that protects the rights of students who allegedly violate 
these policies. 

B. Types of Violations 

Academic dishonesty includes but is not limited to the following: 

1 . Providing or receiving unauthorized assistance in coursework, lab 
work, or during examinations or quizzes. 

2. Using unauthorized materials or devices, such as crib notes, during 
examinations or quizzes. 

3. Plagiarizing term papers, essays, reports, speeches and oral 
presentations, take-home examinations, computer projects, and other 
academic exercises by misrepresenting or passing off the ideas, 
words, formulas, or data of another as one's own. Examples include 
but are not limited to: incorporating verbatim or nearly verbatim 
portions of other sources into assignments without using quotation 
marks and specifying the sources of the material; incorporating ideas 
from other sources into assignments without acknowledging the 
source of the ideas. 

4. Possessing course examination materials before the administration of 
the exam, w ithout the prior knowledge or consent of the instructor. 

5. Intentionally evading IUP academic policies and procedures; for 
example improperly processing course withdrawals, grade changes, 
or other academic procedures. 

6. Falsifying information, including forging signatures on various forms 
and documents, or altering or adding answers on academic exercises 
or exams after work has been graded. 

7. Computer dishonesty, including: tampering with or making 
unauthorized change to another person's or the university's computer 
system, illegally copying computer software, any use of another 
person's computer account, unauthorized activity involving another 
individual's personal computer system or any system belonging to 
the university, and other unauthorized use or violations involving 
computer use. 

8. Noncompliance: failure to follow through with sanction(s) imposed 
as a result of an academic violation. 

C. Procedures 

Charges of academic dishonesty may be brought by faculty members or 
administrators. Students who observe or become aware of an incident of 
academic dishonesty by another student are strongly encouraged to 
report it to a university official. Sanction(s) may not be imposed upon 
a student believed to have engaged in academic dishonesty without 
following one of the processes outlined in this policy. 

A faculty member or administrator who believes that a student has violated 

an academic policy may elect any of the following procedures to resolve 

the matter: 

1. Option I: Informal Resolution 

a. The faculty member or administrator and student may meet 

informally within five class days of the observation or discovery' of 
the incident and agree to resolve the issue without submitting any 
formal documentation. It is recommended that the faculty member 
or administrator complete a statement that summarizes the 



34 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



conference which led to the resolution. This factual statement should 
be signed by both parties and copies provided to the student and the 
faculty member or administrator. If agreement cannot be reached, or 
at the discretion of the faculty member, a more formal process as 
outlined in this policy may be initiated. 

2. Option II: Resolution by Docun -nted Agreement 

a. The faculty member or administrator may schedule a conference with 
the student in an attempt to agree on the facts of the case and to reach 
a mutually agreeable resolution This meeting must be scheduled/ 
requested within five class days of the observation or discovery of 
the alleged violation or of the failure of resolution by Option I. If an 
agreement is reached, the faculty member or administrator must 
complete a Documented Agreement Form outlining the agreement 
and have it signed by both parties. Copies are distributed to the 
student, the faculty member or administrator filing the agreement, 
and the assistant to the vice president for Student Affairs. The form 
must be filed within five class days of the conference. 

b. Once the agreement has been reached and the form is filed, the 
matter is closed. By signing off on the agreement, the student is 
waiving the right to appeal the sanctions agreed upon in the 
conference. If the student fails to fulfill the written agreement, the 
faculty member or administrator may file an academic dishonesty 
referral against the student for noncompliance. 

c. If a documented agreement resolution is reached, no formal 
academic violation report is filed. If this is the student's first offense, 
the resolution agreement remains part of the student's internal 
university record and is maintained on file as indicated in the 
recordkeeping section of this policy (See section F.2). 

d. If a documented agreement is not reached, the faculty member or 
administrator should initiate the formal adjudication process by filing 
an academic dishonesty referral form with ihe assistant to the vice 
president for Student Affairs within five class days of the conference 
with the student. 

3. Option III: Resolution by Formal Adjudication 

A faculty member or administrator should pursue formal resolution of 
academic violations if: 

— he/she cannot reach or chooses not to attempt a mutually agreeable 
resolution with the student regarding the facts of the case or 
sanctions to be imposed, 

— he/she believes that suspension or expulsion is an appropriate 
sanction due to the severity of the violation, or 

— the faculty member or administrator is aware that the student has 
previously violated this policy. 

a. The faculty member or administrator should file an academic 
dishonesty referral form with the assistant to the vice president for 
Student Affairs within five class days of the observation or discovery 
of the violation, or within five class days of the documented 
agreement resolution conference if an agreement could not be 
reached. In any case, the referral must be filed no more than ten class 
days from the observation or discovery of the incident. 

b. This referral must describe in detail the alleged violation and the 
recommended sanctions if the student is found to have violated the 
policy. Upon receipt of the academic dishonesty referral, the assistant 
to the vice president for Student Affairs will review the allegation 
and determine if the student has a previous violation. If the student 
has no previous violation, the assistant to the vice president for 
Student Affairs will notify the student of the allegation and instruct 
him/her to follow the adjudication procedures outlined in this section 
(C.3). If the student does have a previous violation, the assistant to 
the vice president for Student Affairs will instruct the student to 
follow adjudication procedures outlined under the Multiple 
Violations section (D.3) of this policy. 

c. Within five class days of receiving notification of the allegation (first 
offense), the student must request that the department chair schedule 
a hearing to review the facts surrounding the allegation and 
recommended sanctions if the student is found to have committed a 
violation. This hearing will involve the student, the chair, and the 
faculty member; the chair may invite others if mutually agreeable. 
Guidelines for academic dishonesty hearings parallel those for 
judicial hearings found in the IUPjudicial system policy. Refer to 
"General Guidelines for Judicial Hearings" in the judicial system 
information in The Student Handbook. 

d. If the student fails to contact the department chair within the five 
class days to schedule the hearing, the sanction recommended by the 



person filing the referral will automatically be imposed. If the 
student fails to appear when a hearing has been scheduled, the 
hearing will be held in the student's absence and the department 
chair will render a decision based upon factual information presented 
by the faculty member. 

e. Following the hearing, the department chair will render a decision 
based on the information presented at the hearing. Within five class 
days of the hearing, the department chair will forward a written 
report summarizing the hearing that includes the outcome, the factual 
basis for the decisions reached, the sanction! s)to be issued, and 
appeal procedures. Copies of this report will be sent to the student, 
the faculty member or administrator, and the assistant to the vice 
president for Student Affairs. The chair will retain a copy for 
departmental files. 

f. In the event that a chairperson cannot or will not fulfill the above 
role, or in the event that the person filing the referral is an 
administrator or department chair, the assistant to the vice president 
for Student Affairs will determine the appropriate individual to fulfill 
the chair's roie and inform the student. 

D. Sanctions 

1 . The following sanctions may be agreed upon by the student and 
faculty member or administrator through informal resolution or 
documented agreement. They may also be imposed by the 
department chair, hearing officer, or the University Judicial Board 
through formal adjudication. 

a. Single Grade Reduction: Reduction of grade or failure on project, 
examination, quiz, or other academic exercise on which student is 
alleged to have cheated. (Requires the approval of the instructor 
of record. ) 

b. Course Grade Reduction: Reduction of course grade or failure in 
the course. (Requires approval of the instructor of record.) 

c. Constructive or Educational Task: A task which requires the 
student to examine his/her dishonest behavior and which may 
benefit the student, campus, or community. 

d. Letter of Warning: A warning letter may be issued indicating that 
the student has been found in violation of an academic policy and 
that failure to comply with policies in the future may result in 
further disciplinary action to be handled as a second offense. The 
letter of warning will remain in effect for a period of time as 
specified by the individual or board hearing the case. 

e. Disciplinary Probation: disciplinary probation, which is for a 
period of time specified by the individual or board hearing the 
case, is an indication that a student's status at the university is 
seriously jeopardized. During the probationary period, if the 
student is found in violation of another IUP policy, a more 
serious sanction will be levied, including possible suspension 
from the university. 

f. Other: Sanctions deemed appropriate and tailored to a specific 
violation as determined by the faculty member or administrator. 
Any reasonable sanction or combination of sanctions for a given 
violation may be agreed upon by the student and faculty member 
or administrator through informal resolution or documented 
agreement. They may also be imposed by the department chair, 
hearing officer, or the University Judicial Board through formal 
adjudication. 

2. Suspension and Expulsion 

The sanction of suspension can only be imposed on a student through 
direct action of the University Judicial Board or by recommendation 
of the faculty member or administrator or department chair to the 
assistant to the vice president for Student Affairs. Expulsion can be 
recommended by a faculty member, department chair or 
administrator, but can only be imposed by the vice president for 
Student Affairs. 

a. Suspension: A student may be suspended from the university for 
a specified period of time, not to be less than the remainder of the 
current semester. Suspension requires that a student remove him/ 
herself from university premises, not attend classes or social 
activities, and not be present on university or Student 
Cooperative Association property during the period of 
suspension. Suspension can be recommended to the assistant to 
the vice president for Student Affairs by the department chair 
after the hearing with the student and faculty member or 
administrator or imposed by the University Judicial Board, a 
special interim board, or the vice president for Student Affairs. 



Academic Policies — 35 



h. Impulsion: I \puision in.r, he considered undei any of the 

following circumstances: when there is a very serious violation of 
the academic integrity policy; when a student is proven to have 
violated the academic integrity policy on more than one occasion; 
or when a student appears before the hoard alter already having 
boon suspended. II expulsion is deemed the appropriate sanction 
by the department chair or administrator, the University Judicial 
Board, or the assistant to the vice president for Student Allans, a 
recommendation may be made to the vice president for Student 
Affairs that the student he expelled from the institution. 
Expulsion from the institution is permanent. 

3. Multiple Violations 

a. Students found in violation of this policy through resolution by 
documented agreement or through formal adjudication will be 
informed by the assistant to the vice president for Student Affairs 
that subsequent violations may result in additional sanctions, 
including possible suspension 01 expulsion from the university. 

b. If a student is found to have violated academic policies a second 
time, the assistant to the vice president for Student Affairs will 
notify the student that he/she will be required to appear before 
the University Judicial Board or special interim board. The 
faculty member or administrator who filed the second referral 
will be asked to present information concerning the alleged 
violation to the board. 

c. The board will review all material and hear all the information 
pertinent to the second violation. If the student is found in 
violation of the policy a second time, the board will then review 
all material from the student's previous academic violation to 
determine appropriate sanction(s). 

d. The student may appeal the decision or the sanction(s) to the vice 
president for Student Affairs using procedures outlined in the 
Appeals section (E.l) of this policy. The vice president may deny 
or uphold the appeal, or direct the appeal to be heard by a special 
interim board or the University Judicial Board. 

E. Appeals 

Cases of academic dishonesty that are resolved through informal 
resolution or documented agreement cannot be appealed, as the facts of 
the case, the decision, and sanction(s) have been agreed to by the student 
and the individual making the charge. These appeal procedures apply to 
cases resolved through formal adjudication. 

1 . If after receiving the department chair's report on the outcome of the 
hearing, the student disagrees either with the decision, the sanction, 
or both, he/she may appeal to the vice president for Student Affairs 
within five class days of receiving the report. This appeal must be in 
writing and must describe in detail the grounds for the appeal. These 
reasons may include the following: 

a. Denial of a fair and reasonable hearing 

b. New evidence (applies when there is an acceptable reason why 
the information was not presented at the original hearing) 

c. Excessively harsh sanctions 

2. If the student does not appeal within the five-class-day period, the 
recommended sanction will be automatically imposed. The faculty 
member may also appeal a decision of the department chair. The 
appeal procedures are the same as those previously outlined for 
the student. 

3. The vice president for Student Affairs may deny or uphold the appeal 
or direct the appeal to be heard by a hearing officer, a special interim 
board, or the University Judicial Board. The hearing officer or the 
UJB may either accept, modify, or reduce the recommended 
sanction. 

4. Within five class days of the appeal hearing, the hearing officer/UJB 
must submit a written report of the decision to the student, faculty 
member, department chair, and the vice president for Student Affairs. 
The decision of the hearing officer/UJB is deemed final and will be 
implemented by the vice president for Student Affairs. 

5. Appeals to the sanction of expulsion must be submitted to the Office 
of the President. If necessary, the president will consult with legal 
counsel in these cases. 

F. Records and Recordkeeping 

1. Records of Informal Resolution 

Although no official forms are filed at this level of resolution, it is 
strongly recommended that a faculty member or administrator who 



reaches an informal agreement with a student puts the agreement in 
writing, gives the student a copy, and keeps a copy for his/her hi 

2. Records of Resolution by Documented Agreement 

The records of documented agreement resolution I nuns are 
maintained by the assistant to the vice president for Student Allans. 
They are not considered formal disciplinary records until and unless 
the student is found in violation of this policy a second time. They 
are internal university records used for monitoring students foi 
multiple violations only. If a second documented agreement form is 
filed or a student is found in violation of the policy through formal 
adjudication, the student will then have a formal disciplinary record 
which includes records of both violations. This formal record is 
maintained according to the IUP judicial system recordkeeping 
policies. 

3. Records of Formal Adjudication 

Records of academic dishonesty cases resolved through formal 
adjudication are kept on file in the Office of the Assistant to the Vice 
President for Student Affairs. They are maintained as formal 
disciplinary records in accordance with IUP judicial system 
recordkeeping policies. 

G. Operational Notes 

1 . In cases where a violation is alleged at or near the end of the 
semester and resolution by informal resolution, documented 
agreement, or formal adjudication cannot be completed before grades 
are submitted, the faculty member should submit a grade of 
"Incomplete" (I) for the student. The "1" grade will remain on the 
student's record until the case has been resolved. Once the case has 
been resolved, the "I" grade will be replaced with the appropriate 
grade. 

2. If the violation is alleged during the semester when classes are in 
session, the accused student should continue attending all classes and 
continue to complete course requirements during the resolution of 
the academic dishonesty case. 

3. The assistant to the vice president for Student Affairs may extend 
any deadline which cannot be met for what he/she deems legitimate 
reason. 

The various forms described in this policy are available from the assistant to 
the vice president for Student Affairs, 215A Sutton Hall, deans' offices, or 
from the department chairs. Questions concerning the Academic Integrity 
Policy can be directed to the assistant to the vice president for Student 
Affairs, 215A Sutton Hall. 

Approved University Senate 5/5/92 

Night Exam Policy 

All tests, examinations, and quizzes should normally be administered during 
the prescribed course hours. Only in this way can the essential contracted 
nature of the time arrangements between student and professor be preserved 
and, at the same time, proper provisions be made for the many 
extracurricular and personal activities involving students and faculty alike. 
Deviations to allow night exams for valid educational reasons, within the 
guidelines listed below, must be approved by the department and the dean. 

Guidelines: 

1. Night exams can only be scheduled on Monday through Thursday 
evenings within the 6:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m. time period. 

2. Appropriate physical facilities must be arranged for in advance without 
encroachment upon other authorized university functions. 

3. If night exams are to be given, the day of the week on which they will be 
given must be listed in the Undergraduate Course Schedule at the time of 
preregistration. 

4. No night exam can take precedence over a regularly scheduled class. 

5. Arrangements for nonpunitive make-up exams at a mutually agreeable 
time must be available for students that cannot attend the night exam. 

6. For each hour of night exams, an hour of regularly scheduled class time 
will be cancelled. Such cancellations are prohibited during any period of 
two class days immediately preceding and any period of two class days 
immediately following holiday and/or vacation (recess) periods and 
semester terminations, appearing in the published academic calendar. 



36 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



University Policy on Semester Course Syllabi 

Each faculty member shall prepare and distribute, without charge, to each 
student within one week of the first meeting of the class a Semester Course 
Syllabus. The semester course syllabus will be consistent w ith course content 
and catalog description, which was approved by the Curriculum Committee of 
the University Senate for the initial course offering or revision. 

The semester course syllabus is a vehicle of communication to promote 
sludent academic planning and to avoid misunderstandings of course plan 
and requirements. 

It is recommended that each syllabus include: 

a. the faculty member's name, office location, telephone number, and 
office hours 

b. an outline of the course content, objectives, and prerequisites, as 
appropriate 

c. information about the required textbook(s) with title, author, and 
edition, and any other required materials 

d. information on the determination of grades, including the weight, 
types and scheduling of evaluations, other planned requirements, and 
expectation for class participation 

e. statement of policies and/or penalties for make-up exams and late 
submission of assignments 

IUP Student Grade Appeal Policy 
Grade Review Policy 

II a student disagrees with the evaluation of his/her work by the instructor 
but has no basis for a charge of "discrimination" or "capricious evaluation." 
the student should discuss the matter directly with the instructor, and if 
unsatisfied, with the department chairperson, and if still unsatisfied, with the 
dean of the college in which the course was offered. In such cases, the 
decision of the instructor shall be final. 

If a student believes that an improper grade has been assigned, an appeal 
may be filed on the following grounds: 

1 . Discrimination: On the basis of race, religion, national origin, sex. age, 
ancestry, handicapped status, affectional or lifestyle preference, or 
political affiliation. 

2. Capricious Evaluation: Significant and unwarranted deviation from 
grading procedures and course outlines set at the beginning of the course 
(ordinarily in a written statement during the first week of the course) or 
grade assigned arbitrarily on the basis of whim or impulse. The student 
may not claim capriciousness if he or she disagrees with the subjective 
professional evaluation of the instructor. 

Procedures of Appeal 

Level I: Informal Resolution 

Every effort should be made to resolve the disagreement at Level I. The 
student must first seek a resolution to the disagreement with the instructor 
either in person or in writing. If the student is not satisfied with the results, 
the student must then speak with the chairperson of the department that 
offers the course. If still unsatisfied, the student must discuss the matter with 
the dean of the college in which the course is offered. A Student Congress 
member may accompany and advise the student during the Level I 
procedures. Only after all attempts for resolution at Level I have been 
exhausted may the student initiate Level II. 

Level II: Appeal Screening 

A. Composition: Each year there shall be appointed a Grade Appeals 
Committee to determine the existence of the substantive basis for appeal. 
The committee will be composed of seven voting members: three faculty 
members appointed by APSCUF. three members elected by and from the 
Senate Academic Committee (one faculty, one administrator, one 
student), and one student appointed by the Student Congress. A quorum 
consists of a majority of the committee. To take action, a majority of 
those present must be faculty. 

B. Procedure to Initiate Appeal: To initiate Level II of the appeal, the 
student must file an appeal form with the Provost's Office. This form 
must be filed within sixty (60) calendar days of the beginning of the 
semester immediately following the semester in which the grade was 
received. The Provost's Office may extend the sixty-day limit only in 
unusual circumstances when equity demands it and when the student's 



own procrastination or misunderstanding did not substantially contribute 
to (he delay. |Note: Grade appeals will not generally be processed during 
the summer. Therefore, the appeal of any grade received in the spring or 
summer sessions normally will be processed in the fall. A review will be 
scheduled in the summer only when the student's academic eligibility is 
jeopardized by the grade in question or when the student is a graduating 
senior.] The Provost's Office will notify the appropriate dean, 
department chairperson, faculty member, and the Student Congress 
president of the student's initiation of the Level II process. 

C. Procedure to Process Appeal: The student will be expected to submit 
w ntten documentation of his/her complaint and the faculty member will 
be expected to submit in writing the course grading procedure and any 
other pertinent information. Appeals based on discrimination will be 
reviewed according to current standards of nondiscriminatory action. 
Appeals based on capriciousness will be reviewed in light of the faculty 
member's announced evaluation and grading system. The committee will 
review the materials to deny or confirm appeal continuance. Denial of 
appeal continuance must be by a negative vote of four members of the 
committee. This committee will inform the Provost's Office of its 
findings. Within five (5) class days of the receipt of the committee's 
report, the provost or designee will notify the student and the faculty 
member of the findings. If the basis for appeal is determined to be 
substantive, the provost or designee will schedule a Grade Review Panel 
w ithin fifteen (15) class days to be convened prior to the conclusion of 
the semester. 

Level III: Appeal Review 

A. Composition: The Grade Review Panel will consist of five voting 
members: one academic dean or associate dean and four faculty 
members. Four-fifths of the voting members will be a quorum. The 
Student Congress Academic Affairs Committee chairperson may advise 
as requested by the student. The affirmative action officer will advise in 
appeals based on discrimination. The panel will be constituted from the 
Grade Review Pool by random selection. The panel chairperson will be 
elected by and from the panel before each review. 

B. Membership: The Grade Review Pool will be established in the spring 
term to serve for the following academic year. The pool and rotational 
order within the pool will be established by the Provost's Office. A pool 
of three deans or associate deans and twelve full-time faculty members 
will be maintained. In establishing the membership for each review 
panel, prior to each review the names of those designated as primary 
members of the specific panel and available as alternates will be 
supplied to all parties involved. A panel member may request (to the 
provost or designee) disqualification due to a conflict of interest. The 
student and the faculty member may eliminate names in proportion to 
the composition of the panel. Each may eliminate only one dean/ 
associate dean and four faculty. The instructor and the student will be 
supplied a list of all primary and secondary pool members. The 
opportunity to disqualify panel members will take place only once. 
Resulting vacancies will be filled from the appropriate pool of alternates 
so that the panel will be composed of one dean/associate dean and four 
faculty. If through self-disqualification and challenges a panel cannot be 
constituted from the pool, then the Office of the Provost will supplement 
the pool using appropriate random selection methods. 

C. Procedure: 

1 . Both the student and the instructor will have the right to appear 
before the panel, present witnesses, and offer evidence. In addition to 
those specified in Level III, Section A, each may also bring one 
observer, with whom they may consult but who may not participate 
in the review. 

2. The panel shall determine its rules of order for internal operation. 
After hearing the evidence brought forth, the panel will privately 
deliberate and render a decision. If the grade appeal is upheld, the 
panel will constitute a committee of three appropriate faculty 
(ordinarily faculty from the department in which the cour e is 
offered) who will review the student's work and determine the 
appropriate grade or suitable remedy. The panel will incorporate this 
information in the determination which it then forwards to the 
Provost's Office for implementation. (The panel may recommend or 
the department may deem it appropriate that the grades of other 
students in the class also be reviewed.) 

3. The written report sent to the Provost's Office will stale whether the 
student's appeal is upheld or denied; if upheld, the committee's 



Academic Policies — 37 



evaluation and remedy will he included. All documents supporting 
the report will he sealed and kepi onl) as long as necessary to insure 
ihe appropriate action is taken (normally one year) before being 
destroyed or returned to the indi\ idual presenting the evidence 

Implementation 

A. Faculty Compensation: II' a Review Panel (hearing) is scheduled al a 
time in the summer when any faculty member involved is not under 
contract, the faculty member will he compensated under terms mutually 
agreed upon at Meet-and-Discuss. 

B. Continuing Rights: This appeal does not supplant any legal rights 
afforded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and/or the Government 
of the United States. Nothing in this policy abrogates or modifies any 
provisions of or rights under the Collective Bargaining Agreement. 

C. Intended Purpose: The grade appeal procedures are designed simply as a 
means to resolve differences between students and faculty related to 
grading. Under no circumstances should the results of a grade appeal be 
used for disciplinary action or personnel. 

D. * Amendment: Amendments may be implemented upon concurrence by 
University Senate. APSCUF Representative Council, and Meet- 
and-Discuss. 



*Note: In the amendment process above, specification of University Senate 
implies the Council of Trustees' role in approving Senate actions and 
recognizes the Council of Trustees' final action to change policy. 

This policy replaces the policy originally effective at the beginning of the 
Spring Semester, 1986. Approved: University Senate, May 2, 1989; Council 
of Trustees, May 19, 1989. 

Computer Software Policy 

It is the policy of 1UP that contractually protected and/or copyrighted 
computer software shall not be improperly copied, distributed, or used by its 
employees, students, or affiliated organizations. It is the responsibility of 
each member of the university community to adhere to this policy and to 
enforce it wit.i regard to those they supervise. If any member of the 
community has a question regarding the propriety of using software, s/he is 
responsible for contacting his/her supervisor for direction. The supervisor 
may in turn refer the questions to the director of Academic Computing of the 
ISCC for a decision on what constitutes proper use. The full text of the 
policy adopted by University Senate and Council of Trustees in May, 1988, 
is available in the computer laboratories and from the director of 
Academic Computing. 




38 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 




Requirements for Graduation 

Undergraduate students at IUP may pursue programs of study in any one of 
the six undergraduate colleges: the Eberly College of Business, the College 
of Education, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Health and Human 
Services, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, or the College of 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics. A student may earn the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Fine Arts, or the 
Bachelor of Science in Education. To do so, the student must satisfy all of 
the degree requirements, which fall into three categories: 1) university 
requirements; 2) college requirements; 3) department requirements. 
Requirements of the latter two categories may be found under the college 
and the department in which the student is pursuing a program of study. 

University requirements for graduation in all curriculums consist of Liberal 
Studies requirements, residency requirements, and the semester hour and 
cumulative quality-point average requirements. 

Exception: Students who enrolled in a degree program prior to June 1 . 1989, 
are not subject to Liberal Studies requirements; they will complete degree 
requirements including the Genera] Education components outlined in 
earlier editions of the Undergraduate Catalog. Transfer students entering the 
university between June 1, 1989. and June 1, 1991 were assigned either to 
General Education or Liberal Studies at the time their transcripts were 
evaluated. All transfer students admitted after June 1, 1991. are subject to 
the Liberal Studies requirements. 

Academic Life during the Freshman Year 

During the Summer Orientation (Phase II, as described in the section on 
Orientation), students meet with faculty advisers to plan a program of 
courses for their first year. This careful planning considers students' 
individual preferences, the results of placement testing, and degree 
program requirements. 



With a typical freshman academic schedule, students progress both in the 
universitywide Liberal Studies program and in their intended majors. 

Three Liberal Studies courses are designed especially for freshmen, and all 
students are expected to complete these courses during their first year. The 
three are EN101: College Writing, HI195: History: The Modem Era. and 
one course from a list of Fine Arts selections. 

College Writing enhances skills in written expression that are essential to 
success at the university. History: The Modem Era builds critical thinking 
skills and provides a foundation of knowledge for subsequent courses. 
Whichever fine arts course is chosen encourages an appreciative 
participation in campus cultural life. 

Professors teaching these courses work cooperatively with each other and 
with Student Affairs Division staff to integrate class work with campus 
lectures and arts events. Study skills development and tutoring services are 
also provided as necessary. 

Semester Hour and Cumulative Quality-Point Average 
Requirement 

Each student must complete a minimum of 124 semester hours to graduate, 
including 53 hours in Liberal Studies (all on a passing basis), and must have 
a 2.0 ("C" grade) cumulative quality-point average and a 2.0 ("C") average 
in his/her major and/or minor field. 

Liberal Studies 

All students must fulfill the requirements of the university's Liberal Studies 
program. This involves a minimum of 53 semester hours divided among 
Learning Skills, Knowledge Areas, and Synthesis. The number of semester 
hours may rise slightly depending on student choices. Different colleges and 
sometimes departments within colleges may have specific variations as to 
how these Liberal Studies requirements are to be met. 

Liberal Studies provides the broad vision and understanding that enable 
individuals to enjoy full, rich lives and to play constructive roles in their 
communities. The goals for Liberal Studies include ( 1 ) the development of 
important modes of thinking and intellectual skills: critical thinking, 
literacy, understanding numerical data, historical consciousness, scientific 
inquiry, ethical perception, and aesthetic sensitivity; (2) the acquisition of a 
body of knowledge or understanding essential to an educated person; and (3) 
an understanding of the physical, as well as the intellectual, nature of 
human beings. 

Liberal Studies Requirements 

Note: Specific courses may be required or recommended by colleges or 
major departments; see degree program outlines for specifications. 

Additional courses may be added to some categories during the next 
academic year; an updated listing is printed in each semester's schedule of 
undergraduate course offerings. 



Learning Skills: 
English Composition 



Two Courses 



7sh 



EN 101 College Writing 

EN202 Research Writing (sophomore standing) 



Learning Skills: 
Mathematics 



One Course from List 



3-4sh 



MA 101 Foundations of Mathematics 3 

MA 102 Finite Mathematics [inactive] 3 

MAI 10 Elementary Functions 3 

MA121 Calculus I for Natural and Social Sciences and Business 4 

MA 123 Calculus I for Physics and Chemistry 4 

MA127 Calculus I 4 

MA151 Elements of Math I (restricted to designated majors) 3 

MA 152 Elements of Math II (restricted to designated majors) 3 

MA217 Probability and Statistics 3 

BE111 Business Mathematics (restricted to designated majors) 3 



Requirements for Graduation — 39 



Humanities 



Three Courses* 



9sh 



*One course in history, one in literature, and one in philosophy or religious 

studies. 



History: 
HI195 



History: The Modern Era 



Literature: 

EN 121 Humanities: Literature 

FL121 Humanities: Literature (taught in English) 

EN210 Literary Analysis (English and Communication majors) 

Philosophy or Religious Studies: 

PH101 General Logic 

PH 1 20 Introduction to Philosophy 

PH221 Introduction to Symbolic Logic 

PH222 Ethics 

PH223 Philosophy of An 

RS100 Introduction to Religion 

RS250 Understanding the Bible 

RS290 Christianity 



Fine Arts 



One Course from List 



3sh 



AH101 Introduction to Art 

MH101 Introduction to Music 

TH 1 1 Introduction to Theater 

TH102 Introduction to Dance 



Natural Science 



One Option 



3 
3 
3 
3 

8-10sh 



Option I: Two-semester Laboratory Course Sequence 8sh 
Two courses with laboratories (4sh each I, paired together in 
a sequence, from the natural science laboratory course list. 

Natural Science Laboratory Sequences: 

BI103 and 104 General Biology I and II 8 

CH101 and 102 College Chemistry I and II 8 

CHI 11 and 112 General Chemistry I and II 8 

CH 1 1 3 and 1 14 Concepts in Chemistry 8 

Basic Inorganic Chemistry 
GS1OI/1O2-103/1O4 Earth Science I and II with labs (either 

order) 8 
GS12I/122 or 123 Physical Geology with lab 

andGS131/132 or 133 Historical Geology with lab 8 

PY111/121 and 112/122 Physics I and II with labs 8 

PY131/141 and 132/142 Physics I and II with labs (calculus) 8 

SCI 05 and 106 Physical Science I and II (either order) 8 

Option II: One Laboratory plus Two Nonlaboratory Courses lOsh 
One course with laboratory (4sh) from the natural 
science laboratory course list followed by two courses 
(3sh each) from natural science nonlaboratory course list. 
One of the nonlaboratory courses may be counted again 
among the Liberal Studies Electives. 

Natural Science Laboratory Courses: 

BI103 General Biology I 4 

CH101 College Chemistry I 4 

CHI 11 General Chemistry I 4 

CHI 13 Concepts in Chemistry 4 

GS 1 1 / 1 02 Earth Science I with lab 4 

GS 1 03/ 104 Earth Science II with lab 4 

GS121/122 or 123 Physical Geology with lab 4 

PY1 11/121 Physics I 4 

PY131/141 Physics I (calculus) 4 

PY151/161 Medical Physics 4 

SC105 Physical Science I 4 

SC106 Physical Science II 4 

Natural Science Nonlaboratory Courses: 

BI114 Environmental Science 3 

Bill? Biotic Diversity of North America 3 

GS101 Earth Science I 3 

GS103 Earth Science II 3 

GS110 General Astronomy 3 

GS121 Physical Geology 3 



GS13I Historical Geology 

GS141 Introduction to Ocean Science 

GS150 Geology of the National Parks 

GS 1 5 1 Age of Dinosaurs 

GS221 Physical Resources of the Earth 

PY101 Energy and the Environment 

PY1I1 Physics I 

PY112 Physics II 

PY131 Physics I (calculus) 

PY 1 32 Physics II (calculus) 

PY151 Medical Physics 



Social Sciences 



Three Courses from List* 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

9sh 



*No course prefix may be used more than once 

AN1 10 Contemporary Anthropology ( 1 1 

AN2 11 Cultural Anthropology ( I ) 

AN2 1 3 World Archaeology 

CR 1 1 Crime and Justice Systems 

EC 101 Basic Economics 

EC121 Principles of Economics I 

GE101 Intro to Geography: Human Environment Interaction 

GE102 Geography of U.S. and Canada 

GE103 Introduction to Human Geography 

GE104 Geography of Non- Western World ( 1 ) 

PS 101 World Politics (1) 

PS 1 1 1 American Politics 

PC101 General Psychology 

SO 151 Principles of Sociology 

S0231 Contemporary Social Problems 

(1 ) Also fulfills requirement for non-Western course 



Health and Wellness 



One Course 



3sh 



HP143 

FN143 



Health and Wellness 
Nutrition and Wellness 



An alternate method of fulfilling this requirement is the completion of one 
year of Military Science/ROTC: MS 1 1 American Military History ( 1 650- 
1920) and Lab (2sh) and MS102 American Military History (1920-present) 
and Lab (2sh). The courses MS203 and 204 may be substituted for MS 101 
and 102. Veterans are given four credits toward these requirements by 
validating two years' active duty via form DD214. 



Liberal Studies 
Electives 



Three Courses from List* 



9sh 



*At least one course must be numbered 200 or higher 
*No course carrying the student's major prefix may be used 
*No course prefix may be used more than once, except for intermediate- 
level foreign language prefixes (FR. GM. SP. LA, and GK) which may be 
used twice. 

See list of nonlaboratory natural sciences for additional courses which 
may be used as Liberal Studies electives. 

See list of Non-Western Cultures courses, some of which (2) may be 
used as Liberal Studies Electives. 

The following courses are also approved: 

AH205 Ancient to Medieval Art 3 

AH206 Renaissance to Baroque Art 3 

AH211 Modern Art 3 

AH222 Art in America 3 

AN286 Marriage, Kinship, and the Family [same as S0286] (3) 3 

BE101 Microbased Computer Literacy 3 

(identical to CO101.IM101) 

CM101 Communications Media in American Society 3 

CO 10 1 Microbased Computer Literacy 3 

(identical to BE101.IM101) 

CS101 Personal and Family Management 3 

CS315 Consumer Economics and Family Finance 3 

EC 122 Principles of Economics II 3 

EN349 English Bible as Literature 3 

FN 145 Introduction to Nutrition 3 

FR201 College French I (2) 3 

FR202 College French II (2) 3 



40 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



FR203 


Accelerated College French 


FR301 


Portraits of Women in French Novels 


GE230 


Cultural Geography 


GE231 


Economic Geography 


GE251 


Geography of Pennsylvania 


GE253 


Geography of Europe 


GM251 


German III (2) 


GM252 


German IV (2) 


HE218 


Child Development 


HE224 


Marriage and Family Relations 


HI210 


Ancient Civilizations of Mediterranean and Near East 


HI212 


Ancient and Medieval Europe 


HI214 


Themes in American History 


HI305 


Renaissance and Reformation 


HI363 


Thought and Culture in Early America 


HI364 


Thought and Culture in Modern America 


HI366 


African-American Women 


IM101 


Microbased Computer Literacy 




(identical to BE101.CO101) ' 


LA 102 


Elementary Latin II 


LA201 


Intermediate Latin (2) 


MA121 


Calculus 1(1) 


MA122 


Calculus II 


MA 123 


Calculus 1(1) 


MA 124 


Calculus II 


MA 152 


Elements of Mathematics II ( 1 ) 




(specified majors only) 


MA214 


Probability and Statistics 


MA216 


Probability and Statistics 


MA217 


Probability and Statistics (1) 


MA241 


Differential Equations 


MH301 


Music History I 


MH302 


Music History II 


PC310 


Development Psychology 


PC321 


Abnormal Psychology 


PC330 


Social Psychology 


PC378 


Death and Dying 


PH232 


Philosophical Perspectives on Love and Marriage 


PH321 


Symbolic Logic II 


PH323 


Political Philosophy 


PH324 


History of Philosophy I 


PH325 


History of Philosophy II 


PH326 


Phenomenology and Existentialism 


PH327 


American Philosophy [inactive] 


PH329 


Philosophy of Religion 


PH330 


Philosophy of Science 


PH400 


Ethics and Public Policy 


PH405 


Justice and Human Rights 


PH420 


Metaphysics 


PH421 


Theory of Knowledge 


PH450 


Philosophy of Law 


PH460 


Philosophy of Language 


PS346 


Political Sociology 


RS200 


Religion and Culture 


RS210 


World Scriptures 


RS260 


American Religious Development 


RS312 


Archaeology and the Bible 


RS410 


History of Christian Thought I 


RS440 


History of Christian Thought II 


S0286 


Marriage, Kinship, and the Family (same as AN286] 


S0337 


World Societies and World Systems 


SO340 


Sociology of Industry 


S0354 


Sexual Inequality in Human Societies 


S0362 


Racial and Ethnic Minorities 


S0445 


Social Stratification 


S0458 


Political Sociology 




[same as PS346 Political Sociology] 


SP102 


Elementary Spanish II 


SP201 


Intermediate Spanish (2) 


SP211 


Intensive Intermediate Spanish [formerly SP201] 



Non-Western 
Cultures 



One Course from List 



3sh=< 



♦Students must fulfill this requirement by completing one course from the 
list; most of these courses will at the same time fulfill other requirements set 
by Liberal Studies or in some cases by a college or department. 



Also fulfills LS Social Science requirement: 

AN 1 1 Contemporary Anthropology 
AN2 1 1 Cultural Anthropology 
GE 1 04 Geography of Non-Western World 
PS 101 World Politics 

Also fulfills LS Elective requirement: 

AN271 Cultural Area Studies: Africa [same as S0271] 

AN272 Cultural Area Studies: China [same as S0272] 

AN273 Cultural Area Studies: Southeast Asia [same as S0273] 

AN274 Cultural Area Studies: Latin America [same as S0274] 

AN350 Anthropology of Women 

AN365 Native North American Religions [same as RS365] 

CM230 Issues in International Communication 

EC350 Comparative Economic Systems 

GE252 Geography of Latin America 

GE255 Geography of Africa 

GE256 Geography of East Asia 

GE257 Geography of South and Southeast Asia 

HI330 History of the Islamic Civilization 

HI331 Modern Middle East 

IS281 Special Topics in Non-Western Studies 

PS382 Political Systems: Africa 

PS387 Political Systems: Latin America 

PS389 Developing Nations 

RSI 10 World Religions 

RS311 Eastern Philosophy 

RS360 African Religions 

RS365 Native North American Religions [same as AN365] 

RS370 Religions of China and Japan 

RS375 Religions of India 

RS380 Islam 

50271 Cultural Area Studies: Africa [same as AN271] 

50272 Cultural Area Studies: China [same as AN272] 

50273 Cultural Area Studies: Southeast Asia [same as AN273] 

50274 Cultural Area Studies: Latin America [same as AN274] 
SP344 20th Century Spanish American Culture 

and Civilization [taught in Spanish] 

SP364 Survey of Spanish American Literature 
[taught in Spanish] 

Fulfills LS Non-Western requirement only: 

CL151, 201, or 251 Arabic II. Ill, or IV 
CL152. 202. or 252 Chinese II, III, or IV 
CL155. 205. or 255 Hindi II, III, or IV 
CL156. 206. or 256 Hungarian II. Ill, or IV 
CL158. 208. or 258 Japanese II, III, or IV 
CL159, 209. or 259 Korean II. III. or IV 
CL162, 212, or 262 Russian II, III. or IV 
EC 339 Economic Development I 



Certain Study Abroad programs in non-Westem culture areas (information is 
in the respective catalog section: further information is available in the 
Office of International Services) 



Synthesis 



One Course 



3sh 



( 1 ) Students may use this course to fulfill either the Learning Skills: Math- 
ematics requirement or a Liberal Studies Elective requirement, but not both. 

(2) Higher-level language courses may be substituted by students 
demonstrating such ability on placement tests. 



LS 499 Senior Synthesis (required of all students) 

Prerequisite: 73 or more semester hours earned 

This course helps students understand and handle complex 
intellectual and social issues from multiple perspectives. 
A selection of topics is available each semester and summer 
session. Students should schedule the course during the senior 
year, or at least no earlier than the last half of the junior year. 



Requirements for Graduation — 41 



Writing Across 
the Curriculum 



Minimum of Two "W" Courses 



All students musl include among the total courses required for graduation a 
minimum of two designated writing-intensive courses. One of these courses 
iinisi he ui the student's primal) major: the other(s) may be in Liberal 
Studies, college or major requirements, 01 free electives. Such courses, 
which involve extensive use ol writing as pari of the learning experience, 
are identified » ith a /W/ in each semester's Schedule of Undergraduate 
Course Offei in 

Timely Completion of Degree Requirements 

The minimum total semester hour requirement for a baccalaureate degree at 
UP is 124. Students who enroll in degree programs that require more than 
124. or who seek the added benefit of a double major, minor, or specialized 
program, or who change majors should plan their sequence of courses 
carefully with an adviser. Such students should be alert to the possibility that 
they may need to can) a heavier than average class load in order to 
complete the degree in eight semesters. In some situations, summer work or 
an extra semester may be necessary. The need to enroll in remedial or other 
preparatory coursework or to repeat courses may also affect progress toward 
a degree. 

Residency Requirement 

All students receiving an initial IUP baccalaureate degree are required to 
complete forty-five semester hours in IUP courses. At least fifteen semester 
hours in IUP courses are required to fulfill an IUP major and a minimum of 
six semester hours for a minor. Normally, the student will complete the final 
thirty semester hours in residence in IUP courses, unless specific approval 
has been secured from the dean of the student's college. Exception to the 
above requirements for courses to be earned in residence at IUP may be 
granted by the college deans based upon the appropriateness and academic 
integrity of the courses in question. This approval is generally sought as part 
of the process for prior approval of off-campus coursework. 

Pre-Approval for Transfer Coursework 

Students enrolled at IUP who wish to take coursework at another institution 
(either during the summer or regular semesters) must complete an 
Application for Coursework Outside IUP prior to taking the course(s). Only 
the credits from the course(s) transfer, not the grade: therefore, students 
cannot use outside coursework for IUP's repeat policy. Only the credits for 
which students receive the grade of A. B. or C will transfer. If P/F is the 
only grading option available, there must be a narrative evaluation from the 
faculty member certifying that the w ork was of C level or better. No more 
than sixty credits total may be earned at a junior or community college for 
application toward an IUP degree. If the courses are being taken within the 
student's last thirty credits, the courses must be taken at IUP unless the 
student's residency requirement is waived by the college dean. Courses 
without prior approval are taken at the risk of the student; there is no 
obligation on the part of any officer of this university to accept or transfer 
such credit. 

Forms for approval of off-campus coursework are available in the Office of 
Transfer Credit Evaluation/Academic Information Systems. Full directions 
on the form outline the steps involving the transfer evaluation, student's 
adviser, and college dean, or designee. After completing off-campus 
coursework. students should have the institution at which the work was 
taken send a final official transcript directly to Transfer Evaluation Services, 
347 Sutton Hall. IUP. Indiana, PA 15705. Copies of transcripts issued to or 
hand carried by students will not be accepted. 

Eligibility and Application for Graduation 

Commencement ceremonies are in May at IUP at the conclusion of the 
spring semester and in December at the conclusion of the fall semester. Only 
students who have completed all requirements for graduation by the end of 
the semester are eligible to participate in the commencement exercises. 
Students who have withdrawn from courses or have elected to take 
incompletes or have failed courses during the semester and thus have not 
met the requirements for graduation may not participate in commencement 
exercises until those requirements have been fulfilled. Students completing 
requirements in August or December are included on the graduation list for 
the December graduation. 



Students are responsible for knowing and fulfilling the requirements for 
graduation in their degree program. It is the student's responsibility to 
complete a form to apply for graduation and submit it to the office of the 
dean of his/tier college early in the term prior to graduation. 

Certification for graduation is not final until approved bj the dean of the 
college in which the student is enrolled. Diplomas will not be issued until all 
bills and obligations have been satisfied, including the degree fee. and final 
certification for graduation has been issued by the student's college dean. 

Non-Native Students: English Language Requirements 

Non-native students of English, either international students or those from 
the U.S. for whom English is not their first learned language, are required to 
take an ESL Screening/Placement Test prior to registration in the first 
semester attending IUP. The test is administered prior to registration in both 
the fall and spring semesters. Results of this test are used to determine for 
which English course (EN100/ESL. HMO 1 ESL. EN202/ESL. EN121/ESL) 
a newly admitted non-native student must register. In addition, any currently 
enrolled non-native student can take the regularly scheduled test to 
determine registration for non-ESL English courses. For further information, 
contact Dr. Dan Tannacito. 212 EicherHall: telephone (412)357-7081. 

Undergraduate Catalog Applicability Time Frame 

The university reserves the right to modify degree requirements through 
established governance channels. However, the general policy has been 
established that the follow ing time frame regulations form the basis for 
application of the university's undergraduate degree requirements: 

1. A student who has been in continuous registration (fall and spring 
semesters) or who has interruption(s) of less than two calendar years is 
governed by the requirements outlined in the catalog in effect at the time 
of entrance into a degree program (major). 

a. A student who changes major will be governed by the requirements 
of the major and/or college at the time of acceptance into the new 
major, without change of Liberal Studies requirements except as 
specified by the new major. 

b. A student entering through the nondegree program is governed by 
the requirements in effect at the time degree candidacy is awarded. 

c. A part-time student may be covered by these provisions of 
continuous registration to a maximum of ten years. 

2. A student whose education is interrupted by two or more calendar years 
will be governed by the requirements in effect at the time of readmission 
to the university. The readmission may carry specific requirements/ 
substitutions necessary to provide for program integrity. 

3. The applicability of coursework completed more than ten years prior to 
the degree date is subject to review by the dean or designee for 
evaluation on a course-by-course basis. 

Program Changes 

To insure their quality and relevance, academic programs at IUP are subject 
to review and change by duly appointed and responsible university groups. 
Because of this, the university recognizes that provisions must be made to 
prevent hardship to students already enrolled in programs if changes later 
occur in specific or general program requirements. Students affected by 
changes in programs, policies, and regulations are therefore given the option 
of following those requirements that are in effect when the student was first 
enrolled in the program or those in effect at the time of expected graduation. 
The student cannot, of course, combine chosen elements of the two. Should 
a question of rule interpretation arise w ith respect to changes, the student, 
the student's adviser, or both should petition the college dean for a decision 
about which requirements apply. 



42 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 




The Library faculty offers individual and group assistance in using the 
Library's resources. Library services include access to both local and 
national data bases, media equipment and production support, and classes in 
bibliographic instruction. 

The Library faculty offers a one-credit course in the use of libraries, LB 151: 
Introduction to Library Resources. 



Academic Affairs Division 
Areas 

Mark J. Staszkiewicz, Provost 

Evelyn S. Mutchnick, Interim Associate Provost 

Alphonse Novels, Assistant Provost 

The Academic Affairs areas below provide instruction in several disciplines 
that are not specific to one of the university's distinct colleges. They offer 
services and instruction under the direction of the Provost's Office. 

The University Libraries 

Larry A. Kroah, Director; Walter R. I .ancle. Chairperson; 
Brown, Connell, Grassinger, Hall, Hooks, Janicki, Jen, 
Joseph, Kaufman, Kirby, Knupp, Lucas, McDevitt, 
Rahkonen, Shively, Steiner, Zorich; and professors emeriti 
Chamberlin, LaFranchi, Scheeren, Snead, Waddell, Wolf 

The Libraries and Media Resources Department serves the informational 
and research needs of students and faculty by providing a wide variety of 
academic resources which include books, periodicals, micro materials, 
media, and computer data base services. The Library is committed to 
providing greater access to an ever-increasing volume of information using 
such advancements as interactive video, satellite teleconferencing, 
microcomputer-based technologies, and a state-of-the-art online public 
access catalog, in addition to more traditional means. 



Military Science 



Ltc Ricky J. Steele, Chairperson; Maj Scott M. Ferderber, 
Maj David L. Edwards, Cpt C. Geoff Herrmann, Cpt 
Colleen J. Herrmann, Lt Mark A. Tomovicz, Msg (p) 
Charles Dejarnett, Sfc Paul R. Godaire, Sfc John H. Stowe 
Jr., Sfc Folole Salanda, Ssg Randy M. Johnson, Mrs. 
Donna S. Rankin 

IUP is an authorized Senior Reserve Officer's Training Corps (ROTC) unit. 
The ROTC program offers to both men and women the opportunity to learn 
and practice leadership and managerial techniques that will prove beneficial 
to all life's future endeavors; to obtain credits which count toward 
graduation; and, to those who choose to complete the total program, to 
obtain a commission as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. 

Regular ROTC classes for two semesters satisfy the mandatory Liberal 
Studies requirement for Health and Wellness classes. 

Enrollment 

The program is divided into two phases: the Basic Course (freshman and 
sophomore years) and the Advanced Course (junior and senior years). 

Regular Basic Course 

The first two years of military science provide a background of the historical 
role of military forces as well as current national military objectives. In 
addition, basic leadership is developed and certain skills are taught, such as 
adventure training, survival training, map reading, self-defense, rappelling, 
and marksmanship. Enrollment in any of the freshman- or sophomore-level 
ROTC courses (MS101. 102, 203, or 204) in no way obligates or commits 
the student to any military service or any further ROTC courses. These 
courses are offered on the same basis as other academic courses at IUP with 
the privilege of withdrawing at any time. 

Advanced Course 

The last two years constitute the Advanced Course of instruction for men 
and women who desire a commission as a second lieutenant in the Army of 
the United States (either the Army Reserve, National Guard, or, for selected 
students, the Regular Army). This phase is composed of studies in advanced 
leadership and management, tactics, military law, and psychological, 
physiological, and social factors which affect human behavior. Modem 
instructional and training techniques are also covered. Practical application 
is the rule, and students have the opportunity to practice and polish their 
skills. Participation in the Advanced Course will earn the student 
approximately $2,500, between $100-a-month subsistence and pay for 
summer camp ($1,800 is not taxable). For continuation in ROTC during the 
junior and senior years, the student must have a 2.0 grade-point average in 
the student's academic area, have successfully completed requirements for 
the ROTC Basic Course, pass a physical examination, and be accepted by 
the Professor of Military Science (PMS). The U.S. Army requirements for 
commissioning include a course in written communications and in human 
behavior. IUP students normally fulfill these requirements with EN101 and 
EN202 and with a course in psychology, anthropology, sociology, or certain 
major courses in human behavior. Advanced course students must agree in 
writing to complete the junior and senior years, since they will receive 
$100-a-month subsistence during these academic years. 

Requirements for Enrollment 

The general requirements for enrollment in Advanced ROTC are that the 
student be accepted by the university as a regular enrolled student, be a 
citizen of the United States, be physically qualified, and be not less than 
seventeen years of age but less than thirty at anticipated graduation date. 
Veterans and Junior ROTC graduates may receive exemption from the 
ROTC Basic Course as approved by the Professor of Military Science. 



Academic Affairs Division Areas — 43 



What ROTC Offers 

Equipment, ROTC textbooks, and uniforms are issued without cost to 
enrolled students. 

Credit is given for successful completion of the three-semesler-hour Health 
and Wellness Liberal Studies requirement for graduation. 

Students formally enrolled in the Advanced Course (MS305, 306, 407, and 
408) arc paid a subsistence allowance ($100 a month) during the academic 
year. 

Training is given in other practical skills such as self-defense, adventure 
training, rappelling, marksmanship, orienteering, first aid techniques, and 
watei safety. 

Opportunities are available to examine the military profession in detail. This 
includes the Regular Army. National Guard, and Army Reserve. 

If students so desire and are accepted into the Advanced Course, they will 
receive commissions as second lieutenants upon graduation from the 
university and serve either three years' continuous active duty or two to 
three months' active duty for training, with the remaining obligation served 
in the Army Reserve or National Guard. 



Program in Military Science 

Required courses: 20 

MS 101 American Military History (1650-1920) 2sh( 1 ) 

MS102 American Military History (1920-Present) 2sh( 1 ) 

MS203 Fundamentals of Tactical Operations, Techniques 

of Leadership, and Weapons Characteristics 2sh(2) 

MS204 National Security and Fundamentals of Military 

Topography 2sh(2) 

MS305 Fundamentals of Leadership and Modern 

Learning/Teaching Relationship 3sh 

MS306 Study of Advanced Leader Planning and Execution 

of Modern Combat Operations 3sh 

MS407 Management of the Military Complex to Include 

Fundamentals of Military and International Law 3sh 
MS408 Seminar in Military Analysis and Management 3sh 

( 1 ) MS 1 1 - 1 02 may substitute for the Liberal Studies requirement in 
Health and Wellness. 

(2) MS203-204 are available as free electives to all students without any 
military obligation. 



Women's Studies Program 

Maureen C. McHugh, Director 

The Women's Studies minor is designed to examine the status and 
experiences of women from a multidisciplinary perspective. The courses use 
a variety of methods and disciplinary perspectives to explore the impact of 
gender on the experiences of the individual. Women's contributions to a 
variety of fields and the historical, literary, and cultural images of women 
are also addressed. Students are encouraged to challenge traditional theories 
and research regarding women, and to develop a critical, multidisciplinary, 
multicultural, and gendered view of the world. Courses taught within the 
minor typically involve the students through innovative, experiential 
classroom exercises and written assignments. Courses in Women's Studies 
address social equity issues and encourage students to perceive themselves 
as capable of transforming society. 

A minor in women's studies indicates to the prospective employer an 
awareness of and sensitivity to gender issues. This awareness may be needed 
in the following positions: personnel specialist, affirmative action officer, 
crisis intervention specialist, family and youth services provider, legal 
advocate. A minor in women's studies can contribute to success in a variety 
of fields including communication, counseling, criminology, education, 
health, journalism, law, politics, psychology, and applied sociology. 



Minor - Women's Studies 

Required course: 

WS200 Introduction to Women's Studies 
Controlled electives: one course from at least three of 
the following four course groupings 
Group A: Philosophy and History 

HI369 Women in America 

HI390 Women in World Culture 

PH232 Philosophical Perspectives on Love, 
Marriage, and Divorce 

HI366 African-American Women 

RS48 1 Women and Religion 
Group B: Arts and Literature 

EN384 Introduction to Literature by Women 

EN336 Language, Gender, and Society 

FR301 Portraits of Women in the French Novel 
Group C: Social Sciences 

AN350 Anthropology of Women 

PC4 1 1 Psychology of Women 

S0427 Spouse Abuse 

S0354 Sexual Inequality 

CR390 Women and Crime 
Group D: Health and Science 

HP430 The American Woman and Sport 

PC379 Psychology of Human Sexuality 

HP48 1 Gender. Lifestyles, and Health 



3sh 



3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



15 
3 



12 



The Learning Center 

Canny Carranza, Director; Sally Lipsky, Chairperson; 
S. Dean, Green, Stratton, Victor, Wilkie, Winstead 

The Learning Center, a unit of the Student Affairs Division, provides various 
academic support services. Courses are offered which develop learning 
skills to enhance academic success. Courses in two levels of remedial 
mathematics and a course in reading are offered for institutional credit; 
institutional credit counts in determining full-time enrollment status but not 
in determining credits applicable for degree eligibility at graduation. 

Learning Center faculty members also offer three one-credit courses in 
conjunction with the College of Education in Educational Planning 
(ED150), Learning Strategies (ED160). and Career Exploration (ED170). 

Free tutoring and workshops are provided by a trained staff of 
undergraduate paraprofessionals. These services are available in most 
content areas, as well as in general study skills. 

In addition, the Learning Center provides administration of the university's 
Act 101 Program. For information about additional services see Learning 
Center/ Act 101 in the catalog section "Student Programs and Services." 

Office of International Services 

Laila S. Dahan, Director 

Patrick A. Carone, Foreign Student Adviser 

Study Abroad, International Student Exchange, and Study 
Tours 

The Office of International Services offers many important opportunities 
beyond the required curriculum. For example, there are programs enabling 
the student to travel and study abroad. The university regularly sponsors 
summer study tours as well as programs of study, ranging in length from 
three weeks to a full semester, in England, France, Germany, Spain, 
Hungary, Egypt. Mexico. Sweden, Japan, and Finland. A variety of 
programs enable the student to spend a year abroad. The Office, in 
cooperation with Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., administers 
IUP's participation in the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP). 
This program enables IUP students to choose from more than 200 
universities around the world so that the specialized interests of any student 
can be accommodated quite readily. Students may also exchange with one of 
the seventy U.S. universities participating in the National Student Exchange 
coordinated by the Office of International Studies. 



44 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



The Liberal Studies non-Western cultures requirement may be fulfilled by 
certain credit-bearing study abroad. Established IUP-sponsored group study 
opportunities in several countries are approved to satisfy the requirement. 
Students may also arrange in advance to receive Liberal Studies non- 
Western credit for ISEP-sponsored or individually designed study abroad. 

For information and application procedures, contact Ms. Laila S. Dahan, 
director of the Office of International Services. 

The Harris burg Internship Semester 
(T.H.LS.) 

Experiential Education Office 

The Harrisburg Internship Semester (T.H.LS.) is available to an exceptional 
student from any IUP major for the fall or spring semester. The program 
provides a semester-long experience at the policymaking level in the 
executive or legislative branches of state government as well as independent 
boards, agencies, or commissions. Students will earn fifteen credits. 

Requirements for eligibility are fifty-seven or more earned credits and an 
overall QPA of at least 3.0. Applicants must also submit a sample of their 
writing skills which must be a copy of an IUP writing assignment that has 
been graded by an instructor. 

T.H.LS. consists of an internship with a research project for twelve credits 
and an academic seminar for three credits. The program is directed by a 
SSHE faculty member elected to direct the program in Harrisburg. The 
faculty member will be the site supervisor and teach the seminar course. 
Grades and credits will be recorded on the students' academic progress 
repotls at IUP. See the course descriptions under UN480 and UN493. 



Housing is arranged at the Polyclinic Hospital in its nursing residence hall. 
Meals are available in the hospital dining room or elsewhere. Students must 
pay IUP tuition, room, and board in the first place and then be partially 
reimbursed via a biweekly paycheck during the semester. Students must pay 
their own transportation costs between their home and Harrisburg. 

T.H.LS. is offered through the Experiential Education Office in conjunction 
with the academic department of the successful candidate. Applications are 
submitted to the Experiential Education Office, Stouffer Hall. Deadline for 
submission for fall is March 1 : the spring semester deadline is October 1 . 

The IUP Academy of Culinary Arts at 
Punxsutawney 

Albert Wutseh, Director; Hilary DeMane, Timothy Brown, 
Daniel Kish, and Martha Jo Geer, Chef Instructors 

The Academy of Culinary Arts offers a four semester (sixteen calender 
months), competency based program with the last semester being a paid 
extemship with an employer. This distinctive associaton between a hands- 
on discipline, fundamental culinary theory, and on-the-job work experience 
provides each student with the necessary skills and knowledge to begin a 
sucessful career in the field of culinary arts. 

This contemporary approach to learning will enable students to achieve 
elevated levels of proficiency in both culinary techniques and business 
management skills while they advance through this certificate program. 
The Academy of Culinary Arts is accredited by the American Culinary 
Federation Educational Institute. 



1 





The Eberly College of Business — 45 




The Eberly 
College of Business 

Robert C. Camp, Dean 

Manmohan D. Chaubey, Interim Associate Dean 

In the spring of 1994. the College of Business was named the Eberly 
College of Business. The new title of the college commemorates the 
generous commitment of the Eberly family through the Eberly Family Trust 
to the developmental needs of the college. Departments within the Eberly 
College of Business include Accounting. Finance and Legal Studies. 
Management, Management Information Systems and Decision Sciences, 
Marketing, and Office Systems and Business Education. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is offered in Accounting, Finance. 
Management Information Systems, Management, Marketing, Office 
Administration, and Human Resource Management. The Office Systems and 
Business Education Department offers the Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree with a Business Education major and Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree with a Marketing and Distributive Education major. There 
is also a two-year Associate of Arts degree in Business with a concentration 
in Computers and Office Information Systems offered at the Armstrong and 
Punxsutawney campuses. 

Bachelor of Science Degree 

For those pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree. IUP's training will 
provide a broad liberal background in the behavioral sciences; a keen 
perception of the socioeconomic world in which we live and work; a 
foundation of general professional education for personally fruitful and 
socially useful careers in the varied fields of business; and opportunity to 
obtain the specialized knowledge and skills essential to future occupational 
growth and advancement. There are seven Bachelor of Science degrees 



offered in business — Accounting. Finance, Human Resource Management, 
Management. Management Information Systems, Marketing, and Office 
Administration. Each area provides lor a variety of business and business- 
related courses which are designed to enrich the student's understanding of 
the modern business system. 

Entering 1UP students not initially admitted to the Eberly College of 
Business must apply individually for change of major, which will be granted 
only to those who have completed at least twenty-four credits at IUP and 
have achieved no less than a 2.4 grade-point average at IUP 

Enrollment in all Eberly College of Business courses at the 300 and 400 
level is restricted to students with junior or senior standing. All students, 
regardless of major or program affiliation, must meet course prerequisite 
requirements in order to enroll for a given course. 

A student may not pursue coursework in the Eberly College of Business 
with the expectation of graduating from Eberly College of Business unless 
he/she has been accepted as a degree candidate in the college. 

Eberly College of Business students may, in consultation with their advisers, 
plan their program of study to obtain a minor in an area of business 
specialization other than their major or a related area outside of the Eberly 
College of Business. 

Bachelor of Science in Education Degree 

The Eberly College of Business seeks to serve the needs of its students and 
the needs of business, industry, and education through its diverse programs. 
Known for fifty years for excellence in Business Education, IUP's program 
in Distributive Education prepares teacher-coordinators for secondary 
schools offering programs in marketing, distribution, and cooperative work 
experience. These two degree areas (Bachelor of Science in Education with 
a Business Education major and the Bachelor of Science in Education with a 
Marketing Education major) are designed to prepare teachers for 
comprehensive high schools, area vocational-technical schools, and 
community colleges. 

Associate of Arts Degree 

Students who desire a two-year program that prepares them to enter the 
business world may elect to pursue the Associate of Arts degree program 
specializing in Computer and Office Information Systems. The Associate of 
Arts degree is available only on the Armstrong County and Punxsutawney 
campuses. Admission to the Associate Degree program in accounting has 
been suspended. See Department of Office Systems and Business Education 
for further information. 

Department of Accounting 

Duane Ponko, Chairperson; Anderson, Bradwick, Burner, 
W. Davis, Eiteman, Ghobashy, Hyder, Joseph, Keim, Kline, 
Lindh, Plivelic, Ponko, Pressly, Robbins, Woan, Yerep; and 
professor emeritus Cooper 

The Accounting Department provides the training necessary for one to enter 
the fields of public accounting, accounting in business or industry, and 
governmental accounting. 



Bachelor of Science — Accounting 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Social Science: EC121.PC101 

Liberal Studies elective: MA214, EC122, BE/CO/IM 101, 
no courses with AG prefix 

College: Business Administration Core 
Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 

AG202 Principles of Accounting II 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 

FI3I0 Finance I 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 

MG3I0 Principles of Management 



54-56 



33 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



46 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



MG330 Production and Management Operations 3sh 

MG495 Business Policy 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 

Major: Accounting (1) 27 

Required courses: 

AG301 Intermediate Accounting I 3sh 

AG302 Intermediate Accounting II 3sh 

AG3 1 1 Cost Accounting 3sh 

AG401 Advanced Accounting 3sh 

AG412 Advanced Cost Accounting 3sh 

AG421 Federal Taxes 3sh 

AG431 Auditing 3sh 
Controlled electives: 

Two courses from this list: 6sh 
AG422. AG435, AG44 1 , AG45 1 . AG 46 1 , AG 47 1 , BL336 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 8-10 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) A 2.50 average is required in all 300 and 400 level accounting (AG) 
courses in order to graduate with a major in accounting. 



Department of Finance and Legal 
Studies 

Terry T. Ray, Chairperson; Affaneh, Ames, Boldin, 
Duhala, McCaffrey, Roberts, Strock, Troxell, Walia, 
Welker 

Finance Major 

The Finance major, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, is designed 
to educate those students who are interested in the financial management of 
the firm. 

The objective of the finance area is to prepare students to deal with financial 
problem solving in the areas of financial management and investment 
analysis. Graduates should be knowledgeable of the basic theory of finance 
so as to apply it to the rapidly changing field. 

Legal Studies 

Legal Studies offers a variety of law and law-related courses with a special 
emphasis on business applications. Legal Studies provides the student with a 
solid, legally oriented background necessary to a career in business or as 
preparation for pursuit of a law or law-related career. 



27 I 



Bachelor of Science — Finance 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Social Science: EC121, PC101 

Liberal Studies elective: MA214, EC122, BE/CO/IM101, 
no courses with FI prefix 

College: Business Administration Core 
Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 3sh 

AG202 Principles of Accounting II 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

FI310 Finance I 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 

MG310 Principles of Management 3sh 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 3sh 

MG495 Business Policy 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 



54-56 



33 



Major: Finance 

Required courses: 

EC325 Monetary Economics I 3sh 

FI320 Finance II 3sh 

FI322 Life Insurance 3sh 

FI324 Principles of Investments 3sh 

FI420 Investment Analysis 3sh 

FI422 Seminar in Finance 3sh 

Controlled electives: three courses from the following: 9sh 
AG421. EC326, EC334, EC345. EC356, FBI 2, FI385, 
F1410, IM251.QB380 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 8-10 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Pre-Law Minor in Eberly College of Business 

The pre-law minor is intended for the student who is a business major 
concentrating in one of the business areas and interested in law as a career. 
The minor consists of twenty-one semester hours selected by the students 
from a predetermined list of courses spread over five areas of Humanities 
and Social Sciences. The goals of the pre-law minor are academic 
accomplishment, guidance, and advisement. Interested business 
students should contact the pre-law adviser in the Finance and Legal 
Studies Department. 



Bachelor of Science — Business/Pre-Law (1) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 121 

Social Science: EC121, PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA214, EC122, BE/CO/IM101, 
no courses with major prefix 

College: Business Administration Core 33 

Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 3sh 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

FI310 Finance 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems'. Theory and Practice 3sh 

MG3I0 Principles of Management 3sh 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 3sh 

MG495 Business Policy 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 

Major: One Major in Business Administration Areas(l) 27 

Accounting Major 
Finance Major 

Human Resources Management Major 
Management Major/Industrial Management Track 
Management Major/General Management Track 
Management Major/Entrepreneurship and Small Business Track 
Management Information Systems Major 
Marketing Major 
Office Systems Major 

Pre-Law Interdisciplinary Minor for Business 9-21 

Seven courses, with at least one course from six areas 
Criminology: CR210, CR260, CR357 
Economics: EC121, EC122, EC332 
English: EN213, EN220, EN310 
History: HI320, HI321, HI346 
Philosophy: PH101, PH222, PH450 
Political Science: PS358, PS359, PS361 



Free Electives: 



0-1 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 124-125 



The Eberly College of Business — 47 



(#) Sec ad\ isorj paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 

in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation, 
( I ) This program is the generic outline for the pre law minor wilh any of 

the listed Eberl) College of Business majors. 



Department of Management 

Thomas YV. Falcone, Chairperson; Ali, Anderson, 
Ashamalla, Chaubey, Gibbs, Orife, Osborne, G. Ryan, 
J. Ryan, Soni; and professors emeriti McGovern, 
Stevenson 

Graduates holding the Bachelor of Science degree in Management or 
Human Resource Management may find employment opportunities in both 
the public and private sectors. In the 1990s opportunities are expected to be 
especially plentiful in the services sector (e.g.. retailing, health care, food 
services, finance, and transportation). 

The Bachelor of Science in Management program offers three 
concentrations: Industrial Management. General Management, and 
Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management. Students in the 
Industrial Management concentration are well grounded in both 
management theory and application, but their focus is more upon 
production/operations/industnal management. The concentration in General 
Management is distinguished by its low level of structure or specificity. The 
greater flexibility of this major can be useful to the student who wishes to 
design a customized management specialization (e.g., fine arts 
management!. Students taking the Entrepreneurship and Small Business 
Management concentration will focus on creation and operation of a small 
business. This concentration might also be desirable for graduates who 
will be working in small businesses where the manager often must wear 
several hats. 

The Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management prepares 
individuals in both the theoretical and applied aspects of managing the 
human resources function in organizations as a generalist or specialist. 



Bachelor of Science — Management 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Social Science: EC 121. PC 101 

Liberal Studies elective: MA2I4, EC122. BE/CO/IM101, 
no courses with MG prefix 

College: Business Administration Core 
Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 3sh 

AG202 Principles of Accounting II 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

FI310 Finance I 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 

MG310 Principles of Management 3sh 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 3sh 

MG495 Business Policy 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 



33 



Major: One Concentration 
Industrial Management Concentration 
Required courses: 

AG300 Managerial Accounting 3sh( I ) 

MG300 Human Resources Management 3sh 

MG428 Seminar in Management 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from list: COl 10 or FS351 3sh 

Two courses from two areas on list: MG402 or LR480, 

MG40 1 or MG400. AG3 1 1 6sh 

Three courses from list or additional electives from 

above: BL336, EC371, EC372. EN310 or JN326, FI320. 
MA317, MG410, MG481, MG490. MG493(3sh max). 
MK420, QB380, SA101 9sh 



27 



General Management Concentration 

Required onuses. 

AG300 Managerial Accounting 3sh(l) 

MG300 Human Resource Management 3sh 

MG428 Seminar in Management 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Two Advanced Business electives: 300/400 level courses 6sh(2) 

Two Advanced Economics electives: 300/400 level courses 6sh 

Two other advanced electives: 300/400 level courses 6sh 

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Concentration 
Required courses: 

AG300 Managerial Acounting 3sh 

MG275 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 3sh 

MG325 Small Business Management 3sh 

MG403 Small Business Planning 3sh 

MG492 Internship 6sh 

Major Area Restricted Electives 9sh 



Other Requirements: 



Free Electives: 



8-10 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) AG301: Intermediate Accounting I may be substituted to use as 
prerequisite for AG31 1: Cost Accounting. 

(2) Only one MG and/or one AG course may be included in this category. 

(3) Note prerequisites for controlled electives in planning sequence. 



Bachelor of Science — Human Resources Management 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA12I 

Social Science: EC121. PC 101 

Liberal Studies elective: MA214, 
no courses with MG prefix 



EC122.BE/CO/IM10I. 



College: Business Administration Core 33 

Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 3sh 

AG202 Principles of Accounting II 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

FI310 Finance I 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 

MG310 Principles of Management 3sh 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 3sh 

MG495 Business Policy 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 

Major: Human Resource Management 30 

Required courses: 

AG300 Managerial Accounting 3sh(l) 

MG300 Human Resources Management 3sh 

MG428 Seminar in Management 3sh 

MG400 Wage and Salary Administration 3sh 
Controlled electives: 

One course from list: EC330 or PC420 3sh 

One course from list: MG401 or MG402 3sh 

Three courses from list: 9sh(2) 
EC371, EC372. EC373. EN310. EN312, JN326, LR426, 
LR480, MG31 1, MG410, MG493(3sh max), EC330 or 
PC371, PC420 (if not above). SO340 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 





8-10 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) AG301 : Intermediate Accounting I may be substituted to use as 
prerequisite for AG3 1 1 : Cost Accounting. 

(2) Note prerequisites for controlled electives in planning sequence. 



48 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Department of Management 
Information Systems and Decision 
Sciences 

Kenneth L. Shildt, Chairperson; Albohali, Burky, Chen, 
Halapin, McFerron, Nahouraii, Solak; and professor 
emeritus Spencer 

The Management Information Systems major prepares students for careers 
in the business computer and information systems profession. Computer 
programming languages, software engineering, systems analysis, design 
concepts, computer architecture, data base management systems, 
microcomputer applications, and computer networks are integrated with 
other business disciplines to prepare students to develop and maintain 
business information systems. The major also incorporates an emphasis on 
managerial and end-user concerns related to modern information systems. 

Decision Sciences provides students with the knowledge of statistical and 
other quantitative techniques that will help decision making in business. The 
techniques include mathematical programming, forecasting, inventory 
control, simulation, queuing theory, stochastic process, and network models. 



Bachelor of Science — Management Information Systems 



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Social Science: EC121, PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA214. EC 122, BE/CO 101. 
no courses with IM prefix 

College: Business Administration Core 
Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 

AG202 Principles of Accounting II 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 

FI310 Finance I 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 

MG310 Principles of Management 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 

MG495 Business Policy 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 

QB215 Business Statistics 

Major: Management Information Systems 
Required courses: 

CO220 Applied Computer Programming 
IM350 Business Systems Technology 
IM370 Advanced COBOL Application Programming 
IM450 Data Base Theory and Application 
IM45 1 Systems Analysis 
IM470 Systems Design 
Controlled electives: 

At least one course from list: 

CO110. 250. 300, 310, 319. 320. 345 
Two courses from list: IM382, IM480. IM481. QB380 
or above CO courses 



54-56 



33 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



27 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

6sh(l) 



Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 8-10 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 1 One course from AG300. AG30 1 , or AG3 11 may be substituted. 



Department of Marketing 

Krish Krishnan, Chairperson; Batra, Bebko, Garg, Sciulli, 
Soergel, Taiani, Weiers 

The Bachelor of Science in Marketing program is designed to prepare its 
majors for a wide range of careers in private and public sector marketing 
including sales, management, retailing, brand management, customer affairs, 
marketing research, public relations, and international marketing. The 
program focuses on integrating technical knowledge in all areas of 
marketing with analytical and communication skills to prepare the students 
for the challenges of the global competition in the 21st century. 



Bachelor of Science — Marketing 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI21 

Social Science: EC121, PC101 

Liberal Studies elective: MA214. EC122, BE/CO/IM101, 
no courses with MK prefix 

College: Business Administration Core 
Required courses: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communiculions 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 

AG202 Principles of Accounting II 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 

11310 Finance I 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 

MG3I0 Principles of Management 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 

MG495 Business Policy 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 

QB215 Business Statistics 

Major: Marketing 
Required courses 

AG300 Managerial Accounting 
MK321 Consumer Behavior 
MK420 Marketing Management 
\1K42I Marketing Research 
MK422 Seminar in Marketing 
EC — Advanced Economics Elective: 
300/400-leveI course 
Controlled electives 

Three courses from list: 

DE332, DE333, EC331. EC345, MK430, MK43I, 
MK432, MK433, MK493(3sh max) 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 



54-56 



33 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

9sh 



27 




-10 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Department of Office Systems and 
Business Education 

Sharon Steigmann, Chairperson; Bianco, Brandenburg, 
Demand, Mahan, Moore, Moreau, Rowell, Szul; and 
professors emeriti Beaumont, Patterson Cordera, Stoner, 
Thomas, Woomer 

This department offers four-year programs and a two-year associate degree 
program. The associate degree is offered at the Armstrong and 
Punxsutawney campuses only. The department offers the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Science in Education with a Business Education major. 
Bachelor of Science with a major in Office Systems, and a two-yeai 
Associate of Arts degree in Computer and Office Information Systems. 
The program Bachelor of Science in Education with a Marketing and 



The Eberly College of Business — 49 



Distributive Education major is currently on inactive status. No new 
students are being admitted to this major, but they may elect to take these 
certifications in the regular business education program. 

The Business Education major interested in teaching in high schools and 
vocational-technical schools has a choice in the following certification 
areas: accounting, data processing, secretarial. Office Technologies, 
marketing, and distributive education. Students must select two or more 
areas of certification. One of the two areas must be office technologies, 
except that Distributive Education students must take marketing as the 
second area 

The Office Systems program prepares students for careers such as office 
managers, supervisors, records managers, telecommunications consultants/ 
managers, PC analysis, microcomputer user coordinators, and office systems 
analysts. Students who want a two-year program that prepares them for 
entering careers in business and government may select an associate degree 
program at the Armstrong and Punxsutawney campuses only. (A track in 
computer office information systems is available at the branch campuses.) 
Some but not all courses taken toward this degree would apply to a four- 
year program. 

Business Education Major (B.S. in Education) 

The IUP Business Education program is accredited by the National Council 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATEI. The program leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and to certification in 
Pennsylvania as a business education teacher. 

A student must apply to the dean of the College of Education to receive an 
initial certificate to teach in Pennsylvania's public schools. Certification to 
be a business education teacher is approved by the dean of the College of 
Education when a student has met all the requirements in professional 
education. Liberal Studies, and business education major courses. Students 
must attain a 2.5 overall average in order to student teach. The candidate for 
certification must also complete successfully the core battery and 
specialization sections of the National Teachers' Examination. 

The curriculum in Business Education prepares students for a professional 
career in teaching office occupations. The six fields of certification available 
are accounting, data processing, office technologies, marketing, distributive 
education, and secretarial. Students may pursue the work of the entire 
curriculum or they may elect to pursue work according to their aptitudes as 
follows: 

1. The complete program leads to certification in all of the high school 
business subjects. Those who possess aptitudes that indicate success in 
accounting, data processing, marketing, distributive education, office 
technologies, and secretarial may pursue the complete program if they 
choose. However, more than four years would be required in order to 
complete all of the certifications. 

2. The accounting field includes all courses in the curriculum listed under 
that heading and meets the requirements for certification in accounting. 
Additionally, office technologies must be taken as a second certification 
area. 

3. The secretarial field includes all courses in the curriculum listed under 
that heading and meets the requirements for certification in secretarial 
subjects. Additionally, office technologies must be taken as a second 
certification area. 

4. The data processing field includes all courses in the curriculum listed 
under that heading and meets the requirements for certification in data 
processing. Additionally, office technologies must be taken as a second 
certification area. 

5. The marketing certification area includes all courses in the curriculum 
listed under that heading and meets the requirements for certification in 
marketing. Additionally, office technologies must be taken as a second 
certification area. 

6. Students who plan to get certification in the distributive education area 
must take marketing as a second area. 

Practical Business Experience 

Before graduation, each student must document completion of 500 hours of 
secretarial practice, accounting practice, data processing, clerical practice, or 
office-related experience. This experience should be in the field or fields in 
which the student is contemplating certification and can be acquired 
during summer vacations and in offices on the campus during the regular 
school term. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Business Education (*) 
Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: BEI 11 

Social Science: EC121, PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: EC122. MA214. CO/IM101 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

BE3 1 1 Methods and Evaluation in Business Education I 

BE3 1 2 Methods and Evaluation in Business Education II 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Experience I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Experience II 

ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

EX300 Education of the Exceptional in the Regular 
Classroom for pass examination) 

Major: 

Required courses: Business Education Core 

AD 101 Introduction to Business 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 

BL337 Consumer Law 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 
Controlled electives: 

Areas of Certification 

Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 



31-38 



3sh 

2-6sh 

3sh 

Ish 

lsh 

12sh 

lsh 

3sh 

3sh 

0-3sh 



42 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

18sh 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 126-130 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Office Systems Major (Bachelor of Science Degree) 

The office systems program is an intensive study of office systems 
emphasizing the decision-making aspect of office functions and the systems 
approach. The program includes in-depth experiences required for an 
understanding of the total office system and its relationship to the total 
business and economic system. Graduates will be able to pursue careers 
such as office managers/supervisors, records managers, telecommunications 
consultants/managers. PC analysts, microcomputer user coordinators, and 
office systems analysts. 



