Skip to main content

Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

See other formats


LJlsriX^ERS 



OF 







N 1 CJI 


"% 



JESUIT UNIVERSITY 



*!^^ 



f> 



L^ 



^ 4* 





■ 


has 




^ 




r^ 


m 


V" m 


/ 'I 


VH. 


K\ -T^ 


■/ 


V 




-i /■ 




, JjjT* <! \ 


. i 


i 




K\' ' N 1 






) 






^^^^^ JJd 


JtKKKKtKKIM 




■■ 



/ 



V 




003-04 Undergraduate Catalog 



2003-04 Academic Calendar 



Dexter Hanley College New Student O: 
Dexter Haniey College New Student O: 

Housing Opens for New Students 

New Student Roval Welcome 

New Undergraduate Student OrKnr.um 
ng Opens tor Retutning Stud 



Nu 



Fall 2003 

-Aug 22 

Aug 21 

Aug 23 

Aug 23 

..Aug 23-24 
..Aug 24 



Spring 2004 

>n23 

Jan 27 



..Jan 28 



..Feb 4 



..Feb 9 



Royal Welcome/Continuing Students Aug 24 

Graduate School Orientation Aug 24 

Classes Begin (Note: Spring Semester Begins on a Thursday) Aug 25.. 

Holy Spirit Liturgy Aug 28 

Last Day to Add Courses Aug 29 . 

Labor Day, No Classes Sept 1 

Last Day 100% Tuition Refund (non-flat rate only) Sept 3.. 

Convocation Sept 5 

Last Day to Request Credit/No Credit Option (Undergrad only) Sept 5 Feb 12 

Last Day Z';"* Tuition Refund (non-flat rate only) Sept 10 Feb 16 

Last Day 50% Tuition Refund (non-flat rate only) Sept 17 Feb 23 

Last Day 25% Tuition Refund (non-flat rate only) Sept 24 Mar 1 

I.ast Day to Drop a Course with No Grade Sept 24 Mar 1 

•Semester Midpoint Oct 10 Mar 22 

Last Day to Elect Audit Grade Option (Undergraduate) Oct 10 Mar 22 

Incomplete Grades from Prior Terms Due Oct 10 Mar 22 

University Housing Closes at 6:00 p.m Oct 10 Mar 12 

Fall/Spring Break Begins Oct 1 1 Mar 13 

Universirv Housing Re-opens at Noon Oct 14 Mar 21 

Classes Resume after Break Oct 15 Mar 22 

Midsemester Grades Due Oct 15 Mar 25 

Graduate School Comprehensive Exams Oct 18 Apr 3 

Honors Convocation Oct 26 

Last Day to Withdraw with "W" Grade Nov 10 Apr 19 

Last Day of Class before Thanksgiving/Easter Nov 25 Apr 7 

No Classes/University Housing Closes at Noon Nov 26 Apr 8 

Thanksgiving/Easter Holiday Begins Nov 26 Apr 8 



..No 



...Apr 12 
.Apr 13 

AV 11-17 

May 17 
May 18 



J Re-opens at Noon 

Classes Resume after Holiday Dec 1 .. 

Last Week of Classes (Tuesday-Monday; no exams) Dec 2-8 , 

Last Day of Class (Mondav) Dec 8.. 

Final Exams Begin (Tuesday; See Note Below) Dec 9 

Final Exams and Semester End (Saturday) Dec 13 May 22 

University Housing Closes at Noon Dec 14 May 23 

Final Grades Due (Fall Semester: Noon; Spring: 5:00 p.m.) Dec 17 May 24 

Baccalaureate Mass May 29 

Class Night .'. May 29 

Commencement May 30 

University Housing Closes at Noon May 31 

Memorial Day May 31 



INTERSESSION 2004 



Last Day I 
Last Day 10 
Last Day I 
Last Day t 
Last Day t 



Summer Sessions 2004 
I Grad II 



...Jul 5 
...Jul 6 
...Jul 7 
...Jul 7 
...Jul 8 
...Jul 9 
.Jul 19 



Univetsity Housing Opens at Noon .Jan 4 Jun 1 Jun I 

Classes Begin .Jan 5 Jun 2 Jun : 

Last Day to Add Courses .Jan 6 Jun 3 Jun '. 

t Credit/No Credit Option Jan 6 , .Jun 3 

tionReftind Jan" Jun 4 Jun ; 

> Drop Course/50% Tuition Reftind Jan s Jun 7 Jun : 

I Elect Audit Option (Undergrad) Jan 16 lun 15 

> Register for Graduate Comps Jun 25 

Independence Day Holiday, No Class Jul 5 

Graauate Comptehensive Exams Jul 17 

Last Day to Withdtaw ("W" Grade) .Jan 19 lun 23 Jul 21 Jul 27 

Graduate Final Exams Jan 26-27 Jun 30-Jul 1 .....Jul 28-29 Aug 3-4 

Undergraduate Final Ejcams Ian 26-27 lun ,30-]ul 1 Aug 3-4 

Session Ends I."i 2^ Jul 1 .Jul 29 Aug4 

Univetsity Housing Closes at Noon [nl ' Jul 30 Aug 5 

Fin;il Grades Due by Noon M ' Jul 6 Aug 2 Aug 9 



Dav Admissions Office 




. . (570) 941-7540 


Adult and Part-Time Admissi 


)ns OflHce. . 


. . (570) 941-5813 
. . (570) 941-7700 






. (570) 941-7720 


Graduate School Office. . . 




. . (570) 941-7600 






(S7n> 941-6369 





Note: Final exams for fall- 
with a start time of 4:30 p.m 
Friday. 12 December 2003. ^ 
times. Final exams for spring- 
ivith a start time of 4:30 p. m. 



Monday classes 

or later will be held on 

their regular meeting 

Monday cLuses 

htter will be held o> 



Friday, 21 May 2004. at their regular meeting i 




Tt^E UlsriVERSITY OF 

SCRANTON 

A JESUIT UNIVERSITY 



Undergraduate Catalog 
2003-04 



Volume 88 June 2003 

The University of Scranton 

Scran ton, Pennsylvania 18510-4699 

vvww.scranton.edu 

1-888-SCRANTON 



© The University of Scranton, 2003 



Rights Reserved 



The President and officers of The Univer- 
sity of Scranton reserve the right to change 
the information, regulations, requirements 
and procedures announced in this catalog; to 
change the requirements for admission, grad- 
uation or degrees; to change the arrangement, 
scheduling, credit, or content of courses; and 
to change the fees listed in this catalog. 

The University reserves the right to refuse 
to admit or readmit any student at any time 
should it be deemed necessary in the interest 
of the student or of the University to do so 
and to require the withdrawal of any student 
at any time who fails to give satisfactory evi- 
dence of academic ability, earnestness of pur- 
pose, or active cooperation in all requirements 
for acceptable scholarship. 

Notice of Nondiscriminatoiy 
Policy as to Students 

The University of Scranton admits students 
without regard to their race, color, religion, 
national origin, ancestry, sex or age to all the 
rights, privileges, programs, and activities gen- 
erally accorded or made available to students 
at the school. The University does not dis- 



criminate on the basis of race, color, religion, 
national origin, ancestry, disability, sex or age 
in administration of its educational policies, 
admission policies, scholarship and loan pro- 
grams, and athletic and other school-adminis- 
tered programs. 

Otherwise qualified persons are not subject 
to discrimination on the basis of handicap or 
disability. 

If you believe you have been discriminated 
against because of race, color, religion, 
national origin, ancestry, sex, age, or handicap 
or disability, please contact the Director of 
Equity and Diversity. 

It is the personal responsibility of each 
student to acquire an active knowledge of all 
pertinent regulations set forth in the Under- 
graduate Catalog. 

Within the various schools and colleges 
the only official interpretations or modifica- 
tions of academic regulations are those 
which are made in writing by the dean of 
the school or college of which the student is 
a member, or such interpretations or modifi- 
cations of academic regulations as are 
approved by the appropriate dean in writing. 



Table of Contents 

A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • 
Real World Ready 4 

Mission Statement 5 

The University Seal 6 

A Community of Scholars 7 

Jesuit Excellence 8 

Real World Ready 8 

Alumni Society 10 

Pre-Med and Pre-Law Programs 10 

Volunteer Activity 1 1 

The University at a Glance 11 

Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 12 

Admission 13 

University Information 13 

Required High School Preparation 13 

Campus Visit Programs 13 

Submitting an Application 14 

Advanced Placement 14 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP).„l4 

International Students 14 

Students with Disabilities 15 

Special Admissions Programs 15 

Tuition and Fees 16 

Tuition Payments 18 

Health Insurance 20 

Student Identification Cards 20 

Scholarships and Financial Aid 21 

Procedures for Applying 22 

Financial Aid Refund Policy 22 

Loan and Grant Programs 22 

Other Financial Aid Programs 23 

Scholarships 23 

Life on Campus 37 

Student Services 38 

Outside the Classroom 41 

Other Extracurricular Activities 44 

Campus Ministry 45 

The Campus 45 

Academics 47 

Academic Honor Societies 48 

Academic Support Services 50 

Academic Policies and Regulations 52 

Degree Programs 61 

Special Programs 62 

Honors Programs 65 

Interdisciplinary Programs and Concentrations ..72 

General Education Curriculum 82 

General Education Summary 83 

Recommended General Education 

Course Sequence 84 

Options for Undeclared Freshmen 85 

The College of Arts and Sciences 87 

Art and Music 88 

Biology 92 

Chemistry 98 

Biochemistry; Chemistry-Business; 

Chemistry-Computers; Medical Technology 

Communication 107 

Computing Sciences 1 13 

Computer Science; 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 1 18 

Economics 121 



Engineering 123 

Computer Engineering; Electrical Engineering; 

Electronics-Business; Pre-Engineering 
English 129 

Theatre; Writing 

Environmental Science 141 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 143 

International Language/Business 
History 153 

International Studies 
Mathematics 160 

Biomathematics 

Media and Information Technology 165 

Military Science 167 

Neuroscience 170 

Philosophy 171 

Physics 176 

Biophysics 

Political Science 181 

Psychology 186 

Sociology 190 

Gerontology 
Theology/Religious Studies 195 

The Kania School of Management 203 

Accounting 205 

Accounting Information Systems 209 

Economics 212 

Electronic Commerce 215 

Enterprise Management Technology 218 

Finance 220 

International Business 222 

Management 224 

Marketing 227 

Operations and Information Management ....229 

The Panuska College of Professional Studies. ...233 

Counseling and Human Services 234 

Education 240 

Early Childhood Education; Elementary 

Education; Secondary Education; 

Special Education 
Exercise Science and Sport 262 

Coaching 

Health Administration 265 

Human Resources Studies 270 

Nursing 272 

Occupational Therapy 278 

Physical Therapy 283 

Dexter Hanley College 291 

Mission Statement 292 

Degree Programs 292 

Admission Information 293 

Advising Center 295 

Academic Regulations 295 

Tuition and Fees 297 

Financial Aid 298 

RN to B.S. in Nursing 299 

LPN to B.S. in Nursing 301 

B.S. in Liberal Studies 302 

Associate in Arts 303 

Associate in Science: Career-Related Field 304 

Certificates for Academic Credit 309 

The Graduate School 313 

Center for Continuing Education 315 

University Directory 317 

Index 341 



A Community of Scholars 



Jesuit Excellence 



Real World Ready 



The University of Scranton is a community of scholars whose ministry of 
education is informed by the vision of Hfe contained in both the Gospel, 
and the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius Loyola. The University is 
therefore dedicated to freedom of inquiry, the pursuit of wisdom, 
integrity and truth, and the personal growth and development of all who 
share in its life and ministry. 



A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 5 



The Mission Statement of 
The University of Scranton 

Historical Prologue 

A comprehensive, co-educational institu- 
tion, The University of Scranton is, by tradi- 
tion, choice and heartfelt commitment, a 
Catholic and Jesuit university. Founded in 
1888 as Saint Thomas College by the Most 
Reverend William G. O'Hara, D.D., the first 
bishop of Scranton, it achieved university sta- 
tus in 1938, and was entrusted to the care of 
the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) in 1942. 

The Mission of the University 

The University of Scranton is a community 
of scholars whose ministry of education is 
informed by the vision of life contained in 
both the Gospel, and the Spiritual Exercises of 
Saint Ignatius Loyola. The University is there- 
fore dedicated to freedom of inquiry, the pur- 
suit of wisdom, integrity and truth, and the 
personal growth and development of all who 
share in its life and ministry. 

The Character of the University 

As a Catholic university. The University of 
Scranton sees in the teaching and example of 
Jesus Christ the primary source for the values 
and attitudes that imbue the culture of its 
campus. Thus, it seeks to communicate the 
fiillness of the Catholic intellectual tradition 
to its students in a systematic way. Moreover, 
in the ecumenical spirit that it has manifested 
since its founding, the University invites fac- 
ulty, staff and students from other religious 
traditions to share in its mission. 

As a Jesuit university, The University of 
Scranton provides its students with a nurtur- 
ing environment in which a value-laden cur- 
riculum challenges them to develop: 

• a commitment to the value system con- 
tained in the Gospels, 

• a principled respect for the dignity of the 
human person, 

• a devotion to justice, 

• a dedication to the service of the poor, 

• a love of truth and a restless passion for 
learning. 

Convinced that the search for truth neces- 
sarily involves the search for God, the Univer- 
sity also provides its students with opportuni- 
ties for worship and spiritual development, 



and for the academic study of theology, reli- 
gion and religious experience. 

As a university dedicated to education in 
the liberal arts. The University of Scranton 
requires that all of its students complete a rig- 
orous curriculum designed to foster the devel- 
opment of their analytical and critical abili- 
ties. Thus, the core curriculum of the 
University seeks to impart to students a 
knowledge of scientific principles, methods 
and skills, an appreciation of literary and 
artistic expression, an awareness of historical 
perspectives, and an understanding of reli- 
gious, philosophical and moral values. 

As an urban American university. The 
University of Scranton is dedicated to educat- 
ing "men and women for others," from a 
wide variety of backgrounds, whose lives and 
talents will enrich the hfe of the human fam- 
ily. The University is committed to enrolling a 
culturally and racially diverse student body 
from all areas of the country and the world. 
In fulfillment of its mission, the University 
fiirther seeks to attract faculty members from 
richly diverse backgrounds who share its com- 
mitments to excellence in teaching and 
research, to cura personalis (a loving concern 
for students), and to the incarnational vision 
of human life that informs its ministry. 

As a comprehensive university, The Univer- 
sity of Scranton offers certificate and degree 
programs on both the undergraduate (associ- 
ate and baccalaureate) and graduate (master's) 
levels to traditional and non-traditional stu- 
dents. Moreover, in order to prepare them for 
careers in a variety of fields, the University 
offers its students a wide range of professional 
and pre-professional programs of study. 

As the oldest and largest university in 
Northeastern Pennsylvania, The University of 
Scranton is firmly committed to serving the 
people of the region. This commitment is 
manifested in a special way through the Uni- 
versity's dedication to the education of future 
leaders for the area's professional, political, 
religious, cultural and business communities. 

Throughout its history, the University has 
been distinguished by its commitments to lib- 
eral arts education, excellence in teaching and 
the quality of care that it lavishes on its stu- 
dents. As it moves into the new millennium, 
the University reaffirms its commitment to 
these qualities and invites venturesome schol- 
ars and students to join in its mission in the 
service of wisdom, integrity and truth. 



6 A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 



History of the University 

The University of Scranton was founded as 
Saint Thomas College by Bishop William G. 
O'Hara, the first Bishop of Scranton, who 
had always hoped to provide an opportunity 
for higher education in the Lackawanna Val- 
ley. In August of 1888, with few resources at 
hand, he blessed a single block of granite as a 
cornerstone for his new college, which would 
admit its first students four years later. (The 
cornerstone of Old Main is preserved in the 
wall of St. Thomas Hall located at the corner 
of Linden Street and Monroe Avenue.) 

The college was staffed by diocesan priests 
and seminarians until 1896 and then, for one 
year, by the Xaverian Brothers. From 1897 
until 1942 the school, which was renamed 
The University of Scranton in 1938, was 
administered for the Diocese by the Christian 
Brothers. In the late summer of 1942, at the 
invitation of Bishop William Hafey, 1 8 
Jesuits, led by Rev. Coleman Nevils, S.J., the 
newly appointed president, arrived on campus 
to administer the University. 

The Jesuits restructured and strengthened 
Scranton's traditional and pre-professional 
programs with an emphasis on the liberal arts, 
which are the foundation for every program 
at a Jesuit university. This emphasis is 
intended to give students an appreciation for 
all disciplines as they develop specific subject 
knowledge. 

The University has flourished under the 
Jesuits, growing from a primarily commuter 
school with fewer than 1 ,000 students to a 
broadly regional, comprehensive university 
with a total enrollment of over 4,700 students 
in undergraduate, graduate, and non-tradi- 
tional programs. 

As it enters the 21st century, the University 
is building on its historical and educational 
heritage, guided by a 2000-2005 Strategic 
Plan entitled A Community of Scholars -A 
Culture of Excellence and a 20-year Facilities 
Master Plan also adopted in 2000. 

The University remains committed to 
enriching the quality and variety of its aca- 
demic offerings with recent additions in such 
fields as Electronic Commerce, Human 
Resources and Enterprise Management Tech- 
nology. In addition, it continues to invest in 
its physical plant constructing 25 new build- 
ings and renovating 24 others since 1984. 
New construction since 1998 has included 



McGurrin Hall, a four-story home for the 
Panuska College of Professional Studies; Mul- 
berry Plaza and Madison Square townhouses; 
and Brennan Hall, a 71,000 sq. ft. building 
that provides technologically advanced class- 
room and office space for the Kania School of 
Management. (The fifth floor of Brennan Hall 
is home to the Executive Center, an educa- 
tional resource for Northeastern Pennsylvania.) 




The University Seal 

The principal colors of the shield are the 
traditional colors of the University, white and 
royal purple. On the purple field there is a 
horizontal silver bar, containing, in purple, a 
star taken from the seal of the Brothers of the 
Christian Schools and from the seal of Saint 
Thomas College, predecessor of the Univer- 
sity, and two stacks of wheat from the obverse 
of the coat of arms of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. 

The upper half of the shield contains, in 
gold, two wolves grasping a cauldron sus- 
pended from a chain; they are taken from the 
coat of arms of the family of Saint Ignatius 
Loyola, and they identify the University as a 
Jesuit institution. Below the silver bar is a 
golden rising sun, symbolic of Saint Thomas 
Aquinas, the shining light of the Church and 
the Patron of the University. 

Indicating the Diocese of Scranton and 
William Penn, founder of the Common- 
wealth, the black border of the shield repro- 
duces the border of the shield of the Diocese 
and the silver hemispheres are taken from 
William Penn's coat of arms. 



A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 7 



The crest is a golden cross of the particular 
style known as Patonce. It symbolizes Christ, 
the goal and the norm of the University's edu- 
cational efforts, and it complements the 
motto, which the University has had since it 
was entrusted to the care of the Christian 
Brothers in 1899: Religio, Mores, Cultura. 

The outer ring surrounding the seal 
includes the name and founding date of the 
University and reference to the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania. 

A Community of Scholars 

The Faculty 

Over 250 faculty and administrators partic- 
ipate in the University's educational enter- 
prise. They hold degrees from 135 different 
universities in 30 countries on five continents. 
Cambridge and the University of London in 
England; Louvain and the Gregorian in 
Europe; the University of Calcutta in India; 
Sophia University in Japan; Soochow Univer- 
sity in China; Berkeley, Yale, MIT, Notre 
Dame, Harvard and Georgetown in America 
- all are represented among the faculty. 

By its nature and function, a university fac- 
ulty constitutes the most cosmopolitan ele- 
ment in a community. Hindu and Muslim, 
Christian and Jew, ministers and rabbis - 
scholars and teachers all - are found on the 
University's faculty. 

The Jesuit tradition is carried on at the 
University not only by the 16 Jesuits engaged 
in teaching or administration, but by the fact 
that almost half of the faculty hold at least 
one degree from a Jesuit college or university. 

As indicated in the Mission Statement, 
excellent teaching and scholarship are regarded 
as complementary at this institution. In 2002 
there were over 450 publications, proceedings 
and publications, including prestigious peer 
reviewed journals and numerous books on 
subjects ranging from regions of Italy to par- 
enting to business and spirituality. 

Faculty interests are extensive and include 
research and projects funded by the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH), National Science 
Foundation (NSF), Department of Energy 
(DOE), Department of Defense (DOD), 
Health Resources and Services Administration 
(HRSA), National Endowment for the 
Humanities (NEH), Pennsylvania Depart- 



ment of Education (PDE), Pennsylvania 
Commission on Crime and Delinquency 
(PCCD), Pennsylvania Humanities Council 
(PHC), Pennsylvania Council on the Arts 
(PCA), as well as numerous private founda- 
tions and corporations. 

Many faculty participate in international 
projects and faculty exchange programs with 
universities and hospitals around the world, 
bringing this global perspective into the class- 
room. Among the countries involved are Slo- 
vakia, Republic of Georgia, Mexico, China, 
Kyrgyzstan, and Mozambique; funding has 
been received from the US AID and the 
Department of State, and includes five faculty 
Fulbright Scholars. 

The University Directory near the end of 
the catalog presents more detailed informa- 
tion about the faculty. 

Student Diversity and 
Participation 

As our faculty come from around the world, 
so do our students. Twenty-seven states and 
twenty-two foreign countries are represented 
in the University's student body of over 4,700. 
In turn, through the Fulbright and Study 
Abroad programs. University of Scranton stu- 
dents matriculate at such foreign universities 
as Oxford, Leuven, Madrid, Tubingen, 
Mainz, Oslo, Fribourg, Cologne, Salamanca, 
Lancaster, Berne, Strasbourg, the Sorbonne 
and University College, Dublin. This inter- 
change of students contributes to the diversity 
and intellectual life of the University. 

Much of the work in this university com- 
munity is accomplished through student 
input. Considerable scientific research at the 
University is done by undergraduate students 
in the laboratories and in the field. With fac- 
ulty assistance, the University newspaper and 
yearbook are edited and managed by students, 
and students publish articles and abstracts in 
national scholarly journals. Students work in 
the Public Relations and Admissions offices, 
computer center, as resident assistants in the 
dormitories, as research assistants and interns 
for deans and the registrar. Similarly, they par- 
ticipate in the University's decision making. 
Seven students are elected by the student 
body to serve on the University Council. 
Others serve with departmental chairpersons 
and faculty on the Conferences which recom- 



A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 



mend to the Deans changes in academic pro- 
grams. Students also serve with other mem- 
bers of the University community on the vari- 
ous search committees which recommend 
candidates for the principal administrative 
posts from President to Dean. 

Baccalaureate Source of Ph.D.s 

Achievement is also recognized in a recent 
study of the Office of Institutional Research 
at Franklin and Marshall College which 
showed that over a 75-year period (1920-95), 
The University of Scranton ranked 22nd out 
of 254 four-year, private, master's-degree- 
granting institutions as the baccalaureate 
source of Ph.D.s in all fields. 

Jesuit Excellence 

Since 1994, U.S. News & World Report has 
named the University among the top 10 com- 
prehensive universities in the North (the most 
competitive by its annual survey of "America's 
Best Colleges"). The University has consis- 
tently been included in the U.S. News rank- 
ings since they were first introduced in 1983. 
In the 2003 edition, Scranton ranked fourth. 
The University was also ranked 1 1th in the 
category, "Great School at a Great Price." 

The Princeton Review counts Scranton 
among The Best 345 Colleges in the nation 
according to its 2003 edition. The University 
is also profiled in the 2003 edition of Kaplan 
Publishing's The Unofficial, Unbiased, Insider's 
Guide to the 320 Most Interesting Colleges. 

For three consecutive years, Yahoo! Internet 
Life magazine ranked the University among 
the nation's 100 most wired colleges and uni- 
versities. In 2001, Scranton ranked 39th 
among the more than 1 ,300 universities sur- 
veyed and was one of only two Jesuit universi- 
ties making the list. 

In recognition of its work as a values-cen- 
tered institution, the University is one of 100 
American schools named to the John Temple- 
ton Foundation's Honor Roll of Colleges That 
Encourage Character Development. The foun- 
dation made special note of the integration of 
academics and student life as expressed in the 
University's curriculum and co-curricular 
activities, mentioning especially the Freshman 
Seminar, Collegiate Volunteers, Campus Min- 
istries and the peer counseling and education 
programs in the Wellness Center. 



Real World Ready 

Fulbrights and Other 
International Fellowships 

Since 1972, 1 1 1 Scranton students have 
accepted grants in the competitions adminis- 
tered by the Institute of International Educa- 
tion (Fulbright) and International Rotary. In 
2001 the University celebrated its 100th win- 
ner in the competition for prestigious Ful- 
bright Fellowships - the U.S. government's 
premier scholarship for foreign study and 
research. 

Three Scranton students were awarded Ful- 
bright Scholarships for the 2002-03 academic 
year, and one was awarded an Austrian Gov- 
ernment Teaching Assistantship. Jennifer 
Bradley, who completed her M.B.A. this year, 
and Nicole Sublette, who majored in psychol- 
ogy and minored in art history, won Fulbright 
Teaching Assistantships to South Korea, 
where they will teach English as a second lan- 
guage while researching aspects of Korean art. 
Elliott Gougeon, who majored in German, 
will spend the year in Germany on a Ful- 
bright/Padagogischer Austauschdienst Teach- 
ing Assistantship in English. He will explore 
the German reaction to increased school vio- 
lence during his Fulbright year. Finally, Kate 
Christiansen, who majored in international 
studies and minored in German, was awarded 
an Austrian Government Teaching Assistant- 
ship in English to Austria. 

During the 2002-03 academic year three 
Scranton graduates studied overseas on Ful- 
brights. Joy Oliver, a psychology and philoso- 
phy double major, spent her year researching 
Dutch work and organizational experts at 
Utrecht University in the Netherlands. Kristy 
Petty, an international business and Spanish 
double major, examined the strategies of lead- 
ing firms in Argentina's automobile and food- 
stuffs industries during her Fulbright Fellow- 
ship in Buenos Aires. Nicole Negowetti, a 
political science major, pursued a master's 
degree in Peace and Conflict Resolution at 
the University of Limerick in Ireland on her 
Rotary Scholarship. Maria Atzert '01 spent 
the year teaching English as a second language 
in Seoul during her second year as a Fulbright 
Teaching Assistant in South Korea. 

Dr. Susan Trussler of the Economics/Finance 
department is the University's Fulbright Pro- 



A Community of Scholars * Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 9 



gram Advisor. Additional information is avail- 
able online at www.scranton.edu/fulbright. 

Awards from Institute of International 
Education Fulbright Program and 
International Rotary, 1983-2003 

1983 

Erin Brennan Germany 

Patrick Davies (ITT) Chile 

Peter Regeski France 

Joseph Tuncavage Switzerland 

Christopher Wahren Germany 

1984 

Robert Conforti Switzerland 

Kathleen Flanagan France 

Colette Mazzucelli Switzerland 

1985 

John Beltrami Switzerland 

Michele Gieger Germany 

Marguerite Pedley New Zealand 

Louise Vogel Germany 

1986 

Margaret Husosky New Zealand 

James Lavelle Thailand 

Christopher Montone Honduras 

Robert Rabecs Philippines 

Janet Schubert (Rotary) Belgium 

DeLoris Spegar Singapore 

Roy Whitman Switzerland 

Ann Marie Laskiewicz Ross South Africa 

1987 

Susan Conway Germany 

Kathleen Gallagher (Rotary) Nepal 

Margaret Keen France 

Kevin Wright Finland 

1988 

Michel Aboutanos Switzerland 

Jeffrey Gabello Germany 

Christine O'Brien Kenya 

Mary Yuen Singapore 

1989 

Kim Marie Newak Germany 

1990 

Caroline Parente Uruguay 

1991 

Daniel Jurgelewicz Finland 

Thomas Spoto Singapore 

1992 

Maureen Cronin South Korea 

Alissa Giancarlo Germany 

Thomas Kish Hungary 

Jennifer Murphy Denmark 



Neal Rightley Germany 

Salvatore Tirrito Finland 

Denise Udvarhely New Zealand 

1993 

Timothy Gallagher New Zealand 

Susan Kavalow South Korea 

Jennifer Kelly Uruguay 

Alan Landis Colombia 

BethLiVolsi Italy 

Colleen Mclnerney Australia 

Jennifer Seva Argentina 

1994 

Margaret Mary Hricko Spain 

Terrence Kossegi Pakistan 

Karis Lawlor Germany 

Brian Zarzecki Namibia 

1995 

Jason Cascarino New Zealand 

Jeffrey Greer Sri Lanka 

Renee Kupetz Germany 

1996 

Robert Brennan Israel 

Michael Pagliarini France 

Michael Tracy New Zealand 

1998 

Kevin Bisignani Germany 

Jennifer Cahill Japan 

Matthew Pierlott South Korea 

Karen Towers Mauritius 

1999 

Alison Glucksnis Japan 

Katherine Roth United Kingdom 

Christopher Warren Guatemala 

2000 

Lisa Angelella India 

Amy Patuto South Korea 

2001 

Maria Atzert South Korea 

Lisa Biagiotti Italy 

Erin Friel Germany 

Carol Gleeson Paraguay 

Nicole Heron Finland 

Clifford McMurray Germany 

Sean St. Ledger (Rotary) Italy 

2002 

Joy Oliver Netherlands 

Kristy Petty Argentina 

Nicole Negowetti (Rotary) Ireland 

2003 

Jennifer Bradley South Korea 

Elliott Gougeon Germany 

Nicole Sublette South Korea 



10 A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 



Truman and Other National 
Scholarships 

University of Scranton students excel in 
several national fellowship competitions, com- 
piling a superb record of achievement in 
many areas in addition to their exceptional 
record in the Fulbright competition. 

During the 2002-2003 academic year, Sara 
Shoener, a biomathematics and philosophy 
major, became the fifth University of Scran- 
ton student to be named a Truman Scholar, 
one of only 76 students in the country to be 
so honored in 2003. She plans to use her Tru- 
man Scholarship to pursue a joint 
J.D./M.P.H. program at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity School of Public Health and George- 
town University Law Center. Michael Venn, a 
political science and international studies 
major, was one of only 43 students in the 
country to be awarded a Jack Kent Cooke 
Graduate Scholarship. Michael's scholarship 
will provide full support for six years as he 
pursues his Ph.D. in European Studies at the 
University of Cambridge, where he will also 
earn a barrister's degree. Christopher Corey, a 
biochemistry, biomathematics, and biophysics 
major, received a Goldwater Scholarship, one 
of 300 students to be awarded this scholar- 
ship. Talia Argondezzi, an English and philos- 
ophy major, was one of three students in the 
country to receive a senior scholarship from 
Sigma Tau Delta, the International English 
Honor Society; Talia also received a Sigma 
Tau Delta essay award. 

During the 2001-02 year, Stephanie Tessing 
was one of 77 students to be named a Truman 
Scholar. Stephanie was also named to the 
third team of the USA Today All-USA Acade- 
mic Team in 2003. Michael Venn, named 
above, received one of forty Jack Kent Cooke 
Undergraduate Scholar awards given to con- 
tinuing undergraduate students; he also held 
an internship with the Department of State's 
Bureau of European Affairs. Erin Brodie, a 
mathematics and philosophy major, was 
named a Junior fellow in the Joint Program in 
Survey Methodology. Ryan Surace, an 
Accounting major, was one of 50 students to 
receive the State Farm Companies Exceptional 
Student Fellowship. Rachel Henry, a junior 
English major, was one of three students to 
receive a Sigma Tau Delta Junior Award, 
while Heather Theiss, a senior English and 



philosophy majors received one of three sen- 
ior awards given by Sigma Tau Delta. 

In the 2000-01 year, two senior athletes, 
Joseph Fent and Nicole Bayman, received 
NCAA Postgraduate Scholarships. Sarah Gaz- 
dalski, an accounting major, received the State 
Farm Companies Exceptional Student Fellow- 
ship. Les Carter, a mathematics and philoso- 
phy major, was selected as a Junior Fellow in 
the Joint Program in Survey Methodology. 

In each of the past three years. University 
of Scranton students have received scholar- 
ships, including the HE Freeman Asia Award 
and the Gilman Scholarship, to support their 
study at international institutions. 



Alumni Society 



The University of Scranton Alumni Society 
provides a way for graduates to continue their 
participation in the life of the University after 
their student years. Its 20 alumni chapters 
and affiliates include more than 35,000 mem- 
bers. The Society, which is governed by 
elected officers and a 28-member Board of 
Governors, fosters communication among 
alumni and encourages continued dialogue 
between alumni and the University commu- 
nity. It hosts alumni functions, including 
reunions and homecomings, and promotes 
the interests of the University by identifying 
prospective students, assisting the placement 
of graduates, collecting and preserving materi- 
als for University history, encouraging net- 
working among its membership, providing 
numerous services and benefits, performing 
community service projects, and honoring 
student, faculty and alumni accomplishments. 
These activities are coordinated through the 
Office of Alumni Relations on campus. 

Pre-Med and Pre-Law 
Programs 

In 2003, medical and related health profes- 
sions schools accepted over 80% of the Uni- 
versity's 54 applicants. Over the past five 
years, the acceptance rate of University of 
Scranton applicants to medical, dental, and 
other health professions schools has ranged 
between 80-100%. The acceptance rate for 
the 35 Scranton students applying for law 
schools in 2002 was 75% - about 15% above 
the national average. Additional information 



A Community of Scholars • Jesuit Excellence • Real World Ready 1 1 



about the remarkable success of Scranton 
alumni gaining acceptance to professional 
schools, including the nation's most presti- 
gious, is documented in the Health Professions 
and Pre-Law sections later in this catalog. 

Volunteer Activity 

The University's Collegiate Volunteers pro- 
gram has a roster of 2,200 students who per- 



form well over 1 54,000 service hours each 
year. Since 1986, a total of 263 Scranton stu- 
dents have chosen to spend a year or more in 
full-time volunteer service immediately after 
graduation. A total of 190 of these graduates 
have volunteered with the Jesuit Volunteer 
Corps. Additional information about the Col- 
legiate Volunteers program can be found in 
the Student Life section of the catalog. 



The University at a Glance 

Students 

The student population, including adult, 
part-time and graduate students, is over 
4,700. About 80 percent of full-time fresh- 
men live on campus. 

Schools and Colleges Enrollment 

(Year Established) Fall 2002 

College of Arts and Sciences (1888) 1,814 

Dexter Hanley College (1923) 449 

Graduate School (1951) 668 

Arthur J. Kania School 

of Management (1978) 758 

J.A. Panuska, S.J., College 

of Professional Studies (1987) 1,039 

Total 4,728 

Undergraduate Students 4,060 

Men 1,722 (42%) 

Women 2,338 (58%) 

Graduate Students 668 

Men 222 (33%) 

'Women 446 (67%) 

Primary States of Origin (Undergraduates) 

Pennsylvania 47% 

New Jersey 24% 

New York 22% 

Other 7% 

Primary Counries of Origin 
(Pennsylvania Undergraduate Students) 

Lackawanna 38% 

Luzerne 1 1% 

Montgomery 9% 

Delaware 7% 

Bucks 5% 

Philadelphia 5% 



Degrees Conferred, 2001-02 

Bachelor's Degrees 829 

Master's Degrees 201 

Master's Certificates 1 

Associate's Degrees 5 

Total 1,036 

Academic Programs 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 58 

Master's Degree Programs 23 

Undergraduate Concentrations/Tracks 29 

Continuing and Professional 

Education Courses Offered Annually 325 

Faculty 

Eighty-five percent of the University's fac- 
ulty hold doctoral or other terminal degrees 
in their fields. The student-to-faculty ratio 
of 13:1 allows for class sizes that average 23 
students. 

Full-Time Faculty 252 

Men 172 (68%) 

Women 80 (32%) 

Minorities 22 (9%) 

Jesuits 8 (3%) 

Tenured Faculty 196 (78%) 

Men 140 

Women 56 



12 



Undergraduate Admission 
AND Expenses 



The University of Scranton is a selective institution, offering a flexible, 
liberal arts education in the Jesuit tradition oi cura personalis (care for 
each person and the whole person). 



Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 1 3 



Admission 

The Admissions Committee of The Uni- 
versity of Scranton will make the final deci- 
sion on applications for admission. In reach- 
ing this decision, the committee will consider 
a number of factors: demonstrated evidence 
of a student's academic ability, intellectual 
curiosity, strength of character and motiva- 
tion; the student's high school record, class 
rank, and extracurricular activities; SAT 
and/or ACT scores. 

University Information 

The Office of Admissions offers prospective 
students a wide variety of information about 
The University of Scranton through various 
publications. Prospective students can 
request materials by contacting: 

Director of Admissions 

The University of Scranton 

Scranton, PA 18510 

Telephone: (570) 941-7540 or 
1-888-SCRANTON 

Fax: (570) 941-5928 

E-mail: adinissions@scranton.edu 

Web: www.scranton.edu/admissions 

Required High School 
Preparation 

Students wishing to enroll in any of several 
undergraduate programs offered by the Uni- 
versity must have completed a total of 16 or 
more high school academic units covering 
grades 9-12. The term "unit" refers to a high 
school course taught four or five hours weekly 
throughout an academic year of 36 weeks 
duration. Unit requirements and preferred 



distribution of secondary courses are given in 
the table below. 

Applicants without high school credit in 
modern languages may be accepted if they 
present 16 acceptable units. A single year of 
language in high school will not be counted 
as a unit to satisfy the requirements for 
admission. 

Mathematics includes elementary, interme- 
diate, and advanced algebra; plane and solid 
geometry; trigonometry, analysis, and any 
other college-preparatory course. Applicants 
for science and engineering programs must 
include trigonometry and must have earned a 
grade of 85 in each mathematics course. 
Applicants for the nursing programs should 
include chemistry and biology in their high 
school programs. 

Science includes biology, chemistry, physics 
and other college-preparatory courses. Pre- 
engineering applicants are urged to include 
physics in their high school preparation. 

Campus Visit Programs 

The best way to experience The University 
of Scranton is to visit for yourself Individuals 
can schedule a visit that includes a campus 
tour, a group information session, sitting in 
on a class or a personal session with an 
Admissions Counselor. Additional opportuni- 
ties include two fall Open Houses, a Royal 
Nights overnight program and Freshman 
Preview Day in the spring for accepted high 
school seniors. Tours and individual appoint- 
ments are available throughout the year, Mon- 
day through Friday and some Saturdays. To 
arrange a visit, please call 1-888-SCRANTON 
(choose option "1"), (570) 941-6654 or e-mail 
us at admissions@scranton.edu. 









College Program Choice 










Business, 


Science, 


Education, 


High School Unit 


Arts 


OT, PT, E; 


ngineering 


Social Science 




Req. 


Pref. 


Req. 


Pref. 


Req. Pref. 


English 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 4 


History and Social Science 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 3 


Foreign Language 


2 


2+ 


2 


2+ 


2 2+ 


College-Preparatory Mathematics 


3 


4 


4 


4 


3 4 


Science 


1 


2+ 


3 


3+ 


1 2+ 


Other acceptable units 


4 




1 




4 


Total 


16+ 




16+ 




16+ 



14 Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 



Submitting an Application 

Students should apply during the first 
semester of their senior year of high school. 
The early-action deadline is November 15. 
For all applicants other than those in Physical 
Therapy, early- action offers will be made on 
December 15. From that time on, all applica- 
tions will be reviewed on a rolling basis with a 
four-week turn around and a preferred final 
application deadline of March 1st. All Physi- 
cal Therapy applications must be completed 
and received by February 1 5 for a March 1 5 
decision and a May 1 priority confirmation. 

The application form should be completed 
and the entire form given to the guidance 
counselor of the high school who will forward 
high school grades to the University. 

The SAT I: Reasoning Test (College 
Entrance Examination Board) or the ACT 
Test (American College Testing) is required of 
all applicants. These tests should be taken 
during the junior year and/or senior year of 
high school. During Summer Orientation, the 
University administers its own placement 
tests. Therefore, applicants are not required to 
take the SAT II. 

Physical Therapy applicants must submit 
documentation attesting to observation work 
done in their chosen field. 

Application Fees and Confirmation 

A non-refundable fee of $40.00 should 
accompany the application. No fee is charged 
for online applications submitted via the Uni- 
versity Web site at www.scranton.edu/apply. 
Accepted students who wish to confirm their 
place in the freshman class should submit a 
non-reftindable class reservation fee of 
$150.00 by May 1. Resident freshmen should 
also include a non-refundable room deposit 
fee of $150.00. 

Advanced Placement 

Applicants who have taken college-level 
courses in high school may be placed in 
advanced courses and may be given credits as 
well. Students who have been accepted for 
admission and desire to apply for such place- 
ment must take the Advanced Placement 
Examination offered in May by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, N.J. 
08540. Students can have their results sent 



automatically to the University by providing 
the school code (2929). In most cases, a mini- 
mum score of "3" (non science) or "4" 
(math/science) may earn advanced placement 
with 3 to 6 credits. Biology, Biophysics, and 
Physical Therapy majors cannot receive biol- 
ogy credits. Students pursuing a pre-med pro- 
gram should be aware that many medical 
schools do not accept AP credit for required 
pre-medical courses. 

College-Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) 

Through the CLEP tests, taken before 
admission, applicants may gain college credit 
in most academic subjects for work done out- 
side the classroom in jobs, military service, 
etc., or in non-accredited institutions. For 
fiirther information contact: College Level 
Examination Program, Box 1824, Princeton, 
N.J. 08540. Students wishing to be consid- 
ered for CLEP credits should take the CLEP 
examinations and have the results forwarded 
to the Director of Admissions. 

International Students 

The University of Scranton has been edu- 
cating international students since 1946 and 
remains committed to that tradition. At pres- 
ent, approximately 50 different countries are 
represented by undergraduate and graduate 
students. 

The University's Office of International 
Programs and Services and the International 
Center provide international students with 
advice, support and resources to ensure a 
smooth transition to a new culture and edu- 
cational system. Additional information about 
support programs and services for interna- 
tional students can be found later in this cata- 
log in the section on the Office of Interna- 
tional Programs and Services. 

The University has a house on campus that 
serves as a mosque for the use of Muslim stu- 
dents. It is available for daily prayers as well as 
the Friday prayer. 

International Baccalaureate Policy 

The University of Scranton grants college 
credit for classes taken through a recognized 
International Baccalaureate (IB) program. 



Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 1 5 



Students can earn credit for up to three suc- 
cessfully completed higher-level classes in 
which a score of 4 or higher is achieved on 
the appropriate IB examination. For more 
information on IB credit, contact the Admis- 
sions Office. 

Students with Disabilities 

The University of Scranton complies with 
all applicable laws and regulations with 
respect to the accommodation of handicaps 
and disabilities as these terms are defined in 
law. The University will provide reasonable 
accommodations so students can fiilly partici- 
pate in curricular and extracurricular activities. 
Students who need assistance should make 
timely contact with the Office of Equity and 
Diversity at (570) 941-6213. 

Special Admissions Programs 

Academic Development Prograrai 

When the Admissions Committee believes 
applicants may find the transition to college- 
level work especially challenging, the appli- 
cants may be considered for a special fresh- 
man-year Academic Development Program 
(ADP). The program concentrates on English, 
logical thinking, reading skills and study 
habits, as well as work in the student's major 
field. Freshmen who complete all require- 
ments of the ADP program have normal 
sophomore standing. 

Summer Bridge Program 

The University is committed to helping 
students who have demonstrated achievement 
and a desire to attend college but who need to 
improve their verbal skills. The Summer 
Bridge program assists students in making the 
transition from high school to college and in 
the future development of reading and writ- 
ing skills. The summer program and mentor- 
ing during the academic year are designed to 
help students achieve their potential and suc- 
ceed in their degree program. Students are 
chosen on the basis of a careful examination 
of high school transcripts, standardized test 
scores, and extracurricular activities. 



Transfer Student Admission 

Students who wish to transfer to The Uni- 
versity of Scranton must submit applications 
and the usual credentials: official high school 
records, SAP scores and transcript(s) from the 
college(s) attended. (All official transcripts 
must be submitted regardless of whether or 
not credit was earned.) At the discretion of 
the Admissions Committee, students from 
other accredited colleges may be admitted 
provided: 

1 . The courses to be transferred are equiva- 
lent or comparable to courses offered at 
The University of Scranton; 

2. Students are required to follow all 
requirements prescribed for the degree 
program at The University of Scranton; 

3. No credit will be given for courses with 
grades less than C. 

Transfer credit is reviewed on an individual 
basis. Students transferring are required to 
earn a minimum of 30 credits for an associ- 
ate's degree or 63 credits for a baccalaureate 
degree at The University of Scranton. Special 
orientation sessions are held for transfer stu- 
dents. It should be noted that some depart- 
ments require that at least half of the credits 
in the student's major be taken here at the 
University. 

Validation of Business Transfer 
Courses 

Students may validate courses taken at a 
non-AACSB institution by successfully com- 
pleting one or more advanced courses in the 
subject for which the course in transfer is a 
foundation course. Approval is granted by the 
Dean of The Kania School of Management. 
This applies only to lower-division transfer 
courses which the University offers at the 
upper-division level. 

High School Scholars 

High school students who have completed 
their sophomore or junior year with a mini- 
mum of a B+ grade average may take one 
University course each term until they gradu- 
ate from high school. Courses may be taken 
for credit or for audit at a special tuition rate 
of $ 1 00 per credit. Students may enroll for a 
maximum of three credits per session. Indi- 
vidual exceptions may be made if GPA/SAT 



1 6 Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 



scores substantiate the request. Courses avail- however, guarantee transferabihty. Registra- 

able are typical freshman-level courses that are tions will be processed on a space-available 

accepted toward a degree The University of basis. Students will be responsible for tuition 

Scranton. These courses generally transfer to and applicable fees. Further information is 

other regionally accredited colleges and uni- available from the Office of Admissions, at 

versities. The University of Scranton cannot, (570) 941-7540, or fax: (570) 941-5928. 

Tuition and Fees 2003-04 

The University of Scranton charges all full-time undergraduate students a comprehensive or 
flat tuition charge for the fall and spring semesters. Not included in the charge are expenses 
for books and supplies, telephone charges, special service fees and laboratory fees. Room and 
board charges are assessed based on the housing option and meal plan selected. 

Tuition 

Full-time Student Tuition, per year $21,208 

Includes 12 to 18 credits taken in each of the fall or spring semesters only. Credits 
taken during intersession or summer sessions or those taken above 18 credits in one 
semester are charged at the rate of $590 per credit in the fall, intersession and 
spring and $494 in the summer This tuition rate excludes students enrolled in the 
Physical Therapy Program. 

Physical Therapy Student Tuition, per year $23,622 

Includes 12 to 18 credits per semester and all required summer and intersession 
courses. Additional credits are charged at the per credit rate of $590 in the fall, 
intersession and spring and $494 in the summer. 

Tuition for Special Programs: Special Jesuit Liberal Arts program students will be allowed 
to take up to 21 credits per semester (fall and spring) at no additional charge above the flat- 
tuition rate. During their junior and senior years, students in the Honors Program and Busi- 
ness Leadership Program will be allowed to take up to 21 credits per semester at no additional 
charge above the flat-tuition rate. 

Room Charges 

Room charges are assessed per semester. Room fees cover intersession housing but an addi- 
tional fee is assessed for any meal plan. No fees include vacation periods. 

Plan AA, per year $6,186 (single), $5,620 (double) 

Madison Square, Mulberry Plaza 

Plan A, per year $5,620 

Gavigan, Linden Plaza, Redington 

Plan B, per year $5,312 

Blair, Cambria, Casey, Driscoll, Fayette, Gannon, Gonzaga, Hopkins, Kostka, 
Lavis, Leahy , Liva, Luzerne, Lynett, Martin, McCormick, McGowan, 
McKerma, Nevils, Southwell, Tioga, Wayne 

Plan C, per year $5,010 

Dennis Edward, Fitch, Hafey, Hannan, Jerrett, McCourt, Montgomery 

Other Room Charges 

Room Damage Deposit $200 

University Housing Activity Fee (annual fee, all returning students) $40 

Summer Session Housing 

Summer room charges (1st and 2nd sessions) $452 

"G" session $621 

Summer Bridge Program $789 



Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 1 7 



Residency Requirement 

The University requires ail first- and second-year undergraduate students to live in cam- 
pus housing. Exceptions to this policy are limited to students who reside with a parent, legal 
guardian or spouse; are 21 years of age or older; or present other documented extenuating cir- 
cumstances. The Admissions Office will determine a student's residency status upon admis- 
sion to the University. 

Board 

Board charges are assessed per semester. No fees include vacation periods. 

19 meals per week, per year $3,808 

$513 in Intersession. All freshmen living in University homing must participate 
in the 19-meal plan during the entire freshman year. Additional information 
about meal plans can be found in the Sttident Life section of the catalog or by 
contacting Dining Services at (570) 941-7456. 

14 meals per week, per year $3,504 

$474 in Intersession 

10 meals per week, per year $2,988 

$411 in Intersession 

Ordinary Fees 

University Fee, per year $200 

Continuation Fee (in lieu of University Fee for students not in residence) 

per semester $5 

Medical Leave Fee, per semester $15 

Reader (Individual Study) Fee, per credit, in addition to regular tuition $30 

Breakage Fee Actual 

Graduating students only: Commencement/Yearbook Fee $200 

Freshmen/transfer students only: Orientation Fee $200 

Laboratory Fees 

Sciences 

Biology, per course, per semester $100 

Chemistry, per lab hour, per semester $40 

Physics, per course, per semester $75 

Psychology, per course, per semester $50 

Medical Tech Intern, per semester $125 

English 

Film Screen Fee, per course, per semester $40 

Writing Fee, per course, per semester (excluding WRTG 105, 106, 107) $25 

Communication 

Radio Lab Fee, per course, per semester $50 

TV Lab Fee, per course, per semester $50 

History I Political Science 

Film Screen Fee, History 212 & 218, per course, per semester $30 

European Union Simulation Fee, PS 331, per course, per semester $100 

Foreign Language 

Language Lab Fee, per course, per semester $50 



1 8 Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 



Nursing 

Clinical Lab, per lab hour, per semester, undergraduate $40 

Clinical Lab, per clinical course, RN, NURS 481 and 490 $110 

Assessment Fee, Juniors, per lab hours, per semester $40 

Assessment Fee, Seniors, per lab hours, per semester $50 

NLN Mobihty Examinations (RN students only; 3 exams) $195 

Physical Therapy 

Clinical Lab, per hour, per semester $40 

Occupational Therapy 

Clinical Lab, per hour, per semester $40 

Art and Music 

Music Fee (Music 111, 112, 219) $30 

All Art Couises Lab Fee, per course, per semester $70 

All Art History Courses (except ARTH 140), per course, per semester $30 

Art/Music (ARMU 140) $30 

Art/Music (ARMU 141) $45 

Special Service Fees 

Late Tuition Payment Fee $100 

Returned Check Fee $25 

Late Registration Free $20 

Requested change of schedule after classes begin $15 

Change of Major Fee $15 

Off-Campus Course Permission Fee $25 

Certified transcript (per copy) 

Currently matriculated students $3 

All other requests $5 



Tuition Payments 

Each semester an invoice displaying your 
courses, your room assignments, and your 
semester charges will be mailed to your mail- 
ing address. The tuition and fees are payable 
by the due date listed on the invoice. A 
Remittance Form is attached to the bottom 
of the invoice. This Remittance Form must 
be returned with payment by the due date. 
Students paying their bills via Tuition Man- 
agement System (TMS) or with financial aid 
must also return the Remittance Form indi- 
cating their source of fimding. 

Without exception, lab fees must be paid 
for all courses with a lab requirement. Also, 
the University Fee must be paid by all College 
of Arts and Sciences, Panuska College of Pro- 
fessional Studies and Kania School of Man- 
agement students registered for courses. 

No student shall be permitted to receive 
any degree, certificate or transcript of record 
until the student's financial account with the 
University has been settled. For students who 



graduate or withdraw from the University, 
any financial account not settled with the 
University Bursar's Office will be forwarded 
to an external collection agency. At the time 
an account is placed with an agency, collec- 
tion costs become the responsibility of the 
student, and they will be added to the balance 
due to the University. 

Monthly Payments 

The University accepts monthly payment 
through participation with a professional 
agency. Tuition Management Services. For 
application information, please call 1-800- 
722-4867 or contact them on the Web at 
www.afiford.com. Brochures inviting family 
participation in a ten-month payment plan 
are mailed to parents of all incoming students 
by May of each year. Also, an enrollment 
form inviting family participation in a four- 
month semester plan will be included with 
the fall billing in July and the spring billing in 
December. 



Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 1 9 



Tuition Insurance 

The University, through A.W.G. Dewar, 
Inc., provides the Tuition Refund Plan 
(TRP). The plan helps protect your educa- 
tional investment. When combined with the 
University's published refund policy, reim- 
bursement totaling 100% of tuition and room 
and board charges billed by the University 
will be made if you must withdraw from a 
term because of a personal illness or accident. 
In case of withdrawal due to a mental or 
nervous disorder, 60% of the above charges 
are covered. Application information is avail- 
able from the Bursar's Office or you may call 
A.W.G. Dewar, Inc. at (617) 774-1555. 

Alumni Discount 

Individuals who have previously earned a 
baccalaureate degree from The University of 
Scranton and are taking undergraduate, 
credit-bearing courses are eligible for 50% 
tuition reduction. 

Family Tuition Reduction 

The family tuition-reduction policies 
applies whenever two or more dependent 
children from the same family are in atten- 
dance during the same semester at the Uni- 
versity as full-time undergraduate students. 
The reduction also applies whenever at least 
one dependent child in a family is in atten- 
dance at the University as a full-time under- 
graduate student and a parent is enrolled full- 



time as an undergraduate student. The tuition 
deduction is equivalent to each student's 
semester tuition multiplied by 10%. A com- 
pleted form must be filed in the Bursar's 
Office each year to receive the reduction for 
that year. Forms and additional information 
may be obtained from the Bursar's Office. 

Tuition Refunds 

The following tuition refund calendar 
applies to all University students. The amount 
of tuition refund is dependent on the formal 
date of withdrawal. Both tuition and fees are 
refundable during the 100% refund period of 
a semester. During the partial refund periods, 
the refund percentage applies only to tuition; 
laboratory and special service fees are not 
refimdable. 

A student billed flat-rate tuition that drops 
a course(s) within a semester, yet remains 
enrolled for the semester, may be entitled to a 
refiind following the calendar under two sce- 
narios. If the total course load remaining is 
below the flat-rate tuition minimum credit 
load (12 credits), then an applicable refund 
will calculate. Or, if prior to dropping the 
course(s), the student's course load was greater 
than the flat-tuition maximum credit load (18 
credits), an applicable refund will calculate. 

Recipients of Federal Title IV Financial Aid 
who completely withdraw are governed by the 
Federal Refund Policy detailed in the Finan- 
cial Aid section of the catalog. 



Tuition Refund Schedule 

Fall/Spring Semester Credit 

Before the first day of classes; to and including 10 calendar days 100% 

To and including 17 calendar days 75% 

To and including 24 calendar days 50% 

To and including 31 calendar days 25% 

Beyond 31 calendar days of the semester no refund 

IntersessionI Summer Sessions Credit 

Before the first day of classes; to and including 2 calendar days 100% 

To and including 4 calendar days 50% 

Beyond 4 calendar days of the session no refund 



20 Undergraduate Admission and Expenses 



Health Insurance 

The University offers undergraduate stu- 
dents the opportunity to enroll in an attrac- 
tive health insurance plan at the outset of 
each academic year. All students residing in 
University housing units must participate in 
the University's sponsored health program, 
unless written evidence is presented showing 
coverage under another health program (e.g., 
parent's health policy). 



Student Identification Cards 

The University of Scranton provides stu- 
dents with a "one-card" photo-identification 
system - the Royal Card. Every student 
attending the University must have a current 
Royal Card. This card must be presented 
upon demand for student services, and use of 
athletic facilities and the library. The Royal 
Card is used for meals in the dining facilities, 
residence hall access, photocopying in the 
library, and may be used as a substitute for 
cash at many locations on campus. For more 
information about the Royal Card, contact 
Royal Card Office at 941-6181. 



21 



Scholarships and 
Financial Aid 



The University will help as many qualified students as possible to 
complete a college education. For this purpose the University maintains 
an Office of Financial Aid, and all inquiries concerning such assistance 
should be made to: Director of Financial Aid, 401 St. Thomas Hall, tele- 
phone (570) 941-7700, fax (570) 941-4370. Assistance is also available 
via the Web at w^ww.scranton.edu or by e-mail to finaid@scranton.edu. 



22 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



Procedures for Applying 
for Scholarships and 
Financial Aid 

Complete the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFSA). Priority filing date for 
incoming students is February 15; for return- 
ing students, April 15. FAFSA forms are avail- 
able from high school guidance officers, from 
the University's Financial Aid Office and 
online at www.scranton.edu/financialaid. 

In order to be eligible for financial aid, stu- 
dents are required to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress. Standards have been estab- 
lished for federal and University financial aid 
that measure a student's progress toward a 
declared educational objective. These guide- 
lines include a maximum time frame for com- 
pleting a degree, a minimum percentage of 
credits completed each academic year and a 
minimum cumulative grade point average. A 
brief explanation is provided below. 

Credit Requirements 

Full-time students are expected to complete 
their undergraduate degrees within six aca- 
demic years. Part-time students are allotted a 
period of time that shall not exceed 1 2 aca- 
demic years. Students enrolled in The College 
of Arts and Science, The Kania School of 
Management andTheJ.A. Panuska, S.J., Col- 
lege of Professional Studies who are full-time 
students must successfully complete a mini- 
mum of 24 credits per academic year. Stu- 
dents enrolled in Dexter Hanley College as 
full-time students must complete a minimum 
of 21 credits, three-quarter-time students a 
minimum of 1 5 credits, half-time students a 
minimum of 9 credits and less-than-half-time 
students a minimum of 6 credits per aca- 
demic year. Full-time dependent students who 
drop below 1 2 credits per semester may lose 
coverage under their parents' health insurance 
plan and may be required to begin repayment 
of student loans. 

Academic Requirements 

All students must maintain a cumulative 
grade point average of 2.00 in order to demon- 
strate satisfactory academic standing. Academic 
scholarship recipients are required to maintain 
a cumulative grade point average of 2.50, 3.00 
or 3.25 depending on the scholarship. 



Students should consult the Comprehen- 
sive Guide to Financial Aid for a full defini- 
tion of Satisfactory Progress Standards and the 
appeals process. Copies are available at the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Financial Aid Refund Policy 

In accordance with federal regulations, 
those students who receive federal financial 
aid and who completely withdraw from the 
University during the first 60% of a semester 
will have their federal financial aid (Pell 
Grants, Supplemental Educational Opportu- 
nity Grants, Perkins Loans, Stafford Loans 
and PLUS Loans) adjusted based on the per- 
cent of the semester completed prior to the 
withdrawal. That is, students will be entitled to 
retain the same percent of the federal financial 
aid received as the percent of the semester 
completed. The date of withdrawal will be the 
date the student begins the withdrawal process 
in accordance with the official procedures out- 
lined in the catalog. There will be no adjust- 
ment to federal financial aid after 60% of the 
semester is completed. Students who must 
totally withdraw from school should consult 
with the Financial Aid Office on how the 
refund policy applies to their situation. 

Loan and Grant Programs 

Federal Perkins Loan Program 

The University administers this federal pro- 
gram, which provides 5% interest loans to 
needy students. A Free Application For Fed- 
eral Student Aid (FAFSA) is required of all 
loan applicants. 

Federal Stafford Loan Program 

Available in cooperation with community 
banks, credit unions, and savings and loan 
associations. The University of Scranton's pre- 
ferred lender is PNCBank. Freshmen may 
borrow a maximum of $2,625; sophomores, 
$3,500; and juniors and seniors, $5,500 per 
academic grade level. The aggregate maxi- 
mum for undergraduate study is $23,000. 
Depending on their grade level, independent 
students may borrow $4000-$5000 in unsub- 
sidized Stafford loans. The Financial Aid 
Office will pre-certify a loan up to the maxi- 
mum grade level amount. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 23 



Federal Plus Parent Loan 

Available for parents of dependent stu- 
dents. Credit-worthy parents are able to bor- 
row up to the difference between a student's 
cost of attendance and total other financial 
aid. Additional details and applications are 
available from community lending institutions. 

The Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Assistance Agency 
(PHEAA) 

Designated by the General Assembly to 
administer the State Grant Program. Students 
may be awarded from $200 to $3,300 per 
year. A FAFSA must be filed by May 1 . 

Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grant 

A federal campus-based program adminis- 
tered by the University. Amounts may range 
from $200 to $2,500 per year to students 
who demonstrate exceptional need. Priority is 
given to Pell recipients. A FAFSA is required 
for this program. 

Federal Pell Grant 

Provides federal grants, ranging from $400 
to $4,050 per academic year, based on finan- 
cial need. A FAFSA is required. 

Other Financial Aid 
Programs 

University of Scranton Awards 

The University offers a number of awards 
based on academic merit (see "Scholarships") 
and financial need. All accepted freshmen are 
automatically evaluated academically for 
scholarship aid. In order to be considered for 
need-based aid, students must file a FAFSA. 

Federal Work-Study Program 

A federal campus-based program that pro- 
vides employment during the academic year 
and in the summer for students demonstrating 
financial need. The majority of the jobs are 
on-campus positions in various departments 
and administrative offices. Some jobs, both 
on and off campus, involve community service. 
Students seeking campus employment must 
file a FAFSA and Work-Study Application. 



Veterans' Benefits 

Veterans and eligible dependents should 
consult their local Veterans Administration 
counselor in order to establish their eligibility 
for participation. The Office of the Registrar 
certifies enrollment for eligible veterans with 
the Veterans Administration (VA form 22- 
1999). 

U.S. Army ROTC Scholarships 

Please contact the Military Science depart- 
ment in Rock Hall at (570) 941-7457 or 
941-6336. 

U.S. Air Force ROTC Scholarships 

Offers many two- to five-year full- and par- 
tial-tuition scholarships for which qualified 
students may compete if they enroll in U.S. 
Ar Force ROTC. Certain qualified students 
may also be eligible for a tax-free stipend of 
$150 a month. Ml graduating students who 
successfully complete the AFROTC program 
receive commissions as second lieutenants and 
will serve on active duty in the United States 
Ar Force. For more information, contact the 
Aerospace Studies Department at 1-800-945- 
5378, ext. 4860. 

Office of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Under the Pennsylvania Department of 
Labor and Industry, provides help to qualified 
students. Residents of other states should 
inquire about similar programs available in 
their states of residency. 



Scholarships 



Each year the University offers merit schol- 
arships which are based on a student's high 
school record of academic achievement. These 
scholarships include both President's (full 
tuition) and Dean's and Loyola (partial 
tuition) scholarships. Scholarship application 
procedures are outlined in the University's 
viewbook. 

Scranton Preparatory School 
Scholarship 

This four-year, full-tuition scholarship, ini- 
tiated in 1947 by the President and Board of 
Trustees of the University, is given to a gradu- 
ate of the Scranton Preparatory School. 



24 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



Selection of the recipient is on the basis of 
academic achievement, quahties of leadership, 
service to the Preparatory School, and recom- 
mendation of the president and the dean of 
studies of the Preparatory School. 

Purple Club Scholarships 

Noteworthy among gifts to University of 
Scranton students are the significant amounts 
contributed annually by the Purple Club of 
Scranton. Since its founding in 1933, the 
Purple Club has provided special financial 
support to deserving and qualified students. 

Endowed Scholarships 

The Eugene J. and Elizabeth J. Agnone Scholar- 
ship: This scholarship, established in 1997, aids 
needy students from the Scranton area who are 
interested in pursuing careers in medicine. 

The Alperin Family Scholarship: Members of the 
Alperin Family (Irwin E. Alperin, Myer Alperin, 
Toni Alperin Goldberg, the late Joel M. Alperin 
and their families) established this scholarship in 
1987. It is given to incoming students who have 
demonstrated excellence in the classroom and 
financial need. First preference is given to 
employees of the Alperin family companies and 
their families, but all worthy students from 
Lackawanna County and Northeastern Pennsyl- 
vania are considered. 

The Joseph James and Mary Agnes Andrako 
Scholarships: These scholarships were established 
in 1988 according to the provisions in the will 
of the late Joseph J. Andrako. The scholarships 
benefit students who have financial need and 
who are enrolled in a premedical or allied health 
sciences program. 

The Frank A. and Helen S. Baciewicz 
Scholarship: This scholarship was created in 
memory of Frank Baciewicz by his family and 
widow. The student must embody characteristics 
of generosity, thoughtfulness, humor, and men- 
tal and physical tenacity. First consideration is 
given to students from the Dickson City or 
Scranton area. 

The Michael B. Bagdzinski Memorial Scholarship: 

This scholarship was established by family, class- 
mates and friends of Michael, a member of the 
Class of 1 999 who passed away during his senior 
year. The scholarship is given to theatre students 
at the University. 

The Edward F. Bartley Scholarship: Joseph 
Austin '52 and his wife, Mary, established this 
scholarship in 1 996 to honor Bartley, a Univer- 



sity professor emeritus. The scholarship is 
awarded to students from Lackawanna County, 
with preference given to students from the Mid- 
Valley area. 

The Rev. John J. Begley, S.J., Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established by the Scranton Jesuit 
Community to honor one of its own, provides 
financial assistance based on academic excellence 
and demonstrated need. 

The Rev. Paul R. Seining, S.J. Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established by the Scranton Jesuit 
Community to honor one of its own, is for a 
student born and raised in Northeastern Penn- 
sylvania and who has demonstrated financial 
need. First consideration is given to a biology 
major who maintains an overall B average. 

The Velio E. Berardis, M.D., Memorial 
Scholarship: In 1989 Mrs. Dorothy Berardis 
established a scholarship to honor the memory 
of her husband, Velio E. Berardis, M.D. This 
scholarship provides awards, based on merit and 
need, to senior premedical students. Special 
preference is given to those who plan to attend 
Jefferson Medical College. 

The Michael J. Bevilacqua Scholarship: The 

Bevilacqua family established this scholarship in 
1989 as a memorial to honor the late Michael J. 
Bevilacqua. The scholarship is available to stu- 
dents from families who have more than one 
student in college at the same time. 

The Sarah Beth Beynon Memorial Scholarship 
of The Scranton Area Foundation: This scholar- 
ship was established in memory of Sarah Beth 
Beynon by her parents. Sarah would have gradu- 
ated from Pittston Area High School in 2000. 
The scholarship, which is administered through 
The Scranton Area Foundation, benefits under- 
graduate students pursuing a degree in environ- 
mental science and graduate students pursuing 
studies in cancer research. 

The Chester and Veronica Bochinski Memorial 
Scholarship: This scholarship was established by 
James C. Bochinski '70 and his sister, Marie A. 
Ryan, in memory of their parents. The scholar- 
ship is given to students from Northeastern 
Pennsylvania who pursue courses of study in 
psychology, nursing or business administration. 

The Frances R Boland, M.D., Memorial 
Scholarship: Family, triends and colleagues estab- 
lished this scholarship shortly after Dr. Boland's 
death in 1987. Each year a grant is given to pre- 
medical students. The scholarship is based pri- 
marily on merit. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 23 



The Paul M. and Joan A. Borick Scholarship: 

Dr. Borick '47 and his wife established this 
scholarship for students from Lackawanna and 
Wayne counties who intend to pursue courses of 
study in microbiology. 

The Margaret Brtggs Foundation Scholarship: In 

1995 the Margaret Briggs Foundation estab- 
lished this scholarship for an incoming freshman 
who demonstrates financial need. Students from 
Lackawanna County are given first considera- 
tion; thereafter qualified students from one of 
the surrounding counties are considered. 

The William J. and Elizabeth E Burkavage 
Scholarship: Established in 1998, this scholar- 
ship is awarded to deserving students in North- 
eastern Pennsylvania, with first preference to 
those who live in Lackawanna County. 

The Burke Eamily Scholarship: Income from 
this scholarship benefits needy and deserving 
students. The Burke family was originally from 
the Hyde Park section of Scranton. Thomas F. 
Burke, Class of 1909, played a leadership role in 
establishing the scholarship. 

The Alio J. Buselli Memorial Scholarship: Mrs. 
June Buselli established this scholarship in mem- 
ory of her husband to assist incoming freshmen 
from Lackawanna County pursuing degrees in 
science. 

The Rev. Henry J. Butler, S.J., Memorial 
Scholarships: The first scholarship, for students 
from Bishop Hannan High School in Scranton, 
was established in 1984 by James Summers in 
honor of the executive vice president of the Uni- 
versity who died in office in 1981. A second 
Butler Scholarship, for students from Scranton 
High School, was established in 1985 by John 
A. McCrane, a classmate of Father Butler at 
Georgetown University. 

The Private Frank J. Cali Scholarship: Mr. and 

Mrs. Samuel C. Cali created this scholarship in 
memory of Mr. Call's brother. It is available to 
any student who meets the University's 
qualifications. 

The Bridget Carney Scholarship: This scholar- 
ship was established in 1972 by a bequest of 
James I. Kearney, M.D. Income from the schol- 
arship, which is named to honor the memory of 
Dr. Kearney's mother, is awarded to students, 
one or both of whose parents were or are 
parishioners of St. Ignatius Parish, Kingston, 
Pennsylvania. 



The Class of 1952 50th Reunion Scholarship: In 

recognition of its Golden Anniversary Reunion, 
the Class of 1952 established this scholarship, 
which is based on financial need and academic 



The James J. Clauss Scholarship: Established in 
1973 by a local businessman and alumnus from 
the Class of 1947, this scholarship provides aid 
to students who require financial assistance but 
do not qualify for most aid programs based on 
financial need. First consideration is given to 
Northeastern Pennsylvania students. 

The Jon A. Clauss Scholarship: An endowed 
scholarship was established in 1980 to honor the 
memory of Jon A. Clauss, son of Dr. and Mrs. 
Thomas F. Clauss of Justus, Pennsylvania. 
Income from the scholarship is distributed to 
deserving young men and women. 

The Condron Ambition and Achievement 
Scholarship: Established in 2000 by Christopher 
M. Condron '70, this scholarship benefits 
incoming freshmen in The Kania School of 
Management who demonstrate exemplary ambi- 
tion and self-achievement, particularly in non- 
academic areas. First preference is given to stu- 
dents from Lackawanna County, followed by 
those from Luzerne County and other counties 
in Northeastern Pennsylvania. 

The Rev. James J. Conlin, S.J., Scholarship: T\ns 

scholarship provides financial assistance based on 
academic excellence as well as demonstrated need. 

The James A. and Joan Connolly Scholarship: 

Mr. Connolly '43 and his wife established this 
scholarship which provides financial assistance 
based on academic excellence and demonstrated 
need. 

The Louis and Ernestine DeSarro Cortese 
Memorial Scholarship: Vincent E. Cortese '37 
established this scholarship in 1998 in memory 
of his parents. Students must be enrolled in The 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

The Cottone Scholarship: A bequest from 
Benjamin J. Cottone, M.D., '27 established this 
scholarship for pre-medical students. 

The Grace Courtney Scholarship: Raymond S. 
Courtney established this scholarship with a 
bequest in memory of his wife. It provides finan- 
cial assistance to students who meet the Univer- 
sity's admission requirements, with preference 
given to students majoring in foreign language. 

The Cruciani Family Scholarship: Dominick A. 
Cruciani, Jr., M.D., '54, his wife, Florence, and 
their family have established this scholarship for 



26 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



students from Mid-Valley and Valley View high 
schools who intend to pursue courses of study in 
health-allied fields. 

The William J. Cusick Purple Club Scholarship: 

Mr. Cusick '52 established this scholarship, 
based not on academic merit but on demon- 
strated financial need, for students residing in 
New Jersey or eastern Pennsylvania. 

The Salvatore Cusumano Family Scholarship: 
This scholarship, established through a bequest 
from Mr. Cusumano, is awarded to students 
who are enrolled in the pre-medical program 
and who have demonstrated financial need. 

The Harold Davis, M.D., Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established in 1994, is presented to 
a female undergraduate from Northeastern 
Pennsylvania pursuing a degree in the health sci- 
ences. The recipient must be involved in 
extracurricular activities. Both financial need and 
scholastic merit are considered. 

The Rev. Royden B. Davis, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship, established by the Scranton 
Jesuit Community to honor one of its own, pro- 
vides financial assistance based on academic 
excellence and demonstrated need. 

The Shirley A. DiAndriola Scholarship: Estab- 
lished in 1998 through a bequest in the will of 
Shirley A. DiAndriola, this scholarship is 
intended for graduates of Old Forge High 
School attending The University of Scranton. 

The Eugene J. Donahue Scholarship: This schol- 
arship was established in 1997 in memory of 
John and Ann Donahue by Eugene Donahue, a 
resident of Clarks Summit and a 1968 graduate 
of The University of Scranton. The scholarship is 
for students who show a demonstrated need, and 
first consideration is given to students residing in 
Lackawanna County. Recipients must be enrolled 
in the University's Dexter Hanley College. 

The Judith A. Doyle Scholarship: This scholarship 
was created by Joseph T Doyle '69 in honor of 
his wife and in appreciation of his Jesuit educa- 
tion at The University of Scranton. The scholar- 
ship provides financial assistance to deserving 
and needy students. 

The Denise Dubbels Memorial Scholarship: This 

scholarship was created by students and faculty 
members in memory of Denise, an Honors Pro- 
gram student and member of the Special Jesuit 
Liberal Arts program, who was killed in an auto- 
mobile accident while studying in Russia. Her 
degree was conferred posthumously in 1994. The 



scholarship aids students who plan to study in 
developing countries. 

The Attorney John J. and Joanne M. Dunn, Sr., 
Scholarship: Attorney and Mrs. John J. Dunn, 
Sr., established this scholarship in 1998 for stu- 
dents enrolled in the University's Kania School 
of Management. Preference is given to residents 
of Lackawanna County. 

The Robert I. Edelsohn Scholarship: In 1 964 a 
sum was bequeathed in the estate of Robert L 
Edelsohn, a Polish immigrant who became a 
Scranton businessman and realtor. Income pro- 
vides scholarships for needy and deserving stu- 
dents at the University. 

The Educational Freedom Scholarship: In 1 990 
Joseph E. McCaffrey '38 established this scholar- 
ship to aid students who graduate from Lacka- 
wanna County parochial schools. Mr. McCaffrey, 
a member of the New Jersey Chapter of Citizens 
for Educational Freedom, passed away in 2000. 

The ETR and Associates, Inc., Scholarship: This 
scholarship was created by Robert E. Lee, presi- 
dent of ETR and Associates, in appreciation of 
the fine Jesuit education his daughter received at 
The University of Scranton. It is open to any 
student demonstrating personal financial need. 

The Peter J. Farrell and Maida Lippert Farrell 
Scholarship: Proceeds from this scholarship, 
established in 1988 by Professor Matthew C. 
Farrell, Ph.D., are intended for students of 
Native American ancestry. 

The John Francis Finetti Memorial Scholarship: 

This scholarship was established by the family of 
a young man from the Hill neighborhood near 
the University's campus. It is for students who 
demonstrate ability in one or more of the areas 
of history, music, forensics and theatre, with 
preference given to students from Lackawanna 
County. 

The Laureen Finn Memorial Scholarship: 
Laureen Finn died in her sophomore year at The 
University of Scranton. Family, friends and fellow 
members of the Class of 1990 established this 
scholarship in her memory. Proceeds assist a fresh- 
man education or English major with preference 
given to residents of Englishtown, New Jersey. 

The Martha and Herbert Finn Memorial 
Scholarship: This scholarship was established by 
William H. Finn '67 in honor of Martha and 
Herbert Finn. The proceeds are to assist students 
from southern Connecticut and Westchester, 
Nassau and Suffolk counties in New York. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 27 



The Martha Fitch Scholarship: In 1955 a 

bequest was made to the University by Miss 
Martha Fitch, a retired nurse and former super- 
intendent of Thompson Hospital, Scranton. 
Income is used to provide scholarships for needy 
and deserving students. 

The Rev. John J. Fitzpatrick, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship honors the Rev. John J. Fitz- 
patrick, S.J., who, prior to his death in 1987, 
served The University of Scranton for 22 years 
in various roles including dean of men, Jesuit 
minister, student counselor and University chap- 
lain. The scholarship helps students of academic 
excellence who have demonstrated financial need. 
Preference is given to students from Northeast- 
ern Pennsylvania who are enrolled in Dexter 
Hanley College. The scholarship was established 
through the generosity of Midori Y. Rynn, 
Ph.D., professor of Sociology/Criminal Justice. 

The Fitzsimmons Family Scholarship: Mr. and 

Mrs. Edward Fitzsimmons of Gladwyne, Penn- 
sylvania established this scholarship in 1 996. It 
is intended to benefit qualified freshmen from 
northeast Pennsylvania with demonstrated need. 

The Fleet Pennsylvania Services Scholarship: 

Sons and daughters of Fleet Pennsylvania Ser- 
vices employees are eligible for this scholarship. 
The University's financial aid office selects stu- 
dents on the basis of financial need. 

The James H. Foy, M.D., Memorial Scholarship: 

Established in 1987 by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph J. 
Rupp to honor Dr. Foy, whose encouragement 
and support helped Dr. Rupp in his education, 
the scholarship is given to premedical students 
who also demonstrate proficiency in the 
humanities. 

The James M. Franey Scholarship: This scholar- 
ship, started from a bequest from the estate of 
Mr. James M. Franey, benefits students from 
Northeastern Pennsylvania. 

The Sara G. Friel Memorial Scholarship: Before 
her death in 1982, Sara G. Friel, aunt of then- 
University president. Rev. William J. Byron, S.J., 
directed that part of her estate be used to assist 
deserving and financially needy students each 
year. 

The Joseph P. Gallagher Memorial Scholarship: 

The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce 
created this scholarship in 1995 to honor the 
memory of Mr. Gallagher, who was employed by 
the Chamber for 1 5 years. The scholarship is 
given annually to a senior who is the son or 
daughter of an employee of any current member 
of the Chamber. 



The Morris and Mae Gelb Scholarship: Estab- 
lished in 1989 through gifts from the Gelbs and 
members of their family and friends, this scholar- 
ship benefits deserving and needy students of all 
faiths attending the University. 

The Rev. Joseph G. Gilbride, S. T.D., Memorial 
Scholarship: This scholarship is for residents of 
Peckville (Blakely Borough), Carbondale, 
Throop, Nanticoke, and the Parsons Section of 
Wilkes-Barre and Plymouth, all of Northeastern 
Pennsylvania. It was established by Fr. Joseph G. 
Gilbride, prior to his death, to provide assistance 
to needy and worthy students. 

The Dr. and Mrs. John Giunta Scholarship: 

Professor Giunta created this scholarship out of 
his loyalty to The University of Scranton and his 
appreciation for the fine education his own chil- 
dren received here. The scholarship is given to 
students pursuing degrees in economics. 

The Peter S. Graybar Memorial Scholarship: 
Created to honor Peter S. Graybar, a beloved 
friend and active member of The University of 
Scranton's Class of 1993, this scholarship pro- 
vides assistance to a junior who has demon- 
strated active involvement in extracurricular 
activities. 

The Edward T Groncki Scholarship: Established 
to honor the memory of a University of Scran- 
ton alumnus, this scholarship is for deserving 
young men and women who live in Lackawanna 
County. 

The Irving and Edythe Grossman Scholarship: 

This scholarship was created out of the generos- 
ity of Irving and Edythe Grossman and is a 
memorial in their honor. Eligible students must 
demonstrate academic achievement and partici- 
pation in community service. 

The Judge Frederick W. Gunster Scholarship: 

The estate of Joseph F. Gunster '17 provided 
funds for this merit scholarship to honor the 
memory of Joseph's father. 

The Margaret Gunster Scholarship: Joseph F. 
Gunster's mother is remembered through a 
scholarship designed to assist students from low- 
income families. 

The Ruth Gunster Memorial Scholarship: In 

1971, Joseph F. Gunster '17 established this 
scholarship in loving memory of his wife. The 
scholarship, which was increased by a bequest in 
1980, benefits students from Northeastern 
Pennsylvania. 



28 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



The John and Lucille Guzey Scholarship: Begun 
in 1978, this scholarship assists members of the 
Scranton Boys and Girls Club as well as students 
with financial need. 

The A.J. Guzzi General Contractors, Inc., 
Scholarship: Angelo J. Guzzi created this schol- 
arship to assist qualified and deserving students 
fi-om a high school in Abington Heights, Valley 
View, Mid- Valley or Lakeland. The recipient is 
an incoming freshman who demonstrates finan- 
cial need. 

The Rev. Joseph M. Hamemick, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship, established by the Scranton 
Jesuit Community to honor one of its own, pro- 
vides financial assistance based on academic 
excellence and demonstrated need. 

The Rev. Dexter Hanley, S.J., Scholarship: This 
scholarship, named for the late Dexter Hanley, 
S.J., Esq., former president of The University of 
Scranton, assists nieces and nephews of Univer- 
sity Jesuit personnel. 

The Sarkis R. Hazzouri, Jr., Memorial 
Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 
1997 to assist incoming freshmen from Lacka- 
wanna County. First preference is given to grad- 
uates of West Scranton High School who intend 
to enroll in The Kania School of Management. 

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation 
Scholarship: Graduates of The University of 
Scranton's pre-college program, the University of 
Success, are eligible to receive this scholarship. 

The Rev. William B. Hill, S.J., Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established by the late Gerardine 
C. Hill to honor her brother, Rev. William B. 
Hill, S.J. Between 1969 and 2002, Fr. Hill 
served in several administrative positions at The 
University of Scranton, including that of special 
assistant to the president. 

The Hill Neighborhood Association/ Peter Cheung 
Scholarship: This scholarship, named in honor 
of Peter Cheung, who died in an accident while 
an undergraduate, benefits a junior or a senior 
who has demonstrated service to the neighbor- 
hood and the University community. Preference 
is given to residents of the city of Scranton's Hill 
neighborhood. 

The Hoeschele-Steinmetz Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established by General Electric 
in honor of David B. Hoeschele '50. Mr. 
Hoeschele was chosen by General Electric for a 
prestigious award for his leadership in the field 
of electronic circuit design. He requested that 



funds be used to establish a scholarship for 
United States citizens or permanent residents 
from Northeastern Pennsylvania, who are 
enrolled as full-time undergraduates in either the 
physics or electrical engineering program. This 
scholarship is based on need and academic 
merit. 

The George Ronald Holmes, Ph.D., Scholarship: 
Dr. Holmes, an alumnus of the Class of 1961, 
and his wife started this scholarship to provide 
aid to junior and senior psychology majors. 

The Robert V. Horger Scholarship: This scholar- 
ship, established by Robert V. Horger, a promi- 
nent Scranton banker, is given to qualified stu- 
dents from the incoming freshman class who 
demonstrate financial need. 

The Frank and Jean Hubbard Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established through a generous gift 
from Frank and Jean Hubbard, is for graduates 
of North Pocono High School in the top 25% 
of their class who have demonstrated financial 
need. 

The ITT Scholarship: The International Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Corporation established 
this scholarship to encourage students to pursue 
academic excellence. The Office of Admissions 
annually selects an incoming freshman to receive 
the scholarship, which is renewable on the basis 
of academic achievement. 

The Jesuit Community Scholarship: Substantial 
annual gifts from The University of Scranton 
Jesuit Community have made possible an endow- 
ment to provide unrestricted scholarship aid to 
deserving students. Most scholarships are based 
on financial need and academic achievement. 

The Jethro Scholarship: Established by a Univer- 
sity faculty member. Dr. Everett R. Brown, this 
scholarship is awarded to a freshman manage- 
ment, marketing or economics/ finance major 
who demonstrates that he or she has earned a 
significant amount of total college expenses. It is 
not dependent upon financial status of parents 
or guardians nor high school grades, and is avail- 
able for four years, as long as the recipient main- 
tains a grade point average of 3-00 or better. 

The B. Carl Jones Memorial Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established in 1988 by family, 
friends and colleagues of the late B. Carl Jones, a 
University trustee and benefactor. The scholar- 
ship provides financial assistance, based on need, 
to students from Lackawanna County who are 
enrolled in The Kania School of Management. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 29 



The Stanley Karam Scholarship: Fred C. Karam 
established this scholarship in 2000 to honor his 
father. Lackawanna County residents are eligible 
for the scholarship, with first preference to grad- 
uates of West Scranton High School who enroll 
in The Kania School of Management. 

The Francis J. Kearney Scholarship: A 1977 gift 
from a retired pharmacist, followed by a bequest 
in 1979, made possible this scholarship to assist 
deserving students in need of financial aid. 

The Koch-ConUy American Legion Scholarships: 

Established in 1985 by agreement with the 
American Legion, these scholarships are pro- 
vided on the basis of academic achievement and 
financial need. First preference is given to chil- 
dren and grandchildren of the members of the 
Koch-Conley American Legion Post 1 2 L There- 
after, family members of other Pennsylvania 
American Legion Post members may be 
considered. 

The Rev. Stephen A. KoUar Memorial Scholarship: 

This scholarship was established in 1977 from 
the will of the late pastor of Holy Family 
Church in Scranton. Applications must be con- 
sidered in the following priority: (1) Kinship to 
Rev. Stephen Kollar; (2) Members of the Holy 
Family Church for a minimum of three years 
prior to filing the application. In the event that 
there are no eligible candidates in these cate- 
gories, other needy students may be considered. 

The Mary R. Walsh Krahe Scholarship: Estab- 
lished in 1987 by Mary R. Walsh Krahe in 
memory of her brothers, Nicholas E. Walsh and 
William E. Walsh, and the Walsh family of Old 
Forge, this scholarship provides support to stu- 
dents from Lackawanna County with preference 
given to students who attended Old Forge High 
School. 

The Kuehner Scholarship: This scholarship was 
established by Carl '62 and Joanne Kuehner of 
Naples, Florida, in 1985. The scholarship pro- 
vides financial assistance to needy students from 
single-parent families in Lackawanna County. 

The Lackawanna Medical Group Scholarship: 

This scholarship provides assistance to students 
from Lackawanna County who are in financial 
need and who intend to pursue careers in 
health-related professions. First preference is 
given to children of persons affiliated with Lack- 
awanna Medical Group. 

The Lanahan Gecawich Scholarship: Established 
in 1996, this scholarship benefits qualified, 
female first-year students with demonstrated 



need. Preference is given to students pursuing a 
degree in elementary education. 

The Rev. John W. Lange, S.J., Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established by the Scranton Jesuit 
Community to honor one of its own, provides 
financial assistance based on academic excellence 
and demonstrated need. 

The Joseph F. and Robert G. Lavis Scholarship: 

In 1990 a gift was made to the University 
through the estate of Robert G. Lavis, a Scranton 
businessman. Income from this gift provides a 
full four-year scholarship to an incoming fresh- 
man. This scholarship also helps junior and 
senior students who have a reduction in their 
ability to meet educational expenses. 

The Edward /? Leahy Scholarship: This scholar- 
ship was established in 1989 by Edward R. 
Leahy, Esq., '68 in honor of his late uncle and 
provides aid to needy students. 

The LF Brands, Inc., Scholarship: This scholar- 
ship provides financial assistance for children of 
current and past employees of LF Brands (for- 
merly Leslie Fay). It is based on academic 
achievement and financial need, and first consid- 
eration is given to students who intend to enroll 
in the University's Kania School of Management. 

The Ralph J. Lomma Scholarship: This scholar- 
ship, created in honor of distinguished Scranton 
businessman Ralph Lomma '49, is presented to 
students with outstanding high school records. A 
full-tuition scholarship is awarded every four 
years to one student. 

The William V. Loughran and Albert E. Peters 
Scholarship: Established in 1985 through a gift 
of Albert E. Peters ayd Elizabeth Loughran 
Peters, this scholarship assists seniors who intend 
to pursue graduate studies in the fields of science 
and medicine. The scholarship is based on merit 
and need. 

The Bruce Lowenberg and John McLean Kelly 
Memorial Scholarship: Established in 1988 by 
Mrs. Frances McLean Lowenberg, this scholar- 
ship benefits qualified and deserving young men 
and women. 

The Clare Boothe Luce Scholarship: A grant 
from the Clare Boothe Luce Fund provides 
undergraduate scholarships to enrolled female 
students majoring in mathematics and the physi- 
cal and computing sciences. 

The Frank J. and Mae C. MacEntee Memorial 
Scholarship: Established by the MacEntee family 
in memory of their beloved parents, this scholar- 



30 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



ship assists deserving students with their educa- 
tion costs. 

The Frank J. MacEntee,SJ., Memorial Scholar- 
ship: This scholarship, estabHshed by the Scran- 
ton Jesuit Community to honor one of its own, 
provides financial assistance based on academic 
excellence and demonstrated need. 

The Beth Anne and Brian S. Mackie Memorial 
Scholarship: This scholarship was created in 
1991 as a memorial to Beth Anne Mackie by her 
parents and renamed in 1998 after the death of 
Beth Anne's brother, Brian. The eligible student 
must be a psychology major who demonstrates 
academic excellence. 

The Edward J. and Alice Mauley Scholarship: 

Mr. Manley '60, a former chair of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Trustees, and his wife established 
this scholarship for students who live in Lack- 
awanna County. 

The Sally and Richard Marquardt Scholarship: 

This scholarship was established in 1997 by Mr. 
and Mrs. Marquardt, residents of Waverly. It is 
given each year to qualified local students. 

The John P. Martin, Ed.D., Scholarship: Estab- 
lished in 2002, this scholarship is for under- 
graduate students preparing for the priesthood. 

The Rev. Thomas D. Masterson, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship was established by the Scranton 
Jesuit Community and friends of Fr. Masterson 
in honor of the 50th anniversary of his ordination 
into the priesthood. The need-based scholarship 
is for graduates of Loyola Blakefield High 
School in Towson, Maryland. 

The Martin L. Mattei Memorial Scholarship: 

Mr. Mattei '42, the first superintendent of 
schools in the Pittston Area School District, 
passed away in 1999. His family established this 
scholarship for Pittston Area High School gradu- 
ates who demonstrate high academic achieve- 
ment and financial need. 

The Florence Zygmunt McAndrews and Emma 
Kacer Scholarship: This scholarship was estab- 
lished anonymously in 2001 in honor of two 
nurses who touched the lives of those in their care 
with compassion. The scholarship is for nursing 
students from Northeastern Pennsylvania, with 
first consideration to residents of Lackawanna 
County, and is based on financial need and a 
demonstrated commitment to serving others. 

The Congressman and Mrs. Joseph McDade 
Program of Public Service: This scholarship, 
established in 1990, supports students majoring in 



political science who are doing internships in 
Scranton-area government offices with the inten- 
tion of pursuing careers in public service. 

The Joseph M. McDade Scholarship: Contribu- 
tions from two special tributes in 1998 to retir- 
ing U.S. Congressman McDade were used to 
establish this scholarship to provide need-based 
financial aid for students from Northeastern 
Pennsylvania. 

The Robert L. McDevitt, K.S.G., Scholarship: 
This scholarship, established in 1977, provides 
assistance to qualified and deserving Dexter 
Hanley College students. The scholarship was 
established by Robert L. McDevitt, K.S.G., a 
Georgetown University classmate and long-time 
friend of the late Rev. Dexter L. Hanley, S.J., 
who served as president of the University from 
1970 to 1975. 

The Patrick J. McGeehan Memorial Scholarship: 

Mrs. Betty Ann McGeehan established this 
scholarship in 2000 to celebrate the 50th 
anniversary of her husband's graduation from 
the University. The scholarship is for residents of 
Luzerne County. 

The Monsignor Andrew J. McGowan Scholarship: 

The EM. Kirby Foundation, Inc., established 
this scholarship to honor Msgr. McGowan, a 
University trustee emeritus and honorary degree 
recipient. It is used to assist deserving students 
who reside in either Lackawanna County or 
Luzerne County. 

The Joseph J. McGrail, CPA, Scholarship: Joseph 
J. McGrail, an alumnus, established this need 
based scholarship for third- and fourth-year stu- 
dents attending the University. Residents from 
Lackawanna County are given first preference 
for this academic scholarship benefiting students 
enrolled in The Kania School of Management. 

The Rev. Bernard R Mcllhenny, S.J., Scholarship: 

Joseph A. Quinn, Jr., '63 established this need- 
based scholarship to honor Admissions Dean 
Emeritus Fr. Mcllhenny, and also to honor his 
parents, Mary and Joseph A. Quinn, Sr. First 
consideration is given to residents of Luzerne 
County, followed by residents of Lackawanna 
County. 

The John J. and Kathleen McLaine Memorial 
Scholarship: ]ohn J. McLaine '71 established this 
scholarship in 1997 to honor his parents. Prefer- 
ence is given to students from Lackawanna 
County who are enrolled in The Kania School of 
Management. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 3 1 



The John P. McLean Scholarship: The scholar- 
ship was established in 1985 by former trustee 
Thomas E. Sheridan '60 and many other alumni, 
students, family and friends to honor Professor 
John P. McLean, a faculty member for over 50 
years. It is presented to deserving accounting 
students. 

The Charles E. Merrill Scholarship: In 1969, the 
Charles E. Merrill Trust of New York City made 
a gift to the University to assist students of the 
Catholic faith. 

The Andrew and Margaret Chorba Mezick 
Scholarship: This scholarship, established by 
James A. and Mary P. Mezick in honor of Dr. 
Mezick's parents, is given each year to a qualified 
incoming freshman, with preference given to 
students with demonstrated need from the Mid- 
Valley area. 

The Rev. J. Patrick Mohr, S.J., Scholarship: This 
need-based scholarship, established by the Scran- 
ton Jesuit Community to honor one of its own, 
is for graduates of Gonzaga High School in 
Washington, D.C. 

The Angelo H. Montrone Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established by Paul M. Mon- 
trone '62, president of the Henley Group, Inc., 
to honor his father. It assists a Kania School of 
Management student who best exemplifies Mr. 
Montrone's father's lifelong dedication to self- 
improvement and ethical behavior in business. 

The Dr. Leslie E. Morgan Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established through a bequest 
from Dr. Morgan to assist persons studying to 
become members of one of the health-services 
professions. 

The L Leo and Ann Moskovitz Scholarship: Mr. 

and Mrs. Moskovitz, community leaders and 
friends of the University, established this scholar- 
ship for students who intend to pursue careers in 
business or science, with first preference given to 
those who live in Lackawanna County. 

The Joseph F. Mullaney Scholarship: A bequest 
from Dr. Mullaney '38 established this scholar- 
ship for physics, mathematics and science students. 

The Robert W. Munley Scholarship: This schol- 
arship was established by Robert W. Munley, 
Esq., and Judge James M. Munley to honor their 
father, Robert W. Munley. It supports deserving 
students from Lackawanna County. 

The Murphy Scholarship: This scholarship was 
established in 1957 through a bequest of Miss 
Margaret Murphy, a retired schoolteacher and 



lifelong resident of Scranton. Margaret and her 
sister, Katherine, made the award "in loving 
memory of our mother, father, and brothers" to 
assist needy and deserving students. 

The Dr. Louis and Muriel Murphy Scholarship: 

Dr. and Mrs. Murphy, longtime friends of the 
University, established this scholarship to pro- 
vide financial assistance to deserving and needy 
students. 

The James Nasser Family Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established in 1986 by Mr. and 
Mrs. James R. Nasser Preference is given to needy 
pre-med students from Lackawanna County. 

The NEPA APICS Scholarship: This scholarship 
was established in 1987 by the Northeastern 
Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Produc- 
tion and Inventory Control Society for qualified 
junior or senior students enrolled in the Opera- 
tions Management major of The Kania School 
of Management and/or active members of The 
University of Scranton Chapter of APICS. 

The Neivcombe Endowed Scholarship: A series of 
grants from the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foun- 
dation, along with matching hands from the 
University, established this scholarship, which 
provides financial assistance to mature, second- 
career female students. 

The New York Metropolitan Chapter, The Uni- 
versity of Scranton Alumni Society Scholarship: 
This scholarship assists undergraduate students 
on an annual basis. 

The R. Barrett Noone, M.D., Scholarship: Dr. 

R. Barrett Noone, a graduate of the University, 
established this scholarship for University stu- 
dents residing in Bradford, Sullivan, Philadel- 
phia, Montgomery or Delaware Counties. The 
scholarship recipient will be a pre-med major. 

The Marian R. Oates Memorial Scholarship: 

This scholarship, established in memory of an 
alumna who died in an automobile accident 
shortly after her graduation in 1990, benefits 
middle-income students from New Jersey 
enrolled in The Kania School of Management. 

The Raymond S. O'Connell Scholarship: Shortly 
before his death in 1981, Raymond S. O'Connell 
'42 established a scholarship for needy students. 
After his death, his sister, Sara E. O'Connell, 
completed the gift. 

The Frank O'Hara Scholarship: This scholarship 
was established in 1988 by friends and family of 
"Mr. University," Frank O'Hara. Mr. O'Hara 
served in many capacities over a long career with 



32 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



the University. This scholarship, estabHshed in 
his memory, provides assistance to deserving and 
needy students. 

The Marian M. and Patrick F. O'Hara 
Scholarship: Income from an endowment pro- 
vides unrestricted scholarships to deserving 
young men and women. 

The Oppenheim Family Scholarship: This schol- 
arship was established by the Oppenheim family, 
who for many years owned and operated 
Oppenheim's Department Store and its prede- 
cessor, the Scranton Dry Goods Co. Income 
from the scholarship is used primarily for part- 
time, non-traditional students who need finan- 
cial assistance. 

The Rev. G. Donald Pantle, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship, established by the Scranton 
Jesuit Community to honor one of its own, pro- 
vides financial assistance based on academic 
excellence and demonstrated need. 

The Dr. Andrew W. Plonsky Scholarship: Dr. 

Plonsky '40, longtime faculty member and co- 
founder of the University's Computer Science 
program, passed away in 2000. His widow, 
Dorothy, established this memorial scholarship 
for Lackawanna County residents who are study- 
ing computing science. 

The Paul J. Poinsard, M.D., Scholarship: Mrs. 
JoAnne Poinsard established this scholarship in 
memory of her husband, a University alumnus. 
The scholarship assists deserving students in pre- 
medicine. 

The Rev. George C. Powell and Msgr. John K. 
Powell Memorial Scholarship: The Powell family 
established this scholarship to provide financial 
assistance to deserving and needy students who 
also demonstrate good character and leadership 
qualities. 

The Rev. Edward R. Powers, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship provides financial assistance 
based on academic excellence as well as demon- 
strated need. 

The Ernest D. Preate, Sr., Memorial Scholarship: 

The family of Ernest D. Preate, St., Esq., estab- 
lished this scholarship in 1982. First considera- 
tion is given to needy students who are residents 
of Lackawanna County. 

The Rev. J. J. Qtiinn, S.J., Scholarship: This 
scholarship honors Rev. J.J. Quinn, S.J., profes- 
sor emeritus of English. It was started by alumni 
and former students to honor Fr. Quinn's many 
years of service to the University, his students 
and the community. Based on merit and need. 



the scholarship is available to students in all aca- 
demic disciplines. 

The Frank X. Ratchford Memorial Scholarship: 

Mrs. Patricia A. Ratchford and her family estab- 
lished this scholarship in memory of Mr. Ratch- 
ford '61, who died in 1999. The scholarship, 
based equally on financial need and academic 
merit, is for residents of Scranton and Dunmore 
who are majoring in English, philosophy, or 
human resources. 

The Betty Redington Scholarship: This scholarship 
was established through a bequest from Mrs. 
Redington, a former trustee and a long-time 
friend of the University and its students. The 
scholarship benefits students who are most in need 
of financial support to pursue their education. 

The Francis E. and Elizabeth Brennan Redington 
Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 
1984 according to provisions in the will of the 
late Francis E. Redington. It provides financial 
assistance to students on the basis of both ability 
and need. Some portion of the income each year 
supports scholarships for students from the 
Republic of Ireland. 

The John Charles and Kathryn S. Redmond 
Foundation Scholarship: Mr. Redmond, a 
prominent businessman and honorary degree 
recipient, established this scholarship before his 
death in 1989. The scholarship is given to an 
outstanding student who is not eligible for any 
direct financial aid, as specified by state or fed- 
eral regulations, but who shows financial need 
because of the student's family situation (e.g., 
number of children in school needing parental 
support). 

The Raymond M. Reed Scholarship: This schol- 
arship, established by Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
M. Reed, is awarded to students residing in 
Dunmore or Scranton. Students are selected 
based on merit and financial need. 

The Dr. Richard A. Rendich Educational 
Scholarship: This endowed scholarship was 
established by the family of Grace Rendich, a 
University alumna. Income from the fund is 
used to assist in the education of needy young 
men aspiring to the priesthood. 

The Road Scholarship: James C. Barrett '73, 
president of Road Scholar Transport, established 
this scholarship for his employees and their 
families. 

The John M. Robinson Scholarship: This schol- 
arship was established by John M. Robinson, 
who attended the University and subsequently 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 33 



established LPS Industries, Inc., in Newark, 
New Jersey. The scholarship assists promising 
and deserving students, with Scranton-area resi- 
dents receiving first consideration. 

The Patrick and Marie C. Roche Scholarship: 
Out of their affection for the University and 
respect for the school's mission, Scranton natives 
Patrick and Marie Roche created this scholarship 
for eligible Lackawanna County students. 

The Mary Kay/Rochon Scholarship: This schol- 
arship was set up by John Rochon and the Mary 
Kay Foundation. It is awarded to bright female 
students in economic need. 

The Rev. Joseph A. Rock, S.J., Scholarship: 

Created in memory of Fr. Rock, who served the 
University as professor of history, academic vice 
president and, in 1970, acting president, this 
scholarship assists students in the Academic 
Development Program. 

The Rev. Richard W. Rousseau, S.J., Scholarship: 

This scholarship, established by the Scranton 
Jesuit Community to honor one of its own, is 
based on academic merit and financial need. 

The Robert Ryder Scholarship: Established in 
1988 by John Diskin '67 and Coopers and 
Lybrand as a tribute to Mr. Robert Ryder, long- 
time vice president for finance/treasurer, the 
scholarship assists local students of the city of 
Scranton or the borough of Dunmore. 

The Charles V. Sabatino, Sr., Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established in 1990 by Frank C. 
Sabatino, Esq., '76 as a memorial to his father. It 
is based on merit and is awarded to a sophomore 
who is studying history. 

The Josephine Sarcinelli Memorial Scholarship: 

Med Science Laboratory in Scranton established 
this scholarship in 1983 to honor the memory 
of Josephine Sarcinelli, the office manager of the 
firm for many years. The scholarship is given to 
an incoming freshman from Lackawanna 
County who is in financial need and intends to 
major in medical technology. 

The Rev. George Schemel, S.J., Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established in 2000 by the University's 
Jesuit community to honor the late Fr. Schemel, 
is based on academic merit and financial need. 

The John J. Scott, Jr., Memorial Scholarship: 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Scott, Sr., established this 
scholarship in memory of their son, a member 
of the Class of 1969, who died in 2000. The 
scholarship is for graduates of Scranton Prepara- 
tory School, based on financial need, academic 
merit and extracurricular activities. 



The Scranton Times/Sunday Times/Tribune 
Scholarship: This scholarship was established by 
the Lynett-Haggert)' families to provide support 
to current newspaper carriers who are attending 
The University of Scranton. Employees and their 
family members also are eligible. 

The Vincent E. Sedlak Scholarship: Mr. Vincent 
A. Sedlak, a University graduate, established this 
scholarship though a bequest. Income from the 
fiind benefits any student who is majoring in 
chemistry. 

The Charles and Josephine Shander Scholarship: A 

trust established this scholarship which provides 
financial assistance to students from Lackawanna 
County's Mid-Valley area who have at least one 
parent of Polish, Slovak, Russian or Lithuanian 
descent. 

The Thomas J. Shevlin, Jr., and Dr. John F. 
Shevlin Scholarship: Established in 1989 
through a bequest from Thomas J. Shevlin, Jr., 
of Carbondale, Pennsylvania, this scholarship 
assists deserving young men and women in pre- 
medicaJ studies. 

The Paul J. and Virginia P. Shields Scholarship: 

This scholarship was established in 2002 by Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul J. Shields. Income from this 
scholarship is used to assist any deserving under- 
graduate as determined by the Financial Aid 
Office. 

The Mary and Dana Silvon Memorial Scholar- 
ship: Joseph T Doyle '69 and his wife, Judith, 
established this scholarship in memory of Mrs. 
Doyle's sister and niece. The scholarship is avail- 
able to graduates of Seton Catholic High School 
in Pittston. 

The Specialty Group, Inc., Scholarship: T\i& 

scholarship was established in 1988 for graduates 
of Dunmore High School and Bishop O'Hara 
High School in Dunmore. 

The Francis J. Stahl, Class of 1935, Memorial 
Scholarship: This scholarship was established 
through the will of Mary T Stahl and her hus- 
band, Francis J. Stahl '35. The scholarship assists 
local needy students. 

The Tom and Salsey Sullivan Scholarship: In 

2000, Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan established this 
scholarship to be awarded solely on the basis of 
financial need, not academic merit. 

The Amelia Suraci Scholarship: This scholarship 
was established in 1977 by the late Mr. Frank 
Suraci, chairman of Parodi Cigar Corporation, 
to honor his wife, Amelia. After Mr. Suraci's 
death, contributions from the Suraci and Keat- 



34 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



ing families were added to the endowment. Each 
year, the scholarship benefits deserving and 
needy students. 

The Robert], and Joan J. Sylvester Scholarship: 

Arthur J. and Angela V. Kania established this 
scholarship to honor Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester. Mr. 
Sylvester retired in 2001 after serving 18 years as 
the University's Vice President for Institutional 
Advancement. The scholarship is for students 
from Lackawanna County with first considera- 
tion to graduates of Abington Heights, Scranton 
Preparatory and Valley View high schools. 

The TRL Associates Scholarship: This scholarship 
was established by Stephen P. Hrobuchak, Jr., 
President of TRL, Inc., to benefit TRL employees 
and their children. 

The UNICO Scholarship: T\xc UNICO Founda- 
tion of the Scranton Chapter of UNICO 
National, a philanthropic group, established this 
scholarship in 1980 to offer financial assistance 
to deserving students. 

The United Gilsonite Laboratories Scholarship: 

This scholarship, established in 1999, is available 
to U-G-L employees and their families. 

The University of Scranton Alumni Society 
Scholarship: This scholarship, established 
through contributions by the Alumni Society, is 
available to children and grandchildren of Uni- 
versity of Scranton alumni and alumnae. 

The Charles J. Volpe Scholarship and Lecture 
Fund: Established in 1988 in memory of 
Charles J. Volpe, a well-respected Scranton busi- 
nessman and public servant, the scholarship pro- 
vides assistance for a student entering the senior 
year who is majoring in political science. The 
Lecture Fund provides for an annual lecture fea- 
turing a well-known public servant. 

The Mary and Patrick Volpe Scholarship: In 

honor of her parents, Angela V. Kania estab- 
lished this scholarship, for graduates of Old 
Forge High School enrolled in The Kania School 
of Management. 

