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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog."

West 

Chester 

University 

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Undergraduate Catalog 




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2003-2004 






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Undergraduate Catalog 

2003-2004 



The West Chester University Mission Statement 

West Chester University, a member of the Pennsylvania State System ot Higher Education, is a public, regional, comprehensive 
institution committed to providing access and offering high-quality undergraduate education, select post-baccalaureate and graduate 
programs, and a variety of educational and cultural resources for its students, alumni, and citizens of southeastern Pennsylvania. 

The West Chester University Values Statement 

West Chester University is committed to attracting, enrolling, and graduating quality students from a wide variety of educational, cultural, 
and economic backgrounds. This endeavor requires the University to attract and retain highly qualified faculty and staff and to provide 
each member ot the University community with learning and leadership development opportunities. To this end, the University supports 
and encourages programs which benefit all people and which seek to eradicate discrimination and injustice. We treasure what we believe to 
be the highest principles of American society: the worth and uniqueness of each individual, the belief that success is to be earned by indi- 
vidual effort put forth in an environment founded on equality ot opportunity, and the appreciation of the ideal of an inclusive society. 
We believe that it is incumbent upon all members of our community - staff, students, faculty and administrators - to conduct them- 
selves with civility toward one another at all times. We value the special talents and contributions of each member of our community. 
We flirther affirm the worth and dignity of each member and the shared responsibility ot all to treat each other as individuals, with 
respect and courtesy. 

As a university owned by the citizens of Pennsylvania, we value our mission to provide the best educational opportunities possible which 
will enable the University community to successfully address the concerns of a global society. To this end. West Chester University seeks 
to provide diligent advising for students and to focus on teaching students to think clearly and critically, to make logical and ethical judg- 
ments, and to communicate effectively with others. 

West Chester University's community strongly supports the principles of academic integrity and academic responsibility, viewing both as the 
province of every member of the campus community. We hold the highest esteem for teaching directed toward student learning and affirm that 
mastery of content as well as mastery ot teaching skills necessary to communicate such content are paramount. 

This values statement is intended to be a living document which will serve West Chester University as it changes and evolves in the com- 
ing years. 



Communications Directory 



MAILING .\DDRESS: 
TELEPHONES: 



World Wide Web: 
Academic Advising 

Academic Development 
Program 

Admissions/Under- 
graduate Catalogs 

Affirmative Action 

Billing/Payments 

Bookstore 

Careers/Placement 

Conference Ser\aces 

Continuing Education 
(Adult Studies) 
Counseling 

Financial Aid/ 

Work Study 
Graduate Studies/ 

Catalogs 
Housing 

Police 

Public Relations 

and Marketing 
Services for Smdents 
wdth Disabilities 

Student Activities 
and Universitv' Events 



West Chester Universitv 

West Chester, PA 19383 

Dial 610-436 plus number in parentheses. 

For offices not shown here, call the 

University Information Center: 610-436- 

1000. 

wwvir. wcupa.edu 

Director of Academic Ad\ising, Lawrence 

Center (3505) 

Director of Academic Development 

Program, Lawrence Center (3505) 

Director of Admissions, Messikomer Hall, 

(3411); 877-315-2165 (toll free) 

Office of Social Equit)', 13/15 University 

Ave. (2433) 

Office of the Bursar, Elsie O. Bull Center 

(2552) 

Student Services, Inc., Svkes Student 

Union (2242) 

Director of Career Development Center, 

Lawrence Center (2501) 

Office of Conference and Rental Sendees, 

13/15 Universit)' Ave. (6931) 

Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 

Education, McKelvie HaU (1009) 

Counseling Center, Lawrence Center 

(2301) 

Director of Financial Aid, 

Elsie O. BuU Center (2627) 

Dean of Graduate Studies and Extended 

Education, McKelvie HaU (2943) 

Residence Life, Sykes Student Union 

(3307) 

Public SafetN' Department, Peoples 

Building (3311) 

Director of Public Relations and Marketing, 

13/15 University- Avenue (3383) 

Director, Office of Services for 

Students with Disabilities, Lawrence 

Center (2564) 

Student Programming Dept./Student 

Activities Council, Sykes Student Union 

(2983) or 

Student Union Information Desk (2984) 

Sykes Student Union (2955) 

Universit}' Registrar, Elsie O. BuU Center 

(3541) 

Office of the Registrar, 

Elsie O. BuU Center (2230) 

Teacher Education Center, Recitation HaU 

(3090) 



Student Services, Inc. 
Scheduling/Registration 

Summer Sessions 

Teacher Certification 

Accreditation 

West Chester University is accredited by the American Chemical 
Society, American Dietetics Association, American Speech- 
Language-Hearing Association, Commission on Accreditation of 
Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), Commission on 
Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry, CouncU of Social Work 
Education, Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy 
Education, Middle States Association of CoUeges and Schools 
(MSA), National Association of Schools of Music, National League 
for Nursing, Society of Public Health Education/ American 
Association for Health Education (SOPHE/AAHE), and approval 
from the State Board of Nursing of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. West Chester Universit)''s professional education pro- 



grams are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Teacher Education (NCATE) and approved bv the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education to recommend candidates for certification. 

Nondiscrimination/ Affirmative Action Policy 

West Chester University is committed to providing leadership in 
extending equal oppormnities to aU individuals. Accordingly, the 
Universitv' wiU continue to make every eftort to provide these rights to 
aU persons regardless of race, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, 
age, marital stams, sexual orientation, disabUitv', or veteran status. 
This poUcy applies to aU members of the University commiunity, 
including smdents, faculty, staff, and administrators. It also applies to 
aU applicants for admission or employment and aU participants in 
University-sponsored activities. 

This poUcy is in compliance with federal and state laws, including 
Tides VI and VII of the CivU Rights Act of 1964, Title LX of the 
Educational Amendment of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation 
Act of 1973, Americans with DisabUities Act of 1990, and Executive 
Order of the Governor of Pennsylvania. Any individual having sug- 
gestions, problems, complaints, or grievances with regard to equal 
oppormnity or affirmative action, or to request a translation ot this 
publication into a language other than English, is encouraged to con- 
tact Ms. Luz Hernandez, director. Office of Social Equitv, 13/15 
Universitv' Ave., 610-436-2433. 

Sexual Harassment Policy 

West Chester University is committed to equaUtv of opportunity and 

freedom from discrimination for aU of its students and employees. 

Because sex'ual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex, 

the University wiU not tolerate it in any form. 

Uppon official filing of a complaint, immediate investigation wiU be 

made culminating in appropriate corrective action where warranted, 

which may include termination of the relationship with the 

Universit)'. 

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sex'ual advances, requests 

for sex'ual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual 

nature occurring when: 

1. submission to the unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature is made 
either explicitly or impUcitly a term or condition of an individu- 
al's employment, or of a smdent's academic stams or treatment; 

2. submission to or rejection of the unwelcome conduct of a sexual 
namre by an individual is used as the basis for academic or 
employment decisions affecting such an individual; or 

3. the unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature is sufficiently severe, 
persistent, or pervasive to Umit an individual's abUitv' to partici- 
pate in, benefit from, or perform at extracurricular activities, 
work, academic or educational programs, or to create a hostile or 
abusive Uving, working, or academic environment. 

A complete copy of the University's Sex-ual Harassment PoUcv' docu- 
ment, inclusive of the Sexual Harassment Complaint Procedure, mav' 
be obtained from the Office of Social Equity. 

Individuals who beUeve themselves to be the victims of sexual harass- 
ment, or who have questions about the LTniversitv''s policy on this 
matter should contact Ms. Luz Hernandez, director, Office of Social 
Equin-, 13/15 Universitv' Ave., 610-436-2433. 

ADA Policy and Accommodations 

In keeping with West Chester University's commitment to equaUtv' of 
opportunity and compUance with the Americans with Disabilities Act 
ot 1990, the Universit)' has established procedures and designated 
ofifices to provide accommodations for aU people with disabiUties. A 
complete copy of the ADA Poliq- Statement, as weU as appropriate 
offices, appears on page 53 of this catalog. Individuals needing 
accommodations should make their needs known to the responsible 
office at least a week in advance. This publication is available on our 
Web site (wwvv.wcupa.edu). A disk version for those needing accom- 
modations is available from the Office of Admissions, 610-436-3411. 

The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the Universit)'. West Chester 
Universit)' reserves the right to change any provisions or requirements 
at any time. 



Contents 



Communications Directory ii 

Introducing West Chester Universit}' 3 

Campus and Facilities 4 

Admission to West Chester Universit)' 7 

Fees and Expenses 9 

Financial Aid 12 

Student Affairs 21 

Academic Affairs 29 

Degree Requirements 36 

Academic Policies and Procedures 40 

Structure of Academic Affairs 54 

Undergraduate Programs at West Chester 55 

Programs of Study and Course Offerings 56 

Department of Accounting 57 

Department of Anthropology and Sociology 57 

Department of Art 59 

Department of Biology 62 

Department of Chemistry 65 

Citizenship Education Program 68 

(formerly Social Studies) 

Department of Communication Studies 68 

Department of Communicative Disorders 71 

Department of Computer Science 72 

Department of Counseling and Educational 

Psychology 74 

Department of Criminal Justice 74 

Department of Earlv Childhood and Special 

Education 76 

Department of Economics and Finance 78 

Department of Educational Development 80 

Military Science Program (Army ROTC) 81 

Air Force ROTC Program 82 

Department of Elementary Education 82 

Department of English 84 

Department of Foreign Languages 88 

Department of Geography and Planning 94 

Department of Geology and Astronomy 96 

Department of Health 98 

Department of History 102 

Honors Program 105 

Interdisciplinary Programs 106 

American Studies Program 107 

Comparative Literature Studies Program 107 

Ethnic Studies Program 109 



Latin-American Studies Program 109 

Linguistics Program 110 

Peace and Conflict Studies Program 110 

Russian Studies Program Ill 

Department of Kinesiology Ill 

Liberal Studies Program 116 

Department of Literaa' 117 

Department of Management 118 

Department of Marketing 119 

Department of Mathematics 120 

Music (School of) 122 

Department of Applied Music 124 

Department of Music Education 126 

Department of Music History and Literature 127 

Department of Music Theon' and Composition . . .127 

Department of Nursing 128 

Pharmaceutical Product Development Program 131 

Department of Philosophy 131 

Department of Physics and Pre-Engineering Program . .133 

Department of Political Science 135 

Pre-Medical Program 138 

Department of Professional and Secondary Education . .138 

Department of Psycholog}' 140 

Department of Social Work 141 

Department of Sports Medicine 143 

Teaching Certification Programs 145 

Department of Theatre Arts 147 

Women's Studies Program 148 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 150 

Administration 151 

Facult}- 152 

Academic Calendar 166 

University Policy for Storm Closings 166 

Campus Map 167 

Borough Map 168 

Chester Count)' Map 169 

Index 170 

Department Telephone Numbers 174 



Introducing West Chester University 



QualiU' education at a reasonable price... 
this is the goal of West Chester 
University, the second largest of the 14 
institutions of higher learning that com- 
pose the State Svstem ot Higher 
Education of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. A comprehensive and mul- 
tipurpose university, West Chester sen'es 
indi\dduals of all ages with a variety of 
programs to fill their educational needs. 

West Chester offers degrees in the arts 
and sciences, teacher preparation and cer- 
tification, advanced stud}' preparation in 
fields such as medicine and law, educa- 
tion for specific professions, and continu- 
ing education. See page 55 for a complete 
listing of undergraduate degree programs. 

Total enrollment at West Chester 
includes approximateh' 10,200 under- 
graduate students and about 2,000 gradu- 
ate students. While most undergraduates 
are recent high school graduates prepar- 
ing for career objectives, many others are 
older indi%iduals, including veterans and 
homemakers, who either never before 
had the opportunity for a college educa- 
tion or whose schooling was interrupted. 

Most students are residents of Penn- 
sylvania, but students from other states 
and foreign countries are welcome. West 
Chester's student body represents a cross 
section of manv ethnic, racial, and reli- 
gious groups and includes students from 
all economic levels. 

Like the world around it, West Chester 
University is constantly changing and 
growing. The school continues to broaden 
and modif>' the nature and number of its 
programs to reflect the needs of its stu- 
dents in their endea\'or to prepare them- 
selves for success and fijlfillment in life. 

History of the University 

Although its founding year is 1871, the 
Universit)' in fact has deeper roots trac- 
ing from West Chester Academv, a pri- 
vate, state-aided school that existed 
from 1812 to 1869. The academy 
enjoyed strong support from the highlv 
intellectual Chester Counrv Cabinet of 
the Natural Sciences of the pre-Civil 
War decades. It was recognized as one 
of Pennsylvania's leading preparatory 
schools, and its e.xperience in teacher 
training laid the groundwork for the 
normal school years that were to follow. 



As the state began to take increasing 
responsibUitV' tor public education, the 
academy was transformed into West 
Chester Normal School, stiU privately 
owned but state certified. The normal 
school admitted its first class, consisting 
of 160 students, on September 25, 1871. 
In 1913, West Chester became the first 
of the normal schools to be owned out- 
right by the Commonwealth. 

West Chester became West Chester 
State Teachers College in 1927 when 
Pennsylvania initiated a four-vear pro- 
gram of teacher education. In 1960, as 
the Commonwealth paved the way for 
liberal arts programs in its college sys- 
tem. West Chester was renamed West 
Chester State College, and nvo years 
later introduced the liberal arts program 
that turned the one-time academv into a 
comprehensive college. 

In recognition of the historic merit of the 
campus, in 1981 the West Chester State 
College Quadrangle Historic District was 
placed on the National Register of 
Historic Places. The buildings included in 
this historic district are Philips Memorial 
Building, Rubv Jones Hall, Recitation 
Hall, and the Old Library. Except for 
Philips, these buildings are all constructed 
of native Chester Count\' serpentine stone. 

West Chester State achieved another 
major milestone with passage of the 
State Svstem of Higher Education bill. 
West Chester became one of the 14 
universities in the State System of 
Higher Education on Julv 1, 1983. 
Along with its new name — West 
Chester Universir\' of Pennsylvania of 
the State System of Higher Education 
— the institution acquired a new system 
of governance and the opportunity' to 
expand its degree programs. 

The Frederick Douglass Institute 

The Frederick Douglass Institute at West 
Chester University' is an academic pro- 
gram for advancing multicultural studies 
across the curriculum and for deepening 
the intellectual heritage of Frederick 
Douglass, the former slave, distinguished 
orator, journalist, author, and statesman. 
Douglass, who was a frequent \'isitor to 
the West Chester area, gave his last pub- 
lic lecture on West Chester's campus on 
February 1, 1895. Thuty years earlier, at 
the inauguration of a Baltimore, 



Maryland, institute named for him in 
October 1865, Douglass said that the 
mission was "to be a dispenser of knowl- 
edge, a radiator of light. In a word, we 
dedicate this institution to virtue, tem- 
perance, truth, liberty, and justice." 

At West Chester Llniversity-, the 
Douglass Institute is primarily involved in 
four academic areas: 1) conducting 
research in multiculturalism and on 
Frederick Douglass; 2) sponsoring distin- 
guished exhibits and lectures; 3) establish- 
ing opportunities for advanced study for 
public, private, and college-level teachers; 
and, finally', collaborating with historical 
societies and other educational and cul- 
tural agencies. West Chester University's 
Douglass Institute is recognized as the 
model for other Pennsylvania campuses 
and is called collectively the Frederick 
Douglass Institute of the Pennsylvania 
State System of Higher Education. 

The activities of the institute take place 
on and off campus. With undergraduate 
and graduate students, and West 
Chester faculty, the institute sponsors 
seminars and forums on selected topics. 
The Anna Alurrav Douglass Circle is 
the name for a lecture series offering a 
platform for today's leading intellectuals. 
Annually in October, the institute spon- 
sors Douglass Days, a festival of educa- 
tional activities on Douglass and multi- 
culturalism that involves the entire cam- 
pus and surrounding communities. 

For fiirther information, call Dr. C. 
James Trotman, director, Frederick 
Douglass Institute at 610-436-2766, or 
e-mail FDouglass@wcupa.edu. The fax 
number is 610-436-2769. 

The Frederick Douglass Society 

Drawing its content from our campus 
history of social consciousness and its 
strucmre from a variety of models in pub- 
lic life, the Frederick Douglass Society of 
West Chester University is the organiza- 
tion of faculty' and staff at West Chester 
who embrace Frederick Douglass' quest 
for fi-eedom and inclusiveness. Named in 
1983 for one of the 19th century's most 
distinguished advocates of human free- 
dom, the organization is oriented toward 
self-help and improvement by offering a 
coDective voice in the affairs of the 
University. Its programs also aim to stim- 
ulate other groups on campus to enrich 



Campus and Facilities 



our climate. The society annually raises 
money for scholarship funds. It also 
seeks, by the example of Douglass, to 
promote an intellectual standard that is 
not only grounded in excellence but pro- 
foundly rooted in the public mission of 
higher education. 

Institute for Women 

The Institute tor Women was initially 
designated to sen'e as the parent organi- 
zation to represent the interests of 
women on campus. The institute is an 
independent body headed by a director 
and board of directors. Along with the 
Commission on the Status of Women, 
Women's Center, and women's studies 
program, the Instiwte for Women 
engages in campus activities for the bene- 
fit of women students, faculty, and staff. 
The institute sponsors activities to 
enhance the self-esteem and career suc- 
cess of women at the University includ- 
ing the Woman-in-Residence Program, 
and the Graduate Grant and Endowed 
Book Funds. The institute prepares 
periodic reports on the status of women 
at the Universitv and has also secured 
Charlotte W. Newcombe Scholarship 
Grants for mature or second-career 
women for more than 20 years. For 



more information contact Dr. Joan M. 
Welch, director, at 610-436-2940. 

Location of the University 

West Chester University is in West 
Chester, a to%vn that has been the seat of 
government in Chester Count)' since 
1786. With a population of about 
20,000, the borough is small enough to 
have the pleasant aspects of a tree-shaded 
American town, large enough to contain 
essential services and the substance of a 
\agorous communit}', and old enough to 
give the student exposure to America's 
early history. Students can walk to West 
Chester's many churches. The town has 
excellent stores and a fine hospital. 
West Chester was settled in the early 
18th centun', principally bv members of 
the Societ}' of Friends. In the heart of 
town is its courthouse, a classical revival 
building designed in the 1840s by 
Thomas U. Walter, one of the architects 
for the Capitol in Washington, D.C. 
West Chester today is part of the rapid- 
ly growing suburban complex surround- 
ing Philadelphia and offers interesting 
opportunities for the study of local, 
county, and regional government in a 
period ot change and growth. 



Philadelphia is 25 miles to the east and 
Wilmington 17 miles to the south, 
putting the libraries, museums, and 
other cultural and historical resources of 
both cities in easy reach. Valley Forge, 
the Brand}-wine Battlefield, Longwood 
Gardens, and other historical attractions 
are near West Chester. New York and 
Washington are easily accessible by car 
or train. 

How to Reach West Chester 

The Borough of West Chester can be 
accessed from all directions both by car 
and public transportation. Route 3, the 
West Chester Pike, leads directly into 
town from center-cit\' Philadelphia. 
From the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 
motorists traveling west should take 
Route 202 south from the Valley Forge 
Interchange while those traveling east 
can arrive via Route 100 south from the 
Downingtown Interchange. From the 
south, Route 202 from Wilmington and 
Routes 100 and 52 from U.S. Route 1 
all lead to West Chester. 
Public transportation is available fi-om 
Philadelphia and other nearby commu- 
nities. 

Information on public transportation 
and carpoohng is available in Sykes 
Student Union, 610-436-2984.' 



Campus and Facilities 



Description of the Campus 

West Chester Universitv's campus is a 
unique mixture of 19th century colle- 
giate Gothic and contemporary architec- 
tural stales. Sbcty-two buildings, com- 
prising more than 2.4 million square 
feet, are specially landscaped within 400 
acres of rolling countryside. The distinc- 
tive buUdings and magnificent old trees 
make the campus one of the aesthetic 
treasures of Southeastern Pennsylvania. 

Approaching West Chester Borough 
from the south, the University stretches 
westward from High Street and provides 
a gateway to the borough. The 
Academic Quadrangle serves as a land- 
mark surrounded bv the University's 
oldest buildings - Philips Memorial, 
Recitation Hall, Anderson Hall, Ruby 
Jones Hall, and the Old Library. Three 
of these buildings are constructed of the 
green-hued serpentine stone that has 



given West Chester a particular charac- 
ter for more than a century. Over the 
decades the Universirv has expanded to 
the west and south to include eight resi- 
dence halls, science and athletic facili- 
ties, a dining facility', and drama and art 
buildings. The focal point of student 
leisure life outside the classroom is the 
Sykes Student Union, including the lat- 
est in aerobics/conditioning facilities, a 
movie theater, dining areas, a computer 
center, meeting rooms, and lounges. 

A dynamic, ongoing building program 
during the past decade has brought the 
Boucher Science Center, expansion and 
renovation of Sykes Student Union, com- 
puter technology' labs, renovated science 
and academic buildings, and the reopen- 
ing of the Philips Memorial Building, 
Emilie K. Asplundh Concert Hall, and 
Philips Autograph Library. In addition, 
the Graduate School of Business is now 



at a site off Route 202, five miles trom 
the main campus. The University' learn- 
ing environment will continue to keep 
pace with the needs ot students into the 
21st century with the construction of the 
dramatic new Swope Music Building and 
the Performing Arts Center, the addition 
of the Business and Information Tech- 
nology Center, a suite-stvle residence 
complex on North Campus, an apart- 
ment-st\'le residence complex on South 
Campus, enlarged dining facilities, and 
two parking garages. 

Traveling south three-fourths of a mile 
from the original campus, the visitor wUl 
discover the South Campus area, located 
on a 300-acre expanse of gendy rolling 
Chester Count}' countryside. South 
Campus includes an 11 -building housing 
complex providing apartment-style living 
for 500 students, and the Sturzebecker 
Health Sciences Center, a nationally 



Campus and Facilities 



acclaimed teaching, performance, and 
research facility. Surrounding the center 
are athletic fields, tennis courts, and 
Farrell Stadium, home to the 
University's renowned football program 
and the 2002 national champion wom- 
en's lacrosse team. Also at South 
Campus is the 67-acre Gordon Natural 
Area, which includes woodlands, fields, 
and a streamside habitat. This area has 
been conserved as a research and teach- 
ing resource for the natural sciences. 
From the archway of learning at the 
Philips Memorial Building to the hiking 
trails ot the Gordon Center, the visitor 
will find a rich tradition of educational 
excellence and a diverse variety of facili- 
ties in which to learn, live, and recreate. 

Information Services 

Information Services provides comput- 
ing resources for a wide variety of users, 
both academic and administrative. Many 
of the University's administrative func- 
tions, such as registration, grade report- 
ing, and billing, depend heavily on the 
campus-wide transaction processing sys- 
tem that provides centrahzed access to 
University data from workstations locat- 
ed throughout the campus. 
More importandy, computing is a vital 
instructional and research tool. Infor- 
mation Services offers students and facul- 
ty a wide range ot computing resources, 
from mainframe to microcomputers, 
printers, plotters, graphics workstations, 
digitizers, and optical scanners. Many of 
these facilities are available at various 
campus locarions, but the Academic 
Computing Center in Anderson HaU 
serves as a focal point for instructional 
computing activity. A valid WCU 
Identification (ID) card is required to use 
the Academic Computing Center. For 
fiirther information contact the Academic 
Compudng Center at 610-436-3349. 
Computing facilities throughout the 
campus are joined by the Information 
Services Network. This network offers 
electronic mail capabilities for all campus 
workstations, connection to the Internet, 
and access to the University's main library 
catalogs. AH WCU undergraduate stu- 
dents are provided computer accounts. 
The Information Services Network pro- 
vides high-speed access to software 
applications (programming languages, 
spreadsheets, word processors, faculty 
developed programs, etc.) and electronic 
communication capabilities to worksta- 
tions. Student laboratory facihties are 
available in the Academic Computing 



Center and in each ot the eight resi- 
dence halls. South Campus apartments, 
and in Sykes Student Union. 
Students interested in acquiring a work- 
ing knowledge of several commonly 
used software packages are encouraged 
to enroU in the introductory computing 
courses offered by the Department of 
Computer Science. 

Major hardware facilities include an IBM 
mainframe, numerous NTAS tile servers, 
PCs, Macintosh, SUN, and DEC work- 
stations. Letter-quality laser printers also 
are available for student use. 
Academic Computing Services is located 
in Anderson H;iU, 610-436-3349. The 
West Chester University' web site 
address is http://www.wcupa.edu. 

Geology Museum 

The West Chester University Geology 
Museum in Schmucker Science Center 
houses several collections of historic and 
scientific importance. Minerals from 
around the world, drawn from the col- 
lections of William Yocom and Ruth 
Bass, are on display. The collection of 
the late, well-known West Chester geol- 
ogist Hugh McKinstr}' contains fine 
specimens found in Chester County, as 
well as specimens from notable locahties 
world-wide and collections of other sig- 
nificant 19th century amateurs. A spe- 
cial cabinet with ultraviolet light houses 
selected specimens trom the extensive 
collection of fluorescent minerals of 
John Stolar, Sr. Other exhibits include 
fossils, the geology of Chester County, 
and labels written by tamous collectors 
and mineralogists. The museum is free 
and open to the public by appointment. 
Contact the Department ot Geology 
and Astronomy at 610-436-2727. 

WCU Observatory 

The Department of Geology and 
Astronomy maintains an astronomical 
observatory on the roof of the 
Schmucker Science Center. The main 
instrument is an 11.5 inch reflecting 
telescope that can be used in either the 
Newtonian or Cassagrain format. The 
auxihary telescopes include a pair of 
four-inch refractors, one used to project 
solar images in white hght and the other 
equipped with a hydrogen alpha solar fd- 
ter. A five-inch Schmidt camera also can 
be mounted on the telescope assembly. 
The telescope system can be used for 
basic observing, astrophotography, pho- 
tometry, and spectroscopy. The observa- 
tory is equipped with a graphics com- 



puter system and a video camera for pic- 
ture capturing capabihties. The observa- 
tory is used as an astronomical laborato- 
ry for astronomy courses and as a 
research area for independent study for 
junior- or senior-level research projects. 

WCU Planetarium 

The Department of Geology and 

Astronomy operates the University 
Planetarium which houses a Spitz A-5 
planetarium projector. The planetarium is 
used for astronomy class lectures and labs 
as well as for school and pubBc programs. 
Approximately 70 schools and other 
groups attend the free programs each 
year, and annual attendance approaches 
5,000. The planetarium dome is 10 
meters in diameter, and the projector was 
rebuilt and upgraded by Spitz Space 
Systems in 1993. Persons interested in 
arranging group visits should contact the 
Department of Geology and Astronomy 
at 610-436-2727 for details. 

Darlington Herbarium 

The Darlington Herbarium, housed in 
Schmucker Science Center, is one of the 
most highly regarded historical collections 
of dried plant specimens in the East. 
Ainong the 20,000 specimens are plants 
collected by such famous explorers and 
botanists as Captain John Fremont, 
Thomas Nuttall, Sir William Hooker, 
C.S. Rafinesque, and George Englemann. 
More than 200 collectors from America's 
formative years of 1820 to 1850 are repre- 
sented. The herbarium was the work of 
Dr. William Darlington (1782-1863), a 
member of the West Chester Cabinet of 
Science. Dr. Darlington was eminent in 
West Chester as a physician, educator, 
banker, businessman, historian, and 
botanist. His plants, however, were his 
first love. A state park has been estab- 
lished in northern California to preserve a 
rare species of insectivorous plant named 
in his honor — Darlingtonia. 

Robert B. Gordon Natural Area for 
Environmental Studies 

The University has conserved 100 acres of 
natural woodland and field and stream- 
side habitat located on South Campus 
and uses it for several kinds of outdoor 
studies in the natural sciences. Dedicated 
in 1973, the area was named for Robert 
B. Gordon, faculty member and chairper- 
son of the University's Department of 
Science firom 1938 to 1963. 



Campus and Facilities 



Francis Harvey Green Library 

The Francis Harvey Green Library at the 
corner of High Street and Rosedale 
Avenue provides an excellent environ- 
ment for study and research. The sLx- 
story facUit}' includes individual study 
carrels, faculty and graduate lounges, 
group studv and seminar rooms, and gen- 
eral reading areas. The Rdl-time library 
staff of 38 includes the director and assis- 
tant director of library services, 12 faculty 
librarians, and 24 library staff members. 
The hbran" has a pivotal role in both 
teaching and research with a growing 
collection of more than 2,000,000 items, 
including the following: 
Print Materials 

• Books - more than 550,000 

• Current journal subscriptions - more 
than 2,800 

• Government documents - more than 
287,000 

Audio Visual Materials 

• Fihns and videos - more than 4,000 

• Sound recordings - more than 64,000 
Microforms (microfilm, microfiche, 
microcard, etc.) 

• Books, journals, dissertations, docu- 
ments - more than 1,200,000 

Electronic Materials 

• Indexes and other databases - more 
than 100, many of which (e.g., 
EBSCO Academic Search Premier 
and Academic Universe) include the 
full text of articles 

• Journals - articles from more than 
3,000 journals are available through 
providers such as EBSCO Online, 
JSTOR, Catchword, and Project Muse 

• Books - more than 3,600 titles 
through NetLibrarv' 

The vast majority of these materials are 
listed in PILOT, the Librarv's Web-acces- 
sible catalog (http://pilot.sshe.edu:8022). 
FHG Librar\' resources provide an 
excellent basis for undergraduate 



research and compare favorably with 
those ot other public and private acade- 
mic libraries in West Chester's geo- 
graphic area. Interlibrary Loan and 
PALCI Direct Borrow via the web per- 
mit students and facult)' to obtain mate- 
rials from major libraries in Penn- 
sylvania and around the world. 
Noteworthy collections in the library' 
include K-12 textbooks and instructional 
materials, children's literature, and maps. 
The library is a selective depository for 
government documents and maps. 
Special Collections includes the 
University' Archives, the Stanley 
Weintraub Center for the Study of the 
Arts and Humanities; scientific and his- 
torical books from the Chester Counts- 
Cabinet of Natural Sciences; the Normal 
Collection (publications by West Chester 
Universit)' facultv and alumni); the 
Ehinger Collection (historical books on 
physical education); the Biographies of 
the Signers of the Declaration of 
Independence by John Sanderson; and 
the complete set of the Folios of 
Shakespeare. The Phihps Autograph 
Librar)' is housed in a specially designed 
room in Philips Memorial Building. 
The library maintains an extensive web 
site, www.wcupa.edu/libran'.fhg, which 
provides comprehensive information on 
and access to library resources and services. 

Music Library 

The Music Library is part of the 
University hbrary. Located in Swope 
Hall, it houses an extensive collection of 
music, one of the largest of its kind in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Its 
rapidly growing holdings include more 
than 32,000 scores (historical editions, 
collected works, opera, keyboard, and 
vocal and instrumental music) and more 
than 30,000 recordings (classical, folk, 
nonwestern, and popular). Listening 
facilities for 20 persons are available 
within the Hbrar}'. 



Historical Properties 

The Chester Counts' Cabinet of Natural 
Sciences (1826-1871) and the West 
Chester Academy (1811-1871) merged 
to form the West Chester Normal 
School, which evolved into West Chester 
Universit)'. Historical properties that 
came to the Normal School from the 
Chester County Cabinet are a grandfa- 
ther's clock that belonged the Benjamin 
Franklin, Anthony Wayne's telescope, an 
herbarium, library and museum collec- 
tions, and the Anthony Wayne Letters, 
including those to Wayne from George 
Washington, Benedict Arnold, and oth- 
ers. The letters and the library collec- 
tions are housed in the FHG Library 
Special Collections. 

Art Collections 

The University's permanent art collection 
is made up primarily of gifts from interest- 
ed art patrons, senior class purchases, and 
gifts from alumni. The Student Services, 
Inc. (SSI) permanent art collection is on 
display in buUdings throughout the cam- 
pus. The SSI collection consists of a num- 
ber of important works, such as the water- 
color, Andress Place, by j\ndrew Wyeth. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic provides 
diagnostic and therapeutic services for 
persons with speech, language, and hear- 
ing problems. These services are provided 
free of charge to West Chester University 
students, facult)', and staff, and to stu- 
dents enrolled at Cheyney University. A 
fee is charged to others who wish to use 
the services of the clinic. Located at 201 
Carter Drive (across Madack Street from 
the BuU Center parking lot), the clinic is 
operated by the Department of 
Communicative Disorders as a teaching 
and training tacUit)' tor its undergraduate 
and graduate students. 



Admission to West Chester University 



West Chester University- welcomes appli- 
cations from qualified residents ot 
Pennsylvania, other U.S. states, and inter- 
national students. The University evalu- 
ates its applicants on the basis of scholar- 
ship, character, and potential for achieve- 
ment in the programs to which they 
apply. The University operates on a mod- 
ified rolling admissions policy, whereby 
applicants with the strongest academic 
credentials are given priority processing 
and notified as quickly as possible ot their 
status. Other applicants are evaluated as 
their files become complete and may have 
final decisions deferred until later in the 
processing cycle, depending upon their 
individual academic profile. AH decisions 
are communicated to applicants in writ- 
ing. Qualified students of any age from all 
racial, religious, ethnic, and socio-eco- 
nomic backgrounds are welcome at West 
Chester. Smdies may be pursued on a 
friU- or part-time basis. 

General Requirements for 
Admission of Freshmen 

1. Graduation, with satisfactory scholar- 
ship, from an approved secondary 
school or approval by the Credentials 
Evaluation Division of the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of Education. 

2. Either a satisfactor)- score on the 
SAT of the College Entrance 
Examination Board (CEEB) or satis- 
factory scores on the tests given in the 
American College Testing Program 
(ACT). Applicants who graduated 
from high school more than five years 
ago do not need to submit test scores. 

How and When Freshmen Should 
Apply 

For application materials please write or 
call the Office of Admissions, West 
Chester University, West Chester, PA 
19383, 610-436-3411 (or toll-free at 877- 
315-2165), e-mail ugadmiss@wcupa.edu, 
visit our Web site at www.wcupa.edu or 
the State System Web site at 
www.sshechan.edu. 

Freshmen for the fall semester are urged 
to begin the application process early in 
their senior year of high school. Appli- 
cants for the spring semester should 
complete an application by December 1. 
However, if enrollment limits are met 
before these dates, admissions will be 
closed. 



Candidates will receive notification from 
the director of admissions as soon as 
possible after decisions are reached. 
Freshmen who are denied admission on 
the basis of academics wiU not be per- 
mitted to enroU as a nondegree student 
at the Universit)' but will be encouraged 
to consider a junior or communit)' col- 
lege as an alternative. 

Policy on Early Admission 

In exceptional circumstances, students 
with superior academic qualifications and 
unusually mamre personal development 
are admitted as freshmen upon complet- 
ing their junior year of secondary school. 
Students who, in the opinion ot their 
guidance counselors, warrant considera- 
tion for early admission may obtain more 
information from the director of admis- 
sions. Early admission applications 
should be submitted in accordance with 
deadlines recommended for freshmen. 

Arranging for Tests 

Information about the SAT and ACT 
may be obtained from high school guid- 
ance counselors. It is the student's respon- 
sibilitv' to ensure that all required test 
scores are forwarded to the Office of 
Admissions. 

The Universit)- awards credit for courses 
taken through the Advanced Placement 
Program ottered b)- the College Entrance 
Examination Board. Test scores of three 
or better are required and credit may be 
applied toward advanced placement in 
the Universit)' and/or requirements for 
graduation. Students are encouraged to 
submit their scores to the Office of the 
Registrar as early as possible to be sched- 
uled appropriately for their first semester. 

Transfer Students 

Individuals who have been enrolled in any 
postsecondai)- institution after graduation 
from high school and/or have attended 
West Chester University on a nondegree 
basis must apply as transfer students. 
Applicants whose secondan- school cre- 
dentials would not warrant admissions 
consideration as freshmen must complete 
the equivalent of one full academic year 
prior to attempting a transfer. A mini- 
mum cumulative Grade Point Average 
(GPA) of 2.00 is required for transfer 
consideration. However, the University's 
modified rolling admissions policy gives 
priority to applicants with the strongest 



academic credentials. In addition, some 
academic departments have established 
prerequisite course work and specific 
grade point average requirements for 
admission. Special consideration is award- 
ed to graduates of Pennsylvania commu- 
nit\' colleges and to students transferring 
from other universities in the 
Penns)-lvania State System of Higher 
Education. Specific information may be 
obtained from the Office of Admissions. 
Transfer applicants for the fall semester 
should begin the application process 
early in the preceding spring semester. 
Spring semester appUcations should be 
completed bv December 1. If enrollment 
limits are met before this time, admis- 
sions will be closed. 

Application Procedures for 
Students Transferring from an 
Accredited Institution 

1. File an application, available from the 
Office of Admissions or through the 
Internet at http://www.wcupa.edu. 

2. See that the director of admissions 
receives: 

a. An official transcript from all insti- 
tutions attended. If preliminary 
transcripts are submitted, the stu- 
dent must see that final transcripts 
are filed at the end of the semester. 

b. Mid-term grades, if the student is 
currently enrolled elsewhere and is 
applv-ing to West Chester for the 
following semester. 

3. If a student has completed less than 
30 semester hours of credit, he or she 
must supply SAT or ACT scores and 
an official high school transcript. 

If a student is accepted, admission is 
contingent upon successful completion 
of current course work with at least a C 
average as documented by transcripts of 
all work attempted or completed. 
Transfer students should read 
"Maintenance of Academic Standards" 
in the "Academic Policies and 
Procedures" section of this catalog. 
Transcripts ■will be evaluated in accor- 
dance with the policies of the department 
to which the smdent seeks admission. 
After the student has been admitted, he 
or she should work out an acceptable 
program of study in close consultation 
with an adviser in the major department. 
Transfer applicants who are denied 
admission on the basis of academics will 
not be permitted to enroll as a nonde- 



Admission to West Chester Universirv' 



gree student without the approval of the 
Office of Admissions. Such approval 
may be rendered in the event of extenu- 
ating circumstances and only under cer- 
tain agreed-upon conditions in accor- 
dance with University policy. 

Academic Passport 

The Board of Governors of the State 
System of Higher Education adopted an 
Academic Passport Polic)- effective 
January' 1999. The goal of this pohcy is 
to facilitate transfer to State System uni- 
versities from Pennsylvania community 
colleges and other System universities. 

Pennsylvania community college students 
who have earned the associate of arts 
degree (A.A.) or the associate of science 
(A.S.) degree in a transfer program con- 
taining a minimum of 30 credits of liber- 
al arts courses for the A.S. and 45 credits 
of liberal ans courses for the A.A. degree 
with a 2.00 GPA or above are considered 
to have an Academic Passport. Students 
completing 12 credits or more from 
another State System university with a 
minimum 2.00 GPA are said to have an 
Academic Passport as well. The transfer- 
credit provisions described in the 
Academic Passport are extended to com- 
munitv college students without an asso- 
ciate degree who transfer 12 or more 
credits to a Svstem instimtion. In addi- 
tion, West Chester University is extend- 
ing the transfer-credit pro\isions to all 
transfer students from accredited institu- 
tions, effective January 1999. 

The Academic Passport pohcy states 

Up to a maximum of 45 general education 
credits and liberal arts course credits shall be 
used to meet lower-division university general 
education requirements, even if the receiving 
university does not offer the specific course 
being transferred or has not designated that 
course as general education. A course-by-course 
match shall not be required. 

Transfer credit not applied to general edu- 
cation will be applied to major require- 
ments and other degree requirements. 

Please note: Students must meet the 
admissions standards for their selected 
program of study, and enrollment hmi- 
tations may restrict the number of stu- 
dents who can be accommodated. 

Specifics of this policy can be obtained 
from the Office of Admissions or the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Students are urged to apply early and 
submit transcripts from transfer institu- 
tions as soon as possible so that students 
have maximum information on course 
equivalency and which requirements 
have been met. 



University Policies for Students 
Transferring from a Nonaccredited 
Institution 

Apphcants from coUegiate institutions 
(including communit)' colleges and 
junior colleges) that are not accredited by 
one of the six regional associations in 
the United States wLU be considered for 
admission if the appUcant's cumulative 
index is 2.00 (C) or better. 
The evaluation of courses hsted on tran- 
scripts from an institution not accredited 
bv one of the six regional associations 
vviU be made by the student's major 
department in consultation with the fac- 
ulty dean and transfer credit analyst. AH 
evaluations are subject to review by the 
provost and academic vice president. 

International Students 

Students from foreign countries may be 
considered for degree admission if, in 
addition to satisfying the general require- 
ments, they also demonstrate proficiency 
in Enghsh. Standardized test scores fi-om 
one of the following must be submitted 
with the apphcation: Test of Enghsh as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL), SAT, or 
American College Test (ACT). Non- 
native Enghsh speakers are encouraged to 
submit the TOEFL; a minimum score of 
550 is required for the written exam, and 
at least 213 for the computer-based test. 

International students are admitted for 

both the faU and spring semesters. 
AppUcations for the fall must be submit- 
ted to the Office of Admissions by May 
1, while apphcations for the spring semes- 
ter should be submitted by August 1. All 
students are required to submit an apph- 
cation fee. Accepted smdents must be 
able to verif\' their abihty to fuUy meet aU 
educational and hving expenses before any 
immigration documents can be issued. 
Because of the amount of time it takes for 
a student visa to be secured, international 
apphcants are encouraged to complete the 
admissions process well in advance of the 
May 1 and August 1 deadlines. 

Insurance Requirements for 
International Students 

International students at West Chester 
University are required to carry adequate 
health and accident insurance. Insurance 
must be effective for all periods of time 
the student has been authorized to be in 
the United States by an immigration doc- 
ument issued by West Chester University. 
Health and accident insurance pohcies 
must be purchased through a company 
that sells insurance in the United States. 
West Chester University has set mini- 



mum coverage standards which must be 
met by all insurance pohcies. Information 
about the minimum standards are avail- 
able at the Center for International 
Programs Office, 610-436-3515. 

To assure comphance with the insurance 
requirement, all international smdents 
must come to the Center for International 
Programs bv September 1 of each acade- 
mic year. There smdents may obtain 
information as to the amount of insurance 
required and the means of obtaining cov- 
erage to meet the insurance requirement. 

Physical Examination 
Requirements 

Apphcants are not asked to submit a 
report of medical history' until they have 
been accepted for admission and have 
committed to enroll. The form for the 
necessary health examination, which wiU 
be mailed to students, must be complet- 
ed by a physician and returned to the 
University Health Center prior to the 
start of classes. 

Students with Disabilities 

West Chester University wiU make 
every effort to assure students with dis- 
abihties access to all classes required for 
their program of study and will endeavor 
to remove all obstacles to a flihlUing, 
comprehensive university experience. 
Students should contact the Office of 
Services for Students with DisabUities in 
Room 105 Lawrence Center to arrange 
suitable accommodations. Additional 
information can be obtained by calhng 
610-436-2564. 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 

An individual may pursue a second bac- 
calaureate degree at West Chester 
University' after earning the first bac- 
calaureate degree either at West Chester 
University or another institution. Such 
an individual must apply for admission 
through the Office of Admissions as a 
transfer student. 

Admission of CoUege Graduates 
Seeking Certification 

College graduates who yvish to obtain 
teaching certification should consult 
with the Teacher Education Center, 
610-436-3090. 

Readmission of Former Students 

Smdents who have withdrawn from, or 
who for other reasons have not matricu- 
lated at. West Chester for two or more 
consecutive semesters are classified as 
"inactive" and must request an apphca- 
tion for readmission from the Office of 



Fees and Expenses 



Admissions. After an absence of only one 
semester, students wishing to return 
should contact the Oftlce of the Registrar 
and their department advisers. Those 
who have attended any institutions of 
higher learning since leaving West 
Chester must request those institutions to 
forward transcripts of their records to the 
Office of Admissions, West Chester 
University, West Chester, PA 19383. 
Readmitted students who have a disabil- 
ity that they previously did not disclose 
but wish to do so should contact the 
Office of Services for Students with 
Disabilities (OSSD) at 610-436-2564. 
These students will be informed of the 
appropriate documentation to submit as 



well as the assistance and support ser- 
vices available to them. Students who 
believe that their disability had an effect 
on their previous course work at the 
University and wish to have this fact 
considered should include that informa- 
tion in their personal statement. They 
also may wish to seek the support of the 
OSSD in the readmission process. 
Readmitted students are bound by the 
requirements in the major, minor, and 
cognate areas at the time of readmission, 
except where permission is granted by 
the respective department. 
Students intending to enroll in student 
teaching in the first semester of readmis- 
sion must file an application for student 



teaching with the individual departments 
at least four months before their expected 
readmission. See also "Student Teaching" 
in the section entided "Academic Affairs." 
All readmission applications, including 
all supporting documents, should be 
filed by August 1 for the fall semester 
and December 1 for the spring semester. 

Office of Admissions Staff 

Marsha Haug — Director of Admissions 
Edwin Wright — Associate Director 
Courtney Hoover - Assistant Director 
Angela Howard — Assistant Director 
Heather Irwin - Assistant Director 
Angel Harper Jackson - Assistant 

Director 
MoUy Leese - Assistant Director 



Fees and Expenses 



special Note: The fees listed below reflect 
charges at press time. For up-to-date infor- 
mation on fees at any given time, contact 
the Office of the Bursar, 610-436-2552. 
Fees and expenses are subject to change 
without notice. Fees shown here are in 
effect for the academic year 2003—2004, 
unless otherwise noted. 

Tuition Rates 

The following tuition rates are those in 
effect for 2002-03 and are subject to 
change for 2003-04. 
Unless otherwise specified, fees may be 
paid by Visa, MasterCard, American 
Express, check, or money order made 
payable to West Chester University. The 
canceled check, money order record, or 
charge card billing serves as a receipt. 

Undergraduate Tuition for Legal 
Residents of Pennsylvania 

Full-time students (between 12-18 credits) 
$2,189.00 per semester 
Part-time students (11 credits or less), 
or per credit for each credit over 18 

$182.00 per credit 
See the Office of the Registrar for resi- 
dency requirements. 

Undergraduate Tuition for 
Out-of-State Students 

Full-time students (between 12-18 credits) 
$5,473.00 per semester 



Part-time students (11 credits or less), 
or per credit for each credit over 18 

$456.00 per credit 

General Fee 

The general tee of $514 per fiill-time stu- 
dent (12 credits or more) or $43 per cred- 
it hour for the part-time student (11 cred- 
its or less) is a mandatory charge which 
covers the use of the following services: 

• Sykes Student Union Fee ($55) 
Previously called the community cen- 
ter fee, this charge is for the opera- 
tion and use of Sykes Student Union. 

• Health Center Fee ($60) 
This charge is for the use of the 
University Health Center. 

• Snident Services, Inc. (SSI) Fee ($84) 
The SSI fee fiinds student activities, 
services, clubs, and sports. 

• Sykes Student Union EJcpansion Fee 
($60) 

This fee supports the recent renovation 
of Sykes Student Union, which features 
new and improved student services. 

• Exiucational Services Fee ($219) 
(10% of in-state undergraduate tuition 
or $219 using 2002-03 tuition schedule) 
Students pay this fee in lieu of specific 
department charges. 

• Parking Improvement Fee ($36) 
This fee is dedicated to improve the 
quality and availability of campus 
parking for students. The fee will 
provide for new student parking 
spaces, improved shuttle service, and 
safety improvements. 



Technology Tuition Fee 

This mandatory instructional fee will be 
used to enhance classroom technology. 
All charges are per semester. 
Legal residents of Pennsylvania: 
FuU-time undergraduate and graduate 

$50.00 
Part-time undergraduate and graduate 

$25.00 
Out-of-state students: 
FuU-time undergraduate and graduate 

$75.00 
Part-time undergraduate and graduate 

$38.00 
Summer will be considered as one semes- 
ter. Students enrolled in multiple summer 
sessions wiU be charged no more than the 
equivalent of the fiiU-time semester rate. 

Housing Fee 

North Campus Residence Halls - This fee 
entities the student to occupancy of a stan- 
dard double room in any North Campus 
residence hall with one roommate. 
Per student $1,856.00 per semester 

South Campus Apartment Complex - 
This fee entitles the student to occupan- 
cy of a four- or five-person apartment 
with the following bedroom occupancy: 
Single occupancy bedroom 
(per student) $2,328.00 per semester 
Double occupancy bedroom 
(per student) $2,153.00 per semester 
Students in the North Campus residence 
halls losing their roommates who do not 



^H Fees and Expenses 



have another roommate assigned to them 
will be assigned a roommate, relocated, 
or charged a private room fee of $39 per 
week for every week that they occupy the 
room alone. These options are available 
on a limited basis; however, available 
spaces win be used if demand requires. 

Meal Fee 

Students in the North Campus resi- 
dence halls must choose among Plans 1, 
3, 5 and the 175 block. 
Plan 1: 14- Variable Program 

S898.00 per semester 
This convenient program entitles resi- 
dent, off-campus, and commuter stu- 
dents to any 14 out of the 19 meals 
served Monday through Sunday and 
includes a flex fund of S 100. The flex 
aspect of the 14-variable board plan gives 
students the flexibility of making up to 
$100 in purchases at any dining service 
location. Students may add to their flex 
account at any time in $25 increments. 
With flex fiinds students can: 

• Supplement meal entidements 

• Treat friends or family members to 
meals 

• For a late night snack, have a freshlv 
made ITZA PIZZA deUvered to 
the residence hall 

• Purchase items from the 
Convenience Stores 

Plan 2: Flex Program 

This program is designed for the South 
Campus apartment complex, off-campus 
and commuter students, faculty, and 
staff. A minimum of $100 can be placed 
in a flex account that can be accessed by 
an ID card. The program can be used in 
the Lawrence Food Court, Campus 
Corner, Convenience Stores, or in the 
Sykes Ram's Head Food Court. Faculty 
and staff may use their flex dollars in the 
University Club as well. With this pro- 
gram, there is no need to carry cash for 
meals. The flex fund may be increased 
by $25 increments at any time during 
the semester. 

Plan 3: 10- Variable Program 

$824.00 per semester 
This plan allows resident, off-campus, 
and commuter students more flexibility 
in scheduling their meals throughout the 
week. This plan entitles participants to 
10 out of the 19 meals served Monday 
through Sunday and includes a flex fund 
of $100 that can be used as described in 
Plan 1. 

Plan 4: 5-Variable Program 

S611.00 per semester 



This plan is designed for South Campus 
apartment complex, off-campus, and 
commuter students who wish to have 
the convenience of meals on campus. 
This plan entitles participants to five out 
of the 19 meals served Alonday through 
Sunday and includes a flex fund of $100 
that can be used as described in Plan 1. 

Plan 5: 19 All-inclusive Program 

$965.00 per semester 

This plan entitles resident, off-campus, 
and commuter smdents to all of the meals 
served during the week and includes a flex 
fijnd of $100 that can be used as 
described in Plan 1. 

For those students in residence halls, the 
meal plan cost has already been included 
in the University bLUing. South Campus 
apartment complex, off-campus, and 
commuter students can sign up for one of 
these meal plans by applying at the Office 
of the Bursar in the E.O. BuU Center. 

Block Plans 

175 with $100 flex $858 per semester 

50 with $100 flex $560 per semester 

The block plan is different from the 
other plans since students may vary the 
number of meals they eat in a given week 
from 0-19. The number of remaining 
meals carries over week to week, but all 
meals must be consumed by the end of 
the semester or be forfeited. There is no 
refund for unused meals at the end of the 
semester. The two block plans available 
are the 175 per semester and the 50 per 
semester, and both include $100 in flex 
funds. However, resident students may 
only select the 175, which averages 
approximately 12 meals per week. Since 
meals may not be added if they run out 
early, it is important to use them wisely. 
Any flex funds left at the end of the first 
semester will transfer to the second 
semester. Any flex dollars remaining at 
the end of the second semester will be 
forfeited. 
How the Meal Plan Works 

A West Chester University' identifica- 
tion card will be encoded to access a stu- 
dent's dining service account. 

A meal or flex dollars will be deducted 
from the balance automatically when the 
card is presented to the cashier. 

This identification axd vvoll serve as a ticket 
to the offerings at Lawrence Food Court, 
Campus Comer, Convenience Stores, and 
Sykes Ram's Head Food Court. 

Identification Card Fees. The 

University charges a $10 fee to issue an 
identification card to each fuU- or part- 



time student. If this card is lost, stolen, 
or damaged, the student will be charged 
$10 for a replacement card. This fee is 
payable at the Student Services, Inc. 
(SSI) service center located on the 
ground level of Sykes Student Union. 

International Student Services Fee 

International students are assessed a fee 
of $25 per semester to support the ser- 
vices provided to them by the Interna- 
tional Program Office. 

Payment of Fees 

Fall semester bills should be received by 
mid-July. Spring semester bills should be 
received by the first week of December. 
If you do not receive a bUl, contact the 
Office of the Bursar at 610-436-2552. It 
is the responsibility of each student to 
pay/submit the semester biU by the due 
date. Nonreceipt of a semester bill does 
not relieve the student of the responsi- 
bility of paying/ submitting the bUl by 
the due date. Address changes should be 
made through the Office of the Registrar 
to allow for sufficient time to reflect an 
accurate biUing address. 

Students who are receiving approved 
financial aid awards that fully cover or 
exceed the amount of their bills do not 
have to pay, but they must submit to the 
Office of the Bursar the appropriate por- 
tion of their semester bill to complete reg- 
istration. Failure to return the biU, even if 
no payment is due, may result in the can- 
cellation of registration/ schedule and 
the assessment of late penalties. Students 
who cannot pay their bills in hill by the 
due date may apply for partial pavment 
(see "Partial Payment Policy" below). 

Failure to meet the payment deadhne 
could result in cancellation of the stu- 
dent's schedule. In order to have another 
schedule reinstated, the student would 
have to pay his or her bill in fiiU as well 
as a $35 late registration fee. 

Students who owe money to the 
Universitv will have a hold placed on 
their accounts. If not satisfied, this hold 
will cancel registration/scheduling for 
future semesters, prevent the release of 
transcripts, and prohibit graduation 
clearance. The University also mav, at 
its discretion, invoke any other penalty 
appropriate for a particular case in 
which money is owed to the University. 

Partial Payment Policy 

The University extends partial payment 
privileges to all students who are in 
good financial standing and have not 



Fees and Expenses 



defaulted on a previous payment plan. 
The nonrefundable fee charged for this 
service is $35 per semester. Installment 
payments received late are subject to a 
$25 late payment fee. For more informa- 
tion about the plan offered, contact the 
Office of the Bursar at 610-436-2552. 

Uncollectible Check Policy 

A fee of $25 is charged for any check 
returned to the University for insufficient 
funds, stopped payment, or closed 
account. The University may, at its dis- 
cretion, charge this fee for any check 
returned to it for any other reason. 
The check will be returned to the student 
upon its replacement through cash, 
cashier's check, MasterCard, Visa, 
American Express, or money order. 
Students who have two or more checks 
returned against their accounts wiU no 
longer be able to make payment by person- 
al check; all future payments must be made 
by cash, certified check, MasterCard, Visa, 
American Express, or money order. 

Refund Policy 

AH requests for refunds for dropped or 
canceled courses, or for withdrawals, 
must be made in writing or in person to 
the Office of the Registrar. Refunds are 
not automatic; it is the student's respon- 
sibility to initiate a refund request. 
Appeals concerning the refiind policy for 
tuition and the general fee are made to 
the Office of the Registrar. Appeals con- 
cerning the Housing or Meal Fee are 
made to the Office of Residence Life. 
Further appeals, if necessary, may be 
made to the Appeals Committee. 
The refund poUcy does not affect the 
time Une for W, WP, and WF grades as 
described under "Withdrawing from a 
Course" (see page 42). 
Individual fees will be reflinded accord- 
ing to the policies described below. 
Tuition - in fuU through the first day of 
the semester or according to the follow- 
ing schedule once classes have begun. 
(This schedule assumes that the student 
account is paid in fuU and that the per- 
centages apply to the total tuition biU, 
not to a partial payment of tuition.) 
Withdraw during Receive tuition and 

general fees refiind 
Through 1st day of semester 100% 

Days 2-5 of 1st week of semester 90% 
2nd week of semester 80% 

3rd week of semester 70% 

4th week of semester 60% 

5th week of semester 50% 



6th week of semester and after No refiind 
No refiind will be given if the student 
drops a course but retains fiill-time status, 
or if he/she owes the University money. 
General Fee - in fiiU through the first day 
of the semester and prorated on a credit- 
hour basis for a change fi-om fiiU-time to 
part-time status. A change in the number 
of credit hours within the flill-time status 
(12 credit hours or above) does not result 
in a refund of the General Fee; however, a 
change within the part-time status (below 
12 credit hours) will result in a per-credit- 
hour adjustment according to the refiand 
schedule used for tuition refunds. 
Housing Fee - in fiill prior to the first 
day of the semester; after the first day of 
the semester, prorated refiinds are made 
on an individual basis through the Office 
of Residence Life. 

Meal Fee - in fijU prior to the first day 
of the semester; after the first day of the 
semester, prorated refiinds are made on 
an individual basis through the Office of 
Residence Life for resident students, and 
through the Office of the Bursar for 
commuter students. 

Other Fees 

AppUcation Fee. $35 is charged to all 
prospective students for the processing of 
their applications to the University. The 
fee is nonrefundable and is not credited 
to the student's account. 
Nondegree Student AppUcation Fee. 
Nondegree students are charged a one- 
time $15 initial processing fee. 
Acceptance Fee. AH newly accepted and 
readmitted students pay $100 as proof of 
intention to enroU at the University. It is 
credited against the student's tuition and 
is nonrefundable if the student decides 
not to attend. 

Housing Deposit. AH new and return- 
ing students who wish to live in the resi- 
dence halls are charged $100. It is credit- 
ed against the student's housing fee and 
is nonrefiindable if the student decides 
not to live on campus. 
Late Registration Fee. AH students who 
schedule during the late registration peri- 
od are charged a $35 nonrefundable late 
registration fee. 

Credit by Examination Fee. A charge is 
made to aU students who register for a 
Credit by Examination through the 
Office of the Registrar. Each examina- 
tion scheduled costs $25. 
PortfoUo Assessment Fee. Equal to 50 
percent of the per credit hour rate, this 
fee is charged to have a faculty member 



assess a student's prior knowledge in a 
particular course. 

Course Audit Fee. Students who audit 
courses pay the same fees as students 
taking the courses for a letter grade. 
Damage Fee. Smdents are charged for 
damage or loss of University property. 
This fee varies, depending on the extent 
of the damage. 

Identification Card Fees. The 
University charges a $10 fee to issue an 
identification card to each fiall- or part- 
time student. If this card is lost, stolen, 
or damaged, the student wiH be charged 
$10 for a replacement card. This fee is 
payable at the Student Services Center 
Office, Sykes Union. 
Parking Fees. The University charges a 
nonrefundable parking fee to students 
who are eligible to purchase a permit to 
use University parking lots. The current 
parking fee is $30 per year. Parking per- 
mits are available at the Department of 
Public Safety. Parking fines are assessed at 
$10 up to $40 depending on the violation. 
Music Instrument Rental Fees. Each 
student renting a musical instrument for 
a semester is charged $20 per instrument. 
Every student using a pipe organ for 
practice for one period each weekday is 
charged $36 per semester. 
Lost Key Replacement. Students who 
lose the key to their residence haU room 
are charged a nonrefiindable fee of $30 
to replace the lock. 

Transcript Fee. The fee for transcripts is 
$3 per copy. Transcript request forms are 
available in the Office of the Registrar. 
Immediate transcripts are $5 per request. 
Commencement Fee. The University 
charges $56 to aH students enrolled in a 
degree program who wLU have ftilfiHed 
their degree requirements by the end of 
the semester. This fee is paid after the 
student completes a Graduation 
Application Form in the Office of the 
Registrar and is approved for graduation. 
Placement Credentials Fee. This $10 
charge covers the cost of registration, 
development, and updating a student's 
credentials file in the Twardowski Career 
Development Center. The fee entitles 
the student to five mailings of creden- 
tials, as weH as a personal copy. 
Fees for Health and Physical Education 
Majors. Students in the B.S. degree pro- 
grams in health and physical education 
must purchase uniforms at the University 
Bookstore. AH students must be in prop- 
er uniform for activity classes. 



Financial Aid 



The financial aid program at West 
Chester Universit}' provides financial 
assistance and counseling to students who 
can benefit from further education, but 
who cannot obtain it without such assis- 
tance. Financial aid consists of gift aid in 
the form of scholarships or grants, and 
self-help aid in the form ot employment 
or loans. The main responsibility for 
meeting educational expenses rests with 
students and their families. Financial aid 
is a supplement to family contribution and 
is to be used for educational expenses. 
Ehgibility for financial aid, with the 
exception of some private scholarships 
and the Parent Loan Program, is based 
on demonstrated financial need. Family 
income, assets, and family size influence 
a student's demonstrated financial need. 
All documents, correspondence, and 
conversations among the applicants, their 
families, and the Office of Financial Aid 
are confidential and entitled to the pro- 
tection ordinarily arising from a counsel- 
ing relationship. 

In order to receive financial aid, the 
student must: 

1. Be accepted for admission as a degree 
student enrolling at West Chester 
University, or, in the case of a student 
already attending the University', be 
enrolled and making satisfactory aca- 
demic progress as a degree student. See 
the Office of Financial Aid for a more 
detailed explanation of this requirement. 

2. Submit a Free Apphcation for Federal 
Student Aid before March 1 for pri- 
ority' consideration. This apphcation 
will be used to determine demonstrat- 
ed financial need for the student. AH 
students are encouraged to complete 
this apphcation. 

3. Apply for the state grant program in 
his or her state of legal residence. 

4. Submit any other requested documen- 
tation concerning financial and family 
circumstances that may be requested 
by the Office of Financial Aid, or any 
agency that administers financial 



' Federal financial aid includes the Federal Pell 
Grant, SEOG Grant, Perkins Loan, Federal 
Stafford Loan, and Federal PLUS Loan. 

**Withdrawal date is defined as the actual date the 
student began the institution's withdrawal 
process, the student's last date ot recorded 
attendance, or the midpoint of the semester for a 
student who leaves without notifying the 
institution. 



assistance programs. Financial aid 
applicants may be required to submit 
copies of their IRS forms, and/or 
their parents' forms, or various other 
income-related documents. 
Submission of the above does not auto- 
matically entitle a student to receive finan- 
cial aid. The Office of Financial Aid fol- 
lows the regulations estabhshed by the 
federal government in awarding aid. Aid 
applicants are ranked according to unmet 
need (based on budget, federal and state 
grants, and expected family contribution), 
and available funds are offered to the 
neediest students first. Students must apply 
for financial aid each academic year. 
Unless otherwise specified, requests for 
scholarships, grants, loans, and employ- 
ment opportunities described in this cata- 
log should be made to the Office of 
Financial Aid. Application forms for state 
and federal grants may be obtained from 
the Office of Financial Aid at West 
Chester University and from the offices of 
most high school guidance counselors. 
Questions concerning financial aid may be 
directed to the Office of Financial Aid, 
138 Elsie O. Bull Center, West Chester 
University, West Chester, PA 19383, 610- 
436-2627. Office hours are from 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Withdrawal/Enrollment Change 
and Aid 

Students who officially withdraw or 
change their enrollment status may be 
entided to a refund of certain fees, accord- 
ing to West Chester University's policy. 
(See section entitled "Fees and Expenses.") 
If that student has been awarded financial 
aid for the semester in which the with- 
drawal or enrollment change occurs, a por- 
tion of the reflind will be returned to finan- 
cial aid program funds. 
Financial aid refunds due to withdrawals 
or enrollment changes are processed in 
accordance with federal, state, and award- 
ing agency guidelines and regulations. 
The Office of Financial Aid recalculates 
federal* financial aid ehgibihty for stu- 
dents who withdraw, drop out, are dis- 
missed, or take a leave of absence prior to 
completing 60 percent of a semester. 
Recalculation is based on the percent of 
earned aid using the following formula: 

Percent earned = 

Number of days completed up to withdrawal 

date^/total days in semester 



Federal financial aid is returned to the fed- 
eral government based on the percent of 
unearned aid using the following formula: 
Aid to be returned = 

(100% - percent earned) x amount of aid dis- 
bursed toward institutional changes 

When aid is returned, the student may 
owe a debit balance to the University. 
The student should contact the Office of 
the Bursar to make arrangements to pay 
the balance. 

Student Consumer Rights and 
Responsibilities 

You have the right to ask a school: 

1. The names of its accrediting organi- 
zations. 

2. About its programs; its instructional, 
laboratory, and other physical facih- 
ties; and its facult)'. 

3. What the cost of attending is and 
what its poUcies are on refiinds to 
students who drop out. 

4. What financial assistance is avail- 
able, including information on all 
federal, state, local, private, and 
institutional financial aid programs. 

5. What the procedures and deadhnes 
are for submitting apphcations for 
each available financial aid program. 

6. What criteria it uses to select finan- 
cial aid recipients. 

7. How it determines your financial 
need. This process includes how costs 
for mition and fees, room and board, 
travel, books and supplies, personal 
and miscellaneous expenses, etc. are 
coi^sidered in your budget. It also 
includes what resources (such as 
parental contribution, other financial 
aid, your assets, etc.) are considered 
in the calculation of your need. 