Bachelor of Science — Office Systems 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI 21 

Social Science: EC121, PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA214. EC122, BE/CO/IM101 

College: 

Required courses: Business Administration Core 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 3sh 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

FI310 Finance 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 

MG310 Principles of Management 3sh 

MG330 Production and Management Operations 3sh 



33 



SO — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



MG495 Business Policy 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 

QB215 Business Statistics 

Major: 

Required courses: 

IM25 1 Business Systems Analysis and Design 

OS301 Advanced Microcomputer Applications 

05312 Administrative Office Services 

05313 Office Systems Technology 
OS315 Records Administration 
OS400 Telecommunications 
OS430 Office Systems 

Business Electives 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
6sh 



27 



Other Requirements:) 1 ) 
Free Electives: 



0-1 

7-11 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Student must pass BE 1 34 with a "C" or better or pass an exemption 
exam. 



Associate of Arts Degree 

This A. A. degree program is available only at the Armstrong and 
Punxsutawney campuses. Offering specialization in computer and office 
information systems (COIS), the Associate of Arts Degree in Business is 
designed to be a two-year curriculum with these objectives: 

1. To provide business occupational education with the opportunity for 
specialization in COIS. 

2. To enable the student to enter COIS positions in business and 
government. 

3. To enable the student to upgrade his/her skills and knowledge to qualify 
for higher positions in business and government. 

The university has suspended admission to the COIS program at the 
Armstrong Campus. 



Associate of Arts — Business 

Liberal Studies: as follows: 

English: ENI01 4sh 

Humanities or Fine Arts: one course from lists 3sh 

Social Science: EC101 or EC121, PC101 6sh 

Major: Business (Associate) Core 
Required courses: 

AD 101 Introduction to Business 3sh 

AD221 Business Technical Writing 3sh 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 3sh 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 3sh 

BE111 Foundations of Business Math 3sh 

BE131 Keyboarding and Document Formatting 2sh 

BE250 Electronic Office Procedures 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

FI220 Essentials of Finance 3sh 
IM241 Introduction to Management Information Systems 3sh 

IM245 Introduction to Microcomputers 3sh 

Other Requirements: Computer and Office Specialization: 

BE273 Word Processing Applications 3sh 

IM251 Business Systems Analysis and Design 3sh 

IM255 Business Applications in COBOL 3sh 

IM260 Business Computer Application Project 3sh 

Free Electives: 



13 



32 



12 



Other Requirements: 



Business Minors for Eberly College of Business Students 

Minors in Accounting, Finance. Human Resources Management, 
Management, Management Information Systems, and Marketing are offered 
only for students who are majoring in one of the other majors in the Eberly 
College of Business and assume the common thirty-six-credit Business core. 



Minor in Business Administration for Non-Business 
Majors 

The Eberly College of Business offers, as a joint effort of its departments, a 
twenty-one credit hour minor for non-business majors. The program is 
designed to give non-business majors a general background in business with 
twelve credits of prescribed Liberal Studies courses and twenty-one credits 
of required business courses. 

Prescribed Liberal Studies: 

Social Science: EC121 

Mathematics: MA214 or MA217 

Liberal Studies Electives: BE/CO/IM101, ECI22 



Required Business Courses: 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 3sh 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 3sh 

FI310 Finance I 3sh 

MG310 Principles of Management 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 
Two of the following with advisement 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 



15 



Total Degree Requirements: 60 




The College of Education — 51 




The College of Education 

John W. Butzow, Dean 

Joyce Lynn Garrett, Associate Dean for Administration 
and Academic Affairs 

John R. Johnson, Associate Dean for Educational College- 
School Partnerships 

The departments of the College of Education offer programs leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science, the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Education, the degree of Master of Arts, the degree of Master of Education, 
the degree of Master of Science and doctoral programs leading to the 
degrees of Doctor of Education in Elementary Education and Doctor of 
Education in School Psychology. Appropriately, all teacher education and 
public education professional programs completed in the College of 
Education lead to certification for public school teaching or supervision in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

The programs in teacher preparation at IUP enable the educator to become 
responsible for the planning, organization, and evaluation of an instructional 
program within the framework of a school setting. The teacher brings to this 
setting a broad background of liberal studies, an acceptable degree of 
mastery in a specialized field, and an understanding of the processes of 
human growth and learning. In this role the teacher creates, manages, and 
maintains an educational environment appropriate to the needs of the 
students to be served. The teacher uses social, physical, cognitive, and 
psychological data available on the individual student to plan, execute, and 
evaluate the instructional program. The teacher assumes a high degree of 
personal and professional responsibility in developing a philosophy of 
education in the development and management of a plan for professional 
growth. In support of this effort the college prepares school counselors, 
school psychologists, elementary and secondary principals, and specialists 
in communications media, early childhood, and special education. 



The program of teacher preparation will provide an opportunity to gain 
expertise in the following generic competencies: 

1 . An understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of human 
growth and development. 

2. Knowledge of and experience with effective teaching-learning 
techniques. 

3. Utilization of learning resources and evaluation of teaching and learning 
effectively. 

4. Effective classroom management techniques and recognition and 
response to differing behavioral patterns. 

5. An understanding of the historical and philosophical bases of American 
education and a belief that professional development is a lifelong process. 

The teacher education programs at IUP are centered on the learner who. in 
turn, is taught and guided by a faculty committed to the preparation of 
competent teachers. Such teachers demonstrate professionalism, exhibit 
humanism and adaptability, and practice and communicate critical thinking 
skills and are excellent role models. These qualities are developed through 
content that emphasizes a strong liberal studies component along with 
appropriate professional courses and experiences. The programs are 
delivered in a spirit of collaboration with the commitment of teachers in 
the region. 

Summary of Certification Programs Offered 

Early Childhood Education Bachelor of Science in Education 

Elementary Education Bachelor of Science in Education 

Master of Education 
Doctor of Education 



Secondary Education 
English 
Biology 
Chemistry 

Earth and Space Science 
General Science 
Mathematics 
Physics 

Comprehensive Social Studies 
French 
German 
Spanish (K-12) 
Art Education (K-12) 
Business Education 

Home Economics Education 

Music Education (K-12) 
Health and Phvsical Education 
(K-12) 

Special Education 

Education of Mentally/Physically 
Handicapped 

Education of Persons with 

Hearing Loss 
Speech Pathology and Audiology 



Rehabilitation (Degree Program) 
Vocational Education 



Bachelor of Science in Education 
Master of Education 



For details see College of Fine Arts 
For details see Eberly College of 

Business 
For details see College of Health 

and Human Services 
For details see College of Fine Arts 
For details see College of Health 

and Human Services 



Bachelor of Science in Education 
Master of Education 
Master of Science 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

Bachelor of Science in Education 

Master of Education 

Master of Science 

Bachelor of Science 

Bachelor of Science in Education 



Graduate Programs (see Graduate School Catalog) 

Adult/Community Education Master of Arts 

Counselor Education Master of Education 

Educational Psychology Master of Education 

Reading Specialist Master of Education 

Student Personnel Services Master of Arts 



Certification (see Graduate School Catalog) 
Guidance Supervisor 
Reading Specialist 
School Psychologist 



Elementary /Secondary Principals 
Special Education Supervisor 
Letter of Eligibility for School 
Superintendents 



52 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Degree Requirements 

All degree candidates in the College of Education (except for three special 
programs) must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 124 semester hours in 
three categories: Liberal Studies, a specialized major field, and professional 
education. Major requirements in Education of Exceptional Persons, Early 
Childhood Education, and Secondary Education are also under study and are 
expected to change as part of a collegewide revision of teacher education 
programs. Check with assigned adviser about changes. 



Liberal Studies- 
Graduation. 



-52-55 semester hours, described under Requirements for 



Specialized major field — requirements listed under department offerings. 

Professional Education — 30 semester hours, as follows: 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Experience I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Experience II lsh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

Methods Course — (Teaching of ) 3sh 

One semester student teaching 12sh 

Admission to Teacher Education Programs 

All students in teacher education programs must achieve a 2.5 QPA by the 
time they complete their twenty-ninth semester hour. Students who do not 
achieve and maintain this level of achievement will be unable to take 
coursework in the teacher education core. Further details on these program 
requirements are given in the section on Academic Policies, Admission to 
Teacher Education. 

Student Teaching 

Student teaching is designed to be a learning experience for prospective 
teachers. The student teacher is learning to teach under the supervision of a 
full-time master teacher in an off-campus center. A university supervisor is 
assigned to work with individual student teachers and cooperating teachers. 
To gain admission to student teaching, applicants must have achieved a 
minimum cumulative quality-point average of 2.5. Certain programs have 
standards beyond the minimum 2.5. Each student should check with his/her 
adviser for current policy. 

Certification Requirements 

Requirements for certification, as well as the intermediate steps leading 
from admission to student teaching and certification, are outlined in the 
catalog section on Academic Policies under the title "Admission to Teacher 
Education and Certification." The requirements include 

— a minimum grade of C in all professional education courses and an 
overall grade point average of 2.5 

— review and recommendation by the major academic advisor indicating 
completion of all university and departmental teacher education 
requirements 

— completion of student teaching with a minimum grade of C 

— successful completion of the NTE Core Battery and NTE Specialty Area 
Tests 

— competency in Special Education 

Applications for certification cannot be processed until the student 
completes the Bachelor of Science in Education degree or first 
undergraduate degree. 

Commonwealth Requirements for Teacher Certification 

(Excludes Vocational Instructional Certification. See section called 
"Vocational Personnel Preparation.") 

Certification standards for commonwealth public school teachers are 
established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the 
Pennsylvania Board of Education. The academic adviser of the student's 
major department must verify to the dean of the College of Education that 
all academic requirements are met. The student's name is then placed on the 
graduation list. 

Applicants for certification must sign an attestment that they are a citizen of 
the United States. Applicants who are not citizens must have an immigrant 



visa that permits them to seek employment within the United States and 
have declared their intent to become a citizen of the United States. 
Applicants must also certify that they are not in the habit of using narcotic 
drugs in any form or excessive amounts of intoxicating beverages, are not 
currently under indictment, nor have been convicted of a criminal offense 
(if so, supply full information with application. They attest that all 
information in this application is correct.) A physical examination report 
must also be submitted. 

The Instructional I certificate is issued to the beginning teacher upon 
graduation from the College of Education. All candidates for the 
Instructional I certificate must successfully pass the National Teacher Exam, 
general knowledge battery and selected specialty areas. IUP is a designated 
test site; registration for the NTE may be completed through the University 
Testing Services in the Career Services office. With the completion of an 
additional twenty-four semester hours of collegiate and/or inservice courses 
and successful teaching experience, students may acquire the Instructional II 
certificate leading to permanent certification to teach in the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania. 

The University Clinics 

Two clinics/centers under the supervision of the College of Education offer 
diagnostic testing and remedial service and instruction in the following areas: 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic provides diagnosis of speech problems, 
hearing tests and evaluations, and a regular program of therapy. Regularly 
enrolled students at the university may avail themselves of these services 
without charge. 

The Child Study Center provides psychological assessment and parent 
consultation for children and adolescents with learning and/or behavior 
problems. 

Graduate Programs 

Information descriptive of M.Ed, and Ed.D. programs may be found in the 
current issue of the Graduate School Catalog. 

The University School 

Marilyn Howe, Director; Beisel, Hechtman, Johnson, 
Mambo, Marlin; and professors emeritae Davis, Fleming, 
Lingenfelter, Martin, Walthour 

The University School provides a program of instruction from kindergarten 
through sixth grade. The University School provides professional laboratory 
experiences and research activities for faculty and students. Research and 
experimental activities are scheduled with the director of the Universit) 
School. In sum. University School provides RIP students a unique 
opportunity to observe the most advanced learning styles and 
demonstrations for teaching in the year 2000. 

Center for Vocational Personnel 
Preparation 

Thomas W. O'Brien, Director 

Vocational-Technical Professional 
Studies 

Sandra J. Durbin, Chairperson; Debow, Downs, Dolecki, 
Jakubowski, Keith, Mielke, Spewock, Sylves, Whisner 

The Vocational-Technical Professional Studies program offers curricula to 
prepare both preservice and inservice teachers, supervisors, and 
administrators in vocational-technical areas for secondary schools, area 
vocational-technical schools, and postsecondary schools including 
community colleges, and persons within industry serving as instructors and 
coordinators of training programs. The program serves both undergraduate 
and graduate students and leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Education or to a professional certification only. 

A student enrolling in the vocational education curriculum may specialize in 
areas related to interest and/or previous work experience. Graduates have a 



The College of Education —53 



wide selection ol employment opportunities because ol a rapid growth in 
vocational/technical offerings in both the public and pm.ite sectors. 

Pennsylvania pruicsMon.il certification to teach vocational-technical 
education in the commonwealth's secondary schools is issued to individuals 
who meet statulorv requirements, demonstrate occupational/technical 
proficiency on a nationally standardized occupational competency 
examination, and complete sixty credit hours of the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education-approved university program. In the IUP program, 
a plan of studies will be tailored to each student's unique background (i e 
electrical, electronics, data processing, drafting, welding, dental, etc.) and 
professional needs 

Certification to serve as a cooperative education teacher-coordinator in the 
commonwealth's secondary schools can be earned by completing a program 
of studies tailored to each student's individual background and professional 
needs. The program prepares individuals for managing industrial 
cooperative training and school-to-work transitional experiences. For 
persons holding a valid Pennsylvania Instructional Certificate, the program 
of studies will be individualized based upon educational credits earned. 

The Bachelor of Science degree program is 124 semester hours, the 
vocational technical education certificate program is 60-62 semester hours, 
and the cooperative education teacher/coordinator certificate program is 75 
semester hours. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Vocational-Technical 
Education 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with VO prefix 

College: 6 

Professional Educational Sequence: 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 30 

Required courses: 

VO100 Preparation of the Vocational Professional I 15sh 

VO400 Preparation of the Vocational Professional II 15sh 

Other Requirements: 27 

Vocational Technical 

VO450 Technical Preparation of the Vocational 24sh 

Professional 
EN310 Public Speaking 3sh 

VO401 Special Topics in Vocational Technical 3-12sh 

Preparation 
VO402 Special Topics in Vocational Pedagogical 3-15sh 

Preparation 
— Other as approved 



Free Electives: 



6-8 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Certificate — Vocational-Technical Education 

Liberal Studies: As follows: 
Mathematics: MA101 
English: EN 101 

Humanities: one course from lists 
Fine Arts: one course from list 
Natural Science: one course, lab or non-lab 
Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: one course, no course « ith 
VO prefix 



College: 

Professional Educational Sequence: 
EP202 Educational Psychology 
FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 



21-23 

3sh 
3-4sh 

3sh 

3sh 
3-4sh 

3sh 

3sh 



3sh 
3sh 



Major: 33 

Required courses: 

VO100 Preparation of the Vocational Professional I 15sh 

VO400 Preparation of the Vocational Professional II 15sh 

EN310 Public Speaking 3sh 



Free Electives: 



Total Certification Requirements: 60-62 



Certificate as Secondary School Cooperative Education 
Teacher/Coordinator 

Liberal Studies: As follows: 21-23 

Mathematics: MA101 3sh 

English: EN 101 3-4sh 

Humanities: one course from lists 3sh 

Fine Arts: one course from list 3sh 

Natural Science: one course, lab or non-lab 3-4sh 

Social Science: PC101 3sh 

Liberal Studies electives: one course, no courses w ith 3sh 
VO prefix 

College: 6 
Professional Educational Sequence: 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 48 
Required courses: 

VO100 Preparation of the Vocational Professional I 15sh 

VO400 Preparation of the Vocational Professional II 15sh 

VO402 Special Topics in Vocational Pedagogical Prep 15sh 

EN310 Public Speaking 3sh 

Free Electives: 



Total Certification Requirements: 75-77 



Department of Communications 
Media 

Kurt P. Dudt, Chairperson; Ausel, Handler, Juliette, 
Kanyarusoke, Kornfeld, Lamberski, Leidman-Golub. 
Start, Willis, Wilson: and professors emeriti Klingensmith, 
Maclsaac, Murray, Sargent, Young 

The department offers a Bachelor of Science in Communications Media and 
two minors, one in Communications Media and one in Educational 
Technology. The department also serves preservice teachers and other 
students w ho are required to complete the basic course in Technology for 
Learning and Instruction, CM301. 

The philosophy of the Communications Media Department is to prepare 
generalists in the area of Communications. Our students can choose from 
one of three tracks within the department, depending on their career 
interests: Product Development. Electronic Media, or Training and 
Development. Regardless of the sequence chosen, students may select 
courses outside of their sequence in order to broaden their skills. 

The faculty within the department offers a wide variety of experience in all 
areas of Communications Media. With the combination of classroom work 
and the optional internship program, departmental graduates are competitive 
for positions in various areas. Students graduating from this major have 
obtained positions in such areas as radio, television, cable television, public 
relations, advertising agencies, medical media centers, and corporate 
media centers. 

The department has two minors, one in Communications Media and one in 
Educational Technology. The minor in Communications Media is an 
eighteen-credit program designed to complement any major. The minor in 
Educational Technology is a twenty-four-credit program designed for 
students in the College of Education who are completing a teaching degree. 



54 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Sludents changing majors from other academic departments within the 
university are required to have a 2.5 grade-point average before transfer will 
be approved. 



Bachelor of Science — Communications Media 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Natural Science: laboratory sequence required (GS 101/102- 
103/104 recommended) 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: CO101. no courses with CM prefix 



54-55 



College: 

EP202 
EP388 



Educational Psychology or 

Interpersonal Effectiveness and Communication 3sh 



Major: 

Required courses: 

CM101 Communications Media in American Society 

CM102 Basic Technology 

CM 103 Basic Communications Research 

CM200 Images 

CM395 Career Planning in Communication 
Controlled electives: According to Track 
Product Development: CM303 (required), CM271, 440, 

444, 449. 451 (strongly recommended). CM390, 441, 

445, 450, 472, 473, 474, 475, 476, 477, 478, 489, 
490 (also recommended) 

Electronic Media: CM403 (required), 404, 405, 451, 
460 (strongly recommended), CM230, 452, 454, 456, 480. 
455, 390, 490 (also recommended) 

Training and Development: CM330, 335(required), 
CM271, 303, 403, 430, 435, 440, 449, 451 (strongly 
recommended), CM390, 480, 490, 495 (also recommended) 

Other Requirements: 

Out-of-College Requirement (adviser approval) by Track 
Product Development Track 
Electronic Media Track 
Training and Development Track 



42-45 



3sh 

lsh 
lsh 
3sh 
lsh 



33sh 



36sh 



36sh 



15-18 



18sh 
15sh 
15sh 



Free Electives: 



6-7 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Minor — Communications Media 

Required courses: 

CM 101 Communications Media in American Society 
CM — Electives in Communication Media 



18 



3sh 

15sh 



Minor — Educational Technology 24 

Required courses: 

CM101 Communications Media in American Society 3sh 

CM460 Alternative Systems of Communication 3sh 

CO 101 Microbased Computer Literacy 3sh 

CM — Electives in Communications Media 15sh 



Department of Counseling, Adult 
Education, and Student Affairs 

Gary Dean, Chairperson; Ferro, Fontaine, Thomas, 
Witchel, Worzbyt; and professors emeriti Frank, Mahler, 
Pesci, Saylor, Spinelli, Washburn, Wilson 

The department of Counseling, Adult Education, and Student Affairs is 
primarily a graduate department offering programs leading to an M.Ed, in 
School Guidence Counseling and an M.A. in Community Counseling, Adult 
and Community Education, and Student Affairs in Higher Education. 
Undergraduate courses offered by the department are restricted to residence 
hall advisers and peer tutors as part of their training for employment. 



Department of Educational and 
School Psychology 

William F. Barker, Chairperson; Briscoe, Hoellein, 
Levinson, Quirk, Rafoth, Rattan; and professors emeriti 
DeFabo, Meadowcroft, Shank, Yanuzzi 

The department services undergraduate and graduate students. 
Undergraduate students may declare a minor in Educational Psychology by 
making application to the department chairperson. Fifteen semester hours 
from the courses are required for the minor in educational psychology. 

The department also offers the M.Ed, in Educational Psychology as well as a 
post-master's certification and a Doctor of Education in School Psychology. 
Refer to the current Graduate School Catalog for details. 

Department of Foundations of 
Education 

Kurt P. Dudt, Interim Chairperson; Merryman, Penta, 
Rotigel, Thibadeau; and professor emeritus Chu 

Graduate courses offered by this department include Comparative. 
Historical. Philosophical, and Social Foundations of Education; Curriculum 
Development; Professional Negotiations in Education; and International 
Education Studies Program. For specific information concerning these 
courses, see the current edition of the Graduate School Catalog. 

Department of Professional Studies in 
Education 

I (I \\ ina B. Void, Chairperson; Bieger, Cole Slaughter, 
Corbett, DeCicco, Dorsey, Elliott, Fennimore, Gates, 
Gerlach, Hartman, Jalongo, Kaufman, King, Kupetz, 
Mikkelsen, Millward, Mark Twiest, Meghan Twiest, L. 
Void, Williams, Willis; and professors emeriti Glott, Lore, 
Lott, McFeely, Mott, Reilly, Rizzo 

Elementary Education Program 

The Elementary Education program is designed to provide learning 
experiences which will assist students in developing into highly competent 
and effective teachers in grades K-6. Students are able to expand their 
knowledge through coursework and field experiences which embody 
content, knowledge of liberal studies, pedagogy, curriculum, human 
development and learning, and a historical and philosophical basis to 
undergird one's professional behavior. A 2.5 cumulative QPA is required to 
apply for teacher certification, to take major courses in the department, to 
apply for Junior Standing, and to student teach. 

Early Childhood Education Program 

The Early Childhood Education Program prepares students to select from 
among a variety of techniques and strategies those which appropriately 
expand children's cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development. 
Through lectures, research, and on-site experiences with young children, 
students are able to expand their own knowledge of and attitudes toward 
education of young children N-3rd grade. 

A 2.5 cumulative QPA is required to apply for teacher certification, to take 
major courses in the department, to apply for junior standing, and to student 
teach. Students must meet the requirements leading to teacher certification 
as outlined in the Academic Policies section of this catalog. 

Graduate Programs 

Programs leading to the M.Ed, and Ed.D. degrees are described in the 
current issue of the Graduate School Catalog. Internships and assistantships 
are available. 



The College of Education — 55 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Elementary 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI?! 

Natural Science: SC 101. 102. 103. and KM (1) 

Soeial Science: GE101-GE104 tone course), PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA152 (2). no courses with EL prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II 

ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 



27 



Major: 

Required c 
EL211 
EL2I3 
EL215 
EL221 
EL222 
EL312 
EL313 
EL314 
EL356 
EL357 
EL411 
EL425 
ED499 



Music for the Elementary Grades 

Art for the Elementary Grades 

Child Development 

Children's Literature 

Teaching of Reading I 

Teaching of Elementary Science 

Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 

Teaching of Health and Physical Education 

Pedagogy I 

Pedagogy II 

Teaching of Social Studies 

Language Arts Across the Curriculum 

Multicultural Education 



3sh 
lsh 
lsh 
12sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



2sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 
3sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 



34 



Other Requirements: 9 

Special electives from a defined discipline (3| 

Biology: BI103. 104. 150. 155, 232, 261. 265, 269. 272. 273 

Child Development/Family Relations: HE220, 224, 317, 321. 324. 418. 

422, 424, 426, 463 
Criminology: CR101. 270. 357. 361 
Early Childhood: EE200. 220. 310, 311, 312, 315 
Economics: EC121. 122,241 
Educational Psychology: EP373, 376, 378 
Education of Exceptional Persons: EX300*, or 1 1 1 (Prerequisites for all 

other EX courses). 340*. 415 (Most appropriate for Early Childhood 

majors), 416. 417. 418. 419*, 425 (requires permission of Special 

Education Department). SH254 [* = Best choices for regular classroom 

teachers] 
English: EN220. 310. 312, 324*. 330*. 333. 345, 348 [* = Most highly 

recommended by English Department]. Add English course only at 

drop/add: see chairperson. English Department. 
French: FR201. 202 (or 203), 221. 222, 321-322. 351-352 
Geoscience:GS121. 123, 131. 133, 221, 336, 342, 361, 371, GE371 
History: HI308, 311. 320, 321, 322, 326, 331. 340, 341. 342, 343. 360. 

365, 369, 373 
Mathematics: MA317. 420, 456, 457, 458. 459. 471. 483 
Philosophy: PHI 01, 120. 222. 223. 323. 329. 330, 400. 405 
Psychology: PC310. 311. 320, 371. 373 
Reading: ED408. EL422. EE220or451 

Religious Studies: RS100. 110, 200, 210, 250, 260. 290.311, 380 
Sociology: S0333, 336, 337, 428 
Sociology (Urban Education): S0333, 335, 339 
Spanish: SP101, 102. 111. 201, 221, 222, 230, 321 or FLISET Program. 

Students may also select a set of special electives from the list of Liberal 
Studies electives of non-Western courses that have not been used previously 
in their program. 



(*) 



Total Degree Requirements: 126-127 

See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 



(1) 
(2) 
(3) 



This sequence of 10 credits fulfills the Liberal Studies natural science 

requirement. 

For students who test out of MA152, consult your adviser for suggested 

math courses. 

More than twenty options are available for groupings in specific 

deparlments'or cross-departmental areas. This requirement is also 

fulfilled by completion of an approved specially such as FLISET, math. 

or reading. With permission of the chairperson of Professional Studies 

in Education and a specific department, a student my be allowed to 

create an area of specialty other than those listed. See department office 

for full listing; check prerequisites carefully. Submit plan to adviser for 

approval. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Early Childhood 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA 151 

Natural Sciences: SC101, 102, 103. and 104 
Social Science: GE101, 102, 103, or 104; PC101 
Liberal Studies electives: no courses with EE prefix 



56 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence ( 1 ) 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II 

ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

ED499 Multicultural/Multiethnic Education 

Major: 

Required courses:( 1 ) 

EE200 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 

EE220 Language Development and Children's Literature 

EE310 Integrated Curriculum I (Math, Science) 

EE311 Integrated Curriculum II (Social Science) 

EE312 Aesthetic Experiences for Young Children 

EE3 1 5 Development and Learning through Play 

EE45 1 Teaching Primary Reading 

EL215 Child Development 

EL357 Pedagogy II 

EX300 Education of the Exceptional Child 

EX415 Preschool Education for Children with 

Disabilities 

HE426 Techniques of Parent Education 

MA320 Mathematics for Early Childhood 



27 



3sh 
lsh 
lsh 
12sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 



38 



3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh(2) 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 



Free Electives: 



Total Degree Requirements: 127 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) A 2.5 overall grade-point average is required to register for major 
courses. 

(2) If competency exam is passed, an additional free elective may be 
substituted. 



Foreign Languages and International Studies Program for 
Elementary Teaching (FLISET)(1) 

Required courses: 22(2) 

SP201 Intermediate Spanish 4sh 

SP221 Intermediate Conversation 3sh 

SP321 Advanced Conversation 3sh 

SP290 Intensive Spanish for Elementary Teaching 3sh 
SP390 Teaching of Elementary Content through the 

Spanish Language 3sh 

SP404 Advanced Spanish Grammar 3sh 



56 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Controlled elective: 

SP230, SP342. SP344 



Other Requirements: 

Students should take either GE252 or PS387 as their non-Western course. 
Study/internship in Mexico for six to eight weeks the summer following 

junior year. 
Student teaching experience in immersion classroom. 

( 1 ) Program is open to elementary education majors wishing to develop an 
academic specialty which will prepare them to teach in elementary 
programs where content teaching in the foreign language is the 
objective. A student must attain a minimum level of Intermediate High 
speaking proficiency on the ACTFL/ETS scale. 

(2) Credit reduction pending Senate approval, based on prior curriculum 
changes. 



Department of Special Education and 
Clinical Services 

Clarice K. Reber, Chairperson; Bormann, Chapman, 
Domaracki, Ferrill, Fiddler, Glor-Sheib, Marshak, Mease, 
Newell, Nowell, Shane, Stein, Turton; and professors 
emeriti M. Bahn, Morris, Scanlon 

This department offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education in 
any one of four majors. Each of the four majors follows a prescribed 
sequence of courses. Students may elect to major in any one of the 
following fields: 

A. Education of Exceptional Persons 

B. Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology 

C. Rehabilitation 

D. Education of Persons with Hearing Loss 

The following grade policy applies to all four undergraduate programs of 
study in the Department of Special Education and Clinical Services. 
Individual students may appeal any aspect of the policy by making a formal 
written request to the Departmental Appeals Committee. 

1. No more than one "D" in major courses will be accepted toward 
graduation and certification. 

2. No "D" is permitted as the final recorded grade in any of the following 
courses. 

ED42 1 : Student Teaching 

ED44 1 : Student Teaching 

EH308: Language for Persons with Hearing Loss 

EX425: Methods and Curriculum (Mild/Moderate Disabilities) 

EX435: Methods and Curriculum (Severe/Profound Disabilities) 

RH322: Rehabilitation Case Study and Interpretation 

RH488: Field Training in Rehabilitation 

RH493: Field Training in Rehabilitation 

SHI 22: Clinical Phonology 

A. Education of Exceptional Persons 

Completion of the sequence of study in this major leads to Pennsylvania 
Department of Education special education certification (Mentally and/or 
Physically Handicapped Certificate). Students will be prepared to teach 
persons with mental retardation, autism, developmental disabilities, learning 
disabilities, brain injuries, emotional/behavioral disorders, physical 
disabilities, and multiple disabilities. Academic coursework and field 
experiences are integrated within the course of study. The program also 
provides a foundation for pursuing additional study at the graduate level. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Education of 
Exceptional Persons)*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI 51 

Social Science: PC101 

Natural Science: laboratory science required (SC105-106 recommended) 

Liberal Studies electives: no course with EX prefix 



one course College: 

3sh Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experiences I lsh 

ED342 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experiences II lsh 

ED42I Student Teaching (Mild/Moderate) 6sh 

ED441 Student Teaching (Severe/Profound) 6sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 

Required Courses: 

EX111 Introduction to Exceptional Persons 3sh 

EX 112 Typical and Atypical Growth and Development 3sh 

EX221 Methods of Teaching Mathematics to Persons 3sh 

with Disabilities 
EX222 Methods of Teaching Reading to Persons 3sh 

with Disabilities 
EX321 Methods of Teaching Language Arts to Persons 3sh 

with Disabilities 
EX322 Methods of Teaching Content Area Subjects to 3sh 

Persons with Disabilities 
EX340 Introduction to Behavior Management 3sh 

EX416 Education of Persons with Emotional or 3sh 

Behavioral Disorders 
EX417 Education of Persons with Mental Retardation or 3sh 

Developmental Disabilities 
EX4 1 8 Education of Persons with Physical or Multiple 3sh 

Disabilities 
EX419 Education of Persons with Brain Injuries or 3sh 

Learning Disabilities 
LX425 Methods and Curriculum 3sh 

(Mild/Moderate Disabilities) 
EX435 Methods and Curriculum 3sh 

(Severe/Profound Disabilities) 
EX440 Ethical and Professional Behavior lsh 

SH254 Classroom Management of Language Disorders 3sh 



27 



43 



Total Degree Requirements: 124-125 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

B. Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology 

Completion of the sequence of courses in Speech-Language Pathology and 
Audiology serves as a preprofessional program for students planning to 
become practicing speech-language pathologists or audiologists. Students 
entering the undergraduate program should be aware of the following: 

1 ) IUP is accredited by the Educational Standards Board of the American 
Speech-Language-Hearing Association and qualifies a person for the Certificate 
of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing 
Association and Pennsylvania State Licensure. 2) National certification, state 
licensure, and Pennsylvania Department of Education Certification in Speech- 
Language Impaired are available only to holders of the master's degree in 
Speech-Language Pathology. 3) Students will need to project a minimum QPA 
of 3.0 to qualify for admission to most graduate schools. 4) Upon completion of 
a master's degree at IUP, students will be prepared to provide services in work 
settings such as hospitals, community clinics, public health programs, and 
rehabilitation settings. 5) Students who elect to prepare for certification in 
Speech-Language Impaired from the Pennsylvania Department of Education 
must successfully complete the College of Education Requirements listed below 
prior to enrollment in the Master of Science degree in the Speech-Language 
Pathology program at IUP. 

The University Speech and Hearing Clinic serves as the laboratory for the 
undergraduate clinical practicum. Prior to registration for the clinical 
practicum course (SH420), students must earn a minimum QPA of 3.0 and 
complete the following hours of observation through enrollment in ED242 
and ED342: 

A. 25 hours of observation in speech-language pathology supervised by an 
IUP faculty member who holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence in 
Speech-Language Pathology. 



The College of Education — 57 



. 20 hours ill classroom observation 

1. Five hours in regular education classrooms. K-3. 

2. Five hours in special education classrooms. 

3. Five hours in regular education classrooms with integrated special 
students 

4. Five hours in community facilities such as preschools. sheltered 
workshops, etc. Services in this category should he of a 
noneducalional. nonspeech pathology type. 



Bachelor of Science — Rehabilitation 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications 

Mathematics: MA2 17 

Natural Science: Laboratory Science sequence required 

Social Science: PC101. S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: PC321, no courses with Rll prefix 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Speech-Language 
Pathology and Audiology (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA217 
Social Science: PC 101 
Natural Science: laboratory science sequence required 

(B1103-I04 recommended) 
Liberal Studies electives: no courses with SH prefix. 
PC310 recommended 

College!*!: The following are required ONLY for students electing 
the pre-teacher certification track: 
Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning Instruction 
ED442 School Law 
EP202 Educational Psychology 
FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 
SH412 Organization and Administration of Speech and 
Hearing Programs 



54-55 



0-13 



3sh 

lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



Major: 

Required courses: 

ED242 Pre-Student Teaching Clinical Experience i 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II 

EX 1 1 1 Introduction to Exceptional Persons 

EX362 Psychology of Reading in Language Processing 

SH 1 1 1 Introduction to Communication Disorders 

SHI 22 Clinical Phonology 

SH222 Introduction to Audiology 

SH242 Speech Science I 

SH25 1 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech 

and Hearing Mechanism 

Aural Rehabilitation 

Language Development 

Speech Science II 

Articulation and Language Disorders 

Stuttering and Voice Disorders 



3S-41 



SH311 
SH334 
SH342 
SH406 
SH408 
Optional: 
SH420 



Speech Clinic 



lsh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh(l) 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 



Free Electives: 

General Track 

Pre-Teacher Certification Track 



ED499 recommended 
28-32 
15-19 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) A minimum QPA of 2.5 is required to enroll in all 300 and 400 level 
courses for both pre-teacher certification and non-certification speech- 
language pathology majors. 



Major: 

Required courses: 

RH200 Introduction to Rehabilitation 

RH2 1 1 Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation 

RH220 Neurological Basis of Disability 

RH3 1 2 Psychological Basis of Disability 

RH32 1 Principles and Methods of Rehabilitation 

RH322 Rehabilitation Case Study and Interpretation 

RH360 Rehabilitation Counseling: Strategies 

RH410 Vocational Assessment in Rehabilitation 

RH4 1 2 Occupational Aspects of Rehabilitation 

RH422 Current Topics in Rehabilitation 

RH460 Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling 

RH484 Directed Rehabilitation Activities 

RH488 Field Training in Rehabilitation 

RH493 Field Training in Rehabilitation 

Other Requirements: 

Required course: 

EX1 1 1 Introduction to Exceptional Persons 

Controlled elective: 

BI155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 
HP22 1 Human Structure and Function 



48 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
6sh 
6sh 



6-7 



3sh 

3-4sh 

4sh 

3sh 



Free Electives: 



14-16 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



D. Education of Persons with Hearing Loss 

Completion of the sequence of courses in Education of Persons with 
Hearing Loss leads to a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education and 
Pennsylvania Department of Education certification as a "Teacher of the 
Hearing Impaired, K-12." Students are provided with the basic skills to 
teach in special classes for hard-of-hearing or deaf individuals. 

Students enrolled in this sequence of study are prepared to assume positions 
as itinerant hearing therapists and classroom teachers for individuals ranging 
from preschoolers to adults. Work settings may include public schools, 
continuing education programs, and home training situations. 

Observations, clinical experience, and practicum are required prior to 
placement in a school environment for the student teaching experience. The 
student will complete the following 50 hours of observation through 
enrollment in ED242. 

A. 20 hours of observation of itinerant and self-contained classrooms for the 
hearing impaired. 

B. 10 hours of observation in regular education classrooms. 

C. 15 hours of observation in special education classrooms. 
D.5 hours of observation in a noneducational setting. 

The student will complete 50 hours of individual clinical experience through 
enrollment in EH330 and 25 hours of school-based practicum through 
enrollment in ED342. 



C. Rehabilitation 

Completion of this program leads to the Bachelor of Science in Education 
with a specialization in rehabilitation. The program is designed for students 
seeking career opportunities with health and welfare agencies and 
institutions and also provides a foundation for pursuing additional work at 
the graduate level. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Education of Persons 
with Hearing Loss (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA151 

Social Science: PC101 

Natural Science: Laboratory Science Sequence Required 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with EH prefix 



58 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



College: 30 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I Ish 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II lsh 

ED421 Student Teaching-Hearing Impaired (Pri-Elem) 6sh 

ED441 Student Teaching-Heai ng Impaired (Jr-Sr H.S.) 6sh 

ED442 School Law 1 sh 

EH360 General Methodology for Education of Hearing 3sh 

Impaired 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh(l) 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 



Major: 

Required courses: 

EH114 Introduction to Persons with Hearing Loss 3sh 

EH 115 Introduction to Sign Language lsh 

EH244 Intermediate Sign Language lsh 

EH307 Speech for Person with Hearing Loss 3sh 

EH308 Language for Persons with Hearing Loss lsh 

EH329 Hearing Pracicum I lsh 

EH330 Hearing Practicum 2sh 

EH331 Advanced Sign Language lsh 
EH351 Methods of Teaching Reading to Persons with 

Hearing Loss 3sh 
EH365 Parent-Preschool Programs for Children 

with Hearing Loss 3sh 

EX1 1 1 Introduction to Exceptional Persons 3sh 

SH222 Introduction to Audiology 3sh 

SH334 Language Development 3sh 

SH242 Speech Science 1 3sh 

SH31I Aural Rehabilitation 3sh 
Controlled electives: 

One course from: EX1 12 or EL215 or HE218 3sh 



38 



Free Electives: 



1-2 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) MA217: Probability and Statistics may substitute for EP377 but may 
not replace MA 151. 




The College of Fine Arts — 59 




The College of Fine Arts 

Marjorie E. Arnett, Acting Dean 

Robert G. McGowan, Acting Associate Dean 

The College of Fine Arts has professional programs in art. music, and 
theater and awards the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degrees. Programs leading to certification to teach are offered in cooperation 
with the College of Education and lead to the Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree. 

There are four objectives for the College of Fine Arts: 

1 ) to provide special academic programs for majors in the arts 

2) to provide service courses for other departmental majors 

3) to offer all university students general courses in the arts 

4) to make cultural programs in the arts available to the university, the 
surrounding community, and the local region 

There are no additional college requirements for graduation beyond the 
university and departmental requirements listed in other sections of this 
catalog. 

General Fine Arts Major 

A general tine arts major program is available for those students desiring to 
take coursework in art. dance, interior design, media, music, and theater. 
This program is offered in conjunction with the College of Education and 
the College of Health and Human Services. This interdisciplinary program, 
including an opportunity for an internship (FA493). is coordinated through 
the Office of the Dean. College of Fine Arts, where additional information 
is available. 



Bachelor of Arts — General Fine Arts 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with FA prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

Courses must come from three departments, one of which 

must be Art, Music, or Theater. 
Controlled electives 

Art: Art Education (AE), Art History (AH), Art Studio (AR) 

Music: Music (MU). Music History (MH), or Applied Music (AM) 

Theater: Any Theater (TH) courses 

Consumer Services: Interior Design courses (CS) 

Communications Media: Any courses (CM) 

Dance: (HP) Dance courses 

Other Requirements: 

At least one-third (12) of the major credits must be in courses 
numbered in the 300s and 400s. No course that is used to 
fulfill Liberal Studies requirements may be used again to 
meet major requirements. 



36 



Free Electives: 



33-35 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Department of Art 



Anthony G. DeFurio, Chairperson; Ali, Battaglini, Ben- 
Zvi, Boerner, Burwell, Clay, Hamilton, Hedman, Johnson, 
Lacey, Nestor, J. Slenker, R. Slenker, Weiland; and 
professors emeriti Balsiger, Cronauer, Dongilla, Dropcho, 
I lines. Kipp, McVitty, Seelhorst, Vislosky, Wert 

The Department of Art provides both general and special courses in art, 
directed toward the development of the student's creative and expressive 
abilities. Degrees offered are the Bachelor of Arts with tracks in either Art 
History or Art Studio, the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Studio, and the 
Bachelor of Science in Education in Art Education. The degree in art 
education provides certification for teaching art in grades K-12 in the 
schools of Pennsylvania. 

The Department of Art offers a cooperative program with the Art Institute of 
Pittsburgh. Students interested in commercial art, with departmental 
approval, may earn credit toward their major at the Art Institute. 

All art majors are obligated to fulfill the university requirements for Liberal 
Studies. Art education majors must maintain a 2.5 average overall Q.P.A., 
and this is a prerequisite to student teaching. 

A minor in art is available, consisting of at least 18 semester hours in art 
courses approved by the chairperson of the Department of Art. 

Acceptance by the Department of Art as a major requires the submission of 
a portfolio and approval of the portfolio committee. Detailed information 
will be sent to the applicant upon request. 



Bachelor of Arts — Art/History Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Fine Arts: MH101 orTHlOl 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with AH prefix 

Major: 

Foundation Required: 

AR 1 00 Arts of the 20th Century 

AR111 Drawing 

AR1 12 Fundamentals of Drawing and Design 

AR113 Design 

AR114 Color and Two-Dimensional Design 



53-55 



15 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



60 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Art History Required: 30 

AH205 Ancient to Medieval Art 3sh 

AH206 Renaissance to Baroque Art 3sh 

AH211 Modem Art 3sh 

AH222 An in America 3sh 

AH407 Medieval Art 3sh 

AH408 Italian Renaissance 3sh 

AH409 Baroque and Rococo Art 3sh 

AH412 Classical Art 3sh 

AH413 Senior Seminar (To be taken during senior year) 3sh 

AH416 Northern Renaissance Art 3sh 



Free Electives(l): 

AH406 Ancient Migratory Art 
AH424 Art of the East 
AH426 Pre-Columbian Art 
AH492 Internship 



24-26 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3-12sh 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) 



It is recommended that the student of art history make judicious choices 
of elective courses in consultation with the major adviser. Students may 
consider additional foundation or advanced studio electives, advanced 
art history, and related academic electives. Course selection in a foreign 
language is strongly recommended. 



Bachelor of Arts — Art/Studio 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Fine Arts: Fulfilled by Art History counted in major 
Liberal Studies electives: AH206; no courses with AR prefix 

Major: 

Foundation required: 

AR 1 00 Arts of the 20th Century 

AR111 Drawing 

AR 1 1 2 Fundamentals of Drawing and Design 

ARII3 Design 

ARI14 Color and Two-Dimensional Design 
Foundation electives (Select 5 of the following 8 courses): 

AR211 Painting 

AR213 Wood/Furniture Design 

AR214 Ceramics 

AR215 Sculpture 

AR216 Basic Metal Techniques 

AR217 Printmaking 

AR218 Graphic Design 

AR219 Fibers 
Art History required: 

AH205 Ancient to Medieval Art 

AH206 Renaissance to Baroque Art 

AH211 Modern An 

AH413 Senior Seminar (To be taken during senior year) 
Advanced Studio required: (3) 

Advanced Studio courses to be selected from list: 

AR42I. AR451, AR452, AR453, AR454, AR455. AR457. 
AR459, AR460. AR481. AR493 (4) 



50-52 



15 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
*sh(l) 
3sh(2) 
3sh 



15 



Free Electives: 



21 



12-14 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Credits counted under Liberal Studies electives. 

(2) AH222: Art in America may be substituted for AH21 1. 

(3) Students must complete 3 credits within an advanced studio before 
permission will be granted to enroll in the 6-credit component of the 
advanced level. Permission of the instructor is a prerequisite to all 6- 
credit advanced studios. 

(4) Inclusion of internship credits toward any portion of fulfillment of 
degree requirements must be approved by the departmental chair and 
student's major adviser. Approval must be obtained in writing prior to 
enrollment. 



Bachelor of Fine Arts — Studio 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 50-52 

with the following specifications: 

Fine Arts: Fulfilled by Art History counted in major 

Liberal Studies electives: AH206. no courses with AR elective 

Major: 

Foundation required: 15 

AR100 Arts of the 20th Century 3sh 

AR11I Drawing 3sh 

AR 1 1 2 Fundamentals of Draw ing and Design 3sh 

AR113 Design 3sh 

AR114 Color and Two-Dimensional Design 3sh 

Foundation electives (Select 5 of the following 8 courses): 15 

AR211 Painting 3sh 

AR213 Wood/Furniture Design 3sh 

AR214 Ceramics 3sh 

AR215 Sculpture 3sh 

AR216 Basic Metal Techniques 3sh 

AR217 Printmaking 3sh 

AR218 Graphic Design 3sh 

AR219 Fibers 3sh 

Art History required: 9 

AH205 Ancient to Medieval Art 3sh 

AH206 Renaissance to Baroque Art *sh( 1 ) 

AH211 Modem Art 3sh(2) 

AH413 Senior Seminar 3sh 

Advanced Studio required: (3) 

Primary Advanced Studio Concentration 27 

Minor Advanced Studio Concentration 18sh 

Courses from list: AR421, AR45 1 , AR452. AR453, 

AR454. AR455. AR457, AR459. AR460. AR48 1, AR493 1 4 1 



Free electives: 



6-8 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 125-127 



( 1 ) Credits counted under Liberal Studies electives. 

(2) AH222: Art in America may be substituted for AH2 1 1 . 

(3) The foundation-level course must be successfully completed before a 
student will be pemiitted to enroll in the 6-credit component of that 
specific studio course. Permission of the instructor is a prerequisite to 
all 6-credit advanced studios. 

(4) Inclusion of internship credits toward any portion of fulfillment of 
degree requirements must be approved by the departmental chair and 
student's major adviser. Approval must be obtained in writing prior to 
enrollment. 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Art Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Fine Arts: Fulfilled by Art History counted in major. 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: AH206. no courses with AR prefix 



50-52 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED421 Student Teaching Elementary 

ED44 1 Student Teaching Secondary 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II 

ED442 School Law 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

FE202 History/Philosophy of American Education 

Major: 

Foundation required: 

AR100 Arts of the 20th Century 

ARU1 Drawing 

AR1 12 Fundamentals of Drawing and Design 



24 



3sh 
6sh 
6sh 

Ish 
lsh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



15 



The College of Fine Arts — 61 



ARU3 Design 3sh 

ARI14 Color and Two-Dimensional Design 3sh 

Foundation electives (Selecl 5 of the following 8 courses): 15 

AR2U Painting Ssh 

AR213 Wood/Furniture Design 3sh 

AR214 Ceramics 3sh 

AR215 Sculpture 3sh 

AR216 Basic Metal Techniques 3sh 

AR2I7 Printmaking 3sh 

AR218 Graphic Design 3sh 

AR219 Fibers 3sh 

An Education required: 9 

AE315 Survey in Art Education 3sh 

AE3I7 Art Education Methodology: Elementary 3sh 

AE318 Art Education Methodology: Secondary 3sh 

Art History required: 9 

AH205 Ancient to Medieval Art 3sh 

A 11206 Renaissance to Baroque Art *sh( 1 ) 

A1I21 1 Modern Art 3sh(2) 

AH413 Senior Seminar 3sh 

Controlled electives: 12 

Additional courses from lists: (3) 
Ad\ anced Studio: AR42 1 . AR45 1 . AR452. AR453, AR454, AR455, 

AR457, AR459. AR460 
Advanced Art History: AH219, AH222. AH406. AH408, AH409, 

AH412. AH416. AH424. AH426 
Art Education elective: AE330 



Free Electives: 



{#) Total Degree Requirements: 134-136 



I 

(1) 
(2) 
(3) 



See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 

on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

Credits counted under Liberal Studies electives. 

AH222: Art in America may be substituted for AH2 1 1 . 

Courses can only be taken following successful completion of the 

foundation prerequisite course. 

See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 

in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Department of Music 



Calvin E. Weber, Chairperson; Adams, Bird, Borst, 
Casavant, Chepaitis, Dearing, Dickinson, Dietz, Fry, Godt, 
Intili, Kauffman, Kuehn, Lloyd, Luchsinger, Mantel, 
Olmstead, Perlongo, Sartori, Scandrett, Stamp, Staples, 
Teti, Thorell, VanSteenkist, Wheatley, Wilson; and 
professors emeriti Becker, Davis, DiCicco, Malitsky, 
Perkins, Stitt, Wildeboor 

The Department of Music has a three-fold mission: ( 1 ) professional 
preparation of music educators and performers, (2) liberal studies for the 
university, and ( 3 ) programs of music for the community. Degrees offered 
include the Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of Science 
in Education. 

Admission to the Music Department requires satisfactory completion of an 
audition in addition to the university general requirements. Detailed 
information will be sent to the applicant upon request. 

A student wishing to minor in music must elect a minimum of fifteen 
semester hours in music courses as approved by the department chairperson. 
The program leading to the Bachelor of Arts in music has been designed to 
give the student a general experience in music. The student seeking this 
degree has the choice of four tracks: Music History /Literature. Music 
Theory /Composition. Performance, or Jazz Studies. 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Music (equivalent to 
the Bachelor of Music Degree) is a special program with a major in one of 
twenty-one areas of performance. The student in this program prepares to 
pursue a career as a professional performing musician. 



The program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Education with a music 
major leads to certification to teach in the schools of Pennsylvania. 

Special Requirements 

1. Each student must declare a primary performing medium. Those who 
elect voice as their primary instrument normally elect piano as a 
secondary instrument; those who elect piano as their primary instrument 
normally elect voice as their secondary instrument. Performance juries 
are held at the end of each semester. Students are expected to complete 
the requirements for their performing area and level. Piano proficiency is 
required in all degree programs. 

2. Ensemble participation of 5 hours a week is required each semester. 
Students may fulfill this departmental requirement by participation in 
either one-credit or zero-credit ensemble(s). In meeting the degree 
requirements of 7-8 semester hours of ensemble credit, enrollment in 
credit-bearing ensembles is flexible across semesters. 

3. Students must register for MU475 (Music Lab) and attend ( 1 ) all 
department and area recitals and (2) eight campus recitals and concerts 
each semester. 



Bachelor of Arts — Music/History and Literature Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI01 recommended 

Fine Arts: MH 101 

Liberal Studies electives: HI305. no courses with MH prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

MU111 Theory Skills I 
MU112 Theory Skills II 
Mill 15 Theory I 
Mill 16 Theory II 
MU211 Theory Skills III 
MU212 Theory Skills IV 
MU215 Theory III 
MU216 Theory IV 
MH301 Music History I 
MH302 Music History II 

Controlled electives: 

Five courses from this list: 
325.326,420,421 



41 



MH320. 321.322, 323, 324, 



Other Requirements: 

Music Ensembles (MU 120- 136) 
Music Electives 
Jury Clearance in piano C 

Attendance at 8 recitals per semester (MU475. S grade, 
8 semesters) 



2sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
15sh 



8sh 
7sh 
Osh 

Osh 



15 



Free Electives: 



13-15 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Arts — Music/Jazz Studies Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 recommended 

Fine Arts: MH 101 

Liberal Studies electives: HI305. MH103, no courses 
with MU prefix 



Major: 




Required courses: 


MU111 


Theorv Skills I 


MU112 


Theory Skills II 


MU115 


Theory I 


MU116 


Theory II 


MU213 


Jazz Theory Skills I 



56 



MU214 Jazz Theory Skills II 



2sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 
2sh 



62 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



MU222 Jazz Theory I 

MU223 Jazz Theory II 

MU224 Jazz Improvisation I 

MU225 Jazz Improvisation II 

MU3 1 1 Fundamentals of Conducting 

MU318 Jazz Orchestration I 

MU319 Jazz Orchestration II 
Controlled electives: 

Applied Music I thru VIII: 

Private lessons in performance area-2sh each of eight 
semesters 
Major related: 

MH301 Music History I 

MH302 Music History II 

Other Requirements: 

MU135 Jazz Ensemble — 8 semesters 

Jury Clearance in major instrument, minor instrument 

(if any), and piano C 
Attendance at 8 recitals per semester (MU475, S grade, 

8 semesters) 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 

16sh 



3sh(l) 
3sh(l) 



8sh 



Osh 



Osh 



Free Electives: 5-7 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) MH201 -202 Jazz History I-II may be substituted. 



Bachelor of Arts — Music/Music Performance Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA101 recommended 

Fine Arts: MH 101 

Liberal Studies electives: HI305, MH301, no courses 
with MU prefix 

Major: 42 

Required courses: 

MU111 Theory Skills I 2sh 

MU112 Theory Skills II 2sh 

MU1 15 Theory I 3sh 

MU116 Theory II 3sh 

MU211 Theory Skills III 2sh 

MU212 Theory Skills IV 2sh 

MU215 Theory III 3sh 

MU216 Theory IV 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Applied Music I thru VIII: private lessons in 

performance area — 2sh each of eight semesters 16sh 

Major related: 

MH103 Perspectives in Jazz 3sh 

MH302 Music History II 3sh 

Other Requirements: 14 

Music ensembles (MU120-136) 8sh 

Music electives, with adviser approval 6sh 

Jury clearance in major instrument, minor instrument 

(if any), and piano (if not major or minor instrument) Osh 

Attendance at 8 recitals per semester (MU475. S grade, 

8 semesters) Osh 



Major: 54 

Required courses: 

Mill 11 Theory Skills I 2sh 

Mill 12 Theory Skills II 2sh 

Mill 15 Theory 1 3sh 

MU116 Theory II 3sh 

MU211 Theory Skills 111 2sh 

MU2 12 Theory Skills IV 2sh 

MU215 Theory III 3sh 

MU216 Theory IV 3sh 

MU2I7 Keyboard Harmony I lsh 

MU2 18 Keyboard Harmony II lsh 

MU306 Counterpoint I 2sh 

MU315 Theory V 3sh 

MU411 Composition I 2sh 

MU4I2 Composition II 2sh 

MU413 Composition III 2sh 

MU414 Composition IV 2sh 

Controlled electives: 

One from list: MU304, MU307, MU309 2sh 
Applied Music I- VII: Private lessons in performance 

area — 2sh each of seven semesters 14sh 

Major related: 

MH302 Music History II 3sh 

Other Requirements: 8 

Music ensembles (MU 120- 136) 8sh 
Jury clearance in major instrument, minor instrument 

01 any), and piano B Osh 
Attendance at 8 recitals per semester (MU475, S grade, 

8 semesters) Osh 

Free Electives: 7-9 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Fine Arts — Music Performance 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 recommended 

Fine Arts: MH101 

Liberal Studies electives: HI305, MH301, no courses with MU prefix 



53-55 



55 



Free Electives: 



13-15 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Arts — Music/Theory and Composition Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Libera] Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA101 recommended 

Fine Arts: MH 101 

Liberal Studies electives: HI305, MH301, no courses 
with MU prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

MU111 Theory Skills I 2sh 

MU112 Theory Skills II 2sh 

MU115 Theory I 3sh 

MU116 Theory II 3sh 

MU21I Theory Skills HI 2sh 

MU212 Theory Skills IV 2sh 

MU215 Theory III 3sh 

MU216 Theory IV 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Applied Music I thru VIII: private lessons in 

performance area — 4 sh each of 8 semesters 32sh 

Major related: 

MH302 Music History II 3sh 

Other Requirements: 20 

Music ensembles (MU120-136) 8sh 

Music electives 12sh(l) 

Jury clearance in major instrument, minor instrument 

(if any), and piano C (unless major or minor) Osh 

Attendance at 8 recitals per semester (MU475. S grade, 

8 semesters) ()sh 

Junior and Senior Recitals Osh 

Free Electives: 

(#) Total Degree Requirements: 128-130 

( 1 ) Majors with piano or organ performance specialization must elect 
MU217 and MU218: Keyboard Harmony I and II, lsh each. 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



The College of Fine Arts — 63 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Music Education (*) 



53-55 



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 recommended 

Fine Arts: MH101 

Social Science: PC 1 01 

Liberal Studies electives: 111305. MH301. no courses 
with ML! prefix 

College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM30I Technology lor Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-studen't Teaching I 1 sh 

ED342 Prc-student Teaching II lsh 

ED421 Student Teaching Elementary Level 6sh 

ED441 Student Teaching Secondary Level 6sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

MU331 Elementary Methods 3sh 

MU333 Secondary Methods 3sh 

Major: 

Required courses: 

MU11 1 Theory Skills I 2sh 

MU1I2 Theory Skills II 2sh 

MU115 Theory I 3sh 

MU116 Theory II 3sh 

MU2I1 Theory Skills III 2sh 

MU2 12 Theory Skills IV 2sh 

MU215 Theory III 3sh 

MU216 Theory IV 3sh 

MU15 1-152 Class Voice I and II 2sh(l) 

MU153-154 Class Piano I and II 2sh(2) 

MU155 Class Strings I lsh 

Ml) 1 57 Class Percussion I lsh 

MU159 Class Brass I lsh 

MU161 Class Woodwinds I lsh 

MU311 Fundamentals of Conducting 2sh 

Controlled electives: 

One from list: MU312 or MU313 2sh 
Applied Music I thru VII: private lesson in performance 

area — 2sh each of seven semesters 14sh 

Major related: 

MH302 Music History II 3sh 

Other Requirements: 

Music Ensembles (MU120-136) 7sh 

Jury clearance in major instrument, minor instrument 

(if any) and piano C (unless major or minor) Osh 

Attendance at 8 recitals per semester (MU475, S grade, 

7 semesters) Osh 



30 



49 



Department of Theater 

Annie-Laurie Wheat, Chairperson; Ault, Blackledge, 
Bowes, Eisen, Lommock, McCreary, Simpson; and 
professor emeritus Ensley 

The Department of Theater is dedicated to theater as a collaborative and 
highly disciplined fine art that demands a broad-based education and offers 
a wide view of the world as a part of a liberal and humanistic education. 
Students wishing to share in this will find the Department of Theater 
committed to the following: 

1 ) providing comprehensive coursework, from introductory through 

advanced levels of study, in all major areas of theater 

2) providing diverse production opportunities to develop and enhance 
expertise, as well as stimulate artistic and intellectual growth of 

both students and the faculty 

3) augmenting and complementing the aesthetic offerings of the university 
community 

The Department of Theater offers courses in theater history, drama, and 
criticism as well as basic and advanced coursework in acting, dance/ 
movement, voice, directing, design, and technical theater. While many of 
these courses are also available to nonmajors, additional coursework 
specifically addresses libera] studies requirements on both introductory and 
advanced levels. 

As a practical extension of the academic program, the Department of 
Theater offers a variety of production opportunities in the Mainstage and 
Studio theaters. Concert Dance productions, and its professional theater 
company. Summer Theater-by-the-Grove. Additional production experience 
is encouraged through internships with major professional theater 
companies. 

The Department of Theater is developing its offerings in the area of dance. 
With the addition of faculty members and the approval of a series of new 
courses, the department offerings in dance support theater offerings and 
provide opportunities for students to explore dance within the Liberal 
Studies fine arts courses. 

The Department of Theater offers a Bachelor of Arts degree, a Bachelor of 
Fine Arts degree, and a theater minor. Theater courses are also an option in 
the General Fine Arts degree offered by the College of Fine Arts. The B.A. 
in Theater provides for the study of theater within a broad liberal arts 
education. The B.F.A. in Theater provides more intensive, advanced study 
leading to postbaccalaureate professional training or entry-level employment 
in the profession. Though all freshman majors matriculate into the B.A. 
program, students may apply for admission into the B.F.A. program in their 
fourth semester. Students applying for the B.F.A. program will be expected 
to present a portfolio or audition. A minor in theater consists of 15 semester 
hours in coursework approved by the chairperson of the Department 
of Theater. 



Free Electives: 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 139-141 



Admission to the Department of Theater requires satisfactory completion of 
an audition or interview, in addition to the university's general admission 
requirements. Detailed information will be sent to applicants upon request. 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 
For majors with voice as performance specialization, any three of 
the following may be substituted: MU351, 353, 354, 406. 
Private piano I and II (AM101 ,151) may be substituted. 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Hi 



12) 



36 



Bachelor of Arts — Theater 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Fine Arts: AH101.MH101, or TH102 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with TH prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 

TH110 Script Analysis 3sh 

TH115 Principles of Theater Design and Architecture 3sh 

TH201 Theater History I 3sh 

TH202 Theater History II 3sh 

TH301/302 Tragic Mask or Comic Mask 3sh 

TH310 Theater Criticism 3sh 

Any three of the following: 

TH120 Stagecraft I 3sh 

TH122 Costume Workshop 3sh 



64 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



TH221 Basic Lighting 

TH223 Makeup 
Any three of the following: 

TH130 Stage Voice I 

TH131 Stage Movement 1 

TH240 Acting I 

TH350 Directing 



Other Requirements: 

TH486 Practicum for Production (minimum of ft semesters) 4sh 



Free Electives: 



3sh 


TH301/302 Tragic Mask or Comic Mask 


3sh 


TH310 Theater Criticism 




Choose any three of the following: 


3sh 


Til 120 Stagecraft I 


5sh 


TH 1 22 Costume Workshop 


3sh 


TH221 Basic Lighting 


3sh 


TH223 Makeup 




Choose any three of the following: 


4 


TH130 Stage Voice I 


4sh 


TH131 Stage Movement I 




TH240 Acting I 


29-31 


TH350 Directing 



3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Fine Arts — Theater Arts 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Fine Arts: AH101, MH101, orTH102 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with TH prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

TH110 Script Analysis 3sh 

TH115 Principles of Theater Design and Architecture 3sh 

TH201 Theater History I 3sh 

TH202 Theater History II 3sh 



36 



Other Requirements: 

BFA required courses: Choose one from each group 

A. TH220, 320. 321, 322 

B.TH330. 331,340 

C.TH30 1.302 
Additional requirements: 

TH486 (Minimum of 6 semesters at .5 to 1 sh each) 

TH493 Internship 
Controlled electives: 

From list: TH 120. 122. 130. 131.220.221. 223, 
240. 320. 321, 322. 330. 331. 350. 481,482, 
483, 484, 4X4 



Free Electives: 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 

6sh 

0-6sh 

6-12sh 



6-8 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 




The ( ollege oj Health and Human Services — 65 




The College of Health and 
Human Services 



Harold E. Wingard, Dean 
Carleen C. Zoni, Associate Dean 

The College of Health and Human Services is composed of six academic 
departments: Food and Nutrition; Health and Physical Education; Hotel, 
Restaurant, and Institutional Management; Human Development and 
Environmental Studies; Nursing and Allied Health Professions: and Safety 
Sciences. Each department provides theoretical, laboratory, and practical 
experiences for students and prepares them for selected careers. 

Faculty members of the college hold advanced academic degrees in their 
area of expertise. They have extensive experience as teachers and ads isers 
and have had experience working in a variety of career fields. 

Students can study in the following academic areas: Child Development/ 
Family Relations, Community Services. Consumer Affairs, Dietetics, 
Fashion Merchandising. Food and Nutrition Science, Food Service 
Management, Health and Physical Education, Home Economics Education. 
Interior Design/Housing. Medical Technology, Nursing. Physical Education 
and Sport Science, Respiratory Care, and Safety Sciences. 

College goals are designed to emphasize the areas of human development 
and family relations; positive health in growth and development through 
nutritional, physical, and emotional fitness; prevention of illness; restoration 
of optimal health after illness: occupational safety and health; teacher 
education: consumerism; commercial and residential design; merchandising 
and buying of apparel and home furnishings; and management within the 
hospitality industry. 



Courses in natural sciences are required of all academic majors, and students 
.m encouraged to become involved in research activities and computer 
utilization. 

The college offers a variety of opportunities to extend the students' 
educational experience through honorary and service organizations; field 
organizations; and sports and recreational activities. Employment 
opportunities for graduates of the college are excellent. 

Department of Consumer Services 

The Department of Consumer Services and the Department of Home 
Economics Education have merged to form the Department of Human 
Development and Environmental Studies. 

See Department of Human Development and Environmental Studies. 

Department of Food and Nutrition 

Joanne B. Steiner, Chairperson; Cessna, Dahlheimer, 
Johnson, Moore-Armitage; and professor emerita Minnick 

The Food and Nutrition Department offers degree programs in dietetics, 
food and nutrition science, and nutrition education. These curriculums 
prepare students as professionals for a diversity of career opportunities in 
health care, food service, the food industry, and food and nutrition research. 

In addition, the department provides Liberal Studies courses which are 
available to all university students. These include FN 140/141 (or 143, when 
approved) Nutrition and Wellness, an option in the university's Liberal 
Studies requirements for Health and Wellness; FN 145: Introduction to 
Nutrition, a Liberal Studies elective; and LS499: Human Food Consumption 
Patterns, a synthesis course. 

Dietetics 

The dietetics program meets the didactic academic requirements approved 
by the American Dietetic Association. Students are prepared for careers in 
clinical dietetics, dietary food service management in health care facilities, 
administrative dietetics, and community nutrition. Other exciting career 
opportunities exist in the areas of technical sales, consumer education, 
government agencies, health and fitness centers, corporate wellness, and 
private practice. 

Food and Nutrition Science 

Food and Nutrition Science provides a student with a background in the 
basic sciences that gives a solid foundation for theoretical and applied food 
science and nutrition. Emphasis is placed on laboratory work in nutrition 
and food composition. The program meets the needs of students motivated 
in the biological-physical sciences who wish, with graduate education, to 
enter careers in food/nutrition research, nutrition service professions, 
medical science, and education. 

Nutrition Minor 

This minor sequence is recommended for students majoring in the related 
health disciplines such as child development, home economics education, 
nursing and allied health, and health and physical education. Students 
electing a minor in nutrition must complete 16 credit hours of coursework 
from the courses listed below. Students must note that the completion of this 
minor neither meets the requirements for practice as a credentialed 
nutritionist nor satisfies the academic requirements of the American Dietetic 
Association for a registered dietitian. For additional information about these 
careers, contact the Food and Nutrition Department. 



Bachelor of Science — Dietetics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 

Natural Science: CH101-102 

Social Science: EC101, PC101. S0151 

Liberal Studies electtves: BE/CO/IM101; HE 218 or 
PC 310, no courses with FN prefix 



54-55 



66 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Major: 39 

Required courses: 

FN 110 Careers in Food and Nutrition lsh 

FN 150 Foods Lecture 3sh 

FN151 Foods Labratory lsh 

FN212 Nutrition 3sh 

FN213 Life Cycle Nutrition 3sh 

FN355 Nutrition in Disease I 3sh 

FN362 Experimental Foods 3sh 

FN364 Methods of Teaching 3sh 

FN402 Community Nutrition 3sh 

FN430 Professional Topics in Food and Nutrition 3sh 

FN455 Nutrition in Disease II 3sh 

FN458 Advanced Human Nutrition 3sh 

FN463 Nutrition Counseling 3sh 

FN470 Human Food Consumption Patterns 3sh 

FN484 Senior Seminar lsh 

Other Requirements: 

Food Service Requirements: 13 

HR259 Hospitality Purchasing 3sh 

HR313 Food Systems I 4sh 

HR356 Human Resources in Hospitality Management 3sh 

HR408 Institutions Management 3sh 

Additional Sciences: 14 

BI105 Cell Biology 4sh 

BI155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 4sh 

BI232 Fundamentals of Microbiology 3sh 

CH255 Biochemistry and Nutrition 3sh 



Free Electives (minimum): 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Science — Food and Nutrition Science 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 55-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Natural Science: CH111-112 

Social Science: EC101, PC101, S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: MA217, no courses with FN prefix 



College: 

Human Ecology requirements: 

One course from list: HE218 or HE224 

One course from list: CS213, CS315. or CS101 

Major: 

Required courses: 
FN 150 Foods 

FN151 
FN212 
FN362 
FN458 
FN462 
FN464 
FN470 
FN484 



Foods Lab 

Nutrition 

Experimental Foods 
Advanced Human Nutrition 
Advanced Experimental Foods 
Food and Nutrition Research Methods 
Human Food Consumption Patterns 
Senior Seminar 
Controlled electives: 
Three courses from list: 

FN2 1 3, FN355( 1 ), FN444, FN447, FN455( 1 ), FN482 

Other Requirements: 

Science sequence: 

BI150 Human Anatomy 

BI 151 Human Physiology 

BI232 Fundamentals of Microbiology 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 

CH351 Biochemistry 

PY1 1 1 Physics I Lecture 

PY121 Physics I Lab 



3sh 
3sh 



3sh 

lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
lsh 

9sh 



32 



22 



3sh(2) 

4sh(2) 

3sh(2) 

4sh 

4sh 

3sh 

lsh 



( 1 ) FN355 and FN455 must be completed as a sequence, if elected. 

(2) Alternate Biology sequence recommended for graduate study 
preparation: BI105, BI151, BI361. 

(3) To meet American Dietetic Association requirements: FN355, FN364, 
FN402. FN455, HR259. HR313, HR356. HR358 (22sh total). 



Nutrition Minor (1) 

FN212 Nutrition 

FN2 1 3 Life Cycle Nutrition 

FN245 Sports Nutrition 

FN355 Nutrition in Disease I 

FN470 Human Food Consumption Patterns 

FN357 Special Problems in Food or 

FN410 Nutrition in Aging 

( 1 ) Consult with department: revision pending. 



3sh 
3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



Free Electives: (3) 



8-9 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Department of Health and Physical 
Education 

James G. Mill, Chairperson; Beck, Black, Blacksmith, 
Blair, Celtnieks, Clark, Cortazzo, Davis, Dickie, Eltz, 
Grove, Hornfeck, Johnson, Klingaman, Liscinsky, 
Montgomery, Moore, Neal, Sloniger, Sutton, Thompson; 
and professor emeriti Aierstock, Sledzik 

The Department of Health and Physical Education provides the following 
services: 

( 1 ) instruction in health and wellness courses as part of the university's 
Liberal Studies requirement 

(2) instruction in health and physical education courses as Physical 
Education course electives 

(3) an undergraduate major in health and physical education that leads to 
the Bachelor of Science degree in Education with potential certification 
to teach in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

(4) Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education and Sport 

(5) Endorsement program in Driver Education — Safe Living 

Required Program — Liberal Studies 

The Department of Health and Physical Education through its Health and 
Wellness course in the Liberal Studies program seeks to enhance the overall 
well-being of students through instruction planned to promote and maintain 
desirable levels of physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Self- 
responsibility in the following dimensions of wellness is emphasized: 
nutritional awareness, stress awareness and management, exercise and 
fitness, substance use and abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases/AIDS. 
The importance of reducing risk factors for chronic degenerative disease and 
managing lifestyle factors for promotion of health is presented with 
implication for both the present and future. Information is provided during 
class lectures and enhanced by a variety of practical learning experiences 
which give students opportunities for self-assessment and personal 
application of the subject matter. 

In addition, the department offers a variety of one-credit activity courses 
focusing on physical fitness and the development of skills essential for 
recreation and lifetime sports. Instruction is offered in many activities 
including aerobic dance, archery, backpacking, badminton, bowling, 
canoeing, downhill skiing, fencing, golf, resistive exercise, rock climbing, 
scuba, swimming, tennis, volleyball, and others. 

The university's Liberal Studies requirements, in effect since fall, 1989, 
require that each student successfully complete HP 143: Health and Wellness 
or its alternate, FN143: Nutrition and Wellness. Students may also elect to 
take four semester hours of the ROTC program (MS 10 1-102) as an alternate 
to the wellness courses. Activity courses will continue to be offered, 
although they are no longer required. It is encouraged and recommended 
that students choose these courses as elective credits. 

Bachelor of Science Degree (Physical Education and Sport) 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Physical Education and Sport provides 
greater emphasis on subject matter/content and less on pedagogy. Students 



The College of Health and Human Services — 67 



v. Ih> select this emphasis area generally apply their know ledge in fields of 
exercise -.nonce, community and corporate fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, 
pre-physical therapy, and/or executive fitness programming. Requirements 
for the degree in Physical Education and Sport include: I ) the university's 
Liberal Studies requirements; 2)31 credit hours in the HPE Core: and 3) I 1 ' 
credits from the Physical Education and Sport requirements 

In addition, the Department of Health and Physical Education has developed 
mo programs approved In the National YMCA Physical Education Office 
to provide for the professional preparation of YMCA aquatic directors and 
physical directors. Both programs emphasize high standards and are vitally 
concerned with the major objectives of YMCA physical education. 
Specialized "Y" courses are offered through the IUP Aquatic School, the 
annual Middle Atlantic Region Aquatic Institute held at IUP each spring, 
and through other special YMCA programs conducted on the IUP campus 
and sponsored in cooperation with the Middle Atlantic Region Physical 
Education Program. 

Bachelor of Science in Education (Health and Physical 
Education) 

Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education with a 
major in Health and Physical Education include the university's Liberal 
Studies requirements. Professional Education requirements, and the Health 
and Physical Education core requirement. Upon completion of the degree 
program and successfully passing the National Teachers Exam, the student is 
qualified for an Instructional I Certificate in Health and Physical Education, 
issued by the Pennsylvania Department of Education in Harrisburg. This 
certificate is valid for teaching health and physical education in grades K 
through 12 for three years in the public schools of Pennsylvania. Major 
students may utilize free electives to specialize in aquatics. 

Health and Physical Education Core 

The Health and Physical Education curriculum identifies a required core of 
studies which emphasizes a body of knowledge relevant to the study of 
professional health and physical education, as well as the study of physical 
education and sport. Courses contained in the core are those which are 
intended to teach students to identify and solve problems by applying 
relevant knowledge and also to engage in self-directed learning. 

Candidates for the degree program in Health and Physical Education must 
demonstrate acceptable cognitive and psychomotor qualifications as well as 
desirable character and personality traits. The professional program seeks to 
foster those qualities of individual character and competence that are 
inherent in personal and professional maturity. These competencies are 
evaluated at the end of the sophomore year. The student is either granted 
Advanced Standing in the department or restricted in scheduling advanced 
courses for not less than one probationary semester. Continuation in the 
major program is based upon attainment of department Advanced Standing. 

Driver Education — Safe Living 7-12 

Candidates for the driver education certification must possess, or be a 
candidate for. a valid Pennsylvania certificate in any area of certification. A 
student must currently complete the four courses HP251, HP252, HP353, 
and HP354. Students must request the certificate in driver education-safe 
living 7-12 when they apply for graduation. For students who have already 
graduated, contact the office of the dean, College of Education, for correct 
procedure. 

Aquatics School Course Offerings 

Each summer the department offers the annual Aquatics School for eight 
consecutive days. Students must be seventeen years of age or older and 
possess the necessary aquatic prerequisites. A fee will be charged which will 
include room, three meals a day. use of equipment, accident insurance, 
transportation to and from the lake, and special one-night programs. 
Certification will be granted by the American Red Cross. National YMCA, 
Professional Association of Diving Instructors, and the American Heart 
Association upon completion of courses. All courses may be taken for 
college credit, if the student is eligible and pays the additional tuition fee. 
For more information, contact the aquatic director. Courses offered 
exclusively as a part of the Aquatics School are HP267. HP268, HP269. 
HP270. HP271. HP272. HP273. HP274, HP276. HP277. HP279, and 
HP280. Courses offered during the academic year as well as in summer 
school include HP242. HP261, HP265. and HP266. 



Bachelor of Science — Physical Education and Sport 



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 or MAI 10 or MA217 

Health and Wellness: FNI43 or MS101-102 

Natural Science: BI103-104 or CH101-102 

Social Science: PC101, S015I 

Liberal Studies Electives: FN145. CO/BE/IM 101, no courses 
with HP prefix 

Major 

Core Requirements: 

HP142 Foundations of Health and Physical Education 

HP200 Fundamentals of Physical Activity 

HP210 Motor Development 

HP221 Human Structure and Function 

HP246 Biomechanics 

HP25 1 Foundations of Safety and Emergency 
Health Care 

HP263 Aquatics 

HP341 Evaluation in Health and Physical Education 

HP343 Physiology of Exercise 

HP344 Adapted Physical Education 

HP441 Psychosocial Implications for Health and 
Physical Education 

HP442 Seminar in Health and Physical Education 
Professional Requirements: 

HP319 Preprofessional Experience II 

HP345 Athletic Training I 

HP346 Athletic Training Lab I 

HP375 Physiological Basis of Strength 

HP410 Exercise Prescription 

HP41 1 Physical Fitness/Appraisal Guidance 

HP4I2 Physical Activity and Stress Management 
Controlled Electives: ( 1 ) 

HP408 Guided Research 

HP4 1 3 Physical Activity and Aging 

HP246 Health Science Instruction 

HP482 Independent Study 

HP493 Internship 

BI151 Human Physiology 

BI155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 
Nutrition Minor Acceptable as Controlled Elective: 

CH255 Biochemistry and Nutrition 

FN212 Nutrition 

FN355 Nutrition in Disease I 

FN455 Nutrition in Disease II 

FN458 Advanced Human Nutrition 

FN463 Nutrition Counseling 

Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 



54 



31 



19 



3sh 
Ish 

2sh 
3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

lsh 
3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

6-13 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

6-12sh 
4sh 
4sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



tt 



7-14 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Nutrition minor may substitute for Controlled Electives 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Health and Physical 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 1 1 or MA 1 1 or MA2 1 7 

Health and Wellness: FN143 or MS101-102 

Natural Science: BI103-104 or CH101-102 

Social Science: PCI 01, SOI 5 1 

Liberal Studies electives: FN 145. PC378, or approved alternatives 

Major: 

Course Requirements: 31 

HP 142 Foundations of Health and Physical Education 3sh 

HP200 Fundamentals of Physical Activity lsh 

HP210 Motor Development 2sh 



68 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



HP221 Human Structure and Function 3sh 

HP246 Biomechanics 3sh 
HP25 1 Foundations of Safety and Emergency 

Health Care 3sh 

HP263 Aquatics lsh 
HP341 Evaluation in Health and Physical 

Education 3sh 

HP343 Physiology of Exercise 3sh 

HP344 Adapted Physical Education 3sh 

HP441 Psychosocial Implications for Health 3sh 

and Physical Education 

HP442 Seminar in Health and Physical Education 3sh 
Professional Requirements Health and Physical Education: 

HP211 Dance, Rhythmic Activities, and Gymnastics 3sh 

HP212 Team Sports 3sh 
HP213 Individual, Dual Sports, and Adventure 

Activities 3sh 

HP318 Preprofessional Experience I lsh 
HP321 Methods for Elementary Health and Physical 

Education 3sh 

HP325 School and Community Health 3sh 

HP426 Health Science Instruction 3sh 

HP450 Curriculum in Human Sexuality 3sh 

Professional Education Requirements: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II lsh 

ED421 Student Teaching 6sh 

ED441 Student Teaching 6sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 



24 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 







(#) Total Degree Requirements: 131 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Certification — Driver Education-Safe Living 

Certification in Driver Education-Safe Living may be added to a valid 
Pennsylvania Instructional Certificate with the completion of the 
following courses: 

HP251 Accident Causation and Prevention 3sh 

HP252 Introduction to the Driving Task 3sh 

HP353 Driving Education Program Management 3sh 

HP354 Application of Driver Ed. Instructional Modes 3sh 



Department of Home Economics 
Education 

The Department of Home Economics Education and the Department of 
Consumer Services have merged to form the Department of Human 
Development and Environmental Studies. 