The Paul L. Waleff Memorial Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established by the parents of 
Paul L. Waleff who died in 1984 while a stu- 
dent at The University of Scranton. The scholar- 
ship is presented to a junior or senior who plans 
a career of service to persons with disabilities. 

The WEA Manufacturing Scholarship: This 
scholarship was established in 1999. Sons and 
daughters of WEA Manufacturing employees are 
eligible for this scholarship. Employees must have 
worked at WEA for a minimum of three years. 



The Weinberger Family Scholarship: This schol- 
arship was established by Jerry Weinberger, Esq., 
in 2002 for any eligible student from Lacka- 
wanna County as determined by the Financial 
Aid Office. 

The Thomas P. White Scholarship: Mrs. Ilene 
White established this scholarship to honor the 
memory of her husband, Thomas. It is awarded 
to an education major who is a "non-traditional" 
student, such as a transfer student or an individ- 
ual returning to school after an absence. 

The William Zahler Scholarship: In 1986, Mr. 
and Mrs. William P. Zahler of Mayfield Heights, 
Ohio, established a scholarship in memory of 
their son William Zahler, Jr., an associate profes- 
sor of English at the University. Income from 
the scholarship is distributed to deserving young 
men and women. 

Annual Scholarships 

The Aventis Pasteur Scholarship: Each year, two 
graduate students who have demonstrated excel- 
lence in the field of biology and who are pursu- 
ing biochemistry master's degrees are selected for 
summer internships at Aventis Pasteur's Swift- 
water location. 

The Rita and Bernard Bagley Memorial Scholar- 
ship: Established in 1990 by the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Bagley, this scholarship is available to 
residents of Sullivan County, with preference to 
parishioners of St. Basil's Church in Dushore. 

The Dr. A.J. Cawley Scholarship: In memory of 
Dr. A.J. Cawley of Pittston, a scholarship was 
established by a legacy from his sister, Miss Ellen 
Cawley. A scholarship is given each year to a stu- 
dent majoring in electrical engineering. 

The Len and Deborah Gougeon St. Ann's 
Scholarship: Established in 1986 through a gift 
from Drs. Len and Deborah Gougeon, this 
scholarship, based on need, provides assistance 
to a graduate of St. Ann's Elementary School or 
a member of St. Ann's Monastery Parish in 
Scranton. 

The Joseph P. Harper Scholarship: A scholarship 
was established in 1 967 to honor the memory of 
Joseph P. Harper, professor of physics. An 
annual scholarship is given to a senior physics 
major upon the recommendation of the physics 
department and with the approval of the direc- 
tor of financial aid. The department of physics 
presents, with the scholarship, a citation remind- 
ing the recipient of the high scholarly ideals, 
exemplary life, and dedicated service of Professor 
Harper. 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 35 



The Kathryn and Bernard Hyland Memorial 
Scholarship for Excellence in Biology: A gift 
from alumnus Bernard V. Hyland, M.D., made 
in loving memory of his parents, established an 
endowment in 1980 to perpetuate this annual 
scholarship. The scholarship is presented to a 
graduating senior from the biology department, 
who, in the opinion of the department's faculty, 
has achieved distinction based on academic 
excellence in biology, personal integrity, and 
concern for others. 

The Lackawanna County Latvyers Attxiliary 
Scholarship: Established in 1982, this scholar- 
ship is annually presented to an outstanding 
graduating senior from Lackawanna County to 
provide scholarship assistance in the first year of 
law school. The scholarship is given directly by 
the Lawyers' Auxiliary, upon the recommenda- 
tion of the University pre-law advisor. 

The Murray Insurance Agency, Inc., Scholarship: 

This scholarship is for deserving local students 
with first consideration to residents of the city of 
Scranton. 

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation 
Scholarship: This scholarship provides aid for 
mature, second-career women students. 

The O'Malley & Harris Pre-Law Scholarship: 

This scholarship, sponsored by the law firm, 
O'Malley & Harris, P.C., is based on the out- 
come of an annual competition among full-time 
undergraduates at both The University of Scran- 
ton and Marywood University. Entry informa- 
tion is available from either school's pre-law 
advisor. 

The Christopher Jason Perfilio Memorial 
Scholarship: Christopher Perfilio passed away 
the summer before his senior year. His parents 
and older brother established this scholarship in 
his honor to assist philosophy and theology/ reli- 
gious studies students, as well as students in the 
Special Jesuit Liberal Arts program, who have 
records of high academic achievement and 
demonstrate financial need. 

The Bernard Shair Memorial Scholarship: This 
scholarship, established by family, friends, and 
colleagues of Dr. Shair through the Scranton 
Area Foundation, is presented annually to a grad- 
uating senior of The University of Scranton who 
has been enrolled in an accredited dental school. 

The Armond and Betty Strutin Scholarship: This 
scholarship, created out of the generosity and 
commitment to The University of Scranton of 
Armond and Betty Strutin, is distributed each 



year to deserving students identified and desig- 
nated by the Purple Club. 

The Watterson-Gray Memorial Scholarship: 
Members of the Shiloh Baptist Church Family 
or any qualified students from the Scranton area 
who have demonstrated leadership are eligible to 
receive this scholarship. It was established in 
2002 by Rosemary Gray Watterson, Ed.D. 

Biennial Scholarship 

The Corcoran-Condron Scholarship: Biennially 
the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick of 
Lackawanna County provides funds for a Uni- 
versity of Scranton student or students to enjoy 
the benefits of studying for one or two semesters 
at a university in Ireland. 

Endowed Chairs 

The Alperin Chair in Business Administration: 

Established by an endowment, this academic 
chair was set in place in 1980 through the gifts 
of three Scranton businessmen, Joel, Irwin and 
Myer Alperin, and their families. The late Joel 
Mitchell Alperin was the originator and the 
principal sponsor of the chair and its endow- 
ment. Income from the Alperin brothers' gift is 
applied to the salary of a professor in The Kania 
School of Management. 

The Kathryn and Bernard Hyland Chair in 
Biology: This endowed professorship was estab- 
lished by Bernard V. Hyland, M.D., '47 in 
honor of his parents. The professorship supports 
teaching and scholarship of a distinguished 
member of the biology faculty at the University. 

The Chair in Judaic Studies: Income from an 
endowment established by alumni and friends of 
the University makes it possible for the Univer- 
sity to invite, for short visits to Scranton, Judaic 
scholars from Israel or other parts of the world, 
for public lectures and meetings with students 
and faculty. 

The Joseph T. and Frank M. McDonald Chair: 

Income from an endowment established by 
George and Dr. Herbert McDonald is used pri- 
marily to support the pre-law program, includ- 
ing support of the pre-law advisor, internship 
program, and advisory team. Income is also used 
to provide scholarship assistance to deserving 
students in pre-law majors. 

The Pius X Teaching Chair of Theology: Estab- 
lished in 1976 by an anonymous gift and the 
assignment of a matching grant from the Uni- 
versity's Commitment to Excellence capital cam- 



36 Scholarships and Financial Aid 



paign, this chair is occupied by a priest, or 
jointly by a set of priests, of the Diocese of 
Scranton. The chairholders are nominated by 
the faculty of St. Pius X Seminary and approved 
by the faculty of the Department of Theology/ 
Religious Studies at the University. 

Other Endowments 

The NEH Endowment: This endowment was 
established through a challenge grant from the 
National Endowment for the Humanities. It 
supports the acquisition of materials for the 
humanities collection in the Weinberg Memorial 
Library. 

The Jesuit Community Contribution: This gift 
of funds, returned to the University from pay- 
ments made to Jesuits for their services, has 
enabled the University to offer many scholar- 
ships from its operating budget and has substan- 
tially aided the building program. 

The Rose I. Kelly Award: A University of Scran- 
ton alumnus, Joseph Wineburgh, Ph.D., set in 
place an endowment to link the efforts of ele- 
mentary and secondary school teachers to the 
achievements of college students. Each year, an 
outstanding student is selected by a committee 
appointed by the academic vice president. The 
Rose I. Kelly Award winner is asked to name a 
high school or elementary teacher who most 
influenced his or her pre-college academic prepa- 



ration. Both the student and the teacher from 
pre-college days are honored at a campus cere- 
mony. Dr. Wineburgh established the program 
to honor an elementary teacher. Rose I. Kelly, 
who greatly influenced his life. 

The Rev. John J. Long, S.J., Fund: Contribu- 
tions to this fund were made by friends of the 
Rev. John J. Long, S.J., president of the Univer- 
sity, 1953 to 1963, on the occasion of his 
Golden Jubilee in the Society of Jesus and later 
as a memorial after his death in 1971. The fund 
is invested and the income therefrom is used for 
projects and programs concerned with the spiri- 
tual growth of students. 

The Loyola Lecture: The Jesuit Community 
serving The University of Scranton has endowed 
a lecture program intended to bring distin- 
guished Jesuit speakers to campus. Named in 
honor of St. Ignatius Loyola, founder of the 
Society of Jesus, this fund can also support visits 
by other scholars capable of assisting the Univer- 
sity community to a better appreciation of its 
Jesuit heritage. 

The Harry and Helen Mack Award Fund: This 
award was established through a unitrust by 
Mrs. Helen Mack and is restricted to The Uni- 
versity of Scranton's Judaic Studies Program. It 
assists students and the community in learning 
about Jewish heritage and culture. 



37 



Life on Campus 



The University of Scranton is a devoted to the Jesuit maxim of cura 
personalis, or care for each person and the whole person. The University 
recognizes the integral role that campus life plays in the overall education 
of a student. Because in so many ways learning does not stop at the class- 
room door, the University provides a range of activities and support serv- 
ices for leadership development, for reflection, for spiritual and personal 
enrichment, and simply for fun and recreation. 



38 Life on Campus 



Student Services 

We recognize that much of a student's edu- 
cation at The University of Scranton takes 
place outside the classroom. The Division of 
Student Affairs is committed to the integra- 
tion of high-quality student learning with the 
development of the whole person. In addi- 
tion, through resources, programs and collab- 
orative efforts with the academic community 
as well as with all University divisions, it 
strives to form "men and women for others" 
in the Jesuit tradition, persons who are distin- 
guished by a reflective and faith-filled vision 
for living that includes commitment to lead- 
ership and service in the world. 

Efforts in the Division of Student Affairs 
are designed to help students fulfill their 
potential in the following areas: intellectual 
life, wellness, diversity, citizen-leadership, life 
planning, culture and commitment to growth. 

Residence Life 

The Residence Life system includes fresh- 
man and upper-class residences that provide 
secure and comfortable living spaces for study 
and personal development. Residence fresh- 
men are assigned with their classmates to resi- 
dence halls where they are supported in their 
academic programs, personal development 
and leadership opportunities by Residence 
Life Staff and Jesuit Counselors. 

Upper-class students may select from a 
range of housing options that include tradi- 
tional halls with single and double rooms, 
suite-style halls with semi-private baths. Uni- 
versity houses and townhouse apartments. 
Upper-class students may also participate in 
the Gavigan Residential College and its Fac- 
ulty Involvement Programs, or they can 
choose a Theme House that provides intense 
experiences in Spanish language and culture, 
education, technology, community service, 
wellness, or international culture. The Univer- 
sity also provides limited apartment-style 
housing for graduate students. 

The main goal of the residential experience 
is for each student to learn while living in this 
community environment. The process for this 
occurs through the active participation of the 
resident in his or her learning. Learning 
occurs best when students attempt to incor- 
porate their in-class and extracurricular expe- 
riences. In turn, programs and services offered 



through the Office of Residence Life are 
aimed at involving students in their learning. 

The individual residential communities are 
designed for active student participation in 
their community. A basic expectation is for 
each student to respect the rights of others. 
The privilege of living in a residence hall is 
accompanied by the responsibility of positive 
community building. 

Residence Life stresses the importance of 
high achievement in the academic and com- 
munity realm. In turn, it is expected that 
students make healthy decisions regarding 
substances, stress and time management, rela- 
tionships, and the exploration of their faith. 

(For additional information on room and 
board see "Tuition and Fees.") 

The Office of Residence Life is located in 
Fr. Gallery House, 413 Quincy Ave., and is 
open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. The phone number is (570) 
941-6226. Additional information is available 
online at www.scranton.edu/residencelife. 

Residence Life Policies and Guidelines 

The University of Scranton requires allfirst- 
and second-year undergraduate students to live 
in campus housing. Exceptions to this policy are 
limited to students who reside with a parent, 
legal guardian or spouse; are 21 years of age or 
older; or present other documented extenuating 
circumstances. The Admissions Office will deter- 
mine a student's residency status upon admission 
to the University. 

The University provides in-room access to 
the campus communication network (televi- 
sion, computer and video, including instruc- 
tional and commercial television) in all resi- 
dence-hall rooms and telephone service to 
rooms in University houses at no additional 
charge. This service includes unlimited local 
calling and voice mail for each room, as well 
as discounted long-distance rates for those 
enrolled in the University's long-distance pro- 
gram. In addition, light in-room housekeep- 
ing, 24-hour maintenance and 24-hour secu- 
rity are provided. 

Students residing in non-University, off- 
campus housing (within a one-mile aerial 
radius of campus) can also have access to 
campus communication services, including 
basic telephone service, voice mail/messaging 
service and long-distance service. For more 
information regarding these communication 



Life on Campus 39 



services, contact the Office of Network 
Resources, St. Thomas Hall, Room 102, or 
call (570) 941-6181. 

Contractual Obligations 

Once enrolled in a room and/or board 
plan, the student is obligated to that plan for 
the remainder of the academic year including 
intersession. 

Intersession 

Resident students taking one or more 
classes during intersession must live in Uni- 
versity housing and, if applicable, continue 
their meal-plan program if they were enrolled 
for room and/or board for the preceding fall 
semester. As noted above, additional fees do 
apply for meals. For reasons of safety and 
security, those not enrolled in classes during 
intersession are not permitted to reside in 
University housing. Student athletes, 
approved by the Office of Residence Life, 
may live in their rooms over intersession 
without taking classes. 

Dining Services 

Students have a choice of three cost-efifec- 
tive meal plans providing 19, 14 or 10 meals 
per week. The 19-meal plan provides three 
meals per day Monday through Friday, with 
brunch and dinner on Saturday and Sunday. 
The l4-meal plan provides any combination 
of 14 meals per week. The 10-meal plan 
offers students any combination of 10 meals 
per week. Meals are not served during vaca- 
tion periods. All freshmen living in University 
housing must participate in the 1 9-meal plan 
during the entire freshman year. Upper-class 
residents living in Driscoll, Leahy, Redington 
and Gavigan Halls must participate in one of 
the three University meal plans. Meal plan 
participation is optional for upper-class resi- 
dents of Mulberry Plaza, Madison Square and 
Linden Plaza and the University houses and 
for commuters and students living in private 
housing. Discounted meal tickets are available 
for guests and students wishing additional 
flexibility. 

Commuter and Off-Campus 
Affairs 

The University makes special efforts to 
ensure that commuting students and those 
who live off campus have access to its aca- 
demic and co-curricular programs and serv- 



ices through the Office of Commuter and 
Off-Campus Affairs and especially through 
the Commuter and Off-Campus Association 
(COCA). 

Commuter and off-campus programming 
assists students who live apart from the imme- 
diate campus community with their pursuit 
of Jesuit educational ideals emphasizing toler- 
ance and support for those who are different, 
living a healthy life, participation in cultural 
events of every kind and exploration of their 
talents and desires for growth. For more 
information about the COCA, visit the Web 
at wvvw.scranton.edu/COCA. 

Career Services 

Career Services helps students focus on 
career directions that are consistent with their 
unique talents, aspirations, and vision for liv- 
ing. Professional counselors can help students 
discover links between their personal traits 
and career options through individual coun- 
seling, workshops, and many other electronic 
and hard-copy resources available at the 
Career Services Office. 

Students who are looking for related work 
experience while they are attending the Uni- 
versity can benefit from the Career Experience 
Program and other internship-related services. 
As students near graduation they can receive 
training in resume and cover-letter writing 
and in interview and job search techniques. 
They are also able to participate in employer 
on-campus recruiting visits, employment fairs, 
and the annual Law School Fair. 

The Career Services Office is located on 
the third floor of Elm Park Church and is 
open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. The phone number is (570) 
941-7640. Additional information is available 
online at www.scranton.edu/careers. 

Multicultural Affairs 

The University of Scranton is increasingly a 
learning community that mirrors the diversity 
of the Kingdom of God. Each individual in 
this community is encouraged to embrace the 
richness of life associated with other cultures 
and people of diverse backgrounds. Growth in 
this area centers on personal understanding 
and a comfort with one's own cultural iden- 
tity and tolerance and support for those who 
are different. The Director of Multicultural 
Affairs works closely with the administration. 



40 Life on Campus 



faculty, staff and students, especially the 
United Colors student organization, to create 
an atmosphere that is conducive to learning 
for students of color and that offers all stu- 
dents a chance to grow in their understanding 
of and appreciation for people from different 
racial and ethnic backgrounds. 

Jane Kopas Women's Center 

The Jane Kopas Women's Center fosters a 
campus community in which women and 
men can live in a climate of mutual respect, 
understanding and equality, and where 
women are encouraged to reach their fullest 
potential. It provides a safe, comfortable and 
educational environment in which students, 
faculty, staff and members of the community 
can learn about the current and historical role 
of women in society and where they can 
explore issues of gender equality, diversity and 
social justice. 

Both women and men are encouraged to 
attend the Center's co-curricular programs on 
gender and diversity issues and to use its 
resource center for courses, special projects or 
personal enrichment. Books, periodicals, 
videos, tapes, Internet access, and informa- 
tional pamphlets are available for use, and the 
Center is also a place to learn about intern- 
ship possibilities and conferences. 

The Jane Kopas Women's Center's central 
location on the ground level of Fitch Hall and 
its comfortable atmosphere make it a place to 
get away from the daily stress of college life. 
There is always a need for work-study students 
and volunteers to serve the campus commu- 
nity. Interested students can call (570) 941- 
6194 or visit the Center from 10:00 a.m. to 
6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

Judicial Affairs and Assessment 

While participating in the life of the Uni- 
versity community, it is hoped that students 
will learn and develop within the Jesuit edu- 
cational tradition. Consistent with this tradi- 
tion, the University community expects stu- 
dents to lead examined lives supportive of the 
common good. Thus, it is important for stu- 
dents to comply with University behavioral 
expectations designed to promote respect for 
others and observance of the tenets of the 
University Community Standards Code. 

In coordinating the review of student mis- 
conduct cases, the Judicial Affairs Office helps 



students understand their behavioral responsi- 
bilities as members of the University commu- 
nity and ensures that the rights of accusing 
and accused students are upheld within a fair- 
minded judicial system. Also, this office can 
assist students experiencing conflict with 
others by referring them to a peer mediator 
program. 

The staff associated with the Judicial 
Affairs Office also assists the Division of Stu- 
dent Affairs in the creation, implementation, 
and evaluation of a comprehensive assessment 
program. This assessment program addresses 
issues of student growth and development, 
departmental functioning and operation, and 
student perceptions of divisional effectiveness. 

Counseling Center 

Sometimes students have personal prob- 
lems they may wish to discuss with a coun- 
selor. These may be related to the transition 
from high school to college or to decision- 
making regarding a variety of challenges that 
may occur for college students. These may 
also include such things as relationships, alco- 
hol and other drug use, or family issues. 

The Counseling Center is staffed by psy- 
chologists, certified counselors and a licensed 
social worker who are available to help stu- 
dents make the most they can out of their 
years at the University. Sometimes finding 
ways to talk about the stresses of life can 
make the difference between an average col- 
lege experience and one that is exceptional. 

The Center, located in McGurrin Hall, sec- 
ond floor, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Monday through Friday. Later evening 
sessions may be available by appointment, 
and emergency crisis consultation is available 
on a 24-hour basis from September through 
May while classes are in session by contacting 
Public Safety 941-7777 to reach the counselor 
on-call. For Counseling Center appointments, 
students can call (570) 941-7620 or stop by 
the Center. 

Student Health Services 

Because maintaining good health is an 
essential part of success in college. Student 
Health Services is committed to helping stu- 
dents develop the knowledge, attitudes and 
skills they need for an optimal level of health 
and wellness. 



Life on Campus 41 



Student Health Services offers confidential 
health care to all University students in an 
ambulatory clinic in the Roche Wellness Cen- 
ter. Care includes unlimited visits for nursing 
assessment, primary treatment for illness and 
injury, and appointments with physicians or a 
nurse practitioner. Cooperative relationships 
with community health-care providers such as 
laboratories, pharmacies, hospitals and med- 
ical specialists complement the care offered on 
campus. 

The Student Health Service operates from 
8:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday and from 8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. 
on Friday. There are three full-service hospi- 
tals within just a few blocks of the University, 
that provide a full range of emergency and 
specialty services to students when necessary. 
Transportation to other health-care providers 
is provided through a special contractual 
agreement with an ambulance service that is 
available 24 hours a day, every day. 

Because University fees cover all health-care 
services provided to students on campus, Stu- 
dent Health Services does no third-party 
billing. Care by community providers such as 
laboratory, X-ray, private physicians or spe- 
cialists in the community, emergency-room 
visits or hospitals, however, are subject to pri- 
vate payment or insurance coverage. All stu- 
dents should have health insurance and 
should know how to access coverage if neces- 
sary. Information about an optional insurance 
plan for students who do not have insurance 
coverage through another plan is available 
through Student Health Services. 

Center for Health Education and 
Wellness 

In keeping with the Jesuit tradition of edu- 
cating the whole person, the Center for 
Health Education and Wellness encourages 
healthy life-style choices by providing educa- 
tional programs and referrals for all students. 
Examples of past offerings include Smoking 
Cessation Workshops, Professional Develop- 
ment Series, Care of an Intoxicated Friend 
Seminars and Nutritional Seminars. Current 
offerings are posted on campus each semester. 

The Center for Health Education and 
Wellness also is home to the University's Peer 
Education programs. Peer Educators volun- 
teer their time to provide formal educational 
presentations as well as individual referral 



assistance to their fellow students on issues 
related to alcohol and other drug use, sexual 
assault and HIV/ AIDS. These "students help- 
ing students" gain valuable leadership experi- 
ence, sharpen their communication skills and 
deepen their own understanding of these criti- 
cal health issues. Students interested in apply- 
ing to be a Peer Educator are encouraged to 
contact the Center for Health Education and 
Wellness or a current Peer Educator for fiar- 
ther information. 

The Center for Health Education and 
Wellness, at the corner of Mulberry Street and 
North Webster Avenue, is open from 8:30 
a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday 
and evenings by appointment. For appoint- 
ments, stop by the Center for Health Educa- 
tion and Wellness or call (570) 941-4253. 

Outside the Classroom 

Student Activities and Orientation 

This office complements the academic pro- 
gram of studies as part of the University's 
overall educational experience through devel- 
opment of, exposure to, and participation in 
social, cultural, intellectual, recreational and 
governance programs. It encourages such 
things as positive and realistic self-appraisal, 
intellectual development, making appropriate 
personal and occupational choices, clarifica- 
tion of values, the ability to relate meaning- 
fiilly with others, the capacity to engage in a 
personally satisfying and effective style of liv- 
ing, the capacity to appreciate cultural and 
ethnic differences, and the capacity to work 
independently and interdependently. 

The Office of Student Activities and Ori- 
entation is located on the second floor of the 
Gunster Student Center and is open Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
(570-941-6233). 

New Student Orientation 

Orientation helps all new students, fresh- 
man and transfer, with their transition to life 
at the University. The program is the link 
between the admissions process and students' 
arrival at the University for their first semes- 
ter. The emphasis is on scheduling, academic 
and social integration and providing a natural 
connection to the strong sense of community 
at the University. 



42 Life on Campus 



Student Government 

Student Government is an organization 
with the task of maintaining and improving 
all aspects of student life to provide a produc- 
tive academic and social environment for the 
student body. Its familiar faces and wide- 
spread involvement give the campus life and 
energy. Its leadership consists of elected stu- 
dent officers. 

Clubs and Organizations 

The University of Scranton encourages stu- 
dents to participate in many clubs, activities 
and organizations provided through the 
Office of Student Activities and Orientation. 
These clubs and organizations encourage stu- 
dents to become immersed in the campus 
community and their self-directed activities 
allow members to develop their leadership 
skills while meeting the goals of the club and 
the needs of its members. 

Accounting Club 

Advertising Club 

American College of Health Care 

American Production Inventory 

American Psychological Society Student 
Caucus 

Association for Childhood Education 
International 

Biology Club 

Bowling Club 

Business Club 

Chemistry Club 

College Democrats 

College Republicans 

Communications Club 

Computer Science Club 

Council for Exceptional Children 

Criminal Justice Club 

Drill Team/Color Guard 

Environmentally Concerned Organization 

Habitat for Humanity 

Health Administration Club 

Health Administration Association 

Health Professions Organization 

Horticulture Club 

Human Resources Association 

Human Service Association 

India Club 

Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers 

International Students Association 

Irish Society 

Long Term Care Association 

Marketing Club 

Men's Volleyball 



Nursing Association 

Philosophy Forum 

Physical Therapy Club 

Pre-Law Society 

Political Affairs Society 

Psychology Club 

Public Relations Student Society 

Rangers Club 

Royal Battalion 

Royal Dance Ensemble 

Royal Riders 

Royals Historical Society 

Ski Club 

Social Science Club 

Society for Advancement of Management 

Student Education Association 

Student Occupational Therapy Club 

Students for Life 

The New Agenda 

United Colors 

University Singers 

Veterans Club 

Volunteer Community Outreach Efforts 

Women's Business Honor Society 

Women's Crew 

Women's Rugby 

A complete list of campus clubs and organ- 
izations is available on the student activities 
homepage on the Web at www.scranton.edu/ 
studentlife. 

Collegiate Volunteers 

Collegiate Volunteers is a cooperative vol- 
unteer placement program between The Uni- 
versity of Scranton and Marywood University. 
Students are placed according to their inter- 
ests and in response to community need. Stu- 
dent initiated activities are greatly encouraged. 

The program combines service and educa- 
tion. Community service exposes students to 
many important but often hidden realities in 
the world (e.g. the enormity and complexity 
of needs and remedies, and the great gifts that 
the needy bestow on those who share their 
world). In addition, volunteers, both in activ- 
ity and reflection upon activity, learn about 
themselves. 

Above even these goals is the obligation, 
which the schools and the students share, to 
respond to needs according to resources and 
other responsibilities. 

More information is available online at 
www.scranton.edu/volunteers. 



Life on Campus 43 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

The University is a Division III member of 
the National Collegiate Athletic Association 
(NCAA), the Middle Atlantic States Colle- 
giate Athletic Conference (MAC), and East- 
ern College Athletic Conference (ECAC). 
The Athletics Office is located in the John 
Long Center and is open Monday through 
Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Addi- 
tional information is available onUne at 
wvvw.scranton.edu/athletics. 

Varsity Sports - 

Mens Women's 

Baseball Basketball 

Basketball Cross Country 

Cross Country Field Hockey 

Golf Lacrosse 

Ice Hockey Soccer 

Lacrosse Softball 

Soccer Swimming 

Swimming Tennis 

Tennis Volleyball 
Wrestling 

The University of Scranton varsity athletic 
program has enjoyed a tradition of success. In 
2000, Joe Fent, a four-time conference cham- 
pion, earned All-America honors for the sec- 
ond time, while the men's and women's bas- 
ketball teams and the women's soccer teams 
participated in the NCAA Division III 
national championship tournaments. Other 
notable achievements include two NCAA 
titles and four Final Four appearances for 
men's basketball and an NCAA championship 
and seven Final Four berths for the women's 
team - the latest at Danbury, Connecticut, in 
2000. The men's soccer team has a record four 
consecutive NCj\A Final Four appearances. 

In the Middle Atlantic Conference, Scran- 
ton has won 38 women's championships and 
30 men's, for a combined total of 68 as of 
March 2003. The men's and women's soccer 
teams have won 1 9 MAC championships 
including a streak of seven straight from 1 990 
to 1996 for the women's team. In basketball, 
the men have won 16 conference titles, and 
the women's team has won 13. 

The varsity program has produced many of 
the NCAA Division Ill's finest athletes, 
including 48 All-Americans. The women's 
basketball team has had 1 5 All-Americans 
since 1980, including Kelly Halpin in 1998, 



1999 and 2000. Deanna Kyle (1985) and 
Shelley Parks (1987) were the National Play- 
ers of the Year. Men's basketball has also had 
13 All-Americans, with two in 1993. Men's 
soccer has produced 1 1 All-Americans, fol- 
lowed by women's soccer with ten, including 
Sara Suchoski, a freshman, who earned first 
team honors this past season.. 

The University's programs have produced 
31 National Academic All-Americans since 
1981. The University is a consistent leader in 
the Middle Atlantic Conference in the num- 
ber of academic awards. During the 2000-01 
academic year, Nicole Bayman, a member of 
the women's soccer team, and Sarah Gazdalski, 
a member of the Lady Royals' women's swim 
team, were named first-team Academic AJl- 
Americans by the College Sports Information 
Directors of America; Joe Fent earned second- 
team honors. Bayman and Fent have also 
been awarded prestigious NCAA post-gradu- 
ate scholarships. 

Recreational Sports 

Housed in the Byron Recreational Com- 
plex, the Recreational Sports Department 
seeks to provide a comprehensive program of 
sports activities designed to appeal to the 
diverse needs and interests of the University 
community. Intramural leagues begin approx- 
imately the third week of each semester and 
include basketball, volleyball, walleyball, flag 
football, racquetball, tennis, soccer, whiffle- 
ball, badminton, softball and ultimate frisbee. 
Special one-day events are held on weekends 
throughout the year and include skiing, snow 
tubing, golf, table tennis, beach volleyball, 
and hiking. 

In addition to structured programs, the 
Byron Complex also offers many opportuni- 
ties for individual recreation. Cardiovascular 
training equipment (treadmills, cross-trainers, 
steppers, rowers, bikes and other equipment) 
are located on the second level in the Murray 
Royals Fitness Center. Aerobics classes are 
conducted on a weekly schedule and can be 
attended on a drop-in basis. The recreation 
complex also houses three multi-purpose 
courts, four racquetball courts, a six-lane 
swimming pool, a dance-aerobics room, 
weight room, saunas, and steam rooms. In 
addition to indoor facilities, there is an out- 
door basketball court, turfed utility field, and 



44 Life on Campus 



sand volleyball court located directly behind 
the recreation complex. A variety of recre- 
ational equipment may be obtained in the 
recreation office with a valid Royal card. 
Whether students are looking for a competi- 
tive game of basketball, a high-impact aero- 
bics class, or just a leisurely swim in the pool, 
the Recreational Sports Department offers 
them all of these opportunities. 

The recreation center is open during regu- 
lar semesters from 6:30 a.m. through mid- 
night, Monday through Thursday, and Friday 
from 6:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Saturday from 
noon to 9:00 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 
midnight, (570) 941-6203. 

Publications 

The University offers a wide choice of jour- 
nalism opportunities. 

The Aquinas is the weekly, award-winning 
campus newspaper, and positions are available 
to all full-time undergraduate students. 

Esprit is the award-winning campus literary 
journal. 

History students have the opportunity to 
have their articles published in Retrospect, 
which is a student-faculty historical journal. 

The yearbook. Windhover, is produced 
annually by students. 

Performance Music 

The University of Scranton Bands, Choirs 
and String Ensembles offer high quality 
instrumental and choral performing ensemble 
opportunities in a variety of formats ranging 
from very large ensembles to small-ensemble 
and solo performing opportunities. In the 
finest liberal arts tradition, participation is 
open to any and all interested university stu- 
dents (as well as faculty, staff and administra- 
tion) with no individual audition requirement 
or enrollment or membership fee. 

The programs include an annual World 
Premiere Composition Series performance, 
the only series of its kind in the nation, which 
has received honor and acclaim from artists 
throughout the world. Currently in its 20th 
year, the series has provided our students with 
opportunities to work and interact with inter- 
nationally renowned composers and conduc- 
tors, and has made significant contributions 
to the wind and choral repertoires. 



Hundreds of students participate in the 
ensembles every year, and they are achieving 
their performance goals in the musical ensem- 
ble of their choice. For more information on 
any of our Performance Music offerings, please 
visit us online at www.scranton.edu/music, or 
contact Cheryl Y. Boga, Director of Perfor- 
mance Music, at music@scranton.edu or 
(570) 941-7624. 

The University of Scranton Performing 
Arts series presents concert performances by 
outstanding and renowned musicians repre- 
senting a variety of musical genres, and 
closely coordinates programming with the 
Bands, Choirs and String Ensembles to offer 
special masterclasses, workshops and lectures 
by our visiting artists. 

All performances are free of charge and 
open to the public, and most take place in the 
magnificently restored concert hall of the 
Houlihan-McLean Center on campus. 

Our tradition of guest artists and clinicians 
has brought to our student musicians, our 
campus and our community the joyful experi- 
ence of performing with and hearing a long 
list of musical masters, among them Seneca 
Black; Wyclifife Gordon; Victor Goines; Brid- 
gett Hooks; T Terry James; Robert Kapilow; 
Wynton Marsalis; Sam Pilafian; Eric Reed; 
Joshua Rosenblum; Loren Schoenberg; Robert 
Starer; Melissa Thorburn; Lawrence Wolfe; 
George Young; members of the New York, 
Philadelphia, Boston, Minnesota and Dallas 
Symphony Orchestras and The Lincoln Cen- 
ter Jazz Orchestra; "Travelin Light"; members 
of the Empire Brass Quintet; and recently 
deceased composer-in-residence Vaclav Nelhy- 
bel, whose long and productive relationship 
with the University continues to be honored 
through close cooperation between the Uni- 
versity and the Nelhybel Estate with the 
establishment of The Nelhybel Collection. 

Other Extracurricular 
Activities 

Debate 

The tradition of debate in Jesuit colleges 
and high schools is also strong at The Univer- 
sity of Scranton. The Noel Chabanel Council 
of Debate gives interested students an oppor- 
tunity to compete in debate and speech events 
on the intercollegiate level. 



Life on Campus 45 



Radio 

More than 60 students each year gain valu- 
able experience while operating WUSR, 99.5 
FM, which is broadcast at 300 watts with a 
coverage area of 700 square miles. The broad- 
cast region of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre met- 
ropolitan area has an audience of over 
250,000. The format is eclectic with world, 
classical, jazz, urban and alternative music. In 
keeping with the University's mission the sta- 
tion produces public affairs programming and 
provides the community with an alternative 
to commercial radio. Students are encouraged 
to become involved with all aspects of the sta- 
tion, from on-air positions to management. 

Television 

The Royal College Television Network 
gives students the opportunity for hands-on 
experience in television production. Students 
take the initiative in producing, directing, 
writing, shooting and editing television pro- 
grams to express their creativity. These pro- 
grams range from comedy, sports and film 
reviews, to news and public affairs. Programs 
produced by students appear on the campus 
cable television system. 

Theatre 

The tradition of theatre and dramatics in 
Jesuit colleges goes back four-hundred years. 
The University of Scranton has played a vital 
part in that tradition as evidenced by the 
many theatre professionals who were under- 
graduates of the University: the late Jason 
Miller (Pulitzer-Prize winning 
playwright/Academy Award nominee); Walter 
Bobbie (Broadway actor and Tony Award 
winning director), and Stan Wojewodski Jr. 
(former Dean of the Yale School of Drama), 
to name just a few. 

Today, the University Players produce a 
main-stage season along with a festival of stu- 
dent-written plays, and a workshop devoted 
to new student directors. Over 1 50 students, 
from virtually every major, participate on and 
off stage in the productions each year. The 
theatre program in the McDade Center for 
Literary and Performing Arts, a state-of-the- 
art facility complete with a 300-seat main 
stage, flexible studio theatre, scenery and cos- 
tume shops, and additional support spaces. 



The University Players have historically 
been host to many prominent guest artists. 
Oscar-winning British actress Glenda Jackson 
conducted an acting workshop, Oscar-win- 
ning actor the late Sir Richard Harris directed 
a production of Julius Caesar in 1988, and, in 
1998, Emmy-award winner Dennis Size cre- 
ated the set and lighting designs for the play- 
ers' production of Lysistrata. 

Participation in the Players is open to all 
students, regardless of major. Interested stu- 
dents should contact the Director of Theatre 
in the McDade Center, Room 103. 

Campus Ministry 

As a Catholic University, The University of 
Scranton is dedicated to promoting the faith 
of its students, faculty and staff Campus 
Ministry does this through a variety of pro- 
grams offered to all members of the Univer- 
sity community. Mass for Sunday is cele- 
brated on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. and on 
Sunday at 11:00 a.m., 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 
p.m. in Madonna della Strada Chapel. Week- 
day masses are at 12:05 p.m. and 4:40 p.m. in 
St. Ignatius Chapel, located in St. Thomas 
Hall at the heart of the campus. The Univer- 
sity also gathers as a community for special 
liturgical celebrations to mark the beginning 
of the academic year, graduation and other 
important events. 

The Campus Ministry staff offers a variety 
of weekend retreats at the University's beauti- 
ful lakeside Conference and Retreat Center, 
20 minutes from campus. These include lively 
peer-led student retreats, silent retreats based 
on the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius, and 
retreats designed for those who have never 
been on a retreat and would like to try a vari- 
ety of spiritual activities. Some retreats are 
directed to first-year students, others to 
upperclass students. On-campus programs 
address the spiritual needs of students 
through religious education, faith-sharing 
groups, retreat renewals and evening of recol- 
lection, and social justice presentations. Cam- 
pus ministers are also available for spiritual 
direction and counseling. The Campus Min- 
istry office, located in the first floor of the 
Gunster Student Center, has extensive infor- 
mation about all these programs. 



46 Life on Campus 



The Campus 



The University's 58-acre campus is located 
in the heart of Scranton, a community of 
80,000 within a greater metropohtan area of 
750,000 people. Since 1984, the University 
has built 25 new buildings and renovated 24 
others. 

The 426,347-volume Harry and Jeanette 
Weinberg Memorial Library at the center of 
campus includes a large study area open 24 
hours a day with Internet connectivity to the 
world. Loyola Hall of Science and St. Thomas 
Hall have highly specialized laboratories and 
equipment for the study of physics, electrical 
engineering, computing sciences, chemistry, 
biology and molecular biology. There is also a 
fully equipped television studio with editing 
facilities in the Communications Wing of St. 
Thomas Hall, along with the broadcast stu- 
dios of WUSR-FM. 

The John f Long, S.f, Center a.nd the 
adjoining William J. Byron, S.J., Recreation 
Complex house the departments of Athletics 
and Exercise Science and Sport. They also 
have facilities for intercollegiate and intra- 
mural basketball, wrestling, handball, tennis, 
racquetball, volleyball and swimming. Fitz- 
patrick Field is home to men's and women's 
soccer, lacrosse, and field-hockey teams. 
Offering lights and an artificial turf surface, it 
is also used for intramural and club sports. 

Thirteen traditional residence halls, prima- 
rily for freshmen, are centered on terraced 
quadrangles at the core of the campus. Francis 
E. Redington Hall and John R. Gavigan Hall 
provide housing for upper-class students and 
the University also maintains a series of 
houses and apartment buildings in the vicin- 
ity of campus, some of which are organized 
around academic interests. In all, there are 
more than 30 housing options for students, 
who are guaranteed University housing for 
four years. 

The most recent additions to University 
housing are Mulberry Plaza and Madison 
Square. Mulberry Plaza is a complex of four 
apartment buildings. Each unit contains 
three- and five-bedroom apartments, and a 
five-occupant, two-story townhouse unit. 
Madison Square is a three-building complex 
offering two-, three- and four-bedroom apart- 
ments. All units contain kitchens, combined 
living and dining areas, one or two bath- 
rooms, and bedrooms. 



Performance and rehearsal space for the 
University Bands and Choirs is in the 
Houlihan-McLean Center. The McDade 
Center for Literary and Performing Arts 
includes a "black box" studio theatre and a 
300-seat main theater, classrooms, a writing 
laboratory, and offices for the English Depart- 
ment. The Eagen Auditorium in the Gunster 
Memorial Student Center is used for perform- 
ances, lectures and formal and informal Uni- 
versity events. 

McGurrin Hall houses The Panuska Col- 
lege of Professional Studies, and contains 
classrooms, laboratories, an academic advising 
center, and offices for the departments of 
Counseling and Human Services, Education, 
Health Administration, Human Resources, 
and Nursing. Physical Therapy and Occupa- 
tional Therapy classrooms and laboratories are 
in adjacent Leahy Hall. 

Brennan Hall is our newest academic 
building. This 71,000-square-foot facility 
located in the center of campus provides 
offices, classrooms and support facilities for 
the Kania School of Management. Also in 
Brennan Hall is a l48-seat auditorium and 
seminar rooms. The Executive Center on the 
fifth floor of Brennan includes conference and 
meeting rooms that are technologically 
equipped, as well as a dining and kitchen area. 

The Conference and Retreat Center is 
located 1 5 miles north of the campus on 
Chapman Lake. It offers two facilities for 
retreats and conferences, one of which offers 
overnight accommodations for 32. 

Other notable campus buildings include 
The Estate, former residence of the Scranton 
family; Campion Hall, built by the Society of 
Jesus for its members in Scranton; the Center 
for Eastern Christian Studies with its 
150,000-volume library, rare-book collection 
and Byzantine Rite Chapel; Kathryn and 
Bernard Hyland Hall, which houses class- 
rooms and the University Bookstore; and 
recently renovated O'Hara Hall, which is 
home to the Graduate School, Dexter Hanley 
College, the Center for Continuing Educa- 
tion, academic departments and administra- 
tive offices. 



47 



Academics 



The University's academic programs for undergraduates are offered 
through three day schools, The College of Arts and Sciences, The Kania 
School of Management, and The Panuska College of Professional Stud- 
ies; and through its division for non-traditional students, Dexter Hanley 
College. The schools share a common General Education program and 
offer baccalaureate degrees in 57 fields. 



48 Academics 



Academic Honor Societies 

Those National Honor Societies which are 
represented in The University of Scranton are 
listed below in order of the foundation of the 
local chapters. 

Alpha Sigma Nu* 

The National Jesuit Honor Society was 
founded in 1915 with chapters in 28 Jesuit 
universities throughout the United States. The 
Scranton chapter was founded in 1 943, the 
oldest Honor Society in the University. It is 
the only Honor Society open to students and 
faculty in all disciplines and all colleges of the 
University. Its admission standards are the 
most rigorous. The Greek letters signify 
adelphotes skolastikon nikephoron - brotherhood 
of honor students. Juniors and seniors who 
have distinguished themselves in scholarship, 
loyalty and service are eligible for member- 
ship. Appointment is made by the president 
of the University on the recommendation of 
the moderator and nomination by chapter 
members of the Society. The Society annually 
presents the Alpha Sigma Nu University 
award for teaching. 

Phi Alpha Theta* 

International Honor Society in history 
founded in 1921. Basic requirements: 12 
credits in history; grade point average of 3.33 
in history and overall ranking in top 35% of 
class. The Mu Rho chapter was established at 
the University in 1967. 

Sigma Pi Sigma* 

National Honor Society in physics for 
undergraduate and graduate students, founded 
in 1921. Its chapters are restricted to colleges 
and universities of recognized standing which 
offer a strong physics major. The University's 
chapter was founded in February 1969. 

Omicron Delta Epsilon* 

National Honor Society in economics. 
Basic requirements: 12 credit hours in eco- 
nomics with an overall grade point average of 
3.0 and a 3.0 average in economics. The Uni- 
versity's Xi chapter of Pennsylvania was 
founded in May 1969. 



Psi Chi* 

National Honor Society in psychology 
founded in 1931. This organization has chap- 
ters in 974 colleges and universities in all 50 
states. The University's chapter was installed 
in May 1969. Minimum qualifications 
include a major or minor in psychology, rank 
in the top 35th percentile in general scholar- 
ship, and superior scholarship in psychology. 

Phi Delta Kappa 

International professional fraternity for 
men and women in education. Membership is 
limited to graduate students and teachers. The 
University's chapter was founded in 1 970. 

Pi Gamma Mu* 

International Honor Society in social sci- 
ence. Founded in 1924 to improve scholar- 
ship in the social sciences and to encourage 
interdisciplinary study. Basic requirements: at 
least 60 hours of academic work, an overall 
grade point average of at least 3.25, with at 
least 2 1 hours in the disciplines of economics, 
human services, psychology, sociology, politi- 
cal science or history with a grade point aver- 
age of at least 3.33. The University's chapter 
was founded in 1971. 

Alpha Sigma Lambda 

National Honor Society to encourage 
scholarship and leadership among adult stu- 
dents in continuing higher education. The 
Alpha Upsilon chapter was installed at the 
University in 1972. 

Eta Sigma Phi 

National Honor Society for students of 
classical languages. The University's Epsilon 
Gamma chapter was founded in November 
1972. 

Pi Mu Epsilon 

National Honor Society for mathematics 
majors in junior or senior year with a grade 
point average of 3.0 and a 3.0 average in 
mathematics. The University's Mu chapter 
was installed in February 1973. 



' Member of the Association of College Honor Societies. 



Academics 49 



Alpha Mu Gamma 

National Honor Society for students of for- 
eign languages. Founded in 1931. The Greek 
letters signify amphi mouse glosson: for the 
muse of languages. The University's chapter of 
Theta Iota was installed in May 1973. 

Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa 
Alpha* 

National Honor Society in forensics. 
Founded in 1963 through merger of societies 
founded in 1906 and 1908 respectively The 
University's chapter was installed in 1975. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon 

National Honorary Chemical Society 
established in 1899. The University's Beta 
Kappa chapter, one of 60 chapters nation- 
wide, was installed in October 1975. For stu- 
dents with 24 credits in chemistry and a 3.0 
grade point average. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta* 

The National Premedical Honor Society 
founded in 1926. The University's Iota chap- 
ter was installed in May 1976. 

Sigma Xi 

International Honor Society in scientific 
research founded in 1886. The University's 
chapter was chartered in 1968 and has been 
authorized since 1979 to induct as associate 
members undergraduate or graduate students 
showing outstanding promise in original 
research. 

Theta Alpha Kappa* 

National Honor Society in theology and 
religious studies founded in 1 976 at Manhat- 
tan College. The University's Alpha Nu chap- 
ter was installed on April 4, 1980. Member- 
ship requires 12 credits in theology with a 3.5 
grade point average. 

Sigma Tau Delta* 

National Honor Society in English 
founded in 1924. This organization is for stu- 
dents who major or minor in English with a 
grade point average of 3.5 in English and 3.4 
overall. The University's Mu Omicron chapter 
first met on April 30, 1980. 



Alpha Epsilon Alpha 

An honor society founded on April 30, 
1980, at The University of Scranton to recog- 
nize students who excel in the field of com- 
munications. For communication majors with 
a 3.5 grade point average. 

Alpha Kappa Delta* 

International Honor Society for Sociology 
students founded in 1920. Requirements 
include 18 credits in sociology with a grade 
point average of 3.0 overall. The University's 
Upsilon chapter was founded on May 8, 1980. 

Pi Sigma Alpha* 

National Honor Society in political science 
founded in 1920. The Kappa Iota chapter at 
the University was installed on May 9, 1980. 
Membership limited to students with at least 
1 credits in Political Science, a grade point 
average of at least 3.4 in these courses, and 
overall rank in the upper third of the class. 

Alpha Phi Sigma* 

The National Criminal Justice Honor Soci- 
ety founded in 1942. The University's Epsilon 
Zeta chapter was installed in May 1982. Basic 
requirements: 18 credits in criminal justice; 
an overall grade point average of 3.2; a 3.2 
grade point average in criminal justice. 

Phi Sigma Tau* 

National Honor Society for students of 
philosophy. The University's Tau chapter was 
installed in May 1982. 

Omega Beta Sigma 

The Business Honor Society for women 
founded at The University of Scranton in 
1982. Basic requirements: at least sophomore 
standing. Business as a major or minor and a 
grade point average of 3.25. 

Upsilon Pi Epsilon 

National Computer Science Honor Society. 
The University's Gamma chapter was char- 
tered in the spring of 1985. 

Sigma Theta Tau* 

International Honor Society of Nursing 
was founded in 1922 and is a prestigious 



* Member of the Association of College Honor Societies. 



50 Academics 



organization of nurse leaders, scholars and 
researchers. Requirements: completion of one 
half of the curriculum, demonstrated ability 
in nursing, a grade point average of 3.0 and 
rank in the upper one-third of the class. The 
University's Iota Omega Chapter was char- 
tered in April 1988. 

Kappa Delta Pi 

The International Honor Society for edu- 
cation established in 1911, the Sigma Chi 
chapter was installed here at The University of 
Scranton in 1992. It joins over 500 chapters 
from around the world in fidelity to four 
cherished ideals: Humanity, Science, Service 
and Toil. 

Beta Beta Beta 

National Honor Society for biology 
founded in 1922. The University's chapter, 
established in 1994, is one of 372 chapters 
nationwide. The society encourages under- 
graduate biological research through presenta- 
tions at conventions, publication in the jour- 
nal BIOS, and research/travel grants. All 
undergraduate students interested in biology 
may join as associate members. A regular 
member must be a junior or senior with 3.0 
grade point average in biology and having 
completed at least three biology courses (one 
upper level) and in good academic standing at 
the University. 

Sigma Phi Omega 

The National Honor Society in gerontol- 
ogy. Founded in 1980, its purpose is to recog- 
nize those students who excel in gerontology 
as well as professional aging-service personnel. 
The University's Gamma Epsilon chapter was 
established in April 1997. Membership is 
open to students who have at least 1 8 credits 
completed in gerontology/aging studies with a 
grade point average of 3.3. 

Beta Gamma Sigma* 

Beta Gamma Sigma is the only business 
honor society recognized by the AACSB, the 
International Association for Management 
Education. Basic requirements: ranking in the 
top 10% of the class with a major in business 
and management programs. The University's 



chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma was chartered 
in spring 1997. 

Lambda Pi Eta* 

The National Honor Society for communi- 
cation majors founded in 1985 to honor and 
encourage high levels of scholarship and lead- 
ership in the field of communications. The 
University chapter was installed in 1999. 
Membership requires junior-level status, at 
least 12 credits and a grade point average of 
3.25 in communication studies, and a cumu- 
lative grade point average of 3.0. 

Alpha Lambda Delta 

The National Honor Society of Freshmen, 
Alpha Lambda Delta was founded in 1924 to 
honor excellent academic achievement by stu- 
dents in the first year of study. The Richard 
H. Passon Chapter of the Society was 
installed at the University on March 24, 
2001. Membership requires enrollment as a 
fiiU-time student in a degree program, and a 
grade point average of 3.5 or above at the end 
of the first semester of the freshman year. 

Academic Support Services 

Harry and Jeanette Weinberg 
Memorial Library 

Opened in 1992, the holdings of this 
80,000-square-foot, five-story building include 
443,144 volumes, 1,750 print periodical sub- 
scriptions, over 13,000 full-text electronic 
journals, and 510,360 microform pieces. The 
Library conducts an extensive user-education 
program to orient and instruct students in 
resources and research techniques. The facility 
includes the following special features: 

• group-study rooms and quiet study areas; 

• a 24-hour study room (Pro Deo Room) 
with computer lab and Java City Coffee 
Bar; 

• fift:h-floor reading room (Scranton Her- 
itage Room) overlooking the campus and 
community; 

• University Archives and Special Collec- 
tions, which houses University historical 
records, rare books, faculty publications 
and other special collections; and 



* Member of the Association of College Honor Societies. 



Academics 5 1 



• a Media Resources Collection (first floor) 
that holds 13,075 non-print items, 
including videocassettes, records, films 
and filmstrips. 

Databases and Online Catalogs 

The library ofi^ers over 110 databases via 
the World Wide Web. Full-text, online 
resources include: Lexis-Nexis, ProQuest, Pro- 
ject Muse, IDEAL, Annual Reviews, JSTOR, 
Emerald Library, Global Access, Newsbank, 
OED, Past Masters, Contemporary Women's 
Issues, ECO, WilsonWeb and FirstSearch. A 
proxy server gives users remote access to these 
databases. In addition to the Library's own 
Online Public Catalog, users can search the 
Northeast Pennsylvania Library Network 
(NPLN), a virtual catalog of local libraries, 
Jesuit libraries, and the Pennsylvania Acade- 
mic Libraries Consortium Inc. (PALCI), a 
direct borrowing program. With PALCI 
members, the Library also shares 1,900 fiill- 
text books that users can read or borrow 
online. Some required readings for courses are 
available through ERES, an electronic reserve 
reading database over the Internet. 

Library Technology 

There are 80 Internet workstations in the 
Library, including 33 machines available 24 
hours a day, seven days a week in the Pro Deo 
Room. Wireless connection to the Internet is 
available throughout the building via laptops 
with cards. Twelve laptops are available at the 
circulation desk. In addition to these 
machines, students may use ResNet ports to 
plug personal laptops into the network in the 
first floor Pro Deo Room and group study 
rooms. "Ask-a-Librarian" enables users to sub- 
mit questions via the Internet. 

Library Hours 

Library hours are posted on campus, on the 
Internet, and on a recording which can be 
heard at (570) 941-7525. It is open almost 
100 hours per week, with extended hours 
during exam periods. 

For information about the Library, its serv- 
ices, and resources, see the Weinberg Memor- 
ial Library homepage on the World Wide 
Web (www.scranton.edu/library) or select the 
Library from the University's homepage 
(www.scranton.edu). 



Academic Advising Centers 

The College of Arts and Sciences 
Academic Advising Center 

The Academic Advising Center, located in 
St. Thomas Hall 309, serves all freshmen in 
The College of Arts and Sciences. Staffed by 
professional advisors and by faculty advisors 
from a wide variety of disciplines, the Acade- 
mic Advising Center ofl^ers a comprehensive 
program of academic advising throughout the 
freshman year. In addition to individual 
advising, the Academic Advising Center also 
offers specialized Freshman Seminars for stu- 
dents in the CAS common curriculum. Advi- 
sors are available to students from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. They 
provide assistance with orientation, registra- 
tion, drop-add, general education course 
selection, declaration and change of major, 
and assessment of academic performance and 
goals. 

The Panuska College of Professional 
Studies Academic Advising Center 

The Academic Advising Center, located on 
the first floor of McGurrin Hall, serves all 
students in The Panuska College. Stafi^ are 
available during the academic year, Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
to provide individual assistance with academic 
advising, registration, assessment of academic 
performance and career goals. The Center also 
works closely with other campus resources to 
provide comprehensive advisement opportu- 
nities. Faculty mentors are available to stu- 
dents within their academic departments. 

The Kania School of Management 
Academic Advising Center 

The Academic Advising Center, located in 
Brennan Hall Suite 206, serves all students in 
The Kania School of Management. Staff advi- 
sors are available from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, to provide assistance 
with registration, major and general-education 
course selection, and assessment of academic 
performance and goals. The Advising Center 
works closely with other campus resources to 
provide comprehensive advising services. 



52 Academics 



The Center for Teaching and 
Learning Excellence 

The Center for Teaching and Learning 
Excellence is located in St. Thomas Hall. It 
was established to help students accomplish 
their academic goals at the University. The 
center provides services to supplement those 
ofifered in the classroom and is staffed by pro- 
fessional staff and peer tutors. Academic serv- 
ices are available for diagnosed learning-dis- 
abled students. A Reading Specialist is also on 
staff for testing and consultation. Assistance is 
available on a drop-in or referral basis. Ser- 
vices are provided to students with learning 
disabilities in compliance with Section 504 of 
the Rehabilitation Act. The Center for Teach- 
ing and Learning Excellence is open Monday 
through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., 
and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. A 
writing center is available to students seeking 
assistance with papers. It is open Monday 
through Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

Office of the Registrar 

As part of the Academic Affairs Division, 
the Office of the Registrar supports the edu- 
cational mission of the University by connect- 
ing students to the faculty, curriculum and 
classroom via the course scheduling and regis- 
tration processes. The Registrar also docu- 
ments and validates the product of this 
dynamic connection in the form of schedules, 
rosters, grades, evaluations, transcripts and 
diplomas. 

The Registrar's office serves students on a 
daily basis by answering questions, issuing 
transcripts, certifying enrollment status, and 
distributing forms and schedules. In addition, 
students may obtain information about aca- 
demic policies and procedures, and important 
dates and deadlines. 

The office promulgates the master schedule 
of courses twice each year in October and 
March, conducts registration, collects and 
records grades, certifies degree eligibility and 
manages several aspects of commencement. 

Course registration for returning students is 
conducted in April for the summer and fall, 
and in November for spring and intersession 
via the University Information System (UIS) 
on the World Wide Web. Located at 
https://uis.uofs.edu, the system provides 
secure links to academic records, registration 
options, student class schedules, address infor- 



mation, tuition accounts and financial-aid 
information. Mid-term and final grades are 
also available on UIS. 

Located in St. Thomas Hall 30 1 , the Office 
of the Registrar is open Monday to Friday, 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information 
please call (570) 941-7221 or e-mail regis- 
trar@scranton.edu. Additional information 
and resources (including the academic calen- 
dar, course schedules and student grade point 
average calculator) are available online at 
www.scranton.edu/registrar. 

Academic Policies and 
Regulations 

Academic Code of Honesty 

Students have responsibility for governing 
their own conduct i\n compliance with the 
Academic Code of Honesty, which addresses 
behavioral integrity in the academic work of 
the University. Conduct that violates the 
Code includes plagiarism, duplicate submis- 
sion of the same work, collusion, providing 
false information, unauthorized use of com- 
puters, theft and destruction of property, and 
unauthorized possession of tests and other 
materials. Steps taken in response to suspected 
violations may include a discussion with the 
instructor, an informal meeting with the dean 
of the college and a hearing before the Acade- 
mic Dishonesty Hearing Board. Students who 
are found to have violated the Code will ordi- 
narily be assigned the grade F by the instruc- 
tor and may face other sanctions. The com- 
plete Academic Code of Honesty is available 
in the deans' offices, in the Student Hand- 
book and on the Web at www.scranton.edu/ 
student_handbook. 

General Regulations 

Ordinarily, all entering students - both 
freshmen and transfer students - are held to 
the requirements in the catalog of the year in 
which they enter. 

The University reserves the right to change 
any of the policies, rules, and regulations in 
this catalog. All such changes are effective at 
such times as the proper authorities determine 
and may apply not only to prospective stu- 
dents but also to those who are already 
matriculated in the University. Curricular 
changes, however, shall not become effective 



Academics 53 



until published in the catalog unless specifi- 
cally approved for an earlier implementation 
date by the appropriate body. If a change is 
approved for implementation prior to its pub- 
lication in a catalog, the appropriate school, 
department, or program shall inform all stu- 
dents aflPected by the change. Students can 
appeal issues related to the application of 
policies, rules, and requirements, including 
changes thereto, to the dean of their college. 

The University reserves the right to take 
appropriate disciplinary action in the case of 
any student who conducts himself or herself 
in a manner that is contrary to the standards 
of the University. These standards (particu- 
larly in the area of academic integrity) are 
given clear expression in the University's Aca- 
demic Code of Honesty published in the fac- 
ulty and student handbooks of the University. 
The University also reserves the right to mod- 
ify admissions requirements, to change tuition 
and fee charges, and to change the semester 
schedule of courses. 

Degree Requirements 

All students beginning the first term of 
their undergraduate degree/certificate pro- 
gram (matriculating) at The University of 
Scranton in the 2003-04 academic year are 
thereafter governed by the curricular policies 
stated in this catalog. Requirements for 
majors are those in effect when a major is for- 
mally declared and approved. First-year stu- 
dents admitted in 2003-04 will follow the 
general education requirements of this catalog. 

A degree represents the successful comple- 
tion of the entire undergraduate curriculum, 
including general education requirements, 
cognates, basic skills courses and electives, as 
well as major requirements. Students graduat- 
ing with multiple majors receive a single 
degree. 

In order to earn a bachelor's degree from 
The University of Scranton students must: 

• complete all the courses prescribed in the 
curriculum table of the major; 

• complete at least 63 credits at The Uni- 
versity of Scranton, including the last 30 
credits of their degree program; 

• earn a minimum 2.00 overall grade point 
average; and 

• remove all failures in required courses. 
(See "Graduation Procedures and Com- 
mencement" for additional information.) 



In cases where students do not maintain a 
2.00 grade point average in required courses, 
their respective dean may take one of the fol- 
lowing actions: 

• place the student in a goal attainment 
semester for students determined to raise 
the grade point average and remain in the 
major; 

• place the student in an exploratory semes- 
ter for students wanting to explore possi- 
ble new majors; or 

• grant permission to change to a new 
major if the department of the new major 
approves the requested change. 

In all cases, students must either meet the 
standard in the original major or change to a 
new major within two semesters (in the case 
of Dexter Hanley College, within 30 credits). 
Students who remain in the "Goal Attain- 
ment" and/or "Exploratory" semester pro- 
grams for more than two semesters will be 
subject to dismissal by their dean. 

Course Numbering System 

Courses appearing in this catalog are num- 
bered according to the system described 
below. The first digit of any course number 
indicates the level of the course; the second 
and third digits specify categories of courses. 
Levels at which courses are offered include the 
following: 

100-199 Introductory courses 

200-299 Lower division courses 

300-399 Upper division courses 

400-499 Advanced undergraduate 

courses 
500 and above Graduate courses 

In cases where no specific prerequisite is 
listed in the course description, courses at the 
300 or 400 level assume junior or senior 
standing and appropriate background in the 
discipline of the course. 

Categories in which courses are offered are 
indicated according to the following system: 

00 - 09 General-education courses 



10 



40 



-39 



_79 



Courses that may apply 
either to major or general- 
education requirements 

Courses available for 
major (also minor and 
required cognate) credit 



54 Academics 



.80- 


81 


Pracricum, Internship or 
Co-op courses 


82- 


83 


Independent study 


84 




Special topics 


85- 


89 


Honors courses 


.90- 


91 


Seminars 


.92 




Service Learning 


.93- 


94 


Research 


.95- 


96 


Travel courses 


.498 


-_499 


Thesis 



Labs are indicated by an (L) following the 
number of the corresponding lecture courses. 
Courses in the Special Jesuit Liberal Arts Pro- 
gram are indicated by a (J) following the 
course number; those in the Honors Program 
are indicated by an (H) following the course 
number. 

Course Schedule Changes 

Dropping and Adding Courses 

Students may add courses anytime between 
the initial registration period and the fifth 
class-day from the start of a semester. Stu- 
dents who wish to drop one or more courses, 
but who plan to continue attendance in at 
least one other course during the term, need 
to secure their dean's permission. A dropped 
course is not reflected on a student's tran- 
script. The last day to drop a course is usually 
the thirty-first calendar day of a semester and 
the fourth calendar day of intersession and 
summer terms; specific dates are published in 
the official University academic calendar. A 
refund schedule for dropped courses applies 
to students paying on a per-credit basis or 
completely withdrawing from the University. 
Under this schedule, the last day for 100% 
tuition refund is usually the tenth calendar 
day from the first day of classes for a semester 
and the second calendar day from the first 
day of classes for shorter terms; the refund 
schedule dates are published in The Univer- 
sity academic calendar. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

After the end of the period to drop a 
course without having it reflected on the tran- 
script, students may still withdraw from a 
course until the published deadline and 
receive a W grade on their transcript. In all 



cases, students should first discuss the matter 
with the course instructor. 

Students who wish to withdraw from one 
or more courses but who plan to continue to 
attend at least one course for the term, need 
to have a Schedule Change Form signed by 
their instructor and dean. Students who wish 
to withdraw from their last course(s) must 
complete the Withdrawal/Leave of Absence 
Form. In either case, the forms are available 
through the Registrar's Office, the academic 
advising centers, academic department chair- 
persons' offices, and Dexter Hanley College. 
The completed forms must be submitted to 
the Registrar's Office or, in the case of DHC 
students, to Dexter Hanley College by the 
withdrawal deadline as indicated in The Uni- 
versity academic calendar. This deadline is 
approximately 30 days before the last class 
day for the semester and a proportionate 
period of time for a short session. Failure to 
withdraw officially from a course(s) may 
result in a failing grade(s). 

Courses Taken as Readers 
(Independent Study) 

The primary purpose of a reader course is 
to enable University of Scranton students in 
good academic standing to pursue a course of 
study not otherwise offered during the term 
in which the reader is taken. Readers may not 
ordinarily be used to fiilfill general education 
requirements. Students may take no more 
than one reader per term and no more than 
one reader per year, on average, during the 
course of their degree programs. Readers are 
to be taken for the same number of credits as 
are granted similar courses in the discipline in 
which the reader is offered. Readers may not 
ordinarily be used to repeat failed courses. 
Exceptions to these policies must be approved 
by the dean of the student's college and by the 
dean of the school offering the course. Reader 
request forms are available through the Regis- 
trar's Office, the academic advising centers, 
and Dexter Hanley College. The completed 
forms should be submitted to the Registrar's 
Office or Dexter Hanley College by the last 
day to add courses as published in the Univer- 
sity academic calendar. 



Academics 55 



Enrollment Status and 
Attendance Policy 

To be considered a full-time student, 
undergraduate students must be registered for 
at least 12 credits in any given term or semes- 
ter, regardless of the number of credits 
remaining to complete degree requirements. 

Students are expected to attend all sched- 
uled meetings of courses in which they are 
enrolled. Students are responsible for all mate- 
rial presented and announcements made dur- 
ing any class. Attendance policies for individ- 
ual courses are determined by the instructor 
and must be promulgated in writing in the 
course syllabi. 

Final Examination Conflicts 

When a student has three or more exami- 
nations scheduled on the same day, according 
to the examination schedule issued by the 
Registrar's Office, the student can decide 
whether to take all three examinations on the 
same day or to have one rescheduled. If the 
student wishes to have one of the three exam- 
inations rescheduled, the examination with 
the lowest priority will be rescheduled. Order 
of priority: (1) major course, (2) cognate 
course, (3) elective course. 

Where a conflict exists between two courses 
of the same kind (e.g., two cognates or two 
electives), the more senior professor - in 
terms of years of service at The University of 
Scranton - will have first priority. 

If a student wishes to reschedule a conflict 
examination, he/she must advise the faculty 
member prior to the last week of class. If an 
appropriate resolution cannot be reached 
between the student and the faculty member, 
the student should contact his/her dean. 

Grading System 

Grade reports are mailed to all students at 
the end of each semester and are pan of stu- 
dents' official record. Freshmen receive mid- 
semester grades to inform them of their 
progress. Upper-class students receive notice at 
the mid-semester if they are "deficient" and in 
danger of failing the course at that time. Grades 
are also available via the University Information 
System (UIS) at https://uis.uofs.edu. 



A, A- Excellent (outstanding and/or 
original work) 
B+, B, B- Good 

C+, C Satisfactory 
C-, D+, D Passing but well below average 

F Failure (below minimum accept- 
able standards) 

Additional Grading Codes 

W Withdrew officially; deadline is 
one month before the last day of 
classes for the semester 
I Incomplete - notes a course not 
completed due to illness or other 
serious reason; to remove this 
grade students must satisfy all 
course requirements by mid- 
point of the following semester 
or the grade will be converted to 
an F. 
IP In Progress - must be removed 
by the last day of the following 
semester (normally for honors 
thesis courses only) 
S Satisfactory - not calculated in 

grade point average (GPA) 
U Unsatisfactory - equivalent to 
failure; not calculated in GPA 

AU Audited course not taken for 
credit; does not count toward 
degree requirements or in the GPA 

CR Credit by exam 

CS "Credit Satisfactory" - notes a 
course taken under the "credit- 
no credit" option in which a 
grade of "C" or higher is earned; 
counts in hours earned toward 
degree but not in GPA 

CD "Credit Deficiency" - notes a 
course taken under the "credit- 
no credit" option in which a 
passing grade less than C (C-, 
D+, D) is earned; counts in 
hours earned toward degree but 
not in GPA 

NC "No Credit" - notes a course 
taken under the "credit/no 
credit" option in which a passing 
grade is not earned; does not 
count toward hours earned 
toward degree and does not 
count in GPA 

NG No grade assigned 

TC Transfer credit 



56 Academics 



Audit 

Entry of the audit grade (AU) on a tran- 
script assumes satisfactory attendance. The 
student should consult with the instructor as 
to what constitutes satisfactory attendance. A 
change to audit can be made only by passing 
students and before the end of the first half of 
a semester. 

Repeat of Course 

Special permission is not needed to repeat 
courses. Recording of grades for repeated 
courses shall be governed by the following 
conditions: (1) credit for a course will be 
granted only once; (2) credit for the course 
will be lost if the course is repeated and failed; 
(3) the most recent credit and grade will count 
toward the grade point average with the excep- 
tions that a W, I, or NG grade cannot replace 
another grade; (4) each attempt to complete a 
course will be reported on the student's tran- 
script even though the credits of the earlier 
attempts do not count in the cumulative grade 
point average (e.g., a course with a grade of F 
will continue to appear on the transcript even 
after the course has been repeated with a pass- 
ing grade, although the credits from the initial 
failed attempt will not be used in the calcula- 
tion of the cumulative GPA). 

Change of Grade 

A student who believes the grade received 
for a course is unreasonable should first 
appeal the matter to the professor, whose 
decision is normally final. The student has the 
right, however, to appeal to the faculty mem- 
ber's chairperson, who will make a recom- 
mendation in writing to his or her dean. The 
student may request the dean to review the 
matter. The decision of the dean is final. 
Ordinarily, no grade change will be consid- 
ered unless it has been reviewed by the dean's 
office within one month from the time the 
original grade was sent to the student. 

Grade Point Average (GPA) 

A standard used in judging a student's per- 
formance is the grade point average (GPA). 
The value of each semester hour of credit 
earned is determined as follows: a grade of A 
is valued at 4 quality points; A- at 3.67 qual- 
ity points; B+ at 3.33; B at 3.0; B- at 2.67; 
C+ at 2.33; C at 2.0; C- at 1.67; D+ at 1.33; 
D at 1.0. An F yields no quality points. 
Thus, for example, a 3-credit course with a 



grade of A yields 12 quality points; a B yields 
9; a C yields 6. 

The GPA is computed by dividing the total 
number of quality points earned by the total 
of grade point average credit hours. For exam- 
ple, 1 5 credit hours, all at C grade, would 
earn 30 Quality Points or a 2.0 GPA (30/15). 

The total number of grade point average 
credit hours includes those courses with final 
grades of F as well as A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+. C, 
C-, D+ and D. CD, CR, CS, I, IP, NC, NG, 
S, W, TC and U credit do not count toward 
the GPA. This grade point average applies 
only to courses taken at The University of 
Scranton and is not affected by credit trans- 
ferred from other colleges. 

A grade point average listing is made at the 
end of each semester. On the basis of his or 
her cumulative grade point average, a student's 
rank in class and eligibility for Latin honors at 
graduation are determined. See Latin Honors 
upon Graduation. 

Grades with Distinction 

Dean's Lists 

To be eligible for the Dean's List, College 
of Arts and Sciences, Kania School of Man- 
agement, and Panuska College of Professional 
Studies students must earn 1 2 or more credit 
hours which count toward the semester GPA 
(credit hours of CS, CD, and S grades are not 
counted toward this requirement). Dexter 
Hanley College students need to complete 6 
or more credit hours which count toward the 
semester GPA to be eligible for the Dean's 
List. Of the eligible students, those who earn 
a 3.50 or higher semester GPA and no grade 
of D+, D, F, CD, NC, I, NG or U are named 
to the Dean's List for that semester. Students 
placed on the Dean's List will have this dis- 
tinction indicated on their transcripts. A stu- 
dent's GPA will be recalculated when the last 
temporary grade (I, NG) is replaced by a final 
grade. If this new GPA meets the above stan- 
dard, the student will be placed on the Dean's 
List. 

Presidential Honors 

To be eligible for the Presidential Honors, 
students must maintain a 3.5 GPA or higher 
for both the fall and spring semesters. Stu- 
dents who are selected for Presidential Honors 
are recognized each year at an Honors Convo- 
cation, which is held during the fall semester. 



Academics 57 



Grade Option: "Credit/No Credit" 

The "credit/no credit" option is designed to 
encourage students to take courses of interest 
but outside their concentrated areas of study. 
Courses used to fill free elective and free cog- 
nate requirements are eligible to be taken 
with this option. Courses taken under the 
"credit-no credit" option count toward the 
accumulated credit hours for the degree, but 
they are not included in the grade point aver- 
age calculation. 

Students with a cumulative GPA of 2.67 or 
greater who have accumulated at least 60 
credits toward their degree may elect to take 
some courses on a "credit/no credit" basis. 
Students may apply for the "credit-no credit" 
option by seeking approval from their dean's 
office and filing the completed forms with the 
registrar by the end of the second week of the 
semester (or by the second day of summer 
sessions and intersession). The option cannot 
be reversed after the fourth week of class (or 
the fourth day of summer sessions and Inters- 
ession). Courses used to fulfill general educa- 
tion requirements, courses in the major and 
cognate, as well as courses in a minor or con- 
centration, and those used to fulfill require- 
ments in the Honors, SJLA, and Business 
Leadership programs may not be taken under 
the "credit-no credit" option. Students may 
take no more than a total of four courses 
under this option, and no more than one per 
semester (other than internships, practicums, 
or physical education courses). Students 
receive the following transcript notations 
under the "credit/no credit" option: A grade 
of C or higher yields a CS (credit satisfactory) 
notation; a passing grade less than C (C-, D, 
D+) yields a CD (credit deficiency) notation; 
a grade less than passing (F) yields an NC (no 
credit) notation. 

Grade Difficulties: Probation and 
Dismissal 

One semester of probation is granted to 
students whose cumulative GPA falls below 
2.0, or who otherwise are in danger of dis- 
missal. A second semester of probation is not 
automatic; students who do not remove 
themselves from probation after one semester 
are subject to dismissal, unless excepted by 
the appropriate dean. Students who receive an 
F while on probation are also subject to dis- 



missal, as are students who incur two F's in 
one semester, or who accumulate three F's 
that have not been successfully retaken. Pro- 
bationary status may be removed through 
adequate achievement in summer school or 
intersession at The University of Scranton. 

Students on academic probation are 
allowed to take no more than 14 credits (in 
Dexter Hanley College, no more than 12 
credits) during the fall or spring semesters 
without explicit written approval of the 
appropriate dean. Students on academic pro- 
bation are ineligible for participation in extra- 
curricular activities without the written 
approval of their moderator, academic advisor 
and dean. 

Students placed on academic probation for 
a second semester may not participate in any 
extracurricular activity until such time as they 
are formally removed from academic probation. 

University policy prohibits students dis- 
missed from another institution or a college 
of the University from registering for courses 
in any of the colleges of the University in the 
semester following dismissal. 

Graduation Procedures and 
Commencement 

The University of Scranton provides the 
opportunity for students who have completed 
degree requirements to graduate at one of 
four points throughout the academic year: 
summer graduation (graduation date: August 
31), fall graduation (graduation date: Decem- 
ber 31), intersession graduation (graduation 
date: January 31), or spring graduation (grad- 
uation date coincides with the annual Com- 
mencement exercise). Commencement exer- 
cises are held once each academic year at the 
conclusion of the spring semester; the date is 
published in the official University academic 
calendar. Normally students who are certified 
to graduate in the summer, fall, intersession 
or spring may participate in Commencement. 

Certification of graduation, receipt of a 
degree, and permission to participate in Com- 
mencement are not automatic. Seniors expect- 
ing to complete degree requirements in time 
for spring graduation must make formal 
application through the Registrar's Office or 
Dexter Hanley College by February 15. Stu- 
dents who are expecting to complete degree 
requirements for summer, fall or intersession 



58 Academics 



graduation must make formal application a 
minimum of four weeks prior to the end of 
the appropriate term. 

Walker Policy 

Undergraduates who are within 6 academic 
credits of fulfilling all graduation require- 
ments and are in good academic and discipli- 
nary standing may request to "walk" at Com- 
mencement in the spring. They must present 
to their dean a plan to complete their remain- 
ing credits at The University of Scranton dur- 
ing the summer or fall sessions and receive the 
dean's approval. Students may not participate 
in a second commencement upon completion 
of all degree requirements. 

Graduation Honors 

To be eligible for graduation and for Latin 
honors at commencement, a baccalaureate 
degree student must have completed a mini- 
mum of 63 credit hours of course work at 
The University of Scranton. Note: Latin honors 
are based upon a student's final cumulative 
GPA at the completion of the baccalaureate 
degree program. 

Summa cum laude: 3.85 cumulative GPA 

with a minimum of 45 credits counting in 

the GPA 

Magna cum laude: 3.65 cumulative GPA 

with a minimum of 45 credits counting in 

the GPA 

Cutn laude: 3.50 cumulative GPA with a 

minimum of 45 credits counting in the GPA 

Interruptions in Attendance: 
Leaves of Absence and Complete 
Withdrawal 

Leave of Absence 

Students may request their dean's approval 
for a leave of absence by completing and sub- 
mitting the Withdrawal/Leave of Absence 
Form available from the Registrar's OfFice, 
academic advising centers, academic depart- 
ment chairperson offices, and Dexter Hanley 
College. Graduation requirements in effect 
for students at the time their approved leave 
begins will remain in effect when they return 
from their leave under the following conditions: 

• They are in good academic and discipli- 
nary standing at The University when 
their leave begins. 



• They may not take courses at another 
institution without first securing written 
approval from their dean. 

• Their leave is limited to one semester but 
may be renewed for one additional semes- 
ter with the written permission of their 
dean. 

• They place their addresses and phone 
numbers on file in the Registrar's OflPice 
(or Dexter Hanley College for DHC stu- 
dents) and promptly report any address/ 
phone number changes to that office. 

• They understand that this policy does not 
bind The University to offer their curric- 
ula or major programs, which may have 
been discontinued or substantially altered 
during their leave of absence. 

Students who interrupt their education 
without an approved leave of absence must 
apply for readmission and will be subject to 
the catalog requirements in effect at the time 
of readmission. Students on an approved leave 
of absence must apply for readmission but 
retain the same requirements they had when 
they matriculated if their leaves do not extend 
beyond a year. 

Military Leave Policy 

If a student is called or volunteers for active 
military duty while attending The University 
of Scranton, The University will do its best to 
protect the academic and financial interest of 
the student within the norms of good aca- 
demic judgment. The student must meet with 
the dean of his/her college and provide proof 
of being called to active duty. The dean, after 
conferring with the Director of Financial Ad, 
the Treasurer, the student's current faculty, 
and the student, will decide the course of 
action. The dean will then process the neces- 
sary paperwork and place the student on mili- 
tary leave status. If the student does not con- 
cur with the dean's decision, the student may 
appeal to the provost/vice president for aca- 
demic affairs. The student is responsible for 
all room and board and related expenses 
incurred. Deans must confer with the Financial 
Ad and Treasurer's Office before making deci- 
sions regarding refiinds. 

Complete Withdrawal from the 
University 

Students wishing to drop or withdraw from 
all of their courses, thereby discontinuing 
their enrollment, must secure their dean's per- 



Academics 59 



mission to withdraw from The University. 
Students should also discuss any questions 
with their advisor or department chairperson. 
The form for withdrawal may be obtained in 
the Registrar's Office, Dexter Hanley College 
office, the academic advising centers, or in 
academic department chairpersons' offices. 
University withdrawal is not official until all 
signatures required on the Withdrawal/Leave 
of Absence Form have been obtained and the 
form is submitted to the Registrar's Office or, 
in the case of DHC students, to Dexter Han- 
ley College. 

Any tuition refund will be determined by 
the official date of University withdrawal. No 
grades will be recorded on the student's aca- 
demic record if the official University with- 
drawal date is on or before the last day for 
25% tuition refund or the last day to drop 
courses according to the official University 
academic calendar. Grades of W will be 
recorded for course work if the official Uni- 
versity withdrawal date coincides with the 
course withdrawal period. Final grades will be 
recorded for course work if the official with- 
drawal date is after the course withdrawal 
period for the term. 

Readmission to the University 

A student who fails to enroll for a semester 
without an approved leave of absence must 
apply for readmission to The University and, 
if accepted, will need to satisfy the catalog 
requirements in effect at the time of 
readmission. 

Academic Renewal Policy Upon 
Readmission 

Students who have not attended the Uni- 
versity for at least five calendar years may 
request academic renewal. At the time of 
readmission, students seeking academic 
renewal must complete an academic renewal 
form and may petition their Dean to have up 
to 1 6 credit hours of deficient grades removed 
from their grade point averages (GPA). The 
deficient courses and their grades will remain 
on the transcript; they will, however, be 
excluded from the GPA and earned hours and 
will not count toward graduation require- 
ments. The courses with excluded grades on 
the transcript will be designated with an E, 
and the transcript key will explain that E 
means the course grade has been excluded 



from the GPA and earned hours, yielding an 
amended GPA. A comment also will be added 
to the transcript indicating that the student 
received academic renewal and the date. 

Transferring Credits from Other 
Institutions Once Matriculating 
at The University of Scranton 

Matriculating students in good academic 
and disciplinary standing at The University of 
Scranton can transfer in a maximum of 10% 
of the total credits in their program. Transfer 
students from another institution will be lim- 
ited to a maximum of 1 0% of the total credits 
remaining in their program from the initial 
point of University of Scranton matriculation. 
All students must complete at least 63 credits 
at The University of Scranton, including the 
last 30 credits. 

University of Scranton students who have 
completed their sophomore year (60 credits) 
are permitted to take courses at other four- 
year, regionally accredited institutions. Those 
who have not completed their sophomore 
year may be approved for courses at two-year 
or four-year regionally accredited institutions. 
Grades below C received elsewhere are not 
transferable to The University, no grades from 
other institutions are computed into the stu- 
dent's grade point average. 

Students must secure the permission of 
their dean to take courses at another institu- 
tion. Students may not ordinarily take a 
course at another institution if they have 
failed the same course at The University of 
Scranton; however, exceptions to this policy 
can be made by the student's dean. 

Student Rights and Confidentiality 
of Information 

The University of Scranton recognizes the 
privacy rights of individuals who are or who 
have been students, as guaranteed by the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
(FERPA) of 1974. No information from edu- 
cational records, files, or other data directly 
related to a student shall be disclosed to indi- 
viduals or agencies outside The University 
without the express written consent of the 
student. Except where prescribed by law, 
information regarding a student's education 
record may not be disclosed to a parent, 
guardian or spouse without the student's writ- 



60 Academics 



ten authorization on file in the Office of the 
Registrar, Dexter Hanley College (DHC stu- 
dents), or Graduate School (graduate students). 

FERPA does authorize the University to 
disclose information without consent to 
school officials with legitimate educational 
interests who need to review an education 
record in order to fulfill their professional 
responsibilities. The following people or agen- 
cies are also allowed access to records without 
consent: persons or companies with whom 
The University has contracted (such as attor- 
neys, auditors or collection agents); students 
serving on official committees (such as disci- 
plinary or grievance committees) or assisting 
school officials in performing their tasks; per- 
sons or organizations to whom students have 
applied for financial aid; persons in compli- 
ance with a lawful subpoena or court order; 
and persons in an emergency in order to pro- 
tect the health or safety of students or other 
persons. 

The University considers the following to 
be public information that may be made 
available, at its discretion, without prior con- 
sent of the student: 

• Name 

• Former name(s) 

• Address (local and permanent) 

• Telephone number (campus/local and 
permanent) 

• Date and place of birth 

• Photograph 

• Major field of study 

• Participation in officially recognized 
activities and sports 

• E-mail address 

• Dates of attendance 

• Enrollment status 

• Campus employment 

• Class level 

• Expected/actual date of graduation 

• Degrees, awards, academic honors 

• Weight and height of members of athletic 
teams 

Students who wish to prevent the public 
disclosure of any or all the above information 
may complete and submit a request to the 
Office of Student Affairs, Registrar's Office, 
Dexter Hanley College (DHC students) or 
the Graduate School (graduate students). 
Request forms are available from any of the 
preceding offices. 



A directory of names, addresses and tele- 
phone numbers of students is promulgated by 
The University at the beginning of the fall 
semester. Students who do not wish to be 
listed in the campus directory must notify the 
University by the end of the first week of 
classes in the fall semester. 

FERPA affords students the right to inspect 
and review their educational records within 
45 days of the day The University receives 
such requests. Students should submit to the 
Registrar or other appropriate official written 
requests that identify the record(s) they wish 
to inspect. University officials will make 
arrangements for access and notify requesting 
students of the time and place where their 
records may be inspected. 

Students have the right to request the 
amendment of any educational records that 
they believe are inaccurate or misleading. 
They should write to the University official 
responsible for the record, clearly identify the 
part of the record that they want changed, 
and specify why they believe it is inaccurate 
or misleading. If The University decides not 
to amend the records as requested. The Uni- 
versity will notify students of the decision and 
advise them of their right to appeal the deci- 
sion and the process that must be undertaken 
to do so. 

For more information regarding FERPA, 
please contact the Office of the Registrar, 
Room 301, St. Thomas Hall. Students have 
the right to file a complaint with the U.S. 
Department of Education concerning alleged 
failures by The University of Scranton to 
comply with the requirements of FERPA. The 
name and address of the office that adminis- 
ters FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance 
Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 
Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 
20202-4605. 

In addition, The University of Scranton 
complies with the Student Right-to-Know 
Act by providing graduation rate informa- 
tion to current and prospective students 
upon request. Graduation rate information 
may be obtained by contacting the Regis- 
trar's Office or the Office of Admissions. 



Academics 61 



Degree Programs 

The University offers the following degree 
programs for the undergraduate student. 
Consult departmental listings for details. 

Majors 

Bachelor of Arts 

Classical Languages 

Communication 

English 

French 

German 

History 

International Language-Business 

Philosophy 

Spanish 

Theatre 

Theology/Religious Studies 

Bachelor of Science 

Accounting 

Accounting Information Systems 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Biomathematics 

Biophysics 

Chemistry 

Chemistry-Business 

Chemistry-Computers 

Computer Engineering 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Science 

Counseling and Human Services 

Criminal Justice 

Economics 

Early Childhood Education 

Electrical Engineering 

Electronic Commerce 

Electronics-Business 

Elementary Education 

Enterprise Management Technology 

Environmental Science 

Exercise Science 

Finance 

Gerontology 

Health Administration 

Human Resources Studies 

International Business 

International Studies 



Liberal Studies* 

Management 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Media and Information Technology 

Medical Technology 

Neuroscience 

Nursing 

Occupational Therapyt 

Operations Management 

Physical Therapy+ 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Secondary Education 

Sociology 

Special Education 

Associate in Arts* 

Associate in Science* 

Business 

Computer Engineering 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Electrical Engineering 

Gerontology 

Health Administration 

Human Services 

Political Science 

Sociology 

Minors 

Minors, which require a minimum of 15 
hours, are currently available in the following 
fields. Courses counted toward a major may 
not be counted toward the first 1 5 credits of a 
minor. However, courses counted toward a 
cognate or general education courses may be 
used to fulfill minor requirements. 
Accounting 

Accounting Information Systems 
Art History 
Biochemistry 
Biology 
Business 
Chemistry 
Coaching 
Communication 
Computer Information Systems 



* Available through Dexter Hartley College only. 

f Students entering the Occupational Therapy Program will earn a B.S. in Health Sciences after completing the first four years of a 
five-year program and a Master of Science degree in Occupational Therapy afier completion of the fifth year. 

+ Students entering the Physical Therapy program will earn a B.S. in Health Sciences after completing the first four years of a five- 
year program and a Master of Physical Therapy degree (M.P.T.) after completion of the fifih year. 



62 Academics 



Computer Science 

Counseling and Human Services 

Criminal Justice 

Economics 

Electronic Commerce 

English 

Finance 

Foreign Language 

Gerontology 

Health Administration 

History 

Human Resources Studies 

International Studies 

Leadership 

Management of People and Teams 

Management of Structures and Systems 

Mathematics 

Music History 

Operations Management 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Theatre 

Theology/Religious Studies 

Writing 

Special Programs 

Combined Baccalaureate/Master's 
Degree 

Undergraduate students of the University, 
with outstanding undergraduate records, may 
be eligible to be accepted and dually enrolled 
in a master's degree program prior to gradua- 
tion. A student who has achieved an overall 
grade point average of 3.5 after 64 semester 
hours, 3.4 after 80 semester hours, 3.3 after 
96 semester hours, or 3.2 after 112 semester 
hours (with at least 32 graded hours at the 
University) may apply for early admission to a 
master's degree program through the Com- 
bined Baccalaureate/Master's Degree Program. 
Master's degree programs that accept Com- 
bined Baccalaureate/Master's Degree students 
and details of those programs are found in the 
section on The Graduate School. 

Double Major 

Students at the end of the first semester of 
freshman year or thereafter may elect to pur- 
sue a second field of concentration in addi- 



tion to their first major. Students must secure 
written permission from the appropriate dean 
and the two pertinent departmental chairs. 
Students pursuing a second major are 
required to complete all major and required 
cognate courses and any general education 
courses that are explicitly required as part of 
the second major. The remainder of the cred- 
its in the General Education area need not be 
repeated. Except for double majors involving 
education and a content area, a second major 
will not be awarded for fewer than 18 credits 
in the second field that are not counted as part 
of the first major. Students completing double 
majors receive only one degree and diploma. 

Faculty/Student Research Program 

The Faculty/Student Research Program 
(FSRP) gives students an opportunity to be 
involved in faculty research. Students in all 
fields can participate. They engage in a variety 
of activities ranging from relatively routine 
tasks to more sophisticated research. 

There is no cost for the FSRP; the program 
is open to all students in good academic 
standing including incoming freshmen. While 
students do not receive academic credit, they 
do receive transcript recognition. 

To participate in the program, students 
must identify a faculty sponsor with whom 
they want to work. This can be done either 
by talking to individual faculty members 
directly about their research interests or by 
consulting the FSRP Directory. The Directory 
includes information on research projects and 
any student prerequisites. When a student 
and faculty member agree to work together, 
they complete a learning contract that out- 
lines the nature of the research, the tasks 
involved and the hours to be worked. 

For further information about this pro- 
gram, contact the Office of Research Services, 
O'HaraHall, (570) 941-6190. 

Fellowship Programs 

The Office of Fellowship Programs, located 
in St. Thomas 312, assists students preparing 
to make application for national and interna- 
tional awards, including, among others, the 
Truman, Mellon, James Madison, National 
Science Foundation, Goldwater, Soros, 
Churchill, Marshall, and Rhodes Scholar- 
ships. The University Director of Fellowship 
Programs, Dr. Mary Engel, advises students 



Academics 63 



with outstanding academic records in the 
identification of appropriate fellowships and 
scholarships. Members of the Matteo Ricci 
Society, including the directors of the Under- 
graduate Honors Program, the Special Jesuit 
Liberal Arts Program, and the Business Lead- 
ership Program, as well as the faculty advisors 
for the Truman, Goldwater, Fulbright, and 
National Science Foundation, provide guid- 
ance to the Fellowship Program. 

International Programs and 
Services 

In fulfillment of our mission as a Catholic 
and Jesuit institution. The University of 
Scranton is committed to building a diverse 
international institution that serves the needs 
of an increasingly interdependent global com- 
munity. We strive to create a welcoming and 
richly diverse campus with a strong commit- 
ment to international education and fellow- 
ship of the human family. 

The Office of International Programs & 
Services promotes the University's mission by 
facilitating the integration and acculturation 
of international students and scholars as well 
as by promoting initiatives such as study 
abroad, scholar exchanges, international 
internships, global partnerships and service 
learning programs. Our international pro- 
grams and services are designed to encourage 
and foster understanding and appreciation of 
our diverse planet as well as to help prepare 
our students for successful participation and 
leadership in a global society. We invite you 
to visit us to learn more about how we are 
building bridges to promote intercultural 
understanding, global competency and fellow- 
ship in our interconnected world. 

Our History 

The University of Scranton has a solid 
international education record. The Univer- 
sity has been educating international students 
since 1946 and remains committed to that 
tradition. At present, students from almost 30 
different countries are enrolled in either the 
undergraduate or graduate schools. Addition- 
ally, The University of Scranton is committed 
to sending students abroad. To date, students 
from nearly every major have studied in insti- 
tutions such as the University of Oxford 
(England), The Universidad Iberoamericana 
(Mexico), The American University in Cairo 



(Egypt), Universidad Santiago de Compostela 
(Spain), Ateneo de Manila (The Philippines), 
Assumption University (Thailand) and the 
Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso (Chile), 
The Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium) 
and the Sorbonne (France). Our faculty, 
administrators and staff have also been edu- 
cated in universities worldwide. Our faculty 
members hold degrees from 135 different 
universities in 30 countries on five continents. 
Faculty have received degrees from such insti- 
tutions such as the University of Cambridge 
(England), The University of Ghana (Ghana), 
The University of Gdansk (Poland), Pahlavi 
University (Iran), The University of Nairobi 
(Kenya)the University of Calcutta (India), the 
University of Thessalonika (Greece), Sophia 
University (Japan) and Soochow University in 
China. 

Study Abroad 

The University of Scranton provides 
opportunities for students to continue their 
studies at other universities around the world. 
International Programs and Services provides 
one-stop shopping for students interested in 
studying abroad. The Office encourages stu- 
dents who have an interest in gaining global 
experiences to stop by early and often in their 
academic career. Experts will help students 
identify study abroad options, provide aca- 
demic advising, process applications, and pro- 
vide comprehensive pre-departure services. 
The University works closely with institutions 
around the world and is committed to work- 
ing with the individual student to identify the 
study abroad site that is best for them. Financial 
aid packages and University of Scranton schol- 
arships may be used while studying abroad. 

International Students and Scholars 
Services 

International Students and Scholars Ser- 
vices (ISS) ensures the smooth integration 
and acculturation of international students 
and scholars into the University community; 
ensures compliance with immigration regula- 
tions for the University; facilitates relocation 
of international students and scholars to the 
Scranton area; provides guidance, counseling 
and mentoring; and creates opportunities for 
international students and scholars to become 
valued and productive members of the com- 
munity. ISS provides and arranges for a range 
of support services for international students 



64 Academics 



and scholars including health, housing and 
relocation services. Our staff is always ready 
and available to counsel and advise on cross- 
cultural adjustment, and personal issues; and 
we assist faculty and staff in providing an 
appropriate support environment for interna- 
tional students and scholars. ISS also plans 
and implements socio-cultural programming 
for international students, scholars and their 
cohorts, including cross-cultural dialogues, 
symposia, lectures, trips and international fes- 
tivals. We actively promote several global ini- 
tiatives: including the Family Friendship Pro- 
gram, the Global Ambassador Program, 
International Language Xchange Program, the 
Global Dialog Series, the Global Volunteer 
Program and the International Scholars in 
Residence Roundtable. 

Global Initiatives 

International Programs and Services also 
serves the University's mission by promoting 
initiatives such as scholar exchanges, inter- 
national internships, global partnerships, serv- 
ice learning programs as well as a variety of 
other international scholar experiences (semi- 
nars, conferences, workshops, multilateral col- 
laborative projects). To ensure faculty have the 
support necessary to prepare our students for 
successful participation and leadership in 
global society, the University encourages and 
facilitates international faculty exchanges and 
student collaborations. 

Internship Programs 

The University's commitment to intern- 
ships and other types of career-related learn- 
ing experiences as an integral part of the edu- 
cational process is strong and growing. Since 
the fall of 1995, over 1,500 students have 
enrolled in for-credit internships related to 
their majors or vocational goals. 

The University of Scranton offers two 
kinds of career-related learning experiences - 
for-credit internships and non-credit, career- 
related work experiences. Internships for 
credit give students opportunity to reflect 
upon, analyze and critique their experiences 
in ways that demonstrate their ability to inte- 
grate what they have learned in the classroom 
with what they are learning in the field. For- 
credit internships require that students be 
supervised by a faculty member and an on- 
site supervisor, and that they develop a set of 
clearly defined learning objectives, internship 



responsibilities and an assessment plan. Non- 
credit, career-related work experiences assist 
students in gaining work experience that 
complements their academic preparation. 
They are less structured and do not necessar- 
ily relate to specific course work. 

For-credit internships are available to stu- 
dents in many majors. For specific informa- 
tion on such internships, students should 
contact their academic advisors. Students 
wishing to participate in the non-credit 
Career Experience Program should contact 
the Career Development and Placement Cen- 
ter (941-7640) to schedule an appointment 
with one of the counselors. 

Second Degrees 

Persons with good scholastic records and 
baccalaureate degrees from regionally accred- 
ited institutions, who wish to earn second 
baccalaureate degrees, must apply to Dexter 
Hanley College. 

Service Learning 

The Panuska College of Professional Studies, 
in keeping with the mission of this University, 
is committed to a program of service-learning, 
which provides a link between community 
service and academic study. Students learn 
and develop by participating in thoughtfully 
organized service that is conducted in and 
meets the needs of the community. Service- 
learning is integrated into and enhances stu- 
dents' academic curriculum by providing 
structured time for students to reflect on the 
service experience. The service experience is 
an effective strategy for achieving enrichment 
and introducing the student to the academic, 
social and civic needs of diverse groups of 
people. Through this program, students in 
The Panuska College of Professional Studies 
complete service-learning experiences as a 
requirement for graduation. 

Several courses in the College of Arts and 
Sciences also include a service-learning 
requirement. 

Special Sessions 

The University of Scranton annually offers 
Intersession in January and two summer ses- 
sions to allow students to accelerate their 
degree programs or to make up courses that 
may not have been completed during the reg- 
ular semesters. 



Academics 65 



Student/Faculty Teaching 
Mentorship Program 

The Student/Faculty Teaching Mentorship 
Program offers advanced students the oppor- 
tunity to assist and be mentored by faculty in 
the teaching of selected courses. Together, 
they will craft the teaching/tutoring experi- 
ences that best fit the pedagogical require- 
ments of the relevant course. 

There is no fee assessed for this non-credit 
experience. While students do not receive aca- 
demic credit or a grade, they do receive tran- 
script recognition. The program is open to all 
undergraduate and graduate students in good 
academic standing. 

For more information about the program, 
please contact the Center of Teaching and 
Learning Excellence, 5th Floor, Harper-McGin- 
nis Wing of St. Thomas Hall, (570) 941-6129. 

Three-Year Bachelor's Degree 

The University of Scranton's curriculum 
and academic calendar allow qualified stu- 
dents to attain their bachelor's degrees within 
three years - thus considerably reducing the 
overall cost of their undergraduate education 
and allowing the student to enter the market- 
place or begin graduate and professional stud- 
ies a year earlier. While Advanced Placement 
or College Level Examination Programs cred- 
its are very usefial for this, a student who does 
not bring these from high school may still 
complete the degree program in most majors 
within three years through the use of January 
intersession courses and/or summer-school 
sessions. The presumption is that normal aca- 
demic progress is being made. Typically, two 
summer schools (12 credits each) and two or 
three January intersessions will suffice. Espe- 
cially qualified students may be allowed over- 
loads from the appropriate dean to fiirther 
reduce this - as will Advanced Placement 
credits. The dean should be contacted as early 
as possible in a student's career in order to 
facilitate the needed scheduling. Entering 
freshman students may want to use the sum- 
mer school immediately following their high 
school graduation to fiirther this three-year 
program; the Director of Admissions should 
be consulted with respect to this. Details on 
the special Scranton Preparatory/University 
Seven Year (4-3) High School-College Degree 
Program are available from the dean of studies 
at Scranton Preparatory. 



University of Scranton/Marywood 
University Cross-Registration 

This program is available to second-, third- 
and fourth-year students in good academic 
standing. Transfer students are eligible after 
completing their first year at The University 
of Scranton. Students may take two such 
courses (equivalent to 6 credits) during the 
calendar year (January to December), with 
the approval of their advisor and dean, and 
on a space-available basis. 

Honors Programs 

Special Jesuit Liberal Arts 
Program (SJLA) 

Rev. Ronald McKinney, S.J., Director 

Available by invitation to incoming fresh- 
men, the Special Jesuit Liberal Arts Program 
provides an alternate way of fulfilling General 
Education requirements. Students not 
selected initially may apply for admission as 
second semester freshmen or as sophomores. 
Courses for SJLA program participants, who 
are drawn from all different majors, attempt 
to foster the following skills that University 
graduates have found particularly useful in 
law, medicine, business and graduate school: 

1 . An understanding of key achievements 
in the literature, history, philosophy, the- 
ology and science of the Western classi- 
cal and Christian heritage; 

2. An ability to apply logical, systematic, 
and critical reflection to any given intel- 
lectual problem; 

3. An understanding of and sensitivity 
toward the contemporary problems of 
our day; 

4. An outstanding ability to communicate 
clearly and persuasively one's ideas 
through both the spoken and written 
word (what Jesuits have historically 
referred to as eloquentia perfecta). 

Students are expected to become involved 
in extracurricular and service activities on 
campus if they wish to remain in SJLA. Many 
participants also study abroad, earn a double 
major in philosophy, and join the Honors 
Program if they apply and are accepted during 
their sophomore year. Above all, participants 
are expected to seek out and interact with 
their professors and other students in this 



GG Academics 



SJLA Curricul 


um 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. Spr. Cr. 


First Year 












MAJOR/COGNATE 


Major/Cognate 


6-9 


6-9 




LANG 


Modern or Classical Language 


3 


3 




PHIL120J-210J 


Intro, to Philosophy-Ethics 


3 


3 




T/RS 121J-ELECT 


Theology I-Elective 


3 


3 




FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-Physical Education 


1 


1 




16-19 


16-19 


Second Year 












MAJOR/COGNATE 


Major/Cognate 


9-12 


9-12 




ELECT-T/RS 122J 


Elective-Theology II 


3 


3 




PHIL217J-311J 


The Trivium-Metaphysics 


3 


3 




PHED 


Physical Education 


1 


1 




16-19 


16-19 


Third Year 












MAIOR/COGNATE 


Major/Cognate 


9 


9 




ELECT-INTDllOJ 


Elective-The Jesuit Magis 


3 


3 




HUMN311J-312J 


Masterworks I-II 


3 


3 




PHIL 322J-ELECT 


Philosophy of Conscience-Elective 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 












MAJOR 


Major 


6 


6 




ELECT 


Elective 


3 


3 




PHIL419J-413J 


Philos. East & West-End of Philos. 


3 


3 




T/RS314J-ELECT 


Religions of the World-Elective 


3 
15 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 130-142 CREDITS (depending on 


major) 



community of learning, which is under the 
direction of Rev. Ronald H. McKinney, S.J. 
SJLA students are eligible to apply for the 
Christopher Jason Perfilio Memorial Scholar- 
ships, awarded each year since 1995. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



PHIL 120J 

Introduction to Philosophy 

The aim of this course is to awaken in the student 
an appreciation of the nature and method of 
philosophical inquiry through an examination of 
key texts, which grapple with the central ques- 
tions that have arisen in the history of philosophy. 

PHIL 210J 3 cr. 

Ethics 

Through the presentation of a select history of 
moral philosophy, students are introduced to the 
philosophical discipline of ethics. Original texts 
of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, 
Epictetus, St. Augustine, Hobbes, Kant, Mill, 
and Nietzsche are enlisted to explore the most 
fundamental question in ethics, "What is the 
good life?" 



PHIL311J 3cr. 

Metaphysics 

A textual inquiry into the adequacy of philo- 
sophical responses to the fundamental question, 
"What Is?" Special attention will be given to 
Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Nietzsche. 

PHIL 217J 3 cr. 

The Trivium 

Via numerous writing projects and speeches and 
the analysis of select philosophical texts, this 
practicum in grammar, logic, and rhetoric will 
encourage the student to connect the basic ele- 
ments of reason, discourse, and persuasion. 

PHIL 322J 3 cr. 

Philosophy of Conscience 

Studies the role of conscience in moral judgment 
and considers its metaphorical and narrative ele- 
ments. Explores the difference between clarity 
and community, truth and wisdom, principle 
and prudence as we study possible links between 
conscience, reason, eros, imagination and educa- 
tion in some of the works of Plato, Kant and Marx. 

PHIL413J 3cr. 

The End of Philosophy 

The title of this SJLA capstone course refers to 
its three objectives. These are: (1) to complete 



Academics 67 



and unify SJLA coursework in philosophy, (2) to 
clarify philosophy's purpose or goal, and (3) to 
interpret contemporary anxiety about the end of 
the philosophical tradition. 

PHIL419J 3cr. 

(D) Philosophy East and West 

This capstone course of the SJLA program 
brings non-Western philosophy and philosophers 
into a dialogue with Western philosophy and 
philosophers on major philosophical topics. 

T/RS 121J 3 cr. 

(P) Theology I: Introduction to the Bible 

A survey of central texts and themes of the 
Bible. Its purpose is to develop biblical literacy 
as well as skills in interpreting various literary 
forms and key theological concepts. 

T/RS 122J 3 cr. 

(P) Theology II: Introduction to Christian 
Theology 

(Prerequisite: T/RS 121) A survey of key 
Christian themes: creation, Christ's incarnation 
and redemption, the Church and sacraments. 
Christian personhood, and the practice of 
prayer, virtue, and hope for the future. 

T/RS 314J 3 cr. 

The Religions of the World 

An exploration of belief in the traditions of the 
classical historical religions of the world through 
both systematic analysis and the reading of 
sacred texts. 

INTO 11 OJ 3cr. 

The Jesuit Magis 

The purpose of this course is to teach students 
how to coordinate several themes into an integral 
whole: Jesuit commitment to faith and justice, 
in terms of the Magis; service to others as a con- 
crete response to social analysis, complemented 
by guided reflection upon the experience of 
service. 

HUM311J-312J 6 or. 

Masterworks I-II 

In this team-taught, year-long seminar, students 
will read some of the great classics of world liter- 
ature, learn how to facilitate their own discus- 
sions, write a comparative analytic paper, and be 
orally examined by a host of volunteer professors. 

Electives and Exemptions 

SJLA's five or six elective (beyond the two- 
semester language requirement) credits are 
intended to be used toward courses in math, 
computer literacy, and the natural and social 



sciences. There are always exemptions made 
to ensure that everyone takes at least 130 
credits but no more than a credit-heavy major 
requires. Special exemptions may also be pos- 
sible for those participating in foreign study, 
in Honors, or in a difficult double major or 



Honors Program 

Ellen M. Casey, Ph.D., Director 

The Honors Program at The University of 
Scranton concentrates on directed independ- 
ent work for selected students who desire 
greater depth and breadth in their education. 
The Honors curriculum is designed to fit into 
existing University course requirements and 
to support students as they move into increas- 
ingly independent work. The sophomore 
courses, open only to Honors students, enable 
them to meet a University general education 
requirement on a more advanced level. 

Junior Honors students take tutorials both 
in and out of their majors. A tutorial is an 
exploration of a topic on an individually 
directed basis; the student meets with a fac- 
ulty mentor weekly throughout the semester. 
Each Honors student must take three tutori- 
als, at least one in the major and one out of 
the major or in the second major. The student 
may take a fourth and fifth tutorial. These 
tutorials count toward major, minor, cognate, 
or general education requirements. 

