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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog (Florida International University). [1997-1998]"


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Florida International University 

Undergraduate Catalog 

1997-98 



DO NOT REMOVE 


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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



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Florida International University 

Member of the State University System 
Miami, Florida 

1997 - 1998 Undergraduate Catalog 
Contents 

2 Academic Calendar 

6 State Board of Education 

6 Florida Board of Regents 

6 Executive Council 

6 General Information 

8 Accreditdtion and Memberships 

9 Academic Degree Programs 
12 Admissions 

24 Registration 

31 Financial Aid 

34 Academic Affairs 

39 Business and Finance 

42 North Campus and Enrollment Services 

47 University Advancement and Student Affairs 

43 University Outreach 

49 University Relations 

50 Intercollegiate Athletics 

51 Centers and Institutes 
63 Administration and Staff 

65 College of Arts and Sciences 

209 College of Business Administration 

229 College of Education 

265 College of Engineering and Design 

305 College of Health 

327 School of Hospitality Mandgement 

337 School of Journalism and Mass Communication 

347 School of Nursing 

353 College of Urban and Public Affairs 

374 The Honors College 

376 Military Science 

377 Campus Maps 
379 Index 

FIU and Florida International University are registered marks. Florida International 
University believes in equal opportunity practices which conform to all laws 
against discrimination and is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to 
race, color, creed, age, handicap, sex, marital status, or national origin. Addition- 
ally, the University is committed to the principle of taking the positive steps neces- 
sary, to achieve the equalization of educational and employment opportunities. 
Note: The programs, policies, requirements, and regulations published in this cata- 
log are continually subject to review in order to serve the needs of the University's 
various publics and to respond to the mandates of the Florida Board of Regents 
and the Florida Legislature. Changes in programs, policies, requirements, and 
regulations may be made without advance notice. The programs and courses 
listed in this catalog are still under review to meet the state mandated course lev- 
eling requirements of SB 2330. For additional information, please contact the aca- 
demic department 

Students who enrolled as freshman in Fall 1996 and all students enrolling thereaf- 
ter, should carefully review the credit hour requirements for degree programs. 
Students exceeding degree requirements may be subject to an increased ma- 
triculation charge for excess hours. 

The ultimate responsibility for knowing degree requirements and the require- 
ments imposed upon students by State law rests with the students. 
This document was produced at an annual cost of $34,867 to SO. 996 per copy to 
inform the public about University Programs. Fees given in this catalog are tenta- 
tive pending legislative action. 



2 / Academic Calendar 1997 - 1998 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1997-1998* 

Fall Semester 1997 

March 15 Priority Deadline for Financial Aid Applications 1997-1998. 

March 31 Registration Access Information available for Multi-Term Registration. 

April 1 Last day for International Students to submit applications and all supporting documents for 

Fall Term admission 
April 7-1 1 Official Multi-Term Registration for Degree Seeking Students only, by appointment day and time. 

April 14-April 18 Open Multi-Term Registration, 
April 21 -May 2 Summer registration only. 
May 26 First day to apply for Fall 1997 term graduation. 

May 30 Admission application priority consideration deadline (except international students). 

July 7 - 8 Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

July 10-11 Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park and North Campus). 

July 15-16 Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park and North Campus). 

July 1 7 Transfer Student Orientation Sessions (North Campus). 

July 18 Transfer Student Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

July 21 Registration Access Information available for Fall 1997 term. 

July 22 Transfer Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

July 23 Transfer Orientation Sessions (North Campus), 

July 24 Transfer Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

July 28 Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available for registering students. 

July 28-Aug 1 Official Registration Week (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

August 4-22 Open Registration. 

August 7-8 Freshman Orientation Sessions(North Campus). 

August 12-13 Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

August 18-19 Freshman Orientation Sessions (North Campus). 

August 19-20 Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

August 20 Transfer Orientation Sessions (North Campus). 

August 20 Graduate International Student Orientation Session (University Park) 

August 21 International StudentOrientation Session (University Park & North Campus) 

August 21 Transfer Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

August 21-24 Housing check-in (All students, 9 am-8 pm). 

August 22 Last day to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 

August 25 Classes begin, 

August. 25-29 Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

August 29 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to complete Late Registration. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to change a grading option, 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 
liability. 

• Last day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 

• Last day for students to apply and to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate 
class schedules. 

• Last day (by 5 pm) to apply for graduation at the end of Fall 1997 term. 
September 1 Labor Day Holiday (University closed). 

September 5 October 4th CLAST exam registration deadline. 

September 19 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

September 19 Faculty Convocation. 

October 2 - 3 Rosh Hashanah" 

October 4 CLAST Test. 

October 1 1 Yom Kippur" 

October 16- 17 Sukkot" 

October 1 7 Deadline (by 5 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

• Deadline (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 
October 23 - 24 Sukkot" 

November 1 1 Veterans' Day Holiday (University Closed). 

November 27-28 Thanksgiving Holiday (University Closed). 



Academic Calendar 1997 -1998/3 



December 5 Classes end. 

December 6-12 Official Examination Period. 

December 14 Commencement Exercises. 

December 16 Grades due. 

December 18 Grades available to students by telephone and at kiosks. 

December 25 Christmas Holiday (University Closed). 



Spring Semester 1998 

August 29 Last day for International Students to submit applications and all supporting documents for 

Spring Term admission. 
September 15 First day to apply for Spring 1998 term graduation. 

September 26 Admission application priority consideration deadline (except international students). 

November 3 Registration Information Access available for Spring 1998 term. 

November 5 - 6 Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park and North Campus). 
November 7 Transfer Student Orientation (University Park and North Campus). 

November 1 1 Veterans' Day Holiday (University Closed). 

November 17-21 Registration Information, Advising and Access Codes available for Spring 1998 term 
November 24 - 28 Official Registration Week (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 
November 27 -28 Thanksgiving Holiday (University closed). Telephone registration available. 
December 1 - 5 Open Registration. 

December 5 Last day to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 

January 1 New Year's Day (University Closed). 

January 2 International Student Orientation Session (University Park & North Campus). 

January 2-4 Housing check-in 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. 

January 5 Classes begin. 

January 5 - 9 Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

• Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available to students planning to register for Spring Term. 
January 9 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to complete Late Registration. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to change grading option. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 
. liability. 

• Last day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 

• Last day for students to apply and to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate 
class schedules. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for Spring 1998 term graduation. 
Financial Aid Applications available for 1998-1999. 
Martin Luther King Holiday (University Closed). 
Last day to register for the February 21st CLAST exam. 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 
Spring 1998 Mini-Semester 
CLAST Test. 
Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade, 
ch 16-21 Spring Break. 
I 10 Good Friday" 
111-12 Passover** 
I 17-18 Passover** 
I 17 Classes End. 
I 18-24 Official Examination Period. 
I 27 Commencement Exercises. 
I 28 Grades due. 

I 30 Grades available to students by telephone and at kiosks. 

I 30 International Student Orientation Session (University Park & North Campus). 



4 / Academic Calendar 1997 - 1998 



Complete Summer Semester 1998 

January 30 



February 27 
Apri 13-17 
April 14 
April 15 
April 20 ■ 
April 27 ■ 
May 1 
May 2-3 
May 4 
May 4-8 

May 8 



14 
May 1 



May 9 
May 25 
May 29 
May 31 - 
June 7 
June 25 
June 26 



June 26-28 
July 4 
August 1 1 
August 13 
August 17 



June 1 



Last day for International Students to submit applications and all supporting documents for 

Summer Term admission. 

Admission application priority consideration deadline (except international students). 

Registration Information, Advising and Access Codes available for Summer/Fall 1998 terms. 

Transfer Orientation Session (North Campus). 

Transfer Orientation Session (University Park). 

Official Registration Week (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

Open Registration. 

Last day to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 

Housing Check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. for Summer Term A. 

Classes begin. 

Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

• Short Term Loan Applications available to students planning to register for Summer Term. 
Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to complete Late Registration. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to change grading option. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 
liability. 

• Last day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 

• Last day for students to apply and to sign Short Term Tuition Loan promissory notes and validate 
class schedules. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for Summer 1998 graduation. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for Summer 1 998 graduation. 
Last day to register for the June 7th CLAST exam. 
Memorial Day Holiday (University closed). 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

Shavuot" 

CLAST Test. 

International Student Orientation Session (University Park & North Campus). 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.)to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 
Housing Check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. for Summer Term B 
Independence Day (University Closed). 

Classes end 
Grades due. 
Grades available to students by telephone and at kiosks. 



Summer Term A 

May 2-3 
May 4 
May 4-8 
May 8 



May 9 
May 25 
May 29 

June 7 
June 19 
June 23 
June 25 
August 17 



Housing check-in, 9 a.m to 8 p.m. 

Classes begin. 

Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to complete Late Registration. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to change grading option. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 
liability. 

• Last day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 
Last day to register for June 9th CLAST exam. 

Memorial Day Holiday (University closed). 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 
CLAST Test. 

Classes end."* 

Grades due. 

Summer Term A grades available to students by telephone and at kiosks. 

Final grades and GPA calculation available by telephone and at kiosks. 



Academic Calendar 1997 - 1998 / 5 



Summer Term B 

June 15-26 
June 17-18 
June 18-19 
June 22-23 
June 25-26 
June 26 
June 26-28 
July 4 
June 29 
June 29- July 6 
July 6 



July 24 



August 1 1 
August 13 
August 17 



Summer Term B registration resumes. 

Freshman Orientation Sessions (North Campus). 

Freshman Orientation Sessions (University Park). 

Freshmen Orientation (University Park and North Campus). 

Freshmen Orientation (University Park and North Campus). 

Last day to register without incurring $100.00 late registration fee. 

Housing Check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. for Summer Term B. 

Independence Day (University Closed). 

Classes begin. 

Registration for State Employees using fee waivers. 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to complete Late Registration. 

• Drop/Add Period ends at 5 p.m. 

• Last day to change grading option. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 
liability. 

• Last day for Financial Aid recipients to validate class schedules to retain registered courses. 
Last day (by 5 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

• Last day (by 5 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 
Classes end. 

Grades due. 

Grades available to students by telephone and at kiosks. 



'Calendar dates are subject to change. Please contact appropriate offices for verification and updates. 

"No examinations or major quizzes may be given during the designated hours. Jewish holidays begin at 4 p.m. the 

day before the holiday and end at 7 p.m. the day of the holiday. 

""Grades will be posted on transcripts. However, graduation will not be processed until the end of the Complete 

Summer Term, August 1 1 . 



6 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information 



State Board of Education 

Lawton Chiles Governor 

Sandra B. Mortham Secretary of 

State 

Robert Butterworth Attorney General 

Robert F. Milligan Comptroller 

Bill Nelson State Treasurer 

and Insurance Commissioner 

Bob Crawford Commissioner 

of Agriculture 

Frank T. Brogan Commissioner 

of Education 

Florida Board of Regents 

Elizabeth G. Lindsay Chairman, 

Sarasota 

Steven J. Uhlfelder Vice-Chairman 

Tallahassee 

Andrea I. Anderson 'Ft. Myers 

Julian Bennett Jr. Panama City 

Frank T. Brogan Commissioner 

of Education 

Paul Cejas Miami 

Charlton B. Daniel, Jr. Gainesville 

James F. Heekin, Jr. Orlando 

Philip D. Lewis Riviera Beach 

Gwendolyn F. McLin Okahumpka 

Jon C. Moyle West Palm Beach 

Dennis M. Ross Tampa 

Welcom H. Watson Fort Lauderdale 

Charles B. Reed Chancellor, 

State University System 

James R. Harding Student 

Regent 

Executive Council 

Modesto A. Maidique President 

James A. Mau Provost and Vice 

President for Academic Affairs 

Richard J. Correnti Vice President 

for North Campus 

and Enrollment Services 

Cynthia Curry Vice President 

for Business and Finance 

Paul D. Gallagher Vice President 

for University Advancement 

and Student Affairs 

Mary L. Pankowski Vice President 

for University Outreach 

and Intercollegiate Athletics 

Steve Sauls Associate Vice President 

for University Relations 



History 

Florida International University, a 
member institution of the State Uni- 
versity System of Florida, was estab- 
lished by the State Legislature on 
June 22, 1965. Classes began at Uni- 
versity Park on September 19, 1972, 
with nearly 6,000 students enrolled in 
upper-division undergraduate and 
graduate programs. In 1981 the Uni- 
versity added lower division classes 
for freshmen and sophomores, ex- 
panding its enrollment capacity. In 
1984, the University received author- 
ity to begin offering degree pro- 
grams at the doctoral level; these 
programs received Level IV accredi- 
tation from the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools (SACS) in 
1986. 

The Florida Board of Regents ap- 
pointed Charles E. Perry as the first 
president of FIU in July of 1969. He 
was succeeded in June, 1976 by 
President Harold Brian Crosby. Gre- 
gory Baker Wolfe was named the 
third president in February, 1979. 
Modesto A. (Mitch) Maidique was 
named the fourth President of Flor- 
ida International University on Au- 
gust 27, 1986. Maidique received his 
Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from 
the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology and was associated with 
MIT, Harvard, and Stanford for 20 
years. 

University Mission 

Florida International University (FIU) is 
an urban, multicampus, doctoral- 
granting institution located in Miami, 
Florida's largest population center 
with campuses at University Park 
and North Miami, selected pro- 
grams offered in Davie and Fort Lau- 
derdale, and off-campus continuing 
education programs. The mission of 
this state University is to serve the 
people of Southeast Florida, the 
state, the nation and the interna- 
tional community by imparting 
knowledge through excellent teach- 
ing, creating new knowledge 
through research, and fostering 
creativity and its expression. 

Chartered by the Florida Legisla- 
ture in 1965, the University opened 
its doors in 1972 to the largest enter- 
ing class in United States collegiate 
history. With strong undergraduate 
programs centered around a rigor- 
ous liberal arts core curriculum, FIU 
now offers more than 200 baccalau- 
reate, master's and doctoral de- 



gree programs through its many 
Colleges and Schools: Arts and Sci- 
ences, Business Administration, Ur- 
ban and Public Affairs, Education, 
Engineering and Design, Health, 
Hospitality Management, Journal- 
ism and Mass Communication, and 
Nursing. The University's increasingly 
prominent art museum, its libraries, 
and specialized centers and insti- 
tutes enhance these programs. The 
University continues to balance its 
programs for full- and part-time de- 
gree-seeking students and to ad- 
dress the special needs of lifelong 
learners, traditionally and through 
distance learning. Campus life fos- 
ters a sense of community which 
provides for the intellectual, aes- 
thetic, social, emotional, physical 
and moral development of stu- 
dents while providing opportunities 
for leadership training, awareness 
of cultural diversity, and a sensitivity 
to social issues and concerns. 

Southeast Florida and FIU are 
alike in their explosive growth, rich 
ethnic and cultural diversity, and 
quest for excellence. FIU is a lead- 
ing institution in one of the most dy- 
namic, artistically expressive, and 
cosmopolitan cities in the United 
States, the gateway for Latin Amer- 
ica and the Caribbean. The contin- 
ued globalization of the world's 
economic, social and political sys- 
tems adds to the importance of 
FlU's mission, and combines with 
our subtropical environment, and 
our strategic location to strengthen 
Southeast Florida's role as an infor- 
mation and transportation center. 

From this unique setting we have 
derived five key strategic themes 
that guide the University's develop- 
ment: International, Environmental, 
Urban, Health, and Information. We 
focus on these themes with a com- 
mitment to quality management 
and cultural diversity. To summarize 
the University priorities: first, to 
graduate a well educated, ethni- 
cally diverse student body by con- 
tinuing to enhance our teaching 
and by broadening our graduate 
and professional programs; second, 
to promote research and creative 
activities by nurturing strategically 
selected disciplines which contrib- 
ute to the social, artistic, cultural, 
economic, environmental and tech- 
nological foundations for the 21 s 
century; and third, to solve critical 
health, social, educational, and en- 
vironmental problems through ap- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 7 



plied research and service. These 
strategic themes and priorities guide 
our pursuit of recognition as one of 
America's top 25 urban public re- 
search universities by the end of this 
century. (Approved by Florida 
Board of Regents, September 1993) 

Goals 

Florida International University (FIU), 
a comprehensive, multi-campus ur- 
ban research institution, is commit- 
ted to providing both excellence 
and access to all qualified students 
desiring to pursue higher education. 
FIU offers a comprehensive under- 
graduate liberal arts education 
structured around a rigorous core 
curriculum. The University also offers 
a number of highly-regarded mas- 
ter's and doctoral programs in six of 
its colleges and schools. 

The University's academic pro- 
grams are designed to achieve four 
major goals: 

1 . To provide an excellent univer- 
sity education for all qualified stu- 
dents, challenging and stimulating 
them at the lower-division level and 
preparing them to choose a major 
field in the upper division, leading to 
selection of a profession or occupa- 
tion or further study at the graduate 
level. FIU encourages its graduates, 
as educated citizens, to pursue life- 
time opportunities to contribute to 
the development of their commu- 
nity's cultural, aesthetic, and eco- 
nomic environments through 
participation. 

2. To generate new knowledge 
through a vigorous and ambitious 
commitment to research in all aca- 
demic disciplines and to encourage 
creativity by fostering an atmos- 
phere conducive to the expression 
of ideas, artistic development, and 
communication with the external 
community. 

3. To serve the university's exter- 
nal community, with special atten- 
tion to Dade, Broward, and Monroe 
counties, enhancing South Florida's 
capacity to meet its cultural, eco- 
nomic, social and urban challenges 
as we move into the 21st century. 

4. To foster greater global under- 
standing as a major center of inter- 
national education for the people 
of the Americas and the interna- 
tional community. 

Campuses 

The University operates two cam- 
puses in Dade County and two edu- 
cational sites in Broward County. 



The main campus is located at 
University Park in west Dade County, 
approximately 10 miles west of 
downtown Miami. 

The North Campus is adjacent to 
Biscayne Bay, at Northeast Biscayne 
Boulevard and 151st Street. 

The Broward County area is 
served cooperatively by FIU and 
FAU with locations on the campus of 
Broward Community College in 
Davie and the University Tower in 
downtown Fort Lauderdale. FIU also 
offers classes in South Dade on the 
Homestead campus of Miami-Dade 
Community College. 

University Park 

The University Park campus occu- 
pies 342 acres of land. Apartment- 
style residence halls, the Golden 
Pahther Sports Arena, the Library, an 
environmental preserve and other 
athletic facilities contribute to a 
pleasant collegiate atmosphere. 
The university is currently in the midst 
of an $200 million construction pro- 
gram - the largest in its history. Con- 
struction is underway on a $37.5 
million five-floor addition to the Li- 
brary, a $16 million Performing Arts 
Complex, and a $7.5 million College 
of Education building. The university 
recently completed a new $10 mil- 
lion residence hall, a multi-million 
dollar expansion of the Graham Uni- 
versity Center, a football and track 
stadium and a new baseball sta- 
dium. Recently, the National Hurri- 
cane Center moved its offices from 
Coral Gables to a $4 million facility 
on the University Park campus. 
FIU also offers classes on the 
Homestead Campus of Miami-Dade 
Community College. Recently, FIU 
added a 38-acre urban research 
and training complex in West Dade 
known as the Center for Engineering 
and Applied Research. 

North Campus 

The North Campus of Florida Interna- 
tional University educates more than 
8,000 students on 200 acres on Bis- 
cayne Bay. Academic programs in 
Hospitality Management, Journalism 
and Mass Communication, Nursing, 
and Urban and Public Affairs are 
headquartered on the North Cam- 
pus. In addition, degree programs in 
Arts and Sciences, Business Admini- 
stration, Education, and Health are 
offered on the North Campus. 

North Campus is the hub for FlU's 
community outreach efforts. It 
serves as the host campus to the E- 
Iders Institute, the HRS/Children and 
Families Professional Development 
Centre, the Institute of Government, 



the Institute for Public Opinion Re- 
search, the Roz and Cal Kovens 
Conference Center, and the South- 
east Florida Center on Aging. 

Students may apply for admis- 
sion and financial aid, register for 
classes and receive academic ad- 
vising at North Campus. 

The North Campus is adminis- 
tered by the Office of the Vice Presi- 
dent of North Campus and 
University Outreach. The office is on 
the Third Floor of the Library. Repre- 
sentatives from the Divisions of Aca- 
demic Affairs, Business and Finance, 
Student Affairs and Public Affairs are 
also found there. Liaisons with per- 
sonnel in other Divisions and at Uni- 
versity Park are coordinated 
through North Campus Administra- 
tion and Operations. 

FIU Broward 

FIU faculty and administrators pro- 
vide a comprehensive university 
presence in Broward County in co- 
operation with Broward Community 
College (BCC) and Florida Atlantic 
University (FAU). FIU offers a select 
number of full degree programs 
and a variety of supplementary 
courses at two Broward locations. 

Undergraduate and graduate 
programs are held at the Central 
Campus of BCC, which is located in 
Davie. In concert with BCC, a "2+2' 
program permits students to enroll 
at BCC for the first two years of 
study and then to transfer to FIU for 
the completion of their undergradu- 
ate work, receiving a bachelor's de- 
gree. 

The University Tower in downtown 
Fort Lauderdale serves as the admin- 
istrative headquarters for the FIU 
Broward Programs and as a major 
instructional facility. It is utilized for 
graduate programs, research, ad- 
ministrative offices, and services. 
Both FIU Broward facilities are 
staffed to provide support services 
such as academic advisement, ad- 
missions, registration, and student 
activities. 

General Academic 
Information 

Florida International University offers 
over 200 academic programs at the 
bachelor's, master's, and doctorate 
degree levels which are designed 
to respond to the changing needs 
of the growing metropolitan areas 
of South Florida. Degree programs 
are offered in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, College of Business 
Administration, College of Educa- 
tion, College of Engineering and De- 



8 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



sign, College of Health, School of 
Hospitality Management, School of 
Journalism and Mass Communica- 
tion, School of Nursing, and College 
of Urban and Public Affairs. 

In 1995, U.S News & World Report 
magazine ranked FIU as one of the 
top 150 national universities in the 
country in the annual survey of 
"America's Best Colleges." The 
magazine had previously recog- 
nized the University as a "best buy" 
in higher education. In addition, FIU 
was named one of the best ten pub- 
lic commuter colleges in the U.S. in 
"Money Guide", an annual report 
by Money magazine. 

Accreditation and 
Memberships 

All academic programs of the Uni- 
versity are approved by the State 
Board of Education and the Florida 
Board of Regents. The University is 
accredited by the Commission on 
Colleges of the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools (1 866 South- 
ern Lane, Decatur, Georgia, tele- 
phone number 404-679-4501) 
toward the baccalaureate, masters 
and doctoral degrees. The profes- 
sional programs of the respective 
schools of the University are accred- 
ited or approved by the appropri- 
ate professional associations, or are 
pursuing full professional accredita- 
tion or approval. 

The University is also an affiliate 
member of the Association of Upper 
Level Colleges and Universities, the 
American Association of State Col- 
leges and Universities, the Florida As- 
sociation of Colleges and Universities, 
the American Association of Commu- 
nity and Junior Colleges, National As- 
sociation of Land-Grant Colleges, a 
Charter Member of the Southeast 
Florida Educational Consortium, and 
numerous other educational and 
professional associations. The follow- 
ing agencies have accredited pro- 
fessional programs at the University: 
Accreditation Board for Engineering 

and Technology 
Accrediting Commissionl on Educa- 
tion for Health Services Administra- 
tion 
Accrediting Council on Education 
in Journalism and Mass Communi- 
cations 
American Assembly of Collegiate 

Schools of Business 
American Association of Colleges 

of Teacher Education 
American Chemical Society 
American Council of Construction 
Education 



American Dietetics Association 
American Medical Association 
American Health Information 

Management Association 
American Occupational Therapy 

Association 
American Physical Therapy 

Association 
American Society of Clinical 

Pathologists 
Computer Science Accreditation 

Commission 
Commission for the Accreditation of 

Allied Health Education 
Council of Graduate Schools in 

the United States 
Council on Education for Public 

Health 
Florida Consortium on Multilingual 

and Multicultural Education 
Florida State Board of Nursing 
Landscape Architecture Accredita- 
tion Board (LAAB) of the American 

Society of Landscape Architecture 

(ASLA) 
National Accrediting Agency for 

Clinical Laboratory Sciences 
National Association of Colleges 

of Nursing 
National Association of Schools of 

Music 
National Association of Schools of 

Public Affairs 
National Council for Accreditation of 

Teacher Education 
National League of Nursing 
Council on Social Work Education 

Southeast Florida 
Educational Consortium 

Florida International University, 
Broward Community College, and 
Miami-Dade Community College 
are charter members of the South- 
east Florida Educational Consor- 
tium, which was established in 1977. 
This organization links the member in- 
stitutions in planning, maintaining, 
and evaluating cooperative efforts 
in academic programs, student serv- 
ices, and administrative support serv- 
ices. The overall objectives of the 
Consortium are to: 

1. Increase and improve educa- 
tional opportunities. 

2. Ensure smooth transition from 
the community college to the uni- 
versity. 

3. Provide easy access to institu- 
tional services for students and fac- 
ulty. 

4. Effectively utilize human and 
fiscal resources. 



Descriptions of specific coopera- 
tive arrangements between the 
Consortium member campuses and 
student and faculty procedures are 
given in the appropriate sections of 
this Catalog. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 9 



Academic Programs 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts in: 

Chemistry 

Dance 

Economics 

English 

Environmental Studies 

French 

Geology 

History 

Humanities 

International Relations 

Liberal Studies 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Spanish 

Women's Studies 
Bachelor of Fine Arts in: 

Art 

Theatre 

Bachelor of Music 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Biological Science 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Environmental Studies 

Geology 

Mathematics 

Mathematical Sciences 

Physics 

Statistics 

College of Business 
Administration 

Bachelor of Accounting 
Bachelor of Business Administration 
with majors in: 

Finance 

International Business 

Management 

Management Information Systems 

Marketing 

Personnel Management 

College of Education 

Bachelor of Science in: 
Art Education 
Biology Education 
Chemistry Education 
Elementary Education 
Emotional Disturbance (with a track 

in Varying Exceptionalities) 
English Education 
Health Education (with a track in 

Exercise Physiology) 
Health Occupations Education 
Home Economics Education 



Mathematics Education 

Mental Retardation (with a track in 
Varying Exceptionalities) 

Modern Languages Education 
(majors in French and Spanish) 

Music Education 

Parks and Recreation Manage- 
ment (with specializations in Lei- 
sure Service Management, Parks 
Management, and Recreational 
Therapy) 

Physical Education (programs in 
grades K-8 and grades 6-12) 

Social Studies Education 

Specific Learning Disabilities, 
(with a track in Varying 
Exceptionalities) 

Vocational Education (major in 
Vocational Industrial Education 
and a track in Organizational 
Training) 

College of Engineering and 
Design 

Bachelor of Design in Architectural 

Studies 
Bachelor of Science in: 

Civil Engineering 

Computer Engineering 

Construction Management 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

Interior Design 

Mechanical Engineering 

College of Health 

Bachelor of Science in: 
Dietetics and Nutrition 
Health Information Management 
Medical Technology 
Physical Therapy 
Occupational Therapy 
Prosthetics and Orthotics (sus- 
pended admission) 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality 
Management 

School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication 

Bachelor of Science in 
Communication 

School of Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 



College of Urban and Public 
Affairs 

Bachelor of Science in: 

Criminal Justice 

Social Work 
Bachelor of Health Services 

Administration 
Bachelor of Public Administration 

North Campus 
Programs 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts in: 
English 
Humanities 

International Relations 
Political Science 
Psychology 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Visual Arts 

College of Business 
Administration 

Bachelor of Business Administration 

with a major in: 
Marketing 

College of Education 

Foundations courses 
FOCUS Program 

College of Health 

Bachelor of Science in Health 
Information Management 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality 
Management 

School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication 

Bachelor of Science in 
Communication 

School of Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

College of Urban and Public 
Affairs 

Bachelor of Science in: 

Criminal Justice 

Social Work 

Bachelor of Health Services 

Administration 
Bachelor of Public Administration 



10 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Broward County 
Programs 

College of Education 

Courses for Teacher Education 

(Broward Public Schools) 
Courses in Vocational Education 

(Off-Campus) 

College of Engineering and 

Design 

Bachelor of Science in Construction 
Management (BC) 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality 
Management - (BC) 

School of Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
(RN to BSN) (BC) 

Prrnary Location: 

BC = Broward Program on BCC 
Central Campus - Davie 

UT = Askew University Tower - Fort 
Lauderdale 

Minors 

A minor program is an arrangement 
of courses enabling a student to de- 
velop a degree of expertise and 
knowledge in an area of study in ad- 
dition to his or her major academic 
program of study. 

To receive a minor, a student 
must also complete the require- 
ments for a baccalaureate degree 
from the University. A minor is not in- 
terdisciplinary. 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Art History 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Dance 

Economics 

English 

French Language and Culture 

General Translation Studies 

Geology 

Geography 

History 

Humanities 

International Relations 

Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 



Political Science 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Spanish Language and Culture 

Statistics 

Theatre 

Visual Arts 

College of Business 
Administration 

(for non-Business majors only) 

Business 

Entrepreneurship 

College of Health 

Medical Laboratory Sciences 
Nutrition 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Hotel/Lodging Management 
Restaurant/Food Service 

Management 
Travel/Tourism Management 

School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication 

Advertising 

Journalism 

Mass Communication 

Public Relations 

Television 

College of Urban and Public 
Affairs 

Criminal Justice 
Health Services Administration 
Public Administration 
Social Welfare 



Certificates 

Certificate Programs are structured 
combinations of courses with a com- 
mon base of interest from one or 
more disciplines into an area of con- 
centration. 

Successful completion of a Cer- 
tificate Program is entered on the 
student's transcript and records. 
Two types of certificates are 
awarded: 

Academic Certificate 

Awarded by an academic unit to a 
student at the time of awarding a 
bachelor's degree; or upon comple- 
tion of the appropriate coursework 
to a student who already has a 
bachelor's degree. 

An academic certificate shall 
not be awarded to a student who 
does not possess either a bache- 
lor's degree or does not complete 
a bachelor's degree program. An 
academic certificate is to be inter- 
disciplinary in nature, to the great- 
est extent possible. 

Professional Certificate 

Awarded by an academic unit to 
an individual who completes the ap- 
propriate coursework in the area of 
concentration. The professional cer- 
tificate does not need to be interdis- 
ciplinary or associated with a 
degree program. 

For details and course require- 
ments, refer to the appropriate sec- 
tion in each College or School. 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Academic Certificates in: 

Actuarial Studies 

African-New World Studies 

American Studies 

Consumer Affairs 

Environmental Studies 

Ethnic Studies 

Gerontological Studies 

International Studies 

Judaic Studies 

Labor Studies 

Latin American and Caribbean 
Studies 

Law, Ethics and Society 

Linguistic Studies 

Western Social and Political 
Thought 

Women's Studies 
Professional Certificates in: 

Labor Studies and Labor Relations 

Legal Translation and Court Inter- 
preting 

Translation Studies 

Tropical Commercial Botany 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 1 1 



College of Business 
Administration 

Banking 

International Bank Management 

Marketing 

College of Education 

The College offers a variety of Profes- 
sional Certificate and Add-On 
Teacher Certification programs. 
Refer to the College of Education pro- 
gram listing section. 

College of Engineering and 
Design 

Professional Certificate in: 
Heating, Ventilation, and A/C 
Design 

College of Health 

Clinical Chemistry 

Clinical and Medical Microbiology 

Haematology 

Immunohaematology 

Medical Record Coding 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Foodservice Management 

Lodging Management 

Travel and Tourism Management 

School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication 

Professional Certificates in: 
Integrated Communications: 

Advertising and Public Relations 
Media Management 
Spanish Language Journalism 
Student Media Advising 
Television Production 

College of Urban and Public 
Affairs 

Academic Certificate in Law and 
Criminal Justice 
Urban Affairs 



Evening and 
Weekend Degree 
Programs 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts in: 
Economics 
English 

Liberal Studies 
Political Science 
Psychology 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Spanish 

Bachelor of Science in Computer 
Science 

College of Business 
Administration 

Bachelor of Accounting 
Bachelor of Business Administration 

College of Engineering and 
Design 

Bachelor of Science in: 
Computer Engineering 
Construction Management 
Electrical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

School of Hospitality 
Management 

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality 
Management 

School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication 

Bachelor of Science in 
Communication 

School of Nursing 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

College of Urban and Public 
Affairs 

Bachelor of Science in Criminal 

Justice 
Bachelor of Health Services 

Administration 
Bachelor of Public Administration 



For more information, call the Of- 
fice of Adult and Student Informa- 
tion Services (OASIS) at (305) 
940-5669; or the appropriate college 
or school. 



12 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Office of Admissions 



Florida International University en- 
courages applications from quali- 
fied applicants without regard to 
sex, physical handicap, cultural, ra- 
cial, religious, or ethnic background 
or association. 

Application Process 

As part of the State University System 
(SUS) of Florida. FIU uses the com- 
mon application form for under- 
graduates. The application and 
other related information can be re- 
quested from the Office of Admis- 
sion, Charles E. Perry Building (PC 
140), University Park, Miami, Florida 
33199, (305) 348-2363 or on the 
North Campus, ACI-160, North Mi- 
ami, Florida 33181, (305) 919-5760. In 
Broward, contact the Broward Pro- 
gram, 203 Liberal Arts Building, 3501 
S.W. Davie Road, Davie, Florida 
33314,(305)475-4152. 

All credentials and documents 
submitted to the Office of Admis- 
sions become the property of Flor- 
ida International University. Originals 
will not be returned to the appli- 
cant or forwarded to another institu- 
tion. 

Applicants who are attending 
Florida high schools or a Florida 
community college may obtain the 
application form in school guid- 
ance offices. 

A 20.00 U.S. dollars non-refund- 
able application fee made pay- 
able to Florida International 
University must accompany the 
completed application form. In ad- 
dition, the following supporting cre- 
dentials are required: 



Freshman Applicants 

1 . Official secondary school tran- 
scripts and appropriate test scores: 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test (ACT). 

Applicants whose native lan- 
guage is not English and have not 
taken any college level English 
courses, must present a minimum 
score of 500 in the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

All official transcripts, test scores, 
and any other required credentials 
must be received directly from the 
issuing agencies. It is the applicant's 
responsibility to initiate the request 
for credentials to the issuing agen- 



cies and to assure their receipt by 
the Office of Admissions. 

2. Proof of graduation from an 
accredited secondary school must 
be submitted. 

3. Nineteen academic units in 
college preparatory courses are re- 
quired as follows: 

English 4 

Mathematics 3 

Natural Science 3 

Social Science 3 

Foreign Language' 2 

Academic Electives 2 4 

'Two units in the same foreign lan- 
guage are required. 
2 Academic Electives are from the 
fields of mathematics, English, natu- 
ral science, social science, and a 
foreign language. The academic 
grade point average will be com- 
puted only on the units listed above. 
Grades in honors courses. Interna- 
tional Baccalaureate (IB), and ad- 
vanced placement (AP) courses will 
be given additional weight. 

Freshman admission decisions 
are made based on the student's 
strong academic preparation. Com- 
petition for places in the freshman 
class is created by the quality and 
extent of the applicant pool. 

Applicants who do not meet the 
above criteria will be reviewed by 
the Admissions Review Committee. 
Those who show potential in areas 
not easily evaluated by stand- 
ardized tests can be considered for 
admission under the exception rule. 

Students who are applying to 
majors in Theatre, Music, and 
Dance, in addition to meeting uni- 
versity academic standards, must 
meet the approval of the respec- 
tive department through an audi- 
tion. Contact the department for 
audition dates. 



Transfer Applicants 

Degree seeking applicants with 
fewer than 60 semester hours of 
transfer credits must meet the same 
requirements as beginning fresh- 
men. In addition, they must demon- 
strate satisfactory performance in 
their college work. 

Applicants who receive an Asso- 
ciate in Arts (A.A.) degree from a 
Florida Public Community College 
or State University in Florida, will be 



considered for admission without re- 
striction except for published Lim- 
ited Access Programs within the 
University. 

All other applicants from Florida 
Public Community Colleges or State 
Universities in Florida who do not 
hold an Associate in Arts degree 
(A.A.) must have completed 60 se- 
mester hours of transferable credit, 
have a minimum grade point aver- 
age of 2.0, and must present Col- 
lege Level Academic Skills Tests . 
(CLAST) scores before admission 
can be granted. 

Students transferring from inde- 
pendent Florida and out-of-state 
colleges into the University's upper 
division must have maintained a 
minimum 2.00 grade point average 
based upon a 4.00 scale. 

Coursework transferred or ac- 
cepted for credit toward an under- 
graduate degree must be 
completed at an institution accred- 
ited as degree-granting by a re- 
gional accrediting body for higher 
education at the time the course- 
work was completed. 

All applicants must meet the cri- 
teria published for Limited Access 
Programs and should consult the 
specific college and major for re- 
quirements. 

Applicants who meet the above 
admissions requirements, but have 
not completed the general educa- 
tion requirements, or the prereq- 
uisites of their proposed major, may 
complete this college work at FIU, 
or at any other accredited institu- 
tion. Students may also fulfill general 
education requirements through 
the College Level Examination Pro- 
gram (CLEP). 

Official transcripts from all pre- 
vious post secondary institutions 
must be forwarded to the Office of 
Admissions. Students are responsible 
to initiate this request. 

Transfer applicants from a state 
community college are encour- 
aged to review the current edition 
of FlU's transfer student counseling 
manual available In all of Florida's 
community colleges counseling of- 
fices. 

All students seeking admission to 
the University regardless of whether 
the student holds an A.A., must 
have completed two years of 
credit in one foreign language at 
the high school level or 8-10 credits 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 13 



in one foreign language at the col- 
lege level (American Sign Language 
is acceptable). If a student is admit- 
ted to the University without this re- 
quirement, the credits must be 
completed prior to graduation. 

Students who can demonstrate 
continuous enrollment in a degree 
program at an SUS institution or Flor- 
ida Community College since Fall 
Term, 1989 (continuous enrollment is 
defined by the state to be the com- 
pletion of at least one course per 
academic year) can be exempt 
from this requirement. 

Students holding an A. A. degree 
from a Florida Community College 
or SUS institution prior to Fall Term, 
1989 will also be exempt. 

Students who are applying to ma- 
jors In Theatre, Music, and Dance, in 
addition to meeting university aca- 
demic standards, must meet the ap- 
proval of the respective department 
through an audition. Contact the 
department for audition dates. 

Applicants whose native lan- 
guage is not English and have not 
taken any college level English 
courses, must present a minimum 
score of 500 in the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

Admission decisions will not be 
made before a completed applica- 
tion and all supporting documents 
are on file in the Office of Admis- 
sions. 

Applications are kept on file for 
one year from the anticipated en- 
trance date. 

All credentials and documents 
submitted to the Office of Admis- 
sions become the property of Flor- 
ida International University. Originals 
or copies of the originals will not be 
returned to the applicant or for- 
warded to another institution, 
agency, or person. 

Admission to the University is a se- 
lective process and satisfying the 
general requirements does not guar- 
antee acceptance. 

Limited Access Program 

A limited access program utilizes se- 
lective admission to limit program 
enrollment. Limited access status is 
justified where student demand ex- 
ceeds available resources, such as 
faculty, instructional facilities, equip- 
ment, or specific accrediting re- 
quirements. Criteria for selective 
admission includes indicators of abil- 
ity, performance, creativity or talent 
to complete required work within 
the program. Florida Community 



College transfer students with Associ- 
ate in Arts degrees are given equal 
consideration with FIU students. Ad- 
mission to such programs is gov- 
erned by the Articulation 
Agreement and the State of Florida 
Board of Regents rules. 

The following programs have 
been designated as limited access: 

Accounting 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

Finance 

Management 

Management Information Systems 

Marketing 

Medical Technology 

Nursing 

Occupational Therapy 

Physical Therapy 

Requirements for Admission to 
Undergraduate Teacher 
Education Programs 

In the College of Education, all ap- 
plicants for teacher education pro- 
grams must score at or above the 
40th percentile on a standardized 
college entrance test, (i.e., a total 
score of 960 or higher on the SAT, or 
a composite score of 20 or higher 
on the ACT). It is possible for an ap- 
plicant who fails to meet this crite- 
rion to appeal to the College of 
Education. 



Readmission 

An admitted degree-seeking stu- 
dent who has not enrolled in any 
course at the University for one full 
academic year or more is eligible 
for readmission. The student must 
meet the University and program 
regulations in effect at the time of 
readmission. Students must contact 
the Office of Admissions to apply for 
readmission. 



Priority Consideration 

Application Dates 

Summer 

February 1 - Last day for international 

students to submit applications 

and all supporting documents for 

Summer Term. 

Last day to submit applications for 

Summer Term. 

Fall 

April 1 - Last day for International stu- 
dents to submit applications and 
all supporting documents for Fall 
Term. 



Last day to submit applications for 
Fall Term. 

Spring 

September 1 - Last day for interna- 
tional students to submit applica- 
tions and all supporting 
documents for Spring Term. 
Last day to submit applications for 
Spring Term. 

International Students: If the applica- 
tion and documents are not re- 
ceived by the deadline date, the 
application for admission will have 
to be considered for the following 
term. 



International 
Admissions 

International student applicants 
must meet the admission re- 
auirements of the University as 
described in the previous sec- 
tions and comply with the fol- 
lowing: 

Academic Records 

Official transcripts, diplomas and/or 
certificates must be sent directly 
from each previous institution to the 
Office of Admissions. Documents in 
a language other than English must 
be translated by an official transla- 
tion agency. Notarized translations 
are not acceptable. 

All credentials and documents 
submitted to the Office of Admis- 
sions become the property of Flor- 
ida International University. Originals 
or copies of originals will not be re- 
turned to the applicant or for- 
warded to another institution, 
agency or person. 

Proficiency in English 

Applicants who hold an undergradu- 
ate or graduate degree from an in- 
stitution within the United States or 
other English speaking countries are 
not required to submit TOEFL. 

Declaration and Certification of 
Finances 

Upon receipt of the application for 
admission, the Declaration and Cer- 
tification of Finances will be mailed 
to the applicant. It must be com- 
pleted and returned to the Office of 
Admissions. A Certificate of Eligibility 
(Form I-20A) will be issued once the 
applicant has been found admissi- 
ble to the University. 



14 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



The University is required by immi- 
gration authorities to check care- 
fully the financial resources of each 
applicant prior to issuing the Form I- 
20A. Therefore, it is important that 
applicants are aware of the cost of 
attending the University and have 
the necessary support funds for the 
period of enrollment. Applicants 
should refer to the Annual Estimate 
of Cost Chart. 

The total funds available for the 
student for the first or second aca- 
demic year, or both, must equal the 
total estimate of institutional costs 
and living expenses. All items in the 
Declaration and Certification of Fi- 
nances must be accurately an- 
swered to avoid unnecessary delay 
in processing. This document along 
with proof of sufficient funds must 
be received by the Office of Admis- 
sions two months prior to the antici- 
pated entry date. 

Refer to the Annual Estimate of 
Cost table for more information. A 
married student should plan on an 
additional S5.000 in costs to cover 
the living expenses of a spouse. 

A couple with children should an- 
ticipate further yearly additional 
costs of no less than $3,000 for each 
child. 

Medical Insurance 

The State of Florida requires that all 
international students maintain 
health insurance coverage to help 
defray the costs in case of cata- 
strophic medical emergency.- The 
policy must provide specific levels of 
coverage which have been estab- 
lished to ensure that the policy is 
adequate to provide for costs at 
U.S. hospitals, usually much higher 
than costs in many other parts of 
the world. In addition, a policy must 
have a claims agent in the United 
States who may be contacted by 
medical providers and who facili- 
tates prompt payment of claims. 
The University has approved a plan 
which meets the state requirements 
and which meets the needs of most 
students; however, a student on F 
status may select alternate cover- 
age provided it meets the state re- 
quirements for minimal coverage. A 
copy of these requirements is avail- 
able from International Student and 
Scholar Services. Students are ad- 
vised not to purchase insurance poli- 
cies prior to arrival without verifying 
that the policies meet FIU/SUS re- 
quirements. Students in J status are 
required by the United States Infor- 
mation Agency to maintain health 
insurance coverage for themselves 
and their dependents for the full 



length of their program. Florida Inter- 
national University requires students 
on J status sponsored by FIU to pur- 
chase the University approved medi- 
cal insurance plan for themselves 
and their dependents. Compliance 
with the insurance regulation is re- 
quired prior to registration. 

Required Entrance Tests 

All freshman applicants are required 
to submit the results of the Scholas- 
tic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the Ameri- 
can College Test (ACT). 

Tuition 

An international student is consid- 
ered a non-resident and is assessed 
non-resident fees. Immigration regu- 
lations require an international stu- 
dent to attend school each fall and 
spring semester at least two semes- 
ters within an academic year. An un- 
dergraduate student is required to 
take a minimum of twelve credit 
hours per semester. Please refer to 
the section on Student Fees and Stu- 
dent Accounts for more information. 

Full-Time Enrollment 

Non-immigrant alien students in F-l 
visa status are required by United 
States immigration regulations to be 
enrolled full-time, except for the 
summer terms, and to make satisfac- 
tory progress toward the degree pro- 
gram in each term; otherwise the 
student's immigration status may be 
jeopardized. Full-time enrollment is 
defined as enrollment every term for 
a minimum of 12 semester hours (un- 
dergraduate), or nine semester 
hours (graduate). 

The laws and regulations of the 
United States Department of Jus- 
tice, Immigration and Naturalization 
Service state: 

It is the student's responsibility to 
comply with all non-immigrant alien 
requirements as stated under the 
United States laws under Section 
101 (a)( 15)(f)(0 of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act. 

Granting official Extension of 
Stay is dependent upon the stu- 
dent's achieving normal academic 
progress toward the degree require- 
ments. 

Employment 

The legal regulations governing F-l 
student employment are complex, 
and advisors are available at Inter- 
national Student and Scholar Serv- 
ices to explain these regulations. 
International students must check 
with this office before engaging in 
any type of employment, either 
paid or unpaid. In general. how- 



Annual Estimate of Costs 

for Undergraduate 

International Students 

Single Student (30 sem hrs) 



Tuition and Fees 


$ 7,428 


Maintenance 2 


$ 7,908 


Books & Supplies 


S 907 


Medical Insurance 3 


S 576 


Total 


$16,819 



1 Tuition and fees are subject to 
change. Fees include the Student 
Health Fee ($30 per semester) and 
the Athletic Fee ($ 1 0.00 per semes- 
ter). Amounts shown reflect 15 se- 
mester hours for undergraduate 
Fall and Spring terms only. 
Maintenance is estimated at 
$878.75 per month to cover room, 
board, clothing, transportation, 
and incidentals. This cost is for nine 
months. 

3 AII international students are re- 
quired to carry medical insurance. 



ever, employment is available only 
to students who maintain their legal 
status in the U.S. and is regulated un- 
der three categories: 

a) on-campus employment: F-l 
students may be employed on the 
FIU campus for a maximum of 20 
hours per week during fall and 
spring semesters while school is in 
session, and full time during holi- 
days, vacations, and summer. On- 
campus employment includes 
teaching and research assistant- 
ships for graduate students and 
hourly part time work. Students must 
contact individual campus depart- 
ments to inquire about employment 
opportunities. 

b) off-campus employment: F-l 
students may request off-campus 
employment under very limited con- 
ditions and only after maintaining F- 

1 status for at least one full 
academic year. Off-campus em- 
ployment opportunities are not 
readily available, and students 
should not rely on off-campus em- 
ployment as a source of income to 
finance their studies. 

c) Practical training: F-l students 
may request practical training em- 
ployment to accept jobs related to 
their studies. Students usually pursue 
practical training employment after 
completion of degree require- 
ments, although in some cases 
practical training may be author- 
ized prior to completion of studies. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 15 



Since practical training employment 
is limited to one year of full-time em- 
ployment, students cannot rely on it 
as a source of income to finance 
their studies. 

Note: An international student will 
not be granted admission to the Uni- 
versity until all academic and non- 
academic requirements have been 
met. Under no circumstances should 
a student come to the University 
without having received the official 
Letter of Admission and the I-20A 
Form. All correspondence and docu- 
ment submissions should be di- 
rected to: Office of Admissions, 
Florida International University, PC 
140, University Park, Miami, Florida 
33199 U.S.A. 



Scholarships 

FIU recognizes students who are 
academically, artistically, and ath- 
letically talented. The University 
awards full academic scholarships 
to students who are named Na- 
tional Merit Finalist, National His- 
panic Scholars and National 
Achievement finalists. Semifinalists 
may also receive partial scholar- 
ships. 

Advising for Major Fellowships 

Counseling by designated faculty is 
available for students interested in 
applying for Churchill, Deutscher 
Akademischer Austauschdienst, Ful- 
bright, Goldwater, Hertz, Luce, Mar- 
shall, Mellon, National Science 
Foundation, Rhodes, Rotary, and Tru- 
man scholarships or fellowships. All 
are awarded through national com- 
petition. Applications are made 
early in the fall of the senior year, ex- 
cept for Rotary fellowships, which 
are available for any year, Goldwa- 
ter scholarships, which are only for 
sophomores, and Truman scholar- 
ships, which are only for juniors. Fur- 
ther information and the names of 
the designated faculty for each 
award are available from the Office 
of Undergraduate Studies at DM 368 
orACI-180. 

Faculty Scholars Scholarships 

Outstanding entering freshmen are 
selected each year to receive Fac- 
ulty Scholars Scholarship awards. 

To meet the eligibility criteria, ap- 
plicants must have: 

1. Outstanding high school per- 
formance; a minimum academic 
average of 3.5 in a college prepara- 
tory curriculum in high school. 



2. A total score of 1270 on the 
SAT or a composite score of 28 on 
the ACT. 

For more detailed information on 
these scholarships, applicants 
should contact the Office of Admis- 
sions, PC 140 - University Park, (305) 
348-2363. 

Student Right-to-Know 
Safety and Security Act 

Under the Student Right-to-Know 
and Campus Security Act, Florida In- 
ternational University will, upon re- 
quest, make available to students 
and potential students the comple- 
tion or graduation rates of certifi- 
cate or full-time degree-seeking 
students for a one-year period. Also 
available, upon request, are Univer- 
sity policies regarding a) procedures 
for reporting criminal actions or 
other emergencies, b) access to 
campus facilities, c) campus law en- 
forcement, d) crime prevention pro- 
grams, e) statistics concerning 
arrests and the occurrence on cam- 
pus of certain criminal offenses, f) 
criminal activity of off-campus stu- 
dent organizations, and the use, pos- 
session, and sale of illegal drugs or 
alcohol. 



16 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Office of Undergraduate Studies 



Academic Advising Center 

Academic advising of students with 
fewer than 37 semester hours of 
earned credit is the responsibility of 
the Academic Advising Center in 
the Office of Undergraduate Stud- 
ies. When admitted to the University, 
the student will meet with an advisor 
who will help plan the student's aca- 
demic program. At the completion 
of 30 semester hours of earned cred- 
its, the student can choose an in- 
tended major, and after 60 
semester hours, a student should offi- 
cially declare a major. Students with 
intended or declared majors will be 
advised by faculty members or pro- 
fessional advisors in their major de- 
partment. 

Before students are cleared to 
register for classes they are required 
to participate in an academic ad- 
vising session or see an advisor in 
the Advising Center. 

Academic information is avail- 
able in PC 237, University Park, and 
ACI-180, North Campus. 

Freshman Placement 

All freshmen entering the University 
are required to complete place- 
ment tests prior to advising and regis- 
tration. Tests are offered at 
orientation the semester before at- 
tending the University. The Freshman 
Testing/Placement Program in- 
cludes computational skills and 
standards of written English. 

Newly admitted sophomore 
transfer students with fewer than 37 
credits who have not met the Core 
Curriculum requirements in mathe- 
matics or English must participate in 
the Freshman Testing/Placement 
Program and the advising sessions 
before they will be allowed to regis- 
ter for English or math courses at 
the University. 

College Level Academic Skills 
Test (CLAST) 

The State of Florida has developed 
a test of college level communica- 
tion and computation skills. The test 
is called the College Level Aca- 
demic Skills Test (CLAST). The Testing 
Center at the University is responsi- 
ble for administering and processing 
the CLAST. 

The CLAST is designed to test the 
communication and computation 
skills that are judged by state univer- 
sity and community college faculty 



to be associated with successful 
performance and progression 
through the baccalaureate levels. 
All students seeking a degree from 
a public community college or 
state university must take and pass 
all parts of the CLAST. This test is re- 
quired by Florida statutes and rules 
of the State Board of Education. 

The CLAST is administered once 
each semester and students are en- 
couraged to participate in all pre- 
CLAST activities administered by the 
University Learning Center and the 
Testing Office during their first semes- 
ter at the University. Students who 
do not take and pass CLAST will not 
be allowed to continue in upper di- 
vision status in state universities in 
Florida. The CLAST requirements also 
apply to students transferring to 
state universities in Florida from pri- 
vate colleges in Florida and from 
out-of-state colleges. 

Only admitted, degree-seeking 
students who have completed at 
least 1 8 semester hours or the 
equivalent, are eligible to sit for the 
CLAST. 

Those taking the CLAST section 
of the Florida Teachers Certification 
Exam must register through the 
State of Florida Department of Edu- 
cation Teacher Certification Office. 
Information and Registration Bulle- 
tins may be obtained from FlU's Col- 
lege of Education in DM 253 or call 
348-2721. 

Who Should not Register for the 
FIU CLAST? (1) Students who have 
earned an accredited bachelor's 
degree or higher, (2) Students who 
have received an AA degree from 
a Florida institution or college prior 
to September 1 , 1982, and who 
were admitted to upper-level status 
before August 1 , 1984, (3) Students 
with an accredited bachelor's de- 
gree who are enrolled in an under- 
graduate degree program. 

Any student who has taken a 
subtest of the CLAST at least four 
times and has not achieved a pass- 
ing score, but has otherwise demon- 
strated proficiency in coursework in 
the same subject area, may peti- 
tion the CLAST Waiver Committee 
to recommend a waiver from that 
particular subtest. A waiver may be 
recommended to the president 
upon majority vote of the commit- 
tee. If a waiver for a given subtest is 
approved, the student's transcript 
shall include a statement that the 



student did not meet the require- 
ments of the subtest waived and 
that a waiver was granted. The 
waiver application deadline is es- 
tablished each semester by the test- 
ing administrator. 

CLAST and CLAST waiver applica- 
tions, are coordinated by the Test- 
ing Office. The Testing Office of the 
University Learning Center is lo- 
cated in PC 315, University Park, 348- 
2840; and ACI-180, North Campus, 
919-5754. 



University Learning Center/ 
Academic Assistance Labs 

The Center is equipped to help stu- 
dents improve their academic skills. 
Included among these skills are 
reading, writing, English, mathemat- 
ics, statistics, and personal study 
skills. Special emphasis is given to 
those students who need or want as- 
sistance passing the College-Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST). The 
Learning Center is located in PC 318 
at University Park, 348-2180, and in 
ACI-266 at North Miami, 919-5927. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Intormation / 17 



Core Curriculum 
Requirements 

The Core Curriculum requirements 
apply to all students entering the Uni- 
versity with fewer than 37 semester 
hours. Students transferring with 37 
semester hours or more must fulfill 
the University's General Education 
Requirements. All students subject to 
the Core are informed of additional 
policies governing these require- 
ments in mandatory academic ad- 
vising sessions provided by the 
Academic Advising Center of the 
Office of Undergraduate Studies 
(University Park PC 237, North Cam- 
pus ACI-1 80): 

Freshman Experience (one course 
required) 

SLS 1501 Freshman Experience 
Course 

English Composition (two courses 
required 'C or higher required) 
ENC 1 101 Freshman Composition 
ENC 1 102 Literary Analysis 

(Prerequisite: 

ENC 1101) 
ENC 1 101 and ENC 1 102 must be 
completed before enrolling in other 
Gordon Rule courses. 
Mathematics (two courses 
required, 'C or higher required) 
One course must be from the follow- 
ing list: 

Note: MAT - College Algebra and 
MAC - Trigonometry equal to MAC 
2132) 

MGF 1202 Finite Math 
MAC 2132 Pre-Calculus 
MAC 2233 Calculus for Business 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 
A second course may be chosen 
from the following list: 
CGS 2060 Introduction to 

Microcomputers 
CGS 2420 Programming for 

Engineers 
CGS 2423 C for Engineers 
COP Computer Programming 

STA Statistics 

Natural Sciences (One biological 

science course and one physical 

science course required. Lecture 

and Lab must be taken 

concurrently) 

Biological Science with Laboratory: 

APB2170 Introductory 

Microbiology (3) 
APB2170L Introductory 

Microbiology Lab (1) 



BOT 1010 Introductory Botany (3) 
BOT1010L Introductory Botany 

Lab(l) 
BSC 1010 General Biology I (3) 
BSC 1010L General Biology I Lab 

(2) 
BSC 101 1 General Biology II (3) 
BSC 101 1L General Biology II Lab 

(2) 
BSC 2023 Human Biology (3) 
BSC 2023L Human Biology Lab (1) 
EVR 301 3 Ecology of S. Florida (3) 
EVR 301 3L Ecology of S. Florida 

Lab(l) 
OCB 2003 Introductory Marine 

Biology (3) 
OCB2003L Marine Biology Lab (1) 
PCB 251 Introductory Genetics 

(3) 
PCB 251 0L Introductory Genetics 

Lab(l) 
PCB 2700 Foundations of Human 

Physiology (3) 
PCB 2700L Foundations of Human 

Physiology Lab (1) 
Physical Sciences with Laboratory: 
AST 2 1 00 Solar System Astronomy 

(3) 
AST 2 1 00L Solar System Astronomy 

Lab(l) 
AST 2201 Stellar Astronomy (3) 
AST 220 1 L Stellar Astronomy Lab 

(1) 
CHM 1032 Chemistry and Society 

(3) 
CHM 1032L Chemistry and Society 

Lab(l) 
CHM 1033 Survey of Chemistry (3) 
CHM 1033L Survey of Chemistry 

Lab(l) 
CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (4) 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry I 

Lab(l) 
EVR 3011 Environmental 

Resources & 

Pollution (3) 
EVR 301 1L Environmental 

Resources & 

Pollution Lab (1) 
GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth 

Sciences (3) 
GLY 1010L Introduction to Earth 

Sciences Lab (1) 
MET 2010 Meteorology & 

Atmospheric Physics 

(3) 
MET2010L Meteorology & 

Atmospheric Physics 

Lab(l) 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus (5) 
PHY2048L General Physics Lab (1) 



PHY 2053 Physics without Calculus 

(4) 
Arts (1 course required) 
ARH 2050 Art History I 
ARH2051 Art History II 
ARH 4470 Contemporary Art 
ARH 47 1 History of Photography 
ART 1202C 2D Design " 
ART 1203C 3D Design 
ART 2150C Jewelry & Metals 
ART 240 1C Printmaking I 
ART2510C Painting I 
ART 2702C Sculpture I 
ART 31 10C Ceramics 
ART 3 1 63C Glassblowing 
ART 33 10C Drawing 
ART 3331C Figure Drawing II 
CRW 2001 Introduction to 

Creative Writing 
DAA 1 100 Modern Dance 

Techniques I 
DAA 1101 Modern Dance 

Techniques 1-2 
DAA 1 200 Ballet Techniques I 
DAA 1201 Ballet Techniques 1-2 
DAA 1500 Jazz Dance Techniques 
DAA 2102 Modern Dance 

Techniques II 
DAA 2103 Modern Dance 

Techniques 11-2 
DAA 1202 Ballet Techniques II 
DAA 2203 Ballet Techniques 11-2 
DAN 2100 Introduction to Dance 
PGY3410C Photography 
THE 2000 Theater Appreciation 
TPP 21 00 Introduction to Acting 

or 
Permission of instructor and/or an 
audition are required for the follow- 
ing courses. 

MUH1011 Music Appreciation 
MUN 1 100 Golden Panther Band 
MUN1140 Symphonic Wind 

Ensemble 
MUN 1210 Orchestra 
MUN 1340 Sunblazer Singers 
MUN 1380 University Singers 
MUN 1430 University Brass Choir 
MUN 1460 Chamber Music 
MUN 1710 Studio Jazz Ensemble 
MUN 2440 Percussion Ensemble 
MUN 2450 Ensemble 
MUN 2480 Guitar Ensemble 
MUN 2490 New Music Ensemble 
MUN 2510 Accompanying 
MUN 271 1 Jazz Combo Class 

or 



18 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Modern Languages 

Only intermediate levels can sub- 
stitute for the Arts Requirement 
(2000-3000 level). 
ARA 3210 Intermediate Arabic 
CHI 3210 Intermediate Chinese 
FRE 2200 Intermediate French 
FRE 2420 Oral Communication 

Skills in French 
FRE 2270 Foreign Study 1 
GER2210 Intermediate German 
GRE 3200 Intermediate Classical 

Greek 
HBR 2200 Intermediate Hebrew 
ITA 2210 Intermediate Italian 
JPA3210 Intermediate Japanese 
LAT 2200 Intermediate Latin 
POR 2200 Intermediate Portuguese 
RUS 2200 Intermediate Russian 
SPN 2200 Intermediate Spanish 
SPN 2230 Intermediate Reading in 

Spanish 
SPN 2340 Intermediate Spanish for 

Native Speakers 
SPN 2420 Oral Communication 

Skills in Spanish 
Any other modern language 
courses above the first year level 
will also satisfy this requirement. Stu- 
dents entering the University without 
two years of foreign language in 
high school must complete two se- 
mesters of the same language at 
the beginners level, pass CLEP 
exam, or the SAT II Language 
profiency test. 

Historical Foundations of Western 
Civilization (one Gordon Rule 
course required, grade of 'C or 
higher required) 

AMH 2000 Origins of American 

Civilization 
AMH 2002 Modern American 

Civilization 
EUH 201 1 Western Civilization: 

Early European 

Civilization 
EUH 2021 Western 

Civilization:Medieval 

to Modern Europe 
EUH 2030 Western 

Civilization:Europe in 

the Modern Era 
LAH 2002 Latin American 

Civilization' 

Critical Inquiry (One course 
required, grade of "C required. 
These are Gordon Rule courses. 
Prerequisite: ENC 1102) 
ENG2012 Approached to 

Literature 
PHI 201 1 Philosophical Analysis 



REL2011 Religious Analysis 

HUM 3306 History of Ideas' 

SSI 3240 World Prospects and 

Issues' 
HUM 3214 Ancient Classical 

Culture and 

Civilization 
Comparative Culture & Gender 
Studies (one course required) 
AMH 4560 History of Women in the 

U.S.' 
AMH 4570 African-American 

History' 
ANT 3241 Myth, Ritual, and 

Mysticism (SS) 
ANT 3642 Language and Culture 

(SS) 
ANT 4273 Law & Culture (SS) 
ANT 4306 The Third World' (SS) 
ANT 4451 Racial & Cultural 

Minorities' (SS) 
CPO 4034 The Politics of 

Development & 

Underdevelopment 

(SS) 
ECS 3003 Comparative Economic 

Systems' (SS) 
FOW 3540 Bicultural Writing' 
HUM 3225 Women, Culture & 

History' 
HUM 3930 Female/Male: Women's 

Studies Seminar' 
HUM 2450 Cultural Heritage & 

Cultural Change' 
HUN 3191 World Nutrition' 
INR 4024 Ethnicity & Nationality 1 

(SS) 
INR 4283 International Relations, 

Development and 

the Third World' (SS) 
LIN 4651 Gender & Language 1 
LIT 3383 Women in Literature 1 
PHI 3073 African Philosophy' 
PHM4123 Philosophy & Feminism 1 
POT 4309 Sex, Power 8c Politics 1 (SS) 
REL3145 Women & Religion 1 
REL 3302 Studies in World Religions 1 
SYA 41 70 Comparative Sociology 1 

(SS) 
SYD4700 MinoritiesX Race and 

Ethnic Relations' (SS) 
SYD 4704 Seminar in Ethnicity' (SS) 
SYD4810 Sociology of Gender 1 

(SS) 
'(Completion of at least 24 credits is 
required to register for HUN 3191) 



Social Sciences (two courses 

required) 

One course from this list required. 

ANT 2000 Intro to Anthropology 

ANT 3409 Anthropology of 

Contemporary 

Society 
ECO 2013 Principles of 

Macroeconomics 
ECO 2023 Principles of 

Microeconomics 
GEA 2000 World Regional 

Geography 1 
INR 2001 Introduction to 

International 

Relations' 
POS 2042 American Government 
POT 2002 Introduction to Political 

Theory 
PSY 2020 Introduction to 

Psychology 
SYG 2000 Introduction to 

Sociology 
SYG 3002 Basic Ideas of Sociology 
'These courses qualify as having an 
international and/or diversity focus 
for Teacher Education Programs 
common prerequisites. See program 
listings in the College of Education 
section of the catalog for additional 
information. 

Additional Social Science Course: 

The additional course may be se- 
lected from any listed Comparative 
Culture social science course (SS). 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 19 



General Education 



Requirements 



The Board of Regents has defined 
the General Education Require- 
ments to consist of 36 semester 
hours. The University requires that all 
undergraduate students complete 
the 36 semester hours before gradu- 
ation. For students entering the Uni- 
versity with at least 37 semester 
hours, the requirement consists of six 
semester hours each in the areas of 
humanities, mathematics, natural 
science, and social science; and 12 
semester hours of the Writing Re- 
quirement. 

Only courses from the following 
list can fulfill the General Education 
Requirements at the University: 

State Board of Education Rule 
6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule) 

The State of Florida requires all pub- 
lic community colleges and universi- 
ties to include a specified amount 
of writing and mathematics in their 
curriculum to ensure that students 
have achieved substantial compe- 
tency in these areas. This require- 
ment must be fulfilled within the first 
two years of study. 

Writing Requirement 12) 

Students must successfully complete 
twelve hours of writing courses with 
a grade of 'C or better. Six hours 
must be in the composition courses 
(i.e., courses with the prefix ENC). 
The additional six hours must be 
taken in other courses in composi- 
tion (with the ENC prefix) or in other 
approved courses each of which re- 
quires at least 6,000 words of written 
work. The only approved courses 
are listed below: 

AMH 2000 Origins of American 

Civilization 
AMH 2002 Modern American 

Civilization 
ENC 1 101 Freshman Composition 

(lower division 

students only) 
ENC 1102 Literary Analysis (lower 

division students only) 
ENC 1200 Business Letter and 

Reports 
ENC 1930 Essay Writing 
ENC 2210 Technical Writing 
ENC 2301 Expository Writing 
ENC 3211 Report and Technical 

Writing 
ENC 331 1 Advanced Writing and 

Research 



ENC 3317 

ENC 4240 
ENC 4241 
ENC 4930 

ENG2012 

EUH2011 

EUH 2021 

EUH 2030 

HUM 3214 



HUM 3306 
LAH 2020 

PHI 2011 
REL2011 
SSI 3240 



Writing Across the 
Curriculum 
Report Writing 
Scientific Writing 
Special Topics in 
Composition 
Approaches to 
Literature 

Western Civilization: 
Early European 
Civilization 
Western Civilization: 
Medieval to Modern 
Europe 

Western Civilization: 
Europe in the 
Modern World 1 
Ancient Classical 
Culture and 
Civilization 
History of Ideas 1 
Latin American 
Civilization' 
Philosophical Analysis 
Religious Analysis 
World Prospects and 
Issues' 



Humanities (6) 

Art 

ARH 2050 Art History Survey I 

ARH 2051 Art History Survey II 

ART 1 201 C 2D Design 

ART 1203C 3D Design 

ART3310C Drawing (A 1000-level 
art course will be 
substituted for this 
course) 

English 

AML 201' 



Survey of American 

Literature I 

Survey of American 

Literature II 

African-American 

Literature' 

Approaches to 

Literature 

Introduction to Film 
ENG3138 The Movies 
ENG4121 History of Film 

Studies of Film 

Survey of British 

Literature l' 

Survey of British 

Literature ll' 

Introduction to 

Language 
LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction 

LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry 

LIT 2040 Introduction to Drama 

LIT 2120 World Literature ll' 



AML 2020 



AML 3602 



ENG2012 



ENG2100 



ENG4132 
ENL2011 



ENL2021 



LIN 2002 



LIT 3200 
LIT 3383 
History 
AMH 2010 

AMH 2020 

AMH 3317 

AMH 4560 

AMH 4570 

HIS 3001 

Humanities 

HUM 2512 
HUM 3214 



Themes in Literature 
Women in Literature 1 

American History, 

1607-1850 

American History, 

1850-Present 

America and the 

Movies 

History of Women 

in the U.S. ' 

African-American 

History' 

Introduction to History 



Art and Society 
Ancient Classical 
Culture 

Renaissance and 
Baroque 

The Enlightenment and 
the Modern World 
Values in Conflict 
History of Ideas' 
The Roman World 
The Medieval World 
Art and Literature 
Perspectives of the 
Humanities 
Human Concerns 
Film and the 
Humanities 
The Greek World 
Cultural Heritages and 
Cultural Changes' 
Literature and 
Philosophy 
Literature and the 
Humanities 
Ethics and the 
Humanities 
Symbols and Myths 

Liberal Studies 

LBS 42 1 Women and Work in the 
US 1 

Modern Languages 

FRE 3500 History of French 
Civilization 

Contemporary French 
Society 

Introduction to French 
Literature I 

Luso-Brazilian Culture 
Spanish American 
Culture' 

Culture I (Spain) ' 
Introduction to Spanish 
Literature' 



HUM 3232 

HUM 3246 

HUM 3304 
HUM 3306 
HUM 3432 
HUM 3435 
HUM 3545 
HUM 3872 

HUM 4392 
HUM 4406 

HUM 4431 
HUM 4491 

HUM 4543 

HUM 4544 

HUM 4561 

HUM 4555 



FRE 4501 



FRW 3200 



POR 3500 
SPN 3520 



SPN 4500 
SPW 3820 



20 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



In addition, all elementary, inter- 
mediate, and advanced language 
courses. 

Music 

MUH1011 Music Appreciation 

MUH2116 Evolution of Jazz 

MUH 3211 Music History Survey 

MUH 3212 Music History Survey 

Philosophy 

PHH3100 
PHH 3200 
PHH 3420 
PHH 3440 
PHH 4600 



Ancient Philosophy 

Medieval Philosophy 

Early Modem Philosophy 

Late Modern Philosophy 

Twentieth Century 

Philosophy 

Philosophical Analysis 

Introduction to Logic 

Ethics 

Metaphysics 

Eastern Philosophical 

and Religious 

Thought 

Social and Political 

Philosophy 1 

Religious Studies 

REL 201 1 - Religious Analysis 
REL 31 00 Religion and Culture 1 
REL 3131 New Religions in 

American 
REL 31 70 Religion and Ethics 
REL 3302 Studies in World Religions 1 

Theatre 

ORI 3000 
THE 2000 
THE 41 10 
THE 41 11 
THE 4370 

TPP2100 
SPC 2600 
SPC 2602 



PHI 2011 
PHI 2100 
PHI 2600 
PHI 3500 
PHI 3762 

PHM 3200 



Basic Oral Interpretation 
Theatre Appreciation 
Theatre History I 
Theatre History II 
Modern Dramatic 
Literature 

Introduction to Acting 
Public Speaking 
Communication for 
Business ■ 



Mathematics (6) 

(Must be at or above College Alge- 
bra level; one course may be in a 
Computer Science programming 
course.) A grade of 'C or higher 
shall be considered successful com- 
pletion of this requirement. 

Students subject to Rule 6A. 10.30 
need six credits of mathematics, 
three of which can be a computer 
programming or statistics course. 
Students who matriculated prior to 
1983 need only three credits of 
mathematics, but they must be in a 
mathematics course. 
CGS 2060 Introduction to 
Microcomputers 



CGS 2420 Programming for 

Engineers 
CGS 3403 COBOL for 

Non-Computer 
Science Majors 
COP 2172 Programming in Basic 
MAC 1102 Trigonometry 
MAC 1114 College Algebra 
MAC 2132 Pre-Calculus 
MAC 2233 Business Calculus 
MAC 231 1 Calculus I 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 
MGF 1202 Finite Mathematics 
STA 1 1 3 Statistics for Social 

Sciences 
STA 2 1 22 Introduction to Statistics 
STA 3163 Statistical Methods 
QMB3150 Application of 
Quantitative 
Methods in Business 

Natural Science: (6) 

Biological Sciences 

APB2170 Introductory 
Microbiology 
Introductory 
Microbiology 
Laboratory 
Introductory Botany 
General Biology I 
General Biology I 
Laboratory 
General Biology II 
General Biology II 
Laboratory 
Human Biology 
Human Biology 
Laboratory 
Introductory Marine 
Biology 

Introductory Marine 
Biology Laboratory 
Issues in Genetics- 
recDNA and IQ 
Introduction to 
Genetics Lab 
Foundations of Human 
Physiology 

Foundations of Human 
Physiology 
Laboratory 

Chemistry and Society 

Chemistry and Society 

Lab 

General Chemistry I 

General Chemistry I 

Lab 

General Chemistry II 

General Chemistry II 

Lab 



APB2170L 

BOT1010 
BSC 1010 
BSC 1010L 

BSC 1011 
BSC 101 1L 

BSC 2023 
BSC 2023L 

OCB 2003 

OCB 2003L 

PCB2510 

PCB2510L 

PCB 2700 

PCB 2700L 



Chemistry 

CHM 1032 
CHM 1032L 

CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 

CHM 1046 
CHM 1046L 



CHM 2200 Survey of Organic 

Chemistry 
CHM 2200L Survey of Organic 

Chemistry Lab 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

HUN 2201 Principles of Nutrition 
HUN 3122 Nutrition and Culture 1 

Environmental Studies 

EVR3010 Energy Flow in Natural 
and Man-made 
Systems 
Environmental 
Resources and 
Pollution 
Environmental 
Resources and 
Pollution Lab 
Ecology of South Florida 
Energy Resources 



EVR 301 1 

EVR3011L 

EVR 3013 
EVR 4312 

Geology 

GEO 2200 
GEO 2200L 

GEO 3510 ' 
GLY 1010 

GLY 1010L 

GLY 1100 
GLY 1100L 
GLY 3030 
GLY 3030L 

GLY 4650 
OCE3014 

Physics 

AST 2 100 

AST2100L 

AST 2201 
AST 220 1L 
PHY 2048 
PHY 2048L 

PHY 2049L 

PHY 2053 

PHY 2054 



Physical Geography 

Physical Geography 

Lab 

Earth Resources 

Introduction to Earth 

Science 

Introduction to Earth 

Science Lab 

Historical Geology 

Historical Geology Lab 

Environmental Geology 

Environmental Geology 

Lab 

Paleobiology 

Oceanography 

Solar System 
Astronomy (3) 
Solar System 
Astronomy Lab (1) 
Stellar Astronomy 
Stellar Astronomy Lab 
Physics with Calculus 
Physics with Calculus 
Laboratory I 
Physics with Calculus 
Laboratory II 
Physics without 
Calculus I 
Physics without 
Calculus II 



Social Science (6) 

Anthropology 

ANT 2000 Introduction to 
Anthropology 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 21 



Economics 

ECO 2013 Principles of 

Macroeconomics 

ECO 2023 Principles of 

Microeconomics 

Education 

CHD 3220 Child Development: 

Infancy and Early 

Childhood 
CHD 4210 Middle Childhood and 

Adolescent 

Development 

Criminal Justice 

CCJ 301 1 The Nature and Causes 
of Crime 

Home Economics 

FAD 2230 Family Life Cycle 

FAD 3232 Relationships 

FAD 4340 Family Development 

International Relations 

GEA 2000 World Regional 

Geography 1 
GEO 3471 Political Geography' 
INR 2001 Introduction to 

International 

Relations' 
INR 3043 Population and Society' 
INR 3081 Issues and Problems in 

International 

Relations' 

Political Science 

POS 2042 American Government 

Psychology 

CLP 3003 Personal Adjustment 
CLP 4144 Abnormal Psychology 
CYP 3003 Introduction to 

Community 

Psychology 
DEP 2000 Human Growth and 

Development 
DEP 2001 Psychology of Infancy 

and Childhood 
DEP 3303 Psychology of 

Adolescence 
DEP 3402 Psychology of Adulthood 
DEP 4464 Psychology of Aging 
EAB 4794 Principles and Theories 

of Behavior 

Modification 
EXP 3304 Motivation and Emotion 
EXP 4605 Cognitive Processes 
INP 2002 Introductory 

Industrial/Organization 

al Psychology 
PPE 3003 Theories of Personality 
PSY 2020 Introductory Psychology 
SOP 2772 Psychology of Sexual 

Behavior 



SOP 3004 Introductory Social 

Psychology 
SOP 301 5 Social and Personality 

Development 
SOP 3742 Psychology of Women' 
SOP 3932 Psychology of Drugs 

and Drug Abuse 
SOP 4525 Small Group Behavior 
SOP 4645 Consumer Psychology 
SOP 4834 Psychology of Health 

and Illness 

Sociology 

SYG 2000 Introduction to 

Sociology 
SYG 3002 Basic Ideas of 

Sociology 
'These courses qualify as having an 
international and/or diversity focus 
for Teacher Education Programs 
common prerequisites. See program 
listings in the College of Education 
section of the catalog for additional 
information. 

Additional Policies and 
Requirements 

1 . A student who has recently 
graduated from a Florida public 
community college with an Associ- 
ate in Arts degree will have met the 
University's General Education Re- 
quirements. 

2. A student who has recently 
met the General Education Require- 
ments of any institution in the State 
University System of Florida will have 
met the University's General Educa- 
tion Requirements. 

3. A student who has taken the 
freshman and sophomore years in 
an accredited college other than a 
Florida public community college or 
an institution in the State University 
System of Florida may receive credit 
for courses meeting the University's 
General Education Requirements. 

4. Students who have been ad- 
mitted before completing an 
equivalent general education pro- 
gram, must do so at the University 
prior to graduation. 

5. Most departments require for 
admission to their degree programs 
certain freshman and sophomore 
courses in addition to the General 
Education Requirements. Applicants 
should consult the catalog section 
dealing with the program they wish 
to pursue to determine the nature 
and extent of the additional require- 
ments. 

Foreign Language Requirement 



In addition to the above General 
Education Requirements, any stu- 
dent who was admitted with a for- 
eign language deficiency must 
successfully complete 8-10 semester 
credits of instruction in one foreign 
language prior to graduation. 

Transfer Credit 

For purposes of clarity, transferability 
refers to the conditions under which 
the University accepts credits from ' 
other post-secondary institutions. Ap- 
plicability of credit toward a degree 
refers to the prerogative of the re- 
spective academic division to 
count specific credit toward a stu- 
dent's degree requirements. Nor- 
mally, collegiate work will be 
considered for transfer credit only 
from post-secondary institutions 
which are fully accredited by a re- 
gional accrediting association. The 
Office of Admissions will evaluate 
the acceptability of total credits 
transferable to the University. Trans- 
fer credit will be applied as appropri- 
ate to a student's degree program. 
The authority to apply such credit to 
the degree rests with the academic 
division of the student's intended 
major. If a student chooses to trans- 
fer to another academic division 
within the University, credit pre- 
viously earned at another post-sec- 
ondary institution will be 
re-evaluated and applied as appro- 
priate to the student's new degree 
program. 

A maximum of 60 lower division 
semester hours taken at a two- or 
four-year institution may be counted 
toward a degree at the University. A 
maximum of 30 additional upper di- 
vision semester hours taken at a sen- 
ior institution may be counted 
toward a degree at the University. 

Lower division courses in excess 
of 60 semester hours may serve to 
meet specific course requirements 
for an FIU degree, but credit hours 
represented by these courses will 
not reduce the number of credit 
hours to be completed at the Univer- 
sity. 

A grade of 'D' will be accepted 
for transfer. However, such a grade 
in coursework in the major field is 
subject to review and approval by 
the appropriate academic depart- 
ment. Credit from institutions not 
fully accredited by a regional ac- 
crediting association will not be ac- 
cepted; however, when presented, 
it will be considered on an individual 
basis by the appropriate College or 
School. Credit from military schools 
will be transferred in accordance 
with the recommendations of the 



22 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



American Council on Education. 
Credit from foreign institutions will 
be considered on an individual ba- 
sis. 

Acceleration 

The academic programs of the Uni- 
versity are planned in such a man- 
ner that students may complete 
some of their division degree require- 
ments through one or more of the 
mechanisms listed below. Specific in- 
formation on the accelerated 
mechanisms utilized in each aca- 
demic program is available from the 
department or program of the stu- 
dent's major. 

Credit For Non-College Learning 

The award of credit for learning ac- 
quired outside the university or class- 
room experience is the prerogative 
of each academic department or 
program. Only degree-seeking stu- 
dents are eligible to receive this 
type of credit. The significant learn- 
ing must be applicable to the de- 
gree program of the student, and 
should be discussed and appropri- 
ately documented at the time the 
desired program of study is initially 
discussed and decided with the stu- 
dent's program advisor. 

College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) 

The College Level Examination Pro- 
gram is designed to measure knowl- 
edge in certain subject matter 
areas of general education. There 
are two types of CLEP tests: General 
Examination and Subject Examina- 
tion. 

Because CLEP credit is regarded 
as transfer credit, no matter how 
earned, the maximum transferabil- 
ity of credit under CLEP, both Gen- 
eral and Subject examinations 
combined, is 45 semester credits. 

Not more than six semester hours 
will be transferred in each of the 
five areas of the General Examina- 
tion (English, humanities, mathemat- 
ics, natural sciences, social 
sciences/history). The English exami- 
nation must be with essay and will 
not count towards the English Com- 
position requirement. It will count as 
elective credit. 

For additional information on 
CLEP, contact the Office of Admis- 
sions. 



Core Curriculum CLEP 

The University awards credit for CLEP 
scores at the 50th percentile or 
higher. For students completing the 
Core requirements, only the follow- 
ing examinations will be recognized 
for credit. It is strongly recom- 
mended that CLEP examinations be 
taken prior to enrollment at the Uni- 
versity. 

CLEP Subject Examinations 

American Literature, Analysis and In- 
terpretation of Literature, Calculus, 
English Literature, General Biology, 
General Chemistry, General Psychol- 
ogy, Introduction to Psychology, In- 
troduction to Sociology, Macro 
Economics, Micro Economics, Mod- 
ern Language. 

General Education CLEP 

The University awards credit for CLEP 
scores at the 50th percentile or 
higher. For students entering with 
more than 48 semester hours, the fol- 
lowing CLEP general examinations 
may meet the General Education re- 
quirements: 

English Composition with Essay: A 
student will be awarded up to six se- 
mester hours of credit for English, less 
hours previously earned in any col- 
lege-level English course. These cred- 
its will only count toward elective 
credit. 

Humanities: A student will be 
awarded up to six semester hours of 
credit if a satisfactory score is 
achieved. 

Mathematics: A student will be 
awarded up to six semester hours of 
credit if a satisfactory score is 
achieved. 

Natural Science: A student will be 
awarded up to three semester hours 
of credit in biology or physical sci- 
ence, or both, if a satisfactory score 
is achieved. 

Social Science: A student will be 
awarded six semester hours of credit 
if a satisfactory score is achieved. 

For additional information re- 
garding the CLEP Subject Examina- 
tions, contact the Office of 
Admissions. 

Advanced Placement 

The University awards credit for Ad- 
vanced Placement test scores of 
three, four, and five. For students 
completing the Core requirements, 
only the following examinations will 
be recognized for credit. 



Advanced Placement: Art History, Bi- 
ology, Calculus, Chemistry, English, 
French Literature, Government, 
Modern Language, Music Listening 
and Literature, Music Theory, Phys- 
ics, Psychology, Spanish Literature. 

International Baccalaureate 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) 
program is a comprehensive and rig- 
orous two year program leading to 
examinations. Based on the pattern 
of no single country, it is a deliber- 
ate compromise between the spe- 
cialization required in some national 
systems and the breadth preferred 
in others. Florida International Univer- 
sity recognizes the quality of the IB 
program and will award 6 semester 
hours of college credit to those stu- 
dents who score a 5, 6 or 7 on each 
subject at the Higher level. Credit 
will not be awarded to subjects at 
the Subsidiary level. 



National Student Exchange 

National Student Exchange provides 
students with the opportunity to ex- 
change to one of 120 colleges and 
universities in the United States and 
its territories for one semester or aca- 
demic year, while paying in-state tui- 
tion. Full credit is given for work 
satisfactorily completed on ex- 
change. NSE offers the student the 
opportunity to live in a different geo- 
graphic setting, explore a particular 
academic interest, and, of course, 
make new and lasting friendships 
with other students from all over the 
United States. 

In order to participate in the Na- 
tional Student Exchange, students 
must be enrolled full-time and have 
a 3.0 cumulative GPA. For further in- 
formation, contact 'the Office of Un- 
dergraduate Studies in DM 368 at 
University Park, 348-4100; or in ACI 
180 at North Miami, 919-5754. 

University Honors Program 

The University Honors Program, a 
four-year program, focuses on inter- 
disciplinary studies. The Honors Pro- 
gram is committed to curriculum 
integration in its approach to topics, 
resources and classroom practices. 
Every term the program will offer 
one three-credit honors course to- 
ward fulfillment of the eight semes- 
ter program. In their senior year, 
honors students are given the option 
of completing a thesis/project in lieu 
of taking the two senior-year semi- 
nars. 

Students will be selected to par- 
ticipate in the University Honors Pro- 



Undergraduate Catalog General Information / 23 

gram on the basis of SAT or ACT 
scores, grade point average, and 
an application essay. For further in- 
formation, contact the University 
Honors Program, DM 368, (305) 348- 
4100. 

Pre-Medical Advisement 

For their initial advisement, students 
interested in entering professional 
schools of medicine, dentistry, op- 
tometry, or veterinary medicine 
should contact either the Depart- 
ment of Biology, OE 246, (305) 348- 
220 1 , or the Department of 
Chemistry, OE 200, 348-2606, at Uni- 
versity Park at the earliest possible 
time. Professor Zaida Morales- 
Martinez, in the Department of 
Chemistry, (305) 348-3084, is the co- 
ordinator of pre-medical advising. 
After completing a substantial por- 
tion of their professional courses or 
at the end of their junior year, and 
prior to the Fall Term in which they 
plan to apply to professional 
schools, students should contact the 
Chairperson of the Premedical Ad- 
visement and Evaluation Commit- 
tee in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The Committee provides 
additional advisement for students 
wishing to enter the health profes- 
sions and prepares recommenda- 
tions for those applying to 
professional schools. 

Pre-Law Advisement 

Students interested in receiving infor- 
mation on pre-professional educa- 
tion, on application procedures, 
testing, and references should con- 
tact the Department of Political Sci- 
ence or the Department of 
Philosophy in the College of Arts 
and Sciences or the Department of 
Criminal Justice in the School of Pub- 
lic Affairs and Services. A faculty ad- 
visor in these departments will 
advise students who plan to attend 
law school. 



24 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Office of the Registrar 



The Office of the Registrar is responsi- 
ble for directing the University regis- 
tration activities, and establishing, 
maintaining, and releasing students' 
academic records. The office is also 
responsible for Space and Schedul- 
ing, Enrollment Certification, Veter- 
an's Affairs, Graduation, and the 
Student Academic Support System 
(SASS). The office also produces the 
schedule of classes and the univer- 
sity catalogs. 

The University Park office is lo- 
cated in PC 130, 348-2392. the 
North Campus office is located in 
ACI-100, 919-5750, and the Broward 
Programs at Broward Community 
College, Central Campus, 475-4160 
and University Tower, 355-5236. 

Classification of Students 

The University classifies students as 
follows: 

Degree-Seeking Students 

This category includes students who 
have been admitted to a degree 
program, but have not completed 
the requirements for the degree. 
Freshmen - Students who have 
earned fewer than 30 semester 
hours. 

Sophomores - Students who have 
earned at least 30 semester hours 
but fewer than 60 semester hours. 
Juniors - Students who have earned 
at least 60 semester hours but fewer 
than 90 semester hours. 
Seniors - Students who have earned 
90 or more semester hours but who 
have not earned a baccalaureate 
degree. 

Non Degree Seeking Students 

These students may be either affili- 
ated or unaffiliated in their status. 
Unaffiliated students are limited to 
taking one semester of courses at 
the University. Affiliated students 
must be approved by the appropri- 
ate College or School and must 
meet its specific requirements. Un- 
der no circumstances may more 
than 15 hours, taken as a non de- 
gree seeking student, be applied to- 
ward graduation requirements at 
the University, if the student 
changes from non degree seeking 
to degree-seeking status. 

The following regulations applies 
to non degree seeking students: 



1 . Students are not required to 
meet the usual admission require- 
ments and are not officially admit- 
ted as regular students. Enrollment 
as a non degree seeking student 
does not imply a right for future ad- 
mission as a regular, degree-seek- 
ing student. Credit earned will not 
be counted toward a degree at 
the University unless such students 
subsequently apply for regular ad- 
mission and are accepted as under- 
graduate or graduate students. 

2. Registration is permitted on a 
space-available basis and is deter- 
mined at the time of registration. 
Non degree seeking students may 
not register during the official regis- 
tration week for degree-seeking stu- 
dents. 

3. No more than 15 undergradu- 
ate level semester hours earned as 
a non degree seeking student may 
be counted toward a degree. The 
appropriate Dean must approve 
the acceptance of such credit. 

4. Non degree seeking students 
will not be allowed to register for 
more than one term without obtain- 
ing admission to a degree program 
at the University, or obtaining admis- 
sion into a formal certificate pro- 
gram, or acquiring affiliated status 
from the department in which they 
are registering. 

5. Applicants denied admission 
to the University will not be allowed 
to register as non degree seeking 
students for a period of one year 
without obtaining admission into a 
formal Certificate Program or ob- 
taining affiliated status from the ap- 
propriate academic department. 

6. Immigration regulations pre- 
vent most foreign nationals from en- 
rolling without being admitted into 
a formal degree or certificate pro- 
gram, depending on the visa type. 
Therefore, international students 
cannot enroll as non degree seek- 
ing students. 

Affiliated Students 

Students applying for affiliated 
status as non-degree seeking stu- 
dents must be approved by the ap- 
propriate Dean in accordance with 
criteria approved by that College or 
School's Faculty Curriculum Commit- 
tee. 



Transient Students 

This category includes students who 
are fully admitted and are actively 
pursuing a degree at another ac- 
credited two or four year institution. 
Such students need to present evi- 
dence of their status each semester 
before they will be allowed to regis- 
ter. 

Certificate Students 

This category includes students who 
have been accepted into a specific 
certificate program by the aca- 
demic department responsible for 
that program. Certificate programs 
are subject to all University regula- 
tions. 

College/Major Classification 

Lower division students have a col- 
lege designation of lower division 
with a major designation of their in- 
tended major (if indicated by the 
student). This does not imply sub- 
sequent admission to that degree 
program. 

Degree-seeking upper division 
students admitted to an upper level 
degree program are classified ac- 
cording to the college or school 
and major of their degree program; 
and when applicable, to the col- 
lege or school and major of their 
second major. 

When admitted students reach 
a total of 60 or more credit hours (in- 
cluding transfer and current enroll- 
ment), they may apply for 
admission into an upper division ma- 
jor, provided they have passed the 
CLAST or met the necessary require- 
ments for CLAST exemption. All de- 
gree-seeking undergraduates must 
be admitted into an upper division 
major prior to completing 75 credit 
hours, including transfer hours. 

Academic Degree 
Requirements 

Bachelor's Degree 

The University will confer the 
bachelor's degree when the follow- 
ing conditions have been met: 

1 . Recommendation of the fac- 
ulty of the College or the School 
awarding the degree. 

2. Certification by the Dean of 
the College or the School con- 
cerned that all requirements of the 
degree being sought have been 
completed. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 25 



3. A minimum of 120 semester 
hours in acceptable coursework is 
required for the Bachelor's degree. 

4. Completion of the last 30 
credit hours at the University. Excep- 
tions (normally not to exceed six 
hours) may be made in advance by 
the appropriate Dean. 

5. Completion of the General 
Education Requirements or, in the 
case of students admitted with 
fewer than 36 transfer hours, the 
Lower Division Core Curriculum. 

6. Earned a cumulative GPA of 
2.0 or higher at the University. 

7. Earning the grade require- 
ments for major, core courses, and 
course sequences established by 
the appropriate College or School. 

8. Satisfactory completion of the 
College Level Academic Skills Test 
(CLAST) requirement. 

9. Completion of 8-10 credits in 
one foreign language (American 
Sign Language is acceptable). Stu- 
dents who entered the University 
with a foreign language require- 
ment deficiency, regardless of 
whether the student holds an A. A., 
must now complete 8-10 credits in 
one foreign language. Transfer 
credit is applicable to the require- 
ment, and exemption by examina- 
tion is available through the Testing 
Office. Also, students who com- 
pleted two years of high school for- 
eign language study in one 
language are considered to have 
met the requirement. 

a. Students who can demon- 
strate continuous enrollment in a de- 
gree program at an SUS institution or 
Florida Community College since 
Fall Term, 1989 (continuous enroll- 
ment is defined by the state to be 
the completion of at least one 
course per year) will be exempt 
from this requirement. 

b. Also exempt are students hold- 
ing an A. A. degree from a Florida 
Community College or SUS institu- 
tion prior to Fall Term, 1989. 

Two Bachelor Degrees 

Two bachelor degrees may be 
awarded simultaneously when the 
following conditions have been met: 

1 . Requirements for two majors 
have been completed as certified 
by the appropriate academic units. 

2. A minimum of 30 appropriate 
semester hours in addition to the re- 
quirements of one degree has been 
earned. 

A graduate from an accredited 
four-year institution who applies for 



admission to work toward a second 
bachelor's degree must meet the re- 
quirements of the major depart- 
ment which shall include (but is not 
limited to) a minimum of 30 semes- 
ter hours of coursework. 

Two Majors for a Bachelor's 
Degree 

Any undergraduate student who 
elects to do so may carry two ma- 
jors and work to fulfill the require- 
ments of both concurrently. Upon 
successful completion of the require- 
ments of two majors, the student will 
be awarded one degree and a no- 
tation denoting both majors will be 
entered on the transcript. A Request 
for Second Major Form must be filled 
out in the Office of the Registrar to 
declare two majors. 

Minors and Certificate Programs 

Students who have completed an 
approved minor as part of their bac- 
calaureate degree program will 
have this notation as a part of the 
degree comment on their transcript. 

Students who have completed 
an approved certificate program 
will have an appropriate notation 
placed on their transcript. 

Associate in Arts 

Students who satisfactorily com- 
plete 60 semester hours of accept- 
able college work with an overall 
GPA of 2.0 or higher, fulfill the Lower 
Division Core requirements, pass the 
College Level Academic Skills test 
(CLAST) and complete at least 20 
credit hours in residence at the Uni- 
versity may apply for the Associate 
in Arts degree. The degree will not 
be awarded after completion of the 
baccalaureate degree. A notation 
will appear on the student's tran- 
script but no diploma will be issued. 

Summer Enrollment 

All students entering any university 
within the Florida State University Sys- 
tem with fewer than 60 credit hours 
shall be required to earn at least 
nine credit hours prior to graduation 
by attending one or more summer 
terms at a Florida state university. 

Academic Definitions 
Program and Course Regulations 
Credit Hour 

The term credit hour as used refers 
to one hour of classwork, or the 
equivalent, each week for an entire 
academic term. 



Major 

An integral part of the bachelor's 
degree is a major concentration of 
coursework in an approved aca- 
demic discipline or area. The exact 
course and credit requirements and 
prerequisites for each major are out- 
lined in the departmental program 
areas in the catalog. 
Electives 

Students may usually select courses 
from any academic area to com- 
plement their area, or areas, of 
study or to meet their interests in or- 
der to fulfill the credit hour require- 
ments for the bachelor's or master's 
degree. Prerequisite course require- 
ments should be considered in se- 
lecting elective courses. Students 
should refer to their academic pro- 
gram requirements concerning elec- 
tives. 

Minor Program 

A minor program is an arrangement 
of courses that enables students to 
develop some degree of expertise 
in one area of study. A minor is 
awarded upon completion of the 
bachelor's degree, but is not interdis- 
ciplinary in nature. 

Certificate Program 

A certificate program is a combina- 
tion of courses with a common base 
or interest selected from one or 
more academic disciplines and so 
arranged as to form an area of aca- 
demic concentration. Three types of 
certificates are awarded: Aca- 
demic, professional, and continuing 
studies. Students must apply and be 
admitted into the professional certifi- 
cate program. 

Change of College/School or 
Major 

A fully admitted undergraduate stu- 
dent can change majors, provided 
he or she meets the entrance re- 
quirements of the new program, by 
submitting a Request for Change of 
College/School or Major form. The 
form and instructions are available 
in the Registrar's Office. The student 
is subject to the program require- 
ments in effect at the time of the 
change of major. 

Registration 

The following registration informa- 
tion is subject to change and stu- 
dents must verify the dates with the 
Office of the Registrar, PC 130. Uni- 
versity Park; or ACI-100, North Cam- 
pus; or at the Broward Program, 
BCC Central Campus. 475-4160 and 
University Tower. 355-5236. 



26 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



All students, degree and non de- 
gree seeking, registering for more 
that 18 credit hours during one se- 
mester must obtain the approval 
and the signature of the Dean of 
their College or School. 

Registration for courses is as 
follows: 

Registration Week is held during 
the preceding semester (check the 
Academic Calendar for the dates) 
and ends one week later. Degree 
seeking students are given an ap- 
pointment day and time based on 
their classification, GPA, and credit 
hours completed. Students may 
add/drop at this time. 

Open Registration is held follow- 
ing Registration Week and lasts until 
the end of the first week of classes. 
There is no appointment day and 
time and registration is on a first- 
come, first-serve basis. All students 
who have not yet registered are en- 
couraged to do so at this time. Stu- 
dents who have already registered 
may also add or drop courses dur- 
ing this period. 

Telephone Registration 

All students are able to find out their 
grades, registration appointment 
time and day, classroom assign- 
ments, registration holds (if any), 
and register, add and drop courses 
using a touchtone telephone. (305) 
348-1500, or the on-campus kiosks. 
To use the Telephone Registra- 
tion System or the on-campus ki- 
osks, students are given an access 
code by the Office of the Registrar. 
Call (305) 348-2320 for information. 

Immunization 

To register for courses, students, un- 
der the age of 40, must provide the 
University Health and Wellness Cen- 
ter, University Park; HM 1 10, North 
Campus with documentation of im- 
munization against measles and ru- 
bella. Students should contact the 
Health and Wellness Center for 
more information at 348-2401 or at 
919-5620. 

Late Registration Fee 

Any student, degree-seeking or non 
degree seeking, who initiates regis- 
tration after the registration dead- 
line is assessed a SI 00.00 late 
registration fee. Students may initi- 
ate late registration during the first 
week of classes. 



Dropping and Adding 

Courses 

The Official Drop/Add period runs 
throughout the first week of classes 
(Check Academic Calendar for spe- 
cific dates). During this period a stu- 
dent may add courses or register 
with a late registration fee. Students 
may also drop courses or withdraw 
from the University with no record of 
enrollment and without a tuition fee 
liability. Students may submit a 
drop/add card to the Office of the 
Registrar or use the Telephone Regis- 
tration System to officially drop a 
course. If the tuition fee has already 
been paid, a refund will be gener- 
ated by the Cashier's Office and 
mailed to the local address on file. 

Late Adds 

Students may add courses with ap- 
propriate authorization and signa- 
tures until the end of the third week 
of classes. No course can be added 
after this deadline. 

Late Drops 

Courses officially dropped after 
Drop/Add period and through the 
eighth week of the term (summer 
terms have different deadlines 
Check the Academic Calendar for 
specific dates) dropped courses are 
recorded on the student's transcript 
with a grade of 'DR' (dropped). The 
student is financially liable for all 
dropped courses. Students must sub- 
mit a Course Drop Form to the Of- 
fice of the Registrar to officially drop 
a course. Non-attendance or non- 
payment of courses will not consti- 
tute a drop. 

A student may appeal the dead- 
line for a late drop by submitting 
the Appeal for Late Drop form. A 
drop after the deadline will be ap- 
proved only in cases where circum- 
stances peyond the student's 
control make it impossible for the 
student to continue. The student 
must provide appropriate docu- 
mentation. The instructor will desig- 
nate whether the student was 
passing or failing the course at the 
time of the appeal to drop. A 'WP' 
grade indicates the student with- 
drew from the class with a passing 
grade. A 'WF' grade indicates the 
student withdrew from the class 
with a failing grade. The 'WF' grade 
is calculated in the students term 
and cumulative GPA. The deadline 
to submit this appeal is the last day 
of classes of the term. 



Withdrawal from the 
University 

A currently registered student can 
withdraw from the university only 
during the first eight weeks of the se- 
mester. In the Summer Semester, 
withdrawal deadlines will be ad- 
justed accordingly. A Withdrawal 
Form must be filled out and submit- 
ted to the Office of the Registrar. 
Non-attendance or non-payment of 
courses will not constitute a with- 
drawal. (Refer to the Academic Cal- 
endar for the deadline dates.) 

The transcript of a student who 
withdraws before or during the 
Drop/Add first week of classes will 
contain no record of enrollment 
and no tuition fee will be assessed. 
If the tuition has already been paid, 
a refund will be generated by the 
Cashier's Office and mailed to the 
local address on file. If a student 
withdraws from the University prior 
to the end of the fourth week of 
classes, a 25 percent refund, will be 
issued. 

The transcript of a student who 
officially withdraws after Drop/Add 
period and before the end of the 
eighth week of the term will receive 
a 'Wl' for each course. 

The transcript of a student who 
stops attending the university with- 
out officially withdrawing from the 
University will receive an 'F' grade 
for each course. 

A student may appeal the dead- 
line for a late withdrawal by submit- 
ting the Appeal for Late Withdrawal 
form. A withdrawal after the dead- 
line will be approved only in cases 
where circumstances beyond the 
student's control make it impossible 
for the student to continue. The stu- 
dent must submit appropriate docu- 
mentation. The instructor will 
designate whether the student was 
passing or failing the course(s) at 
the time of the appeal to withdraw. 
The deadline to submit this appeal 
is the last day of classes of the term. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 27 



Grading System 

Grade Points Per 
Grades Credit Hour 

A 4.00 

A- 3.67 

B+ 3.33 

B 3.00 

B- 2.67 

C+ 2.33 

C 2.00 

C- 1.67. 

D+ 1.33 

D 1.00 

D- 0.67 

F Failure 0.00 

P Satisfactory (Pass) N/A 

IN Incomplete 1 N/A 

Wl Withdrew from University N/A 
WP Withdrew from University 

after deadline 

with passing grade N/A 

WF Withdrew from University 

after deadline 

with failing grade 0.00 

AU Audit N/A 

DR Dropped Course N/A 

DP Dropped after deadline 

with passing grade N/A 

DF Dropped after deadline 

with failing grade 0.00 

NR Grade Not Reported 

or Invalid 2 N/A 

EM Examination N/A 

^N is only a temporary symbol. It will 
revert to the default grade after two 
consecutive terms. 
2 NR is only a temporary symbol. It 
will default to an 'F' after two con- 
secutive terms if it is not changed by 
the instructor. 

Note: All courses for which a student 
is officially registered at the end of 
the Drop/Add Period and for which 
a Letter Grade, a 'DF', or a 'WF' is re- 
ceived are calculated in the GPA. 

Grading Options 

The Academic Units make the deter- 
mination of the grading option of 
each course. A course may be of- 
fered for a letter grade as listed 
above or Pass/Fail; or for an op- 
tional grade in which the student 
has a choice of either receiving a 
letter grade or pass/fail; or the stu- 
dent may choose to audit a course 
and an 'AU' grade will be recorded 
on the student's record. The grading 
option must be indicated at the 
time of registration. The grading op- 
tion cannot be changed after the 



Drop/Add period (first week of 
classes). There are no exceptions to 
this deadline. 

To register for an audit, the stu- 
dent must obtain the permission 
and signature of the instructor of the 
course audited. Once the course is 
registered for as 'Audit', the grading 
option cannot be changed. 

Incomplete Grade 

An incomplete grade is a temporary 
symbol given at the discretion of the 
instructor for work not completed 
because of serious interruption not 
caused by the student's own negli- 
gence. An incomplete must be 
made up as quickly as possible but 
no later than two consecutive se- 
mesters or it will automatically de- 
fault to the grade that the student 
earned in the course. There is no ex- 
tension to the two consecutive se- 
mester deadline. The student must 
not register again for the course to 
make up the incomplete. 

Students who receive an incom- 
plete grade and have applied for 
graduation at the end of that term, 
must complete the incomplete 
grade by the end of the fourth 
week of the following term. Failure 
to do so will result in a cancellation 
of graduation. The student will need 
to reapply for graduation. 

Forgiveness Policy 

The forgiveness policy is a way in 
which students may repeat a limited 
number of courses to improve their 
grade point average (GPA) by hav- 
ing only the grade received oh the 
last repeat used in its calculation. 
Under the University's forgiveness 
policy, students must file a Re- 
peated Course Form with the Office 
of the Registrar. There is no time limit 
on the use of the forgiveness policy 
for grades; however, the forgiveness 
policy cannot be used once a de- 
gree is posted. All courses taken 
with the grades earned will be re- 
corded on the student's transcript. 
The repeated course form will not 
be processed if the first or repeated 
grade received is 'DR', 'DP', 'IF' 
'Wl', 'WP', 'AU', 'NR', or "EM'. Re- 
peated courses will be appropri- 
ately designated (T: attempted; R: 
last repeat). 

Undergraduate students may use 
the forgiveness policy a maximum 
of three times for the purpose of im- 
proving the GPA. The same course 
may be repeated up to three times 
or the student may use the three op- 
portunities to apply to three differ- 
ent courses. Only the final grade for 
the three courses repeated under 



the forgiveness policy will be 
counted in computing the student's 
GPA. In order for a course to be con- 
sidered as repeated and adjusted 
in the GPA, the course must be the 
same and must be repeated at the 
university. Students who have used 
their three options under the forgive- 
ness policy may still repeat courses; 
however, both the original grade 
and any additional grades received 
through repetitions of the course will 
be used in computing the GPA. 

A course taken on a letter grade 
basis must be repeated on the 
same basis. Students will not be al- 
lowed additional credit or quality 
points for a repeated course unless 
the course is specifically designated 
as repeatable (independent study, 
studio courses, etc.). Students not us- 
ing the forgiveness policy may still re- 
peat a course. All attempts will 
apply to computation of the GPA 
but credit for one attempt will apply 
toward graduation. Students must 
check with the appropriate aca- 
demic department to determine 
whether there are additional restric- 
tions on repeating courses. 

Departmental Credit by 
Examination 

Departmental credit by examina- 
tion is available for certain courses. 
A student who has already gained 
knowledge of a subject offered at 
the University and who wishes to 
take an examination in lieu of taking 
the course should discuss the matter 
with his or her academic advisor 
and with the department offering 
the course. 

Awarding departmental credit 
by examination is the prerogative of 
each academic unit. To receive 
credit by examination, a student 
must be a regular degree-seeking 
student, register, and pay for the 
courses. Once the student is 
awarded the departmental credit 
by examination, an 'EM' grade will 
be recorded on the transcript. 

Change or Correction of Grades 

Once submitted, end-of-semester 
grades (except Incompletes and 
NR's, which default at the end of 
two consecutive terms) are final. 
They are subject to change only 
through a Change of Grade Form 
to correct an error in computation 
or transcribing, or where part of the 
student's work has been unintention- 
ally overlooked. 



28 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Final Examinations 

Final examinations will be given dur- 
ing the week following the last day 
of classes during each semester. The 
Summer Semesters do not have final 
examination periods and course ex- 
aminations may be given at the dis- 
cretion of the faculty member 
teaching the course. 

Final Grades 

Final grades are available over the 
telephone registration system at 
(305) 348-1500 or through the on- 
campus kiosks and the World Wide 
Web. 

DearVs List 

Any fully admitted undergraduate 
student who earns a semester aver- 
age of 3.5 or higher on nine or more 
semester credit hours of coursework 
for which grade points are earned, 
is placed on the Semester Dean's 
List. This achievement is noted on 
the student's semester report of 
grades and permanent academic 
record (transcript). 

Application for Graduation 

Students who plan to graduate are 
reguired to submit to the Office of 
the Registrar an Application for 
Graduation form. This form must be 
submitted before the last day of 
classes of the academic semester 
prior to graduation. Students turning 
in the Application for Graduation af- 
ter the deadline will graduate the 
following semester. There is no 
charge for applying for graduation. 

Students who do not graduate 
must complete the remaining re- 
quirements needed for graduation 
and must re-apply for graduation. 

Academic Honors 
Summa Cum Laude 

To graduate Summa Cum Laude. a 
student must have earned a cumu- 
lative FIU GPA of 3.90 and higher. 

Magna Cum Laude 

To graduate Magna Cum Laude, a 
student must have earned a cumu- 
lative FIU GPA of 3.70 - 3.899. 

Cum Laude 

To graduate Cum Laude. a student 
must have earned a cumulative FIU 
GPA of 3.50 - 3.699. 

To graduate with the above hon- 
ors, the student must have com- 
pleted a minimum of 40 semester 
hours at the University for which 
grade points are awarded. 



Academic Warning, 
Probation, and Dismissal 

Warning 

An undergraduate student whose 
cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0 will 
be placed on warning, indicating 
academic difficulty. 

Probation 

An undergraduate student on warn- 
ing whose cumulative GPA falls be- 
low 2.0 will be placed on probation, 
indicating serious academic diffi- 
culty. The College/School of the stu- 
dent on probation may indicate the 
conditions which must be met in or- 
der to continue to enroll. 

Dismissal 

An undergraduate student on Pro- 
bation whose cumulative and se- 
mester GPAs fall below a 2.0 will be 
automatically dismissed from his or 
her program and the University. An 
undergraduate student will not be 
dismissed prior to attempting a mini- 
mum of 20 semester hours of course- 
work. The student has ten working 
days to appeal the dismissal deci- 
sion. This appeal must be made in 
writing to the Dean of the College 
or the School in which the student is 
admitted. The dismissal from the Uni- 
versity is for a minimum of one year. 
After one year, the student may ap- 
ply for readmission (see Readmis- 
sion) to the University in the same or 
a different program, or register as a 
non-degree seeking student. 

Dismissed students applying for 
admission or registering as non-de- 
gree seeking students are placed 
automatically on academic proba- 
tion. 

Student Records 

Florida international University as- 
sures the confidentiality of student 
educational records in accordance 
with State University System rules, 
state, and federal laws including the 
Family Educational Rights and Pri- 
vacy Act of 1974, as amended. Stu- 
dent academic records are 
maintained in the Office of the Reg- 
istrar and in the academic depart- 
ment of the student's major. All 
currently enrolled and former stu- 
dents have the right to review their 
records to determine their content 
and accuracy. Parents of depend- 
ent students, as defined by the Inter- 
nal Revenue Code, and who give 
evidence of the dependent status, 
have the same rights. For the cost of 
photocopying, students may gener- 
ally have copies of any documents 



in their file, except for other institu- 
tions' transcripts. 

Release of Student Information 
from Educational Records 

The disclosure or publication of stu- 
dent information is governed by poli- 
cies of Florida International 
University and the Board of Regents 
of the State University System of Flor- 
ida within the framework of State 
and Federal Laws, including the 
Family Educational Rights and Pri- 
vacy Act of 1974. 

A student's consent is required 
for the disclosure or publication of 
any information which is a) person- 
ally identifiable and b) a part of the 
educational record. However, cer- 
tain exceptions to that generality, 
both in types of information which 
can be disclosed and in access to 
that information, are allowed within 
the regulations of the Family Educa- 
tional Rights and Privacy Act. The 
following persons and organizations 
may have access to personally 
identifiable information without a 
student's prior consent: 

Faculty, administrators, staff and 
consultants employed by the Univer- 
sity or the Board of Regents whose 
work involves: 

1 . Performance of administrative 
tasks which relate to students; 

2. Performance of supervisory or 
instructional tasks which relate to 
students; or 

3. Performance of services which 
benefit students. 

A student's prior consent is not re- 
quired for disclosure of portions of 
the educational record defined by 
the institution as Directory informa- 
tion. The following Directory Informa- 
tion may be released by the 
University: 

1. Name, local and permanent 
address and telephone numbeKs); 

2. Date and place of birth, and 
sex; 

3. Classification and major and 
minor fields of study; 

4. Participation in officially recog- 
nized activities and sports; 

5. Weight and height of mem- 
bers of athletic teams; 

6. Dates of attendance, degrees 
and awards received; 

7. The most recent previous edu- 
cational agency or institution at- 
tended by the student; and 

8. Photographic image. 

The information above, desig- 
nated by the University as Directory 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 29 



Information, may be released or 
published by the University without a 
student's prior written consent unless 
exception is made in writing by the 
student or the parents of a depend- 
ent student. 

In order to prevent access to or 
release of Directory Information, stu- 
dents or the parents of dependent 
students, must notify the Registrar 
(PC 130), in writing prior to the first 
class meeting day of the semester. 
Access to. or release of Directory In- 
formation will be withheld until fur- 
ther written instruction is received 
from a student, or the parents of a 
dependent student. 

Students have a right to chal- 
lenge the accuracy of their educa- 
tional records and may file written 
requests to amend these records. 
The Office of the Registrar (PC 130) 
should be contacted for further infor- 
mation regarding the procedure to 
follow for questions or problems. 

For complete information regard- 
ing the policies outlined above, 
please contact: 

University Registrar 

Florida International University 

University Park - PC 130 

Miami, Florida 33199 

e-mail: Register@fiu.edu 

Student Social Security Numbers 

FIU expects all students to have a 
valid social security number. En- 
rolled students who do not have 
one will have three months to pro- 
vide the Registrar's Office with proof 
of a valid social security number. 

Transcripts 

The transcript is the complete stu- 
dent record of courses taken at the 
University, in addition to the number 
of transfer credits accepted. The 
GPA is calculated for all courses 
taken at the University after Fall Term 
1975. Once a Baccalaureate, Mas- 
ter's, or Doctorate degree is 
earned, the GPA calculation starts 
again. 

Students must request their tran- 
script in writing. There is a 3-5 work- 
ing days processing period . The 
transcript will not be released if the 
student has a University financial li- 
ability and/or a defaulted student 
loan. There is S5.00 charge per tran- 
script. 

Class Attendance 

The University does not have an at- 
tendance policy. However, individual 
faculty may establish attendance cri- 
teria in classes where deemed neces- 
sary. Academic units may establish 



their own attendance policies with 
the approval of the Provost. 

Policy Statement with Reference 
to Religious Holy Days 

A faculty member who wishes to ob- 
serve a religious holy day shall make 
arrangements to have another in- 
structor conduct the class in his or 
her absence, if possible, or shall re- 
schedule the class. „ 

Because there are some classes 
and other functions where atten- 
dance may be considered essen- 
tial, the following policy is in effect: 

1. Each student shall, upon notify- 
ing his or her instructor, be excused 
from class to observe a religious holy 
day of his or her faith. 

2. While the student will be held 
responsible for the material covered 
in his or her absence, each student 
shall be permitted a reasonable 
amount of time to make up any 
work missed. 

3. No major test, major class 
event, or major University activity will 
be scheduled on a major religious 
holy day. 

4. Professors and University admin- 
istrators shall not penalize students 
arbitrarily who are absent from aca- 
demic or social activities because 

of religious observances. 

Veterans Information 

The Office of Veterans Affairs assists 
all veterans and their dependents 
who wish to receive VA educational 
benefits. The Office also provides 
personal counseling, fee defer- 
ments, tutorial assistance, and work- 
study jobs. The VA Office is located 
in PC 130, University Park; and in ACI- 
100, North Campus. 

Veterans who are planning to at- 
tend the University should contact 
the Office of Veterans Affairs two 
months prior to the date of entry in 
order to expedite the processing of 
paperwork required to obtain edu- 
cational allowances from the Veter- 
ans Administration. 

Training Status 

Fulltime 12 Credits 

3/4 time 9 Credits 

1 /2 time 6 Credits 

Less than 1 /2 time 5 Credits 

Rate of Payments 
Number of Dependents 

For rate of monthly payment of edu- 
cational allowances for veterans 
and dependents, please contact 
Office of Veteran's Affairs. 



For additional information regard- 
ing other Veterans Educational Pro- 
grams, contact the Office of 
Veterans Affairs at University Park, 
PC 130,348-2838. 

Enrollment Certification 

The Registrar's office is responsible 
for certification of student's enroll- 
ment. Certification cannot be proc- 
essed if the student has a financial 
liability. 

Enrollment Status 
Undergraduate: 

Full time: 12 credits or more. 

Half time: 6-11 credits. 

Less than half time: 5 credits or less. 
Enrollment status is for continuous 
enrollment for the semester in which 
the student attended. Reduction of 
course load will reflect the student's 
status. Contact the Registrar's office 
for further details. 

Florida Residency 

Information 

Florida Student Definition 

For the purpose of assessing registra- 
tion and tuition fees, a student shall 
be classified as a Florida or non-Flor- 
ida Resident. 

To qualify as a Florida Resident, 
the student must: 

1. Be a U.S. Citizen, Resident 
Alien, parolee. Cuban National, Viet- 
namese Refugee, or other legal 
alien so designated by the U.S. Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service. 