See Department of Human Development and Environmental Studies. 

Department of Hotel, Restaurant, and 
Institutional Management 

Thomas Van Dyke, Chairperson; Baker, Cauffiel, Gressley, 
Marshall, Miller; and professors emeriti Simpkins, Woods 

The department offers students an academic preparation leading to a 
Bachelor of Science Degree in Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional 



Management. Students take general courses in business, chemistry, biology, 
computer, and foreign language. They then elect to concentrate in either 
food service management or lodging management. 

The food service management track prepares men and women for 
management positions in restaurants, corporate food services, entertainment 
or recreation food service, health care, or other institutional and contract 
food service. 

The lodging management track prepares women and men for management 
positions within hotels, resorts, and other lodging operations. Emphasis is 
on the study of housekeeping, rooms, and sales departments but also 
includes food production and service. 

Both programs require the student to complete 880 hours of hospitality 
industry work experience before graduation. The first 440 hours are 
completed during the freshman and sophomore years in any type of 
hospitality position selected by the student and must be completed before 
the internship is scheduled. The second 440 hours are completed during an 
internship. The internship is supervised by a faculty member who assists the 
student in developing the learning package to be achieved during the 
internship and who advises the intern on university, department, and site 
requirements. 

Professional-type uniforms are prescribed as part of the dress code for 
departmental majors in all food production classes. 



Bachelor of Science — Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional 
Management 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 

Natural Science: CH 101 -102 

Social Science: EC121.PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: CO/IM/BE101. FN 145. no course 
w ith an HR prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 33 

HR101 Introduction to Hospitality 3sh 

FN 150 Foods 3 s h 

FN151 Foods Lab lsh 

HR259 Hospitality Purchasing 3sh 

HR313 Food Systems I 4$h 

HR356 Human Resources in the Hospitality Industry 3sh 

HR401 Cost Management 3sh 

HR411 Seminar in Hospitality Management 3sh 

HR413 Food Systems II 3 s h 

HR493 Internship 6sh(l) 

Controlled electives: One Track required 12-15 

Food Service Management Track: 

FN145 Introduction to Nutrition *sh(2) 

HR306 Food and Beverage Management 3sh 

HR358 Food Service Equipment and Facilities Design 3sh 

HR406 Catering and Banquet Management 3sh 

HR408 Institutions Management 3sh 

Lodging Management Track: 

HR115 Introduction to Tourism 3sh 

HR360 Hotel Systems Management 3sh 

HR365 Hotel Design and Maintenance 3 sn 

HR420 Hotel Sales and Services 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 



Other Requirements: 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 
BI232 Fundamentals of Microbiology 
BL235 Introduction to Business Law 
MK320 Principles of Marketing 
FL — Foreign Languages 



15-21 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3-9sh(3) 



Free Electives: 



0-11 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



The College of Health and Human Services — 69 



(li 



(2) 
(3) 



Each Student imisi complete 8X0 hours of work experience, of which 
440 hours must be through supervised experiences in HR493. Sec 
department internship coordinator for detailed information. 
Credit counted in Liberal Studies electives 
Each student must have foreign language proficiency of either: 

A. Intermediate-level - SP201/FR202/GM252 OR 

B. Successful completion ol two semesters of one language. 
Intermediate-level courses ma) be used as Liberal Studies elective. 



Department of Human Development 
and Environmental Studies 

Donna L. Streifthau, Chairperson; Bell, Gordon, 
Heckroth, Kesner, Lynn, Nelson, Schmitt, Swinker, 
Viggiano, Wernsman; and professors emeritae Cramer, 
Gallati, Hovis, Kazmer, Wood 

The Department of Human Development and Environment Studies was 
created by the merging of the Home Economics Education and Consumer 
Services departments. The mission statement of the Department of Human 
Development and Environmental Studies is to empower individuals to 
support human and environmental needs, enabling them to perform 
professionally in a changing, diverse technological and global society. 

The department is composed of majors that are interdisciplinary and share 
humanistic values. All majors have an applied research focus and stress 
critical thinking, professional judgment, decision making, and synthesis 
of information. 

The Human Development and Environmental Studies Department offers 
academic programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the 
following majors: Child Development/Family Relations. Consumer Affairs. 
Fashion Merchandising, and Interior Design/Housing. The Home Economics 
Education program leads to a Bachelor of Science in Education. These 
majors prepare men and women for positions in business, the community, 
and education. The majors also prepare students for graduate study in the 
areas of interior design, housing, clothing, textiles, consumer economics, 
community service, child development, family studies or education. 

Faculty advisers work closely with students in planning and integrating the 
academic program to meet the students' career goals and to supplement 
classroom experiences. Internships are available and encouraged so students 
can apply academic knowledge to actual situations. International study is 
also available to provide an enriching cultural experience. 

Consumer Affairs 

The Consumer Affairs major prepares individuals for professional positions 
in government, business, and the community. This option concentrates on 
consumer economic behavior and consumer protection and their relationship 
to the fair exchange and consumption of products and services. The 
increased interest in consumer concerns has resulted in creating and 
expanding positions for persons with an understanding of consumer needs, 
business operations, and regulatory agencies. The interdisciplinary approach 
provides the necessary knowledge and skills to fulfill the requirements of 
such positions. 

Community Services Track 

Students can elect a community services track which offers a broad selection 
of courses. Electives may be concentrated in specific areas. A concentration 
of courses is elected in an outside field study such as sociology or 
psychology. Graduates may be employed by the Extension Services or by 
governmental and social agencies. 

Fashion Merchandising 

The Fashion Merchandising program provides course emphasis in apparel 
production and distribution, textiles, apparel merchandising and promotion, 
ready-to-wear analysis, quality control, historical costume, aesthetics, color 
theory, and apparel construction. The Eberly College of Business 
complements the Fashion Merchandising major by providing study in areas 
such as accounting, marketing, consumer behavior, advertising, and 
international marketing. 



A cooperative program between IUP and the Fashion Institute of 
Technology in New York City allows students to study fashion-accessories 
design, manufacturing management, advertising design, advertising and 
communication, textiles/surface design, and textile development and 
marketing. Potential careers include store operations managers, buyers, 
manufacturer's sales representatives, retail sales coordinators, merchandise 
managers, fashion coordinators, sales promoters, personnel managers, 
visual merchandisers, mall promotions managers, quality control 
analysts, production assistants, color consultants, and personalized 
shopping specialists. 

Interior Design/Housing 

The Interior Design program develops creative individuals who are able to 
conceive, propose, and implement design solutions supportive of the needs 
of people and the environment. Emphasis is placed on research, synthesis of 
information, and creative problem solving. Space planning, design graphics, 
lighting, color theory, historical and modern interiors, housing, and textiles 
from the core of the program. Students develop an understanding of the 
Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and its relationship to barrier-free 
design and a sensitivity to global environmental issues. Students tour a 
variety of settings including offices, museums, factories, showrooms, retail 
outlets, construction sites, and other design-related facilities. Supportive 
courses are available in art and business. Potential careers include 
commercial and residential design, housing, sales, historical preservation, 
and showroom management. 



Bachelor of Science — Consumer Affairs 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI01 or higher 

Natural Science: CHI01-102 

Social Science: EC 101, PC 101, S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with CS prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 

CS101 Personal and Family Management 

CS 1 2 1 Introduction to Consumer Services 

CS213 Residential Appliances and Consumer Electronics 

CS216 Clothing and Culture 

CS303 Visual Merchandising 

CS312 Housing and Culture 

CS314 Textiles 

CS315 Consumer Economics and Family Finance 

CS413 Problems in Consumer Economics 

CS421 Senior Seminar 

CS416 Problems in Family Finance 

FN212 Nutrition 

JN120 Journalistic Writing 
Controlled electives: 

Three courses from list: CS112, CS212. CS217, 
CS303, CS318, CS354. CS433, CS461, FN212, 
FN259, FN358, FN362. HR313 

Other Requirements: 

Outside concentration: 
Required: 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 

BL336 Law of Business Organizations 

BL337 Consumer Law 
Controlled electives: Three courses from list: 

AD321, MG300, MK320, MK321, MK433 

Free Electives: 



54-55 



42 



3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

6sh( 1 ) 



18 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

9sh(l) 

9-10 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Substitutions may be approved by department. 



70 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Bachelor of Science — Consumer Services/Community 
Services Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 or higher 

Natural Science: CH101-102 

Social Science: EC 101, PC101, SOI 51 

Liberal Studies electives: no course with CS prefix 

Major: 32 

Required courses: 

AR120 Principles of Design 2sh 

CS101 Personal and Family Management 3sh 

CS121 Introduction to Consumer Services lsh 
CS213 Residential Appliances and Consumer Electronics 3sh 

CS2I6 Clothing and Culture 3sh 

CS312 Housing and Culture 3sh 

CS314 Textiles 3sh 

CS315 Consumer Economics/Family Finance 3sh 

CS421 Senior Seminar 2sh 

FN212 Nutrition 3sh 

HE224 Marriage and Family Relations 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from list: CS112orCS212 3sh 

Other Requirements: 24 

Human Ecology requirements: 

FN 150 Foods 3sh 

HE218 Child Development 3sh 

Outside concentration: 18sh 

Six courses from list: AN21 1. AN319, PC374. PC290, 
PC322, PC310, PC311, PC320, PC321. PC330, PC361. 
PC373, PC312, S0231. S0332. S0333, S0336, S0339, 
S0357, S0435, SW238. 



Free Electives: 



13-14 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Science — Fashion Merchandising 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 or higher 

Natural Science: CH101-102 

Social Science: PC101. EC101. S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: BE/CO/IM101. no course with CS prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

CS121 Introduction to Consumer Services lsh 

CS216 Clothing and Culture 3sh 

CS314 Textiles 3sh 

CS315 Consumer Economics/Family Finance 3sh 

CS350 Apparel Industry I 3sh 

CS421 Senior Seminar 2sh 

CS450 Apparel Industry II 3sh 

CS456 Historic Costume 3sh 

JN120 Journalistic Writing 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from CS1 12 or CS2 12 3sh 
Courses from CS212. CS213. AR1 13 or 120, CS217, 14-I5sh 
CS303, CS354, CS433, CS434. CS453. CS455, 
CS465, EP303 

Other Requirements: 

Outside concentration: 
Required course: 

AG201 Principles of Accounting I 3sh 

Controlled electives: 15sh(l) 

Five courses from list: AD101 or MG360, BL235. 

AD321, BL336, BL337, AG202, AG301. AG302. DE332, 
DE333, EC122, QB215, IM300, FI310. IM251, MG300, 
MG410. MK320, MK321, MK420, MK422, MK430, MK433 



41-42 



18 



Free Electives: 9- 1 1 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(I) Substitutions may be approved by department. 



Bachelor of Science — Interior Design/Housing 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 or higher 

Fine Arts: AH101 

Natural Science: CH 101 -102 

Social Science: EC 101, PC 101. SOI 51 

Liberal Studies electives: AH205 or AH206. no courses 
with CS prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 

CS121 Introduction to Consumer Services lsh 
CS213 Residential Appliances and Consumer Electronics 3sh 

CS217 Interior Design 3sh 

CS312 Housing and Culture 3sh 

CS314 Textiles 3sh 

CS315 Consumer Economics and Family Finance 3sh 

CS357 Interior Design Studio 3sh 

CS421 Senior Seminar 2sh 

CS465 Interior Lighting 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from AR 1 1 3 or AR 1 20 3-2sh 
Courses from list: CS101. CS205. CS303, CS354 14-15sh 
CS433, CS462, CS463, CS464, CS481 



41 



Other Requirements: 

Outside concentration: Six courses from lisis 

Business: AD101 or MG360, AD321. FI382, AG201, 

DE331, DE332, DE333, IM300. FS242. MG300. 

MK320, MK433 
Art: ARI00.AR111.AR112.AR211.AR213.AR214, 

AR215, AR216.AR217.AR218.AR219, AR321.AR451 



I8sh 



Free Electives: 



10-11 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Home Economics Education 

The Home Economics Education major prepares students for the teaching of 
home economics-related subjects in the public schools. Coursework is 
required in all areas of home economics, including child development and 
family relations, consumer economics, clothing, foods, and interior design/ 
housing. Professional education courses are also required. The program is 
currently being restructured. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Home Economics 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Natural Science: CH 10 1-102 

Social Science: PC101, S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: CS315, no courses with HE prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II lsh 

ED431 Student Teaching in Home Economics 6sh 

ED441 Student Teaching 6sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

HE250 Introduction to Teaching Vocational Home 3sh 
Economics Education 



54 



33 



The College of Health and Human Services — 71 



HE350 Teaching Family Life Education 
HE450 Teaching Vocational Home Economics 

Major: 

Required courses: 

CS10I Personal and Family Management 

CS 1 1 2 Fundamentals of Clothing Construction 

CS217 Interior Design 

CS312 Housing and Culture 

CS314 Textiles 

FN 150 Foods 

FN212 Nutrition 

HE218 Child Development 

HE220 Teaching in Child Development Centers 

HE224 Marriage and Family Relations 
Controlled electives: 

One from list: CS212. CS453, CS454 

One from list: CS213 orCS4l3 

One from list: HR3 1 3 or FN362 

One from list: HE424 or HE463 

Other Requirements (select one): 

B1155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 
BI232 Fundamentals of Microbiology 



3sh 
3sh 



44-45 



3sh 

3sh 

3sh(l) 

3sh 

3sh 

4sh 

3sh 

3sh 

4sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3-4sh 

3sh 



4sh 
3sh 



Free Electives: 



3-4 







i2l(#) Total Degree Requirements: 134-136 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 

(1) Prerequisite for CS2 17 isAR120: Principles of Design (2sh). 

(2) Program is under revision: contact department for additional 
information. 



Child Development/Family Relations Major 

The Child Development/Family Relations program leads to a Bachelor of 
Science degree. Primary objectives of the program are to prepare 
professionals to administer and/or work in programs that entail aspects of 
child development and family relationships: to teach at the adult level; or 
administer human services agencies at federal, state, or local level. The 
program also provides preparation for students who want to pursue graduate 
study in child development or family studies. Students in Child 
Development/Family Relations may secure certification in Early Childhood 
Education through an optional program. 



Bachelor of Science — Child Development/Family Relations 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 101 or 110 or 121 or 217 

Natural Science: CH101-102 

Social Science: AN1 10, PC101, S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with HE prefix 

College: 6 

Human Ecology Requirements: 

FN212 Nutrition 3sh 

CS315 Consumer Economics and Family Finance 3sh 



Major: 

Required courses: 

HE218 Child Development 

HE220 Teaching in Child Development Centers 

HE224 Marriage and Family Relations 

HE317 Infant Development 

HE426 Techniques of Parent Education 

HE463 Family and the Community 
Controlled electives: (one track) 
Track A: Child Development/Family Relations 

HE32 1 Preschool Education (Developmental Programming) 

HE324 Family Dynamics 

HE418 Advanced Child Development 



31-34 



3sh 
4sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



HE422 Early Childhood Education 

HE424 Family Issues 
Track B: Child Development (by permission only) 

HE321 Preschool Education (Developmental 
Programming) 

HE418 Advanced Childhood Development 

HE420 Practicum 

HE422 Early Childhood Education 
Track C: Family Relations (by permission only) 

HE324 Family Dynamics 

HE424 Family Issues 

HE493 Internship 

Other Requirements: 
Outside courses: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 
BI 1 55 Human Physiology and Anatomy 
EP202 Educational Psychology 



3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
6sh 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
6sh 



3sh 
4sh 
3sh 



10 



Free Electives: 



18-23 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Department of Nursing and Allied 
Health Professions 

Jodell Kuzneski, Chairperson; Allen, Beck, Bellak, Berg, 
Black, Blair, Cunningham, Edwards, Gerwick, Hartman, 
Holt, Polansky, Rossiter, Sadler, Settlemyer, Smatlak, 
Snyder, Szwarc, Thistlethwaite, Twal, Walz, Zuraikat; and 
professors emeritae Hart, Kresak, Murray 

The College of Health and Human Services offers a curriculum leading to 
the Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing. Students are admitted to the 
nursing major as freshmen. Upon completion of the program, the graduate is 
prepared to write the examination for licensure as a Registered Nurse in 
Pennsylvania and other states. The program is fully accredited by the 
National League for Nursing. 

The nursing curriculum has as its primary goal the development of 
competent professional nurses who are liberally educated, clinically 
competent, and aware of their social responsibilities as members of the 
health professions. The program is designed to provide a broad background 
in general education, coupled with the specialized knowledge and skills 
required for professional nursing. Additionally, the curriculum prepares the 
nurse to practice within the professional code of nursing ethics, to function 
effectively as a member of the health care professions, and to utilize 
scientific principles in planning and implementing health care. The nursing 
program emphasizes concepts in health promotion and maintenance and 
restoration of wellness for people of all ages. 

The first three semesters are devoted mainly to Liberal Studies and science 
courses considered essential to the nursing major. The first clinical nursing 
courses begin in the fourth semester. Clinical experiences in patient care are 
provided in acute and long-term care facilities as well as community health 
agencies throughout the last five semesters. Detailed information is 
available in the department office regarding health screening requirements, 
professional uniform requirements, liability insurance needs, and 
transportation requirements. There is an option to complete the program in 
five years. 

Registered Nurse students are enrolled in the basic baccalaureate program in 
nursing. They will have an upper-division major in Nursing and will fulfill 
all degree requirements set by the university and the Nursing Department. 
The Registered Nurse student may be awarded advanced standing, based on 
prior work completed at an accredited college or university and on 
exemption tests in nursing at a given point in the curriculum. 



Bachelor of Science — Nursing 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217U) 

Natural Science: CH101-102 



55-56 



72 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Social Science: PC101, S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: PY151/161, PC310. no courses 
with NU prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 

NU280 Introduction to Nursing 

NU285 Introduction to Clinical 

NU300 Nursing Seminar I 

NU302 Corel 

NU303 Clinical Lab I 

NU304 Core II 

NU305 Clinical Lab II 

NU310 Nursing Seminar II 

NU322 Maintenance and Restoration of Wellness I 

NU323 Maintenance and Restoration of Wellness II 

NU400 Nursing Seminar III 

NU402 Core III 

NU403 Clinical Lab III 

NU404 Core IV 

NU405 Clinical Lab IV 

NU410 Nursing Seminar IV 

NU422 Maintenance and Restoration of Wellness III 

NU423 Maintenance and Restoration of Wellness IV 

NU430 Nursing Research 

Other Requirements: 

Science sequence: 

BI105 Cell Biology 



53 



BI150 

BI151 

BI241 

FN212 

PC321 

Free Electives: 



Human Anatomy 
Human Physiology 
General Microbiology 
Nutrition 
Abnormal Psychology 



3sh 
3sh 
lsh 
2sh 
5sh 
2sh 
5sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
lsh 
2sh 
5sh 
2sh 
5sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



4sh 
3sh 

4sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



20 



(#) 



(I) 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 128-129 

See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 
The Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing requires two units of high 
school mathematics (one of which is algebra) for admission to the 
nursing major. 



Allied Health Professions Programs 

Helen C. Cunningham, Coordinator 

Respiratory Care 

Respiratory therapists assist physicians in the care of patients who have 
respiratory system problems or illness that relates to breathing. Their 
assistance includes administering gaseous drugs and executing therapeutic 
procedures. Included are the operation and maintenance of specialized 
equipment. 

The program leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Respiratory Care. 
Presented jointly by IUP and the Western Pennsylvania Hospital in 
Pittsburgh, the program offers intensive theoretical and applied knowledge 
to produce highly skilled graduates who are prepared to enter the profession 
as therapists or instructors. 

Two academic years of university studies, followed by two academic years 
of hospital studies and clinical practice, constitute the program. Incoming 
students must maintain a QPA of 2.25 in Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
to be considered for admission into the clinical years in Respiratory Care. 
However, since admission to the hospital is competitive, IUP cannot 
guarantee admission into the hospital program. 



Fine Arts: one course 

Mathematics: MAI 10 or higher level 

Natural Science: CH101-102 

Social Sciences: PC101, S0151, non-Western course 

Health and Wellness/ROTC: H&W recommended 

Liberal Studies electives: one course from: CO101, PC378. 

BI265I 1 ), other course as approved by adviser 
Synthesis: not required 

Major: 

Required courses: 

Completed in junior and senior years at Western Pennsylvania 

Hospital in Pittsburgh 

RT326 Respiratory Care Clinical Practice I 

RT327 Pharmacology 

RT328 Introduction to Respiratory Care 

RT329 Respiratory Care Instrumentation 

RT330 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 

RT33 1 Introduction to Ventilator Management 

RT333 Respiratory Care Clinical Practice II 

RT334 Respiratory Care Instrumentation and 
Application 

RT335 Nursing Arts 

RT336 Cardiopulmonary Evaluation and Clinical 
Correlation 

RT337 Introduction to Pulmonary Functions 

RT426 Respiratory Care Clinical Practice III 

RT427 Applied Pulmonary Physiology 

RT428 Essentials of ECG Interpretation 

RT429 Design and Function of Respiratory Care 
Department 

RT430 Pulmonary Function Studies 

RT43 1 Pediatric Respiratory Care 

RT433 Respiratory Care Clinical Practice IV 

RT434 Pediatrics and Selected Topics 

RT436 Respiratory Care Teaching 

RT437 Methods in Critical Care 

RT438 Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 

Other Requirements: 

Science courses: 

BI105 Cell Biology 
BI150 Human Anatomy 
BI151 Human Physiology 
BI241 General Microbiology 
PY151 Medical Physics Lecture 
PY161 Medical Phvsics Lab 



3sh 

3sh 
4sh 

4sh 
2sh 
lsh 
4sh 
4sh 

3sh 
4sh 

lsh 
5sh 
4sh 
2sh 

2sh 
2sh 
lsh 
5sh 
3sh 
2sh 
2sh 
lsh 



4sh 
3sh 
4sh 
3sh 
3sh 
lsh 



62 



Bachelor of Science — Respiratory Care 

Liberal Studies: As follows: 
Composition: EN101, EN202 
Humanities: three courses, one in each area (PH222 recommended) 



45 



Free Electives: 

(#) Total Degree Requirements: 125 

( 1 ) Pending approval of course as Liberal Studies elective. 
(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Medical Technology 

Medical Technology encompasses the study of analytical and diagnostic 
procedures used in clinical laboratories and in medical research. Medical 
technologists perform a variety of laboratory tests upon which the physician 
depends for accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and proper treatment of the 
patient. The program of studies, presented jointly by IUP and accredited 
medical technology programs in hospitals, prepares the student to enter the 
profession. Upon completion of the four-year program, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology is granted. The program also 
prepares the student for graduate and professional schools. 

IUP maintains short- and long-term affiliations with selected hospital 
schools. The Allied Health Professions coordinator provides student 
counseling and maintains a liaison with hospital schools. However, since 
admission to any hospital program is on a competitive basis, IUP cannot 
guarantee admission into any hospital program. 

The following programs maintain permanent agreements of affiliations with 
IUP: Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington: Altoona Hospital. Altoona: 



The College of Health and Human Services — 73 



Conemaugh Valley Memorial Hospital, Johnstown; Harrisburg Hospital, 
Harrisburg; Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster; Latrobe Aa-a Hospital, 
Latrobe; Polyclinic Medical Center. Harrisburg; Medical College Hospitals, 
Klkms Park Hospital, Elkins Park; St. Vincent Health Center, brie; and 
Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh. Other temporary affiliations are 
negotiated lor the convenience <>l the ■.indent. 

Completion ol academic studies at IUP and ol one year of clinical 
experience qualities the student to take a national certification examination. 
Successful results on this examination lead to certification as a 
professionally qualified medical technologist 



appropriate standards of quality lor educational programs in nuclear 
medicine technology. 

The program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Nuclear Medicine 
Technology consists of three years of study at IUP and one year at the 
University of Findlay/Nuclear Medicine Institute in Findlay. Ohio. Incoming 
students must maintain a QPA of 2.25 in the Natural Science and 
Mathematics to be considered for admission to the Nuclear Medicine 
Institute. Since admission to the Nuclear Medicine Institute is competitive, 
IUP cannot guarantee admission into their program. 



Bachelor of Science — Medical Technology 

Liberal Studies: As follows 45 

Composition: EN101.EN202 

Humanities: three courses — one in each area (PH222 recommended) 

fine Arts: one course 

Mathematics: MAI 10 or higher level 

Natural Science: PY 11 1/121 and 112/122 

Social Sciences: three courses 

Health and Wellness/ROTC: H&W recommended 

Liberal Studies electives or synthesis: one course 

Major: 32 

Required courses: ( 1 1 

MT494 Clinical Microbiology 8sh 

MT495 Clinical Chemistry "' lOsh 

MT 496 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation 6sh 

MT 497 Clinical Immunohematology 4sh 

MT 498 Clinical Immunology/Serology 2sh 

MT 499 Clinical Seminar " 2sh 

Other Requirements: Science sequence 45 

Required courses: 

BI105 Cell Biology 4sh 

BI120 Animal Biology 5sh 

BI36I Microbiology 3sh 

BI364 Immunology 3sh 

CH 1 1 1 - 1 1 2 General Chemistry 1 and II 8sh 

CH23 1-232 Organic Chemistry 1 and II 8sh 

CH323 Analytical Methods 4sh 

CH351 Biochemistry 4sh 
Controlled electives: 

Two courses from list: BI263. 352. 360. 472. 476 6sh 

Free Electives: 4 

BI 1 5 1 Human Physiology strongly recommended 

(#) Total Degree Requirements: 126 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 

1 1 1 These courses are offered by our affiliating hospital-based clinical 

programs. These areas of study are consistent with requirements of the 
Committee for Allied Health Education Accreditation (CAHEA). All six 
of these areas of study are completed during the final twelve months of 
the degree program at one of the affiliating hospitals. 



Bachelor of Science — Nuclear Medicine 

Liberal Studies: As follows: 54 

Composition: EN101.EN202 7sh 

Humanities: three courses, one in each area 9sh 

Fine Arts: one course 3sh 

Mathematics: MAI 10 or higher level 3sh 

Natural Science: CH101-102 8sh 

Social Science: PC101, S0151, non-western 

social science (AN1 10 recommended) 9sh 

Health and Wellness/ROTC: HP143, FN143, or MS101-102 3sh 
Liberal Studies Electives/Synthesis: four Liberal 
Studies electives or three Liberal Studies electives 
and one Synthesis course 12sh 

Major: 32 

Required courses: ( 1 1 

NT427 Nuclear Scintigraphy 3sh 

NT428 Radiation Physics 3sh 

NT429 Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation 3sh 

NT430 Radiation Biology and Radiation Protection 2sh 

NT431 In Vivo/In Vitro Non-Imaging lsh 

NT432 Radiopharmaceutical 3sh 

NT433 Introduction to Tomographic Imaging lsh 

NT434 Clinical Nuclear Medicine 16sh 

Other Requirements: 18 

Science courses: 

BI150 Human Anatomy 3sh 

BI 151 Human Physiology 4sh 

PY 1 1 1 Physics I Lecture 3sh 

PY12I Physics I Lab lsh 

PY112 Physics II Lecture 3sh 

PY122 Physics II Lab lsh 

Required course: 

EN310 Public Speaking 3sh 

Free Electives: 20 

At least two of the selected courses must be Writing Intensive. 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) These courses are offered at the University of Findlay/Nuclear 

Medicine Institute. Findlay. Ohio. These areas of study are consistent 
with requirements of the Committee for Allied Health Education 
Accreditation (CAHEA). All eight of these ares of study are completed 
during the final twelve months of the degree program. 



Nuclear Medicine 

Nuclear Medicine is the medical specialty that utilizes the nuclear properties 
of radioactive and stable nuclides to make diagnostic evaluations of the 
anatomic or physiologic conditions of the body and to provide therapy with 
unsealed radioactive sources. A nuclear medicine technologist's skills 
complement those of the nuclear medicine physician and other allied health 
professionals. 

The nuclear medicine technologist is a highly trained individual who has 
completed an approved course in the theory of nuclear medicine technology. 
This allied health profession utilizes radioactive materials for the diagnosis 
of various pathological disease states and for the treatment of some specific 
disorders. The American College of Radiology, American Medical 
Association, American College of Medical Technology, American Society of 
Technologists. Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the Society of Medicine- 
Technologist Section cooperate to establish, maintain, and promote 



Gerontology Certification Program 

The Gerontology Certificate program provides an interdisciplinary approach 
to the systematic study of the aging and is designed to be combined with any 
undergraduate major at IUP. The 21 -credit-hour program entails three core 
courses, three elective courses, and an internship that will provide 
experiential learning in an agency or program serving older adults. Many 
courses fulfill the requirements for the Liberal Studies program. 
Applications are available at 222 Zink Hall. For information call 357-7647. 



Core Courses: (3 required) 

HP 48 1 Health Aspects of Aging 

or 

BI 160 Biology of Aging 

PC 312 Adult Development and Aging 

SO 357 Sociology of Aging 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



74 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Controlled Electives: 

AN322, AN340. AN444, CS315, FN410. HE324. HE456, HP413, 
MG300, MG3I1, NU616, PC376, PC378, PH400, PH405, RH312, 
SA380, S0322.S0336, SQ342, SQ345. SQ459. 



Other Requirements: 

XX 493 Internship 

Other Courses: 

GN 48 1 Special Topics 
GN 482 Independent Study 



3sh 



var 1 to 3sh 
var 1 to 3sh 



Total Requirements: 21 



Department of Safety Sciences 

Robert D. Soule, Chairperson; Chekanski, Christensen, 
Engler, McClay, McClosky, Pacalo, Reed 

The department offers the degree of Bachelor of Science in Safety Sciences 
with specialization in occupational safety and health. General industrial 
safety and mine safety tracks are offered within this curriculum. 

The degree in Safety Sciences prepares the student for professional, 
administrative, managerial, and supervisory positions in industry, 
manufacturing, insurance, transportation, utility, government, construction. 
trade service industries, and others. There remains an acute need in 
Pennsylvania and the nation for university-educated occupational safety and 
health professionals. The curriculum includes a major of 36 semester hours 
in Safety Sciences and an additional 18 semester hours in related 
professional courses. A variety of elective courses are available in both the 
major and professional course fields that enable students to strengthen their 
primary interest areas. 



Bachelor of Science — Safety Sciences/Industrial Safety 
Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Natural Science: CH101-102 

Social Science: POOL S0151, Non-western recommended 

Liberal Studies electives: EC122. MA122, MA217, no course with 
SA prefix 

Major: 36 

Required courses: Industrial Safety Track 

SA101 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health 3sh 

SA 1 1 1 Principles of Industrial Safety I 3sh 

SA21 1 Principles of Industrial Safety II 3sh 

SA301 Health Hazard Identification 3sh 

SA303 Control of Health Hazards 3sh 

SA311 Industrial Fire Protection 3sh 

SA402 Health Hazard Evaluation 3sh 

SA412 Evaluation of Safety Programs 3sh 

SA493 Internship 6sh 
Controlled electives: 

One course from list: SA345 or SA347 3sh 

One additional SA elective 3sh 

Other Requirements: 34 

Additional Science and Math 

PY 1 1 1 Physics I Lecture 3sh 

PY112 Physics II Lecture 3sh 

PY121 Physics I Lab lsh 

PY122 Physics II Lab lsh 

BI 155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 4sh 

Behavioral elective: 

One course from list: MG3 1 1 . PC37 1 , PC420, or SO340 3sh 

Computer elective: 

One course from list: CO101 or IM300 3sh 

Professional courses: 

MG330 Productions and Operations Management 3sh 

HP242 Emergency Health Care lsh 

Technical Writing elective: 



One course from list: EN322 or EN220 
Controlled electives: 

Three professional courses approved by student's 
adviser 



3sh 
9sh 



Free Electives: 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 126-127 



(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



36 



Bachelor of Science — Safety Sciences/Mine Safety Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Natural Science: CH 101- 102 

Social Science: PC101.SO151 

Liberal Studies electives: EC122, MA122. MA217. no courses 
with SA prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: Mining Safety Track 

SA102 Introduction to Mine Safety and Health 3sh 

SA 1 1 1 Principles of Industrial Safety I 3sh 

SA2 1 1 Principles of Industrial Safety II 3sh 

SA231 Principles of Mine Safety I 3sh 

SA232 Principles of Mine Safety II 3sh 

SA301 Health Hazard Identification 3sh 

SA401 Mine Ventilation 3sh 

SA402 Health Hazard Evaluation 3sh 

SA412 Evaluation of Safety Programs 3sh 

SA493 Internship 6sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from list: SA345 or SA347 3sh 



34 



Other Requirements: 

Additional Science and Math 

PY1 1 1 Physics I Lecture 3sh 

PY112 Physics II Lecture 3sh 

PY121 Physics I Lab lsh 

PY122 Physics II Lab lsh 

BI155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 4sh 

Behavioral elective: 

One course from list: MG3 1 1 , PC37 1 , PC420. or SO340 3sh 

Computer elective: 

One course from list: CO 101 or IM300 3sh 

Professional courses: 

MG330 Productions and Operations Management 3sh 

HP242 Emergency Health Care lsh 

Technical Writing elective: 

One course from list: EN322 or EN220 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Three professional courses approved by student's 9sh 

adviser 

Free Electives: 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 1 26- 1 27 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Minor — Safety Sciences \l 

Required courses: 

SAI01 Introduction to Occupational Safety 3sh(l) 

and Health 

SA111 Principles of Industrial Safety I 3sh(2) 

SA301 Health Hazard Identification 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Three SA courses approved by department chairperson 9sh 

(1) SA 102 Introduction to Mine Safety and Health may be an alternative forSAlOl. 

(2) S A2 1 1 Principles of Industrial Safety II may be an alternative for S A 1 1 1 . 



The College oj Humanities and Social Sciences — 75 




The College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences 

Brenda L. Carter, Dean 

Charles E. Cullum, Associate Dean 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences provides a libera] education 
as an essential foundation for student's preparation for a satisfying career. In 
a dynamic society such as America's, a broad liberal education is a 
necessity. The college maintains an emphasis on the fundamental 
understanding and application of the basic principles of our cultural 
heritage, combined with development of a thorough background of 
knowledge in the student's specific area of interest. It seeks to promote in 
students critical and objective thinking, analytical skill, and a keen 
awareness of their responsibilities to society. 



The college offers majors in 
Anthropology 
Criminology 
Economics 
English 

Foreign Languages and 
International Trade 
French 
Geography 
German 

Government and Public Service 
History 



Industrial and Labor 

Relations 

International Studies 

Journalism 

Law School Preparation 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Regional Planning 

Religious Studies 

Sociology 

Spanish 



Degrees 

The departments of Anthropology, Criminology, Economics, English, 
French. Geography and Regional Planning. German. History. Journalism. 



Philosophy and Religious Studies. Political Science, Spanish and Classical 
Languages, and Sociology offer work leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. 
The Bachelor of Science is offered in Regional Planning. In addition, the 
Associate ol Arts degree is offered by the Criminology Department at the 
Punxsutawney campus. Several departments offer Master of Arts or Master 
ol Science degrees in the university's Graduate School. The English and 
Criminology departments offer graduate programs leading to the Doctor ol 
Philosophy degree. Information about these programs may be obtained from 
the Graduate School. 

Degree Requirements 

In addition to the university's Liberal Studies requirements, all students 
seeking a baccalaureate degree in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences must complete the requirements for a major as established by the 
department through which they wish to specialize. Statements of these 
requirements, and for those minoring in a specific field, appear in the 
department sections that follow. A double major or minor may encompass a 
discipline outside as well as within the college but should be selected only 
with adviser approval. As a general principle, there is considerable latitude 
in course choice for Humanities and Social Sciences majors. The 
intermediate-level foreign language requirement (a description follows) 
applies without exception to all Humanities and Social Sciences four-year 
degree programs. 

College Language Requirements and Liberal Studies 

Students in the colleges of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and of 
Humanities and Social Sciences, who must pass the intermediate-level 
language sequence as a college requirement for graduation, may choose any 
of the languages offered. Self-instruction in Critical Languages fulfills the 
Liberal Studies requirement only in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences. The student with no previous foreign language study will take the 
entry-level courses as prerequisites. The credits will not be applicable to any 
college or departmental requirements but may be counted as free electives in 
the total required for graduation. Generally, students should schedule 
courses in accordance with their previous school or practical background. 

Individual placement will be determined during placement testing and 
registration prior to the first semester or summer session at IUP. Students 
whose placement testing demonstrates possession of competence equivalent 
to the intermediate level are considered to have fulfilled this requirement. 

Any foreign student, registered as such at IUP, whose acquired native 
language is other than English and who demonstrates an acceptable 
proficiency in English, is exempt from the foreign language requirement for 
a Humanities and Social Sciences degree if the department he/she is 
majoring in does not require a specific language. 

Critical Language Program 

This is a self-instructional course for the study of languages not taught in the 
classroom. The students are provided with texts, cassettes, and the services 
of a native speaker. Professional teachers of language from other 
universities will test performance. Interested students must contact the 
coordinator before registration. Each course carries 3sh/credit. 

The following languages may be available for study: Arabic, Chinese, 
Dutch, Modem Greek. Modern Hebrew, Classical Hebrew, Hindi. 
Hungarian. Italian. Japanese. Korean. Persian. Polish. Portuguese. Russian, 
Serbo-Croatian, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog. Thai, Turkish, and Vietnamese. 

For information, contact Dr. Victor S. Drescher. Director of the Critical 
Languages Program. 

Foreign Study Programs 

College majors may be interested in the various Foreign Study Programs 
and Tours. Credits obtained through such arrangements normally are 
applicable toward a Humanities and Social Sciences degree. Also of interest 
are the college's credit-awarding programs at Valladolid (Spain), Duisburg 
(Germany), and Nancy (France), as well as the Summer Study in Mexico 
Program. For information, contact the chair of the appropriate language 
department. 

IUP at Valladolid: Through the Spanish and Classical Languages 
Department, the university has offered a spring semester of study at the 
University of Valladolid. Spain, for the past seventeen years. The 
participants live in private homes. For details and brochures, contact the 
Department of Spanish and Classical Languages. 



76 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



IUP at Duisburg: IUP has a study abroad program at the University of 
Duisburg. West Germany. The program is open to German majors and other 
students having specific interest in a foreign study experience. Students 
must register for FL100 and pay a foreign exchange fee for each semester in 
the program. For further information, contact the German Department. 

IUP at Nancy: IUP has established a study program with the University of 
Nancy, France. Participants in the Nancy program must pay a foreign 
exchange fee for each semester in the program. For details, contact the 
French Department. 

IUP at Mexico Summer Program: The Spanish and Classical Languages 
Department sponsors a program of study in Spanish language in Mexico. 
The program is located at Cuernavaca, and the cost of the program includes 
transportation, complete room and board, insurance, and tuition. The student 
may earn up to 6 hours of undergraduate or graduate credit. Internship 
opportunities are available for students with fluency in Spanish. 

Preprofessional Programs 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers a preprofessional 
program in pre-law that prepares the student for application to a law school. 
This minor is in the following Social Sciences, Humanities, and Business 
departments: Pre-law in Business, Criminology, Economics, English, 
History. Philosophy, or Political Science. All programs are designed to lead 
to a baccalaureate degree and prepare students for law school. 

Coursework in the pre-law program centers upon a carefully developed 
interdisciplinary minor. For detailed guidance in pre-law, students should 
consult the pre-law adviser in their major department. 

Internship Programs 

Humanities and Social Science departments have extensive internship 
programs which allow students to engage in off -campus supervised work 
experience for credit. IUP students have worked in Harrisburg as aides to 
state legislators, with the Governor's Justice Commission and the Local 
Government Commission, and with the Investigations Division, 
Pennsylvania Department of Justice. Others have worked at correctional 
institutions in Pittsburgh. Greensburg, and Warrendale, as peer group 
counselors on the local campus, as an assistant to the Pennsylvania state 
Republican chairperson, as on-site guides at the I nited Nations, as workers 
on an Israeli kibbutz, and as student aides for the Department of Education, 
Puerto Rico. Other students have worked in the Pittsburgh federal probation 
office. Many students have worked with major political parties and 
candidates at the local and state levels. At the county level, they have been 
attached to the offices of the county planner, the Common Pleas Court, 
coroner, treasurer, commissioners, and borough manager. Students have also 
worked in the Washington offices of Pennsylvania congressmen and in many 
federal and international organizations in Washington as well. Opportunities 
for internships in other countries exist. For more information about specific 
internship programs, students should consult with the chair of the 
department in which the student is majoring. 



Department of Anthropology 

Miriam Chaiken, Chairperson; Conelly, Garcia, Koetje, 
ki in km. in. P. Neusius, S. Neusius, Olin-Fahle; and 
professor emerita Lanham 

The Anthropology Department, which was a component of the Sociology/ 
Anthropology Department, became a separate department effective 
July 1. 1993. 

The Anthropology Department promotes awareness of anthropological 
knowledge and methods and seeks to further the discipline and its 
applications to the problems of the contemporary world. Through teaching, 
research, and involvement in campus and community events and programs, 
fhe anthropology faculty members contribute to the liberal education of IUP 
students. The anthropology major itself equips students with knowledge 
and skills needed for full participation in the global environment of the 
21st century. 

Anthropology emphasizes the study of human biological and cultural 
diversity within its four subfields: sociocultural anthropology, biological 
anthropology, linguistics, and archaeology. All students receive a solid 



foundation in fhe discipline of anthropology and tailor their major fo 
specific interests by following one of the three tracks. 

The General Anthropology track continues the student's education in all of 
the subfields of anthropology, preparing fhe student for a graduate education 
in anthropology or in one of many related fields. The general frack also 
provides a solid base for interdisciplinary study with a number of other 
fields including biology, philosophy, political science, psychology, religious 
studies, sociology, and Spanish. 

The Archaeology track provides an emphasis on the study of culture through 
the material remains of human behavior. This track provides training for 
careers in the growing fields of cultural resource management and historic 
preservation, with opportunities for employment in both government and the 
private sector. A wide variety of internship opportunities provide hands-on 
training in these areas. 

The Applied Anthropology track provides students with a background in 
anthropological method and theory, a cross-cultural perspective, and an 
avenue fo translate this knowledge into action through internships and 
research. Examples of career opportunities include program design, 
implementation, and evaluation: policy analysis, administrative and 
managerial development; assessment of current and future human needs; 
and creation of strategies for social intervention and advocacy. In 
consultation with an adviser, each student will develop his or her own 
curriculum in order to build expertise in a specific topical area. 

The departmenf also offers preparation for teaching social studies with a 
concentration in anthropology. This program leads to a Bachelor of Science 
in Education degree. With its emphasis on cross-cultural comparisons, the 
realities of contemporary global cultures and cultural resource management, 
anthropology provides a solid foundation for teaching social science at the 
secondary level. Additionally the department offers a minor in anthropology. 



Bachelor of Arts — General Anthropology Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 

Social Science: S0151 (recommended) 

Liberal Studies electives: BE/CO/IM101 (recommended), 
no courses with AN prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (1) 



Major: 

Required courses: 

AN21I Cultural Anthropology 

AN222 Biological Anthropology 

AN233 Language and Culture 

AN244 Basic Archaeology 

AN456 Field Research Methods 
Controlled electives: 
One theory course: 

AN480 Anthropology Seminar or 

S0447 Modern Sociological Theory (2) 
Three courses in Topical Area Ethnography such as: 

AN27 1 Cultural Area Studies: Africa 

AN272 Cultural Area Studies: 

AN273 Cultural Area Studies: 

AN274 Cultural Area Studies 

AN3I4 Native Americans 



53-54 



0-6 



33 



China 

Southeast Asia 
Latin America 



Two additional AN electives (300 or 400 level) 
Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



3sh 
9sh 



6sh 




37-38 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) S0447: Modem Sociological Theory may be taken only with approval 
of the adviser. 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 77 



Bachelor of Arts — Anthropology/Archaeology Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-54 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics MA217 

Natural Science: GS 1 2 1/122- 1 3 1/1 32 (recommended) 

Social Science S0151 (recommended) 

liberal Studies eleclives: BF./CO/IM101 (recommended). 
no courses « ith AN prefix 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 36 

Required courses: 

AN211 Cultural Anthropology 3sh 

AN222 Biological Anthropology 3sh 

AN233 Language and Culture 3sh 

AN244 Basic Archaeology 3sh 

Controlled electives: 
Three methods courses: 

AN317 Archaeological Research Design and Analysis 3sh 

AN320 Archaeological Field School (2) 6sh 

AN415 Cultural Resource Management 3sh 

One theory course: 

AN480 Anthropology Seminar or 3sh 

S0447 Modern Sociological Theory (3) 
Two area courses, one in archaeology and one in 

ethnography, such as: 

AN213 World Archaeology or 3sh 

AN3 1 5 North American Archaeology 
and 

AN314 Native Americans or 3sh 

AN27 1/272/273/274 Cultural Area Study 
One topical course such as: 

AN401 Sociocultural Change or 3sh 

AN420 Cultural Ecology 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: (4) 37-38 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) For approval by adviser, an equivalent field school of another university 
must have a lab component. 

(3) S0447: Modern Sociological Theory may be taken only with approval 
of the adviser. 

(4) A minor in Goeoscience. Geography, History, or other approved field is 
recommended. An internship ( AN493) also is recommended. Your 
adviser should be consulted. 



Bachelor of Arts — Anthropology /Applied Anthropology 
Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-54 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 

Social Science: S0151 (recommended) 

Liberal Studies electives: BE/CO/IM101, no courses with AN prefix 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( I I 

Major: 36 

Required courses: 

AN211 Cultural Anthropology 3sh 

AN222 Biological Anthropology 3sh 

AN233 Language and Culture 3sh 

AN244 Basic Archaeology 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Two methods courses: 

AN360 Applied Anthropology 3sh 

AN456 Field Research Methods 3sh 



One theory course: 

AN480 Anthropology Seminar or 
S0447 Modern Sociological Theory (2) 

One area course: 

AN314 Native Americans or 

AN27 1/2727273/274 Cultural Area Study 

Two additional AN electives (300 or 400 level) 
Internship in Anthropology (3) 

Other Requirements: (recommended) 
EN322 Technical Writing 
S0231 Contemporary Social Problems 
S0457 Computer Use in Sociology 



3sh 



3sh 

6sh 
6sh 



Free Electives: 



34-35 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) S0447: Modern Social Theory may be taken only with permission of 
the adviser. 

(3) Internship is highly recommended but may be replaced by 6sh of 
pragmatic skill courses upon approval of adviser. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Social Sciences 
Education/Anthropology Concentration (*) 



Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: AN211, EC121, PC101 
Liberal Studies electives: EC 122, GE230, no courses 
with AN prefix 

College: 

Professional Education Sequence ( 1 ) 

CM30I Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II 

ED44 1 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED455 Teaching of Social Sciences in Secondary 

School 
EP202 Educational Psychology 
EP377 Educational Tests and Measurement 
FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

Major: 

Required Anthropology courses: 

AN2 1 1 Cultural Anthropology 

AN222 Biological Anthropology 

AN233 Language and Culture 

AN244 Basic Archaeology 
Two area ethnography courses: 

( AN27 1 , AN272, AN273, or AN3 1 4 ) 
Two additional Anthropology courses 

numbered 300 or above 
History Distributional Requirements: 

Any two History courses which focus on the U.S. 

Any Non-Western or World History course 
Required Social Science Distribution: 

PS280 or PS285 

GE104, GE252, GE255, GE256, or GE257 

Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: (2) 



53-55 



30 



3sh 

lsh 
lsh 
12sh 
lsh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



*sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

6sh 

6sh 

6sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 



21 




0-17 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(1) Students who do not pass a special education competency test must take 
EX300; this will reduce free electives. 



78 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



(2) If certain courses are chosen for Social Sciences major, they may also 
fulfill Liberal Studies requirements and permit additional free electives. 



Minor — Anthropology 

Required course: 

AN 1 1 Contemporary Anthropology 
Controlled electives: 

Four additional courses in Anthropology 



15 



3sh 
12sh 



Department of Criminology 

Joseph Bogan, Chairperson; Austin, Berg, Cohen, Gibbs, 
Hanrahan, Martin, McCauley, McNabb, Melodini, Moyer, 
Mutchnick, J. Thomas, Wegener, Wilson, Zimmerman 

The Department of Criminology offers men and women seeking careers in 
criminology a broad liberal arts education supported by a professional 
education program. The degree offered is the Bachelor of Arts with a major 
in Criminology, under the College of Humanities and Social Sciences; 
students may also minor in Criminology. Through the Graduate School the 
department offers graduate work at the master's and doctoral level. 

The program in Criminology has a five-fold objective: 

1. The education of students for employment and leadership in the 
expanding field of criminology and criminal justice 

2. The education of presently employed criminal justice personnel who 
recognize a need for furthering their education 

3. The instruction of students who wish to acquire an understanding of the 
processes of criminal justice as a cultural part of their higher education 

4. The instruction of students who wish to prepare for graduate study and/or 
research in criminology 

5. A curriculum that provides an excellent foundation for students preparing 
for a career in law 

Nearly every level of government offers opportunities for professional 
careers in criminology. Employment opportunities normally exist in more 
than fifty federal agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
U.S. Secret Service, U.S. Postal Inspectors, Drug Enforcement Agency, 
Bureau of Alcohol. Tobacco and Firearms, National Security Agency, U.S. 
Marshals, the Internal Revenue Service, and military investigative branches. 
Graduates will find employment in local and state law enforcement, 
probation, parole and the custody and treatment of adult and youthful 
offenders. There is also a wide variety of opportunities in the expanding 
fields of private, commercial, and industrial security. In addition, many 
governmental agencies have specialized units dealing with juveniles, 
community relations, training, education, and research. 

Career opportunities are available also in research and teaching at the 
college and university levels and in research divisions of various agencies. 

Students who wish to change their major or minor to Criminology or Pre- 
Law Criminology must have an overall Q.P.A. of 2.5 to declare the major or 
minor and to be accepted formally by the department. 

For new entering freshmen, the department will utilize a junior status 
screening criteria and procedure for junior status approval as described in 
the section. "Sophomore Screening for Junior Status Approval." 



Major: 






Required courses: 




CR102 


Survey of Criminology 


3sh 


CR210 


Criminal Law 


3sh 


CR300 


Theories of Complex Criminal Justice 






Organizations 


3sh 


CR306 


Research Methods 


3sh 


CR400 


Theoretical Criminology 


3sh 


CR401 


Contemporary Issues 


3sh 


Controlled 


electives: 




One course from list: CR416, 451, 470, 491 


3sh 


Five additional Criminology courses 


15sh(2) 



36 



Free Electives: (3) 



27-35 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) No more than 6sh of CR493: Internship may be applied to 36sh 
minimum in major. 

(3) Students selecting a minor may apply no more than 15sh outside the 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences without special approval. 



Bachelor of Arts in Criminology/Pre-Law 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with CR prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 



53-55 



0-6 



ajor: 




Required courses: 




CR102 Survey of Criminology 


3sh 


CR210 Criminal Law 


3sh 


CR300 Theories of Complex Criminal Justice 




Organizations 


3sh 


CR306 Research Methods 


3sh 


CR400 Theoretical Criminology 


3sh 


CR401 Contemporary Issues 


3sh 


Controlled electives: 




One course from list: CR4I6, 451, 470. 491 


3sh 


Five additional Criminology courses 


15sh(2) 



36 



Other Requirements: Prelaw interdisciplinary minor 

Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas: 
Business: BL235. AG201. AG202 
Economics: EC 121, EC 122. EC332 
English: EN213, EN220. EN310 
History: HI320, HI321. HI346 
Philosophy: PH101, PH222, PH450 
Political Science: PS358. PS359, PS361 



15-21 



Free Electives: (3) 



6-20 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) No more than 6sh of CR493: Internship may be applied to 36sh 
minimum in major. 

(3) Students selecting a minor may apply no more than 15sh outside 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences without special approval. 



Bachelor of Arts in Criminology 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with CR prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (1) 



53-55 



0-6 



Associate of Arts in Criminology (offered only at 
PunxsutawneyMD 

Liberal Studies: As follows: 3"* 

English: EN 101, EN202 7 s h 

Mathematics: MA 101 or substitute 3 s h 

Humanities: one course from lists 3 s h 

Fine Arts: one course from list 3sh 

Natural Science: laboratory science sequence required 8sh 

Social Science: PC101. PS111, S0151 9sh 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 79 



Major: 

Required courses: 

CR 101 Crime and Justice Systems 

CRI02 Survey of Criminology 

CR:io Criminal Law 

CR270 Juvenile Justice System 

CR283 Police Pairol Management 

CR291 Theory and Techniques of Interviewing 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 



18 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

Ish 



Total Degree Requirements: 60 



( 1 ) This program is being discontinued over coming academic year: contact 
department for lurther advice. 



Minor in Criminology 

Minor: 1 1 ) 

Required courses: 

CRI02 Survey of Criminology 

CR210 Criminal Law 

CR300 Complex Organization 

CR306 Research Methods 

CR400 Theoretical Criminology 

CR401 Contemporary Issues 



18 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



(I) Must have formal criminology department approval to be admitted to 
minor in Criminology 



Department of Economics 

Donald A. Walker, Chairperson; Asamoah, Cross, Dyal, 
Garvin, Holt, Huff, Karatjas, Martel, Radakovic, Radell, 
Stonebraker, Ware 

The Department of Economics offers programs for majors who intend to 
pursue careers as economists in education, government, industry, finance, or 
commerce. The economist in today's world occupies an increasingly 
important position, and great opportunity exists for qualified people. 

Three different degree programs are available: a Bachelor of Arts in 
Economics that prepares students for immediate employment or graduate 
school; a pre-law Bachelor of Arts in Economics for students who wish to 
attend law school; and the Bachelor of Science in Education that prepares 
students to teach economics and other social sciences in secondary schools. 

The Department of Economics offers concentrations in particular areas of 
Economics. The concentrations are designed to equip students with the 
education and skills that will enable them to obtain a position in government 
or private business upon completion of the undergraduate program. The 
concentrations available at present are 

Competition and Public Policy 

Economics of Government Affairs 

International Economics 

Labor Economics 

Managerial Economics 

Quantitative Economics 
Detailed information regarding these concentrations may be obtained 
from the department chairperson. Concentrations are not restricted to 
Economics majors. 

Either Basic Economics (EC 101) or Principles of Economics (EC121) will 
count as a Liberal Studies Social Science course. However, EC101 is 
intended for students who will take one and only one course in the field. 
Students who anticipate taking more than one Economics course should 
schedule EC121. EC101 will not count toward either a major or minor in 
Economics and may not be taken after the successful completion of or in 
concurrent registrations with any other Economics course. 



Economics majors are encouraged to minor in one of the other Social 
Sciences, in Business, or in Mathematics. A minor in Mathematics is 
strongly recommended for those whose future may include graduate work 
in Economics. 

The Department of Economics also houses the Center for Economic 
Education. The center is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization affiliated with 
both the Pennsylvania Council on Economic Education (PCEE) and the 
national Joint Council on Economic Education (JCEE). Its mission is to 
upgrade the quality of economic education in kindergarten through twelfth 
grade. The Center for Economic Education performs the following 
functions: teacher training, consulting services, research, materials 
development, and programs in economic education for adults. Drs. Nicholas 
Karatjas and Arthur H. Martel are co-directors of the Center. 



Bachelor of Arts — Economics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: EC121 

Mathematics: MAI 10 or MA 121 (1 ) 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with EC prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (2) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

EC121 Principles of Economics I 

EC 122 Principles of Economics II 

EC355 Statistics for Economists 

EC42 1 Macro Analysis 

EC422 Micro Analysis 

MA 121 Calculus I for Natural and Social Sciences and 
Business 
Controlled electives: 

Four other EC courses 



53-56 



0-6 



24 



*sh 
3sh 

3sh(3) 

3sh 

3sh 

*sh(l) 



12sh 



Free Electives: 



38-47 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) MA 123 or MA 127 may be substituted for MAI 21. 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(3) MA214, MA217 or MA363 may be substituted for EC355. 



Bachelor of Arts — Economics/Pre-law 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 
Social Science: EC121 
Mathematics: MA110 or MA121 (1) 
Liberal Studies electives: no courses with EC prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (2) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

EC 1 2 1 Principles of Economics I 

EC 122 Principles of Economics II 

EC355 Statistics for Economists(3) 

EC42 1 Macro Analysis 

EC422 Micro Analysis 

MA121 Calculus I for Natural and Social Sciences and 
Business! 1) 
Controlled electives: 

Four other EC courses 

Other Requirements: Prelaw interdisciplinary minor 

Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas: 
Business: BL235. AG201, AG202 
Criminology: CR210, CR260, CR357 
English: EN213, EN220, EN310 



53-56 



0-6 



24 



*sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

*sh 

12sh 



6-21 



80 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



History: HI320. HI321, HI346 
Philosophy: PH101, PH222, PH450 
Political Science: PS358. PS359, PS361 



Free Electives: 



17-36 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) MA 123, or MA 127 may be substituted for MA121. 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(3) MA214, MA217, or MA363 may be substituted for EC355. 



Bachelor of Arts — Economics/Mathematics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 47-49 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: EC121 (included in major) 

Mathematics: MA 127 (included in major) 

Electives: Intermediate foreign language, no course with EC or 
MA prefix. 

Major: 54-56 

Core: 

EC 1 2 1 Principles of Economics I 

EC122 Principles of Economics II 

EC42 1 Macroeconomics Analysis 

EC422 Microeconomics Analysis 

MA 127 Calculus I 

MA128 Calculus II 

MA227 Calculus III 

MA 171 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MA216orEC355 Statistics 
Economics Electives: 

Students are especially encouraged to take EC334 

(Economics of Corporate Decisions), and EC356 

(Econometrics), but any course except EClOKBasic 

Economics) may be used. EC493( Internship) may be 

counted only with the approval of the program coordinator. 
Mathematics Electives: 

At least one of the following two-semester sequences: 

MA241 Differential Equations and MA371 Linear Algebra 

MA363 and MA364 Mathematical Statistics I and II 

MA445 and MA446 Programing and Probalistic Models in O.R. 
Two additional courses either from the above or from the following: 

MA271 Introduction to Algebraic Structures 

MA342 Advanced Mathematics for Applications 

MA417 Statistical Applications or MA418 Sampling Survey Theory 

MA421 Advanced Calculus I 

MA422 Advanced Calculus II 

MA423 Complex Variables I 

MA425 Applied Mathematical Analysis I 

MA427 Topography 

MA465 Topics in Statistics 

MA476 Abstract Algebra I 

MA477 Abstract Algebra II 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
3sh 
3-4sh 
12 



12-13 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 





19-23 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Social Science 
Education/Economics Track (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PC 101 . PS 1 1 1 , AN 1 10 or AN2 1 1 

Mathematics: MA110 or MA217 or MA121 

Liberal Studies electives: GE230. SQ237 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 
ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 



30 



ED342 


Pre-student Teaching II 


lsh 


ED441 


Student Teaching 


12sh 


ED442 


School Law 


lsh 


ED455 


Teaching of Social Science in the 






Secondary School 


3sh 


EP202 


Educational Psychology 


3sh 


EP377 


Educational Tests and Measurement 


3sh 


FE202 


American Education in Theory and Practice 


3sh 



Major: 21 

Required Economics courses: 

EC121 Principles of Economics I 3sh 

EC122 Principles of Economics II 3sh 

Controlled Economics electives: 15sh 

Upper-level Economics courses including at leasl 
one writing-intensive course and at least one 
course from each of the following three groups: 
International courses: EC339, EC345, EC350. EC351 
Macroeconomic courses: EC325. EC343. EC421 
Microeconomic courses: EC283. EC330. EC331, EC332, 
EC333. EC335. EC336. EC373. EC383 

Other Requirements: 15-18 

Required Social Science distribution 

HI203 U.S. History for Historians 3sh 

GE 3sh 

PS280orPS285 Comparative Governments 3sh 

Social Science minor 6-9sh ( 1 ) 



Free Electives: 



0-4 



Total Degree Requirements: 1 24 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 

on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 
( 1 ) Students must complete a minor in second Social Science of their 

choice. The coursework for each alternative is described below. 

Some of the courses chosen may also fulfill the third Liberal Studies 

elective course above. 

1. Anthropology: AN110 or AN21 1. 12 additional sh in AN 

2. Geography: GE230 (3sh) and 12 additional sh in GE 

3. History: HI195 (3sh). HI203 (3sh), 9 additional sh in HI 

4. Political Science: PS1 11, PS280 or PS285, 9 additional sh in PS 

5. Sociology: S0151. S0237. 9 additional sh in SO 



Minor in Economics 

Minor: 

Required courses: 

EC121 Principles of Economics I 
EC 122 Principles of Economics II 

Three courses from EC200 or higher 



15 



3sh 
3sh 
9sh 



3sh 
lsh 



Department of English 

James Gray. Chairperson; Aghbar, Alvine, Bencich, 
Berlin, Bower, Cahalan, Carse, Chow, Cook, Curey, 
Dandurand, Downing, Emerick, Fritz, Gatti, Gebliard, 
Goebel, Hartwell, M. Hayward, N. Hayward, Heny, B. 
Hudson, S. Hudson, Hurlbert, R.G. Johnson, Kilwein- 
Guevara, Kraszewski, Krupnik, Masiello, McAndrew, D. 
McClure, S. McClure, Rodriguez-Milanes, Murphy, Nania, 
Norris, Perdue, Rafoth, R. Roffman, Ruh, Savova, R. 
Shafer, Slater, Smits, Swigart, Tannacito, R.L. Thomas, 
Vella, Waddell, Welsh, Williamson, T.K. Wilson, 
Woodworth, Yarup, Zalazar; and professors emeriti 
Anderson, Betts, J. Bright, L. Bright, Brown, Craig, Davis, 
Freund, Grayburn, Hull, McManmon, Miller, Ray, Rider, 
Roumm, Seacrist, Seinfelt, Smith, Watta 

The program of studies in the English Department at IUP focuses on critical 
thinking and effective reading and writing at all levels. English majors 



The t 'allege of Humanities and Social Sciences — 81 



stud\ .1 unit- varietj ol subjects ranging from litcraiy theory io practical 
pedagogy, in an atmosphere that encourages and fosters a high degree of 
professional commitment. 

Course choices depend upon a student's career goals; three specialized 
majors are offered, each of which undergoes regular revision to reflect the 

needs of students and the structure ol a changing, competitive job market. 

The English Education program oilers special training for prospective 
secondary school teachers. IUP's consistent success in placing graduates 
from this major in leaching positions suggests that the program is highly 
regarded among educators outside the university. 

Pre l.i« oilers specialized training lor those interested in a career in law or 
some related field. The B.A. in English Humanities oilers a wide range of 
courses in both traditional and nontraditional areas, which allows students to 
tailor their programs to reflect their own interests and career plans. 

The department offers the following degrees: 

English Humanities 

The English Department B.A. Humanities curriculum emphasizes several of 
the traditional concerns of English literary study in nontraditional ways. 
Specifically, the student satisfies the literature requirements by taking 
preliminary courses which survey English and American literature and then 
choosing particular courses from each of five categories, each category 
reflecting a specific locus. 

One category focuses upon literature as a "mode of awareness," a 
philosophic emphasis, and offers such courses as "The Melaphonc 
Perspective." "Symbol and Allegory," "The Oral Tradition." etc. 

A second category views literature from an historical perspective and offers 
such courses as "The Puritan Mind in England and America," "The 
Renaissance." and "Romanticism." 

A third category examines literature from a psychological point of view 
through such courses as "Myth in Literature." "Hero and Anti-Hero," and 
"The Literature of Alienation." 

The fourth category deals with social considerations of perennial importance 
and offers such courses as "War in Literature," "Poverty and Class," and 
"Man in the Natural World." 

The fifth category examines the literary output of a single major author: 
Chaucer. Shakespeare, Milton, or a major American author or authors. 

Courses from other areas (Critical. Creative and Technical Writing, Speech, 
Film. Language, and Communication Studies) complement the literature 
program selected by the student with his or her adviser's assistance. 

Students, especially those for whom the B.A. is a terminal degree, are 
advised to consider an internship in their junior or senior year. 

Since the major can be completed with 36 hours of coursework. students 
have 30-36 hours, depending on their foreign language status, of unspecified 
coursework. They should plan carefully with their adviser as to how these 
credits might best be earned, relevant to future goals. 

Education Program 

The English Department offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Science 
Degree in English Education. Graduates are prepared to teach in middle, 
junior high, and senior high schools. Job opportunities in these areas have 
risen significantly in the past few years. 

The English Education majors receive all of the usual professional training, 
including practical experience in methods courses and student teaching, but 
they are also graduated with a thorough preparation in the subject matter 
areas of literature, language, and composition. Although most students 
choosing an English Education major will be fitted both by training and 
desire for the secondary school classroom, those who opt not to teach will 
find that their speaking and writing skills can be useful to the media, 
governmental services, and industries. 



Program requirements are available at the English Department office. 
Requirements include a portfolio of written work, faculty evaluations, and 
an annual review of progress. 

Pre-Law English 

Successful lawyers possess excellent skills in writing and speaking and can 
analyze a problem and explain its solution in clear, logical terms. Pre-Law 
English prepares the student especially well in these areas and provides the 
skills and knowledge needed to do well in the law school admissions 
examination. 

Most graduates have had successful internships in the offices of practicing 
attorneys and government agencies, although an internship remains optional. 
Students wishing an internship should contact the department director of 
internships. Dr. Bob Curey. early in their career at IUP. 

Minor in English Department 

To minor in English, 15 semester hours in English are required beyond the 
Liberal Studies requirement of EN 101, EN 121, and EN202. 

Students who choose to minor in English should, if their major department 
concurs, substitute EN210: Introduction to Literary Analysis for EN121. 

English as a Second Language (ESL) Program 
The English department's English as a Second Language curriculum 
consists of a sequence of courses: EN150 ESL, ENI00 ESL, EN101 ESL. 
EN121 ESL. and EN202 ESL. These courses satisfy the same university 
and college requirements as their non-ESL equivalents: like the non-ESL 
courses, they are designed to focus on skills needed for successful use of 
language in an academic setting. However, the methodology and curriculum 
for these courses are specially designed to meet the needs of non-native 
speakers of English, and only non-native students are permitted to enroll in 
sections designated "ESL." Placement of students in these sections is 
determined by the results of the English Department ESL Placement Test, 
given at the beginning of each term. 

The Writing Center 

The English Department maintains a writing center, which all students are 
encouraged to use. Instructors may refer students to the center, or students 
may seek help on their own. Call the English Department for information 
on hours of operation. 



Bachelor of Arts — English 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Humanities — Literature: EN210 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with EN prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

EN21 1 English Literature to the Restoration 
EN212 English Literature from the Restoration to 1900 
EN213 American Literature: Beginnings to Present 
Controlled electives: 

EN350, 351,352, 353 
EN360, 361,362. 363 
EN370, 371,372, 373 
EN380. 381.382, 383, 384 
EN208. 310, 311, 329, 330, 333 
EN220, 221,320, 321,322 
EN 340, 341,342, 343 
Any combination of six 



53-55 



0-6 



36 



One course from list A: 
One course from list B: 
One course from list C: 
One course from list D: 
One course from list E: 
One course from list F: 
One course from list G: 
Two courses from list H: 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
6sh(2) 



semester hours from EN481 Special Topics, 
Categories A-G. EN482 Independent Study, or 
EN493 Internship. 

Other Requirements: 

FreeElectives:(3) 





27-35 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



-Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) Any EN48 1 course must have prior approval from department chair if it 
is to apply to the student's major other than in Category H. 

(3) An internship, aside from counting for six semester hours toward the 
major, makes the B.A. degree recipient much more employable by 
providing job experience. Students should see Dr. Curey, internship 
director, for advice about available openings. 



Bachelor of Arts — English/Pre-law 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Humanities — Literature: EN210 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with EN prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

EN21 1 English Literature to the Restoration 
EN212 English Literature from the Restoration to 1900 
EN213 American Literature: Beginnings to Present 
Controlled electives: 

EN350, 351, 352.353 
EN360. 361,362. 363 
EN370. 371,372. 373 
EN380. 381,382, 383, 384 
EN208, 235, 310, 311,329, 



53-55 



0-6 



36 



One course from list A: 
One course from list B: 
One course from list C: 
One course from list D: 
One course from list E: 

330, 333, 334 
One course from list F: 
One course from list G: 



EN220, 221 
EN340. 341 



222, 223. 321, 
, 342, 343 



324 



Two courses from list H: Any combination of six 
semester hours from EN481 Special Topics, 
Categories A-G, EN482 Independent Study, or 
EN493 Internship. 

Other Requirements: Prelaw interdisciplinary minor 

Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas: 

Business: BL235. AG201, AG202 

Criminology: CR210, CR260. CR357 

Economics: EC121. EC122, EC332 

History: HI320, HI321, HI346 

Philosophy: PH101. PH222, PH450 

Political Science: PS358, PS359, PS361 
Comprehensive Examination at conclusion of senior year 

Free Electives:(3) 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
6sh(2) 



3-21 



6-26 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Libera] 
Studies elective. 

(2) Any EN48 1 course must have prior approval from department chair if it 
is to apply to the student's major. 

(3) An internship with a law firm, public agency, or legislative office 
greatly strengthens law school applications. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — English Education (*) 
Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Humanities — Literature: EN210 

Fine Arts: TH101 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: Intermediate-Level Foreign Language, 
no courses with EN prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 
ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 
ED342 Pre-student Teaching II 
ED441 Student Teaching 



30 



3sh 

lsh 

lsh 

12sh 



ED442 School Law lsh 

ED452 Teaching of English in the Secondary School 3sh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurement 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 40 

Required courses: 

EN213 American Literature 3sh 

EN220 Advanced Composition I 3sh 
EN314 Speech and Communication in the 

Secondary English Classroom 3sh 

EN318 Literature of Adolescents 3sh 
EN323 Teaching Literature and Reading 

in the Secondary School 3sh 

EN324 Teaching and Evaluating Writing 3sh 

EN329 History of the English Language lsh 

EN330 Structure of English 3sh 

EN341 Shakespeare 3sh 
Controlled electives: 

Choose one Genre course: EN214, 215, 216, 217 3sh 

Choose one British Literature Survey: EN21 1.212 3sh 

Choose one Theme course: EN372, 38 1 . 348 3sh 

Choose two additional courses from list: 6sh 
EN208, 21 1, 212, 214. 215, 216. 217. 221. 
320, 322, 332. 333. 336. 348, 372. 381 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 2-4 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 



Department of French 

Robert L. Whitmer, Chairperson; Henry, Jones, Liscinsky, 
McCreary, Op de Beeck; and professor emeritus Fisel 

The Department of French offers a varied curriculum designed to provide 
not only basic language instruction but also the more advanced 
competencies needed by language specialists and students hoping to take 
advantage of an international study experience. For the French major, the 
department has three degree programs: B.S. in Education (K-12), B.A. in 
Liberal Arts, and the B.A. in French for International Trade. The latter 
degree program provides solid undergraduate training preparatory to an 
M.B.A. in International Marketing and Finance. 

Students majoring in French will acquire proficiency in all phases of the 
language and enter more deeply into the history, culture, and literature of 
Francophone countries. They will also gain some knowledge of the 
linguistic development of the language throughout the centuries. French 
majors generally find employment in government work, librarianship. 
journalism, foreign trade, airlines, tourism, business, and teaching. Students 
choosing careers as teachers will find the close supervision and advanced 
methodology offered by the department a distinct asset. 

College Language Requirements 

Students in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and in the 
departments of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics must pass 
the intermediate sequence of a foreign language (FR201-FR202 orFR203) 
or demonstrate that they have somehow acquired the equivalent proficiency 
level. Students from the other colleges may choose to take French (201 and 
202 or the accelerated 203) to fulfill a Liberal Studies elective. Any student 
who chooses French has an option to enroll in the traditional, three-credits- 
per-semester courses or the accelerated, six-credit track. 

Placement/Exemption 

The student with no previous French study will take FR101 (four credits) as 
a prerequisite. Students with previous French study will be placed into the 
appropriate course level by means of a written departmental exam 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — Si 



administered in the summer tor entering freshmen and during the first week 
bl each term for other students. No student judged to be a native speaker of 
French w ill be allowed to enroll in any eourse below the 300 level, with the 
exception of FR254 

French for Elementary Education 

A student in Elementary Education maj elect a concentration of 18 semester 
hours ol French, consisting of the following: 

FR201-202 6sh 

IR22I-222 4sh 

FR351-352 6sh 

FR321-322 2sh 

A student in Elementary Education interested in bilingual elementary 
leaching may, through special scheduling arrangements, increase the 
concentration in French to include foreign study and foreign child-centered 
internship experience. 

Study Abroad — Nancy, France 

IIP has established a study abroad center in Nancy, France. All majors are 
encouraged to participate in the Study Abroad Program, especially those 
seeking the International Trade degree. Students have an option to 
participate in a full-year or one-semester program (spring). A six-week 
summer session has also been added to the options available. Nonmajors 
ma> be accepted into any of the programs but must enter the language 
courses offered in the Cours pour etrangers (Courses for Foreign Students). 
All credits are evaluated by the department as transfer credits. For further 
information regarding the cost and application procedures, contact the office 
of the dean of the college. 

Internships 

The Department of French, through contacts w ith certain French companies 
and through its affiliation with the ICN (Institut Commercial de Nancy), is 
able to place summer interns in Paris and other sites in France. The 
internship (generally six to twelve credits) is viewed as a highly desirable 
culminating experience following study in Nancy. For further information, 
contact the office of the dean of the college at least six months in advance. 



Bachelor of Arts — French 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with FR prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language (included in major) 

Major: 36 

Required courses: 

FR201 College French I 3sh(l) 

FR202 College French II 3sh( 1 ) 

FR221 French Conversation III 2sh 

FR222 French Conversation IV 2sh 

FR321 Advanced Conversation I lsh 

FR322 Advanced Conversation II lsh 

FR35 1 Advanced French Language I 3sh 

FR352 Advanced French Language II 3sh 

FR361 Development of French Culture and Literature I 3sh 
FR362 Development of French Culture and Literature II 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Other French electives: 12sh 

Free Electives: 33-35 

Total Degree Requirements: 1 24 

( 1 ) FR203 Accelerated College French will substitute for these courses. 



Bachelor of Arts — French for International Trade 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Social Science: EC121. PS101, PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA214. no courses with FR prefix 



54-56 



College: 

Foreign Language (included in major) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

FR201 College French I 

FR202 College French II 

FR221 French Conversation III 

FR222 French Conversation IV 

FR254 Civilization of Modern France 

FR32 1 Advanced Conversation I 

FR322 Advanced Conversation II 

FR351 Advanced French Language 1 

FR352 Advanced French Language II 

FR354 Business French 

FR361 Development of French Culture and Literature I 

FR362 Development of French Culture and Literature II 
Controlled electives: 

Two additional FR electives (advanced levels)(2) 

Other Requirements: Business Sequence: 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 

EC122 Principles of Economics II 

FI310 Finance I 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 

MG311 Human Behavior in Organizations 

MG360 Management and Production Concepts 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 

QB215 Business Statistics 

Free Electives: 



36 



3shl 1 I 

3sh| 1 ) 

2sh 

2sh 

3sh 

lsh 

lsh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

6sh 



33 



3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



0-1 



Total Degree Requirements: 124-125 

( 1 ) FR203 Accelerated College French will substitute for these courses. 

(2) Most students earn additional language credits (up to 18) in semester or 
year abroad. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — K-12 French Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PC 101 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with FR prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II 

ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED453 Teaching of Foreign Languages in the 

Secondary School 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurement 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

EX300 Education of Exceptional Child 



30-33 



3sh 

lsh 

lsh 

12sh 

lsh 
3sh(2) 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



0-3sh(3) 



Major: 

Required courses: 

FR201 College French I 3sh( I I 

FR202 College French II 3sh( 1 ) 

FR221 French Conversation III 2sh 

FR222 French Conversation IV 2sh 

FR321 Advanced Conversation I lsh 

FR322 Advanced Conversation II lsh 

FR351 Advanced French Language I 3sh 

FR352 Advanced French Language II 3sh 

FR361 Development of French Culture and Literature I 3sh 

FR362 Development of French Culture and Literature II 3sh 



33 



84 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Controlled electives: 
Other FR electives 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 



9sh 



3-8 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) FR203 Accelerated College French will substitute for these courses. 

(2) ED453 offered only in fall semester. 

(3) May be fulfilled by examination in lieu of regular class. 