8. If you have a loan, what the interest 
rate is, the total amount that must be 
repaid, the length of time you have to 
repay the loan, when payments are to 
begin, and any cancellation and 
deferment provisions that apply. 

9. If you are offered a work study job, 
what kind of job it is, what hours 
you must work, what your duties 
wiU be, what the rate of pay will be, 
and how and when you will be paid. 

10. To reconsider your aid package, if 
you believe a mistake has been made. 

11. How the school determines whether 
you are making satisfactory academic 



Financial Aid 



progress, and what happens if you 
are not. 
12. What special facilities and services 
are available to the disabled. 

You have the responsibility to: 

1. Review and consider all information 
about a school's program before you 
enroU. 

2. Pav special attention to your applica- 
tion for student financial aid, com- 
plete it accurately, and submit it on 
time to the right place. Errors can 
delay your receipt of financial aid. 

3. Provide all additional documenta- 
tion, verification, corrections, 
and/or new information requested 
by either the Office of Financial 
Aid or the agency to which you 
submitted your application. 

4. Read and understand all forms that 
you are asked to sign and keep 
copies of them. 

5. Accept responsibUity for the promis- 
sory note and all other agreements 
that you sign. 

6. If you have a loan, notify the lender 
of changes in your name, address, or 
enrollment status. 

7. Perform in a satisfactory manner 
the work that is agreed upon in 
accepting a college work study job. 

8. Know and comply with the dead- 
lines for application tor aid. 

9. Know and comply with your 
school's refund procedures. 

THE FOLLOWING IS A BRIEF DE- 
SCRIPTION OF THE nNANCL\L 
AID PROGRAMS AVAILABLE AT 
WEST CHESTER LTNIVERSIT\". 

Federal Work Study Program 

Federal work study is an employment 
program that allows students to work 
part time on campus. Application is 
made through the Free Apphcation for 
Federal Student Aid. The priority dead- 
line is INIarch 1. 

Federal Perkins Loan Program 

The Office of Financial Aid administers 
the Federal Perkins Loan Program for 
students who demonstrate financial need. 
TTie annual loan limit is S4,000, wth 
aggregate limits of $20,000 for students 
who have successfully completed two years 
of an undergraduate program leading to a 
bachelor's degree (but have not completed 
that degree) and S8,000 for all other stu- 
dents. The interest rate is 5 percent and 
begins to accme when repa\'ment com- 
mences - nine months after the student 



leaves school or drops below half-time sta- 
tus. There are deferment and cancellation 
privileges for smdents meeting specific cri- 
teria. Application is made through the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid. 
The priority deadline is March 1. 

Federal Stafford Loan Program 

This loan program, formerly the 
Guaranteed Smdent Loan Program, 
operates with the cooperation of private 
lenders (banks, credit unions, etc.). Loans 
for students who demonstrate need are 
subsidized (no in-school interest pay- 
ments); loans for smdents who do not 
demonstrate need are unsubsidized (in- 
school interest payments required). 
Annual loan limits are $2,625 for first- 
year students, $3,500 for second-year stu- 
dents, and $5,500 for undergraduate stu- 
dents who have completed two years. 
Independent students may borrow addi- 
tional unsubsidized funds: up to $4,000 
per year for their first two years, and up 
to $5,000 per year after they have com- 
pleted tvvo years. The academic level 
maximum amounts are riot guaranteed. 
The loan amount is influenced by the 
receipt of other aid. The interest rate for 
first-time borrowers is variable, not to 
exceed 8.25 percent. For subsidized loans, 
it begins to accrue when repa\Tnent com- 
mences — six months after the student 
terminates his or her education or drops 
below halt-time status. Students should 
allow 10 weeks for processing and apply 
by May 31. The Master Promisson* Note 
and the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid must be filed. 

Federal Parent Loan for 
Undergraduate Students (PLUS) 

The Federal PLUS program operates 
through private lenders. Parents may 
borrow up to the cost of education 
minus other aid for each dependent stu- 
dent attending a postsecondary educa- 
tional instimtion for each academic 
level. The interest rate is variable, not to 
exceed nine percent, and repayment 
commences 60 days after disbursement 
of the loan funds. Applications are 
secured at lending institutions. 

Short-Term Emergency Loan 

Students in need of funds to cover unusu- 
al or emergency education expenses may 
contact the Office of the Bursar concern- 
ing the Short-Term Emergency Loan 
Program. The maximum loan is $200. 



Federal PeU Grant 

This is the federal grant program. All 
students are encouraged to apply for a 
Federal PeU Grant. Students receive 
notification of eligibilitv' in the form of a 
Student Aid Report. Interested students 
must file the Free Apphcation for 
Federal Student Aid. Deadhne is May 1 
of the current academic year. 

Federal Supplemental Educational 
Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 

The FSEOG program is federally fund- 
ed and administered by the Office of 
Financial Aid. A student must demon- 
strate financial need and be an under- 
graduate. Students must file the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid. 
The priorit)' deadhne is March 1. 

State Grants 

PENNSYLVANIA HIGHER EDU- 
CATION ASSISTANCE AGENCY 
(PHEAA) GRANT. The Common- 
\vealth of Pennsylvania, through 
PHEAA, makes state grants available to 
students who demonstrate financial need 
and are Pennsylvania residents. PHEAA 
requires that students successfiilly com- 
plete at least 24 credits for each fiill-year 
grant awarded. Students must file the 
Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid. Deadline is Mav 1. 
The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has 
entered into reciprocal agreements with 
the following adjacent states: Delaware, 
West Virginia, and Ohio. Residents of 
these states who wish to attend West 
Chester University are permitted to use 
state grants from their home states for 
educational expenses at West Chester. 
Some other states not adjacent to 
Pennsylvania may permit their residents 
to use state grants for attendance at West 
Chester University. Students should con- 
tact the agency for higher education in 
their states for more information. 

Scholarships and Awards 

'ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARDS. Awards of $4,000 each 
(one-time awards) are given to freshmen. 

ACME MARKETS, INC. SCHOL- 
ARSHIPS. Acme Markets, Inc. spon- 
sors four-year scholarships for six enter- 
ing freshmen. Students are to be enrolled 
in a degree program in business, man- 
agement, or marketing and have a career 
interest in retail management or related 
area. Recipients wiU also participate in 
an Acme internship or co-op program. 
The scholarships are renewable provided 



Financial ^^id 



all scholarship requirements are main- 
tained. Applications will onl)' be accept- 
ed even- four years beginning with the 
1996-97 academic year. 
THE J.PETER ABLER PRIZE FOR 
EXCELLENCE IN THEATRE. The 
J.Peter Adler Prize for Excellence in 
Theatre has been funded through indi- 
vidual, family, and group gifts to honor 
the memon' of J.Peter Adler, son of 
WCU President Madeleine Wing 
Adler. The prize is awarded annually to 
West Chester University seniors who 
have exhibited strong talent in theatre, 
and who will be continuing their educa- 
tion in a graduate degree program. 
LENORE ALT EXCELLENCE IN 
LEADERSHIP AWARD. This $500 
award, which was established by Lois 
Alt, associate professor of vocal and 
choral music, in memory of her mother, 
will be presented to a junior woman 
music major with a 3.25 GPA, who has 
completed all theory and history of 
music 200-level courses. 
WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FUND. A scholarship fond 
was established by the Alumni Associa- 
tion of West Chester University' in 1974 
to benefit the students of West Chester 
University. The criteria for selection are 
scholarship, leadership, character, and 
need. Scholarships may be awarded to 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 
Applications are available from the Office 
of Financial Aid or the Office of Alumni 
Relations. The awards are generally made 
on Alumni Day each year and are applied 
to the students' course fees for the next 
academic year. Scholarship amounts vary. 
GERALDINE RUTH DALEY 
ANDERSON SCHOLARSHIP. This 
fund was established to honor Mrs. 
Geraldine Dalev Anderson '34 by a gift 
from her husband, Robert S. Anderson, 
M.D. The awards from the fond are 
restricted to physical education majors 
who are graduates of high schools in 
Lackawanna, Luzerne, and Wyoming 
counties in Pennsylvania. Students also 
must have financial need and demon- 
strate academic achievement. Preference 
will be given to women students. The 
value of the award is estimated at $1000. 
Applications may be obtained from the 
Office of Financial Aid. 
ROBERT S. ANDERSON '23 
SCHOLARSHIP. Robert S. Anderson 
'23 created this endowed scholarship in 
his will to benefit West Chester 



University students with fmancial need. 
Renewable scholarships will be awarded 
to incoming students with satisfactory 
academic standards and financial need. 
SANDRA ALESL\ ATKINS MEMO- 
RIAL SCHOLARSHIP. This scholar- 
ship is awarded annually as a memorial to 
Sandra Alesia Atkins, a member of the 
class of 1981, to an outstanding music 
student from Overbrook High School in 
Philadelphia who erurolls at West Chester 
Universit}' as a candidate for the B.S. 
degree in music education. The recipient 
win be selected by the School of Music 
upon recommendation of the Overbrook 
High School Music Department. 
HERBERT BELLER SCHOLAR- 
SHIP IN GEOLOGY. EstabUshed by 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Beller, this schol- 
arship is awarded annually (renewable) 
to an outstanding junior or senior geolo- 
gy major who needs assistance to pay 
tuition. The Department of Geology 
chair will select the recipient; the dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences also 
must approve the selection. 
BENZING FAMILY SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. C)Tithia Benzing, professor of eco- 
nomics and finance at West Chester 
Universit)', and her spouse, William 
Benzing, instructor of history' at Delaware 
Count}' Community College and a tax 
consultant, have established this fond. 
The scholarship is awarded through the 
Department of Economics and Finance to 
an outstanding senior in the department. 
*BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
SCHOLARSHIPS. Merit-based renew- 
able scholarships available to incoming 
freshmen who are residents of Penn- 
sylvania. Awards are based on the suc- 
cessfol completion of an academic high 
school program, satisfactory SAT/ ACT 
scores, high school rank, and academic 
record. The Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid also must be completed. 
ELIZABETH O'BYRNE BORZ '41 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship 
provides $500 annually to an entering 
freshman with a B average and is renew- 
able providing a 3.0 GPA is maintained 
as an undergraduate at the University-. 
GEORGE AND SUSAN BOYER 
ORGAN SCHOLARSHIP. This schol- 
arship was created by alumni George 
Boyer '69 and Susan Bover '79 to assist a 
talented incoming student whose main 
area of performance is the organ. In the 
even that there is no incoming student 
eligible for the scholarship, it may then 



be awarded to a current organ major who 
meets the criteria of excellence. 
CAROL BRANCA SCHOLARSHIR 
This scholarship, established bv the 
Branca family in honor of Carol Branca, is 
awarded to a B.A. communications stud- 
ies major who has an overall GPA of 3.5 
or better at the end of the first semester of 
the sophomore year. To qualify, students 
must have completed three semesters at 
the University, and a minimum of 15 
credits per semester. The scholarship is 
renewable provided the recipient contin- 
ues as a communications studies major 
and maintains a GPA of 3.5 or better. 
Transfer students with more than six 
credits are not eligible for the scholarship. 
The minimum award is currently $500. 
JUSTO B. BRAVO SCHOLARSHIP 
IN CHEMISTRY. This award is avaU- 
able to a foil-time student majoring in 
chemistry'. Applications are made to the 
Department of Chemistry'. 
LAURY SAMUEL BROKENSHIRE 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship is 
presented annually as a memorial to 
Laury Brokenshire '59 by his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. James R. Brokenshire of 
Reading. It is awarded to an outstanding 
junior class music student selected by 
the School of Music faculty. 
ROBERT M. BROWN ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP FOR PHYSICS. 
This scholarship was established by 
alumnus Robert M. Brown '38 for a 
worthy foU-time sophomore, junior, or 
senior undergraduate physics major. The 
scholarship is renewable if the recipient 
maintains the required 3.0 GPA. 
BONNIE CLAIRE BRUNO 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP. One 
$500 award is made to an outstanding 
foU-time student in the College of Arts 
and Sciences yvho is a Pennsylvania resi- 
dent, demonstrates fmancial need, and 
has a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00. 
DIANE AND ROGER 
CASAGRANDE SCHOLARSHIP. 
Established by Drs. Diane and Roger 
Casagrande, this scholarship is awarded 
to a foU-time communication studies or 
pre-engineering declared major with a 
cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher and a 
consistent record of considerable campus 
and community ser^'ice. The scholarship 
is renewable but not automatically so. 
The selection committee will consist of 
the chairs from the departments of 
Physics and Communication Studies, as 
well as a graduating senior for either 
department as invited by the chairs. 



Financial Aid 



CAVALCADE OF BANDS SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This award is sponsored joindy 
by the Cavalcade of Bands Association 
and the School of Music. The recipient(s) 
must be admitted in good standing to the 
music program at West Chester Univer- 
sity and selected by the director ot the 
winning band(s) in each category of the 
American and Yankee Conferences. The 
awards are determined annually. Normal- 
ly, one student from each of the four win- 
ning bands will be selected to receive a 
$1,000 tuitional scholarship. 
ROBERT L. CARL MEMORIAL 
KEYBOARD SCHOLARSHIP. Two 
scholarships are awarded to freshman 
keyboard majors, in honor of the late 
Robert L. Carl, former chairperson of 
the Department of Keyboard Music, 
who taught piano at the University from 
1946 until 1971. Applications are made 
to the dean of the School of Music. 
PAUL E. CARSON BAND SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This award has been made pos- 
sible by the generosity of Paul E. Carson, 
former chair of the Instrumental Depart- 
ment and a member of the University fac- 
ulty for 28 years. Scholarships are awarded 
to freshmen majoring in band instruments. 
VINCENT D. CELENTANO 
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship is awarded as a memorial to 
Dr. Vincent D. Celentano, musician, 
scientist, and Explorer Committee mem- 
ber. Eligible freshmen in the School of 
Music must be affiHated with Exploring 
or the Senior Branch of Scouting. 
ELVA L. BOYER CHAMBERLIN '31 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship is 
awarded to an academically qualified stu- 
dent who demonstrates financial need, 
with preference given to a student study- 
ing in the field of education. Awards are 
made by the University Scholarship 
Committee based on recommendations 
from the director of financial aid. 
CHESTER COUNTY ALUMNI 
CHAPTER SCHOLARSHIP. The 
West Chester University Chester County 
Alumni Chapter sponsors a scholarship 
for a Chester County high school gradu- 
ate and freshman. The $500 award is 
fiinded through contributions from chap- 
ter members. Applications may be 
obtained through the Office of Financial 
Aid and the Office of Alumni Relations. 
CLASS OF 1920 SCHOLARSHIP. 
This fiind was established by the Class of 
1920 through a gift on the occasion of the 
class's 65th reunion. The award is inade to 
a student who has completed one year of 



study at the University or to an outstand- 
ing freshman. Documented financial need 
and demonstrated leadership qualities are 
essential. The amount will be no less than 
$500. Application forms are available 
through the Office of Financial Aid. 
CLASS OF 1937 SCHOLARSHIP. 
This scholarship fund was established by 
the Class of 1937 as a golden anniversary 
gift to West Chester University on the 
50th reunion of the class. The scholar- 
ships are awarded to entering freshmen 
based on scholarship, leadership, charac- 
ter, and financial need. The awards are 
generally made on Alumni Day each year 
and are applied to tuition fees tor the 
academic year. Applications are available 
from the Office of Development and 
Alumni Relations or the Office of 
Financial Aid. Selection of recipients will 
be made by the Scholarship Committee 
of the Alumni Board of Directors. 
CLASS OF 1938 SCHOLARSHIP. 
This fund was established by the Class of 
1938 as a Golden Anniversary Gift to the 
University at the 50th reunion of the class. 
The award is to be made to a student who 
has successfiJly completed one academic 
year at West Chester and is based on lead- 
ership, scholarship, character, and financial 
need. Application forms are available 
through the Office of Financial Aid. 
CLASS OF 1942 SCHOLARSHIP. 
Established by the Class of 1942, this 
scholarship is awarded to a student 
enrolled in the School of Education with 
a record of high academic achievement, 
demonstrated financial need, and evi- 
dence of contributions to the campus 
community through volunteer activities. 
CLASS OF 1943 MATH SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This scholarship was initiated by 
two Class of 1943 members to improve 
the teaching of math on the middle 
school and secondary levels. It is award- 
ed annually to an undergraduate who 
intends to teach mathematics, exhibits 
excellence in that discipline, and wUl 
help foster the job of problem solving in 
others. Applications are made through 
the Department of Mathematics. 
CLASS OF 1948 SCHOLARSHIP. The 
Class of 1948 initiated this scholarship as a 
gift in celebration of its 50th reunion. 
Recipients must be a junior, have a mini- 
mum GPA of 3.0, major in an area of 
teacher education, and be active in at least 
one school-sponsored extracurricular activ- 
ity. The scholarship is renewable provided 
the minimum 3.0 GPA is maintained. 
The minimum award is currentlv $750. 



CLASS OF 1951 SCHOLARSHIP. 
The Class of '51 established this scholar- 
ship as a gift in celebration of its 50th 
Reunion in May 2001. The award is made 
to an incoming freshman who plans to 
major in education, has a cumulative high 
school grade average of "B" or better, par- 
ticipated in extracurricular or community 
activities, and demonstrates financial need. 
The scholarship is renewable provided the 
recipient maintains an overall 3.0 average 
at West Chester University. 
CLASS OF 1957 SCHOLARSHIP. 
This fund was established by the Class 
of 1957 to assist entering freshmen with 
demonstrated exemplary achievement in 
mathematics or science and English. 
Application forms are available through 
the Office of Financial Aid. 
CLASS OF 1967 SCHOLARSHIP. 
Estabhshed by the Class of 1967, this 
scholarship is awarded to a deserving 
incoming freshman. 
CLASS OF 1970 SCHOLARSHIP. 
This fund was made available through 
the Class of 1970 on its 15th reunion in 
1985. The award is to be made to a stu- 
dent who has demonstrated academic 
achievement and good University citi- 
zenship. The amount is no less than 
$100. Application forms are available 
through the Office of Financial Aid. 
JOHN T. COATES HORN SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This scholarship was estab- 
hshed in 1987 as a memorial to John T. 
Coates by his wife and daughters. It is 
awarded to a talented incoming fresh- 
man whose major performing area is the 
French horn. 

COLONIAL SCHOLARSHIP FOR 
BUSINESS STUDY. This scholarship 
is awarded to incoming freshmen with 
demonstrated financial need from 
Plymouth Whitemarsh High School 
enrolled in the School of Business and 
PubHc Affairs. 

*CONNELLY FOUNDATION 
SCHOLARSHIP. The ConneUy 
Foundation, established in 1955 by Mr. 
and Mrs. John F. Connelly (deceased), 
provided the fiinds for this endowed schol- 
arship. Awards wiU be made to deserving 
graduates of Catholic high schools in the 
five-county Philadelphia area including 
Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Bucks, 
and Philadelphia counties. 
SAMUEL RUSSELL COSBY, JR. 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP 
(VOICE). This scholarship was created 
to honor Samuel R. Cosby, Jr. '44 by his 
nephew BiU Cosby. The scholarship will 



Financial Aid 



be awarded to an incoming freshman 
who plans to attain a bachelor of music 
degree in performance, with a concentra- 
tion in vocal performance. It is restricted 
to students from WiUiam Penn High 
School or Bodine Magnet School, both 
in Philadelphia. The School of Music 
dean will select the recipient. 
PAT CROCE SPORTS MEDICINE 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP. The 
scholarship was estabUshed through a 
personal gift from Pat Croce to recog- 
nize and reward outstanding students in 
the sports medicine program. 
KENDALL PARIS DAVIS SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This scholarship is awarded to 
an incoming, fuU-time, female student 
from Delaware with demonstrated finan- 
cial need and deep academic desire. 
CLIFFORD DeBAPTISTE SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. Named in honor of Clifford 
DeBaptiste, former mayor of the Borough 
of West Chester, communitv' leader, and 
local businessman, this scholarship will 
assist qualified traditional and nontradi- 
tional social work students from both the 
B.S.W. and M.S.W. programs. Require- 
ments include excellence in academic 
achievement, demonstrated communit)' 
leadership initiatives, and a demonstrated 
commitment to biculmral and bihngual 
social work practice. Initial assistance in 
the range of $500 will be provided for 
book funds and/or travel assistance to and 
from practicum assignments. 
ERIC S. DELLECKER '84 SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This scholarship for pre-med- 
ical students was established in memory of 
Eric S. Dellecker bv his parents. Recipients 
are chosen by the University Pre-Medical 
Committee based on academic achieve- 
ment and the completion of one academic 
year in the pre-medical program. 
PHILLIP B. DONLEY AWARD. This 
scholarship was established bv the athlet- 
ic training alumni and is awarded to a 
junior majoring in athletic training. The 
recipient will be chosen based on GPA, 
cUnical evaluations, and service (profes- 
sional, Universitv, and community). 
'RALPH H. DeRUBBO ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND. This scholar- 
ship was created by Ralph H. DeRubbo 
'47 to assist a student in financial need. 
FREDERICK DOUGLASS SOCI- 
ETY SCHOLARSHIP. Scholarships 
are available to minority students who 
are enrolled fuU time. Applicants must 
demonstrate their ability' to make a posi- 
tive contribution to the University 
and/or community through active 



involvement. Applications and guidelines 
are available during the spring semester 
in the Office of Financial Aid. 
DR. ROBERT E. DRAYER MEMOR- 
IAL AWARD. An annual award for die 
senior who graduates with the most distin- 
guished record in histon', in memor\' of 
Dr. Robert E. Draver, assistant professor 
of history, who died in 1968. The Depart- 
ment of History selects the recipient. 
*ROBERT EDWARD DRAYER 
SCHOLARSHIPS. There are three 
renewable Drayer Scholarships. The 
four-year full scholarship is given to a 
freshman history' major with strong aca- 
demic achievement; it covers in-state 
tuition, fees, room, and board. The two- 
year hill scholarship also covers in-state 
tuition, fees, room, and board, and is 
awarded for academic merit each year to 
a history major who will be returning to 
West Chester University as a junior. The 
S2,000 four-year partial scholarship is 
awarded each year to a freshman histor)- 
major on the basis of need and merit. 
EARTH AND SPACE UNDER- 
GRADAUTE SCHOLARSHIP. 
Awards will be made to junior or senior 
majors in B.S. geoscience or B.S.Ed, earth 
and space sciences on the basis of academ- 
ic achievement, financial need, and per- 
sonal characteristics. Recipients will be 
chosen by vote of the faculty in the 
Department of Geology and Astronomy. 
FACULTY AWARD. A certificate pre- 
sented annually to a graduating senior in 
the Department of Nursing who, in the 
opinion of the department faculty, demon- 
strates "outstanding ability and exceptional 
commitment to professional nursing." 
FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP FUND. 
Annual awards of $200 each are made in 
May to undergraduate students on the 
basis of academic abUity and financial 
need. Applications are made to the 
Faculty Scholarship Fund. 
DEBRA POLLARD FORD '76 MAR- 
KETING SCHOLARSHIP. Inter- 
Media Marketing and American 
Telecast Corporation estabhshed this 
scholarship in memor\- of Debra PoUard 
Ford '76, an educator who later served as 
the director of training and development 
at Inter-Media Marketing. The scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to a marketing 
major who is selected by the Department 
of Marketing faculty. 
WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY 
FOUNDATION GRANT. The West 
Chester University Foundation has mod- 
est funds available for grants to needy 



students. Any student who is about to 
complete, or has completed, his/her first 
year may apph'. In evaluating applica- 
tions, the foundation will give special 
attention to those who are active in all 
facets of University hfe. Each year, appli- 
cations for the fall semester should be 
submitted by May 1, and for the spring 
semester by December 1. 
*MELVIN L. FREE SCHOLARSHIP. 
This scholarship was established by 
Melvin L. Free, a member of the class of 
1932. It is offered to an incoming fresh- 
man with a strong academic record. 
CHARLES S. AND NL\RGHERITA 
GANGEMI MEMORIAL SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. Established in memory of the 
parents of retired music faculty member 
Charles D. Gangemi, this scholarship is 
awarded annually to two students in the 
School of Music. One award is to an 
entering freshman piano major, to be 
selected bv the Department of Ke^'board 
Music. The other award is to an under- 
graduate or graduate theory and/or compo- 
sition major, to be selected by the Depart- 
ment of Music Theory and Composition. 
RA\'MOND AND AL\Y GR./>lYSON 
FRIDAY xMEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This scholarship was established 
by Dr. Raymond Friday, professor of 
vocal and choral music, in memory of his 
parents. It is awarded annually to a fresh- 
man voice major who is selected in the 
spring semester on the basis of scholar- 
ship and vocal achievement. 
MIRIAM GOTTLIEB PIANO 
SCHOLARSHIP. This award has been 
made possible through the generosity of 
Mrs. JVIiriam Gottlieb, who was a mem- 
ber of the University's Department of 
Keyboard Music faculty from 1946 until 
her retirement in 1975. 
MICHAEL C. GREY AWARD. This 
award was established in memory of 
Michael C. Grey '89 by Barbara J. 
Brown, an alumnus and former 
faculty/staff member. 
BESSIE GRUBB SCHOLARSHIP 
FOR GR.APHIC ARTS. Named for 
Bessie Gmbb, who was employed at West 
Chester University in the School of Educa- 
tion's Visual Aids Department for 30 years 
until her retirement in 1969, this scholar- 
ship is awarded to a junior vWth a concen- 
tration in graphic design or photography. 
THE JOHN GUTSCHER MEMORI- 
AL SCHOLARSHIP IN MUSIC 
EDUCATION. This award, presented 
for the first time in 1988, is based on 
music student teaching excellence, acade- 



Financial Aid 



mic excellence, and financial need. The 
award was established by the family of 
John Gutscher, a former School of Music 
facult)' member. The student or students 
are selected by the music student teach- 
ing supervisors with the approval of the 
Department of Music Ediication. 
*EVELYN H. HALDEMAN SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This scholarship was estab- 
lished by Evelyn H. Haldeman, a member 
ot the class ot 1944. One-time awards are 
made by the University Scholarship 
Committee to students based on need, 
above-average scholarship, and citizenship. 
MAZIE B. HALL SCHOLARSHIP. 
This scholarship was estabhshed in 
honor of Mazie B. Hall '24 who worked 
all of her adult life to establish better 
relations among individuals. 
*DR. CLIFFORD H. HARDING 
ARTS AND SCIENCES SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This scholarship was established by 
a bequest from Dr. Clifford H. Harding, 
former professor of history and chair of the 
Department of Political Science. Awards 
ot S2,000 each will be made to qualified 
entering freshmen with several renewable 
for the second year. Applicants to majors 
in the College of Arts and Sciences will be 
invited to applv based on a re\dew of their 
high school rank, high school GPA, and 
total SAT scores. Selection will be made 
by a faculty committee from the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

*DR. CLIFFORD H. HARDING 
BUSINESS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship was 
established by a bequest from Dr. 
Cliftord H. Harding, former professor of 
history and chair of the Department of 
Political Science. Awards of S1,000 each 
will be made to qudified entering fresh- 
men. Applicants to majors in the School 
of Business and Public Affairs will be 
invited to applv based on a review of 
their high school rank, high school GPA, 
and total SAT scores. Selection wUl be 
made by a faculty' committee from the 
School ot Business and Public Affairs. 
LEONARD HOCKENSMITH 
MEMORLVL SCHOLARSHIP FOR 
PHI KAPPA SIGMA. This ftind was 
established in memor)' of Leonard 
Hockensmith '91, a history major and Phi 
Kappa Sigma brother, who was active in 
his fraternity and campus organizations, 
which included being a cartoonist for the 
Quad The scholarship will be awarded to a 
Phi Kappa Sigma brother or a relative of a 
Phi Kappa Sigma alumni brother from any 
chapter who is active in extracurricular 



activities, has a cumulative GPA of at least 
2.60, and is in good standing with the fra- 
ternity and the campus community. 
ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This frind was established in 
honor of the German naturalist 
Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), 
pre-eminent scholar of his time who 
explored much of Latin America, collect- 
ing and cataloging the flora of the New 
World and is considered the founder of 
plant geography. The recipient should be 
a foreign language major who plans to 
continue with graduate study, or a junior 
or senior foreign language major enrolled 
in a study abroad program. 
MARY LOUISE TURNER HOPKINS 
'43 AWARD. This award was established 
by John Feelye Hopkins '43 in memory of 
his wife Mary Louise Turner Hopkins and 
has been permanendy endowed through 
his recent bequest. It is presented annually 
to a senior majoring in special education. 
HELEN TAPPER IVINS '35 EN- 
DOWED SCHOLARSHIP. The Helen 
Tapper Ivins '35 Endowed Scholarship 
was established by Mrs. Ivins's sister, 
Marie Tapper Lewis '32, and her son, C. 
Stephen Lewis, in memoiy of Helen 
Tapper Ivins, a member of the West 
Chester University History/Social Studies 
Department who also served on one of the 
school's first scholarship committees. The 
Ivins Scholarship is awarded to an under- 
graduate student with a minimum grade 
point average of 3.0 who is stud}ing to 
become a history/social smdies teacher. 
Applications can be made through the 
Department of History. 
MARION PETERS IRVIN EN- 
DOWED SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship was established by family 
members to assist an upperclass educa- 
tion major, committed to teaching, who 
has financial need. 

ANN JOHNS SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship is awarded by the Faculty 
Dames of West Chester LTniversit)' to 
undergraduate women who are at least 
25 years old and enrolled in degree pro- 
grams. Contact the Office of Financial 
Aid for additional information and 
application forms. 

ARTHUR E. JONES MEMORIAL 
SCHOLARSHIP. Talent in the choral 
conducting area is the consideration for 
this annual award to a music student in 
remembrance of Dr. Arthur E. Jones, for- 
mer chair of choral music. To be eligible, 
a student must be a junior who has com- 



pleted a course in choral conducting. A 
2.0 overall GPA and a 2.5 music GPA 
are required. The Department of Vocal 
and Choral Music selects the recipient. 
CAROLYN KEEFE SCHOLARSHIP. 
The Carolyn Keefe Scholarship was estab- 
lished to honor Dr. Carol)Ti Keefe, profes- 
sor emerita of communiations studies, for- 
mer longtime professor of speech commu- 
nication, and a director of forensics at 
WCU. To qualif)' for the scholarship, a 
student must have completed at least two 
years on the Forensics Team, remrn to the 
University and participate in active com- 
petition the following year, have a mini- 
muiTi GPA of 3.0, and be a member of Pi 
Kappa Delta, national forensics honorary. 
VERA A. KENNY SCHOLARSHIP. 
This renewable award is made to an 
incoming freshman enrolled in School of 
Education. 

DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY 
SCHOLARSHIP. Three scholarships 
are awarded to any sophomore, junior, or 
senior student in health and physical 
education. Applications are made to the 
chairperson. Department of Kinesiology. 
CHARLES KING '32 AND 
DOROTHY ECKMAN KING '32 
SCHOLARSHIP. An annual $600 
award was established by family mem- 
bers to honor Charles and Dorothy 
King. No limitations are set for recipi- 
ents who will be determined through the 
Otfice of Financial Aid. 
CHARLOTTE E. KING SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This endowed scholarship was 
established by N. Ruth Reed in memory 
of Dr. Charlotte E. King, former 
University professor and first chair of the 
Elementary Education Department. The 
committee from the department will 
select an elementary education recipient. 
DAVID S. KONITZER ENDOWED 
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIR This 
scholarship honors the memory of David 
S. Konitzer, a West Chester University 
senior who was tragically killed in an 
automobile accident. The scholarship is 
awarded to a sophomore, junior, or senior 
Chester County resident who plans to 
teach physical education and who meets 
other scholarship requirements. 
FRITZ K. KRUEGER MEMORIAL 
VOICE SCHOLARSHIP. Two schol- 
arships, endowed bv the Kxueger family, 
tor freshmen who are vocalists are 
awarded in honor of the late Fritz K. 
Krueger, who taught in the Department 
of Vocal and Choral Music from 1961 



Financial Aid 



until 1971. Applications are made to the 
dean of the School of Music. 
STANLEY H. AND FLEURETTE 
LANG/NORTHEAST HIGH 
SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship was established by the 
Northeast High School Alumni Associa- 
tion and is awarded to a Northeast High 
School graduate based on high scholastic 
standing, class rank, SAT scores, sendee 
to Northeast High School, good charac- 
ter, school and community citizenship, 
and financial need. The scholarship is 
renewable through four years. 
LEONARD LAUBACH MUSIC 
SCHOLARSHIP. Alumnus Leonard 
Laubach '40 estabhshed this scholarship 
to fund scholarships for music students. 
Awards are determined by the School of 
Music Scholarship Committee. 
MEL LORBACK END0\\T:D 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND. Established 
by Jerad L. Yeagley '62, this scholarship 
honors Mel Lorback, former WCU soc- 
cer coach and professor. The scholarship 
will assist a male soccer player with out- 
standing academic and leadership quali- 
ties, with preference given to physical 
education majors. 

LEWIS H. NL\RSHALL AWARD. An 
annual award is made to a senior in the 
social and behavioral sciences whose lead- 
ership, professional promise, and academic 
achievement are outstanding. It is made 
available by the Chester Count)' Associa- 
tion of Township Officials, and the 
awardee is selected bv a committee of fac- 
ulty selected from appropriate disciplines. 
CHARLES MAYO SCHOLARSHIP. 
This award of approximately S250 is 
made annually in memor)- of Dr. Charles 
Mayo, a political scientist, who was pres- 
ident of West Chester University from 
1974 until 1982. It is made by vote of 
the political science facult)' to an out- 
standing junior or senior in the disci- 
pline. Details are available through the 
Department of Political Science. 
JAMES E. McERLANE SCHOLAR- 
SHIP FOR INTERNATIONAL 
STUDY. This award is presented to a 
student with academic abilit}' and finan- 
cial need for study abroad. The scholar- 
ship was established in honor of James 
E. McErlane, Esq. by his friends in the 
Chester Count}' community. 
*NLA.RTHA FORD McILVAIN 
SCHOLARSHIP. Established by Martha 
Ford '52 and Donald Mcllvain, this schol- 
arship provides annual assistance to enter- 
ing freshmen of high academic promise, 



and is renewable through graduation pro- 
vided a minimum 3.0 GPA is maintained. 
NANCY R. McINT^HE MEMORL'\L 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship is 
awarded to an inconung freshman from 
Penns\ivania who has been diagnosed 
with multiple sclerosis or has some other 
physical disability. Preference will be given 
to smdents enrolling in the College of 
Arts and Sciences or the School of Educa- 
tion. Applicants should demonstrate 
extracurricular involvement and leadership 
capabilities through service or group work. 
DR. ALAN P. MEWHA ENDOWED 
SCHOL.\RSHIP. Established by Dr. 
PriciUa .Alden Mewha in memorj' of Dr. 
.Alan P. Mewha and his instructors Miss 
Harriet Elliot and Miss Leone Broadhead, 
this scholarship is awarded to an outstand- 
ing upperclass geography major. 
S. POWELL MIDDLETON MEMO- 
RIAL SCHOLARSHIP. This is an 
annual award to a freshman music stu- 
dent for talent and achievement on an 
orchestral instrument. The award honors 
the former conductor of the University 
Symphony Orchestra who died in 1970. 

DOROTm' gi\t:n miller and 

FRANK WILLL\M MILLER 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship was 
established by Dorothy Given Miller '19 
and Frank William Miller '20. Recipients 
must have successfully completed one 
year at the University and demonstrate 
academic achievement, leadership, 
strength of character, and financial need. 
Application forms are available from the 
Office of Financial Aid. 
LLOYD C. MITCHELL PIANO 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship was 
established in honor of Dr. Lloyd C. 
Mitchell upon his retirement in 1971 
after 35 years' service at the University, 
including 20 years as chair of the 
Department of Music and dean of the 
School of Music. It is awarded annually 
to a freshman music student selected by a 
piano faculty jury. Applications are made 
to the dean of the School of Music. 
MCHAEL P. MONTEMURO 
MATH SCHOLARSHIP. This scholar- 
ship was established by the Montemuro 
fainily in memor\' of math professor Dr. 
Michael P. Montemuro. A SI, 000 scholar- 
ship for tuition will be awarded to an 
incoming freshman who is enrolled in the 
B.S.Ed, degree program in mathematics. 
Selection by a Department of Mathematics 
committee wdU be based on the high 
school record of the candidates, including 



SAT scores, class rank, courses, grades, 

and recommendations. 
AGNES MONTEMURO SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This scholarship is awarded to an 
honors graduate of Interboro High School, 
with preference given to a student plan- 
ning to major in education. The Interboro 
High School guidance staff, administra- 
tion, and senior teachers choose recipients. 
MICHAEL MOROCHOKO 
MEMORI.AL PIANO AWARD. The 
Department of Keyboard Music presents 
a scholarship annually to an outstanding 
junior music student majoring in piano. 
This award is a memorial to Michael 
Morochoko, father of a former student. 
CONNIE MURRAY SCHOLARSHIP 
FOR PLANO. The Main Line Music 
Teachers established this S300 award in 
memory of Connie Murray, one of their 
members, who championed the cause of 
private music teachers. The scholarship is 
presented each year to a piano pedagog)' 
major and selected by the Keyboard 
Department of the School of Music. 
NATIONAL GUARD OFnCERS 
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM. Upon 
certification by the appropriate National 
Guard official as being eligible, students 
may register for a given semester by pay- 
ing 25 percent of tuition costs plus all 
other fees. The University wUl bill the 
National Guard directly for the remain- 
ing 75 percent of the tuition charges. 
NEW JERSEY ALUMNI SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. The New Jersey Chapter of the 
West Chester Universit}' Alumni 
Association sponsors uvo annual $500 
scholarship awards. These awards are avail- 
able to smdents who are New Jersey resi- 
dents and are fijnded by the contributions 
of New Jersey alumni. Applications may be 
obtained through the Office of Financial 
Aid and the Office of Alumni Relations. 
CHARLOTTE W. NEWCOMBE 
FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP. 
This scholarship is awarded to under- 
graduate women who are at least 25 
years old and enrolled in their junior or 
senior years. Selection is based on 
scholastic abilit}', financial need, and 
special life circumstances. Contact the 
Office of Financial Aid for additional 
information and application forms. 
DOROTLTr' NOWACK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This award was established in 
memory of Dorothy Nelson Nowack, a 
professor of public health at West Chester 
until her retirement in 1991. Recipients 
will be seniors with 90 credits who are 
smdving public health/health promotion. 



Financial Aid 



have a 3.3 or higher cumulative GPA, and 
exhibit a commitment to professional 
activities and service to the University, a 
department, or outside community. 
OFF-CAMPUS STUDENT ASSO- 
CIATION SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship is awarded annually by the 
Off-Campus Student Association to 
undergraduate commuters who are 
involved with off-campus activities. 

RICHARD PACIARONI '55 SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This endowed memorial schol- 
arship for geography, established by the 
Paciai'oni family, is awarded annually to 
an undergraduate geography major or 
graduate student for enrichment activities 
or career/professional development. 
Recipients are required to have a 3.0 
GPA in geography major and are chosen 
by the Department of Geography faculty. 
THEODORA PANDEL MEMORI- 
AL PIANO SCHOLARSHIP. This 
award is presented through the generos- 
ity of Praxiteles Pandel, associate profes- 
sor of piano. 

EDITH HARMON PARKER 
BLACK CAUCUS ALUMNI CHAP- 
TER SCHOLARSHIP. This scholar- 
ship was established through the estate 
of Edith Harmon Parker '33 and is 
awarded to a student with good academ- 
ic standing studying a discipline related 
to human relations, with preference 
given to black students. 
HILLARY H. PARRY MEMORL\L 
SCHOLARSHIP. An annual award to a 
junior music student, granted for scholar- 
ship, citizenship, and achievement in vocal 
study. The scholarship is in remembrance 
of a former teacher of voice. A 2.0 overall 
GPA and a 2.5 music GPA are required. 
BLANCHE STRETCH PETERSON 
PIANO/ORGAN SCHOLARSHIP. 
This scholarship is awarded to an incom- 
ing freshman from New Jersey whose 
main area of performance is the piano or 
organ, with preference given to a student 
from Salem or Cumberland counties. 
PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA, POW- 
ELL MIDDLETON AWARD. An 
annual award in memory of S. Powell 
Middleton is presented by the Rho 
Sigma chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 
men's music fraternity. It is based on out- 
standing musicianship, scholarship, and 
character. Applications are made to the 
dean of the School of Music. 

WILLIAM PYLE PHILIPS SCHOL- 
ARSHIPS. Awarded annually to juniors 
and seniors who are natives of Chester 
County on the basis of demonstrated 



scholastic ability. Funds are available for 
approximately eight scholarships to cover 
the basic tuition. Application forms may 
be secured in the Office of Financial Aid. 

'PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP. 
These merit-based, renewable scholar- 
ships are awarded to incoming freshmen 
based on the successful completion of an 
academic high school program, SAT or 
ACT scores, high school rank, and aca- 
demic record. For additional informa- 
tion and application forms, contact the 
Office of Admissions. 

PRESSER SCHOLARSHIP. This is a 
grant of $1,000, consisting of $500 from 
the Theodore Presser Foundation and 
$500 from the School of Music, to be 
applied toward tuition in a student's 
senior year. It is awarded by the presi- 
dent of the University to the student 
majoring in music who achieved the 
highest cumulative GPA at the end of 
the junior year, having completed no 
less than 95 credits at West Chester 
University. During the recipient's senior 
year, the student will be known as the 
Presser Scholar, denoting a reward for 
excellence with the hope that the award 
will help the student not only financial- 
ly, but also in his/her fliture career. 

N. RUTH REED HEALTH 
DEPARTMENT SCHOLARSHIP. 
This scholarship is sponsored by the 
West Chester University Department of 
Health. Applicants must be students at 
West Chester University (specifically, 
undergraduate health majors with sopho- 
more academic status or better), possess 
a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0, and 
demonstrate high moral character, posi- 
tive personality traits, and evidence of 
genuine interest and aptitude in working 
in the health field. For information con- 
tact the Department of Health. 

WINIFRED PIERSOL REESER '43 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship supports an upperclass student 
who is committed to the field of kinesiol- 
ogy and maintains a GPA of at least 3.0. 

REISS FOREIGN STUDIES 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP. 
Retired faculty member Mary Ann Reiss 
created this scholarship for students 
majoring in French, German, Russian, 
or Spanish who plan to study abroad. 

FRANCIS J. REYNOLDS SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This scholarship is awarded 
by the Department of Chemistry to a 
chemistry major who has successfully 
completed one year at the University. 



Applications are available through the 
Department of Chemistry. 

LEAH GALLAGHER RIDDLE '41 
ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship was established as a memori- 
al to alumna Leah Gallagher Riddle '41 
by her family and friends. It wiU be 
awarded annually to an exemplary upper- 
class student whose major is in early 
childhood and/or elementary education. 

ALFRED D. ROBERTS FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE SCHOLARSHIP. This 
fund was established in honor of Dr. 
Alfred D. Roberts, professor of foreign 
languages at West Chester University 
from 1959 through 1988. He founded the 
Department of Foreign Languages and 
the Junior Year Abroad program at West 
Chester, and served as the president of 
the Faculty Senate. The scholarship recip- 
ient will be a student with outstanding 
achievement in the study of a foreign lan- 
guage but does not need to have a major 
or minor in foreign language. 
SARTOMER COMPANY ENVI- 
RONMENTAL SCHOLARSHIP. A 
$1,500 annual environmental award is 
presented to a sophomore or junior who 
is a Pennsylvania resident and has fiilfilled 
a number of chemistry courses including 
the chemistry of the environment course. 
Recipients must have a minimum overall 
GPA of 3.0 and a 3.2 GPA in the sci- 
ences as well as write an essay judged by a 
company representative. 
MABEL KRING SCHAFFER '10 
SCHOLARSHIP. This award was 
established in memory of Mabel Kring 
Schaffer through the estate of her daugh- 
ter, Nancy E. Schaffer, class of 1949. It 
will be awarded to a worthy student with 
financial need as determined by the 
offices of Admissions and Financial Aid. 
ANNE M. SCHAUB MEMORL\L 
SCHOLARSHIP. The Anne M. Schaub 
Memorial Scholarship is awarded annual- 
ly to a kinesiology major who is entering 
the second semester of the sophomore 
year. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required. 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
ENDOWMENT. The School of 
Education Endowment was created by 
John F. Kenny '32 in memory of his 
wife. Vera A. Kenny, and in recognition 
of Clarence L. McKelvie '24, professor 
of education. Awards or loans will be 
made to academically deserving students 
under the guidance of the dean of the 
School of Education. 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC STRING 
SCHOLARSHIP. Two scholarships are 



Financial Aid 



awarded to incoming freshmen who are 
string majors. 

EVERETT E. SH.\EFER MEMORI- 
AL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP. 
Established by R. Elizabeth Wyers 
Shaefer '44 in memory ot her husband, 
this scholarship assists a performing 
musician enrolled in anv music degree 
program with a minimum 2.0 cumulative 
grade point average wdth a minimum 2.5 
grade point average in music. 
DR. AHMAD H. SHAMSEDDINE 
MEMORL\L AWARD. An annual 
award is given to an outstanding student in 
the field of business/economics, in memor)- 
of Dr. Ahmad H. Shamseddine, associate 
professor ot economics, who died in 1971. 
JANE ELIZABETH SHEPPARD 
VOCAL/CHORAL SCHOLARSHIP. 
This award was established in honor of 
Jane E. Sheppard upon her retirement in 
May 1987 after 34 years of senice in the 
Department of Vocal and Choral Music. 
The recipient of this monetary award 
will be selected on the basis of outstand- 
ing participation in vocal and choral 
activities, which must include four 
semesters of Chamber Choir, scholar- 
ship, and personal qualifications. 
SICO FOUNDATION SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS. The SICO Company provides a 
limited number of scholarships for four 
years of study at West Chester Universirv 
at a rate of $1,000 per year ($4,000 total' 
value). High school students qualified for 
college admission or high school gradu- 
ates who have not attended college on a 
fUl-time basis may compete tor a SICO 
Foundation Scholarship when their legal 
residences are located in the foDowing 
Pennsylvania counties: Adams, Berks, 
Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, 
Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York. 
A student attending the Shippensburg, 
Boyertown, Spring-Ford, or Williams 
Valley High Schools in Pennsylvania 
whose residence is outside the aforemen- 
tioned area is considered in the SICO 
Company service area and mav apply for a 
scholarship. No distinction is made on 
the basis of sex, race, or religious belief 
JESSE V. SILVANO SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. This scholarship was established 
in memory of Jesse V. SUvano, a West 
Chester University student. To qualify, 
recipients must be a sophomore, junior, 
or first-semester senior, have a minimum 
GPA of 2.5, be committed to complet- 
ing an undergraduate degree in criminal 
justice, have an interest in attending law 



school, be active in campus or communi- 
ty' activities, and have financial need. 
ROB SIMON MEMORIAL AWARD. 
This award has been established by 
Joseph and Janice Simon, alumni of the 
School of Music, and the late Dr. Irving 
H. Cohen, a member of the School of 
Music faculty for many years, in memory 
of Rob Simon, who was a double bass 
major at the Universitv'. The competition 
is open to double bass majors during 
their junior or senior year. 
VINCENT D. AND MARY R. SKA- 
HAN SCHOLARSHIP. The scholar- 
ship, in honor of Vincent D. and Mary 
R. Skahan, benefits graduating seniors 
from West Catholic High School who 
have been accepted for admission to 
West Chester Universirv. Recipients 
must have a cumulative B average upon 
graduation from West Catholic. The 
scholarship is renewable provided the 
recipient maintains a 3.0 GPA. The 
minimum award is currently $500. 
GREG SMITH MEMORIAL 
SCHOLARSHIP. An annual scholar- 
ship of $100 is presented by the baseball 
club in memory of a former baseball cap- 
tain and president of the baseball club. 
W. W. SMITH CHARITABLE 
TRUST. The W.W. Smith Charitable 
Trust was established in 1977 under the 
will of WUliam Wikoft Smith, an impor- 
tant supporter of educational opportunity 
in the Delaware Valley. Established 
through his will, the W. W. Smith 
Charitable Trust has carried on Smith's 
work. Funds from this program are used 
to support students from middle-income 
families who might not qualify' for other 
aid. The funds also support students 
enrolled in the Academic Development 
Program at West Chester University. For 
additional information, contact the direc- 
tor of the Academic Development 
Program or the Office of Financial Aid. 
SOPHOMORE MUSIC EDUCA- 
TION SCHOLARSHIP. Three schol- 
arships are given annually to music edu- 
cation sophomores. University citizen- 
ship and musical performance as well as 
a 2.0 overall GPA and a 2.5 music GPA 
are required. Applications are made to 
the dean of the School of Music. 
SOPHOMORE MUSIC SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS. These awards are presented annu- 
ally to three sophomore music students, 
one each in the areas of instrumental, 
vocal, and keyboard. Recipients must 
exhibit good citizenship and performance 
skills, as well as have an overall 2.0 GPA 



and a 2.5 GPA in music. Auditions for the 
scholarships are held in the fall semester. 
CHARLES A. SPRENKLE EN- 
DOWED SCHOLARSHIP. Created by 
family and friends, this scholarship hon- 
ors Dr. Charles A. Sprenkle, who joined 
the facult}' in 1955 and was appointed 
dean of the School of Music in 1971. The 
scholarship is awarded annually, at the 
beginning of the fall semester, for tuition 
assistance to the sophomore who achieved 
the highest grade point average during 
the previous year as a fijll-time freshman 
enrolled in the School ot Music. 
DR. ETHEL M. STALEY SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. Established in memor)' of Dr. 
Ethel M. Staley, who taught French at 
West Chester from 1930 to 1952, this 
scholarship is awarded annually to an 
outstanding graduate or undergraduate 
student in French. 

JANE B. SWAN SCHOLARSHIP. 
Sponsored by the Women's Institute of 
West Chester University', a scholarship of 
approximately $500 is awarded annually 
to a woman student who is completing 
an interrupted education. Application 
forms are available at the Women's 
Center and the Office ot Financial Aid. 
DR. CHARLES S. SWOPE SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FOUNDATION. A Memorial 
Scholarship Trust Foundation established 
by Charles E. Swope and Richard M. 
Swope in memory of Dr. and Mrs. 
Charles S. Swope. Dr. Swope served as 
president of West Chester University for 
a quarter ot a centun'. Applicants must be 
fijll-time students enrolled in their junior 
year. Scholarships are S1,000 each; up to 
15 may be awarded annually. Applications 
must be fded on or before April 1. 
Selection is made during May with schol- 
arships commencing in September. 
WILLIAM A. .\ND BARBARA V. 
TAYLOR SCHOLARSHIPS. Mrs. 
Barbara Taylor Toland established this 
endowed scholarship in memory of her 
first husband of 35 years, William A. 
Taylor. Two renewable, fiiU-tuition 
scholarships are awarded to incoming 
freshmen, one to a Chichester High 
School graduate and one to a Sun Valley 
High School graduate. The recipients are 
to be deserving students who have not 
qualified for any other scholarships or 
financial aid at the University. 
S. ELIZABETH T\^SON MEMORI- 
AL SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship 
is awarded to an outstanding undergrad- 
uate student in the Department ot 
Communicative Disorders. 



Student Affairs 



ROBERT M. VALYO SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. The scholarship honors Chief 
Robert M. Valyo, who served as chief ot 
police in Whiteland Township, Chester 
Counrv'. To qualify, recipients must be 
criminal justice majors entering their 
junior or senior year and have an o\'erall 
minimum GPA of 3.0. The minimum 
award is currently S500. 
JOY VANDEVER ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP. Established by the 
friends of Joy Vandever upon her retire- 
ment from the West Chester University 
faculty, this scholarship is awarded to a 
music major who finishes among the 
top 50 percent in the Parr)- Junior Year 
Voice Competition. 
EARLE C. WATERS ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship was 
established in memory of Earle C. 
Waters, former professor of health and 
physical education and coach of nationally 
renowned soccer, track, and g}Tnnastics 
teams. Awards will be made to students 
demonstrating financial need who have 
completed their first year with a GPA of 
no less than 2.8 in the Department of 
Kinesiology' with a concentration in the 
teaching of health and physical education, 
and who have demonstrated qualities of a 
well-rounded citizen b)- participating in 
and contributing to the success of 
University or community-sponsored activ- 
ities. Awards will be made by a committee 
from the School ot Health Sciences. 
WEST CHESTER UNI\T:RSIT\' 
MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS. These 



one-time scholarships are awarded to 
incoming freshmen who demonstrate 
high academic achievement. 
MYNN DIEFENDERFER WHITE 
'27 HONORS SCHOLARSHIP. This 
scholarship has been endowed in honor 
of ALTin Diefenderfer WTiite by her 
husband, Paul, her two children, 
Cynthia and Jim, and three of her 
grandchildren. The SLOOO scholarship is 
awarded annually to a rising junior who 
is a member in good standing of the 
University Honors Program, is active in 
the Honors Student Association, and 
who demonstrates leadership in the cam- 
pus communit)'. The award is renewable 
for the second year proxdded the recipi- 
ent maintains the standards for which 
they were initially selected. 
HARRY WILKINSON MUSIC THE- 
ORY SCHOLARSHIP. This scholar- 
ship is awarded to a sophomore music 
student during the spring semester on the 
basis of talent and achievement in the 
areas of music theory, ear- training, and 
sight singing. The scholarship fund has 
been established by Dr. Harry Wilkinson, 
retired professor in the Department of 
Music Theory and Composition. 
LOIS WILLIAMS ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP. This scholarship was 
established by Lois WiUiams, the former 
choral conductor and vocal professor who 
retired in 1991 after 36 years of service to 
the Universit}'. It is awarded to a student 
in any music degree program within the 
School of Music who has earned a mini- 



mum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in all music 
subjects. The student must be at least in 
his or her third semester ot Concert 
Choir. The candidate for this scholarship 
will be selected by the conductor of the 
Concert Choir and wiU be presented to a 
student whose leadership and responsi- 
bilitv' as a member of the Concert Choir 
is an obvious indication of this person's 
potential as a musician/educator. 
DR. CARLOS ZIEGLER SCHOL- 
ARSHIP. This S500 award is presented 
annually to a junior student majoring in 
early childhood or elementar)' education. 
The recipient must have a 3.0 GPA or 
higher, and show leadership and poten- 
tial as an early childhood or elementary 
teacher. 

RUTH WALDAL\N ZOLL 
SCHOLARSHIP. This tlind was estab- 
lished through the generosity of the late 
Mrs. Ruth Waldman ZoU '28. These 
scholarships are especially for students 
who have significant need. One scholar- 
ship each year is reserved for a student 
entering the University from a high 
school in Berks Counn- where Mrs. ZoU 
resided. Award amounts vat}' and appli- 
cation forms may be obtained fi'om the 
Office of Financial Aid. 

'Students accepted to tibe Universit}.' prior to 
Januan" 15 who have demonstrated outstanding 
achievement will be invited to apply for these 
merit scholarships. Candidate selection is based on 
academic performance, involvement, and accom- 
plishment, and is determined by the University 
Scholarship Committee. 



Student Affairs 



The administration of West Chester 
Universit)' is committed to pro\'iding a 
comprehensive educational experience 
for students. To accomplish this mis- 
sion, the Division ot Student Affairs 
provides a variety of services and pro- 
grams to augment the classroom experi- 
ence. The goal of the division is to assist 
students in their intellectual, social, and 
psychological growth and to contribute 
to developing a campus community 
where knowledge, acceptance, and social 
concerns are basic values. 
Offices within the Student Affairs 
Division include Athletics, Career De- 



velopment, Children's Center, Counsel- 
ing and Psychological Services, Greek 
Life and Student Organizations, Health 
Services, Judicial Affairs and Community 
Development, Multicultural Affairs, 
New Student Programs, Recreation and 
Leisure Programs, Residence Lite and 
Housing, Service Learning and Volun- 
teer Programs, Sykes Student Union, and 
the Women's Center. The Division of 
Student Affairs also offers services for 
commuter and off-campus students and 
for lesbian, gay, and bisexual students. 
The administration believes that stu- 
dents should share the responsibility for 



governing their communit)' and should 
have a voice in shaping the objectives of 
the University. Through a democratical- 
ly constructed student government and 
committee structure, the administration, 
facult)', and student body seek to work 
together on behalf of the general weltare 
of the University. 

Classification of Students 

Students who attend West Chester 
Universit)' are classified for administra- 
tive purposes into two categories. 
(1) RESIDENT STUDENTS 
These students live in housing 
facilities operated by the University. 



Student Altairs 



Residents of North Campus resi- 
dence halls are required to choose 
from four University meal plans. 
(See "Meal Fee" on page 10.) 
Those residents living in the South 
Campus apartment complex are not 
required to be on a meal plan; how- 
ever, they may choose any meal 
plan option if they are interested. 
(2) OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS 
This classification covers students 
who travel or commute to and 
from their legal residences, as well 
as students who hve away from 
the homes of their parents or legal 
guardians in a dwelling that is not 
supervised or approved by the 
University. 

Services 

Residence Life and Housing Services 

The Office of Residence Life and 
Housing Services is responsible for creat- 
ing and maintaining an environment in 
each housing tacUity that encourages aca- 
demic, social, and emotional growth. 
Each facility is staffed with trained per- 
sonnel who are available 24 hours a day 
to provide services, assistance, and a vari- 
ety of information. AH resident students 
are given and encouraged to read the resi- 
dential handbook, A Guide to 
Residential Living, which contains valu- 
able information on all services, policies, 
and responsibilities pertaining to all hous- 
ing facilities. The Office of Residence 
Life and Housing Services is located in 
238 Sykes Student Union, 610-436-3307. 
On-Campus Housing 
The residence haUs on the North Campus 
provide accommodations for approximate- 
ly 3,100 resident students in double occu- 
panc)' accommodations. In addition, the 
South Campus apartment complex houses 
almost 500 residents in four- or five-per- 
son, fijUy fiirnished units with each bed- 
room having either single or double occu- 
pancy. AH students may be guaranteed 
housing for their hill four years. 
Housing Assignments. The Office of 
Residence Life and Housing Ser\'ices 
makes the housing assignments for all 
students living in all housing facilities. 
These assignments are made without dis- 
crimination. Only individuals of the same 
gender will be assigned as roommates or 
in the same apartment unit. Each room 
or apartment has basic fiirnishings for 
comfortable hving, and the students mav 
make them more homelike with their 
own accessory additions. During orienta- 



tion, students are informed about the ser- 
vices and equipment fiarnished by the 
University and those necessities that they 
must supply for themselves. Lounge and 
recreation areas, television, and a variety 
of other facilities and conveniences pro- 
vide a pleasant setting for student life in 
each residence hall. Services are also 
available in a central location in the 
apartment complex. 

Transfer Students. Transfer students are 
admitted both as resident students and 
as commuting students. Those transfer 
students who desire on-campus housing 
should indicate this at the time they 
apply for admission to the University. 
Married Students. The University has no 
housing facilities for married students 
with their spouses or for students with 
children or dependents. Prior to registra- 
tion, they will need to secure their own 
accommodations in the community. 
Readmitted Students. Students readmit- 
ted to the University are eUgible for on- 
campus housing unless a specific disci- 
pUnary sanction would prohibit such 
occupancy. Interested students should 
contact the Office of Residence Life and 
Housing Services for specific informa- 
tion about the apphcation process. 
Policy for Withdrawals. Resident students 
must vacate their residence hall or apart- 
ment within 24 hours of completing the 
withdrawal form in the Office of the 
Registrar. Resident students must secure 
the signature of the assistant director of 
housing prior to vacating their residence 
hall or apartment. 

Students with Disabilities. Students must 
be able to care for themselves indepen- 
dendy or arrange for services that will 
allow them to perform normal life fiinc- 
tions in the context of a residential set- 
ting, including, but not limited to, 
bathing, dressing, and other personal-care 
issues. This requirement may be met by 
having a live-in, personal-care attendant, 
within certain restrictions. Some accom- 
modations are also available for students 
who have special needs. Additional infor- 
mation, including available services and 
penalties tor noncompliance, can be 
obtained by contacting the director of 
housing services at 610-436-3307. The 
fiiU text of the policies and procedures are 
found in the WCU Handbook on 
Disabilities, the "Guide to Residential 
Living," or on the University web page at 
www.wcupa.edu/_services/sm.lif7. 



Dining Accommodations 

AH students residing in the North 
Campus residence halls must be on the 
University meal plan as a condition of 
occupancy. Students with medical prob- 
lems who cannot meet this requirement 
may request a meal waiver. Residents of 
the South Campus Apartment Com- 
plex, as well as off-campus and com- 
muting smdents, may purchase any 
University meal plan offered, choose one 
of the options hsted below, or obtain 
meals at the transient rates. 
The University's meal plan provides a 
number of choices for students. North 
Campus resident students must select 
one of the following meal plan options: 

• Variable 10 guaranteed meal plan 
(any 10 meals of the 19 meals served) 
plus $100 of flex 

• Variable 14 guaranteed meal plan 
(any 14 meals of the 19 meals served) 
plus SI 00 of flex 

• 19 guaranteed meal plan plus $100 
flex, or 

• Block Plan of 175 meals per semester 
plus $100 flex 

The meal week runs from Saturday to 
Friday and any unused meals at the end 
of the week will be forfeited. 
In addition to the above meal plans, the 
following meal plans are also available to 
South Campus Apartment residents, 
off-campus, and commuter students: 

• Block Plan of 50 meals per semester 
plus $100 flex 

• Variable 5 guaranteed meal plan (any 
5 meals of the 19 meals served) plus 
$100 flex, or 

• Flex dollars only - must begin with a 
$100 minimum balance and may be 
increased in $25 increments. 

The flex dollar portion of every meal plan 
may be increased in $25 increments at 
any time during the semester. Flex dollars 
not used at the end of the fall semester 
will be transferred to the spring semester. 
The smdent forfeits any flex dollars 
remaining at the end of the spring semes- 
ter which wiU not be refunded. Students 
who leave the University after the fall 
semester wUl forfeit any remaining flex 
dollars. AH meal plans may be used in the 
foHowing locations: Lawrence Dining 
HaU, Lawrence Convenience Store and 
Campus Corner, the 12th and South 
Convenience Store at the South Campus 
Apartments, and the Ram's Head Food 
Court in S\kes Union. 
Students in North Campus residence 
haUs wiU have their meal plan cost 



Student Affairs 



included in their University billing. Off- 
campus, commuter, and South Campus 
apartment students can sign up for a 
meal plan bv applying at the Office of 
the Bursar in the Elsie O. BuU Center. 

Off-Campus and Commuter 
Services 

Services to Off-Campus and Commuter 
Students, which are coordinated by the 
associate director of Sykes Student 
Union, include the Off-Campus Housing 
Service, advising the Off-Campus and 
Commuter Association, and serving as a 
community resource agent in areas related 
to off-campus and commuting students. 
Additional services provided to off-cam- 
pus students include landlord/tenant legal 
aid information and development of 
long-range plans and research on the 
profile and needs of off-campus students. 
The assistant director of Sykes Student 
Union and Off-Campus and Commuter 
Services is located in 116 Sykes Student 
Union, 610-436-2984. 

OfF-Campus Housing 

Students who choose to live in the com- 
munit\' must secure their own living 
accommodations. Off-Campus and 
Commuter Services wiU assist students in 
finding housing b\' providing up-to-date 
listings of available housing. These listings 
are available in Sykes Student Union. The 
off-campus housing listings may also be 
accessed on the Internet at http:// 
maimTTi.wcupa.edu/public/qn'och.proc. 

Bookstore 

The Student Services, Inc. Bookstore is 
located on the ground floor of Sykes 
Student Union. The Bookstore sells both 
new and used textbooks for all WCU 
courses as well as school and art supplies. 
Textbooks may also be purchased on the 
store's web site. The SSI Bookstore also 
stocks best sellers, a variety of general 
interest literature, and a wide selection of 
reference books, as well as study and 
teacher aids. SSI Bookstore offers a com- 
plete line of official WCU imprinted 
clothing and an array of gifts that can be 
purchased on the store's web site. 
Greeting cards, groceries, snacks, and 
laundry supplies are also available in the 
Bookstore. Services offered include film 
processing, special orders for computer 
software and general interest books (at no 
extra cost), UPS shipping, and daily book 
buybacks. AH major credit cards, SSI 
EZPay, and personal checks, accompa- 
nied by a valid ID, are accepted. The 
Bookstore hours are as follows: Monday 



- Thursday firom 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Friday, 
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.; and Saturday, 11 a.m. - 
3 p.m. (hours are subject to change). For 
additional convenience, the store offers 
extended operating hours at the begin- 
ning of each semester. For more infor- 
mation call 610-436-BOOK or visit the 
web site at www.click2ssi-bookstore.com. 