2. Have established a legal resi- 
dence in this State and have main- 
tained that legal residence for 12 
months immediately prior to the 
start of the term in which the stu- 
dent is seeking Florida resident classi- 
fication. The student's residence in 
Florida must be as a bona fide domi- 
ciliary rather than for the purpose of 
maintaining a mere temporary resi- 
dence or abode incident to enroll- 
ment in an institution of higher 
education, and should be demon- 
strated as indicated below (for de- 
pendent students as defined by IRS 
regulations, a parent or guardian 
must qualify). 

3. Submit the following documen- 
tation (or in the case of a depend- 
ent student, the parent must submit 
documentation), prior to the last 
day of registration for the term for 
which resident status is sought: 

a. Documentation establishing le- 
gal residence in Florida (this docu- 
ment must be dated at least one 
year prior to the first day of classes 



30 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



of the term for which resident status 
is sought). The following documents 
will be considered in determining le- 
gal residence: 

(1.) Declaration of Domicile 

(2.) Proof of purchase of a home 
in Florida which the student occu- 
pies as his or her residence. 

(3.) Proof that the student has 
maintained residence in the state 
for the preceding year (e.g., rent re- 
ceipts, employment record). 

b. Documentation establishing 
bona fide domicile in Florida which 
is not temporary or merely incident 
to enrollment in a Florida institution 
of higher education. The following 
documents will be considered evi- 
dence of domicile even though no 
one of these criteria, if taken alone, 
will be considered conclusive evi- 
dence of domicile (these docu- 
ments must be dated at least one 
year prior to the first day of classes 
of the term for which Florida resi- 
dent status is sought): 

(1.) Declaration of Domicile 

(2.) Florida Voter's registration 

(3.) Florida Driver's license 

(4.) Proof of real property owner- 
ship in Florida (e.g., deed, tax re- 
ceipts). 

(5.) Employment records or other 
employment related documenta- 
tion (e.g., W-2, paycheck receipts), 
other than for employment nor- 
mally provided on a temporary ba- 
sis to students or other temporary 
employment. 

(6.) Proof of membership in or af- 
filiation with community or state or- 
ganizations or significant 
connections to the State. 

(7.) Proof of continuous pres- 
ence in Florida during the period 
when not enrolled as a student. 

(8.) Proof of former domicile in 
Florida and maintenance of signifi- 
cant connections while absent. 

(9.) Proof of reliance upon Flor- 
ida sources of support. 

(10.) Proof of domicile in Florida 
of family. 

(11.) Proof of admission to a li- 
censed practicing profession in Flor- 
ida. 

(12.) Proof of acceptance of per- 
manent employment in Florida. 

(13.) Proof of graduation from 
high school located in Florida. 

(14.) Any other factors peculiar 
to the individual which tend to es- 
tablish the necessary intent to make 
Florida a permanent home and 



that the individual is a bona fide 
Florida resident, including the age 
and general circumstances of the 
individual. 

c. No contrary evidence estab- 
lishing residence elsewhere. 

d. Documentation of depend- 
ent/independent status (IRS return 
or affidavit) 

A student can also qualify for 
Florida residency by one or more of 
the following criteria: 

1 . Become a legal resident and 
be married to a person who has 
been a legal resident for the re- 
quired twelve-month period, or, 

2. Be a member of the Armed 
Forces on active duty stationed in 
Florida, or a spouse or dependent, 
or, 

3. Be a member of the full-time 
instructional or administrative staff 
of a state public school, state com- 
munity college or state university in 
Florida, a spouse or dependent, or, 

4. Be a dependent and have 
lived five years with an adult rela- 
tive who has established legal resi- 
dence in Florida, or, 

5. Be a former student at a pub- 
lic institution of higher education 
who was properly classified as a resi- 
dent who re-establishes domiciliary 
status and re-enrolls within a period 
of twelve months, or, 

6. Make a statement as to the 
length of residence in Florida and 
qualification under the above crite- 
ria. 

Term Courses Are Offered 

Listed next to certain courses in this 
catalog are the designations 'F', 'S', 
and 'SS'. These designations indi- 
cate that the academic depart- 
ment normally offers these courses 
during the 'F' (Fall), 'S' (Spring), 'SS' 
(Summer) terms. Students should be 
aware that there are circumstances 
beyond the University's control (low 
enrollments, financial constraints, or 
other extenuating situations) which 
may result in the courses not being 
offered as indicated. The University 
is not responsible for failure to offer a 
course as indicated. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 31 



Financial Aid 



What is Financial Aid 

Financial aid is a source of financial 
support provided Py various agen- 
cies (federal, state and local govern- 
ments, universities, community 
organizations, and private corpora- 
tions or individuals) to help students 
meet the cost of attending college. 
It includes gift-aid (grants and schol- 
arships) and self-help (loans and stu- 
dent employment). 

• Grants are awards based on fi- 
nancial need which do not have 
to be repaid. 

• Scholarships are non-repayable 
awards based either on merit, 
special talent and/or financial 
need. 

■ Student loans are available to stu- 
dents and/or their parents at low 
interest rates (5 to 1 1%) with the 
option to defer repayment until 
after graduation or after the stu- 
dent drops below half-time. 

• Student employment allows stu- 
dents to earn money toward their 
education by working part time 
while attending school. 

Applying for Assistance 

Applying for financial aid is a 
lengthy process, therefore it is impor- 
tant to begin early. Applications for 
financial assistance are available in 
January for the following academic 
year which begins in August. Finan- 
cial Aid applications are not re- 
viewed until ALL documents 
required to complete the file are re- 
ceived in the Financial Aid Office. 
Completing your financial aid 
forms correctly and submitting them 
. by the published deadline increases 
your potential to receive the maxi- 
mum financial aid for which your 
are eligible. 

Admissions: To be eligible for most fi- 
nancial aid programs, you must be 
admitted to a degree program: 
However, you should not wait until 
you are admitted to apply for assis- 
tance. Students pursuing or enrolled 
in qualified Certificate Programs are 
only eligible for Federal Family Edu- 
cation Loans. 

Summer Assistance: Most financial 
aid funds are exhausted after stu- 
dents are awarded assistance for 
the Fall and Spring semesters. Typi- 
cally, Federal Family Education 
loans are the primary source of assis- 
tance for Summer enrollment. 



Transfer Student Procedures: Gener- 
ally, financial aid cannot be trans- 
ferred from one post-secondary 
institution to another during the aca- 
demic year. If you plan to transfer in 
mid year, apply to both your current 
institution and Florida International 
University to insure consideration for 
all applicable financial assistance. 

Eligibility Criteria 

To qualify for most need-based fi- 
nancial assistance you must meet 
the following basic eligibility require- 
ments: 

■ demonstrate financial need; 

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible non- 
citizen; 

• be registered with Selective 
Service, if required; 

■ not be in default on a loan, or 
owe a repayment on Title IV aid 
received at any institution; 

■ be enrolled at least half-time in 
an eligible program of studies; 
and, 

• maintain satisfactory academic 
progress. 

Additional requirements may ap- 
ply depending on the aid programs 
awarded to you. 



Determining Financial Need 

Financial need is defined as the dif- 
ference between the estimated 
cost of attendance and the 
amount you and your family can 
reasonably be expected to contrib- 
ute towards your educational ex- 
penses. Need analysis is a federally 
mandated formula which measures, 
in an equitable and systematic way, 
how much students and their fami- 
lies can afford to pay towards their 
education. Income, assets (exclud- 
ing your primary residence), family 
size , number of family members at- 
tending college, and other items 
are evaluated to give a complete 
assessment of a family's financial 
strength. 

Awarding Procedures 

Students who complete their files by 
the priority deadline of March 15 
have the greatest opportunity of be- 
ing considered for those financial 
aid programs they requested and 
are qualified to receive for the aca- 
demic year. Files are processed ac- 
cording to the completion date. 



A financial aid package may 
consist of a combination of grants, 
loans, and work funds. Other 
sources of assistance such as merit 
awards and private and institutional 
scholarships will be taken into con- 
sideration when preparing the 
award. 



Sources of Assistance 

The University participates in all Fed- 
eral and State funded programs. In- 
stitutional assistance is available for 
students with academic promise 
and financial need. 
Academic Merit Assistance: The Uni- 
versity's commitment to academic 
excellence is highlighted through 
programs which honor students who 
are recognized as National Merit, 
National Achievers and National His- 
panic Scholars. Additional awards 
for outstanding high school seniors 
include the Faculty Scholars, Vale- 
dictorian and Salutatorian Scholar- 
ships. For detailed information 
regarding these programs, contact 
the Office of Admissions at (305) 348- 
3671. 

Minority Aid: The Office of Minority 
Student Services administers the 
Academic Opportunity Program 
Scholarship for matriculating fresh- 
men of African descent. Information 
on this program can be obtained 
by contacting the office at (305) 
348-2436. 

Financial Aid Services 

Walk in Services 

Financial Aid personnel are avail- 
able Monday through Friday to an- 
swer general questions, 
distribute/accept application mate- 
rials and provide information con- 
cerning application procedures 
and program requirements. 

Financial Aid Counseling 

A Financial Aid Administrator is avail- 
able without an appointment dur- 
ing regular office hours to assist 
students with special problems, 
technical questions, exceptions, 
etc. 

For additional information and 
application materials contact the Fi- 
nancial Aid Office: 
University Park, PC 125, Miami, FL 

33199 
North Campus, 3000 NE 145St„ACI 

100, North Miami, Florida 33181- 

3600,(305)348-1500. 



32 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Student Fees and Student Accounts 



Fees 

Registration and tuition fees are es- 
tablished by the Board of Regents 
as required by the Florida Legisla- 
ture. These fees are subject to 
change without notice. The cur- 
rently authorized fees are: 

Credit Hour Fees 

Florida Non-Florida 

Resident Resident 

Undergraduate $59.43 $234.27 
Graduate. Thesis 
or Dissertation $114.99 $385.73 

Student Fees 

Athletic $10.00 $10.00 

Health $36.00 $36.00 

Registration fees for course audits 
are the same as the above fees, ex- 
cept that no assessment will be 
made for the out-of-state portion. 

A schedule of registration and 
tuition fees for all programs is pub- 
lished prior to each semester and 
can be obtained at the Office of 
Registration and Records. Since 
fees often change in the fall semes- 
ter the above fees should be used 
for information purposes only. The 
schedule of classes will contain the 
most accurate fee information. 

Fee Waivers 

Students using a fee waiver for part 
of the fee payment must present 
the original and the student copy to 
the Cashier's Office at the time of 
payment, on or before the last day 
to pay fees. Students who are re- 
sponsible for a portion of their fees in 
addition to the fee waiver will be re- 
quired to pay their portion before 
the fee waiver is applied. 

University and State employees 
using the State employee fee 
waiver to pay their fees must regis- 
ter on or after the day established 
in the official University calendar for 
State employee registration. A prop- 
erly completed and approved 
waiver form must be presented at 
the Cashier's Office by the date 
published for the last day to pay 
fees. Fee Waivers will be processed 
only for those courses shown on the 
approved fee waiver request form 
presented at the time of registra- 
tion. A course over-ride card will not 
be accepted with the tuition waiver 
program. Only one fee waiver form 
per employee will be accepted 
each semester. The State employee 
fee waiver will not be accepted as 



payment for course registrations 
prior to the announced date for 
state employee registration. State 
Employee Fee Waivers do not cover 
Thesis, Dissertation, Internships, Di- 
rected Individual Study, Non Credit 
Courses. Sponsored Credit Pro- 
grams, certificate programs, field ex- 
perience, practicum, closed 
courses, or courses taken for audit 
grades. 

Senior citizens fee waivers are 
available to persons 60 years of age 
or older who meet the requirements 
of Florida residency as defined in 
this catalog. The fee waiver allows 
qualified individuals to attend credit 
classes on an audit basis. Senior citi- 
zens using the fee waiver must regis- 
ter during the first week of classes. 
Senior citizens using the fee waiver 
must pay the photo id fee during 
first term in attendance. 

Florida law requires that State 
employee fee waivers and senior 
citizen fee waivers be granted on a 
space available basis only; there- 
fore, individuals using these waivers 
must comply with the procedures 
outlined in the schedule of classes 
for each semester. 

Refunds will not be processed for 
employees who have registered 
and paid prior to the state em- 
ployee registration day and wish to 
use the fee waiver. 

Fee Payment 

Fees may be paid at the Cashier's 
Office at University Park, PC 120, or 
at North Campus ACI 140. Broward 
students may pay by mail or at the 
Cashier's Office at University Park or 
North Campus. Night drop boxes 
outside the Cashier's Offices are 
available 24 hours a day for fee pay- 
ments by check or money order 
through the last day to pay fees. 
Payment is also accepted by mail. 
The University is not responsible for 
cash left in the night drop or sent 
through the mail. Failure to pay fees 
by the established deadlines will 
cause all courses to be canceled. 
See Fee Liability below. 

Late Registration Fee 

Students who register after the es- 
tablished deadline for registration 
will be subject to $100 late registra- 
tion fee. 



Late Payment Fee 

Students who pay fees after the es- 
tablished deadline for payments will 
be subject to a $ 1 00 late payment 
fee. If applicable, this fee may be 
assessed in addition to the late regis- 
tration fee described in the preced- 
ing section. 

Florida Prepaid Tuition Plan 
Students 

All students planning to register un- 
der the Florida Prepaid Tuition Plan 
must present their FPTP identification 
card to the Bursar's Office, PC 1 15 
on the University Park Campus or at 
the Cashier's Office ACI 140, on the 
North Campus before the published 
last day to pay fees. The portion of 
the student fees not covered by the 
plan must be paid by the student 
prior to the published last day to 
pay fees to avoid cancellation of 
classes. 

Financial Aid Students 

All financial aid recipients must 
come to the Cashier's Office and 
pay the difference between their fi- 
nancial aid or scholarship awards 
and their final fee assessment and 
have their class schedule validated 
at the Cashier's Office prior to the 
published last day to pay fees. Fail- 
ure to have the schedule validated 
will result in the cancellation of all 
classes for the semester. The valida- 
tion process cannot be handled 
through the night drop or by mail, 
but must be done in person. 

Fee Liability 

Students are liable for all fees associ- 
ated with all courses in which they 
are registered at the end of the 
drop/add period. The fee payment 
deadline is published in the official 
University calendar. If fees are not 
paid in full by the published dates, 
all courses will be canceled and 
any money paid will be lost. 

Registration is not complete until 
all fees are paid in full. 

Reinstatement of Classes 

Appeals for reinstatement of registra- 
tion for classes canceled for fiscal 
reasons must be filed in writing on 
the prescribed form with the Cash- 
ier's Office by the time specified on 
the cancellation notice. Each re- 
quest will be evaluated by the Rein- 
statement Appeals Committee. 
Reinstatement will be considered for 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 33 



all classes on the class schedule at 
the end of the drop/add period. Re- 
instatement cannot be requested 
selectively for certain classes. The 
decision of the committee is final 
and all reinstatement activity, includ- 
ing fee payment, must be com- 
pleted prior to the end of the fourth 
week of classes. All students whose 
registration has been reinstated will 
be assessed a late payment fee. If 
the late registration fee is applica- 
ble it will also be assessed. 

Application Fee 

A non-refundable fee of $20 shall ac- 
company each application for ad- 
mission to the University. 

Vehicle Registration Fee 

A non-refundable annual or semes- 
ter vehicle registration fee is applica- 
ble to all persons operating or 
parking a motor vehicle on the Uni- 
versity's Campuses. Upon payment 
of the applicable fee and registra- 
tion of the vehicle at the Depart- 
ment of Parking and Traffic, each 
vehicle will be assigned a parking 
decal which must be permanently 
affixed to the outside of the vehicle. 
The decal is required for all vehicles 
parking on campus. Parking and 
traffic regulations are strictly en- 
forced. 

Other Fees 
Library Fines 

Per book per library hour .25 

. Maximum fine per book $5.00 

Lost book fine $51.15 

Note: These fees are subject to 
change as permitted by law. Addi- 
tional fees may be added and spe- 
cial purpose fees may be assessed 
in some instances. 

Checks 

The University will accept personal 
checks for amounts due to the Uni- 
versity. These checks must be in the 
exact amount due only. The Cash- 
ier's Office will not accept checks 
above the amount due, third party 
checks or checks for cash. State law 
requires that a service fee of $25 or 
5% of the amount of the check 
(whichever is greater) be assessed 
on a check returned unpaid by the 
bank for any reason. Checks re- 
turned by the bank can be re- 
deemed only by cash, cashier's 
checks, or money orders. A personal 
check will not be accepted to re- 
place a dishonored check. 

Returned checks will be assigned 
to an agency for collection if not 
promptly paid. When an account 



has been assigned the collection 
agency fee will be added to the Uni- 
versity charges for collection at the 
current contract rate. Returned 
checks on student accounts will re- 
sult in cancellation of classes and 
will require petition for reinstate- 
ment. See reinstatement of classes 
above. 

The Cashier's Office will not ac- 
cept a check on any student's ac- 
count which has had two previous 
dishonored checks. 

Refunds 

Refunds will be processed and 
mailed to the address shown on the 
Registrar's files to all students whose 
fee accounts show an overpayment 
after the last day to pay fees. Stu- 
dents due a refund will not be re- 
quired to submit a refund 
application to receive their refund, 
it will automatically be calculated. If 
there is an amount due in the ac- 
counts receivable system, that 
amount will be deducted from any 
refund due. 

Students who have completed 
registration and have paid all fees 
due and have completely with- 
drawn from the University prior to 
the end of the fourth week of 
classes are eligible for a refund of 
25% of total fees paid. 

Any student attending the Univer- 
sity for the first time who completely 
withdraws from all of his/her classes 
is entitled to a prorated refund up to 
60% of the semester. This only ap- 
plies to first time students. 

In the following exceptional cir- 
cumstances, a full refund of total 
fees paid will be made upon presen- 
tation of the proper documentation:' 

■ Death of a student or immediate 
family member (parent, spouse, 
child or sibling). Death certificate 
required. 

■ Involuntary call to military service. 
Copy of orders required. 

• Illness of student of such severity 
or duration to preclude comple- 
tion of courses. Confirmation by a 
physician required. 

Processing of refunds will begin 
after the end of the last day to pay 
fees. 

Appeals for tuition refunds must 
be submitted in writing to the Office 
of the Registrar within two years af- 
ter the end of the term for which the 
refund is requested. There are no ex- 
ceptions to this policy. 



Past Due Accounts 

Delinquent accounts are sufficient 
cause to prohibit registration, gradu- 
ation, release of transcripts, or re- 
lease of diplomas. 

The University is not able to grant 
credit or time payments for any 
fees. Financial aid is available to 
those qualifying through the Finan- 
cial Aid Office. A limited number of 
short term loans are available to full 
time enrolled students who may ex- 
perience problems in meeting fee 
payment due dates. 

The University reserves the right to 
assign any past due account to an 
agency for collection. When an ac- 
count has been assigned the collec- 
tion agency fee will be added to 
the University charges for collection 
at the current contract rate. 

Deadlines 

Students are reminded that dead- 
lines are strictly enforced. The Univer- 
sity is not able to grant credit or to 
■extend the fee payment period be- 
yond the time set in its official calen- 
dar. The University does not have 
the authority to waive late fees un- 
less it has been determined that the 
University is primarily responsible for 
the delinquency or that extraordi- 
nary circumstances warrant such 
waiver. The University has no author- 
ity to extend deadlines for individual 
students beyond those set by the of- 
ficial calendar. 



34 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Academic Affairs 



The Office of Academic Affairs over- 
sees the planning and administra- 
tion of the instructional programs of 
the Colleges and Schools of the Uni- 
versify. Matters affecting faculty, cur- 
riculum, and the development of 
undergraduate and graduate de- 
gree programs fall within its purview. 
Consequently, both the Office of Un- 
dergraduate Studies and the Office 
of Graduate Studies report to the Of- 
fice of Academic Affairs. 

This office also supervises aca- 
demic support programs, such as In- 
formation Resource Management, 
the Libraries, Instructional Media 
Services, Sponsored Research and 
Training, FAU/FIU Joint Center for En- 
vironmental and Urban Problems, 
Latin American and Caribbean 
Center, Institute for Judaic Studies, 
Institute for Public Policy and Citizen- 
ship Studies, The Art Museum, Multil- 
ingual-Multicultural Studies Center, 
Planning and Institutional Research, 
Southeast Florida Center on Aging, 
and the Women's Studies Center. 

Responsible for all the academic 
units, the chief academic officer is 
the Provost and Vice President for 
Academic Affairs. The Provost and 
Vice President also serves as liaison 
to the Florida Board of Regents for 
academic matters. As a member of 
the University Executive Staff, the 
Provost and Vice President leads in 
the overall academic planning and 
direction of the University. 

(For detailed information on the 
University's academic Centers and 
Institutes, refer to the Center and In- 
stitute Section.) 



Office of Undergraduate 
Studies 

Fernando Gonzalez-Reigosa, Dean 
Yvonne Bacarisse, Associate Dean 
Glenda Belote, Associate Dean 
Joe Wisdom, Associate Dean 
William Beesting, Assistant Dean 

The Office of Undergraduate Studies 
is responsible for undergraduate pro- 
gram activities that span more than 
one academic unit, included in 
these activities are the Academic 
Advising Center, offering advising 
for freshmen, undecided majors, stu- 
dents changing majors, and non-de- 
gree seeking students, and 
monitoring of Core Curriculum and 



General Education requirements; 
the University Learning Center, pro- 
viding CLAST counseling and aca- 
demic preparation, national test 
administration, and assistance in im- 
proving academic skills; the Faculty 
Scholars and Invitational Scholars 
awards and the University Honors 
Program; Academy for Art of Teach- 
ing; and ROTC. The office is located 
in DM 368, University Park, 348-2099; 
and ACI-180, North Campus, 940- 
5754. 



Office of Graduate 
Studies 

Richard L. Campbell, Dean 
Ruben D. Jaen, Associate Director 

The Office of Graduate Studies is un- 
der the administration of the Dean 
of Graduate Studies. 

The Graduate Dean is assisted 
by an Associate Director, who has 
responsibility for all requests for can- 
didacy certification, assists with mi- 
nority student recruitment and 
admission, and also assists the Dean 
of Graduate Studies in other mat- 
ters. 

The Office of Graduate Studies is 
responsible for: the implementation 
of the Graduate Student Grievance 
Policy; the development of and 
compliance with University gradu- 
ate policy, procedures, and plan- 
ning; graduate financial aid 
distribution; University clientele link- 
ages for development support and 
productivity. 

Academic Deans and Depart- 
ment chairs within academic units 
have the responsibility for detailed 
operations of all graduate pro- 
grams. 

The Graduate Dean works with 
the Graduate Council in the formu- 
lation of new graduate policies and 
procedures. The Graduate Council 
is a subcommittee of the Faculty 
Senate and consists of members 
who also represent their respective 
colleges/schools on the Council. 
The Graduate Council reviews cur- 
ricula changes proposed by aca- 
demic units and endorsed by the 
University's Curriculum Committee. 

Another committee in the Office 
of Graduate Studies is the Advisory 
Committee for Graduate Studies. 
This Committee makes recommen- 



dations to the Graduate Dean on 
the implementation of graduate 
policies and procedures on all pro- 
grams that offer graduate degrees. 
The Dean of Graduate Studies 
serves as Chair of this Committee. 
Generally, the members on this 
Committee are assistant and associ- 
ate deans who have responsibility 
for graduate education in their re- 
spective academic units. 

Human Research Committee. 
Dr. Bernard Gerstman, Professor of 
Physics, Chairs the University Re- 
search Council which, among other 
things, .is in charge of making deci- 
sions and giving approval to the use 
of human subjects on projects and 
research conducted by University 
professors and students. In addition, 
the Committee makes recommen- 
dations for fostering University wide 
research productivity. 

Graduate students seeking infor- 
mation on general graduate poli- 
cies and procedures, or instructions 
on preparing and filing the thesis or 
dissertation, should contact the Of- 
fice of Graduate Studies in PC 520, 
University Park, or call (305) 348-2455 
for an appointment. Internet users 
are invited to visit our web site lo- 
cated at www.fiu.edu/-gradstud. 



Information Resource 
Management (IRM) 

Arthur S. Gloster, Chief Information 
Officer and Vice Provost Informa- 
tion Resource Management 
All computing, telecommunications, 
library, and instructional media serv- 
ices on all Florida International Uni- 
versity campuses are under the 
direction of the Vice Provost and 
Chief Information Officer. The five 
major units of Information Resources 
are: University Computer Services 
(UCS), the Southeast Regional Data 
Center (SERDAC), Telecommunica- 
tions, the FIU Libraries, and Instruc- 
tional Media Services (IMS). 

University Computer 
Services (UCS) 

University Computer Services (UCS) 
provides instructional and research 
computing support to the faculty 
and students from all FIU academic 
departments on all campuses. Com- 
puter hardware available for stu- 
dent use includes a DEC Alpha 7620 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 35 



running Open VMS, a Sun 690 MP 
server, a Sparc 10 and a Sparc 5 all 
running Solaris, as well as numerous 
PC and Macintosh microcomputers, 
X terminals and Unix workstations. 
Services of interest to students in- 
clude: introductory seminars and 
workshops on the most widely used 
equipment and software; use of e- 
mail, Internet and the Web; compre- 
hensive documentation libraries, 
open access X terminal labs, dial-up 
and direct VMS/Unix access; open 
microcomputer labs; a computer 
store in the Graham Center featur- 
ing educational discounts; assis- 
tance with remote access to 
University servers; and peer/profes- 
sional consultation on various com- 
puter-related problems within limits 
defined by academic departments. 

In addition to instructional com- 
puting support, UCS through its Appli- 
cation Systems and User Services 
Groups, provides support for the ad- 
ministrative functions of the Univer- 
sity, including Admissions, 
Registration, Financial Aid and Cash- 
iers. 

Lab Use: Students are required to 
have a valid FIU picture ID card to 
use UCS labs. Occasionally, during 
the peak periods before midterm 
and final exams, lab hours are ex- 
tended to meet increased demand. 
Nevertheless, users are advised to 
complete assignments early; time lim- 
its may be imposed during periods of 
high demand. Ethical computing 
practices are enforced. University 
Park student labs are located in PC 
411. PC 413, PC 414, PC 415. PC 416, 
PC 419, PC 422, PC 322, BA 150, BA 
160, BA 170. The North Campus labs 
are located in ACI-293, ACI 326, ACI 
393, ACI 266. For a recorded mes- 
sage with current student lab hours, 
call 348-2174. Please direct other Uni- 
versity Park inquiries to the staff of- 
fices in PC 41 3A, 348-2568. Please call 
919-5589 for information concerning 
North Campus facilities. For more de- 
tailed information, see our home 
page at: . 
URL://www.fiu.edu/orgs/irm/ucs 

Part-time Student Employment: 

Each semester. University Computer 
Services employs over 60 part-time, 
student user consultants. Although 
primarily responsible for maintaining 
a good working environment and 
flow of users through lab facilities, 
some consultants work in UCS User 
Services where they assist in desktop 
network integration and microcom- 
puter support. They diagnose and re- 
solve system and equipment 
malfunctions in departments all 



across the University. Other students 
actually teach faculty, staff and 
peers to use software applications 
and computer resources. Given 
daily exposure to an extensive vari- 
ety of hardware and software and 
direct training by UCS professional 
staff, working as a UCS user consult- 
ant for several semesters provides 
excellent job experience and refer- 
ences. Students with better than av- 
erage interpersonal and computer 
skills are invited to apply for work 
and complete an employment ap- 
plication in PC 413A, PC 548, ACI 
293 and ACI 295. 

Southeast Regional Data 
Center (SERDAC) 

The State University System's South- 
east Regional Data Center provides 
primary academic computing serv- 
ices to Florida International Univer- 
sity via an Ethernet network which 
connects student and faculty work- 
stations to the Data Center's Unix 
and DEC VMS cluster services. 

SERDAC's computers allow con- 
venient access to the Internet. Infor- 
mation Information on these services 
may be obtained by calling 348- 
2700. 

SERDAC's word processing facil- 
ity offers a multitude of services, 
from the high volume generation of 
personalized letters and envelopes, 
to the electronic scanning of most 
printed materials and color printing. 
For information concerning this facil- 
ity, please call 348-3069. 

Primary operations and dispatch 
services for faculty, student, and ad- 
ministrative printout are located in 
University Park, PC-436. Please call 
348-2109 for information concerning 
this facility. 

SERDAC offers personal com- 
puter/workstation maintenance to 
the University community. Currently, 
the SERDAC Maintenance Facility has 
been designated as a factory-author- 
ized center for IBM, Dell, Zenith, and 
Apple personal computers. Please 
call 348-21 17 for information. 

Telecommunications 

The Department of Telecommunica- 
tions (DOT) is responsible for adminis- 
trating, planning, designing, 
operating, installing and maintain- 
ing of voice and data communica- 
tions systems, equipment and 
networks that serve the University 
community. In addition. DOT plays 
an integral part in the design and 
completion phases of the Univer- 



sity's major construction projects 
and renovations. 

The department's voice organiza- 
tion's scope of responsibility includes 
the planning, managing and devel- 
opment of the University's tele- 
phone systems (ESSX at University 
Park and Rolm at North Campus) in- 
cluding 24-hour Operator service, 
voice mail, feature customization, 
move/add/change orders and toll 
charge accounting. Through the 
data communications and network 
management services, DOT main- 
tains several intercampus data com- 
munications networks and operates 
the University's modem pool for ac- 
cess to FlUnet and the Internet. 
These services provide users access 
to all networked University comput- 
ing resources and gateways to state- 
wide, national and international 
telecommunications networks. Also, 
besides day-to-day repair and instal- 
lation of data communications 
equipment and cabling, the Depart- 
ment supervises the comprehensive 
design of communications systems 
and wiring for any new construction 
and facility renovations at the Uni- 
versity. 

Libraries 

The University Libraries are housed in 
the Athenaeum (AT) at University 
Park, and in a new Library building 
(LIB) on the North Campus. 

The total library collection com- 
prises more than 1 ,150,000 volumes, in 
addition to substantial holdings of fed- 
eral, state, local, and international 
documents; maps; microforms; music 
scores; newspapers; institutional ar- 
chives; and curriculum materials. The 
Library subscribes to 8,650 scholarly 
journals and other serials. 

A computerized catalog of li- 
brary holdings provides a listing of 
materials in both FIU Libraries, and 
other libraries in the State University 
System and throughout the world. 
The bulk of the collection is housed 
in open stacks. 

Classification of library resources 
is according to the Library of Con- 
gress system, except for some of the 
documents and special collections 
(e.g.. U.S.. Florida, and U.N. docu- 
ments, archives, etc.) which are ar- 
ranged by their own classification 
systems and have separate public 
catalogs. 

In keeping with the University's 
commitment to day and night op- 
eration, the libraries are open when 
the University is in session and during 
vacation periods. For exact library 
hours, please consult the posted 



36 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



schedules or LUIS, the library's online 
catalog or the library home page. 
Staff members are always available 
at the Public Service desks to assist 
students and faculty in their use of 
the library. 

Consortium Library Privileges 

Currently registered students, fac- 
ulty, and staff may use the libraries 
of any of the other campuses of the 
State University System. For access 
to libraries in the southeast Florida re- 
gion, students, faculty and staff 
should check at the circulation desk 
concerning SEFLIN library privileges. 

A state-of-the-art system of interli- 
brary loan links the libraries with oth- 
ers throughout North America. It 
includes the use of telefacsimile for 
time-critical requests. 

Instructional Media Services 

Instructional Media Services special- 
izes in the development, produc- 
tion, and utilization of various types 
of audiovisual and co/nmunication 
media for educational purposes. 
The services offered are listed below. 
The Centers For Instructional Tech- 
nology are do-it-yourself media and 
graphic arts production centers, pro- 
viding technical assistance to faculty, 
staff and students in the creation of 
visual aids such as slides, overheads, 
flyers, posters and charts for class- 
room presentations, papers or pro- 
jects. Professional help and instruction 
is available on the premises in the use 
of Macintosh computers, copystand 
cameras, overhead-makers; lamina- 
tors, etc. While consumable items 
such as films, posterboard and trans- 
parencies are to be provided by stu- 
dents, there is no fee for either the 
help provided or the use of the facili- 
ties. Multimedia and interactive soft- 
ware development services are 
available for faculty to use for instruc- 
tional and/or scholarly presentations. 
(OE 164 at University Park; LIB- 150 at 
North Campus). 

Photography Services provides still 
photographic support and services 
to faculty and staff for educational, 
training and informational purposes. 
(OE-167 at University Park; services 
available to all FIU campuses). 
Instructional Graphics prepares art- 
work, graphs, illustrations, charts, 
slides and posters for faculty and 
staff. (OE 169 at University Park; 
serves other campuses through fax 
and inter-office mail). 
Instructional Television (VH-245 at 
University Park) provides technical, 
creative and professional services in 
the production of video and multi- 



media programs for instructional, re- 
search and general information/ 
training purposes. This area provides 
a wide range of video services, in- 
cluding: the design and production 
of educational and training pro- 
grams; the documentation of class- 
room guest speakers and special 
presentations; and programs for indi- 
vidual or group instruction. 

Equipped for studio productions 
or taping at remote locations, post- 
production facilities may be used to 
produce a finished edited program. 
In the field of distance learning, the 
department will provide the means 
of transmitting live interactive 
classes to remote locations. Five 
electronic classrooms (two at Uni- 
versity Park, two at the North Cam- 
pus, and one at FlU's Broward 
Campus) offer faculty the opportu- 
nity to expand the walls of the tradi- 
tional classroom to reach students 
throughout South Florida. 

The department also arranges 
for satellite teleconferences (both 
uplink and downlink), schedules 
and maintains video conference 
equipment on both campuses to al- 
low two-way audio and video for 
classes, meetings and conferences, 
and assists in interactive video pro- 
jects. Available to faculty and staff 
only. 

Equipment Distribution and 
Scheduling provides a large variety 
of educational audiovisual equip- 
ment for use by faculty and staff. 
Services are available to students for 
classroom use and when sponsored 
by professors. (PC-236 at University 
Park; ACI-193 at North Campus). 

Other services available are con- 
sultation on the purchase, rental, 
and installation of audiovisual equip- 
ment; and professional guidance on 
a wide range of audio-visual instruc- 
tional topics and technology. For 
more information, contact 348-281 1 , 
OE 165, University Park; or 919-5929, 
LIB- 150, North Campus. 

Consortium Media Privileges 

Faculty, staff and students can use 
the audiovisual services on any cam- 
pus of the Consortium. AV materials 
and equipment cannot be bor- 
rowed. 



International Studies 

Mark B. Rosenberg, Vice Provost for 

International Studies 
Giselle De Bruno Jamison, Assistant 

Director for International Studies 

The Office of International Studies 
(OIS) is responsible for the develop- 
ment and coordination of interna- 
tional programs and activities at the 
University. OIS staff members work 
with students and faculty who are in- 
terested in participating in interna- 
tional exchange, study abroad 
programs, and other international 
academic opportunities. OIS devel- 
ops agreements with foreign universi- 
ties to extend the range of 
opportunities for students and fac- 
ulty. In addition, the office advises 
students and faculty on the avail- 
ability of Fullbright Grants, and man- 
ages other international scholarship 
programs such as, the Latin Ameri- 
can and Caribbean Basin Scholar- 
ship and the African and Afro- 
Caribbean Scholarship. 

OIS facilitates the University's in- 
teraction with local and interna- 
tional interest groups, serves as a ■ 
liaison with universities and visitors 
from abroad, and promotes the in- 
ternational mission of the university. 
For more information on the serv- 
ices offered by OIS, contact Giselle 
De Bruno Jamison, (305)348-2894, 
e-mail: debrunog@fiu.edu. 

The Office of International Stud- 
ies also houses the Asian Studies Pro- 
gram. This program coordinates all 
international activities related to 
Asia within Florida International Uni- 
versity. The staff work with students, 
as well as with faculty, who are inter- 
ested in exchange, research, schol- 
arship and fellowship opportunities 
at universities in China, Japan, 
South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, 
Malaysia, Indonesia, India and Paki- 
stan as well as other Asian coun- 
tries. This Office provides 
information regarding projected un- 
dergraduate as well as graduate 
certificate programs in Asian Stud- 
ies, intended to offer a competitive 
advantage to interested students. 
Staff members plan seminars, work- 
shops and cultural showcases 
which focus upon selected Asian 
countries, in order to enrich the 
range of extracurricular educa- 
tional experiences available to stu- 
dents. The Asian Studies Program 
interacts with all business, commu- 
nity, faculty and student groups 
who wish to contribute toward the 
further development of FlU's newest 
regional studies program, while col- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 37 



lecting and disseminating informa- 
tion about the Asian-related activi- 
ties and achievements of faculty 
and students. Located in PC 538, 
University Park. (305) 348-1914; Fax 
(305) 348-6586. 

International Student 
Exchange Programs 

International Student Exchange (ISE) 
Programs provide students with the 
opportunity to study abroad (during 
one or two semesters) at one of the 
various universities that has an 
agreement with Florida International 
University (FIU). Full credit is given for 
work satisfactorily completed during 
the exchange program - as long as 
it has been pre-approved by an ad- 
visor. ISE offers the opportunity to 
live abroad, explore other lan- 
guages and cultures, and become 
acquainted with new friends from all 
over the world. Students will be re- 
quired to pay their normal FIU tui- 
tion, insurance, housing, and travel 
arrangements. 

In order to participate in ISE, a stu- 
dent must be enrolled at FIU and 
have a 3.5 cumulative GPA. Limited 
financial assistance may be avail- 
able. For further information, contact 
the Office of International Studies, 
University Park, DM 353, Miami, Flor- 
ida 33199, (305) 348-2894, or e-mail: 
debrunog@fiu.edu. 



Institutional Research 
and Academic Planning 

Sushil Gupta, Vice Provost 
David Hall, Assistant Director 
Marta Perez, Assistant Director 

The Office of Institutional Research 
and Academic Planning provides 
statistical information to support de- 
cision making process within all aca- 
demic and administrative units of 
Florida International University, the 
faculty senate and different commit- 
tees within FIU, the Board of Re- 
gents, state and federal agencies, 
and professional and private organi- 
zations. 

The Office of Institutional Re- 
search and Academic Planning is 
known as the official source of Uni- 
versity statistics. This office publishes 
research reports that provide statisti- 
cal information about the university 
on a regular basis. Institutional Re- 
search and Academic Planning also 
provides information requested by 
the University community on an ad 
hoc basis. This office coordinates 



the collection of data, preparation 
of reports and files, and their submis- 
sion to the Board of Regents. The co- 
ordination and submission of 
questionnaires and surveys from out- 
side sources is also done by this of- 
fice. All questionnaires or surveys 
developed by faculty or staff which 
are designed to collect data about 
the operations of the University, stu- 
dents or employees must be coordi- 
nated through this office. For more 
information about this office and its 
services, call (305) 348-2731. 



Sponsored Research 
and Training 

Thomas A. Breslin, Acting Vice 

President 
Catherine F. Thurman, Director 

The Division of Sponsored Research 
and Training serves the research 
and training needs of interested fac- 
ulty by providing timely information 
on the availability of local, state, 
and federal program support. The 
attraction of these funds to the cam- 
pus provides an opportunity to bet- 
ter serve the needs of the people of 
Florida through services not regularly 
funded by the Legislature. 

Among the major goals of the Di- 
vision of Sponsored Research and 
Training are the following: to help 
stimulate faculty and staff interest in 
research and training projects; to as- 
sist the faculty and staff in obtaining 
funds for research and training pro- 
jects; and to provide technical assis- 
tance to faculty and staff who 
manage contract and grant pro- 
grams for the University. For more in- 
formation, contact 348-2494. 



The Art Museum 

The Art Museum at Florida Interna- 
tional University has served the 
South Florida community for the last 
19 years presenting exhibition and 
art lectures of local, national and in- 
ternational importance. Exhibitions 
include student shows, self-curated 
exhibitions from both the University's 
collections and from institutions and 
organizations outside the University, 
and national traveling shows. The 
Art Museum is supported by the Uni- 
versity community, local, state and 
federal agencies and Friends of the 
Art Museum. 

The Art Museum serves Miami's 
multi-cultural community year 
round, free of charge. The Museum 



is home to Coral Gables' Metropoli- 
tan Museum and Art Center Collec- 
tion, The Cintas Foundation of 
Contemporary Hispanic Art, a per- 
manent collection of works by North 
and South American and Florida art- 
ists, and the site of the Martin Z. Mar- 
gulies Family Collection. One of the 
world's most important international 
outdoor sculpture collections, in- 
cludes works by Calder, De Koon- 
ing, Miro, Nevelson, Serra, and other 
well-known artists. 

The Art Museum provides a 
unique experience to a very broad 
audience including children, stu- 
dents, teachers, senior citizens, mi- 
norities and the disabled. Besides 
serving two campuses and two cen- 
ters, its programs extend to surround- 
ing counties outside of Dade 
including Broward, Palm Beach and 
Monroe Counties. 

The Art Museum has been recog- 
nized for its excellence by the grants 
it has received, most recently the 
National Endowment for the Arts; 
The Institute for Museum Services; 
The National Endowment for Hu- 
manities, The Florida Endowment for 
the Humanities; The Dade County 
Council of Arts and Sciences; The 
Metropolitan-Dade County Cultural 
Affairs Council and the Florida Arts 
Council. 

The Art Museum, which occupies 
a 5,000 square-foot area on the Uni- 
versity Park campus, opened with 
an internationally acclaimed exhibi- 
tion, Contemporary Latin American 
Drawings, in April, 1977. Since then, 
many important exhibitions have 
been presented, including: Alberto 
Giacometti, Draftsman and Sculp- 
tor; Mira, Mira, Mira: Los Cubanos de 
Miami; Adolph Gottlieb: Paintings 
and Works on Paper; Marcel 
Duchamp; Louise Bourgeois; The Phil- 
lips Collection in the Making: 1920 - 
1930; Imagenes Liricas: New Spanish 
Visions; CUBA-USA: The First Genera- 
tion; Antoni Tapies in Print; Agustin 
Fernandez: A Retrospective, 
Miro/Noguchi; and the annual 
American Art Today series featuring 
contemporary artists exploring tradi- 
tional themes including Still Life, The 
Figure in the Landscape, The Por- 
trait, Narrative Painting, The City Sur- 
face Tension. Clothing as Metaphor 
and Images from Abroad.. 

The Art Museum has continued 
to enhance its exhibitions with the 
Critics' Lecture Series, which has in- 
cluded many of the exhibiting art- 
ists, scholars, museum curators and 
art historians, including: Susan Son- 
tag, Robert Hughes, Hilton Kramer, 



38 / Genera l Information Undergraduate Catalo g 

Michael Graves, Peter Plagens, Tom 
Wolfe, Germaine Greer, Dore 
Ashton, Carlos Fuentes, Michael 
Brenson, Frank Stella, Richard Serra, 
Helen Frankenthaler, Kirk Varnedoe, 
David Ross, Michael Kimmelnnan, 
and Anne d'Harnoncourt. 

The Museum is operated by the 
Director, the Assistant Director, the 
Office Manager, the Regis- 
trar/Preparator, the Community Re- 
lations/Education Coordinator, and 
the Program Assistant plus a staff 
made up partially of University stu- 
dents working through an internship 
program. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 39 



Business and Finance 



The Division of Business & Finance 
comprises the offices of Auxiliary 
Services, Parking and Traffic, Budget 
Planning, Controllers, Environmental 
Health and Safety, Equal Opportu- 
nity Programs, Facilities Manage- 
ment, Human Resources, North 
Campus Business and Finance and 
Office of Continuous Improvement, 
Office of General Counsel, Office of 
the Inspector General, Public Safety 
and Purchasing. 



Auxiliary Services 

Auxiliary Services supervises the 
bookstore and food services opera- 
tions on both University Park and the 
North Campus, which includes the 
Cafeteria, Grade's Grill and all 
vending operations. 

Auxiliary Services also oversees 
the operations of Duplicating Serv- 
ices, which includes a Print Shop. 
Convenience Copiers and a Total 
Copy Reproduction Center. 

A recent addition to the Auxiliary 
Services portfolio is Parking and Traf- 
fic Services, which is a unit that en- 
forces all University Parking and 
Traffic Rules and Regulations. 



Controller's Office 

This area is primarily responsible for 
maintaining accounting records, 
controlling budgets, coordinating fi- 
nancial activities and reporting on fi- 
nancial data. Typical functions of 
the Controller's Office are the pay- 
ment of invoices to vendors, collec- 
tion of fees and other revenues, 
contract and grant accounting, 
payroll, disbursement and collection 
of student loans and the reconcili- 
ation of accounting ledgers. 

The Controller's Office is a service 
oriented unit assisting the University 
community in most aspects of finan- 
cial operations. Questions concern- 
ing the use of State funds, internal 
control procedures or methods to 
pay a vendor or employee are nor- 
mally addressed to this unit. Guid- 
ance is provided to travelers 
pertaining to the State requirements 
for the reimbursement of traveling 
expenses. Assistance is provided to 
employees in the interpretation of 
accounting ledgers and fiscal re- 
ports. 



The following sections operate 
within the Controller's Office: Gen- 
eral Accounting, Accounts Payable, 
Travel, Construction and Property, 
Accounting, Contracts and Grants, 
Disbursement, Student Loan and Ac- 
counts Receivable, Payroll, and the 
Cashier's Office at all campuses. 



Environmental Health 
and Safety 

The Department of Environmental 
Health & Safety & Risk Management 
Services provides the leadership 
and direction necessary to assure 
identification, implementation and 
effective administration of programs 
designed to promote hazard recog- 
nition, avoidance, reporting and 
control, as well as compliance with 
various federal, state and local 
safety regulations. 

In addition to programs neces- 
sary for regulatory compliance, the 
department takes a proactive ap- 
proach on many issues. Among the 
programs and activities managed 
by the department are: Investiga- 
tion and initial processing of liability 
claims against the University; review 
of risk management concerns re- 
lated to special events planned by 
student organizations and University 
employees and presentations to stu- 
dent groups; and indoor air quality 
investigations. 

The primary component of the 
department's mission is service. This 
mission is accomplished by working 
in close coordination and coopera- 
tion with other departments, and 
the University community in general. 
At University Park, the department is 
located at CP 183, 348-2621/2262. 
Services are provided at the North 
Campus from the Facilities Opera- 
tions complex, SOI 115,919-5225. 



Equal Opportunity 
Programs 

This office provides leadership and 
direction in the administration of the 
University equalization programs for 
women and minorities in several 
ways. It prepares the University's an- 
nual Affirmative Action Plan and the 
State Equity Accountability Plan, as- 
sists University units in implementing 
and monitoring affirmative action 



procedures; provides oversight to 
the University Diversity Program; pro- 
vides a channel for employee and 
student grievances regarding dis- 
crimination, or issues indicating a 
need for additional affirmative ac- 
tions; administers implementation of 
the Policy to prohibit Sexual Harass- 
ment; coordinates University compli- 
ance with the Americans with 
Disabilities Act and with Title IX of 
the Education Amendments of 1972, 
and promotes effective relationships 
between the University and commu- 
nity organizations. Equal Opportu- 
nity Programs also administers the 
State University Systems scholarship 
programs funded for the purpose of 
increasing minority enrollment. In ad- 
dition, the Office maintains a liaison 
relationship with State and Federal 
agencies dealing with EEO and af- 
firmative action. The Office is lo- 
cated at University Park, PC 215. 

Americans with Disabilities 

Act (ADA) 

The Assistant Vice President for 
Equal Opportunity Programs is the 
University's ADA Coordinator, and 
has responsibility for ensuring access 
to employment, academic and 
public programs for persons with dis- 
abilities. The Office administers a 
central budget used to fund the 
costs of reasonable accommoda- 
tions for University employees and 
applicants for employment. The of- 
fice also works closely with the Of- 
fice of Disability Services for Students 
in the provision of auxiliary aids and 
services to ensure access to aca- 
demic programs, and with all Univer- 
sity offices in the provision of access 
to University public events. 

HIV/AIDS Policy 

Students and employees of the Uni- 
versity who may become infected 
with the HIV/AIDS virus will not be ex- 
cluded from enrollment of employ- 
ment or restricted in their access to 
University sen/ices or facilities unless 
individual medically-based judg- 
ments establish that exclusion or re- 
striction is necessary to the welfare 
of the individual or of other mem- 
bers of the University community. 
The University has established an 
HIV/AIDS Committee which includes 
representatives from major University 
divisions and other staff as appropri- 
ate. The Committee, which meets 
regularly, is responsible for monitor- 



40 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ing developments with regard to 
HIV/AIDS, acting upon and adminis- 
tering the University's Policy on 
HIV/AIDS in specific cases, and coor- 
dinating the University's efforts in 
educating the University community 
on the nature of the disease. In addi- 
tion, the Committee will meet as 
needed to consider individual oc- 
currences of the disease which re- 
quire University action. 

Persons who know or suspect 
they are sero-positive are expected 
to seek expert medical advice and 
are obligated, ethically and legally, 
to conduct themselves responsibly 
for the protection of others. 

The University has designated 
HIV/AIDS counselors who are avail- 
able to provide further information 
on this subject. Contact one of the 
following offices at University Park, 
Assistant Vice President for Equal 
Opportunity Programs, PC 215; 
Counseling Services, GC 340; and 
Student Health Services, OE 1 15. 
North Campus contact, Counseling 
Services, SC 261 or the Student 
Health Clinic, TC 110. 

Sexual Harassment 
Nondiscrimination 
Educational Equity 

All members of the University Com- 
munity are entitled to study and 
work in an atmosphere free from ille- 
gal discrimination. Florida Interna- 
tional University's equal opportunity 
prohibits discrimination against stu- 
dents and employees on the basis 
of their race, color, creed, age, dis- 
ability, sex (including sexual harass- 
ment), religion, marital status, or 
national origin. Under the policies, it 
does not matter whether the dis- 
crimination was intended or not; the 
focus is on whether students or em- 
ployees have been treated differ- 
ently or subjected to intimidation, or 
a hostile or offensive environment as 
a result of their belonging to a pro- 
tected class or having a protected 
status. Illegal sexual harassment in- 
cludes unwelcomed physical con- 
tact of a sexual nature, overt or 
implied threats to induce perform- 
ance of sexual favors, verbal harass- 
ment, use of sexually suggestive 
terms, or display or posting of sexu- 
ally offensive pictures. 

Any employee, applicant, or stu- 
dent who believes that he or she 
may be a victim of unlawful discrimi- 
nation, may file a complaint with 
the Office of Equal Opportunity Pro- 
grams, PC 215 at University Park 



(348-2785) in accordance with this 
procedure. 



Facilities Management 

Facilities Management provides pro- 
fessional support to planning, design- 
ing, construction, maintenance, 
and operations of facilities on all 
campuses, to accommodate all as- 
pects of the University mission as de- 
fined in the Campus Master Plan. 
This department is separated into 
three major areas of supervision 
which are Facilities Development, 
Facilities Operations and Utilities Sup- 
port Services. 

Facilities Development is responsi- 
ble for all design and construction 
projects. These activities include 
building programs, design coordina- 
tion, construction administration 
and occupancy coordination. 

Facilities Operations is responsi- 
ble for the operations and logistics 
of physical resources including build- 
ing and grounds maintenance, cus- 
todial, landscaping, roads and 
parking lots. 

For routine and emergency 
maintenance services, please con- 
tact the Customer Service Center 
at 348-4600 at University Park and 
919-5700 at North Campus. 

Utilities Support Services oversees 
the University's utility systems includ- 
ing air conditioning, water, sewage, 
electrical power and solid waste 
management. In addition, Utilities 
Support Services works together 
with Environmental Health 8c Safety 
to assure that all toxic (biological or 
chemical) wastes are disposed of 
properly. 



Human Resources 

The Office of Human Resources pro- 
vides human resource manage- 
ment services for staff members and 
employees of all academic and ad- 
ministrative departments including 
student employees, research or 
graduate assistants, college work 
study and OPS employees on all 
campuses. All services provided by 
the office are in compliance with 
applicable federal and state regula- 
tions, and include six major human 
resources areas - Employment and 
Recruitment, Compensation and 
Pay, Employee Benefits, Personnel 
Records, Employee Assistance and 
Labor Relations. 

In addition to the above men- 
tioned human resource manage- 



ment areas, the Office of Human 
Resources is responsible for the Vol- 
unteer Program, and the Presiden- 
tial Holiday Affair. 

The University Park office is lo- 
cated in PC 224, 348-21 81 ; the 
North Campus office is located at 
322-A Library Building, 919-5545. 



Office of the General 
Counsel 

The Office of the General Counsel 
provides legal services to the Univer- 
sity. The General Counsel provides 
representation and advice to the 
University administration (and as ap- 
propriate faculty and staff) concern- 
ing legal issues affecting the 
University. The General Counsel re- 
tains and oversees outside counsel 
as needed and serves as liaison with 
the Office of the Attorney General, 
the General Counsel to the Board of 
Regents, and with other State agen- 
cies providing legal services to the 
University. 



Office of the Inspector 
General 

The Office of the Inspector General 
assists all levels of management in 
accomplishing their goals and ob- 
jectives by furnishing them with inde- 
pendent appraisals, recommenda- 
tions and pertinent comments con- 
cerning the activities reviewed. The 
independent appraisal activity in- 
cludes evaluation of financial re- 
sults, legal compliance, program 
results, economy and efficiency, 
and internal accounting control pro- 
cedures. 

In addition, the office of Inspec- 
tor General conducts investigations 
of suspected fraudulent or other dis- 
honest acts. It is also the official con- 
tact for employees to report 
allegations under the Whistle-Blow- 
ers Act. 



Public Safety 

Public Safety is a full service law en- 
forcement organization dedicated 
to assuring an environment condu- 
cive to living and learning in a Uni- 
versity community. The department's 
members include Law Enforcement 
Officers who are fully certified and 
sworn, and have full police authority 
to enforce state, local and Univer- 
sity regulations. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 41 



Purchasing Services 

Purchasing Services is organized to 
support the students, the instruc- 
tional and research efforts of the 
faculty, staff, and all University de- 
partments. Purchasing involves the 
acquisition of equipment, furnish- 
ings, supplies, construction services, 
preventive maintenance services, 
contractual services, and lease of 
space for the University. 

Purchasing Services is responsible 
for a number of functions in addition 
to the primary function of central- 
ized university purchasing. These 
other functions include Central 
Stores, Central Receiving, Property 
Control, Surplus Property and Cam- 
pus Mail. 

The office is located at University 
Park, PC 519 and can be reached 
at 348-2161. 



Office of Continuous 
Improvement (OCI) 

The Office of Continuous Improve- 
ment (OCI) is responsible for a vari- 
ety of programs and services, 
including employee professional de- 
velopment programs. 

Reengineering of Services and 
Programs. OCI works with manage- 
ment and staff of various University 
departments to assist in improving ef- 
ficiency, work environment, and cus- 
tomer satisfaction. 

OCI consults with various entities 
within the University and coordi- 
nates their input into creating im- 
proved services and programs. 
Some of these services and pro- 
grams are the A&P (Administrative 
and Professional) Employee Perform- 
ance Appraisal Program, the Univer- 
sity's Awards Program, the 
University's Suggestion Program, di- 
versity initiatives, and strategic plan- 
ning for the Division of Business and 
Finance. 

In addition to these programs 
and services, OCI is responsible for 
employee professional develop- 
ment programs. In this capacity, 
OCI offers a variety of training and 
career development programs for 
University staff. These programs are 
carefully designed and planned to 
cover relevant and timely topics. 
Program length and presentation 
techniques vary according to the 
objectives of each course, although 
time for exercises, practice feed- 
back, and questions is always pro- 
vided. Programs being offered are 



circulated each quarter via the 
newsletter for Business and Finance 
and/or a special employee profes- 
sional development/training flyer. 

Training programs can be sched- 
uled for individual departments 
upon request. 

The Career Development Pro- 
gram (the 'Passport' Program) is tar- 
geted for specific employee groups 
(office professionals, tradespeople, 
and custodial employees), and is 
designed to enhance professional 
growth and provide promotional op- 
portunities for participants who com- 
plete the program. Call 899-3031 for 
more information about employee 
professional development programs. 

The OCI also provides internal 
consulting services in organizational 
development/transformation and in- 
structional design. 

Newsletter and Publications for 
the Division of Business and Finance. 
The OCI publishes the division's 
monthly newsletter as well as coordi- 
nates publication of the division's 
annual report. The location of the 
Office is ECS 442. Call 348-6090 for 
more information. 



University Budget and 
Planning 

University Budget and Planning is re- 
sponsible for the development of all 
operating budgets in all budget enti- 
ties, including capital programs, leg- 
islative budget requests, operating 
budget requests and internal oper- 
ating budget plan. The office also 
has responsibility for University plan- 
ning, including strategic planning. 
The office is staffed by a director, a 
secretary and three professional 
staff. 



42 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



North Campus and Enrollment Services 



North Campus 

The North Campus of Florida Interna- 
tional University educates more than 
8100 students on 200 acres on Bis- 
cayne Bay. Academic programs in 
Hospitality Management. Journalism 
and Mass Communication, Nursing, 
and Urban and Public Affairs are 
headquartered on the North Cam- 
pus. In addition, degree programs in 
Arts and Sciences, Business Admini- 
stration, Education, and Health are 
offered on the North Campus. 

North Campus is the hub for FlU's 
community outreach efforts. It 
serves as the host campus to the E- 
Iders Institute, the HRS/Children and 
Families Professional Development 
Centre, the Institute of Government, 
the Institute for Public Opinion Re- 
search, the Roz and Cal Kovens 
Conference Center, and the South- 
east Florida Center on Aging. 

Students may apply for admis- 
sion and financial aid, register for 
classes and receive academic ad- 
vising at North Campus. The North 
Campus Library occupies 57,000 
square feet and has a seating ca- 
pacity for 600. It is a Federal Govern- 
ment Document Depository and a 
Florida State Government Docu- 
ment Depository. The Library has its 
own local area network for CD- 
ROMS and serves as the locus for 
the FIU Libraries PantherNet, a proto- 
type remote dial-in system that al- 
lows telephone access to 
CD-ROMs, electronic journals, elec- 
tronic reserves, library publications 
and provides support for Distance 
Learning. 

Apartment-style residential hous- 
ing on North Campus accommo- 
dates 552 students. Student life is 
enhanced through the provision of 
programs and services offered in 
the Wolfe University Center, the fo- 
cal point of social and cultural inter- 
action out of the classroom. The 
Wolfe Center houses the cafeteria. 
University Bookstore, Student Gov- 
ernment offices, an Olympic-size 
pool, computer lab, vending ma- 
chines, automatic banking facilities, 
a post office, a 300-seat theater, 
meeting rooms, a ballroom and 
game room. Student development 
programs in Recreational Sports, Ca- 
reer Services, Disability Services, In- 
ternational Student Services, 
Minority Student Services, Orienta- 
tion, Student Activities, Student 



Counseling, Student Health and 
Wellness, Victim Advocacy, the Vol- 
unteer Action Center and the 
Women's Center are also provided 
on the North Campus. 

The North Campus is adminis- 
tered by the Office of the Vice Presi- 
dent of North Campus and 
Enrollment Services. The office is on 
the Third Floor of the Library. Repre- 
sentatives from the Divisions of Aca- 
demic Affairs, Business and Finance, 
Student Affairs and University Rela- 
tions are also found there. Liaisons 
with personnel in other Divisions and 
at University Park are coordinated 
through North Campus Administra- 
tion and Operations, (305) 919-5490. 



Office of Admissions 

The Office of Admissions is responsi- 
ble for the recruitment and admis- 
sion of undergraduate applicants. 
Staff provides information to pro- 
spective students, guidance coun- 
selors and the general public to 
inform them of the academic and 
other educational programs offered 
by the University. The department 
also collects and processes official 
application materials for all gradu- 
ate admissions. For specific informa- 
tion on the application process and 
requirements for admission please 
refer to the General Information sec- 
tion of this catalog. 

Location: PC 140, University Park, 
348-2363; ACI 160, North Campus, 
919-5760; Trailers. Broward Program, 
475-4150. 



Office of Community 
College Relations 

The Office of Community College 
Relations has the primary responsibil- 
ity for inter- and intra-institution rela- 
tions with Florida's community 
colleges. Staff members provide in- 
formation to prospective transfer stu- 
dents, community college staff and 
administrators to continually inform 
and update them regarding aca- 
demic programs, transfer scholar- 
ships and other relevant 
information. 



Office of Financial Aid 

The Office of Financial Aid is respon- 
sible for the administration of finan- 
cial aid programs that assist 
students in their pursuit of a higher 
education. Financial Aid includes 
scholarships, grants, loans and em- 
ployment. Financial assistance 
based on need is determined on an 
individual basis using a standard for- 
mula provided by the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Education. For specific 
information on types of assistance, 
eligibility criteria, application proce- 
dures and other requirements, 
please refer to the General Informa- 
tion section of this catalog. 

Location: PC 125, University Park, 
ACI-100, North Campus, 348-1500. 



Office of the Registrar 

The Office of the Registrar is responsi- 
ble for coordinating the University 
registration activities, including off- 
campus course registration, and es- 
tablishing, maintaining and releas- 
ing students' academic records. The 
office is also responsible for Space 
and Scheduling, Veteran's Affairs, 
and Graduation. 

The Office of the Registrar staff 
has the responsibility to assist the stu- 
dent, faculty, other administrative 
offices, and the general public; to 
hold safe and preserve the confi- 
dentiality of the student's records; 
and to ensure the integrity of the 
University's policies and regulations. 

Enrollment Support Services, a di- 
vision of the Office of Registrar, man- 
ages the Division's computerized 
student records database, the Uni- 
versity's degree audit (SASS), Re- 
cords Archiving, and computer- 
related programs. This unit also pro- 
vides computer system planning 
support to academic units and 
other departments in the University. 
The University Catalog and the 
Course Schedule booklet published 
each semester are produced in this 
unit. 

Location: PC 130, University Park, 
348-2383; ACI 100 North Campus, 
940-5750; Broward Program, 475- 
4150. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 43 



University Advancement and Student Affairs 



The Division of University Advance- 
ment and Student Affairs is responsi- 
ble for the operation of all University 
programs relating to institutional ad- 
vancement and Student Affairs 

University 
Advancement 

University Advancement is responsi- 
ble for the operation of all University 
programs relating to institutional ad- 
vancement. Activities are centered 
in two departments: 



Alumni Affairs 

The Office of Alumni Affairs seeks to 
maintain contact and encourage 
communication with and participa- 
tion in special events with the more 
than 68,000 FIU alumni of record. 
Alumni participation is stimulated 
through activities by the FIU Alumni 
Association and through programs 
sponsored by this office, including 
publications, alumni social events, 
collegiate marketing projects and 
alumni benefits. 



Development 

The Development Office coordi- 
nates the University's efforts to raise 
funds in support of the University 
and its programs from alumni and 
other individuals, corporations, foun- 
dations, and other private sector or- 
ganizations. The Office develops 
and implements numerous pro- 
grams to raise funds annually from 
alumni and others through the Fund 
for FIU, and works closely with the 
Board of Trustees of the FIU Founda- 
tion and other volunteers to in- 
crease private support for the 
University and its students. 

The Vice President for University 
Advancement serves as the princi- 
pal University liaison to the Board of 
Trustees of the FIU Foundation, Inc., 
a group of leading South Florida 
business and community leaders 
dedicated to securing community 
support and private funds for the 
University. 



Student Affairs 

Student Affairs seeks to educate a 
diverse body of students by support- 
ing their personal and academic 
growth. We promote cross-cultural 
outreach and understanding, cre- 
ate an environment which fosters 
the development of the 'whole' stu- 
dent, promote cultural learning and 
pluralism, provide programs and 
services which enhance intellectual, 
social cultural, physical, emotional, 
and spiritual development, support 
civic awareness and service learn- 
ing, and prepare students to be- 
come contributing members of the 
community. 

The following are Student Affairs 
departments and programs: 



Campus Ministry 

The Interfaith Campus Ministry serves 
student groups involved in a variety 
of activities. Professional repre- 
sentatives from various faiths are 
available for personal appoint- 
ments. Individual denominations 
sponsor campus-wide programs in- 
cluding worship, study groups, social 
gatherings, and cultural events. 
Campus Ministry sponsors programs 
and activities which are non-de- 
nominational. 

Location: GC 340, University Park, 
348-2215; SC 265, North Campus, 
940-5609. or 940-5610, and 956-5247. 



Career Services 

Career Services is user friendly and 
assists students with information 
about majors, jobs, and careers. To 
help students in these areas. Career 
Services (CS) has four programs: Ca- 
reer Advisement, Career Mentoring, 
Career Placement, and Experiential 
Education (Co-op, Internships and 
career related volunteer work). 

CS is highly automated to provide 
students and alumni with up-to-date 
information regarding the World of 
Work and networking opportunities. 
The offices have a 24-hour Golden 
Panther JobsUne which offers stu- 
dents and alumni an opportunity to 
listen to employers describe actual 
job vacancy announcements. For stu- 
dents who register with CS, there is a 
resume referral system which auto- 
matically refers students' resumes to 



interested employers; and a Phone- 
Master system which calls students 
at home with specific career-re- 
lated information. Registered stu- 
dents also have opportunities to sign 
up with employers interviewing on 
campus from any computer lab. A 
videoconferencing interactive 
video interviewing system is avail- 
able for students to interview with 
employers unable to visit the Univer- 
sity. 

CS offers numerous workshops 
and seminars, networking forums Ca- 
reer Fairs, and Law/Graduate 
School days. The Office houses a 
comprehensive Career Library, an in- 
teractive www homepage and pro- 
vides evening hours at University 
Park. 

Location: GC 230, University Park, 
348-2423; WUC 255, North Campus, 
919-5560 and University Center at 
Davie, 474-1404. 



Disability Services for 
Students 

Disability Services for Students pro- 
vides information and assistance to 
students with disabilities who are in 
need of special accommodations. 
Individual services are available to 
students with visual, hearing, 
speech, physical, and learning dis- 
abilities, chronic health problems, 
psychological disorders, and tempo- 
rary disabilities. Services include 
counseling, classroom accommoda- 
tions, adapted equipment, note-tak- 
ers, readers, interpreters, adapted 
testing, priority registration, and refer- 
rals. Support and assistance in over- 
coming architectural, academic, 
attitudinal, and other barriers en- 
countered is provided. Requests for 
services must be made prior to the 
beginning of each semester and 
current documentation of disability 
is required to receive services. 

Location: GC 190, University Park, 
348-3532; Wolfe Student Center 139, 
North Campus, 919-5305; Bldg. 9, 
Room 224, Broward Program, 948- 
6793; TTY/TDD 348-3852. 



44 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Greek Organizations 

Greek organizations contribute to 
the University by promoting leader- 
ship, scholarship, service, social ac- 
tivities and brotherhood and 
sisterhood. There are ten fraternities 
and eight sororities coordinated by 
a Greek Advisory Board. An Inter- 
fraternity Council governs fraternities 
and a Panhellenic Council governs 
sororities. There is a National Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council governing body for his- 
torically black fraternities/sororities 
and an Order of Omega, an honor- 
ary and leadership society that pro- 
motes scholarship among Greeks. A 
formal rush period is held in the Fall 
semester, and an informal rush is 
held during the Spring term. 

Location: GC 316, University 
Park, 348-1293. 



International Student 
and Scholar Services 

International Student and Scholar 
Services provides assistance on mat- 
ters regarding immigration regula- 
tions and procedures related to 
non-immigrant legal status. The staff 
provides counseling and advise- 
ment on academic, personal and fi- 
nancial concerns, and serves as a 
liaison to academic and administra- 
tive departments throughout the Uni- 
versity. An orientation program is 
offered each semester as well as in- 
ternational and inter-cultural pro- 
grams to assist students in adapting 
more effectively to the University 
community and to living in Miami. 
An active International Student 
Club on each campus collaborates 
with the department in organizing 
various social activities. Club pro- 
grams enable students to partici- 
pate in the international dimension 
of the University and provide oppor- 
tunities for involvement in the 
greater Miami educational commu- 
nity. 

Location: GC 217, University 
Park, 348-2421; WUC 255, North 
Campus. 919-5813. 



Minority Student Services 

Minority Student Services provides 
minority students with personal, aca- 
demic, social, and cultural support 
needed for the achievement of edu- 
cational goals. Staff provides orien- 
tation, leadership development, 
counseling, career and academic 



advisement, financial assistance 
and tutorials; and serves as a liaison 
to academic units and student sup- 
port services university-wide. This de- 
partment also collaborates with 
student groups in coordinating tradi- 
tional cultural celebrations, and 
other activities for minority students' 
physical, mental and social well-be- 
ing. 

Location: GC 216, University 
Park, 348-2436; WUC, 253, North 
Campus, 919-5817. 



Office of the 
Ombudsman 

The University Student Ombudsman 
Office was established by the Univer- 
sity President pursuant to Section 
240.2098 Florida Statutes. The Om- 
budsman Office acts as an impartial 
and confidential forum to assist stu- 
dents who have encountered prob- 
lems or conflicts at the University, 
particularly problems or concerns 
not adequately addressed through 
normal channels. This may include 
correcting processes or procedures, 
which are incapable of resolving 
the issue, or are causing an inordi- 
nate delay. The Ombudsman may 
resolve problems through various 
methods, including investigation, 
mediation, or making referrals to the 
appropriate University department 
for review. The Ombudsman should 
be utilized in situations where all ar- 
eas of appeal have been ex- 
hausted or proven unsuccessful. 

For more information or services, 
please contact the Office of the 
Ombudsman at 348-2797 located in 
Graham Center 219. 



Orientation 

Panther Preview, FlU's Orientation 
program, is designed to introduce 
students and parents to Florida Inter- 
national University. Orientation ses- 
sions are scheduled prior to the Fall 
and Spring terms. The mandatory 
two-day program for freshmen in- 
cludes placement testing, advising, 
question and answer sessions, and a 
taste of campus life. The one-day 
parent program introduces parents 
to FIU, as well as assists them in pre- 
paring for the challenges and 
changes of parenting a college stu- 
dent. Transfer students are strongly 
encouraged to attend a half-day 
Orientation that includes advising, 
question and answer sessions, and a 
campus tour. Information about Ori- 



entation and related services is 
mailed to newly admitted under- 
graduate students prior to the first 
term of enrollment. 

Location: GC 340, University 
Park, 348-3828; WUC 363, North 
Campus, 919-5804. 



Pre-collegiate Programs 

Pre-collegiate Programs provides 
academic enrichment, career plan- 
ning and scholarship opportunities 
to promising minority students at the 
high school level. Pre-collegiate pro- 
grams also expose high school stu- 
dents to the university environment 
and facilitate their transition to col- 
lege. 

Location: GC 216, University 
Park, 348-2436. 



Student Activities 

Student Activities provides learning 
opportunities for students to prac- 
tice and develop leadership, com- 
munication, problem-solving, 
program planning, organization, im- 
plementation, and evaluation skills. 
Activities are co-curricular and 
cover all aspects of the educational 
experience. Over 150 registered stu- 
dent organizations exist to enrich 
campus life and contribute to the so- 
cial, cultural, and academic growth 
of students. Students may organize 
additional groups that promote the 
University's educational mission. 

Student Activities is also responsi- 
ble for new student Orientation, 
Student Handbook, Student Govern- 
ment Association, Student Organiza- 
tions Council, Student Programming 
Council, the Volunteer Action Cen- 
ter, Greek organizations, and stu- 
dent media. 

Location: GC 340, University 
Park, 348-2137; WUC 363, North 
Campus, 919-5804; LA building, 
room 203, Davie, 236-1518; Univer- 
sity Tower, room 305, Broward, 355- 
5279. 



Student Counseling 
Center 

The Student Counseling Center fo- 
cuses on enhancing the emotional 
and cognitive well-being of stu- 
dents. The following services are pro- 
vided: 1) individual, couple and 
group counseling for problems asso- 
ciated with anxiety, depression, in- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 45 



terpersonal relationships, coping 
skills and self esteem; 2) relaxation 
techniques and biofeedback train- 
ing; 3) psychological testing when 
appropriate; 4) educational work- 
shops on mental health and well- 
ness issues. 

The Student Counseling Center 
also offers a structured, supervised 
training program for graduate level 
students who are specializing in the 
mental health field. 

The Student Counseling Center is 
staffed by licensed psychologists 
and mental health counselors with 
expertise in dealing with student 
concerns and development. All serv- 
ices are provided to students free of 
charge. Complete confidentiality is 
assured. 

Location: GC 21 1 , University Park, 
348-2434; HM 1 10, North Campus, 
919-5313. 



Student Government 
Association 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) is comprised of repre- 
sentatives from all Schools and 
Colleges who are elected by the stu- 
dent body. There is a Student Gov- 
ernment Council at both North 
Campus and University Park. SGA 
appropriates an annual budget gen- 
erated by the Activity and Service 
fee which is paid by oil students at 
the time of registration. Bills, appro- 
priations, and resolutions come be- 
fore the SGA for discussion, support, 
funding, or other action on matters 
related to various activities, issues, or 
causes. 

SGA members represent the stu- 
dent body on university-wide com- 
mittees and task forces to ensure 
student representation at the admin- 
istrative level. Students are encour- 
aged to become involved in all 
aspects of Student Government. 

Location: GC 31 1 , University Park, 
348-2121; WUC 363, North Campus, 
919-5680; LA building, room 203, 
Davie, 236-1518. University Tower, 
room 506, Broward, 355-5279. 

Student Health Services 

The Student Health Service provides 
affordable, quality & professional pri- 
mary health care for routine, non- 
emergency illness and injuries. The 
department promotes health edu- 
cation, wellness programs, and pre- 
ventive medicine. The Health 
Center stimulates student aware- 



ness of holistic health behaviors 
which may be integrated into life- 
style practices to maintain optimal 
physical and mental health. 

Medical services include routine 
office visits; physical examinations; 
family planning; HIV testing; immuni- 
zations; laboratory testing; limited 
pharmacy services; nutrition counsel- 
ing; exercise testing; and private 
consultations with a physician or 
nurse practitioner. Referrals are 
made to local hospitals, pharma- 
cies, and physicians for services not 
provided at the Health Clinic. Ap- 
pointments are required. In case of 
an emergency on campus. Public 
Safety should be immediately 
called 24 hours a day. 

Office visits are free to students 
who present an FIU identification 
card valid for the current semester. 
Laboratory, immunizations, and 
pharmacy services are provided for 
a nominal fee. In addition, the stu- 
dent is responsible for the cost of all 
services rendered at off-campus 
medical facilities. Therefore, the Uni- 
versity strongly recommends that all 
students have adequate health in- 
surance coverage. Brochures de- 
scribing low group-rate health 
insurance coverage exclusively for 
students may be obtained at the stu- 
dent Health Center on both cam- 
puses. 

Students may participate in 
many health educational programs 
that stress proactive prevention, in- 
cluding Student Health Advocates 
of Peer Education (SHAPE), and the 
Student Health Advisory Council 
(SHAC), fitness testing, EMPOWER 
motivational diet groups, run- 
ning/walking club, AIDS peer educa- 
tors, and many others. 

The Wellness Center features a li- 
brary of health educational re- 
sources including textbooks, 
journals, audiotapes, videotapes, 
computer interactive software pro- 
grams, CD-ROM programs, and la- 
ser videodiscs. All of these resources 
are available for student, faculty 
and staff use within the Wellness me- 
dia room, upon presentation of a 
valid FIU I.D. 

Please see the Student Hand- 
book for more detailed information 
on Student Health Services. 

Location: Student Health & Well- 



ness Center: 




University Park 




Appointments and 




Information 


348-2401 


Administration 


348-3080 


Immunization 


348-2688 



Health Education/ 

Wellness Center 348-4020 
North Campus 

Appointments 919-5620 

Immunization 919-5675 

Wellness Center 919-5307 



Student Judicial and 
Mediation Services 

The Office of Student Judicial and 
Mediation Services ensures that the 
policies and procedures regarding 
student rights and responsibilities 
and the Student Code of Conduct 
which supports these rights, can be 
freely exercised by each student 
without interference by others. 

As members of the University 
community, students are expected 
to honor and abide by the policies 
and reguldtions of the University and 
the Florida Board of Regents as well 
as Federal and State laws and local 
ordinances. The Office of Judicial 
and Mediation Services provides an 
educational forum which supports 
the academic mission of the Univer- 
sity, and fosters the personal growth 
and positive learning experiences of 
students. 

Infringements of an academic 
nature should be directed to the Of- 
fice of the Provost. All other com- 
pldints that are non-academic 
should be directed to Judicial and 
Mediation Services. The University re- 
serves the right to review the case 
of any student who has been impli- 
cated in a criminal offense prior to 
admission, to determine the stu- 
dent's eligibility for admission and 
participation in extracurricular activi- 
ties. See the Student Code of Con- 
duct in this Handbook for more 
information on Judicial Services. 

The "Student Handbook" pro- 
vides specific information regarding 
the "Student Code of Conduct". Lo- 
cation: GC 214A, University Park, 348- 
3939. 



University Centers 

The University Center on each cam- 
pus provides direct services to stu- 
dents and the University community. 
The Graham Center (GC) at Univer- 
sity Park and the Wolfe Center (UC) 
at North Campus are the focal 
points for the University community 
to meet and interact in a non-class- 
room, educational environment. As 
the hubs of student life, the buildings 
house the Student Government of- 



46 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



fices, the 'Beacon' student newspa- 
per. They also offer the services of ( 
computer labs, bookstores, cafete- 
rias, grills, vending machines, auto- 
matic banking facilities, auditoriums, 
lounges, meeting rooms, ballrooms, 
gamerooms and an overnight lodg- 
ing facility. 

The Graham Center houses the 
radio station (WUFI), TicketMaster, a 
satellite cashiering office, a food 
court offering Polio Tropical, Burger 
King and coffee shop. The mini-mall 
offers a credit union, computer 
store, copy center and travel 
agency. The North Campus Univer- 
sity Center houses a post office, a 
theater, and parking services. 

Both centers also house services 
provided by the Division of Student 
Affairs (Career Services, Counseling 
Services, Disability Services for Stu- 
dents, International Student Serv- 
ices, Minority Student Services, 
Student Activities, Women's Center 
and Volunteer Center). 

Other services include: lost and 
found, locker rental, vending re- 
funds, test preparation courses, and 
Photo I.D. card. 

Staff in the centers also coordi- 
nate the scheduling of space and 
assist with the production of student 
and university-sponsored events. 

To better serve the FIU commu- 
nity, the University has committed 
over $10 million to renovate and ex- 
pand both university centers. Ex- 
pected completion is Fall 1998. 

Location: GC 104, University Park 
348-2297; UC 124, North Campus, 
940-5800. 



University Housing 

University Housing offers a wide vari- 
ety of accommodations serving 
over fifteen hundred students at 
both the University Park and North 
Miami campuses. Both furnished 
apartments, as well as a new state 
of the art traditional residence hall is 
available. 

The traditional residence hall. 
Panther Hall, opened in the Fall of 
1996. This 410 bed fully furnished resi- 
dence hall consists of two bedroom 
suites with a private bath. The resi- 
dence hall has a computer lab, 
study lounges, common area 
lounges, recreation facility, game 
room, common area kitchens, and 
laundry rooms. 

The apartment style units include 
bedrooms, kitchens, private or semi- 
private baths, and basic furnishings. 



Apartment styles include studios, ef- 
ficiencies, one bedrooms, and two 
bedrooms. 

Prices vary depending on the 
type of unit and campus location, 
with an average semesterly cost of 
$1,375.00. Semester rates include all 
utilities (electric, local telephone 
service, cable television, and 
water.) All housing agreements are 
issued for the academic year with 
summer assignments available. A 
$100.00 deposit is required at the 
time of application. 

Each residential facility provides 
easy access to the library, class- 
room buildings, athletic events, and 
a variety of on-campus recrea- 
tional, social, and cultural activities. 
All facilities are staffed with individu- 
als who are trained and committed 
to providing the student with a liv- 
ing environment that is supportive 
of their academic pursuits. Univer- 
sity Housing's goal is to challenge 
each resident to get involved and 
take advantage of the many out of 
classroom learning opportunities. Liv- 
ing on campus is a critical part of 
the college experience. 

Furthermore, University Housing 
serves as a liaison between com- 
muter students searching for hous- 
ing and community members 
seeking renters. Current rental list- 
ings are available in the Central 
Housing Office. 

Director: Jim Wassenaar; Loca- 
tion: Panther Hall (PH) 126; Phone: 
348-4190; Fax: 348-4295; E-mail: hous- 
ing@fiu.edu; www page: 
http://www.fiu.edu/orgs/housing. 



Victim Advocacy Center 

The Victim Advocacy Center pro- 
vides emergency crisis intervention, 
on-going support, advocacy, and 
resource referral to students, faculty, 
staff, and alumni who have been 
victims of crime or abuse. The Cen- 
ter provides awareness and preven- 
tion workshops and educational 
programs. A resource library is avail- 
able for student use at the University 
Park office. All services are free and 
confidential. 

The Victim Advocacy Center 
deals with, but is not limited to the 
following types of victimization: sex- 
ual violence, relationship abuse, 
stalking, assault and battery, hate 
crimes, sexual harassment, and in- 
decent exposure. Support is also 
available to surviving friends and 
family of murder victims. Persons 
who have experienced incidents of 



violence, harassment, or abuse are 
encouraged to seek assistance 
from the Victim Advocacy Center. 
Location: GC 195A, University Park 
(305) 348-1215; WUC 257, North 
Campus, (305) 919-5324; Crisis Re- 
sponse Line, 24 hours (305) 348-3000. 



Volunteer Action Center 

The Volunteer Action Center (VAC) 
is the central office for community 
service and volunteer activities on 
campus. The center encourages stu- 
dents to realize their potential to im- 
pact their community and effect 
social change through the power of 
service-learning, advocacy and vol- 
unteerism. VAC orgahizes monthly 
volunteer projects, alternative break 
programs and serves as a clearing 
house for volunteer opportunities. 

Location: GC 331 , University 
Park, 348-2149. 



Women's Center 

The Women's Center offers various 
programs and services related to 
the intellectual, social and profes- 
sional growth of women. Through 
collective efforts, the Center advo- 
cates for systematic changes that 
will improve the lives of women and 
men. Center programming focuses 
on the particular needs of women 
students, and encourages women 
to learn more about themselves, 
other women, and the environment 
in which they live. A Women's Men- 
toring Program exists to promote the 
professional and leadership success 
of women students. All other pro- 
grams are open to the entire com- 
munity. Services provided by the 
Center focus on women, and in- 
clude, confidential referrals, data- 
base of scholarships, library and 
resource files, and opportunities for 
internships. Locations: GC 318, Uni- 
versity Park, 348-3692 and WUC 257, 
North Campus, 919-5359. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 47 



University Outreach Programs 



The mission of University Outreach is 
to develop and implement quality 
educational programs and services 
in partnership with the academic, 
business, and professional communi- 
ties. The instructional and academic 
resources of the University will be ex- 
tended through innovative ap- 
proaches including distance 
learning, alternative scheduling, 
and community-based academic 
credit and non-credit programs. 
State-of-the-art technological capa- 
bilities offer a high-quality learning 
environment through the Kovens 
Conference Center or at a cus- 
tomer's location. A professional and 
courteous team is dedicated to the 
highest standards of customer satis- 
faction. Local, state, national, and 
international communities will be 
served with consistent, cost-effec- 
tive, high-quality and distinctive pro- 
grams and services. 

University Outreach carries out its 
mission to extend lifelong learning 
opportunities to adult and nontradi- 
tional students by providing in- 
creased access to University 
programs. Courses of instruction are 
developed and offered in a variety 
of formats. These include profes- 
sional development seminars, short 
courses, workshops, lecture series, 
and career training. 

Academic Credit Programs 

Degree programs and courses for 
academic credit are scheduled to 
meet student needs by offering 
them at times and locations that will 
increase learning opportunities. 
More than 200 courses for aca- 
demic credit are offered annually 
off-campus in Dade and Monroe 
Counties. Weekend degree pro- 
grams for working professionals are 
offered in collaboration with the Uni- 
versity's thirteen colleges and 
schools. Instruction using telecom- 
munications is offered between 
campuses, public schools, and 
other locations with the proper 
equipment. 

An individual, employer, public 
agency or professional organization 
may request that a specific course 
or degree program be offered, and 
may contract with the University to 
provide credit courses and degree 
programs at the worksite to benefit 
a designated group of individuals. 
Study Abroad courses are also avail- 
able in several academic disciplines 



in Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin Amer- 
ica and the Caribbean. 

Students may register for Out- 
reach credit courses through the tra- 
ditional registration process at North 
Campus or University Park. Special 
registration arrangements are made 
for students who meet at off-cam- 
pus sites. For more information on 
Academic Credit Programs call 
(305) 919-5669 in Dade County, or 1- 
800-310-5548 from other locations. 

Distance Learning 

Distance Learning coordinates 
credit & non-credit courses through 
state-of-the-art technology. Stu- 
dents are linked with professors elec- 
tronically through television, 
computers, videotape, satellite tele- 
conferencing, and other innovative 
technologies. Instruction can occur 
in the home, in offices, in the com- 
munity, or at school centers conven- 
ient to the learner. 

Distance Learning may occur 
anytime during the day at the con- 
venience of the learner. Some in- 
struction occurs at specific times 
and in specific locations on- and off- 
campus. Instead of taking time to 
travel to and from campuses, stu- 
dents with job and family responsibili- 
ties may now tailor their academic 
work to their own busy schedules. 

Each Distance Learning course is 
the equivalent of an on-campus 
section of the same course as to 
learning objectives, course content, 
and transferability. Students must 
meet stated prerequisites or assess- 
ment scores where applicable. Dis- 
tance Learning courses provide the 
student a higher degree of schedul- 
ing flexibility. 

For more information about Dis- 
tance Learning and course offer- 
ings, call (305) 919-5217. 

Professional Development 

Non-credit instruction includes ca- 
reer change and retraining pro- 
grams, and seminars/workshops for 
professional development or per- 
sonal enrichment. Outreach offers 
career certificate programs for 
travel agents, and applied com- 
puter training and total quality man- 
agement. Professional Development 
programs are taught by University 
faculty or professional experts in a 
specific discipline. A business, 
agency or professional organization 
may also contract to have courses 



or a degree program offered for em- 
ployees at a specified location. Con- 
tinuing education units (CEUs) may 
be awarded to eligible participants 
in non-credit instruction applicable 
to professional licensing require- 
ments. 

Students may register for profes- 
sional development courses by mail, 
fax (919-5484), at the first class meet- 
ing on a space available basis, or 
through the traditional registration 
process at North Campus or Univer- 
sity Park. Special registration ar- 
rangements are made for students 
who meet at off-campus sites. 
Course payments may be made by 
check, money order. Visa, or Master- 
card. A catalog of Outreach pro- 
grams is published each semester 
and may be requested by calling 
(305) 919-5669 in Dade and Monroe 
counties, or 1-800-310-5548 from 
other locations. 

Legal Studies Program 

University Outreach offers the follow- 
ing Legal Studies programs: Legal As- 
sistant, Legal Secretary, Law and 
Business Office Management, Immi- 
gration and Nationality Law, Legal 
Nurse Consultant, Family Mediation 
training and other courses for attor- 
neys providing CLE units from the 
Florida Bar. For more information call 
(305) 348-2491 or 1-800-310-5548. 

Roz and Cal Kovens Conference 
Center 

The Roz and Cal Kovens Confer- 
ence Center at Florida International 
University supports the teaching, re- 
search, and public service mission of 
the University by offering an out- 
standing conference and meeting 
environment. Conference Center 
staff deliver quality meeting plan- 
ning support services, and programs 
that meet or exceed the expecta- 
tions of all internal and external cli- 
ents of the Center. Whether it is an 
academic symposium, a govern- 
mental assembly, a civic gathering, 
a professional seminar, an indus- 
trial/technological conference or a 
multinational corporate meeting, 
the Kovens Conference Center has 
a full array of University resources, 
faculty and staff available. 

The Center is fully equipped with 
state-of-the-art telecommunications 
resources including computer labs, 
video-conferencing, audio/visual 
services, and case study rooms. Con- 
ferees have access to uplink/down- 



48 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



link satellite transmission enabling 
them to transmit to and from loca- 
tions throughout the world. Simulta- 
neous translation capabilities for up 
to three languages are also avail- 
able. This exceptional array of com- 
munications services can satisfy the 
needs of the most demanding .clien- 
tele. For more information call the 
Kovens Conference Center at (305)- 
919-5000. 

Conference Services 

Kovens Conference Center staff are 
available to help you transform your 
program ideas into successful con- 
ferences, workshops, seminars, insti- 
tutes, meetings and other related 
educational activities. Before the 
program, staff can help with pro- 
gram planning and concept design, 
coordinate bid preparations, coordi- 
nate promotional activities, and co- 
ordinate all other meeting logistics. 

During the program, staff will pro- 
vide all program support services in- 
cluding directional signs, 
registration, arrange for required 
audiovisual, telecommunications, si- 
multaneous translation, computer 
needs, and issue Continuing Educa- 
tion Units. After the program, staff 
will wrap-up all conference logisti- 
cal details, process payment of all 
invoices, tabulate evaluations, and 
prepare final financial statements. 

For more information, contact 
Florida International University's 
Kovens Conference Services staff at 
(305)919-5000. 

University Outreach 

Development 

Outreach Development is responsi- 
ble for providing leadership in ob- 
taining financial support for the 
achievement of University Outreach 
goals and objectives. This office de- 
velops internal and external relation- 
ships with key community, 
legislative, business and profession- 
als in the community at large to en- 
sure the success of North Campus 
Outreach initiatives. Program person- 
nel coordinate and support the ef- 
forts of the University Outreach 
Development Council, a select 
group of community volunteers 
committed to identifying financial re- 
sources for Outreach functions. Per- 
sons interested in more information 
on Outreach Development should 
call(919)-5703. 



University Outreach 
Marketing 

Outreach Marketing is responsible 
for promoting lifelong learning pro- 
grams, and Kovens Conference 
Center activities. This office provides 
professional creative and artistic 
means of publicizing programs and 
services, including the development 
and distribution of publications, ad- 
vertising, and public information. For 
more information on Outreach Mar- 
keting call (305) 919-5669. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 49 



University Relations 



The Division of University Relations is 
responsible for coordinating all of 
FlU's internal and external public re- 
lations activities. The division is com- 
prised of five units: Governmental 
Relations, Media Relations, Publica- 
tions, University Communications, 
and University Events. 



Governmental Relations 

Governmental Relations coordi- 
nates and represents the University 
at the federal, state and local levels 
of government. 



Media Relations 

Media Relations works with local, na- 
tional and international news media 
to help promote the university's im- 
age, academic programs, research 
activities and special events. The of- 
fice is responsible for disseminating 
all University news releases and statis- 
tical information to the media. The 
Office of Media Relations also pro- 
duces a monthly public affairs televi- 
sion show, FIU In View. 



University 
Communications 

University Communications man- 
ages and develops the editorial 
content of a wide variety of publica- 
tions used to provide information to 
FlU's key publics, including alumni, 
donors, civic and governmental 
leaders as well as students, faculty 
and staff. In addition, the office pro- 
vides public relations and editorial 
services to the University. 



University Events 

University Events strengthens ties be- 
tween the University and community 
through planning and coordinating 
major community held on the FIU 
campuses. The office also assists in 
hosting visiting dignitaries and coor- 
dinating major campus events in- 
cluding Commencement, 
Convocation, dedications and rec- 
ognition activities. 



Publications 

Publications produces effective and 
informative publications to advance 
the University's communications in- 
itiatives. The office provides a vari- 
ety of services including marketing, 
design, desktop publishing and pro- 
duction. In conjunction with typeset- 
ting auxiliary, this office directs and 
produces university publications pro- 
motional collaterals and advertise- 
ments. 



50 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Intercollegiate Athletics 



FIU is a member of the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association (NCAA), 
and the Trans America Athletic Con- 
ference (TAAC) for men and 
women. The University has com- 
peted at the Division l-AAA level 
since September of 1987, having 
competed successfully at the Divi- 
sion II level since 1972. Programs 
and services in Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics provide an opportunity for stu- 
dent-athletes to develop as skilled 
performers in an educational set- 
ting. Much emphasis is placed on 
the student as a student-athlete to 
ensure intellectual, emotional and 
social well-being. 

Athletics 

Athletic team membership is open 
to all full-time students. Women's 
programs consist of basketball, vol- 
leyball, soccer, golf, tennis, track, 
Softball, and cross country. Men's 
programs consist of basketball, soc- 
cer, baseball, golf, tennis, indoor 
and outdoor track and cross coun- 
try, and softball. To be eligible for in- 
tercollegiate competition, the 
University requires each student-ath- 
lete to be in good academic stand- 
ing and make satisfactory progress 
toward a degree. Team member- 
ship is determined in a manner 
which does not discriminate based 
on race, sex, national origin, marital 
status, age or disability. 

Financial assistance is available 
to both freshmen and transfer stu- 
dents recruited for all 16 athletic 
teams. Assistance may include 
grants, scholarships, loans or self- 
help programs. To be eligible for fi- 
nancial assistance, each 
student-athlete must be in good 
academic standing and make satis- 
factory progress toward a degree. 

Campus Recreation 

The Intramural Sports Program is de- 
signed to provide a healthy, safe, 
and competitive outlet for students, 
employees, and alumni of Florida In- 
ternational University. The goal of 
the intramural sports program is to 
ensure that all members of the FIU 
community have an opportunity to 
participate in some type of recrea- 
tional sports activity as regularly as 
his or her interest, ability, and time 
will permit. Through participation in 
the intramural sports program indi- 
viduals are able to enjoy organized 
sports, have fun, keep physically fit, 
meet people, cultivate leadership 



abilities, and put to good use vari- 
ous learned skills. Values such as 
sportsmanship, fair play, and mature 
behavior are stressed and encour- 
aged. 

Leagues and tournaments are of- 
fered in flag football, softball, soc- 
cer, basketball, volleyball, 
racquetball, bowling and tennis. 

Athletic and Recreational 
Facilities 

The Golden Panther SportsPlex en- 
compasses four facilities which serve 
as the sites for athletic, educational 
and recreation activities. 

The Golden Panther Arena is a 
multi-purpose facility. There is a seat- 
ing capacity for special events of 
5,000. It contains racquetball courts, 
basketball and volleyball courts, 
classrooms and locker rooms. The 
arena is open to students, faculty, 
staff, and alumni with valid identifi- 
cation. 

The Golden Panther Baseball 
and Soccer Stadiums are the home 
to our intercollegiate men's and 
women's programs. Both stadiums 
are lighted. The baseball stadium 
will seat 2,000 and the soccer sta- 
dium will seat 1 ,500. 

The FIU Community Stadium is a 
Football and Track facility. The sta- 
dium is the site for the fall and spring 
commencement ceremonies. Over 
14,000 students and their families 
can take part in this exciting event. 
The stadium is also home to our inter- 
collegiate men's and women's 
track and field programs. In the fall 
Dade County Schools ploy many of 
their high school football games in 
this facility. 

FIU students are admitted to all 
regular intercollegiate athletic 
home events free of charge. Presen- 
tation of a valid University identifica- 
tion card is required. 

Please call the following numbers 
for additional information: SportsPlex 
Facilities 348-3258; Golden Panther 
Box Office 348-4263. 

Fitness Centers at University Park 
and North Campuses are equipped 
with a complete line of Nautilus ma- 
chines and locker rooms. The Centers 
are available at no cost to currently 
enrolled students with valid identifica- 
tion cards. There is a semester fee for 
faculty, staff, and alumni. 

The Aquatic Center on the North 
Campus overlooks the bay and is 



fully furnished to provide an environ- 
ment for conversation, study and/or 
sun-bathing. The multipurpose de- 
sign of the 50 meter x 25 yard pool 
and diving well allow for recrea- 
tional and instructional use. 

The Racquet Sports Center at Uni- 
versity Park has 12 lighted tennis 
courts and eight lighted racquetball 
courts. The Racquet Sports Center 
at North Campus has six lighted ten- 
nis courts, along with a sand volley- 
ball court. Both campuses have 
full-sized basketball courts near their 
Racquet Sports Centers. 

For additional information or 
hours of operation call: 

Campus Recreation: 348-2951 
University Park, 919-4571 North Cam- 
pus. 

Fitness Center: 348-2575, Univer- 
sity Park; 919-5678, North Campus. 

GPA Open Recreation: 348-2900. 

Racquet Sports Center: 348- 
295 1 , University Park; 9 1 9-4572 , North 
Campus. 

Aquatic Center: 919-4595. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 51 



Centers and Institutes 



Center for Accounting, 
Auditing, and Tax 
Studies 

The Center for Accounting, Audit- 
ing, and Tax Studies (CAATS) con- 
ducts and sponsors innovative 
research. Major ongoing projects fo- 
cus on the audit impact of emerg- 
ing technology and on detection of 
fraud. 

CAATS builds bridges to practitio- 
ners by turning ideas into products; 
it enhances the value of account- 
ants' services to clients and to the 
public by contributing to audit effi- 
ciency and effectiveness. CAATS' in- 
ternational commitments relate to 
the accounting issues confronting 
the less developed nations, particu- 
larly in the Middle East and Latin 
America. 

CAATS also conducts seminars 
and short courses designed to pro- 
vide educational opportunities to 
South Florida public accountants, in- 
ternal auditors, and management 
accountants. CAATS strives to be 
self supporting. Net fees earned by 
providing educational opportunities 
to accountants, together with contri- 
butions received from the public, 
are applied to research and to the 
enrichment of graduate instruction. 
In this way, CAATS provides the mar- 
gin of excellence which enriches 
the entire educational experience. 

All CAATS activity is dedicated to 
advancing accounting, auditing, 
and tax knowledge. CAATS is lo- 
cated in BA 245B, University Park, 
348-2586. 



Center for the 
Administration of Justice 

The Center for the Administration of 
Justice (CAJ) was founded at Flor- 
ida International University, a mem- 
ber of the State University System of 
Florida, in 1984 to engage in re- 
search, training and public educa- 
tion about the administration of 
justice in Latin America. With offices 
in Miami and San Jose, Costa Rica, 
CAJ has become a unique interna- 
tional resource at the forefront of jus- 
tice sector reform in Latin America. 
CAJ employs a multidisciplinary 
and international staff of specialists, 
including lawyers, political scientists, 



public administrators and public pol- 
icy analysts. Many are former justice 
sector officials with experience and 
skills in justice sector issues. 

Giving special emphasis on sup- 
port to local efforts to strengthen 
and invigorate fair and inde- 
pendent justice systems, the CAJ 
regularly works with public officials, 
scholars and practitioners in Latin 
America. 

The CAJ has become a leading 
source of information and leader- 
ship on justice sector reform issues in 
Latin America. Its assessments have 
been widely disseminated and have 
been critical in public policy deci- 
sion-making throughout the region. 



Center for Advanced 
Technology and 
Education (NSF-CATE) 

The NSF-funded Center for Ad- 
vanced Technology and Education - 
CATE provides a computing 
environment capable of engaging 
researchers as well as facilitating 
classroom and laboratory-based in- 
struction in critical technology area 
such as image processing and com- 
puter vision, neural networks, distrib- 
uted and parallel processing, visual 
programming and 3-D modeling. 
CATE constitutes an infrastructure 
that is viable for cutting-edge re- 
search activities providing an envi- 
ronment that facilitates 
state-of-the-art educational and re- 
search activities. The ONYX parallel 
machine, confocal microscope, 
high-speed motion analyzer, roving 
robot, and several (24) SGI worksta- 
tions provide the potential for: (a) 
parallel and distributed processing, 
(b) high performance 3-D rendering 
and modeling, (c) real-time process- 
ing capability, (d) operating systems 
and graphics that meet current 
standards, and (e) high-speed data 
acquisition, playback, analysis, and 
communications links. 



Center for Banking and 
Financial Institutions 

The College of Business Administra- 
tion at Florida International Univer- 
sity has a long tradition of preparing 
students for careers in the banking 
and financial institutions. The Center 
for Banking and Financial Institutions 
was established to provide addi- 
tional services to banks and finan- 
cial institutions located in the 
Southeast United States and in Latin 
America and the Caribbean. 

Associates of the Center for Bank- 
ing and Financial Institutions are a 
select group of highly qualified func- 
tional specialists in the areas of ac- 
counting, finance, information 
systems, marketing, and human re- 
source management, who are inter- 
ested in the application of their 
functional specialties in solving con- 
temporary organizational problems 
in banks and financial institutions. 

The Center for Banking and Finan- 
cial Institutions at FIU meets the de- 
mands of the banking and financial 
service sector through four major ac- 
tivities: 

Education: The Center for Banking, 
and Financial Institutions along with 
the Department of Finance, co- 
sponsors the Banking Certificate pro- 
gram. Upon completion of a four 
course sequence of banking and fi- 
nancial institution courses, students 
are awarded a Certificate in Bank- 
ing from the College of Business Ad- 
ministration. The Center also 
supports educational opportunities 
for bank and financial institution em- 
ployees and other individuals who 
wish to continue their education in 
the area of banking and financial in- 
stitutions, through other off campus 
programs. 

Management Development: The 
Center for Banking and Financial In- 
stitutions develops and conducts 
high quality training programs and 
conferences on topics that are of in- 
terest to and demanded by banks 
and financial institutions. The Center 
also offers custom in-house training 
programs for those institutions who 
desire a more focused or special- 
ized program. 

Research: The Center for Banking 
and Financial Institutions supports 
theoretical and applied research on 
problems and issues in the financial 
service sector. 



52 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Consulting: The Center for Banking 
and Financial Institutions serves as a 
consulting clearinghouse. The Cen- 
ter will assist banks and other finan- 
cial institutions in contacting experts 
from Fill and nationwide to assist 
them in solving unique problems in 
their organizations. 

The Center for Banking, and Fi- 
nancial Institutions is located in BA- 
320. University Park, 348-2771. 



Children's Creative 
Learning Center 

The Children's Creative Learning 
Center at FIU is an Educational Re- 
search Center for Child Develop- 
ment. 

The Center offers several pro- 
grams. An educational pre-school is 
available at both the North and Uni- 
versity Park campuses to children 
between the ages of 2 years and six 
months (toilet trained) through 5. In 
addition, at U.P., an activity based 
edu-care/flex-time program with 
day (ages 3 to 5, toilet trained) and 
evening hours (ages 3 to 6, toilet 
trained) is offered. 

The programs are designed to 
meet the needs of children Mon- 
day through Friday, from 7:45 a.m. 
to 5:30 p.m. (North Campus) and 
until 9:00 p.m. (University Park), 

Since its inception in 1975, this 
model program has become well 
known for providing appropriate 
hands-on experiences for children 
of students, faculty, staff, alumni 
and the neighboring community. 

The educational pre-school pro- 
gram offers a creative atmosphere 
which enhances and promotes in- 
volvement in activities, such as: cir- 
cle time, story time, art, music, 
science, cooking, dramatic play 
and pre-reading and pre-math and 
developmental tasks along with the 
introduction of educational con- 
cepts to convey awareness of the 
world around us. 

The edu-care/flex-time program 
is filled with fun, child like activities 
such as story time, arts and crafts, 
music, movement, dramatic play, 
and more. 

For more information and appli- 
cation, please call us at 348-2143. 



Institute on Children and 
Families at Risk 

The Institute on Children and Fami- 
lies at Risk was established by the 
School of Social Work at Florida Inter- 
national University in 1991. The Insti- 
tute promotes research, 
demonstration projects, training, 
and technical assistance to address 
the needs of children, youth, fami- 
lies, and the social networks and sys- 
tems that support them. With an 
emphasis on prevention, early inter- 
vention and major reforms in crisis 
and out-of-home care, the Institute 
has generated a series of multi-cul- 
tural, multi-generational and multi- 
modal initiatives. These include 
training and instructional design for 
child welfare workers in South Flor- 
ida. 

Research and capacity-building 
functions of the Institute encompass 
a range of family support strategies 
including family-support villages, 
refugee, immigrant and migrant 
service initiatives, services and sys- 
tems integration, consumer-driven 
practice and policy, community 
campaigns for culturally-responsive 
services and missions, and refinanc- 
ing strategies. The Institute also de- 
signs and evaluates improvements 
in 'helping' technologies for all serv- 
ice systems supporting at-risk chil- 
dren, families and communities. 

Emphasizing partnerships at the 
local, state and national level, the 
Institute collaborates with a number 
of institutions, organizations and sec- 
tors to promote technology transfer, 
joint demonstration projects and ca- 
pacity-building efforts. Special em- 
phasis is on the link between 
universities, public sector social 
health services and public schools. 
The Institute provides consulting serv- 
ices both nationally and internation- 
ally with a focus on the training and 
technology transfer between states 
and nations on techniques and 
strategies to better organize serv- 
ices and supports for at-risk chil- 
dren, families and communities. 

The Institute also serves as the re- 
search and development arm of 
the School of Social Work and pro- 
vides research opportunities for mas- 
ter's and doctoral-level students. Its 
cross-systems endeavors also de- 
pend on the leadership and exper- 
tise of faculty and students in other 
disciplines at Florida International 
University, at several other universi- 
ties in the South Florida area and 
the staff of the State of Florida's De- 



partment of Health and Rehabilita- 
tive Services staff. 



Drinking Water 
Research Center 

The Drinking Water Research Center 
(DWRC) was established by the Flor- 
ida Legislature in 1977, and charged 
with the responsibility for applied re- 
search on the state's drinking water. 
Since that time, the Center has re- 
sponded to state, national and 
global environmental concerns by 
expanding its research focus to 
cover a wide spectrum of water-re- 
lated environmental issues. 

Water Treatment-evaluating 
treatment processes; evaluating al- 
ternative disinfectants and their ef- 
fect on water quality; researching 
the use of high energy electrons in 
water, wastewater and hazardous 
waste treatment. 

Surface Water Quality-studying 
treatment of domestic, industrial 
and hazardous wastes since im- 
proper disposal can affect surface 
water quality. 

Ground Water Quality-studying 
ground water movement; investigat- 
ing water management modeling 
of the Everglades Basin. 

Marine Environment-oil spill shore- 
line protection and counter meas- 
ures; studying black band disease 
of corals. 

The DWRC does not conduct 
academic classes. However, quali- 
fied students often have an oppor- 
tunity to work as a research 
assistants in the DWRC laboratories 
or carry out independent research 
projects. Cooperation and inter- 
change with other departments in 
the University is stressed. 

The Center is part of the College 
of Engineering and Design and is lo- 
cated at VH 326 and CEAS 2441 , 
University Park. 348-2826. 



Center of Economic 
Research and Education 

The Center of Economic Research 
and Education is a Type II Center ap- 
proved by the Board of Regents of 
the State University System. The pur- 
pose of the Center is to foster a 
greater understanding of econom- 
ics. The Center represents an impor- 
tant link between the University, 
business, and education communi- 
ties. As part of its activities, the Cen- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 53 



ter undertakes research projects, 
sponsors conferences and seminars, 
provides courses in economic edu- 
cation for teachers, and dissemi- 
nates economic data and 
information. 

Established in 1982 as one of 
eight centers located throughout 
the State University System, the Cen- 
ter is located in DM 314, University 
Park. Its phone number is 348-3283. 



Center for Educational 
Development 

The Center for Educational Develop- 
ment (CED) is a multidisciplinary unit 
based in the College of Education 
whose mission includes: (1) plan- 
ning, technical assistance, training 
and research in support of educa- 
tional systems development interna- 
tionally and domestically; (2) 
increased minority group access to 
and achievement in educational 
systems; (3) acquisition of state and 
external resources for development 
of educational systems; and (4) 
multi-institutional collaboration in 
educational development projects 
and research. 

The Center is governed and sup- 
ported jointly by Florida Interna- 
tional University, Miami Dade 
Community College, and the Univer- 
sity of Miami, it is comprised of two 
specialized institutes: the Interna- 
tional Institute of Educational Devel- 
opment and the Urban Educational 
Development Institute. 

For more information call 348- 
341 8, or write to Dr. Miguel A. 
Escotet, Director, International Insti- 
tute of Educational Development, 
College of Education, University Park 
Campus, Miami, Florida 33199. E- 
Mail: iide@solix.fiu.edu 



Center for International 
Executive Education 
(CIEE) 

The CIEE, located at University Park 
BA 332, was founded with the mis- 
sion of bridging the resources of the 
College of Business Administration 
with the interests of the international 
business community. The core strate- 
gic focus of the CIEE is to increase 
the competitiveness of organiza- 
tions by providing training that re- 
sults in the development of a global 
management perspective and an 
understanding of the impact of the 



global economic and political 
forces on the Americas. 

The Graduate Diploma Series 
(GDS) programs offered by the CIEE, 
facilitates the achievement of this 
mission by providing a structured 
program of study to participants 
who wish to sharpen their global 
management skills without enrolling 
in a graduate degree program. This 
series includes: the Graduate Di- 
ploma in International Business 
(GDIBM), the Graduate Diploma in 
International Marketing (GDIM), and 
the Graduate Diploma in Interna- 
tional Finance (GDIF) 

These programs are designed to 
provide participants with the com- 
petencies and skills necessary to as- 
sume responsibilities in the 
international sales and marketing, 
management, and finance func- 
tions of their organizations. These 
programs have been structured for 
participants who have an under- 
graduate degree in business or engi- 
neering. 

Non-business majors who wish to 
update their international business, 
marketing or finance skills by enroll- 
ing in the programs are encour- 
aged to first enroll in an 
international business language 
course which will expose partici- 
pants to the fundamental concepts 
of doing business in a multicultural 
setting. This course is offered every 
summer before the commence- 
ment of the GDS programs. 

In addition to these programs, 
the CIEE pursues its mission by spon- 
soring the Global Manager Pro- 
gram, a 3-week executive 
development program, in partner- 
ship with the business community, 
that is designed for middle to senior 
level executives who have to grap- 
ple with the challenges of the 
global economy. 



Elders Institute 

The Elders Institute, a continuing edu- 
cation unit within the Southeast Flor- 
ida Center on Aging, serves the 
educational needs of the senior 
adults on the University's North Cam- 
pus. The Institute's mission and 
scope is to initiate, plan, design, and 
manage non-credit short courses, 
lectures, seminars, and workshops 
for older learners. Programs are of- 
fered during daytime hours, and are 
held primarily on campus. The 
courses offered are primarily in the 
humanities, the behavioral sciences 
and the social sciences. Workshops 



and seminars provide opportunities 
to develop new skills and to explore 
methods and means for personal 
growth and self-improvement. The 
Institute's instructional staff are com- 
munity experts, University faculty 
and retired seniors. The participants 
are motivated learners who seek 
knowledge, new information and 
skills for intellectual stimulation and 
personal growth. 

The Elders Institute at Coral Ga- 
bles presents continuing education 
courses at the Coral Gables Congre- 
gational Church. Half the courses 
are offered in Spanish; half in Eng- 
lish. The Institute is located in Confer- 
ence Center 301 , North Campus, 
919-5910. 



English Language 
Institute 

Since 1978, the English Language In- 
stitute (ELI) has offered non-credit 
English language instruction to non- 
native speakers of English in the 
community and from abroad. 
Intensive English Program: Classes in 
reading, grammar, writing, and con- 
versation are taught at five levels of 
proficiency. Language laboratory fa- 
cilities are available in which stu- 
dents can increase their listening 
comprehension and speaking skills 
under the guidance of an instructor. 
Students normally take a full, three- 
course load, but it is also possible for 
fully admitted University students to 
take a course in a single skill. 
Testing and Placement: The English 
Language Institute offers proficiency 
testing of both written and oral profi- 
ciency in English as a support serv- 
ice for academic units throughout 
the University. Evaluative proce- 
dures are designed to fit the needs 
of individual programs or schools, to 
assist them in the identification of in- 
dividual students' level of profi- 
ciency in English, and to place 
students in appropriate programs of 
study when needed. In addition, the 
Institute regularly administers the 
Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage (TOEFL). 

Community Outreach Program: The 
English Language Institute offers non- 
credit courses in the evening and 
on Saturday for non-native speakers 
of English. 

Accent Reduction: Accent reduc- 
tion classes are available for non-na- 
tive speakers of English who a have 
a good command of the language 



54 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



but who wish to improve their pro- 
nunciation. 

Other Programs: Business English. Su- 
per Intensive (immersion), Summer 
Institute. 

The English Language Institute is 
located in LC 204, University Park, 
348-2222. 



The Family Business 
Institute 

The Family Business Institute was cre- 
ated to provide an on-going series 
of small, personal, in-depth seminars 
focusing on challenges faced by 
mature family business owners, their 
family, and their non-family staff. A 
newsletter augments the educa- 
tional programs. The following cor- 
porate sponsors are partners 
dedicating their resources toward 
supporting health family businesses: 
Arthur Andersen LLP, Greenberg 
Traurig and The Equitable Mu- 
sibay/Chiappy Agency, Na- 
tionsBank, Gerson. Preston & Co. 

The Family Business Institute is lo- 
cated in BA 332, University Park 
Campus. (305) 348-4237. 



FAU-FIU Joint Center for 
Environmental and 
Urban Problems 

Florida's environmental and urban 
problems derive in large part from 
the state's rapid growth and devel- 
opment. Recognizing the need to 
address these problems through ef- 
fective growth management, the 
Florida Legislature established the 
Joint Center for Environmental and 
Urban Problems at Florida Interna- 
tional University and Florida Atlantic 
University in 1972. In the many years 
since then, most of Florida's growth 
management laws and policies 
have taken shape, and the Joint 
Center has been a frequent and im- 
portant contributor to policy forma- 
tion at the state, regional, and local 
levels. The Joint Center has made its 
contribution by taking an interdisci- 
plinary approach to these complex 
and interrelated areas of study. 

The Joint Center functions as an 
applied research and public serv- 
ice facility that carries out programs 
supportive of government agen- 
cies, educational institutions, and 
non-profit organizations. The Center 
is active in the following program ar- 



eas: (1) research projects, with pub- 
lic and private agencies that ad- 
dress environmental and urban 
problems; (2) community service 
projects; (3) production, in conjunc- 
tion with FlU's media services, of 
video documentaries concerning 
urban and environmental issues; (4) 
workshops, assemblies, conferences 
and lectures; and (5) publication of 
the Joint Center's quarterly journal, 
Environmental and Urban Issues. 

The Joint Center maintains 
offices at FlU's University Park Cam- 
pus, at FAU's Broward Campus at 
University Tower in Fort Lauderdale, 
and at the FAU Boca Raton cam- 
pus. 

The FIU office is staffed by an as- 
sociate director, senior research as- 
sociate, secretary, and several 
research assistants. University fac- 
ulty specialists from the School of 
Design. Environmental & Urban Sys- 
tems, Environmental Studies, and 
several other programs frequently 
work with Joint Center staff on spe- 
cific projects. 

Research and Service: Research at 
the Joint Center focuses on the de- 
velopment and implementation of 
public policy in the areas of growth 
management, sustainable develop- 
ment and integrated community, 
urban, and regional planning. The 
Joint Center is committed to assist- 
ing government agencies and com- 
munities in these areas. Recent 
research topics have included eco- 
nomic development for central Mi- 
ami neighborhoods; energy- 
efficient urban design; military envi- 
ronmental policy; affordable hous- 
ing and community development 
strategies in the non-profit sector; 
and transportation and land use. 

Research clients have included 
the U.S. Army Environmental Policy 
Institute, the Florida Department of 
Community Affairs, Homes for South 
Florida, Habitat for Humanity, the 
City of Homestead, the City of Mi- 
ami, and the Metro-Dade Planning 
Department. 

Through in-house research and 
through collaboration with FIU fac- 
ulty, the Joint Center will continue 
to link university resources to com- 
munities and to the region, and will 
focus interdisciplinary expertise on 
the problems of south Florida's ur- 
ban, agricultural, and natural land- 
scapes. 

The Center has recently ex- 
panded its scope with international 
linkages to Latin America and South 
Africa. In 1994, The Joint Center and 
the FIU School of Design collabo- 



rated in the formation of the FIU 
Ecotourism Research Council. The 
Council provides a forum for faculty 
members to pursue multidisciplinary 
applied research on environmen- 
tally sensitive tourism development. 
The Council's initial efforts are pro- 
ceeding under an agreement be- 
tween FIU and the Nicaraguan 
Ministries of Natural resources and 
Tourism. 

Working with the South African In- 
stitute of Town and Regional Plan- 
ners, the Joint Center has 
developed an internship program 
for recently graduated South Afri- 
can planners. The program was initi- 
ated in late 1993. The experience 
gained from this, and the opportuni- 
ties created by the post-apartheid 
era, have led to a commitment to 
expand the program and explore 
collaborative research opportuni- 
ties in the field of sustainable devel- 
opment. 



Future Aerospace 
Science and 
Technology Center for 
Cryoelectronics (FAST) 

FAST is one of five centers created 
by the Air Force as part of its minor- 
ity university enhancement pro- 
gram, providing research 
experience opportunities for under- 
graduate and graduate students in 
the area of Electrical Engineering. 