Minor — French 21 

Required courses: 

FR201-202 College French I and II 6sh 

FR22 1-222 French Conversation 111 and IV 4sh 

FR35 1-352 Advanced French Language I and II 6sh 

FR32 1-322 Advanced Conversation I and II 2sh 

FR361 Development of French Culture and Lit I 3sh 



Department of Geography and 
Regional Planning 

Susan E. Forbes, Chairperson; Begg, Bencloski, 
Buckwalter, Miller, G. Sechrist, R. Sechrist, Shirey; and 
professors emeriti Gault, Kulkarni, Payne, Tepper, Weber 

Geography has several traditions of study. Two of the more important 
traditions are the study of relationships between humans and environment or 
the ecological tradition and the study of spatial organization, which involves 
the way people use space on the earth's surface. In both traditions the focus 
is on understanding regions of the world and the interactions within and 
between them. Geographers make important contributions to the 
understanding of all aspects of humankind's use of and impact on the 
earth's surface. 

Regional Planning involves preparing for the future. The demands and 
effects of a large and growing population require that land use. resource use. 
settlement patterns, transportation systems, and economic activity be 
planned. Regional planning is concerned with the social, locational. and 
environmental aspects of these planning decisions. In the 1990s, economic 
development has become an important focus. 

Geography and Regional Planning are in the same department because 
"Planning is the art of which geography is the science." Employment 
opportunities for geographers and regional planners are good. Students will 
find a wide variety of positions in government, business, industry, planning, 
and education available. Environmental and locational knowledge gained in 
the department's programs provide skills needed in the job market. Students 
interested in obtaining additional career information should visit the 
departmental office in Room 10. Leonard Hall. 

Three degree programs are offered by the department: 
( 1 ) Bachelor of Arts in Geography 
(21 Bachelor of Science in Regional Planning 

(3) Bachelor of Science in Social Science Education with a concentration 
in geography 

A minor in geography is appropriate for majors in all other fields of the natural 
and social sciences. Students of business also find this minor relevant. A minor 
consists of a minimum of fifteen semester hours in geography. A student may 
elect any combination of courses for the minor. The department suggests that 
students take the core program if they anticipate doing graduate work in 
geography. Students might also consider concentrating in one of the areas of the 
field, such as physical/environmental, human/cultural, research/cartography/ 
GIS, or regional geography. 

Geography and Regional Planning department resources include the 
departmentwide LAN. Computer Cartography Lab with six 486 computers. 



large-format digitizers, size E plotters, zoom transfer scope, color printers, 
and Atlas*GIS, AUTOCAD, ARCCAD, and ERDAS software variably used 
in many majors' classes. The Spatial Sciences Research Center (SSRC), 
directed by Dr. Robert P. Sechrist, has production facilities for GIS database 
development using the Intergraph microstation. ARC/Info, ARC CAD, 
Atlas*GIS, Map Info and OzGIS. These packages run on the Center's VAX- 
based network and ten 486s. 

The Geography and Regional Planning Census Documents Library houses 
the Pennsylvania State Data Center (PDSC) population and economic 
census publications used for teaching, research, and planning in community 
service and local and county governments. The department is also an 
affiliate of the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA ). 

Geography Education: The department houses both the National Council 
for Geographic Education (NCGE), which serves geography educators at all 
levels with activities and programs that address geography learning and 
instructional and research issues in North America, and the Pennsylvania 
Geographic Alliance (PGA), which is supported by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education (PDE). PGA provides leadership and professional 
development opportunities in geography teaching and learning in 
Pennsylvania. Dr. Ruth Shirey is executive director of NCGE and one of 
two PGA coordinators in Pennsylvania. 

A strong internship program offers placement in conservation, land 
management, human resource and planning agencies at the local, state, and 
federal levels. 



Bachelor of Arts — Geography 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA217 recommended 

Natural Science: GS10I/102. 103/104 or GS121/122. 131/132 
Liberal Studies electives: CO/IM/BE101. no courses with GE prefix 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (1) 

Major: 36 

Required courses: 

GE230 Cultural Geography 3sh 

GE241 Physical Geography 3sh 

GE312 Research in Geography and Planning 3sh 

GE411 Geography: Thought and Philosophy 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from GE25 1-257 3sh 

One course from GE3 13-3 14 3sh 

Six courses ( 1 8cr) from any other GE courses 1 8sh 



Free Electives: 



27-34 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science — Regional Planning 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA2 17 recommended 

Natural Science: GS101/102, 103/104, or GS121/122. 131/132 

Social Science: PS1 1 1 recommended, EC121 

Liberal Studies electives: CO/IM/BE101. no courses with GE prefix 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 36 

Required courses: 

GE312 Research in Geography and Planning 3sh 

GE360 Introduction to Planning 3sh 

GE361 Planning: Basic Study and Analysis 3sh 

GE462 Planning: Development, Principles, and Theory 3sh 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 85 



GE463 Planning: Design 
i.l t(>4 Land Use Policy 
Controlled electives 

One course from GE313-314 

Three courses from GE230, 231,241, 331,335, 336. 

341.342 
Two courses Irom (il 313 or 314. 332. 415, 44(1 

Other Requirements: 

Interdisciplinary minor (2 lsh) or 
Minor in approved field ( 15-21 sh) 

Internship (GE498) strongly recommended 



3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

9sh 
6sh 



Free Electives: 



15-36 



0-19 



' Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( I ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Social Science 
Education/Geography Track (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: GE102, PC101, EC121 

Liberal Studies electives: EC122. S0237, and AN271 or 272 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II lsh 

ED441 Student Teaching 12sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

ED455 Teaching of Social Sciences in the Secondary 3sh 

School 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurement 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 

Required courses 

GE230 Cultural Geography 3sh 

GE241 Physical Geography 3sh 

Controlled Electives 

At least one course from each of the following three groups: 

Environmental Geography: 

GE340 Geography of Fresh Water Resources 3sh 

GE341 Climatology I 3sh 

GE342 Physiography 3sh 

GE440 Conservation: Environmental Analysis 3sh 

Human Geography: 

GE231 Economic Geography 3sh 

GE331 Population Geography 3sh 

GE332 Urban Geography 3sh 

GE333 Trade and Transportation 3sh 

GE334 Political Geography 3sh 

GE336 Social Geography 3sh 

GE337 Historical Geography 3sh 

GE431 Geography of American Indians 3sh 

Philosophy. Tools, and Techniques: 

GE213 Cartography I 3sh 

GE312 Research in Geography 3sh 

GE314 Map and Photo Interpretation 3sh 

GE411 Geography: Thought and Philosophy 3sh 

GE415 Remote Sensing 3sh 

Two of the following regional geography courses: 6sh 

GE251 Geography of Pennsylvania 3sh 

GE252 Geography of Latin America 3sh 

GE253 Geography of Europe 3sh 

GE254 Geography of USSR 3sh 

GE255 Geography of Africa 3sh 

GE256 Geography of East Asia 3sh 

GE257 Geography of South and Southeast Asia 3sh 

Geography Electives 3sh 



30 



24 



Social science distribution requirements: 15-18 

The following courses are required: 

PS280 Comparative Government I 3sh 

HI203 U.S. History for Historians 3sh 

Plus one of the following options: 9-12sh 

1 ) 6 additional hours in one social science field (history 
recommended) and three semester hours in another. 
or 

2) 9-12 additional hours in one social science field (history 
recommended), sufficient to meet the requirements for a minor. 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: (1) 0-14 

(2) Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

ill If certain courses are chosen for Social Sciences major, they may also 
fulfill Liberal Studies requirements and permit additional free electives. 

(2) Students who do not pass a special education competency exam must 
take EX300; this will increase graduation requirements to 126 credits. 



Department of German 

Jacob U. Voelker, Chairperson; Brode, Ready, Sommer, 
Sullivan 

The Department of German offers three degree programs: the B.A. in 
German, the B.A. in German for International Trade, and the B.S. in 
Education in Secondary German Education. 

While majoring in the German Department, students will acquire 
proficiency in all phases of the language and develop an understanding and 
appreciation of the history, culture, and literature of the German-speaking 
countries. They will also gain knowledge of the linguistic development of 
the language throughout the centuries. German majors may look forward to 
rewarding careers in teaching, government, journalism, foreign trade, 
tourism, business, and librarianship. 

The degree program in German for International Trade provides an excellent 
way to combine language proficiency and cultural awareness in German 
with professional training in business. With this undergraduate background, 
students may enter M.B.A. degree programs and pursue careers in 
international business and trade. Study abroad for one or two semesters is 
strongly urged and is an integral part of the program. Qualified students 
may also choose to participate in internship programs with German-based 
corporations and financial institutions. 

College Language Requirements 

Students in the departments of the College of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics and in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences must 
pass the intermediate sequence of a foreign language (GM251 and GM252) 
or demonstrate by the CLEP exam in German that they have acquired the 
equivalent proficiency level. Students from the other colleges may elect to 
take two courses in German at the intermediate (III/IV) level toward 
fulfilling the requirement for Liberal Studies electives. Any student who 
chooses German can meet the requirement through enrollment in the 
traditional, the accelerated, or the intensive six-credit track, which provides 
maximum opportunity for conversational practice in small groups under the 
direction of trained assistants. 

Study Abroad 

The Department of German encourages all students who study German at 
IUP to consider study abroad for one or two semesters. German majors are 
strongly urged to study two semesters or one academic year at a German 
university. To provide this opportunity at a relatively modest cost, the 
university has arranged an exchange of students between Duisburg 
University and IUP. By participating in this or other approved programs, 
students can earn from twelve to fourteen hours per semester. For further 
information regarding the cost and application procedures, contact the office 
of the dean of the college. 



86 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Minor in German 

Students completing eighteen credits beyond GM 152 will be recognized as 
having minored in German. Nine of the twelve credits must be taken at the 
300 level with only three credits from the conversation sequence. GM221. 
222, 321, 322. This achievement will be noted on the student's transcript 
and thus provide more career flexibility. 



Bachelor of Arts — German 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with GM prefix 

College: 

Foreign language (included in major) 



Major: 

Required courses: 

GM221 Conversation III 2sh 

GM222 Conversation IV 2sh 

GM321 Advanced Conversation I lsh 

GM322 Advanced Conversation II lsh 

GM251 German III 3sh 

GM252 German IV( 1 ) 3sh 

GM351 Advanced German I 3sh 

GM352 Advanced German II 3sh 
GM361 Development of German Culture and Literature I 3sh 
GM362 Development of German Culture and Literature II 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Other GM electives (advanced levels) 9 or 12sh 



36 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 




33-35 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 
( 1 ) GM253 or GM254 may be substituted for GM252. 



Bachelor of Arts — German for International Trade 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 12 1 

Social Science: EC121 

Liberal Studies electives: MA214, no courses with GM prefix 

College: 

Foreign language (included in major) 

Major: 36 

Required courses: 

GM221 Conversation III 2sh 

GM222 Conversation IV 2sh 

GM321 Advanced Conversation I lsh 

GM322 Advanced Conversation II lsh 

GM251 German III 3sh 

GM252 German IV 3sh 

GM253 Intermediate Composition and Conversation 3sh 

GM254 Business German 3sh 

GM351 Advanced German I 3sh 

GM352 Advanced German II 3sh 
GM361 Development of German Culture and Literature I 3sh 
GM362 Development of German Culture and Literature II 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Two additional GM electives (advanced levels) 6sh( 1 ) 

Other Requirements: Business Sequence: 33 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG20I Accounting Principles I 3sh 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 3sh 

EC122 Principles of Economics II 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 



IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 

FI310 Finance I 3sh 

MG311 Human Behavior in Organizations 3sh 

MG360 Management and Production Concepts 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 



Free Electives: 



0-1 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Most students earn additional language credits (usually 12- 
semester study abroad. 



14) in 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Secondary German 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with GM prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM30I Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching II 

ED44 1 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED453 Teaching of Foreign Languages in 

the Secondary School 
EP202 Educational Psychology 
EP377 Educational Tests and Measurement 
FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

Major: 

Required courses: 

GM221 Conversation III 

GM222 Conversation IV 

GM321 Advanced Conversation I 

GM322 Advanced Conversation II 

GM251 German III 

GM252 German IV 

GM35 1 Advanced German I 

GM352 Advanced German II 

GM361 Development of German Culture and 

Literature I 
GM362 Development of German Culture and 

Literature II 
Controlled electives: 
Other GM electives 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 



10 



3sh 

lsh 
lsh 
12sh 
lsh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



33 



2sh 

2sh 

lsh 

lsh 

3sh 

3sh( 1 ) 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 



9sh 




6-8 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 

on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 
( 1 ) GM253 may be substituted for or taken in addition to GM252. 



Department of History 

Neil B. Lehman, Chairperson; Bailey, Cashdollar, Fricke, 
Gallanar, Goodrich, Harris, Kadlubowski, King, Landon, 
Larner, Marcus, McDonough, Miller, Smith, Vogel, Wang, 
Wiley; and professors emeriti Cord, Ferguson, Gelbach, 
Hatfield, Mastro, Mervine, Moore, Oliver, Wahl 

Programs in history are designed to give both those who major in history in 
the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and those who concentrate in 
history in the College of Education an opportunity to study in some depth 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 87 



the pasl storj ol peoples and their world. Degrees offered by the History 
Department arc the Bachelor of Arts in History and the Bachelor of Science 
in Education with a major in Social Studies, concentrating in history. The 
first program is under the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and 
the second is under the College ol Education. 

The history student will find that the program is excellent preparation for 
government service, lor pre-law training, for broad business opportunities. 



in varied fields of journalism, for archival positions, and lor 
teaching. Not only the story of the people of the United States but also that 



for « ork 



teaching. Not only the story ol the people ot the United Mates nut also mat 
of other peoples is covered, in the belief that global historical understanding 
is essential lor the future of civilization 

Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in History are thirty-three 
semester hours in history. Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Education with a major in Social Studies, concentrating on 
history, are a minimum of twenty-seven semester hours in history within the 
filt\ lour semester hours required for social science certification. The 
requirement for a minor in history is 15 semester hours. For majors in 
history programs, courses in history in Liberal Studies are applicable only if 
numbered 300 or higher. All programs should be planned with an adviser. 
Every major and concentrate in history will be advised by history 
department staff members. 

Admission to History 482 and 483, initiation in the local chapters of Phi 
Alpha Theta and Pi Gamma Mu, participation in study tours and study 
abroad programs, and other activities should be investigated by every 
history student. The department is committed to the ideal of a broad liberal 
arts education. 



Bachelor of Arts — History 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 50-52 

with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with HI prefix 
Humanities-History: Fulfilled by required courses in major 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

HI200 Introduction to History 3sh 

HI201 Western Civilization before 1600 3sh(2) 

HI202 Western Civilization since 1600 3sh(2) 

HI203 U.S. History for Historians 3sh(2) 

Controlled Electives: 

HI 480 Senior Seminar (3) 3sh 

Non-Westem HI course: Latin America. Africa, or Asia 3sh 

Five additional history courses (4) 15sh 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 33-41 



33 



Total Degree Requirements: 1 24 

( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) For students who have taken HI195. 210, 212, or 214 prior to becoming 
History majors, this course may not be appropriate. Consult History 
adviser before scheduling. 

(3) This requirement may be fulfilled by completing either the 
departmental honors program or graduate seminar with a concluding 
paper. 

(4) Courses selected from 300 and 400 level offerings. 



Bachelor of Arts — History/Pre-law 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 50-52 

with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with HI prefix 
Humanities-History: Fulfilled by required courses in major 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( I ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

H1200 Introduction to History 

HI201 Western Civilization before 1600 

HI202 Western Civilization since 1600 

HI203 U.S. History for Historians 
Controlled electives: 

HI480 Senior Seminar (3) 

Non-Western HI course: Latin America. Africa, or Asia 

Five additional history courses (4) 

Other Requirements: Prelaw Interdisciplinary Minor 

Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas: 
Business: BL235, AG201, AG202 
Criminology: CR210, CR260, CR357 
Economics: ECI21. EC 122, EC332 
English: EN213, EN220, EN310 
Philosophy: PH101. PH222. PH450 
Political Science: PS358. PS359. PS361 



0-6 



33 



3sh 
3sh(2) 
3sh(2) 
3sh(2) 

3sh 
3sh 
15sh 



3-21 



Free Electives: 



12-32 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) For students who have taken HI195, 210, 212, or 214 prior to becoming 
History majors, this course may not be appropriate. Consult History 
adviser before scheduling. 

(3) This requirement may be fulfilled by completing either the 
departmental honors program or graduate seminar with a concluding 
paper. 

(4) Courses selected from 300 and 400 level offerings. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Social Science 

Education/History Track (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 5 1-52 

with the following specifications: 

Humanities-History: Fulfilled by required courses in major 
Social Science: PCI01, EC121, and AN1 10 
Liberal Studies electives: EC 122, GE230, and either S0237 
or S0362: no courses with HI prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching and Clinical Experiences I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching and Clinical Experiences II 

ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED455 Teaching of Social Sciences in the Secondary 

School 
EP202 Educational Psychology 
EP377 Educational Tests and Measurement 
FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

Major: ( 1 ) 

Required History courses: 

HI200 Introduction to History 
HI201 Western Civilization before 1600 
HI202 Western Civilization since 1600 
HI203 United States History for Historians 
HI480 Senior Seminar in History 
Controlled History elective: 

One course from the fields of Middle East, Africa, 
Asia, or Latin America at the 300 level or higher 
History electives: 

Three history courses at the 300 level or higher, 
one to be from United States history 
Required Social Science distribution: 

GEXXX 200-level or higher Geography course 
PS 1 1 1 American Politics 



30 



3sh 
lsh 

lsh 

12sh 

lsh 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



27 



3sh 

3sh(2) 
3sh(2) 
3sh(2) 
3sh 



3sh 



9sh 

3sh 
3sh 



9-12 



88 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



PS280 Comparative Government I: Western Political 

Systems or 
PS285 Comparative Government II: Non-Western 

Political Systems 
S0231 Contemporary Social Problems 



3sh 

3sh 

3sh(3) 



Free Elcctives: 



3-7 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) Eligibility for student teaching and certification in secondary social 
studies education (history concentration) requires a cumulative GPA of 
2.75 and a grade of C or better in history courses and in the required 
social science distribution courses. 

(2) For students who have taken HI 195, 210, 212. or 214 prior to becoming 
History majors, this course may not be appropriate. Consult History 
adviser before scheduling. 

(3) S0231 required only if S0237 or S0362 are not taken as Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Department of Industrial and Labor 
Relations 

James F. Byers, Chairperson; Gates, Gaylor, McPherson, 
Morand, Sedwick 

The Department of Industrial and Labor Relations offers a graduate program 
within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences leading to the degree 
of Master of Arts in Industrial and Labor Relations. The forty-two- 
semester-hour program consists of a required core of twenty-seven semester 
hours, including an elective thesis and elective course offerings totaling 
fifteen semester hours. Internships are available and strongly encouraged. 

The Industrial and Labor Relations program is multidisciplinary. combining 
analytical and human relations skills with knowledge drawn from social 
sciences and business disciplines. The degree is designed to prepare 
professional industrial and labor relations practitioners in public and private 
management, unions, neutral agencies, government agencies, and arbitration 
panels. It has as a special emphasis labor relations in the public sector. 

While the department does not offer coursework leading to an undergraduate 
major or degree, it does offer several undergraduate courses which are open 
to students of any major or college. 



Department of Journalism 

Patricia Heilman, Chairperson; DeGeorge, Jesick, 
Mukasa, Russell, Truby; and professors emeriti Furgiuele, 
Swauger 

Students interested in a career in news-editorial or public relations fields, 
with opportunities in such related areas as advertising, desktop publishing, 
and marketing, should enjoy this innovative, flexible program. The 
journalism major combines journalism elective courses, the student's choice 
of a variety of courses from other university departments, plus internships 
which provide on-the-job experience. 

The IUP journalism major is flexible for the individual student, who 
decides, with an adviser, what directions his or her education will take for a 
mass communication career. The two sequences offered are News-Editorial 
and Public Relations. 

A student wishing to enter the program becomes a journalism major in the 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Then, the student chooses an 
individual program within a large group of elective journalism courses, plus 
a much larger group of courses from various other areas of the university. A 
student who completes the major graduates with a B.A. in journalism. 



Because journalism itself covers all areas of life, the journalism major 
covers many areas of study preparation. There are only four required 
courses, so the student is free to mold the program to his/her own special 
interests through both major and free electives. 

The journalism major will use journalism courses to fulfill the minimum of 
thirty hours required for the major. All journalism majors must complete the 
intermediate sequence of a foreign language. This may be done in one of 
three ways: by examination, by earning credit in third and fourth levels of a 
foreign language, or by completing four levels of a new language. If the last 
procedure is used, the two beginning foreign language courses ma\ be 
applied as free electives to the total number of credits needed for graduation. 

The Journalism Department offers an 18-credit minor designed to 
complement any major. Three 3-credit courses are required: JN105: 
Journalism and Mass media: JN102: Basic Journalistic Skills; and JN120: 
Journalistic Writing. The remaining nine credits may be taken from the 
following list of Journalism major courses: JN326. JN338. JN344. JN347, 
JN375. and designated Special Topics courses. Internship credits do not 
apply toward the 18-credit minor; however, a student in the minor program 
may take an internship and apply the credits as free electives. 

Course Sequence 

The lournalism faculty offers the following operational policy for its course 
sequence and prerequisites. The basic idea is for students to take Level I 
courses prior to Level II courses, etc. We ask that special attention be given 
to course prerequisites to avoid scheduling students without proper 
experience into courses. We do retain flexibility of waiving sequence and 
prerequisites in individual cases. 

Level I 

J\ 102 Basic Journalism Skills (required for all journalism majors) 
JN105 Journalism and Mass Media (required for all journalism majors) 

If they have the prerequisites and if enrollment permits, 

nonmajors are welcome in JN105. 
JN120 Journalistic Writing (for journalism minors and nonmajors) 
JN220 Writing for the Print Media (required for all journalism majors) 



Level II 

JN243 History of American Press JN338 

JN321 Feature Writing JN344 

JN326 Public Relations I JN345 

JN327 Layout, Design, and Production JN375 

JN328 News Reporting JN393 

JN337 Editing 



Level III 

JN347 Journalism Law 
JN348 Editorial Page 
JN423 Management 
JN446 Advanced Reporting 
JN449 Public Affairs Reporting 
JN450 Advertising Writing 



IN4X2 
JN490 
JN491 
JN492 
JN493 
JN494 



News Analysis 
Issues and Problems 
Sports Journalism 
World New Coverage 
Document Design i 



Independent Study 
Public Relations II 
Presentation Making 
Problem Solving in PR 
Internship 
Document Design II 



Minor Courses or Free Electives 

A number of departments cooperate to make journalism study at IUP a very 
broad experience. These courses may be considered lor dual major, a minor 
program(s). or as electives. 

With the assistance of an adviser, a student may develop a program by 
choosing from the follow ing electives. Electives shown here have pre- 
authorization. Any other elective requires adviser approval in writing. 

Art: AR218.AR455 

Business: AD101, AD321, DE333. MG300, MG401 

Marketing: MK320, MK321. MK420, MK421. MK433 

Communications Media: CM271. CM404. CM440. CM445. CM451 

English: EN208, EN220, EN221, EN310, EN31 1, EN322 

History: HI369, HI346, HI362, HI363, HI364 

Philosophy: PH101, PH222, PH323 

Political Science: PS 1 11, PS251, PS280. PS285. PS351, PS353, 
PS354, PS359. PS370. PS371, PS356, PS361. PS362 

Computer Science: CO101 orBElOl orlMlOl 

Educational Psychology: EP304 

Criminology: CR101.CR102, CR295 

Economics: EC241, EC283, FC332. FC333 

Psychology: PC310. PC320. PC330, PC37I. PC420 

Sociology: SQ231. SQ339. SO340, S0362. SO380 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 89 



Bachelor of Arts — Journalism 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with JN prefix 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level i I i 

Major: 

Required courses: 

JN102 Basic Journalistic Skills 

JN105 Journalism and the Mass Media 

JN220 Writing for the Print Media 

JN328 News Reporting 
Controlled electives: 

Other JN courses 

Other Requirements: 

Department recommends a planned program of dual major. 
minor(s). or electives with special consideration of the 
preapproved courses listed. (3) (4) 



53-55 



0-6 



30 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

18sh(2) 



Free Electives: 



33-41 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Individually Designed Philosophy Minor 

As a minor, philosophy has much to offer in helping individuals of various 
backgrounds better understand the fundamental assumptions of their 
disciplines. For that reason, the minor in Philosophy will be individually 
designed to meet special career needs and personal interests. Selection of 
courses will be accomplished through discussions with and approval of the 
department adviser. The minimum requirement for a minor is 15 semester 
hours with the restrictions on the major applying to the minor also. Students 
must expect careful planning in any program approved. For further 
explanation and suggestions, see departmental adviser. 

Liberal Studies Offerings 

The Philosophy program's Liberal Studies courses are all introductory in 
nature; none of them presupposes any philosophical background. The 
student may choose from the following: PH101: General Logic: PHI 20: 
Introduction to Philosophy: PH221: Introduction to Symbolic Logic: 
PH222: Ethics; PH223: Philosophy of Art. 

Pre-Law Program 

The Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies participates in the 
University Pre-Law Minor Program whereby a student majors in one of 
several academic disciplines including philosophy and also meets the pre- 
law minor requirements. Students interested in the philosophy major/pre- 
law minor should consult the departmental pre-law adviser. Philosophy 
courses included in the pre-law minor program are as follows: PH101: 
General Logic; PH222: Ethics; and PH450: Philosophy of Law. 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) Maximum of 6 credits Internship applied to major. 

(3) Students may take no more than 15sh outside the College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences without prior approval of adviser. 

(4) Majors in the public relations sequence should make every effort to 
schedule MK320, MK433. and AD321. 



1994) 



Minor — Journalism (Implementation date: Fall. 
Minor: 

Required Courses: 

JNI02 Basic Journalistic Skills 

JN105 Journalism and Mass Media 

JN120 Journalistic Writing 
Three controlled electives from following list: 

JN243. 326. 338. 344. 347. 375. 481 



Total (2) 18sh 

( 1 ) The above three courses are to be taken in sequence. 

(2) Internship credits do not apply toward the 18-credit minor; however, a 
student in the minor program may take an internship and apply the 
credits as free electives. 



Department of Philosophy and 
Religious Studies 

Albert E. Bouffard, Chairperson; Begres, Boone, 
Bouffard, Caraway, Chan, Ferrara, Gibson, Lin, Mlecko, 
Montgomery, Schaub, Smith, Yirenkyi; and professors 
emeriti Hermann, Kannwisher 

Philosophy 

The program in philosophy is designed to provide the student w ith a capacity 
for thinking clearly, a critical attitude, and the ability to reason theoretically. 

The major offers the background required for graduate work in philosophy. 
Those whose primary interests are in other disciplines will find philosophy 
courses which relate directly to their fields on a theoretical level. Both the 
minor and double major are especially desirable for their reflective benefits 
and because of the essentially interdisciplinary nature of philosophy. 



Bachelor of Arts — Philosophy 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with PH prefix 



53-55 



0-6 



3sh( 1 1 


PH324 


3sh(l) 


PH325 


3sh(l) 




9sh 


PH405 




PH420 




PH421 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 30 

Required courses: 

PH22 1 Symbolic Logic I 3sh 

History of Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval 3sh 
History of Philosophy II: Renaissance 3sh 

and Modern 

Justice and Human Rights 3sh 

Metaphysics 3sh 

Theory of Knowledge 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Four other PH courses (with restrictions) 12sh(2) 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 33-41 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) No more than three 100-200 level courses may be counted toward the 
major. Only PH courses may be counted toward the major. Unless 
otherwise indicated in the Course Descriptions, all 300-400 level 
courses require junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 
This prerequisite applies both to Philosophy majors and to majors in 
any other discipline. 



Bachelor of Arts — Philosophy/Pre-Iaw 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with PH prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (1) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

PH221 Symbolic Logic I 



53-55 



0-6 



30 



3sh 



90 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



PH324 History of Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval 
PH325 History of Philosophy II: Renaissance and 

Modern 
PH405 Justice and Human Rights 
PH420 Metaphysics 
PH421 Theory of Knowledge 
Controlled electives: 

Four other PH courses (with restrictions) 

Other Requirements: Prelaw lnterc'sciplinary Sequence 
Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas: 
Business: BL235. AG201, AG202 
Criminology: CR201. CR260, CR357 
Economics: EC 1 2 1 , EC 1 22, EC332 
English: EN213, EN220. EN310 
History: HI320. HI321, HI346 
Political Science: PS358, PS359, PS361 

Free Electives: 



3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

12sh(2) 



6-21 



12-29 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) No more than three 100-200 level courses may be counted toward the 
major. Only PH courses may be counted toward the major. Unless 
otherwise indicated in the Course Descriptions, all 300-400 level 
courses require junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 
This prerequisite applies both to Philosophy majors and to majors in 
any other discipline. 

Religious Studies 

The Program in Religious Studies is designed to provide a balanced, 
nonsectarian, cross-cultural approach leading to a better understanding of 
the phenomenon of religion in human experience. It emphasizes an 
interdisciplinary approach by a) requiring religion-related courses outside 
Religious Studies and by b) encouraging the minor or a double major, rather 
than a single major in Religious Studies. 

The program is valuable for those planning careers in religious education, 
religious journalism, or religious broadcasting. The program also provides 
an excellent background for graduates planning to enter Catholic, Jewish, or 
Protestant seminaries. Additionally. Religious Studies is a good 
complement to majors in such fields as Anthropology. English, Fine Arts. 
History, International Studies, Music, Philosophy. Political Science, 
Psychology, and Sociology. Religious Studies is one significant way to 
integrate course studies within the university curriculum. 

In addition to the twenty-four semester hours of Religious Studies 
courses in the major, six semester hours must be taken from a number of 
courses offered by other departments which complement those offered in 
Religious Studies. Opportunity for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural 
study is implicit in the study of religious themes — and is required in the 
Religious Studies Program at IUP. Revisions are pending in the 
Religious Studies program. 

Minor 

The requirements for a Minor in Religious Studies are 15sh: 

a) 12sh must be taken from the Religious Studies offerings, which 
include certain required courses (see below). 

b) 3sh must be taken outside the Religious Studies offering but in 
"religion-related" courses. 

Consult adviser in Religious Studies for choices. 

Liberal Studies Offerings 

The Religious Studies program"* Liberal Studies courses are all introductory 
in nature; none presupposes any Religious Studies background. The student 
may choose from the following: RS100: Introduction to Religion; RS250: 
Understanding the Bible; RS290: Christianity. 



Bachelor of Arts — Religious Studies 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with RS prefix 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 



53-55 



0-6 



Major: 

Controlled electives:! 2) 
One course from list A 
One course from list B 
One course from list C 
One course from list D 
Four additional RS courses(3) 
Two courses from religion-related courses(3) 

Other Requirements: 

Free Electives: 



30 



RSlOOorRSllO 
RS210orRS250 
RS370orRS375 
RS380, RS410, orRS440 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
12sh 
6sh 




33-41 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in the Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) Other courses may be approved in consultation with adviser. 

(3) Consult Religious Studies adviser. 



Minor — Religious Studies 

RSlOOor 110 

RS370 or 375 
RS380or410or440 
Elective in Religious Studies(l) 
Religion-related course! 1) 

( 1 ) Consult Religious Studies adviser. 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



Department of Political Science 

David D. Chambers, Chairperson; Carone, Carranza, 
Dejene, Hirt, Keene, Morris, Palmer, Piatt, Sitton; and 
professors emeriti Chaszar, Lee, Smith 

Political scientists focus upon political systems, including the effect of 
environment on the system, inputs, the decision-making agencies which 
render binding public policies, and system outputs. Approaches to the study 
of government and politics include the normative approach, in which 
philosophical attention centers on values by asking the question "What 
ought to be?" and the behavioral approach, in which an attempt is made to 
develop verifiable theories through scientific methods by asking the 
questions "How" and "Why?" 

Students majoring in political science have employment opportunities in 
federal, state, and local governments and with private civic groups, interest 
groups, and political groups. Students who go on to graduate work find 
appointments at higher levels and in college teaching. Students graduating in 
political science, as in any of the social sciences, are in demand by 
employers in business and industry. Students completing the Political 
Science Internship Program have experienced considerable success in 
finding employment upon graduation. The political science major is also 
especially suitable for the pre-law student. 

Degrees offered by the political science department are the Bachelor of Arts 
in Political Science, in Government and Public Service, and in Political 
Science Pre-Law. An interdisciplinary major and a minor in International 
Studies are sponsored by the Political Science Department. The department 
also offers a minor in political science. 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 91 



Bachelor of Arts — Political Science 
Liberal Studies: As outlined in liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

S < il v ience: PSI 1 1 

I iberal Studies electives: no courses with PS prefix 



Free Electives: 



53 55 



0-6 



33 



3sh(2) 
*sh(3) 
30sh 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level! 1 ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

PS 101 World Politics 
PS 1 1 1 American Politics 
Controlled electives: 

At least one course in three of first four areas: 
American Studies: PS25 1 . 300. 346. 350. 35 1 . 353. 

354. 355, 356. 357. 35S. 354 
Political Theory: PS360. 361 . 362 
Public Policy and Administration: PS250. 370. 371, 444 
International Studies: PS280, 282, 283. 285, 320, 321, 

380. $82, 18 \ 384, 385, 386, 387. 388, 389 (4) 
General Political Science: PS300 (strongly recommended) 
PS377. 480.48I.4S2.4S5. 493 



Other Requirements: 15-27 

Second major, minor, or concentration as approved by adviser with 
maximum of 15 credits outside College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences unless specifically approved 



Free Electives: 



3-23 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 

Studies electives. 
(2l PS101 satisfies non-Western requirement. 

(3) Credit for PSI 11 is counted in the Liberal Studies requirements. 

(4) PS280 and/or PS285 recommended as prerequisite to PS380 through 
PS389. 



Bachelor of Arts — Political Science/Pre-Law 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PSI 11 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with PS prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level! 1 ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

PS101 World Politics 
PS 1 1 1 American Politics 
Controlled electives: 

At least one course in three of first four areas: 
American Studies: PS251. 300, 346. 350. 351, 353. 

354. 355. 356. 357. 358, 359 
Political Theory: PS360, 361. 362 
Public Policy and Administration: PS250, 370. 371. 444 
International Studies: PS280, 282, 283, 285. 320, 321. 

380, 382, 383. 384. 385. 386. 387, 388, 389 (4 i 
General Political Science: PS300 (strongly recommended I 
PS377, 480. 48 1 . 482, 485, 493 

Other Requirements: Prelaw interdisciplinary minor 

Seven courses, including at least one from each of six areas: 
Business: BL235. AG201. AG202 
Criminology: CR210. CR260. CR357 
Economics: EC121. EC122. EC332 
English: EN213. EN220. EN310 
History: HI320, HI321. HI346 
Philosophy: PH101. PH222. PH450 



53-55 



0-6 



33 



3sh(2) 
*sh(3) 
30sh 



15-21 



12-26 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) PS10I satisfies non-Westem requirement. 

(3) Credit for PSI 11 is counted in the Liberal Studies requirements. 

(4 1 PS280 and/or PS285 recommended as prerequisite to PS380 through 
PS389. 



Bachelor of Arts — Government and Public Service 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 217 

Social Science: EC 1 2 1 . PC 1 1 . SO 1 5 1 

Liberal Studies electives: CO101. no courses with PS prefix 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate LeveK I ) 

Major: 39 

Required courses: 

PS 1 1 1 American Politics 

PS250 Public Policy 

PS251 State and Local Political Systems 

PS300 Research and Methods in Political Science 

PS370 Introduction to Public Administration 

PS371 Issues in Public Administration 

PC330 Social Psychology 

EC335 Public Finance 

EC336 State and Local Finance 

S0458 Political Sociology 
Controlled electives: 

Three courses from list: PS350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 
358. 377, 444, 481, 482, 485, 493 

Other Requirements: 21 

One course from communications areas (English. 3sh 

Journalism. Communications Media) as approved 

by adviser 
Interdisciplinary minor 18sh 

Government Management 

Personnel Administration 

Financial Administration 

Planning 



3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh(2) 

3sh(2) 

3sh(3) 

9sh 



Free Electives: 



3-11 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in the Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) Approved substitutes for EC335 and EC336: EC283, 332. 333, 373. 

(3) Approved substitutes for S0458: S0335. 345, 303. 



Bachelor of Arts — Political Science/International Studies 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PSI 11 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with PS prefix 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate LeveK 1) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

PS 101 World Politics 

PS 1 1 1 American Politics 
Interdisciplinary Sequence: 

Cultural specialization sequence 



0-6 



33 



3sh 

*sh(2) 
15sh(3) 
15sh(4) 



-Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 



0(5) 

30-38 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. Only courses 300 level and beyond may count in the 
cultural specialization sequence. 

(2) Credit forPSlll is included with Liberal Studies. 

(3) The interdisciplinary sequence includes an introductory or comparative 
international course from each of five social science disciplines: 
anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and 
sociology. Selection depends on goal(s) of major and should be 
planned in consultation with the International Studies adviser. 

(4) The specialization sequence focuses on one area or culture and three 
disciplines: economic systems, political systems, language, literature, 
history, geography. Currently three specializations are offered: Latin 
America, the Far East and Soviet Studies. Consult with adviser for 
planning course selection. 

(5) Majors are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the study abroad 
opportunities available through IUP department programs and exchange 
opportunities available through the Center for International Studies. 



Minor — Political Science 

Minor 

Required courses: 

PS 101 World Politics 
PS 111 American Politics 

Controlled electives: 

Three additional PS courses 



15 



3sh 
3sh 

9sh 



Minor — International Studies 
Minor 

Required courses: 

PS 101 World Politics 

PS 1 1 1 American Politics 
Controlled electives: 

Interdisciplinary sequence (see major) 

( 1 ) Credit counted with Liberal Studies Social Sciences. 



3sh 
*sh(l) 

15sh 



Department of Sociology 

Herbert Hunter, Chairperson; Ackerman, Gondolf, Grant, 
Holtz, Nowak, Rawleigh, Reynolds, Sanderson, Snyder; 
and professor emeritus Newhill 

The Sociology Department, which was a component of the Sociology/ 
Anthropology Department, became a separate department effective July 1, 
1993. 

The Sociology Department seeks to develop both the scientific and 
humanistic foundations of sociology, to educate the wider community as to 
the significance of sociological knowledge, to apply sociological knowledge 
to current social problems, and to advance the profession by promoting the 
welfare of individuals and society. The discipline of sociology focuses 
primarily on the analysis of modem industrial societies by examining their 
basic patterns of social organization, the various changes that occur within 
these patterns, and the impact of the patterns on individual thought and 
action. Students are prepared for employment in human service fields or for 
graduate study in sociology or related fields. 

Students majoring in sociology may select one of three tracks: general 
sociology, clinical sociology, and applied social research. The general track 
attempts to broadly educate those students who may wish to pursue graduate 
training in sociology and make sociology a career and profession. Because 
of its flexibility, it is also appropriate for students who want to pursue 
double majors that would include such fields as psychology or criminology. 



The general track gives students the broadest possible training in sociology. 
Students graduating with majors in general sociology are frequently in 
demand by employers in business, industry, and government. 

The clinical track in sociology seeks to help students understand the causes 
of many of the problems that plague modern societies, such as poverty, 
racial discrimination, substance abuse, and domestic violence. It is designed 
to provide students w ith the knowledge and skills necessary to become 
practitioners in various human services (e.g., social work, juvenile 
counseling, medical sociology, gerontology). 

The applied social research track emphasizes the development of research 
and assessment skills in students. Such skills are important in carrying out 
program assessments, needs assessments, program development, and other 
activities that focus on gathering, analyzing, and interpreting data important 
for policymakers. 

The department also prepares teachers for secondary school social studies 
with a concentration in sociology. The program leads to the degree 
Bachelor of Science in Education. With its emphasis on patterns of social 
organization in modern industrialized societies, sociology provides a solid 
foundation for teaching social science at the secondary level. Minors are 
available in sociology and in applied social research. 



Bachelor of Arts — Sociology /General Sociology Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 recommended 

Social Science: S0151 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with SO prefix 

College: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( I i 



Major: 

Required courses: 

SOI 51 Principles of Sociology *sh 

SO320 Sociological Theory 3sh 

SO380 Social Research Methods 3sh 

One of the following courses: 

50361 Social Stratification 3sh 

50362 Racial and Ethnic Minorities 3sh 

50363 Sociology of Sex and Gender 3sh 
At least one different course from four of the following 
substantive areas: 

Social Inequality and Social Change: 

SO303 Social and Cultural Change 3sh 

World Societies and World Systems 3sh 

Social Stratification 3sh 

Racial and Ethnic Minorities 3sh 

Sociology of Sex and Gender 3sh 

Social Policy 3sh 

Political Sociology 3sh 
Deviance and Social Problems 

S0231 Contemporary Social Problems 3sh 

Deliquency and Youth 3sh 

Alcohol and Drug Abuse 3sh 

Spouse Abuse 3sh 

Child Abuse Mi 
Individual and Society 

S0251 Sociology of Human Sexuality 3sh 

S0345 Interpersonal Dynamics 3sh 

S0357 Sociology of Aging 3sh 
Social Organization and Institutions 

S0286 Marriage, Kinship, and the Family 3sh 

Sociology of the Family 3sh 

The Community 3sh 

Sociology of Industry 3sh 

Sociology of Education 3sh 

Social and Cultural Aspects of Health 3sh 
and Medicine 

Sociology of Work 3sh 

Sociology of Religion 3sh 

Sociology of Mass Media 3sh 

Political Sociology 3sh 



27 



12 



S0337 
S0361 
S0362 
S0363 
S0448 
S0458 



S0333 
S0335 
S0427 
S0428 



S0336 

so.w 

SO340 
S0341 
S0342 

S0348 
S0352 
S0421 
S0458 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 93 



Comparative Sociology 

S0233 Language and Culture 3sh 

50271 Cultural Area Studies: Africa 3sh 

50272 Cultural Area Studies: China 3sh 

50273 Cultural Area Studies: Southeast Asia 3sh 
S0286 Marriage. Kinship, and the Family 3sh 
SO303 Social and Cultural Change 3sh 
S0314 Native Americans 3sh 
S0337 World Societies and World Systems 3sh 
S0342 Social and Cultural Aspects of Health and 3sh 

Medicine 



Free Sociology Electives: 
Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 



6 



36-44 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) Credit counted in Liberal Studies, not in the major 
( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Arts — Sociology/Clinical Sociology Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 recommended 

Social Science: S0151 required. AN1 10 and PCI 01 recommended 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with SO prefix 



College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

SO 1 5 1 Principles of Sociology 

50301 Clinical Sociological Theory 

50302 Clinical Sociological Practice 

50303 Social and Cultural Change 
SO320 Sociological Theory 
SO380 Social Research Methods 
S0493 Internship in Sociology 

Controlled electives: One substantive area (2) 

Medical Sociology: AN444 or S0342. and 4 courses 

from list: AN222. 444, BI151 or 155, EC335, 

FN212, PC321, 378. S0231. 336. 342, 357,459 
Gerontology: PC378 or S0357. and 4 courses from 

list: AN444. EC335. GE360, PC312, 378, 

S023 1 , 25 1 . 336, 342, 352, 357 
Juvenile Delinquency: CR451 or S0333. and 4 

courses from list: CR102. 270, 370. 451. GE432, 

HI374. S0231, 333. 336. 339, 345, 361, 362 
Interpersonal and Family Sociology: S0336 or 345, 

and 4 courses from list: HE218, 224, PC31 1. 321. 

330, S0251. 335, 336, 339, 345, 361. 363, 427, 428 
Labor and Industry: SO340 or 348. and 4 courses 

from list: EC330. 350, 371, 372, 373, HI373, 

LR426. 480. PC420. S0231. 303, 340. 348, 361, 458 
Community Development: S0339, and 4 courses 

from list: AN271. 272. 314, EC336, 383, FN402. 

GE33 1.332. 360. PS25 1 . 354. S023 1 . 333. 336. 338, 

339,341.363 



0-6 



42 



*sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 
12sh 
15sh(3) 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 





21-29 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) Credit counted in Liberal Studies, but not in the major 
( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



(2 I Students may create then own substantive area with the approval of the 
department chairperson. 
i \t least two courses in any substantive area must be SO (Sociology) 
courses. 



53-55 



0-6 



42 



Bachelor of Arts — Sociology/Applied Social Research 
Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA217 

Social Science: SO 151 required, AN 110 recommended 
Liberal Studies electives: CO101, no courses with SO prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (1) 

Major: 

Required courses: 

SOI 51 Principles of Sociology *sh 

SO320 Sociological Theory 3sh 

SO380 Social Research Methods 3sh 

50456 Field Research Methods 3sh 

50457 Computer Use in Sociology 3sh 

50458 Political Sociology 3sh 
S0471 Internship in Sociology 12sh 

Controlled electives: One substantive area(2) 15sh(3) 

Medical Sociology: AN444 or S0342, and 4 courses 

from list: AN222. 444. BI151 or 155, EC335. 

FN212, GE360, PC321, 378, S0231. 335, 336, 342, 

357, 459 
Gerontology: PC378 or S0357. and 4 courses from 

list: AN444, EC335, 360. GE360. PC312. 378, S0231, 

251,336,342,352,357 
Juvenile Delinquency: CR451 or S0333, and 4 courses 

from list: CR102. 270. 361, 370, 451, GE432, 

HI374, S0231, 333, 336, 339, 345, 361, 362 
Interpersonal and Family Sociology: S0335 or 346, 

and 4 courses from list: AN319. HE218, 224, 

PC311. 321. 330, S0251. 335, 336, 337. 339. 

345,361,362,427.428,435 
Labor and Industrv: SO340 or 348, and 4 courses 

from list: EC330, 350, 371. 372, 373. HI373. 

LR426. 480, PC420, PS352. S0231, 303, 340. 

348,361,458 
Community Development: S0339. and 4 courses 

from list: AN271. 272, 314, EC336, 383, FN402, 

GE331, 332, 360. PS251. 354, S0231, 333, 336. 

338,339.341.363 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 





21-29 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies elective. 

(2) Students may create their own substantive area with the approval of the 
department chairperson. 

(3) At least two courses in any substantive area must be SO (Sociology) 
courses. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Social Sciences 
Education/Sociology Concentration (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PC101, S0151. EC121 

Liberal Studies electives: EC 122. GE230, PS346, no courses 
with SO prefix 

College: 30 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching I lsh 



94 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



ED342 


Pre-student Teaching II 


lsh 


ED441 


Student Teaching 


12sh 


ED442 


School Law 


lsh 


ED455 


Teaching of Social Sciences in Secondary 
School 


3sh 


EP202 


Educational Psychology 


3sh 


EP377 


Educational Tests and Measurement 


3sh 


FE202 


American Education in Theory and Practice 


3sh 



Major: 36 

Required Sociology or related courses 

S015I Principles of Sociology *sh ( 1 ) 

S0231 Contemporary Social Problems 3sh 

SO320 Sociological Theory 3sh 

SO380 Social Research Methods 3sh 

AN211 Cultural Anthropology 3sh 

Controlled Electives 

One course recommended from each of the following 3 areas 

of Sociology: 
Social Structures and Processes: S0336. 340, 341, 348, 352, 

421.458,459 
Social Problems: S0231, 251, 333, 335, 357, 362, 363, 427. 428 
Theory and Research: AN317. 321; SO301. 456, 457 

History Distributional Requirements 

Any two History courses which focus on the U.S. 6sh 

Any Non-Western or World History Course 3sh 

Required Social Science Distribution 

GE200 level or higher 3sh 

PS280orPS285 3sh 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives:(2) 





3-5 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(1) S0151: Principles of Sociology is counted as part of the 53-55sh 
Liberal Studies requirements. 

(2) Students who do not pass a special education competency test must 
take EX300; this will reduce their free electives. 



Minor — Sociology 

Required course: 

SO 1 5 1 Principles of Sociology 

Controlled electives: 

One course from list: S023 1 , SO320, SO380 
Three additional courses in Sociology 



15 



3sh 

3sh 
9sh 



Minor — Applied Social Research 

Required courses: 

SO380 Social Research Methods 

50456 Field Research Methods 

50457 Computer Use in Sociology 

50458 Political Sociology 
Controlled elective: 

Any research course in College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences, as approved by department chairperson 
Optional internship: 
AN493 or S0493 



15 



3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



3sh 



6sh 



Department of Spanish and Classical 
Languages 

Peter Broad, Chairperson; Carranza, Drescher, Foltz, 
Glisan, Hernandez, Mendizabal, Miltz, Smith, Spieker, 
Thornton, Young 

The Department of Spanish and Classical Languages offers a varied 
curriculum designed to provide not only basic language instruction in 



Spanish, Greek, and Latin but also the more advanced competencies needed 
by language specialists and students hoping to take advantage of an 
international study experience. For the undergraduate Spanish major, the 
department has three degree programs: the B.S. in Education, the B.A. in 
Spanish, and the B.A. in Spanish for International Trade. The latter degree 
program provides solid undergraduate degree training preparatory to an 
M.B.A. in International Management. 

Students majoring in Spanish will acquire proficiency in all phases of the 
language and enter more deeply into the history, culture, and literature of 
Spanish-speaking countries. Spanish majors generally find employment in 
government work, librarianship, journalism, foreign trade, airlines, tourism, 
business, and teaching. Students choosing careers as secondary school 
teachers will find the close supervision and advanced methodology offered 
by the department a distinct asset. 

College Language Requirements 

Students in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences, who must pass an intermediate-level 
language course requirement for graduation, may choose any one of the four 
languages offered: French. German. Latin, and Spanish. Those choosing 
the Spanish or Latin options will fulfill the requirement by successfully 
completing SP 201 orSP211 or LA 201. Self-instruction in Critical 
Languages fulfills the requirement only in the College of Humanities and 
Social Sciences. The student with no previous foreign language study will 
take SP101-102 or SP1 1 1 or LA101-102 as a prerequisite; the credits will 
not be applicable to any college or department requirements (except for 
students in HRIM who may fulfill their six-hour language requirement with 
SP1 1 1 or 2 1 1 or with two four-hour courses) but may be counted as general 
electives in the total required for graduation. Students in the other colleges 
may choose to take one of the languages offered (at the intermediate level) 
in fulfilling the requirements of Liberal Studies electives. 

Students with previous Spanish study in high school will be placed into the 
appropriate course levels by means of a written departmental exam, 
administered prior to the beginning of the semester. In addition, as deemed 
necessary in individual cases, students may be required to take an oral 
proficiency test with one or more faculty members in the Spanish 
department. Each student's individual requirements and the judgment of the 
classroom instructors will also be considered in placement. No student 
judged to be a native speaker of Spanish will be allowed to enroll in any 
course below the 300 level. 

Spanish for Elementary Education 

A student in Elementary Education may elect a concentration of 19 semester 

hours of Spanish, consisting of the following: 

SP20I or equivalent 4sh 

SP221 Intermediate Conversation 3sh 

SP230 Intermediate Composition 3sh 

SP260 Introduction to Literature 3sh 

SP321 Advanced Conversation 3sh 

SP404 Advanced Spanish Grammar 3sh 

Study Abroad and Internships 

Study Abroad: The university has established study abroad centers in both 
Spain and Mexico. The program in Valladolid. Spain, is a second-semester- 
only program, whereas the one in Mexico is a summer program. All majors 
are encouraged to participate in study abroad; nonmajors are also accepted 
into these programs. The eighteen hours in Spain or seven hours in Mexico 
are applicable to a major or a minor in Spanish. Students interested in more 
information should contact the Spanish department. 

Internships: Internships in Spain and Mexico are available through the 
department. All internships take place during the summer and vary from six 
weeks to two months in duration. Internship is a credit-bearing course. 
SP493, and all interns are enrolled in the first session of summer school. 
Noncredit internships cannot be considered. Students enrolled in the Spanish 
for International Trade program are strongly urged to do an internship in 
order to gain credibility in the field of international business. Internships 
are available in banking, government, social work, communications, 
education, marketing, and many other fields. Arranging an internship 
abroad takes considerable long-range planning, and anyone interested 
should contact the Spanish Department at least three months in advance. 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences — 95 



53-55 



Bachelor of Arts — Spanish 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in the Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with SP prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language (included in major) 

Major: 

Required Courses: 

SP201 or equivalent 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Secondary Spanish 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-55 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with SP prefix 



37 



» 4sh 

SP221 Intermediate Conversation 3sh 

SP230 Intermediate Composition 3sh 

SP260 Introduction to Literature 3sh 

SP321 Advanced Conversation 3sh 

SP340 Hispanic Civilization through the 19th Century 3sh 

SP342/344 20th-century Spain/20th-Century 3sh 

Spanish-America 

SP404 Advanced Grammar 3sh 
Controlled Electives: 

At least one course from those numbered 410-431 3sh 

Any other nine (9) credits in courses 342 or above 9sh 

Other Requirements: 



Free Electives: 





32-34 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Arts — Spanish for International Trade 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Social Science: EC121 

Liberal Studies electives: GE252, MA214, CO/BE/IM101, 
no course with SP prefix 

College: 

Foreign Language (included in major) 

Major: 34 

Required courses: 

SP201 or equivalent 4sh 

SP222 Intermediate Conversation (Business) 3sh 

SP230 Intermediate Composition 3sh 

SP260 Introduction to Hispanic Literature 3sh 

SP321 Advanced Conversation 3sh 

SP340 Hispanic Civilization through the 19th Century 3sh 

SP404 Advanced Grammar 3sh 

SP342/344 20th-century Spain/20th-Century 3sh 

Spanish-America 

SP354 Commercial Spanish 3sh 

Controlled Electives: 

Other Spanish Electives 6sh 

Other Requirements: Business Sequence 36 

AD321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3sh 

AG201 Accounting Principles I 3sh 

AG202 Accounting Principles II 3sh 

BL235 Introduction to Business Law 3sh 

EC122 Principles of Economics II 3sh 

FI310 Finance I 3sh 

IM300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3sh 

MG310 Human Behavior in Organizations 3sh 

MG330 Management and Production Concepts 3sh 

MG495 Business Policy 3sh 

MK320 Principles of Marketing 3sh 

QB215 Business Statistics 3sh 

Free Electives: 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-Student Teaching and Clinical Experiences I 

ED342 Pre-Student Teaching and Clinical Experiences II 

ED44 1 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED453 Teaching of Foreign Language in Secondary 

School 
EP202 Educational Psychology 
EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 
FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

Major: 

Required courses: 

SP201 or equivalent 

SP221 Intermediate Conversation 

SP230 Intermediate Composition 

SP260 Introduction to Hispanic Literature 

SP321 Advanced Conversation 

SP340 Hispanic Civilization 

SP342/344 20th-century Spain/20th-Century 
Spanish-America 

SP353 Phonetics and Phonemics 

SP404 Advanced Grammar 
Controlled Electives: 

Any other six (6) credits from SP 300 or above 

Free Electives: (recommended) 

ED499 Multicultural/Multiethnic Education 

EX300 Education of Exceptional in Regular Classroom 



30 



3sh 
lsh 
lsh 
12sh 
lsh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



4sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 
3sh 

6sh 



2sh 
3sh 



34 



6-8 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 



Minor — Spanish 

Required courses: 

SP201 or equivalent 
SP221 Intermediate Conversation 
SP230 Intermediate Composition 
SP260 Introduction to Literature 
SP321 Advanced Conversation 
SP342/344 20th-century Spain/20th-Century 
Spanish-America 

Controlled electives: 



22 



4sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



One course: SP340. SP342, SP344, SP362, SP364, or SP353 3sh 



Total Degree Requirements: 124-126 



96 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 




The College of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics 

To be appointed, Dean 

John N. Fox, Dean's Associate 

One of the characteristics of the twentieth century is the marked change in 
the relation of citizens to their environment. Space probes, orbiting 
satellites, and productive research on the structure and synthesis of living 
matter have brought to the forefront for reexamination such time-honored 
queries as. "What is the nature of the universe?" or "Can people control 
their natural environment?" or "How did life begin?" Correct answers to 
these and other questions, coupled with proper application of this knowledge 
for humankind's betterment, must be a significant part of the goal of 
educated people everywhere. 

The objectives of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics are to 
acquaint the student with the kinds of problems which lend themselves to 
possible solutions through the use of science; to introduce different 
scientific techniques through significant illustrative experiences; to give a 
sense of perspective in the development of science; and to develop an 
understanding of the basic community of all scientific disciplines. 

Degrees 

The departments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, and Physics 
offer work leading to either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts 
degree, depending upon the specific course program pursued. The Bachelor 
of Science degree is awarded for successful work in the departments of 
Geoscience and Mathematics. The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded by 
the Department of Psychology. A Bachelor of Science degree is also 
awarded in Natural Sciences. 



Several departments in the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
sponsor Master of Arts or Master of Science degrees in the university's 
Graduate School. The Department of Psychology offers the Doctor of 
Clinical Psychology degree. Information on these programs should be 
obtained from the Graduate School. 

Degree Requirements 

In addition to the university's Liberal Studies requirements, all students 
seeking a baccalaureate degree in the College of Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics must complete the requirements for a major as established by 
the department through which they wish to specialize. Statements of these 
requirements and for minoring in a specific field appear in the department 
sections that follow. A double major or minor may encompass a discipline 
outside as well as within the college but should be selected only with 
adviser approval. As a general principle, there is considerable latitude in 
course choice for Natural Sciences and Mathematics majors; for specifically- 
required courses, substitution in any program must have the written approval 
of the student's department chairperson or the college dean. 

The Foreign Language Requirement 

Unless otherwise indicated, each department adheres to the following 
foreign language requirement: 

A candidate for a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree must 
demonstrate a proficiency in a foreign language equivalent to that attained 
upon completion of two years of college instruction in that language. This 
requirement may be met by 

a. successful completion of the intermediate level in a specific language; or 

b. successful completion of an exemption or credit examination in lieu of 
the above. 

Any foreign student, registered as such at IUP, whose acquired native 
language is other than English and who demonstrates an acceptable 
proficiency in English, is exempt from the foreign language requirement for 
a Natural Sciences and Mathematics degree if the department he/she is 
majoring in does not require a specific language not thus covered. 

Preprofessional Programs 

The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics offers programs for the 
preparation of students for acceptance by a professional school: pre-medical 
(including osteopathic medicine), and pre-veterinary medicine. In addition, 
the college offers a major in the Natural Sciences for those students whose 
goal is dentistry, pharmacy or pharmacology, optometry, podiatry, 
chiropractic medicine, or physical therepy. All programs are so designed 
that, should work at a professional school not ensue, the student may 
earn an IUP baccalaureate degree, provided he/she has been faithful to 
faculty advisement. 

The preprofessional health programs in Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
presuppose that the student has an excellent background in the high school 
sciences and mathematics or will prove to be an excellent college student. 
Students should identify their proposed field of study upon admission to IUP. 

Cooperative Programs 

IUP has been fortunate to enter into cooperative agreements with a number 
of outstanding institutions to provide significant career opportunities to our 
students. These formal agreements provide for accelerated graduate or 
professional degree programs or carefully planned and coordinated 
undergraduate programming with the cooperating institution. Programs are 
intended to assure acceptance of properly qualified students by the 
cooperating professional schools. Additional information concerning the 
specific programs can be found under the appropriate academic department 
in this catalog. 

Engineering (See Department of Physics) 

Drexel University - the program combines the opportunity for two years of 
study at IUP with the remaining three years of study as part of the Drexel 
plan of cooperative education. A student completing this program will 
receive a bachelor's degree in engineering from Drexel University. 

University of Pittsburgh - the program will allow the student to enroll at IUP 
for the first three years of college and conclude degree work by enrolling in 
an engineering program at the University of Pittsburgh for last two years. 
The student will earn a B.S. degree in Natural Science from IUP and the 
appropriate engineering degree from the University of Pittsburgh; see the 
Natural Science section for IUP degree requirements. 



The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 97 



Family Medicine (See Department of Biolog) I 

Jefferson Medical College ol I 'nomas Jefferson University - the program is 
designed to increase the opportunities for RIP students to be admitted to 
Jefferson Medical College in the Family Medicine Program designed to 
provide physicians to rural communities in Pennsylvania where there is a 
shortage. 

Forestry and Environmental Studies (Sec Department ol Biology) 
Duke University - the program is designed to coordinate the education of 
students from IUP with the graduate programs in forestry and environmental 
management offered at Duke University, in Durham. North Carolina. 

Podiatry (See Natural Sciences i 

The Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine program is designed to 

accelerate the professional training of IUP students in the field of podiatry. 

Optometry (See Natural Sciences) 

The Pennsylvania College of Optometry program is designed to accelerate 

the professional training of IUP students in the field of optometry. 

Marine Science Consortium 

College majors may be interested in the programs available through the 
Marine Science Consortium. The Marine Science Consortium was 
established in 1968 for the purpose of promoting teaching and research in 
the marine sciences. The participating institutions include IUP and thirteen 
other colleges and universities. Although no separate major in the Marine 
Sciences exists, elective courses may be taken and credited toward 
undergraduate curriculums in Biology. Geology. Geography, and Earth 
Science. The Marine Science Consortium offers five three-week sessions 
during the summer at the NASA-Wallops Island Station. Virginia. Normally, 
several research cruises are offered each summer. 

Students must register for credit and pay credit fees to a participating 
institution. Room and board fees are paid to the consortium. Applications 
for all summer sessions must be submitted to the institutional director by 
April 1. Students must be accepted by the consortium before registering 
at a participating institution. See section on Marine Science Consortium 
for a listing of courses. For brochure, summer bulletin, and application 
forms, contact Dr. Ray L. Winstead, Biology, or Dr. Darlene S. 
Richardson, Geoscience, who are the IUP directors and assist students in 
program planning. 

Internship Programs 

Several departments have established programs under which students 
engage in an off -campus supervised work experience for credit. 

For more information about specific Internship programs, students should 
consult with the chairperson of the department in which the student is 
majoring. Low-income students eligible for internships may receive federal- 
state funding. 



Department of Biology 

Robert S. Prezant, Chairperson; Alico, Andrew, Ash- 
Johnson, Baker, Browe, Butler, Charnego, Ciskowski, 
Dietrich, Ferrence, Forbes, Gendron, Hulse, Humphreys, 
Kerans, Kesner, Linzey, Lord, Luciano, Nastase, Newell, 
Peard, Peterson, Pickering, Pistole, Schrock, Simmons, 
Winstead; and professors emeriti Gallati, Hoffmaster, 
Liegey, Moore, Stapleton 

Degrees offered by the biology department are the Bachelor of Science in 
Biology, the Bachelor of Arts in Biology, Bachelor of Science in 
Environmental Health, and the Bachelor of Science in Education with a 
Biology major. The first three degree programs are under the College of 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the fourth is under the College of 
Education. The department also offers a Biology minor. All of these 
programs are in revision for implementation in 1995-96 academic year. 

The program leading to a B.S. in Biology is designed to provide 
maximum depth in the sciences and mathematics with minimum elective 
opportunity. Students who plan to attend graduate school or professional 



schools such as those in human or veterinary medicine most often choose 
this program ol studies. 

The program leading to a B.A. in Biology is designed to reduce the 
requirement in sciences and mathematics and allow for greater elective 
choice from diverse fields. Unspecialized career plans can be best 
accommodated with this program. 

The Environmental Health program is a preparation for employment in 
local, state, and federal agencies and industry. Between the junior and senior 
year, each student should serve an internship with a governmental agency or 
an industrial concern. 

The program leading to the B.S. in Education with a Biology major is 
designed to prepare for certification in public school teaching. 

Note: The Biology Department cooperates in programs with Jefferson 
Medical College. Duke University School of the Environment, and Marine 
Science Consortium, Inc. 

Duke Cooperative College Program in Forestry and 
Environmental Studies 

The Cooperative College program with the Duke University School of the 
Environment. Durham. North Carolina, is designed to coordinate the 
undergraduate education of students at IUP with graduate programs in the 
areas of resources and environment offered at Duke. Undergraduate majors 
in one of the natural sciences, mathematics, economics, business, or political 
science are suited to the program. Preparation for the Duke program should 
include at least one year each of biology with work in botany, economics 
with a significant component of microeconomics, and mathematics which 
should include calculus, computer science, and statistics. Applicants to the 
Duke program who have completed courses in ecology, chemistry, geology, 
physics, and a foreign language or additional courses in biology, economics, 
and mathematics will be given preferential consideration. Students are 
accepted in either of two degree programs at Duke: the Master of Forestry 
(M.F.) or Master of Environmental Management (M.E.M.). 

Students may be accepted into the Duke graduate program after three years 
of high-quality undergraduate study at IUP or upon completion of the 
baccalaureate. Students who qualify after three years will have completed 
most of the undergraduate degree requirements at IUP except for total hours. 
Courses at Duke will be applied to the bachelor's degree at IUP. Dr. Gould 
F. Schrock. Department of Biology, is the faculty adviser at IUP and assists 
students in program planning. 

Jefferson Medical College-IUP 
Physician Shortage Area Program 

A cooperative Family Medicine Physician Education Program has been 
established by IUP and Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson 
University in Philadelphia for the purpose of improving the distribution of 
physicians in Pennsylvania. The program is designed to increase the 
opportunities for young women and men to practice family medicine in the 
rural communities of Pennsylvania where there is a shortage of physicians. 

The program at Jefferson Medical College will admit approximately four 
graduates of IUP and twenty graduates of other colleges each year. Students 
from IUP will be admitted only if properly qualified according to the 
admission standards and policies of Jefferson Medical College. Applications 
are reviewed by the Joint IUP-Jefferson Subcommittee and 
recommendations made to the Jefferson Committee on Admissions. 

Admission to Jefferson Medical College 

A strong preparation in the sciences and mathematics basic to medical 
school studies is required. A variety of college course formats and 
combinations, including biology, general and organic chemistry, and physics 
is a minimum. Courses taken to meet the basic requirements should be 
rigorous and. in general, comparable to courses accepted for concentration 
in these disciplines. Courses taken should be supplemented by laboratory 
experiences. Students may take upper-level science courses out of 
educational interest or to fulfill the requirements of their major. Taking 
additional science courses that cover material taught within the medical 
school curriculum is not helpful to gain admission. 

Breadth of education is expected. Pursuit of some discipline in depth is 
encouraged. A successful medical student must actively acquire, synthesize, 
apply, and communicate information. These are skills which can be 



98 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



developed through a great variety of academic disciplines. Studies in the 
humanities and the social and behavioral sciences and development of 
effective writing skills are strongly suggested. Additional requirements for 
admission can be found in '•Information for Prospective Students," 
published by Jefferson Medical College. 

Students who qualify for the Physician Shortage Area Program (PSAP) must 
certify their intentions to adhere to the following plan of education and 
practice: (a) complete the family medicine curriculum during their four 
years of medical education at Jefferson Medical College, including a six- 
week clerkship in a rural area; (b) complete a three-year family medicine 
residency; and (c) agree to practice family medicine in an underserved area. 
Preference will be given to Pennsylvania residents who are interested in this 
program, with highest priority given to those who actually live, at the time 
of application, in the underserved area in which they hope to practice. (Dr. 
Allan Andrew, pre -medical adviser in the Biology Department, will assist 
students in program planning.) 

In the programs of study that follow, no more than six semester hours in 
aggregate from internships, independent study, and special topics may be 
counted toward biology course requirements. Credits beyond six earned 
from these sources are counted as general electives. 



Bachelor of Arts — Biology 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Natural Science: CHI 11-1 12 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with BI prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 

BI105 Cell Biology 

BI110 Plant Biology 

BI120 Animal Biology 

BI263 Genetics 

BI480 Biology Seminar 
Controlled electives: 

Biology electives (major courses only) 

Other Requirements: 

Chemistry sequence 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 

CH351 Biochemistry 
Foreign Language Intermediate Level(2) 

Free Electives: 



55-56 



27 

4sh 
5sh 
5sh 
3sh 
lsh 

9sh( 1 ) 

8-14 

4sh 

4sh 

0-6sh 



27-34 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

(1) No more than 6sh total from Independent Study, Special Topics, 
Internship applies to major: excess applied as free electives. 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science — Biology 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Natural Science: PY1 11/12 1-1 12/122 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 122 OR MA216. no courses with BI 
prefix 

Major: 33 

Required courses: 

BI105 Cell Biology 



BI110 Plant Biology 
BI120 Animal Biology 
BI263 Genetics 
BI480 Biology Seminar 
Controlled electives: 

Biology electives (major courses only! 



4sh 

5sh 
5sh 
3sh 
lsh 

15sh(l) 



Other Requirements: 

Chemistry sequence 

CH 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 
CHI 12 General Chemistry II 
CH23 1 Organic Chemistry I 
CH232 Organic Chemistry II 
CH351 Biochemistry 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level(2) 



20-26 



4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



8-18 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) No more than 6sh total from Independent Study. Special Topics, or 
Internship applies to major; excess applied as free electives. 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Biology (*) 
Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-56 

with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MAI 10 or MA121 
Natural Science: CHI 1-1 12 
Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: PYI 1 1. no courses with BI prefix, one course 
must have a GS prefix from the Liberal Studies Natural Science. 
Option II. Nonlaboratory List. 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experiences I 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical ExperiencesII 

ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED451 Teaching Science in the Secondary Schools 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measures 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

Major: ( 1 ) 

Required courses: 

BI103 General Biology I 
BI104 General Biology II 
B1110 Plant Biology 
BI120 Animal Biology 
BI361 Microbiology 
BI480 Biology Seminar 
Controlled electives: 

Biology electives: (major courses only) BI105, 
BI263, and BI362 recommended 

Other Requirements: 

Chemistry sequence: 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 

CH351 Biochemistry 
Physics sequence: 

PY12I Physics Lab I 

PYI 12 Physics II 

PYI 22 Physics Lab II 

Free Electives: 



30 



3sh 
lsh 
lsh 
12sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 



4sh 
4sh 
5sh 
5sh 
3sh 
lsh 



30 



8sh(2) 



13 



4sh 
4sh 

lsh 
3sh 
lsh 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 127-128 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) Eligibility for student teaching and certification in secondary biology 
requires a cumulative GPA of 2.75 and a grade of C or better in biology 
courses. 

(2) No more than 6sh from Independent Study, Special Topics. Internship 
applies to major: excess applied as free electives 

i # ) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 99 



Bachelor of Science — Environmental Health 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MAI21 

Natural Science: PY 111/121-112/122 

Social Science: PS1 1 1 

Liberal Studies electives: MA216. no courses with Bl prefix 



Major: 




Required 


.nurses 


B1105 


Cell Biolog) 


BI110 


Plant Biology 


BI120 


Animal Biology 


BI241 


General Microbiology 


BI362 


Ecology 


BI310 


Applied Entomology and Zoonoses 


BI321 


Environmental Protection I 


BI322 


Environmental Protection II 


BI480 


Biolog) Seminar 


BI498 


Internship or Alternate Experience 



36 



4-h 
5sh 
5sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
Ish 
6sh(2) 



Other Requirements: 

Required courses: 

CHI 1 1 General Chemistry I 
CHI 12 General Chemistry II 
CH231 Organic Chemistrv I 
SA101 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health 

Management 
SA301 Nature and Effects of Occupational Health 

Hazards 
SA302 Measurements and Evaluation of Occupational 

Health Hazards 
Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 



21-27 



4sh 

4sh 
4sh 

3sh 

3sh 

3sh 

0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



4-11 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) No more than 6sh total from Independent Study. Special Topics, or 
Internship applies to major; excess applied as free electives. 



Minor — Biology 

Minor: 17 

Option A: Required courses 

BI103-104 General Biology I and II 8sh 

Additional Bl courses 9sh( 1 ) 

Option B: Required courses 

BI105 Cell Biology 4sh 

Additional Bl courses 13sh(l) 

Other Requirements: 

Must have permission of biology department chairperson 

( 1 ) With approval of department chairperson 



Biochemistry Program 

Richard A. Hartline, Program Coordinator; Dietrich, 
Harding, Biology and Chemistry faculties. 

The B.S. in Biochemistry is a four-year degree curriculum offered as a 
cooperative program by the Biology and Chemistry departments. 

The curriculum leading to a B.S. in Biochemistry begins with foundation 
courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics in the first two 
years. Specialization in biochemistry commences in the third year with 
courses in biochemistry, genetics, physical chemistry. Special Topics in 
Biochemistry, and Biochemistry Seminar. 



A unique feature of this undergraduate program is that Biochemistry 
research is a requirement. After consultation with faculty, the students will 
define a problem and devise an experimental plan through library research. 
I .ihoratory research will be done under the direct supervision of a College 
of Natural Science and Mathematics faculty member. Finally, the student 
will report on the results of the research in both written and oral forms. 

The B.S. in Biochemistry Program is intended for those students whose 
interests lie in a most exciting field of modern science. Graduates of this 
program can expect to be qualified to enter graduate programs in 
biochemistry, biology, chemistry, molecular biology, and professional 
schools in the health sciences, and positions in industrial and government 
research laboratories and in industrial production facilities. 



Bachelor of Science — Biochemistry 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in the Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Science: PY1 31/141- 1 32/142 

Liberal Studies elective: MA 124, no courses with BC prefix; 
one course must be 200-level or higher. 

Major: 

Required courses: 

BI105 Cell Biology 

BI263 Genetics 

BI361 Microbiology 

BI401 Laboratory Methods in Biology 
and Biotechnology 

BC301/31 1 Biochemistry I and Lab 

BC302/312 Biochemistry II and Lab 

BC480 Biochemistry Seminar I 

BC481 Special Topics in Biochemistry 

BC482 Independent Research in Biochemistry 

BC490 Biochemistry Seminar II 

CHI 13 Concepts in Chemistry 

CHI 14 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 

CH232 Organic Chemistry II 

CH323 Analytical Methods 

CH340 Physical Chemistry 
Controlled Electives: 

Advanced Biology course chosen from: 
BI331. BI350, BI352, BI364. or B 145 3 

Either MA216 or COl 10 
Foreign Language Intermediate Level(2) 

Free Electives: 



56-59 



51 

4sh 
3sh 
3sh 

3sh 

4sh 

4sh 

Ish(l) 

3sh 

2sh 

lsh(l) 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

3sh 

6-13 

3sh 
3-4sh 
0-6sh 

7-11 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) 1 sh each semester of senior year 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Department of Chemistry 

Pothen Varughese, Chairperson; Asting, Ballas, Bravo, 
Christodouleas, Coleman, Costa, Crumm, Elcesser, Fazio, 
Ford, Harding, Hartline, Kolaczkowski, Kupchella, Long, 
McKelvey, Patsiga, Scroxton, Syty, Wood, Woolcock, 
Zambotti; and professors emeriti Bordas, Marks, Tackett, 
Wunz 

Degrees offered by the Department of Chemistry are the Bachelor of 
Science in Chemistry, the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry, and the Bachelor 
of Science in Education with a Chemistry major. The first two degree 
programs are under the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and 
the third is under the College of Education. The department also offers a 
Chemistry minor. 



700 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



The B.S. in Chemistry is a professional degree and is certified by the 
American Chemical Society. The student completing this major should he 
qualified to assume a position in industry or government as a chemist or to 
apply for admission to graduate school to pursue advanced studies leading to 
the M.S. or Ph.D. degree. The student considering going to a professional 
school who also wishes to complete this degree should elect appropriate 
courses as required by the professional school in addition to the courses 
required here. Those students who are particularly interested in biochemistry 
should elect a few selected biology courses. 

The curriculum leading to the B.A. in Chemistry is designed to allow for the 
workable union of nonscience areas with chemistry in such a way as to 
retain the fundamental science and mathematics requirements needed for a 
career in chemistry. A careful selection of electives will qualify the student 
for entrance into many fields in which there is an acute need for educated 
people and. at the same time, satisfy the entrance requirements of various 
professional and graduate schools. 

Some possible and useful combinations between chemistry and other 
disciplines would include chemistry-biology, chemistry-business 
administration, chemistry -computer science, chemistry -criminology, 
chemistry-government, chemistry-pre -dental, chemistry -pre-law, chemistry- 
safety science, chemistry-pre-medicine, and chemistry-English (technical 
writing). The student must arrange a practical sequence of non-chemistry 
courses in consort with his/her adviser and the department chairperson 
concerned. A student seeking a career in forensic science should major in 
chemistry. The department also offers pre-medical programs in both the B.S. 
and B.A. curriculums. These programs prepare the student to satisfy the 
entrance requirements of medical schools. 

The curriculum leading to the B.S. in Education with a Chemistry major is 
designed to prepare the student to teach chemistry at the secondary school 
level. Upon completion of the specified coursework and the requirements 
for teacher certification processes, the student is eligible for Pennsylvania 
certification by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 



Bachelor of Arts — Chemistry 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA121 orMA123 

Natural Science: PY11 1/121-112/122 or PY 13 1/14 1-132/142 
Liberal Studies electives: MA 122 OR MA 124. no courses 
with CH prefix 

Major: 

Required courses: 

CH 1 1 3 Concepts in Chemistry 

CHI 14 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 

CH232 Organic Chemistry II 

CH321 Quantitative Analysis 

CH322 Instrumental Analysis 

CH341 Physical Chemistry I 

CH343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 

Other Requirements: 

Planned program in complementary field 
(adviser approval) with 6sh in 300/400 level 
courses (2) 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level 



56-57 



29 

4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
lsh 

15-21 
15sh(l) 



0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



17-24 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) 



(2) 
(3) 



Recommended fields: Biology, Business. Computer Science, 

Criminology, Dietetics. Economics, English, Foreign Language, 

Geoscience. Mathematics, Safety Science, Physics. Political Science, 

Psychology. 

Chemistry Pre-Med program requires: BII05. BU20. BI263, BI331. 

Intermediate-level Foreign language may be included in Liberal Studies 

electives. 



56-57 



Bachelor of Science — Chemistry 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Sciences: PY131/I41-132/142 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no courses with CH prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

CHI 13 Concepts in Chemistry 

CH114 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 

CH23 1 Organic Chemistry I 

CH232 Organic Chemistry II 

CH301 Chemistry Seminar 

CH321 Quantitative Analysis 

CH322 Instrumental Analysis 

CH341 Physical Chemistry 1 

CH342 Physical Chemistry II 

CH343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 

CH344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 

CH410 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 

CH41 1 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
Controlled electives: 

Additional Chemistry electives from list: 
CH331. CH335, CH351, CH376, CH412. 
CH421.CH441.CH498 

Other Requirements: 

Additional math: COl 10 and one additional course 

from MAI71. MA227. MA241, MA342 
Pre-Med program (3) 
Foreign Language Intermediate Level(4) 



44 



4sh 

4sh( 1 ) 

4sh 

4sh 

lsh 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 

3sh 

lsh 

lsh 

lsh 

3sh 

6sh(2) 



7-14 



7-8sh 



Free Electives: (5) 



0-6sh 

9-17 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Those who took CH 1 1 1 and CH 1 1 2 should take CH 1 1 6 for ACS 
certified B.S. 