In the Honors seminars, a small group of 
Honors students meets weekly with the direc- 
tor and assistant director for student-led dis- 
cussions. The junior seminar is based on an 
interdisciplinary reading list; the senior semi- 
nar is based on the senior Honors projects. 

There is no tuition charge lor these semi- 
nars, since they are the only Honors require- 
ments that do not satisfy ordinary graduation 
requirements. 

Senior Honors students do a yearlong, 6- 
credit project in their majors, working under 
the guidance of a professor to explore a spe- 
cialized topic, either academic or professional 
in nature. Upon completion, the project is 
defended before a board of three faculty mem- 
bers who judge whether it is of Honors caliber. 

There is no extra charge for Honors work. 
In addition, honors students who pay flat 
tuition may take between 12 and 21 credits in 
their third and fourth years at the flat rate. 



68 Academics 



Honors Program Schedule 

Second Year 

Fall: Application 
Spring: Honors Course 

Third Year 

Fall: 1 or 2 tutorials 

Spring: 1 or 2 tutorials, HONR 387: Junior Honors 

Seminar 

Fourth Year 

Fall: Honors Project, HONR 489H: Senior Honors 

Seminar 

Spring: Honors Project; Defense of Project 

Admission to the Honors Program 

Applications are accepted every fall from 
those students who have at least 1 8 hours of 
college credit and who expect to graduate after 
three more years of work at the University. 
Applicants must ordinarily have at least a 3.3 
GPA; a minimum of a 3.5 GPA (cum laude) 
is required for graduation in the program. The 
number of spaces in the program is limited, 
and admission is based on the applicant's high 
school and college records, SAT scores, appli- 
cation, recommendations, and interviews. For 
further information contact Dr. Ellen Casey, 
Director of the Honors Program. 

Course Descriptions 

No Honors Program courses may be taken 
on a Pass/Fail basis. 

HUM 286H 3 cr. 

(C,W) Victorian Studies 

This course uses literature to explore 19th- 
century British social and intellectual history. 
Focusing on the period from 1832-1901, it 
examines Victorian attitudes toward industrial- 
ization, religion, art and gender. 

(S,W) SOC 217H 3 cr. 

Family Issues and Social Policy 

This course examines the conditions, problems 
and policies associated with work-family issues, 
divorce, family violence and elder care. Students 
will use service-learning experience to evaluate 
these policies from a multicultural perspective, 
to determine who really benefits from them, and 
to assess any unintended consequences (positive 
and negative). 

HONR 387H 2 cr. 

Junior Honors Seminar 

Student-led discussions of contemporary non- 
fictional works chosen for their variety and their 
importance. 



HONR 489H 1 cr. 

Senior Honors Seminar 

Student-led discussions of the content, rationale, 
and methodology of Senior Honors Projects. 

DEFT 385H-389H 3 cr. each 

Honors Tutorial 

An exploration of a topic on an individually 
directed basis. 

DEFT 487H-489H 6 cr. total 

Honors Project 

An independent project of academic or profes- 
sional nature culminating in an oral defense 
before a board of three faculty members. 

Business Leadership Program 

Robert L. McKeage, Ph.D., Director 

Leadership, the process of persuasion or 
example by which the members of a group are 
persuaded to pursue the groups objectives, is 
the focus of many new programs in educa- 
tion. The Business Leadership Program in the 
University's Kania School of Management 
provides selected students with an opportu- 
nity to perfect their talents for business lead- 
ership. The program includes special sections 
of key business courses taught from the lead- 
ership perspective, leadership seminars, a 
mentor/internship program, and an inde- 
pendent leadership project. 

The key courses are taught with a special 
emphasis on business leadership by faculty 
chosen for their exceptional teaching and 
their interest in the leadership concept. The 
leadership seminars will help the students 
assess and perfect their talents for leadership 
and will put them into contact with many 
business leaders. Noteworthy among the 
opportunities are the internships (where the 
students are placed with business leaders who 
serve as mentors) and the projects developed 
and executed by the students to demonstrate 
their leadership skills. The program will cul- 
minate in the students preparing portfolios on 
the essence of leadership, as derived from par- 
ticipation in the program, and defending their 
concepts of leadership before a faculty board. 

This highly selective program accepts 1 5 
sophomores each spring to begin the rwo-year 
curriculum the following fall. Applicants are 
selected on the basis of the following criteria: 

• Leadership experience and/or potential; 
drawing from the student's record in high 



Academics 69 



school, college, work history, clubs and 
activities. 

• Student's self-assessment and motivation 
in applying — how and why this program 
relates to the student's long-term goals. 

• Interests and hobbies. 

• Recommendations of teachers, others. 

• 3.3 grade-point average (ordinarily); a 
minimum of a 3.5 grade-point average 
will be needed for graduation with honors 
in the program 

Course Descriptions 

Although three of the first four courses are 
required of all business students, sections des- 
ignated by BLDR are restricted to students in 
the Business Leadership Program. 

BLDR 351 3cr. 

Principles of Management 

This course covers the key aspects of the man- 
agement process for decision-making. The focus 
is the organizational setting in which business 
leadership is exercised. 

BLDR 355 3 cr. 

Business Ethics 

The individual and social ethics of the major 
areas of decision-making in business from a lead- 
ership perspective. 

BLDR 455 3cr. 

Policy and Planning 

This is the capstone course for all business 
majors. Concepts and skills developed in the 
fxinctional areas of accounting, finance, manage- 
ment, marketing and production/ operations are 
integrated and applied to the top-level manage- 
ment of an organization. Topics include analyz- 
ing organizational environment, setting missions 
and objectives, developing strategies and plans, 
allocating resources, and designing organiza- 
tional structures, reward, and control systems. 
Special emphasis will be given to the role of 
executive leadership and values in the articula- 
tion of a corporate vision and culture, and in the 
choice of growth and competitive strategies. 
Intended as a case- and project-oriented course. 

BLDR 484 3 cr. 

Work as Vocation 

This final course in the BLDR sequence provides 
students with an opportunity to discover their 
professional "calling." This course is intended to 
help the graduating students make the transition 
from the classroom to the "real world," and to 
integrate the values they inculcated at the Uni- 



Business Leadership Program 
Schedule 

Third Year 

Fall: BLDR 351: Principles ot Management I, 
BLDR 385: Business Leadership Seminar #1 
Spring: BLDR 355: Business Ethics, 
BLDR 386: Business Leadership Seminar #2 

Fourth Year 

FalL BLDR 455: Policy & Planning, 
BLDR 485: Business Leadership Seminar #3 
Spring: BLDR 484: Work as Vocation, BLDR 486: 
Business Leadership Seminar #4, Senior Project 

versity into their work experience. They will 
examine their strengths, weaknesses, and interests 
to develop career plans and strategies. 

BLDR 385 1 cr. 

Self Assessment Business Leadership Seminar #1 

Focus is on identifying the characteristics of 
leadership, self- assessment of personal strengths 
and weaknesses, and preparation of plan for self- 
development. 

BLDR 386 1 cr. 

Empowemient Business Leadership Seminar #2 

Focus is on identifying the tasks of the leader 
and "enabling or empowering" people to achieve 
the organization's goals 

BLDR 485 1 cr. 

Mentorship Business Leadership Seminar #3 

Student is placed in an organizational setting as 
a leadership intern to study the leadership of the 
organization. 

BLDR 486 1 cr. 

Senior Project Business Leadership Seminar #4 

Student proposes, develops and executes a proj- 
ect evidencing a high degree of leadership skills 
and activity. 

Pre-Law Program 

The University is justly proud of its tradi- 
tion in providing students seeking careers in 
the law with a solid preparation for the 
demands of legal study and practice. Scranton 
graduates in all regions of the nation have 
achieved distinction in virtually every area of 
the law. 

The clearest measure of the strength of the 
University's Pre-Law Program is the remark- 
able success its graduates have had in winning 
admittance to law schools throughout the 
country. Recent graduates have been admitted 



70 Academics 



to many prestigious law schools, including 
Cornell, Georgetown, Penn, American Uni- 
versity, Boston College, Catholic University, 
Dickinson, Fordham, Notre Dame, Pittsburgh, 
Rutgers, Seton Hall, Temple, Villanova and 
Widener. 

Pre-Law Curriculum 

No specific undergraduate major is 
required for admission to law school; the 
American Bar Association's statement on 
Preparation for Legal Education does not rec- 
ommend any particular group of either 
majors or individual courses, noting that "the 
law is too multifaceted, and the human mind 
too adaptable, to permit such a linear 
approach to preparing for law school or the 
practice of law." The ABA statement, how- 
ever, does describe certain skills and values 
that are essential to success in law school and 
to competent practice. These are: 

1 . Analytic and Problem Solving skills, 
involving critical thinking and the ability 
to structure and evaluate arguments for 
and against propositions; 

2. Critical Reading Abilities, derived from 
substantial experience in the close read- 
ing and critical analysis of complex texts; 

3. Writing Skills, developed through rigor- 
ous practice in preparing and revising 
original pieces of substantial length; 

4. Oral Communication and Listening 
Abilities, based on experience in giving 
and evaluating formal presentations; 

5. Research and Time Management Skills, 
involving the ability to plan a research 
strategy, to undertake substantial library 
work, and to organize large amounts of 
information within a fixed period of 
time; and, not least of all, 

6. a Commitment to Serving Others and 
Promoting Justice, based on significant 
experience in service projects while an 
undergraduate. 

The skills noted above can be acquired by 
students majoring or minoring in any disci- 
pline that involves intensive reading and 
extensive writing such as, for example, Eng- 
lish, history or political science. At the same 
time, students who have majored in other 
areas, including philosophy, languages, man- 
agement, any of the social sciences, as well as 
the natural sciences, have enjoyed success in 
the study and practice of law. Ultimately, the 



best preparation for law school comes from 
taking challenging courses from demanding 
professors. 

In addition to these skills and values, the 
ABA has identified several more specific areas 
of knowledge that pre-law students should 
acquire as undergraduates. The University's 
Curriculum 2000 provides a framework 
whereby all can be acquired through the 
General Education requirements applicable to 
all majors. 

• a broad understanding of American 
history (HIST 110-111) 

• a fundamental understanding of political 
thought and the American political 
system (PS 130-131) 

• a basic understanding of ethical theory 
(PHIL 210) 

• a grounding in economics, especially 
microeconomic theory (ECON 1 53) 

• an understanding of basic pre-calculus 
mathematics (MATH 106 or equivalent) 

• a basic understanding of human behavior 
and social interaction (PSYC 1 10 or SOC 
110) 

• an understanding of diverse cultures 
within and beyond the United States (the 
6-credit cultural-diversity GE requirement) 

In addition to the courses listed above 
which satisfy general education requirements, 
certain departments offer courses that can be 
of particular value to pre-law students and 
which, depending upon their major, can be 
taken as electives within either the major or 
cognate. Such courses include HIST 336 
(History of American Law), HIST 337 
(British Constitutional and Legal History), PS 
311-312 (American Constitutional Law), and 
WRTG 212 (Writing for the Law). 

Pre-Law Internships 

Interested students with a grade point aver- 
age above 3.00 at the time of application may, 
with the approval of the appropriate dean, 
receive academic credit for internships served 
in the offices of either private law firms or 
various legal agencies such as the district 
attorney, public defender, or district magis- 
trate. Prior approval of the planned internship 
is necessary. A minimum of 1 50 hours work 
is required for internship credit in PS 280. 
Application forms for these internships are 
available from the Registrar's Office. 



Academics 71 



Pre-Law Advisory Council 

A pre-law advisory council headed by Dr. 
Frank X.J. Homer, Director of Law School 
Placement, provides continuing advice on 
course selection, career planning and the law 
school application process. He is assisted by 
Ms. Constance E. McDonnell, Associate 
Director of Career Services, and Dr. Robert F. 
Hueston, moderator of the student Pre-Law 
Society, along with faculty members from the 
departments of Criminal Justice, English, 
History, Philosophy and Political Science as 
well as faculty representatives from both The 
Panuska College of Professional Studies and 
The Kania School of Management. 

Law School Admission Test 

Along with a student's undergraduate aca- 
demic record, the LSAT score is a critical 
factor in the law-school-admission process. 
Ordinarily, pre-law students take the LSAT at 
the end of the junior year or early in the sen- 
ior year. As a means of assisting University 
students to score up to their fullest potential 
on the LSAT, on-campus LSAT workshops 
are offered at least twice each year. These pro- 
vide University students with an alternative to 
costly commercial test-preparation services. 

Pre-Medical Program 

The success of the University's Pre-Medical 
Program has been outstanding. Since 1980, 
the University has placed an average of more 
than 50 students per year into American 
schools of medicine, dentistry, optometry, 
podiatry and veterinary medicine, often in the 
most prestigious schools in the country. 

The University of Scranton offers its pre- 
medical students unique opportunities in 
anticipation of changes in healthcare delivery 
for the rwenty-first century. They include a 
special exposure to primary-care medicine 
(the practice of family physicians, general 
internists, and general pediatricians), pre- 
dicted to be the area of greatest grov^h in 
medicine. Students have an opportunity to 
participate in an undergraduate primary-care 
externship through the Scranton-Temple Res- 
idency Externship Program. In this program, 
students accompany physicians at Scranton 
Mercy and Moses Taylor Hospitals to gain 
exposure to clinical settings in primary-care 
medicine. Students gain transcript recognition 



for participation in this externship, as well as a 
clear view of the profession they seek to enter. 

A special opportunity is offered to eight 
students each year through the Medical 
Scholars Program, a cooperative program at 
The University of Scranton and Temple Uni- 
versity School of Medicine. Through this pro- 
gram, highly qualified high school seniors are 
offered early assurance, contingency admission 
to Temple University School of Medicine. 

Moreover, The University of Scranton is 
one of only six undergraduate institutions 
participating in the Jefferson Medical College 
Physician Shortage Area Program (PSAP) . 
This program is designed to recruit and edu- 
cate medical students who intend to enter 
family medicine and practice in physician- 
shortage areas in Pennsylvania. Finally, Uni- 
versity of Scranton students are encouraged to 
participate in programs at the Center for 
Primary Care at the Penn State College of 
Medicine, Hershey. 

The Pre-Medical Program is supported by a 
network of hundreds of medical alumni and 
by an active Medical Alumni Council. The 
Medical Alumni Council has compiled a 
directory of physicians who have agreed to 
serve as resources for information or intern- 
ship opportunities for University of Scranton 
students. It also sponsors on-campus pro- 
grams to which undergraduate students are 
invited. 

Pre-Medical Undergraduate Curricula 

Many undergraduate students who intend 
to apply to health-professions schools choose 
Biology or Biochemistry as their major. How- 
ever, students may choose any major, pro- 
vided that they meet the requirements for 
entrance to medical, dental, or other health- 
professions schools. 

For students at The University of Scranton, 
the minimum requirements are listed below. 
All courses must be taken with their corre- 
sponding labs. 

• BIOL 141-142: General Biology 

• CHEM 112-113: General and Analytical 
Chemistry 

• CHEM 232-233: Organic Chemistry 

• PHYS 120-121: General Physics 
Virtually all medical schools require a year of 

English literature, and many require a semester 
or a year of mathematics, including calcidus. 



72 Academics 



Many medical schools recommend that 
students demonstrate a wide range of interests 
in their choice both of courses and of extra- 
curricular activities. Volunteer work is 
strongly recommended by the admissions 
committees of most health-professions 
schools, as is course work in ethics, particu- 
larly in PHIL 212: Medical Ethics, PHIL 
316: American Perspectives on Health Care 
Ethics, and/or T/RS 330: Biomedical Ethics. 

Some medical and dental schools also have 
specific prerequisites for English, mathematics, 
or other courses, as listed in Medical School 
Admission Requirements, or Admission Require- 
ments of U.S. and Canadian Dental Schools. 

The Association of American Medical Col- 
leges recommends that undergraduate stu- 
dents planning to apply to medical school 
acquire a strong background in the natural 
sciences, so students should consider courses 
in biology, chemistry, physics and mathemat- 
ics beyond the minimum requirements. Stu- 
dents should develop strong oral and written 
communication skills, and they should com- 
plete rigorous courses in the humanities and 
social sciences. Honors courses and programs, 
independent study, and/or undergraduate 
research are also encouraged. 

The University offers all applicants to 
health-professions schools the option of a for- 
mal applicant evaluation by the Health Pro- 
fessions Evaluation Committee (HPEC). This 
committee consists of 19 faculty and adminis- 
trators representing a wide range of academic 
disciplines. It is directed by Dr. Mary Engel, 
University Director of Fellowship Programs 
and Director of Medical School Placement, 
who also advises the Health Professions Orga- 
nization. 

All applicants who seek to apply to doc- 
toral-level health professions schools are eval- 
uated on academic record, volunteer and 
community service activities, extracurricular 
activities, and demonstrated motivation 
toward their chosen careers. Students submit 
documents and request faculty letters of eval- 
uation and are interviewed by two members 
of HPEC. Through the HPEC interview, stu- 
dents have an opportunity to develop their 
interviewing skills and receive feedback on 
their application materials and interviewing 
performance. The HPEC evaluation package 
sent to health professions schools provides a 
comprehensive narrative which describes in 



depth an applicant's qualifications for 
advanced study and a career in the health 
professions. 

The University also makes available to stu- 
dents a wide variety of resources in the Health 
Professions Lending Library; information 
about materials which students may borrow is 
available from the Director of Medical School 
Placement. 

Additional Information 

Information and copies of publications are 
also available in the office of Dr. Mary Engel, 
Director of Medical School Placement, St. 
Thomas 312. In addition, the student- 
supported Health Professions Organization 
Web site at wrww.scranton.edu/premed pro- 
vides extensive helpfiil information for inter- 
ested students. 

Interdisciplinary Programs 
and Concentrations 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

Interdisciplinary courses are team-taught 
courses that vary from semester to semester. 
They may be used to fulfill appropriate Gen- 
eral Education requirements as specified in 
the course schedule bulletin. 

INTD 100 1 cr. 

Freshman Seminar 

Freshman seminars are designed to foster stu- 
dents' successful integration into academic and 
community life at The University of Scranton. 
Topics common to all freshman seminars include: 
the purpose of higher education; time manage- 
ment; the mission of a Jesuit university; aca- 
demic-development strategies; the role of fac- 
ulty; University resources; and personal values. 

INTD 103 3 cr. 

(D) The Vietnam Experience 

The historical origins of the Vietnam War, 
including the period of French colonialism and 
the American intervention; the politics, econom- 
ics, and military strategy in Vietnam during the 
war years and today; present relations with 
China and the USSR. Why were we there and 
why did we fail? 

INTD 104 3 cr. 

Men's Health 

The course will examine the historic, physio- 
logic, social, cultural, emotional and economic 



Academics 73 



issues affecting men's health. The course explores 
strategies to assist students to gain inlormation 
regarding men's health issues, adopt healthier 
lifestyles, and use health care services appropri- 
ately. Health issues related to culture and diver- 
sity will also be addressed. Class members will be 
expected to actively participate in all discussions. 

INTO 105 3 cr. 

Great Lives: Images on Stage 

An examination of the often contrasting impres- 
sions of historical personalities, as they are por- 
trayed in plays and films and as they appear to 
historians. Historical figures to be considered 
include Caesar, Richard III, Thomas More, Lin- 
coln and Churchill. 

INTO 108 3 cr. 

Health and Legal Implications of 
Chemical/Drug Abuse 

A team-taught course that deals with the neuro- 
physical, health, and legal implications of alco- 
hol/drug abuse, viz: its biochemical effects and 
aspects, its legal and social consequences, and its 
health and lifestyle implications. 

INTO 209 3 cr. 

(D) The Holocaust 

An exploration of the cataclysmic event in Jew- 
ish history known as the Holocaust. The course 
will examine the subject from the perspective of 
various academic disciplines - historical, socio- 
logical, philosophical, artistic, and literary, 
among others - and will include a field trip to 
the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. 

INTO 211 3cr. 

(D,E) HIV/AIDS: Biological, Social and 
Cultural Issues 

(Prerequisite: C/IL 102 or equivalent) Study of 
the biology of HIV and AIDS, impact of the 
epidemic on various social groups and countries. 
The epidemiology of the disease and the 
response of health-care systems and govern- 
ments. Opportunity for American Red Cross 
certification in basic HIV facts and eligibility for 
HIV Instructor certification will be included as 
part of the course. Open to all majors. 

INTO 224 3 cr. 

(Q,W) Science, Decision Making and 
Uncertainty 

A study of decision-making as it relates to scien- 
tific and public policy matters. The course covers 
philosophical, mathematical and psychological 
aspects of decision- making in the face of uncer- 
tain evidence. Topics include the nature of scien- 



tific evidence; probabilistic evidence and the law; 
uncertainty and medicine; and other issues such 
as nuclear power, waste disposal, and strategic 
nuclear planning. 

INTD 333 3 cr. 

The Bible in Image and Text 

This team-taught course is a study of the inter- 
pretation of major biblical stories and figures in 
the Christian theological tradition and in art his- 
tory. The marriage of Christian text and image is 
a natural and long-lived one; it provides an 
exciting way to integrate knowledge of various 
major themes such as creation and last judge- 
ment, and of many great biblical figures, such as 
Moses and Christ. 

NSCI 102 3 cr. 

Science and Society 

This course attempts to show how the sciences, 
particularly the behavioral sciences, impact both 
positively and negatively on society. Issues dealt 
with include the nature of science, similarities 
and differences between the scientific disciplines, 
the impact of science on the concept office will, 
and the philosophical and moral implications of 
psychological testing, socio-biology, and Skin- 
nerian radical behaviorism. 

NSCI 201 3 cr. 

(E) Science and the Human Environment 

A brief study of the effects of technological, sci- 
entific and industrial progress on the air, land, 
and water resources of the human environment. 
Problems in each of the resource areas will be 
discussed in detail. 

Catholic Studies Program 

Kathleen C. Dv^er, Ph.D., Director 

The Catholic Studies Program seeks to pro- 
vide every student with the opportunity to 
engage the Catholic tradition in a deeper and 
broader way than the typical program of stud- 
ies can provide. Accordingly, this program 
casts a wide net over what the Catholic tradi- 
tion and heritage are and how they interface 
with human endeavor. Catholic Studies is a 
specialization built around a multi-disciplinary 
core that provides a systematic way of integrat- 
ing the many facets of Catholic tradition with 
various academic disciplines. Because Catholic 
tradition is integrally linked to virtually every 
subject, it can provide a natural integrative 
coherence for nearly all majors and areas of 
studies. Thus the CSP provides a good means 



lA Academics 



of organizing many general-education require- 
ments into a unified concentration; it is an 
attractive academic program for rounding out 
a students Catholic higher education. 

The Catholic Studies Program consists of 
both inter- and uni-disciplinary courses that 
provide opportunities to study the Catholic 
heritage in the ancient and the contemporary 
Church alike, and give access to the rich 
forms in which it has been expressed in litera- 
ture, art, architecture, music, history, philoso- 
phy, science, etc. Catholic Studies welcomes 
all interested students whether or not they are 
Catholic. It is compatible with all majors. Ide- 
ally, students will enter in their freshman year, 
but it is possible for students to enter in their 
sophomore year. Courses in the program will 
meet either general education, major, minor 
or cognate requirements. All non-CSP stu- 
dents are welcome in any course(s) in the pro- 
gram, but CSP students are given enrollment 
preference. Honors tutorials are encouraged. 
SJLA students are welcome. 

All courses taught in the Catholic Studies 
Program will seek to promote appreciation of 
the Catholic tradition by being faithful to the 
Church's apostolic teaching. Courses will also 
encourage students (1) to integrate faith and 
academics; (2) to study the Catholic Tradition 
in an intellectually rigorous way; (3) to assess 
human intellectual activity and experience in 
the light of the Catholic faith; and (4) to 
examine the experience of Catholics in his- 
tory, politics, various social groups, philo- 
sophical and religious movements, and/or sci- 
ence and technology. 

The concentration consists of 21 credits: 6 
are required; the other 1 5 are electives. T/RS 
184C must be taken; one semester of Christ- 
ian Classics is also required. Students may 
build their studies on their majors and inter- 
ests. Students are invited to petition for read- 
ers that meet program standards. Students 
may likewise seek permission for courses not 
cross-listed to count for credit, provided they 
are eligible to do significant Catholic Studies 
work in them. 

Catholic Studies Electives 

Students will choose five courses from a list 
that may be obtained from the director, and 
which is also available from the Registrar's 
Office. 



Required Courses 

T/RS 184C 3 cr. 

(P,W) Inside the Catholic Tradition 

This introduction to Catholic Tradition will 
study its scope, depth, and on-going develop- 
ment, reception, and characteristics. Topics cov- 
ered include Faith and Revelation, the intercom- 
munion of Scripture and Tradition, the role of 
Magisterium, and the development of doctrine. 
Selected readings are taken from important con- 
ciliar texts and theologians. 

INTD201C-202C 6 cr. 

(P,W) Christian Classics I-II 

Each semester of this CSP core course provides a 
structured opportunity for reading in common 
some of the major Christian works of literature 
and spirituality with which every educated 
Catholic should be familiar. Important Catholic 
books and significant works of some great men 
and women who have shaped Christian thought 
and life will be read and discussed. 

Environmental Studies 
Concentration 

Leonard W. Champney, Ph.D., Political 
Science; John R. Kalafut, M.S., Physics and 
Electrical Engineering; Edward M. Scahill, 
Ph.D., Economics/Finance; Program 
Co-Directors 

The Environmental Studies Concentration 
introduces students to the scientific, eco- 
nomic, legal, political and philosophical 
dimensions of environmental issues, both 
within the United States and globally. The 
concentration is open to students from any 
major and may be of particular interest to stu- 
dents planning careers in government, law or 
business. 

Courses for the Environmental Studies 
Concentration are drawn from eight depart- 
ments in The College of Arts and Sciences 
and The Kania School of Management. Many 
of these courses may also be used for general 
education requirements. To enroll, students 
should consult one of the co-directors of the 
concentration. The concentration consists of 
eight courses: 

PHYS 1 06 (E) Energy and the Environment 
NSCI 201 (E) Science and the Human 

Environment 
CHEM 202 (E) Global Change 
ECO 103 (S) Economics of Environ- 
mental Issues 



Academics 75 



PS 230 (S) Environmental Policy 

MGT 210 Business and the Environment 

T/RS 3 1 6 (PW) God and the Earth 

PHIL 213 (P) Environmental Ethics 

In addition, MATH 201, Algebra and 
Environmental Issues, is recommended. This 
course fulfills the quantitative reasoning 
requirement in the general education curricu- 
lum, and is also a writing intensive course. 

Natural Science majors who wish to pursue 
the Environmental Studies Concentration 
may complete the three natural science 
courses using any combination of the natural 
science courses listed above and/or the follow- 
ing courses: 

CHEM 340 Environmental Chemistry 

CHEM 342 Environmental Toxicology 

CHEM 344 Environmental Geochemistry 

BIOL 273 Marine Biology 

BIOL 371 Ecology 

BIOL 471 Applied Ecology 

BIOL 473 Estuarine Ecology 

Forensic Health Concentration 

Mary Muscari, Ph.D., Director 

Open to all undergraduate students, the 
Forensic Health Interdisciplinary Concentra- 
tion is designed by the Departments of Nurs- 
ing and Criminal Justice to advance students' 
interest in the field of forensic health. Foren- 
sic Health is the application of the health- 
related sciences to public or legal proceedings 
and the scientific investigation and treatment 
of trauma and/or death of victims and perpe- 
trators of abuse, violence, criminal activity, 
and traumatic accidents. Forensic health care 
professionals work with a variety of clients, 
including victims intrafamilial violence and 
sexual assault, criminal ofi^enders, and juvenile 
delinquents. Career settings include emer- 
gency departments, psychiatric facilities, cor- 
rectional facilities, schools, community health, 
and legal consulting in the court system. 

Students interested in this concentration 
are required to complete four 3-credit courses 
and one 3-credit elective course for a total of 
15 credits. 

Required Courses 

PSYC 110 is a prerequisite to NURS 344 
and 345. CJ 1 10 is recommended, but not 
required, prior to NURS 344 and 345 and 
the Criminal Justice electives. 



CJ 1 10 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

NURS 344 Forensic Health Care of Victims 
NURS 345 Forensic Health Care of 

Perpetrators 
PSYCHO Fundamentals of Psychology 

Elective Courses (choose one) 

Students are required to consult the Foren- 
sic Health Interdisciplinary Concentration 
Director before choosing their elective. 
CJ 213 Criminology 

S/CJ 214 Juvenile Delinquency 
S/CJ 218 The American Court System 
S/CJ 220 Penology: The American 

Correctional System 
CJ 230 Crime Prevention 

CJ 237 The Investigative Process 

S/CJ 324 Victimology 

Human Development Program 

James P. Buchanan, Ph.D., Director 

This program offers all students, especially 
those majoring in the behavioral and social 
sciences, the opportunity to develop a multi- 
disciplinary focus in human development. 
The academic aims of the concentration are 
to provide an understanding of 

1 . Both normal and exceptional develop- 
ment of humans as biological and psy- 
chological organisms; 

2. The relationship between individuals 
and family/social environment; and 

3. The means to enhance human develop- 
ment, including a field experience in a 
human-development agency. 

The 30-credit Human Development con- 
centration is administered by an interdiscipli- 
nary board of faculty from the Psychology, 
Sociology, and Human Resources departments. 
Students interested in careers and graduate 
programs in human development should con- 
tact the director for more information on 
course choice and on integrating the concen- 
tration with various majors. Students who 
complete this concentration will have it noted 
on their transcripts. The Human Develop- 
ment concentration requires the following: 

1. PSYC 221: Childhood & Adolescence 

2. PSYC 222: Adulthood & Aging or 
GERO 110: Introduction to Gerontology 

3. PSYC 225: Abnormal Psychology 

4. HS 241: Case Management and 
Interviewing 



IG Academics 



5. PSYC 360: Clinical Psychology or HS 
242: Counseling Theories or SOC 115: 
Introduction to Social Work 

6. BIO 201: Anatomy and Physiology or 
BIO 202: ABC's of Genetics or PSYC 
23 1 : Behavioral Neuroscience 

7. Three of the following courses with at 
least one course from the cultural- 
diversity group of: SOC 234: Cultural 
Anthropology, SOC 224: American 
Minority Groups, SOC 210: Marriage 
and the Family, HD 335: Exceptional 
Child, HD 224: Family Development, 
HS 333: Multiculturalism in Human 
Services, PSYC 237: Psychology of 
Women, or S/CJ 214: Juvenile Delin- 
quency; and at least one course from the 
applied skills group of: EDUC 222: 
Educational Psychology, EDUC 140: 
Early Childhood Education, SOC 118: 
Child Welfare, HS 341: Group Dynam- 
ics, HS 323: Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 
HD 234: Marital and Family Therapy, 
HS 334: Marital and Family Counseling, 
or PSYC 284: Behavior Modification. 

8. PSYC 480: Field Experience in Clinical 
Psychology or HS 380: Internship in 
Human Services or SOC 480: Internship 
in Social Work. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



HD224 

Family Development 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) This course will 
explore the reciprocal interactions among chil- 
dren and parents as related to the development 
of all individuals in the family. Topics covered 
include the roles of family members, parenthood 
and marriage, parenting at specific developmen- 
tal stages, families with single parents, families 
with exceptional children, and child abuse. 

HD 234 3 cr. 

Marital and Family Therapy 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110; recommended: PSYC 
225) An introduction to the theory, research, 
and practice of couples-counseling and family 
therapy. Topics include family dysfunctions, 
assessment methods, treatment approaches, 
innovative techniques, and research findings. 
(Also listed as HS 334.) 

HD 335 3 cr. 

Exceptional Child 

(Prerequisites: PSYC 1 10, PSYC 225) This 
course will consider atypical social, emotional. 



and mental development during childhood and 
adolescence. Topics include mental retardation, 
intellectual giftedness, learning disabilities, psy- 
chopathology of childhood and adolescence, and 
conduct disorders. 

Italian Studies Concentration 

Virginia A. Picchietti, Ph.D., Director 
Josephine M. Dunn, Ph.D., Co-Director 

The Italian Studies Concentration is 
designed to advance students' understanding 
of diverse aspects of Italian culture and society. 
The concentration is open to all majors and 
consists of both interdisciplinary and single- 
discipline courses drawn from various academic 
departments at the University. It encourages 
both breadth and depth in the study of Italian 
culture and society; its goal is to cultivate a 
broadly based knowledge of Italian civilization 
and its contributions to the specific fields 
comprising the concentration. At the same 
time, courses in the concentration will fulfill 
general education requirements with an 
emphasis on cultural diversity and on a writ- 
ing-intensive curriculum. 

The curriculum is designed to accomplish 
the following: provide a focused study of Ital- 
ian culture and society; develop oral and writ- 
ten skills; and develop practical skills applica- 
ble to trips to Italy and in career fields. The 
concentration requires the successful comple- 
tion of seven courses, three of which are 
required courses and four of which are to be 
chosen from an approved list of electives. Stu- 
dents will be required to complete successfiilly 
two courses of Italian language as well as the 
Italian Studies Seminar. Students will enter 
the language level they can master (deter- 
mined in consultation with the director and 
the language department), and will fulfill the 
language requirement by successfully complet- 
ing two of the approved language courses. 

Required Courses 

Students will choose two language courses 

(at appropriate level) and seminar. 
ITAL 101-102 Elementary Italian 
ITAL 1\\-1\1 Intermediate Italian 
ITAL 311-312 Advanced Italian Composi- 
tion and Conversation 
Italian Studies Seminar (a specific topics 

course whose content varies according to the 

interests of students and faculty. Offered every 

two years.) 



Academics 11 



ITAL 208 



ITAL 209 



Elective Courses (choose four) 

ENGL 431 Dante's Divine Comedy 
ITAL 207 Italian Women Writers 

Envisioning Italy from Novel to 
Film: The Case of Neorealism 
Italian Cinema: From Origins 
to Present 
ARTH 2 1 4 Renaissance Art and Architec- 
ture: 1250-1500 
ARTH 216 Michelangelo and His World 
ARTH 217 Leonardo Da Vinci 
ARTH 218 The Age of Rembrandt 
ARTH 384 Special Topics in Art History 
(if applicable) 
Opera 

Special Topics in Music History 
(if applicable) 
Modern Italy 
The Renaissance 
Medieval Philosophy 
Modern Philosophy I 
The Ascent of Man 



MUS 217 
MUS 284 



HIST 240 
HIST 323 
PHIL 221 
PHIL 222 
NSCI 103 



Latin American Studies 
Concentration 

Lee M. Penyak, Ph.D., Director 

The Latin American Studies Concentration 
is designed to advance students' awareness 
and understanding of Latin America. It seeks 
to provide both broad, general knowledge of 
the entire Latin American region, and in- 
depth knowledge of specific countries, 
regional groupings of countries, and cuhures 
both dominant and marginal. The concentra- 
tion is open to all majors and it consists of 
courses from a variety of disciplines with a 
primary focus on Latin America. These 
courses fulfill general education requirements 
in the Humanities area (Foreign Languages 
and History), the Social Sciences area (Politi- 
cal Science), and some of them also carry cul- 
tural diversity and writing intensive credit. 
Supporting courses may fulfill general educa- 
tion requirements in other areas as well. 

The Latin American Studies Concentration 
is an attractive complement to many existing 
majors. Related fields include foreign lan- 
guages, international business, international 
language/business, international studies, his- 
tory, political science, theology, philosophy 



and sociology. Some related professions or 
careers include law, government, non-govern- 
mental organizations, non-profit organiza- 
tions, banking and teaching. 

Core and supporting courses are listed 
below. Others will be added as they are 
developed. 

Language (4.5-6 credits) 

SPAN 311-312* or PORT 210t 

History (6 credits) 

HIST 125-126 Latin American History 
HIST 213 Gender and Family in 

Latin America 
HIST 2 1 5 Church & Society in 

Latin America 
HIST 327 The African Experience 

in Latin America 

Politics (6 credits) 

PS 2 1 9 Survey of Latin American Politics 
PS 3XX Topical or country-specific courses 

Supporting Courses (6 credits) 



SPAN 320 
SPAN 314 

SPAN 331 
SPAN/PS 295 

T/RSXXX 
PHIL XXX 



Introduction to Literature 
Topics in Latin American 
Culture & Civilization 
Spanish American Literature 
Contemporary Mexican 
Culture and Language 
Liberation Theologies 
Latin American Thought 



Peace and Justice Studies Program 

Stephen]. Casey, M.A., Coordinator 

The Synod of Bishops of the Roman 
Catholic Church (1971) reported that "actions 
on behalf of justice and participation in the 
transformation of the world fiiUy appear to us 
as a constitutive dimension of the preaching of 
the Gospel..." The 32nd General Congrega- 
tion of the Society of Jesus (1974-75) estab- 
lished a pedagogical norm for its own institu- 
tions of higher education when it determined 
that the practice of faith was inextricably 
linked to the promotion of justice. In this vein 
the University's Peace and Justice Program was 
instituted to bring academic studies, including 
classes, community service and interdiscipli- 
nary research, into the process of building a 
more just and thus more peaceful society. 



* At this level or higher; intermediate Spanish (211-212) is a prerequisite for 311. 
t Elementary Portuguese is taught intensively; only 4.5 credits are required. 



78 Academics 



The Peace and Justice Concentration will 
be an attractive complement to the academic 
programs of students planning careers in law, 
international relations, human services, min- 
istry and teaching - to name only the most 
obvious. However, any students who have a 
personal interest in the problems of peace and 
justice, regardless of their career goals, can 
benefit from its multi-disciplinary concentra- 
tion of courses. It is open to majors from all 
the undergraduate schools of the University. 
Eight courses (24 credits) must be taken by 
students in order to have "Peace and Justice 
Concentration" added to their transcript. 
Courses may be taken as part of the cognate 
requirement (with permission of the chairper- 
son of the major) or as part of the general 
education requirements. 

The following courses will provide students 
with the opportunities to reflect critically on 
the social, economic, psychological, political 
and structural issues impeding the establish- 
ing of a just and peaceful society. 

A. Requirements in Theology (any two of 
the following): 

T/RS231 Social Ethics 

T/RS 232 John Paul II and Catholic 
Social Thought 

T/RS 234 Twentieth-Century Peacemaker 

T/RS 236 Prophets & Profits 

T/RS 237 Politics: A Christian Perspective 

T/RS 239 Money and Power in the Bibli- 
cal Tradition 

T/RS 313 Faith and Justice in the 
Prophetic Tradition 

T/RS 331 God and the Earth 

T/RS 332 Jesus and the Moral Life 

T/RS 334 Church and Contemporary 
Social Issues 

B. Electives (any five courses listed below 
can be counted; others may be included with 
approval from the program coordinator): 

CHEM 104 Science and Society 
CHS 338 Poverty, Homelessness & 

Social Justice 
COMM 220 Responsibility in 

Communication 
COMM 311 Political Communication 
ECO 462 Urban and Regional 

Economics 
ECO 465 Development Economics 
ENLT 226 Novels by Women 
ENLT 228 Race in Anglo-American 

Culture 1600-1860 



ENLT 348 Colonial & Post-Colonial 

Fiction 
GEOG 217 Cultural Geography 
HIST 211 The Third World 
HIST 216 Race in American History 
HIST 224 Ethnic and Racial Minorities 

in NEPA 
HS 333 Multiculturalism in Human 

Services 
INTO 209 The Holocaust 
LIT 207 Literature of American 

Minorities 
MGT 473 Organizational Social 

Responsibility 
NSCI 201 Science and the Human 

Environment 
PHIL 213 Environmental Ethics 
PHIL 218 Feminism: Theory & Practice 
PHIL 227 Political Philosophy 
PHIL 4 1 Philosophy of Culture 
PHYS 106 Energy and the Environment 
PS 227 Women, Authority and Power 

PS 216 Women's Rights & Status 

PSYC 220 Social Psychology 
S/CJ 2 1 Law and Society 
SOC116 Community Organization 
SOC 224 American Minority Groups 
SPAN 314 Topics in Latin American 

Culture & Civilization 

C. Integrative Capstone Course (required 
in junior/senior year): 

T/JP 310 3 cr. 

Toward a Just and Peaceful World 

This course will reflect on the various issues and 
problems raised by peace and justice study. It will 
consider the relationship of religion, moral philos- 
ophy and the social/political concerns embraced 
in the quest for a human world order. Faculty 
from several disciplines will make presentations. 
Each student will write a paper from the perspec- 
tive of his/her major area of concentration. 

Women's Studies Concentration 

Sharon M. Meagher, Ph.D., Director 

The Women's Studies Concentration con- 
sists of courses that examine women's experi- 
ences and the ways gender-related issues affect 
human lives and cultures. Faculty and stu- 
dents analyze the ways gender roles and 
images, and assumptions about gender, are 
reflected in art, business, literature, law, phi- 
losophy, public policy, religion, language, his- 
tory, the sciences, and their own lives. At the 
same time many Women's Studies courses will 



Academics 79 



address issues of race, class, ethnicity, and age 
that intersect with gender-related issues. 

Women's Studies courses focus on women's 
experiences in history, society, and cuhure, 
and examine their reactions to such experi- 
ences; examine institutional structure/modes 
of authority/ analysis of power, especially con- 
sidering their implications for women; and 
incorporate one or more feminist 
analyses/scholarly works (recognizing that 
there are multiple, and even conflicting, femi- 
nist perspectives). 

Women's Studies seek to promote critical 
thinking, intellectual growth, and a self- 
awareness useful to all students. It is an attrac- 
tive academic supplement to the programs of 
students planning careers in government, law, 
business, human services, ministry, and teach- 
ing - to name but a few. 

Courses for the Women's Studies Concen- 
tration are drawn from all the colleges at the 
university and are open to students in all 
majors. (To enroll, students must see the 
Director of Women's Studies.) The concentra- 
tion consists of six courses including one 
required core course. The student may take 
PHIL 218 or SOC 215 as the required core 
course. The remaining five courses are chosen 
across several departments by the student 
from cross-listed courses approved by the 
Women's Studies Committee. Many of the 
cross-listed Women's Studies courses also ful- 
fill major, minor, cognate, and/or general edu- 
cation requirements. 

Students may seek permission from the 
Women's Studies Committee to take no more 
than one reader for Women's Studies credit, 
subject to the usual rules governing readers. 
Students may also petition to substitute no 
more than one course not cross-listed with 
Women's Studies, if the course has sufficient 
Women's Studies content and the student is 
able to do a significant project/assignment on 
a Women's Studies topic. 

Women's Studies Courses 

Some of the listed courses have prerequisites; 
please consult departmental description. 
ARTH 210 (CA,D) Women in the Visual 

Arts 
COMM 229 (D) Gender and 

Communication 
ENLT 225 (CL,D,W) Writing Women 



ENLT 227 (CL,D,W) Frankenstein's 

Forebears 
ENLT 226 (CL,D) Novels by Women 
ENLT 228 (CL,D,W) Race in Anglo- 
American Culture 1600-1860 
FREN 430* French Women Writers 
HIST 2 1 3 (CH,D) Gender and Family 

in Latin America 
HIST 238 (CH,D) History of American 

Women I 
HIST 239 (CH,D) History of American 

Women II 
ITAL 207 (CL,D,W) Italian Women's 

Writing in Translation 
HS 337 (D) Counsehng Girls and 

Women 
LIT 207 (CL,D,W) Literature of 

American Minorities 
NURS 111 (D) Women's Health 
PHIL 2 1 8 (P,D) Feminism: Theory and 

Practice 
PHIL 326 (PD) Advanced Topics in 

Feminist Theory 
PHIL 331 (P) Feminist Philosophy of 

Science 
PS 2 1 6 (D) Women's Rights and Status 

PS 227 (D) Women, Authority and 

Power 
SOC 215 Feminism and Social Change 
SOC 217 (D) Family Issues and Social 

Policies 
SPAN 430* Hispanic Women Writers 
T/RS315 (PD) Women in Christianity 
T/RS 3 1 9 (PD)Women's Spiritual/ 

Autobiographical Writings 
WOMN 380-81 Women's Studies 

Internship 
WOMN 429 Special Topics 



Course Descriptions 



3 cr. 



WOMN 380-81 

Women's Studies Internship 

(Prerequisites PHIL 218, or SOC 215, or per- 
mission of Women's Studies Committee) 
Designed to broaden the educational experience 
of students by providing practical experience for 
them in various non-profit and other organiza- 
tions that deal primarily with women's issues or 
women clients. Students will ordinarily be 
expected to write a reflection paper. Supervision 
by faculty members and agency supervisor. 



* Taught in the original language. 



80 Academics 



Aerospace Studies (Air Force 
Reserve Officer Training Corps) 

Lt. Col. Donna Lynn Smith, Chairperson 

The Air Force Reserve Officer Training 
Corps (AFROTC) program at Wilkes Univer- 
sity permits students attending The University 
of Scranton to earn commissions as officers in 
the United States Ar Force while pursuing a 
University degree. Students may enroll in 
either the four-year or two-year programs. 
Aerospace Studies courses are held on the 
campuses of Wilkes University, Bloomsburg 
University and King's College. 

The four-year program permits students to 
enter the AFROTC program in freshman or 
sophomore year. (Students with three years 
remaining until graduation may enroll con- 
currently in the freshman and sophomore 
Aerospace Studies courses and can complete 
the four-year program in three years.) 

The two-year program is available for stu- 
dents (including graduate students) who have 
at least two years remaining until graduation. 
Students interested in enrolling in the two- 
year program must apply as early as possible 
in their sophomore or junior year. Students 
should call 1-800-945-5378, ext. 4860, for 
more information. 

General Military Course (Four-Year 
Program Only) 

The first two years of the four-year pro- 
gram constitute the General Military Course 
(CMC). CMC courses are open to any Uni- 
versity student. Students enrolling in these 
courses do not incur any military service obli- 
gation. (Exception: Ar Force scholarship 
recipients incur a commitment at the begin- 
ning of their sophomore year.) The CMC 
curriculum consists of four 1 -credit Aerospace 
Studies courses, plus a non-credit leadership 
laboratory each semester, which introduces 
students to U.S. Air Force history and envi- 
ronment, customs, courtesies, drill and cere- 
monies, and leadership skills. 

Professional Officer Course 
(Two- and Four-Year Programs) 

The final two years of the four-year pro- 
gram comprise the Professional Officer Course 
(POC). It consists of four 3-credit Aerospace 
Studies courses, plus a non-credit leadership 
laboratory each semester. Cadets earn a $250- 
$400 per-month, tax-free subsistence 



allowance during the academic year and incur 
a military obligation. To be accepted into the 
POC, students must pass a physical examina- 
tion and an officer-qualification test and must 
meet certain academic standards. Four-year 
cadets must also complete a four-week field- 
training program; two-year applicants must 
complete a five-week field training program, 
both of which are administered the summer 
before POC entry. In addition, all POC cadets 
must complete a course in mathematical rea- 
soning prior to being commissioned. 

Uniforms 

The U.S. Ar Force supplies all uniforms, 
equipment, and textbooks required for 
AFROTC. Al cadets are required to pay a 
nominal initial deposit which will be refunded 
when the cadet returns all uniform items in 
satisfactory condition at the completion of (or 
withdrawal from) the AFROTC program. 

Scholarships 

The U.S. Ar Force offers many one- to 
five-year full and partial scholarships for 
which qualified students may compete, if they 
enroll in AFROTC. Al scholarship awards are 
based on individual merit, regardless of finan- 
cial need, with most scholarship recipients 
determined by central selection boards. Schol- 
arship-selection boards for students already in 
college are held each year. Since scholarship 
applicants must meet certain academic, physi- 
cal-fitness and medical requirements to be 
considered by the scholarship boards, they 
should contact the Aerospace Studies depart- 
ment early to apply. Al AFROTC scholarship 
recipients entering (or transferring to) The 
University of Scranton receive free room. 

Commissioning 

Al students who satisfactorily complete the 
POC curriculum requirements are commis- 
sioned as second lieutenants in the U.S. Ar 
Force, and will serve on active duty in a career 
specialty they have chosen, consistent with 
USAF needs. 

For additional information, or if you have 
specific questions about the Ar Force Reserve 
OfiPicer Training Program, contact the Aero- 
space Studies Department, at 1-800-945-5378, 
extension 4860, or at http://wilkesl.wilkes.edu/ 
-afrotc. 



Academics 8 1 



Saint Pius X Seminary 

Faithful to the vision of the National 
Council of Catholic Bishops' document, Pro- 
gram for Priestly Formation, the Diocese of 
Scranton enjoys a cooperative arrangement 
with the University to enable seminarians to 
prepare for the intensive study of theology 
beyond the undergraduate level. Men who are 
seriously discerning the possibility of a voca- 
tion to the diocesan priesthood reside 
together in community at Saint Pius X Semi- 
nary in Dalton. Seminarians share in commu- 
nal celebration of the liturgy, deepen their 
own prayer lives through individual spiritual 
direction, undertake practical apostolic serv- 
ice, and gain insight into the daily life of a 
priest. On campus, seminary students fulfill a 
Philosophy major (30 credits) in the Univer- 
sity's College of Arts and Sciences and study a 
range of theological topics (18 credits) to pro- 
vide a solid foundation for advancement to 
major seminary. In addition, seminarians pur- 
sue courses in history and languages, as well 
as electives that will further enrich their 
undergraduate curriculum so that candidates 
for priesthood possess an intellectual forma- 
tion truly reflective of the liberal arts tradi- 
tion. While seminarians must enroll in gen- 
eral education courses required of all 
undergraduates, in addition to the seminary 
curriculum, they also possess the flexibility to 
develop a concentration, that is, a minor or 
double major, in another field of study that 
appeals to their personal interests. Seminari- 
ans are encouraged to avail themselves of the 
breadth of educational opportunities available 
to them at the University campus. 

Students accepted into seminary formation 
who have already earned a bachelor's degree 
or who undertake college studies at a non- 
traditional age enter the University's Dexter 
Hanley College, which aims to accommodate 
the particular needs of the non-traditional 
college student. Seminarians in this category 
who have not yet obtained a college degree 
follow the typical seminary curriculum toward 
a bachelor's in Philosophy. Those who possess 
a degree complete a two year pre-theology 
program focusing on the philosophy and the- 
ology prerequisites necessary to begin 
advanced theological study in major seminary. 

Saint Pius X Seminary is operated by the 
Diocese of Scranton under the direction of 



the Most Reverend James C. Timlin, D.D., 
the Bishop of Scranton. The seminary forma- 
tion faculty consists of priests of the Diocese; 
however, the seminary program serves students 
from beyond Northeastern Pennsylvania, 
including the Archdioceses of Baltimore and 
Washington. 

For more information, contact Monsignor 
David Bohr, S.T.D., at (570) 563-1 131. 

Specific Course Requirements 

Seminarians in the four-year college program 
normally major in Philosophy and are 
expected to take the following courses in ful- 
fillment of the general requirements of the 
Philosophy Department and St. Pius X Semi- 
nary. Seminarians enrolled in the two-year pre- 
theology program are required to take the 
courses listed below that are marked by an 
asterisk (*): 

WRTG 107 Composition 

COMM 100 Public Speaking 
C/IL 102/1 02L Computing and 

Information Literacy 
PHIL 120 Introduction to 

Philosophy* 
PHIL 210 Ethics* 

PHIL 215 Logic 

PHIL 220 History of Ancient 

Philosophy* 
PHIL 22 1 History of Medieval 

Philosophy* 
PHIL 222 Modern Philosophy* 

PHIL 310 Epistemology* 

PHIL 311 Metaphysics* 

PHIL 330 Fate, Destiny, and Dignity 

PHIL 434 Issues in Philosophy and 

Theology* 
T/RS 121-122 Theology I-II* 
T/RS 214C Inside the Catholic 

Tradition* 
T/RS 215 The History of Christian 

Theology 
T/RS 222 Introduction to Liturgical 

Theology* 
T/RS 230 Moral Theology* 

LAT 111-112 Elementary Latin* 
SPAN 1 1 - 1 02 Elementary Spanish 
GRK 1 1 1 - 1 1 2 Elementary Greek 
INTD 201-202C Christian Classics 



82 Academics 



The University of Scranton 
General Education 
Curriculum 

All students at The University of Scranton 
have the opportunity to become liberally edu- 
cated in the Ignatian tradition. This liberal 
education will include the development of 
general skills and skills in the major. It will 
also include opportunity to develop both 
depth and breadth in the major, the cognate, 
and in the areas of natural science, social/ 
behavioral science, humanities, philosophy, 
and theology. Within the disciplines listed 
above, students will also take at least two 
courses that are writing-intensive and two 
courses with a strong cultural diversity com- 
ponent. The University's approach to general 
education follows the outline below. To follow 
that outline, it helps to first understand how 
courses fulfilling general education require- 
ments are designated. 

Designation of Courses Fulfilling 
General Education Requirements 

Courses that fulfill general education 
requirements as described in the outline 
below can be identified in catalog and course 
bulletin listings by a letter code in parentheses 
preceding the course title: 

Q Quantitative Reasoning 

CH Humanities/Culture: History 

CL Humanities/Culture: Literature 

CA Humanities/Culture: Arts 

CF Humanities/Culture: Foreign Languages 

P Philosophy or Theology/Religious 
Studies 

E Natural Science 

S Social/Behavioral Science 

W Writing-Intensive 

D Cultural Diversity 

Courses having more than one letter code 
indicates that the course satisfies multiple 
general education requirements, reducing 
overall requirements; e.g., (CH,W) satisfies 
both a Humanities/Culture: History and a 
Writing-Intensive requirement. 



Outline of General Education 
Requirements 

Skills Acquisition 

Public Speaking: One course, 3 credits 
COMM 100 Public Speaking 
PHIL217J TheTrivium 

Basic Composition: One or two courses, 

3-6 credits 

WRTG 105 & 106 College Writing I & II 
WRTG 107 Composition 

Computing/Information Literacy: One course 

and laboratory, 3 credits 

C/IL 102/102L Computing and Informa- 
tion Literacy 
C/IL 104 Computing and Informa- 

tion Literacy for Business 
(a focused variant of C/IL 
102/102L with an empha- 
sis appropriate for students 
with majors in The Kania 
School of Management) 

Writing-Intensive Requirement (W): Two 
courses, variable credit* 

One of these courses should be in the 
major program of study. Writing-intensive 
courses may also fulfill other major, cognate 
and/or general education requirements. 

Quantitative Reasoning (Q): One course, 
3 credits* 

A mathematically based course as recom- 
mended by the major or chosen by the stu- 
dent in consultation with an advisor. 

Subject Matter Mastery 

The Human Person and God 

• Theology/Religious Studies: Two courses, 
6 credits 

T/RS 121 Theology I 
T/RS 122 Theology II 

• Philosophy: Two courses, 6 credits 

PHIL 120 Introduction to Philosophy 
PHIL 210 Ethics 

• Theology/Philosophy Elective (P): One 
course, 3 credits* 



* A list of eligible courses to fulfill general education requirements is available through the academic advising centers, the deans' 
offices, the Office of the Registrar and online at www.scranton.edu/academics/gelist.shtml. Not all courses are offered every registra- 
tion cycle. 



Academics 83 



General Education Su 

Subject 


mmary 

Credits 


Courses 


Freshman Seminar 


1 


INTO 100 


Physical Education 


3 


Courses approved as PHED activity classes' 


Writing 


3 or 6 


WRTG 107 or (WRTG 105 and 106 for 
ADP only) 


Public Speaking 


3 


COMM 100 


Computing Information Literacy 


3 


C/IL102and 102Lor 104 


Quantitative Reasoning 


3-4 


Courses designated with (Q)' 


Theology/Philosophy 

i 


15 


T/RS 121 and 122, PHIL 120 and 210 and 
approved T/RS or PHIL Elective (P) 


Natural Science 


6-8 


Courses designated with (E) 


Humanities 
History 
Literature 
Foreign Language 
Art/Music/Theater 


12 total 
0-6 
0-6 
0-6 
0-3 


6 credits in one area: History (CH), 
Literature (CL), or Foreign Language (CF). 
6 additional credits from any of the 
remaining humanities area, but no more 
than 3 from Art/Music/Theatre area (CA). 


Social/Behavioral Science 


6 


Courses designated with (S) 


Writing Intensive 


3-6 


Two courses designated (W); one should be in 
the major^ 


Cultural Diversit)' 


6 


Two courses designated with (D)' 


Electives 


12 


Any subject except PHED activity classes 


Total Credits 


77-85 based upon major and credit value of courses 


' Requirement may be satisfied by exemption exam. 

^ Writing-intetisive and cultural diversity courses may also satisfy other requirrtnents in the general education curriculum 
reducing the total number of credits required. 



Nature 

• Natural Science (E): Two courses, 6-8 credits* 

Two courses in natural or physical sciences 
are recorrmiended by the major or selected by 
the student after consultation with their advisor. 

Culture 

• Humanities (CA, CF, CH, CL): Four courses, 
12 credits* 

Courses in the humanities are recommended 
by the major or selected by the student after 
consultation with the advisor. Students must 
earn 6 credits in one humanities field: foreign 
language (CF), history (CH) or literature (CL). 
The remaining 6 credits must come from the 
other humanities fields, with no more than 3 
credits coming from the fine arts (CA). 



Integration of Individual and 
Community 

Personal 

• First Year Experience: One course, 1 credit 

INTD 100: Freshman Seminar 

• Physical Education: Three or more courses 
totaling 3 credits* 

Social 

• Social or Behavioral Science (S): Two 
courses, 6 credits 

Two courses in social or behavioral sciences 
as recommended by the major or selected by 
students after consultation with their advisors. 

• Cultural Diversity (D): Two courses, 6 credits 

Two courses with strong cultural diversity 
content are required. These courses may also 
fulfill other major, cognate and/or general 
education requirements. 



* A list of eligible courses to fulfill general education requirements is available through the academic advising centers, the deans' 
offices, the Office of the Registrar and online at www.scranton.edu/academics/gelist.shtml Not all courses are offered every registra- 
tion cycle. 



84 Academics 



Electives 

Four courses, 12 credits. Students are 
encouraged to use their general education elec- 
tives to add minors or second majors where 
possible. For some majors, specific courses 
have been recommended in the GE elective 
area by the home departments. Where no spe- 
cific recommendations have been made by the 
home department, any course (other than 
PHED activity courses) may be used as a free 
elective. Please refer to the department course 
listings in the catalog for complete course 
descriptions. If you have a question about how 
a specific course satisfies a requirement, please 
contact your advisor, academic advising center, 
dean's office or registrar's office. 

Recommended General 
Education Course Sequence 

First Year 

Speech: COMM 100 

Writing: WRTG 107 or PHIL 217J or 
WRTG 105 and 106 

Computer Literacy: C/IL 102/102L or 
C/IL 104 

Quantitative Reasoning (designated with Q) 

Freshman Seminar: INTD 1 00 



First and Second Year 

Philosophy: PHIL 120-PHIL 210 
Theology/ Religious Studies: T/RS 121-122 
Humanities (designated with CH, CL, CF 
orCA) 

Natural Science (designated with E) 
Social/ Behavioral Science (designated with S) 
Physical Education 

Second and Third Year 

Electives: Students should begin the 12 
credits of free electives that are required. 

Philosophy or Theology elective (designated 
with P): Most students will not have had the 
opportunity to complete all of the GE 
requirements listed under First and Second 
Year and, therefore, will attend to these 
requirements in the third and even the fourth 
years. Students are advised to have fulfilled 
some of their cultural-diversity and writing- 
intensive course requirements during this 
time.* 

Fourth Year 

Finish GE requirements that have not been 
completed by the end of the third year, 
including the writing-intensive and cultural 
diversity requirements. 



* A list of eligible courses to fulfill general education requirements is available through the academic advising centers, the deans' 
offices, the Office of the Registrar and online at www.scranton.edu/academics/gelist.shtml. Not all courses are offered every registra- 
tion cycle. 



Academics 85 



Options for Undeclared Freshmen 



Students who are not yet ready to declare a major have the option of selecting one of three 
general areas of study - CAS Common Curriculum, KSOM Business Area and CPS Common 
Curriculum - with the particular major to be determined by the end of the freshman year. 



CAS Common Curriculum — First Year 

Undecided students who are interested in exploring one of the majors offered in the College 
of Arts and Sciences may enroll in the CAS Common Curriculum program. Students in this 
program take a combination of freshman-level General Education courses and courses in 
potential majors. Specific courses are chosen in consultation with an academic advisor. In addi- 
tion, CAS Common Curriculum students take a Freshman Seminar designed to help them 
make informed decisions about their majors. All CAS Common Curriculum students should 
take at least two potential major courses each semester of their freshman year. 

Descriptive Title of Course 

GE BASIC SKILLS Public Speaking/Composition/Computer Literacy 

GE PHIL or T/RS Theology 1 or Intro to Philosophy 

MAJOR Select from Intro classes of any major 

MAJOR Select from intro classes of any major 

MAJOR Select from intro classes of any major 

INTD 100 Freshman Seminar 

PHED Physical Education 



FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3-4.5 


3-4.5 


3-4.5 


3-4.5 


3-4.5 
1 


3-4.5 
1 



16-18 



16-18 



KSOM Business Common Curriculum - First Year 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


MAJOR (GE S/BH) 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Econ. 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computer Info. Literacy 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE QUAN-ELECT 


MATH 


Math Option - two courses 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 



CPS Common Curriculum — First Year 






For students considering Health Care or 


Education as a major, the Panuska College o 


f 


Professional Studies has a program designee 


to provide an exploratory freshman 


year for those 


who wish to defer 


declaring their choice of 


major. 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


GECOMM 100 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 


3 




GEWRTG 107 


WRTG 107 


Composition 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


BIOL 110-111 


Structure & Function of Human Body 


4 


4 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE C/IL 102 


C/IL 102 


Computing & Info Literacy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




M^JOR 




Elective or Core Course 




3 


ELECT 


HS332 


Career Choice 


17 


2 
18 



86 










Mulberry Plaza 



87 



The College of 
Arts and Sciences 



With more than 35 areas of study, The College of Arts and Sciences 
(CAS) is the largest academic division of the University. Its liberal arts 
programs serve students well in many different careers. CAS programs 
also lay the foundation for professional study in law, medicine and 
dentistry, as well as for graduate study in various fields. 



Arts and Sciences/Art and Music 



ART AND MUSIC 

Michael DeMichele, Ph.D., Chair 
Josephine M. Dunn, Ph.D., Director, 
Art and Music Program 

See History for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The Art and Music program offers two 
minors: Art History and Music History. 
Foundation courses in studio art are also 
offered (e.g., drawing, design and painting). 
Each discipline aims to develop a student's 
creative expression, to prompt aesthetic appre- 
ciation and judgment, to develop critical 
thinking, and to deepen understanding of the 
impulse to create with sound and image. 

Designated courses in Art History and 
Music History satisfy General Education 
requirements in the following areas: Humani- 
ties, Cultural Diversity, and Writing-Intensive. 

Minor in Art History 

A minor in Art History requires 18 credits, 
including ARTH 111 and 112. Four addi- 
tional courses in Art History are required. 
Internships at the Everhart Museum are avail- 
able to Art History minors upon completing 
1 2 credits in Art History. 

Students with minors in Art History have 
recently enrolled in graduate degree programs 
in art history, decorative arts, library science 
and museum education. Others have accepted 
employment with the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art, Sotheby's New York and Franklin 
Institute. Students with music literature 
minors have pursued careers in recording, 
musical composition and performance. Studio 
artists have continued their studies at the 
Moore College of Art, Maryland Institute of 
Art, and the Art Students' League, NYC. 

Minor in Music History 

A minor in Music History requires 18 
credits, including MUS 111, 112, 235, 236, 
and two additional music courses numbered 
1 10 or above. 

Course Descriptions 

Art 

ART 112 3cr. 

Color and Design 

A foundation course introducing the elements 
and principles of two-dimensional design. Vari- 



ous materials are used to explore the organiza- 
tion of space and basic color theory. 

ART 114 3cr. 

Three-Dimensional Design 

A foundation course investigating basic materials 
and approaches in the creation of three-dimen- 
sional form. Hands-on involvement with diverse 
media, techniques and tools of the sculptor's 
craft is emphasized. 

ART 116 3cr. 

Basic Drawing 

A foundation course designed to develop skills 
in basic drawing and perception. Various media 
are employed in exercises involving the use of 
line and shading, shape and space, and design 
and composition. 

ART 120 3 cr. 

Painting I 

(Prerequisite: ART 112, 1 16 or equivalent) A 
first-level painting course concerned with funda- 
mentals such as composition, observation, basic 
color theory and basic techniques. The class 
includes one museum trip and regular group 
critiques. 

ART 182, 183 3 cr. 

Independent Study Courses 

These courses are designed to address the career 
objectives of students who intend to pursue 
studies in studio art, or in disciplines for which 
background in studio art is necessary. Arranged 
with permission of the director. 

ART 184 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

Selected topics in studio art vary on the basis of 
student/faculty interest and available resources 
Topics may include, but are not limited to: 
Printmaking, Painting II, Advanced Drawing, 
Pastel and Watercolor. 



Art History 



3 cr. 



ARTH 1 1 1 

(CA) History of 'World Art I 

A survey of the history of painting, sculpture, 
and architecture from prehistoric times through 
the dawn of the Renaissance in 1400. The art of 
ancient Eastern and Western civilizations is 
studied in historical contexts of idea, style and 
technique. 

ARTH 112 3cr. 

(CA) History of World Art II 

The course opens with the history of painting, 
sculpture, and architecture in Renaissance, 



Arts and Sciences/ Art and Music 89 



Baroque, and 1 8th-cenmiy Europe. Introduced by 
Impressionism, Expressionism, and Cubism, die 
study of the art of the modern world concludes 
with a survey of idea, style and technique in 20th- 
century art. (ARTH 111 not a prerequisite.) 

ARTH113 3cr. 

(CA,D,W) Native American Art 

Students will study the history, society, religious 
beliefs and craft traditions of the precolonial 
peoples of the United States, as well as contem- 
porary Native American artists. The course 
entails group work, a collaborative final project, 
and a trip to the Mashantucket Pequot Museum 
in Connecticut. 

ARTH 114 3cr. 

(CA,W) History of Architecture 

A general survey of architectural history from 
the prehistoric through the modern era, focusing 
on architectural style, the built environment, 
and the rituals which condition the use and 
design of structures and urban spaces. The 
course features walking tours of Philadelphia and 
the city of Scranton as well as guest lectures by 
area architects. 

ARTH 115 3cr. 

Art of the Ancient World 

(Formerly ARTH 201) A survey of the art and 
architecture produced between 3000 and 1250 
B.C. The course opens in the painted caves of 
Prehistoric Europe, and continues through the 
contemporaneous civilizations of the Ancient 
Near East (Sumer, Babylon, Assyria, Persia) and 
Egypt. 

ARTH 116 3cr. 

{CA,W) Art of Greece and Rome 

(Formerly ARTH 202) The course begins in the 
Aegean with the Minoan and Mycenaean cul- 
tures celebrated by Homer; surveys the art of 
classical Greece; and continues with the art of 
the Etruscans in ancient Italy. The course con- 
cludes with Roman art and architecture (3rd c. 
B.C. to 5th c. A.D.). 

ARTH 117 3cr. 

(W) Early Christian and Byzantine Art 

(Formerly ARTH 203) The art and architecture 
produced by the first Christians borrowed much 
from the forms and ideas of Roman art. The 
course surveys art produced in Rome, Ravenna, 
Milan, Greece and Constantinople, 200-1400 
A.D. Emphasis will be placed on the origin and 
symbolism of Christian imagery and architecture. 



ARTH 118 3cr. 

(W) Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic 
(Formerly ARTH 204) A survey of art and 
architecture in western Europe, 1100-1400. 
Medieval architecture, manuscripts, paintings, 
and decorative arts will be presented as mirrors 
of medieval thought and spirituality. 

ARTH 205 3 cr. 

The Icon in Russian and East European 

This course focuses on theology, image and artis- 
tic style in the making of the icon in Russia and 
East Europe. The icon will be from medieval 
through modern times. 

ARTH 210 3 cr. 

(CA,D) Topics on Women in the Visual Arts 

This cross-disciplinary course presents selected 
topics on women in the visual arts, 1600 to the 
present. It includes the history of women's 
achievements and struggles in the visual arts, var- 
ied ways of thinking and writing about women, 
art and culture. Topics may include, but are not 
limited to: Contemporary Women Artists; 
Women Artist in Latin America; Women Artists 
in America; 19th-century Women Artists, etc. 

ARTH 213 3 cr. 

(CA) American Art 

A survey of American architecture, painting and 
sculpture from the earliest exploration days. The 
course will cover art of Native America, the colo- 
nial period, the Civil War era and the 20th 
century. 

ARTH 214 3 cr. 

Renaissance Art in Italy, 1200-1480 

As a survey of the art produced in Italy, 1200- 
1480, the course examines the production of art 
as it relates to society and culture. From St. 
Francis' Assisi to Pope Sixtus IV's Rome, and 
from Giotto to Botticelli, painting, sculpture, 
and architecture will be studied in contexts of 
history, gender, technology, intellectual life, the- 
ology and philosophy. 

ARTH 215 3cr. 

Renaissance Art in Italy, 1480-1620 

This course continues with a survey of art and 
society in Italy, 1480-1620. The papacy, during 
the 15th century, brings Michelangelo and 
Raphael to Rome, which remains a cultural capi- 
tal for artists through the 17th century. Artists 
working in 16th century Florence, in the wake 
of Michelangelo, introduce a style that flourishes 
brightly, but briefly: Mannerism. 



90 Arts and Sciences/ Art and Music 



ARTH 216 3 cr. 

(CA,W) Michelangelo and His World 

(Formerly ARTH 4 1 0) This course investigates 
the painting, sculpture, and architecture of 
Michelangelo. By considering the artistic tradi- 
tions to which he fell heir as a Florentine artist, 
the traditional and the innovative aspects of 
Michelangelo's work will be assessed. Readings 
from his letters and poetry and from 1 6th-century 
biographies will furnish a rich context for the 
appreciation of his work and for understanding 
the society to which he belonged. 

ARTH 217 3 cr. 

(W) Leonardo Da Vinci 

(Formerly ARTH 411) Artist, scientist, author 
and free-thinker, Leonardo left few paintings, 
many drawings, and copious notes attesting the 
wide range of his intellectual curiosity. This 
course focuses both on the 15th-century world 
to which the artist belonged and on his many 
writings in order to measure Leonardo's greatness 
as prodigy and visionary. 

ARTH 218 3 cr. 

(W) The Age of Rembrandt 

(Formerly ARTH 303) A survey of the painting, 
sculpture, and architectute produced in Europe 
between 1600 and 1750. The course opens in 
Bernini's Rome of the Counter-Reformation and 
concludes in France at the royal courts of Louis 
XIV and XV. 

ARTH 219 3 cr. 

The Renaissance in Northern Europe 

(Formerly ARTH 311) Art produced in north- 
ern Europe (France, Germany, Belgium, and the 
Netherlands) differs remarkably from the art 
produced in Italy by Botticelli and Michelangelo. 
This course surveys painting north of the Alps by 
such artists as Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Wey- 
den, Hieronymus Bosch, and Albrecht Diirer. 

ARTH 220 3 cr. 

History of Photography 

The course explores the historical development 
of photography and considers the medium's aes- 
thetic components as well as the theoretical and 
representational issues it raises. 

ARTH 221 3 cr. 

Nineteenth-Century Art 

(Formerly ARTH 304) An exploration of paint- 
ing and sculpture from Neoclassicism to Sym- 
bolism. Special emphasis will be given to works 
by J.L. David, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, 
Manet, Morisot, Rodin, and Van Gogh. In addi- 



tion to developing skills of visual analysis, the 
course will focus on the interaction between artist 
and society. 

ARTH 222 3 cr. 

Impressionism and Post-Impressionism 

(Formerly ARTH 312) Impressionism, an artistic 
movement linked today with leisure and pleasure, 
developed out of conflict and challenged many 
standard European art practices. The course 
investigates the artistic goals and strategies of 
Manet, Monet, Degas, Renoir, Morisot, Cassatt 
and Pissarro and considers how their works 
respond to important social issues of the day. 
Paintings by the Postimpressionists Cezanne, 
Seurat, Van Gogh and Gauguin will be examined 
as reactions to the aims of Impressionism. 

ARTH 225 3 cr. 

Art of the Twentieth Century 

(Formerly ARTH 305) Beginning with pre- 
World War I works by Matisse and Picasso, this 
course surveys the painting, sculpture, architec- 
ture and photography of the period known as 
modernism, ending with an exploration of the 
contemporary phenomenon of postmodernism. 
Through examination of both artworks and texts 
by artists and critics, considerations of style and 
technique will be integrated with an analysis of 
historical context. 

ARTH 227 3 cr. 

Matisse and Picasso 

(Formerly ARTH 315) This course examines the 
works of these two influential modern artists by 
considering the aesthetic and historical context 
of their paintings, sculptures, prints, and writ- 
ings on art. 

ARTH 295-296 3 cr. 

(W,D,CA) Travel Seminar 

Short study trips to provide students with the 
opportunity to study works of painting, architec- 
ture, and sculpture on site. Trips will be designed 
as themes: the Art Museums of London and 
Paris, The Bible in Text and Image (Italy), 
Renaissance Villas and Palaces, Michelangelo, etc. 

ARTH 311 3cr. 

(CA) Medieval and Renaissance Women 

This topics course explores various ways of look- 
ing at Italian medieval and Renaissance descrip- 
tions of women. In addition, primary texts by 
Hildegard von Nengen, Giovanni Boccaccio, 
Christine de Pisan, Leonbattista AJberti and Bal- 
dassare Castiglione will be studied for the light 
they shed on the notion and nature of woman. 



Arts and Sciences/ Art and Music 9 1 



Great emphasis will be placed on in-class analy- 
sis of images, and a field trip to the Italian 
Renaissance collection of the Metropolitan 
Museum, NYC, will enable students to apply 
skills of visual analysis. 

ARTH316 3cr. 

Painted Chambers of the Renaissance 

Renaissance images were made, commissioned 
and viewed by particular audiences to whom the 
work of art communicated and reinforced con- 
temporary beliefs and values. This course explores 
the meaning and purpose of murals produced 
for public and private use in private homes, 
churches and civic structures. Contemporary lit- 
erature of the period will also be studied. 

ARTH 380 1-3 cr. 

Museum Methods 

(Prerequisites: ARTH 111, 112 and two addi- 
tional ARTH courses) Offered in cooperation 
with the Everhart Museum, this course intro- 
duces students to ideologies of arts administra- 
tion and methods of curatorial research and pro- 
cedure. On-site study at the Everhart Museum is 
supervised by the Curator of Art and by Art His- 
tory faculty. 

ARTH 384, 484 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

(Prerequisites: ARTH 111, 112 and two addi- 
tional ARTH courses) Selected topics will vary 
from year to year on the basis of student/ faculty 
interest and available media resources. Topics 
may include Art of the Far East, History of Print- 
making, etc. Discrete styles and individual artists 
may also be the focus of a selected topics course. 



Music 



3cr. 



MUS ill 

(CA) Music History I 

The history and literature of Western classical 
music from the medieval period to the 1 8th cen- 
tury, including Gregorian chant, the growth of 
polyphony, the rise of instrumental music, and 
the birth and growth of opera. 

MUS 112 3cr. 

(CA) Music History II 

The history and literature of Western classical 
music from the 18th century to the present, 
including the increasing importance of instru- 
mental music and opera, the development of 
atonality and serial music, and the recent avant- 
garde. MUS 1 1 1 is not a prerequisite. 



MUS 211 3cr. 

Keyboard Music 

Music written for the piano, organ, harpsichord 
and clavichord from the Renaissance to the 20th 
century. The course focuses on the development 
of keyboard instruments and the forms and 
composers that dominate the literature. 

MUS 213 3cr. 

Symphony 

Development of the symphony as an independ- 
ent genre, from its origins in the mid- 18th cen- 
tury to the present day. Works by Haydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, 
Mahler, Shostakovich and Stravinsky will be 
among those considered. 

MUS 217 3 cr. 

Opera 

The history of opera from its beginnings at the 
turn of the 17th century to the present with an 
emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Repre- 
sentative operas by Mozart, Verdi, Wagner and 
Puccini, among others, will be examined. 

MUS 218 3cr. 

American Musical Theatre 

The development of musical theatre in America 
from the 19th century to the present, emphasiz- 
ing works composed since the 1940s. Musicals 
by Jerome Kern, Rodgers and Hammerstein, 
Lerner and Loewe, Leonard Bernstein, and 
Stephen Sondheim will be considered. 

MUS 219 3 cr. 

History of Jazz 

A detailed examination of a "truly American 
musical form." Included will be discussions of 
major stylistic periods, compositions, and per- 
formers. Listening examples, as well as live per- 
formances, will contribute to an understanding 
of jazz from its origins to the present day. 

MUS 222 3 cr. 

Bach 

(Formerly MUS 323) The music of Johann 
Sebastian Bach in the context of the musical 
forms, styles, and genres current in the first half 
of the 18th century. A survey of Bach's life and 
works is followed by detailed study of selected 
vocal and instrumental compositions. 

MUS 223 3 cr. 

Mozart 

(Formerly MUS 324) An examination of Mozart's 
major works in the genres of symphony, con- 
certo, chamber music, church music, and opera, 
together with a brief biographical survey. The 



92 Arts and Sciences/Biology 



influence of late 18th-century culture and musi- 
cal conventions on Mozart's work is considered. 

MUS 225 3 cr. 

Beethoven 

(Formerly MUS 325) Study of a composer whose 
fiery personality drove him to express through 
music universal concepts in an age of revolution, 
i.e., freedom and the dignity of the person. 
Course traces the evolution of Beethoven's major 
works - sonatas and concertos, symphonies and 
string quartets as well as Fidelia and the Missa 
Solemnis - and the effect of his deafness on his 
view of life and on his later works. 

MUS 226 3 cr. 

Romantic Music of the Nineteenth Century 

A study of the major musical developments in the 
19th century, the Romantic Period: the rise of 
piano literature, the art song, chamber and pro- 
gram music, and opera. Attention to nationalism. 

MUS 228 3 cr. 

Music of the Twentieth Century 

(MUS 112 recommended as prerequisite) A 
study of the history and literature of Western 
classical music in the 20th century. The various 
"isms" of the period, including impressionism, 
expressionism, neo-classicism, serialism, and 
minimalism, will be examined. 

MUS 233 3 cr. 

Music in America 

An overview of music in the United States from 
colonial times to the present, with an emphasis 
on the 20th century. Classical, popular, and tra- 
ditional musical styles are considered, including 
the symphony, the opera, the Broadway show, 
jazz, rock, hymnody and folk music. 

MUS 235 3 cr. 

Music Theory I 

The fundamental materials of tonal music: notes 
and rests, rhythm and meter, scales and modes, 
intervals, triads and seventh chords, melodic and 
harmonic organization, and an introduction to 
voice leading and part writing. Some knowledge 
of music notation helpful. 

MUS 236 3 cr. 

Music Theory II 

(Prerequisite: MUS 235) Extension of the tonal 
vocabulary to include chromatic harmony, mod- 
ulatory techniques, and the use of extended 
chords, as well as an overview of selected post- 
tonal procedures. 



MUS 280 3 cr. 

Liturgical Music 

The role of music in the Roman Catholic 
Church. Emphasis on the practical rather than 
the historical. Recommended for any lay person 
or member of the clergy involved in developing 
church liturgy. No musical background required. 

MUS 335 3 cr. 

Introduction to Composition 

(Prerequisite: MUS 235, 236) Guided individual 
projects in original composition, together with 
the analysis of selected works from the classical 
repertory. 

MUS 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

Selected topics in music history will vary from year 
to year in accord with student/faculty interest. 



BIOLOGY 

Faculty 

Michael A. Hardisky, Ph.D., Chair 
Paul R. Beining, S.J., Ph.L. 
Timothy Joseph Cadigan, S.J., Ph.D. 
Michael D. Carey, Ph.D. 
John R. Conway, Ph.D. 
Kathleen G. Dwyer, Ph.D. 
George R. Gomez, Ph.D. 
Gary G. Kwiecinski, Ph.D. 
Christine E. McDermott, Ph.D. 
Michael A. Sulzinski, Ph.D. 
Terrence E. Sweeney, Ph.D. 
Daniel S. Townsend, Ph.D. 
Janice Voltzow, Ph.D. 
Robert E Waldeck, Ph.D. 

Overview 

Courses in the Department of Biology are 
designed to achieve the following objectives: 
(1) To present the fundamental scientific facts 
and concepts which are needed for an under- 
standing of the living world and people's rela- 
tion to it; (2) To prepare students for advanced 
study or work in other biological fields. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Biology 
program supplies preprofessional preparation 
meeting all requirements and recommendations 
of professional schools (medicine, dentistry, 
veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry). 

While the department's record in the 
preparation of physicians is an impressive one 



Arts and Sciences/Biology 93 



as indicated in the Pre-Medical section, its 
record as one of the baccalaureate sources of 
Ph.D.s in the biological sciences is equally 
prestigious. In this respect, a 1988 study by 
the Office of Institutional Research at 
Franklin and Marshall College shows that 
over the previous 66 years. The University of 
Scranton ranked 48th out of 877 four-year 
private, primarily undergraduate, institutions. 

The biology curriculum appears below. In 
addition to the 9-credit freshman course in 
General Biology, biology majors will select 33 
credits of Biology electives with at least one 
course in each of the following five course 
groups (special exemption may be made by 
permission of the chairperson). 

Cellular (C): BIOL 250, 255, 344, 

346,348,349,350,351, 
352, 354, 358, 445, 450 
Molecular (M): BIOL 250, 263, 344, 350, 

351,358,361,362,364 
Organismal (O): BIOL 195, 196, 225, 

241,243,245,250, 255, 
272, 344, 345, 346, 347, 
348, 349, 351, 354, 370, 
445, 446, 473 
Genetics (G): BIOL 260, 263, 361 , 

362, 375 
Population (P): BIOL 195, 196, 272, 

273,345,349,370,371, 
375,471,472,473 
Biology majors may use up to 6 credits in 
Chemistry (CHEM 350, 351, 360, 450, 451) 
as Biology electives. 

See the Pre-Medical Program section for 
the premedical advisor's elective recommenda- 
tions for pre-professional students. 

Minor in Biology 

The student must complete Biology 141- 
142, including the laboratory, and 15 addi- 
tional credits of courses suitable for the Biol- 
ogy major. Biology electives must be selected 
from at least three of the five established 
course groups, and must include at least 3 
credits of advanced laboratory work. It is 
strongly suggested that a potential Biology 
minor seek the advice of the department s 
chairperson concerning the selection of elec- 
tives suitable to his/her personal goals. 



Course Descriptions 

Biology courses numbered 100-139 and 200- 
239 are not open to Biology majors. 

BIOL 100 4 cr. 

(E) Modern Concepts of Human Biology 

(Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and 
lab) Exploration of the practical impact which 
modern biological concepts have on our lives. 
Topics include cell function, genetics, plant and 
human biology, genetic engineering, cancer, 
AIDS and dying. Provides a framework lor mak- 
ing informed ethical decisions regarding perti- 
nent biological issues. Three hours lecture; two 
hours lab. Fall only. 

BIOL 101 3 cr. 

(E) Introduction to Biological Science 

Introduction to fundamental concepts, princi- 
ples and theories of modern biology. Discussion 
and application of the scientific method in dis- 
covery and learning, discussion of experimental 
and statistical techniques, examination of the 
historical and cultural fabric of biological sci- 
ence, and discussion of the impact of biological 
research and development on modern society. 
Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 105 3 cr. 

(E) Biodiversity 

An examination of the variety of animal and 
plant species, especially in the two most diverse 
ecosystems: the coral reef and the tropical rain 
forest. The foundations of biological diversity 
will be studied: ecology, systematics, evolution 
and biogeography. Current topics will be dis- 
cussed, such as deforestation, human population 
growth, endangered species and global warming. 
Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 108 3 cr. 

(E) History of Life on Earth 

(Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and 
lab) Sequence of appearance of life on earth 
based on the geological record. Topics include 
the origin of life on earth, patterns and processes 
of the fossil record, and an introduction to the 
diversity of life, past and present. Three hours 
lecture. 

BIOL 110-111 8cr. 

(E) Structure and Function of the Hiunan Body 

(Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and 
lab) A general study of the anatomy and physiol- 
ogy of the human organism, emphasizing the 
body's various coordinated flinctions from the 
cellular level to integrated organ systems. Three 
hours lecture, two hours lab each semester. 



94 Arts and Sciences/Biology 



Biology Curriculum 












Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 




FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 












MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology 




4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analytical Chemistry I 


-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 




3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 






3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 




1 




16 


18 


Second Year 












MAJOR 


BIOL 


Biology Electives 




4.5 


4 


COGNATE 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 




4.5 


4.5 


GE QUAN-COGNATE MATH 103-114' 


Pre-Calculus Math-Analysis I 




4 


4 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 






3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS121 


Ethics-Theology I 




3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 




17 


18.5 


Third Year 












MAJOR 


BIOL 


Biology Electives 




4.5 


5 


COGNATE 


PHYS 120-121 


General Physics I-II 




4 


4 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social Behavioral Elective 




3 




GE HUMN 


HUAdN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 




3 


3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 






3 


GEPHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




17.5 


1 
16 


Fourth Year 












MAJOR 


BIOL 


Biology Electives 




7.5 


7.5 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or TR/S Elective 






3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 




6 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 






1 


16.5 


14.5 






TOTAL: 


134 CREDITS 


' MATH 103 (taken before MATH 114) if indicated by Math Placement Test. Otherwise, credits 


may be i 


Uzken in math. 


biology 


chemistry or physics. 













BIOL 141-142 9cr. 

(E) General Biology 

(Requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and 
lab) A comprehensive study of the nature of liv- 
ing organisms, both plant and animal, their 
structure, function, development and relation- 
ships, including the problems of development, 
heredity and evolution. Three hours lecture, 
three hours lab each semester. 

BIOL 195 3 cr. 

(E) Tropical Biology (0,P) 

Study of tropical communities with emphasis on 
the coral reef Introduction to a variety of other 
tropical areas, such as sandy beaches, turtle grass 
beds, mangrove swamps, tide pools, rocky 
shores, and rain forests. Approximately two 
weeks will be spent at a biological station in the 
American tropics. Swimming proficiency 
required. Intersession only. 



BIOL 196 3 cr. 

African Photo Safari (0,P) 

Natural history of Eastern Equatorial Africa with 
special emphasis on the delicate ecological balance 
between plant and animal communities. The 
savannah plains, tropical mountain forests, 
northern frontier and Great Rift Valley will be 
visited for first-hand study of the tremendous 
diversity of fauna and flora. Intersession only. 

BIOL 201 3cr. 

(E) Anatomy and Physiology 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 101) An introduction to the 
biochemical, cellular, tissue and organismal 
organization of selected body fiinctions; struc- 
ture in relation to function is emphasized. Three 
hours lecture. 



Arts and Sciences/Biology 95 



BIOL 202 3 cr. 

(E) The ABC's of Genetics 

Heredity for the non-science major, with empha- 
sis on the human. Provides the background nec- 
essary for the non-scientist to understand his/her 
own hereditary background and to have 
informed opinions about societal issues related 
to genetics. Includes Mendelian, molecular, and 
population genetics, evolution, genetic diseases, 
genetic engineering, etc. Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 210 3cr. 

Introductory Medical Microbiology 

(Pre- or co-requisites: BIOL 110-111, CHEM 
110-111; requires concurrent enrollment in lec- 
ture and lab) Fundamentals of microbiology, 
including structure, function, identification, 
pathogenesis, epidemiology and control of 
microorganisms with emphasis on human 
pathogens. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. 
Fall only. 

BIOL 241 5 cr. 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (O) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concur- 
rent enrollment in lecture and lab) Structure and 
phylogeny of vertebrate organ-systems, empha- 
sizing and comparing vertebrate structures in 
relation to their fonctions. Amphioxus, shark, 
necturus, and the fetal pig are subjected to 
detailed laboratory study. Three hours lecture, 
four hours lab. Fall only. 

BIOL 243 5 cr. 

The Human Body (O) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concur- 
rent enrollment in lecture and lab) Structure and 
function of the principal organ systems in mam- 
mals, emphasizing the human condition. The cat 
is subjected to detailed study in the laboratory. 
Three hours lecture, four hours lab. Spring only. 

BIOL 245 4.5 cr. 

General Physiology* (O) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 112-113; 
requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and 
lab) Physiological processes underlying function- 
ing of the animal organism. Study of irritability, 
excitation, conduction, contractility, cellular 
physiology, and functions of mammalian organ- 
systems. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. 

BIOL 250 5 cr. 

Microbiology (C,0,M) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 112-113; 
requires concurrent enrollment in lecture and 
lab) Structure, function, growth, reproduction, 
heredity and relationships of bacteria, yeasts. 



molds, viruses; a brief survey of pathogens, life 
cycles of parasitic microzoa; introduction to dis- 
ease and immunology. Three hours lecture, four 
hours lab; not open to Nursing majors. 

BIOL 255 3 cr. 

Animal Nutrition and Metabolism (C,0) 
(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, concurrent 
enrollment in CHEM 233, if not already suc- 
cessfully completed) A survey of concepts and 
disciplines within the nutritional sciences. Lec- 
tures and discussion address basic sciences, bio- 
logical factors, and current controversies includ- 
ing physiological systems directly and indirectly 
influencing nutrition and metabolism, nutrients 
and their metabolism, energy balance, food tech- 
nology, and agribusiness. Spring semester 

BIOL 260 4.5 cr. 

Genetics (G) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) Mendelian, cyto-, 
population and evolutionary, and basic molecu- 
lar genetics; emphasis on eucaryotes. Three 
hours lecture, three hours lab. 

BIOL 263 5 cr. 

Genetic Engineering (G) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concur- 
rent enrollment in lecture and lab) Study of the 
nature and function of the gene with emphasis 
on the experimental evidence which gave rise to 
the present concepts of genetic engineering. 
Strong emphasis is placed on recombinant DNA 
techniques in both lecture and laboratory. Three 
hours lecture, three hours lab. 

BIOL 272 5 cr. 

Invertebrate Biology (0,P) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concur- 
rent enrollment in lecture and lab) Structure and 
fonction of the major groups of invertebrates 
with emphasis on their evolutionary relation- 
ships. Labs focus on the diversity of invertebrate 
forms and include field trips. Three hours lec- 
ture, three hours lab. Fall, odd years. 

BIOL 273 3 cr. 

Marine Ecology (P) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) Diversity of 
marine habitats and of the organisms that 
inhabit them. Lectures and discussion address 
the physical and biological factors that influence 
the distribution and ecology of organisms in the 
various marine environments, including inter- 
tidal, estuarine, benthic, coral reef and open 
ocean communities. The effects of humans on 
the sea will be assessed. Three hours lecture. 



96 Arts and Sciences/Biology 



BIOL 344 4.5 cr. 

Principles of Immunology (C,0,M) 
(Prerequisite: BIOL 250 strongly recommended 
for 344 lecture, required for 344 lab) The basic 
molecular, cellular and organismal aspects of the 
immune response, emphasizing chemical and 
functional bases of antigens and immunoglobu- 
lins, cellular and humoral response, tolerance, 
immune deficiency, hypersensitivity, autoimmu- 
nity, blood groups, transplantation. Three hours 
lecture, three hours lab. Spring only. 

BIOL 345 3 cr. 

Comparative Animal Physiology (P,0) 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 245) The physiological prin- 
ciples involved in adaptations of animals to their 
environment from a comparative viewpoint; 
osmotic control, temperature regulation, nerve 
and muscle physiology, sensory perception, etc. 
Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 346 3 cr. 

Endocrinology and Reproduction (C,0) 
(Prerequisite: BIOL 245) The mammalian 
endocrine system; emphasis on molecular mech- 
anisms of hormone action, feedback control of 
hormone production, integration with other 
physiological systems, and reproductive 
endocrinology. Three hours lecture. Spring only. 

BIOL 347 3 cr. 

Exercise Physiology (O) 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 245) Study of anatomical 
and physiological effects of exercise, centering 
around control of physical performance by capac- 
ity to generate energy through aerobic and anaer- 
obic pathways; includes effects of heredity, age, 
nutrition, training and environment on perform- 
ance. Emphasizes the multidimensional role of 
exercise in weight control, cardiovascular fitness, 
stress management, fatigue, strength, etc. Three 
hours lecture/ demonstration. Spring, odd years. 

BIOL 348 4.5 cr. 

Neurophysiology (C,0) 
(Prerequisite: BIOL 245, or, for neuroscience 
majors, PSYC 231) Study of the organization 
and function of the neuron, neural circuits, and 
the major sensory and motor components of the 
central nervous system; bioelectric phenomena, 
synaptic transmission; the neural basis for higher 
functions such as cognition, memory, and learn- 
ing. Three hours lecture; three hours lab. 

BIOL 349 5 cr. 

Plant Physiology (C,0,P) 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 141 or 101 or permission of 
instructor) Functional anatomy and physiology 



of plants, including structure, photosynthesis, 
respiration, mineral nutrition, water relations, 
productivity, growth and differentiation, trans- 
port, stress physiology, and energy flow. Three 
hours lecture. Three hours lab. Lab is writing- 
intensive (W). Spring, odd years. 

BIOL 350 5 cr. 

(W) Cellular Biology (C,M) 
Study of structure and function in eukaryotic 
cells. Emphasis on biomolecules, cell organelles, 
cell motility, signaling, and cell physiology. The 
cellular basis of human physiology and disease 
will also be discussed. Labs focus on experimen- 
tal studies of cellular structure and function 
using techniques of modern cell biology. Three 
hours lecture, three hours lab. Lab fulfills a 
writing-intensive (W) requirement. 

BIOL 351 5cr. 

Developmental Biology (C,0,M) 
(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concur- 
rent enrollment in lecture and lab) Development 
of vertebrates and invertebrates from gametogen- 
esis through organogenesis. Emphasis on cellular 
and molecular mechanisms involved in differen- 
tiation, morphogenesis, and determination of 
the body plan. Labs focus on experimentation 
with living, developing organisms. Three hours 
lecture, three hours lab. Spring only. 

BIOL 352 5 cr. 

Histology (C) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; BIOL 241 
strongly recommended; requires concurrent 
enrollment in lecture and lab) Microscopic 
structure and function of the four basic verte- 
brate tissues. Emphasis will be placed on mam- 
malian tissues. Lectures include historical, theo- 
retical and practical perspectives. Laboratories 
include examination of tissues through the use 
of loan sets of slides as well as demonstrations 
and exercises in basic preparation of tissues for 
microscopic examination. Three hours lecture, 
four hours lab. Fall only. 

BIOL 354 5 cr. 

Special Histology 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233, BIOL 352) 
Microscopic recognition and functional correla- 
tions of the major vertebrate organ systems. 
Enrollment is limited to preserve informal and 
flexible working conditions appropriate to 
advanced histological work. This course is cus- 
tomized to the participants' needs. Options 
include in-depth training in techniques or in- 
depth analysis of a particular organ system. Two 
hours lecture, five hours lab. Spring only. 



Arts and Sciences/Biology 97 



BIOL 358 3 cr. 

Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology (C,M) 
(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) Introduces Biol- 
ogy and Neuroscience majors to the cellular and 
molecular biology of the vertebrate nervous sys- 
tem. Includes ion channel structure and func- 
tion, synthesis, packaging and release of neuro- 
transmitters, receptor and transduction 
mechanisms, intracellular signalling, cell-to-cell 
communication, glial cell function, and neural 
growth and development. Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 361 5 cr. 

Molecular Biology I (M,G) 
(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 232; co- 
requisite: CHEM 233; requires concurrent 
enrollment in lecture and lab) Structure and 
function of prokaryotic cells from a molecular 
viewpoint. Study of biomacromolecule structure 
and function; bacterial DNA replication, tran- 
scription, translation and how these processes are 
regulated. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. 
Spring only. 

BIOL 362 5 cr. 

(W) Molecular Biology II (M,G) 
(Prerequisite: BIOL 361 or CHEM 350) Struc- 
ture and function of eukaryotic cells and organ- 
isms from a molecular viewpoint. Study of 
eukaryotic genome and gene organization, DNA 
packaging and replication, RNA transcription 
and splicing, translation into proteins and how 
these processes are regulated. Discussion of HIV, 
cancer, and evolution on the molecular level. 
Three hours lecture, three hours lab optional. 
Fall only. Lab fulfills a writing-intensive (W) 
requirement. 

BIOL 364 5 cr. 

Virology (M) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142, CHEM 232-233) 
A detailed survey of viruses important to animals 
and plants, including structure, replication, 
pathogenicity and diagnostic techniques. Strong 
emphasis is placed on the molecular biology of 
viruses in both lecture and lab. Three hours lec- 
ture, three hours lab. Fall only. 

BIOL 370 4.5 cr. 

(W) Animal Behavior (P,0) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) Classification of 
behavior types, development, flinctional advan- 
tages and evolution of behavior, and social and 
physiological aspects studied in lower and higher 
organisms. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. 
Spring only. The laboratory fulfills a writing- 
intensive requirement (W). 



BIOL 371 5 cr. 

Ecology (P) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) Study of physical, 
chemical, and biological factors that influence 
the distribution and abundance of organisms 
and determine the relationships among organ- 
isms from the population to the ecosystem level. 
Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Fall only. 

BIOL 375 3 cr. 

Evolution (G,P) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142) A consideration 
of the theories of evolution and evidences for 
them in plants and animals. Population genetics 
and the adaptiveness of various organic traits 
will be discussed. Three hours lecture. Fall only. 

BIOL 379 3 cr. 

Biostatistics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 103) Data analysis and 
statistical techniques in biology and medicine; 
probability and frequency distributions, descrip- 
tive statistics, hypothesis testing, and various 
parametric and nonparametric statistical tests. 
Use of one or more computerized statistical pro- 
grams. Three hours lecture. Spring only. 

BIOL 384 2-4 cr. 

Special Topics in Biology 

Study of selected topics in biology, varying from 
year to year in accord with student/faculty inter- 
est and current research advances. May include 
such topics as sensory reception, membrane biol- 
ogy, population genetics, etc. 

BIOL 393-394 Variable Credit 

Undergraduate Research 

(Prerequisite: 12 credits in Biology) Individual 
problems for advanced students with sufficient 
background in biological and physical sciences. 

BIOL 445 3 cr. 

Mammalian Physiology (C,0) 
(Prerequisites: BIOL 245, CHEM 232-233) 
Molecular, cellular, and tissue aspects of selected 
organ systems not normally covered in General 
Physiology, including calcium and skeletal 
homeostatic systems, integumentary system, 
gastrointestinal system, and aspects of nervous, 
endocrine, reproductive, and lymphatic systems. 
Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 446 3 cr. 

Cardiovascular Physiology (O) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 245, PHYS 120 or 140) 
The physiological and biophysical bases of car- 
diovascular function, including cardiac electro- 
physiology and mechanics; regulation of the 



98 Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 



heart and the peripheral circulation; hemody- 
namics; solute and fluid exchange; and cell-cell 
interactions governing white blood cell transit. 
Special circulations will highlight the role of car- 
diovascular regulation in overall physiological 
function. Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 450 5 cr. 

Electron Microscopy (C) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141-142; requires concur- 
rent enrollment in lecture and lab) Introduction 
to the mechanics of the electron microscope 
with emphasis on standard laboratory tech- 
niques, including preparation of materials, sec- 
tioning, viewing and photographic analysis. One 
hour lecture, six hours lab. 

BIOL 471 3cr. 

Applied Ecology (P) 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 371) The application of eco- 
logical principles and concepts to environmental 
problems, including consideration of their ori- 
gins, effects on living systems, and potential 
solutions. Consideration of such issues as biodi- 
versity, habitat degradation and loss, conserva- 
tion biology, ecosystem management, wildlife 
ecology, agroecology, pollution, and global cli- 
mate change. Three hours lecture. 

BIOL 472 3 cr. 

Systems Ecology (P) 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 371) The study of ecosys- 
tem dynamics and their relationship to the func- 
tioning of the biosphere. A quantitative 
approach to ecosystem structure and function, 
emphasizing the use of simulation and concep- 
tual models. The course will involve opportuni- 
ties to construct and test simulation models. 
Three hours lecture. Spring, even years. 

BIOL 473 5 cr. 

Estuarine Ecology (0,P) 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 141 or 101 or permission 
of instructor) The ecology of marine and estuar- 
ine systems, including soil chemistry, halophyte 
physiology, tidal marsh ontogeny, ecosystem 
function and the consequences of human alter- 
ation of the coastal zone. Lab includes a week- 
long field trip during Spring Break to Sapelo 
Island, Georgia, and Cocodrie, Louisiana. Three 
hours lecture, three hours lab. Spring, even years. 



CHEMISTRY 

Faculty 

David E. Marx, Ph.D., Chair 
Christopher A. Baumann, Ph.D. 
Michael C. Cann, Ph.D. 
John C. Deak, Ph.D. 
Trudy A. Dickneider, Ph.D. 
Timothy Daniel Foley, Ph.D. 
Donna M. Narsavage-Heald, Ph.D. 
David A. Rusak, Ph.D. 
Joe A. Vinson, Ph.D. 
Joan Wasilewski, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The department offers five majors: Chem- 
istry, Biochemistry, Chemistry-Business, 
Chemistry-Computers, and Medical Technol- 
ogy. The program in Chemistry is approved 
by the American Chemical Society, which 
means that graduates may be certified by the 
American Chemical Society if they meet the 
requirements. In addition, outstanding stu- 
dents in the Chemistry and Biochemistry 
majors are eligible for consideration in the 
combined, five-year baccalaureate/master's 
degree program (please refer to the section on 
the Graduate School and to the Graduate 
School Catalog for specifics of the program). 
The strength of the department is indicated 
by the fact that The University of Scranton 
has been one of the leading schools in the 
country in the number of master's degrees 
awarded in chemistry. 

The prestige of the department is also 
demonstrated by a study of the Office of 
Institutional Research at Franklin and Mar- 
shall College which ranked the University of 
Scranton 34th out of 917 private, four-year, 
primarily undergraduate colleges as the bac- 
calaureate source of those earning Ph.D.s in 
Chemistry between 1981 and 1990. 

Recent graduates of the department have 
been admitted to doctoral programs at a 
number of major universities including Har- 
vard, Cornell, Johns Hopkins and the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. In addition, some gradu- 
ates have attended medical and dental schools, 
and some have gone on to law school. 



Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 99 



Minor in Chemistry 

The minor in Chemistry includes Organic 
Chemistry (6 credits), Physical Chemistry (6 
credits), and a chemistry laboratory course (3 
credits). 

Biochemistry 

The department offers two tracks of study 
for biochemistry majors. The tracks are simi- 
lar for the first three semesters, allowing stu- 
dents the option to change between the two 
tracks within that time frame, should their 
career goals change. The research track pre- 
pares students for graduate study in biochem- 
istry or for a career in which independent 
research experience would be beneficial. The 
pre-professional track is more flexible and 
allows students a greater selection of elective 
courses in chemistry and biology in order to 
tailor their course of study to meet their indi- 
vidual career goals. The pre-professional track 
provides a strong background for students 
pursuing further studies in law or medicine or 
career paths not emphasizing research. 

Minor in Biochemistry 

The minor in Biochemistry includes 
Organic Chemistry (6 credits), Biochemistry 
(3 credits). Biophysical Chemistry (3 credits) 
and Chemistry laboratory (3 credits). 

Chemistry-Business 

The Chemistry-Business major combines 
theoretical and technical instruction in chem- 
istry with management training in business. 
Graduates of this program will be concerned 
not only with chemical research and techno- 
logical development but also with manage- 
ment problems in science-related industries. 

Most Chemistry majors tend to be 
research-oriented although almost half of the 
approximately 100,000 chemists employed in 
American private industry are engaged in 
work other than research and development: 
management, marketing and sales. This com- 
bined degree was formulated to prepare 
chemists to assume these latter responsibilities. 

From the point of view of the business stu- 
dent, almost one-third of all business gradu- 
ates can expect to be employed in a chem- 
istry-related field: pharmaceuticals, plastics, 
petroleum, etc. Most Business majors 
employed in such industries must develop, 



often on their own, the technical knowledge 
needed to understand their company's opera- 
tions and products. A fiandamental back- 
ground in chemistry as provided in this con- 
centration is a distinct advantage to 
individuals planning such careers. 

Chemistry-Computers 

The Chemistry-Computers program is 
designed to provide a vehicle tor preparing 
students in the area of intensive computer use 
in the field of chemistry. The use of computers 
has long been important in chemistry, but in 
recent years areas such as molecular modeling 
and design have become increasingly impor- 
tant. Drug companies use these techniques for 
the design of drugs for particular medical 
problems. In addition, most of the modern 
analytical instruments are highly enhanced by 
on-line computer processing of data. This pro- 
gram is designed to enable students to enter 
industry or graduate programs in areas such as 
computational chemistry, chemical informa- 
tion retrieval, or molecular design. 

B.S. in Medical Technology 

The Bachelor of Science in Medical Tech- 
nology degree program, under the direction 
of Dr. Trudy Dickneider, is designed to train 
and qualify students as medical technologists 
or clinical laboratory scientists serving hospi- 
tals, clinical laboratories, industrial or research 
institutions. The program meets and exceeds 
the requirements of the National Accrediting 
Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences 
(NAACLS). The program involves the satis- 
factory completion of the first three years of a 
curriculum of study (indicated below) at the 
University of Scranton and the fourth year of 
clinical education at a hospital having a 
School of Medical Technology approved by 
NAACLS. After completing the program, stu- 
dents take a national certification examina- 
tion. To date the University has arranged affil- 
iation with hospitals in the cities of Abington, 
Williamsport and Wilkes-Barre. See affilia- 
tions at the end of this catalog. 

The curriculum for the BSMT closely 
parallels the B.S. in Biochemistry program so 
that students have the option to change to the 
latter after two years, should their career goals 
change. 



1 00 Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 



Chemistry Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analytical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 114-221 


Analysis I-II 


4 


4 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GET/RS-PHIL 


T/RS 121-PHIL 120 


Theology I-Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 






18.5 


17.5 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 240 


Inorganic Chemistry 




3 


COGNATE 


MATH 222' 


Analysis III 


4 




COGNATE 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics 


4 


4 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


CMPS 134 


Computer Science I 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 






16.5 


17.5 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 330 


Organic Chem. Ill 


5 




MAJOR 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 362-363 


Physical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 390-391 


Chem. Literature-Seminar 


1 


1 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 




17.5 


17.5 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 440-440L 


Adv. Inorganic Chem.-Lab 


3 


1.5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 493-494 


Undergraduate Research 


1.5 


1.5 


MAJOR 


CHEM ELECT 


Chem Elective, 300 Level or above 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
13.5 


6 
12 






TOTAL: 130.5 CREDITS 


' For ACS certification, Chen. 


xistry majors must complete MATH 222, MATH 34 1. CHEM 350 or 450. and one uppei 




division chemistry elective. 











Course Descriptions 

In cases where a student withdraws from a 
chemistry lecture course, the student must also 
withdraw from the corresponding laboratory 
course unless a written waiver is provided by the 
department. 

C/CJ 200 3 cr. 