The FAST Center evaluates novel 
applications of space-based 
cryoelectronics, initially studying 
new systems for reduction in losses 
of feed and phase shift networks in 
phased array transmitter systems. 
This involves development of low- 
loss active integrated low-noise 
phased array or post-processed 
phased array down-converter re- 
ceiving systems, high gain-low loss, 
low noise micro (and later millime- 
ter) wave circuits and systems for 
space based applications. Of par- 
ticular interest is the ability to design 
and fabricate integrated systems 
which could be used as "steerable" 
phased array antennas with, some 
frequency-agility as well. 

Current research is focused on is- 
sues relating to: integration and het- 
ero-epoitaxy of the buffer and 
dielectric layer with the GaAs semi- 
conductor and 123 high T c super- 
conductor layers; obtaining good 
ohmic GaAs contacts at low tem- 
peratures, tailoring the surface mor- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 55 



phology of the high T c supercon- 
ductor to achieve a designed Q 
value for the passive elements, 
package design and testing with re- 
spect to microwave and thermal cy- 
cling consideration, and the 
identification and minimization of 
noise source. 



The FIU Institute of 
Government 

Since 1982, the Institute of Govern- 
ment, as part of the College of Ur- 
ban and Public Affairs has provided 
training, technical assistance, con- 
sulting services, policy forums and 
executive leadership development 
programs to municipal, county, and 
state administrators, staff members, 
appointees, and elected officials in 
Dade, Monroe, and Broward Coun- 
ties. This program draws the univer- 
sity together with the community in 
which it resides, and couples ideas 
and skills from many disciplines with 
working governments. 

The Institute is primarily funded 
through a state grant with the Flor- 
ida Institute of Government located 
in Tallahassee. There are 15 Institutes 
of Government affiliated with state 
universities and community colleges 
around the state. 

Upon request, the Institute devel- 
ops and delivers specialized training 
for governmental units to address 
specific needs they have identified. 
The training is developed in consult- 
ation with the clients and can be de- 
livered at their site or at the 
University. The Institute offers a work- 
shop series for career development 
for governmental staff as well. 

The Institute also holds confer- 
ences and workshops as a forum for 
community discussion about and 
analysis of policy issues of concern 
to local governments and state de- 
partments in the South Florida area. 

Technical assistance and ap- 
plied research services are also pro- 
vided for a wide variety of units and 
divisions within state and local gov- 
ernments. Issues which may be ad- 
dressed include public management, 
public policy analysis, and service de- 
livery systems. 

The Institute and the Department 
of Public Administration conducts 
the Executive Development Pro- 
gram for mid-level career public 
and voluntary sector managers. This 
certificate program emphasizes 
problem solving and decision mak- 
ing in government and the volun- 



tary sector, personal growth, career 
development and state of the art 
management tools. Community 
and government leaders as well as 
FIU faculty serve as Adjunct Faculty 
in the Program and participate in 
panel discussions relating to the 
aforementioned topics. Participants 
in the program are also linked with 
upper-level public administrators 
and elected officials to provide per- 
sonal and professional growth and 
mentoring. 

The Institute arranges technical 
assistance and consulting services 
when governments feel they would 
benefit from outside support. They 
might, for example, be seeking to 
solve an internal problem, to gather 
and analyze research data perti- 
nent to their operation, or to carry 
out an evaluation of some segment 
or all of their operation. 

Topics in the past have included 
"Right-Sizing Government", "The 
Homeless Problem", "Decision Mak- 
ing in the Aftermath of Hurricane An- 
drew", and "Florida Sunshine Laws". 

The Institute holds conferences 
and workshops as a forum for com- 
munity discussion about and analy- 
sis of policy issues of concern to 
local governments in the South Flor- 
ida area. 

The Institute develops and carries 
out executive leadership develop- 
ment through a number of pro- 
grams, such as, the annual 
Executive Leadership Development 
Mentoring Program. This program 
links upper-level public administra- 
tors and elected officials with less-ex- 
perienced administrators and 
officials, in a year-long program 
starting each fall, to provide per- 
sonal and professional growth for 
each individual." 



The HRS/Children, and 
Families Professional 
Development Centre 

The HRS/Children, and Families Pro- 
fessional Development Centre 
(PDC) at FIU is responsible for provid- 
ing Florida Health and Rehabilitative 
Services (HRS) Children and Families 
(C&F) program staff with a func- 
tional knowledge base as well as a 
set of practical skills for working with 
children and families. Located on 
FlU's north campus, the PDC is 
staffed by a credentialed and expe- 
rienced group of instructors who pro- 
vide training to child welfare workers 
throughout a geographical catch- 



ment area from Vero Beach to Key 
West. 

The PDC provides a foundation 
of child welfare knowledge and skills 
to ensure that new staff have com- 
petencies in the practices, policies, 
and procedures that are essential to 
the mission of the C&F program. In 
addition, the PDC offers specialty in- 
service training to increase and de- 
velop specialized competencies for 
experienced C&F staff and the staff 
from private child welfare service 
providers. 

The stated purpose of the fo- 
cused PDC training is to enable 
child welfare workers in general to 
make better casework decisions 
that result in improved service out- 
comes for Florida's children and 
families. 



Hemispheric Center for 
Environmental 
Technology (HCET) 

The Hemispheric Center for Environ- 
mental Technology was established 
by Florida International University 
and the United States Department 
of Energy's Office of Science and 
Technology (OST) to research, de- 
velop, and demonstrate innovative 
environmental technologies and to 
establish international alliances to fa- 
cilitate the implementation of these 
technologies. 

HCET's research and develop- 
ment (R&D) activities focus on the 
decontamination and decommis- 
sioning of nuclear facilities and the 
management and reduction of ra- 
dioactive and hazardous wastes. 
These R&D activities support the De- 
partment of Energy's Environmental 
Management programs in the areas 
of waste characterization, monitor- 
ing, and sensor technology; under- 
ground storage tank remediation; 
and decontamination and decom- 
missioning. 

HCET's mission is to develop and 
market technologies to solve envi- 
ronmental problems and foster sus- 
tainable development throughout 
the Americas. To achieve this end, 
HCET performs research and devel- 
opment, gathers and disseminates 
market and technology assessment 
data, facilitates technology transfer, 
and forms partnerships with indus- 
tries and governments throughout 
the Americas. HCET targets its tech- 
nology development organizations 
for government and industrial users 
of environmental technologies. 



56 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



The foundation for HCET's tech- 
nological capabilities has success- 
fully been built within Florida 
International University's College of 
Engineering and Design. HCET has 
the capability and resources to de- 
velop innovative technologies as 
well as assess and demonstrate 
technologies that have been devel- 
oped or modified both in-house 
and by other vendors. HCET also 
has the expertise to comparatively 
evaluate emerging technologies 
and pursue, organize, and facilitate 
technology transfer from suppliers 
to consumers. 



International Hurricane 
Center 

The International Hurricane Center 
(IHC) is a Type I research center serv- 
ing the State University System of 
Florida. Type I status was approved 
by the Board of Regents on March 
15, 1996, and makes the IHC Flor- 
ida's official hurricane research cen- 
ter for the ten universities comprising 
the state system. The IHC is also des- 
ignated as the formal liaison for 
NOAA's Tropical Prediction Center 
(also known as the National Hurri- 
cane Center) located on the Univer- 
sity Park campus. 

The IHC promotes an inter- and 
multi-disciplinary research mission fo- 
cused on mitigation of hurricane 
damage to people, the economy, 
and the built and natural environ- 
ments. The IHC's large-scale re- 
search agenda includes topics in 
diverse disciplines such as engineer- 
ing, architecture, sociology, psychol- 
ogy, anthropology, urban planning, 
economics, business, finance, insur- 
ance, geography and public 
health, among others. Research op- 
portunities for interested graduate 
level students exist in most of the ar- 
eas previously cited. 

For more information, contact 
the IHC at (305) 348-1607 or visit our 
web site at www.fiu.edu/~hurrican. 



Institute of Judaic 
Studies 

The Institute of Judaic Studies (US) 
brings the University and the com- 
munity together in a mutual effort to 
nurture teaching and research in 
academic areas which stand as the 
cornerstones of Western Civilization. 
Contemporary issues and problems 



provide focal points for study, dia- 
logue, exchange and travel. 

The objective of the Institute is to 
infuse Jewish content into the cur- 
riculum of the University at all appro- 
priate levels. The Institute fosters 
scholarship and inquiry into Jewish 
themes leading to the develop- 
ment of course offerings within exist- 
ing academic departments. For 
more information, call 348-3225. 



Center for Labor 
Research and Studies 

The Center for Labor Research and 
Studies, established in 1971 is the 
only labor center in Florida and one 
of the most dynamic in the nation. It 
serves students, faculty and adminis- 
trators throughout the State Univer- 
sity System as well as labor, business, 
community organizations, academ- 
ics, policy makers, and journalists, 
nationally and internationally, 
through a series of diverse activities. 

Accredited through the Univer- 
sity and College Labor Education 
Association (UCLEA), the Center is 
one of 51 accredited labor centers 
in the United States. Its broad mis- 
sion is to provide services to workers 
and their organizations. This broad 
mission translates into three specific 
objectives: 1) provide comprehen- 
sive, statewide labor education serv- 
ice; 2) provide programs designed 
to support faculty research in labor 
relations, the changing nature of 
work, and labor education issues; 
and 3) offer a multidisciplinary 
credit and non-credit curriculum in 
labor studies at the University. 

As a Type I Center of the Florida 
State University System, the CLR8(S has 
major responsibility at the University for 
research and curriculum develop- 
ment on labor relations and the 
changing nature of work in Florida. 
This responsibility can be met, in part, 
by following the University's mandate 
as described in its mission statement: 
(to) serve the broad community, with 
special concern for greater Miami 
and South Florida, enhancing the met- 
ropolitan area's capacity to meet its 
cultural, economic, social and urban 
challenges. 

Since it was founded, the CLR&S 
has become recognized for its inno- 
vative national and international 
non-credit education programs. 
These programs have educated la- 
bor and management participants 
in areas including labor relations, 
pension fund administration, dis- 



pute resolution, labor history, dy- 
namics of worker participation and 
international labor issues. 

The Center's non-credit classes 
for Florida's labor-management 
practitioners include open enroll- 
ment single courses, individualized 
courses for particular unions, as well 
as two certificate programs: the 
Workplace Issues Certificate and 
the Union Leadership Academy Cer- 
tificate. The credit program, offered 
through the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, includes a Bachelor's De- 
gree in Liberal Studies with a 
concentration in Labor Studies and 
two related Certificate programs 

The Center houses various pro- 
jects which serve to carry out its re- 
search and training functions 
including non-credit programs and 
conferences, applied and theoreti- 
cal research projects, and publica- 
tions including Latin American Labor 
News, Labor Studies Forum and an 
Occasional Paper Series. In addition, 
three related institutes, the Immigra- 
tion and Ethnicity Institute, the Hu- 
man and Labor Rights Institute, and 
the Institute for Comparative Studies 
on Work and Society, are housed at 
the Center. The Center is located in 
the Labor Center building at the Uni- 
versity Park Campus, (305) 348-2371 , 
Fax:(305)348-2241. 



Latin American and 
Caribbean Center 

The Latin American and Caribbean 
Center (LACC) promotes advanced 
education and research on Latin 
America and the Caribbean, a re- 
gion of intense interest to the United 
States. It offers undergraduate and 
graduate certificate programs to 
both degree and non-degree seek- 
ing students, combines research in 
the social sciences and the humani- 
ties, graduate and undergraduate 
instruction and offers publications, 
and public education activities that 
address the full range of issues af- 
fecting hemispheric relations. A new 
Master of Arts in Latin American and 
Caribbean Studies was imple- 
mented in the Fall 1996 semester. 
This multidisciplinary master's pro- 
gram builds on FlU's strong and 
growing resources in area studies, 
most notably the more than 100 fac- 
ulty members who are recognized 
nationally and internationally for 
their expertise on the region, with 
special emphasis on the disciplines 
of economics, history, international 
relations, modern languages, politi- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 57 



cal science, and sociology/anthro- 
pology. For more information about 
the M.A. in Latin American and Car- 
ibbean Studies see the College of 
Arts and Sciences section in the 
Graduate Catalog. 

Since it was founded in 1979, 
LACC has become one of the coun- 
try's leading programs in contempo- 
rary Latin American and Caribbean 
studies. Over 100 language and 
area studies faculty regularly offer 
courses on diverse topics related to 
the region. Through special semi- 
nars, colloquia and other presenta- 
tions sponsored by LACC, faculty 
and students have access to visiting 
scholars and other professionals with 
expertise on Latin American and 
Caribbean issues. Externally funded 
research programs support a contin- 
ual flow of visiting Latin Americanists 
and Caribbeanisrs to the University. 
Through the external grants it re- 
ceives, LACC contributes to the Uni- 
versity's efforts to strengthen its Latin 
American and Caribbean studies li- 
brary collection. LACC receives 
funding from state and federal 
sources as well as private founda- 
tions, among them, the Andrew Mel- 
lon, Tinker, Rockefeller, and Ford 
Foundations. 

Several other programs and insti- 
tutes are part of LACC. Two of 
these, the Florida Caribbean Insti- 
tute (FCI) and the Florida-Mexico In- 
stitute (FMI), are programs of the 
Florida International Affairs Commis- 
sion, created by the state legislature 
to improve Florida's cultural, com- 
mercial, and educational ties with 
strategic regions. Both FMI and FCI 
administer competitive scholarship 
programs which allow students from 
Mexico and the Caribbean to at- 
tend any institution in the State Uni- 
versity System or the Community 
College System at the in-state rate. 

In June 1 995 the Summit of the 
Americas Center (SOAC) was cre- 
ated by the Florida legislature to re- 
search, analyze, and monitor the 
accords of the Summit of the Ameri- 
cas, with special attention given to 
Florida's role in hemispheric trade 
and commerce. Located within 
LACC, SOAC is a cooperative ven- 
ture among LACC, the University of 
Florida's Center for Latin American 
Studies, and the University of Mi- 
ami's North-South Center. 

Other LACC affiliated programs 
include the Cuban Research Insti- 
tute, the only academic center in 
the United States devoted exclu- 
sively to the study of Cuba and Cu- 
ban-Americans; and the 



Intercultural Dance and Music Insti- 
tute, which organizes regular semi- 
nars and performances by artists 
and scholars of the arts. 

LACC regularly places students in 
foreign study programs and local in- 
ternships. More information is avail- 
able in DM 353 University Park, 
348-2894. 



Lehman Center for 
Transportation Research 
(LCTR) 

The Lehman Center for Transporta- 
tion Research (LCTR) at Florida Inter- 
national University was established 
in 1993 in honor of Congressman Bill 
Lehman and his tireless efforts to 
make South Florida a better place 
for all of us. The center's vision is to 
become a strong 'state-of-the-art' 
transportation research and training 
facility. LCTR is committed to serve 
and benefit our society by conduct- 
ing research to improve mobility, 
hence the quality of life issues, de- 
velop partnerships in the transporta- 
tion industry, and educate a 
multidisciplinary workforce to plan, 
manage and implement transporta- 
tion systems. 

Faculty, staff and students at 
LCTR are involved in research re- 
lated to the design and operation 
of transportation systems, public pol- 
icy, air pollution, and the applica- 
tion of geographic information 
systems and other advanced tech- 
nologies such as artificial neural net- 
works and scientific visualization in 
transportation. Future plans include 
networking with the public and pri- 
vate industry to collaborate on trans- 
portation related research. In 
addition, applied research will be 
conducted on, but not limited to in- 
telligent vehicle and highway sys- 
tems. 



Center for Management 
Development 

The Center for Management Devel- 
opment, located in the College of 
Business Administration, was created 
by the Board of Regents in 1980. 
Contract Training: Management 
training and executive develop- 
ment programs are provided in the 
community and on campus. Pro- 
grams are created to meet the 
unique training needs of each cli- 
ent. Faculty/trainers use highly inter- 



active, practical, and industry-spe- 
cific activities aimed toward devel- 
oping job-related competencies. 
Certificates, Continuing Education 
Units (C.E.U.'s), and Nursing Contact 
Hours may be earned. 
Certificate Programs: Professionals 
who desire to advance their careers 
by upgrading their knowledge and 
skills will benefit from participating in 
the appropriate certificate pro- 
gram. Certificates may be earned in: 
Human Resource Administration 
Training & Human Resource 

Development 
Managing Quality Health Care 
Systems 
Technical Assistance and Consult- 
ation: The Center is a clearing house 
for matching a variety of faculty re- 
sources to complex and specialized 
needs of the community. It draws on 
a variety of disciplines in the College 
of Business Administration to serve 
the private and public sectors. 

The Center is located in BA 332, 
University Park Campus, (305) 348- 
4237. 



Manufacturing 
Research Center (MRC) 

The Manufacturing Research Center 
(MRC) is being developed with a 
grant from the Advanced Research 
Projects Administration and is a fully 
integrated manufacturing system 
from concept, through prototypy- 
ing, to finished hardware or manu- 
factured tool and die assemblies. 
With the rapid movement of industry 
to reduce time to market from prod- 
uct concept, the Center has been 
designed to support local industry in 
the South Florida region and pro- 
vide an environment for advance 
manufacturing research. The Center 
contains a design and rapid proto- 
typing front end. integrated into a 
CNC machining facility through to a 
back end injection molding ma- 
chine with injection mold fabrica- 
tion and part fabrication, both in 
plastic and metal by spin casting. 
The Center contains: a rapid proto- 
typing system, a mill-turn machining 
center, a vertical machining center, 
a coordinate measuring machine, a 
material handling system, and injec- 
tion molding equipment, supporting 
CAD/CAM and cell control software. 

Concurrent Engineering: Under 
the support of ARPA, the MRC has 
developed an integrated prod- 
uct/process concurrent engineering 
system. It is a feature-based engi- 



58 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



neering system for concurrent prod- 
uct and process design, and fo- 
cuses on the development of 
unified product information model, 
an innovative product modeling 
technique, a manufacturing re- 
sources database and various engi- 
neering applications to 
demonstrate the feasibility of the 
concurrent engineering concept. 

Production Planning & Schedul- 
ing: Funded by the Defense Logistic 
Agency, this project is to improve 
the practice of apparel production 
planning, scheduling, and control, 
with its focus on development and 
implementation of a practical com- 
puter integrated system for the ap- 
parel manufacturing industry. The 
system will accurately estimate time- 
phased plant capacity, generate 
production plans, prepare resource 
requirements, assign workers to 
workstations, respond to order in- 
quires and change, and control 
shop floor activities. It will be build 
upon an open system architecture 
with a set of production engineer- 
ing tools for master production plan- 
ning, capacity planning, learning 
and skill prediction, material require- 
ments planning, plant loading, 
worker assignment, and shop floor 
monitoring and control. 

Intelligent Cell Engineering and 
Control: The purpose of this re- 
search (funded by NSF) is to design 
and develop a neural network 
based decision support system for 
use in design and configuration of 
advanced manufacturing cells and 
cell control system. This project also 
explores an intelligent shop floor 
framework for on-line scheduling 
and control of flexible manufactur- 
ing systems. 

Knowledge-Based Data Screen- 
ing & Analysis for Shuttle Opera- 
tions: Sponsored by NASA, this 
project is to design and develop a 
knowledge-based tool for the shop 
floor modeling, analysis and report- 
ing. 



National Policy and 
Resource Center on 
Nutrition and Aging 

•Vision: reduce malnutrition and 
food insecurity and promote good 
nutritional practices among older 
adults. 

■Mission: work with the federal Ad- 
ministration on Aging (AoA) to pro- 
vide national leadership in Aging 
and Nutrition Networks; place food 



and nutrition services in the main- 
stream of home and community 
based social, health and long-term 
care delivery systems serving older 
individuals. 

The Center helps Elderly Nutrition 
Programs, the cornerstone of the 
Older Americans Act, improve their 
food and nutrition services, use re- 
sources more effectively, and 
adapt to changes in demograph- 
ics, health care and public policy. 
The Center works with the Admini- 
stration on Aging to assist the Aging 
Network that includes more than 
2200 local nutrition projects serving 
congregate and home delivered 
meals, 57 state and territory agen- 
cies on aging, 227+ tribal organiza- 
tions and 650+ area agencies on 
aging. The Center provides techni- 
cal training and conducts policy 
analysis and best practices re- 
search. With the rapidly increasing 
numbers of frail and homebound e- 
Iders, the Center is dedicated to (1) 
risk-based screening to identify the 
most nutritionally needy, (2) expan- 
sion of food and nutrition services in 
health and social service programs, 
and (3) linking food and nutrition 
services to home and community 
health care through multidiscipli- 
nary care management to improve 
quality of life, promote inde- 
pendence, and decrease early 
nursing home admissions and hospi- 
talizations. 

The Center can be reached at 
(305) 348-1517, fax (305) 438-1518, 
email: nutreldr ©fiu.edu or online 
http://www.fiu.edu/-nutrelder. 
Nancy S. Wellman, PhD, RD, FADA, 
Director; Dian O. Weddle, PhD, RD, 
FADA, Associate Director. 



Institute for Public 
Management and 
Community Service 

The Institute for Public Management 
and Community Service was re-es- 
tablished by the College of Urban 
and Public Affairs at Florida Interna- 
tional University in 1994. The Institute 
administers a multi-faceted munici- 
pal development and democratic 
institution-building project in South 
America through a grant from the 
United States Agency for Interna- 
tional Development. The project's 
primary focus is on Chile and Para- 
guay. In support of this project, the 
Institute has developed a close 
working partnership with the senior 
management of Metropolitan Dade 



County by drawing on their exper- 
tise and experience in local govern- 
ance issues. 

The project's Paraguayan pro- 
gram, its most elaborate compo- 
nent, involves activities at the 
national, departmental, and munici- 
pal levels of government with the 
goal of strengthening that country's 
young democratic institutions 
through a variety of strategies. The 
Institute is very much involved in 
helping Paraguayan policy makers 
identify means to promote govern- 
mental decentralization, citizen par- 
ticipation, and the enhancement of 
local government capacity. Project 
staff assist high-level Paraguayan of- 
ficials through resource identifica- 
tion and as advisors. 

The Institute has provided both fi- 
nancial and intellectual assistance 
to Chilean non-governmental or- 
ganizations and public officials 
through the funding of conferences 
and seminars on decentralization, 
privatization and municipal finance. 
Drawing on the wide-ranging exper- 
tise of scholars and practitioners 
across the Western Hemisphere, the 
Institute successfully provides edu- 
cational opportunities for the practi- 
tioners of local government in Latin 
America. 

Institute staff have published vari- 
ous articles and monographs, 
served as resources to visiting inter- 
national dignitaries to the Metropoli- 
tan Dade County area, have 
consulted around the world, and 
were active in the organization of 
the Summit of the Americas, held in 
Miami in 1994. 



Institute for Public 
Opinion Research 

The Institute for Public Opinion Re- 
search (IPOR), is a research arm of 
the School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication at Florida Interna- 
tional University. IPOR was founded 
in 1983 to provide decision makers 
with reliable and timely information 
on how a scientifically-selected sam- 
ple of the public stands on impor- 
tant issues, and to enhance the 
dialogue on major issues among de- 
cision makers, the media, and the 
people of Florida. IPOR provides pro- 
fessional services in all aspects of sur- 
vey research including study and 
sample design, questionnaire devel- 
opment, interviewing, data entry, 
data analysis, and report writing. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 59 



IPOR has conducted over 40 sur- 
veys, interviewing over 44,000 re- 
spondents. These projects include 
eight years of the FlU/Florida Poll, 
one of the most comprehensive 
public opinion surveys conducted in 
the country. The FlU/Florida Polls ask 
Floridians how they feel about the 
important issues facing them — crime 
and drugs, education, transporta- 
tion, health, taxes, politics, etc., and 
tracks these questions year after 
year to determine whether and how 
views are changing. 

IPOR studies include five needs 
assessment surveys of the elderly in 
Florida or Dade County. Two of 
these surveys, one of Dade County 
elderly and the other of Florida's eld- 
erly population, are the most com- 
prehensive surveys of their kind ever 
conducted, with the data providing 
critical information for planning the 
care of these groups into the next 
century. Other health-related re- 
search conducted by IPOR includes 
three cancer awareness and pre- 
vention/behavior surveys. 

Major IPOR surveys that are help- 
ing inform critical policy and devel- 
opment decisions include: a survey 
of over 5,000 Dade County residents 
on the issues of service delivery and 
incorporation which has provided in- 
formation critical to incorporation ef- 
forts of areas of unincorporated 
Dade County; two statewide sur- 
veys central to planning for the Flor- 
ida transportation system on 
Floridians attitudes and behaviors re- 
garding the state transportation sys- 
tem; two surveys on the effects of 
Hurricane Andrew that are being 
used to help disaster planning both 
locally and nationally; and two sur- 
veys of the residents of south Florida 
of their attitudes regarding police 
protection and crime that are help- 
ing guide the public safety planning 
in the region. 

Other surveys include a study to 
measure awareness, attitudes, and 
behavior regarding recycling; stud- 
ies of drug abuse in the workplace, 
the school age population, and in 
the general population in Dade 
County; several studies measuring 
public attitudes on international is- 
sues including the war with Iraq, and 
•U.S. policy toward the government 
in Cuba; and studies on parks and 
recreation, homelessness, taxation 
and spending, and labor issues. 

IPOR is constantly working with 
new technology and data sources 
to develop and test new sampling 
and interviewing methodologies. Us- 
ing new geographic information sys- 



tems technology, IPOR has worked 
with Dade County planners to pro- 
vide a sampling strategy for a field 
study of Dade County elderly living 
in areas most affected by Hurricane 
Andrew, and with Federal Emer- 
gency Management Agency(FEMA) 
and Florida's Bureau of Economic 
and Business Research to collect, 
manage, and analyze data on the 
effects of Hurricane Andrew on the 
population of South Dade. 

IPOR conducts its telephone polls 
from its phone research laboratory 
at the North Campus of FIU. All IPOR 
project personnel are well-paid pro- 
fessionals who are specially training 
for each project and who are moni- 
tored for adherence to IPOR's pro- 
cedures and guidelines. 

IPOR is located in ACII, Room 
301 . For more information call (305) 
919-5778; fax (305) 919-5242, or send 
e-mail to gladwin@servms.fiu.edu 



Institute for Public Policy 
and Citizenship Studies 

The Institute for Public Policy and Citi- 
zenship Studies was founded in 1985 
to offer students, faculty, and the 
community alternative learning op- 
portunities in public policy and citi- 
zenship development. Four key 
objectives have guided the Insti- 
tute's programs: 

1. To provide non-traditional edu- 
cational opportunities to the student 
body on the responsibilities and op- 
portunities of citizenship. 

2. To assist students and faculty in 
understanding the impact that pub- 
lic policy has on their daily lives and 
in their career pursuits. 

3. To promote interdisciplinary re- 
search efforts among faculty on lo- 
cal and national policy matters. 

4. To encourage joint university 
and community efforts on local pol- 
icy issues. 

The Institute sponsors the Student 
Honors Mentor Program, a semester- 
long opportunity for students to 
meet and interact with peers and 
faculty members from other aca- 
demic disciplines. The Mentor Pro- 
gram encourages participants to 
examine a public policy issue in a 
small group setting through discus- 
sions, research, or innovative pro- 
jects. In providing an alternative 
mode of learning, the Institute 
hopes to give students practical ex- 
perience in community decision- 
making and problem-solving. 



The Institute also sponsors and 
supports the annual Intergenera- 
tional Public Policy Summer Institute 
which teams elder civic activists 
with high school students, many of 
whom are at-risk. 

The Institute offers an interdiscipli- 
nary and practical approach to the 
study of public policy with its Certifi- 
cate Program in Public Policy Stud- 
ies. See 'Certificate Programs' for 
further information. 

The Institute also works in coop- 
eration with other FIU centers, includ- 
ing the Women's Studies Center, 
The Center on Aging, The Labor 
Center, and The Latin Ameri- 
can/Caribbean Center. 

In addition, the Institute sponsors 
conferences and events focusing 
on key policy issues that are salient 
within our local community. Nation- 
ally known speakers and University 
faculty are invited to present their re- 
search findings and perspectives on 
a variety of issues ranging from citi- 
zenship education in Dade County 
to the ethical implications of an ag- 
ing society to the impact of govern- 
ment regulations on the fishing 
industry. The conferences are de- 
signed to offer the public and univer- 
sity community additional resources 
in understanding the policy prob- 
lems that we, as a community, face 
on a daily basis. 

The Institute is located in LC 220, 
University Park, 348-2977. 



Small Business 
Development Center 

The Small Business Development 
Center (SBDC) is a program de- 
signed to provide comprehensive 
small business management and 
technical assistance to the small 
business community. The Center 
serves as a focal point for linking re- 
sources of the federal, state, and lo- 
cal governments with those 
resources of the University and the 
private sector. These resources are 
utilized to counsel and train small 
businesses in resolving start-up, or- 
ganizational, financial, marketing, 
technical, and other problems they 
might encounter. 

The Small Business Development 
Center is a basic services center. It 
disseminates business management 
information, performs financial 
analyses and management audits, 
assists in market and feasibility stud- 
ies, and provides business manage- 
ment counseling and training. 



60 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



In June 1980, the SBDC started 
actively fulfilling its mission to the 
small business community of greater 
Miami area by providing counseling 
services and training programs to 
the public. In the past year, the 
SBDC staff provided 6,459 people 
from the community with small busi- 
ness management training. Also, 
the Center counseled 2,724 persons 
in starting and managing their small 
businesses during the same period. 

The Center also attracts many cli- 
ents through its special services 
such as the International Trade Pro- 
gram and the Florida Energy Assis- 
tance Program. These services are 
designed to provide, respectively, 
counseling and training for export- 
ers/importers and reduction of en- 
ergy consumption and costs in 
small businesses. In addition, we pro- 
vide business assistance to the His- 
panic business community through 
the Hispanic Enterprise Develop- 
ment Program. 

The SBDC is actively involved in 
promoting community relations for 
the University through the activities 
of its staff with Chamber of Com- 
merce, trade associations, and 
community-based organizations. 
These activities include serving on 
committees and numerous speak- 
ing engagements. 

The Center is located in EAS 
building, room 2620, University Park, 
348-2272, HM 1 12 A & B, North Cam- 
pus, 919-5790, and 46 SW 1st Ave- 
nue, Dania, 987-0100. 



Southeast Florida Center 



on Aging 



The Southeast Florida Center on Ag- 
ing offers a multi-disciplinary pro- 
gram in gerontology with a unique 
public sector focus. It is the mission 
of the Center to serve as a focal 
point for applied public policy re- 
search; to design and implement 
comprehensive gerontological edu- 
cation and training programs for stu- 
dents, professionals and older 
learners; and to demonstrate con- 
cepts to serve older persons. The 
Center seeks to achieve its goals 
through a wide variety of educa- 
tional activities designed to further 
the pursuit of knowledge and under- 
standing about aging in today's so- 
ciety, with particular emphasis upon 
the development, implementation, 
and evaluation of public policy in 
Florida, the United States, and 
throughout Latin America and Car- 
ibbean. 



Objectives: The Center supports, 
sponsors, conducts, and partici- 
pates in a wide range of activities 
aimed at improving the quality of 
life for older people of South Florida. 
Pursuant to its mandate for educa- 
tion and training, research and corn; 
munity service, the Center is 
engaged in: 

1 . Development of gerontology 
education across disciplines 
throughout the University commu- 
nity. 

2. Expanded opportunities for 
training and professional develop- 
ment of persons working with or 
planning to work with older people. 

3. Aging research, with special 
emphasis on current and future pub- 
lic policy in the area of long term 
care. 

4. A wide range of lifelong learn- 
ing and educational opportunities 
for older people. 

5. Technical assistance and sup- 
port to public agencies and com- 
munity organizations aimed at 
improving the effectiveness of pro- 
grams for older people. 

The Center consists of three com- 
ponents: 

Research: Focus on applied public 
policy research, as well as promo- 
tion of research involving faculty 
from a variety of disciplines within 
the University. There is an emphasis 
on potential applications of re- 
search findings by policy makers 
and health and social services prac- 
titioners. 

Education and Training: Organiza- 
tion, in close collaboration with the 
academic departments, of credit 
and non-credit certificate programs 
for undergraduate and graduate 
students and for practitioners in the 
field of aging. Delivery of training 
seminars and workshops both at the 
University and at locations through- 
out Southeast Florida. 

The Elders Institute, a continuing 
education program, offers a broad 
array of continuing education 
courses for the older learner and is 
exploring development of addi- 
tional educational and cultural op- 
portunities for older persons. 
Program Development and Techni- 
cal Assistance: Design of innovative 
concepts and programs that further 
public policy objectives through ex- 
pansion of opportunities for older 
people and improvement of the de- 
livery of health and social services 
to them. The Center provides assis- 
tance and support for agencies 



and organizations serving older peo- 
ple throughout Florida. 

The Center is located in ACI 384, 
North Campus, 919-5550. 



Southern Technology 
Application Center STAC 

The Southern Technology Applica- 
tion Center (STAC) serves nine south- 
eastern states and is part of a 
national network of technology 
transfer resources and expertise. 
STAC's mission is to help increase 
U.S. competitiveness and spur eco- 
nomic development in the south- 
east through the transfer of critical 
knowledge. One of the programs 
STAC operates in the Southeast Re- 
gional Technology Transfer Center 
to help companies acquire and 
commercialize technology devel- 
oped by NASA and other federal 
laboratories. It provides assistance in 
every phase of technology develop- 
ment and commercialization. 
STAC's assistance spans from identi- 
fying and locating technologies, to 
analyzing markets, to bringing to- 
gether experts from government, 
academic and industry to address 
complex technical questions. STAC 
is supported by the State of Florida 
University System and NASA's Office 
of Space Access and Technology. 
Commercial Technology Division. 



Women's Studies Center 

The Women's Studies Center, estab- 
lished in 1982, is a university program 
with a multipurpose mission that fo- 
cuses on the development and co- 
ordination of academic women's 
studies courses and the support of 
research on gender. In addition, the 
center coordinates extracurricular 
programming on gender issues for 
faculty, staff, students, and the gen- 
eral community. 

The center offers a Bachelor of 
Arts degree in women's studies and 
a certificate program. The courses 
in women's studies provide an op- 
portunity for the study of the histori- 
cal, political, economic, literary, 
social, and cultural roles of women 
and of the function of gender in di- 
verse societies and cultures. The 
courses are coordinated through 
various university departments, and 
are open to women and men alike, 
as a balance to traditional educa- 
tion. In Women's Studies classes, stu- 
dents explore the range of 
women's experiences, from their 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 61 



struggle for equality to their contribu- 
tions in politics, history, literature, psy- 
chology, and other subjects. 
Through this rich discipline, sexual 
bias throughout society— in the work- 
place, in school, and at home— is 
analyzed through historical study 
and new theory. Equal importance 
is given to the commitment to dis- 
cover and teach ideas and knowl- 
edge about global concerns, 
nationality, race, ethnicity, class, 
age, and sexual identity. Students 
should refer to the Arts and Sciences 
women's studies section for degree 
and certificate details. 

The program is directed toward 
specialists and generalists alike. It of- 
fers a plan of study for students who 
wish to major in women's studies or 
earn a certificate in women's stud- 
ies, and it also welcomes students 
who wish to enroll in its courses as 
electives. 

The center fosters faculty re- 
search in Women's Studies through 
various means including a publica- 
tions series; research seminars; lec- 
ture series; and conferences, such 
as an annual Women's History 
Month Conference. 

In addition to coordinating aca- 
demic courses and research in 
Women's Studies, the program pro- 
vides a place and opportunity for 
extracurricular activity. The center 
offers reentry women's counseling, 
assistance on issues of inequality, 
and access to information on gen- 
der issues and concerns. The re- 
sources of the center are used by 
the academic and general commu- 
nity, and everyone is welcome to 
visit or inquire about out services. 

The center is located in DM 212, 
University Park, 348-2408. 



Florida's Statewide 
Course Numbering 
System 

Courses in this catalog are identified 
by prefixes and numbers that were 
assigned by Florida's Statewide 
Course Numbering System. This com- 
mon numbering system is used by all 
public postsecondary institutions in 
Florida and by two participating pri- 
vate institutions. The major purpose 
of this system is to facilitate the trans- 
fer of courses between participating 
institutions. 

Each participating institution con- 
trols the title, credit, and content of 
its own courses and assigns the first 
digit of the course number to indi- 
cate the level at which students nor- 
mally take the course. Course 
prefixes and the last three digits of 
the course numbers are assigned by 
members of faculty discipline com- 
mittees appointed for that purpose 
by the Florida Department of Educa- 
tion in Tallahassee. Individuals nomi- 
nated to serve on these committees 
are selected to maintain a repre- 
sentative balance as to type to insti- 
tution and discipline field or 
specialization. 

The course prefix and each digit 
in the course number have mean- 
ing in the Statewide Course Number- 
ing System (SCNS). The list of course 
prefixes and numbers, along with 
their generic titles, is referred to as 
the "SCNS taxonomy." Description 
of the content of courses are re- 
ferred to as "course equivalency 
profiles." 

General Rule for Course 
Equivalencies 

Equivalent courses at different institu- 
tions are identified by the same pre- 
fixes and same last three digits of 
the course number and are guaran- 
teed to be transferable between 
the participating institutions that of- 
fer the course, with a few excep- 
tions. (Exceptions are listed below). 
For example, a survey course in 
social problems is offered by 31 dif- 
ferent postsecondary institutions. 
Each institution uses "SYG-010" to 
identify its social problems course. 
The level code is the first digit and 
represents that year in which stu- 
dents normally take this course at a 
specific institution. In the SCNS tax- 
onomy, "SYG" means "Sociology, 
General," the century digit "0" repre- 
sents "Entry-Level General Sociol- 
ogy," the decade digit "V 
represents "Survey Course," and the 



unit digit "0" represents "Social Prob- 
lems." 

In science and other areas, a 
"C" or "L" after the course number is 
known as a lab indicator. The "C" 
represents a combined lecture and 
laboratory course that meets in the 
same place at the same time. The 
"L" represents a laboratory course 
or the laboratory part of a course, 
having the same prefix and course 
number without a lab indicator, 
which meets at a different time or 
place. 

Transfer of any successfully com- 
pleted course from one participat- 
ing institution to another is 
guaranteed in cases where the 
course to be transferred is offered 
by the receiving institution and is 
identified by the same prefix and 
last three digits at both institutions. 
For example, SYG 1010 is offered at 
a community college. The same 
course is offered at a state. university 
as SYG 2010. A student who has suc- 
cessfully completed SYG 1010 at the 
community college is guaranteed 
to receive transfer credit for SYG 
2010 at the state university if the stu- 
dent transfers. The student cannot 
be required to take SYG 2010 again 
since SYG 1010 is equivalent to SYG 
2010. Transfer credit must be 
awarded for successfully completed 
equivalent courses and used by the 
receiving institution to determine sat- 
isfaction of requirements by transfer 
students on the same basis as credit 
awarded to native students. It is the 
prerogative of the receiving institu- 
tion, however, to offer transfer credit 
for courses successfully completed 
which have not been designated as 
equivalent. 

Sometimes, as in Chemistry, a se- 
quence of one or more courses 
must be completed at the same in- 
stitutions in order for the courses to 
be transferable to another institu- 
tion, even if the course prefix and 
numbers are the same. This informa- 
tion is contained in the individual 
SCNS course equivalency profiles for 
each course in the sequence. 

The Course Prefix 

The course prefix is a three-letter des- 
ignator for a major division of an 
academic discipline, subject matter 
area, or sub-category of knowl- 
edge. The prefix is not intended to 
identify the department in which a 
course is offered. Rather, the con- 
tent of a course determines the as- 
signed prefix used to identify the 
course. 



62 /General Information Undergraduate Catalog 

Authority for Acceptance of 
Equivalent Courses 

State Board of Education Rule 6A- 
10.024(17), Florida Administrative 
Code, reads: 

When a student transfers among 
institutions that participate in the 
common course designation and 
numbering system, the receiving in- 
stitution shall award credit for 
courses satisfactorily completed at 
the previous participating institu- 
tions when the courses are judged 
by the appropriate common course 
designation and numbering system 
faculty task forces to be equivalent 
to courses offered at the receiving 
institution and are entered in the 
course numbering system. Credit so 
awarded can be used by transfer 
students to satisfy requirements in 
these institutions on the same basis 
as native students. 

Exceptions to the General Rule for 
Equivalency 

The following courses are excep- 
tions to the general rule for course 
equivalencies and may not be trans- 
ferable. Transferability is at the dis- 
cretion of the receiving institution: 

1 . Courses in the _900-_999 series 
(e.g., ART 2905) 

2. Internships, practical, clinical 
experiences, and study abroad 
courses 

3. Performance or studio, 
courses in Art, Dance, Theater, and 
Music 

4. Skills courses in Criminal Justice 

5. Graduate courses 

College preparatory and voca- 
tional preparatory courses may not 
be used to meet degree require- 
ments and are not transferable. 

Questions about the Statewide 
Course Numbering System and ap- 
peals regarding course credit trans- 
fer decisions should be directed to 
Lynette Housty in the Registrar's Of- 
fice at (305) 348-2320, or the Florida 
Department of Education, Office of 
Postsecondary Education Coordina- 
tion, 1 101 Florida Education Center, 
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400. Spe- 
cial reports and technical informa- 
tion may be requested by calling 
telephone number (904) 488-6402 or 
Suncom 278-6402. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information / 63 



Administration and Staff 



Office of the President 

President Modesto A. Maidique 

Inspector General Alfredo Acin 

Executive Assistant 
to the President Josefina Cagigal 

Academic Affairs 

Provost and 

Vice President James A. Mau 

Vice Provost of 

Academic Affairs Rosa L. Jones 
Vice President (Acting). 

Research and 

Graduate Studies Thomas A. Breslin 
Vice Provost, Planning 

and Institutional 

Research Sushil Gupta 

Chief Information Officer 

and Vice Provost 

Information Resource 

Management Arthur S. Gloster 
Vice Provost, 

Academic Budget 

and Personnel Judith A. Blucker 
Vice Provost, 

Enrollment 

Services Richard J. Correnti 

Vice Provost, 

International 

Studies Mark B. Rosenberg 

Assistant to the 

Provost Dennis Wiedman 

Dean, Graduate 

Studies Richard L. Campbell 

Dean, Undergraduate 

Studies Fernando Gonzalez-Reigosa 
Director, Instructional 

Media Services Blanca A. Riley 

Director, The Art 

Museum Dahlia Morgan 

Director, Computer 

Systems and 

Services Jacqueline M. Zellman 
Director, Division of 

Sponsored Research 

and Training, Catherine Thurman 
Director, SERDAC Frederick Koch 
Director (Acting), 

Telecommunications Blanca Riley 

Academic Deans 

Dean, College of Arts 

and Sciences Arthur W. Herriott 

Dean, College of 

Business 

Administration Harold E. Wyman 
Dean, College of 

Education I. Ira Goldenberg 



Dean, College of 

Engineering 

and Design Gordon R. Hopkins 

Dean (Acting), 

College of Health Judith A. Blucker 
Dean, School of 

Hospitality 

Management Anthony G. Marshall 
Dean, School of 

Journalism and Mass 

Communication J. Arthur Heise 
Dean, School of 

Nursing Linda A. Simunek 

Dean , College of 

Urban and 

Public Affairs Ronald M. Berkman 

Libraries 

Director Laurence A. Miller 

Associate Director Antonie B. Downs 

Assistant Director for 

Collection 

Development Salvador Miranda 
Assistant Director, 

Reader Services Sherry Carrillo 

Centers and Institutes 

Director, Center for 

Administration of Justice Luis Salas 
Director, Center for 

Accounting, Auditing, 

and Tax Studies Felix Pomeranz 
Director, Center for 

Advanced Technology 

and Education Malek Adjouadi 
Director, Center for 

Banking and Financial 

Institutions John S. Zdanowicz 

Director, Child and 

Family Psychosocial 

Research Center Wendy Silverman 
Director, Center for 

Economic 

Research and 

Education Jorge Salazar-Carrillo 
Director, Center for 

Educational 

Development Robert V. Farrell 

Director, Center for 

International Executive 

Education Harold E. Wyman 

Director. Center for 

Labor Research 

and Studies Guillermo J. Grenier 
Assistant Director, Center 

for Management 

Development Ellie Browner 

Director, Elders Institute Diane Otis 
Director, English 

Language Institute Luis Sanchez 



Associate Director, 

FA U-FIU Joint Center for 

Environmental and 

Urban Problems Thomas D. Wilson 
Director, Future Aerospace 

Science and Technology 

Center for 

Cryoelectronics Grover Larkins 

Director, FIU Institute 

of Government Milan J. Dluhy 

Director, Institute for 

Children and 

Families at Risk J. Scott Briar 

Director, Hemispheric 

Center for Environmental 

Technology M.A. Ebadian 

Director, Institute for 

Judaic Studies Stephen Fain 

Director, Institute for 

Public Management 

and Community 

Services Allan Rosenbaum 

Director, Lehman 

Transportation 

Research Center L. David Shen 

Director, Manufacturing 

Research 

Center Ching-Sheng Chen 

Director, Institute 

for Public Policy and 

Citizenship Studies John F. Stack 
Director, Institute for 

Public Opinion 

Research Hugh Gladwin 

Acting Executive Director, 

International 

Hurricane Center Thomas M. David 
Director, International 

Hurricane 

Center Stephen P. Leatherman 
Director Latin 

American and Caribbean 

Center Mark B. Rosenberg 

Director, National 

Center for Nutrition 

and Aging Nancy Wellman 

Director, Small Business 

Development 

Center Marvin Nesbit 

Executive Director. 

Southeast Florida 

Center on Aging Max B. Rothman 
Director. Southern 

Technology Application 

Center TBA 

Director, Women's Studies 

Center Marilyn Hoder-Salmon 



64 / General Information 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Business and Finance 

Vice President Cynthia W. Curry 

Director, Human Resources Val Berry 
Special Assistant to the Vice 

President and Director, 

Office of Continuous 

Improvement Mathew Altier 

Assistant Vice President, 

Budget/Planning Charles Tinder 
Assistant Vice President, 

Equal Opportunity 

Programs Toni Margulies-Eisner 
Counsel, Legal 

Services Thomas Santoro 

Director, Auxiliary 

Services, Parking 

and Traffic Juan Argudin 

Director (Acting), 

Controller's 

Office Andy Fornaguera 

Director, Environmental 

Health and 

Safety Jennifer Mwaisela 

Director, Facilities 

Management Victor Citarella 

Director, North Campus 

Business and 

Auxiliary Services Nicolas DiCiacco 
Director, Public 

Safety Jesse Campbell 

Director, Purchasing 

Services Judy Weech 



North Campus, 
Enrollment Services 

Vice President Richard J. Correnti 

Associate Vice President, 

Enrollment 

Management Thomas A. Syracuse 
Assistant Vice 

President, Elaine Gordon 

Director, North Campus 

Administration and 

Operations, TBA 

Director, 

Admissions Carmen A. Brown 

Director, Community 

College Relations Susan H. Lynch 
Director, Financial Aid Ana R. Sarasti 
University Registrar Lynette Housty 



University 

Advancement and 
Student Affairs 

Vice President Paul D. Gallagher 

Associate Vice President, 

Development Dale C. Webb 

Associate Vice President, 

Studen Affairs, 

North Campus Helen Ellison 

Associate Vice President, 

Minority Programs E. George Simms 
Assistant to the 

Vice President John A. Bonanno 
Executive Assistant Rod D. Lipscomb 
Associate Dean, Student 

Affairs (Acting) Larry Lunsford 

Associate Dean/ 

Director, Counseling 

Center Patricia Telles-lrvin 

Director, 

Alumni Affairs Eduardo Hondal 

Director, Development 

Communications Roger E. Wyman 
Director, Career Planning 

and Placement Olga Magnusen 
Director, Disability Services 

for Students Peter Manheimer 

Director, Graham 

University Center, 

University Park Ruth A. Hamilton 
Director, Wolfe University 

Center, North Campus M. Whit Hollis 
Director, Health and 

Wellness Center Robert Dollinger 
Director, 

Housing James R. Wassenaar, Jr 
Director, International 

Student and Scholar 

Services Ana Sippin 

Director, Minority 

Student Services, 

North Campus Robert Coatie 

Director, Recreational Sports, 

North Campus Gregory A. Olson 
Director, Upward 

Bound Sofia Santiesteban 



University Outreach 
and Intercollegiate 
Athletics 



Mary L. Pankowski 



Vice President 
Dean, University 

Outreach Robert B. Leiter 

Associate Dean, 

University 

Outreach J. Patrick Wagner 

Assistant Dean, 

Adminstration Rozalia W. Davis 



Director, Distance 
Learning, Cynthia Elliott 

Director, Kovens Conference 
Center and Conference 
Services, TBA 

Intercollegeiate Athletics 
and Campus Recreation 

Head Baseball Coach Danny Price 
Head Men 's Basketball 

Coach Shakey Rodriguez 

Head Women's Basketball 

Coach Cindy Russo 

Head Cross Country/ 

Track Coach Mike Becker 

Head Men's and Women's 

Golf Coach John A. Cusano 

Head Men's Soccer 

Coach Karl Kremser 

Head Women's Soccer 

Coach Everton Edwards 

Head Softball Coach TBA 

Head Men's Tennis 

Coach Peter Lehmann 

Head Women's 

Tennis Coach Ronnie Reis-Bemstein 
Head Volleyball 

Coach John Trojaniak 

Assistant Athletic Director, 

Campus Recreation 

Student Fitness Nathan Bliss 

Assistant Athletic Director, 

Compliance 

Student Fitness Tony O'Neal 

Assistant Athletic Director, 

Facilites Mary Alice Manella 

Assistant Athletic Director, 

Media Relations Rich Kelch 

Assistant Athletic Director, 

Marketing 

and Promotion James Husbands 



University Relations 

Associate Vice President, 

University Relations Steve Sauls 

Director of Government 

Relations Richard Candia 

Director, Media 

Relations TBA 

Director, Publications Terry Witherell 
Director, University 

Communications Todd Ellenberg 
Director, University 

Events Lane Coleman 



I Undergraduate Catalog /65 



College of Arts and 
Sciences 



66 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences fur- 
thers the study of fundamental intel- 
lectual disciplines, and serves the 
University's other Colleges and 
Schools. The College grants Bache- 
lor's, Master's, and Ph. D. degrees. 
In addition, the College serves stu- 
dents who need to complete gen- 
eral education and core curriculum 
requirements, and other require- 
ments, in order to enroll in specific 
disciplines or professional programs. 

The College is composed of 19 
departments, in addition to the 
School of Computer Science, the 
School of Music and several interdis- 
ciplinary programs. 

Undergraduate Programs 

The College offers departmental 
programs of study leading to Bache- 
lor's degrees in biological sciences, 
chemistry, computer science, 
dance, economics, English, environ- 
mental studies, geology, history, in- 
ternational relations, mathematical 
sciences, mathematics, modern lan- 
guages (French, German, Portu- 
guese, and Spanish), music, 
philosophy, physics, political sci- 
ence, psychology, religious studies, 
sociology and anthropology, statis- 
tics, theatre, and visual arts. The Col- 
lege also offers interdisciplinary 
programs of study leading to Bache- 
lor's degrees in humanities, liberal 
studies and women's studies. A la- 
bor studies concentration is avail- 
able in the liberal studies program. 

Minor programs of study are of- 
fered in art history, biology, chemis- 
try, computer science, dance, 
economics, English, French lan- 
guage and culture, general transla- 
tion studies, geology, geography, 
history, humanities, international re- 
lations, mathematical sciences, 
mathematics, music, philosophy, 
physics, political science, Portu- 
guese, psychology, religious studies, 
sociology and anthropology, Span- 
ish language and culture, statistics, 
theatre, and visual arts. 

Certificate Programs 

Students can earn through the Col- 
lege certificates in: Actuarial Stud- 
ies, African-New World Studies, 
American Studies, Consumer Affairs, 
Environmental Studies, Ethnic Stud- 
ies, Gerontological Studies, Interna- 
tional Studies, Labor Studies, Labor 
Studies and Labor Relations, Latin 
American and Caribbean Studies, 
Law, Ethics and Society, Legal Trans- 



lation and Court Interpreting, Linguis- 
tic Studies, Translation Studies, Tropi- 
cal Commercial Botany, Western 
Social and Political Thought, and 
Women's Studies. 

Admission 

FIU freshmen and sophomore stu- 
dents may be coded with an "in- 
tended" major in the College upon 
earning 24 semester hours. 

They may be fully admitted to 
the College if they have earned 60 
semester hours, have a cumulative 
grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 
and have passed the CLAST. Full ad- 
mission to the College is accom- 
plished by filing the form "Request 
for Acceptance into Upper Division 
College/School". 

A transfer student with an Associ- 
ate in Arts degree from a Florida 
community college, or having com- 
pleted the equivalent coursework 
at a four year institution with a mini- 
mum of 60 semester hours earned, 
having a cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) of 2.0 and having 
passed the CLAST, may be admit- 
ted to a program in the College. 
Applicants must submit an Applica- 
tion for Admission to the University 
and must follow the regular Univer- 
sity procedures. Applicants must be 
eligible for admission to the Univer- 
sity before admission to the Col- 
lege. 

All students are encouraged to 
seek advising as early as possible in 
the department/program of their 
choice, even if they have not yet 
been fully admitted into that major. 

College Requirements for a 
Baccalaureate Degree 

Candidates to the Bachelor's de- 
gree must satisfy individual depart- 
mental requirements, and the 
following College requirements, in 
addition to the University-wide re- 
quirements: 

1. A minimum of 120 semester 
hours in acceptable coursework is 
required. 

2. At least half of the upper divi- 
sion credits in any major must have 
been taken in residence at the Uni- 
versity. 

3. In the last 60 semester hours of 
enrollment, the student must earn 
nine semester hours of elective 
credits through coursework outside 
the major; six of which are to be 



taken outside the department spon- 
soring the program. 

4. Earn a grade of "C" or higher 
in all courses required for the major. 
A grade of "C-" or lower is not ac- 
ceptable in any required course. 

5. Of the total number of hours 
submitted for graduation, a mini- 
mum of 50 semester hours must be 
in upper division courses. Addition- 
ally, the student may submit, with 
departmental approval, up to ten 
semester hours of lower division 
courses taken at the University. 

College Requirements for a 
Minor 

Students who desire to earn a minor 
must satisfy individual departmen- 
tal/program requirements, and the 
following College requirements: 

1 . At least half of the courses 
used to fulfill the requirements must 
have been taken at the University. 

2. Earn a grade of "C" or higher 
in all courses required for the minor. 
A grade of "C-" or lower is not ac- 
ceptable in any required course. 

3. Of the courses used to fulfill 
the requirements, at least half of 
them must be at the upper division 
level and preferably should include 
a minimum of one course at the 
4000 level. 

Note: The programs, policies, re- 
quirements, and regulations listed in 
this catalog are continually subject 
to review in order to serve the 
needs of the University's various pub- 
lics and to respond to the man- 
dates of the Florida Board of 
Regents and the Florida Legislature. 
Changes may be made without ad- 
vance notice. Please refer to the 
General Information section for the 
University's policies, requirements, 
and regulations. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 67 



Biological Sciences 

Kelsey Downum, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Victor Apanius, Assistant Professor 
Brad Bennett, Assistant Professor 
Charles Bigger, Associate Professor 
Richard Campbell, Research 

Scientist 
Chun-fan Chen, Associate Professor 
Dan Childers, Assistant Professor 
Tim Collins, Assistant Professor 
Keith Condon, Assistant Professor 
Leon A. Cuervo, Professor 
George H. Dalrymple, Associate 

Professor 
Maureen Donnelly, Assistant 

Professor 
James Fourqurean, Assistant 

Professor 
Brian Fry, Associate Professor 
Robert M. George, Lecturer 
Walter M. Goldberg, Professor 
Jack B. Fisher, Research Scientist 
Rene J. Herrera, Associate Professor 
Ronald D. Jones, Professor 
Christopher Kernan, Research 

Scientist 
Suzanne Koptur, Associate Professor 
David N. Kuhn, Associate Professor 

and Graduate Program Director 
David W. Lee, Professor 
John Makemson, Professor 
Gerald L. Murison, Professor 
Steven F. Oberbauer, Associate 

Professor 
Case K. Okubo, Associate Professor 

and Head Undergraduate 

Advisor 
Thomas R. Pitzer, instructor 
Thomas E. Pliske, Lecturer 
L. Scott Quackenbush, Associate 
Professor 

Jennifer Richards, Professor 
Laurie L. Richardson, Associate 

Professor 
Barbra A. Roller, Lecturer 
Philip Stoddard, Assistant Professor 
Martin L. Tracey, Professor 
Joel Trexler, Associate Professor 
Ophelia I. Weeks, Associate 

Professor 
Scott Zona, Research Scientist 

Bachelor of Science 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

General Science Requirements 
Lower Division 

Common Prerequisites 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 
BSC 1010L General Biology I Lab 
BSC 1011 General Biology II 



BSC 101 1L 
CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 

CHM 1046 
CHM 1046L 

CHM 2210 
CHM2210L 

CHM 2211 

CHM2211L 



General Biology II Lab 
General Chemistry I 
General Chemistry I 
Lab 

General Chemistry II 
General Chemisry II 
Lab 

Organic Chemistry I 
Organic Chemisry I 
Lab 

Organic Chemistry II 
Organic Chemisry II 
Lab 
or 

Physics with Calculus I 
Physics with Calculus I 
Lab 

Physics with Calculus II 
Physics with Calculus II 
Lab 
or 

Physics without 
Calculus I 
Physics without 
Calculus I Lab 
Physics without 
Calculus II 
Physics without 
Calculus II Lab 
Calculus I 
Calculus II 
or 
STA2122 Intro to Statistics I 

Required Courses 

Six semester hours of lectures and 
two semesters of laboratories in 
each of the following areas: general 
biology, general chemistry, general 
physics and organic chemistry; Cal- 
culus I and II or Statistics I and II. 
(Note: Calculus I and Statistics I to- 
gether do not satisfy this require- 
ment). Grade 'C or better required. 

Recommended Courses 

Foreign language. Two semesters of 
language. 

To qualify for admission to the de- 
partment, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable to the de- 
partment. 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

1.PCB3043 Ecology 3 

2. PCB3513 Genetics 3 

3. BCH 3033+L General 

Biochemistry 5 



PHY 2048 
PHY 2048L 



PHY 2049 
PHY 2049L 



PHY 2053 
PHY 2053L 
PHY 2054 
PHY 2054L 

MAC X31 1 

MACx312 



PCB3203+L Cell Physiology 4 

or 
PCB 4723+L Animal Physiology 4 

or 
BOT 4504+L Plant Physiology 4 

or 
MCB 4404+L Microbial Physiology 4 

or 
PCB4724+L Comparative 

Physiology 4 

4. BSC 4931 Undergraduate 

Seminar 1 

5. Biology Electives 1 

5 courses (min) 14 

6. Laboratory Requirement 2 4 Labs 

7. Electives outside major 9 
'Five upper division lecture courses 
(3000-level and above) to be cho- 
sen in consultation with a faculty ad- 
visor. The following courses are not 
allowed as Biology Electives: Stu- 
dent Research Labs (BSC 3915,4919, 
and 6916); Cooperative Education 
credits (BSC 3949 and 4949); Biology 
of Aging (PCB 3241); and courses for 
non-science majors (BOT 1010, PCB 
2700 and APB 2170, BSC 2023, EVR 
3013, and OCB 2003). 
laboratory requirement is met with 
any four upper division Biology labs 
either from PCB 3043, 3513, or from 
any of the lab electives. This does 
not include the lab in requirement 3. 

Students interested in teacher 
certification should contact the Col- 
lege of Education at 348-2721. 

Special Programs 

Bachelor of Science with 
Honors 

Admission to the Program 

a. Permission of the department. 
Application should be made by let- 
ter to the Curriculum Committee 
from the applicant after completion 
of two semesters at the University 
and prior to two semesters before 
graduation. The letter should state 
the intended research problem and 
be countersigned by the Thesis Com- 
mittee (advisor and mentor). 

b. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in biol- 
ogy, chemistry, physics, geology, 
and mathematics courses. 

Graduation Requirements 

a. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in biol- 
ogy, chemistry, physics, geology, 
and mathematics courses. 

b. Completion of the BS require- 
ments in Biology and Honors Re- 
search (BSC 4015, 1 to 3 credits, and 
Honors Thesis (BSC 4974, 1 credit). 



68 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



c. Completion of Honors re- 
search in collaboration with a two- 
person Honors Committee, consisting 
of the honors advisor and one other 
member. The honors advisor must be 
a tenured or tenure-earning member 
of the department. The research re- 
sults must be written in the form of an 
honors thesis and approved by the 
Honors Committee. 

d. Deposit two completed ap- 
proved copies of the Honors Thesis 
with the Department's Office: one 
copy to be kept in the department 
and the other to be deposited in 
the Library. 

e. Presentation of the results of 
the Honors Research in a depart- 
mental seminar. 

Minor in Biology 
Required Courses 

BSC 1010 and BSC 101 1 with labs, 
and three additional biology 
courses, one of which must include 
a lab and one must be at the 4000- 
level or higher. Minimum credits be- 
yond BSC 1010 and BSC 1011 with 
labs are 10 credits. Grades of 'C or 
better required for all courses and 
lab. 

Pre-Medical, Dental, 

Optometry, and Veterinary 

Curricula 

Students who have fulfilled the re- 
quirements for the BS in Biology will 
also have satisfied the course re- 
quirements for admission to the 
above mentioned professional 
schools. Some professional schools 
may have additional course require- 
ments. Interested students should 
consult a Pre-Medical Advisor for ar- 
ranging a curriculum to enhance 
their potential to gain admission. 

Accelerated Combined Degree 
Programs 

Seven-Year Programs for BS/DO, 
BS/DPM and BS/DMD 

1. BS in Biology/DO (Bachelor of 
Science in Biology-FIU/Doctor of Os- 
teopathy-College of Osteopathic 
Medicine, Southeastern University of 
the Health Sciences). 

2. BS In Blology/DPM (Bachelor of 
Science In Biology-FIU/Doctor of Pe- 
diatric Medicine-School of Podiatric 
Medicine, Barry University). 

3. BS in Biology/DMD (Bachelor 
of Science in Biology-FIU/Doctor of 
Dental Medicine-College of Den- 
tistry, University of Florida). 



Seven-Year Accelerated 
Combined Degree Programs 

The Department of Biological Sci- 
ences at Florida International Univer- 
sity and the College of Osteopathic 
Medicine, Southeastern University, 
the School of Podiatric Medicine, 
Barry University and the College of 
Dentistry, University of Florida offer 
combined degree programs de- 
signed to integrate the undergradu- 
ate and the medical curricula in 
seven years instead of the tradi- 
tional eight years, while maintaining 
the quality of both the undergradu- 
ate and the medical education. The 
accepted qualified students are ad- 
mitted to the FIU Biology Program 
and receive provisional early accep- 
tance to the medical program at 
the time they are entering FIU. These 
programs give the students the op- 
portunity to concentrate on a com- 
prehensive undergraduate liberal 
arts education around rigorous core 
and science curricula. During the 
first two years at FIU, students com- 
plete the general core courses and 
basic science requirements. The 
third academic year is spent in tak- 
ing advanced courses to fulfill the re- 
quirements for the Bachelor of 
Science in Biology. After completing 
the third year curriculum at FIU, the 
students enter the medical program 
to receive the traditional four year 
medical education. Satisfactory 
completion of the basic medical sci- 
ence courses at the medical school 
will permit the students to earn 30 
credit hours toward the BS degree in 
Biology. For further information con- 
tact Dr. C. F. Chen at 348-3509. 

Certificate Program in 

Tropical Commercial Botany 

See section on certificate programs 
under College of Arts and Sciences. 



Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories should be taken 
concurrently with or subsequent to 
lectures. Students should register for 
each separately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

APB - Applied Biology; BCH - Bio- 
chemistry; BOT - Botany; BSC - Intro- 
ductory Biology; MCB - Microbiology; 
OCB - Oceanography (Biological); 
PCB - Process Cell Biology; ZOO - Zo- 
ology. 

APB 2170 Introductory Microbiology 

(3) 

APB 2170L Introductory Micro Lab 

(1). Basic concepts of microbes as 

pathogens, food spoilage and fer- 



mentative organisms. Microbial rela- 
tionships to immunology, sanitation, 
pollution and geochemical cycling. 
Not applicable for majors in Biologi- 
cal Sciences or Medical Laboratory 
Sciences. (Lab fees assessed) (S) 

BCH 3033 General Biochemistry (4) 
BCH 3033L Biochemistry Lab (1). 

Chemistry of proteins, lipids, carbo- 
hydrates, and nucleic acids; princi- 
ples of enzymology, metabolism, 
and bioenergetics. Prerequisite; 
CHM2211 and BSC 1010. (F) 

BCH 4034 General Biochemistry II 
(3). Protein synthesis and structure, 
nucleic acid synthesis and structure, 
protein-protein and protein-nucleic 
acid interactions, membrane struc- 
ture, signal transduction, and meta- 
bolic regulation. Prerequisite: BCH 
3033. 

BCH 5134C Workshop in Chromatog- 
raphy Techniques (1). Workshop 
covers the theory and practice of 
chromatographic techniques to 
separate complex mixtures of bio- 
molecules, including absorption, ion 
exchange, size exclusion and affinity 
chromatography. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status. (S) 

BCH 5280 Bioenergetics (3). The rela- 
tionship of thermodynamics to living 
processes; energy transduction, en- 
zymes in coupled systems. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

BCH 541 1C Techniques in Molecular 
Evolution Research (5). Ribosomal 
genes from related organisms are 
amplified by polymerase chain reac- 
tion (PCR) and sequenced. Phyloge- 
netic maps are made by computer 
from sequence data. Students may 
use material from their own re- 
search. Prerequisites: BCH 3033 and 
Lab, PCB 4524 and Lab or Graduate 
Status. 

BOT 1010 Introductory Botany (3). 
BOT 1010L Introductory Botany Lab 
(1). A history of mankind's study and 
use of plants, and a survey of plants 
of economic importance. Includes 
lab. No science prerequisite. (Lab 
fees assessed) (S) 

BOT 2153C Local Flora (2). Labora- 
tory observation of the gross fea- 
tures of vascular plants and 
practice in the use of keys for identi- 
fication. Basic ecology of principle 
plant communities of Southern Flor- 
ida. Field trips. 

BOT 3014 Plant Life Histories (3). 

Plant form, function, and reproduc- 
tion: the lives of algae, fungi, bryo- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 69 



phtes, ferns, gymnosprerms, and 
flowering plants. This course is de- 
signed for majors and certificate stu- 
dents. Prerequisites: A course in 
General Biology or permission of in- 
structor. Corequisite: BOT3014L 

BOT 3014L Plant Life Histories Labora- 
tory (1). Laboratory to accompany 
Plant Life Histories. Students examine 
living and preserved material in the 
lab and outdoors. Plants examined 
at all levels of complexity. Prereq- 
uisites: A course in General Biology 
or permission of instructor. Corequi- 
site: BOT 3014. • • 

BOT 3153L Local Flora Lab (2). Intro- 
duction to the taxonomy and ecol- 
ogy of common native, cultivated, 
and exotic plant species in southern 
Florida. Prerequisites: BOT 1010, BSC 
1010, or equivalent. Corequisite: BOT 
2153. 

BOT 3353 Morphology of Vascular 
Plants (3). 

BOT 3353L Morphology of Vascular 
Plants Lab (1). Origin and evolution 
of plants, especially vascular plants 
of tropical origin. Analysis of vascu- 
lar plant anatomy and morphology, 
emphasizing the underlying princi- 
ples of plant construction. Prereq- 
uisite: A course in General Biology or 
permission of instructor. (F) 

BOT 3434 Mycology (3) 
BOT 3434L Mycology Lab (1). An in- 
troduction to the taxonomy, genet- 
ics, and physiology of fungi with 
special emphasis on commercially 
important fungi and plant and ani- 
mal pathogenic fungi. Prerequisites: 
Two semesters of General Biology, 
BSC 1010 and BSC 1011. (F) 

BOT 3663 Tropical Botany (3) 
BOT 3663L (1). How environmental 
factors affect the distribution of vege- 
tation, and the morphology and 
physiology of plants in the tropics. Em- 
phasis on tropical plants of economic 
importance. Prerequisites: BSC 1011 
or equivalent, concurrent registration 
in lab required. (F) 

BOT 3810 Economic Botany (3). The 

origins, domestication and uses of 
economically important plants. Pre- 
requisites: BSC 1010, BOT 1010 or 
equivalent. 

BOT 4374 Plant Development (3). 
BOT 4374L Plant Development Lab 
(1). The development of vascular 
plants, with emphasis on experimen- 
tal approaches to plant anatomy, 
morphology, and reproduction. 
Practical instruction in tissue and or- 



gan culture. Prerequisites: BOT 4504 
or permission of instructor. 

BOT 4404 Phycology (3). 
BOT 4404L Phycology Lab (1). The bi- 
ology of marine and freshwater al- 
gae, with an emphasis on structure, 
function, reproduction, classifica- 
tion, and ecology. (F) 

BOT 4504 Plant Physiology (3) 
BOT 4504L Plant Physiology Lab (1). 

Plant growth and metabolism in rela- 
tionship to environment. Photobiol- 
ogy, nutrient relations, transport, 
and hormones in relation to plant 
development and function. Prereq- 
uisite: Organic Chemistry I. (F) 

BOT 4723 Taxonomy of Tropical 
Plants (3). Introduction to higher 
plant taxonomy, including nomencla- 
ture, modern systems of angiosperm 
classification, and angiosperm evolu- 
tion. Emphasis on identification of 
tropical plant families and plants of 
economic importance. Course in- 
cludes lab. Prerequisite: A course in 
General Biology. 

BOT 4723L Taxonomy of Tropical 
Plants Lab (1). Field, herbarium, and 
laboratory exercises relating to the 
description, identificaiton, nomen- 
clature, classification, and phyto- 
geny of tropical plants. Prerequisites: 
BOT 3153L, BOT 3663L, or permission 
of instructor. Corequisite: BOT 4723. 

BOT 5406 Algal Physiology (3). Physi- 
ology and metabolism of eukaryotic 
algae, including ecological aspects 
of the aquatic environment and al- 
gal roles in aquatic biogeochemical 
cycling. Prerequisites: BOT 4405, 1 
year of chemistry or consent of in- 
structor. (S) 

BOT 5515 Biochemistry of Plant Natu- 
ral Products (3). Aspects of primary 
and secondary plant metabolism 
will be covered including biosynthe- 
sis and degradation of natural prod- 
ucts as well as their biological/ 
pharmacological activity. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 221 1 or BCH 3033. (S) 

BOT 5575 Photobiology (3) 

BOT 5575L Photobiology Lab (1). The 

study of basic photochemical 
mechanisms as they occur in mo- 
lecular biological processes such as 
photosynthesis, plant growth, animal 
vision, bioluminescence, and radia- 
tion damage. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

BOT 5602 The Functional Ecology of 
Tropical Plants (3). 
BOT 5602L The Functional Ecology of 
Tropical Plants Lab (1). The relation- 



ship of climate and soils to the distri- 
bution and function of the major 
plant groups of the tropical regions. 
Prerequisites: Two courses in botany 
or permission of instructor. 

BOT 5605 Plant Ecology (3). In-depth 
study of plant ecology at 3 levels: in- 
dividual, population, and commu- 
nity. Laboratory and field exercises 
will examine lecture topics. Includes 
tab. 

BOT 5605L Plant Ecology Lab (1). 

Field and lab exercises will examine 
plant ecology of individuals, popula- 
tions, and communities. Prereq- 
uisites: BSC 3043, or permission of 
instructor. Corequisite: BOT 5605. 

BOT 5606 Ethnobotany (3). Review 
the use and management of plants 
by indigenous people. Discuss 
emerging theories in ethnobotany, 
examine the role of ethnobotany in 
conservation and resource utiliza- 
tion. Prerequisites: BOT 3810, BOT 
3723, or ANT 3403, or permission of in- 
structor. (F) 

BOT 5647 Ecology of Marine Vascu- 
lar Plants (3). Biology and ecology 
of seagrasses and mangroves, with 
an emphasis on South Florida and 
Caribbean species. Physiological 
ecology, population and commu- 
nity ecology, and ecosystem proc- 
esses. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

BOT 5648 Workshop on Aquatic 
Plants (1). Biology and identification 
of aquatic plants. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

BOT 5682C Florida Plant Communi- 
ties (3). Two-week field trip to many 
diverse plant communities of the 
state. Ecological and environmental 
factors influencing plant distribution 
will be examined, contrasting vege- 
tation among sites. Prerequisites: 
BSC 1011, BSC 3043 or permission of 
instructor. 

BOT 5816L Ethnobotany Workshop 
(1). Field methods in the study of 
plant use by traditional and modern 
societies. Examines botanical docu- 
mentation, ethnological description 
and experimental design. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

BOT 5924 Workshop in Tropical Fami- 
lies (3). An introduction to important 
spermatophyte families, including 
systematics, ecology, and conserva- 
tion. Includes laboratory and field 
experience. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 



70 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



BOT 5925 Workshop in the Biology of 
Southern Florida's Native Trees (3). 

Distribution, floristic relationships, 
morphology, reproductive biology, 
taxonomy, and conservation of 
trees native to southern Florida. Pre- 
requisites: BOT 2153, BOT 3723. or per- 
mission of instructor. 

BSC 1010 General Biology I (3) 
BSC 1010L General Biology Lab (1). 

Biomolecules, cells, energy flow, ge- 
netics, and physiology. Science 
background or Biology major recom- 
mended. (Lab fees assessed) (F,SS) 

BSC 101 1 General Biology II (3) 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab (1). 

A survey of organismal biology with 
emphasis on botany, and zoology. 
Science background or Biology ma- 
jor recommended. (Lab fees as- 
sessed) (S,SS) 

BSC 2023 Human Biology (3) 

BSC 2023L Human Biology Lab (1). 

Biological and general scientific prin- 
ciples governing human structure, 
function, health, and relationship to 
the planetary environment. For non- 
science majors. (Lab fees assessed) 

BSC 3915, 4914 Student Research 
Lab (1-12). Independent laboratory 
study in a project or projects of the 
student's choice. Registration by 
consultation with instructor. May be 
repeated for additional credit. 

BSC 3949, 4949 Cooperative Educa- 
tion in Biology (1-3). A student ma- 
joring in biological sciences may 
spend several terms employed in in- 
dustry or government in a capacity 
relating to the major. Prerequisites: 
Permission of Co-op Education and 
major department. 

BSC 4401 Biotechnology: Applica- 
tions in Industry, Agriculture and 
Medicine (3). Biological, biochemi- 
cal, ecological, engineering, en- 
trepreneurial, and ethical aspects of 
biotechnology in industry, agricul- 
ture, and medicine. 

BSC 4915L Honors Research (1-3). 

Laboratory and/or field study in con- 
sultation with an Honors Thesis advi- 
sor. Prerequisite: Science and Math 
GPA3.5. 

BSC 4931 Undergraduate Seminar 

(1). An exploration of various re- 
search works in biological sciences. 
Oral presentation by the students re- 
quired. 

BSC 4934 Topics in Biology (1-3). An 

intensive study of a particular topic 



or limited number of topics not oth- 
erwise offered in the curriculum. 

BSC 4974 Honors Thesis (1). Writing 
an Honors Thesis. Prerequisite: BSC 
4915. 

BSC 5596C Environmental Instrumen- 
tation (3). Theory and techniques for 
measurement of environmental pa- 
rameters of interest to field biologist. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

BSC 5825 Wildlife Biology (3). The 

study of game and non-game wild- 
life with emphasis on management 
and population regulation. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

BSC 5927 Graduate Bioresource 
Workshop (1). This workshop is de- 
signed to introduce Biology gradu- 
ate students to the various resources 
available for graduate teaching 
and research. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

BSC 5936 Glaser Seminar: The Biol- 
ogy of Tomorrow (1). A series of lec- 
tures by an invited, internationally 
recognized authority in biological 
topics of current and future con- 
cern. (S) 

ENY 1004 General Entomology (3) 
ENY 1004L Entomology Lab (1). The 

morphology, systematics, physiology 
and ecology of the major insect or- 
ders, and introduction to basic field 
procedures. Prerequisite: BSC 1011. 
(S) 

ENY 4060 Advanced Entomology 
(3). Explorations of the morphology, 
physiology, behavior arrd metabo- 
lism of insects in the context of their 
evolutionary, environmental and 
economic significance. Prerequisite: 
BSC 1010, BSC 1011, or permission of 
the instructor. 

ENY Advanced Entomology Labora- 
tory (1). Detailed studies of insect 
morphology, systematics and field 
population dynamics and behavior. 
Prerequisites: BSC 1010. BSC 1011, or 
permission of instructor. 

MCB 3023 General Microbiology (3) 
MCB 3023L General Microbiology 
Lab (1). introduction to the princi- 
ples and techniques of microbiology, 
genetics, taxonomy, biochemistry 
and ecology of microorganisms. Pre- 
requisites: Organic Chemistry I and II; 
General Biology I and II; or permission 
of instructor. (S) 

MCB 4203 Microbial Pathogenicity (3) 
MCB 4203L Microbial Path Lab (1). 

Host-parasite relationships: physiol- 
ogy of bacterial, fungal and viral 



pathogens emphasizing mecha- 
nisms of pathogenicity and the host 
response. Prerequisites: MCB 3023 

MCB 4404 Microbial Physiology (3) 
MCB 4404L Microbial Physiology Lab 
(1). Introduction to the study of 
physiological and metabolic activi- 
ties of microorganisms and proc- 
esses that affect them. Prerequisite: 
MCB 3023, MCB 3023L (S) 

MCB 4603 Microbial Ecology (3) 
MCB 4603L Microbial Ecology Lab 
(1). Principles and applications of mi- 
crobial interactions with the environ- 
ment: physical, chemical, and 
biological. Prerequisite: MCB 3023. 
MCB 3023L 

MCB 4653 Applied and Food Micro- 
biology (3). 

MCB 4653L Applied and Food Micro- 
biology Lab (1). Public Health micro- 
biology of water and sewage, 
microbiology of food preparation 
and spoilage; industrial aspects of 
microbiology. Prerequisite: MCB 
3023. MCB 3023L 

MCB 5114 Microbial Diversity (3). 

Analysis of metabolic and morpho- 
logical diversity in bacteria in the 
context of bacterial systematics. Pre- 
requisites: MCB 3023 and MCB 
3023L; additional course in microbiol- 
ogy or biochemistry. Corequisite: 
MCB 5996L. 

MCB 51 14L Microbial Diversity Labo- 
ratory (1). Laboratory to accom- 
pany Microbial Diversity lecture. 
Prerequisites MCB 3023 and MCB 
3023L; additional course in Microbiol- 
ogy or Biochemistry. Corequisite: 
MCB 5996. 

MCB 5405 Biology of Photosynthetic 
Bacteria (3). 

MCB 5405L Biology of Photosyn- 
thetic Bacteria Lab (1). Study of the 
physiology and ecology of photo- 
synthetic bacteria, including Blue- 
green algae (cyanobacteria), 
purple and green bacteria, and Ha- 
lobacteria. 

MCB 5505 Virology (3) 
MCB 5505L Virology Lab (1). Princi- 
ples and methods of study of bacte- 
rial, plant, and animal viruses. 
Molecular aspects of viral develop- 
ment, virus pathogens, and carcino- 
gens. Prerequisites: Biochemistry, 
Genetics, and Organic Chemistry. 

OCB 2003 Introductory Marine 
Biology (3) 

OCB 2003L Introductory Marine 
Biology Lab (1). A survey of marine 
biological environments and zones. 



Undergraduote Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 71 



including the relationship of the 
physical and chemical environment 
to the distribution of marine plants 
and animals. (Lab fees assessed) (F) 

OCB 3043 Marine Biology and 
Oceanography (3). 
OCB 3043L Marine Biology and 
Oceanography Laboratory (1). An 

ecological approach to the biology 
of organisms in the marine environ- 
ment with an emphasis on zonation 
and adaptation to the physical envi- 
ronment. Intended for biology ma- 
jors or other science majors. 
Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and BSC 
101 1 or equivalent. (S) 

OCB 3264 Biology of Coral Reefs (3). 

Biology of reef animals and reef 
ecology: emphasis on Florida and 
Caribbean reefs. Classroom instruc- 
tion and observation of coral reef 
and turtle grass communities. Prereq- 
uisites: BSC 101 1 and scuba certifica- 
tion. 

OCB 5634 Marine Ecology (3). Re- 
view of processes determining spe- 
cies distribution and abundance in 
marine ecosystems. Energy flow and 
trophic relationships examined. Pre- 
requisite: PCB 3043. 

OCB 5634L Marine Ecology Lab (1). 

Laboratory to accompany Marine 
Ecology. Prerequisite: PCB 3043. 
Corequisite: Marine ecology. 

OCB 5670L Techniques in Biological 
Oceanography (1). A laboratory 
course designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with biological sampling tech- 
niques at sea. Shipboard 
experience will be required as part 
of the course. Prerequisites: Previous 
course in marine biology; and per- 
mission of instructor. 

PCB 2510 Introductory Genetics (3). 
PCB 2510L Introductory Genetics 
Lab (1). Principles of Mendelian and 
Molecular genetics with selected ex- 
amples of applications such as ge- 
netic engineering and twin studies. 
(SS) 

PCB 2700 Foundations of Human 
Physiology (3) 

PCB 2700L Foundations of Human 
Physiology Lab (1). Functional sur- 
vey of the organ systems of the hu- 
man body. Intended primarily for 
non-science majors. (Lab fees as- 
sessed) (F) 

PCB 3043 Ecology (3) 
PCB 3043L Ecology Lab (1). The ba- 
sic principles governing the interac- 
tion of organism and environment. 
Trophic structure and energetics. 



species diversity, evolution of popu- 
lations, biogeochemical cycles. (S,F) 

PCB 3203 Cell Physiology (3) 
PCB 3203L Cell Physiology Lab (1). 

Biochemical and biophysical princi- 
ples of cell physiology: enzyme struc- 
ture and function, energy trans- 
ductions, electrical and chemical 
signals. Prerequisites: Eight semester 
hours each of General Biology, Gen- 
eral Physics, and Organic Chemistry. 
(S) 

PCB 3241 Physiology of Aging (3). In- 
troductory treatment of the physiol- 
ogy of organ systems with emphasis 
on the decline in organ function 
with aging and on the resultant limi- 
tations in physiological perform- 
ance. (F) 

PCB 3513 Genetics (3) 
PCB 3513L Genetics Lab (1). Mende- 
lian inheritance and introduction to 
molecular genetics. Prerequisites: 
BSC 1010andCHM2210. (F) 

PCB 3702 Intermediate Human 
Physiology (3) 

PCB 3702L Intermediate Human 
Physiology Lab (1). Functions of the 
human body and the physio-chemi- 
cal mechanisms responsible for 
each organ's function. Prerequisite: 
General Biology. 

PCB 3703 Human Physiology I (3) 
PCB 3703L Human Physiology I Lab 
(1). Basic facts and concepts relat- 
ing to the physiology of cells and 
nervous, muscular, and cardiovascu- 
lar systems, with emphasis on regula- 
tory mechanisms and abnormal 
physiology. Prerequisites: One year 
of Biology or Zoology; Chemistry, 
and Physics. (F) 

PCB 3704 Human Physiology II (3) 
PCB 3704L Human Physiology II Lab 
(1). Physiology of respiratory, gastro- 
intestinal, excretory, endocrine and 
reproductive systems. Continuation 
of PCB 3703. Prerequisites: One year 
of Biology or Zoology; Chemistry, 
and Physics. 

PCB 37 1 1 Physiological Mechanisms 
(3). Physiological processes studied 
from a biophysical and biochemical 
perspective. Integrative aspects of 
physiology are de-emphasized to 
accomplish a detailed, but introduc- 
tory coverage of mechanisms. (F) 

PCB 4024 Cell Biology (4). A struc- 
tural and molecular analysis of cell 
function. Prerequisite: PCB 3513. 

PCB 4233 Immunology (3) 

PCB 4233L Immunology Lab (1). Fun- 



damentals of immunology including 
antibody structure, immunopathol- 
ogy, molecular recognition at cell 
surfaces and immunological as- 
pects of cancer biology. Prereq- 
uisite: General Microbiology or 
permission of instructor. (S) 

PCB 4254 Developmental Biology (3) 
PCB 4254L Developmental Biology 
Lab (1). Comprehensive survey of 
principles of development and criti- 
cal analysis of methods used to 
study these problems. Prerequisites: 
PCB 3513 and PCB 3203 or BCH 3033. 

PCB 4301 Freshwater Ecology (3). 
PCB 430 1L Freshwater Ecology Labo- 
ratory (2). Community-level analysis 
of marshes, lakes and rivers from 
theoretical and practical view- 
points, emphasizing quantitative de- 
scription of community structure 
and function. Prerequisite: Ecology 
or General Biology and permission 
of instructor. 

PCB 4413 Advanced Genetics (3). 

Advanced level treatment of topics 
such as meiotic disjunction-unipa- 
rental disomy, transcription & splicing - 
differential splicing, polymorphisms, 
chromatin organization, horizontal 
gene transfer, etc. Prerequisite: PCB 
3513. 

PCB 4524 Molecular Biology (3) 
PCB 4524L Molecular Biology Lab 
(1). Advanced nucleic acid and pro- 
tein biochemistry: biosynthesis of 
macromolecules and molecular ge- 
netics. Prerequisite: Biochemistry or 
Genetics and Organic Chemistry. (F) 

PCB 4673 Evolution (3). A study of 
the synthetic theory of evolution, its 
historic and experimental justifica- 
tion and the mechanisms of natural 
selection. Prerequisites: Genetics, 
Ecology, or permission of instructor. 

PCB 4723 Animal Physiology (3) 
PCB 4723L Animal Physiology Lab 
(1). Advanced study of physiologi- 
cal mechanisms employed by ani- 
mals to maintain function of the 
organ systems and to interact with 
the environment. Prerequisites: Or- 
ganic Chemistry and Cell Physiology 
or Biochemistry. 

PCB 4724 Comparative Physiology (3) 
PCB 4724L Comparative Physiology 
Lab I (1). Regulation of the internal 
environment: osmotic gastrointesti- 
nal, metabolic, circulatory and respi- 
ratory physiology. Prerequisites: 
General Biology and Organic Chem- 
istry. (F) 



72 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



PCB 4733 Human Systemic Physiol- 
ogy I (3) 

PCB 4733L Human Systemic Physiol- 
ogy Lab (1). Selected topics in hu- 
man physiology with emphasis on 
topics of clinical significance. Pre- 
requisite: Introductory human physi- 
ology or a college level course in 
biology or chemistry. 

PCB 4734 Human Systemic Physiol- 
ogy II (3). Selected topics in human 
physiology with emphasis on topics 
of clinical significance. Prerequisite: 
Introductory human physiology or a 
college level course in biology or 
chemistry. 

PCB 5195 Histochemistry/Microtech- 
nique (3) 

PCB 5195L Histochemistry/Micro- 
technique Lab (1). Chemistry and 
use of fixatives and dyes; histochem- 
istry emphasizes procedures used in 
research and pathology labs includ- 
ing techniques for enzymes, protein, 
carbohydrate, nucleic acids and lip- 
ids. Prerequisite: Biochemistry or Cell 
Physiology. 

PCB 5238 Marine Comparative Im- 
munology Workshop (1). A work- 
shop at the Keys Marine Lab to 
present general and unique re- 
search methodologies associated 
with the immunology of marine ani- 
mals. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

PCB 5185 Workshop in Microtech- 
nique (1). Laboratory techniques re- 
quired for preparation of tissues for 
light microscopy/histological study. 
Prerequisite: Senior or graduate stu- 
dent status. 

PCB 5259 Topics in Developmental 
Biology (3). Molecular and cellular 
mechanisms in the development of 
plants and animals. Prerequisite: Sen- 
ior status or permission of instructor. 

PCB 5303 Limnology (3) 
PCB 5303L Limnology (1). Chemical 
and physical properties of standing 
and flowing freshwater systems; eco- 
physiology and interactions of the 
fresh water flora and fauna in rela- 
tion to abiotic factors; oligotrophic 
to eutrophic conditions. 

PCB 5327 Coastal Ecosystems and 
Modeling (3). Basics of ecology for 
coastal and wetland ecosystems. 
The theory and mechanisms of simu- 
lation modeling. Hands-on creation 
and application of computer mod- 
els in ecological research. Prereq- 
uisites: PCB 3043 and MAC 23 11 or 
permission of instructor. 



PCB 5344L Tropical Ecology Field 
Lab (3). Field course in Costa Rica 
with fieldwork in two or more diverse 
habitats (rainforest, and dry forest). 
Emphasis on diversity and interac- 
tions between species. Visits to se- 
lected sites of deforestation, 
conservation and restoration. 

PCB 5358 Everglades Research and 
Resources Management (3). Appli- 
cation of basic skills in ecology to 
contemporary issues in the Ever- 
glades area, with emphasis on the 
relation between research and man- 
agement of wilderness, wildlife, 
vegetation, water and fire. Prereq- 
uisite: PCB 3043 Ecology or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

PCB 5405 Biochemical Ecology (3). 

Principles of chemical communica- 
tion between diverse organisms and 
the importance of a variety of allelo- 
chemicals in community structure. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

PCB 5407 Workshop: Microelec- 
trodes in Microbial Ecology (1). Use 

of Microelectrodes to measure 
chemical microenvironments and 
biological processes in natural sam- 
ples. Hands-on experience with 02 
and pH electrodes. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

PCB 5423 Advanced Ecology: Popu- 
lations and Communities (3). Ad- 
vanced analysis of population and 
community ecology. Prerequisites: 
PCB 3043 or permission of instructor 
or graduate standing. 

PCB 5443 Advanced Ecology: Com- 
munities and Ecosystems (3). Ad- 
vanced analysis of ecological 
principles pertaining to communi- 
ties, ecosystems, and landscapes, 
with special emphasis on the South 
Florida and Caribbean region. Pre- 
requisites: Graduate student status, 
or PCB 3043 and permission of in- 
structors. 

PCB 5615 Molecular and Organis- 
mal Evolution (3). The evolutionary 
relationships among nucleotides 
and proteins as well as the proc- 
esses which yield these relationships. 
The possible molecular events lead- 
ing to speciation. Prerequisites: Ge- 
netics and Biochemistry. 

PCB 5665 Human Genetics (3). Princi- 
ples and techniques in the analysis 
of the human race. Prerequisite: 
PCB 3513. 

PCB 5676 Evolution and Develop- 
ment of Sex (3). The evolutionary ex- 
planations for the evolution of 



sexual reproduction and models of 
sexual differentiation. Prerequisites: 
Genetics and Evolution or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

PCB 5677 Evolution and Develop- 
ment (3). The models and evidence 
for the interaction of development 
and evolution, using both plant and 
animal systems. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

PCB 5686 Population Biology (3). 
PCB 5686L Population Biology Lab 
(1). Intrinsic properties of natural 
and theoretical populations and 
their dynamics and interactions, 
and responses to disturbance. In- 
cludes field problems and computer 
exercises. Prerequisite: A course in 
genetics, evolution, or permission of 
instructor. 

PCB 5687 Evolutionary Ecology (3). 

Adaptations and interactions of 
plants and animals in natural and 
disturbed habitats. Prerequisite: PCB 
3043 or equivalent. 

PCB 5785 Membrane Signal 
Transduction (3). Hormones and 
neurotransmitters as extracellular 
messengers. Membrane receptors 
and mechanisms of signal transduc- 
tion: membrane channels and en- 
zymes, direct linkage and G-protein 
linkage. Second messengers. Prereq- 
uisites: BCH 3033 or PCB 3203. (F) 

PCB 5786 Membrane Physiology (3). 

Chemical and physical properties of 
the plasma membrane, its biosynthe- 
sis and functions in transport and sig- 
nal transduction. Prerequisites: PHY 
2048, PHY 2049, BCH 3033 or PCB 
3203. 

PCB 5806 Endocrinology (3). Bio- 
chemistry, physiology and anatomy 
of the endocrine systems of verte- 
brates and invertebrates. Steroid, 
peptide, and terpenoid hormones 
which control reproduction, growth, 
and other parameters. Prerequisite: 
BSC 1 1 1 , CH M 22 1 1 , one physiology 
course. (S) 

PCB 5835C Neurophysiology (3) 
PCB 5835L Neurophysiology Lab (1). 

Comparative neurophysiology; 
physico-chemical mechanisms of 
resting and action potentials; synap- 
tic transmission; neural coding and 
integration; sensory-motor function 
and neurophysiological basis of be- 
havior. Prerequisites: Biochemistry or 
Cell Physiology, Calculus. 

PCB 5902 Readings in Stable Isotope 
Studies (1). Discussion of scientific 
papers published in the fields of iso- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 73 



tope ecology and isotope biogeo- 
chemistry. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

PCB 5934 Topics in Skeletal Muscle 
Physiology (4). Advanced discussion 
of some aspects of the biophysics, 
biochemistry and physiology of 
skeletal muscle contraction. Topics 
may vary from year to year. Based 
on review articles and research pa- 
pers. Prerequisite: APB 4240 or PCB 
3703 and PCB 3203 or BCH 3033. 

PCB 5938 Ecosystem Studies Semi- . 
nar (3). Theory and practice of eco- 
system analysis, based on discussion 
of current articles and books. Em- 
phasis on using different ap- 
proaches to understand natural 
complexity, with case studies re- 
searched by students. Prerequisites: 
Course in Ecology, permission of in- 
structor. 

ZOO 2203C Invertebrate Zoology 
(4). Taxonomy, anatomy, develop- 
ment, physiology and ecology of 
major invertebrate groups, including 
terrestrial and aquatic phyla. Prereq- 
uisite: BSC 1011 or equivalent. In- 
cludes lab. (S) 

ZOO 2303 Vertebrate Zoology (3) 
ZOO 2303L Vertebrate Zoology Lab 
(1). Systematics, anatomy, physiol- 
ogy, development and ecology of 
vertebrate animals. Prerequisites: 
BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 101 Land 
BSC 101 1L or equivalent. (F) 

ZOO 2713C Comparative Vertebrate 
Anatomy (4). Study of the structural 
diversity and classification of verte- 
brates and the evolution of various or- 
gan systems. Dissection of a variety of 
vertebrate specimens to reveal rela- 
tionships of the various organ systems. 
Prerequisite: One year of General Biol- 
ogy with laboratory or General Zool- 
ogy with laboratory. 

ZOO 3603 Embryology (3) 
ZOO 3603L Embryology Lab (1). Ani- 
mal morphogenesis. Laboratory 
must be taken with lecture. Prereq- 
uisites: One year of General Biology 
with laboratory or General Zoology 
and General Botany with laboratory. 

ZOO 3731 Human Anatomy (3) 
ZOO 3731 L Human Anatomy Demon- 
stration (1). Survey of organ systems 
of the human body with major em- 
phasis on the skeletal, muscular, 
and peripheral nervous system. 
Guided examination of prosected 
human cadavers. Prerequisites: A 
course in General Chemistry, Gen- 
eral Physics and General Biology. (F) 



ZOO 3733 Human Gross Anatomy I 
(3) 

ZOO 3733L Human Gross Anat I Lab 
(1). Structure and function of various 
tissues, organs and organ systems of 
the human body. Dissection of hu- 
man cadaver material to reveal the 
relationships of the various organ sys- 
tems of the body. Prerequisites: BSC 
1011, BSC 1011L.CHM 1046, CHM 
1046L, PHY 2054. or equivalents. (Lab 
fees assessed) 

ZOO 3734 Human Gross Anatomy II 
(3) 

ZOO 3734L Human Gross Anat II Lab 
(1). Continuation of ZOO 3733. Pre- 
requisites: BSC 1011, BSC 101 1L, CHM 
1046, CHM 1046L, or equivalents. 

ZOO 3753 Histology (3) 
ZOO 3753L Histology Lab (1). Micro- 
scopic anatomy of cells, tissues and 
organs. Prerequisites: General biol- 
ogy and organic chemistry. (F) 

ZOO 3892C Biology of Captive Wild- 
life (3). Behavior, nutrition, physiol- 
ogy, anatomy, pathology and 
diseases of captive wildlife. Taught 
at Metrozoo. Prerequisite: General Bi- 
ology or permission of instructor. 

ZOO 4234 General Parasitology (3). 

Modern concepts of biology, devel- 
opment, immunology and pathol- 
ogy of animal parasites. Corequisite: 
ZOO 4234L. 

ZOO 4234L General Parasitology Lab 
(1). Taxonomy and morphology of 
animal parasites. Prerequisite: BSC 
1010 and BSC 1011. Corequisite: 
ZOO 4234. 

ZOO Advanced Vertebrate Morphol- 
ogy (3). The study of the diversity of 
anatomical structure in vertebrates 
and the relationship between form 
and function. Prerequisites: BSC 1010 
and BSC 1010L, BSC 1011 and BSC 
101 1L, and ZOO 2303 or permission 
of instructor. 

ZOO Advanced Vertebrate Mor- 
phology Lab (1). Accompanies Ver- 
tebrate Morphology lecture. 
Dissection and analysis of a variety 
of vertebrate species to reveal form- 
function relationships. Prerequisites: 
BSC 1010 and BSC 1010L. BSC 101 1 
and BSC 101 1L, ZOO 2303 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

ZOO 4423C Herpetology (4). Study 
of the biology of reptiles and am- 
phibians with emphasis on the natu- 
ral history and ecology of local 
species. Prerequisites: One year of 
biological sciences and ecology or 
permission of instructor. 



ZOO 4472 Ornithology (3). Avian sys- 
tematics, anatomy, physiology, be- 
havior, ecology, evolution, and 
conservation. Labs teach visual and 
auditory identification, census tech- 
niques, banding, and taping. Field 
trips alternate Saturdays. Prereq- 
uisites: General Biology. (F) 

ZOO 4472L Ornithology Lab (2). Stu- 
dents will learn the skills needed to 
conduct ecological and behavioral 
studies on birds in their natural habi- 
tats. Some Saturday field trips and 
at least one overnight weekend 
field trip. Corequisites: Zoo 4472. (F) 

ZOO 4513 Animal Behavior (3). Evo- 
lutionary approach to under- 
standing the diversity of behavioral 
strategies. Ecological and physiologi- 
cal mechanisms of behavior will be 
emphasized. Prerequisite: General Bi- 
ology. (F) 

ZOO 4513L Animal Behavior Labora- 
tory (1). Field study of wild animals 
and lab study of neuroethology of 
fishes and invertebrates. Three week- 
end day trips and one overnight 
weekend field trip. Prerequisite: ZOO 
4513, may be taken as a corequi- 
site. (S) 

ZOO 4743C Neuroscience (4). Struc- 
ture and function of the human 
nervous system. Dissection and dem- 
onstration of human nervous system 
and various neurophysiology labs. 
Prerequisites: One course in physiol- 
ogy and one course in human anat- 
omy. (S) 

ZOO 5266 Biology of Crustaceans (3). 
ZOO 5266L Biology of Crustaceans 
Laboratory (1). Morphology, physiol- 
ogy, systematics and evolution in 
crustaceans. 

ZOO 5376 Animal Design and Move- 
ment (4). Basic biomechanical and 
behavioral theories of how animals 
feed and move. Prerequisites: BSC 
1010, BSC 1011, PHY 2053, and PHY 
2054 or equivalent. 

ZOO 5456 Ichthyology (3). Systemat- 
ics, structure, function, ecology, and 
evolution of fishes. Prerequisites: BSC 
1010, BSC 101 1, PCB 3043. (S) 

ZOO 5456L Ichthyology Lab (1). Ac- 
companies ichthyology lecture. Pre- 
requisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1011, PCB 
3043. 

ZOO 5434 Primate Biology (3). Sur- 
vey of the natural history of the 
prosimians, monkeys, and apes with 
special emphasis on primate anat- 
omy, evolution, ecology, and be- 



74 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



havior. Prerequisties: General biol- 
ogy or permission of instructor. 

ZOO 5434L Primate Biology Field Lab 
(1). An introduction to the field study 
of non-human primate behavior. 
Prerequisites: General biology or per- 
mission of instructor. 

ZOO 5479 Workshop in Field Orni- 
thology: Mark and Recapture Meth- 
ods (1). Instruction in techniques of 
banding wild birds, including their 
capture with mist nets, identificaiton 
in the hand, and maintenance of 
federally required records. Prereq- 
uisites: ZOO 4472 and ZOO 4472L or 
permission of the instructor. 

ZOO 5732 Advanced Anatomy Dem- 
onstration (1-4). Dissection and dem- 
onstration of the human body with 
the emphasis on structure and func- 
tion. May be repeated to a maxi- 
mum of 8 credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 
3733L and ZOO 3734L or consent of 
instructor. 

ZOO 5745 Advanced Neuro- 
anatomy (3). In-depth knowledge of 
the embryonic development, struc- 
ture, and function of the human 
nervous system with a great deal of 
clinical consideration. Prerequisite: 
ZOO 4743C or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

ZOO 5754 Comparative Pathology 
(3). General mechanisms of disease 
and comparative evaluation of ani- 
mal diseases of specific organ sys- 
tems in various animals including 
fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals. 
Prerequisites: ZOO 3753 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

ZOO 5754L Comparative Pathology 
Laboratory (1). A laboratory to com- 
plement the lecture utilizing gross 
specimens and histopathologic ma- 
terial including glass and projection 
slides. Prerequisites: ZOO 3753 or per- 
mission of instructor. 



Chemistry 



Kenneth G. Furton, Associate 
Professor, and Chairperson 
David Becker, Assistant Professor 
David Chatfield, Assistant Professor 
Milagros Delgado, Lecturer 
Yiwei Deng, Assistant Professor 
Arthur W. Herriott, Professor and 

Dean 
Gary G. Hoffman, Associate Professor 
Rudolf Jaffe, Associate Professor 
Jeffrey A. Joens, Associate Professor 
Webe Kadima, Assistant Professor 
Leonard S. Keller, Professor 
John T. Landrum, Associate Professor 
Ramon Lopez de la Vega, Associate 

Professor 
Zaida C. Morales-Martinez, 
Instructor and College 
Coordinator for Premedical 
Advising and College 
Coordinator for Science Student 
Recruitment and Retention 
Kevin E. O'Shea, Associate Professor 
John H. Parker, Professor 
J. Martin Quirke, Professor 
Stephen Winkle, Associate Professor 
Hong Xie-Wang, Instructor and 
Laboratory Coordinator 

Bachelor of Science 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

The chemistry program is accred- 
ited by the American Chemical Soci- 
ety and prepares the student for 
graduate study or a professional ca- 
reer as a chemist in industry, in gov- 
ernment service, or in secondary 
school teaching. (Students inter- 
ested in secondary teacher certifi- 
cation should contact the College 
of Education at 348-2721.) 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

Lab II 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 
Required for the Degree 
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 



CHM2210L Organic Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II 
CHM 221 1L Organic Chemistry II 

Lab 
To qualify for the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all 
the lower division requirements in- 
cluding CLAST, completed 60 se- 
mester hours, and must be 
otherwise acceptable to the pro- 
gram. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

At least 36 credits in chemistry to in- 
clude the following: 

CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis 3 
CHM3120L Quantitative Analysis 

Lab 2 

CHM 3410 Physical Chemistry I 4 
CHM3410L Physical Chemistry 

Labi 1 

CHM 341 1 Physical Chemistry II 4 
CHM 341 1L Physical Chemistry 

Lab II 2 

CHM 41 30 Modern Analytical 

Chemistry 3 

CHM4130L Modern Analytical 

Chemistry Lab 2 

CHM 4220 Advanced Organic 

Chemistry 3 

CHM4230L Structure 

Determination 

Laboratory 1 

CHM 4610 Advanced Inorganic 

Chemistry 3 

CHM 4610L Advanced Inorganic 

Chemistry Laboratory 1 
CHM4910L Undergraduate 

Research in 

Chemistry 3 

CHM 4930 Senior Seminar 1 

One additional senior-level (4000) 
Chemistry course 3 

At least three additional credits 
to be chosen from the following list: 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 
CGS 2420 Fortran for Engineers 3 
MAC 2313 Multivariable 

Calculus 3 

Electives 21 

Bachelor of Arts 

This program is designed for stu- 
dents preparing for careers in medi- 
cine, dentistry, environmental 
studies, veterinary medicine, patent 
law, secondary science education, 
or criminalistics chemistry. Students 
should complement the basic cur- 
riculum with suitable electives cho- 
sen in consultation with an advisor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 75 



(Students interested in secondary 
teacher certification should contact 
the College of Education at 348- 
2721.) 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 
CHM2210L Organic Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry II 
CHM 221 1L Organic Chemistry II 

Lab 

or 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

Lab II 
or 

PHY 2053 Physics without Calculus I 
PHY 2053L Physics without 

Calculus Lab I 
PHY 2054 Physics without Calculus 

II 
PHY 2054L Physics without 

Calculus Lab II 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 

To qualify for the program, FIU un- 
dergraduates must have met all the 
lower division requirements includ- 
ing CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise ac- 
ceptable to the program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

At least 16 credits in chemistry to In- 
clude the following: 
CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis 3 
CHM3120L Quantitative Analysis 

Lab 2 

CHM 3400 Fundamentals of 

Physical Chemistry 3 
CHM 3400L Fundamentals of 

Physical Chemistry 

Lab 1 

CHM 4220 Advanced Organic 

Chemistry 3 

CHM4230L Structure 

Determination Lab 1 
And at least one additional senior 
level (4000) course in chemistry 3 
Electives 44 



Minor in Chemistry 

The Minor requires at least 23 credits 
in chemistry to include: 
General Chemistry I &. II (CHM 1045, 
1045L, and 1046, 1046L) 9 

Quantitative Analysis (CHM 3120, 
3120L) 5 

Organic Chemistry I 8c II (CHM 2210, 
CHM 2210L, CHM 221 1 , CHM 221 1L) 9 

At least half of the credits to be 
counted towards the minor must be 
taken at the University. 

Criminalistics-Chemistry 

Program 

The Criminalistics-chemistry Core Re- 
quirements are the same as the re- 
quirements for the BA degree in 
chemistry plus Modern Analytical 
Chemistry (CHM 4130, 4130L). (De- 
gree granted by the Department of 
Chemistry.) 

Internship 

A 3-6 credit internship in the labora- 
tory of a participating criminal jus- 
tice agency. 

Criminal Justice Coursework: The 
student should take nine credits of 
criminal justice courses in consult- 
ation with an advisor in the Depart- 
ment of Criminal Justice, 940-5850. 

Electives 

Coursework in the behavioral and 
political sciences, and upper divi- 
sion coursework in the biological sci- 
ences is recommended to total 60 
semester hours. 

Pre-Medical, Dentistry, 
Veterinary, Optometry 
Curricula 

Students who have satisfied the re- 
quirements for either the BA or the 
BS degree in chemistry will also have 
satisfied the course requirements for 
admission to professional schools in 
the above areas. Additional course- 
work in chemistry and biology rele- 
vant to the career objectives of the 
student may also be taken as elec- 
tives. Interested students should con- 
sult a Chemistry Department faculty 
advisor. 

A seven year FIU/SECOM pro- 
gram in osteopathic medicine is 
also offered; students must be admit- 
ted to FIU and to SECOM (Southeast- 
ern College of Osteopathic 
Medicine). 



Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate 
degree in chemistry may also take 
part in the Cooperative Education 
Program conducted in conjunction 
with the Department of Coopera- 
tive Education in the Division of Stu- 
dent Affairs. The student spends one 
or two semesters fully employed in 
an industrial or governmental chem- 
istry laboratory. For further informa- 
tion consult the Department of 
Chemistry or the Department of Co- 
operative Education at 348-2423. 

Department Policy 

The Department of Chemistry does 
not award credit for courses by ex- 
amination; it does, however, award 
credit for AP Chemistry with a score 
of 3 or higher and with evidence of 
a suitable laboratory experience. 
The department does not award 
credit for life experience. 

Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be 
taken prior to the corresponding 
course. Laboratories must be taken 
concurrently where noted. Students 
must register for the laboratory sepa- 
rately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

CHM-Chemistry;CHS-Chemistry-Spe- 
cialized; ISC-Interdisciplinary Natural 
Sciences; OCC-Oceanography- 
Chemical. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

CHM 1032 Chemistry and Society(3) 
CHM 1032L Chemistry and Society 
Lab (1). A course for non-science 
majors which introduces students to 
basic concepts in chemistry and ap- 
plies those concepts to contempo- 
rary issues such as air/water 
pollution, energy and food produc- 
tion, drugs, nutrition, and toxic 
chemicals. Prerequisite: One year of 
high school or college algebra. (Lab 
fees assessed) (F.S.SS) 

CHM 1033 Survey of Chemistry (4). 
CHM 1033L Survey of Chemistry Lab 

(1) General and organic chemistry 
for non-science majors only. Atoms 
and molecules, states of matter, 
equilibrium, kinetics, acids and 
bases and introduction to organic 
chemistry. Laboratory must be 
taken concurrently. Does not fulfill re- 
quirements for chemistry, biology or 
pre-med majors. Prerequisites: One 
year of high school or college alge- 
bra. (Lab fees assessed) (F) 



76 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (4) 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry Lab I 
(1). Fundamental principles of gen- 
eral chemistry: states of matter, 
atomic structure, stoichiometry, 
chemical bonding, acid-base reac- 
tions, gas laws. Concurrent registra- 
tion in both lecture and laboratory is 
required. Prerequisite: Second year 
high school algebra or college alge- 
bra. (Lab fees assessed) (F.S.SS) 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3) 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry Lab II 

(1). Continuation of General Chemis- 
try I (CHM 1045). Fundamental princi- 
ples of chemistry: thermodynamics, 
solutions, kinetics, equilibrium and 
electrochemistry. Concurrent regis- 
tration in both lecture and labora- 
tory is required. Prerequisites: CHM 

1045. CHM 1045L(Lab fees as- 
sessed) (F.S.SS) 

CHM 2200 Survey of Organic Chem- 
istry (3) 

CHM 2200L Survey of Organic Chem- 
istry Lab (1). A basic one-semester 
survey course in organic chemistry 
for non-majors presenting a broad 
background in the reactions and 
structures of organic molecules. 
Does not fulfill requirements for 
chemistry, biology, or pre-med ma- 
jors. Laboratory must be taken con- 
currently with the course. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1032, CHM 1032L, 
CHM 1033, CHM 1033L, or CHM 

1046, CHM 1046L (Lab fees as- 
sessed) (F) 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I (4) 
CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry Lab I 
(1). An introduction to chemical 
bonding and atomic structure the- 
ory as it pertains to the chemistry of 
carbon compounds. Correlation be- 
tween structure and reactivity of or- 
ganic molecules followed by a 
systematic look at the various reac- 
tion types using reaction mecha- 
nisms as a tool for study. Concurrent 
registration in both lecture and labo- 
ratory is required. Prerequisites: CHM 
1046, CHM 1046L. (Lab fees as- 
sessed) (F.S.SS) 

CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry II (3) 
CHM 221 1 L Organic Chemistry Lab II 
(1). Continuation of CHM 2210. 
2210L. Concurrent registration in lec- 
ture and laboratory is required Pre- 
requisites: CHM 2210, 2210L. (Lab 
fees assessed) (F.S.SS) 

CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis (3) 
CHM 3120L Quantitative Analysis 
Lab (2). Fundamentals of classical 
quantitative analysis. Topics include 
theory of precipitation, acid-base 
and oxidation-reduction reactions. 



as well as an introduction to spectro- 
photometric methods of analysis, 
ion-exchange techniques and com- 
plex formation. Laboratory must be 
taken concurrently with the course. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1046, CHM 1046L 
(F.S.SS) 

CHM 3400 Fundamentals of Physical 
Chemistry (3). 

CHM 3400L Fundamentals of Physi- 
cal Chemistry Lab (1). Principles of 
physical chemistry. Topics include 
thermodynamics, equilibria, electro- 
chemistry, and reaction kinetics. 
Laboratory must be taken concur- 
rently with the course. Prerequisites: 
MAC 231 1 . 2312; PHY 2048. 2048L 
PHY 2049, 2049L, or PHY 2053, 2048L, 
and 2054, 2049L, CHM 3120, 3120L 
(S) 

CHM 3410 Physical Chemistry I (4) 
CHM 3410L Physical Chemistry Lab I 
(1). Principles of thermodynamics, 
gas laws, kinetic theory of gases, 
chemical equilibrium, electrochemis- 
try, and kinetics. Laboratory to be 
taken concurrently with the course. 
Prerequisites: MAC 231 1 , 2312; PHY 
2048, 2048L PHY 2049, PHY 2049L. 
and CHM 3120, CHM 3120L (F) 

CHM 341 1 Physical Chemistry II 
(4).CHM 341 U Physical Chemistry 
Lab II (2). C255 Introduction to quan- 
tum mechanics. The Schrodinger 
equation and its application to rota- 
tional, vibrational, and electronic 
spectroscopy, atomic and molecu- 
lar structure, and bonding. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 3410, 3410L. (S) 

CHM 3949, CHM 4949 Cooperative 
Education in Chemistry (1-3). One 

semester of fulltime supervised work 
in an outside laboratory. Limited to 
students admitted to the University 
Coop Program. A written report and 
supervisor evaluation will be re- 
quired of each student. (F.S) 

CHM 4090L Introduction to Scientific 
Glassblowing (1). Basic glassblowing 
operations with glass tubing and rod 
are taught. Emphasis is on making 
and repair of scientific glassware. 
No prerequisites. 

CHM 4130 Modem Analytical Chem- 
istry (3) 

CHM 4130L Modern Analytical 
Chemistry Lab (2). Instrumental 
methods of chemical analysis, in- 
cluding electroanalytical methods, 
gas and liquid chromatography, 
mass spectrometry, x-ray fluores- 
cence, and spectrophotometric 
methods. Laboratory must be taken 
concurrently with the lecture. Pre- 
requisites: CHM 3120, 3120L, CHM 



221 1 . 221 1L. CHM 3410. PHY 2048 
2048L, PHY 2049, 2049L, or permission 
of instructor. (S) 

CHM 4220 Advanced Organic 
Chemistry (3). An intensive examina- 
tion of the major areas of contem- 
porary organic chemistry. Reactive 
intermediates, pericyclic reactions, 
molecular rearrangements, and 
modern synthetic methods are 
among the topics covered. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 22 1 1 . 22 1 1 L (F) 

CHM 4230L Structure Determination 
Lab (1). The qualitative analysis of or- 
ganic compounds using modern 
spectroscopic, chromatographic 
and chemical methods. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 221 1, and 221 1L (F.S.SS) 

CHM 4300 Bio-Organic Chemistry 
(3). Chemistry of naturally-occurring 
organic compounds of biological 
importance. The relationship be- 
tween organic chemistry and the 
chemical reactions which constitute 
the living organism. Prerequisite: 
CHM 221 Land 221 1L 

CHM 4305 Biological Chemistry (3). 

Structures and functions of nucleic 
acids and proteins and cellular proc- 
esses such as metabolism, replica- 
tion and transcription are examined 
from a chemistry perspective. Pre- 
requisites: CHM 221 1 , CHM 3120, 
BSC 1011 or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: A semester of physical 
chemistry. 

CHM 4320L Research Techniques in 
Organic Chemistry (2). Practical in- 
struction in the more advanced ma- 
nipulations and procedures of the 
modern chemistry laboratory. Re- 
stricted to B.S. chemistry majors. Pre- 
requisites: CHM 3120, CHM 221 1. 
CHM 221 1L, CHM 3410, and CHM 
341 1L 

CHM 4321 Protein Chemistry (3). 

Structures of proteins and how they 
are determined. Protein-small mole- 
cule, protein-protein, protein-DNA, 
protein membrane interactions and 
their functions. Prerequisites: CHM 
221 1 , BSC 101 1 , a biochemistry 
course or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: CHM 3410 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 4610 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry (3). Atomic structure, peri- 
odicity, bonding and structure of in- 
organic compounds, solution 
chemistry, ligand field theory, or- 
ganometallic chemistry, and spe- 
cific chemistry of the elements. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 2211. 
andCHM3411.(F) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 77 



CHM 461 OL Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry Lab (1). Synthesis, purifica- 
tion, and study of coordination and 
organometallic compounds. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 341 1 . Corequisite: CHM 
4610. (F) 

CHM 491 OL Undergraduate Re- 
search in Chemistry (3). The student 
works directly with a professor on a 
research project. Credit is assigned 
based on 4 hr/wk laboratory/library . 
work per credit hour, A written re- 
port is required. (F.S.SS) 

CHM 491 1L Undergraduate Re- 
search 2 (1-20). Faculty directed re- 
search in chemistry. Credit is 
assigned based on 4 hr/wk labora- 
tory/library work per credit hour. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
CHM 49 10L (F.S.SS) 

CHM 4930 Senior Seminar (1). Each 
student will make an oral presenta- 
tion to faculty and other students en- 
rolled in the seminar course. The 
subject of the seminar may be 
either a report of results of an inde- 
pendent study project or a survey of 
the recent literature on an assigned 
topic. (F,S) 

CHM 4931 Special Topics (3). Covers 
selected topics in chemistry. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

CHM 4933 Special Topics (3). Covers 
selected topics in chemistry. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

CHM 4934 Special Topics (3). Covers 
selected topics in chemistry. Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

CHM 5150 Graduate Analytical 
Methods (3). Analysis of analytical 
data, electrochemistry, spectroana- 
lytical techniques, chromatography, 
survey of new analytical methods. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. (S) 

CHM 5156 Advanced Chromatogra- 
phy (3). Intensive examination of 
the contemporary practice of chro- 
matography including available 
chromatographic techniques, their 
selection and application. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 4130 or permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 5181 Special Topics in Analyti- 
cal Chemistry (VAR). An intensive ex- 
amination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4130 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 5225 Graduate Organic Chem- 
istry (3). Advanced topics in organic 
chemistry. Structure of organic mole- 



cules, reaction mechanisms, or- 
ganic synthesis, and natural product 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 
(F) 

CHM 5236 Spectroscopic Tech- 
niques and Structures Elucidation 
(3). Advanced techniques for the 
spectroscopic identification of or- 
ganic compounds. Interpretation of 
spectral information for determina- 
tion of structures of various classes 
of organic compounds. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 4220 and CHM 4230L 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis (3). Use 

of classical and modern reactions in 
the design and construction of com- 
plex organic molecules including 
natural products. Some topics cov- 
ered will be construction reactions, 
refunctionalization, stereochemistry 
and conformational analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 4220 or permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 5260 Physical Organic Chemis- 
try (3). A series of topics will be dis- 
cussed including molecular orbital 
theory as it pertains to organic mole- 
cules, kinetic and thermodynamic 
approaches to the study of reaction 
mechanisms, quantitative ap- 
proaches to conformational analy- 
sis, etc. Prerequisite: CHM 4220 and 
physical chemistry or permission of 
instructor. 