(2) CH49H (2sh) required for American Chemical Society certification. 

(3) Chemistry /Pre-Med program requires BI105. BI120, BI263. BI331, 
BI352. andCH351. 

(4) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives, 

(5) Pre-med requires Biology sequence I8sh. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Chemistry (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 121 

Natural Science: PY 1 1 1 / 1 2 1 - 1 1 2/ 1 22 

Social Science: PC 101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 122, no courses with CH prefix 

College: 30 

Professional education sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II lsh 

ED421 Student Teaching 12sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

ED45 1 Teaching Science in the Secondary School 3sh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measures 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 33-35 

Required courses: 

CH 1 1 3 Concepts in Chemistry 4sh 

CHI 14 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 4sh 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 4sh 

CH232 Organic Chemistry II 4sh 

CH32I Quantitative Analysis 4sh 



The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 101 



CH322 Instrumental Analysis 
CH341 Physical Chemistrj I 

CH343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory 1 
CH498 Problems in Chemistr} 
Controlled electives: 

One additional chemistry course from list: 
CH342,CH351,CH4U 

Other Requirements: 

HI 105 Cell Biology 



4sh 

4sh 

Ish 

I 2sh 

3-4sh 



4sh 



Free Klectives: 



0-1 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 124-126 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(#1 Sec advisor) paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements tor Graduation. 



Minor — Chemistry 

Minor: 20 

Required courses: 

(Hill General Chemistry 1 4sh 

CH112 General Chemistry II 4sh 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 4sh 

CH232 Organic Chemistry D 4sh 

One chemistry elective from CH321, CH323, CH351 4sh 



Department of Computer Science 

Gary L. Buterbaugh, Chairperson; Cross, Cunningham, 
McKelvey, Micco, Oblitey, Shubra, Sweeney, Watts, Wolfe; 
and professor emeritus Tompkins 

The programs in Computer Science at IUP lead to the B.S. or B.A. degree 
and are designed primarily to prepare graduates for productive work in 
highly computer-dependent areas of business, government, and industry. In 
recent years, majors graduating from the program have attained their first 
jobs in business applications, programming and systems analysis, computer 
software development, scientific and applied mathematical programming, 
other computer-related areas, and graduate school. 

In a rapidly developing field such as Computer Science, it is important that 
the graduate's education be broad and fundamental so that new trends can 
more readily be followed. Our goal is to balance fundamentally and breadth 
with sufficient supervised practice so that our graduates are productive at the 
time they graduate but ready and willing to change with the field. 

Most applied computer scientists work in cooperation with professionals 
trained in other areas and with managers. Hence, the ability to work and 
communicate with others of different educational backgrounds is an 
important characteristic. To that end, we encourage Computer Science 
majors to take a strong minor (or area concentration) in a second area of 
interest. Some students may wish to double major. Majors in other 
disciplines at IUP are also welcome to take Computer Science courses for 
which they are qualified or a Computer Science minor. 

Students majoring in Computer Science should set their goals beyond 
simple programming and should be preparing 

1. to program well, both in design and implementation phases, and 
document what they have programmed 

2. to analyze real-world problems in preparation for program design 
and implementation 

3. to manage activities that are strongly computer dependent 

4. to improve the tools that programmers and systems analysts use. 
i.e., to develop 

a. better machine systems 

b. better software systems 

c. better languages for communicating with machines 

d. better methods for solving intractable problems 

5. to teach about computers at college or high school level 

6. to advance the fundamental theory of digital information 
processors. 



Bachelor of Arts — Computer Science 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 55-58 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 (or MAI21-I22 or 127) 
Liberal Studies electives: MA216 (or MA214or MA217). 
no courses with CO prefix 

Major: 35 

Required Courses 

COI05 Fundamentals of Computer Science 3sh 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

CO220 Applied Computer Programming 3sh 

CO300 Assembly Language Programming 3sh 

CO310 Data Structures 3sh 

C0315 Large File Organization and Access 3sh 

CO380 Seminar on the Computer Profession lsh 

CO480 Seminar on Technical Topics lsh 

Controlled Electives: Select 9sh ( I ) 

CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3sh 

C0319 Software Engineering Concepts 3sh 

CO320 Software Engineering Practice 3sh 

C0345 Data Communications 3sh 

C0355 Computer Graphics 3sh 

CO360 IBM Job Control Language 1 sh 

C0362 UNIX and C 3sh 

C0481 Special Topics in Computer Science (as l-4sh 

approved for majors) 
C0485 Independent Study l-4sh 

C0493 Internship in Conputer Science 12sh(2) 

Upper Level Electives by Categories 6sh(3) 

Computer Architecture: CO410 

Theory of Languages: C0419. CO420. C0424, CO460 
Systems Programming: CO430, C0432 
Numerical Methods: CO450 
Artifical Intelligence: CO405 
Data Base Management: C0441 

Other Requirements: 6-22 

Additional Writing: 

EN322 Technical Writing 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level 0-6sh(4) 

Additional Mathematics: 3-13sh(5) 

MA 1 23 Calculus for Physics and Chemistry 

( MA 1 2 1 and MA 1 22 or MA 1 27 may be substituted ) 
MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 

(MA363 and MA364, MA214 and MA417, or MA217 
and MA417 may be substituted) 
MA219 Discrete Mathematics 



Free Electives: 



9-28 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Select at least 9sh from the list of controlled electives and/or the list of 
upper-level electives. Note: Only 4sh of C0493 may be counted toward 
these 9sh. 

(2) C0493 may be selected in either the second semester of the junior year 
or the first semester of the senior year. If C0493 is selected and 
approved. CO380 should be taken in the immediately preceding 
semester. 

( 3 ) Select at least two (2) additional courses, from at least two (2) different 
categories, from the list of upper-level electives. 

(4) Foreign Language intermediate-level courses are counted as Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(5) Any of the Mathematics options satisfy both the Learning Skill 
requirement, and one course may be counted as a Liberal Studies 
elective. The 3-credit minimum applies to students who take MA123 
and MA216. The 1 3-credit maximum applies to students who take the 
MA121-122 calculus option and the MA363-364 statistics option. 



102 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Bachelor of Science — Computer Science/Applied 
Computer Science Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-58 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA123 (or MA121-122 or MA127) 
Liberal Studies electives: MA216 (or MA214 or MA217), 
no courses with CO prefix 

Major: 38 

Required Courses 

CO 105 Fundamentals of Computer Science 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 

CO220 Applied Computer Programming 

CO300 Assembly Language Programming 

CO310 Data Structures 

C03 1 5 Large File Organization and Access 

C0319 Software Engineering Concepts 

CO380 Seminar on the Computer Profession 

C044 1 Data Base Management 

CO480 Seminar on Technical Topics 
Select one ( 1 ) of the following two courses: 

CO320 Software Engineering Practice 

C0493 Internship in Computer Science 
Controlled Electives: Select 6sh (3) 

CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 

C0345 Data Communications 

C0355 Computer Graphics 

CO360 IBM Job Control Language 

C0362 UNIX and C 

C0481 Special Topics in Computer Science (only 
sections approved for majors I 

C0485 Independent Study 
Upper Level Electives by Categories: Select 3sh (4) 

Computer Architecture: CO410 

Theory of Languages: C0419, CO420. C0424, CO460 

Systems Programming: CO430, C0432 

Numerical Methods: CO450 

Artificial Intelligence: CO405 

Other Requirements: 

Additional Writing: 

EN322 Technical Writing 
Foreign Language Intermediate Level 
Additional Mathematics: 

MA 123 Calculus I for Physics and Chemistry 

( MA 121 and MA 1 22 or MA 1 27 may be substituted ) 
MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 

(MA363 andMA364, MA214and MA417. or MA2I7 
and MA417 may be substituted) 
MA219 Discrete Mathematics 
Complete a minor from one of the following areas: 6-18 

a) From any department in the College of 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 6-18sh 

b) From designated Business courses 18sh 

c) From designated Economics courses 15sh 

d) From designated Geography courses 15sh 



Free Electives: 



0-20 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Credit for both CO320, Software Engineering Practice, and C0493. 
Internship in Computer Science, may be counted toward the degree but 
only one will be counted toward the major requirements. 

(2) C0493 may be selected in either the second semester of the junior year 
or the first semester of the senior year. If C0493 is selected and 
approved, CO380 may be taken in the immediately preceding semester. 

(3) Select at least 6sh from the list of controlled electives and/or the list of 
upper level electives. 

(4) Select at least one ( I ) additional course from the list of upper level 
electives. 

(5) Foreign Language intermediate-level courses are counted as Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(6) Any of the Mathematics options satisfy both the Learning Skill 
requirement, and one course may be counted as a Liberal Studies 



elective. The 3-credit minimum applies to students who take MA 123 
and MA216. The 1 3-credit maximum applies to students who take the 
MA 12 1-122 calculus option and the MA363-364 statistics option. 



Bachelor of Science — Computer Science/Languages and 
Systems Track 

Liberal Studies: As slated in Liberal Studies Requirements 54-58 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 1 23 or MA 1 27 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no course with CO prefix 



3sh 




3sh 


Major: 


3sh 


Required ( 


3sh 


CO 105 


3sh 


COl 10 


3sh 


CO220 


3sh 


CO300 


lsh 


CO310 


3sh 


C0315 


lsh 


C0319 




CO380 


3sh ( 1 ) 


CO4I0 


12sh(2) 


CO420 




C0432 


3sh 


CO480 


3sh 


Controllec 


3sh 


CO250 


lsh 


CO320 


3sh 


C0345 


l-4sh 


C0355 




CO360 


l-4sh 


C0362 




CO405 




C0419 




C0424 




CO430 




C0441 




CO450 




CO460 


6-22 


C048I 


3sh 


C0485 


0-6sh(5) 


C0493 


3-13sh(6) 





40 



Fundamentals of Computer Science 3sh 

Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

Applied Computer Programming 3sh 

Assembly Language Programming 3sh 

Data Structures 3sh 

Large File Organization and Access 3sh 

Software Engineering Concepts 3sh 

Seminar on the Computer Profession lsh 

Processor Architecture and Micro Programming 3sh 

Modern Programming Languages 3sh 

Introduction to Operating Systems 3sh 

Seminar on Technical Topics lsh 
Electives: Select 9sh < 1 ) 

Introduction to Numerical Methods 3sh 

Software Engineering Practice 3sh(2) 

Data Communications 3sh 

Computer Graphics 3sh 

IBM Job Control Language lsh 

UNIX and C 3sh 

Artificial Intelligence 3sh 

Software Development and Ada 3sh 

Compiler Construction 3sh 

Introduction to Systems Programming 3sh 

Data Base Management 3sh 

Applied Numerical Methods 3sh 

Theory of Computation 3sh 

Special Topics in Computer Science (as l-4sh 
approved for majors) 

Independent Study l-4sh 

Internship in Computer Science 12sh(3) 



Other Requirements: 13-21 

Additional Writing: 

EN322 Technical Writing 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level 0-6sh(4) 

Mathematics: A minor in mathematics including 10-12sh(5) 

the following courses 

MA123 Calculus I for Physics and Chemistry 

( 1 27 may be substituted) 
MA 124 Calculus II for Physics and Chemistry 

(MA128 may be substituted) 
MA 1 7 1 Introduction to Linear Algebra 
MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 

(MA363 and MA364, MA214 and MA417, or MA217 
and MA417 may be substituted) 
MA219 Discrete Mathematics 



Free Electives: 



5-23 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 1 Select at least 9sh from the list of controlled electives. Note: Only 4sh 
of C0493 may be counted toward these 9sh. 

(2) Credit for both CO320, Software Engineering Practice, and C0493, 
Internship in Computer Science, may be counted toward the degree but 
only one will be counted toward the major requirements. 

(3) C0493 may be selected in either the second semester of the junior year 
or the first semester of the senior year. If C0493 is selected and 
approved, CO380 may be taken in the immediately preceding semester. 

(4) Foreign Language intermediate-level courses are counted as Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(5) Credit for MA123/127 and MA124/128 counted in Liberal Studies. 



The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 103 



Minor — Computer Science 

Minor: 

Required courses: 
CO electives 



15 



I5sh(l) 



( 1 ) CO101 Microbased Computer Literacy is an appropriate entry course 
for minors or for students who wish to take only one course. 

(2) No more than six credits ma} he from courses numbered 205 or lower. 
f3) See Computer Science minor adviser for suggestions 



Department of Geoscience 

Frank W. Hall, II, Chairperson; Cercone, Clark, Park, 
Richardson, Sutton, Taylor; and professor emeritus Prince 

The Geoscience Department provides curriculums in areas of natural science 
dealing with and related to the earth and its environment by offering courses 
in astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography. 

In addition to on-campus instruction, opportunities exist for summer 
coursework and research in geology and oceanography at the Marine 
Science Consortium located at Wallops Island. Virginia. 

Degrees offered by the Department of Geoscience are the Bachelor of 
Science in Geology, the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Geoscience, 
and the Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in Earth and Space 
Science or with a major in General Science. The first two degree programs 
are under the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the last two 
are under the College of Education. 

The department also will act in an advisory capacity for students enrolled in 
the B.S. in Natural Science with concentrations in Astronomy, Meteorology. 
or Oceanography. These degree programs are designed to prepare students 
for graduate work in the aforementioned disciplines. 

The B.S. degree in Geology is. in a sense, a dual-purpose degree program. 
Not only is it designed to graduate well-trained, competent geologists, able 
to compete for positions as professional geologists in the job market; it is 
also designed to provide the student with the necessary allied science and 
mathematics background to enable the good student to qualify for admission 
to the graduate school of his/her choice in Geology. 

The B.S. degree in Environmental Geoscience offers the student a broad- 
based science background. In addition to a firm foundation in Geology- 
Geoscience courses, the student will also acquire a background in Biology 
and Chemistry. This will provide thorough training for the rapidly growing 
field of Environmental Geoscience, both for students who plan to pursue 
postgraduate training in this field and for those who plan to enter directly 
into jobs in federal and state agencies and private consulting firms. 

The department recognizes as one of its functions the role of serving the 
field of public education by the preparation of qualified and certified 
teachers of earth and space science. Also, because of the interdisciplinary 
nature of both the department and the requirements for preparing general 
science teachers, the department administers the program designed to lead to 
general science certification and includes majors of that category as 
department members. 

Minor in Geology 

The minor in Geology consists of 17 semester hours. Required are GS121: 
Physical Geology/GS123: Intensive Physical Geology Lab and GS131: 
Historical Geology/GS133: Intensive Historical Geology Lab. Three upper- 
level (300 or higher) courses in geology (total 9 credits) will make up the 
remaining requirements for the minor in Geology totaling 17 credits. 

Minor in Geoscience 

The requirement for the minor in Geoscience will be 16 semester hours of 
geoscience, taken within the following framework. Students must complete 
one course in each discipline within the department: Astronomy, three 
semester hours; Geology, four semester hours (not GS 1 22 or 1 32); 
Meteorology, three semester hours; Oceanography, three semester hours, for 
a total of thirteen semester hours. The additional three semester hours can be 



taken in any one of the aforementioned disciplines. Liberal Studies 
nonlaboratory courses, GS 110, 141, 150, 151, and 221, will not be 
acceptable toward the minor in Geoscience. 



Bachelor of Science — Geology 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 1 23 

Natural Science: CHI 1 1/1 12 or 113/114 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 1 24, no courses with GS elective 



Major: 






Required courses: ( 1 ) 




GS121 


Physical Geology 


3sh 


GS123 


Intensive Physical Geology Laboratory 


lsh 


GS131 


Historical Geology 


3sh 


GS133 


Intensive Historical Geology Laboratory 


lsh 


GS321 


Mineralogy 


3sh 


GS322 


Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology 


3sh 


GS325 


Structural Field Geology I 


3sh 


GS326 


Field Geology or Summer field course (offered 






by other universities) (1,2) 


3sh 


GS330 


Paleontology 


3sh 


GS362 


Plate Tectonics 


3sh 


GS411 


Sedimentary Petrology 


3sh 


GS412 


Stratigraphy or GS327 Geomorphology 


3sh 


GS480 


Geoscience Seminar 


lsh 


Controlled electives: 


9sh 


GS courses 300 or above 





56-57 



33 



Other Requirements: 

Additional Science: 

PY111 Physics I Lee 

PY112 Physics II Lee 
Foreign Language Intermediate Level (3,4) 



8-14 



4sh 

4sh 

0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



11-18 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



17 



(1) Summer Field Camp in geology (5-9sh) is strongly recommended. 

(2) A maximum of six credits from approved summer field camp may 
apply to a required core and controlled electives (3). 

(3) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(4) Six credits of computer languages may be used to meet foreign 
language requirement; CO220. CO3I0. or other higher-level CO 
courses with departmental permission in consultation with the 
Computer Science Department. 



Minor — Geology 
Minor: 

Required courses: 

GSI21 Physical Geology 3sh 

GS123 Intensive Physical Geology Laboratory lsh 

GS131 Historical Geology 3sh 

GS133 Intensive Historical Geology Laboratory lsh 

Three upper-level (300 or higher) courses in Geology 9sh 



Bachelor of Science — Environmental Geoscience 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Science: CHI 11/CH1 12 or CHI 13/1 14 
Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no courses with GS prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

GS121 Physical Geology 

GS123 Intensive Physical Geology Laboratory 

GS 1 3 1 Historical Geology 



27 



3sh 
lsh 
3sh 



104 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



GS133 


Intensive Historical Geology Laboratory 


lsh 


GS310 


Environmental Geology 


3sh 


GS321 


Mineralogy 


3sh 


GS322 


Igneous and Metamorphic 


3sh 


GS325 


Structural Geology 


3sh 


GS331 


Hydrogeology 


3sh 


GS332 


Geochemistry 


3sh 


GS480 


Geoscience Seminar 


lsh 


Other Requi 


rements: 




Biology sequence: 




BI105 


Cell Biology 


4sh 


BI361 


Microbiology 


3sh 


Chemistry 


sequence: 




CH231 


Organic Chemistry 


4sh 


CH323 


Analytical Methods 


4sh 


Controlled electives: 


8-9sh 


BI272 


Conservation of Plant/Animal Resources 


3sh 


BI321 


Environmental Protection I 


3sh 


BI362 


Ecology 


3sh 


CH322 


Instrumental Analysis 


4sh 


CH341 


Physical Chemistry I 


4sh 


CO110 


Problem Solving and Structured Programming 


3sh 


CO220 


Applied Computer Programming 


3sh 


CO250 


Introduction to Numeric Methods 


3sh 


CO310 


Data Structures 


3sh 


GE314 


Map and Photograph Interpretation 


3sh 


GE415 


Remote Sensing 


3sh 


GS326 


Field Geology 


3sh 


GS327 


Geomorphology 


3sh 


GS411 


Sedimentary Petrology 


3sh 


GS432 


Coal Geology 


3sh 


GS440 


Subsurface Geology 


3sh 


PYI11/ 


21 Physics I Lecture and Lab 


4sh( 1 ) 


PY112/ 


22 Physics II Lecture and Lab 


4sh 


Foreign Language Intermediate Level (2.3) 


0-6sh 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experiences I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experiences II lsh 

ED451 Teaching Science in the Secondary Schools 3sh 

ED441 Student Teaching 12sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

15 EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 

Required courses: 

BI311 Environmental Biology 4sh 

GS121 Physical Geology 3sh 

GS123 Intensive Physical Geology Laboratory lsh 

GS131 Historical Geology 3sh 

GS133 Intensive Historical Geology Laboratory lsh 

GS341 Solar System 3sh 

GS342 Stellar Astronomy 3sh 

GS350 Operation of the Planetarium lsh 

GS361 Oceanography 3sh 

GS37 1 Meteorology I 3sh 

PY111 Physics I Lee 3sh 

PY112 Physics II Lee 3sh 

PY121 Physics I Lab lsh 

PY122 Physics II Lab lsh 

Controlled electives: 

Geology electives ( not GS 1 1 0. 1 4 1 ) 6sh 



30 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 



39 







Total Degree Requirements: 124-125 



Free Electives: 



10-18 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



"I See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies, "Admission to Teacher Education." 



( 1 1 Students who plan to pursue an advanced degree in environmental 
geoscience are strongly advised to take the physics sequence as their 
controlled electives. 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(3) Six credits of computer languages may be used to meet foreign 
language requirement; CO220, CO310, or other higher-level CO 
courses with departmental permission in consultation with the 
Computer Science Department. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — General Science 

Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 121 (1) 

Natural Science: CHI 11-112 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: BE/CO/IM101. no courses with prefix of 
chosen track in major 



55-56 



Minor — Geoscience 

Minor: 16 

Required courses: 

One course from each of the following: 

Astronomy (not GS110) 3sh 

Geology (not GS 122 or 132) 4sh 

Meteorology 3sh 

Oceanography 3sh 

Additional 3sh from one of the above fields (300 level 3sh 

or higher) 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence 

CM301 Instructional Media 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experiences I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experiences II lsh 

ED441 Student Teaching 12sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

ED451 Teaching Science in the Secondary Schools 3sh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 



30 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Earth and Space 
Science (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 55-56 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA121 

Natural Science: CHI 11-1 12 

Social Science: PC10I 

Liberal Studies electives: CO 10 1, no courses with GS prefix 



Major: 39-40 
Required courses: 

BI103 General Biology I 4sh 

BI104 General Biology II 4sh 

GS101 Earth Science: Geology and Oceanography 3sh 

GS102 Earth Science: Geology and Oceanography Lab lsh 

GS103 Earth Science: Meteorology and Astronomy 3sh 

GS104 Earth Science: Meteorology and Astronomy Lab lsh 

PY111 Physics I Lee 3sh 

PY112 Physics II Lee 3sh 

PY121 Physics I Lab lsh 

PYI22 Physics II Lab lsh 



The C allege of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 105 



Controlled electives: 15-16 

Biolog\ track: Ull 10 or 120. 272. Bl elective 
Chemistr) track: CH231, 321, 351, 232, or 340 or 341 
Geoscience track: GS 121 oi I2v 131,341 or 342. 361. 371 
Physics track: PY222. 231.242. $31,350(1) 

Other Requirements: 

Free Klectives: 

Total Degree Requirements: (#) 124-126 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Kducation." 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 

( 1 ) Note: If Physics track is elected. MA 1 23 and MA 1 24 are required. 



Department of Mathematics 

Gerald M. Buriok, Chairperson; Alarcon, Anderson, 
Angelo, Balenovich, Bertness, Broughton, Burkett, 
Busovicki, A. Davis, Donley, Dubovsky, Duncan, Early, 
Feldman, D. Frank, Gorman, Maderer, Massey, R. 
McBride, Mitchell, Morgan, J. Myers, Ray, Reber, Rettig, 
D. Shafer, Shawer, Shepler, Speakman, Steelman, 
Stempien, G. Stoudt, R. Stoudt, M. Woodard; and 
professors emeriti Arms, Gibson, Hartman, Hoyt, 
McBride, Morrell, Mueller, Oakes, E. Smith, W. Smith, 
Stilwell, Willison 

The Mathematics Department prepares students for work in industry, 
graduate school mathematics, and teaching. Degrees offered by the 
department are the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, the Bachelor of 
Science in Applied Mathematics, and the Bachelor of Science in Education 
with a Mathematics major. The first two degree programs are offered within 
the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and the third is with the 
College of Education. The department also offers a minor in Mathematics 
and a minor in Applied Statistics. The program for a mathematics major in 
the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is two-phased. A student 
may pursue a degree in Applied Mathematics or Mathematics. Those 
completing a degree in Mathematics will be prepared to continue their 
studies in mathematics in graduate school, though some may enter business, 
industry, or government service. Those students receiving a degree in 
Applied Mathematics will be primarily prepared to enter business, industry, 
or government service in an area where mathematics or computer science is 
used or to continue their studies in applied mathematics or computer science 
in graduate school. This student would not be expected to continue graduate 
studies in pure mathematics. 

The program leading to the B.S. in Education with a Mathematics major 
prepares the student for teaching mathematics in junior or senior high 
school. Many graduates, however, continue their formal education in 
mathematics at the graduate level or work in government or industry. 

Elementary education majors may elect to take a concentration of at least 
fifteen hours in mathematics. The program of courses for this concentration 
is as follows: in addition to MA151 and MA 152, select nine hours from the 
following courses: MA317, MA420. MA450. MA456, MA457, MA458, 
MA459. MA471, or MA483. 

Minor in Mathematics 

The minor in Mathematics consists of a minimum of seventeen ( 17) 
semester hours in mathematics. The minor is Mathematics may offer 
preparation for advanced study in areas such as Economics. Computer 
Science. Physics, and other natural sciences. Any student who is required to 
take a year of calculus should consider this minor. 

Minor in Applied Statistics 

The minor in Applied Statistics may be of interest to students who are 
required to take a calculus course and a course in probability and statistics. 
This includes, but is not limited to, students in the College of Business, 
Safety Science majors, and Computer Science majors. 



A cumulative QPA of at least 2.0 in MA courses is required for a minor in 
Mathematics or Applied Statistics. The Mathematics Department will not 
certify a minor for a transfer student unless at least two (2) of the courses 
counting for the minor have been completed in the 1UP Mathematics 
Department. 



Bachelor of Science — Applied Mathematics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
whh the following specifications: 

Mathematics: (included in major) 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with MA prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 
MA 127 Calculus! 
MA 128 
MA171 
MA216 
MA227 



50-52 



40-41 



Calculus II 

Introduction to Linear Algebra 
Probability and Statistics for Natural Science 
Calculus III 
MA241 Differential Equations 
MA271 Introduction to Algebraic Structures 
Controlled electives: 
Two courses from list: 

MA371, 421, 422, 423, 424, 427. 476, 477 
One of the following two-course sequences: 

MA342/CO450: MA363/MA364; MA445/MA446 
A minimum of three additional semester hours from the 
list of controlled electives above or the following: 
MA353, 425, 447,465,481 

Other Requirements: 

Computer Science: 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 
CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 



4sh 
4sh 
3sh 
4sh 
4sh 
3sh 
3sh 

6sh 

6-7sh 



3sh 



6-12 



3sh 

3sh 

0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



19-28 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) A student may select courses to fulfill requirements for specialized 
track. 

a. Actuarial/Statistics: MA363. 364, 421, 422. 446, 465 

b. Scientific/Engineering: MA241, 342. 363, 364. 371, 423. 445,446 

c. Math Analyst: MA241. 342, 363. 364. 371, 445 or 446, 476. CO minor. 



Bachelor of Science — Mathematics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 50-52 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: (included in major) 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with MA prefix 

Major: 40-41 

Required courses: 

MA127 Calculus I 4sh 

MA 128 Calculus II 4sh 

MA 171 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3sh 

MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Science 4sh 

MA227 Calculus III 4sh 

MA241 Differential Equations 3sh 

MA271 Introduction to Algebraic Structures 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Four courses from list: 12sh 

MA37 1 , 42 1 , 422, 423, 424, 427, 476, 477 
A minimum of three additional semester hours from the 3-4sh 

list of controlled electives above or the following: 

MA342, 350, 353, 355. 363, 364. 425. 445, 

446.447,465.481 



106 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Other Requirements: 

Computer Science: 

CO110 Problem Solving and Slructured Programming 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 0-6sh 



3-9 



Free F.lectives: 



22-31 
Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives 



Bachelor of Arts — Economics/Mathematics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Social Science: EC121 (included in major) 
Mathematics: MA127 (included in major) 
Electives: Intermediate foreign language, no course with 
EC or MA prefix. 



47-44 



Major: 

Core: 

EC121 
EC 122 
EC421 
EC422 

MA 127 
MA128 
MA227 



54-56 



Principles of Economics I 
Principles of Economics II 
Macroeconomics Analysis 
Microeconomics Analysis 
Calculus I 
Calculus II 
Calculus III 



3sh 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
3sh 
3-4sh 



MA 171 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MA216 or EC355 Statistics 
Economics Electives: 12 

Students are especially encouraged to take EC334 

(Economics of Corporate Decisions), and EC356 

(Econometrics), but any course except EC101(Basic 

Economics) may be used. EC493( Internship) may be 

counted only with the approval of the program coordinator. 
Mathematics Electives: 12-13 

At least one of the following two-semester sequences: 

MA241 Differential Equations and MA371 Linear Algebra 

MA363 and MA364 Mathematical Statistics I and II 

MA445 and MA446 Programming and Probabilistic Models in O.R. 
Two additional courses either from the above or from the following: 

MA271 Introduction to Algebraic Structures 

MA342 Advanced Mathematics for Applications 

MA417 Statistical Applications or MA418 Sampling Survey Theory 

MA421 Advanced Calculus I 

MA422 Advanced Calculus II 

MA423 Complex Variables I 

MA425 Applied Mathematical Analysis I 

MA427 Topography 

MA465 Topics in Statistics 

MA476 Abstract Algebra I 

MA477 Abstract Algebra II 



Other Requirements: 
Free Electives: 





19-23 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Mathematics 
Education (*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 50-52 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: (included in major) 

Social Science: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: no courses with MA prefix 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II lsh 



30 



ED441 Student Teaching 

ED442 School Law 

ED456 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary Schools 

EP202 Educational Psychology 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 

Major: 

Required courses: 

MAI 17 Principles of Math 

MA 1 7 1 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MA27 1 Introduction to Algebraic Structures 

MA353 Theory of Numbers 

MA355 Foundations of Geometry I 

MA350 History of Mathematics 

MA460 Computers/Calculators in Secondary School 

MA452/453/454 Math Seminar 
One Calculus sequence: (A or B) 

A. MA127 Calculus I 
MA128 Calculus II 
MA227 Calculus III 

B. MA123 Calculus I for Physics/Chemistry 
MA 124 Calculus II for Physics/Chemistry 

One Statistics sequence: (A or B) 

A. MA363 Mathematical Statistics I 
MA364 Mathematical Statistics II 

B. MA216 Probability/Statistics for Natural Science 

Other Requirements: 

CO205 Programming Languages for Secondary Schools 



Free Electives: 



12sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 

35-39 

3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
3sh 
2sh 
3sh 
lsh 

4sh(l) 

4sh 

4sh 

4sh 
4sh 

3sh( 1 ) 

3sh 

4sh 



3sh 



0-6 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

( 1 ) If neither Option A has been chosen, then one of MA37 1 , MA42 1 . 
MA476. MA445 is required. 



Minor — Applied Statistics 

The minor in Applied Statistics consists of seventeen ( 17) semester hours in 
Mathematics selected as follows: 

(a) Introductory calculus course: MA 121, MA 123. or MA 127 

(b) Introductory statistics course: MA214. MA216. or MA217 

(c) MA417 
(d)MA418 

The remaining hours may be chosen from the following: 
(a) a second calculus course: MA 122, MA 124, or MA 128 
(b)MA171 

(c) Any course for mathematics majors approved by the Applied 
Statistics Adviser. 



Minor — Mathematics 

Required courses: 17sh 

MA121 and 122 or 

MA 123 and 124 
Controlled electives 9sh( 1 ) 

Other courses for math majors. MA2 1 6 and M A2 1 9 may be included 

(I) The following courses are excluded: MA100, MA101, MA102. MAI 10, 
MAI 17, MA2I4, MA217, MA417, and MA418 



Natural Science 

Allan T. Andrew, Coordinator 

The program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Science is 
designed to prepare students for early admission to professional schools — 
optometry, podiatry, chiropractic, physical therapy, pharmacy, and dentistry. 
Several tracks prepare students for further study in astronomy, engineering. 



The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 107 



meteorology, or oceanography. The U.S. degree in Natural Science is earned 
by students who transfer to professional schools thai have an articulation 
agreement with IUP. Students interested in obtaining a lour-veai 
baccalaureate degree before entering a medical 01 professional school 
should enroll in a program ot studies leading to a B.A. or U.S. degree in the 
departments ol Biology. Chemistry, or Physics. Students considering a 
professional careei in a high technology business or industry may wish to 
obtain a foundation in the Natural Sciences while using their free eleclives 
to pursue additional work in areas such as Economics, Pre-Law or a minor 
in Business Administration lor further information about these programs 
contact the Dean's office. I lie B.S, in Natural Science may not be used for a 
second major or a second degree by majors in the College of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics 



Other Requirements: 9-15 

CO1I0 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3sh 

MA24I Differential Equations 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



19-26 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science — Natural Science 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: included in major 
Natural Science: included in major 
Liberal Studies electives: no courses with SC prefix 
Synthesis: not required for three-year students who transfer to a 

professional school with an articulation agreement 
Writing Intensive: one course required for three-year students who 
transfer to a professional school with an articulation agreement 



43-44 



Major: 

Controlled electives(*): 
Bl courses 
CH courses 
PY courses 
MA courses 
Computer science and/or advanced courses 

in Biology. Chemistry. Mathematics, or Physics 

Other Requirements: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( I ) 
CO101 Microbased Computer Literacy (2) 



44-46 



8sh 

8sh 

8sh 

7-8sh 

13-14sh 



0-9 



0-6sh 
0-3sh 



Free Electives: 



(*) 



25-37 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Preprofessional Advisers will outline the courses required for 
admisssion to a professional school 

(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 

(2) Not required for tracks which include COl 10 or CO250; may also be 
included in Liberal Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science — Natural Science/Pre- Astronomy 
Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Science CHI 11-1 12 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 124. no courses with GS prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

PY131 Physics I-C Lee 

PY132 Physics II-C Lee 

PY141 Physics I-C Lab 

PY142 Physics II-C Lab 

PY222 Mechanics I 

PY223 Mechanics II 

PY242 Optics 

PY322 Electricity and Magnetism I 

PY323 Electricity and Magnetism II 

GS 1 2 1 Physical Geology 

GS123 Intensive Physical Geology Lab 

GS131 Historical Geology 

GS133 Intensive Historical Geology Lab 

GS341 Solar System 

GS342 Stellar Astronomy 



33 



3sh 

3sh 
lsh 
Ish 
2sh 
2sh 
3sh 
2sh 
2sh 
3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
3sh 



Bachelor of Science — Natural Science/Pre-Engineering 
Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 

Humanities/Philosophy and Religious Studies: PH222 

Natural Science: CHI 11-1 12 

Social Science: EC121. PS101 or 1 1 1 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no courses with SC prefix 

Synthesis: not required for three-year students 

Writing Intensive: one course required for three-year students 

Major: 33-35 

Required courses: 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3sh 

MA 171 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3sh 

MA241 Differential Equations 3sh 

MA342 Advanced Calculus for Applications 4sh 

PY 1 3 1 Physics I-C Lecture 3sh 

PY132 Physics II-C Lecture 3sh 

PY141 Physics I-C Lab (or PY121 Lab) lsh 

PY142 Physics II-C Lab lsh 

PY331 Modern Physics (2) 3sh 

Controlled electives: One package, depending on program 

Chemical Engineering: 

CH231 Organic Chemistry I 4sh 

CH232 Organic Chemistry II 4sh 

Civil Engineering: 

MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 4sh 

— Technical elective 3-4sh 
Electrical Engineering: 

MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 4sh 

Technical elective 3-4sh 
Industrial Engineering: 

MA216 Probability and Statistics for Natural Sciences 4sh 

Technical elective 3-4sh 
Materials Science and Engineering: 

CH23 1 Organic Chemistry I 4sh 

CH232 Organic Chemistry II 4sh 
Mechanical Engineering: 

— Technical electives 6-8sh 

Other Requirements: 0-6 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (1) 

Free electives: 9 

Other Requirements: about 64 

Two years at University of Pittsburgh School of Engineering(2) 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 159-161 

Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 

Studies electives. 

A 2.5 GPA is required for transfer to the University of Pittsburgh. 

For curriculum information about the cooperative program in 

engineering with Drexel University, refer to the catalog section for the 

Physics Department. 

See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 

in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



(1) 

(2) 
(3) 



(#) 



108 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Bachelor of Science — Natural Science/Pre-Meteorology or 
Oceanography Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 56-57 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Science: CHI 11- 112 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no courses with GS prefix 



Other Requirements: 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

MA 122 Calculus II for Natural and Social Science 
and Business 



0-7 



4sh(2) 



27-37 



Major: 










43-46 




Required courses: 










(*) 


CH321 


Quantitative Analysis 








4sh 


CH341 


Physical Chemistry 








4sh 




PY131 


Physics I-C Lee 








3sh 




PY132 


Physics II-C Lee 








3sh 




PY141 


Physics I-C Lab 








lsh 




PY142 


Physics II-C Lab 








Ish 




PY222 


Mechanics I 








2sh 


(1) 


PY233 


Mechanics II 








2sh 


PY342 


Thermal and Statistical Physics 






3sh 


(2) 
(3l 


Controlled electives: 










One sequence from list: BI 103- 


104orBI105- 


120 


8-9sh 


One sequence from list: GS361 


-362orGS371 


-372 


6sh 




One sequence from list: GS121 and 123- 


131 and 133 


6-8sh 




orGS341-342 













Free Electives: 

Electives to meet minimum of 90 IUP credits 0-3sh(3) 

Credits from work at Pennsylvania College of Optometry 34sh 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 



Accelerated three-year Pennsylvania College of Optometry (PCO) 
program: students are admitted to the PCO accelerated program only as 
incoming freshmen. A maximum of thirty-four credits of work may be 
transferred after the first year at PCO. Upon the completion of the first 
year of studies at PCO, a transcript from PCO is to be sent by the 
student to the Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
with a note requesting application materials for graduation. 
Three or four credits of Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be 
included in Liberal Studies electives. 

Required for many schools of optometry; recommended for PCO. 
Additional electives if needed to meet minimum of 90 IUP credits 
should be selected from the following suggestions: BI 1 50: Human 
Anatomy, BI263: Genetics. 



Other Requirements: 9-15 

Additional math/computer sequence: 

COU0 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3sh 

MA241 Differential Equations 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 0-6sh 



Free Electives: 



6-16 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science — Natural Science/Pre-Optometry 
Track(*) 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA121 
Natural Science: CH111-U2 

Social Sciences: PC 101, EC 101. non-Western course 
Liberal Studies electives: MA216 or 217, CO101, no courses 

with SC prefix 
Synthesis: not required for three-year students who transfer to a 

professional school with an articulation agreement 
Writing Intensive: one course required for three-year students who 

transfer to a professional school with an articulation agreement 



52-55 



Major: 




Required courses: 


BI105 


Cell Biology 


BI120 


Animal Biology 


BI151 


Human Physiology 


BI241 


General Microbiology 


CH231 


Organic Chemistry I 


CH232 


Organic Chemistry II 


CH351 


Biochemistry 


PY111 


Physics I Lecture 


PY121 


Physics I Lab 


PY112 


Physics II Lecture 


PY122 


Physics II Lab 



35 



4sh 
5sh 
3sh 
3sh 
4sh 
4sh 
4sh 
3sh 
lsh 
3sh 
lsh 



Department of Physics 

Dennis Whitson, Chairperson; Fox, Freeman, Gaggini, 
Giniewicz, Hershman, Karimi, Matolyak, Matous, Nunian, 
Ramsey, Roberts, Sobolewski, Talwar, Wijekumar; and 
professors emeriti Berry, Buckwalter, McNamara, Riban, 
Waddell 

The goal of the Department of Physics is to prepare fully qualified 
individuals for productive careers in physics. Three degrees are offered 
within the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics: the Bachelor of 
Science in Physics, the Bachelor of Arts in Physics, and the Bachelor of 
Science in Applied Physics. These programs offer adequate preparation for 
graduate study in physics or for research in industrial technology. The 
applied physics degree provides a strong technical background for work in 
solid state electronics and for interdisciplinary research in the areas of 
computer science, chemistry, biology, and geology. A Bachelor of Science 
degree in Education with a major in Physics is offered through the College 
of Education. A two-year pre-engineering program is offered in cooperation 
with Drexel University wherein students transfer to Drexel after two years. 
The department also offers a minor in Physics, as well as general science 
courses which satisfy the Natural Science requirements of the Liberal 
Studies program. 

Minor in Physics 

To minor in Physics, a student must successfully complete fifteen semester 
hours in Physics which must consist of at least three courses at the 200 level 
or higher. PY150 may be substituted with the permission of the chairperson. 

Cooperative Pre-Engineering (Chemical, Civil, Electrical, 
Materials, Mechanical) Program with Drexel University 

Common to all pre-engineering programs are the following science and 
mathematics requirements: *PY131/141, PY132/142, PY322, PY342, 
*MA123,*MA124.MA171,MA241,*CH 111, *CH1 12 (*or appropriate 
substitute). 

Further requirements depend on the particular engineering program chosen. 
Complete information regarding a specific program may be obtained from 
the physics department. For information on the Cooperative Pre-Engineering 
program with the University of Pittsburgh, see the catalog section for 
Natural Science and the program outline for "Bachelor of Science in Natural 
Science/Pre-Engineering." 



The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — 109 



56-57 



Bachelor of Arts — Physics 
Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 
Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Science: PY13 1/141-132/142 

Liberal Studies elective*: MA124, no courses with PY prefix 



Major: 

Required courses: 

PY131 Physics I-C Lee 

PY132 Physics II-C Lee 

PY141 Physics I-C Lab 

PY142 Physics H-C Lab 

PY222 Mechanics 1 

PY223 Mechanics 11 

PY231 Electronics 

PY322 Electricity and Magnetism I 

PY323 Electricity and Magnetism II 

PY331 Modern Physics 

PY350 Intermediate Experimental Physics I 

PY351 Intermediate Experimental Physics 11 

PY473 Quantum Mechanics I 
Controlled electives: 

One additional PY majors course 

Other Requirements: 

Additional mathematics and computer science: 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 

MA24I Differential Equations 

MA342 Advanced Mathematics for Applications 

Additional natural science sequence 

Additional social or natural science sequence (advanced) 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 

Free Electives: 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 1 Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science — Physics 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA123 

Natural Science: PY 131/141-132/142 

Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no courses with PY prefix 



Major: 






Required courses: 




PY131 


Physics I-C Lee 


*sh 


PY132 


Physics II-C Lee 


*sh 


PY141 


Physics I-C Lab 


*sh 


PY142 


Physics II-C Lab 


*sh 


PY222 


Mechanics I 


2sh 


PY223 


Mechanics II 


2sh 


PY231 


Electronics 


4sh 


PY242 


Optics 


3sh 


PY322 


Electricity and Magnetism I 


2sh 


PY323 


Electricity and Magnetism II 


2sh 


PY331 


Modem Physics 


3sh 


PY342 


Thermal and Statistical Physics 


3sh 


PY350 


Intermediate Experimental Physics I 


3sh 


PY351 


Intermediate Experimental Physics II 


3sh 


PY473 


Quantum Mechanics I 


4sh 


Controllec 


electives: 




One course from list: PY472 or PY490 


3sh 


One additional PY majors course 


3sh 



56-57 



37 



Other Requirements: 13-19 
Additional Mathematics: 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

MA241 Differential Equations 3sh 

MA342 Advanced Mathematics for Applications 4sh 

One from list:'CO250, MA171. MA363, MA421. MA423 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) (l-6sh 





28 


Free Electives: 


11-18 


*sh 






Total Degree Requirements: 124 


*sh 
*sh 
*sh 




(1) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 




Studies e 


lectives. 




2sh 

2sh 
4sh 












Bachelor of Science Applied Physics 




2sh 




Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 


56-57 


2sh 




with the following specifications: 




3sh 




Mathemati 


cs: MA123 




3sh 




Natural Sc 


ience: CHI 11-112 (replaced by CH 1 13- 1 14 for 




3sh 




Chemistry track) 




4sh 




Liberal Studies electives: MA 124, no courses with PY prefix 




3sh 




Major: 




28 






Required courses: 




22 


-28 


PYI31 


Physics I-C Lee 


3sh 






PY132 


Physics II-C Lee 


3sh 


3sh 




PY141 


Physics I-C Lab 


lsh 


3sh 




PY142 


Physics II-C Lab 


lsh 


4sh 




PY150 


Computer Application to Physics Laboratories 


3sh 


6sh 




PY222 


Mechanics I 


2sh 


6sh 




PY231 


Electronics 


4sh 


0-6sh 




PY242 


Optics 


3sh 






PY322 


Electricity and Magnetism I 


2sh 


11 


-18 


PY331 


Modem Physics 


3sh 






PY352 


Applied Physics Laboratory 


3sh 



Other Requirements: 9-15 

MA241 Differential Equations 3sh 

COl 10 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3sh 

CO250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level ( 1 ) 0-6sh 

Controlled electives: According to Track 23-27 

Solid State Electronics Track: CO300. MA342, PY323, 24 

PY342, PY353, PY432, PY475, PY476 
Computer Science Track: PY342, PY353, PY432. PY475. 27 

PY476, CO300, CO310, CO410, CO450 
Chemistry Track: MA342, CH23 1 , CH232, CH323, CH34 1 , 24 

CH342. CH343 
Biology Track: BI105, CH231. BI120, CH323, CH351, 27 

Two biology electives from the following: BI263, 

BI361.BI472. BI350, BI401 
Geology Track: GS 1 2 1, GS 1 22, GS 131, GS 132 23 

Five Geoscience electives from the following: 

GS321, GS325. GS326. GS362, GS412. GS440. GS481 



Free Electives: 



3-8 



Total Degree Requirements: 1 24 



( 1 ) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Science in Education — Physics (*) 
Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 
with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA 123 

Natural Science: CHI 11-1 12 

Social Sciences: PC101 

Liberal Studies electives: MA241: BI103; GS1 10, GS121, 
GS141, or GS221; no courses with PY prefix 



56-57 



110 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



30 



32 



College: 

Professional Education Sequence: 

CM301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3sh 

ED242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I lsh 

ED342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II lsh 

ED441 Student Teaching 12sh 

ED442 School Law lsh 

ED45 1 Teaching of Science in the Secondary School 3sh 

EP202 Educational Psychology 3sh 

EP377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3sh 

FE202 American Education in Theory and Practice 3sh 

Major: 

Required courses: 

PY131 Physics I-C Lee 3sh 

PY132 Physics II-C Lee 3sh 

PY141 Physics I-C Lab lsh 

PY142 Physics II-C Lab lsh 

PY222 Mechanics I 2sh 

PY223 Mechanics II 2sh 

PY231 Electronics 4sh 

PY242 Optics 3sh 

PY322 Electricity and Magnetism I 2sh 

PY331 Modern Physics 3sh 

PY342 Thermal and Statistical Physics 3sh 

PY350 Intermediate Experimental Physics I 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

Physics electives 2sh 

Other Requirements: 

Additional Math courses: 

MA124 Calculus II for Physics and Chemistry 4sh 

MA342 Advanced Math for Applications 4sh 

Free Electives: 



(#) Total Degree Requirements: 126-127 

(*) See requirements leading to teacher certification in the catalog section 
on Academic Policies. "Admission to Teacher Education." 

(#) See advisory paragraph "Timely Completion of Degree Requirements" 
in catalog section on Requirements for Graduation. 



Department of Psychology 

Carl W. Schneider, Chairperson; Barrett, Berman, 
Goodwin, Grover, Kaniasty, Magee, Marquette, McHugh, 
Patton, Pavloski, Quigley, Rich, Rittle, Robertson, Sadler, 
Stires, Sussmann, Thornton, VandeCreek, Vormbrock, 
Walz, Zanich, Zimny; and professor emeritus Jacobs 

The program in psychology leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree and is 
designed to give the student an understanding of the methods and major 
findings in the science of behavior and mental processes. The major offers 
the background required for graduate work in psychology and also 
preparation for such related fields as social work, personnel work, 
advertising, medicine, law. and theology. The department also offers a minor 
in psychology. 

An honors program has been developed to enrich the education of qualified 
psychology majors and assist such students in gaining entrance to graduate 
school by providing classroom and research experiences which will prepare 
them for work at the graduate level. 

A track in applied psychology was developed which offers students a firm 
background in the science of psychology, preparation for nonclinical 
applications of psychology to the solution of human and social problems in 
private and public organizations, and preparation for graduate study in the 
applied area of psychology. The core for the track is the same as for the 
psychology major; coursework in applied psychology is provided by 
enrolling in appropriate psychology electives and a carefully designed 
concentration of courses outside the department. 

All psychology majors are required to take a minor or a concentration in 
another discipline. 



Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 

Natural Science: BI103-104 recommended 

Social Science: PC 101 

Liberal Studies electives: BE/CO/IM101. no courses with PC prefix 

Major: 33 

Required courses: 

PC290 Research Design and Analysis I 4sh 

PC291 Research Design and Analysis II 4sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from each of these six core areas: ( 1 ) 

A. Developmental Psychology: PC3 10. 311. 312. 315 3-4sh 

B. Individual Differences: PC320, 321,322 3sh 

C. Social/Environmental: PC330, 331,335 3-4sh 

D. Cognition/Learning: PC340, 341,342, 345 3-4sh 

E. Biological Bases of Behavior: PC350. 352, 355, 356 3-4sh 

F. Metatheoretical Perspectives in Psychology: 

PC410, 411 3sh 

Other PC electives beyond PC 101 5sh 

Other Requirements: 15-21 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (2) 0-6sh 

Minor/concentration: 15sh 



Free Electives: 



15-22 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 



( 1 ) At least 2 must be content-based laboratory courses. 

(2) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies electives. 



Bachelor of Arts in Psychology /Applied Psychology Track 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 54-55 

with the following specifications: 

Mathematics: MA217 

Natural Science: BI 103-104 recommended 

Social Science: PC 101, EC121 

Liberal Studies electives: BE/CO/IM101. no courses with PC prefix 

Major: 37 

Required courses: 

PC290 Research Design and Analysis I 4sh 

PC291 Research Design and Analysis II 4sh 

PC421 Psychology of Work 3sh 

PC425 Experimental Organizational Psychology 4sh 

PC493 Practicum(l) 3sh 

Controlled electives: 

One course from each of these six core areas (2): 

A. Developmental Psychology: PC310, 311, 312. 315 3-4sh 

B. Individual Differences: PC320, 321,322 3sh 

C. Social/Environmental: PC330. 331. 335 3-4sh 

D. Cognition/Learning: PC340, 341,342, 345 3-4sh 

E. Biological Bases of Behavior: PC350. 352. 355, 356 3-4sh 

F. Metatheoretical Perspectives in Psychology: 

PC41 0.411 3sh 

Other Requirements: 15-21 

Outside concentration 

EC122 Principles of Economics II 3sh 

EC330 Labor Economics 3sh 

LR480 Principles and Practices of Collective Bargaining 3sh 

2 courses, as approved by adviser (3) 6sh 

Foreign Language Intermediate Level (4) 0-6sh 

Free Electives: 11-18 

Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Department recommends at least 6 credits of PC493: Practicum. 

(2) At least two must be content-based laboratory courses. 



/ he < ollege of Natural Sciences and Mathematics — III 



(3) Department highh recommends PC424: Planned Organizational Change 
and recommends one course from business or another applied area. 

(4) Intermediate-level Foreign Language may be included in Liberal 
Studies elcctives. 



Minor — Psychology 




Required courses: 


20 


PCIOI General Psychology 


3sh(l) 


PC280 Psychological Inquiry 


3sh 


PC290 Research Design and Analysis I 


4sh(2) 


Four other PC electives beyond PC101 


12sh(3) 



(1) Meets Liberal Studies Requirement 

(2) Prerequisite MA2 17 

(3) Selected in consultation with the director of the undergraduate program 



Minor — Psychological Science 

Required courses: 

PC 101 General Psychology 
PC290 Research Design and Analysis I 
One course from core areas A. B, or C 
One course from core areas D or E 
One PC elective 



17-18 
3sh(l) 

4sh(2) 
3sh 
4sh 
3-4sh 



(1) Meets Liberal Studies Requirement 

(2) Prerequisite MA2 17 




112 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 




The School of Continuing 
Education 



Nicholas E. Kolb, Dean 

The mission of the School of Continuing Education is to serve the lifelong 
educational needs of nontraditional students, working adults, professional 
organizations, local and state agencies, and the citizens of the common- 
wealth by providing access to the academic and human resources of IUP. 

The School of Continuing Education was created by the IUP Board of 
Trustees in May, 1966. Today, the school comprises the Division of Credit 
Programs, the Division of Conferences and Noncredit Programs, the 
Highway Safety Center, and the Criminal Justice Training Center. The 
school is characterized by its commitment to academic excellence and high- 
quality programs. The school maintains a dynamic environment which 
fosters innovation and experimentation in order to continually improve 
programs and respond to the ever-changing needs of society. 

Division of Credit Programs 

Edward W. Nardi, Assistant Dean 

The Division of Credit Programs offers a variety of opportunities for the 
adult and nontraditional learner to access the academic resources of IUP on 
a part-time basis. Courses may be selected from day or evening offerings. 

The Associate of Arts Degree in General Studies is designed for the 
nontraditional or adult learner who seeks to acquire a broad base of 
knowledge in the liberal arts. This program consists of the core of Liberal 
Studies requirements of the IUP bachelor's degree programs plus nine to 



twelve credits of electives. The student is encouraged to develop a plan of 
study with his or her academic adviser which will bring focus to the 
individual's interest in a particular area or subject. No more than thirty 
credits may be transferred into this degree program from other colleges. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in General Studies is designed for the 
mature adult student, who under faculty advisement can explore and develop 
an individualized plan of study which does not approach any existing IUP 
major. This self-designed plan of study must be based on a specific theme 
which incorporates basic and applied coursework within a theoretical 
framework culminating in a senior-year independent research project. At the 
time of application for degree candidacy through the School of Continuing 
Education or transfer from another major, the student must submit a plan of 
study which contains the proposed theme, rationale, and courses needed to 
satisfy the Special Interest Area. A faculty member will be assigned to assist 
with the plan of study prior to acceptance to degree candidacy. Students 
other than School of Continuing Education students must have completed 
45sh before a request for transfer will be honored. 

The student's plan of study, which is designed to fulfill the Special Interest 
Area, must be approved by the student's adviser and the dean of the School 
of Continuing Education. 



Associate of Arts — General Studies 

Liberal Studies: as outlined in the Liberal Studies 50-53 
Section with the following specifications and modifications: 

Learning Skills 10-1 lsh 

Humanities 9sh 

Fine Arts 3sh 

Natural Science 7-8sh 

Social Science 9sh 

Health and Wellness/ROTC 3-4sh 

Controlled Liberal Studies Electives 9sh 



Free Electives 



9-12 
Total Degree Requirements: 62 



Bachelor of Science — General Studies 

Liberal Studies: As outlined in Liberal Studies section 53-54 

General Area of Study 24 

Choose at least 6sh from three of the four areas listed below. At least 12sh 
must be 300-level or above. Courses should relate to theme developed in 
Special Interest Area. 



Human Behavior and Development Area 



Anthropology 

Health 

Home Economics 

Social and Political Systems Area 
Economics 

Geography and Regional 
Planning 
History 

Arts, Letters, and Culture Area 
Art 

Communications Media 
English 
French 
German 
Journalism 



Psychology 
Sociology 



Industrial and Labor Relations 
Political Science 
Social Sciences 



Music 
Philosophy 
Religious Studies 
Spanish 
Theater 



Science, Mathematics, and Technology Area 

Biology Geoscience 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Computer Science Physics 



The School of Continuing Education — 113 



Special Interest Area (3l 21 

With approval of adviser, student may select, hum any department listed 
above, courses which locus on a particular need or interest. At least I2sh 
must he 300-level 01 above. The program must include either one research 
course which provides opportunities for extensive writing or an independent 
study project. Some courses will not he available to General Studies majors. 



Electives 

At least dsh must he 300-level or above 



25-26 



Total Degree Requirements: 124 

( 1 ) Individually planned theme may not duplicate any existing degree 
programs which are otherwise available at IUP, nor may they be used to 
circumvent specific requirements within an existing major. 

(2) No more than 30 semester hours taken in any one department will count 
toward graduation. 

(3) In application of university policies, the Special Interest Area is 
considered as the major. Specifically, in order to graduate, students 
must be in academic good standing and attain a 2.00 grade point 
average in the Special Interest Area. 



Part-time Studies Program (Nondegree) 

The Part-time Studies Program is designed to offer the adult and 
nontraditional learner the opportunity to begin or renew a college education 
at IUP. Through this program an individual may enroll in undergraduate 
credit courses to pursue personal interests, acquire new skills, or work 
toward formal admission to degree candidacy. Credit earned in this 
program may be applied to a degree upon formal admission to an IUP 
degree program. 

Postbaccalaureate Program 

The Postbaccalaureate Program is designed to provide access to 
undergraduate courses to individuals who have an earned baccalaureate 
degree. Students may be seeking a second bachelor's degree, additional 
teacher certification, or personal enrichment. Postbaccalaureate students 
may attend IUP on a part-time or full-time basis. 

Off-Campus Studies Program 

The Off-Campus Studies Program is designed to support the efforts of IUP 
and its faculty to offer academic programs and credit courses to specific 
groups of individuals through the on-site delivery of university courses. The 
Master of Education in Elementary Education and the Master of Science in 
Adult and Community Education are offered in the Pittsburgh area. The 
Master of Science in Safety Sciences is offered in Harrisburg at the SSHE 
University Center. In addition, undergraduate courses are available at the 
IUP Bedford County Center and periodically at various other off-campus 
locations throughout the commonwealth. 

Adult Advisement Services 

Adult Advisement Services provides the part-time, nontraditional, and adult 
learner access to academic exploration and planning through individual 
conferences and workshops. Seminars are offered throughout the year to 
provide the opportunity for adult learners to become acquainted with the 
many resources of the university. 

Division of Conferences and 
Noncredit Programs 

Donna Griffith, Director 

The division offers a wide variety of noncredit programs in an effort to meet 
community needs in the areas of public service, professional development, 
and personal enrichment. 

Business, Industry, and Labor 

Courses and workshops are offered in the following areas: Computer 
Literacy, Management Development, Small Business Development, 
Certified Public Accountant Series, and Contract Training. Certificate 
programs include Real Estate and Paralegal. Courses may be offered at IUP 
or at the business/industry site, as preferred. 



Community-University Studies 

Noncredit courses and workshops are offered in Indiana, Kittanning, and 
Punxsutawney. Personal growth and enrichment topics include creative 
leisure, sell-improvement, fitness, culinary arts, languages, money and 
finances, arl/music/literature, Elderhostel, and Mornings with the 
Professors There are no exams, no grades, and no pressure. The program is 
provided as a service to the community. 

Special Programs 

The education and training needs of health and human service professionals 
are met through course offerings, one-day workshops, seminars, and 
conferences. Additionally, Youth Experience in Summer (YES) provides 
educational enrichment for youth in elementary through high school grades. 

Conferences 

The division facilitates conferences offered by academic departments and 
hosts off-campus groups and organizations during the summer months. The 
conferencestaff also provides consulting services and coordinates 
conferences throughout the state for IUP and other organizations. 

Highway Safety Center 

Richard J. Hornfeck, Director 

IUP's Highway Safety Center attempts to address the highway safety needs 
of the commonwealth through a variety of programs and activities. The 
Highway Safety Center programs encompass activity in five major areas: 1) 
research, surveys, and studies, 2) education (teaching), 3) training and 
conferences, 4) field and extension services, and 5) traffic safety 
communications and information exchange. 

Teacher Certification in Driver Education 

Through cooperative effort with IUP's Department of Health and Physical 
Education, the Highway Safety Center coordinates and directs IUP's 
Teacher Certification Program in Driver Education. 

IUP Regional Highway Safety Project 

The IUP Regional Highway Safety Project is a federally funded program 
contracted with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation's Center for 
Highway Safety. Originating at IUP in January, 1 987, under the title of the 
Indiana County Seat Belt Program, its purpose was to increase public 
awareness and the usage of occupant restraints. The program expanded its 
emphasis and territory in 1989 and now includes the counties of Armstrong. 
Jefferson, and Clearfield. Programs for corporations, schools, civic groups, 
law enforcement agencies, etc., include topics such as occupant safety, 
bicycle safety, pedestrian safety, safe driving characteristics, and DUI. The 
project also serves as a resource to other community safety groups by 
providing printed materials, audiovisual aids, crash-car dummy costumes, 
and the "Seat Belt Convincer." A Car Seat Loaner Program also provides 
car seats to residents in Indiana County. 

Driver Training Programs 

From basic driver education programs for beginning drivers to truck driver 
training to advanced driver training programs in emergency driving 
techniques, the Highway Safety Center provides a cadre of courses all 
designed to meet the needs of the student. 

Emergency Services Training 

This is a large diversified program area designed to meet the training needs 
of ambulance, fire, and police personnel in the areas of emergency medical 
services and rescue. 

Motorcycle Safety Program 

MSP is a statewide motorcycle riding program funded by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Transportation to help reduce the rising number of serious 
motorcycle accidents. MSP was designed to offer all riders — both novice 
and experienced — the opportunity to learn how to handle a motorcycle 
correctly, safely, and with confidence in all riding situations. 

Traffic Accident Investigation 

Traffic Accident Investigation programs are available for safety directors, 
insurance adjusters, and police personnel. Courses range from basic 
investigation up to and including accident reconstruction. 



114 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Criminal Justice Training Center 

Gary M. Welsh, Director 

The Criminal Justice Training Center's role in both the university and the 
community is to provide high-quality education and training programs for 
the continuing professionalism of the criminal justice system. 

These programs include seminars for in-service personnel in fulfillment of 
mandatory continuing education requirements. They are conducted on an "as 
needed" basis covering an unlimited range of topics, such as vehicle and 
criminal law updates, search and seizure, accident investigation, alcohol 
enforcement, and driver proficiency. Grant-funded programs may be written 
and conducted in the above programs. Special programs are provided to 
offer the basic 480-hour academy training required for law enforcement 
service under Mandatory Act 120. Training under the Lethal Weapons Act 
235 provides the basic requirements and mandatory recertification for armed 
security personnel. 




Course Descriptions — 115 



Course Descriptions 

Credit designation at right of title is expressed in (c) class hours per week, 
(I) lab or (d) discussion section hours per week, and (sh) semester hours ol 
credit per semester. 

AD: Administrative Services 

Department of Office Systems and Business 

Education 

Eberly College of Business 

Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level arc open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

AD 101 Introduction to Business 3c-01-3sh 

Overview of the principles, practices, and methods common to most 
business firms in a private enterprise system. (Not open to juniors and 
seniors in Business! 

AD 221 Business Technical Writing 3c-0I-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN 101 

Application of business and technical writing styles, letters, memos, reports, 
procedures, and manuals are some areas of concern. Emphasis on clear, 
concise writing style. I Branch campus course only. May not be used as a 
substitute for AD321) 

AD 321 Business and Interpersonal Communications 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisite: EN101, EN202 

Study of communication theory and principles as applied to business 
situations and practices; development of communication skills in areas of 
communication such as speaking, writing, listening, and nonverbal 
communicating. Emphasis on building effective interpersonal relations in a 
business environment. 

AD 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 48 1 are offered primarily for upper-level undergraduate 

students. 

AD 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

AE: Art Education 
Department of Art 
College of Fine Arts 

AE 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

AE 315 Survey of Art Education 3c-01-3sh 

A seminar to introduce the art education major to the principles and 
practices of teaching visual arts K through 12. Field experiences, pre-student 
teaching activities, introduction to literature, and history and philosophies of 
art education emphasized. (Prerequisite to student leaching) Fall only. 



AE 317 Art Education Methodology at the lc-3l-3sh 

Elementary Level 

Examines children's artistic development, art programs, planning, 
motivation, and evaluation. Weekly leaching experience is an integral part of 
the course. (Prerequisite to student teaching) Fall only. 

AE 318 Art Education Methodology at the lc-31-3sh 

Secondary Level 

Relationship of art education to the total secondary curriculum is studied to 
determine goals of junior-senior high school art. The adolescent creative 
products are analyzed to help the prospective art teacher to identify with 
problems of students, i Prerequisite to student teaching) Spring only. 

AE 481 Special Topics 3c-01 3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

AE 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 



AG: Accounting 
Department of Accounting 
Eberly College of Business 



Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level are open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

AG 201 Accounting Principles I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Sophomore status (29sh) or permission of department 
chairperson 

Introduces the student to the accounting cycle in service and merchandising 
concerns using the single proprietorship form of business organization: 
covers use of special journals and subsidiary ledgers in the accounting 
system as well as accounting and internal control procedures for cash, 
receivables, inventory, and plant and equipment. 

AG 202 Accounting Principles II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: C or better in AG201, sophomore status 
Covers accounting principles and procedures for payroll, partnerships, 
corporations, long-term liabilities and investments, and manufacturing firms 
w ith a general accounting system. Introduces the student to cost accounting 
systems, financial statements analysis, budgeting, and use of accounting 
information in making managerial decisions. 

AG 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 2S1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

AG 299 Cooperative Education I 0c-01-2sh 

Prerequisites: Completion of 55 credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 
including at least a "C" in AG201. AG202, and IM241. and approval of the 
cooperative adviser 

The initial experience in a program designed to combine classroom theory 
with practical application through job-related experiences. Students are 
actively employed in the accounting area in business, industry, government. 



116 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



and a variety of organizalions and agencies with a work focus which relates 
to their academic training and career objectives in accounting. The student is 
expected to complete subsequently AG399 or an internship. 

AG 300 Managerial Accounting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AG202 (not open to Accounting majors) 

Emphasizes the use of accounting information in performing the managerial 

functions of planning, control, decision making, and performance 

evaluation. 

Note: Accounting majors will not be granted degree credit for AG300. 

AG 301 Intermediate Accounting I 3c-0!-3sh 

Prerequisite: C or better in AG202 

An overview of the foundation of accounting theory dealing with 
application of generally accepted accounting principles as promulgated in 
professional pronouncements to the reporting process and to accounting for 
various asset items in the financial statements. 

AG 302 Intermediate Accounting II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: C or better in AG301 

Application of generally accepted accounting principles to various areas 
such as accounting for corporations, long-term investments in securities, 
bonds, pension costs, leases, etc. 

AG 311 Cost Accounting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: C or better in AG202 

Cost accounting methods and procedures including cost accumulation under 
job order cost system and process cost system, cost allocation, budgeting, 
and accounting for spoilage, joint, and by-products. The planning and 
control aspect of cost accounting is emphasized. 

AG 399 Cooperative Education II 0c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AG299: completion of 85 credits with an overall GPA of 2.0; 
a GPA of 2.3 in AG301, AG302. and AG31 1 with at least a "C" in each 
course; and approval of the cooperative adviser 

The subsequent course in cooperative education is designed to combine 
classroom theory with practical application through job-related experiences. 
Cooperative Education students are actively employed in the accounting 
area in business, industry, government, and a variety of organizations and 
agencies with a work focus which relates to their academic training and 
career objectives in accounting. 

AG 401 Advanced Accounting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AG302 

Study of accounting issues of specialized nature including partnerships, 
organization and liquidation, agency and branch accounting, accounting for 
business combinations, preparation of consolidated financial statements, 
accounting for government and not-for-profit entities, accounting for estates 
and trusts, and receivership accounting. 

AG 412 Advanced Cost Accounting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: C or better in AG3 11 

Study of budgets, standard costs, direct and absorption costing, analysis of 
cost variances, and extensive analysis of various cost control and profit 
planning programs. 

AG 421 Federal Taxes 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: C or better in AG202 

Acquaints the student with Federal Income Tax Laws as they apply to 
individual taxpayers and partnerships. 

AG 422 Federal Taxation of Corporations, Partnerships, 3c-01-3sh 
Estates, and Trusts 

Prerequisites: AG421 and AG302 

Advanced course in federal income taxation as it applies to taxpayers other 

than individuals. Covers the tax treatment of those property transfers subject 

to federal and state gift and death taxes. The tax planning aspect of the 

various course topics as well as tax research methodology are also 

discussed. 



AG 435 Internal Auditing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AG431 

This course covers four issues: foundations for internal auditing, 
administering internal auditing activities, operational areas, and special 
relationships and evaluation for internal auditing. 

AG 441 Accounting for Government and Nonprofit 3c-01-3sh 

Organizations 

Prerequisite: AG302 
Presents the views of authoritative professional organizations as to desirable 
standards of accounting and reporting for governmental and nonprofit 
entities. Topics include budgeting and budgetary accounts, accounting for 
various funds, the general fixed assets group of accounts, the financial 
reporting process, and application of the principles of fund accounting in 
specific areas. 

AG 451 Seminar in Accounting Standards 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AG302 

Study of professional standards having authoritative support in the field of 
accounting. APB opinions. FASB interpretations, and SEC Accounting 
Series Releases are discussed. 

AG 461 Accounting Systems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AG302. AG311. IM300 

Study of concepts, principles, and procedures of accounting system design, 
installation, implementation, auditing, and maintenance in relating to system 
objectives, information requirements, constraints, system elements, and 
considerations on a computerized basis. 

AG 471 International Accounting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AG3 1 1 for Accounting majors or AG300 for non-Accounting 
majors 

A comparative study of the effects of differences in cultural and business 
philosophies on national and international accounting policies. Specific 
financial accounting controversies, such as accounting for transactions 
involving foreign currency exchanges, will be discussed. International 
management accounting topics will include international transfer pricing 
policies, performance evaluations of multinational managers and divisions, 
and management information systems. International aspects of financial 
planning, auditing, and taxation practices will also be reviewed. 

AG 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

AG 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

AG 488 Internship in Accounting 6sh 

(Industrial and Government) 

Prerequisites: Consent of departmental chairperson and dean. Eberly College of 
Business: overall GPA of 2.75 and GPA in accounting courses of 3.0 
Practical experiences, generally totaling 400 hours, in an industrial or 
government accounting setting. 

AG 493 Internship in Accounting (Public) 6sh 

Prerequisite: Consent of departmental chairperson and dean, Eberly College 
of Business; overall GPA of 3.00 and GPA in accounting courses of 3.0 
Practical experiences, generally totaling 400 hours, with a public accounting 
firm. 



AG 431 Auditing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AG302 

Study of auditing theory and practical application of auditing standards and 
procedures to the review, testing, and evaluation of accounting controls and 
to the verification of transactions and balances to express an opinion in an 
audit report on the fairness of financial statements' presentation. 



Course Descriptions — 117 



AH: Art History 
Department of Art 
College of Fine Arts 



AH 1(11 Introduction to Art 3c-01-3sh 

Designed to introduce the student to the significance of an as related to 
contemporary living and our historical heritage. 

AH 205 Ancient to Medieval Art 3c-01-3sh 

Study of art from prehistoric tunes to the Middle Ages. Man's artistic 
Development is seen in relation to political, social, economic, and religions 
events Course was offered as AH 115 prior to Summer, 1990. 

AH 206 Renaissance to Baroque Art !< 01-3sh 

Study of art from the Renaissance to the Baroque in light of the historical 
events which affect man's artistic impulses and development. Course was 
Differed as All 1 16 prior to Summer. 1990. 

AH 2 1 1 Modern Art 3c-01-3sh 

A survey of the revolutionary movements which began about 1850; 
concludes with trends in contemporary arts. 

AH 222 Art in America 3c-01-3sh 

Surveys American art and its relation to the development of American ideas 
and ideals. 

AH 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under an) special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

AH 407 Medieval Art 3c-01-3sh 

Art and architecture of Europe during the Middle Ages, beginning with early 
Christian and Byzantine and concluding with the Gothic period. Dual listed 
for graduate credit as AH507. 

AH 408 Italian Renaissance Art 3c-01-3sh 

Italian art from 1400s through 1650 and Mannerist movement. Special 
attention paid to great masters of the period. Dual listed for graduate credit 
as AH508. 

AH 409 Baroque and Rococo Art 3c-0l-3sh 

A general survey of art from 1575-1775. will include architecture, sculpture. 

painting, and other arts. Dual listed for graduate credit as AH509. 

AH 412 Classical Art 3c-01-3sh 

Historical survey of the architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor arts of 
the classical period of Greece and Rome, including the Minoan. Mycenaean, 
and Etruscan cultures. 

AH 413 Senior Seminar 3c-01-3sh 

Intended to help students develop adequate vocabularies and methods to be 
used in discussion and criticism of works of art. 

AH 416 Northern Renaissance Art 3c-01-3sh 

Explores phenomena of art north of the Alps from 1400 to 1600, especially 
as it appears in the Lowlands, as well as side explorations into art of France, 
Germany, Austria, and the court at Prague. 

AH 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

AH 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 



AM: Applied Music 
Department of Music 
College of Fine Arts 

Music majors and others who may qualify take private instruction in their 
respective major areas of performance in instrument or voice for up to eight 
semesters. Half-hour lessons are given each week (2 sh| for students 
enrolled in the B.S. and B.A. degree programs. A one-hour lesson (4 sh) is 
scheduled by students enrolled in the B.F.A. degree program only. 



AM 101. 151.201.251.301,351,401,451 
AM 102. 152, 202, 252, 302, 352, 402, 452 
AM 103. 153, 203, 253, 303. 353, 403, 453 
AM 104, 154, 204, 254, 304, 354, 404, 454 
AM 105. 155, 205, 255, 305. 355, 405, 455 
AM 106. 156. 206. 256, 306, 356. 406. 456 
AM 107. 157, 207, 257, 307, 357, 407, 457 
AM 108. 158. 208, 258, 308, 358, 408, 458 
AM 109. 159, 209, 259, 309, 359, 409, 459 
AM 110, 160,210,260,310,360,410,460 
AM 111. 161,211,261,311.361,411,461 
AM 112. 162,212,262.312,362,412,462 
AM 113. 163.213,263,313,363,413,463 
AM 114. 164,214,264,314,364,414,464 
AM 115, 165,215,265,315,365,415,465 
AM 116, 166,216,266.316,366,416,466 
AM 117, 167,217,267,317.367,417,467 
AM 118. 168,218,268,318,368.418,468 
AM 119, 169.219,269,319,369,419,469 
AM 120, 170, 220, 270. 320, 370, 420, 470 
AM 121, 171,221.271,321.371.421,471 



Piano I-VIII 
Organ I-VIII 
Harpsichord I-VIII 
Harp I-VIII 
Voice I-VIII 
Violin I-VIII 
Viola i-vm 
Cello I-VIII 
String Bass I-VIII 
Flute I-VIII 
Clarinet I-VIII 
Oboe I-VIII 
Bassoon I-VIII 
Saxophone I-VIII 
Trumpet I-VIII 
French Horn I-VIII 
Trombone I-VIII 
Baritone Horn I-VIII 
Tuba I-Vm 
Percussion I-VIII 
Guitar I-VOI 

var-l-3sh 



AM 482 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

AN: Anthropology 

Department of Anthropology 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

AN 110 Contemporary Anthropology 3c-01-3sh 

An introduction to the nature of anthropological inquiry. By using the 
anthropological perspective, current relevant topics will be discussed. 
Topics could include but are not limited to changing myths and rituals, legal 
anthropology, cross-cultural aspects of aging, gender roles, evolutionism and 
creationism, cultural extinction, and world hunger. Prior to Spring, 1989, 
was listed as AN 110: Introduction to Anthropology. 

AN 211 Cultural Anthropology 3c-01-3sh 

Explores the nature of culture as a human survival technique. Provides a 
framework for appreciation and understanding of cultural differences and 
similarities in human societies, past and present. 



118 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



AN 213 World Archaeology 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of the prehistory of Western and non-Western cultures with emphasis 
on the development of technology and on the evolution of adaptive 
strategies with particular attention to the origins of agriculture. This course 
exposes the students to the diversity of past cultural systems and to the 
methodological and theoretical questions of concern to archaeologists. 

AN 222 Biological Anthropology 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to the goals and techniques of biological anthropology with 
emphasis on primatology, paleoanthropology, genetics, and osteology. 
Provides a basis for evaluating the role of biology in human behavior. 

AN 233 Language and Culture 3c-01-3sh 

Focuses on social and cultural functions of language. Particular emphasis 
given to problems in anthropology with respect to non-Westem languages. 

AN 244 Basic Archaeology 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to the goals and methods of anthropological archaeology with 
particular attention to the analysis of cultural chronology, past lifeways, and 
cultural process. Provides laboratory experience with artifacts and other 
archaeological data. 

AN 271 Cultural Area Studies: Africa 3c-01-3sh 

Explores the cultural diversity of the continent of Africa. The first unit 
examines the historical processes which shape modern society, including the 
formation of indigenous African empires, the evidence for trade routes, 
slave trading, and colonialism. The second unit examines the nature of 
African traditional societies, including analyses of forager and agricultural 
groups. The last unit covers issues of contemporary development in Africa 
such as famine and agricultural policy, the status of women in economic 
development, and apartheid. Reading includes ethnographic and historical 
accounts of African society as well as selections by African writers on the 
issues of contemporary society. (Also offered as S0271; may not be taken 
for duplicate credit.) 

AN 272 Cultural Area Studies: China 3c-01-3sh 

Designed to assist the student in developing an understanding of 
contemporary China. While the course will begin with prehistoric and 
historic aspects of China, the focus will be on contemporary issues 
presented in the context of anthropological theory. Specific Chinese cultural 
components that will be investigated include values, attitudes, norms, social 
organization, linguistics, and folklore. (Also offered as S0272; may not be 
taken for duplicate credit.) 

AN 273 Cultural Area Studies: Southeast Asia 3c-01-3sh 

An introduction to the peoples and cultures of Southeast (SE) Asia. 
Prehistory and the development of indigenous states in SE Asia and analysis 
of impact of world religions, such as Islam, and Western colonialism. Also 
examines modern hunter-gatherer and farming societies and discusses 
contemporary issues in social and economic change, including the "Green 
Revolution," tropical deforestation, the struggle of ethnic minority tribal 
peoples, and the plight of Indochinese refugees. (Also offered as S0273: 
may not be taken for duplicate credit. ) 

AN 274 Cultural Area Studies: Latin America 3c-01-3sh 

An introduction to the peoples and cultures of Latin America. Focuses on 
the prehistory and development of pre-Columbian complex societies in 
Mesoamerica and the Andes and analyzes the impact of European 
colonialism on these major regions. Also examines contemporary issues, 
such as civil wars, economic development, rural-urban migrations, and 
migration and immigration of Latin American peoples into the United 
States. (Also offered as S0274; may not be taken for duplicate credit.) 

AN 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

AN 286 Marriage, Kinship, and the Family 3c-01-3sh 

Sociological and anthropological study of patterns of marriage, kinship, and 
family life, with emphasis on the relationship between family patterns and 
other social institutions. Topics covered include the family and marriage in 
historical and comparative perspective; worldwide patterns of gender 
stratification; incest and incest avoidance; class and race contexts of family 



patterns; mate selection and love; parenthood and child rearing; domestic 
and sexual violence; alternative family lifestyles; and the current crisis and 
possible future of the family. Intended for a broad audience but also open to 
sociology and anthropology majors and minors. (Also offered as S0286; 
may not be taken for duplicate credit.) 