Forensic Science 

Designed for law-enforcement majors as well as 
science majors, this is a study of the rules of evi- 
dence and the position of the expert scientific 
witness in law, followed by a review of the uses 
of scientific, and particularly chemical, evidence 
in various phases of the investigation and trial of 
criminal actions. 



CHEM 100 3 cr. 

(E) Elements of Chemistry 

An elementary study of the field of chemistry for 
the non-science major; concepts of structure, 
states of matter, modern developments, implica- 
tions of the field for modern society. Three 
hours lecture. 

CHEM 104 3 cr. 

(E) Science and Society 

A study of some current problems of a scientific 
and technological nature from the point of view 
of the non-science major. Scientific background 
will be provided to lead to greater understanding 
and possible solutions. Possible topic: energy, 
genetic engineering, narcotics, pesticides, etc. 
Three hours lecture. 



Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 101 



Biochemistry Research Track Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analytical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 114 


Analysis I 


4 




COGNATE 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE ^XTlTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


17 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 240 


Inorganic Chemistry 




3 


COGNATE 


PHYS 120-12F 


General Physics I-II 


4 


4 


: GE ELECT 


CMPS 134 


Computer Science I 


3 




IGET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


3 




I GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 


1 GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


• GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


.5 


.5 


18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 330 


Organic Chemistry III 


3.5 




MAJOR 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 360-361 


Biophysical Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 390-391 


Chemistry Literature-Seminar 


1 


1 


COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT' 2 


Cognate Electives (210 level or above) 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


18 


17.5 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 450-451 


Biochemistry I-II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CHEM 450L 


Biochemistry Lab 


1.5 




MAJOR 


CHEM 493-494 


Undergraduate Research 


1.5 


1.5 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


COGNATE ELECT'-^ 


Cognate Elecdve (210 level or above) 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


12 


3 
13.5 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Cognate electives for the Biochemistry major may be taken in any of the following disciplines: Biology. Chemistry, Computer 


Science, Environmental Science, Mathematics or Physics and certain Psychology courses (PSYC 210, 231 and PSYC 384: 


Psychopharmacology) 










' For ACS certification. Biochemistry majors must take J^IATH 114, 221, 222, 341: PHYS 140-141 in 


place of PHYS 


120- 


121; and CHEM 440 and 440L; and one course from the following: BIOL 250. 260, 263, 350, 361, 


or another Biology 


course approved by the Chemistry Department. 









CHEM 110-111 6cr. 

(E) Introductory Chemistry 

A study of the fundamental concepts of general 
chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry. 
Three hours lecture each semester. 

CHEM llOL-lllL 2cr. 

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; 
CHEM 1 lOL is prerequisite for CHEM 1 1 IL) 



Experiments dealing with principles of general, 
organic and biological chemistry are performed. 
Two hours laboratory each semester. 

CHEM 112-113 6cr 

(E) General and Analytical Chemistry 

A study of the laws, theories and principles of 
general chemistry together with qualitative and 
quantitative analysis. Three hours lecture each 
semester. 



102 Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 



Biochemistry Pre-professional Track Curriculum 



First Year 

MAJOR (GE NSCI) 

COGNATE 

COGNATE (GE QUAN) 

GEWRTG 

GE C/IL 

GE FSEM 

GE PHED 



Department and Number Descriptive Title of Course Fall Cr. Spr. Cr. 

CHEM 1 12-1 13 General Analytical Chem. l-II 4,5 4.5 

BIOL 141-142 General Biology I-II 4.5 4.5 

MATH 103/114 Pre-Calculus-Analysis I 4 4 

WRTG 107 Composition 3 

C/IL 102 Computing and Information Literacy 3 

INTD 100 Freshman Seminar 1 

PHED ELECT Physical Education l 









17 


17 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chem I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


PHYS 120-121 


General Physics I-II 


4 


4 


GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GE T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Eleaive 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


.5 


.5 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 360 


Biophysical Chemistry 


4.5 




MAJOR 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


MAIOR 


CHEM 450-451 


Biochemistry I-II 


4.5 


3 


MAJOR 


CHEM 390 


Chem Literature 


1 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 






16 


15 


Fourth Year' 










MAJOR 


CHEM ELECT 


Adv. Topics-Biochemistry 




3 


MAJOR/COGNATE 


CHEM/BIO ELECT 


Chem or Bio Elective- 


3-5 




COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT 


Biology Elective^ 


3-5 


3-5 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15-19 


6 
15-17 






TOTAL: 


131-137 CREDITS 



' Senior year must contain at least 2 credits of laboratory or research. 

- Advanced biology courses are those courses which the Biology Department designates in tlie cellular, molecular or genetics areas. 



CHEM 112L-113L 3 cr. 

General and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; 
CHEM I I2L is prerequisite for CHEM 1 13L) 
Experiments involve semi-micro techniques for 
qualitative and quantitative analysis (gravimetric 
and volumetric analysis). Three hours laboratory 
each semester. 

CHEM 114L 2cr. 

General Analytical Chemistry Laboratory 

A special laboratory course for those students 
who are advanced in chemistry. Semi-micro 
techniques of gravimetric and volumetric quanti- 



tative analysis. Admission will be on the basis of 
a placement exam and the professor's permis- 
sion. Note: For students with majors in the 
Chemistry and Biology departments, this course 
will satisfy the requirements for the CHEM 
112-113 laboratory courses. 

CHEM 202 3 cr. 

Global Change 

Earth-system sciences and global environmental 
change, examining the records of past changes in 
climate, land-mass distribution, and atmospheric 
and oceanic composition, evaluating fossils, tree- 
ring data, and geological indicators. 



Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 1 03 



Chemistry-Business Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analytical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 103-114 or 114-221 


Pre-Calculus. -Analysis 1 or Analysis I-II 


4 


4 


COGNATE (GE S/BH) 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro. & Macro. Econ. 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




15.5 


17.5 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


ACC 253-254 


Financial-Managerial Acag. 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 




3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I & II 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GE HUMN 


FOR LANG' 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


17.5 


17.5 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 320-391 


Industrial Chem. I-Chem. Seminar 


3 


1 


; MAJOR 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


yvL^JOR 


MKT351 


Intro, to Marketing 


3 




^^pR 


FIN 351 


Intro, to Finance 




3 


^^^NATE 


CMPS 330 


Information Systems 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 204 


Special Topics in Statistics 




3 


GE ELECT 


CHEM ELECT 


Chem. (210 level or above) 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-ELECT 


Ethics-Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




16 


16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


OIM351-OIM352 


Intro, to Mgt Science-Op Mgt 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MGT 251 


Legal Environment of Business 


3 




COGNATE 


PHYS 120-121 


General Physics 


3 


3 


. GEHUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


B^"^ 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


6 
15 


^p 




TOTAL: 130 CREDITS 


' The department recommends foreign language. 









CHEM 232-233 6 cr. 

(E) Organic Chemistry 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 1 12-1 13) An introduc- 
tion to the chemistry of the principal aliphatic 
and aromatic compounds of carbon and their 
derivatives. Three hours lecture each semester. 

CHEM 232L-233L 3 cr. 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; 
CHEM 232L is prerequisite for CHEM 233L) 
Investigation of the chemical preparations and 
syntheses of major organic functional groups. 
Three hours laboratory each semester. 

CHEM 240 3 cr. 

Inorganic Chemistry 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 113) Descriptive chemistry 
of main group and selected transition elements 



and their compounds correlated with the peri- 
odic table, physical properties, atomic and molec- 
ular structure. 

CHEM 320 3 cr. 

Industrial Chemistry 

A review of chemical operations and unit or 
batch processes common to industry. Economet- 
ric analysis involving supply-demand, productiv- 
ity, commodity prices and costing is an impor- 
tant area covered, as are measures of productivity 
and patent activity. Three hours lecture. 

CHEM 330 2 cr. 

Organic Chemistry III 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) A continuation 
of Chemistry 232-233, emphasizing the study of 
the major types of organic mechanisms. Two 
hours lecture. 



1 04 Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 



Chemistry-Computers Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCl) 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analytical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


CMPS 134-144 


Computer Science I-II 


3 


4 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 142-114 


Discrete Structures-Analysis I 


4 


4 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GEC/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




18.5 


18.5 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


CMPS 240-250 


Data Struct.-Mach. Org. 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


MATH 221-222 


Analysis II-III 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics 


4 


4 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 122 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology II 


3 
18.5 


3 
18.5 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


MAJOR 


CHEM 362-363 


Physical Chemistry I-II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CHEM 390-391 


Chemistry Literature-Seminar 


1 


1 


MAJOR 


CMPS 352 


Operating Systems 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 341 


Differential Equations 




4 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Hiunanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 




PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


17 


17 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 493-^94 


Undergraduate Research 


1.5 


1.5 


GE ELECT 


CHEM or CMPS ELECT 


Chem.-Comp. Elective, 300 level or above 3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




14.5 


13.5 






TOTAL: 


136 CREDITS 



CHEM 330L 1.5-3 cr. 

Organic Chemistry III 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) 
Experiments involve advanced techniques in 
synthesis and characterization of organic com- 
pounds. Six hours laboratory for Chemistry 
majors and three hours laboratory for Biochem- 
istry majors. 

CHEM 340 3 cr. 

Environmental Chemistry 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) A study of 
chemicals in the environment including their 
origin, transport, reactions, and toxicity in soil, 
water, air and living systems. 



CHEM 342 3 cr. 

Environmental Toxicology 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233, BIOL 141-142) 
This course will encompass several realms of 
environmental toxicology, including general 
toxicologicaJ theory, effects of contaminants on 
various biological systems, and discussion of 
environmental toxicological issues (i.e., specific 
case studies as well as the types of analyses used 
in these types of studies). 

CHEM 344 3 cr. 

Environmental Geochemistry 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) Consideration 
of natural cycles (carbon, sulflir, oxygen, water, 
etc.) that govern the chemistry of our planet. 
The origins of the elements, paleohistory, and 
composition of the planet. Effects of man's activ- 
ities with attention to their effects on the state of 
the oceans and the atmosphere. 



Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 105 



Medical Technology Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


CHEM 112-113 


Gen. Analytical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 103-114 


Pre-Calculus, Analysis I 


4 


4 


GE ELECT 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 








17 


17 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE ELECT 


BIOL 250-245 


Microbiology-Physiology 


5 


4.5 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GEWRTG 


WRTG 107 


Composirion 


3 




GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humaniries Elective 


18.5 


3 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 350 


Intro, to Biochemistry 


3 




MAJOR 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


COGNATE 


BIOL 344 


Immunology 




3 


GE PHIL-PHIL or T/RS 


PHIL 210-PHIL or T/RS 


Ethics-Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


6 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


15 


Fourth Year' 










MAJOR 




Clinical Education 






MAJOR 




Chnical Microbiology 






MAJOR 




Clinical Chemistry 






MAJOR 




Clinical Hematology/Coagulation 






MAJOR 




Clinical Immunohematology 






MAJOR 




Chnical Immunology/Serology 






MAJOR 




Clinical Seminar 






16 


16 






TOTAL: 133.5 CREDITS 


' There is a $125 Clinical Year Fee charged for each semester of senior year to cover University administrative costs. The studeyit 


IS not, however, charged University tuition for the credits earned in senior year. Some hospitals may charge 


their own ^ 


fees. The 


department has an outstanding record in having its student 


r accepted into medical-technology programs. It should be clear. 


boivever, that admission to 


clinical education is competitive 


and dependent on the student's academic record and success in the 


interview. The hospital is responsible for selection. A delay in beginning the clinical education may delay a 


students graduation. 


credits for senior-year courses vary from 28 to 32, depending on the hospital. Course titles in that year may 


also vary. 





CHEM 350 3 cr. 

General Biochemistry I 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 233) An introduction to 
the study of biochemistry. A study of the chemi- 
cal nature of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, 
nucleic acids and enzymes, including relation- 
ships among vitamins, hormones, and inorganic 
compounds. Three hours lecture. Successful 
completion of CHEM 350 precludes credit for 
CHEM 450. 

CHEM 351 3cr. 

General Biochemistry II 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 350) An introduction to 
the study of the metabolism of carbohydrates, 



lipids, amino acids, and proteins, including 
energy transformations and the role of enzyme 
systems in the above processes. Three hours lec- 
ture. Successful completion of CHEM 351 pre- 
cludes credit for CHEM 451. 

CHEM 352 3 cr. 

Chemical Toxicology 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 233) The nature, mode of 
action and methods of counteracting substances 
which have an adverse effect on biological sys- 
tems, especially human. Medical, industrial and 
environmental forensic aspects will be discussed. 
Three hours lecture. 



1 06 Arts and Sciences/Chemistry 



CHEM 360 3 cr. 

Biophysical Chemistry I 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 232-233) An introduction 
to the application of physical-chemical principles 
to biological problems. This involves aqueous 
solutions, colloidal chemistry, thermodynamics, 
electro-chemistry, chemical kinetics and nuclear 
chemistry. Three hours lecture. 

CHEM 361 3 cr. 

Biophysical Chemistry II 

(Prerequisite CHEM 360) A continuation of 
Biophysical Chemistry I involving a study of 
atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, 
photo-chemistry, and surface chemistry with 
applications to biological and biochemical phe- 
nomena. Three hours lecture. 

CHEM 360L-361L 3 cr. 

Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite; 
CHEM 360L is prerequisite for CHEM 36 IL) 
Experiments involve applications of physical- 
chemical techniques to biological problems. 
Three hours laboratory each semester. 

CHEM 362-363 6 cr. 

Physical Chemistry I-II 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 113, MATH 222) A 
study of the physical-chemical properties of mat- 
ter and the dynamics of chemical reactions. 
Three hours lecture each semester. 

CHEM 362L-363L 3 cr. 

(W) Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is pre- or co-requisite; CHEM 362L is 
prerequisite for CHEM 363L) Experiments 
demonstrate physical-chemical properties of 
matter and reactions. Three hours laboratory 
each semester. 

CHEM 370 2 cr. 

Instrumental Analysis 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 360 or 362) Instrumental 
methods of analysis consisting of theory and 
application of such instrumental techniques as 
spectroscopy, polarography, and instrumental 
titrimetry. Two hours lecture. 



CHEM 370L 

Instrumental Analysis Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) 
Experiments involve application of modern 
chemical instrumentation and techniques to 
quantitative analysis. Six hours laboratory. 



3cr. 



CHEM 384 2-4 cr. 

Special Topics in Chemistry 

Study of selected topics in chemistry and bio- 
chemistry, depending on student and faculty 
interest and the current state of the science. It 
may include topics from inorganic chemistry, 
organic chemistry, physical chemistry, analytical 
chemistry, polymer chemistry and interdiscipli- 
nary topics. 

CHEM 390 1 cr. 

Chemical Literature and Writing 

A study of the published source material of chem- 
ical science and industry. The course includes 
practical instruction in library technique and in 
the written reporting of results. One hour lecture. 

CHEM 391 1 cr. 

Seminar 

Current topics in chemistry, biochemistry, and 
industrial chemistry are prepared and presented 
by the students. 

CHEM 440 3cr. 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 362-363 or 360-361) 
Theoretical concepts and their application to the 
reactions and structure of inorganic compounds. 
Coordination chemistry and related topics, phys- 
ical methods and reaction mechanisms. Three 
hours lecture. 

CHEM 440L 3cr. 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) Lab- 
oratory methods involving synthesis and charac- 
terization of inorganic compounds are devel- 
oped. Three hours laboratory. 

CHEM 450 3cr. 

Biochemistry I 

(Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 233 and 360 or 
362) Structure-function relationships with 
emphasis on the organic and biophysical charac- 
teristics of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates are 
described. Enzyme mechanisms and kinetics and 
the thermodynamic basis of intermediary metab- 
olism are major themes. Three hours lecture. 
CHEM 450L Lab is required of Biochemistry 
majors. Successful completion of CHEM 450 
precludes credit for CHEM 350. 

CHEM 450L 3 cr. 

(W) Biochemistry Laboratory 

(Lecture is required as pre- or co-requisite) Experi- 
ments involve techniques used in characterization 
of biopolymers and study of enzyme kinetics. 



Arts and Sciences/Communication 1 07 



CHEM 451 3 cr. 

Biochemistry II 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 450) The discussion of 
intermediary metabohsm is continued from 
CHEM 450 with emphasis on Hpid protein and 
nucleic acid metaboUsm. Chemical aspects of 
molecular biology, including DNA replication, 
gene regulation and protein biosynthesis are 
included. Three hours lecture. Successful com- 
pletion of CHEM 451 precludes credit for 
CHEM 351. 

CHEM 452 3 cr. 

Enzymology 

A course in the chemical nature of enzymes with 
relation to mechanism of enzyme action and 
kinetics, purification and identification of 
enzymes and isoenzymes, biochemical and physi- 
ological aspects of enzymes in living systems. 
Three hours lecture. 

CHEM 460 3 cr. 

Physical Chemistry III 

(Prerequisite: CHEM 363) Quantum mechanics 
and quantum chemistry, including classical 
problems, perturbational theory, variational the- 
ory and specific applications of molecular orbital 
theory to organic molecules and spectroscopic 
applications. 

CHEM 464 3 cr. 

Polymer Chemistry 

(Co-requisites: CHEM 330, CHEM 361 or 363) 
Survey of preparative methods for polymers; 
characterization of polymers using physico-chem- 
ical methods, spectroscopy, and thermal analysis; 
structure-property relationships; and applications 
of polymers. Three hours lecture. 

CHEM 464L 1.5 cr. 

Polymer Chemistry Laboratory 

(Pre- or co-requisites: CHEM 330, CHEM 464) 
Laboratory experiments investigate synthesis and 
characterization methods for polymers, struc- 
ture-property effects, and thermal analysis of 
polymers. Three hours laboratory. 

CHEM 493-494 3 cr. 

(W) Undergraduate Research 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 233, 360 or 362, 390) 
Individual study and research in connection with 
a specific chemistry or biochemistry problem. 
Results must be written as a thesis and defended 
before the department. 1.5 credits each semester. 



NSCI 103 3 cr. 

(E,W) The Ascent of Man 

Science and technology from the ancient Greeks 
to the present will be discussed from the per- 
sonal viewpoint of the scientists and inventors. 
Lectures will be supplemented by films, demon- 
strations, and field trips. Three hours lecture. 



COMMUNICATION 

Faculty 

Edward E Warner, Chair 
William B. Anderson, Ph.D. 
Jan W. Kelly, Ph.D. 
Rebecca Lea Mikesell, Ph.D. 
Matthew M. Reavy, Ph.D. 
Patricia A. Richards 
Robert P. Sadowski, Ph.D. 
Roger D. Wallace, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The Department of Communication 
embraces the fields of broadcasting (radio and 
television), cable, film, journalism, advertis- 
ing, public relations, and speech. Although 
the media are interrelated, students may con- 
centrate in one of these fields. Some students, 
however, will seek a mixture or subspecialty 
which combines study in several Communica- 
tion areas. The department will adapt each 
student's curriculum to his or her goals, and 
for this reason individual student advising by 
the Communication faculty is a high priority. 

Students who major in Communication 
become knowledgeable about the subject mat- 
ter from both humanistic and scientific per- 
spectives. They also have several opportunities 
to acquire on-the-job experiences through 
departmental internships, as well as individu- 
alized study available through faculty-directed 
projects and theses. A Communication degree 
program prepares students for professional 
careers and advanced studies. In addition, 
courses are designed to serve students in other 
departments of the University by developing 
their oral and written communication skills. 

A student wishing to earn a B.A. degree in 
Communication must satisfactorily complete 
a minimum of 36 credits from the Department 
of Communication course offerings. Included 
among these 36 credits are five core courses 
required for all Communication majors: 



1 08 Arts and Sciences/Communication 



COMM 1 1 5 Writing for Communication 

COMM 210 Logical and Rhetorical 
Communication 

COMM 215 Introduction to Communi- 
cation Theory 

COMM 316 Communication Ethics 

COMM 415 Senior Seminar 

Tracks 

Majors are required to select a track or area 
of study: 

• Advertising 

• Communication Studies 

• Film 

• Journalism 

• Public Relations 

• Radio/TV Production 

Each track has two required courses. The 
remaining Communication elective courses can 
be from the declared track or from the other 
tracks. The cognate in communication must 
consist of eight courses in the same academic 
area which will contribute to the students 
preparation for work in the declared track. 

Courses required in a specific track are identi- 
fied by an asterisk; other courses in the track are 
optional. 

Advertising 

COMM 120 Mass Communication 

COMM 225 Advertising* 

COMM 227 Contemporary Public Relations 

COMM 325 Advertising Copywriting* 

COMM 326 Political Advertising 

COMM 329 Graphics 

COMM 380 Advertising Practicum 

Communication Studies 

COMM 110 Interpersonal Communication* 

COMM 2 1 1 Argumentation and Debate 

COMM 214 Small Group Communication* 

COMM 228 Intercultural Communication 

COMM 229 Gender and Communication 

COMM 312 Organizational Communication 

COMM 411 Persuasion and Propaganda 

Film 

COMM 120 Mass Communication 

COMM 232 Film History* 

COMM 332 Documentary Film 

COMM 432 Film Theory and Criticism* 

COMM 427 International Film 



Joumalism^ 

COMM 120 Mass Communication 

COMM 223 Radio Journalism 

COMM 224 Newswriting* 

COMM 323 Television Journalism 

COMM 324 Computer Assisted Reporting 

COMM 328 News Editing* 

COMM 329 Graphics 

Public Relations 

COMM 120 Mass Communication 

COMM 225 Advertising 

COMM 226 Strategic Writing for PR* 

COMM 227 Contemporary Public Relations* 

COMM 327 Cases in Strategic PR 

COMM 329 Graphics 

Radio I TV Production 

COMM 120 Mass Communication 

COMM 221 Radio Production* 

COMM 222 Television Production* 

COMM 310 Mass Communication Law 

COMM 3 1 7 Digital AudioA^ideo Production 

COMM 321 Advanced Radio Production 

COMM 322 Advanced TV Production 

COMM 422 Educational Television 

COMM 480 Television Practicum 

Minor in Communication 

A student wishing to minor in Communi- 
cation must satisfactorily complete 1 8 hours 
to be selected with the approval of the depart- 
ment chair. Nine of these hours must come 
from the following three options: 

1. COMM 115: Writing for Communication 

2. Either COMM 210: Logical and 
Rhetorical Analysis or COMM 215: 
Introduction to Communication Theory 

3. COMM 316 Communication Ethics 
(COMM 100 and COMM 484 do not 
count toward the minor.) 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



COMM 100 
Public Speaking 

This is a performance class which emphasizes 
the theory, composition, delivery, and criticism 
of speeches. Successful completion of COMM 
1 GO (with a grade of C or better) fulfills the 
speech skills requirement of the University. 



Arts and Sciences/Communication 1 09 



Communication Curriculum 










Departtnent mid Number 


Descriptive Course Title 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


COMM ELECT-COMM 115 Comm. Elective-Writing for Comm. 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT 


Cognate Elective 




3 


GE WRTG/SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


COMM 210 


Logical and Rhetorical Analysis 


3 




MAJOR 


COMM 215 


Communication Theory 




3 


MAJOR 


COMM ELECT 


Communication Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics/Theology II 


3 


3 


GE QUAN-S/BH 


QUAN-S/BH ELECT 


Quantitative-Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


COMM316-ELECT 


Communication Ethics-Comm. Elective 


r 3 


3 


MAJOR 


COMM ELECT 


Communication Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Electives 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
18 


3 , 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


COMM 415 


Senior Seminar 


3 




MAIOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Communication Elective 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


3 


6 


GE HUMN-S/BH 


HUMN-S/BH ELECT 


Humanities-Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 
15 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 



COMM 110 3cr. 

Interpersonal Communication 

An investigation and analysis of the process and 
nature of human communication and its intra- 
personal and interpersonal attributes. 

COMM 115 3cr. 

(W) Writing for Communication 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 107 or fulfillment of Writ- 
ing Skills requirement) An introduction to the 
major forms of writing for communication pro- 
fessions: corporate, print, radio/television pro- 
duction, public relations and advertising. Stu- 
dents will focus on the development and 
improvement of writing, research and critical 
thinking skills. 

COMM 120 3 or. 

Mass Commim^ication 

Historical survey of the nature, scope, and func- 
tion of the print and electronic media in the 



United States. Economics, programming and 
public control are some of the topics covered. 

COMM 210 3cr. 

(W) Logical and Rhetorical Analysis 

A study of the principles of logic and persuasion, 
analysis of fallacies, and critical examination of 
the principles of structure in written and oral 
communication. Practice in briefs and abstracts 
with an emphasis on precision and clarity. 

COMM 211 3cr. 

Argumentation and Debate 

This course concentrates on the techniques of 
argumentation, persuasion, debate, and foren- 
sics. Focuses heavily on research, case construc- 
tion and formal analysis. 

COMM 214 3 cr. 

Small Group Commimication 

An examination of research, techniques, and 
principles of small-group communication. Topics 



110 Arts and Sciences/Communication 



include problem solving, decision making, con- 
flict resolution, leadership theories, interaction 
strategies and participant roles. 

COMM 215 3 cr. 

(W) Introduction to Communication Theory 

This course introduces the communication 
major to the rich body of theory and research in 
human communication. Students will examine 
theories from the traditional contexts of the 
field: interpersonal, small group, public, organi- 
zational, mass media, intercultural and gender. 
An emphasis is on applying the various theories 
to students' communicative lives. 

COMM 221 3 cr. 

Radio Production 

An examination of the dynamic industry roles of 
the radio producer/director. Areas to be studied 
include production theory and techniques which 
apply to station and program promotions, adver- 
tising, news, and music formats. 

COMM 222 3 cr. 

Television Production 

Designed to provide both theoretical back- 
ground and practical application of television 
production in and outside the studio. Various 
format types, production techniques, and artistic 
styles are studied. Opportunity for producing 
and directing television programs. 

COMM 223 3 cr. 

Radio Journalism 

(Prerequisite: COMM 221 or COMM 224 or 
COMM 328) With a focus on gathering and 
preparing news for broadcast (concentrating 
especially on interviewing techniques), this class 
will investigate various news formats and styles. 
At the mid-semester point, the class will begin 
operating as a news team. 

COMM 224 3 cr. 

(W) Newswriting 

(Prerequisite: COMM 115) Evaluating news, 
reporting, and writing stories. Newsroom organ- 
ization. Style and usage. Interviewing. Feature 
writing. Students work at computer terminals. 
Typing ability needed. 

COMM 225 3 cr. 

Advertising 

This course explores advertising as an institution 
in society, utilizing research, media planning, 
and creative strategies. Students will participate 
in the formulation of an advertising campaign 
plan for local businesses. 



COMM 226 3 cr. 

Strategic Writing for Public Relations 

Writing and editing of public relations and mar- 
keting communication materials such as press 
releases, speeches, direct mail, brochures, 
newsletter and Web sites. Writing and editing 
for electronic media and video news. Emphasis 
on integrated communications. 

COMM 227 3 cr. 

Contemporary Public Relations 

Principles of the professional practice of modern 
public relations. Concepts of planning and 
executing effective communication strategies 
including message design and distribution for 
any organization. 

COMM 228 3 cr. 

(D) Intercultural Communication 

Designed to provide a framework for under- 
standing diversity in communication patterns 
among cultures and co-cultures. Topics include 
high- and low-context patterns, verbal and non- 
verbal communication across cultures and co- 
cultures, persuasion, dialects, organization of 
verbal codes, and the structure of conversations. 

COMM 229 3 cr. 

(D) Gender and Communication 

This course focuses on interactive relationships 
between gender and communication in contem- 
porary American society by examining the mul- 
tiples ways communication in families, schools, 
media and society in general creates and perpet- 
uates gender roles. The course considers not only 
what is in terms of gender roles, but also what 
might be and how students, as change agents, 
may act to improve their individual and collec- 
tive lives. 

COMM 232 3 cr. 

Film History 

This course traces the evolution of filmmaking 
from its earliest experimental stages to the feature 
film of today. The course concentrates on the 
American film industry, its audience impact as a 
mass medium, and the genres of films that have 
evolved. Selected screenings will reveal transitions 
and refinements that characterize this medium. 

COMM 310 3cr. 

Mass Communication Law 

(Junior or senior standing) Analysis and exami- 
nation of statutory laws, congressional legisla- 
tion, and federal rules and regulations governing 
the mass media in the United States. Focus on 
the First Amendment, libel and slander, privacy, 
copyright, free press/fair trial, obscenity, adver- 



Arts and Sciences/Communication 111 



rising, antitrust and monopoly, taxarion, and 
licensing. 



COMM311 3cr. 

Political Communication 

The srudy of rherorical srrategies used by the 
modern politician. Examination of American 
polirical rhetoric as well as rhetorical styles oper- 
ative in foreign-policy activities. 

COMM 312 3 cr. 

Organizational Communication 

The study of communication behaviors, pat- 
terns, and strategies in organizations. Topics 
include power and politics, organizational cul- 
tures, human resources, conflict management, 
and negotiation. Historical and contemporary 
theories of organizing are examined and cri- 
tiqued from a communication perspective. 

COMM 313 3 cr. 

Nonverbal Communication 

A study of the nonverbal aspects of human inter- 
action. Topics include impression management, 
social influence, form and function in design, 
proxemics, kinesics, and the symbolic environment. 

COMM 314 3cr. 

Legal Communication 

An examination oi specific skills needed to pro- 
mote effective and meaningful communication 
by the legal professional and the interface with 
clients, juries, judges, and the non-legal public. 

COMM 316 3cr. 

Communication Ethics 

(Formerly Responsibility in Communication) 
This course will consider the need for and appli- 
cations of proper standards by those in today's 
media. It will also focus on the media responsi- 
bility to be aware of the public they serve. Dif- 
ferent faculty may approach this course from 
various ethical/humanistic perspectives. 

COMM 317 3 cr. 

Digital Audio and Video Production 

This course will provide an introduction to pro- 
ducing audio and video content for new tech- 
nologies such as the Web and digital publication 
formats. Students will use digital recording and 
editing equipment to produce projects suitable 
for new technologies. 

COMM 318 3 cr. 

Multi-Media Presentations 

(Prerequisite: COMM 317) This course focuses 
on the principles and practices of speaker deliv- 
ery style when using multimedia to present a 



message. Message construction and audience 
analysis will also be emphasized. 

COMM 321 3 cr. 

Advanced Radio Production 

(Prerequisite: COMM 221) Building upon the 
foundation acquired in COMM 221, students 
generate specialized projects of their own design. 
Then, working with the instructor and profes- 
sionals from the radio industry, students produce 
and direct complete programs for broadcast. 

COMM 322 3 cr. 

Advanced Television Production 

(Prerequisite: COMM 222) Building upon the 
foundation acquired in COMM. 222, students 
pursue specialized projects in producing and 
directing programs for broadcast or cable 
distribution. 

COMM 323 3 cr. 

Television Journalism 

(Prerequisite: COMM 224 or COMM 328) 
Broadcast-journalism skills are refined through 
classroom and outside assignments. Production 
techniques, including tape editing, are explored. 
Television news formats are produced. 

COMM 324 3 cr. 

(W) Computer-Assisted Reporting 

(Prerequisite: COMM 224) Intensive training 
and practice in techniques of reporting and 
writing news stories and in covering public 
affairs. Familiarity with journalistic basics, style, 
and computer terminal operations required. 

COMM 325 3 cr. 

Advertising Copywriting 

Students develop two separate creative campaign 
strategies for hypothetical clients of their own 
choosing. For these large-budget accounts, stu- 
dents must create copy for newspapers, maga- 
zines, broadcast, and direct mail, all with a con- 
sistent campaign theme. 

COMM 326 3 cr. 

Political Advertising 

Critical examination of rhetorical strategies used 
in 20th-century political campaigning. Case 
studies and student projects focus on the special 
uses of broadcast and print media in political 
advertising. 

COMM 327 3 cr. 

Cases in Strategic Public Relations 

Case studies focusing on the problems and chal- 
lenges faced by a variety of organizations. Practi- 
cal application of creative problem-solving, the- 
ory and research in actual organizations. 



112 Arts and Sciences/Communication 



COMM 328 3 cr. 

News Editing 

(Prerequisite: COMM 224) Preparing copy for 
publication. Correcting, improving and trim- 
ming stories. Headline writing, layout, graphics. 
Wire services, printing process. 

COMM 329 3 cr. 

Graphics 

Visual aspects of print media. Typography, print- 
ing presses, handling photos and other art layout 
and design, introduction to desktop pubhshing. 
Famiharity with journalism basics, style, and 
computer-terminal operations required. 

COMM 331 3 cr. 

Mass Media Management 

(Prerequisite: COMM 120) The multi-faceted 
roles of managers in the various communication 
industries are examined. Special attention is 
given to technical, conceptual and humanistic 
concerns. Specific areas of study include man- 
agement of self and personal relations, unions 
and contracts, community relations, audience 
analysis and measurement. 

COMM 332 3 cr. 

Documentary Film 

This course traces the growth, development, and 
influence of American and foreign nonfiction 
films, particularly their various functions as 
propaganda, public service and promotion, edu- 
cation, entertainment, and art. 

COMM 334 3 cr. 

Broadcast Programming 

Study of programming strategies, practices, and 
operations of commercial radio and television sta- 
tions. Topics include audience research, program 
acquisitions, scheduling, formats, syndication, 
promotion, and network-affiliate relationships. 

COMM 380 3 cr. 

Advertising Practicum 

(Prerequisite: COMM 225 or COMM 325) 
Students function as a full-service advertising 
agency which provides clients with a complete 
array of services ranging from campaign creation 
to implementation and evaluation. 

COMM 411 3cr. 

Persuasion and Propaganda 

An in-depth examination of the theoretical 
foundations and practical applications of those 
factors which influence the persuasibility of tar- 
get audiences. Topics include attitudes, beliefs, 
values, behaviors, appeals and reference groups. 



COMM 415 3cr. 

Senior Seminar 

(Prerequisite: Senior standing) This capstone course 
will synthesize course work to prepare students 
for entry into the profession of communication. 
Emphasis will be placed on the application of 
Jesuit ideals to the identification and approaches 
that concerns today's communication industry. 

COMM 416 3 cr. 

Philosophy of Communication 

A general study of the forces and dynamics that 
articulate the phenomenon of human communi- 
cation by an examination of the human capacity 
to comprehend and realize fialfillment or whole- 
ness through communication. 

COMM 422 3 cr. 

Educational Television 

Instructional uses of the television medium by 
public television stations, schools, closed-circuit 
and cable systems. Types of educational programs 
are evaluated. Students work on preparing projects 
which may reflect their own pedagogical interests. 

COMM 425 3 cr. 

Cable Television 

A study of cable television and its development 
and current place in the telecommunications 
industry. Topics include programming strategies, 
formats, multiple-system operators, independents, 
syndication, sales, satellite services, pay-per-view, 
audience ratings, management and the franchis- 
ing process. Students develop their own research 
proposals for establishing new cable channels, 
networks and services. 

COMM 426 3 cr. 

International Broadcasting 

Comparative analysis of national and international 
media systems throughout the world. Emphasis on 
their origin, development, and operation. 

COMM 427 3 cr. 

International Film 

An investigation of the major contributions and 
movements of various nations in the development 
and evolution of film as a multi-national and 
global industry. 

COMM 432 3 cr. 

Film Theory and Criticism 

Critical examination of the major theoretical and 
analytical explanations of film's effectiveness as an 
artistic form of communication. The work of clas- 
sical, contemporary and experimental film scholars 
will be studied, and selected films depicting their 
observations will be screened. Film analysis and 
criticism projects will be designed by students. 



Arts and Sciences/Computing Sciences 113 



COMM 433 3 cr. 

Television Criticism 

Analysis of radio and television programs and 
promotional strategies, including formats, scripts, 
talent, commercials, public- service announce- 
ments, positioning, ratings, and network-afFiliate 
relationships. 

COMM 480 3 cr. 

Television Practicum 

(Prerequisites: COMM 222, COMM 322) 
Communication Seniors undertake significant 
areas of study resulting in a broadcast-quality 
videotape or audiotape suitable for airing by 
commercial or non-commercial television sta- 
tions, radio stations or cable systems. 

COMM 481 3-6 cr. 

Internship 

(Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, plus 
appropriate course work, and faculty approval) 
Highly recommended for every major, this on- 
the-job experience is guided by practitioners in 
the communication field and supervised individ- 
ually by a faculty member in consultation with 
the student's advisor and the department chair. 
(Internship credits can only be used in the elec- 
tive area.) See internship director. 

COMM 482 3 cr. 

Directed Independent Study 

(Prerequisite: Senior standing) In consultation 
with the student's advisor and department chair. 
Communication Seniors undertake a significant 
area of study resulting in a major research paper. 
Students select a Communication professor whom 
they wish to direct the study. Provided to augment 
an area of the student's interest not substantially 
covered in available departmental courses. 

COMM 484 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

In-depth departmental seminars on selected 
communication topics meeting the needs and 
interests of students. Topics vary from semester 
to semester. 

COMM 499 3 cr. 

Senior Thesis 

(Prerequisites: COMM 215 and 316) An optional 
research-based written project in which Commu- 
nication seniors (in consultation with their advi- 
sor and department chair) select an issue or prob- 
lem for scholarly study, undertakes significant and 
meaningfiil research, and produces a major paper 
of publishable quality. Students select a Commu- 
nication professor whom they wish to direct their 
thesis. Strongly recommended for students plan- 
ning for graduate school. 



COMPUTING SCIENCES 

Faculty 

Richard M. Plishka, M.B.A., Chair 
John Beidler, Ph.D. 
Yaodong Bi, Ph.D. 
Joseph M. Borosky, M.S. 
Paul M. Jackowitz, M.S. 
Robert W. McCloskey, Ph.D. 
James R. Sidbury, Ph.D. 
Charles E. Taylor, M.B.A. 

Overvie\v 

The University of Scranton's Bachelor of 
Science program in Computer Science dates 
from 1970 - one of the oldest in Pennsylva- 
nia. The Computer Science Program is 
accredited by the Computing Commission of 
ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Balti- 
more, MD 21202-4012 (telephone: 410-347- 
7700). The Computer Science major provides 
an integrated introduction to Software Engi- 
neering along with the mathematical skills 
needed in Computer Science. The program 
culminates in the senior year with the Com- 
puter Projects course. Research and internship 
opportunities are available. The Computing 
Sciences department may be reached on the 
World Wide Web at www.cs.scranton.edu. 

Minor in Computer Science 

The student must take a minimum of 20 
hours including CMPS 134, MATH 142, 
CMPS 144, CMPS 240 and any two of 
CMPS 250, 260, 340, 344, 350, 352, 356, 
360, 364, 370, 372, 374 or 384. 

Computer Information Systems 

This program investigates the analysis, 
design, development, implementation, evalua- 
tion and effective use of computer informa- 
tion systems in organizations. Since business 
and government are principal users of com- 
puters, CIS majors will select cognate courses 
in business. Students are encouraged to par- 
ticipate in an internship. 

Minor in Computer Information Systems 

The student must take a minimum of 18 
credits including CMPS 134, 136 or 144, 
330, 331 and two of MATH 142, CMPS 202 
or 312, CMPS 240, 311, 340, 356 or 376. 



1 1 4 Arts and Sciences/Computing Sciences 



Computer Science Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaU Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 134-144 


Computer Science I-II 


3 


4 


COGNATE 


MATH 114 


Analysis I 




4 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GE T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH 142 


Discrete Structures 


4 




GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 




17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 240-250 


Data Structures-Machine Org. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 260 


Theoretical Foundations 




3 


COGNATE 


MATH 221-351 


Analysis I I-Li near Algebra 


4 


3 


GE NSCI 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 


GEPHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GEPHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 




18 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 352-344 


Operating Systems-Program Lang. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 340-ELECT' 


File Processing-Elective 


4 


3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 350-374 


Comp. Architecture-Software Eng. 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


MATH 310 


Applied Probability & Statistics 


4 




COGNATE 


C0GNATE2 


Cognate Elective 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Eleaive 


17 


3 
15 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 490 


Computer Projects 


3 




MAJOR 


CMPS ELECT' 


Major Electives 




6 


COGNATE 


COGNATE^ 


Cognate Elective 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 214 


Computers and Ethics 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 


132 CREDITS 


' The three electives in 


the major must be chosen fi-om CMPS 341, 354, 356. 358. 360. 362, 364. 370. 372. 376, 384, 393 


and 481. 










- At Uast 4 credits mitst he courses in the natural sciences for science majors ivhich enhance the student's ability in the application 


of the scientific method. See departmental advisor for acceptable courses. 







Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



CMPS 134 
Computer Science I 

An introduction to programming concepts and 
methodology using an appropriate object- 
oriented programming language (currently Java). 
Topics include problem analysis, abstraction, 
modularization, the development and use of 
algorithms, reuse, and the use or programming 



constructs including data types, classes, control 
structures, and methods. 

CMPS 136 3 cr. 

Computer Programming II 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 134) for non-computing 
majors who want more object-oriented program- 
ming experience. Includes data structures, file 
processing, graphical user interfaces and event- 
driven programming. May not be used to satisfy 



Arts and Sciences/Computing Sciences 115 



Computer Information Systems Curriculum 





Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 134-144 


Computer Science I-II 


3 


4 


GE QUAN-COGNATE MATH 142-114 


Discrete Structures-Analysis I 


4 


4 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE WRTG-SPCH 


NXTITG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Pliilosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 




17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 240-250 


Data Structures-Machine Org. 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ACC 253-254 


Financial & Managerial Ace. 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro.-Macro. Economics 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


MATH 204> 


Statistics 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 




16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 352-ELECP 


Operating Systems-Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 340-341 


File Processing-Database Systems 


4 


3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 330-331 


Info. Sys.-Sys. Analysis & Design 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I & II 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


16 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 490-ELECP 


Computer Projects-Elective 


3 


6 


COGNATE 


MKT351 


Intro. Marketing 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 214 


Computers and Ethics 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


3 



15 



15 



TOTAL: 131 CREDITS 

'0^57^4725/. 

^ Elective courses in the Computer hiformation Systems major must be chosen from CMPS 260, 344, 350, 354, 356, 360, 362, 
364, 370, 372. 374, 376, 384, 393 and 48 L 



the requirements of CMPS or CIS. May not be 
taken by a student who has credit for CMPS 144. 

CMPS 144 3 cr. 

Computer Science II 

(Prerequisites: CMPS 134 and MATH 142) 
This course emphasizes object-oriented software 
development, addressing both software engineer- 
ing and programming. Topics include modular- 
ization, abstraction, encapsulation/information 
hiding, software reuse, software testing, classic 
data abstractions (e.g., lists, trees) and algo- 
rithms (e.g., sorting, searching) recursion, pro- 
gram correctness, and basic algorithm analysis. 



CMPS 202 3 cr. 

Web Development 

(Prerequisite: C/IL 102 or equivalent course) A 
course that covers fundamental aspects of the 
development of personal, professional, and busi- 
ness resources using Web-development tools. 
Topics include creating Web pages using basic 
HTML; advanced HTML concepts; frames; 
JavaScript to enhance Web pages; forms; CGI 
(common gateway interface); Java classes. 
Emphasis is on client-side development although 
server-side issues are discussed. This is a techni- 
cal course for students who do not necessarily 
have a technical background. May not be used as 
part of any major in the Computing Sciences 
Department. 



1 1 6 Arts and Sciences/Computing Sciences 



CMPS 240 3 cr. 

Data Structures and Algorithms 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 144) An examination of the 
issues of data representation, algorithm struc- 
ture, and encapsulation as they pertain to the 
development of object-oriented software. 
Abstract data types studied include stacks, 
queues, binary trees, n-ary trees, and graphs. 
Various representation alternatives are analyzed 
and compared, trade-ofifs frequently encountered 
by software developers are discussed. 

CMPS 250 3 cr. 

Machine Organization and Assembly 
Language Programming 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 144) An introductory study 
of the organization and architecture of computers 
through an exploration of various virtual 
machines. Programming at the assembly-lan- 
guage level and interfacing with software compo- 
nents (primarily written in C). Topics include 
representation of data and instructions, computer 
arithmetic, memory hierarchies, instruction sets, 
addressing modes, digital logic, microprogram- 
ming, pipelining, and parallel processing. 

CMPS 260 3 cr. 

Theoretical Foimdations of Computer Science 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 240) An examination of 
the ftindamental models and concepts of com- 
putation - automata, formal languages, and 
grammars - and how they are related. Church- 
Turing thesis; recursive and recursively enumer- 
able sets; unsolvable problems; complexity of 
algorithms; Chomsky hierarchy. 

CMPS 301 3cr. 

Computer Networks and Security 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 136 or CMPS 144) An 
introduction to intranets and wide-area network- 
ing including operating systems fundamentals, 
hardware considerations, deployment and 
administration of networks, security issues, 
intrusion detection/protection, firewalls, VPN's 
and encryption. May not be used to satisfy the 
requirements of the major. May not be taken by 
a student who has credit for CMPS 354. 

CMPS 312 3 cr. 

Web Technology 

(Prerequisites: C/IL 102 or equivalent, COMM 
329, CMPS 311) This course covers the funda- 
mental aspects of developing and maintaining 
Web sites. It provides a thorough coverage of the 
structure and elements of HTML and JavaScript 
necessary to create commercial-quality Web sites. 
Brief coverage will also be given to graphic 



design and multimedia content. Emphasis will 
be placed on client-side development although 
server-side issues will be considered. May not be 
used as part of any major in the Computing Sci- 
ences Department. Cannot be taken by a stu- 
dent who has credit for CMPS 202 or 356. 

CMPS 330 3 cr. 

(W) Information Systems Analysis 

(Prerequisite: C/IL 102/104 or CMPS 134) 
Introduction to concepts and practices of infor- 
mation processing. Computerized system require- 
ments and techniques in providing appropriate 
decision-making information to management. 

CMPS 331 3cr. 

Information Systems Development 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 330) A study of system- 
development methodology and the role played 
by the systems analyst in developing user- 
accepted information systems. 

CMPS 340 4 cr. 

File Processing 

(Prerequisites: CMPS 144 required, CMPS 240 
recommended.) File-structures concepts and file- 
processing applications using an appropriate pro- 
gramming language (currently COBOL). Topics 
include file maintenance and storage management; 
file searching, sorting, and merging; cosequential 
processing; index structures; B-trees; hash tables; 
indexed sequential files; database concepts. 

CMPS 341 3 cr. 

Database Systems 

(Prerequisites: CMPS 340 required, CMPS 240 
recommended) An introduction to database 
management systems with an emphasis on rela- 
tional database design and applications. It uses an 
appropriate database package such as ORACLE 
or PostgreSQL. 

CMPS 344 3 cr. 

Programming Languages 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 240) A study of program- 
ming languages from both the theoretical and 
practical perspectives. A survey of major and 
developing paradigms and languages is under- 
taken which includes use of specific languages to 
broaden the student's experience. Implementa- 
tion is studied through an introduction to lan- 
guage translation along with a study of run-time 
models and interfaces with virtual machines. 

CMPS 350 3 cr. 

Computer Architecture 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 250) A study of the logical 
structure of computer-system organization 



Arts and Sciences/Computing Sciences 117 



including a survey of logic and design with an 
emphasis on functional components. Topics 
include instruction sets, hard-wired and micro- 
programmed control-unit designs, memory sys- 
tems (caches and virtual memory), I/O systems 
(interrupts, DMA, and channels). Overview and 
examples of alternative and advanced computer 
architectures (pipeline, array processors, multi- 
processors). 

CMPS 352 3 cr. 

Operating Systems 

(Prerequisites: CMPS 240, CMPS 250) An intro- 
duction to the principles of operating systems. 
Topics include operating system structure, process 
management, scheduling and dispatching, process 
synchronization and interprocess communication, 
memory management, virtual memory, device 
management, I/O, and file systems. 

CMPS 354 3 cr. 

Data Communications and Networks 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 352) A study of data com- 
munication and networking concepts, including 
distributed-system architectures, electronic inter- 
faces, data-transmission, data link protocols, 
terminal networks, computer communication, 
public-data networks, and local-area networks. 

CMPS 356 3 cr. 

Web Programming 

(Prerequisites: CMPS 240, HTML experience to 
the level where the students are capable of devel- 
oping their own Web page) This course covers 
all aspects of programming on the World Wide 
Web. This includes the presentation of HTML, 
Java, JavaScript and CGI. Topics include 
advanced HTML (maps, forms, etc.) client- 
server programming basics as they relate to the 
Web, Java machine concepts, Java/JavaScript 
similarities and differences, server-side program- 
ming, GIF animations, Web programming 
resources and environments. 

CMPS 358 3 cr. 

Real-Time Systems 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 352) A study of issues 
related to systems that interface with the physi- 
cal world and must meet the timing constraints 
imposed on them. Topics include: real-time 
hardware architecture, real-time operating systems, 
invoking and managing threads and processes, 
interprocess communications and synchroniza- 
tion, manipulating process priority, concurrent 
programming, exception handling, software 
safety, reliability, and fault tolerance. 



CMPS 360 3 cr. 

Analysis of Algorithms 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 240) A survey of methods 
for designing and analyzing algorithms. Classic 
algorithms from graph theory, combinatorics and 
text processing are examined, as are traditional 
design strategies such as divide-and-conquer, 
backtracking and dynamic programming. Other 
topics include NP-completeness and parallel 
algorithms. 

CMPS 362 3 cr. 

Numerical Analysis 

(Prerequisites: CMPS 134, MATH 222) A sur- 
vey of numerical methods for solving equations, 
integration, differentiation, interpolation, differ- 
ential equations, and linear algebra, and the 
analysis of error. 

CMPS 364 3 cr. 

Theory of Computation 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 260) The development of a 
theoretical notion of computability and its rela- 
tionship to Turing computability and recursive 
functions; the study of the relationships between 
automata, formal languages and grammars. 

CMPS 370 3 cr. 

Computer Graphics 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 240) An introduction to 
the hardware, software and techniques used to 
generate graphical representations by computer. 
Two and three dimensional concepts, algorithms 
and architectures are studied. An essential aspect 
of the course involves the development of pro- 
grams utilizing appropriate APIs (currently 
OpenGL is emphasized) as a means of develop- 
ing expertise. Advanced topics may be pursued 
as appropriate. 

CMPS 372 3 cr. 

Artificial Intelligence 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 240) Problem solving using 
expert systems, heuristic programming tech- 
niques, tree speed-up techniques, and learning 
mechanisms. 

CMPS 374 3 cr. 

(W) Fundamentals of Software Engineering 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 240) An introduction to 
the concepts of Software Engineering. Stress is 
placed upon formal models for the design and 
development of high-quality soft^vare. Topics 
include: project planning, requirements analysis, 
system design, program design, program imple- 
mentation, program testing, system testing, sys- 
tem delivery, and maintenance. A group project 
will be included. 



118 Arts and Sciences/Criminal Justice 



CMPS 376 3 cr. 

Rapid Prototyping 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 136 or CMPS 144) Some 
common applications using a database with a 
visual interface (perhaps Web based) can be suc- 
cessfully created using Rapid Prototyping (a.k.a. 
Rapid Application Development) This course 
will cover the synergy of combining a visual lan- 
guage and a relational database employing rigor- 
ous design techniques. 

CMPS 384 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

(Prerequisite: as published) Some recent courses 
have covered Rapid Prototyping, Real-Time Sys- 
tems, and Parallel Computing. A syllabus 
including prerequisites is published prior to the 
registration period for the course. 

CMPS 393 3 cr. 

Computer Research 

(Departmental permission required) A research 
project carried out by a student under the direc- 
tion of a faculty member in the department. The 
results will be prepared in a form suitable for 
publication. Reader fee. 

CMPS 440 3 cr. 

Compiler Design 

(Prerequisite: CMPS 344) Study of techniques 
and problems involved in constructing compil- 
ers. Lexical analysis, syntax analysis, semantic 
analysis, symbol-table management, code genera- 
tion, code optimization. 

CMPS 481 3cr. 

Computer Internship 

(Departmental permission required) An extensive 
job experience in computing which carries aca- 
demic credit. Prior approval is required and infor- 
mation is available on the department Web site. 

CMPS 490 3 cr. 

(W) Computer Projects 

(Prerequisite: Senior standing, departmental per- 
mission required) In this course students prepare 
and present individual computer projects to be 
evaluated by the instructor and their fellow 
students. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Joseph F. Cimini, J.D., Chair 
See Sociology for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The Bachelor of Science degree program in 
Criminal Justice has the following objectives: 

1 . To prepare students for careers in law 
enforcement at the local, state or federal 
levels. 

2. To prepare students for careers in the 
field of correction and rehabilitation: 
parole, prisons, juvenile delinquency, etc. 

3. To provide students with academic 
preparation for advanced study in law, 
criminology, public administration and 
related fields. The Criminal Justice 
major is administered by the Depart- 
ment of Sociology/Criminal Justice, 
which also administers the Sociology and 
Gerontology degree programs. An advi- 
sory board of community leaders work- 
ing in the field of criminal justice has 
been established to work with University 
students, faculty and administrators. 

Minor in Criminal Justice 

The minor in Criminal Justice requires 18 
credits. There are three required courses: SOC 
110: Introduction to Sociology, CJ 110: 
Introduction to Criminal Justice and S/CJ 
213: Criminology. The following elective 
courses are strongly recommended by the 
department in the Criminal Justice sequence: 
S/CJ 212: Criminological Research, S/CJ 
214: Juvenile Delinquency, S/CJ 210: Law 
and Society, and CJ 312: Criminal Law. 

Course Descriptions 

CJ 110 3cr. 

(S) Introduction to Criminal Justice 

A foundation course examining problems in the 
study of crime and criminal justice, basic ele- 
ments of criminal law and constitutional rights, 
and the functions of, as well as the relationship 
between, major components of the criminal-jus- 
tice system; agencies and role of law enforce- 
ment; prosecution; the judicial process, and cor- 
rections. 



Arts and Sciences/Criminal Justice 119 



Criminal Justice Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


CJ110-S/CJ213 


Intro, to Crim. Just.-Criminology 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


SOC 110 


Intro to Sociology 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GEHUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


S/CJ 210 


Law and Society 


3 




MAJOR 


S/CJ218-S/CI220 


Amer. Court System-Penology 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


S/CJ 212 


Criminological Research 


3 




GEQUAN 


S/CJ 215 


Statistics for the Social Sciences 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CJ ELECT 


Criminal Justice Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


SOC 224 


American Minority Groups 


3 




COGNATE 


SOC SCI ELECT' 


Social Science Electives 


3 


6 


GE S/BH 


PS 131 


American National Government II 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT2 


Free Electives 


6 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CJ ELECT 


Criminal Justice Electives 


3 


6 


MAJOR 


CJ 480-481 or ELECT 


Internships or Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Social Science Electives 


3 


6 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT- 


Free Elective 


3 




15 


15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' The department recommends PS 135: State and Local Government, PSYC 225: Abnormal Psychology, PSYC224: Personality. 


SOC 116: Community 


; Organization, SOC 118: Child 


Welfare, SOC 231: Urban Sociology, SOC 228. 


: Social Psychology. 


- In the elective area, if the student is considering general I 


msiness as a minor, the department strongly reco 


mmends ACC 253: 


Financial Accounting, . 


ACC 254: Managerial Accounting and MGT 35 1 : Principles of Management I. 







S/CJ 210 3 cr. 

(S) Law and Society 

The relationship between law and society, or the 
interaction of legal and social variables. Exam- 
ines jurisprudential and social theories of law; 
development of law; the role of the legal profes- 
sion; legal behavior and decision making; and 
law and social change. 

S/CJ 212 3 cr. 

Criminological Research 

Survey of methods and techniques for achieving 
interpretable results in research in the criminal- 
justice field; research design; data collection. 



S/CJ 213 3 cr. 

(S) Criminology 

Crime as a form of deviant behavior; nature and 
extent of crime; past and present theories; evalu- 
ation of prevention, control and treatment programs. 

S/CJ 214 3cr. 

(S) Juvenile Delinquency 

Nature and extent of delinquency: competing 
explanatory models and theories; evaluation of 
prevention, control, and treatment programs. 



120 Arts and Sciences/Criminal Justice 



S/CJ 215 3 cr. 

(Q) Statistics for the Social Sciences 

An introduction to the techniques used by social 
scientists to analyze their data. Students learn 
descriptive and inferential statistics in conjunction 
with computer usage. Basic skills and procedures 
are taught for organizing and describing data, 
assessing relationships among social variables, 
and using this information to make inferences 
about the population. 

S/CJ 218 3 cr. 

(S) The American Court System 

Mindfiil of the role played by our judiciary in 
resolving disputes, setting policy, and otherwise 
having an impact on everyday life, this course 
provides a basic examination of America's courts 
in terms of their history and development, their 
structure and organization, their procedures, 
people, institutions and issues. 

S/CJ 220 3 cr. 

Penology: The American Correctional System 

Analysis and evaluation of contemporary correc- 
tional systems; theories of punishment; discus- 
sion of recent research concerning the correc- 
tional institution and the various field services; 
the history of corrections in Pennsylvania. 

S/CJ 221 3 cr. 

Community-Based Corrections 

Examination of community treatment in the 
correctional process; contemporary usage of pre- 
sentence investigation, selection, supervision, 
release of probationers and parolees. 

S/CJ 224 3 cr. 

(S,W) Sociology of Deviance 

Critical examination of theories and empirical 
studies of social deviance, focusing upon the for- 
mulation and application of deviant labels, 
organizations relating to deviance, and deviant 
behavioral patterns. Special attention given to 
noncriminal forms of deviance. 

S/CJ 225 3 cr. 

White-CoUar Crime 

A study of white-collar crime, including corpo- 
rate misdeeds, political corruption, occupational 
illegalities and upperworld deviance. This course 
will explore the causes, consequences, and crimi- 
nal-justice system response to white-collar crime. 

S/CJ 226 3 cr. 

(S,D) Comparative Justice Systems 

An exploration of the meaning and character of 
justice, law and crime in different cultures and 
countries, and of evolving global standards and 



patterns of justice, international law, and trans- 
national crime, making specific comparisons 
between Western and Eastern nations, capitahst 
and socialist systems, and countries having much 
crime and little crime. 

S/CJ 227 3 cr. 

Organized Crime Patterns 

The national and international organizational 
structure of organized crime will be analyzed. 
Primary attention will be given to comparative 
theories and concepts. The various methods of 
prosecution, investigation and control will be 
discussed. 

CJ 230 3 cr. 

Crime Prevention 

This course analyzes the basic theories of com- 
munity policing, problem-solving policing and 
crime prevention. The emphasis is on primary, 
secondary and tertiary prevention techniques. 
Emphasis will be given to the various analytical 
approaches to the study of criminal profiling, 
terrorism and methods of planning. 

S/CJ 232 3 cr. 

Public Safety Administration 

An overview of the public-safety field - its phi- 
losophy, disciplines and research. The course 
focuses on an examination of the police and 
governmental responses to disaster and acci- 
dents. A primary emphasis is given to the various 
analytical approaches to the study of terrorism. 
Methods of planning, investigation and preven- 
tion are discussed. 

S/CJ 234 3 cr. 

Criminal-Justice Management 

This course surveys major trends in law enforce- 
ment including leadership, management, and 
administration. It includes discussion of police 
personnel issues, computerized training pro- 
grams and police health issues. The emphasis is 
on critical thinking, problem solving and con- 
temporary policing practices. 

CJ 237 3 cr. 

The Investigative Process 

This course considers appropriate investigative 
procedures concerning major criminal investiga- 
tions. An analysis of specific investigative theories 
and courtroom applications will be conducted 
through learning simulation. The homicide 
court problem will focus on the preservation and 
admission of evidence. 



Arts and Sciences/Economics 121 



S/CJ 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics in Criminal Justice 

(Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and 
instructor) Courses designed to meet specific 
needs of individual students or courses offered 
on a trial basis to determine the value of placing 
them into the regular curriculum. 

CJ310 3cr. 

Criminal Justice Process 

A study of the law of criminal procedure, treating 
investigation and police practices, preliminary 
proceedings, and trial, as they relate to the devel- 
opment and structure of the American criminal- 
justice system and as they affect offenders. 

CJ 312 3 cr. 

Criminal Law 

A study of substantive criminal law in view of its 
historical foundations, purpose, functions and 
limits; of crime and defenses generally; and of 
the elements which constitute certain specific 
crimes under state and federal statutes. 

S/CJ 314 3 cr. 

The Bill of Rights and Criminal Justice 

From the perspective of the criminal-justice pro- 
fessional, this course addresses key principles 
enunciated in the first, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth 
and fourteenth amendments to the Constitution 
of the United States. 

S/CJ 316 3cr. 

Principles of Evidence 

An examination of the law of evidence pertain- 
ing to the trial of a criminal case. A discussion of 
the common law, pertinent statutes, judicial opin- 
ions, and rules (e.g., the Federal Rules of Evi- 
dence) relating to: direct and circumstantial evi- 
dence; opinion testimony; exhibits; competence, 
relevance, materiality; privileges; and hearsay and 
its exceptions. 

S/CJ 317 3 cr. 

Trial, Jury and Counsel 

A consideration of the rights guaranteed by the 
Sixth Amendment to The Constitution of the 
United States, surveying constitutional provi- 
sions, statutes, court rules, and cases concerning 
the right of a criminal defendant to a speedy and 
public trial, to trial by jury, and to the assistance 
of counsel. 

S/CJ 318 3 cr. 

Civil Liability 

An examination of the law-enforcement officer 
or employee as a defendant in a civil suit arising 
from the scope of his or her employment. Liabil- 



ity based upon rights statutes is examined, along 
with consideration of the typical defenses. 

S/CJ 324 3 cr. 

Victimology 

An examination of the causes and consequences 
of crime victimization. The recent emergence of 
the study of the victim, the types and circum- 
stances of victimization, and the nature of the 
criminal- justice system's response to crime vic- 
tims are considered, along with the ethical and 
practical dimensions of crime victimization. 

CJ 382-383 3 cr. 

Independent Study in Criminal Justice 

(Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson and 
instructor) Directed projects and surveys in 
criminal justice, law enforcement, and correc- 
tions designed to give the student academic flex- 
ibility. 

CJ 480-481 3cr. 

Internship Experience 

(Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) Supervised 
experiential learning in an approved criminal- 
justice setting, taken preferably in junior and 
senior year. 



ECONOMICS 

Satyajit Ghosh, Ph.D., Chair 

See Economics (KSOM) for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The Arts and Sciences major in Economics 
ofifers students a strong general liberal-arts 
background and at the same time a thorough 
grounding in the most quantitative of the 
social sciences. Its major requirements parallel 
those of The Kania School of Management 
Economics major (see p. 212), while its cog- 
nate provides background in the social sci- 
ences. The major in Economics equips stu- 
dents with the training and background 
needed to assume responsible, decision-making 
positions in the financial sector, industries and 
government service. It is especially appropriate 
for students intending graduate studies in 
Economics or careers in law. 

Minor in Economics 

18 credits consisting of ECO 153-154 (or 
ECO 101, 102); ECO 361-362, plus two 
upper-level economics courses. 



122 Arts and Sciences/Economics 



Economics Curriculum 






■■w. 




Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE S/BH) 


ECO 153-154 


Principles of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology 1 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT- 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


ECO 361-362 


Intermediate Micro-Macro Econ. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


STAT 253 


Statistics for Economics 




3 


COGNATE 


ACC 253 


Financial Accounting 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humn. Electives (HIST 110-111 recomm. 


) 3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT' 


Free Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of International Business 


3 




MAJOR 


ECO ELECT 


Economics Elective 


3 


6 


COGNATE 


FIN 351 


Intro, to Finance 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECTA 


Cognate Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


3 
15 


3 
15 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


ECO 460 


Monetary and Financial Economics 


3 




MAJOR 


ECO ELECT-ECO 490 


Eco. Elective-Seminar 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECTA 


Cognate Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


6 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 






TOTAL: 130 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options, page 205. 


: 2 IfEDUC 113 is requii 


'ed in the first semester, it is taken 


in place of a humanities elective and is counted as a GEfree 


elective. 


One GE free elective in 


t the fourth year must then be taken as a humanities elective. 






^ If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 






■* Economics majors may 


apply up to 6 cognate credits toward a Math minor. Students taking the sequence open to Math majors 


are strongly urged to complete the calculus sequence by taking A4ATH 222, particularly if they plan on pursuing graduate studies. 


Economics majors in the 


College of Arts and Sciences ivillct 


'pply their elective cognate credits to the following areas (exceptions 


require the permission of the CAS Dean): Political Science, 


Psychology, Public Administration, Sociology. Nini 


? credits must be in 


the same field. 











Arts and Sciences/Engineering 123 



ENGINEERING 

Robert A. Spalletta, Ph.D., Director 
See Physics for faculty listing. 

Overview 

Engineering is the profession in which a 
knowledge of the mathematical and natural 
sciences gained by study, experience, and 
practice is judiciously applied to develop ways 
to utilize, economically, the materials and 
forces of nature for the benefit of mankind. A 
number of majors are available. 

Computer Engineering 

The undergraduate Computer Engineering 
curriculum is broad-based with continually 
updated content in computers, engineering 
science, and engineering design. The objec- 
tives of this program are to prepare our stu- 
dents for a professional career in computer 
engineering and to prepare them for advanced 
study in computer engineering, computer sci- 
ence, or electrical engineering. The technical 
core of the program emphasizes theoretical 
and laboratory skills, hardware and software 
skills, simulation and design. 

Students in the Computer Engineering pro- 
gram study basic science, mathematics, com- 
puter science, electrical engineering, design, 
writing, pubhc speaking, and the liberal arts in 
order to prepare for a professional career or 
advanced studies. The program includes 
courses from the programs of Computer Sci- 
ence and Electrical Engineering, providing bal- 
anced coverage and integration of the hard- 
ware and software aspects of computer 
systems. The design process is emphasized 
throughout all four years, and design projects 
are included in all laboratory courses. The 
sophomore and junior years include core 
courses in computer algorithms, digital system 
design, computer architectures, microprocessor 
systems, computer interfacing, and program- 
ming. These courses provide a foundation for 
the senior year, which includes electives and 
an in-depth two-semester design project. 

Career opportunities in computer engineer- 
ing range from computer applications such as 
computational medicine, oceanic engineering, 
and office automation to robotics, software 
engineering systems design, graduate study, 



reliability and other applications such as neu- 
ral networks. 

Electrical Engineering 

The Electrical Engineering major of the 
Department of Physics/EE prepares the stu- 
dent for the analysis and design of electronic 
systems and devices whose principal functions 
are the shaping and control of information. 
The Department of Physics/EE offers four 
areas of focus: Computer Engineering, Bio- 
medical Engineering, Optical Engineering, 
and Environmental Instrumentation Engi- 
neering. The specific electives for these areas 
of focus will be chosen in consultation with 
the student's academic advisor. 

Electronics-Business 

The state of the business world today is 
such that a major portion of its administrative 
effort must be geared to the supervision of 
persons engaged in complex technological 
processes often involving applications of elec- 
tronics. As a consequence, the ideal adminis- 
trator is now one who is conversant with both 
good business practice and technological 
know-how. The Electronics-Business major 
provides a student with a program of carefully 
selected business and economics courses cou- 
pled with a series of coordinated physics and 
electrical engineering courses so as to provide 
preparation for an administrative career in an 
electronically oriented business enterprise. 
The program also provides sufficient prepara- 
tion for further studies leading to the Master 
of Business Administration. 

Pre-Engineering 

The University provides a pre-engineering 
program which introduces the student to the 
highly technical training necessary for all 
phases of the engineering profession. This is a 
two-year course of study which enables the 
student to transfer to another school to com- 
plete his or her degree work. 

Of special importance is The University of 
Scranton's association with the Cooperative 
Engineering Program at the University of 
Detroit Mercy, and its programs in chemical, 
civil, electrical, environmental, and mechani- 
cal engineering. For the student who has 
completed the pre-engineering curriculum at 
The University of Scranton, the Detroit 



1 24 Arts and Sciences/Engineering 



Mercy three-year cooperative program offers 
alternate semesters of formal instruction and 
work experience in industry. A direct transfer 
program is available with Widener College, 
which may be either a co-op program begin- 
ning in the summer preceding the junior year 
or a regular two-year program. In addition to 
the valuable experience gained from industry, 
many students have been able to pay the cost 
of their tuition from the remuneration 
received for their work. This amounts to a 
substantial equivalent scholarship grant. 
Other schools into which University of Scran- 
ton students transfer include Lehigh, Buck- 
nell, Penn State and Drexel. 

Generally, different engineering programs 
have slightly different requirements which 
must be completed before starting the junior 
year. These will vary from school to school. 
Therefore, students should, before beginning 
the sophomore year, consult with an advisor 
at the institution at which they plan to com- 
plete their studies. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



ENGR 250 

Engineering Mechanics-Statics 

(Prerequisite: PHYS 140; pre- or co-requisite: 
MATH 221) Various types offeree systems; 
resultants and conditions of translational and 
rotational equilibrium; stress analysis of the parts 
of different types of structures by graphical, alge- 
braic and vector methods; frictional forces; cen- 
troids and second moments of areas of solids. 
Three hours lecture. 

ENGR 251 3cr. 

Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics 

(Prerequisite: ENGR 250; pre- or co-requisite: 
MATH 222) Kinematics of particles and rigid 
bodies which include linear, curvilinear, angular 
and relative motions; inertia forces, impulse, 
momentum, work, energy and power; mechani- 
cal vibrations. Three hours lecture. 

ENGR 252 3 cr. 

Solid State Materials Science 

(Prerequisites: PHYS 270, MATH 222) The 
crystalline state of matter; multielectron atoms 
and the band theory of solids; quantum statis- 
tics; applications to p-n junction diodes includ- 
ing photodetectors, LEDs and photovoltaics; 
biopolar and field-effect transistors; transistor 
modeling. Three hours lecture. 



ENGR 253 1 cr. 

An Introduction to Computer-Aided Design 

(Prerequisites: MATH 114, CMPS 134) This 
course is an introduction to the methods of 
drafting and design using computer-aided tech- 
niques. Topics to be covered include plane 
geometry construction, projection theory, sec- 
tional views, dimensioning, tolerancing and the 
development of working drawings. Extensive use 
will be made of commercially available CAD 
software packages. Two hours laboratory. 

ENGR 254 1 cr. 

3D Computer-Aided Design 

(Prerequisite: ENGR 253) Advanced computer- 
aided design lab with emphasis on three-dimen- 
sional techniques. Topics include wireframe and 
solid modeling, rendering and Boolean opera- 
tions and use of a finite-element program for 
mechanical analysis of CAD designs. Extensive 
use will be made of commercially available soft- 
ware packages. Two hours laboratory. 

ENGR 350 3 cr. 

Applied and Engineering Mathematics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 222, PHYS l4l) Hrst- 
and second-order differential equations with 
constant coefficients; Fourier series, Fourier 
transforms and Laplace transforms; partial differ- 
ential equations and boundary-value problems; 
special functions (e.g., Bessel functions and 
Legendre polynomials); numerical analysis and 
use of maple software. (Also listed as PHYS 
350.) Three hours lecture. 

ENGR 352 3 cr. 

Statistical and Engineering Thermodynamics 

(Prerequisite: PHYS 270) Derivation of 
Thermo-dynamics from probability theory and 
atomic physics; Laws of Thermodynamics; 
Maxwell relations; chemical potential and phase 
changes; refrigerators and heat pumps; theory of 
gasses and theory of solids. Special topics 
dependent upon interests of majors represented. 
(Also listed as PHYS 352.) Three hours lecture. 

E/CE 240 3 cr. 

Introduction to Computer Engineering 

(Formerly EE 240) Introduction to combina- 
tional and sequential digital-logic circuits. Analy- 
sis and design techniques including Boolean alge- 
bra and Karnaugh mapping. Use of the computer 
to simulate digital circuits. Three hours lecture. 

EE241 4cr. 

Circuit Analysis 

(Prerequisite: PHYS 14 1; pre- or co-requisite: 
MATH 222) Intermediate course treating Kirch- 



Arts and Sciences/Engineering 125 



Computer 


Engineering Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










COGNATE 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


CMPS 134-144 


Computer Science I-II 


3 


4 


COGNATE 


MATH 142-114 


Discrete Struaures-Analysis I 


4 


4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GEWRTG 


WRTG 107 


Composition 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




16 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


E/CE 240-EE 241 


Intro, to Comp. Eng. I-Circuit Analysis 


3 


4 


COGNATE 


PHYS 270 


Modern Physics 


4 




COGNATE 


EE 243L 


Digital System Design Lab 




2 


COGNATE 


MATH 221-222 


Analysis II-III 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


CMPS 240 


Data Structures 


3 




MAJOR 


CMPS 250 


Machine Organizauon 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-210 


Introduction to Philosophy-Ethics 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Pubhc Speaking 


18 


3 
19 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EE 343-344 


Electronic Circuits I-II 


5 


3 


MAJOR 


ENGR 350 


Applied & Engineering Math 


3 




MAJOR 


EE346 


Digital Signal Processing 




3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 350-E/CE 340 


Computer Architecture-Digital Systems 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112 


General and Analytical Chemistry 


4.5 




GEHUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GES/BHl 


S/BH ELECT' 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


18.5 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


EE449 


Computer Interfacing 


5 




MAJOR 


EE 450^54 


Control Systems-Robotics Design 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CMPS 374 


Fimdamentals of Software Engineering 




3 


COGNATE 


ENGR 250 


Engineering Mechanics-Statics 


3 




MAJOR 


CMPS 3522-344 


Operating Systems-Programming Langs 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Himianities Electives 




6 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




18 


18 






TOTAL: 143.5 CREDITS 


' ECO 153-154 suggested 








^ Or technical elective in Physics (PHYS 372, 447, 460, 473. 474) 







hoff s Laws, resistive networks, systematic meth- 
ods, network theorems, first-and second-order 
transients, and sinusoidal steady-state. Introduc- 
tion to SPICE. Three hours lecture and two 
hours laboratory. 

EE 243L 3 cr. 

Digital System Design Laboratory 

(Formerly EE 345L) Introduction to the design, 
construction and testing of digital logic circuits. 
Most of the major components of a computer 



will be investigated. Use of computer program to 
draw circuits and designs. Three hours laboratory. 

E/CE 340 3 cr. 

Digital Systems 

(Prerequisites: E/CE 240, MATH 142, CMPS 
350) Analysis and design of advanced digital cir- 
cuits, minimization techniques, combinational 
and sequential circuit design and numerical 
techniques. The interdependence of hardware 
and software on computer design will be stressed. 



1 26 Arts and Sciences/Engineering 



Electronics-Business Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (S/BH) 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro. Economics 


3 


3 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 103-1 14 or 


Pre-Caiculus.-Analysis I OR 








MATH 114-221 


Analysis I-II 


4 


4 


COGNATE (GE NSCI) 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


18 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


E/CE 240 


Introduction to Computer Engineering 


4 




MAJOR 


EE241 


Circuit Analysis 




4 


MAJOR 


ACC 253-254 


Fin. Accounting-Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ENGR 252 


Solid State Material Science 




3 


COGNATE 


PHYS 270 


Elements of Modern Physics 


4 




COGNATE 


MATH 221-222 or 


Analysis II-III OR 


4 






MATH 222-341 


Analysis Ill-Differential Equations 




4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


18 


15 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EE 343-344 


Electronic Circuits I-II 


5 


3 


MAJOR 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanides Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


17 


1 
16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


MGT351 


Principles of Management 1 


3 




MAJOR 


MKT351 


Introduction to Marketing 




3 


MAJOR 


FIN 351 


Introduction to Finance 


3 




MAJOR 


OIM 352 


Introduction to Operations Management 




3 


MAJOR 


OIM351 


Introduction to Management Science 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 132 CREDITS 



EE 343 3 cr. 

Electronic Circuits I 

(Prerequisites: EE 241, ENGR 252) Analysis 
and design of analog electronic circuits using 
diodes, BJTs, and FETs. Emphasis is placed on 
amplifier circuits and their frequency depend- 
ence. Three hours lecture. 

EE 343L 2 cr. 

Electronic Circuits I Lab 

(Co-requisite: EE 343) Experiments with diodes, 
BJTs, JFETs and MOSFETs. Some of the experi- 
ments are short projects to introduce the student 
to the application of design principles. Three 
hours laboratory. 



EE 344 3 cr. 

Electronic Circuits II 

(Prerequisite: EE 343, EE 343L) Laboratory- 
oriented course designed to acquaint students 
with the operation and design of electronic 
instrumentation. Analysis of electronic instru- 
ments used in various applications and the 
design of special-purpose instrumentation. 
Emphasis on use of operational amplifiers in 
design situations. One hour lecture and three 
hours laboratory. 

EE 346 3 cr. 

Digital Signal Processing 

(Prerequisites: EE 240, EE 241) A study of dis- 
crete-time signals and systems, convolution, z- 
transform, discrete Fourier transform, and FFT 



Arts and Sciences/Engineering 1 27 



Electrical Engineering Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










COGNATE (GE NSCI) 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 114-221 


Analysis I-II 


4 


4 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMMlOO 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL-ELECT 


C/IL 102-CMPS 134 


Comp. & Info. Lit.-Intro. to CMPS 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


Second Year 






18 


18 


MAJOR 


E/CE240-EE241 


Intro to Computer Engr.-Circuit Analysis 


3 


4 


MAJOR 


EE 243L 


Digital System Design Lab 




2 


COGNATE 


ENGR 250-252 


Statics-Solid State Materials 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ENGR 253-254 


Intro, to CAD-3D CAD 


1 


1 


COGNATE 


PHYS 270 


Elements of Modern Physics 


4 




COGNATE 


MATH 222-341 


Analysis III-DifFerential Equations 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112 


General and Analytical Chemistry 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


18 


3 
17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EE 447^48 


Electromagnetics I-II 


3 


4 


MAJOR 


EE 343-344 


Electronic Circuits I-II 


5 


3 


MAJOR 


EE346 


Digital Signal Processing 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Elective 




3 


COGNATE 


ENGR 350 


Applied and Engineering Math 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GEHUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


17 


1 

17 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


EE449 


Computer Interfacing 


5 




MAJOR 


EE451 


Communications Systems 




3 


MAJOR 


EE450 


Control Systems 


3 




MAJOR 


EE 452-453 


VLSI I-II 


2 


2 


MAJOR 


EE454 


Robotics Design Project 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT- 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




17 


17 






TOTAL: 139 CREDITS 


' An advanced technical elective approved by the department 








^ ECO 101 is recommended 


hy the departmait. 









algorithms. Analysis and design techniques for 
digital filters and their realizations. Emphasis 
will be on the use of computer-aided interactive 
digital- signal processing programs for several 
projects on signal analysis and filter design. 
Three hours lecture. 

EE 447 3 cr. 

Electromagnetics I 

(Prerequisites: PHYS 270, ENGR 350) Analytic 
treatment of electrical and magnetic theory; vec- 
tor calculus of electrostatic fields; dielectric mate- 
rials; vector calculus of magnetic fields. (Also 
listed as PHYS 447.) Three hours lecture. 



EE 448 3 cr. 

Electromagnetics II 

(Prerequisite: EE 447) Magnetic materials, elec- 
tromagnetic induction, displacement currents, 
Maxwell's equations; radiation and waves; appli- 
cations include transmission lines, wave guides, 
and antennas. (Also listed as PHYS 448.) Three 
hours lecture. 

EE 448L 1 cr. 

Electromagnetics Design Laboratory 

(Co-requisite: EE 448) Laboratory designed to 
emphasize and reinforce the experimental basis 
of electromagnetism. Multi-week projects 



128 Arts and Sciences/Engineering 



Pre-Engineering 


; Transfer Program Curriculum 


m 


■Pi 




Department atid Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










COGNATE (GE NSCI) 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 - 


COGNATE 


CMPS 134 


Computer Science I 




3 = 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 114-221 


Analysis I-II 


4 


4 • 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


18 


18 ^ 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EE240 


Introduction to Digital Circuits 


3 




MAJOR 


EE241 


Circuit Analysis 




4 


MAJOR 


ENGR 250-252 


Statics-Solid Material Science 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ENGR 253-254 


Introduction to CAD-3-D CAD 


1 


1 


COGNATE 


PHYS 270 


Elements of Modern Physics 


4 




COGNATE 


MATH 222-341 


Analysis II-Diff. Equations 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112-113' 


General & Analytical Chem I-II 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


18 


3 






TOTAL: 72 CREDITS 


' EE Major Elective may be substituted for CHEM 113- 



require the student to perform experiments that 
measure fundamental electrical constants, the 
electrical and magnetic properties of matter, and 
the properties of electromagnetic waves. (Also 
listed as PHYS 448L.) Two hours laboratory. 

EE 449 5 cr. 

Computer Interfacing 

(Prerequisites: EE 344, EE 346) Microprocessor 
programming and interfacing; data acquisition, 
manipulation and transmission; microprocessor 
support devices and common computer inter- 
faces. Periodic written and oral presentations are 
required. Three hours lecture and four hours 
laboratory. 

EE 450 3 cr. 

Control Systems 

(Prerequisites: EE 344, ENGR 350) Review of 
system modeling and Laplace Transforms; block 
diagram reduction and signal-flow graphs; tran- 
sient and steady-state control-system characteris- 
tics; root locus and frequency-response methods 
of analysis and compensation design; state vari- 
able methods. Three hours lecture. 

EE451 3cr. 

Communication Systems 

(Prerequisites: EE 344, ENGR 350) A study of 
the principles of communication theory with 
emphasis given to analog and digital communi- 



cations. Modulation techniques such as AM, 
DSB, SSB, and FM are discussed in detail. Per- 
formance of these systems in the presence of 
noise is also studied. Three hours lecture. 

EE 452 2 cr. 

Very Large Scale Integration Devices I 

(Prerequisites: EE 240, EE 344) Analysis of 
MOSFET and CMOS circuitry. Use of computer 
programs such as SPICE and OCTTOOLS to 
design and analyze student design projects 
involving tens of transistors. Two hours lecture. 

EE 453 2 cr. 

Very-Large-Scale Integration Devices II 

(Prerequisite: EE 452) Continuation of EE 452. 
VLSI computer compilers are used to design 
electronic circuits. One hour lecture and two 
hours laboratory. 

EE 454 3 cr. 

Robotics Design Project and Professional 
Practice 

(Prerequisites: EE 449, EE 450) Students design 
a self-contained intelligent robot required to 
carry out a complex task. Each project involves 
creative conception, design, development, evalu- 
ation, economic constraints, reliability and 
safety. Written and oral presentations. One hour 
lecture and three hours laboratory. 



Arts and Sciences/English 1 29 



EE 484 3 cr. 

Superconductivity Devices and Circuits 

(Prerequisites: EE 447, ENGR 252) A course 
designed for students with interest in super- 
conductivity. Strong background in calculus, 
electromagnetics and solid-state devices is neces- 
sary. Topics to be discussed: perfect conductivity, 
the classical model of superconductivity, and 
direct applications; the quantum model of 
superconductivity, Josephson junctions and 
superconducting devices (SQUIDs). Group proj- 
ects (literature search and brief presentations at 
the end of the term) are assigned. 



ENGLISH 

Faculty 

Jones DeRitter, Ph.D., Chair 
Rebecca S. Beal, Ph.D. 
Ellen M. Casey, Ph.D. 
Daniel V. Fraustino, Ph.D. 
Michael Friedman, Ph.D. 
Antoinette Gail Glover, Ph.D. 
Leonard G. Gougeon, Ph.D. 
John M. Hill, M.F.A. 
Francis X. Jordan, Ph.D. 
Richard A. Larsen, M.F.A., Program Director 
for Theatre 

John M. Mclnerney, Ph.D. 
Michael T. O'Steen, M.F.A. 
Richard H. Passon, Ph.D. 
Joseph L. Quinn, S.J., Ph.D. 
William Rakauskas, Ed.D. 
Carl M. SchafFer, M.F.A. 
Stephen E. Whittaker, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The English Department offers courses in 
literature, theatre, writing, film, pedagogy, 
and theory. Courses are designated as English 
(ENLT), Theatre (THTR) and Writing 
(WRTG) and are described below under these 
groupings. In addition to the majors in Eng- 
lish and Theatre described in the following 
section, the department offers minors in Eng- 
lish, Theatre, and Writing. If they wish, Eng- 
lish majors may pursue either minors or 
tracks in Theatre and Writing. English majors 
pursuing tracks in Writing or Theatre may 
place these courses in either the elective or 
cognate area of the major. English majors 
pursuing minors in Writing or Theatre may 



place these courses in the cognate area but not 
in the elective area of the major. (Courses 
used for a minor cannot be applied to 
requirements or electives within the major.) 

English Major 

The student majoring in English must take 
ENLT 140: English Inquiry or the equivalent, 
and twelve other courses designated ENLT, 
THTR, or WRTG. Students are required to 
take at least one course in each of the follow- 
ing areas: 

A. British Literature: Medieval and 
Renaissance (ENLT 234, 235, 240, 340, 
342, 343) 

B. British Literature: Restoration and 
Eighteenth Century (ENLT 241, 345) 

C. British Literature: Romantic and 
Victorian (ENLT 236, 237, 242, 347, 
HUM 286) 

D. American Literature to 1 865 (ENLT 
212, 230, 243, 350, 351) 

E. Modern British Literature (ENLT 239, 
244, 361) 

F. American Literature, 1 865 to the Present 
(ENLT 245, 353, 355, 455) 

In addition, of the twelve courses beyond 
ENLT 140 or the equivalent, at least one 
must be at the 300 level, at least one must be 
a 400-level senior seminar, at least one more 
must be at the 300 or 400 level, and at least 
one must be designated Theory Intensive: 
ENLT 225, 228, 341, 462. Students may 
place Theatre and/or Writing courses in either 
the English major or the cognate area, but no 
course can be counted for both the major and 
the cognate. 

Although the English department strongly 
recommends ENLT 140 as the initial course 
in the major, any ENLT course numbered 
from 120 to 179 may serve as an equivalent 
and be substituted both in the major and as a 
prerequisite for more advanced course work. 
A total of no more than two courses with a 
number between 120 and 179 can be counted 
toward the major. 

Theatre Track 

Completion of this track will be noted on 
the English majors transcript. The student 
must complete a minimum of five coutses (15 
credits) toward the track. Courses counted 
toward the track include any course designated 



130 Arts and Sciences/English 



with the THTR prefix; WRTG 215, 217, 315; 
and ENLT 211, 220, 295, 340, 341, 345, 355. 

Writing Track 

Completion of this track will be noted on 
the English major's transcript. The student 
must complete a minimum of five courses (15 
credits) designated with the WRTG prefix 
and numbered at the 200 level or above. Of 
these five courses, at least one must be in Cre- 
ative Writing (WRTG 213, 214, 215, 216, 
217, 313, 314, 315, 316), and at least one 
must be in Applied Writing (WRTG 210, 
211,212). 

Theatre Major 

As a major existing within the English 
Department, Theatre offers a broad-based lib- 
eral arts degree for the theatre generalist. The 
Theatre major prepares the student for fur- 
ther, more focused training in the theatrical 
arts through a wide variety of courses in per- 
formance arts, technical theatre, design arts, 
directing, theatre history, playwriting and dra- 
matic literature. Students may focus their pro- 
grams of study to some degree toward specific 
interests in these areas of theatre through the 
use of electives within the major. 

Theatre majors are strongly encouraged to 
complete either a minor (perhaps in English 
or Writing) or a second major (perhaps in 
English). Other combinations are possible. 

Theatre majors are required to participate 
in University Players productions; Theatre 
minors are strongly encouraged to do so. All 
students with an interest in theatre, whatever 
their major, are invited to participate in Uni- 
versity Players productions. (See also "The- 
atre" under Extracurricular Activities.) 

Students majoring in Theatre are required 
to take three introductory courses in Theatre, 
Acting, and Technical Theatre (THTR 110, 
111, 112), two Theatre History courses 
(THTR 211,212), Design for the Theatre 
(THTR 213), Directing I (THTR 31 1), and 
5 credits of Production Laboratory (THTR 
280, 380). Four elective courses in Theatre 
round out the major. Introduction to Drama 
(ENLT 122), and at least one other course in 
Dramatic Literature are required in the stu- 
dent's cognate area. Courses which would sat- 
isfy the Dramatic Literature requirement 
include ENLT 211, 220, 295, 340, 341, 345, 
355,461. 



Minors within the 
Enghsh Department 

English Minor 

To minor in English, the student must take 
a minimum of six courses (18 credits). One of 
these courses must be ENLT 140 or the 
equivalent (see above). The remaining 15 
credits must be taken in courses that would 
satisfy area or elective requirements for the 
major. No more than two courses with a 
number between 120 and 179 may be 
counted toward the minor. 

Theatre Minor 

To minor in Theatre, the student must take 
a minimum of six courses (18 credits). Three 
courses are required: THTR 110, THTR 1 1 1 
and either THTR 2 1 1 or THTR 212. Elec- 
tive courses counted toward the minor 
include any course with the THTR prefix 
and/or WRTG 215, 217, or 315. The student 
may also include one of the following litera- 
ture courses: ENLT 122, 21 1, 220, 295, 340, 
341,345,355,461. 

Writing Minor 

To minor in Writing, the student must take 
a minimum of six courses (18 credits). All six 
courses must carry the WRTG prefix, and all 
six must be listed at the 200 level or above. 
The student must take at least one course in 
Creative Writing (WRTG 213, 214, 215, 
216, 217, 313, 314, 315, 316) and one course 
in Applied Writing (WRTG 210, 211, 212). 

Course Descriptions 

Literature 

ENLT 103 3 cr. 

Children's Literature 

A broad study of literature for children since 
1 800, with the emphasis on American works 
since 1950, including aesthetic consideration of 
the art and design of picture books. Works for 
children up to the age of 1 2 are considered. 

ENLT 110 3cr. 

History of Cinema 

A study of the historical development of motion 
pictures. Practitioners in America and through- 
out the world are treated in this concise history 
of cinema. Film screening fee. 



Arts and Sciences/English 131 



English Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


ENLT 140 


English Inquiry 


3 




MAJOR 


ENLT 


Area Requirement 




3 


MAJOR 


ENLT-WRTG-THTR 


Major Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Quantitative Reasoning Elective 




3 


GEWRTG 


WRTG 107 


Composition 


3 




GE COMM 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 103 


Computing & Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTD 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


ENLT 


Area Requirement 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ENLT-WRTG-THTR 


Area Requirement and/or Elective 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


ENLT 


Area Requirement 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ENLT-WRTG-THTR 


Area Requirement and/or Elective 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Elecdves 


6 


6 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210-T/RS 122 


Elective 


3 




GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elecdves 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


ENLT 490 or 491 


Senior Seminar 


3 




MAJOR 


ENLT-WRTG-THTR 


Area Requirement and/or Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Eleaive 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 



ENLT 111 3 cr. 

The Art of Cinema 

The study of the artists, technicians and business- 
men who make fdms. Taped interviews of inter- 
nationally famous fdmmakers, as well as an ana- 
lytic scrutiny of modern fdms, develop students' 
intelligent, active participation in the major art 
form in modern cidture. FUm screening fee. 

ENLT 112 3cr. 

Film Genres 

A study of popular fdm genres (i.e., the western, 
the thriller, the musical, the historical epic, the 
woman's picture) as they developed and changed 
in the U.S. and abroad. Film screening fee. 

ENLT 113 3cr. 

Film Criticism 

A study of the grammar, poetics, rhetoric, and 
aesthetic of fdm criticism constitutes the heart of 
this course. Film screening fee. 



ENLT 120 3 cr. 

(CL) Introduction to Fiction 

An exploration of the nature of prose fiction, its 
elements and techniques. The emphasis is criti- 
cal rather than historical. The range of works 
and the specific selections may vary with the 
individual instructor. 

ENLT 121 3 cr. 

(CL) Introduction to Poetry 

An exploration of the nature of poetry, its value, 
aims, and techniques. The emphasis will be criti- 
cal rather than historical. The range of poems 
and the specific selections may vary with the 
individual instructor. 

ENLT 122 3 cr. 

(CL) Introduction to Drama 

An exploration of the nature of drama, its types, 
techniques, and conventions. The emphasis will 
be critical rather than historical. The range of 



1 32 Arts and Sciences/English 



plays and the specific selections may vary with the 
individual instructor. This course may be counted 
toward the Theatre major, minor or track. 

ENLT 123 3 cr. 

Masterworks of Western Civilization 

Study of masterpieces of literature from the 
Hebrew Old Testament and classic Greek to the 
modern European, illuminating the development 
of Western civilization. 

ENLT 125 3 cr. 

(CL) Classic American Stories 

This course will examine representative examples 
of the American short story from the 19th cen- 
tury to the present. Emphasis will be placed on 
the significance of individual works, but some 
consideration will be given to the evolving 
American milieu. Readings will include 
Hawthorne, Poe, Crane, Malamud, and Oates. 

ENLT 126 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Introduction to Irish Culture 

An exploration of Irish culture by means of the 
island's major works of mythology, history, reli- 
gion, folk story, fairy tale, song, verse, drama 
and fiction. All readings in English. 

ENLT 127 3 cr. 

(CL) Myth of the Hero 

Mythic materials are examined to discover the 
underlying heroic archetypal patterns. Then 
modern literature is examined in the light of the 
same mythic patterns. 

ENLT 140 3 cr. 

(CL) English Inquiry 

An exploration of fiction, poetry, and drama. 
The approach is inductive; the aims are a greater 
understanding of literature, and an introduction 
to techniques of literary scholarship, theory, and 
research. 

The prerequisite for all 200-level ENLT 
courses is ENLT 140 or the equivalent Students 
must complete the University's Written Communi- 
cation requirement before they can register for 
any Writing Intensive literature course. 

ENLT 210 3 cr. 

(CL) Modern Poetry 

Some previous study of poetry expected. Modern 
poets ranging from Frost and Stevens to Bishop 
and Larkin are examined. Major emphasis is 
placed on close readings of representative works 
and historical and cultural contextualization. 



ENLT 211 3cr. 

(CL) Dramatic Comedy 

Principles, modes, tactics used in dramatic com- 
edy. The plays of writers ranging from Shake- 
speare to Neil Simon, as well as several films, will 
be analyzed as models. Opportunity for student 
writing of comedy. This course may be counted 
toward the Theatre major, minor or track. 

ENLT 212 3cr. 

(CL,W) Masters of Darkness 

This course will survey a significant sampling of 
the short works of three of America's most 
famous "dark Romantic" writers: Melville, 
Hawthorne, and Poe. Consideration will be 
given to the historical milieu and the authors' 
responses to the problems and promises of the 
American experience. 

ENLT 213 3 cr. 

(CL,W) Satire 

An exploration of the historical, critical, and 
conceptual nature of satire, including established 
satirical conventions and techniques. Representa- 
tive examples in fiction, drama, poetry, and other 
media, with emphasis on British literature of the 
Restoration and 1 8th century, the Age of Satire. 

ENLT 214 3 cr. 

Macabre Masterpieces 

A survey of English and American horror fiction 
which focuses on this mode of writing as a seri- 
ous artistic exploration of the human mind, par- 
ticularly abnormal psychology. Readings will 
include works by Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, 
Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Conrad, and 
Bram Stoker. 

ENLT 215 3cr. 

(CL) Literature of the Absurd 

Focusing on literature from 1850 to the present, 
this course will examine fiction, drama, and 
poetry that reflect a general sense of disintegrating 
values and lost religious beliefs. Readings will 
include works by Poe, Byron, Hardy, Stevenson, 
Conrad, Williams, Hemingway, and Beckett. 

ENLT 220 3 cr. 

(CL) Shakespeare 

An introduction to the works of William Shake- 
speare, including forays into each of the major 
dramatic genres (comedy, tragedy, history, and 
romance). Consideration will be given to the 
biographical and cultural contexts of individual 
works. This course may be counted toward the 
Theatre major, minor or track. 



Arts and Sciences/English 133 



ENLT221 3cr. 

fW) Woody AUen 

This course examines the films, the pubhshed 
screenplays, the volumes of short prose, and 
assorted interviews and articles. We will examine 
some of Woody Allen's sources, such as Plato, 
Shakespeare, Joyce, and Bergman. Our approach 
will be historical and analytical. 

ENLT 222 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Graham Greene's Travellers 

Detailed study of several privileged characters 
who exchange the familiar comforts of home for 
the disorienting complexities of the post-colonial 
world. Encountering social unrest in Africa, 
Latin America, Haiti, and French Indo-China, 
Greene's protagonists abandon their aloof posi- 
tions and confront the personal and ethical 
dilemmas raised by their situations. 

ENLT 224 3 cr. 

(CL,W) Perspective in Literature about Illness 

This course will explore the narrative conventions 
of both the (literary) life story and the (scien- 
tific) case history as a means of analyzing both 
the characters involved in literary depictions of 
illness and the ways in which they perceive and 
understand others involved in the same health 



care event. 



3cr. 



ENLT 225 

(CL,D,W) Writing Women 

(Theory Intensive) This course begins with Vir- 
ginia Woolf 's A Room of One's Own and Carolyn 
Heilbrun's Writing a Woman's Life. The reading 
list includes a range of feminist responses to the 
questions raised by Woolf and Heilbrun, as well 
as fiction and poetry from Sappho to Willa 
Gather and Adrienne Rich. 

ENLT 226 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Novels by Women 

A study of novels by and about women, includ- 
ing such authors as Austen, Bronte, Eliot, 
Ghopin, Woolf Lessing, Byatt, and Morrison. 
The aim is to expand students' knowledge of the 
novel's history and development and their 
understanding of women's experiences as 
expressed by women writers. 

ENLT 227 3 cr. 

(GL,D,W) Frankenstein's Forebears 

(Theory Intensive) An interdisciplinary explo- 
ration of the influential lives and works of Mary 
Wollstonecrafc (feminist, memoirist, and novel- 
ist); William Godwin (anarchist philosopher and 
novelist); their daughter, Mary Shelley (author of 



Frankenstein); and her husband, Percy Bysshe 
Shelley (Romantic poet and erstwhile political 
activist). 

ENLT 228 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Race in Anglo-American Culture 

(Theory Intensive) This course will examine Eng- 
lish, Anglo-American, and American portrayals 
of African- and Native American peoples 
between 1600 and 1860. The reading list 
includes works from both high culture (poems, 
plays, and novels) and low culture (Indian captiv- 
ity narratives, frontier biographies, and slave 
autobiographies). 

ENLT 229 3 cr. 

(CL,D) The Cross-Cultural Novella 

This course aims both to foster an understand- 
ing and appreciation of the novella as a distinct 
literary form and to introduce the student to the 
literature of a variety of continents and cultures. 
The course will deal with writers such as Tolstoy, 
Flaubert, Kafka, Kawabata, Mann, and Gaines. 

ENLT 230 3 cr. 

(CL) American Romanticism 

This course will deal with representative short 
works of America's six major Romantic authors: 
Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Hawthorne, 
Melville, and Poe. 

ENLT 234 3 cr. 

(CL,W) Camelot Legend 

This course will examine the development of 
Arthurian legend-tales of knights and ladies asso- 
ciated with the court of King Arthur-from its 
early origins in Celtic and Latin medieval litera- 
ture, through medieval romances and histories, 
culminating in Malory's Morte D'Arthur. 

ENLT 235 3 cr. 

(CL,W) Literature in the Age of Chaucer 

(Area A) This course will explore 14th-century 
non-dramatic vernacular literature. In addition 
to Chaucer, authors studied may include Lang- 
land, Kempe, and the Pearl Poet. 

ENLT 236 3 cr. 

{CL,W) The Romantic Protest 

(Area C) A survey of the first half of the British 
Romantic period. Readings will include Blake, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge and at least three 
"minor" writers of this era. Discussions will 
focus on the Romantic imagination, the role of 
nature in Romantic mysticism, and Romantic 
notions concerning heightened sensations and 
altered realities. 



1 34 Arts and Sciences/English 



ENLT 237 3 cr. 

(CL,W) The Darker Romantics 

(Area C) A survey of the second half of the 
British Romantic period. Readings will include 
Byron, Percy Shelley, Keats, and at least three 
"minor" writers of this era. Discussions will focus 
on the waning of the "Romantic religion" of 
Blake, Coleridge, and Wordsworth in an increas- 
ingly prosperous, skeptical, and secularized era. 

ENLT 239 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Irish Short Story 

(Area E) Detailed study of short stories from the 
pens of such masters as Yeats, Joyce, Frank 
O'Connor, McGovern, Jordan, Trevor, and 
Beckett. Serious craftsmen aware of the verbal 
tradition, shapers of the Literary Revival, these 
masters of language forge a literature that affirms 
spiritual values in the midst of material misery. 

ENLT 240 3 cr. 

British Literature: Medieval and Renaissance 

(Area A) A detailed study of representative works 
and authors from the Anglo-Saxons to the 17th 
century. Though the emphasis will be on an 
intensive study of major works in their literary 
and cultural context, consideration will be given 
to minor writers as well. 

ENLT 241 3 cr. 

British Literature: Restoration and 18th 
Century 

(Area B) Study of a select group of English and 
Anglo-Irish authors whose works were first pub- 
lished between 1660 and 1776. Discussions and 
assignments will emphasize literary history, criti- 
cal analysis, and sociopolitical contexts. 

ENLT 242 3 cr. 

British Literature: Romantic and Victorian 

(Area C) A study of the major literary works in 
19th-century England: poetry, novels and non- 
fictional prose. The emphasis is threefold: critical 
analysis; literary history; social, intellectual and 
political background. 

ENLT 243 3 cr. 

American Literature to 1865 

(Area D) An in-depth study of a select group of 
major American authors from the Colonial 
Period to the Civil War. Included are Bradford, 
Franklin, Irving, and Poe. Consideration given 
to the historical and cultural milieu and develop- 
ment of major American themes and attitudes. 



ENLT 244 3 cr. 

Modern British Literature 

(Area E) Selected modern and postmodern Eng- 
lish poets, playwrights, and fiction writers: Hop- 
kins, Eliot, Hughes, Auden, Larkin, Spender, 
Osborne, Stoppard, Pinter, Greene, Waugh, Read, 
Lodge, Amis, Spark, McEwan and Chatwin. 

ENLT 245 3 cr. 

American Literature, 1865 to the Present 

(Area F) Study of a select group of major Ameri- 
can authors from the Civil War to the present. 
Included are Twain, Crane, Fitzgerald and Von- 
negut. The historical and cultural milieu and the 
development of major American themes and atti- 
tudes are reviewed. 

ENLT 295 3 cr. 

(CL) Shakespeare in Stratford 

This course combines a traditional study of six 
Shakespearean plays on the University campus 
with a week-long residency at the Shakespeare 
Centre in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. Students 
will read and discuss the plays produced during 
the current Royal Shakespeare Company season 
and attend performances of those plays. 

All 300-level ENLT courses have a prerequisite 
of ENLT 140 or equivalent; a 200-level ENLT 
course is strongly recommended. 

ENLT 340 3 cr. 

Introduction to Late Medieval Drama 

(Area A) A survey of l4th- and 15th -century 
drama, including the Corpus Christi cycle, 
morality plays such as Everyman, Mankind and 
Castle of Perseverence, and the saint's play. This 
course may be counted toward the Theatre 
major, minor or track. 

ENLT 341 3cr. 

(CL,W) Shakespeare: Special Topics 

(Theory Intensive) A detailed study of Shake- 
speare's treatment of either a panicular genre 
(comedy, tragedy, history, romance) or a particu- 
lar subject that occurs across genres. Special 
attention will be paid to the meaning of plays in 
performance. This course may be counted 
toward the Theatre track or minor. 

ENLT 342 3 cr. 

Renaissance Poetry and Prose 

A survey of lyric and narrative poetry, fictional 
and non-fictional prose, and drama written in 
England between the time of Sir Thomas More 
and John Milton. Readings will include More, 
Surrey, Lyly, Spenser, Sir Philip and Mary Sidney, 
Donne, Webster, Jonson, Marvell, and Milton. 



Arts and Sciences/English 1 35 



ENLT 343 3 cr. 

Milton and 17th-century Poetry 

Detailed study of the Metaphysical poets, the 
Cavalier poets, and the poetry of John Milton. 
This course seeks to provide a bridge between 
the Elizabethan Age and the Restoration and 
18th-century poets. 

ENLT 344 3 cr. 

Milton's Paradise Lost 

Intensive study of Milton's masterpiece. In addi- 
tion to our reading and discussion of the text 
itself, we will examine its biographical and histor- 
ical context and explore a variety of critical 
approaches to the poem. 

ENLT 345 3 cr. 

(CL,W) Restoration and 18th-century 
Drama 

(Area B, Theory Intensive) A survey of the major 
formal and thematic developments on the Lon- 
don stage between 1660 and 1776. Discussions 
will focus on the social, political and institutional 
changes that re-shaped theatrical productions 
during this period. This course may be counted 
toward the Theatre major, minor or track. 

ENLT 346 3 cr. 

The English Novel: 18th and 19th Centuries 

The history of the English novel from its origins 
in the early 18th century until the end of the 
19th century. The course focuses on such major 
figures as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Austen, 
Dickens and Eliot. 

ENLT 347 3 cr. 

Victorian Voices 

This course will focus on three major Victorian 
authors: one non-fiction prose writer, one novel- 
ist, and one poet. Possible authors include Car- 
lyle, Arnold, Ruskin, Dickens, Eliot, Bronte, 
Tennyson, Browning, 

ENLT 348 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Colonial and Postcolonial Fiction 

Through detailed study of such authors as 
Achebe, Conrad, Forster, Kincaid, Kipling, 
Naipaul, Orwell, and Rushdie, this course 
explores the myths and meanings of 19th- and 
20th-century European colonialism in Asia, 
Africa, and the Americas. 

ENLT 350 3 cr. 

Major Works: American Romantics 

(Area D) Cooper's The Prairie, Emerson's 
Nature, Thoreau's Walden, Melville's Moby Dick, 
and others. Evaluation of the works in their his- 



torical context and the development of the 
American Romantic movement, 1820-1865. 

ENLT 351 3cr. 

Transcendentalists 

This course transcends the typical limits of this 
literary period to Emerson and Thoreau's major 
works. Thus, Orestes Brownson, Margaret Fuller, 
Ellery Channing, Theodore Parker are covered. 

ENLT 352 3 cr. 

(CL,W) The Development of the American 
Novel 

This course will focus on the ways in which the 
American novel has reflected our changing liter- 
ary and cultural values from the late 1 8th to the 
20th century. The reading list will include works 
by Charles Brockden Brown, Nathaniel 
Hawthorne, Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, John 
Steinbeck, and Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. 

ENLT 353 3 cr. 

Major Works: American Realists 

(Area F) Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Howell's The 
Rise of Silas Lapham, James's The American, 
Crane's The Red Badge of Courage, Dreiser's Sister 
Carrie and others. Works are evaluated in their 
historical milieu and the development of Ameri- 
can Realism, 1865-1900. 

ENLT 354 3 cr. 

Major Works of Twain and James 

Works to be studied include Twain's Huckleberry 
Finn and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's 
Court, and James's Portrait of a Lady and The 
Ambassadors. These works will be examined both in 
terms of their historical context and by way of a 
comparative analysis of the two authors. 

ENLT 355 3 cr. 