CHM 5280 Natural Products Chemis- 
try and Biosynthesis (3). Studies of 
the chemical origins (biosynthesis), 
properties, and synthesis of the vari- 
ous classes of naturally occurring 
compounds: terpenes, steroids, alka- 
loids, acetogenins. Prerequisite: 
CHM 4220 or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5306 Special Topics in Biologi- 
cal Chemistry (3). Investigation of 
one or more areas of biologically re- 
lated chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 
4305 or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5380 Special Topics in Organic 
Chemistry (VAR). An intensive exami- 
nation of one or more areas se- 
lected by instructor and students. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4220 and physical 
chemistry or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5423 Atmospheric Chemistry 
(3). Chemical processes in atmos- 
pheres. Photochemistry, chemical ki- 
netics, tropospheric and stratospheric 
chemical reactions, anthropogenic 
effects on the earth's atmosphere 
and chemistry of planetary atmos- 
pheres. Prerequisite: CHM 3410, CHM 
341 1 , or permission of instructor. 



CHM 5425 Graduate Physical Chem- 
istry (4). Prequantum physics, the 
Schrodinger equation and its solu- 
tions, atoms and molecules, rota- 
tional, vibrational, and electronic 
spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis (3). 

Theory of elementary reactions, acti- 
vated complex theory, mechanisms 
of complex reactions. Prerequisites: 
CHM 3411, MAP 2302. 

CHM 5490 Physical Spectroscopy 
(3). Introduction to atomic and mo- 
lecular quantum states, selection 
rules, and fundamental principles of 
spectroscopy. Introduction to group 
theory and to the theory of UV/vis- 
ible, infrared, Raman, microwave, 
nmr, photoelectron, and mass spec- 
troscopies, and the applications of 
these methods to the determination 
of fundamental physical properties 
and the structure of organic and in- 
organic molecules. Prerequisite: 
Physical Chemistry. 

CHM 5490L Physical Spectroscopy 
Lab (1). The theory of spectroscopy 
and the use of modern instrumenta- 
tion to investigate molecular struc- 
ture. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, 221 1L 
Corequisite: PHY 4604 or CHM 5490. 

CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry (3). 

Physical properties of biomolecules, 
molecular conformation; thermody- 
namic, kinetic, and spectroscopic 
properties of biomolecules. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 4305 or permission of in- 
structor. 

CHM 5517 Solid State (3). Crystalline 
form of solids, lattice dynamics, met- 
als, insulators, semiconductors, and 
dielectric materials. Prerequisite: 
CHM 5490 or PHY 4604. 

CHM 5765 Aquatic Chemistry (3). Re- 
dox chemistry, chemistry of sedi- 
ments, organic biogeochemistry, 
chemodynamics, and fates or or- 
ganic pollutants in aqueous environ- 
ments. Prerequisites: CHM 221 1 , 
CHM 4130, or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5581 Special Topics in Physical 
Chemistry (VAR). An intensive exami- 
nation of one or more areas se- 
lected by instructor and students. 
Prerequisite: CHM 341 1 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 5650 Physical Inorganic Chem- 
istry (3). Introduction to use of physi- 
cal methods to determine the 
structure of inorganic compounds. 



78 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Prerequisite: CHM 4610 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 5681 Special Topics in Inor- 
ganic Chemistry (VAR). An intensive 
examination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4610 or permission 
of instructor. 

CHM 5931 Special Topics (3). A 

course covering selected special 
topics in chemistry. 

CHM 5936 Special Topics in Environ- 
mental Chemistry (3). An intensive 
examination of one or more areas 
selected by the instructor and stu- 
dents. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

CHS 4100 Radiochemistry (2) 
CHS 4100L Radiochemical Tech- 
niques Lab (2). Production, isolation, 
methods of detection, counting sta- 
tistics and estimation of radioiso- 
topes. Applications to chemical, 
physical and biological problems, 
Laboratory must be taken concur- 
rently with the course. Prerequisites: 
CHM 1045, 1046, 3120, 3120L; MAC 
3411,3412. 

CHS 4503 Forensic Science (3). Mod- 
ern instrumental methods of chemi- 
cal analysis and their use in the 
administration of justice. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 3120 and CHM 221 1 or 
permission of instructor. Corequisite: 
a semester of physical chemistry or 
permission of instructor. 

CHS 4503L Forensic Science Lab (1). 

Laboratory to accompany Forensic 
Science, CHS 4503. Prerequisite: 
CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 221 1 , 
CHM 221 1L or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

CHS 4591 Internship in Criminalistics 
Chemistry (3). Internship in a foren- 
sic-type laboratory, contributing in a 
specific manner on an assigned 
problem. Twenty hrs/wk. Written re- 
port required. Open only to students 
in the Criminalistics Chemistry Pro- 
gram. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

CHS 5531 Forensic Analysis (3). An in- 
troduction to established chemical 
analysis techniques used in forensic 
science and new techniques under 
development. Prerequisite: CHM 
3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 221 1 . CHM 
221 1 L or permission of instructor. 

CHS 5531L Forensic Analysis Lab (1). 

Laboratory to accompany Forensic 
Analysis CHS 5531. Prerequisite: CHM 
3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 221 1 , CHM 
22 1 1 L or permission of instructor. 



ISC 4041 Scientific Literature (1). This 
course presents a perspective on 
the scientific literature and scientific 
documentation. Problems in using 
and searching the scientific litera- 
ture will be specifically designed to 
meet the needs of various disci- 
plines, e.g. chemistry, environmental 
science, physics, biology. Prereq- 
uisites: 16 semester hours of science. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 79 



School of Computer 
Science 

Michael Evangelist, Professor and 

Director 
Bill Kraynek, Professor and Associate 

Director 
Walid Akache, Instructor 
Paul C. Attie, Assistant Professor 
Linda Barasch, Instructor 
David Barton, Professor 
Toby S. Berk. Professor 
Chungmin Chen, Assistant Professor 
Yi Deng, Assistant Professor 
Timothy Downey, Instructor 
Raimund Ege, Associate Professor 
Mbola Fanomezantsoa, Instructor 
Dawn J. Holmes, Lecturer 
Masoud Milani, Associate Professor 
Jainendra K. Navlakha, Professor; 

Graduate Director 
Ana Pasztor, Professor 
Alexander Pelin, Associate Professor 
Norman Pestaina, Instructor 
N. Prabhakaran, Associate Professor 
Naphtali Rishe, Professor 
Orlando Sauleda, Instructor 
Rakesh Sinha, Assistant Professor 
Wei Sun, Associate Professor 
Mark A. Weiss, Professor 

The Bachelor of Science program in 
Computer Science is accredited by 
the Computer Science Accredita- 
tion Commission (CSAC) of the Com- 
puter Science Accreditation Board 
(CSAB), a specialized accrediting 
body recognized by the Council on 
Postsecondary Accreditation 
(COPA) and the U.S. Department of 
Education 

The School of Computer Science 
offers both undergraduate and 
graduate degree programs. The ma- 
jor program and a minor program, 
are described below. 

Bachelor of Science 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, Fill undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

As part of the 60 semester hours 
of lower division coursework neces- 
sary to enter this upper division ma- 
jor, note the following recommend- 
ations or course requirements, or 
both. 



Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

COP 221 Introduction to 
Programming 
or 
COP 2423 C for Engineers 
MAC 2311 Calculus 1 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 


COP 4225 
CEN 4500 
COP 4555 

CDA 4400 


Advanced Unix 

Programming 

Data 

Communications 

Survey of 

Programming 

Languages 

Computer Hardware 

Analysis 


3 
3 

3 
3 


PHY 2048 
PHY 2049 


Physics with Calculus 1 
Physics with Calculus 
Lab II 
or 


CAP 3710 
COT 5420 


Introduction to 
Computer Graphics 
Theory of 
Computation 1" 


3 

3 


PHY 2053 


Physics without 
Calculus 1 


MAD 3401 
MAD 3305 


Numerical Analysis* 
Graph Theory* 


3 
3 


PHY 2053L 


Physics without 
Calculus Lab 1 


MAD 4203 


Introduction to 
Combinatorics* 


3 


PHY 2054 


Physics without 
Calculus II 


MHF 4302 


Mathematical 
Logic* 


3 



PHY 2054L Physics without 
Calculus Lab II 
Two additional one-semester 
courses in natural science; each of 
these should be a course designed 
for science or engineering majors. 
Courses required for the degree: 
MAD 2104 Discreet Mathematics 

Third and Fourth Years 

ENC3211 Report and Technical 

Writing 3 

COT 3420 Logic for Computer 

Science 3 

MAD 3512 Introduction to 

Theory of Algorithms 3 
STA 3033 Introduction to 

Probability and 

Statistics for CS 3 

or 
STA 4321-2 Mathematical 

Statistics I and II 3-3 
COP 3337 Intermediate 

Programming 3 

COP 3338 Advanced 

Programming 3 

COP 3402 Fundamentals of 

Computer Systems 3 
COP 3530 Data Structures 3 

COP 4540 Database 

Management 3 

CDA 4101 Structured Computer 

Organization 3 

CEN 4010 Introduction to 

Software Engineering 4 
COP 4610 Operating Systems 

Principles 3 

In addition, majors must com- 
plete three courses from the follow- 
ing list. At least one course must be 
a starred (") course: 
COP 5621 Compiler 

Construction 3 



Science Requirement 

I. A two-semester sequence in phys- 
ics for science majors. The following 
sequences (with accompanying 
laboratory courses) will satisfy the re- 
quirement. 

Physics with Calculus I and II with 

Labs 
Physics I and II with Labs 
General Physics I and II with Labs 
Physics without Calculus I and II 

with Labs 

II. Two additional one-semester 
courses in natural science. Each of 
these should be a course designed 
for science or engineering majors. 

A list of additional approved 
courses is available through the 
School of Computer Science. 

At least 28 of the 43 upper divi- 
sion credits must be taken at the Uni- 
versity. 

Remarks: The following courses are 
not acceptable for credit toward 
graduation, unless a student has 
passed the course before declaring 
a Computer Science major: CGS 
2060, CGS 3300, COP 21 72, MAC 
2233, STA 1013, STA 3122-23, STA 
2023, QMB 3150, ESI 3161. 

Minor in Computer Science 

Required Courses 

COP 2210 Introduction to 

Programming 3 

or 
CGS 2423 C for Engineers 3 

COP 3402 Fundamentals of 

Computer Systems 3 
COP 3337 Intermediate 

Programming 3 

Plus two from the following list: CGS 
3403, COP 3338, COP 3530, COP 



60 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



4555. CDA 4101 . CDA 4400, CEN 
4500, CAP 3710, CGS 2570, and 
MAD 3401. Normally the students 
from Engineering would choose 
COP 3338, and either COP 3530 or 
CDA 4101 and students from the 
School of Business would choose 
CGS 2570 and CGS 3403. If one of 
the other options are selected, then 
the student should verify that he or 
she has the additional prerequisites 
necessary for the chosen course. At 
least nine of the 15 credits must be 
taken at FIU. 



Course Description 
Definition of Prefixes 

CAP-Computer Applications; CDA- 
Computer Design/Architecture; CIS- 
Computer Information Systems; 
CGS-Computer General Studies; 
COC-Computer Concepts; COP- 
Computer Programming; COT-Com- 
puting Theory. 

CAP 3710 Introduction to Computer 
Graphics (3). A first course in com- 
puter graphics. Course includes sev- 
eral programming assignments using 
available graphics hardware. There 
is considerable emphasis on the use 
of an available graphics software 
package. Prerequisites: COP 3338, 
COP 3337 or CGS 2420, and MAP 
2312. 

CAP 5602 Introduction to Artificial In- 
telligence (3). Presents the basic 
concepts of Al and their applica- 
tions to game playing, problem solv- 
ing, automated reasoning, natural, 
language processing and expert sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: COP 3530. 

CAP 5701 Advanced Computer 
Graphics (3). Advanced topics in 
computer graphics: system architec- 
ture, interactive techniques, image 
synthesis, current research areas. 
Prerequisites: COP 3530 and CAP 
3710 or equivalent, or by permission. 

CDA 4101 Structured Computer Or- 
ganization (3). This course investi- 
gates the analysis of the levels of 
organization of computer systems, 
including the conventional, micro- 
programming and operating sys- 
tems levels. A number of major 
computer systems are analyzed. Pre- 
requisites: MAD 2104, COP 3402 and 
COP 3337. 

CDA 4400 Computer Hardware 
Analysis (3). The study of hardware 
functions of a basic computer. Top- 
ics include logic elements, arit- 
hmetic logic units, control units. 



memory devices, organization and 
I/O devices. Prerequisites: CDA 4101. 

CEN 4010 Introduction to Software 
Engineering (4). Basic tools and 
techniques for specifying, designing, 
implementing, verifying, and testing; 
module organization and develop- 
ment techniques, program correct- 
ness, the Software Life Cycle, an 
introduction to software manage- 
ment techniques, and social/ethical 
implications of Computers/Com- 
puter Science. This course contains 
a presentation component. Prereq- 
uisites: COP 3338 and COP 3530. 

CEN 4500 Data Communications (3). 

Study of communications-based sys- 
tems, common carrier facilities, tar- 
iffs, and related equipment. Analysis 
and design of communications net- 
works utilizing various techniques. 
Uses of communications for data 
collection, remote computing, mes- 
sage switching. Prerequisite: CDA 
4101. 

CEN 501 1 Software Engineering (3). 

This course deals with the design of 
large scale computer programs. In- 
cluded are topics dealing with plan- 
ning design, implementation, 
validation, metrics, and the man- 
agement of such software projects. 
Prerequisite: CEN 4010. 

CEN 5686 Expert Systems (3). Intro- 
duction to expert systems, knowl- 
edge representation techniques 
and construction of expert systems. 
A project such as the implementa- 
tion of an expert system in a high 
level Al-language is required. Prereq- 
uisite: COP 3530 or permission of in- 
structor. 

CDA 5312 Micro Processing for Soft- 
ware Designers (3). Design of appli- 
cation software for OEM products. 
Topics include: 16-bit microproces- 
sor architecture and assembly lan- 
guage, HLLs for design of micro- 
processor software, software for mul- 
tiprocessing and multiprocessor sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

CGS 1500 Word Processing with 
WordPerfect (1). This course is to 
teach how to use WordPerfect ef- 
fectively. The student will be ex- 
pected to become competent 
WordPerfect user. Not acceptable 
for credit to Computer Science ma- 
jors. 

CGS 1510 Electronic Spreadsheets 
(1). The fundamentals of electronic 
spreadsheets using a modern soft- 
ware package on a microcom- 



puter. Not acceptable for credit to 
Computer Science majors. 

CGS 1540 Microcomputer Data- 
bases (1). The fundamentals of mi- 
crocomputer Database manage- 
ment system using a modern soft- 
ware package on a microcom- 
puter. Not acceptable for credit to 
Computer Science majors. 

CGS 1580 Desktop Publishing (1). 

The fundamentals of desktop Pub- 
lishing and Presentation graphics us- 
ing a modern software package on 
a microcomputer. Not acceptable 
for credit to Computer Science ma- 
jors. 

CGS 2100 Intro to Microcomputer 
Applications for Business (3). A 

hands-on study of spreadsheet and 
database management package 
for business students without a tech- 
nical background. Not acceptable 
credit by Computer Science major. 

CGS 2060 Introduction to Microcom- 
puters (3). A hands-on study of mi- 
crocomputer software packages for 
applications such as operating sys- 
tem, word processing, spreadsheets, 
and database management. For 
students without a technical back- 
ground. Not acceptable for credit 
to Computer Science majors. 

CGS 2420 FORTRAN for Engineers 
(3). A first course in programming 
that describes the syntax and se- 
mantics of the FORTRAN 77 program- 
ming language. The development 
of algorithms will be discussed to- 
gether with fundamentals of pro- 
gram testing and debugging. 
Emphasizes those aspects of the lan- 
guage required by students of engi- 
neering and natural sciences. Not 
acceptable for credit for Computer 
Science majors. 

CGS 2423C for Engineers (3). A first 
course in programming geared for 
engineering and natural science stu- 
dents that describes the ANSI C pro- 
gramming language. Not 
acceptable for credit for Computer ' 
Science majors. • 

CGS 2570 Advanced Microcom- 
puter Applications (3). Microcom- 
puter systems and technology. 
Topics include popular hardware, 
operating systems, application soft- 
ware, system development and 
maintenance. Prerequisites: CGS 
2060 or COP 2210. 

CGS 3403 COBOL for Non-Computer 
Science Majors (3). Introduction to 
COBOL and historical background. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 81 



Flow-charting and program design. 
This course is not for computer sci- 
ence majors. 

CGS 3559 Using the Internet (1). In- 
ternet history and importance. What 
is available on the Net. Tools such as 
email, listserves, telnet, ftp, Archie, 
Veronica, Gopher, netfind, the 
World Wide Web, Wais, and Mosaic. 
Nontechnical. Prerequisite: CGS 
2060 or equivalent. 

CIS 3900 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

CIS 3930 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

CIS 4905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

CIS 4930 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

CIS 5900 Independent Study (1-10). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

CIS 5910 Project Research (1-6). Ad- 
vanced undergraduate or master's 
level research for particular projects. 
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Department. 

CIS 5931 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

COP 2172 Programming in BASIC 
(3). Introduction to the BASIC com- 
puter language with emphasis on 
business data processing applica- 
tions. Not acceptable for credit to 
computer science majors. 

COP 2210 Introduction to Program- 
ming (3). A course in the fundamen- 
tals of digital computer programming. 
The concept of an algorithm; pseudo- 
code; programming; testing and de- 
bugging using a well-structured 
language. 

COP 3337 Intermediate Program- 
ming (3). A study of the C++ pro- 
gramming language including 
streams, classes, recursion, template 
classes and exceptions. An introduc- 
tion to data structures is included. 
Prerequisites: Course in program- 
ming, ex: Pascal. C, Ada of C++. 



COP 3338 Advanced Programming 
(3). Advanced programming con- 
cepts including object-oriented pro- 
gramming. Topics include 
inheritance and polymorphism in 
the C++ programming language 
and programming in a pure object- 
oriented language such as Java. 

COP 3402 Fundamentals of Com- 
puter Systems (3). Principles of Com- 
puter Systems with emphasis on 
machine language and assembly 
language: addressing modes, I/O in- 
structions, interface to high level pro- 
grams. Error correction and data 
compression. Prerequisites: COP 
2210 or equivalent. 

COP 3530 Data Structures (3). Basic 
concepts of data organization, run- 
ning time of a program, abstract 
types, data structures including 
linked lists, n-ary trees, sets and 
graphs, internal sorting. Prereq- 
uisites: MAD 2104 and COP 3337. 

COP 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Computer Science (1-3). One se- 
mester of full-time work, or equi va- 
lent, in an outside organization, 
limited to students admitted to the 
CO-OP program. A written report 
and supervisor evaluation is required 
of each student. Prerequisites: Cal- 
culus II and COP 3337. 

COP 4225 Advanced Unix Program- 
ming (3). Unix overview: files and di- 
rectories, shell programming. Unix 
tools: sed, grep, and others. Unix in- 
ternals: file systems, process struc- 
ture. Using the system call interface. 
Interprocess communication. Prereq- 
uisite: COP 3338. Corequisite: COP 
4610. 

COP 4540 Database Management 
(3). Logical aspects of databases. 
Topics include: Semantic Binary, Re- 
lational Network and Hierarchical 
Models; Database design; Fourth- 
generational languages; SQL; Physi- 
cal database organization; 
object-oriented databases. Corequi- 
site: COP 3530. 

COP 4555 Principles of Programming 
Languages (3). A comparative 
study of several programming lan- 
guages. Emphasis is given to design, 
evaluation and implementation. Pro- 
grams are written in a few of the lan- 
guages. Prerequisite: COP 3337. 

COP 4610 Operating Systems Princi- 
ples (3). Organization, I/O, system 
call interface. Processes, threads, 
synchronization and communica- 
tion, deadlock. CPU scheduling. 
Memory, secondary storage, file sys- 



tems. Prerequisites: CDA 4101 . COP 
3338, and COP 3530. 

COP 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Computer Science (1-3). One se- 
mester of full-time work, or equiva- 
lent, in an outside organization, 
limited to students admitted to the 
CO-OP program. A written report 
and supervisor evaluation is required 
of each student. Prerequisites: MAP 
2312, STA 3033 and COP 3337. 

COP 5621 Compiler Construction 
(3). Basic techniques of compilation; 
self-compilers; syntax encoding and 
recognition; code generation and 
optimization. Prerequisites: MAD 
3512 and CEN 4010. 

COT 3420 Logic for Computer Sci- 
ence (3). An introduction to the logi- 
cal concepts and computational 
aspects of propositional and predi- 
cate logic, as well as to concepts 
and techniques underlying logic pro- 
gramming, in particular, the com- 
puter language Prolog. Prerequisites: 
COP 3337, and MAD 2104. 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 
(3). Abstract models of computa- 
tion; halting problem; decidability 
and undecidability; recursive func- 
tion theory. Prerequisite: MAD 3512. 



82 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Economics 

Panagis Liossatos, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Nejat M. Anbarci, Associate 

Professor 
Hassan Arvin-Rad, Assistant Professor 
Harvey Averch, Professor. Courtesy 

Appointment 
Alison Butler, Assistant Professor 
Manuel J. Carvajal, Professor 
Irma de Alonso, Professor 
Alan Gummerson, Lecturer 
Antonio Jorge, Professor of Political 

Economy 
AM Cem Karayalcin, Associate 

Professor 
Bruce Kelley, Assistant Professor 
Robert J. Lemke, Assistant Professor 
J. Kenneth Lipner, Associate 

Professor 
Elisabetta Magnani, Assistant 

Professor 
Devashish Mitra, Assistant Professor ' 
Jorge Salazar-Carrillo, Professor and 

Director, Center for Economic 

Research and Education 
Constantinos Syropoulos, Associate 

Professor 
Mira Wilkins, Professor 
Maria Willumsen, Associate Professor 
Ann Witte, Professor 

The major in economics provides 
the student with an understanding 
of economic problems and institu- 
tions, and analytical tools to apply 
this knowledge to contemporary 
problems. The program is designed 
for the student desiring a career in 
business, government, international 
agencies, or multinational corpora- 
tions; and for those planning gradu- 
ate study in economics, business, 
law, public administration, urban 
studies, or international relations. 

Bachelor of Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Required Courses 
Common Prerequisites 
ECO 2013 Principles of 

Macroeconomics 
ECO 2023 Principles of 

Microeconomics 
Courses required for the degree: 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 

or 
MAC 2233 Calculus for Business 
STA 2 1 22 Introduction to Statistics I 



STA 2023 Statistics for Business and 

Economics 
To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, 
completed 60 semester hours, and 
must be otherwise acceptable into 
the program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

Required Courses 

ECO 3101 Intermediate 

Microeconomics 3 

ECO 3203 Intermediate 

Macroeconomics 3 
ECO 3303 Development of 

Economic Thought 3 
ECO 4410 Measurement and 

Analysis of Econ 

Activity 3 

ECO 4421 Introduction to 

Econometrics 3 

ECO 4932 Topics in Theory 1 
Additional Economics Courses 2 15 
Electives 27 

'This requirement can also be met 
by taking ECO 4933. 
2 ECO 2013, ECO 2023, ECO 301 1 , 
ECO 3021, ECO 3040, ECO 3431, 
ECO 3949, ECO 4906, and ECO 4949 
can not be included in this grouping 
of additional economic courses. 

Minor in Economics 
Required Courses 

ECO 2013 Principles of 

Macroeconomics 

or 
ECO 301 1 Economics and 

Society-Macro 3 

ECO 2023 Principles of 

Microeconomics 

or 
ECO 3021 Economics and 

Society-Micro 3 

ECO 3101 Intermediate 

Microeconomics 3 
ECO 3203 Intermediate 

Macroeconomics 3 
Additional Eonomics Courses' 6 

1 ECO 3040, ECO 343 1 , and ECO 
4906 cannot be included in this 
grouping of additional economic 
courses. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ECO-Economics; ECP-Economic 
Problems and Policy; ECS-Economic 
Systems and Development. 



F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeco- 
nomics (3). Introduction to eco- 
nomic analysis of the overall 
economy: national income ac- 
counting, unemployment, inflation, 
monetary and fiscal policies, 
budget deficits and debt, long-run 
growth. (F.S.SS) 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeco- 
nomics (3). Introduction to eco- 
nomic analysis of individual 
units— households and firms. Opera- 
tion of markets; supply and demand 
analysis. (F,S,SS) 

ECO 301 1 Economics and Society- 
Macro (3). Introduction to intermedi- 
ate macroeconomics. 
Determination of aggregate in- 
come, unemployment, inflation, 
growth. Use of fiscal and monetary 
policy. Cannot receive credit for 
both ECO 2013 and ECO 3011. 
(F,S,SS) 

ECO 3021 Economics and Society- 
Micro (3). Introduction to economic 
analysis of individual units in the 
economy— households, firms. Supply 
and demand analysis, operation of 
markets. Cannot receive credit for 
both ECO 2023 and ECO 3021 . 
(F,S,SS) 

ECO 3040 Consumer Economics (3). 

Consumer behavior; advertising and 
other influences affecting demand. 
Patterns of consumer expenditure; 
effects of public policy on family in- 
comes and consumption patterns. 
The consumer protection move- 
ment. Does not count as economics 
elective toward economics major. 
(F,S,SS) 

ECO 3101 Intermediate Microeco- 
nomics (3). Analysis of markets, the- 
ory of firm, demand and production 
theories, general equilibrium, and 
welfare economics. Prerequisites: 
ECO 2023 or ECO 3021 . (F,S) 

ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeco- 
nomics (3). Analysis of the aggre- 
gate economy in the long-run (full 
employment, economic growth, pro- 
ductivity) and the short-run (unem- 
ployment, business cycles); 
economic policy for short-run stabil- 
ity and long-run growth (monetary 
and fiscal policies,, budget deficit, in- 
flation, and debt); balance of pay- 
ments and exchange rate. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or ECO 301 1. 
(F,S) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 83 



ECO 3223 Money and Banking (3). 

Elements of monetary theory; rela- 
tionships between money, prices, 
production, and employment; fac- 
tors determining money supply; his- 
tory and principles of banking, with 
special references to the United 
States. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or 
ECO 3011. -(F) 

ECO 3303 Development of Eco- 
nomic Thought (3). Evolution of eco- 
nomic theory and doctrine. 
Contributions to economic thought 
from ancient times to J. M. Keynes. 
Emphasis on institutional forces shap- 
ing the continuum of economic 
thinking. (S) 

ECO 3431 Applied Macroeconomics 
(3). Aggregate economic perform- 
ance and business conditions analy- 
sis, nature and causes of economic 
expansions and recessions, inflation, 
balance of trade, balance of pay- 
ments, and exchange rate prob- 
lems, fiscal and monetary policies, 
short-run instability and long-run 
growth. Cannot be taken for credit 
concurrently with, or after taking 
ECO 3203. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or 
ECO3011.(F,S.SS) 

ECO International Economics (3). Ex- 
plorations of why nations trade, ef- 
fects of trade on distribution, 
commercial policy, balance of pay- 
ments adjustment; exchange rate 
determination, Eurocurrency mar- 
kets, and international institutions. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or ECO 301 1 , 
and ECO 2023 or ECO 3021. 

ECO 3933 Special Topics (3). A 

course designed to give students a 
particular topic or a limited number 
of topics not otherwise offered in 
the curriculum. 

ECO 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Economics (1-3). A student majoring 
in Economics may spend one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry 
or government in a capacity relat- 
ing to the major. Does not count as 
economics elective toward eco- 
nomics major. 

ECO 4224 Issues in Money and Bank- 
ing (3). Current controversies in the 
conduct of monetary policy; innova- 
tions in financial markets and instru- 
ments, and their impact on the 
targets and long-run goals of cen- 
tral banks. Prerequisite: ECO 3223. 

ECO 4321 Radical Political Economy 
(3). The relationship between Marxist 
and orthodox economists. Attention 
given to the New Left and other cur- 
rent criticisms of capitalist econo- 



mies. Multinational corporate policy, 
concentration of economic power, 
income distribution, and Third World 
development. 

ECO 4401 Introduction to Mathe- 
matical Economics (3). Mathemati- 
cal formulation of economic theory. 
Mathematical treatment of maximiz- 
ing and optimizing behavior; appli- 
cations to consumer and business 
firm theory, value, economic strate- 
gies, growth and stability. Emphasis 
on understanding of analytical tech- 
niques. Recommended prepara- 
tion: ECO 3101 or ECO 3203, and 
Calculus. (F,S) 

ECO 4410 Measurement and Analy- 
sis of Economic Activity (3). Covers 
statistical methods as applied in 
economics. Topics include estima- 
tion and hypothesis testing, analysis 
of variance, and single and multiple 
regression models. Prerequisites: STA 
2023 or equivalent. (F.S) 

ECO 4421 Introduction to Economet- 
rics (3). Application of statistics and 
economic theory to formulating, esti- 
mating, and drawing inferences 
about relationships among eco- 
nomic variables. Coverage includes 
linear regression model, hetero- 
scedasticity, serial correlation, multi- 
collinearity, and simultaneous 
equations. Prerequisites: ECO 3101, 
ECO 3203, ECO 4410, or permission 
of instructor. (F.S) 

ECO 4504 Introduction to Public Fi- 
nance (3). Describes the way re- 
sources are allocated in a market 
economy and cases where markets 
fail. Analyzes government expendi- 
ture policy, principles of taxation, 
and the various taxes in use today. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2023 or ECO 3021 . 
(S) 

ECO 4622 Economic Development 
of the United States (3). The growth 
of the American economy from co- 
lonial times to the present. Special 
emphasis on market forces, institu- 
tional arrangements, and policies 
contributing to this process. 

ECO 4623 American Business History 
(3). The growth of American busi- 
ness from 1880 to present; integra- 
tion, diversification, and foreign 
expansion. Business strategies and 
managerial structures. (F) 

ECO 4632 European Economic His- 
tory (3). The development of Medi- 
terranean and Western European 
economies, from the earliest times 
to the 20th Century. Attention is cen- 
tered on capital accumulation. 



technology, trade, industrialization, 
monetary factors, and the role of 
government in economic organiza- 
tion. 

ECO 4701 World Economy (3). A 

broad overview of the international 
economy in historical perspective. 
Topics: economic demography, 
trade flows, capital movements, dif- 
fusion of technology, the emer- 
gence of transnational institutions. 
The student obtains a conception of 
how economic interdependence 
has developed. 

ECO 4703 International Trade Theory 
and Policy (3). Causes and conse- 
quences of international trade; ef- 
fects of tariffs and quotas; strategic 
trade and industrial policies; political 
economy of protectionism; interna- 
tional economic integration; factor 
movements; and multinational firms. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2023 or ECO 3021. 
(F) 

ECO 4713 International Macroeco- 
nomics (3). Analysis of output, infla- 
tion, business cycles and economic 
policy in open economy settings; ex- 
change rate regimes (fixed versus 
flexible exchange rate); fiscal, 
monetary, and exchange rate poli- 
cies. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or ECO 
3011. (S) 

ECO 4733 Multinational Corporation 
(3). Growth and development of 
multinational enterprise. Theories of 
direct foreign investment. Impact on 
the United States and other devel- 
oped and less developed nations. 
Policy implications relating to em- 
ployment, economic growth, bal- 
ance of payments, taxation, and 
national defense. National sover- 
eignty and the multinational corpo- 
ration. 

ECO 4906 Undergraduate Tutorial (1- 

6). Supervised readings, individual tu- 
torial, and preparation of reports. 
Requires consent of faculty supervi- 
sor and Department Chairperson. 
Does not count as economics elec- 
tive toward economics major. 

ECO 4932, 4933 Topics in Theory 
(3,3). Study of a particular topic or a 
selected number of topics in eco- 
nomics theory not otherwise offered 
in the curriculum. Prerequisites: ECO 
3101 and ECO 3203 or permission of 
the instructor. (F.S) 

ECO 4934 Special Topics (3). A 

course designed to give students a 
particular topic or a limited number 
of topics not otherwise offered in 
the curriculum. May be repeated 



84 / College of Arts ond Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



for credit with permission of Depart- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

ECO 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Economics (1-3). A student majoring 
in economics may spend one or 
two semesters fully employed in in- 
dustry or government in a capacity 
relating to the major. Does not 
count as economics elective to- 
ward economics major. 

ECO 5709 The World Economy (3). 

Designed to give an overview of the 
crucial issues in the world economy. 
The course covers trade, capital, la- 
bor, and technology flows; transna- 
tional economic organizations; 
current economic crisis; global eco- 
nomic interdependence; and the 
nature and characteristics of inter- 
national economic order. Required 
for MIB Program. (S) 

ECO 5735 Multinational Corpora- 
tions (3). Economic theory and multi- 
national corporations. Economic 
effects. Consequences of nationali- 
zation. Spread of the multinational 
form. State-owned multinational cor- 
porations. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor for undergraduates. (S) 

ECO 5906 Advanced Individual 
Study (1-6). Supervised readings, in- 
dividual tutorial, and preparation of 
report. Requires consent of faculty 
supervisor and Department Chair- 
person. Open to seniors and gradu- 
ate students. 

ECO 5945 Internship (3). Directed in- 
dividual study which assists the stu- 
dent in using economic analysis in 
his employment. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

ECP 3123 Economics of Poverty (3). 

Poverty in the United States: its meas- 
urement and history. Theory of per- 
sonal income distribution. Present 
and proposed policies to alleviate 
poverty. 

ECP 3302 Introduction to Environ- 
mental Economics (3). Economic 
principles applied to environmental 
problems. Relationship of market 
and non-market forces to environ- 
mental quality. Development of 
tools for policy analysis. Prereq- 
uisites: ECO 2023 or ECO 3021 , or 
permission of instructor. (F,S,SS) 

ECP 3410 Introduction to Public Eco- 
nomics (3). An introduction to the 
applied economics of the public 
sector and the microeconomics of 
public policy making and admini- 
stration. 



ECP 3533 Health Systems Economics 
(3). Identification of health systems is- 
sues and basic instruments of health 
systems analysis including the mar- 
ket mechanism, insurance and cost- 
benefit analysis. 

ECP 3613 Introduction to Urban Eco- 
nomics (3). Study of urban areas, 
their characteristics and economic 
functions. Topics include location 
decisions of firms and households, 
economies of agglomeration, trans- 
portation, land use, zoning, urban 
growth and development policies, 
urban dimensions of economic and 
social problems, and the public sec- 
tor in urban areas. (F) 

ECP 4004 Seminar on Current Eco- 
nomic Topics (3). Faculty and stu- 
dent discussion of contemporary 
economic and social issues. 

ECP 4031 Cost-Benefit Analysis (3). 

Covers cost-benefit analysis, cost-ef- 
fectiveness analysis, benefit-risk 
analysis, risk-risk analysis, and sys- 
tems analysis as applied in the gov- 
ernment sector for public 
investment decisions. Prerequisites: 
ECO 3101 or equivalent. 

ECP 4143 Economics of Racism (3). 

Analysis and examination of the 
economic costs of racism to the indi- 
vidual and society. A perspective 
from mercantilism to the post indus- 
trial contemporary world; interna- 
tional racial aspects of. 
development, income distribution 
and wealth. 

ECP 4203 Introduction to Labor Eco- 
nomics (3). Basic introduction to sup- 
ply and demand for labor. Discusses 
labor markets in both historical and 
institutional context emphasizing 
why certain patterns have occurred 
and contemporary institutions devel- 
oped. Prerequisite: ECO 3021. 

ECP 4204 Theory of Labor Economics 
(3). Neo-classical theory of labor de- 
mand and labor supply, human 
capital theory and critiques. Current 
programs of human resource devel- 
opment and income maintenance 
are discussed. Prerequisite: ECO 
3101. 

ECP 4314 Natural Resource Econom- 
ics (3). Natural resources and the 
economy; economics of renewable 
and nonrenewable resource har- 
vesting and management; public 
policy options for influencing re- 
source consumption and their envi- 
ronmental implications. 
Prerequisites: ECP 3202 and ECO 
3101 , or permission of instructor. 



ECP 4403 Principles of Industrial Or- 
ganization (3). Theory of the firm, 
market structure; business strategies 
and conduct. Topics include infor- 
mation and advertising, product du- 
rability, technical change, antitrust 
and trade policies, and regulation. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2023 or ECO 3021 , 
(recommended: ECO 3101). 

ECP 4451 Law and Economics (3). 

The relationship of economic princi- 
ples to law and the use of eco- 
nomic analysis to the study of legal 
problems. Topics include: property 
rights and contracts, and economic 
analysis of legal decision making. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 
2023 or equivalents. 

ECP 4540 Social Insurance and Eco- 
nomic Security (3). Survey of the de- 
velopment of the social insurance 
system in the United States, with par- 
ticular emphasis on "Social Secu- 
rity". It reviews the scope and 
coverage of the Social Security pro- 
grams, their administration and their 
costs. 

ECP 4622 Regional Economic 
Growth Management (3). Combines 
natural resource economics and 
the economics of public decision- 
making to identify and evaluate 
costs and benefits of public policies 
for managing rapid population 
change. Prerequisites: ECO 301 1 
and ECO 3021. 

ECS 3003 Comparative Economic 
Systems (3). Analysis of alternative 
economic systems. Emphasis on the 
contrast between market-oriented 
capitalist economies and Soviet- 
style planned economies, and on 
the process of transition from 
planned to market-oriented sys- 
tems. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or 
ECO 301 1 , and ECO 2023 or ECO 
3021. 

ECS 3013 Introduction to Economic 
Development (3). Structural and insti- 
tutional determinants of economic 
development; economic analysis 
and policy formation. Topics include 
theories of economic development, 
economic growth, income distribu- 
tion, rural-urban migration, industry 
and agriculture, unemployment, 
education, international trade, eco- 
nomic reform, and the environment. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or ECO 301 1, 
and ECO 2023 or ECO 3021. (F,S) 

ECS 3402 The Political Economy of 
South America (3). An introduction 
to the political economy of the 
South American countries, with em- 
phasis on the opening of the re- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 85 



gion's economies, privatization and 
deregulation, debt crisis, foreign in- 
vestment, poverty, income distribu- 
tion, human resources, and regional 
trade agreements. Prerequisites: 
ECO 2013 or ECO 301 1 . and ECO 
2023 or ECO 3021. (F) 

ECS - The Brazilian Economy (3). Ex- 
amines the evolution of Brazilian 
economy, focusing on the process 
of its industrialization in the 20 th cen- 
tury, the policies to achieve it, its im- 
pact on the socioeconomic 
environment and the adjustments of 
institutions to the structural changes 
in the economy. Prerequisites: ECO 
201 3, or ECO 301 1 , ECO 2023 or ECO 
3021. 

ECS - Women, Culture, and Eco- 
nomic Development (3). Analysis of 
problems facing women in develop- 
ing countries, focusing on gender 
and cultural issues and their relation- 
ships to economic development. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or ECO 301 1, 
ECO 2023 or ECO 3021 , or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

ECS 4403 Economics of Latin Amer- 
ica (3). Study of current economic is- 
sues facing Latin American 
countries, including population 
growth, poverty, inequality, inflation, 
trade and balance of payment 
problems, economic reform, and re- 
gional integration. Prerequisites: 
ECO 2013 or ECO 301 1 , or ECO 2023 
or ECO 3021. (S) 

ECS 4404 Economic Integra- 
tion/Latin America (3). Analysis of 
the methods, meaning and implica- 
tions of economics in Latin America. 
Designed to enable the student to 
appreciate the trend toward region- 
alism and economic cooperation. 
Prerequisite: ECO 3021. 

ECS 4430 The Economic Develop- 
ment of Cuba/Past and Present (3). 

Survey of the Cuban economy un- 
der capitalist and Marxist ideologies. 
Emphasis on the transition stage 
and on current policies of economic 
and social change. (F) 

ECS 4432 Economic Integration/Car- 
ibbean (3). Analysis of the methods, 
meaning, and implications of eco- 
nomic integration in the Caribbean. 
Designed to enable the student to 
appreciate the trend toward region- 
alism and economic cooperation. 

ECS Economics of the Caribbean 
Basin (3). Survey of the economic 
systems of the major countries of the 
Caribbean. Special attention de- 
voted to current problems of eco- 



nomic growth and social transforma- 
tion. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 or ECO 
3011. 

ECS 5005 Comparative Economic 
Systems (3). A critical evaluation of 
the design, goals, and achieve- 
ments of economic policies in capi- 
talist and socialist economies. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
for undergraduates. 

ECS 5025 Economic Planning (3). 

Analysis of planning methods in 
capitalist and socialist economies. 
Evaluation of macro and micro eco- 
nomic planning tools (input-output) 
and programming techniques. The- 
ory and practice of economic de- 
velopment planning of agriculture, 
industrialization, foreign trade, and 
manpower. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instruc- 
tor. 



86 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



English 



Donald Watson, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Harry T. Antrim, Professor and 

Director of Master of Arts in 

Literature Program 
St. George Tucker Arnold, Associate 

Professor 
Joan L. Baker, Assistant Professor 
Lynne Barrett, Associate Professor 
Lynn M. Berk, Professor 
Lisa Blansett, Assistant Professor 
Gisela Casines, Associate Professor 

and Associate Dean 
Maneck Daruwala, Associate 

Professor 
Carole Boyce Davies, Associate 

Professor and Director of 

African-New World Studies 

Certificate Program 
Theresa DiPasquale, Associate 

Professor 
John Dufresne, Associate Professor 
Charles Elkins, Professor 
Mary Jane Elkins, Associate 

Professor and Head Advisor 
Peggy Endel, Associate Professor 
Mary Free, Associate Professor and 

Assistant Chairperson 
James Hall, Professor 
Peter Hargitai, Instructor 
Bruce Harvey, Assistant Professor 
Alfonso Hawkins, Assistant Professor 
Marilyn Hoder-Salmon, Associate 

Professor and Director of 

Women's Studies Center 
Tometro Hopkins, Assistant Professor 
Kenneth Johnson, Associate 

Professor 
Jeffrey Knapp, Instructor 
Kathleen McCormack, Associate 

Professor 
Campbell McGrath, Assistant 

Professor 
Carmela Pinto Mclntire, Associate 

Professor 
Asher Z. Milbauer, Associate 

Professor 
Adele S. Newson, Associate Professor 
Robert Ratner, Instructor 
Meri-Jane Rochelson, Associate 

Professor 
Richard Schwartz, Associate 

Professor 
Ronn Silverstein, Instructor 
Ellen Sprechman, Lecturer 
Lester Standiford, Professor and 

Director of Creative Writing 

Program 
Linda Strong-Leek, Assistant Professor 
Richard Sugg, Professor 
James Sutton, Assistant Professor 
Patricia Wallace, Assistant Professor 
Butler H. Waugh, Professor 



Barbara Weitz, Instructor 
C. Kemp Williams, Associate 

Professor 
Mehmet Yavas, Associate Professor 

and Director of Linguistics 

Program 



Bachelor of Arts in English 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Requirements 

Common Prerequisites 

ENC 1101 Freshman Composition 
ENC 1102 Literary Analysis 
Recommended Courses 
ENG2012 Approaches to 

Literature 
AML2011 Survey of American 

Literature I 
AML 2020 Survey of American 

Literature II 
ENL2011 Survey of British 

Literature I 
ENL2021 Survey of British 

Literature II 
To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Requirements 

(30 hours in 3000 and 4000 level 
courses) 

Periods: (Two courses - Six hours) 

a. One course in British literature 
before 1 800 

or 

One course in American literature 

before 1860 

b. One course in British literature 
after 1800 

or 

One course in American literature 

after 1860 
Note: In addition to these courses, 
the Department may designate spe- 
cific courses each semester which 
will fulfill these requirements. 

Shakespeare: (One course - Three 

hours) 

ENL4320 Shakespeare: Histories 

ENL4321 Shakespeare: Comedies 

ENL 4322 Shakespeare: Tragedies 

Linguistics: (One course - Three 

hours) 

LIN 3013 Introduction to 

Linguistics 

or 



LIN 4680 Modern English 

Grammar 
Electives:(18) 

Upper division electives in writing, 
film, literature, and/or linguistics. The 
English Department recognizes a 
continuing obligation to insure that 
its majors write well. The Chairperson 
may require any English major to 
take the appropriate composition 
course. An English major may 
choose to take a general program 
of English studies or may select one 
of the Department's three areas of 
emphasis: literature, language and 
linguistics, or creative writing. Majors 
should choose their English courses 
and electives in consultation with 
their advisors, especially upon enter- 
ing the program. 

Additional Approved Electives: 

(30) 

Students should consult with a de- 
partmental advisor. 



Minor in English 

Students majoring in any other disci- 
pline may minor in English. 

There are several advantages 
for obtaining this minor. First, stu- 
dents expand their knowledge of lit- 
erature written in English, thus, 
make their college education more 
complete and rounded. Second, 
because in the courses that the De- 
partment of English offers writing 
skills are emphasized, students will 
polish and perfect forums for the de- 
velopment of complex and sophisti- 
cated arguments through the 
analysis of literary work; the training 
students receive in these courses 
will help them to point to the 
strengths and weaknesses of any 
piece of writing. 

Requirements 

Fifteen hours in 3000 and 4000-level 

courses 

Period Courses: (Two courses - Six 

hours) 

1. One course in British literature 
before 1 800 

or 

One course in American literature 

before 1 860 

2. One course in British literature after 
1800 

or 

One course in American literature 

after 1860 

Note: In addition to these 
courses, the Department may desig- 
nate specific courses each semes- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 87 



ter which will fulfill these require- 
ments 

3. Three courses (nine hours) at the 
3000 and 4000-level in the Depart- 
ment of English. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

AML-American Literature; CRW -Crea- 
tive Writing; ENC-English Composition; 
ENG-English-General; ENL-English Lit- 
erature; HUM-Humanities; UN-Linguis- 
tics; UT-Literature; MMC-Mass Media 
Communication. 

AML 201 1 Survey of American Litera- 
ture I (3). Students read and discuss 
major American works written be- 
tween 1620 and 1866. Works will be 
considered in an historical context. 

AML 2020 Survey of American Litera- 
ture II (3). Students will read and dis- 
cuss major American works written 
between 1 865 and the present. 
Works will be examined in an histori- 
cal context. 

AML 3001 American Folklore (3) An 

examination of the variety of Ameri- 
can folklore from the very earliest ex- 
pressions to the present. 

AML 3032 The American Revolution in 
Literature (3). Study of writings cre- 
ated at the time of the American 
Revolution and those of later authors 
In order to evaluate how American 
writers have shaped our sense of the 
Revolution. 

AML 3262 Modem Southern Short 
Story (3) The contributions of twenti- 
eth-century writers of the South to the 
short story genre. Includes the work of 
Faulkner, O'Connor, Welty and 
McCullers. 

AML 3602 African-American Litera- 
ture (3). Offers a survey of African- 
American literature spanning its 
genesis to the present. Includes units 
on major eras and major figures in 
the development of the literary tradi- 
tions. May be repeated. 

AML 3401 American Humor (3) This 
course examines the writings of Ameri- 
can humorist from the beginnings to 
the present. Special attention is given 
to the writings of Twain and Thurber. 

AML - American Fiction to 1900 (3). 

Study of representative fiction by 
American authors from the Colonial 
period to 1900. Authors include 
Brown, Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, 
Melville, Twain, Chopin, James, and 
others. 



AML 4014 Studies in 19th-century Afri- 
can American Literature (3). An ex- 
amination of literary works written by 
African Americans during the 19th 
Century. May be repeated with 
change of content. 

AML 4024 Studies in 20th-century Afri- 
can American Literature (3). An ex- 
amination of literary works written by 
African Americans during the 20th 
Century. May be repeated with 
change of content. 

AML 4120 Modem American Fiction 

(3) Study of American novels and 
short stories written in the twentieth 
century. Among the writers to be 
read are John Barth, Alice Walker 
and Flannery O'Connor. 

AML 4154 Modem American Poetry 

(3) Study of American poetry written 
in the twentieth century. Among the 
poets to be examined are Elizabeth 
Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks and Rich- 
ard Wilbur. 

AML 4213 Studies in Colonial and 
Early American Literature (3). Stu- 
dents read, discuss, and write about 
literature of the Colonial and Early 
American periods from the time of 
the Puritans through the period of the 
Early Republic. 

AML 4216 Colonial Literature (3). 

American Literature from the settle- 
ment of the continent through 1 776. 

AML 4221 Early National Literature (3). 

Examines the major literary works of 
the period 1776-1825. 

AML 4223 Antebellum Literature (3). 

Examines the writings of the period 
1825-1860, including Hawthorne, Poe, 
and Jacobs. 

AML 4245 Modernism and Post-Mod- 
ernism in American Literature (3). The 

course provides working definitions of 
modernism and post-modernism and 
will consider how the writers of the 
twentieth century use those outlooks 
while addressing political, social, and 
personal Issues. 

AML 4263 Contemporary Southern 
Writers (3) Study of the literature of 
the modern South, its uniqueness and 
variety. Some of the writers included 
are Tennessee Williams, Eudora Welty 
and William Faulkner. 

AML 4621 Major African American 
Writers (3). An examination of se- 
lected African American writers. May 
be repeated with change of content. 

AML 4624 African American Women 
Writers (3). A study of the writings of 



African American women. May be 
repeated with change of content. 

AML 4300 Major American Writers (3). 

Each section of this course will con- 
sider the works of one, two, or three 
major American writers. The writers 
studied in this course will change 
from semester to semester. The 
course may be repeated for credit. 

AML 4306 Mark Twain (3) Study of the 
writings of American humorist and 
novelist Mark Twain including Rough- 
ing It, Innocents Abroad and Huckle- 
berry Finn. 

AML 4312 Hemingway, Fitzgerald and 
Faulkner (3) Analysis of the most im- 
portant novels of Hemingway, Fitzger- 
ald and Faulkner including The Sun 
Also Rises, The Great Gatsby and The 
Sound and the Fury. 

AML 4503 Periods in American Litera- 
ture (3). Individual sections will read 
and discuss works in the context of 
such historical settings as the colonial, 
federal, antebellum, reconstruction, 
or modern periods of the American 
past. May be repeated. 

AML 4930 Special Topics in American 
Literature (3). An examination of dif- 
ferent aspects of American literature; 
may be repeated with a change of 
content. 

AML 5305 Major American Literary 
Figures (3). Each section will consider 
the lifework of several authors such as 
Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Twain, 
James, Faulkner, Mailer, Wright, Bald- 
win. May be repeated. 

AML 5505 Periods in American Litera- 
ture (3). The literature and criticism re- 
garding one specified period of 
American Literature, such as Colo- 
nial, Federal, Transcendental, Ante- 
bellum, and Twentieth Century. May 
be repeated with change of period. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

CRW 2001 Introduction to Creative 
Writing (3). Beginning course de- 
signed to acquaint students with ele- 
mentary critical vocabulary and 
writing skills necessary for the writing 
of poems and short fiction. Students 
may also be required to read and dis- 
cuss published writing. Prerequisite: 
ENC 1 101 and ENC 1 102 or equiva- 
lent. 

CRW 31 1 1 Narrative Techniques (3). 

Analysis of and excercises in the el- 
ments of fiction: point of view, con- 
flict, characterization, tone. Students 
will do various short assignments and 
one short story. Reading of published 



88 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



fiction will also be required. Prereq- 
uisite: CRW2001. 

CRW 331 1 Poetic Techniques (3). 

Analysis of and exercises in poetic 
techniques. Students will write poems 
in which they employ one or more 
technical skills. Reading and discus- 
sion of published poems will be re- 
quired. Prerequisite: CRW 2001. 

CRW 4110 Writing Fiction (5). An inter- 
mediate course in writing fiction. Pre- 
requisite: CRW 31 11. 

CRW 4310 Writing Poetry (5). An inter- 
mediate course in writing poetry. Pre- 
requisite: CRW 3311. 

CRW 4900 Independent Study in 
Creative Writing (3). Development 
and completion of an independent 
project in creative writing undertaken 
with the consent of the instructor. Pre- 
requisite: CRW 2001. 

CRW 4930 Special Topics in Creative 
Writing (1-5). A course designed to 
give students an opportunity to pur- 
sue special studies in aspects of crea- 
tive writing not otherwise offered. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: CRW 
2001. 

CRW 4931 Special Topics in Creative 
Writing (1-5). Gives students an oppor- 
tunity to pursue special studies in as- 
pects of creative writing not 
otherwise offered. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: CRW 2001 and three 
hours of CRW on the 3000/4000 level. 

CRW 5130 Advanced Fiction Work- 
shop (5). Practice in the techniques 
and analysis of fiction through the 
reading, discussion and revision of stu- 
dent manuscripts in a workshop set- 
ting. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Nine hours undergraduate CRW 
coursework. 

CRW 5331 Advanced Poetry Work- 
shop (5). Practice in the techniques 
and analysis of poetry through the 
reading, discussion and revision of stu- 
dent manuscripts in a workshop set- 
ting. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Nine hours undergraduate CRW 
coursework. 

CRW 5620 Advanced Screenwriting 
Workshop (5). Practice in the tech- 
niques and analysis of screenwriting 
through the reading, discussion, and 
revision of student manuscripts in a 
workshop setting. May be repeated. 
Prerequisite: Nine hours undergradu- 
ate CRW coursework. 

CRW 5934 Special Topics in Creative 
Writing (1-5). A course designed to 
give students an opportunity to pur- 



sue special studies in aspects of 
creative writing not otherwise of- 
fered. May be repeated. 

CRW 5935 Special Topics in Creative 
Writing (1-5). Gives students an oppor- 
tunity to pursue special studies in as- 
pects of creative writing not 
otherwise offered. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: CRW 2001 and three 
hours of CRW on the 3000/4000 level. 

ENC 1930 Essay Writing (3). A course 
in writing short descriptive, analytic, 
and argumentative essays. Does not 
fulfill core curriculum requirement. Stu- 
dents who have completed ENC 
1 101 or ENC 1 102, or both, cannot re- 
ceive credit for this course. Written 
work meets state composition require- 
ment of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 1 101 Freshman Composition (3). 

Students will be introduced to the 
principles and process of expository, 
persuasive, and reflective writing. The 
first of a two-semester freshman com- 
position sequence. Written work 
meets state composition requirement 
of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 1 102 Literary Analysis (3). A con- 
tinuation of ENC 1 101. Develops an 
analytical, aesthetic, and cultural sen- 
sitivity to literature and further ex- 
plores the techniques of composition 
and library research. 

ENC 1200 Business Letter and Reports 
(3). Intensive instruction and practice 
in the organization, content, and 
style of business letters of all kinds: spe- 
cial correspondence formats (bid pro- 
posals, customer relations), 
memoranda, feasibility reports, 
speeches, and group conference re- 
ports. Written work meets state com- 
position requirement of 6,000 written 
words. 

ENC 2210 Technical Writing (3). Effec- 
tive presentation of technical and 
semi-technical information: technical 
description, information gathering, 
general technical reports, organiza- 
tion and development of informa- 
tion, process communication. Written 
work meets state composition require- 
ment of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 2301 Expository Writing (3). An 

advanced composition course in the 
techniques of exposition, argumenta- 
tion, and persuasion. Written work 
meets state composition requirement 
of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 321 1 Report and Technical Writ- 
ing (3). For business, professional, and 
scientific students needing practice 



in collecting, organizing, interpret- 
ing, and presenting factual material. 

ENC 331 1 Advanced Writing and Re- 
search (3). Provides instruction in the 
concepts and methods of critical re- 
sponse and argumentation, and in 
the formulation, analysis, and presen- 
tation of original research in ex- 
tended academic papers. Written 
work meets state composition require- 
ment of 6,000 written words. Prereq-. 
uisites: ENC 1101, ENC 1102 or 
equivalent. 

ENC 3317 Writing Across the Curricu- 
lum (3). An interdisciplinary, upper di- 
vision, Gordon Rule, writing course in 
which students explore substance 
and style as they compose essays on 
subjects from various fields. Written 
work meets state composition require- 
ment of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 4240 Report Writing (3). Instruc- 
tion and practice in writing reports for 
practical purposes. Collecting, organ- 
izing, and interpreting facts, then writ- 
ing up findings in report form and 
style. Includes recommendation re- 
ports, use of graphical elements, writ- 
ing manuals and instructions, physical 
research reports, feasibility reports, 
progress reports, other specialized re- 
port formats. Prerequisite: ENC 1200 
or ENC 2210. Written work meets state 
composition requirement of 6,000 writ- 
ten words. 

ENC 4241 Scientific Writing (3). Devel- 
ops skills necessary to write laboratory 
reports, scientific proposals, articles, 
research reports, progress reports, 
and seminar presentations. Written 
work meets state composition require- 
ment of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 4930 Special Topics in Composi- 
tion (3). Allows students to refine non- 
fiction writing skills in a variety of 
genres and roles. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: ENC 1101, ENC 1 102 or 
equivalent. Written work meets state 
composition requirement of 6,000 writ- 
ten words. 

ENG 2001 Modes of Inquiry (3). A re- 
search and report writing course. A fi- 
nal research project is required. Basic 
bibliographical tools, library use, and 
technical and scientific reporting will 
be the main subject matter. There will 
also be an emphasis on style, struc- 
ture, and tone in a variety of re- 
search modes. 

ENG 2012 Approaches to Literature 
(3). In this course, students will study 
the process of analyzing the mean- 
ing and artistry of literary texts. They 
will read and interpret representative 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 89 



poems, short stories, and plays. Writ- 
ten work meets state composition re- 
quirement of 6,000 written words. 

ENG 2100 Introduction to Film (3). This 
course will introduce students to the 
basic artistic and compositional ele- 
ments of film and the analysis of the 
relationship between technical and 
aesthetic aspects of film. Prerequisite: 
ENC 1101. 

ENG 3138 The Movies (3). Viewing 
and discussion of films, with attention 
to cinematic ways of story-telling and 
to the popular film as an expression 
of cultural values. May be retaken for 
credit with change of content. 

ENG 4013 History of Literary Criticism 
(3). A study of the major texts in liter- 
ary criticism and theory from Plato to 
the present. 

ENG 4022 Rhetoric and Poetics (3). 

Ancient and modern theory and 
practice in discussing the formal prop- 
erties of elevated language. 

ENG 4023 Semiotics and Narratology 
(3). This course studies Semiotics (the 
science of signs and sign system) and 
Narratology (theories about the na- 
ture of narratives) in an attempt to 
characterize the nature of how a 
story gets told/shown. 

ENG 4043 Contemporary Literary The- 
ory and Criticism (3). An examination 
of the works of recent literary theorists. 

ENG 41 19 Film Humor and Comedy 
(3). Examines the nature of humor 
and comedy and its relation to film 
narrative. Films from all periods of 
cinematic history will be viewed. 

ENG 4121 History of the Film (3). Dis- 
cussion, with examples, of the devel- 
opment of cinematic art, from its 
European and American beginnings 
to its place as a major world art form. 

ENG 4132 Studies in the Film (3). Inten- 
sive examination of the work of a par- 
ticular nation, group, or director. May 
also explore various film genres, e.g., 
documentary, horror, the Western. 
With change of content, may be re- 
taken for credit. 

ENG 4134 Women and Film (3). An ex- 
amination of how women have been 
represented in dominant commercial 
films and how women filmmakers 
have responded to the appropriation 
of the image of women through alter- 
native film narratives. 

ENG 4135 The Rhetoric of Cinema (3). 

This is an examination of how films are 
constructed cinematically and narra- 



tively to involve audiences on aes- 
thetic, intellectual and ideological 
levels. 

ENG 4906 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations, with the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

ENG 4936 Honors Seminar (3). De- 
signed specifically for honors students 
and other superior, highly motivated 
students. Seminar topics will vary from 
semester to semester. 

ENG 4949 Cooperative Education in 
English (1-3). A student majoring in 
English may spend one or two semes- 
ters fully employed in industry or gov- 
ernment in a capacity relating to the 
major. Prerequisite: Permission of Co- 
operative Education Program and 
major department. 

ENG 5009 Literary Criticism and Schol- 
arship (3). Techniques and goals of 
humanistic research, bibliography, 
and critical commentary. 

ENG 5018 Practical Criticism (3). Ap- 
plies various critical theories - e.g. the 
formalistic, historical, structural, arche- 
typal, sociological, etc. - to specific lit- 
erary productions. 

ENG 5058 Form and Theory of Con- 
temporary Literature (3). Various ap- 
proaches and theories of practice in 
the major genres of imaginative writ- 
ing, including development and ar- 
ticulation of the creative esthetic. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

ENG 5907 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, reports on independent in- 
vestigations, with the consent of the 
Chairperson. 

ENL 201 1 Survey of British Literature I 
(3). Students will read and discuss ma- 
jor British works written from the Old 
English period through 1750. Works 
will be examined within an historical 
context. 

ENL 2021 Survey of British Literature II 
(3). Students will read and discuss ma- 
jor British works written between 1 750 
and the present. The works will be ex- 
amined in an historical context. 

ENL 31 12 Development of the Novel: 
The 18th Century (3). A study of the 
development of the novel in England 
from the early attempts by Defoe 
and others to the Gothic novel. 

ENL 3122 Development of the Novela: 
The 19th Century (3). A study of the 



development of the novel in Eng- 
land from Austen to Henry James; 
some of the novelists to be dis- 
cussed are Bronte, Eliot and Dickens. 

ENL 3132 Development of the Novel: 
The 20th Century (3). A study of the 
development of the novel in England 
from Conrad to the present; some of 
the novelists to be discussed are 
Lawrence, Woolf, and Joyce. 

ENL 3261 19th Century British Women 
Novelists (3). Examines fiction written 
by women in the 19th century, includ- 
ing classical realist, gothic, sensation, 
working-class, and New Woman nov- 
els. Authors include Austen, Eliot, . 
Bronte, and Gaskell. 

ENL 4161 Renaissance Drama (3). A 

study of non-Shakespearean drama 
of the English Renaissance. Among 
the dramatists to be read are 
Johnson, Kyd, Marlowe and Webster. 

ENL4171 Restoration and 18 th Cen- 
tury Drama (3). Representative plays 
from the period 1660-1800. May in- 
clude plays by Dryden, Etherege, Wy- 
cherley, Otway, Congreve, Farquhar, 
Gay, Fielding, Goldsmith and Sheri- 
dan. 

ENL 42 10 Studies in Medieval Litera- 
ture (3). Students will read, discuss 
and write about works of medieval 
English literature from the time of Be- 
owulf to that of Chaucer. 

ENL 42 12 Medieval Women Writers 
(3). The contributions of medieval 
women to literary history are exam- 
ined. Among the writers to be studied 
are Margery Kemp and Marie de 
France. 

ENL 4222 Studies in Renaissance Lit- 
erature (3). Students will read, discuss, 
an'enaissance excluding William 
Shakespeare. 

ENL 4225 Spenser (3). Study of the 
works of one of the most important 
figures of the sixteenth century includ- 
ing The Faerie Queen, The 
Shepheards Calender and Amorefti. 

ENL 4222 Renaissance: Prose and Po- 
etry (3). A study of Renaissance po- 
etry and prose to suggest their 
contributions to literacy history. 
Among the writers to be read are 
Wyatt, Sidney, Donne, More and Ba- 
con. 

ENL 4230 Studies in Restoration and 
18th-century Literature (3). An in- 
depth study of the major figures in 
English Literature from 1660 to 1800, a 
period of transition between the Ren- 
aissance and modern times. Some of 



90 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



the writers who will be studied are 
Dryden. Pope. Swift, Jonson. and 
Fielding. 

ENL 4241 Romanticism I (3). Focuses 
on the first generation of Romantic 
writers, including Blake. Wordsworth, 
Wollstonecraft. and Coleridge. 

ENL 4242 Romanticism II (3). Focuses 
on the second generation of Ro- 
mantic writers including Byron, 
Keats, Shelley, and Bronte. 

ENL 4243 Studies in Romanticism (3). 
Examination of recurring themes 
and motifs in Romantic literature. 

ENL 4251 Victorian Literature (3). 
Study of the poetry and prose of the 
Victorian Age (1832-1901). Among 
the authors to be read are Dickens. 
Eliot, Carlyle, Ruskin. Arnold, Ten- 
nyson and Browning. 

ENL 4254 Late Victorian Fiction (3). 
An examination of the variety of fic- 
tion written from 1880-1901. Some of 
the writers to be studied include 
Wells. Zangwill, Gissing and D'Arcy. 

ENL 4260 Studies in 19th-century Brit- 
ish Literature (3). Students will read, 
discuss, and write about literary 
works produced by British Romantic 
and Victorian writers between the 
Age of Wordsworth and the death 
of Queen Victoria. 

ENL 4273 Studies in Modern British Lit- 
erature (3). This course focuses on 
the literature of the 20th Century, 
limiting itself to British writers, but in- 
cluding the various genres of the 
modern and post modern periods. 

ENL 4274 Yeats and His Contempo- 
raries (3). Studies the major works of 
William Butler Yeats and some of his 
contemporaries and associates. 

ENL 4303 Major British Writers (3). 
Each section will consider the life- 
work of an author such as Chaucer, 
Spenser, Milton. Pope. Wordsworth. 
Dickens. Browning, Joyce, or others. 
May be repeated. 

ENL 43 11 Chaucer (3). Study of Geof- 
frey Chaucer's contributions to Eng- 
lish literacy history. Among the works 
to be examined are The Canterbury 
Tales. The Parliament of Fowls and 
The Book of the Duchess. 

ENL 4320 Shakespeare: Histories (3). 
Reading and informal dramatic in- 
terpretation of representative plays. 

ENL 4321 Shakespeare: Comedies 
(3). Reading and informal dramatic 



interpretation of representative 
plays. 

ENL 4322 Shakespeare: Tragedies 
(3). Reading and informal dramatic 
interpretation of representative 
plays. 

ENL 4341 Milton (3). Study of the po- 
etic and prose contributions of John 
Milton including the influence of the 
literature of antiquity on him and in- 
fluence on subsequent poets. 

ENL 4370 Virginia Woolf and Her Cir- 
cle (3). Focusing on the works of Vir- 
ginia Woolf. This course also explores 
how the members of the 
Bloomsburg Circle influenced this 
English novelist. 

ENL 4503 Periods in English Literature 
(3). Individual sections will read a 
group of literary works from one 
specified period of English literature, 
such as the Medieval, Renaissance. 
Victorian, twentieth-century and 
contemporary periods. May be re- 
peated with change of period. 

ENL 4930 Special Topics in English Lit- 
erature (3). An examination of the 
different aspects of English litera- 
ture. May be repeated with change 
of content. 

ENL 5220 Major British Literary Fig- 
ures (3). Each section will consider 
the lifework of an author such as 
Chaucer. Spenser, Milton, Pope, 
Wordsworth, Dickens, Browning, 
Joyce, or others. May be repeated. 

ENL 5505 Periods in English Literature 
(3). The literature and criticism re- 
garding one specified period of Eng- 
lish Literature, such as Medieval, 
Renaissance, Victorian, Twentieth 
Century, and Contemporary. May 
be repeated with change of period. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LIN 2002 Introduction to Language 
(3). The study of the nature of hu- 
man language, its origins, and its re- 
lation to thinking behavior, and 
culture. An examination of the simi- 
larities and differences between spo- 
ken human languages, animal 
languages, and non verbal commu- 
nication (including sign language); 
of language variation between dia- 
lects and between different histori- 
cal stages of a language; and of 
writing systems. 

LIN 2612 Black English (3). This 
course covers the varieties of Black 
English spoken in the Americas, the 
Caribbean, and West Africa. Fo- 
cuses on the nature of these English 



varieties and their social uses within 
the community, literature, and edu- 
cational system. 

LIN 3013 Introduction to General Lin- 
guistics (3). Study of the sounds, vo- 
cabulary, and sentence patterns of 
standard modern English. Other top- 
ics include meaning, social and re- 
gional dialects, language change, 
and style. 

LIN 3670 Grammatical Usage (3). 

The study of formal, traditional us- 
age of English grammar and me- 
chanics. Prerequisites: ENC 1 101 and 
ENC 1102. 

LIN 4122 Historical Linguistics (3). The 

study of linguistic methodology for 
determining historical and genetic 
relationships among languages. Pre- 
requisite: Introductory course in Lin- 
guistics or permission of instructor. 

LIN 4321 General Phonology (3). The 

study of phonological processes in 
language and linguistic methodol- 
ogy for phonological analysis. Pre- 
requisite: Introductory course in 
Linguistics or permission of instructor. 

LIN 4430 General Morphology and 
Syntax (3). The study of linguistic 
methodology for determining the 
morphological and syntactic struc- 
tures of languages. Prerequisite: In- 
troductory course in Linguistics or 
permission of instructor. 

LIN 4612 Black English (3). This 

course is a linguistic approach to 
the characteristics and functions of 
Black English and the current social 
controversies surrounding it. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

LIN 4651 Gender and Language (3). 

Examines the evidence on a variety 
of questions regarding women and 
language, including women's 
speech in English and other lan- 
guages, sexist language, and the re- 
lationship between language and 
societal attitudes towards women. 

LIN 4680 Modern English Grammar 
(3). Practical study of syntax. 

LIN 4702 Applied Linguistics (3). Lin- 
guistics in the classroom. English as a 
second language. Stylistics. Dialects. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3013. 

LIN 4801 Semantics (3). The study of 
the semantic structure of lan- 
guages. The structures underlying 
the meanings of words and underly- 
ing syntactic structures. Prerequisite: 
Introductory course in Linguistics or 
permission of instructor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 91 



LIN 4905 Independent Study (VAR). 

This course is designed for students 
who wish to pursue specialized top- 
ics in advanced Linguistics: phonet- 
ics, phonology, morphology, syntax, 
semantics, psycholinguistics, histori- 
cal linguistics, or language contact. 
Prerequisite: Introductory course in 
Linguistics or permission of instructor. 

LIN 521 1 Applied Phonetics (3). 

Study of sounds and suprasegmen- 
tals of English. Comparison of pho- 
netic features of English with those 
of other languages. Universal con- 
straints and markedness in learning 
second/foreign language pronun- 
ciation. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 
3013, or LIN 5018 or the equivalent. 

LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction (3). 

This course offers an introduction to 
the basic elements of prose fiction: 
symbolism, plot, imagery, structure, 
characterization, style, point of 
view. Prerequisite: ENC 1101. 

LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry (3). 

This course offers an introduction to 
the basic elements of poetry: im- 
agery, figurative language, diction, 
style, tone, prosody. Prerequisite: 
ENC 1101. 

LIT 2040 Introduction to Drama (3). 

This course will introduce the student 
to the basic elements of drama and 
its various forms, modes, and tech- 
niques. Students will read 10-12 
plays by representative English, 
American, and European authors. 
Prerequisite: ENC 1101. 

LIT 21 10 World Literature I (3). Sur- 
veys the literature of many cultures 
from the beginning of written texts 
through the 16th century. Usually ex- 
cludes British works. 

LIT 2120 World Literature II (3). This 
course surveys the literature of Asia 
and Europe from the 17th century to 
the present. It gives attention to the 
themes and world views these works 
embody, as well as to their artistry. 

LIT 3022 The Short Novel (3). An ex- 
amination of the variety of short nov- 
els that have been written in the 
past three centuries. Short novels 
from Europe and the Americas are 
discussed. 

LIT 3050 Forms of Satire (3). This 
course will discuss the history and 
the different forms of satire from the 
Romans to the present, including 
the works of Horace, Juvenal, Swift, 
and Byron. 



LIT 3132 Arthurian Literature (3). The 

legend of King Arthur is examined 
both in the original medieval version 
and in the subsequent retelling. 

LIT 3145 Continental Novel (3). A 

study of the works of the major Euro- 
pean novelists of the 19th and 20th 
centuries. Some of the writers whose 
work are read in translation are Tol- 
stoy. Mann, and Flaubert. 

LIT 3170 Topics in Literature and Jew- 
ish Culture (3). An examination of lit- 
erature by or about Jews in a 
variety of national, cultural, or histori- 
cal contexts. May be repeated with 
change of content. 

LIT 3190 Survey of Caribbean Litera- 
ture (3). Surveys course of the narra- 
tives, poetry, and fiction from the 
beginning of the Caribbean literary 
tradition to the present time. 

LIT 3200 Themes in Literature (3). Indi- 
vidual sections will read and discuss 
works relating to topics of current 
and enduring interest. Discussion of 
literature as it reflects the identities 
of men and women: their places in 
families in past, present, and future 
societies, in the natural world, and 
the cosmic order. May be repeated. 

LIT 3331 Classics of Children's Litera- 
ture (3). An examination of literary 
texts that form part of the imagina- 
tive experience of children, as well 
as part of our literary heritage. 

LIT 3383 Women in Literature (3). Stu- 
dents will examine the images of 
women created by European and 
American writers. The course will 
also explore the roles, historical and 
contemporary, of women writers. 

LIT 3384 Caribbean Women Writers 
(3). Examination of the writings of 
Caribbean women. 

LIT 3702 Major Literary Modes (3). In- 
dividual sections will read and dis- 
cuss the literary expression of heroic, 
tragic, comic, satiric, mythic, realis- 
tic, or others formalized views of hu- 
man existence. May be repeated. 

LIT 3202 Morality and Justice in Lit- 
erature (3). A study of the ways liter- 
ary texts articulate the values of 
their society. 

LIT 3930 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give students an oppor- 
tunity to pursue special studies not 
otherwise offered. May be repeated 
with change of content. 

LIT 4001 Major Literary Genres (3). In- 
dividual sections will read and dis- 



cuss the form and development of 
novels, drama, poetry, short fiction, 
or such special forms as biogra- 
phies, folksongs and tales, or essays, 
among other genres. May be re- 
peated. 

LIT 4041 17th Century Drama (3). A 

study of Western European drama 
of the seventeenth century includ- 
ing Calderon, Jonson, Tirso de 
Molina, Corneille, Racine, Wycher- 
ley, and Congreve. 

LIT 4188 Regional Literature in Eng- 
lish (3). Individual sections will dis- 
cuss English writing in Ireland, 
Scotland, Wales, Canada, the Carib- 
bean, India, sub-Saharan Africa, 
and Oceania, as well as distinctive 
regions in England and America. 
May be repeated. 

LIT 4192 Major Caribbean Authors 
(3). Examines the literary achieve- 
ments of major writers of the Carib- 
bean region in the social, political, 
and cultural contexts of the English, 
French, and Dutch Caribbean. 

LIT 4351 Major African Writers (3). Sur- 
veys a variety of literary texts rele- 
vant to life in post-colonial Africa. 

LIT 4403 Literature Among the Arts 
and Sciences (3). Individual sections 
will relate the study of literature to 
other disciplines in the humanities, 
fine arts, the social and natural sci- 
ences. May be repeated. 

LIT 4420 The Psychological Novel 

(3). This course concentrates on nov- 
els which explore the complexities 
of the human psyche. 

LIT 4930 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students 
an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. May 
be repeated. 

LIT 4931 Special Topics in Women's 
Literature (3). An examination of dif- 
ferent aspects of literature by 
women. May be repeated with a 
change of content. 

LIT 5934 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students 
an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. May 
be repeated. 



92 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Environmental Studies 

John Parker, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Bradley Bennett, Associate Professor 
Madev Bhat, Assistant Professor 
Alice Clarke, Assistant Professor 
Constantine Hadjllambrinos, 

Assistant Professor 
Krishnaswamy Jayachandran, 

Assistant Professor 
Joel Heinen, Associate Professor 
Fiona Horsfall, Research Scientist 
Stephen P. Leatherman, Professor 
David Lee, Professor 
Jack Meeder, Research Scientist 
Tom Pliske, Instructor 
Gary Rand, Assistant Professor 
Mike Ross, Research Scientist 

Affiliated Faculty 

Jerry Brown, Sociology/Anthropology 

George Dalrymple, Biological 

Sciences 
Jim Fourqurean, Biological Sciences 
David Genereux, Geology 
Joel Gottlieb, Political Science 
Kevin Hill, Political Science 
James Huchingson, Religious Studies 
Rudolf Jaffe, Chemistry 
Jeff Joens, Chemistry 
Ronald Jones, Biological Sciences 
Farrokh Jhabvala, International 

Relations 
Suzanne Koptur, Biological Sciences 

Rod Neumann, International 

Relations 
Steve Oberbauer, Biological 

Sciences 
George O'Brien, Education 
Betsy Smith, Social Work 
Berrin Tansel, Civil and 

Environmental Engineering 
Joel Trexler, Biological Sciences 
Bill Vickers, Sociology/Anthropology 

This department prepares students 
to work in professions with an envi- 
ronmental focus. The Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree emphasizes the 
chemical and ecological aspects of 
environmental analysis. The Bache- 
lor of Arts degree is broader, with an 
emphasis on the political, social and 
economic aspects of environmental 
issues. This is an interdisciplinary pro- 
gram and particularly relies on assis- 
tance of faculty from outside 
departments who are affiliated with 
Environmental Studies. 



Bachelor of Science in 
Environmental Studies 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 
BSC 1 01 0L General Biology Lab I 
BSC1011 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab II 
CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth 

Science 
GLY 1010L Introduction to Earth 

Science Lab 

and 
EVR 3010 Energy Flow in Natural 

and Man-made 

Systems 

or 
PHY 2023 Survey of General 

Physics 
MAC 2132 Pre-Calculus 

Mathematics 

or 
MAC 1102 College Algebra 

and 
MAC 1114 Trigonometry 

Courses required for the degree: 

ECO 2023 Principles of 

Microeconomics 
To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Lower or Upper Division 
Requirements 

ECO 2023 Microeconomics 3 

STA 3111 Statistics I 4 

STA 3112 Statistics II 2 

or 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 4 

CHM 2200 Survey of Organic 

Chemistry 3 

CHM 2200L Survey of Organic 

Chemistry Lab 1 

or 
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 4 
CHM2210L Organic Chemistry I 

Lab 1 



and 
CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry II 3 
CHM 221 1L Organic Chemistry II 

Lab 1 

Upper Division Program 
Recommended Courses 

ENC2210 Technical Writing 3 

POS 2042 American 

Government 

or 
POS 3424 Legislative Process 3 
Required Courses 
Three of the four following courses 
EVR 4026 Ecology of Biotic 

Resources 3 

EVR 4211 Water Resources 3 

EVR 4231 Air Resources 3 

EVR 43 12 Energy Resources 3 
PCB 3043 Ecology 3 

PCB 3043L Ecology Lab 1 

CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis 3 
CHM 3120L Quantitative Analysis 

Lab 2 

ECP 3302 Introduction to 

Environmental 

Economics 3 

REL 3492 Nature and Human 

Values 3 

PUP 4203 Environmental Politics 3 

or 
EVR 4352 U.S. Environmental 

Policy 3 

EVR 4920 Environmental Studies 

Seminar 1 

EVR 4905 Independent Study 2 
Electives 17 

Students are urged to develop 
an area of specialization of 12 to 15 
credits or a minor in consultation 
with an advisor. 
Total 60 semester hours 



Bachelor of Arts in 
Environmental Studies 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 

Required Courses 

BSC 101 1 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab I 
CHM 1032 Survey of Chemistry I 
CHM 1032L Survey of Chemistry 

Labi 

or 
CHM 1033 Survey of Chemistry II 
CHM 1033L Survey of Chemistry 

Lab II 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 93 



ECO 2023 Microeconomics 
MAC 1102 College Algebra 

Recommended Courses 

Energy and the Natural Environment. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 
Upper Division Preparation 

Recommended Courses 

ENC2210 Technical Writing 3 

POS 2042 American 

Government 

or 
POS 3424 Legislative Process 3 

Lower or Upper Division 
Requirements 
Required Courses: (31) 
EVR3010 Energy Flow in 

Natural and 

Man-made Systems 3 
EVR 301 1 Environmental 

Resources and 

Pollution 3 

EVR 301 1L Environmental 

Resources 

and Pollution Lab 1 
EVR 3013 Ecology of 

South Florida 3 

EVR 30 1 3L Ecology of South 

Florida Lab 1 

PUP 4203 Environmental 

Politics 3 

or 
EVR 4352 U.S. Environmental 

Policy 3 

REL 3492 Nature and Human 

Values 3 

or 
ANT 3403 Cultural Ecology 3 

ECO 2023 Microeconomics 3 
STA 3111 Statistics I 4 

ECP 3302 Introduction to 

Environmental 

Economics 3 

EVR 4920 Environmental 

Seminar 1 

EVR 4905 Independent Study 3 
Area of Specialization Courses: 
(12) 

The student must take at least 
twelve additional credits in an ap- 
proved area of specialization, such 
as energy and resource manage- 
ment, human ecology, 
international/political issues, ur- 
ban/environmental planning and 
policy, geography or ecology. Mi- 



nors may be used as an area of spe- 
cialization. 

Electives 17 

Total 60 semester hours 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate 
degree in environmental studies 
may also take part in the Coopera- 
tive Education Program conducted 
in conjunction with the Department 
of Cooperative Education in the Divi- 
sion of Student Affairs. The student 
spends one or two semesters fully 
employed in industry or a govern- 
mental agency. For further informa- 
tion consult the Department of 
Cooperative Education. 

Environmental Internships 

Students interested in job-related 
academic internships should contact 
the Environmental Studies office, CP 
323. For details on compensation, 
benefits, and academic credit, con- 
tact Dr. Jack Parker. 



Course Descriptions 

(Course descriptions are also found 
in catalog sections of all participat- 
ing departments. For assistance see 
an advisor.) 

Definition of Prefixes 

EVR-Environmental Studies. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

EVR 3010 Energy Flow in Natural and 
Man-made Systems (3). A course for 
non-science majors, examining en- 
ergy use and efficiency, nuclear 
and renewable energy sources (in- 
cluding solar energy), and their envi- 
ronmental impacts. Prerequisite: 
College algebra or equivalent. (F,S) 

EVR 301 1 Environmental Resources 
and Pollution (3). A course for non- 
science majors, emphasizing air and 
water pollution, water resources, 
earth resources, solid waste dis- 
posal, noise pollution, and weather 
patterns. (F.S.SS) 

EVR 301 1L Environmental Science: 
Pollution Lab (1). Laboratory and 
field analyses of topics and con- 
cepts covered in EVR 301 1 . Corequi- 
site: EVR3011. (F.S.SS) 

EVR 3013 Ecology of South Florida (3) 
EVR 3013L Ecology of South Florida 
Lab (1). A course for non-science 
majors, offering an introduction to 
the ecology of South Florida 
through lectures and a series of field 



trips into several unique ecosystems, 
such as the Everglades, hardwood 
hammocks, and coastal regions. 
The course also deals with natural re- 
source conservation, wildlife man- 
agement, endangered species, 
and wilderness issues. (F.S.SS) 

EVR 3415 Population and Environ- 
ment Issues (3). Examines the his- 
tory, current status and projected 
growth of the human population in 
relation to environmental issues. Pre- 
requisite: College algebra. 

EVR 3931 Topics in Environmental 
Studies (3). An intensive analysis of a 
current environmental topic. Course 
may be repeated with change in 
content. 

EVR 3949/EVR 4949 Cooperative 
Education in Environmental Studies 
(1-3). One semester of full-time su- 
pervised work in an outside labora- 
tory taking part in the University 
Co-op Program. Limited to students 
admitted to the Co-op Program. A 
written report and supervisor evalu- 
ations will be required of each stu- 
dent. (F,S,SS) 

EVR 4026 Ecology of Biotic Re- 
sources (3). The study of renewable 
natural resources of the earth's bi- 
omes, particularly those of tropical 
forests, the factors influencing their 
productivity, conservation, and hu- 
man use. Prerequisites: BSC 1010 
andBSC 1011. 

EVR 421 1 Water Resources (3). A 

seminar dealing with various as- 
pects of water use, water pollution 
problems, chemistry and ecology of 
South Florida's waters. Ecology is rec- 
ommended. Prerequisites: CHM 
1045 and CHM 1046 or equivalent 
and general biology. (F) 

EVR 4231 Air Resources (3). Com- 
mon air pollutants - their sources 
and methods of control. Different 
legislative and administrative ap- 
proaches will be studied. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 1045 and CHM 1046 or 
equivalent. (S) 

EVR 4312 Energy Resources (3). Semi- 
nar dealing with power and energy 
production in modern society, fun- 
damental energy relationships of in- 
dustrial and domestic processes. 
Prerequisite: EVR 3010 or PHY 2023 or 
equivalent. (SS) 

EVR 4321 Sustainable Resource De- 
velopment (3). An overview of so- 
cial, economic and ecological 
approaches to sustainable resource 
development. Examines various poli- 



94 / College of Arts ond Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



cies for harmonizing economic 
growth and environmental sustain- 
ability. 

EVR 4323 Restoration Ecology (3). 

Principles and practices of environ- 
mental restoration, re-creation and 
enhancement. Examines ecological 
theory that relates to restoration 
through case studies from southern 
Florida. Prerequisites: EVR 3013 or 
PCB 3043 or permission. 

EVR 4351 U.S. Energy Policy (3). Poli- 
cies governing the utilization of en- 
ergy in the U.S. Focuses on the 
physical, political and social con- 
straints that shape energy policy in 
this country. Prerequisites: EVR 3010 
or permission of instructor. 

EVR 4352 U.S. Environmental Policy 
(3). Introduction to U.S. environ- 
mental policy. Reviews primary U.S. 
environmental legislation and the 
role of regulation. 

EVR 4401 Conservation Biology (3). 

Applies modern theory from ecol- 
ogy and population genetics to con- 
servation issues. Topics include 
population viability studies, reserve 
design, forms of rarity, and policy is- 
sues. Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and 
BSC 1011. (S) 

EVR 4905 Research and Inde- 
pendent Study (Var). Student devel- 
ops and carries out research project 
with guidance from professor. Per- 
mission of instructor. 

EVR 4920 Environmental Seminar (1). 

A series of talks by FIU and external 
experts addressing both develop- 
ment of professional skills and cur- 
rent environmental topics. Students 
prepare short presentations. 

EVR 4934 Special Topics (1-3). Ad- 
vanced undergraduate level course 
dealing with selected environ- 
mental topics. Course may be re- 
peated with change in content. 

EVR 5061 South Florida Ecology: 
Field Studies (3). Introduction to 
ecology of South Florida. Series of 
field trips to unique ecosystems (Ev- 
erglades, hardwood hammocks, 
coastal regions). No science back- 
ground required. Intended for 
teachers. Not intended for Environ- 
mental Studies students. 

EVR 5065 Ecology of Costa Rican 
Rainforest (3). Intensive study of Cen- 
tral American tropical forest ecosys- 
tems conducted for two weeks in 
Costa Rica in sites ranging from low- 
land to high montains. Primarily for 



teachers. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 
(SS) 

EVR 5066 Ecology of the Amazon 
Flooded Forest (3). Study of the ecol- 
ogy of the flooded forest with em- 
phasis on the relationships between 
plants and animals and the annual 
flooding cycle. The course includes 
a two-week field study at river . 
camp in Peru. Prerequisites: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instruc- 
tor. (SS) 

EVR 5067 Tropical Forest Conserva- 
tion and Utilization (3). Distribution 
and classification of tropical forest 
ecosystems, their description and 
the ecological principles governing 
their function. Factors influencing 
tropical forest utilization and destruc- 
tion, and strategies for sustainable 
use and conservation. Prerequisites: 
EVR 5355 or permission of instructor. 

EVR 5141 Environmental Nuclear 
Chemistry (3). Nuclear reactions 
and the nature of radioactivity. 
Properties and uses of radioactive 
isotopes, fission, and fusion. Introduc- 
tion to reactor technology. Consent 
of instructor required. 

EVR 5236 Air Pollution Dynamics (3). 

A course designed to give an under- 
standing of the fates of atmospheric 
pollutants. Scavenging processes in 
the atmosphere; radiation, resi- 
dence times, chemical reactions, 
global transport process, point 
source dispersion and modeling cal- 
culations. Prerequisite: EVS 3360 or 
EVR 4231. 

EVR 5300 Topics in Urban Ecology 
(3). Topics include urban and subur- 
ban ecosystems emphasizing en- 
ergy relations, ecological functions 
of urban landscapes, urban wildlife, 
urban forestry and ecological issues 
relevant to human health and well- 
being. Prerequisites: PCB 3043 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EVR 5313 Renewable Energy 
Sources (3). An analysis of renew- 
able energy sources and energy effi- 
ciency including wind, biomass, 
geothermal, hydroelectric, solid 
waste, solar heating, solar cooling, 
and solar electricity. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

EVR 5315 Energy Resources and Sys- 
tems Analysis (3). Detailed analysis 
of energy flows in natural and man- 
made systems. Energy systems analy- 
sis. Energy use patterns. Conventional 
and alternate sources of energy. 



EVR 5320 Environmental Resource 
Management (3). The scientific and 
philosophical basis for the manage- 
ment of renewable and non-renew- 
able energy, mineral, air, water, and 
biotic resources. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instruc- 
tor. (F) 

EVR 5353 International Energy Policy 
(3). Focuses on the distribution of 
global energy resources and re- 
lated issues. A comparison of the en- 
ergy policies of various countries 
serves as the basis for exploring alter- 
native energy policy approaches. 
Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or permission 
of instructor. 

EVR 5355 Environmental Resource 
Policy (3). A survey of international 
and national environmental policy 
and the legal, economic, and ad- 
ministrative dimensions of interna- 
tional accords and selected U.S. 
law. Prerequisites: EVR 5320 or per- 
mission of instructor. (S) 

EVR 5360 Protected Area Manage- 
ment (3). Interdisciplinary examina- 
tion of ecological, administrative, 
and socio-economic aspects of 
managing protected natural areas. 
Case studies from developed and 
developing nations. 

EVR 5405 International Biological 
Conservation Accords (3). Survey of 
international biological conserva- 
tion agreements. Topics include bi- 
lateral migratory wildlife 
agreements, the Berne Convention 
on Migratory Wildlife, CITES, Ramsar, 
the UNCED Biodiversity Treaty and 
the Statement of Principles on For- 
ests. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

EVR 5406 U.S. Endangered Species 
Management (3). History and imple- 
mentation of the U.S. Endangered 
Species Act. Topics include legal 
and administrative aspects, 
reauthorization, procedures for re- 
covery planning and conflict resolu- 
tion, and biological measures of 
success. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or 
permission of instructor. 

EVR 5410 Women and the Popula- 
tion/Environment Equation (3). 

Women's role in family and society 
as an important component of the 
population and environment equa- 
tion. Factors such as education, em- 
ployment, and health are explored. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

EVR 5907 Research and Inde- 
pendent Study (VAR). The student 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 95 



works with a professor on a research 
project. Variable credit. 

EVR 5935 Special Topics (VAR). A 

graduate-level course dealing with 
selected environmental topics. The 
content will not necessarily be the 
same each time the course is of- 
fered. 

EVR 5936 Topics in Environmental 
Studies (3). An analysis of several 
current environmental topics. Rec- 
ommended for primary and secon- 
dary school teachers. 



Geology 



Gautam Sen, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Bradford Clement, Professor 
Laurel Collins,, Research Scienfist 
Charles Connor, Research Associate 
Grenville Draper, Professor 
David Genereux, Assistant Professor 
Rosemary Hickey-Vargas, Associate 

Professor 
Martha Gamper-Longoria, Research 

Associate 
Michael Gross, Assistant Professor 
Jose Longoria, Professor 
Andrew Macfarlane, Associate 

Professor 
Florentin Maurrasse, Professor 
Claudia Owen, Lecturer 
Edward Robinson, Research 

Associate 
James Saiers, Assistant Professor 
Dean Whitman, Assistant Professor 
Huai-Jen Yang, Post-Doctoral Fellow 
Eric Zechner, Post-Doctoral Fellow 

Geologists are employed widely in 
environmental and hydrologic as- 
sessment and remediation, petro- 
leum, mining and mineral industries. 
Geologists also are involved in basic 
research and teaching. Knowledge 
of geology is essential for under- 
standing problems of groundwater 
supply, environmental hazards, 
geotechnical engineering and natu- 
ral resources. 

Well-equipped laboratories in the 
Geology Department allow students 
to learn the major techniques of the 
earth sciences. The geology pro- 
gram prepares students to become 
licensed Professional Geologists 
(P.G.) in the State of Florida. 

The program offers a B.S. degree 
in Geology with an optional environ- 
mental geology track and a 
broader-based interdisciplinary B.A. 
in Geology. Only grades of 'C or 
better will be accepted for required 
courses in either program option. A 
minor in geology is also available. 

Bachelor of Science 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division 

Common Prerequisites 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 



GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth 

Science 
GLY 1010L Introduction to Earth 

Science Lab 
MAC 23 11 Calculus I 
PHY 2048 and 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L and 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2053 and 
PHY 2054 Physics Without 

Calculus II 
PHY2053Land 
PHY 2054L Physics Without 

Calculus Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 
GLY 1 100 Historical Geology 
GLY 1 100L Historical Geology Lab 
BSC1011 General Biology II 
BSC1011L General Biology Lab II 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 

Upper Division 

Required Courses 

GLY 3202 Earth Materials 3 

GLY 3202L Earth Materials Lab 2 
GLY 4311 Petrology 3 

GLY 431 1L Petrology Lab 2 

GLY 451 1 Stratigraphy and Lab 4 
GLY 4400 Structural Geology 3 
GLY 4400L Structural Geology 

Lab 1 

GLY 4822 Introduction to 

Hydrogeology 3 

GLY 4791 Field Geology and 

Geologic Mapping 3-6 

or 
GLY 3881 Environmental 

Geology Field 

Methods 3 

or 
GLY 3782 Geology Field 

Excursion 3 

Electives 9-12 

Three courses at the 3000 to 5000 
levels offered by the Geology De- 
partment (but excluding Environ- 
mental Geology GLY 3030, and 
Earth Resources GEO 3510) selected 
to form a concentration in consult- 
ation with a department advisor. 

For example, to form a concen- 
tration in environmental geology, a 
student might select from: Applied 
Environmental Geology (EVS 4164 & 
EVS 4164L), Remote Sensing in the 
Earth Sciences (GLY 3754), Florida 
Geologic and Hydrologic Systems 
(GLY 4823), Geochemistry (GLY 
5246). 



96 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

This program is for the student who 
requires a broad background in ge- 
ology for a career in science educa- 
tion or public or private 
administration dealing with earth 
and environmental sciences. 

Lower Division 

Common Prerequisites 

BSC 101 1 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab II 
CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth 

Science 
GLY 1010L Introduction to Earth 

Science Lab 
or 

GLY 3030 Environmental Geology 
GLY 3030L Environmental Geology 

Lab 
GLY 1 100 Historical Geology 
GLY 1 100L Historical Geology Lab 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 
PHY 2053 and 
PHY 2054 Physics Without 

Calculus II 
PHY 2053L and 
PHY 2054L Physics Without 

Calculus Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 
GLY 1 1 00 Historical Geology 
GLY 1 1 00L Historical Geology Lab 
BSC 101 1 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab II 

Required Courses 

GLY 3202 Earth Materials 3 

GLY 3202L Earth Materials Lab 2 

GLY 4311 Petrology 3 

GLY 43 1 1 L Petrology Lab 2 

GLY 4511 Stratigraphy 4 

GLY 4400 Structural Geology 3 
GLY 4400L Structural Geology 

Lab 1 
GLY 4822 Introduction to 

Hydrogeology 3 

Electives 

Three approved 3000 or 4000 level 
courses in either geology (excluding 
Earth Resources. GEO 3510 and Envi- 
ronmental Geology, GLY 3030), 



other science departments or in the 
College of Engineering and Design, 

Minor in Geology 
Required courses 

GLY 1010 or GLY 3030 and GLY 1 100 
with labs, and four additional geol- 
ogy courses. At least two of the four 
additional courses must be taken 
with accompanying labs, one of 
which must be at the 4000 level. 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate 
degree in Geology may also take 
part in the Cooperative Education 
Program conducted with the De- 
partment of Cooperative Education 
in the Division of Student Affairs. The 
student spends one or two semes- 
ters fully employed in industry or a 
government agency. For further in- 
formation consult the Department 
of Geology or the Department of 
Cooperative Education. 



Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be 
taken prior to the corresponding lec- 
ture course. Laboratories must be 
taken concurrently where noted, 
but students must register for the 
laboratory separately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

EVS-Environmental Science; GEO- 
Geography/Systematic; GLY-Geol- 
ogy; MET-Meteorology; OCE- 
Oceanography; OCG-Oceanogra- 
phy-Geological; OCP-Oceanogra- 
phy/Physical. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

EVS 4164 Applied Environmental 
Geology (3). 

EVS 4164L Applied Environmental 
Geology Lab (1). A survey of the 
geological and geographical fac- 
tors critical to man's attempt to con- 
tend with the natural processes. 
Construction problems, sewers, 
waste disposal, dams, ground 
water, and terrain evaluation in rela- 
tion to the nature of the underlying 
substratum. Principles illustrated from 
South Florida and the Caribbean re- 
gion in particular. Study of the geo- 
logical factors involved in future 
development and growth of these 
areas, and conservation methods in 
relation to the geology of these ar- 
eas. Prerequisites: GLY 1010, GEO 
2200, and a sound background in 
mathematics, physics, and chemis- 
try. Laboratory must be taken con- 



currently with the course. (S in alter- 
nate years) 

GEO 2200 Physical Geography (3). 
GEO 2200L Physical Geography Lab 
(1). Survey of the physical environ- 
ment relevant to studies in regional 
geography and earth sciences. 
Natural evolution of landforms, and 
the interacting processes responsi- 
ble for these features. Environmental 
modification and deterioration 
caused by human interaction. Ef- 
fects of these changes: socio-eco- 
nomic impact and geographic 
problems. Case studies illustrated 
from South Florida and the Carib- 
bean region. (S in alternate years.) 

GEO 3510 Earth Resources (3). A 

course for non-majors dealing with 
the nature, origin, and distribution of 
mineral resources. Geology of petro- 
leum, coal, metals, etc., and prob- 
lems of their exploitation and 
depletion. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth Sci- 
ence (3). 

GLY 101 OL Introduction to Earth Sci- 
ence Lab (1). Basic survey of Earth 
materials and structure, plate tec- 
tonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, sur- 
face processes and groundwater, 
climate change, earth resources 
and the impact of geology on soci- 
ety. Prerequisites: High school or col- 
lege algebra. (Lab fees assessed) 
(F,S,SS) 

GLY 1037 Environmental Hydrology 
for High School Students (1). Environ- 
mental issues surrounding the natu- 
ral occurrence and human use of 
surface water and groundwater in 
South Florida. Includes field trips to 
local sites of hydrologic/environ- 
mental significance. 

GLY 1 100 Historical Geology (3). 
GLY 1 100L Historical Geology Lab 
(1). An introduction to the geologi- 
cal history of the earth and the geo- 
logical time scale. Evolution of 
animals and plants. Prerequisite: 
GLY 1010 or GLY 3030 or equivalent. 
Lecture and lab must be taken con- 
currently. (F) 

GLY 2072 Earth's Climate and 
Global Change (3). Introduction to 
Earth's climate and the variations of 
climate through geological and his- 
torical time. Emphasis is placed on 
the importance of the interactions 
of Earth's crust, atmosphere, bio- 
sphere and oceans in affecting the 
planet's climate. (F in alternate 
years) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 97 



GLY 2072L Earth's Climate and 
Global Change Lab (1). Practical 
analysis of the important factors af- 
fecting Earth's Climate. Analysis of 
historical and geological records of 
climate change. Corequisite: GLY 
2072. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 3030 Environmental Geology 
(3). 

GLY 3030L Environmental Geology 
Lab (1). The composition and struc- 
ture of the earth, the internal and ex- 
ternal forces acting upon it and the 
resulting surface features. Case stud- 
ies and general principles illustrated 
from South Florida and the Carib- 
bean. Two field trips expected. No 
prerequisites. (F.S.SS) 

GLY 3034 Natural Disasters (3). A 

geological look at catastrophic 
events including earthquakes, volca- 
noes, tsunamis, mass movements, 
hurricanes, floods, and desertifica- 
tion. Emphasis on the geologic set- 
ting in which these natural disasters 
take place. Special attention will be 
given to compare similar disasters in 
the geologic past. Prerequisite: Physi- 
cal science at the high school level. 

GLY 3103 Dinosaurs (3). Survey of 
the different groups of dinosaurs. Di- 
nosaur biology, geology, and the his- 
tory of their discovery to further 
understanding of their life histories 
environments, and the causes of 
their extinction. 

GLY 3103L Dinosaurs Laboratory (1). 

Survey of the different groups of di- 
nosaurs. Laboratory study of dino- 
saur bones, prints and eggs to 
further our understanding of their life 
histories, environments, and the 
causes of their extinction. Corequi- 
site: GLY 3103. 

GLY 3157 Elements of Caribbean 
Geology (3). A survey of the geol- 
ogy of the Caribbean and neighbor- 
ing regions in view of current data 
and modern concepts of global tec- 
tonics. The course summarizes the 
important points of Caribbean and 
Central American geology in their 
relation to mineral and energy re- 
sources; natural environmental disas- 
ters, especially seismic zones; 
agriculture; and the geologic poten- 
tial for future development and in- 
dustrialization. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 3202 Earth Materials (3). Physi- 
cal and chemical properties of min- 
erals and mineral assemblages, 
such as rocks and soils. Processes of 
mineral formation. Prerequisites: GLY 
1010 or permission of instructor and 



General Chemistry. Corequisite: GLY 
3202L 

GLY 3202L Earth Materials Lab (2). 

Physical and chemical properties of 
minerals, rocks and soils with empha- 
sis on identification. Application of 
macroscopic methods, X-ray diffrac- 
tion, polarized light microscopy, in 
situ and bulk chemical analysis. Pre- 
requisites: GLY 1010 and GLY 1010L 
or permission of instructor and Gen- 
eral Chemistry. Corequisite: 3001. 

GLY 3220 Optical Mineralogy (3). 
GLY 3220L Optical Mineralogy Lab 
(1). Principles and use of the polariz- 
ing petrographic microscope. Opti- 
cal properties of isotropic, uniaxial 
and biaxial minerals; solution of opti- 
cal problems by use of stereo- 
graphic projections. Prerequisite: GLY 
3200 or equivalent. Laboratory must 
be taken concurrently with course. (S) 

GLY 3754 Remote Sensing in the 
Earth Sciences (3). Remote sensing 
methods for the exploration and in- 
vestigation of geologic processes 
and earth resources; airphoto inter- 
pretation, processing and analysis of 
multi-band digital satellite imagery; 
GIS. Prerequisite: GLY 1010 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 3760 Geological Map Analysis 
(3). Laboratory course dealing with 
analysis of geological maps and sec- 
tions; theory and method of interpre- 
tation of surface outcrops on maps. 
Properties of simple geological struc- 
tures. Recommended to be taken 
prior to GLY 4400 and GLY 4791 . Pre- 
requisites: Trigonometry, Introduc- 
tion to Earth Science or equivalent 
(e.g. MAC 2132, GLY 3030 or equiva- 
lents). (F) 

GLY 3782 Geology Field Excursion 
(1-3). A one to three-week field ex- 
cursion in a region of interest to 
demonstrate the occurrence, ap- 
pearance and processes of various 
geological phenomena. Course 
may be repeated. Prerequisite: GLY 
1010. (F.S.SS) 

GLY 3881 Environmental Geology 
Field Methods (3). Introduction to 
commonly used field methods in en- 
vironmental geology including site 
evaluation, bore-hole geophysical 
and hydrogeological techniques, 
and topographic map skills. Prereq- 
uisites: GLY 1010 or GLY 3030. 

GLY 3949/GLY 4949 Cooperative 
Education in Geology (1-3). One se- 
mester of full-time supervised work in 
an outside laboratory taking part in 
the University Co-op Program. Lim- 



ited to students admitted to the Co- 
op Program. A written report and su- 
pervisor evaluations will be required 
for each student. (F.S.SS) 

GLY 4036 Earth Sciences and Soci- 
ety (3). Explores the new directions 
of Earth Science studies and exam- 
ines how they can enhance soci- 
ety's ability to make wise decisions 
on resource development, waste dis- 
posal, natural hazards Prerequisites: 
GLY 1010 or GLY 3030. 

GLY 4300 Petrology (3). Origin, com- 
position and classification of igne- 
ous, sedimentary, and metamorphic 
rocks. Observational, theoretical, 
and experimental studies of rocks. 
Prerequisite: GLY 3202. 

GLY 4300L Petrology Lab (2). Identifi- 
cation of rocks using macroscopic 
and microscopic techniques. Appli- 
cation of electron microprobe. Pre- 
requisite: GLY 3202. 

GLY 4400 Structural Geology (3). 
GLY 4400L Structural Geology Lab 
(1). Faults, folds, fractures and other 
rock structures; their description and 
representation on maps and dia- 
grams; mechanics of their forma- 
tion. Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or 
equivalent; knowledge of trigo- 
nometry and algebra. (S) 

GLY 4450 Environmental and Explo- 
ration Geophysics (3). Introduction 
to geophysical methods used in ex- 
ploration and environmental geo- 
physics. Seismic methods; potential 
fields; electrical and EM methods; 
ground penetrating radar; geophysi- 
cal well logging. Prerequisites: GLY 
1 1 or 3030; MAC 23 1 2 PHY 2049 or 
3054; or consent of instructor. Core- 
quisite: GLY 4450L.(S) 

GLY 4450L Environmental and Explo- 
ration Geophysics Laboratory (1). 

Acquisition and interpretation of ex- 
ploration geophysical data. Seismic, 
gravity, magnetic, and geoelectri- 
cal methods; geophysical well log- 
ging. 4-5 field trips to sites in Dade 
County expected. Corerequisite: 
GLY 4450. Prerequisite: GLY 3360 or 
GLY 4400 or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 4450. (S) 

GLY 451 1 Stratigraphy (3). Strati- 
graphic principles applied to inter- 
preting the rock record. Sediments, 
depositional environments and dy- 
namics in the sedimentary record. 
Stratigraphic correlation and the de- 
velopment of the Geologic Time 
Scale. Prerequisites: GLY 3202. 



98 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



GLY 45 1 1 L Stratigraphy Lab ( 1 ) . 

Laboratory analysis of rock facies 
and index fossils used in the interpre- 
tation of the geologic record. Pre- 
requisites: GLY 3202L. 

GLY 4555 Sedimentology (3). 
GLY 4555L Sedimentology Lab (1). 

Sedimentary processes in the geo- 
logical cycles, as illustrated in recent 
environments. Different groups of 
sedimentary rocks. Primary and sec- 
ondary sedimentary structures. 
Physico-chemical properties and di- 
agenetic processes. Analytical tech- 
niques applied to modern sedi- 
mentology of both loose and lithi- 
fied sediments. Prerequisites: Intro- 
duction to Earth Science or 
equivalent; Earth Materials and Stra- 
tigraphy and a sound background 
in mathematics and chemistry. 
Laboratory must be taken concur- 
rently with course. (S) 

GLY 4650 Paleobiology (3). 
GLY 4650L Paleobiology Lab (1). De- 
velopment of life as traced through 
the fossil record. Survey of the main 
groups of animals commonly found 
as fossils. Theories of evolution and 
extinction. Study of the major fossil 
groups used in biostratigraphic zona- 
tion, and as paleoecologic indica- 
tors. Prerequisites: Physical and 
historical geology, general biology, 
or the instructor's permission. Labora- 
tory must be taken concurrently 
with course. (F) 

GLY 4730 Marine Geology (3). 
GLY 4730L Marine Geology Lab (1). 

Survey of the main physiographic 
provinces of the ocean floor. Mod- 
ern theories concerning the evolu- 
tion of the crust; continental drift, 
seafloor spreading. Distribution and 
thickness of deep-sea sediments, 
and their relationship to the morphol- 
ogy and evolution of the crust. 
Deep-sea mineral resources. Marine 
geology of the Caribbean from re- 
cent data. Sea-bed assessment of 
mineral resources in the Caribbean 
and neighboring region. Prereq- 
uisites: OCE 3014, GLY 1010, or in- 
structor's permission. Laboratory 
must be taken concurrently with 
course. (F) 

GLY 4791 Field Geology and Geo- 
logic Mapping (3-6). A three-to six- 
week field instruction and practice 
in methods of constructing strati- 
graphic sections, structural cross sec- 
tions and geologic mapping using 
topographic base maps, aerial pho- 
tos, and surveying equipment. Pre- 
requisites: GLY 451 1 and GLY 451 1 L, 
GLY 4400 and GLY 4400L. (SS) 



GLY 4812 Introduction to Ore Depos- 
its (3). Major classes of metal depos- 
its, their geologic settings and 
genetic theories, and case studies 
of great deposits. Environmental, 
economic and legal aspects of met- 
al extraction, processing and use. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010, GLY 101 0L or 
GLY 3030, GLY 3030L. 

GLY 4822 Introduction to Hydrogeol- 
ogy (3). Principles of groundwater 
flow, determination of aquifer prop- 
erties, geologic factors influencing 
groundwater flow and quality, le- 
gal/regulatory framework for hydro- 
geology. Prerequisite: One 
college-level course in physics, 
chemistry, geology, and calculus, or 
permission of instructor. (F) 

GLY 4823 Florida Geologic and Hy- 
drologic Systems (3). Survey of geo- 
logical formations of Florida and 
their relationship to hydrologic and 
mineral resources. Sedimentary fa- 
cies in relation to their hydrologic 
properties. Prerequisites: GLY 4822 
and GLY 451 1 or permission of in- 
structor. 

GLY 4910, GLY 491 1 Undergraduate 
Research in Geology (VAR). Individ- 
ual research under the supervision 
of a professor in the student's field 
of specialization or interest. Subject 
may deal with laboratory work, field, 
and/or bibliographical work. Field re- 
search in the Caribbean is encour- 
aged. Variable credit to a maxi- 
mum of 1 credits. Permission of the 
student's advisor is required. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 5021 Earth Sciences for Teach- 
ers (3). Study of geological materials 
and processes, as covered in Intro- 
duction to Earth Science, but at a 
higher level and with additional as- 
signments. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5021 L. 
(F,S,SS) 

GLY 5021L Earth Sciences for Teach- 
ers Laboratory (1). Study of the prop- 
erties of minerals and rocks; 
interpretation of topographic and 
geologic maps; study of the geol- 
ogy of Florida, including field trips. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5021. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 5158 Florida Geology (3). De- 
tailed lithostratigraphic and biostrati- 
graphic analyses of Southeast 
Florida and their relationship to tec- 
tonics, paleoclimates. Prerequisite: 
GLY 351 1 and GLY 351 1L (S in alter- 
nate years) 

GLY 5246 Geochemistry (3). 

GLY 5246L Geochemistry Lab (1). Ori- 



gin of chemical elements and princi- 
ples affecting their distribution in the 
solar system, solid earth and hydro- 
sphere. Use of chemical data to 
solve geologic problems. Prereq- 
uisites: Introduction to Earth Science 
and General Chemistry. (F in alter- 
nate years) 

GLY 5251 Water-Rock Interaction 
(3). Survey of geochemical proc- 
esses at the water-rock interface. 
Topics include absorption of inor- 
ganic and organic ions, colloid sta- 
bility in groundwater, mineral 
dissolution and precipitation. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 1046, MAC 2312, GLY 
431 1 or permission of instructor. 

GLY 5283C Application of ICPES in 
Geochemistry (3). Determination of 
elemental abundances in rocks, 
soils, natural water using inductively 
coupled plasma emission spectros- 
copy (ICPES). Instrumental princi- 
ples, sample selection and 
preparation methods and applica- 
tion of results to research. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 1045, CHM 1046 or 
permission of the instructor. (S or SS) 

GLY 5286 Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques in Geology (3). Sur- 
vey of techniques and instrumenta- 
tion used in geological research, 
including computing and data han- 
dling. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of instructor, 
Corequisite: GLY 5286L (F) 

GLY 5286L Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques in Geology Lab (1). 

Introduction to advanced instrumen- 
tation and analytical techniques in 
Geology, including computing and 
data processing. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5286. (F) 

GLY 5298 Topics in Geochemistry 
(3). Seminar covering current re- 
search in selected areas of low-tem- 
perature geochemistry: oceans and 
oceanic sediments; continental wa- 
ters and sediments; hydrothermal 
systems. Prerequisite: GLY 4555 or 
permission of instructor. (F) 

GLY 5322 Igneous Petrology and 
Geochemistry (3). Presentation and 
discussion of current topics in igne- 
ous petrology and geochemistry in 
a semindr format. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. (S) 

GLY 5335 Metamorphic Geology (3). 

Metamorphic mineralogy; charac- 
teristics of low, medium and high 
pressure metamorphic rocks; pres- 
sure-temperature determinations; 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 99 



metamorphic textures; modeling 
and determination of P-T-t paths. (F) 

GLY 5335L Metamorphic Geology 
Lab (1). Metamorphic mineralogy; 
characteristics of low. medium and 
high pressure metamorphic rocks; 
pressure-temperature determina- 
tions; metamorphic textures; model- 
ing and determination of P-T-t paths. 
(F) 

GLY 5346 Sedimentary Petrology (3). 

Systematic study of sedimentary 
rocks. Special emphasis on geneti- 
cal aspects, geochemistry, paleon- 
tology, mineralogy, and micro- 
facies. Emphasizes microscopic 
study. Prerequisite: GLY 4555. Core- 
quisite: GLY 5346L. (F in alternate 
years) 

GLY 5346L Sedimentary Petrology 
Lab (1). Laboratory studies of sedi- 
ments and sedimentary rocks with 
emphasis on microscopic analyses 
and geochemical techniques. Pre- 
requisite: GLY 4555 and GLY 4555L. 
Corequisite: GLY 5346. (F in alternate 
years) 

GLY 5408 Advanced Structural Geol- 
ogy (3). Advanced treatment of the 
theory of rock mechanics to solve 
problems solve natural rock defor- 
mation. Prerequisites: GLY 4400, 
MAC 3413, or permission of instruc- 
tor. Corequisite: GLY 5408L (S) 

GLY 5408L Advanced Structural Ge- 
ology Lab (1). Problem solving in the- 
ory of rock deformation. Experi- 
mental procedures in rock mechan- 
ics. Corequisite: GLY 5408. S 

GLY 5425 Tectonics (3). Properties of 
the lithosphere; plate kinematics 
and continental drift; characteristics 
of plate boundaries; mountain belts; 
formation of sedimentary basins. Pre- 
requisites: GLY 1010, 1 100, 4400, 
4310, 3200 or permission of instructor. 
(S) 

GLY 5446 Topics in Structural Geol- 
ogy and Tectonics (3). Selected ad- 
vanced topics in structural geology 
and rock deformation. Latest ad- 
vances in crustal tectonics. Prereq- 
uisite: GLY 5408. (F/S) 

GLY 5457 Analysis of Geophysical 
Data (3). Reduction and interpreta- 
tion of geophysical data, including 
time series analysis, continuation of 
potential fields. Three-dimensional 
modeling of gravity, magnetic data, 
integrated geophysical surveys. Pre- 
requisites: GLY 4450, PHY 2048, PHY 
2049, MAC 231 1 , MAC 2312, MAP 
2302. Corequisite: GLY 5457L (S) 



GLY 5457L Analysis of Geophysical 
Data Lab (1). Field and laboratory 
applications of geophysical tech- 
niques. Computer aided analysis 
and three-dimensional modeling of 
gravity and magnetic data. Prereq-. 
uisites: GLY 4450, PHY 2048, PHY 
2049, MAC 231 1 , MAC 2312, MAP 
2302. Corequisite: GLY 5457. (S) 
GLY 5495 Seminar in Geophysics (2). 
Detailed investigation of current 
geophysical techniques, including 
topics on instrument design. Prereq- 
uisite: GLY 5457 or permission of in- 
structor. (F/S) 

GLY 5546 Topics in Stratigraphy (3). 
Discussion of research projects 
and/or current literature in strati- 
graphic correlation as derived from 
sedimentologic principles and bio- 
zonation. Prerequisite: GLY 5346. (F) 

GLY 5608 Advanced Paleontology I 
(3). Discussion of current literature 
and research projects on evolution, 
systematics functional morphology, 
with reports by members of the semi- 
nar. Prerequisites: GLY 4650, GLY 
5609, or permission of instructor. (F) 

GLY 5621 Caribbean Stratigraphic 
Micropaleontology (3). Microscopic 
study of biostratigraphic type sec- 
tions from the Caribbean area. Em- 
phasis on planktonic foraminifera 
and radiolaria, paleoecologic and 
paleoclimatic interpretations. Pre- 
requisite: GLY 4650 or permission of 
instructor. (F) 

GLY 5754 Applied Remote Sensing 
in the Earth Sciences (3). Applica- 
tion of remote sensing and image 
analysis in the earth sciences; quali- 
tative and quantitative satellite im- 
age and air photo interpretation. 
Emphasis is on use of computer 
processing packages. Prerequisites: 
GLY 1010 or consent of instructor. 