AN 312 World Ethnography 3c-01-3sh 

Detailed study of specific preliterate cultures. Emphasis given to questions 
of cultural integration. 

AN 314 Native Americans 3c-OI-3sh 

Survey of culture history and culture area characteristics of the Indians of 
North America. Detailed study of representative groups related to historical, 
functional, and ecological concepts. 

AN 315 North American Archaeology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AN110 or AN244 or permission of the instructor 
Survey of North American prehistory with emphasis on cultural ecology and 
technology. Attention is given to all geographic areas north of Mexico, but 
the focus is on the Eastern Woodlands. 

AN 316 Anthropology of Religion 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: ANUO or AN21 1 

Explores nature, function, and universal characteristics of religion in human 
society by utilizing cross-cultural approach. Theories concerning religious 
phenomena serve as topics for discussion. 

AN 317 Archaeology Research Design and Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AN244 or permission of the instructor 
Introduction to theory and method in archaeological research through 
lecture, laboratory exercises, and individual projects. Provides students with 
actual experience analyzing and interpreting archaeological data sets. 

AN 318 Museum Methods 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: AN 1 10 or AN2 1 1 or AN244 

Lecture and laboratory course surveying the role of museums as social and 
educational institutions, types of museums, museum administration, and 
museum architecture. Procedures for collection, curalion. preservation, and 
storage of anthropological and natural history specimens examined. 

AN 320 Archaeological Field School var-6sh 

Prerequisite: AN1 10, AN244. or permission of instructor 
Introduction to archaeological survey, field excavation, and laboratory 
processing. Field school students participate in one or more of the on-going 
research projects of the IUP Archaeology Program. 

AN 340 Anthropology of Aging 3c-01-3sh 

Introduces the student to various experiences faced by elderly people in 
numerous world's societies. Explores the impact of such factors as ethnicity, 
nationality, race, and class and the processes of cultural change on the lives 
of people growing old. Comparative, cross-cultural perspectives will be 
stressed. 

AN 350 Anthropology of Women 3c-01-3sh 

Designed for any student with an interest in the lives of women around the 
world, regardless of whether or not they have a strong background in 
anthropology. Examines the social roles, rights, and responsibilities of 
women cross-culturally, viewing both women's productive (economic) 
functions as well as reproductive functions. Reading describes the position 
of women in technologically simple societies and addresses the comparative 
position of women in the industrialized socialist and capitalist countries. 
The central theme of the course is an examination of how the position of 
women has changed in the twentieth century. 

AN 360 Applied Anthropology 3c-01-3sh 

Applied anthropology focuses on the anthropologist as an agent of social 
change and bridges the gap between theories of cultural behavior and the 
policies which affect contemporary cultures. Examines the historical role of 
anthropologists in early public administration and then examines at length 
the work of contemporary applied anthropologists in programs of 
international economic development (health, agriculture, and education), in 
domestic human service planning and delivery, in cultural resource 
preservation, and in their role as advocates for unempowered minorities. 



Course Descriptions — 1 19 



AN 365 Native North American Religions 3c-01-3sh 

An introduction to the indigenous religions of North America and to Ihe 
peoples « ho practice these rich and varied approaches to the sacred. This 
course not only examines major religious themes and dimensions (myth, 
ritual, ethics, etc.) but includes an historical perspective on North American 
Indian lifeways. This perspective involves discussion oi the clash with Euro- 
American values and contemporary native religious responses to social 
Crisis and change. (Also offered as RS365; may not be taken for duplicate 
credit. I 

AN 401 Social and Cultural Change 3c-01 5sh 

Prerequisite: AN 1 10 or SO 151 

Exploration of current theoretical perspectives on social and cultural change. 
Special attention given to "planned change" at the local or regional level. 

AN 415 Cultural Resource Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AN244 or consent of the instructor 

Provides an understanding of how cultural resources are being preserved 
and managed under current American laws and regulations with particular 
emphasis on historic properties, such as historic buildings and 
archaeological sites. Case studies and field trips are incorporated so that 
students gain a thorough understanding of key problems and issues in 
historic preservation and cultural resource management. 

AN 420 Cultural Ecology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AN110 or AN211 

Introduces the student to the field of ecological anthropology by exploring 

the concept of the ecosystem in relationship to varying human adaptive 

strategies. Illustrates the importance of understanding man-environment 

interactions both in studying the developing world and in investigating the 

past. 

AN 444 Medical Anthropology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: 9 credits in anthropology or permission 
Focuses on the study of human confrontation with disease and illness and on 
the adaptive arrangements made by various human groups for dealing with 
these dangers. Health and disease are viewed from a broad array of micro 
and macro perspectives, e.g., evolutionary, ecological, and psychosocial. 
Designed for nursing and social work students as well as social and 
biological sciences students. 

AN 456 Field Research Methods 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: 9 credits in anthropology 

Examination of methods and practice of sociology and anthropology in the 
areas of qualitative and quantitative methods. Concentrates upon the 
development of field notes, interviewing techniques, participant observation, 
etc. Qualitative methods of sampling and analysis will include theoretical 
sampling and analytic induction. Brief background research into community, 
organizational, and group structure will also be emphasized. 

AN 480 Anthropology Seminar var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: 9 credits in anthropology or permission 

A seminar approach to the integration of the fields of anthropology. 

Designed to assist the advanced student in understanding the nature of 

anthropology, the major theoretical issues, and the history of intellectual 

development. 

AN 481 Special Topics in Anthropology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 48 1 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

AN 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

AN 483 Readings in Anthropology var- 1 -3sh 

Directed readings on special topics in anthropology. Instructor guides 
selection of readings. 



AN 493 Internship in Anthropology var-3-12sh 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

The course is designed to offer students practical experience in any of the 
specialized fields of anthropology (physical, social-cultural, archaeology, or 
linguistics i Each student develops objectives in consultation with a 
particular departmental faculty member who is supervising the internship. 
Detailed field notes and a major paper based on the experience are required. 

AR: Art (Studio) 
Department of Art 
College of Fine Arts 

AR 100 Arts of the Twentieth Century lc-3l-3sh 

Designed to expand student response to visual, aural, and kinetic art forms 
of this century with special emphasis on recent decades. The course includes 
lecture, studio, and field experiences. 

AR 111 Figure Drawing 0c-61-3sh 

A foundation course in drawing, including a study of the structure of 
drawing and composition with a variety of media and subject matter. 

AR 112 Fundamentals of Drawing 0c-61-3sh 

A course which seeks to integrate basic principles and fundamentals of 
drawing and design. 

AR 113 Three-Dimension Design Oc-61-3sh 

Basic elements and principles of design are studied. A course in design in 
three dimensions. 

AR 114 Color and Two-Dimensional Design 0c-6I-3sh 

Focuses on the consistent properties of color and the manner in which two- 
dimensional design can be organized. Specific attention is given to the 
complex interactions of color within two-dimensional design. 

AR 120 Principles of Design 0c-41-2sh 

Principles of design and color are studied and applied to a crafted object. 
Major emphasis on aesthetic quality inherent in designing with materials. 

AR 211 Painting 0c-61-3sh 

An introductory course in painting in which a variety of materials, 
techniques, and approaches are explored. 

AR 213 Woodworking: Function and Form 0c-61-3sh 

Involves the study of woodworking and furniture design as it relates to the 
individual designer-artist. Students will experience a formal background in 
both woodworking technique and the application of design. 

AR 214 Ceramics 0c-61-3sh 

A general introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of clay. The student 

will work both at the wheel and with hand building methods. 

AR 215 Sculpture 0c-6l-3sh 

Introductory course in sculpture with emphasis on study of form as well as 
visualizing in the third dimension. 

AR 216 Basic Metals 0c-61-3sh 

Introduction to metal work with emphasis upon creation of functional and 
nonfunctional art objects. Approached from the viewpoint of beginner 
learning basic processes of metal fabrication. 

AR 217 Printmaking 0c-61-3sh 

Introduction to basic techniques of production of fine prims including work 
in relief, intaglio, lithograph, and serigraph processes. 

AR 218 Graphic Design 0c-61-3sh 

Students explore various techniques and their application to such 
commercial art projects as package design, trademark, and other design 
problems. Lettering is stressed, both instant type and hand lettering. 

AR 219 Fibers 0c-61-3sh 

Provides students w ith introductory working knowledge in design and 
execution of projects in non 4/hamess loom weaving and related fabric 
areas. Other fiber techniques, including handmade paper, available for 
students to explore as desired. 



120 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



AR 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

AR 421 Advanced Drawing 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisites: AR1 11 and 112 

Designed to meet the needs of the student who has some background in the 
field. Problems of composition, two- and three-dimensional relationships, 
and surface are on an individual basis. (Offered as AR321 prior to 1994-95.) 

AR 451 Advanced Woodworking: Function and Form 0c-61-3sh 
Prerequisite: AR213 

Offers advanced training and skills involving the study of contemporary 
furniture design and woodworking. Emphasis on a technical and aesthetic 
point of view. 

AR 452 Advanced Ceramics 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR214 

Continued exploration of the field of ceramic production, along with kiln 
firing and glaze formulation. 

AR 453 Advanced Sculpture 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR215 

Gives the student an opportunity to pursue independent study in sculpture. 
Materials and processes will be individually chosen and the work related to 
broadening concepts. 

AR 454 Advanced Painting 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR211 

Individual experimentation and exploration by the painter and investigation 
of the various technical approaches. 

AR 455 Advanced Graphic Design 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR218 

Stresses advanced techniques in layout and illustration. The student explores 
ideas, such as creation of trademarks and how products are designed. 
Layouts are analyzed as to their quality. Package design is studied. 

AR 457 Advanced Printmaking 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR217 

Student elects to study one of the printmaking processes in greater depth and 

works toward development of own techniques, working processes, and 

ideas. 

AR 459 Advanced Fibers 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR219 

Provides student with a working knowledge in design and execution of 
projects in weaving and related areas. Other fiber techniques, including 
handmade paper, will be available for the students to explore as desired. 

AR 460 Advanced Metals 0c-61-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR216 

Design and processes associated with art of metal are given greater 
concentration. The developing artist is encouraged to investigate, in depth, 
one or more of the metal arts as an extension of the basic course. 

AR 481 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

May provide an in-depth study of a narrowly defined area of the discipline. 
Subject matter may change with repeated offering of the course. May be 
repeated for credit. 

AR 482 Independent Study var l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

AR 493 Internship var-3- 1 2sh 

Designed for art majors who wish to receive practical experience working 
within professional situations which relate to the student's artistic and 
occupational goals. 



BC: Biochemistry 

Biochemistry Program 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

BC 301 Biochemistry I 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI105 and CH232 

Introduction to biochemistry emphasizing the structure and function 
relationships of proteins, enzymes, and vitamins; bioenergetics; and the 
metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. 

BC 302 Biochemistry II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: BC301 

Continuation of BC301 concerning the metabolism of nitrogen, amino acids, 
nucleotides, and nucleic acids and the function of cell membranes, 
hormones, and specialized tissues. 

BC 311 Biochemistry Laboratory I Oc-41-lsh 

Prerequisites: BI 105 and CH232 

A companion to BC301 including experiments in photometry, enzyme 
kinetics and purification, lipid isolation and characterization, electron 
transport in respiration and photosynthesis, and use of radioisotopes. 

BC 312 Biochemistry Laboratory II Oc-41 1 sh 

Prerequisite: BC311 

A companion to BC302 including experiments in membrane 
characterization, properties of amino acids, isolation and function of nucleic 
acids, and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids. 

BC 480 Biochemistry Seminar I lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisites: BC302 and 312 

Discussion of recent trends in biochemical thought. Oral and written reports 
on assigned readings, library or laboratory research. Guest lecturers. The 
combination BC480 and BC490 counts as one writing-intensive course. 

BC 481 Special Topics in Biochemistry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: BC302 and 312 

A lecture-discussion course of recent biochemical topics or those of unique 
interest. Topic and instructor to change annually. 

BC 482 Independent Research in Biochemistry var-l-3sh 

Prerequisites: BC302 and 312, permission by program coordinator 
Student conducts a research project in any area of biochemistry with in the 
College of Natural Science and Mathematics. Work supervised by faculty. 
Does not involve regular class or lab hours. Enrollment by permission only. 

BC 490 Biochemistry Seminar II lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisites: BC302, 312, and 480 

Discussion of recent trends in biochemical thought. Oral and written reports 
on assigned readings, library or laboratory research. Guest lecturers. The 
combination BC480 and BC490 counts as one writing-intensive course. 

BE: Business Education 

Department of Office Systems and Business 

Education 

Eberly College of Business 

Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level are open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

BE 101 Microbased Computer Literacy 3c-01-3sh 

An introductory course designed to provide students with a fundamental 
understanding of computers. The course familiarizes students with the 
interaction of computer hardware and software. Emphasis is placed on the 
application of microcomputers, the use of productivity software (word 
processing, spreadsheet management, file and data base management), and 
the social and ethical aspects of the impact of computers on society. 
Note: This course is co-listed as CO101 and IM101. Any of these courses 
may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D or 
F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit. 



Course Descriptions — 121 



BK III Foundations of Business Mathematics i< hi -3sh 

Develops an understanding ol numbers and kmm ledge ol fundamental 
concepts in arithmetic and algebra in the solution of common and advanced 
problems encountered in business by the businessperson and consumer. 
Topics illustrating and emphasizing the application of business mathematics 
include methods used to compute interest discount, partial payments, 
Discounting of notes and dr.iits. depret iation, amortization, sinking fund 
redemptions, effective rate of interest, and preparation of statistical data. 

BK 131 Keyboarding and Document Formatting 3c-01-2sh 

I mphasis on development of correct techniques in typewriting, introduction 
to basic styles ol business letters, simple tabulations, and simple 
manuscripts: specific standards of speed and accuracy are required. ( Title 
prior to 1989 was BE131: Principles of Typewriting.) 

BK 132 Advanced keyboarding and 3c-OI-3sh 

Document Formatting 

Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA in BE131 or credit by examination 

Emphasis on further development of speed, accuracy, and production ability; 

includes business letters with special features, business reports, business 

forms, rough drafts, manuscripts. (Title prior to 1989 was BE132: 

intermediate Ty pew ruing.) 

BK 134 Keyboarding lc-01- I sh 

Exception: This course is open to students in all colleges without restriction. 
A class designed to provide students with the fundamental skills to keyboard 
information quickly and accurately in fourteen one-hour sessions. It is 
intended for the student who does not require the additional skills included 
in keyboarding and document formatting, such as letter formats, manuscript 
typing, and tabulation. Recommended for students in computer science. 
journalism, management information systems, criminology, etc. 

BK 250 Electronic Office Procedures 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: BE131 or equivalent 

A study of the theory and practice of the systems in an electronic office: 
records management, office environment, communication transmittal 
systems, reprographics, and office procedures. (Branch campus course only. 
May not be used as a substitute for BE264.) 

BK 260 Alphabetic Shorthand Theory 3c-01-3sh 

Basic principles of alphabetic shorthand with emphasis on mastery of 
shorthand theory, punctuation, grammar, and spelling. "New matter" 
dictation will be introduced during the last few weeks of class. The 
alphabetic system taught will vary. 

BK 261 Shorthand Theory 3c-01-3sh 

An introductory course in the basic principles of Gregg Shorthand. 
Centennial Edition. 

BK 262 Shorthand Dictation and Transcription 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: BE131, BE261 

Major objectives are to review and strengthen the student's knowledge of 
principles of Gregg Shorthand. Centennial Edition, to build shorthand- 
writing speed and to build transcription skills. (Title prior to 1989 was 
BE262: Shorthand Dictation.) 

BK 264 Office Procedures 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: BE131 or equivalent 

Advanced study of theory and practice in activities common to office 
records management; handling of mail; telephone and telegraph services; 
receiving callers; writing reports; dictation and transcription equipment; 
bank, financial, and legal transactions; shipping and receiving services; 
reference books; etc. 

BK 273 Word Processing Applications 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: BE131 or equivalent 

In this course students will develop a high degree of proficiency in the use 

of word processors. Emphasis is on machine operations and production 

skills in formatting, text editing, and understanding word processing 

concepts. (Branch campus course only. May not be used as a substitute for 

BE/CO/lMini) 



BK 2X1 Special topics ic <>l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Spet ial topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics thai are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

he offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students 

BK 311 Methods and Kvaluation in Business and V ill- Kh 

Marketing Education I 

Prerequisites: PCI01. EP202. and completion of the freshman and 

sophomore courses in the student's major areas 

Includes general methods of teaching and evaluation plus methods and 

evaluation in basic business courses. Unit plans, lesson plans, and unit tests 

are emphasized. Techniques and procedures of teaching and classroom 

management are studied. Includes units in vocational education such as 

advisory committees, adult education, and federal legislation for funding. 

BK 312 Methods and Kvaluation in Business var-l-3sh 

Kducation II 

Prerequisite: BE311 orDE410 

Covers three sections of special methods and evaluation in office 
technologies: secretarial, accounting, and data processing. Objectives, 
planning, evaluating, and skill building are studied. Media and facilities for 
instruction are examined. Students elect sections needed for certification. 

BK 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

BE 482 Independent Study var- l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

BI: Biology 

Department of Biology 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

BI 103 General Biology I 3c-21-4sh 

Prerequisite: Non-Biology majors only 

A basic introduction to ecology, biochemistry, and cell biology, genetics, 
and evolution. 

BI 104 General Biology II 3c-21-4sh 

Prerequisites: BI103 General Biology I. Non-Biology majors only 
A basic introduction to plant and animal physiology, neurobiology, animal 
behavior, and plant and animal reproduction and development. 

BI 105 Cell Biology 3c-2l-4sh 

Introductory course to increase depth of beginning student's understanding 
of structural and functional development plus evolutionary aspects of cell 
concept. 

BI 110 Plant Biology 3c^l-5sh 

Prerequisite: B1105 or special permission 

Plant structure, function, development, recognition and grouping, 
environmental relationships, and economic importance of plants considered. 

BI 114 Environmental Science 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Non-Biology majors only 

An introduction to environmental science with an emphasis on human 
impacts. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to the consideration 
of population growth, pollution, preservation of species, and establishment 
of public policy. Students will leam basic principles in ecology as the basis 
for understanding problems of the environment. 



122 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



BI 115 Biotic Diversity of North America 3c-0I-3sh 

Prerequisites: Non-Biology majors and non-Biology minors only 
An introduction to the biological diversity of North America from Barrow, 
Alaska, to Tehuantepec, Mexico. All major aquatic and terrestrial hiomes 
occurring in North America will be examined with regard to plant forms, 
animal composition, and environmenlal (abiotic) conditions. 

BI 120 Animal Biology 3c-41-5sh 

Prerequisite: B1105 or special permission 

Morphology, physiology, embryology, ecology, taxonomy, social, and 
economic importance of animals: consideration of principles applicable to a 
correlation of classical with present-day zoology. 

BI 150 Human Anatomy 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: Non-Biology majors only 

Study of the functional systematic anatomy of the human. Lab studies center 

on nonhuman mammals whose anatomy is then related to the human 

condition. 

BI 151 Human Physiology 3c-21-4sh 

Prerequisites: BI105, Non-Biology majors only 

Course deals with acquiring, through lecture presentations and laboratory 
experiments, an understanding of the basic functions and control of the 
major organ systems of the human body. Organ systems examined include 
the following: muscular system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, 
endocrine system, renal system, digestive system, reproductive system, and 
nervous system. 

BI 155 Human Physiology and Anatomy 3c-31-4sh 

Prerequisite: Non-Biology majors only (Food and Nutrition, Home 
Economics Education, Physical Education, and Safety Sciences majors I 
Study of structure and function of the human body. Emphasis is on normal 
function, with particular attention to functional anatomy, control 
mechanisms, and interrelationships among systems. Laboratory studies will 
include experimentation and dissection. For students with little or no science 
background. 

BI 232 Fundamentals of Microbiology 2c-3l-3sh 

Prerequisites: CH101 or equivalent, Non-Biology majors only (Food and 
Nutrition and Home Economics Education majors i 

Study of microorganisms and the role they play in water, food disease, and 
infection. Food spoilage, poisoning, and disease are emphasized. General 
methods and techniques are emphasized in the laboratory. 

BI 241 General Microbiology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: Non-Biology majors only (Nursing and Respiratory Therapy 
majors), BI105, CH101, or equivalent 

Study of microorganisms and the role they play in water, soil, food, and 
infection. Microbes and disease will be emphasized. Standard methods and 
techniques are emphasized in laboratory. 

BI 251 Field Botany 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI104 and BI1 10 

The collection, preservation, identification, and distribution of selected 
herbaceous and woody plants of Western Pennsylvania. Emphasis on 
taxonomic principles, the use of keys and manuals, and the recognition of 
local flora. 

BI 252 Field Zoology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI120 

Field natural history of vertebrates: identification, collection, and 
preservation techniques. 

BI 261 Ornithology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI105 or BI103 and 104 

A study of birds of the region. Indoor laboratory as well as early morning 
and possibly weekend field trips required. 

BI 262 General Entomology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI 120 

Morphology, anatomy, ecology, taxonomy, and economic and public health 
importance of insect orders, particularly those of Western Pennsylvania; 
student collection and field trips required. 

BI 263 Genetics 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BlllOor 120 and CH231 

Deals with the distribution and function of the hereditary material; special 

emphasis on microbial, viral, and molecular genetics. 



BI 269 Bioethics and Coevolution 3c-01-3sh 

Discussion and exploration of the coevolution of man and nature. Areas 
covered include the concepts of coevolution, bioethics. resource utilization, 
and possible future lifestyles. Designed for majors and nonmajors. 

BI 271 Evolution 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: One year Biology 

Historical development of evolutionary thought; evidence and operational 
mechanisms involved; origin and phylogenetic relationships of biological 

groups. 

BI 272 Conservation of Plant and Animal Resources 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI105 or BI103 and 104 

A study of accepted practices in soil, water, forest, and wildlife 
conservation. Saturday field trips. 

BI 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Specia: 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

BI 310 Applied Entomology and Zoonoses 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI 1 20 or permission 

Study of the measures for abatement or control of arthropods, rodents, birds 
and other disease vectors of public importance; selection, chemistry, 
formulation, and safe application of insecticides, rodenticides, and 
fumigants; pesticiding equipment; application of biological and other 
measures of control. 

BI 311 Environmental Biology 3c-31-4sh 

Prerequisites: Restricted to Elementary Education and Earth Science 
Education majors only 

Laboratory and field course providing basic knowledge in biology and its 
practical implications. Physical and biological aspects of the environment 
are studied. 

BI 321 Environmental Protection I 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI105. CHI 12. and permission of instructor. Environmental 
Health majors only 

Considers the impact of important components of the physical environment 
on health and deals with principles and methods for identification, 
evaluation, and control of such health hazards. Major attention to principles 
and methods of epidemiological investigation. Major credit only for 
Environmental Health majors. 

BI 322 Environmental Protection II 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI321, Environmental Health majors only 

Subjects receiving attention include water and food supplies, domestic and 

industrial sewage and wastes, housing, accidents, community air pollution, 

domestic and industrial poisons, ionizing radiations, occupational health 

hazards. 

BI 331 Animal Developmental Biology 2c-3l-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI 120 

Comparative and molecular development of vertebrate animals are the majo 
considerations. General principles of development are illustrated using 
vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant materials. 

BI 350 Cellular Physiology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH231 

Topics include cell membrane systems, bioenergetics, and information 
processing systems as well as growth and differentiation of cells and their 
organelles. Complements plant and animal physiology and biochemistry. 

BI 352 Comparative Animal Physiology 2c-3l-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI 1 20. CH231 

Comparative study of homeostatic mechanisms and systems in animals and 
their relation to fundamental chemical and physical events in cells. 

BI 360 Medical Mycology 2c -31 -3sh 

Prerequisite: BI105 

A study of the mycology of pathogenic fungi. Consideration will include 
sources of infection, distribution, symptomatology, diagnosis, prognosis, 
immunology, and treatment. Pathogens are used in the course, and emphasis 
is placed upon actual laboratory technique and procedures. 



('nurse Descriptions — 123 



Bl 361 Microbiology I Ish 

prerequisites: BI105, CH231 

Introduction to morphology, physiology, and ecolog) "I procaryotic 
organisms- Importance of microorganisms in basic and applied research. 
economics, infection, and immunology are discussed. 

|BI 362 Ecology 2c-31-3sh 

! Prerequisites BI110, 120 

Stud\ of interrelations and adaptations ol organisms; includes consideration 
of physical and biotic environmental factors. Field trips. 

Bl 364 Immunology 2c-3I-3sh 

Prerequisites BI361, CH232, or by permission 
Physical and chemical properties of antigens and antibodies; nature of 
antigen-antibody interactions; mechanism of antibody formation; and 
immune reaction and disease. Lab employs serological techniques. 

Bl 401 Laboratory Methods in Biology and 2c-41-3sh 

Biotechnology 

Prerequisite: CH351 

rheory and practice in a number of major analytical and preparative 

techniques currently in use in physiology, molecular biology, and 

biotechnology. 

Bl 420 Biology of Higher Invertebrates 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI120 

A phylogenetic o\ en iew of the higher invertebrates. Annelida through 
lower Chordata. A systematic approach on functional morphology and 
microstructure. behavior and physiology, under an evolutionary umbrella. 
Laboratory sessions offer additional research opportunities. 

Bl 425 Herpetolog] 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI120 

A comprehensive survey of the classes Amphibia and Reptilia. including 
their classification, structure, origin, evolution, phylogenetic relationships, 
distribution, and natural history. Special emphasis is placed on the 
herpetofauna of Pennsylvania. 

Bl 432 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI120 

Discussion of anatomy of representative vertebrates from a comparative 

pom! ot \ iew. Stresses major organizational changes observed in vertebrate 

history. 

Bl 453 Plant Physiology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI110. CH231 

Studies physiological processes occurring in plants considered in relation to 
grow th. development, and ecology of plants. 

Bl 463 Limnology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI362 

An investigation into the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of 
inland waters and their interrelationships. In the laboratory the student will 
gain experience in the techniques involved in aquatic sampling and the 
analysis of data. (Saturday or Sunday labs may be required.) 

Bl 466 Principles of Virology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI203 or equivalent course in Genetics, or CH351 or 
equivalent course in Biochemistry, or permission of instructor 
Topics include structure, classification, assay, and transmission of viruses; 
methods used in the study of viruses; viral replication, gene expression, and 
gene regulation; host-viral interactions and subviral pathogens. 

Bl 475 Mammalogy 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI120* 

A general discussion of mammals emphasizing systematics, distribution, and 

structural and functional modifications related to evolution of this group. 

Lab work samples numerous techniques that can be applied to mammalian 

biology. 

Bl 476 Parasitology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BII20 

Structure, physiology, ecology, life cycles, pathology, and treatment of 
parasitic protozoa and flatworm and roundworm species of man. Dissection 
of hosts for parasites. 



Bl 478 Mycology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: BI1I0 

Involves a study of the systemics, morphology, and physiology of the 
kingdom Myceteae with emphasis on economically important and 
experimentally useful organisms. 

Bl 4X0 Biology Seminar I c -01- lsh 

Discussion of recent trends in biological thought and research. Students 
report on assigned readings and/or personal research. 

Bl 4X1 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

This course varies from semester to semester covering diverse topics in 
specific areas of biology. 

Bl 4X2 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office. A 2.5 GPA overall and in major 
courses required. 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources. Work is supervised by a faculty member but does not involve 
regular class or laboratory hours. 

Bl 493 Biology Internship var-6- I2sh 

Prerequisites: Biology major with at least 57 semester hours, 2.5 overall 
QPA, and permission of the director of internships and the chairperson 
Selected students have opportunity, under department supervision, to gain 
off -campus practical experience in area of interest. Only six credits may be 
applied toward major; total number of credits will be decided in consultation 
involving student, his/her adviser, and director of internships. 

BL: Business Law 

Department of Finance and Legal Studies 

Eberly College of Business 

Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level are open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

BL 235 Introduction to Business Law 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to legal systems, torts, contracts, and sales law. 

BL 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

BL 336 Law of Business Organizations 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: BL235 

A study of the law dealing with commercial paper, agency, partnerships, 
corporations, and bankruptcy. 

BL 337 Consumer Law 3c-01-3sh 

Nature of law as it pertains to the consumer. Attention to consumer 
protection relationships; real and personal property; credit; environmental 
law; law pertaining to employment; landlord-tenant relationships; product 
liability; insurance; and family law. 

BL 382 Real Estate Fundamentals 3c-01-3sh 

Designed to acquaint the student with the language, principles, and laws that 
govern the business of real estate. Emphasis on the underlying concepts of 
land, property, rights in realty, and the means, methods, and laws that govern 
the conveyance of these rights. Required course for taking the Pennsylvania 
Real Estate Sales Exam. (Offered as FI382 prior to 1994-95.) 

BL 383 Real Estate Practice 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: BL382 

One of the two courses required by the Pennsylvania Real Estate 
Commission in order to take the Pennsylvania Real Estate Sales Licensing 
Exam. Topics include real estate brokerage, the real estate market, listing 



124 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



contracts, the Pennsylvania Real Estate Licensing and Requirements Act and 
its rules and regulations, appraisal, properly management, fair housing laws, 
ethical practices for real estate professionals, and real estate math. 

BL 440 Business Negotiations 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: BL235, junior standing 

This course is open to all majors meeting the prerequisites. It covers the 
basic theories and strategies of negotiation in the business environment and 
provides instruction and practice to develop negotiation skills. The course 
focuses on the knowledge and skills needed in intercompany and 
intracompany negotiations. The course focuses on neither collective 
bargaining nor labor negotiations. 

BL 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

BL 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

CE: Counselor Education 

Department of Counseling, Adult Education, and 

Student Affairs 

College of Education 

CE 250 Developing Interpersonal Relationship Skills lc-01- 1 sh 

Teaches interpersonal relationship skills: listening, communicating, group 
dynamics, decision making, leadership, assertiveness, time use management, 
problem solving, and conflict resolution. Restricted to residence hall 
counselors. 

CE 253 Counseling in School Settings 3c-01 -3sh 

An elective course designed to provide in-service teachers and school 
personnel, other than counselors, with a basic understanding of the 
knowledge, information, and skills appropriate to counseling with 
individuals and groups. Restricted to peer tutors. 

CE 281 Special Topics 3c-0 1 3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

CE 481 Special Topics 3c-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

CE 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 



CH: Chemistry 

Department of Chemistry 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

CH 101 College Chemistry I 3c-21-4sh 

The basic fundamental principles and concepts of inorganic chemistry are 
developed from the standpoint of atomic and molecular structure with 
illustrative examples from descriptive chemistry. The laboratory portion of 
the course illustrates physical and chemical properties in a qualitative and 
quantitative manner. The course is designed for selected majors within the 
College of Health and Human Services. 

CH 102 College Chemistry II 3c-2!-4sh 

Prerequisite: CH101 

The basic fundamental principles and concepts of organic and biochemistry 
are developed. Deals primarily with structural features of organic 
compounds, the chemistry of functional groups, and practical examples and 
uses of organic compounds. The laboratory portion illustrates properties and 
reactions of representative organic compounds. The course is designed for 
selected majors within the College of Health and Human Services. 

CH 111 General Chemistry I 3c-31-4sh 

Lecture-discussion of principles of chemistry, including theory and 
applications. The lab illustrates principles discussed. Topics discussed 
include scientific measurements, simple definitions and concepts, the mole, 
stoichiometry, gas laws, electronic structure of the atom, bonding, 
thermochemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. 

CH 112 General Chemistry II 3c-31-4sh 

Prerequisite: CH11 1 
Continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics discussed include the solid and 
liquid state, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, solubility 
equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and descriptive chemistry of 
the elements. 

CH 113 Concepts in Chemistry 3c-31-4sh 

Introductory course for chemistry majors. Topics covered include atomic 
theory, an introduction to chemical reactions, stoichiometry, 
thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, kinetic-molecular 
theory of gases, the liquid and the solid states, and solution theory. 

CH 114 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 3c-3l-4sh 

Prerequisite: CHI 13 

Topics include chemical kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics, acids 
and bases, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, and descriptive 
chemistry of selected elements. 

CH 116 Basic Inorganic Chemistry 3c-31-2sh 

Prerequisite: CH 1 1 1 and CH 1 1 2 

Required for chemistry majors who have taken CH 1 1 1 and CH 1 1 2. A 
systematic study of the chemistry of the elements will be presented in both 
the lecture and the laboratory. Also included will be the chemistry of 
coordination compounds. This course starts at the beginning of the second 
half of the spring semester and is taught concurrently with CHI 14. 

CH 231 Organic Chemistry I 3c-41-4sh 

Prerequisite: CHI 12 or 114 

A study of compounds of carbon, with special emphasis on structure- 
reactivity relationships. Laboratory work emphasizes methods of separation 
and purification of organic compounds. 

CH 232 Organic Chemistry II 3c-4I-4sh 

Prerequisite: CH231 

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I with an introduction to spectroscopic 

techniques. Laboratory work emphasizes the synthesis of representative 

compounds. 

CH 255 Biochemistry and Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH102 

Course for Home Economics majors; studies chemistry and biological 

function of biologically active compounds with respect to nutritional 

requirements. 



Course Descriptions — 125 



CH 281 Special Topics 3c -01 5sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics arc offered or an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

he offered tindei any special topic identity no more than three nines Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students 

CH 301 Chemistry Seminar lc-01-lsh 

Discussion of current technical literature and current research problems of 
staff, lectures In outside chemists ami student presentations. Open to junior 
oi semoi chemistry majors and to others by permission of the instructor. 

CH 321 Quantitative Analysis 3c-41-4sh 

prerequisite: (III U oi cm u 

theory and practice of quantitative analysis, including gravimetric and 

volumetric analysis: special emphasis on perfecting student's laboratory 

techniques and application oi general chemical knowledge through problem 

solving. 

CH 322 Instrumental Analysis 3c-41-4sh 

Prerequisite: II I Ml 

Modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Student learns theory 
behind the instrument, principles of operation, interpretation of data 
obtained, and limitations of methods. 

CH 323 Analytical Methods 3c-4l-4sh 

Prerequisites: CHI 12 and non-Chemistry major 

Principles of precipitation, acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and equilibria are 
applied to problem solving and to laboratory determinations: instrumental 
methods of analysis, such as colorimetry. atomic absorption and flame 
emission, gas chromatography, etc. 

CH 331 Organic Molecular Structure Determination 4c-var-3sh 
Prerequisites: CH231-232 (CH232 may be taken concurrently) 
Gives the student experience in systematic identification of various classes 
of organic compounds by both chemical and physical methods. 

CH 335 Advanced Organic Chemistry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CH232 and CH341 

Selected topics of current interest covered. Possible topics include reaction 
mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, stereochemistry, natural products, 
heterocyclics, polymer chemistry, and organic synthesis. 

CH 340 Physical Chemistry for the Biological Sciences 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisite's: MA 122, 124, 128, and PY112 or 132; CH232 
One semester course for Biochemistry and Biology majors. Chemical 
thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics; quantum mechanics; and spectroscopy 
especially as applied to biomechanical systems. 

CH 341 Physical Chemistry 1 4c-0I-4sh 

Prerequisites: MA 122. 124. or 128 and PY1 12 or 132; CHI 12 or 114 
Chemical thermodynamics with applications to solutions, phase, and 
chemical equilibria-kinetic theory. 

CH 342 Physical Chemistry II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH341 

Study of solids, liquids, surfaces, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, 
atomic and molecular structure. 

CH 343 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 0c-3l-lsh 

Prerequisites: CH321, 341 

Experiments illustrating application of fundamental laws to actual systems. 
Carries writing-intensive credit. 

CH 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 0c-31-lsh 

Prerequisites: CH342, 343 " 

Extension of Physical Chemistry Laboratory I; experiments related to 

chemical kinetics, molecular spectroscopy, and other topics of physical 

chemistry. 

CH 351 Biochemistry 4c-01-4sh 

Prerequisite: CH231 

Study of chemistry and biological functions of carbohydrates, lipids. 

proteins, minerals, vitamins, and hormones. 



CH 376 KadiiH'hemistry 4c-var-3sh 

Prerequisite (11322 

Study of basic aspects of nuclear structure, phenomena of radioactive 
isotopes, and chemical effects of such isotopes. Concurrent lab work 
utilizing instruments lor detection and measurement of radioactive nuclides 
used in chemical experimentation. 

CH 410 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 0c-3l-lsh 

Prerequisite: (11322 Instrumental Analysis 

A laboratory course in which the techniques used in the synthesis and 
characterization of inorganic compounds will be explored. Emphasis will be 
placed on the preparation of a wide variety of inorganic compounds and the 
methods by which they are identified and characterized. 

CH 411 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH341 

Gives understanding of advanced theories of atomic structure, chemical 
bonding, acids and bases, coordination compounds, and selected topics. 

CH 412 Advanced Structural and Synthetic 2c-21-3sh 

Methods in Inorganic Chemistry 

Prerequisites: CH4I 1 and either CH410 or CH322 

Advanced techniques used in the synthesis and characterization of inorganic 
compounds will be explored. In lecture, emphasis will be placed on the 
theory and application of structural and spectroscopic methods of 
characterization. In lab, emphasis will be placed on advanced methods of 
synthesis and structural characterization using representative examples of 
important classes of inorganic compounds. 

CH 421 Advanced Instrumental Analysis 4c-var-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH322 

Study of modem chemical analysis, using advanced instrumental 
techniques; emphasis on theory, principles of operation, capabilities, and 
limitations of advanced analytical instruments used. 

CH 441 Advanced Physical Chemistry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite or corequisite: CH342 

Study of fundamental ideas of quantum and statistical mechanics, molecular 
structure, and other topics of current interest. 

CH 481 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

CH 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

CH 493 Internship in Chemistry var-4-9sh 

Prerequisites: CH113, 1 14, 231, 232, 321, 341, and departmental approval 
Full-time involvement in an actual "on-the-job" situation in an industrial 
laboratory under the tutelage of a selected preceptor. A department faculty 
member will work closely with the student and preceptor and will assume 
responsibility of making the final evaluation and assigning a grade. 

CH 498 Problems in Chemistry var-l-2sh 

Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson 

Course of independent study on selected problems, including lab work, 
library reading, and conferences with staff member. A minimum of four 
hours per week required per credit. 

CL: Critical Languages 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Critical Languages are offered in four levels. See program description in the 
opening section of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Specific 
languages are offered as available. 



126 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



CL 101 - 120 Critical Languages I 3c-01-3sh 

Basic vocabulary and pronunciation in the target language. Oral/aural skills 

are stressed. 

CL101 Arabic I 

CL102 Chinese I 

CL103 Dutch I 

CL104 Finnish I 

CLIO? Hindi I 

CL106 Hungarian I 

CL107 Italian 1 

CL108 Japanese I 

CL109 Korean I 

CL110 Modern Greek I 

CL111 Portuguese I 

CL112 Russian I 

CL113 Swedish I 

CL 151 - 170 Critical Languages II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Level I or acceptable equivalent 

A continuation of the first-semester course. Depending on the language 

being studied, reading and writing may be introduced at this level. 

CL151 Arabic II 

CL152 Chinese II 

CL153 Dutch II 

CL154 Finnish II 

CL155 Hindi II 

CL156 Hungarian II 

CL157 Italian 11 

CL158 Japanese II 

CL159 Korean II 

CL160 Modern Greek II 

CL161 Portuguese II 

CL162 Russian II 

CL163 Swedish II 

CL 201 - 220 Critical Languages III 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Level II or acceptable equivalent 

At this first intermediate level, students will begin lo develop a degree of 

oral proficiency that will vary with the language studied. Reading and 

writing will be studied in all languages by this level. 

CL201 Arabic III 

CL202 Chinese III 

CL203 Dutch III 

CL204 Finnish III 

CL205 Hindi III 

CL206 Hungarian I 

CL207 Italian III 

CL208 Japanese III 

CL209 Korean III 

CL210 Modern Greek III 

CL2I1 Portuguese III 

CL212 Russian III 

CL213 Swedish III 

CL 251 - 270 Critical Languages IV 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: Level III or acceptable equivalent 

By the end of this course the student should be able to communicate in 

simple terms with an educated native speaker on a topic with which the 

student is familiar. Ability in reading and writing will vary with language. 

CL251 Arabic IV 

CL252 Chinese IV 

CL253 Dutch IV 

CL254 Finnish IV 

CL255 Hindi IV 

CL256 Hungarian IV 

CL257 Italian IV 

CL258 Japanese IV 

CL259 Korean IV 

CL260 Modern Greek IV 

CL261 Portuguese IV 

CL262 Russian IV 

CL263 Swedish IV 



CM: Communications Media 
Department of Communications Media 
College of Education 

CM 101 Communications Media in American Society 3c-01-3sh 

Required of Communications Media majors 

Introduction to the evolution, status, and future of communications media. 

Students explore intrapersonal communication through self-assessment, 

values clarification, and feedback; interpersonal communication through 

interviews, observations, case studies, and gaming: and mass 

communications through the examination of the processes and the 

technology utilized to disseminate and manage information. Career paths, 

field applications, professional associations, and the primary literature are 

m\ obligated. 

(Previous title: Survey of Communications Media) 

CM 102 Basic Technology lc-01- 1 sh 

Prerequisite: CM 101 

Provides Communications Media majors with the ability to identify, operate, 
and maintain a variety of audiovisual hardware commonly found in 
education, business, industry, and allied health professions. 

CM 103 Basic Communications Research lc-01- lsh 

Prerequisite: CM 101 

An introduction to research as it specifically applies to the field of 
communications. Major emphasis will be placed on a review of the resource 
materials pertaining to the area of communications. Also to be included will 
be a basic understanding of research methodology as it relates to the design 
and validation of communication devices. 

CM 200 Images 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CM 101 

The course examines the basic visual and aural elements, the strategies and 
options of techniques, the psychological and physiological implications of 
creative composition, and the range of media and formats. 

CM 230 Issues in International Communication 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of international communications w ith particular emphasis on 
communications flow, four press theories, ownership, structure and access to 
media, government/media relationships, the impact of communications on 
developed and developing countries. 

CM 271 Beginning Photography 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CM 101 or permission 

Working with black-and-white materials, the student learns to operate a 
camera, develop film, make contact prints and enlargements, and mount 
prints for display. Ancillary topics are introduced such as filtration, print 
spotting, flash, and the use of accessory lenses. Student is required to have a 
35mm camera, preferably a single-lens reflex, with fully manual focusing 
and exposure capability. 

CM 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

CM 301 Technology for Learning and Instruction 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EP202 or permission 

Preservice teachers gain competencies in selection, evaluation, and 
utilization of various instructional technologies. Application of new 
technologies to teaching and learning will be emphasized, along with 
performance-based activities in instructional design. A major portion of the 
course is devoted to the integration of computer-based instructional 
activities in the school curriculum. Does not count towards credits needed 
for Communications Media major. 

CM 303 Scriptwriting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CM 101 

Required of Communications Media majors 

Introduction to the design of media materials and script writing. Style and 

techniques of writing will be analyzed. Classroom emphasis is on writing, 

critiques, and revision of designs and scripts. Scripts for audio, still 

projection, and mo'ion picture and television productions will be written. 



Course Descriptions — 127 



CM 330 Communications Media in Training and 3c-01-3sh 

Education 

Prerequisites: CMI01. 303 

The course reviews the historical growth and philosophies of the design and 

development of training and education products and processes. The student 

examines the principal roles and functions of human and material resource 

professionals for training (performance improvement), education 

(competency improvement), and development (personal and organizational 

growth). 

CM 335 Consulting Practices in Communications 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CM 1 01 

The course presents the theoretical views and clinical applications oi 
consulting skills and practices associated with and needed by 
communication professionals. Presented will be the functions and role of the 
consultant, the client's perspective on consulting, hiring a consultant, ethics 
in consulting, personal assessment tests, and related literature and models. 

CM 375 Mass Media and Behavior 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisite: PC 101 and junior or senior status 

Theory and research on the influence of the mass media on human behavior 
and attitudes. Topics include the effects of news and political advertising on 
public opinion; the effects of racist and sexist portrayals; and the effects of 
violence and pornography on aggressive behavior. (Also offered as PC 375; 
may be taken only once.) 

CM 390 1'iai i icii in in Communications var-l-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM 101, written permission 

An opportunity with credit for students to make contributions to department 
and campus media-related facilities and offices including WIUP-TV, WIUP- 
FM, Penn, Oak, Public Relations, Media Resources. Repeatable for a 
maximum of six credits. 

CM 395 Career Planning in Communications Media lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisite: Minimum 20 CM credits 

The course serves as a primary skill-building and strategy-seeking 
experience for the internship program and later career entry and growth. 
Extensive writing, research, and individual counseling are involved. Travel 
may be necessary. 

CM 403 Writing for Broadcasting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM101, permission of instructor 

The course acquaints students with the various techniques used in writing 
scripts for radio and television and makes them aware of the visual impact 
of television and the audio impact of radio. Students are made aware of the 
limitations of television and radio as well as their unique features. 

CM 404 Foundations of Broadcasting 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM 101, permission 

Examination of the historical, legal, and economic aspects of broadcasting. 
Impact of broadcasting on society will be explained as well as the impact of 
the new technology on our existing broadcasting systems. 

CM 405 Radio Production 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CMI01, 200, 403, 404, permission 
An introduction to production techniques as they pertain to radio. The 
student will be exposed to programming, scripting, producing programs, 
intros, outros, commercials, public service announcements, station 
identifications, and promotional announcements. The course will also deal 
with the interaction of a radio station with national networks and with the 
real-life concerns of deadlines. 

CM 430 Analysis of Communication Products and 3c-0l-3sh 

Processes 

Prerequisites: CM330, permission 

The course will provide both a framework for action and tools to measure 
the effectiveness of training and education in human and material resource 
development programs. The course contains practical theory and problem- 
focused discussion with students regarding application. Topics include 
instrument choice or construction, data collection and analysis, 
interpretation, and alternative presentation strategies of the findings. 



CM 435 Organizational Development in 3c-0l-3sh 

Communications Media 
Prerequisites: CM330, permission 

The course presents the basic methods and approaches for organization, 
management, and development of human and material resource departments. 
The topics include the primary activities and roles of an HMRD director, 
problem-solving functions in reporting to management, characteristics 
associated with career systems, and special topics. 

CM 440 Communications Graphics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM101, permission 

Provides basic experiences in planning and producing a commonly used 
television studio, industrial display, and classroom graphics which are 
applicable in educational, industrial, and medical training programs. 
Experiences include technical layout and lettering; color; mounting and 
laminating; copying and reproduction techniques utilizing photography and 
xerography; photo silk screening and photo sketching. 

CM 441 Advanced Communication Graphics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM440, permission 

Provides in-depth experience in planning and preparing graphic materials 
commonly used in the communications profession; graphic materials include 
design, photosketching, lettering, slide titling and duplication, preparation of 
camera-ready art, lithographic film and master layout sheets, professional 
slide flat production and photocopy, large format transparency production, 
color key, and color systems. 

CM 445 Applications and Techniques of 3c-01-3sh 

Motion Pictures 

Prerequisites: CM444, permission 

A survey of the role that motion picture film production plays in society. 
Major emphasis will be placed on the variety of applications with special 
consideration given to motion pictures as a tool to support research. 

CM 449 Basic Audio Recording Techniques 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM101, 403, permission 

Theory and practice of recording sound, developing an understanding of the 
language of sound recording as well as the ability to make sound recordings. 
Exposure to recording for various media including radio, music, motion 
pictures, television, multi-image, and slide and tape production. Material 
also appropriate for teachers who wish to make use of tape recorder in the 
classroom. Students will gain hands-on experience through labs and projects 
to be completed outside of class. Students will be expected to provide an 
audio tape recorder. 

CM 451 Television Production 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM 101, permission 

Develops basic skills in television production and direction. Consideration 
of operating problems of a television studio, as well as functions, 
limitations, and capabilities of television equipment and facilities. 

CM 452 Electronic Field Production 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM451, permission 

Provides in-depth field experience with portable video equipment and 
lighting. Students edit programs to broadcast quality. 

CM 453 Broadcast News Process 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM405, 451, permission 

Reporting and presenting radio and TV news programs. Analysis of news 
and public affairs broadcasting. 

CM 454 Broadcast Regulation 3c-0I-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM404, permission 

This course delves into the areas of law affecting broadcasters. Topics 
covered are laws pertaining to cable television, station licensing and 
renewal, political broadcasting, libel, copyright, the right of reply, and 
privacy. The historical development of the FCC and its jurisdictions will 
also be examined. Case studies will be discussed along with the relevancy of 
some laws as they pertain to today's society. 

CM 455 Television Performance 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM451, permission 

Provides theory and practice for performing on television. Detailed analysis 
of a performer's role in a variety of settings. 



128 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



CM 456 Broadcast Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM404. permission 

Detailed examination of the management decision-making process in radio 
and television; particular reference to program policies, personnel 
administration, and community relations. 

CM 460 Alternative Systems of Communication 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM404. permission 

The implications and capabilities of cable systems, the private and industrial 
utilization of nonbroadcast services, the emergence of satellite CATV 
networking, and the application of two-way cable response systems. 

CM 472 Photography II: The Print 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM271, permission 

Students will develop camera and print-making skills to the degree that they 
can produce salon-quality photographic prints. Students will understand the 
photographic processes utilized in producing a high-quality negative and 
print to the extent that they can manipulate those processes to communicate 
an intended message with their photographs. Emphasis on camera and print 
control as well as composition and negative and print manipulation. 

CM 473 Creative Darkroom Techniques 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM472, permission 

Students pursue photographic competencies to a high level of proficiency. 
Specific topics may vary as photographic technology changes, but typical 
assignments include high-contrast photography through the use of graphic 
arts materials, multiple exposures in the camera and in projection printing, 
making and using paper negatives, and hand coloring of photos. 

CM 474 Documentary Photography 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM271. 472. permission 

Prepares the student to deal with the actions of subjects in both descriptive 
and interpretive styles. The student is assigned to photograph a variety of 
local events in a manner that makes the nature of the event evident to the 
viewer of the photograph. The student also learns differences between 
printing for reproduction and for exhibit. The student is required to have a 
35mm camera (preferably a manual exposure single-lens reflex) and a flash 
unit. 

CM 476 Commercial Photography 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM271. 471, major status, permission 

An introduction to professional studio and location work, including making 
pictures for advertising, catalogs, publicity, and other commercial purposes. 
Deals with lighting, backgrounds, and camera use for photographing 
portraits, products, and architecture. In addition to use of the student's own 
35mm camera equipment, the course provides experience with the 4x5-inch 
view camera. Ability to solve basic algebra problems is required. 

CM 477 Slide/Sound Production 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM271. 303. 440, 449, and permission 
This course is designed to provide advanced students with the theoretical 
and practical experiences necessary to be able to plan, design, produce, and 
present effective slide/tape presentations for use in education, industry, and 
the allied health professions. 

CM 478 Multi-image Production 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: CM271, 303. 440. 449, permission 

An advanced production course employing instructional development 

techniques to emphasize the unique features of multiple image messages 

primarily through 2x2-inch slides. Scripting, storyboarding, computer 

programming, and audiovisual production techniques are used in the course 

project. 

CM 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 48 1 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

CM 482 Independent Study var 1 -3sh 

Prerequisites: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students may, with the sponsorship of a department faculty member and 
consensus of the department, elect an advanced course of study which 
reflects the academic goals of the department. Approval is based on 



academic appropriateness and availability of resources. Exemplary project is 
intended to extend or combine field knowledge not readily available through 
other course offerings. Students may take one or more semester hours (40 
hours or more of commitments s.h.). and multiple projects are possible: a 
maximum of 3 s.h. are permitted towards a degree program. 

CM 493 Internship var-6 to 1 2sh 

Prerequisites: Communications Media majors only, junior or senior status, 
permission 

Supervised professional work experience in communications media. Sites 
reflect the academic goals of the department and are approved and 
administered by a department coordinator. Location, duties, length of 
internship, and hours are individually tailored to student career goals. Sites 
represent wide application of process and technology of communications in 
business, education, allied health, or other agencies. Students may take 3 or 
more s.h. per semester (40 hours or more of commitments s.h.), and 
multiple experiences are possible; a maximum of 3 s.h. of internship and/or 
field experiences are permitted towards a degree program. 

CO: Computer Science 

Department of Computer Science 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

CO 101 Microbased Computer Literacy 3c-01-3sh 

An introductory course designed to provide students with a fundamental 
understanding of computers. The course familiarizes students with the 
interaction of computer hardware and software. Emphasis is placed on the 
application of microcomputers, the use of productivity software (word 
processing, spreadsheet management, file and data base management), and 
the social and ethical aspects of the impact of computers on society. (Does 
not count toward Computer Science major. Replaced CO200 in 1989-90.) 
Note: This course is co-listed as BE101 and IM101. Any of these courses 
may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D or 
F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit. 

CO 105 Fundamentals of Computer Science 3c-01-3sh 

This is the first course for Computer Science majors. It is required of all 
Computer Science students and is appropriate for other Natural Sciences and 
Mathematics students. Topics include the fundamental concepts of computer 
architecture, algorithm development and analysis, programming languages, 
software engineering, data organization and representation, and systems 
software. Hands-on introduction to computer usage with an emphasis on 
terminology and the underlying connections within the discipline. 

CO 110 Problem Solving and Structured Programming 3c-0l-3sh 
(For Science, Mathematics, and Computer Science majors, and for others 
who have a sufficiently quantitative orientation) 

Basic structure of modern digital computers; batch processing vs. interactive 
time-shared on-line computing; problem analysis and computer solution 
using flowcharting and the FORTRAN language. Exemption or credit by 
examination possible. 

CO 205 Programming Languages for Secondary Education 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisite: Education major 

Provides an introduction to the three high-level programming languages 
most commonly used in secondary education: Pascal, LOGO, and BASIC, 
with particular emphasis on Pascal. Also includes a comparative study of the 
control structures and data structures present in these three languages. This 
course is intended lo establish a solid foundation to prepare prospective 
teachers of computing courses K-12. (Note: Previous experience with 
microcomputers is strongly recommended. Does not count toward a 
Computer Science major. Credit toward graduation will not be given if this 
course is taken after completing six or more credits of computer science 
courses.) 

CO 220 Applied Computer Programming 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: COl 10 or equivalent 

Structured programming principles and techniques, as implemented through 
the ANS COBOL language; program design using top-down techniques: 
group programming projects; program and project documentation; 
introduction to tape and disk files. 



Course Descriptions — 129 



CO 250 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO! 10. MA102, MA122 or MA123 or MA127 
Algorithmic methods for function evaluation, roots of equations, solutions 
to systems of equations operations, matrix operations, curve fitting, 
interpolation, numerical integration anil differentiation: errors in 
computation, 

CO 2X1 Special Topics Sc-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

he offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 2X1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

t'O 300 Assembly Language Programming 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: COl 10 or equivalent 

Examination of structure and languages of machines; representation of data, 
addressing techniques, symbolic coding, assemblers, macros, etc.: problem 
solution using assembly language. 

CO 310 Data Structures 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: COl 10 or CO220 

Basic concepts of data; storage systems and structures; lists, arrays, strings, 
hashing techniques: searching and sorting techniques; data structures in 
programming languages: string processing. Programming in a block- 
structured language. 

CO 315 Large Kile Organization and Access 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO220 

The organization of large computer files for business systems, information 
systems, and other applications. Use of COBOL for efficient file access. 
Evaluation of file access methods. Advanced topics in COBOL. 

CO 319 Software Engineering Concepts 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: C0315 or permission of instructor 
Includes the collection of tools, procedures, methodologies, and 
accumulated knowledge about the development of the software life cycle; 
current methodologies, tools, and techniques being applied to each phase 
will be discussed in depth with localized exercises given to reinforce 
learning of concepts. 

CO 320 Software Engineering Practice lc-2d-3sh 

Prerequisite: C0319 or permission of the instructor 
Planning, design, and implementation of large software systems using 
software engineering techniques. Students work in project teams on real or 
realistic software development projects. Credit for either CO 320 or CO 493 
may count toward computer science major requirements for graduation, but 
not both; the other course credits are free electives. 

CO 345 Data Communications 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO 1 1 0, CO220, and MA2 14,216,217, or equivalents 
Communication of digital data between computers and to and from 
terminals and other peripherals; computer networks; design project or term 
paper. 

CO 355 Computer Graphics 2c-ll-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO310 and junior status 

The use of computer graphics hardware and software. An overview of 

current applications and experience with representative software will 

introduce current practice. Foundations in primitives, geometry, and 

algorithms of passive computer graphics are the principal focus of the 

course. A brief introduction to interactive computer graphics will be 

included. 

CO 360 IBM Job Control Language lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisite: CO220 or permission of the instructor 
Detailed study of the job control language (JCL) of the IBM OS operating 
system; comparison of OS with the locally available DEC operating system, 
VAX VMS. 

CO 362 UNIX and C 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO 310 or permission of instructor 

Provides a general introduction to UNIX and C including historical roots, 
current practice, prospects for the future, and hands-on skills. Students will 
develop understanding of the features, syntax, and "culture" of UNIX and C 
through lectures, reading, and projects. UNIX and C will be studied both 



separately and in synergistic combination. Upon completion of the course, 
students will have immediately practical awareness and some skills and will 
be provided with a foundation for further coursework in operating systems, 
compiler construction, and/or graduate study. UNIX is a trademark ol Bell 
Laboratories. 

CO 380 Seminar on the Computer Profession Oc- Id- 1 sh 

Prerequisites: Permission (See text below) 

Reading, review, and discussion of the current literature of computer science 
and industry trade journals; effective oral presentations; employment 
prospects. Should he taken the semester before an internship or the first 
semester ol the senior year. Should not be taken at the same time as CO480. 

CO 405 Artificial Intelligence 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO3I0 

An introduction to the Held of artificial intelligence, i.e.. the study of ideas 
that enable computers to process data in a more intelligent way than 
conventional practice allows. The course covers many information 
representation and information processing techniques. Students will explore 
the underlying theory including matching, goal reduction, constraint 
exploration, search, control, problem solving, and logic. 

CO 410 Processor Architecture and Microprogramming 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO300 and CO310 

The logical description of computer processor structure (architecture), with 

emphasis on the microprogramming approach. Project assignments using 

minicomputer. 

CO 419 Software Development with Ada 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO310 

Introduction to the Ada programming language as a tool of the software 
engineer. Projects will use the advanced programming constructs resident in 
Ada. including packages, multi-tasking, generic units, exception handlers, 
and concurrent programming. 

CO 420 Modern Programming Languages 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO220 and CO310 

Comparative study of the properties and applications of a range of modem 
higher-level programming languages, including Ada. APL, C, LISP. LOGO. 
Pascal. PROLOG, and SNOBOL. Comparison with older languages such as 
ALGOL, BASIC, COBOL, FORTRAN, and PL/1. 

CO 424 Compiler Construction 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO300 and C03 10 

Relates the formal concepts of automata and language theory to the 
practicality of constructing a high-level language translator. The structures 
and techniques used in lexical analysis, parsing, syntax directed translation, 
intermediate and object code generation, and optimization are emphasized. 

CO 430 Introduction to Systems Programming 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO300 and CO310 

Concepts and techniques of systems programming with an emphasis on 
assembly and compilation of user programs. Representation of source 
language so as to facilitate the needed translation process. Exercises using 
various computer systems. 

CO 432 Introduction to Operating Systems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO300, CO310 or equivalents 
Introduction to the principles of operating system design and 
implementation. Topics include interrupt service, process states and 
transitions, spooling, management of memory and disk space, virtual 
storage, scheduling processes and devices, and file systems. 

CO 441 Data Base Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: C0315 

Review of data base concepts. Detailed study of data base management 
approaches. Comparative study of commercially available data base 
management systems. Project on the locally available data base systems. 

CO 450 Applied Numerical Methods 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO250, MA 171, and MA24 1 . or equivalents 
Polynomial approximations using finite differences, with applications in 
numerical integration and differentiation. Numerical solution of initial value 
ordinary differential equations. The APL language will be introduced and 
used, along with FORTRAN, in programming selected algorithms. 



ISO — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



CO 451 Numerical Methods for Supercomputers 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: MA 121 and MA 122, or MA 123 or MA127, MA171, CO250 
Super computers make use of special computer architectures — vector and 
parallel processors — in order to achieve the fastest processing speed 
currently available. Students will be introduced to these features and will 
leam how numerical algorithms can be constructed to exploit 
supercomputers' capabilities. Students will gain practical experience in 
programming for the Cray, YMP. in incorporating existing scientific 
software packages into user-written programs, in submitting remote jobs to 
the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center, and in producing animated graphical 
output to summarize the typically large volume of output data generated by 
large scientific programs. (Also offered as MA45 1 ; may not be taken for 
duplicate credit.) 

CO 460 Theory of Computation 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: C03 10 or consent of instructor 

Formal methods for describing and analyzing programming languages and 
algorithms. Backus-Naur forms; productions; regular expressions; 
introduction to automata theory; Turing machines; recent concepts in 
algorithm theory computability. 

CO 480 Seminar on Technical Topics Oc-11-lsh 

Prerequisites: See text below 

Reading, review, and discussion of the current literature of computer science 
and industry professional and technical journals, oral presentations. Should 
be taken the last semester of the senior year. Should not be taken at the same 
time as CO380. 

CO 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 
Seminar in advanced topics of Computer Science; content will vary 
depending on interests of instructor and students. May be repeated for 
additional credit. Special Topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

CO 482 Independent Study var-l-4sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

CO 493 Internship in Computer Science var-12sh 

Prerequisites: CO250, CO300, CO310, C0315, CO380, other courses 
depending on type of internship position desired, completion of application, 
and selection by committee 

Positions with participating companies provide students with experience in 
computer science under the supervision of the companies and faculty. 
Requirements include three on-site consultations, two university 
consultations, completion of progress reports, oral presentation, and a final 
cumulative paper. Offered only to students during the second semester and 
summer of the junior year or the summer and the first semester of the senior 
year. No more than four semester hours of C0493 may be applied toward 
the 30-semester-hour requirement for a major in Computer Science. 

CR: Criminology 

Department of Criminology 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

CR 101 Crime and Justice Systems 3c-01-3sh 

This course introduces the field of criminology through the examination of 
historical data, statistical information, theories of criminal causation, social 
control of behavior, development of laws, evaluation of criminal justice 
system policies, procedures, and trends. Students will leam the terminology 
of the field, gain an awareness of the methods of inquiry utilized in the field, 
and have the opportunity to examine personal attitudes and values regarding 
crime and responses to crime. 

CR 102 Survey of Criminology 3c-01-3sh 

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the discipline 
of criminology through an examination of its theories, basic assumptions, 
and definitions. 



CR 210 Criminal Law 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the history and sources of criminal law coupled with an analysis 

of the substantive elements of specific crimes. 

CR 260 Criminal Procedure and Admissibility of Evidence3c-OI-3sh 
Law of arrest, search, and seizure, with discussion of important case law. 
Analysis of safeguards established for protection of individual liberties. 

CR 270 Juvenile Justice System 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the agencies and processes dealing with juvenile justice in the 
United States. 

CR 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

CR 283 Police Patrol Administration 3c-01-3sh 

The study of the role and characteristics of the police patrol function. 
Special emphasis is given to understanding how patrol relates to other police 
functions and its effect on crime. 

CR 291 Theory and Techniques of Interviewing 3c-01-3sh 

Consideration of the theory, nature, methods, and principles of interviewing. 

CR 295 Criminal Investigation 3c-01-3sh 

The study of logical and scientific principles necessary for the detection and 
investigation analysis of criminal activities. Theories of information, 
interrogation, observation and interrogation, and observation and ethics are 
among the topics to be discussed. 

CR 300 Theory of Complex Criminal Justice 3c-01-3sh 

Organizations 

Prerequisite: CR102 or permission of instructor 

Study of the evolution and theories of organizational alternatives and their 

application to the administration of justice. 

CR 306 Criminological Research Methods 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CR102 or permission of instructor 

An introduction to the basic criminological research methods designed to 
prepare the student to understand and participate in quantitative and 
qualitative research. 

CR 355 Crime in the Workplace 3c-01-3sh 

Study of the theoretical and legal basis of crime in the workplace. 

CR 357 Law, Social Control, and Society 3c-01-3sh 

The evolution and development of the modern legal system. Topics include 
civil, criminal, and administration law, the legal profession, legal systems in 
American society, and the law as one of many instruments of social control 
and social change. 

CR 361 Juvenile Law 3c-OI-3sh 

An analysis of pertinent juvenile law and procedure involving case study 
methods. 

CR 362 Correctional Law 3c-0I-3sh 

Study and theory of principles of law relating to rights of the convicted, 
postcorrection procedures, and correctional management. 

CR 370 Correctional Institutions 3c-01-3sh 

An examination of the organization and function of correctional institutions. 
Emphasis is placed on various social processes and problems associated 
with incarceration. 

CR 371 Community-Based Corrections 3c-01-3sh 

A survey of noninstitutional programs, focusing on alternatives to 
incarceration in community settings. Programs reviewed include prerelease, 
probation, parole, halfway houses, and restitution-based programs. 

CR 383 Police Administration 3c-01-3sh 

A study of police management, structure, and operations and their roles in 
the quality of services delivered. The relationship between police 
administration and its social environment will be examined. 



Course Descriptions — 131 



CK 386 ( lorrectional Administration 3c-01-3sh 

A siiuly of correctional management, structures, and operations and their 
pies in the quality of services deli\ ered. I he relationship between 
correctional administration and its social environment, 

CR 388 Court Administration 3c-01-3sh 

A siiuly of court responsibility within the criminal and civil justice systems; 

jurisdictions, policies, and management procedures in court administration. 

CR 390 Women and Crime 3c-01-3sh 

A siudy of the nature and extent of women's crime, theories of female 
criminality, processing of women offenders through the criminal justice 
system, the response of police and court officials to women as victims of 
crime, and opportunities for women as employees in criminal justice 
agencies 

CR 391 Substance Cse and Abuse in Criminal Justice 3c-01-3sh 
Study of substance use and abuse confronting American society. Alcohol 
and drug use and abuse education, philosophy, physiological effects, and 
social aspects will be examined in terms ol control measures and public 
safety 

CR 400 Theoretical Criminology 3c-01-3sh 

A re\ iew and critical analysis ol the major criminological theories 
beginning with the Classical School; psychological, sociological, economic. 
biological, and political theories of crime and its causes will be included. 

CR 401 Contemporary Issues in Criminology 3c-01-3sh 

Examination of the nature and extent of crime in modern Western society. 
Emphasis will be placed on issues selected from, but not limited to. 
emerging patterns of violence, organized crime, white collar crime, 
victimless crime, corruption, and those crime control strategies deemed 
appropriate in a democracy. 

CR 416 Criminal Justice Personnel and Supervision 3c-01-3sh 

Study of public personnel systems with specific application to criminal 
justice agencies. The role and function of supervision as a concept of a 
comprehensive personnel system as well as the relationship between agency 
personnel and the impact on crime will be examined. 

CR 451 Etiology of Delinquent Behavior 3c-01-3sh 

An analysis of the prevalent theories of delinquency causation with a view 
toward developing prevention, control, and treatment approaches. 

CR 470 Comparative Study of Justice 3c-01-3sh 

Comparison of American systems of administration of justice with those of 
other nations. 

CR 480 Seminar in Criminology — 3c-01-3sh 

The Administration of Justice 

A study of selected topics in criminology — the administration of justice. 
May be taken more than once for a maximum of 6 semester hours. Not for 
credit after prior CR480: Seminar in the Administration of Justice. 

CR 481 Special Topics in Criminology var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Department consent 

A seminar providing study of selected topics not emphasized in other 
courses. May be taken more than once to a maximum 6 semester hours. 

CR 482 Independent Study in Criminology var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

CR 491 Individual and Group Treatment Modalities 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the therapeutic techniques, process, and application used in 
various criminal justice environments. 

CR 493 Internship var-3-12sh 

A structured field placement designed to broaden the student's educational 
experience through observation and participation in work assignments in 
government or private sectors. Six semester hours of credit can be applied to 
the major requirements. 



CS: Consumer Services 

Department of Human Development and 

Environmental Studies 

College of Health and Human Services 

CS 101 Personal and Family Management 3c-01-3sh 

Management as a system and its relationship to individuals and families. 
Formulation of goals, values, and standards; use of decision-making 
process; utilization of resources. 

CS 112 Fundamentals of Clothing Construction lc-31-3sh 

Principles and techniques involved in fundamental clothing construction and 
fitting arc analyzed. Directed laboratory experiences provide an opportunity 
to solve individual problems in garment structure through the application of 
principles. 

CS 117 Design Graphics lc-0 1 -3sh 

Introduction to drafting and presentation techniques as they relate to interior 
design. Two and three dimensional graphic hand skills including drafting, 
delineation of shading and perspective; application of color, media, texture, 
tone, and lettering are introduced. 

CS 121 Introduction to Consumer Services lc-01-lsh 

Career possibilities for Consumer Services majors are explored. Students 
will be guided in clarifying their professional objectives and understanding 
the necessary preparation to pursue individual vocational goals. 

CS 205 Color Theory and Application 3c-OI-3sh 

The theoretical basis of color is presented as it relates to the human visual 
system, light, pigment, perception, and measurement. The application of 
color theory is discussed in terms of interior design, merchandising, and 
display. 

CS 212 Advanced Clothing Construction lc-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS1 12 or placement (by exam) 

Principles of advanced fitting and clothing construction are applied and 
analyzed. Offered even years, fall semester. 

CS 213 Residential Appliances and Consumer Electronics 2c-2l-3sh 
Consumer education in the selection, use, and care of home equipment 
appliances and consumer electronics; the relationship of energy sources and 
utilities to major appliances, portable and personal care appliances, and 
consumer electronics. 

CS 214 Environmental Textiles 2c-21-3sh 

Investigation of components and characteristics of textiles for man's near 
environment with emphasis on soft goods for public and private interiors, 
including production, marketing, and legislation affecting acquisition, use. 
and care. A student may not count both CS214 and 314 toward graduation 
requirements. 

CS 216 Clothing and Culture 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: PC101 

Survey of aesthetic, cultural, sociopsychological. economic, and physical 

factors related to the meaning and use of clothing for the individual and 

society. 

CS 217 Interior Design lc-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR120 or equivalent 

Emphasis upon development of knowledgeable consumers in the selection 
and design of a home, its furnishing, and its total environment. 

CS 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 



132 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



CS 299 Cooperative Education I Osh 

Prerequisite: Approval of Co-op Coordinator 

Designed to combine theory with practical application through job-related 
experiences. Consumer services majors are actively employed in business, 
industry, and a variety of organizations and agencies with a work focus 
which relates to their academic training and career objectives. First of two 
alternating work experiences required. 

CS 303 Visual Merchandising lc-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: AR 120 or equivalent 

Designing and arranging of display and selling areas in relationship to 

merchandising trends and consumer demands. Emphasis on promotion 

techniques and merchandise sales through effective use of space, design, and 

color. 

CS 312 Housing and Culture 3c-OI-3sh 

Managerial, sociological, economic, and aesthetic aspects of housing and 
man are investigated as well as a consideration of the environment of the 
home as part of the community. 

CS 314 Textiles 2c-21-3sh 

Prerequisite: CHI 02 

Analyses of textile components of fiber, yarn, fabrication, finishes, and 
color with emphasis upon consumer acquisition, use, and satisfaction. 

CS 315 Consumer Economics and Family Finance 3c-01-3sh 

Economic, sociological, and psychological principles are applied to family 
money management problems. Information needed to manage finances 
effectively and to become a rational consumer is presented. 

CS 318 Fashion Merchandising 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CS216 and upper level standing 

Study of the origins, movement, dissemination, and prediction of fashion; an 
investigation of the methods of operation, merchandising activities, and 
current fashion industry trends; an analysis of the planning and control 
procedures used in retail merchandising of fashion goods. 

CS 350 Apparel Industry I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CS216, completion of 57 semester hours 
Introduces the student to the design, production, and distribution of apparel, 
including primary textile markets; women's, men's, and children's wear; 
accessories; fashion centers; retailers of fashion; apparel wholesale selling 
process; fashion store image; and future trends. 

CS 357 Interior Design Studio lc-3l-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS217 

Creative solutions to problems in interior environments emphasized. 
Professional interior design practices; design opportunities. 

CS 399 Cooperative Education II Osh 

Prerequisite: Approval of Co-op Coordinator 

A program designed to combine theory with practical application through 
job-related experiences. Consumer services majors are actively employed in 
business, industry, and a variety of organizations and agencies with a work 
focus which relates to their academic training and career objectives. The 
student is required to serve a minimum of two alternating work experiences. 

CS 413 Problems in Consumer Economics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS3 15 or Economics 

Problems of consumer-seller relationships studied with emphasis given to 
effects of current economic and social forces. Governmental and private 
protection agencies which aid the consumer are reviewed. Individual 
investigations required. Fall semester only. 

CS 416 Problems in Family Finance 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS315 

In-depth theories and principles in personal and family finance and the 

rights and responsibilities of consumers are emphasized. Opportunities are 

provided for students to explore specific areas of interest. Spring semester 

only. 

CS 421 Senior Seminar 2c-01-2sh 

Prerequisites: CS 1 2 1 : completion of 90 semester hours 
Knowledge gained in major and outside concentration courses is applied to 
individual career goals. Students have the opportunity to pursue related 
areas not directly covered in previous coursework, with emphasis upon 
independent research, analytical thinking, and communications skills. 



CS 433 Study Tour var- 1 -6sh 

Prerequisite: Upper-level standing 

Opportunity is provided to visit business establishments and cultural center: 
concerned with household equipment, furnishings, textiles, clothing, and 
housing in America as well as abroad. Museums, factories, designers' 
showrooms, distribution centers, stores, cultural events, and seminars are 
included. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 semester hours. 

CS 434 Quality Control in Textiles 2c-21-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS314 

Physical properties explored through microscopic examination and use of 

textile testing equipment for fabric analysis. 

CS 450 Apparel Industry II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO350 and Liberal Studies math requirements 
Introduces the student to the merchandising and promotion of apparel, 
including organization, buying responsibilities, techniques, and resources: 
various retail institutions, resident buying offices, apparel dollar planning 
and control, apparel merchandise assortment planning, apparel buying 
practices, application of apparel planning and buying, and apparel 
advertising and promotion. 

CS 453 Flat Pattern Design lc-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS 1 1 2 or CS2 1 2 

Garment design achieved by use of flat pattern techniques. An 

understanding is developed of the interrelationship of garment design, figure 

analysis, fabric, fit. and construction processes. Offered even years, spring 

semester. 

CS 454 Tailoring lc-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS1 12 or CS212 

Various tailoring methods are studied and applied in the selection, fitting, 
and construction of a tailored garment. Consumer problems in the selection 
of ready-to-wear apparel are investigated. Offered odd years, fall semester. 

CS 456 Historic Costume 3c-01-3sh 

Chronological study of historic costume from ancient times to the present 
day with emphasis on the effect of aesthetic, economic, geographic, 
political, religious, and social factors upon the design of clothing worn. 

CS 461 Microwave Cooking Technology 2c-21-3sh 

Study of the electronic technology, selection, care, and use of the microwave 
men. Basic physical and chemical concepts related to microwave cooking 
are included. Individual investigative research problems are required. 

CS 462 Historic Interiors 3c-01-3sh 

Chronological study from ancient times to the mid- 19th century of the 
dominant influences and characteristics of historical interiors, furniture, and 
ornamental design. Emphasis placed upon style detail and its relationship to 
social, economic, political, religious, and aesthetic influence and to the 
contemporary scene. Paper required. 

CS 463 Modern Interiors 3c-01-3sh 

Chronological study from mid- 19th century to the present of the dominant 
influences and characteristics of the 20th-century interior, furniture, and 
ornamental design. Emphasis placed upon style detail and its relationship to 
social, economic, political, religious, and aesthetic influences and to 
contemporary usage. Paper required. 

CS 464 Interior Planning and Drawing 1 c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS217 

Analysis and design contract interior spaces. Presentation, appropriate 
media, equipment, and techniques will be stressed. Freehand and mechanical 
methods employed to depict floor plans, elevation, and construction details 
with emphasis on function. 

CS 465 Interior Lighting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CS217 or equivalent 

Lighting fundamentals applicable to the environmental design of residential 
and commercial spaces. Includes calculation methods, terminology, theory 
of color visibility, light source alternatives, fixture function and selection, 
lighting trends, and related professional organizations. 

CS 481 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 



Course Descriptions — 133 



limes. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

CS 482 Independent Study var-l Ista 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Particular consumer considerations are independently investigated in the 
area oi housing, home equipment, interior design, clothing, and textiles, or 
in the management of resources. Course may he repeated for a total of 3 
semester hours. Students meet with a faculty member at least 5 hours per 
semester hour. 

CS 4s>3 Internship var- 1 - 1 2sh 

Prerequisites: Approval of instructor and department chairperson; upper- 
level standing 

Practical experience related to the student's major area of study with 
objectives, supervised experience, and evaluation. Course may be repeated 
for a total of 12 semester hours. 

DE: Distributive Education 

Department of Office Systems and Business 

Education 

Eberly College of Business 

Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level are open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

DE 281 Special Topics 3c 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

DE 331 Modern Merchandising 3c-01-3sh 

Techniques for planning and controlling inventory, analyzing sales, working 
with modem systems for handling cash, and using color, line, and design. 
Practice in preparing merchandise display units. 

DE 332 Retail Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: DE331 or DE333 

Study of structure and changing environment of retailing; special emphasis 

on merchandise management, organization, sales promotions, services, and 

control. 

DE Hi Principles of Selling 3c-01-3sh 

Covers field of selling, preparing to sell, the selling process, and an 
introduction to sales management. Sales demonstrations incorporating 
audiovisual aids are a part of the course. 

DE 413 Methods and Evaluation in 3c-01-3sh 

Distributive Education II 

Prerequisites: DE410 or BE111. MK320. DE333, and EP202 
Includes two sections of special methods and evaluation in this field. 
Objectives are to acquaint students with the basic principles of group and 
individual instruction in various subject matter areas, as well as methods of 
presentation. Unit plans, lesson plans, demonstrations, and evaluations will 
be prepared. Students select sections needed for certification. 