Bus Transportation on Campus 

The University provides bus service from 
North to South Campus (and return) 
during the spring and fall semesters. The 
buses run from 7:15 a.m. to 1 a.m. on 
weekdays, from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. on 
Saturdays, and firom 1 p.m. to 1 a.m. on 
Sundays. On North Campus, the buses 
stop at University Avenue and Church 
Street, and also in front of Wayne Hall. 
On South Campus the buses stop at the 
Russell L. Sturzebecker Health Sciences 
Center, McCoy Center, the South 
Campus Apartment Complex, and Q_ 
and R Lots. Bus schedules are available 
at residence hall desks or the Student 
Union Information Center. There is no 
bus service during the summer. 
Students using the bus service should be 
advised that it is impossible to provide 
timely transportation between the North 
and South Campus within the standard 
10-minute class break. Therefore, stu- 
dents should plan and develop class 
schedules that allow time to be trans- 
ported between the two campuses 
through the use of open class periods. 

Career Planning and Placement 
Services 

The professional staff of the Twardowski 
Career Development Center assists stu- 
dents in defining career goals, relating 
academic preparation to these goals, and 
eventually helping in the search for 
internships and part-time/fiiU-time career 
opportunities. These services are available 
throughout the entire calendar year in 
Lawrence Center, second floor. A career 
information library is available for brows- 
ing and research. Graduate school refer- 
ence material is maintained for students 
considering graduate school. Other activ- 
ities of the Twardowski Career Develop- 
ment Center include seminars, on-cam- 
pus interviews and job fairs with poten- 
tial employers, resume critique, resume 
referral, electronic resume databases, and 
a job posting system. 
Additional information is available at 
http://wwav.wcupa.edu/_services/sru.car/. 
The Twardowski Career Development 
Center is located in 106 LawTence 



Center, 610-436-2501, or e-mail 
cdc#wcupa.edu. 

Children's Center 

The Children's Center provides afford- 
able, quality' child care on campus for 
children of students and employees of the 
University. The center offers a develop- 
mentally based educational program for 
children ages three to six years with a 
summer program for ages three to twelve. 
A multiple-child discount of 20 percent is 
available. Snacks are provided by the cen- 
ter, with parents providing a bag lunch. 
Located on the ground floor of 
McCarthy Hall, the Children's Center is 
licensed by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, and all required registration 
material must be completed prior to 
enrollment. Enrollment for each semester 
begins when the schedule of courses is 
available from the Office of the Registrar. 
The Children's Center also offers a wide 
range of opportunities for involvement 
by students such as: 

• Practicum experiences in the fields of 
early childhood education, social 
work, and nursing; 

• Volunteer programs with the Depart- 
ment of Social Work, communit)' 
service programs, Greek organiza- 
tions, and individual students; 

• Paid part-time aide positions through 
the Work Study program and 
Student Services, Inc. funding; 

• Classroom participation through the 
departments of Music Education, 
PCinesiolog}-, and Foreign Languages. 

For more information contact the 
Children's Center at 610-436-2388. 

Counseling and Psychological 
Services Department 

The Department of Counseling and 
Psychological Services (the Counseling 
Center) is located on the second floor of 
Lawrence Center, 610-436-2301. 
Services are available to all currendy 
enrolled undergraduate and graduate 
students. The Counseling Center 
includes licensed psychologists, consult- 
ing psychiatrists, and graduate-level 
trainees with whom students may dis- 
cuss their concerns in strict confidence. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

Since the Counseling Center provides 
services for a wide range of concerns, 
each student's experience will be tailored 
to his or her needs. Students may wish 
to improve their interpersonal skills, 
resolve personal conflicts, or clarify their 



Student Affairs 



educational or vocational choices. Any ot 
the following approaches may be imple- 
mented to address a student's concerns: 

1. Individual psychological counseling 
consists of a one-to-one experience 
where the focus is on resolving person- 
al conflicts and conflicts with others, 
and on improving the student's exper- 
tise at making meaningflil choices. It 
may also help people avoid choosing 
behaviors that restrict personal growth 
and undermine their well-being. 

2. Group counseling consists of a small 
number of peers with one or two 
counselors. Such groups meet once 
each week to help group members 
learn about themselves. Groups may 
or may not have a specific focus. Past 
groups with a focus have included 
students who have experienced the 
death of a parent, bad habits which 
block personal growth, eating disor- 
ders, and assertiveness training. 
General counseling groups have 
included those for interpersonal prob- 
lem solving and for female smdents. 

3. Individual vocational counseling 
consists of a one-to-one experience 
that focuses on clarifying the student's 
choice of concentration and vocation. 
Vocational choice is most solid when 
it is the outgrovrth of understanding 
oneself. Such understanding is 
advanced by the thoughtflil explo- 
ration of values, interests, and abilities. 

4. Testing may include psychological or 
vocational interest tests which can 
clarify educational and vocational 
planning. The student and counselor 
can determine whether such testing 
might be helpfiil. Arrangements also 
can be made at the Counseling 
Center for taking the Miller 
Analogies Test, a graduate school 
admissions examination. 

5. Consultation services for staff and 
faculty are available on a hmited 
basis. Psychologists may be able to 
assist with crises, program planning, 
group and interpersonal communica- 
tions, and referral to other agencies. 

Greek Life and Student 
Organizations 

The Office of Greek Life and Student 
Organizations coordinates three distinct, 
yet interrelated, programming areas. It 
advises West Chester Universifys frater- 
nity and sorority community, compris- 
ing 27 inter(national) chapters, on their 
service projects, community activities, 
scholarship support programs, recruit- 



ment and new member programs, and 
other related matters. In addition, the 
office works with four governing/pro- 
gramming councils, three Greek affdiat- 
ed honor societies, and the Camp 
Dreamcatcher fiind-raiser. The office 
also is responsible for the registration 
and coordination of all 209 recognized 
student clubs and organizations. In con- 
junction with the Student Leadership 
Project Team, the office creates and 
implements a multidimensional smdent 
leadership program. See the office's web 
site at www.wcupa.edu/stu/greek. The 
Office of Greek Life and Student 
Organizations is located in 238 Sykes 
Student Union, 610-436-2117. 

Health Services 

The University Health Center is staffed 
by a medical and health education team 
of physicians and nurses who are avail- 
able to meet first-aid needs and to treat 
acute illnesses and minor surgical condi- 
tions. Gynecological services, including 
testing for pregnancy and sexually trans- 
mitted diseases, contraceptive counsel- 
ing, and routine e.xaminations, are also 
available. Nutritional services, HIV test- 
ing, and health/wellness education are 
also offered through the Health Center. 
The Universit)' is not responsible for any 
additional medical. X-ray, or surgical 
services or hospitalization. 

All smdents are required to pay a health 
sen,ace fee at the beginning of each 
semester, the fee covers all office visits. 
Many medications are available at a 
nominal fee. Allergy injections also are 
given at the Health Center. 

The University requires that all students 
have a medical history form, along with 
verification of a current ph)'sical examina- 
tion, on file in the Health Center. Certain 
prematriculation immunizations are also 
required. Forms for these requirements are 
mailed to students prior to registration. 

The University Health Center is located 
on the second floor of Wayne Hall, 
610-436-2509. Services are available to 
currently enrolled students only. When 
school is in session, the Health Center 
is open Monday through Friday from 8 
a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. during fall and spring 
semesters. Summer hours are provided 
weekdays only from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. All 
visits are by appointment. 

Insurance Programs 

Because of the unpredictable nature of 
medical and surgical emergencies, all 



students are encouraged to be covered 
by a health insurance program. Student 
insurance plans are offered through the 
Health Center. Information on the 
insurance program is mailed to students 
prior to registration or may be obtained 
from the University Health Center. 

Insurance requirements may be mandat- 
ed by specific departments and/or ath- 
letic programs. Refer to the appropriate 
section in the catalog for further infor- 
mation on these requirements. 
Liability Insurance Requirement for 
Students in Nursing. See the section 
describing the Department of Nursing. 

Student Physical Examinations 

A physical examination is required tor all 
entering and transfer students. The 
University Health Center reserves the 
right to request an annual physical exam- 
ination by the family physician for any 
student suffering from a chronic illness. 

No student will be permitted to register 
for classes until a histor)' and physical 
examination report is completed and 
filed. These forms are available at the 
University Health Center and are 
mailed to students prior to registration. 

Communicable Diseases 

A current report of a negative tuberculin 
test or chest X-ray showing no active 
mberculosis (TB) is mandated by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education 
for all senior student teachers and all 
junior or sophomore students participat- 
ing in a field experience in the public 
schools. The TB test can be given at the 
Health Center for a nominal charge. 

AH students born after 1957 must show 
evidence of immunization involving other 
communicable diseases and booster shots 
against measles. Highly recommended 
vaccines include a series of three Hepatitis 
B injections, and a single injection of 
meningococcal vaccine. The American 
College Health Association recommends 
that all college students under the age of 
30 consider getting vaccinated against 
meningococcal disease. Pennsylvania state 
law requires the meningococcal vaccine for 
all students li\'ing in University housing. 
Guidelines published by the Centers for 
Disease Control wiU be adhered to and 
revised as appropriate to protect the health 
of those in the Universit}' communit)'. 

Because of the potential for transmission 
of several infectious diseases, all students 
utilizing injectable medicines wiU be 
required to show evidence of satisfactory 
disposal of needles and syringes. The 



Student Affairs 



Health Center will provide free disposal 
of medical waste. 

Judicial Affairs and Community 
Development 

West Chester University's judicial system 
is the responsibility of the Office of the 
Dean of Students and is overseen by the 
diretor ot Judicial Affairs and Commu- 
nity Development. In accordance with 
the Universit\''s Mission and Values 
Statements, the University' is committed 
to providing a sound educational envi- 
ronment for intellectual pursuits. 

Accordingly, a set of behavioral stan- 
dards has been created to maintain a 
safe and secure campus environment. 
The West Chester University Student 
Code of Conduct, found in Section III 
of the Ram's Eye View, translates those 
acts that constitute unacceptable behav- 
ior for the Universit}''s students and stu- 
dent organizations. Students and stu- 
dent organizations accept the responsi- 
bility to abide by all University rules and 
regulations. In addition to these rules 
and regulations, students are expected to 
obey federal, state, and local laws. The 
University, for educational purposes, has 
the right to review any action taken b)' 
local law enforcement agencies regard- 
ing students. If off-campus behavior 
affects the University in an)' wav, a stu- 
dent may be charged with a violation of 
the West Chester University Student 
Code of Conduct. Proven failure to 
meet this obligation will justify appro- 
priate disciplinary action. 
As members of the University commu- 
nity, students have the right: 

• To participate in all activities of the 
University, free from any form of 
harassment or discrimination; 

• To personal privacy except otherwise 
provided by the law; and 

• To procedural due process in all 
action arising from violations of 
University regulations. 

Along with those rights, students have 
the responsibilit}-: 

• To respect the rights and property of 
others 

• To become fiilly acquainted with the 
published Universit)' regulations and 
to comply with them; and 

• To recognize that their actions reflect 
on the entire University community. 

The Office for Judicial Affairs and 
Community Development also works 
collaboratively with administrators, fac- 
ulty, staff, and student leaders to devel- 
op educational programs designed to 



promote community building activities, 
consistent with the West Chester 
University Values Statement. Such 
efforts have a special emphasis on civili- 
ty, respect for individuals, teamwork, 
conflict resolution, and academic 
integrit}'. The Office for Judicial Affairs 
and Community Development is located 
in 238 Sykes Union, 610-436-3511. 

Mail Service 

The University has an on-campus post 
office located on the second floor of 
Lawrence Center. Commuting students 
requesting a mail box must show a need 
for the box by applying to Off-Campus 
and Commuter Services, located in il6 
Sykes Student Union, 610-436-2984, 
which will approve or disapprove the 
request depending on the availability of 
a Umited number of mail bo.xes and the 
demonstrated lack of alternative mail 
receipt options for the student. Resident 
students receive their mail at their resi- 
dence halls. To ensure prompt delivery, 
mail sent to North Campus resident stu- 
dents should show the student's name, 
room number, the name of the residence 
hall, and the University's name and 
address (West Chester University, West 
Chester, PA 19383). Mail sent to South 
Campus residence students should show 
the student's name, 839 South Campus 
Drive, Box#, West Chester, PA 19382 
(do not include WCU in the South 
Campus address). 

Multicultural Affairs 

The Office of Multicultural Affairs is 
dedicated to the development of multi- 
cultural sensitivity, understanding, and 
appreciation of diversity among stu- 
dents. The office develops and imple- 
ments comprehensive programs aimed at 
addressing the needs and concerns of 
the multicultural student. The staff of 
the Office of Multicultural Affairs also 
serve as consultants to other University 
offices regarding multicultural students 
and aids in projects focused on improv- 
ing the general campus climate. The 
office is located in 238 Sykes Student 
Union, 610-436-3273. 

New Student Programs 

The Office of New Student Programs 
coordinates orientation and outreach 
programs for freshman and transfer stu- 
dents. Orientation programs include 
summer, fall, and January sessions as 
well as sessions for transfer students. 



West Chester's orientation programs are 
designed to introduce new students to 
the University and acquaint them with 
the academic, student services, and 
social aspects of college life. Attendance 
at orientation is required. 
Outreach efforts include participation in 
Fall Welcome Back activities, coordina- 
tion of the Learning Communities 
Project, and Family Day. A variety of 
social and educational programs are 
offered during the first year to aid new 
students in making a successfiil transi- 
tion to West Chester Universit}'. 
The Office of New Student Programs is 
located in 236 Sykes Student Union, 
610-436-3305. ' 

Public Safety 

West Chester University is concerned 

about the safety and welfare of all cam- 
pus members and is committed to pro- 
viding a safe and secure environment. 
Campus security is the responsibility of 
the University's Department of Public 
Safet)', located in the Peoples Building 
at the corner of Church Street and 
University Avenue. 

Because no campus is isolated from 
crime, the University has developed a 
series of policies and procedures to ensure 
that every possible precautionary measure 
is taken to protect members of the 
Universit)' communit)' while thev are on 
campus. Public Safet)' provides a "Safe 
Walk" program to escort individuals to 
and from campus locations. Van trans- 
portation is also available for the physical- 
ly challenged. In addition, Public Safet)- 
provides assistance for those needing help 
in jump-starting a car or those who have 
locked themselves out of their vehicle. 

A fiiU explanation of the Universit)''s secu- 
rity policies and procedures, as well as 
additional pertinent information, appears 
in a publication called 'Your Safety Is Our 
Concern," which is available from the 
Office of Admissions, the Department of 
Public Safety, and the Public Safety web 
site: www.wcupa.edu/_Information/ 
AFA/publicsafety/. 

Vehicle Registration 

/Ul University parking lots require a cur- 
rent Uniyersit\' parking permit or pass to 
be displayed on all vehicles. All employ- 
ees, eligible students, and visitors desiring 
to use designated parking lots must regis- 
ter their vehicle with the Department of 
Public Safet)' Parking Services Office and 
purchase/obtain a parking permit. Parking 
permits are nonrefundable and may only 



Student Aftairs 



be used by the registered purchaser. 
Permits are not transferable between indi- 
viduals nor ma)' they be resold. All West 
Chester Universit}' parking pennits are 
the property of West Chester University. 
Resident students with 63 credits or 
more and commuter students with 25 
credits or more are eligible to purchase a 
North Campus permit. Residents ot the 
South Campus apartments are eligible to 
purchase a permit for that area only. 
Freshman resident students are not per- 
mitted to bring cars to campus. A fresh- 
man is defined as one having earned 
fewer than 25 credits prior to the fall 
semester. Other students must park at 
South Campus Q_and R lots. Shuttle 
bus service is provided between South 
and North campuses. The annual regis- 
tration fee is established by the Council 
of Trustees upon recommendation of the 
Parking Committee and the approval of 
the president. Specific registration pro- 
cedures wlU be announced yearly. 
A valid student ID, nonsuspended opera- 
tor's license, and vehicle registration card 
must be presented at the time the vehicle 
is registered. The parking permit should 
be placed in the vehicle immediatelv. 
Instructions on placement are on the 
reverse side ot the permit. Mutilated or 
defaced parking permits must be 
replaced. Please contact the Department 
of Public Safet)' Parking Services Office 
for the current cost. The operation and 
registration of a vehicle must conform to 
Commonwealth vehicle law and 
University regulations. For complete 
information regarding motor vehicles and 
registration, refer to the A-Iotor Vehicle 
Regulations pamphlet available at the 
Public Safet)' Office and the Public 
Safety web site at www.wcupa.edu/ 
_Information/AFA/publicsafety/. 
Any change in the vehicle registration 
number must be reported to the Depart- 
ment of Pubhc Safetv immediatelv. 
Persons in violation of the parking rules 
and regulations are subject to ticketing 
and towing. 

Parking fines are assessed at SIO up to 
$40 depending on the violation. The 
current towing charge is $60 plus the fee 
for the violation. 

Service Learning and Volunteer 
Programs 

The Office of Service Learning and 
Volunteer Programs promotes communi- 
ty service within academic courses and as 
cocurricular activities. The office provides 
assistance to facultv who use communitv' 



service as a teaching method and to stu- 
dents in need of service placements. In 
addition, the office works directly with 
more than 90 local agencies providing 
volunteer opportunities to WCU stu- 
dents. Throughout the vear special events 
are planned, and the entire campus is 
imdted to participate. West Chester 
University is a member of Pennsylvania 
Campus Compact. The Office of Service 
Learning and Volunteer Programs is 
open from August - May and is located 
in B-19 Killinger HaU, 610-436-3379. 

Student Services, Incorporated (SSI) 

Student Services, Incorporated (SSI) is a 
not-for-profit organization primarily 
designed to serve the students of West 
Chester Universitv. The objective of this 
corporation is to initiate, regulate, and 
operate the financial matters of all cocur- 
ricular student activities. Such activities 
include the management of the campus 
bookstore, student pubhcations, student 
organizations, check cashing/ticket ser- 
vice, student programming, intercolle- 
giate athletics, and the graduate smdent 
association. 

In fiscal matters and in various poUcy- 
making areas, the final authority rests 
with the president of the Universitv'. 

The SSI Business Office, 610-436-2955, 
is located in 259 Sykes Student Union. 

Sykes Union Building 

The Earl F. Sykes Union first opened in 
1975 as the communit\- center for West 
Chester University. Major renovations 
and a building expansion was completed 
in 1995 providing students with a new 
102,000-square-foot facility. 
Sykes Union, as a facility and an opera- 
tion, is designed to encourage all mem- 
bers of the campus community to partici- 
pate in a wide variety of culmral, social, 
educational, and recreational programs. 
The multipurpose building features a 
350-seat theater, a fitness center, a book- 
store, and an amusement game room, all 
on the ground floor. The first floor offers 
a dining area with seating for 350, an 
outdoor terrace, and a large food servery. 
Also included on the first floor is a 
5,000-square-foot multipurpose room 
designed for dances, concerts, banquets, 
and lectures, as well as the union admin- 
istrative offices and Information Center. 

The second floor houses the Student 
Affairs offices of the Vice President, Dean 
of Students, Assistant Vice President, 
Residence Life and Housing, Off- 
Campus and Commuter Services, New 



Student Programs, Judicial Affairs and 
Communitv' Development, Multicultural 
Affairs, and Greek Life and Smdent 
Organizations. The Smdent Services, Inc. 
Business Office and the departments of 
Student Programming and Activities, 
along with smdent clubs and organiza- 
tions, are also located on the second floor. 

The third floor penthouse features a 22- 
unit computer lab, the Frederick Douglass 
study lounge, and seminar space. Sykes 
Union also houses 17 meeting rooms 
accommodating groups fi'om five to 500. 

For information concerning Sykes 
Union please call the Information 
Center at 610-436-3360/2984. 

Women's Center 

The Women's Center addresses the spe- 
cial concerns particular to women, includ- 
ing the issues facing women students who 
enter the University from high school or 
remrn to college after time at home or in 
the job world. Located in LawTence 
Center on the second floor, the Women's 
Center provides a lounge area for conver- 
sation, as well as study, peer advising, 
support for personal and professional 
issues, and special interest programs (lec- 
tures, films, concerts, etc.). For more 
information, including opportunities for 
student volunteers, call 610-436-2122. 

Activities 

Student Activities on Campus 

Smdent activities at West Chester 
University' encompass a wide range of cul- 
tural, social, educational, and recreational 
programs for a diverse smdent population. 

TTie departments of Cocurricular 
Programs and Campus Activities, under 
the auspices of Student Services, Inc., take 
a leadership role in organizing and spon- 
soring joint or individual programs as part 
of their mission. One major role centers 
on advisory relationships with the Smdent 
Activities Council, the major smdent pro- 
gramming organization on campus. 
Current movies, area band performances, 
national cultural entertainment acts, lec- 
tures (with a special emphasis on the 
"Leadership, Unit)', and Volunteerism, 
and Image Maker" - LUVIM - pro- 
grams), variety lunchtime entertainment, 
and special events such as "Welcome 
Back" activities in September are all spon- 
sored by Campus Activities and the 
Smdent Activities Council. Homecoming, 
Family Day, Spring Weekend, and major 
concerts are additional special University 
events that unite many segments of the 



Student Affairs 



campus. The Cocurricular Programs and 
Campus Activities departments are locat- 
ed in 236 Svkes Student Union, 610-436- 
2983 or 436-3037. 
Students can become a vital force on 
campus through participation and 
involvement in student organizations and 
activities. AH smdents have an opportuni- 
ty to attend campus events and/or join an 
organization that meets their individual 
needs. Leadership roles are always avail- 
able; these opportunities to be active can 
become one of the more enriching experi- 
ences in student life. Becoming involved 
builds individual integrity and a sense of 
community — two desirable qualities in all 
aspects of life. Student activities and orga- 
nizations are the lifeblood ot any campus 
environment, and West Chester Univer- 
sity has many such opportunities. 

Student Organizations 

Each October, an updated "Directory of 
Student Organizations'" is printed that 
includes the names, addresses, and tele- 
phone numbers of all presidents and 
advisers of more than 200 campus student 
organizations. For a comprehensive 
description of WCU student organiza- 
tions, refer to the Ram'i Eye View Student 
Handbook, or contact the Office for Greek 
Life and Student Organizations, 238 
Sykes Student Union, 610-436-2117. 
The following is the official list ot all stu- 
dent organizations that were registered 
during the 2002-2003 academic year: 

Student Governing/Campus 
Programming Organizations 

Graduate Student Association 
Off-Campus and Commuter Association 
Residence Hall Association 
Student Activities Council 
Student Government Association 
Sykes Union Advisory Board 

Academic/Professional Organizations 

Accounting Society 

Alchemist Club 

Anderson Mathematics Club 

Anthropolog}' Club of WCU 

Art Association 

Association for Childhood Education 

International 
Athletic Training Club 
Contemporary Dance Company 
Council for Exceptional 

Children/Special Education 
Criminal Justice Association-Lambda 

Alpha Epsilon 
Dance Production Workshop 
Darlington Biological Society 
Economics and Finance SocieU' 
English Club 
English Graduate Student Association 



Forensics 

French Club 

Genetics/Ethics Club 

Geography Club 

German Club 

Graduate Social Work Student 

Association 
History Club 

Honors Student Association 
Institute of Management Accountants 
Italian Club 
Linguistics Club 
National Association of Black 

Accountants 
National Council of Teachers of English 
National Student Speech, Hearing and 

Language Association 
Philosophy Club 
Political Science Club 
Pre-Law Society 
Psychology Club 
Russian Club 
Social Work Club 
Society of Physics Students 
Sociology Club-Delta Alpha Tau 
Spanish Club 

Student Dietetic Association 
Student Nurses' Association of 

Pennsylvania (SNAP) 
University Theatre 
West Chester Association for the 

Education of Young Children 
WCU Education Association/Student 

PSEA, NEA 
Women in Communications 
Women in Science 

Special Interest Organizations 

Anime Club 

Asian American Association 

Association for Disability Awareness 

(ADA) 
Black Men United 
Black Student Union 
Caribbean Island Association 
Chess Club 
College Democrats 
College Republicans 
Dance Team 
Darkness Before the Light Role-Plaving 

Club 
EARTH (Environmental Association 

for Repairing the Habitat) 
Feminist Majority Alliance 
HiUel Jewish Student Union 
Homecoming 
Human Rights Coalition, Amnesty 

International 
INDU-Indo-American Association 
International Student Organization 
LASO-Latino American Student 

Organization 
LEAD-Leadership, Empowerment, and 

Development 
LGBTA-Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual 

Transgendered Association 



Recreation and Leisure Programs 

Sistahs United 

Students for Life 

Swing Dance Club 

Wiccan Society 

Women's Center Club 

Religious Organizations 

Campus Bible Fellowship 

Campus Crusade for Christ/Christian 

Impact 
Catholic Newman Student Association/ 

Center 
Chosen Generation Outreach Ministries 
Covenant Campus Fellowship 
CrossSeekers 

Gospel Choir-Praise Project 
HiUel Jewish Student LTnion 
Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship 
Jewish Heritage Programs 
Latter Day Saints Student Association 
Lutheran Student Association 
MusUm Student Association 
University Christian Fellowship 
Young Life 

Service Organizations 

The Abbe Society 

Alpha Phi Omega 

Best Buddies 

Circle K Club 

Emergency Medical Services 

Friars' Society 

Habitat for Humanity 

Phi Sigma Pi 

Rotaract 

University Ambassadors 

Greek Letter Organizations 
Governing Councils 

Black and Latino Greek Council 
Interfraternity Council 
Inter-Greek Council 
Panhellenic Council 

Honoraries 

Gamma Sigma Alpha 
Order of Omega 
Rho Lambda 

Fratemiries 

Beta Theta Pi 
Delta Chi 
Kappa Alpha Psi 
Kappa Delta Rho 
Lambda Theta Phi 
Omega Psi Phi 
Phi Beta Sigma 
Phi Kappa Sigma 
Pi Kappa Phi 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Sigma Pi 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Tau Kappa Epsilon 
Theta Chi 

Sororities 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 



Student Affairs 



Alpha Phi 

Alpha Sigma Tau 
Alpha Xi Delta 
Chi Upsilon Sigma 
Delta Phi Epsilon 
Delta Sigma Theta 
Delta Zeta 
PhiMu 

Phi Sigma Sigma 
Sigma Gamma Rho 
Zeta Phi Beta 
Zeta Tau Alpha 

Publications and Media Organizations 

Daedalus 

Media Advisor\- Board 

The Quad 

The Serpentine 

WCUTV 5-West Chester University 

Television 
WCUR-West Chester Universit\' Radio 

Sports Clubs 

Equestrian 

Fencing 

Ice Hockey 

RoUer Hockey 

Rugby-Men 

Rugby-Women 

Shotokan Karate 

Skiing 

Sports Club Council 

Volleyball-Men 

Water Polo-Women 

Musical Organizations 

Brass Ensemble 
Chamber Choir 
Collegium Musicum 
Concert Band 
Concert Choir 
Criterions Jazz Ensemble 
Flute Ensemble 
Guitar Ensemble 
Kappa Kappa Psi 
Marching Band-"Golden Rams" 
Mastervvorks Chorus 
Men's Chorus 

Music Educator's National Conference- 
Chapter 21 (PCMEA) 
Opera Theatre Ensemble 
Penns}'lvania Music Teachers Association 
Percussion Ensemble 
Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 
Saxophone Ensemble 
Sigma Alpha Iota 
Symphonic Band 
Symphony Orchestra 
Tau Beta Sigma 
Universit)' Chorale 
Wind Ensemble 
Women's Choir 

Honor Societies 

Communication Studies-Pi Kappa Delta 
Communications-Lambda Pi Eta 
Counseling-Chi Sigma Iota 



Criminal Justice— Sigma Tau Omicron 
Economics-Omicron Delta Epsilon 
Education-Delta Kappa Gamma 
Education-Kappa Delta Pi 
Education-Phi Delta Kappa 
Educational Services-Chi Alpha Epsilon 
English-Sigma Tau Delta 
Foreign Languages-Alpha Mu Gamma 
Geographv-Gamma Theta Upsilon 
Geolog\'-Sigma Gamma Epsilon 
Histor\'-Phi Alpha Theta 
Kinesiolog}'-Phi Epsilon Kappa 
Leadership-Omicron Delta Kappa 
Literac)- (Reading)-Alpha Upsilon Alpha 
Mathematical Sciences-Pi Mu EpsUon 
Music-Pi Kappa Lambda 
Nursing-Sigma Theta Tau 
PhUosophy-Phi Sigma Tau 
Physics-Sigm.a Pi Sigma 
PoUtical Science-Pi Sigma Alpha 
Psvcholog\'-Psi Chi 
Social Science— Pi Gamma Mu 
Social Work-Phi Alpha 
Sociolog}-Alpha Kappa Delta 
Theater Arts-Alpha Psi Omega 

Recreation and Leisure Programs 

The Office of Recreation and Leisure 
Programs provides recreational and 
leisure-time activities for the University 
communit)'. 

Intramural Sports affords students the 
opportunity to participate in individual or 
team competitive activities. The Intra- 
mural Sports program promotes health, 
weUness, and physical fitness, as well as 
encourages the worthy use of leisure time. 
Regardless of abilit)' level, even- individual 
can experience successflil participation in 
a variety' of individual or team athletic 
events including flag football, basketball, 
soccer, floor hockey, and softball. 
For students who enjoy organized sports 
other than varsity athletics. Sports Club 
options are provided for those who are 
either skilled athleticall}' or interested in 
participating in a club sport for enjoy- 
ment. Becoming a member of a club pro- 
vides opportunities for instruction, social- 
ization, competition, and fun. 
Kinesiolog)' majors receive a sports credit 
through participation in a club program. 
Currently, West Chester University has 
10 Sports Clubs: equestrian, fencing, ice 
hockey, shotokan karate, men's rugbw 
women's rugby, skiing, men's volleyball, 
women's water polo, and roller hockey. 
Outdoor recreational opportunities are 
conducted through the Outdoor 
Adventure Program which offers a vari- 
ety of different trips and one-day activi- 
ties for students throughout die year. 
Examples include canoeing, rafting, ski- 



ing, camping, and spelunking trips; ice 
skating nights; hiking; and horseback rid- 
ing. In addition to scheduling trips, the 
Outdoor Adventure Program rents recre- 
ation equipment such as backpacking 
equipment, tents, sleeping bags, camping 
equipment, mountain bikes, snow boards, 
and cross-countr)' skis/boots. 
For students who do not wish to partici- 
pate in a formal recreational program. 
Open Recreation provides days, times, 
and facilities in which students may par- 
ticipate in an informal recreational activ- 
ity. The semester calendar hsts sched- 
uled days and times for utiUzing swim- 
ming pools, weight rooms, indoor/out- 
door tracks, outdoor tennis courts, and 
basketball g}-mnasiums. 
Special Events include one-dav programs 
such as skating nights, racquetball nights, 
or special tournaments such as the Schick 
Basketball Super Hoops Tournament. 
The Aerobics program is one of our most 
popular acti\'ities with over 800 students, 
faculty, and staft' participating in 30 dif- 
ferent aerobic sessions. The program pro- 
vides regidar aerobics, aerostep, car- 
diostep, cardio-kickboxing, slide step, step 
and sculpt, and cross-training sessions. 
Registration is required for participation. 
The Fitness Center in Sykes Student 
Union is designed to give students a 
professional setting tor exercise and 
weight training. The Sykes Fitness 
Center is equipped with cardiovascular 
equipment, pin-selectorized equipment, 
and Olympic free weights. The center 
also includes an aerobics studio where aU 
the aerobics sessions are held. A valid 
student ID is required for admission to 
the center, and an orientation session is 
also required for all participants. 
For more information on any program 
pro\'ided by the Office of Recreation 
and Leisure Programs, call 610-436- 
2131 or 436-3088, or stop by Room 133 
Ehinger Gymnasium. 

Intercollegiate Athletic Program 

West Chester University's Department 
of Athletics aftirms academic excellence 
as the cornerstone in the Ufe of the stu- 
dent-athlete, placing the highest priority 
on the overall quaht}- of the educational 
experience. By strengthening the inte- 
gration of athletic program objectives 
with academic and developmental goals, 
athletics support the Universit)'s mis- 
sion to meet student needs and interests. 
Participation in athletics can serve to 
strengthen the student's integrity, sense 



Academic Affairs — Special Programs and Services 



of fairness, respect for others, and dedi- 
cation to goals. It also can provide the 
opportunity for enhancing interpersonal 
leadership skills. Both men and women 
can choose from a broad variety of team 
and individual sports. In addition, acad- 
emic support services are available for 
student-athletes, underscoring the com- 
mitment to scholastic success. 
The women's intercollegiate athletic pro- 
grams include basketball, cross country, 
field hockey, golf, indoor track, lacrosse, 
soccer, Softball, swimming and diving, 
tennis, outdoor track and field, and vol- 
leyball. The men's intercollegiate athletic 
programs include baseball, basketball, 
cross country, football, golf, indoor track, 
soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, and 
outdoor track and field. 
West Chester University is a Division II 
member of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association (NCAA), the 
Eastern College Athletic Conference, 
and the Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference. The Division I field hockey 
program competes in the Atlantic 10. 
The Department of Athletics is located 
in the Russell L. Sturzebecker Health 



Sciences Center on South Campus, 
which has won national acclaim for the 
quahty and extent of its teaching, per- 
formance, and research facilities. Of 
special note is the one-acre gymnasium 
(which can be divided into six smaller, 
pneumatically sealed gyms), a natatori- 
um with two fiiU-size swimming pools 
connected by a diving well, 20 lecture 
rooms, two dance studios, a multipur- 
pose room, a human performance labo- 
ratory, an environmental health labora- 
tory, and two physical therapy rooms. 
This complex is surrounded by John A. 
Farrell Football Stadium and its new 
state-of-the-art lighting system; Serpico 
Baseball Stadium; and the brand-new 
South Campus Softball Complex, prac- 
tice and playing fields, tennis courts, and 
weight rooms. 

Alumni Association 

The West Chester University Alumni 
Association is an organization of more 
than 58,000 graduates of the University. 
The purpose of the Alumni Association 
is to promote the interests of West 
Chester University in all areas of acade- 
mic, cultural, and social needs, to 



strengthen the Alumni Association 
through a strong network of graduates, 
and to increase the awareness of alumni 
to the University's needs. 
The Alumni Association sponsors five 
major events on campus each year: 
Welcome to West Chester Day and 
Homecoming in the faU, Alumni 
Weekend in the spring, and Senior Days 
in December and May. The West Chester 
University Magazine, published three 
times each year, incorporates RAM- 
PARTS, providing aU alumni with 
information on their classmates and 
events of interest. 

The Alumni Association also offers pro- 
gramming and services to students 
through its efforts with admissions 
recruiting, career mentoring, and net- 
working. The on-campus University 
Ambassadors group works with current 
matriculating students to build ties with 
the University that will continue when 
these students become alumni. In turn, 
this group also keeps alumni updated on 
events and news of their alma mater. 



Academic Affairs 



West Chester University's undergraduate 
programs include teaching certification 
programs, local certificate programs, and 
programs of study leading to the bache- 
lor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, bachelor 
of music, bachelor of science in educa- 
tion, bachelor of science, bachelor of sci- 
ence in nursing, and bachelor ot social 
work. A complete list of undergraduate 
degree programs appears on page 55. 
Programs of study at the graduate level 
are also available. These are listed on 
page 35 and are described in detail in the 
Graduate Catalog. 

Honors Program 

The University provides to able students 
with outstanding achievements in schol- 
arship, community service, the arts, 
and/or leadership the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in a challenging honors program 
and to receive appropriate recognition 
when they complete the requirements. 
The aim of the honors program is to 



provide an inviting environment for aca- 
demically gifted and highly motivated 
students to interact and form a learning 
community of peers, faculty, administra- 
tors, and staff that will challenge and 
enrich the students' college experience. 
Grounded in the liberal arts tradition, the 
honors program seeks cross-disciplinary 
connections in order to develop students' 
natural intellectual abilities and to chal- 
lenge them to employ those gifts on 
behalf of the larger community. For this 
reason, the West Chester Universit)' hon- 
ors program considers "honors" more than 
a matter of strong grades. It means using 
the gift of knowledge to be an active and 
creative problem solver in both the cam- 
pus community and in the world. Honors 
is about building character and fostering a 
commitment of lifelong learning that can 
develop the leaders of the 21st century. 
Membership is competitive and based on 
attainment and maintenance of a cumula- 
tive 3.25 grade point average, regular 



enrollment in honors courses, and service 
to the campus community. 
The program consists of 27 hours of 
cross-disciplinary core courses surround- 
ing the theme of community investment 
and leadership development that, along 
with a course dravwn from mathematics or 
science, fidfiUs the University's general 
education requirements. Certification for 
honors is achieved by the completion of 
the core 27 hours, two upper-level honors 
seminars, and a capstone project. 
Seminars are special topic courses that 
rotate on a semester basis and are com- 
petitively selected by the Honors Council 
from faculty submissions. Such subjects 
have included "Leadership in South 
Africa," "Media Ethics," "Family Com- 
munication," "Vampires in Fiction, Film, 
and Folklore," "Peer-Assisted Learning," 
and "The Mexican Connection." The 
capstone project allows students to put 
theory into practice by inviting them to 
identify and investigate a problem in a 



Academic .Aftairs — Special Programs and Services 



community business, nonprofit agency, or 
research laboratorv, and then work to 
solve the problem. 

The honors supplemental certification 
program option exists for academically 
qualified students who have completed a 
minimum of 45 credits, maintain a mini- 
mum GPA of 3.25, and demonstrate 
active contributions and service to the 
co-curricular elements of the campus 
community. To receive the special hon- 
ors certificate award, students need to 
complete a minimum of 12 hours of 
honors course work at the 300/400 level 
and demonstrate active contributions and 
service to co-curricular elements of the 
campus community. Generally, a mini- 
mum of two 300-level or above courses 
is offered each semester. These small 
group (10-20 students) seminar offerings 
are interdisciplinaty/writing emphasis 
and have no prerequisites. Students may 
petition, on special circumstances, to 
substitute an HON 400-level indepen- 
dent study for three hours ot credit. 

Honors students who have successRiUy 
completed their first year in the program 
may qualify for a Bonner AmeriCorps 
service-learning scholarship. An educa- 
tion voucher of $1,000 will be awarded to 
students who verify 300 hours of com- 
munity service during a calendar year. 

The program provides housing in 
Killinger Hall for on-campus residents. 
Rooms feature direct connection to the 
University' computer system. Students 
also have membership in the Honors 
Student Association. 

An Honors Council, which includes 
both faculty and students, sets the poli- 
cies of the program. A committee of 
that council, working with the director, 
determines the admission and retention 
of students. Students completing the fuU 
honors program receive designation on 
their University transcript and the right 
to wear a medallion of achievement at 
commencement. Recognition at com- 
mencement is based on the student's 
academic record as of the completed 
semester prior to commencement. 

Further information about the honors 
program - requirements, offerings, hous- 
ing, and the co-curricular activities of the 
Honors Smdent Association - is available 
from the Honors Program Office, Room 
131 Francis Harvey Green Libraty, West 
Chester University, West Chester, PA 
19383; phone, 610-436-2996; fax, 610- 
436-2620; e-mail, honors@wcupa.edu. 



International Education 

Established in 1973, the Center for 
International Programs is responsible for 
coordinating study abroad programs, 
international faculty exchanges, visits by 
foreign scholars, and international pro- 
grams for the campus and the broader 
community. In addition, the Center for 
International Programs actively pro- 
motes development of an international 
curriculum, facilitates internships and 
independent study abroad, and provides 
a variety of essential services for approxi- 
mately 130 international students and 
scholars from more than 60 countries. 

Students are encouraged to participate in 
semester or year-long study abroad pro- 
gram as well as summer study abroad pro- 
grams sponsored by West Chester 
University. The Center tor International 
Programs provides numerous study 
abroad information seminars evety semes- 
ter. The schedule of seminars is available 
at the Center for International Programs 
Office in the Old Libraty, Room 101. 

Academic Development Program 

The academic development program 
(ADP) is designed to provide an oppor- 
tunity for a college education at West 
Chester University to those students 
who do not meet current admission 
requirements but who show a potential 
for success in college. Students admitted 
to the program are expected to take 
advantage of the program components 
which have been developed to enhance 
their skills in reading, writing, speaking, 
mathematics, and critical thinking, as 
well as to help them in their transition 
from high school to college. 

ADP comprises a series of required cours- 
es supplemented by specialized tutoring, 
counseling, scheduling, and advising. 

The program begins with an intensive, 
six-week session during the summer 
which smdents must complete. Any 
developmental course work taken during 
this time is credit-bearing, but these cred- 
its are not applicable toward graduation. 

Students in the program also are 
required to complete the following 
courses: COM 101, EDR 100, and 
WRT 120, aU of which should be taken 
as soon as possible after completion ot 
summer requirements. All of these 
courses satisfy University requirements 
for graduation. Students will be advised 
also on the completion of general educa- 
tion requirements and, as necessaty, on 
the transition to a major course of study. 



For further information, please contact 
the academic development program, 103 
Lawrence Center, 610-436-3274. 

Assessment 

To assess and improve student learning, 
academic programs, and student services, 
the University wiU seek information on 
student perceptions and satisfaction, as 
well as intellectual/personal growth. AH 
students are expected to participate in 
the assessment program when requested. 

National Student Exchange Program 

West Chester is one of approximately 180 
participating colleges and universities 
across the United States and Canada that 
offers students the opportunity to spend a 
maximum of one year of study at another 
college or university. The exchange pro- 
gram enables smdents to experience a 
quarter, semester, or year at another uni- 
versity or college, yet not encounter com- 
plications such as transfer credits and out- 
of-state tuition. While encouraging sm- 
dents to experience and appreciate various 
cultural perspectives, the National Smdent 
Exchange Program also provides students 
with the opportunity to take advantage of 
specialized courses and programs that may 
not be available at West Chester. 
To qualify for the program, students must 
be fiiU time, have a 2.50 cumulative GPA, 
and should be a sophomore or junior dur- 
ing the period of exchange to ensure that 
students share experiences and insights 
with other students when resuming their 
smdies at West Chester. Applications and 
fiirther information are available from the 
National Student Exchange coordinator 
in the Office of the Registrar. Applica- 
tions are due Februaty 15 or each year. A 
nonrefi.indable fee is required of all stu- 
dents who apply for the National Smdent 
Exchange Program. For more informa- 
tion, contact the Office of the Registrar, 
610-436-3085. 

Pennsylvania State System Visiting 
Student Program 

Undergraduate smdents enrolled in a 
degree program who have earned 27 
credits and are in good academic stand- 
ing have the opportunity to enroll as a 
visitor for a faU, spring, or summer term 
at any of the other 13 Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education instimtions. 
The program allows smdents to take 
advantage of specialized courses, pro- 
grams, or experiences not available at the 
home institution without losing (home) 
instimtional residency. Advance approval 
from both the home and the host institu- 



Academic Affairs — Special Programs and Services 



tions is required. Visiting Student 
Program information is available at the 
Office of the Registrar, E. O. BuU 
Center, 610-436-3085. 

Environmental Programs 

Students interested in pursuing environ- 
mental degree programs may choose 
from those identified below. Consult the 
departments listed for details on these 
programs. 

Ecology. Offered by the Department of 
Biology, this program provides a strong 
background in field biology and prepares 
students for careers as biologists in envi- 
ronmental agencies, industry, consulting 
firms, and similar organizations. (See 
page 62 for more information.) 
Environmental Health Science. Offered 
by the Department of Health, this pro- 
gram synthesizes a rigorous scientific 
preparation wdth specialized, applied 
environmental courses and a required 
internship. Courses include topics such as 
hazardous wastes, industrial hygiene and 
safety, risk assessment, environmental 
regulations, toxicology, and a research- 
based seminar. This degree program pre- 
pares graduates for careers as environ- 
mental scientists in consulting firms, 
industry, and government. (See page 99 
for specific program information.) 

Pre-Professional Study 

West Chester University recognizes that 
some students will select career goals 
that win require pursuit of academic 
degrees after the baccalaureate, either in 
graduate school or at a professional 
school. Students with such goals are 
encouraged to discuss them with appro- 
priate members of the faculty. 

Pre-Medical. Students interested in 
graduate studies in one of the health pro- 
fessions (dentistry, medicine, optometry, 
podiatry, veterinary medicine, or physi- 
cian assistant studies) are encouraged to 
apply for admission to the pre-medical 
program, which is supervised by mem- 
bers of the Pre-Medical Committee. 
More information about this program 
can be found under the pre-medical pro- 
gram listing in the section, "Programs of 
Study and Course Offerings." 
Pre-Law. Students who are contemplat- 
ing going on to law school should take 
part in the pre-law program conducted by 
the University. Law schools maintain that, 
while there is no proper "pre-law major," 
students should choose courses that 
sharpen their analytical reasoning, writing, 
speaking, and listening capabilities in the 



humanities, social sciences, or natural sci- 
ences (particularly those courses requiring 
research and communication skills). 
Overall academic performance is essential; 
a cumulative average of at least 3.0 is 
required by most accredited law schools. 
Students interested in attending law 
school should contact Prof. Sandra 
Tomkowicz, Department of Marketing 
and director of the pre-law program, in 
Room 312 D, Anderson Hall, early in 
their academic careers. Students also are 
encouraged to participate in the Pre- 
Law Society. 

Engineering. West Chester University, 
in cooperation with The Pennsylvania 
State University at University Park and 
the Penn State Harrisburg campus, pro- 
vides a program in which, at the end of 
five years, a student earns a B.S. in 
physics firom West Chester University 
and a B.S. in engineering from Penn 
State University. Students spend three 
years at West Chester and two years at 
Penn State, taking only engineering- 
related courses. AU mathematics, physics, 
cognates, and general education courses 
are taken at West Chester University. 
Students may choose from many fields of 
engineering, some of which are listed in 
the "Phvsics" section of this catalog. 
Pre-Theology. Pre-seminary students 
tend to major in religious studies under 
the auspices of the Department of 
Philosophy but select courses from a 
wide variety of disciplines. Students 
interested in graduate studies in theolo- 
gy and religious studies should work out 
their programs of studv with the 
Department of Philosophy. 

Pre-Major Academic Advising 
Program 

The pre-major academic advising pro- 
gram allows students who have not yet 
chosen a major to explore their interests 
before entering a degree program. During 
their fu'st year, students are encouraged to 
schedule courses that fiilfill the general 
education requirements. In addition to 
these requirements, other courses may be 
scheduled in a wide range of disciplines. 
Academic advisers will help students 
select and schedule appropriate courses, as 
well as make referrals and discuss voca- 
tional and career interests. Academic 
advisers also help students to develop 
sound strategies for academic success. 
Students should understand that certain 
academic programs require prerequisites 
for fiirther study. Completion of such 
prerequisites, if not taken during the 



period of study as an undeclared major, 
may prolong University attendance. 
These prerequisite courses require that 
students earn, at least, a "C" grade. 
A student may transfer into a program 
from pre-major status only if 

1. there is a vacancy in the desired pro- 
gram, 

2. the chairperson of that program 
approves, and 

3. a formal, approved "change of major" 
form has been filed in the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Students should inquire about program 
vacancies as early as possible during 
their first year of study. 
The pre-major academic advising program 
is located in Room 132 Lawrence Center. 
Pre-major academic advising provides 
the following services for students who 
have not yet declared a major: 

Advice regarding course selection; 
Assistance in establishing educational 

objectives; 
Information regarding various pro- 
grams offered by the LTniversity; 
Advice to students in academic difficulty; 
Referral to University support services; 
Guidance in and instructions for 

declaring a major; and 
Interpretation of University, school, 
and department regulations, rules, 
and requirements. 

Learning Assistance and Resource 
Center 

The Learning Assistance and Resource 
Center (LARC) provides academic sup- 
port services that help students become 
independent, active learners and achieve 
academic success. The LARC offers 
tutoring services in most general educa- 
tion such as mathematics, viriting, natur- 
al sciences, social sciences, foreign lan- 
guages, and introductory business cours- 
es. Tutoring sessions are 50 minutes long 
and are held by appointment only. 
Interested students register on a furst- 
come, first-served basis and are assigned 
tutors depending on availability. The 
LARC offers supplemental instruction 
(SI) in several general education and 
"high-risk" courses; registration tor SI 
sessions is done in the classroom at the 
beginning of the semester. The LARC 
also offers refresher workshops in prepa- 
ration for the Pre-Professional Skills Test 
(PPST) for education majors. Available 
to student groups on request are work- 
shops that demonstrate the application of 
learning strategies to the course content 
and seminars on affective skills that influ- 



Academic Affairs — Special Programs and Services 



ence learning, such as stress manage- 
ment, test anxiet}' reduction, assertive- 
ness, concentration, and motivation. The 
LARC web site (www.wcupa.edu/ 
_Academics/cae.tut/) includes informa- 
tion on its services, a list of courses being 
tutored, and links to helpful resources. 
The LARC provides opportunities for 
paid practical training for undergraduate 
students, as well as assistantships for 
graduate students. The LARC offers a 
comprehensive training program for new 
tutors, which includes seminars, work- 
shops, on-line training, individualized 
projects, and peer observation. Tutors 
employed by the L7\RC acquire the 
knowledge and experience necessary to 
meet the requirements for certification by 
the College Reading and Learning 
Association. 

The LARC is open Monday - 
Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and 
Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For 
more information call 610-436-2535 or 
visit 105 Lawrence Center. 

Services for Students with 
Disabilities 

The Office of Services for Students with 
Disabilities (OSSD) offers services for 
students with physical and learning dis- 
abilities. The OSSD is designed to assist 
students in making a successfiil transi- 
tion to the Universit}'. We take a proac- 
tive stance that encourages students to 
understand their needs and strengths in 
order to best advocate for themselves. 
At West Chester University we recognize 
that some students with disabilities want 
minimal assistance while others require 
the full range of support and services. 
The staff of the OSSD supports suidents 
as they become more self-reliant by 
emphasizing their knowledge and com- 
munication skills and the understanding 
of their rights and obligations under the 
laws. To facilitate successfiil transition we 
recommend a comprehensive assessment 
of needs through this office. 
The OSSD provides advocacy with fac- 
ulty' for classroom accommodations 
under the requirements of Section 504 
and the Americans with Disabilities 
Act. Recent, appropriate, and compre- 
hensive documentation provided by 
licensed professionals must accompany 
requests for accommodations. 
The OSSD coordinates provision of 
direct services for students with disabih- 
ties through support staff in the research 
and technical areas of the Universitv'. We 



also advocate in the readmission proce- 
dure, with the offices of Financial Aid 
and the Registrar, and supplement advis- 
ing services to the extent that the infor- 
mation or assistance is disability related 
and necessary to promote student access. 

The OSSD is located within the 
Academic Programs and Services 
Division and coordinates services with 
other units within the division, such as 
the Learning Assistance and Resource 
Center and the Pre-Major Academic 
Advising Program, as well as other 
Universit)' offices including the Writing 
Center and the Office of Residence Life 
and Housing. Liaison with governmental 
agencies and private practitioners for pro- 
vision of services is also available through 
the OSSD. In order to ensure continuity 
of services, suidents should pursue such 
actions prior to enrollment. Students 
needing financial support for personal ser- 
vices or interpreters should register with 
the appropriate agency at least sbc months 
in advance of matriculation. The policies 
and procedures used by the OSSD are 
contained in the West Chester University 
Handbook on Disabilities, which is avail- 
able in the OSSD office. 

Office of Services for Students with 

Disabilities 

Room 105 Lawrence Center 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2564 

Services Provided for Students with 
Disabihties 

• Academic coaching 

• Special summer orientation 

• Specialized tutoring in English and 
math 

• Central documentation file 

• Optional comprehensive needs 
assessment 

• Advocac)' with faculty 

• Alternative test-taking arrangements 

• Academic advising 

• Priority registration 

• Note-taking support 

• Study skills tutoring 

• Alternate formatting assistance (e.g.. 
Recordings for the Blind, Inc.) 

• Adaptive technology 

• Readers for visually impaired students 

• Interpreters for deaf students 

• Referrals for LD testing 

• Peer support 

• Swdents with Disabilities Association 



ADA Classroom Modifications 

Appeals Procedure 

Notification of Classroom Modifications 

For a student with a documented dis- 
ability requesting classroom modifica- 
tions, the Office of Services for Students 
with Disabilities (OSSD) will issue a 
copy of a letter of modifications for the 
student to present to the facult)' member 
of the course. This modifications letter 
will inform the faculty member of the 
student's specific academic needs. It is 
the responsibility of the student to pre- 
sent the letter of modifications to the 
faculty member. Students v«th disabili- 
ties are held to the same academic stan- 
dards as all other students. Faculty 
members are not required to provide 
modifications prior to or retroactive 
from the date a modifications letter is 
presented. Facult)' members should con- 
tact the OSSD if they have questions 
about the modifications outhned. 

Appeals Regarding Classroom 
Modifications 

The University provides for an appeals 
process regarding classroom modifica- 
tions. Any and all efforts will be made 
with the understanding that a timely res- 
olution is in the best interest of all parties 
involved. While an appeal is under 
review, the student is expected to attend 
classes and do assignments to the best of 
his/her ability and faculty members are 
expected to provide reasonable classroom 
modifications to the best of their abilities. 
While an appeal is under revdew, the stu- 
dent and the faculty members of his/her 
courses are expected to make good faith 
efforts toward reasonable classroom mod- 
ifications and engage in the educational 
process. /Vn appeal reviewed under this 
policy does not alter or interfere vsdth the 
student's right to file a complaint of dis- 
crimination on the basis of a disabilit)' 
with the Universit)''s Office of Social 
Equity or to pursue a formal complaint 
with the Pennsylvania Human Relations 
Commission or the U.S. Department of 
Education, Office of Civil Rights. 
A. If a student has concerns with the 
determination of modifications by 
the OSSD, the student and the 
director of OSSD should first meet 
in order to resolve the matter. If they 
do not reach agreement, the student 
may initiate a formal appeal by con- 
tacting in writing the associate 
provost (for undergraduate students) 
or the graduate dean (for graduate 
students) (see section C). 



Academic ^Aiiairs — Special Programs and Services 



B. If a faculty member has concerns 
about the application of the modifi- 
cations to his or her course and/or a 
student feels the modifications are 
not being adequately implemented, 
the student and the professor should 
meet in order to resolve the problem. 
If these efforts are unsuccessfiil, 
either the faculn- member or the stu- 
dent may request informal resolution 
through'OSSD. 

1. The student and/or the taculr\' 
member informs both OSSD and 
the chair of the department of the 
course vvithin tvvo work days fol- 
lowing the meeting between the 
faculty' member and the student 
about unresolved concerns for 
modifications in the course. 

2. Within one week after being 
informed of the concerns, OSSD 
will coordinate a meeting of the 
student, faculty' member, and/or 
chair in an attempt to achieve a 
resolution by meeting with the 
student and/or facultv member. 
During this meeting, wth the 
consent of the student, OSSD 
may fiirther ad\'ise the faculrv' 
member of the student's individual 
needs and the appropriateness of 
any recommended modifications. 

C. If resolution is not accompUshed 
after informal meetings between 
OSSD, the student, facult\' member, 
and chair, a formal appeal may be 
started. Either the faculty- member or 
the student may initiate the formal 
appeal bv contacting OSSD in writ- 
ing; as appropriate, the associate 
provost or the graduate dean will 
then be notified. The formal appeal 
will proceed as follows: 

1. Within the two weeks following 
the initiation of the formal appeal, 
a Classroom Modifications 
Review Panel wiU meet. If the 
student involved is an undergradu- 
ate, the associate provost wLU con- 
vene the panel. If the student is a 
graduate student, the graduate 
dean will convene the panel. The 
panel will consist of a dean of a 
school or college, a faculn- mem- 
ber, and a student, each of whom 
will be from outside the depart- 
ment than the one in which the 
problem arose and selected from 
respective pools of individuals who 
have received training in ADA 
law and procedures; the dean shall 
serve as panel chair. Panel mem- 



bers will be informed in writing by 
the associate provost or dean of 
Graduate Studies at least a week 
in advance of the date, time, and 
place that the panel will be con- 
vened. 

2. At the proceedings of the panel, 
the representative of OSSD will 
present to the panel relevant infor- 
mation about the nature of the 
student's disabilit\' and appropriate 
modifications. Because this infor- 
mation is confidential, the stu- 
dent's consent to the disclosure of 
the information must be obtained 
beforehand. In order to protect 
matters which are confidential, the 
panel may, upon its own motion 
or upon the request of any 
involved pany, hear statements in 
private wthout the other parties 
being present. 

If the situation involves a chal- 
lenge to the OSSD director's 
denial of a requested modification, 
the OSSD shall present informa- 
tion and documentation showing 
why such modification is inappro- 
priate. 

It the dispute is related to the 
apphcation of a modification in a 
particular course, the facultv' 
member shall then present to the 
panel his or her concerns about 
the modification and shall have 
the opportunitN' to present any 
information or documentation 
\vhich the faculty- member beheves 
is relevant. The panel may request 
that the chairperson of the acade- 
mic department in which the dis- 
pute arose, or other taculf\- mem- 
bers who teach the same course, 
present any concerns that they 
may have regarding how the mod- 
ifications might create a funda- 
mental alteration in the nature of 
the course. 

The student shall have the oppor- 
tunit\-, but shall not be required, 
to make a statement to the panel 
and to present any informatiop or 
documentation which the student 
beheves is relevant. 
The Office of Social Equit)- wiU 
be available to the panel for con- 
sultation on an "as needed" basis. 

3. It shall be the function of the 
panel to make a recommendation 
to the provost concerning the 
appropriateness of the requested 
modifications and/or a rewsion of 



the modifications. The panel shall 
deUberate immediately following 
the meeting and shall render its 
recommendation hv majorirv' vote. 
The decision and any dissenting 
opinions of the panel shall be sent 
in writing to the pro\'OSt within 
three work days by the panel 
chair. 
4. The provost shall review the rec- 
ommendation of the panel and 
render a final decision on the mat- 
ter in writing to the student, the 
facult)' member, and the OSSD 
director within one week after 
receiving the panel's recommenda- 
tion. 

The Writing Program 

West Chester University's cross-discipli- 
nar\' writing program was begun in 1978 
as a pUot project fiinded b}- the National 
Endowment for the Humanities and the 
Pennsylvania State College Educational 
Trust Fund. Building on the skills devel- 
oped in Enghsh composition courses, the 
program is based on the assumption that 
writing is integral to all academic learn- 
ing in hberal and professional studies. 
The program's focus is therefore not on 
remediation but on enhancement; the 
Universit)' regards vvriting as much more 
than a set of basic language skills. The 
program provides for: 

(1) Writing-emphasis courses each semester 
in traditional hberal studies (for 
example, Enghsh hterature, history, 
anthropology, sociology', chemistry, 
and physics) and in protessional 
studies (for example, criminal jus- 
tice, early childhood education, 
nursing, and pubhc health) 

(2) A general requirement that all stu- 
dents must take three of these writing- 
emphasis courses, in addition to 
Enghsh composition. Transfer stu- 
dents need to consult the 
Undegraduate Catalog under 
"Writing Emphasis" for details on 
their degree requirements. 

The WCU writing program has been 
recognized for its scope and achieve- 
ment by the Association ot American 
Colleges. It is administered by a director 
and a committee of one student and 
seven faculty members representing dif- 
ferent fields of study. 

Internships 

A number of departments offer the 
opportunit)' for internships, field experi- 
ences, or practicums in which students 



Academic Affairs — Special Programs and Senices 



may earn credit through employment in 
their field of interest. Students need to 
consult with their department and 
review the various department hstings in 
this catalog. 

Three University-wide internship 
opportunities are open to students from 
anv major: The Harrisburg Internship 
Semester (THIS) is a full-semester, 15- 
credit experience in Pennsylvania state 
government. It is open to any junior or 
senior who has a minimum GPA of 3.5. 
A stipend is involved. (See Department 
of Political Science, HBI 400, 401, 
402.) The Washington Center 
Internships are 15-credit experiences 
with the U.S. Congress, Executive 
Branch, interest groups, and lobbies. 
The Pennsylvania House of Rep- 
resentatives Legislative Fellowship 
Program, open to all junior/senior stu- 
dents with a minimum GPA of 3.5, 
involves committee staff assignments in 
pohcy development and a stipend. All 
three programs are administered bv the 
Department of Pohtical Science; contact 
the chair at 610-436-2743. 

Summer Sessions 

West Chester University's summer pro- 
gram, among the oldest university-spon- 
sored summer programs in the United 
States, has one of the largest enroll- 
ments in the State System of Higher 
Education. More than 600 courses, both 
graduate and undergraduate, are offered, 
including workshops, seminars, and 
internships, as well as the typical semes- 
ter classes. Offerings are generally avail- 
able in everv' department and in interdis- 
ciplinary areas. 

Students from any college or university-, 
as well as nontraditional students, may 
take courses for enjoyment, personal 
grovrth, or degree credit. The summer 
program runs for 13 weeks (two five- 
week sessions and a three-week post ses- 
sion), and a student can earn up to 12 
credits during the summer sessions. 

Summer session booklets containing the 
course schedules may be obtained from 
the Office of the Registrar (undergradu- 
ate), the Office of Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education (graduate), and 
academic departments or the University 
web site (wvvw.wcupa.edu). For more 
information contact the Office of the 
Registrar at 610-436-3541 or the Office 
of Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education at 610-436-2943. 



Office for Adult Studies 

Nondegree is an academic term for "not 
formall}' accepted in a degree program." 
Students often begin their college 
careers bv taking classes nondegree, for 
personal and professional growth. 
Nondegree students take the same 
courses as ever\'one else and earn the 
same college credit. Students may earn a 
total of 1 8 credits (usually about six 
courses) as a nondegree student. After 
earning 18 credits, students need to 
apply for adnussion if they wish to con- 
tinue. College graduates can take as 
many courses as they want. 
Nondegree students can take a maxi- 
mum of nine credits each semester. 
Students may be considered for nonde- 
gree status if they 

• graduated from high school (or 
received a GED) three or more years 
ago; 

• have less than 30 credits from anoth- 
er college or university with at least a 
2.0 cumulative grade point average 
(GPA); 

• have earned a college degree and 
want to take courses for professional 
or personal development; 

• are a high school student with a letter 
ot recommendation from their guid- 
ance counselor or principal. 

The University' recognizes and awards 
credit for hfe-learning experience that 
can accelerate a student's degree. The 
Office for Adult Studies advises students 
on how to earn college credit tor their 
learning experience through three avail- 
able options: 

• Credit by Examination (contact the 
Registrar's Office) 

• Portfolio Development 

• College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) 

Students may use anv combination of 

these options and progress at their own 

pace. 

Nondegree students may take advantage 

of all ser\'ices offered b\' the University 

including: 

• Internet registration 

• Payment plans 

• Da\time childcare 

• Career and personal counsehng 
For additional information, contact the 
Office for Adult Studies at 610-436- 
1009 or e-mail adultstudy@wcupa.edu. 

Veterans Affairs 

Under the provisions of Tide 38, West 
Chester University is an accredited uni- 



versity for the education of veterans. The 
University cooperates with the Veterans 
Administration to see that honorably 
separated or discharged veterans receive 
every consideration consistent with either 
degree or nondegree admission standards. 

All veterans, certain dependents of dis- 
abled or deceased veterans, and war 
orphans who wish to obtain educational 
benefits under the appropriate public 
laws must register with the office over- 
seeing veterans affairs at initial registra- 
tion. Veterans must renew their registra- 
tion with this office at the beginning of 
each subsequent semester and each sum- 
mer session. The Veterans Administra- 
tion requires students who are veterans 
to schedule at least 12 semester hours 
per semester in order to receive fiiU ben- 
efits under the GI Bill. 

Certification tor Veterans Administra- 
tion benefits is administered by the 
Office of Financial Aid, Room 138, 
Elsie O. Bull Center. 

Armed Services Programs 

Army Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps (ROTC) is available through a 
cross-enrollment agreement with 
Widener University'. Classes are gener- 
ally conducted on the campus of 
Widener University. Students receive 
from 1.0 to 3.0 free elective credit hours 
per course (maximum 12 credit hours) 
towards their baccalaureate programs. 

West Chester students also may enroll in 
the Air Force Reserve Officers' Training 
Program (AFROTC) through an agree- 
ment with Saint Joseph's Universitv'. All 
aerospace studies courses are held on the 
Saint Joseph's University campus, and 
these courses earn transfer credit at WCU. 

The University, with the approval of the 
Council of Trustees, permits West 
Chester LTni\'ersit\' students enrolled in 
the Armed Services Reserve Officer 
Candidate Program (ROC) to receive six 
semester hours of baccalaureate credit 
upon successflil completion and certifica- 
tion of ROC militan' requirements. 
These credits are classified as free elective 
transfer credits. Depending on the status 
of the student's program at the time of 
ROC credit transfer, these credits will be 
counted toward, or in excess of, the 120 
credits required for a baccalaureate degree. 

ROC programs are contingent on suc- 
cessflil completion of a military require- 
ment during vacation and the awarding 
of a college degree before being granted 
the service commission. 



Academic Affairs — Special Programs and Ser\ices 



Graduate Studies 

West Chester's graduate programs, intro- 
duced in 1959, offer study opportunities 
leading to the master ot education, mas- 
ter of arts, master of science in adminis- 
tration, master of science in nursing, 
master of business administration, master 
of public health, master of science, mas- 
ter of social work, and master ot music 
degrees. West Chester schedules its grad- 
uate courses in the late afternoon and 
e\'ening during the fall and spring semes- 
ters. It is possible to pursue fiill-rime 
graduate stud}' during the academic year 
and during summer sessions. 