GLY 5785 Caribbean Shallow-Ma- 
rine Environments (3). Field study of 
multiple tropical environments in the 
Caribbean area. Dynamic proc- 
esses and coastal evolution in re- 
sponse to natural and 
human-induced changes. 

GLY 5786 Advanced Field Excursion 
(3). A study of the geology of a se- 
lected region of the world followed 
by 10-12 day field trip in order to 
study the field relationships of the 
geologic features. Special emphasis 
is given to stratigraphic, structural 
and tectonic relationships of lithic 
package. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. (SS) 



GLY 5808 Mining Geology (3). Appli- 
cation of theoretical models of ore 
formation to exploration and the 
use of geochemical and geophysi- 
cal techniques in the search for ore 
deposits. Prerequisites: GLY 431 1 
andCHM 1046. (F/S) 

GLY 5816 Economic Geology (3). 

Economically important metal de- 
posits of sedimentary, igneous and 
hydrothermal origins and their geo- 
logic settings and characteristics. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010. GLY 431 1, 
CHM 1045, CHM 1046. (F) 

GLY 5826 Hydrogeologic Modeling 
(3). Techniques used in modeling 
groundwater flow and solute trans- 
port in geologic systems. Case stud- 
ies of significant aquifers. 
Prerequisites: GLY 5827, MAP 2302, or 
permission of instructor. (S.SS) 

GLY 5827 Hydrogeology (3). Physics 
of flow in geological media. Satu- 
rated and unsaturated flow, ground- 
water and the hydrologic cycle, 
estimating hydraulic parameters of 
aquifers, introduction to chemical 
transport. Prerequisite: GLY 1010, 
MAC 2312, and PHY 2053, or permis- 
sion of instructor. (F) 

GLY 5827L Hydrogeology Lab (1). 

Laboratory, field, and computer ex- 
ercises to complement GLY 5827. (F) 

GLY 5828 Chemical Hydrogeology 
and Solute Transport (3). Quantita- 
tive analysis of hydrologic, geologic, 
and chemical factors controlling 
water quality and the transport and 
fate of organic and inorganic sol- 
utes in the subsurface. Prerequisite: 
GLY 5827. (S) 

GLY 5857 Geology for Environmental 
Scientists and Engineers (3). Charac- 
terization of rocks and rock masses; 
geological maps; seismic hazards; 
weathering of rocks; hydrologic cy- 
cle; slope stability; coastal proc- 
esses; geophysical techniques. 
Course includes field trips in the 
South Florida region. Prerequisites: 
CHM 1045, GLY 1010 or permission of 
instructor. (S) 

GLY 5931 Graduate Seminar (1). 

Presentation or critical examination 
of current research problems in geol- 
ogy. A selection of topics is consid- 
ered each term. Topics may also 
include individual research in the stu- 
dent's field of investigation. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. (F.S.SS) 

OCE 1001 Introduction to Oceanog- 
raphy (3). The oceans, their nature 



100 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



and extent. Water of the oceans, 
chemical balance. Marine prov- 
inces, sediments and their relation 
to sea life and oceanic circulation, 
coastal provinces, sediments and 
their relation to sea life and oceanic 
circulation, coastal and deep- 
ocean circulation. Waves, tides, tsu- 
namis. One field trip expected. 
(F,S,SS) 

OCE 3014 Oceanography (3). The 

ocean origin, physical properties, sa- 
linity, temperature, sound. Radiative 
properties, heat budget and cli- 
matic control. Tides, wind-driven mo- 
tion-monsoon circulation. El Nino 
phenomenon. Subsurface water 
masses. Oceanic circulation and pa- 
leoclimates. (F,S,SS) 



History 

N. David Cook, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Daniel A. Cohen, Associate Professor 
Manuel Moreno Fraginals, Professor 

Emeritus 
Christopher Gray, Assistant Professor 
Mitchell Hart, Assistant Professor 
Sherry Johnson, Assistant Professor 
Alan Kahan, Associate Professor 
Howard Kaminsky, Professor Emeritus 
Eric J. Leed, Professor 
Alex Lichtenstein, Assistant Professo 

and Director of Graduate Studies 
Felice Lifshitz, Associate Professor 
Joseph F. Patrouch, Assistant 

Professor and Director of 

Graduate Studies 
Brian Peterson, Associate Professor 
Joyce S. Peterson, Associate 

Professor and Associate Dean 
Darden Asbury Pyron, Professor 
Howard B. Rock, Professor 
Mark D. Szuchman, Professor and 

Associate Dean 
Clarence Taylor, Associate Professor 
Victor M. uribe, Assistant Professor 
William O. Walker III, Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in History 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Students interested in teacher certifi- 
cation should contact the College 
of Education at 348-2721. 

Lower Division Preparation 



Common 

Complete 
AMH 2000 

AMH 2002 

AMH 2010 

AMH 2020 

EUH 2002 

EUH2011 

EUH 2021 

EUH 2030 

LAH 2020 
WHO 2001 



Prerequisites 

two of the following: 
Origins of American 
Civilization 
Modern American 
Civilization 
American History 
1607-1850 
American History 
1850-Present 
Historical Analysis: 
Western Europe and 
the World 

Western Civilization: 
Early European 
Civilization 
Western Civilization: 
Medieval to Modern 
Europe 

Western Civilization: 
Europe in the 
Modern Era 
Latin American 
Civilization 
World Civilization 



To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

One course, at the 3000 or 4000 
level in each of the following areas, 
(indicated in brackets at the end of 
each course description in the Uni- 
versity Catalog). 

Medieval Europe or Ancient 

History (1) 3 

Modern Europe [2) 3 

The United States (3) 3 

Latin America or Africa (4) 3 

HIS 4935 Senior Seminar 3 

Any five additional History courses 

(at the 3000 or 4000 level) 1 5 

Electives (at the 3000 or 4000 level) 
in any Department at FIU, to make 
up the prescribed number of credits 
required for graduation. (Ten credits 
maximum at the 1000 or 2000 level 
for those entering as juniors or sen- 
iors). 30 

Minor in History 

Five general History courses (at the 
3000 or 4000 level) 15 semester 
hours. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

AFH-African History; AMH-American 
History; EUH- European History; HIS- 
General; LAH-Latin American His- 
tory; 

AFH 4454 Sub-Saharan Africa (3). A 

survey of Sub-Saharan Africa from 
the origins of humankind to the pre- 
sent. Topics include the rise of cen- 
tralized societies; slavery; 
colonialism; independence; and 
contemporary challenges. (4) 

AFH 5905 Readings in African His- 
tory (3). An examination of historiog- 
raphical traditions within African 
history. Topics will vary; with a 
change in theme, the course may 
be repeated. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

AFH 5935 Topics in African History 
(3). An examination of specific 
themes in African history. Topics will 
vary. With a change in theme, the 
course may be repeated. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

AMH 2000 Origins of American Civili- 
zation (3). Examines the origins of 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 101 



the United States from the first Euro- 
pean settlements through the early 
republic. Topics include society, cul- 
ture, politics and economics. Written 
work meets the state composition re- 
quirement (6,000 words). 

AMH 2002 Modern American Civili- 
zation (3). Examines the develop- 
ment of the United States from the 
early republic to the present. Topics 
include society, culture, politics and 
economics. Written work meets the 
state composition requirement 
(6,000 words). 

AMH 2010 American History, 1607- 
1850 (3). A survey of American his- 
tory from the founding of Virginia to 
the antebellum era. Analysis of colo- 
nial America, the American Revolu- 
tion, the Constitution, and the 
growth of a new republic. (3) 

AMH 2015 Historical Analysis: The 
American Revolution (3). Exploration 
of the nature of the Revolution from 
1763 through ratification of the Con- 
stitution in 1 789. Emphasis on pri- 
mary sources, historical interpreta- 
tions and the nature and meaning 
of the Revolution. Written work 
meets state composition require- 
ment (6,000 words). 

AMH 2020 American History, 1850 to 
the Present (3). A survey of Ameri- 
can history from before the Civil War 
to our own day. Analysis of the Civil 
War, Reconstruction, the Gilded 
Age, the move toward imperialism, 
and the problems of the 20th Cen- 
tury, (3) 

AMH 2053 Historical Analysis: De- 
mocracy in America (3). The institu- 
tions, social order, and mentality of 
the United States in the 1830s, in real- 
ity and in their classic portrayal by Al- 
exis de Tocqueville's, Democracy in 
America. Written work meets state 
composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

AMH 2428 History of Miami (3). The 

history of Miami and Dade County 
from the time of the native Ameri- 
cans until today. Students write re- 
search papers based on primary 
sources, as well as archival sources. 
(3) 

AMH 3012 American History, 1600- 
1763 (3). The American social colo- 
nial experience from the earliest 
settlements at Jamestown and Ply- 
mouth to the eve of the American 
Revolution. Particular emphasis will 
be on religion, social structure, poli- 
tics, and slavery. (3) 



AMH 3141 American History, 1790- 
1860 (3). An exploration of early na- 
tional U.S. History, with particular 
attention to party politics, religious 
pluralism, sentimental culture, re- 
form movements, and economic de- 
velopment. (3) 

AMH 3270 Contemporary U.S. His- 
tory (3). An examination of the ma- 
jor trends, forces and personalities 
that have shaped the recent Ameri- 
can past. (3) 

AMH 3317 America and the Movies 
(3). An examination of the social 
and cultural history of 20th century 
America through its movies. (3) 

AMH 3331 American Intellectual His- 
tory I (3). This course will trace the 
origins and development of the 
main ideas and intellectual themes 
of Anglo-American history during 
the colonial and early national pe- 
riod, 1600-1815. It will stress social 
ideas and popular concepts, and re- 
late them to the formation of domi- 
nant American national 
characteristics. (3) 

AMH 3332 American Intellectual His- 
tory II (3). This course will emphasize 
the full flowering of individualistic lib- 
eralism in 19th Century American 
thought, and trace the implications 
of and reaction against this tradition 
down to the present. (3) 

AMH 3444 The Great American West 
(3). The course will explore the 
meaning of the West for both the 
settlers and modern Americans. Us- 
ing song, film, novels, art, etc., the 
course will examine the lives and val- 
ues of the Indians, mountain men, 
farmers, ranchers, and cowboys. (3) 

AMH 4130 The American Revolution 
(3). An exploration of the nature of 
the Revolution from the beginning 
of the conflict in 1 763 through the 
ratification of the Constitution in 
1789. Discussion of the political and 
economic differences between the 
colonists and England, along with 
the meaning the war had to the dif- 
ferent classes of Americans. (3) 

AMH 4140 Age of Jefferson (3). A sur- 
vey of Jeffersonian America (1790- 
1828) with emphasis on the origins of 
American politics, the emerging 
American economy, the rise of 
American nationalism, and Jeffer- 
sonian mind. (3) 

AMH 4160 The Age of Jackson (3). A 

survey of Jacksonian America (1828- 
1850) with emphasis on the growth 
of political parties, the rise of Ameri- 



can industry, the emergence of la- 
bor, slavery, and early reform move- 
ments. (3) 

AMH 4170 Civil War and Reconstruc- 
tion (3). The rise and sources of mili- 
tant sectionalism in the United 
States, the war itself, and the restora- 
tion of the nation. (3) 

AMH 4230 The Roaring Twenties and 
the Great Depression (3). A political, 
economic, social, and intellectual 
history of the 1920s and the great 
depression of the 1930s. (3) 

AMH 4251 The Great Depression (3). 

This course deals with the experi- 
ence of the American people in the 
Great Depression of the 1930s. It ex- 
amines causes of the depression, 
government response, and effec- 
tiveness of response, as well as look- 
ing at the actual daily experience 
of people during the Depression 
and the changes it made in U.S. so- 
ciety. (3) 

AMH 4292 Origins of Modern Amer- 
ica, 1877-1920 (3). U.S. history be- 
tween the Civil War and World War 
I, origins of modern American social, 
cultural, and private life. Impact of 
industrialization, urbanization, immi- 
gration and war on American soci- 
ety, culture between 1877 and 1920. 
(3) 

AMH 4373 Entrepreneurs in U.S. (3). 

Focusing on entrepreneurism, 
course covers American ideals 
(capitalism, individualism, upward 
mobility, the free market, inde- 
pendence) in historical context. Ex- 
amines why these ideals have 
changed, colonial era to the pre- 
sent. (3) 

AMH 4400 Southern History (3). An 

examination of the main themes 
and social forces that have shaped 
the southern experience and the 
southern intellectual tradition in a 
distinctive way within the larger his- 
torical reality of colonial Anglo- 
America and the United States. The 
period covered is from initial explora- 
tion and settlement of Sir Walter 
Raleigh and John Smith to the pre- 
sent. (3) 

AMH - South Florida History: Re- 
search (3). A history of South Florida 
from the Tequestas and Calusas to 
the present. The main focus is stu- 
dent research using primary sources 
including manuscript censuses, mi- 
crofilmed newspapers and archives. 

AMH 4500 United States Labor His- 
tory (3). Transformations in the na- 



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Undergraduate Catalog 



ture of work, the experience of the 
working class, and the development 
of the American labor movement, 
with special attention to issues of 
race, region, and gender. (3) 

AMH 4560 History of Women in the 
United States (3). The changing di- 
mensions of women's lives from the 
colonial era of U.S. history to the pre- 
sent. The course will examine the 
changing economic, social, and po- 
litical position of women as well as 
the development of feminist move- 
ment and organizations. (3) 

AMH 4570 African-American History 
(3). Black society in the United 
States and its relation to the politi- 
cal, economic, social, and cultural 
history of America. (3) 

AMH 4571 African American History 
from the 17 th to the late 19 th Centu- 
ries (3). Examines the experience of 
African Americans from the colonial 
period to the Reconstruction era. 
Topics include: slave cultures; devel- 
opment of free black communities; 
civil war. 

AMH 4573 African American History 
from the Late 19 th Century to the Pre- 
sent (3). Examines the experience of 
African Americans from the emer- 
gence of Jim Crow to the Black 
Power Movement. Topics include 
the Great Migration, Marcus 
Garvey, the Civil Rights and Black 
Power Movements. 

AMH 4930 Topics in U.S. History (3). 

Selected topics or themes in U.S. his- 
tory. The themes will vary from se- 
mester to semester. With a change 
in theme, the course may be re- 
peated. (The theme will be an- 
nounced in the yearly schedule). (3) 

AMH 5905 Readings in American His- 
tory (3). Students read books from 
different historiographical traditions 
and with conflicting interpretations 
about an important subject in Ameri- 
can history. Subjects will vary ac- 
cording to professors. Course may 
be repeated with departmental ap- 
proval. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

AMH 5935 Topics in American His- 
tory (3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in American his- 
tory. The theme will vary from semes- 
ter to semester. With a change in 
theme, the course may be re- 
peated. (The theme will be an- 
nounced in the yearly schedules.) 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 



AMH 6915 Research in American His- 
tory (3). Students conduct research 
in primary and secondary sources 
on aspects of important subjects in 
American History. Subjects will vary 
according to professor. Course may 
be repeated with departmental ap- 
proval. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

EUH 2002 Historical Analysis: West- 
ern Europe and the World (3). A sur- 
vey of western European history 
from the 15th through the 20th cen- 
turies, concentrating on the interac- 
tions between Europeans and 
non-Europeans. Written work meets 
state composition requirement 
(6,000 words). 

EUH 2007 Historical Analysis: The 
Rise of Western Culture (3). A survey 
of Western history from Antiquity to 
the Renaissance, illustrated by analy- 
sis of classic histories written in each 
period. Written work meets state 
composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

EUH 201 1 Western Civilization: Early 
European Civilization (3). Examines 
the earliest development of Euro- 
pean Civilization; European thought 
and behavior in pre-classical, classi- 
cal and post-classical periods. Writ- 
ten work meets state composition 
requirement (6,000 words). 

EUH 2015 Historical Analysis: Athens, 
Sparta, Peloponnesian War (3). A 

study of the Peloponnesian War, in 
Thucydides' classical history, that 
aims to introduce the student to the 
subject-matter of Western history 
and to the habits of critical thinking 
about the meanings of thought and 
action. Written work meets state 
composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

EUH 2021 Western Civilization: Me- 
dieval to Modern Europe (3). Exam- 
ines key developments of European 
civilization from medieval to early 
modern times. Written work meets 
state composition requirement 
(6,000 words). 

EUH 2030 Western Civilization: 
Europe in the Modern Era (3). Exam- 
ines key developments in the origins 
and nature of contemporary 
Europe, including social, political 
and industrial changes from the 
early modern period to the present. 
Written work meets the state compo- 
sition requirement (6,000 words). 

EUH 2069 Historical Analysis: The Rus- 
sian Revolution (3). A study of the 
Russian Revolution of 1917: its 



causes, dynamics, and implications. 
Written work meets state composi- 
tion requirement (6,000 words). 

EUH 2074 Historical Analysis: De Toc- 
queville and the French Revolution 

(3). Analysis of the causes and ef- 
fects of the French Revolution 
through the eyes of one of its lead- 
ing interpreters, Alexis de Toc- 
queville. Written work meets state 
composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

EUH 2235 Historical Analysis: The Ro- 
mantic Tradition (3). A study of the 
Romantic tradition of self-fulfillment 
from Rousseau and Goethe to the 
present. Alternative paths of self-ful- 
fillment including socialism and elit- 
ism. Written work meets state 
composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

EUH 3120 Europe in the Central Mid- 
dle Ages (3). Europe from the ninth 
to the twelfth centuries, analyzing 
the disintegration of the empire of 
Charlemagne and its replacement 
by nascent national states and by 
the supra-national papal monarchy. 
(1) 

EUH 3121 Europe in the Earlier Mid- 
dle Ages (3). The disintegration of 
the Roman imperial unity and its re- 
placement by Latin, Greek and Ara- 
bic cultural spheres, with particular 
emphasis on the Latin West. (1) 

EUH 3122 Europe in the Later Middle 
Ages (3). The thirteenth throughout 
the fifteenth centuries as the prel- 
ude to the revolutionary transforma- 
tions of early modernity e.g., 
secularization, industrialization, ex- 
pansionism, scientism and democra- 
tization) (1). 

EUH 3142 Renaissance and Reforma- 
tion (3). A study of the development 
of humanism in Italy and Protestant- 
ism in Germany, and their impact 
on Europe in the Fourteenth, Fif- 
teenth, and Sixteenth centuries. (2) 

EUH 3181 Medieval Culture (3). Se- 
lected topics in the cultural history 
of Europe from 500 to 1500: epic 
and knightly romance; Christian the- 
ology and spirituality; scholastic phi- 
losophy; Romanesque and Gothic 
arts; the rise of literature in the ver- 
nacular; the culture of the layman; 
and the contribution of women. (1) 

EUH 3205 Nineteenth-Century 
Europe 1815-1914 (3). This course will 
deal with the political, diplomatic, 
economic, social, and cultural his- 
tory of Europe from 1815 until 1914. 



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Special attention will be given to the 
Industrial Revolution. (2) 

EUH 3245 European History, 1914- 
1945 (3). Europe in the era of the 
two World Wars, with special empha- 
sis on communism and fascism. (2) 

EUH 3282 European History, 1945 to 
Present (3). Europe since the Sec- 
ond World War examined in its politi- 
cal, diplomatic, social, economic, 
and cultural aspects. (2) 

EUH 3400 Greek History (3). The ori- 
gins of the Greek polis in Myce- 
naean times, its domination of 
civilization in the first millennium B.C., 
its transformation under Alexander 
and his successors. The political his- 
tory, culture, values, and social dy- 
namics of Greek civilization. (1) 

EUH 341 1 Ancient Rome (3). The for- 
mation of the Roman republic, its 
rise to domination in the Mediterra- 
nean, its transformation into the Ro- 
man Empire, and its final 
disintegration. The political history, 
culture, values, social dynamics, 
and enduring force of the Roman 
civilization. (1) 

EUH 3570 Russian History (3). An 

overview of Russian History from the 
time of tribal Slavs until today. The 
course will focus especially on the 
changing conditions of the Russian 
peasantry and on the unique devel- 
opment of the Russian state. (2) 

EUH 3576 The Russian Revolution 
and the Soviet Union (3). This course 
deals with Russia since 1917 and fo- 
cuses particularly on the theory and 
practice of communism in the So- 
viet Union. The impact of commu- 
nism on the lives of the people, 
whether in politics, economics, or 
culture, will be examined. (2) 

EUH 361 1 European Cultural and In- 
tellectual History (3). This course will 
examine the development of the 
key ideas in European political and 
social theory, in conceptions of the 
natural world and of the individual 
which have come to dominate Euro- 
pean culture in the last four hun- 
dred years. (2) 

EUH 4025 Saints, Relics and Miracles 
in Medieval Europe (3). Synthetic 
view of medieval Europe through 
the lens of saints veneration. Topics 
include saints as patrons, miracles 
and magic pilgrimage, bureau- 
cratic canonization, gender and 
mysticism. (1) 



EUH 4033 Nazism and the Holocaust 
(3). The history of the Third Reich 
and the Holocaust. The develop- 
ment of the german State and the 
emancipation of the Jews; the rise 
of racial antisemitism; Hitler and the 
emergence of Nazism as a political 
force; the 'Final Solution' and Euro- 
pean and American responses. (2) 

EUH 4123 Medieval Holy War (3). 

Analysis of the cross-cultural phe- 
nomenon of holy warfare or the 
sanctification and glorification of 
militarism in the Christian crusader 
movement and the Islamic jihad. (1) 

EUH 4187 Topics in Medieval Euro- 
pean History (3). Selected topics or 
themes in Medieval history. The 
themes will vary from semester to se- 
mester. With a change in content, 
the course may be repeated. (The 
theme will be announced in the 
yearly schedule). (1) 

EUH 4200 Seventeenth Century 
Europe (3). A thematically-arranged 
study of social, political and artistic 
developments, in the 17th century. 
Concentrates on the 30 years war, 
absolutism, rural society, scientific 
revolution, and Baroque art. (2) 

EUH 4286 Topics in European History 
(3). An examination of selected top- 
ics or themes in early modern and 
modern European history. The 
themes will vary from semester to se- 
mester. With a change in content, 
the course may be repeated. (The 
theme will be announced in the 
yearly schedule). (2) 

EUH 4300 Byzantine History (3). A sur- 
vey of the political, cultural, and so- 
cial history of the Byzantine Empire 
from 284 to 1461 , including Byzan- 
tium's contributions to Christian the- 
ology, Roman law, and the culture 
of the Renaissance and eastern 
Europe (1). 

EUH 4313 History of Spain (3). A sur- 
vey of Spanish history from the Re- 
conquista through the Civil War, 
with particular emphasis on the 
Golden Age. (2) 

EUH 4432 Between Empire 8c Renais- 
sance: Italy in the "Middle Age" (3). 

The Italian peninsula between the 
age of Roman imperial dominance 
and the rebirth of Italian centrality 
during the "Renaissance." Greek, 
Germanic, Muslim and Norman inter- 
vention and the political role of the 
Roman Church. (1) 

EUH 4440 The Making of Medieval 
France (3). A survey of French his- 



tory as a case study in state building 
from the Celtic period and the incor- 
poration of the region into the Ro- 
man empire as Gaul to the reign of 
Philip Augustus (1). 

EUH 4451 History of Modern France, 
1815-1968 (3). Survey of French his- 
tory form the restoration through the 
student revolt of May 1968, with at- 
tention to questions of change and 
continuity in the French response to 
modernity. (2) 

EUH 4453 The French Revolution and 
Napoleon (3). A study of French and 
European history from 1798 to 1815, 
with an emphasis on the political de- 
velopment of the Revolution, social 
groups within France, and the rise of 
Napoleon. (2) 

EUH 4462 History of Modern Ger- 
many, 1815-1945 (3). A survey of 

German history from the unification 
movement through WWII. Topics dis- 
cussed include Hitler's relation to 
the German past, liberalism, mod- 
ernization. (2) 

EUH 4501 England to 1688 (3). A sur- 
vey of ancient, medieval and early 
modern English history with attention 
to continental comparisons and 
contrasts. (1) 

EUH 4520 England in the 18th Cen- 
tury (3). Exploring one of the great- 
est eras in English history, this course 
will cover the growth of the British 
empire, crown and Parliament, the 
industrial revolution, social problems 
and English culture. (2) 

EUH 4542 The Culture and Society of 
Britain, 1830-Present (3). An explora- 
tion of the rise and fall of Britain as 
an industrial, imperial nation. Topics 
include the nature of industrializa- 
tion and class formation, the role of 
race and gender in British culture 
and society, war and the loss of em- 
pire in the 20th century. (2) 

EUH 4600 Key Texts in Western Cul- 
ture to the Renaissance (3). The his- 
tory of Western Civilization from its 
beginning to the Renaissance, stud- 
ied through particularly significant 
texts. (1) 

EUH 4602 The Enlightenment (3). This 

course deals with the French Enlight- 
enment of the Eighteenth Century, 
particularly with Voltaire, Diderot, 
and Rousseau. Impact of the Scien- 
tific and English Revolutions on En- 
lightenment. (2) 

EUH 4606 Key Texts in Western Cul- 
ture from the Reformation to the 20th 



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Undergraduate Catalog 



Century (3). The history of Western 
Civilization from the Reformation to 
the present, studied through particu- 
larly significant texts. (2) 

EUH 4610 Women and Gender in 
Europe, 1750-Present (3). Examines 
how women contributed to the de- 
velopment of modern European his- 
tory. Also explores how ideas about 
gender and sexuality shaped, and 
were influenced by, the nature of 
politics, economics and culture. (2) 

EUH 4613 Social History of Early Mod- 
em Europe (3). Examines European 
history 1300-1800 through discussion 
of various topics including: lords, 
peasants, demography, family life, 
education, witchcraft. (2) 

EUH 4660 Modern Europe, 1789-Pre- 
sent (3). European history from the 
French Revolution until today, with 
special attention to liberalism, na- 
tionalism, socialism, communism, 
and fascism. The course will touch 
on the main points of the national 
histories of the various European 
states, from Britain to Russia. (2) 

EUH 5905 Readings in European His- 
tory. (3). Students read books from 
different historiographical traditions 
and with conflicting interpretations 
about an important subject in Euro- 
pean history. Subjects will vary ac- 
cording to professors. Course may 
be repeated with departmental ap- 
proval. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

EUH 5935 Topics in European History 
(3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in European history. 
The theme will vary from semester to 
semester. With a change in theme, 
the course may be repeated. Che 
theme will be announced in the 
yearly schedules.) Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

EUH 6915 Research in European His- 
tory (3). Students conduct research 
in primary and secondary sources 
on aspects of important subjects in 
European History. Subjects will vary 
according to professor. Course may 
be repeated with departmental ap- 
proval. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

HIS 3308 War and Society (3). An ex- 
amination of the ways societies 
have organized themselves for exter- 
nal and internal wars. The course will 
also explore the changing conduct 
of war, the image of the warrior, 
and the ways in which military institu- 
tions have crystalized class struc- 
tures. 



HIS 4400 The Formation of Urban So- 
ciety (3). A comparative study of 
the cultural, social, political and 
economic development of cities. 
Topics include: the ancient city, in- 
dustrialization, immigration, poverty 
and urban planning. 

HIS 4454 The History of Racial Theory 
in Europe and the United States (3). 

The literature produced by natural 
and social scientists on the question 
of race, the shifting notions of racial 
identity and difference, superiority 
and inferiority, and the political and 
social consequences of these ideas. 
(2,3) 

HIS 4908 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations, with the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

HIS 4930 Special Topics (3). An ex- 
amination of specific themes or top- 
ics in history. The theme will vary 
from semester to semester. With a 
change in content, the course may 
be repeated. Che theme will be an- 
nounced in the yearly schedule). 

HIS 4935 Senior Seminar (3). A semi- 
nar to be taken by all history majors, 
to provide experience in research, 
writing, and critical analysis. 

HIS 5289 Comparative History (3). A 

study of specific topics in history that 
cut across regional, national, and 
chronological lines. The topics will 
change from semester to semester, 
and with a change in content, the 
course may be repeated. Che topic 
of the course will be announced in 
the yearly schedule). 

HIS 5908 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations, with the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

HIS 5910 Advanced Research Semi- 
nar (3). Small group sessions will ana- 
lyze particular subject areas in 
history, with the consent of the in- 
structor. 

HIS 5930 Special Topics (3). An ex- 
amination of specific themes or top- 
ics in history. The theme will vary from 
semester to semester, and with a 
change in content, the course may 
be repeated. Che theme will be an- 
nounced in the yearly schedule). Pre- 
requisite: Graduate Standing. 

HIS 5940 Supervised Teaching (3). 

The students will work under the 
close supervision of a regular mem- 



ber of the faculty in a mentorial fash- 
ion. The supervision will cover various 
aspects of course design and deliv- 
ery in History. 

LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization 
(3). An analysis of the underlying 
themes that have shaped the his- 
tory of the Ibero-American areas 
from the time of initial contact to 
the present. Emphasis is given to cul- 
tural exchange and transformation. 
Written work meets state composi- 
tion requirement (6,000 words). 

LAH 2092 Historical Analysis: The 
Latin Americans (3). An examination 
of the evolution of symbols of status 
and power, and of the socioeco- 
nomic relationships among groups 
within the various Latin American re- 
gions. Written work meets state com- 
position requirement (6,000 words). 

LAH 3132 The Formation of Latin 
America (3). An examination of 
Latin America in the colonial period, 
focusing on conquest, Indian rela- 
tions, the landed estate, urban func- 
tions, labor, and socioeconomic 
organization from the 15th through 
the 18th Centuries. (4) 

LAH 3200 Latin America: The Na- 
tional Period (3). Trends and major 
problems of Latin American nations 
from independence to the present. 
(4) 

LAH 3450 Central America (3). An 

overview of Central American his- 
tory from colonial times to the pre- 
sent, with emphasis on the period 
after the mid-Eighteenth Century. All 
five modern nations are dealt with 
in some detail, while the thematic fo- 
cus is on social and economic his- 
tory. (4) 

LAH 3718 History of US-Latin Ameri- 
can Relations (3). Surveys the history 
of the social, economic and politi- 
cal relations between the US and 
the countries of Central America, 
South America, and the Caribbean 
basin during the last two centuries. 
(4) 

LAH 3740 Comparative History of 
Latin American Rebellions and Revo- 
lutions (3). Identifies the historical 
forces driving revolutionary change 
in Latin America. Causes of revolu- 
tions, directions of the revolutionary 
movements, and their political agen- 
das. (4) 

LAH 4433 Modern Mexico (3). An ex- 
amination of the central themes of 
nation-building in Mexico from 1810 
to the present: race, land, political 



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College of Arts and Sciences / 105 



authority, regionalism, dictatorship, 
and the Mexican Revolution. (4) 

LAH 4482 Cuba: 18th - 20th Centu- 
ries (3). The socio-economic and po- 
litical setting in Cuba since the 
mid-Eighteenth Century. (4) 

LAH 451 1 Argentina: 18th - 20th Cen- 
turies (3). A survey of the social and 
political formation of the Argentine 
nation, starting with the colonial leg- 
acy and ending with the contempo- 
rary political situation. (4) 

LAH 4600 History of Brazil (3). Origins 
of Portuguese rule and African slav- 
ery; crisis of colonialism and transi- 
tion to independence; coffee, 
abolition, and the Brazilian Empire; 
Republican Brazil and the Revolu- 
tion of 1930; postwar developments. 
(4) 

LAH 4720 Family and Land in Latin 
American History (3). Evolution of 
land tenure in Latin American socie- 
ties and its connections with the 
strategies and interests of elite fami- 
lies. (4) 

LAH 4721 History of Women in Latin 
America (3). Examines women's 
roles in indigenous societies, in the 
colonial period, during inde- 
pendence, and in the 19th century. 
Also explores women and slavery, 
populism and popular culture, and 
the rise of the feminist movement. (4) 

AH 4750 Law and Society in Latin 
American History (3). Social history 
of law and legal struggles by colo- 
nial Indians, black slaves, peasants, 
women and contemporary 
"colonos" (settlers). Its emphasis is 
on the prevalence of legal confron- 
tations throughout Latin American 
History. (4) 

LAH 4932 Topics in Latin American 
History (3). Selected topics or 
themes in Latin American history. 
The themes will vary from semester 
to semester. With a change in con- 
tent, the course may be repeated. 
(The theme will be announced in 
the yearly schedule). (4) 

LAH 5905 Readings in Latin Ameri- 
can History (3). Students read books 
from different historiographical tradi- 
tions and with conflicting interpreta- 
tions about an important subject in 
Latin American history. Subjects will 
vary according to professors. 
Course may be repeated with de- 
partmental approval. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 



LAH 5935 Topics in Latin American 
History (3). An examination of spe- 
cific themes or topics in Latin Ameri- 
can history. The theme will vary from 
semester to semester. With a change 
in theme, the course may be re- 
peated. (The theme will be an- 
nounced in the yearly schedules.) 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

LAH 6915 Research in Latin Ameri- 
can History (3). Students conduct re- 
search in primary and secondary 
sources on aspects of important sub- 
jects in Latin American History. Sub- 
jects will vary according to professor. 
Course may be repeated with de- 
partmental approval. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

WOH 2001 World Civilization (3). 

Comparative histories of major 
world civilizations, including China, 
India, the Moslem Middle East, Af- 
rica, Latin America, and the West. 
Emphasis on cultural characteristics 
and interactions. Written work meets 
state composition requirement 
(6,000 words). 

WOH 3281 Jewish History to 1750 (3). 

Jewish history from the First Exile in 
586 BCE to 1750. The development 
of Jewish institutions in exile and as a 
nation, the development of the Tal- 
mud and the medieval experience. 

WOH 3282 Modern Jewish History 
(3). A survey of the major currents in 
modern Jewish History. The reaction 
to the Enlightenment, the American 
experience, the growth of the East- 
ern European Shtetl, the Holocaust 
and the Birth of the State of Israel. 



106 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Humanities 

Kenneth F. Rogerson, Philosophy, 

Director of Humanities 
Marian Demos, Associate Professor, 

Modem Languages (Classics) 
Fernando Gonzalez Reigosa, 

Associate Professor, Psychology 

and Dean, Undergraduate 

Studies 
Nora Heimann, Assistant Professor, 

Visual Arts 
Eric Leed, Professor, History 
Ramon Mendoza, Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Joyce Peterson, Associate Professor, 

History, and Associate Dean of 

the College 
Richard P. Sugg, Professor, English 
Barbara Watts, Associate Professor, 

Visual Arts 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Humanities 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

The Humanities program offers a 
structured interdisciplinary curricu- 
lum designed to confront the stu- 
dent with values and issues con- 
cerning human beings and society, 
extending beyond the scope and 
methodology of natural and social 
sciences. 

The program focuses primarily 
upon the human condition, human 
values, changing views of the 
world, and society's major con- 
cerns. These values, world views, 
and concerns have been the pre- 
ferred object of thought and crea- 
tivity of philosophers, poets, 
playwrights, fiction writers, artists, 
mystics and religious thinkers. Their 
views have become the reservoir of 
humankind's most outstanding intel- 
lectual achievements, and they 
have also been powerfully ex- 
pressed in the works of painters, 
sculptors, and film directors, as well 
as in other productions of mass me- 
dia and popular culture, which 
must now engage the serious stu- 
dent of our culture and its future. 
The program also pays particular at- 
tention to non-Western and Ameri- 
can ethnic-minority cultures, in 
order to expose the student to the 
different values, world views, and 
outstanding cultural achievements 
of these cultures. 

For those students particularly in- 
terested in Classical Greek and Ro- 
man culture, the program offers a 
well-structured Classical track and a 
sequence of Greek and Latin 
courses. 



The Humanities program is not 
only theoretical. It seeks to develop 
in the student those skills and atti- 
tudes which are specifically human, 
such as skills of verbal and written 
communication, analytical skills, 
open-minded and critical attitudes 
towards the problems of our chang- 
ing society, artistic sensitivity and ex- 
pression, and all forms of 
imaginative creativity. Above all, 
the program hopes to challenge 
the student to raise the cultural 
level of our society by bringing his or 
her humanistic approach to bear 
upon institutions, cultural programs, 
mass media, and the business com- 
munity. 

The Humanities program is not 
only a richly rewarding program of 
undergraduate study, but it also pre- 
pares students for later success in 
post-graduate programs in the lib- 
eral arts, law school, business, and 
public affairs. 

A Humanities double major is a 
fine complement to a highly special- 
ized vocational or professional ma- 
jor. In addition, a Humanities minor 
offers an attractive option both to 
students in arts and sciences and to 
those in the other schools of the Uni- 
versity. 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Common Prerequisites 

No specific courses required; all stu- 
dents are encouraged to complete 
the Associate in Arts degree. 

Upper Division Program (30) 

A. Core: The following 4 courses 
are required from all HUM majors 
(12 credit hours): 

HUM 4431 The Greek World' 
HUM 3232 Renaissance and 

Baroque 
HUM 4920 Humanities Seminar 1 
and one of the following courses: 
HUM 3246 The Enlightenment and 

the Modern World 
HUM 3254 Contemporary World 
HUM 3252 20th Century Culture 

and Civilization 
Note: For students who take more 
than four core courses, the surplus 
can be counted under B or C below. 

B. Three additional Humanities 
courses (9 credit hours): 



HUM 3214 Ancient Classical 

Culture and 

Civilization 
HUM 3304 Values in Conflict 
HUM 3225 Women, Culture and 

History 
HUM 3306 History of ideas 
HUM 3432 The Roman World 
HUM 3435 The Medieval World 
HUM 2512 Art and Society' 
HUM Art in Context 

HUM 3545 Art and Literature 
HUM 3930 Female/Male: Women's 

Studies Seminar 
HUM 4391 Human Concerns' 
HUM 4406 Film and the 

Humanities 
HUM 4491 Cultural Heritages and 

Changes 
HUM 4542 Human Concerns 
HUM 4543 Literature and 

Philosophy 
HUM 4544 Literature and the 

Humanities 
HUM 4561 Ethics and the 

Humanities 
HUM 4555 Symbols and Myths 
HUM 4906 Independent Study' 

C. Three additional courses 
either from the list of HUM courses 
offered by the Program; or from the 
following Humanities disciplines: His- 
tory, Philosophy, Religion, Art History, 
and Literature; or from other disci- 
plines related to the Humanities if 
approved by Humanities faculty stu- 
dent advisers. (9 credit hours) 

D. General Electives (30 semes- 
ter hours): These courses may be 
outside of the Humanities and its 
contributing disciplines. Courses 
must be approved by the Program 
Director. 

'With a change in theme and the in- 
structor's permission, these courses 
may be repeated for credit. 

Classics Track 

a. Humanities Core Curriculum 12 

b. Three additional courses deal- 
ing with Classical (Greek or Roman) 
culture and civilization. These 
courses may be either HUM courses 
or courses from contributing Humani- 
ties disciplines. 9 

c. Three interdisciplinary Humani- 
ties (HUM) courses. 9 

d. Language requirement: The 
language requirement is the same 
as for other FIU students; however, 
students in the Classics Track are 
strongly encouraged to satisfy the re- 
quirement with a Classical language. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 107 



e. General Electives (30 semester 
hours). These courses may be out- 
side of the Humanities and its contrib- 
uting disciplines. Courses must be 
approved by the Program Director. 

Minor in the Humanities (15) 

1 . One of the following: 
HUM 3214 Ancient Classical 

Culture and 

Civilization 

or 
HUM 4431 The Greek World 

or 
HUM 3432 The Roman World 

and 

2. Four additional HUM courses 
(including classical languages) 12 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

HUM-Humanities 

GRE 1 120 Classical Greek I (5). Em- 
phasis of grammar, and on basic 
reading and writing skills. 

GRE 1121 Classical Greek II (5). Em- 
phasis on grammar, and on basic 
reading and writing skills. Prereq- 
uisite: GRE 1120. 

GRE 2200 Intermediate Classical 
Greek (5). Emphasis on grammar, 
and on acquiring intermediate read- 
ing and writing skills. Prerequisite: 
GRE 1121. 

GRW 3210 Greek Prose Writers (3). 

Translation into English and gram- 
matical analysis of selected texts of 
Classical prose writers, such as Plato, 
Aristotle, Xenophon, Thucydides 
and Plutarch. Prerequisite: Reading 
knowledge of Classical Greek or 
GRE 2200. 

HUM 2512 Art and Society (3). A 

study of the relationship between 
art and culture in different periods, 
including patronage, the role of the 
artist, and the relationship between 
art and economic, political, relig- 
ious, and ideological forces. 

HUM 2701 Study Abroad in the Hu- 
manities (1-9). Integrated study of 
painting, architecture, music, 
drama, dance, and philosophy. Atti- 
tudes and beliefs of societies as they 
are reflected in the arts. 

HUM 3214 Ancient Classical Culture 
and Civilization (3). Explores the cul- 
ture of the ancient Greek and Latin 
worlds from an interdisciplinary per- 
spective and studies the varied con- 



ceptions of the individual, society, 
and nature. 

HUM 3225 Women, Culture and His- 
tory (3). Examines women's lives 
within various world cultures and his- 
torical periods. Examines the cultural 
meaning attributed to women, 
women's lived experiences and his- 
torical contributions. 

HUM 3232 Renaissance and Baroque 
Cultures (3). An in-depth examination 
of the cultural monuments of the Ren- 
aissance, Reformation, Counter-Refor- 
mation, and Baroque periods and of 
the forces that helped shape them. 

HUM 3246 The Enlightenment and the 
Modem World (3). Explores the cul- 
ture and the Enlightenment and the 
modern world from an interdiscipli- 
nary perspective and studies the vary- 
ing conceptions of the individual 
society and nature. 

HUM 3252 20th Century Culture and 
Civilization (3). The 20th century 
through the Vietnam war, as repre- 
sented by the period's creative and 
intellectual works in literature, art, his- 
tory and philosophy - discussed from 
an interdisciplinary perspective. 

HUM 3254 The Contemporary World 
(3). Significant creative and intellec- 
tual works, ideas and movements of 
the last twenty years - surveyed and 
discussed from an interdisciplinary 
perspective. 

HUM 3304 Values in Conflict (3). Philo- 
sophical, ethical, and religious foun- 
dations of Western civilization and 
significant challenges its value system 
has received from critical and revolu- 
tionary thought. 

HUM 3306 History of Ideas (3). The his- 
torical development of fundamental 
concepts through an interdisciplinary 
cultural approach. Nature, freedom, 
beauty, virtue, alienation, and relativ- 
ism are traced in literature, art, and 
philosophy including the social con- 
text of developing ideas. 

HUM 3432 The Roman World (3). An in- 
depth examination of selected cul- 
tural monuments and events of the 
Roman Republic and Empire and of 
the forces that helped shape them. 

HUM 3435 The Medieval World (3). An 

in-depth examination of cultural 
monuments of the European Middle 
Ages and of the forces that helped 
shape them. 

HUM - Art in Context (3). Examines 
topics concerning art in the context 
of the history and culture of a particu- 



lar society (with change in content 
and consent of the instructor, this 
course may be repeated for credit). 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

HUM 3545 Art and Literature (3). A 

study of a period in the history of vis- 
ual art as it relates to literature. Topics 
may include art and mythology, sa- 
cred and profane love in art and lit- 
erature, painting and poetry, and the 
novel and art. 

HUM 3562 Politics and the Arts (3). Ex- 
plores arts and patronage in relation 
to the politics and ideologies of a 
given place and time. Topics vary. 
May be repeated with a change in 
content. 

HUM 3591 Art and Technology (3). Ex- 
plores the relationship between inno- 
vations in technology and artistic 
expression. Course theme is media 
based, and varies from semester to 
semester. May be repeated with de- 
partment approval. 

HUM 3930 Female/Male: Women's 
Studies Seminar (3). This course inter- 
prets and contrasts the status of 
women and men in context with 
women's inequality. Diverse topics in- 
clude the workplace, family, educa- 
tion, image, violence and ethnicity. 

HUM 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Humanities (3). A student majoring in 
Humanities may spend one or two se- 
mesters fully employed in industry in a 
capacity relating to the major. 

HUM 3939 Special Topics (3). An ex- 
amination of specific topics in the hu- 
manities. The topics may vary from 
semester to semester. May be re- 
peated with a change in content. 

HUM 4392, 4542 Human Concerns (3). 

Examines concerns important to the 
human condition, including varying 
conceptions of human nature, the re- 
lation of the individual to society, the 
quest for identity, the search for 
meaning through literature, art and 
social institutions. (With consent of the 
instructor, this course may be re- 
peated for credit). 

HUM 4406 Film and the Humanities 
(3). Studies the significance of film in 
Western culture: the language, 
semiotics and technique of films with 
the aid of appropriate cinema- 
tographical material. 

HUM 4431 The Greek World (3). An in- 
depth examination of selected cul- 
tural monuments and events of the 
Greek World in the Classical and Hel- 



108/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



lenistic periods and of the forces 
that helped shape them. 

HUM 4491 Cultural Heritages and 
Cultural Changes (3). Focuses upon 
various cultures and their develop- 
ment, including such topics as: cul- 
tural evolution and revolution, 
ethnicity and pluralism, and subcul- 
tures and countercultures. (With con- 
sent of the instructor, this course 
may be repeated for credit.) 

HUM 4543 Literature and Philosophy 
(3). The interpretation of literature 
and philosophy from an interdiscipli- 
nary perspective. In addition to 
philosophical novels, poetry, and 
drama, the course may examine 
philosophical scrutiny of literature. 

HUM 4544 Literature and the Hu- 
manities (3). Literature from an inter- 
disciplinary perspective. Literary 
texts are related to the cultural con- 
text of their production and the 
ideas surrounding them. 

HUM 4555 Symbols and Myths (3). 

An in-depth examination of mythol- 
ogy and symbolic language within 
the cultural and psychodynamic 
forces that inform them. This course 
gives special emphasis to Classical 
myths. 

HUM 4561 Ethics and the Humanities 
(3). Human values studied from an 
interdisciplinary perspective. Se- 
lected ethical issues are examined 
using philosophical, historical, or liter- 
ary texts. The relationship between 
ethical values and cultural achieve- 
ments is explored. 

HUM 4920 Humanities Seminar (3). 

Addresses a specific topic in-depth 
from a variety of perspectives. Top- 
ics will be announced in advance. 
(With consent of the instructor, this 
course may be repeated for credit.) 

LAT 1 120 Latin I (5). Emphasis on 
grammar and on acquiring basic 
reading and writing skills. 

LAT 1 121 Latin II (5). Emphasis on 
grammar and on acquiring reading 
and writing skills. Prerequisite: LAT 
1120. 

LAT 2200 Intermediate Latin (5). Em- 
phasis on grammar and on acquir- 
ing basic reading and writing skills. 
Prerequisite: LAT 1121. 

LAT 3210 Latin Prose Writers (3). Trans- 
lation into English and grammatical 
analysis of selected texts of classical 
prose writers such as Cicero, Caesar 
and Livy. Prerequisite: Reading 
knowledge of Latin or LAT 2200. 



International Relations 

Damian J. Fernandez, Associate 

Professor and Chairperson 
Ken I. Boodhoo, Associate Professor 
Thomas A. Breslin, Associate 

Professor 
John F. Clark, Assistant Professor 
Ralph S. Clem, Professor 
Emily Copeland, Assistant Professor 
Peter R. Craumer, Assistant Professor 
Farrokh Jhabvala, Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
Paul Kowert, Assistant Professor 
Charles G. MacDonald, Professor 
Mohiaddin Mesbahi, Associate 

Professor 
Rod Neumann, Assistant Professor 
Nicholas G. Onuf, Professor and 

Director of Graduate Studies 
Patricia L. Price, Assistant Professor 
Elisabeth Prugl, Assistant Professor 
Susan E. Waltz.Professor 
Gregory B. Wolfe, Professor 

Bachelor of Arts 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

Students may begin taking courses 
in the Department at any time and 
maV declare their intention to major 
in International Relations after com- 
pleting 24 semester hours of general 
education requirements. To qualify 
for full admission to the program, FIU 
students must have met all lower di- 
vision requirements including CLAST, 
complete 60 semester hours, and 
must be otherwise acceptable into 
the program. 

Common Prerequisites 

INR 2001 Introduction to 

International 

Relations 
a second INR course 
Required for the degree: 
GEA 2000 World Regional 

Geography 

Recommended Courses 

Economics, foreign languages, ge- 
ography, history, international rela- 
tions, political science, sociology. 

Upper Division Program 

International Relations majors must 
complete a minimum 30 semester 
hours of coursework in the depart- 
ment with a grade of 'C or better. 
Core Requirement: (9) 
GEA 2000 World Regional 

Geography 3 



INR 301 3 Development of 

International 

Relations Thought 3 
INR 4603 Theories of 

International 

Relations 3 

Group I Courses for the Major: (9) 

In addition to the Core Require- 
ment, INR majors must take at least 
one course (3 sem. hrs.) from each 
of the following divisions in Group I: 

(1) International Law/International 
Organizations (IL) 

(2) Foreign Policy/Security Studies 
(FP) 

(3) International Political Econ- 
omy/Economic Geography (IPE) 

Group II Courses for the Major: 

(12) 

INR majors must also take at least 
four courses (12 sem. hrs.) in Group 
II, including at least one from each 
of the following divisions: 

(1) Area Studies(AS) 

(2) Geography(G) 

(3) Issues and Problems in Interna- 
tional Relations(IP) 

Electives 

Courses are designed to meet par- 
ticular professional goals. The stu- 
dent is encouraged to consider a 
dual major in related fields; to pur- 
sue courses in foreign languages 
and methodology; and to work to- 
ward appropriate academic certifi- 
cates (e.g., Latin American and 
Caribbean Studies). 

Minor in Geography 

A student majoring in another aca- 
demic discipline earns a Minor in 
Geography by successfully complet- 
ing approved coursework of 15 se- 
mester hours with a grade of 'C or 
better as described below: 

GEO 2000 Introduction to 

Geography 3 

GEA 2000 World Regional 

Geography 3 

In addition to the above re- 
quired courses, students must take 
a minimum of three other Geogra- 
phy courses, at least one with a 
GEA prefix, and at least one with a 
GEO prefix. 

Minor in International Relations 

A student majoring in another aca- 
demic discipline earns a Minor in In- 
ternational Relations by successfully 
completing approved coursework 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 109 



of 15 semester hours in the Depart- 
ment of International Relations with 
a grade of 'C or better. This pro- 
gram must include: 
INR 2001 Introduction to 

International 

Relations 3 

GEA 2000 World Regional 

Geography 3 

At least one course from Group I 3 
At least one course from Group II 3 
Any other course offered by the De- 
partment of International Relations. 

Dual Major and Certificates 

Students are encouraged to pursue 
a dual major or a certificate pro- 
gram to complement the Interna- 
tional Relations program. This allows 
the student to add an important di- 
mension to the major. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

GEA-Geography-Regional (Area); 
GEO-Geography-Systemic; INR-lnter- 
national Relations; PUP-Public Policy. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geogra- 
phy (3). A systematic survey of the 
major regions and countries of the 
world, with regard to their physical, 
cultural, and political charac- 
teristics. Emphasis upon climate, 
natural resources, economic devel- 
opment, and population patterns. 
(F,S,SS) 

GEA 3320 Population and Geogra- 
phy of the Caribbean (G) (3). Physi- 
cal, cultural and political geography 
of the Caribbean; emphasis on popu- 
lation patterns, growth and ethnicity. 
(S) 

GEA 3400 Population and Geogra- 
phy of Latin America (G) (3). Intro- 
duction to the physical, cultural, 
and political geography of Latin 
America. Emphasis on population 
patterns and problems of popula- 
tion growth, systems of land use and 
tenure, economic development, 
natural resources, and agriculture. 
(F.S) 

GEA 3500 Population and Geogra- 
phy of Europe (G) (3). Introduction 
to the physical, cultural, and politi- 
cal geography of Europe emphasiz- 
ing the evolution of the states and 
the geographical factors facilitating 
the integration movement. (S) 



GEA 3554 Geography of Russia and 
Central Eurasia (G) (3). A geographi- 
cal analysis of the countries of the 
former Soviet Union. Emphasis on re- 
sources, population, union urbaniza- 
tion, and economic development. 
(S) 

GEA 3600 Population and Geogra- 
phy of Africa (G)(3). Examines the 
structure of pre-conquest society 
and covers colonialism's effects on 
contemporary food production and 
ecological management. An over- 
view of development issues in Af- 
rica. (F) 

GEA 3635 Population and Geogra- 
phy of the Middle East (G) (3). Intro- 
duction to the physical, cultural, 
and political geography of the Mid- 
dle East. Emphasis on population 
patterns, natural resources, and eco- 
nomic development. (F) 

GEA 4905 Independent Study (1-6). 

Directed independent research in 
regional geography. Requires prior 
approval by instructor. (F,S,SS) 

GEO 2000 Introduction to Geogra- 
phy (G) (3). Leading concepts of hu- 
man and environmental 
geography. Physical, cultural, eco- 
nomic and political factors in the 
spatial patterns of natural and hu- 
man systems. (F,S) 

GEO 3421 Cultural Geography (G) 
(3). The study of spatial variations 
among cultural groups and the spe- 
cial functioning of society. Focuses 
on describing and analyzing geo- 
graphic differences in language, re- 
ligion, economy, and government. 
(S) 

GEO 3471 Political Geography (G) 
(3). Emphasis is given to man's or- 
ganization of space, particularly as 
it pertains to the nation-state. Fac- 
tors instrumental to determining the 
viability of states are included stress- 
ing unifying-repelling forces. (S) 

GEO 3502 Economic Geography (G) 
(3). Explores spatial facets of the 
economy at the international level, 
including trade, development, 
manufacturing, multinational corpo- 
rations and technology. (S) 

GEO 3602 Urban Geography (G) (3). 

The study of spatial organization 
within and among urban settle- 
ments. Analysis of both the empirical 
and theoretical aspects of urbanism 
are covered, with an emphasis on 
current urban problems. (S) 



GEO 4905 Independent Study (1-6). 

Directed independent research in 
systematic geography. Requires 
prior approval by instructor. (F,S,SS) 

GEO 5415 Topics in Social Geogra- 
phy (G, IP) (3). Topics discussed in- 
clude geographic aspects of 
population and ethnicity, with em- 
phasis on sources and analysis of 
data and pertinent concepts. Pre- 
requisite: GEA 2000 or permission of 
instructor. (S) 

INR 2001 Introduction to Interna- 
tional Relations (3). Introduction to 
the interactions among interna- 
tional actors: states, International or- 
ganizations, and transnational 
groups. Concepts such as power 
and national interest will be intro- 
duced. (F,S,SS) 

INR 3004 Patterns of International Re- 
lations (IP) (3). The course deals with 
the development and practice of 
key concepts of international rela- 
tions as seen in the historical per- 
spective of the 19th and 20th 
centuries. The course is structured so 
as to emphasize the continuity and 
coexistence of the several concepts 
during the 20th century, and to pro- 
vide an outline of modern diplo- 
matic history. (F,S,SS) 

INR 3013 Development of Interna- 
tional Relations Thought (3). The na- 
ture and characteristics of inter- 
national relations from antiquity to 
the end of the First World War. Ex- 
amination of the religio-philosophi- 
cal, socio-economic and political 
ideas and systems associated with 
them. Study of select historical oc- 
currences and patterns of social 
change and their interaction with 
the dynamics of international rela- 
tions. Prerequisite: INR 2001. 

INR 3043 Population and Society (G, 
IP) (3). Introduction to basic demo- 
graphic concepts: fertility, mortality, 
migration, urbanization. Discussion 
of economic development, modern- 
ization and population change. Ex- 
amination of sources of data and 
background Information including 
censuses and vital statistics, and 
their utilization. (F) 

INR 3081 Contemporary Interna- 
tional Problems (IP) (3). Examines se- 
lected world and regional issues 
and problems. Topics vary accord- 
ing to the instructor. (F.S.SS) 

INR 3106 International Relations of 
the United States (FP) (3). Introduces 
major issues of U.S. foreign policy. 
Topics are examined from multiple 



110/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



perspectives, including those of indi- 
vidual leaders, domestic interest 
groups, and the national interest. 
(F.S) 

INR 3214 International Relations of 
Europe (AS) (3). An examination of 
the international, social, economic, 
and political life of contemporary 
Europe. Emphasis given to interna- 
tional organizations and the trend 
toward economic and political inte- 
gration. (F.S) 

INR 3232 International Relations of 
China (AS) (3). An examination of 
the development of China's interna- 
tional relations in the 20th century. 
Special attention to the develop- 
ment of institutional mechanisms for 
diplomacy and to problems of inte- 
grating domestic and foreign poli- 
cies. (S) 

INR 3243 International Relations of 
Latin America (AS) (3). An examina- 
tion of international, social, eco- 
nomic, and political life of Latin 
America. Emphasis given to the role 
of international organizations; re- 
gionalism; and the trend toward 
economic integration. (F,S,SS) 

INR 3246 International Relations of 
the Caribbean (AS) (3). An examina- 
tion of the international social, eco- 
nomic, and political life of the 
Caribbean. Includes English, Span- 
ish, and French speaking regions. 
(F,S) 

INR 3252 International Relations of 
North Africa (AS) (3). An examina- 
tion of the social, political and eco- 
nomic structure of North Africa and 
the manner in which its historical de- 
velopment has conditioned interna- 
tional relations within and external 
to the region. (F) 

INR 3253 International Relations of 
Sub-Saharan Africa (AS) (3). An 

analysis of the international relations 
of sub-Saharan African nations with 
one another and with other, non-Af- 
rican nations. Examines the effects 
of such international relationships on 
development, politics, and social 
change in sub-Saharan Africa. 

INR 3262 International Relations of 
Russia and the Former USSR (AS)(3). 

Analysis of the international relations 
of countries of the former USSR, cov- 
ering the Soviet and post-Soviet 
eras. Emphasis on Russia, Muslim 
Central Asia, and their impact on 
the international system. (F) 

INR 3274 International Relations of 
the Middle East (AS) (3). An exami- 



nation of the international social, 
economic, and political life of the 
Middle East. The role of oil in the re- 
gion will receive special attention. 
(F.S) 

INR 3403 International Law (IL) (3). In- 
troduction to the legal concepts, 
framework, and institutions which 
play a role in international relations 
theory and practice. (F.S.SS) 

INR 3502 International Organizations 
(IL, IP) (3). The study of international 
political, economic, and social or- 
ganizations and their impact upon . 
the relations between nations. Em- 
phasis on the constitution, voting, 
membership, security and operation 
of such organizations, and the set- 
tling of international disputes 
through these bodies. (F.S.SS) 

INR 3703 International Political Econ- 
omy (IPE) (3). Explores the important 
concepts, theories, and contending 
approaches used in the study of in- 
ternational political economy. 

INR 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Social Sciences (3). A student major- 
ing in one of the Social Sciences 
(Economics, International Relations, 
Political Science, Sociology, or Psy- 
chology) may spend several semes- 
ters fully employed in industry or 
government in a capacity relating 
to the major. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Cooperative Education Program 
and major department. (F.S.SS) 

INR 4024 Ethnicity and Nationality: 
World Patterns and Problems (IP) (3). 

A systematic survey of multinational 
states and their current political and 
socio-economic situations. The con- 
cept of ethnicity and its correlates. 
Conceptual bases of ethnic integra- 
tion, assimilation, and stratification. 
The macro and micro-scales; coun- 
try, region, city, neighborhood. The 
consequences of modernization 
and economic development. (F) 

INR 4044 World Population Problems 

(IP) (3). Analysis of problems of popu- 
lation growth, economic develop- 
ment, and food supply. The impact 
of population growth upon the world 
political system. The Green Revolu- 
tion and its implications. Environ- 
mental consequences of population 
growth. Prerequisite: INR 3043. (F) 

INR 4054 World Resources and World 
Order (IP) (3). An examination of the 
impact of the quantity and distribu- 
tion of the world's resources upon 
the relations between nations. The 
availability of mineral resources and 
food, in particular, will receive atten- 



tion; and an assessment will be 
made of the international eco- 
nomic and political implications de- 
riving therefrom. (F.S) 

INR 4082 Islam in International Rela- 
tions (IP) (3). Analysis of the role of Is- 
lam in shaping the dynamics of 
contemporary international rela- 
tions. Emphasis on ideological, cul- 
tural and political role. Islamic 
movements and states and relations 
with the West. (S) 

INR 4090 Ethical Problems in Interna- 
tional Relations (IP) (3). Explores sev- 
eral approaches to the international 
ethical problems posed by interven- 
tion, human rights abuses, nuclear 
threats, global economic privation 
and other international phenom- 
ena. Prerequisite: INR 2001. 

INR 4247 Caribbean Regional Rela- 
tions (AS) (3). An examination of the 
forces and institutions which contrib- 
ute to or inhibit cooperation and in- 
tegration in the Caribbean. 
Prerequisites: INR 3246, CPO 3323, 
ECS 4432. (S) 

INR 4283 International Relations, De- 
velopment, and the Third World (AS, 
IP) (3). An examination of the im- 
pact of the theory and practice of 
development and the relations be- 
tween nations, with particular em- 
phasis on the Third World. Attention 
given to the role of international po- 
litical and economic organizations 
in the development process. (F.S) 

INR 4335 Strategic Studies and Na- 
tional Security (FP) (3). The role of 
force in international relations is ex- 
amined. The use and control of 
force in theory and practice is ana- 
lyzed. Special attention is paid to 
contemporary national security is- 
sues. (F.S) 

INR 4404 International Protection of 
Human Rights (IL, IP) (3). Develop- 
ment of the concern of the interna- 
tional community with the rights of 
individuals and groups and the insti- 
tutional mechanisms which have 
been set up for their protection. (F) 

INR 4408 Topics in International Law 
(IL, IP) (3). An intensive examination 
of selected topics in international 
law and relations among nations. 
Topics will vary according to the in- 
terests of the instructor and the stu- 
dents. (F) 

INR 4603 Theories of International Re- 
lations (3). Analysis and conceptuali- 
zation of the forces and conditions 
which influence relations among na- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences /111 



tions. Emphasis is on the provision of 
an analytical basis for the study of in- 
ternational relations. Prerequisite: 
INR 2001 or permission of instructor. 
(F,S,SS) 

INR 4905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Directed independent research. Re- 
quires prior approval by instructor. 
(F,S,SS) 

INR 4931 Topics in International Rela- 
tions (3). Varies according to the in- 
structor. (F,S.SS) 

INR 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Social Sciences (3). A student major- 
ing in one of the Social Sciences 
(Economics, International Relations, 
Political Science, Sociology, or Psy- 
chology) may spend one or two se- 
mesters fully employed in industry or 
government in a capacity relating 
to the major. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Cooperative Education Program 
and major department. (F.S.SS) 

INR 5007 Seminar in International 
Politics (3). An advanced graduate 
course designed to give students a 
specialized knowledge of the clas- 
sics in international politics. The 
course traces the development of in- 
ternational politics from Thucydides 
to the present. 

INR 5086 Islam in International Rela- 
tions (3). Analysis of the role of Islam 
in shaping the dynamics of contem- 
porary international relations. Em- 
phasis on the ideological, cultural, 
and political role of Islamic move- 
ments and states, and their relations 
with the West. (F) 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics of 
Development (3). This course exam- 
ines the conceptual and substan- 
tive dimensions of ethnicity in the 
context of world politics and politi- 
cal development. The course will 
highlight ethnicity and ethnic 
groups as critical factors in North- 
South politics. (F) 

INR 5255 Seminar in African Devel- 
opment (3). Examines political, eco- 
nomic and social development in 
Sub-Saharan Africa in an interna- 
tional context. Introduces students 
to sources for research in African in- 
ternational development. Prereq- 
uisites: Undergraduate course on 
Africa or graduate status. 

INR 5315 Foreign Policy Analysis (3). 

Comparative examination of theo- 
ries of foreign policy making, em- 
phasizing the international, 
domestic, and organizational con- 
texts in which national policies are 



formulated and enacted. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. (F) 

INR 5409 International Law I (3). Role 
of international law in the relations 
of states; nature, development, the- 
ory, sources of law; international per- 
sonality; jurisdiction, including 
territory and nationality; dispute set- 
tlement. (F) 

INR 5507 International Organizations 
I (3). Study of international organiza- 
tions and their role in international re- 
lations. Emphasis on their legal 
status, rule-making capacities and 
role in dispute settlement and main- 
tenance of peace. (S) 

INR 5607 International Relations and 
Development (3). An analysis and 
conceptualization of the process of 
development as it takes place in 
the international context. Special at- 
tention given to the role of interna- 
tional organizations in promoting 
development and the manner in 
which differences in developmental 
levels conditions international rela- 
tions. (S) 

INR 5906 Independent Study (VAR). 

Directed independent research. Re- 
quires prior approval by instructor. 
(F,S,SS) 

PUP 3206 International Law and the 
Environment (IL, IP) (3). Introduction 
to the growing body of international 
laws on environmental issues, with 
special emphasis on important 
cases. Recent attempts to coordi- 
nate and regulate activities affect- 
ing the global environment, with 
particular attention to the UN Envi- 
ronmental Agency. (S) 



112/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Liberal Studies 

Janat F. Parker, Professor, 
Psychology, and Director of 
Liberal Studies 
Marcelle Welch, Professor, Modern 
Languages, and Associate 
Director of Liberal Studies 
The Liberal Studies Program exposes 
the student to a wide range of 
courses offered by the College, 
while granting the opportunity to 
pursue an individualized program of 
studies under the Liberal Studies 
guidelines. These guidelines include 
six categories of courses: (1) Founda- 
tions of Liberal Studies, two courses 
to be taken as early as possible; (2) 
Interdisciplinary Colloquia, two 
courses involving faculty from sev- 
eral departments of the College, 
and dealing with interdisciplinary 
topics; (3) Scientific Analysis, two 
courses to expose the student to the 
scientific method and its application 
to problems in biology, chemistry, 
environmental science, geology, 
and physics; (4) Humanistic Analysis, 
two courses dealing with the analy- 
sis of literary, philosophical, religions 
and historical texts or works of art 
and music; (5) Social Analysis, two 
courses to expose the student to the 
basic theories and methods of so- 
cial scientists in the fields of anthro- 
pology, economics, international 
relations, political science, psychol- 
ogy, and sociology; (6) Artistic Crea- 
tion, one course in studio art or 
music, creative writing, or theatre to 
allow the student to experiment with 
his or her own creativity, and to ex- 
perience the work of the artist. 

Students are free to choose any 
combination of courses within these 
guidelines. Under the advisement of 
the Director or Associate Director of 
Liberal Studies, the student will be 
encouraged to pursue an individual- 
ized and focused program. 

Bachelor of Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Common Prerequisites 

No specific courses required; all stu- 
dents are encouraged to complete 
the Associate in Arts degree. 

Recommended Courses: Arts 
and Sciences concentration recom- 
mended. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 



be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program 
Required Courses: (33) 
Courses offered by any of the units 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
chosen in accordance with aca- 
demic guidelines of the Program of 
Liberal Studies, to meet require- 
ments in the four following areas: 
Scientific Analysis 6 

Humanistic Analysis 6 

Social Analysis 6 

Artistic Creation 3 

Interdisciplinary Colloquia 
offered by the Liberal Studies 
Program 6 

Foundations of Liberal Studies 6 
Electives 

The remaining hours will be taken as 
electives. 

Limitations 

If the student wishes to obtain a sec- 
ond major concurrently, no more 
than three courses taken to meet 
the requirements of the other major 
may be counted towards the re- 
quirements of Liberal Studies. If the 
student wishes to obtain a minor 
concurrently, no more than two 
courses taken to meet the require- 
ments of the minor may be counted 
towards the requirements of Liberal 
Studies. No student is allowed to 
take more than six courses in one dis- 
cipline. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

IDS-lnterdisciplinary Studies; SSI-So- 
cial Sciences: Interdisciplinary 

IDS 2930 Faculty Scholars Seminar 
(1). Provides freshman Faculty Schol- 
ars the opportunity to participate in 
the interdisciplinary study of signifi- 
cant themes. May only be taken 
twice. 

IDS 3930 Foundations of Liberal Stud- 
ies (3). This will be a broad synthesis 
of knowledge and methods in the 
Arts and Sciences taught from the 
perspective of different disciplines. 
Specific topics will be announced in 
advance. 

IDS 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Liberal Studies (3). A student major- 
ing in Liberal Studies may spend one 
semester fully employed in industry 
in a capacity relating to the major. 



IDS 4905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Cross-disciplinary topics for individ- 
ual study and research to be cho- 
sen by students in consultation with 
their faculty advisors. 

IDS 4920 Liberal Studies Colloquia 
(3). Individual sections will study, 
from an interdisciplinary perspec- 
tive, issues selected and presented 
jointly by College faculty. Specific 
topics will be announced in ad- 
vance. 

IDS 4930 Foundations of Liberal Stud- 
ies (3). This will be a broad synthesis 
of knowledge and methods in the 
Arts and Sciences, taught from the 
perspective of different disciplines. 
Specific topics will be announced in 
advance. 

IDS 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Liberal Studies (3). A student major- 
ing in Liberal Studies may spend one 
semester fully employed in industry 
in a capacity relating to the major. 

SSI 3240 World Prospects and Issues 
(3). This course examines, from a 
multidisciplinary point of view, spe- 
cific global issues such as food, 
population, and arms control. The is- 
sues discussed may change from 
one semester to the next. 



Labor Studies 

Required Courses for Liberal 
Studies: (33 ) 

Thirty-three semester hours of con- 
centration at the 3000 or 4000 level 
as required for all Liberal Studies stu- 
dents to be selected in consultation 
with and agreement of advisor. 
Courses are to meet requirements in 
the following areas: 

Scientific Analysis 6 

Humanistic Analysis 6 

Social Analysis 6 

Artistic Creation 3 

Interdisciplinary Colloquia 6 

Foundations of Liberal Studies 6 

When possible, these courses 
should be selected from the list of 
required and elective courses for La- 
bor Studies. All courses must be 
completed with a grade of 'C or 
better. 

Required Courses for Labor 
Studies Concentration: (12) 
LBS 3001 Introduction to Labor 
Studies 
Minimum of three courses (nine 
hours) to be chosen from the follow- 
ing: (additional courses from this list 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 1 1 3 



may be used to fulfill electives). To 
be chosen in consultation with and 
agreement of advisor. 
ECO 3021 Economics and Society, 

Micro 
LBS 4101 Theories of the Labor 

Movement 
LBS 42 1 Women and Work in 

the United States 
LBS 4501 Labor and Industrial 

Relations Law 
LBS 4900 Directed Study in 

Labor Studies 
SYO 4360 Industrial Sociology. 
Electives (15) 

To be chosen from the following in 
consultation with and agreement of 
advisor (some of these courses may 
require prerequisites). 
Economics 
ECO 301 1 Economics and Society, 

Macro 
ECO 3101 Intermediate 

Microeconomics 
ECO 3303 Development of 

Economic Thought 
ECO 4321 Radical Political Econ 
ECO 4622 Economic 

Development of U.S. 
ECO 4701 World Economy 
ECO 4733 Multinational 

Organizations 
ECP 4203 Intro to Labor 

Economics 
ECP 4204 Theory of Labor 

Economics 
ECS 3402 The Political Economy of 

South America 

History 

AMH 2020 American History 

1 850-Present 
AMH 3270 Contemporary U.S. 

History 
AMH 4251 The Great Depression 
AMH 4500 United States Labor 

History 
EUH 4660 Modern Europe, 

1789 to the Present 
LAH 3200 Latin America in the 

Modern World 
LAH 451 1 Argentina: 18th-20th 

Centuries 
LAH 4600 History of Brazil 
Industrial Engineering 
EIN 4214 Safety in Engineering 
EIN 4261 Industrial Hygiene 
International Relations 
INR 3004 Patterns of International 

Relations 
INR 3043 Population and 

Society 



INR 4283 International Relations, 

Development, and 

the Third World 
Labor Studies 
LBS 4401 Collective Bargaining in 

Industrial Systems 
LBS 4150 Contemporary Labor 

Issues 
LBS 4260 Administration of 

Labor Organizations 
LBS 4461 Labor Dispute 

Resolution 
LBS 4654 Comparative and 

International Labor 

Studies 
LBS 4905 Topics in Labor Studies 
LBS 4930 Topics in Labor Studies 
LBS 5464 Fact Finding and 

Arbitration 

Management 

MAN 4401 Collective Bargaining 
MAN 4410 Union-Management 

Relations 
MAN 4610 International and 

Comparative 

Industrial Relations 
Philosophy 
PHI 2600 Ethics 
PHI 3636 Professional Ethics 
PHI 4630 Contemporary Ethical 

Issues 
PHM 3200 Social and Political 

Philosophy 
PHM 3400 Philosophy of Law 
Political Science 
POS 3044 Government and 

Politics of the U.S. 
POS 307 1 Corporate Power and 

Politics 
POS 3424 Legislative Process 
POS 4122 State Government 

and Politics 
POT 3204 American Political 

Thought 
POT 3302 Political Ideologies 
PUP 4004 Public Policy (U.S.) 
Psychology 
INP 2002 Introductory 

Industrial/Organization 

al Psychology 
Public Administration 
PAD 2002 Intro to Public 

Administration 
PAD 4223 Public Sector Budgeting 
PAD 5427 Collective Bargaining in 

the Public Sector 
Sociology/Anthropology 
ANT 4007 The Organizer 
ISS 3330 Ethical Issues in Social 

Sciences 



SYA 3300 


Research Methods 


SYA4010 


Sociological Theories 


SYO 4360 


Industrial Sociology 


SYO 4530 


Social Stratification 




(Mobility) 


SYP 4421 


Man, Society and 




Technology 


Statistics 




STA 1013 


Statistics for Social 




Services 


STA3122 


Introduction to 




Statistics 1 


STA 3123 


Introduction to 




Statistics II 


Theatre 




SPC 2600 


Public Speaking 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

LBS - Labor Studies 

LBS 3001 Introduction to Labor Stud- 
ies (3). History and development of 
the labor movement, with emphasis 
on union development as a re- 
sponse to industrialization and tech- 
nological change. Includes the 
structure and functioning of modern 
unions, the development of modern 
technology, the industrial working 
class, and the impact of the rural-ur- 
ban shift of labor. 

LBS 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Labor Studies (1-3). One or two se- 
mesters of part or full-time work re- 
lated to the major. Written reports 
and supervisor evaluations required. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Labor 
Studies Program. 

LBS 4101 Theories of the Labor Move- 
ment (3). This course deals with theo- 
ries which have attempted to 
explain the origins, developments, 
and functioning of the labor move- 
ment. 

LBS 4150 Contemporary Labor Issues 
(3). Studies of contemporary labor 
issues selected from such areas as 
collective bargaining, arbitration, 
mediation, legislation, regulative 
and administrative law, employ- 
ment discrimination, and union 
grievances. 

LBS 4210 Women and Work in the 
United States (3). The role of women 
in the work force and in unions with 
historical, social, and economic em- 
phasis. 

LBS 4260 Administration of Labor Or- 
ganizations (3). Administration of la- 
bor organizations; labor policies and 



114/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



practices; legal requirements and fi- 
nancial administration of unions. Pre- 
requisite: LBS 3001. 

LBS 4401 Collective Bargaining in In- 
dustrial Systems (3). A comprehen- 
sive study of collective bargaining 
with emphasis upon the private sec- 
tor. Included will be negotiations 
and scope of contracts, day-to-day 
contract administration, and major 
bargaining issues. 

LBS 4461 Labor Dispute Resolution 
(3). Theory and practice of dispute 
resolution in industry arbitration proc- 
esses, grievances, mediation, fact- 
finding, and conciliation. Arbitration 
of industrial claims and disputes, 
commercial arbitration. Prerequisite: 
LBS 3001. 

LBS 4501 Industrial and Labor Rela- 
tions Law (3). Studies the history and 
current functioning of labor law with 
special emphasis upon the private 
sector. 

LBS 4654 Comparative and Interna- 
tional Labor Studies (3). A study of la- 
bor issues from a comparative and 
international perspective with em- 
phasis upon the impact of interna- 
tional organizations on labor 
relations systems and a comparison 
among major labor relations models. 

LBS 4900 Directed Study in Labor 
Studies (3). Supervised reading 
and/or field research and training. 

LBS 4905/4930 Topics in Labor Stud- 
ies (3). Selected topics or themes in 
Labor Studies. The themes will vary 
from semester to semester. With a 
change in content, course may be 
repeated. 

LBS 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Labor Studies (1-3). One or two se- 
mesters of part or full-time work re- 
lated to the major. Written reports 
and supervisor evaluations required. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Labor 
Studies Program. 

LBS 5464 Fact Finding and Arbitra- 
tion (3). Study of labor dispute resolu- 
tion with emphasis on grievances, 
fact-finding, and arbitration. 



Mathematics 

Enrique Villamor, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Kaushal Ajitabh, Assistant Professor 
Gerardo Aladro, Associate Professor 
Daniella Bekiranov, Assistant 

Professor 
Julian Edward, Assistant Professor 
Domitila Fox, Instructor 
Shamita Dutta Gupta, Assistant 

Professor 
Susan Gorman, Instructor 
Steven M. Hudson, Associate 

Professor 
George Kafkoulis, Associate 

Professor 
Mark Leckband, Associate Professor 
Diana McCoy, Instructor 
Abdelhamid Meziani, Associate 

Professor 
Richard Nadel, Instructor 
Taje Ramsamujh, Associate Professor 
David Ritter, Associate Professor 
Michael Rosenthal, Instructor 
Dev K. Roy, Associate Professor 
Richard L. Rubin, Associate Professor 
Mitch Rudominer, Assistant Professor 
Philippe Rukimbira, Associate 

Professor 
Anthony C. Shershin, Associate 

Professor 
Minna Shore, Instructor 
James F. Slifker, Associate Professor 
Graham Taylor, Assistant Professor 
John Zweibel, Associate Professor 

An undergraduate student may ma- 
jor in Mathematics or in Mathemati- 
cal Sciences. The Bachelor's degree 
in Mathematics emphasizes a 
deeper study of pure mathematics 
in the traditional mode. A student 
planning to continue into graduate 
study should major in Mathematics. 
The Mathematical Sciences de- 
gree offers an alternative involving 
more breadth. The mathematical re- 
quirements, which are fewer and 
tend to be more applied, are sup- 
plemented by additional require- 
ments in computer science qnd 
applied statistics. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Mathematical Sciences 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 



be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

MAC 2313 Calculus III 

COP 2210 Programming in Pascal 

or 
CGS2420" Programming in 

FORTRAN 

or 
CGS 2423 C for Engineers 
Completion of two of the following 
courses: 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 
BSC 1010L General Biology Lab I 
BSC 101 1 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab II 
CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 
MAP 2302 Differential Equations 
MAS 3 1 05 Linear Algebra 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

COP 2400 Assembly Language 

Programming 3 

COP 2212 Intermediate 

Programming 3 

MAD 2104 Discrete 

Mathematics 3 

MAD 3401 Numerical Analysis 3 
MAD 351 2 Introduction to the 

Theory of Algorithms 3 
MAP 4401 Advanced Differential 

Equations 3 

STA 3163-4 Statistical Methods I 

and II 3-3 

In addition, two courses from the 
following list: 

COP 3530 Data Structures 3 

MAA 4402 Complex Variables 3 

MAD 3305 Graph Theory 3 
MAP 3103 Mathematical 

Modeling 3 

MHF 4302 Mathematical Logic 3 

STA 5446 Probability Theory 3 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 1 15 



Electives 

The balance of the 60 semester hour 
requirement for graduation may be 
chosen from any courses in the Uni- 
versity approved by the student's 
advisor. 

Remarks: The following courses are 
not acceptable for credit toward 
graduation, unless a student has 
passed the course before declaring 
a Mathematical Sciences major: 
M AC 2233 , STA 1 1 3 . STA 3 1 22-23 . 
STA 2023, and QMB 3150 (College of 
Business Administration). 

Minor in Mathematical 

Sciences 

Required Courses: 

MAC 231 1-2-3. Calculus 1,11.111 (or 
equivalent). 

Plus four courses from those ap- 
proved for the Mathematical Sci- 
ences Major program. MAP 2302 
and MAS 3105 may be included 
among these four courses. A grade 
of 'C or higher is necessary for the 
minor. 

Remarks: No mathematical sciences 
courses (Computer Science, Mathe- 
matics, or Statistics) can be applied 
to more than one minor, nor can 
courses used to satisfy major require- 
ments be used towards minor re- 
quirements. In the case where a 
mathematical science course is re- 
quired for a major in one area and 
a minor in another, the student 
should see his or her advisor for an 
appropriate substitution for the re- 
quirement of the minor. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Mathematics 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

MAC 2313 Calculus III 

COP 2210 Programming in Pascal 

or 
CGS 2420 Programming in 

FORTRAN 



CGS 2423 C for Engineers 
Completion of two of the following 
courses: 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 
BSC 10101 General Biology Lab I 
BSC 101 1 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab II 
CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L . Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 
MAP 2302 Differential Equations 
MAS 3 1 05 Linear Algebra 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

MAA 3200 Introduction to 

Analysis 3 

MAA 4211 Advanced 

Calculus 3 

MAS 4301 Algebraic Structures 3 

STA 4321 Mathematical 

Statistics I 3 



In addition, 
each of the 

List 1 

MAD 4203 

MAA 4402 
MTG3212 
MAS 4213 
MAA 4212 

MAS 4302 

MTG 4302 

List 2 

MAP 4401 

MAD 3305 
MAP 3103 

STA 3322 

MAD 3401 
MHF 4302 
MHF4102 



three courses from 
following lists. 

Introduction to 

Combinatorics 

Complex Variables 

College Geometry 

Number Theory 

Topics in Advanced 

Calculus 

Topics in Algebraic 

Structures 

Topology 

Advanced Differential 
Equations 
Graph Theory 
Mathematical 
Modeling 
Mathematical 
Statistics II 
Numerical Analysis 
Mathematical Logic 
Axiomatic Set Theory 



Electives 

The balance of the 60 semester hour 
requirement for graduation may be 
chosen from any courses in the Uni- 
versity approved by the student's 
advisor. 

Remarks: The following courses are 
not acceptable for credit toward 
graduation, unless a student has 
passed the course before declaring 
a Mathematics major: MAC 2233, 
STA 1013, STA 3122-23, STA 2023, and 
QMB 3150 (College of Business Ad- 
ministration). 

Minor in Mathematics 
Required Courses: 

MAC 231 1-2-3 Calculus l-l-lll (or 
equivalent). 

Plus four courses from those ap- 
proved for the Mathematics Major 
program. MAP 2302 and MAS 3105 
may be included among these four ■ 
courses. A grade of 'C or higher in 
each of these courses is necessary 
for the minor. 

Remarks: No mathematical sciences 
courses (Computer Science, Mathe- 
matics, Statistics) can be applied to 
more than one minor, nor can 
courses used to satisfy major require- 
ments be used towards minor re- 
quirements. In the case where a 
mathematical sciences course is re- 
quired for a major in one area and 
a minor in another, the student 
should see his or her advisor for an 
appropriate substitution for the re- 
quirement of the minor. 

Certificate in Actuarial 

Studies 

The department offers a certificate 
in Actuarial Studies. For further infor- 
mation refer to the Certificate sec- 
tion at the end of the College of 
Arts and Sciences' section. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

MAA-Mathematics, Analysis; MAC- 
Mathematics, Calculus and Pre-Cal- 
culus; MAD-Mathematics, Discrete; 
MAP-Mathematics, Applied; MAS- 
Mathematics, Algebraic Structures; 
MAT-Mathematics, General; MGF- 
Mathematics, General and Finite; 
MHF-Mathematics, History and Foun- 
dations; MTG- Mathematics, Topol- 
ogy and Geometry. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 



116/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



MAA 3200 Introduction to Analysis 
(3). Topics include: naive set theory, 
functions, cardinality, sequences of 
real numbers and limits. Emphasis on 
formal proofs. Prerequisite: MAC 
2313. (F) 

MAA 421 1 Advanced Calculus (3). 

An intense study of the foundations 
of calculus, Topics" may include: the 
real number system, continuity, dif- 
ferentiation, Riemann-Stieltjes inte- 
gration, and series of functions. 
Note: The student must complete 
MAA 3200 before attempting this 
course. Prerequisites: MAC 2313, 
MAS 3105 and MAA 3200. (S) 

MAA 4212 Topics in Advanced Cal- 
culus (3). A sequel to MAA 421 1 . Top- 
ics may include: theory of integration; 
analysis in several variables; and 
Fourier series. Prerequisite: MAA 421 1 . 

MAA 4402 Complex Variables (3). 

An introduction to complex vari- 
ables, beginning with the algebra 
and geometry of the complex 
number system. Topics include: com- 
plex functions; analytic functions; 
Cauchy's theorem and its conse- 
quences; Taylor and Laurent series; 
residue calculus; evaluation of real 
integrals and summation of series; 
conformal mapping. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, and MAP 2302 or MAA 
4211'. (F) 

MAC 1 102 College Algebra (3). Poly- 
nomial and rational functions, linear 
and quadratic equations, inequali- 
ties, lines and circles, inverse func- 
tions, exponential and logarithmic 
functions, Students cannot receive 
credit for both this course and MAC 
2132 Precalculus. Prerequisite: High 
school algebra. 

MAC 1114 Trigonometry (3). Trigono- 
metric functions, identities, condi- 
tional equations, polar coordinates, 
vectors, polar graphs, complex num- 
bers, DeMoivre's Theorem, conic 
sections. Student cannot receive 
credit for both this course and MAC 
2132 Precalculus. Prerequisites: Col- 
lege Algebra or equivalent. 

MAC 2132 Pre-calculus Mathemat- 
ics (3). Topics to be covered in- 
clude: functions, exponential and 
logarithmic functions, trigonometry 
and the basics of analytic geome- 
try. Prerequisite: Two years of high 
school algebra. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2233 Calculus For Business (3). 

A one semester introduction to the 
basic notions of calculus. Specific 
topics include: Differential Calculus 
using polynomial, exponential and 



logarithmic functions, and its appli- 
cation to optimization; integral cal- 
culus with area and probability 
applications. Prerequisite: MAC 2132 
or working knowledge of algebra. 
(F.S.SS) 

MAC 231 1 Calculus I (4). Introduc- 
tion to derivatives, differentiation for- 
mulas, differentials, applications of 
the derivative; introduction to an- 
tiderivatives. Prerequisite: Trigonome- 
try or MAC 2 1 32, with a grade of C 
or better. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2312 Calculus II (4).Riemann 
sums, techniques of integration, ap- 
plications of the integral,. improper 
integrals, infinite series, Taylor series, 
polar and parametric functions. Pre- 
requisite: MAC 231 1 , with a grade of 
C or better. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2313 Multivariable Calculus 
(4). This course deals with the differ- 
ential and integral calculus of real 
valued multivariable functions. The 
topics include: directional and par- 
tial derivatives, gradients, and their 
applications; differential calculus of 
vector valued functions; multiple, it- 
erated, line, and surface integrals. 
Prerequisite: MAC 2312 or equiva- 
lent with a grade of 'C or better. 
(F,S,SS) 

MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics (3). 

Sets, functions, relations, permuta- 
tions, and combinations, proposi- 
tional logic, matrix algebra, graphs 
and trees. Boolean algebra, switch- 
ing circuits. Prerequisites: COP 2210 
or CGS 2420 and MAC 23 1 1 . (F.S.SS) 

MAD 3305 Graph Theory (3). An intro- 
duction to the study of graphs. Top- 
ics include the following: paths and 
circuits, connectedness, trees, short- 
est paths, networks, planar graphs, 
the coloring of graphs, and directed 
graphs. Applications of graphs to 
computer science will be discussed. 
Prerequisites: COP 2210 or CGS 2420 
and either MAS 3105 or MAD 2104. 
(F,S,SS) 

MAD 3401 Numerical Analysis (3). 

Basic ideas and techniques of nu- 
merical analysis. Topics include: fi- 
nite differences, interpolation, 
solution of equations, numerical inte- 
gration and differentiation, applica- 
tions, introduction to applied linear 
algebra. This course will make exten- 
sive laboratory use of the computer 
facility. Prerequisites: COP 2210 or 
CGS 2420 and MAC 2312. (F.S.SS) 

MAD 3512 Theory of Algorithms (3). 

Strings, formal languages, finite state 
machines, Turing machines, primitive 



recursive and recursive functions, re- 
cursive unsolvability. Prerequisite: 
MAD 2104. Computer Science ma- 
jors must also take COT 3420. (F.S.SS) 

MAD 4203 Introduction to Combina- 
torics (3). A survey of the basic tech- 
niques of combinatorial 
mathematics. Topics will include the 
Pigeonhole Principle, Binomial Coef- 
ficients, Inclusion-Exclusion, Recur- 
rence Relations, and Generating 
Functions. Prerequisites: MAC 2313 
or both MAC 2312 and MAD 2104. 
(SS) 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations (3). 

An introduction to differential equa- 
tions and their applications, based 
upon a knowledge of calculus. Top- 
ics to include: initial value problems 
of the first order, numerical solutions, 
systems of differential equations, lin- 
ear differential equations, Laplace 
transforms, series solutions. Prereq- 
uisite: MAC 2312 with a grade of 'C 
or better. (F,S,SS) 

MAP 3103 Mathematical Modeling 
and Applications (3). A course to 
provide an understanding of the use 
of mathematical models in the de- 
scription of the real world. Basic prin- 
ciples in the philosophy of formal 
model building as well as specific 
models will be considered. Prereq- 
uisites: MAS 3105 and either MAC 
2313 or MAP 2302. 

MAP 3104 Topics in Mathematical 
Modeling (3). A sequel to MAP 3103. 
In-depth study of techniques listed 
for MAP 3103. Prerequisite: MAP 3103. 

MAP 4401 Advanced Differential 
Equations (3). A second course in dif- 
ferential equations. Topics may in- 
clude: Bessel functions and other 
special functions arising from classi- 
cal differential equations, Sturm-Liou- 
ville problems, partial differential 
equations, transform techniques. 
Prerequisites: MAP 2302 and MAC 
2313. (S) 

MAS 3105 Linear Algebra (3). An in- 
troduction to the topics in linear al- 
gebra most often used in appli- 
cations. Topics include: matrices 
and their applications; simultaneous 
linear equations and elementary op- 
erations; linear dependence; vector 
spaces; rank and inverses; inner 
products and 'best' approximations; 
numerical solutions of simultaneous 
linear equations; eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors; iterative methods for 
calculating eigenvalues; and sys- 
tems of linear equations. Prereq- 
uisite: MAC 2312. (F.S.SS) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 1 17 



MAS 3931 Topics in Actuarial mathe- 
matics (1). Topics related to calcu- 
lus/linear algebra such as 
monotone sequences, least upper 
bound, complex arithmetic, solid 
analytic geometry, linear transforma- 
tions. Mathematics involved in insur- 
ance. Prerequisites: Admission to 
Actuarial Studies Certificate pro- 
gram. 

MAS 4213 Number Theory (3). Topics 
to be discussed are selected from 
the following: congruences, Dio- 
phantine equations, distribution of 
primes, primitive roots, quadratic 
reciprocity, and classical theorems 
of number theory. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2312 or permission of instructor. 
(SS) 

MAS 4301 Algebraic Structures (3). 

An introduction to abstract mathe- 
matical structures of modern alge- 
bra. Fundamental concepts of 
groups, rings, and fields will be stud- 
ied. Note: the student must com- 
plete MAA 3200 before attempting 
this course. Prerequisites: MAS 3105 
and MAA 3200. (S) 

MAS 4302 Topics in Algebraic Struc- 
tures (3). A sequel to Algebraic 
Structures. Topics may include: a 
continuation of the study of groups, 
rings and/or fields; polynomial do- 
mains; Euclidean domains; and Ga- 
lois theory. Prerequisite: MAS 4301 . 

MAT 2949 Cooperative Education in 
Mathematical Sciences (1-3). One 

semester of full-time supervised work 
in an outside organization taking 
part in the University Co-op pro- 
gram. A written report and supervi- 
sor evaluation will be required of 
each student. Prerequisites: Calcu- 
lus I and COP 2210. 

MAT 3905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

MAT 3930 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

MAT 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Mathematical Sciences (1-3). One 

semester of full-time supervised work 
in an outside organization taking 
part in the University Co-op Pro- 
gram. Limited to students admitted 
to the Co-op Program. A written re- 
port and supervisor evaluation will 
be required of each student. Prereq- 
uisites: Calculus II and COP 2212. 



MAT 4905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

MAT 4930 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

MAT 4943 Mathematical Sciences In- 
ternship (VAR). A special program to 
encourage students to get on-the- 
job experience in computer sci- 
ences, statistics, or mathematics in 
an industrial enterprise, governmen- 
tal agency or other organization. Re- 
quirements: minimum grade of 'B' or 
higher in all courses in the major 
area, and approval by Departmen- 
tal Internship Committee. Applica- 
tion is required at least one term in 
advance of registration for this 
course. 

MAT 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Mathematical Sciences (1-3). One 

semester of full-time supervised work 
in an outside organization taking 
part in the University Co-op Pro- 
gram. Limited to students admitted 
to the Co-op Program. A written re- 
port and supervisor evaluation will 
be required of each student. Prereq- 
uisites: Calculus II, a statistics course, 
and COP 2120. 

MGF 1202 Finite Mathematics (3). 

Study of concepts and applications 
involving finite mathematical proc- 
esses such as sets, combinatorial 
techniques, formal logic, discrete 
probability, linear systems, matrices, 
linear programming. Prerequisite: 
Working knowledge of high school 
algebra. (F.S.SS) 

MHF 1202 Sets, Logic, and Writing 
(3). Intuitive set theory, introduction 
to symbolic logic, the relationship 
between them and their applica- 
tions to problem-solving, involving 
writing as a crucial tool in the 
course. Prerequisite: permission of 
Undergraduate Studies. (SS) 

MHF 3404 History of Mathematics 
(3). Development of mathematical 
thought through the ages. Topics 
may include equation solving, trigo- 
nometry, astronomy, and calculus. 
Prerequisite: MAC 2312. (S) 

MHF 4102 Axiomatic Set Theory (3). 

Axioms of set theory, order and well- 
foundedness, cardinal numbers, or- 
dinal numbers, axiom of choice, 
special topics. Prerequisites: MAA 
3200 or permission of instructor. (S, al- 
ternate years) 



MHF 4302 Mathematical Logic (3). A 

study of formal logical systems and 
their applications to the foundations 
of mathematics. Topics to be se- 
lected from the following: definition 
of mathematical proofs; set theory; 
analysis formalized with the predi- 
cate calculus; theorem of Godel 
and Church; recursive function the- 
ory; and idealized computers. Pre- 
requisite: MAA 3200 or MAD 3512. (S, 
alternate years) 

MTG 3212 College Geometry (3). A 

study of the basic structure of Euclid- 
ean geometry together with topics 
from advanced Euclidean geome- 
try and non-Euclidean geometry. 
Prerequisite: Calculus II or permission 
of the instructor. (S) 

MTG 4302 Topology (3). An introduc- 
tory course in topology requiring a 
prerequisite knowledge of calculus. 
Topics to be discussed will be se- 
lected from the following: topologi- 
cal spaces, metric spaces, 
continuity, completeness, compact- 
ness, separation axioms, products 
spaces, subspaces, convergence, 
and homotopy theory. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, MAS 3105, and MAA 
3200. (SS) 

STA 4603-STA 4604 Mathematical 
Techniques of Operations Research 
I and II (3-3) . An introduction to 
those topics in mathematics associ- 
ated with studies in operations re- 
search. Topics include the following: 
linear programming and related top- 
ics, dynamic programming, queuing 
theory, computer simulation, net- 
work analysis, inventory theory, deci- 
sion theory, integer programming. 
Prerequisites: MAS 3105 and either 
STA 3033 or STA 4322. 



118/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Modern Languages 

Isabel Castellanos, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Aurelio Baldor, Instructor 
Pascale Becel, Assistant Professor 
Jean-Robert Cadely, Assistant 

Professor 
Eric Camayd-Freixas, Assistant 

Professor 
Ricardo Castells, Assistant Professor 
James O. Crosby, Professor Emeritus 
Leonel A. de la Cuesta, Associate 

Professor 
Asuncion Gomez, Assistant Professor 
Yvonne Guers-Villate, Professor 

Emeritus 
Danielle Johnson-Cousin, Associate 

Professor 
Santiago Juan-Navarro, Assistant 

Professor 
John B. Jensen, Professor 
Peter A. Machonis, Associate 

Professor 
Ramon Mendoza, Professor (North 

Campus) 
Marian Montero-Demos, Associate 

Professor 
Ana Roca, Associate Professor 
Reinaldo Sanchez, Professor 
Juan Torres-Pou, Assistant Professor 
Maida Watson, Professor 
Marcelle Welch, Professor 
Theodore Young, Assistant Professor 
Florence Yudin, Professor 

Bachelor of Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Common Prerequisites 

French 

FRE 1120 French I 
FRE 1 121 French II 
FRE 2200 Intermediate French 
Required for the Major: 
FRE 2420 Oral Communication 
Skills 

German 

Common Prerequisites 

GER1130 German I 
GER 1131 German II 
GER 2200 Intermediate German 
Required for the Major: 
GER 2440 German Conversation 
Intermediate 

Portuguese 

Common Prerequisites 

POR 1130 Portuguese I 
POR 1131 Portuguese II 



POR 2200 Intermediate Portuguese 

Required for the Major: 

POR 3400 Advanced Oral 
Communication 

Spanish 

Common Prerequisites 

SPN1120 Spanish I 

SPN 1121 Spanish II 

SPN 2200 Intermediate Spanish 

Required for the Major: 

SPN 2420 Oral Communication 

Skills 

or 
SPN 2340 Intermediat Spanish for 

Native Speakers 
To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

Required Courses 

Foreign Language 33 semester hours 
Electives 27 semester hours 

Students in the Teacher Prepara- 
tion Program carry two majors: Mod- 
ern Language and Modern 
Language Education and must re- 
quest admission to both programs. 
(Students interested in teacher certi- 
fication should contact the College 
of Education at 348-2721.) 

Requirements for all Modern 
Language Majors 

All majors must have a designated 
faculty advisor, and all are required 
to take 33 semester hours in the De- 
partment of Modern Languages, 
with a grade of 'C or higher. 

Requirements For Spanish Majors 

To undertake a major in Spanish, a 
student must demonstrate a profi- 
ciency in the language at the inter- 
mediate level. This may be done by 
an examination administered by the 
Department, or by completing SPN 
2200 (non-native speakers) or SPN 
2340 (native speakers). 

Required credits for Major (33) 

(21 credits of Core Courses and 12 
credits of electives) 

Core Courses 

SPN 3301 Review Grammar and 
Writing 
or 



SPN 2341 Advanced Spanish for 

Native Speakers 3 

SPN 3422 Advanced Grammar 

and Composition 3 
SPW 3820 Introduction to 

Peninsular 

Spanish Literature 3 
SPW 3130 Introduction to 

Spanish American 

Literature 3 

SPN 3733 Introduction to 

General Linguistics 3 

(or equivalent) 
One additional course in Spanish 

Linguistics 3 

One additional course in Spanish 

or 
Spanish American Literature 3 

(Students who have advanced 
proficiency in Spanish may replace 
the six language credits with elec- 
tives in Spanish at the 3000 or 4000 
level with the written permission of 
their advisors). 

Elective Courses: 

Twelve credits of electives in Spanish 
at the 3000 or 4000 level from a 
range of courses in Spanish/Spanish 
American literature, Spanish linguis- 
tics, Hispanic culture, and Transla- 
tion/Interpretation. 
SPN 3733 Introduction to General 
Linguistics (or 
equivalent) is a 
prerequisite for other 
linguistics offerings. 

Requirements for French Majors 

(33) 

Basic Courses: 

Grammar (6) 

FRE 3420 Review Grammar/ 

Writing I 

(non native or near 

-native speakers) 
FRE 3421 Review Grammar 

Writing II 
FRE 4422 Review Grammar/ 

Writing III 

Conversation (3) 

FRE 3410 Advanced French 
Conversation (no 
native or near-native 
speakers) 
FRE 34 1 3 Communication Arts 
FRE 3504 Language and Culture 

Phonetics (3) 

FRE 3780 French Phonetics 
Advanced Courses: 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 1 19 



Literature (at least nine credits) 

FRW 3200 Introduction to 

Literature I 

or 
FRW 3201 Introduction to 

Literature II 

or 
FRW 38 1 Literary Analysis 
Two 3-credit literature courses (FRW) 
preferably taken in different literary 
periods or genres. 

Linguistics (3) 

FRE 4840 History of the 

Languagae I 
FRE 4841 History of the Language I 
FRE 4503 Francophonie 
FRE 4855 Structure of Modern 

French 

Civilization (6) 

FRE 3504 Language and Culture 
FRE 3500 History of French Society 
FRE 4501 Contemporary French 

Culture 
FRE 4935 Senior Seminar 

(Civilization) 
Elective (3) 
French linguistics or literature 3 

Requirements for Other 
Language Majors 
A major in a language other than 
Spanish or French may take only 21 
credits in the major target lan- 
guage, but completion of at least 
two semesters of a second foreign 
language is recommended. There is 
no fixed sequence of courses re- 
quired, and a student may enroll in 
any course offered for majors, pro- 
vided he or she meets the course 
prerequisites. 

Minor in French Language 
and Culture 

A student majoring in another disci- 
pline may earn an academic minor 
in French Language and Culture by 
taking 1) 12 semester hours of 
course work in French language FRE 
3410, FRE 3420/3421 , FRE 3780; 2) 
three semester hours in French Civili- 
zation and Culture FRE 3500 or FRE 
4501 ; 3) three semester hours of re- 
stricted electives courses In French 
linguistics, French Translation Skills or 
Introduction to Literature, FRW 3200. 

Minor in Portuguese 

A student majoring in another disci- 
pline may earn an academic minor 
in Portuguese by taking 12 semester 
hours of course work in the lan- 
guage at the level of POR 3420 or 



above, and six additional hours in 
Portuguese or in approved courses 
in a related discipline, such as linguis- 
tics or the civilization of Portuguese- 
speaking peoples. 

Minor in General Translation 
Studies 

In order to obtain an academic mi- 
nor in General Translation Studies, 
a student takes 12 semester hours in 
translation/interpretation courses 
(FOT, FRT, or SPT prefix), with grades 
of B or better, and nine additional 
hours in courses of immediate rele- 
vance to the program, to be ap- 
proved by the Director of the 
program. Normally these will be se- 
lected from among offerings in Politi- 
cal Science, Economics, 
International Relations, Sociology, 
Anthropology, Computer Science or 
Modern Languages. At least two of 
them should be taken outside of 
Modern Languages. Courses in ba- 
sic and intermediate instruction shall 
not be counted for the minor. 

Minor in Spanish Language 
and Culture 

Required Credits for Minor 

Fifteen credits of Core Courses and 
three credits of electives. Total: 18 
semester hours. 

Core Courses 

SPN 3301 Review Grammar and 
Writing 3 

or 
SPN 2341 Advanced Spanish for 
Native Speakers 3 

SPN 3733 Introduction to Gen 

Linguistics 3 

(or equivalent) 
SPW 3820 Introduction to 

Peninsular Spanish 
Literature 3 

SPW 3130 Introduction to 

Spanish American 
Literature 3 

One SPN course on Culture 3 

Elective Courses 

Three credits in Spanish at the 3000 
or 4000 level in language, literature, 
culture, or translation/interpretation. 

Students who have advanced 
proficiency in Spanish may replace 
SPN 3422 Review Grammar and Writ- 
ing or SPN 2341 Advanced Spanish 
for Native Speakers with another up- 
per-level Spanish elective with the 
written permission of their advisors. 

SPN 3733 (or equivalent) is a pre- 
requisite for other linguistics offerings. 



Basic Language Instruction 

The department offers three-semes- 
ter sequences of instruction in begin- 
ning and intermediate Arabic, 
Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, 
Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Span- 
ish, Russian, and beginning Instruc- 
tion in other languages. 

The courses in basic language in- 
struction are designed primarily for 
persons wishing to acquire conversa- 
tional ability in a foreign language; 
but they provide training in all four 
language skills listening, speaking, 
reading, and writing. Students are 
advised to consult the Departmen- 
tal course listing for specific sections. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ARA-Arabic Language; CHI-Chinese 
Language; FOL-Foreign Languages; 
FOT-Foreign Languages in Transla- 
tion; FOW-Foreign Languages, Com- 
parative Literature; FRE-French 
Language; FRT-French Translation; 
FRW-French Literature (Writings); 
GER-German Language; GET-Ger- 
man Translation; HBR -Hebrew; ITA- 
Italian Language; in-Italian 
Translation; JPN-Japanese Lan- 
guage; UN-Linguistics; POR-Portu- 
guese Language; POW-Portuguese 
Literature (Writings); PRT-Portuguese 
Translation; RUS-Russlan Language; 
SPN-Spanish Language; SPT-Spanish 
Translation; SPW-Spanlsh Literature 
(Writings). 

(See English listing for additional Lin- 
guistics courses.) 

ARA 3130 Arabic I (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

ARA 3131 Arabic II (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

ARA 3210 Intermediate Arabic (3). 

Provides intermediate training in the 
acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisite: One 
year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

CHI 3130 Chinese I (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

CHI 3131 Chinese II (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

CHI 3210 Intermediate Chinese (3). 

Provides intermediate training in the 
acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One 



120 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

FIL 5526 Spanish Film (3). The history 
of film in Spain and discussions of 
films by the most important 20th 
Century Directors. 

FIL 5527 Latin American Film (3). The 

study of 20th Century films and 
documentaries produced by lead- 
ing Latin American directors. Films 
are examined in relation to Latin 
American Society and its literary 
creations. 

FOL 1000 Elementary Foreign Lan- 
guage (3). Emphasis on oral skills, 
contemporary language and cul- 
ture. Content oriented to students 
with specific professional or leisure in- 
terests. For languages not often 
taught. This course is not part of a se- 
ries. No prerequisites. 

FOL 3013 Language Skills for Profes- 
sional Personnel (3). The course is 
geared to the special linguistic 
needs of community groups (medi- 
cal, business, technical, etc.). 

FOL 3732 Romance Linguistics (3). 

The common and distinctive Ro- 
mance features. Survey of linguistic 
geography and internal/external in- 
fluences. 

FOL 3905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or apprenticeship. 

FOL 3930 Special Topics (3). Read- 
ings and discussion of literary/linguis- 
tic topics to be determined by 
students and teacher. 

FOL 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Modern Languages (3). A student 
majoring in one of the Humanities 
(English, History, Modern Languages, 
Visual Arts or Performing Arts) may 
spend one or two semesters fully em- 
ployed in industry or government in 
a capacity relating to the major. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Cooperative 
Education Program and major de- 
partment. 

FOL 3955 Foreign Study (3-12). Study 
abroad credits. Individual cases will 
be evaluated for approval. 

FOL 4905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

FOL 4930 Special Topics (3). Inde- 
pendent readings, research, or pro- 
ject. 



FOL 4935 Senior Seminar (3). Topics 
and approach to be determined by 
students and instructor. 

FOL 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Modern Languages (3). A student 
majoring in one of the Humanities 
(English, History, Modern Languages, 
Visual Arts or Performing Arts) may 
spend one or two semesters fully em- 
ployed in industry or government in 
a capacity related to the major. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Cooperative 
Education Program and major de- 
partment. 

FOL 4958 Foreign Study: Advanced 
Language Literature (VAR 3-12). 

Study abroad credits. Individual 
cases will be evaluated for approval. 

FOL 5735 Romance Linguistics (3). 

The common and distinctive Ro- 
mance features. Survey of linguistic 
, geography and internal/external in- 
fluences. 

FOL 5906 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

FOT 2120 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces of French literature in 
English. Comparative use of the origi- 
nal text. Discussion and interpreta- 
tion. 

FOT 3800 Translation/Interpretation 
Skills (3). Emphasis on basic princi- 
ples and practice application. 

FOT 3810 Creative Writing/Transla- 
tion (3). Training through non-struc- 
tured writing. Examination of various 
approaches to the problems and 
objectives of creative translation. 

FOT 4130 European Literature in 
Translation (3). For students profi- 
cient in more than one foreign lan- 
guage. Content and focus to be 
determined by student and instruc- 
tor. 

FOT 4801 Professional Translation/In- 
terpretation (3). Techniques and re- 
sources for professional translation 
and interpretation. Prerequisite: FOT 
3800. 

FOT 5125 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces of world literature. 
Open to students who are proficient 
in more than one language. 

FOT 5805 Translation/Interpretation 
Arts (3). The language barrier and 
translation and interpretation. Types, 
modes, and quality of T/l: philologi- 
cal, linguistic, and socio-linguistic 
theories. History of T/l from Rome to 
date. The impact of T/l on Inter- 



American developments. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

FOW 3520 Prose and Society (3). The 

dynamics of participation and al- 
ienation between prose writers and 
their environment. 

FOW 3540 Bicultural Writings (3). Ex- 
periment in linguistic pluralism. Con- 
tent and focus to be determined by 
the international community. 

FOW 3580 Intellectual History (3). 

The interaction or dissociation 
among writers in a critical historical 
period. Study of primary sources 
and their contemporary evaluations, 

FOW 3582 Literature of Reform (3). 

The consciousness of change in ver- 
bal art. 

FOW 3584 Literature of Repression 
(3). The consciousness of constraints, 
their adoption and/or rejection in 
verbal art. 

FOW 4390 Genre Studies (3). Exami- 
nation of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of in- 
teraction between literary types 
(e.g. novel and drama). 

FOW 4590 Creative Modes (3). Dis- 
cussion of a single mode or a plural- 
ity of epoch styles such as classical/ 
baroque, realism/surrealism. The pe- 
culiar/common features of expres- 
sive media. 

FOW 4790 The Literary Generation 
(3). The real and apparent shared 
ideals of an artistic generation, its in- 
fluence and range. 

FOW 4810 Problems in Reading and 
Interpretation (3). The identification 
and appreciation of techniques for 
sensitive reading and discussion of lit- 
erary texts. 

FOW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Exami- 
nation of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of in- 
teraction between literary types 
(e.g. novel and drama). 

FOW 5545 Bicultural Writings (3). Ex- 
periment in linguistic pluralism. Con- 
tent and focus to be determined by 
the international community. 

FOW 5587 Comparative Studies (3). 

Cross-over and distinctiveness in a 
multi-language problem, period, or 
aesthetic. 

FOW 5934 Special Topics in Lan- 
guage/Literature (3). Content and 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 121 



objectives to be determined by stu- 
dents and teacher. 

FOW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be deter- 
mined by students and instructor. 
(Approval of the Department re- 
quired.) 

FRE 1013 Language Skills for Profes- 
sional Personnel (1-3). The course is 
geared to the special linguistic 
needs of community groups (medi- 
cal, business, technical, etc.). 

FRE 1 120 French I (5). Course de- 
signed specifically for beginning uni- 
versity students with no previous 
language study. Emphasis on oral 
French and on acquiring basic lan- 
guage skills. 

FRE 1 121 French II (5). Emphasis on 
oral French and on acquiring basic 
language skills. 

FRE 1 130 Accelerated Basic French 
(5). Accelerated course for students 
who already have some basic 
knowledge of French. Encourages 
rapid acquisition by intensive expo- 
sure to the language. Prerequisites: 
At least one year of High School 
French or equivalent. 

FRE 2200 Intermediate French (3). 

Provides intermediate training in the 
acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One 
year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

FRE 2240 Oral Communication Skills 
(3). Development of oral skills 
through skits, debates, and hypo- 
thetical situations. Open to non-na- 
tive speakers Prerequisites: FRE 1 121 
or FRE 1 130 or equivalent. 

FRE 2270 Foreign Study (3-12). Inter- 
mediate level. One semester full- 
time credit for foreign residence 
and study. Individual cases will be 
evaluated for approval. 

FRE 3410 Advanced French Conver- 
sation (3). To develop oral profi- 
ciency skills and a greater 
awareness of French culture. 

FRE 3413 Communication Arts (3). 

Develop communicative compe- 
tence through intensive oral class 
work. Emphasis on ability to express 
ideas and appreciation of multiple 
aspects of French culture. 

FRE 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I 
(3). Practice in contemporary usage 
through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writ- 
ing and speaking ability in extempo- 



raneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target 
language. 

FRE 3421 Review Grammar/Writing II 
(3). Instruction and practice in ex- 
pository writing in French, with em- 
phasis on organization, correct 
syntax, and vocabulary building. Pre- 
requisite: FRE 3420. 

FRE 3440 Business French (3). Intro- 
duces the minor and non-major to 
the culture, economy, and com- 
merce of modern-day France. Exten- 
sive practice in business writing and 
communication. Conducted in 
French. Prerequisite: FRE 1121. 

FRE 3500 History of French Civiliza- 
tion (3). Open to any student who 
understands the target language. 
The development of a particular civi- 
lization. Emphasis on the evolution 
of a society, its ideas and its values. 

FRE 3504 Language and Culture (3). 

Emphasis on oral skill applied to con- 
temporary culture, to enhance stu- 
dent's knowledge and 
understanding of French way of life 
in Francophone world. Emphasis is 
also placed on acquisition and in- 
tensive practice of vocabulary and 
grammar. Prerequisites: FRE 3410 or 
permission of instructor. 

FRE 3740 Applied Linguistics (3). Ex- 
amination of available linguistic ma- 
terials for self-instruction. Problem 
solving in syntax and phonetics, 
through the application of mod- 
ern/traditional methods. 

FRE 3780 French Phonetics (3). An in- 
troductory course in French linguis- 
tics. Includes the International 
Phonetic Alphabet and a system- 
atic inventory of all the sounds of 
French, with refinement exercises in 
the language laboratory. Prereq- 
uisites: FRE 2200 or equivalent. 

FRE 3781 Intermediate French Pho- 
netics (1). Pronunciation of French 
for non-majors. Includes an introduc- 
tion to the International Phonetic Al- 
phabet and a systematic review of 
the sounds of French. Prerequisites: 
FRE 1120 and FRE 1121. 

FRE 3820 Dialectology (3). Definition 
and analysis. Problem-solving in dia- 
lect classification. 

FRE 4378 French Cinema (3). In-class 
viewing and discussion of selected 
French films to develop knowledge 
and understanding of this important 
aspect of French culture from begin- 
nings to the present. Prerequisites: 



FRW 3200 or FRW 3810 and another 
FRW course. 

FRE 4422 Review Grammar/Writing 
III (3). A study of various aspects of 
forms and styles, with emphasis on 
expository writing in French. Prereq- 
uisite: FRE 3421. 

FRE 4470 Foreign Study: Advanced 
Language/Literature (3-15). Full-se- 
mester credit for foreign residence 
and study/work. (Approval of De- 
partment required.) 

FRE 4501 Contemporary French Soci- 
ety (3). Course designed primarily 
for French majors, advanced under- 
graduates and graduates. Examina- 
tion of the cultural, ideological, 
socio-political and economic fabric 
of France from WWI to the present. 
Prerequisites: FRE 3420 or permission 
of instructor. 

FRE 4503 La Francophonie (3). Analy- 
sis of the different varieties of French 
spoken outside of France. Includes 
Quebec French, African French, 
and French Creoles. Also examines 
the political alliance of Franco- 
phone countries. Credit will not be 
given for both FRE 4503 and FRE 
5505. Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 
3010 or UN 3013. 

FRE 4791 Contrastive Phonology (3). 

Contrasts in the sound systems of 
English and French. 

FRE 4800 Contrastive Morphology 
(3). Contrasts in the morphology 
and syntax of English and French. 

FRE 4840 History of the Language I 
(3). The internal and external history 
of the French language from Latin 
to Old French. Examination of some 
of the first texts written in French. Pre- 
requisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 3010 or LIN 
3013. 

FRE 4841 History of the Language II 
(3). External and internal history of 
the French language from 1400 to 
the present. Examination of first dic- 
tionaries and grammars of French. 
Survey of recent linguistic legislation 
concerning the French language. 
Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 3010 or 
LIN 3013. 

FRE 4850 Structure of Modern French 
(3). Systematic study of the phonol- 
ogy, morphology, syntax, and lexi- 
con of Modern French. Taught in 
English. Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 
3010. 

FRE 4935 Senior Seminar (3). Topic 
and approach to be determined by 
students and instructor. 



122 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



FRE 5060 Language for Reading 
Knowledge I (3). Designed primarily 
for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. and Ph.D. 
requirements. Open to any student 
who has no prior knowledge of the 
language. 