DE 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 



DE 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

EC: Economics 

Department of Economics 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

EC 101 Basic Economics 3c-OI-3sh 

Scarcity, role of prices in determining production and the allocation of 
resources, business cycle analysis, policy options for reducing 
unemployment and inflation, economic role of government, the farm 
problem, poverty, and international trade are studied. For those who do not 
plan to take more than 3 semester hours of economics. Note: May not be 
taken after successful completion of or concurrent registration in any other 
Economics course. 

EC 121 Principles of Economics I 3c-01-3sh 

Nature and methodology of economics; mixed capitalism and market 
economy; national income; employment theory, including economics of 
fiscal policy; money, banking, and Federal Reserve System: international 
trade and finance. 

EC 122 Principles of Economics II 3c-0l-3sh 

Economics of the firm; theory of consumer demand; determination of price 
and output in different market structures; distribution of income; economic 
growth. 

EC 241 Contemporary Economic Issues 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC101 orEC122 

A rigorous but nontechnical analysis of a variety of economic problems and 
a formulation and evaluation of possible corrective policies. 

EC 28 1 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

EC 283 Environmental Economics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC101 orEC122 

Examination of economic costs and benefits of environmental control and 

modification. Techniques of economic analysis are used to understand 

economic aspects of environmental problems and contribute toward their 

solution. 

EC 325 Monetary Economics I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121, EC122 

Organization, operation, and economic significance of U.S. monetary 
institutions; commercial banks and Federal Reserve System; survey of 
monetary theory and policy: mechanism of international payments. 

EC 326 Monetary Economics II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC325 or permission of the instructor 

Detailed study of monetary theory; tasks of central banking; principal 

objectives of monetary policy; intensive study of recent monetary 

experience; complementary and competing aims of monetary and fiscal 

policy. 

EC 330 Labor Economics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC 121. EC 122 

History, structure, and operation of trade unions and employer 
organizations; major federal labor legislation; collective bargaining theory; 
wage determination; current labor problems. 

EC 331 Economic Organization of Industry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC 122 or permission of the instructor 
Social effectiveness of industries analyzed through measures of market 
structure, market conduct, and market performance. 



134 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



EC 332 Government and Business 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC122 or permission of the instructor 
An analysis of the antitrust laws focusing on the maintenance of 
competition, the prohibition of unfair business conduct, and the achievement 
of desirable economic performance. 

EC 333 Regulation of Industry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121. EC122 or permission of the instructor 
Examines the theory and practice of regulation, emphasizing effects of 
regulation on economic performance and efficiency in the U.S. 

EC 334 Economics of Corporate Decisions 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121, EC122. MA121 or equivalent 
Applications of economic theory using algebra, elementary statistics, and 
calculus to solve business optimization problems including problems of 
forecasting and risk. 

EC 335 Public Finance 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121. EC122 or permission of the instructor 
Taxation and expenditure theory at the federal level; federal budget and debt 
considerations; public sector impact upon economy. 

EC 336 State and Local Finance 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC122 or permission of the instructor 
Analysis of character and impact of state and local government revenue 
sources, expenditures, and fiscal systems; intergovernmental fiscal relations. 

EC 339 Economic Development I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121, EC122 

Theory of growth; theory of economic development of underdeveloped 

countries. 

EC 343 History of the Economic Development 3c-01-3sh 

of the United States 

Prerequisites: EC101 orEC121 orEC122 

Applications of economic theory and models of economic development to 
the main patterns of U.S. postrevolutionary growth; emphasizes economic 
development as a laboratory for economic analysis. 

EC 345 International Economics I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121 and EC122 or permission of the instructor 

Theory of international trade; analysis of balance of payments; international 

economic equilibrium; mechanism of international economic and monetary 

adjustments. 

EC 346 International Economics II 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC345 or permission of the instructor 

Application of theory of international trade to empirical data and problems; 
historical survey and examination of current problems of international trade; 
the institutional setting of international trade. 

EC 350 Comparative Economic Systems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC101 or EC121 or EC122 

Evaluation of premises, practices, institutions, and performance of capitalist, 
socialist, and mixed economies using economic theory and measurement. 

EC 351 Russian Economic Development 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC101 orEC121 orEC122 

Study of the theory, institutions, and performance of the Russian economy 
including comparison of present and past patterns of economic development. 

EC 355 Statistics for Economists 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to economic statistics. Material covered regarding empirical 
frequency distributions, probability, distributions of random variables, 
functions of random variables, and tests of economic hypotheses. 

EC 356 Introduction to Econometrics 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC355 or its mathematical equivalent or permission of the 

instructor 

Introduction to econometrics. Interest centers upon linear normal regression 

models of two or more random variables, special econometric problems, and 

solutions of simultaneous equations. 

EC 371 Economics of Labor Legislation 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC330 or permission of the instructor 
Economic background and effects of governmental regulation of labor 
relations, with emphasis on a detailed examination of National Labor 
Relations Act as amended. 



EC 372 Economics of Wages and Employment 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC330 or permission of the instructor 
Analysis of wages and employment under various market structures. Also, 
analysis of the impact of labor market forces on wages, prices, and 
distributive shares. 

EC 373 Economics of Human Resources 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EC101 orEC122 

Inquiry into economic demographics and related factors affecting growth, 

structure, and distribution of an economy's labor force into different 

occupations. 

EC 383 Urban/Regional Economics 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC121 and EC 122 

Location theory, land use patterns, urban economic/regional growth change, 
and urban economic problems and policies. 

EC 421 Macroeconomic Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC12I, EC 122 or permission of the instructor 
Emphasizes aggregate income levels and problems of unemployment, 
inflation, and growth. Covers consumption and investment theories and the 
role of fiscal and monetary policy. 

EC 422 Microeconomic Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EC 121, EC 122, MA 121 or equivalent 

Consumer behavior, theory of the firm, theory of exchange, market 

structures, distribution, general equilibrium theory, welfare economics. 



EC 480 Seminar 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 
Seminar in selected economic issues or problems. 



3c-01-3sh 



3c-01-3sh 



EC 481 Special Topics 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

EC 482 Independent Study var- 1 -6sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

EC 493 Internship in Economics var-2-12sh 

Prerequisite: A student must be an Economics major who has completed at 
least 12 semester hours in economics and who has at least a 2.5 grade-point 
average in the major and in all coursework. 

The course provides on-the-job experience in economics positions with 
private and governmental employers. The student is also required to 
complete related academic work in the form of papers and selected readings. 
Number of credits earned will depend upon the nature of the job and amount 
of time involved in internship. A maximum of six of the credits earned in 
this course may be counted toward the 30 semester hours in economics 
requirement for Economics majors. 

ED: Education 
College of Education 

ED 150 Educational Planning lc-01-lsh 

Introduces students to the system of higher education and to skills that 
promote effective educational planning and decision making. Includes the 
topics of history and purposes of higher education and its changing 
curriculums; models for, and variables to consider in, decision making, goal 
setting, and educational planning. Note: Certain sections of this course will 
be restricted to specific enrollment groups. 

ED 160 Learning Strategies lc-01-lsh 

Assists students to develop and use effective and efficient study strategies 
on a consistent basis. Students will examine their academic goals and 
implement study strategies to help achieve those goals. Includes the topics 
of goal setting and self-monitoring, learning styles, test preparation and test 
taking, lecture and textbook note taking, time management and 



Course Descriptions — 135 



concenlration, and general strategies for learning. Students wdl be required 
to give evidence of application of the study strategies to other courses in 
which they arc currently enrolled. Active participation in class meetings is 
expected. Note: Certain sections of this course will be restricted to specific 
enrollment groups. 

ED 170 Career Exploration lc-01- I sh 

Introduces students to the theoretical and practical framework with which to 
explore careers compatible with overall academic skills, aptitudes, and life 
goals. Students will examine the world of work, assess their interests and 
abilities, and make realistic decisions on academic majors and careers. Note: 
Certain sections of [his course will be restricted to specific enrollment 
groups. 

ED 242 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience I var-lsh 

Observation/participation in a basic education classroom beginning not later 
than the sophomore year. 

El) 281 Special Topics 3c-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

ED 321 Student Teaching var-6sh 

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher certification 

Experience in teaching at the elementary level; coordination and visitation 
by a university faculty member with daily supervision by a cooperating 
classroom teacher. 

ED 342 Pre-student Teaching Clinical Experience II var-lsh 

Prerequisites: ED242 and admission to teacher certification 
Students work toward the development of specific competencies that relate 
to individual major fields of teaching. 

ED 408 Reading in the Content Areas 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: EL222 

Problems related to teaching students reading and study skills specifically 
needed in each of the subject areas at the elementary level. Content teachers 
learn how to develop students' competence in these skills as part of their 
regular classroom instruction. 

ED 415 Computers in the School Curriculum 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO 101, BE101, IMlOl.or permission of the instructor 
Students will use a variety of computer software including word processing, 
record management programs, and simulation programs. Emphasis will be 
on the application of computer programs within the K-12 school curriculum. 

ED 421 Student Teaching var-6sh 

Experience in teaching at the elementary level; coordination and visitation 
by a university faculty member with daily supervision by a cooperating 
classroom teacher. 

ED 423 Professional Practicum, Including School Law var-3sh 

Series of conferences and related activities to prepare students for actual 
teaching experiences. Parallels student teaching experience in junior and 
senior years. (Elementary education majors only) 

ED 431 Teaching in Home Economics var-6sh 

Experience in teaching home economics at the secondary level. 

ED 441 Student Teaching var-6-12sh 

Experience in teaching at the elementary or secondary level; coordination 
and visitation by a university faculty member with daily supervision by a 
cooperating classroom teacher. 

ED 442 School Law lc-01- 1 sh 

Required of all teacher certification students. Includes overview of legal 
principles that apply to special areas of education. Must be taken prior to 
student teaching. 

ED 451 Teaching Science in the Secondary School 2c-21-3sh 

Background to help science majors meet the problems of teaching science. 
Various inquiry approaches useful in meeting objectives of a contemporary 
science class are taught and exemplified. 



ED 452 Teaching of English and Communication in the 3c-01-3sh 

Secondary School 

Prerequisites: EN 314, 323, and 380 

This course is a prerequisite to student teaching in English. Introduces the 

student to current professional practices in the teaching of English and 

communications in high school. 

ED 453 Teaching of Eoreign Languages in the 3c-OI-3sh 

Elementary /Secondary Schools 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 321-322 and 351-352 in the 
student's major language; passage of a language proficiency examination or 
permission of the instructor 

The student will study current theories of language acquisition and methods 
of language leaching for the elementary and secondary school. Through 
hands-on practice and peer teaching demonstrations, the student will 
develop techniques for teaching functional language, planning lessons, 
setting curricular objectives, testing language skills, and selecting/adapting 
materials for both elementary and secondary school classrooms. (Course 
taught fall semester only) 

ED 455 Teaching of Social Science in Secondary Schools 3c-01-3sh 
Study of modern methods and techniques for teaching social science and of 
current curriculums in social science. 

ED 456 Teaching Math in the Secondary Schools 3c-01-3sh 

Study of modern methods and techniques for teaching mathematics and 
current curriculums. 

ED 462 Issues and Innovations in Education 3c-01-3sh 

Study of issues and innovations which influenced education will be included 
in this course. Educational innovations and issues which deal with 
curriculum, school organization, and materials of instruction will be 
examined. 

ED 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: By permission only 

Provides an opportunity for students to investigate in-depth an area of 
education under professional supervision. 

ED 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

ED 495 International Study Tour in Education var-3sh 

Study of various peoples through their cultural settings and educational 
systems; on-site visitation to selected schools and other social agencies and 
institutions; seminars with school officials and directed readings. 

ED 499 Multicultural/Multiethnic Education 2c-01-2sh 

Prerequisite: One methods course must be taken prior to, or concurrently 
with, ED499 

Provides students with an understanding and appreciation of cultural 
diversity in the United States. Students will gain the ability to locate and 
develop curricular materials appropriate to this country's diversity. 

EE: Early Childhood Education 
Professional Studies in Education 
College of Education 

Note: Courses in Early Childhood Education are restricted to majors with a 
2.5 average, except by department permission. 

EE 200 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3c-01-3sh 

Introductory course for prospective teachers of young children. Provides 
students with the opportunity to gain knowledge of historical, sociological, 
and political aspects of early childhood education. Emphasis on 
systematically observing, recording, and evaluating children's behavior in 
classrooms. (Formerly EL353: Preschool Education) 



136 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



EE 220 Language Development and Children's 3c-01-3sh 

Literature 

Includes the study of children's language acquisition and children's 
literature within the context of a developmentally appropriate language arts 
curriculum, preschool through the primary grades. Strategies for developing 
children's linguistic competence and integrating literature throughout the 
early childhood program will be emphasized. Observations, interviews, and 
teaching experiences are an integral part of the course. (This course is 
offered as a writing intensive course.) 

EE 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

EE 310 Integrated Curriculum I 3c-OI-3sh 

Examines the sequence of cognitive development in children and the 
implications for instructional programs. Stages of cognitive understanding 
will be applied to the basic components of numerical concepts and science 
concepts. Classroom management strategies that can be utilized in varied 
environments will be stressed. 

EE 311 Integrated Curriculum II 3c-01-3sh 

Enables students to realize the importance and relevance of content area 
subjects as related to the early childhood years. Planning for teaching with 
specific emphasis on methods and materials for social and environmental 
living is introduced. The integration of music and art is emphasized. Values 
systems and self-esteem are integral to social living. 

EE 312 Aesthetic Experiences for Young Children 3c-01-3sh 

An interdisciplinary approach to different forms of creative expression in 
young children. Art. music, and movement will be analyzed as aesthetic 
elements in a comprehensive early childhood curriculum. Development of 
creative potential in both teachers and children will be promoted as a means 
of enhancing the artist's experiences. Students will expand their use of the 
arts to enhance the self-esteem and self-worth of the children. 

EE 315 Development and Learning through Play 3c-01-3sh 

Provides early childhood educators with the knowledge and skills necessary 
to promote and guide children's play behavior as the child's basic learning 
mechanism. Emphasis on definitions, theories, and stages of play within the 
context of social, emotional, physical, and intellectual growth for children 
aged 0-8 years. Students will observe children at play, design specific 
learning activities that utilize a play/games format, and direct educational 
experiences during the supervised field component. (Previous title: Play as 
Cognitive and Affective Development) 

EE 451 Teaching Primary Reading 3c-01-3sh 

A methods course designed to assist students in developing the reading 
abilities of young children. Deals with instructional issues related to 
teaching reading and introduces students to varying reading and pre-reading 
processes which are effective with young children. Also emphasizes 
diagnostic and assessment strategies for teaching reading. 

EE 481 Special Topics var-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

A course/seminar on topics in education appropriate for the Early Childhood 
Education setting. 

EE 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 



EH: Education of Persons with Hearing Loss 

Department of Special Education and Clinical 

Services 

College of Education 

EH 114 Introduction to Persons with Hearing Loss 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: Adviser permission, EH majors only 

Deals with the different approaches used in teaching the hearing impaired — 
manual language, oral language, and total communication. The historical 
background of each approach is presented with its strengths and weaknesses. 
Crileria for the use of each approach established in consideration of degree 
of loss exhibited by the pupil, the age of onset, and the social and 
psychological implications. (Offered as Introduction to Hearing Impaired 
prior to 1994.) 

EH 115 Introduction to Sign Language lc-01-lsh 

Development of manual dexterity and fluency using fingerspelling. 
Acquisition of basic sign language vocabulary. Practice in acquiring general 
information from a signed message and conversing informally on commonly 
used topics. 

EH 244 Intermediate Sign Language Ic-01-lsh 

Prerequisite: EH1 15 

Emphasis on comprehension of signed information and on developing 

fluency in conveying a message in both signed English and American Sign 

Language. Modification of signs and individualization of techniques for 

instruction/communication with learning-impaired or multihandicapped deaf 

learners. 

EH 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

EH 307 Speech for Persons with Hearing Loss 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EH 114, SH242 

Techniques for developing, diagnosing, analyzing, and correcting the speech 
and voice problems of hearing-impaired individuals. Lecture, 
demonstration, and special projects. (Offered as Speech for the Hearing 
Impaired prior to 1994.) 

EH 308 Language for Persons with Hearing Loss 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EH1 14, SH234 

Development and remediation of language of the hearing impaired. 
Language sampling and diagnostics, sentence patterning, and analytic vs. 
natural teaching methods. Structuring a communicative environment. 
(Offered as Language for the Hearing Impaired prior to 1994.) 

EH 329 Hearing Practicum I var-lsh 

Prerequisites: EH114, EHI15 

Provides the student with actual contact with individuals with hearing loss. 
Practica will be set up in appropriate school programs and/or clinics for the 
hearing impaired, or hearing itinerant programs, or in clinical settings where 
hearing impaired individuals are receiving therapy or are being tested. 
Techniques of observing and evaluating behavior are presenled initially to 
prepare the student to profit maximally from the observation experiences. 
Written reports of the practica are submitted and discussed, and each student 
is encouraged to gain experience in as many different sellings as available. 

EH 330 Hearing Practicum II var-lsh 

Prerequisites: EH329 

Provides students wiih actual contact with individuals with hearing loss. 
Practica will be sel up in appropriate school programs and/or clinics for the 
hearing impaired, or hearing itinerant programs, or in clinical settings where 
hearing-impaired individuals are receiving therapy or are being tested. 
Techniques of observing and evaluating behavior are presented initially to 
prepare the student to profit maximally from the observation experiences. 
Written reports of the practica are submitted and discussed, and each student 
is encouraged to gain experience in as many different settings as available. 
This is a continuation of EH329: Hearing Practicum I and includes support 
and supervision of students in EH329. 



Course Descriptions — 137 



EH 331 Advanced Sign Language lc-01- Ish 

Prerequisites: EH lis. EH244 

Studies the evolution ol signs; tluilccuc.il sign systems. Analysis and 
comparison of the linguistic similarities/differences ol various sign 
languages. Direct translation of written or spoken information on specific 
topics using American Sign Language or Signed English. Practice using 

conversation on boih a social and academic level. 

EH 351 Teaching Reading to Persons with lc-01 ish 

Hearing I nss 

Prerequisite: LI Mils 

Presents basic concepts of developmental reading instruction and systematic 

coverage ol the methods Of teaching reading to students with hearing loss 
from readiness stages through upper school. 

KH 360 (ieneral Methodology for Education of $c-01-3sh 

Persons with Hearing Loss 
Prerequisites: Hill 14. EH307, EH308 

Prov ides a systematic coverage ol the basic procedures for teaching 
curriculum subjects. Included are adaptive methods of instruction for 
teaching mathematics; science as it relates to the child and the curriculum; 
content, objectives, and resource materials for social studies; creative 
experiences in the field of language arts, rhythmics, and physical education 
and health. (Offered as (ieneral Methodology for Education of Hearing 
Impaired prior to 1994.) 

EH 365 Parent-Preschool Programs for Persons with 3c-01-3sh 

Hearing Loss 

Prerequisites: EH1 14. EX220. SH234. EH308, EH307 

Developing home/clinic programs for parents and hearing-impaired infants 

(0-3 years). Teaching speech, language, speechreadmg. use of residual 

hearing, and developing readiness skills at preschool level. (Offered as 

Parent-Preschool Programs for the Hearing Impaired prior to 1944 i 

EH 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite; As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

EH 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction w ith a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

EL: Elementary Education 
Professional Studies in Education 
College of Education 

Note: Courses in Elementary Education are restricted to majors with a 2.5 
average, except by department permission. 

EL 211 Music for the Elementary (trades 2c-0l-2sh 

Geared for elementary education students. Includes basic ideas for 
understanding, development, and confidence for future classroom teachers 
and their pupils in areas of music education. 

EL 213 Art for the Elementary Grades 2c-0l-2sh 

The creative use of art materials and an understanding of development of 
capacities of children through art. 

EL 215 Child Development 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of human development, from conception to adolescence, in terms of 
basic scientific data. Development, growth, and behavior are studied and 
their implications for home, school, and community are considered. 

EL 221 Children's Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Acquisition of a wide acquaintance vv ith children's literature, old and new. 
Poetry selections, annotated stories, and bibliographies will be assembled. 
Ways and means to develop, stimulate, and guide children's reading of 
literature presented. Principles and techniques of successful storytelling are 
studied and practiced. 



EL 222 Teaching of Reading I 3c-0l-3sh 

Systematic coverage ol the teaching of reading, including methods, 
techniques, and materials. First ol a two course sequence. 

EL 281 Special Topics 3c-()l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics arc ottered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 
topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 
be ottered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 
topics numbered 2X1 are offered primarily lor lower-level undergraduate- 
students 

EL 312 leaching of Elementary Science 2c-0l-2sh 

Emphasis placed upon science as it relates to child and curriculum, planning 
for teaching science, and recent innovations in science teaching. Course 
offered on the junior block only. 

EL 313 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisites: MA151, 152 

Recent developments in curriculum and methods of instruction of 
contemporary elementary school mathematics programs. Students will 
become acquainted w ith books, materials, and other resources helpful to 
prospective teachers. Includes observations of master teachers. 

EL 314 Teaching of Health and Physical Education 2c-01-2sh 

Games, stunts, rhythms, relays, tumbling, dances, and skills suitable for the 
elementary school child. Teaching of health in elementary school is 
emphasized, including methods, materials, and lesson planning. 

EL 351 Creative Activities in the Elementary School 3c-01-3sh 

Provides students with a wide range of creative experiences in fields of art, 
crafts, music, rhythmics, dramatics, and games in elementary school. Stress 
is placed upon need to help children in developing their capacities for 
creative expression in these areas. 

EL 356 Pedagogy I 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior status 

Competencies specific to the science of teaching will be introduced in this 
course. Students will become familiar with the fundamentals of teaching 
across all content area subject matter at the elementary level. Areas that w ill 
be explored include models of teaching, including lesson and unit planning, 
and creating a classroom environment that is conducive to learning. 

EL 357 Pedagogy II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior status 

Principles based on classroom experience. Instruction will include 
classroom management skills, integration of computers in the elementary 
curriculum, contemporary issues in education, the role of research in 
elementary classroom teaching, and teacher professionalism during and after 
field experiences. (This course is writing intensive.) 

EL 411 Teaching of Social Studies 3c-01-3sh 

Overview of social studies in elementary school. Includes study of 
objectives, trends, areas of content, patterns and principles of organization, 
and techniques of teaching. Variety of learning experiences and materials 
used and evaluated. 

EL 422 Diagnostic and Remedial Reading 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EL222 

Causes of reading disability; methods of diagnosis; procedures and materials 
for remedial work, group and individual. 

EL 425 Language Arts Across the Curriculum 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EL222 

Places emphasis on the view that the art of communication is an interrelated 
process and the task of classroom teachers is not only integrating the 
language arts among themselves but also integrating them throughout the 
entire curriculum. Techniques for teaching oral and written communication, 
spelling, handwriting, vocabulary development, listening, and linguistics 
will be presented. Special emphasis given to recent trends and research. 
(Replaces EL 413: Teaching Language Arts effective Summer. 1992) This 
course is offered as a writing-intensive course. 

EL 481 Special Topics var-3sh 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and department 
A course/seminar on topics in education appropriate for the Elementary 
Education setting. 



138 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



EL 482 Independent Study var-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources. (Offered as EL481 prior to 1993-94) 

EN: English 

Department of English 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

EN 100 Basic Writing 5c-01-3sh 

Designed to develop the basic English skills necessary for clear and 
effective communication. Reserved for selected students. This course does 
not meet General Education English or Liberal Studies writing 
requirements. (Title prior to 1989 was EN 100: Basic English.) 

EN 101 College Writing 3c-var-4sh 

Prerequisite: EN100, where required by placement testing 
Normally to be taken the first semester at IUP. Courses use readings in the 
nature and history of language, semantic and linguistic analysis, and 
problems in rhetoric and other approaches to composition. Seven theme- 
length expository papers (or the equivalent) are written, in addition to 
shorter exercises and a written final examination. (Title prior to 1989 was 
ENI01: English I.) 

EN 121 Humanities Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN101 

Introduces students to literature of various genres through a careful analysis 
of poetry, fiction, and drama. Includes literature of various time periods, 
nationalities, and minorities. (Replaced EN201: English HI effective 
Summer, 1990) 

EN 150 English for Foreign Students 3c-01-3sh 

Provides international students with an opportunity to improve their ability 
to speak and write English before they take EN100 and EN101. The 
emphasis is on individualized exercises and assignments. This course carries 
graduation credit but does not meet General Education or Liberal Studies 
English requirements. 

EN 202 Research Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: ENI01, sophomore standing 

Teaches students to read, analyze, and evaluate nonfiction sources and to 
present the results of their analysis in clear, organized, carefully documented 
research papers. The focus of reading and research in each section will be 
determined by the instructor. (Replaced EN 102: English II effective 
Summer, 1990) 

EN 208 The Art of the Film 3c-01-3sh 

Concentrates on the film as an artistic medium. Eight to twelve motion 
pictures are shown during semester and are analyzed in class discussions. 

EN 210 Introduction to Literary Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN 101 

Acquaints students with the literary genres (especially fiction, poetry, and 
drama) by means of examples of each and provides them with some of the 
various critical approaches to the interpretation of literature so that they may 
gain the ability to apply them. At the conclusion of the course, students are 
expected to be able to read literature perceptively and to write critical papers 
about it. 

EN 211 English Literature to the Restoration 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 210, or permission 

Surveys English literature from its beginnings to the Restoration, 
acquainting students with the experience of reading many of the primary 
materials (whole works whenever possible or full, free-standing parts) and 
provides them with background information concerning the development 
and flowering of the various genres, the dominant ideas of each period, and 
the social and cultural context of the separate works. 

EN 212 English Literature from the Restoration to 1900 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisites: EN10I, 210, or permission 

Surveys English literature from the Restoration to the beginning of the 20th 
century, acquainting students with the experience of reading many of the 
primary materials (whole works whenever possible or full, free-standing 



parts) and providing them with background information concerning the 
development and flowering of the various genres, the dominant ideas of 
each period, and the social and cultural context of the separate work. 

EN 213 American Literature: Beginnings to the Present 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisites: EN101, 210, or permission 

Provides an understanding of American literature from its beginning to 
roughly the middle of the present century. The course will concentrate 
primarily upon a relatively small number of major works, each of which will 
help to illustrate the "spirit of the age" it represents. 

EN 214 The Novel 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101. 210, or permission 

This course surveys the development of the novel from Cervantes' Don 
Quixote t" the present with emphasis on major writers and forms in English. 
Includes consideration of teaching the novel. 

EN 215 Poetry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 1 1 , 2 1 0, or permission 

A study in appreciation of poetry, with special attention to the technique of 
the poet and structure of poetry. Includes consideration of teaching poetry. 

EN 216 Short Fiction 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 210. or permission 

A study of the development of the short story from the middle of the 19th 
century to the present with attention to form, structure, and types of the 
story. Includes consideration of teaching short fiction. 

EN 217 Drama 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 1 1 . 2 1 0, or permission 

A study of selected plays from various periods in an attempt to understand 

the function of drama. Includes consideration of teaching drama 

EN 220 Advanced Composition I 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.202 

Primaril) seeks to improve writing style, particularly in the more utilitarian 
forms, such as magazine article and personal essay. 

EN 221 Creative Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.202 

This is a seminar course in which students are expected to produce a 
substantial body of written work in one or more of the creative genres, the 
particular kind of writing chosen with regard to the special interests and 
abilities of each student. 

EN 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

EN 310 Public Speaking 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN 10 1 

Fundamental principles of public speaking, audience analysis, interest and 
attention, and selection and organization of speech material. 

EN 311 Oral Interpretation 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101. 310 

Emphasizes understanding and appreciation of literature through developing 

skill in reading aloud. 

EN 312 Speech — Persuasion 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 10 1,202, 310 

Advanced study of problems involved in influencing an audience. 

EN 313 The Rhetorical Tradition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.310 

Survey of rhetorical theory from Greek and Roman through modern times. 

EN 314 Speech and Communication in the Secondary 3c-01-3sh 
English Classroom 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202. 210 

Offers students practical and theoretical approaches to relationships between 
oral and written communication. The course is performance-based 
(involving a variety of communication activities) and knowledge-based 



Course Descriptions — 139 



(involving study ol research on language arts relationships). Emphasis is 
given to integration of the Four language arts For improving teachers' own 
communication skills as well as those of their students. 

KN 31X Literature for Adolescents 3c-01 ish 

Prerequisites: IN 101, 210, or permission, English Education major 
Surveys poetry, drama, and fiction with which the adolescent is familiar 
through school work and personal reading. 
(Offered as EN218 prior to 1993-94.) 

KN 320 Advanced Composition II 3c-01 3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 220 

Workshop and tutorial atmosphere for students who intend to write or teach 

writing. 

EN 321 Creative Writing 11 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 221 

Workshop loi students who wish to write Fiction or poetry under guidance of 

instructor. 

EN 322 Technical Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 10 1.202 

Focuses on helping the student to acquire and to apply communication skills 

essential to the technical and professional writer. 

EN 323 Teaching Literature and Reading in the 3c-01-3sh 

Secondary School 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202. 210 

Introduces students to the theory and research on teaching literature and 

reading in the secondary school. Reviews reader-response literary theory 

and classroom-based research on teaching literature. Also reviews socio- 

psycholinguistic reading theory and classroom-based research on teaching 

reading. 

EN 324 Teaching and Evaluating Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 202. 210. English Education major or permission 
A study of modern approaches to the teaching of writing, including current 
theories on the composing process, as well as instruction in evaluating, 
including holistic scoring. Includes practice in writing. 

EN 329 The History of the English Language lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisites: EN 10 1,202 

Studies historical development of the English language, as a basis for a 
better understanding of modern American English. 

EN 330 The Structure of English 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202 

An introduction to the fundamentals of language study with equal emphasis 
on the sound, word, sentence, meaning, and discourse patterns of English. 
Educationally relevant topics, such as applications of linguistics to the 
teaching of English language and literature, varieties of grammar, and 
linguistic descriptions of styles and registers are an integral part of the 
course. Course is a prerequisite for ED 452: Teaching of English and Speech 
in the Secondary School. 

EN 333 Psycholinguistics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.202 

Psycholinguistics concerns the interrelation between language system and 
behavior and various factors of human psychology. Surveys developments 
since the 1940s, including relationships between language and perception, 
biology, memory, meaning, and cognition, as well as oral and written 
behavior. Students of language and literature may improve their assumptions 
about how human beings use language. 

EN 334 ESL Methods and Materials 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor 

An introduction to English as a Second Language theory and practice. Aims: 

( 1 ) general understanding of current theory and methods of teaching ESL; 

(2) ability to select appropriate, and adapt existing, materials for elementary 
and high school ESL students. Recommended for all English teachers who 
expect to have ESL students in their classes. 

EN 336 Language, Gender, and Society 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, EN 102. junior standing 

Investigates the various ways that language and gender interact and intersect 
in society. Examines such questions as: Does society use language to favor 
one sex over the other? Why is language a crucial component in formulating 



constructs of masculinity and femininity? What stereotypes of gender-based 
language are promoted in our society? How can we analyze language to 
reveal disparate views and treatment of the sexes? 

KN 340 Chaucer 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: I-.NI01, 202. 210 

Corequisites: EN2I I. 212. 213, or permission 

Studies Chaucer, his life, his language, the development of his literary style, 

and his art, with and through his major poetical works. 

EN 341 Shakespeare 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.202, 210 

Corequisites: EN21 1, 212. 213. or permission 

Studies Shakespeare's development as a poetic dramatist against background 

of Elizabethan stage; examines audience, textual problems, language 

imagery, and philosophy. 

EN 342 Milton 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202. 210 

Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213, or permission 

A close reading of the major English poems and prose of John Milton, with 

particular attention to Paradise Lost and Samson Agonistes. 

EN 343 Major American Author 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213, or permission 

Studies in the literary output of a major American author or authors against 

the background of the social and literary milieus in which the works were 

created. Specific subject or subjects to be announced by the instructor. 

EN 345 Classical Literature in Translation 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 102 

Masterpieces studied range from those of ancient Greece to Middle Ages. 
English literature and American literature excluded. 

EN 346 Contemporary American and British Poetry 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 10 1,202 

Study of British and American poetry since World War II. 

EN 347 Modern American Fiction 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202 

Major American writers of fiction since 1945 are considered. 

EN 348 African-American Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.202 

Analyzes significant African-American literature of a variety of types — 
autobiography, essay, fiction, poetry. 

EN 349 English Bible as Literature 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101.202 

Considers literary aspects of the English Bible by relating earlier 
translations to the Authorized Version of 1611 and by tracing some of the 
major influences of the King James Bible upon writers and speakers of 
modem English. 

EN 350 The Metaphoric Perspective 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213, or permission 
Acquaints students with the means by which metaphor expands our 
awareness, providing us in its more extreme examples with what has been 
called "the strategy of the dream." Specifically the course explores metaphor 
as a "perspective by incongruity," which may be embedded in poetic 
structures or may be itself the controlling structure for longer works of 
fiction and nonfiction. 

EN 351 The Literature of Discursive Reason 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213 

Examines literature that displays the mind's analytic process. Readings 

include essays and other nonfiction as well as poetry, drama, and fiction. 

EN 352 Symbol and Allegory 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101. 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN21 1, 212. 213, or permission 

Examines symbol and allegory as means of comprehending and expressing 

profound aspects of existence. Explores the distinction between symbolic 

and allegorical modes of thought. 



140 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



EN 353 The Oral Dimension 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN211. 212. 213. or permission 

Acquaints students with the nature of oral composition, the habits of thought 
that orality fosters, and the particular mode of awareness the oral dimension 
of literature demands of an audience (and awakens in a reader). At the 
conclusion of the course students should have an understanding of the 
formulaic nature of such purely oral forms as the ballad and the epic and an 
awareness of the manner in which orality patterns thought differently from 
writing, and they should be able to detect oral features and patterns in works 
of literature from cultures not primarily oral but containing a high "oral 
residue." 

EN 360 Romanticism 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 10 1,202 

Corequisites: EN21 1. 212, 213. or permission 

Focuses on literature in its milieu and emphasizes an understanding of 

Romantic literature from its development in Germany and France to its 

flowering in England and America. 



EN 373 Concepts of Character in Drama and Novel 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN211, 212, 213, or permission 
Traces the techniques literary artists employ to portray aspects of 
personality and examines the influence upon character portrayal of such 
diverse factors as the chosen genre, contemporary notions of character 
depiction, and prevailing psychological theories contemporary with the 
works. 

EN 380 Country Life— City Life 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213. or permission 

Investigates the relationship between literature and two relatively distinct 
social environments — the town and the country. Examines literary genres, 
modes, and preoccupations peculiar to the separate social climates as well as 
the body of literature reflecting the painful collision between the two and 
effects of that collision upon such human concerns as families, the 
celebration of love and death, or the perception of the substance of nature 
itself. 



EN 361 The Renaissance 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101. 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN211. 212, 213, or permission 

Studies the revolutionary changes in artistic, ethical, and political thinking 
brought about by the European and English Renaissance as these changes 
are manifested in the literature of that age and succeeding ones. Focuses in 
particular upon the origin and later development of such notions as self- 
development, individuality, and the acquisition and maintenance of power. 

EN 362 Chivalry and Courtly Love 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN211, 212, 213, or permission 

Aims to give students a broad awareness of the cultural milieu of the High 
Middle Ages through a study of chivalry and courtly love as well as an 
understanding of how this literary genre was born, evolved over time and 
across cultures, and continues to structure elements in our own culture. 
Examines theories which seek to explain the development of the codes of 
courtly love and chivalry and the literature which gives evidence of their 
existence and development. 

EN 363 The Puritan Mind in England and America 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN211. 212, 213, or permission 

Examines what is distinctive in the intellectual outlooks of Puritanism as it 

is directly embodied in the literature of England and America in the 16th, 

17th. and 18th centuries and indirectly in the literature of later ages down to 

the present. 



EN 381 Poverty and Class in Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101. 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213, or permission 

Examines major literary works that document the conditions created by 
class and caste division and the poverty that is visited upon a portion of the 
people as well as the social values that seek to justify or condemn class 
divisions. Examines an extensive body of images of the poor, concepts about 
class and caste, and the consequence of class division. 

EN 382 War in Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN211, 212, 213, or permission 

War is a subject depicted, in varying ways, in the literature of many times 

and places. Beginning with The Iliad, some of the major literary treatments 

of war and the attendant effects on the society and/or individuals placed in 

this context are explored. 

EN 383 Man in the Natural World 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 
Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213, or permission 
Attempts to understand the literature which concerns itself with the 
relationship between nature and humankind by viewing that interaction, at 
least initially, as either antagonistic or sympathetic: in the first case 
humanity dominates or exploits, while in the second it participates. The first 
attitude can be most easily seen in the traditional Hebraic-Christian view, 
while the second appears as romanticism, or more currently, as ecological 
awareness. 



EN 370 Myth and Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN21 1, 212, 213, or permission 

Introduces students to the nature and function of the mythic experience and 

makes them aware of the integral relation myth has with literature of all 

times and cultures, including our own. Illustrates how myth creates 

meaning, orders experience, and enters into literary techniques. 

EN 371 Hero and Antihero 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN211. 212. 213. or permission 

Examines the range of heroic and antiheroic protagonists and actions in 

literature of various times and countries with an additional focus upon the 

specific world views that make heroic and antiheroic behavior effective or 

even possible. 

EN 372 Alienation in Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101, 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN211, 212, 213, or permission 

Explores literature from various times and places for what it shows us of the 

separation of self from the external world — the estrangement of human 

beings from others as well as from themselves — its origin, nature, and 

various forms. 



EN 384 Introduction to Literature by Women 3c-01-3sh 

Reading of women's fiction, nonfiction prose, poetry, and drama, with 
emphasis on the work of the 19th and 20th centuries in England and 
America. Both works of well-known writers traditionally included in the 
English curriculum and the writings of their less well-known contemporaries 
will be included. 

EN 390 Literary Tour: Britain var-3sh 

Offered selected summers, for five weeks during the first or second summer 
session. Visits London, Stratford, and Cambridge or Oxford, as well as other 
places important in English literature. 

EN 480 Seminar: Studies in English and var-3sh 

American Literature 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 202, 210 

Corequisites: EN2 1 1 . 2 1 2, 2 1 3, or permission 

A seminar experience designed for advanced students. Students considering 

graduate work in English might well wish to enroll, but students with a 

variety of career goals — business, industry, law, government service — can 

take advantage of this opportunity to plan a schedule of independent study 

with the help of a faculty mentor. 

EN 481 Special Topics var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Vary from semester to semester covering such diverse topics as autobiography, 
science fiction, folklore, the political novel, black theater, etc. 



Course Descriptions — 141 



EN 482 Independent Study var-l-6sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

EN 493 Internship var-3-12sh 

On-the-job training opportunities in related areas. Application and 
acceptance to internship program required. 

EP: Educational and School Psychology 

Department of Educational and School 

Psychology 

College of Education 

EP 202 Educational Psychology 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisite: PC101, admission to sophomore standing in teacher 
certification or permission 

Designed to promote a better understanding of the principles of psychology 
governing human behavior, with particular emphasis on their relation to 
learner, learning process, and learning situation in an educational 
environment. (Offered as EP302 prior to 1992-93) 

EP 281 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

EP371 Psychology of Teaching Sex Education 3c-01-3sh 

Explores the methods of teaching sex education to elementary, intermediate, 
and secondary levels; the sexual development of the child through 
adolescence and adulthood. 

EP 373 Psychology of Adolescent Education 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EP202 

Study of significant characteristics, behavior, and educational and social 
problems of adolescents. 

EP 376 Behavior Problems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EP202 

Examination of emotional and social aspects of behavior problems 
encountered in classroom situations and potential remedial techniques. 

EP 377 Educational Tests and Measurements 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: PC101, admission to junior standing in teacher certification or 

permission 

Designed to acquaint students with major methods and techniques of 

evaluation used to assess and report growth, development, and academic 

achievement of individuals in an educational environment. Includes 

interpretation of standardized test information. 

EP 378 Learning 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisite: EP202 

Explores learning theories and educational application in the classroom. 

EP 383 Education of the Disadvantaged Student 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EP202 

Acquisition of necessary understandings of physiological, psychological, 
and social implications relevant to working with and teaching the 
disadvantaged student. 

EP 384 Field Experience 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EP202 

Provides student with tutorial experience in the public schools and social 
service organizations with professional supervision. 



EP481 Special Topics in Educational Psychology 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary 
basis to explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A 
given topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than 
three times. Special topics numbered 481 are offered primarily for upper- 
level undergraduate students. 

EP 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

EX: Education of Exceptional Persons 

Department of Special Education and Clinical 

Services 

College of Education 

EX 111 Introduction to Exceptional Persons 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: For department majors and official incoming transfers only 
Surveys characteristics, needs, problems, and behavior patterns of any 
person who deviates sufficiently from "normal" to be considered 
exceptional. Consideration to those who fall intellectually both above and 
below average and to those who are handicapped visually, acoustically, 
behaviorally, orthopedically, neurologically, or in respect to speech patterns. 
(Offered as EX 120 prior to 1993-94) 

EX 112 Typical and Atypical Growth and Development 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisites: EX111.PC101 

Presents foundations of human growth from conception, including basic 
embryogenesis, up to but not including adolescence. Considers the 
biological, cultural, educational, and parenting influences that shape the 
child, as well as selective examples of normal and deviant physical and 
intellectual development. (Offered as EX220 prior to 1993-94) 

EX 221 Methods of Teaching Mathematics to Persons 3c-01-3sh 
with Disabilities 

Prerequisites: MA151, EX111 

Emphasizes recent developments in elementary curriculum and instructional 
techniques for developing concepts; implications of recent resource 
developments and materials helpful to the prospective special education 
teacher. Emphasis is also placed on methods of helping children learn 
mathematical concepts through physical activity and on ways to adapt 
regular classroom materials to meet needs and abilities of slow and disabled 
learners. (Offered as EX240: Teaching Mathematics for the Mentally and/or 
Physically Handicapped prior to 1993-94) 

EX 222 Methods of Teaching Reading to Persons with 3c-01-3sh 
Disabilities 

Prerequisite: Sophomore status or above 

Presents basic concepts of developmental reading instruction and systematic 
coverage of the methods of teaching reading from readiness stages through 
eighth grade. Diagnostic-prescriptive techniques are included. (Offered as 
EX251: Methods of Teaching Reading prior to 1993-94) 

EX 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

EX 300 Education of the Exceptional in the 3c-01-3sh 

Regular Classroom 

Prerequisite: For non-Special Education majors only 
Surveys traits, needs, problems, and behavior patterns of the exceptional 
person and indicates methods and considerations for the regular classroom 
teacher encountering the exceptional person in his/her classroom. Legal 
rights of the exceptional are stressed, and contributions of the disabled to 
society are presented. Implications regarding parenting of exceptional 
children and youth are included. 



142 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



EX 32 1 Methods of Teaching Language Arts to 3c-01-3sh 

Persons with Disabilities 

Prerequisites: EX 11 1 , EX222, and SH254 

Review of typical and atypical characteristics of the handicapped in 
relationship to the language arts. Deals with preparation and execution of 
units of instruction in language arts for mentally and/or physically 
handicapped persons. Diagnostic and prescriptive approaches are included; 
integration of language arts with a highlight on reading is stressed. (Offered 
as EX353: Reading and Other Language Arts for the Mentally and/or 
Physically Handicapped prior to 1993-94) 

EX 322 Methods of Teaching Content Area Subjects to 3c-01-3sh 
Persons with Disabilities 

Prerequisite: EX 11 1 

Presents methods for teaching science and social studies to the mentally and/ 
or physically handicapped. Scope and sequence of content, as well as 
evaluative techniques for each content area, are studied. Integration of other 
content areas and skill areas is stressed. Also stresses teaching in both 
resource room and less restrictive environments. (Offered as EX343: 
Content Area Subjects for the Mentally and/or Physicallv Handicapped prior 
to 1993-94) 

EX 340 Introduction to Behavior Management in 3c-01-3sh 

Special Education 

Prerequisites: EX 1 11, EX 1 12. EP202 

An overview of systematic behavioral change techniques for use with 

students in a variety of special education settings including integrated, 

resource, self-contained, special school, and residential. Emphasizes a case 

analysis approach to creating and evaluating behavioral changes for students 

with mild to severe disabilities. 

EX 415 Preschool Education for Children 3c-01-3sh 

with Disabilities 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 

Provides information on assessment, intervention strategies, curriculum, and 
prescriptive planning for preschool children with disabilities. Serves as a 
course for departmental majors who are specifically interested in early- 
childhood education, as an elective for other interested students in related 
fields, and as a priority course for Early Childhood Education majors. 
(Formerly EX464: Preschool Education of the Handicapped) 

EX 416 Education of Persons with Emotional or 3c-01-3sh 

Behavioral Disorders 

Prerequisite: Junior status or above 

Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of emotional and 
behavioral disorders, definition and identification of the population, and 
educational approaches. Reviews research in the field, including current 
issues, trends, practices, and services. (Formerly EX341: The Socially and 
Emotional Maladjusted) 

EX 417 Education of Persons with Mental Retardation 3c-01-3sh 
or Developmental Disabilities 

Prerequisite: Junior status or above 

Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of mental 

retardation and developmental disabilities, including autism. Definition. 

identification, and educational approaches are discussed. Reviews research 

in the field, including current issues, trends, practices, and services. 

(Formerly EX457: Severe and Profound Retardation and Multiple 

Disabilities) 

EX 418 Education of Persons with Physical or 3c-01-3sh 

Multiple Disabilities 

Prerequisite: Junior status or above 

Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of a wide and 
diverse range of physical/multiple disablities, the definition and 
identification of the population, and educational approaches. Reviews 
research in the field, including current issues, trends, practices, and services. 
(Formerly EX430: Physical Disabilities and Psychological Handicaps) 

EX 419 Education of Persons with Brain Injuries or 3c-01-3sh 

Learning Disabilities 

Prerequisite: Junior status or above 

Focuses on major theoretical positions regarding etiology of neurological 
and learning disabilities, definition and identification of the population, and 
educational approaches. Reviews research in the field, including current 
issues, trends, practices, and services. (Formerly EX454: The Brain Injured 
and the Learning Disabled) 



EX 425 Methods and Curriculum 3c-01-3sh 

(Mild-Moderate Disabilities) 

Prerequisites: EX221. EX222. EX321, EX322, EX340 
Provides in-depth examination of assessment methods, strategies, and 
curriculums. Emphasizes assessment methods and strategies used in a 
variety of service models that serve elementary- and secondary-level 
students with learning disabilities, behavioral disorders, mild mental 
retardation, and high-function autism. (Formerly EX450: Methods and 
Curriculum Planning for Mildly and Moderately Handicapped) 

EX 435 Methods and Curriculum 3c-01-3sh 

(Severe-Profound Disabilities) 

Prerequisites: EX221, EX222. EX322. EX321, EX340 
Emphasizes methods designed to facilitate the development of an integrated, 
functional, and community-based curriculum that will prepare students for 
participation in a wide variety of postschool environments. 

EX 440 Ethical and Professional Behavior lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 

Emphasis on ethical and professional behavior for student teachers and 
professional employees. Possibilities for and methods of initiating and 
profiting from postbaccalaureate study are indicated. Student teachers are 
required to complete and present a curriculum book regarding each student- 
teaching experience. (Offered as EX490 prior to 1993-94) 

EX 480 Seminar in Special Education var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 

Interested students may use this course for the pursuit of knowledge 
regarding specific concerns of the exceptional which are not ordinarily 
considered in such detail during regular classroom instruction. Students 
wishing to enroll are expected to submit a written proposal regarding their 
desire for study at the time permission for enrollment is sought. With 
permission, the course may be repeated for credit. (Previous title: Selected 
Problems) 

EX 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

EX 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

FA: Fine Arts 
College of Fine Arts 

FA 281 Special Topics 3c-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

FA 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

FA 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 



Course Descriptions — 143 



FA 493 Internship 

Covers the areas of the visual and performing arts. 



var-3-12sh 



FE: Foundations of Education 
Department of Foundations of Education 
College of Education 

FE 202 American Kducation in Theory and Practice 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Students must have sophomore status and be enrolled in a 
teacher certification program 

Provides an introduction to some of the major traditional and contemporary 
philosophic concepts which have played a role in the formation of 
educational policies and practices. Emphasis on the relationship between 
educational theory and practice in such areas as the role of the school in 
society, curricular content, teaching and learning methodology, educational 
goals, and professionalism. 

FE 28 1 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

FE 414 Comparative Foundations of Education 3c-01-3sh 

(Dual Level) 

Analysis, evaluation, and especially comparison of educational purposes, 
curriculum, and methods in some western European nations, some 
developing nations in Africa. Asia, and Latin America, and nations such as 
Russia and the Peoples Republic of China. The educational theories and 
practices in the United States will be compared with those in other lands. 
Designed to develop insight into new ideas and practices in American 
schools. 

FE 415 Curriculum Development (Dual Level! 3c-0l-3sh 

Analysis of philosophical, sociological, and psychological basis for creation 
of curricular patterns, K- 1 2. Includes utilization of technological devices, 
critical examination of basic concepts underlying determination of 
objectives, and selection and organization of subject matter and of learning 
experiences in general. Current curriculum research will be analyzed, as will 
existing instructional materials and programs. 

FE 440 Orientation to Teaching in Urban Centers 3c-01-3sh 

Provides students with an understanding of learners and their unique 
learning needs and conditions. Emphasis on understanding the origin of 
altitudes and values and how these affect the relationships which exist 
between students and teachers. Special attention to practical application of 
theoretical information to problems of urban education. Field trips and guest 
speakers will be emphasized. 

FE 441 Field Experiences in Urban Centers var-6sh 

Prerequisite: FE440 

Provides specialized experience for students desiring to teach in inner-city 
schools. Aspects to be emphasized include physical characteristics of 
community, background and aspirations of children and youth, and 
specialized teacher competencies, classroom management, planning, 
instructional materials, teaching strategies, and evaluations. Records of 
comprehensive experiences in urban areas will be considered in making 
field experience assignments. Schools selected for student experience will 
be located in Pittsburgh. 

FE 442 Interpreting Urban/Field Experiences var-3sh 

Prerequisites: FE440, FE441 

Evaluation of learning and behavior problems encountered during field 
experience in urban schools. Flexible approach stressed to encourage wide 
range of investigation and exploration of psychological and sociological 
problems as they affect education. Supervision and guidance for 
investigating specific problems provided by specialists from psychology, 
sociology, and education who will function as resource personnel giving 
direction. Enables students to combine experiences gained by teaching in 
urban schools with recent and pertinent theoretical information. 



FE 454 Public School Administration V ill Wi 

Study of the development of public school administration; current 
organizational patterns for public education at the local, county, state, and 
national levels; and the impact of administration upon the total educational 
program. 

FE 456 Issues and Trends in Education 3c-OI-3>.h 

Critical analysis of issues and trends in education with emphasis on 
philosophical and social dimensions of topics covered. Attention to work of 
some major contemporary critics of education. 

FE 481 Special Topics 3c-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

FE 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

FI: Finance 

Department of Finance and Legal Studies 

Eberly College of Business 

Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level are open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

FI 220 Essentials of Finance 3c-01-3sh 

Provides students with a survey of three fundamental areas of finance: 
1) Corporate Finance, 2) Basic Investment, and 3) Financial Intermediation 
and the Monetary System. Students will be introduced to financial analysis, 
planning, and control; to the management (the acquisition and allocation) of 
funds; and to the fundamentals of the time value of money and capital 
budgeting. Students will be familiarized with the basic investment markets, 
fundamental and technical analysis, and portfolio analysis. Students will 
also consider the influence of government and financial institutions on 
interest rates, sources of finance, investment of funds, and finance in 
general. (Offered for Associate Degree Program at branch campuses only: 
may not be used as a substitute for FI310) 

FI 281 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

FI 310 Finance I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AG202, MA214 for business majors; AG202, MA214 or 
MA217 for non-business majors (MA214 recommended) 
Study of the methods of securing and managing funds on short, 
intermediate, and long-term bases. The financial analysis, planning, and 
control of a corporation. Also covered is working capital management. 

FI 320 Finance II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FI310, upper division only 

Continues FI310 and covers topics on long-term external financing of the 
firm, capital budgeting, valuation of the firm, mergers, international 
business finance, and business failures. 

FI 322 Life Insurance 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FI310 

Comprehensive study of that insurance which provides protection against 
the economic loss caused by termination of earning capacity. Analysis 
benefits, underwriting, rate making, and legal doctrines. 



144 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



FI 324 Principles of Investments 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: FI3I0 

Analysis of various types of securities and other forms of investment 
possibilities and a study of sound investment policies from a corporate 
viewpoint. Factors influencing the general movement of security prices and 
the return from investments are considered. 

FI 355 Financial Analysis Using Lotus 1-2-3 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: BE/CO/IM101 and FI310 

This course develops the financial students' computer modeling and analysis 
skills. Students will be taught how to utilize current computing resources, 
electronic spreadsheet, and other software to analyze, model, and solve a 
variety of financial problems. 

FI 385 Securities and Commodities Markets 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FI320. FI324 

Study of the structure of security and commodity markets; the nature of 
speculative transaction and methods of trading; analysis of pricing: and the 
objectives of security and commodity market regulation. 

FI 410 Financial Institutions and Markets 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FI324 

Review of the entire structure of financial institutions, money, and capital 
markets, of which the business enterprise is both a supply and demand 
factor, and structure and dynamics of interest-rate movements. 

FI 420 Investment Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FI320, FI324 

Integrates the work of the various courses in the finance areas and 
familiarizes the student with the tools and techniques of research in the 
different areas of investments. 

FI 422 Seminar in Finance 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FI320. FI324, seniors only 

Primarily for the senior Finance major, covers topics in all areas of finance 
by using recent articles, cases, discussions, speakers, and a financial 
simulation game. 

FI 424 International Financial Management 3c-01-4sh 

Prerequisite: FI310 

The financial management concepts, useful in a single-country context, are 
adapted for the international variables and constraints caused by being 
international. Provides an insight into unique issues and problems the 
manager of the multinational enterprise will face such as: working capital 
management; capital budgeting process; financing and investing abroad; 
capital and money markets; foreign exchange markets; and risk 
management. 

FI 481 Special Topics var-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 481 are offered primarily for upper-level undergraduate 

students. 

FI 482 Independent Study var-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

FI 493 Finance Internship var-3-12sh 

Prerequisites: FI320. FI324. consent of chairperson and dean 
Practical experience in the finance field. 

Note: Internship FI493 can be taken, if the student qualifies, as a general 
elective. It does not fulfill the major-area elective requirement. 



FL: Study Abroad and Comparative Literature 

(Foreign Language) 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

FL 100 Study Abroad var- 1 - 1 2sh 

Registration mechanism and limited credit arrangement as provided in 
preapproval process for Study Abroad programs coordinated through the 
Center for International Studies. 

FL 121 Humanities Literature 3c-0I-3sh 

Introduces the student to works, authors, and genres of general literary 
significance in the Western tradition. Not organized historically but trains 
the student in the critical reading and appreciation of literature from the 
present and other periods. Authors, works, and themes are studied with 
respect to cultural context, aesthetic form, and thematic significance. Taught 
in English. Substitutes for EN 121: Humanities-Literature. 

FL 391 Selected Works from the Medieval Period 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 102 

Comparative study of selected works of major importance per se and as 

representative of major themes of medieval European literature. Also listed 

asEN391. 

FL 392 Renaissance/Baroque/Classical 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 102 

Literary works representing various genres from both periods are studied 

and compared for their themes, motifs, and stylistic features, applying 

principles set forth in H. Wolffin's Renaissance and Baroque. Also listed as 

EN392. 

FL 393 Romanticism 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 102 

Study of the principal authors and works of late 18th-century and early 19th- 
century Europe and the unique national characteristics of the Romantic 
movement in lyric, drama, and prose. Also listed as EN393. 

FL394 Nineteenth-Century European Novel 3c-01-3sh 

in Translation 

Prerequisites: EN 101. 102 

A survey of major 19th-century European novels in translation (excluding 
English), emphasizing the rise of realism and naturalism and the cultural, 
historical, social, and artistic relationships between the various national 
literatures. Also listed as EN394. 

FL 395 Selected Writers from 20th-Centurv Europe 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN101. 102 

Comparative study of selected works of major importance per se or as 

representatives of major trends in 20th-century literature. Also listed as 

EN395. 

FL 396 The Literature of Emerging Nations 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: EN 101, 102 

A comparative study of a selection of literature written in major European 
languages but originating in the nations of the developing world. Works will 
be mainly prose fiction (although essay, theater, and poetry may be 
included) and reflect a diversity of geographical, cultural, and prior colonial 
circumstances. Also listed as EN396. 

FL 421 Language and Society 3c-OI-3sh 

Considers salient facts of language and its role in society and culture. 
Language families, linguistic change, and reciprocal influences of culture 
and language are presented. 

FL 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 



Course Descriptions — 145 



FN: Food and Nutrition 
Department of Food and Nutrition 
College of Health and Human Services 

FN 110 Careers in Food and Nutrition lc-01 I sh 

Career possibilities for nutrition majors arc explored. Students will be 
guided in clarifying their professional goals and will become acquainted 
with the educational and experiential requirements necessary to attain these 
goals. 

FN 140 Nutrition and Wellness. Part A 2c-2 1 1 .5sh 

Introduces the student to contemporary nutrition issues as they relate to 
personal choices and physical Illness as a component of wellness. 
(Combined with FN141 as FN143 effective 1992) 

FN 141 Nutrition and Wellness. Part B 2c-21- 1 .5sh 

Introduces the student to physical fitness, stress management, and substance 
abuse as components of wellness. (Combined with FN 1 40 as FN 1 4 ) 
effective 1992) 

FN 143 Nutrition and Wellness 3c-01-3sh 

Introduces the student to the major components of wellness: contemporary 
nutrition issues as they relate to personal food choices, physical fitness, 
stress management, sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS, and substance 
abuse. Completion of FN 143 fulfills the Liberal Studies Health and Wellness 
requirement. 

FN 145 Introduction to Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Provides students with an understanding of essential nutrients and their roles 
in the body, as well as the changing nutritional needs of an individual 
throughout the lifespan. Includes the impact of exercise and food choices on 
metabolism, body composition, and weight control: nutrition 
misinformation; consumer issues: commercially prepared foods; and major 
diseases that are affected by eating behaviors. 

FN 150 Foods Lecture 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite (or concurrently): CH102 

Basic principles of food, to include composition, sanitation, preparation, and 

preservation. 

FN 151 Foods Lab 

Prerequisite (or concurrently): FN150 
Application of basic principles of food preparation. 



0c-31-lsh 



FN 212 Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH102 or CHI 12 

Sources and functions of nutrients, interdependence of dietary essentials, 
and nutritive value of an optimum diet are studied. Attention given to varied 
conditions in human life. 

FN 213 Life Cycle Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FN212 

A detailed study of nutrition which applies information from FN212: 
Nutrition to all stages of the life cycle; current issues and research as they 
impact on these developmental stages. 

FN 245 Sports Nutrition Ic-01-lsh 

Prerequisites: FN 143, or FN 145. or FN2 1 2 

Students' nutrition knowledge will be advanced with special application to 
the optimal nutrient needs and nutrition practices of athletes to maximize 
performance. The fallacies of ergogenic aids will also be discussed. 

FN 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

FN 355 Nutrition in Disease I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: BI155, CHI 02. FN212 

Basic tools for diet modification: food exchange systems; interviewing 
techniques; nutrition assessment; professional practice; dietary treatment of 
injury, surgery, recovery, obesity, and diabetes. Nutrition support. Food 
sampling experiences. Fall semester. 



FN 357 Special Problems in Foods 0c-4l Jsh 

Prerequisite: FN150 

Individual problems in foods investigated with emphasis on identified 
weaknesses in the student's knowledge of food. 

FN 362 Experimental Foods 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: IN 1 50, 212. CH102, or (111 12 

The experimental study of foods, relating chemical and physical properties 
lo reactions and processes occurring in food systems. 

FN 364 Methods of Teaching 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: FN3 1 3 and 356 or concurrently 

Current teaching techniques and resource materials in nutrition education 

emphasized. Both classroom teaching and on-the-job training programs are 

included. 

FN 402 Community Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FN212 

Nutritional implications of both good and poor nutrition for all age groups in 
home and community situations are studied. Corrective and preventive 
measures emphasized. Spring semester. 

FN 410 Food, Nutrition, and Aging 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior status 

Relationship of food to health maintenance and special dietary problems 
during the middle and later years. 

FN 430 Professional Topics in Food and Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FN355, FN364, HR356, and PC101 

Topics include promoting food and nutrition services and programs, career 
planning and development, ethical challenges to dietitians, quality assurance 
standards, and impact on the legislative process. 

F'N 444 Food Composition and Biochemistry 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CH355 

Basic chemistry and biochemistry of essential components of food 
originating from plant and animal sources. 

FN 447 Nutritional Aspects of Food Technology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FN2 1 2 and BI232: junior status 

Study of current known effects of food processing techniques on the 
nutritional value and safety of foods. 

FN 455 Nutrition in Disease II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FN355 

Dietary treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal, renal, cardiovascular, 
and hepatic systems; inborn errors of metabolism; allergies; cancer. 
Therapeutic quackery. Food sampling experiences. Spring semester only. 

FN 458 Advanced Human Nutrition 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CH351 or 355 or, concurrently, FN2I2, BI155 
In-depth study of the nutrients and their functions within the cell. 
Incorporation of the principles of physiology and biochemistry in the study 
of nutrition. Emphasis on current research and evaluation of research 
methodology. 

FN 461 Microwave Cooking Technology 2c-21-3sh 

Study of the electronic technology, selection, care, and use of the microwave 
oven. Basic physical and chemical concepts related to microwave cooking 
are included. Individual investigative research problems are required. 

FN 462 Advanced Experimental Foods lc-41-3sh 

Prerequisites: FN362, CH231 

An experimental approach to the many factors influencing the chemical and 
physical properties of food. Use of the scientific method in developing an 
individual project combining an evaluation of current literature and 
appropriate sensory and analytical methodology. 

FN 463 Nutrition Counseling 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: FN355, PC101, FN455 or concurrently 
Use of intervention strategies in prevention and treatment of disease through 
diet. Supervised practicum (3 hours per week) counseling clientele in 
normal and therapeutic nutrition. 



146 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



FN 464 Food and Nutrition Research Methods 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: FN362, 458, CH351, and MA217 

Introduction to research methodology in foods and nutrition. Includes theory 
and techniques of physical, chemical, and instrumental analysis. 
Applications of these methods to food and animal models with statistical 
analysis of data. 

FN 470 Human Food Consumption Patterns 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: One social science course and junior standing 
Exploration of human food consumption behaviors from food production to 
individual and societal consumption patterns. Influencing factors which will 
be discussed include agronomic, economic, geographic, sociologic, 
nutritional, political, and psychological factors. The ethics and morality of 
food distribution will be discussed. Students may not enroll in this course if 
they have taken the section LS499 that corresponds to this course. 

FN 481 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

FN 482 Independent Study var-l-6sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office; must have earned 60 semester hours 
Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources. 



FR 203 Accelerated College French 6c-01-6sh 

Develops listening and speaking skills through an immersion method. 
Students use present, past, and future to indicative tenses in intensive aural/ 
oral interaction and are expected to make use of the audio and video 
capabilities of the Foreign Language Learning Center on a weekly basis. 
Liberal Studies elective credit is given for this course. (Replaces FR251- 
252) 

FR 221 Conversation III 2c-01-2sh 

Gives students opportunity to practice the grammatical knowledge they 
acquire in a corresponding class and develops their oral skill. Stresses 
phonetics, pronunciation, and vocabulary. 

FR 222 Conversation IV 2c-01-2sh 

Continues the study of phonetics to improve students' pronunciation. 
Readings of relatively short texts followed by questions and answers. Some 
informal conversation to increase the vocabulary, to be able to react 
spontaneously to a given situation, and to carry the oral skill to a higher 
level. 

FR 253 Intermediate Composition and Conversation 3c-01-3sh 

Intermediate course in grammar, reading, composition, and some oral work. 
Can substitute for or be in addition to FR202 for majors or serious students. 

FR 254 Civilization of Modern France 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FR202 or equivalent 

Study of modem French culture and civilization — social institutions, 
government, industry, economics, and geography. Development of all 
language skills for use in business situation in French-speaking 
environment. Emphasis on acquisition of an active knowledge of the 
business world. 



FN 484 Senior Seminar lc-01-lsh 

Prerequisites: Senior status, FN458, FN464 or concurrently 
Emphasis on individual review of food and nutrition literature with formal 
presentation and discussion of current research. 

FN 493 Internship var-6-12sh 

Prerequisite: Must have earned 57 semester hours 

An opportunity for students to work away from the university in supervised 
job situations at health care facilities, restaurants, or other institutional food 
service or lodging establishments. Objective is to provide students with job- 
related experiences. Must meet university internship requirements. 

Note: White uniforms including white shoes are required for all lab courses 
where food is prepared. Students must meet the professional dress 
requirements of the department. 

FR: French 

Department of French 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

FR 101 Basic French 4c-01-4sh 

For the student beginning the study of French or who needs remedial study 
before beginning the intermediate sequence. Primary emphasis is on the 
mastery of French pronunciation and oral communication. Students will 
learn to converse in simple present time and become acquainted with 
location of Francophone populations and elements of their daily lives. 
Attendance and Foreign Language Learning Center practice is required. 
(Replaces FR151 and 152) 

FR 201 College French I 3c-01-3sh 

The initiation of college-level mastery of basic language skills and exposure 
to cultural materials. Supplements beginners' oral competency with more 
advanced reading and writing. Emphasis on narration in the past. Efforts are 
made to practice skills and comprehend texts in authentic cultural contexts. 
Liberal Studies elective credit is given for this course. (Replaces FR251) 

FR 202 College French II 3c-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: FR201 or equivalent 

This course continues the college-level mastery of language skills. The 
ability to narrate present and past is intended to express opinion and 
hypothesis. Emphasis is on acquiring greater skill in reading literary and 
cultural texts. Liberal Studies elective credit is given for this course. 
(Replaces FR252) 



FR 255 The Art of Translation ( version ) 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FR202 or equivalent 

Practice in the skills needed to translate from the foreign language into 
English. Students will analyze problems of translation as they occur in 
scientific, business, journalistic, and literary texts. 

FR 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

FR 301 Portraits of Women in the French Novel 3c-01-3sh 

Explores the polarity of the treatment of female characters in the French 
novel. Explores differences of treatment by male and female writers through 
inclusion of women novelists. Provides a chronological survey of the 
development of the novel in France from the 17th to the 20th centuries. 

FR 321-322 Advanced Conversation I and II each lc-01-lsh 

Designed to increase speaking ability. The variety of content permits 
repetition of these relatively informal courses. 

FR 351-352 Advanced French I and II each 3c-01-3sh 

Reviews grammar in depth; analyzes the structure of the language; frequent 
themes required. 

FR 354 Business French 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: FR 254 or permission of instructor 

Study of principles and practices of business communication in French 
secretarial and administrative procedures with an emphasis on the planning 
and writing of business letters, reports, and abstracts of articles in business 
and economics. 

FR 361 Development of French Culture and 3c-01-3sh 

Literature I 

Provides a general background in French cultural history, including art, 
architecture, and music and in social and political ideas and a general survey 
of literature. The course spans the period from the Middle Ages to the 
French Revolution. 



Course Descriptions — 147 



FR 362 Development of French Culture and Jc (H -3sh 

Literature II 

This course provides a general background in French cultural history 
including art, architecture, and music and in social and political ideas and a 
general survey of literature. Spans the period from Pre-Romanticisni to the 
present. 

KR 363 Medieval and Renaissance Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the major literal] works oi the period, beginning with the 
Chansons de gestes and emphasizing the evolution of ideas and the various 
literary genres. 

FR 365 Seventeenth-Century French Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the major Baroque and neoclassical works in poetry, theater, and 
prose with special attention to the evolution of ideas and the French moralist 
tradition. 

FR 366 Eighteenth-Century French Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the Age of Enlightenment in its principal authors and works, 
including the popularization of ideas for and by secondary authors; a survey 
of the century's intellectual and literary crosscurrents in French literature 
and the wider scope of foreign influences. 

FR 367 Nineteenth-Century French Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the literature of 19th-century France with particular attention to 
the development of the novel while also treating the genres of poetry and 
theater. Attention is given foreign influences and correlations. 

F"R 368 Twentieth-Century French Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A survey of the poetic, theatrical, and narrative genres of the French 20th 
century with emphasis on the interaction between philosophical 
development and literary expression. 

FR 371 The French Novel 3c-01-3sh 

Elective survey of the origin and development of the French novel. Works 
representative of major genres are read in their entirety. 

F'R 372 Studies in Contemporary French Literature 3c-01-3sh 

Content of this course will vary in accordance with needs and interests of 
those who elect it. 

FR 481 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

FR 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources. An opportunity to engage in an in-depth analysis of some topic 
dealing with the French language and culture through consultation with a 
faculty member. 

FR 493 Internship var-3-12sh 

Prerequisite: One semester of study in France 

A supervised field experience in France with approved public agencies and 
institutions or private firms; no longer than one semester and no less than 
one month. Positions will be matched as closely as possible with the intern's 
personal interests and professional goals. For more information, contact the 
director of the Internship Abroad Program. 



GE: Geography 

Department of Geography and Regional 

Planning 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

GE 101 Introduction to Geography: Human 3c-01-3sh 

Environment 

Throughout history, human life and society have been shaped by the 
physical environment. Today, human activity threatens that environment. 
The relationship between humans and environment is examined in the 
context of the surface processes of weather, climate, plate tectonics, 
population distribution, and soil formation. Topics include agriculture, acid 
rain, global warming, deforestation, desertification, erosion, volcanism, and 
pollution. 

GE 102 Geography of United States and Canada 3c-OI-3sh 

The cultural landscape of North America is studied. The relationship 
between man and environment is examined and spatial patterns of 
environment, economy, society, and politics are considered. 

GE 103 Introduction to Human Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Human society and human behavior are shaped by space. In this sense, 
geography is destiny. Some of the ways space affects our lives are 
examined. Migration, diffusion, settlement, distance decay, spatial behavior, 
politics, and population are treated from a geographic perspective. 

GE 104 Geography of the Non-Western World 3c-01-3sh 

Relates theories of the discipline of geography to problems in the 
developing world. Emphasizes geographic components of dependency 
theory, indigenous versus industrial strategies of resource management; 
world systems theory, spatial legacies of colonialism; and development 
economics, theories of migration and urban structure, to explore causes, 
characteristics, and consequences of underdevelopment. 

GE 213 Cartography I 3c-01-3sh 

Introduces students to principles of thematic map construction. Emphasis is 
on the techniques of choropleth mapping and the production of scientific 
graphs and charts. 

GE 230 Cultural Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to cultural geography, including population, settlement, 
historical, urban, and political geography, human relationships with the 
natural environment, and the literature and methods of cultural geography. 

GE 231 Economic Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to geographic concepts, methods, and skills related to spatial 
patterns of production, consumption, and exchange over the earth's surface. 

GE 241 Physical Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to physical geography including the study of weather, climate, 
soils, vegetation, landforms. energy cycles, and the hydrologic cycle. 

GE 251 Geography of Pennsylvania 3c-01-3sh 

Regions of Pennsylvania are examined in detail to identify man- 
environment relationships. Soils, topography, climate, vegetation, 
population, and economic patterns are studied. 

GE 252 Geography of Latin America 3c-01-3sh 

Impact of rapid population growth and economic development on the 
environment and spatial organization of Latin America are considered. The 
resource base and cultural heritage of the region are studied. 

GE 253 Geography of Europe 3c-01-3sh 

Investigates relationships underlying land use, dominant international 
problems, boundary disputes, and regional complexes of the European 
continent. 



GE 254 Geography of USSR 3c-01-3sh 

Regions of the Soviet Union, natural resources, cultural patterns, population, 
strategic areas, and related geopolitical problems are studied. 

GE 255 Geography of Africa 3c-01-3sh 

Systematic survey of the physical, economic, political-historical, and 
cultural geography of the continent is followed by regional studies of 
countries and peoples in Africa, south of the Sahara. 



148 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



GE 256 Geography of East Asia 3c-OI-3sh 

Studies China, Japan, Korea, Outer Mongolia. Taiwan. Geographic 
background for development and wise use and restoration of natural 
resources are dealt with. 



GE 341 Climatology I 3c-01-3sh 

Elements of weather and climate and the climatic regions of the earth are 
studied in relation to other aspects of the physical and biological 
environment. 



GE 257 Geography of South and Southeast Asia 3c-01-3sh 

India. Pakistan. Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand. Laos. Cambodia, 
Vietnam, Malaysia, and Indonesia are studied with special attention to 
regional similarities and differences, particularly as they pertain to human 
adjustment. 

GE 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

GE 312 Research in Geography and Planning 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to the basic elements of research in the context of orderly 
scientific investigation. Emphasizes the application of research methodology 
to specific geographic and planning problems. 

GE 313 Cartography II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: GE 213 

Gives an understanding of the compilation and use of maps and quantitative 
data. Develops skills essential to the construction of various types of maps. 

GE 314 Map and Photograph Interpretation 3c-01-3sh 

Maps and air photographs, along with remote sensing materials, permit 
inventory and analysis of geologic, land use. urban development, and other 
landscape phenomena. The understanding of these materials and associated 
tools for their use is presented. 

GE 331 Population Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Spatial variations in numbers, characteristics, and dynamics of human 
population, models, and theoretical constructs relevant to demographic 
structures and processes are studied, as well as major world and regional 
problems. 

GE 332 Urban Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Basic principles of urban geography including site, situation, function, urban 
land use, urban structure, and urban hierarchy are introduced. Relationships 
between urban geography and urban planning are explored. 

GE 53i Trade and Transportation 3c-01-3sh 

Deals with the spatial aspects of transportation systems and their use. 
Circulation, accessibility, time and distance concepts, and trade patterns are 
discussed. 

GE 334 Political Geography 3c-OI-3sh 

Geographic factors and conditions are analyzed as they relate to the 
character and function of states. Political institutions are evaluated in light 
of geographic conditions. 

GE 336 Social Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Spatial dimensions of the American society are the focus of this course. The 
distribution of various social groups and their impact on the landscape are 
considered. 

GE 337 Historical Geography 3c-01-3sh 

Studies of past geographies, geographical change through time, and 
historical perspectives on the cultural landscape are included. Historical 
geography of the United States is emphasized. 

GE 340 Geography of Fresh Water Resources 3c-01-3sh 

Contributes to the students' understanding of fresh water as a resource. 
Fresh water is identified by its physical characteristics, by an inventory 
based on the types of storage within the hydrologic cycle, and by the values 
assigned to this resource by different cultures. Included in the course are 
problems relating to the consumptive and withdrawal uses of water, the role 
of water supply and water law, flooding and floodplain management, the 
sources of water contamination and pollution, and case studies of selected 
river basins. 



GE 342 Physiography 3c-01-3sh 

Focuses on the study of landforms and water features. Types, distribution, 
and processes of formation are considered in relationship to the human 
landscape. 

GE 360 Introduction to Planning 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to field of planning on city, metropolitan, regional, and county 
levels. Included are intergovernmental context and legislative basis for 
planning: the comprehensive plan: plan implementation and the planning 
agency. 

GE 361 Planning: Basic Studies and Analysis 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: GE360 

Research, analytical design, and plan-making techniques in urban and 
regional planning. Examines basic items necessary to prepare urban and 
regional comprehensive plans. 

GE 371 Aerospace Workshop 3c-OI-3sh 

Develops an appreciation and provides information related to aerospace 
activities and contributions; offers background for teaching aerospace 
courses; discusses aviation/space careers; and presents the basic principles 
of flying (usually including some flight instruction). Offered summer only. 

GE 411 Geography: Thought and Philosophy 3c-01-3sh 

Seminar limited to junior and senior majors with at least 12 semester hours 
in geography. Deals with history of the discipline, great ideas, leading 
problems, and unresolved issues. 

GE 415 Remote Sensing 3c-01-3sh 

Deals with air photographs, satellite imagery, thermal sensing, and radar 
imagery and their application to deriving information about the earth's 
physical and cultural landscapes. 

GE 416 Computer-Assisted Cartography 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: GE313. or equivalent, or permission of instructor 
This course introduces automated cartographic production techniques. 
Topics include the use of cartographic hardware and software, the 
distinction between vector and raster representations, data bases, the 
cartographer-machine interface, and designing computer-generated maps. 

GE 431 Geography of American Indians 3c-0l-3sh 

Focuses on the historical/cultural geography of Native Americans. 
Population, resources, land use. development, settlement patterns, and other 
selected topics are covered. 

GE 432 Geography of Crime 3c-01-3sh 

The geographical context of crime is examined from historical and 
contemporary viewpoints. Relevant concepts and analytical approaches are 
introduced. 

GE 440 Conservation: Environmental Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Problems of exploitation and utilization of regional resources such as soils, 
minerals, forests, and wildlife are considered in relation to population 
growth and regional planning and development. 

GE 462 Planning: Developmental Principles and Theory 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisite: GE360 

Examines the process of city planning during ancient, medieval. 
Renaissance, and modem periods. A review of early planning in America, as 
well as present city planning, is included. 

GE 463 Planning: Design 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: GE360 

Presents concepts of city, subdivision, and transportation design in relation 
to topography, natural resources, and other physical elements. 

GE 464 Land Use Policy 3c-01-3sh 

Basic concepts of land use policy at the national, regional, county, and local 
levels are treated. Analysis is made of various land use policies. 



Course Descriptions — 149 



GE 481 Special Topics Jc-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses arc offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that arc not included in the established curriculum A given 
topic ma) be offered under an) special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 48 1 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

GE 482 Independent Study v ar 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources 

GE 493 Internship var-3-12sh 

Professional learning experience with emphasis on application of academic 
background. Open to majors and minors in geography and regional planning 
with 75 semester hours and 15 semester hours in the department, 
respectively. See internship supervisor for additional information. 

GK: Greek 

Department of Spanish and Classical Languages 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

GK 151 Greek I 3c-01-3sh 

For beginning students: pronunciation, reading, oral, and written 
communication are the objectives. In grammar the case system of the Greek 
noun is begun. All classical Greek courses are offered occasionally through 
Independent Study. Modern Greek may be available through the Critical 
Languages program. Offered only by individualized instruction. 

GK 152 Greek II 3c-01-3sh 

Continuation of Greek I. In grammar the case system of the Greek noun is 
completed. Offered only by individualized instruction. 