Administration 

^LSA- (Concentrations: Human Resource 

Management, Individualized, Leadership 
for Women, Long-Term Care, Public 
Administration, Regional Planning, Sport 
and Athletic Administration, Training and 
Development) 

Certificates in Administration; Human Resource 
Management; and Leadership for Women 

Anthropology/Sociology 

M.S.A. (Concentration: Long-Term Care) 
Certificate in Geronotolog\' 

Biology 

M.S. Biology 

Business 

^LBA. (Concentrations: Exonomics/Finance, 
Executive, General Business, Manage- 
ment, TechnologT.' and Electronic 
Commerce) 

Chemistry 

MA. Physical Science (Concentration: 

Chemistry) 
M.Ed. Chemistry 
M.S. Chemistry 
M.S. Clinical Chemistry 

Communication Studies 

M.A. Communication Studies 

Conununicative Disorders 

MA. Communicative Disorders 

Computer Science 

M.S. Computer Science 
Certificate in Computer Science 

Counseling and Educational 
Psychology 

.M.Ed. Elementan- School Counseling 
M.Ed. Secondan- School Counseling 
ALS. Higher Education/Post- Secondary 

Counseling 
Specialist I Certificate in Counseling 

(Elementari- or Secondary) 
Post Master's Certificate 

Criminal Justice 

M.S. Criminal Justice 

Early Childhood and Special Education 

M.Ed. Special Education 
Certification in Special Elducation 



Educational Research 

See Professional and Secondary Education 

Elementary Education 

M.Ed. Elementary Education 
Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 
Certification in Elementarj' Education 

English 

M.A. English 

Foreign Languages 

M..-\. French 

M..A Spanish 

M.Ed. French 

M.Ed. Spanish 

Geography and Planning 

M.A. Geography 

M.S..'^. (Concentration: Regional Planning) 

Geology and Astronomy 



M.A. 



Ph^•5ical Science (Concentration: 
Earth Sciences) 



Health 

M.Ed, School Health 
M.P.H.PubUc Health 
Certificate in Emergency' Preparedness (pending 

approval) 
Certificate in Integrative Health 
Certification in Health Care Administration 

History 

M.A. History 
M.Ed. Histor)' 

Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

MA. Holocaust and Genocide Studies 
Certificate in Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

Kinesiology 

M.S. Health and Physical Education 

(Concentrations: General Ph\-sical 

Education, Elxercise and 

Sport Phii-siolog)) 
M,S,A, (Concentration: Sport and Athletic 

Administration) 
Certification in Driver Education and Safe Li\'ing 

Literacy 

M,Ed, Reading 
Certificate in Literac)' 
Certification as a Reading Specialist 

Mathematics 

M..^. Mathematics (Concentrations: 

Mathematics, Mathematics Education) 
M.S. AppUed Statistics 
Certificate in Applied Statistics 
Certification in Mathematics 



Music 


MA 


Music Histon' 


M.M. 


Accompanying 


M.M. 


Music Composition 


M.M, 


Music Education 


M,M, 


Music Performance 


M.M, 


Music Theon' 


M.M, 


Piano Pedagog)' 



Nursing 

z\LS,N. 

Certificate in Parish Nursing 

Certification as a School Nurse 

Philosophy 

M.A. Philosophy 



Physical Science 

See Chemistry, and Geology and Astronomy 

Political Science 

M.S..\. (Concentration: PubUc .A.dministration) 

Professional and Secondary Education 

M.Ed. Secondar)' Education 
M.S. Educational Research 
Certification in Secondary- Education 
Certificate in Teaching and Learning with 

Technology- 
Courses in En\ironmental Education, Urban 

Education 

Psychology 

MA. Clinical Psycholog)- 

M.A. General Ps\chologi.' 

M.A. Industrial/Organizational Psychologv- 

Certificate in Clinical Mental Health 

Public Administration 

See Political Science 

Social Work 

MS.W. Social Work 

Special Education 

(See Early Childhood and Special Education) 

Teaching English as a Second 
Language 

M.A. Teaching English as a Second Language 
Certificate in Teaching English as a Second 
Language 

The follo>ving departments and inter- 
disciphnarv' areas offer graduate cours- 
es, but no graduate degree: 

Anthropolog}' and Sociolog}', Art, Lin- 
guistics, Theatre Arts, and Women's 
Studies, 

Scholarly Publications 

College Literature is an international, quar- 
terl)- journal of scholarly criticism dedicat- 
ed to the needs of coUege/universit\' teach- 
ers; it pro\ides access to innoN'ative wav-s of 
studying and teaching ne%v bodies of liter- 
ature and experiencing old literatures in 
newwa\'s, Kostas IM\Tsiades ot the 
Department of English serves as editor. 
Journal of the Hellenic Diaspora is a semian- 
nual, international scholarly re\iew focus- 
ing on the Greek experience of the 19th 
and 20th centuries, published at West 
Chester University' by Fella Publishing 
Co. of New York Kostas AhTsiades, 
Department of English, serves as editor. 

Aralia Press 

This nationally renowned literary fine 
press, located in 509 Francis Har\'ey 
Green Libran', gives students hands-on 
experience in the publishing field 
through actual book production. 
Professor Michael Peich, Department of 
English, serves as the director. 



Degree Requirements 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Responsibility 

The ultimate responsibility' for satisfying all graduation require- 
ments is the student's. Facult)' academic advisers are expected to 
provide accurate, helpRd information to students, and students 
are expected to be knowledgeable about the academic policies 
and procedures governing the completion of their degrees. The 
smdent and faculrv adviser are expected to consult with each 
other regularly. Under West Chester Universit)''s advising pro- 
gram, all students have faculty advisers, appointed through their 
major departments, who counsel them on academic matters 
throughout their undergraduate vears. Students who have not 
yet declared a major are advised by the Pre-Major Academic 
Advising Center in Lawrence Center. 

Applicable Catalog Year 

AH students are bound bv the catalog in the year they are most 
recendy admitted to the Universit}' for general education 
requirements. Students are bound by the major, minor, and cog- 
nate requirements in the catalog for the academic year for which 
thev are accepted into the major or minor. If any of the degree 
requirements change while students are matriculating, they may, 
but do not have to, meet changed requirements after their first 
semester of study as a declared major. In some instances, accred- 
iting and/or certification standards necessitate the change in 
major, minor, and cognate requirements. In such situations, the 
respective school or college will formally inform each student 
that he or she must meet the new requirements. Readmitted stu- 
dents are bound bv the requirements in place for general educa- 
tion, major, minor, and cognate areas at the time of readmission, 
except where permission is granted by the respective department. 

Dual Degrees and Majors 

Students are permitted to pursue dual majors under the same 
degree or dual degrees with the concurrence of the participating 
departments. (See "Dual Degrees" and "Dual Majors" in the 
"Academic Policies and Procedures" section of this catalog.) 

Basic Proficiency 

Students who do not demonstrate basic proficiency in English 
or mathematics may be required to take 000-level courses as 
prerequisites of their degree programs. These courses do not 
count towards graduation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

1. Satisfactor\' completion ot a minimum of 120 semester 
hours at or above the 100 level, distributed as shown in the 
curriculum for the .student's major field. NOTE: Three pro- 
grams - B.S.Ed. ii3'biolog)', B.S.Ed, in chemistry, and B.M. 
in music education - require 126 credits. 

2. Achievement of a cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) 
of at least 2.00 (C) and an average of at least 2.00 (C) in the 
major field. 

3. Attendance at West Chester University for at least 30 
semester hours of the degree program, normally the final 30 
semester hours of the degree program. 



4. Fulfillment of any special requirements or program compe- 
tencies that are particular to a department or a school. 

5. Fulfillment of all financial obligations to the University, 
including pavment of the graduation fee, and of all other 
obligations, including the return ot Universit)' property. 

6. Compliance with aU academic requests, including filing an 
apphcation for graduation in the Office of the Registrar. 

BACCALAUREATE GENERAL 
EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The General Education Goals Common to All 
Baccalaureate Curricula 

A broad education emphasizes the enhancement of basic skills 
in English and mathematics, and encompasses experiences in 
the humanities, the social and natural sciences, and the arts. At 
the same time, this education must be versatile because of the 
many new courses and areas of study that are constantly 
becoming available. 

West Chester University strives to have students meet the fol- 
lowing general education goals: 

1. Ability to communicate effectively 

2. Ability to employ quantitative concepts and mathematical 
methods 

3. Ability to think critically and anal\ticaUy 

4. Abilit)' to demonstrate the sensibilities, understandings, and 
perspectives of a person educated in the liberal arts tradition 

5. Ability to respond though tfliUy to diversity 

6. Ability to make informed decisions and ethical choices 

7. Preparation to lead productive, contributing lives 
West Chester University's curriculum has been planned to 
allow freedom of choice for the student within educationally 
sound limits. 

This revised general education program applies to all students 
entering West Chester in August 2002 and thereafter (special 
provisions apply to honors program, see page 105). All stu- 
dents should consult with their advisers and their department 
handbooks. 

Policy on General Education Requirements 

Students, both those matriculating as freshman and transfer 
students, who have not completed the academic foundations 
requirements in mathematics and English by the time they 
have earned 60 credits toward graduation must have the per- 
mission of the dean of their school or coDege (or his or her 
designee) to schedule additional courses. 
A total of 48 semester hours of general education requirements 
must be completed for a baccalaureate degree. Those 48 credits 
are allocated among English composition, mathematics, di\'erse 
communities, communication, science, behavioral and social sci- 
ences, humanities, the arts, interdisciplinary studies, and student 
electives. Credit requirements for each area are pro\'ided in the 
following list. NOTE: Except for the nine student elective 
semester hours under Category IV, courses taken to satisfy gen- 
eral education requirements may not be taken Pass/Fail. This 
includes courses taken to satisfy interdisciplinar}', diverse commu- 
nity, and writing emphasis general education requirements. 



Degree Requirements 



Specific general education courses may be required by a major or 
minor program, but no course may have its numeric credits 
duplicated in any application. A student may use the course from 
one major to meet the requirements of the second major. In this 
case, the adviser will work with the student to determine which 
course(s) should be used to address any remaining credits. But in 
no case may a student graduate with fewer than 120 credits at 
the 100 level or above. Students should be aware that, although 
general education requirements have been met, major degree 
requirements mav necessitate a specific minimum performance 
level in general education courses, e.g., a grade of C- or better. 
Following is an example of a general education course that also 
fulfills program requirements: BIO 110 is a biology require- 
ment and serves as a general education option. 
Consult your major degree program for guidance. 
Students in the honors program should consult pages 105-106 
concerning general education requirements. 

General Education Components 

I. Academic Foundations 18 semester hours 

A. English Composition (6 semester hours) 

WRT 120, WRT 121, or 204, or 205, or 206, or 208, 
or 220 

Policy for placement in English composition 
courses: Placement in the appropriate composition 
course is determined bv the score on the SAT and/or by 
performance on a placement test administered b}' the 
Department of English. A student who places into and 
passes WRT 121 or above is not required to take WRT 
120. The student, however, must complete a minimum 
of 120 credits to graduate. AH entering freshmen with 
an SAT Verbal score below 500 will be placed into 
ENG 020 and must pass this course with a grade of C- 
or better. Entering freshmen with an SAT Verbal score 
of 500 and above and below 610 must take WRT 120. 
Entering freshmen with an SAT Verbal score of 610 
and above are not required to take WRT 120 but must 
take one of the foUowing: WRT 121, 204, 205, 206, 
208, or 220. A student enrolled in ENG 020 must pass 
with a grade of C- or better before he or she enrolls in 
WRT 120. IMPORTANT: Credits earned in ENG 
020 are computed in the student's GPA. However, 
these credits will not be counted as part of the 120 col- 
lege-level credits required for graduation. Non-native, 
English-speaking students seeking admission to ENG 
030, ENG 130, and ENG 131 must consult the 
English as a Second Language (ESL) program staff for 
a placement evaluation prior to registering tor these 
courses. ENG 130 and 131 are comparable to WRT 
120 and 121 for non-native, English-speaking students 
only. All students who do not place out of WRT 120 
must take and pass WRT 120 (130) to graduate, and 
no substitution of other courses satisfies this require- 
ment. A student who fails this course after three 
attempts vnll be dismissed immediately following the 
third failure regardless of GPA. 

B. Mathematics (3 semester hours) 

College-level mathematics course designated by the stu- 
dent's major department. 

Pohcy for placement in mathematics: Placement in 
the appropriate mathematics course is determined by 
the student's math SAT score or performance on the 



II. 



Mathematics Placement Examination adniinistered 
by the Department of Mathematics. All entering 
fi-eshmen with SAT scores between 440 and 480 must 
complete MAT 000 with a grade of C- or better unless 
they are early childhood, elementary, or special educa- 
tion majors, in which case they take MAT 001 before 
they enroU in any other mathematics course. Any stu- 
dent, regardless of major, who scores below 440 must 
take MAT 001. Students who score between 440 and 
480 on the SAT but who take and pass the departmen- 
tal placement test during the summer orientation may 
place out of the developmental math levels and eru-oU 
directly into the college-level (100) mathematics 
course. IMPORTANT: Credits earned in MAT 000 
or 001 are computed in the student's GPA. However, 
these credits will not be counted as part of the 120 col- 
lege-level credits required for graduation. 

C. Communication (3 semester hours) 

One communication course will be required of all 

WCU students. 

Choose from the following list: 

COMlOl, 208, 216, or230 

D. Diverse Communities (3 semester hours) 
Effective for all students entering fall 2002 and later, 
one diverse communities course wiU be required of all 
WCU students. The requirement for a diverse commu- 
nities course may be fiilfilled by any approved course 
with a "J" designation in the course schedule. Approved 
diverse communities courses are indicated by a I sign in 
the catalog course descriptions. ^ diverse communities 
course mav simultaneously fiilftll another degree require- 
ment. If a y course is used tofulfdl another degree require- 
ment, general education student electives increase from nine 
to 12 credits as needed to reach 120 credits. 

E. Interdisciplinary Requirement (3 semester hours) 
One interdisciplinary course will be required of all 
WCU students. Interdisciplinan' courses may be fill- 
filled by any approved course with an "I" designation in 
the course schedule. Approved interdisciplinary courses 
are indicated by a pound sign (#) in the catalog course 
descriptions. An interdisciplinary course may not be 
used to fulfill a general education distributive or diverse 
communities course requirement. 

NOTE: A course may not simultaneously meet the 
interdisciplinary, diverse communities, or foreign culture 
cluster requirements. A complete list of approved inter- 
disciplinary courses can be found on this page below. 

Distributive Requirements 21 semester hours 

A. Science (6 semester hours) 

Select courses from at least two of the following areas. 
Courses must be selected from outside the student's major 
department. Recommended courses are listed below: 

1. Biology— BIO 100 or BIO 110 

2. Chemistry— CHE 100, CHE 103, CHE 104, 
CHE 105, CHE 106, or CHE 107 

3. Computer Science — CSC 110, CSC 115, or 
CSC 141 

4. Earth Science— ESS 101, ESS 111, or ESS 170 

5. Physics— PHY 100, PHY 105, PHY 130, ?UY 
140, PHY 170 or PHY 180 



Degree Requirements 



B. Behavioral and Social Sciences (6 semester hours) 
Select courses from at least two of the following areas. 
Courses must be from outside the student's major 
department. Recommended courses are listed beloiu: 

1. Anthropology— ANT 102 or ANT 103 

2. Psycholog)'— PSY 100 

3. Sociology— SOC 200 or SOC 240 

4. Economics— ECO 101, ECO 111, or ECO 112 

5. Geography— GEO 101 or GEO 103 

6. Government— PSC 100, PSC 101, or PSC 213 

C. Humaniries (6 semester hours) 

Select courses from at least tujo of the following areas. 
Courses must be selected from outside the student's major 
department. Recommended courses are listed below: 

1. Literature— LIT 165, CLS 165, CLS 260, or 
CLS 261 

2. History— HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 150, HIS 151, 
or HIS 152 

3. PhUosophy— PHI 101 or PHI 180 
D. The Arts (3 semester hours) 

Any courses in the following areas: art, cinematogra- 
phy, dance, music, photography, and theatre. 

III. Student Electives 9 semester hours 
Students are encouraged to choose electives in consulta- 
tion with their major adviser. 

Courses taken to satisfy the distributive area of general educa- 
tion requirements and the courses taken to satisfy the diverse 
communities, interdisciplinary, or writing emphasis require- 
ments may not be taken Pass/Fail. 

All students are encouraged to complete the above program in their 
first two years at West Chester. 

Additional Baccalaureate Requirements 

IV. Writing Emphasis Courses 9 semester hours 

AH students who take their entire general education pro- 
gram at WCU must complete three approved vmting 
emphasis courses. AH students who enter with fewer than 
40 credits must take at least three approved writing empha- 
sis courses at WCU. Transfer students who enter with 
40-70 credits must take two writing emphasis courses. 
Students who transfer more than 70 credits must take one 
writing emphasis course. AH students, regardless of time of 
entrance into the University (native or transfer), must take 
one writing emphasis course at the 300-400 level. WRT 
120, 121, 204, 205, 206, 208, or 220 do not count as writ- 
ing emphasis courses. Each writing emphasis course may 
simultaneously fijlfill another degree requirement. Writing 
emphasis courses may not be transferred to WCU. 



Diverse Communities Courses 

American Indian Today 

The Culture ot Cities 

Introduction to World Literature 

African Studies 

Women's Literature I 

Women's Literature II 

World Literature I 

Latino Literature in the U.S. 

Diversity Perspectives in Early 

ChildhoodEducation 



EDA/EDE 230 
EDE 352 



EDR 



341 





Approved 


ANT 


321 


ANT 


347 


CLS 


165 


CLS 


203 


CLS 


258 


CLS 


259 


CLS 


260 


CLS 


335 


ECE 


407 



GEO 


204 


GEO 


312 


HEA 


110 


HIS 


362 


HIS 


373 


HIS 


451 


HON 


202 


KIN 


246 


KIN 


457 



LIN 



WOS 



211 



LIT 


303 


MHL 


125 


MUE 


332 


NSG 


109 


PHI 


180 


PSC 


101 


PSC 


301 


PSC 


323 


PSC 


343 


SCE 


350 


SWO 


351 


THA 


250 


WOS 


225 


WOS 


250 



315 



Inclusive Classrooms 

Self Group Processes in Diverse 

Classrooms 

Inclusion and Reading in the Content 

Area 

Introduction to Urban Studies 

Urban Geography 

Transcultural Health 

Violence in America 

African-American History 

Women in America 

Education Systems and Social 

Influence 

Sport, Culture, and Society 

Psychosocial Aspects of Physical 

Disabilities 

Language Communities in the U.S. and 

Canada 

Multi- Ethnic American Literature 

Perspectives in Jazz 

Music Curriculum II 

Health Issues of Women 

Introduction to Ethics 

The Politics of Diversity in the United 

States 

Gender and Politics 

The Politics of Race, Class, and 

Gender 

Cultures and Politics of Asia 

Science in Secondary School 

Human Behavior in the Social 

Environment 

Race and Gender in American Theatre 

Women Today 

Women's Self-Reflections in History, 

Art, and Music 

Third World Women 



AMS 


200 


AMS 


210 


AMS 


250 


BIO 


102 


CLS 


201 


CLS 


270 


CLS 


329 


CLS 


352 


CLS 


368 


CLS 


371 


COM 340 


ECO 


344 


EFR 


220 


EGE 


222 


EGE 


323 


ENG 


215 


ENV 


102 


ERU 


209 


ESP 


219 


ESP 


222 


ESP 


324 


ESP 


362 



Approved Interdisciplinary Courses 

American Civilization 

Mass Media and Popular Culture 

Myths and Modernization 

Humans and the Environment 

Classical M\thology in the 20th Century 

Life, Death, and Disease 

Gender and Peace 

Modernit}'/Postmodernity 

Literature, Myth, and Society 

Law, Literature, and Communication 

Political Communication 

American Economic Experience 

French Civilization (in English) 

German Civihzation (in Enghsh) 

Austrian Civilization, 1848-1938 

Views on Literacy 

Humans and the Environment 

Soviet Russian Culture (in English) 

Civilization of Spain (in English) 

Latin-American Culture and Civilization 

(in English) 

Puerto Rican Language and Culture 

New World America 



Degree Requirements 



ESS 102 Humans and the Environment 

GEO 204 Introduction to Urban Studies 

GER 221 German Civilization (in German) 

HIS 302 Modern India 

HIS 306 Chinese Civilization 

HIS 308 An Introduction to the Islamic World 

HIS 323 Austrian Civilization 

HIS 329 Gender and Peace 

. IND 201 Unified Science I 

IND 110 Applied Environmental Science 

KIN 246 Sport, Culture, and Society 

LIN 330 Introduction to Meaning 

LIT 162 Literature of the Apocalypse 

LIT 245 Medieval Women's Culture 

LIT 250 Victorian Attitudes 

LIT 270 Urbanism and Modern Imagination 

LIT 309 Martin Luther King 

MAT 201 The Scientific Revolution 

MHL 201 Form and Style in the Arts 

NSG 222 Transcultural Health 

PHI 102 Introduction to Religious Studies 

PHI 174 Principles of the Arts 

PHI 330 Introduction to Meaning 

PHI 470 Biomedical Ethics 

PSC 204 Introduction to Urban Studies 

PSC 318 International Political Economy 

SCB 210 The Origin of Life and the Universe 

SOC 349 Perspectives on Mental Illness 

SSC 200 Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies 

SSC 201 Global Perspectives 

SWO 225 Race Relations 

WOS 225 Women Today — An Introduction to 

Women's Studies 

WOS 250 Women's Self Reflections in Writing, 

Music, and Art 

WOS 315 Third World Women 

WOS 329 Gender and Peace 

WOS 405 Feminist Theory 

NOTE: There are particular honors courses that have been 
approved as interdisciplinary at the 300 and 400 levels. Honors 
students should discuss these courses with the director of the 
honors program. 

Foreign Language and Culture Requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Music Degree and 

Certain B.S. Degree Candidates 

A. West Chester University beheves that college students 
today require exposure to global cultures, and the 
University integrates this belief into courses and pro- 
grams in various ways. Departments in the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the School of Business and Public 
Affairs, and the School of Music, particularly, see a 
need for students earning bachelor of arts degrees to 
gain competency in foreign language and cultures as a 
critical aspect of their education. The University pro- 
vides options for these students based on varying lev- 
els of language competency deemed appropriate by 
major departments tor study in their field. Questions 
regarding foreign language requirements should be 
directed to the department chairperson. 
A number of B.A. degree programs require a foreign 
language proficiency gained from completing the sec- 



ond half of the intermediate year (202) of a foreign 

language. At this level, students may be expected to 

have a working knowledge of the language and culture 

of a foreign country. These programs are as follows: 

Biology 

Comparative Literature 

English 

Foreign Languages (in a second foreign language) 

History 

Liberal Studies 

Mathematics (limited to French, German, and Russian) 

Political Science (B.A. in international relations only) 

B. Other B.A. degree programs offer students the fol- 
lowing options: 

(a) demonstrating foreign language proficiency 

through the intermediate level (202) or 
(b)demonstrating foreign language proficiency 
through the Elementary II (102) level of a lan- 
guage and further acquiring a cultural foundation 
through taking three culture cluster courses within 
the same foreign language area. It is not necessary 
for students to complete the Elementary II (102) 
level before taking culture cluster courses. 
While this option does not give students the depth 
and focus of language study, the three courses will 
help them understand a foreign culture. (In this 
option, students may elect to further their foreign lan- 
guage skills by taking an additional semester of the 
language, plus two culture cluster courses.) 
The foreign language plus culture cluster option is 
open to students who entered after May 1980. 
Degree programs offering the culture cluster option 
are as follows: 
Anthropology 
American Studies 
Art (B.A. only) 
Communication 
Communicative Disorders 
Economics (B.A. only) 
Geography (B.A. only) 
Philosophy 
Political Science (B.A. general and public 

management only) 
Psychology 
Sociology 
Theatre Arts 

C. Some B.S. degree programs also require a foreign lan- 
guage. Students should see their advisers. 

D.The B.M. in music degree requires three hours of a 
foreign language for students in the elective studies in 
an outside field program of study. 

E. The Department of Foreign Languages handles test- 
ing and placement. 

F. Course substitutions to the foreign language require- 
ment of a department will be granted if the student 
meets one of the following criteria: 

1. The student is able to demonstrate proficiency 
through successful testing by the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



2. The student holds a diploma from a secondary edu- 
cation institution in another country. This institu- 
tion must be at least the equivalent of a U.S. high 
school, and instruction must be in a language other 
than English. 
G. Students who may request course substitutions 

because of a disability should refer to page 32, 

"Services for Students with Disabilities." 
H. Students should take note of the poUcies regarding 

taking courses out of sequence; see page 42. 

Foreign Culture Clusters 

Of the three required culture cluster courses, students who 
choose that option may take no more than two in the same 
department, except that only one may be taken in the department 
in which they major. Students are encouraged to begin taking 
their culture cluster courses as soon as possible after completing 
the 102 level of the language. The 201 level of language courses 
is acceptable for use as one of the three culture cluster courses. 
Any exceptions to these conditions must be petitioned. A student 
may not use one course to simultaneously fulfill a general educa- 
tion distributive requirement and a culture cluster requirement. 

I. Classical Civilization (Latin or Greek) 
Approved courses: ARH 382, HIS 318, HIS 319, 

HIS 348, PHI 270 

II. France and Francophone Area (French) 
Approved courses: ARH 383, ARH 385, EFR 220, 

EFR 230, EFR 250, GEO 303, 
HIS 420, HIS 427, HIS 435, 
PHI 415, PSC 342 



III. Germany (German) 

Approved courses: EGE 222, EGE 323, EGE 403, 
EGE 404, EGE 405, EGE 408, 
EGE 409, HIS 323, HIS 330, 
HIS 420, HIS 423, HIS 435, 
PHI 272, PHI 273, PSC 342 

IV. Italy (Italian) 

Approved courses: ARH 384, EIT 260, PSC 342, 
GEO 303 

V. Spanish (Spanish or Portuguese) 

Approved courses: ANT 224, ANT 322, ANT 324, 
ANT 362, CLS 311, CLS 335, 
ESP 219, ESP 222, ESP 305, 
ESP311, ESP324, ESP325, 
ESP 333, ESP 335, ESP 403, 
ESP 405, GEO 302, HIS 315, 
HIS 316, HIS 317, PSC 340 

VI. Russia and Eastern Europe (Russian or an Eastern 
European language) 

Approved courses: ERU 209, GEO 304, HIS 324, 
HIS 425, PSC 246 
NOTE: A course may simultaneously meet the interdiscipli- 
nary' and culture cluster requirements. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Degree Classification — Definitions 

Degree Candidates — all undergraduates 
admitted to a degree program or to the 
undeclared major by the Office of 
Admissions or through approved inter- 
nal transfer recorded in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

Nondegree Students — students permitted 
to enroll part time (maximum nine cred- 
its per semester) for course work toward 
professional development, personal 
growth, or certification. Recent high 
school graduates (within the previous 
two years) are required to meet the 
admission standards of the University. 
Transfer students may enroll nondegree 
if they have attempted less than 30 cred- 
its and have a 2.5 grade point average. 
High school students may attend on a 
nondegree basis with written permission 
of their high school principal or guid- 
ance counselor. Nondegree students may 



attempt a maximum of 18 credits. Upon 
reaching 18 credits, students must have 
a 2.00 GPA or the department's 
required GPA to be eligible for admis- 
sion to a degree program or to request 
permission to enroll with professional 
development status. 

Student Standing 

The student's standing is determined by 
the number of semester hours of credit 
earned as follows: 



Freshman 


0-29.5 semester hours of 




credit (inclusive) 


Sophomore 


30-59.5 semester hours of 




credit (inclusive) 


Junior 


60-89.5 semester hours of 




credit (inclusive) 


Senior 


90 or more semester 




. hours of credit 



Full-Time Status 

A full-time class load ranges from 12 to 
18 semester hours of credit. Credits 
attempted or earned through the process 
of Credit by Examination are not count- 
ed in the student class load. 

Overloads 

Students wishing to carry more than 18 
credit hours in the fall or spring semester, 
or six credit hours in a summer session, 
must secure permission. Permission wiU 
not be granted for more than 24 hours in 
a fall or spring semester. The maximum 
student load for summer school is six 
hours per session. A student wiU not be 
allowed to carry an overload of more than 
18 hours in any one summer nor be 
allowed to carry' more than one additional 
course per summer session. 
A student should not seek permission to 
carry an overload if his or her cumula- 
tive average is below 2.75. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Permission for an overload is granted by 
the chairperson of the department in 
which the student is majoring and the 
Office of the Registrar. 

School Assignments for Field 
Experiences 

Students are assigned early field and stu- 
dent teaching experiences at schools 
with which the Universit)' has a formal 
agreement. Students will not be assigned 
to schools that they attended or where 
members of their families are employed 
or attend. 

Special requests for school assignments 
■mil be considered by the student's major 
department. 

Effective fall 1999, before an undergrad- 
uate smdent may register for independent 
study or research, practicum, internship, 
extemship, or any field placement, he or 
she must have an overal GPA of 2.00 or 
higher, and a GPA of 2.00 or higher in 
his or her major courses. 
This policy does not supersede current 
departmental policies that have estab- 
lished higher standards. This policy does 
not prevent departments from setting 
higher GPA standards for undergradu- 
ate students within their major. Depart- 
ments may also establish a minimum 
required GPA for all cognate courses for 
undergraduate students who wish to 
register for any of these courses. 

Second Degrees 

An indi\ddual may pursue a second 
degree at West Chester Universit}' after 
earning the first degree either at West 
Chester or some other instimtion. Such 
an indi\'idual must apph' for admission 
through the Office of Admissions as a 
transfer student and earn at least 30 hours 
of West Chester University credit beyond 
the requirements of the initial baccalaure- 
ate program. All requirements for the 
curriculum in which the second degree is 
earned must be satisfied. A given course 
required in both the degree programs is 
not repeated for the second degree. 

Dual Degrees 

A student who has successhxUy complet- 
ed at least 30 credits of work at West 
Chester Universit)' may petition to pur- 
sue a second undergraduate degree con- 
currently with the first, such as a B.S. in 
computer science and a B.A. in art. It 
admitted to a second degree program, 
the student must, to receive both 
degrees at graduation, earn at least 30 
credits beyond the requirements of the 



baccalaureate program with the fewest 
required credits for a minimum of 150 
credits. When a student is enrolled in 
dual degree programs: 

a. The student may not be graduated 
until both the degrees are completed. 

b. All requirements for the curriculum 
of each degree must be satisfied. 

c. A course required in both degree 
programs does not have to be repeat- 
ed for the second degree. 

d. All University requirements such as 
minimum GPA and number of cred- 
its taken at West Chester Universit}' 
in the major must be met for each 
degree separately. 

Double Major 

A student mav select two majors within 
the same degree. In this case, a student 
must meet ail of the requirements for 
both majors. The student should consult 
regularlv with ad\'isers from both pro- 
grams. Students wishing to pursue two 
types of baccalaureate degrees (B.A., 
B.F.A., B.M., B.S., B.S.Ed., B.S.N.) 
should see Dual Degree section above. 

Minor Fields of Study 

Students who have enough flexibOit}' in 
their major curriculum to fulfiU the 
requirements of a minor must fill out 
and submit a Minor Selection 
Application to the Office of the 
Registrar. To enroll in a minor field of 
study, students must have the permis- 
sion of both their major and their pro- 
posed minor departments. Admission to 
the minor does not guarantee admission 
to the major. Smdents must complete 
18 to 30 hours of courses selected in 
consultation with the minor program 
adviser. At least 50 percent of minor 
course work must be taken at West 
Chester. Aso, beginning with students 
entering in the fall 1993 semester, stu- 
dents must earn a minimum GPA of 
2.00 in the set of courses taken for a 
minor in order to receive transcript 
recognition of that minor. 
Minors available at West Chester 
Universit}' include the following: 
Accounting 

African/African-American Literature 
American Studies 
Anthropology 
Anthropology/Sociology 
Art History 
Astronomy 
Athletic Coaching 
Biology 



Business Geographies and Information 

Systems 
Chemistry 

Communication Studies 
Comparative Literature 
Computer Science 
Creative Writing 
Criminal Justice 
Dance (Education/Therapeutic) 
Dance (Performance) 
Early Childhood Education 
Earth Sciences 
Economics 

Elementary Education 
Elementary School Mathematics 
Ethnic Studies 
Film Criticism 
Finance 
French 
Geography 
Geology 
German 
Health Science 
Histor}' 

Holocaust Studies 
International Business 
Italian 
Jazz Studies 
Journalism 
Latin 

Latin American Studies 
Linguistics 
Literature 
Mathematics 
Music 
Nutrition 

Organizational and Technical Writing 
Peace and Conflict Studies 
Philosophy 
Physics 

PoUtical Science 
Psychology 
Public Management 
Religious Studies 
Russian 

Russian Studies 
Sociology 
Spanish 

Special Education 
Studio Art 
Theatre 
Translation 

Web Technology and Application 
Women's Studies 

Specific course requirements may be ob- 
tained from the minor program advisers. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Changing Majors 

A student wishing to transfer from one 
program of study at the University to 
another program must fiLe a Change of 
Curriculum form in the Office of the 
Registrar. The smdent must meet the 
standards for admission to the desired 
program and must obtain written permis- 
sion from the department involved. Any 
courses that were initially accepted for 
transfer credit from another coUege are 
subject to re-evaluation by the department 
to which the student transfers internally. 

Adding a Course 

Smdents may add a course by fihng a 
schedule change form in the Office ot 
the Registrar during the Drop/ Add 
Period. Students wiU not be permitted 
to add a course after the end of the Add 
Period (sixth day of the semester). 

Dropping a Course 

Students may drop a course by fihng a 
schedule change form in the Office of 
the Registrar during the Drop/ Add 
Period, thereby receiving no grade. 
Students will not be permitted to drop a 
course after the end of the Drop/ Add 
Period (fifth day of the semester). 

Scheduling Courses 

Students may not schedule more than 
one section of the same course in any 
given semester. If they do so, they may 
be removed from one section by the chair 
of the department offering the course. 

Withdrawing from a Course 

A grade of W (Withdraw) will be 
entered on the academic record of any 
student who withdraws from a course 
between the end of the first week and before 
the end of the ninth class week or the 
equivalent in summer sessions. 
After the ninth week of classes, students 
may not withdraw selectively from cours- 
es; they must contact the Office of the 
Registrar and withdraw from the 
University. The University will record a 
"W" for all courses in which the student 
is registered. However, if the effective 
date of official withdrawal is during the 
last week of classes, a letter grade or NG 
will be assigned for that course. A stu- 
dent may not receive a W during the 
last week of classes. 
STUDENTS WHO FAIL TO 
WITHDRAW FROM OR DROP A 
COURSE OFFICIALLY CAN 
EXPECT TO RECEIVE A GRADE 
OF F FOR THE COURSE AND 



ARE FINANCIALLY RESPONSI- 
BLE TO PAY FOR IT. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students wishing to withdraw from the 
University may go to the Oftice of the 
Registrar or submit their withdrawal to 
the office in writing. Written notifica- 
tion is required for all withdrawals. If ill- 
ness or some other emergency interrupts 
the student's University work necessitat- 
ing withdrawal, he or she must notify 
the Office of the Registrar at once. 
Unless a student withdraws officially, F 
grades will be recorded for unfinished 
courses. 

Taking Courses Out of Sequence 

Students may not enroll for credit in a 
more elementary course in a sequence 
after having satisfactorily passed a more 
advanced course in that sequence. For 
example, a student may not enroU for 
credit in French 101 after having satis- 
factorily passed French 201. Similarly, 
students who enroll in a course that 
requires less proficiency than placement 
or proficiency tests indicate they possess 
may be denied credit towards graduation. 

Repeating Courses 

Beginning with the 1991 fall semester, 
the Repeat Pohcy is divided into two 
sections, i.e., a pohcy covering develop- 
mental courses (000-level) that do not 
count towards graduation, and a policy 
covering college-level courses. 
A. Policy covering developmental 
courses 

Students who enter the University 
beginning with the 1991 fall semester 
may have three attempts to pass each 
developmental course (000-level). 
The repeat privilege for develop- 
mental courses wiU not count within 
the five-repeat allotment for col- 
lege-level courses. Credits for these 
courses do not count towards gradua- 
tion but are computed in the cumula- 
tive Grade Point Average. Students 
may file two grade replacement 
forms, which result in eliminating 
the grades from the first and second 
attempts. The third attempt, how- 
ever, will be the grade of record. 
Students must pass the developmen- 
tal basic skiUs courses (Enghsh and 
mathematics) with a C- or better 
before enrolling in a more advanced 
course in the respective discipUne. 
Students enrolled in the basic skills 
developmental course(s) who do not 
pass with a C- or better after three 



attempts will be permanently dis- 
missed from the Universit)' regard- 
less of overall Grade Point Average. 
Students who fail developmental 
courses at West Chester University 
may not repeat those courses at 
another university or transfer in the 
college-level (100 or higher) course. 

B. Pohcy covering undergraduate col- 
lege-level courses 

Students may repeat undergraduate 
college-level courses to improve a 
grade of F, D, C, or B (not A). 
Beginning with the 1985 fall semester, 

1. No student may use the repeat 
option more than five times 
TOTAL. For example, this 
means repeating five DIFFER- 
ENT courses once each, or repeat- 
ing each of two different courses 
twice (four repeats) and one addi- 
tional course once. 

2. A single course may not be repeat- 
ed more than twice. 

3. A replacement for the grade in the 
first attempt occurs automatically 
at the completion of the second 
attempt of a repeated course. This 
constitutes one of the five avail- 
able repeats. 

4. A grade replacement will only take 
place on the second attempt of a 
course. 

5. When a student completes a third 
attempt of a course, the grades for 
the second and third attempts will 
be used to calculate the cumulative 
grade point average. 

6. Smdents may repeat undergradu- 
ate college-level courses to improve 
a grade of F, D, C, or B (not A). 

Smdents will not be permitted to 
repeat courses for credit beyond five 
repeats, or beyond two repeats for a 
single course. 

Undergraduate students who take and 
complete a course at West Chester may 
not repeat the course at another instim- 
tion and have the credits or grade count 
towards a West Chester degree. 

Undergraduates who take a course tor 
graduate credit are subject to the gradu- 
ate repeat policy. See the Graduate 
Catalog for information. 

Because all students must take and pass 
WRT 120 to graduate, a student who 
fails this course after three attempts will 
be dismissed immediately foUowing the 
third failure, regardless of GPA. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Repeat Course Procedure 

The first time a student completes a 
course for a grade it is considered the 
first attempt. The second time a student 
completes a course for a grade it is con- 
sidered the second attempt and the first 
repeat. The third time a student com- 
pletes a course for a grade it is consid- 
ered the third attempt and is the second 
repeat. The first time a course is repeat- 
ed, only the second grade is computed 
into the GPA. The repeat is filed auto- 
matically when the second attempt has 
been completed. If the college-level 
course is repeated a second time, both 
the second and third grades are comput- 
ed into the GPA. Students who com- 
plete a course with a fourth attempt or 
more are in violation ot the Repeat 
Policy and wiU not earn credit. 

Pass/Fail Policy 

1. All degree students who are sopho- 
mores, juniors, or seniors with a 
cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 are 
eligible to take courses Pass/Fail. 

2. The Pass/Fail privilege is limited to 
one course per semester; only student 
electives in general education and 
free electives within the major/minor 
maybe taken on a Pass/Fail basis. 
Free electives are completed at the 
choice of the student. They may not 
be used to satisfy major, core, cognate, 
or general education (including dis- 
tributive) requirements. 

Courses taken to satisfy the distribu- 
tive area of general education require- 
ments and the courses taken to satisfy 
the diverse communities, interdiscipli- 
nary, or writing emphasis require- 
ments may not be taken Pass/Fall. 

3. A grade of Pass carries credit value 
but does not affect the cumulative 
Grade Point Average. 

4. A grade oi Fail is computed into the 
cumulative Grade Point Average. 

5. After contracting for Pass/Fail, the 
student may not request or accept any 
grade other than a P or an F. 

6. This process must be completed by 
the end of the ninth week ot the 
semester or the equivalent in summer 
school. Forms are available in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Auditing Privileges 

Anyone may attend the University for 
the sole purpose of auditing courses by 
first scheduling for the course, paying the 
regular fee, and then completing an audit 
application form available from the 
Office of the Registrar. An undergradu- 



ate student may declare "audit" status in a 
course through the end of the ninth week 
of class but may only audit one course 
per semester. Faculty may refuse to grant 
auditor status. Full-time students have 
the privilege of auditing without addi- 
tional charge, provided they obtain 
approval from the course instructor and 
the course does not create an overload 
situation. If an overload results, students 
are assessed the per-credit rate for each 
credit in excess of 18. Part-time students 
may audit, provided they obtain the 
instructor's approval, enroll in the course 
through the Office of the Registrar, and 
pay the regular course fees. 

Credit is never given to auditors. The 
auditor status may not be changed after it 
has been declared. The grade ot Audit 
(AU) is recorded on the student's tran- 
script. An audited course will not fUfill 
any requirement toward graduation 
including interdisciplinary, diverse com- 
munities, and writing emphasis attributes. 

Credit by Examination 

Forms to register for credit by examina- 
tion are available from the Otfice of the 
Registrar. A fee of S25 is charged for each 
course. Credit by examination is a privi- 
lege subject to the following conditions: 

1. AppHcation occurs during the 
Drop/ Add Period. If the student has 
already scheduled into the course, the 
course will be dropped from the 
schedule for that term. Grade notifi- 
cation for credit by exam will occur at 
the end of the semester. Therefore, if 
the student fails, the course will have 
to be taken in a later term. 

2. The student has a cumulative GPA 
of at least 2.00. 

3. The student demonstrates evidence 
of satisfactory academic background 
for the course. 

4. The student has not already complet- 
ed a more advanced course that pre- 
supposes knowledge gained in the 
course. For example, credit by exami- 
nation cannot be given for FRE 101 
after the student passed FRE 102. 

5. Credits attempted or earned through 
the process ot credit by examination are 
not counted in the student class load. 

NOTE: Students who have taken a 
course but have not achieved a satisfac- 
tory grade may not apply for credit by 
examination for the same course. 

Independent Study 

Many departments offer an independent 
study course for students with demon- 



strated ability and special interests. This 
course is appropriate when a student has 
a specialized and compelling academic 
interest that cannot be pursued within 
the framework of a regular course. 
Students must obtain departmental per- 
mission for independent study courses. 
An overall GPA of 2.00 or higher and a 
minimum GPA of 2.00 in a student's 
major courses are required. The inde- 
pendent study form is available in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Individualized Instruction 

Individualized instruction is the teaching 
of a regular, listed catalog course to a sin- 
gle student. Individualized instruction is 
offered only when the University has can- 
celed or failed to ofter a course according 
to schedule. Students must obtain depart- 
mental permission for individual instruc- 
tion. The individualized instruction form 
is available in the Office ot the Registrar. 

Graduate Credit 

A senior (90 credits or more) pursuing a 
bachelor's degree who has an overall 
Grade Point Average of 3.00, may, with 
the permission of the major adviser, 
course professor, department chair of 
the course, the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education, and the associ- 
ate provost, enroll in up to six credits of 
graduate-level course work. The student 
must be at the senior level with the des- 
ignated Grade Point Average at the 
time the course begins. 

If the course is dual numbered, the 
undergraduate must take the undergrad- 
uate-level course and apply it towards 
the bachelor's degree. If the course is 
not dual numbered, but at the 500 level 
or above, the course may count either as 
undergraduate credit towards the bache- 
lor's degree or as graduate credit. 

If the student wishes to have the credits 
count towards the bachelor's degree, the 
student must submit a completed 
"Application for an Undergraduate 
Student to Take a Graduate Course for 
Undergraduate Credit." The form is 
available in the Office of the Registrar. If, 
on the other hand, the student wishes to 
have the credits count towards a graduate 
degree, he or she must submit a complet- 
ed "Application for an Undergraduate 
Student to Take a Graduate Course for 
Graduate Credit." The form is available 
in the Graduate Office. To receive grad- 
uate-level credit, the student also must 
submit a properly completed and 
approved Graduate School Admissions 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Form to the Office of Graduate Studies 
before completing the appropriate form. 
Individual departments have the right to 
implement more stringent academic 
standards for courses within their 
departments. Any student not meeting 
Universit}' or departmental standards 
when the appropriate semester begins 
will not be permitted to enroll. 
If a course is taken for undergraduate 
credit, no additional fees will be 
required. If a course is taken for gradu- 
ate credit, the student must pay graduate 
tuition and applicable tees tor that 
course. A student not carrying 12 hours 
of undergraduate credits wLU be charged 
at the appropriate hourly tuition rates 
for both the undergraduate and graduate 
credits. All other fees will be charged at 
the undergraduate level. 
No more than six credits taken under this 
policy may be applied to the master's 
degree. Students may not elect to change 
between undergraduate and graduate cred- 
it after the term or semester has begun. 

Undergraduate students approved to take 
a graduate course for undergraduate cred- 
it are bound by the undergraduate catalog 
polic)' on repeats and wdthdrawals. 
Undergraduate students approved to take 
a graduate course for graduate credit are 
bound by the graduate catalog policy on 
repeats and withdrawals. 

Undergraduate Student 
Attendance Policy 

Each professor will determine a class 
attendance polic\' and publish it in his or 
her syllabus at the beginning of each 
semester. When a student fails to comply 
with the policy, the professor has the right 
to assign a grade consistent with his or her 
policy as stated in the sj'llabus. Absences 
cannot be used as the sole criterion for 
assigning a final grade in a course. 
Excused absences, in accordance with the 
Excused Absences Polio,' for University- 
Sanctioned Events, wiU not result in a 
penalty, provided the student foUovre this 
policy. University departments or pro- 
grams may establish attendance policies to 
govern their sections as long as those poli- 
cies fall within these guidelines. 

Excused Absences Policy for 
University- Sanctioned Events 

Undergraduate students participating in 
University-sanctioned events such as, 
but not limited to, the Marching Band, 
musical ensembles, theatre group, ath- 
letic events, forensics competition, etc., 
wUl be granted an excused absence(s) by 



the respective faculty members for class 
periods missed. Students will be granted 
the privilege of taking, at an alternative 
time to be determined by the professor, 
scheduled examinations or quizzes that 
will be missed. The professor will desig- 
nate such times prior to the event. 
Professors can provide a fair alternative 
to taking the examination or quiz that 
will be missed. Students must submit 
original documentation on University 
letterhead signed by the activity director, 
coach, or adviser detailing the specifics 
of the event in advance. Specific 
requirements include: 

1. Responsibility for meeting academic 
requirements rests with the student. 

2. Students are expected to notify their 
professors as soon as they know they 
will be missing class due to a 
University-sanctioned event. 

3. Students are expected to complete 
the work requirement for each class 
and turn in assignments due on days 
of the event prior to their due dates 
unless other arrangements are made 
with the professor. 

4. If a scheduled event is postponed or 
canceled, the student is expected to 
go to class. 

5. Students are not excused from classes 
for practice on nonevent days. 

The following are specifics for the stu- 
dent athlete: 

1. The student athlete is expected, 
where possible, to schedule classes on 
days and at hours that do not conflict 
with athletic schedules. 

2. Athletes are not excused from classes 
for practice or training-room treat- 
ment on nongame days. 

Exemption from Final 
Examinations 

Students who have attained an A or B 
prior to the finals, have completed all 
other course requirements, and have the 
instructors' permission may waive final 
examinations. This privilege is subject to 
several reservations. 

1. Any unit examinations given during 
the final examination period are not 
subject to this policy. 

2. Academic departments as well as 
individual faculty may adopt a policy 
excluding the final examination 
exemption for certain courses. 

3. Mutual agreement between the 
instructor and the student to waive 
the final examination should be deter- 
mined during the week prior to the 
beginning of the examination period. 



The course grade will be the A or B 
earned exclusive of a final examination 
grade. 

Grade Reports 

After each semester, a report of each 
smdent's semester grades is available on 
STUVIEW, the University's web site 
(www.wcupa.edu). 

Grading System 





Qualin- 


Percentage 




Grade 


Points 


Equivalents 


Interpretation 


A 


4.00 


93-100 


ExceUent 


A- 


3.67 


90-92 




B* 


3.33 


87-89 


Superior 


B 


3.00 


83-86 




B- 


2.67 


80-82 




C+ 


2.33 


77-79 


Average 


C 


2.00 


73-76 




C- 


1.67 


70-72 




D+ 


1.33 


67-69 


Below Average 


D 


1.00 


63-66 




D- 


0.67 


60-62 




F 


0. 


59 or lower 


Failure 


NG 






No Grade 


W 






Withdrawal 


Y 
AU 






Administrative 

Withdrawal 

Audit 



NG (No Grade): Given when a student 
fails to complete course requirements by 
the end of a semester for a valid reason. 
See "Grade Changes." 
W (Withdrawal): Given when a student 
withdraws from a course between the 
end of the first and the end of the ninth 
class week of the semester or the equiva- 
lent in summer sessions. 
Y (Administrative Withdrawal): Given 
under appeal when there is documentation 
that the smdent never, in fact, attended 
class. Other extenuating circumstances 
regarding administrative withdrawal may 
be reviewed by the associate provost. No 
refiinds are associated with this grade. 

The grade assigned to the student must 
reflect the percentage equivalent of the 
plus, minus, and straight grades earned 
in a course. 

Cumulative Grade Point Average 

The cumulative Grade Point Average 
(GPA), sometimes called the cumulative 
index, is determined by dividing the total 
quality points earned for courses by the 
total credit hours attempted. The follow- 
ing example is based on a single semester: 

Quality' QuaUtv' 

Points Points 

Credit Hours for Earned for 

Attempted Grade Grade Course 

1st subject 4 A 4 4x4- 16 

2nd subject 3 B 3 3x3-9 

3rd subject 3 C 2 2x3-6 

4th subject 3 D 1 1x3-3 

5th subject J_ F 0x2-J) 

15 34 

34 divided by 15 equals a GPA of 2.27. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



AH grades received during a student's 
enrollment (except the grades of P and 
NG, and except when a second attempt 
produces a higher course grade and a 
Grade Replacement takes place) are 
included in the cumulative GPA. Grades 
from other colleges are excluded. 

If a student repeats a course, in an effort 
to improve an F, D, C, or B grade, he 
or she must file a Grade Replacement 
Form in the Office of the Registrar. 

Once graduated, a student's grades and 
GPA cannot change. 

Grade Changes 

A grade awarded other than NG is final. 
Final grades can be changed only when 
there is a clerical or computational error. 
A newly disclosed diagnosis of a learning 
disability may not be used as reason for 
requesting a grade change or removal. If 
the student thinks there is an error, the 
student must report the alleged error in 
writing to the professor as soon as possi- 
ble, but no later than the end of the fifth 
week ot the following semester. If a 
grade change is warranted, the professor 
must submit a change of grade request to 
the Office of the Registrar not later than 
the end of the ninth week of the semes- 
ter. Final grades cannot be changed after 
the ninth week of the semester following 
the alleged error. 

NG (No Grade) is given when a student 
fails to complete course requirements by 
the end of a semester for a valid reason. 
If the student did not complete course 
requirements because of a valid reason, 
such as a serious illness or death in the 
family, the professor may assign a grade 
of NG and grant the student permission 
to complete the requirement within the 
first nine weeks of the next semester. 

A GRADE OF NG IS CHANGED 
TO AN F AUTOMATICALLY IF 
THE REQUIREMENTS HAVE 
NOT BEEN COMPLETED BY 
THE END OF THE NINTH WEEK 
OF THE FOLLOWING SEMES- 
TER. (The instructor must file a change 
of an NG grade in the Office of the 
Registrar by the middle of the tenth 
week of the semester.) 

A graduating senior has only 30 calen- 
dar days after the end of the term in 
which he or she intends to graduate to 
complete all degree requirements, 
including the removal of NG. 



Grade Appeals 

Scope of the PoUcy 

The Grade Appeals Policy applies only 
to questions of student evaluation. Since 
appeals involve questions of judgment, 
the Grade Appeals Board will not rec- 
ommend that a grade be revised in the 
student's favor unless there is clear evi- 
dence that the original grade was based 
on prejudiced or capricious judgment, or 
was inconsistent with official University 
policy. Please refer to the Academic 
Dishonesty Policy for cases where the 
grade appeal involves a grade given for 
academic dishonesty. Academic dishon- 
esty includes but is not limited to: 

1. Plagiarism, that is, copying another's 
work or portions thereof and/or using 
ideas and concepts of another and 
presenting them as one's own with- 
out giving proper credit to the source; 

2. Submitting work that has been pre- 
pared by another person; 

3. Using books or other materials with- 
out authorization while taking exami- 
nations; 

4. Taking an examination for another 
person, or allowing another person to 
take an examination in one's place; 

5. Copying from another's paper during 
an examination or allowing another 
person to copy from one's own; and/or, 

6. Unauthorized access to an examina- 
tion prior to administration. 

Procedure 

1. (a) A student must initiate an appeal 

in writing within 20 class days 
from the date of the decision or 
action in question. In case of an 
appeal ot a final grade, the appeal 
must be filed no later than the first 
20 class days of the term following 
the one in which the grade was 
received. This written appeal 
should be sent to the instructor 
who awarded the grade in ques- 
tion. The appeal shall be reviewed 
by the student and the faculty 
member. They shall mutually 
attempt to resolve the appeal with- 
in five class days from the receipt, 
(b) If the appeal is based on an inter- 
pretation ot departmental or 
University policy, the student's 
academic adviser also may be pre- 
sent during the review process. In 
such case, there shall also be a 
limit ot five class days in which to 
resolve the appeal. 

2. An appeal not resolved at Step 1 shall 
be referred in writing by the student 



within five class days after the comple- 
tion of Step 1 to the chairperson of 
the department of which the course in 
question is a part. If there is a depart- 
mental appeals committee, the prob- 
lem shall be referred directly to it. The 
department chairperson or the depart- 
mental appeals committee shall nor- 
mally submit a written response to the 
student within 10 class days foUowdng 
receipt of the written statement of the 
problem. A copy of this response also 
shall be provided to the instructor. 

3. If no mutually satisfactory decision has 
been reached at Step 2, the student 
may submit a written appeal to the 
dean of the college or school in which 
the problem originated. Such an appeal 
shall be made within five class days fol- 
lowing the receipt of the written 
response of the department chairperson 
or the departmental appeals committee. 
The dean shall investigate the problem 
as presented in the written documenta- 
tion, review the recommendation and 
provide, in writing, a proposal for the 
solution of the problem within 10 class 
days following its referral. 

4. If the problem is not mutually resolved 
by Step 3, the student may file an 
appeal with the Grade Appeals Board 
within five class days of the receipt of 
the written proposal from the dean. 
The request for an appeal must be 
submitted to the associate provost or, 
if appropriate, to the dean of graduate 
studies who will convene the Grade 
Appeals Board as soon as possible, but 
no later than 15 class days after the 
receipt of the written request. 

Grade Appeals Board 

1. Membership 

A. The associate provost (or, if appro- 
priate, the dean of graduate stud- 
ies) serves as nonvoting chairper- 
son. If the associate provost is not 
available to serve, the administra- 
tion will appoint a substitute mutu- 
ally acceptable to the student and 
the Association of Pennsylvania 
State CoDege and University 
Faculties (APSCUF). 

B. A faculty dean not involved in the 
appeals process. A substitute may 
be appointed as given in "A" above. 

C. Two faculty members. At the 
beginning ot each academic year, 
the Office of the Associate 
Provost shall randomly select two 
full-time faculty from each acade- 
mic department in order to consti- 
tute the pool. Two faculty mem- 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



bers from different departments 
will be selected randomly from 
this pool for each Appeals Board. 
D. Two undergraduate students or, if 
appropriate, two graduate students 
appointed by the president of the 
Student Government Association 
(SGA). 

2. Attendance 

A. The facult}' member involved may 
be assisted by an advdser, an 
APSCUF representative, or the 
chairperson of the department in 
which the problem originated. 

B. The student involved may be 
assisted by an ad\iser. The adviser 
may be another student, an admin- 
istrator, or a faculU' member. 

C. Such witnesses as are called on 
behalf of either the faculty mem- 
ber or the student. 

D. Resource persons or expert wit- 
nesses called at the request of the 
board. In the event that the deci- 
sion making involves knowledge 
of the disciphne, the board shall 
be required to utilize at least one 
resource person from the disci- 
pline, an expert adviser(s) to aid 
them in their decision making. 

3. Procedure 

A. Preparation for the Hearing — All 
parties must be informed of the 
complaint in writing by the chair- 
person of the Grade Appeals Board 
(hereafter referred to as "chairper- 
son"), normally within five class 
days after the receipt of the com- 
plaint. Copies ot documents and 
correspondence filed with respect 
to the complaint shall be pro\'ided 
to the interested parties through 
the chairperson. Thereafter, neither 
new evidence nor new charges shall 
be introduced before the board. 
The chairperson shall notify in 
writing the interested parties of the 
exact time and place of the hearing 
and shall provide existing 
University and/or Commonwealth 
policies relevant to the appeal at 
least five class days before the 
beginning of the proceedings. 
Throughout these proceedings, the 
burden of proof rests upon the per- 
son bringing the appeal. 

B. Hearing Procedure — During the 
hearing, both the facult)' member 
and the student shall be accorded 
ample time for statements, testi- 
mony of witnesses, and presenta- 
tion ot documents. 



C. Decision of the Appeals Board 

1. The Grade Appeals Board shall 
deliberate in executive session 
and render a decision by major- 
ity vote within three davs of the 
close of the hearing. The chair- 
person may participate in these 
deliberations but not vote. 

2. The chairperson shall notify, in 
writing, the student, the faculty 
member, and the department in 
which the course in question is 
located of the decision within 
three class davs of the board's 
final action. The notification 
shall include the basis upon 
which the decision was reached. 

Notes 

1. Both facult)' member and student are 
entitied to the right of challenge for 
cause of any member of the depart- 
ment committee (if used) and the 
Grade Appeals Board except the chair- 
person. In the case of challenge at the 
Appeals Board level, the chairperson 
shall adjudicate the challenge. One 
challenge at each level is permitted. 

2. A "class day" is defined as any dav 
when classes are officially in session 
at West Chester University. 

3. It the course in which the grade dis- 
pute occurred is offered under the 
auspices ot a unit of the Universirv 
other than an academic department, 
the program director/coordinator, 
head of that unit, and/or the depart- 
ment chairperson will function in 
Step 2 of the procedure. In Step 3, 
the appeal should then be made to 
the associate provost rather than the 
dean of the college/school. 

4. If the professor is not on contract or in 
residence on the campus, he or she 
shall have the right to defer the proce- 
dure until his or her return. Sirrdlarlv, if 
the procedure would nonnallv occur 
during the summer and the student is 
not enrolled in an}' summer session, the 
procedure may be deferred until the fall 
semester at the student's request. 

Student Academic 
Dishonesty Policy 
I. Academic Dishonesty Process 

A. Academic dishonesty is prohibited 
and violations may result in disci- 
pline up to and including expulsion 
from the Universit}'. Academic dis- 
honesty as it applies to students 
includes but is not limited to acad- 
emic cheating; plagiarism; the sale, 
purchase, or exchange of term 



papers or research papers; falsifica- 
tion of information which includes 
any form of providing false or mis- 
leading information, written, elec- 
tronic, or oral; or of altering or fal- 
sifying official institutional records. 
Plagiarism is defined as cop\ing 
another's work or portions thereof 
and/or using ideas and concepts of 
another and presenting them as 
one's own without gi%ing proper 
credit to the source. 

NOTE: The student code of conduct 
covers theft or attempted theft of 
property or services; destruction; van- 
dalism; misuse or abuse of the real or 
personal property of the University', 
any organization, or any individual. 

B. Charges of academic dishonesty 
against a student mav be brought by 
any member of the University' com- 
munit}'. Students making claims of 
dishonesty must do so under the 
guidance of the appropriate 
involved facultv member or office 
director. A written charge must be 
initiated within 20 calendar days 
from the date of the alleged action. 
However, if the alleged action 
occurs during the last 20 calendar 
days of the semester, the charger 
has 20 calendar days into the subse- 
quent semester to make the charge. 
The last day of a semester is the last 
day of final examinations. NOTE: 
If the charger is not on contract or 
in residence on the campus, he or 
she shall have the right to defer the 
procedure until his or her return. 
Similarly, it the procedure would 
normally occur during the summer 
and the charger is not enrolled in 
any summer session, the procedure 
may be deferred until the fall 
semester at the charger's request. 

C. Charges of academic dishonesty 
mav be dealt with informallv, by 
mutual agreement of the person 
bringing the charges and the stu- 
dent. A written agreement of the 
settlement shall be signed bv both 
sides. An instructor mav, on his/her 
own authorit)', apph' a penalt\' to 
the student's grade, including fail- 
ure in the course. If additional 
sanctions are requested h\ the 
instructor, the appeals process must 
be employed and an academic 
integrity hearing must be convened. 
A student may appeal the instruc- 
tor's unilateral imposition of a 
penalized or failing grade. A stu- 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



dent who files an appeal will suffer 
no worse penalty as a result of the 
appeal than she/he would have suf- 
fered if she/he had not appealed the 
instructor's unilateral sanction. 

D. If the intormal process has not 
been employed or either party is 
not satisfied with the resolution 

• under (C) above, then that party 
shall, vidth 10 calendar days, submit 
written notification to the depart- 
ment chair or unit director. The 
department shall then, within 20 
calendar days, handle the matter 
according to its own written proce- 
dures and provide viTitten notifica- 
tion of its decision to all parties. 

E. If either party is not satisfied with 
the resolution reached in (D) above, 
the party may, within 20 calendar 
days of the department's decision, 
appeal the matter in writing to the 
dean or, in the absence of the dean, 
another appropriate administrator. 
The dean or administrator shall 
then, within 20 calendar days, han- 
dle the matter according to her/his 
written procedures and provide 
written notification to all parties. 

F. If either party is not satisfied with 
the decision of the dean or admin- 
istrator, that party may, within 10 
calendar days, appeal the matter in 
writing to the Academic Integrity 
Board. 

G. Membership of the Academic 
Integrity Board 

1. The provost (or provost's 
designee) shall appoint faculty 
and administration members of 
the Academic Integrity Board. 
The associate provost (or, if 
appropriate, the dean of gradu- 
ate studies) serves as nonvoting 
chairperson. If the associate 
provost or dean of graduate 
studies is not available to serve, 
the administration will appoint 
a substitute. 

2. A faculty dean not involved in 
the charging process. A substi- 
tute may be appointed as given 
in 1 above. 

3. Two faculty members. At the 
beginning of each academic 
year, the Office of the Associate 
Provost shall randomly select 
two, hiU-time faculty from each 
academic department in order to 
constitute the pool. Two faculty 
members from different depart- 
ments vioU be randomly selected 



firom this pool to serve on each 
Academic Integrity Board. 
4. Two undergraduate students or, 
if appropriate, two graduate stu- 
dents, appointed by the presi- 
dent of the Student Government 
Association (SGA) or president 
of the Graduate Student 
Association (GSA), respectively. 
H. A written recommendation based 
on a preponderance of evidence 
arrived at by majority vote, in which 
the facts and reasons for the recom- 
mendation are set forth, shall be 
issued within 15 calendar days after 
the close of the board proceedings 
and shall be sent to the provost and 
vice president for academic affairs 
with copies to all parties. If the vote 
of the board is not unanimous, a 
minority report also will be for- 
warded to all parties within 15 cal- 
endar days of the close of the board 
proceedings. Within 15 calendar 
days, the provost shall implement 
the recommendation of the board 
or shall provide a vmtten response 
containing his/her decision and 
explaining to all parties his/her rea- 
sons for declining to implement the 
board's recommendation. 
I. Either party may express its reaction 
in writing regarding the recommen- 
dation of the board to the provost or 
his/her designee within seven calen- 
dar days. Any stay of sanction shall 
be granted only upon application to 
and at the sole discretion of the 
provost or his/her designee. The 
decision of the provost shall be final. 
II. Sanctions 

A. At the conclusion of the appeals 
process, a student may be exonerat- 
ed or subject to any combination of 
the following range of penalties: 
failure in the course, disciplinary 
probation, suspension, expulsion, 
financial restitution, or holds placed 
on the student's records. If a student 
has a record of past violations of the 
Student Academic Dishonesty 
Policy as adjudicated by the 
Academic Integrity Board, then the 
board will review that record and 
consider it when applying sanctions. 
The board shall have no knowledge 
of that record when making its ini- 
tial adjudication of the case. 

Policy on Disruptive Classroom 
Behavior 

1. Definition of disruptive classroom 
behavior 



A. Disruptive behavior is defined as 
an act that is disorderly, that 
might include but is not limited to 
that which disrespects, disrupts, 
harasses, coerces, or abuses, and/or 
might threaten or harm property 
or person, so that it interferes with 
an orderly classroom, teaching 
process, or learning function. 

B. Such behavior originates in a 
classroom, faculty member's office, 
or other site so long as it is related 
to the academic classroom or 
classroom fiinction. 