FRE 5061 Language for Reading 
Knowledge II (3). Emphasis on trans- 
lation of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisite: 
FRE 5060 or equivalent. 

FRE 5508 La Francophonie (3). Analy- 
sis of the different varieties of French 
spoken outside of France. Includes 
Quebec French, African French, 
and French Creoles. Also examines 
the political alliance of Franco- 
phone countries. Credit will not be 
given for both FRE 4503 and FRE 
5505. Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or UN 
3010 or LIN 3013. 

FRE 5735 Special Topics in Linguistics 
(3). Content to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of 
Department required.) 

FRE 5755 Old French Language (3). 

Introduction to the phonology, mor- 
phology, and syntax of the Old 
French language. Reading and 
analysis of the 12th and 13th cen- 
tury texts in their original. Compari- 
son of major medieval dialects. 
Prerequisite: FRE 4840 or FRE 5845. 

FRE 5845 History of the Language I 
(3). The internal and external history 
of the French language from Latin 
to Old French. Examination of some 
of the first texts written in French. 
Credit will not be given for both FRE 

4840 and FRE 5845. Prerequisite: FRE 
3780. 

FRE 5846 History of the Language II 
(3). External and internal history of 
the French language from 1400 to 
the present. Examination of first dic- 
tionaries and grammars of French. 
Survey of recent linguistic legislation 
concerning the French language. 
Credit will not be given for both FRE 

4841 and FRE 5846. 

FRE 5855 Structure of Modern French 
(3). Systematic study of the phonol- 
ogy, morphology, syntax, and lexi- 
con of Modern French. Taught in 
English. Credit will not be given for 
both FRE 4855 and FRE 5856. 

FRE 5908 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

FRT 3800 Basic Translation Exercises 
(3). Emphasis on basic principles 



and practice application. Prereq- 
uisite: FRE 3421. 

FRT 4801 Professional Translation (3). 

Techniques and resources for profes- 
sional translation. Prerequisite: FRT 
3810. 

FRT 5805 Translation/Interpretation 
Arts (3). Techniques of professional 
translation and interpretation. Pre- 
requisite: FRT 4801. 

FRW 3200 Introduction to Literature I 
(3). Close reading and analysis of 
prose and poetry from the Middle 
Ages to the 17th Century. 

FRW 3201 Introduction to French Lit- 
erature II (3). Close reading and 
analysis of French prose, theatre, 
and poetry, from the 18th to the 
20th century. Prerequsities: FRE 3421 
or FRE 4422. 

FRW 3280 French 19th Century Novel 
(3). Four major novels by major 19th 
century novelists will be selected to 
illustrate the development of novel- 
ist techniques as well as of a differ- 
ent conception of the role of the 
novel that finally made it an impor- 
tant literary genre. Prerequisite: FRW 
3810 or another FRW course. 

FRW 3300 French Comedies (3). A 

study in French comedies from the 
15th century to the 19th century, 
with special emphasis on Moliere's 
plays. Prerequisite: FRW 3200. 

FRW 3323 French 19th Century 
Drama (3). Plays will be chosen to il- 
lustrate various literary movements 
in 19th century French drama: Ro- 
manticism, Realism, Naturalism, and 
Symbolism. Prerequisite: FRW 3200. 

FRW 3370 French 19th and 20th Cen- 
tury Short Stories (3). Great short sto- 
ries by Maupassant, Merimee, 
Flaubert, Camus, and Sartre will be 
studied to familiarize the student 
with literary criticism by a close read- 
ing and analysis of short texts. Pre- 
requisite: FRE 3421. 

FRW 3532 French Romantic Litera- 
ture (3). A study of French Romantic 
generation through the works of La- 
martine, Hugo, de Musset, etc. Pre- 
requisite: FRW 3200. 

FRW 3810 Literary Analysis (3). The 

identification and appreciation of 
techniques for sensitive reading and 
discussion of literary texts. 

FRW 3905 Independent Study (3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or apprenticeship. 



FRW 3930 Special Topics (3). Read- 
ings and discussion of literary/linguis- 
tic topics to be determined by 
students and instructor. 

FRW 4123 Travel, Exile, and Cross- 
Cultural Encounters (3). Drawing on 
writings from the turn of the century 
to the present, explores the themes 
of exile and escape, of cultural and 
visual appropriations, the repetition 
and deconstruction of exotic cli- 
ches. 

FRW 4212 French Classical Prose (3). 

Study of major works of 17th century 
French authors such as Descartes, 
Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruy- 
ere, etc. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, 
and another FRW course. 

FRW 4218 18th Century French Prose 
(3). Major works by the 18th century 
French philosophes that illustrate the 
evolution of socio-political and aes- 
thetic thought leading to the French 
Revolution. Prerequisites: FRW 3200 
or FRW 3810 and another FRW 
course. 

FRW 4272 French Novels from the 
Classical Period (3). A study of ma- 
jor 17th and 18th century French 
novels. Course conducted in 
French. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, and 
another FRW course. 

FRW 4281 French 20th Century Novel 
(3). A detailed analysis of modern 
novels, and a general examination 
of the intellectual currents which 
these novels illustrate or express 
(e.g. surrealism, existentialism, nou- 
veau roman, post-modernism. Pre- 
requisites: FRW 3200, and another 
FRW course. 

FRW 4310 Seventeenth-Century 
French Drama (3). A study of French 
classical aesthetics through the 
plays of Corneille, Moliere, and Rac- 
ine. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, and an- 
other FRW course. 

FRW 4324 French 20th Century Thea- 
tre (3). Focuses on the scope and 
variety of contemporary French 
theatre from Claudel, through exis- 
tentialism and the theatre of the ab- 
surd, to Cixous and Cesaire. 
Prerequisites: FRW 3200, and an- 
other FRW course. 

FRW 4390 Genre Studies (3). Exami- 
nation of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of in- 
teraction between literary types 
(e.g. novel and drama). 

FRW 4410 French Medieval Literature 
(3). A study in different literary forms 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 123 



prevalent during the 12th and 15th 
centuries. Read in modern French; 
course will be conducted in French. 
Prerequisites: FRW 3200, and an- 
other FRW course. 

FRW 4420 Sixteenth-Century French 
Literature (3). A study of major 
authors of the French Renaissance, 
Rabelais, Ronsard, Montaigne, etc. 
Course conducted in French. Prereq- 
uisites: FRW 3810 or 3820, and an- 
other FRW course. 

FRW 4583 Women Writers in French 
(3). Drawing on the writings of 
women authors in French, this 
course explores topics such as: the 
effects of narrative techniques on 
subject formation, the poetics of si- 
lence and of revolt, sexual differ- 
ence versus cultural difference. 
Prerequisites: FRW 3810 or 3820, and 
another FRW course. 

FRW 4590 Creative Modes (3). Discus- 
sion of a single mode or a plurality 
of epoch styles such as classical/ba- 
roque, realism/surrealism. The pecu- 
liar/common features of expressive 
media. 

FRW 4750 Francophone Literature of 
Africa (3). Introduction to the Fran- 
cophone literatures of Africa; study 
of a literary tradition in French, with 
special emphasis on post-World War 
II writers. Prerequisites: FRW 3200 or 
another FRW course. 

FRW 4751 Francophone Literature in 
the Caribbean (3). Introduction to 
the Francophone literature of the 
Caribbean; study of a literary tradi- 
tion in French, with special emphasis 
on post-World War II writers. Prereq- 
uisites: FRW 3200 or another FRW 
course. 

FRW 4905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

FRW 4930 Special Topics (3). Inde- 
pendent readings, research, or pro- 
ject. 

FRW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Exami- 
nation of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of in- 
teraction between literary types 
(e.g. novel and drama). 

FRW 5934 Special Topics in Lan- 
guage Literature (3). Content and 
objectives to be determined by stu- 
dent and instructor. 

FRW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be deter- 
mined by students and instructor. 



(Approval of the Department re- 
quired.) 

GER 1120 German I (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

GER 1121 German II (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

GER 2210 Intermediate German (3). 

Provides intermediate training in the 
acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One 
year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

GER 2240 German Intermediate 
Conversation (1). This course is de- 
signed to help students maintain 
and increase their conversational 
ability in the language while unable 
to continue the regular sequence. 
May be repeated twice. Prereq- 
uisite: GER 1121 or equivalent. 

GER 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I 
(3). Practice in contemporary usage 
through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writ- 
ing and speaking ability in extempo- 
raneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target 
language. 

GER 4905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

GER 4930 Special Topics (3). Inde- 
pendent readings, research, or pro- 
ject. 

GER 5060 German for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Designed primarily 
for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. 
requirements. Open to any student 
who has no prior knowledge of the 
language. 

GER 5061 German for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Emphasis on transla- 
tion of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisite: 
GER 5060 or the equivalent. 

GET 3100 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces in German literature in 
English. Comparative use of the origi- 
nal text. Discussion and interpreta- 
tion. 

HAI 3xxx Accelerated Haitian Cre- 
ole (3). Emphasis on oral skills, con- 
temporary language, and culture. 

HAI 3xxx Accelerated Intermediate 
Haitian Creole (3). Builds on acceler- 
ated course by continuing and ex- 
panding communicative activities. 



Prerequisites: Accelerated Haitian or 
permission of instructor. 

HBR 1 120 Hebrew I (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

HBR 1121 Hebrew II (5). Provides 

training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

HBR 2200 Intermediate Hebrew (3). 

Provides training in the acquisition 
and application of basic language 
skills. Prerequisites: One year prior 
study or equivalent experience. 

ITA 1 120 Italian I (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

ITA 1 121 Italian II (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

ITA 2210 Intermediate Italian (3). Pro- 
vides intermediate training in the ac- 
quisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One 
year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

ITA 2240 Italian Intermediate Con- 
versation (1). This course is designed 
to help students maintain and in- 
crease their conversational ability in 
the language while unable to con- 
tinue the regular sequence. May be 
repeated twice. Prerequisite: ITA 
3131 or equivalent. 

ITA 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I 
(3). Practice in contemporary usage 
through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writ- 
ing and speaking ability in extempo- 
raneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target 
language. 

ITA 4905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

ITA 4930 Special Topics (3). Inde- 
pendent readings, research, or pro- 
ject. 

ITT 31 10 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces of Italian literature in 
English. Comparative use of the origi- 
nal text. Discussion and interpreta- 
tion. 

JPN 1120 Japanese I (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

JPN 1121 Japanese II (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 



124 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



JPN 3210 Intermediate Japanese 
(3). Provides intermediate training in 
the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: 
One year prior study or equivalent 
experience. 

LIN 3010 Introduction to General Lin- 
guistics (3). Examination and synthe- 
sis of the concepts and perspectives 
of major contributions to language 
theory. 

LIN 3200 Phonetics (3). The applica- 
tion of phonetic theory and prac- 
tice for speech refinement. Study of 
sound patterns in communication 
and creative activity. Prerequisite: 
UN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 3610 Dialectology (3). Definition 
and analysis. Problem-solving in dia- 
lect classification. Prerequisite: UN 
3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4326 Contrastive Phonology (3). 

For students proficient in more than 
one foreign language. Choice of 
languages to be determined by stu- 
dents and instructor. Prerequisite: 
UN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4433 Contrastive Morphology 
(3). For students proficient in more 
than one foreign language. Con- 
tent and emphasis to be deter- 
mined by students and instructor. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4620 Studies in Bilingualism (3). 

Readings and analysis of bilingual 
programs and binational goals. Pre- 
requisite: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4702 Applied Linguistics (3). Ex- 
amination of available linguistic ma- 
terials for self-instruction. Problem- 
solving in syntax and phonetics, 
through the application of mod- 
em/traditional methods. Prereq- 
uisite: LIN 3010 or equivqlent. 

LIN 4722 Problems in Language 
Learning (3). Primarily designed for 
prospective teachers, but open to 
all interested students. The course 
will aim to devise approaches to dif- 
ficulties commonly experienced in 
syntax, usage, reading and compre- 
hension. Prerequisite: UN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

LIN 4931 Special Topics in Linguistics 
(3). Provides the opportunity for stu- 
dents and instructor to explore top- 
ics not included in the regular 
course offerings. Content to be de- 
termined. 

LIN 5207C Acoustic Phonetics (3). In- 
troduction to principles of acoustic 
and instrumental phonetics, includ- 



ing the physics of speech sounds 
and use of the sound spectrograph 
and other instruments. Prerequisites: 
UN 3010, UN 3013, UN 5018 or the 
equivalent, plus one additional 
course in phonetics orphonology. 
Corequisite: One of the prerequisites 
may be counted as a corequisite. 

LIN 5601 Sociolinguistics (3). Princi- 
ples and theories of linguistic vari- 
ation with special attention to 
correspondences between social 
and linguistic variables. 

LIN 5603 Language Planning: Linguis- 
tic Minority Issues (3). Introduction 
to the field of language planning. 
Minority linguistic issues in develop- 
ing and developed nations: official 
languages, endangered languages, 
and language as problem and/or 
resource. 

LIN 5604 Spanish in the United States 
(3). An examination of the sociolin- 
guistic research into Spanish in the 
U.S.: varieties of Spanish, language 
attitudes, language contact and 
change, and aspects of language 
use. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: LIN 
3010, UN 3013, LIN 5018, or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5613 Dialectology (3). The geog- 
raphy of language variation: linguis- 
tic geography, atlases, national and 
regional studies. Dialectology within 
a modern sociolinguistic frame 
work; research approaches. 

LIN 5625 Studies in Bilingualism (3). 

Readings and analysis of bilingual 
programs and binational goals. 

LIN 5720 Second Language Acquisi- 
tion (3). Research, theories, and 
issues in second language acquisi- 
tion. Topics include the Monitor 
Model, the role of the first language, 
motivation, age, individual differ- 
ences, code-switching, and the en- 
vironment; affective variables and 
attitudes. 

LIN 5760 Research Methods in Lan- 
guage Variation (3). Research in so- 
ciolinguistics, dialectology, 
bilingualism: problem definition, in- 
strument design, data collection 
and analysis, including sampling 
techniques and statistical proce- 
dures. Prerequisite: LIN 5601 , LIN 
5625, LIN 5613 or other course in vari- 
ation. 

LIN 5825 Pragmatics (3). Study of the 
relationships between language 
form, meaning, and use. Special em- 
phasis on speech act theory. Prereq- 



uisites: LIN 3010, UN 3013, LIN 5018 or 
the equivalent. 

(See English listing for additional Lin- 
guistics courses.) 

POR 1000 Elementary Portuguese 
(3). Emphasis on oral skills, contem- 
porary language, and culture. Con- 
tent oriented to students with 
specific professional or leisure inter- 
ests. This course is not part of a se- 
ries. No prerequisites. 

POR 1 130 Portuguese I (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

POR 1 131 Portuguese II (5). Provides 
training in the acquisition and appli- 
cation of basic language skills. 

POR 2200 Intermediate Portuguese 
(3). Provides intermediate training in 
the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: 
One year prior study or equivalent 
experience. 

POR 3131 Accelerated Beginning 
Portuguese (5). Accelerated course 
for students fluent in Spanish. Encour- 
ages rapid acquisition by intensive 
exposure to the language through 
immersion activities, videos, and cul- 
ture. Prerequisite: Fluency in Spanish. 

POR 3230 Accelerated Portuguese I 
(5). Accelerated course for students 
fluent in Spanish. Encourages rapid 
acquisition by intensive exposure to 
the language through immersion ac- 
tivities, videos, and culture. 

POR 3240 Portuguese Intermediate 
Conversation (1). This course is de- 
signed to help students maintain 
and increase their conversational 
ability in the language while unable 
to continue the regular sequence. 
May be repeated twice. Prereq- 
uisite: POR 3131 or equivalent. 

POR 3400 Advanced Oral Communi- 
cation (3). Development of oral skills 
through a variety of activities: Read- 
ings and recitations, public speak- 
ing, debate, skits, video production 
and drama. Open to native and 
non-native speakers. Prerequisite: 
Oral communication ability in Portu- 
guese. 



POR 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I 
(3). Practice in contemporary usage 
through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writ- 
ing and speaking ability in extempo- 
raneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target 
language. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 125 



POR 3421 Review Grammar/Writing 
II (3). Examination of grammatical 
theory; discussion of the modern es- 
say. Practice in the detection and 
correction of errors in usage. The 
course will focus on current interna- 
tional events as content for informal 
talks and compositions. 

POR 3500 Luso-Brazilian Culture (3). 

Open to any student who under- 
stands Portuguese. The develop- 
ment of Portuguese speaking 
civilizations, with emphasis on either 
Portugal or Brazil: history, art, music, 
daily life, impact on other cultures. 

POR 3930 Special Topics in Lan- 
guage Linguistics (3). Readings, re- 
search, and discussion of topics in 
Portuguese language or linguistics 
to be determined by students and 
instructor. 

POR 4470 Foreign Study: Advanced 
Language Literature (VAR). Up to a 

full semester credit for foreign resi- 
dence and study/work. (Approval 
of Department required.) 

POW - Brazilian Cinema (3). An ex- 
amination of Brazilian films and cul- 
ture from Cinema Novo to the 
present. Focuses on the northeast, 
urban society, magic and the Ama- 
zon. Taught in Portuguese. 

POW 4905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

POW 4930 Special Topics (3). Inde- 
pendent readings, research, or pro- 
ject. 

PRT 3401 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces of Portuguese litera- 
ture in English. Comparative use of 
the original text. Discussion and inter- 
pretation. 

RUS 1 120 Russian I (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

RUS 1121 Russian II (5). Provides train- 
ing in the acquisition and applica- 
tion of basic language skills. 

RUS 2210 Intermediate Russian (3). 

Provides intermediate training in the 
acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One 
year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

SPN 1000 Elementary Spanish (3). 

Emphasis on oral skills, contempo- 
rary language and culture. Content 
oriented to students with specific 
professional or leisure interests. This 



course is not part of a series. No pre- 
requisites. 

SPN 1030 Elementary Spanish for 
Medical Personnel (5). Conversa- 
tional elementary Spanish for medi- 
cal personnel. Recommended for 
non-native speakers of Spanish who 
are in nursing or other health-re- 
lated professions. 

SPN 1 120 Spanish I (5). Course de- 
signed specifically for beginning uni- 
versity students with no previous 
language study. Emphasis on oral 
Spanish and on acquiring basic lan- 
guage skills. 

SPN 1 121 Spanish II (5). Emphasis on 
oral Spanish and on acquiring basic 
language skills. 

SPN 2200 Intermediate Spanish (3). 

Provides intermediate training in the 
acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One 
year prior study or equivalent experi- 
ence. 

SPN 2210 Oral Communications 
Skills (3). Development of oral skills 
through skits, debates, and contex- 
tualized communication. Prereq- 
uisites: SPN 1121 or equivanlent. 

SPN 2230 Intermediate Readings in 
Spanish (3). Provides opportunities to 
develop fluency. Emphasis on se- 
lected literary and /or cultural read- 
ings; films and group activities 
intended to stimulate communica- 
tion and enhance an understanding 
of Hispanic culture. Prerequisites: SPN 
1121 or equivaleant. Corequisite: SPN 
2200 recommended. 

SPN 2240 Intermediate Spanish Con- 
versation (1). This course is designed 
to help students maintain and in- 
crease their ability in the language 
while unable to continue the regular 
sequence. May be repeated twice. 
Prerequisite: SPN 1121 or equivalent. 

SPN 2270 Foreign Study (12). Interme- 
diate level. One semester full-time 
credit for foreign residence and 
study. Individual cases will be evalu- 
ated for approval. 

SPN 2340 Intermediate Spanish for 
Native Speakers (3). Improvement 
of spelling, grammar, vocabulary, 
reading, writing, and oral skills for His- 
panic bilinguals educated in the 
U.S., with less than two years of for- 
mal training in Spanish but whose 
mother tongue is Spanish. Prereq- 
uisite: Ability to understand Spanish. 

SPN 2341 Advanced Spanish for Na- 
tive Speakers (3). Improvement of lit- 



eracy skills through grammar review, 
composition, and selected readings 
of representative Hispanic writers, in- 
cluding Cuban, Puerto Rican, and 
Chicano authors. For U.S. Hispanic bi- 
linguals with at least two years of for- 
mal training in Spanish. Prerequisite: 
SPN 2340 or permission of instructor. 

SPN 3013 Language Skills for Profes- 
sional Personnel (1-3). The course is 
geared to the special linguistic 
needs of the community groups 
(medical, business, technical, etc.). 

SPN 3301 Review Grammar and Writ- 
ing (3). Practice in contemporary us- 
age through selected readings in 
culture and civilization. Develop- 
ment of writing and speaking ability 
in extemporaneous contexts. The 
course will be conducted exclu- 
sively in the target language. For 
non-native speakers. 

SPN 3401 Advanced Conversation 
(3). Improvement of oral proficiency 
and listening comprehension skills, 
correction of accent, vocabulary 
building. Use of small group conver- 
sation, pronunciation tapes, and var- 
ied outside readings. 

SPN 3410 Advanced Oral Communi- 
cation (3). Development of oral skills 
through a variety of speaking and 
conversational activities: public 
speaking, debate, drama, recita- 
tion. For native speakers and ad- 
vanced non-natives. Prerequisite: 
Oral ability in Spanish. 

SPN 3413 Communication Arts (3). 

Oral interpretation and dramatic 
reading. Original and non-original 
texts will be the content of the 
course. Study of shared modes of ex- 
perience and their individual linguis- 
tic expression in an acquired 
language. 

SPN 3422 Advanced Grammar and 
Composition (3). To consolidate the 
student's command of oral and writ- 
ten Spanish. Advanced readings of 
authentic materials. Preparation 
and documentation of written 
monographs. For natives and ad- 
vanced non-natives. Prerequisites: 
SPN 234 1 , Review Grammar and 
Writing or equivalent. 

SPN 3440 Spanish Business Composi- 
tion/Correspondence (3). Training in 
the special writing needs of busi- 
ness: letter-writing, memoranda, bro- 
chures, advertising, proposals, 
declarations, government docu- 
ments, etc. 



126 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



SPN 3520 Spanish American Culture 
(3). Introduction to the major artistic 
and cultural phenomena in Latin 
America. Art, music, film, and litera- 
ture will be discussed in their cultural 
context. Prerequisite: Ability to un- 
derstand Spanish at advanced level. 

SPN 3702 Applied Linguistics (3). Ex- 
amination of available linguistic ma- 
terials for self-instruction. Problem- 
solving in syntax and phonetics, 
through the application of mod- 
ern/traditional methods. Prereq- 
uisite: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 
(Conducted in Spanish). 

SPN 3733 Introduction to General Lin- 
guistics (3). Examination and synthe- 
sis of the concepts and perspectives 
of major contributions to language 
theory. (Conducted in Spanish.) 
Equivalent to LIN 3010. 

SPN 3780 Phonetics (3). The applica- 
tion of phonetic theory and prac- 
tice for speech refinement. Study of 
sound patterns in communication 
and creative activity. Prerequisite: 
LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 3820 Dialectology (3). Definition 
and analysis. Problem-solving in dia- 
lect classification. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 4312 Introduction to Spanish 
Syntax (3). An introduction to Span- 
ish syntax. Topics include an intro- 
duction to syntactic analysis and 
syntactic phenomena of Spanish. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 4470 Foreign Study: Advanced 
Language Literature (12). Full semes- 
ter credit for foreign residence and 
study/work. (Approval of the Depart- 
ment required.) 

SPN 4500 Spanish Culture (3). Open 

to any student who understands the 
target language. The development 
of a particular civilization. Emphasis 
on the evolution of a society, its 
ideas and its values. 

SPN 4790 Contrastive Phonology (3). 

Contrasts in the sound systems of 
English and Spanish. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 4802 Contrastive Syntax (3). 

Contrasts in the grammatical sys- 
tems of English and Spanish with em- 
phasis on structures with equivalent 
meanings. Recommended for stu- 
dents of translation and interpreta- 
tion. Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPN 4822 Hispanic-American Sociol- 
inguistics (3). Language and society 



in Latin America. Sociolinguistic the- 
ory followed by consideration of spe- 
cific language problems in Spanish 
and Portuguese speaking areas of 
the Americas. Prerequisite: LIN 3010 
or equivalent. 

SPN 4840 History of the Language 
(3). The internal and external history 
of language development. Examina- 
tion of model texts from key periods 
ofevolution. Prerequisite: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

SPN 4905 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

SPN 4930 Special Topics in Linguis- 
tics (3). Provides the opportunity for 
students and instructor to explore 
topics not included in the regular 
course offerings. Content to be de- 
termined. 

SPN 4936 Senior Seminar (3). Topic 
and approach to be determined by 
students and instructor. 

SPN 5060 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Designed primarily 
for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. 
requirements. Open to any student 
who has no prior knowledge of the 
language. 

SPN 5061 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Emphasis on transla- 
tion of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisite: 
SPN 5060 or the equivalent. 

SPN 5525 Spanish American Culture 
(3). A graduate survey of the major 
artistic phenomena in Latin Amer- 
ica. Art, music, film, and literature 
will be discussed in their cultural con- 
text. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing and permission of the instructor. 

SPN 5536 Afro-Cuban Culture (3). Ex- 
plores the role played by blacks in 
Cuban culture. Issues studied in- 
clude: Afro-Cuban religions, lan- 
guages, and music, as well as the 
Afro-Cuban presence in literature 
and the arts. 

SPN 5537 Special Topics in Afro-His- 
panic Culture (3). Close examina- 
tion of various topics related to the 
culture of African diaspora groups in 
the Hispanic world. 

SPN 5705 The Structure of Spanish 

(3). An introduction to Spanish lin- 
guistics. Topics include Spanish pho- 
netics, phonology, morphology, and 
syntax. Students who have pre- 
viously taken Syntactic Structures of 
Spanish and/or Sound Structure of 



Spanish will not receive credit for this 
course. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

SPN 5725 Syntactic Structures of 
Spanish and English (3). An in-depth 
study of syntactic structures in Span- 
ish and English, with an emphasis on 
how linguistic theory can account 
for the similarities and differences 
between the two languages. Prereq- 
uisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5805 Morphological Structures 
of Spanish and English (3). A survey 
of the morphologies of Spanish and 
English. Topics include the differ- 
ence between isolating and syn- 
thetic languages, rich vs. impo- 
verished agreement , and syntactic 
ramifications of morphology. Prereq- 
uisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5807 Syntactic Structures of 
Spanish (3). The study of syntactic 
structures in Spanish, topics include 
different syntactic approaches to 
current issues in Spanish syntax. Pre- 
requisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5824 Dialectology of the Span- 
ish Caribbean (3). Study of varieties 
of Spanish used in the Caribbean 
area, including Miami-Cuban Span- 
ish. The course will take historical 
and contemporary perspectives 
and will involve research among in- 
formants in South Florida. Prereq- 
uisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5845 History of the Language 
(3). Historical development of the 
Spanish language, primarily from 
the point of view of internal linguistic 
change. Spanish as an example of 
general processes of language de- 
velopment. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, 
LIN 3013, or LIN 5018. 

SPN 5908 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, 
or research. 

SPT 31 10 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces of Hispanic literature 
in English. Comparative use of the 
original text. Discussion and interpre- 
tation. 

SPT 3800 Introduction to Translation 
Skills (3). Basic written translation 
into and out of English. 

SPT 3812 Introduction to Interpreting 
(3). Beginning exercises in sight trans- 
lation, consecutive and simultane- 
ous interpretation in Spanish and 
English. Basic public-speaking tech- 
niques. Theory and practice. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences/ 127 



SPT4801 Translation Practice (3). 

Translation of media, literary, and sci- 
entific texts. 

SPT 4802 Practice in Oral Translation 
and Interpretation (3). Sight transla- 
tion into and out of English, Introduc- 
tion to the study of terminology. 
Prerequisite: SPT 3812 or permission 
of instructor. 

SPT 4803 Practice in Legal Transla- 
tion (3). Provides advanced training 
in translating most commonly used 
legal documents in both civil and 
criminal procedures. 

SPT 4804 Practice in Legal Interpreta- 
tion (3). Training in consecutive and 
simultaneous interpretation of both 
civil and criminal legal proceedings 
before Federal and State courts. 

SPT 4805 Translation in Communica- 
tion Media (3). Provide insight into 
the techniques of translation of adver- 
tising, public relations and publicity 
materials to be used in the mass me- 
dia such as print and broadcasting. 

SPT 4806 Oral Skills for Interpreters 

(3). Voice production in sight transla- 
tion, consecutive and simultaneous 
interpretation. Vocal projection, 
enunciation and phonetics, theory 
and practice. Extensive exercises in 
vocal control. Use of sound equip- 
ment. Prerequisite: SPT 3812. 

SPT 4807 Practica in Business Transla- 
tion (3). Business and language 
translation and the business world. 
Principles, techniques, and methods 
of business translation. Extensive 
practical exercises in translating rou- 
tine business documents English to 
Spanish and vice versa. Prerequisite: 
SPT 3800. 

SPT 4808 Practica in Technological 
Translation (3). Language and tech- 
nology. The translator in the techno- 
logical world. Principles, techniques, 
and methods of technological trans- 
lation. Extensive practical exercises. 
Prerequisite: SPT 3800. 

SPT 4809 Practica in Medical Transla- 
tion (3). Medical language. The 
translator and the medical world. 
Principles, techniques and methods 
of medical translation. Extensive 
practical exercises in translating rou- 
tine medical documents English to 
Spanish and vice versa. Prerequisite: 
SPT 3800. 

SPT 4813 The Interpreter and Lan- 
guage (3). The interpreter as a lin- 
guistics expert. The stylistic levels of 
language. Legal jargon and street 



language in English and Spanish. 
Dialectal problems. Practical and 
ethnical problems. Prerequisite: SPT 
3812. 

SPT 4814 Conference Interpreting 
(3). Interpreting for international con- 
ferences and for diplomacy. Inten- 
sive practice in simultaneous 
interpretation. Prerequisite: SPT 3812. 

SPT 4815 Interpreting for Business (3). 

The principles and techniques of in- 
terpreting in the context of a bilin- 
gual (Spanish/English) business 
setting. Consecutive, simultaneous 
interpretation and sight translation 
of business matters. Prerequisites: SPT 
3800, SPT 3812 or permission of in- 
structor. 

SPT 4820 Computer-Aided Transla- 
tion (3). The translating machine 
and computer-aided translation. 
Machine operation. Selected appli- 
cations of computer translating texts 
from various disciplines. Correction 
of translated texts with computers. 
Prerequisites: SPT 3800, CDA 2310, 
and permission of director of pro- 
gram. 

SPT 4940 Judicial Translation-Inter- 
pretation Internship (3). Students will 
spend a semester working in state 
and federal courts under the supervi- 
sion of a professor, in order to prac- 
tice in situations in what they have 
learned. Prerequisites: SPT 3800, SPT 
3812, SPT 4801 , SPT 4803, SPT 4804, 
SPT 4806, and SPT 4807. 

SPT 4941 Professional Translation-In- 
terpretation Internship (3). Students 
will spend a semester working in 
state and federal courts under the 
supervision of a professor, in order to 
practice in situations in what they 
have learned. Prerequisites: SPT 
3800, SPT 3812, and permission of in- 
structor. 

SPT 51 18 Literature in Translation (3). 

Masterpieces of world literature. 
Open to students who are proficient 
in more than one language. 

SPT 5715 Hispanic Women Writers in 
Translation (3). Readings and analy- 
sis of Spanish and Spanish American 
women writers in translation. Empha- 
sis on cultural and linguistic consid- 
erations involved in the translation 
of literary texts. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

SPW 3130 Introduction to Spanish 
American Literature (3). Close read- 
ing and analysis of prose, poetry 



and drama. Selections from Spanish 
American Literature. 

SPW 3323 Garcia Lorca's Theatre (3). 

Readings from representative plays 
by Spain's finest dramatist of the 
20th century, including his three well- 
known tragedies and a number of 
short comic plays. Discussion of such 
themes as social and individual jus- 
tice and freedom; passion and re- 
pression; and the role of poetry in 
the theatre. 

SPW 3342 Twentieth Century Spanish 
Poets (3). Readings from selected 
poets of the 20th century, such as 
Antonio Machado, Miguel Hernan- 
dez, Damaso Alonso, and Rafael Al- 
berti. Close examination of the 
poems representative of these po- 
ets, and their contribution to the de- 
velopment of Spanish poetry from 
the Generation of 1898 to the mid- 
dle of the 20th century. 

SPW 3371 The Latin American Short 
Story (3). Readings from the 19th 
century authors and such 20th cen- 
tury masters as Borges, Cortazar, 
Cabrera Infante, Garcia Marquez, 
and Rulfo. Examination of short-story 
techniques and of such themes as 
social satire, the nature of reality, 
reason, and irrationally. 

SPW 3423 Masterworks of the Gold- 
en Age (3). Readings from selected 
masterpieces of the Spanish Renais- 
sance and Baroque, such as La Ce- 
lestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, and the 
short novels of Cervantes. Emphasis 
on satire and the representation of 
such human problems as freedom, 
poverty, and the rebellion of the in- 
dividual. 

SPW 3520 Prose and Society (3). The 

dynamics of participation and al- 
ienation between prose writers and 
their environment. 

SPW 3604 Don Quijote (3). A careful 
reading and discussion of Cervan- 
tes' Don Quijote, with particular at- 
tention to its multiple meanings in 
human terms, its innovative contribu- 
tions to the novel in Europe, and the 
author's use of irony, charac- 
terization, and humor. 

SPW 3720 The Generation of 98 (3). 

Based on the works of Azorin, 
Baroja, Ganivet, Machado, Maetzu, 
Unamuno, and Valle-lnclan. This 
course will emphasize the individual 
thrust each author makes to foster 
artistic revolution and human regen- 
eration, within a society charac- 
terized by abulia and existentialist 
anxiety. 



128 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



SPW 3810 Problems in Reading and 
Interpretation (3). The identification 
and appreciation of techniques for 
sensitive reading and discussion of lit- 
erary texts. 

SPW 3820 Introduction to Spanish Lit- 
erature (3). Close reading and 
analysis of prose, poetry, and 
drama. Selections from Spanish pen- 
insular literature. 

SPW 3930 Special Topics (3). Read- 
ings and discussion of literary/linguis- 
tic topics to be determined by 
students and instructor. 

SPW 4152 European Literature in 
Translation (3). For students proficient 
in more than one foreign language. 
Content and focus to be determined 
by students and instructor. 

SPW 4263 The Spanish Novel of the 
Nineteenth Century (3). Within the 
context of literature and society, 
representative Spanish novels of the 
epoch will be studied. Special atten- 
tion will be given to Galdos and 
Clarin. 

SPW 4271 Twentieth-Century Spanish 
Novel to 1956 (3). A study of the 
genre in Spain before and after the 
Civil War. Emphasis will be on pre- 
dominant narrative tendencies. Rep- 
resentative authors will be 
discussed, such as Cela, Laforet, 
Sender, Matute, Medio, and others. 

SPW 4304 Latin American Theatre 
(3). A view of Latin American thea- 
tre from the 19th century to the pre- 
sent. Representative works of the 
most renown dramatists will be ex- 
amined, with emphasis on the works 
of Usigili, Triana, Marques Wolff, and 
Diaz. 

SPW 4324 Contemporary Spanish 
Drama: Buero Vallejo (3). Chrono- 
logical readings from plays written 
between 1949-1980. Emphasis on 
dramatic reading. An examination 
of the evolution of dramatic art in 
the contexts of censorship and free- 
dom. 

SPW 4334 Golden Age Poetry (3). Se- 
lected readings from the major lyric 
poets of the 16th and 17th centu- 
ries. Special attention to the prob- 
lems of contemporary readings of 
classical texts. 

SPW 4343 Poetry of Garcia Lorca (3). 

Chronological examination of the 
major works of Spain's greatest 
poet. Special attention to the lyric 
and dramatic features. 



SPW 4351 Spanish American Poetry I 
(3). A view of Spanish American po- 
etry from the Pre-Colonial period un- 
til 1850. Representative works of the 
most renown poets will be exam- 
ined, with emphasis on Ercilla, Sor 
Juana, Bello, Heredia, and Avel- 
laneda. 

SPW 4352 Spanish American Poetry 
II (3). A view of Spanish American 
poetry from 1 850 to the present. 
Representative works of the impor- 
tant poets will be examined, and 
special attention will be given to 
Lezama Lima, Parra, Paz, and 
Vallejo. 

SPW 4364 The Spanish American Es- 
say (3). A study of the ideological 
and intellectual forces that have 
shaped the Spanish American 
thought, as expressed in the works 
of representative authors such as 
Rodo, Mallea, Martinez Estrada, Paz, 
Manach, and others. 

SPW 4390 Genre Studies (3). Exami- 
nation of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of in- 
teraction between literary types 
(e.g. novel and drama). 

SPW 4424 Golden Age Drama (3). 

Close readings from the finest plays 
written in Spain's Golden Age by 
Lope de Vega, Calderon, Tirso, and 
others, including the Don Juan 
theme. An examination of theatre as 
stylized conformity and as protest lit- 
erature in a highly controlled society. 

SPW 4460 Quevedo's Satire (3). 

An introduction to the literary world 
of Spain's great baroque poet, who 
created modern satire in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: A good understanding 
of Spanish. 

SPW 4590 Creative Modes (3). Dis- 
cussion of a single mode or a plural- 
ity of epoch styles such as classical/ 
baroque, realism/surrealism. The pe- 
culiar/common features of expres- 
sive media. 

SPW 4930 Special Topics (3). Inde- 
pendent readings, research, or pro- 
ject. 

SPW 5408 Colonial Latin American 
Literature (3). The most important 
and representative literary works of 
Colonial Latin America from the 
Cronicas to Lizardi. Prerequisites: Up- 
per level and graduate standing. 

SPW 5155 Comparative Studies (3). 

Cross-over and distinctiveness in a 
multi-language problem, period, or 
aesthetic. 



SPW 5237 The Traditional Spanish 
American Novel (3). Study and 
analysis of the traditional Spanish 
novel as a form of art, from 19th cen- 
tury Lizardi's El periquillo sarniento, to 
1950. The novels and authors studied 
are representative of 'costumbrismo', 
'romanticismo', 'naturalismo', 'mod- 
ernismo'.and 'criollismo'. 

SPW 5277 Twentieth Century Spanish 
Novel, from 1956 to the Present (3). 

Analysis of the Spanish novel from 
Ferlosio's El Jarama to the present. 
The perspective will be focused 
within historical, social, and artistic 
context. Representative authors 
such as Cela, Martin Santos, Umbral, 
Delibes, Benet, Goytisolo, and oth- 
ers will be included. 

SPW 5286 Contemporary Spanish 
American Novel (3). A study of the 
Spanish American Novel from 1950. 
The course will intensively and exten- 
sively focus on the novelists who are 
best known for their innovations, de- 
fining and analyzing the qualities 
which give originality and newness 
both in themes and language. 

SPW 5346 Poetry of Jorge Guillen (3). 

Selected readings from the five vol- 
umes of Aire nuestro. Emphasis on 
the techniques of close reading and 
explication. Related selections from 
Guillen's literary criticism. 

SPW 5358 Graduate Seminar: Prose 
and Poetry of Jorge Luis Borges' (3). 

Close readings of short stories and 
poetry. Emphasis on Borge's linguis- 
tic and cultural pluralism and the in- 
terplay of philosophy with tabulation. 

SPW 5359 Graduate Seminar: Poetry 
of Pablo Neruda (3). Chronological 
examination of the major works of 
Chile's Nobel Laureate. Related 
readings from Neruda's Memories. 
Emphasis on the poet's linguistic 
and aesthetic innovations. 

SPW 5387 Women and Poetry (3). 

Women as poets and the poeti- 
cized. Close reading of Peninsular 
and Latin American texts, 16th - 20th 
Century. Students examine the con- 
tributions of women and how they 
have been represented in poetry. 
Prerequisite: 4000 or 5000 level 
course in Hispanic Poetry. 

SPW 5405 Medieval Spanish Litera- 
ture (3). Readings in Medieval litera- 
ture of Spain including the epic, the 
learned poetry of the Xlllth and 
XlVth Centuries, and the literature of 
Juan N's court. Prerequisites: Gradu- 
ate standing and permission of in- 
structor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 129 



SPW 5407 The Renaissance in Spain 
(3). Readings in the literature and 
cultural experssions of the Spanish 
Renaissance. Prerequisites: Gradu- 
ate standing and permission of in- 
structor. 

SPW 5425 Quevedo: Poetry (3). 

Close reading of selected poems by 
Spain's greatest baroque poet and 
creator of modern Spanish satire, in- 
cluding poems on love, death, and 
metaphysical concerns, and a wide 
range of humorous poems. 

SPW 5426 Quevedo: Prose Satire (3). 

Close reading of selected satires in 
prose by Spain's greatest baroque 
satirist and creator of modern Span- 
ish satire. Includes Quevedo's pica- 
resque novel El Buscon, and his 
Suenos, or Visions of Hell. 

SPW 5428 Theatre in Calderon and 
Lope (3). The creation of verbal the- 
atrical technique in the Baroque 
masters Calderon de la Barca and 
Lope de Vega. 

SPW 5436 Poetry Writing in Spanish 
(3). Readings from Spanish and Latin 
American texts; description and rec- 
reation of traditional and experimen- 
tal metrics. Students will exchange 
critiques of original poems. Prereq- 
uisites: sample of unpublished po- 
ems; wordprocessing literacy; 
permission of instructor. 

SPW 5475 19th Century Latin Ameri- 
can Literature (3). A study of the 
main literary works of Spanish speak- 
ing 19th Century Latin America: 
omanticism. Realism, Naturalism 
and Modernism. Prerequisites: Upper 
level and graduate standing. 

SPW 5515 Advanced Studies in His- 
panic Folklore (3). Studies the oral lit- 
erary and linguistic tradition of the 
Hispanic world. Prerequisites: Gradu- 
ate standing and permission of in- 
structor. 

SPW 5556 Spanish Realism and Natu- 
ralism (3). Readings in Spanish XlXth 
Century Novel of Realism and Natu- 
ralism including Alarcon, Perez Gal- 
dos, Pardo Bazan, Clarin and Blasco 
Ibanez. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of instructor. 

SPW 5575 Spanish American Mod- 
ernism (3). An in-depth study of 
prose and poetry of one of the most 
important periods of Spanish Ameri- 
can literature, focusing on Marti, 
Dario, Najera, Casals, Silva, Valen- 
cia, Lugones, and Herrera y Reissig. 



SPW 5606 Cervantes (3). A compre- 
hensive introduction to the master- 
pieces of Cervantes as the creator 
of the modern novel, and to critical 
theories about his art. 

SPW 5735 Hispanic Literature of the 
United States (3). Readings in the lit- 
erature of Hispanics in the United 
States. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of instructor. 

SPW 5756 Mexico in Poetry (3). 

Close reading of modern poets; dis- 
cussion of essays on Theory and 
Practice. Students examine national 
representation in Myth, symbol and 
metaphor. Prerequisites: 4,000 or 
5,000 level course in Culture of Litera- 
ture. 

SPW 5486 Modern Spanish Women 
Writers (3). Analysis of narrative 
works by Spain's most repre- 
sentative women writers from the 
19th century to the present. Empha- 
sis on the novel. Includes works by 
Pardo Bazan, Matute, Laforet, Mar- 
tin Gaite. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

SPW 5806 Methods of Literary Re- 
search (3). Introduction to bibliog- 
raphy, methods of research, the 
composition of essays, rhetoric, and 
the presentation of documentation. 
Theory of literary criticism, and its 
practical application to texts in 
Spanish. 

SPW 5934 Special Topics in Lan- 
guage/Literature (3). Content and 
objectives to be determined by stu- 
dent and instructor. 



130 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Music 

Fredrick Kaufman, Professor and 

Director (composition) 
John Augenblick, Associate 

Professor (choral) 
Gary Campbell, Assistant Professor 

(saxophone) 
Robert Davidovici, (violin) 
J. Richard Dunscomb, Professor (Jazz) 
Orlando J. Garcia, Associate 

Professor (composition) 
Anna Elizabeth Hinkle-Turner . 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

(composition/electronic music) 
Clair McElfresh, Professor (choral) 
Matthew Mclnturf, Assistant Professor 

(bands) 
Michael Orta, Visiting 

Instructor/Lecturer (jazz piano) 
Carlos Piantini, Professor (orchestra) 
Joseph Rohm, Associate Professor 

(theory) 
Miguel Salvador, Associate Professor 

(piano) 
Arturo Sandoval, Professor/ 

Artist-in-Residence (trumpet) 
Susan Starr, 

Professor/ A rtist-in -Residen ce 

(piano) 
Violet Vagramian-Nishanian, 

Professor (theory) 

Miami String Quartet 
Ivan Chan, (violin) 
Chauncey Patterson, (viola) 
Cathy Meng Robinson, (violin) 
Keith Robinson, (cello) 
Adjunct Instructors: 
Elsie Augenblick, choral 
Jay Bertolet, tuba 
Lindsey Blair, jazz guitar 
Marcia Dunscomb, jazz 
Michele Fernandez, woodwind 

techniques 
Deborah Fleisher, harp 
Luis Gomez-lmbert, string bass 
Robert Grabowski, jazz 
Paul Green, clarinet 
James Hacker, trumpet 
Geoffrey Hale, bassoon 
Jon Hutchison, trombone 
Cliff Huxford, French horn 
Jonathan Joseph, jazz drums 
Lisa LaCross, flute 
Sam Lussier, jazz 
Dennis Marks, jazz bass 
Maritza Mascarenhas, world music 
Carlos Molina, classical guitar 
Carolyn Morgan, piano 
Louis Mowad, classical guitar 
Hector Nesiosup, Latin percussion 
Nicky Orta, jazz bass 
Nobleza Pilar, voice 



Errol Rackipov, jazz vibes 
Loretta Scherperel, organ 
Leslie Schroerlucke, clarinet 
Lee Stone, string techniques 
Nestor Torres, jazz flute 
John Tafoya, percussion 
Armando Tranquilino, theory 
Gretel VanWalterop, oboe 

Bachelor of Music 
Degree Program Hours: 128 

A Bachelor of Music degree is of- 
fered with an emphasis in one or 
more of the following areas: Applied 
Music, Composition, Jazz Studies, 
and Music Education (students will 
take a dual major in Music and Mu- 
sic Education - see Music Education 
in the College of Education for spe- 
cific requirements). 

All entering students must pro- 
vide evidence of performance abil- 
ity (vocal or instrumental) through 
an audition. Contact the Music De- 
partment at (305) 348-2896 for more 
information or to schedule an audi- 
tion. 

Freshman/Sophomore Admission 

Freshman admission requires an 
audition and placement test in Mu- 
sic Theory. Contact the Music De- 
partment at 348-2896 for an 
audition appointment. 

Transfer Admission 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
meet all the lower division require- 
ments including CLAST, completed 
60 semester hours, and must be oth- 
erwise acceptable into the program. 

Music students at the University 
come from a wide variety of aca- 
demic backgrounds from Florida, 
other states and countries. Because 
of this diversity, the Faculty of Music 
gives basic preliminary examina- 
tions in order to assist the student to 
eliminate any deficiencies: 

1. Music History - consisting of all 
periods of history. 

2. Music Theory - consisting of 
sightsinging, melodic and harmonic 
dictation and written harmonization 
and analysis. 

Common Prerequisites 

MUT1111 Music Theory I 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II 

MUT2116 Music Theory III 

MUT 21 17 Music Theory IV 

MUT 1221 Sightsinging I 

MUT 1222 Sighysinging II 

MUT 2226 Sightsinging III 



MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV 
MVK1111 Class Piano I 
MVK1112 Class Piano II 
MVK2121 Class Piano III 
MVK2122 Class Piano IV 
Four hours in one of the following: 

MUN1140 Symphonic Wind 

Assemble 

or 
MUN 1210 Orchestra 

or 
MUN 1310 Concert Orchestra 
Eight hours of applied lessons 
Required for the degree: 
MUC 1342 MIDI Technology 
Four instances of successful comple- 
tion in the following: 

MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 

Junior/Senior Year Areas of 
Emphasis 

The following are Junior/Senior Year 
areas of emphasis for Music stu- 
dents. Nine hours in elective courses 
outside the department are re- 
quired by the College. Admission to 
each area is by faculty approval. 

Area I : Instrumental 
Performance (54) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

MUT 361 1 Form 3 

MUT 3401 Counterpoint 3 

MUT 4311 Orchestration 2-3 

History: (9) 
MUH3211 Music History 

Survey I 3 

MUH3212 Music History 

Survey II 3 

MUH3371 Twentieth Century 

Music: Exploration 3 
Ethnomusicology (3) 
MUN 2052 Music of the World 3 
Ensembles (8) 

Two credits each semester enrolled 
in Applied Music (To be determined 
by advisor) 8 

Major Applied (8) 

Four semesters 2 credits each 
semester 8 

Conducting (2) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 

MUG 4302 Instrumental 

Conducting 1 

Recitals: (0) 

Junior Recital 

Senior Recital 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 131 



Recital Attendance (0) 

To be taken each semester enrolled 

in Applied Music 

MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

Electives 

Music Electives 6 

Electives outside the major 9 

Area II: Vocal Performance (55) 
Required Courses 
Theory: (6) 

MUT3401 Counterpoint 3 

MUT 361 1 Form and Analysis 3 
History: (9) 
MUH3211 Music History 

Survey I 3 

MUH3212 Music History 

Survey II 3 

MUH 3371 Twentieth Century 

Music: Exploration 3 

Ethnomusicology (3) 

MUN 2052 Music of the World 3 
Ensembles (8) 

Two credits each semester enrolled 
in Applied Music including four se- 
mester of Opera Workshop. Others 
to be determined by Advisor. 
Major Applied (8) 

MVV3431 Junior Prin App 2 

MVV3431 Junior Prin App 2 

MVV 4441 Senior Prin App 2 

MVV 4441 Senior Prin App 2 

Conducting (2) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 
MUG 4202 Choral Conducting 1 
Recitals: (0) 

MVV 3970 Junior Recital 

MVV 4971 Senior Recital 

Recital Attendance 

To be taken each semester enrolled 

in Applied Music 

MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

Diction for Singers (4) 

MUS 2211 English Diction 1 

MUS 2221 French Diction 1 

MUS 2231 German Diction 1 

MUS 2241 Italian Diction 1 

Electives 

Music Electives 6 

Electives outside the major 9 

Area III: Composition (56) 
Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

MUT 3401 Counterpoint 3 

MUT 3611 Form and Analysis 3 
MUT 4311 Orchestration 3 



History: (9) 

MUH 3211 Music History Survey 3 
MUH 3212 Music History Survey 3 
MUH 3371 Twentieth Century 

Music: Exploration 3 

Ethnomusicology (3) 

MUH 3052 Music of the World 3 

Ensembles (6) 

At least one ensemble each semes- 
ter enrolled in Applied Music, 
including four semesters of New 
Music Ensemble, others to be deter- 
mined by advisor.) 6 
Conducting (2) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 
MUG 4202 Choral Conducting 1 

or 
MUG 4302 Instrumental 

Conducting 1 

Principal Applied (4) 

Four semesters, 1 credit each 
semester 4 

Composition:' (10) 
MUC2221 Composition I 2 

MUC 2222 Composition II 2 

MUC 3231 Composition III 2 

MUC 3232 Composition IV 2 

MUC 4241 Composition V 2 

MUC 4932 Composition Forum 

Completion of four semesters of 
Composition Forum is required for 
graduation. 
Electronic Music: (4) 
MUC 2301 Electronic Music 

Labi 2 

MUC 3302 Electronic Music 

Lab II 2 

Recital Attendance (0) 
To be taken each semester enrolled 
in Applied Music 

MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 
Recitals: 2 (0) 

Composition Recital 

Senior Recital 

Electives outside the major 9 

1 MUC 2221 and 2222 (4 credits) 
should be taken during the sopho- 
more year. 

Composition students must present 
a 45 minute recital of their works 
and a 30 minute performance re- 
cital. A final oral exam administered 
after the composition recital must 
also be successfully completed. 

Area IV: Commercial/Jazz 
Performance (56) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (13) 

MUT 4311 Orchestration 2-3 



MUT 4353 Jazz Arranging 2 

MUT 2641 Jazz Improvisation I 2 
MUT 2642 Jazz Improvisation II 2 
MUT 4643 Jazz Improvisation III 2 
MUT 4663 Jazz Styles and 

Analysis 2 

History: (9) 
MUH 3212 Music History 

Survey II 3 

MUH 3371 Twentieth Century 

Music: Exploration 3 
MUH 21 16 Evolution of Jazz 3 

Ethnomusicology (3) 
MUH 3052 Music of the World 3 
Additional Music Courses: (20) 
Ensembles (8) 

Two credits each semester enrolled 
in Applied Music (To be determined 
by advisor) 8 

Jazz Applied 1 (8) 

Four semesters major jazz applied 7 
Conducting (3) 

Basic 2 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 
MUG 4202 Choral Conducting 1 

or 
MUG 4302 Instrumental 

Conducting 1 

Jazz Rehearsal Techniques 1 

Recitals 

MUN 4784 Senior Jazz Applied 

Recital 

MVJ 3970 Junior Jazz Recital 
Recital Attendance 
(To be taken each semester en- 
rolled in Applied Music) 
MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 
Commercial/Jazz (3) 
MUM 4301 Business of Music 1 

MUH 1014 Intro to Jazz Studiesl 2 
Electives: (9) 

To be determined by advisor 
1 Piano majors will take four credits 
(two years) of Classical Applied Pi- 
ano instead of Class Piano. 
2 Drummers Entering without Classi- 
cal Applied Percussion will take four 
credits (two years) of Classical Ap- 
plied Percussion. 

3 Electric Bass Majors will take two 
credits (1 year) of Applied String 
Bass. 

Area V: Piano Performance (55) 
Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

MUT 3611 Forum and Analysis 3 
MUT 3401 Counterpoint 3 



132 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



History: (15) 

MUH3211 Music History Survey I 3 

MUH3212 Music History Survey II 3 

MUH3371 20th Century Music 3 

MUH 3052 Music of the World 3 

MUH 4400 Keyboard Literature 3 

Ensembles: (8) 

Two semesters of large ensemble: 

Choir, Wind Ensemble or Orchestra. 

MUN 3463 Chamber Music (two 

semesters) 2 

MUN 4513 Accompanying (four 

semesters) 4 

Major Applied (8) 
Four semesters, two credits each se- 
mester. 

Conducting (1) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 

Pedagogy (2) 

MVK4640 Piano Pedagogy 2 

Recitals (0) 

Junior Recital 

Senior Recital 

Recital Attendance (0) 

MUS 3040 

To be taken each semster enrolled 

in Applied Music 

Electives 

Music Electives 6 

Electives outside of major 9 

Minor in Music 

A Minor in music requires 18 credits 
of music courses to be selected in 
consultation with the chairperson of 
the Music Department. 

Bachelor of Science in 

Music Education: Grades 

K-12 

Degree Program Hours: 127 

Common Prerequisites 

MUT1111 Music Theory I 
MUT 11 12 Music Theory II 
MUT2116 Music Theory III 
MUT 21 17 Music Theory IV 
MUT 1221 Sightsinging I 
MUT 1222 Sighysinging II 
MUT 2226 Sightsinging III 
MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV 
MVK1111 Class Piano I 
MVK1112 Class Piano II 
Four hours in one of the following: 
MUN 1140 Symphonic Wind 

Assemble 

or 
MUN 1210 Orchestra 



MUN 1310 Concert Orchestra 
EDF 1005 Introduction to 

Education 1 
EDG 2701 Teaching Diverse 

Populations' 
EME 2040 Introduction to 

Educational 

Technology 
Eight hours of applied lessons 
Required for the degree: 

Four instances of successful comple- 
tion in the following: 
MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 
'Requires field experience of 15 
clock hours outside of class time. 

Lower Division Program: (67) 
Theory (12) 

MUT 1111 Music Theory I 3 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II 3 

MUT 21 16 Music Theory III 3 

MUT 21 17 Music Theory IV 3 

Sightsinging (4) 

MUT 1221 Sightsingingl 1 

MUT 1222 Sightsinging II 1 

MUT 2226 Sightsinging III 1 

MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV 1 

Class Piano (2) 

MVK 1 1 1 1 Class Piano 1 

MVK1121 Class Piano 1 

Piano proficiency must be met. See 
advisor for specific course require- 
ments. 

Applied Lessons (8) 
Two freshman applied lessons and 
two sophomore applied lessons. 
Ensembles (6) 

Two ensembles each semester. See 
advisor for specific ensemble re- 
quirements. 

Recital Attendance (0) 
MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 
MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 
MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 
MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 

Professional Education (6) 

EDF 1005 Introduction to 

Education 1 
EDG 2701 Teaching Diverse 

Populations 1 
EME 2040 Introduction to 

Educational 

Technology 
'Requires field experience of 15 
clock hours outside of class time. 

At least one course taken to 
meet the natural science require- 
ments in General Education and/or 



prerequisites must include a labora- 
tory component. 

In addition to EDG 2701 , students 
must take 6 credit hours with an in- 
ternational or diversity focus in the 
lower division. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division/gen- 
eral education requirements includ- 
ing CLAST, completed 67 semester 
hours, 2.5 GPA, and must be other- 
wise acceptable into the program. 
Minimum GPA and ACT/SAT scores 
do not assure admission into the pro- 
gram. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 
Vocal Track 
Musicology (5) 

Music of the World 3 

MUT 4311 Orchestration 2-3 

Music History (9) 

MUH 321 1 Music History Survey I 3 
MUH 3212 Music History Survey II 3 
MUH 3371 20th Century Music 3 
Conducting (2) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 
MUG 4301 Choral Conducting 1 
Applied Lessons (3) 
Two junior applied lessons and one 
senior applied lesson. 
Recital (1) 

Senior Recital 

Ensembles (6) 

. 1 major and 1 other ensemble each 
semester. See ensemble require- 
ment in Music Student Handbook. 

Recital Attendance (0) 

MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 
MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 
MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 
Music Skills (4) 

MVV 1 1 1 1 Voice Class' 1 

Voice Class 
Intermediate' 1 

Vocal Pedagogy 1 1 
Guitar Skills 2 1 

Voice Principals exempt 
2 Guitar Principals exempt 
Professional Education (29) 
EDG 3321 General Instructional 

Decision Making 3 

EDG 3321 L General Instructional 
Decision Making 
Laboratory 2 

EDP 3004 Intro to Education 

Psychology 3 

EDF 3514 Philosophical and 
Historical 



MVV 2121 



MVV 3630 
MVS 1116 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences/ 133 



Foundations of 
Education 3 

EDF 4634 Cultural and Social 
Foundations of 
Education 3 

MUE 3340 Special 

Teaching Lab I 3 

MUE 4341 Special 

Teaching Lab II 3 

MUE 4940 Student Teaching 9 

Electives 2 

Music Education 

Certification in Music Education is 

available through the College of 

Education. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

HUM-Humanities; MUC-Music: Com- 
position; MUE-Music: Education; 
MUG-Music: Conducting; MUH-Mu- 
sic: History/Musicology; MUL-Music: 
Literature; MUM-Music: Commercial; 
MUN-Music: Ensembles; MUS-Music; 
MUT-Music: Theory; MVB-Applied Mu- 
sic/Brass; MVK-Applied Music-Key- 
board; MVJ-Applied Music/Jazz; 
MVP-Applied Music/Percussions; 
MVS-Applied Music/Strings; MVV-Ap- 
plied Music/Voice; MVW-Applied 
Music/Woodwinds. 
MUC 1101 Basic Music Composition 
(1). Elementary principles of compo- 
sition including the performance of 
composition projects. Course in- 
cludes calligraphy and notation 
skills. Course may be repeated for 
credit. Prerequisites: Freshman music 
majors; permission of instructor. 

MUC 1342 MIDI Technology (2). Intro- 
duction to the MIDI protocol and 
MIDI-based software, including mu- 
sic notation, sequencing, patch edit- 
ing, ear training, and keyboard skills 
software. Prerequisites: Music major 
or permission of instructor. 

MUC 2221 Composition I (2). Crea- 
tive writing utilizing 20th century 
compositional techniques in Impres- 
sionism, Neoclassicism, Post Webern 
Serialism, Indeterminacy, Minimal- 
ism, Mixed, Multi and Inter media, 
etc. Prerequisite: MUT 1112. Corequi- 
site:MUT2116. 

MUC 2222 Composition II (2). Con- 
tinuation of MUC 2221. Prerequisite: ' 
MUC 2221. Corequisite: MUT 21 17. 

MUC 2301 Electronic Music Lab I (2). 

Exploration of the electronic me- 
dium including the history of elec- 
tronic music, digital studio 
techniques, analog studio tech- 



niques, digital synthesis and analog 
synthesis. Prerequisite: MUC 1342. 

MUC 3231 Composition III (2). A con- 
tinuation of Composition I to further 
the development of students com- 
positional abilities through the writ- 
ing of more evolved works with 
regard to duration, instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: MUC 2222 and admis- 
sion to composition area. 

MUC 3232 Composition IV (2). Con- 
tinuation of MUC 3231. Prerequisite: 
MUC 3231. 

MUC 3302 Electronic Music Lab II 
(2). A continuation of Electronic Mu- 
sic Lab I with an emphasis on ad- 
vanced MIDI applications including 
samplers, digital sequencing, digital 
signal processing and interactive 
MIDI software. Includes one large 
composition project. Prerequisite: 
Electronic Music Lab I. 

MUC 4241 Composition V (2). Con- 
tinuation of MUC 3232. Prerequisite: 
MUC 3232. 

MUC 4242 Composition VI (2). Con- 
tinuation of MUC 4241. Prerequisite: 
MUC 4241. 

MUC 4400 Electronic Music Lab III 
(2). Special projects in advanced 
electronic music programming envi- 
ronments including Csound, MAX, In- 
teractor, HMSL and CHANT. Includes 
one large composition project. Can 
be repeated four times. Prerequisite: 
Electronic Music Lab II and permis- 
sion of instructor. 

MUC 4932 Composition Forum (0). 

Student composers critique each 
others' work and discuss topic of in- 
terest to composers. Required of all 
students taking Composition II. Pre- 
requisite: Admission to Composition 
Program. 

MUC 6251 Graduate Music Compo- 
sition (1-3). The writing of evolved 
musical compositions with regard to 
each student's strengths and aes- 
thetic development. Graduate 
standing in Music Education and or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUC 6305 Electronic Music Lab I (2). 

Exploration of the electronic me- 
dium including the history of elec- 
tronic music, digital studio 
techniques, analog studio tech- 
niques, digital synthesis and analog 
synthesis. Prerequisites: MUC 1342 or 
permission of instructor. 

MUC 6306 Electronic Music Lab II 
(2). Continuation of Electronic Music 
Lab I with an emphasis on ad- 



vanced MIDI applications including 
sampling, digital sequencing, digital 
signal processing and interactive 
MIDI software. Includes one large 
composition project. Prerequisite: 
MUC 6401. 

MUC 6405 Electronic Music Lab III 
(2). Special projects in advanced 
electronic music programming envi- 
ronments including Csound, MAX, In- 
teractor, HMSL and CHANT. Includes 
one large composition project. Can 
be repeated 4 times. Prerequisite: 
MUC 6402. 

MUE 2440C String Techniques (1). 

Class instruction of string instruments; 
tuning and care of instruments; 
teaching techniques, fingerings, 
bowings; violin, viola, cello and dou- 
ble bass. 

MUE 2450C Woodwind Techniques 
(1). Class instruction of woodwind in- 
struments; tuning and care of instru- 
ments. Teaching techniques. Single 
reed instruments, double reed instru- 
ments, and flute. Class one hour, 
laboratory one hour. 

MUE 2460C Brass Techniques (1). 

Class instruction of brass instruments; 
tuning and care of instruments. 
Teaching techniques. Piston and 
valve instruments, french horn, and 
trombone. Class one hour, labora- 
tory one hour. 

MUE 2470C Percussion Techniques 
(1). Class instruction of percussion in- 
struments; sticking techniques; care 
of instruments; teaching techniques. 
Drum and mallet instruments. Class 
one hour, laboratory one hour. 

MUE 3921 Choral Conducting Work- 
shop (3). The study of various topics 
related to choral literature, conduct- 
ing and techniques. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

MUE 3922 String Workshop (3). The 

study of various topics related to 
string literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MUE 3923 Instrumental Conducting 
Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to instrumental en- 
semble literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MUE 3924 Jazz Workshop (3). The 

study of various topics related to 
jazz literature, conducting and tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 



134 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



MUE 5921 Choral Conducting Work- 
shop (3). The study of various topics 
related to choral literature, conduct- 
ing and techniques. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

MUE 5922 String Workshop (3). The 

study of various topics related to 
string literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MUE 5923 Instrumental Conducting 
Workshop (3). The study of vorious 
topics related to instrumental en- 
semble literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MUE 5924 Jazz Workshop (3). The 

study of various topics related to 
jazz literature, conducting and tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MUE 5928 Workshop in Music (2). Ap- 
plications of materials and tech- 
niques in music in a laboratory or 
field setting. 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting (1). A 

basic conducting course to gain fun- 
damental technique and interpreta- 
tion. A prerequisite for both 
advanced instrumental and choral 
conducting. 

MUG 4202 Choral Conducting (1). 

With a background in basic theory, 
and having performed in ensem- 
bles, the student will develop tech- 
niques of group conducting 
including madrigal, glee, choir, etc. 
A survey of choral literature will be in- 
cluded. Prerequisite: MUG 4101. 

MUG 4302 Instrumental Conducting 
(1). With a background in basic the- 
ory, and having performed in en- 
sembles, the student will develop a 
knowledge of baton technique, 
score reading, and interpretation. 
Prerequisite: MUG 4101. Corequisite: 
Orchestra or wind ensemble or both. 

MUG 5105 Advanced Conducting 
Techniques (1). An extension of form 
and analysis, with interpretation 
both in instrumental and choral con- 
ducting. Twentieth century scoring 
and symbol interpretation will be 
studied in depth, with actual con- 
ducting experience required. 

MUH 101 1 Music Appreciation (3). 

Lives and creations of great com- 
posers in various periods of history. A 
multi-media course. 

MUH 1018 Introduction to Jazz Stud- 
ies (2). An introductory study of jazz 
music and musicianship. Required of 



all students who have been ac- 
cepted into the Commercial/Jazz 
Studies program. 

MUH 1560 African American Music 
(3). Examines the historical influence 
and development of African Ameri- 
can music from its African roots to its 
dominance in the American popu- 
lar culture. 

MUH 2116 Evolution of Jazz (3). A his- 
tory course that surveys jazz styles 
from mid-1 9th century to the pre- 
sent. A sociological and musical 
look at jazz, the personalities and 
their experience. 

MUH 3019 History of Popular Music in 
the U.S. (3). Overview of Afro-Ameri- 
can and Euro-American popular mu- 
sic and its historical development. 
Examination of musical style and so- 
cial context in lecture-discussion for- 
mat with film and video. 

MUH 3052 Music of the World (3). Sur- 
vey of folk, popular and classical 
musical traditions from around the 
world. Examination of musical style 
and social context with film and per- 
formance demonstrations. 

MUH 3060 Latino Music in the United 
States (3). Survey of Latin American 
musical tradition brought through im- 
migration. Examination of musical 
style and social context in lecture- 
discussion format with film and per- 
formance demonstrations. 

MUH 3061 Music of Mexico and Cen- 
tral America (3). A survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical tradi- 
tions in the region. Examination of 
musical style and social context in 
lecture-discussion format with film 
and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 3062 Music of the Caribbean 
(3). Survey of folk, popular and classi- 
cal musical traditions and their on- 
going connection with Caribbean 
populations in the U.S. Class includes 
film and performance demonstra- 
tions. 

MUH 321 1 Music History Survey I (3). 

A survey of music from antiquity to 
1 750. Lectures on historical styles will 
be supplemented with slides, record- 
ings, and musical analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: Core for Music majors or by 
permission of instructor. 

MUH 3212 Music History Survey II (3). 

A survey of music from 1750 to the 
present. Lectures on historical styles 
will be supplemented with slides, re- 
cordings, and musical analysis. Pre- 



requisite: Core for Music majors or 
by permission of instructor. 

MUH 3371 Twentieth Century Music: 
Exploration (3). An exploration of 
music since 1900. Lectures on style 
plus demonstrations will be supple- 
mented with recordings and analy- 
sis. Prerequisites: MUH 321 1 and MUH 
3212. 

MUH 3541 Music of Latin America: 
Folklore and Beyond (3). An over- 
view of the orchestral, chamber, 
solo, vocal, and electronic music 
from Latin America written in the 
20th century and its relationship to 
the folk music of the region. 

MUH 3801 Jazz History (2). An in- 
depth study of jazz music from its in- 
ception to the present day. 
Specifically designed for music ma- 
jors, in particular Jazz Studies stu- 
dents. Prerequisites: MUT 1112, MUT 
1222. 

MUH 4680 Music History Seminar I 
(2). Emphasizes both historical and 
theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops 
written skills and research methods. 
Written project required. Prereq- 
uisite: MUH 321 1 , MUH 3212, and per- 
mission of instructor. 

MUH 4681 Music History Seminar II 
(2). Emphasizes both historical and 
theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops 
written skills and research methods. 
Written project required. Prereq- 
uisite: MUH 4680 or permission of in- 
structor. 

MUH 4682 Music History Seminar III 
(2). Emphasizes both historical and 
theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops 
written skills and research methods. 
Written project required. Prereq- 
uisite: MUH 4681. 

MUH 4683 Music History Seminar IV 
(2). Emphasizes both historical and 
theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops 
written skills and research methods. 
Written project required. Prereq- 
uisite: MUH 4682. 

MUH 5025 History of Popular Music in 
the U.S. (3). Overview of Afro-Ameri- 
can and Euro-American popular mu- 
sic and its historical development. 
Examination of musical style and so- 
cial context in lecture-discussion for- 
mat with film and video. 

MUH 5057 Music of the World (3). Sur- 
vey of folk, popular and classical 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 135 



musical traditions from around the 
world. Examination of musical style 
and social context with film and per- 
formance demonstrations. 

MUH 5065 Latino Music in the United 
States (3). Survey of Latin American 
musical traditions brought through 
immigration. Examination of musical 
style and social context in lecture- 
discussion format with film and per- 
formance demonstrations. 

MUH 5066 Music of Mexico and Cen- 
tral America (3). A survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical tradi- 
tions in the region. Examination of 
musical style and social context in 
lecture-discussion format with film 
and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5067 Music of the Caribbean 
(3). Survey of folk, popular and classi- 
cal musical traditions and their on- 
going connection with Caribbean 
populations in the U.S.. Class in- 
cludes film and performance dem- 
onstrations. 

MUH 5375 Twentieth Century Music: 
'New Dimensions' (3). A technical 
study of music since 1900. Lectures 
on style plus demonstrations and 
practical application will be supple- 
mented with recordings and analy- 
sis. 

MUL 4400 Keyboard Literature (3). 

Study of solo works for the keyboard 
from historical beginnings to the pre- 
sent. Performance practices and sty- 
listic analysis will be emphasized, 
with illustrations of representative 
works. Prerequisites: MUH 321 1 , MUH 
3212. 

MUL 4500 Symphonic Literature (3). 

Survey of symphonic literature from 
the 17th century to present day. 
Analysis and illustrations of repre- 
sentative works. Prerequisites: MUH 
3211, and MUH 3212. 

MUL 4630 Symphonic/Chamber Vo- 
cal Literature (1). Corequisite with 
MUL 4500 Symphonic Literature. A 
practicum surveys Symphonic & 
Chamber vocal music from 17th 
Century to present day. Includes se- 
lection of personal repertory and en- 
semble performance. 

MUL 4662 History and Literature of 
Opera (3). Chronological survey of 
opera literature from the 17th cen- 
tury to present day. Analysis and per- 
formance of representative works. 
Prerequisites: MUH 321 1 , and MUH 
3212. 



MUL 5456 Wind Instrument Literature 
(3). The history and development of 
Wind Instrument Literature from ca. 
1650 to the present day. Music ap- 
propriate for all levels of instruction 
from middle school through college 
level is included. Prerequisite: Ad- 
vanced/graduate standing. 

MUM 1401 Music Calligraphy (3). 

The correct procedures for music 
penmanship, the notation of notes 
and chords for music parts and 
scores. 

MUM 3601 Audio Techniques I (3). 

Basic sound engineering, including 
the basic workings of P.A. equip- 
ment and the interplay between 
the various components. 

MUM 3602 Audio Techniques II (3). 

Studio recording techniques, micro- 
phone placement, taping and mix- 
ing. 

MUM 4301 Business of Music (1). Prin- 
ciples and practices of modern pub- 
lishing techniques; copyright laws; 
wholesale and retail distribution of 
music. Performance rights; agree- 
ments and relations between pro- 
ducers directors, performers, writers, 
personnel managers, and booking 
agents. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MUM 4302 Business of Music II (3). 

Continuation of principles and prac- 
tices of modern publishing tech- 
niques; copyright laws; wholesale 
and retail distribution of music. Per- 
formance rights; agreements and re- 
lations between producer, directors, 
performers, writers, personnel man- 
agers, booking agents. Prerequisite: 
MUM 4301. 

MUM 4940 Music Internship (VAR). 

Practical experience utilizing music 
theory, composition, and history in 
the commercial music industry. The 
precise nature of the work will be de- 
termined in consultation with an ad- 
visor. Prerequisite: MUM 4302. 

MUN 1 100, 4103, 5105 Golden Pan- 
ther Band (1). A study and perform- 
ance of pop, jazz, and rock musical 
selections for the instrumental me- 
dium. Students will demonstrate 
what they have learned by perform- 
ing and through individualized play- 
ing examinations. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

MUN 1120, 3123, 5 125 University 
Concert Band (1). Readings and per- 
formances of large concert band 
repertoire, including pop and show 
tunes. Designed to give any univer- 



sity student who demonstrates an 
acceptable level of performance 
on a wind or percussion instrument, 
the opportunity to perform in a 
band. 

MUN 1 140, 4143, 5145 Symphonic 
Wind Ensemble (1). Readings and 
performances of wind ensemble mu- 
sic from the 18th century to the pre- 
sent. Open to wind and percussion 
instrumentalists. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of conductor. 

MUN 1210, 4213, 5215 Orchestra (1). 

An instrumental ensemble performing 
works from the symphonic repertory. 
Prerequisites: Previous experience 
and permission of conductor. 

MUN 1310, 3313, 5315 Concert Choir 
(1). A choral ensemble performing 
music written and arranged for 
mixed voices. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

MUN 1340, 3343, 5345 Sunblazer 
Singers (1). A small ensemble of se- 
lected mixed voices performing a 
repertoire in the modern popular id- 
iom. Miniature contemporary ac- 
companiment will be utilized. 
Prerequisite: Permission of conduc- 
tor. 

MUN 1380, 3383, 4380, 5385 Master 
Chorale (1). A chorus performing a 
repertoire primarily from great cho- 
ral works. Large orchestral accom- 
paniment as well as various 
instrumental ensembles will be util- 
ized. Prerequisite: Permission of con- 
ductor. 

MUN 1430, 3433, 5435 University 
Brass Choir (1). A study and perform- 
ance of literature written for the 
brass medium (trumpet, horn, trom- 
bone, euphonium, and tuba) from 
the pre-baroque, baroque, classical, 
romantic and contemporary periods. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

MUN 1460, 3463, 5465 Chamber Mu- 
sic (1). Small ensemble in the per- 
forming of chamber music literature. 
Prerequisite: Permission of conduc- 
tor. 

MUN 1710, 3713, 5715 Studio Jazz En- 
semble (1). An ensemble to provide 
creative professional-level experi- 
ence in the contemporary popular 
idiom. Permission of conductor. 

MUN 1790 Salsa Jazz Ensemble (1). 

An ensemble to provide creative 
professional-level experience in the 
salsa/Latin jazz idiom. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 



1 36 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



MUN 2320, 4323, 5325 Women's Cho- 
rus (1). A choral ensemble perform- 
ing music written or arranged for 
women's voices. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

MUN 2330, 4333, 5335 Men's Chorus 
(1). A choral ensemble performing 
music written or arranged for men's 
voices. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MUN 2440, 4443, 5445 Percussion En- 
semble (01). A study and perform- 
ance of music literature charac- 
teristic of the percussion ensemble. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MUN 2450, 4453, 5455 Piano Ensem- 
ble (1). The presentation and per- 
formance of music literature 
characteristic of piano and pianos 
in ensemble. 

MUN 2480, 4483, 5485 Guitar Ensem- 
ble (1). The presentation and per- 
formance of music literature 
characteristic of the Guitar Ensem- 
ble. Prerequisite: Permission of con- 
ductor. 

MUN 2490, 4493, 5495 New Music En- 
semble (1). A chamber group of 
varying instrumentation and size per- 
forming art music from the 20th cen- 
tury with emphasis on music from 
the past 20 years. Explores electron- 
ics, multimedia works, etc. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

MUN 2491, 4494, 5496 Latin Ameri- 
can Music Ensemble (1). Study and 
performance of one or more folk 
and/or popular musical styles from 
Latin America. 

MUN 2510, 4513, 5515 Accompany- 
ing (1). Accompanying instrumental 
and vocal students in studio and re- 
cital situations. 

MUN 271 1, 4714, 5716 Jazz Combo 
Class (1). Harmdnic practice, formal 
procedures, rhythmic and improvisa- 
tional practices of jazz performance 
in the small group. Prerequisites: Per- 
mission of conductor. 

MUN 4784, 5785 Jazz Ensemble Re- 
hearsal Techniques (1). An ensem- 
ble that provides its members a 
creative approach to jazz ensemble 
rehearsal techniques, literature, im- 
provisation and related materials. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MUO 1501, 4502, 5505 Opera Work- 
shop (1). The presentation and per- 
formance of music literature 
indigenous to the opera stage. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of director. 



MUO 2001 Music Theater Workshop - 
Voice (2). Introduction to musical 
comedy performance; integration 
of dramatic, musical and move- 
ment components studied through 
work on selected scenes and songs. 
Particular emphasis on vocal train- 
ing. Corequisite: TPP 3250. 

MUO 3603 Elements of Stage Produc- 
tion (2). Aspects of technical thea- 
tre will be examined such as stage 
design and lighting, costumes and 
make-up, stage direction, prop con- 
struction, prompting, and Opera 
Theatre administration. 

MUO 4503 Opera Theatre I (3). Cul- 
mination of opera courses with em- 
phasis on accumulation of repertoire, 
systematic development of a role, 
and rehearsal procedures and disci- 
pline. Student may perform self-di- 
rected scenes. Permission of 
instructor. 

MUO 4504 Opera Theatre II (3). Con- 
tinuation of Opera Theatre I. Stu- 
dent may participate in staged 
operatic production as performer or 
technical personnel. Prerequisite 
MVV 4561 . MW 4451 , and MVV 
3931 or permission of instructor. 

MUS 1010 MUS 3040 Recital Atten- 
dance (0). Students attend concerts 
and recitals as a corequisite to ap- 
plied music. Required of music ma- 
jors each semester. 

MUS 2211 English Diction (1). De- 
velop the skills in the proper enuncia- 
tion of the English language as used 
in opera, oratorio and art song litera- 
ture. Corequisites: All applied MVV. 

MUS 2221 French Diction (1). De- 
velop the skills in the proper enuncia- 
tion of the French language as used 
by singers in opera, oratorio and art 
song literature. Corequisites: All ap- 
plied MVV. 

MUS 2231 German Diction (1). De- 
velop the skills in the proper enuncia- 
tion of the German language as 
used by singers in opera, oratorio 
and art song literature. Corequisites: 
All applied MVV. 

MUS 2241 Italian Diction (1). De- 
velop the skills in the proper enuncia- 
tion of the Italian language as used 
by singers in opera, oratorio and art 
song literature. Corequisites: All ap- 
plied MVV. 

MUS 3905, MUS 5905 Directed Study 
(VAR). Designed to provide areas of 
exploration and specialization be- 
yond the basic selected study pro- 



grams, such as electronic music, re- 
ligious music literature, sound tech- 
niques, etc. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MUS 3910, MUS 4910, MUS 5910 Re- 
search (VAR). Research composi- 
tion or performance projects, under 
the guidance and direction of the 
music faculty. (May be repeated). 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MUS 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Performing Arts (VAR). A student ma- 
joring in Performing Arts may spend 
several semesters fully employed in 
industry or government in a capac- 
ity relating to the major. 

MUT 1001 Fundamentals of Music 

(3). A beginning music theory 
course in the basic elements of mu- 
sic rhythms, meter notation, key sig- 
natures scales, intervals, and triads. 

MUT 1111 Music Theory I (3). This 
course is designed to promote and 
develop comprehensive musician- 
ship in all disciplines of the musical 
art, analysis, composition, perform- 
ance, and listening. Corequisite- 
MUT 1221. 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II (3). This 
course is designed to promote and 
develop comprehensive musician- 
ship in all disciplines of the musical 
art, analysis, composition, perform- 
ance, and listening. The second se- 
mester is a continuation of Theory I. 
Prerequisite: MUT 11 1 1. Corequisite- 
1222. 

MUT 1221 Sightsinging I (^.Develop- 
ment of Basic Musicianship through 
aural perception, sightsinging, and 
ear training exercises. Corequisite: 
MUT 1111. 

MUT 1222 Sightsinging II (1). Devel- 
opment of Basic Musicianship 
through aural perception, sightsing- 
ing and ear training exercises. The 
second semester is a continuation 
of Sightsinging I. Prerequisite: MUT 
1221. Corequisite: MUT 11 12. 

MUT 21 16 Music Theory III (3). Con- 
tinuation of Freshman Theory. It 
seeks to promote and further de- 
velop comprehensive musicianship 
in all disciplines of the musical art. 
analysis, composition, performance, 
and listening. Prerequisite: MUT 1112. 
Corequisite: MUT 2226. 

MUT 2117 Music Theory IV (3). This 
course further develops those skills 
acquired in sophomore Theory I. Pre- 
requisite: MUT 21 16. Corequisite: MUT 
2227. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 137 



MUT 2226 Sightsinging III (1). Con- 
tinuation of the Development of Ba- 
sic Musicianship through aural 
perception, sightsinging. and ear 
training exercises. Prerequisite: MUT 
1222. Corequisite:MUT2116. 

MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV (1). Con- 
tinuation of the Development of Ba- 
sic Musicianship through aural 
perception, sightsinging, and ear 
training exercises. Prerequisites: MUT 
2226, MUT 2116. Corequisite: MUT 
2117. 

MUT 2641 Jazz Improvisation I (2). A 

beginning course in Jazz improvisa- 
tion that teaches fundamental as- 
pects, chord structures and 
extensions, chord scales, melodic 
patterns, and tunes. Course will in- 
volve both theory and practical ap- 
plication. A concert will be held at 
conclusion of the term. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

MUT 2642 Jazz Improvisation II (2). A 

follow-up course that both rein- 
forces and extends all materials 
learned in Jazz Improvisation I, 
Course stresses more complex 
chord structures, scales, and tunes. 
A concert will be held at conclusion 
of the term. Prerequisite: MUT 2641. 

MUT 3401 Counterpoint (3). A study 
of linear writing through species 
counterpoint. Two and three-part in- 
strumental and vocal counterpoint 
of the 18th century: Canon, inven- 
tions, fugues. Particular emphasis will 
be placed on formal analysis. Pre- 
requisite: MUT 2117, 2227, or equiva- 
lent. 

MUT 361 1 Form and Analysis (3). 

Study and analysis from the smaller 
forms of musical composition to mul- 
timovement forms. Prerequisite: MUT 
21 17, MUT 2227. 

MUT 431 1 Orchestration (2-3). With a 
background of basic theory, the stu- 
dent will explore the techniques of 
writing and arranging for instruments 
in performing organizations. Prereq- 
uisite: Prerequisites: MUT 2117 and 
MUT 2227. 

MUT 4353 Jazz Arranging (2). This 
course teaches the fundamental as- 
pects of jazz arranging: instrumenta- 
tion, transposition, section and 
ensemble writing, chord voicings, 
counterpoint, and form and analy- 
sis. The performance of an original 
arrangement is required as a final 
project. Prerequisite: MUT 2641. 

MUT 4643 Jazz Improvisation III (2). 

A continuation of Jazz Improvisation 



II, this course teaches chromatic 
chords, advanced scales and pro- 
gressions, patterns, repertoire. Indi- 
vidual and ensemble performance 
is required as a final project. Prereq- 
uisite: MUT 2642. 

MUT 4663 Jazz Styles and Analysis I 
(2). An extensive study of the signifi- 
cant styles and performers in jazz his- 
tory from its origins to the present. 
Includes instruction in layered listen- 
ing, various analyses and transcrib- 
ing. Prerequisites: Jazz theory or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUT 4664 Jazz Styles and Analysis II 
(2). An extensive study of the signifi- 
cant styles and performers in jazz his- 
tory from its origins to the present. 
Includes instruction in layered listen- 
ing, various analyses and transcrib- 
ing. Continuation of Jazz Styles and 
Analysis I. Prerequisites: MUT 4663 or 
permission of instructor. 

MUT 5051 Graduate Theory Survey 
(3). Analytical, theoretical and aural 
skills required for successful gradu- 
ate studies in music. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in Music Educa- 
tion or permission of instructor. 

MUT 5152 Comprehensive Musical 
Systems (3). Examination of various 
comprehensive theoretical systems 
utilized in the analysis of music. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing in Mu- 
sic Education or permission of 
instructor. 

MUT 5316 Advanced Orchestration 
(3). Examination of orchestrational 
techniques utilized by composers 
from the Baroque era through cur- 
rent times. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing in Music Education or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

MUT 5381 Arranging (3). A course in 
practical arranging for the public 
school teacher, including choral, 
band, and popular arranging. Pre- 
requisites: MUT 2117 and MUT 2227. 

MUT 541 1 Modal Counterpoint (3). 

Develop skills necessary to write in 
the Renaissance style and to ana- 
lyze the masterworks of Palestrina, 
Lassus. Victoria, and others. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing in Music 
Education or permission of instructor. 

MUT 5585 Musical Styles Through 
Strict Composition (3). This course is 
designed to develop basic composi- 
tional skills for writing works in all 
forms and fugues. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in Music Educa- 
tion or permission of instructor. 



MUT 5627 Schenkerian Analysis (3). 

Advanced studies in Schenkerian 
analysis of tonal music. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in Music Educa- 
tion or permission of instructor. 

MUT 5628 Atonal Analysis (3). Ad- 
vanced studies in set theory and se- 
rial techniques of twentieth-century 
music. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing in Music Education or permission 
of instructor. 

MUT 5629 Analytical Techniques (3). 

Examination and practice of various 
techniques utilized in the analysis of 
art music from the common prac- 
tice period through the 20th cen- 
tury. Prerequisite: Placement exam 
or permission of instructor. 

MUT 5930 Special Topics (3). Exami- 
nation of composers, compositional 
schools, or other areas of specializa- 
tion and/or interest to the the- 
ory/composition faculty. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in 
Music Education or permission of in- 
structor. 

MVB 1211,2221,3231,4241,5251 
Secondary Applied Trumpet (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on trumpet as a secondary instru- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MVB 1212, 2222, 3232, 4242, 5252 
Secondary Applied French Horn (1). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on french horn as a secondary in- 
strument. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

MVB 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 
Secondary Applied Trombone (1). In- 
dividual instruction in applied music 
on trombone as a secondary instru- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MVB 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 
Secondary Applied Baritone Horn 
(1). Individual instruction in applied 
music on baritone horn as a secon- 
dary instrument. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

MVB 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 
Secondary Applied Tuba (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
tuba as a secondary instrument. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVB 1311,2321,3331,4341,5351 
Principal Applied Trumpet (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on trumpet as a principal instru- 
ment. Music majors only. 

MVB 1312, 2322, 3332, 4342, 5352 
Principal Applied French Horn (1-2). 



138/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on trench horn as a principal in- 
strument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 
Principal Applied Trombone (1-2). In- 
dividual instruction in applied music 
on applied trombone as a principal 
instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 
Principal Applied Baritone Horn (1- 

2). Individual instruction in applied 
music on baritone horn as a princi- 
pal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1315, 2325, 3335, 4345, 5355 
Applied Tuba (1-2). Individual in- 
struction in applied music on tuba 
as a principal instrument. Music ma- 
jors only. 

MVB 1411,2421,3431,4441,5451 
Major Applied Trumpet (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
trumpet as a major instrument. Mu- 
sic majors only. 

MVB 1412, 2422, 3432, 4442, 5452 
Major Applied French Horn (1-2). In- 
dividual instruction in applied music 
on trench horn as a major instru- 
ment. Music majors only. 

MVB 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 
Major Applied Trombone (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on trombone as a major instrument. 
Music majors only. 

MVB 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444, 5454 
Major Applied Baritone Horn (1-2). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on baritone horn as a major in- 
strument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1415, 2425, 3435, 4445, 5455 
Major Applied Tuba (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on tuba 
as a major instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVB 3970 Junior Recital - Brass (1). 

All music performance majors must 
present, during their junior year, at 
least one half of a public recital, 
and pass an oral examination on 
the music programmed. See areas 
of emphasis for specific require- 
ments. 

MVB 4971 Senior Recital - Brass (1). 

All music majors must present, be- 
fore graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance for majors) 
of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music pro- 
grammed. See areas of emphasis 
for specific requirements. 

MVJ 1210, 2220, 3230, 4240, 5250 
Secondary Jazz Piano (1). Individual 



instruction in applied jazz music on 
piano. Prerequisite: Preceding 
course in sequence or permission of 
instructor. 

MVJ 121 1 Principal Applied Jazz 
Drums (1-2). Individual instruction in 
applied music on jazz drums as a 
principal instrument. Prerequisite: 
Music majors only. 

MVJ 1212 Secondary Latin Jazz Per- 
cussion (1). Individual instruction in 
applied music on Latin percussion in- 
struments. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

MVJ 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 
Secondary Jazz Guitar (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied jazz music 
on guitar. Prerequisite: Preceding 
course in sequence or permission of 
instructor. 

MVJ 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 
Secondary Jazz Electric Bass (1). In- 
dividual instruction in applied jazz 
music on electronic bass. Prereq- 
uisite: Preceding course in se- 
quence or permission of instructor. 

MVJ 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 
Secondary Jazz Flute (1). Individual 
instruction in applied jazz music on 
flute. Prerequisite: Preceding course 
in sequence or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

MVJ 1216, 2226, 3236, 4246, 5256 
Secondary Jazz Saxophone (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied jazz mu- 
sic on saxophone. Prerequisite: 
Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of instructor. 

MVJ 1217,2227,3237,4247,5257 
Secondary Jazz Trumpet (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied jazz music 
on trumpet. Prerequisite: Preceding 
course in sequence or permission of 
instructor. 

MVJ 1218, 2228, 3238, 4248, 5258 
Secondary Jazz Trombone (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied jazz mu- 
sic on trombone. Prerequisite: 
Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of instructor. 

MVJ 1219, 2229, 3239, 4249, 5259 
Secondary Jazz Percussion (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied jazz mu- 
sic on percussion. Prerequisite: 
Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of instructor. 

MVJ 1310 Principal Applied Jazz Pi- 
ano (1-2). Individual instruction in ap- 
plied music on jazz piano as a 
principal level. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 



MVJ 1312 Principal Applied Latin 
Jazz Percussion (1-2). Individual in- 
struction in applied music on Latin 
jazz percussion as a principal instru- 
ment. Prerequisite: Music majors 
only. 

MVJ 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 
Principal Jazz Guitar (2). Individual 
instruction in applied jazz music on 
guitar. Prerequisite: Preceding 
course in sequence or permission of 
instructor. 

MVJ 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 
Principal Jazz Electric Bass (2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied jazz mu- 
sic on electronic bass. Prerequisite: 
Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of instructor. 

MVJ 1410 Major Applied Jazz Piano 
(1-2). Individual instruction in ap- 
plied music on jazz piano as a major 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 141 1 Major Applied Jazz Drums 
(1-2). Individual instruction in ap- 
plied music on jazz drums as a major 
instrument. Prerequisite: Music ma- 
jors only. 

MVJ 1412 Major Applied Latin Jazz 
Percussion (1-2). Individual instruc- 
tion in applied music on Latin jazz 
percussion as a major instrument. 
Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1413 Major Applied Jazz Guitar 
(1-2). Individual instruction in ap- 
plied music on jazz guitar at a major 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1414 Major Applied Jazz Bass 
(1-2). Individual instruction in ap- 
plied music on jazz bass at a major 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 4971 Senior Recital - Jazz (1). 

All music majors must present, be- 
fore graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a 
public recital, and pass an oral ex- 
amination on the music pro- 
grammed. See areas of emphasis 
for specific requirements. 

MVK - Keyboard Studies (1). Course 

designed to develop the composite 
keyboard skills and practical training 
for the piano major/principle to be- 
come a proficient sight-reader. 

MVK 1 1 1 1 Class Piano I (1). A course 

designed to teach piano skills and 
competencies to non-piano majors. 
This is a four-semester sequence for 
music majors. This course includes: 
keyboard familiarization, finger exer- 
cises and techniques, transposing, 
and easy literature. Prerequisite: 
None. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences/ 139 



MVK 11 12 Class Piano II (1). A con- 
tinuation of Class Piano I, MVK 1111. 
Prerequisite: MVK 1111. 

MVK 1211,2221,3231,4241,5251 
Secondary Applied Piano (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on piano as a secondary instrument. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVK 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 
Secondary Applied Organ (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on organ as a secondary instru- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MVK 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 
Principal Applied Piano (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on pi- 
ano as a principal instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVK 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 
Principal Applied Organ (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on organ as a principal instrument. 
Music majors only. 

MVK 1411,2421,3431,4441,5451 
Major Applied Piano (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on pi- 
ano as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVK 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 
Major Applied Organ (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
organ as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVK 2121 Class Piano III (1). A con- 
tinuation of Class Piano II. The 
course includes continued work in 
finger technique, scales and finger- 
ing, transposing, simple accompani- 
ments to folk songs, sight reading 
cadences, and simple literature. Pre- 
requisite: MVK 1112. 

MVK 2122 Class Piano IV (1). A con- 
tinuation of Class Piano III. Prereq- 
uisite: MVK 2121. 

MVK 3130 Class Piano V (1). Further 

development of elementary key- 
board techniques and musicianship: 
scales, harmonization, arpeggios, 
transposition, improvisation, 
sightreading, and simple literature. 
Prerequisite: MVK 2122 or by place- 
ment exam. 

MVK 3131 Class Piano VI (1). A con- 
tinuation of MVK 3130. Prerequisite: 
MVK 3130 or by placement exam. 

MVK 3970 Junior Recital - Keyboard 
(1). All music performance majors 
must present, during their junior 
year, at least one half of a public re- 
cital, and pass an oral examination 



on the music programmed. See ar- 
eas of emphasis for specific require- 
ments. 

MVK 4141 Class Piano VII (1). Further 
development of elementary key- 
board techniques and musicianship: 
scales, harmonization, arpeggios, 
transposition, improvisation, 
sightreading, and simple literature. 
Prerequisite: MVK 3131 or by place- 
ment exam. 

MVK 4142 Class Piano VIII (1). A con- 
tinuation of MVK 4141. Prerequisite: 
MVK 4141 or by placement exam. 

MVK 4640 Piano Pedagogy (2). A sur- 
vey of current teaching methods 
and techniques in piano pedagogy. 
Supervised teaching provides hands- 
on experience. 

MVK 4971 Senior Recital - Keyboard 

(1). All music majors must present, 
before graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a 
public recital, and pass an oral ex- 
amination on the music pro- 
grammed. See areas of emphasis 
for specific requirements. 

MVP 1211,2221,3231,4241,5251 
Secondary Applied Percussion (1). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on percussion as a secondary in- 
strument. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

MVP 131 1, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 
Principal Applied Percussion (1-2). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on percussion as a principal in- 
strument. Music majors only. 

MVP 1411,2421,3431,4441,5451 
Major Applied Percussion (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on percussion as a major instrument. 
Music majors only. 

MVP 3970 Junior Recital - Percussion 
(1). All music performance majors 
must present, during their junior 
year, at least one half of a public re- 
cital, and pass an oral examination 
on the music programmed. See ar- 
eas of emphasis for specific require- 
ments. 

MVP 4971 Senior Recital - Percussion 
(1). All music majors must present, 
before graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a 
public recital, and pass an oral ex- 
amination on the music pro- 
grammed. See areas of emphasis 
for specific requirements. 

MVS 1116 Guitar Skills (1). Emphasis 
on music reading and elementary 



techniques. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MVS 1211,2221,3231,4241,5251 
Secondary Applied Violin (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on violin as a secondary instrument. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVS 1212, 2222, 3232, 4242, 5252 
Secondary Applied Viola (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on vi- 
ola as a secondary instrument. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVS 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 
Secondary Applied Cello (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
cello as a secondary instrument. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVS 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 
Secondary Applied Double Bass (1). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on double bass as a secondary 
instrument. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

MVS 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 
Secondary Applied Harp (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
harp as a secondary instrument. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVS 1216, 2226, 3236, 4246, 5256 
Secondary Applied Guitar (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on guitar as a secondary instrument. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVS 1311,2321,3331,4341,5351 
Principal Applied Violin (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
violin as a principal instrument. Mu- 
sic majors only. 

MVS 1312, 2322, 3332, 4342, 5352 
Principal Applied Viola (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on vi- 
ola as a principal instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVS 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 
Principal Applied Cello (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
cello as a principal instrument. Mu- 
sic majors only. 

MVS 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 
Principal Applied Double Bass (1-2). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on double brass as a principal in- 
strument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1315, 2325, 3335, 4345, 5355 
Principal Applied Harp (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
harp as a principal instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVS 1316, 2326, 3336, 4346, 5356 
Principal Applied Guitar (1-2). Indi- 



140 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



vidual instruction in applied music 
on guitar as a principal instrument. 
Music majors only. 

MVS 1411,2421,3431,4441,5451 
Major Applied Violin (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
violin as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVS 1412, 2422, 3432, 4442, 5452 
Major Applied Viola (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on viola 
as a major instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVS 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 
Major Applied Cello (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on cello 
as a major instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVS 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444, 5454 
Major Applied Double Bass (1-2). In- 
dividual instruction in applied music 
on double brass as a major instru- 
ment. Music majors only. 

MVS 1415, 2425, 3435, 4445, 5455 
Major Applied Harp (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on harp 
as a major instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVS 1416, 2426, 3436, 4446, 5456 
Major Applied Guitar (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
guitar as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVS 2226 Intermediate Guitar Skills 
(1). Emphasis on techniques and 
styles such as calypso, folk, blues, 
classical, and jazz. Open to all FIU 
students. Prerequisite: MVS 1116. 

MVS 3970 Junior Recital - String (1). 

All music performance majors must 
present, during their junior year, at 
least one half of a public recital, 
and pass an oral examination on 
the music programmed. See areas 
of emphasis for specific require- 
ments. 

MVS 4971 Senior Recital - String (1). 

All music majors must present, be- 
fore graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a 
public recital, and pass an oral ex- 
amination on the music pro- 
grammed. See areas of emphasis 
for specific requirements. 

MVV 1 1 1 1 Voice Class (1). Class in- 
struction on voice designed to help 
the student in developing perform- 
ance skills and increased musical 
know ledge. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 



MVV 1211,2221,3231,4241,5251 
Secondary Voice (1). Individual in- 
struction in applied music on voice 
as a secondary instrument. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVV 1311,2321,3331,4341,5351 
Principal Applied Voice (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on trumpet as a principal instru- 
ment. Music majors only. 

MVV 1411,2421,3431,4441,5451 
Major Applied Voice (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
voice as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVV 2121 Intermediate Voice Class 
(1). Emphasis on sightsinging, tonal 
production, interpretation, and 
other vocal exercises. Particular at- 
tention is paid to vocal and acting 
improvisation. Prerequisite: MVV 
1111. 

MVV 3630 Vocal Pedagogy (1). Re- 
search into various philosophies of 
vocal pedagogy with emphasis on 
the science of acoustics, anatomy, 
terminology, psychological factors 
which apply to the art of singing. 

MVV 3970 Junior Recital - Voice (1). 

All music performance majors must 
present, during their junior year, at 
least one half of a public recital, 
and pass an oral examination on 
the music programmed. See areas 
of emphasis for specific require- 
ments. 

MVV 4551 Opera History Practicum 
(2). A performance course corequi- 
site with History of Opera: MUL 4662 
with emphasis on historical develop- 
ment and differentiation of operatic 
styles through characterization and 
musical interpretation. Includes en- 
semble experience. 

MVV 4971 Senior Recital - Voice (1). 

All music majors must present, be- 
fore graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a 
public recital, and pass an oral ex- 
amination on the music pro- 
grammed. See areas of emphasis 
for specific requirements. 

MVV 5651 Vocal Pedagogy (3). A 

survey of the literature of teaching 
methods for the mature voice de- 
rived from historical and modern 
sources. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. Corequisite: Applied voice 
lesson. 

MVW 1211,2221,3231,4241,5251 
Secondary Applied Flute (1). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 



flute as a secondary instrument. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVW 1212, 2222, 3232, 4242, 5252 
Secondary Applied Oboe (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on oboe as a secondary instrument. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MVW 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 
Secondary Applied Clarinet (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on clarinet as a secondary instru- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MVW 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 
Secondary Applied Bassoon (1). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on bassoon as a secondary instru- 
ment. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

MVW 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 
Secondary Applied Saxophone (1). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on saxophone as a secondary in- 
strument. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

MVW 1311,2321,3331,4341,5351 
Principal Applied Flute (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
flute as a principal instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVW 1312, 2322, 3332, 4342, 5352 
Principal Applied Oboe (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on oboe as a principal instrument. 
Music majors only. 

MVW 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 
Principal Applied Clarinet (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on clarinet as a principal instrument. 
Music majors only. 

MVW 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 
Principal Applied Bassoon (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on bassoon as a principal instru- 
ment. Music majors only. 

MVW 1315, 2325, 3335, 4345, 5355 
Principal Applied Saxophone (1-2). 

Individual instruction in applied mu- 
sic on saxophone as a principal in- 
strument. Music majors only. 

MVW 141 1,2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 
Major Applied Flute (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on flute 
as a major instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVW 1412, 2422, 3432, 4442, 5452 
Major Applied Oboe (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
oboe as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 141 



MVW 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 
Major Applied Clarinet (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
clarinet as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVW 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444, 5454 
Major Applied Bassoon (1-2). Individ- 
ual instruction in applied music on 
bassoon as a major instrument. Mu- 
sic majors only. 

MVW 1415, 2425, 3435, 4445, 5455 
Major Applied Saxophone (1-2). Indi- 
vidual instruction in applied music 
on saxophone as a major instru- 
ment. Music majors only. 

MVW 3970 Junior Recital - Wood- 
wind (1). All music performance ma- 
jors must present, during their junior 
year, at least one half of a public re- 
cital, and pass an oral examination 
on the music programmed. See ar- 
eas of emphasis for specific require- 
ments. 

MVW 4971 Senior Recital - Wood- 
wind (1). All music majors must pre- 
sent, before graduation, at least 
one half (full recital performance 
major) of a public recital, and pass 
an oral examination on the music 
programmed. See areas of empha- 
sis for specific requirements. 



Philosophy 

Bruce Hauptli, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Leke Adeofe, Assistant Professor 
Michelle Beer, Associate Professor 
Bongkil Chung, Associate Professor 
Paul Draper, Associate Professor 
Kenneth Henley, Professor 
George Kovacs, Professor 
Robert Noggle, Assistant Professor 
Kenneth Rogerson, Associate 

Professor 
Paul Warren, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in 

Philosophy 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Common Prerequisites 

No specific courses required; all stu- 
dents are encouraged to complete 
the Associate in Arts degree. 

Philosophy encompasses a 
broad range of topics and methods 
of inquiry: Socratic questioning of 
the extent and nature of human 
knowledge, probing the rational ba- 
sis of moral and political thought, 
confrontation with fundamental 
questions of value and meaning, 
analysis of basic concepts underly- 
ing theoretical and practical 
thought, reflection on the human ex- 
istential situation, and exploring the 
structure of reasoning itself. The 
great philosophers are studied both 
for historical understanding and con- 
temporary significance. 

Philosophy majors may choose 
one of three tracks. The General 
Track is designed to serve students 
with a broad interest in philosophy. 
The Professional Track is designed for 
students considering philosophy as 
a professional discipline. It is espe- 
cially appropriate for those consider- 
ing graduate work in philosophy 
and those with an interest in a thor- 
ough and systematic study of the 
full range of philosophical thought, 
The Specialized Track is designed for 
students who are interested in philo- 
sophical reflection on a specific dis- 
cipline or area such as law, religion, 
or psychology. It is especially appro- 
priate for pre-law students and for 
dual majors who are interested in 
the relationship between philosophy 
and their other major discipline. 

Lower Division Requirements: 

PHI 2100 (Introduction to Logic) is 
recommended for all majors, and is 
one of the three options for satisfy- 



ing the Logic requirement of the 
General and Specialized Tracks. 

During their lower division years, 
students are encouraged to take 
other courses in Philosophy accord- 
ing to their particular interests. PHI 
201 1 (Philosophical Analysis) pro- 
vides students with an excellent in- 
troduction to philosophy and serves 
to prepare students for their major 
courses. To qualify for formal admis- 
sion to the Philosophy Program, FIU 
students must have met all the 
lower division requirements (includ- 
ing CLAST), completed 60 semester 
hours, and be otherwise accept- 
able to the Program. 

Upper Division Requirements: 

The following requirements apply to 
all three tracks. Any course taken to 
fulfill a requirement for the major 
may not be taken with the 
'pass/fail' option and must be 
passed with a grade of 'C or bet- 
ter. PHI 2103 (Critical Thinking) and 
PHI 3636 (Professional Ethics) may 
not be used to fulfill any require- 
ments for the major. Also, no more 
than six hours of Independent Study 
may be used to fulfill these require- 
ments. In addition to fulfilling the re- 
quirements of the major, the 
College of Arts and Sciences re- 
quires that within their final 60 semes- 
ter hours students take at least nine 
hours outside the major discipline 
(at least six hours must be outside 
the major department). 
The General Track: (33 Semester 
Hours Required) 
The General Track is designed to 
serve students with a broad interest 
in philosophy. One three-hour Logic 
course is required, selected from PHI 
2100 (which counts within this track 
as part of the 33 hour total), PHI 
4130, or PHI 4161. The remaining 30 
hours may include any upper-divi- 
sion philosophy courses except PHI 
2103 and PHI 3636. Students are 
strongly encouraged to discuss their 
course selections with their advisor. 
The Professional Track: (33 
Semester Hours Required) 

The Professional Track is designed 
for students considering philosophy 
as a professional discipline. It is espe- 
cially appropriate for those consider- 
ing graduate work in philosophy 
and those with an interest in a thor- 
ough and systematic study of the 
full range of philosophical thought. 
Receiving a 'C or better in 33 se- 
mester hours of upper division phi- 
losophy courses distributed as 
follows will fulfill the requirements for 
this track: 



142 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Logic/Probability 3 

Epistemology/Metaphysics 9 

Value Theory 6 

History of Philosophy 6 

Philosophy Electives 9 

PHI 2 100 does not fulfill the 
Logic/Probability requirement for 
this track, however it may be in- 
cluded as a Philosophy elective. 
The Specialized Track: (33 
Semester Hours Required) 
The Specialized Track is designed for 
students who are interested in philo- 
sophical reflection on a specific dis- 
cipline or area such as law, religion, 
or psychology. It is especially appro- 
priate for pre-law students and for 
dual majors who are interested in 
the relationship between philosophy 
and their other major discipline. An 
approved Individualized Plan of 
Study will meet the requirements for 
this track. Such plans are designed 
by the Philosophy advisor in consult- 
ation with the student so that they 
can be tailored to the student's spe- 
cific interests and goals. Students 
pursuing the Specialized Track must 
secure prior written approval of their 
course selections from their advisor. 
The proposed course selections 
must present a clear, focused, and 
coherent plan of study. The Philoso- 
phy Program Brochure (available in 
the Department on either campus) 
includes several models of such 
plans of study, including Pre-Law 
Studies, Western Philosophy and Its 
Historical Context, Social and Politi- 
cal Philosophy, Philosophy and Relig- 
ious Thought, Philosophy and 
Difference, Philosophy and Psychol- 
ogy, and Philosophy and the Arts. 
Each such plan must include 33 se- 
mester hours, and the courses taken 
in accord with the plan must be 
passed with a grade of 'C or bet- 
ter. One three-hour Logic course is 
required, selected from PHI 2100 
(which counts within this track as 
part of the 33 hour total), PHI 41 30, 
or PHI 4161. With the prior written ap- 
proval of the Philosophy advisor, up 
to nine semester hours from other 
programs may be counted toward 
the 33 hour major (only six hours 
credited toward the major require- 
ments of another major program 
may be counted toward the 30 
hour philosophy major). 

The Philosophy Minor 

A student may earn a minor in Phi- 
losophy by earning a grade of 'C 
or better in any four upper division 
philosophy courses except PHI 2103 
(Critical Thinking) and PHI 3636 (Pro- 
fessional Ethics). 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

GRE-Ancient Greek; PHH-Philosophy, 
History of; PHI-Philosophy; PHM-Phi- 
losophy of Man and Society; PHP- 
Philosophers and Schools. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

GRE 3050 Introduction to Ancient 
Greek (3). Introduces the Greek lan- 
guage of the New Testament, and 
other works of the ancient period to 
enhance the understanding of trans- 
lated texts. A portion of the Gospel 
of John is studied. 

PHH 3042 Latin American Philosophy 
(3). This course will examine the de- 
velopment of Latin American 
thought, with particular attention to 
the 19th and 20th centuries. It will 
consider the traditions and initiatives 
of prominent Latin American philoso- 
phers in the light of problems such 
as personal and cultural identity. 

PHH 3100 Ancient Philosophy (3). 

The basic concerns and teachings 
of representative philosophers and 
schools of thought, particularly in 
the Greek and Roman cultural set- 
tings, and linkages to their past and 
future are emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3200 Medieval Philosophy (3). 

The basic concerns and teachings 
of representative philosophers and 
schools of thought in the cultural set- 
tings of the Middle Ages, and link- 
ages to their past and future are 
emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3420 Early Modern Philosophy 
(3). The basic concerns and teach- 
ings of representative philosophers 
and schools of thought in the period 
from the Renaissance to Kant and 
the linkages to their past and future 
are emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3440 Late Modem Philosophy 
(3). The basic concerns and teach- 
ings of representative philosophers 
and schools of thought in the period 
from Kant to Nietzsche and the link- 
ages to their past and future are em- 
phasized in this course. (S) 

PHH 3602 Twentieth Century British 
Philosophy (3). Examines the devel- 
opment of 20th century British phi- 
losophy, with special attention to 
the justification for its aims, methods, 
and central concerns (e.g. knowl- 
edge, appearance and reality, 
memory, and the value of philoso- 
phy). 



PHH 3700 American Philosophy (3). 

This course will examine the develop- 
ment of American philosophical 
thought, with particular attention to 
the 19th and 20th centuries. It will 
consider the traditions and initiatives 
of the prominent American philoso- 
phers, in the light of problems such 
as the relationship between theory 
and practice. 

PHH 3810 Philosophy of Buddhism 
(3). Examines the central philosophy 
of Buddhism dealing with: 1) the 
question of reality and appearance, 
2) the theories of causation, 3) the 
relation of these views to Buddhist 
soteriology (realism, idealism, dialec- 
tics, Hwa-yen). (S) 

PHH 3840 Indian Philosophy (3). 

Metaphysical, epistemological and 
ethical theories within such major In- 
dian philosophical systems as philo- 
sophical Buddhism, Gains, Samkhya 
dualism, and Vedanta transcenden- 
talism are examined. (F) 

PHH 4600 Twentieth Century Philoso- 
phy (3). The basic concerns and 
teachings of representative philoso- 
phers and schools of thought in the 
cultural settings of the present cen- 
tury, and linkages to past and 
emerging generations are empha- 
sized in this course. 

PHH 4930 A Major Philosopher (3). 

This course will examine in detail the 
works of a major figure in the history 
of philosophy. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. Course may be re- 
peated on a different philosopher. 
(S) 

PHI 201 1 Philosophical Analysis (3). 

This course introduces both the tools 
of philosophical thinking and some 
of their applications to fundamental 
topics such as knowledge, value, 
meaning, and human society. 
(F.S,SS) 

PHI 2100 Introduction to Logic (3). 

This introductory course in logical 
thinking and argumentation will 
treat both practical and theoretical 
approaches to understanding hu- 
man communications and solving 
problems. Students will be intro- 
duced to inductive and deductive 
logic, fallacies, and the role of logic 
in scientific explanation and popu- 
lar expression. (F,S,SS) 

PHI 2101 Philosophical Logic (3). This 
course studies the propositional and 
predicate calculus and such topics 
as necessary truth, entailment, the 
ontological implications of logic. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 143 



and the justification of deduction 
and induction. 

PHI 2103 Critical Thinking (3). A 

course in practical reasoning de- 
signed to sharpen abilities at analyz- 
ing, evaluating, and constructing 
arguments. (F,S,SS) 

PHI 3073 African Philosophy (3). An 

analysis of the metaphysical, 
epistemic, ethical, and political 
thoughts constituting the African 
world views and cultural settings. (S) 

PHI 3300 Epistemology (3). The view- 
points of various philosophers and 
schools of thought regarding types 
of knowledge, certitude, and crea- 
tivity are the main emphases of this 
introductory course. The meaning of 
truth and truthfulness is analyzed 
from both the classical and the con- 
temporary perspectives. 

PHI 3320 Philosophy of Mind (3). An 

inquiry into the concept of mind 
and subsidiary concepts such as sen- 
sation, perception, desire, emotion, 
intention, volition, imagination, and 
intellect. The course will address the 
problem of the relation of mind and 
body and such topics as the con- 
cept of a person, the nature of in- 
tentional action, and the nature of 
consciousness. (F) 

PHI 3400 Philosophy of Science (3). 

The philosophic background of sci- 
entific method will be examined. At- 
tention will be given to the 
philosophical consequences of con- 
ceptual change in the sciences. 
Such topics as the growth and unity 
of science, explanation and predic- 
tion, and the role of science in soci- 
ety will be explored, (S) 

PHI 3420 Philosophy of Social Sci- 
ence (3). An inquiry into philosophi- 
cal questions raised by the social 
sciences. Topics include forms of so- 
cial explanation, the nature of ra- 
tionality, and the status of values in 
social science. 

PHI 3500 Metaphysics (3). This intro- 
ductory course examines basic 
metaphysical questions regarding 
the nature of reality, as well as the 
meaning of these questions for the 
relationship of persons with their 
world. Fundamental texts from classi- 
cal and contemporary philosophers 
will be considered. (F) 

PHI 3601 Ethics (3). What is intrinsi- 
cally good? What ought one to do? 
How are moral claims justified? Com- 
peting views of major philosophers 
are considered. (S) 



PHI 3636 Professional Ethics (3). This 
course will examine the role of eth- 
ics in the professions. The focus will 
be on the moral issues arising in the 
professions with the aim of develop- 
ing the analytical skills required to 
address such problems. 

PHI 3638 Contemporary Ethical Is- 
sues (3). After a review of basic 
questions regarding ethics, this 
course considers special ethical 
problems in contemporary society 
from the perspective of one or more 
philosophers or systems of ethics. 
Topics will be selected and an- 
nounced in advance. (F) 

PHI 3700 Philosophy of Religion (3). 

This course investigates whether or 
not religious beliefs can be rationally 
justified. Such topics as the nature of 
God, the problem of evil, religious 
experience, and the relationship of 
faith to reason will be explored. (SS) 

PHI 3762 Eastern Philosophical and 
Religious Thought (3). This introduc- 
tory course examines the develop- 
ment of philosophical and religious 
thought in the East from ancient to 
modern times. Hinduism, Buddhism, 
Confucianism, Taoism, and other 
major viewpoints will be considered, 
in themselves and in comparison 
with Western forms of thought. (SS) 

PHI 3800 Philosophy of Art (3). An in- 
troduction to problems in Philosophy 
of Art, with emphasis on those prob- 
lems which are especially relevant 
to appreciation and criticism in the 
arts. Typical problems include the re- 
lation between form and content, 
truth and falsity in art, the nature of 
emotion in art and of the aesthetic 
response, as well as the nature of art 
itself. This course will include a study 
of selections from the writings of ma- 
jor thinkers and the consideration of 
those works of art which are rele- 
vant to this study. 

PHI 4130 Symbolic Logic (3). This 
course provides an introduction to 
symbolic logic. Emphasis is upon 
both the formal techniques of analy- 
sis of argument and upon the theo- 
retical aspects of formal logic. (S) 

PHI 4161 Philosophy and Probability 
(3). An introduction to the philo- 
sophical applications of elementary 
probability theory. Topics include 
mathematical probability, rational 
decision making, the foundations of 
science, and Pascal's wager. (S) 

PHI 4221 Philosophy of Language 
(3). The subject matter concerns the 
relations between language. 



thought, and the world. Topics to be 
studied include reference, meaning, 
speech acts, and propositional atti- 
tudes. Also to be considered are the 
implications of claims here for issues 
in other areas of philosophy. (F) 

PHI 4222 Philosophy of Dialogue (3). 