GK 251 Greek III 3c-01-3sh 

Continued training in basic skills, with the possible addition of the study of 
specific topics: consult the department for topics of interest. In grammar 
most tenses of the Greek verb are studied. Offered only by individualized 
instruction. 

GK 252 Greek IV 3c-01-3sh 

Continuation of Greek III. In grammar more tenses of the verb are studied. 
The readings become short selections from Greek literature. Offered only by 
individualized instruction. 

GK 351 Advanced Greek Language I 3c-01-3sh 

Reviews grammar in-depth; analyzes the structure of the language. While 
themes are not required, selections from Greek prose are read both for 
know ledge of their content and for developing knowledge of the structure of 
the language. Offered only by individualized instruction. 

GK 352 Advanced Greek Language II 3c-OI-3sh 

Continuation of GK351. Selections are from poetry this semester. Offered 
only by individualized instruction. 

GK 482 Independent Study var-3sh 

An opportunity to engage in an in-depth analysis of some topics dealing 
with the Greek language and culture through consultation with a faculty 
member. Permission required. 

GM: German 

Department of German 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

GM 101 Elementary German var-6sh 

Students complete levels I and II sequence in one semester (6sh). Emphasis 
on mastery of spoken language as well as basic language skills. Classes 
meet M.W.F for 60 minutes and T.R for 90 minutes. (Offered prior to 1993- 
94 as Intensive Elementary German, using Dartmouth Intensive Language 
Model.) 



GM 201 Intermediate German var-6sh 

Students complete levels III and IV sequence in one semester (6shi. 
Students develop language skills with emphasis on oral competency. Classes 
meet M.W.F for 60 minutes and T.R for 90 minutes. (Offered prior to 1993- 
94 as Intensive Intermediate German, using Dartmouth Intensive Language 
Model.) 

GM 221 Conversation III 2c-01-2sh 

Two-hours-weekly conversation practice in small groups emphasizing the 
use of greetings, idiomatic expressions, and communication skills to 
improve vocabulary and pronunciation. 

GM 222 Conversation IV 2c-0l-2sh 

Two hours of weekly conversation designed as a continuation of the practice 
in small groups, focusing on speaking and listening skills and on 
participation in discussions and dialogues. May enroll without having taken 
GM221. 

GM 251 German III 3c-01-3sh 

Continued training in basic skills, with the possible addition of the study of 
specific topics; consult the department for topics of interest. 

GM 252 German IV 3c-OI-3sh 

Continuation of German III with some emphasis on literary works. 

GM 253 Intermediate Composition and Conversation 3c-01-3sh 

Can be taken instead of or in addition to 252. Designed for majors or serious 

students. Offered in spring only. 

GM 254 Business German 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: GM251 or equivalent 

A one-semester course which can be taken instead of, or in addition to. 
GM252 by students interested in business or as part of the General 
Education requirement (equivalent to German IV). Business practices and 
specialized business vocabulary, letter writing, and problems of translation 
are emphasized. 

GM 256 Scientific German 3c-01-3sh 

Designed to substitute for GM252, course will be offered in the second 
semester. Primarily for science majors, it may be taken as an elective by 
German majors. 

GM 281 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 
topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may- 
be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 
topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 
students. 

GM 321-322 Advanced Conversation I and II each 2c-01-lsh 

Designed to increase speaking ability. The variety of content permits 
repetitions of these relatively informal courses. 

GM 351 Advanced German Language I 3c-01-3sh 

Aims review and expand the student's grammatical skills, to apply these 
skills to extensive cultural and short literary readings, and to produce 
frequent themes on these readings. 

GM 352 Advanced German Language II 3c-01-3sh 

Continues to expand the student's grammatical skills and to apply them by 
the writing of longer themes based on cultural and literary readings. 

GM 361 Development of German Culture and 3c-01-3sh 

Literature I 

Designed to provide a background in German literature, music, art, 
architecture, and history. Surveys the period from the migrations of the 
Germanic tribes to the rise of Prussia as a European power. 

GM 362 Development of German Culture and 3c-01-3sh 

Literature II 

A continuation of GM361. Covers the period from the French Revolution 
and its effects on Germany up to the present, with an emphasis on German 
literature, history, and music. 

GM 363 Introduction to German Literature I 3c-01-3sh 

Selected readings in German poetry to acquaint the student with formal and 
thematic aspects of German verse from the Middle Ages to the present. 



150 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



(IM 364 Introduction to German Literature II 3c-01-3sh 

Selected readings in German fiction and drama to acquaint the student with 
representative works and techniques of interpretation. 

GM 367 Nineteenth-Century German Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A survey of the major works of German poetry and prose with an emphasis 

on the literary movements of Romanticism. Realism, and Naturalism. 

GM 368 Twentieth-Century German Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A study of representative works of German poetry and prose from 
Expressionism through World War II. 

GM 369 Contemporary German Literature 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the literary achievement of postwar Germany up to the present. 

GM 370 The Age of Goethe I 3c-01-3sh 

A study of representative works from the Enlightenment and Storm and 
Stress periods. 

GM 371 The Age of Goethe II 3c-01-3sh 

A study of selected works of German Classicism with an emphasis on the 
prose and poetry of the first decades of the 19th century. 

GM 410 History of the German Language 3c-01-3sh 

History and development of German language, with special emphasis on 
relationships with English. Analysis of annals in Gothic, Old High German, 
and Middle High German using methods of historical and contemporary 
linguistics. 

GM 481 Special Topic var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. Designed to meet the special needs of a student 
group. 

GM 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

An opportunity to engage in an in-depth analysis of some topic dealing with 

the German language and culture through consultation with a faculty 

member. 

GM 493 Internship in Germany var-3-12sh 

Prerequisites: 12 credits in 300- or 400-level courses and a minimum of one 
semester study in Germany 

A supervised field experience in Germany with approved public agencies 
and institutions or private firms; no longer than one semester and no less 
than one month. Positions will be matched as closely as possible with the 
intern's personal interests and degree of proficiency in the German 
language. Academic work at the Gesamthochschule in Duisburg must 
precede the internship. Open to students in other disciplines, such as 
Political Science, International Relations, Business, etc.. with adviser 
approval. 

GN: Gerontology 

Department of Allied Health Professions 

Program 

College of Health and Human Services 

GN 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 



GN 481 Special Topics var l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content. 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are ottered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

GN 482 Independent Study var 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources 

GN 493 Internship 3sh 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, all required courses 

Supervised experience in public or private agency that serves aging clients. 

GS: Geoscience 

Department of Geoscience 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

GS 101 Earth Science: Geology and Oceanography 3c-01-3sh 

A nonmathematical treatment of introductory oceanography and geology 
designed specifically for nonscience majors. 

GS 102 Earth Science: Geology and Oceanography Lab Oc-21-lsh 
Should be taken concurrently with GS101 

Lab experiences in various aspects of oceanography and geology. Includes 
field trip(s). 

GS 103 Earth Science: Meteorology and Astronomy 3c-01-3sh 

No prerequisite 

The earth's upper environment is studied by focusing on the effects of the 

atmosphere and the earth's place in the universe on the daily lives of 

humankind. 

GS 104 Earth Science: Meteorology and Astronomy Lab Oc-21-lsh 

Should be taken concurrently with GS103 

Use of the weather station and the planetarium highlight the series of 

exercises designed to aid students in developing meaningful concepts about 

their ability to understand and. in the future, control their place in the 

universe. 

GS 110 General Astronomy 3c-01-3sh 

Specifically designed to introduce students to discipline of astronomy; 
emphasis placed on study of time and the seasons, planets, moon. sun. space 
flight, and constellations. Two night observations will be scheduled, weather 
permitting. 

GS 121 Physical Geology 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction to science of the earth: physical properties and processes of the 
earth's interior and crust and their interaction with surface processes which 
shape and modify the physical environment. 

GS 122 Physical Geology Laboratory Oc-21-lsh 

Should be taken concurrently with GS121 

Identification of common rocks and minerals, introduction to geologic 
landforms and structures, analysis of the effects of geologic processes on the 
environment. Includes field trips. 

GS 123 Intensive Physical Geology Laboratory Oc-31-lsh 

Should be taken concurrently with GSI21 by all Geology/Geoscience 

majors/minors 

Selected problems in rock and mineral identification, topographic and 

geologic mapping techniques, and geomorphology. Designed to prepare 

students for upper-level geology classes. Includes field trips. 

GS 131 Historical Geology 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS121 or permission of the instructor 

Introduction to the history of the earth and the record of physical and 

biologic evolution. 



Course Descriptions — 151 



GS 132 Historical Geology Laboratory Oc-21-lsh 

Should he lakcn concurrently with GS131 

Use of geologic map interpretation, fossil identification, .mil stratigraphic 
ioik sequences to solve problems in earth history. Includes field trips. 

GS 133 Intensive Historical Geology Laboratory Oc 31-lsh 

Should he taken concurrently with GS131 bj .ill Geology/Geoscience 
majors/minors 

Selected problems in stratigraphic analysis, paleontology, and structural 
geology; designed to prepare students for upper-level geolog) classes. 
Includes field trips. 

GS 141 Introduction to Ocean Science 3c-01-3sh 

Introduction io physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes in 
oceanography and the interactions among them. Impact ol exploitation of 

the oceans, coastal areas, marine, physical, and living resources on the 
ens ironmenl and on humankind. Includes field trips which may involve a 
fee and may occur on weekends. 

GS ISO Geology of National Parks 3c-01-3sh 

A study of geological processes and earth history as documented by the 
classical geological features of U.S. and Canadian national parks. Includes 
Badlands. Glacier. Grand Canyon, Great Smokies, Gros Morne, Mammoth 
Cave, Yellowstone. Yosemile, and others. Not open to Geoscience majors or 
minors. 

GS 151 The Age of Dinosaurs 3c-01-3sh 

A thorough introduction to dinosaurs and the world they inhabited. Topics 
include the most current theories regarding dinosaurian biology (behavior, 
metabolism, evolution), ecology (greenhouse climate, associated plants and 
animals), and extinction (asteroid impact, volcanism, climate change). Not 
open to Geoscience majors and minors. 

GS 221 Physical Resources of the Earth 3c -01-3sh 

Introduction to mineral, energy, and water resources of the earth, genesis of 
ore depositions, exploration, exploitation, and utilization of resources; 
impact of exploitation of resources on the environment and on humankind. 
Includes field trips which may occur on weekends. 

GS 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 2X1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

GS 310 Environmental Geology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite; gsh in geology or permission 

The application of geologic information to the accommodation and 
reduction of natural hazards, to land-use planning, and to the utilization of 
earth materials. Includes field trips which occur on weekends. 

GS 321 Mineralogy 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS121 or CHI 11 

Concerned with properties of minerals; introduction to crystallography and 
chemistry of crystals, followed by a determination of minerals and their 
probable genesis. Includes field trips which may occur on weekends. 

GS 322 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology 2c-3I-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS321 

Concerned with a description of igneous and metamorphic rock character 
based upon mineral components and physical relationship between mineral 
components of a rock. Includes field trips which may occur on weekends. 

GS 325 Structural Geology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: GS131 and GS 132/ 133 or permission of instructor 
Study of primary structures, contacts, rock mechanics, joints, faults, folds, 
foliation, and lineation. Includes work with geologic maps and structure 
sections. Brunton compass, orthographic and stereographic projections. 
Includes field trips which may occur on weekends. 

GS 326 Field Geology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS325 

Principles and techniques of field geology with emphasis on developing 
field skills using Brunton compass, aerial photographs, topographic maps, 
altimeter, Jacob staff, and rock color charts. Field projects involve 
techniques of field note-taking, measuring and describing stratigraphic 



sections, geologic field mapping and analysis, construction of geologic maps 
and structure sections, and report writing. Includes field trips which may 
occur on weekends. 

GS 330 Paleontology 2c-3l-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS131 or permission of instructor 

Study of the morphology, evolution, geologic significance, and 

pal ology of fossil organisms. Includes field trips which may occur on 

weekends. 

GS331 Hydrogeology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: MA121-122, GS121-122/I23. or permission 
An oven iew of groundwater geology, including flow equations, graphical 
solutions to flow problems, and computer modeling of How systems, as well 
as the geotechnical and social implications of groundwater utilization. 
Includes field trips which occur on weekends. 

GS 332 Geochemistry 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: CH111-112, GS121-122/123, or permission 

Introduction to low-temperature chemistry of the earth's surface and near- 

surface; includes discussions of chemical activity, solution chemistry, 

organic geochemistry, trace elements, isotopes, and the chemistry of natural 

waters. 

GS 336 Geology of the Northern Rockies var-3sh 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

A field study of the major geologic features and relationships involved in 
the development of the northern Rocky Mountains. National Park and 
Monument areas of South Dakota. Wyoming, and Montana are included 
among the 

GS 341 Solar System 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: MA 1 2 1 and PY 1 1 1 

Fundamentals of astronomy, with emphasis on observational methods, 
mechanics, and origin of the solar system and spatial relationship of the 
solar system to the other members of the universe. 

GS 342 Stellar Astronomy 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: MAI 21 and PY111 

Fundamentals of astronomy, with emphasis on sun, stars, galaxies, the 

sidereal universe, and use of spectroscopy for gathering astronomical data. 

GS 350 Operation of the Planetarium var- 1 sh 

Prerequisites: GS1 10. GS341, GS342, or permission of instructor 
Designed to acquaint the student with methods of operation and repair of a 
Spitz A-3-P planetarium. Content includes topics suitable for lectures to 
various age groups. Student will write and present a demonstration program. 
Meets once a week with occasional evening observations. 

GS 361 Physical Oceanography 2c-31 3sh 

Prerequisites: PY11 1 and MAI 21 or permission of instructor 
Introduction to physical, chemical, geological, and biological nature of 
ocean: topography, submarine geology, and bottom deposits. Includes field 
trip(s) which may occur on weekend(s). 

GS 362 Plate Tectonics 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisites: PY1 1 1-1 12 and a minimum of 20sh of geology 
Introduction to formal theory of plate tectonics. Topics include magnetic 
anomalies, first motion studies, thermal structures of the plates, kinematics, 
crustal generation, sea floor spreading, collision, and subduction 
deformation. Prior to 1988 was titled Marine Geology and Plate Tectonics. 

GS 371 Meteorology I 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: One year of physical science or physics 

Introduction to meteorological sciences; composition and structure of the 

atmosphere; radiation principles; elementary thermodynamics and heat 

balance. 

GS 411 Sedimentary Petrology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS321 or permission of instructor 

Study of sediments and sedimentary rocks with emphasis on interpreting 
ancient environments of deposition utilizing sieve analysis, hand lens, and 
petrographic microscope. Includes field trips which may occur on weekends. 



152 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



GS 412 Stratigraphy 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: GS41 1 or permission of instructor 

Principles and processes involved in development and description of 

stratified rock sequences, principles and problems of correlation, and 

selected stratigraphic problems. Includes field trips which may occur on 

weekends. 

GS 440 Subsurface Geology 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: Minimum 20 credit hours of geology 
An introduction to the geology of petroleum, its origin, migration, 
entrapment, and production. Lab is designed to provide practical experience 
in subsurface mapping techniques and the use and evaluation of geophysical 
logging devices. Includes field trips which may occur on weekends. 

GS 480 Geoscience Seminar var- 1 sh 

For seniors majoring in some aspect of geoscience. The seminar ( 1 ) provides 
the student with an opportunity to prepare, formally present, and defend a 
scientific paper based either on his/her own research or on a topic chosen 
with the approval of instructor and (2) provides opportunity to discuss topics 
presented by other students, faculty, or guests. 

GS 481 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content. 

It is the department's intention to use this course to schedule extended field 
trips and for teaching special courses which will utilize the specialties of the 
geoscience faculty. 

GS 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Independent study provides the student with an opportunity to use library, 
laboratory, or field research in an area which is of interest under the 
supervision of a designated faculty member. Approval is based on academic 
appropriateness and availability of resources. 

GS 493 Geoscience Internship var- 1 - 1 2sh 

Summer or semester work experience with cooperating firms or agencies. 
May be scheduled only after consultation with adviser and chairperson. 
Requirements include up to three on-site consultations, depending on credit 
hours and locations site: completion of up to three oral progress reports; and 
submission of a detailed work diary. Restricted to junior and senior 
department majors; only three credits may be applied toward major. 

HE: Home Economics Education 
Department of Human Development and 
Environmental Studies 
College of Health and Human Services 

HE 218 Child Development 3c -01-3sh 

Prerequisite: PC101 

Focuses on the normal development and behavior of children. Survey made 

of physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development of children from 

conception through early adolescence. Pertinent child development research 

analyzed. 

HE 220 Teaching in Child Development Centers 2c-41-4sh 

Prerequisite: HE218 or equivalent 

Techniques in planning for and teaching preschool children. Participation as 
teacher-assistant provides experience in applying principles of child 
guidance and development needed by teachers in preschool centers or 
secondary school child development laboratories. 

HE 224 Marriage and Family Relations 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: PC101 

Focuses on principles of human relations basic to marital decisions and 
adjustment. Influence of community and family experiences on personal 
development and adjustment explored. 

HE 250 Introduction to Teaching Vocational Home 3c-01-3sh 

Economics Education 

Overview of philosophy and organization of home economics profession 
and the role of home economics teachers. Opportunities for planned 
observations and varied teaching experiences using a variety of resource 
materials are provided. Self-evaluation relative to desirable teacher 
competencies is stressed. 



HE 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three limes. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

HE 317 Infant Development 2c-21-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE218 

Study of characteristic developmental changes of human infants from birth 
to approximately two and a half years. Participation as teacher assistant in 
infant/toddler child care center provides experience in developmentally 
appropriate guidance and planning for very young children. 

HE 321 Preschool Education 3c-01-3sb 

Prerequisite: HE220 or concurrently 

Examination of the child development philosophy as the basis for 
developmentally appropriate decisions and methods in preschool education 
programming. Emphasis is placed on play as a developmental process and as 
the major aspect of the preschool curriculum. May not be interchanged with 
EL353: Preschool Education. 

HE 324 Family Dynamics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE224 or equivalent 

Emphasis on processes and models of family development topics. Focus on 
approaches and dynamics of principles related to familial and marital 
adjustment and coping. 

HE 350 Teaching Family Life Education 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HE250, ED242 
Corequisite: EP302 

Emphasis on teaching family life education in home economics classrooms 
and ihrough community organizations and agencies. Lessons arc planned 
and implemented using a variety of instructional methods incorporating 
adaptations and modifications for special needs learners, basic skills, global 
concerns, and use of a problem-solving/decision-making approach. Planning 
of content, learning activities, instructional materials, and evaluation based 
on clearly stated objectives is emphasized. A microcomputer spreadsheet is 
utilized to manage a department budget and a gradebook. Participation in 
professional organization activities is expected. 

HE 418 Advanced Child Development 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE2IX 

Study of trends and research in the field of child development based on a 

review of major theorists and current literature. 

HE 420 Practicum in Child Development lc-101-6sh 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and HE220 and HE321 
The intensive practicum provides in-depth practical advanced laboratory 
experiences designed to refine and further develop the techniques and skills 
needed by professionals to work with young children and families. 

HE 422 Early Childhood Education 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE220 or concurrently 

Current educational theories and research reviewed in terms of implication 
for preschool and their effect on material, equipment, and activity selection. 

HE 424 Family Issues 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE224 

Concentrated study of selected areas of family life, with emphasis on current 

personal and social issues affecting the family. 

HE 426 Techniques of Parent Education 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE220 or equivalent 

Examination of nature, extent, and significance of parent education. 
Interrelationships of home, school, and community agencies are examined in 
light of various programs, methods, and techniques of parenting education. 

HE 427 Administration of Child Development Centers 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HE220 or equivalent, juniors or seniors only 
Development of special knowledge and competencies needed by successful 
administrators of child care programs including proposal writing, budgeting, 
management, staff selection and training, appropriate curriculum materials, 
philosophy, parent involvement, child advocacy, and program evaluation. 



Course Descriptions — 153 



HE 430 Student leaching Praclicum lc-01-lsh 

Taken concurrently with ED431 and ED441. Assists studenl teachers in 

anah/mg problems and experiences encountered during student leaching. 
Emphasizes the variety and types of home economics programs and focuses 
on developing effective teaching strategies dour sessions of three and a half 
hours during the semester). 

HK 450 Teaching Vocational Home Economics V 01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HE350 

Emphasis is on teaching vocational home economics in consumer/ 
homemaking and occupational home economics programs, Federal 
legislation impacting on home economics is analyzed for use in program 
decisions. Emphasis is given to program development using CBVE model, 
de\elopment of individual learning packets, vocational youth organizations, 
advisory committees, home economics and vocational educational priorities, 
professional organizations, proposal development for funding, impact on 
public policy, marketing home economics, and development of a personal 
philosophy ol homes economics education. 

HE 455 Home Economics Programs for Individuals with 3c-0l-3sh 

Special Needs 

Prerequisite: EX300 

Application of vocational regulations and public laws in relation to 

individuals with special needs. Developing home economics programs 

(planning, methods, strategies, and resources) for individuals with special 

needs applicable to school and nonschool settings. 

HE 463 Family and the Community 3c-01-3sh 

Study of community agencies and problems that affect families and their 
contributions to community. Investigation of ways group dynamics, 
communication media, and other resources aid understanding of human 
behaviors. Field experience is an integral part of the course. 

HE 481 Special Topics 3c-01-3sb 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

HE 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost"s office 

Upper-level students with high scholastic achievement pursue their 
particular interests outside the realm of the organized home economics 
education curriculum. May be taken more than once to a maximum of 3 
semester hours. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and 
availability of resources. 

HE 493 Internship var-6-I2sh 

Prerequisites: Permission of department, college dean, and university 
internship coordinator: upper-level standing 

Practical experience related to the student's major area of study. Objectives 
are developed individually in consultation with university faculty member 
who supervises the internship. Log and major paper required. May be 
repeated up to a total of 12 semester hours; however, these semester hours 
are not applicable toward the 124 semester hours required for graduation if 
student receives 12 semester hours in student leaching. 

HI: History 

Department of History 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

HI 195 The Modern Era 3c-01-3sh 

Interprets the development of two centers of civilization, Europe and 
America, within a global context, and extends from at least the Age of 
Enlightenment through the present, (majors should substitute HI202 for 
HI 195 to meet the liberal studies humanities requirements) 

HI 200 Introduction to History 3c-01-3sh 

For history majors and concentrates. Topics include philosophy of history, 
important schools of history and historians, and methods of historical 
research. Student is encouraged to become a better historian and to identify 
w ith historical profession. For history majors only. 



HI 201 Western Civilization Before 1600 3c-OI-3sh 

Survey course presenting in various forms the origin and development of 
major political, social, religious, and intellectual institutions in Western 
Civilization to approximately 1600. For History majors or by instructor's 
permission. 

HI 202 Western Civilization Since 1600 3c-01-3sh 

Development of Western civilization from the expansion of Europe to the 
present, including political, diplomatic, economic, social, and cultural areas. 
Introduces issues and interpretations encountered in upper-level courses. For 
History majors or by instructor's permission. 

HI 203 United States History for Historians 3c-01-3sh 

Introduces aspiring historians to United States history since 1763. 
Emphasizes the issues, methods, and problems that currently concern 
professional historians. For History majors or by instructor's permission. 

HI 210 Ancient Civilization: The Middle East and the 3c-OI-3sh 
Eastern Mediterranean 

An examination of the development and the spread of ancient civilization in 
ancient Middle East and the Eastern Mediterranean. Topics of study will 
include the characteristics of civilization and the development of political, 
social, economic, and cultural institutions in the river valley centers and the 
diffusion to the fringe areas, (course designed for non-majors) 

HI 212 Ancient and Medieval Europe 3c-01-3sh 

An examination of the development of civilization in Europe during the 
ancient and medieval periods. The course will focus on the Ancient Greek 
and Roman civilizations and the medieval European civilization. The 
characteristics and institutions of civilization will be stressed as well as the 
political history. 

HI 214 Themes in American History 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HI195 

Open only to non-History majors. Designed to give students an appreciation 
of the basic themes and issues in the making of American society. Students 
will examine themes such as the fruition of democracy, the American dream, 
slavery and freedom, the tensions between liberty and order, and the role of 
the United States in a world setting. 

HI 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

HI 301 History of Ancient Greece 3c-OI-3sh 

Will analyze major political, social, and economic developments in ancient 
Greek civilization from Bronze Age to death of Alexander. 

HI 302 History of Ancient Rome 3c-0I-3sh 

Will trace Roman history from early Republic down to fall of Empire. 
Roman political theory will be particularly emphasized. 

HI 303 Medieval Europe I, 400-1000 3c-01-3sh 

History of early Medieval Europe, from decline of Rome to beginnings of 
High Middle Ages: emphasis on political, social, economic, religious, and 
intellectual developments. 

HI 304 Medieval Europe II, 1000-1300 3c-01-3sh 

History of late Medieval Europe, from High Middle Ages to Renaissance 
period; emphasis on political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual 
developments. 

HI 305 Renaissance and Reformation 3c-01-3sh 

History of Europe from c. 1250: rise of commercial city, kings, and 
pressures on Christian Church to 1600. Some consideration of technology 
and voyages. 

HI 306 Early Modern Europe 3c-0I-3sh 

Greatness of France under Louis XIV; Sweden; Thirty Years' War. 
Emergence of modern society; French Revolution. 

HI 307 History of Europe: 1815-1914 3c-01-3sh 

Study of Europe in 19th century, with emphasis on the emergence of major 
thought patterns. Romanticism. Nationalism. Socialism, and Positivism. 



154 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



HI 308 Twentieth-Century Europe 3c-01-3sh 

Political, economic, and diplomatic trends in Europe since 1900, with major 
emphasis on causes and results of war and search for security. 

HI 311 Rise and Fall of Hitler's Empire 3c-01-3sh 

In-depth study of Hitler and the Nazi order; offers an analysis of 19th- 
century origins of Nazi ideology ar. i intensively analyzes domestic and 
foreign totalitarian policy ( I920-194D). including Holocaust, Resistance, 
and the postwar Nuremberg Trials. 

HI 320 History of England to 1688 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of the growth of the English nation, with emphasis on political, 
social, and economic developments leading to 17th-century conflict between 
Crown and Parliament. 

HI 321 History of England, 1688 to Present 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of the growth of England as a democratic constitutional monarchy. 
Attention directed to industrial revolution and to imperial expansion and 
England's role in 20th-century world. Attention given to social and cultural 
history. 

HI 322 French Revolution and Napoleon 3c-01-3sh 

Brief sketch of Old Regime, concentration on Revolution and Empire, with 
emphasis on politics, social structure, diplomacy, and economics. 

HI 324 History of Germany to 1848 3c-01-3sh 

Study of the development of Germany politically and culturally from 
ancient times, emphasizing medieval and early modern periods to 1849. 

HI 325 History of Germany: 1849 to the Present 3c-01-3sh 

Study of the political and cultural development of modem Germany from 
the Revolution of 1848, including imperial, republican, and totalitarian 
phases, to post-World War II East and West Germany. 

HI 326 History of Russia 3c-01-3sh 

General survey of Russian history, culture, and institutions. Special 
consideration given to study of historical forces formative of Revolution of 
1917. 

HI 327 History of Soviet Russia 3c-01-3sh 

General survey of contemporary Soviet history, culture, and institutions. 
Special consideration is given to the study of communist theory and its place 
in current Russian historiography. 

HI 330 History of the Islamic Civilization 3c-01-3sh 

An approach to learning about a non-Western culture: Muhammad, Arabs, 
and Muslims as creators of a great civilization from rise of Islam to 1800; 
emphasis on cultural institutions of Islam and their interrelationships within 
Middle East. 

HI 331 Modern Middle East 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of changes that have taken place in Middle East and in Islam since 
1 8th century and of contemporary problems in that region. 

HI 340 Colonial America 3c-01-3sh 

Survey of original thirteen states from their inception as colonies within the 
British empire to 1763, the eve of Independence. Attention is given to their 
political development; economic position within the empire; relations with 
Indians; and evolution of social, educational, and religious life. 

HI 341 American Revolution 3c-01-3sh 

An examination of Whig-Tory participants of American Revolution. 
Examines events from 1763 to 1783. Changing interpretations of the causes 
and effects of the revolution will be discussed. 

HI 342 The Early Republic 3c-0l-3sh 

Survey of United States history from 1783 to 1850, with special attention on 
constitutional, political, economic, and social trends. 

HI 343 Civil War and Reconstruction 3c-01-3sh 

Study of the failure of American democracy to cope with issues of mid-19th 
century, followed by political, economic, military, and social developments 
during war and reconciliation of North and South. 



H I 345 The Age of Ragtime: American 3c-0l-3sh 

History. 1900-1929 

Using the nation's cultural development as its thematic foundation, this 
course analyzes the transitional character of the Progressive Era, World War 
I, and the 1920s. 

HI 346 Recent United States History 3c-01-3sh 

Study of political, economic, and cultural changes in American life since 
1929; examines roots of social problems facing us today. Some recent 
foreign policy trends also studied. 

HI 350 History of Latin America Colonial Period, 3c-01-3sh 

1450-1820 

Study of life of people. Indian cultures, conquest by Spaniards and 
Portuguese, government during Colonial Period, and Wars of Independence. 

HI 351 Historv of Latin America: National Period, 3c-01-3sh 

1820-Present 

Study of the history of nations which have emerged since independence; 
emphasis on economic, political, cultural, and social developments of these 
nations, as well as relationships of these nations to others in the hemisphere. 

HI 360 History of Pennsylvania 3c-01-3sh 

Emphasizes the cultural, economic, political, and social development of our 
state in its various periods from colonial to today. Special attention given to 
diversity of Pennsylvania's people, their institutions and problems. 

HI 361 History of American Diplomacy, 1775-1900 3c-01-3sh 

Traces foreign relations of the United States from Independence to 
emergence as a world power. Topics concentrate on themes of commercial 
relations, political isolation, expansion, and debate over imperialism. 

HI 362 History of American Diplomacy, 1900-present 3c-OI-3sh 
Treats primarily our 20th-century involvement in world affairs and domestic 
debate over that involvement. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of 
interest groups and increasing power of Executive Department over foreign 
affairs. 

HI 363 Thought and Culture in Early America 3c-01-3sh 

Selected topics in early American intellectual and cultural growth, with 
emphasis on Puritanism, Enlightenment, cultural nationalism, and Romantic 
movement. 

HI 364 Thought and Culture in Modern America 3c-01-3sh 

Selected treatment of historical development of modern American 
movements in social and political thought, religion, philosophy, fine arts, 
and literature. 

HI 365 History of Black America Since Emancipation 3c-01-3sh 
Description and analysis of the role of blacks in the history of the United 
States since the Civil War; emphasis on key leaders, major organizations, 
leading movements, and crucial ideologies of blacks in modern America. 

HI 367 Native American History 3c-OI-3sh 

An unfamiliar perspective on a familiar tale. This course presents the "new 
Indian History" — North America from Native American materials and points 
of view. Identification, analysis, and synthesis of Indian realities and options 
over time are at the heart of this course. 

HI 369 Women in America 3c-01-3sh 

A study of the activities of women from the colonial era to the modem era — 
evaluating cultural, societal, religious, economic, and political frameworks. 
Reviews women's involvement in movements for feminism, social reform, 
unionism, and the abolition of slavery. 

HI 370 Religion in America 3c-01-3sh 

A history of religious belief and practice in the United States from the 
colonial period to the present, with an emphasis on the last one hundred 
years. 

HI 372 History of the Early American Working Class 3c-01-3sh 

Description and analysis of the nature and significance of the working class 
of the United States in the 18th and 19th centuries. The work settings and 
communities of workers will be examined as well as unions such as the 
National Labor Union and the Knights of Labor. 



Course Descriptions — 755 



HI 373 Histon of the Modern American Working Class 3c-01-3sh 
Description and analysis ol the nature and significance ol the working class 
ol the United States in the 20th century. Work settings and strikes vv. ■ 1 1 be 
examined and analyzed as well as unions such as the United Mine Workers 
and the United Auto Workers and labor leaders including Samuel Gompers. 
John L. Leu is. and George Meany. 

HI 374 History of Organized Crime 3c-01-3sh 

This course studies the relationship between urban, entrepreneurial crime 
and the evolution of industrial America. 

HI 390 Histon of Women— World Cultures 3c-01-3sh 

Explores religious, legal, political, economic, and mythic dimensions of 
women in society from ancient to modern times, including Western and non- 
Western experiences. 

HI 391 Film as History 3c-01-3sh 

Particularly concerned with probing the relationship between cinema and 
sen iety. History of film is explored and student is given some background in 
film interpretation and cinematography, the western, science fiction, police 
films, and great foreign and American detective films. 

HI 480 Senior Seminar 3c-01-3sh 

A regimen of research resulting in a written paper. Students work on a 
program selected by the instructor. For History majors or by instructor's 
permission. 

HI 481 Special Studies in History var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Each semester, courses are offered in interest areas that are not part of the 
regular program. Some examples of courses of this type are the Victorian 
Age. the History of Love, World War II. the Great Depression, the Adams 
Chronicles, and the History of New York City. Students may schedule as 
many of these courses as desired, but two per semester is the usual limit. 

HI 482 Independent Study var-3-6sh 

Prerequisites: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost"s office with 12sh in history; a 3.0 history 
average; permission of a faculty member 

Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources. Involves directed reading or research for qualified students. 
Experimental projects and personalized learning are encouraged. 

HI 483 Independent Study 3c-01-3sh 

An honors program within the independent study format. Minimum 
qualifications are a 3.0 QPA, 15sh of history, and a 3.2 average in history 
classes. Satisfactory honors work is rewarded by formal recognition at 
graduation. 

HI 493 Internship var-3-12sh 

With departmental approval, students are attached to local or national 
government or private agencies doing directive, bibliographical, archival, or 
museum work. Advising professor meets with intern regularly and 
determines what papers or reports will be required. 

HP: Health and Physical Education 
Department of Health and Physical Education 
College of Health and Human Services 

HP 110 Beginning Swimming 0c-21-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of swimming, fitness, and aquatic safety. 
Designed to meet the needs of the adult nonswimmer. 

HP 116 Badminton- Volleyball 0c-21-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of badminton and volleyball. 

HP 117 Fitness-Swimming Oc-21-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of swimming and fitness. 



HP 119 Golf-Bowling 

Fundamentals and techniques of golf and bowling. 



0c-21-lsh 



HP 123 Folk and Square Dance I 0c-21- 1 sh 

Fundamentals and techniques of folk and square dancing. 



HP 124 Fitness Through Dance Oc-21-lsh 

A physical litncss development course for men and women that employs a 
combination ol exercises and dance techniques performed to music. The 
purpose ol the course is to develop a sequential exercise program thai allow s 
the siudenl to develop and maintain aerobic fitness, understand body 
alignment and the principles of exercise, develop correct dance techniques, 
and plan and develop an individualized and independent continuance 
program. 

HP 126 Resistive Exercises 0c-21-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of progressive resistive exercises. 

HP 127 Fencing 0c-21-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of fencing. 

HP 128 Golf 0c-2l Ish 

Fundamentals and techniques of golf. 

HP 129 Badminton-Tennis 0c-2I-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of badminton and tennis. 

HP 134 Bowling 0c-21-lsh 

Fundamentals and techniques of bowling. 

HP 142 Foundations of Health, Physical Education, 3c-01-3sh 

and Sport 

Historical, philosophical, and psychosocial foundations of health and 
physical education are introduced. Specific emphasis is given to scientific 
theories and principles in such areas as health promotion and behavioral 
change, exercise physiology, motor development, kinesiology, and motor 
learning. 

HP 143 Health and Wellness 3c-0l-3sh 

Introduces the student to the major components of wellness: contemporary 
nutrition issues as they relate to personal food choices, physical fitness, 
stress management, sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS, and substance 
abuse. Completion of HP 143 fulfills the Liberal Studies Health and Wellness 
requirement. 



HP 145 Tennis 

Fundamentals and techniques of tennis. 

HP 147 Tennis-Fencing 

Fundamentals and techniques of tennis and fencing. 



0c-2l-lsh 



0c-21-Ish 



HP 150-151 Adapted Physical Education I-II Oc-varl-lsh 

Prerequisite: Special permission must be obtained from the department chair 
to register. 

Physical activity classes designed to accommodate students with special 
needs. Such activity programs are intended to permit specific individuals 
with medical restrictions to participate in activities which have a strong 
fitness component as well as a recreational and therapeutic component. All 
activity is subject to approval of the student's personal physician. 

HP 160 Downhill Skiing lsh 

The cognitives and skills necessary for beginning downhill skiing. 

HP 162 Scuba Diving Oc-21- 1 sh 

Designed to teach necessary skills and proper use of equipment for 
underwater swimming. Tanks, regulators, weights, and special equipment 
furnished. Student must purchase a mask, fins, and snorkel (approximately 
$15). Includes theory as well as practical work. 



HP 163 Backpacking 

Fundamentals and techniques of backpacking. 



0c-21-lsh 



-lsh 



HP 165 Lifeguarding 0c-2 1 - 

Prerequisites: Departmental consent and Advanced Swimmer 
Designed for professional lifeguards. Includes lifeguarding techniques for 
pools and fresh and saltwater beaches. Red Cross certification (Pittsburgh 
Division) granted upon satisfactory completion of course requirements. 

HP 166 Basic Smallcraft Oc-21-lsh 

Prerequisite: Intermediate swimming ability 

Designed to introduce the use of the canoe, paddle board, and sailboat. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of boating skills, safety rescue, and 
survival procedures. Red Cross smallcraft certification is granted upon 
successful completion of the course. 



156 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



HP 167 Basic Synchronized Swimming Oc-21-lsh 

Prerequisite: Intermediate swimming ability 

Activity course designed to assist students in the development of beginning 
synchronized swimming skills. YMCA certification is granted upon 
successful completion of course requirements. 

HP 200 Fundamentals of Physical Activity lc-21-lsh 

A foundation course designed for the purpose of training in the analysis and 
performance of the fundamental skills for subsequent motor behavior as 
they relate to games, sports, and dance. The opportunity to refine powers of 
observation through principles of efficient and effective movement 
fundamentals is provided. Individual data profile charts of performance will 
be completed for future reference. 

HP 201 Archery-Badminton-Bowling var- 1 sh 

Skill progressions and analyses, in combination with an opportunity to 
progress individually in skill competency in each activity. Methods and 
materials emphasized. 

HP 210 Motor Development 2c-01-2sh 

Corequisite: HP200 Fundamentals of Physical Activity 
A study of the processes of growth and development and their effects upon 
human motor behavior across the lifespan. Includes changes during physical 
growth, maturation and aging, and subsequent effects upon cognitive, 
perceptual, and physiological performance, both individually and within a 
sociocultural context. 

HP211 Dance, Rhythmic Activities, and Gymnastics 4c-21-3sh 
Prerequisite: HP200 Fundamentals of Physical Activity 
Designed to provide an aesthetic and kinesthetic movement experience 
which will prepare the student as a teacher of basic movement in a variety of 
situations. The dance section will include creative movement, rhythms, and 
square, folk, and contemporary dance. Gymnastics will include basic 
tumbling, stunts, and apparatus skills. 

HP 212 Team Sports 4c-21-3sh 

Prerequisite: HP200: Fundamentals of Physical Activity 

Introduces students to the history, current status, and leaching similarities 

among team sports. Also includes materials and methods unique to each 

sport. 

HP 213 Individual and Dual Sports 4c-21-3sh 

and Adventure Activities 

Prerequisite: HP200: Fundamentals of Physical Activity 

Provides historical and current status of individual and dual sports, as well 

as adventure activities. Includes skill development, analysis of skilled 

performance, and strategies for planning and implementing instructional 

programs. 

HP 221 Human Structure and Function 3c-01-3sh 

Anatomical organization of the human body, surveyed in sufficient depth to 
prepare students for physiology, biomechanics, and adaptive physical 
education. 

HP 230 Aerobic Fitness 1 c-21-2sh 

An opportunity to participate in a variety of aerobic activities; will aid 
fitness leaders in developing and implementing several types of aerobic 
programs; will offer current information on aerobics as preventive medicine. 

HP 242 Emergency Health Care lc-21-lsh 

American Red Cross Standard, Advanced, and Instructor's certification and 
Multimedia Instructor's certification awarded upon successful completion of 
this course. 

HP 246 Biomechanics 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: HP221 

Study of the relationship between mechanical and physical principles and 

human movement. 

HP 251 Foundations of Safety and Emergencv 3c-01-3sh 

Health Care 

Focuses on accident prevention, injury control, and first responder's skills. 
Emphasizes identificaion of causes of accidents, recommended 
countermeasures. and mitigation. American Red Cross Certifications are 
issued in ( 1) standard first aid. (2) community CPR. (3) instructor of 
standard first aid, and (4) instructor of community CPR. 



HP 252 Introduction to the Driving Task 2c-21-3sh 

Provides an in-depth treatment of operating a motor vehicle competently in 
all major variations and under most conditions encountered in traffic. A 
competent operator is one who performs the total driving task 
knowledgeably and skillfull) and demonstrates full understanding and 
application ol identification, prediction, decision, and execution process. 

HP 261 Water Safety Instructor 0c-2l-lsh 

Prerequisites: Departmental consent and lifesaving certification 
Emphasizes the teaching aspect of skills, techniques, and attitudes necessary 
in all areas of swimming. Students successfully completing course are 
qualified to hold such positions as waterfront directors, aquatic directors, 
and other similar positions. 

HP 263 Aquatics Oc-21-lsh 

Basic performance techniques in swimming strokes presented with special 
emphasis on teaching methodology, aquatic sports and games, water safety, 
skin diving, springboard diving, and other aquatic activities. 

HP 264 Advanced Aquatics 0c-21- 1 sh 

Swimming and rescue skills necessary to complete American Red Cross 
Senior Lifesaving Course. Emphasis placed upon a broad range of other 
aquatic experiences and teaching strategies. 

HP 270 Instructor of Handicapped Swimming 0c-2l- 1 sh 

Prerequisite: HP26I 

Concerned with the learning of skills used to teach swimming to exceptional 
children. All handicaps are considered. This course is important not only in 
physical education but also for the mentally retarded, rehabilitation 
education, agency personnel, postgraduate swimming education, YMCA 
Boys Clubs, community programs, private clubs, and industrial programs. 
The Red Cross certification Instructor of Swimming for the Handicapped is 
granted upon successful completion of the course. Summer only. 

HP 271 Instructor of Scuba Diving 0c-21-lsh 

Prerequisite: HP262 

Prepares instructors to teach skin and scuba diving. Emphasis is placed on 
teaching methods, use and mechanics of equipment, safety, diving physics 
and physiology, and advanced diving skills. Instructor of Scuba Diving 
certificate granted by the Professional Association of Diving Instructors 
upon successful completion of the course. Summer only. 

HP 272 Instructor of Canoeing 0c-21 1 sh 

Prerequisite: HP266 

Concerned with the learning of skills pertinent to teaching canoeing to 
beginners. All aspects of canoeing including paddling, repair of equipment, 
white water canoeing, safety, survival, and teaching techniques are 
presented. The Red Cross certification Canoeing Instructor is granted upon 
successful completion of the course. Summer only. 

HP 273 Instructor of Sailing 0c-21- 1 sh 

Prerequisite: HP266 

Concerned with learning of skills pertinent to teaching beginning sailing. All 
aspects of sailing are considered, including the elements of sailing, repair of 
equipment, racing, safety, and techniques of teaching. Summer only. 

HP 274 Instructor of Infants and Preschoolers 0c-21-lsh 

in Swimming 

Prerequisites: HP261, instructor's consent 

Methods course for preparation of swimming instructors in the knowledge 
and skills of teaching young children to swim. YMCA certification 
Instructor of the Very Young granted upon successful completion of course 
requirements. Summer only. 

HP 276 Coaching of Sw imming 0c 21 1 sh 

Prerequisite: HP261 

A lecture-discussion methods course designed to prepare Physical Education 
majors for coaching of swimming. Emphasis is placed on training methods, 
officiating, nutrition, scientific principles, and meet strategy. Summer only. 

HP 277 Coaching of Synchronized Swimming lc-21-2sh 

Designed to go beyond the activity nature of Basic Synchronized Swimming 
(HP267). Students are involved in set design, costumes, selection of music, 
making props, selecting themes, and organizing a program. Summer only. 



Course Descriptions — 157 



HP 27') Swimming Pool Maintenance and Chemistry 21 (II 2sh 

Prerequisite: HP264 

A lecture-discussion course designed to teach fundamental water chemistry, 
Filtration, treatment of water problems, winterization of outdoor pools, and 
pool management, Emphasis is placed on water testing and analysis o1 
chemicals and bacteria. Summer only. 

HP 2X0 Aquatic Facilities Management 21-01 2sh 

Prerequisite: HP264 

An organizational and administrative course designed to prepare the aquatic 
professional for management of indoor and outdoor facilities, includes 
facility design, safety procedures activity, and sport and recreational aspects. 
Suinmei only. 

HP 2X1 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 2SI are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 



HP 341 Evaluation in Health and Physical Kducation 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Evaluation theory, instructional objectives, and cognitive lest construction; 
technical and practical considerations in testing and interpretation of test 
results in both health and physical education. 

HP 343 Physiology of Exercise 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: HP22 I 

Physiological effects of exercise in humans, Majoi factors ol diet, conditioning, 
physical fitness, maximum performance level, and fatigue are considered. 

HP 344 Adapted Physical Kducation 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HP246 

Recognition of structural deviations, corrective exercises, and physical 
education programs for a wide range of handicaps. 

HP 345 Athletic Training I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HP221 

.Specifically designed to introduce students to the discipline of athletic 
training with emphasis in prevention, evaluation, management, and 
rehabilitation in sports medicine. 



HP 302 Gymnastics var-lsh 

Prerequisite: HP205 

Fundamental skill progressions and analyses in tumbling and all apparatus 
areas. Emphasis on individual conditioning and basic skill competency, 
safety procedures, and teaching techniques. (Last offered in 1992-1993) 

HP 317 Basketball Officiating lc-21-lsh 

Officiating techniques and responsibilities in basketball. Opportunities for 
officiating experience and qualification for professional ratings. 

HP31S Preprofessional Kxperience I 3c-01-!sh 

Recommended Prerequisite: HP321 

Prerequisite: Physical Education majors only 

Students teach as assistants to a faculty member in two different activities, 

one in physical education (general education) and one in elementary 

physical education at the University School. Emphasis on unit development, 

class management, leadership skills, and evaluation. 

HP 319 Preprofessional Kxperience 11 var-3sh 

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, departmental approval 
Students may request an assisting/teaching/leadership assignment in certain 
university-related areas that may be either instructional or noninstructional 
in nature. Examples of such professional areas are adaptives. recreation, 
dance, coaching, aquatics, intramurals, administration, elementary, service 
or major classes, club activities, and assisting in laboratory or the training 
room. 

HP 321 Methods in Klementary Health 3c-01-3sh 

and Physical Kducation 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Guides the professional student in the development of competencies 
essential to teaching health and physical education at the elementary school 
level. Includes theories of instruction in health science, necessity of a safe 
and healthful school environment, and judicious utilization of school and 
community health resources and service, as well as study of theories of and 
movement relevant to elementary school children. Observation, materials, 
methods of teaching, and opportunities for intern teaching provided. 

HP 325 School and Community Health 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Introduces students to the role of school and community in protecting and 
promoting the health of its members. Topics include historical development 
of the concepts of health and health education, identification of national and 
community goals to reduce risk of disease and enhance health status, and the 
responsibilities of both school and community toward achieving these goals. 

HP 333 Psychology of Coaching 2c-01-2sh 

The goals of athletics in schools and communities; principles and 
responsibilities of the coach; current problems. 

HP 335 Coaching and Managing of Athletic Programs 3c-01-3sh 
Lecture course designed to prepare students for coaching or administering 
an athletic program. Emphasizes the professional preparation and 
responsibilities of a coach, the support and auxiliary personnel working 
under and with the coach, and the coach's responsibility to the athletes, plus 
the administrative responsibilities of coaching. 



HP 346 Athletic Training Lab 2c-0l- 1 sh 

Should be taken concurrently with HP345 

Provides sufficient opportunity for each student to develop proficient skills 
and techniques in the areas of evaluation, assessment, taping, and 
rehabilitation procedures. 

HP 353 Driver Kducation Program Management 3c-01-3sh 

Emphasizes the development, organization, and management of high school 
driver education from the standpoint of its historical development to its 
present programs designed to meet the demands of the highway 
transportation system. Special emphasis on the role of the teacher in 
conducting a high-quality program that will meet with student, parent, 
school, and community approval. 

HP 354 Application of Driver Kducation Instructional 2c-21-3sh 
Modes 

Prerequisites: HP251, HP252. HP353 

Prepares prospective driver education teachers to plan, teach, and evaluate 
the four modes of driver education (classroom, on-road. simulation, and 
multiple vehicle range). Teaching high school students in supervised 
laboratory sessions is provided. 

HP 372 Health and Physical Kducation 2c-01-2sh 

for Special Populations 

Prerequisite: EX220; Junior level or above 

Methods and techniques of teaching health and physical education to special 
populations will be explored. Designed primarily for students majoring in 
special education, course will focus on handicapping conditions, limitations 
imposed by such conditions, and the responsibility of the special education 
teacher working in the physical education setting. 

HP 375 Physiological Basis of Strength Training 3c-01-3sh 

Designed to give the student the anatomical and physiological basis of 
muscle function. Students should also gain an understanding of changes that 
can be made through weight training and knowledge of programs that will 
bring about these changes. Opportunities for working with various types of 
equipment will be available. 

HP 40S Guided Research Problem var-2sh 

Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson 

Selection and research of a problem pertinent to student interests and those 
of the professions of health, physical education, and recreation. Classes held 
on a seminar basis. 

HP 410 Kxercise Prescription 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: HP343 

Designed to teach individuals to write exercise prescriptions based upon a 
subject's tolerance for physical activity. Special emphasis on risk factors, 
techniques of evaluation, drugs, injuries, environmental factors, and 
motivation and their role in physical activity assessment. 

HP411 Physical Fitness Appraisal 3c-01-3sh 

Involves the selection, administration, and interpretation of various tests for 
appraising the physical fitness levels of individuals. Information given 
concerning the various fitness components, and discussions held so that each 
student gains an understanding of the variables to be tested. 



158 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



HP 412 Physical Activity and Stress Management 3c-01-3sh 

Acquisition of necessary understanding of anxiety and stress; their nature, 
place in society, and intervention strategies as they relate to physical 
activity. 

HP 413 Physical Activity and Aging 3c-01-3sh 

Presents major aspects of physical activity, its importance to the older adult, 
and the organization of an activity program. Attention to physiology of 
physical activity, effects of activity on growth and aging, exercise 
prescription, flexibility, overweight and obesity, and motivational strategies. 

HP 426 Health Science Instruction 3c-01-3sh 

Health curriculum — K-12, methods and media of instruction in health 
science. 

HP 430 The American Woman and Sport 3c-01-3sh 

Comprehensive, multidisciplinary analysis of the problems, patterns, and 
processes associated with the sport involvement of girls and women in our 
culture. Presents historical perspective with an emphasis on physiological, 
psychological, and sociocultural influences. 

HP 441 Psychosocial Implications for Health and 3c-01-3sh 

Physical Education 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

A study of psychological and sociological influences, both theoretical and 

empirical, and their effects upon health and physical performance. 

HP 442 Seminar in Health, Physical Education, 3c-01-3sh 

and Recreation I 

Theory and philosophy of health, physical education, and recreation; current 
issues and problems; innovative and creative programs. 

HP 447 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) lc-ll-lsh 

Instructor 

Prerequisite: Basic CPR certification 

Study of methods and skills necessary to certify instructors of 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation and multimedia first aid. Successful 
completion of requirements leads to certification by the American Health 
Association and the American Red Cross. Summer only. 

HP 450 Curriculum and Programming in 3c-01-3sh 

Sexuality Education 

Topics include anatomy and physiology of the human reproductive tracts, 
development, birth defects, contraception, venereal disease, and abortion. 
Not for credit toward degrees in Biology. 

HP 481 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

HP 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

HP 493 Internship var-3-12sh 

Educational opportunity which integrates classroom experience with 
practical experience in community service agencies or industrial, business, 
or governmental organizations. Junior standing required. 



HR: Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional 

Management 

Department of Hotel, Restaurant, and 

Institutional Management 

College of Health and Human Services 

HR 101 Introduction to Hospitality Management 3c-01-3sh 

Focuses on the development of the hospitality industry and career 
opportunities within hotel and restaurant chains and independents. Guest 
speakers address various hospitality management topics. (Replaced FN 101 
in 1990) 

HR 115 Introduction to Tourism 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HR101; majors only 

Analyzes the economic and social impact of tourism, its promotion and 
implementation. Acquaints student with services needed by tourists, the role 
of the travel agent, and tourism organizations. (Replaced FN115 in 1990) 

HR 259 Hospitality Purchasing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FN 150 or equivalent 

Includes sources, standards, grades, methods of purchase, and storage of 
various foods, beverages, and fixtures. Emphasis on the development of 
purchasing policies and specifications. (Replaced FN259 in 1990) 

HR 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

HR 306 Food and Beverage Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: FN 150 or equivalent 

Examines principles, processes, beverage laws, and food and beverage 
service, sales, promotions, and menu design as functions of the food and 
beverage department. (Replaced FN306 in 1990) 

HR 313 Food Systems I 2c-var-4sh 

Prerequisites: FN 150. HR259. permission; professional chef's uniform 

required 

A basic course in quantity food production with experience in planning. 

purchasing, preparing, and serving nutritionally adequate meals. 

Requirements of the National School Lunch program emphasized in satellite 

and on-premises foodservice. Requires some preparation and service outside 

regularly scheduled class time. (Replaced FN313 in 1990) 

HR 356 Human Resources in the Hospitality Industry 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisites: PC101. HR313 

Organization and administration of hospitality business, including human 
resource theories and policies, work simplification, training, 
communication, and safety. (Replaced FN356 in 1990) 

HR 358 Food Service Equipment and Facilities Design 3c-01-3sh 
Prerequisite: HR313 

Examines types and uses of food service production and service equipment 
with emphasis on incorporation into an effective facilities design. Field trips 
permit investigation of a variety of unit designs. (Replaced FN358 in 1990) 

HR 360 Hotel Systems Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HR356. IM241, AG201 

Development and application of management skills as applied to the rooms 
division of a hotel. Emphasis on basic front desk procedures, rooms division 
departmental functions and relationships, and hotel facilities development. 
Students use MICROS 451 system in class. (Replaced FN360 in 1990) 

HR 365 Hotel Design and Maintenance 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisite: HR356 

Analyzes functions of housekeeping and maintenance departments within a 
hotel. Identification of various hotel design concepts and design 
characteristics are explored, as well as guest room layout and furnishing. 
(Replaced FN365 in 1990) 



Course Descriptions — 159 



HR 401 Cost Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HR356, 313 

Food, beverage, and labor controls lor hospitality or health care operations, 
including relationships between budgetary information and managerial 
decision making to meet financial needs. (Replaced FN40I in 199(1) 

HR 406 Catering and Banquet Management var-3sh 

Prerequisites: HR3 13, majors only; chef's uniform and wait-staff attire 

required 

Profitable organization, preparation, and service of catered events in both 

on- and off-premises locations are the main emphases of the course. 

Requires meeting times other than listed in order to meet course objectives. 

(Replaced FN406 in 1990) 

HR 408 Institutions Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HR.' I 3, 356, AG201. senior standing 
A compendium of the concepts of managing human resources, capital, 
materials, equipment, and markets as related to various hospitality property 
systems. Focus on concept development and managerial decision making. 
(Replaced FN408 in 1990) 

HR 411 Seminar in Hospitality Management 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: HR360, HR365 

Analysis of the current trends and practices within hospitality industry as 
related by industry professionals. Course includes researching topics and 
writing at least three research papers. (Replaced FN411 in 1990) Carries 
writing-intensive credit. 

HR 413 Food Systems II lc-61-4sh 

Prerequisites: HR313, HR356, HR401, and permission; professional chef 
uniform required 

Food systems course with emphasis on restaurant and dining room 
operation. Experiences to include selection of classic cuisines, meal 
promotion methods, budget development, personnel training, production, 
and service. (Replaced FN413 in 1990) 

HR 420 Hotel Sales and Services 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: BL235 and HR306 

Examines the types of hotels, facilities, and organizations that hold 
conventions or meetings from the sales perspective. Examination of 
procedures necessary to service the group once in-house. (Replaced FN420 
in 1990) 

HR 433 Educational Study Tour var-2-6sh 

Comprehensive program of directed activities permits first-hand experiences 
in the historical and cultural aspects of the hospitality industry worldwide. 
Visits to renowned operations will be included in the tour. (Replaced FN433 
in 1990) 

HR 481 Special Topics var-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

HR 482 Independent Study in Hospitality Management var- 1 -6sh 
Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 
curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 
member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources. Must apply a semester in advance and have sixty earned credits. 

HR 493 Internship in Hospitality Management var-6-12sh 

Prerequisites: 57 earned credits, 2.0 GPA, and completion of an approved 

440-hour Work Experience I 

An opportunity for students to work in a supervised experience directly 

related to the HRIM major. Must meet university and departmental 

internship requirements. Minimum of 440 hours required during the 

internship. 

Note: White uniforms including white shoes are required for all lab courses 
where food is prepared. Students must meet the professional dress 
requirements of the department. 



IM: Information Management 
Department of Management Information 
Systems and Decision Sciences 
Eberly College of Business 

Note: All courses at the 300 and 400 level are open only to students with 
junior or senior standing. All students, regardless of major or program 
affiliation, must meet course prerequisite requirements in order to enroll for 
a given course. 

IM 101 Mil rohased Computer Literacy 3c-01-3sh 

An introductory course designed to provide students wilh a fundamental 
understanding of computers. This course familiarizes students with the 
interaction of computer hardware and software. Emphasis is placed on the 
application of microcomputers, the use of productivity software (word 
processing, spreadsheet management, file and data base management), and 
the social and ethical aspect of the impact of computers on society. 
Note: This course is co-lisled as BE101 and CO101. Any of these courses 
may be substituted for each other and may be used interchangeably for D or 
F repeats but may not be counted for duplicate credit. 

IM 241 Introduction to Management Information 3c-0l-3sh 

Systems 

Study of management information systems and their design and 
implementation. General systems theory, computer hardware, and 
programming are emphasized then integrated to demonstrate how an MIS is 
developed. (Offered at branch campuses only after 1991-92) 

IM 245 Introduction to Microcomputers 3c-01-3sh 

This course demonstrates how to utilize the microcomputer in business. 
Topics will include hardware, operating systems, word processing, 
spreadsheets, data base, and BASIC. Offered for Associate Degree Program 
at branch campuses only. 

IM 251 Business Systems Analysis and Design 3c-0I-3sh 

Prerequisite: IM241 or IM300 

This course involves teaching the tools and techniques required for the 
analysis and the design of business systems. The major steps in the system's 
development life cycle are presented along with practical applications from 
the major subsystems of typical business organizations. Issues related to 
personnel, hardware, software, and procedures are explored as students 
work individually and in project teams to solve typical business application 
problems. 

IM 255 Business Applications in COBOL 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AG201 and IM241 or IM300 

This course introduces the student to the COBOL programming as it applies 
to business organizations and their applications. Structured COBOL 
concepts and methods are taught as the student learns how to solve business 
problems using computers. The student will be involved using files, reports, 
and tables to produce a variety of outputs utilized in operating and managing 
business activities. 

IM 260 Business Computer Application Project 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: IM255 

Provides each student an opportunity to utilize skills and concepts presented 
in previous courses in the planning, design, and implementation of a 
comprehensive case study involving computerized business applications. 
Students will work in teams and individually in performing tasks that are 
necessary to solve each problem assigned. These tasks will include systems 
analysis, systems design, programming, testing, and implementing and 
documenting simulated business problems. 

IM 281 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 



160 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



IM 300 Information Systems: Theory and Practice 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: CO/BE/IM 101. AG 202 

Includes basic MIS concepts, fundamentals, and practices. Broad areas of 
coverage are principles, the computer as a problem-solving tool, Computer- 
Based Information Systems (CBIS), organizational information systems, and 
Information Systems management. (Replaced IM 241 in Eberly College of 
Business core, effective fall, 1992) 

IM 350 Business Systems Technology 3c-0I-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO220 or IM255 

Student is taught fundamental and advanced concepts of computer hardware 

and a procedure for evaluation and acquisition of computer hardware. 

IM 370 Advanced COBOL 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: CO220 
Corequisite: IM350 

Advanced COBOL is a continuation of introductory COBOL with an 
emphasis on structured methodology of program design, development, 
testing, implementation, and documentation of common business-oriented 
applications. It includes a heavy emphasis on the techniques and concepts of 
the table processing, file organization, and processing alternatives, internal 
and external sorting, subroutines, and application development for both the 
batch and on-line systems. 

IM 372 Microcomputer Applications 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: IM350. CO220. AG20I, or by permission 
This course demonstrates how to use the microcomputer in business and 
how to provide technical assistance to users of the microcomputer. Emphasis 
will be placed on integrating software and interfacing with mainframe 
computers or with minicomputers. Topics covered include microcomputer 
hardware, microcomputer operating systems, local area networks, and 
microcomputer software tools. 

IM 382 Auditing for EDP Systems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: AG20I. CO220. or IM255 

Emphasizes the responsibility of the systems analyst to include in systems 
design the proper management and financial controls and audit trails in 
business information systems. The design of control for application 
programs and systems is covered. Audit software packages are examined. 

IM 450 Data Base Theory and Application 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: IM370. upper-division students only 
After learning data structures, the student will then apply them to 
CODASYL compatible data base management systems. TOTAL, and IBM's 
data base management system. Student must develop and use a data base as 
part of requirement. 

IM 451 Systems Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: IM350 and IM255 or CO220 

Develops an understanding of concepts and techniques involving 

conventional and structured approaches to analyzing problems of business 

information systems and systems definition feasibility, as well as 

quantitative and evaluative techniques of business information systems 

analysis. 

IM 470 Systems Design 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: IM451 

Students leam tools and techniques for design of a business system. Along 
with classroom discussions of principles and techniques for analyzing, 
designing, and constructing the system, students will formulate system 
teams to analyze the problems of an existing business information system, to 
design an improved system, and to control implementation of a new system. 

IM 480 Distributed Business Information Systems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: IM350 

Study of the techniques involved in planning, design, and implementation of 
distributed processing systems. Distributed marketing, financial, and 
corporate accounting systems are included. 

IM 481 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 



IM 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Individual research and analysis of contemporary problems and issues in a 

concentrated area of study under the guidance of a senior faculty member. 

Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

IM 493 Internship in MIS var-3-12sh 

Prerequisites: IM370, consent of department chairperson and dean 
Positions with participating business, industry, or governmental 
organizations provide the student with experience in systems analysis. 
Note: Internship IM493 can be taken, if the student qualifies, as a general 
elective. It does not fulfill the major-area elective requirement. 

IS: International Studies 

Department of Political Science 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

IS 281 Special Topics in Non-Western Studies 3c-01-3sh 

This course focuses on politics, society, and culture of a particular non- 
Western country or area. Course content is variable, depending on the 
semester. Will be taught by visiting exchange professors from non-Western 
countries. This Special Topics course may be offered on a continuing basis. 

IS 482 Independent Study var- 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

JN: Journalism 

Department of Journalism 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

JN 102 Basic Journalistic Skills 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN101 

Required for journalism majors and minors. Emphasis on grammar, 
punctuation, spelling, AP Stylebook, copyediting, headlines, and accuracy. 
(Offered as JN106 prior to 1994-95) 

JN 105 Journalism and the Mass Media 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN 101 

A critical examination of roles-goals of newspapers, magazines, radio, and 

television as they affect American society socially, politically, and 

economically. 

JN 120 Journalistic Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: EN 101, Nonmajors/Minors 

Emphasis on intelligent use of writing ability in a journalistic style and 

understanding of the why of journalism and mass media. This course 

practices and improves writing skills for all news media, print and 

broadcast. 

JN 220 Writing for the Print Media 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN102 (C or better), majors only 

A course in journalistic style intended for students who plan to become 
professional writers. Teaches the basic journalistic formats and strategies 
used in print media such as the summary lead, the delayed lead, and the 
conventional news-story format. Throughout emphasizes economy, clarity 
and the development of voice for a given medium. 

JN 243 History of the American Press 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN 1 20 or JN220 

Traces the development of the American press from its colonial roots. 
Emphasis on the role of the press in political and social development. 
(Offered as JN343 prior to 1994-95) 



Course Descriptions — 161 



JN 281 Special Topics Jc-01 3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Speeial topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 
topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be ottered under am special topic identity no more than three times. Special 
topics numbered 2N1 are ottered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 
students. 

.IN 321 Feature Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN 102. J N220 

Designed for the student who might work in journalism or who might wish 

to write on a part time or free-lance basis. 

JN 326 Public Relations 1 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN 102. JN 120 or 220 

Introduces students to the principles, practices, programs, and possibilities 
in the various areas of public relations. 

.IN 327 Layout Design and Production 2c-31-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN105 

Provides basic techniques and theories of layout design and production, 
including typography, copyfitting. photo/art cropping and scaling, and steps 
in design process. Includes traditional paste-up and desktop publishing in 
the design of ads. newspapers, newsletters, brochures, and magazines. 

JN 328 News Reporting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN102. JN105. JN220. majors only 

Includes instruction in writing the news story, preparing copy, interviewing, 
covering special events, and similar reporting activities. 

JN 337 Editing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN102, JN220 

Stresses basic practices such as copyediting and headline writing while also 
focusing on guidelines for improving accuracy, clarity, transition, spelling, 
and punctuation of copy. Students use wire service stylebook extensively. 

JN 338 News Analysis 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN 105. junior/senior standing 

A current events course, this is a critical study of news and its relationship 
to the mass media and the public. Seminar and discussion format. 

JN 344 Issues and Problems 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN 102. JN120 or 220 

Students examine critical case histories of ethical and professional situations 
and circumstances in the mass communication industry in a lecture and 
discussion format. 

JN 345 Sports Journalism 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN220 

Emphasizes skills for covering, writing, and editing of sports and introduces 

students to specific practices in newspaper. radio-TV, and sports information 

work. 

JN 347 Journalism Law 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN328, junior/senior standing 

Open to nonmajors by permission of the instructor. Survey of the major 
Supreme Court and state court rulings governing the mass media, especially 
the news media. Areas include libel, antitrust, free press/fair trial, privacy. 
Approach is nontechnical. 

JN 348 The Editorial Page 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing 

Emphasis on the writing of vigorous but thoughtful and fair editorials. Study 
of contemporary practice and policy on letters to the editor, columnists, 
cartoons, the op-ed page. 

JN 375 World News Coverage 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

A course dealing with international news events and analysis of 
international new coverage in sources from around the world. Emphasis 
placed on analyzing comparative coverage of events in different sources. 
Students study not only current international news but also how it is 
reported. The goal of the course is fostering a critical attitude toward news. 



JN 393 Document Design I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing 

Teaches students advanced principles of document design and gives them 
the opportunity to apply techniques of rhetorical/stylistic analysis, general 
problem solving, and holistic information display to a wide variety of 
writing formats used in business, industry, and government news. 

JN 423 Management in Mass Communications 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN493 or field experience 

Attention given to the process of advancement to management positions in 
the advertising, journalism, and public relations industries. 

JN 430 Public Opinion and the News Media 3c -01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Deals with understanding and measuring public opinion. Emphasis is placed 
on critically analyzing the historical origins and the dynamics of public 
opinion in the policy making process as well as the role of the news media 
in public opinion. Students then measure people's thinking on any given 
issue or issues. 

JN 446 Advanced Reporting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN328 (C or better), instructor permission 
Designed for the student seeking a career as a working journalist, this course 
refines basic reporting and deals with more sophisticated techniques and 
coverage. (Offered as JN346 prior to 1994-95) 

JN 449 Public Affairs Reporting 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisites: JN328. majors only 

This seminar course covers the specialized field of reporting government 

and public service beats. Techniques and sources are covered in lecture and 

demonstration and through guest speakers. (Offered as JN349 prior to 1994- 

95) 

JN 450 Advertising Writing 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN220, instructor permission 

This is a basic course in the preparation of advertising copy and continuity 
for all media. It is a combination of lecture and laboratory course. 
Enrollment is limited to fifteen upperclass majors per semester. (Offered as 
JN350 prior to 1994-95) 

JN 481 Special Topics var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 
These courses vary from semester to semester, covering a number of 
journalism specialties. From time to time they are converted to permanent 
course numbers. Special topics numbered 481 are offered primarily for 
upper-level undergraduate students. 

JN 482 Independent Study var-l-6sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 
chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Opportunities for independent study that goes beyond the usual classroom 
activities. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 
resources; enrollment is limited to fifteen upperclass majors per semester. 

JN 490 Public Relations II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN220. JN326 

A public relations writing class that includes assignments such as releases. 

features, newsletters, reports, biographies, rewrites, hometown stories. 

copyediting. interviewing, research, and special projects. 

(Offered as JN390 prior to 1994-9? I 

JN 491 Presentation Making 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN220. JN326 

Gives the student practice in writing and making oral presentations based on 
public relations cases and problems. Familiarizes the student with problem 
solving and small group communication skills necessary for those working 
in the area of public affairs. (Offered as JN391 prior to 1994-95) 

JN 492 Problem Solving in PR 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN328 

Introduces students to techniques for analyzing and tracking information 
flow in organizations. Introduces students to creative problem-solving 
techniques which are standard practice in corporate research groups. 
(Offered as JN392 prior to 1994-95) 



162 — Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



JN 493 Internship var-6- 1 2sh 

Prerequisites: JN102, JN105. JN220, JN328, department approval 
On-the-job training opportunities in journalism and related areas. Maximum 
of 6sh may be applied to 30sh minimum of major. 

JN 494 Document Design II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: JN 328, JN393 

Gives students advanced work in preparation of substantial corporate and 
government documents such as annual reports, lengthy project reports, and 
research reports, etc. Emphasizes skills in research of public and government 
documents, data analysis and problem solving, holistic information display, 
writing, and editing. (Offered as JN394 prior to 1994-95) 

LA: Latin 

Department of Spanish and Classical Languages 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

LA 101 Elementary Latin I 4c-01-4sh 

For beginning students. Emphasis is on oral and reading skills. Students will 
learn most of the Latin noun system; they will also learn how to answer 
simple and moderately difficult Latin questions. There are also short 
readings in easy Latin. Students learn significant differences between Latin 
and English. Attendance is required. 

LA 102 Elementary Latin II 4c-01-4sh 

A continuation of Latin 101. In grammar, students finish the noun system 
and learn several Latin tenses, including the perfect tense. Latin questions, 
oral and written, remain an important part of the course, as do the readings. 
There are class discussions and a paper on readings in English from 
Sophocles. Tacitus, and Cicero. Attendance is required. 

LA 201 Intermediate Latin 4c-01-4sh 

Intermediate Latin. More of the verb system is learned; while grammatical 
studies continue, more emphasis is placed on learning how to read short, 
intermediate-level selections from Latin literature. Oral and written 
questions continue. Ovid's Metamorphoses is the topic for class discussion 
and a paper. Liberal Studies credit is given. 

LA 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

LA 351 Advanced Latin I 3c-01-3sh 

Reviews grammar in-depth; analyzes the structure of the language. Written 
themes are not required. Selections from Latin prose are read for knowledge 
of their content and for developing knowledge of the structure of the 
language. Offered only by individualized instruction. 

LA 352 Advanced Latin II 3c-01-3sh 

Continuation of Latin 351. Selections are from poetry this semester. 

LA 361 Development of Roman Culture and Literature 3c-01-3sh 
Latin poetry and history will be read to show the influence of political and 
social ideas on literature; emphasis will be on the contrast between the 
Republican and Imperial periods. Some reading will be in Latin; most will 
be in English. Offered only by individualized instruction. 

LA 362 Latin Conversation and Composition 3c-01-3sh 

Aims at the ability to speak Latin on a conversational level and to write 
grammatically correct Latin prose. Offered only by individualized 
instruction. 

LA 371 Survey of Latin Literature I 3c-01-3sh 

Comprehensive view of Latin literature from Ennius through the Augustan 
Age. Offered only by individualized instruction. 

LA 481 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 



times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

LA 482 Independent Study var-l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

An opportunity to engage in an in-depth analysis of some topic dealing with 

the Latin language and culture through consultation with a faculty member. 

Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

LB: Library 

The University Libraries 

Academic Affairs Division 

LB 151 Introduction to Library Resources var-lsh 

A lecture/laboratory course (fourteen one-hour classes) which provides an 
introduction to the resources of a university library, how those resources are 
organized, and how to effectively use those resources. 

LB 28 1 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 281 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

LB 481 Special Topics 3c-0 1 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity no more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 481 are primarily for upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

LC: Learning Center 
The Learning Center 
Student Affairs Division 

LC 070 Reading Skills for College Study 3c-01-3sh 

This course is designed to assist students in the development of college- 
level reading skills with emphasis on textbook reading. Includes literal and 
critical comprehension skills, vocabulary development, and reading 
efficiency. This course carries institutional, nondegree credit, and attendance 
is required. 

LC 090 Introduction to College Math I 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: A student may not register for this course after successfully 
completing any course offered by the mathematics department without the 
written approval of the Learning Center director. 
Reviews basic computational skills and their applications. Includes 
operations with whole numbers, decimals, and fractions; the concepts of 
ratios, proportions, and percents; basic geometric principles; and an 
introduction to algebra. This course carries institutional, nondegree credit, 
and attendance is required. 

LC 095 Introduction to College Math II 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: A student may not register for this course after successfully 
completing any course offered by the mathematics department, without 
written approval of the Learning Center director. 

Introduces beginning algebraic concepts, including signed numbers; rules 
and properties of equations; exponents; polynomials; factoring; algebraic 
fractions; graphs and linear equations, inequalities, and radical expressions. 
This course carries institutional, nondegree credit, and attendance is 
required. 

LC 281 Special Topics 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 28 1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 



Course Descriptions — 163 



1.C4KI Special Topics !< 01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics courses are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to 
explore topics thai arc not included in the established curriculum. A given 
topic may be offered under any special topic identity in) more than three 
times. Special topics numbered 4X1 are primarily lor upper-level 
undergraduate students. 

LC 482 Independent Study var-l *sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's offil e 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources 

LR: Industrial and Labor Relations 
Department of Industrial and Labor Relations 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

LR 281 Special Topics 3c-01 -3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 2S1 are offered primarily for lower-level undergraduate 

students. 

LR 426 Case Studies in Labor-Management Relations 3c-01-3sh 
In-depth study of daily labor-management relationships in a variety of 
organizational settings through utilization of case study technique. Focuses 
on a problem-solving approach to the legal and contract administration 
components of the labor-management relationship. 

LR 480 Principles and Practices of Collective 3c-0l-3sh 

Bargaining 

An examination of the historical, legal, and functional parameters of 
collective bargaining. Topics covered include the organizing process, 
negotiations, contract administration, dispute resolution, and public sector 
labor relations. 

LR 481 Special Topics in Industrial and Labor Relations 3c-01-3sh 

Prerequisite: As appropriate to course content. 

Special topics are offered on an experimental or temporary basis to explore 

topics that are not included in the established curriculum. A given topic may 

be offered under any special topic identity no more than three times. Special 

topics numbered 481 are offered primarily for upper-level undergraduate 

students. 

LR 482 Independent Study var-l -3sh 

Prerequisite: Prior approval through adviser, faculty member, department 

chairperson, dean, and provost's office 

Students with interest in independent study of a topic not offered in the 

curriculum may propose a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty 

member. Approval is based on academic appropriateness and availability of 

resources. 

LS: Liberal Studies 
Liberal Studies Program 
Academic Affairs Division 

LS 499 Senior Synthesis 3c-OI-3sh 

Prerequisite: 73 or more semester hours earned 

This course helps students understand and handle complex intellectual and 
social issues from multiple perspectives. A selection of topics, available 
each semester and summer session, is announced and described in the 
undergraduate course schedule. Students should schedule the course during 
the senior year or at least no earlier than the last half of the junior year. 



MA: Mathematics 

Department of Mathematics 

College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 

MA 100 Basic Algebra 3c-01-3sh 

Note: A student may not take MA 100 Basic Algebra after successfully 
completing MAI 10 or a calculus course without the written approval of the 
mathematics department chairperson. 

A basic course in algebra including factoring, exponents and radicals, 
systems of linear equations, complex fractions, and inequalities. Designed 
lor those students who lack the basic algebraic skills required in MAI 10 
Elementary Functions. This course will not meet Liberal Studies math 
requirements. 

MA 101 Foundations of Mathematics 3c-OI-3sh 

Introduces logic and mathematical way of analyzing problems; develops an 
appreciation for nature, breadth, and power of mathematics and its role in a 
technological society; and introduces useful mathematics or mathematics 
related to student interest. Possible topics include logic, problem solving, 
number theory, linear programming, probability, statistics, intuitive calculus, 
introduction to computers, mathematics of finance, game theory. 

MA 102 Finite Mathematics 3c-0l-3sh 

Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics or a college 
mathematics course. Credit for MA 102 toward graduation will not be given 
to anyone with credit in any mathematics course beyond calculus. 
An informal approach to practical applications of mathematics. Fundamental 
concepts of enumeration, matrices, linear systems, predicate calculus, 
probability, and series will be introduced and used in considering 
mathematical models. Calculators or computer packages may be used in 
solving mathematical problems. 

MA 110 Elementary Functions 3c-01-3sh 

Note: A student may not take MA 110: Elementary Functions after 
successfully completing a calculus course without the written approval of 
the mathematics department chairperson. 

For students not prepared to begin the study of calculus; topics include 
polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. 

MA 117 Principles of Mathematics 3c-01-3sh 

This course is an introduction to the nature of mathematics, designed 
specifically as a first course for mathematics education majors to experience 
several facets of mathematics including deduction, induction, problem 
solving, discrete mathematics, and theory of equations. Enrollment open to 
secondary mathematics education majors only. 

MA 121 Calculus I for Business, Natural, and 4c-01-4sh 

Social Sciences 

Note: A student may not take MA 121: Calculus I for Business, Natural, and 
Social Sciences after successfully completing another calculus course 
without the written permission of the mathematics department chairperson. 
Prerequisite: MAI 10 or equivalent high school preparation 
Introduces non-Math major to analytic geometry, elementary functions 
(including logarithmic and exponential functions), central ideas of the 
calcul