American Drama 1919-1939 

(Area F) A review of the first "golden age" of 
American drama, which includes biting master- 
pieces such as The Hairy Ape, Awake and Sing, 
and comic works such as You Can't Take It With 
You and The Time of Your Life. This course may 
be counted toward the Theatre track or minor. 

ENLT 356 3 cr. 

Major Works of Hemingway and O'Hara 

Works to be studied include Hemingway's The 
Sun Also Rises and For Whom the Bell Tolls, and 
O'Hara's Appointment in Samarra and From the 
Terrace. These will be examined in terms of both 
their historical contexts and their basic themes as 
part of a comparative analysis of the two authors. 



1 36 Arts and Sciences/English 



ENLT 360 3 cr. 

(D) Jewish Literature 

The course provides a broad literary overview of 
Jewish life from medieval times to the present, 
examining the poetry, fiction, memoirs, and 
drama of Jewish writers from a variety of cultures. 

ENLT 361 3 cr. 

Modern Irish Novel 

(Area E) A selective introductory course to Ire- 
land's renowned modern novelists: Francis Smart, 
John McGahern, William Trevor, Neil Jordan, Brian 
Moore, Bernard MacLaverty, John Banville and 
others. These literary artists capture the verve, 
flavor, and illumination that distinguish today's 
Irish novels. 

ENLT 362 3 cr. 

Literature and Philosophy 

(Theory Intensive) This course explores the Pla- 
tonic insight that on the highest level literature 
and philosophy converge. We begin with a few of 
Plato's dialogues which develop this idea. Then 
we examine several "literary" works in English 
which embody it. Our approach is analytical, 
inductive and historical. 

ENLT 363 3 cr. 

Magazine Editing 

The process of editing is surveyed. Macro-editing 
(publishing for a defined audience and delight- 
ing, surprising, informing, and challenging it) is 
emphasized over micro-editing (grammar, punc- 
tuation, and so forth). Both are fitted into the 
larger picture of promotion, fulfillment, circula- 
tion, advertising, production, and distribution. 

ENLT 364 3 cr. 

Modern Novel 

The evolution of the novel from modern to post- 
modern times. Major American and English 
writers are studied, moving from traditional narra- 
tive to self-conscious stylistic devices. 

ENLT 365 3 cr. 

Comparative Romanticism 

Major British and American Romantic writers 
will be studied in an effort to distinguish the 
forms Romanticism takes in the two countries 
and to determine possible relationships. Authors 
to be examined include Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Hawthorne, Poe, 
Emerson, and Whitman. 



ENLT 366 

Dante's Divine Comedy 

A canto-by-canto study, in translation, of 
Dante's dream vision of hell, purgatory, and 



3 cr. 



heaven. Consideration will be given to the cul- 
tural milieu and to medieval art and thought as 
these affect the allegorical meaning and structure 
of the poem. 

ENLT 367 3 cr. 

Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. 

Study of the life and works of Gerard Manley 
Hopkins, S.J., the only priest-poet ever to be 
honored with a place in Westminster Abbey's 
Poet's Corner. 

ENLT 368 3 cr. 

Conrad's Fiction 

A reading of major works by Conrad and survey 
of critical response to this quintessential modern 
Western writer. 

ENLT 382-383 Variable credit 

Guided Independent Study 

A tutorial program open to third-year students. 
Content determined by mentor. 

ENLT 395 3 cr. 

Travel Seminar: Ireland 

This is an artistic, cultural, literary tour. Stu- 
dents will study the people and places that con- 
tribute to Ireland's distinct place in the world of 
literary art. (Intersession or Spring Break) 

All 400-level ENLT courses have a prerequisite 
of ENLT 140 or equivalent; a 300-level ENLT 
course is strongly recommended. 

ENLT 443 3 cr. 

Chaucer 

(Theory Intensive) A study of Chaucer's poetry 
in the context of medieval culture. Readings and 
assignments will concentrate on The Canterbury 
Tales, but will also cover the other major poems, 
such as the Book of the Duchess and the Parlia- 
ment of Birds. 

ENLT 447 3 cr. 

Keats: Death and Love 

This course will focus almost exclusively on one 
writer, John Keats, and explore the dynamic rela- 
tionship in his poetry between death and love. 

ENLT 455 3 cr. 

American Realists 

(Area F) Study of representative figures in the 
post-Civil War period, the period of the rise of 
American realism. Authors treated will be Mark 
Twain, Henry James, Stephen Crane, and 
selected modern authors. 



Arts and Sciences/English 137 



ENLT 458 3 cr. 

Joyce 

This course explores the prose works of James 
Joyce, a major figure in 20th-century hterature. 
We will read Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as 
a Young Man, and, with the help of various 
guides, Ulysses. We will work to apprehend in 
Joyce both the universal and the peculiarly Irish. 

ENLT 461 3 cr. 

Modern Drama 

Some previous study of drama required. A sur- 
vey of the major trends and authors in 20th-cen- 
tury British and American drama, with some 
Irish and Continental works included. Readings 
will include works by Shaw, O'Neill, Miller and 
Williams. This course may be counted toward 
the Theatre major, minor, or track. 

ENLT 462 3 cr. 

Literary Criticism and Theory 

(Theory Intensive) This course explores both the 
derivation and the defining characteristics of a 
range of contemporary interpretive practices, 
including those of psychoanalytic, Marxist, femi- 
nist, formalist, reader response, structuralist, 
poststructuralist, and cultural materialist critics. 

ENLT 470 3 cr. 

Teaching Modern Grammars 

This course explores the English language in the 
context of transformational/generative grammar 
and in relation to what is expected of middle 
school and high school English teachers. Tech- 
niques for teaching these new grammars and lab- 
oratory teaching experience in the first-year writ- 
ing clinic will be presented. 

ENLT 480 Variable Credit 

Internship 

English majors can receive internship credit for a 
variety of on-the-job experiences. Approval must 
be obtained beforehand from chair and dean. 

ENLT 482-483 Variable Credit 

Guided Independent Study 

A tutorial program open to fourth-year students. 
Content determined by mentor. 

ENLT 490-491 3 cr. 

(W) Senior Seminar 

The topics of these writing-intensive seminars 
vary from semester to semester. Based largely on 
student writing, presentations, and discussion, 
this capstone course is required in the major and 
culminates in the student's development of a 
seminar paper. May be repeated for credit. 
Enrollment limited to 1 5 students per section. 



Theatre 

THTRllO 3cr. 

(CL) Introduction to Theatre 

An introduction to the theories and practices of 
the theatre arts. Dramatic structure, dramatic lit- 
erature, critical writing, acting, directing, design, 
practical stagecraft, and some theatre history will 
all be touched on in an effort to introduce stu- 
dents to the fullness and variety of the art of 
theatre. 

THTR 111 3 cr. 

(CA) Introduction to Acting 

This course introduces the student to the fijnda- 
mental elements of the actor's craft, including 
internal and external techniques, character analy- 
sis, and vocal/physical warmups. These elements 
will be used in various in-class exercises and 
rehearsed performance work. The subject of 
auditions will also be covered. (First of a three- 
course sequence.) 

THTR 112 4cr. 

Introduction to Technical Theatre 

This course introduces the student to the mate- 
rials, equipment, and techniques used in the 
construction and finishing of stage sets, includ- 
ing lighting, sound, and special effects. Forty 
hours of lab work and participation on a crew 
for a major University Players' production will 
be required. 

THTR 210 3 cr. 

Intermediate Acting 

(Prerequisite: B- or higher in THTR 111.) This 
course focuses on fiarther exploration of internal 
acting techniques. Stanislavski-based and other 
modern acting systems are explored through 
exercises, written analysis, and scene/monologue 
study. There is an emphasis on ensemble acting 
in the classroom, rehearsal, and production. 
(Second of a three-course sequence.) 

THTR 211 3cr. 

(CL) Theatre History I 

A chronological study of western theatre from 
ancient Greek drama to 17th-century British 
drama. A selection of plays from representative 
playwrights will be read and discussed with an 
emphasis on the social, cultural, and theatrical 
contexts within which these playwrights lived 
and worked. 

THTR 212 3cr. 

(CL) Theatre History II 

A chronological study of Western theatre from 
the middle 17th century to the present. A selec- 



138 Arts and Sciences/English 



Theatre Cu 


rriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


THTR 110-111 


Intro. Theatre-Intro. Acting 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


THTR112 


Intro. Tech. Theatre 


4 




COGNATE 


ENLT 122 


Intro. Drama 




3 


GESPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Quantitative Reasoning Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 




17 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


THTR 21 1-212 


Theatre History I-II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


THTR 213 


Design for the Theatre 




3 


MAJOR 


THTR 280 


Production Laboratory 


1 




COGNATE 


ELECT2 


Elective-Dramatic Literature 


3 




GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PH1L210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 




17 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


THTR 311 


Directing I 




3 ; 


MAJOR 


THTR ELECT' 


Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


THTR 280 


Production Laboratory 


I 


1 


COGNATE 


ELECTA 


Elective 


6 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy orT/RS Elective 


3 




GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
16 


3 , - 
16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


THTR ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


THTR 280 


Production Laboratory 


1 


1 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


3 


6 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 


6 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 






16 


16 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Major eUctives: the 


Theatre major must select four electives fivm the followirtg: any THTR course at the 200 level or 


higher; 


WRTG215. WRTG315, and ENLT courses 200 level o> 


■ higher that qualify as dramatic literature courses. 




- Cogrute electives must include two courses in dramatic literature; one of these must be ENLT 122. 




:f 



tion of plays from representative playwrights will 
be read and discussed, with an emphasis on the 
social, cultural, and theatrical contexts within 
which these playwrights lived and worked. 

THTR 213 3cr. 

(CA) Design for the Theatre 

(Prerequisite: THTR 1 1 2 with a grade of B- or 
higher) An introduction to the various design 
and production elements in theatre. Scenery, 
lighting, costumes, projections, props and sound 
will be explored. Students participate in the 
design elements of the University productions. 



THTR 214 3cr. 

Drama Practicum 

(Prerequisite: any other course that may be 
counted in the Theatre minor) Work on one of 
the major aspects of producing a play: acting, 
costuming, set construction, lighting, publicity, 
and box-office management. 

THTR 280 1 cr. 

Production Laboratory 

Theatre majors working on University Players 
productions can receive credit for serving as 
props master, master electrician, sound designer, 
assistant technical director, assistant stage man- 
ager, or running crew. Forty hours of production 



Arts and Sciences/English 139 



work and strict adherence to deadlines required. 
May be taken for credit up to five times. 



3cr. 



THTR310 
Theories of Theatre 

Students will study the theories of theatre 
advanced in the writing of Diderot, Archer, 
Stanislavsky, Vakhtangov, Brecht, Copeau, 
Artaud, Grotowski, Brook, and Schechner. 



THTR311 3cr. 

Directing I 

(Prerequisites: B- or higher in THTR 11 1 or 
permission of instructor.) An introduction to a 
range of skills and techniques used by stage 
directors as they transform scripts into successful 
performances. Several plays will be read and ana- 
lyzed. Students will direct a short scene or play 
for performance. 

THTR 313 3 cr. 

Set Design for the Theatre 

(Prerequisite: THTR 213 with a grade of B- or 
higher) An exploration of the basic crafts of the 
theatrical set designer. Concentration on devel- 
oping one's personal vision and interpretive skills 
through script analysis. Practice in sketching, 
drafting, painting, collage, model making and 
typical stage construction. Introduction to envi- 
ronmental theatre. 

THTR 370 3 cr. 

Technical Theatre: Special Topics 

Topic and prerequisites will be announced prior 
to preregistration. 

THTR 371 3 cr. 

Theatre Design: Special Topics 

Topic and prerequisites will be announced prior 
to preregistration. 

THTR 372 3 cr. 

Dramatic Literature: Special Topics 

Topic and prerequisites will be announced prior 
to preregistration. 

THTR 373 3 cr. 

Acting: Special Topics 

(Prerequisite: THTR 111) Topic and prerequi- 
sites will be announced prior to preregistration. 
Past topics include Actor's movement, voice and 
speech, stage combat. 

THTR 380 2 cr. 

Advanced Production Lab 

(Prerequisites: 2 cr. of THTR 280, permission of 
the instructor.) Advanced Theatre majors who 
work on University Players productions can 
receive credit for stage management, technical or 



design work, acting or directing. 80 hours of 
production work and strict adherence to dead- 
lines required. May be taken for credit only once. 

THTR 382-383, 482-483 3 cr. 

Independent Study in Theatre 

A tutorial program open to junior and senior 
students who have completed appropriate lower- 
division coursework. 

THTR 410 3cr. 

Advanced Acting 

(Prerequisite: B- or higher in THTR 210.) This 
course focuses on external techniques, especially 
the use of the actor's body to create physical 
characterizations. This work builds on the stu- 
dent's knowledge and experience through the use 
of exercises, written analysis, and scene /mono- 
logue study. (Third of a three-course sequence.) 

THTR 411 3cr. 

Directing II 

(Prerequisites: B- or higher in THTR 311 or 
permission of instructor.) Advanced study of 
rehearsal techniques, directing methods and 
styles, and effective director-actor relationships. 
Students will direct a 20-30 minute one act or 
excerpt for the Director's Workshop as part of 
the University Players season. 

THTR 480 Variable Credit 

Internship 

Theatre majors or minors can receive credit for a 
variety of on-the-job work experience. Approval 
must be obtained beforehand from the supervis- 
ing faculty member, chair, and dean. 



Writing 



3cr. 



WRTG 105 
College Writing I 

(Placement into 105 required) The first of a 
two-course sequence that fiilfills the University's 
Written Communication requirement, this course 
concentrates on defining and focusing problems, 
creating arguments, and providing evidence in 
academic essays. This course cannot be counted 
toward the Writing Track or the Writing Minor. 

WKTG 106 3 cr. 

(D) College 'Writing II 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 105) The second of a two- 
course sequence that ftilfiUs the university's 
Written Communication requirement, this 
course combines study of the elements of style 
and grammar with instruction in structuring and 
providing support for argumentative essays. This 
course cannot be counted toward the Writing 
Track or the Writing Minor. 



1 40 Arts and Sciences/English 



WRTG 107 3 cr. 

Composition 

A study of expository and argumentative prose, 
and the strategies and techniques used by suc- 
cessfiil academic writers. This course fulfills the 
university's Written Communication require- 
ment. It cannot be counted toward the Writing 
Track or the Writing Minor. 

Note: Students must complete the University's 
Written Communication requirement before 
they can register for any WRTG course at the 
200, 300, or 400 level. 

WRTG 210 3 cr. 

Advanced Composition 

The purpose of this course is to review, practice 
and apply the principles of a rhetoric of order, 
stressing invention, disposition, style, tone and 
theme. 

WRTG 211 3cr. 

Technical and Business Writing 

A course in scientific or technical writing designed 
to help students improve their writing skills in 
preparation for their professions. Specialized 
training is offered in writing of proposals, reports, 
instructions, letters, abstracts, resumes, etc. 

WRTG 212 3 cr. 

Writing for the Law 

This course aims to help the student develop the 
writing skills that will be of particular value to 
prospective lawyers. Readings, exercises, and 
assignments stress precision and conciseness as 
well as carefiil argument. The course should also 
be valuable to any student who wants to 
improve his/her analytical ability. 

WRTG 213 3 cr. 

Fiction Writing I 

Designed to increase students' skills in writing 
short fiction, this course augments frequent prac- 
tice in the genre with attention both to theories 
of short-story composition and to diverse exam- 
ples. In a workshop atmosphere, students will 
read and discuss one another's work as well as 
fiction by well-known authors. Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 214 3 cr. 

Nonfiction Writing I 

Designed to develop skills in writing creative 
nonfiction prose, this course employs a work- 
shop format and requires intensive reading and 
analysis of student work as well as work by 
noted practitioners such as Orwell, Baldwin, 
Didion, and Dillard. Photocopying fee. 



WRTG 215 3cr. 

Play Writing I 

This course is designed to teach students the 
basic elements and techniques involved in writ- 
ing for theatrical performance. Students will 
write either a one-act play or one act of a two- 
or three-act play. This course may be counted 
toward the Theatre Major, Minor, or Track. 
Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 216 3 cr. 

Poetry Writing I 

Theory and practice of writing poems. Opportu- 
nity for sustained, serious responses to student 
work and practical advice on publishing, gradu- 
ate programs, etc. The course employs a work- 
shop format and expects students to possess 
facility with language and a love of reading and 
writing. Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 218 3 cr. 

Writing the Web 

Students will analyze both the visual and textual 
contents of e-mail, news groups, chat groups, 
MUs, and Web sites, and will be expected to 
produce a portfolio or Web site that demon- 
strates their ability to work in this new medium. 
Discussion topics include ethical issues unique 
to the Internet writing environment. 

WRTG 310 3cr. 

Strategies for Teaching Writing 

This course for English/Education majors 
emphasizes strategies for taking students into, 
through, and beyond the writing process. Stu- 
dents have many opportunities to plan and to 
design writing assignments, to conduct writing 
sessions, and to evaluate written composition. 

WRTG 313 3cr. 

Fiction Writing II 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 213) The advanced work- 
shop augments intensive student writing assign- 
ments with theoretical discussions and diverse 
examples of good fiction by established writers. 
Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 314 3cr. 

Nonfiction Writing II 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 214) The advanced work- 
shop augments intensive student writing assign- 
ments with discussion and analysis of creative 
nonfiction by various hands. Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 315 3cr. 

Play Writing II 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 215) This advanced work- 
shop builds on the skills acquired in Play Writ- 
ing I, and includes intensive reading and writing 



Arts and Sciences/Environmental Science 1 4 1 



assignments that encourage students to explore 
theatrical styles beyond realism. This course may 
be counted toward the Theatre major, minor or 
track. Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 316 3 cr. 

Poetry Writing II 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 216) Advanced workshop 
on practice and theory of writing poetry. The 
course encourages extensive reading and inten- 
sive writing. Photocopying fee. 

WRTG 382-383, 482-483 Variable Credit 
Guided Independent Study 

A tutorial program open to junior and senior 
students who have completed appropriate lower- 
division coursework. Context determined by 
genre and mentor. 

WRTG 480 Variable Credit 

Internship 

English majors and/or Writing minors can 
receive internship credits for a variety of on-the- 
job experiences. Approval must be obtained 
beforehand from the supervising faculty member, 
chair and dean. 



ENVIRONMENTAL 
SCIENCE 

Faculty 

Michael C. Cann, Ph.D., Co-Director, 
Chemistry Department; Michael D. Carey, 
Ph.D., Co-Director, Biology Department 

See Biology and Chemistry for faculty listings. 

Overview 

The Environmental Science major is an 
interdisciplinary program of the Biology and 
Chemistry Departments at The University of 
Scranton. The Environmental Science major 
has the following objectives: 

1 . To prepare students for entry-level posi- 
tions (in the public or private sector) in 
the broad field of environmental analy- 
sis, compliance, and technology; 

2. To prepare students for advanced study 
in environmental science; 

3. To provide a sufficiently comprehensive 
science and liberal arts background to 
allow students to pursue advanced train- 
ing or work in other fields that deal with 



environmental issues, e.g., environmen- 
tal law, environmental health, and envi- 
ronmental regulation in business and 
industry. 
The Environmental Science program pro- 
vides a rigorous and comprehensive ground- 
ing in the biological, chemical, and physical 
aspects of the natural environment, and in the 
analytical and instrumental techniques used 
to investigate environmental problems. 
Upper-class students may choose to focus 
more closely on either the chemical or biolog- 
ical aspects of environmental science, and 
must complete either an undergraduate 
research project or an internship in environ- 
mental science. The program also is designed 
to expose students to the social, political, reg- 
ulatory, economic, and ethical concerns that 
are commensurate with defining and address- 
ing environmental issues in today's world. 

Environmental Science Curriculum 

I. Required courses in the major and cognate 
include courses in Biology, Chemistry, 
Environmental Science, Natural Science, 
Mathematics, and Physics. 

II. The student must complete four courses 
from among the following electives 
within the major; at least one course 
must be chosen from each group: 
Group A 

CHEM 342 Env. Toxicology 3 cr. 

CHEM 344 Env. Geochemistry 3 cr. 

CHEM 350 General Biochemistry I 3 cr. 

CHEM 352 Chemical Toxicology 3 cr. 

Group B 

BIOL 195 Tropical Biology 3 cr. 

BIOL 250 Microbiology 5 cr. 

BIOL 272 Invertebrate Biology 5 cr. 

BIOL 273 Marine Ecology 3 cr. 

BIOL 349 Plant Physiology 5 cr. 

BIOL 370 Animal Behavior 4.5 cr. 

BIOL 375 Evolution 3 cr. 

BIOL 471 Applied Ecology 3 cr. 

BIOL 472 Systems Ecology 3 cr. 

BIOL 473 Estuarine Ecology 5 cr. 

III. In fulfilling GE requirements, students 
are strongly encouraged to enroll in: 

PHIL 213 Environmental Ethics 3 cr. 
PS 230 Environmental Policy 3 cr. 

ECO 103 Econ. of Env. Issues 3 cr. 



142 Arts and Sciences/Environmental Science 



Environmental Science Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


CHEM 112-113 


Gen. Analytical Chem I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


NSCI 201 


Science and Human Environment 




3 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Phys. Ed. 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR 


BIOL 371 


Ecology 


5 




MAJOR 


BIOL 379 


Biostatistics 




3 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) 


MATH 103-114' 


Pre-Caiculus-Analysis I 


3-4 


4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16.5-17.5 


18.5 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHEM 340 


Environmental Chemistry 


3 




MAJOR 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Elective 




3-5 


GE S/BH 


POL SCI 230 


Environmental Policy 


3 




GE S/BH 


ECO 103 


Economics of Envir. Issues 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


PHYS 120-121- 


General Physics 


4 
16 


4 
18-20 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Elective 


3-5 


3 


MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Elective 


3-5 




MAJOR 


ESCI 480 or 493 


Research or Intern, in Env. Sci. 


1.5 




KAAjOR 


ESCI481or494 


Research or Intern, in Env. Sci. 




1.5 


MAJOR 


ESCI 440^41 


Topics in Environmental Sci. 


1 


1 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Eleaive 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


14.5-18.5 


6 
17.5 






TOTAL: 


130-137 CREDITS 


' Students entering exempt fr 


om MATH 103 may select CMPS: Computer Science I or MATH 221 


; Analysis II. 




^ Or Elements of Physics I an 


dIKPHYS 141-141) 









Course Descriptions 

Most of the required and recommended 
courses in the Environmental Science major 
reside in other departments, and their descrip- 
tions can be found under the appropriate 
departmental listing. 

ESCI 440-441 2 cr. 

Topics in Environmental Science 

(Prerequisite: Senior Standing in ESCI major or 
permission of instructor) One credit/semester. 
Discussions of current and significant environ- 
mental science issues. 



ESCI 480-481 3 cr. 

Internship in Environmental Science 

(Prerequisite: Senior Standing in ESCI major or 
permission of instructor) 1.5 credits/semester. 
Student to work with private firm, advocacy 
group, or governmental agency on an environ- 
mental issue or technique that involves applica- 
tion of scientific principles to monitor, test, or 
develop/implement solutions to environmental 
problems. Project and institutional sponsor sub- 
ject to approval of the Environmental Science 
Committee; final project report required. 



Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 143 



ESCI 493-494 3 cr. 

Research in Environmental Science 
(Prerequisite: senior status in ESCI major or per- 
mission of instructor) 1.5 credits/semester. Indi- 
vidual study and research of a specific environ- 
mental problem. Mentored by a Biology or 
Chemistry faculty member. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

Faculty 

Linda Ledford-MiUer, Ph.D., Chair 
Joyce M. Hanks, Ph.D. 
Thomas A. Kamla, Ph.D. 
Robert A. Parsons, Ph.D. 
Njegos M. Petrovic, Ph.D. 
Virginia A. Picchietti, Ph.D. 
Joseph P Wilson, Ph.D. 
Habib K. Zanzana, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The program of the Foreign Language 
Department is designed to enable students to 
read, write, speak and comprehend one or 
more foreign languages; to think and express 
themselves logically, precisely and critically in 
one or more foreign languages; to acquire 
skills in literary criticism by reading represen- 
tative foreign authors; to gain insight into the 
evolution of the culture and civilization of 
foreign peoples as reflected in their literature. 

The Bachelor of Arts program in Classical 
Languages gives students a solid foundation 
in Latin and Greek to engender an apprecia- 
tion of the liberal aspects of Classical Studies. 
Classics majors are encouraged to take their 
junior year abroad at Loyola University's 
Rome Center of Liberal Arts with which The 
University of Scranton is affiliated. 

Foreign Language majors and students pur- 
suing teaching certification must complete 36 
credits in one language beginning with the 
intermediate level if it is modern, and the ele- 
mentary level if it is classical. Modern Language 
majors normally take at least 12 credits in a sec- 
ond language, either modern or classical, as 
their cognate. A double major may be pursued 
by taking 36 credits in one language, beginning 
with the intermediate or elementary level, and 
by satisfying the major and cognate require- 



ments of another department. The placement 
of students at a particular foreign-language level 
is the responsibility of the department. 

The department urges students to study 
abroad during their junior year. In addition, it 
strongly recommends that students who 
spend the entire junior year abroad plan their 
studies carefully, so that they will be able to 
take at least one course per semester in their 
major language during the senior year. 

Minors in Language 

French, German, Spanish: 18 credits at the 
intermediate level or higher. 

Greek, Italian, Latin: 18 credits at the ele- 
mentary level or higher. 

Portuguese: 1 5 credits consisting of PORT 
1 10, PORT 210, and two advanced Por- 
tuguese courses. 

Minors in Japanese and Russian are some- 
times possible, depending upon the availabil- 
ity of courses in these languages. They consist 
of 18 credits at the elementary level or higher. 

Students who minor in two languages 
must complete 12 credits in each language 
beginning at the intermediate level or higher. 

Elementary courses in any language are not 
open to students who have studied two or more 
years of the same language in high school Excep- 
tions to this policy must be approved by the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Major in International Language- 
Business 

The major in International Language- 
Business is a professionally oriented program. 
Its purpose is to make language study a more 
career-structured discipline by providing stu- 
dents with the opportunity to acquire a liberal 
education while, at the same time, taking 
courses specifically relevant to a business 
enterprise. 

In order to bridge the communication gap 
between multinational businesses and the lack 
of functional language skills often exhibited 
by the personnel representing them, special- 
ized language courses focusing on the business 
terminology and cultural setting of the coun- 
tries in question complement the regular lan- 
guage and business courses in this major. 

The department urges students to study 
abroad during their junior year. In addition, it 
strongly recommends that students who spend 



144 Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 



the entire junior year abroad plan their studies 
carefully, so that they will be able to take at 
least one course per semester in their major 
language during the senior year. Students who 
pursue a business internship will earn credits in 
addition to the 1 30 credits stipulated for the 
program, unless there is room in the free area. 

Course Descriptions - 
Modern Languages 



French 



6 cr. 



FREN 101-102 

(CF) Elementary French* 

Designed to impart a good basic foundation in 
comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing 
the French language. Designed primarily for stu- 
dents with little or no background in the French 
language. 

FREN 203 3 cr. 

French Cultural Heritage 

This course aims to develop understanding of 
the culture, literature and civilization of France. 
Representative readings from different periods. 
Lectures, discussions and readings in English. 

FREN 211-212 6 cr. 

(CF,D) Intermediate French* 

(Prerequisites: FREN 101-102 or equivalent, as 
determined by placement exam) Designed to 
give greater scope and depth to the student's 
knowledge of the grammar and style of the 
French language. Taught in French. Completion 
of the second half of the intermediate sequence 
satisfies one semester of the cultural diversity 
requirements (D). 

FREN 239 3 cr. 

(CL,D) French Christian Thinkers 

(Prerequisite: An Introduction to Literature 
course in the English or Foreign Language 
departments) Readings and analysis of writings 
by French Christians from the Middle Ages 
through the 20th century. Taught in English, 
but credit in French available for students able 
to read and write in French, who meet one addi- 
tional class period per week with instructor. 

FREN 311 3cr. 

(CF,D) French Conversation* 

(Prerequisites: FREN 211-212 or equivalent, as 
determined by placement exam) Intensive 
French conversation, emphasizing cross-cultural 



comparisons and development of self-expression 
in French. Taught in French. 

FREN 312 3cr. 

(CF,W) French Composition* 

(Prerequisites: FREN 211-212 or equivalent, as 
determined by placement exam) An intensive 
course in writing in French, stressing grammar, 
writing analysis and composition. Taught in 
French. 

FREN 313-314 6 cr. 

(CL,D) Survey of French Literature 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) A 
review of French literature from the chanson de 
geste to the contemporary period. 

FREN 315-316 6 cr. 

(D) Survey of French Culture and Civilization* 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312, or equivalent) A 
review of the geography, history, art and other 
accomplishments that comprise the heritage of 
the French-speaking people worldwide, from 
antiquity to the present. 

FREN 319 3cr. 

Business French* 

(Prerequisites: FREN 31 1-312 or equivalent) 
Overview of the spoken and written language of 
the French business world. Formalities and con- 
ventions of letter writing, banking, import/ 
export, and other commercial transactions. Analy- 
sis of terminology from business-related areas 
such as finance, insurance and international com- 
merce within a contemporary cultural setting. 

FREN 320 3 cr. 

(CL) Introduction to French Literature 

(Prerequisites: FREN 31 1-312 or equivalent) An 
introduction to the principal literary genres of 
poetry, novel, short story, essay and drama, 
through analysis of representative works in the 
French tradition. Strongly recommended as a 
prerequisite for all upper-division literature 
courses in French. 

FREN 321-322 6 cr. 

(D,W) Advanced French Stylistics* 

(Prerequisites: FREN 31 1-312 or equivalent) 
Designed to strengthen the speaking and writing 
skills. Advanced use of grammar and syntax. 

FREN 421 3 cr. 

Medieval and Renaissance French Studies 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
Selected literary works from the 1 1th century to 
the late Renaissance. 



* Meets three hours per iveek in class; includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center 
(language lab) resources. 



Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 145 



Foreign Language Curriculum 










Departtnent and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE HUMN) 


LANG' 211-212 or 311-312 


Intermediate or Conversation/Composition 3 


3 


COGNATE 


LANG 101-102 or 21 1-212 


Second Modern or Classical Language 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GEQUAN 


MATH 106 or 107 


Quantitative Methods I or II 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


LANG 311-312' 


Adv. Conversation/ Comp 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


LANG 21 1-212 or 31 1-312 


Second Modern or Classical Language 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology li 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


LANG ELECTA 


Advanced Lang. Electives 


6 


6 


COGNATE 


LANG-ELECT 


Language Elective-Elective 


3 


6 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elecdves 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


LANG ELECT 


Advanced Lang. Electives 


6 


6 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Elecdves 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Students who begin language at the Advanced (311) level will take 6 fewer credits in the major and 6 more credits in 


the cog- 


nate or free elective area in either the junior or senior year. 


In their second year, they will choose advanced language electives. 


- Spanish majors will take SPAN 320-321 and three of the following four courses: SPAN 313, 314, 330, 331. 





FREN 423 3 cr. 

Seventeenth-Century French Studies 

(Prerequisites: FREN 31 1-312 or equivalent) 
Literary, philosophical, and social expression 
from 1610 to 1715. 

FREN 425 3 cr. 

Eighteenth-Century French Studies 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
The Enlightenment from 1715 to 1789. 

FREN 427 3 cr. 

Nineteenth-Century French Novel 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
The development of prose narration as reflected 
in the literary movements of the age. 

FREN 429 3 cr. 

Nineteenth-Century French Poetry 

(Prerequisites: FREN 31 1-312 or equivalent) 
The development of poetic forms from the 
romantic to the symbolist movement inclusively. 



FREN 430 3 cr. 

French Women Writers 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
Women's view of themselves and the world as 
reflected in their literary creations. Cross-listed 
with Women's Studies Concentration. (See 
Women's Studies Concentration section.) 

FREN 431 3cr. 

(D,W) Twentieth-Century French Novel 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
The development of prose narration from the 
Dreyfus case to the present. 

FREN 432 3 cr. 

French Short Story 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
Principal practitioners of the short story in 
French, including contemporary authors. 



146 Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 



International 


Language-Business Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE HUMN) 


LANG' 211-212 or 311-312 


Inter, or Conversation/Composition 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


LANG 101-102 or 21 1-212 


Second Language 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-^X^lTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE QUAN ELECT 


MATH 106 or 107 


Quantitative Methods I or II 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTD 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


LANG 311-312' 


Conversation/Composition 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ACC 253 


Financial Accounting 


3 




COGNATE 


LANG 21 1-212 or 31 1-312 


Second Modern or Classical Lang. 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Eco 153-154 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


LANG 321-3222 


Advanced Stylistics 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


LANG ELECT 


Advanced Language Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MGT351 


Prbciples of Management I 




3 


MAJOR 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Internt'l Bus. 




3 


MAJOR 


FIN 351 


Intro, to Finance 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECP 


Elective 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECTA 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Fourdi Year 










MAJOR 


LANG 319 


Business Language 




3 


MAJOR 


LANG ELECT 


Advanced Language Electives 


6 


3 


MAJOR 


MKT351 


Intro, to Marketing 


3 




MAJOR 


INT ELECT 


OneofMGT475,MKT475, 
ECO 375, FIN 475, IB 476, IB 477 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECP 


Electives 


3 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Students who begin their major language level at the 311 level take 6 fewer credits in the major and 6 more credits in 


the cog- 


note or free area. In their second year, they will choose advanced language electives. 






^ Students whose first language is Spanish will take SPAN 320-321, and three of the following four course: 


t.- SPAN 313, 314. 


330 and 331 in their advanced language electives area. 








J PS 212, PS 240 andACC 254 are recommended GE electives. 






^ A course focusing on the 


' ethics of business is recommended. 









I 



FREN 433 3 cr. 

Twentieth-Century French Drama 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
The development of dramatic forms from the 
Theatre Libre to the present. 

FREN 434 3 cr. 

French Novel Into Film 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) 
Examination of the transformations effected in 
major French novels adapted for the screen, and 



exploration of alternative solutions to the prob- 
lems posed. 

FREN 435 3 cr. 

The French Theater 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent) An 
inquiry into the various forms of the French the- 
ater through a study of significant representative 
works from different periods. 



Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 147 



FREN 437 3 cr. 

Francophone African Literature 

A study of Francophone African Literature from 
the Maghreb to the African diaspora, with 
emphasis on main Hterary currents, ideology, 
poUtical cHmates, Hnguistic traditions, and Hter- 
ary manifestations in each country. 

FREN 439 3 cr. 

The Craft of Translation 

A study of the techniques of translation with 
emphasis on accurate terminology and proper 
syntax when translating newspaper articles, legal 
documents, medical records, business records 
and correspondence, essays, poems, songs, and 
short fiction. 

FREN 482-483 3 cr. 

Guided Independent Study 

(Prerequisites: FREN 311-312 or equivalent; 
junior or senior standing) Tutorial content deter- 
mined by mentor. 



German 



6 cr. 



GERM 101-102 

(CF) Elementary German* 

A complete course in the fundamentals of the 
German language. Emphasis on reading of 
graded texts, with written, oral and aural exer- 
cises. Designed for students with little or no 
background in the German language. 



GERM 211-212 6 cr. 

(CF,D) Intermediate German* 

(Prerequisites: GERM 101-102 or equivalent) 
Reading from modern authors of moderate diffi- 
culty. Oral and written exercise. Systematic 
review of German grammar. 

GERM 213-214 6 cr 

Introduction to Business German* 

(Prerequisites: GERM 101-102 or equivalent) 
Specialized intermediate-level course for students 
who wish to focus their skills on the language of 
the business world. Oral and written exercises. 
Systematic review of German grammar. 

GERM 295 3 cr 

(D) German Culture and Language 

Intersession course to German, Austria and 
Switzerland. Credits may be used in Free Area 
and Cultural Diversity but not for German 
major or minor. Comparison of German and 
American cultures. Study of history, music, 
political science, language and modern attitudes. 



Team-taught by University faculty from several 
academic departments. 

GERM 311-312 6 cr. 

(CF,W) Advanced German Composition and 
Conversation* 

(Prerequisites: GERM 211-212 or equivalent) 
Selected texts in prose and poetry. Advanced 
practice in conversation and composition. Sur- 
vey of German grammar. 

GERM 313-314 6 cr. 

(CL,D) Survey of German Literature and 
Culture 

(Prerequisites: GERM 31 1-312 or equivalent) A 
survey of German literature from the 1 1th cen- 
tury to the contemporary period, with special 
emphasis on the main intellectual currents as 
well as the social and political developments. 

GERM 319 3cr. 

Business German* 

(Prerequisites: GERM 311-312 or equivalent) 
Overview of the spoken and written language of 
the German business world. Formalities and 
conventions of letter writing, banking, 
import/export, and other commercial transac- 
tions. Analysis of terminology from business- 
related areas such as finance, insurance and 
international commerce within a contemporary 
cultural setting. 

GERM 321-322 6 cr. 

(W) Advanced Stylistics* 

(Prerequisites: GERM 311-312 or equivalent) 
Advanced study of syntax and semantics aimed 
at the development of stylistic sensitivity. Inter- 
disciplinary textual analyses (business and com- 
mercial German, communications media, the 
sciences and humanities) for further practice in 
composition and conversation. 

GERM 421 3 cr. 

German Classicism and Romanticism 

(Prerequisites: GERM 311-312 or equivalent) A 
study of the literature of the 1 8th (Goethe, 
Schiller, Holderlin) and early 19th centuries 
(Kleist, Hoffmann, Novalis) in their Classical 
and Romantic contexts. 

GERM 423 3 cr. 

Realism and Naturalism 

(Prerequisites: GERM 311-312 or equivalent) A 
study of the works of late 19th-century authors, 
such as Storm, Fontane and Keller. 



* Meets three hours per week in class; includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center 
(language lab) resources. 



148 Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 



GERM 425 3 cr. 

German Literature up to 1945 

(Prerequisites: GERM 31 1-312 or equivalent) 
An in-depth study of such authors as Brecht, 
Mann, Kafka and Riike. 

GERM 427 3 cr. 

Postwar German Literature 

(Prerequisites: GERM 311-312, or equivalent) 
Concentration on contemporary authors such as 
Frisch, Durrenmatt, Grass and Boll, as well as 
representative authors from the former East 
Germany. 

GERM 482-483 Variable Credit 

Independent Study 

(Prerequisites: GERM 31 1-312 or equivalent; 
junior or senior standing) Tutorial content deter- 
mined by mentor. 



Hebrew 



6 cr. 



HEBR 10M02 
(CF) Biblical Hebrew 

A systematic introduction to the fundamentals 
of Biblical Hebrew grammar and to certain 
aspects ol ancient Semitic language and culture. 

Italian 

(Additional course work is available by 
arranging independent and/or foreign study) 

ITAL 101-102 6cr. 

(CF) Elementary Italian* 

Introduction to the Italian language. Designed 
for beginners. 

ITAL 207 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Italian Women's Writing in 
Translation 

This course addresses women's voices and expe- 
riences in 20th-century Italian prose, poetry, 
theater and film. Not all the artists subscribe to 
a feminist ideology, but their works share an 
interest in issues concerning women. Students 
examine the styles, themes and historical con- 
texts of the primary works. Does not count 
toward the Italian minor or major. 

ITAL 208 3 cr. 

(D,W) Envisioning Italy From Novel to 
Film: The Case of Neorealism 

This course addresses the way in which authors 
and film makers have envisioned Italy in the 
Neorealist tradition. Students will analyze neore- 
alist novels and their cinematic adaptations to 



determine similarities and differences in the 
artists' visions and interpretations of Italian soci- 
ety. This course does not count toward the Ital- 
ian minor or major. 

ITAL 209 3 cr. 

Italian Cinema: From Origins to Present 

Course examines Italian cinema from the silent 
era to the present. Focus on the impact of his- 
torical events on the film industry and on the 
transformation in style and content in the reac- 
tion to specific moments in Italian history. Films 
with subtitles. Taught in English. Does not 
count toward the Italian minor or major. 

ITAL 211-212 6cr. 

(CF,D)Intermediate Italian* 

(Prerequisites: ITAL 101-102 or equivalent) 
Grammatical review, written and oral composi- 
tion with selected cultural readings of intermedi- 
ate difficulty. Completion of the second half of 
the intermediate sequence satisfies one semester 
of the cultural diversity requirements. 

ITAL 295 3 cr. 

(D) Italian Culture and Society 

An examination of Italian culture and society 
from the Renaissance to today. The course traces 
the development of Italian culture and society 
through primary texts, including essays, plays, 
short stories, films, opera and contemporary 
music, and sculpture and painting. The course 
includes travel to Italy. 

ITAL 311-312 Get. 

(CF,D) Advanced Italian Composition and 
Conversation* 

(Prerequisite: ITAL 211-212 or equivalent) An 
intensive course in Italian composition and con- 
versation with emphasis on detailed study of 
advanced grammatical and stylistic usage of the 
Italian language. 

ITAL 313 3cr. 

(CL) Survey of Italian Literature I 

(Prerequisite: ITAL 31 1-312 or equivalent) This 
course, conducted in Italian, introduces students 
to 19th-and 20th-century Italian literature and 
to significant literary movements and figures 
from these periods. 

ITAL 314 3cr. 

(CL) Survey of Italian Literature II 

(Prerequisites: ITAL 311-312 or equivalent) This 
course, conducted in Italian, introduces students 
to Italian literature from the medieval period to 



I 



* Meets three hours per week in class; includes activities inside andJor outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center 
(language lab) resources. 



Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 149 



the 18th century. It focuses on significant Hter- 
ary movements and figures fi^om these periods. 

Japanese 

(Additional course work is available by 
arranging independent and/ or foreign study) 

JAP 101-102 6cr. 

(CF) Elementary Japanese* 

Development of the fundamental skills, listening, 
speaking, reading and writing, with emphasis on 
language performance. Emphasis on practical 
application of the basic skills for business-related 
activities. Relevant cultural aspects are intro- 
duced. Designed primarily for students with no 
background in the Japanese language. 

JAP 21 1-212 3cr. 

Intermediate Japanese* 

(Prerequisites: JAP 101-102 or equivalent) This 
course continues development of the four major 
skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. 
Upon completion of the course students will 
understand all the basic concepts of the structure 
of the language. 

Portuguese 

(Additional course work is available by 

arranging independent and/or foreign study) 

These courses meet the cognate language 
requirement and may serve as the basis for a 15- 
credit minor in Portuguese. 

PORT 110 4.5 cr. 

(CF) Intensive Elementary Portuguese* 

A video-based introduction to Brazilian Por- 
tuguese, this course covers basic grammar and 
vocabulary needed for listening, speaking, read- 
ing, and writing Portuguese. Students will also 
develop some cultural understanding of Brazil, 
Portugal, and other Lusophone countries. Meets 
4 days a week. Offered fall only, even years. 

PORT 210 4.5 cr. 

(CF,D) Intensive Intermediate Portuguese* 

(Prerequisite: PORT 1 10 or equivalent) A con- 
tinuation of elementary Portuguese. Students 
will refine, through oral and written activities, 
literary and other readings, and video, the skills 
learned in PORT 1 10. Cultural knowledge of 
the Lusophone world will also be further devel- 
oped. Meets four days a week. Offered spring 
only, odd years. 



Russian 

(Additional course work is available by 
arranging independent and/ or foreign study) 

RUSS 101-102 6 cr. 

(CF) Elementary Russian* 

Primary emphasis on developing the skills of 
understanding, speaking, reading and writing 
Great Russian. A thorough and continual study 
of the Cyrillic alphabet is an integral part of the 
course's content. 

RUSS 211-212 6cr. 

Intermediate Russian* 

(Prerequisites: RUSS 101-102 or equivalent) 
This course continues development of the four 
major skills: listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. It builds on the grammatical concepts 
learned in RUSS 101 and 102 and provides a 
solid foundation for the student interested in 
visiting Russia and/or in reading the Russian 
classics, contemporary literature, and newspapers. 



Spanish 



6 cr. 



SPAN 101-102 

(CF) Elementary Spanish* 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, con- 
versation; suitable readings and written exercises. 
Designed primarily for students with little or no 
background in the Spanish language. 

SPAN 203 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Topics in Latin American Cultural 
Heritage 

This course aims to develop understanding of 
the culture, literature and civilization of Latin 
America (i.e., Brazil and Spanish America). The 
topic and the region of Latin America studied 
may change, and thus this course may be 
repeated for credit when appropriate. Lectures, 
discussions and readings in English. 

SPAN 211-212 6cr. 

(CF,D) Intermediate Spanish* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 101-102 or equivalent, as 
determined by placement exam) Grammatical 
review, written and oral composition with 
selected cultural readings of intermediate diffi- 
culty. Completion of the second half of the 
intermediate sequence satisfies one semester of 
the cultural diversity requirements. 



'Meets three hours per week in class; includes activities inside and/or outside the classroom that involve Language Learning Center 
(language lab) resources. 



150 Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 



SPAN/PS 295 6 cr. 

(CF,D,S) Contemporary Mexican Culture 
and Language* 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 21 1 or higher) A 6-credit 
intersession travel course to Guadalajara, Mexico; 
3 credits in Humanities (foreign-language area), 
3 credits in the social sciences (political-science 
area), and cultural diversity credit. Team taught 
by University faculty from the departments of 
Foreign Languages and Political Science with 
assistance from Mexican faculty at UNIVA. 

SPAN 296 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Topics in the Culture, Civilization, 
and Literature of Latin America 

Travel course: develops understanding of the cul- 
ture, literature and civilization of Latin America. 
Topic and the region of Latin America studies 
may change, and the course may be repeated for 
credit when appropriate. Taught in English. 
Students desiring credit in Spanish must do all 
readings and writing in Spanish and meet with 
professor for discussions in Spanish. 

SPAN 310 3 cr. 

Medical Spanish* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 211-212 or equivalent) 
Designed for the student who plans to work in 
any area of health care, this course focuses on 
the needs and problems of Spanish-speaking 
patients. Students learn specialized vocabulary 
and improved communicative abiUty through 
conversation and composition and develop an 
increased awareness of health issues often of par- 
ticular concern to Hispanics. 

SPAN 311 3cr. 

(CF,D) Spanish Conversation* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 211-212 or equivalent, as 
determined by placement exam) Reading-based 
conversation stressing development of self-expres- 
sion in Spanish. Practice in oral composition. 

SPAN 312 3cr. 

(CF,W) Spanish Composition* 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 212 or equivalent) Intensive 
writing practice stressing grammar, writing 
analysis, and composition. 

SPAN 313 3 cr. 

Spanish Culture and Civilization* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 31 1-312 or equivalent) An 
overview of the diverse historical, political, reli- 
gious and artistic factors that have determined 
the cultural make-up of the peoples of the Iber- 
ian peninsula. 



SPAN 314 3 cr. 

(D,W) Topics in Latin-American Culture 
and Civilization* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 311-312 or equivalent) 
The course examines the diverse cultural, histori- 
cal, linguistic, religious, and political features of 
Latin America. Content will vary according to 
the cultural/geographic region examined, and 
the course, therefore, may be repeated for credit. 

SPAN 319 3 cr. 

Business Spanish* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 311-312 or equivalent) 
Overview of the spoken and written language of 
the Spanish business world. Formalities and con- 
ventions of letter writing, banking, import/export, 
and other commercial transactions. Analysis of 
terminology from business-related areas such as 
finance, insurance and international commerce 
within a contemporary cultural setting. 

SPAN 320 3 cr. 

(CL) Introduction to Literature 

(Prerequisites; SPAN 31 1-312 or equivalent) An 
introduction to the principal genres of literature 
(poetry, short story, essay, drama and novel) 
through analysis of representative works in the 
Hispanic tradition. Required prerequisite for all 
upper-division literature courses. 

SPAN 321 3 cr. 

(W) Advanced Stylistics* 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 311-312 or equivalent) 
Designed to achieve more sophisticated use of 
Spanish, both orally and in writing. Includes 
intensive examination of compositions and 
translation exercises, as well as discussion of 
areas of particular difficulty for the non-native 
speaker (e.g., false cognates and unfamiliar struc- 
tures). 

SPAN 323 3 cr. 

Contemporary Issues* 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 311-312 or equivalent) A 
conversation-intensive course. Discussion and 
reports based on readings in a broad range of 
current periodicals and focusing on issues of rel- 
evance to the Hispanic world and to the particu- 
lar career or interest areas of students. 

SPAN 330 3 cr. 

(CL) History of Spanish Literature 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 320) Study of Spanish liter- 
ature from Cantar de Mio Cid to 20th century, 
with emphasis on main literary currents in each 
century. 



* Meets three hours per week in class: includes activities inside andlor outside the classroom that im'olve Language Learning Center 
(language lab) resources. 



Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 151 



SPAN 331 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Survey of Spanish-American 
Literature 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 320) A survey of Spanish- 
American literature from the 16th century to the 
present, with representative readings from each 
of the principal cultural areas. 

SPAN 421 3cr. 

Twentieth-Century Spanish Drama 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 320) Peninsular drama of 
the 20th century including dramatic forms after 
Buero Vallejo and new directions of Spanish the- 
atre in the post-Franco era. 

SPAN 422 3 cr. 

Spanish-American Drama 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 320) Spanish-American 
drama from the late 1 9th century to the present, 
with emphasis on contemporary trends. 

SPAN 430 3 cr. 

Hispanic Women Writers 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 320) This course examines 
writing by Hispanic women, including prose, 
poetry, drama and essays, and investigates the 
social, political, aesthetic, and feminist contexts 
of their writing. Cross-listed with Women's 
Studies Concentration. (See Women's Studies 
Concentration section.) 

SPAN 433 3 cr. 

Hispanic Lyric Poetry 

(Prerequisite: SPAN 320) The development of 
lyric poetry in the Spanish-speaking world. 
Examples of early poetry in Spain and Spanish 
America are studied to establish an awareness of 
the Hispanic lyric tradition, but the main focus 
of the course is on 20th-century Spanish Amer- 
ica and such figures as Gabriela Mistral, Pablo 
Neruda, and Cesar Vallejo. 

SPAN 439 3 cr. 

The Craft of Translation 

A study of the techniques of translation with 
emphasis on accurate terminology and proper 
syntax when translating newspaper articles, legal 
documents, medical records, business records 
and correspondence, essays, poems, songs, and 
short fiction. 

SPAN 482-483 Variable Credit 

Guided Independent Study 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 311-312 or equivalent) A 
tutorial program open to Junior and Senior stu- 
dents only. Content determined by mentor. 



SPAN 484 3 cr. 

Topics in Hispanic Prose 

(Prerequisites: SPAN 320) Prose fiction of Spain 
and/or Spanish America. Topics may focus on an 
author, a period, a movement, a country or 
region, or a theme. Content may vary and the 
course may, therefore, be repeated for credit with 
consent of Department Chair. 

Course Descriptions — 
Classical Languages 



Greek 

GRK 111-112 

(CF) Elementary Greek 

An intensive course in the fundamentals of 
Classical Greek grammar. 



6 cr. 



6 cr. 



GRK 113-114 

New Testament Greek 

A systematic introduction to the fiandamentals 
of the grammar of Koine Greek as it is found in 
the New Testament. 

GRK 205 3 cr. 

(D) Legacy of Greece and Rome 

Survey of the artistic and cultural treasures of 
classical Greece and Rome with a focus on their 
enduring legacy in our own civilization. 

GRK 207 3 cr. 

Roots of Greek in English 

The relationship of both Greek and English to 
the other languages of the Indo-European fam- 
ily; the Greek elements that have come into 
English are presented: bases, prefixes, numerals, 
hybrids, etc. A study of the 20-25% English 
words which come from Greek, particularly in 
scientific fields. 

GRK 211-212 6cr. 

Intermediate Greek 

(Prerequisites: GRK 111-112 or equivalent) 
Review of fundamentals. Readings from 
Zenophon, Euripides, and the New Testament. 

GRK 213 3cr. 

(CL,D,W) Classical Greek Literature and 
Mythology 

This course examines the role that mythology 
played in Greek literature, and examines the 
changing attitudes of the Greeks towards the 
Olympian gods from Homer to the fourth cen- 
tury B.C. All readings and lectures in English. 



152 Arts and Sciences/Foreign Languages and Literatures 



GRK 220 3 cr. 

Ancient Civilization: Greece 

The political, constitutional, and cultural history 
of Greece from the earliest times to the death of 
Alexander the Great. All readings and lectures in 
English. 

GRK 295 3 cr. 

(D) Classic and Contemporary Greek Culture 

Travel course (nine days) during the Spring 
Break. A study of contemporary and classical 
Greek culture with a focus on the Greek legacy 
in our own Western civilization. In Greece, 
students visit Athens, the Acropolis, National 
Archeological Museum, Corinth, Mycenae, 
Epidaurus, Olympia, Delphi, and three Greek 
islands. Additionally, students attend 20 regu- 
larly scheduled classes during the semester. 

GRK 311-312 3-6 cr. 

Readings in Greek Literature 

(Prerequisites: GRK 211-212 or equivalent) 
Selections from Greek writers to suit students' 
special interests. 

GRK 482-483 Variable Credit 

Guided Independent Study 

(Prerequisites: GRK 21 1-212 or equivalent; jun- 
ior or senior standing) Tutorial content deter- 
mined by mentor. 

Latin 

LAX 111-112 6cr. 

(CF) Elementary Latin 

An intensive course in the fundamentals of Latin 
reading and composition. 

LAT 205 3 cr. 

History of Latin Literature 

A survey of Roman and post-Roman Latin liter- 
ature. Taught in English. 

LAT 207 3 cr. 

Roots of Latin in English 

The relationship of both Latin and English to 
the other languages of the Indo-European fam- 
ily; the Latin elements that have come into Eng- 
lish are presented: bases, prefixes, numerals, 
hybrids, etc. Approximately 60-65% of English 
words come from Latin. 

LAT 211-212 6cr. 

(CF) Intermediate Latin 

(Prerequisites: LAT 111-112 or equivalent) 
Review of fundamentals. Reading of selections 
from Caesar, Cicero and Virgil. 



LAT 213 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Classical Roman Literature and 
Mythology 

The course examines the role that mythology 
played in Roman literature, and examines the 
changing attitudes of the Romans toward the 
divinities, manifested in literature from Plautus 
to Apuleius. All readings and lectures in English. 

LAT 220 3 cr. 

Ancient Civilization: Rome 

The political, constitutional, and cultural history 
of Rome from the earliest times to the end of 
the Western empire. All readings and lectures in 
English. 

LAT 311-312 3-6 cr. 

Readings in Latin Literature 

(Prerequisites: LAT 21 1-212 or equivalent) 
Selections from Latin writers to suit the stu- 
dents' special interests. Topics will vary from year 
to year; the course may, therefore, be repeated 
for credit. 

LAT 482-483 Variable Credit 

Guided Independent Study 

(Prerequisites: LAT 21 1-212) A tutorial program 
open to Junior and Senior students only. Con- 
tent determined by mentor. 

Course Descriptions - Literature 

LIT 105 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Introduction to World Literature in 
Translation 

This course introduces students to significant 
works in English translation of world literature, 
while introducing the genres of narrative (fiction 
and non-fiction), poetry, and drama, and the 
critical terminology needed to discuss them. 
Taught in English. Readings may vary. 

LIT 205 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Modern Latin-American Literature 
in Translation 

A survey in English of 20th-century Latin Amer- 
ican writers, including Gabriel Garcia Marquez 
(Colombia), Jorge Luis Borges (Argentina), 
Rigoberta Menchu (Guatemala), Carlos Fuentes 
(Mexico), Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis 
(Brazil) and Isabel Allende (Chile). Introduction 
to major literary movements, such as the "Boom" 
and "magical realism," which have influenced 
writers in the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. 



Arts and Sciences/History 1 53 



LIT 206 3 cr. 

Travelers and Their Travels 

An examination of the history and literature of 
travel as expressed in a variety of both fictional 
and non-fictional accounts. 

LIT 207 3 cr. 

(CL,D,W) Literature of American Minorities 

Examination of racial and ethnic groups from the 
settlement of America until the present. Exami- 
nation of the historical context and current situ- 
ation of Native Americans, African-Americans, 
Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, women-as- 
minority, and other marginalized groups. Read- 
ings from literature and other disciplines. Cross- 
listed with Women's Studies Concentration. 

LIT 208 3 cr. 

(CL,D) French Masterpieces in English 
Translation 

The study of selected major works from the 
leading French writers of the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies who have made an important contribution 
to the development of Western civilization. Such 
authors as Stendhal, Flaubert, Gide, Proust, 
Camus and Malraux will be discussed. 

LIT 209 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Masterworks of Russian and Slavic 
Literature 

A survey of major literary achievements of Slavic 
peoples. Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Cosic, Sienkiewicz 
and Solzhenitsyn will be read. No knowledge of 
Slavic languages is required. All readings and lec- 
tures are in English. 

LIT 384 3 cr. 

(CL,D) Special Topics in American Minority 
Literature 

This course examines a particular minority 
group in American society through texts written 
by and about that group. Representative groups 
include, for example, Native Americans, African 
Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Ameri- 
cans, and Women. This course may be repeated 
for credit when content varies. 



HISTORY 

Faculty 

Michael D. DeMichele, Ph.D., Chair 

Raymond W Champagne, Ph.D. 

Willis M. Conover, Ed.D. 

Roy Palmer Domenico, Ph.D. 

Josephine M. Dunn, Ph.D. 

Frank X.J. Homer, Ph.D. 

Robert Hueston, Ph.D. 

Lawrence W. Kennedy, Ph.D. 

Lee M. Penyak, Ph.D. 

Susan L. Poulson, Ph.D. 

Robert W. Shaffern, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The department aims: (1) to train the stu- 
dent in solid historical methodology; (2) to 
present history as the study of interdependent 
human activities and concrete events which 
have social significance; (3) to engender an 
intelligent and critically sympathetic under- 
standing of various civilizations and cultures. 

Outstanding students are eligible for con- 
sideration in the Combined Baccalaureate/ 
Master's Degree program (please refer to the 
section on The Graduate School and to the 
Graduate School Catalog for specifics of the 
program). Through careful utilization of 
intersession and summer sessions, it is possi- 
ble to complete both the B.A. and M.A. 
degrees within a four-year period. Contact the 
chair or the graduate-program director of the 
department for additional information. 

See the Pre-Law section in the catalog for 
details of the department's success in this area. 

Minor in History 

A minor in History (18 credits) should 
include HIST 110-111 or HIST 120-121 or 
HIST 125-126 plus any four additional his- 
tory courses. 

International Studies 

A major in International Studies seeks to 
provide the student with a full recognition 
and understanding of the multitudinous 
forces which shape the contemporary world - 
nationalism, wars, political and economic ide- 
ologies, cultural differentials, and modern 
technology. Such a broad knowledge and 
understanding of world affairs can be utilized 
in careers in teaching, international business, 



1 54 Arts and Sciences/History 



the legal profession, journalism, the Foreign 
Service of the United States and other govern- 
ment agencies. 

Minor in International Studies 

A minor in International Studies (18 cred- 
its) should include HIST 110 and 111 or PS 
130 and 131 plus four additional courses 
from the following: PS 212, PS 213, PS 217, 
PS 218, PS 219, PS 221, PS 222, PS 295, PS 
318, PS 319, PS 328, PS 330, PS 331, PS 
332, PS 338; HIST 125, HIST 126, HIST 
211, HIST 213, HIST 214, HIST 215, 
HIST 219, HIST 220, HIST 226, HIST 
295, HIST 335, HIST 338, HIST 339, and 
GEOG 217. 

Course Descriptions 

GEOG 134 3 cr. 

(S) World Regional Geography 

Introduces the major concepts and skills of geog- 
raphy. A regional approach stresses the five themes 
of geography including location, place, human 
environment interaction, movement and region. 

GEOG 217 3cr. 

(D,S) Cultural Geography 

Study of the influence of geography on the ori- 
gin, structure, and spread of culture. Focuses on 
describing and analyzing the ways language, reli- 
gion, economy, government and other cultural 
phenomena vary or remain consistent from place 
to place. 

HIST 110-111 6cr. 

(CH) History of the United States 

The United States from the time of its European 
beginnings to the present with special emphasis 
on the history of Pennsylvania; colonial origins 
to Reconstruction; Gilded Age to the modern era. 

HIST 120-121 6 cr. 

(CH) Europe, 1 500 to the Present 

European history with concentration upon the 
political aspects of European development. The 
rise of national monarchies; political, social, eco- 
nomic and intellectual developments; industrial- 
ism, the new nationalism and liberalism. 

HIST 125 3 cr. 

(CH,D) Colonial Latin America 

An introduction to colonial Latin American his- 
tory: Amerindian civilizations; the Spanish and 
Portuguese colonial period, with emphasis on 
the themes of conquest, colonialism, race, class 
and gender. 



HIST 126 3 cr. 

(CH,D) Modern Latin America 

An introduction to modern Latin American 
history: the Latin American republics, with 
emphasis on the themes of nation building, 
dictatorship, cultural identity, revolutionary 
movements, and inter-American relations. 

HIST 140 3 cr. 

(W) The Craft of the Historian 

Introduction to the craft of the historian includ- 
ing the techniques of historical study, research 
and writing as well as historiography. Students 
will be given various exercises dealing with both 
primary and secondary sources to enable them 
to think historically through writing exercises 
based on historical questions. 

HIST 210 3 cr. 

History as Biography 

An exploration of the nature of biography and 
its relationship to the study of the past. Biogra- 
phies of several major figures from the modern 
era will be read and studied to exemplify differ- 
ent biographical techniques and their utility as 
means of historical inquiry. 

HIST 211 3cr. 

The Third World: Empire to Independence 

A study of the developing nations with the 
developed nations in the contemporary world. 

HIST 212 3cr. 

(D) Rebels, Rogues, and Reformers 

A sociological cross-cultural, and psychohistorical 
approach to those folk heroes, political "expro- 
priators" and bandits whose spectacular exploits 
have been romanticized and preserved through 
the centuries. Figures such as Robin Hood, Car- 
touche, Pancho Villa, Jesse James, Che Guevara 
and others will be considered. 

HIST 213 3cr. 

(CH,D) Gender and Family in Latin America 

(Prerequisite: HIST 125 or 126) Examines the 
role of gender and family in Latin America from 
1521 to present. Themes of gender roles, marriage, 
family and licit and illicit sexuality will be high- 
lighted. Individual units will examine machismo, 
marianism, relations of power and women in the 
workplace. Distinctions will be made according 
to race and class. 

HIST 214 3 cr. 

(CH,D) History of Contemporary World 
Politics 

Deals directly with the history of the political, 
economic, and social issues that are current in 



Arts and Sciences/History 155 



History Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


HIST 110-111 


United States History 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


HIST 120-121 


Europe: 1 500 to Present 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Quantitative Reasoning 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


HIST 140^ 


Craft of the Historian 


3 




MAJOR 


HIST ELECT 


Electives 


3 


6 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


HIST ELECT 


Electives 


6 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


HIST 490 or 491^ 


Seminar Elective 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Electives 


6 


6 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 130 CREDITS 


WPsSimts may use cognate electives to develop a second major. 






W Department requires . 


HIST 140: The Crafi of the Historian, for history majors; students admitted to foui 


-year B.A./M.A. 


program are recommended to take HIST 500: Research Methods. No sttident should take both Research Methods courses. 


^ Senior History majors 


■ are required to take HIST 490 or 


HIST 491. 







international affairs including the future possi- 
bilities of world order and the crises of foreign- 
policy making. 

HIST 215 3cr. 

(CH,D) Church and Society In Latin America 

(Prerequisite: HIST 125 or 126) Examines the 
historic role of the Catholic Church in Latin 
America. Major themes include the conversion 
of New World peoples to Catholicism, syn- 
cretism, Church and State, and Liberation Theol- 
ogy. Other units include indigenous religions and 
beliefs, Protestantism and Judaism in Latin 
America. 



HIST 216 3 cr. 

(CH,D) Race in American History 

The course studies the role of race in American 
history from the colonial era to the present, 
focusing on the experience of African-Americans 
with consideration given to other racial and eth- 
nic groups. Topics include: slavery; "Jim Crow" 
laws; the Ku Klux Klan; black migration of the 
20th century; African-American community life; 
and the civil rights struggle. 

HIST 217 3 cr. 

(CH) History of American Catholicism 

A survey of the significant events, trends, and 
individuals reflecting the Catholic experience in 
America from the earliest colonial settlements to 
the post- Vatican II era. 



156 Arts and Sciences/History 



International Studies Curriculum 






First Year 

MAJOR 


Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


HIST 110-111 


United States History 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


PS 130-131 


American National Government 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


LANG 101-102 or 21 1-212 


Elementary OR Intermediate 


3 


3 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Quantitative-Reasoning Elective 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


HIST 120-121 


Europe: 1 500 to Present 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PS 212-ELECT 


Internat'l Rel.-Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


GEOG 134 


World Regional Geography 




3 


COGNATE 


LANG 


Intermediate or Advanced 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


HIST or PS' 


Electives 


3 


3 


GES/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Econ. 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


I.S. 390 ELECT 


Seminar-Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


HIST or PS' 


Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




15 


15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Major electives to be 


seUctedfrom PS 213. 217, 218. 219, 221, 222. 295. 318. 319 328, 330, 331. 332, 338: HIST 125. 


126, 211, 213, 214, 215, 219, 220, 226. 295, 335. 338, 339; GEOG 217. HIST 140 recommended. 







HIST 218 3 cr. 

The World at War, 1939-45 

Examination of the tactics, strategy, and global 
significance of World War II. The logistics and 
scope of the conflict. Importance of propaganda, 
patriotism and the people. Film-seminar 
approach. Film fee. 

HIST 219 3 cr. 

(CH,D) Modern World History 

A study of change and development in the world 
during the 20th century. Emphasis on cultural, 
economic, and political differences between 
Western and non- Western states. 



HIST 220 3 cr. 

(CH) War and Modern Society 

(Formerly H/PS 215) Role of military force in 
international relations; historical background 
focusing on wars, American and European, of 
19th and 20th century; theories of function of 
war; arms control and deterrence of war. 

HIST 221 3cr. 

(CH,D) The American West 

A study of acquisition, settlement, and develop- 
ment of the Trans-Mississippi West, including 
the mining, cattleman's and farmer's frontiers; 
Indian removal, and Manifest Destiny in Texas 
and Oregon. 



Arts and Sciences/History 157 



HIST 222 3 cr. 

History of American Presidential Elections 

A study of the candidates, issues and campaigns 
in American Presidential elections from Washing- 
ton to Kennedy. The course will also examine the 
evolution of the electoral process and the rela- 
tionship between political parties. 

HIST 223 3 cr. 

Introduction to Irish History 

An introduction to Irish History which surveys 
the principal political, social, economic and 
intellectual changes in Irish life since the time of 
the pre-Celtic peoples. Topics will include: 
Celtic civilization; the coming of Christianity; 
the Norman invasion; the English connection; 
Irish nationalism; and the "troubles" in North- 
ern Ireland. 

HIST 224 3 cr. 

(CH,D) Ethnic and Racial Minorities in 
Northeastern Pennsylvania 

Film-seminar approach to the study of various 
ethnic groupings in Northeastern Pennsylvania. 
Seeks to achieve better understanding of the 
immigrant's problems and accomplishments 
through use of documentary and feature films. 

HIST 225 3 cr. 

Imperial Russia 

From the crystallization of political forms in the 
ninth century through the Kievan State, Mongo- 
lian Invasion, rise of Muscovy to the Eurasian 
Empire from the 17th to the end of the 19th 
century. 

HIST 226 3 cr. 

Russian from Revolution to Revolution 

An examination of 20th-century Russia and the 
Soviet Union, beginning with the reign of Tsar 
Nicholas II and culminating with the breakup of 
the USSR and its aftermath. Analysis of the pre- 
revolutionary Russia, the Bolshevik Revolution, 
Lenin and Stalin, World War II, the Cold War, 
the fall of communism and Russia's place in 
world affairs. 

HIST 227 3 cr. 

(D) The Civilization of Islam 

An introduction to the history of Islamic civi- 
lization from the career of the Prophet 
Muhammed (c. 632 AD) to the eve of European 
colonization and imperialism. 

HIST 228-229 6 cr. 

Ancient History 

A survey of ancient civilizations of the Near East 
and Mediterranean worlds. The culture, society 



and science of Mesopotamia and Persia; Egypt - 
the Gift of the Nile; the ancient Israelites; 
heroic, archaic, classical and Hellenistic Greece; 
republican and imperial Rome; the origins of 
Christianity. 

HIST 230-231 6 cr. 

Medieval History 

The civilization of medieval Christendom from 
the fall of the Roman Empire to the beginning of 
the I4th century; its religious, social, economic, 
cultural and political aspects; the relationship 
between church and society, belief and life style, 
ideal and reality; the interaction between Western 
Christendom, Byzantium and Islam. 

HIST 232 3 cr. 

(CH) England, 1485 to 1714 

The end of the Wars of the Roses; Tudor Abso- 
lutism, Henry VIII and Reformation; Elizabeth 
I; Renaissance and Elizabethan music and litera- 
ture; the Stuarts; Colonialism; Commonwealth; 
Restoration; the Revolution of 1688; Reign of 
Anne. 

HIST 233 3 cr. 

(CH) England, 1714 to Present 

Parliamentary rule; Cabinet government; political 
parties; Industrial Revolution; 19th-century 
reforms; building of a British Empire; World 
War I; problems of readjustment; World War II; 
Britain and the world today. 

HIST 236 3 cr. 

Modern Germany: Unification and Empire 

The 1815 Confederation; 1848 and the failure 
of liberalism; the Age of Bismarck; Wilhelm II 
and the "New Course"; World War I and the 
Collapse of the Empire. 

HIST 237 3 cr. 

Modern Germany: The Twentieth Century 

The troubled birth of the Weimar Republic: the 
Ruhr Crisis; the Stresemann Era; economic col- 
lapse and the rise of Nazism; the Third Reich, 
and World War II; the two Germanics and the 
"economic miracle." 

HIST 238 3 cr. 

(CH,D) History of American Women: From 
Colonization to Mid-Nineteenth Century 

A study of American women from the colonial 
era to the mid- 1 9th century. Changes in the 
family, the workforce, women's participation in 
politics and reform movements, and Native- 
American and African-American women. 



158 Arts and Sciences/History 



HIST 239 3 cr. 

(CH,D) History of American Women: From 
Mid-Nineteenth Century to the Present 

A study of American women since the mid- 19th 
century. The efifects of industrialization on the 
family, women's participation in the workforce, 
the Depression and the family, women and war, 
the feminist movement, and the conservative 
response. 

HIST 240 3 cr. 

(D) Modern Italy 

This course will examine major developments in 
Italian history from the Napoleonic invasion 
until current crises of the Republic. Important 
themes for discussion will be the unification 
movement, the liberal state. Fascism and anti- 
Fascist resistance, the postwar Republic, cultural 
and social change, and economic development. 

HIST 241 3 cr. 

Law in the Western Tradition 

A survey of ideas about law in Western civiliza- 
tion from antiquity until the Civil War. Empha- 
sis on the legal systems, such as the Hebrew, the 
Athenian, the Roman, the German, and the 
Catholic, that influenced the modern ideas 
about the law. 

HIST 295 3 cr. 

(CH) Britain: Past and Present 

(Prerequisite: any 100 level History course) 
Combines with travel experience in Great 
Britain to introduce the student to the major 
historical, cultural, political, economic and social 
events in Britain's past and present. 

HIST 296 3 cr. 

(D) Italian History and Heritage 

Combines with a travel experience to introduce 
the student to Italy's cultural heritage and the 
history of the current Italian Republic. Students 
will visit sites of historic, artistic and religious 
significance as well as important places of the 
contemporary Italian republic. 

HIST 310 3cr. 

Colonial America, 1607-1763 

The European background of the Age of Discov- 
ery; the founding of the British-American 
colonies; their political, economic and cultural 
development; British colonial policy and admin- 
istration; the development of an American civi- 
lization. 



HIST 311 3cr. 

American Revolution, 1763-1789 

Background to the War for Independence; British 
imperial policy; the development of economic 
and ideological conflicts; the military contest; 
British ministerial policy and the parliamentary 
opposition; the Confederation; the formation of 
the Constitution. 

HIST 312 3cr. 

The Early National Period of American 
History, 1789-1824 

Beginning of the New Government; politics and 
diplomacy in the Federalist Era; Jefifersonian 
Democracy; the War of 1812; nationalism and 
sectionalism, Marshall and the rise of the 
Supreme Court. 

HIST 313 3cr. 

The Age of Andrew Jackson, 1824-1850 

Politics and society in the Jacksonian Era, slavery 
and the antislavery crusade, American expansion 
in the 1 840s; the Mexican War; the emergence 
of the slavery issue. 

HIST 314 3 cr. 

Civil War and Reconstruction 

Crisis Decade, disintegration of national bonds; 
The War: resources, leadership, strategy, politics, 
monetary policy, diplomacy; Reconstruction: 
realistic alternatives, presidential and congres- 
sional phases, efifects in the North and South. 

HIST 315 3cr. 

(W) American Progressivism, War, and 
Reaction, 1900-1929 

(Prerequisites: HIST 1 10 and 111) American 
society from the age of Theodore Roosevelt and 
Woodrow Wilson to the "New Era" of the Roar- 
ing Twenties. Topics include Progressive reform 
movements. World War 1 and cultural conflict in 
the 1920s. 

HIST 316 3 cr. 

(CH) From Depression to Cold War: 
1929-1960 

A study of American society from the Great 
Depression to the election of 1960. The course 
will focus on the New Deal; American entry into 
World War II; the origins of the Cold War; and 
America in the age of "consensus." 

HIST 317 3cr. 

History of United States Immigration 

(Prerequisites: HIST 1 10-1 1 1) A study of immi- 
gration to the United States with emphasis on 
the period from the Revolution to the restrictive 
legislation of the 20th century. Motives and 



Arts and Sciences/History 159 



characteristics of immigration. Experiences of 
newcomers. 

HIST 318 3cr. 

A History of American Assimilation 

(Prerequisites: HIST 110-111) The history of 
assimilation (or adjustment) of immigrants to 
American life. Nativism from pre-Civil War days 
to the 1920s. The "Old Immigration" and the 
"New Immigration" considered in the social, 
political, economic, and religious contexts of 
their eras. Special problems of the second gener- 
ation from the 1850s to the 1960s. 

HIST 319-320 6 cr. 

Byzantine Civilization 

The Byzantine Empire from its origins in the 
fourth century to its collapse in the 15th; the 
political and economic growth of the Empire 
with emphasis on its art and religion. 

HIST 321-322 6 cr. 

(CH) American Ideas and Culture 

(Prerequisites: HIST 1 10 for HIST 321, and 
111 for HIST 322) History of American art, 
architecture, literature and thought; Colonial 
developments; the American enlightenment; the 
emergence of a national culture; Romanticism, 
post-Civil War realism in American art and liter- 
ature; the intellectual response to the industrial 
order; the American mind in the 1920s; the 
intellectual and cultural response to the Depres- 
sion; post- World War II developments. 

HIST 323 3 cr. 

The Renaissance 

A study of culture in Italy from the I4th to the 
I6th centuries. Humanism, art, historiography 
and politics will be emphasized. 

HIST 324 3 cr. 

The Reformation 

The history of Europe during the era of religious 
revivalism (16th centiuy). The course will focus on 
the magisterial Protestant reformers, the Catholic 
Counter-Reformation and dynastic politics. 

HIST 325 3 cr. 

French Revolution to 1815 

(Prerequisite: HIST 120) Historical antecedents; 
the philosophies; republicanism and the fall of 
the monarchy; Reign of Terror; the Directory; 
Napoleon; internal achievements; significance of 
the Spanish and Russian campaigns; and War of 
Liberation. 



HIST 326 3 cr. 

Europe in the Age of Absolutism 

(Recommended for Background: HIST 120) A 
study of the major political, social, economic 
and intellectual movements in Europe from the 
rise of royal absolutism until the outbreak of the 
French Revolution. 

HIST 327 3 cr. 

(CH,D) The African Experience in Latin 
America 1500-1900 

(Prerequisite: HIST 125 or 126) Examines the 
experiences of Africans in the colonies and for- 
mer colonies of Latin America and the 
Caribbean with emphasis on Spanish America 
and Portuguese Brazil. Units will highlight slav- 
ery, the response of slaves to subjugation; the 
role of free Africans and men and women of 
color, intermarriage, religion and music. 

HIST 330 3 cr. 

Europe, 1815-1914 

(Prerequisite: HIST 121) A study of 19th- 
century Europe concentrating on The Congress 
of Vienna and its aftermath, the Age of Nation- 
alism and Realism, European Dynamism and 
the non-European world, and the Age of Moder- 
nity and Anxiety. 

HIST 331 3 cr. 

(C) Recent U.S. History: 1960 to the Present 

A study of American society since 1960. The 
course will focus on the New Frontier and Great 
Society; the Vietnam War; protest movements; 
Watergate; and the conservative response to 
these developments. 

HIST 332 3 cr. 

(W) America in the Gilded Age, 1865-1900 
(Prerequisites: HIST 1 10-1 1 1) American society 
in the age of industrialization and urbanization. 
Topics include the emergence of big business 
and labor conflict, immigration and the growth 
of cities, Populism, imperialism, and the Span- 
ish-American War. 

HIST 333-334 6 cr. 

Twentieth-Century Europe 

World War I; Treaty of Versailles; Russia 
becomes the USSR; the European struggle for 
security; Italian Fascism; rise of Nazi Germany; 
Asia between the two wars; World War II; loss of 
colonial empires in Africa and Asia; development 
of the Cold War; Marshall Plan and NATO. 



160 Arts and Sciences/Mathematics 



HIST 335 3 cr. 

World War II, Cold War and Detente 

The diplomacy of World War II; the development 
of the Cold War between the U.S. and the 
U.S.S.R. and the adoption of the policy of detente. 

HIST 336 3 cr. 

History of American Law 

(Prerequisites: HIST 1 10-HIST 111) Traces the 
history of ideas and concepts utilized by the 
courts, legislature, organized bar and administra- 
tive agencies to solve legal problems: and shows 
how American legal thought and reasoning 
developed from Colonial days to the present. 

HIST 337 3 cr. 

English Constitutional and Legal History 

Anglo-Saxon basis; Norman political institu- 
tions; Magna Carta; beginnings of common law; 
jury system; Tudor absolutism; struggle for sov- 
ereignty; rise of House of Commons; democratic 
reforms; extension of administrative law. 

HIST 338-339 6 cr. 

American Diplomatic History 

(Prerequisites: HIST 110-1 11) A study of Ameri- 
can diplomatic history and principles; The Revo- 
lution; Early American policies on isolation and 
expansion; The War of 1812; The Monroe Doc- 
trine; Manifest Destiny; The Civil War; American 
imperialism and the Spanish-American War; Latin 
American diplomacy in the 20th century; World 
War I; attempts to preclude further war; World 
War II; Cold War; Contemporary problems. 

HIST 340 3 cr. 

(W) History of Urban America 

(Prerequisites: HIST 110-111) The evolution of 
cities in the United States from the founding of 
colonial settlements to the end of the 20th cen- 
tury. The nature of cities and urban life, the 
process and impact of urban growth, and the 
problems facing contemporary cities will all be 
considered. 

HIST 390 3-6 cr. 

History Internship 

A practical work experience which exposes the 
student to the nature of historical investigation, 
analysis, and/or writing in a museum, historical 
site, or public agency. Supervision by faculty and 
agencies. 

HIST 490 3 cr. 

(W) Seminar in European History 

(Restricted to senior History majors and four- 
year B.A./M.A. History students) An analysis of 
selected topics in European history from the 



1 5th to the 20th century. Extensive readings. 
Historical research and writing stressed. 

HIST 491 3 cr. 

(W) Seminar in American History 

(Restricted to senior History majors and four- 
year B.A./M.A. History students) An analysis of 
selected topics in U.S. or Latin American history 
from the Colonial era to the present. Extensive 
readings. Historical research and writing stressed. 

IS 390 3 cr. 

(W) Seminar in International Studies 

Required for International Studies majors. Other 
advanced undergraduates may take this course 
with permission of the professor This course 
may be used for either History or Political Science 
credit. 



MATHEMATICS 

Faculty 

Jakub S. Jasinski, Ph.D., Chair 
Maureen T. Carroll, Ph.D. 
Steven T. Dougherty, Ph.D. 
Michael Dutko, Ph.D. 
Gary E. Eichelsdorfer 
Anthony P. Ferzola, Ph.D. 
Bernard Johns, M.A. 
John J. Levko, S.J., Ph.D. 
Kenneth G. Monks, Ph.D. 
Masood Otarod, SCD 
Paul Perdew, Ph.D. 
Krzysztof Plotka, Ph.D. 
Zhongcheng Xiong, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The Mathematics program balances algebra 
vs. analysis in its basic courses and pure vs. 
applied mathematics (including probability 
and statistics) in its advanced courses. Sup- 
porting courses balance traditional physics 
with contemporary computer science. Gradu- 
ates have great flexibility: some continue 
study in mathematics or related fields, some 
teach, some become actuaries and some work 
in jobs which vary from programming to 
management. A student chapter of the Math- 
ematical Association of America encourages 
early professionalism. 



Arts and Sciences/Mathematics 161 



Minor in Mathematics 

The Mathematics minor must include 
MATH 1 14, 221, 222, and 351 and two 
additional electives chosen from Mathematics 
courses numbered over 300 or Phys 350. 

Biomathematics 

The Biomathematics major leads to 
employment or graduate study ranging from 
biostatistics through public health to medi- 
cine. The major contains four tracks: Epi- 
demiology, Molecular Biology, Physiology, or 
Population Biology. Students interested in 
medical school should alter the standard 
schedule so that General Biochemistry can be 
elected in the third year. This may be done by 
attending summer sessions, by using AP cred- 
its, or - when approved by an academic advi- 
sor - by shifting General & Analytical Chem- 
istry to the first year and Organic Chemistry 
to the second year. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



MATH 005 
Algebra 

A study of algebra including factoring, expo- 
nents, radicals, graphing, and linear and quad- 
ratic equations. Enrollment is restricted to Dex- 
ter Hanley College students who are limited in 
algebra skills. Permission of the dean of Dexter 
Hanley College is required in order to enroll in 
this course. Credits count only as free elective. 

MATH 101 3cr. 

(Q) Mathematics Discovery 

Topics exploring various aspects of mathematical 
reasoning and modeling are selected to bring the 
excitement of contemporary mathematical 
thinking to the nonspecialist. Examples of topics 
covered in the past include fractal geometry, 
chaos theory, number theory, and non-Euclidean 
geometry. Not open to students with credit for 
or enrolled in any mathematics course numbered 
above 101. 

MATH 102 3 cr. 

(Q) Fundamentals of Numerical Mathematics 

(Prerequisite: Not open to students with credit 
for, or enrolled in, MATH 103 or any mathe- 
matics course numbered above 105) A study of 
the flindamental elementary concepts underlying 
numbers and number systems and their applica- 
tions. Topics covered include logic, sets, func- 
tions, the natural numbers, integers, rational 



numbers, real numbers, estimation, number the- 
ory, patterns, counting, and probability, in addi- 
tion to other topics chosen by the instructor. 

MATH 103 4 cr. 

(Q) Pre-Calculus Mathematics 

An intensified course covering the topics of alge- 
bra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Not 
open to students with credit for or enrolled in 
MATH 109 or any calculus course. 

MATH 105 4 cr. 

(Q) Fundamentals of Geometric Mathematics 

(Prerequisite: Not open to students with credit 
for, or enrolled in, any other mathematics course 
numbered above 102) A study of the fundamen- 
tal concepts underlying geometric mathematics 
and its applications. Topics include logic, sets, 
functions and relations, classical geometry, meas- 
urement, transformations, statistics, and analytic 
geometry and its relationship to algebra and 
functions, in addition to other topics chosen by 
the instructor. 

MATH 106 3 cr. 

(Q) Quantitative Methods I 

Topics from algebra including exponents, radi- 
cals, linear and quadratic equations, graphing, 
fiinctions (including quadratic, exponential and 
logarithmic), and linear inequalities. Not open 
to students with credit for or enrolled in MATH 
103 or MATH 109. 

MATH 107 3 cr. 

(Q) Quantitative Methods II 

(Prerequisite: MATH 106 or equivalent) Topics 
from differential calculus including limits, deriv- 
atives, curve sketching, marginal cost fianctions, 
and maximum-minimum problems. Integration. 
Not open to students with credit for or enrolled 
in MATH 114. 

MATH 108 3 cr. 

Quantitative Methods III 

(Prerequisite: MATH 107 or 114) Topics from 
integral calculus including the definite and 
indefinite integral, techniques of integration, 
and multivariable calculus. Not open to students 
with credit for or enrolled in MATH 221. 

MATH 109 4 cr. 

(Q) Quantitative Methods in the Behavioral 
Sciences 

The mathematics necessary for elementary statis- 
tics: algebraic rules, logic, equations, fiinctions, 
and linear regression. Particular attention paid to 
lines, parabolas, reciprocals, square roots, loga- 
rithms, and exponentials. Intended for students 



162 Arts and Sciences/Mathematics 



Mathematics Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE QUAN) 


MATH 142-114 


Discrete Structures-Analysis I 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


CMPS 134 


Computer Science I 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED 


Physical Education 




1 




17 


17 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


MATH 221-222 


Analysis II-Analysis III 


4 


4 


MAJOR 


MATH 351 


Linear Algebra 




3 


COGNATE (GENSCI) 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


SociaJ/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology 11 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECTA 


Elective 


3 






17 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


MATH 446-ELECT 


Real Analysis I-Eleaive 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MATH 448-ELECT 


Modern Algebra I-Elective 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECTA 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 




16 


16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


MATH ELECT' 


Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MATH ELECT' 


Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MATH ELECT' 


Electives 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT- 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Elective! for Mathematic. 


i majors: Major electives are selected from Mathematics courses numbered above MATH 300; also 


PHYS 350. PHYS 551, 


CMPS 362 or CMPS 364. A student must select as an elective at least one of MATH 447 or 


449. 


and at lean two of MATH 512, 545, 460, 461. Additional courses numbered under MATH 300 may 


be taken as free elec- 


lives but not as major electives. 








^ Cognate electives must be 


■ used to complete a minor, a concentration, a second major, secondary-education certification. 


or a 


package of courses pre-approved by the department. 








The results of the placement tests administered during freshman orientation assist students and their 


advisors in choosing 


the proper beginning-level mathematics sequence and the proper entry-level within that sequence. Ifi 


1 course is a prerequi- 


site for a second course, directly or indirectly, and a student receives credit for the second cottrse then 


that student will not 


he allowed to register- for the prerequisite course. 









from psychology and related disciplines. Not 
open to students with credit for or enrolled in 
MATH 103. 

MATH 114 4cr, 

(Q) Analysis I 

(Prerequisite: MATH 103 or equivalent) The 
beginning of a 1 2-credit sequence covering the 
topics of calculus and analytic geometry. Limits, 
derivatives, integration. Fundamental Theorem. 



MATH 142 4 cr. 

(Q) Discrete Structures 

A study of symbolic logic, sets, combinatorics, 
mathematical induction, recursion, graph theory, 
and trees. Intended for Mathematics, Computer 
Science, and Computer Information Systems 
majors, but open to other qualified students. 



Arts and Sciences/Mathematics 1 63 



Biomathematics Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


MATH 142-114 


Discrete Structures-Analysis I 


4 


4 


MAJOR 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Phys. Ed. 


1 


.5 


15.5 


15 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


MATH 221-222 


Analysis II-III 


4 


4 


MAJOR 


BIOL ELECT'-BIOL 379- 


Track Electives-Biostatistics 


4.5-5 


3 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112-113 


General & Analytical Chemistry 


4.5 


4.5 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


.5 


17-17.5 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


MATH 312-351 


Probability-Linear Algebra 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-Il 


4 


4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elecrives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECTIVES 


Physical Education 


.5 


.5 


18 


18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


BIOL ELECT' 


Track Elective 


3-5 


3-5 


MAJOR 


MATH 341 


DifiFerential Equations 




3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humaniries Elective 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/BehavioraJ Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECTIVE 


Eleaive 


3 


3 


15-17 


15-18 






TOTAL: 131.5-136.5 CREDITS 

y Track: BIOL 260 or 371, BIOL 250, BIOL 344 Molecular 


' Biology electives mtm 


; all come from one track. Epidemioloq 


Biology Track: BIOL 260, BIOL 361-362. Physiology Track: BIOL 245, two of BIOL 345, 347, 348, 349, 445, oi 


'446 


Population Biology Track: three of BIOL 370, 371, 375, or 472. 






^ MATH 314 may be 


substituted for BIOL 3^9 but only aft, 


er MATH 312 has been completed. 







MATH 184-284-384-484 1-4 cr. 

Special Topics 

Topics, prerequisites, and amount of credit will 
be announced prior to preregistration. 

MATH 201 3 cr. 

(Q,W) Algebra and Environmental Issues 

(Prerequisite: Not open to students with credit 
for, or enrolled in, MATH 103, 106, 109, or 
any calculus course) Study of algebra applied to 
environmental issues such as the concentration 
of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Modeling 
will include use of algebra to analyze data and 
predict future situations. Students will use writ- 
ing as a tool to understand computations and to 
present and interpret models based on scientific 
data. Recommended for non-science students, 
especially those in Environmental Studies. 



MATH 204 3 cr. 

(Q) Special Topics of Statistics 

Study of the computational aspects of statistics; 
hypothesis testing, goodness of fit; nonparamet- 
ric tests; linear and quadratic regression, correla- 
tion and analysis of variance. Not open to stu- 
dents who have credit for or are enrolled in an 
equivalent statistics course (e.g., PSYC 210, 
MATH 312 or MATH 314). 

MATH 221 4cr. 

Analysis II 

(Prerequisite: MATH 114) Topics include: appli- 
cations of the definite integral, transcendental 
functions, methods of integration, improper 
integral, parametric equations, polar coordinates, 
and indeterminate forms. 



1 64 Arts and Sciences/Mathematics 



MATH 222 4 cr. 

Analysis III 

(Prerequisite: MATH 221) Topics include: infi- 
nite series, vectors, solid analytic geometry, mul- 
tivariable calculus, and multiple integration. 

MATH 310 4cr. 

Applied Probability and Mathematical Statistics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 221) Basic concepts of 
probability theory random variables, distribution 
functions, multivariable distributions, sampling 
theory, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothe- 
sis testing, linear models and analysis of variance. 

MATH 312 3 cr. 

Probability Theory 

(Prerequisite: MATH 221) Basic concepts of prob- 
ability theory, random variables and their distribu- 
tion firnctions; limit theorems and Markov chains. 

MATH 314 3 cr. 

Statistics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 312) Measure of central 
tendency, measure of dispersion, continuous ran- 
dom variables, expected value, moments, confi- 
dence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, 
and correlation. 

MATH 320 3 cr. 

Chaos and Fractals 

(Prerequisite: One math course beyond MATH 
221 and one CMPS course or equivalent experi- 
ence) Study of chaotic dynamical systems and 
fractal geometry. Topics from discrete dynamical 
systems theory include iteration, orbits, graphi- 
cal analysis, fixed and periodic points, bifurca- 
tions, symbolic dynamics, Sarkovslcii's theorem, 
the Schwarzian derivative, and Newton's 
method. Topics from fractal geometry include 
fractal, Hausdorff, and topological dimension, L- 
systems, Julia and Mandelbrot sets, iterated 
fiinction systems, the collage theorem, and 
strange attractors. 

MATH 325 3 cr. 

(W) History and Philosophy of Mathematics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 222 and either MATH 
142 or a math course numbered above 300 or 
instructor's permission) A survey of major devel- 
opments in mathematics from ancient through 
modern times. In addition to the mathematics, 
this course focuses on the context in which these 
results were discovered as well as the lives of the 
mathematicians. Topic may include development 
of numeral systems, Euclidean and non-Euclid- 
ean geometry, algebra, calculus, number theory, 
real analysis, logic and set theory. 



MATH 330 3 cr. 

Actuarial Mathematics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 22 1 ) Theory of interest, 
accumulation and discount, present value, future 
value, annuities, perpetuities, amortizations, 
sinking funds, and yield rates. 

MATH 341 4 cr. 

Differential Equations 

(Prerequisite: MATH 222) Treatment of ordi- 
nary differential equations with applications. 
Topics include: first-order equations, first-order 
systems, linear and non-linear systems, numeri- 
cal methods, and Laplace transforms. Computer- 
aided solutions will be used when appropriate. 

MATH 345 3 cr. 

Geometry 

Euclidean, non-Euclidean, and projective geom- 
etry. Transformations and invariants. 

MATH 346 3 cr. 

Number Theory 

(Prerequisite: MATH 1 14) Topics include divisi- 
bility, the Euclidean algorithm, linear diophan- 
tine equations, prime factorization, linear con- 
gruences, some special congruences, Wilson's 
theorem, theorems of Fermat and Euler, Euler 
phi function and other multiplicative functions, 
and the Mobius Inversion Formula. 

MATH 351 3cr. 

Linear Algebra 

(Prerequisite: MATH 221) Vector spaces, 
matrices, determinants, linear transformations, 
eigenvalues, eigenvectors, inner products, and 
orthogonality. 

MATH 360 3 cr. 

Coding Theory 

(Prerequisite: MATH 351) A study of algebraic 
coding theory. Topics include: linear codes, 
encoding and decoding, hamming, perfect, 
BCH cyclic and MDS codes, and applications to 
information theory. 

MATH 446 3 cr. 

Real Analysis I 

(Prerequisite: MATH 222) Topics include: the 
algebra and topology of the real numbers, 
functions, sequences of numbers, limits, con- 
tinuity, absolute and uniform continuity, and 
differentiation. 



Arts and Sciences/Media and Information Technology 1 65 



MATH 447 3 cr. 

Real Analysis II 

(Prerequisite: MATH 446) Selections from: 
integration theory, infinite series, sequences and 
infinite series of fianctions, and related topics. 

MATH 448 3 cr. 

Modern Algebra I 

(Prerequisite: MATH 351) Fundamental 
properties of groups, rings, polynomials, and 
homomorphisms. 



MATH 449 
Modern Algebra II 

(Prerequisite: MATH 448) Further study of 
algebraic structures. 



3cr. 



3 cr. 



MATH 460 
Topology 

(Prerequisite: MATH 446) Topological spaces: 
connectedness, compactness, separation axioms, 
and metric spaces. 

MATH 461 3 cr. 

Complex Variables 

(Prerequisite: MATH 222) The theory of complex 
variables: the calculus of functions of complex 
variables, transformations, conformal mappings, 
residues and poles. 

MATH 462 3 cr. 

Vector Calculus 

(Prerequisites: MATH 222, MATH 351) The 
calculus of scalar and vector fields and of fiinc- 
tions defined on paths or surfaces. Implicit 
Function, Green's, Strokes, and Gauss' Theo- 
rems. Applications. 

MATH 493-494 6 cr. 

Undergraduate Mathematics Research 

An introduction to mathematical research. Stu- 
dents will be required to investigate, present and 
write up the result of an undergraduate-level 
mathematical research project. Students will gain 
experience in researching the mathematical liter- 
ature, investigating a mathematical problem, and 
learning how to write a mathematical paper. Stu- 
dents will be required to present their results in 
both oral and written form. 

INTO 224 3 cr. 

(Q,W) Science, Decision Making and 
Uncertainty 

See description under Interdisciplinary Courses, 
page 72. 



MEDIA AND 

INFORMATION 

TECHNOLOGY 

Matthew M. Reavy, Ph.D., Director 
See Communication for faculty listing. 

Overview 

Electronic communication has significantly 
changed the world in many ways. Virtually all 
aspects of communication within and between 
institutions and corporations are affected by 
the need to provide information in multiple 
media. As the fields of computers and com- 
munication have come together, they have cre- 
ated the need for a new type of educational 
preparation. No longer do we look only to 
print documents and to oral presentations as 
the way to convey information. Rather, there 
is a great need for people who are knowledge- 
able in both the technical aspects and the 
communication aspects of this new paradigm. 

Our program builds on the strengths of 
several departments at the University to 
produce a program that has strength in all its 
parts. Starting with Physics/Electrical Engi- 
neering to provide a careful look at the sci- 
ence of communication, we add the support 
of the Computing Sciences to provide pro- 
gramming tools and network expertise. To the 
student's understanding of the science and the 
languages of computers, we add the practical 
and theoretical skills of the Communication 
Department to produce effective multimedia 
specialists. The student may add additional 
writing courses from the English Department. 
In addition to courses in the major, the stu- 
dent will develop a content area in another 
discipline and will be required to produce a 
major project in this area. This culminating 
project will demonstrate practical experience 
as well as theoretical knowledge. 

Major Electives (see department pages 
for course descriptions) 

CMPS 3 1 2 Web Technology 

(or CMPS 202) 
CMPS 376 Rapid Prototyping 
COMM 310 Mass Communication Law 
COMM 324 Advanced Newswriting 
ECO 370 Interactive Marketing 

(prerequisite: MKT 351) 



1 66 Arts and Sciences/Media and Information Technology 



Media and Information Technology Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


CMPS 134-136' 


Computer Sci I-Computer Prog II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PHYS 104- 


Intro, to Consumer Technology 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Eleaive 




3 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computer & Info Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro Phil-Theology I 


3 


3 


GEHUM 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


COMM 329 


Graphics 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE QUAN 


MATH 2043 


Special Topics of Statistics 


3 




GE HUMN 


ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


COMM 317-318 


Digital AV-Muiti-Media Pres. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PHYS 204-CMPS 311 


Information Tech-Networks 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ELECT 


Elecuve 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


6 


MAJOR 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GEHUM 


ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE NCSI 


NCSI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


18 


3 
18 


Fourdi Year 










MAJOR 


MIT 490 


Information Technology Project 


3 




MAJOR 


PHIL-T/RS* 


Computers & Ethics or equivalent 




3 


MAJOR 


ELECT 


Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


6 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Electives 


6 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


To most effectively use the skills developed in the Media 


and Information Technology major, a content area is needed. 


Therefore, each student 


will complete either: (a) another academic major; or (b) an academic minor 


(or concentration) 


and take a course in Statistics' (Qtutntitative Reasoning Area). 






> Or CMPS 144 










- Also GE NSCI requirement 








} MATH 204 or any othi 


»r statistics course that fits into GE QUAN. If the cognate is a second major in the sciences, any 


GE 


QUAN is acceptable. 










^ PHIL 214 Computers and Ethics or equivalent course in 


' Philosophy or Theology/Religiom Studies area. 







Arts and Sciences/Military Science 1 67 



MIT 310 E-Research: Information- 

seeking Skills and Strategies 
MIT 481 Internship in Information 

Technology 
PHYS 103 Seeing the Light 
PHYS 108 New York Times Physics 
PHYS 1 1 3 Science of Photography 
WRTG 2 1 1 Technical and Business Writing 
WRTG 2 1 8 Writing the Web 

Course Descriptions 

MIT 310 3cr. 

E-Research: Information-seeking Skills 
and Strategies 

This course concentrates on the use of the Inter- 
net for research in a variety of fields, emphasiz- 
ing online research techniques and effective 
online search strategies, both of which will be 
valuable for careers in an e-world. Topics include 
organization of information; evaluation and 
selection of databases; evaluation of information 
from web resources; types of online information 
resources (e.g.. government documents, statisti- 
cal sources; consumer, medical, and business 
information; online communities, etc.); online 
periodical databases; use of search engines; copy- 
right and fair use issues; and citing electronic 
sources. Students will develop life-long learning 
skills for locating and evaluating information. 
Hands-on experience will be emphasized. 

MIT 481 3 cr. 

Internship in Information Technology 

This is an extensive job experience in media and 
information technology that carries academic 
credit. Prior approval is required. 

MIT 490 3 cr. 

Information Technology Project 

(Seniors only, departmental permission required). 
In this course, students prepare and present 
Information Technology projects to be evaluated 
by the instructor and their fellow students. 



MILITARY SCIENCE/ 
ARMY RESERVE 
OFFICER TRAINING 
CORPS (ROTC) 

LTC Mark Carmody, Program Director 

Overview 

The University of Scranton's Military Science 
Department, also known as the Royal Warrior 
Battalion, was named the top officer-produc- 
ing program in the Second Brigade and was 
documented in the top 10% of 105 programs 
in the First ROTC Region (East Coast) for 
2002. It was also selected as "Best Unit" for 
1999 in the First ROTC Region, and the 
department established itself in the top 10% 
of all 270 ROTC programs in 1998. 

The Royal Warrior Battalion has a flexible 
ROTC program that can be tailored to most 
students' needs, and classes are offered on 
campus. Two- and four-year programs are 
available, both of which lead to a commission 
as an officer in the United States Army (after 
passing a medical examination). Most stu- 
dents take one course per semester of the 
basic course program (freshman and sopho- 
more years), and one course per semester of 
the advance courses (junior and senior years). 

The Royal Warrior Battalion enjoys out- 
standing results in awarding scholarships. In 
fact, all qualified applicants from 1998 to 2002 
who applied for a two-, three- or four-year 
campus-based scholarship were offered that 
scholarship. As of the spring 2003 semester, 
162 students were enrolled in the Royal War- 
rior Battalion, with 86 scholarship recipients. 

Advanced ROTC Course 

Juniors, seniors and graduate students qual- 
ify for entry into the Advanced ROTC course 
in three ways: 

1 . On-campus courses: Most students take 
the introductory Military Science 
courses of the basic Military Science pro- 
gram on campus during their freshman 
and sophomore years. This allows them 
to participate in adventure training, and 
to learn about the opportunities and 
responsibilities of being an Army officer 
without incurring any obligation. 



168 Arts and Sciences/Military Science 



2. Summer programs: Students may also 
qualify through a paid, five-week Leader- 
ship Training Course (LTC) summer 
training session held in Fort Knox, Ken- 
tucky, which provides military training 
equivalent to the instruction received by 
ft-eshmen and sophomores in the basic 
course program. 

3. Advanced Placement: Students with any 
prior military service, members of the 
United States Army Reserves or National 
Guard, or former Junior ROTC mem- 
bers may qualify for advanced placement 
into the Advanced ROTC program. 

Two- Year Program 

Available to qualified full-time students 
(generally having a minimum of two aca- 
demic years remaining to degree completion) 
who meet the criteria set forth in paragraphs 
(2) or (3) above. Application for this program 
should be made prior to the end of the spring 
semester of the sophomore year for those stu- 
dents not previously enrolled in Military Sci- 
ence instruction. Also available for graduate 
students. 

Four- Year Program 

Consists of attending the freshman and 
sophomore courses; students can begin as late 
as the fall semester of their sophomore year if 
approved by the department chair. Enroll- 
ment in the first four courses of Military Sci- 
ence is accomplished in the same manner as 
any other college course and carries no mili- 
tary obligation for non-scholarship students. 
Application to enroll in the advanced Military 
Science courses should be made while the stu- 
dent is enrolled in Military Science 202. 

Each contracted student is required to 
complete the National Advanced Leadership 
Course (NALC), a paid, five-week training 
course held during the summer months 
between a students junior and senior year at 
Fort Lewis, near Seattle, Washington. Trans- 
portation, food, lodging, medical and dental 
care is provided at no cost to the student. 

Scholarships 

There are significant scholarship opportuni- 
ties for ROTC students. Scholarships pay annu- 
ally up to $17,000 for tuition, $600 for books, 
and $2,500-$4,000 stipend (paid mondily). 
The stipend pays $250 monthly (August to 
May) for freshmen and up to $400 monthly for 



seniors. Freshmen and sophomores can apply 
for three- and two-year full scholarships in 
December. Historically, most University of 
Scranton students win scholarships by their 
junior year. Winners of full, high school level, 
ROTC scholarships are provided free room and 
board by The University of Scranton. 

Partner in Nursing Education (PNE) 

In 1 996, the Army designated The Univer- 
sity of Scranton as a PNE and sends five high- 
school-level Army ROTC Nursing Scholarship 
recipients to Scranton each year. Additionally, 
Nursing students who complete the Army 
Nurse Summer Training Program (NSTP) 
receive 3 credits towards NURS 482 lab. 

Transcript Credit 

Up to 1 5 Military Science credits can be 
counted on the transcript. Additionally, Physi- 
cal Fitness Training (PHED 138) can count 
for the 3 required Physical Education credits 
and nurses receive 3 credits toward senior-year 
clinicals for Army NSTP. Candidates for an 
Army commission through Military Science 
are required by regulation to complete aca- 
demic courses in the areas of communications 
skills, military history, and computer literacy. 
Generally, these requirements will be met by 
satisfying the University's general-education 
requirements. Contact the professor of Mili- 
tary Science for specific requirements. 

Minor in Leadership 

American Military Leadership emphasizes 
total competence in one's field, coupled with 
an absolute respect for ethics. It is based on 
the knowledge of people, history, and current 
management practices. The Military Science 
Department offers a minor in Leadership that 
capitalizes on the classroom instruction 
offered in the courses listed below provided 
by several University departments. The minor 
also offers unique field experiences for stu- 
dents to practice leadership skills in demand- 
ing but safe and controlled training activities. 
The minor is open to all University students 
in the advanced military science courses. 

A minor in Leadership requires 1 8 credits, 
at least six of which must be approved elec- 
tives outside of the Military Science depart- 
ment. The student must take MS 301, MS 
302, MS 401, and MS 402, plus courses from 
the list of approved electives. They must also 
complete a University internship approved by 



Arts and Sciences/Military Science 169 



the instructor of record, the Professor of MiH- 
tary Science. The student may choose two 
electives from the following approved courses: 

CJ237 MS 201, 202 

GEOG 134 MS 480 

HIST 214 MS 481 

HIST 216 PHED 138 

HIST 218 PS 130,131 

HIST 219 PS 213 

HIST 220 PS 227 

HIST 223 PS 231 

HIST 239 PS 232 

INTO 103 PS 327 

MGT351 PS 329 

MGT 352 PSYC 220 

MGT 471 PSYC 236 

MGT 490 PSYC 284 

MS 101, 102 S/CJ234 

The student must receive a grade of C or 
better in each course in order for it to count 
towards the minor, and the student must have 
an average of 3.0 in the courses counting 
toward the minor. 



Course Descriptions 



2cr. 



MS 101-102 

Concepts of Leadership I-II 

Instruction is designed to provide basic under- 
standing of military knowledge while concen- 
trating on leadership skills and civic responsibili- 
ties important to all citizens. Students may elect 
to participate in activities that produce expertise 
in rappelling, orienteering, first aid, swimming 
and marksmanship. 

MS 111-112 Ocr. 

Leadership Applications Laboratory 

Freshmen and sophomores are encouraged to 
participate in this elective. Hands-on instruction 
is designed to reinforce classroom training on 
weapons, first aid, tactics, leadership and mili- 
tary drill. 

MS 131-132 Ocr. 

Advanced Leadership Applications Laboratory 

Advanced-course junior/senior students are 
required to attend. Students plan, resource and 
conduct training under the supervision of Army 
ROTC faculty and staff members. Emphasis is 
on reinforcement of classroom leadership train- 
ing and military instruction to prepare juniors 
for situations they will experience at the 
advanced summer camp. 