This course examines the meaning, 
the foundations, the limitations of 
dialogue, and the dialogical struc- 
ture of expression and human rela- 
tionships based on the philosophy of 
Martin Buber. It includes a philo- 
sophical analysis of the dialogical 
principle and the application of its 
insights to the problems of human liv- 
ing and knowing. 

PHI 4321 Topics in the Philosophy of 
Mind (3). This course examines se- 
lected issues in the philosophy of 
mind. Topics include the nature and 
value of the passions, self and self- 
deception, theory of action, etc. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: In- 
structor's permission or PHI 3320. 

PHI 4633 Biomedical Ethics (3). After 
examining the foundations of ethics, 
this course will consider the human 
and ethical dimensions of current is- 
sues in the life sciences, such as the 
meaning of human living and suffer- 
ing, ethics of genetic control, death 
and dying, personal responsibility in 
the medical and counseling profes- 
sions. (F) 

PHI 4764 Religious Experience (3). 

An introduction to philosophical 
thought about religious experi- 
ences. After a brief survey of the ma- 
jor types of religious experiences, 
issues about their nature and cogni- 
tive status are examined. (F) 

PHI 4836 Philosophy of Time (3). An 

analysis of the nature of time. Topics 
include the "passage" of time, the 
asymmetry between past and fu- 
ture, Zeno's paradoxes, and philo- 
sophical implications of the special 
theory of relativity. 

PHI 4882 Philosophy in Literature (3). 

Philosophical implications of se- 
lected works and the impact of 
philosophical concepts such as the 
self, death, identity, alienation, re- 
sponsibility, freedom, and the ab- 
surd. 

PHI 4910 Independent Research (1- 

6). Topics will be selected to meet 
the academic needs of the individ- 
ual student. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. (F.S.SS) 



144 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



PHI 4930 Special Topics (3). In-depth 
study of topics of special interest in 
philosophy. 

PHI 4935 Philosophy Seminar (3). This 
seminar is designed for majors and 
other qualified students approved 
by the Department, and will be 
guided by one or more faculty 
members. Topic will be selected 
and announced in advance. The 
number of participants will be lim- 
ited. (F) 

PHI 5934 Special Topics (3). Topics 
will be selected to meet the aca- 
demic needs of groups of students. 

PHM 3040 Philosophical Anthropol- 
ogy (3). ) This course attenpts to in- 
terpret philosophically scientific 
perspectives concerning the nature 
of man and the human condition. It 
seeks to elucidate the basic quali- 
ties that make man what he is and 
distinguish him from other beings. 

PHM 3200 Social and Political Phi- 
losophy (3). The nature of society 
and the state, authority of society 
and the state over the individual, 
political obligation, legitimacy of 
government, and idea of social con- 
tract are considered. (F,SS) 

PHM 3400 Philosophy of Law (3). Af- 
ter an analysis of the nature of law 
and judicial reasoning in the light of 
fundamental alternative interpreta- 
tions, basic topics of legal philoso- 
phy will be considered, such as 
freedom and rights, responsibility 
and punishment, rule of law and 
civil disobedience, legality and jus- 
tice. (F) 

PHM 3500 Philosophy of History (3). 

After exploring the definitions, di- 
mensions and interrelations of phi- 
losophy and history, students will 
examine major philosophies of his- 
tory. The social responsibility of the 
historical narrative and the philo- 
sophical assumptions of historiogra- 
phies will be discussed. 

PHM 4020 Love and Sexuality (3). 

This course analyzes the nature and 
meaning of love and sexuality, and 
studies the basic problems in human 
sexual living, such as love and the 
man-woman relationship, the forma- 
tion of sexual union, and attitudes to- 
ward love and sexuality in 
contemporary society. 

PHM 4050 Philosophy of Death (3). 

This course analyzes the meaning of 
death and man's attitude towards 
death and the dying. It examines 
how philosophy can share in the 



new confrontation between man 
and his death, and shows the ways 
philosophical thinking contributes to 
the discovery of an authentic atti- 
tude towards the phenomenon of 
death as part of human living. 

PHM 4123 Philosophy and Feminism 
(3). A conceptual analysis of alterna- 
tive feminist views. Topics include 
the goals of the feminist movement, 
sexist theories on women's nature, 
sexual stereotypes and androgyny, 
the nature of oppression, sexism, ra- 
cism and homophobia. (F) 

PHM 4360 Topics in Political Philoso- 
phy (3). Examines a selected topic 
in political philosophy, such as: jus- 
tice, democracy, liberty, or an im- 
portant thinker. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: PHM 3200 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

PHM 4430 Topics in Philosophy of 
Law (3). Examines a focused topic in 
philosophy of law, such as: punish- 
ment, legislation of morality, the rule 
of law, or an important thinker. May 
be repeated. 

PHP 3840 Chinese and Japanese Phi- 
losophy (3). Metaphysical and ethi- 
cal theories of the three main 
philosophical systems of China, 
namely. Classical and neo-Confu- 
cianism, Taoism, and Chinese Bud- 
dhism are examined. For Japanese 
philosophy, Shintoism is included. 

PHP 4510 Marxism (3). This course ex- 
amines the philosophic insights of 
Marx and the main trends (anthro- 
pological, social, existential) in con- 
temporary Marxism. It includes an 
analysis of the Marxist interpretation 
of alienation, work, and human 
authenticity. (S) 

PHP 4782 Phenomenology (3). This 
course analyzes the method, the ba- 
sic philosophical insights and the ap- 
plications of 20th century pheno- 
menology. It includes the pheno- 
menological analysis of knowing as 
well as basic questions regarding 
the nature of reality together with 
the study of fundamental texts from 
Husserl. Heidegger, and Merleau- 
Ponty. 

PHP 4784 Analytic Philosophy (3). 

This course examines the 20th cen- 
tury Anglo-American tradition of ap- 
proaching philosophic problems by 
the methods of linguistic analysis. It 
will include study of techniques of lin- 
guistic analysis and an evaluation of 
their adequacy in dealing with 
meaning and truth, the mind-body 
problem, and free will. 



PHP 4786 Existentialism (3). This 

course examines the origin, basic 
philosophical insights, and influence 
of the mainstreams of modern exis- 
tentialism. It includes the study of 
fundamental texts of Kierkegaard, 
Nietzsche, Sartre, Jaspers, and Ca- 
mus. (S) 

PHP 4788 Contemporary French Phi- 
losophy (3). Main trends (hermeneu- 
tics, postmodernism, deconstruction) 
in twentieth century French philoso- 
phy, with emphasis on seminal think- 
ers, e.g., Levinas, Derrida, Ricoeur, 
Foucault, Irigaray. (S) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 145 



Physics 

Stephan L. Mintz, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Werner Boeglin, Assistant Professor 
Richard A. Bone, Professor 
Yesim Darici, Associate Professor 
Rudolf Fiebig, Professor 
Bernard Gerstman, Associate 

Professor 
Kenneth Hardy, Professor 
Laird H. Kramer, Assistant Professor 
Pete C. Markowits, Assistant Professor 
Oren Maxwell, Associate Professor 
Brian A. Rave, Assistant Professor 
John W. Sheldon, Professor 
Caroline E. Simpson, Assistant 

Professor 
Nongjian Tao, Assistant Professor 
Walter van Hamme, Associate 

Professor 
Xuewen Wang, Associate Professor 
James R. Webb, Associate Professor 
Yifu Zhu, Assistant Professor 

Bachelor of Science 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

This program prepares students for 
careers as professional physicists in 
industry, government, or graduate 
study in physics, engineering, or ma- 
terial science. It also prepares stu- 
dents for teaching careers. Students 
interested in teacher certification 
should contact the College of Edu- 
cation. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
MAC 2311 Calculus I 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 
MAC 2313 Calculus III 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

and Lab II 
To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 



Upper Division Program (60) 

PHY 3123 PHY 3124 Modern 

Physics 6 

PHY3123L PHY 31 24L Modern 

Physics Labs 2 

PHY 3503 Thermodynamics 3 
PHY 4221 PHY 4222 Mechanics 6 
PHY 4323 PHY 4324 

Electromagnetism 6 
PHY 4604 PHY 4605 Quantum 

Mechanics 6 

PHY 481 0L Senior Physics Lab 3 
PHY 4905 PHY 4906, PHY 4907 

Independent Study 3 
Approved electives in experimental 
or theoreticdl physics 6 

MAC 2313 Multivariable 

Calculus 3 

MAP 2302 Differential 

Equations 3 

Electives (Physics or Non-Physics) 13 

Minor in Physics 

This program is designed for the stu- 
dents who desire additional capa- 
bilities in physics beyond the basic 
sequence. This program is especially 
recommended for chemistry, mathe- 
matics, and engineering/technol- 
ogy majors. 
PHY 2048, PHY 2049 Physics 

with Calculus 10 

PHY 2048L, PHY 2049L Physics 

with Calculus Lab 2 
PHY 3123, PHY 3124 Modern 

Physics 6 

PHY3123L. PHY 31 24L Modern 

Physics Labs 2 

Additional approved courses 3 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate 
degree in physics may also take 
part in the Cooperative Education 
Program conducted in conjunction 
with Career Planning &. Placement. 
The student spends several semes- 
ters fully employed in an industrial or 
governmental physics laboratory. 
For further information consult the 
Department of Physics or Career 
Planning 8c Placement. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

AST-Astronomy; MET-Meteorology 
PHS-Physics/Specialized;PHY-Phys- 
ics; PHZ-Physics; PSC-Physical Sci- 
ences; ENU-Nuclear Engineering. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 



AST 2037 Intelligent Life in the Uni- 
verse (3). Examines the possibility of 
extraterrestrial life in terms of the 
probability of the existence of plan- 
ets in other solar systems, the condi- 
tions necessary for life, and means 
of communication. (F or S) 

AST 2100 Solar System Astronomy 
(3). General principles of Astronomy 
with emphasis on the structure and 
evolution of the Solar System, the 
laws of planetary motion, and the 
physical aspects of the sun, planets, 
and interplanetary debris. Prereq- 
uisites: College Algebra and Ge- 
ometry. (F,S,SS) 

AST 2100L Solar System Astronomy 
Laboratory (1). Laboratory section 
of AST 2100. Outdoor observing of 
the moon, planets and indoor exer- 
cises including celestial positions 
and time, the moon's orbit, plane- 
tary motions, comparative planetol- 
ogy. Corequisite: AST 2100. (Lab fees 
assessed) (F,S,SS) 

AST 2201 Stellar Astronomy (3). Gen- 
eral principles of Astronomy with em- 
phasis on the structure and 
evolution of stars, stellar systems, gal- 
axies and the universe. Topics in- 
clude stellar birth and death, 
neutron stars and black holes, galac- 
tic distances and the expansion of 
the universe. Prerequisites: College 
Algebra and Geometry. (F,S,SS) 

AST 220 1L Stellar Astronomy Labora- 
tory (1). Laboratory section of AST 
2201 . Outdoor observing of stars, 
constellations, binary and variable 
stars, star clusters, nebulae and in- 
door exercises including radiative 
properties of the stars, spectra, stel- 
lar and galactic distances, Hubble's 
Law. Corequisite: AST 2201 . (Lab 
fees assessed) (F.S.SS) 

AST 3213 Modern Astrophysics (3). 

An introduction to the structure of 
stars and galaxies and the evolution 
of the universe as a whole. Topics 
will include atomic spectra, stellar 
classifications, galactic structure, 
and cosmology. Prerequisites: PHY 
2048, 2049. (F or S) 

AST 5215 Stellar Astrophysics (3) Top- 
ics in Stellar Astrophysics, in greater 
detail and depth than similar topics 
in AST 3213. Emphasis on current stel- 
lar structure, evolution models and 
the underlying observational data. 
Prerequisites: PHY 3124, PHY 3503, 
PHY 4324, PHY 4222 or equivalent. (F 
orS) 

AST 5405 Extragalactic Astrophysics 
(3). Topics in extragalactic astro- 



146 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



physics, in greater detail and depth 
than similar topics in AST 3213. Em- 
phasis on galactic structure and 
evolution, quasars and cosmology. 
Prerequisites: PHY 3124, PHY 3503, 
PHY 4324, PHY 4222 or equivalent. (F 
orS) 

AST 5507 Celestial Mechanics (3). 

Principles of classical Newtonian me- 
chanics applied to the motions of 
planets, satellites, and interplane- 
tary space probes. Prerequisites: 
PHY 4222 or equivalent. (F or S) 

ENU 4101 Introduction to Nuclear Re- 
actors (3). An elementary course in 
nuclear fission reactor theory and 
power plant operation. An overview 
of the relevant nuclear processes 
and their application to reactor de- 
sign. Prerequisites: PHY 2048, 2049. 

MET 2010 Meteorology and Atmos- 
pheric Physics (3). Physics of the 
Earth's atmosphere and weather in- 
cluding energy and heat transfer, ra- 
diation, temperature and pressure 
changes and the development of 
storms, atmospheric optical effects, 
and weather forecasting. Prereq- 
uisite: High school algebra. (F,S) 

MET 2010L Meteorology and Atmos- 
pheric Physics Laboratory (1). Practi- 
cal weather analysis including 
fronts, local severe weather, hurri- 
canes, also elementary analyses 
and interpretation of weather maps, 
satellite imagery, radar data. Core- 
quisite: PHY 2010. (F.S) 

PHS 4303 Nuclear Physics (3). A 

treatment of the current state of the 
nuclear theory problem and a dis- 
cussion of modern experimental 
methods. Prerequisites: PHY 3123, 
3124. 

PHY 2023 Survey of General Physics 
(3). Units, quantities, Newton's laws, 
work, momentum, fluids, heat, gas 
laws, waves, charge and current, 
electric fields, circuits, light, atomic 
and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: 
Algebra, trigonometry (high school). 
(F.S.SS) 

PHY 2048, PHY 2049 Physics with Cal- 
culus (5,5). Basic physics with calcu- 
lus sequence. PHY 2048 will cover 
kinematics, Newton's Laws, conser- 
vation laws, gravitation, fluids, 
sound, and thermodynamics. Pre- 
requisite: MAP 231 1. Pre or Co-requi- 
site: MAC 2312. PHY 2049 will cover 
electricity and magnetism, field the- 
ory, geometrical and wave optics. 
(F.S.SS) 



PHY 2048L, PHY 2049L General Phys- 
ics Laboratory I, II (1,1). Laboratory 
sections of PHY 2048, 2049, PHY 2053, 
2054. Prerequisites or Corequisites: 
PHY 2048, PHY 2049, PHY 2053, PHY 
2054. (Lab fees assessed) (F.S.SS) 

PHY 2053, PHY 2054 Physics without 
Calculus (4,4). A general introduc- 
tory course using a non-calculus ap- 
proach. PHY 2053 covers kinematics, 
Newtonian mechanics, properties of 
fluids, thermodynamics, and wave 
motion. PHY 2054 covers electricity 
and magnetism, geometrical and 
wave optics and the structure of 
matter. Prerequisites: College alge- 
bra, trigonometry, and analytic ge- 
ometry. (F.S,SS) 

PHY 3123, PHY 3124 Modern Physics 
I and II (3,3). Recent developments 
in physics are discussed. Subject 
matter includes: review of classical 
physics, special relativity, four-vec- 
tors, wave-particle duality, the hy- 
drogen atom, many electron atoms, 
nuclear instrumentation, nuclear 
structure, nuclear reactions, elemen- 
tary particles, introduction to quan- 
tum mechanics, and solid state 
physics. Prerequisite: PHY 2049. (F) 
(Modern Physics I); (S) (Modern Phys- 
ics II) 

PHY 3123L, PHY 3124L Modern Phys- 
ics Laboratory I and II (1,1). Labora- 
tory courses to accompany Modern 
Physics I and II consisting of experi- 
ments in atomic and nuclear phys- 
ics. Pre- or corequisites: PHY 3123 
and PHY 3124. (F) (Modern Physics 
Lab I); (S) (Modern Physics Lab II) 

PHY 3424 Optics (3). General formu- 
lation of geometrical optics includ- 
ing matrix techniques, interference 
phenomena, and the theory of 
Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction 
are among the topics covered. Pre- 
requisites: PHY 2048, 2049. 

PHY 3503 Thermodynamics (3). Fun- 
damental principles of thermody- 
namics, the first, second, and third 
laws, free energy, entropy, the 
chemical potential, phase rule and 
its applications. Prerequisites: PHY 
2048,2049, CHM 1045, 1046. (F) 

PHY 3772 Electronics (3). Solid state 
theory and the theory of circuits, cir- 
cuit operation and design in lecture 
and laboratory sessions. Prereq- 
uisites: PHY 2048, 2049. 

PHY 3949, PHY 4949 Cooperative 
Education in Physics (1-3). One se- 
mester of full-time supervised work in 
an outside laboratory taking part in 
the University Co-Op Program. Lim- 



ited to students admitted to the Co- 
op Program. A written report and su- 
pervisor evaluation will be required 
of each student. (F,S,SS) 

PHY 4221, PHY 4222 Intermediate 
Classical Mechanics I & II (3,3). 

Laws of motion, statics of particles 
and rigid bodies, motion of particles 
in one, two, and three dimensions, 
systems of particles, rigid bodies in a 
plane, central forces. Accelerated 
reference systems, rigid body in 
three dimensions, generalized coor- 
dinates, Lagrangian and Hamil- 
tonian formulations of mechanics, 
vibrating systems, and normal coor- 
dinates. Prerequisites: MAC 2313, 
PHY 2048, 2049. (F) (Intermediate 
Classical Mechanics I); (S) (Interme- 
diate Classical Mechanics II) 

PHY 4323, PHY 4324 Intermediate 
Electromagnetism I and II (3,3). The 

theory of electromagnetic fields 
and waves is developed from basic 
principles. Vector calculus. Cou- 
lomb's law. Gauss's Law, electro- 
static potential, dielectrics, solutions 
to Laplace's and Poisson's equa- 
tions, magnetic induction, vector 
potential, magnetic materials. Max- 
well's equations, and propagation 
of waves in space and various me- 
dia are discussed. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, PHY 2048 and 2049.(F) (In- 
termediate Electromagnetism I); (S) 
(Intermediate Electromagnetism II) 

PHY 4513 Statistical Thermodynam- 
ics (3). Review of the fundamental 
laws of thermodynamics applied to 
simple systems. Elementary kinetic 
theory of gases applied to diffusion, 
viscosity, thermal and electrical con- 
ductivity. Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac 
and Bose-Einstein distribution func- 
tions applied in the Boltzmann limit 
to the calculation of thermody- 
namic variables. Prerequisites: MAC 
2313, PHY 2048, 2049. 

PHY 4604 Quantum Mechanics I (3). 

A comprehensive introduction to 
quantum mechanics. Wave me- 
chanics applied to standard one di- 
mensional problems and the 
hydrogen atom. Prerequisites: PHY 
3124 or permission of instructor and 
MAP 2302, MAC 2313, and PHY 2049. 
(F) 

PHY 4605 Quantum Mechanics II (3). 

General matrix formalism, angular 
momentum, symmetries, perturba- 
tion theory and variational methods, 
an introduction to relativistic theory 
and theory of fields. Prerequisite: 
PHY 4604. (S) 






Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences/ 147 



PHY 4752C Introduction to Scientific 
Instrumentation (3). The student 
learns to set up and operate such 
standard pieces of laboratory appa- 
ratus as bridges, amplifiers, oscillo- 
scopes, frequency counters, 
flowmeters, and thermocouple cir- 
cuits utilizing chart recorders. A 
background in general physics is re- 
quired. 

PHY 4810L Senior Physics Lab (3). Ad- 
vanced laboratory topics are 
treated. Modern physics laboratory 
equipment is used and the student 
is introduced to current laboratory 
practice. Prerequisites: PHY 2048 
and 2049. (S) 

PHY 4905, PHY 4906, PHY 4907 Inde- 
pendent Study (3). The student 
works under the supervision of a fac- 
ulty member on subject matter of 
mutual interest. Instructor's permis- 
sion is required. 

PHY 4936, PHY 4937, PHY 4938 Spe- 
cial Topics (VAR). A study of topics 
of special physics interest. 

PHY 51 15 Mathematical Physics I 
(3). Methods of solution for problems 
in mathematical physics: Variational 
principles, complex variables, partial 
differential equations, integral equa- 
tions, and transforms. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, MAP 2302. (F) 

PHY 51 16 Mathematical Physics II 
(3). Additional solution methods in 
mathematical physics: Perturbation 
methods, Laplace's and Poisson's 
Equations, waves, special functions, 
vector fields, vector waves. Prereq- 
uisite: PHY 5115. (S) 

PHY 5235 Nonlinear Dynamics and 
Chaos (3). Introduction to the univer- 
sal behavior of classical systems de- 
scribed by nonlinear equations. 
Prerequisites: PHY 4222, MAA 421 1. (F 
orS) 

PHY 5240 Advanced Classical Me- 
chanics (3). Advanced formulations 
of the equations of motion and their 
applications: the central field prob- 
lem, rigid body dynamics, oscilla- 
tions and continuous systems. 
Prerequisite: PHY 4222. (F) 

PHY 5346 Advanced Electromag- 
netic Theory I (3). Advanced treat- 
ment of classical electromagnetism: 
Electrostatics, Green's function, 
Laplace's equation, multipole ex- 
pansion, magnetostatics, Maxwell's 
equations, waves. Prerequisite: PHY 
4324. (F) 



PHY 5347 Advanced Electromag- 
netic Theory II (3). Additional topics 
in classical electomagnetism: Wave 
guides, radiating and diffracting sys- 
tems, Kirchoff 's integral for diffrac- 
tion, covariant formulation of field 
equations. Prerequisite: PHY 5346. (S) 

PHY 5446 Laser Physics (3). Principles 
of lasers and laser applications, in- 
cluding atom-field interactions, 
stimulated emission and dipole oscil- 
lators, optical resonators and elec- 
tromagnetic modes, semiclassical 
laser theory, and specific laser sys- 
tems. Prerequisite: PHY 4605. (F or S) 
PHY 5667 Nonperturbative Quantum 
Field Theory (3). Euclidean QFT, 
renormalization group, local gauge 
symetry, lattice regularization, Wil- 
son action, fermion fields, expansion 
schemes, numerical algorithms, 
hadron properties, recent develop- 
ments. Prerequisites: PHY 4605. 
PHY 5930 Seminar in Physics (1-3). A 
series of specialized lectures/semi- 
nars on selected topics in Physics/As- 
tro-Physics. Prerequisites: Permission 
of Department. 

PHY 5936 Special Topics Research 
(1-10). Participation in an original in- 
vestigation in theoretical or experi- 
mental physics/astro-physics under 
direct faculty supervision. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

PHY 5937, PHY 5938 Seminar in Spe- 
cial Topics (3). Seminar work under 
the supervision of a faculty member 
on subject material of mutual inter- 
est. 

PHY 5940 Physics Graduate Teach- 
ing Workshop (1). The teaching of 
physics laboratories. Includes prac- 
tice of lab experiments, use and ad- 
justment of lab equipment and 
explanation of departmental grad- 
ing policy. Supplemented by out- 
side lectures on university policies. (F) 

PHZ 4710 Introduction to Biophysics 
(3). Physical investigation of biologi- 
cal molecules with special refer- 
ence to structure and function of 
protein, biomembranes and visual 
receptors. Prerequisite: PHY 3124 or 
CHM3411. 

PHZ 5130 Theoretical Treatment of 
Experimental Data (3). Statistical 
analysis of physical processes and 
statistical tests, with particular em- 
phasis on instrumentation-related 
problems. Mathematical modeling 
and computer simulation. Prereq- 
uisite: Undergraduate statistics 
course, or equivalent, or permission 
of instructor. 



PHZ 5234 Atomic and Molecular Col- 
lision Phenomena (3). Investigation 
of atomic and molecular collision 
phenomena: Kinetic theory, elastic 
scattering, inelastic scattering, exci- 
tation and ionization, heavy particle 
collisions. Prerequisites: PHY 4605 
and PHY 4222. (F or S) 

PHZ 5304 Advanced Nuclear Physics 
(3). Fundamental properties of nu- 
clei, nuclear forces, nuclear models, 
radioactivity, weak processes and 
nuclear reactions. Prerequisite: PHY 
4604. Corequisite: PHY 4605. (F or S) 

PHZ 5405 Solid State Physics (3). Crys- 
talline form of solids, lattice dynam- 
ics, metals, insulators, semi-con- 
ductors, crystalline surfaces, and 
amorphous materials. Prerequisites: 
PHY 3124 or CHM 341 1 . (F or S) 

PHZ 5505 Low Energy Plasma Physics 
(3). The investigation of the kinetics 
of rarefied gases and thermal plas- 
mas: Phase space, random currents, 
orbit theory, plasma sheaths, radia- 
tion, the pinch effect. Prerequisites: 
PHY 3503, PHY 4324, and PHY 4222. 

PHZ 5506 Plasma Physics (3). An intro- 
duction to plasma fundamentals, 
the Boltzmann equation, the hydro- 
dynamic equations, orbit theory, the 
interaction of electromagnetic 
waves with plasmas, the pinch ef- 
fect and instabilities. Prerequisite: 
PHY 2049. 

PHZ 5606 Special Relativity (3). A de- 
tailed study of special relativity: 
Lorentz transformations, relativistic 
electrodynamics. Prerequisite: PHY 
3124. 



148 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Political Science 

John Stack, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Virginia Chanley, Assistant Professor 
Ronald Cox, Associate Professor 
Bruce Detwiler, Associate Professor 
Eduardo Gamarra, Associate 

Professor 
Joel Gottlieb, Associate Professor 
Ivelaw Griffith, Associate Professor 
Kevin Hill, Assistant Professor 
Heidi Hobbs, Assistant Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
Dario Moreno, Associate Professor 
Brian Nelson, Associate Professor 
Nicol Rae, Associate Professor 
William Reno, Assistant Professor 
Mark Rosenberg, Professor 
Cheryl Rubenberg, Associate 

Professor 
Rebecca Salokar, Associate 

Professor 
Judith H. Stiehm, Professor 
Mary Volcansek, Professor 
Christopher Warren, Associate 

Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in Politicai 

Science 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

The major in Political Science pro- 
vides students the opportunity to ac- 
quire a broad education that will 
equip them to adapt to a wide vari- 
ety of careers. The program for ma- 
jors is designed to encourage the 
analysis of theories, institutions, and 
processes of political systems in the 
context provided by the social sci- 
ences; to stimulate a grasp of the 
broad sweep of political science as 
a discipline; to develop a continu- 
ing and responsible interest in politi- 
cal activity and public affairs; to 
provide the opportunity to acquire 
a fundamental understanding of po- 
litical science as a basis for citizen- 
ship, a career in government, or 
professional study and service; and 
to stimulate the qualified student's 
interest in graduate study in political 
science. 

The curriculum is designed to ex- 
pose students to the various areas 
of Political Science and to allow for 
some specialization. Students are 
encouraged to create a blend of 
courses that fit their interests. You 
should work with the undergradu- 
ate advisor in selecting courses. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 



pleted 60 semester hours, and be 
otherwise acceptable into the pro- 
gram. 

If a student has completed a 
minimum of 24 semester hours of 
general education credits, it is still 
possible to be accepted into this 
program. However, the general 
education deficiencies must to be 
completed prior to graduation from 
the University. 

Curriculum for Political Science 
Majors 

Students should obtain and read 
"Political Science Advising Guide" 
from the department office. A mini- 
mum of 30 credit hours of upper divi- 
sion study (3000 and 4000 level) are 
required for a major in Political Sci- 
ence. In addition, POS 2042-Ameri- 
can Government, (or its equivalent), 
is required but does not count to- 
ward the 30 credit minimum. The 
American Government course at 
the community college meets this re- 
quirement. Students who have not 
met this requirement should take this 
course in their first semester at FIU. 
No specific upper division courses 
are required. Rather, courses in Politi- 
cal Science must be distributed so . 
that five courses meet the Breadth 
requirement, three courses meet the 
Depth requirement, and two remain- 
ing courses meet the Political Sci- 
ence Electives requirement. The 
student must earn a grade of "C or 
better in all Political Science courses 
credited toward the major. Students 
choosing to major in Political Sci- 
ence must officially declare their 
major by completing applicable 
forms. See the department secre- 
tary for assistance. 

Common Prerequisites 

Complete two of the following: 
POS 2042 American Government 
CPO 2002 Introduction to 

Comparative Politics 
INR 2002 Dynamics of World 

Politics 

Required for the degree: 
POS 2042 American Government' 
'Students who take POS 2042 as one 
of the common prerequisites will 
also fulfill this requirement. 

Requirements for a Major 
I. Breadth Requirement 

This is designed to acquaint all ma- 
jors with the five general fields of Po- 
litical Science. One three-semester 
hour course must be taken in each 
of the following fields, for a total of 
15 semester hours. 



American Politics (AP)-This 
Breadth area can be met only by 
one of the following courses: 
POS 3142 Urban Politics 3 

POS 3424 The Legislative 

Process 3 

POS 3443 Political Parties 3 

POS 3413 The Presidency 3 

Judicial Politics (JP)-This Breadth 
area can be met only by one of 
the following courses: 
POS 3283 The Judicial Process 3 
POS 3603 Constitutional Law: 

Powers 3 

POS 3604 Constitutional Law: 

Limits 3 

Comparative Politics (CP)-This 
Breadth area can be met only by 
one of the following courses: 
CPO 2002 Introduction to 

Comparative Politics 3 
CPO 3055 Authoritarian Politics 3 
CPO 3103 Politics of Western 

Europe 3 

CPO 3204 African Politics 3 

CPO 3304 Politics of Latin 

America 3 

CPO 3403 Government and 

Politics of the Middle 

East 3 

CPO 3643 Russian Politics 3 

International Politics (IP)-This 
Breadth area can be met only by 
one of the following courses: 
INR 2002 Dynamics of World 

Politics 3 

INR 3102 American Foreign 

Policy 3 

Political Theory and Methodology 
(PT)-This Breadth area can be met 
only by one of the following 
courses: 
POT 3013 Ancient and 

Medieval Political 

Theory 3 

POT 3054 Modern Political 

Theory I 3 

POT 3302 Political Ideologies 3 
POT 3064 Contemporary 

Political Theory 3 

POT 3204 American Political 

Thought 3 

II. Depth Requirement 

This is designed for student speciali- 
zation in one of these areas. Stu- 
dents must take three courses in any 
one of these areas of concentration. 
1. American/Judicial Politics 
(AP.JP) 

Courses chosen may be all AP or JP 
or a mix of both. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ol Arts and Sciences / 149 



2. Comparative/International 
Politics (CP.IP) 

Courses chosen may be all CP or IP 
or a mix of both. 

3. Political Theory And 
Methodology <PT) 

III. Political Science Electives 
Requirement 

Any two 3000, 4000, or 5000 level 
courses in political science. 

Minor in Political Science 

A Political Science minor consists of 
any five courses in Political Science 
with a 'C or better grade. POS 2042- 
American Government or its equiva- 
lent is a pre-requisite for a minor and 
does not count towards the five (5) 
courses. Neither independent study 
nor Internships will count toward the 
minor. Students should select spe- 
cific courses in consultation with 
their major advisor and a Political 
Science advisor. Students must ap- 
ply for a minor by completing a Re- 
quest for Minor Form and have it 
signed by their Major Advisor and Mi- 
nor Advisor. 

Pre-Law Students 

The Department of Political Science 
recognizes the interests and needs 
of the Political Science major who 
plans to attend law school. The ba- 
sic skills important to a pre-law stu- 
dent include: 

(1) how to think logically, 

(2) how to read intelligently, and 

(3) how to express oneself clearly. 

These skills are developed in a 
number of disciplines. Beyond these 
basic skills, the department encour- 
ages students to acquire a broad 
background In political science 
rather than to select only courses 
which deal with public law. Some 
pre-law students choose American 
or Judicial politics as their depth 
area, but the other two depth areas 
are equally useful for pre-law stu- 
dents. The department's pre-law ad- 
visors will counsel students on 
specific pre-law concerns. 

In selecting electives, students 
should remember that the LSAT and 
law school require the ability to read 
with comprehension of concepts 
and logic and to express oneself 
with clarity and precision. Whether 
or not a given student will benefit 
from a particular elective is a ques- 
tion best answered by the student in 
close consultation with an advisor. 
Courses in History, Philosophy, Eco- 
nomics, Sociology, Psychology, 
Math and English will probably all 



give the student practice in relevant 
skills. Breadth of preparation is impor- 
tant. Whether a particular course in 
logic, writing or another area is the 
best choice can only be answered 
on an individual basis. 

Public Affairs Internships 

The Department provides opportuni- 
ties for practical work-study experi- 
ences in governmental and 
nongovernmental agencies. Three 
categories of internships are avail- 
able to qualified students: 

1. Judicial Internships (Prereq- 
uisite: POS 3283-Judicial Process or 
equivalent) 

2. Legislative Internships (Prereq- 
uisite: POS 3424-Legislative Process 
or equivalent) 

3. Campaign Internships (In elec- 
tion year). 

Standards for enrollment as an in- 
tern student include: 

a. Enrollment is by permission of 
instructor only. A student wishing to 
enroll as a public affairs intern 
should consult with the appropriate 
faculty member early in the preced- 
ing semester and receive written 
permission to enroll. Ordinarily, spe- 
cific courses must be taken prior to, 
or concurrent with, the internship. 

b. A Political Science major may 
count a maximum of six credit hours 
in internships toward his/her major. 

c. All public affairs internships in 
political science will be on a 
Pass/Fail basis. For further informa- 
tion on internships, contact your po- 
litical science advisor. 

Upper Division Transfer Credit 

As a general rule, students will re- 
ceive transfer credits for junior and 
senior level courses in political sci- 
ence with a grade of 'C or higher. 
These courses may then be applied 
to the 30 credit hours requirement 
for majors in political science. 

Major Advising Program 

All new majors meet with the Depart- 
ment Undergraduate Advisor. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CPO-Comparative Politics; INR-lnter- 
national Relations; POS-Political Sci- 
ence; POT-Political Theory; 
PUP-Public Policy. 

CPO 2002 Introduction to Compara- 
tive Politics (CP) (3). Analysis of ma- 
jor theories of comparative politics 
Including development, state build- 



ing, institutions, patterns of political 
interaction and comparative elites. 
Focus on Latin America and the 
Third World. 

CPO 3055 Authoritarian Politics (CP) 
(3). The purpose of this course is to 
identify the conceptual and empiri- 
cal characteristics of authoritarian 
regimes. An ideal typical autho- 
ritarian regime will be established, 
followed by case study analyses of 
modern authoritarian systems, like 
those of Brazil, Mexico, and Portu- 
gal. The course is designed to ana- 
lyze the circumstances giving rise to 
non-totalitarian modern dictator- 
ships, their political dynamics, and 
their survival capability. 

CPO 3103 Politics of Western Europe 
(CP) (3). Studies of political systems 
of the major European countries on 
a comparative basis. Attention is fo- 
cused on such factors as political 
party systems, the cabinet form of 
government, and the politics of the 
Common Market. Considers the im- 
plications of the impact of mass soci- 
ety on these nations. Enables the 
students to better understand the 
nations which have supplied many 
of the theoretical foundations of 
modern politics. 

CPO 3204 African Politics (3). Com- 
pares the politics of Sub-Saharan Af- 
rica, and the Republic of South 
Africa and addresses questions of 
economic development, the colo- 
nial legacy, and the impact of tradi- 
tional social patterns. 

CPO 3304 Politics of Latin America 
(CP.PT) (3). This course analyzes the 
multiple structures, processes, and 
groups which are relevant to an un- 
derstanding of Latin American politi- 
cal economy. Of special interest are 
the political impacts of land and 
wealth inequality and economic de- 
pendency. The dynamics of Latin 
American politics are considered, 
with an emphasis on the role of the 
military and the church. Alternate 
strategies for modernizing the region 
are considered. 

CPO 3403 Politics of the Middle East 
(CP) (3). This course will focus on the 
social, cultural, and political aspects 
of the Middle East region. Through 
an understanding and an interweav- 
ing of these complex facets, a stu- 
dent should gain a foundation and 
background for comprehension of 
the contemporary conflict which 
pervades this mercurial region. 

CPO 3502 Politics of the Far East 
(CP) (3). An intensive examination of 



150 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



the major political institutions of 
China, Japan, and Korea. A critical 
analysis of changing aspects of tra- 
ditional relationships in Far Eastern 
political culture and major reform 
movements in contemporary Far 
Eastern politics. Allows the student 
to better understand nations whose 
political development will be an im- 
portant factor in global develop- 
ment. 

CPO 3541 Politics of China (CP) (3). 

This course introduces students to 
China's political history from 1840 
and analyzes politics in the People's 
Republic of China with special em- 
phasis on political and economic 
development, socio-economic and 
political conflict, ideology, and for- 
eign policy. 

CPO 3553 Government and Politics 
of Japan (3). Introduction to Japa- 
nese politics. Special attention is . 
given to the Japanese variant of de- 
mocracy, the capitalist state, and 
foreign policy. 

CPO 3643 Russian Politics (CP) (3). 

Examines the political structure and 
institutions of Russia. Attention is 
paid to the historical and cultural as- 
pects of the structure and use of 
power. 

CPO 4010 Theory in Comparative 
Politics (CP) (3). This course intro- 
duces students to research strate- 
gies, concepts, and theories of 
comparative politics. There will be a 
focus on the three predominant 
types of modern political systems 
(democracy, authoritarianism, and 
totalitarianism), followed by an ex- 
amination of the current theoretical 
approaches to studying cross-na- 
tional political behavior. 

CPO 4034 The Politics of Develop- 
ment and Underdevelopment 
(CP.IP) (3). This course is an analysis 
of the causes of development and 
underdevelopment in Third and 
Fourth World countries. It includes 
an analysis of major theoretical ap- 
proaches to understanding develop- 
ment problems, as well as an 
analysis of the roles of major na- 
tional and non-national actors. 

CPO 4053 Political Repression and 
Human Rights (CP) (3). Examination 
of domestic factors resulting in politi- 
cal repression and violations of hu- 
man rights. American, European, 
and South American examples will 
be used. 

CPO 4057 Political Violence and 
Revolution (CP, PT) (3). An examina- 



tion of major historical instances and 
modern expressions of political vio- 
lence; discussion of revolution from 
a comparative perspective. Atten- 
tion will focus on the social origin 
and political determinants of such 
events. 

CPO 4062 Comparative Judicial Poli- 
tics (JP.CP) (3). An examination of 
the various modes of dispute settle- 
ment and rule adjudication cross- 
culturally. Emphasis is on the 
similarities and differences of judicial 
behavior, judicial decision-making, 
judicial recruitment, and judicial 
powers in cross-national analysis. 

CPO 4072 Comparative Electoral Be- 
havior (CP) (3). Public opinion, vot- 
ing choice, and electoral patterns 
from a comparative and historical 
perspective. Attention will focus on 
West Europe and Latin America. Dif- 
ferences from North American 
trends and patterns will also be de- 
tailed. 

CPO 4165 Italian Politics (CP) (3). An 

examination of the political struc- 
ture and traditions of Italy since WW 
II. Particular attention is given to the 
internal development of democ- 
racy as a model for other nations. 
Emphasis on the politics of pluralism. 

CPO 4303 Politics of South America 
(CP) (3). A cross-national discussion 
of the political systems and cultures 
of the Latin American nations, with 
special emphasis on the larger coun- 
tries. Attention is given to the role of 
the military and to the problem of 
violence. Designed to give the stu- 
dent an overview of the political life 
of the nations with whom we share 
this hemisphere. 

CPO 4323 Politics of the Caribbean 
(CP) (3). Studies the political system 
of the major British, French, Dutch, 
and Spanish areas in the Caribbean 
basin. Attention is focused on such 
factors as political party democra- 
cies in a non-industrial setting. The 
paradoxes between modernity and 
tradition throughout the developing 
Caribbean, and the relationship be- 
tween politics, economics, and cul- 
ture are discussed. The student is 
helped to understand the dynamics 
of change in an important area of 
the world and to compare those dy- 
namics with change in his own coun- 
try. 

CPO 4333 Politics of Central Amer- 
ica (CP) (3). This course analyzes the 
historical and contemporary politi- 
cal dynamics of the five countries of 
Central America. Special attention 



is given to problems of develop- 
ment and modernization within the 
context of the region's economic 
dependence on the United States. 
Special attention is given to the 
problem of political restraints on the 
modernization process and to those 
regional arrangements which have 
been created to solve the area's 
problems. The student will develop a 
better understanding of a region 
which has close ties to the United 
States. 

CPO 4340 Politics of Mexico (CP) (3). 

This course analyzes the structure 
and process of the Mexican political 
system from four perspectives: 1) 
Mexico's revolutionary heritage; 2) 
its formal governmental structure; 3) 
formal political relations; and 4) the 
structure and process of Mexican 
political economy, 

CPO 4360 Cuban Politics (CP) (3). Ex- 
amines the course of twentieth cen- 
tury Cuban politics. The course is 
subdivided into five parts covering 
the three periods of relatively stable 
politics and the two major revolu- 
tions. 

CPO 4401 The Arab-Israeli Conflict 
(CPJP) (3). This course provides the 
student with an introduction to the 
political roots of the Middle East con- 
flict, and examines the dilemmas of 
finding a solution by focusing on the 
domestic and international con- 
straints imposed upon the major ac- 
tors. 

CPO 4404 Politics of North Africa (3). 

An examination of the politics of the 
Arab-Islamic countries of North Af- 
rica. Attention is given to pre-colo- 
nial politics and subsequent 
European penetration as bases for 
understanding contemporary poli- 
tics. 

CPO 4461 Politics of Eastern Europe 
(C,P) (3). An examination of the his- 
torical and contemporary political 
dynamics of the countries of Eastern 
Europe. Special attention is given to 
the process of "democratization" 
and the effort to move towards a lib- 
eral-democratic, capitalist order. 

CPO 4741 Comparative Political 
Economy (3). Examines the theoreti- 
cal approaches used to assess the 
relationship between political institu- 
tions and private economic interests 
in advanced, industrial countries 
and the less developed world. 

CPO 4930 Topics in Comparative 
Politics (CP) (3). An intensive exami- 
nation of a topic in comparative 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 151 



politics. Subject matter varies ac- 
cording to the instructor. Topic to be 
announced in advance. 

CPO 5036 Politics of Development 
(3). This course examines divergent 
explanations for development and 
underdevelopment. Of central im- 
portance are the concepts and 
theories which emphasize the politi- 
cal dimensions of development, in- 
cluding theory and concept, 
processes of development, and ac- 
tors in the development process. 

CPO 5045 Seminar in American Poli- 
tics (3). The advanced study of U.S. 
politics. Students read and discuss 
the major works and theories con- 
cerning American politics and gov- 
ernment. 

CPO 5091 Seminar in Comparative 
Politics (3). A foundation in the de- 
velopment of the field of compara- 
tive politics and in the major schools 
of thought that have molded the 
perspectives on comparative politi- 
cal analysis. 

CPO 5325 Politics of the Caribbean 
(3). Examines the structural and insti- 
tutional aspects of the politics of the 
Caribbean in both domestic and in- 
ternational contexts. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

CPO 5716 Foundations of Political 
Science (3). Prepares students for 
the advanced study of politics. 
Areas of study include history of Po- 
litical Science as a discipline, com- 
parison of classical and modern 
sciences of politics and realpolitik, 
epistemological foundations. 

CPO 5935 Topics in Comparative 
Politics (3). A rigorous examination 
of a topic in comparative politics. 
Subject matter varies according to 
instructor. Topic will be announced 
in advance. 

CPO 5936 Seminar in Comparative 
Political Parties (3). Students read 
and discuss major works on parties 
by conservative, liberal, and marxist 
authors. 

INR 2002 Dynamics of World Politics 
(IP) (3). An examination of the politi- 
cal forces which shape the actors, 
institutions, and processes of world 
politics. Special attention is given to 
the role of transnational forces. 

INR 3102 American Foreign Policy 
(IP, AP) (3). An examination of the le- 
gal, administrative, and political 
structure by which American foreign 
policies are formulated and imple- 



mented. Includes a discussion of the 
objectives and consequences of 
United States foreign policy in se- 
lected regional, social-economic, 
and ideological areas. Enables the 
student to understand the proce- 
dures by which foreign policy is 
made and implemented in the 
United States. 

INR 4084 Ethnicity in World Politics 
(IP) (3). This course examines the po- 
litical dimensions of ethnic conflict 
from a comparative perspective. It 
evaluates the dynamics of ethnic 
conflict in Western Europe, Africa, 
Latin America, and the United States, 
through a series of case studies. 

INR 4204 Comparative Foreign Pol- 
icy (CP.IP) (3). This course is an 
analysis of the development of the 
foreign policy-making process in the 
United States, Britain, France, West 
Germany, and Italy. Particular atten- 
tion is directed to the domestic and 
international factors which affect 
the making of foreign policy. 

INR 4244 Latin America in World Poli- 
tics (CP, IP) (3). This course will be 
primarily concerned with Latin Amer- 
ica's role in the world political sys- 
tem. Of special interest will be the 
impact of the North-South split on 
Latin America, and in particular 
Latin America's relationship to the 
United States. Key issues of interna- 
tional politics concerning Latin 
America, including the Panama Ca- 
nal, will be selected for study. 

INR 4350 International Environ- 
mental Politics (3). Addresses envi- 
ronmental politics from an inter- 
national perspective. Ecological 
problems and issues are becoming 
international, environmental prob- 
lems are crossing national borders, 
and public attitudes Prerequisites: In- 
troduction to International Relations 
and Introduction to Environmental 
Science (recommended). 

INR 4407 Political Foundations of In- 
ternational Law (IP.JP) (3). An exami- 
nation of the interaction between 
politics and International law, with 
particular emphasis on such interac- 
tion during the present century. The 
role of international institutions in the 
modifying of existing international 
law concepts and the developing 
of such concepts is also examined. 

INR 4501 Multinational Organizations 
(IP) (3). The course examines con- 
temporary international politics 
through an analysis of inter-govern- 
mental and non-governmental ac- 
tors. It emphasizes the prominent 



role played by increasing levels of 
transnational relations, interdepend- 
ence, and global dominance in 
world politics. 

INR 4521 Politics of Regional Integra- 
tion (3). Examines regional eco- 
nomic blocs - European Union, 
NAFTA and Pacific rim. Forces influ- 
encing regional integration and ef- 
fects on global trade are studied. 

INR 4702 Politics of World Economy 
(IP) (3). The politics of world econ- 
omy with emphasis on the role 
played by transnational politi- 
cal/economic institutions. 

INR 4926 Model United Nations (3). 

Students participate in a UN simula- 
tion. Attention is given to the work- 
ings of the UN, negotiating skills, and 
critical international issues. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

INR 4933 Topics in International Poli- 
tics (IP) (3). An intensive examina- 
tion of a topic in international 
politics. Subject matter varies ac- 
cording to the instructor. Topic to be 
announced in advance. 

INR 5007 Seminar in International 
Politics (3). An advanced graduate 
course designed to give students a 
specialized knowledge of the clas- 
sics in international politics. The 
course traces the development of in- 
ternational politics from Thucydides 
to the present. 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics of 
Development (3). This course exam- 
ines the conceptual and substan- 
tive dimensions of ethnicity in the 
context of world politics and politi- 
cal development. The course will 
highlight ethnicity and ethnic 
groups as critical factors in North- 
South politics. 

INR 5105 American Foreign Policy 
(3). Compares different perspec- 
tives in foreign policy analysis. Pro- 
vides a comprehensive under- 
standing of major issues in U.S. policy. 

INR 5414 Topics in International Law 
(3). An intensive examination of the 
political dimensions of international 
law in the context of rapidly chang- 
ing global political relations. 

INR 5934 Topics in International Poli- 
tics (3). A rigorous examination in in- 
ternational politics. Subject matter 
varies according to instructor. Topic 
to be announced. 

POS 2042 American Government 
(3). Power distribution and policy- 
making in U.S. Topics include politi- 



152 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



cal change; role of majorities; minori- 
ties; media, elections in U.S. politics; 
national institutions; and Florida 
state and local government. 

POS 3142 Urban Politics (AP) (3). An 

examination of the processes by 
which social conflicts in American ur- 
ban areas are represented and 
regulated. Emphasis is placed on 
how urban problems are identified; 
and the way proposed solutions are 
formulated, legitimatized, and ad- 
ministered by urban policy-making 
processes. Includes a discussion of 
urban political culture. Enables the 
student to understand major prob- 
lems confronting communities in ur- 
ban areas. 

POS 3283 The Judicial Process (JP) 
(3). An introduction to the study of 
public law. Examines the relation- 
ship between politics and judicial 
structure and process. Emphasizes 
the judicial system as a particular 
kind of policy-making system, and 
evaluates its strengths and weak- 
nesses from a policy-making per- 
spective. 

POS 3413 The Presidency (AP) (3). 

An examination of the various inter- 
pretations of the Presidency. Atten- 
tion is directed to the role of the 
President in a technocratic society. 
Enables the student to understand 
one of the most visible political insti- 
tutions. 

POS 3424 The Legislative Process 
(AP) (3). Examines the context and 
process of legislative decision-mak- 
ing, including the impact of elec- 
tions, groups, bureaucracies, and 
the norms of legislative behavior. 
Evaluates legislatures in light of vari- 
ous theories of representation and 
conflict-management. 

POS 3443 Political Parties (AP) (3). 

Studies the internal structure, politi- 
cal functions, and behavior of mod- 
ern political parties. Attention is 
given to the relationships between 
political parties and various eco- 
nomic, ethnic, and regional interest. 
Enables the student to understand 
the problems of expressing and 
structuring political demands to fa- 
cilitate or obstruct governmental de- 
cision making. 

POS 3603 Constitutional Law: Powers 
(JP) (3). An examination of the basic 
principles of American government, 
as defined through constitutional 
law. Focus will be on the nature of 
the union, federalism, national gov- 
ernment powers, separation of pow- 
ers, state government powers, and 



powers of the respective branches 
of government. 

POS 3604 Constitutional Law: Limita- 
tions (JP) (3). An examination of the 
limitations on government as de- 
fined by the Supreme Court through 
constitutional law. Focus will be on 
the limitations of government with re- 
spect to the rights of the individual, 
of groups, and of the states. Particu- 
lar attention will be paid to civil 
rights, civil liberties, the rights of the 
accused, political rights, and eco- 
nomic liberties. 

POS 3703 Methods of Political Analy- 
sis (PT) (3). An introduction to the 
principal concepts and techniques 
of data collection and organization 
in political science. Includes practi- 
cal exercise in data collection and 
organization. Highly recommended 
for those planning graduate study. 

POS 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Political Science (3). A student ma- 
joring in Political Science may spend 
several semesters fully employed in 
industry or government in a capac- 
ity relating to the major. 

POS 4034 Political Change and the 
1960's (AP) (3). A study of the theo- 
ries of political change in America 
and their application to the political 
movements of the 1960's. Emphasis 
on the civil rights movement, the 
New Left and the counterculture. 

POS 4071 Corporate Power and 
American Politics (AP) (3). An exami- 
nation of the formal and informal 
linkages between the private and 
public sectors and the sets of rela- 
tionships which govern each. Par- 
ticular attention is devoted to the 
exploration of the political role of 
business and the close but uneasy 
relationship between private enter- 
prise and democracy. 

POS 4074 Latino Politics (3). Presents 
an overview of the role of Hispanics 
in the U.S. Political System. It ex- 
plores the historical and socio-eco- 
nomic dimensions of Latino Politics. 

POS 4122 State Government and 
Politics (AP) (3). A study of the politi- 
cal processes, structure, and devel- 
opment of state systems. This course 
attempts to provide the student with 
an understanding of the basic struc- 
ture of state government and politi- 
cal processes. 

POS 4154 Topics in Urban Politics 
and Policy (AP) (3). An intensive ex- 
amination of a topic in urban poli- 
tics and policy. Subject matter 



varies according to instructor. Topic 
will be announced in advance. 

POS 4152 Conflict and Change in 
American Cities (AP) (3). A study of 
social conflict in American cities. Em- 
phasis is on how urban problems are 
identified and proposed solutions 
are formulated, legitimized and ad- 
ministered by policy-making proc- 
esses. 

POS 41 73 Politics in the American 
South (AP) (3). An examination of 
the politics of the American South 
with particular attention to the role 
of political parties, the Civil Rights 
movement, and the impact of Re- 
construction. 

POS 4205 American Political Culture 
(3). Examines American political cul- 
ture and the forces that share it. Spe- 
cific focus on competing theories, 
and the role of political socializa- 
tion, ideology, the economy, me- 
dia, and schooling. 

POS 4314 American Ethnic Politics 
(AP) (3). This course examines Ameri- 
can ethnic politics from conceptual 
and substantive perspectives. Spe- 
cial attention is devoted to the theo- 
retical dynamics of ethnicity as well 
as an intensive investigation of Irish, 
Italian, Jewish, and Black ethnic poli- 
tics. 

POS 4463 Interest Group Politics (AP) 
(3). An examination of the various 
types of voluntary associations 
which seek to influence the political 
process. Special attention is given to 
the role of private power in a plural- 
ist system. Enables the student to un- 
derstand the ambivalent American 
attitude towards pressure groups 
and lobbying activities in the legisla- 
tive and administrative arenas. 

POS 4605 Gender Justice (AP.JP) (3). 

The development of gender law in 
the U.S. and legal strategies by 
which courts both initiate and re- 
spond to demands for social 
change. Emphasis on various legal 
definitions of justice and equality. 

POS 4627 Equality and the Constitu- 
tion (JP) (3). An examination of the 
Supreme Court's interpretations of 
the Constitution in relation to social 
and political equality. Questions of 
equal justice pertaining to race, al- 
ienage, gender, sexual orientation, 
political representation, and eco- 
nomic status are explored. 

POS 4905 Independent Study (3). De- 
signed for advanced students who 
wish to pursue specialized topics in 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 153 



political science. Arrangements 
must be made with instructor during 
the prior semester. 

POS 4930 Topics in Public Law (JP) 
(3). An intensive examination of a 
topic dealing with public law. Sub- 
ject matter varies according to in- 
structor. Topic will be announced in 
advance. 

POS 4931 Topics in Politics (AP) (3). 

An intensive examination of a topic 
in politics. Subject matter varies ac- 
cording to instructor. Topic will be 
announced in advance. 

POS 4935 Honors Seminar (3). A rigor- 
ous examination of a political topic 
designed for advanced political sci- 
ence majors. Subject matter varies 
according to instructor. Topic to be 
announced in advance. 

POS 4941 Legislative Internship (AP) 
(VAR). An opportunity for the stu- 
dent to participate in a selected pol- 
icy area within one of the com- 
munities of South Florida. The nature 
of the work to be accomplished in 
connection with the internship will 
be worked out between the student 
and advisor. 

POS 4944 Judicial Internship (JP) 
(VAR). An opportunity for the stu- 
dent to participate in a selected pol- 
icy area within one of the com- 
munities of South Florida. The nature 
of the work to be accomplished in 
connection with the internship will 
be worked out between the student 
and advisor. 

POS 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Political Science (3). A student ma- 
joring in Political Science may spend 
one or two semesters fully employed 
in industry or government in a ca- 
pacity relating to the major. 

POS 5158 Topics in Politics (3). Sub- 
ject matter varies according to in- 
structor. 

POS 5208 Seminar in Political Behav- 
ior (3). Analyzes the literature in po- 
litical behavior. Special emphasis is 
on voting, socialization, attitudes, 
partisanship, campaigning, the me- 
dia, and political participation in the 
developed democracies. Prereq- 
uisite: Seminar in Political Science 
Methodology, 

POS 5447 Seminar in U.S. Political 
Parties (3). Students read and dis- 
cuss the major works and theories 
on U.S. Political Parties. 

POS 5638 Topics in Public Law (JP) 
(3). A rigorous examination of a 



topic in public law. Subject matter 
varies according to instructor. Topic 
will be announced in advance. 

POS 5702 Teaching Political Science 
(1). Introduces graduate students to 
the pedagogical and practical as- 
pects of teaching political science. 
Topics will include selecting books, 
writing a syllabus, lecturing, running 
discussion groups, and testing and 
grading. Covers professional ethics, 
and student rights and responsibili- 
ties. 

POS 5706 Methodology (3). This 
course is an introduction to the prin- 
cipal concepts and techniques of 
quantitative and non-quantitative 
methodology in the Social Sciences. 
It is designed to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the language and format 
of quantitative and non-quantita- 
tive applications in order to permit 
students to deal effectively with the 
literature of the their field. 

POS 5909 Independent Study (3). De- 
signed for advanced students who 
wish to pursue specialized topics in 
political science. Arrangements 
must be made with instructor during 
prior semester. 

POS 5932 Topics in Urban Politics (3). 

An extensive examination of the 
processes by which social conflicts 
in American urban areas are repre- 
sented and regulated. Emphasis is 
on the ways in which urban prob- 
lems are identified and proposed so- 
lutions formulated, legitimatized, 
and administered by urban policy- 
making processes, includes a discus- 
sion of urban political culture. 
Enables the student to understand 
the major problems confronting 
communities in urban areas. 

POT 2002 Introduction to Political 
Theory (3). Introduction to various 
ways of thinking about the political. 
Includes an examination of explana- 
tions offered for political phenom- 
ena and an analysis of political 
prescriptions. Special attention 
given to assumptions underlying po- 
litical beliefs. 

POT 3013 Ancient and Medieval Po- 
litical Theory (PT) (3). A study of the 
major political philosophers of the 
ancient and medieval periods. Pri- 
mary emphasis is given to the Greek 
experience. The nature of political 
theory as a tradition of discourse is 
examined. 

POT 3054 Modern Political Theory 
(PT) (3). An analysis of the thought 
of the great political thinkers since 



Machiavelli, culminating with the 
nineteenth century theorists. Basic 
themes and ideas common to all 
these political theorists will be dis- 
cussed in detail. The problem of 
'modernity' will receive special at- 
tention. 

POT 3064 Contemporary Political 
Theory (PT) (3). An overview of the 
major conceptual frameworks used 
by political theorists to describe, ex- 
plain, and evaluate political behav- 
ior and processes. Stress is placed 
on political theory, not only as a ba- 
sis for inquiry, but also as a base for 
political action. This course enables 
the student to develop analytical 
abilities with which to interpret the 
political events of his or her time. 

POT 3204 American Political Thought 
(PT) (3). An examination of Ameri- 
can political thought from its 17th 
century origins to the contemporary 
period. The continuities and disconti- 
nuities in the development of Ameri- 
can political ideas since colonial 
times will receive special attention. 

POT 3302 Political Ideologies (PT) 
(3). An analysis of modem political 
ideologies since the French Revolu- 
tion, including liberalism, conserva- 
tism, and socialism. Particular 
emphasis will be given to Marxism. 
The contemporary link between ide- 
ology and totalitarianism will be ex- 
amined. 

POT 3621 Theories of Justice (PT.JP) 
(3). An analysis of major theories of 
justice from Plato to the present. Em- 
phasis on the implications of theory 
for U.S. constitutional law, the role of 
judges, and the nature of the good 
society. 

POT 4309 Sex, Power and Politics 
(PT) (3). Theories are examined that 
explain differences between 
women's and men's power in the 
political arena. Their internal consis- 
tency and "fit" with reality are also 
explored. 

POT 4930 Topics in Political Theory 
(PT) (3). An intensive examination of 
a topic in political theory. Subject 
matter varies according to instruc- 
tor. Topic will be announced in ad- 
vance. 

POT 5007 Seminar in Political Theory 
(3). An examination of writings from 
a diverse list of some of the major 
political theorists in the western tradi- 
tion from antiquity to the present. 

POT 5307 Feminist Political Theory 
(3). Examines feminist political the- 



154 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ory in the second half of the twenti- 
eth century with the focus on the 
work of U.S. scholars. 

POT 5326 Seminar in Class Analysis 
(3). The theoretical and empirical is- 
sues associated with class divisions 
in contemporary societies. Theoreti- 
cal debates regarding definitional 
problems of class identity and em- 
pirical case studies highlighting class 
conflict and stratification. 

POT 5934 Topics in Political Theory 
(3). An intensive examination of se- 
lected topics dealing with political 
theory. Subjects will vary, depend- 
ing upon the desires of students and 
faculty. Allows the student to 
choose topics of particular interest 
to him or her. 

PUP 4004 Public Policy: U.S. (AP) (3). 

An intensive examination of the the- 
ory and practice of formulating, le- 
gitimatizing, administering, and 
evaluating public policy. Includes a 
discussion of the role of administra- 
tors, legislators, courts, interest 
groups and political parties in their 
processes. Gives the student an ana- 
lytical basis for understanding and 
participating in the making of public 
policy in a variety of policy areas. 
Prerequisite: Prior work in American 
institutions: The Congress, Presi- 
dency, or Judicial. 

PUP 4203 Environmental Politics 
(AP.JP) (3). Examines US Environ- 
mental Politics in terms of political in- 
stitutions. 

PUP 4323 Women in Politics (AP) (3). 

Examines the role of women in the 
political system as they act within, 
and are affected by, politics. Spe- 
cial attention to current and endur- 
ing political issues which particularly 
affect women. 

PUP 4931 Topics in Public Policy (AP) 
(3). An examination of a topic in 
public policy. Subject matter varies 
according to instructor. Topic to be 
announced in advance. 

PUP 5934 Topics in Public Policy (3). 

A rigorous examination of a topic in 
public policy. Subject matter varies 
according to instructor. Topic will be 
announced in advance. 

URP 4149 Planning and Human Ecol- 
ogy (AP) (3). Environmental plan- 
ning and design utilizing a human 
ecology perspective. Examines is- 
sues of open space planning, urban 
design, neighborhood planning, 
and citizen participation. 



Psychology 



Scott Fraser, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Lorraine Bahrick, Associate Professor 
Milton Blum, Professor Emeritus 
Margaret Bull-Kovera, Assistant 

Professor 
Brian Cutler, Associate Professor 
Marvin Dunn, Associate Professor 
Joan Erber, Professor 
Luis Escovar, Associate Professor 
Gordon Finley, Professor 
Ronald Fisher, Professor 
Arthur Flexser, Associate Professor 
Leslie Frazier, Assistant Professor 
Jacob Gewirtz, Professor 
Fernando Gonzalez-Reigosa, 

Associate Professor 
Lowell Krokoff, Associate Professor 
William Kurtines, Professor 
Mary Levitt, Associate Professor 
Michael Markham, Assistant 

Professor 
Michelle Marks, Assistant Professor 
Gary Moran, Professor 
Janat Parker, Professor 
James Rotton, Associate Professor 
Juan Sanchez, Associate Professor 
Bennett Schwartz, Assistant Professor 
Wendy Silverman, Professor 
Jonathan Tubman, Assistant Professor 
Chockalingam Viswesvaran, 

Assistant Professor 

Bachelor of Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Common Prerequisites 

BSC 2023 Human Biology 
PSY 2020 Introduction to 

Psychology 
DEP 2000 Human Growth and 

Development 



DEP 2001 



Psychology of Infancy 
and Childhood 



INP 2002 Introductory 

Industrial/Organization 

al Psychology 

or 
SOP 2772 Psychology of Sexual 

Behavior 
STA 2122 Introduction to Statistics I 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, Fill undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 



Upper Division Program 

The Psychology major requires 36 
hours of upper division psychology 
coursework, including STA 31 1 1. All 
courses must be taken for a letter 
grade. A 'C or better is required for 
all courses that count toward the 
major. 

The program has the following 
three major psychology compo- 
nents and a fourth, general, com- 
ponent for graduation: 

I. Specific Required Courses in the 
Following Sequence: (12) 

A. Statistics (offered by the De- 
partment of Statistics): 
STA 31 11 Statistics I 4 

Note: COP 2210 is recommended 
for students planning to enter gradu- 
ate school. 

B: PSY 3213 Research Methods in 
Psychology (Prerequisites: STA 3111) 3 

C. Advanced laboratory or field 
experience (Prerequisites: STA 3111 
and PSY 3213) 5 

Note: Because the three courses 
in this component of the program 
must be taken in sequence, the first 
course (STA 3111) should be taken 
no later than the first semester of 
the junior year. 

II. Distribution Requirement 
Courses: (15 semester hours) 

To fulfill this required component, 

each student must take one course 

or a laboratory /field experience 

from each of the five areas (A-E) 

listed below. 

Lecture Laboratory/Field 

Courses Experiences 

Area A: Experimental 

EXP 3523 EAB 3002 EXP 4404C 

EXP 4204 PSB 4003 EXP 4005 

EXP 4605 EXP 4214 

EAB 4034 

Area B: Social 

SOP 3004 SOP 4645 SOP 42 1 5 

SOP 4522 SOP 4714 

SOP 4525 SOP 4649 

SOP 4842 

Area C: Applied 

CYP3003 INP 4203 CYP4953 

SOP 4712 PPE4604 

Area D: Personality/ Abnormal 

CLP 3003 CLP 4374 PPE 4325C 

CLP 4 1 44 DEP 42 1 3 EXP 3304 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 155 



PPE 3003 



EAB 3765 



Area E: Developmental 

DEP 3402 DEP 3 1 1 5 PSY 4932L 
DEP4164 DEP 3303 DEP 4464 

DEP 4014 

III. Required Psychology Course 
Electives: (9) 

Any psychology course taken for a 
letter grade can be used to fulfill the 
requirement for electives. 

Note: In some cases a student may 
fulfill a distribution area requirement 
with a laboratory course and may 
not therefore take a lecture course 
in that area. In such a case, the stu- 
dent must take four (12 hours) elec- 
tive courses so that the total number 
of upper division hours for the psy- 
chology major reaches the required 
number of 35 credit hours. 

IV. Electives to Complete the 
requirement of 60 credit hours: (24) 
A student may, but is not required 
to, take additional upper division 
psychology courses beyond the re- 
quired 36 hours towards the fulfill- 
ment of the 60 upper division credit 
hours needed for graduation. Stu- 
dents may, with the permission of 
the instructor, take PSY 4900 and PSY 
491 6, which are given Pass/Fail 
grades. These courses can therefore 
not count in the category of Re- 
quired Psychology Electives, but 
they can be used as additional 
credit towards graduation. There is 

a College requirement that at least 
nine hours of elective credit (not in- 
cluding STA 3111) must be outside of 
Psychology. 

Remarks: (1) The student is strongly 
urged to contact the Psychology 
Department for advisement in cur- 
riculum planning; (2) Limited funds 
are available through the to stu- 
dents with demonstrated scholastic 
ability and financial need; (3) Psy- 
chology majors are allowed to trans- 
fer a maximum of ten upper division 
semester credit hours toward the 
psychology degree. 

Bachelor's Degree with Honors 

Application must be made and de- 
partmental approval granted, to un- 
dertake an independent project 
which must be approved by and 
carried out under the supervision of 
a member of the Department. Upon 
completion of the study, a satisfac- 
tory oral defense of the work must 
be presented to a Department com- 
mittee. 



Note: The Bachelor's degree offered 
in this program is a liberal arts de- 
gree and not a professional degree. 
While it is possible to concentrate 
courses in one's area of interest, it is 
not possible at the present time to 
obtain a 'professional specialization' 
at the undergraduate level in psy- 
chology. 

Minor in Psychology 

A Minor in Psychology requires 15 up- 
per division semester hours of ap- 
proved psychology credits. Students 
seeking the minor must meet with a 
psychology faculty member for ad- 
visement and should file with the Psy- 
chology Department a written 
notice of intention to minor in psy- 
chology. A grade of 'C or higher is 
required in all courses counted to- 
ward the minor. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CLP-Clinical Psychology; CYP-Com- 
munity Psychology; DEP-Develop- 
mental Psychology; EAB- Experi- 
mental Analysis of Behavior; EDP- 
Educational Psychology; EXP-Experi- 
mental Psychology; INP-lndustrial 
and Applied Psychology; UN- 
Linguistics; PCO-Psychology for 
Counseling; PPE-Psychology of Per- 
sonality; PSB-Psychobiology; PSY- 
Psychology; SOC-Sociology; 
SOP-Social Psychology; SPA- 
Speech Pathology and Audiology. 

CLP 3003 Personal Adjustment (3). 

Study of personal adjusthnent in the 
social and occupational life of the 
individual. Emphasis on interper- 
sonal aspects of effective behavior. 

CLP 4144 Abnormal Psychology (3). 

Various forms of behavior pathology 
are examined in the light of tradi- 
tional and current concepts of men- 
tal health and illness. Problems of 
diagnosis and treatment are dis- 
cussed. The role of social mores is ex- 
amined. 

CLP 4374 Psychotherapy (3). Current 
approaches to the treatment and 
improvement of psychological disor- 
ders are critically surveyed. Empha- 
sis is placed on the examination of 
the various techniques of psycho- 
therapy and behavior therapy. 
Broader strategies of prevention 
and mental health promotion, like 
consultation, counseling, and pro- 
grammed agency services, are also 
studied. 

CLP 4444 Personality Disorders (3). 

Studies personality disorders accord- 



ing to current concepts of mental 
health and illness. Emphasis given to 
current theoretical and diagnostic 
categories. Prerequisite: CLP 4144. 

CLP 5166 Advanced Abnormal Psy- 
chology (3). Advanced study of the 
causes, psychopathology manifesta- 
tions, and social and personal con- 
sequences of behavior disturbance. 
Emphasis is placed on the critical ex- 
amination of current research on 
the biological, psychological, and 
social aspects of these disorders. 
Clinical approaches to diagnosis, 
course, and prognosis in the con- 
temporary mental health context (in- 
cluding 'practicum' assignments if 
feasible) are covered. 

CLP 5169 Proseminar in Develop- 
mental Psychopathology (3). A com- 
prehensive review of topics in 
developmental psychopathology in- 
cluding history, scope, methods, indi- 
vidual and contextual influences, 
developmental course, long-term 
outcomes, and resilience. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

CLP 5175 Personality Dynamics (3). 

A review of different approaches to 
the study of personality. Prereq- 
uisites: Successful completion of a 
course in theories of personality, or 
equivalent. Permission of instructor. 

CLP 5185 Current Issues in Mental 
Health'. (3). A critical, intensive exami- 
nation of selected, important issues 
in mental health. Emphasis is given 
to the empirical study of contempo- 
rary problems related to the making 
of mental patients; planning, pro- 
gramming, and administering men- 
tal health services; political, ethical, 
and legal constraints on the opera- 
tion of mental health facilities; inter- 
disciplinary cooperation among 
helping and human service profes- 
sionals; and evaluation of preven- 
tive care and treatment services. 
Prerequisite: Abnormal Psychology 
or permission of the instructor. 

CYP 3003 Introduction to Commu- 
nity Psychology (3). An introduction 
to the issues and scope of Commu- 
nity Psychology. Students will be ex- 
posed to the development of 
Community Psychology as a grow- 
ing discipline. Particular emphasis 
will be placed on the role of the 
community psychologist as an 
agent of social change. 

CYP 4953 Community Psychology 
Field Experiences I (5). Students will 
be organized into task-oriented 
teams or will work independently in 



156 / College of Arts ond Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



the community, for the purpose of 
becoming familiar with various com- 
munity institutions and developing 
an action plan for assisting institu- 
tions in implementing change. Pre- 
requisite: PSY 3213 orSTA 3123.(Lab 
fees assessed) 

CYP 5534 Groups as Agents of 
Change (3). Theory and practice in 
utilizing groups as agents of change 
or development in communities and 
organizations. Didactic presentation 
and structured exercises focus on 
relevant issues. Students design and 
implement problem-focused inter- 
ventions, using class as client system. 

CYP 5954 Community Psychology 
Field Experiences I! (5). Same orien- 
tation and description as Field Expe- 
rience I. Students in this course will 
be able to pursue their work with 
community institutions in more 
depth. Prerequisite: Students en- 
rolled in this course must have com- 
pleted Community Psychology Field 
Experiences I. 

DEP 2000 Human Growth and Devel- 
opment: Introductory Developmen- 
tal Psychology (3). An introductory 
study of the development of person- 
ality, intelligence, and motivation, 
from childhood to adulthood. Em- 
phasis is on development of cogni- 
tive systems through social learning. 
The full life span of human growth 
and development will be consid- 
ered. Prerequisites: PSY 2020 or 
equivalent. 

DEP 2001 Psychology of Infancy and 
Childhood (3). An introduction to hu- 
man development focusing on in- 
fancy and childhood. Particular 
attention will be devoted to intellec- 
tual, personality, and social develop- 
ment. Consideration will be given to 
both theoretical and empirical per- 
spectives. 

DEP 3115 Development in Infancy: 
The Basis of Human Knowledge (3). 

Provides a comprehensive review of 
current methods, theories, and find- 
ings in cognitive and perceptual de- 
velopment in the first year of life. 
Special emphasis on the bases of 
knowledge; object and event per- 
ception, memory, and imitation. Pre- 
requisites: PSY 2020 and one 
developmental course, any level 
recommended. 

DEP 3303 Psychology of Adoles- 
cence (3). An examination of psy- 
chological, sociological and 
biological factors contributing to 
the changes from childhood to ado- 
lescence, and biological factors 



contributing to the changes from 
childhood to adolescence, and 
from adolescence to young adult- 
hood. 

DEP 3402 Psychology of Adulthood 
(3). The transition from youth to mid- 
dle age is studied. Focus is on 
changing roles in family, work, and 
societal settings, as these factors in- 
fluence personality and other as- 
pects of psychological function. 

DEP 4014 Psychology of Parenting & 
Parenthood (3). An intensive exami- 
nation of the reciprocal influences 
of parents on the development of 
their children and of children on the 
adult development of their mothers 
and fathers. 

DEP 4032 Life-Span Cognitive Devel- 
opment (3). Course covers all facets 
of cognitive growth, change, and 
decline from infancy through adult- 
hood, and old age. Prerequisite: 
DEP 2000, DEP 2001 , DEP 4164, or 
DEP 4464. 

DEP 4044 Psychology of Moral Devel- 
opment (3). A review of psychologi- 
cal theories and research concern- 
ing the development of moral atti- 
tudes and behavior. 

DEP 4164 Children's Learning (3). 

Learning in infancy and childhood, 
with particular emphasis on simple 
conditioning, discrimination shifts, 
mediation, transposition, observa- 
tional, and concept learning. Pre- 
requisite: Students enrolling in this 
course should have completed suc- 
cessfully at least one prior course in 
developmental psychology. 

DEP 4182 Socio-emotional Develop- 
ment (3). A survey of facts and theo- 
ries of human social- emotional 
development and social learning in 
the early years of life. Prerequisite: 
DEP 2000 or DEP 2001. 

DEP 4213 Childhood Psychopathol- 
ogy (3). Various forms of abnormal 
behavior in infancy, childhood, and 
adolescence are examined within 
the context of traditional and con- 
temporary psychological theory. 
Problems of differential diagnosis 
and forms of remediation are dis- 
cussed. 

DEP 4324 Psychology of Identity De- 
velopment (3). An introduction to 
psychological theory, research, and 
application in the area of identity 
development. 

DEP 4464 Psychology of Aging (3). 

An examination of the factors that 



contribute to the psychological pro- 
file characterizing old age. Biologi- 
cal and sociological components 
are considered, and their impact on 
perceptual, cognitive, and personal- 
ity processes is analyzed. 

DEP 4704 Developmental Psychol- 
ogy: Lecture (2) 

DEP 4704L Developmental Psychol- 
ogy Laboratory (3). Lecture/Labora- 
tory observation exercises illustrative 
of the concepts and research tech- 
niques used in developmental psy- 
chology. Particular emphasis is 
given to cognitive and social-cogni- 
tive development. This course is for 
seniors who have completed PSY 
3213, one developmental psychol- 
ogy course, and STA 3111. (Lab fees 
assessed) 

DEP 5044 Psychology of Moral Devel- 
opment (3). Introduction to the lit- 
erature on moral development. 
Review and discussion of recent de- 
velopments in this area. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

DEP 5056 Issues in Life-Span Devel- 
opmental Psychology: Infancy 
through Old Age (3). A survey in 
depth of theories, issues, methods, 
and data in life-span developmen- 
tal psychology through the entire 
age range. Prerequisites: DEP 2001 
or DEP 4464, or their equivalents, are 
recommended. 

DEP 5058 Biological Basis of Behav- 
ior Development (3). Introduction to 
theory and research underlying be- 
havioral development. Covers such 
pre-and post-natal determinants as 
evolution, genetics, neuroendo- 
crines, as well as social develop- 
ment, behavioral ecology, and 
sociobiology. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: Proseminar courses. 

DEP 5068 Applied Life Span Develop- 
mental Psychology (3). This course is 
designed to acquaint the student 
with various applications in life-span 
developmental psychology. An 
overview of general issues and ar- 
eas of application is offered, and 
specific applications are consid- 
ered. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of instructor. 

DEP 5099 Proseminar in Infancy, 
Childhood, and adolescence (3). 

Provides a comprehensive review of 
issues in perceptual, cognitive, so- 
cial, emotional, and personality de- 
velopment from infancy through 
adolescence. Prerequisite: Gradu- 



U ndergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 157 



ate standing or permission of instruc- 
tor. Corequisite: Pro-seminars. 

DEP 5118 Current Issues in Cognitive 
and Perceptual Development in In- 
fancy (3). Provides an in-depth 
analysis of current issues, methods, 
research and theory of cognitive 
and perceptual development dur- 
ing the first year of life. Special em- 
phasis on object and event 
perception, memory, and imitation. 
Prerequisites: Two courses in devel- 
opmental psychology - any level 
recommended. 

DEP 5185 Emotional Learning & Its 
Reversal (3). Theoretical analyses 
and methodological issues in the 
study of emotional learning. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

DEP 5315 Proseminar in Parent-Child 
Relations (3). Provides an overview 
of key issues in parent-child relations 
including culture, socialization/ge- 
netics, fatherhood, timing, adop- 
tion, work, effects of children on 
parents, and parent training. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

DEP 5344 Psychology of Moral Devel- 
opment (1). A graduate survey of 
psychological theory, research, and 
application in the area of moral de- 
velopment. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

DEP 5405 Proseminar in Psychology 
of Adulthood and Aging (3). A com- 
prehensive review of topics in adult- 
hood and aging including: bio- 
logical changes, social processes, 
work, family, cognition, memory, per- 
sonality, and psychopathology. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

DEP 5608 Theoretical Perspectives in 
Developmental Psychology (3). The 

focus of this course is on the mojor 
paradigms, models, and theories 
that have been influential in devel- 
opmental psychology, both histori- 
cally and contemporaneously. 
Meta-theoretical issues, paradig- 
matic influences, and specific theo- 
ries are considered. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

DEP 5725 Research Seminar in Psy- 
chosocial Development (1). This 
course is designed to develop re- 
search skills and competencies in 
the area of psychosocial develop- 
ment. The emphasis of the course is 
on involvement in original research. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



Corequisite: Senior undergraduate 
or graduate standing. 

DEP 5796 Methods of Developmen- 
tal Research (3). Survey of issues 
and methods at all stages of life- 
span developmental research in- 
cluding theory, methods, design, 
and data reduction. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. Corequisite: proseminars. 

EAB 3002 Introduction to the Experi- 
mental Analysis of Behavior (3). An 

introduction to and survey of the 
principles, methods, theories, and 
applications of the experimental 
analysis of behavior. PSY 2020 or PSY 
2012. 

EAB 3765 The Application of Behav- 
ior Analysis to Child Behavior Prob- 
lems (3). The applications of the 
theories and methods of behavior 
analysis to various childhood behav- 
ior disorders including anxiety and 
phobia, attention deficit disorders, 
autism and obesity. Prerequisite: EAB 
3002. 

EAB 4034 Advanced Behavior Analy- 
sis (2). 

EAB 4034L Advanced Behavior 
Analysis Lab (3). Strategies and tac- 
tics in the scientific approach to be- 
havioral research, both basic and 
applied. Both lecture and labora- 
tory sessions are involved. Prereq- 
uisite: EAB 3002 or equivalent. 
Corequisite: EAB 4034L. 

EAB 4794 Principles and Theories of 
Behavior Modification (3). Studies dif- 
ferent approaches to the modifica- 
tion of problem behavior, through 
the application of learning princi- 
ples and theories. Prerequisite: EAB 
3002. 

EAB 5098 Proseminar in the Experi- 
mental Analysis of Behavior (3). An 

advanced survey of the principles 
of respondent and operant condi- 
tioning and the bases of action in 
both social and non-social settings. 
Prerequisites: EAB 3002, EAB, 4034, or 
equivalents. 

EAB 5655 Advanced Methods of Be- 
havior Change (3). An intensive 
study of selected methods of modi- 
fying human behavior, emphasizing 
the applications of the principles of 
respondent and operant condition- 
ing, as well as those derived from 
modern social learning theories. 
Practice and role playing opportuni- 
ties are provided in behavior ther- 
apy, relaxation therapy, behavior 
modification, biofeedback or similar 
behavioral approaches. Prereq- 



uisites: EAB 4794, CLP 4374, CYP 
4144; enrollment in an authorized 
program; equivalent background; 
or permission of instructor. 

EAB 5797 Single-Case Research 
Methods (3). Intensive study of de- 
signs, strategies, and methods of sin- 
gle-case behavioral research. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 

EXP 3304 Motivation and Emotion 
(3). Introduces several perspectives 
from learning theory, perception, 
and personality theory to explore 
ways in which people move through 
their physical and social environ- 
ment. 

EXP 3523 Memory and Memory Im- 
provement (3). This introduction to 
human memory considers the topics 
from a number of points of view. The 
following issues are addressed: the 
nature of memory and its phenom- 
ena; the capabilities and limitations 
of an ordinary and an extraordinary 
memory; and the skills that can aid 
an ordinary memory. 

EXP 4005 Advanced Experimental 
Psychology (2) 

EXP 4005L Advanced Experimental 
Psychology Lab (3). Lecture and 
laboratory course investigating ex- 
perimental research in the funda- 
mental processes of human 
behavior. Includes perceptual, cog- 
nitive, and linguistic processes. Pre- 
requisites: PSY 3213 and STA 
3111 .(Lab fees assessed) 

EXP 4204 Sensation and Perception 
(3). Basic concepts in sensation and 
perception are explored, with an 
emphasis on models of peripheral 
and central neural processing. Top- 
ics such as receptor function, bright- 
ness and color vision, movement 
and object perception, perceptual 
memory and pattern recognition 
are considered. Psychophysical 
techniques, such as subjective mag- 
nitude estimation and signal detec- 
tion theory, are covered. (Lab fees 
assessed) 

EXP 4214C Human Perception: Lec- 
ture (2) and Laboratory (3). Lectures 
concern the methods researchers 
use to learn about the phenomena 
of sensation and perception. Labora- 
tory exercises allow students to apply 
these methods and to experience 
the perceptual phenomena under in- 
vestigation. Prerequisites: PSY 3213 
and STA 31 11. 

EXP 4404C Human Learning and Re- 
membering: Lecture (2) and Labora- 



158 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



tory (3) (5). Lectures on the research 
and theoretical contributions to the 
understanding of human learning 
and remembering; and laboratory 
exercises illustrative of the concepts 
and techniques used in conducting 
experimental studies of human learn- 
ing and remembering. Prerequisites: 
PSY 3213 and STA 31 1 1. (Lab fees as- 
sessed) 

EXP 4605 Cognitive Processes (3). In- 
vestigation of the mental processing 
underlying experiences and behav- 
ior. Topics include: games, puzzles, 
and problems; intuitive and creative 
thought; conceptualization, reason- 
ing and clinical diagnosis; choices 
and decisions; conceptions of time 
and space; and thought in abnor- 
mal or altered states of conscious- 
ness. 

EXP 4934 Current Experimental Theo- 
ries (3). The stress in this course is on 
current specific theories determining 
the nature and direction of the re- 
search and interest in several impor- 
tant areas, such as psychophysics, 
learning and remembering, devel- 
opmental patterns and motivation, 
personality, etc. Topics to be cov- 
ered will be announced at the be- 
ginning of the academic year. May 
be taken twice for credit toward the 
major. 

EXP 5099 Proseminar in Experimen- 
tal Psychology (3). Provides a com- 
prehensive review of current 
research and theory in areas such 
as learning, memory, cognition, sen- 
sation, and perception. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

EXP 5406 Theories of Learning (3). 

The major theoretical systems of 
learning are covered, with the in- 
tent of determining how well each 
accounts for the phenomena of 
learning. Emphasis is placed on ex- 
ploring the controversial issues 
raised by extant theories, and the 
experimental resolution of these 
theoretical controversies. The im- 
pact of theory on current thinking 
about learning is considered. 

EXP 5508 Applied Cognitive Psychol- 
ogy (3). Covers the basic theories of 
cognitive psychology perception, 
attention, memory, learning, knowl- 
edge, with emphasis on application 
to real-world problems. Prerequisite: 
Graduate Standing. 

EXP 5524 Cognitive Neuroscience 
(3). Investigation of the relation be- 
tween mind and brain. Discuss litera- 
ture from both patient studies and 



from the growing research in neuroi- 
maging. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

EXP 5527 Memory and Conscious- 
ness (3). The relation of memory and 
consciousness is explored with em- 
phasis on issues of current research 
and theoretical work from both a 
cognitive and a neuropsychological 
perspective. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

INP 2002 Introductory Industrial/Or- 
ganizational Psychology (3). Intro- 
duction to the study of behavior in 
the work environment. Illustrative 
topics included formal and informal 
organization, work motivation, satis- 
faction and performance, leader- 
ship, job analysis, selection and 
performance evaluation, training, 
and development. 

INP 4055C Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology Lecture (2) 
INP 4055L Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology Laboratory (3). Students 
gain experience with the use of psy- 
chometric instruments in the areas 
of job analysis, personnel selection, 
performance appraisal, job satisfac- 
tion, criteria analysis, and manage- 
ment training and development. 
Prerequisites: PSY 3213; STA 31 1 1; 
and INP 2002 or INP 4203, or Person- 
nel Management. (Lab fees as- 
sessed) 

INP 4203 Personnel Psychology (3). 

Techniques and procedures applica- 
ble to the selection, placement, utili- 
zation, and evaluation of personnel 
in organizations are considered. The 
emphasis will be on empirical proce- 
dures, rather than the management 
function in the personnel area. Top- 
ics such as quantitative methods 
and models for selection, criteria 
analysis, performance appraisal, 
management training, and job satis- 
faction are discussed. Prior course in 
statistics strongly recommended. 

INP 5095 Proseminar in Industrial Psy- 
chology (3). Provides coverage of in- 
dustrial and personnel psychology 
topics such as job analysis, person- 
nel recruitment and selection, legal 
aspects of employment, perform- 
ance appraisal, and training design 
and evaluation. Prerequisites: Ac- 
ceptance to Master's or Ph.D. pro- 
gram in Psychology. 

LIN 4710 Language Acquisition (3). 

An examination of the way children 
acquire language, based on experi- 
mental findings from contemporary 
linguistics, psycholinguistics, and be- 
havioral theory. 



LIN 5701 Psychology of Language 
(3). An overview of the psychology 
of language and the psychological 
'reality' of linguistic structure. Behav- 
ioristic vs. cognitive views of psychol- 
inguistics are examined. 
Consider-ation is given to the bio- 
logical bases of language and 
thought, language acquisition, and 
language pathology. 

PPE 3003 Theories of Personality (3). 

An examination of various theories 
of personality. Consideration is given 
to traditional and contemporary ap- 
proaches to personality develop- 
ment. 

PPE 3502 Psychology of Conscious- 
ness (3). Normal and altered states 
of human consciousness are ana- 
lyzed from the perceptual and 
neuro-psychological viewpoint. 
Broad topic areas include physi- 
ologically determined levels of 
arousal, from deep sleep to intense 
excitement; selective attention; per- 
ceptual plasticity; illusions; sensory 
deprivation; biofeedback; psychoso- 
matic disease; hypnotism and sug- 
gestibility; as well as a critical 
treatment of the phenomena of 
parapsychology. 

PPE 3670 Psychology of Myth (3). My- 
thology is studied from various psy- 
chological viewpoints. The process 
of Myth. Creation and the role of rit- 
ual in psychological enhancement 
are emphasized. Course focuses on 
classical mythology. 

PPE 4104 Humanistic Psychology (3). 

Studies the methodology, research, 
and findings of the humanistic orien- 
tation in psychology. Topics such as 
counseling, encounter groups, 
higher consciousness, biofeedback, 
intentional communities, education, 
mysticism, and religion are exam- 
ined from the humanistic viewpoint. 
Prerequisite: Prior completion of a 
course in Theories of Personality is 
recommended. 

PPE 4325C Differential Psychology: 
Lecture (2) and Laboratory (3). Lec- 
tures and laboratory field experi- 
ences in the principles and methods 
underlying the administration, con- 
struction, and evaluation of psycho- 
logical tests. Practice in the 
administration and interpretation of 
selected psychological tests. Prereq- 
uisites: STA 31 1 1 or an equivalent in- 
troductory course in statistics, and 
PSY 32 13. (Lab fees assessed) 

PPE 4514 Psychology of Dreams and 
Dreaming (3). An in-depth examina- 
tion of the most important psycho- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 159 



logical theories of dream function 
and of the use of dreams in different 
therapeutic approaches. The cur- 
rent research on the physiology and 
psychology of sleep is also evalu- 
ated. Prerequisite: Theories of Person- 
ality or its equivalent. 

PPE 4604 Psychological Testing (3). 

An introduction to the rationale un- 
derlying the use of psychological 
tests. Topics include basic test termi- 
nology, test administration, interpret- 
ing standard scores, reliability, 
validity, tests of intelligence, interest 
inventories, personality tests, the eth- 
ics of testing, and the fairness of 
tests for different segments of the 
population. Prerequisites: STA 31 1 1 
or equivalent. 

PPE 4930 Topics in Personality (VAR). 

Special topics will be announced in 
advance. 

PSB 4003 Introductory Bio-Psychol- 
ogy (3). A study of the more impor- 
tant psychobiologic correlates of 
behavior in basic psychological phe- 
nomena. 

PSB 4315 Neuropsychology (3). The 

relation of brain to cognition and 
behavior. An introduction to the 
study of the effects of brain dam- 
age on psychological processes. 

PSY 2020 Introductory Psychology 
(3). Psychological principles underly- 
ing the basic processes of sensation, 
perception, cognition, learning, 
memory, life-span developmental, 
social behavior, personality, abnor- 
mal behavior, and psychotherapy. 

PSY 3213 Research Methods in Psy- 
chology (3). Basic methods in con- 
temporary psychology. Emphasis on 
the role of methodology and experi- 
mentation in subfields of psychol- 
ogy. Students evaluate different 
designs and conduct original re- 
search projects. Prerequisite: STA 
3111. (Lab fees assessed) 

PSY 3930 Psychology of Humor (3). A 

study of the development of sense 
of humor in comedians and audi- 
ences; its expression in the produc- 
tion and appreciation of comedy, 
etc.; its psycho-physiologic-social 
correlates; its effect in maintaining 
well-being and preventing illness; 
and its role in human relations. 

PSY 4801 Metatheory in Psychology 
(3). Issues related to the 
metatheoretical foundation of psy- 
chology, and history and systems of 
psychology. 



PSY 4900 Independent Readings in 
Psychology (VAR). Limited to quali- 
fied students who have permission 
from a faculty member and who 
present a plan of study including 
area and objectives. Students en- 
rolled in this course are expected to 
have regularly scheduled meetings 
with their faculty advisor, and to sub- 
mit a written report of their study. Of- 
fered for Pass/Fail only. 

PSY 4914 Honors Research Project 
(VAR). Limited to qualified seniors 
seeking honors in psychology. Stu- 
dents must submit a research plan 
and have a research advisor's ap- 
proval of the research project prior 
to enrollment in the course. A writ- 
ten report of the research in the 
A.P.A. publication style must be sub- 
mitted for evaluation before credit 
will be awarded. Offered for 
Pass/Fail only. 

PSY 4916 Independent Research in 
Psychology (VAR). Limited to quali- 
fied students who have permission 
from a faculty member and who 
present a written proposal for re- 
search. Students enrolled in this 
course are expected to have regu- 
larly scheduled meetings with their 
faculty advisor, and to submit a writ- 
ten report of their research. 

PSY 4930 Special Topics in Psychol- 
ogy (VAR). Special topics will be an- 
nounced in advance. 

PSY 4931 Senior Seminar in Psychol- 
ogy (1). An advanced seminar for 
seniors. Analysis of major contempo- 
rary trends in psychological theory 
and research. 

PSY 4932 Psychology of Human 
Communication (2). 
PSY 4932L Psychology of Human 
Communication Lab (3).This course 
covers psychological theory, re- 
search and application in the area 
of human communication. Prereq- 
uisite: STA 31 1 1 , PSY 3213.(Lab fees 
assessed) 

PSY 4941 Independent Field Experi- 
ences in Psychology (VAR). Limited 
to qualified students who have per- 
mission from a faculty member and 
who present a plan of study includ- 
ing area and objectives. Students 
enrolled in this course are expected 
to have regularly scheduled meet- 
ings with their faculty advisor, and to 
submit a written report of their expe- 
riences. 

PSY 5206C Fundamentals of Design 
of Experiments (3). CRD and RCB de- 
signs. Latin square designs. Factorial, 



nested and nested-factorial experi- 
ments. Fixed, random and mixed 
models. Split-plot designs. Covari- 
ance analysis. Prerequisites: STA 

3122 and 3123, or their equivalents. 

PSY 5216 Proseminar: History and 
Systems of Psychology (3). An ex- 
amination of the historical founda- 
tions of modern psychology and 
survey of current systems and 
schools of psychology. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

PSY 5246C Multivariate Analysis in 
Applied Psychological Research (3). 

Covers basic techniques of multivari- 
ate analysis, emphasizing the ration- 
ale and applications to psycho- 
logical research. Includes multiple 
regression, HotellingsT#, MANOVA, 
principle component analysis, and 
factor analysis. Prerequisite: STA 

3123 or equivalent; linear algebra 
recommended. 

PSY 5908 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Under the supervision of an in- 
structor in the graduate degree pro- 
gram, the graduate student delves 
individually into a topic of mutual in- 
terest which requires intensive and 
profound analysis and which is not 
available in a formal offering. May 
be repeated once. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 

PSY 5917 Psychology Research 
Proseminar (3). Specialized research 
and presentation to faculty mem- 
bers in his or her major research 
area. Seminar style. This course is in- 
tended as a core course for the 
masters program in psychology. Pre- 
requisite: Full graduate admission. 

PSY 5918 Supervised Research 
(VAR). Research apprenticeship 
under the direction of a research 
professor or a thesis advisor. Prereq- 
uisite: Full graduate admission. 

PSY 5939 Special Topics in Psychol- 
ogy (VAR). Special topics will be an- 
nounced in advance. 

SOP 2772 Psychology of Sexual Be- 
havior (3). An examination of the na- 
ture, development, decline, and 
disorders of sexual behaviors, primar- 
ily from the perspectives of normal 
adjustment and interpersonal rela- 
tions. Discussion also addresses love, 
intimacy, and similar emotionally 
charged socio-psychological topics. 
Modern and popular treatment ap- 
proaches - including the 'new sex 
therapies' are critically evaluated. 



1 60 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



SOP 3004 Introductory Social Psy- 
chology (3). Introduction to the 
study of the relationship of the indi- 
vidual to social systems, including 
topics such as social behavior, atti- 
tude development and change, so- 
cial conflict, group processes, mass 
phenomena, and communication. 

SOP 3015 Social and Personality De- 
velopment (3). This course provides 
a survey of social and personality 
development throughout the life cy- 
cle. Emphasis will be placed on the 
interaction between psychological 
and environmental variables in life- 
span development changes. 

SOP 3742 Psychology of Women (3). 

An examination of women from vari- 
ous perspectives, such as biological, 
anthropological, mythological, relig- 
ious, historical, legal, sociological, 
and psychoanalytical points of 
view. Discussions of ways in which 
these various perspectives influence 
the psychological development of 
contemporary women. 

SOP 3932 Psychology of Drugs and 
Drug Abuse (3). This course will 
cover some basic information about 
the nature and effects of drugs 
abused, the social and personal dy- 
namics involved in the phenomena 
of drug abuse and the various reha- 
bilitation programs currently being 
employed to combat drug abuse. 

SOP 4050 Social Psychology in Latin 
America (3). Upper division seminar 
on Social Psychology in Latin Amer- 
ica. The course will provide the stu- 
dent with the opportunity to survey 
the literature and research in social 
psychology from different countries 
in Latin America and to compare 
that material with on-going re- 
search and literature in the United 
States. Prerequisites: SOP 3004 and 
reading knowledge of Spanish. 

SOP 4215 Experimental Social Psy- 
chology: Lecture (2) and Laboratory 
(3)-(5). The primary purpose of this 
course is to have students conduct 
actual social psychological experi- 
ments. Lecture material will be sec- 
ondary to (and in the interest of) 
allowing students to execute repre- 
sentative experiments in areas such 
as attitude measurement and 
change, group structure, and com- 
munication, etc. Prerequisites: PSY 
32 1 3 and STA 3 1 1 1 . (Lab fees as- 
sessed) 

SOP 4522 Social Motivation (3). Fo- 
cuses upon those sources of human 
motivation that are a consequence 
of man's social-interpersonal envi- 



ronment and his striving to obtain 
valued goals. Topics discussed in- 
clude test-taking anxiety, alienation 
and affiliation motivation, internal 
vs. external orientation, achieve- 
ment motivation, etc. The measure- 
ment of social motives and their 
roots and consequences for behav- 
ior are discussed. 

SOP 4525 Small Group Behavior (3). 

Introduction to the study of the struc- 
ture and function of groups, empha- 
sizing the behavior of individuals as 
affected by the group. The course 
focuses on experimental evidence 
concerning such topics as social fa- 
cilitation, group decision making, 
phases in group development, physi- 
cal factors in group behavior, etc.; 
rather than upon student experi- 
ence in sensitivity or encounter train- 
ing. 

SOP 4645 Consumer Psychology (3). 

This course addresses the psycho- 
logical components contributing to 
satisfaction and dissatisfaction in 
buying and selling transactions. The 
consequences of such transactions, 
as they affect the environment in 
which we live as well as society in 
general, are examined. The inter- 
face between business, labor, gov- 
ernment, and the consumer as all 
four groups are involved in con- 
sumer affairs is analyzed objectively. 

SOP 4649 Experimental Consumer 
Psychology: Lecture (2) and Labora- 
tory (3)-(5). Using the interactional 
workshop and objective observa- 
tional methods, students will be re- 
quired to conduct original research 
projects related to solving consumer 
affairs problems. Laboratory require- 
ments include both on-and off-cam- 
pus work. The former emphasizes 
techniques and evaluation. The lat- 
ter is necessary for the gathering of 
data. Prerequisites: PSY 3213 and 
STA 3111. (Lab fees assessed) 

SOP 4712 Environmental Psychology 

(3). An introduction to the study of 
human-environment transactions, 
with an emphasis on applications of 
physiological, psychological, and so- 
cial theories. 

SOP 4714 Environment and Behav- 
ior: Lecture (2) and Laboratory (3)- 
(5). Students gain experience with 
laboratory and field techniques 
used in the study of the reciprocal 
relationship between the physical 
environment and human behavior. 
Prerequisite: PSY 3213 or permission 
of instructor. (Lab fees assessed) 



SOP 4834 Psychology of Health and 
Illness (3). Course provides an over- 
view of the field of behavioral medi- 
cine, the interface of psychology 
with health and health care. Psycho- 
logical factors in illness, health, and 
health delivery systems will be cov- 
ered. Prevention and early interven- 
tion will be stressed. 

SOP 4842 Legal Psychology (3). Par- 
ticular emphasis will be given to in- 
terpersonal courtroom processes. 
Topics considered include scientific 
jury selection, proximics, persuasive 
argumentation, witness demeanor, 
eyewitness testimony, and similar in- 
fluences upon juror decision making. 

SOP 5058 Proseminar in Social Psy- 
chology (3). An in-depth examina- 
tion of the role of social psychology 
in the social sciences and the major 
substantive problems as they relate 
to contemporary societal issues. 
Minimum prerequisite: An introduc- 
tory course in social psychology or 
its equivalent. 

SOP 5316 Theories and Methods of 
Cross-Cultural Research (3). An in- 
tensive analysis of contemporary 
theories and methods of cross-cul- 
tural research in psychology includ- 
ing topics such as: culture as a 
research treatment, differential inci- 
dence of personality traits, the use 
of ethnographies, 'etic' vs. 'emic' 
distinction. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of instructor. 

SOP 5616 Social Psychology of Or- 
ganizations (3). The application of 
concepts and theories from social 
psychology and sociology to the or- 
ganizational setting. Emphasis would 
be on role theory, value formation 
and the operation of norms, includ- 
ing their development and enforce- 
ment. Formal and informal 
organization structure, power and 
authority concepts, and leadership 
theories will be covered. Communi- 
cation processes and networks and 
their effects on task accomplish- 
ment and satisfaction will be in- 
cluded. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 161 



Religious Studies 

Nathan Katz, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Paul Draper, Associate Professor 
Christine Gudorf, Professor 
Steven Heine, Professor 
James Huchingson, Associate 

Professor 
Erik Larson, Assistant Professor 
Lesley Northup, Assistant Professor 

and Graduate Program Director 
Terry E. Rey, Assistant Professor 
Theodore Weinberger, Assistant 

Professor 

Affiliated Faculty 
Thomas A. Breslin 
Bongkil Chung 
Daniel A. Cohen 
Mitchell B. Hart 
Marilyn Hoder-Salmon 
Rositta Kenigsberg 
David L. Lee 
Felice Lifshitz 
Mohiaddin Messbahi 
Joseph F. Patrouch 
Felix Pomeranz 
Meri-Jane Rochelson 
Dorothy Patricia Wallace 

Bachelor of Arts in Religious 
Studies 

Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Common Prerequisites 
No specific courses required; all stu- 
dents are encouraged to complete 
the Associate in Arts degree. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. Recommended Courses: 
Religion, Philosophy, History. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 
Required Areas 

Religious Studies majors are to take 
one course in each of the following 
areas (the area numbers are indi- 
cated by parentheses at the end of 
each course description): 
The Study of Religion (1) 3 

Sacred Texts (2) 3 

Judaism & Christianity (3) 3 

Ethics (4) 3 

Religion & Culture (5) 3 

Islam & Non-Western Religious 
Traditions (6) 3 



Additional Religious Studies 

Courses 1 5 

General Electives 27 

The College of Arts and Sciences re- 
quires for the bachelor's degree 
that a student take at least nine 
hours outside the major discipline, of 
which six hours must be taken out- 
side the major department. 
Remarks: A complete description of 
the Religious Studies Program is con- 
tained in a brochure available at 
the Department of Religious Studies. 
Students should refer to the bro- 
chure for specific requirements of 
the major program. Students select 
their required courses in religious 
studies with the approval of a fac- 
ulty member of the Department. 

Students are also encouraged to 
consider a dual major i.e., simultane- 
ously to meet the requirements of 
two academic majors. 

The Department serves the com- 
munity and professional groups by 
offering courses off campus. For fur- 
ther information concerning these 
courses consult the department. 

Minor in Religious Studies 

A student majoring in another aca- 
demic discipline can earn an aca- 
demic minor in religious studies by 
taking at least four REL courses (12 
upper division semester hours). Stu- 
dents are normally encouraged to 
take REL 3302 as one of these 
courses. 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

GRE-Ancient Greek; REL-Religion; 
HBR-Biblical Hebrew. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring se- 
mester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

GRE 3041 New Testament Greek II 
(3). Continuation of New Testament 
Greek I. Prerequisites: New Testa- 
ment Greek I or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

GRE 3050 New Testament Greek I 
(3). Introduces the Greek language 
of the New Testament, and other 
works of the ancient period to en- 
hance the understanding of trans- 
lated texts. A portion of the Gospel 
of John is studied. 

HBR 3100 Biblical Hebrew I (3). Intro- 
duces the language of the Hebrew 
Scriptures, portions of which are 
read in class. 



HBR 3101 Biblical Hebrew II (3). A 

continuation of Biblical Hebrew I. 
Prerequisite: Biblical Hebrew I. 

REL 201 1 Religion: Analysis and Inter- 
pretation (3) Introduces methods of 
critical reflection on religion and 
some of their applications to funda- 
mental topics such as knowledge, 
value, the sacred, the individual 
and human society. (F, S. SS) 

REL 2210 Bible I: The Hebrew Scrip- 
tures (3). This course introduces the 
literature and thought of the Old Tes- 
tament, especially as these were 
shaped in interaction with political, 
social, and historical currents of the 
times. (2) 

REL 2240 Bible II: New Testament (3). 

This course introduces the thought 
and literature of the New Testament 
in its contemporary setting. Atten- 
tion is given to Jesus and Paul and 
to later developments in first-century 
Christianity. (2) F 

REL 2362 Islam (3). Explores the 
Qur'an; the exemplary life of Mu- 
hammad; the Caliphate; Islamic 
law, exegesis, science, art, theology 
and mysticism; and contemporary Is- 
lam in Morocco, India and Indone- 
sia. (6) 

REL 2936, 4936 Special Topics (1-6). 

In-depth study of topics of special in- 
terest in religion. 

REL 3002 Ritual in Religion and Cul- 
ture (3). Examines ritual and its roots, 
functions, analysis, and meaning, 
both in religious contexts and as it is 
assimilated and adapted in the 
wider culture. (1) (S) 

REL 3091 Joseph Campbell and the 
Power of Myth (3). Examines the na- 
ture of myth, particularly from the 
perspective of mythologist Joseph 
Campbell, and focuses on his contri- 
bution to the study of myth. ( 1 ) 

REL 3100 Introduction to Religion 
and Culture (3). This course explores 
both the ways religion uses culture 
to express its basic concerns and 
the ways that culture and lifestyle re- 
flect religious perspectives. Atten- 
tion will be given to traditional and 
popular expressions of American cul- 
ture. (5) 

REL 31 10 Religion and Television (3); 

Examines the interaction of religion 
and television; television as a vehi- 
cle for religious programming, news, 
and values, and religion as a dy- 
namic influence on the medium. 



162 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



REL 3111 Religion in Film (3). Stu- 
dents examine religious themes, im- 
ages, symbols and characters in 
various feature and short films, a spe- 
cific method of critical analysis, and 
the religious and societal effects of 
contemporary films. (5) 

REL 3112 Religion and Literature (3). 

Using fictional and non-fictional 
autobiographical texts, this course 
examines how autobiography can 
serve as the articulation of a spiritual 
quest. 

REL 3120 Religion in America (3). His- 
torical survey of the development 
and influence of religions in the U.S. 
with emphasis on the unique role of 
religion in American culture. (5) 

REL 3131 New Religions in America 
(3). Explores the American ten- 
dency to generate new religious 
movements and examines a variety 
of these sects and cults. (5) 

REL 3145 Women and Religion (3). Ex- 
plores the involvement, portrayal, 
and roles of women in religion, from 
early goddess religions through the 
cult of Mary to contemporary femi- 
nist theology. (5) 

REL 3160 Science and Religion (3). 

The methods, assumptions, goals of 
religion will be compared with those 
of the natural and human sciences. 
Specific issues, such as evolution, so- 
ciobiology, and the new astronomy 
will be considered to illustrate simi- 
larities and differences between the 
two approaches. (5) 

REL 3170 Religion and Ethics (3). This 
course will examine the nature of 
ethics in its relationship to faith orien- 
tation. After considering the various 
religious foundations of ethics in the 
thought of influential thinkers, atten- 
tion will be given to the application 
of these perspectives to pressing 
ethical problems in contemporary 
society. (4) 

REL 3171 AIDS, Ethics and Religion 

(3). Examines ethical issues in AIDS 
as framed by churches, by persons 
with AIDS (PWA) networks, and by 
AIDS workers. (4) 

REL 3172 Reproductive Ethics (3). Sur- 
veys U.S. religion on family, surro- 
gacy, artificial insemination and in 
vitro fertilization, contraception, 
abortion, and fetal hazards in work- 
place. (4) 

REL 3178 Christian Sexual Ethics (3). 

Surveys the dialogue between Chris- 
tian churches and the sciences re- 



garding homosexuality, conception, 
genital activity and sex roles. (4) 

REL 3180 Medical and Bioethics (3). 

A survey of religious treatment of 
ethical issues in health care and 
medical research. (4) 

REL 3194 The Holocaust (3). Exam- 
ines different responses to the Holo- 
caust — both during the years when 
it took place and afterwards. What 
does it mean to be a Jew, a Chris- 
tian, a human being in the shadow 
of the Holocaust? (3) 

REL 3197 Topics in Race and Relig- 
ion (3). Examines the role of religion 
in specific historical events such as 
the US civil rights movement, the 
rise/fall of S. African apartheid, or 
the subjugation of the Amerindians. 
(5) 

REL 3209 The Dead Sea Scrolls (3). 

Surveys scholarship on the Dead 
Sea Scrolls, including their signifi- 
cance for the study of the Bible and 
the history of Judaism and Christian- 
ity. (2) 

REL 3220 Moses, Priests and Prophets 
(3). In-depth studies of selected por- 
tions of the hebrew Scriptures, pay- 
ing close attention to the history of 
ancient Israel and situating the texts 
within the cultural milieu of the an- 
cient Near East. 

REL 3250 Jesus and the Early Chris- 
tians (3). Examines the life of Jesus 
and the New Testament Docu- 
ments; what we know about Jesus, 
how we know it, and how and why 
early Christianity spread so rapidly. 

REL 3270 Biblical Theology (3). Ex- 
plores the ideas of God, man, re- 
demption, ethics, and the after-life, 
tracing each through its develop- 
ment from earliest Hebrew thought 
to the rise of post-biblical Judaism 
and Christianity. (3) 

REL 3302 Studies in World Religions 
(3). Examines the origins, teachings, 
and practices of selected world re- 
ligions. The specific religions se- 
lected for examination may vary 
from semester to semester. (1) (F, S) 

REL 3325 Religions of Classical My- 
thology (3). Examines the beliefs 
and practices of ancient Egyptian. 
Semitic, Greek, and Germanic relig- 
ions, their influences on later civiliza- 
tion and religious thought, and the 
possible continuing insights offered 
by each. (5) 

REL 3330 Religions of India (3). The 

myriad religions of India, from prehis- 



toric origins to contemporary politi- 
cized Hinduism. Schismatic move- 
ments (Buddhism, Jainism) and 
"Indianized" extrinsic religions (Juda- 
ism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrian- 
ism). (6) (F) 

REL 3362 Islamic Faith and Society 
(3). A survey of the main facets of Is- 
lamic religion and societies from the 
time of Muhammad to the present. 
(6) 

REL 3392 Jewish Mysticism (3). An 

overview of the history and philoso- 
phy of Kabbala and an exploration 
of selected practices and tech- 
niques of Jewish mysticism. (3) 

REL 3492 Nature and Human Values 
(3). This course will explore resources 
from philosophy and religion that 
could contribute to a solution of the 
current environmental crisis. Ethical 
issues of the environment will espe- 
cially be examined in the light of 
these resources. (4) (S) 

REL 3505 Introduction to Christianity 
(3). Introduces the basic beliefs and 
practices of Christianity in their his- 
torical and modern forms, including 
both common and distinctive ele- 
ments of Catholicism, Protestantism, 
and Eastern Orthodoxy. (3) 

REL 3510 Early Christianity (3). This 
course will survey the First develop- 
ment of Christian thought and prac- 
tice from its beginnings as a primitive 
church to its establishment as a major 
faith in the Middle Ages. It will then 
consider the relevance of this early 
experience for modern movements 
of this faith. (3) (S) 

REL 3520 Medieval Christianity (3). 

Surveys Christianity during the mid- 
dle ages, including its development, 
medieval theology and religious 
practices, and its on-going influ- 
ence in Christianity. (3) 

REL 3530 Protestantism (3). Surveys 
Protestantism from the Reformation 
to the present, including the forma- 
tion of Protestant theology, the rela- 
tionship of Protestantism to culture 
and contemporary developments. 
(3) 

REL 3532 Reformation (3). The lives 
and thoughts of the leaders of the 
Protestant Reformation will be the fo- 
cus of this course. Significant atten- 
tion will be given to the personal 
experiences and theological per- 
spectives which directed the ac- 
tions of such persons as Luther, 
Calvin, and Zwingli, as well as the 
movements they founded. (3) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 163 



REL 3564 Modern Catholicism (3). 

Surveys Catholicism from the Vati- 
can Council to the present, includ- 
ing developments in liturgy, 
theology, and the relationship of the 
Church to the world. (3) (S) 

REL 3600 Judaism (3). This course is 
an introduction to this major world 
religion. Following a survey of the his- 
tory of Judaism, major themes in 
Jewish religious thought will be high- 
lighted, especially as they relate to 
modern movements of this faith. (3) 
(F) 

REL 3601 The Ethics of Judaism (3). 

Examines Jewish approaches to ethi- 
cal issues. Takes into account both 
traditional and nontraditional ap- 
proaches which claim, in some way, 
to be authentically Jewish. (4) (F) 

REL 3625 Introduction to Talmud (3). 

Through close readings (in English 
translation) of specific Talmudic 
texts, this course introduces students 
to the Talmud - the magnum opus 
of Rabbinic Judaism. (2) 

REL 4030 Methods in the Study of Re- 
ligion (3). This course examines a 
number of the most important meth- 
ods used in the academic study of 
religion, together with repre- 
sentative examples of the use of 
these methods. Prerequisite: Relig- 
ious Studies major status or permis- 
sion of instructor. (1) 

REL 4146 Feminist Theology and Eth- 
ics (3). Surveys major Christian and 
Jewish feminists on revelation, sexu- 
ality and body, liturgy, religious com- 
munity and other topics. (4) 

REL 41 73 Technology and Human 
Values (3). This course will explore 
the sources and impact of modern 
technology from philosophical and 
religious perspectives. Topics to be 
discussed include the effects of 
technology upon the understanding 
of human nature, and the relation- 
ship among technology, the natural 
environment, and hopes for a liv- 
able human future. (5) 

REL 4205 Current Methods in Biblical 
Studies (3). This course introduces 
the Bible and the methods and tools 
of biblical study, including transla- 
tions, word studies, historical studies, 
and the use of appropriate secon- 
dary resources. Prerequisite: REL 
2210, REL 2240 or permission of in- 
structor. (2) 

REL 4224 The Prophets and Israel (3). 

Examines the setting of the prophets 
in the history of Israel, their contribu- 



tions to biblical religion, and their 
use in later religious and renewal 
movements. (2) 

REL 4251 Jesus and Paul (3). Exam- 
ines the historical settings, teach- 
ings, significance, and later 
interpretations of Christianity's 
founder and its foremost interpreter. 
(3) 

REL 431 1 Religious Classics of Asia 
(3). Classical religious texts of Asian 
traditions. Content may vary. 
Course may be repeated with 
change in content. (2) 

REL 431 2 Jews of Asia (3). Surveys 
the history, culture, and literature of 
the Jews of Asia, with emphasis on 
the Cochin Jews, the Bene Israel of 
Bombay and environs, the 'Bagh- 
dadis' Indian port cities, and the Chi- 
nese Jews of Kaifeng. 

REL 4340 Survey of Buddhism (3). The 

course will explore the central 
themes of the main schools of Bud- 
dhism developed in India, China, Ja- 
pan, and Korea. The themes will be 
examined from religious, moral, and 
philosophical points of view. (6) (S) 

REL 4345 Zen Buddhism (3). This 
course explores Zen (ch'an) Bud- 
dhism in its historical, theoretical, 
and practical dimensions with a spe- 
cific aim of examining the theme 
that the Buddha mind can be actu- 
alized by awakening to one's own 
Buddha-nature. (6) 

REL 4420 Contemporary Religious 
Thought (3). A survey of major fig- 
ures in contemporary theology for 
the purpose of understanding their 
thought and its application to cur- 
rent issues in religion and society. (1) 

REL 4425 Contemporary Issues in 
Christian Theology (3). Examines 
contemporary efforts to reflect on 
traditional topics in Christian theol- 
ogy, such as God and human na- 
ture, and explores the role of 
theology in addressing selected so- 
cial and cultural issues. (3) 

REL 4441 Religion and the Contem- 
porary World (3). An examination of 
reflection by religious thinkers and 
others who employ religious per- 
spectives, concerning select con- 
ceptual issues of critical importance 
in the contemporary world. (1) 

REL 4461 Topics in the Philosophy of 
Religion (3). Examines a specific 
topic in the philosophy of religion, 
such as faith and reason, religious 
experience, or an important thinker. 



It may be repeated with permission 
of instructor. (1) 

REL 4481 Contemporary Latin Ameri- 
can Religious Thought (3). The major 
trends of religious thought in Latin 
America and their impact on the so- 
ciety of the area will be investi- 
gated. Special reference will be 
made to Post-Vatican II theology 
and to very recent theologies of lib- 
eration. (1) 

REL 4613 The Modernization of Juda- 
ism (3). Explores the ways in which 
religious beliefs and traditional con- 
cepts of Jewish self identity have 
changed as a result of emancipa- 
tion and the participation of Jews in 
the modern Western world. (3) (S) 

REL 4910 Independent Research (1- 

6). Topics will be selected to meet 
the academic needs of the individ- 
ual student. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

REL 4912 Research Seminar in Relig- 
ious Studies (3). Working on a vari- 
ety of individual research projects, 
students explore research issues and 
methods. Research projects must be 
approved in advance. Course may 
be repeated. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. 