2. Limitation of Policy 

This policy addresses only student 
classroom behavior as defined here. 
Nonacademic student behavior is 
addressed in the Student Code of 
Conduct and the Judicial Board process 
as outlined in the Ram's Eye View. 

3. Classroom Management 

This policy acknowledges the need 
for protection of academic freedom in 
the classroom, for faculty authority in 
classroom management, and for facul- 
ty and student safety in the classroom. 

4. Due Process 

This pohcy respects faculty and stu- 
dent rights to due process in any 
event emanating from disruptive stu- 
dent behavior in the classroom. 

Process 

1. The first instance of disruptive 
behavior shall result in an immediate 
verbal warning by the faculty mem- 
ber. The faculty member shall advise 
the student of the existence of the 
Disruptive Classroom Behavior 
Policy and where it is published. 
Exception: A first instance in which 
disruptive behavior appears to com- 
promise the safety of or is threaten- 
ing to a faculty member or student(s) 
shall result in immediate removal of 
the student from the classroom by 
the faculty member. In the event of 
imminent danger to person or prop- 
erty. Public Safety wiH be called and 
immediate removal shall result. 
Extreme or severe behavior can result 
in removal from the course and not 
merely from the immediate class. 

2. A second instance of disruptive 
behavior shall result in the removal of 
the student from class for the 
remainder of the class period. The 
faculty member should log the behav- 
ior and the steps taken in writing. 

3. A third instance of disruptive behav- 
ior shall result in permanent removal 
of the student from the class. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Temporary Removal 

1. A student who has been asked to 
leave the classroom must meet with 
the faculty member prior to returning 
to the next class. 

2. A student may, as the result of 
removal from the classroom and hav- 
ing met or tried to meet with the fac- 
ulty member without success, request 
a third party agreeable to both the fac- 
ulty member and him/herself to assist 
in resolving his/her difference with the 
faculty member. He/she can do so by 
applying to the chairperson of the 
department in which the course in 
which the event occurred is housed. 

Permanent Removal 

1. In the event of permanent removal 
from the class, the faculty member 
shall notify the chairperson of the 
department in which the course is 
housed, who shall then notify the 
dean of his/her school/coUege, the 
dean of students, and the chairperson 
of the student's major department. 

2. A student who has been permanendy 
removed from the classroom shall be 
assigned a grade consistent with course 
requirements depending upon the 
point in the course at which the 
removal took place. A written state- 
ment of the reason for permanent 
removal shall be provided to the stu- 
dent by a review panel, in the event of 
an appeal by the student, or by the fac- 
ulty member, in the event there has 
been no appeal. The review panel shall 
be the only venue for a hearing on per- 
manent removal from the classroom. 

Appeal Process 

1. The student may, within five 
Universit)' calendar days of removal, 
appeal permanent removal. That 
appeal shall be made to the review 
panel which shall be constimted and 
charged by the dean of the school/col- 
lege, or his/her designee, in which the 
event occurred. The panel shall include 
an academic manager, a faculty mem- 
ber, and a student. It shall within five 
University calendar days conduct fact 
finding and make a written recom- 
mendation to the dean who shall pro- 
vide copies to the faculty member and 
the student. Extension based on com- 
pelling circumstances may be granted 
by the dean or his/her designee. 

2. A student who appeals removal shall 
be given an opportunity to keep up 
with classroom assignments during 



the time it takes the review panel to 
reach its decision. 
3. In the event that the student's behav- 
ior was perceived as sufficiently 
threatening or severe, either party may 
invoke the right to a separate inter- 
view or may submit written testimony 
to allow for fact finding by the panel. 

Dean's List 

The names of degree-seeking students 
who complete 12 or more graded hours in 
an academic semester and achieve a 
semester GPA of 3.67 or better are placed 
on the dean's list. Nondegree students 
who complete a minimum of nine credits, 
have a GPA of 3.67, and no grade below 
a "B" in the semester also will be recog- 
nized on that semester's dean's list. 

Maintenance of Academic 
Standards: Probation and Dismissal 

A student's scholastic standing at the 
University is indicated by his or her 
cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA). 
Three categories of academic standing 
have been established: good academic 
standing, probation, and dismissal. A stu- 
dent remains in good academic standing 
as long as he or she maintains a mini- 
mum cumulative GPA of 2.00 for all 
work taken at the University. Probation 
and dismissal are actions taken by the 
University when a student's GPA falls 
below an acceptable level at the end of 
the fall or spring term. No student wiU go 
on or come off academic probation, or be 
dismissed from the University for acade- 
mic reasons, at the end of summer term. 
Conditions of Probation. Probation is 
defined as a trial period during which a 
student whose cumulative average has 
fallen below acceptable standards must 
bring his or her average up to those 
standards or be dismissed from the 
University. The following Riles govern 
the category of probation: 
A. A student shall be placed on proba- 
tion if he or she has attempted 

• more than nine and up to 18 
semester hours of work with a 
cumulative GPA of less than 2.00 

• more than 18 but fewer than 48 
semester hours of work with a 
cumulative GPA from 1.00 to less 
than 2.00 

• at least 48 but fewer than 64 semes- 
ter hours of work with a cumulative 
GPA from 1.40 to less than 2.00 

• at least 64 or more semester hours 
of work with a cumulative GPA 
from 1.70 to less than 2.00 



B. Probation shall commence immediate- 
ly at the end of the semester in which 
the cumulative GPA falls into the 
range described. A notice of probation 
shall be printed on the student's tran- 
script, and the student shall be notified 
by the Universit)' that he or she is in 
danger of dismissal. A student who 
receives notice of being placed on pro- 
bation shall immediately seek advising, 
tutoring, and instruction in effective 
study habits and efficient use of time 
— in short, take every possible mea- 
sure to improve the quality of his or 
her academic performance. 

C. A student will be allowed to continue 
on probation for no more than 30 
attempted semester hours of work after 
being placed on probation. If the GPA 
has not reached an acceptable level by 
that time, the smdent will be dismissed 
from the University. A student is 
removed from probation when the 
cumulative GPA rises to 2.00 or above. 

D. Those students who entered the 
University for the first time beginning 
with the 1989 fall semester and who 
have been placed on probation a sec- 
ond time will be allowed to continue 
on probation for no more than 15 
attempted semester hours of work after 
being placed on that second probation. 
If the GPA has not reached an accept- 
able level by that time, the student will 
be dismissed from the University. 
Thus, a student may be on probation 
no more than twice, and placement on 
probation for a third time will result in 
immediate dismissal. 

NOTE: This does not prevent individ- 
ual departments from requiring an aver- 
age higher than 2.00 as a condition of 
acceptance or retention. 

Dismissal from the University 

A. A student shall be dismissed from the 
University if he or she has attempted 

• more than 18 but fewer than 48 
semester hours of work with a 
cumulative GPA of less than 1.00 

• at least 48 but fewer than 64 
semester hours of work with a 
cumulative GPA of less than 1.40, 
whether he or she has previously 
been placed on probation or not 

• at least 64 or more semester hours 
of work with a cumulative GPA of 
less than 1.70, whether he or she 
has previously been placed on pro- 
bation or not 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



NOTE: A student also shall be dis- 
missed if he or she fails to meet the 
standards set under paragraph C above. 

B. A student may appeal the dismissal 
by calling or writing the Office of the 
Associate Provost. 

C. Nothing in this policy shall be taken 
to preclude the dismissal of students 
for violations of other University 
pohcies, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of those policies. 

Readmission of Dismissed Students 

A. A student dismissed from the 
University may not take course work 
at the University until he or she 
applies and is considered for readmis- 
sion by the University. No student 
wiU be considered tor readmission 
earher than one full calendar year 
after the time of dismissal. 

B. Students readmitted to the University 
must maintain a RiU 2.00 GPA for 
each semester of work following read- 
mission and, after the completion of 
no more than 48 semester hours (or 
prior to graduation, whichever comes 
first), must obtain an overall cumula- 
tive GPA of 2.00 for all work taken at 
the University. A student who fails to 
meet this standard shall be dismissed 
from the University a second time and 
is not eligible for future readmission. 

If a student is approved to be readmitted 
to the University under the Academic 
Renewal Policy and the student was, prior 
to separation from the University, a candi- 
date in a program leading to initial teacher 
certification (B.S.Ed., B.M. in music edu- 
cation, or B.S. health and physical educa- 
tion-teacher certification), he or she may 
not be readmitted to the original major. 
The academic renewal smdent must re- 
enter in a nonteacher certification degree 
program or as an undeclared student. 
If a student readmitted under academic 
renewal subsequently qualifies for formal 
admission to teacher education based 
upon the provisions ot the academic 
renewal pohcy, that student may seek a 
change of major to a teacher certification 
program under the prevailing internal 
transfer policy of the specific program. 

Academic Renewal Policy 

The Office of the Associate Provost, at 
its discretion, offers academic renewal to 
students at the time they apply for read- 
mission. 

A. The Academic Renewal Policy permits 
West Chester University undergradu- 
ates whose GPA and total credits 
earned make it impossible for them to 



graduate from West Chester 
University under any other form of 
readmission, even if they were granted 
five more repeats. Students can be 
admitted only once under the 
Academic Renewal Policy, and it is not 
retroactive if a student has already been 
readmitted. Students who were previ- 
ously enrolled in an education degree 
program, see paragraph B below. 

1. A student must have had a mini- 
mum of a five-year absence from 
West Chester University. 

2. All grades for courses previously 
taken wUl remain on the WCU 
academic database; academic 
renewal vidU be noted on a new 
transcript. General education cours- 
es previously taken and passed with 
a grade of C or better will be main- 
tained on the student's record as 
T's. Departments may require their 
majors and minors to repeat any or 
all major, minor, cognate, and sup- 
porting courses, even if the student 
had earned a grade of C (2.00) or 
better in them, and even if the 
department accepts less than a C in 
the course tor its majors/minors. 

3. Beginning wdth readmission, stu- 
dents wiU be treated as first-time, 
first-year admits; i.e., granted all 
privileges of that group (permitted 
to use the repeat policy, eligible for 
graduation with honors, etc.). 
Because these students are consid- 
ered to be first-time admits, they 
have the option to enter a different 
major than the one in which they 
were originally enroOed. The select- 
ed department will be notified that 
this is an academic renewal student, 
and that department has the right 
to refiise admission to its programs. 

4. Academic renewal students will be 
treated as readmits in terms of cata- 
log academic rulings. General edu- 
cation, major, minor, and cognate 
areas are based on the catalog in the 
year they were granted academic 
renewal. Students ptu'suing an edu- 
cation degree need to refer to the 
paragraph above concerning this. 

B. If a student is approved for readmis- 
sion to the University under the aca- 
demic renewal policy and the student 
was, prior to separation from the 
University, a candidate in a program 
leading to initial teacher certification 
(B.S.Ed., B.M. in music education, 
or B.S. in health and physical educa- 
tion - teacher certification), he or she 



may not be readmitted to the original 
major. The academic renewal student 
must re-enter either in a program 
that does not lead to teacher certifi- 
cation, or as an undeclared student. 

1 . If a student readmitted under acad- 
emic renewal wishes to apply for 
formal admission to teacher educa- 
tion status, that student may seek a 
change of major to a teacher certifi- 
cation program under the prevailing 
internal transfer policy of the specif- 
ic program. The student must meet 
all requirements for formal admis- 
sion to the desired program, includ- 
ing the minimum cumulative GPA. 

2. When the student applies to re- 
enter a program leading to teacher 
certification, the qualifying cumu- 
lative GPA will be based on the 

a. grades earned in those courses 
which were retained in the 
renewal process (even though 
these courses no longer con- 
tribute to the WCU cumulative 
GPA) 

b. grades of any transfer courses 
and 

c. grades earned at WCU after 
returning under renewal (a 
minimum of 15 credits) 

Taking Courses Off Campus 

West Chester University smdents may 
take courses off campus and transfer the 
credits. Credit for these courses will trans- 
fer in to West Chester University only if 
the student's cumulative GPA from the 
institution where the courses are taken is 
2.00 or higher on a 4.00 grading scale. 
Grades received in courses taken at other 
institutions are not calculated in the West 
Chester cumulative GPA; only the credits 
may be transferred. All minimum grade 
requirements of the student's major/minor 
program for individual courses also must 
be met for credit to transfer. This policy 
became effective September 1999. The 
equivalency of the desired course must be 
established before the student takes the 
course off campus. Prerequisites also must 
be met before the courses wiQ be trans- 
ferred into the University. 
Departments determine which courses 
at other schools are equivalent to specif- 
ic courses in their department so that 
they can evaluate incoming transfer 
credits. They must inform the Office of 
the Registrar of those equivalencies, and 
the Registrar must keep a record of 
those equivalencies. If equivalency has 
been established for incoming transfer 



H Academic Policies and Procedures 



students, it also exists for matriculated 
West Chester students who wish to take 
the course off campus. 
The student should contact the Office of 
the Registrar to determine which course is 
equivalent. If an agreement exists, the 
Office of the Registrar wiU specif}' the 
course to be taken and sign the form to 
indicate equivalency. If there is no record 
of equivalency' for this course at the stu- 
dent's chosen school, the office cannot 
sign the form. In those cases, the student 
must contact the chair ot the West 
Chester University' department that offers 
the course and have equivalenc}' deter- 
mined. The signature of the registrar or 
the course's department chair indicates 
equivalency onlv, it does not grant or deny 
approval to take the course off campus. 
Procedure: To ensure that equivalencies 
are current, the Office of the Registrar 
will establish a schedule for obtaining 
current syllabi and supporting docu- 
ments from institutions that are most 
frequendv involved in transfer credit 
evaluations. The Office of the Registrar 
wdU make this information available to 
department chairs to assist them in 
updating equivalenc}' evalutions. 
NOTE: Undergraduate students who 
take and complete a course at West 
Chester Universitv mav not repeat the 
course at another institution and have 
the credits or grade count towards a 
West Chester degree. 

Transfer of Credit 

Credit mav be granted for equivalent 
courses completed in accredited institu- 
tions of higher education. Credit for work 
completed at an unaccredited institution 
may be granted on the recommendation 
of the student's major department in con- 
sultation with the school or college dean 
and transfer credit analyst. (See also 
"Admission to West Chester" and the sec- 
tion on "Taking Courses Off Campus.") 
Effective for students who entered the 
Universitv' after September 1973, D 
grades are accepted for transfer if the 
credit is for equivalent courses within the 
framework of general requirements or free 
electives, provided the transferred course 
does not satisfy a major field requirement 
as well. The student also must have a 2.00 
overall GPA from the institution from 
which they are transferring. 
Effective for students who enter the 
Universit}' as of fall 1996, grades in a 
course submitted tor transfer as a major 
program requirement must be the same 
or higher than the minimum grade 



required by the department. For exam- 
ple, if a program requires that a student 
earn a B or better in a major program 
requirement, then the student requesting 
transferring credit from another institu- 
tion must have earned a minimum of B 
in the parallel course. If a student earns a 
lower grade than the requirement, the 
department may require the course to be 
repeated at West Chester University. 
If a student changes his or her major, 
grades originallv approved for transfer 
wUl be re-evaluated by the new major 
department. 

Effective fall 1998, no course equivalen- 
cy transfer credit will be given for WCU 
courses numbered at the 300 or 400 
level, unless the courses are taken at an 
institution that grants a baccalaureate 
degree. Departments have the right to 
accept courses for their majors as XXX 
199 or TRN 199 credits. An exception 
will be made for departments that have 
already established, bv fall 1998, equiva- 
lenc}' with nonbaccalaureate institutions 
for transferring courses at the 300 level. 
Those established equivalency agree- 
ments wUl remain in effect. 

IN ORDER TO RECEIVE FULL 
CREDIT FOR COURSES 
TAKEN ELSEWHERE AND 
FOR PROFICIENCIES 
DEMONSTRATED ON 
ADVANCED PLACEMENT OR 
COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINA- 
TION PROGRAM (CLEP) 
EXAMINATIONS, THE 
TRANSFER STUDENT 
SHOULD HAVE THIS WORK 
EVALUATED PRIOR TO 
.ENROLLING IN ANYPOTEN- 
TL\LLY EQUIVALENT 
COURSE AT WEST CHESTER. 

Transfer students should refer to the 
Academic Passport Policy under "Ad- 
missions." Specifics of the Academic 
Passport Polic}' implications for West 
Chester University students can be 
obtained from the Office of the Registrar. 

Policy on Correspondence Courses 

The Universitv' does not allow credit tor 
courses taken through correspondence. 

Advanced Placement Program 

Courses taken under the Advanced 
Placement Program offered bv the College 
Entrance Examination Board ma\' be 
applied toward advanced placement in the 
University and/or toward credit require- 
ments for graduation. Courses taken 
under the Advanced Placement Program 



offered by the College Entrance 
Examination Board may be applied 
toward advanced placement in the 
Universitv and/or toward credit require- 
ments for graduation. For information 
about the Advanced Placement Program, 
contact the College Board directiy. For 
questions about West Chester University's 
policy, see the Tacts" section of the 
Registrar's web page. 

Experiential Learning Credits 
(Life Learning Experience) 

West Chester Universitv offers three 
programs that assess learning acquired 
outside of the traditional classroom. The 
University evaluates and awards credits 
on a course basis; therefore, students 
must demonstrate competence in a par- 
ticular course, not a general body of 
knowledge. Students mav earn a maxi- 
mum of 32 credits through any combi- 
nation of these three programs. 
CLEP — the College Level 
Examination Program is a series of 
standardized tests offered by the 
College Board in appro.ximately 30 
different subject areas. West Chester 
Universit}' accepts the examinations, 
for degree credit only, in which the 
score is in the 50th percentile or 
above. The examinations are given at 
the Universitv ever}' month but 
December. West Chester University 
does NOT accept the general exami- 
nations of CLEP. Information, 
including fees, test dates, available 
exams, etc., is available through the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Portfolio Development and 
Assessment — Students may choose to 
develop a portfolio as a means of 
demonstrating competence in a 
course. A portfolio consists of a brief 
autobiographical sketch, and extensive 
description of the student's learning 
ex-periences and supporting documen- 
tation such as a job description, cer- 
tificates from training courses, letters 
of recommendation, etc. The portfolio 
is evaluated bv an appropriate facult}' 
member who will also usuall}' require 
an interview. The charge for portfolio 
assessment is one-half the tuition for 
the course. Information describing 
portfolio assessment is available 
through the Center for Adult Studies. 

Credit by Ejcamination — The third 
option is Credit by Examination which 
is described earlier in this catalog. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Requirements for Graduation 

A student is recommended for gradua- 
tion upon the satisfactor)' completion of 
a minimum of 120 semester hours at 
the 100 level or above and upon fulfill- 
ment of all categories of the require- 
ments for his or her degree. A minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.00 (C) is required 
for graduation. Specific programs, in 
accordance with University* procedures, 
may set other higher standards and may 
require more than 120 credits tor com- 
pletion of the degree. Degree require- 
ments are detailed under the heading of 
the subject field. See also "Requirements 
for the Baccalaureate Degree." A student 
must file for graduation no later than the 
end of the junior year. It is imperative 
that the student meet with his or her 
academic ad\'iser. Students can obtain a 
copy of the graduation checklist trom the 
Office of the Registrar. Effective May 
2004 graduation, any student currently 
matriculated in the University may grad- 
uate after completion of 120 credits, 
PROVIDED: 

a. He/she has completed all general 
education requirements, which 
include nine credits ot free/student 
electives, that are specified in the cat- 
alog for the vear that the student was 
most recently accepted into WCU. 

b. AND he/she has completed all 
courses required by the major, to 
include all supporting (cognate) 
courses. 

c. AND he/she is only eliminating free 
electives within the major, but not 
the nine credits of general education 
free/student electives (needed in "a" 
above). 

Any senior who does not complete all 
degree requirements within 30 calendar 
days of the end of the term in which he 
or she intends to graduate must pay the 
diploma fee again before an updated 
diploma will be issued. Such a student, 
however, does have the right to request a 
letter from the Universit)' confirming his 
or her graduation after all requirements 
have been satisfactorily completed. 
The permanent record (transcript) 
records all degrees, majors, and minors 
completed, but a diploma only shows 
one degree. Students who simultaneously 
complete two undergraduate degrees and 
who wish to receive two diplomas, each 
printed with one of their degrees, may 
do so by paying a second diploma fee. 



Resident Credit Requirement 

To qualify for graduation, a student 
must take at least 30 semester hours of 
credit bevond the general education 
courses at West Chester. Normally, the 
student will take the last 30 semester 
hours at West Chester. In addition, a 
student must take at least 50 percent of 
the courses in his or her major or minor 
discipline (excluding cognate courses) at 
West Chester University. 

Anticipated Time for Degree 
Completion 

It is the expectation that a student should 
anticipate being able to graduate in 
eight consecutive fall/spring semesters. 
This expectation would not apply if any 
of the following conditions exist: 

1 . A student needs to complete devel- 
opmental courses 

2. A student enters the major of gradu- 
ation after the first semester of 
his/her first year 

3. A student transfers to West Chester 
Universitv' and has compiled courses 
that do not fit into his/her current 
program 

4. A student fails to meet the minimal 
standards of academic performance of 
the University of his/her major pro- 
gram 

5. A student chooses to repeat one or 
more courses 

6. A student fails to follow guidelines 
set forth to meet major or University 
requirements 

7. A student who selects the culture 
cluster option requires an extra 
semester to meet that requirement 

In order to graduate following (or with- 
in) the expectation, it is the student's 
responsibility to consult with the major 
department for course scheduling guide- 
lines in the major. 

The expectation, however, is invalidated 
when the following conditions exist: 

1. A program requires more than 120 
hours for completion 

2. The sequencing of courses requires 
more than eight consecutive fall/ 
spring semesters 

3. A program requires the completion 
of requirements that can only be met 
in summer 

Nothing in this polic}- prevents the offer- 
ing of a program that does not meet 
expectations. Such programs, however, are 
so identified in the Universit)' catalog. 
Each department will determine when 
its courses will be offered. 



Required Notice of Intention to 
Graduate 

Students intending to graduate in May 
or August must come to the Office of 
the Registrar and give notice of inten- 
tion to graduate no later than March 1. 
August graduates may participate in the 
Mav commencement exercises if they 
file their notices of intention to graduate 
by February 1. Students intending to 
graduate in December must give such 
notice no later than November 1. The 
baccalaureate degree will not be granted 
unless this requirement is met. 
After submitting this notice, the student 
wUI receive a cap and gown order form 
and a bill for the graduation fee. He or she 
also will specif\' how his or her name 
should be shown on the diploma and 
commencement program. Unless the dead- 
line is met, it will be impossible for the 
University to order a diploma, place the name 
on the forthcoming commencement program, 
or have the transcript reflect the appropriate 
date of graduation. For this reason, all stu- 
dents are urged to review their records of 
progress towards graduation with their 
adviser and to file for graduation two 
semesters prior to the date of graduation. 

Graduation Honors 

Graduation honors are awarded as follows: 

Cumulative GPA 

cum laude 3.25 - 3.49 

magna cum laude 3.50 - 3.74 

summa cum laude 3.75 - 4.00 

The honors list for commencement is 
based on the GPA from the next to last 
semester before a student graduates. A 
transfer student must have 60 hours of 
grades reported at West Chester 
University prior to that time to be so 
recognized. Those who do not attain 
honors distinctions untU the end of their 
final semester, or those transfer students 
with honor distinction who do not com- 
plete 60 hours until the end of the final 
semester, will have recognition of their 
achievement on their final transcripts, 
where all honors distinctions are 
recorded. 

Transcripts 

Requests for official transcripts are made 
bv writing to the Office of the Registrar, 
Elsie O. BuU Center. The fee is S3 for 
each transcript. Immediate transcripts 
are $5 upon request. Checks, payable to 
West Chester University, must accom- 
pany either request. 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



Directory Information — Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974 

West Chester University from time to 
time makes public certain kinds of infor- 
mation about students, such as the names 
of those who receive scholarships, who 
hold offices, or who are members of ath- 
letic teams. Various kinds of campus 
directories are published throughout the 
year to help members of the University 
community locate and communicate with 
each other. The commencement pro- 
grams publish the names of those who 
have received degrees during the year. 
The Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act of 1974 defines the term 
"directory information" to include the fol- 
lowing categories of information: the stu- 
dent's name, address, telephone number, 
e-mail address, date and place of birth, 
major field of study, class schedule, class 
roster, participation in officially recognized 
activities and sports, weight and height of 
members of athletic teams, date of atten- 
dance, degrees and awards received, and 
the most recent pre\'ious educational 
agency or institution attended by the stu- 
dent. The University wdU limit informa- 
tion that is made public to categories such 
as these but wiU not necessarily publish all 
such information in every listing. 
Undergraduate students who do not wish 
to have any or all of such directory 
information published without their 
prior consent must file notice in the 
Office of the Registrar. Graduate stu- 
dents must file notice in the Office of 
Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education. The student must bring a 
signed, dated statement specifying items 
not to be pubUshed to the appropriate 
office within the first 15 calendar days 
after the beginning of the fall and spring 
semesters. 

Student Name Changes 

Any student wishing to change his/her 
name from that currently on record 
must provide legal documentation sup- 
porting the change. This must be the 
original or a notarized photocopy of a 
court-generated document, such as a mar- 
riage license, court order, divorce decree, 
etc. A driver's license is not adequate. 
Requests for name changes received 
through the mail will be acknowledged 
by letter. 

Exception to Academic PoUcies 

Students may file a petition that 
requests exception to academic pohcies. 
Petition forms are available in the Office 



of the Registrar and the Office of the 
Associate Provost. Students who may 
request an exception because of a dis- 
ability should refer to page 32, "Services 
for Students with Disabilities." 

The Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act 

The Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, is a 
federal law which states (a) that a writ- 
ten institutional pohcy must be estab- 
lished and (b) that a statement of adopt- 
ed procedures covering the privacy rights 
of students be made available. The law 
provides that the institution will main- 
tain the confidentiality of student educa- 
tion records. 

West Chester University accords all 
rights under the law to students who are 
in attendance at the University, and in 
certain instances to the parents of 
dependent students, as defined in 
Section 152 of the Internal Revenue 
Code of 1954. Basically, a dependent 
student is a student whose parent(s) 
provides more than half of his/her sup- 
port. Generally, the University does not 
provide information to parents because 
of this act. However, exceptions are 
made if: 

1. the student must give his or her par- 
ents written consent if the student is 
independent; or 

2. the parents must provide a certified 
copy of their most recent Federal 
Income Tax Form reflecting depen- 
dency status of the son/daughter 
which must be on file in the Office 
of the Registrar. 

No one outside the institution shall have 
access to, nor will the institution dis- 
close, any information from students' 
education records without the students' 
written consent except to personnel 
within the institution, to officials of 
other institutions in which students seek 
to enroU, to persons or organizations 
providing students financial aid, to 
accrediting agencies carrying out their 
accreditation function, to persons in 
comphance with a judicial order, a valid 
subpoena, and to persons in an emer- 
gency in order to protect the health or 
safety of students or other persons. All 
these exceptions are permitted under the 
act. 

Within the West Chester University 
community, only those members, indi- 
vidually or collectively, acting on the 
student's educational interest are allowed 
access to student education records. 



These members include, without Umita- 
tion, personnel in the offices of the 
Registrar, Bursar, Financial Ad, 
Admissions, and academic personnel 
within the hmitations of their need to 
know. 

At its discretion the institution may 
provide directory information in accor- 
dance with the provisions of the act to 
include student name, address, tele- 
phone number, e-mail address, date and 
place of birth, major field of study, class 
schedules, class rosters, dates of atten- 
dance, degrees and awards received, the 
most recent previous educational agency 
or institution attended by the student, 
participation in officially recognized 
activities and sports, and weight and 
height of members of athletic teams. 
Students may withhold directory infor- 
mation by notifying the Office of the 
Registrar in writing within 15 calendar 
days after the beginning of each fall 
semester. 

Requests for nondisclosure will be hon- 
ored by the institution for only one aca- 
demic year; therefore, authorization to 
withhold directory information must be 
filled annually in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

The law provides students with the right 
to inspect and review information con- 
tained in their education records, to 
challenge the contents of their education 
records, to have a hearing if the out- 
come of the challenge is unsatisfactory, 
and to submit explanatory statements for 
inclusion in their files if the decisions of 
the hearing panels are unacceptable. The 
University Registrar at West Chester 
University has been designated by the 
institution to coordinate the inspection 
and review procedures for student edu- 
cation records, which include admis- 
sions, personal, and academic. Students 
wishing to review their education 
records must make written requests to 
the Office of the Registrar listing the 
item or items of interest. Only records 
covered by the act will be made available 
within 45 days of the request. Students 
may have copies made of their records 
with certain exceptions, or a copy of the 
academic record for which a financial 
hold exists. These copies will be made at 
the students' expense at prevaiHng rates 
which are hsted in the current catalog. 
Education records do not include 
records of instructional, administrative, 
and educational personnel which are the 
sole possession of the maker and are not 
accessible or revealed to any individual 



Academic Policies and Procedures 



except a temporary substitute, records of 
the law enforcement unit, student health 
records, employment records, or alumni 
records. Health records, however, may 
be reviewed by physicians of the stu- 
dents' choosing. 

Students may not inspect and review the 
following as outlined by the act: finan- 
cial information submitted by their par- 
ents, confidential letters and recommen- 
dations associated with admissions, 
employment or job placement, or honors 
to which they have waived their rights 
of inspection and review; or education 
records containing information about 
more than one student, in which case 
the institution will permit access only to 
that part of the record which pertains to 
the inquiring student. The institution is 
not required to permit students to 
inspect and review confidential letters 
and recommendations placed in their 
files prior to January 1, 1975, provided 
those letters were collected under estab- 
lished policies of confidentiality and 
were used only for the purposes for 
which they were collected. 
Students who beheve that their educa- 
tion records contain information that is 
inaccurate or misleading, or is otherwise 
in violation ot their privacy or other 
rights, may discuss their problems infor- 
mally with the Office of the Registrar. If 
the decisions are in agreement with the 
students' requests, the appropriate 
records will be amended. If not, the stu- 
dents will be notified within a reason- 
able amount of time that the records 
will not be amended, and they wUl be 
informed by the Office of the Registrar 
of their right to a formal hearing. 
Student requests for a formal hearing 
must be made in writing to the associate 
provost who, within a reasonable period 
of time after receiving such request, will 
inform students of the date, place, and 
time of the hearing. Students may pre- 
sent evidence relevant to the issues 
raised and may be assisted or represent- 
ed at the hearings by one or more per- 
sons of their choice, including attorneys, 
at the students' expense. The hearing 
panels which wiU adjudicate such chal- 
lenges will be the individuals designated 
by the University. 

Decisions of the hearing panels will be 
final, will be based solely on the evi- 
dence presented at the hearing, and will 
consist of written statements summariz- 
ing the evidence and stating the reasons 
for the decisions, and will be delivered 
to all parties concerned. Their education 



records will be corrected or amended in 
accordance with the decisions of the 
hearing panels, if the decisions are in 
favor of the student. If the decisions are 
unsatisfactory to the student, the student 
may place with the education record 
statements commenting on the informa- 
tion in the records, or statements setting 
forth any reasons for disagreeing with 
the decisions of the hearing panels. The 
statements will be placed in the educa- 
tion records, maintained as part of the 
students' records, and released whenever 
the records in question are disclosed. 
Students who believe adjudications of 
their challenges were unfair or not in 
keeping with the provisions of the act 
may request, in writing, assistance from 
the president of the institution to aid 
them in filing complaints with The 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act Office (FERPA), Department of 
Education, Room 4074, Switzer 
Building, Washington, D.C. 20202. 
Revisions and clarifications wUl be pub- 
Hshed as experience with the law and 
the institution's policy warrants. 
This policy has been adopted in accor- 
dance with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. 
1232(g), and the regulations promulgat- 
ed thereunder at 34 C.F.R. 99.1 et seq., 
and that reference should be made to 
that statute and regulations for addition- 
al information. 

Please contact the Office of the 
Registrar with any questions. 

ADA Policy Statement 

West Chester University is committed 
to equality of opportunity and freedom 
from discrimination for all students, 
employees, applicants for admission or 
employment, and all participants in 
pubhc University-sponsored activities. 
In keeping with this commitment, and 
in accordance with the Americans with 
Disabihfies Act of 1990 and the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the 
University will make every effort to pro- 
vide equahty of opportunity and free- 
dom from discrimination for all mem- 
bers of the University community and 
visitors to the University, regardless ot 
any disability an individual may have. 
Accordingly, the University has taken 
positive steps to make University facili- 
ties accessible to individuals with dis- 
abilities and has established procedures 
to provide reasonable accommodations 
to allow individuals with disabiHties to 
participate in University programs. 



The director of the Office of Social 
Equit\' has been designated as the ADA 
coordinator for the Universit}'. In this 
capacity, the director of Social Equity 
works with the University ADA 
Committee to advance University poU- 
cies and procedures that will provide 
equal educational and employment 
opportunities for individuals with dis- 
abilities. The Office of Social Equity has 
an estabhshed process to investigate and 
address any complaints of discrimination 
on the basis of a disabihty. Any individ- 
ual who has a suggestion, question, or 
complaint regarding ADA issues is 
encouraged to contact the director of 
Social Equity, 13/15 University Avenue, 
610-436-2433. 

West Chester University has also estab- 
lished the Office of Services for 
Students with Disabilities, which oper- 
ates as a centrahzed service for address- 
ing the needs of students with disabili- 
ties and as a resource center for stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff. A student who 
wants to request an accommodation 
and/or receive specialized services 
should contact the director of the 
OSSD. The poHcies and procedures 
used by the OSSD are contained in the 
West Chester University Handbook on 
Disabilities, which is available in the 
OSSD, 105 Lawrence Center, V/TDD 
610-436-3217. 

Various housing facilities and services 
are available for resident students with 
disabilities. For this and other informa- 
tion about on-campus housing and food 
service, please contact the Office of 
Residence Life and Housing, 238 Sykes 
Student Union, 610-436-3307. 
The ADA specialist of the Office of 
Human Resource Services has been des- 
ignated as the contact person for 
employees and applicants seeking to 
request an accommodation. The ADA 
specialist is located at 201 Carter Drive, 
610-436-2129. 

West Chester University is involved in 
the ongoing process of renovating cam- 
pus buildings to ensure accessibility for 
all individuals. Many of our buUdings 
are currently accessible, but some are 
awaiting renovation. To find out 
whether a particular location is accessi- 
ble or how to access a location, please 
contact the space manager at 610-436- 
3348. To make arrangements for 
changes to a particular facility to ensure 
accessibility, please contact the manager 
of campus projects at 610-436-3599. 



Structure of Academic Affairs 



COLLEGE OF ARTS .\ND SCIENCES 

Charles D. Hurt, Dean 

Jennie Skerl, Associate Dean 

Anthropology and Sociology 

Art 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Communication Studies 

Computer Science 

English 

Foreign Languages 

Geology and Astronomy 

History 

Interdisciplinary Programs 



Liberal Studies 
Mathematics 
Pharmaceutical Product 

Development 
Philosophy 

Physics and Pre-Engineering 
Pre-Medical 
Psycholog)' 
Theatre Arts 
Women's Studies 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Christopher M. Fiorentino, Dean 

Cynthia Benzing, Associate Dean 

Accounting 

Criminal Justice 

Economics and Finance 

Geography and Planning 

Management 



Marketing 
Political Science 
Social Work 
Graduate Social Work 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Tony W. Johnson, Dean 
Joseph Malak, Associate Dean 

Early Childhood and 
Special Education 

Elementary Education 

Counseling and Educational 
Psychology 



Literacy 

Professional and 

Secondary Education 

Teacher Certification 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Timothy V. Blair, Dean 

Instrumental Music 

Keyboard Music 

Music Education 

Music Histon' and Literature 



Music Theory and 

Composition 
Vocal and Choral Music 



OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATE PROVOST 

SheUa Patterson, Associate Provost 
Admissions 
Assessment 
Financial Aid 
General Education 
Graduate Studies and Extended Education 

• Adult Studies 

• Center for International Programs 
Honors Program 

Registrar 

Quincy Moore, Dean, Undergraduate Studies and Student Support 
Services 

Academic Development Program 
Office of Services for Students with Disabilities 
Learning Assistance and Resource Center 
Pre-Major Academic Advising Program 
Educational Development 

LIBRARY 

Richard H. Swain, Director 

Mary Anne Burns-Duffy, Interim Associate Director 



SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES 

Donald E. Barr, Dean 
Ann Stowe, Associate Dean 
Communicative Disorders Nursing 

Health Sports Medicine 

Kinesiology 



Undergraduate Programs at West Chester 



Students may enroll at West Chester University in programs leading to the following degrees or certificates: 

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)* 



Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) 
Bachelor of Music (B.M.) 



Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.Ed.) 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) 



Local Certificate (CERTIF) 
Teaching Cerfificate (TCHG CERT) 



Accounting B.S. 

American Studies B.A. 

Anthropology B.A. 

Art B.A. 

Athletic Training B.S., CERTIF 

Biochemistry B.S. 

Biology B.A., B.S., B.S.Ed., TCHG 
CERT 

Biology-Cell and Molecular, Ecology, 
Medical Technology, Microbiology, B.S. 
Medical Technology CERTIF 

Business Management B.S. 

Chemistry B.S., B.S.Ed., TCHG CERT 

Chemistry- Biology B.S. 

Citizenship Education (formerly Social 
Studies) TCHG CERT 

Clinical Chemistry B.S. 

Communication B.S.Ed., TCHG CERT 

Communication Studies B.A. 

Communicative Disorders B.A. 

Comparative Literature B.A. 

Computer and Information Sciences B.S. 

Crinunal Justice B.S. 

Driver-Safety Education TCHG CERT 

Early Childhood Education B.S.Ed., 
TCHG CERT 

Earth-Space Science -Astronomy B.S.Ed. 

Earth-Space Science - Geology B.S.Ed. 

Economics B.S. 

Elementary Education B.S.Ed., TCHG 
CERT 

English (see Literature) B.S.Ed., 
TCHG CERT 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Environmental Education TCHG 
CERT 

Ethnic Studies CERTIF 

Finance B.S. 

Forensic Chemistry B.S. 

French B.A., TCHG CERT 

General Science TCHG CERT 

Geography B.A. 

Geoscience-Earth Systems B.S. 

Geoscience-Geology B.S. 

German B.A., TCHG CERT 

Health and Physical Education B.S., 
TCHG CERT 

Health and Physical Education-Exercise 
Specialist B.S.* 

Health Science-General B.S. 

Health Science-Respiratory Care B.S. 

History B.A. 

Latin B.A., B.S.Ed., TCHG CERT 

Liberal Studies-Arts and Sciences B.A. 

Liberal Studies-Science and 
Mathematics B.S. 

Liberal Studies-Professional Studies B.S. 

Literature B.A. 

Marketing B.S. 

Mathematics B.S.Ed., TCHG CERT 

Music Composition B.M. 

Music Education B.M., TCHG CERT 

Music Performance B.M. 

Music: Studies in an Outside Field B.M. 

Music Theory B.M. 

Nursing B.S.N. 



Nutrition and Dietetics B.S.* 

Philosophy B.A. 

Pharmaceutical Product Development B.S. 

Physical Education (See Health and 
Physical Education) 

Physics B.S., B.S.Ed., TCHG CERT 

Physics-Engineering B.S. 

Political Science B.A. 

Political Science-International Relations 

B.A. 

Political Science-Applied Public Policy 

B.A. 

Pre-Medical (see Chemistry-Biology) 

Psychology B.A. 

Public Health-Environmental B.S. 

Public Health-Health Promotion B.S. 

Respiratory Care (See Health Sciences) 
B.S. 

Russian B.A., TCHG CERT 

Russian Studies CERTIF 

Secondary Education (See individual 
concentration) B.S.Ed., TCHG CERT 

Social Studies (see Citizenship Education) 

Social Work B.S.W.* 

Sociology B.A. 

Spanish B.A., TCHG CERT 

Special Education B.S.Ed., TCHG 
CERT 

Speech Correction TCHG CERT 

Studio Arts B.F.A. 

Theatre Arts B.A. 

Women's Studies B.A. 



'Pending Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education approval 



KEY 

The following symbols designate course 
attributes in the course description sections: 
■ Culture cluster 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 
▲ Crosslisted course 

• Diverse communities course 



Programs of Study and Course Offerings 



Guide to the Catalog 

Departments are arranged alphabetically 


CRJ 


Criminal Justice 


KIN 


Kinesiology 


CRL 


Chemistry 


LAN 


Foreign Languages 


within the 


college or school housing them 


CRW 


English 


LAT 


Foreign Languages 


(see list or 


1 page 54). Interdisciplinary pro- 


CSC 


Computer Science 


LIN 


Foreign Languages/Linguistics 


grams are 
Sciences 


listed with the College of Arts and 


CSW 


Computer Science 




Program 


ECE 


Early Childhood and Special 


LIT 


English 


i-f VrJ.^! IV^^tJ ■ 


. 




Education 


LSP 


Liberal Studies 


Students may obtain a typical sequence ot 
courses for any program from the office 


ECO 
EDA 


Economics 
Special Education 


MAK 
MAT 


Keyboard Music 
Mathematics 


specified in this catalog. 


EDC 


Counseling and Educational 


MGT 


Management 


Please note that all courses, course descrip- 
tions, course sequences, and course substitu- 




Psychology 


MHL 


Music History 


EDE 


Elementary Education 


MIS 


Management 


tions are subject to change. Current informa- 


EDF 


Professional and Secondary 


MKT 


Marketing 


tion is available from the appropriate depart- 




Education 


MSI 


Educational Services 


ment chair, dean, or program coordinator. 


EDM 


Professional and Secondary 


MTC 


Music Theory and Composition 


Guide to Course Prefixes 




Education 


MTL 


Mathematics 


Many program descriptions in this catalog 
refer to courses offered by other departments 
using a course abbreviation called a prefix. In 
addition, some course prefixes do not use the 
logical initials of the courses to which they 


EDO 
EDP 

EDR 


Professional and Secondary 

Education 

Counseling and Educational 

Psychology, Professional and 

Secondary Education 

Literacy 


MUE 

MW7 

MWP 

NSG 

NSL 

OBO 


Music Education 

Music Theory and Composition 

Keyboard Music 

Nursing 

Nursing 

Instrumental Music 


refer (e.g., 


ABC is used to indicate instru- 


EDS 


Professional and Secondary 


ORG 


Keyboard Music 


mental music courses), lo assist in locating 




Education 


PEA 


Physical Education/Kinesiology 


the department or program which uses each 


EFR 


Foreign Languages 


PED 


Kinesiology 


prefix, the ' ' 


toUowing guide to course prefixes 


EGE 


Foreign Languages 


PER 


Instrumental Music 


is provided. 


EIT 


Foreign Languages 


PHI 


Philosophy 






ERU 


Foreign Languages 
English 


PHL 


Physics 


PREFIX 


DEPARTMENT/PROGRAM 


ENG 


PHR 


Physics 


ABC 


Instrumental Music 


ENV 


Health 


PHS 


Physics 


ACC 


Accounting 


ESP 


Foreign Languages 


PHY 


Physics and Pre-Engineering 


ADM 


Administration, Leadership for 


ESL 


Geology and Astronomy 


PL\ 


Keyboard Music 




Women 


ESS 


Geology and Astronomy 


PMG 


Political Science 


AEB 


Instrumental Music 


EXS 


Kinesiology 


POR 


Foreign Languages 


AEO 


Instrumental Music 


HN 


Economics and Finance 


PSC 


PoUtical Science 


AER 


Educational Services 


FLM 


English/Comparative Literature 


PSY 


Psychology' 


AES 


Instrumental Music 


FLU 


Instrumental Music 


RUS 


Foreign Languages 


AIC 


Instrumental Music 


FRE 


Foreign Languages 


SAX 


Instrumental Music 


AIM 


Instrumental Music 


FRH 


Instrumental Music 


SCB 


Biology 


AJZ 


Instrumental Music 


GEO 


Geography and Planning 


sec 


Chemistry 


ALC 


Instrumental Music 


GER 


Foreign Languages 


SCE 


Geology and Astronomy 


AMC 


Instrumental Music 


GRE 


Foreign Languages 


SCI 


Geology and Astronomy, Physics 


AMS 


American Studies 


GTR 


Instrumental Music 


SMD 


Sports Medicine 


ANT 


Anthropology and Sociology 


HAR 


Keyboard Music 


SML 


Sports Medicine 


APC 


Instrumental Music 


HBI 


Political Science 


SOC 


Anthropology and Sociology 


ARH 


Art 


HEW 


Foreign Languages 


SPA 


Foreign Languages 


ART 


Art 


HEA 


Healdi 


SPP 


Communicative Disorders 


ASC 


Instrumental Music 


HIS 


History 


SSC 


Citizenship Education, Ethnic 


AWC 


Instrumental Music 


HON 


Honors Program 




Studies, Peace and Conflict 


BAR 


Instrumental Music 


HPE 


Physical Education 




Studies 


BAS 


Instrumental Music 


HRP 


Instrumental Music 


SWO 


Social Work 


BIL 


Biology 


HTL 


Health 


TBA 


Instrumental Music 


BIO 


Biolog>' 


INB 


Management 


THA 


Theatre Arts 


BLA 


Marketing 


IND 


Geology and Astronomy 


TPT 


Instrumental Music 


BSN 


Instrumental Music 


INS 


Instrumental Music 


TRB 


Instrumental Music 


CHE 


Chemistry 


ITA 


Foreign Languages 


VCL 


Instrumental Music 


CHO 


Vocal and Choral Music 


JBR 


Instrumental Music 


VLA 


Instrumental Music 


CLS 


Comparative Literature Studies, 


JRN 


English 


VLN 


Instrumental Music 




English 


JST 


Instrumental Music 


VOC 


Vocal and Choral Music 


CLT 


Instrumental Music 


JWW 


Instrumental Music 


vol 


Vocal and Choral Music 


COM 


Communication Studies 


KEM 


Keyboard Music 


wos 


Women's Studies 




(previously SPC) 


KIL 


Kinesiology 


WRT 


English 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Anthropolog}' and Sociolog}' 



Department of Accounting 

309A .\nderson Hall 

610-436-2236 

Clyde J. Galbraith, Chairperson 

PROFESSOR: A. Naggar 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: LaSalle 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Hynn, Galbraith, Smith 

The Department of Accounting offers a fiill program of accounting 

courses designed to prepare a student for entrance into the fields ot 

public, private, or governmental accounting. Students successfiiUy 

completing the curriculum should be adequate!}' prepared to take the 

Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and Certified Management 

Accountant (CI\L\) examinations. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Includes COM 101 or 208 or 216 or 230, 

CSC 110 or 115 or 141, ECO lir, MAT 105' 
or 107* or 110*, PHI 101 or 150 or 180, and 
nine semester hours of free electives 

2. Business Core 36 semester hours 
ACC 201*, 202*; BLA 201*; ECO 112*, 



251*, 252*; HN 325*; MAT 108 or 161; 
MGT 200*, 341, 499*; MKT 325* 

3. Accounting Major Courses 
ACC 301*, 302*, 303*, 305*, 401*, 403*. 404*, 
405*, 40r 

4. Business Electives 
300-level or above courses in BLA, ECO, 
nN, INB. MGT, MIS, MKT, or ENG 368 

5. Restricted Electives 
Three semester hours of any 100-level or above 
nonbusiness course 

A minimum of 15 credits in 300-400 level ACC courses and a mini- 
mum of 30 credits in business courses must be completed at WCU. 
To enroll in 400-level courses, the followng courses must have been 
successfiilly completed: ACC 202, and ECO 251, 252. 



27 semester hours 



6 semester hours 



3 semester hours 



Accounting Minor 

1 . Required 

ACC 201, 202, and 301; ECO 111 

2. Electives 

Any two of the tollowing courses: 
ACC 302, 303, 305, 403, 404, and 407 



18 semester hours 

12 semester hours 

6 semester hours 



A minimum grade of C must be attained in each of these courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ACCOUNTING 

Symbol; ACC 

The objective of the accounting concentration is to 
prepare students for accounting careers in business, 
for the CPA examination, and for the private 
practice of accounting. 

201 Financial Accounting I (3) Introduction to 
financial accounting. A conceptual approach to 
recording, financial summarizing, and presentation 
and e\'aluation ot the financial affairs of a business 
firm. 

202 Managerial Accounting 11 (3) Introduction 
to management accounting. Accumulating, pro- 
cessing, and interpreting financial data to be used 
as a basis for making managerial decisions in a 
business firm. PREREQ: ACC 201. 

205 Fraud E.\anunation for Managers (3) 
Introduction to tools necessary' to understand the 
prevention, detection, and investigation of 
accounting fraud. 

301 Intermediate Accounting 1 (3) Anah'sis and 
evaluation of assets, liabilit)', and capital account. 
Problems of income measurement and recognition. 
PREREQ: ACC 202. 



302 Intermediate Accounting II (3) 

Continuation of ACC 301. PREREQ: ACC 301. 

303 Cost Accounting I (3) Techniques of product 
unit cost determination and uses of cost data in 
managerial decisions. PREREQ; ACC 202. 

305 Intermediate Accounting III (3) Con- 
tinuation of ACC 302. PREREQ: ACC 302. 

400 Accounting Internship (3-6) The business 
internship for students in accounting enhances the 
student's educational experience by proriding a 
substantive work experience in the business world. 
PREREQ; Internship program coordinator's 
appro\'al. 

401 Auditing (3) Introduction to auditing as a 
tool for verification of the fair representation of 
financial statements. PREREQ; ACC 302. 

403 Federal Taxation I (3) A study of indiridual 
and federal income taxes, with some business 
application. Emphasis on tax planning for mini- 
mization of tax liability-. PREREQ; ACC 202. 

404 Federal Taxation II (3) A study of the princi- 
ples of federal income taxation on corporations and 
corporate distributions, partnerships, estates, and 
trusts. Emphasis is on tax planning and researching 
complex probkms. PREREQ; ACC 403. 



405 Advanced Accounting (3) In-depth study of 
business combinations and consolidations, govern- 
ment accounting, and other specialized topics. 
PREREQ; ACC 302. 
407 Not-for-Profit and Governmental 
Accounting (3) A study of accounting principles 
and procedures ot not-tor-profit and governmental 
organizations. The course includes accounting for 
the local, state, and federal government, hospitals, 
colleges and universities, public schools, and chari- 
ties. PREREQ; ACC 202. 
♦ 410 Directed Studies in Accounting (1-3) 
Special research projects, reports, and readings in 
accounting. Open to seniors only. PREREQ; 
Permission ot instructor. 

415 Professional Accounting (3) This course is 
intended to develop and implement students' 
knowledge currenth- required tor professional 
accounting careers. PREREQ; Senior standing 
and instructor's approval. 
420 Accounting Information Systems (3) 
Accounting information swtems development, 
processing, and controls mth emphasis on current 
computer-based svstems and programs used in 
accounting fields.' PREREQ; ACC 302 and 303. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Anthropology and Sociology 

101 E Old Librar>- 

610-436-2556 

Edmundo Morales, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Becker, Berger, Greisman, Keith, McConatha, 

Morales, Shaffer, StoUer 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Freeman-Witthoft, Luck, 

Zumpetta 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Johnston 



The Department of Anthropolog)- and Sociology offers two programs 
leading to the bachelor of arts degree. 

1. The B.A. in ANTHROPOLOGY focuses on human biological 
evolution; on the origin, development, and integration of human 
cultures; and on the interrelationship of biological and cultural fac- 
tors in the etiolog)' of human behavior. 

2. The B.A. in SOCIOLOGY focuses on understanding the process- 
es involved in the creation, maintenance, and evolution of social 
structure, and on the impact of diverse structural forms on individ- 
ual behavior. 



Anthropologv' and Sociology' 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Majors in the two B.A. programs should consult the appropriate 
department handbook and their adviser for current requirements. 
Students planning to major in one of these programs are advised to 
take ANT 102 and SOC 200 no later than their sophomore year. 
Application for admission is made on forms available from the depart- 
ment office. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE BJV. PROGRAMS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement 0-15 semester hours 

3. Limited Electives (chosen under advisement) 18 semester hours 

4. Major Requirements 60 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS — ANTHROPOLOGY 



Required Core Courses 

ANT 101, 102, 103, and 495 

Specialization Requirements 

Four to seven courses in anthropology 

Cognate Requirements 

LIN 230; additional courses outside of 

anthropology approved by the student's adviser 

Free Electives 15-24 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS — SOCIOLOGY 

1. Required Core Courses 

SOC 200, 300, 321, 322, and 492 



4. 



12-21 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



12-24 semester hours 



2. Specialization Requirements 18 semester hours 
Anv SLX advanced courses in sociology 

3. Career Preparation Sequence 
Five nonsociology courses approved by the 
student's adviser 

4. Free Electives 

Minor Programs 

Students maj' minor in the two following programs. A minimum of 
18 semester hours is required. Elective courses are selected in consul- 
tation with the student's minor adviser. Students may take any of 
these minors as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts or bachelor 
of science in liberal studies general degree program. 



12 semester hours Anthropology Minor 



Required Courses 
ANT 102, either ANT 101 or 103, and one 
400-level course in anthropology 
2. Elective Courses 

Three other courses in anthropology 

Sociology Minor 

1. Required Courses 
SOC 200, 300, and 322 

2. Elective Courses 

Three other courses in sociology 



18 semester hours 

9 semester hours 



9 semester hours 

18 semester hours 

9 semester hours 

9 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

Symbol: ANT 

101 Introduction to Anthropology: Biological 

(3) Fundamentals of human biologi', evolution, 
and the prehistoric development of culture. 

102 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural (3) 
Comparative analysis of culture systems. 

103 Introduction to Anthropology: Archaeology 
(3) Interpretation ot culture through analysis ot 
archaeological remains. 

113 Archaeological Field Techniques (3) Imple- 
mentation of archaeological principles and theory 
in laboratory' and field studies. PREREQ_or 
CONCURRENT: ANT 103. 
120 Cultures of Ethnic Groups in America (3) 
Survey ot the cultural history and traditions of eth- 
nic groups in America. 

202 World Ethnology (3) Survey of the social 
organization, belief systems, and cultures of select- 
ed peoples. PREREQi ANT 102 or permission of 
instructor. 

■ 224 Native Peoples of South America (3) This 
course will introduce the student to the study of 
native peoples ot South America after the 
European contact. Geographically, the course wiU 
cover the cultural characteristics, similarities, and 
differences among South American natives includ- 
ing the Amazonia. 

260 Artifacts and Culture (3) (See also HIS 353.) 
PREREQ: .•\NT 102. 

♦ 280 Practicum in Museum Techniques I (3) 
Exploration of techniques ot cataloging, conserv- 
ing objects, and ot designing and setting up 
exhibits. Involvement in actual museum work. 
PREREQ^ ANT 102 or permission of instructor. 

A. Biological Anthropology 

310 Human Paleontology (3) Evolutionary' 
thought; origin and antiquit\' of the primates; fossil 
man and living races. {Some background in biology 
recommended.) 

B. Ethnology: Area Courses 

320 American Indian (3) Ethnolog)' of North 
America. PREREQ^ ANT 102. 



1 321 American Indian Today (3) Native 
Americans in contemporar)' Anglo-America. 
PREREQl ANT 102 or permission of instructor. 

■ 322 Ethnology of Central America (3) Survey 
of the modern cultures ot Central America: rela- 
tionships to ancient peoples; the process of mod- 
ernization in this area. PREREQ: ANT 102, 

■ 324 Native Peoples of the Andes (3) This 
course provides a comprehensive survey ot the his- 
torical formation and development of the Andean 
society before and after the Spanish conquest. 

326 Cultures and Peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa 
(3) Ex.imination of the cultures and societies of 
Black Africa. PREREQ: ANT 102. 

327 Cultures and Peoples of India (3) (See also 
HIS 302.) PREREQ: ANT 102. 

♦ 329 Problems in Ethnology (3) Survey of the 
ethnographic literature pertaining to specific geo- 
graphic regions. Area ot focus to be announced in 
advance. PREREQ: ANT 102. 
C. Ethnology: Topical Courses 

340 Folklore in Society (3) Survey of basic 
American folklore genres. Emphasis on folklore as 
process, tradition, and as an element ot culture. 

341 Social Organization (3) Study of social 
groups, their structure, and fiinctioning. PRE- 
REQ: ANT 102. 

342 Political Anthropology (3) Analvsis of tribal 
and peasant political systems. PREREQi.ANT 102. 

343 Economic Anthropology (3) Analysis of trib- 
al and peasant economic systems. PREREQ^ 
ANT 102. 

344 Magic, Religion, and Witchcraft (3) An 
anal\'sis of supernaturalistic ideolog)' and ritual in 
both tribal and civil societ>'. PREREQ: ANT 102. 

345 Culture and Personality (3) Study of the 
relationship between culture systems and personal- 
ity. PREREQ: ANT 102. 

346 Culture Change (3) Empirical and theoretical 
study of culuire change. PREREQ; ANT 102. 

I 347 The Culture of Cities (3) This seminar 
introduces students to the cultural dynamics of city 
life in the era of globalization. Topics ot study 
include globalization, the politics of urban space, 
informal economies, and immigration. 



348 Dimensions of Ethnographic FilmA'ideo 

(3) This course will introduce swdents to the 
study of ethnographic fdm/video. Topics to be 
considered include visual anthropology, ethno- 
graphic representation, and film theor\'. 

350 Primitive Art (3) (See also ARH 350). PRE- 
REQ: ANT 102. 

D. Archaeology 

360 Historical Archaeology (3) Historical 
research through archaeolog)'. Chester County is 
emphasized through local research projects. PRE- 
REQ.or CONCURRENT: ANT 103. 

■ 362 Archaeology of Central America (3) The 

archaeological record ot Central America, covering 
the significant features of each culture area from 
modern Mexico to Panama. 

ADVANCED AND SENIOR COURSES 

380 Language and Culture (3) (also LIN 380) 
See LIN 380. 

381 Sociolinguisrics (3) (also LIN 381) The 
study of the use of language in society and in edu- 
cational settings; social dialects; language policy, 
black English. PREREQ: ANT 102. 

383 Structurahsm: From Chaos to Order in the 
World of Ideas (3) This course is a general survey of 
structuralist theory- as it relates to linguistics, anthro- 
pology, psychology, and literature. The goal of the 
course is to demonstrate how structuralism is a theo- 
retical orientation in the social sciences and the 
humanities that attempts to transform the chaos of 
appearances into order of realit\' in the world of ideas. 

♦ 405 Topical Seminar in Anthropology (3) 

Selected topics in the subdisciplines ot anthropolo- 
g)'. Topics announced in advance. Juniors and 
seniors only. 

♦ 410 Independent Studies in Anthropology 

(1-3) Special research projects, reports, and read- 
ings in anthropology. Juniors and seniors only. 
PREREQi Permission of department chairperson. 



H Culture cluster 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

I Diverse communities course 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Art 



459 Histoiy of Ethnological Theoiy (3) Develop- 
ment of ethnological theory with emphasis on the 
nature of explanation in ethnolog}'. PREREQ; Six 
hours in ethnolog)' and junior or senior standing. 

490 Seminar in Social Anthropology (3) Histor)- 
and theory of social anthropolog)'. PREREQ^ Six 
hours in ethnolog)- and six hours in sociology. 
Seniors onh". 

495 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3) 
Discussion and supenised research designed to 
integrate conceptual and methodological skills. 
The research paper for the seminar must be 
acceptable as a required departmental senior 
research paper. Senior anthropology majors only. 

SOCIOLOGY 

SvTObol: SOC 

200 Introduction to Sociology (3) Fundamentals 

of the sociological perspective on human behavior. 

240 Sociology of the Family (3) Comparative, 
historical, and cross-cultural analysis of the family 
institution. 

300 Sociological Theory (3) Historical develop- 
ment of the sociological perspective on human 
behavior, with emphasis on the perennial issues in 
sociological explanation. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

302 Sociology of Everyday Life (3) How people 
interact in everyda%' settings, examined from the 
dramaturgical perspectives of Goffman, Douglas, 
Burke, and others. PREREQi SOC 200. 

321 Statistics in Sociological Research (3) The 

application ot statistical methods to sociological 
hypothesis testing. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

322 Methods of Sociological Research (3) The 

logic of social research. Fundamentals of research 
design, data collection and reduction, and nonsta- 
tistical analysis. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

333 Self and Society (3) A symbolic interactionist 
perspective on social psychology which focuses on 
the self in social interaction. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

335 Racial and Cultural Minorities (3) Analysis of 
the implications of racial differences, the factors 
affecting prejudice and discrimination, and structur- 
al aspects ofgroup conflicts. PREREQ^ SOC 200. 



341 Social Stratification (3) Analysis of inequah- 
ties in wealth, power, and prestige in contempo- 
rary societies. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

342 Urban Sociology (3) A descriptive study of 
the form and development of the urban communi- 
ty with respect to demographic structure, sparial 
and temporal patterns, and fiinctional organiza- 
tion. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

343 Sociologyof Organizations (3) Analysis of 
large-scale, formal organizations with emphasis on 
bureaucracy as the dominant form of social organi- 
zation in the West. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

344 Sociologyof Religion (3) Theoretical analysis 
of social functions of religion, the history and inter- 
nal structure of religious institutions, and their rela- 
tionship to other institutions. PREREQ^ SOC 200. 

345 Sociology of Education (3) Sociological 
dimensions of educational institutions. PREREQ^ 
SOC 200. 

346 Sociologyof Gender (3) Analysis and evalua- 
tion of sociological research on sex roles. PRE- 
REQ: SOC 200. 

# 349 Perspectives on Mental Illness (3) An 
interdisciplinary examination ot mental disorders — 
their definition, cause, and treatment. PREREQ^ 
SOC 200. 

350 Sociology of Mental Illness (3) A sociologi- 
cal perspective on mental disorders. PREREQ; 
SOC 200. 

351 Deviance (3) Causes and consequences of the 
construction and violation of social norms. PRE- 
REQ: SOC 200. 

352 Criminology (3) Sociological analysis of the 
definition, distribution, and causes of crime, and 
of social response to it. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

353 Juvenile Delinquency (3) Theories of delin- 
quena", evaluation of programs for its prevention 
and control. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

360 Sociology of Culture (3) Analysis of the major 
social movements that have shaped the character 
and fliture of modern man. PREREQ: SOC 200. 

361 Sociology of Medicine (3) A sociological per- 
spective on health, illness, and medical care. PRE- 
REQ: SOC 200. 



362 Sexuality in Society (3) The social dimen- 
sions of human se.xuaht>-. PREREQ; SOC 200. 
364 Sociology of Aging (3) An examination of 
the problems, adaptations, and contributions of 
the aging population. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

369 Social Movements (3) ^An introduction to the 
swdy of social movements, both historical and 
contemporar>-. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

370 Social Problems (3) ^Analysis of current social 
disorders: urban unrest, racial tension, poverty', 
addictions, crime, and mental illness. PREREQ; 
SOC 200. 

371 Applied Social Change (3) Strategy and tac- 
tics of planning and guiding change in small and 
large-scale social systems. 

376 Sociology of War and Peace (3) Exploration 
of the relationship between social structure and 
war. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

377 Clinical Sociology (3) Analysis and evaluation 
of therapeutic applications of sociology in group 
and individual settings. PREREQ; SOC 200. 

401 Social Change (3) Critique of the leading 
models of social order and change; analysis of 
major transformation in Western civilization. 
PREREQ; SOC 200. 

402 Career Internship in Sociology (6) Field 
experience in agencies involved in social change. 
Majors only with permission of instructor. 

410 Issues in Sociological Thought (3) Analysis 
of several of the key philosophical issues underly- 
ing sociological thought. PREREQ; SOC 300,' or 
permission of the instructor. 

♦ 490 Independent Studies in Sociology (1-3) 
Individual research projects, reports, and/or read- 
ings. Seniors only. PREREQ; Permission of 
department chairperson. Maiors only. 

♦ 491 Topical Seminar in Sociology (3) Special 
topics in theory or methodology. Topics 
announced in advance. Admission by permission 
of instructor. Juniors and seniors only. 

492 Senior Seminar in Sociology (3) Preparation 
of senior research paper. Senior sociolog}' majors 
only. 



# Approved Interdisciplinary course 

♦ This course may be taken again tor credit. 



Department of Art 

212 MitcheU Hall 

610-436-2755 

John Baker, Chairpenon 

PROFESSORS: Baker, Blake, Sermas 

ASSOCLATE PROFESSORS: HoUon, Usher, White 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Brody, da Costa, Loustau, 

Moon, Rumfield, Schiff-Hill 
The undergraduate programs offered by the Department of Art give 
students the opportunity to achieve competence in studio art, theory, 
and the history' of art, taking into consideration both personal and 
vocational needs. Each student's advising reflects an effort to relate 
the general requirements to art subjects. 

In addition to the formal programs listed below, alternative courses of 
study may be planned in conjunction with other departments. 
Students are encouraged to make connections between art and other 
subjects where appropriate to achieve vocational and personal 
advancement after consultation with the student's adviser. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS — ART 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Language Requirement (See special note 0-15 semester hours 
below.) 