MS 201-202 4cr. 

Dynamics of Leadership I-II 

Instruction is designed to familiarize the student 
with basic military operations and the principles 
of leadership. Students experience hands-on 
training with navigation and topographic equip- 
ment, first aid and military weapons. 

MS 301-302 3 cr. 

Military Leadership I-II 

(Prerequisite: MS 201-202 or equivalent) This 
course continues to develop each student's leader- 
ship qualities and teaches students how to plan, 
resource and execute effective training in prepa- 
ration for attendance at the National Advanced 
Leadership Course prior to their senior year. 
(MS 301 is 2 credits, MS 302 is 1 credit) 

MS 401-402 3 cr. 

Advanced Military Leadership 

Taught by the Professor of Military Science, this 
course continues to develop the student's leader- 
ship skills. Emphasis is on operations of a mili- 
tary staff, briefing techniques, effective writing, 
army training systems, and the logistical and 
administrative support of military operations. 
(MS 401 is 2 credits, MS 402 is 1 credit) 

MS 480 2 cr. 

Internship in Military Science: National 
Advanced Leadership Course 

(Prerequisites: MS 301, MS 302, contracted sta- 
tus as a cadet) This internship is a paid five-week 
experience of training and evaluation conducted 
at Fort Lewis, Washington with ROTC cadets 
from all across the country. It gives the student 
the opportunity to practice the leadership theory 
acquired in the classroom. 

MS 481 Icr. 

Internship in Military Science: Cadet Troop 
Leading 

(Prerequisites: MS 301, MS 302, contracted sta- 
tus as a cadet) This internship is a paid three- 
week experience of leadership training and men- 
toring. The intern leads and supervises soldiers 
in the planning and execution of the unit's 
scheduled training as an understudy to a military 
officer in the U.S. Army. 

PHED 138 1 cr. 

Physical Fitness Training 

Stretching, strengthening exercises, and an aero- 
bic workout, supervised by Army ROTC faculty. 
This course counts toward the 3-credit PHED 
requirement during the junior and senior years. 
This course is open to all students. 



1 70 Arts and Sciences/Neuroscience 



Neuroscience Curriculum 






J 




Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


BIOL 141-142 


Gen. Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112-113 


Gen. Analytical Chem. I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


MAJOR (GE S/BH) 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


16 


3 
18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


BIOL 348 


Neurophysiology 




3 


MAJOR 


ELECT 


Major Elective 




3 


MAJOR 


PSYC 231 


Behavioral Neuroscience 


4.5 




MAJOR 


PSYC 210-330' 


Psych. Stats-Res Methods in Beh. Sci. 


3 


5 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) MATH 114 


Analysis I 


4 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 122 


Intro, to Phil.-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


2 


18.5 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Major Electives 


6-8 


3-4 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


6-8 


6-8 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


15-19 


3 ; 
15-18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Major Elective 


3-4 


■f 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


6-8 


t 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 1 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 k 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15-18 


12 ] 
18 ; 






TOTAL: 131.5-141.5 CREDITS 


' PSYC 330 fulfills one of the writing-intensive requirements of the general-education program. 




1 



NEUROSCIENCE 

J. Timothy Cannon, Ph.D., Program Director 
See Psychology for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The foundation courses of this interdisci- 
plinary curriculum are selected from the Biol- 
ogy, Psychology, and Chemistry departments. 
Depending upon the electives chosen, the 
program can prepare students for a variety of 
graduate programs within the field of neuto- 
science. Such graduate training may draw 
from a range of disciplines, including biology, 
psychology, anatomy, pharmacology, toxicol- 
ogy, biophysics, biochemistry and medicine. 
Students have ample research opportunities in 



laboratories that can support a diversity of 
behavioral, biochemical, neurophysiological 
and neuroanatomical investigations. The pro- 
gram is administered by an intetdisciplinary 
committee. 

Major in Neuroscience 

42.5 to 46.5 ctedits. Majors must take two 
electives from both Biology and Psychology. 
Psychology electives must be drawn from 
PSYC 220, 221, 222, 225, 230, 234, 235, or, 
with permission of the director, PSYC 284 or 
384. Biology electives must be drawn from 
those intended for Biology majors. With per- 
mission of the director, NEUR 384: Special 
Topics in Neuroscience may be used to fulfill 
one Psychology or Biology elective requirement. 



Arts and Sciences/Philosophy 171 



Cognate in Neuroscience 

31-37 credits. Students should consider 
their projected graduate program when 
choosing cognate electives from the areas of 
chemistry, mathematics, physics, and com- 
puter science. 

Course Descriptions 

NEUR 384 

Special Topics in Neuroscience 

(Formerly NEUR 170; prerequisites: BIOL 141- 
142, PSYC 231) Course topics are developed by 
individual faculty to provide in-depth coverage 
of specific areas in neuroscience. Some courses 
have required or elective laboratory components. 
Course titles and descriptions will be provided in 
advance of registration. 

NEUR 493-494 3-6 cr. 

Undergraduate Research in Neuroscience 

(Formerly NEUR 160-161; prerequisites: BIOL 
141-142, PSYC 231, PSYC 330, and permission 
of instructor) Individual study and research on a 
specific topic relevant to neuroscience under the 
supervision of a faculty member. It is strongly 
recommended that this research be initiated dur- 
ing the junior year, and it is expected that the 
research will extend over a two-semester period. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Faculty 

William V. Rowe, Ph.D., Chair 
Harold W. Baillie, Ph.D. 
David W. Black, Ph.D. 
Timothy K. Casey, Ph.D. 
Matthew J. Fairbanks, Ph.D. 
Christina Gschwandtner, Ph.D. 
Richard J. Klonoski, Ph.D. 
John W. McGinley, Ph.D. 
Ronald McKinney, S.J., Ph.D. 
Sharon M. Meagher, Ph.D. 
J. Patrick Mohr, S.J., Ph.D. 
Kevin M. Nordberg, Ph.D. 
Ann A. Pang- White, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The basic objectives of the Philosophy 
Department may be stated as follows: 
1 . To inspire the student to confront the 
philosophical problems implicit in the 
experience of self, others and the uni- 
verse, together with the question of their 



relations to ultimate transcendence (God 
and immortality); 

2. To develop in the student habits of clear, 
critical thinking within the framework of 
both an adequate philosophical method- 
ology and accepted norms of scholarship; 

3. To introduce the student to reading crit- 
ically the great philosophers, past and 
present; and 

4. Finally, to help the student to formulate 
for himself or herself a philosophy of life 
or worldview consistent with the objec- 
tives of liberal education at a Catholic 
university. 

For the Bachelor of Arts degree in Philoso- 
phy, the major must take 24 credits (eight 
courses) in Philosophy in addition to the 6 
credits required of all students. These 24 cred- 
its must include a logic course and at least 
two courses on the 300 or 400 level. Majors 
should take logic before the senior year. 

See also the Philosophy oflFerings in the SJLA 
Program described elsewhere in this catalog. 

Minor in Philosophy 

A minor in Philosophy consists of 18 cred- 
its - the 6 credits required of all students and 
12 additional credits. Seven distinct philoso- 
phy minors are available: the traditional open 
minor, Ethical Issues of Professional Life, Phi- 
losophy and Commercial Life, Pre-Law, Fiis- 
tory of Philosophy, Philosophy and Religious 
Life, and Philosophy and Science. Course list- 
ings for specific minors are available on the 
Philosophy Department Web page or in the 
Philosophy Department office. 

Course Descriptions 

PHIL 120: Introduction to Philosophy is a 
prerequisite for PHIL 210: Ethics. PHIL 210 is 
a prerequisite for all other philosophy courses. 

PHIL 120 3 cr. 

Introduction to Philosophy 

The aim of this course is to awaken in the stu- 
dent an appreciation of the nature and method 
of philosophical inquiry through an examination 
of key texts that grapple with central questions 
in the history of philosophy. 

PHIL 210 3cr. 

Ethics 

(Prerequisite: PHIL 120) An examination of 
moral issues through close readings of important 
historical texts such as the writings of Plato, 
Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant or Mill. 



1 72 Arts and Sciences/Philosophy 



Philosophy Curriculum 












Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 




FaUCr 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 












MAJOR (GE PHIL) 


PHIL 120-210 


Introduction to Philosophy- 


■Ethics 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Informatior 


1 Literacy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 




3 


3 


GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Elective 




3 




GE NSCI-S/BH 


NSCI ELECT-S/BH ELECT 


Nat. Sci. Elective-Soc/Beh. Elective 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical 


Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Second Year 












MAJOR (GE PHIL) 


PHIL 200 or 300 level 


Second-year Electives 




3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I & II 




3 


3 


GE HUMN 


FOREIGN LANGUAGE' 


Humanities Electives 




3 


3 


GE S/BH-NSCI 


S/BH ELECT-NSCI ELECT Soc/Beh. Elective-Nat. Sci. : 


Elective 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Natural Science 




3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


I 


16 


16 


Third Year 












MAJOR 


PHIL 200 or 300 level 


Third-year Eleaives 




3 


6 


COGNATE 


ELECT2 


Electives 




9 


9 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Electives 




3 
15 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 












MAJOR 


PHIL 300 or 400 level 


Fourth-year Electives 




6 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECTA 


Electives 




9 


9 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Electives 




3 
18 


3 
15 








TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 


' Foreign language is recommended by department. 


^ In the Cognate area of 


'24 hours, the department requires that 12 credits be focused in onefi 


'eld. It should be noted that 6 cred- 


its not required by the 


department in the major area are added to the free area in senior year These may 


be taken in • 


tny field. 


including Philosoplfy. 













Themes will include happiness, virtue, the 
nature of justice, free choice, conscience, natural 
law and obligation, God and morality. 

PHIL 211 3cr. 

(P) Business Ethics 

This course is an application of standard philo- 
sophical principles and theories to the critical 
study of questions, issues, and problems that 
surround the moral conduct of business. Recom- 
mended for business majors. 

PHIL 212 3 cr. 

(P) Medical Ethics 

Considering nine ethical methodologies, this 
course views health care holistically in terms of 
human biological and psychological needs to 
show that ethical action must intend to satisfy 
them. Ethical principles are applied to such issues 
as professional communication, sexuality, procre- 
ation, experimentation, bodily modification, and 
death. Recommended for health care students. 



PHIL 213 3cr. 

(P) Environmental Ethics 

An introduction to environmental philosophy 
and the various ethical responses to the ecologi- 
cal crisis of the late 20th century. Examines such 
issues as biocentrism vs. anthropocentrism, the 
relation between culture and nature, the envi- 
ronmental ethical debate. 

PHIL 214 3cr. 

(P) Computers and Ethics 

Ethical aspects of hacking, software, piracy, 
computer-aided decision making, protection of 
software by copyright, patent, trade secret laws, 
unauthorized use of computer resources, privacy 
and database security, program warranties and 
programmer responsibility, artificial intelligence, 
the interface between human and computer. 

PHIL 215 3cr. 

(P) Logic 

An introduction to logic as the science of argu- 
ment including the nature of arguments in ordi- 



Arts and Sciences/Philosophy 1 73 



nary language, deduction and induction, truth 
and validity, definition, informal fallacies, cate- 
gorical propositions and syllogisms, disjunctive 
and hypothetical syllogisms, enthymemes, and 
dilemmas. 

PHIL 218 3 cr. 

(P,D) Feminism: Theory and Practice 

What is feminism? What is the relationship 
between feminist theory and practice? This 
course focuses on these and related philosophical 
questions. Special attention will be paid to the 
interrelationship of gender, class and race. This 
course also fulfills a requirement in the Women's 
Studies Concentration. 

PHIL 220 3 cr. 

(P) Ancient Philosophy 

The Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle and their 
immediate successors. Special emphasis on the 
theory of knowledge, the metaphysics and philo- 
sophical anthropology of Plato and Aristotle. 

PHIL 221 3 cr. 

(P) Medieval Philosophy 

A survey of philosophy in the European Middle 
Ages, including the connections between 
medieval philosophy and its classical and Christ- 
ian sources; questions concerning nature/grace, 
reason/faith, theology/philosophy, and the 
nature and ethos of scholasticism. 

PHIL 222 3 cr. 

(P) Modern Philosophy I 

Machiavelli and the break with the Ancients. 
Modern political thought and social contract. 
Hobbes with an appeal to the passions. Locke 
and theoretician of capitalism. Rousseau and the 
crisis of modern political thought. Foundations 
of modern epistemology. Descartes and the search 
for absolute certainty. Hume and empiricism. 

PHIL 223 3 cr. 

(P) Modern Philosophy II 

The development of idealism in the thought of 
Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel, with its 
influence on Feuerbach, Marx, Engels, and 
Kierkegaard. Special consideration of dialectical 
thinking in its resolution of the antitheses of 
reality and appearance, freedom and necessity, 
infinite and finite, and faith and knowledge. 

PHIL 224 3 cr. 

(P) Foundations of Twentieth-Century 
Philosophy 

A study of some of the key figures that have set 
the tone for the 20th-century philosophy. Ruber, 



Marx, Kierkegaard, Hume and Russell are stud- 
ied in detail. 

PHIL 225 3 cr. 

(P,D) Asian Philosophy 

This course will introduce students to the various 
systems of Asian philosophy including Hin- 
duism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism and 
Shinto with special emphasis on the metaphysics, 
ethics and political philosophy of these systems. 

PHIL 226 3 cr. 

(P,D) Chinese Philosophy 

An introduction to the classical Chinese under- 
standing. The course examines Daoist teachings 
and vision, the thought of Confucius and Bud- 
dhism. 

PHIL 227 3 cr. 

(P) Political Philosophy 

Philosophical and ethical analysis of the social 
nature of man with emphasis on modern social 
questions. Ethics of the family, of nation and of 
communities. International ethics. 

PHIL 229 3 cr. 

(P,D) Philosophy of Religion 

An investigation of the main topics in philoso- 
phers' reflections on religion: arguments for the 
existence of God; meaningful statements about 
God; assessment of religious experience; notions 
of miracle, revelation, and immortality; the 
problem of evil; relations between religious faith 
and reason; religion and ethics. Readings from 
classical and contemporary authors. 

PHIL 231 3cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Women 

This course reviews the philosophies of woman 
in western thought from Plato and Aristotle to 
Nietzche, Schopenhauer, and Beauvoir. It con- 
cludes with an interdisciplinary selection of read- 
ings, to be addressed philosophically, on women 
in art, anthropology, literature, politics, theology, 
psychology, etc. 

PHIL 232 3 cr. 

Idea of a University 

An investigation of the philosophy of a liberal 
education, using John Henry Newman's Idea of a 
University as a tool. 

PHIL 234 3 cr. 

(P) Existentialism 

A critical study of selected works of Kierkegaard, 
Jaspers, Marcel, and Sartre, with special empha- 
sis on the existentialist themes of selfhood, free- 
dom, dread, responsibility, temporality, body, 



1 7 A Arts and Sciences/Philosophy 



limited and unlimited knowledge and reality, 
and fidelity to community. 

PHIL 236 3 cr. 

(P) Freud and Philosophy 

Examination of overt and covert philosophical 
implications of Freud's system of psychoanalysis. 
Emphasis on actual writings of Freud, particu- 
larly after 1920. 

PHIL 238 3 cr. 

(P) Wealth and the Human Good 

What is wealth? Is wealth the key to happiness? 
Is it possible for individual human beings and 
human society to flourish without wealth? What 
does it mean to say that the measure of success 
in contemporary consumer society is wealth? 
These and other questions related to life in mod- 
ern capitalist commercial society will be 
addressed in the course. 

PHIL 240 3 cr. 

(P,W) Logic and Written Discourse 
PHIL 240 is to equip students with an under- 
standing of the conditions that constitute good 
reasoning, and also the skill to construct good 
arguments in writing. It covers the following 
four areas: the nature of logical arguments, 
deduction (e.g., syllogism, propositional logic), 
induction (e.g., analogical reasoning, causal 
inference), and fallacies 

ED/P 306 3 cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Education 

An examination of representative modern systemic 
philosophies of education with a critical analysis of 
the answers that each system of philosophy pro- 
vides to the important questions concerning the 
nature of knowledge, value, man and society. 

PHIL 310 3cr. 

(P) Epistemoiogy 

An introduction to the theory of knowledge 
ranging from ancient to contemporary philoso- 
phy. Topics include sensation, perception, mem- 
ory, recollection, reason, truth, science, technol- 
ogy, language, and the body. The unifying theme 
of the course is the historical importance of 
imagination and the central role it plays in 
knowing. 

PHIL 311 3cr. 

(P) Metaphysics 

A textual inquiry into the adequacy of philoso- 
phers' answer to the fundamental question, 
"What is?" Special attention will be given to 
Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant's critical philoso- 
phy and the issues of nature and history. 



PHIL 312 3cr. 

(P) Modern Philosophy III 

A study of 19th-century European philosophers 
such as Hegel, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard and Marx. 
We will consider the place of philosophy in his- 
tory and society, the theme of conflict in life and 
thought, and the simultaneous spread and decay 
of humanism in Europe. 

PHIL 313 3cr. 

(P) Philosophy and Friendship 

An historical survey of primary texts which dis- 
cuss friendship. Readings in the course include 
authors of the ancient, medieval, modern and 
contemporary periods in the history of philoso- 
phy. Some of these authors are, Xenophon, Plato, 
Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, de Montaigne, 
Bacon, Kant, Emerson, Nietzsche, Gray, Arendt 
and Sartre. 

PHIL 314 3cr. 

(PD,W) Philosophy and the City 

This course explores philosophical issues con- 
nected to urban and public policy. Students will 
analyze the relationship between philosophy and 
public life and will develop a deeper understand- 
ing of their own relation to the city and their 
roles as citizens. 

PHIL 315 3cr. 

(P) Twentieth-Century Political Philosophy 

This course is a survey of modern social contract 
theory and its relation to capitalism, and of 
modern Marxism. Issues raised will include obli- 
gation and consent, equality, freedom and self- 
determination, the role of markets, and the role 
of the state. 

PHIL 316 3cr. 

(P,D,W) American Perspectives on Health- 
Care Ethics 

This course will consider basic ethical issues in 
the practice and distribution of health care in 
the United States. Topics covered will include 
the physician-patient relationship, clinical issues 
such as transplants or end-of-life concerns, the 
nature of professionalism, just distribution, 
ethics in health-care institutions, and biomedical 
research. Recommended for those interested in 
the health-care professions. 

PHIL 319 3cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Law 

A study of the various justifications of law and 
their implications. Special consideration will be 
given to the problems of civil disobedience and 
the force of law in private institutions. 



Arts and Sciences/Philosophy 175 



PHIL 320 3 cr. 

(P) Aesthetics 

The main theories of the essential character of 
beauty or art, how they are judged, how they are 
related to the mind and the whole person, how 
they are created and how this creativity expresses 
a commitment to oneself and to the world. 

PHIL 321 3 cr. 

Great Books 

Major thinkers in the Western philosophical, 
religious, political and literary traditions. This 
course emphasizes philosophical themes in 



PHIL 325 3 cr. 

(P) Literature and Ethics 

This course examines the "old quarrel between 
philosophy and literature," the dispute between 
Plato and Ancient Athenian poets regarding the 
best and truest source of moral knowledge, and 
examines the impact of this quarrel on contem- 
porary moral theory and practice. 

PHIL 326 3 cr. 

(P,D) Advanced Topics in Feminist Philosophy 

(Prerequisite: PHIL 218, other women's studies 
courses, or permission of instructor.) This course 
will explore a special topic in feminist philoso- 
phy. Course may be repeated as topics vary. Pos- 
sible topics might include: feminist aesthetics, 
issues of equality, theories of the body. This 
course is cross-listed with Women's Studies. 

PHIL 327 3 cr. 

Readings in the Later Plato 

A survey and contextualization of the dialogues 
usually said to be "Later" in Plato's intellectual 
development will precede a textually based 
examination of those dialogues in which Plato's 
dialectic turns on the "concept" of difference. 
Thaetetus, Sophist, and Parmenides will be 
emphasized. 

PHIL 328 3 cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Literature 

This course examines the nature of literature, 
and its relation to philosophy and political life. 
Students will study both classical texts on litera- 
ture and contemporary Anglo-American exami- 
nations and appropriations of them, as well as 
recent European literary theory. 

PHIL 331 3cr. 

(P) Feminist Philosophy of Science 

A feminist critique of both the alleged value-free 
character of modern science and the positivist 
philosophy of science supporting this view. The 



course thus focuses on feminist arguments for the 
contextual, i.e., social, political and economic, 
nature of science and the resulting need to 
rethink such key concepts as objectivity, evidence 
and truth in light of androcentrism and gender 
bias. Consideration is also given to critical 
responses from feminist and nonfeminist defend- 
ers of more traditional accounts of science. 

PHIL 340 3 cr. 

(P,D) Philosophy and Judaism 

A study of several Jewish thinkers who lived and 
wrote in the context of two "endings": the end 
of European Jewery in the Holocaust and the 
end of the Jewish Diaspora through the creation 
of Israel. 

PHIL 410 3cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Culture 

Examines the meaning of the term "culture." 
Explores the notions of civilization and bar- 
barism, common principles in cultural develop- 
ment, and the interaction of such cultural forces 
as myth, magic, language, art, religion, science, 
and technology. Special attention will be given to 
the question of "progress" and "regress " in culture. 

PHIL 411 3cr. 

(P) Thomas Aquinas: Philosophy and 
Controversy 

PHIL 411 is a contextual study of Thomas 
Aquinas' philosophy, a great thinker in the 1 3th 
century. Selections from his metaphysics, ethics, 
and anthropology will be examined. His dispute 
with the Averroists on the status of the intellect, 
the condemnation of some propositions of his in 
1277, and his later canonization in 1325 will 
also be discussed. 

PHIL 412 3cr. 

(P,D) Art and Metaphysics 

The course utilizes the work of Martin Heidegger 
as well as several contemporary American novels 
to explore the philosophical problem of nihilism 
as it manifests itself today in the relationship 
between modern technology and art. Special 
attention is given to modern architecture. 

PHIL 414 3cr. 

(P,D,W) Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas 

This course is a study of the 20th-century Jewish 
philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. We will focus 
on Levinas' theory of ethical experience, an 
account that takes its categories from both Greek 
and Hebrew sources, thereby enriching the dia- 
logue between Jewish and Christian traditions in 
philosophy. 



176 Arts and Sciences/Physics 



PHIL 418 3 cr. 

(P) Phenomenology 

An introduction to this 20th-century European 
movement through selected works of Husserl, 
Heidegger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty. Topics 
include the nature of the self lived experience, 
history, social reality, sense perception, technol- 
ogy and science, space and time, the lived body, 
and the theory of intentionality. 

PHIL 420 3 cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Rhetoric 

A systematic investigation of the form, meaning 
and influence of rhetoric. Explores the relation- 
ships between topic and metaphor, logic and 
narration, ethos and logos, conscience and per- 
suasion. Special attention is given to the various 
relationships between rhetoric and philosophy. 

PHIL 425 3 cr. 

Postmodern Philosophy 

An examination of the transition from mod- 
ernist culture and thought to postmodernist cul- 
ture and thought. Derridas method of decon- 
struction will serve as the paradigm example of 
postmodernism. Recommended for those inter- 
ested especially in literature and fine arts. 

PHIL 430 3 cr. 

(P) Philosophy of the Social and Behavioral 
Sciences 

The goal of the course is to encourage students 
to think philosophically about issues raised in 
social scientific studies, especially regarding the 
following: (1) the problem of cross-cultural 
understanding and interpretation, (2) the diffi- 
culties of research design and methodology, and 
(3) the relationship between social science, ethics, 
and policy making. 

PHIL 431 3cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Science 

An introduction to the history and philosophy 
of science. Selections from Darwin's The Origins 
of Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871) 
and Popper, Feyerabend, Hanson, Stace, Quine, 
Frank, Rescher, Hempel, and Baier. 

PHIL 434 3 cr. 

(P) Issues in Philosophy and Theology 

This course will investigate certain modern and 
contemporary problems in the relationship 
between philosophy and theology. In particular, 
it will examine the ways in which philosophical 
discussions (both specific arguments and general 
positions) influence theological discussions, as 
evidence of the suggestion that philosophy "gives 
voice" to theology. 



PHYSICS 

Faculty 

Robert A. Spalletta, Ph.D., Chair 
W. Andrew Berger, Ph.D. 
Joseph W. Connolly Ph.D. 
Paul P. Fahey Ph.D. 
John R. Kalaflit, M.S. 
Argyrios C. Varonides, Ph.D. 
Christine A. Zakzewski, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The Department of Physics and Electrical 
Engineering offers majors in Physics and Bio- 
physics, as well as the Electrical Engineering, 
Computer Engineering and Electronics-Busi- 
ness majors described earlier. The objectives 
of the department are to provide skills, under- 
standing, and the methodology required to 
initiate active participation in the develop- 
ment of new knowledge about the material 
universe. The approach of the physicist, based 
as it is on the analysis of mathematical models 
dealing with matter and energy and their 
interactions, supplies a unique and important 
insight to the solution of problems in many 
disciplines. 

A 1988 study by the Office of Institutional 
Research at Franklin and Marshall College 
shows that over 66 years. The University of 
Scranton ranked 33rd out of 977 four-year, 
private, primarily undergraduate institutions 
as the baccalaureate origin of physics doctor- 
ates. In addition, the Biophysics concentra- 
tion in recent years has regularly produced 
students admitted to medical school. 

Minor in Physics 

21 credits, including PHYS l40, 141, 270 
(all with labs), 352, ENGR 252, and at least 
one of PHYS 473, 372 and/or 371. 

Major in Biophysics 

The Biophysics major is designed to pre- 
pare a student to apply the physical and 
mathematical sciences to problems arising in 
the life sciences and medicine. By choosing 
proper electives, the student can prepare to 
enter graduate study of biophysics, biology, 
biochemistry, medicine or dentistry. 



Arts and Sciences/Physics 177 



Course Descriptions 

PHYS 100 3cr. 

(E) History of Science and Technology 

The evolution of scientific enquiry in human 
history. Focus on key concepts and laws of 
nature that have enabled humans to develop 
modern technological societies. A major theme 
will be that science arises from traditions that are 
spiritual as well as technical, with the spiritual 
tradition being explored from the perspective of 
the life and traditions of the Catholic Church. 

PHYS 101 3 cr. 

(E) The Solar System 

The study of the solar system, its origin, its evo- 
lution, its fate. Study of the planets, asteroids, 
meteors and comets. Theories about the cosmos 
from antiquity to the modern age. 

PHYS 102 3 cr. 

(E) Earth Science 

Selected topics from geology and meteorology, 
weather forecasting, ground and surface water, 
mountain building, volcanoes, earthquakes, plate 
tectonics, and oceanography. 

PHYS 103 3 cr. 

(E) Seeing the Light 

The physics of light and vision. Includes topics 
such as biophysics of the human eye, the visual 
system, color vision, binocular vision, and the 
wave nature of light. 

PHYS 104 3 cr. 

(E) Introduction to Consumer Technology 

Every day we listen to the radio or compact-disc 
recordings, watch TV, use photocopiers and fax 
machines without really knowing how they work. 
Designed to provide the scientific background to 
understand the operation of common communi- 
cation systems and electronic equipment. 

PHYS 105 3 cr. 

(E) Man and the Evolutionary Universe 

The study of the universe from the ancient times 
to the present. The ideas and approaches of vari- 
ous peoples are to be discussed, from the era of 
the powerful myths to the scientific approach of 
the Greeks, up to modern times, focusing on 
man and the evolving universe, in a historical 
and modern perspective. The role and the 
involvement of the Church in scientific thinking 
will be stressed as well. 



PHYS 106 3 cr. 

(E) Energy and the Environment 

Focus on various aspects of man's use of energy 
and changes in the environment that accompany 
that use. Sources of energy; the nature of the 
present energy and environmental crises and 
possible solutions; energy requirements of the 
future; conservation; and alternate energy sources. 

PHYS 107 3 cr. 

(E) "Hands-On" Physics 

An introduction to the scientific method with an 
emphasis on physical reality. A series of experi- 
ments and discussions illustrate various physical 
phenomena allowing the participation in the 
assessment of important social, political, and sci- 
entific issues. 

PHYS 108 3 cr. 

(W,E) New York Times Physics 

Every day we are bombarded with information 
regarding the impact of technology on our lives. 
Using The New York Times, students will explore 
the scientific and technological concepts of our 
modern world. Topics will vary weekly. 

PHYS 109 3 cr. 

(E) The Conscious Universe 

A course that discusses and concentrates on mat- 
ters like waves, auanta and quantum theory. Sci- 
ence will be viewed as a rational enterprise com- 
mitted to obtaining knowledge about the actual 
character of physical reality and the character of 
the physical law. 

PHYS 110 3cr. 

Meteorology 

Focus on the basic physical and chemical phe- 
nomena involved in the determination of climate 
and weather, enabling the student to comprehend 
weather events, patterns, and forecasting. Topics 
include: atmosphere composition and structure, 
moisture and precipitation, cloud formation, pres- 
sure and wind, cyclones, circulation of atmos- 
phere, air masses and fronts, and forecasting. 

PHYS 113 3cr. 

(E) The Science of Light and Photography 

An introductory-level science course intended 
for non-science majors covers the basic science 
of light and its application in the technology of 
photography. Topics range from a historical 
overview of early photographic methods to mod- 
ern digital cameras. The scientific principles of 
light waves and rays, the optics of lenses, the 
process involved in picture taking and the for- 
mation and development of the image. Topics 



178 Arts and Sciences/Physics 



Physics Curriculum 






m 




Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics I-II 


4 


4 ^ 


COGNATE (GE QUAN) MATH 103'-1 14 or 1 14-221 


Pre-Calc. Math-Analysis I OR Analysis I- 


-II 4 


^ 1 


COGNATE 


CM PS 134 


Computer Science I 




3 ^ 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 1 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 


>> 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 ^ 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


15 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


PHYS 270-352 


Modern Physics-Stat. & Eng. Thermodyi 


ti. 4 


3 


COGNATE 


ENGR 253-254 


Intro, to CAD-3-D CAD 


1 


1 


COGNATE 


MATH 221-222 or 222-341 


Analysis II-III OR Analysis III-Diff Equations 4 


4 .' 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 . 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS121 


Ethics-Theology I 


3 
18 


3 

17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


PHYS 447-448 


Electromagnetics I-II 


3 


4 


MAJOR 


PHYS 371-372 


Mechanics-Atomic & Laser Phys. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PHYS 350 


Applied & Engineering Math 




3 


COGNATE/MAJOR 


MATH 341 /ELECT 


Differential Equations or Elective 


3-4 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Eleaive 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


17 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


PHYS/EE 


Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PHYS 493 


Physics Research 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PHYS ELECT 


Elective 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


3 * 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
18 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 134-135 CREDITS 

test results take one fewer Physics elective. t; 


' Physics majors starting ; 


with MATH 103 due to placement 



include the nature of light, laws of optics, devel- 
opment of black and white and color images, 
and digital electronics for photographic capture 
and display. Not for major elective credit in 
Physics, Biophysics or EE. 

PHYS 114 3cr. 

Solar Electricity 

The history, physics and engineering of obtaining 
energy from the sun, with special attention to 
environmental impact of Photovoltaic (PV) tech- 
nology. Topics include: environmental protection, 
economic growth, job creation, diversity of sup- 
ply, rapid deployment, technology transfer and 
innovation with a free, abundant and inex- 
haustible fiiel source. Not for major elective crecht 
in Physics, Biophysics or Electrical Engineering. 



PHYS 120-121 8 cr. 

(E) General Physics 

(Prerequisites: MATE! 103-114) General college 
course for pre-medical, pre-dental, biology, bio- 
chemistry and physical therapy majors. Mechanics, 
heat, electricity and magnetism, sound and light. 
Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. 

PHYS 140-141 8cr. 

(E) Elements of Physics 

(Co-requisite: MATH 114-221) Calculus-based 
introduction to the elements of physics. Topics 
covered: mechanics, heat, sound, light and elec- 
tricity and magnetism. Required of Physics, 
Electrical Engineering, Mathematics, Computer 
Science and Chemistry majors. Three hours lec- 
ture and two hours laboratory. 



Arts and Sciences/Physics 1 79 



Biophysics Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE NSCI) 


PHYS 140-141 


Elements of Physics 


4 


4 


MAJOR 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE (GEQUAN 


) MATH 103-1 14 or 114-221 


Pre-Calc. Math-Analysis 1 OR Analysis 


I-II 4 


4 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




16.5 


18.5 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


PHYS 270-352 


Modem-Statistical Physics 


4 


3 


MAJOR 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analytical Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


EE241 


Circuit Analysis 




4 


COGNATE 


CMPS 134 


Computer Science I 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 221-222 or 222-341 


Analysis II-III OR Analysis ill-Diff Equations 4 


4 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120 


Introduaion to Philosophy 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


18.5 


3 
18.5 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


ELECT 


Physics, Biology, or Chemistry 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ediics 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Eleaive 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 
17.5 


1 
17.5 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


ELECT 


Physics, Biolog)', or Chemistry 


6 


6 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


6 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 


137 CREDITS 


PHYS 100-114 are courses designed for non-science majors. They require no background in science or math. 





PHYS 201 3 cr. 

(E) Stellar Evolution 

An introduction to astrophysics for non-science 
students, it concentrates on the study of the sun, 
stars and the universe. Their evolution, birth, 
lifetimes and deaths. The remnants of the stars, 
and exotic entities such as neutron stars, quasars, 
black holes. Galaxies and galaxy formations. The 
expanding universe. Red shifts and cosmological 
principles. Grand unified theories. 

PHYS 204 3 cr. 

Information Technology 

Lectures and demonstrations are designed to 
describe and explain the basics of information 
technology and engineering for students outside 
the technical disciplines. It includes data repre- 
sentation, graphics and visual information, data 
compression, data transmission and network 
technology. 



PHYS 270 4 cr. 

Elements of Modern Physics 

(Prerequisites: PHYS l4l, MATH 114) Intro- 
ductory modern Physics course for Physics and 
Engineering majors; also recommended for other 
science majors. Review of classical physics; spe- 
cial theory of relativity; atomic theory of hydro- 
gen from Bohr to Schroedinger; multielectron 
atoms and the periodic table; introduction to 
nuclear physics. Three hours lecture and two 
hours laboratory. Lab fulfills a writing intensive 
requirement (W). 

PHYS 350 3 cr. 

Applied and Engineering Mathematics 

(Prerequisites: MATH 222, PHYS 14 1) First- 
and second-order differential equations with 
constant coefficients; Fourier series and Fourier 
transforms and Laplace transforms; partial differ- 
ential equations and boundary value problems; 
special functions, e.g., Bessel functions and 



1 80 Arts and Sciences/Physics 



Legendre polynomials; numerical analysis and 
use of MAPLE software. (Also listed as ENGR 
350.) Three hours lecture. 

PHYS351 3cr. 

Mathematical Physics II 

Functions of a complex variable. Infinite series 
in the complex plane. Theory of residues. Con- 
formal mapping. Fourier and Laplace trans- 
forms. Advanced partial differential equations. 
Boundary value problems in Physics. Green's 
functions. 

PHYS 352 3 cr. 

Statistical and Engineering Thermodynamics 

(Prerequisite: PHYS 270) Derivation of Ther- 
modynamics from probability theory and atomic 
physics; Laws of Thermodynamics; Maxwell 
relations; chemical potential and phase changes; 
refrigerators and heat pumps; theory of gasses 
and theory of solids. Special topics dependent 
upon interests of majors represented. (Also listed 
as ENGR 352.) Three hours lecture. 

PHYS 371 3 cr. 

Advanced Mechanics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 341) Comprehensive 
course in Newtonian dynamics,variational prin- 
ciples, Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations; the- 
ory of small oscillations and specialized non-lin- 
ear differential equations in mechanical systems. 

PHYS 372 3 cr. 

Atomic and LASER Physics 

(Prerequisite: PHYS 270, MATH 222) Intensive 
and quantitative treatment of modern atomic 
physics using the principles and techniques of 
quantum mechanics. The study of energy levels, 
pumping, feedback and transition rates in lasers. 
Required of Physics majors and highly recom- 
mended elective for electrical engineers. Three 
hours lecture with optional laboratory. 

PHYS 447 3 cr. 

Electromagnetics I 

(Prerequisites: PHYS 270, PHYS 350) Analytic 
treatment of electrical and magnetic theory; vec- 
tor calculus of electrostatic fields; dielectric 
materials; vector calculus of magnetic fields. 
(Also listed as EE 447.) Three hours lecture. 

PHYS 448 3 cr. 

Electromagnetics II 

(Co-requisite: PHYS 447) Magnetic materials, 
electromagnetic induction, displacement cur- 
rents. Maxwell's equations; radiation and waves; 
applications include transmission lines, wave 
guides and antennas. (Also listed as EE 448.) 
Three hours lecture. 



PHYS 448L 1 cr. 

Electromagnetics Design Laboratory 

(Co-requisite: PHYS 448) Laboratory designed 
to emphasis and reinforce the experimental basis 
of electromagnetism. Multi-week projects 
require the student to perform experiments that 
measure fundamental electrical constants, the 
electrical and magnetic properties of matter, and 
the properties of electromagnetic waves. (Also 
listed as EE 448L.) Two hours laboratory. 

PHYS 460 3 cr. 

Non-linear Systems and Chaos 

Non-linear systems in mechanics and electronics 
are studied. Limit cycles, chaotic attractors, hys- 
teresis, stability and phase space are defined and 
applied to complex systems. Classical oscillators, 
e.g.. Duffing oscillator, the van der Pol oscillator 
and the Lorenz equations, will be solved through 
various approximation methods. Chaos, bifurca- 
tions, routes to chaos, chaotic maps, correspon- 
dence between maps and Poincare sections of 
physical systems will be studied. 

PHYS 473 3 cr. 

Optics 

(Prerequisites: PHYS 270, MATH 341 or PHYS 
350) An introduction to the principles of geo- 
metrical, physical and quantum optics. Topics to 
be covered include ray and wave optics, super- 
position, diffraction, interference, polarization, 
Fourier methods, and coherence theory. Practical 
devices such as photodetectors and light sources 
will also be discussed. Three hours lecture. 

PHYS 474 3 cr. 

Acoustics 

(Prerequisite: PHYS 350) This course covers the 
flmdamentals of vibration as applied to one-, two- 
and three-dimensional systems with varied 
boundary conditions. Transmission, absorption, 
attenuation, and radiation are covered. Resonators 
and wave guides and filters are studied along with 
the fundamentals of transducers. Acoustical issues 
in hearing are covered, time permitting. 

PHYS 493-494 6 cr. 

Undergraduate Physics Research I -II 

(Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor) Stu- 
dents choose a research project sponsored by a 
member of the department and approved by the 
instructor and chairperson. Students gain experi- 
ence with research literature, techniques, and 
equipment. Weekly seminars are given on quan- 
tum mechanics, mathematics tools, and topics 
related to ongoing research projects. A written 
report is required. 



Arts and Sciences/Political Science 181 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Faculty 

Leonard W. Champney, Ph.D., Chair 
Jean W. Harris, Ph.D. 
Robert A. Kocis, Ph.D. 
William J. Parente, Ph.D. 
Gretchen Van Dyke, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The Bachelor of Science program in PoUti- 
cal Science imparts to students an under- 
standing of: 

1 . The scope and purpose of government 
in civil society; 

2. The origins, goals, and limitations of 
democratic government; 

3. The structure and functions of the insti- 
tutions of American government; 

4. The similarities and differences in the 
structures and functions of the govern- 
ments of other countries; and 

5. The nature of the relationships among 
these governments in the international 
community. 

The Political Science Department offers 
courses in the major subfields of political sci- 
ence: political institutions, political theory, 
international relations, comparative politics, 
public policy, and quantitative methods. In 
addition to the major in Political Science, the 
department offers a track in Public Adminis- 
tration and Public Affairs and a minor in 
Political Science. 

Students in the major must take PS 130, 
PS 131, PS 212, PS 217, PS 240, and either 
PS 313 or PS 314. The remaining 21 Political 
Science credits required for the major are 
selected by the student. 

Public Administration and Public 
Affairs Track 

Political Science majors may concentrate in 
Public Administration and Public Affairs. 
This track is designed for students who may 
seek a career in government service at the fed- 
eral, state, or local level. It develops analytic 
and quantitative skills, while providing sub- 
stantive knowledge of a range of public-policy 
problems, and the management systems 
designed to implement policy decisions. 



Students in this track complete the courses 
required for the Political Science major as well as 
PS 135: State and Local Government, PS 
231: The Public Policy Process, PS 232: Pub- 
lic Administration, and PS 480: Public 
Administration Internship. For their remain- 
ing Political Science electives, students choose 
3 courses from the following: PS 216, PS 
227, PS 230, PS 319, PS 322, PS 325, PS 
327, PS 329. 

Students in this track would complete their 
cognate in one of two ways. For option one 
students complete HIST 110-111, HIST 
120-121, ECO 153, ECO 154, ACC 253, 
ACC 254. Option two entails completing a 
minor, concentration, or another special pro- 
gram in consultation with Dr. Champney or 
Dr. Harris, the track advisors. 

The department also recommends that stu- 
dents in this concentration take INTD 224: 
Science, Decision Making, and Uncertainty. 

Minor in Political Science 

To minor in Political Science, a student 
must take a minimum of 1 8 credits in Politi- 
cal Science, including PS 130-131: American 
National Government I-II. 

Course Descriptions 

IS 390 3 cr. 

(W) Seminar in International Studies 

Required for International Studies majors. Other 
advanced undergraduates may take this course with 
permission of the professor. This course can count 
for either Political Science credit or History credit. 

PS 130-131 6cr. 

(S) American National Government 

PS 130 addresses the key principles of American 
government: democracy, constitutionalism, sepa- 
ration of powers, and federalism. It also discusses 
political parties, voting, public opinion, interest 
groups, and the media. PS 131 addresses the 
structure and functions of the branches of gov- 
ernment: Congress, the Presidency, Bureaucracy, 
and the Courts. It also discusses civil rights and 
civil liberties. 

PS 135 3 cr. 

(S) State and Local Government 

The structures, scope, processes, and politics of 
state and local governments are analyzed. Also 
considered: the constitutional position of state 
and local governments; the changing relationships 
among federal, state and local governments; and 



1 82 Arts and Sciences/Political Science 



Political Science Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


PS 130-131 


American National Government 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


HIST 110-111 


U.S. History 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Elective 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 ' 


GET/RS-PHIL 


T/RS 121-PHIL 120 


Theology I-Intro. to Philosophy 


3 


3 , 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 ' 


16 


16 ' 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


PS 212-217 


Comparative Politics-lnternat'l Politics 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


HIST 120-121 


Europe: 1500 to Present 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Elective 


3 


i 


GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Elective 




3 ; 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


PS 240-ELECT 


Research Methods-Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PS313or3l4-ELECP 


Political Ideas-Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


PS ELECT 


Electives 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECP 


Free Electives 


6 


6 1 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


PS ELECT 


Electives 


6 


6 :: 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 1 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECTA 


Humanities Eleaives 


3 


3 ^1 


GE ELECT 


ELECT- 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


3 : 

15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS ; 


' ECO 101 and GEOG 134 are recommended as cognate electives. 




' 


-' The department also recommends a modern foreign langtMge in junior year with subsequent language courses to follow in sen- 


ior year as part ofGE humanities. The departmental advisor should be consulted. 






' Political Science majors , 


tre required to take either PS 313 (Classical Political Ideas) or PS 314 (Modern Political Ideas). Both 


are strongly recommended. 









policy areas of interest to students in the class 
(educational policy, criminal justice policy, etc.). 

PS 212 3 cr. 

International Relations 

This course examines the prominent tenets of 
international relations as an academic discipline. 
Secondly, students are provided with basic 
knowledge and tools for analyzing the inter- 
national system as it unfolds today. A constant 
theme is bridging the gap between theory and 
practice of international relations. 



PS 213 3cr. 

(D) Modern Africa 

An introduction to the politics of major African 
states with emphasis on ethnic, racial, and religious 
tensions as well as the geopolitics of the region. 

PS 216 3 cr. 

(D) Women's Rights and Status 

Public policies (formal and informal) and their 
implementation determine the rights of citizens. 
This course examines public policies that impact 
the legal, political, economic, and social status of 
women in the U.S. A historical exploration of 
women's rights will be the foundation for the 
examination of women's rights and status today. 
The future prospects of women's rights and sta- 
tus will also be discussed. 



Arts and Sciences/ Political Science 183 



PS 217 3 cr. 

Comparative Government 

Political institutions of Germany, Ftance, 
Britain, and selected Third World nations are 
analyzed with focus on elections, parties, interest 
groups and foreign policies. 

PS 218 3 cr. 

East European Politics 

This course examines the history and politics of 
East Europe from Poland to the Balkans and 
from Germany to the Ukraine during the 20th 
century. Special attention is given to ethnic poli- 
tics before and after the communist period and 
the economics of the new privatization and its 
problems. 

PS 219 3 cr. 

Survey of Latin American Politics 

An overview of the political cultures and politi- 
cal dynamics of Latin America. A series of repre- 
sentative nations is examined to provide a gen- 
eral overview of the region. Topics include 
historical figures and events, the processes of 
democratization and modernization, and issues 
in contemporary politics. 

PS 220 3 cr. 

(S,D) Ideologies 

A study of the three major political ideologies 
that shaped the 20th century (communism, fas- 
cism, and liberalism) and of those that may 
shape the twenty-first: feminism, racism, egali- 
tarianism, environmentalism, libertarianism, and 
communitarianism. 

PS 221 3 cr. 

Politics of Southeast Asia 

Domestic politics of Southeast Asia and inter- 
national politics affecting the region. The 
ASEAN nations (Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, 
Philippines, Singapore, and Brunei) and Burma, 
the region's only socialist country, along with the 
three communist states of Indochina: Vietnam, 
Laos, and Cambodia are considered; spheres of 
influence and capitalism versus state socialism as 
a lever of economic development are also discussed. 

PS 222 3 cr. 

Politics in Russia 

This course considers Russian politics and colo- 
nialism from the Revolution to contemporary 
economic efforts to move toward capitalism. The 
politics of the remnants of the Soviet empire are 
examined and Stalin and the Bolshevik experi- 
ment are also examined. 



PS 227 3 cr. 

(D) Women, Authority and Power 

In our representative democracy, women are a 
minority of elected and appointed government 
officials. This course studies the historical and 
current paradox of women and U.S. public pol- 
icy decision making. It examines the role of 
women in pressure politics, their integration into 
positions of political authority, and the ftiture 
prospects for the political power and authorit}' 
of women. 

PS 230 3 cr. 

(S) Environmental Laws and Regulations 

Consideration of the variety oi statutory laws 
legislated by Congress, as well as the variety of 
administrative rules and regulations promulgated 
by the executive branch. Policy areas include air 
pollution, water pollution, solid and toxic waste 
disposal, management of public lands, and the 
regulation of nuclear power. A brief introduction 
to international cooperation and conflict. 

PS 231 3 cr. 

(S) Environmental Policy Process 

The role of the legislative, executive, and judicial 
institutions in shaping the content of environ- 
ment policy. Discussion of the processes by 
which such policies are formulated and imple- 
mented, including consideration of the impact 
of federalism.. 

PS 232 3 cr. 

Public Administration 

A study of the structures, scope and processes of 
American public bureaucracies. The growth of 
the executive branches of governments, the role 
of public bureaucracies in our democratic 
government, and the experiences of American 
public bureaucrats are analyzed. 

PS 240 3 cr. 

(Q,W) Research Methods in Political Science 

Consideration of both qualitative and quantita- 
tive research methods in the study of Political 
Science. Topics include: primary source material, 
legal research, analysis of aggregate data, analysis 
of survey data and use of focus groups. Special 
consideration is given to survey research and 
public opinion polling. Course also introduces 
principles of univariate, bivariate and multivari- 
ate statistical techniques. 



PS 280 

Pre-Law Internship 



3cr. 



1 84 Arts and Sciences/Political Science 



PS 310 3cr. 

Judicial Politics 

Role of the federal and state court systems in our 
constitutional democracy, with an emphasis on 
their policy-making functions. Consideration of 
the factors shaping the judicial philosophies and 
political orientations of federal and state justices 
and judges. 

PS 311-312 6cr. 

Constitutional Law 

An examination, by means of case law, of the 
demands of liberty and the demands of democ- 
racy within the American Constitution. Topics 
include federalism, the separation and division 
of powers, social issues tied to industrialization 
and urbanization, commercial and property 
rights, and the rights of the poor and the 
oppressed as they arise in our legal framework. 

PS 313 3 cr. 

(D) Classical Political Ideas 

An examination of philosophical questions 
about politics (including the nature of law, 
morals, justice, and authority; and the role of 
ideas in political and social life) in classical texts 
from East and West, from Lao Tzu and Plato to 
the beginnings of modernity and Machiavelli. 

PS 314 3cr. 

(D) Modern Political Ideas 

An examination of philosophical questions and 
politics (including the nature of law, morals, jus- 
tice, and authority; and the role of ideas in polit- 
ical and social life) in modern texts from East 
and West, from the beginnings of modernity 
with Machiavelli to Marx and Mao. 

PS 315 3cr. 

Contemporary Political Thought 

A study, based on primary materials, of the cur- 
rent state of the controversies in contemporary 
political thinking. A wide range of perspectives, 
from far left to far right, will be analyzed and 
critically examined. Minimally, the works of 
John Rawls, Robert Nozick, C.B. MacPherson, 
Isaiah Berlin, and Leo Strauss will be included. 

PS 316 3cr. 

Jurisprudence 

An examination of the differences between "the 
law" and "the laws"; the nature of legal systems; 
the nature and grounds of political, moral and 
legal obligations, and the controversy between 
the traditions of Natural Law and Positive Law. 



PS 317 3 cr. 

Parties, Elections, and Interest Groups 

Discussion of the historical development and 
current status of political parties and interest 
groups in the United States. Emphasis on the 
functions performed by political parties in our 
system vs. their functions in other systems, such 
as parliamentary democracies. Emphasis also on 
factors shaping the creation, maintenance, and 
political power of organized interest groups. 

PS 318 3 cr. 

(W) U.S. Foreign Policy: Cold War and 
Aftermath 

Examines and analyzes critically the content of 
American foreign policy in the Cold War and 
post-Cold War eras. Special emphasis on themes, 
goals and means of American foreign policy, partic- 
ularly national security. 

PS 319 3 cr. 

(W) U.S. Foreign Policy Process 

Examines the actual formulation and implemen- 
tation of American foreign policy within the 
decision-making process. Analyzes what the 
process is, who the decision makers are, and 
internal and external variables of policy making 
in the U.S. Involves at least two in-depth Ameri- 
can foreign policy case studies. 

PS 322 3 cr. 

Public Personnel 

(Prerequisites: At least two of PS 130, 131, 135, 
231, 232 or permission of instructor) An exami- 
nation of public-personnel administration and 
management. Theories of organization, person- 
nel choices, personnel management, civil-service 
history, and current issues in personnel adminis- 
tration and management are considered. 

PS 325 3 cr. 

Politics of the Budgetary Process 

(Prerequisites: At least two of PS 130, 131, 135, 
231, 232 or permission of instructor) Public 
budgeting in theory and in practice is discussed. 
Historical reforms and the inevitable politics of 
the process are considered. Use of budget simu- 
lations allow for practical experience. 

PS 326 3 cr. 

Theories of Political Economy 

An examination of the worLs of the great 
thinkers in the tradition of the political economy, 
and an extensive study of the historical evolution 
of theories of value, the creation of value and the 
increase of productive abilities. 



Arts and Sciences/Political Science 185 



PS 327 3 cr. 

U.S. Congress 

Reading and discussion of selected Federalist 
Papers in order to appreciate the founders' views 
on human nature, the nature of government, 
democracy, and legislatures. An examination of 
the structure and function of the contemporary 
United States Congress, including the impact of 
political parties and interest groups on the busi- 
ness of Congress. Theories of representation are 
also considered. 

PS 328 3 cr. 

(D) Modern China 

Study of modern Chinese politics in the 19th 
and 20th centuries. Problems of modernization. 
Westernization, and communism in the People's 
Republic of China. 

PS 329 3 cr. 

The American Presidency 

This course v/ill focus on the American presi- 
dency - historical development, powers of the 
office, elections, models of the presidency and, to 
a lesser extent, the relations between the president 
and congress, and the president and the judiciary. 

PS 330 3 cr. 

Western Europe in World AiFairs 

This seminar provides an historical, political, 
and analytical foundation for understanding the 
profound political and economic changes facing 
Europeans today. This involves studying the two 
world wars, the formation of Cold- War alliances 
and security systems, the European integration 
movement, the foreign policies of major Euro- 
pean states, and organization of post-Cold War 
Europe. 

PS 331 3 cr. 

(W) The European Union 

(Enrollment only by permission from the profes- 
sor.) Provides an in-depth study of the European 
Union and its 1 5 member states in order to pre- 
pare students for an intercollegiate simulation of 
the EU, which is held in Washington, D.C., 
each December. Students examine the EU's the- 
oretical and historical foundations, its institu- 
tions and policy procedures, and the ongoing 
challenges for European integration. 

PS 332 3 cr. 

(D) Modern Japan 

This course examines the history and politics of 
Japan; the period of the shoguns; the reforms of 
the modernizing Meiji era at the end of the 19th 
century; the Japanese effort to conquer Asia; the 



postwar political structure; the question, "Is 
Japan a democracy?"; and the economic miracle 
of the present. 

PS 338 3 cr. 

Politics of Islam 

The political ideology of Islam; efforts to estab- 
lish theocracies in a number of states from Iran 
to Egypt to Malaysia and Indonesia; Islam as a 
political opposition in such countries as the 
Philippines, Russia, and China; Shiite versus 
Sunni sects; the politics of Israel and the Islamic 
states of the Middle East; OPEC; the Palestinian 
question; political terrorism; Islam as an expan- 
sionist ideology. 

PS 384 3 cr. 

Special Topics in Political Science 

Study and analysis of selected topics in the field 
of Political Science. The particular topic or top- 
ics will vary from year to year depending on the 
instructor and changing student needs. 

PS 480 3 cr. 

Public Administration Internship I 

Permission of faculty advisor and Dr. Champney 
required for internship registration. 

PS 481 3cr. 

Public Administration Internship II 

Permission of faculty advisor and Dr. Champney 
required for internship registration. 

SPAN/PS 295 3 cr. 

(S,D) Contemporary Mexican Culture and 
Language 

An intersession travel course to Guadalajara, 
Mexico, for 3 credits in Humanities (foreign lan- 
guage area, intermediate and/or advanced level), 
3 credits in the social sciences (political science), 
and cultural diversity credit. The course is team- 
taught by University of Scranton faculty from 
the Departments of Foreign Languages and 
Political Science with assistance from Mexican 
faculty at UNIVA. 



186 Arts and Sciences/Psychology 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Faculty 

Brad A. Alford, Ph.D. 
Galen L. Baril, Ph.D. 
James P. Buchanan, Ph.D., Chair 
J. Timothy Cannon, Ph.D. 
John J. Dunstone, Ph.D. 
Thomas P. Hogan, Ph.D. 
Christie Pugh Karpiak, Ph.D. 
John C. Norcross, Ph.D. 
John J. O'Malley, Ph.D. 
Carole S. Slotterback, Ph.D. 

Overview 

Psychology provides a unique educational 
experience of quality, breadth and flexibility. 
Our curriculum has been carefully designed 
to give students a balanced education in the 
discipline and the widest range of career 
options, from baccalaureate entry-level posi- 
tions to graduate training in prestigious uni- 
versities. According to a recent independent 
study, the number of the University's gradu- 
ates who have gone on to receive doctorates 
in psychology has placed us in the top 10% of 
comparable institutions nationally. 

Psychology majors are required to take 
PSYC 110, PSYC 210, PSYC 330 with lab, 
PSYC 390 (fall, junior year), and PSYC 490- 
491 (senior year). Students also take a mini- 
mum of five courses from the following list 
with at least one course in each group: Physio- 
logical Processes (230, 231), Learning 
Processes (234, 235), Social-Developmental 
Processes (220, 221), and Individual Processes 
(224, 225). Students are free to choose from 
any of these or the remaining Psychology 
courses to fulfill the four additional course 
requirements in the major. Completion of two 
optional Psychology laboratory courses consti- 
tutes an elective course. Students are encour- 
aged to take PSYC 493-494: Undergraduate 
Research in their junior or senior year. 

The Psychology Department encourages 
students to tailor their programs to their own 
needs and interests. For example, students 
interested in marketing, personnel, or indus- 
trial-organizational psychology may elect a 
business minor and recommended courses in 
Psychology. Interdisciplinary programs, such 
as the Human Development Concentration, 



and dual majors with a number of other 
departments are also available. Students 
should consult their advisor and the Psychol- 
ogy Handbook for recommended courses, both 
major and cognate, tailored to their interests. 

To avoid duplication of course content. Psy- 
chology majors may not register for the fol- 
lowing courses: HS 242: Counseling Theories, 
HS 293: Research methods in Human Ser- 
vices, and HS 323: Psychiatric Rehabilitation. 
Students who wish to declare a minor or a sec- 
ond major in Human Services should consult 
their advisors and the chair of Human Services 
with regard to the above course restrictions. 

Minor in Psychology 

18 credits, consisting of PSYC 1 10, PSYC 
210, PSYC 330 lecture, and one course from 
three of the following four groups: Physio- 
logical Processes (230, 231), Learning 
Processes (234, 235), Social-Development 
Processes (220, 221), and Individual Processes 
(224, 225). An equivalent statistics course 
and/or an equivalent methods course may be 
substituted for PSYC 210: Statistics and/or 
PSYC 330: Research Methods. Contact the 
Department Chair for a list of these courses. 
Any substituted course must then be replaced 
with a 3-credit Psychology course. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



PSYC 105 

(E) Brain and Human Nature 

An examination of the human mind, brain and 
why we are the way we are. Topics include: the 
mind-body problem, the nature of conscious- 
ness, the evolution of behavior, addictions (e.g., 
love), eating disorders, depression, and aggres- 
sion. (Credit cannot be earned for this course 
and PSYC 231; not open to Psychology majors 
or minors.) 

PSYC 106 3 cr. 

(E) Drugs and Behavior 

This course will examine interactions between 
drugs and behavior. Behavioral topics will 
include: tolerance, addiction, learning, aggres- 
sion, sexual behavior, eating, anxiety, depression 
and schizophrenia. Drug/drug categories will 
include: alcohol, cannabis, opiates, antidepres- 
sants and anti-anxiety. (Credit cannot be received 
for this course and PSYC 384; not open to Psy- 
chology majors or minors.) 



Arts and Sciences/Psychology 1 87 



Psychology Curriculum 










Department and Number Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


PSYCllO^-ELECT 


Fund, of Psyc.^-Psyc. Elective 


3.5 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literac)' 


3 




GEQUAN 


MATH' 


Elective' 




3 


GE S/BH 


SOC 1102 


Intro, to Sociology- 


3 




GE^X^lTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120-210 


Introduction to Philosophy-Ethics 


3 


3 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16.5 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


PSYC 210-330 


Statistics-Research Methods 


3 


5 


MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Psychology Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


WRTG 21 P 


Technical & Business Writing^ 


3 




GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECP 


Natural Science Electives' 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Hiunaniries Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


15 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


PSYC 390 


Academic & Career Dev. in Psychology 


1 




MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Psychology Electives 


6 


9 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 
16 


3 
18 


Fourdi Year 










MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 


Psychology Elective 


3 




MAJOR 


PSYC 490-491 


Hist. & Lit. of Psych. I-II 


2 


1.5 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


9 

17 


15 
16.5 






TOTAL: 131 CREDITS 


' MATH 103 or 106 or , 


W9or 114 


' The department strongly 


recommends WRTG 211 ( Technical & Business Writing) in preparation for Research Methods and 


higher-level Psychology courses, and Soc 110 ( Intro. 


to Sociology). 






■5 BIOL 101 and either BIOL 20 1( Anatomy and Physiology) or BIOL 202 (The ABC's of Genetics) or BIOL 110-111 


or BIOL 


141-142. Lab mditsfor BIOL 1 10-111 and 141-142 can be placed in GE Elective areas. 






^ No more than 15 credits of Psychology electives may 


be placed in the free elective area. 






^ Entering fall-semester fri 


ashmen enrolled in the majors only PSYC 110 section must also enroll in PSYC llOL PSYC 1 lOL is 


required only for entering fall-semester freshmen. 









PSYC 110 3cr. 

(S) Fundamentals of Psychology 

An introduction to the scientific study of behav- 
ior through a survey of psychology's principal 
methods, content areas and applications. Course 
requirements include participation in psycho- 
logical research or preparation of a short article 
review. 

PSYCHOL .5cr. 

Demonstrations For Fundamentals of 
Psychology 

This lab is offered only in the fall semester and 
is restricted to and required only for students 



who enter the University as freshman Psychology 
majors and who are enrolled in the Psychology 
majors' fall section of PSYC 110. It is team 
taught by the psychology faculty and will entail 
exercises, simulations and applications. The 
course is graded pass/fail. 

PSYC 210 3 cr. 

(Q) Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences 
Basic statistics in the behavioral sciences, includ- 
ing organization and display of data; measures of 
central tendency; variability; correlation and 
regression; one- and two-sample t-tests; confi- 
dence intervals, one-way and two-way analysis of 



Arts and Sciences/Psychology 



variance, chi-square; and consideration of effect 
size, power, and null hypothesis testing includ- 
ing types of errors. Introduction to the comput- 
erized statistical-analysis package SPSS-PC. 

PSYC 220 3 cr. 

(S) Social Psychology 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) Social determinants of 
behavior from a psychological perspective. Topics 
include liking, love, conformity, persuasion, atti- 
tude change, and person perception. 

PSYC 221 3 cr. 

(S) Childhood and Adolescence 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) Survey of psychologi- 
cal research dealing with the development and 
behavior of children. The physical, cognitive and 
social aspects of development, from infancy to 
adolescence, are considered. 

PSYC 222 3 cr. 

(S) Adulthood and Aging 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 1 1 0) Survey of psychologi- 
cal research dealing with the age-graded aspects 
of behavior in adulthood. Course will consider 
the physical, cognitive and social aspects of the 
aging process from late adolescence to death. 
Topics include occupation selection, marriage, 
parenthood, middle age, retirement and dying. 

PSYC 224 3 cr. 

(S) Personality 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) A survey and critical 
evaluation of personality and its implications for 
assessment, psychotherapy, and research. 

PSYC 225 3 cr. 

(S) Abnormal Psychology 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) A comprehensive 
survey of mental and behavioral disorders from 
biological, psychological, and sociocultural per- 
spectives. The course will consider diagnosis and 
labeling, overview of specific disorders, and vari- 
ous treatment approaches. 

PSYC 230 3-4 cr. 

Sensation and Perception 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 1 1 0) Concerns the study of 
sensory mechanisms and perceptual phenomena. 
Optional lab entails supervised individual experi- 
mentation. Lecture, 3 credits; optional 1 -credit 
laboratory. Lab fee; lab offered only in spring. 

PSYC 231 3-4.5 cr. 

(E) Behavioral Neuroscience 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 1 10 or BIOL 141-142) 
Introduction to the field of neuroscience, exam- 
ining the cellular bases of behavior, effects of 



drugs and behavior, brain/body correlates of 
motivation and emotion, and neural changes 
accompanying pathology. Three hours lecture 
and optional 1.5-credit laboratory. Lab fee; lab 
offered fall only. 

PSYC 234 3-4 cr. 

(S) Cognitive Psychology 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 1 10) Considers a number of 
approaches to the study of human cognitive 
processes with an emphasis on the information- 
processing model. Topics include pattern recog- 
nition, attention, memory, imagery, concepts 
and categories, and problem solving. Lecture, 3 
credits; optional 1 -credit laboratory. Lab fee; lab 
offered fall only. 

PSYC 235 3-4.5 cr. 

Conditioning and Learning 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) Concerns the experi- 
mental study of both classical and instrumental 
conditioning. Optional lab involves supervised 
animal and human experimentation. Lecture, 3 
credits; optional 1 -credit laboratory. Lab fee; 
spring only. 

PSYC 236 3 cr. 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) The psychological 
study of people at work. Topics include personnel 
selection and training, motivation, leadership, 
the physical work environment, and computer 
applications. Fall only. 

PSYC 237 3 cr. 

(D,S) Psychology of Women 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) Examines the biologi- 
cal, sociological and cultural influences on the 
psychology of women. Topics include gender 
socialization, sex roles, and the impact of gender 
on personality, communication, achievement, 
and mental health. Fall, every other year. 

Special Topics courses at the 200 level are 

developed by individual faculty to provide in- 
depth coverage of a specific area. Prerequisites 
include PSYC 110, at least sophomore status, 
and other Psychology courses as determined by 
the instructor. This course and PSYC 384 may 
be used only once to satisfy major elective 
requirements. 



PSYC 284 

Special Topics: Behavior Modification 
Special Topics: Sports Psychology 
Special Topics: Psychology of Language 



3cr. 



Arts and Sciences/Psychology 1 89 



PSYC 330 5 cr. 

Research Methods in die Behavioral Sciences 

(Prerequisites: PSYC 1 10; a grade of C or higher 
in PSYC 210) A survey of scientific method and 
research design in the behavioral sciences. Topics 
include single subject, survey, correlational and 
experimental research. Lecture and lab involve 
computerized data analyses. Lab also includes 
supervised research and scientific writing. Lec- 
ture, 3 credits; lab, 2 credits. Lab fee; lab offered 
only in spring. The laboratory is writing-intensive 
(W). 

PSYC 335 3 cr. 

(W) Psychological Testing 

(Prerequisites: PSYC 110; a grade of C or higher 
in PSYC 210) Provides a thorough grounding in 
principles of testing and a review of the major 
types of assessment, including intellectual, per- 
sonality, and interest. 

PSYC 360 3 cr. 

(W) Clinical Psychology 

(Prerequisites: PSYC 1 10; a grade of C or higher 
in PSYC 225) An overview of contemporary 
clinical psychology focusing on its practices, 
contributions and directions. Topics include 
clinical research, psychological assessment, psy- 
chotherapy systems, community applications, 
and emerging specialties, such as health and 
forensic psychology. Fall only. 

Special Topics courses at the 300 level are 

developed by individual Psychology faculty to 
provide in-depth coverage of a specific area. Pre- 
requisites include PSYC 110, at least sophomore 
status, and other Psychology courses as deter- 
mined by the instructor. This course and PSYC 
284 may be used only once to satisfy major elec- 
tive requirements. 

PSYC 384 3 cr. 

Special Topics: Psychopharmacology 

(Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in PSYC 231) 
Special Topics: Cognitive Psychotherapies 
(Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in PSYC 225) 
Special Topics: Multivariate Statistics 

(Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in PSYC 210) 

PSYC 390 1 cr. 

Academic and Career Development in 
Psychology 

(Prerequisites: Junior standing; Psychology major) 
This seminar, designed for Psychology majors in 
their junior year, will entail studying, discussing, 
and applying information on academic planning, 
career development, and graduate school. Course 



requirements include attendance at several aca- 
demically-related department events or psycholog- 
ically related university presentations. Graded Sat- 
isfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Fall only. 

PSYC 480 3 cr. 

Field Experience in Clinical Settings 

(Prerequisites: Junior or senior status; a grade of 
C or higher in PSYC 225; PSYC 335; PSYC 
360; permission of instructor) This course 
entails supervised field experience in a mental- 
health or social-service facility in the commu- 
nity. Students are required to spend 8 hours a 
week at their placement and 1.5 hours a week in 
a seminar throughout the semester The profes- 
sor provides classroom instruction, and the on- 
site supervisor provides clinical supervision. 
Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. 

PSYC 481 3cr. 

Field Experience in Personnel Psychology 

(Prerequisites: Junior or senior status; a grade of 
B or higher in PSYC 236 and 335; MGT 361; 
permission of instructor) This course entails 
supervised field experience in a personnel office. 
Students are required to spend 1 hours a week 
at their placement and one hour periodically 
throughout the semester in a seminar Graded 
Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Offered as a reader 

PSYC 490 2cr. 

History and Literature of Psychology I 

(Prerequisites: Senior standing; Psychology major 
or minor) This lecture and discussion course will 
examine the history of modern psychology from 
pre-Socratic philosophers to contemporary per- 
spectives. Emphasis will be placed on the influ- 
ential works of various schools of thought that 
have shaped the emergence of psychology. Fall 
only. 

PSYC 491 1.5 cr. 

(W) History and Literature of Psychology II 

(Prerequisite: Senior standing; a grade of C or 
higher in PSYC 490) This seminar, designed for 
students with a major or minor in Psychology, 
will entail critical reading, analysis, and discus- 
sion of selections from the seminal literature in 
psychology, including selected works of William 
James, Sigmund Freud, and B.F. Skinner. Indi- 
vidual professors will choose additional readings 
on the basis of their interests and student prefer- 
ences. Spring only. 



190 Arts and Sciences/Sociology 



PSYC 493-494 3-6 cr. 

Undergraduate Research 

(Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; PSYC 
330; a grade of B or higher in PSYC 330 lecture 
and the Psychology course most relevant to 
research topics; permission of instructor) Indi- 
vidual study and research on a specific topic 
under the supervision of a faculty member. Stu- 
dents are expected to spend a minimum of 10 
hours a week on research activities throughout 
the semester. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Faculty 

Joseph F. Cimini, J.D., Chair 

Thomas E. Baker, M.S. 

Harry R. Dammer, Ph.D. 

David O. Friedrichs, M.A. 

John B. Pryle, M.A. 

Loreen Wolfer, Ph.D. 

Midori Yamanouchi-Rynn, Ph.D. 

Overview 

Courses in Sociology are designed to meet 
the intellectual and career interests of students 
who are concerned about w^hat is happening 
in their society and in their daily personal 
interaction with other people. The courses are 
designed to help the student interested in 
social work, human services, industrial organ- 
ization, urban planning, etc., to attain a pre- 
professional orientation to these fields. 

Students interested in Urban Planning are 
advised to include SOC 116, 224, and 231 in 
their electives; for Social Work, SOC 234, 
115, 116, 118, and 224; for Medical Services/ 
Administration, SOC 216, GERO 212, 216, 
218, and 230; for Human Resources/Admin- 
istration, SOC 226, 227, and 228. 

The Department of Sociology/Criminal 
Justice also administers the Criminal Justice 
major and the Gerontology major. 

Minor in Sociology 

18 credits, including SOC 110, SOC 112, 
and SOC 318. The following electives are 
strongly recommended by the department in 
the Sociology sequence: SOC 234, SOC 231, 
SOC 224, and SOC 226. 



Major in Gerontology 

The degree program in Gerontology has 
the following objectives: 

1 . To understand the processes of aging; 

2. To prepare for careers in agencies and 
institutions serving the older adult, such 
as area agencies on aging, family services, 
long-term care facilities, federal, state, and 
local governmental agencies, retirement 
communities, business and industry, etc.; 

3. To provide a liberal gerontology educa- 
tion with special emphasis on the devel- 
opment of the whole person; and 

4. To provide students with academic 
preparation for advanced study in geron- 
tology, social work, public administra- 
tion, social welfare and related fields. 

The Scranton area is especially suited to 
serve as a laboratory setting for gerontology 
education with its high proportion of older 
adults and its many agencies and facilities for 
the same. The department has established an 
Advisory Board in Gerontology composed of 
practitioners in the field: health specialists, 
community leaders, and senior citizens. The 
Advisory Board will help to ensure that the 
program curriculum is current. 

Minor in Gerontology 

18 credits, including SOC 110, GERO 
1 10, and GERO 230. The following electives 
are strongly recommended by the department 
in the Gerontology sequence: GERO 218, 
GERO 216, GERO 212, GERO 232. 

Course Descriptions 

Sociology 

SOC 110 3cr. 

(S) Introduction to Sociology 

Fundamental principles in the field of sociology. 
Stratification, ethnicity, deviance; basic institu- 
tions of society; social change and demographic 
trends. 

SOC 112 3cr. 

(S) Social Problems 

Application of sociological principles to major 
issues in contemporary society. 

SOC 115 3cr. 

Introduction to Social Work 

Growth of social work as a professional 
endeavor. The scope of social work; casework in 



Arts and Sciences/Sociology 191 



Sociology 


Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


SOC 110-112 


Intro, to Sociology-Social Problems 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


SOC ELECT 


Sociology Elective 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE WRTG-SPCH WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


16 


1 
16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


SOC 318-224 


Soc. Theory-Amer. Minority Groups 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


SOC 211 


Methods of Social Research 


3 




COGNATE 


HS241 


Case Management and Interviewing 




3 


GE S/BH 


GEROllO 


Introduction to Gerontology 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GEQUAN 


S/CJ215 


Statistics for the Social Sciences 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


SOC ELECT 


Sociology Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Political Science Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Psychology Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT' 


Social Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE NSCl 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


SOC ELECT 


Sociology Electives 


6 


3 


MAJOR 


SOC 480-481 or ELECTA 


Internships or Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT' 


Social Science Electives 


3 


6 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 130 CREDITS 

mmends a mix of Human Services, Criminal Justice, Gerontology, 


' In the cognate Social Science eleclives, the department recoi 


Political Science and Psychology electives, especially PSYC 224 (Personality). 






' Department Reci 


immendation: The social-iuork internship 


may be taken in either the junior or senior year, or both (riot to 


exceed a mitximum of 6 credits of internship). 









the medical, psychiatric, family and child welfare, 
and guidance fields, community organization, 
social research, social planning, social group 
work. Current trends in social work. 

SOC 116 3cr. 

Community Organization 

A general introduction to the process of commu- 
nity organization, as a field of both social work 
and human endeavor. The coordination and 
financing of welfare activities, methods of 
appraising community needs and resources, 
planning and the initiation of welfare services. 



Services of a voluntary and governmental nature, 
strategies of power. 

SOC 118 3cr. 

Child Welfare 

Development of child-welfare in the United 
States. Educational, health, recreational and 
child-labor regulations. Study and treatment of 
children in their own homes, foster homes and 
institutions. Child care and protective programs 
on federal, state and local levels. 



192 Arts and Sciences/Sociology 



SOC 132 3 cr. 

Introduction to Archaeology 

An introduction to the study of archaeology from 
anthropological and historical perspectives. Areas 
to be explored include survey and site recogni- 
tion, excavation planning, record keeping, treat- 
ment of artifacts, and above-ground archaeology. 

SOC 210 3 cr. 

(D,W) Marriage and the Family 

An historical, comparative, and analytical study 
of marriage and family institutions. Problems of 
courtship, mate selection and marriage adjust- 
ment in modern society. 

SOC 211 3cr. 

Methods of Social Research 

This course is designed to help the student 
understand the range of research methods used 
in sociological and gerontological research/inves- 
tigations and evaluate their strengths and weak- 
nesses. It will also help students to appreciate 
some basic problems involved in the collection 
and analysis of data. 

SOC 212 3 cr. 

Religion and Society 

A survey of religious systems and their interrela- 
tions with society and social institutions, with 
emphasis on the social consequences and deter- 
minants of religious behavior. The theories of 
Durkheim, Weber, Parsons, Bellah, Berger and 
Luckman will be examined. 

SOC 213 3 cr. 

Collective Behavior and Social Movements 

This course will examine collective behavior 
which includes protest demonstrations, riots, 
mass or diffuse phenomena such as fads and 
crazes, social movements, and revolution, with a 
decided emphasis on social and political move- 
ments. This course is recommended for those 
interested in sociology, political science, history, 
or other social sciences. 

SOC 214 3 cr. 

Sociology of Sport 

The role of sport in civilized societies; sport as 
work and recreation; women and minorities in 
sport; sport in education; sport and the mass 
media. 

SOC 215 3 cr. 

Feminism and Social Change 

This course examines the relationship between 
feminism and social change, studying feminist 
movements and how feminist ideologies, strate- 
gies, and individuals influenced social move- 



ments. It also explores outcomes of women's 
movements, the mobilization of counter-move- 
ments, and the consequences of feminism for 
Society for various organizational and profes- 
sional roles and for individual women. 

SOC 216 3cr. 

Medical Sociology 

The social dimensions of health and illness; role 
of physician, nurse and patient; social organiza- 
tion of health services; the content of medical 
practice; culture and health disorders; mental 
health and mental illness. 

SOC 217 3 cr. 

(D,W) Family Issues and and Social Policy 

This service-learning course examines family 
problems of work and poverty, separation and 
divorce, family violence, and elder care, address- 
ing each in terms of describing the social prob- 
lem and why it exists and the program/policies 
designed to address it. Students are offered solu- 
tions and are helped and are helped to apply 
multicultural interpretations. 

SOC 224 3 cr. 

(S,D) American Minority Groups 

Patterns of adjustment between ethnic and racial 
groups, with special attention given to the 
American scene. Prejudice and discrimination as 
opposed to the democratic ideology. 

SOC 226 3 cr. 

Sociology of Work and Professions 

The nature and role of contemporary occupa- 
tions and professions in the life cycle are dis- 
cussed; occupational choice, career patterns and 
occupational mobility are noted. The student is 
made aware of the relationship among education, 
work and aspirations. The career path from 
entry-level job to retirement is examined. 

SOC 227 3 cr. 

Business and Society 

Modern industrialism as social behavior. Social 
conditions in the rise of industrialism and their 
effect on the worker; collective bargaining and 
industrial conflict, the industrial community; 
social classes and the industrial order. This course 
also shows how the business sector impacts on 
society and on the globalization of the economy. 

SOC 228 3 cr. 

Social Psychology 

Study of individual behavior as affected by cul- 
tural and social stimuli. Emphasis on the analy- 
sis of human conduct in social settings. 



Arts and Sciences/Sociology 1 93 



SOC 229 3 cr. 

Crisis in Population 

A study of the basic variables of population, 
birth, death and migration, socioeconomic and 
cultural variables affecting population growth, 
projections and forecasts. The chief natural and 
social demographic theories. Population policies 
and practices in selected world areas. 

SOC 231 3cr. 

Urban Sociology 

Urban ecology and culture as the dominant form 
of community life in contemporary society; their 
characteristics, peculiarities, and problems. 

SOC 232 3 cr. 

(D) Great American Cities 

A sociological trip through 20 selected major 
U.S. cities will encounter a variety of cultures 
and examine that matrix of ideas, creeds, reli- 
gions, races, ethnicities, attitudes, habits, arti- 
facts and institutions - social, educational, artis- 
tic, political, and economic - which condition 
the way the people in each city lives. 

SOC 234 3 cr. 

(S,D) Cultural Athropology 

Cultural and social organization among primi- 
tive or preliterate societies; marriage, property, 
religion, magic and tribal control. Significance of 
the study of primitive cultures for understanding 
of urban industrial civilizations. 

SOC 235 3 cr. 

Peoples of East Asia 

The anthropology of the East Asian culture area, 
focusing particularly on China and Japan. Topics 
include basic social institutions, world views, 
culture and personality, and the problem of 
modernization. 

SOC 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics in Sociology 

(Prerequisite: Consent of the chair and the 
instructor) Courses designed to meet specific 
needs of individual students or courses offered 
on a trial basis to determine the value of placing 
them into the regular curriculum. 

SOC 318 3cr. 

Sociological Theory 

An examination of the major theoretical develop- 
ments in sociological theory from the classical 
period of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to con- 
temporary schools such as structural-functional- 
ism, conflict theory, exchange theory, and sym- 
bolic interaction. 



SOC 382-383 3 cr. 

Independent Study in Sociology 

(Prerequisite: Consent of the chair and instructor) 
Designed for advanced students who are capable 
of independent study. A program of planned 
research under the guidance of a faculty member. 

SOC 480-481 3cr. 

Internship in Social Work 

(Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; permis- 
sion of instructor) Supervised experiential learn- 
ing designed to broaden the educational experi- 
ence of students through practical experience 
and work assignments with governmental and/or 
community agencies in the field of social work. 
Supervision by a faculty member and agency 
supervisor. 

Approved courses from other curricula: 
Sociology majors may be advised to choose several 
courses taught in the Criminal Justice sequence; 
courses so approved include: 
S/CJ 210 Law and Society 
S/CJ 213 Criminology 
S/CJ 214 Juvenile Delinquency 
S/CJ 218 The American Court System 
S/CJ 220 Penology: Corrections 
S/CJ 221 Community-based Corrections 
S/CJ 224 Sociology of Deviance 
S/CJ 225 White Collar Crime 
S/CJ 227 Organized Crime Patterns 
S/CJ 317 Trial, Jury and Counsel 
S/CJ 324 Victimology 



Gerontology 



3cr. 



GERO 110 

(S) Introduction to Gerontology 

A multidisciplinary examination of the cognitive 
and affective aspects of aging. The course covers 
social, physiological, psychological, economic, 
and health aspects of aging, as well as service- 
delivery systems. It explores planning and action 
strategies aimed at enhancing the quality of life 
and providing adequate benefits and services for 
the elderly. 

GERO 112 3cr. 

Social Problems of Aging 

This course studies specific problems of the aged 
in America, with attention to issues of inequality 
in opportunities and rewards; of mental health, 
housing, minorities, and institutions; of crime 
and victimization; of economic status, work, 
leisure, and retirement; of attractiveness, aging 
and sexuality; of drugs, doctors, nursing homes 
and hospitals. 



1 94 Arts and Sciences/Sociology 



Gerontology 


Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


SOCllO 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




MAJOR 


GEROllO 


Introduction to Gerontology 




3 


MAJOR 


GER0 218 


Health and Aging 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


GERO 232-230 


Aging and Death-Social Policy and Aging 


3 


3 


MAJOR-GE QUAN 


SOC211-S/CJ215 


Methods of Soc, Research-Stats for Soc. Sci. 3 


3 


COGNATE 


HS241 


Case Management and Interviewing 


3 




GE S/BH 


SOC 224 


American Minority Groups 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


GERO ELECTl 


Gerontology Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


PSYC 222-SOC 228 


Adulthood and Aging-Social Psychology 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


HADM 112-SOCSCI 


Health Systems-Social Science Elective 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


GERO ELECT 


Gerontology Electives 


3 


\ \ 


MAJOR 


GERO 480-481 /ELECT' 


Internships and/or Electives 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Social Science Electives 


6 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 
15 


3 ' 
15 






TOTAL: 130 CREDITS 


' Department recommendation: The Gerontobgy Intenuh. 


ip may be taken in either the junior or senior year, i 


or both (not to ; 


exceed a maximum of 


6 credits of internship). 






1 



GERO 210 3 cr. 

Aging Around the World 

A cross-cultural approach looking at the ways in 
which a variety of societies deal with aging and 
the aged. The issues of work, economics, other 
types of expertise and different definitions of the 
aged are analyzed. 

GERO 212 3 cr. 

Aging and the Life Cycle 

Rites of passage, age norms, and role rehearsals 
for life transitions; the life cycle in comparative 
cultures; sociological dimensions of adulthood 
and aging concerning the work cycle, sport and 



leisure development, patterns of consumer 
behavior and life style, and the family cycle. 



3cr. 



GERO 214 

Aging and Human Behavior 

A critical examination of life satisfaction in old 
age; the social and psychological factors which 
affect it; factors contributing to the psychologi- 
cal well-being of older adults as a flinction of 
their position in the social system. 



3cr. 



GERO 216 

Aging and the Community 

Consideration of selected community strategies 
effecting desired changes in the development 



Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 195 



and implementation of social services and pro- 
grams for the elderly: legislative action, inter- 
agency relationships, the citizen role. 

GERO 218 3 cr. 

Health and Aging 

An explorative study of the mental and physical 
health problems prevalent in the older adult 
population, with emphasis upon the preventive 
aspect of health care as applied by themselves 
and health-care providers. Health-care 
approaches appropriate to the various problems, 
and relevant resources within the home and 
community are considered. 

GERO 220 3 cr. 

Crime and Aging 

A consideration of crime as it affects aging; 
examining the older adult as victim, offender, 
practitioner, and perpetrator, in light of current 
thought, policy, and law. 

GERO 230 3 cr. 

Social Policy and Aging 

Review of major legislation affecting older 
adults, including the Social Security Act, Older 
Americans Act, Medicare, and various local, 
state, and national programs for the aged. 

GERO 232 3 cr. 

Aging and Death 

This course offers the student an opportunity to 
explore the mystery and meaning of death. 
Focus is on a number of aspects ot dying and the 
death process, such as the dying individual and 
the family; cross-cultural perspectives; terminal 
illness; professions and death; rites and rituals. 

GERO 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics in Gerontology 

(Prerequisite: Permission of the chair and the 
instructor) Courses designed to meet specific 
needs of individual students or courses offered 
on a trial basis to determine the value of placing 
them into the regular curriculum. 

GERO 382-383 3 cr. 

Independent Study in Gerontology 

Designed for advanced students who are capable 
of independent study. A program of planned 
research in gerontology under the guidance of a 
faculty member. Registration upon approval of 
the chairperson of the department and the 
instructor directing the study. 



GERO 480-481 3 cr. 

Internship in Gerontology 

(Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; permis- 
sion of instructor) Supervised experiential learn- 
ing in one or more organizations that serve older 
adults. Supervision by a faculty member and 
agency supervision required. 



THEOLOGY/RELIGIOUS 
STUDIES 

Faculty 

E. Springs Steele, Ph.D., Chair 
Scott C. Bader-Saye, Ph.D. 
John J. Begley, S.J., Ph.L. 
James Brian Benestad, Ph.D. 
Stephen J. Casey, M.A. 
Mary Anne Foley, Ph.D. 
Brigid C. Frein, Ph.D. 
Maria Poggi Johnson, Ph.D. 
Albert M. Liberatore, S.T.D. 
Susan F. Mathews, Ph.D. 
Kelli O'Brien, Ph.D. 
Charles R. Pinches, Ph.D. 
Eric A. Plumer, Ph.D. 
Thomas R Sable, S.J., Ph.D. 
Marc B. Shapiro, Ph.D. 

Overview 

As "faith seeking understanding," theology 
plays an essential role in the quest for God, 
wisdom, and human fulfillment. Catholic 
education recognizes that theology addresses 
certain basic human questions in ways that 
speak to the heart and mind as no other disci- 
pline can. Theology approaches such questions 
not in isolation, but as a partner in a living 
exchange between the Church and the diverse 
traditions of the world. Theology/Religious 
Studies courses seek to form conscience and 
character, helping our students address con- 
temporary questions of good and evil, freedom 
and truth, life and death. In addition to 
courses with a primarily Christian focus, the 
department olifers courses in non-Christian 
religious traditions. The General Education 
requirement of 6 7 heology credits for all stu- 
dents is fulfilled byT/RS 121-122, a two- 
semester introductory sequence. These courses 
must be completed before students take 
upper-division courses in Theology. 



196 Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 



Major in Theology/ Religious Studies 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Theology/ 
Religious Studies requires 30 credits in the 
major (including the two introductory 
courses), allowing for a second major and/or 
minor or concentration in many fields. Theol- 
ogy majors must take at least four courses at 
the 300 or 400 level, including at least one 
semester of the Theology Capstone Seminar, 
T/RS 490. To ensure a well-rounded back- 
ground in the discipline, each major must 
take at least one course from each of the fol- 
lowing categories: 

Old Testament: T/RS 210,310,311, 

312,313,440 
New Testament: T/RS 314,315,316, 

317,318,441 
History: T/RS 213,215,217,218, 

319,320,321,322,323 
Doctrine: T/RS 220, 222, 328, 

329, 330, 331 
Moral Theology: T/RS 230, 23 1 , 232, 

236, 332, 334, 335, 337 

Pastoral Studies Track 

Completion of this track will be noted on 
the Theology major's transcript. The student 
must minor in Counseling/Human Services, 
including in that minor HS 111, HS 112, HS 
241 and HS 341. Included among the courses 
for the major or minor must be: T/RS 338 
Psychology and Spirituality, Internship in Pas- 
toral Studies with placement in a pastoral set- 
ting, and a pastoral studies capstone seminar. 

Theology/ Religious Studies Minor 

The minor in Theology/Religious Studies 
requires 18 credits: T/RS 121 and 122 plus 
four more courses. In choosing courses for a 
minor, students may concentrate in one area 
of theology or they may select courses from 
several areas. 

Course Descriptions 

T/RS 121 3 cr. 

(P) Theology I: Introduction to the Bible 

A survey of central texts and themes of the 
Bible. Its purpose is to develop biblical literacy 
as well as skills in interpreting various literary 
forms and key theological concepts. 



T/RS 122 3 cr. 

(P) Theology II: Introduction to Christian 
Theology 

(Prerequisite: T/RS 121) A survey of key Christ- 
ian themes: creation, Christ's incarnation and 
redemption, the Church and sacraments, Christ- 
ian personhood, and the practice of prayer, 
virtue, and hope for the future. 

T/RS 210 3 cr. 

(P,D) Jews, Christians, and the Bible 

(Formerly T/RS 207) A survey of ancient and 
modern ways of reading the Bible. The focus 
will be on a group of central biblical figures 
whose stories will be examined in the context of 
ancient Israelite history and society. The biblical 
stories will then be compared with later elabora- 
tions by Jewish and Christian interpreters. 

T/RS 211 3cr. 

Perspectives on Western Culture 

The religious, philosophical and political writ- 
ings of major thinkers of the Western tradition. 
The first semester includes the study of the 
Bible, Aristotle's Ethics, Plato's Apology, Augus- 
tine's City of God, and the thought of Aquinas. 
Emphasis is on the study of these works as they 
illuminate the current world. 

T/RS 212 3 cr. 

Saints and Holiness 

An inquiry into the nature of Christian sanctity 
by an examination of the lives and accomplish- 
ments of traditional saints and of contemporary 
persons who respond to the Gospel message. 

T/RS 213 3 cr. 

American Catholic Thought 

The major themes of American Catholic tradi- 
tion from colonial times to the present are 
placed in their historical, religious, social and 
political context. 

T/RS 214C 3 cr. 

(P,W) Inside the Catholic Tradition 

(Formerly T/RS 1 84C)This introduction to 
Catholic Tradition will study its scope, depth, 
and ongoing development, reception, and charac- 
teristics. Topics covered include Faith and Revela- 
tion, the intercommunion of Scripture and Tra- 
dition, the role of Magisterium, and the 
development of doctrine. Selected readings are 
taken from important conciliar texts and 
theologians. 



Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 1 97 



Theology/Religious Studies Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GET/RS) 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT 


Quantitative Reasoning Elective 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


T/RS ELECT 


Theology Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 




GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Eleaive 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210-ELECT 


Ethics-Phil. Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


T/RS ELECT 


Theology Electives 


3 


6 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Eleaives 


9 


9 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Electives 


3 
15 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


T/RS 490 


Topics in Theological Investigation 




3 


MAJOR 


T/RS ELECT 


Electives 


6 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Eleaives 


9 


9 


GEFREE 


ELECT 


Eleaives 


3 
18 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 


130 CREDITS 



T/RS 215 3 cr. 

(P,W) The History of Christian Theology 

(Formerly T/RS 210) A study of the vital growth 
of Christianity's life, doctrine, worship and spiri- 
tuality over the centuries. Special emphasis will 
be placed on principal leaders, thinkers and 
heroes. 

T/RS 216 3 cr. 

(P) Judaism in Modern Times 

This course is a detailed study of the history of 
modern Judaism (1700 to present) in all of its 
aspects, including Messianism, Hasidism, Jewish 
Emancipation, new Jewish religious movements, 
Zionism, Holocaust, and the rise of the State of 
Israel. 

T/RS 217 3 cr. 

(P,D) The Holocaust in Context: History 
and Theology 

An exploration of the Holocaust through the 
perspective of the history of anti-Semitism. The 
course will examine the historical aspects of the 



Holocaust as well as the moral and theological 
issues raised by it. 

T/RS 218 3 cr. 

(P,D) Women in Christianity 

(Formerly T/RS 315) An exploration of some of 
the major roles women have played in Christian 
thought and experience, including their contri- 
butions as disciples, spiritual guides, and social 
critics. Will also examine assumptions about 
male and female identities and consider chal- 
lenges to traditional roles. 

T/RS 219 3 cr. 

(P,D) The Religions of the World 

(Formerly T/RS 314) An exploration of belief in 
the traditions of the classical historical religions 
of the world through both systematic analysis 
and the reading of sacred texts. 

T/RS 220 3 cr. 

(P) Spirituality: Liturgy and Sacraments 

A basic course in sacraments which explores the 
religious experience of the faith community and 



198 Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 



its expression in sacraments. Two features of the 
Rite of Christian Initiation of Aduhs, its process- 
orientation and the role of community, will serve 
as basis for the examination of new sacramental 
models. Specific attention will be given to the 
development of a sacramental spirituality. 

T/RS 221 3 or. 

Prayer 

Introduction to the nature, purpose, and method 
of prayer in the Catholic Christian tradition. 

T/RS 222 3 cr. 

(P) Introduction to Liturgical Theology 

This course will consider the relationship 
between liturgy and theology, as realities in the 
Christian life which form and inform one 
another. Fundamental documents of the Roman 
liturgy will be introduced, with an eye toward 
discerning insights into God, Christ, the 
Church, the sacraments and the human person 
which are embodied therein. 

T/RS 223 3 cr. 

Introduction to the Theology of the 
Byzantine Churches 

(Formerly T/RS 225) The Byzantine theological 
tradition develops special emphases within the 
mainstream of the Christian tradition. This 
course introduces the student to the study of 
some of the specifically Byzantine contributions 
to the understanding of the Christian mystery, 
with particular emphasis on early developments. 

T/RS 224 3 cr. 

(P) Introduction to Eastern Liturgies 

(Formerly T/RS 226) A survey of the Eastern 
Eucharistic Liturgies with particular emphasis on 
the structure, history, and liturgical theology of 
the Byzantine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. 

T/RS 225 3 cr. 

(P) A Theology of Marriage 

(Formerly T/RS 240) This course will introduce 
students to the theology of marriage. It will 
focus on the distinctiveness of Christian mar- 
riage, its sacramentality, marriage as a vocation 
and covenant, love and friendship in marriage, 
sex, singleness, family and children. Questions of 
the state of the institution of marriage in con- 
temporary culture will also be discussed. 

T/RS 226 3 cr. 

(P) Faith and Healing: God and 
Contemporary Medicine 

(Formerly T/RS 313) This course will consider 
the history of Western medicine in the light of a 
range of Christian notions such as that life is a 



gift from God, that the body is good, that illness 
is a (limited) evil, that health is a responsibility. 
In this light, the idea that medicine is a calling 
and healing an art will be considered. 

T/RS 227 3 cr. 

(P) Biomedical Ethics 

(Formerly T/RS 330) This course will present 
theological reflections on the two main ethical 
theories undergirding contemporary biomedical 
ethics. It will also present and discuss relevant 
philosophical and theological arguments on such 
issues as abortion, care of handicapped infants, 
euthanasia, suicide, and the profession of medi- 
cine. 

T/RS 228 3 cr. 

Parables in Pop Culture 

(Formerly T/RS 214) This course is designed to 
help students attend to and interpret the narra- 
tives of popular culture from the perspective of 
Christian faith. We will discuss Jesus' use of 
parables, engage the theological tradition of 
"finding God in all things," and analyze a variety 
of artistic productions (movies, television and 
music) that represent dominant themes of con- 
temporary culture. 

T/RS 230 3 cr. 

Moral Theology 

A study of the Christian moral tradition, its his- 
tory and principles. Among areas to be treated 
are: the family, sexual activity and human rights. 

T/RS 231 3cr. 

(P) Social Ethics 

This course will prepare students to recognize 
ethical dimensions of political, economic and 
social issues through the study of the following: 
pertinent writings of Pope Paul VI and Pope 
John Paul II, a classic work of political theory, 
and several contemporary writings on such issues 
as morality, foreign policy and economic justice. 

T/RS 232 3 cr. 

John Paul II and Catholic Social Thought 

This course will explore the dialogue between 
the Catholic Church and modern ideologies on 
social and political matters. Readings include 
pertinent documents of the Second Vatican 
Council and recent papal writings, especially 
those of Pope John Paul II. 

T/RS 233 3 cr. 

(P,W) Suffering 

This course examines the way in which Chris- 
tians and Jews narrate their suffering in the con- 
text of God's purposes. Traditional formulations 



Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 1 99 



of "the problem of evil" will be critiqued, and the 
concept of redemptive suffering will be explored. 

T/RS 234 3 cr. 

(P,D) Twentieth-Century Peacemakers 

A study of some of the principles and methods 
of "waging peace" found in the lives and writings 
of Mohandas Ghandi, Dorothy Day, Thomas 
Merton and Martin Luther King. 

T/RS 235 3 cr. 

(P) The Theology of Birth and Death 

This course will investigate the meaning and sig- 
nificance of the birth and death of human 
beings in the Christian tradition. Related topics 
will be: suicide, euthanasia, capital punishment, 
contraception and abortion. 

T/RS 236 3 cr. 

(P,W) Prophets and Profits: The Economy 
in the Christian Life 

An inquiry into the witness of the Church with 
regard to questions of wealth, business, econom- 
ics and formulation of public policy. Biblical 
sources. Church tradition, and contemporary 
narratives will be employed to assess the com- 
mon good. 

T/RS 237 Politics: A Christian Perspective 

An inquiry into the role of the state, the Church 
and the individual in political life. Special atten- 
tion is given to the problem of violence; the 
course is set in the unique American perspective 
of Church-State relations. 

T/RS 238 3 cr. 

Nietzsche and Christianity 

A focus on Nietzsche's relation to and critique of 
Western thought in general and Christian 
thought in particular. Nietzsche's deep influence 
on contemporary theology and philosophy will 
be shown through extended readings from his 
collected works. 

T/RS 239 3 cr. 

(P) Money and Power in the BibUcaJ Tradition 

(Formerly T/RS 328) A study of the presenta- 
tion of various social- justice issues in the Old 
and New Testaments, including wealth and 
poverty as signs of God's favor, obligations to 
care for and protect the poor, and faith as 
involving both rights and responsibilities. 

T/RS 240 3 cr. 

(P) Scrolls and Scriptures 

What are the Dead Sea Scrolls? Do they predict 
the fijture? Were they suppressed by the Vatican? 
Do they reveal secret information about Jesus? 



Conspiracy theories and tabloid headlines 
abound, but what do the scrolls really tell us? 
This course will look at the tabloids, the con- 
spiracy theories and the scrolls themselves to 
understand better Judaism and early Christianity. 

T/RS 296 3 cr. 

(PD) Life Along The Dead Sea 

A three component travel course: (1) Participa- 
tion in a one-week archaeological excavation at 
Ein Gedi, Israel; (2) A one-week tour of impor- 
tant biblical sites; and (3) a U of S-based series 
of lectures for background and context. 

T/RS 310 3 cr. 

(P) The Heart of the Old Testament 

(Formerly T/RS 309) An in-depth look at the 
five books of Moses (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, 
Numbers and Deuteronomy) using ancient and 
modern exegetical views to examine and empha- 
size the central theme of the Covenant. 

T/RS 311 3cr. 

Job and the Psalter 

(Formerly T/RS 306) A close look at the wisdom 
literature of the Old Testament. The study of 
both the Book of Psalms and the Book of Job 
will emphasize theological themes. 

T/RS 312 3cr. 

(P) The Great Prophets 

(Formerly T/RS 308) An examination of the 
four major prophets of the Old Testament: Isa- 
iah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, with an 
emphasis on the study of selected texts. 

T/RS 313 3 cr. 

(P,W) Faith and Justice in the Prophetic 
Tradition 

(Formerly T/RS 208) The goals of contemporary 
Jesuit education are the service of faith and the 
promotion of justice. This course will examine 
the roots of these ideals in the writings of the 
OT prophets, with special attention to Isaiah. 

T/RS 314 3cr. 

The Four Gospels 

A study of the four Gospels from the perspec- 
tives of history, theology and literature. 

T/RS 315 3 cr. 

(P,W) John's Gospel and Letters 

(Formerly T/RS 304) A close look at the Fourth 
Gospel and the Epistles of John with an empha- 
sis on their literary, historical, and theological 
characteristics. 



200 Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 



T/RS 316 3 cr. 

Passion and Resurrection Narratives 

(Formerly T/RS 307) A study of the theology of 
each of the Gospels by an analysis of the key 
narratives of the Passion and Resurrection in the 
four Gospels. 

T/RS 317 3cr. 

(P) Pauline Letters 

(Formerly T/RS 204) An introduction to the 
writings of the Apostle Paul, exploring Jewish 
and Greco-Roman influences on his letters as 
well as his contribution to basic Christian beliefs 
and practices. 

T/RS 318 3cr. 

(P) The Apocalypse of St. John 

(Formerly T/RS 305) This introduction to the 
last book of the Bible will emphasize the literary 
forms and thought patterns of apocalyptic litera- 
ture as well as the historical and theological 
character of the book itself highlighting both 
textual interpretation and contemporary rele- 
vance. 

T/RS 319 3 cr. 

(P,D,W) Judaism in the Time of Jesus 

(Formerly T/RS 335) A study of first-century 
Jewish religious sects as well as the cultural, 
political, and historical setting of the Roman 
Empire in which Jesus lived and preached and 
where monotheism continued to develop. 

T/RS 320 3 cr. 

(P) Early Christian Writers 

(Formerly T/RS 215) This course is designed to 
provide an introduction to the main figures, the- 
ological currents and ideas of the formative 
period of the history of Christian theology by a 
close reading of selected texts from the major 
authors of the first six centuries of the Church. 

T/RS 321 3 cr. 

(P) Development of Christian Thought to 
HOG 

(Formerly T/RS 218) A survey of the principal 
theological, spiritual and institutional develop- 
ments in the first millennium of the Church's 
life. 

T/RS 322 3 cr. 

(P) Development of Christian Thought 
1100 to 1800 

(Formerly T/RS 219) Survey of the principal 
theological, spiritual, and institutional develop- 
ments in the Church in the medieval, reforma- 
tion, and early modern periods. 



T/RS 323 3 cr. 

Protestant Traditions 

(Formerly T/RS 228) This course will examine 
both historical and contemporary representatives 
of selected Protestant traditions, focusing on 
their characteristic understandings of (1) scrip- 
ture, tradition and knowledge of God; (2) grace, 
faith and works; and (3) the Church and the 
Christian life. 

T/RS 324 3 cr. 

Jesuit Spirit 

(Formerly T/RS 312) The Society of Jesus 
(Jesuits): its spirituality, tradition and history 
from their sixteenth-century origins in the Spiri- 
tual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola through 
the contemporary period, with special emphasis 
on Jesuit theological and cultural contributions 
to the Church. 

T/RS 325 3 cr. 

(P,W) Heaven and Hell 

(Formerly T/RS 223) Besides studying the ori- 
gins of the Christian belief in the afterlife, the 
course will also focus on Catholic and Protestant 
formulations of the doctrines of salvation and 
damnation as well as literary responses to the 
notions of heaven and hell. 

T/RS 326 3 cr. 

Belief and Unbelief 

(Formerly T/RS 327) A multidisciplinary 
inquiry into the nature of Faith in the Catholic 
tradition with special attention to the challenges 
of modernity. 

T/RS 327 3 cr. 

Spiritual Classics 

(Formerly T/RS 324) A study of the autobiogra- 
phies of St. Augustine and St. Teresa of Avila 
[The Confessions and Life of Teresa of Jesus). As an 
introduction to the study of the spiritual life, 
John Paul lis "Sign of Contradiction" is read. 

T/RS 328 3 cr. 

Models of the Church 

(Formerly T/RS 318) A brief survey of various 
expressions of the Church's nature and mission 
throughout its history, from the New Testament 
through Vatican II. Exploration of some contem- 
porary approaches, including liberation and fem- 
inist theology, and such questions as: What and 
who is the "true Church"? Where is it located? 
What is the place of Mary in the life of the 
Church? 



Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 20 1 



T/RS 329 3 cr. 

(P) Signs and Symbols 

(Formerly T/RS 323) A study of the nature and 
purpose of symbols in the Church. Students will 
draw from the insights of contemporary symbol 
theorists as they piece together their own defini- 
tion of "symbol." This definition will then be 
used to gain a new perspective on the Church's 
doctrine and sacraments as fundamentally sym- 
bolic realities. 

T/RS 330 3 cr. 

(P) Christ in Tradition and Culture 

(Formerly T/RS 227) Examines the meaning 
and message of Jesus Christ as understood and 
communicated in the faith of his followers with 
special consideration given to the symbolic 
dimensions and cultural aspects of that Christian 
understanding. 

T/RS 331 3 cr. 

(P,W) God and the Earth 

(Formerly T/RS 316) This course will explore 
the way human beings relate to the land and to 
other life forms and how this relationship is 
affected by belief in God. Biblical and other the- 
ological texts from Christianity and other reli- 
gious traditions will be considered. 

T/RS 332 3 cr. 

Jesus and the Moral Life 

(Formerly T/RS 338) A study of how the life of 
Jesus and the theological claims Christians make 
about his person relate to the moral life. Histori- 
cal resources of the first century will be consid- 
ered as well as contemporary writings in Christ- 
ian ethics. 

T/RS 333 3 cr. 

(P) Friendship and the Christian Life 

(Formerly T/RS 321) This course will explore 
friendship as a central practice of the Christian 
life, especially the moral and spiritual life, and 
examine virtues such as fidelity, forgiveness, and 
love which are essential for sustaining and nur- 
turing friendships. 

T/RS 334 3 cr. 

(P,D,W) The Church and Contemporary 
Social Issues 

(Formerly T/RS 326) Explores the religious and 
ethical dimensions of social issues such as preju- 
dice and violence. The findings of related social 
sciences and literature are placed in the context 
of Christian anthropology to give the student a 
concrete view of their interrelationship. 



T/RS 335 3 cr. 

(P) Christian Ethics 

(Formerly T/RS 331) This course will discuss 
the practice of the Christian moral life in con- 
temporary society. The Christian virtues will be 
distinguished and related to selected problems 
arising in our lives as private individuals, as 
members of families, as professionals, and as citi- 
zens. Other topics to be treated include: evil, sin, 
Christian liberty. Christian perfection, relativism 
and humanism. 

T/RS 336 3 cr. 

(P,D,W) The Jewish Way of Life 

(Formerly T/RS 333) As a global introduction to 
Judaism this course will examine: essential 
beliefs, holidays and life ceremonies, Jewish his- 
tory and modern Judaism, especially the Holo- 
caust, the State of Israel and the Coming to 
America. 

T/RS 337 3 cr. 

(P,D,W) Jewish Approaches to Ethics 

A survey of Jewish approaches to ethics and ethi- 
cal problems with comparisons to other religious 
traditions and the writings of secular ethicists. 
Students who take T/RS 334 may not take T/RS 
337. 

T/RS 338 3 cr. 

(P,D,W) Psychology and Spirituality 

(Formerly T/RS 439; prerequisite: PSYC 110) 
This course explores selected Christian and Bud- 
dhist traditions of spirituality as understood by 
their practitioners and from the perspective of 
representative theorists or schools of Western 
psychology. The course concludes by assessing 
positive and negative aspects of these psychologi- 
cal approaches to understanding and evaluating 
spiritual experience. 

T/RS 339 3 cr. 