REL 4931 Religious Studies Seminar 
(3). This seminar is designed for ma- 
jors and other qualified students ap- 
proved by the Department. The 
specific topic will be selected and an- 
nounced in advance. The number of 
participants will be limited. 

REL 4937 Special Topics (3). In-depth 
study of topics of special interest in 
religious studies. 

REL 5023 Religious Ritual (3). Exam- 
ines the critical relationship of ritual, 
religious practice and belief, and 
culture, while introducing the princi- 
ples and methods of both ritual stud- 
ies and liturgies. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

REL 5025 Myth and Religion (3). In- 
vestigates the role, function, and 
meaning of myth in religious experi- 
ence and practice through an ex- 
amination of specific myths, mythic 
patterns, and critical theories. Pre- 
requisite: Bachelor's degree. 

REL 5130 North American Religion 
(3). Historical examination of the re- 
ligious groups and influences in 
North America, focusing on their 
contributions and cultural impacts. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of instructor. 



1 64 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



REL 5131 Sects, Cults, and New Relig- 
ions (3). Explores and critically ana- 
lyzes the multiplicity of New 
American religious movements and 
the unique combination of factors 
that has encouraged them. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

REL 5145 Women and Religion (3). Ex- 
amines the influence of religion on 
social construction of gender and 
the definition of woman's nature 
and role, with a focus on Western 
developments. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 

REL 5160 Science and Religion (3). 

Surveys the interaction between sci- 
ence and religion from conflict mod- 
els to integration; special attention 
to specific natural sciences includ- 
ing cosmology and biology. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

REL 5240 Bible II: The New Testament 
(3). History, theology, and interpreta- 
tion methods of the New Testament. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

REL 5331 Religions of India (3). Top- 
ics include: religion in prehistoric 
and ancient India, classical Hindu 
texts and schismatic movements, 
medieval theism, the acculturation 
of extrinsic religions, Hindu-Muslim- 
Sikh syncretism, and the modern pe- 
riod. 

REL 5461 Religion and Philosophy 
(3). Examines the use of philosophi- 
cal reasoning to justify religious be- 
lief or its rejection. Such topics as 
natural theology, atheism and fi- 
deism will be examined. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

REL 5515 History of Early Christianity 
(3). Origin and growth of Christianity 
from the first to the fifth century, and 
the adaptation of its message to the 
Greco-Roman world. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

REL 5565 Modern Catholicism (3). 

Theology and liturgical practice in 
the Roman Catholic Church from 
Trent (16th c) to the present, with pri- 
mary and secondary sources. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

REL 5600 Studies in Judaism (3). His- 
torical overview of Jewish belief and 
practice with special consideration 
of Jewish ritual life. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

REL 5613 Modernization of Judaism 
(3). Explores the ways in which relig- 



ious beliefs and traditional concepts 
of Jewish self identity have changed 
as a result of emancipation and the 
participation of Jews in the modern 
Western world. Prerequisite: Bache- 
lor's degree. 

REL 591 1 Independent Research (1 - 

5). Topics are selected to meet the 
academic needs of the individual 
student. Prerequisite: Permission of In- 
structor. 

REL 5937 Special Topics (3). Topics 
will be selected to meet the aca- 
demic needs of groups of students. 

REL 6395 Seminar in Asian Religions 
(3). Asian religious traditions - texts, 
rituals or artifacts.,Content may 
vary. May be repeated with change 
in content. 

REL 6971 Thesis (1-6). For students 
working on the thesis for the M.A. in 
Religious Studies. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 165 



Sociology and 
Anthropology 

Stephen M. Fjellman, Professor and 

Chairperson 
G. Janice Allen, Assistant Professor 
Jerald B. Brown, Associate Professor 
Janet M. Chernela, Associate 

Professor 
Chris Girard, Associate Professor 

and Director, Comparative 

Sociology, Graduate Program 
Hugh Gladwin, Associate Professor 

and Director, Institute for Public 

Opinion Research 
Guillermo J. Grenier, Associate 

Professor and Director, Center for 

Labor Research 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
A. Douglas Kincaid, Associate 

Professor and Associate Director, 

LACC 
Lilly M. Longer, Associate Professor 
Abraham D. Lavender, Associate 

Professor 
Barry B. Levine, Professor 
Kathleen Logan, Associate Professor 
Shearon A. Lowery, Associate 

Professor 
Anthony P. Maingot, Professor 
James A. Mau, Professor and Provost 
Betty Hearn Morrow, Associate 

Professor 
William T. Osborne, Associate 

Professor 
Walter Gillis Peacock, Associate 

Professor and Program Director 

at the International Hurricane 

Center 
Lisandro Perez, Associate Professor 

and Director, Cuban Research 

Institute 
Alex Stepick, Professor and Director, 

Immigration and Ethnicity Institute 
Richard Tardanico, Associate 

Professor 
William T. Vickers, Professor 
Lois West, Assistant Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in 
Sociology/Anthropology 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

To be admitted to the upper divi- 
sion, students must meet the Univer- 
sity's and College's admission 
requirements. Students without an 
AA degree must have the back- 
ground to handle advanced aca- 
demic work. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program. FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 



pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable to the pro- 
gram. 

Required Courses 

Introduction to Anthropology, Intro- 
duction to Cultural Anthropology, or 
Introduction to Sociology. If the stu- 
dent does not have one of these 
courses, it will be required as part of 
the upper division program. 

Recommended Courses 

Other anthropology and sociology 
courses; ecology, economics, geog- 
raphy, history, political science, psy- 
chology; arts, biology, English, 
foreign languages, mathematics, 
philosophy. 

Upper Division Program (60) 

Required Courses (27) 

Core Courses 

ANT 3086 Anthropological 

Theories 3 

SYA 3300 Research Methods 3 
SYA4010 Sociological Theories 3 
ISS 3330 Ethical Issues in 
Social Science 
Research 3 

Area Courses: Either Anthropology 
or Sociology 15 

Electives: with the approval of the 
faculty advisor 33 

A grade of 'C or higher is re- 
quired for all courses that make up 
the major (12 semester hours of core 
courses and 15 semester hours of 
area courses in Sociology and An- 
thropology). 

Minor in Sociology and 
Anthropology 
Prescribed Courses 

Fifteen credits in the Department of 
Sociology/Anthropology including 
two courses from the following: 
ANT 3086 Anthropological 

Theories 3 

SYA 3300 Research Methods 3 
SYA 4010 Sociological 

Theories 3 

ISS 3330 Ethical Issues in 

Social Science 

Research 3 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ANT-Anthropology;ISS-lnterdiscipli- 
nary Social Sciences; SYA-Sociologi- 
cal Analysis; SYD-Sociology of 
Demography and Area Studies; SYG- 



Sociology, General; SYO-Social Or- 
ganization; SYP-Social Processes. 
Fall-Fall semester offering; S-3pring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semes- 
ter offering. 

ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropol- 
ogy (3). This course surveys the four 
subfields of anthropology, including 
physical anthropology and human 
evolution, archaeology, cultural an- 
thropology, and linguistics. Intro- 
duces basic anthropological 
theories and concepts. (F,S,SS) 

ANT 3086 Anthropological Theories 
(3). This course examines the proc- 
ess of theory building and explana- 
tion in the social sciences, and 
outlines the historical and philosophi- 
cal foundations of anthropological 
thought. Theorists and schools of 
thought reviewed include Darwin 
and evolution; Boas and historical 
particularism; Freud and culture and 
personality; and Malinowski and 
functionalism. (F,S) 

ANT 3100 Introduction to Archaeol- 
ogy (3). The history of archaeology 
is traced from its origins to its emer- 
gence as a scientific discipline 
within anthropology. Students are fa- 
miliarized with the concepts and 
methods of modern archaeology, 
and with the scientific goals of ar- 
chaeological research. (F,S) 

ANT 3144 Prehistory of the Americas 
(3). Early man in the Americas is ex- 
amined through archaeological re- 
cords. (S) 

ANT 3241 Myth, Ritual, and Mysti- 
cism (3). A survey of anthropologi- 
cal approaches to the study of 
myth, ritual, and mysticism, as relig- 
ious and symbolic systems. The so- 
cial and psychological functions of 
myth and ritual in primitive and com- 
plex societies will be compared. (S) 

ANT 3251 Peasant Society (3). Com- 
parative study of peasant societies 
with emphasis on the concepts of 
folk community, traditional culture, 
and modernization. Data on peas- 
antry In Latin America and other cul- 
ture areas will be reviewed. 

ANT 3302 Male and Female: Sex 
Roles and Sexuality (3). Cross-cul- 
tural ethnographic data will be util- 
ized to examine the enculturation of 
sex roles, attitudes, and behavior; 
cultural definitions of maleness and 
femaleness; and varieties of human 
sexual awareness and response. (F) 

ANT 3304 Voices of Third World 
Women (3). Deals with the literature 



166 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



in the social sciences and humani- 
ties written by women of the Third 
World or others who have recorded 
their testimony. 

ANT 3403 Cultural Ecology (3). Sys- 
tems of interaction between man 
and his environment; the role of so- 
cial, cultural, and psychological fac- 
tors in the maintenance and 
disruption of ecosystems; interrela- 
tions of technological and environ- 
mental changes. (SS) 

ANT 3409 Anthropology of Contem- 
porary Society (3). The application 
of classical anthropological meth- 
ods and concepts to the analysis of 
contemporary American culture. In- 
vestigation of a unique cultural 
scene will involve the student in field 
work and the preparation of an eth- 
nographic report. (F,S) 

ANT 3442 Urban Anthropology (3). 

Anthropological study of urbaniza- 
tion and urban life styles, with par- 
ticular emphasis on rural-urban 
migration and its impact on kinship 
groups, voluntary associations, and 
cultural values. 

ANT 3462 Medical Anthropology (3). 

A survey of basic concepts; exami- 
nation of preliterate and non-west- 
ern conceptions of physical and 
mental health and illness; emphasis 
on cultural systems approach to the 
study of illness and health care. 
Background in biology, medicine, or 
nursing helpful. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. (S) 

ANT 3476 Movements of Rebellion 
and Revitalization (3). Cross-cultural 
study of revolutionary, messianistic, 
and revitalization movements in 
tribal and peasant societies. Case 
materials include Negro-slave re- 
volts, cargo cults, and peasant wars 
of the twentieth century (Mexico, 
China, Vietnam). 

ANT 3500 Introduction to Physical 
Anthropology (3). A study of the bio- 
logical history of man as interpreted 
through the theory of evolution, 
anatomy and the fossil record, con- 
temporary population genetics, and 
the concept of race. (F) 

ANT 3642 Language and Culture (3). 

An examination of the relationship 
between language and culture, the 
implications of language for our per- 
ceptions of reality, and the socio-cul- 
tural implications of language 
differences for interethnic relations 
and international understanding. (F) 



ANT 3780 Anthropology of Brazil (3). 

Anthropological perspective on Bra- 
zilian society and culture. Covers 
classic and contemporary studies of 
Brazil including such topics as race, 
ethnicity, national identity, regional- 
ism, and social organization. (S) 

ANT 421 1 - 4328 Area Studies (3). Eth- 
nological survey of selected indige- 
nous cultures. Areas to be studied 
include; (1) North America; (2) Af- 
rica; (3) Asia or Southeastern Asia; 
(4) China. Topics will be announced 
and will vary depending on current 
staff. (F.S) 

ANT 4224 Tribal Art and Aesthetics 
(3). This course deals with the social 
and cultural context and functions 
of art in preliterate societies as in 
sub-Saharan Africa, New Guinea, 
and North America. Topics include 
wood carving, bronze casting, sing- 
ing, dancing, drumming, masquer- 
ading, theatrical performance, and 
all forms of oral literature. (F) 

ANT 4273 Law and Culture (3). A 
cross-cultural examination of the 
practical and theoretical relation- 
ships between the legal system and 
other aspects of culture and soci- 
ety. (S) 

ANT 4305 Explorations in Visual An- 
thropology (3). An examination of 
the use of film in anthropology, both 
as a method of ethnographic docu- 
mentation and as a research tech- 
nique for analyzing non-verbal 
modes of communication. Docu- 
mentary films and cross-cultural 
data on paralanguage, kinesics, 
proxemics, and choreometrics will 
be reviewed and discussed. (F) 

ANT 4306 The Third World (3). An in- 
terdisciplinary, cross-cultural survey 
of the factors contributing to the 
emergence of the Third World. Sig- 
nificant political, economic, pan-na- 
tional and pan-ethnic coalitions are 
analyzed. (F) 

ANT 4312 American Indian Ethnol- 
ogy (3). An examination of the so- 
cio-cultural patterns of selected 
American Indian groups as they ex-" 
isted in the indigenous state, prior to 
European contact. 

ANT 4324 Mexico (3). An interdiscipli- 
nary examination of the major so- 
cial, cultural, economic, and 
political factors contributing to the 
transformation from the Aztec em- 
pire to colonial society to modern 
Mexico. (F) 



ANT 4328 Maya Civilization (3). A sur- 
vey of the culture and intellectual 
achievements of the ancient Maya 
civilization of Mesoamerica. Course 
includes: history and social-political 
structure, archaeology, agriculture 
and city planning, mathematics, hi- 
eroglyphics, astronomy, and calen- 
dars. (F.S) 

ANT 4330 Contemporary Maya Cul- 
tures (3). Studies the Maya cultures 
of Mexico and Central America 
from the Conquest to the present. In- 
vestigates the political, social, eco- 
nomic, religious, and cultural life of 
contemporary Maya peoples. (F) 

ANT 4332 Latin America (3). Native 
cultures of Mexico, Central and 
South America; the lowland hunters 
and gatherers, and the pre-Colum- 
bian Inca and Aztec Empires; the im- 
pact of the Spanish conquest. (F) 

ANT 4334 Contemporary Latin Ameri- 
can Women (3). The lives of 20th 
century Latin American women and 
gender analysis along class and eth- 
nic dimensions. Discussion of relig- 
ion, family, gender roles, machismo, 
and women's roles in sociopolitical 
change. (F) 

ANT 4335 Inca Civilization (3). A sur- 
vey of Andean culture history with 
emphasis on Inca and pre-lnca civili- 
zations. Includes discussion of peo- 
pling of South America, habitats, 
and the transition from foraging to 
village settlements, and the rise of in- 
digenous empires. (S) 

ANT 4340 Cultures of the Caribbean 
(3). An ethnological survey of native 
cultures and of the processes of cul- 
ture contact and conflict in the Car- 
ibbean and Circum-Caribbean 
region. (F) 

ANT 4343 Cuban Culture and Soci- 
ety (3). The diverse origins and mani- 
festations of the culture of 
20 ,h -century Cuba. The social struc- 
ture of the Cuban Republic and the 
profound institutional transforma- 
tions caused by the Revolution of 
1959. (S) 

ANT 4352 African Peoples and Cul- 
tures (3). This course includes a sur- 
vey of the cultures and civilizations 
of sub-Saharan Africa. It includes dis- 
cussions of history, geography, so- 
ciopolitical structures, religion, art, 
music, and oral literature. (F) 

ANT 4406 Anthropology of War and 
Violence (3). The purpose of this 
course is to introduce the scientific 
study of human aggression and war- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 167 



fare from an evolutionary and cross- 
cultural perspective in order to gain 
a better understanding of the 
causes and consequences of such 
behavior, and to evaluate pro- 
posed options for the control of war- 
fare. 

ANT 4422 Kinship and Social Organi- 
zation (3). Comparative study of kin- 
ship systems and the social 
organization in tribal, peasant, and 
industrial societies. Emphasis on the 
ethnographic record in anthropol- 
ogy. Prerequisites: ANT 2000 or per- 
mission of instructor. (F) 

ANT 4433 Psychological Anthropol- 
ogy (3). Cross-cultural studies in cog- 
nition, possession states, myth 
making and world view are exam- 
ined. The interface of anthropology, 
psychology and psychiatry is re- 
viewed. (S) 

ANT 4451 Racial and Cultural Minori- 
ties (3). The study of selected ethnic 
and cultural groups, with particular 
emphasis on patterns of inter-ethnic 
and intercultural relationships. Minor- 
ity groups studied may include Afro- 
Americans, American Indians, 
Chicanos, Cubans, women, senior 
citizens or prisoners. (F,S) 

ANT 4461 Hallucinogens and Culture 
(3). Cross-cultural examination of 
the political, religious, and socio-cul- 
tural factors related to altered states 
of consciousness, including dreams 
and images. Applications to con- 
temporary psychology are ex- 
plored. (S) 

ANT 4552 Primate Behavior and Ecol- 
ogy (3). This course covers the evolu- 
tion of primates, and primate 
ecology, social organization, and in- 
telligence. The course will provide 
students with opportunities to ob- 
serve and study living primates. (F) 

ANT 4723 Education and Socializa- 
tion (3). A cross-cultural examination 
of educational and socialization 
processes, their functions in the 
larger society, and the value sys- 
tems they transmit. 

ANT 4907 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/or 
field research and training. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. (F.S.SS) 

ANT 4908 Directed Field Research 
(VAR). Permission of instructor re- 
quired. (F.S.SS) 

ANT 4930 Topics in Anthropology 
(3). Special courses dealing with ad- 
vanced topics in the major anthro- 



pological subdisciplines: (1) social 
and cultural anthropology, (2) ap- 
plied anthropology, (3) physical an- 
thropology, (4) linguistics, and (5) 
archaeology. Instruction by staff or 
visiting specialists. Topics to be an- 
nounced. Instructor's permission re- 
quired. May be repeated. (F,S) 

ANT 4941 Holocaust Documentation 
Internship (3). History and signifi- 
cance of the Holocaust; issues in 
oral history; interviewing Holocaust 
survivors; transcribing and archiving 
interview data. 

ANT 5318 American Culture and So- 
ciety (3). Anthropological analysis of 
the cultures and subcultures of the 
United States, focusing on the so- 
cial, ethnic, and regional organiza- 
tions and their corresponding value 
and symbolic systems. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. (S) 

ANT 5496 Social Research and 
Analysis (3). A graduate overview of 
the scientific methods used in inter- 
cultural studies. Includes the philo- 
sophical basis of science, research 
design, and hypothesis testing using 
both secondary and original data. 
Students will conduct a research 
project in this course. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

ANT 5548 Ecological Anthropology 
(3). Theories of human adaptation, 
including environmental determi- 
nism, possibilism, cultural ecology, 
materialism, and evolutionary ecol- 
ogy. Credit for both ANT 3403 and 
ANT 5548 will not be granted. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor. (SS) 

ANT 5908 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/or 
field research and training. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. (F,S,SS) 

ANT 5915 Directed Field Research 
(VAR). Permission of instructor re- 
quired. (F,S,SS) 

ISS 3330 Ethical Issues in Social Sci- 
ence Research (3). An introduction 
to the problems of possibilities of 
ethical premises in the perspectives 
and work of social scientists. Exami- 
nation of historical interrelationships 
between moral philosophies and de- 
veloping scientific methodologies. 
Analyses of contemporary social 
ethicists' attempts to assume moral 
postures while examining social rela- 
tions. Case studies involving issues 
such as nation building in areas of 



accelerated change including Af- 
rica and Asia. (F,S) 

SYA 3300 Research Methods (3). An 

introduction to the scientific method 
and its application to anthropologi- 
cal and sociological research. Top- 
ics include: formulation of research 
problems; research design; field 
methods and collection of data; hy- 
pothesis testing and interpretation 
of results. (F,S) 

SYA 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Social Sciences (3). A student major- 
ing in one of the Social Sciences 
(Economics, International Relations, 
Political Sciences, Sociology, or Psy- 
chology) may spend one or two se- 
mesters fully employed in industry or 
government in a capacity relating 
to the major. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Cooperative Education Program 
and major department. 

SYA 4010 Sociological Theories (3). 

Examines the emergence of sociol- 
ogy as the study of social relations. 
Compares and contrasts the work of 
selected theorists, with respect to 
their methodologies, treatment of 
the emergence and consequences 
of modern society, political sociol- 
ogy, conception of social class, and 
analysis of the role of religion in soci- 
ety. The student is expected to gain 
in-depth knowledge of opposing 
theories, as well as an appreciation 
of the contingent nature of socio- 
logical theories. (F.S) 

SYA 401 1 Advanced Social Theory 
(3). An analysis of various classical 
and current sociological theories, 
with particular attention paid to 
their conceptions of man in society 
and the wider implications such con- 
ceptions have. The theories of Durk- 
heim. Parsons, Weber, Goffman, 
Bendix, and Dahrendorf are exam- 
ined. 

SYA 4124 Social Theory and Third 
World Innovations (3). An examina- 
tion of the contributions to social 
theory by intellectuals of the Third 
World. Particular attention is paid to 
theory derived from classical Marx- 
ism. 

SYA 4170 Comparative Sociology 
(3). A cross-cultural and cross-na- 
tional survey of sociological studies, 
with particular emphasis on theoreti- 
cal and methodological issues. Ex- 
amples will be drawn from studies 
on culture patterns, social structures, 
sexual mores, power relationships 
and the ethical implications of cross- 
national research. 



168 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



SYA 4330 Basic Research Design (3). 

Advanced course in social re- 
search, providing research prac- 
ticum for studying patterns of 
human behavior; analyzing findings 
of studies, methodical and analyti- 
cal procedures; reporting and ex- 
plaining these results; and applying 
these inferences to concrete situ- 
ations. Also acquaints the student 
with the use of computers in re- 
search in the behavioral sciences. 
(F) 

SYA 4354 Historical Sociology (3). 

The authenticity and meaning of his- 
torical data for sociological re- 
search. Systematic theories in history 
are analyzed for their utility in sociol- 
ogy. Particular emphasis on the so- 
ciological uses of the comparative 
method in history. 

SYA 4621 Sociology of the 20th Cen- 
tury (3). An examination of the socio- 
logical implications evident in the 
events of our modern world. Heavy 
reliance is placed on intellectual 
materials other than social science, 
especially literature. 

SYA 4905 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/or 
field research and training. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. (F.S.SS) 

SYA 5135 Sociology of Knowledge 
(3). The study of the theoretical ba- 
sis of knowledge and the inter-relat- 
edness of knowledge and social 
factors, particularly as knowledge re- 
lates to institutional forms of behav- 
ior. (S) 

SYA 5909 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/or 
field research and training. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. (F,S,SS) 

SYA 5941 Directed Field Research 
(VAR). Permission of instructor re- 
quired. (F,S,SS) 

SYD 3600 The Community (3). The so- 
cial group known as the community 
is identified and analyzed for its dis- 
tinctive qualities. By distinguishing it 
from other social groups, its dominat- 
ing force on the behavior of its mem- 
bers is isolated. Attention is given to 
the interaction of individuals and 
groups as they exist within the com- 
munity. (S) 

SYD 3620 Miami: An Urban Labora- 
tory (3). Study of Miami and Dade 
County using sociological and an- 
thropological techniques and the- 
ory, fieldwork assignments, readings 
and guest speakers. (F) 



SYD 4237 Immigration and Refugees 
(3). Examines the causes and conse- 
quences of immigration and refu- 
gee flows. Focuses on sociological 
and anthropological issues. 

SYD 4410 Urban Sociology (3). Study 
of the urban community, with par- 
ticular attention to the problems as- 
sociated with urban life. The 
development of urban societies is re- 
viewed historically, and factors asso- 
ciated with this development are 
identified. (F) 

SYD 4601 Community Organization 
(3). An intensive study of how com- 
munities are organized, with special 
emphasis on the interactive proc- 
esses of the varied components of a 
community. Special study, permit- 
ting students to concentrate on in- 
terest areas, is required. 

SYD 4610 Area Studies: Social Struc- 
tures and Problems (3). Special 
courses on the social structures and 
related problems of specific geo- 
graphical and cultural areas. To be 
offered at various times. 

SYD 4621 Cubans in the U.S. (3). An 

overview of Cuban migration to the 
U.S. and the establishment of Cu- 
ban communities in this country. Em- 
phasis on the development and 
dynamics of the enclave in Miami. 

SYD 4630 Latin American and Carib- 
bean Social Structures (3). Explora- 
tion of the types of social structures, 
statuses, and roles, and the resulting 
distributions of power and authority 
in the hemisphere. 

SYD 4700 Minorities/Race and Ethnic 
Relations (3). The study of social 
groups identified by racial or ethnic 
characteristics. Particular emphasis 
is given to the role of minorities in so- 
ciety, and the interactive process re- 
sulting from their contact with the 
majority. Social behaviors of minori- 
ties are reviewed and related to insti- 
tutional structures and their 
accepted norms. (F,S) 

SYD 4704 Seminar in Ethnicity (3). An 

upper-level seminar, stressing a com- 
parative sociological approach to 
the study of two or more racial-eth- 
nic groups. Emphasis on the interre- 
lations of ethnic communities within 
the same society and the socio-po- 
litical effects of these interrelations. 
Prerequisite: SYD 4700 or permission 
of Instructor. (S) 

SYD 4801 Sociological Theories of 
Gender (3). Examines theories of 
gender in classical and contempo- 



rary sociological theory. Prereq- 
uisites: SYA 4010 or permission of in- 
structor. 

SYD 4802 Sociology of Sexual Minori- 
ties (3). Social construction and de- 
velopment of sexual and gender 
identities in Western societies and 
cross-culturally. Topics include vari- 
ous contemporary social issues re- 
garding sexuality and minority status. 

SYD 4810 Sociology of Gender (3). 

An examination of women's and 
men's roles, statuses, and life oppor- 
tunities in society. Consideration of 
current theories of gender inequal- 
ity. (S) 

SYD 4820 Sociology of Men (3). Ex- 
amines the nature of the social con- 
struction of male gender identity in 
American society. (F) 

SYD 5045 Demographic Analysis (3). 

The study of the processes that de- 
termine the size and composition of 
human populations. Emphasis on 
demographic transition theory and 
the antecedents and conse- 
quences of differential growth rates 
throughout the world. 

SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 
(3). This course introduces the socio- 
logical perspective and method, 
and the basic areas of sociological 
interest such as socialization, sex 
roles, social groups, race and ethnic 
relations, deviance and social con- 
trol, social stratification, and urban 
life. (F,S,SS) 

SYG 2010 Social Problems (3). An in- 
troduction to the concept of a so- 
cial problem and the approaches 
used to understand more fully the to- 
tal dimensions of some specific prob- 
lems. Special emphasis is given to 
clarifying one's understanding of 
the underlying nature of selected so- 
cial problems, an analysis of those 
aspects amenable to remedy, and 
an inventory of the knowledge and 
skills available. (F.S.SS) 

SYG 3002 Basic Ideas of Sociology 
(5). The course introduces the stu- 
dent to the ideas of community, 
authority, status, alienation, and the 
sacred, as used in sociological litera- 
ture. (F.S.SS) 

SYG 3320 Social Deviancy (Deviant 
Behavior) (3). The study of behavior 
that counters the culturally ac- 
cepted norms or regularities. The so- 
cial implications of deviancy are 
reviewed, and theoretical formula- 
tions regarding deviant behavior 
are analyzed. (S.SS) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 169 



SYG 4003 Sociology through Film 
(3). Popular and documentary films 
as data for the analysis of various so- 
ciological problems. (F) 

SYG 4060 Sociology of Sexuality (3). 

Applies sociological perspectives to 
sexual attitudes and behavior, ex- 
amining various world cultures. Top- 
ics include premarital and 
extramarital sex, sexual orientation, 
and prostitution. (F,S) 

SYO 3120 Marriage and the Family 
(3). An introduction to the intensive 
study of the kinship relationship of 
man known as family. The family is 
distinguished from other special 
units, and behavior variations of this 
special unit are analyzed and asso- 
ciated with special functions. Con- 
temporary manifestations of the 
family and the dynamic changes in- 
dicated are considered. (F,S,SS) 

SYO 3250 School and Society (3). A 

specialized course dealing with the 
place of schools (particularly public) 
in society, the import of social crite- 
ria for school personnel, and the in- 
fluence of such criteria on 
educational processes within the 
school system (institution). (F) 

SYO 3400 Medical Sociology (3). An 

introductory overview of the social 
facets of health, disease, illness, and 
the organization/delivery of medical 
care and health care. (F.S) 

SYO 3401 Sociology of Health Be- 
havior (3). Provides a sociological 
perspective on health behavior. Top- 
ics include health as a social con- 
struct; personal, familial, and 
social/cultural determinants of 
health behavior; and health care 
delivery. 

SYO 4130 Comparative Family Sys- 
tems (3). The study of family organi- 
zation and function in selected 
major world cultures. Emphasis is 
given to the inter-relationships of the 
family, the economic system, urbani- 
zation, and human development. 

SYO 4200 Sociology of Religion and 
Cults (3). The study of religion's insti- 
tutions, their structure and function 
in various societies. Leadership quali- 
ties, participation, and practices, 
and the relationship of religious insti- 
tutions to other social institutions are 
studied. (F) 

SYO 4300 Political Sociology (3). The 

underlying social conditions of politi- 
cal order, political process, and po- 
litical behavior are explored. 
Examples are drawn from empirical 



and theoretical studies of power, 
elites, social class and socialization. 
(S,SS) 

SYO 4360 Industrial Sociology (3). 

Concentrated study of industrializa- 
tion and the sociological theory in- 
volved. Manpower, unemployment, 
apprentice programs, and classifica- 
tory schemes are studied. (F) 

SYO 4410 Sociology of Mental Illness 
(3). Contemporary issues in mental 
health and illness from a sociologi- 
cal perspective. Includes differential 
prevalence, health, and illness be- 
haviors, organization of care, social 
policy, and social control. (F) 

SYO 4420 Comparative Sociology of 
Health Care Systems (3). Health 
care policies, organization, and sys- 
tems from a cross-national perspec- 
tive, focusing on issues such as 
access, insurance, corporation, and 
spiraling costs. (S) 

SYO 4530 Social Stratification (Mobil- 
ity) (3). The study of society struc- 
tured hierarchically with particular 
attention to the form and content 
of the various levels. Problems in the 
social order and differential human 
behaviors associated with stratifica- 
tion are analyzed. (S) 

SYO 4571 The Problems of Bureauc- 
racy in The Modern World (3). The 

course deals with the micro-socio- 
logical problems of the internal or- 
ganization of bureaucracies; the 
relation between bureaucracy and 
personality; the macro-sociological 
problems of the emergence of the 
bureaucratic form; bureaucratiza- 
tion and contemporary life; general 
problems of affluence; meaningless 
activity; ways to beat the bureauc- 
racy; and bureaucracy and atroc- 
ity. (S) 

SYP 3000 The Individual in Society 
(3). Introduction to the study of the 
individual as a social being, with par- 
ticular emphasis on man's social ori- 
gins, human perceptions, and the 
interaction of the individual and the 
group within society. (F) 

SYP 3300 Social Movements (3). The 

study of human behavior as found in 
relatively unstructured forms, such as 
crowds, riots, revivals, public opinion, 
social movements and fads. The inter- 
play of such behavior and the rise of 
new norms and values is analyzed. (S) 

SYP 3400 Social Change (3). The 

study of major shifts in focus for so- 
cieties or culture, and the indicators 
associated with such changes. Par- 



ticular attention is given to the de- 
velopment of industrial societies and 
the dynamics involved for nations 
emerging from various stages of 'un- 
derdevelopment. (S) 

SYP 3520 Criminology (3). An intro- 
duction to the study of criminal be- 
havior, its evidence in society, 
society's reaction to the subjects in- 
volved, and the current state of 
theoretical thought on causality 
and treatment. (F) 

SYP 3530 Delinquency (3). An analy- 
sis of behavior which is extralegal, 
with major concentration on its ap- 
pearance among young people (ju- 
veniles) and society's response. 
Particular emphasis is given to the 
dynamic thrusts being made in es- 
tablishing juvenile rights as a distinct 
part of human or civil rights. (S) 

SYP 4321 Mass Culture (3). Analysis 
of the social, political, and cultural 
impact of mass communications. (S) 

SYP 4410 Social Conflict (3). The 

study of conflict in society and its 
place in social relationships. A study 
of causes and resolutions, with par- 
ticular emphasis on methods of reso- 
lution and their influence on social 
change. (F) 

SYP 4421 Man, Society, and Technol- 
ogy (3). The study of contemporary 
society, man's role in it, and effects 
of technological change. A study of 
interrelationships, with special atten- 
tion given to vocational study and 
instruction within the framework of 
the relationships perceived. (S) 

SYP 4441 Sociology of the Underprivi- 
leged Societies (3). An examination 
of the various theories concerning 
what is happening in the 'under-de- 
veloped world.' The political, social, 
and economic events of these so- 
cieties are subjected to sociological 
analysis. 

SYP 4460 Sociology of Disasters (3). 

Study of human response to disaster 
events, including political and eco- 
nomic factors influencing vulnerabil- 
ity. Examines how individuals and 
institutions make decisions at all lev- 
els of disaster response. 

SYP 4562 Domestic Violence (3). Ap- 
plies sociological perspectives to 
the topic of domestic violence. Ana- 
lyzes cultural roots and social struc- 
tures that promote and reinforce 
violence in intimate relationships. 
Prerequisites: SYG 2000 or ANT 2000. 
(F) 



170 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



SYP 4600 Sociology of Art and Litera- 
ture (3). This course approaches the 
question of art and society through 
an analysis of: the social production 
of art; the relationship between 
imagination and society; the role of 
the artist; and the ideological im- 
pact of aesthetic theory. 

SYP 4601 Symbols and Society (3). 

An analysis of the effect of culture 
on the individual and on society. 
The roles of popular and intellectual 
culture will be examined. 

SYP 4730 Sociology of Aging (3). The 

social impact of aging on individual 
and group interaction patterns, par- 
ticularly in the areas of retirement, 
family relations, community partici- 
pation, and social services. Explores 
the major sociological theories of 
aging in light of current research. (F) 

SYP 4740 Sociology of Death (3). An 

introduction to 'death' as social 
phenomenon. Attention given to 
various approaches which systemati- 
cally study death, with primary em- 
phasis given to the sociological 
approach. Major attention is given 
to an exploration of attitudes to- 
ward death, and an assessment of 
the implications for the respective 
groups involved. 



Statistics 

Jie Mi, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Carlos W. Brain, Associate Professor 
Ling Chen, Associate Professor 
Zhenmin Chen, Assistant Professor 
Gauri L. Ghai, Associate Professor 
Sneh Gulati, Associate Professor 
Ina Parks Howell, Lecturer 
Laura Reisert, Instructor 
Samuel S. Shapiro, Professor 
Hassan Zahedi-Jasbi, Associate 

Professor 
Jyoti N. Zalkikar, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Science in 

Statistics 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Common Prerequisites 

MAC 231 1 Calculus I 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 
COP 2210 Introduction to 

Programming 

or 
COP 2420 Programming in 

FORTRAN 

or 
COP 2400 Assembly Language 

Programming 

or 
CGS 2423 C for Engineers 
One of the following: 
BSC 1010 General Biology I 
BSC 1010L General Biology Lab I 
BSC 101 1 General Biology II 
BSC 101 1L General Biology Lab II 
CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 
CHM 1045L General Chemistry 

Labi 
CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 
CHM 1046L General Chemistry 

Lab II 
PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 
PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus 

Labi 
PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 
PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus 

Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 
MAC 2313 Multivariate Calculus 
MAS 3 1 05 Linear Algebra 



Upper Division Program 
Required Courses: (33) 
STA3163 Statistical Methods I 3 
STA3164 Statistical Methods II 3 
STA4321 Introduction to 

Mathematical 

Statistics I 3 

STA 4322 Introduction to 

Mathematical 

Statistics II 3 

STA 4202 Introduction to 

Design of 

Experiments 3 

STA 4234 Introduction to 

Regression Analysis 3 
STA 4664 Statistical Quality 

Control 3 

ENC2210 Technical Writing 3 

Six additional credit hours of ap- 
proved statistics courses 6 
Three additional credit hours in an 
approved statistics, mathematics, 
or computer science course 3 

A grade of 'C or higher in each 
of these courses is necessary for the 
major. 

Electives 

The balance of the 120 semester 
hour requirement for graduation 
may be chosen from any courses in 
the University approved by the stu- 
dent's advisor. 

Remarks: The student must consult 
his or her advisor to determine 
which courses, in addition to the re- 
quired courses listed above, satisfy 
the requirements for a statistics ma- 
jor. The following courses are not ac- 
ceptable for credit toward 
graduation, unless a student has 
passed the course before declaring 
a statistics major: MAC 2233, STA 
1013, STA 2023, STA 3033, STA 31 1 1 , 
STA 31 12, STA 2122, STA 3123, STA 
3145 and QMB 3200 (College of Busi- 
ness Administration). 

Minor in Statistics 

Lower or Upper Division 
Preparation: (3, 4, or 5) 

STA 31 11 Statistics I 4 

or 
STA 2 1 22 Introduction to 

Statistics I 3 

or 
STA 2023 Statistics for Business 

and Economics 3 

or 
MAC 2312 Calculus II 4 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 171 



Upper Division Program: (12) 
Required Courses 

STA3163 Statistical Methods I 3 
STA3164 Statistical Methods II 3 
Two additional courses from ihe fol- 
lowing list: 

STA 3033 Introduction to 

Probability and 

Statistics for CS 3 

or 
STA 4321 Introduction to 

Mathematical 

Statistics I 1 3 

STA 4322 Introduction to 

Mathematical 

Statistics II 3 

STA 4202 Introduction to 

Design of 

Experiments 3 

STA 4234 Introduction to 

Regression Analysis 3 
STA 4502 Introduction to 

Nonparametric 

Methods 3 

STA 4664 Statistical Quality 

Control 3 

'STA 4321 has MAC 2313 as a prereq- 
uisite. 

A grade of 'C or higher in each 
of these courses is necessary for the 
minor. 

Remarks: No courses in statistics, 
mathematics or computer sciences 
can be applied to more than one 
minor in these disciplines, nor can 
courses used to satisfy major require- 
ments be used towards minor re- 
quirements. In the case where a 
course is required for both a major 
in one area and a minor in another, 
the student should see his or her ad- 
visor for an appropriate substitution 
for the requirement of the minor. 

Certificate Program in 

Actuarial Studies 

See section on certificate programs 
under College of Arts and Sciences. 



Course Description 
Definition of Prefixes 

MAP - Mathematics, Applied; STA - 
Statistics. 

MAP 5117 Mathematical and Statisti- 
cal Modeling (3). Study of ecologi- 
cal, probabilistic, and various 
statistical models. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, COP 2210 or CGS 2420, 
MAS 3105; and STA 4322 or STA 3164 
or STA 3033. 



STA 1013 Statistics for Social Services 
(3). This is an elementary course in 
statistics, covering graphical and nu- 
merical condensation of data as 
well as the most basic parametric 
and non-parametric methods. Em- 
phasis is placed on the interpreta- 
tion of statistical results, rather than 
on ways to analyze experimental 
data. Prerequisite: MAC 2132 or 
MGF 1 202 or Junior standing. (F,S,SS) 

STA 1061 Introduction to SPSSX for 
Data Analysis (1). Data coding and 
entry for use on the mainframe. How 
to input data, create variables, se- 
lect subsets of data. Use procedures 
such as: LIST, FREQUENCIES, CROS- 
STABS, DESCRIPTIVES, MEANS and 
CORRELATIONS. Prerequisite: Basic 
Statistics, DCL and EDT. 

STA 1062 Introduction to SAS for 
Data Analysis (1). Data coding for 
entry use on the mainframe. SAS 
Data step to input data, create vari- 
ables, select subsets of data, PROCs 
such as: PRINT, FORMAT, MEANS, 
FREQ, SUMMARY, TEST, CORR. UNI- 
VARIATE and PLOT. Prerequisite: Ba- 
sic statistics, DCL and EDT. 

STA 2023 Statistics for Business and 
Economics (3). Starting with an intro- 
duction to probability, the course 
provides an introduction to statisti- 
cal techniques used in manage- 
ment science. It includes descriptive 
statistics, probability distributions, es- 
timation and testing of hypotheses. 
Subsequent credit for STA 2122 or 
STA 3111 will not be granted. Prereq- 
uisites: MAC 2132 or MGF 1202 or 
Junior standing. (F,S,SS) 

STA 2122 Introduction to Statistics I 
(3). A course in descriptive and infer- 
ential statistics. Topics include: prob- 
ability distribution of discrete and 
continuous random variables. Sam- 
pling distributions. Large sample esti- 
mation and hypothesis testing for 
means and proportions. Prereq- 
uisites: MAC 2132 or MGF 1202. 
(F.S.SS) 

STA 3033 Introduction to Probability 
and Statistics for CS (3). Basic prob- 
ability laws, probability distributions, 
basic sampling theory, point and in- 
terval estimation, tests of hypothe- 
ses, regression and correlation. 
Minitab will be used in the course. 
Prerequisite: MAC 2312. (F,S,SS) 

STA 3060L Statistics Laboratory (1). A 

laboratory course designed to illus- 
trate important statistical concepts 
through experiments. Data are ana- 
lyzed using statistical software pack- 



ages. Prerequisite or Corequisite: A 
statistics course. 

STA 31 1 1 Statistics I (4). Descriptive 
statistics, frequency distributions, 
probability distributions, point and in- 
terval estimation, hypothesis testing, 
one-way analysis of variance, corre- 
lation. Subsequent credit for STA 
2122 or STA 2023 will not be granted. 
Prerequisite: MAC 2132 or MGF 1202 
or Junior standing. (F.S.SS) 

STA 3112 Statistics II (2). Analysis of 
variance, nonparametric methods, 
linear regression, analysis of cate- 
gorical data. Computer software 
will be used. Subsequent credit for 
STA 3123 will not be granted. Prereq- 
uisite: STA 31 11. (F,S,SS) 

STA 3123 Introduction to Statistics II 
(4). Small sample statistical infer- 
ence for means and variances. T, 
chi-square and F distributions. Analy- 
sis of variance, regression, correla- 
tion, basic nonparametric tests, 
goodness of fit tests and tests of in- 
dependence. Prerequisites: STA 
2122 or equivalent. 

STA - Statistics for the Health Profes- 
sions (3). Statistical analysis with ap- 
plications in the health sciences. 
Binomial and normal distributions. In- 
ferences about means and propor- 
tions. Regression, correlation, 
goodness of fit tests. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2 1 32 or MGF 1 202 or Junior 
standing. 

STA 3163-STA 3164 Statistical Meth- 
ods I and II (3-3). This course pre- 
sents tools for the analysis of data. 
Specific topics include: use of nor- 
mal distribution, tests of means, vari- 
ances and proportions; the analysis 
of variance and covariance (includ- 
ing contrasts and components of 
variance models), regression, corre- 
lation, sequential analysis, and non- 
parametric analysis. Prerequisite: 
MAC 2312 or a course in statistics. 
(F,S) 

STA 3905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

STA 3930 Special Topics (VAR). A 

course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

STA 3949 Cooperative Education in 
Statistics (1-3). One semester of 
either part-time or full-time work in 
an outside organization. Limited to 
students admitted to the Co-op pro- 
gram. A written report and supervi- 



172 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



sor evaluation are required of each 
student. Prerequisite: 2 courses in sta- 
tistics and permission of Chairperson. 

STA 4102 Introduction to Statistical 
Computing (3). Data manipulation 
and statistical procedures using 
popular software, simulation, and 
statistical algorithms. Prerequisites: 
STA 3164 or STA 3123 or STA 31 12, 
and COP 2210 or CGS 2420. 

STA 4173-HSC 4510 Statistical Appli- 
cations in Health Care (3). A course 
in descriptive and inferential statis- 
tics for the Health Services. Topics in- 
clude probability distributions, point 
and interval estimation, hypothesis 
testing, regression and correlation, 
dnd contingency table analysis. Pre- 
requisite: STA 1013 or equivalent col- 
lege mathematics course. 

STA 4182 Statistical Models (3). This is 
a specialized course in the use of 
statistical models to represent physi- 
cal and social phenomena. The em- 
phasis is on providing tools which will 
allow a researcher or analyst to gain 
some insight into phenomena being 
studied. An introductory knowledge 
of probability theory and random 
variables is assumed. Specific topics 
include: introduction to discrete 
and continuous probability distribu- 
tions, transformation of variables, ap- 
proximation of data by empirical 
distributions, central limit theorem, 
propagation of moments, Monte 
Carlo simulation, probability plot- 
ting, testing distributional assump- 
tions. Prerequisites: STA 3033 or STA 
4321. 

STA 4202 Introduction to Design of 
Experiments (3). Completely ran- 
domized, randomized block, Latin 
square, factorial, nested and re- 
lated designs. Multiple comparisons. 
Credit will not be given for both STA 
4202 and STA 5206. Prerequisite: STA 
4322 or STA 3164 or STA 3033 or (STA 
3163 and STA 4321). 

STA 4321 -STA 4322 Introduction to 
Mathematical Statistics I and II (3- 

3). This course presents an introduc- 
tion to the mathematics underlying 
the concepts of statistical analysis. It 
is based on a solid grounding in prob- 
ability theory, and requires a knowl- 
edge of single and multivariable 
calculus. Specific topics include the 
following: basic probability concepts, 
random variables, probability densi- 
ties, expectations, moment generat- 
ing functions, sampling distributions, 
decision theory, estimation, hypothe- 
sis testing (parametric and non-para- 
metric), regression, analysis of 



variance, and design of experi- 
ments. Prerequisite: MAC 2313. (F,S) 

STA 4234 Introduction to Regression 
Analysis (3). Multiple and polyno- 
mial regression, residual analysis, 
model identification and other re- 
lated topics. Credit will not be given 
for both STA 4234 and STA 5236. Pre- 
requisite: STA 3164 or STA 3123 or STA 
3112. 

STA 4502 Introduction to Nonpara- 
metric Methods (3). Sign, Mann-Whit- 
ney U, Wilcoxon signed rank, 
Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman and other 
distribution-free tests. Rank correla- 
tion, contingency tables and other 
related topics. Credit for both STA 
4502 and STA 5505 will not be 
granted. Prerequisite: First course in 
statistics. 

STA 4664 Statistical Quality Control 
(3). This course presents the simple 
but powerful statistical techniques 
employed by industry to improve 
product quality and to reduce the 
cost of scrap. The course includes 
the use and construction of control 
charts (means, percentages, 
number defectives, ranges) and ac- 
ceptance sampling plans (single 
and double). Standard sampling 
techniques such as MIL STD plans will 
be reviewed. Prerequisite: Introduc- 
tory course in statistics. 

STA 4905 Independent Study (VAR). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
readings, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

STA 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Statistics (1-3). One semester of 
either part-time or full-time work, in 
an outside organization. Limited to 
students admitted to the Co-op pro- 
gram. A written report and supervi- 
sor evaluation are required of each 
student. Prerequisite: STA 4322, STA 
3164 and permission of Chairperson. 

STA 5106 Intermediate Statistics I (3). 

Power, measures of assoc, measure- 
ment, ANOVA: one-way and facto- 
rial, between and within subjects 
expected mean squares, planned 
comparisons, a-priori contrasts, 
fixed, random, mixed models. This 
course may be of particular interest 
to behavioral sciences. Prereq- 
uisites: STA 3111 and graduate stand- 
ing. (F) 

STA 5107 Intermediate Statistics II 
(3). Correlation and regression both 
simple and multiple, general linear 
model, analysis of covariance, 
analysis of nominal data, analysis of 
categorical data. This course may 



be of particular interest to behav- 
ioral sciences. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. (S) 

STA 5126/PSY 5206 Fundamentals of 
Design of Experiments (3). CRD and 

RCB designs. Latin square designs. 
Factorial, nested and nested-facto- 
rial experiments. Fixed, random and 
mixed models. Split-plot designs. Co- 
variance analysis. Prerequisites: STA 
3123 or STA 31 12 or equivalent. 

STA 5206 Design of Experiments I (3). 

Design and analysis of completely 
randomized, randomized block, 
Latin square, factorial, nested and 
related experiments. Multiple com- 
parisons. Credit for both STA 4202 
and STA 5206 will not be granted. 
Prerequisite: STA 4322 or STA 3164 or 
STA 3033 or (STA 3163 and STA 4321). 

STA 5207 Topics in Design of Experi- 
ments (3). This applied course in de- 
sign of experiments covers topics 
such as split-plot design, confound- 
ing, fractional replication, incom- 
plete block designs, and response 
surface designs. Prerequisite: STA 
5206. 

STA 5236 Regression Analysis (3). 

Simple, multiple and polynomial re- 
gression, analysis of residuals, model 
building and other related topics. 
Credit for both STA 4234 and STA 
5236 will not be granted. Prereq- 
uisites: STA 3164 or STA 3123 or STA 
31 12, or STA 6167. 

STA 5446-STA 5447 Probability The- 
ory I and II (3-3). This course is de- 
signed to acquaint the student with 
the basic fundamentals of prob- 
ability theory. It reviews the basic 
foundations of probability theory, 
covering such topics as discrete 
probability spaces, random walk, 
Markov Chains (transition matrix and 
ergodic properties), strong laws of 
probability, convergence theorems, 
and law of iterated logarithm. Pre- 
requisite: MAC 2313. 

STA 5505 Nonparametric Methods 
(3). Distribution-free tests: sign, Mann- 
Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed rank, 
Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, etc. Rank 
correlation, contingency tables and 
other related topics. Credit for both 
STA 4502 and STA 5505 will not be 
granted. Prerequisite: First course in 
statistics. 

STA 5676 Reliability Engineering (3). 

The course material is designed to 
give the student a basic under- 
standing of the statistical and 
mathematical techniques which are 
used in engineering reliability analy- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 1 73 



sis. A review will be made of the ba- 
sic fundamental statistical tech- 
niques required. Subjects covered 
include: distributions used in reliabil- 
ity (exponential, binomial, extreme 
value, etc.); tests of hypotheses of 
failure rates; prediction of compo- 
nent reliability; system reliability pre- 
diction; and reliability appor- 
tionment. Prerequisite: STA 4322. 

STA 5800 Stochastic Processes for En- 
gineers (3). Probability and condi- 
tional probability distributions of a 
random variable, bivariate prob- 
ability distributions, multiple random 
variables, stationary processes, Pois- 
son and normal processes. Prereq- 
uisites: STA 3033, MAC 2313, MAP 
2302. 

STA 5826 Stochastic Processes (3). 

This course is intended to provide 
the student with the basic concepts 
of stochastic processes, and the use 
of such techniques in the analysis of 
systems. Subjects include: Markov 
Processes, queuing theory, renewal 
processes, birth and death proc- 
esses, Poisson and Normal proc- 
esses. Applications to system 
reliability analysis, behavioral sci- 
ence, and natural sciences will be 
stressed. Prerequisite: STA 5447. 

STA 5906 Independent Study (VAR). 
Individual conferences, assigned 
reading, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigation. 



Theatre and Dance 

Therald Todd, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Lee Brooke, Associate Professor 
Joanne Brown, Instructor 
Phillip Church, Associate Professor 
Karen Fuller, Instructor 
Robert Jones, Instructor 
Gary Lund, Instructor 
Douglas Molash, Assistant Professor 
Leslie Neal, Associate Professor 
Wayne Robinson, Assistant Professor 
Brian Schriner, Instructor 
Andrea Seidel, Associate Professor 
Marilyn Skow, Associate Professor 
Leslie Ann Timlick, Assistant Professor 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in 

Theatre 

Degree Program Hours: 128 

The goal of the theatre program is 
to provide intensive theatre training 
through classes and productions 
conducted with professional theatre 
discipline and the highest possible 
aesthetic standards. In addition to 
completion of course work, theatre 
majors are required to participate in 
all of the major productions pre- 
sented while the student is enrolled 
in the Theatre Program. 

Students will complete the core 
courses and select a specialization 
in either Acting or Production. 

The degree requirements repre- 
sent q four year program. Upper divi- 
sion transfers must have their lower 
division preparation evaluated by 
the department and will be advised 
accordingly. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Students for whom English is a 
second language must have a mini- 
mum TOEFL score of at least 550 plus 
an interview with department per- 
sonnel to determine adequacy of 
English writing and speaking skills for 
the major. 

Required Courses: (47) 
THE 1020 Freshman Theatre 

Seminar 3 

TPA2210 Stagecraft I 3 

TPA2010 Introduction to Scenic 
and Lighting Design 3 
TPA 3230 Stage costuming 3 

TPA 3250 Stage Make-up 3 



TPA 2290L Technical Theatre 

Labi 1 
TPA2291L Technical Theatre 

Lab II 1 
TPA 2292L Technical Theatre 

Lab III 1 
TPA 3293L Technical Theatre 

Lab IV 1 

TPP2110 Acting I 3 

TPP2710 Theatre Voice I 2 
TPP2510 Theatre Movement I 2 
TPP 1120 Introduction to 

Performance 3 

TPP 3310 Directing I 3 

TPP 3650 Playscript Analysis 3 

THE 41 10 Theatre History I 3 

THE 41 11 Theatre History II 3 

THE 4970 Senior Project I 1 

THE 4971 Senior Project II 1 
THE 4370 Modern Dramatic 

Literature 3 

THE 4930 Senior Seminar 2 

Additional required courses for 
the Acting specialization: (18) 

TPP 21 11 Acting II 3 

TPP 31 12 Acting III 3 

TPP 41 14 Acting IV 3 

TPP 4920 Actor's Workshop I 3 

TPP 3711 Theatre Voice II 2 

TPP 351 1 Theatre Movement II 2 
TPP 3 1 64 Theatre Voice 

and Movement III 3 

Additional required courses for 
the Production Specialization: (18) 
TPA 3061 Approaches to 

Design for the Stage 

or 
TPA 3601 Stage Management 3 

A practical art class selected 
from the Visual Arts Department 
and approved by advisor 3 

TPA 4400 Theatre Management 

or 
TPA 3060 Scenic Design I 

or 
TPA 3220 Stage Lighting I 3 

TPA 4061 Scenic Design II 

or 
TPA 22 11 Stagecraft II 

or 
TPA 4221 Stage Lighting II 

or 
TPA 4231 Stage Costume Design I 

or 
THE 4950 Theatre Internship 3 
TPA 3930 Special Topics 

in Technical 

Production and/or 
THE 4916 Research 6 

Total Credits for the Major 65 



1 74 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Bachelor of Arts in Dance 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

The philosophy of the dance pro- 
gram is to provide the highest stand- 
ards of academic and technical 
training while fostering individual 
creativity, intellectual growth and 
humanistic ideals to meet the chal- 
lenges of the 21st Century in a mul- 
ticultural society. The program offers 
a four year curriculum of compre- 
hensive dance technique and the- 
ory classes, complemented by a 
secondary emphasis in a dance re- 
lated field such as dance educa- 
tion, dance history, dance 
ethnology or preparation for ad- 
vanced degree work in a selected 
area of dance such as dance ther- 
apy. The secondary emphasis is de- 
termined through faculty 
advisement. Upper division transfer 
students must have their lower divi- 
sion preparation evaluated by the 
department. 

Students interested in majoring in 
dance and who meet the admission 
requirements of the University are 
automatically accepted as potential 
dance majors. While no auditions are 
required prior to admittance to the 
University, certain standards of per- 
formance are required by the dance 
faculty before the student is allowed 
to declare a major in dance. An in- 
termediate proficiency is required in 
one or more dance techniques. Stu- 
dents are evaluated during the first 
week of classes each term to deter- 
mine appropriate technique level. In 
addition, all students applying for ac- 
ceptance into the major must have 
met all lower division requirements 
including CLAST. 

INDAMI - Intercultural Dance 
and Music Institute and the FIU 
Dance Ensemble-The Student Per- 
formance Group are based at the 
University Park Campus. 
Required Courses: (55) 
DAA 1200 Ballet Techniques I 2 
DAA1201 Ballet Techniques 1-2 2 
DAA 2202 Ballet Techniques 11-2 3 
DAA 2203 Ballet Techniques 11-2 3 
DAA 1 100 Modern Dance 

Techniques I 2 

DAA 1 101 Modern Dance 

Techniques 1-2 2 

DAA 2 1 02 Modern Dance 

Techniques II 2-3 

DAA 2103 Modern Dance 

Techniques 11-2 2-3 

DAA 3204 Ballet Techniques III 



DAA 3 1 04 Modern Dance 

Techniques III 3 

or 
DAA 3343 Cultural Dance Forms' 
DAA 3205 Ballet Techniques 111-2 

or 
DAA 3 1 05 Modern Dance 

Techniques II 1—2 3 

or 
DAA 3343 Cultural Dance Forms ' 
DAA 4206 Ballet Techniques IV 

or 
DAA 4106 Modern Dance 

Techniques IV 3 

or 
DAA 3343 Cultural Dance 

Forms 1 
DAA 4207 Ballet Techniques IV-2 

or 
DAA 4107 Modern Dance 

Techniques IV-2 3 

or 
DAA 3343 Cultural Dance 

Forms' 
DAN 1603 Music for Dance 2 

DAA 2700 Dance Composition I 2 
DAN 3420 Laban Movement 

Analysis 2 

DAA 3702 Dance 

Composition III 2 

DAN 4113 Dance History I 3 

DAN 41 14 Dance History II 3 

DAA 3420 Dance Repertory 2 
DAN 4512 Dance Production 2 
DAN 4970 Senior Thesis 2 

DAN 4932 Dance Ethnology 

or 

Latin American and 

Caribbean Dance 3 



DAN 



DAN 4171 Dance Philosophy and 

Criticism 
] Note: Cultural Dance Forms may 
be substituted two times or more, 
subject to advisement. 

DAA 3703 Dance Composition IV 
now becomes an elective. 
Specialization Electlves: (min 12) 
With Dance faculty advisor's ap- 
proval the student will select elec- 
tives which will prepare him/her for 
a career in a dance related field. 
The electives would constitute a spe- 
cialization in the selected area. The 
exact number of credits needed to 
complete the specialization de- 
pends on the specialization, but the 
minimum allowed by the dance pro- 
gram is 12. 

More credits may be necessary, 
depending on the nature of the spe- 



cialization. Each student will receive 
individual advisement on specializa- 
tion requirements. 

A grade of 'C or higher is neces- 
sary in all required courses for gradu- 
ation. 
Total credits for the major: 67 

Minor in Dance 

The Minor in Dance is designed to 
meet the needs of the Liberal Arts 
student who wants to pursue dance 
in order to increase his/her creative 
development and artistic aware- 
ness, and for those students who 
feel that dance is closely related to 
or an important extension or facet 
of their major discipline. 
Requirements for Minor 

Twenty credits minimum. 

Fourteen credits in Dance 
Technique 
Six credits in other Dance courses 

Ten credits must be taken at FIU 

Ten credits must be upper division 

Minor in Theatre 

Required Courses (24) 

THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation 3 

TPP2100 Introduction to 

Acting 3 

THE 4370 Modern Dramatic 

Literature 3 

TPA2210 Stagecraft 3 

TPA 2290L Tech Theatre Lab I 1 
Theatre Electives (upper division) 1 1 

Theatre minors will not be al- 
lowed to take TPP 21 10 Acting I. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

DAA-Dance Activities; DAN-Dance; 
ORI-Oral Interpretation; SPC-Speech 
Communication; THE-Theatre; TPA- 
Theatre Production and Administra- 
tion; TPP-Theatre- Performance and 
Performance Training. 

COM 3461 Intercultural/lnterracial 
Communication (3). How people 
communicate cross-culturally, inter- 
culturally and intraculturally. 

DAA 1 100 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques I (2). Development of Tech- 
niques and understanding of the art 
form of contemporary dance. May 
be repeated. 

DAA 1101 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques 1-2 (2). A continuation of 
Modern Dance Techniques I with 
emphasis on vocabulary, move- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 175 



ment, rhythm and alignment. May 
be repeated. Prerequisite: DAA 1 100 
or permission of instructor. 

DAA 1200 Ballet Techniques I (2). De- 
velopment of Techniques and un- 
derstanding of ballet. May be 
repeated. 

DAA 1201 Ballet Techniques 1-2 (2). 

A continuation of Ballet Techniques I 
with an emphasis on vocabulary, 
movement skill and alignment. May 
be repeated. Prerequisite: DAA 1200 
or permission of instructor. 

DAA 1500 Jazz Dance Techniques 
(2). Development of the dance 
Techniques and understanding of 
jazz dance. May be repeated. 

DAA 2102 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques II (2-3). A continuation of ba- 
sic Techniques and understanding 
of the art form of contemporary 
dance. Prerequisite: DAA 1 100 or 
permission of instructor. May be re- 
peated. 

DAA 2103 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques 11-2 (2-3). A continuation of 
Modern Dance Techniques II with 
further emphasis on style and phras- 
ing. Prerequisite: DAA 2102 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

DAA 2202 Ballet Techniques II (2-3). 

A continuation of Ballet Techniques 
II with increasing complexity of com- 
binations. Emphasis on correct exe- 
cution of basics and musicality. May 
be repeated. Prerequisite: DAA 2202 
or permission of instructor. 

DAA 2203 Ballet Techniques 11-2 (2- 

3). A continuation of the basic Tech- 
niques and understanding of ballet. 
Prerequisite: DAA 2202 or permission 
of instructor. May be repeated. 

DAA 2501 Jazz Dance Techniques II 
(2). A continuation of Jazz I with em- 
phasis on quickness and musicality 
when executing complex combina- 
tions of movements. 

DAA 2600 Tap (2). Designed for stu- 
dents interested in learning the skills 
and Techniques of tap dancing. 

DAA 2700 Dance Composition I (2). 

A study of the principles of composi- 
tion- emphasis on improvisation to 
explore structure and form in 
dance. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

DAA 2701 Dance Composition II (2). 

A continuation of Composition I with 
an emphasis on exploring move- 
ment potential and structuring of 



dance forms. Prerequisite: DAA 2700 
or permission of instructor. 

DAA 3104 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques III (3). A continuation of Mod- 
ern Dance I and II with an emphasis 
on skills In movement style and 
phrasing necessary to perform mod- 
ern dance repertory. Prerequisite: 
DAA 2102 or permission of instructor. 

DAA 3105 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques 111-2 (3). A continuation of 
Modern Dance Techniques III with 
an emphasis on skills in movement 
style and phrasing necessary to per- 
form modern dance repertory. Pre- 
requisite: DAA 3104 or permission of 
instructor. 

DAA 3204 Ballet III (3). A continu- 
ation of Ballet I & II with an emphasis 
on developing strength & coordina- 
tion in more complex movement. 
Additional work on phrasing, quality 
of movement, musicality and per- 
formance style. Prerequisite: DAA 
2202 or permission of instructor. 

DAA 3205 Ballet Techniques 111-2 (3). 

A continuation of Ballet Techniques 
III with an emphasis on strength and 
form. Introduction of pointe work. 
Center practice in balance, jumps, 
beats and turns. Prerequisite: DAA 
3204 or permission of instructor. 

DAA 3220 Pointe Techniques (1). In- 
troduction of fundamentals for de- 
velopment of pointe Techniques. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Instructor. 

DAA 3343 Cultural Dance Forms (3). 

An in-depth focus on specific cul- 
tural dance styles (Haitian, Afro-Cu- 
ban, etc.) to vary each semester. 
Studio course. May be repeated. 

DAA 3420 Dance Repertory (2). The 

study and practice of works in reper- 
tory. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

DAA 3702 Dance Composition & Im- 
provisation III (2). A further explora- 
tion of choreography for the group 
form. Students will be required to 
take a concept and complete a 
work for showing and critique. Pre- 
requisite: DAA 3701 or permission of 
instructor. 

DAA 3703 Dance Composition & Im- 
provisation IV (2). Students work on 
extended choreographic projects 
with an eye toward developing ma- 
terial for their senior project. Prereq- 
uisite DAA 3702 or permission of 
instructor. 



DAA 3950 Dance Ensemble (1). An 

auditioned performing and produc- 
tion laboratory. Permission of instructor. 

DAA 4106 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques IV (3). Advanced modern 
dance Techniques with the major fo- 
cus on dance as an art form using 
the body as a medium of expres- 
sion. Prerequisite: DAA 3104 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

DAA 4107 Modern Dance Tech- 
niques IV-2 (3). A continuation of 
Modern Dance Techniques IV with 
the major emphasis on perform- 
ance skills. Prerequisite: DAA 4106 or 
permission of instructor. 

DAA 4206 Ballet Techniques IV (3). 

Further development of strength 
and form with emphasis placed on 
perfecting the execution of the clas- 
sical ballet Techniques. Prerequisite: 
DAA 3204 or permission of instructor. 

DAA 4207 Ballet Techniques IV-2 (3). 

A continuation of Ballet Techniques 
IV with an emphasis on developing 
individual performance styles. Pre- 
requisite: DAA 4206 or permission of 
instructor. 

DAA 4362 Spanish Dance (2). This 
course explores the basics of three 
theatre styles of Spanish dance. 

DAA 4363 Spanish Dance II (3). A 

continuation of Spanish Dance I 
stressing the development of musi- 
cality while working with a variety of 
basic rhythms. Arm and upper body 
strength and style will be empha- 
sized as well as footwork techniques. 
Prerequisites: DAA 4362 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

DAA 4364 Spanish Dance III (3). A 

continuation of Spanish Dance II, 
stressing the development of musi- 
cality while working with both basic 
and more complex flamenco 
rhythms. Elements of flamenco cho- 
reography are also explored. Prereq- 
uisite: DAA 4363. - 

DAA 4502 Jazz Dance Techniques III 
(2-3). A continuation of jazz dance 
Techniques and skills with Increased 
emphasis on developing complex 
dance combinations and full rou- 
tines. 

DAN 1603 Music for Dance (2). The 

connection of musical structure and 
body movement will be explored in 
improvisational dance composition 
exercises. The basic elements of 
rhythm, tempo and meter will be 
studied. 



176 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



DAN 2100 Introduction to Dance (3). 

An overview of dance from a vari- 
ety of cultural and traditional per- 
spectives. Through film, lecture, and 
movement, this course explores the 
diverse ways in which we organize 
and interpret our life experience as 
human beings through dance. 

DAN 3420 Laban Movement Analy- 
sis (2). An introduction to movement 
analysis, Bartenieff fundamentals, Ef- 
fort-Shape, and Labanotation. 

DAN 3820 Introduction to 
Dance/Movement Therapy (1). An 

introduction to the history, theory, 
and practice of Dance/Movement 
Therapy. Students learn how this me- 
dium can further the emotional, 
cognitive, and physical integration 
of the individual. 

DAN 3910 Latin American Carib- 
bean Dance and Culture (3). Re- 
search, fieldwork, and studio 
practice related to the investigation 
of the dance and culture of Latin 
America and the Caribbean. 

DAN 4113 Dance History I (3). An in- 
troduction to the history of non-west- 
ern, cultural dance forms from tribal 
to modern. 

DAN 4114 Dance History II (3). A sur- 
vey of the development of dance in 
the West from Ancient Greece to 
present day. Prerequisite: DAN 4113 
or permission of instructor. 

DAN 4171 Philosophy and Criticism 
of Dance (3). An exploration of the 
major philosophical and critical 
theories of the art of the dance 
within a broad socio-historical con- 
text. 

DAN 4512 Dance Production (2). This 
course prepares dancers for all as- 
pects of dance concert production 
including lighting, costuming, props, 
set designs, budget management, 
and publicity. 

DAN 4910 Research (1-5). Super- 
vised individual investigation of spe- 
cial research projects. Credit will 
vary with the nature and scope of 
the project. May be repeated. 

DAN 4932 Dance Ethnology (3). A 

special topics course which will 
study a specific dance culture from 
an historical, sociological and an- 
thropological viewpoint. Topic will 
vary from semester to semester. 

DAN 4970 Senior Thesis (2). Prepara- 
tion of a comprehensive final work 
in the student's area of emphasis un- 
der the direction of a faculty advi- 



sor. Prerequisite: Permission of instruc- 
tor, dance majors only. 

ORI 3000 Basic Oral Interpretation 
(3). Development of the voice as an 
instrument for expressive interpreta- 
tion of literature. 

ORI 3003 Intermediate Oral Interpre- 
tation (3). A continuation of the ba- 
sic Techniques of oral interpretation 
with emphasis on program develop- 
ment. Programs will include poetry, 
prose, and drama. Prerequisite: ORI 
3000. 

SPC - Voice and Diction (3). Effec- 
tive voice production, articulation, 
acceptable pronunciation, accent 
reduction, intonation, rhythm and 
phrasing. 

SPC 2062 Communication for Busi- 
ness (3). A communication course 
that emphasizes oral communica- 
tion skills necessary for the business 
and professional communities. Con- 
centration on interviewing, public 
speaking, problem-solving, and 
leadership skills. 

SPC 2600 Public Speaking (3). Study 
of the principles of ethical and effec- 
tive public speaking, with practice 
in the construction and delivery of 
original speeches before an audi- 
ence. 

SPC 3210 Communication Theory 
(3). Comprehensive introduction to 
the study of human communication 
processes including verbal and non- 
verbal modalities. Key historical and 
contemporary definitions and con- 
cepts in communication theory are 
reviewed. 

SPC 3301 Interpersonal Communica- 
tion (3). Fundamental principles and 
terms of human communication 
study in the interpersonal context. 
Practical application of definitions, 
models, and communication rules 
and competence discussed with 
emphasis on a variety of relational 
stages and types. 

SPC 3513 Argumentation and De- 
bate (3). Lectures and activities con- 
cerned with audience-centered 
reasoning. Topics include: Nature of 
argument, analysis, reasoning, evi- 
dence, values, and building and re- 
futing arguments. Prerequisite: SPC 
2600 or permission of instructor. 

SPC 3514 Argumentation and De- 
bate II (3). Study of all styles of for- 
mal and informal debate. Emphasis 
on construction and use of the brief, 
debate strategy and delivery. Pre- 



requisites: SPC 2600, SPC 3513 and 
permission of instructor. 

SPC- Corporate Communication 
Theory and Leadership Dynamics 
(3). Emphasis on oral communica- 
tion and leadership skills that are es- 
sential for the business community. 

THE 1020 Freshman Theatre Seminar 
(3). An orientation to the study, the- 
ory, and practice of theatre for 
freshman theatre majors. It provides 
the foundation for theatre study at 
more advanced levels. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. (F) 

THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation (3). A 

study of theatre: process and prod- 
uct, introducing the past of theatre, 
its literature and traditions; and the 
means by which theatre is pro- 
duced: acting, directing and visual 
design. (F,S) 

THE 2051 Children's Theatre (3). Tech- 
niques of selection, production, and 
performance of plays for children. 

THE 2820 Creative Dramatics (3). The 

study of informal drama activity with 
children. Techniques of improvisa- 
tion, sense recall, music, and move- 
ment are employed. 

THE 41 10 Theatre History I (3). The de- 
velopment of the theatre from its ori- 
gins to the early 19th century. (F) 

THE 41 1 1 Theatre History II (3). The 

development of the theatre from 
early 19th century to the present. (S) 

THE 4370 Modern Dramatic Litera- 
ture (3). Intensive play reading and 
discussion from early modern - 
through contemporary. (S) 

THE 4916 Research (1-5). Supervised 
individual investigation of special re- 
search projects. Credit will vary with 
the nature and scope of the pro- 
ject. May be repeated. 

THE 4930 Senior Seminar (2). Theories 
of theatre presentation. Reading, 
seminar presentations and discus- 
sions cover the theories of playwrit- 
ing, dramatic forms, acting, 
directing, design and theatrical criti- 
cism. Prerequisite: Theatre major. (S) 

THE 4950 Theatre Internship (1-15). 

Supervised internship in a profes- 
sional company in acting, directing, 
stage management, design, techni- 
cal theatre, or theatre manage- 
ment. 

THE 4970 Senior Project I (1). Prepara- 
tion of a final creative project in the 
student's area of emphasis under the 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 1 77 



direction of a department chairper- 
son. Theatre majors only. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Instructor. 

THE 4971 Senior Project II (1). Final 
preparation and performance or 
presentation of a creative project in 
the student's area of emphasis under 
the direction of a faculty advisor. 
Theatre majors only. Prerequisite: THE 
4970. 

THE 4972 Senior Thesis (1). Research 
and writing of a thesis dealing with 
an aspect of theatre history and/or 
theory. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 

TPA 2010 Introduction to Scenic and 
Lighting Design (3). An introduction to 
the creative process of Pringing scen- 
ery and lighting to the stage. Includes 
script analysis and rendering tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: TPA 2210. (F) 

TPA 2210 Stagecraft I (3). An introduc-. 
tion to construction Techniques used 
in stage. Direct experience with 
wood and metal working tools, blue- 
print reading, and various materials in- 
cluding wood, metal, plastics and 
fabrics. Lecture and laboratory. Pre- 
requisite: Prior arrangement with advi- 
sor. (F,S) 

TPA 22 11 Stagecraft II (3). Advanced 
problems in the construction and 
movement of scenery, properties, 
and special effects. Prerequisite: TPA 
3200. 

TPA 2290L Technical Theatre Lab 1(1). 

Supervised crew work in construction, 
painting, lighting, costuming, and run- 
ning major productions. Required of 
Theatre majors. (F,S) 

TPA 2291 L Technical Theatre Lab II 
(1). Supervised crew work. Required 
of Theatre majors. (F,S) 

TPA 2292L Technical Theatre Lab III 
(1). Supervised crew work. Required 
of Theotre majors. (F,S) 

TPA 3040 Costume Design I (3). The 

theory and practice of designing 
stage costumes through play and 
character analysis, research, and 
translation of this information into ef- 
fective stage costume designs. Pre- 
requisite: TPA 3230. Corequisites: TPA 
2291 or TPA 2292. 

TPA 3060 Scenic Design I (3). Funda- 
mentals of designing effective set- 
tings for the play. Discussion and 
practice in: analysis, research, the 
creation of appropriate and exciting 
environments for the actor, and basic 
skills in rendering and model making. 



Prerequisite (for Theatre majors): TPA 
2210. 

TPA 3061 Approaches to Design for 
the Stage (3). Nontraditional ap- 
proaches to the development of de- 
sign elements for the stage. 
Prerequisites: TPA 3230, and TPA 2010. 

TPA 3071 Stage Rendering (3). An in- 
troduction to the Techniques used in 
rendering scenery and costume de- 
sign concepts. Recommended as 
preparation for TPA 3060 and TPA 
4230. 

TPA 3220 Stage Lighting (3). Familiari- 
zation with stage lighting equipment, 
purposes, and aesthetics of stage 
lighting; development of an ap- 
proach to designing lighting; practi- 
cal experience in the use of 
equipment. Lecture and laboratory. 

TPA 3230 Stage costuming (3). Cos- 
tume history and costume construc- 
tion techniques, as well as the basics 
of the design process, fabric identifi- 
cation, and manipulation. Corequi- 
site: TPA 2290, 2291 , 2292, or 3292. (F) 

TPA 3250 Stage Make-up (3). Facial 
analysis, color matching, makeup de- 
sign and application techniques of 
makeup for the stage. Includes char- 
acter analysis and history of makeup 
styles. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. (S) 

TPA 3293L Technical Theatre Lab IV 
(1). Supervised crew work. Required 
of Theotre majors. Prerequisite: TPA 
2292L. (F.S) 

TPA 3601 Stage Management (3). A 

practical course in the methods and 
procedures used by the stage man- 
ager. It includes the study of the work- 
ing organizational function of the 
stage manager in theatre, dance, 
and other performance situations. 

TPA 3930 Special Topics in Technical 
Production (1-3). Lecture-lab studies 
in particular areas of theatre produc- 
tion, one area per semester, includ- 
ing stage management, prop 
making, sound design, special effects. 

TPA 4061 Scenic Design II (3). Ad- 
vanced skills in setting the mood of, 
and creating movement through a 
theatrical space. Emphasis will be 
placed upon rendering Techniques 
and model making. Prerequisite: TPA 
3060. 

TPA 4041 Costume Design II (3). A 

continuation of Costume Design I, 
with increased emphasis on refining 
skills developed at first design level, 
plus developing a personal design 



style and more advanced construc- 
tion skills. Prerequisite: TPA 3040. 

TPA 4221 Stage Lighting II (3). Ad- 
vance work in lighting of the stage. 
Emphasis is on practical training and 
experience through drafting of light 
plots accompanied by discussion 
and evaluation. Prerequisite: TPA 
3220. 

TPA 4231 Stage costume design i (3). 

Advanced skills in designing, render- 
ing, and construction of costumes. In- 
cludes pattern making and charting 
the show. Prerequisite: TPA 3230. 

TPA 4400 Theatre Management (3). 

Survey of all aspects of theatre ad- 
ministration: budget planning and 
maintenance; public relations; box of- 
fice and house management; unions 
and contracts. 

TPP 1 120 Introduction to Performance 
(3). An introduction to the acting 
process using an improvisational ap- 
proach. (S) 

TPP 2100 Introduction to Acting (3). 

An introduction to the acting proc- 
ess. Self awareness, physical and vo- 
cal control, basic stage Techniques 
and beginning scene work will be stud- 
ied. Intended for the student with little 
or no acting experience. (F,S) 

TPP 21 10 Acting I (3). Development 
and training of basic skills: use of self, 
stage terminology, stage voice and 
movement. Intended for the serious 
theatre student. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of instructor. Majors only. (F) 

TPP 21 1 1 Acting II (3). Continuation of 
skills with emphasis on Stanislavski 
based technique, i.e., given circum- 
stances and objectives. Through 
scenework students learn to analyze 
text and make discoveries through re- 
hearsal. Prerequisite: TPP 2110 and 
TPP 3283 and permission of instructor. 
(S) 

TPP 2510 Theatre Movement I (2). A 

study of movement for the actor 
through improving the mind-body 
connection, alignment, relaxation, 
imagination, centering, flexibility and 
use of space. Corequisite: TPP 21 10. 
(F) 

TPP 2710 Theatre Voice I (2). A study 
of voice production for the actor, the 
vocal apparatus, breathing, place- 
ment, range, resonance and connec- 
tion to emotion. Corequisite: TPP 
2110. (F) 

TPP 31 12 Acting III (3). Continuation 
of skills with emphasis on transformai- 
tonal character choices. Through 



178 /College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



scenework students learn to apply 
what they've learned to several 
characters from contemporary play- 
wrights. Prerequisites: TPP 2111 and 
permission of instructor. (F) 

TPP 3164 Theatre Voice and Move- 
ment III (3). Laban, Feldenkrais. and 
Neutral Mask will be studied to im- 
prove self-use and body articulation. 
Emphasis on handling heightened 
texts such as Shakespeare. Prereq- 
uisites: TPP 371 1 , TPP 351 1 , audition for 
B.F.A. program. Corequisite: TPP 3112. 
(F) 

TPP 3165 Theatre Speech and Move- 
ment IV (2-3). Character mask and 
period movement for more specific 
physical characterization study. The 
study of dialects and accents and vo- 
cal characterization. Prerequisites: 
TPP 3164. Corequisite: TPP 41 14. 

TPP 3250 Musical Theatre Workshop I 
(3). An introduction to Musical Com- 
edy performance: integration of the 
dramatic, musical and movement 
components will be studied through 
work on selected scenes. 

TPP 3310 Directing (1). Basic princi- 
ples of play direction; including 
problems of selecting, analyzing, 
casting, and rehearsing plays. Pre- 
requisites: TPP 211 1 and TPP 3650. (S) 

TPP 351 1 Theatre Movement II (2). A 

continuation of the work from Thea- 
tre Movement I with an emphasis on 
the physical approaches to creat- 
ing a character. Prerequisite: TPP 
2510. Corequisite: TPP 21 11. (S) 

TPP 3650 Playscript Analysis (3). De- 
tailed playscript examination for di- 
rectors, actors and designers, 
focusing on identification of those 
elements upon which successful 
theatre production depends. (F) 

TPP 371 1 Theatre Voice II (2). A con- 
tinuation of the vocal development 
with more emphasis on text and 
standard speech. Phonetics will be 
explored to help reduce speech re- 
gionalisms. Prerequisite: TPP 2710, 
permission of instructor. Corequisite- 
TPP 21 11 andTPP3511.(S) 

TPP 3730 Dialects (3). A study of dia- 
lects common to western theatre. 

TPP 41 14 Acting IV (3). Continuation 
of the development and training of 
acting skills with emphasis on a vari- 
ety of styles. Prerequisites: TPP 31 12 
and permission of instructor. (S) 

TPP 4192 Advanced Rehearsal and 
Performance (1). Exploration of the 
acting process through rehearsal 



and performance of a play. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 

TPP 4221 Audition Workshop for the 
Actor (3). Audition techniques 
through preparation and presenta- 
tion of audition material. Includes 
an exploration of professional actor 
training and actor business protocol. 
Prerequisites: TPP 41 14 or permission 
of instructor. 

TPP 431 1 Directing II (3). A contin- 
ued study of directing Techniques 
culminating in the preparation of a 
play for public performance. Prereq- 
uisite: TPP 3310. 

TPP 4531 Stage Combat (3). A study 
of combat Techniques for the stage, 
including fencing, boxing, wrestling, 
and tumbling. 

TPP 4600 Playwriting I (3). Study of 
the theory and principles of writing 
plays for the stage. Practice in writ- 
ing either the short or long play. May 
be repeated. 

TPP 4601 Playwriting II (3). A continu- 
ation of the study of the theory and 
principle of writing plays for the 
stage. Actual practice in writing 
plays. Prerequisite: TPP 4600. 

TPP 4920 Actor's Workshop I (3). This 
course will concentrate on the act- 
ing demands of a specific period, 
style, genre, or playwright. Prereq- 
uisite: TPP 41 14 or permission of in- 
structor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 179 



Visual Arts 

Clive King, Professor and 

Chairperson 
William Maguire, Professor 
Ralph F. Buckley, Associafe Professor 
William Burke, Professor 
James M. Couper III, Professor 
Carol Damian, Associate Professor 
Eduardo Del Valle, Associate 

Professor 
Richard Duncan, Associate Professor 
Mirta Gomez, Associate Professor 
Nora Heimann, Assistant Professor 
Ellen Jacobs, Professor 
Kate Kretz, Assistant Professor 
Juan Martinez, Associate Professor 
Dahlia Morgan, Lecturer/Art 

Museum Director 
Christine Tamblyn, Assistant Professor 
Manuel Torres, Associate Professor 
Barbara Watts, Associate Professor 
Sandra Winters, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 
Common Prerequisites 

ARH 2050 Art History Survey I 

ARH2051 Art History Survey II 

ART 1202 2D Design 

ART 1203 3D Design 

ART 1300 Drawing I 

ART 1301 Figure Drawing I 

Completion of two of the following: 

ART 1300 Drawing I 

ART 1301 Figure Drawing I 

ART 21 10 Ceramics I 

ART 2150 Jewelry and Metals 

ART 2181 Glassblowing I 

ART 2401 Printmaking I 

ART 2510 Painting I 

ART 2702 Sculpture I 

ART 2 Figure Sculpture I 

PGY3410 Photography I 

Remarks: The student who does not 

have an A.A. degree or who lacks 

proficiency in required courses, or 

both, will be expected to take more 

than 60 semester hours to complete 

the bachelor's degree, or to make 

up courses at the lower division level. 

To qualify for admission to the 
program, 'Fill undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST, com- 
pleted 60 semester hours, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 



Visual Arts Scholarships 

All Visual Arts scholarships are 
awarded as a result of the faculty's 
Spring Review, usually in April. Stu- 
dents should contact the depart- 
ment at 348-2897 for information on 
procedures for participation in the 
Spring Review. 

Upper Division Program (60) 

Required Courses: (48) 

ARH 4450 Modern Art 3 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art 3 

ARH Elective (upper division) 6 

Studio Major 15 
ART 3820/3821 Visual Thinking I 8c II 6 

ART Thesis I & II 6 
ART & ARH Electives outside 

Studio Concentration 12 

Electives outside of major 9 

Minor in Visual Arts 

(18 semester hours) 

ARH Elective (upper division) 3 

ART 33 10C Drawing 3 

or 
ART 333 1 C Figure Drawing II 
ART Studio Electives 
(upper division) 1 2 

Minor in Art History 

(18 semester hours) 

ARH 4450 Modern Art 3 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art 3 

ART Studio Elective (upper division) 3 

ARH Electives (upper division) 9 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ARH-Art History; ART-Art; PGY-Photog- 

raphy. 

ARH 2050 Art History Survey I (3). A 

broad survey of the visual arts and 
architecture from the Paleolithic Pe- 
riod through the Middle Ages. 

ARH 2051 Art History Survey II (3). A 

broad survey of the visual arts and 
architecture from the Renaissance 
through the Modern Age. 

ARH 3210 Early Christian and Byzan- 
tine Art (3). The art of Byzantine Em- 
pire from the early Christian period 
and the foundation of Constanti- 
nople to the Ottoman conquest 
and afterward (300-1500 A.D.). Pre- 
requisite: ARH 2050 or permission of 
instructor. 

ARH 3350 Baroque Art (3). European 
art of the 17th and early 18th centu- 



ries. Artists to be studied include 
Bernini, Caravaggio, Velasques, Ver- 
meer, Rembrandt, Rubens, Poussin, 
La Tour, and Watteau. Prerequisite: 
ARH 2051. 

ARH 3930 Special Topics in Art His- 
tory (3). Rotating special topics in 
Art History. May be repeated with 
change of content. Prerequisites: 
ARH 2050 and ARH 2051 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

ARH 4014 History of Decorative Arts 
(3). A survey of the more important 
and influential periods in history in 
the production of ceramics, fabrics, 
glass, jewelry and silversmithing. 
Slides, lectures, student research. 

ARH 4131 Greek Art (3). Lectures, 
slides, research. The Art of Greece 
from the Bronze Age through the 
Classical Period. 

ARH 4151 Roman Art (3). Lectures, 
slides, research. The Art of Ancient 
Rome from the Early Iron Age 
through the Late Roman Empire. 

ARH 4310 Early Italian Renaissance 
(3). Lectures, slides, research. From 
the origins of Italian Renaissance in 
the Late Gothic Period to the Early 
15th Century. 

ARH 431 1 The Art of Venice: The Rise 
of a Mediterranean Superpower (3). 

Analysis of artistic aspects of Venice's 
growth to power. Emphasis on the 
church of St. Mark and the Venetian 
National Shrine. 

ARH 4312 Later Italian Renaissance 
(3). Lectures, slides, research. The Art 
of Italy in the later 15th and 16th 
Century. 

ARH 4400 Primitive Art (3). An intro- 
duction to the art of widely dissimilar 
groups from areas on the margin or 
beyond the cultural influences of 
Europe, the Near East, India, China, 
and Japan. Emphasis will be placed 
on African, Oceanic, and North 
American Indian Art. 

ARH 4430 Art and Politics (3). An in- 
vestigation into the interrelationship 
between art and political issues, 
with emphasis on the 19th and 20th 
centuries. 

ARH 4431 19th Century Painting (3). 

A study of Neoclassicism, Romanti- 
cism, Realism, and Impressionism. 
Artists to be considered include 
David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, 
Goya, Courbet, Manet, Degas, 
Monet, and Renoir. 



1 80 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ARH 4450 Modern Art (3). Lectures, 
films, slides. A survey of European 
and American Art from 1890-1945. 
ARH 2051 . or permission 9f instructor. 
Prerequisite: ARH 2051 or permission 
of instructor. 

ARH 4454 Post 1985 Art (3). Examines 
the changing roles of the arts within 
the current socio-political context of 
plurality, corporate sponsorship and 
mass communications. 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art (3). Lec- 
tures, slides, visitors and student re- 
search. A survey of art from 1945 to 
the present. Prerequisites: ARH 2051 
or ARH 4450. or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

ARH 4552 Art of China and Japan 
(3). An introduction to the art of 
China to the Ming Dynasty and of 
Japan through the 18th century. The 
emphasis will Pe on painting and 
sculpture, with some ceramics and 
architecture. 

ARH 4610 American Art (3). A survey 
of American painting from the Colo- 
nial period to the eve of World War 
I. Artists to Pe studied include Co- 
pley, West. Cole, Whistler, Sargent, 
Homer, Henri, and Bellows. 

ARH 461 1 North American Indian Art 
(3). A survey of native North Ameri- 
can art history with emphasis on the 
post-contact period. The arts of the 
far north. Northwest coast, south- 
west, plains and the eastern wood- 
lands. 

ARH 4650 Pre-Columbian Art (3). 

Slides, lectures, research. A survey of 
Pre-Colombian Art from approxi- 
mately 2000 B.C. to 1500 A.D. of 
Mesoamerica. (Intermediate area 
from Honduras to Columbia and the 
Andes). 

ARH 4652 Pre-Columbian Art of the 
Andes (3). A survey of Andean Pre- 
Colombian art and architecture. Ba- 
sic characteristics of technique, 
style and iconography in relation to 
Andean socioeconomic and cul- 
tural patterns. 

ARH 4655 Mesoamerican Art History 
(3). A survey of Mesoamerican pre- 
Columbian art and architecture 
from the Mexican and Mayan territo- 
ries, 1500 BC to the Conquest. 

ARH 4670 20th Century Latin Ameri- 
can Art (3). Lectures, films, slides. The 
Art of Central, South America and 
the Caribbean of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury. 



ARH 4672 A History of Cuban Art (3). 

A survey of the visual arts in Cuba 
(sculpture, painting, and prints) with 
emphasis in the 20th century. 

ARH 4710 History of Photography (3). 

A chronological examination of the 
work of the world's most significant 
photographers, from photography's 
invention in the 1 830's to the present. 

ARH 4905 Directed Studies (1-6). A 

group of students, with the approval 
of the art faculty, may select a mas- 
ter teacher of theory, research or 
criticism in selected areas as film, 
painting, sculpture, architecture, 
crafts, art history, multi-media art, 
etc. Arrangements must be made 
at least a semester before course is 
offered. May be repeated. 

ARH 4910 Research (1-6). Art history, 
criticism, and theory in areas not 
covered by the present program 
and which the student wishes to 
study. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. May be repeated. 

ARH 4931 Women and Art (3). 

Women in the history of art; past, 
present and future. Slides, lectures, 
films, panels and discussions. 

ARH 5907 Directed Studies (1-6). A 

group of students, with the approval 
of the art faculty, may select a mas- 
ter teacher of theory, research or 
criticism in selected areas as film, 
painting, sculpture, architecture, 
crafts, art history, multi-media art, 
etc. Arrangements must be made 
at least a semester before course is 
offered. May be repeated. 

ARH 5913 Research (1-6). Art history, 

criticism, and theory in areas not 
covered by the present program 
and which the student wishes to 
study. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. May be repeated. 

ART 1202C 2D Design (3). Studio 
course introducing the basic art ele- 
ments such as line, value, and color 
to develop the students vocabulary 
and awareness of two-dimensional 
potential in various media. 

ART 1203C 3D Design (3). Studio 
course introducing the basic ele- 
ments inherent in three-dimensional 
works of art. Shape, mass, balance, 
proportion, and scale are elements 
which will be explored. 

ART 21 12C Ceramics I (3). A begin- 
ning course for art and non-art ma- 
jors that introduces the 
fundamentals of throwing and glaze 
applications. 



ART 2150C Jewelry and Metals (3). A 

study of basic metal techniques and 
strengthening of three-dimensional 
design concepts for the beginner. 
The advanced student will explore 
the more difficult technical aspects 
of areas such as hollow ware, enam- 
eling, casting, and stone setting. 
May Pe repeated. 

ART 2300C Drawing I (3). An intro- 
duction to the fundamentals of 
drawing. The course equips the stu- 
dent with a variety of basic skills, ap- 
proaches and concepts explored 
through a comprehensive range of 
medias. 

ART 2301C Drawing II (3). The course 
is designed for the student who has 
acquired basic drawing skills. It 
strengthens technical and concep- 
tual skills while introducing more ex- 
perimental approaches. Modes of 
personal expression are also devel- 
oped. Prerequisite: ART 2300C 

ART 2330C Figure Drawing I (3). 

Drawing from model. Student will 
study gesture, movement, form, vol- 
ume, light, and other varied media. 

ART 2401C Printmaking I (3). Intro- 
duces the student to a number of 
processes. Explores primarily one of 
the following: etching, lighography 
or screen printing with excursions 
into relief collograph, montype and 
color as appropriate. 

ART 25 10C Painting I (3). Introduc- 
tion to development of expression, 
through individual understanding of 
tools, materials, technique, percep- 
tion and vocabulary of painting. 

ART 2702C Sculpture I (3). Beginning 
sculpture students will be given as- 
signed problems structured to study 
the forms in nature and the work of 
other sculptors. 

ART 31 10C Ceramics (3). A begin- 
ning course for art and non-art ma- 
jors. Fundamentals of throwing, 
hand-building, and glaze applica- 
tion. May Pe repeated. 

ART 31 13C Ceramics II (3). Intermedi- 
ate ceramics is designed for the stu- 
dent who has acquired the 
fundamental skills taught in basic ce- 
ramics. Projects are designed to ad- 
vance technical skills and aesthetic 
growth. Prerequisite: ART 21 12C 

ART 31 14C Ceramics III (3). Concen- 
trates on the development of techni- 
cal skills in relationship to personal 
vision, with a view towards a consis- 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 181 



tent body of work. Prerequisite: ART 
3113C 

ART 31 15C Low Temperature Ceram- 
ics (3). An in- depth study of low- 
temperature clays and glazes, and 
exploration of a variety of glazing 
and firing techniques, including lus- 
tres, residual salt, raku, white and 
red earthenware, etc. Prerequisite: 
ART 31 IOC. 

ART 3183C Glassblowing (3). A basic 
course in off-hand glass blowing, 
concerned with preparing, forming, 
and finishing glass; understanding of 
glass as an art form; operation and 
maintenance of a glass studio. May 
be repeated. 

ART 33 IOC Drawing (3). Drawing will 
be considered as an essential part 
of every art student's curriculum. De- 
pending on his lower level work, a 
student will be encouraged to take 
at least one drawing course at the 
University. Off-campus studio work 
may be arranged. May be re- 
peated. 

ART3312C Drawing III (3). Students 
at this level should have a proficient 
level of practice and conceptual 
skills. These skills are consolidated 
and further developed. There is a 
strong emphasis on self-directed 
study. Prerequisite: ART 3302C. 

ART 333 1C Figure Drawing II (3). Ex- 
ploration of the live human figure as 
it determines our understanding of 
subject, theme, composition and 
meaning. Prerequisite: ART 2330C. 

ART 3332C Figure Drawing III (3). Fur- 
ther exploration of the live human 
figure as it determines our under- 
standing of subject, theme, compo- 
sition and meaning. Prerequisite: 
ART 333 1C. 

ART - Printmaking II (3). With a 
knowledge of basic intaglio and re- 
lief printing, the student will explore 
specific media such as etching, li- 
thography, silk-screen and other ex- 
perimental techniques. 

ART - Printmaking III (3). Exploration 
and expansion of experimental print 
processes as they relate to student's 
own imagery and acquired skills. 
Greater independence and per- 
sonal direction. Prerequisite: ART 
3402C. 

ART 3520C Painting II (3). Intermedi- 
ate painting requiring refinement of 
technique and personal expression. 
Frequent critiques of student work. 
Prerequisite: ART 25 IOC. 



ART 3521C Painting III (3). Intermedi- 
ate painting requiring further refine- 
ment of technical skill and personal 
expression. Frequent critiques of stu- 
dent work. Prerequisite: ART 351 1C. 

ART - Sculpture II (3). Intermediate 
sculpture is structured for the stu- 
dent who has acquired basic skills 
and is ready to test their creative 
abilities through individualized pro- 
jects. Prerequisite; ART 2702. 

ART 3703C Sculpture III (3). This class 
is an extension of ART 3703. Students 
are expected to continue to de- 
velop and explore new ideas. Pre- 
requisite: ART 3703C. 

ART 371 1C Figure Sculpture (3). A 

basic sculpture class emphasizing 
anatomical study with 2 & 3 dimen- 
sional rendering in clay, training the 
student to observe and accurately 
model the human figure. 

ART 3809 Performance Art (3). A 

workshop on the history and prac- 
tice of performance art for the fine 
arts student. Focus on intersections 
with other visual arts media and so- 
cial contexts. Not a course in 
dance, music or theater. 

ART 3820 Visual Thinking I (3). A be- 
ginning studio-based course with a 
strong theoretical component 
where concepts are examined 
through a variety of approaches 
and media. 

ART 3821 Visual Thinking II (3). An 

advanced studio-based course with 
a strong theoretical component 
where concepts are examined 
through a variety of approaches 
and media. Prerequisite: ART 3820. 

ART 3830C Color Theory (3). This 
course is designed to familiarize the 
student with the theory and princi- 
ples of color as it relates to the arts. 
Lecture, demonstration, and appli- 
cation through assigned projects will 
be included. 

ART 383 1C Materials and Tech- 
niques (3). Instruction in the craft of 
painting. Demonstration and exer- 
cise in the following will be included: 
color, pigments, ground, all major 
media, studio and equipment. 

ART 3949C Cooperative Education 
in Visual Arts (3). A student majoring 
in Visual Arts may spend several se- 
mesters fully employed in industry in 
a capacity relating to the major. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of chairperson. 

ART 41 14C Ceramics (3). The ad- 
vanced student will explore all as- 



pects of expression in clay and 
glaze. Students will be expected to 
be mostly self-directed. Prerequisite: 
ART 31 IOC, or permission of the in- 
structor. May be repeated. 

ART 41 15C Ceramics IV (3). Focuses 
on the development of a well pro- 
duced, accomplished body of work 
that reflects the individual's ideas. 
Prerequisite: ART3114C. 

ART4116C Ceramics V (3). Concen- 
trates on a single ongoing project 
personally defined by the student 
and explored within the larger con- 
text of art history and contemporary 
society. Prerequisite: ART 41 15C. 

ART 41 1 7C Ceramics VI (3). Concen- 
trates on further refinement of tech- 
nical skills, development of a 
consistent and cohesive body of 
work and a clear articulation of artis- 
tic conception. Prerequisite: ART 
4116C. 

ART 4151C Jewelry and Metals (3). 

SeeART2150C. 

ART4184C Glassblowing (3). See 

ART3183C. 

ART 4313C Drawing IV (3). Students 
are expected to possess an accom- 
plished level of skill and a strong per- 
sonal direction in order to focus on 
the development of a consistent 
body of personal work. 

ART4314C Drawing V (3). Ad- 
vanced drawing toward coherent 
body of work. (See ART 4304). 

ART4315C Drawing VI (3). Drawing 
has to be BFA exhibition quality. Indi- 
vidual is engaged in a mature cohe- 
sive body of work. Prerequisite: ART 
4305C. 

ART 4320C Drawing (3). See ART 

33 IOC. 

ART 4332C Figure Drawing (3). See 

ART 3331 C. 

ART 4333C Figure Drawing IV (3). Stu- 
dents are expected to possess a de- 
veloped level of skill in drawing the 
figure and a strong personal direc- 
tion. Prerequisite: ART3332C. 

ART 4334C Figure Drawing V (3). 

Consolidation of the focus direction 
established in ART 4333C. Ad- 
vanced drawing further developing 
technical and conceptual skills. Pre- 
requisite: ART 4333C. 

ART 4335C Figure Drawing VI (3). 

Work produced at the pre-BFA exhi- 
bition level. A strong cohesive body 
of figure drawings executed with a 



182/ College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



clear personal vision. Prerequisite: 
ART 4334C. 

ART4402C Printmaking (3). See ART 

2401 C. 

ART4403C Printmaking IV (3). Instruc- 
tional emphasis will be toward indi- 
vidual solutions. Student expected 
to independently research techni- 
cal problems. Prerequisite: ART 
3403C. 

ART4404C Printmaking V (3). Stu- 
dent must be showing inde- 
pendence in initiating and 
executing projects. Self motivation, 
energy and purpose should be the 
focus. Prerequisite: ART 4404C. 

ART4405C Printmaking VI (3). Stu- 
dent should produce BFA exhibition 
work. (See ART 4405). Prerequisite: 
ART 4405. 

ART 4522C Painting IV (3). Ad- 
vanced painting with expectation 
of highly skilled technique and care- 
fully evolved concerns that might 
continue into subsequent semesters. 
Prerequisite: ART3512C. 

ART 4523C Painting V (3). Advanced 
painting toward coherent body of 
work. Prerequisite: ART 451 3C. 

ART4524C Painting VI (3). Ad- 
vanced painting. BFA exhibition 
quality body of work expected at 
this level. (See ART 451 3C.) 

ART 4532C Painting (3). An ad- 
vanced course concentrating on 
conceptual clarity and the realiza- 
tion of stylistic development. Group, 
individual criticism will be empha- 
sized. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 251 0C or equivalent. 
Suggested prerequisites: ART 383 1C 
and ART 3803C. 

ART 4703C Sculpture (3). See ART 
2702C. 

ART 47 1 0C Figure Sculpture (3). To 

develop skills in representational 
structure and anatomy from the 
model and learn mold-making tech- 
niques. May be repeated. 

ART 4681 Time Arts (3). An introduc- 
tion to electronic media for the first 
arts student. Computer and video 
as tools for the artmaking process. 
Not a course in programming or 
commercial computer graphics. 

ART 4740C Sculpture IV (3). First of a 
series of advanced classes which 
represent the beginning of a serious 
aesthetic commitment leading to a 
BFA degree. Prerequisite: ART 3704C. 



ART 4741C Sculpture V (3). This class 
is an extension of ART 4705 and 
should be used to further advance 
previous efforts with the intention of 
producing major finished works. Pre- 
requisite: ART 4705C. 

ART 4742C Sculpture VI (3). The goal 
of this class is to bring fully devel- 
oped ideas to a finished state in 
preparation for BFA thesis exhibition. 
Prerequisite: ART 4706C. 

ART 4832L Art Gallery and Display (1 - 

3). The study and participation of all 
aspects of Gallery operations, from 
daily operation to special exhibitions 
and events. Permission of Gallery Di- 
rector: 

ART 4906C Directed Study (VAR). A 

group of students, with the approval 
of the Visual Arts Department fac- 
ulty, may select a master artist 
teacher and pursue a course of art 
study in selected areas such as 
graphic design, film, multi-media, en- 
vironmental design, sound, etc. Ar- 
rangements must be made at least 
one semester before course is of- 
fered. May be repeated. 

ART 491 0C Research (1-6). Students 
may study or research an individual 
art project with an art faculty mem- 
ber. Complexity and amount of 
work will determine the number of 
credit hours granted. May be re- 
peated. 

ART 4949C Cooperative Education 
in Visual Arts (3). See ART 3949C. 

ART 4952C Thesis I. The course will ex- 
pose students to fundamental issues 
and ideas current in the field of art. 
An inquiry into the structure of art 
and its relationship to society, knowl- 
edge, and the self. Prerequisite: 15- 
18 hours of Studio Major and 
permission of instructor (portfolio re- 
view). 

ART 4953C Thesis II (3). Studio work 
in student's major area with major 
professor, resulting in a student ex- 
hibit. Arrangements with major pro- 
fessor one semester before 
graduation. Written thesis required. 
Prerequisite: 15 semester hours of stu- 
dio major and permission of instruc- 
tor (portfolio review). (Fall and 
Spring only). ART 4970C. 

ART 5125C Ceramics (3). The ad- 
vanced student will explore all as- 
pects of expression in clay and 
glaze. Students will be expected to 
be mostly self-directed. Prerequisite: 
ART 31 IOC, or permission of the in- 
structor. May be repeated. 



ART 5159C Jewelry and Metals (3). A 

study of basic metal techniques and 
strengthening of three- dimensional 
design concepts for the beginner. 
The advanced student will explore 
the more difficult technical aspects 
of areas such as hollow ware, enam- 
eling, casting, and stone setting. 
May be repeated. 

ART 5185C Glassblowing (3). A basic 
course in off- hand glass blowing, 
concerned with preparing, forming, 
and finishing glass; understanding of 
glass as an art form; operation and 
maintenance of a glass studio. May 
be repeated. 

ART 5340C Drawing (3). Advanced 
drawing for M.S. in Art Education stu- 
dents. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 4304C, or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. 

ART 5341C Figure Drawing (3). Ad- 
vanced figure drawing for M.S. in Art 
Education students. May be re- 
peated. Prerequisites: ART 4333C, or 
equivalent, or permission of instruc- 
tor. 

ART 5406C Printmaking (3). Ad- 
vanced printmaking for M.S. in Art 
Education students. May be re- 
peated. Prerequisites: ART 4404C, or 
equivalent or permission of instructor. 

ART5580C Painting (3). Advanced 
painting for M.S. in Art Education stu- 
dents. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 4513 or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. 

ART 57 1 0C Figure Sculpture (3). To 

develop skills in representational 
structure and anatomy from the 
model and learn mold-making tech- 
niques. May be repeated. 

ART 5730C Sculpture (3). Advanced 
sculpture for M.S. in Art Education 
students. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 4705C or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. 

ART 5907C Directed Study (VAR). A 

group of students, with the approval 
of the Visual Arts Department fac- 
ulty, may select a master artist 
teacher and pursue a course of art 
study in selected areas such as 
graphic design, film, multi-media, en- 
vironmental design, sound, etc. Ar- 
rangements must be made at least 
one semester before course is of- 
fered. May be repeated. 

ART5910C Research (1-6). Students 
may study or research an individual 
art project with an art faculty mem- 
ber. Complexity and amount of 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College ot Arts and Sciences / 183 



work will determine the number of 
credit hours granted. May be re- 
peated. 

PGY 3020 Introduction to Film-Mak- 
ing (3). For the beginning student of 
film making. Survey of the origins 
and development of cinematogra- 
phy as an art form. Presentation and 
technical analysis of selected films. 

PGY 2110C Color Photography I (3). 

An introduction to color materials 
and processing. Frequent critiques 
of students' work. Prerequisites: PGY 
340 1C and PGY 4420C or permission 
of instructor. 

PGY - Photography I (3). Introduc- 
tion to the practice of still photogra- 
phy. Includes darkroom work and 
camera skills. Frequent critiques of 
student work. 

PGY - Color Photography II (3). Inter- 
mediate color photography requir- 
ing refinement of technique and 
personal vision. Frequent critiques. 
Prerequisite: PGY 21 IOC. 

PGY - Color Photography III (3). In- 
termediate color photography re- 
quiring further refinement of 
technical skill and personal vision. 
Frequent critiques. Prerequisite: PGY 
3111C. 

PGY - Photography III (3). Intermedi- ■ 
ate photography requiring further re- 
finement of technical skills and 
personal vision. Semester long pro- 
ject required. Frequent critiques. Pre- 
requisite: PGY 3401 C. 

PGY 3410C Photography II (3). Inter- 
mediate photography requiring re- 
finement of technical skills and 
personal vision. Frequent critiques. 
Prerequisite: PGY 2400C. 

PGY - Color Photography IV (3). Ad- 
vanced color photography with an 
expectation of highly skilled techni- 
cal and carefully evolved concerns 
that may continue in subsequent se- 
mesters. Prerequisite: PGY 41 12C. 

PGY - Color Photography V (3). Ad- 
vanced color photography toward ' 
coherent body of work. (See PGY 
41 13C). Prerequisite: PGY 41 13C. 

PGY - Color Photography VI (3). Ad- 
vanced color photography. BFA ex- 
hibition quality body of work 
expected at this level. (See PGY 
41 13C. Prerequisite: PGY 41 14C. 

PGY - Photography IV (3). Ad- 
vanced photography with the ex- 
pectation of highly skilled technique 
and a carefully evolved project that 



might continue into subsequent se- 
mesters. Prerequisite: PGY 3402C. 

PGY - Photography V (3). Ad- 
vanced photography with the ex- 
pectation of highly skilled technique 
and a carefully evolved project that 
might continue into subsequent se- 
mesters. Prerequisite: PGY 4403C. 

PGY - Photography VI (3). Ad- 
vanced photography. BFA exhibi- 
tion quality body of photographic 
work is expected at this level. (See 
PGY 4403). Prequisite: PGY4404C. 

PGY 4420C Photography (3). An ad- 
vanced course for majors and ac- 
complished non-majors. Includes 
demanding critique of student's 
work. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisite: PGY 34 10C or permission of in- 
structor. 

PGY - Color Photography (3). Ad- 
vanced color photography for MS in 
Art Education students. (See PGY 
4113). Prerequisite: PGY4113C. 

PGY 5425C Photography (3). Ad- 
vanced photography for M.S. in Art 
Education students. May be re- 
peated. Prerequisite: PGY 4003C, or 
equivalent, or permission of instruc- 
tor. 



184 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Womens Studies 

Marilyn Hoder-Salmon, Associate 

Professor and Director 
Lois West, Assistant Professor, 

Womens Studies and Sociology 

Affiliated Faculty: 
Janice Allen-Kelsey, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Irma de Alonso, Economics 
Joan Baker, English 
Pascale Becel, Modern Languages 
Michelle Beer, Philosophy 
Glenda Belote, Undergraduate 

Studies 
Lisa Blansett, English 
Janet Chernela, Sociology/ 

Anthropology 
Alice Clarke, Environmental Studies 
Carol Damian, Visual Arts 
Theresa DiPasquale, English 
Mary Jane Elkins, English 
Evelyn Enrione, Dietetics and 

Nutrition 
Valerie George, Dietetics and 

Nutrition 
Christine Gudorf, Religious Studies 
Tometro Hopkins, English 
Rosa Jones, Social Work 
Ken Johnson, English 
Sherry Johnson, History 
Lowell Krokoff, Psychology 
Lilly Longer, Sociology/Anthropology 
Abe Lavender, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Mary Levitt, Psychology 
Kathleen Logan, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Kathleen McCormack, English 
Carmen Mendez, Public 

Administration 
Betty Morrow, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Adele Newson, English 
Lesley Northup, Religious Studies 
Joyce Peterson, History 
Eleanor Polster, Management 
Elisabeth Prugl, International 

Relations 
Erika Rappaport, History 
Meri-Jane Rochelson, Engljsh 
Rebecca Salokar, Political Science 
Regina Shearn, Criminal Justice 
Karen Sowers-Hoag, Social Work 
Ellen Sprechman, English 
Betsy Smith, Social Work 
Judith Stiehm, Political Science 
Linda Strong-Leek, English 
Susan Waltz, International Relations 
Barbara Weitz, English 
Margaret Wilson, Center for Labor 

Research and Studies 



This major provides an opportunity 
for the study of the historical, politi- 
cal, economic, literary, social, and 
cultural roles of women and of the 
function of gender in diverse socie- 
ties and cultures. The courses are co- 
ordinated by the Women' Studies 
Center, and are open to women 
and men alike, as a balance to tra- 
ditional education. Through this rich 
discipline, bias throughout society - 
in the workplace, in school, and at 
home - is analyzed through historical 
study and new theory. Equal impor- 
tance is given to the commitment 
to discover and teach ideas and 
knowledge about global concerns, 
nationality, race, ethnicity, class, 
age, and sexual identity. Students 
may formulate a program of study 
consonant with their interest and 
goals. The major is excellent prepa- 
ration for graduate study in most 
fields and for careers in both the 
public and private sectors. A back- 
ground in womens studies develops 
critical skills and offers new knowl- 
edge to meet the challenges of al- 
terations in society and of 
expanding opportunities. 

For further information and/or to 
seek academic advising for the 
womens studies major visit the 
Womens Studies Center in DM-212 
or call 348-2408. We welcome your 
inquiry. 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the pro- 
gram FIU undergraduates must 
have met all the lower division re- 
quirements including CLAST or its 
equivalent; completed 60 semester 
hours, and be otherwise accept- 
able into the program. 

Upper Division Program 

The major requires 30 hours of upper 
division course work. Students who 
elect to major in womens studies 
are required to declare a minor in 
another area of concentration 
(courses may overlap). Students 
who choose to declare a double 
major are exempt from the minor re- 
quirement. The major requires a 
core concentration of four courses 
and six electives for a total of 10 
courses. Any core concentration 
course that is not taken for the core 
requirement, may be taken as an 
elective. Refer to full course descrip- 
tions in the appropriate departmen- 
tal listings of this catalog. Genre and 
topic courses are offered regularly 
and new courses are periodically 
added to the curriculum. The elec- 
tive selection may include one 
course on ethnicity, class or race. 



Student programs are coordinated 
with designated faculty advisors. 

Upper Division Requirements 

Core Concentration: (Four courses; 

twelve hours/one course from each 

category) 

WST3010 Introduction to 

Womens Studies 3 



HUM 3930 


Female/Male; 
Womens Studies 
Seminar 


3 


SOP 3742 


Psychology of 

Women 

or 


3 


SYD4810 


Sociology of Gender 

or 

Feminist Theory 


3 


WST 4344 


3 


ANT 3302 


Male and Female: 
Sex Roles and 
Sexuality 


3 



AMH 4560 History of Women 

in the U.S. 3 

ANT 3302 Male and Female: 

Sex Roles and 

Sexuality 3 

or 
AMH 4560 History of Women 

in the U.S. 3 

or 
EUH4610 Women and Gender 

in Europe, 1750 to 

Present 3 

REL3145 Women and Religion 3 

or 
LIT 3383 Women in Literature 

(or any English 

electives listed 

below) 3 

or 
PHM 41 23 Philosophy and 

Feminism 3 

Electives in Womens Studies (Six 
courses: 18 hours; all are 3 credit 
hour) 

Economics: 

ECS 3 Women, Culture 

and Economic 
Development 



English: 

AML4624 

ENL3261 

ENL4134 
ENL4212 

EN L 4370 

LIN 4651 



African-American 

Women Writers 

19 th Century British 

Women Novelists 

Women in Film 

Women in Medieval 

Literature 

Virginia Woolf and 

Her Circle 

Gender and Language 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences / 185 



LIT 3383 Women in Literature 
LIT 3384 Caribbean Women 

Writers 
LIT 4931 Special Topics in 

Womens Literature 

History: 

AMH 4560 History of Women 

in the United States 
EUH4610 Women and Gender 

in Europe, 1750 to 

Present 
LAH 4721 History of Women in 

Latin America 

Humanities: 

HUM 3225 Women, Culture and 

History 
HUM 3930 Female/Male: 

Womens Studies 

Seminar 

Interdisciplinary Studies: 

WST 3 Gay and Lesbian 

in the U.S. 
WST 3010 Introduction to 

Womens Studies 
WST 4344 Feminist Theory 

Labor Studies: 

LBS 42 1 Women and Work 
in the United States 

Modern Languages: 

FRW 4583 Women Writers in French 



Philosophy: 




PHM4123 


Philosophy and 




Feminism 


Religion: 




REL3145 


Women and Religion 


REL3172 


Reproductive Ethics 


REL3178 


Christian Sexual Ethics 


REL4146 


Feminist Theology and 




Ethics 


Political Science: 


POS 4605 


Gender Justice and 




the Courts 


POS 4627 


Equality and the 




Constitution 


POT 4309 


Sex, Power, and Politics 


PUP 4323 


Women in Politics 



Psychology: 

SOP 3742 Psychology of Women 

Sociology/Anthropology: 

ANT 3302 Male and Female: 
Sex Roles and 
Sexuality 

Voices of Third World 
Women 

Contemporary Latin 
American Women 
Theories of Gender 
Sociology of Gender 



SYD 4820 Sociology of Men 

SYG 4060 Sociology of Sexuality 

SYO3120 Marriage and the Family 

SYP 4562 Domestic Violence 

Visual Arts: 

ARH4931 Women in Art 

Business: 

MAN 4102 Women and Men in 
Management 

Criminal Justice: 

CCJ 4663 Women, Crime, and the 
Criminal Justice 
System 

Dietetics and Nutrition: 

HUN 3294 Womens Nutrition Issues 
HSC 3579 Wellness of Women 

Course Descriptions 

WST 3010 Introduction to Womens 
Studies (3). Considers the interdisci- 
plinary study of American women in 
todays world. Focuses on women 
through the life course and exam- 
ines the debates on womens studies 
in the university. 

WST - Gay and Lesbian in the United 
States (3). An interdisciplinary exami- 
nation of contemporary issues fac- 
ing gays and lesbians in the United 
States. Topics include a review of sig- 
nificant events in the gay/lesbian 
movement; political and legal con- 
siderations; and social/cultural con- 
tributions. 

WST 4344 Feminist Theory (3). This 
course explores how women are 
viewed theoretically across the so- 
cial sciences and humanities. Top- 
ics, such as multiculturism, 
cross-nationalism and post-modern- 
ism, are addressed. 



ANT 3304 



ANT 4334 



SYD 4801 
SYD 4810 



1 86 / College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Certificate Programs 

Certificate in Actuarial Studies 

Coordinating Committee 
Hassan Zahedi, Director, (Statistics) 
Steve Hudson, (Mathematics) 
James F. Slifker, (Mathematics) 

The Certificate in Actuarial Studies is 
designed to provide a focus for 
those students who are interested in 
pursuing a career in the actuarial 
sciences. The primary emphasis of 
the Certificate program is on the 
mathematical and statistical back- 
ground that forms the foundation of 
the work in this area. 

The program is most obviously 
suitable for those students who are 
majoring in Mathematics or Statis- 
tics. It would also be valuable for 
those who wish eventually to enter 
the actuarial field, but choose to 
major in an allied discipline, such as 
Business or Computer Science. In 
addition, it allows access to persons 
in the community who are currently 
working in this area and wish to de- 
velop or upgrade their skills. 

Prerequisites: 

Before entering the Certificate pro- 
gram, the student must have com- 
pleted the following courses (or 
equivalent): 

MAC 231 1-12 Calculus l-ll 
MAC 2313 Multivariable 

Calculus 
COP 2210 Introduction t