3. Art Department Program Requirements 

B A. Studio Art Sequence (provides a basic concentration with the 
option of a second, preprofessional concentration) 



Studio Foundation (ART 106, 111 
112, and 220) 

b. Art History (ARH 103, 104, and 
two ARH electives) 

c. Other Studio (Elect from studio 
offerings at least half above the 300 
level. See special note below.) 

d. Preprofessional Concentration- 
courses to be selected from another 
discipline (elementary education, special 
education, business, foreign area studies, 
or others under advisement) 



12 semester hours 



12 semester hours 



21-24 semester hours 



9 semester hours 



Art 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



NOTE: The foreign language requirement for B.A. studio art is two 
semesters with three foreign area study courses or to meet the level of 
Intermediate II, 202. 

Students must maintain a minimum grade of C in all ART and ARH 
courses, required and elective, within the major. 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS — STUDIO ARTS 

The bachelor of fine arts is regarded as the initial professional degree 
in art bv the National Association of Schools of Art. Its primary 
emphasis is on the development of skills, concepts, and sensitivities 
important to the professional artist. Concentration in a major profes- 
sional area begins only with satisfactory completion of the foundation 
requirements and the approval of the faculty adviser. 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Art Department Program Requirements* 

Foundation Requirements 

a. Studio Art (ART 106, 111, 112, 30 semester hours 



206, 216, 217, 220, 221, 222, 113 or 241) 



b. Art History (ARH 103, 104, and two 
art history electives) 

c. Professional Concentration 

(eight art courses by advisement) 

d. Studio Art (or art-related electives 
by advisement) 

Minor in Studio Art 

1. Required Courses 
ART 106, 111, and 220 

2. Minor Specialization 9 semester hours 
The student, under advisement, may select a 

minor speciahzation so that the emphasis is on 
one of these groups: drawing and painting, graphic 
design, printmaking, sculpture, or crafts. 



12 semester hours 

24 semester hours 

6 semester hours 

18 semester hours 

9 semester hours 



Minor in Art History 18 semester hours 

This program provides alternative tracks to satisfy a varietv of 
emphases to which art history may be appUed. These include both 
vocational and liberal arts interests, which range from a highlv struc- 
tured sequence to a selt-designed sequence. 

A. Art History Survey 18 semester hours 
Structured sequence of courses designed to provide an in-depth 
comprehensive core of Western art development. Recommended 
as an important cultural component to the study of history, litera- 
ture, performing arts, anthropology, sociology, and psychology. 
(The 18 semester hours include ARH 103 and 104, and 12 credits 
of electives selected at the 200, 300, and 400 levels.) 

B. Art History and Its Interfaces 18 semester hours 
According to interest or possible vocational application, this pro- 
gram provides an opportunirv to explore either the various histori- 
cal periods/styles of art or the interfaces of art history with studio 
art, American studies, and other cognate areas. 

1. Student must complete the required courses 6 semester hours 
ARH 103 and 104 

2. Student must also take two upper-level 6 semester hours 
art history courses 

3. Student must take, under advisement 6 semester hours 

a. Any two studio courses 

b. Any two American studies courses 

c. Any two other art history courses 

d. Any two cognate courses from other disciplines 

e. Any combination of the above 

Either of these minors may be taken as a concentration by students 
as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science 
in Uberal studies general degree program. 



Students must maintain a grade of C in all ART and ARH courses within 
the major (required and elective). 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ART 

Symbol: ART 

105 Art Workshop (3) An art workshop for nonart 
majors. E.xploration of art materials and techniques. 

106 Beginning Drawing (3) Drawing from direct 
observation and an introduction to ideas of percep- 
tion and interpretation. Use of a variety of media. 

111 Basic Design (2-Diniensional Design) (3) 
Developing a visual vocabulary by experimenting 
with shape, space, light, color, and texture in a 
variet)' of media. 

112 Color and Design (2 -Dimensional Design) 
(3) Extensive study of color theory and its applica- 
tion to a variety of fine and industrial arts projects. 
PREREQiARTlll. 

113 Computer Art I (3) Introduction to computer 
art is designed to provide students of graphics and 
fine arts with the skills necessary to utilize the com- 
puter as a graphics tool, enabling students to incor- 
porate computer art technology into their work. 
147 Crafts: Weaving I (3) Basic techniques of 
weaving are explored with emphasis on fabric 
design and craftsmanship. 

206 Intermediate Drawing (3) Work in a variety 
of media and methods designed to develop "aggres- 
sive seeing." Emphasis on the exploration of line as 
boundary to describe form and space, as gesture, as 
calligraphy, and tor expressive qualities as a tool for 
working in other media. PREREQi ART 106. 
210 Typography I (3) An introduction to the use 
of type as a basic element of graphic communica- 
tion; the use of different type faces to communi- 
cate visually desired effects, typeform, type indica- 
tion, type spacing, comp lettering, and basic 
design with type for layouts and comprehensives. 



211 Graphic Design I (3) The exploration ot var- 
ious aspects of graphic communication through 
the use of typography, layout, and general graphic 
techniques. The development of creative, original, 
and conceptual ideas for solving communications 
problems utilizing professional studio practices and 
procedures. Mechanical, paste-up preparation, and 
other methods of reproduction will be covered. 
Use of the computer is integrated into a variet)' of 
course assignments. COREQ: ART 210; PRE- 
REQ: ART 111, 113, or permission of the 
instructor. 

212 Graphic Design 11 (3) The continuation of 
ART 211 with an emphasis on typographic prob- 
lem solving. The further study of graphic design 
concepts and design principles used in solving dif- 
ferent types of design problems within a given for- 
mat. Use of the computer as an essential design 
tool is Integrated into a variet)' of course assign- 
ments. PREREQi ART 211, or permission of the 
instructor. 

213 Computer Art II (3) An advanced study of the 
computer as a design tool. The computer will be 
used to incorporate typography and graphic design 
solutions utilizing page layout software. PREREQi 
ART 113 or permission of the instructor. 

216 Beginning Painting (3) An introduction to 
the basic materials and techniques of the painter 
with emphasis on color. 

217 Intermediate Painting (3) The course seeks 
to provide a workshop atmosphere in which the 
student is given the opportunitj' to explore the 
potential of the painting media. Use of standard 
materials of paint, brushes, and canvas is required. 
PREREQ: ART216. 

220 Fundamentals of 3-Dimensional Design (3) 
An introduction to the theories, processes, and ele- 



ments of perception and visual design in a three- 
dimensional simation. Problems will be geared to 
problem solving rather than object making. 

221 Advanced 3-Dimensional Design (3) 

Solving problems of relating visual elements to 
volumetric forms in space by experimenting with 
various materials. PREREQi ART 220. 

222 Beginning Sculpture (3) An introduction to 
the basic fundamentals ot sculpture, including 
concepts of design, knowledge of tools and tech- 
niques, and materials and processes. Project 
assignments to be rendered in clay, plaster, wood, 
and stone. 

223 Basic Photography (3) A course dealing with 
the photographic process. The course will cover 
camera handling, film and print processing, pho- 
tographic composition and presentation. Students 
must supply adjustable 35mm camera plus devel- 
oping and printing materials. 

224 Intermediate Photography (3) A course for 
those who have had a basic photography class or pre- 
vious photography experience. The course will stress 
technical and creative approaches to photography 
using small-format cameras. Ad\'anced techmques of 
exposure, lighting, composition, and macro photog- 
raphv will be included. Students must supply their 
own 35mm adjustable camera and developing and 
printing materials. PREREQ: ART 223. 

225 Advanced Photography (3) A course dealing 
with professional techniques in black and white as 
well as color photography. Different camera for- 
mats will be considered. Advanced darkroom tech- 
niques, photographic manipulation, and retouch- 
ing will also be covered. PREREQ: ART 223 and 
ART 224. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Art 



226 Water Color I (3) An introduction to tiie 
basic tools and techniques of the water-color 
painter. Emphasis upon transparent water color. 

227 Water Color II (3) Advanced problems in 
water color, gouache, tempera, and mixed media. 
PREREQ; ART227. 

231 Ceramics I: Basic Techniques (3) 
Introduction to the basic techniques of ceramics. 
Hand and wheel methods of construction; knowl- 
edge of clay bodies, firing, and glazing. 

232 Ceramics II: Intermediate Techniques (3) 
Fundamental methods ot creating clay forms on 
the wheel. Experimentation with clay bodies, 
glazes, and kiln operation. Design is stressed. 
241 Printmaking; Introduction of Relief Print- 
making (3) An introduction to the medium of 
printmaking: linoleum cuts, woodcuts, and color- 
graphs. 

243 Printmaking: Intermediate Relief Print- 
making (3) Continuation of ART 241, emphasiz- 
ing expressive possible techniques and their com- 
bination with other print media. PREREQ^ ART 
241, or permission ot instructor. 
245 Architectural Drawing (3) Studio experiences 
in layout; preparation of plans and elevations, pre- 
sentations (renderings), and architectural lettering. 
Use of mechanical drawing tools to help students 
express steps that occur from design to realization 
of a structure. 

248 Crafts: Weaving II (3) Provides an opportu- 
nity for the weaver to further explore and develop 
skills as a designer. Emphasis is placed on the 
interrelationship between ftinctional materials and 
design processes. 

25 1 Art in the Elementary School (3) Workshop 
and seminar providing experience with a wide 
variety of media appropriate for use with children. 
Investigation into the philosophy and psychology 
of children's art. 

306 Drawing III: Life Drawing (3) An explo- 
ration of the abstract dynamics of figure drawing 
with particular application ot anatomical structure 
to expressive design. PREREQ^ ART 106 and 
206. 

♦ 307 Drawing IV (3) Individualized instruction 
in increasingly complex formal and expressive 
problems in drawing. 

310 Graphic Design III (3) The exploration of 
developing and designing logotype S)'Tnbols for use 
in corporate and public agencies and their applica- 
tions to a variety of print materials. The use of the 
computer as an essential design tool is integrated 
into course assignments. PREREQ^ ART 212 or 
permission of instructor. 

311 Graphic Design: Independent Project (3) 
Individualized instruction in design problems at an 
advanced level. 

312 Graphic Design IV (3) A study of advanced 
concepts and design principles with an emphasis 
on creative solutions to problems in three-dimen- 
sional package design. The use of the computer as 
an essential design tool is integrated into course 
assignments. PREREQ^ ART 311 or permission 
of instructor. 

316 Advanced Painting (3) Emphasis on 
advanced problems in painting in a variety of tech- 
niques. Individual expression is encouraged. PRE- 
REQ: ART 217. 

317 Painting: Studio Problems (3) Concentration 
on individual work and professional competence. 
Group critiques and discussions. 

318 Painting ftom Landscape: Independent 
Project (3) Indlviduahzed landscape painting 



course requiring the student to paint on location In 
the Delaware Valley. 

319 Painting from Masters: Independent Project 
(3) Introduces the student artist to techniques and 
styles by painring from master works. 

♦ 320 Painting: Independent Projects (3) The 
development of a personal st}'le is explored 
through a theme and its variation. Discipline and 
self-criticism are realized through a series of cri- 
tiques and evaluations. 

321 Intermediate Sculpture (3) More advanced 
problems in sculpture with emphasis on individual 
exploration of form, structure, and process. 
Independent project to be rendered in choice ot 
materials. Including clav, plaster, wood, and stone. 
PREREQ: ART 222. ' 

322 Advanced Sculpture (3) Continued explo- 
ration and development ot indrndual form and 
process awareness through involvement with mod- 
eling, casting, fabrication, and assemblages. In 
addition to clay, wood, stone, and plaster, metals 
and plastics will be utilized. 

323 Abstract Painting (3) A studio exploration of 
the fijndamental principles of abstract painting. 

324 Life Modeling (3) Figure modeling in clay 
from the life model. Emphasis on hand-eye coor- 
dination using figure studies as vehicles of expres- 
sion. Anatomy will not be stressed; however, 
weight, balance, construction, and spatial relation- 
ships will be emphasized. 

♦ 325 Sculpture: Independent Projects (3) 
Individualized instruction in advanced sculpture. 
Preparation tor senior show. 

331 Ceramics III: Advanced Techniques (3) An 
advanced course to develop craftsmanship and to 
explore clay as a means of individual expression. 
PREREQi ART 232. 

332 Ceramics: Studio Problems (3) Work at an 
advanced level in specialized ceramic techniques. 

♦ 335 Ceramics: Independent Projects (3) 
Individualized instruction as well as research and 
study in ceramic design. 

341 Printmaking: Introduction to Intaglio 
Printmaking (3) Intagho techniques, etching, dry 
point, aquatint, and engraving. 

342 Printmaking: Introduction to Lithography 
(3) Fundamentals of stone and plate lithography. 

343 Printmaking: Intermediate Etching (3) 
Continuation of 341 with emphasis on expressive 
qualities of the medium and its possible combina- 
tion with other print media. PREREQ; ART 341, 
or permission ot instructor. 

344 Printmaking: Intermediate Lithography (3) 
Continuation of ART 342 with emphasis on 
expressive qualities of the medium and its possible 
combination with other print media. PREREQ; 
ART 342, or permission of instructor. 

♦ 345 Printmaking: Independent Projects (3) 
In-depth, individualized Instruction In a selected 
printmaking medium. 

350 Art of Papermaking (3) The exploration of 
traditional and contemporary techniques in the art 
of papermaking. An emphasis on creative and 
original designs in conjunction with an under- 
standing of materials. 

351 Art of Papermaking (3) The exploration of 
traditional and contemporary techniques in the art 
of papermaking. An emphasis on creative and 
original designs In conjunction with an under- 
standing of materials. 

359 Resources in Art Education (3) The use of 
cultural and community resources in the schools 
with an emphasis on the teaching of art apprecia- 
tion. 



♦ 450 Art-Graphic Design Internship (3) 

Integration of classroom study and lab work with 
specific planned periods of learning through job 
experience. The course is based on an individual- 
ized, student-oriented, learning contract. 

♦ 455 Introduction to Multimedia (3) A work- 
shop for students with background in the studio 
arts. To be taken under advisement. 

490 Graphic Design V (3) The farther study of 
solving advanced visual communication problems 
through the development of skills in research, 
design, and the preparation of comprehensives for 
client presentations. The use of the computer as an 
essential design tool is integrated into course 
assignments. PREREQ; ART 312, or permission 
of instructor. 

491 Graphic Design VI (3) The continuation of 
advanced visual communication problem solving 
outlined in ART 490 with an emphasis on fin- 
ished comprehensives for the portfolio. The use of 
the computer as an essential design tool is inte- 
grated into course assignments. COREQ; ART 
499; PREREQ; ART 490, or permission of the 
instructor. 

499 Graphic Design VII: PortfoUo (3) Smdy 
under the guidance of the instructor to prepare 
individual portfolios for professional presentation 
for employment or continuation of studies on the 
graduate level. Spring offering. COREQ; ART 
491; PREREQ; ART 490, or permission of 
instructor. 

ART HISTORY 

Symbol: ARH 

101 Art Appreciation (3) An introduction to 
painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decora- 
tive arts with emphasis on understanding the visu- 
al arts as universal human expression. 

102 Survey of Art History (3) A general introduc- 
tion to the history of western art from the earliest 
cave paintings to the 20th centur\'. 

103 Art History I: Paleolithic through Middle 
Ages (3) Survey of significant art and architectural 
monuments from prehistor}' through the Middle 
Ages. 

104 Art History II: Renaissance Through 
Modem (3) Continuation of ART 103. Survey of 
Western and non- Western art and architecture 
from the Renaissance through the 21st century. 

210 Non-Western Art (3) Analysis of primitive 
art as determined through ritual and myth. Focus 
Includes ethnographic parallels to prehistory and 
the concept of primltivism In the West. 

211 Art of Egypt (3) The art and architecture of 
Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Assyria, and 
Babylonia from 3000-500 B.C. 

■ 382 Art of Greece and Rome (3) The art and 
architecture of the Greeks, Etruscans, and 
Romans. 

■ 383 Art of Middle Ages (3) The art and archi- 
tecture of the European medieval world and their 
development from Early Christian and 
Romanesque art into the fiill flowering of the 
Gothic period. 

■ 384 Art of Renaissance-Baroque (3) Art and 
architecture from 1300 through 1700 in Europe. 
Focus on patronage and the role of the artist. 
Political, economic, and religious influences on the 
art of the Renaissance and Baroque periods. 

■ 385 18th and 19th CentuiyArt (3) Major 
European artistic contributions of the 18th and 
19th centuries including Rococco, Neoclassical, 



♦ This course may he taken again for credit. 
■ Culture cluster 



Biolog)' 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. Art, 

architecture, and their cultural influence. 

386 Modem Art Seminar (3) Analysis of major 

stvles of 20th-centurv- art from Post Impressionism 

to Pop Art. Special emphasis on important artists 

and their contributions to Western art. 

389 Art of Spain (3) Introduction to the an and 

architecture of Spain and her colonies from the 

caves of Altamira to the contemporari,' period. 

Focus on specific artists including Velazquez, 

Goya, Miro, Gaudi, Picasso, and Dali. 

♦ 400 Art Seminar (3) Special topics to be 

announced for studio and art history. Offered 



periodically as appropriate. PREREQ^ Permission 

of instructor. 

413 American Art (3) A survey of American 

paintings and sculpture from Colonial times to the 

present. 

♦ 415 Art History: Independent Study (3) 

Opportunin- for the student to pursue a particular 

field of interest. 

416 American Architecture I (3) Introduction to 

American architecture of the early colonies and of 

the repubUc after American independence. Analysis 

of traditional European elements and American 

adaptadons in public and private buildings. 



417 American Architecture II (3) Introduction of 
architectural forms and stvles in America from 
1800 through the 21st centut)-. Analysis of the 
social, st}'listic, and technological sources of the 
last two centuries with fiiture developments pro- 
jected for the 21st centur\' environment. 
419 Women Artists (3) An introduction to 
women artists in histot)' from the prehistoric peri- 
od through the 21st centuri'. Analysis of painting, 
sculpture, architecture, and nontraditional art 
forms produced by women. Special focus on artists 
of the 19th and 20th centuries. 
♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Biology 

(See also Pre-Medical Program) 

Schmucker Science Annex (#2) 

610-436-2538 

Judith Greenamyer, Chairperson 

Sharon Began, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Began, Beneski, Fairchild, Fish, Knabb, Slusher, 

Tiebout, Waber, Woodruff 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Broitman, Casotti, Mbuy, Vreeland 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Artus, Evenden, Greenamyer 
ADJUNCT FACULTY: Gotkin, Grant, Hertel, Lennon, Natale, 

Warhol, White 
The major in biology centers on a core of courses that emphasize 
broad unifying principles. Available electives provide enriching experi- 
ences in many areas of biologi,'. 

The Department of Biology offers three undergraduate degree programs 
with five concentrations within the B.S. degree: 

1. The B.A. in BIOLOGY provides the liberal education and the spe- 
cial preparation required for careers in university teaching, govern- 
ment service, independent and industrial research, science-related 
sales and public relations, and other areas of business. This program 
also prepares students for admission to graduate and professional 
schools. The possibility of 26 semester hoiu-s of student electives 
enables the smdent to obtain a minor in another area of interest. 

2. The B.S. in BIOLOGY: GENERAL CONCENTRATION can 
be individually tailored to provide the skills that students need to 
achieve their career goals. This program also provides the basic 
preparation needed for entrv into graduate or professional schools, 
including phvsical therapv programs. 

3. The B.S. in BIOLOGY:CELL and MOLECULAR concentra- 
tion offers the smdent a strong background in both biology and 
chemistr)\ Emphasis on lab-oriented courses prepares the student 
to pursue a career in laboratory research in cell and molecular biol- 
ogy at industrial, medical, academic, and government facilities. 
This program also prepares the smdent for admission to graduate 
and professional schools. 

4. The B.S. in BIOLOGY: MICROBIOLOGY concentration pre- 
pares smdents for careers in research laboratories, industrial and 
academic research, and government service in the areas of bacteri- 
olog)', immunology, virology, mycology, microbial ecology, and 
parasitology. The program provides extensive laborator)- experience 
with the techniques that are most usefiil and important to modem 
microbiological science. This program also provides the basic 
preparation needed for entry into graduate or professional schools. 

5. The B.S. in BIOLOGY: ECOLOGY concentration provides an 
opportunin,' for interested smdents to obtain a strong background 
in field biology. The required core curriculum and concentration 
electives provide opportunities for later careers as biologists in state 
and federal environmental agencies, industry, environmental con- 



sulting firms, and similar organizations. Internships are strongly 
recommended as part of the program. Course work emphasizes 
skills obtained in biolog}', chemistn', and mathematics. Additional 
course work from other departments may be recommended to fijJ- 
fdl particular career objectives. 

6. The B.S. in BIOLOGY; MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY concen- 
tration offers students the oppormnity to enter the field of labora- 
tory medicine with emphasis on the techniques and instrumenta- 
tion used to evaluate disease processes. This concentration allows 
students to complete the necessary general education and depart- 
mental requirements in three years. The fourth }'ear is spent in a 
hospital internship training program at one of the several affiliated 
hospitals, and smdents receive 26 semester hours credit for the 
internship year (BIO 407 and 408, Internship in Medical 
Technology). To qualify for the internship, smdents must have a 
2.75 GPA and be accepted by an accredited hospital medical tech- 
nology program. Smdents completing the internship will receive a 
B.S. in biology/medical technology concentration and the training 
necessary to take the national certification exam. Affiliated hospi- 
tals include Pennsylvania Hospital, Reading Hospital, and Tenet 
hospitals. 

7. The B.S. in EDUCATION— BIOLOGY is a program designed 
to prepare the student for a career in teaching in secondary- 
schools. Professional certification in biology is awarded to the stu- 
dent who completes the program satisfactorily. Smdents are 
stronglv advised to seek certification in a related area to enhance 
their employment potential. Such related areas include general sci- 
ence, health, education, athletic training, and environmental edu- 
cation. This program requires 126 credits for completion. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE 
BACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Science requirements are met by CHE 103 and 

PHY 130. 

2. Biolog)' Requirements* 
BIO 110, 220, and 230 

3. Other Science Requirements 
CHE 103-104, 231; CRL 103-104, 231; 
and PHY 130 

4. All B.A./B.S. students must also take BIO 409, 
490 or 491; CHE 232; and Pm' 140. 

5. Mathematics Requirements 6-7 semester hours 
MAT 121 and one semester of calculus 



9 semester hours 



20 semester hours 



'Biologv' core courses must be passed with a grade of C- (70%) or better. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Biolog)' 



B.A. IN BIOLOGY 



1, 



Required Biology Courses* 21 semester hours 

BIO 110, 215, 217, 220, 230, 270, and 409 or 

490 or 491 

Biology Electives 12 semester hours 

Selected under advisement 

Foreign Language Requirement up to 12 semester hours 

S. IN BIOLOGY— GENERAL Concentration 

Required Biology Courses* 21 semester hours 

BIO 110, 215, 217, 220, 230, 270, and 409 or 

490 or 491 

Biology Electives 21 semester hours 

Selected under advisement 



B.S. IN BIOLOGY— CELL AND MOLECULAR 
Concentration 

1. Required Chemistry Courses 
CHE 476, 491**, and CRL 476 

2. Required Biology Courses 
BIO 110*, 214*,'215* or 217*, 220*, 230*, 
421*, 431, 490** or 409 or 491, and BIL 333 

3. Biology or Chemistry Electives 
Selected from courses at or above the 300 level 

B.S. IN BIOLOGY— ECOLOGY Concentration 



5-6 semester hours 



28 semester hours 



12 semester hours 



1. Required Biology Courses 27 semester hours 
BIO 110*, 215*, 217*, 220*, 230*, 270*, 

310, 470, and 409* or 490* or 491* 

2. Biology Electives 12 semester hours 
Selected under advisement from BIO 275, 277, 

313, 377, 471, 472, 473, 474, 475, 476, and 485 

3. Ecologically Relevant Courses 6 semester hours 
Selected under advisement 

B.S. IN BIOLOGY— MICROBIOLOGY Concentration 

1. Required Biology Courses* 30 semester hours 
BIO 110*, 214*, 215* or 217*, 220*, 230*, 

270*, 464*, 465*, and 409* or 490* or 491* 

2. Microbiology Electives 11 semester hours 
Selected under advisement from BIO 314, 334, 

414, 452, 454, 456, 474, 480, 484 or BIL 333 

B.S. IN BIOLOGY— MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 
Concentration 

1. Required Biology Courses* 53 semester hours 

BIO 110*, 214*, 215* or 217*, 220*, 230*, 407*, 
408', 465*, 490* 

B.S. IN EDUCATION— BIOLOGY (126 semester hours) 

1. Required Biology Courses* 25 semester hours 
BIO 110*, 214*, 215*, 217*, 220*, 230*, 270*, 

and 311* 

2. Biology Electives 6 semester hours 
Selected under advisement 



3. Required Education Courses 30 semester hours 

4. Required Earth Systems Course 3 semester hours 
SCB210 

Minor in Biology 18 semester hours 

The Department of Biolog\' offers a minor in biology. The biology 
minor requirements include the following: 

1. Required prerequisite: BIO 110 (must be passed with a C- or bet- 
ter), or BIO 100 (must be passed with a grade of A). These courses 
are prerequisites and must be completed before admission to the 
minor. The grades in these courses are not used in calculating the 
GPA in the minor. These do not count towards the 18 semester 
hours required for the minor. 

2. BIO 215 or BIO 217 (must be passed with a C- or better). 

3. In addition to requirements 1 and 2, students must complete 15 
additional credits at the 200 level or higher for the minor. At least 
eight credits must be in addition to the biology courses required by 
the student's major. Nonmajor courses such as BIO 204, 259, 269, 
and 307 require a grade of C- or better. 

4. A minimum of 18 credits in biology, exclusive of BIO 110, must 
be taken for a minor in biology, and all minor courses must be at 
the 200 level or above. 

5. To graduate with a biolog)' minor, students must maintain a GPA 
of 2.00 in the minor courses, and they must meet with the minor 
adviser at least once per semester. At least nine credits in biology 
must be taken at WCU. 

Internal and External Transfer Students 

For an internal transfer into any biology degree program, a student 
must: 

1. Be in good academic standing (2.00 GPA or better); 

2. Have already passed BIO 100 with an A- or better, or BIO 110 
with a C- or better; 

3. Complete the application for change of major. 
For newly admitted transfer students, a student must: 

1. Meet University standards for admission to West Chester 
University; 

2. Have a grade of C- (70%) or better if they have taken a BIO 110 
equivalent. 

3. Interview with department representatives. 

NOTE: In order to receive a degree in biology from West Chester 
University, a transfer student must successfiiUy complete a minimum 
of 50 percent of the required biology credits in the West Chester 
University Department of Biology. 

Advanced Placement Policy 

A score of three or better on the Biology Advanced Placement E.xam 
of the SAT I will transfer as credit for BIO 110, General Biology. 



'Biology core courses must be passed with a grade of C- (70%) or better. 
"CHE 491 may be substituted for BIO 490. Students who choose to do this 
must take 14 credits of upper-level BIO or CHE electives. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
BIOLOGY 

Symbol: BIO unless otherwise shown 
(3,2) represents three hours of lecture and 
two hours of lab. 

100 Basic Biological Science (3) Basic principles 
of biology. Cell theory, metabolism, genetics, 
development, diversity of life forms, and ecology. 
Not open to biology majors. (2,2) 
# 102 Humans and the Environment (3) The 
effects of human population on earth's resources 
are studied against a background of physical, bio- 
logical, and health sciences. Note: Students com- 
pleting BIO 102 may not take ESS 102 or 



ENV102 for credit. May not be taken as biology 
major elective. 

110 General Biology (3) The concepts general to 
all living organisms such as cell structure and fiinc- 
tion, genetics, evolution, and ecology. This course 
is designed for majors in biology and related scien- 
tific areas. (2,3) 

204 Introductory Microbiology (4) The biology 
of medically important microorganisms, their 
structure, taxonomy, physiology, control, and host- 
parasite interactions. (3,2) PREREQ: BIO 100 or 
BIO 110 and one semester ot chemistr)'. May not 
be taken as a biology major elective. 
214 General Microbiology (4) The biology of 
microorganisms, their stmcture, physiology, and 
control; the namre and dynamics of disease and dis- 



ease control; principles of food, industrial, and envi- 
ronmental microbiolog)-. The laboratory will deal 
with microbiological techniques, isolation and iden- 
tification of microbes, and water and food analysis. 
This course is for biology majors. (3,3) PREREQ^ 
BIO 110 and one semester of chemistry. 
215 General Botany (3) A sun'ey of plant and 
plant-like organisms from bacteria to and includ- 
ing the angiosperms with emphasis on anatomy, 
physiology, reproduction, and economic impor- 
tance. (2,3) PREREQ: BIO 110. 
217 General Zoology (3) Principles of animal biol- 
ogy. Form and fiinction of vertebrate and inverte- 
brate animal types (2,3) PREREQ: BIO 110. 



# Approved interdisciplinary course 




Biolog)' 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



220 Cell Physiology (3) An introduction to cellu- 
lar and molecular biology with emphasis on cell 
morphology, biochemistry, and cell phvsiolog\'. 
(2,3) PREREQ: BIO 110 and CHEM 230 or 231 
(may be taken concurrently). 
230 Genetics (3) Nature of genetic material and 
its qualitative and quantitative variation: recombi- 
nation; interaction of gene products; regulation of 
genetic material; and its role in evolution. (3) 
PREREQ: BIO 110 and MAT 121. 
259 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) An 
introduction to human structure and function. 
Skeletal, muscular, and nervous s)'stems are 
emphasized. Laboratory involves study of human 
development and gross anatomy of the skeletal, 
muscular, and nervous systems. (3,2) May not be 
taken as a biology major elective. 

269 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 
Continuation of BIO 259. Endocrine, circulatory, 
respiratory, immune, digestive, and urogenital sys- 
tems emphasized. (3,2) Mav not be taken as a 
biology major elective. PREREQ: BIO 259. 

270 General Ecology (3) Relationships between 
living organisms and their en\'ironment. (2,3) 
PREREQ: BIO 110. Recommended are BIO 215 
and 217, MAT 121, or SCI 101 and 102 and one 
semester of computer science. 

275 Field Botany (3) Methods of studying plants 
in their natural surroundings. Use of keys, botani- 
cal manuals, and illustrated floras to identify' living 
specimens. (2,3) PREREQ: BIO 100 or 215. 
277 Vertebrate Ecology (3) Animal life in the 
surrounding localities. Identification, behavior, 
habitats, feeding, and reproduction. (2,3) PRE- 
REQ; BIO 100 or 217. 

307 Pathophysiology (3) An integrated study of the 
processes involved in the total body sj'stemic complex 
as it changes from the ordered homeostatic condition 
to the imbalanced diseased state. The use of disease 
models, with clinical considerations, strengthens the 
concepts. (3) PREREQi BIO 259 and 269. May not 
be taken as a biolog\' major elective. 

310 Biometrics (3) The experimental design and 
computer-assisted statistical anal\^is of biological 
research problems. (2,3) PREREQ^BIO 110 and 
MAT 121. 

311 Contemporary Issues in Biology Teaching 
(3) Curricular trends in biology education, 
biotechnology', and bioethics are analyzed in a 
social contc-rt through constructive controversy. 
The nature of science is explored and experiential 
skills are honed through practical application via a 
laboratorv-oriented, facultv-student mentoring 
program.' (2,2) PREREQ^BIO 110, 215, 217, 
230; EDF 100; EDP 250, 351 (or graduate-level 
equivalents); or permission of the instructor. May 
not be taken as a biology' elective. 

313 Marine Biology (3) The course is intended to 
provide a general introduction to the biology of 
marine organisms. Lectures will focus on the 
diversit)', ecology, and adaptations of organisms 
living in the marine em'ironmcnt. (3) 

314 Diagnostic Bacteriology (4) Systematic study 
of pathogenic bacteria with extensive laboratory 
experience in handling and identiiy-ing these 
organisms. (3,3) PREREQ: BIO 214. 

BIL 333 Introduction to Recombinant DNA 
Methodology (2) Laboratory' techniques for gene 
manipulation, restriction endonuclease use, DNA 
electrophoresis, gene cloning in E. coli, and poly- 
merase chain reaction. (0, 4) PREREQ^ BIO 204 
or214, BIO230, CHE231. 
334 Microbial Genetics (4) A course on the genet- 
ics of bacteria, their viruses, plasmids, and cranspos- 
able elements. Applications of microbial genetics in 



generic engineering and biotechnology. (3,3) PRE- 
REQ, BIO 110, 214, 230, and CHE 231. 
357 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4) Com- 
parative study of the principal organ systems ot 
vertebrates as to their structure, fiinction, and evo- 
lutionary' relationships. (2,4) PREREQ^ BIO 217. 
367 Physiologyof Drug Interaction (3) An 
introduction to the mechanism of action of proto- 
type drugs. The physiological alterations produced 
by various drugs as well as interactions between 
drug classes yvill be emphasized. (3) PREREQj^ 
BIO 269 or BIO 468 or BIO 469. 
377 Entomology (3) The structure, function, clas- 
sification, economic importance, and biological 
significance of insects. (2,3) PREREQ: BIO 110 
or 217. 

407 and 408 Internship in Medical Technology 
(13 for each semester, total of 26) A two-semes- 
ter, work-study appointment yvith an affiliated 
hospital. The satisfactory completion of this 
internship is accepted as the senior year's yvork by 
West Chester University'. This internship yvill pre- 
pare the student to take the National Exam for 
Medical Technologists. PREREQ^ Students yvho 
have completed 65 credit hours in the B.S. biolog}' 
general concentration should applv for this intern- 
ship in the summer folloyving their sophomore 
year. Students must have an overall GPA of 2.75 
and approval from the Department of Biology and 
the affiliated hospital. 

♦ 409 Internship in Biological Sciences (3-16) A 
one-semester, work-studv appointment with a 
commercial, industrial, or governmental agency. 
Students yvill be supervised jointiv by a profession- 
al scientist of the agency and a Department of 
Biology faculty member. A maximum of eight 
combined credits from BIO 409 and BIO 491 
may be applied to biology' electives. PREREQ^ 
Biology' major, senior standing, GPA of 2.5 over- 
all, 2.50 in biology', and approval of biology' cur- 
riculum committee. 

414 Applied and Industrial Microbiology (3) This 
course traces both the historical and current applica- 
tions of microbiology' in industry and society'. Topics 
covered during lectures include building and equip- 
ment design, microbiological safety, fermentation, 
yvaste treatment, compost, and food production. 
The course also features guest lectures from several 
practicing microbiologists involved in industry. 
PREREQ^ BIO 214 or permission of the instructor. 
421 Cellular and MolecuJar Biology (4) A lecture 
and laboratory course that studies the molecular 
basis of cellular hfe. Eukary'otic cell structure and 
function yvill be emphasized. (3,3) PREREQ^ 
BIO 220, BIL 333. and CHE 232. 
428 Animal Histology (3) A study of the micro- 
scopic structure and frincrion of vertebrate tissues 
and organs. (2,2) PREREQi BIO 110 and 217, or 
permission of the instructor. 
431 Molecular Genetics (3) A second course in 
genetics, covering the molecular biolog)' of genetic 
events. Emphasis yvill be on the molecular details of 
basic genetic processes, such as DNA replication 
and transcription, RNA translation and protein 
synthesis, the genetic code, molecular mechanisms 
of gene regulation, and an introduction to "biotech- 
nology." (3) PREREQ. BIO 230 and CHE 232. 

♦ 435-438 Course Topics in Biology' (1-3) 
Courses in this series are of timely interest to the 
student. Topics may include biological terminolo- 
g)', laboratory techniques, mycology, etc. Open 
only to junior and senior science majors. 

448 Animal Development (4) Introduction to 
principles of animal development with laboratory 



study of vertebrate embn'os. (3,3) PREREQ^ BIO 
110, 217, 220, and 230.' 

452 Parasitology (3) Biology of the principal par- 
asites of man and domestic animals. Emphasis is 
on life cy'cles of common parasites, identification 
of diagnostic forms, and understanding the dis- 
eases associated yvith parasites of major economic 
and medical importance. (3) PREREQ^ BIO 204 
or 214, and 217. 

454 Mycology (3) An introductory course includ- 
ing a general study ot the biology' ot fiingi and a 
survey of the field of medical mycology'. (3) PRE- 
REQi BIO 110 and 214 plus another three-credit- 
hour biology' course. 

456 Virology (3) Molecular biology' of bacterial, 
plant, and animal viruses; virus classification, ultra- 
structure, mechanisms of replication, and effects of 
virus infection on host cell. PREREQ; CHE 232 
and BIO 230 and 214. 

457 Functional Animal Morphology (3) A study 
of the structure, form, and function of morpholog- 
ical adaptations in animals as examined through a 
mechanical, ecological, and evolutionary perspec- 
tive. (3) PREREQ; BIO 217. 

464 Microbial Physiology (4) Physiology and 
biochemical variations seen in prokary'otes and 
lower eukan'otes. (2,4) PREREQ: BIO 214 and 
230, and CHE 232. 

465 Immunology (4) Immunoglobulin structure 
and fiinction, nature of antigens, cell-mediated 
immunity', hy'persensitivity, regulation of immuni- 
ty, and immunological diseases. Laboratory experi- 
ence in immunological techniques. (3,3) PRE- 
REQ: BIO 214 and CHE 232. 

466 Plant Physiology (3) Physiological processes 
of plants. Photosy'nthesis, respiration, intermediary 
metabolism, entrance of solutes into the plant, 
water metabolism, and groyvth regulators. (2,3) 
PREREQ: BIO 215 and CHE 231. 

467 Endocrinology (3) An integrative look at the 
physiology' of the mammalian endocrine system in 
the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. 
The pathology' associated with hormonal imbal- 
ance yviU be included. (3) PREREQi BIO 217 and 
BIO 220 with a C or better in each, plus any 
300/400 level biology- course yvith a C or better. 

468 Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (4) 
Comparative physiology of fishes, amphibians, 
reptiles, birds, and mammals, yvith emphasis on 
organ-based homeostasis. (3,3) PREREQ; BIO 
217 and BIO 220. 

469 Human Physiology (4) Theoretical and 
applied principles ot the physiology' ot humans pre- 
sented from an org'an-sy'stem approach. Emphasis is 
placed on homeostatic regulaton' mechanisms. (3,3) 
PREREQ; BIO 220, BIO 230,'CHE 232. May 
not be taken as a biology' major elective. 

470 Population Biology (3) A quantitative, sec- 
ond course in ecology, emphasizing distributional 
patterns and fluctuations in abundance of natural 
populations. (2,3) PREREQ; BIO 270. MAT 
121, and one semester ot calculus. 

471 Wetlands (3) A course designed to provide 
practical experience in wedands' classification, 
delineation, regulation, management, and mitiga- 
tion practices. The abiotic and biotic characteris- 
tics of inland and coastal wetlands are emphasized. 
(2,3) PREREQ; Eight hours of biology' or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

472 Aquatic Biology' (3) A laboratory' and field- 
oriented course in the ecology' and biota of streams 
and wetlands. (2,3) PREREQ; BIO 215, 217, 270. 



' This course may be taken again for credit. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Chemistrv 



473 Conservation Biology (3) The application of 
basic biological and ecological principles for the 
preservation of biological diversity'. Emphasis will be 
on understanding the threats to biodiversity, the val- 
ues of biodiversity, and preservation strategies 
including ecological risk assessment and the man- 
agement of endangered species, habitats, and ecosys- 
tems. PREREQ.(rcquired): BIO 110, 215 or 217, 
and 270. PREREQ.(recommcnded): BIO 310. 

474 Microbial Ecology (4) Theory and applica- 
tion ot modern microbial ecolog)'. Lectures will 
focus on topics such as microbial communities, 
interactions with other organisms, biogeochem- 
istry, and biotechnology. (3,3) PREREQiBIO 
110, 214, 270, and CHE 103, 104. 

475 Plant Communities (3) A survey of ecologi- 
cal, morphological, and physiological strategies of 
plants from seed through adult stages. The inte- 
gration of these strategies to explain the major 
plant communities of North America will be cov- 
ered. (2,3) PREREQ: BIO 215. 

476 Limnology (3) The measurement and analy- 
sis of the physical, chemical, and biological prop- 
erties of lakes. (2,3) PREREQIBIO 110 and 
CHE 103, 104. 

480 Light Microscopy and the Living Cell (3) A 
one-semester lecture and lab course covering the 
theory and practical techniques of all types of light 
microscopy and their uses in investigating hving 
cells. Aso includes techniques such as microinjec- 
tion, cell electrophysiolog)', and others. Strong 
emphasis on "hands-on" work with equipment. 
(2,2) PREREQ: BIO 110, BIO 215 or 217, CHE 
104, CRL 104, or permission ot instructor. 
484 Epidemiology (3) A general study of the epi- 
demiology ot both infectious and noninfectious 



diseases, including industrial and environmentallv 
related health problems. (3) PREREQ: BIO 214. 
485 Systematic Botany (3) Principles of evolution 
as illustrated by the principles of plant taxonomy. 
Modern concepts of biosvstematics. Practical 
experience in plant identification. (2,3) PREREQ; 
BIO 215. 

490 Biology Seminar (3) Reports on special top- 
ics and current developments in the biological sci- 
ences. PREREQ: 18 hours of biology courses and 
senior standing. 

♦ 491 Special Problems in Biology (1-3) Tutorial 
course primarily for advanced undergraduate biolo- 
gy majors capable of independent study and 
research on a problem approved by the supervising 
instructor. A maximum of eight combined credits 
from BIO 409 and BIO 491 may be applied to 
biology electives. PREREQ; Permission ot instruc- 
tor, 2.50 GPA overall, 2.50 GPA in biology. 
IND 401 Environmental Applications of GIS 
(3) Students are introduced to regional problem 
solving based on interdisciplinary, scientific data 
using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). 
Background in one of the natural or applied sci- 
ences is presumed, and students without such 
background should contact one of the instructors 
before scheduling. Most relevant lecture material is 
handled as readings outside of class, and class time 
is devoted largely to environmental analysis using 
ArcViewGIS. One half-day field trip is required. 
(1,2) PREREQ: Minimum of 64 credits earned, 
major in BIO, CHE, ENV, ESS, GEO, or PHY, 
with at least 15 credits earned in one of these dis- 
ciplines, or permission of the instructor. 

# SCB 210 The Origin of Life and the Universe 
(3) An interdisciplinary course that presents the 



theory and evidence for the first three minutes of 
the universe and tormation of the stars, galaxies, 
planets, organic molecules, and the genetic basis of 
organic evolution. May not be taken as a biology 
major elective. 

SCB 350 Science Education in the Secondary' 
School (3) A methods course emphasizing knowl- 
edge of curricular development and skill in plan- 
ning, involving the design and execution of learn- 
ing activities for all instructional modes. (2,2) 
PREREQ: Required core courses in science disci- 
pline and EDS 306 (or graduate-level equivalent), 
or permission of instructor. 

SCI 101 The Carbon Cycle (3) An exploration of 
how the carbon cycle connects earth and life, 
through photosynthesis, respiration, decay, rock 
formation and weathering, and plate tectonics. 
Humans have altered the carbon cycle by burning 
fossil tuels. Students investigate the carbon cycle 
on the WCU campus and consider the implica- 
tions for global warming. For elementary educa- 
tion majors only. Team taught with the 
Department of Geology and Astronomy. 
SCI 102 Electricity with Physical and Biological 
Applications (3) An exploration of the physics of 
electrical circuits, the chemical basis of electricity 
as the flow of electrons, acid-base and oxidation- 
reduction reactions in chemical and in living sys- 
tems, the electrical actiNity in the human netN'ous 
system, and connections between electricit)' and 
sensation and locomotion in humans. For elemen- 
tary education majors only. Team taught with the 
departments of Physics and Chemistry. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Chemistry 

(See also Pre-Medical Program) 

119 Schmucker Science Center II 

610-436-2631 

James S. Falcone, Jr. Chairperson 

Michael J. Moran, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Fenton, Ghoroghchian, Moran 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Ahmad, Barth, Cichowicz, 

Frost, Reid, Ressner 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Caffo, Falcone, Goodson, Starn, 

Townsend 
The Department of Chemistry is approved by the American Chemical 
Society's Committee on Professional Training. Graduates ot the B.S. 
in chemistry program and the B.S. in biochemistry program receive 
certification it they complete the program. 
The Department of Chemistr)' offers five undergraduate degree 
programs: 

(1) The B.S. in CHEMISTRY program (approved by the American 
Chemical Society [ACS]) provides a rigorous scientific foundation in 
all major areas of chemistry. This degree prepares the graduate for a 
career in a wide variety of chemically related areas including the 
chemical, petroleum, environmental, and pharmaceutical sectors. In 
addition, it serves as a basis for graduate and professional smdy lead- 
ing to higher level industrial positions, teaching at the college level, 
or involvement in technical aspects of related fields such as law. 

(2) The B.S. in BIOCHEMISTRY program (approved by the 
American Chemical Society [ACS]) provides a comprehensive 
background in the major areas of chemistry with an emphasis in 



biochemistiy. Students awarded this degree will be qualified for 
employment opportunities in chemistry and biochemistry. The 
program also prepares students for graduate study in chemistry 
and in biochemistry. 

(3) The B.S. in CHEMISTRY-BIOLOGY (Pre-Medical) provides 
the core courses required for admission to schools ot medicine, 
dentistry, and veterinary medicine as well as schools of optometry, 
podiatry, chiropractic, and physical therapy. It also enables the 
student to pursue a career in biochemistry and molecular biology. 

(4) The B.S. in FORENSIC CHEMISTRY is a program that pre- 
pares students for careers in crimalistics and toxicology. The pro- 
gram also serves as a basis for graduate study and specialization in 
these fields. A one-semester internship in a police or toxicology 
forensic-chemistry laborator)' is mandatory. 

(5) The B.S. in EDUCATION in CHEMISTRY program prepares 
the student for a career in teaching chemistry in secondary 
schools. The program gives the student experience in the major 
branches of chemistry so that, with proper selection of electives, 
graduate work in either pure chemistr)' or chemistry education can 
be pursued. Sufficient flexibility is provided so that the student 
also may become certified in general science. This program 
requires 126 credits for completion. 

Majors in the five B.S. programs should consult the Department of 
Chemistry handbook and their adviser for current requirements. A grade 
of C- or better is necessary in all required science and math courses. 



Chemistry 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Research and Internship Programs 

Although internships are not a mandatory part of all chemistry pro- 
grams, they are available to majors on a selective basis. Students receive 
varying amounts of credit based on the number of hours spent in a 
work situation and on the nature of the academic work during the 
internship or research. Credit varies from one to 12 semester hours. 
The maximum number of research or internship credits that can be 
taken may be limited by the department. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO DEGREE 
PROGRAMS IN CHEMISTRY, BIOCHEMISTRY, 
FORENSIC CHEMISTRY, AND EDUCATION - 
CHEMISTRY 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Note; Certain programs have individualized 

requirements; see below. 

2. Chemistry Requirements 
CHE 103-104, 231-232, 321, 418, 476, 491. 
CRL 103-104, 231, 321 

Lab safety exam to be passed before completing 
70 credits. See adviser for more information. 

3. Other Science Requirements 
PHY 170-180; BIO 110 (B.S. chemistry 
majors may substitute CSC 141) 
PHY 170 and BIO 110 (or CSC 141) fiilfill 
science general education requirements. 

4. Mathematics Requirements 
MAT 161-162 (MAT 161 flilfills a general 
education math requirement) 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — CHEMISTRY 

1. Required Chemistry Courses 26 semester hours 
CHE 341, 342, 409, 411, 424 

CRL 232, 341, 342, 411, and 424 

2. Chemistry Electives 9 semester hours 
Group A electives: CHE 333 or CHE 477 

(3 semester hours) 

Group B electives: selected from upper-division 

chemistry courses (6 semester hours) 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

1. Required Chemistry Courses 28 semester hours 
CHE341, 342, 4li,424, 477 

CRL 232, 341, 342, 411, 424, and 476 

2. Other Required Courses 3 semester hours 
One of these courses; BIO 214, 220, or 230 

3. Biochemistry Elective 4 semester hours 
Students must select from among the following: 

CHE 381, 479, 480, or CRL 477 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — FORENSIC CHEMISTRY 

1. Required Chemistry Courses 20 semester hours 

CHE 341, 371, 45i, 479 
CRL 341, 371, 476, and a 300-400 level 
chemistry elective 



27 semester hours 



11 semester hours 



11 semester hours 



2. Other Required Courses 15 semester hours 

BIO 204, 230; BIL 333; CRJ 110; and MAT 121 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION — 
CHEMISTRY 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 
Note; Students in this program must register for 
LIT 165 and PHI 180 as humanities general 
education courses, and for PSY 100 as a 
behavioral/social science general education course. 

2. Required Chemistry Courses 9-10 semester hours 
CHE 341 or 345, 409 or 411, 417 

CRL 341 

3. Required Education Courses 33 semester hours 
EDA/EDR 341, EDF 100; EDM 300; 

EDP 250, 351; EDS 306, 411, 412; and SCE 350 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — CHEMISTRY-BIOLOGY 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Note: Students in the chemistry-biology 

curriculum must take PHI 470 as a humanities or 
interdisciplinary general education requirement. 

2. Required Chemistry Courses 32 semester hours 
CHE 103, 104, 231, 232, 321, 345, 418*, 476, 491 

CRL 103, 104, 231, 321*, and 476 

3. Required Biology Courses 
BIO 110, 217, 220, 230, 357, 448, and 468 

4. Required Courses 
PHY 130-140 or 170-180 

5. Required Mathematics Courses 
MAT 121 and 161 

6. Concentration Electives* 
Selected from upper-division chemistry and 
biology courses 

Minor in Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry offers a minor in chemistry. The 
requirements are as follows; 

1. Required courses; Completion of CHE 231, CHE 232, CRL 231, 
CHE 321, CRL 321, and three credits of 300-level or higher 
chemistry elective(s). These electives must be chemistry courses 
(CHE) that satisfy the chemistry requirements of the ACS chem- 
istry major program. Each of these courses must be passed with a 
grade of C- or better. 

2. Completion of the prerequisites for these courses including CHE 
103, CHE 104, CRL 103, CRL 104. Each of these courses must 
be passed with a grade of C- or better. 

3. GPA of at least a 2.00 in the minor. 

4. Interview with the Department of Chemistry minor adviser and 
chair at least once a semester. 



24 semester hours 



8 semester hours 



7 semester hours 



9-10 semester hours 



17 semester hours 



' Students may, with the permission of the department chair and the coordina- 
tor of the pre-medical program, substitute an approved 6-12 credit internship 
for selected requirements and concentration electives. The courses with aster- 
isks would be replaced by the internship (12 credits). 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
CHEMISTRY 

Symbols: CHE, CRL 

100 Concepts of Chemistry (3) A broad survey 
course with a laboratory experience that seeks to 
develop an understanding ot the field of chemistry 
through inquiry. Basic competence in scientific 
methods and procedures will be obtained by 
observing chemical reactions and studying the 
chemical and physical properties of a variety of 
compounds. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 

101 Fundamentals of Chemistiy (3) A mathe- 
matically oriented course for students who intend 
later to take CHE 103 but whose science and 



mathematics backgrounds are judged by a pretest 
to need remediation. 

103-104 General Chemistry MI (3) (3) Basic 
laws and theories ot chemistry, including atomic 
structure, chemical bonding, oxidation-reduction, 
solutions, and ionic equilibria. Correlations ot 
chemical principles and their application to mod- 
ern descripfive chemistry. CHE 103 must precede 
CHE 104. PREREQ.(for CHE 103): Successfol 
completion of high school chemistry OR passing 
grades in CHE 101. 

CRL 103-104 Experimental General Chemistry 
I-ll (1) (1) Basic laborator)' studies in college 
chemistry utilizing the quantitative approach. 
Semimicro qualitative analysis and inorganic 



preparations. CONCURRENT or PREREQ: 
CHE 103-104. CRL 103 must precede CRL 104. 
107 General Chemistry for the Allied Health 
Sciences (4) A one-semester treatment ot the hin- 
damentals ot chemistr\', including atomic structure 
and bonding, types ot reactions, kinetics, equilibri- 
um, and thermodynamics. May not be taken as a 
chemistry major elecrive. CRL 107 may be taken 
concurrently or alter CHE 107. 
CRL 107 General Chemistry Lab for Allied 
Health Science (1) A one-semester laboratory 
course to complement CHE 107. Basic laboratory 
techniques, both qualitative and quantitative, will 
be used to illustrate principles from the lecture. 
CONCURRENT or PREREQ: CHE 107. 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



Chemistry 




230 Introduction to Organic and Biological 
Chemistry (3) A course in the fundamentals of 
organic chemistry. Structural theory of organic mol- 
ecules, organic synthesis, and biological applica- 
tions. PREREQ: C- or better in CHE 104 or 107. 
231-232 Organic Chemistry I-II (4) (3) A survey 
of the classes of organic reactions from a mechanis- 
tic deductive approach. Preparatory topics will 
include atomic structure, bonding theories, reso- 
nance,, and acid-base concepts. CHE 231 wtU focus 
on classes of organic molecules, organic nomencla- 
ture, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution, and 
elimination reactions applied to the chemistry of 
hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, alcohols, and simple 
systems. CHE 232 will include reactions of car- 
bonyl compounds, the chemistry of aromatic com- 
pounds, molecular rearrangements, oxidation and 
reduction reactions, carbanion and amine chem- 
istry, and spectroscopy. PREREQ.(for CHE 231): 
CHE 104. PREREa(for CHE 232): CHE 231. 
CRL 231-232 Experimental Organic Chemistry 
l-II (2) (2) Basic laboratory skiUs in organic chem- 
istry including classical as well as instrumental 
techniques. Organic synthesis and modern spec- 
trophotometric methods of identification. CON- 
CURRENT or PREREQ: CRL 104 and CHE 
231-232. CRL 231 must precede CRL 232. 
300 Fundamentals of Radioisotope Techniques 
(3) (Also PHY 340) Biological, chemical, environ- 
mental, and physical effects of nuclear radiation. 
Radiation detection instrumentation and radio 
tracer methodology. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 
PREREQ;. CHE 104 and PHY 140 or 180. 
310 Introductoiy Biochemistry (3) The chemical 
nature of biological phenomena is presented. 
Particular emphasis is placed on the metabolic 
pathways and the enzymes responsible for these 
processes with applications to nutrition. PREREQ^ 
CHE 230 or 231. (Not for chemistry majors.) 
321 Analytical Chemistry (3) Fundamental prin- 
ciples of analytical chemistry. Theory of gravimet- 
ric and volumetric methods of analysis. PREREQ; 
CHE 104. 

CRL 321 Experimental Analytical Chemistry (2) 
Practical experience in modern techniques of 
chemical analysis with emphasis on volumetric and 
gravimetric methods. CONCURRENT or PRE- 
REQ: CHE 321. 

333 Organic Chemistry III (3) An advanced 
mechanistic study ot organic compounds, fiinc- 
tional groups, and their reaction. Spectroscopic 
characterization of organic molecules will also be 
covered. PREREQ: C- or better in CHE 232. 

341 Physical Chemistry I (4) An introduction to 
physical chemistry including ideal gases, kinetic 
theory, three laws of thermodynamics, introduction 
to phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, applica- 
tion of the fiindamental equation of thermodynam- 
ics, transport phenomena, chemical kinetics, intro- 
ductory spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction, and the 
strucm're of solids. PREREQ: CHE 103, CHE 
104, MAT 161 and 162 all with a C- or better. 
CONCURRENT or PREREQ: PHY 180. 
CRL 341 Experimental Physical Chemistry I (2) 
Laboratory course in physical chemistry including 
computer applications, thermodynamics, chemical 
kinetics, structure, and spectroscopy. PREREQ;. 
CHE 104, MAT 162, PHY 170. COREQ; CHE 
341, PHY 180. 

342 Physical Chemistry II (3) Advanced thermody- 
namics including nonideal gases, nonideal systems, 
and thermodynamics at surfaces; introduction to sta- 
tistical mechanics; quanmm chemistry; advanced 
chemical kinetics, including kinetics near equilibri- 
um, catalytic kinetics, and activated complex theory; 



and dynamic electrochemistry. PREREQ;^ CHE 
341 and PHY 180, both with a C- or better. 
CRL 342 Experimental Physical Chemistry II 

(2) Experiments and projects in advanced physical 
chemistry. PREREQ: CHE/CRL 341. COREQ; 
CHE 342. 

345 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry (3) A 
survey of the fiindamental topics in physical chem- 
istry with applications to biology and medicine. 
Primarily for biology and chemistry-biology 
majors. PREREQ: CHE 232, MAT 161, and 
PHY 140 or 180. 

371 Forensic Chemistry (3) Introduction to crim- 
inahstics (chemical, forensic, analytical techniques) 
with the role, fiinctions, operations, and organiza- 
tion of a scientific police laboratory. PREREQ; 
CHE 104, CHE 232, and CHE 321. 
CRL 371 Forensic Chemistry Lab (2) Principles 
of microscopy, screening methods, and instrumen- 
tal methods of chemical analysis applied to crimi- 
nalistics and toxicological samples. CONCUR- 
RENT or PREREQ: CHE 371. 
381 Clinical Chemistry (3) Analysis of biological 
fluids. Chnical significance of enzyme, electrolyte, 
protein, and carbohydrate analysis. Requires per- 
mission of instructor or preparation in organic 
chemistry and quantitative analysis. CONCUR- 
RENT or PREREQ: CHE 321 and CHE 476. 
403 Chemistryof the Environment (3) The 
chemistry ot the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and 
biosphere; human impact on these areas. PRE- 
REQ; CHE 104. May also be offered with lab. (2 
hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 
409 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry (3) 
Emphasis is on the periodic properties of the rep- 
resentative elements, the structure of inorganic 
soUds, the chemistry of aqueous and nonaqueous 
solutions, and the study of some transition metals. 
Lanthanides and actinides also are studied. PRE- 
REQ: CHE/CRL 104. 
♦ 410 Advanced Independent Study or 
Chemical Research (3-6) Taken under the direct 
supervision ot a faculty member. May be taken for 
two semesters for a total of six credits. PREREQ; 
Senior standing or permission of department 
chairperson. 

411 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) Structure 
and properties of the elements and inorganic com- 
pounds from a theoretical point of view. Atomic 
structure and the periodic law; molecular structure 
and bonding, including symmetry and MO theory; 
structure, bonding, and reactivity of transition-ele- 
ment compounds and main group compounds; 
acid-base chemistry. PREREQ; CHE 341. CON- 
CURRENT: CHE 342. 

CRL 411 Inorganic Syntheses (2) A four-hour lab- 
oratory course in the synthesis and characterization 
of inorganic compounds of the main group and the 
transition elements. PREREQ; CHE 409 or 411. 

417 History of Chemistry (1) The history of 
chemistry and its predecessors from earUest times 
to the present day. PREREQ; CHE 104. 

418 Chemical Information (1) Instruction in the 
use of a modern chemical hbrary, reference and 
data acquisition, synthetic procedures, and com- 
puter data bases. PREREQ; CHE 231. 

424 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3) Basic 
principles of apphed instrumental analysis. Special 
emphasis on the use of spectrophotometric and 
electroanalytical instrumentation. PREREQ; 
CHE 321 and 341. CONCURRENT: CHE 342. 
CRL 424 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 
Laboratory (2) Practical experience in the choice 
and apphcation of instrumental methods of analy- 



sis to chemical systems. CONCURRENT or 
PREREQ; CHE 424. 

436 Polymer Chemistry (3) Polymerization kinet- 
ics, rheology of polymer melts, crystallization para- 
meters, and monomer reactivity in copolymeriza- 
tion. PREREQ; CHE 232. 

CRL 436 Polymer Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

Synthesis of poljnmers; molecular, physical, and 
thermal characterization of polymers. Instrumental 
methods include X-rays, IR, electron microscopy, 
and thermal analysis. CONCURRENT: CHE 436. 

443 Quantum Chemistry (3) Basic quantum 

chemistry including the properties of wave func- 
tions, the hydrogen atom problem, chemical bond- 
ing, angular momentum, eigenvalues and eigen- 
fiinctions, and spectroscopic concepts. PREREQ; 
CHE 342. 

♦ 450 Internship in Chemistry (1-12) A tiill- or 
part-time work-study appointment in a clinical, 
commercial, governmental, or industrial laboratory 
supervised joindy by an on-site supervisor and 
Department of Chemistry faculty member. PRE- 
REQ; GPA of 2.00 or above and permission of 
the Chemistry Internship Committee (CIC). 

451 Internship in Forensic Chemistry (1) A fiill- 
or part-time work-smdy appointment in a clinical, 
commercial, governmental, or industrial laboratory 
supervised joindy by an on-site supervisor and a 
Department of Chemistry faculty member. The ana- 
lytical methodology in the laboratory will include 
techniques applicable to forensic toxicology and/or 
criminalistics samples. PREREQ; Permission of the 
Forensic Chemistry Intemship Committee. 

452 Intemship in Chemistry-Biology (6-12) 

This course gives the student exposure to and 
hands-on experience in the field of biomedical 
research. Intended to be a full-time appointment 
in a hospital, medical school, or research institute, 
it may be modified to be part-time to better meet 
a student's needs. Supervised jointly by an on-site 
supervisor and a Department of Chemistry faculty 
member. The analytical methodology in the labo- 
ratory will include techniques applicable to bio- 
medical research. PREREQ; Permission of the 
Chemistry-Biology Internship Committee. 
460 Advanced Organic Spectroscopy (3) An 
advanced course in organic spectroscopy dealing with 
IR, NMR, and MS techniques. Other techniques 
also may be covered. PREREQ; CHE 232 with a 
C- or better. CONCURRENT: CHE 341 or 345. 

476 Biochemistry I (3) This course examines the 
physical and chemical characteristics of proteins, 
carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. The 
bioenergetics of carbohydrate and fat metabolism 
and the enzymatic control of these processes is a 
focal point. The role of nucleic acids in protein 
synthesis is also covered. PREREQ; CHE 232. 

CRL 476 Experimental Biochemistry I (2) Labo- 
ratory exercises in the tiindamentals of biochem- 
istry. CONCURRENT or PREREQ; CHE 476. 

477 Biochemistry II (3) This course is an exten- 
sion of CHE 476 and considers the biosynthesis 
and degradation of proteins, carbohydrates, hpids, 
and nucleic acids. The primary focus is on the 
interrelationship of these molecules and the path- 
ways involving their metabohsm. PREREQ; CHE 
345 (or equivalent) and CHE 476, or permission 
ot instructor. 

CRL 477 Experimental Biochemistry II (2) A 

second-semester laboratory course in biochemistry 
that stresses the use of advanced analytical instru- 
ments to characterize biologically important mole- 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 




Citizenship Education 



School ot Education 



cules and to elucidate their mechanism of action. 
PREREQ; CHE 476 and CRL 476. 
479 Chemical Toxicology (3) A one-semester 
course in the environmental and physiological 
aspects of chemical toxicity. Special emphasis will 
be placed on documentation, sampling, and verifi- 
cation of materials. PREREQ; CHE 232. 
^ 480 Introduction to Chemical Research 
(2-6) j\n independent chemical research project 
under the direction of a faculty member. The fac- 
ulty member assigns the research topic and back- 
ground Uterature readings and works closely with 
the student in the research laboratory giving 
instruction in laboratory techniques. The student 
is required to write a final research report. PRE- 



REQl Senior standing or permission of depart- 
ment chairperson. 

491 Seminar in Chemistiy (1) Oral presentation 
ot papers based on laboratory or hbrary research. 
PREREQi Permission of department chairperson. 
# SCB 210 The Origin of Life and the Universe 
(3) An interdisciplinary course that presents the 
theory and evidence for the first three minutes of 
the universe and formation of the stars, galaxies, 
planets, organic molecules, and the genetic basis of 
organic evolution. (3) PREREQ; High school or 
college courses in at least two sciences. 
sec 370 Science and Human Values (3) A one- 
semester course illustrating the impact of science 
on human thought, values, and institutions. 



Ethical, sociological, and psychological aspects of 
science-mediated change are covered in depth. 
# SCI 102 Electricity With Physical and 
Biological Applications (3) An exploration of the 
physics of electrical circuits, the chemical basis of 
electricity as the flow of electrons, acid-base and 
oxidation reactions in chemical and in living sys- 
tems, the electrical activity in the human nervous 
system, and connections between electricity and 
sensation and locomotion in humans. For elemen- 
tary education majors only. Team taught with the 
departments of Biology and Physics. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



Citizenship Education Program 
(formerly Social Studies) 

For additional information consult the major department or the 
Teacher Education Advisement Center, Room 251, Francis 
Harvey Green Librar}'. 

ELECTIVE CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania grants a secondary citizenship edu- 
cation certificate enabling the holder to teach geography, history, or polit- 
ical science in public school. West Chester University's program is 
accredited by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the National 
Council for the Social Studies, and the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education. Certification programs are offered in 
conjunction with the B.A. programs in geography, history, and political 
science. (Certification-only programs are available for those already hold- 
ing a baccalaureate degree.) For information, contact the appropriate 
department or the Teacher Ekiucation Advisement Center, Room 251, 
Francis Harvey Green Library. 