Eastern Christian Spirituality 

(Formerly T/RS 325) A study of the meaning of 
the spiritual life for Eastern Christian writers 
with a particular emphasis upon Sts. Athanasius, 
Gregory of Nyssa and Gregory Palamas. Themes 
such as prayer, image of and likeness with God, 
discernment of spirits, hesychasm and icons will 
be discussed. 

T/RS 440 3 cr. 

Introduction to Old Testament 

(Formerly T/RS 400) An introduction to the 
primary methods and problems of Old Testa- 
ment interpretation: its historical background, 
the theological analysis and synthesis of major 



202 Arts and Sciences/Theology/Religious Studies 



sections, as well as the use of source, form, and 
redaction criticism and such more recently 
developed approaches as social, scientific, liter- 
ary, and feminist criticism. 

T/RS 441 3 cr. 

Inside the New Testament 

An introduction to the primary methods and 
problems of New Testament interpretation 
focusing on the contents, historical background 
and theological import of major passages. 
Among the specific topics studied will be from 
and redaction criticism along with recent critical 
approaches to the text such as structuralist exe- 
gesis, narrative and feminist criticisms. 

T/RS 445 3 cr. 

Pastoral Theology 

(Formerly T/RS 44 1 ) This course is based n the 
assumption that when done properly, all theol- 
ogy is pastoral. Throughout the course, students 
will "read" both the liturgy an classical theologi- 
cal texts in a pastoral way, as well as reflect theo- 
logically on their own pastoral experience. It will 
be conducted in seminar format. 



T/RS 480 1-3 cr. 

Internship 

(Prerequisite: Junior standing, 1 5 credits of Theol- 
ogy/Religious Studies) Theology majors and 
minors can receive credits for a variety of ministe- 
rial experiences. Approval must be obtained 
beforehand from supervising faculty member and 
chairperson. Internship credits can be placed in 
the cognate or free area; they do not count toward 
the 30 credits needed for a Theology major or the 
1 8 credits needed for a Theology minor. 

T/RS 490 3 cr. 

Theology Capstone Seminar 

(Prerequisite: 12 credits of Theology/Religious 
Studies). A capstone seminar required for Theol- 
ogy majors, recommended for minors and avail- 
able to other qualified students with permission 
of instructor. Topics will vary from semester to 
semester depending on student interest and fac- 
ulty expertise. The use of primary sources and 
research appropriate to the specific topic will be 
emphasized. Students may take more than one 
semester of this course. 



203 



The Kania School 
OF Management 



The vision of The Kania School of Management is to prepare students 
to make lasting contributions to their organizations and communities. 



204 Kania School of Management 



Accreditation 

The Kania School of Management is 
accredited by The Association to Advance 
Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB Inter- 
national) on both the undergraduate and 
graduate levels. 

Mission Statement 

The Mission of The Kania School of Man- 
agement is to contribute to a Jesuit, liberal 
arts education by preparing students to meet 
the educational requirements for success in 
leadership, management, team membership, 
and other productive roles in business and 
related fields, and to provide service to the 
broad University community. The Kania 
School of Management provides for the devel- 
opment of knowledge, skills, interpersonal 
and communication capabilities, attitudes and 
values that will enable students to assume 
positive, influential roles in their work organi- 
zations and society. This process integrates the 
foundation for Hfelong learning and decision 
making with a clear sense of ethical responsi- 
bilities and a sensitivity to cultural and demo- 
graphic diversity. Our mission supports the 
University's Statement of Mission - to provide 
professional and pre-professional programs 
"designed to meet the standard of the appro- 
priate professional fields, and to develop stu- 
dents who have a clear sense of the ethical 
responsibilities which these fields demand of 
their successful practitioners." 

Departmental Programs 

Ten programs are available in the Kania 
School of Management: Accounting - Track 
in Financial Accounting, Accounting - Track 
in Managerial Accounting, Accounting Infor- 
mation Systems, Electronic Commerce, 
Enterprise Management Technology, Finance, 
International Business, Management, Market- 
ing, and Operations Management. In addi- 
tion, a B.S. in Economics is jointly offered 
with the College of Arts and Sciences. These 
programs prepare the student for a career in 
business or for graduate study. In addition to 
the requirements of the major and the busi- 
ness core, students in The Kania School of 
Management will complete the same general 
education core as students in the other under- 
graduate colleges. At least 50% of the major 
and business core credits must be earned at 



The University of Scranton. Apart from 
minor exceptions, which require the explicit 
approval of the dean of the school, the stu- 
dent will spend the senior year in residence at 
the University.The Kania School of Manage- 
ment is a member of the SAP University 
Alliance. This program enhances the value of 
the curriculum by placing the latest informa- 
tion technology in the classroom to give the 
next generation of business leaders a real- 
world advantage. The school has a fiilly oper- 
ational SAP R/3 system for instructional use. 
Members of the faculty have been specifically 
trained by SAP America and are integrating 
Enterprise Resource Planning systems in 
appropriate classes. 

Graduation Requirements 

In order to graduate in a business major, in 
addition to the 2.00 minimum grade-point 
average (GPA) overall, the student must have 
earned a minimum 2.00 GPA in both the 
major and business core coursework. 

Minors 

A minor in General Business is available to 
non-business students with the exception of 
students majoring in Chemistry-Business, 
Electronics-Business and Economics (SOM 
only). It will consist of 21 credits: 

ECO 101 Current Economic Issues 

ACC 253 Financial Accounting 

ECO 351 Environment of International 

Business 
FIN 351 Introduction to Finance 
MGT 351 Principles of Management 
MKT351 Introduction to Marketing 
OIM 471 Business Information 

Management 
The last five must be taken after the other 
courses, and may be taken no earlier than the 
junior year. Minors in Accounting, Accounting 
Information Systems, Economics, Electronic 
Commerce, Finance, Management of People 
and Teams, Management of Structures and 
Systems, and Operations Management are 
described under those respective programs. 

Business Cognate 

Non-Business students with special needs 
may pursue a personal cognate in Business, 
but may not take more than 25% of their 
total credit hours in Business. With the 



Kania School/ Accounting 203 



approval of his or her advisor, the student is 
free to select a variable number of Business 
courses. However, the prerequisites stated in 
the catalog must be observed, and upper- 
division courses may not be taken before the 
junior year. 

Math Options 

Two math options are available to Business 
majors: 

Option I* (6 credits) 

MATH 107 (Quantitative Methods II) 

MATH 108 (Quantitative Methods III) 

Option U* (8 credits) 

MATH 114 (Analysis I) 

MATH 221 (Analysis II) 

Both options cover the topics of calculus. 
Option I takes an applied approach; Option 
II a theoretical approach. 

The Business Leadership Program 

Robert L. McKeage, Ph.D., Director 
See page 68. 



ACCOUNTING 

Faculty 

Michael O. Mensah, Ph.D., Chair 
Brian W. Carpenter, Ph.D. 
Laura Helene Ellis-Westwell, Ph.D. 
Ronald J. Grambo, Ph.D. 
Roxanne T. Johnson, Ph.D. 
Robyn Lawrence, Ph.D. 
Daniel P Mahoney, Ph.D. 
Steven A. Solieri, Ph.D. 
Joseph R. Zandarski, Ph.D. 

Overview 

Accounting plays a vital role in the business 
and investment decisions made by the man- 
agement, owners and creditors of organiza- 
tions. Because of this important role, account- 
ing has become known as the "language of 
business." To fulfill the needs of students 
entering this discipline, the Accounting 
Department of The University of Scran ton 
offers majors in two tracks: Financial Account- 
ing and Managerial Accounting. In addition, a 



combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Busi- 
ness Administration Degree program is avail- 
able for students interested in professional cer- 
tification in states requiring 1 50 credit hours 
of education. The department's undergraduate 
degree program in Accounting Information 
Systems is described separately in this catalog. 

Financial Accounting focuses on the needs 
of users outside of the organization, primarily 
investors and creditors. This accounting infor- 
mation facilitates the investment and credit 
decisions that are inherent in a market econ- 
omy. The financial track is best suited for 
those students aspiring to become Certified 
Public Accountants (CPAs). While licensure 
of CPAs is separately governed by each state's 
legislative body, the Accounting Department 
provides students with opportunities to satisfy 
the education requirements of any state in 
which they may aspire to become certified. 
(Please refer to the combined B.S./M.B.A. 
degree program below.) 

Managerial Accounting focuses on the 
information needs of users within the organi- 
zation. This information aids in planning and 
controlling the organization's activities, and in 
evaluating the performance of the organiza- 
tion's segments and managers. The managerial 
accounting track is best suited for those stu- 
dents aspiring to become Certified Manage- 
ment Accountants (CMAs). 

The success of our graduates is demon- 
strated by their job placements. Alumni are 
employed by Big Four, regional, and local pub- 
lic accounting firms, by many notable firms in 
private industry, as well as by governmental 
and not-for-profit organizations. Qualified stu- 
dents have opportunities for on-the-job train- 
ing through our internship program. 

Combined Bachelor of Science/ 
Master of Business Administration 
Degree Program 

The Accounting Department of The Uni- 
versity of Scranton offers interested and quali- 
fied students the opportunity to earn both a 
Bachelor of Science degree in accounting and 
a Master of Business Administration degree 
with an accounting specialization. While this 
program may benefit any student interested 
in the accounting discipline, the program was 



* Students are tested for math placement during summer orientation. On the basis of these tests and their high school background it 
will be recommended that some students take Option II, especially if they expect to pursue graduate studies. The majority of stu- 
dents will be placed in Option I, and may also be required to take MA TH 1 06: Quantitative Methods I as a prerequisite to tak- 
ing MATH 107. 



206 Kania School/Accounting 



developed in response to the adoption by 
most states of a 1 50-credit-hour educational 
requirement to become a Certified Public 
Accountant. With judicious course schedul- 
ing, most students can complete the program 
within five academic years. 

Students interested in this BS/MBA degree 
program should apply to The Graduate 
School as prescribed by The Graduate School 
Catalog as early as December of their junior 
year at The University of Scranton. Criteria 
for acceptance into the combined program 
include the student's previous academic per- 
formance, GMAT score, letters of recommen- 
dation and statement of purpose. Students 
admitted into this combined BS/MBA degree 
program may elect to follow either the Finan- 
cial Accounting track, the Managerial 
Accounting track, or the Accounting Informa- 
tion Systems major. Students must adhere to 
The Graduate School Catalog requirements. 

Minor in Accounting 

The Accounting minor provides students of 
any major with an understanding of the lan- 
guage of business, thus serving to expand 
their career possibilities. The minor also serves 
as an excellent foundation for students who 
might later pursue a graduate business degree 
or law degree. The minor consists of four 
required courses (ACC 251-252 or ACC 253- 
254, ACC 361 and ACC 363), plus two elec- 
tive courses (any 300 or 400 level accounting 
courses). Therefore, business students (and 
other students who are required to take two 
semesters of sophomore-level accounting) can 
complete the minor by taking four additional 
accounting courses beyond the two account- 
ing courses that are required of their major. 
Other students can complete the minor by 
taking no more than six accounting courses. 
Interested students should contact their advi- 
sors in the KSOM Advising Center. 

Course Descriptions 

ACC 210 3 cr. 

Survey of Managerial and Financial Accounting 

(Not open to students needing 6 credits in intro- 
ductory accounting) A foundation course for 
Ace 502. Topics covered include recording trans- 
actions, adjusting and closing entries, and 
preparing financial statements; the form and 
content of each financial statement; and the 
principles underlying accounting treatment of 



economic events. Managerial accounting termi- 
nology, concepts and cost classification; the cost 
of goods manufactured and sold statement; and 
the budgeting process are also covered. 

ACC 251 3cr. 

Financial Accounting I 

(For accounting, AIS, EMT and finance majors) A 
survey of accounting principles, concepts and pro- 
cedures. Topics covered include financial state- 
ments, the information-processing cycle, cash, 
receivables, inventory costing methods, plant 
and equipment, intangibles, and current liabilities. 

ACC 252 3 cr. 

Financial Accounting II 

(Continuation of ACC 251 for accounting, AIS, 
EMT and finance majors; prerequisite: ACC 251) 
A study of long-term liabilities, owners' equity of 
corporations and partnerships, the cash-flow state- 
ment, and cost analysis and accumulation. 

ACC 253 3 cr. 

Financial Accounting 

(For non-accounting, non-AIS, non-EMT and 
non-finance majors) A survey of the accounting 
cycle, basic financial statements, theory and tech- 
niques of income, asset, and liability recognition. 

ACC 254 3 cr. 

Managerial Accounting 

(Continuation of ACC 253 for non-accounting, 
non-AIS, non-EMT and non-finance majors; 
prerequisite: ACC 253) This course examines 
accounting information primarily from the per- 
spective of a user within the organization. Topics 
covered include cost allocation, product costing, 
budgeting, profit planning, and performance 
evaluation. 

ACC 361 3 cr. 

Intermediate Accounting I 

(Prerequisite: junior standing, ACC 252) A 
comprehensive study of contemporary account- 
ing theory, concepts and procedures and their 
application to the asset classifications on the bal- 
ance sheet. Current pronouncements of the vari- 
ous accounting organizations relevant to assets 
will be emphasized. 

ACC 362 3 cr. 

Intermediate Accounting II 

(Prerequisite: ACC 361) Application of contem- 
porary accounting theory to liabilities and stock- 
holder's equity classifications of the balance 
sheet. Current pronouncements of accounting 
organizations relevant to liabilities and owners' 
equity accounts will be emphasized. 



Kania School/ Accounting 



Accounting - 


Financial Accounting Track Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


34 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECP 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar/Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 251-252 


Financial Accounting I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT' 


Free Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


ACC 361-362 


Intermediate Accounting I-II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ACC 363-364 


Federal Taxes-Auditing 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


FIN351-MKT351 


Intro, to Finance-Intro, to Marketing 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM 351-OlM 352 


Intro, to Mgt. Science-Intro, to Oper Mg 


t. 3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Ind Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 
Fourth Year 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




18 


18 


MAJOR 


ACC 460-ELECT^ 


Adv. Accounting-Major Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ACC 461-ELECT* 


Cost Accounting-Major Eieaive 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM471-MGT455 


Bus. Info. Mgt.-Bus. Policy & Strategy 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECTA 


Free Electives 


3 


3 


: GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 

TOTAL: 133-r 


1 


1 


16 13 
35 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205. 


^ If EDUC 113 is require 


■d in the first semester, it is taken it. 


1 place of a humanities elective and is counted as a GEfrei 


' elective. 


One GEfree elective in 


the fourth year must then be taken 


as a humanities elective. 






^ If a third math course is 


recjuired, it replaces this GE elective. 






'' Major electives for the Financial Accounting track are ACC 365, 470, 472, 473, 474, 475 and 480. Students luho plan to sit 


for the CPA examination in New York or New Jersey need 6 credits of finance and 6 credits of law. For the additional course in 


finance, one of FIN 361 


', FIN 362, or FIN 475 is recommended. ACC 470 is recommended for the additional law course. 



ACC 363 3 cr. 

Federal Taxes 

(Prerequisites: junior standing, ACC 252 or 
254) An introductory course covering pertinent 
phases of federal income taxation. Emphasis on 
business transactions, preparation of individual 
returns, and finding the answers to federal tax 
questions. 

ACC 364 3 cr. 

Auditing Theory 

(Prerequisite: ACC 361) Regulatory, legal, ethi- 
cal, and technical issues related to the independ- 



ent audit service. Examination of auditing stan- 
dards, statistical methods and techniques 
involved in the examination of certain transac- 
tion cycles. 

ACC 365 3 cr. 

Federal Taxation of Corporations and 
Partnerships 

(Prerequisite: ACC 252) An introduction to the 
taxation of C and S corporations and partner- 
ships, including analysis of the tax consequences 
of their formation, operation, and liquidation. 



208 Kania School/ Accounting 



Accounting - 


- Managerial Accounting Track Curriculum 






First Year 


Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


GE S/BH 

GE WRTG-SPCH 

GE PHIL-T/RS 

GE C/IL 

GE QUAN 

GE HUMN 

GE FSEM-PHED 

Second Year 


ECO 153-154 

WRTG 107-COMM 100 

PHIL 120-T/RS 121 

C/IL 104 

MATH ELECT' 

HUMN ELECP 

INTD 100-PHED ELECT 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Ekonomics 
Composition-Public Speaking 
Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 
Computing and Information Literacy 
Math Option (rwo courses) 
Humanities Elective 
Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


3 
3 
3 

3-4 
3 
1 


3 
3 
3 

3 
3-4 

1 


16-17 


16-17 


BUS CORE 
BUS CORE 
BUS CORE 
GE PHIL-T/RS 
GE NSCI 
GE HUMN 
GE ELECT 

Third Year 


ACC 251-252 
STAT 251-252 
MGT251 

PH1L210-T/RS122 
NSCI ELECT 
HUMN ELECT 
ELECP 


Financial Accounting I-II 
Statistics for Business I-II 
Legal Environment of Business 
Ethics-Theology II 
Natural Science Electives 
Humanities Electives 
Free Elective 


3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


18 


18 


MAJOR 
MAJOR 
BUS CORE 
BUS CORE 
BUS CORE 
BUS CORE 
GE PHIL-T/RS 

Fourth Year 


ACC 361-362 
ACC 461-365 
MGT 351-352 
FIN351-MKT351 
OIM351-OIM352 
ECO/IB 351 
PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Intermediate Accounting I-II 
Cost Acctg.-Federal Tax of Corp. 
Principles of Management I-II 
Intro to Finance-Intro, to Marketing 
Intro, to Mgt. Science-Intro, to Oper. M 
Environment of Intl. Business 
Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 
3 
3 
3 
gt. 3 

3 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


18 


18 


MAJOR 
MAJOR 
BUS CORE 
GE HUMN 
GE ELECT 
GE PHED 


ACC 462-ELECT'' 
ACC ELECTIVES^ 
OIM471-MGT455 
HUMN ELECT 
ELECP 
PHED ELECT 


Adv. Mgrl. Accounting-Major Elective 

Major Electives 

Bus. Info. Mgt.-Bus. Policy & Strategy 

Humanities Eleaive 

Free Electives 

Physical Education 

TOTAL: 133-1 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 


3 
3 
3 

3 

1 


16 13 
35 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205. 


UfEDUC. IBisrequt 
One GEfree elective in 


■red in the first semester, it is taken in place of a humanities elective and is counted 
' the fourth year must then be taken as a humanities elective. 


as a GEfrci 


? elective. 


■5 If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 






■* The major eUctives for 


the Managerial Accounting track are ACC 363, 460, 470, 471, 472, 474, 475 and 480. 





ACC 370 3 cr. 

Fraud Detection and Control 

(Prerequisite: ACC 252, 254, or 210) This 
course provides the student with an understand- 
ing of the various forms of fraud that take place 
within and outside of the organization. The stu- 
dent is exposed to the control and investigative 
techniques essential to the prevention and detec- 
tion of these frauds. 

ACC 460 3 cr. 

Advanced Accounting I 

(Prerequisite: ACC 362) The theories and prom- 
ulgated standards of accounting related to multi- 



ple business units, including accounting for 
business combinations, consolidated financial 
statements, minority interest, and branch 
accounting. Also covered is governmental and 
nonprofit accounting. 

ACC 461 3cr. 

Cost Accounting 

(Prerequisites: junior standing, ACC 252) Theo- 
ries, techniques and procedures in cost accumu- 
lation, reporting and control, including such 
topics as job-order costs, process costs, by-prod- 
ucts and joint-products costing, and standard 
cost and variance analysis. 



Kania School/ Accounting Information Systems 209 



ACC 462 3 cr. 

Advanced Managerial Accounting 

(Prerequisite: ACC 461) Accounting techniques 
as control devices in business with emphasis on 
the use of accounting data in business decisions. 
Topics to include budgeting and profit planning, 
cost-volume-profit analysis and direct costing. 

ACC 470 3 cr. 

Law for Accountants 

(Prerequisite: MGT 251) A study of the law of 
contracts, sales, commercial paper, secured trans- 
actions, rights of debtors and creditors, and 
bankruptcy. 

ACC 471 3 cr. 

Management Auditing 

(Prerequisite: ACC 362) An in-depth examina- 
tion of the accountant in the manager's position. 
Includes administrative effectiveness and effi- 
ciency as provided through sound internal con- 
trols, and design and implementation of moni- 
toring systems within the organization to 
promote better cost-benefit decisions. 

ACC 472 3 cr. 

Advanced Accounting II 

(Prerequisite: ACC 362) A study of the theories 
and promulgated standards of accounting related 
to international operations, partnerships, estates 
and trusts, installment sales, consignments, SEC 
reporting, and interim financial reporting. 

ACC 473 3 cr. 

Advanced Auditing 

(Prerequisite: ACC 364) An examination of sta- 
tistical analysis in making audit judgements; 
internal control and auditing issues relating to 
EDP systems; risk assessment and testing for cer- 
tain transaction cycles; and other attestation 
services and reports. 

ACC 474 3 cr. 

Accounting Information Systems 

(Prerequisite: ACC 252) The design and applica- 
tion of accounting systems in both the manual 
and automated environments. Analysis of infor- 
mation's accumulation and use patterns in 
organizations with a focus on providing usefiil 
and timely information. Extensive computer 
usage of Professional Business Software. 

ACC/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Accounting 

(Prerequisites: ACC 252 or 254, ECO 351) This 
course is designed for both accounting and non- 
accounting majors with an interest in global 
accounting issues. The environmental influences 



on accounting development, the reporting stan- 
dards for selected countries, financial statement 
analysis, and taxation and managerial accounting 
issues for multi-national business entities are 
examined. 



ACCOUNTING 
INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Michael O. Mensah, Ph.D., Chair, 
Accounting Department 

See Accounting for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The explosion of electronic commerce, the 
use of enterprise systems, the growth of global 
alliances and information sharing, and other 
information technology-driven developments 
have expanded the variety of opportunities 
available to professionals with a strong and 
integrated knowledge of accounting principles 
(the "language of business") and the evolving 
information technologies needed to imple- 
ment and manage accounting information 
systems (AIS). AIS professionals provide value 
to their organizations or clients by using their 
skills to help generate reliable, timely, and rel- 
evant decision-making information for the 
use of managers and other stakeholders. These 
professionals assist their organizations or 
clients in assessing the opportunities and risks 
associated with specific information technol- 
ogy deployments. They also oversee the 
implementation and management of account- 
ing systems within their organizations. In the 
assurance sector, AIS professionals often ftinc- 
tion as information systems auditors. They 
provide accounting, technology, and other 
skills to support traditional as well as paper- 
less audits. They are often called upon to 
assist in special investigations such as fraud 
audits and forensic accounting. 

The objective of the AIS major is to pre- 
pare students to function in the corporate, 
public accounting, and non-profit sectors as 
entry-level accounting systems professionals. 
Students can select electives for either an 
accounting information systems auditing or a 
general information systems management 
emphasis. AIS majors are encouraged to pur- 
sue professional certifications such as the Cer- 
tified Information Systems Security Profes- 



2 1 Kania School/ Accounting Information Systems 



sional (CISSP), the Certified Information 
Systems Auditor (CISA), and the Certified 
Internal Auditor (CIA). In addition, students 
may also plan to become Certified Public 
Accountants (CPA) or Certified Fraud Exam- 
iners (CFE). The AIS major is a four-year 
undergraduate program. However, students 
may use the combined BS/MBA program at 
the University to meet the 150 hour require- 
ment for CPA certification as needed. Quali- 
fied students have opportunities for on-the- 
job training through our internship program. 

Minor in Accounting Information Systems 

The Accounting Information Systems 
minor provides students of any major with an 
understanding of basic accounting and an 
opportunity to acquire related information 
technology knowledge and skills. The minor 
serves to expand students' career opportuni- 
ties in areas such as accounting, business, gov- 
ernment, non-profit management and law 
enforcement. The minor consists of 18 cred- 
its: ACC 251 and 252, ACC 474, ACC 253 
and 254, AIS 372, and two additional 300- 
or 400-level AIS courses. Therefore, business 
students (and other students who are required 
to take two semesters of sophomore-level 
accounting courses) can complete the minor 
by taking four additional Accounting/ AIS 
courses. 

Course Descriptions 

AIS 362 3 cr. 

Database Management Systems for Elec- 
tronic Business 

(Prerequisite: ACC 474) This course deals with 
the use of database management systems to sup- 
port electronic business. Topics include: data 
modeling; database design and normalization; 
structured query language (SQL); database appli- 
cation development ; integration of Web server 
and database server; distributed databases; data 
warehousing; and data mining. (EC 362 and AIS 
362 are offered jointly.) 

AIS 367 3 cr. 

Enterprise Accounting and Control 

(Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, junior 
standing) This course examines how accounting 
principles, methods, and techniques are har- 
nessed to meet the reporting needs of an organi- 
zation in an integrated management and infor- 
mation technology environment. It is designed 
to demonstrate the integration of both financial 



and managerial accounting procedures with the 
core business processes and organizational ele- 
ments of an enterprise. (AIS 367 and EMT 367 
are offered jointly.) 

AIS 372 3 cr. 

Accounting for Electronic Business 

(Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, junior 
standing) This course will introduce students to 
the role of accounting in today's global business 
environment. Students will examine how tech- 
nology has impacted the techniques of account- 
ing and reporting. Computerized models of 
accounting will be used to explore the tools 
available to compile data for management deci- 
sion and reporting. Both Internet business and 
traditional business transactions will be evalu- 
ated. (AIS 372 and EC 372 are offered jointly.) 

AIS 373 3 cr. 

Object Oriented Applications in Business 
and Accounting 

(Prerequisite: ACC 474) This course is an intro- 
duction to the design and analysis of computer 
systems utilizing an object-oriented approach. 
Topics include: major methodologies, methods 
and techniques for analysis and design, concepts 
and techniques for development projects, CASE 
tool support development work, and approaches 
to planning for systems implementation, evalua- 
tion, and maintenance. 

AIS 381 3 cr. 

Electronic Business Information Systems 
Security and Ethics 

(Prerequisite: AIS 362) This course is designed to 
provide students with an understanding of the 
technical, managerial, legal and ethical issues of 
information security. Topics include: Web server 
and client security; secure transactions and pay- 
ments; information security; digital certificates 
and practices; legal, moral and ethical issues; 
intellectual property and patents; governmental 
regulations and policies; and emerging technolo- 
gies. (AIS 381 and EC 471 are offered joindy.) 

AIS 473 3 cr. 

Advanced Auditing Issues: Information 
Systems Auditing 

(Prerequisites: ACC 364 and ACC 474) The 
objective of this course is to develop competence 
in information systems auditing (the audit and 
control of computer-based information systems) 
by focusing on the design and implementation 
of audit approaches in automated settings. Top- 
ics include: information systems (IS) audits, IS 
controls, risk assessment, and computer-assisted 
audit techniques (CAATS). 



Kania School/ Accounting Information Systems 211 





Accounting 


Information Systems 


; Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FdlCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Opdon (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECTA 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE PSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 251-252 


Financial Accounting I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Stadsncs for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCl 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elecdves 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECP 


Free Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


ACC 361-362 


Intermediate Accounting I-II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


ACC 364 


Audinng 




3 


MAJOR 


AIS 362 


Database Management Systems 
for Electronic Business 




3 


BUS CORE 


ACC 474 


Accounting Informadon Systems 


3 




BUS CORE 


MGT 35 1-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


FIN351-MKT351 


Intro, to Finance-Intro, to Marketing 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351-OIM352 


Intro to Mgt. Science-Intro to Open Mgt. 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Internadonal Business 


3 




18 


18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


AIS 373 


Object Oriented Applications in 
Bus. & Acctg. 


3 




MAJOR 


AIS 372 


Accoundng for Electronic Business 


3 




MAJOR 


AIS 483 


Business Applications of 
Communication Networks 




3 


MAJOR 


AIS ELECP 


AIS Electives 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Policy & Strategy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanides Elecdve 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Eleaive 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT- 


Free Elective 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 






TOTAL: 136-138 CREDITS 



' See note on Math Options on page 205- 

^ IfEDUC 113 is required in the first semester, it is taken in place of a humanities elective and is counted as a GEfree elective. 

One GEfree elective in the fourth year must then be taken as a humanities elective. 
^ If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 

^ Recommended audit eleaives include AIS 473 or ACC 473, AIS 381 and AIS 367. General systems electives include AIS 367, 
ACC 461, ACC 460. ACC 470 and ACC 363. 



212 Kania School/Economics 



ACC 474 3 cr. 

Accounting Information Systems 

(Prerequisite: ACC 252) The design and applica- 
tion of accounting systems in both the manual 
and automated environments. Analysis of infor- 
mation's accumulation and use patterns in organ- 
izations with a focus on providing useful and 
timely information. Extensive computer usage of 
Professional Business Software. 

AIS 483 3 cr. 

Business Applications of Communication 
Networks 

(Prerequisite: ACC 474) Use of computer and 
telecommunication networks to achieve organi- 
zational goals. Topics include data communica- 
tions; planning and design of communication 
networks; data integrity, independence and secu- 
rity, client-server computing; global communica- 
tion; the Internet; applications of telecommuni- 
cation networks and current issues and future 
trends. (AIS 473, EC 473, and OIM 473 are 
offered jointly.) 



ECONOMICS 

Faculty 

Satyajit Ghosh, Ph.D., Chair 
Frank P. Corcione, Ph.D. 
Riaz Hussain, Ph.D. 
loannis N. KaUianiotis, Ph.D. 
Hong V. Nguyen, Ph.D. 
lordanis Petsas, Ph.D. 
Murli Rajan, Ph.D. 
Edward M. ScahiU, Ph.D. 
Susan Trussler, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The major in Economics, which is available 
both through The Kania School of Manage- 
ment and The College of Arts and Sciences, 
provides an excellent training for understand- 
ing the economic events and developments of 
our complex industrialized society and of the 
world economies. It equips the student with 
training and background needed to assume 
responsible decision-making positions in the 
financial sector, industry, commerce, banking, 
or government service. It also gives a strong 
preparation for the pursuit of graduate studies 
in Economics or the law. 



Minor in Economics 

18 credits consisting of ECO 153, 154 (or 
ECO 101,102), 361, 362, plus two upper 
level ECO courses (SOM majors may not use 
ECO 351). 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



ECO 101 

(S) Current Economic Issues 

Intended to provide a foundation in economics 
for non-business students. This course provides 
analysis of contemporary economic issues rele- 
vant to the U.S. economy and the world. Issues 
such as economic policy, budget deficit, federal 
debt, recession, inflation, health care, environ- 
ment, and regulation of business are studied. 
Not a substitute for ECO 153-154 or other 
upper-level economics courses. 

ECO 103 3 cr. 

(S) The Economics of Environmental Issues 

This course provides students with a framework 
for viewing environmental issues as economic 
issues. Alternative methods for addressing envi- 
ronmental problems are examined, including 
"command and control " regulatory policies and 
"market-based" policies. The evolution of public 
policies toward the environment is discussed. 
Not open to Economics or Business majors or 
minors. 

ECO 153 3 cr. 

(S) Principles of Microeconomics 

This course centers on the salient characteristics 
of the modern free-enterprise economy. Topics 
include the operations of the price system as it 
regulates production, distribution, and con- 
sumption, and as it is in turn modified and 
influenced by private groups and government. 

ECO 154 3 cr. 

(S) Principles of Macroeconomics 

This course analyzes the determinants of aggre- 
gate economic activity. The main areas studied 
are the monetary and banking system, the com- 
position and fluctuations of national income, 
and inflation, all as influenced by monetary and 
fiscal policy. 

ECO/IB 351 3cr. 

(D) Environment of International Business 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154 or ECO 101, jun- 
ior standing) This course introduces the student 
to the growing field of international business, 
touching on the economic, social and political 
environments of international trade and multi- 



Kania School/Economics 2 1 3 



Economics Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR (GE S/BH) 


ECO 153-134 


Principles of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE QUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECP 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


ECO 361-362 


Intermediate Micro-Macro Econ. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


STAT 253 


Statistics for Economics 




3 


COGNATE^ 


ACC 253 


Financial Accounting 


3 




COGNATE* 


ELECT 


Cognate Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology 11 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humn. Electives (HIST 110-111 recom. 


) 3 


3 


GE ELECT 
Third Year 


ELECT' 


Free Elective 


3 




18 


18 


MAJOR 


ECO/IB 35 1-ECO/IB 375 


Env. of Ind. Bus.-Int'l Economics 


6 




MAJOR 


ECO 363 


Applied Econometrics 




3 


MAJOR 


ECO ELECT 


Eco Eleaive 


3 




COGNATE* 


FIN351-ELECT 


Intro, to Fin.-Cognate Electives 


3 


6 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Elective 




3 


COGNATE-* 


ELECT 


Cognate Elective 


3 




15 


15 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


ECO 460 


Monetary & Fin. Eco. 


3 




MAJOR 


ECO SEM-ECO 471 


Eco. Seminar-Advanced Macro. 


3 


3 


COGNATE' 


ELECT 


Cognate Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 


6 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 






TOTAL: 130-132 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205. 


UfEDUC113isrequh 


ed in the first semester, it is taken in 


1 place of a humanities elective and is counted , 


as a GEfree 


' elective. 


One GEfree elective in 


the fourth year must then be taken 


as a humanities elective. 






J If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 






^ Economics majors may 


apply up to 6 cognate credits towara 


' a math minor. Students taking the sequence o 


pen to matk 


' majors 


are strongly urged to complete the calculus sequence by taking MATH 222, particularly if they plan on pursuing gradi 


uate 


studies. Economics majors registered in The Kania School of Management will apply 9 of their elective cognate credits to one of 


the following areas (exceptions require the permission of the 


SOM dean): accounting, finance, international business, , 


manage- 


ment, marketing, operations management. The remaining cognate credits may he applied to the social sciences or from 


the other 


business areas (but note 


' that no more than 30 credits altogether can be taken in business subjects, excliuive of economic courses). 


Care must be taken to observe prerequisites. 









national corporations. International institutions 
and agencies that impact on international busi- 
ness are discussed and practical aspects of these 
topics are emphasized. 

ECO 361 3 cr. 

Intermediate Microeconomics 

(Prerequisite: ECO 1 53) This course centers on 
the analysis of production and cost theories. The 



topics studied are pure competition, monopoly, 
oligopoly, monopolistic competition and factor 
pricing. Economics majors take in sophomore 
year; Finance majors in the junior year. 

ECO 362 3 cr. 

Intermediate Macroeconomics 

(Prerequisite: ECO 1 54) Course centers on the 
study of national income accounting, price level 



214 Kania School/Economics 



fluctuations, issues of unemployment, inflation, 
full employment, and impact of monetary and 
fiscal policy on income level and distribution. 
Economics majors take in sophomore year; 
Finance in junior year. 

ECO 363 3 cr. 

Applied Econometrics 

(Prerequisites: ECO 361, ECO 362, STAT 253) 
This course deals with the modeling and estima- 
tion of relationships as applied to economics. 
The topics covered include single-equation 
structural modeling and time-series modeling; 
estimation methods and problems; testing of 
economic hypotheses; and forecasting. The 
emphasis of the course is on applications involv- 
ing the use of actual data. 

ECO 364 3 cr. 

Labor Economiics and Labor Regulations 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154) Analysis of labor 
supply and demand; measurement and theory of 
unemployment; occupational choice; wage dif- 
ferentials; labor-market issues and policies; labor 
legislation. 

ECO 365 3 cr. 

Mathematical Economics 

(Prerequisites: ECO 361, ECO 362, STAT 253, 
MATH 107, MATH 108 or permission of the 
instructor) This course studies the methodology 
of modern economic analysis. Emphasis is 
placed on developing the rigorous theoretical 
foundations of micro and macroeconomics using 
tools of calculus and linear algebra. Topics such 
as comparative static analysis, general -equilib- 
rium analysis, consumer and firm behavior, 
intertemporal decision making, decision-making 
under uncertainty, theory of growth and 
rational-expectation hypothesis are covered. 

ECO 366 3 cr. 

Economic Geography 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154) This course exam- 
ines the broad areas of the spatial organization of 
economic systems and the location of economic 
activity; the role of transportation in determining 
optimal locations and optimal flow of goods, 
information, and people; and spatial organiza- 
tion of the growth and development of cities, 
regions and nations. 

ECO/IB 375 3 cr. 

International Economics 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154 or ECO 351 or 
permission of the instructor) This course 
explains the rationale for international trade and 
gains from trade and discusses various trade poli- 



cies. Topics covered in the course include: com- 
parative advantage, free trade and trade restric- 
tions (tariffs, quotas, etc.), the trade policy of 
the United States, exchange rates and their 
determinants, balance-of-payments analysis and 
the significance of multinational corporations. 

ECO 410 3 cr. 

Economics for K-12 Teachers 

Provides an introduction to fiandamental eco- 
nomic concepts as well as a review of techniques 
and materials (print, audiovisual, etc.) that can 
be used to teach economics at the K-12 grade 
levels. Emphasis is placed on strategies designed 
to integrate economics into such courses as lan- 
guage arts, mathematics and social studies. Not a 
substitute for other economics courses. 

ECO 460 3 cr. 

Monetary and Financial Economics 

(Prerequisite: ECO 362, FIN 351) This course 
emphasizes the interrelations between financial 
markets, financial institutions and aggregate eco- 
nomic activity. Topics include: an overview of 
financial institutions, introduction to money and 
capital markets, fijndamentals of interest rates, 
the money supply process, the conduct of mone- 
tary policy, and other topics that occupy the 
subject matter of money and financial markets. 

ECO 461 3 cr. 

Managerial Economics 

(Prerequisite: ECO 361) Teaches the use of eco- 
nomic tools for managerial decision making. Top- 
ics include discussion of applicable economic, 
statistical and computer skills. Emphasis is on 
the microeconomic theory of the firm and how 
this is applied. 

ECO 465 3 cr. 

Development Economics 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154) This course intro- 
duces students to contemporary development 
economics. Topics include: the concept and 
measurement of economic development, the 
problems and prospects of the less developed 
countries, and the alternative theories and 
processes of economic development. 

ECO 470 3 cr. 

Law and Economics 

Prerequisite: ECO 361 or permission of the 
instructor) This course focuses on the public- 
policy implications of law and economics. It is 
based on the notion that legal rules establish 
implicit prices for different types of behavior 
and that consequences of these rules can be ana- 
lyzed using microeconomics. In particular, micro- 



Kania School/Electronic Commerce 215 



economic theory is used to analyze economic 
aspects of property, contracts, torts, and crime. 

ECO 471 3 cr. 

Advanced Macroeconomics 

(Prerequisites: ECO 362, 460, 363 or permis- 
sion of the instructor) This course centers on the 
study of recent advances in macroeconomic 
analysis. Topics include empirical macroeco- 
nomic analysis, open- economy macroeconom- 
ics, the role of expectations, economic policy 
and economic growth. 

ECO 490 3 cr. 

Economics Seminar 

Advanced study of a special area in economics. 
Topics and prerequisites vary. 

The followdng courses are offered infrequently: 

ECO 102 Fundamentals of Economic 

Analysis 
ECO 200 (S) Economic Security and 

Personal Finance 
ECO 461 Managerial Economics 
ECO 462 Urban and Regional Economics 
ECO 463 Public Finance and Taxation 
ECO 464 Environmental Economics and 

Policy 

Please contact the department chair for 
course schedules and detailed descriptions. 



ELECTRONIC COMMERCE 

Prasadaro Kakumanu, Ph.D., Chair, Opera- 
tions and Information Management Department 

See Operations and Information Manage- 
ment for faculty listing. 

Overview 

Electronic commerce is an emerging busi- 
ness environment that provides common 
business services, multimedia content publish- 
ing and secure interactive web sites by inte- 
grating back-end and front-end applications. 
The necessary electronic commerce infrastruc- 
ture is provided by integrating information 
and telecommunication technologies, the 
Internet and the World Wide Web, and busi- 
ness models that incorporate security, privacy, 
and legal issues. Electronic commerce lets 
companies reach new markets, operate around 
the clock, shorten the product-development 
cycle, enhance customer service, reduce or 



eliminate inventory related costs, and create 
enterprise links - all at lower costs. The phe- 
nomenal growth in online commerce 
increases the demand for people with skills in 
areas such as electronic commerce infrastruc- 
ture, new business initiatives, law and secu- 
rity, electronic payment, financial services, 
and interactive marketing. The program 
below develops the knowledge and skills nec- 
essary for linked organizations in the new 
millennium. 

Minor in Electronic Commerce 

To minor in Electronic Commerce the stu- 
dent must take a minimum of 18 credits. 
Three courses are required: C/IL 104 (or 
equivalent), EC 251, and OIM 471 and any 
three of the following: EC 361, EC 362, EC 
370, EC 371, EC 372, EC 461, EC 462, EC 
470, EC 471, or EC 473. 

Course Descriptions 

EC 251 3cr. 

Introduction to Electronic Business 

(Prerequisite: C/IL 104) This course explores 
how the Internet has revolutionized the buying 
and selling of goods and services in the market- 
place. Topics include: Internet business models, 
electronic commerce infrastructure, designing 
online storefronts, payment acceptance and secu- 
rity issues, and the legal and ethical challenges of 
electronic commerce. Students will also gain 
hands-on experience in creating a web site using 
an HTML authoring tool. 

EC 361 3 cr. 

Electronic Business Communication Networks 

(Prerequisite: EC 251) The course is designed to 
provide students with networking and telecom- 
munications fundamentals necessary to develop 
enterprise networks to conduct business on the 
Internet. Topics include: network fundamentals 
and technologies, wireless networks and the 
Internet, network security, management, and 
trends. Discussion is focused on business applica- 
tions within and among organizations. Hands- 
on experience and case studies will be used to 
illustrate concepts. 

EC 362 3 cr. 

Database Management Systems for 
Electronic Business 

(Prerequisites: EC 251, OIM 471) This course 
deals with the use of database management sys- 
tems to support electronic business. Topics 



216 Kania School/Electronic Commerce 



include: data modeling; database design and 
normalization; structured query language (SQL); 
database application development; integration of 
web server and database server; distributed data- 
bases; data warehousing; and data mining. (EC 
362 and AIS 362 are offered jointly.) 

EC 370 3 cr. 

Interactive Marketing 

(Prerequisites: MKT 351, junior standing) This 
course examines the integration of evolving 
interactive technologies in the design and imple- 
mentation of marketing programs. The use of 
information technology infrastructure to support 
the execution of conception, pricing, promotion 
and distribution of ideas, goods and services has 
the potential of making the marketing process 
more efficient and productive. (EC 370 and 
MKT 370 are offered joindy.) 

EC 371 3 cr. 

Investments 

(Prerequisites: FIN 351, junior standing) This 
course provides students with an overview of the 
fundamentals of investing. Topic coverage will 
include debt, equity and derivatives markets. 
Internet resources will be used to develop secu- 
rity valuation models. 

EC 372 3 cr. 

Accounting for Electronic Business 

(Prerequisites: ACC 252 or ACC 254, junior 
standing) Introduces students to the role 
accounting is playing in today's business envi- 
ronment and how technology has impacted the 
techniques of accounting and reporting. Com- 
puterized models of accounting are used to 
explore the software tools available for decisions 
and reporting. Internet business and traditional 
business transactions will be evaluated. Students 
will see the effects of control features built into 
software systems. (EC 372 and AIS 372 are 
offered jointly.) 

EC 461 3 cr. 

Internet Applications Development 

(Prerequisites: EC 361, EC 362) An introduction 
to existing and evolving Internet technologies 
needed for web site development and manage- 
ment. Client and server-side scripts will be uti- 
lized to explore their role in interacting with cus- 
tomers, customizing web pages, processing forms, 
maintaining state, and connecting to databases. 
Course delivery will be primarily conducted 
through hands-on assignments and projects. 



EC 462 3 cr. 

Projects in Electronic Business 

(Prerequisite: EC 46 1 ) In this course, students 
will integrate their knowledge and skill in busi- 
ness and technology to acquire the big picture of 
electronic business. The purpose of this course is 
to synthesize knowledge acquired in different 
courses to develop a secure working electronic 
commerce site. Students will work in a team- 
oriented environment under the guidance of the 
instructor. 

EC 470 3 cr. 

Supply Chain Management 

(Prerequisite: OIM 352 or permission of instruc- 
tor) Many companies view Supply Chain Man- 
agement as the core of their business strategy. 
Student will learn how principles of Supply 
Chain Management integrate into the manage- 
ment of the enterprise and the business 
processes. Students will examine the use of infor- 
mation technologies in Supply Chain Manage- 
ment. Computer software will be used to gain 
hands-on experience. (EC 470 and OIM 366 are 
jointly offered.) 

EC 471 3 cr. 

Information Systems Security 

(Prerequisites: EC 361, EC 362) The course pro- 
vides students with a basic understanding of the 
technical, managerial, legal and ethical issues of 
information security. Topics include cryptographic 
systems, IP concepts and behavior, Internet and 
systems threat assessment, secure transactions and 
payments, antivirus tools, password management 
and cracking, and system auditing. Students will 
largely utilize Microsoft Windows platforms, but 
other operating systems will be discussed. (EC 
471 and AIS 381 are offered jointly.) 

EC 472 3 cr. 

Electronic Business and Entrepreneurship 

(Prerequisites: EC 361, EC 362) The course 
examines the issues related to the starting of new 
technology-based businesses. It focuses on entre- 
preneurial traits, idea generation, entry strate- 
gies, marketing plans and development of busi- 
ness plans. Venture capital and other forms of 
financing will also be covered. In addition there 
will be a discussion on legal and intellectual 
properties issues. (EC 472 and OIM 472 are 
offered jointly.) 



Kania School/Electronic Commerce 217 



Electronic Commerce Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computer and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECP 


Humaniries Elective 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar- Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 253-254 


Financial-Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


EC 251 


Introducuon to Electronic Commerce 


3 




BUS CORE 


OIM 471 


Business Information Management 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humaniries Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT3 


Free Elecrive 


3 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EC 361 


Elearonic Business Comm. Networks 


3 




MAJOR 


EC 362 


Database Mgt. tor Electronic Business 




3 


MAJOR 


EC ELECT 


EC Eleaives 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MKT351-FIN351 


Intro to Marketing-Intro to Finance 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351-OIM352 


Intro to Mgt. Science-Intro to Open Mgt, 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Ind. Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elecrive 


18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


EC 461 


Internet Applications Development 


3 




MAJOR 


EC 462/ELECT 


Projects in Electronic Business/Elea 




6 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Pohcy & Strategy 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Eiecdves 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


13 






TOTAL: 133-135 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205. 


^ IfEDUC 1 13 is required in the first semester, it is taken . 


in place of a humanities elective and is counted as a GEfree elective. 


The GEfi-ee elective in 


! the fourth year must he taken as a 


humanities elective. 






> If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 




...,....:.« 



EC 473 3 cr. 

Business Applications of Communication 
Networks 

(Prerequisite: OIM 471) Use of computer and 
telecommunication networks to achieve organiza- 
tional goals. Topics include data communications; 
planning and design of communication networks; 
data integrity, independence and security; client- 
server computing; global communication; the 
Internet; applications of telecommunication net- 
works and current issues and future trends. (EC 
473, AIS 483, and OIM 473 are offered jointly.) 



218 Kania School/Enterprise Management Technology 



ENTERPRISE 

MANAGEMENT 
TECHNOLOGY 

Satya N. Prattipari, Ph.D., Program Director 
See Operations and Information Manage- 
ment for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The major in Enterprise Management 
Technology (EMT) is a general management 
program with emphasis on information tech- 
nology. The program's focus is on the inte- 
grated management of the whole enterprise 
rather than the management of individual 
functional areas. It is designed to produce 
graduates with expertise in integrated business 
processes and the use of Enterprise Manage- 
ment Planning systems popularly known as 
ERP systems. This program is enabled by a 
fully functional SAP R/3 system provided 
through The Kania School's alliance with SAP 
America. EMT courses build upon the foun- 
dation provided by core courses in all business 
areas. These courses are followed by more 
advanced courses in each functional area 
which use ERP systems to manage and inte- 
grate the processes. Project-oriented courses, 
including business consulting, complete the 
program. The EMT major is a good choice 
for individuals desiring careers in information 
systems consulting or general management 
with an Information Technology emphasis. It 
is also an excellent preparation for graduate 
studies in business. 

Course Descriptions 

EMT 351 3cr. 

Business Process Overview 

This is the first course in the area of Enterprise 
Management. Students will learn to appreciate 
the integration of a company's core business 
processes. Students will be exposed to the main 
business processes that drive an organization, the 
interactions within and between them, and the 
effect of integration on the decision-making 
environment. This course uses an enterprise-wide 
integrated information-systems software and sim- 
ulated data for a model company. (EMT 351 
and OIM 353 are offered jointly.) 



EMT 367 3 cr. 

Enterprise Accounting and Control 

(Prerequisites: Ace 251-252 or Ace 253-254) This 
course examines how accounting principles, 
methods, and techniques are harnessed to meet 
the reporting needs of an organization in an inte- 
grated management-and-information-technology 
environment. It is designed to demonstrate the 
integration of both financial and managerial 
accounting procedures with the core business 
processes and organizational elements of an enter- 
prise. (EMT 367 and AIS 367 are offered jointly.) 

EMT 460 3 cr. 

Customer Support Systems 

(Prerequisites: EMT 351, MKT 351) An inter- 
disciplinary approach to enterprise management 
that focuses on the customer is emphasized. The 
objective of the course is to orient enterprise- 
wide decision making to successful customer- 
relationship management on an ongoing basis. 
(EMT 460 and MKT 460 are offered jointly.) 

EMT 461 3 cr. 

Enterprise Treasury Management 

(Prerequisites: EMT 351, FIN 351) This course 
is designed to provide advanced study in the 
financial-management area through detailed 
analysis of financial statements, liquidity crises, 
cash optimization, credit analysis, banking 
arrangements, loan contracts, commercial paper 
and the use of money market. (EMT 461 and 
FIN 361 are offered jointly.) 

EMT 462 3 cr. 

Production Planning and Control 

(Prerequisites: EMT 351, OIM 352) This course 
concerns the study of production planning and 
control activities in an enterprise resource-plan- 
ning context. Topics include: aggregate planning, 
capacity planning, master production schedul- 
ing, material requirements planning, produc- 
tion- activity control, purchasing, inventory 
models, and Just-in-Time systems. Interactions 
between operations and the other functional 
areas of the business will be demonstrated using 
Enterprise Management Systems software. 

EMT 463 3 cr. 

Enterprise HR Systems 

(Prerequisites: EMT 351, MGT 351) This 
course explains the functions of a human 
resources division or department including: 
job descriptions, labor demographics, recruit- 
ment and hiring, turnover and mobility, inter- 
viewing, aptitude and other employee testing, 
performance evaluation, disciplinary proce- 
dures, employee health and safety, wage and 



Kania School/Enterprise Management Technology 219 



Enterprise Management Technology Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-134 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaidng 


3 


3 


GET/RS-PHIL 


T/RS 121-PHlL 120 


Theology I-Intro Philosophy I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computer and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECP 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM/PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 251-252 


Financial Accounting I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT3 


Free Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EMT351 


Business Process Over\'iew 


3 




MAJOR 


EMT 367 


Enterprise Accounting and Control 




3 


BUS CORE 


FIN 351 


Introduction to Finance 


3 




BUS CORE 


MKT351 


Introduction to Marketing 


3 




BUS CORE 


OIM 352 


Introduction to Operations Management 




3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351 


Intro to Management Science 


3 




BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management HI 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Intl. Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


15 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


EMT 460 


Customer Support Systems 


3 




MAJOR 


EMT 461 


Enterprise Treasury Management 




3 


MAJOR 


EMT 462 


Production Planning and Control 


3 




MAJOR 


EMT 463 


Enterprise HR Systems 




3 


MAJOR 


EMT 470 


Enterprise Information Systems 


3 




MAJOR 


EMT 471 


Configuration and Consulting 




3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Policy and Strategy 




3 


BUS CORE 


OIM 471 


Business Information Management 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 






TOTAL: 133-135 CRE! 


DITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205- 




' IfEDUC 1 13 is required in the first semester, it is taken in place of a humanities elective and is counted as a GE free elective. 


The GE free elective in 


the fourth year must he taken as a 


humanities elective. 






J If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE electi 


h'e. 







hour administration, government regulations; 
and the handling of absenteeism, alcohoHsm 
and drug addiction. (EMT 463 and MGT 
361 are offered jointly.) 

EMT 470 3 cr. 

Enterprise Information Systems 

(Prerequisite: EMT 351) This course is con- 
cerned with the management and operations of 



information systems in an integrated enterprise. 
It will examine the integrated business processes 
of an enterprise. Students will analyze and study 
enterprise systems software in detail. Students 
will be exposed to the management of the enter- 
prise systems software. They will learn about 
business integration through the concepts of 
business engineering and business workflow. 



220 Kania School/Finance 



EMT471 

Configuration and Consulting 

(Prerequisite: EMT 351) Focus is on the imple- 
mentation of enterprise systems projects and the 
role of consuhants in such implementation. It 
examines the integrated business processes of an 
enterprise, and the concepts of developing data 
models, business objects, and event-process 
chains. Students develop implementation plans 
for enterprise systems software. The course will 
also discuss the configuration procedures in 
implementing enterprise systems software. The 
goal of the course is to prepare the students to 
become consultants in enterprise systems. 



FINANCE 
Faculty 

Satyajit Ghosh, Ph.D., Chair 
Frank P. Corcione, Ph.D. 
Riaz Hussain, Ph.D. 
loannis N. Kallianiotis, Ph.D. 
HongV. Nguyen, Ph.D. 
lordanis Petsas, Ph.D. 
Murli Rajan, Ph.D. 
Edwatd M. Scahill, Ph.D. 
Susan Trussler, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The practitioner in finance must be famil- 
iar with the tools and techniques available 
and, given the resources and constraints of 
organizations and the general economic envi- 
ronment in which the organization operates, 
be adept at efficiently managing the fiscal 
resources of the organization, including the 
raising of funds and their short-term and 
long-term investment. Career opportunities in 
finance include: 

Banking - Bank Examiner, Trust Officer 

Investments — Financial Analyst, Security 
Broker 

Corporate — Financial Analyst, Working 
Capital Management 

Minor in Finance 

18 credits consisting of ECO 153, 154, 
351, FIN 351 and two upper level Finance 
courses (from FIN 361, 362, 470, 471, 472 
and 475.) 



3 cr. Course Descriptions 



FIN 351 3 cr. 

Introduction to Finance 

(Prerequisites: junior standing, ECO 153-154 or 
101, ACC 252 or 253, or permission of the 
instructor) This course introduces students to 
the field of finance. Topics include time value of 
money, risk analysis, basic operation of the capi- 
tal markets, current asset and liability analysis, 
and introduction to the topics of capital budget- 
ing and cost of capital calculation. 

FIN 361 3 cr. 

Working Capital Management 

(Prerequisite: FIN 351) This course is designed 
to provide advanced study in the financial-man- 
agement area through detailed analysis of finan- 
cial statements, liquidity crises, cash optimiza- 
tion, credit analysis, banking arrangements, loan 
contracts, commercial paper and the use of 
money market. (FIN 361 and EMT 461 are 
offered jointly.) 

FIN 362 3 cr. 

Investments 

(Prerequisite: FIN 351) An introduction to the 
theory and process of managing investments. 
Topics include practical operation of the equity 
markets, debt options and fiitures markets. 
Stock-valuation models using ftindamental tech- 
nical and random-walk approaches. 

FIN 470 3 cr. 

Capital Investment and Structure 

(Prerequisite: FIN 351) Advanced study in the 
"permanent" financial aspects of the firm, 
including capital-budgeting models, optimal- 
replacement processes, abandonment, leasing, 
cost of capital, capital structure, mergers and 
acquisitions, and bankruptcy. 

FIN 471 3 cr. 

Derivative Securities 

(Prerequisite: FIN 362) This course looks at the 
nature of derivative securiries, focusing on 
options. It develops pricing models for options, 
emphasizing the Black-Scholes model. The use 
of options in various investment strategies is dis- 
cussed in terms of risk and return. Students use 
real-time data to implement these strategies. 

FIN 472 3 cr. 

Portfolio Management 

(Prerequisite: FIN 362) Advanced study of pro- 
fessional management of various portfolios 
including those of banks, insurance companies, 
pension hands, and non-profit institutions. 
Markowitz and Sharpe models, data availability, 
and computerized-data services are covered. 



Kania School/Finance 22 1 



Finance Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WKYG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECP 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


16-17 


1 
16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 251-252 


Financial Accounting I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT3 


Free Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


ECO 361-362 


Intermediate Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


FIN 361 


Working Capital Management 




3 


MAJOR 


FIN 362 


Investments 




3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


FIN351-MKT351 


Intro, to Finance-Intro, to Marketing 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351-OIM352 


Intro, to Mgt. Science-Intro, to Open Mgt. 3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Ind. Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




18 


18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


ECO 460-FIN ELECT 


Monetary & Fin. Eco.-Fin. Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


FIN 470-FIN ELECT 


Capital Investment and Struaure-Fin. El 


ec. 3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM 471 


Business Information Management 




3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Policy & Strategy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanides Elecrive 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Educadon 


1 
13 


1 
16 






TOTAL: 133-135 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Optio7is on page 205. 


- IfEDUC 1 13 is required in the first semester, it is taken in place of a humanities elective and is counted i 


IS a GEfree elective. 


One GEfiee elective in 


the fourth year must then be taken as a humanities elective. 






-' If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 







FIN 473 3 cr. 

Financial Institutions 

(Prerequisite: ECO 362) The study of financial 
markets and financial institutions, including 
depository and nondepository institutions. Topics 
include regulation, operation, and management 
of financial institutions, financial instruments, 
interest-rate principles, risk-management strate- 
gies, loan analysis, and asset/liability manage- 
ment. Insurance and pension principles and 
investment banking are covered. 



FIN/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Finance 

(Prerequisites: ECO 351, FIN 351) This course 
deals with the environment of international 
financial management, foreign-exchange risk- 
management, multinational working-capital 
management, international financial markets 
and instruments, foreign-investment analysis, 
and management of ongoing operations. It also 
exposes students to a wide range of issues, con- 
cepts, and techniques pertaining to international 
finance. 



222 Kania School/International Business 



INTERNATIONAL 
BUSINESS 

Susan Trussler, Ph.D., Program Director 
See Economics for faculty listing. 

Overview 

The major in International Business is an 
interdisciplinary program designed for those 
Business students who seek an understanding 
of the complex world within which multina- 
tional corporations, national and international 
agencies, and individuals interact. In the 
twenty-first century all business activities are 
becoming more and more international in 
nature; it is imperative that those who wish to 
succeed in this international setting have a 
clear understanding not only of the theory and 
practice of the core business disciplines, but 
also of their interaction with the geographic, 
cultural, and political environments within 
which multinational corporations operate, and 
international trade and investment occur. This 
major is designed to prepare students who 
wish to work in the international arena - 
either overseas or in the United States. 

Course Descriptions 

ECO/IB 351 3cr. 

(D) Environment of International Business 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154, junior standing) 
This course introduces the student to the field of 
international business, including the economic, 
social, and political environments of international 
trade and multinational corporations. Inter- 
national institutions and agencies that impact on 
international business are discussed and practical 
aspects of these topics are emphasized. 

ECO/IB 375 3 cr. 

International Economics 

(Prerequisites: ECO 153-154 or ECO 351 or 
permission of the instructor) This course 
explains the rationale for international trade and 
gains from trade and discusses various trade poli- 
cies. Topics covered in the course include: com- 
parative advantage, free trade and trade restric- 
tions (tariffs, quotas, etc.), the trade policy of 
the United States, exchange rates and their 
determinants, balance-of-payments analysis, and 
the significance of multinational corporations. 



ACC/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Accounting 

(Prerequisites: ACC 252 or 254, ECO 351) This 
course is designed for both accounting and non- 
accounting majors with an interest in global 
accounting issues. The environmental influences 
on accounting development, the reporting stan- 
dards for selected countries, financial statement 
analysis, and taxation and managerial accounting 
issues for multi-national business entities are 
examined. 

FIN/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Finance Management 

(Prerequisites: ECO 351, FIN 351) This course 
deals with the environment of international 
financial management, the foreign-exchange-risk 
management, the multinational working-capital 
management, the international financial markets 
and instruments, foreign investment analysis, 
and the management of ongoing operations. It 
also exposes students to a wide range of issues, 
concepts, and techniques pertaining to interna- 
tional finance. 

MGT/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Management 

(Prerequisites: ECO, MGT 351) Focuses on 
fiinctional strategies of multinational corpora- 
tions (MNCs), structure and control systems of 
MNCs, and comparative management. Specific 
MNC strategies to be covered include entry, 
sourcing, marketing, finance, human resources 
and public affairs. Study of structure and control 
systems includes corporate structure and head- 
quarters-subsidiary relationships. Study of com- 
parative management systems focuses on nature 
of management systems and practices in differ- 
ent cultures. 

MKT/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Marketing 

(Prerequisites: MKT 351, ECO 351) Analysis of 
the marketing strategies of multinational corpo- 
rations with emphasis on the internal environ- 
ment of country markets. Discussions will 
include comparisons of different regional mar- 
kets along socioeconomic, political and cultural 
lines. Different types of international market 
barricades and the corresponding market-entry 
strategies will be analyzed. Additional readings 
from international publications will be required. 

IB 476 3 cr. 

U.S. -East Asia Trade and Investment 

(Prerequisite: ECO 351) This course describes 
and analyzes trade and investment flows between 



Kania School/International Business 223 



International Business Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. Spr.Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Principles of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120^ 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Foreign Language Electives 


3 


3 


GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 253-254 


Financial-Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 




3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT' 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT' 


Foreign Language Eleaives 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


IB ELECTA 


Advanced IB Electives 




6 


BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MKT351-FIN351 


Intro, to Marketing-Intro, to Finance 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM 351-OIM 352 


Intro, to Mgt. Science-Intro, to Oper Mgt. 3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Ind. Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Regional/Global Electives 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


IB ELECTA 


Advanced IB Electives 


6 


6 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Policy & Strategy 


3 




BUS CORE 


OIM 471 


Business Information Management 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECTA 


Regional/Global Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT'.' 


Free Electives 


(3) 


(3) 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Educarion 


1 
13 (16) 


1 
13 (16) 






TOTAL: 130-132 (136-138) CREDITS' 


' See note on Math Op 


•tions on page 205. 


^ IfEDUC 113 is required, it is taken in place of PHIL 


120. cm 104 is then moved to the spring of the first year. 


PHIL 120 


will be taken in the second year. 








^ If a third math course is required, GE electives are movi 


•dfrom the fourth to the second year. The NSCI 


sequence is 


moved to 


the fourth year. 










^ Four of the five functional international business courses 


1 and two electives from IB 476, 477. 490, ECO 366. 465 


or the the 


fifth functional IB course. 








' For students requiring EDUC 1 13 and a third math course, 6 additional credits are needed to complete 


the foreign 


-language 


requirement. 










* Global Studies electives include GEOG 134 (recommen 


dedj, PS 212, PS 213, T/RS 314. Regional Studies electives are courses 


that focus on specific 


countries or regions of the luorld (not U.S.J, including adture courses taught in a foreign language. 



the U.S. and Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan. 
Topics covered in the course include: economic 
trends in these countries, U.S. trade and invest- 
ment with them, U.S. trade deficit, trade poUcies 
of the U.S. and these countries, analysis of Japan's 
KEIRETSU, Koreas CHAEBOL, China's MFN 
status and Taiwan's environmental problems. 



IB 477 3 cr. 

European Business 

(Prerequisite: ECO/IB 351) This course intro- 
duces the student to the European business envi- 
ronment, focusing on the implications for inter- 
national business operations and competitiveness. 
This includes the study of rapidly changing busi- 
ness environments in Central and Eastern 



224 Kania School/Management 



Europe (CEE) as well as the nations of the Euro- 
pean Union (EU). The elimination of barriers to 
trade, and the response of companies inside and 
outside the EU to the threats and opportunities 
of the Single Market are examined. 

IB 495 3 cr. 

European Business Experience 

(Prerequisites: MGT 351, MKT 351, ECO/IB 
351) Students will have an opportunity to partic- 
ipate in lecture-discussion sessions with top-level 
executives from various multinational corpora- 
tions, local business firms and government agen- 
cies in a number of different countries in Europe. 
Participants will gain a basic understanding of 
the issues prominent in international business 
today. Course involves travel to Europe. (MGT 
495, MKT 495 and IB 495 are offered jointly) 



MANAGEMENT 
Faculty 

Gerald Biberman, Ph.D., Chair 
Alan L. Brumagim, Ph.D. 
Cynthia W. Cann, Ph.D. 
Satya P. Chattopadhyay, Ph.D. 
Jafor Chowdhury, Ph.D. 
Irene Goll, Ph.D. 
Robert L. McKeage, Ph.D. 
Delia A. Sumrali, D.B.A. 
Len Tischier, Ph.D. 
John M. Zych, D.B.A. 

Overview 

Management involves getting things done 
through people. The Management major pro- 
vides students with a broad-based, generalist 
background that is designed to provide gradu- 
ates with the skills and tools needed to cope 
successfully with the challenging roles and 
expectations that are sweeping through organ- 
izations. "Getting things done" involves ana- 
lyzing, designing and continuously improving 
an organization's structure and processes. 
"Through people" involves leading, motivat- 
ing, and working effectively with other people 
in teams and other settings. Management 
courses use a variety of teaching techniques 
that involve a high degree of student/ faculty 
interaction-including experiential exercises, 
student presentations, simulations and team 
activities-to develop self- analytic skill, team 
and communication skills. Students working 



with their faculty and advisors can choose 
from a variety of courses to design a program 
of study that will prepare them to enter a 
variety of positions in private industry and 
other organizations. 

Minors in Management 

Management of Structures and Systems: This 
minor focuses on the skills a successful man- 
ager needs to plan, organize, maintain, and 
improve an organization's structures and sys- 
tems. The student will take MGT 351, 352, 
460, 461, 462 and any upper-level manage- 
ment elective except MGT 455. 

Management of People and Teams: This 
minor focuses on the skills a successful man- 
ager needs to meet the management chal- 
lenges of people and teams in today's work- 
place. The student will take MGT 351, 352, 
361, 362, 471 and any upper-level Manage- 
ment elective except MGT 455. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



MGT 161 
Introduction to Business 

Nature, types and principles of business. 
Overview of business functions - finance, mar- 
keting, production, accounting, and manage- 
ment - in an analytical framework. Attention to 
business environment: legal, governmental, 
social and ethical. Enrollment is restricted to 
Associate Business Degree students. Non-Busi- 
ness students may take this course as a free elec- 
tive with the permission of the dean of Dexter 
Hanley College. 

MGT 210 3cr. 

Business and the Environment 

Interdisciplinary course integrates management, 
marketing and operations management. The 
course emphasizes the centrality of environmen- 
tal issues to corporate strategy, and approaches 
businesses are taking to respond to environmen- 
tal issues. It is designed for students from various 
disciplines to learn from each other without hav- 
ing had business courses. Business majors may 
use this course only to fulfill a free elective. 

MGT 251 3cr. 

Legal Environment of Business 

The nature, sources, formation, and applications 
of law. Judicial function, court system, litigation 
and other methods of resolving disputes. Legisla- 
tion-law from judicial decisions, law by adminis- 
trative agencies, regulation of business activity, 
antitrust law, consumer protection, environ- 



Kania School/Management 223 



Management 


Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


34 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECP 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE PSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 253-254 


Financial-Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 251 


Legal Environment of Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210-T/RS 122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT' 


Free Elective 


18 


3 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


MGT ELECP 


Mgt. Elective 




3 


MAJOR 


MGT ELECT' 


Mgt. Elective 




3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-Il 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MKT351-FIN351 


Intro, to Marketing-Intro, to Finance 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351-OIM352 


Intro, to Mgt. Science-Intro to Oper Mgt. 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO 351 /IB 351 


Environment of Ind. Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RST ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




15 


15 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


MGT ELECT* 


Mgt. Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MGT ELECT 


Mgt. Electives 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Policj' & Strategy' 


3 




BUS CORE 


OIM 471 


Business Information Management 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elecrive 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Eleaives 


3 


6 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 






TOTAL: 130-132 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205. 


^ IfEDUC 1 13 is required in the first semester, it is taken ir, 


! place of a humanities electit>e and is counted as a GEfret 


? elective. 


One GEfiree elective in 


the fourth year must then he taken 


as a humanities elective. 






' If a third math course i: 


r required, it repLices this GE elective. 






•* In consultation with their advisors, management majors should choose two of the following fi)ur fiycus courses; MGT 361, 362, 


460 or 461. MGT 361 and 362 focus more on people skills; MGT 460 and 461 focus more on organizational and adminis- 


trative processes. 











merit, and pollution control. Tort, criminal and 
insurance law, property rights for both personal 
and real property. Business organization, princi- 
ple of agency, partnership and corporation. 

MGT 351 3cr. 

Principles of Management I 

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) Survey course 
examines key aspects of organizations and their 
management - dynamic environments, organiza- 



tion design and structure, roles/functions of 
managers, managing technology and change, 
global management, and alternative types of 
organizations. This course examines the expand- 
ing role of the manager from planning, organiz- 
ing, controlling and directing, to the knowledge 
and skills involved in managing and working 
with a diverse workforce. 



226 Kania School/Management 



MGT 352 3 cr. 

Principles of Management II 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) Survey course exam- 
ines the individual in the work setting, working 
with a variety of people inside and outside the 
organization. This course deals with such issues 
as motivation, leadership and communication 
diversity at the work place, and with individual 
effectiveness, interpersonal relations, and group 
skills. 

MGT 361 3 cr. 

Human Resources Management 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) Course explains the 
flinctions of a human resources division or 
department - including job descriptions, labor 
demographics, recruitment and hiring, turnover 
and mobility, interviewing, aptitude and other 
employee testing, performance evaluation, disci- 
plinary procedures, employee health and safety, 
wage and hour administration, government regu- 
lations; and the handling of absenteeism, alco- 
holism, and drug addiction. (MGT 361 and 
EMT 463 are offered jointly.) 

MGT 362 3 cr. 

Employee-Management Relations 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) This examines 
employee-management practices in contempo- 
rary society, employee participation in unions, 
and their spill-over effect on nonunion settings. 
Course topics include unions, the collective-bar- 
gaining process, wages and benefits, seniority, 
grievance procedures, and arbitration. Discrimi- 
nation in employment and equal-employment 
opportunity will be discussed, as well as future 
issues in union and nonunion settings and inter- 
national employee-management relations. 

MGT 455 3 cr. 

Business Policy and Strategy 

(Prerequisites: Senior standing, FIN 351, OIM 
352, MGT 352, MKT 351) This is the capstone 
course for all Business majors. Concepts and 
skills developed in the prerequisite courses are 
integrated and applied to the overall manage- 
ment of an organization. Topics will include set- 
ting objectives, designing strategic plans, allocat- 
ing resources, organizational structuring and 
controlling performance. 

MGT 460 3 cr. 

Organization Theory 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) Study of the forces 
both within and outside the organization that 
determine the structure and processes of an 
organization. Topics to be covered will include 



technology and size- influences, conflict, bound- 
ary roles, matrix structure, political factors, and 
sociotechnical systems. 

MGT 461 3 cr. 

Managing Through Systems and Quality 

(Perquisite: MGT 351) Systems theory provides 
a powerfiil way to understand work organizations: 
as interacting, inter-dependent systems. Manag- 
ing effectively through systems involves working 
with vision, with empowered, growing people 
with a customer orientation, with good measures 
and analysis, and with a continuous improvement 
culture. This course will focus on these quality 
management approaches that form the under- 
pinning of tomorrow's management practices. 

MGT 462 3 cr. 

Project Management in Organizations 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) This course will exam- 
ine advanced project-management concepts from 
all phases of the project lifecycle (from require- 
ments-specification through post-project assess- 
ment). Special emphasis will be placed on 
understanding projects within the context of 
complex organizational settings by utilizing an 
open-systems perspective. Linkages with more 
permanent administration structures within the 
organization will be reviewed. (OIM 462 and 
MGT 462 are offered jointly.) 

MGT 471 3 cr. 

Group Dynamics 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351 or permission of 
instructor) Survey of constructs, research and 
applications of small group phenomena in an 
organizational contest. Examines theories, 
research measurements and observational meth- 
ods used in studying groups. Students will be 
able to explore their own behavior in groups by 
participating in various groups and/or by observ- 
ing others in group experiences. The course will 
prepare students to be effective in groups. 

MGT 472 3 cr. 

Women and Men in Management 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) This course explores 
the opportunities for women in management 
and the special skills and insights needed by 
women to take full advantage of such opportuni- 
ties. It will focus on the effects of having men 
and women as colleagues in the workplace and 
the problems that may ensue. Topics to be cov- 
ered include sexual harassment, the dual-career 
family and male/female socialization. 



Kania School/Marketing 227 



MGT 473 3 cr. 

Organizational Social Responsibility 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351 or permission of the 
instructor) This course introduces students to 
basic concepts underlying the social responsibil- 
ity aspect of the management process. The role 
of pluralism is examined in the societal system 
to provide an understanding of the evolving rela- 
tionship between organizations and society as a 
whole. The managerial approach is explored in 
the light of the increasing importance of societal 
impact on the organization. 

MGT 474 3 cr. 

(D)Managing a Multicultural Workforce 

This course addresses the skills and knowledge 
managers must develop to deal with an increas- 
ingly culturally diverse workforce. Specific topics 
to be covered include diversity in ethnicity, 
nationality, religion, culture, gender, age, sexual 
orientation and disability. The course will help 
students interact and work with people different 
from themselves and to understand their own 
cultural values, biases and behaviors. 

MGT/IB 475 3 cr. 

International Management 

(Prerequisites: ECO, MGT 351) Focuses on 
fianctional strategies of multinational corpora- 
tions (MNCs), structure and control-systems of 
MNCs, and comparative management. Specific 
MNC strategies to be covered include entry, 
sourcing, and marketing, finance, human 
resources and public affairs. Study of structure 
and control systems includes corporate structure, 
headquarters-subsidiary relationships. Study of 
comparative management systems focuses on 
nature of management systems and practices in 
different cultures. 

MGT 495 3 cr. 

European Business Experience 

(Prerequisites: MGT 351, MKT 351, ECO/IB 
351) Students will have an opportunity to par- 
ticipate in lecture-discussion sessions with top- 
level executives from various multinational cor- 
porations, local business firms, and government 
agencies in a number of diflPerent countries in 
Europe. Participants will gain a basic under- 
standing of the issues prominent in international 
business today. Course involves travel to Europe. 
(MGT 495, MKT 495, and IB 495 are offered 
jointly.) 



MARKETING 
Faculty 

Gerald Biberman, Ph.D., Chair 
Alan L. Brumagim, Ph.D. 
Cynthia W. Cann, Ph.D. 
Satya P. Chattopadhyay, Ph.D. 
Jafor Chowdhury, Ph.D. 
Irene GoU, Ph.D. 
Robert L. McKeage, Ph.D. 
Delia A. Sumrall, D.B.A. 
Len Tischler, Ph.D. 
John M. Zych, D.B.A. 

Overview 

Marketing is "people-oriented," focusing 
on the interaction between the firm and its 
market (buyers). The marketer explores major 
needs to develop new products and to posi- 
tion them so that buyers see their relevance. 
Marketing majors are introduced not only to 
the visible marketing tools: products, sales- 
people, and the various selling and promo- 
tional techniques, but also to less visible mar- 
keting functions: marketing research and the 
firm's interactions with wholesalers and retail- 
ers. The student will develop both the quanti- 
tative and qualitative skills needed to succeed 
in a real business environment. 



Course Descriptions 



3cr. 



MKT 351 

Introduction to Marketing 

(Prerequisites: junior standing, ECO 153-154 or 
ECO 101) This course introduces the student to 
the field of marketing. An overview of the prin- 
ciples on which the discipline is founded. The 
marketing concept is presented as the framework 
under which the decisions related to marketing- 
mix variables (product, place, price and promo- 
tion) are made by organizations. 

MKT 361 3 cr. 

Marketing Research 

(Prerequisite: MKT 351) Study of the role of 
marketing information as the basis for deci- 
sion-making. Topics include research design, 
methods of gathering data, questionnaire 
structure, interviewing methods and prepar- 
ing the final report. 



228 Kania School/Marketing 



Marketing Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 


Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 


Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT- 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










BUS CORE 


ACC 253-254 


Financial-Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 


Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 


Legal Environment of Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECTA 


Free Elective 


18 


3 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


MKT361 


Marketing Research 




3 


MAJOR 


MKT 362 


Consumer Behavior 




3 


BUS CORE 


MKT351-FIN351 


Intro, to Marketing-Intro, to Finance 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 


Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351-OIM352 


Intro. Mgt. Science-Intro. Oper. Mgt. 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of Intl. Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


3 




15 


15 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


MKT 470-476 


Mkt. Communications-Mkt Strategy 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


MKT ELECT 


Mkt. Electives 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 


Business Policy & Strategy 


3 




BUS CORE 


OIM 471 


Business-Information Management 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 


6 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


16 


16 






TOTAL: 130-132 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Opti 


ons on page 205. 


UfEDUC 113isreqm> 


■ed in the first semester, it is taken in place of a humanities elective and is counted 


as a GEjree elective. 


One GE five elective in 


the fourth year must then be taken 


as a humanities elective. 






^ If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE electh 


ve. 







MKT 362 3 cr. 

Consumer Behavior 

(Prerequisite: MKT 351) Study of theories of 
consumer behavior. The buyer is analyzed at the 
individual level in terms of motivation, attitudes, 
etc. and at the social level in terms of influence 
on buying behavior from the socio-economic 
environment. 



MKT 370 3 cr. 

Interactive Marketing 

(Prerequisite: MKT 351) This course examines 
the integration of evolving interactive technolo- 
gies in the design and implementation of mar- 
keting programs. The use of information tech- 
nology infrastructure to support the execution of 
conception, pricing, promotion and distribution 
of ideas, goods and services has the potential of 
making the marketing process more efFicient and 
productive. (EC 370 and MKT 370 are offered 
jointly.) 



Kania School/Operations and Information Management 229 



MKT 370 3 cr. 

Interactive Marketing 

(Prerequisite: MKT 351, junior standing) This 
course focuses on the integration of state-of-the- 
art interactive technologies in the design and 
implementation of marketing programs. The 
functions of market identification benefit 
immensely from the capabilities of the rapidly 
developing information technology (IT) infra- 
structure. (MKT 370 and EC 370 are offered 
jointly.) 

MKT 460 3 cr. 

Customer Support Systems 

(Prerequisites: EMT 351, MKT 351) An inter- 
disciplinary approach to enterprise management 
that focuses on the customer is emphasized. The 
objective of the course is to orient enterprise- 
wide decision making to successful customer- 
relationship management on an ongoing basis. 
(MKE 460 and EMT 460 are offered jointly) 

MKT 470 3 cr. 

Marketing Communications 

(Prerequisite: MKT 351) Personal and mass com- 
munication approaches generated by manufactur- 
ers and intermediates or institutions toward tar- 
get markets. The design of advertising campaigns 
to shift consumer attitudes, to secure resellers' 
support and to inform, persuade, and move them 
to action. Development of copy selection and 
media and measurement of promotion effective- 
ness including evaluation of sales force. 

MKT 471 3cr. 

Sales Force Management 

(Prerequisites: MGT 352, MKT 351) This course 
develops the concepts and techniques needed to 
identify and analyze the various decision areas 
faced by a sales-force manager. Topics include 
recruiting, selecting and training the sales force; 
forecasting, budgeting and sales quotas; assigning, 
motivating and compensating the sales force. 



MKT 472 

Retailing Management 

(Prerequisites: MGT 352, FIN 351, OIM 351) 
This course focuses on the decision areas facing 
retail managers, including retailing, structure, 
merchandising, locations, store layout, promo- 
tion, pricing and personnel. 

MKT/IB 475 3 cr. 

(D) International Marketing 

(Prerequisites: MKT 351, ECO 351) Analysis of 
marketing strategies of multinational corpora- 
tions with emphasis on the internal environment 
of country markets. Discussions include compar- 



isons of different regional markets along socio- 
economic, political and cultural lines; different 
types of international market barricades and cor- 
responding market-entry strategies. 

MKT 476 3 cr. 

Marketing Strategy 

(Prerequisite: MKT 351) The theme of this 
course is building effective marketing strategies 
through integrated decision-making. Emphasis is 
on different decision models within functional 
areas such as demand analysis, consumer research, 
product and promotion management, etc. 

MKT 495 3 cr. 

European Business Experience 

(Prerequisites: MGT 351, MKT 351, ECO/IB 
351) Students will have an opportunity to partic- 
ipate in lecture-discussion sessions with top-level 
executives from various multinational corpora- 
tions, local business firms, and government agen- 
cies in a number of different countries in Europe. 
Participants will gain a basic understanding of 
the issues prominent in international business 
today. Course involves travel to Europe. (MGT 
495, MKT 495, and IB 495 are offered jointly.) 



OPERATIONS AND 

INFORMATION 

MANAGEMENT 

Faculty 

Prasadarao Kakumanu, Ph.D., Chair 

Ying I. Chien, Ph.D. 

S. Kingsley Gnanendran, Ph.D. 

Deborah J. Gougeon, Ph.D. 

Satyanarayana V. Prattipati, Ph.D. 

Rose Sebastianelli, Ph.D. 

Nabil A. Tamimi, Ph.D. 



3 cr. Overview 



Operations and Information Management 
is primarily concerned with the effective man- 
agement of production and operations sys- 
tems in manufacturing and service organiza- 
tions. Career opportunities include: 

Manufacturing 
V.P. Manufacturing 
Production Manager 
Materials Manager 
Inventory Analyst 
Warehouse Manager 
Plant Manager 



230 Kania School/Operations and Information Management 



Quality Control Manager 
Production Planning Analyst 
Purchasing Manager 
Shipping Specialist 

Services 

V.P. Operations 
Operations Manager 
Supplies Specialist 
Buyer or Purchasing Agent 
Store Manager 
Customer Service Manager 
Warehouse Manager 
Inventory Analyst 

Minor in Operations Management 

A student must take a minimum of 18 
credits. Five courses are required: STAT 252, 
OIM 351, OIM 352, OIM 470 or OIM 366, 
and OIM 471 plus one other OIM course. 



Course Descriptions 



3 cr. 



STAT 251 

(Q) Statistics for Business I 

(Prerequisite: MATH 107 or 114) Detailed cov- 
erage of descriptive statistics. An introduction to 
the elements of probability theory (including 
Hayes's theorem) and decision theory, and index 
numbers. The major discrete and continuous 
probability distributions are covered with an 
emphasis on business applications. Data analysis 
will be done using appropriate software. 

STAT 252 3 cr. 

(Q) Statistics for Business II 

(Prerequisite: STAT 251; corequisite: C/IL 104) 
A survey of inferential statistical methods cover- 
ing sampling distributions, interval estimation, 
hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests, analysis 
of variance, regression and correlation analysis, 
and non-parametric statistics. Data analysis will 
be done using appropriate software. 

STAT 253 3 cr. 

Statistics for Economics 

(Prerequisite: MATH 107 or 114) Coverage of 
statistical tools to analyze economic data. Topics 
include measures of central tendency, dispersion, 
probability distributions, index numbers, time 
series analysis, regression and correlation, and 
analysis of variance. Data analysis will be done 
using appropriate software. 



OIM 351 3cr. 

Introduction to Management 

(Prerequisites: C/IL 104, STAT 251) A survey of 
the quantitative methodology used to solve deci- 
sion problems by modern businesses. Topics 
include linear programming methods, waiting 
line models, project scheduling, and simulation. 
Emphasis is placed on model building and analy- 
sis using spreadsheet software. 

OIM 352 3 cr. 

Introduction to Operations Management 

(Prerequisites: OIM 351, STAT 252) A ftinc- 
tional view of how to manage the activities 
involved in the process of converting or trans- 
forming resources into products or services. Top- 
ics include an overview of strategic decisions, 
forecasting, product design, process planning, 
facility layout, basic inventory models, capacity 
planning, aggregate planning and scheduling. 

OIM 353 3 cr. 

Business Process Overview 

This is the first course in the area of Enterprise 
Management. Students will learn to appreciate 
the integration of a company's core business 
processes. Students will be exposed to the main 
business processes that drive an organization, the 
interactions within and between them, and the 
effect of integration on the decision-making 
environment. This course uses an enterprise- 
wide integrated information-systems software 
and simulated data for a model company. (EMT 
351 and OIM 353 are offered jointly.) 

OIM 363 3 cr. 

Quality Management 

(Prerequisite: STAT 252) The philosophy of 
Total Quality Management (TQM) and issues 
concerning its implementation are studied, cov- 
ering the approaches of well-known leaders in 
the field, e.g., Deming. Topics include employee 
empowerment, quality-improvement tools, 
cross-functional teams, leadership for quality, sta- 
tistical-process control, process capability, 
Taguchi methods, ISO 9000 standards, and the 
role of inspection in quality management. 

OIM 366 3 cr. 

Supply Chain Management 

(Prerequisite: OIM 471 or permission of instruc- 
tor) Many companies view Supply Chain Man- 
agement as the core of their business strategy. 
Student will learn how principles of Supply Chain 
Management integrate into the management of 
the enterprise and the business processes. Students 
will examine the use of information technologies 



Kania School/Operations and Information Management 231 



Operations 


and Information 


Management Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 












GE S/BH 


ECO 153-154 




Prin. of Micro-Macro Economics 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 




Introduaion to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE cm 


C/IL 104 




Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT' 




Math Option (two courses) 


3-4 


3-4 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECTA 




Humanities Eleaive 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar-Physical Education 


1 


1 




16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 












BUS CORE 


ACC 253-254 




Financial-Managerial Accounting 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


STAT 251-252 




Statistics for Business I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT251 




Legal Environment of Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS 122 




Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 




Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 




Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ELECP 




Free Elective 


3 






18 


18 


Third Year 












MAJOR 


OIM 353 




Business Process Overview 


3 




MAJOR 


OIM 363 




Total Quality Management 


3 




BUS CORE 


MGT 351-352 




Principles of Management I-II 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MKT351-FIN351 




Intro, to Marketing-Intro to Finance 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


OIM351-OIM352 




Intro, to Mgt. Science-Intro, to Oper Mgt. 3 


3 


BUS CORE 


ECO/IB 351 




Environment of Int'l Business 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 




Philosophy or T/RS Elective 


15 


3 
15 


Fourth Year 












MAJOR 


OIM 470 




Production Planning and Control 


3 




MAJOR 


OIM 366 




Supply Chain Management 




3 


MAJOR 


MAJOR ELECT 




Major Electives'' 


3 


3 


BUS CORE 


MGT 455 




Business Policy & Strategy 


3 




BUS CORE 


OIM 471 




Business Information Management 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 




Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 




Free Eleaives 


3 


6 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 




Physical Education 


1 


1 




16 


16 








TOTAL: 130-132 CREDITS 


' See note on Math Options on page 205- 




UfEDUClldisre, 


quired in the first semester, it is 


taken in place of a humanities elective and is counted i 


« a GEfree elective. 


One GEfree elective in the fourth year must then i 


he taken 


as a humanities elective. 






' If a third math course is required, it replaces this GE elective. 






* Major eleaives: twt 


) OIM courses, EC 472, or MGT 462. 









in Supply Chain Management. Computer soft- 
ware will be used to gain hands-on experience. 
(OIM 366 and EC 470 are offered jointly.) 

OIM 462 3 cr. 

Project Management in Organizations 

(Prerequisite: MGT 351) This course will exam- 
ine advanced project-management concepts from 
all phases of the project lifecycle (from require- 
ments-specification through post-project assess- 
ment). Special emphasis will be placed on 
understanding projects within the context of 



complex organizational settings by utilizing an 
open-systems perspective. Linkages with more 
permanent administration structures within the 
organization will be reviewed. (OIM 462 and 
MGT 462 are offered jointly.) 

OIM 470 3 cr. 

Production Planning and Control 

(Prerequisite: OIM 352) This course is con- 
cerned with the study of production planning 
and control activities in an enterprise resource- 
planning context. Topics include forecasting, 



232 Kania School/Operations and Information Management 



aggregate planning, capacity planning, master 
production scheduling, material requirements 
planning, production activity control, purchas- 
ing, inventory models, and Just-in-Time Sys- 
tems. The interactions between operations and 
the other functional areas of the business will be 
emphasized. 

OIM 471 3 cr. 

Business Information Management 

(Prerequisite: C/IL 104) Computers and how 
they can be applied to the operations and man- 
agement of business firms. Topics include data- 
processing concepts, overviews of computer 
hardware and software, modern data- and infor- 
mation-processing systems, applications of com- 
puters in business, acquiring and managing of 
computer and information resources. Software 
packages will be used to gain hands-on experience. 

OIM 472 3 cr. 

Electronic Business and Entrepreneurship 

(Prerequisites: EC 361, EC 362) The course 
examines the issues related to the starting of new 



technology-based businesses. It focuses on entre- 
preneurial traits, idea generation, entry strate- 
gies, marketing plans and development of busi- 
ness plans. Venture capital and other forms of 
financing will also be covered. In addition there 
will be a discussion on legal and intellectual 
properties issues. (OIM 472 and EC 472 are 
offered jointly.) 

OIM 473 3 cr. 

Business Applications of Communication 
Networks 

(Prerequisite: OIM 471) Students explore the use 
of computer and telecommunication networks to 
achieve organizational goals. Topics include data 
communications; planning and design of com- 
munication networks; data integrity, independ- 
ence and security; client-server computing; global 
communication; the Internet; applications of 
telecommunication networks and current issues 
and Riture trends. (OIM 473, EC 473, and AIS 
483 are offered jointly.) 



233 



The Panuska College 
OF Professional Studies 



The Panuska College of Professional Studies prepares students in a 
wide range of professions, principally in allied health and education. The 
College has been designed with the conviction that all disciplines should 
be taught and understood through a balance of theory and practice. An 
exclusively theoretical understanding of a discipline is incomplete. 
Practice for which there is no understood context is of limited value. It is 
this belief that structures the College's pedagogy and curriculum. Panuska 
College students receive exemplary preparation for the profession of their 
choice, and a solid education in the liberal arts and sciences. In addition, 
students perform community service annually as a requirement for grad- 
uation. In this way, the service aspects of their prospective careers can be 
understood in personal and comprehensible terms. Such an ethic has 
roots in antiquity, is Catholic and Jesuit in tradition and spirit, and 
responsive to contemporary needs. All of the College's programs are 
accredited by the appropriate professional organizations. 



234 Panuska College/Counseling and Human Services 



COUNSELING AND 
HUMAN SERVICES 

Faculty 

Oliver J. Morgan, Ph.D., Chair 

Lori Ann Bruch, Ed.D. 

Thomas M. Collins, Ph.D. 

Lee Ann M. Eschbach, Ph.D. 

David W. Hall, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth J. Jacob, Ph.D. 

Ann Marie Toloczko, Ph.D., Program Director 

Overview 

The Counseling and Human Services cur- 
riculum is designed to develop in students the 
values, knowledge and skills necessary to work 
with people in a variety of settings and situa- 
tions. The sequence of courses focuses on 
understanding normal and abnormal human 
adjustment across the lifespan and on devel- 
oping skill in interventions designed to maxi- 
mize human adjustment and development. 
Core requirements in the major emphasize 
values, knowledge and skills common to all 
fields of human services, while electives allow 
students to develop competence in assisting 
specific populations. A 3-credit, 120-hour 
internship experience is required of all majors, 
with a second, 3-credit internship available as 
an elective. 

Students must maintain a minimum grade 
of C in all major courses and cognate courses, 
and full-time students must complete a mini- 
mum of 10 hours of community service dur- 
ing each fall and spring semester registered as 
a Counseling and Human Services major. 
Dexter Hanley College students will meet the 
service-learning requirement by completing 
major courses that have a service-learning 
component. They will not be required to 
complete additional service-learning hours. 

The curriculum is geared toward students 
who have high social-science interests as well 
as general scientific interest and aptitude in 
the social and behavioral sciences. The cur- 
riculum prepares students for entry-level posi- 
tions in a variety of human-services positions 
in private or public settings, or for graduate 
study in counseling, social work, or related 
social or behavioral science professions. 

Recent graduates have pursued master's 
degrees in social work; community, rehabilita- 



tion or school counseling; occupational ther- 
apy; art therapy; human resources administra- 
tion; audiology and law. They have attended 
the University of Pennsylvania, Fordham Uni- 
versity, New York University, Rutgers, Hunter 
College, Adelphi University and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Concentration in Rehabilitation Services 

The Counseling and Human Services cur- 
riculum has expanded to ofi^er a concentration 
in rehabilitation services to enhance the 
knowledge and practice for work with persons 
with disabilities in response to an increasing 
need for baccalaureate-level professionals in 
rehabilitation services. Through a concentra- 
tion in rehabilitation services, students will be 
prepared to work in state and local agencies 
that are responsible for the vocational, mental- 
health, job-development and coaching, and 
related needs of persons with disabilities. 
Included in this concentration can be an 
emphasis on persons with addiction and sub- 
stance-abuse disabilities. This concentration is 
for Counseling and Human Services majors 
only. 

Combined Baccalaureate/Master's 
Program 

Outstanding Counseling and Human Ser- 
vices majors are eligible for consideration in 
this program (please refer to the catalog sec- 
tions on Special Programs or The Graduate 
School and to the Graduate School Catalog for 
specifics of the program). Community Coun- 
seling, Rehabilitation Counseling and School 
Counseling are graduate programs available 
for students of high academic quality and 
clear professional goals. Each graduate pro- 
gram is nationally accredited, and the Depart- 
ment of Counseling and Human Services is 
recognized regionally and nationally in Coun- 
selor Education. Three faculty received the 
Outstanding Counselor Educator Award for 
the state of Pennsylvania. 

Pastoral Studies Track 

The Departments of Counseling and 
Human Services and Theology/Religious 
Studies are offer Pastoral Studies track. The 
program is incorporated into the 131-credit 
B.S. in Counseling and Human Services and 
the 1 30-credit B.A. in Theology/Religious 
Studies. Students in the interdisciplinary pro- 
gram pursue a formal curriculum that 



Panuska College/Counseling and Human Services 235 



includes interdisciplinary team-taught courses, 
experiential learning via an internship in pas- 
toral studies and a capstone seminar to inte- 
grate professional experiences. The program is 
an excellent opportunity for students inter- 
ested in pursuing advanced training in pas- 
toral services. 

Completion of this program will be noted 
on the Counseling and Human Services 
major's transcript. The student must either be 
pursuing a double major or a minor in Theol- 
ogy/Religious Studies. Students are required 
to complete the following courses specific to 
the program: CHS 439 Psychology and Spiri- 
tuality; CHS 380 Internship in Pastoral Stud- 
ies; and HADM 284 Pastoral Studies Cap- 
stone Seminar. 

Minor in Counseling and Human 
Services 

A minor in Counseling and Human Services 
requires CHS 111, 112, 241, 242, 341 and 
one CHS elective course. 

Course Descriptions 

CHS 111 3 cr. 

(S) Introduction to Human Adjustment 

Introduction to human adjustment throughout 
the lifespan. Focuses on discrimination of nor- 
mal and abnormal behavioral and emotional 
responses to developmental life stages and to 
common developmental concerns. 

CHS 112 3cr. 

Human-Services Systems 

Examines the human-services systems and institu- 
tions which have evolved as a response to human 
need. Explores both the effect of social problems 
on individuals and families and the service sys- 
tems designed to alleviate such problems. Includes 
service-learning component. 

CHS 241 3 cr. 

(D) Case Management and Interviewing 

The role of the human-service professional as a 
case manager or coordinator of services is exam- 
ined. Initial interviewing skills and techniques 
are discussed with an emphasis on case concep- 
tualization, problem identification, goal selec- 
tion, evaluation, and follow-up. Includes service- 
learning component. 

CHS 242 3 cr. 

Counseling Theories 

The role of the human-services professional as 
an individual counselor or caseworker is exam- 



ined. Theories and techniques as well as prob- 
lems in individual counseling are explored. 

CHS 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

Courses developed to provide in-depth coverage 
of specific topics in human services. Course title 
will be provided in advance of registration. May 
be used only twice to satisfy major or minor 
elective requirement. 

CHS 293 3 cr. 

(W) Research Methods in Human Services 

An introduction to research methodology as 
applied to problems in human-services agencies 
and settings. Specific topics include descriptive, 
experimental, and quasi-experimental research 
methods. Emphasis is placed on development of 
the student's ability to be a critical consumer of 
research in human services. 

CHS 321 3 cr. 

Physical Disabilities 

Selected physical conditions and/or disabling 
conditions are examined with particular empha- 
sis on body systems involved, treatment possibil- 
ities, residual fianction limitations, and psycho- 
logical impact of each condition. 

CHS 322 3 cr. 

Cognitive Disabilities 

Etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment and 
prevention of cognitive disabilities are presented. 
This course examines both student and societal 
beliefs concerning persons with cognitive disabil- 
ities. The implications of living with cognitive 
disabilities will be explored and the impact of 
disability culture as a means to facilitate the 
empowerment of children and adults with cog- 
nitive disabilities will be presented. 

CHS 323 3 cr. 

Psychiatric Rehabilitation 

An examination of the problems associated with 
mental and emotional disturbances. Emphasis is 
placed on contemporary modalities of rehabilita- 
tion as they relate to community mental-health 
programs, and innovative non-medical treatment 
approaches. Critical issues in mental health will 
be discussed. 

CHS 331 3 cr. 

Health and Behavior 

Focuses on stress which affects thoughts, emo- 
tions, and the body. Stress diseases of adaption 
include cancer. Type A Behavior, GI tract disor- 
ders along with stress-related thought disorders 
and emotional disturbances. Students learn to 



236 Panuska College/Counseling and Human Services 



Counseling and Human Services Curriculum 


m 


!■■ 


Pircf Vf»ar 


Department atid Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


1. iloL 1.V.C1J. 

MAJOR 


CHS 1 1 1 


Intro, to Human Adjustment 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 112 


Human Service Systems' 




3 


COGNATE{GE S/BH) 


PSYC 1 10 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 ■ 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 . 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHS 241 


Case Mgt. and Interviewing' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 242 


Counseling Theories 




3 


MAJOR 


CHS 293 


Research Methods 




3 .: 


GE S/BH 


PSYC 221 


Childhood and Adolescence 


3 




COGNATE 


PSYC 222 


Adulthood and Aging 




3 


GE QUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Elective 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Eleaives 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


CHS 333 


Multiculturalism in H.S.' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 340 


Career Seminar 


1 


: 


MAJOR 


CHS 341 


Group Counseling' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 380 


Internship 




3 


MAJOR 


CHS ELECT 


Counseling and Human Services Electives 


6 


6 


COGNATE 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


I 


1 


17 


16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


CHS 441 


Crisis Intervention' 


3 




MAJOR 


ELECT 


Counseling and Human Services Electives 




3 


COGNATE 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Electives 


6 


6 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 


6 
15 


6 
15 






TOTAL: 131 CREDITS 


' Includes service- learning 


component. 








To avoid duplication of course content, Counseling and Human Services majors should not take PSYC 225 (Abnormal Psychol- 


ogy). PSYC 224 (Personality). PSYC 330 (Research Methods), or PSYC 360 (Clinical Psychology). Students 


who wish . 


to declare 


a double major or a minor in Psychology should consult their 


advisors. 







Panuska College/Counseling and Human Services 237 



apply relaxation, cognitive restructuring and 
record-keeping in the treatment of their own as 
well as others' health. 

CHS 332 3 cr. 

Career Development 

Explores theories of career choice and adjust- 
ment. Emphasis will be placed upon methods 
and resources for facilitating career development 
throughout the life span. Career education, 
computerized information systems, and deci- 
sion-making methods will be considered along 
with innovative approaches for placement of 
special-needs populations. 

CHS 333 3 cr. 

(D) Multiculturalism in Human Services 

Focuses on current social and cultural issues in 
human services and related fields. Human devel- 
opment in a multicultural society will be exam- 
ined and the basic objectives and dimensions of 
multicultural intervention will be defined. Stu- 
dent self- awareness of values, attitudes, and 
beliefs will be emphasized. Includes service-learn- 
ing component. 

CHS 334 3 cr. 

Marital and Family Counseling 

Theories of family counseling will be presented 
with specific attention to the structural and 
strategic approaches. A variety of family-counsel- 
ing techniques and stages will be learned 
through the use of role play and videotaping. 
The utilization of family counseling will be dis- 
cussed. (Also listed as HD 234.) 

CHS 335 3 cr. 

Administration in Himian Services 

Focuses on the development of skills and knowl- 
edge related to program and organizational devel- 
opment, and community-wide planning in human 
services. Topics include organizational theory 
applied to human-service settings, consultation, 
supervision, planning. Rinding and training. 

CHS 336 3 cr. 

Recreational Therapy 

Designed to develop an understanding of pur- 
pose, organization, administration and delivery of 
recreational-therapy services for the handicapped. 

CHS 337 3 cr. 

(W, D) Counseling Girls and Women 

This course is designed to explore the topic of 
counseling girls and women in a sociocultural, 
historical, and multicultural context. Through 
the examination of the history of women (e.g., 
social construction of gender, identity) from a 



self-in-relation foundation, and feminist counsel- 
ing and its role in de-pathologizing the impor- 
tance of relationships to girls and women will be 
explored. 

CHS 338 3 cr. 

Poverty, Homelessness and Social Justice 

Focuses on developing an understanding of the 
social, historical and political dimensions of 
poverty and homelessness in the U.S. and 
explores the implications for distributive justice. 
Students assess the effectiveness of the social 
policies and programs created to combat poverty 
and homelessness, and participate in course- 
required service learning and social action proj- 
ects. Includes service-learning component. 

CHS 340 1 cr. 

Career Seminar 

(Majors only; prerequisite for CHS 380) 
Designed to introduce the student in the Coun- 
seling and Human Services curriculum to coun- 
seling, hiunan development and human-services 
occupations. Short- and long-term goals are 
examined in preparation for employment or fur- 
ther study. 

CHS 341 3cr. 

Group Dynamics 

A basic understanding of group dynamics and 
individual behavior in groups is presented. Meth- 
ods of developing and organizing group pro- 
grams are stressed. Students participate in a 
group experience. Includes service-learning compo- 
nent. 

CHS 342 3 cr. 

Foundations of Rehabilitation 

Students will develop sensitivity, appreciation 
and understanding of what it means to have a 
disability. Topics covered will include federal, state 
and community mandates, independent-living 
concepts, and the basic principles of rehabilita- 
tion. A comprehensive review will occur of the 
variety of rehabilitation programs. Ethical deci- 
sion-making will be integrated into the course 
and students will learn to practice with cultural 
sensitivity. Site visits to rehabilitation agencies 
and applied experiences will be provided. 

CHS 343 3 cr. 

Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of 
Disabilities 

Students will acquire knowledge and understand- 
ing of the medical, fianctional and psychosocial 
aspects of a wide array of disabilities. The empha- 
sis will be hoUstic and person-centered. Curricu- 



238 Panuska College/Counseling and Human Services 



Counseling an 


id Human Services Concentration 






in Rehabilitation Services Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


CHS 111 


Intro, to Human Adjustment 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 112 


Human Service Systems' 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


CHS 241 


Case Mgt. and Interviewing' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 242 


Counseling Theories 




3 


MAJOR 


CHS 293 


Research Methods 




3 


COGNATE(GE S/BH) 


PSYC 221 


Childhood and Adolescence 


3 




COGNATE 


PSYC 222 


Adulthood and Aging 




3 


GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Elective 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


Third Year 






18 


18 


MAJOR 


CHS 333 


Multiculturalism in H.S.' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 340 


Career Seminar 


1 




MAJOR 


CHS 341 


Group Counseling' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 342 


Foundations of Rehabilitation 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 343 


Med. & Psychosoc. Aspects of Disability 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 344 


Vocational Education 




3 


MAJOR 


CHS ELECT 


Counseling and Human Services Electives 


3 


6 


COGNATE 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Elective 




3 


GE PHED 
Fourth Year 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


17 


16 


MAJOR 


CHS 440 


Job Development 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 441 


Crisis Intervention' 


3 




MAJOR 


CHS 480 


Internship in Rehabilitation Services 




3 


MAJOR 


CHS ELECT 


Counseling and Human Services Electives 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


CHS ELECT 


Counseling and Human Services Electives 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/Behavioral Eleaives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 


3 , 
15 15 

1 CREDITS 






TOTAL: 13 


' Includes service-learning 


component. 








To avoid duplication of course content. Counseling and Human Services majors should not take PSYC 225 (Abnormal Psychol- 


ogy). PSYC224 (Personality Theories). PSYC 330 (Research Methods), or PSYC 360 (Clinical Psychology). 







Panuska College/Counseling and Human Services 239 



lum components include learning medical termi- 
nology, the use of medical information and dis- 
cussion of psychosocial aspects of disability. Stu- 
dents will have the opportunity to interact with 
persons with disabilities. 

CHS 344 3 cr. 

Vocational Evaluation 

This course focuses on the theme of assessment 
and employment of individuals with disabilities. 
Students will discover the impact of the Rehabil- 
itation Act Amendments of 1998 and the ADA 
on employment concerns of persons with dis- 
abilities. Students will compile and utilize assess- 
ment information such as prior records, test 
results, work samples and situational assessment. 

CHS 380 3 cr. 

Internship in Human Services 

(Prerequisite: CHS 340) The internship is a sig- 
nificant clinical and educational experience. It 
provides both a supervised practical experience 
in the student's field and an opportunity to inte- 
grate knowledge and skills. Students will spend a 
minimum of 120 hours in the field placement. 
Offered only during the spring semester; prereq- 
uisite for CHS 481. 

CHS 421 3 cr. 

Addictions 

An integrated biophysical model of addition and 
recovery is described. Approaches to assessment, 
treatment and relapse prevention are covered. 

CHS 422 3 cr. 

Substance-Abuse Education 

Design, implementation, and evaluation of sub- 
stance-abuse education and prevention programs. 

CHS 423 3 cr. 

Legal and Health Aspects of Substance 
Abuse 

Legal and health consequences of substance abuse 
are examined. Special attention is given to the role 
of family dynamics, recovery process, dual disor- 
ders and ethics in the counseling process. 

CHS 439 3 cr. 

Psychology and Spirituality 

This course will assist students in understanding 
various models of spirituality and their potential 
integration into the counseling process. Critical 
reflection on a variety of diverse spiritual perspec- 
tives and their implications for human services 
practice is encouraged. Current research in the 
area of spirituality and counseling is examined. 



CHS 440 3 cr. 

Job Development 

An awareness of the changing world of work will 
be the backdrop for job analysis, labor-market 
surveys; vocational adjustment, job development 
and job placement. Students will be exposed to 
both traditional and current models of employ- 
ment for individuals with disabilities. Coordina- 
tion of services with collaborating agencies (e.g., 
social, financial and vocational) will be included. 
Rehabilitation technology and adapted computer 
applications will be emphasized. 

CHS 441 3 cr. 

Crisis Intervention 

Theory and practice of crisis intervention as 
applied to common crisis situations such as sui- 
cide, battering, violent behavior, post-traumatic 
stress disorder, substance abuse, sexual assault, and 
personal loss. Includes service-learning component. 