Program of Study 

This program is designed to assure that prospective citizenship educa- 
tion teachers possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions asso- 
ciated with the concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disci- 
plines that make up citizenship education, and that they are able to cre- 



ate learning experiences which make these aspects of the subject matter 
meaningfiil tor learners. The course of study emphasizes ten thematic 
strands: 

• Culture and culmral diversity 

• Time, continuity, and change 

• People, places, and environment 

• Individuals, groups, and institutions 

• Power, authority, and government 

• Production, distribution, and consumption 

• Science, technolog}', and society 

• Global connections 

• Civic ideals and practices 

• Individual development and identity 

Prospective teachers must complete subject-matter courses in history 
and social sciences that make up no less than 40 percent of a total 
four-year or extended preparation program with a major of 21 hours 
in either geography, history, or political science. 

COMMON REQUIREMENTS 

For details, see "Teaching Certification Programs" on pages 145-147. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION 

(formerly Social Studies) 

SSC 331 Teaching Citizenship Education in 

Secondary Schools (3) Methods and materials of 



teaching citizenship education for prospective sec- 
ondary school teachers. Emphasis is on combining 
educational theory with citizenship education con- 
tent for effective teaching. Exercises and practical 
apphcation. Enrollment is restricted to students 



who will be student teaching the next semester. 
Permission to waive this polic}' may be granted by 
the Department of Histon' chairperson. PRE- 
REQ: EDS 306. 



Department of Communication Studies 

512 Main HaU 

610-436-2500 

Dennis R. Klinzing, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Dean, Foeman, Klinzing, McCullough, Orr 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brown, Jenks, Levasseur, NeweU, 

Pearson, Remland, Thompsen 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Hickman, Lordan, MiUhous, Reed 



The Department of Communication Smdies offers two programs. 
One program leads to the bachelor ot arts degree and the other leads 
to the bachelor of science in education. 

1. The B.A. in COMMUNICATION STUDIES focuses on oral 
communication as the core of a liberal education that can be 
applied to a number of specializations. 

2. The B.S. in EDUCATION— COMMUNICATION is for stu- 
dents who wish to meet the state of Pennsylvania requirements for 
teacher certification in communication. 



College ot" Arts and Sciences 



Communication Studies 



Majors are expected to meet \vith their advisers to plan a course of 
study, to select courses prior to scheduling, to discuss career opportu- 
nities, and to keep abreast of departmental cocurricular activities. 
Handbooks are provided to help students be aware of requirements 
for each program in the department. Students who wish to transfer 
into the communication studies program must have a 2.0 GPA or 
better. Also see Program Admission Requirements below. 

Departmental Student Activities 

The Forensic Society, the radio station, the TV Club, and Women in 
Communication are student organizations that involve department 
faculty and resources. The activities of these organizations are open to 
all students. For more information see the "Student Affairs" section. 

Department Internships 

Internship experiences are available in all areas related to students' 
vocational and academic interests. Students have been placed in 
offices of congressmen, radio and television stations, and local indus- 
tries. Students and their placements are screened to assure mutual sat- 
isfaction for all parties involved. For details, students should check 
with the department's internship coordinator. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE B A. AND B.S. 
PROGRAMS 

General Education Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS— COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

1. Required Lower-Division Courses 18 semester hours 
COM 204 Dyadic Communication (3) 

COM 212 Mass Communication (3) 

COM 216 Small Group Communication (3) 

COM 219 Communication Concepts (3) 

COM 224 Communication Research (3) 
Three of the required lower-division courses (COM 208, 219, and 
224) are prerequisites for all communication studies courses except for 
COM 310 and COM 315. In addition, COM 216 is a prerequisite 
for COM 304. Also, COM 208 must be taken to satisfy the general 
education communication requirement. 

2. Upper-Division Courses 18 semester hours 
Students will work with their advisers to select six appropriate cours- 
es at the 300 and/or 400 level from the listing of department course 
offerings. In order to facilitate student/adviser selection of upper- 
division courses, a listing of those courses that the department plans 
to offer wUl be posted and distributed to advisers. This hsting will 
project two years into the ftiture and will be updated at the begin- 
ning of each academic year. COM 300 and COM 400 may not be 
used to satisfy the upper-division course requirements. 
Additional Notes 

a. Limited substitutions may be made to the required lower-divi- 
sion courses with the adviser's written consent. 

b. A grade of C or better must be earned in a COM course in 
order for it to meet a department requirement. Also, a 2.5 
average or better must be earned in the aggregate of lower- and 
upper-division courses before graduation will be recommended. 

c. To encourage B.A. communication studies majors to develop 
communication competence that extends beyond oral English, 
a grade of C or better is required in WRT 120 and 121, and a 
grade of C- or better is required in the 202-level course of a 
foreign language. If a major employs the culture cluster option 
to fiilfill his/her language requirement, a C- or better is 



required in the 102 level of the foreign language course and in 
each of the culture cluster courses, 
d. Students who exhaust their course repeat options and have not 
earned a grade of C or better in all the prerequisite communi- 
cation courses will be advised that they will not be able to com- 
plete the requirements for a B.A. in communication studies. 
The department chair will offer an exit interview and help them 
to identify available alternatives. 

3. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement 0-15 semester hours 
See pages 39-40. 

4. Apphed Area 24-27 semester hours 
Courses are to be selected in consultation 

with an adviser to meet career objectives. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION- 
COMMUNICATION 

1. Core Requirements 30 semester hours 
COM 201*, 208*, 219, and 224; ENG 230, 331, 

and 392; LIT 200 or 201*; CLS 260*; and LIN 330* 

2. Emphasis Area Requirements 30 semester hours 
Choose two areas: 

a. Speech Emphasis (15 credits) 

COM 204, 216, 307, and 405; THA 102**. 
Participation in forensics activities is required. 

b. Theater Emphasis (15 credits) 

THA 103**, 104, 210, 301, and 306 or 307. 
Participation in theater productions is required. 

c. Media Emphasis (15 credits) 

COM 212, 217 or 317, 320, 355, and CSW 131 

3. Professional Education Requirements 30 semester hours 
EDF 100, EDP 250 and 351, EDR/EDA 341, 

EDS 306, 411-412, and COM 402/ENG 390 

Program Admission Requirements 
(BA., B.S.Ed., and Minor Programs) 

Applicants who have completed the prerequisite core (COM 208, 
219, 224) will be ranked by grade point average in the core. Selection 
for admission will be based on these rankings at the conclusion of 
each semester, after grades are posted. Students who do not gain 
admission may reapply, but they must compete with the group of 
appUcants in that semester. 

Minor in Communication Studies 18 semester hours 

This minor may be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts 
or bachelor of science in the liberal studies general degree program. A 
minor in communication studies requires students to complete three 
prerequisite courses: COM 208, COM 219, and COM 224, and to 
earn a grade of C or better in each of these courses. Students are also 
required to earn a grade of C or better in WRT 120 and WRT 121. 
Three elective courses may then be selected from any 300- or 400- 
level courses offered in communication studies, but a C grade or bet- 
ter must be earned in each of these courses, and a 2.5 average must be 
achieved in the minor before clearance for graduation with a minor 
will be granted. A student must have a 2.0 cumulative average or bet- 
ter to gain admission to the minor in communication studies as well 
as meeting program entrance requirements. 



' Courses used as general education requirements. 

" Can be used for either general education arts requirements or free electives. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

Symbol: COM 

101 Speech Fundamentals: Interpersonal 
Communication (3) Development ot competen- 
cies for purposeful speech communication. 
Awareness of the eftects of language on communi- 
cations. Recognition of the types and purposes of a 



selected number of communications. Grasp of the 
role of evidence and organization in spoken mes- 
sages. 

105 Voice Dynamics (3) Training in the creative- 
esthetic production of speech; includes respiration, 
phonation, articulation, and resonation. 
200 Communication Careers Planning 1(1) This 
course is designed to introduce the first oi a two- 
phase, career-planning process. Self-assessment 



and exploration is provided through assigned read- 
ings, mini-lectures, reflective exercises, and small 
group activities. 

201 Fundamentals of Communication 
Technology (3) Examination of the use of com- 
puters and other technologies to create, organize, 
store, Wsuiilize, and present messages. 

202 Scripts and Formats for Mass Media (3) 
Students are required to analyze, evaluate, and 




Communication Studies 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



produce scripts for a variety of mass media for- 
mats. The course emphasis is on radio, television, 
and film. 

204 Interpersonal Communication (3) One-on- 
one communication to give the student a fiinda- 
mental understanding of the processes and experi- 
ences of the most basic t\'pe of human communi- 
cation. 

208 Public Speaking (3) Development of skills 
necessary to understand the theorv' of communica- 
tion as a problem-sohing tool in the community. 
Special emphasis is on the student's performance 
as a sender and receiver of messages directed at 
social action. 

210 Photo Communication I (3) A basic course 
in the use of creative techniques available to the 
beginning photographer for the production of 
high-quaht)' slides. 

212 Mass Communication (3) A survey course 
designed to identify, analyze, and evaluate the 
pragmatic, persuasive, creaDve, and technical 
dimensions of mass media. 

216 Small Group Communication (3) Intro- 
duction to and practice in the structured small 
group. Emphasis on preparation for, analysis ot, 
and participation in problem-solving oriented 
groups. 

217 Directing and Producing the Documentary 
Television Program (3) Planning and producing 
the nondramatic tele\'ision production. 

219 Communication Theory (3) A study of 
human communication that includes a historical 
view of the field, examinations of definitions of 
communication, analyses ot the nature of theon,- 
and the process of theorizing, assessment of per- 
spectives of communication, and construction of 
models of communication. 

220 Multi-media Communication (3) The prac- 
tical apphcation of communication theon' through 
experiences in photography and multi-media pro- 
ductions. The creative potential of combining 
sound and various photographic elements %vill be 
explored with special attention given to photojour- 
naiism as used in advertising, public relations, the- 
ater, and related mass communication fields. 

221 Photo Communication 11 (3) This course 
will give the student a chance to develop a person- 
al photographic communication st)'le. The student 
will be encouraged to explore and express his or 
her personal perceptions through photography. 

222 Successful Web Publishing (3) Examination 
of problems and solutions tor successful Web pub- 
lishing. 

224 Communication Research (3) .\n examina- 
tion of the nature of inquin' and research in com- 
munication. Emphasis on understanding and 
appreciating the strengths and weaknesses of vari- 
ous methods of research in communication. 

230 Business and Professional Speech Communi- 
cation (3) Practice in effective speaking and listen- 
ing. Interpersonal communication in the business 
and professional setting, including reports and sales 
presentations, policy speeches, conference leader- 
ship techniques, group d\Tiamics, and speaking. 

231 Interviewing in Organizations (3) An intro- 
duction to the skills necessar)' for a variet)' of orga- 
nizational inter\'iew settings. Students will act as 
inteniewers and interviewees in many t\pes of 
interviews, work in groups, and give performance 
feedback to peers. 



292 Effects of Computer-Mediated Commun- 
ication (3) .A.n examination ot the manv effects of 
computer-mediated communication. 
300 Communication Careers Planning 11 (1) 

This second phase of the careers planning course 
series examines the initial steps required for find- 
ing emplo\'ment. Topics covered include the job- 
hunting process, resume development, networking, 
and the transition from college to employment. 

303 Modem Trends in Argument (3) Study of 
the new thinking in argumentation theory. De- 
emphasizes classic vahdity and centers on the 
building of arguments that are acceptable to the 
listeners. Course focuses on the work of Stephen 
Toulmin and Chaim Perehnan. PREREQ: COM 
208, 219, 224. 

304 Organizational Communication (3) An in- 
depth analysis of the dynamic process of commu- 
nication as it occurs in organizational networks. 
PREREQ: COM 208, 216, 219, 224. 

307 Nonverbal Communication (3) A study of 
the verbal and sensory messages we are constandy 
receiWng. Bodv language and the uses of space, 
time, touch, objects, and color inherent in the sen- 
sory messages we receive. PREREQ^ COM 208, 
219,224. 

309 Advanced Public Speaking (3) Designing 
personal strategies, adapting delivery to large audi- 
ences, developing oral use of language, and speak- 
ing to live or simulated communit\' groups. PRE- 
REQ: COM 208, 219, 224. 

310 Field E.\perience in Photographic Com- 
munication (3) This course in slide photography 
wiU build on the student's previous experiences in 
photography. The student will develop the techni- 
cal, visual, and photo communication skills neces- 
sar\' to explore, record, and interpret his or her 
surroundings through photographic essays and 
related photo communication projects. These skills 
will be achieved through field experiences and 
classroom instruction. 

312 Intercultural Communication (3) A study of 
factors that contribute to communication break- 
downs between diverse cultures and between frag- 
mented segments mthin the same society-. PRE- 
REQ: COM 208, 219, 224. 
315 Structure of Meetings (3) This course pre- 
pares students to plan formal agenda, vmte and 
interpret organizational by-laws and constitutions, 
and participate in and preside over meetings 
according to parliamentary procedures. 

317 Directing and Producing the Dramatic 
Television Program (3) Planning the program. 
Preparing the shooting script. Practice in rehears- 
ing with actors and cameras. PREREQ^ COM 
208,219,224. 

318 Forensics (3) Swdy in the philosophy and 
practice of forensics. Initiating, developing, and 
administrating a forensic program. Coaching and 
judging debate and individual events. PREREQ^ 
COM 208, 219, 224. 

320 Communicating on Television and Radio 
(3) For the smdent who, by career or circumstance, 
will be required to be on radio and television. The 
focus of the course will be on three major areas: 
interyiewer/interviewee techniques; acting tor tele- 
vision, including working in commercials; and 
news reporting, including studio and remote loca- 
tions. PREREQ, COM 208, 219, 224, THA 103. 
330 Oral Communication for Technical Profes- 
sionals (3) The student will explore the oral com- 



ponent of effective communication as it applies to 
the business and professional world of mathemat- 
ics, engineering, and science. PREREQ^ COM 
208, 219, 224. 

340 Political Communication (3) This course 
examines the fiinctions and effects of political 
messages in poUcymaking and in campaigns. 
Particular attention is paid to the flow of messages 
between pohticians, the media, and the electorate. 
355 Public Relations Principles (3) An introduc- 
tion to the role of the public relations practitioner 
in the formation of public opinion. Communica- 
tions theory will be combined with specific tech- 
niques for working with the press, producing 
printed material, and conducting special events. 
PREREQi com 208, 219, 224. 

♦ 399 Directed Studies in Speech Communi- 
cation (1-3) Research, creative projects, reports, 
and readings in speech communication. Students 
must apply to advisers one semester in advance of 
registration. Open to juniors and seniors only. 
PREREQ: COM 208, 219, 224, and approval of 
department chairperson. 

♦ 400 Internship in Speech Communication (3- 
6-9-12-15) This course provides a structured and 
supervised work experience in communication. 
Credits earned are based on amount of time spent 
on the job. Students must apply to the department 
internship coordinator and receive approval of the 
department internship faculty committee to be 
admitted. PREREQ: COM'208, 219, 224. 

402 Teaching Communications (3) Theory and 
practice in teaching junior and senior high school 
communication and drama courses, and in direct- 
ing cocurricular programs in junior and senior 
high school. PREREQi COM 208, 219, 224. 

403 Persuasion (3) Current theories of attitude 
and attitude change. Practice in speaking to modi- 
fy behavior through appeals to the drives and 
motives of the Ustener. PREREQ: COM 208, 
219, 224. 

405 Argumentation and Debate (3) Functions 
and principles of argumentation and debate, 
including anal^-sis, cadence, reasoning, and refiita- 
tion. Class debates on \ital issues. PREREQ^ 
COM 208, 219, 224. 

410 Conflict Resolution (3) This course explores 
the means of resolving conflict through argument, 
negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. PRE- 
REQ: COM 208, 219, 224. 
415 (also LIN 415) Language, Thought, and 
Behavior (3) This course is designed to help stu- 
dents understand the way language fiinctions in 
the communication process. To accomplish this 
purpose, various language systems will be exam- 
ined and one will be selected for in-depth analysis. 
PREREQ: COM 208, 219, 224. 
455 PubUc Relations Campaigns (3) This course 
is for students who have completed COM 355 and 
want to learn strategic planning and program 
implementation. Students use case studies and 
social science research to evaluate PR program 
effectiveness. PREREQ; COM 208, 212, 219, 
224, and 355. 

♦ 499 Communication Seminar (3) Intensive 
examination of a selected area ot stud)- in the field 
of communication studies. Topics will be 
announced in advance. PREREQ: COM 208, 
219, 224. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



School of Health Sciences 



Communicative Disorders 



Department of Communicative Disorders 

201 Carter Drive 
610-436-3401 
Elena Stuart, Chairperson 
PROFESSOR: Weiss 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Gunter, Koenig 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Stuart 
INSTRUCTOR: Curtin 

The Department of Communicative Disorders offers a program lead- 
ing to a B.A. in communicative disorders. It is a preprofessional pro- 
gram that provides students with basic knowledge of human commu- 
nication and communication disorders in preparation for graduate 
study in audiology, speech-language pathology, speech and hearing 
science, or related health science or communication fields. 
Students will be provided with the opportunity to complete much of 
the undergraduate preparation that is applicable to fulfilling the 
requirements for the Certificate of CUnical Competence (CCC) from 
the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). 
The department operates a Speech and Hearing Chnic that serves as a 
teaching and training facihty for the academic program. The clinic 
provides diagnostic and therapeutic services for children and adults 



vidth speech, language, and hearing problems. These services are avail 
able to individuals from the University as well as from the surround- 
ing communities. 

Academic Policies 

1. Grades of "C-," "D," or "F" earned in major (SPP) courses must 
be raised to "C" or better. A failed major course must be repeated 
the next time the course is offered. 

2. A minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA and 2.5 major average is 
required for all communicative disorders majors in order to com- 
plete the degree program. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS — 
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 

2. Foreign Language and Culture 

3. Related Areas 
These courses are to be selected under 
advisement from a department-approved list 

4. Communicative Disorders Concentration 
SPP 101, 106, 163, 166, 203, 204, 207, 263, 
306, 323, 333, 346, 347, 350, 363, 366, and 463 

5. Electives up to 17 semester hours 



48 semester hours 
15 semester hours 
18 semester hours 



34 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS 

Symbol: SPP 

101 Introduction to Communicative Disorders 

(3) An introductory survey of normal processes 
and disorders of speech, language, and hearing. 
Suitable for nonmajors. 
106 Anatomy of Speech and Hearing 
Mechanisms (3) A study of embryology, normal 
development, neurology, and physiology of 
anatomical structures of the speech and hearing 
mechanisms, PREREQ: SPP 101. 
163 Seminar I in Communicative Disorders (.5) 
The seminar is designed to help integrate experi- 
ential and theoretical information. The seminar 
will focus on career/professional awareness, orien- 
tation to the department, and individual studies. 
166 Seminar II in Communicative Disorders (.5) 
The seminar is designed to help integrate experi- 
ential and theoretical information. The seminar 
will focus on personal adjustment, assertiveness, 
and active listening. 

203 Speech and Hearing Science (3) This course 
presents students with the fiindamental knowledge 
of acoustics related to speech production and speech 
perception. It also provides an opportunity for stu- 
dents to engage in laboratory experiences related to 
acoustic and psychoacoustic measurement. 

204 Speech and Language Development (3) 
Examination of normal communication develop- 
ment: biological, cognitive, social, and ecological 
bases ot language. Developmental milestones from 
prelinguistic communication to oral language and 
literacy. Normal variations in development associ- 
ated with cultural diversity and bilingualism. PRE- 
REQ: ENG/LIN 230, SPP 101. 

207 Introduction to Phonetics (3) Introduction 
to the International Phonetic Alphabet and its use 
in transcribing normal and disordered speech. 
Emphasis is placed on broad and narrow transcrip- 
tion skills. 

240 Development and Disorders of Language (3) 
An examination ot normal language development 



and its psycholinguistic, neurological, and social 
dimensions. Special education considerations for 
children with language disorders. PREREQ^ EDA 
104 is required; SPP 101 is recommended. 
266 Seminar III in Communicative Disorders 
(.5) The seminar Is designed to help Integrate 
experiential and theoretical information. The sem- 
inar will focus on implications of disabilities and 
on cultural diversity. 

306 Articulation and Phonological Disorders (3) 
The symptomatology, etiology, assessment, and 
remediation of articulatory and phonological disor- 
ders. Includes study of standard and variant sounds 
of the English language. PREREQ: SPP 101, 
106, 203, 204, and 207. 

323 Fluency and Voice Disorders (3) The symp- 
tomatology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of 
communicative disorders associated with fluency 
and voice. PREREQ: SPP 106. 
333 Language Disorders (3) Clinical manage- 
ment issues associated with developmental and 
acquired language disorders in children and adults. 
Linguistic patterns observed in the performance of 
individuals with various etiological conditions 
(e.g., mental retardation, autism, hearing loss, 
neurological impairment, craniofacial anomalies, 
learning disability). Factors indicating risk for and 
maintenance of language disorders. Protocols for 
evaluation and treatment indicated by develop- 
mental theories, processing models, and sensitivity 
to normal variations among culturally diverse pop- 
ulations. PREREQ: SPP 204. 
346 Hearing Disorders (3) An introduction to 
audiology and its relationship to other medical and 
educational fields concerned with hearing impair- 
ments. Developmental, medical, social, physical, 
and psychological properties of hearing and sound 
are explored. Evaluative techniques are Introduced 
with opportunity for limited practical experience. 
PREREQ: SPP 106 and 203. 
348 Hearing Disorders Laboratory (1) 
Laboratory experience to become familiar with 



most common hearing testing and remediation 
equipment. Taken concurrently with SPP 346. 
350 Clinical Principles in Communicative 
Disorders (3) A study of evaluative and therapeutic 
materials and methods applicable to the profession- 
al setting. PREREQi SPP 207, 306, 323, and 333. 
363 Seminar IV in Communicative Disorders 
(.5) The seminar Is designed to help integrate 
experiential and theoretical Information, focusing 
on principles and applications of counseling. 
366 Seminar V in Communicative Disorders (.5) 
The seminar is designed to help Integrate experi- 
ential and theoretical information, focusing on 
professional resources and the legal, ethical, and 
pohtical responsibilities of the professional. 

♦ 410 Independent Study (1-3) Research, cre- 
ative projects, reports, and readings in speech 
pathology and audiology. Application must be 
made to advisers by students one semester in 
advance of registration. Open to juniors and 
seniors only. PREREQ; Approval of department 
chairperson. Offered on demand. 

45 1 Clinical Practicum in Communicative 
Disorders (3) Supervised practice In the Speech 
and Hearing Clinic. Designed to prepare students 
to evaluate and provide therapy for children and 
adults who have communication problems. PRE- 
REQ; Overall GPA of 2.75 and major GPA of 
3.0; permission of the department. 
463 Seminar VI in Communicative Disorders (.5) 
The seminar Is designed to help Integrate experien- 
tial and theoretical information, focusing on 
employment opportunities and graduate education. 
469 Clinical Instrumentation (3) Evaluation, 
selection, use, and maintenance of electronic aids 
for the speech and hearing clinician. Emphasis on 
demonstrations and practical experience. Open to 
speech pathology and audiology students with 
senior standing. Also offered as SPP 569 for grad- 
uate credit. 

♦ 498 Workshop in Communicative Disorders 
(3) 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Computer Science 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Department of Computer Science 

404 Anderson Hall 
610-436-2204 
www.cs.wcupa.edu 
James D. Fabrey, Chairperson 
PROFESSORS: Epstein, Fabrey, Milito, Weaver 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: .\lilbom, KHne, Wyatt, Yang 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Edelman 
INSTRUCTORS: Perry, Townsend 

The Department of Computer Science offers a program leading to the 
bachelor of science degree. The B.S. in computer science prepares the 
student for a career in the field of computer science and its applica- 
tions and/or additional study in computer science at the graduate 
level. Students gain valuable on-the-job experience through an intern- 
ship program with local industry or business. Normally, the computer 
science degree requires attendance during eight academic semesters 
plus one summer session. It is important the major consult with 
his/her adviser to ensure that all requirements are being met. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE - COMPUTER SCIENCE 
AND INFORMATION SCIENCES 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
MAT 151* 

2. Core Curriculum 

Computer Science Requirements 21 semester hours 

CSC 141, 142, 220, 240, 241, 242, 402 

Communication Skills Requirements 3 semester hours 

COM lOr or 230* and ENG 368 or 371 

Mathematics Requirement 8 semester hours 

MAT 161, 162 

Cooperative Experience (i.e.. Internship) 9 semester hours 

CSC 400 

3. Additional Requirements 31 semester hours 
In addition to completing the core curriculum (requirements in 
computer science, communication skills, and mathematics), the 
student must complete 27 credits consisting of any combination of 

A. approved electives in computer science, 

B. approved electives in business, 

C. approved electives in mathematics, or 

D. courses which have been taken as part of the completion of a 
minor. 

At least 15 of these credits must be from approved electives in 
computer science. 

For guidance in the selection of courses to fulfill these additional 
requirements, see the web page for the Department of Computer 
Science at www.cs.wcupa.edu. 

4. Approved Electives 

A. Computer Science Courses: 

Any CSC major elective course at or above the 300 level 
NOTE: CSC 350 is not a CSC major elective. 

B. Business Courses: 

ACC 201, ACC 202, ECO 340, ECO 348, MGT 200, MIS 
300, MIS 451, MKT 200 

C. Mathematics Courses: 

Any MAT major elective course at or above the 200 level 

5. Special Entrance Requirements 

Students who enter WCU as freshman computer science majors 
should meet the following high school criteria: 
• Rank in the top two-fifths of graduating class 



• Pass Algebra I, Algebra II/Trigonometry, Geometry, and a 
senior year math course 

• Earn a math SAT original score of 500 (or recentered score of 
520) or better 

• Earn a combined SAT original score of 950 (or recentered 
score of 1020) or better 

6. Advanced Placement Credit 

The following guidelines will be used to determine college credit 
when evaluating Advanced Placement scores in computer science. 
Examination AP Score Policy 



Computer Science AB 1, 2 
3 
4,5 



Computer Science A 



no credit 

3 credits for CSC 141 
6 credits for CSC 141 and 
CSC 142 
1,2 no credit 

3, 4, 5 3 credits for CSC 141 

7. Transfer and Continuation Requirements 

Students who seek to transfer to the computer science major from 

another college or from another major within WCU must first 

earn a grade of B or better in CSC 141 (or equivalent course, or 

CSC 142 or CSC 240) and earn a grade of C- or better in MAT 

161 (or equivalent or higher-level mathematics course) before 

being admitted to the major. 

All computer science majors at WCU must satisfy the same 

requirements as stated above before being permitted to take any 

300 or higher-level computer science major course. 

Exceptions to this transfer and continuation policy can be made on 

a case-by-case basis by the department chairperson. 

8. Graduation Requirements 

In order to graduate, a computer science major must earn a grade 
of C- or better in each course taken to fiiltill the core requirements 
(listed above) and the additional requirements (Usted above). 
Furthermore, a computer science major must earn a 2.5 GPA 
overall in CSC courses and a 2.0 GPA overall in MAT courses 
taken to complete the core or additional requirements. 
This policy does not apply to courses that are taken as free electives. 

Minor in Computer Science 19 semester hours 

Baccalaureate students may receive transcript recognition for a minor 

area of study in computer science by completing the following six 

required courses: 

CSC 141, 142, 240. 241; MAT 151, 161 

In addition, at least one 300-level CSC classroom course is strongly 

recommended. A student must earn a minimum grade of C- in each 

course and a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 tor all courses taken for 

the minor. 

Minor in Web Technology and Applications 18 semester hours 

The minor in web technology' and applications introduces smdents to 
fundamental principles of Web design, including the underlying tech- 
nology and principles of aesthetics and effective communications. All 
students in the minor must complete three core courses (ART 113, 
COM 201, CSW 131) and three electives (chosen from ART 111, 
ART 210, ART 211, ART 212, ART 213, COM 222**, COM 
292**, CSC 231, EDM 300, ENG 320, ESS 435", HIS 390-, HIS 
480**, or an approved independent project*). Students must complete 
their 18 semester hours in the minor with an overall GPA of 2.5 or 
higher. Only grades of C- or higher will count towards the comple- 
tion of the minor. 



'Required courses that will count towards the general education requirements. 
** At least one of these electives must be a designated capstone project course. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Computer Science 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Symbol: CSW 

101 Introduction to Computers (3) (nonmajors) 

This course is for nonmajors dealing with what 
computers are, what thev can do, and how they are 
used. A brief history of computers and the societal 
implications of computer usage. A brief introduc- 
tion to the Internet is provided along with hands- 
on experience using word processing, database, 
and spreadsheet software. 
131 Introduction to Web Design (3) (nonma- 
jors) This course will cover HTML and introduc- 
tor\' JavaScript programming to provide students 
with a basic technology skill set for pursuing other 
topics in web technology. Use of some simple web 
authoring and graphics paclcages, but a focus on 
the structure and semantics of HTML and 
JavaScript. One ot three core requirement courses 
for the web technology and applications minor. 
PREREQ^ Familiarity with basic graphical user 
interface and systems concepts such as files, fold- 
ers, and use of an editor, and web browsers. 

SYMBOL: CSC 

110 Fundamentals of Computer Science (3) 
(nonmajors) Introduction to the fiandamentals of 
computing. Topics include surveys ot the follow- 
ing sub-areas of computer science: artificial intelli- 
gence, hardware/operating systems, programming 
languages/software, ethics/social issues, history, 
electronic communications, problem solving, and 
programming. The course includes laboratory pro- 
jects in application software, programming, and 
electronic communication, as well as a report on 
one of the first four areas above. 
115 Introduction to Computer Programming (3) 
(nonmajors) The art and science of computing are 
introduced using a structured programming language, 
such as Stmctured BASIC. Topics include looping, 
branching, arrays, and program development. 

141 Computer Science I (3) The art and science 
of computing and its apphcations are introduced 
using an object-oriented programming language, 
such as C++. Topics include structured program- 
ming, algorithmic development, decisions, loops, 
functions, parameter passing, and classes. PRE- 
REQi Math SAT of 550 or better or a B or bet- 
ter in CSC 115. 

142 Computer Science II (3) Techniques of pro- 
gram design, documentation, and implementation 
are studied using an object-oriented language, 
such as C++. Topics include classes, multidimen- 
sion^d arrays, records, pointers and dynamic data, 
pointer arithmetic, internal storage of simple and 
compound data types, text and binary files, and 
introduction to recursion. PREREQ;, CSC 141. 
220 Foundations of Computer Science (3) Topics 
include regular and context free grammars and lan- 
guages, computational logic, finite state machines, 
and parsing. PREREQ: NL\T 151 and 161. 

231 Introduction to Web Programming (3) This 
course builds on web design skills developed in 
CSW 131. Web programming languages/s)'stems 
will be introduced, and one will be emphasized. 
The choice of these will be dictated by the latest 
developments in web technology. A major pro- 
gramming project will be required. A capstone elec- 
tive in the web technology and applications minor. 
240 Computer Science III (3) The object-orient- 
ed paradigm is studied using a computer language, 
such as C++. Topics include class hierarchies and 
inheritance, function and operator overloading, 
object-oriented design and implementation. 



streams, templates, and class libraries. PREREQ^ 
CSC 142, MAT 151. 

241 Data Structures (3) Data structures and relat- 
ed algorithms are studied using object-oriented 
programming, such as C++. Topics include data 
abstraction, recursion, Usts, stacks, queues, hnked 
lists, trees, hashing, searching and sorting algo- 
rithms, and the evaluation ot algorithm efficiency. 
PREREQiCSC 240, MAT 151 and 161. 

242 Computer Organization (3) This course teach- 
es introductory topics in computer architecture and 
hardware design as well as the basics of assembly 
language. Software is provided to assemble, run, and 
debug assembly language programs. Additionally, a 
compiler for a high-level language, such as C++ 
demonstrates the realistic usage of assemblv lan- 
guage. PREREQiCSC 142, MAT 151. 

300 Cooperative Programming (3) The student 
works for an organization involved in the comput- 
er field. The student may do work in various areas 
of the discipline such as programming, network- 
ing, or customer support. PREREQ; Written 
approval of the internship director and a minimum 
grade of C- in each of the following courses: CSC 
141, 142, 240, and 241 with a 2.50 GPA in CSC; 
MAT 151 and 161 with a 2.00 GPA in MAT. 
317 Visual Programming (3) Techniques for pro- 
gramming in a visual eniironment are studied. 
Languages such as Visual BASIC and Java will be 
covered. PREREQi CSC 240. 
321 Database Management Systems (3) 
Characteristics of generalized database management 
systems. Surveys of different database models that 
are currently used. The design and implementation 
of a database system. PREREQiCSC 240 and 241. 
331 Operating Systems (3) This course is a general 
survey of elements of operating systems with in-depth 
smdies of certain features of specific operating sys- 
tems. Elements of concurrent programming are stud- 
ied, such as the mutual exclusion problem, sema- 
phores, and monitors. Additionally, the following 
topics are covered: process scheduling and deadlock 
avoidance; memory management issues such as pag- 
ing and segmentation; organization and protection of 
file systems. PREREQ; CSC 220, 240, 241, and 242. 

335 Data Communications and Networking I (3) 
An overview of the various aspects of modern data 
and telecommunications. Discussion of the hard- 
ware and software facets of the transmission of 
information in the forms of voice, data, text, and 
image. Topics include communication protocols, 
transmission technologies, analog/digital transmis- 
sion, communications media, public data networks, 
LANs, and ISDN. PREREQ: CSC 240 and 241. 

336 Data Communications and Networking II (3) 
Ai in-depth study of various aspects of modem data 
communication systems. Discussion of serial port 
communications, network performance and design, 
and Internet protocols. Topics include PC serial 
port hardware (RS-232, UART) and software 
(XMODEM protocol), queuing theory, X.25, frame 
relay, SMDS, BISDN, ATM, TCP/IP, sockets, 
and Internet applications. PREREQ^CSC 335. 
341 Compiler (3) Covers the basic topics in com- 
piler design including lexical analysis, syntax analy- 
sis, error handhng, symbol tables, intermediate 
code generation, and some optimization. 
Programming assignments will build various pieces 
of a compiler for a small language. PREREQ;^ 
CSC 220, 240, 241, and 242. 

345 Programming Language Concepts and 
Paradigms (3) An examination of the conceptual 
underpinning of programming languages and of the 
paradigms into which they fall. Topics will be drawn 
fi"om those comprising the field of programming lan- 



guage such as abstraction, bindings, concurrency, 
design, encapsulation, history, representation, storage, 
and types. Programming projects will focus on lan- 
guages within the fimctional, declarative, and object- 
oriented paradigms - such as Common Lisp, ML, 
Prolog, CLOS - rather than the familiar imperative 
paradigm. PREREQiCSC 220, 240, and 241. 
350 Computers in Education (3) (noimiajors) 
Technical knowledge and skills for successfiil use of 
the computer as a supportive tool for education in 
the elementary and secondary school classes. Includes 
hands-on experience using word processing, data- 
base, spreadsheet, and elementary desktop publish- 
ing. Software evaluation techniques are learned using 
both utility and subject-matter software. 
361 Simulation of Discrete Systems (3) Com- 
puter simulation using logical and numerical mod- 
ehng to represent discrete systems. Detailed analy- 
sis of the foundation upon which all discrete simu- 
lation languages are built. Use of a special lan- 
guage, such as GPSS, to simulate actual systems. 
PREREQ: CSC 220, 240, 241, and MAT 221. 
371 Computer Graphics (3) A mathematical ap- 
proach to the construction and manipulation of proto- 
types for graphical display purposes, taking into con- 
sideration light source, reflexivity of surfaces, and color 
palates. Includes an elementary treatment of anima- 
tion. PREREQiCSC 220, 240, 241, and MAT 211. 
400 Cooperative Specialty (9) The student works 
in the area of computer science that is his or her 
specialty. PREREQi Written approval of the 
internship director and a minimum grade of C- in 
each of the following courses: CSC 141, 142, 240, 
and 241 with a 2.50 GPA in CSC; MAT 151 and 
161 with a 2.00 GPA in MAT. 
402 Software Engineering (3) This course 
explores the technical, ethical, organizational, and 
social imphcations of computing. In addition to 
assigned readings, including software engineering 
literature, students develop a moderately large soft- 
ware team project. PREREQ. CSC 240 and 241. 
417 User Interfaces (3) This course covers design- 
ing and creating graphical user interface (GLJI) pro- 
grams. Window tool kit sets are presented in several 
programming languages to illustrate variation in 
styles of GUI programming. PREREQICSC 240, 
241, and 317, or permission of instructor. 
481 Artificial Intelligence (3) Artificial 
Intelligence (AI) is concerned with the replication 
or simulation on a machine of the complex behav- 
iors associated with intelligence. Topics wUl be 
drawn from any of those comprising the field of Al 
such as agent architectures, automatic truth main- 
tenance, constraint satisfaction, expert systems, 
frizzy logic, games, genetic algorithms, knowledge 
representation, machine learning, neural networks 
and connectionism, natural language processing, 
planning, reasoning, robotics, search, theorem 
proving, and vision. Projects requiring coding will 
focus on an AI language such as Common Lisp or 
Prolog. PREREQ: CSC 220 and 241. 
490 Independent Project in Computer Science (3) 
The swdent designs and implements a software sys- 
tem. Project problems are drawn from local industry 
and university departments. A computer science 
faculty member supervises each project. PREREQ^ 
Permission of instructor. 

♦ 495 Topics in Computer Science (3) Topic 
announced at time of offering. PREREQ^ 
Permission of instructor. 

499 Independent Study in Computer Science (3) 
In conjunction with the instructor, the student 
selects study topics via hterature search. PRE- 
REQi Permission of instructor. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Criminal Justice 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology 



201 Recitation Hall 
610-436-2559 

Angelo F. Gadaleto, Chairperson 
Stephanie L. Hinson, Assistant Chairperson 
PROFESSORS: D. Brown, Gadaleto, Kahn, Parsons 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Broderick, Hinson, Napierkowski, 
Spradlin 



ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Zhang 

The Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology provides 
courses such as educational psychology, adolescent development, and 
essentials of the helping relationship. Educational psychology is a 
required professional care course of the University teacher certification 
program. Adolescent development and essentials of the helping rela- 
tionship are popular elective courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

Symbol: EDC 

462 Essentials of the Helping Relationship (3) 

This course sun'evs the concepts and skills 
involved in helping others through individual 
interviewing, problem soKing. decision making, 
and svstematic behavior change. 
♦ 498 Counselor Education Workshop (3) 



499 Peer Helper Workshop (1-3) A workshop 
that focuses on acquisition of specific knowledge 
and skills necessary for working in a college setting. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Symbol: EDP 

249 Adolescent Development (3) This course 
focuses on the emotional, social, intellectual, 
moral, physical, and self-concept factors shaping 



human behavior with emphasis on adolescent 
behavior. 

250 Educational Psychology (3) A study of learn- 
ing in relation to the physical, social, emotional, 
and intellectual aspects of personality. 
467 Group Dynamics (3) A group process course 
designed to help students develop their personal 
effectiveness in group situations. 



♦ This course 



may 



be taken 



again 



for credit. 



Department of Criminal Justice 

200 Rubv Jones Hall 

610-436-2647 

Jana Nestlerode, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Brev^'ster, Nestlerode 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Kauffman, McVey, Nealy, 

O'Neill 
West Chester University's Department of Criminal Justice offers a 
broad-based, interdiscipUnar\' program that combines theory with 
appUcation. Courses that teach applied knowledge complement a solid 
core curriculum ot theory, philosophy, and analysis. The program is 
designed to fiilfdl the needs of four categories of students: 

1. Those who desire a carefiiUy planned four-year program of study 
to prepare for careers in criminal justice; 

2. Sttidents from two-vear colleges who desire to continue their edu- 
cations and obtain bachelor's degrees; 

3. Criminal justice professionals who seek to increase their profes- 
sional competencies by strengthening their educational back- 
grounds; 

4. Those who wish to pursue master's degrees or law degrees. 
The program provides 1) a core curriculum of required courses to 
ensure a solid working knowledge of the major systems within the 
discipline; 2) a variety of elective courses that permits students to tai- 
lor their academic careers to their professional goals; 3) a venue for 
the development of critical analysis and communication sldlls; and 4) 
practical experience in a criminal justice setting. These primary pro- 
grammatic qualities advantageously position the successful undergrad- 
uate student for entry-level positions in criminal justice agencies or 
postgraduate studies. 

A primary feature of the program is the summer practicum served at a 
criminal justice agency. It is designed to give the student the opportu- 
nity to apply acquired theoretical knowledge and receive direct profes- 
sional experience in the field. 

Related Student Activities 

The Criminal Justice Club (Sigma Tau Omicron) is the local chapter 
of the American Criminal Justice Association (Lambda Alpha 



18 semester hours 
12 semester hours 

27 semester hours 



Epsilon). The acti\ities of this organization are open to all students. 
The Law Society is an organization also open to all students, but may 
be of particular interest to those students aspiring to law school. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Required Courses 15 semester hours 
CRJ 110*, 210*, 300*, 38r, and 400* 

3. Criminal Justice Electives 

4. Summer Practicum (required) 
CRJ 490* 

5. Related Areas (minor or electives taken 
under advisement) 

Enrollment in CRJ 110 and CRJ 210 is open to all students. 
However, enrollment in all other criminal justice courses is limited to 
criminal justice majors, criminal justice minors, and to those students 
who have received special permission from the department chairper- 
son. Admission to the program is competitive, and enrollment in such 
restricted courses is no assurance of admission into the major (nor is 
acceptance into the minor program assurance of firture acceptance into 
the major). Students wishing to change their majors to criminal justice 
must apply to the department. Evaluation of applications is based on 
academic performance, writing abilit)', and other relevant data. 
NOTE: This program deviates from the "Anticipated Time for Degree 
Completion," which is outlined on page 51, since the program requires 
the completion of requirements that can only be met in the summer. 
Students must have a GPA of at least 2.3 for admission to the pro- 
gram. 
Minor in Criminal Justice 18 semester hours 

1. Required Courses 15 semester hours 
CRJ 110*, 210', 300*, 387*, and 400* 

2. Criminal Justice Electives 3 semester hours 
This minor may be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts 
or bachelor of science in hberal studies general degree program. All 
students who wish to enter the minor must have a minimum overall 
2.00 GPA. 



A minimum grade of C is required in this course. 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Criminal Justice 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Symbol: CRJ 

110 IntToducrion to the Criminal Justice System 

(3) This course is designed to describe the criminal 
justice system from arrest through trial, appeal, 
sentencing, correction, and parole. The object of 
this course is to provide the student with a proce- 
dural framework ot the criminal justice process. 
210 Theories in Criminal Justice (3) This course 
is a survey of the historical and contemporary 
attempts to explain the phenomena of crime and 
criminal behavior from the perspectives ot sociolo- 
gy, psychology, economics, biology, and law. 
Emphasis will be placed on contemporary theory 
and the analysis of evidence supportive of various 
theoretical positions. 

215 GIS for Criminal Justice Careers (3) A 
course in crime mapping and the analysis of maps 
of crime patterns, police services, locations of 
criminal incidents, offenders' geographical behav- 
iors, and spatial trends in crime. This course is 
cross-hsted with GEO 215. 

220 Corrections (3) The purpose of this course is 
to provide the student with a survey and analysis 
of the correctional system and its processes trom 
both a historical and geographical perspective. 
Emphasis will be placed on relating this survey 
and analysis to contemporary' practice and future 
trends in the area of corrections. 
240 Criminal Investigation (3) Criminal investi- 
gation tiinctions of police involving crimes of vio- 
lence, crimes against property, and organized 
crime. Police operational techniques and applica- 
ble court decisions in the areas of interview, 
search, seizure, and arrest. 

268 Private Security (3) This course will provide 
an in-depth examination of the various facets and 
interests of the private sector of security'. A review 
of the histor\', organization, management, and 
safet)' issues pertaining to the private security pro- 
fession will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on 
policy and decision making, personnel, and bud- 
geting, as well as an examination of security pro- 
gramming that responds to the private sector. 
300 Criminal Law (3) This course will cover the 
principles of criminal rcsponsibiliU', the purposes 
and limitations of criminal law, and the elements of 
various criminal offenses. Substantive criminal law 
will cover the conduct, acts, and omissions that have 
been designated as crimes. These acts (or omissions) 
plus the mental state and other essential elements 
that make up criminal action will be examined. 
PREREQ; Students must have earned a grade of C 
or bener in CRJ 110, CRJ 210, and WRT 121. 
304 History and Philosophy of Law and Justice 
(3) This course is intended to aid the beginning stu- 
dent in understanding the historical and philosophi- 
cal influences on the American criminal justice sys- 
tem; introduce the student to a broad range ot indi- 
viduals who, over a period of 2,000 years, have 
made significant contributions to the formulation 
and process of justice; and analyze various other sys- 
tems of criminal justice found in dissimilar cultures. 
310 Juvenile Justice Administration (3) A survey 
of both the formal (police/courts/corrections) and 
the informal (diversion) means of dealing with the 
problem of juvenile crime. Emphasis is not on the 
behavior but on society's response to it. Emphasis 
also wiU be placed on the legal rights of juveniles. 
312 White-CoUar Crime (3) This course analyzes 
the usually nonviolent criminal conduct described 
as official corruption, systematic crime, or viola- 
tions of trust that are characterized by calculation. 



deceit, and personal enrichment. The influence of 
organized crime also is explored. 
314 Organized Crime (3) Organized crime is 
examined as an American phenomenon, then 
compared to organized criminal acrivitv' in Europe 
and Asia. The student wiU place in perspective the 
current organizations in the U.S. and their histori- 
cal development over the last centur}'. European 
groupings are examined as precursors/models of 
U.S. transplants with insights into the prohfera- 
tion of such groups in the Far East. 
330 Criminal Behavior (3) This course e.xposes stu- 
dents to broad, theoretical positions on crime and to 
observable criminal offenses. Students will learn to 
avoid oversimplified, dogmatic answers. Research 
findings on understanding and controlling crime will 
be discussed. The course will help a student appreci- 
ate the need to integrate contemporar)' psychology 
into an understanding of criminal behavior. 
340 Victimless Crimes (3) This course is designed 
to familiarize the student with the ramifications of 
vice control. It will cover such topics as prosfitution, 
homosex"ualitv, pornography, gambling, and book- 
making, as well as historical perspecrives, statutes and 
interpretations, a comparison of illegal operations, 
enforcement techniques, and legalization efforts. 
350 Scientific Crime Detection (3) This course 
will engender an appreciation of what is entailed 
for an indix'idual to understand current scientific 
methods of detection in the criminal justice system. 
387 Criminal Justice Research (3) This course is 
designed to provide an overview of research meth- 
ods used in criminal justice research, including 
data collection methods, sampling techniques, and 
basic statistical analyses. The course will provide 
hands-on appUcation of research methods as well 
as critical analyses of research studies conducted by 
others in the field of criminal justice. PREREQ^ 
Students must have earned a grade ot C or better 
in CRJ 110, CRJ 210, and WRT 121. 
400 Criminal Procedure (3) This course is an 
examination of the theory and application of the law 
and rules of cNndence for the criminal justice student. 
It will develop an understanding ot the reasons for 
the rules of evidence and a grasp of the application 
of the rules in case investigation and for presentation 
in court through a study of selected cases, statutes, 
and the an;Jysis of hypothetical cases and situations. 
PREREQ; Students must have earned a grade of C 
or better in CRJ 300 and CRJ 387. 
♦ 410 Independent Studies in Criminal Justice 
(1-3) Research projects, reports, and readings in 
criminal justice. PREREQi Permission of depart- 
ment chairperson. 

430 Interviewing and Counseling the Offender 
(3) Techniques of interviexving and counsehng 
applicable to law enforcement and corrections offi- 
cers. Areas ot study include the initial interview, 
interrogation, informant-handling techniques, 
manipulative behavior of offenders, and exit inter- 
views. Role plaj-ing and sociodrama are used. 
435 Assessment of the Oflfender (3) This course 
will develop students' abilities to describe, recognize, 
and understand psychometric measures on adult and 
juvenile offenders. Topics include understanding the 
selection of psychometric measurements, observing 
and drawing from life histories, and understanding 
how violent behavior may be predicted. 
440 Violent Crime (3) This course seeks to survey 
the incidence of violent crime, to analyze the violent 
criminal, and to study the variety of means that 
have been developed to control criminal violence. 
450 Criminalistics (3) This course is designed to 
follow CRJ 240 and CRJ 350. It buUds on the 
principles learned in those courses and permits 



students to apply those principles. The course 
involves demonstrations of examinations and 
analyses of physical evidence. Students actively 
participate in several of those examinations and 
experiments. Materials will be provided; field trips 
may be made. Course enrollment is limited. 
♦ 455 Topical Seminar in Criminal Justice (3) 
Intensive examination ot a selected area of study in 
the field of criminal justice. Topics will be 
announced at the time of offering. Course may be 
taken more than once when different topics are 
presented. PREREC^Junior or senior CRJ major 
or with permission of instructor. 

460 Evidence and Trial Advocacy (3) This course 
moves a step beyond basic criminal law and criminal 
procedure studies and takes the student into the 
courtroom. The student wiU learn basic rules of evi- 
dence presentation and court procedure and discover 
how the trial process works by actively participating 
in it. The student will learn how to distill the issues, 
and to present concise, well-reasoned arguments 
supporting a given position. It is in this manner that 
the student will learn critical anal\'sis and practical 
presentation. (This course is designed for those stu- 
dents who have completed CRJ 300 and CRJ 400.) 

461 Notable Criminal Cases (3) Selected factual 
accounts of criminality' and criminal behavior over 
the past 75 years are analyzed. Selection is based 
on notoriety and continued dispute. Course is 
designed to illuminate, through reading and class 
analysis, a wide spectrum of criminal conduct and 
the related investigative and judicial response. 

462 Management Problems and Practices (3) This 
course is intended to aid in the instruction of stu- 
dents who are potential candidates for administrative 
positions. Its objective is neither to present a new 
approach to the field nor to support an existing one; 
rather, it is to provide the student with a well-round- 
ed view of the subject and to lay the groundwork for 
flirther study. This is done by bringing together the 
most appropriate concepts and practices in managing 
an organization; e.g., purpose defining, planning, 
decision making, staffing, motivating, communicat- 
ing, collective bargaining, and controlling. 

470 Interpersonal Relations (3) This course is 
designed to aid a student's self analysis in terms of 
behavior patterns or changes affecting his or her 
life. This self knowledge often leads to under- 
standing relationships with others, which can 
assist students in relating to other persons in their 
personal, social, and professional lives. 
482 Contemporary Legal Issues (3) This course 
encompasses a brief review of the general princi- 
ples of law and procedure, followed by an in-depth 
study of the more controversial legal dilemmas fac- 
ing today's criminal justice system. The course is 
designed to shed light on each side of the issue, to 
enable the student to see beyond the superficial 
aspects of the conffict, and to understand its more 
profound nature. 

487 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice (3) This 
course is designed to identify and examine ethical 
issues among practitioners and students in the 
criminal justice field. Such issues may include the 
discretionary power of arrest, the use of deadly 
force, the decision to prosecute, participation in 
plea bargaining, representation of the guilty, and 
the imposition of punishment. Such a course will 
promote inquiry that combines ethical analysis 
with a practical awareness of the reaUties of the 
criminal justice system. 

490 Practicum (3-12) Full-time 12-week struc- 
tured work experience at a department-approved 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Early Childhood and Special Education 



School ot Education 



criminal justice agency under the joint supervision 
of the facultv instructor and the ageno.'. The 
course includes periodic reports, a final paper, and 
attendance at classes held on campus. Offered pri- 



marily in the summer. PREREQ; 84 earned cred- 
its, GPA at WCU of at least 2.0, C or better in 
CRJ 300 and CRJ 387. Note: Any student termi- 
nated for cause by the professional agency- may not 



retake the course unless special approval to do so is 
obtained from the department. 



Department of Early Childhood and Special Education 



309 Recitation Hall 

610-436-2579 

Judith S. Finkel, Chairperson 

Catherine Prudhoe, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Finkel, Maggitti 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Drake, McGinley, Prudhoe, 

Zlotowski 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bell, DeLuca, OzeUs, Qi, Wandry 
The Department of Early Childhood and Special Education stands 
out in the southeastern Pennsylvania and tri-state region with its 
extensive early practicum opportunities for its students; its small, pro- 
fessionally diverse facudts", a high rate ot employment opportunities; a 
heightened sense of collegialiu' and volunteerism among its students; 
and finally, national (National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education), regional (Middle States Association ot Colleges and 
Secondary Schools), and state (Pennsylvania Department ot 
Education) accreditation. 

The Department of Early Childhood and Special Education offers pro- 
grams of study leading to a bachelor of science in early childhood edu- 
cation or a bachelor of science in special education. Dual certification 
programs are available in early childhood and special education, early 
childhood and elementary education, and special education and elemen- 
tary education. Minor concentrations are available in either area. 
The B.S.Ed, in EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION curriculum 
is designed to provide both the liberal education and special prepara- 
tion required for careers in public and private school as teachers and 
directors, as well as supervisory work in early childhood programs in 
public schools and other venues. Upon satistacton' completion of the 
program, the student will quality for a Pennsylvania Instructional I 
Teaching Certificate valid for six years of teaching in preschool, 
kindergarten, and grades one through three. 

The B.S.Ed, in SPECIAL EDUCATION prepares teachers who can 
provide diverse student populations with the knowledge, skills, and val- 
ues considered essential for effective participation in society. It provides 
relevant and comprehensive education for those who desire to support 
the educational, emotional, and physical needs of students with disabili- 
ties in the public schools of Pennsylvania. Upon satisfactory' completion 
of the program, the student will quality' for a Pennsylvania Instructional 
I Teacher Certificate, valid for sLx years of teaching. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION— EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
(Curriculum NK-3) 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Includes LIT 352, MAT 101, and SOC 240; 

requirements in art, humanities, social sciences, 
and sciences; and a second math course as a 
student elective. 

2. Professional Education 12 semester hours 
EDF 100, EDM 300, EDP 250+ and 351+ 

3. Specialized Preparation 60 semester hours 
ECE 100, 225+, 231+, 232, 308, 321+, 404, 

405+, 407, 410+, 411+; EDA 230; EDR 309, 

325; MAT 349+; MUE 232 
NOTE: MUE 232 may count toward the general education require- 
ments. 



12 semester hours 



45 semester bom's 



12 semester hours 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION— SPECLVL 
EDUCATION 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Student electives selected under advisement 

(suggested general education student elective 
MAT 102) 

2. Professional Education 
Required: EDF 100, EDM 300, EDP 250 
and 351 

3. Special Education^: 
NOTE; Special education requirements are 
structured in the following distinct blocks: 
High incidence: 

EDA 302, 350, 360 
Low incidence: 

EDA 301, 329, 349 
Introducton' and major courses: 

EDA 104, EDA 230 or EDA/EDR 341, 

EDA 380, and EDA 416/417 
One program elective from the folio-wing: 

EDA 200, 230, 280, or 341 

4. Required Supporting Courses^: 
EDR 311, HEA 206, MAT 357, and SPP 240 

Minor Programs 

Students who desire admission to the minor in early childhood or 
special education must have achieved the minimum cumulative GPA 
required for their earned credits: 2.65 for students with 27-47 credits, 
and 2.80 for students with 48 or more credits. Students admitted to 
either of these minors must maintain the minimum cumulative GPA 
required of them at admission to the minor in order to continue. 
Students who fall below the minimum cumulative GPA required are 
permitted to retake, in accordance with University policy, course work 
in the minor that contributed to their fall below the required mini- 
mum cumulative GPA. Such students will not be permitted to take 
additional course work in the minor untd they achieve the required 
minimum cumulative GPA. 

The minors do not lead to Instructional I teacher certification by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

Minor in Early Childhood Education 15-18 semester hours 
Required Courses 

ECE 100, ECE 231, ECE 232, PSY 100, and one of the foUow- 

ing: ECE 404 or ECE 405 

Minor in Special Education 18 semester hours 

Current trends, enforced by recent litigation, have increased the need for 
a general understanding of the individuals with disabilities in our culture. 
The program is designed to introduce students to individuals with 
mild disabihties through course work and field practicums. 
Required special education courses are EDA 104, EDA 200, and 
EDA 302/350/360 (as a block). 



+ Courses requiring prerequisites — check catalog course descriptions below. 
:): Minimum grade of C- is required in all special education and the 

following supporting courses: EDR 311, HEA 206, MAT 357, and 

SPP 240. 



School of Education 



Earlv Childhood and Special Education 




Admission to Early Childhood Education and Special Education 
Degree Programs 

For formal admission to early childhood education and special educa- 
tion degree programs, see "Formal Admission to Teacher Education" 
in the "Teaching Certification Programs" section of this catalog. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER TO THE MAJORS IN 
EARLY CHILDHOOD AND SPECIAL EDUCATION. 
Students may apply for "external transfer" (see below) when transfer- 
ring from another post-secondar\' institution. Students already admit- 
ted to West Chester University as premajors or in another major may 
apply for "internal transfer." 

Students seeking external or internal transfer must have earned a min- 
imum of 12 college-level credits. Students with 12-47 credits must 
also have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.65. The required mini- 
mum cumulative GPA for students with 48-59 earned credits is 2.80. 
Students with 60 or more earned credits must have a minimum cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.80; have achie\'ed the following passing scores (in 
parentheses) as established by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education on the Praxis I PPST examinations in Reading (172), 
Writing (173), and Mathematics (173); and completed college-level 
studies in EngUsh composition (three credits), Uterature taught in 
EngUsh (three credits), and mathematics (six credits). 
External or internal transfer to the majors in early childhood and spe- 
cial education does not represent nor confer formal admission to 
teacher education. (See "Formal Admission to Teacher Education" in 
the "Teaching Certification Programs" section of this catalog.) 
INTERNAL TRANSFER STUDENTS. There is an announced time 
for internal admission at the beginning of each semester. 
EXTERNAL TRANSFER STUDENTS. Transfer credit will be 
granted for 100- and 200-level courses if the course descriptions are 
equivalent and in accordance with University poUcy. All other 
required courses in the professional education and specialized prepara- 
tion areas will be evaluated and approved on an individual basis. 



Application and Approval for Student Teaching 

Students must apply through the department for approv-al for student 
teaching in earl)- childhood education or special education. To apply, the 
student must have completed 90 semester hours. (See "Formal 
Admission to Teacher Education" in the "Teaching Certification 
Programs" section of this catalog.) As part of the 90 credits, the student 
must complete all professional education courses and all specialized 
preparation courses with the minimum required GPA. (See also student 
teaching, page 146.) 

An appUcation for student teaching must be filed in November prior 
to the academic year in which student teaching is to be scheduled. 
Application meetings will be announced at the beginning of the fall 
semester each year. Students register for student teaching as they 
would for any other University courses. 

Field Placement In Schools 

AH field placements, including student teaching, are arranged by the 
department. Students are not to soUcit placements. While student 
needs are considered in assigning placements, no particular placement 
can be guaranteed. Transportation to and from field placements is the 
responsibiht)' of the individual student. 

West Chester Universitv' does not place students at reUgiously affihat- 
ed schools when public school placements are available if that place- 
ment results in the students' receiving academic credit (e.g., student 
teaching). In addition, the University' will make every attempt to first 
place students into public (vs. private) schools for student teaching 
and related activities. Further, students will not be assigned student 
teaching or other related duties at nonsectarian private schools or 
agencies unless they specifically request such placement. Each request 
will be considered individually to ensure that the private entity does 
not receive special benefit from the arrangement that outweighs the 
benefit to the University and its students. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Symbol: ECE 

" 100 Orientation to Early Childhood (3) An 

introduction to the histon' and philosophy of early 
childhood education. Field obsen'ations in a vari- 
ety' of settings provide the student with an oppor- 
tunitv' for career decision making. 
" 225 Infant Learning Environment and Field 
Experience (6) The study of infant/toddler devel- 
opment and appropriate programming. The rela- 
tionship ot the developmental level to the structur- 
ing of learning environment is fostered as students 
interact with infants in child care settings for four 
hours per week. 

• 231 Child Development (2-5 years) (3) 
Physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and moral 
deyelopment of the child, 2-5 years of age. 
Parallels are drawn from this phase of child devel- 
opment to students' self-development. 

* 232 Preschool Learning Environment (3-6) 
Methods and materials for structuring the class- 
room environment for the child 2-5 years of age. 
Readiness skills and concepts in all curricular areas 
are addressed. 

308 Social Studies and Sciences in Primaiy 
Grades (3) A consideration of methods of instruc- 
tion for social studies and science in K-3 grade 
classrooms. 

** 321 Middle Childhood and Adolescent 
Development (5-8 years) (3) Physical, social, 
emotional, intellectual, and moral development of 
the child 5-8 years ot age. Parallels are drawn from 
this phase of child development to students' self- 
development. 



A* 325 Teaching Reading and Field Experience 
(Primaiy Grades) (6) The teaching of reading and 
its masten' is the focus of this course. Students apply 
knowledge of theories and practices in supervised 
field placements in schools with children 5-8 years of 
age. Tutoring of individual children and small groups 
is Integrated with planning and evaluation of lessons 
and activities as well as remediation. Crosslisted as 
EDR 325. PREREQ: ECE 310 or EDR 309. 
404 Integrated Learning in Kindergarten (3-6) 
The focus of this course is on curricular content 
and developmentally appropriate ex-periences in 
various kindergarten programs. 
* 405 Administration and Supervision of Early 
Childhood Programs (3) Principles of administra- 
tion and supervision of programs for young chil- 
dren. Includes parent education and community 
relarions. PREREQ; ECE 232. 
> 407 Diversity Issues in Early Childhood (3) 
This seminar will address the rewards and chal- 
lenges of teaching in America's diverse classrooms. 
** 410 Student Teaching (6) (First halt of semester) 
"411 Student Teaching (6) (Second half of semes- 
ter) Two separate student teaching experiences are 
required: one in nursery or kindergarten and one in 
grades 1-3. Weekly practicum sessions are required. 
PREREQ; See "Application and Approval for 
Student Teaching" earEer in this section. 

Symbol: EDR 

' 309 Introduction to the Language Arts (3) The 

areas of listening, speaking, and writing are stud- 
ied in depth. Knowledge, teaching, and evaluative 
techniques arc addressed. Introduction to the 
reading process and the relationship of language to 
reading also will be studied. 



SPECLVL EDUCATION 

Sv-mbol: EDA 

104 Introduction to Special Education (6) This 
course is designed to acquaint the prospective spe- 
cial education teacher with the historical and legal 
evolution of the field, as well as the characteristics 
of individuals with high- and low-incidence disabil- 
ities with a focus on mental retardation, emotional 
disturbance, learning disabilities, and phwical and 
other health impairments. In addition, this course is 
designed to have the prospective teacher observe 
and reflect upon the characteristics of these students 
with disabilities within the context of school and 
clinical settings. The content will focus on issues 
relative to special education in a diverse society and 
will rely heavily on reflective teaching and learning. 
200 Practicum (3) This course is an integral part 
of the program for minors. Field experience in an 
integrated environment consisting of collaborative 
training with regular and special educators. PRE- 
REQ: EDA 104. 

► 230 Inclusive Classrooms (3) The purpose of 
this course is to prepare preservice early childhood, 
elementarj', and special education students to 
teach smdents with disabilities effectively in gener- 
al education settings. The course will be co-taught 
by special education and early childhood education 
faculty. PREREQ: EDE 200. 



" Open to early childhood and elementary education 

majors only 
** Open to earlv childhood majors only 
A Crosslisted course. Students completing ECE 

325 may not take EDR 325 for credit. 
^ Diverse communities course 



Economics and Finance 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



250 Inclusive Practices in Music Education (1) 

Designed to acquaint music educators with the 
philosophy of inclusive education and provide them 
with skills to accommodate students with disabili- 
ties in music classes (for music educators only). 
280 Integrating the Arts (3) Fine art, music, pup- 
petrj', and dance are combined as creative process- 
es to be adapted for use with children with disabil- 
ities. This course can be used to fidfill general 
education requirements. 

301 Field Experience and Seminar: Low- 
Incidence Disabilities (3) A weekly one-and-a- 
half-hour seminar and three-hour field placement 
with individuals with low-incidence disabihties. 
This course will be taken the same semester as 
EDA 320 and EDA 349. This course will give 
students experience designing and implementing 
instruction for individuals with low-incidence dis- 
abihties and time to share and reflect on their 
experience. The readings will focus on issues of 
assessment, curriculum, and instruction of individ- 
uals with low-incidence disabilities. PREREQ; 
Formal admission to teacher education. 

302 Field Experience and Seminar. Hi^- 
Inddence Disabilities (3) A weekly one-and-a-half- 
hour seminar and three-hour field placement with 
individuals with high-incidence disabilities. This 
course will be taken the same semester as EDA 350 
and EDA 360. The goal is to experience inclusive 
classrooms, with culturally diverse populations, 
implementing best practices for teaching all children 



integrating theory and practice. The reading and dis- 
cussions will focus on special education in a diverse 
society and will include reflective teaching and the 
reflective teaching model. PREREQi EDA 104. 
320 Behavior Management (3) This course is an 
exploration of current practices in behavior man- 
agement with emphasis on teacher-dehvered sys- 
tems. PREREQ: EDA 104 and formal admission 
to teacher education. 