CHS 480 3 cr. 

Internship in Rehabilitation Services 

(Prerequisite: CHS 340) The internship is 
specifically designed for students in the Rehabili- 
tation Services concentration. Students will 
spend a minimum of 1 50 hours in their field 
placement. The internship provides a practical 
experience in the rehabilitation field and an 
opportunity to integrate course knowledge. The 
internship will be offered in the spring semester 
of the student's fourth year. 

CHS 481 3 cr. 

Internship in Human Services 

(Prerequisite: CHS 380) This advanced intern- 
ship in Counseling and Human Services involves 
1 50 hours in a community agency or organiza- 
tion providing human services. It allows the stu- 
dent to explore a different type of organization 
or experience within an organization. This 
internship may be taken during any regular aca- 
demic semester including intersession and sum- 
mer and may be completed outside of the imme- 
diate University region. Approval of program 
director is required. 



240 Panuska College/Education 



EDUCATION 

Faculty 

Deborah Eville Lo, Ph.D., Chair 
Donna Bauman, Ph.D. 
Joseph M. Cannon, M.Ed. 
Barbara Cozza, Ph.D. 
Anthony DeCarh, Ed.D. 
Joseph A. Fusaro, Ed.D. 
Thomas W. Gerrity, Ed.D. 
Patrice Gross, Ed.D. 
TimothyJ. Hobbs, Ph.D. 
Nancy J. Kolodziej, Ed.D. 
Tata J. Mbugua, Ph.D. 
Kathleen K. Montgomery, D.Ed. 
Ivan A. Shibley, D.Ed. 
Gloria T Wenze, Ed.D. 
David A. Wiley, Ed.D. 

Overview 

The Department of Education endeavors 
to contribute to the improvement of educa- 
tion by preparing informed, inquiring, and 
skilled professionals who, as scholars and deci- 
sion-makers, are prepared for positions in the 
educational community. More specifically, the 
department aims to provide persons with a 
breadth and depth of knowledge and under- 
standing in their specialized areas of profes- 
sional practice and to provide training to 
ensure competence in the specific area of 
functioning. To this end, individual program 
competencies have been developed. Addition- 
ally the Department endeavors to offer oppor- 
tunities for continued professional grovvT:h to 
practicing educators, to assist in the educa- 
tional growth and development of the com- 
munity served by the University, and to foster 
the advancement of knowledge through 
research in education. 

The Department of Education offers 
degrees in Early Childhood, Elementary and 
Special Education, each leading to certifica- 
tion. Secondary Education concentrations 
lead to certification in: 

Biology General Science 

Chemistry German 

Citizenship Latin 

Communication Mathematics 

English Physics 

French Spanish 



Elementary Education leads to state certifi- 
cation (Pennsylvania, K-6) and Early Child- 
hood Education (pre-K-3). 

The department's programs are accredited 
by the Pennsylvania Department of Educa- 
tion. The University's Professional Education 
Unit is also accredited by the National Coun- 
cil for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 
Accreditation and interstate agreements 
between Pennsylvania and selected states 
assure that courses taken will be considered 
for certification in most states. Praxis Series I 
& II tests are required for Pennsylvania 
Teacher Certification. Students are accepted 
to the University as Education Majors, but 
progress beyond 48 credits may occur only 
upon application for Teacher Candidate sta- 
tus. Materials necessary for the application 
process include teacher recommendations, 
completion of specific courses, and passing 
scores on the appropriate Praxis Series I tests 
as might be required by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. Completing the 
application process will admit the education 
major to Teacher Candidacy and permit the 
student to engage in junior-level course work. 
Materials necessary for the application are 
available from the Education Department and 
the CPS Advising Center. 

A student may enter the Secondary Educa- 
tion program either as a major in Education 
or as a major in an academic department with 
a second major in the Education Department. 
However, in both cases the student must be 
approved by the department and follow the 
prescribed courses if the student desires certi- 
fication. Registration into Education Depart- 
ment courses numbered 230 and above are 
limited to majors or second majors in the 
programs of the Education Department. 
Exceptions require the expressed permission 
of the assistant dean and chair of the depart- 
ment. All aspects of the state-approved pro- 
gram must be completed to ensure recom- 
mendation for certification. 

Double majors, including both a subject area 
and Education, may be arranged in the case of 
exceptional students. These must be approved 
by both departments involved and by the col- 
lege dean. A specific program will be designed 
in each individual case. Double-certification 
programs may also be arranged with the 
approval of the appropriate program directors. 

Education majors are evaluated regularly at a 
meeting of the Education Department faculty 



Panuska College/Education 24 1 



to assess each individual students continuing 
potential to become a teacher. This determina- 
tion is based on academic and personal qualities 
consistent with the competencies stated in The 
Education Student Handbook (available from 
the Education Department Web site). The aca- 
demic standard of the Education Department 
is established by the laws of the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania and the regulations of 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 
For first-year students entering the University 
in the academic year 2003-04, the GPA stan- 
dard is 3.0. This standard applies to each of 
three GPA calculations: (1) overall; (2) educa- 
tion major course only, and 3) teaching area 
courses. Additionally, a grade of C or better is 
required in all major and teaching-area courses 
to student-teach and to elicit a recommenda- 
tion for certification. Students whose profes- 
sional development is unsatisfactory are subject 
to departmental probation and may be recom- 
mended to the dean of the college for dismissal 
from the Education program. The department's 
probation policy and other information are 
presented in The Education Student Handbook. 
All Education majors are required to perform 
10 hours of community service per academic 
year. The service hours for freshman, sopho- 
more and junior Education majors are nor- 
mally performed in a semester opposite the 
required field experience of that academic year. 
The service hours for senior education majors 
are performed as part of the students' profes- 
sional development during their senior stu- 
dent-teaching experience. Secondary Education 
majors perform 20 hours of service in their 
freshman year and have no service requirement 
for their sophomore year. 

Additionally, as a matter of University pol- 
icy, all Education majors are required to sub- 
mit a completed Act 34 clearance and the 
Pennsylvania Child Abuse History Clearance 
to the Education Department prior to being 
placed at any field experience site that would 
put them in direct contact with children. This 
clearance is collected by the University on 
behalf of the school entity wherein the field 
experience will occur. Completed clearances 
should be submitted with field-experience 
information forms required by the Director of 
Field Placement. In no case will a student be 
provided with placement information previ- 
ous to the director's receipt of the completed 



forms. The completed clearance forms may be 
delivered to the school entity by the Educa- 
tion Department after the clearance form is 
obtained by the student. The University will 
not maintain a student's Act 34 clearance 
form or background check after delivery of 
the clearance form to the school entity 
wherein the field experience will occur. 

Due to new Pennsylvania Department of 
Education mandate, changes in teacher edu- 
cation programs may require changes to cur- 
ricular requirements for all of the education 
programs. The following outline presents the 
criteria for admission into candidacy for certi- 
fication after the student has completed at 
least 48 semester hours. 

Education Certification Candidacy 
Track — Admission to Teacher 
Education Programs fi)r Freshmen 
Entering in or afier Fall 2002 

1 . Verification of at least 48 semester hours 
that include the required 6 semester 
hours of mathematics and the required 6 
semester hours of English. 

2. Verification of a 3.0 GPA or higher. 

3. Official ACT 34/151 clearances. 

4. Completion of the following courses, 
with a minimum grade of C in teaching 
area and major courses: 

EDUC 121 Foundations of Education 
EDUC 180 Field Experience I 
EDUC 280 Field Experience II 
ENLT 103 Children's Literature 
(Secondary Education 
majors may substitute any 
ENLT literature course) 
WRTG 107 Composition 
Three semester credit hours of mathematics 
that must include one of the following:* 

MATH 204 Special Topics of Statistics 
PSYC210 Statistics in the Behavioral 

Sciences 
EDUC 120 Apphed Statistics 
PS 240 Political Science Statistics 

S/CJ215 Statistics for the Social 

Sciences 
Three semester credit hours of mathematics 
that must include one of the following:* 
MATH 1 06 Quantitative Methods 
MATH 201 Algebra and Environ- 
mental Issues 



' Requirements may differ for students pursuing certification in mathematics or the sciences. 



242 Panuska College/Education 



5. Passing scores on the Praxis Series I 
examinations. 

6. Completed recommendations from 
faculty in the following courses: 

EDUC 121 Foundations of Education 
EDUC 180 Field Experience I 
EDUC 280 Field Experience II 

Freshman and sophomore students will 
confer with their academic advisors in order 
to plan the sequence of courses that will be 
taken for each term. Entering freshmen will 
be given the new program requirements prior 
to orientation. All the courses mentioned 
above will be a part of the new programs. 

Federal regulations in the Higher Education 
Act of 1998 require that departments of teacher 
education report their students' performance on 
the Praxis Series examinations. An analysis of 
the results fom the most recent academic year is 
available from the Chair of the Department of 
Education. 

Course Descriptions 

The following courses are not available to stu- 
dents matriculating during or after fall 2001: 
EDUC140, EDUC 242. EDUC 344, EDUC 
345, EDUC 346, EDUC 347, EDUC 351, 
EDUC 352, EDUC 451. 

The Education Department ordinarily does 
not permit students to take courses concurrently 
with the student-teaching sequence. Students 
seeking deviations from this policy must complete 
a form requiring the approvals of the advisor, 
the appropriate program director, the depart- 
ment chairperson, and the dean. Student teach- 
ing requires application, which must be submit- 
ted to the appropriate advisor and approved by 
the program director, prior to registration for the 
student teaching semester Completed ACT 34 
and Child Abuse History Clearance forms are 
required previous to receiving a field assignment. 

EDUC 110 3cr. 

Values Development 

A course designed to acquaint the student with 
theories relating to value development: what val- 
ues are, and how they are formed. The affective 
process, value systems, activities for value-devel- 
opment suitable for use by parents, teachers and 
others involved in human relations will be cov- 
ered. Open to all majors. 



EDUC 113 3cr. 

Reading- Research 

A course designed to increase a student's profi- 
ciency in reading and research. The following 
skill areas will be covered: comprehension, 
vocabulary, expression, critical analysis, library 
and study skills. Students will be required to 
develop minimum computer competencies. Lec- 
ture and laboratory approaches are utilized with 
the emphasis on individualized instruction. 

EDUC 120 3 cr. 

(Q,W) Applied Statistics 

(Prerequisite: WRTG 107) This course is 
designed to enable students to use statistics to 
solve problems and to communicate clearly the 
procedures employed and the results obtained. 
Students will be required to perform statistical 
computations and to write as a means of learn- 
ing the course material. Topics covered include 
hypothesis testing, correlation, t-test and Chi- 
square test. 

EDUC 121 3 cr. 

The Foundations of Education 

This course is designed to examine the character- 
istics of the public school system in the United 
States, the role of education in contemporary 
society, and current issues related to education. 

EDUC 131 3 cr. 

(D) Experiencing Cultural Diversity through 
Children's Literature 

A course designed to introduce students to the 
diversity of cultures represented in children's lit- 
erature as a way to identify and differentiate the 
variety of cultures that they may encounter as 
teachers. 

EDUC 180 1 cr. 

Field Experience I 

(Pre- or co-requisite: EDUC 121) This course 
prepares for field-experience requirements in 
EDUC 280 and 380. It focuses on the develop- 
ment of observation and reflective skills through 
case studies, vignettes and video situations. 
Application required. 

EDUC 222 3 cr. 

Educational Psychology 

(Prerequisite: Psych 110) This course examines 
the psychological basis of teaching strategies, 
classroom environment, learning, motivation, 
reinforcement, and evaluation. 



Panuska College/Education 



Early Childhood Education Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FdlCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


ENLT 103 


Children's Literature 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH 106-ELECT 


Quantitative Methods F-Stats Elective 


3 


3 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fund, of Psychology 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar'-Physical Education' 


1 


1 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing & Information Literacy 


17 


3 
16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 222 


Educational Psychology 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 280-241 


Field Experience II-Foundations of Readin 


g' 1 


3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 256-THTR 1 10 


Family & Comm Rel-Intro to Theater 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


HIST 110 


History of the United States 


3 




GE NSCI 


PHYS 102 


Earth Science 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 122 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology II 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 251 


Development of Early Learner 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYC221 


Childhood & Adolescence 




3 


GE ELECT 


GEOG 134 


World Reg. Geography 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education"" 


1 




17 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 380 


Field Experience III 


1 




MAJOR 


EDUC 356-354 


ECE LA/SS/ARTS'-Math/Sci/Health 


4 


4 


MAJOR 


EDUC 341-252 


Educ of Exceptional Child-Assess in ECE 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 342-343 


Ed Media & Tech-Eval & Meas. 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 362-NURS 100 


Psycholinguistics-Family Health 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE NSCI 


NSCI 201 


Science in Human Environment 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education' 


1 




17 


17 


Fourth Yeaf* 










MAJOR 


EDUC 440 


Professional Practice Seminar 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 456 


Student Teaching, Planning 


2 




MAJOR 


EDUC 457 


Student Teaching, Instruction 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 458 


Student Teaching, Management 


2 




MAJOR 


EDUC 459 


Student Teaching, Prof Dev. 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 




6 


GE ELECT 


ECON410 


Economics for Educators 




3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 


13 


6 
18 






TOTAL: 133 CREDITS 


' Includes service-learning component. 








^ May be replaced by i 


MATH 201. 








3 PHED - 1 credit in 


Movement and Dance required. 








'' ■* Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 







244 Panuska College/Education 



Elementary 


Education Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


ENLT 103 


Children's Literature 




3 


GEQUAN 


QUAN ELECT 


Quantitative Methods F-Stats Elective 


3 


3 


GE ^X^lTG-SPCH 


WKYG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fund, of Psychology 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-ELECT 


Freshman Seminar'-Physical Education^ 


1 


1 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE C/CIL 


C/IL 102 


Computing & Information Literacy 


17 


3 
16 


Second Year 










MAfOR 


EDUC 222-244 


Educ Psychology-Plan Effect Elem Instr. 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Experience II 


1 




MAJOR 


EDUC 241 


Foundations of Reading' 




3 


GE NSCI 


PHYS 102-NSCI 201 


Earth Science-Sci. in Human Env. 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-PHIL 210 


Intro to Philosophy-Ethics 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE HUMN 


HISTllO-ELECT 


History of the United States-Hum Elective 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYC221 


Childhood & Adolescence 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education^ 


1 




17 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 348'-349 


Math/Sci. Methods-LA/SS Methods 


4 


4 


MAJOR 


EDUC 380 


Field Experience III 


1 




MAJOR 


EDUC 341 


Education of the Exceptional Child 




3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 343-362 


Eval. & Measurement-Psycholinguistics 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 342 


Education Media & Technology 


3 




COGNATE 


NURS 100 


Family Health 


3 




GE ELECT 


PS 135-GEOG 134 


State & Local Govt.-World Reg Geog 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education' 




1 


17 


17 


Fourth Year* 










MAJOR 


EDUC 440 


Professional Practice Seminar 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 441 


Student Teaching, Planning 


2 




MAJOR 


EDUC 442 


Student Teaching, Instruction 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 443 


Student Teaching, Management 


2 




MAJOR 


EDUC 444 


Student Teaching, Prof Dev.' 


3 




COGNATE 


THTRUO 


Intro to Theater 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


COGNATE 


ECON 410 


Economics for Educators 




3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 


13 


6 
13 






TOTAL: 130 CREDITS 


' Includes service-learning compotzent. 








-' May be replaced by MATH 201. 








' PHED - 1 credit in 


Movement and Dance required. 








■* Semesters may he reversed at the discretion of the department. 







Panuska College/Education 245 



EDUC 226 3 cr. 

Secondary, Transitional and Vocational Services 
The role of the special-education teacher in 
designing and implementing transitional and 
vocational services for the disabled student. 
Emphasis is placed upon the role of the special- 
education professional as an advocate for the dis- 
abled in accessing school, community, state, and 
federal resources. 

EDUC 241 3cr. 

Foundations of Reading Instruction 

A basic course in reading. It provides an intro- 
duction to reading-instruction, reading programs, 
and the reading process as it relates to language 
acquisition and learning to read. The readiness, 
reading skills, techniques and methods which are 
essential for effective reading will be examined. 

EDUC 242 3 cr. 

Mathematics Methods for Elementary Teaching 

The course provides the Elementary Education 
major with planning and instructional strategies 
appropriate for use in the mathematics area of 
elementary curriculum. An analysis of content 
will be made in light of the needs of the elemen- 
tary student and society. 

EDUC 244 3 cr. 

Planning Effective Elementary Instruction 

(Prerequisite: EDUC 222) This course prepares 
the elementary major with the research-based 
tools and strategies required to prepare lesson 
and long-term planning, consistent with best 
practice, for exemplary instruction in the class- 
room. Particular attention will be paid to align- 
ment of objectives and assessment consistent 
with the Pennsylvania Academic Standards. 

EDUC 251 3cr. 

Development of the Early Learner 

This course will be focus on the development of 
the early learner, birth through age eight. Psycho- 
motor, affective and cognitive development, as 
well as special-needs children, will be studied. 
Theory to practice linkages will be stressed. An 
observation component is part of the course 
expectation. 

EDUC 252 3 cr. 

Assessment in Early Childhood Education 

(Prerequisites: EDUC 140 and 251) This course 
will focus on strategies, methods, and instru- 
ments for assessing the early learner's develop- 
ment in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affec- 
tive domains. Theory-to-practice linkages will be 
stressed. An observation component is part of 
the course expectation. 



EDUC 256 3 cr. 

Family and Community Relations 

This course prepares the ECE teacher with the 
strategies and communication skills necessary to 
build positive relationships with colleagues 
within the school and agencies in the larger 
communities that can contribute to the well- 
being of each student in order to realize the full 
developmental potential of each child. 

EDUC 258 1 cr. 

Assessment Practicum 

(Co-requisite: EDUC 265) Students will obtain 
hands-on experience in the assessment of special- 
needs students and adults. 

EDUC 265 3 cr. 

SPED Educational Assessment 

This course will focus on the strategies, meth- 
ods, and instruments for assessing the disabled 
student's development in the cognitive, psy- 
chomotor, and affective domains. Theory-to- 
practice linkages will be stressed. An observation 
component is part of the course expectation. 

EDUC 267 3 cr. 

Learning Disabilities 

This course provides an introduction to learning 
disabilities. Definitions, current theories, etio- 
logical bases, and educational management of 
students with learning disabilities and/or hyper- 
activity and attention deficit are emphasized. 

EDUC 280 1 cr. 

Field Experience II 

(Prerequisites: EDUC 121 and 180; pre- or co- 
requisite: EDUC 222) The course is closely asso- 
ciated with Educ 222. Projects will be assigned 
to be carried out in basic education schools and 
other agencies through observation, tutoring, 
and oral/written reports. Completed ACT 34 
and Child Abuse. Application required. 

ED/P 306 3 cr. 

(P) Philosophy of Education 

(Formerly ED/P 106) An examination of repre- 
sentative modern systemic philosophies of edu- 
cation with a critical analysis of the answers that 
each system of philosophy provides to the 
important questions concerning the nature of 
knowledge, value, man, and society. 

EDUC 310 1-3 cr. 

Special Topics in Education 

A series of courses dealing with specific educa- 
tional issues, theories, ideologies, skills, methods, 
or other designated topics for individual or 



246 Panuska College/Education 





Secondary Education (Biology) 


Curriculum^ 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAIOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 




1 


COGNATE 


BIOL 141-142 


General Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


CHEM 112-113 


General Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 






19 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Experience II 


1 




COGNATE 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


BIOL 349 


Plant Physiology 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH 114 


Analysis I 


4 




GE NSCI 


PHYS 102 


Earth Science 




3 


GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT/ELECT 


Literature/Humanities Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


GE S/BH 


EDUC 222 


Educational Psychology 




3 ^ 


GE ELECT 


STAT ELECT 


Statisrics Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


3 






18 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 314 


Specific Subject Methods' 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 380 


Field Experience III 


1 




COGNATE 


BIOL 250 


Microbiology 


5 




COGNATE 


BIOL 370 


Animal Behavior 




4.5 


COGNATE 


BIOL 375 


Evolution 


3 




COGNATE 


BIOL 361 


Molecular Bio 




5 


GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


BIOL 273/473 


Marine or Estuarine Ecol 


18 


3 
18.5 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Sec. Ed 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Sec. Ed. 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Sec. Ed. 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Sec. Ed.' 




3 


GEHUM 


HUMN 


Humanities Elect 




3 


COGNATE 


BIOL 371 


Ecology 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE NSCI 


PHYS 120 


General Physics 


4 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


Eleaive 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


2 





15 



16 



TOTAL: 138.5 CREDITS 

' Includes se>-vice-leaniirig component. Freshman Seminar service committnent is 20 hours, with no service requirement in 
sophomore year. 

-' For a second major in Biology, an additional 6.5 credits in Biology, Organic Chem 2321 and 233L, Physics 121 and 121 L 

and 4 elective credits in Chemistry, Math or Physics are required. 
-' Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 



Panuska College/Education 247 



group study. Course is offered in accord with 
student need. 

EDUC312 3cr. 

The Secondary School Mathematics 
CurriciiJum 

(Co-requisite: EDUC 313) This course examines 
the strategies and content of mathematics curric- 
ula in the secondary school and attempts to com- 
pare them to major contemporary reform efforts. 
The course includes a review of secondary-school 
(junior and senior high school) mathematics. 

EDUC 313 3cr. 

General Methods and Planning 

(Prerequisite: EDUC 222; pre- or co-requisite 
for EDUC 380) Methodology for setting direc- 
tion in the classroom, creating a learning situa- 
tion, developing the content, reinforcing and 
evaluating will be covered. Students will be 
involved with developing plans for teaching. 

EDUC 314 3cr. 

Specific Subject Methods 

(Prerequisite: EDUC 313) Utilizing knowledge 
of planning and teaching, students will be 
guided in the analysis of specific content and 
techniques for teaching that content. They will 
demonstrate their ability to carry out plans in 
"micro" teaching experiences. 

EDUC 340 3 cr. 

Reading in the Secondary School 

This course is the study of the reading process 
with emphasis placed on understanding and 
skills needed by secondary school students in 
their subject fields. 

EDUC 341 3 cr. 

The Education of the Exceptional Child 

A general view of the field; historical back- 
ground - both philosophical and legislative. A 
survey of physical, mental, and emotional handi- 
caps and of giftedness, along with remedial and 
preventive practices with a look at the future. 

EDUC 342 3 cr. 

Educational Media and Technology 

A course in which students are expected to pro- 
duce media appropriate for classroom use. The 
student is also expected to exhibit competency 
in the use of common education media equip- 
ment and the uses of computers. Students will 
also be introduced to modern and future forms 
of media technology appropriate for the class- 
room teacher. 



EDUC 343 3 cr. 

Evaluation and Measurement 

This course acquaints prospective teachers with 
the various facets of test interpretation and test 
construction. Standardized achievement, diag- 
nostic, and aptitude tests will be covered, along 
with teacher-made objective and essay tests. 
Emphasis will be placed on constructing valid 
and reliable tests by the teacher. The use and 
misuse of standardized tests and teacher-made 
tests will be discussed. 

EDUC 344 3 cr. 

Science Methods for Elementary Teaching 

This course is designed to provide the Elemen- 
tary Education major with planning and instruc- 
tional strategies appropriate for use in the sci- 
ence area of the Elementary curriculum. An 
analysis of content and methodologies will be 
made in light of the needs of the elementary 
school, the elementary student and society. 

EDUC 345 3 cr. 

Language Arts Methods 

The course is designed to provide the Elementary 
major with a knowledge of the process of a 
child's language acquisition. Planning for the 
instructional strategies used in teaching oral/writ- 
ten composition, grammar, listening, speaking, 
spelling and handwriting skills are examined. 

EDUC 346 3 cr. 

(D) Social-Studies Methods 

The course is designed to provide the Elemen- 
tary major with a knowledge of the child's needs 
in the social sciences and the humanities. Plan- 
ning for the instructional strategies used in 
teaching history, geography, and economics are 
examined. 

EDUC 347 3 cr. 

Instructional Strategies for Content-Area 
Reading 

The course is designed to introduce students to 
procedures to teach functional reading skills in 
the elementary schools. Emphasis will be placed 
on the specialized vocabularies, concepts and 
study skills which are considered necessary for 
the comprehension of reading materials perti- 
nent to content-area subjects. Various resources 
and devices will be examined. 

EDUC 348 4 cr. 

Integrated Methods: Elem Math/Science 

(Prerequisite: EDUC 244) This course is 
designed to provide the elementary education 
major with planning and instructional strategies 



248 Panuska College/Education 



necessary for exemplary science and mathematics 
instruction in both distinct and integrated meth- 
ods of delivery. An analysis of similarities and 
differences in content and standards within these 
disciplines will guide the study. 

EDUC 349 4 cr. 

Integrated Methods: Elementary Language 
Arts/Social Studies 

(Prerequisite: EDUC 244) This course is 
designed to provide the elementary education 
major with planning and instructional strategies 
necessary for exemplary language arts and social 
studies instruction in the classroom. Attention 
will be paid to those strategies that might be used 
for integrated instruction as well as instruction 
of each area as separate and distinct disciplines. 

EDUC 351 3cr. 

Methods Across the ECE Curriculum 

This course is designed to explore methods for 
integrating a primary curriculum to include 
social-studies content, literature and language 
arts, as well as the expressive arts. An integrated 
curriculum which invites children to become 
involved in a variety of creative activities and 
learning situations will be stressed. 

EDUC 352 3 cr. 

ECE Methods in Math/Science/Health 

This course will provide the education student 
with an appropriate knowledge base from which 
to design instructional sequences which integrate 
science, health and mathematics concepts for 
young learners. 

EDUC 353 3 cr. 

Math/Science/Health for Early Childhood 
Teaching 

(Pre- or co-requisite: EDUC 242 and 344) This 
course will provide individuals receiving certifi- 
cation in both Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education with an appropriate knowledge base 
from which to design instructional sequences 
which integrate science, health, and mathematics 
concepts for young learners. 

EDUC 354 4 cr. 

Integrated Methods: 
ECE Math/Science/Health 

This course, developed for the ECE Major, will 
provide instructional strategies necessary for 
instructional sequences which integrate science, 
health and mathematics content and experiences 
for young learners. 



EDUC 356 4 cr. 

Integrated Methods: Early Childhood Educa- 
tion Social Studies/Language/Expressive Arts 

This course, developed for the ECE Major, will 
provide instructional strategies necessary for 
instructional sequences which integrate language 
arts, expressive arts and social studies content 
and experiences for young learners. 

EDUC 362 3 cr. 

Psycholinguistics 

This course is designed to examine the language 
development in children as well as correlation 
between language and cognition. Particular 
attention will be given to designing educational 
environments and interactions which facilitate 
language development in children. 

EDUC 363 3 cr. 

Teaching Special Learners 

(Prerequisite: EDUC 222) This course is 
intended to introduce those aspects of students 
which would qualify them as "special needs" stu- 
dents in physical, cognitive and/or social areas. 
The course will provide strategies that will 
enable developing teachers to provide meaning- 
ful learning experiences to all students included 
in their classrooms. 

EDUC 364 3 cr. 

(D) Inclusionary Classroom Practices 

Emphasis will be placed on the special-education 
teacher as one member of an educational team. 
Students will receive guidance in supporting the 
disabled student in a general-education classroom, 
supporting the general-education teacher in pro- 
viding instruction for the disabled child, and gen- 
erally facilitating the acceptance and optimal 
learning of the disabled student in a general-edu- 
cation environment. 

EDUC 365 3 cr. 

Professional Seminar 

Focuses on the special educator as one team 
member in a larger professional group which 
may include administrators, ancillary staff, par- 
ents, and other professionals. Students will learn 
to write lEPs, transitional plans, and school- 
based grant proposals. Students will receive 
guidance in constructing a portfolio and in case 
management. 

EDUC 366 3 cr. 

Emotional/Behavioral Disabilities 

A study of the problems associated with emo- 
tional and behavioral disabilities in the class- 
room. Emphasis is placed on behavior manage- 



Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (Chemist 


ry) Curriculum'^ 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 




1 


GE NSCI 


CHEM 112-113 


General Analnical Chem I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literaq' 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH 114 


Analysis I 


4 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduaion to Philosophy 


3 




GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT 


Literature Eleaive 




3 


GE ELECT 


MATH 221 


Analysis II 




4 


FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 1 


1 




18.5 


18.5 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Experience II 




1 


COGNATE 


CHEM 232-233 


Organic Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


PHYS 140-141 


General Physics I-II 


4 


4 


COGNATE 


CHEM 240 


Inorganic Chemistry 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 




3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


EDUC 222 


Educational Psychology 


3 




GE ELECT 


MATH 222 


Analysis III 


4 




18.5 


18.5 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 314 


Specific Subject Methods' 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 380 


Field Experience III 


1 




COGNATE 


CHEM 362-363 


Physical Chemistry I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


COGNATE 


CHEM 344 


Environmental GeoChem 




3 


COGNATE 


BIOL 141 


General Biology 


3 




COGNATE 


CHEM 370 


Instrumental Analysis 




5 


GE HUMN' 


HUMN 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




18.5 


18.5 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Sec. Ed 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Sec. Ed. 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Sec. Ed. 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Sec. Ed.' 




3 


COGNATE 


CHEM 440 


Advanced Inorganic 


3 




COGNATE 


CHEM 350 


Genera! Biochem I 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Open Electives 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


2 




14 


13 






TOTAL: 


138 CREDITS 


' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar 


■ service commitment is 20 hours, with no servict 


■ requirement 


in 


sophomore year. 










- For a second major in 


Chemistry, the following are required: CHEM 330, 390, 391, 4401,493 and 494 




^ Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 







250 Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (Citizenship with History) Curriculum 



Department and Nutnber Descriptive Title of Course 



Fall Cr. Spr. Cr. 



First Year 










MAIOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


HIST 110-111 


V.S. History I-II 


3 


3 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE QUAN/STAT 


MATH ELECT-STAT ELECT Mathematics Elect-Statistics Elective 


3 


3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE NSCI 


ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 






18 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR/GE/ S/BH 


EDUC 222-280 


Educational Psych.-Field Exp. II 


3 


1 


COGNATE 


GEOG 134 


World Regional Geography 




3 


COGNATE 


HIST 140 


Craft of the Historian 


3 




COGNATE 


PS 130-131 


Am. Nat. Government I-II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT 


Literature Elective 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HIST 120-121 


European History I-II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


PS 135 


State and Local Government 


3 




GE PHED 


ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 




18 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380-314 


Field Ill-Specific Subj. Methods' 


1 


3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


COGNATE 


HIST 219 


Modern World History 


3 




COGNATE 


HIST 214 


World Politics 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


History Elective 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Minority History 


3 




GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 




3 


GE T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE ELECT 


PS 212 


International Reladons 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED 


Physical Education 


1 






17 


18 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Secondary' 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


History Electives 


6 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humanities Elective^ 


3 




GE ELECT 


ECO 410 


Economics for Education Majors 


3 




GE ELECT 


HIST 490 or 491 


Seminar in History' 


3 





18 13 

TOTAL: 137 CREDITS 

' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, with no service requiremait in 
sophomore year. 

• Humanities Electives: Stticiejits must earn 6 credits in Literature or Foreign Language with no more than 3 credits in Art or Music. 

^ Students may substitute a 300- or 400-level course with permission of the History Department Chair. 

^ Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 



Panuska College/Education 251 



ment and appropriate learning strategies for 
inclusionary general-education classes, self-con- 
tained special-education classes, and residential 
placements. 

EDUC 367 3 cr. 

Designing Curriculum for Elementary 
Special Education 

Emphasis is on the effective design and use of 
curriculum and materials to educate elementary 
students with special needs. 

EDUC 368 3 cr. 

Designing Secondary Special Education 

Emphasis is on the effective design and use of 
curriculum and materials to educate secondary 
students with special needs. 

EDUC 369 3 cr. 

Early Assessment and Intervention 

This course will focus on the development of the 
early learner, birth through age eight, along with 
appropriate assessment and intervention tech- 
niques for children falling under the IDEA. 

EDUC 380 1 cr. 

Field Experience III 

(Prerequisites: EDUC 244, 280. Pre- or co- req- 
uisite EDUC 313) This course will be closely 
associated with the methods courses. An empha- 
sis is placed on studying teaching techniques and 
involvement in teacher activities in basic-educa- 
tion schools. Application required. 

EDUC 440, 441, 442, 443 and 444 must be 
scheduled during the same semester. Collectively, 
they comprise a semester of student teaching. 

EDUC 440 3 cr. 

Professional Practice Seminar 

In-depth study of the rationale, theories, and 
techniques for creating a situation where learning 
can take place and for handling specific individual 
and group behavior problems in productive ways. 

EDUC 441* 2cr. 

Planning in Elementary Student Teaching 

Preparation of actual teaching plans during ele- 
mentary student teaching. Application required. 

EDUC 442 3 cr. 

Instruction in Elementary Student Teaching 

Involvement in implementing methods and 
techniques. Elementary-school student teaching 
on a full-time basis under the supervision of 
classroom teachers and University supervisors. 



EDUC 443 2 cr. 

Managing Elementary Classrooms in 
Student Teaching 

Involvement in the management of learning sit- 
uations during elementary student teaching. 

EDUC 444 3 cr. 

Professional Growth in Elementary Student 
Teaching 

The demonstration of professional growth dur- 
ing student teaching as evidenced by professional 
behavior and skills, a commitment to improve- 
ment, and ability to relate to others. This will 
include attendance at and participation in a 
weekly seminar to analyze and discuss professional 
considerations and student-teaching problems. 

EDUC 451* 5cr. 

Early Childhood Education Student Teaching 

This course is a high-intensity practicum a pre-K 
classroom. Assignment by the Education 
Department requires completion of an applica- 
tion process. Attendance at weekly seminars is 
also required. This course must be preceded by 
or be followed by Elementary Student Teaching 
if state certification is being pursued. A grade of 
C or higher is required for endorsement of certi- 
fication applications. 

EDUC 440, 456, 457. 458 and 459 must be 
scheduled during the same semester Collectively, 
they comprise a semester of student teaching. 

EDUC 456 2 cr. 

Planning in Early Childhood Student 
Teaching 

Preparation of actual teaching plans during sec- 
ondary student teaching. Application required. 

EDUC 457 3 cr. 

Instruction in Early Childhood Student 
Teaching 

Involvement in implementing methods and 
techniques. Secondary student teaching on a 
full-time basis under the supervision of class- 
room teachers and University supervisors. 

EDUC 458 2 cr. 

Managing Classrooms in Early Childhood 
Student Teaching 

Involvement in the management of learning sit- 
uations during secondary student teaching. 



*Student teaching requires an application due March 1 or October 1 for fall and spring placements, respectively. 



252 Panuska College/Education 



EDUC 459 3 cr. 

Professional Growth in Early Childhood 
Student Teaching 

The demonstration of professional growth dur- 
ing student teaching as evidenced by professional 
behavior and skills, a commitment to improve- 
ment, and ability to relate to others. This will 
include attendance and participation in a weekly 
seminar to analyze and discuss professional con- 
siderations and student-teaching problems. 

EDUC 461, 462, 463 and 464 must be 
scheduled during the same semester. Collectively, 
they comprise a semester of student teaching. 

EDUC 461* 2 cr. 

Planning in Special Education Student 
Teaching 

Preparation of actual teaching plans during special- 
education student teaching. Application required. 

EDUC 462 3 cr. 

Instruction in Special Education Student 
Teaching 

Involvement in implementing methods and 
techniques. Special-education student teaching 
on a full-time basis under the supervision of 
classroom teachers and University supervisors. 

EDUC 463 2 cr. 

Managing Special Education Student 
Teaching Instruction 

Involvement in the management of learning situ- 
ations during special-education student teaching. 

EDUC 464 3 cr. 

Professional Growth in Special-Education 
Student Teaching 

The demonstration of professional growth dur- 
ing student teaching as evidenced by professional 
behavior and skills, a commitment to improve- 
ment, and ability to relate to others. This will 
include attendance at and participation in a 
weekly seminar to analyze and discuss professional 
considerations and student-teaching problems. 

EDUC 475, 476, 477, 478 and 479 must be 
scheduled during the same semester. Collectively, 
they comprise a semester of student teaching. 

EDUC 475 3 cr. 

Secondary Classroom Management and 
Discipline 

In-depth study of the rationale, theories, and 
techniques for creating a situation where learning 
can take place and for handling specific individual 
and group behavior problems in productive ways. 



EDUC 476* 2 cr. 

Planning in Secondary Student Teaching 

Preparation of actual teaching plans during sec- 
ondary student teaching. Application required. 

EDUC 477 3 cr. 

Instruction in Secondary Student Teaching 

Involvement in implementing methods and 
techniques. Secondary student teaching on a 
full-time basis under the supervision of class- 
room teachers and University supervisors. 

EDUC 478 2 cr. 

Managing Classrooms in Secondary Student 
Teaching 

Involvement in the management of learning sit- 
uations during secondary student teaching. 

EDUC 479 3 cr. 

Professional Growth in Secondary Student 
Teaching 

The demonstration of professional growth dur- 
ing student teaching as evidenced by professional 
behavior and skills, a commitment to improve- 
ment, and ability to relate to others. This will 
include attendance and participation in a weekly 
seminar to analyze and discuss professional con- 
siderations and student-teaching problems. 



*Student teaching requires an application due March 1 or October 1 for fall and spring pUcementi. respectively. 



Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (Citizenship with Political Science) Curriculum 




Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


HIST 110-111 


U.S. History I-II 


3 


3 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE QUAN/STAT 


MATH ELECT-PS 240 


Mathematics Elect-PS Statistics 


3 


3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fimdamentals of Psycholog)' 




3 


FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE NSCI 


ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


17 


3 , 
18 


Second Year 










MAJOR/GE/ S/BH 


EDUC 222-280 


Educational Psych.-Field Exp. II 


3 


1 


COGNATE 


GEOG 134 


Wodd Regional Geography 




3 


COGNATE 


PS ELECT 


Political Science Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


PS 130-131 


Am. Nat. Government I-II 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT 


Literature Elective 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 




3 


GE HUMN 


HIST 120-121 


European History I-II 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


PS 135 


State and Local Government 


3 




GE PHED 


ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




18 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380-314 


Field Ill-Specific Subj. Methods' 


1 


3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


COGNATE 


PS 313 or 314 


Political Ideas 


3 




COGNATE 


PS 217 


Comparative Politics 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


PS Electives 


3 


6 


GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 


3 




GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE ELECT 


PS 212 


International Relations 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED 


Physical Educadon 


2 


1 


18 


18 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Secondary' 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


PS Electives 


6 




GEPHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humaniries Elective^ 


3 




GE ELECT 


ECO 410 


Economics for Education Majors 


3 




15 


13 






TOTAL: 134 CREDITS 

n>ice commitment is 20 hours, with no service requirement in 


' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar set 


sophomore year. 










^ Humanities Elecrives: 


Students must earn 6 credits in Literature or Foreign Language ivith no more than 3 c 


redits in Art or A'tusic. 


^ Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 







254 Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (Communication) Curriculum^ 





Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


COMM110orl20 


Interpersonal Comm/Mass Comm 




3 


COGNATE 


C0MM115 


Writing for Communication 




3 


GE SPCH-^X^TG 


COMM 100-NXnTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GEQUAN 


ELECT 


Quant. Reasoning Eleaive 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theology 1 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ENGL 140 


English Inquiry 


3 




GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 






17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 222-280 


Educational Psychology-Field II 


3 


1 


COGNATE 


COMM ELECT 


Communication Elective^ 


3 




COGNATE 


COMM ELECT 


Communication Elective-'' 




3 


COGNATE 


ENGL LT 


British Literature Eleaive 


3 




GE T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE HUMN 


ENGL 


American Lit. Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


WRTG210 


Advanced Composition 


3 




GE NSCI 


PSYC 105 


Brain & Human Nature 


3 


3 


GEQUAN 


STAT ELECT 


Statistics Electives 


3 




GE ELECT 


COMM 210 


Logical & Rhetorical Analysis 






GE HUMN 


COMM 215 


Intro to Communication Theory 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


18 


2 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313-380 


General Methods and Planning-Field III 


3 


1 


MAJOR 


EDUC 314 


Specific Subject Methods' 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 362 


Psycholinguistics 


3 




COGNATE 


ENLT 460 


Comm. Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


COMM 316 


Communication Ethics 


3 




COGNATE 


COMM ELECT 


Communication Elective^ 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


EDUC 341 


Educ. of Except, Child 




3 


GE ELECT 


LIT or ENGL 


Minority Literature/Theatre Elective 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 








18 


17 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Sec. Ed 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Sec. Ed. 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Sec. Ed. 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Sec. Ed.' 




3 


COGNATE 


COMM 415 


Communication Senior Seminar 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Communication Elective 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 


3 




GE 


EN LT 462 


Literacy Critic 


3 






WORLD LIT ELECT 


World Literacy Elective 


3 





18 



13 



TOTAL: 137 CREDITS 



' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, with no service requirement in 

sophomore year. 
^ The course configuration allows for a minor in English with carefid planning. Jt is the student's responsibility to plan for a 

minor if one is desired. 
' The following classes are recommended - but not required - as options for elective choices: COMM 21 J: Argument and 

Debate, COMM 214: Small-Group Communication, COMM 228: Intercultural Communication, COMM 224: Newsivriting 
^ Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 



Panuska College/Education 255 



Secondary 


Education (English) Curriculum^ 








Department atid Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 or 1 


COGNATE 


ENLT 140 


English Inquiry 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


ENLT Area Requirement 




3 


WRTG-COGNATE WRTG 107-ELECT 


Composition-Theatre Elective 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


ELECT 


Quant. Reasoning Elective 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 222-280 


Educational Psychology-Field 11 


3 


1 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


ENLT Area Requirement 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


ENLT Area Requirement 


3 




COGNATE 


ENLT 220 or 341 


Shakespeare Elective 




3 


GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE ELECT 


WRTG 21 lor 218 


Advanced Writing Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Rep. World Literattu-e 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


GE ELECT 


STAT ELECT 


Statistics Elective 


3 




18 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 314 


Specific Subject Methods' 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380 


Field Experience III 


1 




COGNATE 


^X^lTG310 


Strategies for Teaching Writing 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 362 


PsychoUnguistics 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


ENLT Area Requirements 


3 


3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN 


ENLT Area Requirements 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Minority Lit. Elect. 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED 


Physical Education 


1 




GE ELECT 


EDUC 341 


Ed Exceptional Child 


17 


,3 
18 


Fourth Year* 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Sec. Ed 


2 




MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Sec. Ed. 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Sec. Ed. 


2 




MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Sec. Ed.' 


3 




COGNATE 


ENLT ELECT 


Open Elective-'' 


3 




COGNATE 


ENLT 490 or 491 


Senior Seminar 




3 


GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Open Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Open Elective 


13 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 


131 CREDITS 


' Includes service-lea 


rning component. Freshman Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, with no service 


' requirement 


in 


sophomore year. 










^ Secondary Education/English majors will complete a second major in English. English majors at The Lhi 


iversity ofScranton are 


required to take at 


least four courses in British literature 


and at least two in American liurature. These appear above as "Area 


Requirements"; for further details, students should see page 129 and/or consult their English Department 


advisors. 




^ Students who have 


not already done so must complete tht 


f English Department's Theory Intensive Requirement. 




^ Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 







Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (General S( 


:ience) Curriculum 






Fir^t Year 


Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


Fall Cr. 


Spr. Cr. 


1. 1131 AtoJ. 

MAJOR 


EDUC 121-180 


Foundations of Education-Field I 


3 


1 


COGNATE 


BIOL 14M2 


General Biology I-II 


4.5 


4.5 


GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 


3 




GEWRTG 


WRTG 107 


Composition 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




GE QUAN 


MATH 114 


Analysis I 




4 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT 


Literature Eleaive 




3 


FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 






18.5 


18.5 



Second Year 

MAJOR 
COGNATE 
COGNATE 
GE PHIL 
GET/RS 
GE S/BH 
GE HUMN 
COGNATE 

Third Year 

MAJOR 
MAJOR 
MAJOR 
COGNATE 
COGNATE 
GE ELECT 
GE NSCI 
GE S/BH 
GE ELECT 
GE PHED 

Fourth Year^ 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

COGNATE 

COGNATE 

GE HUMN 

GE ELECT 

GE PHIUT/RS 



EDUC 280 
PHYS 120-121 
CHEM 112-113 
PHIL 210 
T/RS 122 
PSYCHO 
ELECT 
STAT ELECT 



EDUC 313 
EDUC 380-314 
EDUC 340 
COGNATE ELECT 
COGNATE ELECT 
PHIL 431 
PHYS 101-102 
EDUC 222 
PHIL 432 
PHED ELECT 



EDUC 475 
EDUC 476 
EDUC 477 
EDUC 478 
EDUC 479 
ELECT 
CHEM 104 
HUMN ELECT 
ELECT 
ELECT 



Field Experience II 

General Physics I-II 

General/ Analytical Chemistry I-II 

Ethics 

Theology II 

Fundamentals of Psychology 

Humanities Electives 

Statistics Elective 



General Methods and Planning 
Field Ill-Specific Subject Methods' 
Reading in Secondary Schools 
Environmental Context 
Technological Context 
Philosophy of Science 
Modern Astronomy-Earth Science 
Educational Psychology 
Philosophy of Technology 
Physical Education 



Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 
Student Teaching Plan Sec. Ed 
Student Teaching Instr. Sec. Ed. 
Student Teaching Mgmt. Sec. Ed. 
Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Sec. Ed.' 
Environmental Context 
Science and Society 
Humanities Elective 
Open Electives 
Open Electives 

TOTAL: 



1 

4 

4.5 

3 

3 

3 
3 



16 



4 
4.5 



18.5 17.5 



18 13 

137 CREDITS 



' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, ivith no service requirement in 

sophomore year 
^ Semesters may he reversed at the discretion of the department 



Panuska College/Education 257 



Secondary Education (Latin) Curriculum'^ 








Department mid Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. C 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 or 1 


COGNATE 


LAT 21 1-212 


Intermediate Latin I-II 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Informadon Literacy 




3 


GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT 


Quant. Reasoning Course 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


FSEM-PHED 


INTO 100-PHED ELECT 


Freshman Seminar'-Physical Education 


1 


1 


16-17 


16-17 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Exp. II 




1 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Latin Electives 


6 


6 


GE PHIL 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT 


Lit. Elect/Hum. Elect 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI 


Natural Science Electives 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


EDUC 222 


Educational Psychology 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


GE ELECT 


STAT ELECT 


Statistics Elective 


3 




18 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380-314 


Field Ill-Specific Subj. Methods' 


1 


3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Latin Electives 


6 


6 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Related Electives 




3 


GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 




3 


GE ELECT 


SOC 234 


Cultural Anthropology 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Open Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


I 




17 


18 


Fourdi Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Secondary' 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Latin Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Related Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humanities Elective 


6 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Latin Elective 


3 




18 


13 






TOTAL: 


134 CREDITS 


' Includes semce-learning component. Freshman Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, with no service 


requirement 


in 


sophomore year. 










-' Program results in a 


second major in Latin. 








' Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the departmetit. 







258 Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (Math) Curriculum 



First Year 

MAJOR 

GE HUMN 

COGNATE 

COGNATE 

GE SPCH-WRTG 

GE C/IL 

GE ELECT 

GE PHIL-T/RS 

FSEM 



Department and Number Descriptive Title of Course 



EDUC 121-180 

HUMN ELECT 

MATH 114 

MATH 142 

COMM 100-WRTG 107 

C/IL 102 

CMPS 134 

PHIL 120-T/RS 121 

INTO 100 



Foundations of Education-Field I 

Humanities Eleaive 

Analysis I 

Discrete Structures 

Public Speaking-Composition 

Computing and Information Literacy 

Computer Science I 

Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 

Freshman Seminar'-Physicai Education 



FallCr. Spr. Cr. 

3 1 

3 









17 


18 


Second Year 










GESB/H 


EDUC 222-280 


Educational Psychology-Field 11 


3 


1 


COGNATE 


MATH 221-222 


Analysis II-III 


4 


4 


GE T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE HUMN 


LIT ELECT 


Literature Elective 


3 




GE NSCI 


PHYS 140/PHYS 141 


Elem. of Physics I-II 


4 


4 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 351 


Linear Algebra 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


Third Year 




18 


16 


MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380-314 


Field Ill-Specific Subject Methods' 


1 


3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 312 


Secondary Math Curriculimi 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 312 


Probability Theory 




3 


COGNATE 


MATH 345 OR MATH 325 


Geometry OR History/Phil, of Mathematics 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 446 OR MATH 448^ 


Real Analysis I OR Mod. Algebra I 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH ELECT 


Math Elective (Upper Division) 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Eleaive 




3 


COGNATE 


MATH 447 or 449 


Real Analysis II OR Modern AJgebra II 




3 


COGNATE 


MATH ELECT 


Math Elective (Upper Division) 


3 








16 


18 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Sec. Ed 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Sec. Ed. 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Sec. Ed. 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Sec. Ed.' 




3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 446 or 448 


Real Analysis I OR Mod. Alg. P 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH ELECT 


Math Elective (Upper Division) 


3 




COGNATE 


MATH 345 or MATH 325 


Geometry OR History/Phil, of Mathematics 


3 




GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 


3 




GE HUMN 


ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 





18 13 

TOTAL: 134 CREDITS 

' Includes service-learning component. Freshma?i Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, with no service requirement in 
sophomore year 

- Real Analysis I should be taken the fall of the junior year in odd-numbered years; Modern Algebra I should be taken in the fall 

of the junior year in even-numbered years. 
^ Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 



Panuska College/Education 



Secondary 


Education (Modern Language) Curriculum^ 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


MLANG 21 1-212 


Intermediate Mod Lang 


3 


3 


GE SPCH-WRTG COMM 100-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Compudng and Information Literaq' 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humaniries Elecrive 




3 


GE QUAN 


ELECT 


Quant. Reasoning Elective 


3 




GET/RS-PHIL 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 




3 


FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Exp. II 




1 


COGNATE 


MLANG 31 1-312'^ 


Advanced Comp./Conv. I-II 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT 


Related Electives 


3 


3 


GE PHIL 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


3 




GE HUMN 


LIT/HUMN ELECT 


Lit.Elect/Hum. Elect 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI 


Natural Science Elecrive 




3 


GE S/BH 


EDUC PSYC 


Educational Psychology 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


STAT ELECT 


Staustics Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


18 


17 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380-314* 


Field Ill-Specific Subj. Methods' 


4 




MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


COGNATE 


MLANG 32 1-322^ 


Stylistics I-II 


3 


3 


COGNATE 


COGNATE ELECT 


Modern Language Electives'' 


3 


6 


GE NSCI 


NSCI 


Natural Science Elective 




3 


GE HUMN 


ELECT 


Humaniries Elecrive 




3 


GE ELECT 


SOC 234 


Cultural Anthropology 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED 


Physical Education 


2 




18 


18 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 475 


Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 476 


Student Teaching Plan Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 477 


Student Teaching Instr. Secondary 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 478 


Student Teaching Mgmt. Secondary 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 479 


Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Secondary' 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Modern Language Elecrive" 


9 




GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Educarion 


3 




GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE ELECT 


ELECT 


Related Elective 


3 




18 


13 






TOTAL: 135 CREDITS 

service commitment is 20 hours, with no service requirement in 


' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar 


sophomore year. 










- Spanish, French or 


German should be selected as a specialization within Modem Language (MLANG). Fh-ogram result 


s in a 


second major in the area of the modern language chosen. 








J All Secondary Education MLANG Majors are strongly encouraged to study abioadfor a period of at least 


' one semester. 




** Before enrolling in 


EDUC 314, students are required to 


pass a proficiency exam at the intermediate-high 


level. 




^ Students ii'hose specialization within Modem Languages 


is Spanish are required to take SPAN 320, and SPAN 321 and three 


of the following: SPAN 313, SPAN 314, SPAN 330 am 


dior SPAN 331. In Spanish, there is no Advance 


d Stylistics IL 




"> Students who begir. 


t language study at the advanced level (311) will take 6 credits in advanced MLANG 


electives. 




'' Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 







260 Panuska College/Education 



Secondary Education (Physics) 

Department and Number 



First Year 

MAJOR 

COGNATE 

COGNATE 

GE SPCH-WRTG 

GE C/IL 

GEQUAN 

GE PHIL 

GE HUMN 

FSEM 



EDUC 121-180 

PHYS 140-141 

MATH 221 

COMM 100-WRTG 107 

MATH 114 

C/IL 102 

PHIL 120 

LIT ELECT 

INTO 100 



Fourth Year^ 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

MAJOR 

GE HUMN 

COGNATE 

COGNATE 

COGNATE 

GE HUMN 

GE PHIL-T/RS ELECT 



EDUC 475 
EDUC 476 
EDUC 477 
EDUC 478 
EDUC 479 
HUMN ELECT 
PHYS ELECT 
ENGR 250 
PHYS 371 
HUMN ELECT 
PHIL-T/RS ELECT 



Curriculum flPJ 

Descriptive Title of Course Fall Cr. Spr. Cr. 

Foundations of Education-Field I 3 1 

Elements of Physics I-II 4 4 

Analysis II 4 

Public Speaidng-Composition 3 3 

Analysis I 4 

Computing and Information Literacy 3 

Intro. Philosophy 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Freshman Seminar' 1 



Classroom Mgmt. Secondary 

Student Teaching Plan Secondary 

Student Teaching Instr. Secondary 

Student Teaching Mgmt. Secondary 

Student Teaching Pro. Dev. Secondary' 

Humanities Electives 

Physics Electives 

Statics 

Advanced Mechanics 

Humanities Electives 

Philosophy or T/RS elective 



17 











18 


18 


Second Year 












MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Exp. II 






1 


COGNATE 


MATH 222 


Analysis III 




4 




COGNATE 


PHYS 270 


Modern Physics 




4 




COGNATE 


PHYS 102 


Earth Science 






3 


COGNATE 


PHYS 352 


Stat Thermo 






3 


GE ELECT 


MATH 341 


Differential Equations 






3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 






3 


GET/RS 


T/RS 121-122 


Theology I-II 




3 


3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE S/BH 


EDUC 222 


Educational Psych. 




3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




17 


1 

17 


Third Year 












MAJOR 


EDUC 313 


General Methods and Planning 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 380-314 


Field Ill-Specific Subj. 


Methods' 


1 


3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 340 


Reading in Secondary Schools 




3 


COGNATE 


PHYS 447-448 


Electromagnetics I-Il 




3 


4 


COGNATE 


EE241 


Circuits 






4 


GE ELECT 


PHYS 350 


Applied & Engineering 


Math 




3 


GE NSCI 


BIOL 101 


Gen. Biology I 




3 




GE ELECT 


CHEM 100 


General Chemistry 




3 




GE ELECT 


PHYS 372 


Atomic/Laser Physics 






3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


1 



18 16 

TOTAL: 139 CREDITS 



' Includes service-learning component. Freshman Seminar service commitment is 20 hours, with no service reauirement in 
sophomore year. 

' Semesters may be reversed at the discretion of the department. 



Panuska College/Education 261 



Special Education Curriculum 










Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 180 


Field Experience I 


1 




COGNATE 


EDUC 121 


Foundations of Education 


3 




COGNATE 


EDUC 341 


Educ. of Exceptional Child 


3 




GEQUAN 


MATH ELECT 


Quant. Reasoning Course 




3 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE NSCI 


PSYC 106 


Drugs and Behavior 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE S/BH 


PSYC 221 


Childhood and Adolescence 




3 


GE SPCH-WRTG 


COMM lOO-WRTG 107 


Public Speaking-Composition 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Introduction to Philosophy-Theolog)' I 


3 


3 


|GE-FSEM 


INTD 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 280 


Field Experience II 




1 


MAJOR 


EDUC 265 


SPED Educational Assessment 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 258 


Assessment Practicum 




1 


GE HUMN 


ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 267 


Learning Disabilities 


3 




COGNATE 


EDUC 222 


Educational Psychology 


3 




GE ELECT 


STAT ELECT 


Statisrics Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


CHS 241 


Case Management & Interviewing 




3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 241 


Foundadons of Reading Inst.' 


3 




COGNATE 


PSYC 225 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 




GE NSCI 


PSYC 231 /PSYC 105 


Behavioral Neiu-osci./Brain & Human Nature 


3 


GE PHIL 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


18 


15 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


EDUC 380 


Field Experience III 




1 


MAJOR 


EDUC 369 


Early Assessment & Intervention 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 367 


Designing Curriculum for Elem. SPED 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 368 


Designing Curriculum for Elem. SPED 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 364 


Inclusionary Classroom Practices' 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 366 


Emotional & Behavioral Disabiliues 




3 


COGNATE 


EDUC 342 


Educational Media/Tech. 


3 




MAJOR 


EDUC 226 


Sec. Transitional & Voc. Services 




3 


COGNATE 


CHS 322-333 


Mental Retardation-Muldculturalism in 


HS 3 


3 


GE ELECT 


ENGL 130 OR EDUC 131 


Children's Lit. or Exp. Cult. Div. Child Lit. 3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Educauon 




1 


GET/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 


18 


3 

17 


Fourth Year^ 










MAJOR 


EDUC 365 


Professional Seminar 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 461 


Planning in SPED Student Teaching 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 462 


Instrucdon in SPED Student Teaching 




3 


MAJOR 


EDUC 463 


Managing SPED Instrucdon 




2 


MAJOR 


EDUC 464 


Professional Growth in SPED' 




3 


COGNATE 


CHS 


Physical Disabilities 


3 




GE HUMN 


ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


9 




GE PHIL 


ED/P 306 


Philosophy of Education 


3 




PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




16 


13 


I 




TOTAL: 132 CREDITS 

rvice commitment is 20 hours, with no service requirement in 


^^^^ules service-learning 


' component. Freshman Seminar se 


sophomore year. 










^ Semesters may be reverse 


d at the discretion of the department. 







262 Panuska College/Exercise Science and Sport 



EXERCISE SCIENCE 
AND SPORT 

Faculty 

Gary N. Wodder, Ph.D., Chair 
Robert M. Bessoir, M.Ed. 
Ronald W. Deitrick, Ph.D., Program Director 
of Exercise Science 
Curt Dixon, Ph.D. 
David A. Hair, M.Ed. 
John S. Hopkins, M.S. 
Stephen L. Klingman, M.S. 
John B. Robertson, M.A. 
J. Michael Strong, M.S. 

Overview 

The Department of Exercise Science and 
Sport consists of three areas: a major in Exer- 
cise Science, a minor in Coaching and physi- 
cal education activity classes. 

Exercise Science Major 

Exercise Science is the study of human 
movement as related to exercise, sport, and 
physical activity. It is dedicated to promoting 
and integrating scientific research and educa- 
tion on the effects and benefits of exercise, 
and to the delivery of physical-activity pro- 
grams that prevent disease, facilitate rehabili- 
tation, promote health, and enhance human 
performance. Exercise Science is part of the 
field of Sports Medicine which also includes 
clinical areas of study. The scientific aspects of 
Sports Medicine include exercise physiology, 
biochemistry of exercise, and biomechanics. 
Testing of maximal oxygen consumption and 
lactic acid metabolism, analysis of muscle 
fatigue, research on muscle hypertrophy and 
bone density, measurement of body composi- 
tion, and benefits of exercise in cardiovascular 
disease, diabetes and weight control are a few 
of the many contributions made by exercise 
scientists to Sports Medicine. 

Few academic program majors offer such 
diverse opportunities afi:er graduation as Exer- 
cise Science. The academically rigorous cur- 
riculum prepares graduates with knowledge 
and experience for employment opportunities 
in a variety of settings. In the applied health 
area, careers in corporate and community/ 
hospital-based wellness programs, cardiopul- 
monary rehabilitation, and research centers 
investigating the benefits of exercise in spinal- 



cord injury are possibilities. Sports physiolo- 
gist and strength and conditioning specialists 
for sports teams are also career options. 

Exercise Science is an excellent option for 
students interested in applying to graduate 
health-profession programs such as osteo- 
pathic medicine, physical therapy, physician 
assistant, and clinical exercise physiology. 
Additional required course work to meet 
entry requirements can be chosen as electives. 
In this regard, students should make their 
career intentions known early in their pro- 
gram of study. Opportunities for graduate 
study are available in academic units of medi- 
cine, biology, physiology, and exercise science. 
Although not required, completion of the 
program provides students with the ability to 
take difi^erent certification exams offered by 
several professional organizations including 
the American College of Sports Medicine. 

In order to graduate. Exercise Science 
majors must maintain an overall 2.5 GPA in 
major courses and an overall GPA of 2.0 in 
cognate courses. Students receiving a grade 
less than C- in any major or cognate course 
must repeat the course and earn a C- or better 
grade in that course. Completion of the serv- 
ice-learning requirements (20 hours per aca- 
demic year) of the College of Professional 
Studies is also a requirement for graduation. 

Coaching Minor 

The 17-credit Coaching minor is based on 
the American Sport Education Program 
(ASEP) and will help meet the needs of those 
who wish to coach and work more effectively 
with young athletes from youth through 
interscholastic sports. 

The course Introduction to PHED 160: 
Coaching (1 cr.), is a suggested prerequisite 
for the 3-credit courses. 

Physical Education 

The Physical Education program seeks to 
improve the physical-fitness levels of each stu- 
dent, introduce new activities, or improve and 
increase students' recreational skills through 
our offerings of over 30 different courses. 
Emphasis is placed on instruction in a variety 
of popular sports and recreational activities, 
especially those with carry-over value for post- 
college years. 

Every regularly enrolled student must satisfy 
the 3-credit Physical Education requirement 
unless excused by the Department. It is possi- 



Panuska College/Exercise Science and Sport 263 



ble to be excused from Physical Education 
classes by application to the Department if (a) 
a physician certifies that a student, for med- 
ical reasons, should not engage in vigorous 
physical activity; (b) the Department deems it 
advisable; (c) the student is a veteran. Grading 
is (S) Satisfactory or (U) Unsatisfactory. 

There are a variety of formats for the Physi- 
cal Education classes: one-half semester for .5 
credit, three times per week for 1 credit, two 
times per week for 1 credit, and one time per 
week for 1 credit. Students may select from 
among the following: tennis, yoga, skiing, 
soccer, racquetball, weight training, aerobics, 
hapkido, volleyball, running, karate, self- 
defense for women, advanced life-saving, 
water-safety instructor, jazz dance, golf, tai chi, 
badminton, wellness, latin and swing dance, 
cardio fitness, beginning/intermediate swim- 
ming, fitness swimming, first aid/CPR/AED, 
karate, wellness, white water rafting and judo. 

Course Descriptions 

Exercise Science 

EXSC 210 3 cr. 

Sports Physiology 

(Prerequisite: BIOL 1 10) This course explores the 
physiological principles and systems underlying 
sport performance - aerobic and anaerobic energy, 
oxygen transport, and muscular and cardiovascu- 
lar systems. Students will learn how to apply the 
principles to improve human performance. 

EXSC 212 3 cr. 

Nutrition in Exercise and Sport 

(Prerequisites: EXSC 210 or BIOL 347, CHEM 
112-113 or permission of instructor) Role of 
nutrients in optimizing human performance. 
Consideration of caloric and nutrient exercise 
requirements, gender-specific needs, weight loss/ 
eating disorders, and nutritional ergogenic aids. 
Includes service-learning component. 

EXSC 220 3 cr. 

Nutrition for the Health Professions 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111, CHEM 110 
orl 12; pre- or co-requisite: CHEM 111 or 113) 
Focus on concepts of nutrition, including chem- 
istry, digestion absorption and metabolism of 
nutrients. Exploration of the role of diet in 
chronic illness. Basic nutrition concepts applied 
to the needs of individuals across the life span, 
families, and communities. 



EXSC 229 3 cr. 

Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology 

(Prerequisites: BIO 1 10-1 1 1 and EXSC 210) 
This course is designed to provide the student 
with basic scientific information and an under- 
standing of human motion within the areas of 
anatomy and neuromuscular physiciology. 
Includes service-learning component. 

EXSC 313 3 cr. 

Biomechanics of Sport and Exercise 

(Prerequisites: BIO 110-111, PYYS 120-121 and 
EXSC 219) This course introduces the student 
to the concepts and principles of biomechanics 
as they relate to sport and exercise. 

EXSC 375 3 cr. 

Exercise Testing/Programming for Health 
and Performance 

(Prerequisites: EXSC 210, major in EXSC or 
permission of instructor) Provides knowledge 
related to Graded Exercise Testing and counsel- 
ing, including purposes, basic exercise EGG, 
energy costs of exercise, principles of exercise 
prescription, special populations, and case study. 

EXSC 380 3 cr. 

Internship in Exercise Science 

(Prerequisites: EXSC 375; majors only) The 
application of Exercise Science principles, 
knowledge and skills in a supervised setting. 
Depending on career interests, students can 
select from a variety of interest including sites 
located outside of the Northeast region. 

EXSC 412 3 cr. 

(W) Current Topics in Exercise Science and 
Sports Medicine 

(Prerequisite: EXSC 210 or BIOL 347 or per- 
mission of instructor) Current topics in the field 
affecting health and human performance includ- 
ing ergogenics, exercise benefits in chronic, dis- 
ease states, clinical exercise physiology, and age/ 
gender issues. Includes service-learning component. 

EXSC 435 3 cr. 

(D) Women in Sport 

This course is designed to concentrate on the 
applied psychological and selected sports medi- 
cine concerns of the female athlete, including 
nutrition, body composition, osteoporosis, spe- 
cific exercise training, female injuries and train- 
ing, and psychosocial issues. 

EXSC 440 3 cr. 

Advanced Physiology of Sport and Exercise 

(Prerequisite: Fourth-year standing in Exercise 
Science) Advanced concepts of human perform- 



264 Panuska College/Exercise Science and Sport 



Exercise Science Curriculum 

Department and Number 



First Year 




MAJOR 


PHEDELECT-EXSC210 


COGNATE 


BIOL 110-111 


GE NSCI 


CHEM 112-113 


GEWRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102/102L 


GE QUAN 


MATH 103orll4 


GE FSEM 


INTD 100 


Second Year 




MAJOR 


EXSC212 


MAJOR 


PHED 105 


MAJOR 


PHED112 


COGNATE 


NURS100-BIOL245 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


COGNATE 


PHYS 120-121 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Third Year 




MAJOR 


PHED 203 


MAJOR 


EXSC 229 


MAJOR 


EXSC313 


MAJOR 


EXSC 375 


MAJOR 


EXSC 380 


COGNATE 


EDUC 120 


COGNATE 


BIOL ELECT 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS ELECT 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL210-T/RS122 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Fourth Year 




MAJOR 


EXSC 442 


MAJOR 


EXSC 412 


MAIOR 


EXSC 440 


MAJOR 


EXSC 448 


MAJOR 


EXSC 435 


MAJOR 


PHED 101 


COGNATE 


PSYC 284 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 



Descriptive Title of Course Fall Cr. Spr. Cr. 

Phys Ed Elective-Sports Physiology I 3 

Structure & Function of Human Body 4 4 

General & Analytical Chemistry 4.5 4.5 

Composition-Public Speaking 3 3 

Computing and Information Literacy 3 

Pre-Calculus OR Analysis I 4 

Freshman Seminar' 1 





17.5 


17.5 


Nutrition in Exercise and Sport' 


3 




Cardio. Fitness 


1 




First Aid/CPR/AED 


1 




Family Health-General Physiology 


3 


4.5 


Intro, to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


General Physics 


4 


4 


Humanities Electives (Cultural Diversity) 


3 




Humanities Elective 




3 


Fimdamentals of Psychology 




3 




18 


17.5 


Prevention & Care of Sports Injuries 


3 




Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology' 


3 




Biomechanics of Sport and Exercise 




3 


Exercise Testing/Programming 


3 




Internship in Exercise Science 




3 


Applied Statistics 


3 




BIOL 347 or 348 or 446 




3 


Philosophy or T/RS Elective 




3 


Ethics-Theology II 


3 


3 


Free Elective _ 


3 


3 



Clinical Exercise Physiology 
Current Topics in Ex. Sci/Sports Med.' 
Adv Physiology of Sport & Exercise 
Research Methods in Exercise Science 
Women in Sport 
Weight Training 
Sports Psychology 
Social/Behavioral Elective 
Humanities Electives 
Free Elective 



18 



16 



18 



TOTAL: 137.5 CREDITS 



' Includes service-learning component 



Coaching Minor Curriculum 



Department and Number 

PHED 112 

PHED 160 

PHED 202 

PHED 208 

PHED 203 

PSYC 284 

PHED 205 



Descriptive Title of Course Credits 
first Aid/CPR/AED 1 

Introduction to Coaching 1 

Sport Administration 3 

Conditioning and Training for Sport 3 

Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 3 

Sports Psychology 3 

Teaching Sport Skills 3 

TOTAL: 17 CREDITS 



Panuska College/Health Administration 263 



ance as related to sport and exercise including 
physiological limits, Bioenergetics, fiber 
type/myoplasticity of skeletal muscle, cardiovas- 
cular dynamics and the athletic heart, and pul- 
monary ventilation and aerobic performance. 

EXSC 442 3 cr. 

Clinical Exercise Physiology 

(Prerequisite: EXSC 210 or BIOL 347 or permis- 
sion of instructor) This course covers exercise 
response and adaptation in a variety of chronic 
lifestyle diseases and the use of exercise tolerance 
assessment to improve and optimize quality of life. 

EXSC 448 3 cr. 

Research Methods in Exercise Science 

(Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing in Exercise 
Science, EXSC 375) Designed for the student to 
study and gain experience in research related to 
the field of Exercise Science. The nature of 
research, methods for acquiring, analyzing, and 
publishing/presenting research relevant to Exer- 
cise Science. 



Coaching 



1 cr. 



PHED 112 

First Aid/CPR/AED 

This course leads to American Red Cross certifi- 
cation in CPR, First Aid, and Automated Exter- 
nal Defibrillation (AED). Prepares students to 
recognize and respond to respiratory, cardiac, 
and other emergency situations. 

PHED 160 1 cr. 

Introduction to Coaching 

Prerequisite course which will assist prospective 
coaches as they develop a positive coaching phi- 
losophy, apply coaching principles and use sport- 
management skills. 

PHED 208 1 cr. 

Conditioning and Training for Sports 

Students will learn how to design effective, indi- 
vidualized training programs by incorporating 
training basics such as overload, specificity, adap- 
tation and progression. Will include individual 
differences among athletes, muscular fitness, 
energy fitness and performance factors. (Formerly 
PHED 210.) 

PHED 202 3 cr. 

Sports Administration 

Examines the business of coaching, offering 
practical approaches to the administrative func- 
tions of organizing, planning, leading and con- 
trolling. Integrates philosophy and principles into 
practice. 



PHED 203 3 cr. 

Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 

Will cover sports first aid, prevention of and 
dealing with sports injuries. Helps coaches 
become competent first responders in sports 
emergencies. Students will learn how to recognize 
and prevent common sports injuries and admin- 
ister appropriate first aid. Also covers procedures 
for evaluating and caring for injuries, guidelines 
for rehabilitation and therapeutic taping. 

PSYC 284 3 cr. 

Sports Psychology 

(Prerequisite: PSYC 110) This course covers a 
variety of topics in sports psychology including 
the learning of athletic skills, principles of moti- 
vation, goal-setting and reinforcement. The 
emotional aspects of sports competition and var- 
ious strategies for mental preparation for compe- 
tition such as relaxation, concentration, and 
attentional skills will be discussed. 

PHED 205 3 cr. 

Teaching Sports Skills 

Students will master the essentials of teaching 
sports skills and improve their teaching effective- 
ness. They will learn how to prepare for teaching 
sports skills, how to introduce, explain, and 
demonstrate sports skills and use cognitive 
processes to improve performance. 



HEALTH 
ADMINISTRATION 

Faculty 

Daniel J. West, Ph.D., Chair 

Mary Helen McSweeney, Ph.D. 

Peter C. Olden, Ph.D. 

Terri Freeman Smith, M.S. 

Robert J. Spinelli, M.Ph., Program Director 

William G. Wallick, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The Health Administration major inte- 
grates courses from the field of health and 
business administration, and is designed to 
develop in students the values, knowledge and 
skills needed for management positions in a 
variety of fields. The curriculum is interdisci- 
plinary, emphasizes knowledge of global 
health care issues, and includes a minor in 
business administration. Students are given a 
broad base of knowledge for securing entry- 



266 Panuska College/Health Administration 



level positions with public and private agen- 
cies, organizations such as hospitals, insurance 
and managed care companies, pharmaceutical 
firms, community health and rehabilitation 
facilities. The curriculum also provides a theo- 
retical foundation for future graduate-level 
education in various disciplines such as public 
health, health administration, health policy 
and planning, gerontology, law school and 
business administration. The major empha- 
sizes applications to real-world experience by 
requiring a three credit, 120 hour internship, 
with a second three-credit elective internship, 
as well as 10 hours of community service each 
semester. Opportunities exist for students to 
identify with and actively participate in the 
Health Administration profession through an 
active student association affiliated with the 
American College of Healthcare Executives 
(ACHE). The program also offers a five-year, 
combined BS/MHA for qualified students. 

Requirements for graduation include a mini- 
mum 2.5 GPA in all major courses, as well as a 
minimum grade of C or better in all cognate 
courses. A service learning component is inte- 
grated into one health administration course 
each semester. Dexter Hanley College students 
meet the service-learning requirement by com- 
pleting major courses that have a service-learn- 
ing component. The Health Administration 
program is a fiill undergraduate member of the 
Association of University Programs in Health 
Administration (AUPHA) in Washington, DC. 

Health Administration Concentration 
in Long-Term Care Administration 

The HADM Concentration in Long-Term 
Care Administration prepares students for job 
opportunities in nursing homes, assisted living 
facilities, adult day care and work with chroni- 
cally ill populations. Students complete a 
sequence of 40 credits of Health Administra- 
tion, 21 credits of Business and 12 credits of 
Gerontology courses, as well as a 1000 hour 
HADM internship. Upon successfiil comple- 
tion of the curriculum, students will have met 
the educational requirements of the Pennsylva- 
nia State Board of Licensure for Nursing 
Home Administrators and be eligible to take 
the state licensure examination for long-term 
care administrators. The HADM/LTCA track 
increases credits for the Health Administration 
degree to 134 credits. A 1 0-hour-per-semester 
service learning requirement is integrated into 
the HADM/LTCA course work. 



Students may also earn a second minor in 
Gerontology by taking Soc 110 and Gero 
230. The HADM/LTCA program is accred- 
ited by the National Association of Boards of 
Examiners of Long-Term Care Administrators 
(NAB) in Washington, DC. 

Minor in Health Administration 

The student must take a minimum of 18 
HADM credits. Four courses are required: 
HADM 111, 112,211,312. 

Course Descriptions 

HADM 111 3 cr. 

Introduction to Health Administration 

An introduction to health care and public health 
in the United States. Guest speakers and two site 
visits to local health care organizations are 
included. Includes service-learning component. 

HADM 112 3cr. 

Health Systems 

The nature and organization of health systems in 
the United States and select countries. Knowl- 
edge of health services for diverse populations is 
emphasized. Guest speakers and two site visits to 
local health care organizations are included. 
Includes service-learning component. 

HADM 211 3cr. 

(W) Health Administration 

(Prerequisite: HADMUl or 112) An introduc- 
tion to management principles for health care 
organizations, including activities of boards of 
directors in health agencies and systems. A case 
study approach and team presentations are 
emphasized. Includes service-learning component. 

HADM 212 3 cr. 

Health Administration Law 

The legal and regulatory environment of health 
care and the administration of health care services. 

HADM 213 3cr. 

Supervising Health Personnel 

Principles and practices of direct supervision of 
health care personnel including motivation, 
leadership and human resources functions. 

HADM 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

Selected topics of current interest in health 
administration offered on a variable basis such as 
managerial epidemiology, international health 
systems, etc. 



Panuska College/Health Administration 267 



Health Administration Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


HADM 111 


Introducrion to Health Administration 


3 




MAJOR 


HADM 112 


Health Systems' 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GEWRTG 


WRTG 107 


Composition 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Compudng & Info. Lit. for Business 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


3 




GEQUAN 


PSYC210 


Psychological Statistics 


3 




GE S/BH 


ECO 101 


Current Economic Issues 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


HADM 293/w 


Research in Health Administranon' 




3 


MAJOR 


HADM211/W 


Health Administration' 




3 


MAJOR 


HADM 212 


Health Administration Law 


3 




COGNATE 


ACC 253 


Financial Accounting 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 212 


Medical Ethics 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


COGNATE 


MGT35I 


Principles of Management I 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Electives 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 
18 


3 
18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


HADM 312 


Health Finance' 


3 




MAJOR 


HADM 


Health Administranon Elective 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


HADM 340 


Career Seminar 


1 




MAJOR 


HADM 380 


Internship in Health Administration' 




3 


COGNATE 


FIN 351 


Introducrion to Finance 


3 




COGNATE 


MKT351 


Introducrion to Marketing 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




14 


15 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


HADM 441 


Issues in Health Administration' 




3 


MAJOR 


HADM 


Elective 


3 




MAJOR 


HADM 315 


Cultural Diversity Health Administration' 3 




COGNATE 


ECO/IB 351 


Environment of International Business 


3 




COGNATE 


OIM 471 


Business Informarion Management 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 


GE S/BH 


S/BH ELECT 


Social/ Behavioral Elective 


3 




GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Elecrives 


3 


3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 
16 


3 
15 






TOTAL: 


131 CREDITS 


' Induces sert'ice-learm 


ing component 



268 Panuska College/Health Administration 



Health Administration - Concentration in 




m 


Long-Term Care Administration 


Curriculum 




^1 




Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FaUCr. 


Spr. Cr.' 


First Year 










MAJOR 


HADMUl 


Introduction to Health Administration 


3 




MAJOR 


HADM112 


Health Systems' 




3 


GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GEWRTG 


WRTG 107 


Composition 


3 




GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing & Info. Literacy for Business 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Elective 


3 




GEQUAN 


PSYC210 


Psychological Statistics 


3 




GE S/BH 


GEROllO 


Introduction to Gerontology 




3 


COGNATE 


GERO 216 


Aging and Community 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




17 


18 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


HADM 293/w 


Research in Health Administration' 




3 ; 


MAJOR 


HADM211/W 


Health Administration' 




3 ^ 


MAJOR 


HADM 212 


Health Administration Law 


3 




MAJOR 


HADM 213 


Supervising Health Personnel 


3 




COGNATE 


GERO 218 


Health and Aging 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


COGNATE 


ACC 253 


Financial Accoundng 


3 




COGNATE 


FIN 351 


Introduction to Finance 


3 


f 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


3 




GE S/BH 


ECO 101 


Current Economic Issues 




3 1 


GE COGNATE 


GERO 232 


Aging and Death 


18 


3 1 
18 1 


Third Year 








1 


MAJOR 


HADM 312 


Health Finance' 


3 


1 


MAJOR 


HADM315-ELECT 


Cult. Div. & Health Admin.-Free Eleaive 


3 


3 


MAJOR 


HADM 340 


Career Seminar 


1 




MAJOR 


HADM 318 


Long-Term Care Administration' 




3 


COGNATE 


MGT351 


Principles of Management I 


3 




COGNATE 


MKT351 


Introduction to Marketing 




3 


COGNATE 


ECO/IB351 


Environment of International Business 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 212 


Medical Ethics 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 




3 • 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 




3 :: 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 ■ 


17 


16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


HADM 441 


Issues in Health Administration' 




3 ^^ 


MAJOR 


HADM 480 


Internship in LTC Administration' 


6 


6 


COGNATE 


OIM 471 


Business Information Management 




3 - 


GEHUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


6 


3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Elective 


3 




15 


15 






TOTAL: 134 CREDITS 


' Includes sen>ice-lea 


rning component 






m 



Panuslca College/ Health Administration 269 



HADM 293 3 cr. 

(W) Research in Health Administration 

(Majors only; Prerequisite Psyc 210) An intro- 
duction to research methodology as applied to 
health administration issues and problems with 
an emphasis on descriptive, experimental and 
quasi-experimental designs. Includes service- 
learning component. 

HADM 312 3 cr. 

Health Finance 

(Prerequisite: ACC 253 or 254 or permission of 
the instructor) An introduction to financial and 
accounting concepts for health care providers. 
Emphasis is placed on knowledge of third-party 
reimbursement and budgeting concepts. Includes 
service-learning component. 

HADM 314 3 cr. 

Health Policy 

Public policy in the health care sector is studied, 
including the process of policymaking. Implica- 
tions of governmental policies for health care 
organizations and administrators are discussed. 

HADM 315 3 cr. 

(D) Cultural Diversity and Health 
Administration 

(Prerequisite: HADM 21 1 or permission of 
instructor; for HADM majors or minors only) 
The principles of management of culturally 
diverse society as applied to the health care field. 
Emphasis is placed on the importance of assess- 
ing and addressing the health care needs of vari- 
ous cultural groups within a given health care 
service area. Includes service-learning component. 

HADM 316 3 cr. 

Health Care Marketing 

Marketing theories, concepts, and strategies as 
applied to the health care field. 

HADM 318 3 cr. 

Long-Term Care Administration 

An introduction to the management of long-term 
care facilities. Emphasis is placed on the differ- 
ences between acute and long-term care, institu- 
tional and community-based long-term care serv- 
ices, and special concerns of the long-term care 
resident. Site visits to long-term care facilities are 
included. Includes service-learning component. 

HADM 330 1 cr. 

Managed Care 

The course provides an overview of managed care, 
current market trends and market performance 
issues. Closed and open panels, managed care 
contracting, disease management, behavioral 



health services and managed Medicare/Medicaid 
programs are also covered. Case studies of success- 
fid managed care programs are included through- 
out the course. 

HADM 340 1 cr. 

Career Seminar 

A survey of current trends and occupations in 
Health Administration with an emphasis on 
advanced planning and preparation for the 
required internship experience. 

HADM 380 3 cr. 

Internship in Health Administration 

(Prerequisites: HADM 340, 18 HADM credits 
or approval of program director) A supervised 
Health Administration work experience within 
an approved organizational setting. Requires 120 
hours in the field 3inA a minimum of 18 hours of 
on-campus, faculty led seminar. Graded Satisfac- 
tory or Unsatisfactory. Students must provide 
their own transportation. 

HADM 441 3 cr. 

Issues in Health Care Administration 

(HADM seniors only) A capstone course in 
which students demonstrate knowledge attained 
throughout the HADM curriculum as well as 
the ability to apply that knowledge in a practical 
manner through completion of a "mega case 
study" utilizing a small administrative group/ 
team approach. Includes service-learning component. 

HADM 480 3 cr. 

Internship in Long-Term Care Administration 

(Prerequisite: approval of HADM director) A 
practical internship in a licensed long-term care 
facility under the supervision of a licensed nurs- 
ing home administrator. Students spend 520 
hours per semester in the field placement and 1 5 
hours in on-campus seminars. Students must 
accumulate 1 ,000 hours of internship experience 
by taking HADM 480 in both the fall and 
spring semesters of their Senior year. Students 
must provide their own transportation. 

HADM 481 3 cr. 

Internship in Health Administration 

(Prerequisite: HADM 380) A supervised Health 
Administration work experience of 150 hours 
within an approved organizational setting. Graded 
satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Students must pro- 
vide their own transportation. 



270 Panuska College/Human Resources Studies 



HUMAN RESOURCES 
STUDIES 

Faculty 

Daniel J. West, Ph.D., Chair 

Mary Helen McSweeney, Ph.D. 

Peter C. Olden, Ph.D. 

Terri Freeman Smith, M.S. 

Robert J. Spinelli, M.Ph. 

William G. Wallick, Ph.D., Program Director 

Overview 

The Human Resources Studies major inte- 
grates knowledge from the human resources 
field, social and behavioral sciences, business, 
and the liberal arts. Human Resource profes- 
sionals work within all industries and are con- 
cerned with recruiting, developing, and 
retaining a productive workplace. The chang- 
ing nature of work, as influenced by social, 
economic, technological, and educational 
forces is explored both nationally and glob- 
ally. The study of human resource theories 
and their practical applications in the work- 
place is an essential part of the program. The 
faculty is committed to providing the highest 
quality learning environment to prepare stu- 
dents academically and practically for employ- 
ment in the human resources field. In addi- 
tion, students in the HRS major are expected 
to actively develop their own knowledge, 
skills, attitudes, and competencies to prepare 
themselves for a career in human resources. 
To that end, students are encouraged to 
demonstrate academic excellence in all course- 
work, make meaningful service commitments 
to their communities, and develop an attitude 
toward life-long learning. Opportunities for 
students to identify with and actively partici- 
pate in the HR profession, such membership 
in the student Chapter of the Society for 
Human Resource Management, are hallmarks 
of the program. Program highlights include: 

Bachelor of Science Degree 

• 131 credits with 37 credits from HRS 
major courses 

• Required Business minor 

• Required portfolio documenting specific 
student outcomes 

• Overall minimum 2.5 GPA is required in 
major courses 



• Overall minimum 2.0 GPA is required in 
cognate courses 

• Required internship to gain practical 
work experience 

• National and global focus - study abroad 
is encouraged 

• Required 80 Hour Service Learning com- 
ponent 

• Combined B.S./M.S. can be earned in a 
five-year period 

Minor in Human Resources Studies 

The student must take a minimum of 18 
credits. Five courses are required: HRS 111, 
112, 251, 252, and 340 plus one HRS elective. 

Course Descriptions 

HRS 111 3 cr. 

(S) Macro Human Resources 

An introduction to the changing nature of work 
including trends, theories, concepts, and prac- 
tices for maintaining an effective workforce. 

HRS 112 3cr. 

Micro Human Resources 

An introduction to the major ftinctional areas of 
the human resources field. Includes service-learning 
component. 

HRS 251 3cr. 

(W) Performance Appraisal 

A review of the performance management 
process including the design and implementa- 
tion of job descriptions and of accompanying 
performance appraisal systems. Includes service- 
learning component. 

HRS 252 3 cr. 

(W) Workforce Education and Training 

A study of the various organizational approaches 
to developing the skills and competencies of 
employees including the assessment of need, 
design, development, implementation, and 
evaluation of training. Includes service-learning 
component. 

HRS 284 3 cr. 

Special Topics 

Selected topics in human resources are offered 
on a variable basis. 

HRS 293 3 cr. 

Research Applications in Human Resources 

An introduction to research methodology as 
applied to human resources issues and problems 
with an emphasis on descriptive, experimental, 
and quasi-experimental designs. 



Panuska College/Human Resources Studies 27 1 



Human Resources Studies Curriculum 








Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


HRSlll 


Macro Human Resources 


3 




MAJOR 


HRS112 


Micro Human Resources' 




3 


GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar' 


1 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120-T/RS 121 


Intro to Philosophy-Theology I 


3 


3 


GE SPCH 


COMM 100 


Public Speaking 




3 


GEWRTG 


WKYG 107 


Composition 




3 


1 GE C/IL 


C/IL 104 


Computing and Information Literacy 


3 




- GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Elective 


3 




. QE QUAN 


PSYC 210 


Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences 




3 


MgHF.n 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 


1 


17 


16 


Second Year 










MAJOR 


HRS251 


Performance Appraisal' 




3 


MAJOR 


HRS 252 


Workforce Education and Training' 


3 




MAJOR 


HRS 293 


Research Applications in HR 




3 


COGNATE 


ACC 253 


Financial Accounting 


3 




COGNATE 


PSYC 335 


Psychological Testing 




3 


GE S/BH 


ECO 101 


Current Economic Issues 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 




GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL-T/RS 


Philosophy-T/RS Elective 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 122 


Theology II 




3 


GE NSCI 


NSCI ELECT 


Natural Science Eleaive 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elective 


3 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


1 




16 


18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


HRS 340 


Compensation and Benefits 




3 


MAJOR 


HRS 351 


Recruitment, Selection and Staffing' 


3 




MAJOR 


HRS 353 


HR Information Systems 


3 




MAJOR 


HRS 390 


Career Seminar' 




1 


MAJOR 


HRS ELECT 


HRS Eleaive 


3 




COGNATE 


MGT351 


Principles of Management I 




3 


COGNATE 


FIN 351 


Introduction to Finance 




3 


COGNATE 


ECO 351 


Environment of International Business 


3 




COGNATE 


MKT 351 


Introduction to Marketing 




3 


COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Elective 


3 




GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Elecrive 


3 




GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Elective 


18 


3 
16 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


HRS 480 


Internship' 


3 




MAJOR 


HRS 490 


Leadership Seminar' 




3 


MAJOR 


HRS ELECT 


HRS Elective 


3 




COGNATE 


OIM471 


Business Information Management 


3 




COGNATE 


ELECT 


Cognate Elective 


3 




GEHUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Himianities Electives 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Electives 


15 


9 
15 






TOTAL: 


131 CREDITS 


' Includes service-learning component 



272 Panuska College/Nursing 



HRS 340 3 cr. 

Compensation and Benefits 

A study of both direct and indirect forms of 
compensation including legal requirements with 
a focus on internal and external equity. 

HRS 351 3cr. 

(D) Recruitment, Selection, and Staffing 

A study of the techniques, methods, and require- 
ments for identifying, screening, evaluating, and 
selecting prospective job candidates. Includes 
service-learning component. 

HRS 353 3 cr. 

Human Resources Information Systems 

An introduction to the various computer soft- 
ware applications related to the human resources 
field. 

HRS 382 3 cr. 

Directed Study 

An independent study experience on a specific 
human resources-related topic or a research project. 

HRS 390 1 cr. 

Human Resources Career Seminar 

A survey of current trends and occupations in 
Human Resources with an emphasis on advanced 
planning and preparation for the required 
internship experience and post-graduation career 
planning. Includes service-learning component. 

HRS 480 3 cr. 

Human Resources Internship 

A supervised human resources work experience 
within an approved organizational setting. 
Requires at least 120 hours of human resources 
employment with an additional 18 hours of on- 
campus, faculty-led seminars and individual 
meetings. Includes service-learning component. 

HRS 490 3 cr. 

Human Resources Leadership Seminar 

Students will assess and develop their leadership 
skills and participate in an in-depth case study 
that integrates previous learning. Includes service- 
learning component. 



NURSING 

Faculty 

Patricia Harrington, Ed.D., Chair 
Dona M. Carpenter, Ed.D. 
Linda H. Desmond, Ed.D. 
Mary Jane K. DiMattio, Ph.D. 
Marian L. Farrell, Ph.D. 
Rosellen M. Garrett, Ph.D. 
Mary Jane S. Hanson, Ph.D. 
Sharon S. Hudacek, Ed.D. 
Lisa Ann Lesneski, M.S.N. 
Mary E. Muscari, Ph.D. 
Laurel T. Pierangeli, M.S. 
Paula Roe-Prior, Ph.D. 
Margarete Lieb Zalon, Ph.D. 

Overview 

The purpose of the baccalaureate nursing 
program is to prepare qualified persons for 
entry-level practice of professional nursing in 
hospitals and community health settings. The 
program also provides the academic founda- 
tions for advanced study in nursing. 

High school graduates are admitted as 
freshmen into the program, which leads to a 
Bachelor of Science degree with a major in 
Nursing. Total class enrollment is limited in 
consideration of educational and clinical 
resources. The curriculum can be completed 
in eight regular semesters of full-time study or 
four academic years. 

The nursing program has the fiill approval 
of the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing. 
The curriculum is based on a planned pro- 
gression of courses so as to develop and build 
upon knowledge and skills at levels of increas- 
ing competency. Therefore, all required courses 
must be taken in sequence. For progression 
through the Nursing program, a minimum 
average grade of C must be attained in the 
prerequisite Natural Science courses (BIOL 
110-111, CHEM 110-111, BIOL 210). A 
minimum grade of C must be attained in the 
prerequisite Quantitative course, PSYC 210, 
and in each Nursing course. Students who 
score less than a 1 3 on the Math Placement 
exam during Freshman Orientation will be 
required to complete Math 102 or an equiva- 
lent course. 

Final grade for Nursing courses with con- 
current clinical laboratory: The clinical-labo- 
ratory component of a Nursing course shall 



Panuska College/Nursing 273 



be on the basis of S, Satisfactory (Pass), or U, 
Unsatisfactory (Fail). If the student obtains an 
S in the clinical laboratory, the final grade in 
the course, which is entered on the perma- 
nent transcript, shall be the grade assigned for 
the lecture portion of the course. If the stu- 
dent does not obtain an S in the clinical labo- 
ratory, the final grade in the course, which is 
entered on the permanent transcript, shall be 
an F, no matter what grade was assigned for 
the lecture portion of the course. Both lecture 
and clinical components must be repeated if a 
grade of C-, D+, D or F is obtained in a Nurs- 
ing course. 

Prior to the junior and senior year, students 
enrolled in the Nursing program must present 
a certificate as evidence of having completed 
the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Basic Life 
Support course or Modular course offered by 
the American Red Cross or the American 
Heart Association. In order to graduate. 
Nursing majors are required to complete a 
minimum of 20 hours of community service 
during each academic year. Dexter Hanley 
College students will meet the service-learn- 
ing requirement by completing major courses 
that have a service-learning component. 

In addition to the general University tuition 
and fees, students majoring in Nursing 
assume responsibility for the following: uni- 
forms and other required clinical accessories, 
yearly physical examinations, entrance eye 
examination, immunizations, comprehensive 
achievement tests, liability insurance and any 
travel expenses incurred. Students must also 
provide their own transportation to and from 
agencies utilized for clinical laboratories, and 
have access to a car during their community- 
health clinical experiences in the senior year. 
Senior status in the Nursing Program is 
defined as completion of at least 100 credits 
including cognate and prerequisite courses for 
NURS 450 and NURS 452. 

Applicants and students should be aware 
that Pennsylvania law prohibits licensure of 
individuals convicted of felonies related to 
controlled substance and may prohibit licen- 
sure if there is a conviction for any felonious 
act. For details, see the Admissions Brochure 
and the Student Handbook of the Department 
of Nursing. Prior to the junior year clinical 
courses, all Nursing majors are required to 
submit a Pennsylvania Child Abuse History 
Clearance and a Pennsylvania State Police 
Criminal Record Check to the Nursing Depart- 



ment. These clearances are maintained on file 
in the Department of Nursing. Copies will be 
provided to clinical sites upon request. 

Upon graduation the students will be eligible 
for admission to the examination for the regis- 
tered-nurse licensure. The University of Scran- 
ton's Nursing program is accredited by the 
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. 

The Department of Nursing also offers a 
flexible program for registered nurses and 
licensed practical nurses interested in return- 
ing to school to complete a bachelor's degree 
in nursing. An accelerated track is offered for 
students interested in pursuing graduate edu- 
cation and who meet the admission criteria 
for this option. For BS requirements, please 
see the Dexter Hanley College section. 

Course Descriptions 

The following option is available for ROTC 
Nurse cadets: Subject to annual review, 3 credits 
may be awarded for successful completion of the 
ROTC Nurse Summer Training Program 
(NSTP) in place of NURS 473 Lab (2 cr.) and 
NURS 475 Lab (1 cr.). 

NURS 100 3 cr. 

Family Health 

(For non-Nursing majors) Concepts and princi- 
ples related to the promotion and maintenance 
of optimal family health. Considers factors perti- 
nent to health needs and health practices 
throughout the life cycle. 

NURS 111 3 cr. 

(D) Women's Health 

(Open to all students) Course focuses on historic, 
physiological, social, cultural, emotional and eco- 
nomic issues affecting women's health. The 
course explores strategies to empower women's 
use of health-care services. Class members will be 
expected to participate actively in all discussions. 

NURS 112 3cr. 

Sexual Development through the Life Span 

(Open to all students) Impact on sexual roles 
and expression, and health and social issues as 
they relate to sexual function. Emphasis is placed 
on developing sexual awareness of the student. 
Three hours lecture. 

NURS 113 1 cr. 

Interpretation: Cardiac Rhythms 

(Prerequisites: NURS 350 or NURS 380, C/IL 
102) Focus on the role of the nurse in providing 
care to individuals experiencing common cardiac 
dysrhythmias. One hour lecture. 



274 Panuska College/Nursing 



Nursing Curriculum 






<• 




Department and Number 


Descriptive Title of Course 


FallCr. 


Spr. Cr. 


First Year 










MAJOR 


NURS 140' 


Introduction to Nursing Concepts 




3 '• 


GE NSCI 


CHEM 110-111 


Introduction to Chemistry 


3 


3 


GE NSCI 


BIOL 110-111 


Structure & Function 


4 


4 


GE WRTG-SPCH 


WRTG 107-COMM 100 


Composition-Public Speaking 


3 


3 .: 


GE C/IL 


C/IL 102 


Computing and Information Literacy 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 120 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




GE S/BH 


PSYCHO 


Fundamentals of Psychology 


3 




GE FSEM 


INTO 100 


Freshman Seminar 


1 




GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


17 


17 


Second Year 








i 


MAJOR 


NURS 250 


Physical Assessment /Heakh Patterns 


3 




MAJOR 


NURS 251 


Nursing Related to the Health Patterns 




4 \ 


MAJOR 


NURS 262 


Pharmacology I 




1 


COGNATE 


EXSC 220 


Nutrition for Health Professions 




3 


COGNATE 


BIOL 210 


Introductory Medical Microbiology 


3 




GE QUAN 


PSYC210 


Psychological Statistics 




3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL 210 


Ethics 


3 


3 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


T/RS 121 


Theology I 


3 


t 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Electives 


6 




GE S/BH 


PSYC 225' 


Abnormal Psychology 




3 !i 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 




1 


18 


17-18 


Third Year 










MAJOR 


NURS 350-371 


Nursing Care of the Adult I-II 


5.5 


5.5 


MAJOR 


NURS 352 


Mental Health Nursing 


5.5 




MAJOR 


NURS 373 


Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family 




5 


MAJOR 


NURS 360-361 


Pharmacology II-III 


1 


1 


GE PHIL-T/RS 


PHIL212*-T/RS122 


Medical Ethics-Theology 11 


3 


3 


GE ELECT 


PSYC 221 '-ELECT 


Childhood and Adolescence-Elective 


3 
18 


3 

17.5 


Fourth Year 










MAJOR 


NURS 450 


Nursing Care of the Adult III 


5.5 




MAJOR 


NURS 452 


Nursing Care of Children and Adolescents 


4.5 




MAJOR 


NURS 493 


Research in Nursing 


3 




MAJOR 


NURS 471 


Community Health Nursing 




3.5 ' 


MAJOR 


NURS 473= 


Synth, of Leadership Concepts in Nursing 




3 


MAJOR 


NURS 475= 


Critical Care Nursing 




3 


GE HUMN 


HUMN ELECT 


Humanities Eleaive 




3 


GE ELECT 


FREE ELECT 


Free Elective 




3 


GE PHED 


PHED ELECT 


Physical Education 


I 




14 


15.5 






TOTAL: 135 CREDITS 


' Fall or spring semester 










- ROTC option available 










' Recommended by the department 














f 


f^-.--.%.,>i-' 



Panuska College/Nursing 275 



NURS114 3cr. 

Cardiopulmonary Critical Care Nursing 

(Prerequisites: NURS 350 or NURS 380, C/IL 
102) Focus on the professional nurse's role in 
providing care to critically ill patients. Emphasis 
on nursing care for alterations in cardiopulmonary 
fiinction, including common cardiac dysrhythmias. 

NURS 140 3 cr. 

(W) Introduction to Nursing Concepts 

An exploration of the core concepts of the client, 
health, nursing and health patterns. Historical, 
philosophical, and social development of nursing 
and the role of the professional nurse are pre- 
sented. Understanding of health and health con- 
tinuum in the broader perspective of the human 
person, the physiological, psychological, devel- 
opmental, and socio-cultural modes. Service 
learning: 20 hours. Three hours lecture. 

NURS 213 3 cr. 

(W) Child and Adolescent Health Promotion 

(Recommended Prerequisite: PSYC 221, but 
open to all students) Focus on the professional's 
role as advocate, care-giver and/or teacher in the 
promotion of health for children and adolescents, 
directly through health maintenance and preven- 
tion and indirectly through health-care policy. 

NURS 241 3 cr. 

(W) Perspectives in Professional Nursing 

(Prerequisites: Sophomore standing in the Nursing 
Program, RN and LPN students only) Perspectives 
in professional nursing explores concepts incorpo- 
rated in the philosophy, organizing framework and 
curriculum structures of the Nursing program. 
Integration of the health patterns and nursing 
process in the delivery of professional nursing care 
is introduced. Pertinent issues impacting on the 
nursing profession are addressed. 

NURS 242 3 cr. 

Nursing Related to the Assessment of Health 
Patterns 

(Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, NURS 241, 
RN and LPN students only) Focus on the profes- 
sional nurse's role as caregiver in assessing, diagnos- 
ing and planning interventions of adaptive health 
patterns in individuals. Application of the nursing 
process to well persons and to individuals and fam- 
ilies with alterations in health panerns. Exploration 
of concepts for planning holistic health care. Two 
hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 

NURS 250 3 cr. 

Physical Assessment Related to Health Patterns 

(Prerequisites: BIOL 110-111, sophomore stand- 
ing in Nursing program) Development of begin- 



ning skill in the basic physical-assessment tech- 
niques necessary for the promotion of optimal 
health as a care-giver. Focus on the professional 
nurse's role in assessing the physiological dimen- 
sion of adaptive health patterns in individuals 
with a stable health status. Service learning: 10 
hours. Two hours lecture and three hours campus 
laboratory. 

NURS 251 4cr. 

Nursing Related to Health Patterns 

(Prerequisites: NURS 140, NURS 250; 
co-requisite: NURS 262) Focus on the profes- 
sional nurse's role in promoting the individual's 
health status, utilizing the developmental, physi- 
ological, psychological and sociocultural dimen- 
sions of functional health patterns. Development 
of beginning skills in therapeutic nursing inter- 
ventions. Service learning: 10 hours. Two hours 
lecture, six hours campus/clinical laboratory 

NURS 262 1 cr. 

Pharmacology I 

(Prerequisites: Chem 110, BIOL 110-111, BIOL 
210) Principles of pharmacology and specific 
drug groups. Emphasis is placed on drug actions, 
side effects, dosages and nursing responsibilities. 

NURS 310 3cr. 

(D) Understanding Transcultural Health Care 

This course will focus on exploring values, 
beliefs and lifestyles of diverse cultural groups in 
order to broaden the student's perception and 
understanding of health and illness and the vari- 
ety of meanings these terms carry for members 
of differing groups. 

NURS 311 3cr. 

Computer Applications in Nursing 

(Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in Nursing 
program, LPN or RN) Designed for Nursing 
majors or nurses who wish to learn computer 
capabilities for nursing applications in ways that 
do not involve programming. Emphasis is on 
interactive computer experience as an introduction 
to disk-operating systems, and word processing, 
computer-assisted instruction, file management, 
database management system, care-planning, 
software evaluation and research access. 

NURS 312 3cr. 

(D) Nursing the Older Adult 

(Prerequisite: Junior standing in Nursing, OT, or 
PT program) Focus on the professional nurse's 
role of care-giver, advocate and teacher in pro- 
moting and maintaining adaptive responses of 
the older adult experiencing alterations in health 
patterns. Emphasis placed on multidimensional 



276 Panuska College/Nursing 



assessment factors and interventions in meeting 
bio-psycho-social needs. 

NURS314 3cr. 

Principles of Nursing Ethics 

(Prerequisites: Philosophy 210, Junior standing 
in Nursing Program, LPN or RN track) 
Addresses ethical issues in the clinical nursing 
practice of the professional nurse as care-giver, 
advocate, teacher, leader/manager. The focus is 
on the decisions made regarding patient care. 
Three hours lecture. 

NURS 344 3 cr. 

Forensic Health Care of Victims 

An overview of forensic health issues as they 
relate to victims of violent crimes, such as 
intrafamilial violence, sexual violence, stalking, 
workplace violence, homicide and terrorism. 
Content includes forensic roles, evidence collec- 
tion and preservation, victim needs and rights, 
responses to trauma, victim's resources, and 
death investigation. 

NURS 345 3 cr. 

Forensic Health Care of OfiFenders 

An overview of forensic health issues as they 
relate to perpetrators of violent crimes, including 
intrafamilial violence, sexual violence, stalking, 
workplace violence, homicide and terrorism. 
Content includes forensic roles, crime classifica- 
tions, relationship between animal cruelty and 
human violence, offender needs and rights, and 
juvenile offenders. 

NURS 350 5.5 cr. 

Nursing Care of the Adult I 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 110-111, BIOL 210, 
NURS 251; co-requisites: NURS 360 and 
NURS 352) The first of three courses that 
focuses on physiological and psychological adap- 
tation to dysfunctional health patterns. Empha- 
sis is placed on the nursing process and fianc- 
tional health patterns as a framework for 
practice. Pathophysiology and nursing care 
related to alterations in oxygenation, perftision 
and metabolism, and the perioperative experi- 
ence are included. Service learning: JO hours. 
Three hours lecture, 1 5 hours clinical lab/week 
(for seven weeks) alternate with NURS 352. 

NURS 352 5.5 cr. 

Mental Health Nursing 

(Prerequisites: CHEM 1 1 0- 1 1 1 , BIOL 1 1 0- 1 1 1 , 
BIOL 210, NURS 251; co-requisites: NURS 
360, NURS 350) The focus is on psychological 
adaptation to dysfunctional health patterns. 



Emphasis is placed on the nursing process and 
functional health patterns as a framework for 
practice. Psychopathology and nursing care of 
individuals and families experiencing alterations 
in mental health are explored. Three hours lec- 
ture, 1 5 hours clinical lab/week (for seven 
weeks) alternate with NURS 350. 

NURS 360 1 cr. 

Pharmacology II 

(Prerequisite: Nurs 262) Principles of pharma- 
cology and specific drug groups related to alter- 
ations in the sleep-rest, activity-exercise, self-per- 
ception/self-concept health patterns. Emphasis is 
placed on drug actions, side effects, dosages, and 
nursing responsibilities. One hour lecture. 

NURS 361 1 cr. 

Pharmacology III 

(Prerequisite: NURS 360) Principles of pharma- 
cology and specific drug groups related to alter- 
ations in the nutrition-metabolic, sexuality-repro- 
duction, role-relationship, cognitive-perceptual, 
and elimination health patterns. Emphasis is 
placed on drug actions, side effects, dosages, and 
nursing responsibilities. One hour lecture. 

NURS 371 5.5 cr. 

Nursing Care of the Adult II 

(Prerequisites: NURS 350, NURS 352; co-req- 
uisites: NURS 361, NURS 373) The second of 
three courses that focus on physiological and 
psychological adaptation to dysfianctional health 
patterns. Emphasis is placed on the nursing 
process and fiinctional health patterns as a 
framework for practice. Pathophysiology and 
nursing care related to alterations in metabolism, 
nutrition and immunity are included. Service 
learning: 10 hours. Three hours lecture, 15 hours 
clinical lab/week (for 7 weeks) alternate with 
NURS 373. 

NURS 373 5 cr. 

Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family 

(Prerequisites: NURS 350, NURS 352; co-req- 
uisites: NURS 361, NURS 371) Focus is on the 
physiological and psychological adaptation to 
functional and dysfunctio