1 341 Inclusion and Reading in the Content Area 
(3) This course is co-taught b\' special education 
and Uteracy faciJty. It will help prepare secondary 
education and special education majors to teach all 
students effectively, including those with disabili- 
ties in general-education, content-specific settings. 
Practical guidehnes, content literac)- strategies, and 
adaptations will be emphasized to prepare pre-edu- 
cators to meet the academic social, and affective 
needs of all students in the inclusive secondary 
classroom. PREREQ: EDF 100, EDP 250. ' 

349 Methods for Low-Incidence Disabilities (3) 
This course is designed to prepare students to 
teach children with low-incidence disabihties. 
Provides an understanding of curriculum prepara- 
tion, methods, materials, and curricular areas 
unique to learners with low-incidence disabihties. 
PREREQi EDA 104 and formal admission to 
teacher education. 

350 Methods for High-Incidence Disabilities (3) 
The course is designed to prepare students to 
teach children with high-incidence disabihties. It 



provides an understanding ot learning problems. 
The focus is on instruction in academic areas. 
PREREQ: EDA 104. 

360 Assessment in Special Education (3) This 
course is designed to introduce students to instruc- 
tional assessment in special education and the 
development of relevant education plans to meet 
federal regulations. PREREQ: EDA 104. 
380 Life Transitions With Individuals With 
Disabilities (3) This course is a study of hfe-span 
issues for individuals with disabilities. It stresses 
curriculum content and instructional strategies that 
are sensitive to human diversity and promote career 
development and transition. PREREQ^ EDA 104. 
♦ 410 Independent Study (1-3) Special topics or 
projects initiated by the student that will enable 
her or him to do extensive and intensive study in 
an area of special education. PREREQi 
Permission of chairperson. 

416 Student Teaching (6) Participation in teaching 
and all other activities in the student teaching role 
related to the teacher's work. PREREQi Formal 
admission to teacher education and Pennsylvania- 
mandated GPA, 90 semester hours including all pro- 
fessional education courses, and all specialized prepa- 
ration courses with standards as shown above (*). 

417 Student Teaching (6) See EDA 416 for 
description and requirements. 



I Diverse communities course 
♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Economics and Finance 

309A Anderson Hall 

610-436-2217 

Cynthia Benzing, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Benzing, DeMoss, T. Naggar 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Bove, Mohan 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Andrews, Buchenroth, 

DurJeavy, Schini, Tolin 
The primary objective of the Department of Economics and Finance 
is to provide a learning experience that wiU permit each student to 
achieve maximum intellectual development in his or her chosen area 
of study and to prepare for a satisfying career in that field. 
As an aid to the achievement of this purpose, the Department of 
Economics and Finance strives: 

1. To assist students in acquiring a fiindamental knowledge and 
understanding of the framework within which our business and 
industrial system operates; 

2. To acquaint students with the modern techniques used by business 
and industry that enables them to deal effectively with the chang- 
ing environment; and 

3. To encourage smdents in developing the ablliry to analyze situa- 
tions, to relate and classify pertinent factors, and to derive alterna- 
tives for solving problems. 

The Department of Economics and Finance coordinates its courses 
with the departments of Accounring, Management, and Marketing. 
Majors in the department must consult the departmental handbook 
and their adviser annually for current requirements. 
Two degree programs are offered: 

1. The B.S. in ECONOMICS focuses on a business orientation of 
economic analysis. 

2. The B.S. in FINANCE focuses on investment, internarional 
finance, and financial markets. 



All freshmen and those transfer students who have not completed 
the required courses will be admitted to the pre-business program. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— ECONOMICS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
(includes COM 101 or 208 or 216 or 230, 

CSC 110 or 115 or 141, MAT 105* or 107* 

or 110*, PHI 101 or 150 or 180, and nine credits 

of free electives) 

2. Business Core 39 semester hours 
ACC 20r, 202*; BLA 201*; ECO 111*, 112*, 

251*, 252*; FIN 325*; MAT 108; MOT 200*, 
341*, 499*; and MKT 325* 

3. Major Concentradon Courses 27 semester hours 
ECO 335*, 340*, 348*, 400*, and ECO 409* or 

FIN 375*; and two electives in economics 

300 level or above*, ECO 337* or 338* or 

PSC 318*, and ENG 368* 

Business Electives 

300-level or above courses in ACC, BLA, 

ECO, FIN, INB, MGT, MIS, MKT; 

GEO 325, 425; or PSC 318 

Restricted Electives 

Three semester hours or any 100-level or above 

nonbusiness course. 
A minimum of 15 credits in 300-400 level ECO courses and a minimum 
of 30 credits in business courses must be completed at WCU. 
Only students accepted into the accounting, economics, finance, man- 
agement, and marketing majors or minors may register for 300-level 
business classes. 



4. 



5. 



3 semester hours 



3 semeter hours 



*A minimum grade of C must be attained in these courses. 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Economics 



36 semester hours 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— FINANCE 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
(includes COM 101 or 208 or 216 or 230, 

CSC 110 or 115 or 141, ECO 111*, 
MAT 105' or 107* or 110*, PHI 101 or 
150 or 180, and nine credits of free electives) 

2. Business Core 
ACC 201*, 202*; BLA 201'; ECO 112*, 

251*, and 252*; FIN 325*; MAT 108; MOT 200*, 
341, 499*; and MKT 325* 

3. Major Concentration Courses 24 semester hours 
HN 326*, 337*, 344*, 372*, 375*; mo 

electives in finance or accounting 300-level 
or above*; and ENG 368* 

4. Business Electives 9 semester hours 
300-level or above courses in ACC, BLA, ECO, 

INB, MGT, MIS, MKT; GEO 325, 425; or 
PSC 318 

5. Restricted Electives 3 semester hours 
Three semester hours of any 100-level or above 

nonbusiness course 
A minimum of 15 credits in 300-400 level FIN courses and a minimum of 
30 credits in business courses must be completed at WCU. 
Onlv students accepted into the accounting, economics, finance, man- 
agement, and marketing majors or minors ma)' register for 300-level 
business classes. 

Minor in Economics 27 semester hours 

To be admitted into the minor in economics, students must ha\-e an 
overall GPA of 2.5 and ha\e completed the following classes wth a C 



orbetter:^L\Tl05or 107or 110, andECO 111, 112, and 251. 
Once admitted to the minor, students must maintain an overall GPA 
of 2.5 to continue in the minor. 

Course requirements are ^L\T 108, ECO 340' and 348*, and two 
economics electives at the 300 level. Only business majors and stu- 
dents who have been accepted into the minor may register for 300- 
level economics classes. 

Minor in Finance 30 semester hours 

To be admitted into the minor in finance, students must have an 
overall GPA of 2.5 and have completed the follo\ving classes vsith a C 
or better: M\l 105 or 107 or 110, and ECO 111, 112, and 251 
Once admitted to the minor, students must maintain an overall GPA 
of 2.5 to continue in the minor. 

Course requirements are ACC 201*, AL\T 108, and HN 325*, 344*, 
and 372*. Only business majors and smdents who have been accepted 
into the minor may register for 300-level fmance classes. 

Prebusiness Status 

AU prebusiness students (internal and external transfers) may apply for 
the major or minor after completion of 45 credits with a minimum 
overall GPA of 2.50. In addition, thev must have completed the fol- 
lowing courses with a C or better: ACC 201; ECO 111, 112, 251; 
NL\T 105 (or higher); and MGT 200; as well as a passing grade in 
^L■VT 108. To progress in the finance or economics major program, 
students must maintain a 2.50 overall GPA. To graduate, students 
must have a 2.50 overall GPA and a 2.50 GPA in their major course 
work (as defined by each program). 



'A minimum grade of C must be attained in these courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ECONOMICS 

S>-mbol: ECO 

101 Principles of Economics — Survey (3) Basic 

principles underhing production and consumption 
acn\'ities in our modified, capitalistic economic 
system, from the aggregate as well as indiWdual 
and sectoral standpoints. Issues include competi- 
tion, unemplojTiient, inflation, economic growth, 
and alternative svstems. 

111 Principles of Economics I (Macro) (3) 
National income and its measurement. The deter- 
mination of price levels, output, and emploiiTnent. 
Money and credit, evpenditures, and economic 
stability. Government fiscal and monetar)' policy. 
PREREQ; Working knowledge of high school 
mathematics is required. 

112 Principles of Economics II (Micro) (3) 
Principles undcrh-ing use and allocation of scarce 
productive resources. Consumption and produc- 
tion acti\ities. Value, price, and income distribu- 
tion. Considerations of economic efficiency' and 
welfare. PREREQ^ Working knowledge of high 
school mathematics. 

251 Quantitative Business Analysis I (3) Teaches 
swdents to analra data and solve problems using 
descriptive statistics and probabilitii' theorj'. Discrete 
and continuous probability' distributions, and sam- 
pling distributions. Stresses practical business appli- 
cations of statistical theon.- as well as obtaining and 
interpreting descriptive statistics using Excel and 
Minitab. Use of a spreadsheet program (such as 
Excel) necessarv' to manipulate data and formulas. 
PRERE(i.\L4T 105 or 107 or 110, and ECO 111 
and 112. 

252 Quantitative Business Analysis II (3) Teaches 
students how to develop testable h\'potheses and use 
them to anal\"ze data and answer questions. Co\'ers 
confidence inten'als, analras ot \'ariance, simple 



r^ression, multiple regression, and correlation. 
Stresses practical business \'ariance using Excel and 
another statistical package and interpret the results. 
Use of a spreadsheet program (such as Excel) neces- 
sai)' to manipulate data and formulas. PREREQ^ 
MAT 105 or 107 or 110; and ECO 111, 112; and 
ECO 251 or MAT 121. 

334 Labor Economics (3) Application of eco- 
nomic theory- to the operation of labor markets 
and the collective bargaining process. Considera- 
tion is given to the development of the labor 
movement and public policv toward labor and 
emplo>-ment. PREREQ: ECO 111 and 112. 

335 Money and Banking (3) A survey of money, 
credit, and prices, emphasizing their effects on 
economic stabilit)'. The Federal Reserve S\"stem 
and its effect on credit control. PREREQ^ ECO 
111 and 112. 

336 Regulation of Competition (3) Background and 
de\'elopment of public policies that directly modify 
the free enterprise economy ot the United States. 
E\'aluation of policies that change the nature and 
extent of competition. PREREQ^ ECO 111 and 112. 

337 Economic Growth and Development (3) A 
survev and critical evaluation ot alternative theories 
of capitalist economic development. Analv-sis and 
comparison of alternative public policies applicable 
to underdeveloped countries and regions. PRE- 
REQ: ECO 111 and 112. 

338 International Economics (3) A descriptive, 
analnical e.xammation of International trade, 
finance, and other economic relationships. The 
effects of public policies on these relationships. 
PREREQiECO 111 and 112. 

340 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) A continu- 
ation and extension of the price-sj'stem anal)-sis in 
ECO 112. Emphasis on the need for efficienc)' in 
the economv's use of scarce productive resources. 
PREREQ^ ECO 111 and 112, and ^L\T 108. 



341 Public Finance (3) Government's influence on 
stabilitv' of national income. Nature of taxes and 
expenditures at the v'arious levels of government and 
their effect on the allocation of resources and the dis- 
tribution of income. PREREQ. ECO 111 and 112. 
343 Comparative Economic Systems (3) Basic 
ideas and economic institutions of socialism, com- 
munism, and capitalism in the 20th centur)-. Prob- 
lems created bv the emergence of competing sw- 
tems. PREREQ: ECO 111 and 112. 
# 3-t4 American Economic E.\perience (3) This 
course examines the U.S. economy from the Ci\Tl 
War to the present with emphasis on economic theo- 
r\' and analras. The sociological ramifications of eco- 
nomic conditions will be examined through the litera- 
ture of the era. PREREQ^ECO 101 or 111 or 112. 
345 Histort' of Economic Thou^t (3) Origins of 
economic thought and comparison of the major 
schook of economic doctrine. Current economic and 
sodo-poUtical factors. PREREQ^ECO 111 and 112. 

347 Managerial Economics (3) A course that seeks 
to develop managerial judgment. The premise is that 
technical application, to be successful, must proceed 
from economic feasibilitii-. One plan is weighed 
against another in terms of comparative costs and 
rev'enues, return on investment, plant-replacement 
problems, obsolescence, and depredation. PRE- 
REQ: .A.CC 202, ECO 111. 112. and 252. 

348 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) Introduc- 
tion to the theor\' ot income, employment, and 
growth. Prov'ides the analvric tools necessar)' for 
dealing with aggregate economic problems. PRE- 
REQ; ECO 111 and 112, and MAT 108. 

350 Urban Economics (3) Economic aspects of 
such urban problems as poverri', housing, taxation, 
income distribution, and discrimination. Analj-sis of 
economic aspects of various proposed remedies, 



# Appro\'ed Lnterdisciplinan* course 



ij^l Educational Development 



Office of the Associate Provost 



including urban renewal, tamilv allowances, cooper- 
atives, and others. PREREQ: ECO 111 and 112. 
385 Environmental and Resource Economics (3) 
The role of the environment in an economic system. 
Topics include energy economics, the economics of 
renewable and nonrenewable resources, and the eco- 
nomics of pollution. PREREQiECO 111 and 112. 

400 Research Methods for Business and 
Economics (3) Provides the skills and tools 
required in business and economic research. Covers 
research ethics, hypothesis development, sampling 
methodology, experimental design, survey method- 
ology, data collection, multivariate analysis, and 
regression. Research project required. PREREQ: 
ECO 252, and MAT 108 or 161. 

401 Introduction to Econometrics (3) Statistical and 
mathcniatic.J techniques applied to economic situa- 
tions. Use of empirical data in economic analysis. 
PREREQi ECO 111, 112, and 252, and MAT 108. 

409 Senior Seminar (3) Students are expected to 
prepare a research paper that describes and ana- 
lyzes a current topic in economics. PREREQ^ 
Senior standing, ECO 252, 340, and 348. 

410 Independent Studies in Economics (1-3) 
Special research projects, reports, and readings in 
economics. Open to seniors only. PREREQ^ 
Permission of instructor. 

♦ 411-412 Internship (3 or 6) The internship is 
open to majors in economics only. It is intended to 
enhance the student's educational experience by 
providing substantive, professional work experience. 
PREREQi Permission of department chairperson. 

FINANCE 

Symbol: FIN 

200 Personal Finance (3) This course addresses 
all of the major personal financial planning prob- 
lems that individuals and fimilies encounter. It 
presents a model of the major elements of effective 
money management. All of the latest financial 
planning tools and techniques are discussed. 
325 Corporate Finance (3) Fundamental financial 
management course introduces students to essen- 
tial financial concepts, including the analysis of 
financial statements, time value of money, stock 
and bond valuation, risk and return, capital bud- 



geting, and cost of capital. PREREQ^ ACC 201; 
ECO 111 and 112; ECO 251 or MAT 121; and 
MAT 108 or 161. 
326 Intermediate Financial Management (3) 

Emphasizes the theoretical understanding and 
practical application of concepts introduced in 
FIN 325. Students perform a fmancial analysis of 
one or more companies including current trends in 
the economy and industry, as well as ratio, 
DuPont, and operating capital analyses. Use of 
spreadsheet analysis to value stocks and bonds; 
determine the cost of capital, NPV, and IRR; and 
calculate beta. PREREQi FIN 325, and MAT 
108 or 161. 

330 Principles of Insurance (3) Designed to give stu- 
dents a sound foundation for persona] risk manage- 
ment ;Jong with a basic understanding of the insur- 
ance industry. Covers insurance pricing, industt}' regu- 
lation, risk management, and contract law; homeown- 
er's, personal auto, life, and health insurance; and 
retirement products. A paper is required. PREREQ; 
nN 325. 

332 Real Estate Finance (3) Covers different 
types of real estate, forms of ownership, real prop- 
erty rights, and land use policies; how to perform a 
feasibilit)' analysis and value real estate using the 
income capitalization, sales comparison, and cost 
approaches; various types of residential mortgages; 
and how to finance a commercial property pur- 
chase. How to lease, buy, sell, and mortgage a 
propert}', anal\'ze the market, examine risk factors, 
and determine the best financing technique. PRE- 
REQ: FIN 325. 

337 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 
Covers a variety of domestic and international 
fmancial markets and institutions, including the 
mutual fiind industry, banking institutions, insur- 
ance companies, savings institutions, credit unions, 
and pension funds, as well as their regulation, 
operation, and management. Reviews macroeco- 
nomic principles and monev and banking theory. 
Written and oral presentation of a fmancial insti- 
tution required. PREREQ: RN 325. 
344 Investments (3) Covers key concepts in the 
investment process with an introduction to stocks, 
bonds, options, and fiitures. Discusses valuation of 



fmancial assets, market efficiency, interest rates, 
risk management, and asset allocation. Financial 
analysis required that emphasizes economic and 
industrj- forecasts and trends. PREREQ; FIN 325. 
350 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 
Management (3) Emphasizes portfolio construc- 
tion and importance of diversity and asset alloca- 
tion rather than security selection. How to set 
portfolio objectives, develop investment policy, 
construct a portfolio, and manage it. Importance of 
using options and fiitures, periodic review and 
portfolio revision, benchmarking, and duration 
analysis. Interview a client, develop an investment 
portfoho based on needs assessment, and present 
the results. PREPJ;Q; FIN 344. 
370 Problems in Financial Management (3) Case 
problems in corporate financial management. 
Includes cases on managing current assets, obtain- 
ing short-term loans, raising long-term capital, 
budgeting capital, and handling divided policy. 
PREREQ: FIN 326. 

372 International Pmance (3) Introduces global 
financial markets and financial risk management. 
Covers foreign exchange markets, money markets, 
bond markets, and equity markets, of which each 
market is developed to consider the needs of a multi- 
national corporation, thus providing a meaningfiil 
integrarion of international markets and institutions. 
PREREQ, nN 325. 

375 Contemporary Issues in Finance (3) 
Students will think, speak, and write about com- 
plex financial and economic issues, including 
ethics, efficient markets, data analysis and fore- 
casting, globahzation, behavioral finance, and 
portfoho analysis. Thesis, PowerPoint presenta- 
tion, and portfoho analysis required. Senior 
finance majors only. PREREQ: FIN 326, 344, 
and 337. 

410 Special Topics in Finance (3) Pro\'ides in- 
depth coverage of a major current topic in finance. 
The topic will change each semester. Topics to be 
covered include capital budgeting, valuation, 
financial derivatives, and financial modeUng. 
PREREQ: FIN 325. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Educational Development 

132 Lawrence Center 

610-436-3505 

Herbert Lee, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Dinniman, Egan, K)'per 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Casciato, Corbett, Giangiulio, 

Jenkins, Lee, Patwell 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: AUen, Grice, Hill 
INSTRUCTOR: Guy 

The Department of Educational Development is a cadre of University 
facult)' who have specific and specialized administrative and/or teach- 
ing assignments at the University. While much of the assigned 
rcsponsibilit)' is to facilitate students' out-of-class learning and devel- 



opment, regular and nonclassroom teaching are still included. Areas 
within the Department of Educational Development include pre- 
major academic advising, career advising, academic administration, 
tutoring, services for students with disabilities, and other articulated 
teaching and/or administrative assignments. 
The department administers the following credit-bearing course: 
WCJ 100 Introduction to American Culture (3) This course is 
designed for the orientation of international students and new resi- 
dents to life and study in the United States. A study of American 
higher education, personal values, attitudes, and cultural patterns, the 
emphasis is on the diversity of peoples and lifestyles. This course is 
not open to U.S. citizens for graduation credits. 



Office ot the Associate Provost 



Educational Services: Air Force ROTC 



Military Science (Army ROTC) 

West Chester University students are eligible to participate in the Army 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Program through a formal 
cross-enrollment agreement with the Widener University Department of 
Military Science. Army ROTC offers Univesity smdents the opportunity 
to graduate with a college degree and a commission in the United States 
army, Army National Guard, or United States Army Reserve. All Army 
ROTC classes are conducted on the Widener campus. 
The Army ROTC Program consists of a basic course taken during the 
freshman and sophomore years, and an advanced course taken during 
junior and senior years. Successfiol completion of the basic course is 
required before placement in the advanced course. Students who partici- 
pated in Junior ROTC in high school or who have prior military service 
may receive placement in the advanced courses, which is determined by 
the army professor of military science. The basic course requirement also 
may be satisfied through attendance at a five-week Army ROTC Basic 
Camp at the end of the sophomore year. Students enrolled in the 
advanced course receive a stipend of $350 for juniors and $400 for 
seniors per month. Guaranteed National Guard and Reserve Forces 
options also are available. 

Nursing students who complete the four-year or two-year program, 
obtain their nursing degree, and pass their Nursing Board 
Examinations are commissioned into the Army Nurse Corps. Two- 
year (limited) and three-year Army ROTC scholarships are available 
on a competitive basis. These scholarships pay 100 percent of the stu- 
dent's tuition up to $10,000 and include payment of certain University 
fees, a book and school supplies subsidy, and a monthly stipend of 



$250 for freshmen, $300 for sophomores, $350 for juniors, and $400 
for seniors. 

Application for two- and three-year Army ROTC scholarships must 
be submitted early in the spring semester of the freshman or sopho- 
more year (respectively). AppUcations for attendance at the Army 
ROTC Basic Camp must be submitted early in the spring semester of 
the sophomore year. 

Military science students also participate in orientation and field 
training activities as part of the military science curriculum. These 
activities are explorations of historical, organizational, and fiinctional 
activities of the U.S. Army, conducted in conjunction with the Army 
Officer Education Program, and are recognized as a pan of the 
process for preparation of cadets for commissioning. 
Activities are conducted off campus through tours, field trips, laborato- 
ry sessions, and practical field applications. Practical field appUcation 
activities include marksmanship, land navigation, small units opera- 
tions, rappelling, water survival, color guard, drill team, rifle team, 
organized athletics, and other military skills. Varying degrees of health 
and body risk are involved in these activities. The government of the 
United States, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, West Chester 
University, its officers, trustees, employees, agents, or students assume 
no liability for any injury caused during the above activities. 
For further information on scholarship and career opportunities, con- 
tact the professor of military science, Widener University, Chester, 
PA 19013, 610-499-4097. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MILITARY SCIENCE 

Symbol: MSI 

101 Introduction to ROTC I (1) This course is 
designed to teach self-confidence through team 
study and activities in basic drill, physical fitness, 
rappelling, leadership reaction course, first aid, 
making presentations, and basic marksmanship. 
Includes fundamental concepts of professional 
leadership in both classroom and outdoor labora- 
tory environments. One hour and a required lead- 
ership lab, plus participation in three, one-hour 
sessions for physical fitness. Participation in a 
weekend exercise also is required. 

102 Introduction to Leadership (1) Learn/apply 
principles of effective leading. Reinforce self-con- 
fidence through participation in physically and 
mentally challenging exercises with upper-division 
ROTC students. Develop communication skills to 
improve individual performance and group inter- 
action. Relate organizational ethical values to the 
effectiveness of a leader. One hour and a required 
leadership lab, plus participation in three, one- 
hour sessions for physical fitness. Participation in a 
weekend exercise also is required. 

201 Self'Team Development (2) Learn/apply 
ethics-based leadership skills that develop individual 
abilities and contribute to effective team building. 
Develop skills in oral presentations, writing concise- 
ly, planning events, coordinating group efforts, 
advanced first aid, land navigation, and basic mili- 
tary tactics. Learn fiindamentals of ROTC's 
Leadership Development Program. Two hours and 
a required leadership lab, plus required participation 



in three, one-hour sessions for physical fitness. 
Participation in a weekend exercise also is required. 
202 Individual/Team Military Tactics (2) 
Introduction to individual and team aspects of mili- 
tary tactics in small-unit operations. Includes use of 
radio communications, making safety assessments, 
movement techniques, planning for team safety/secu- 
rity, and methods of pre-execution checks. Practical 
exercises with upper-division ROTC students. Learn 
techniques for training others as an aspect of contin- 
ued leadership development. Two hours and a 
required leadership lab, plus required participation in 
three, one-hour sessions for physical fitness. 
Participation in a weekend exercise also is required. 

301 Leading Small Organizations I (3) Series of 
practical opportunities to lead small groups, receive 
personal assessments and encouragement, and lead 
again in situations of increasing complexity. Uses 
small-unit defensive tactics and opportunities to 
plan and conduct training for lower-division stu- 
dents to develop these skills as vehicles to practice 
leading. Three hours and a required leadership lab, 
plus required participation in three, one-hour ses- 
sions for physical fitness. Participation in one week- 
end exercise also is required, and one or two more 
weekend exercises may be offered for participation. 
PRERECi. Army ROTC advanced course standing 
or approval of the professor of military science. 

302 Leading Small Organizations II (3) Continues 
methodolog)- of JVISl 301. Analyze tasks, prepare 
written or oral guidance for team members to accom- 
plish tasks, delegate tasks, and supervise. Plan for and 
adapt to the unexpected in organizations under 
stress. Examine and apply lessons from leadership 
case studies as well as the importance ot ethical deci- 
sion making in setting a positive climate that 



enhances team performance. Three hours and a 
required leadership lab, plus required participation in 
three, one-hour sessions for physical fimess. 
Participation in one weekend exercise and three other 
one-day exercises is required. PRER£Q;.MSI 301. 

401 Leadership Challenges and Goal Setting (2) 

Plan, conduct, and evaluate activities of the 
ROTC cadet organization. Articulate goals and 
put plans into action to attain them. Assess orga- 
nizational cohesion and develop strategies to 
improve it. Develop confidence in skills to lead 
people and manage resources. Learn/apply various 
Army policies and programs in this effort. Three 
hours and a required leadership lab, plus required 
participation in three, one-hour sessions for physi- 
cal fitness. Participation in one weekend exercise 
also is required, and one or two more weekend 
exercises mav be offered for optional participation. 
PREREQ: MSI 301 and MSI 302. 

402 Transition to Lieutenant (2) Continues the 
methodology from MSI 401. Identify and resolve 
ethical dilemmas. Refine counseling and motivat- 
ing techniques. Examine aspects of tradition and 
law as related to leading as an officer in the Army. 
Prepare for a fliture as a successful Army lieu- 
tenant. Three hours and a required leadership lab, 
plus required participation in three, one-hour ses- 
sions for physical fitness. Participation in one 
weekend exercise also is required, and one or two 
more weekend exercises may be offered for option- 
al participation. PREREQ: MSI 401. 

Additional Requirements. Students enrolled in 
the Army ROTC Program are required to com- 
plete communications, computer literacy, and mil- 
itary history courses prior to commissioning. 



Elementan' Education 



School of Education 



Air Force ROTC 

West Chester University students are eligible to participate in the i'Mr 
Force Reserve OiEcer Training Corps (AFROTC) through an agreement 
with Saint Joseph's Universit\-. All aerospace studies courses wiD be held 
on the Saint Joseph's campus. Credits can be transferred to WCU and 
appear on the official transcript. The AFROTC program enables a college 
student to earn a commission as an Air Force officer while concurrendy 
satisfVing requirements for his or her baccalaureate degree. 
The program of aerospace studies at Saint Joseph's University offers 
two-, three-, and four-year curricula leading to a commission as a sec- 
ond Ueutenant in the Air Force. In the tour-year curriculum, students 
take classes as part of the General MiHtary Corps (CMC) during the 
freshman and sophomore years. Students will also attend a four-week 
summer training program following the spring semester of the sopho- 
more year. Upon their remrn, smdents then progress to the remaining 
two-year curricula, taking courses corresponding to the Professional 
Officer Corps (POC) during the junior and senior years. Students 
who enter as sophomores are part of the three-year curriculum and 
take the second half of GMC courses. They attend a six-week sum- 
mer training program. Those who begin the program as juniors enroll 
in the two-year POC curriculum and attend a sbc-week summer train- 
ing program following the spring semester of the junior year. Students 
are under no contracmal obUgation to the Air Force until they accept 
an Air Force scholarship or enter the POC. 



The subject matter of the freshman and sophomore years is developed 
from a historical perspective and focuses on the scope, structure, and 
histor)- of military power with an emphasis on the development of air 
power. During the junior and senior years, the curriculum concentrates 
on the concepts and practices of leadership and management, and the 
role of national security forces in contemporary American society. 
In addition to the academic portion of the curricula, students partici- 
pate in a two-hour leadership laboratory (LLAB) each week. During 
this period, the day-to-day skills and working environment of the Air 
Force are discussed, explained, and simulated. The leadership lab is 
structured to allow students to practice leadership and management 
techniques through various methods. 

Air Force ROTC offers two-, three-, and four-year scholarships on a 
competitive basis to qualified applicants. All scholarships cover tuition, 
application fees, lab fees, and $45O-S510 per year for te.xtbooks, as well 
as provide a $250, S300, S350, or S400 tax-free monthly stipend. 
For fiirther information on the program, scholarships, and career 
opportunities, contact the professor of aerospace studies, AFROTC 
Det 750, Saint Joseph's University, 5600 City Avenue, Philadelphia, 
PA 19131-1399, 610-660-3190/3191. Information also is available on 
the Det 750 web site at http://www.sju.edu/admin/afrotc. 



COURSES FOR AFROTC 

Symbol: AER, AEL 



AER 100 The Foundations of the United States 
Air Force (1) 

AER 200 The Evolution of USAF Aerospace 
Power (1) 



AER 300 Air Force Leadership Studies (3) 
AER 400 National Security Affairs (3) 
AEL 200 Leadership Laboratory (Pass/Fail) 



Department of Elementary Education 

106B Recitation Hall 

610-436-2944 

Martha Drobnak, Chairperson 

Linda Baloche, Assistant Chairperson 

Frances A. Slostad, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Baloche, Brown, Maxim, Radich 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Bollin, Cai, Drobnak, Slostad 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Corrody, Hoyle, Sanderson, 

Winterton 
The Department of Elementary Education offers programs leading to 
certification by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for elementary 
education teachers (K-6). 

The B.S. Ed. in ELEMENTARY EDUCATION curriculum is 
designed to provide a broad background of general education, an 
understanding of children, and the knowledge and skills needed to 
teach all aspects of the elementar)' school program. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the approved program, the smdent will qualify for a 
Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate, valid for sbt years of teaching 
in kindergarten and grades one through six. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION — 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 
(Curriculum K-6) 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Includes GEO 101, LIT 395, MAT 101, 

SCI 101, SCI 102, and American history 

2. Professional Education 12 semester hours 
EDF 100, EDM 300, EDP 250, and 351 + 

3. Specialized Preparation 57 semester hours 
EDE 200, 251+, 332+', 352+*, 401+', 406+*, 



410+*, and 411+*; EDR/EDE 302+*, 311+*, 312+*; 
EDA/EDE/ECE 230+, HEA 301*; MAT 102+ 
and 351++*; MUE 231; and SCE 310+* 



4. Elective Area 



3 semester hours 



Application and Approval for Student Teaching 

Students are eligible to student teach if they have (a) achieved fiill-admis- 
sion stams to teacher education, (b) met the professional preparation 
requirements (exception: EDE 406 may be taken concurrend}' with sm- 
dent teaching), (c) earned at least 90 credits prior to the student teaching 
semester, and (d) maintained the Pennsylvania-mandated GPA of 2.80. 
(See "Formal Admission to Teacher Education" in the "Teaching 
Certification Programs" section of this catalog.) Student teaching is typi- 
cally scheduled for a smdent's final semester at the University. 
Students must file an application through the Department of 
Elementary Education for smdent teaching; apphcation for smdent 
teaching must be made one semester prior to smdent teaching through 
the Teacher Education Center, Francis Harvey Green Library- 251. 
Following application, students register for student teaching (EDE 410 
and 411) as the\- would for other Universit}' courses. 

Field Placement in Schools 

AH field placements for EDE courses, including smdent teaching, are 
arranged in conjunction with the Department of Elementan' 
Education. Students are not to solicit placements. While smdent 
needs are considered in assigning placements, no particular placement 
can be guaranteed. Transportation to and from field placements is the 
responsibiht}' of the individual smdent. Students must have their 



+ Courses requiring prerequisites - check catalog course descriptions below. 
++ Prerequisites are MAT 101 and MAT 102 (unless waived by examination). 
* Advanced program courses that require formal admission to teacher 
certification to enroll. 



School of Education 



Elementan- Education 



criminal, child abuse, and TB clearance bv the first day of class for 
EDE 200, EDR 312, and EDE 410/411.' 

West Chester University- does not place students at religiously affiliat- 
ed schools when pubUc school placements are available and when that 
placement results in the students' recei\ing academic credit. 

Admission and Progression Requirements in Elementary 
Education B.S. Ed. Program 

Students must meet Uni\'ersit)' admission requirements. AH students 
who enter the Universit}' as elementar}- education majors are designated 
as probationary teacher education students until they achieve formal admis- 
sion to teacher education. All students seeking a bachelor of science in 
education in elementan- education must formally apph' for admission to 
teacher education. (See "Formal Admission to Teacher Education" in 
the "Teaching Certification Programs" section of this catalog.) 
Only students formallv admitted to teacher education vnH be eligible 
to take advanced professional education course work. For elementary 
education majors, the advanced professional course work includes 
300- and 400-level EDE courses and EDE/EDR 312 plus HEA 301, 
MAT 351, and SCE 310. Students formally admitted to teacher edu- 
cation must maintain the required minimum GPA in order to contin- 
ue taking advanced professional course work. If a student falls below 
the required minimum GPA, he or she will be permitted to retake - 
in accordance with Universirv polic\' - professional course work that 
contributed to the fall below the minimum GPA but will not be per- 
mitted to take additional work until the minimum is met. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR TR.\iNSFER TO THE MAJOR IN ELE- 
MENTARY EDUCATION. Students may apph- for "external trans- 
fer" (see below) when transferring from another post-secondan' institu- 
tion. Students •alread\- admitted to West Chester Universit)' as prema- 
jors or in another major may apply for "internal transfer" (see below). 
Students seeking e.\ternal or internal transfer must have earned a min- 
imum of 27 college-level credits. Students with 27-47 credits must 
also have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.65. the required mini- 
mum cumulative GPA for students with 48-59 earned credits is 2.80. 
Students with 60 or more earned credits must have minimum cumula- 
tive GPA of 2.80; have achieved the following passing scores (in 
parentheses) as established by the Penns)h'ania Department ot 
Eduation on Praxis I PPST examinations in Reading (172), Writing 
(173), and Mathematics (173); and completed college-level studies in 



English composition (three credits), hterature taught in English (three 
credits), and mathematics (six credits). If admission availabiliri- is lim- 
ited, applicants \vill be ranked bv cumulative GPA, and selection will 
be based on these rankings. 

E.x-temal or internal transfer to the major in elementary education 
does not confer formal admission to teacher education. (See "Formal 
Admission to Teacher Education" in the "Teaching Certification 
Programs" section of this catalog.) 

EXTERNAL TR.ANSFER STUDENTS. Transfer credit for fresh- 
man- and sophomore-level courses will be granted in accordance with 
LTniversit^• poUcy. Professional and specialized preparation courses wiU 
be evaluated and approved on an individual basis. Application for the 
major is made through the Office of Admissions. (See "Formal 
Admission to Teacher Education" in the "Teaching Certification 
Programs" section of this catalog.) 

INTERNAL TRANSFER STUDENTS. AppUcarion is made directiy 
to the Department of Elementan- Education. The department admits 
internal transfer students twice a vear - for two weeks early in the fall term 
and again for two weeks earlv in the spring term. Call the department for 
dates and details. (See "Formal Admission to Teacher Education" in the 
"Teaching Certification Programs" section of this catalog.) 
Minor in Elementary Education 18 semester hours 

Required Courses 

EDE 251, 40U, 406-f, EDR/EDE 302+, 

31 1+; and one EDE elective approved by 

the department 

Admission to the Minor in Elementary Education 

Students seeking a minor in elementar)- education must have complet- 
ed 27 credits and must have the minimum cumulative GPA required 
for their earned credits: 2.65 for students with 27-47 credits and 2.80 
for students with 48 or more credits. Students admitted to the minor 
must maintain the minimum cumulative GPA required of them at 
admission to the minor in order to continue. Students who tall below 
the minimum cumulative GPA required are permitted to retake, in 
accordance with Universin' poUc\-, course work in the minor that con- 
tributed to their fall below the required minimum cumulative GPA. 
Such students will not be permitted to take additional course work in 
the minor until thev achieve the required minimum cumulative GPA. 



+ Courses requiring prerequisites - check catalog course descriptions below. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Symbol: EDE 

** 200 Theory and Field Experiences in 
Elementaiy Education (3) Orientation to the cur- 
ricula, processes, and structures ot elementan- educa- 
tion todav. Field experiences related to course topics. 
t ▲ 230 Inclusive Classroom (3) The purpose of 
this course is to prepare preser\'ice early childhood, 
elementary-, and special education students to teach 
students with disabilities etfectively in general edu- 
cation settings. The course will be co-taught by spe- 
cial education, early childhood education, and ele- 
mentan- education faculty-. PREREQi EDE 200. 
**251 Child Development and Behavior (3) 
Emotional, social, mental, moral, physical, and self 
factors shaping human beharior with emphasis on 
child and early adolescent development. Specific 
application to classroom settings. 

253 Human Development and Behav-ior (3) 
Ph)-sical, mental, emotional, social, moral, and self 
factors shaping human behav-ior throughout the 
life cycle; specific application to work with indi- 
v-iduals and groups in educational settings. PRE- 
REQ: PSY 100. 

254 Development in the Middle School Child 
(3) Characteristic development and behavior of 



children between 10 and 15 years of age; under- 
standing and working \\-ith these children in edu- 
cational senings. PREREQ: EDE 251 and 253 or 
their equiv-alent. 

A •* 302 Teaching the Language Arts (3) Study 
of teaching language skills in the elementarj- 
school: listening, speaking, and writing. 
CrossHsted as EDR 302. PREREQ: EDE 251. 
A 311 Introduction to Reading Instruction (3) 
An exploratory course investigating the reading 
process, language and learning theories, and their 
relation to reading. Historical scope and various 
programs of reading are studied and evaluated. 
Crosslisted as EDR 311. PREREQ; EDE 251. 
A ** 312 Reading Instniction and Practicum (6) 
Focus is on mastery- of the teaching of develop- 
mental reading, early reading, and prereading 
experiences. The students learn how to plan, 
teach, and evaluate reading/thinking skUls related 
to the instruction of reading in the elementary 
classroom. Students work in the public schools 
with small and large reading groups teaching vari- 
ous aspects of the reading lesson. Students also 
learn how to evaluate pupil performance and 
remediate minor reading problems. Crosslisted as 
EDR 312. PREREQ: EDE 200 and 311. 
A 315 Developmental Reading for the 
Handicapped Child (3) The focus of this course is 



the study of the nature of the reading process and 
its relation to language development, motivation 
and methodology for developmental reading skills, 
reading programs and materials, problems in deal- 
ing with handicapped children, and practicum in 
reading instruction. Special education majors only. 
CrossUsted as EDR 315. 

330 Instructional Programs and Strategies (3) 
Introduction to principles underlring the develop- 
ment of instructional programs in the schools. 
Strategies include cognitive and skill learning, and 
modes of teaching. 

** 332 Teaching Social Studies in the 
Elementary School (3) Methods of teaching social 

studies and geograph\- in the elementary curricu- 
lum. Techniques, current research projects, read- 
ing materials, audio \-isual aids, resource persons, 
and field trips used as tools of learning. The orga- 
nization, development, and use ot resource units 
are stressed. PREREQ: EDE 200 and 251. 
** 352 Self and Group Processes in the Diverse 
Classroom (3) Study of the classroom as a unique 

** Open to elementar)- education majors onl\- 
A CrossUsted course. Students completing the 

EDE course mav not take the EDR or EDA 

course for credit. 
I Diverse communities course 



English 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



social system and Intentional community. 
Application ot interpersonal, social learning, and eco- 
logical theor\' in light of diverse sociocultural con- 
texts. Attention directed at the dynamics of racism, 
ethnocentrism, sexism, dassism, and heterosexism in 
the classroom. Analysis and practice ot group process 
skills shaping teacher-student and student-student 
relationships. Enhancement of knowledge and skills 
essential in facilitating collaborative norms in the 
classroom learning system. PREREQl EDE 251. 
" 401 Creativity in the Classroom (3) 
Exploration of materials and processes of chil- 
dren's perceptions and behavior, aimed at encour- 
aging the development of their critical and creative 
potentials. PREREQ: EDE 312. 
** 406 Classroom Management (3) Detailed 
investigation of the elementat)' teacher's role in 
classroom management. Teacher influence, person- 
ality, and class interaction; class roles and expecta- 
tion; seating plans; discipUne; referral; and the 
teacher's role in evaluating and identifting poten- 
tial problems in chUdren. PREREQ: EDE 312. 
409 Independent Study (1-3) Special topics or 
projects initiated bv the student that will enable 
her or him to do extensive and intensive studv in 



an area of elementary education. PREREQ^ 
Permission of department chairperson. 
**410 Student Teaching (6) (First half of semester) 
** 411 Student Teaching (6) (Second halt of 
semester) Two separate student teaching experi- 
ences are required: one in grades K-3 and one in 
grades 4—6. Weekly practicum sessions are required. 
PREREQ; See 'AppUcation and Approval for 
Student Teaching" earher in this section. 
** 412 Work-Study in the Elementary School (6) 
Limited practicum tor preser\'ice teachers who 
have taken EDE 200, 251, 311, 312, and 406. 
Students work for a fuU term in one school district 
under supervision. Six credits may be granted 
toward student teaching requirements (EDE 411). 
PREREQ; Permission of department. 
♦ 421 Seminar in Elementary Education (3) An 
Intensive study of some current, major develop- 
ments in elementary education. Topics announced 
in advance. PREREQ; Senior standing and per- 
mission of instructor. 

A ** ♦ 423 Seminar in Communications Skills 
(3) Intensive study of some current, major devel- 
opments in communications skills (language arts) 
related to elementary education. Topics announced 



in advance. CrossUsted as EDR 423. PREREQ; 
Permission ot instructor. 

A** 458 Language Arts/Reading for the Unique 
Child (3) An open-ended course to help students 
understand and plan instructional programs for the 
linguistically different, the gifted, and those with 
special needs. The students will examine various 
strategies, techniques, management, and viable 
programs tor teaching these children language arts 
and reading. Crosslisted as EDR 458. 
489 Teaching Skills to Combat Sexism (3) This 
course is oftered to create awareness in prospective 
teachers of the extent and consequences of sex role 
stereotyping at all levels of educational experience. 
It will develop specific skills, behaviors, and class- 
room strategies that can ehminate effects of sexism 
in classrooms and on students. Teaches how to 
deal effectively with the emotion-laden issue of 
combating sex-role stereotypes. 



" Open to elementary education majors only 
♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 
A Crosslisted course. Students completing the 

EDE course may not take the EDR or EDA 

course for credit. 



Department of English 



532 Main Hall 

610-436-2822 

Chen'l Wanko, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Brooks, Echewa, Fishman, Green, Larsen, 

Maltbv, Molholt, K. Myrsiades, L. Myrsiades, Peich, 

Ramanathan, Shloss, Trotman 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Awuyah, Fletcher, Godfrey, 

Herzog, Jeffrey, Johnson, Kelly, Lalicker, Micheau, Newcomb, 

Scheffler, Smith, Teutsch, Wanko, Ward 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Ashley, Bacon, Bauerlein, 

Buckelew, Comfort, Huff, Kahn, Mader, Northrop, Perry, 

Pflieger, Pollard, Shevlin, Sorisio, Tischio, Verderame, Yoon 
The Department of English offers three degree programs: the bachelor 
of arts in literature, the bachelor of science in education (in coopera- 
tion with the School of Education), and the bachelor of arts in com- 
parative literature (in cooperation with the Department of Foreign 
Languages). Each program is planned in consultation with an adviser. 

1. The B.A. in LITERATURE provides a broad background in 
English and American literamre; valuable training in the critical 
skills of reading, interpretation, and analysis; intensive practice in 
writing; and an understanding of the workings of the language. 
This extremely versatile degree prepares smdents for graduate 
studies and law school, and careers in journalism, radio and televi- 
sion, publishing, public relations, and other professions in which 
skills in reading, writing, and processing information at a sophisti- 
cated level are required. 

2. The B.S. in EDUCATION in ENGLISH prepares smdents to 
teach in the secondat)- schools in Pennsylvania under an 
Instmctional I Certificate. These students will in large part satisfy 
the requirements for a B.A. in literamre, deriving extensive bene- 
fits from participation in a carefully constructed program that 
emphasizes literamre as a culmral product and smdents as active 
learners. Before receiving permission to smdent teach, smdents in 
this program must satisfy the prerequisites for smdent teaching 
listed on page 146 as well as specific Department of English 
requirements listed on this page. 



3. The B.A. in COMPARATIVE LITERATURE provides a curricu- 
lum option for smdents with an interest in international smdies by 
offering a broad background in European and non-Westem culture 
and literature. See Comparative Literature Smdies on pages 107-109. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE B A./B.S. ED. 
PROGRAMS 

General Education Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LITERATURE 



0- 



12 semester hours 
9 semester hours 



18 semester hours 



1. Foreign Language Requirement 

2. Departmental Preparatorv Requirement 
LIT 168, 295, and 296 

3. Departmental Intermediate Requirements* 
ENG 230; two American literamre courses, 
one before 1860 (A) and one after (B); two 
British literamre courses, one before 1800 (C) 
and one after (D); and one departmental elective 

4. Departmental Advanced Requirements 9 semester hours 
Three seminars from a selection focusing on 

topic, author, or theme (LIT 400) 

5. Professional Electives or Minor 18 semester hours 

6. Additional Electives (to complete 120 semester hours) 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN 
ENGLISH 



1. 



39 semester hours 



9 semester hours 



18 semester hours 



Professional Education Requirements, 

see page 138. 

Departmental Preparatory Requirements 

LIT 168, 295, and 296 

Departmental Intermediate Requirements" 

ENG 230 and 331; two American literamre 

courses, one before 1860 (A) and one after (B); 

two British literamre courses, one before 1800 (C) 

and one after (D); two world Uteramrc courses, one 

through the Renaissance (E) and one after (F) 

Departmental Advanced Requirements 9 semester hours 

Three seminars from a selection focusing on 

topic, author, or theme (LIT 400) 



See the department handbook for group descriptions. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



English 



Student Teaching Prerequisites 

Students should apply during their sophomore year for acceptance as 
candidates for teaching certification. Transfer students should apply as 
sophomores or after completing a year at West Chester. 

Grades on Required Courses 

Anyone attempting to qualify for student teaching must pass each of the 
following courses with a grade of C or higher: CLS 260, 261, 361, 362, 
or 367; EDF 100; EDM 300; EDP 250 and 351; EDS 306; ENG 230, 
331, 390, and 392; LIT 168, 295, 296, and 398; PSY 100; and WRT 
120, 121 or 204, 205, 206, 208, or 220. 

A student receiving a grade of C- or lower for any of these courses 
should retake the course immediately, before attempting courses in 
the English or education sequence. A student having difficulty with 
several of the courses listed above should recognize that he or she may 
not be able to meet the competency requirements for student teaching 
and should consider withdrawing from the B.S. program. 

Grade Point Average 

Before receiving approval to student teach, a student must attain an 
overall GPA of 2.8 or better, including a minimum GPA of 2.75 for 
all English courses attempted. Students must also achieve a GPA of 
3.0 by the end of their student teaching. 

Competency Elxantination 

A student must pass the test of vmting competency given by the 
Department of English before the application for approval to student 
teach will be considered. This examination is scheduled each semester 
and announced in advance by both the Department of English and 
the Department of Professional and Secondary Education. Smdents 
are urged to take the exam as early in their program as possible. 

Portfolio 

A student in the B.S.Ed. English program must also pass a portfolio 
requirement. Before student teaching, students submit their portfolio 
to the Department of English for evaluation. Specific requirements of 
the portfolio are listed in the English Majors' Handbook. 

Minor Programs 

The Department of English offers the following seven programs. Elective 
courses are selected in consultation with the student's minor adviser. 

African/ Alirican-American Literature 18 semester hours 

Minor 

1. Required Courses 6 semester hours 
CLS 351 and LIT 202 or 203 

2. Elective Courses 12 semester hours 
Any four courses from the following: 

LIT 202 or 203, 204, 205, 206, 309, or CLS 365, 
CLS/LIT 400 
Literature Minor 18 semester hours 

1 . Required Courses 6 semester hours 
LIT 200 or 201, and LIT 230 or 231 

2. Elective Courses 12 semester hours 
One in American literature and one in English 

literature (in a period other than those covered 
in requirement 1), and any two other LIT courses 
Creative Writing Minor 18 semester hours 

1. Required Course 3 semester hours 
CRW201 

2. Elective Courses 15 semester hours 
Any five courses selected from the following: 

CRW 202, 203, 301, 302, 303, 304, 400, 490, 

and 491 
Comparative Literature Minor 18 semester hours 

See pages 107-109. 
Film Criticism Minor 18 semester hours 

1. Required Course 3 semester hours 
FLM 200 

2. Elective Courses 15 semester hours 
Any 15 credits selected from the following 



list with the approval of the adviser: 

CLS 304, 363, 364, 368, 369, 400, and 410; 

COM 217 and 317; EFR 250; EGE 404, 409; 

EGE 405 or KIT 260; FLM 201, 202, 300, 301, 

and 400; FRE 350; GER 404/EGE 404; GER 405; 

ITA 360; SPA 305/ESP315 
This minor is also listed in the section in comparative literature studies. 
Journalism Minor 18 semester hours 

1. Required Courses 12 semester hours 
JRN 200, 225, 226, and 250 

(Minimum grade of C-) 

2. Elective Course 3 semester hours 
One of the following: JRN 312, 315, 325, or 355 

3. An additional three credit hours are to be 3 semester hours 
earned through a supervised internship (ENG 395) 

in the communications area or through a practicum 
(JRN 411) based on one semester's supervised 
service on the University's student newspaper. 

Business and Technical Writing Minor 18 semester hours 

1. Prerequisites 

WRT 121, 204, 205, 206, 208, or 220 

2. Required Courses 12 semester hours 
ENG320, 368, 371,and375 

3. Elective Course 3 semester hours 
Choice of ART 113, COM 220, COM 230, 

CSC 141 or higher, ENG 270, JRN 355, 

MGT 100, MIS 300, MKT 200 (or other elective 

approved by the program director for the minor) 

4. Internship 3 semester hours 
An additional three semester hours are to be earned 

through a supervised internship in business and 

technical writing, ENG 395. 
Linguistics Minor 

The Department of English is one of several departments participat- 
ing in the linguistics minor. The description of the linguistics minor 
and its requirements are found in the section describing interdiscipli- 
nary programs on page 1 10. 

The literature and viriting minors may be taken among the minors in 
the bachelor of arts or bachelor of science in the liberal studies general 
degree program. 

Internships 

A student will be permitted to take an internship under the supervision 
of the Department of English only if he or she is enrolled in a depart- 
mental major or minor program and has met the following requirements: 

1. an accumulation of at least 80 semester hours 

2. an overall Grade Point Average of at least 2.75 

3. an overall Grade Point Average of at least 3.0 in the major or 
minor program 

4. completion of 12 semester hours in courses in the major or minor 
program (not counting WRT 120, 121, or WRT 200-level courses) 

5. a letter of application to the Internship Committee of the Department 
of English accompanied by a resume and two faculty references 

A student will be limited to 15 hours of internship credit. Students 
who wdsh to take more than nine hours of internship credit in one 
semester must obtain approval from the full committee after submit- 
ting an application and an academic transcript in the preceding 
semester. 'The Internship Committee will determine the number of 
credits to be earned during an internship by applying a ratio of 40 
hours of work for each hour of academic credit. The internship credits 
for English majors may be applied to the student/adviser-designed 
program. Only under exceptional circumstances, and entirely at its 
discretion, will the Internship Committee consider applications from 
students not meeting the departmental requirements. 
NOTE: It is the student's responsibility to demonstrate that he or she 
has met the academic requirements for an internship. 



English 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ENGLISH 

Symbol: WRT 

120 Effective Writing I (3) jAji intensive course 
in writing that emphasizes skill in organization 
and awareness ot stj'les of writing and levels of 
usage as ways of expressing and communicating 
experiences. 

121 Effective Writing II (3) Continues the 
expositor)' writing experience offered in Effective 
Writing I and explores techniques of gathering, 
evaluating, and selecting materials to be used in 
writing research papers. 

204 Critical Writing: Approaches to Popular 
Culture (3) The strategies of critical theor\- and crit- 
ical wnting will be used to examine and explain pop- 
ular culture. The course will explore multiple media 
- such as print, television, film, music, and various 
visual and electronic formats - as representations of 
humanities, arts, and sciences, about which students 
will write researched, critical cultural analyses. 

205 Critical Writing: Investigating Experience 
(3) This course emphasizes writing as a means of 
critically reflecting on and communicating personal 
experience and representations of the self It 
includes instruction in traditional forms of personal 
wnting (such as autobiography), as well as less 
familiar forms (such as Web pages). These critical 
self-representations will be set within larger histori- 
cal and cultural contexts through academic research. 

206 Critical Writing: The Multidisciplinary 
Imagination (3) Imagination becomes a vehicle 
for students to explore a variety of disciplinarv and 
social perspectives on issues of relevance to society. 
Assignments cover writerly issues, such as genre, 
style, and language, and related issues, such as the 
role of imagination, innovations, and discovery in 
the sciences, arts, social sciences, and humanities, 
through documented research. 

208 Critical Writing: Entering the Public Sphere 
(3) Publication is a goal for many writers. 
Reporters, scientists, poets, academics, and others 
vvrite for pubhcation. This class will require stu- 
dents to write for professional and/or class-pro- 
duced print forums appropriate for humanities, 
arts, social sciences, and scientific fields, examining 
those forums in order to analyze and critique their 
discourse conventions. The course will provide 
opportunities for students to submit their work to 
such torums for publication. The class may also 
produce its own publication about writing-related 
news and events that students will learn about by 
conducting documented research projects. 
220 Critical Writing: Special Topics (3) Each 
section will have a special topic that focuses on 
current (inter)discipHnary issues of importance in 
the humanities, arts, social sciences, and/or sci- 
ences. In these courses students will investigate, 
research, critique, and practice rhetorical strategies 
focusing on each section's topic. 

Symbol: ENG 

020 Basic Writing (3) A preparatory course of 
study emphasizing the basic grammatical, logical, 
and rhetorical skills that produce effective themes. 
NOTE: This course is a prerequisite to WRT 120 for 
students who have been placed in ENG 020. Credits 
earned in 0-level courses do not count toward the 120 
hours of credit needed for graduation. 
030 English for Non-Native Speakers (3) 
Individualized instruction for the non-native 
speaker; conversational EngUsh, formal written 
English, reading and listening comprehension, and 
grammar. (Students should seek placement advice 



from the ESL program staff before registering.) 
Also, see note under ENG 020. 

130 Effective Writing I for Non-Native 
Speakers (3) An intensive course in writing for the 
non-native speaker of Enghsh, emphasizing skill 
in organization and awareness of snies of writing 
and levels of usage as wavs of expressing and com- 
municating experiences. For non-native speakers of 
English. ENG 130 is comparable to lVRT120for 
international students only. (Students should seek 
placement advice from the ESL program staff before 
registering.) 

131 Effective Writing II for Non-Native 
Speakers (3) Continues the expository writing 
experience offered to non-nati\'c speakers in 
English 130, and explores techniques of gathering, 
evaluating, and selecting materials to be used in 
writing research papers. For non-native speakers of 
English. ENG 131 k comparable to WRT 121 for 
international students only. (Students should seek 
placement advice from the ESL program staff before 
registering.) 

132 Effective Speaking I for Non-Native 
Speakers (3) After a brief introduction to the dif- 
ferences between writing and speaking, this course 
focuses on giving directions, explaining concepts, 
asking questions, giving presentations, and engag- 
ing in small talk, inteniewing, and extensive pro- 
nunciation drills. 

134 Idioms in the Context of American Culture 
(3) Through the use ot modern American movies, 
this course helps students learn the meanings of 
idioms in context. Students practice using these 
idioms in drills and exercises. 
200 Intermediate Composition (3) A workshop 
that provides intensive instruction for students 
who experience difficulty in writing. Not open to 
freshmen. 

204 Critical Writing: Approaches to Popular 
Culture (3) The strategies of critical theor\- and crit- 
ical writing will be used to examine and explain pop- 
ular culture. The course will explore multiple media 
- such as print, television, film, music, and various 
visual and electronic formats - as representations of 
humanities, arts, and sciences, about which students 
will write researched, critical cultural analyses. 
215 Views on Literacy (3) The historical and 
social contexts of EngUsh literacy. Emphasis on 
writing. 

230 (Also LIN 230) Introduction to Linguistics 
(3) Basic concepts ot language description, classifi- 
cation, change, reconstruction, dialectology, and 
sociolinguistics. (Prerequisite for all courses in 
English.) 

270 Publishing (3) A practical examination of the 
general components of the pubUshing field with 
emphasis on book production. 

271 Typography (3) This course provides students 
with experience in production of books, using his- 
torical and modern methods of design. PREREQ^ 
ENG 270. 

275 Literary Editing and Publishing (3) 
Experience in pubUshing the student Uterary mag- 
azine Daedalus: editing, proofing, photographic 
selection and layout, and printing. 
304 Essay Workshop (3) Experience in reading 
and writing essays, with focus on revision, on the 
use of the pubUc "I," and on appropriate voice. 
Attention to invention. 

320 Writing and Computers (3) Introduction to 
document design and production, desktop publish- 
ing, and issues of technological impact on written 
communication. 

330 English Phonology (3) Phonemics and mor- 
phophonemics in EngUsh. Writing systems and 



phonemic-graphemic relationships in EngUsh. 
Historical development of EngUsh sounds. PRE- 
REQ: ENG 230. 

331 Structure of Modem English (3) A detailed 
analysis of the modem descriptive approach to the 
study of EngUsh grammar and how it compares with 
the traditional approach. PREREQ^ ENG 230. 
335 History of the English Language (3) Review 
of the influences on the development of the 
EngUsh language. PREREQ: ENG 230. 

339 History and Dialects of American English 
(3) Development of the EngUsh language in 
America since colonial setriement. American and 
British EngUsh. Pronunciation, vocabulary, and 
grammar of the regional and social dialects of 
American EngUsh. PREREQ; EXG 230. 

340 Sociolinguistic Aspects of English (3) The 
study of language in its social context; the ethnog- 
raphy of communication; language and society, 
social classes, ethnic groups, poUtics, sex, and edu- 
cation. PREREQ: ENG 230. 

350 Introduction to English as a Second Lan- 
guage (3) Exploration of the scope of the field, 
tvpes of programs, and general approaches to 
instruction. 

368 Business and Organizational Writing (3) 
The nature of communication within business and 
organizations. Theoretical basis and practical 
appUcation. 

371 Technical Writing (3) Instruction in the 
forms and techniques of written, oral, and visual 
communication currendy practiced in the scientific 
and technical professions. A series of coordinated 
assignments leads to a final project in the student's 
field of professional study. 

375 Strategies for Writing in the Workplace (3) 
Strategy and poUtics of cUent-centered and com- 
petitive writing that achieves objectives for the 
professions and organizations. 
390 Teaching English in Secondary Schools (3) 
Review ot language arts requirements in secondary 
schools. Special reference to grade-placement with 
adoption of materials, appraisal of results, and 
development of programs of study. PREREQ^ 
ENG 230 and 331; EDM 300; EDS 306; and 
EDP351. 

392 Writing and Teaching Writing in Secondary 
EngUsh (3) The course wiU introduce students to 
major theorists in composition and Uterac}' theor\', 
including Britton, Emgi, Heath, Murray, Moffett, 
Perl, and Graves. It wiU provide oppormnities to 
write in aU the modes - for all the purposes and 
audiences — required by most secondary school cur- 
ricula, and to analyze these writing experiences in 
terms ot sociocultural, cognitive, and other psycho- 
logical theory and research. PREREQ: ENG'230 
and 331; EDM 300; EDS 306; and EDP 351. 

♦ 395 Internship (3-12) Intensive practical expe- 
rience with selected businesses, media, and pubUc 
agencies. Limited to quaUfied students who have 
earned a minimum of 80 credit hours. See page 85 
for specific requirements. 

397 Writing Tutoring (3) Theory and practice of 
writing tutoring, especiaUy for those who plan a 
career in teaching or who are focusing on the 
remediation or development of language and writ- 
ing skills. 

♦ 410 Independent Study (3) 

411-413 Yearbook Practicum I, II, III (1) Prac- 
tical yearbook production experience in a closely 
supenised firamework. PREREQ: ENG 270 or 
permission of the instructor. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



English 



414 Tutoring Practicum (1) Supervised experi- 
ence as an undergraduate tutor for any of the 
English tutoring programs (e.g., Department of 
Enghsh or academic development program [ADP] 
tutoring, etc.). 

♦ 430 Language Seminar (3) Studies in English 
language and Ungulstics. PREREQ: ENG 230 
and at least junior standing. 

445 Women Writing: Autobiography (3) A virit- 
ing seminar directed toward the reading of wom- 
en's autobiographies and the writing of personal 
autobiographical narratives. A writing-emphasis 
course. 

♦ 450 Prose Writing Seminar (3) This variable- 
topic seminar concentrates on problems in 
advanced writing, focusing on prose analysis and 
its application to student writing and revision. 

LITERATURE 

Symbol: LIT 

♦ 162 Literature of the Apocalypse (3) An inter- 
disciplinary study of ancient rehgions, apocalyptic 
writing, and modern interpretations of that writ- 
ing. An investigation of the pohtical, economic, 
moral, and artistic ramifications of the nuclear 
arms race on modern society. 

165 Introduction to Literature (3) A course 
designed to develop awareness of literature as 
being central to all the arts, to increase levels of 
Uteracy and critical faculties, and to broaden 
understanding of the human condition. 
168 Conventions of Reading (3) An introduction 
to the study of textual genres — fiction, drama, poet- 
ry, essay, autobiography, and film — and to method- 
ologies of reading. Various cognitive and cultural 
influences on the reading process will be analyzed. 

200 American Literature I (3) Survey of represen- 
tative American writers from Colonial times to 
1860, including Bradstreet, Taylor, Franldin, Foe, 
Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. (A)* 

201 American Literature II (3) A survey of repre- 
sentative American writers from 1860 to the pre- 
sent, including Whitman, Twain, James, Crane, 
Eliot, Frost, Hemingway, and Faulkner. (B)* 

202 African-American Literature I (3) Survey of 
African-American authors from the antebellum era 
through the first quarter of the 20th century. (A)* 

203 African-American Literature II (3) Con- 
tinuation of LIT 202. Second quarter of the 20th 
century to the present. (B)* 

204 Black Women Writers of America (3) Survey 
of black women writers of America. Examines 
themes and influences on American and African- 
American literary contexts. (B)' 

205 Harlem Renaissance (3) This course exam- 
ines the historical and cultural movement of the 
1920's known as the Harlem Renaissance. 

206 African-American Literature and Literary 
Theory (3) This course will examine the relation- 
ship between Afro-American hterature and the 
theories serving to explain it. 

207 Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (3) 
This course examines the courageous Ufe and 
times of an American reformer and his influence 
on slavery, abohtionism, suffrage, and temperance 
movements in the development of America. 

230 English Literature I (3) A survey of Enghsh 
hterature from Anglo-Saxon writing through the 
18th century. (C)* 

231 English Literature II (3) A survey of English 
literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. (D)* 

# 245 Medieval Women's Culture (3) This is an 
interdisciphnary study of writings by medieval 



women and their contribution to the development 
of medieval culture. (C)* 

250 Victorian Attitudes (3) A study of 19th-cen- 
turv attitudes toward social changes as expressed in 
art, architecture, hterature, and nonfiction prose. 
265 Literatiire and Psychology (3) Examines var- 
ious hterary works and characters as case studies 
illustrating such psychological conditions as 
depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophre- 
nia, child abuse, sexual abuse, drug and alcohol 
dependence, and personaHty disorders. 
269 The Literature of Roguery (3) A historical 
study of the rogue in fiction with emphasis on the 
satiric view of society. Among writers studied are 
Defoe, Thackeray, Donleavey, and Kerouac. 
# 270 Urbanism and Modem Imagination (3) 
Covers a variety of responses ot contemporary 
wnriters, artists, and planners to the rise ot the 
modern city. 

271 Drama Since 1970 (3) A selective survey of 
American and British drama since 1970. The play- 
wrights studied will be drawn from a wide and 
expanding group, including Sam Shepard, David 
Rabe, Lanford Wilson, Tom Stoppard, Peter 
Shaffer, Caryl Churchill, and others. 

272 New Fiction (3) Fiction pubhshed in the last 
10 years. 

274 Feminist Poetry (3) A study of poetry 
espousing the feminist cause and exploring the 
feminist response. Techniques and attitudes of 
such poets as Plath, Sexton, Rich, Morgan, 
Wakoski, and Kumin. 

295 Historical Contexts (3) A study of a repre- 
sentative number of hterary texts and the ways 
they interact historically, socially, intellectually, 
and politically with their own cultures as well as 
with the culture of the 20th-century reader. 
Literary and nonliterary texts will be studied as 
indicators of cultural and discursive shifts from 
one historical moment to another. 

296 Theory, Meaning, Value (3) An introduction 
to the different theoretical positions that condition 
the ways in which we read a text and assign mean- 
ing to it. 

297 Themes in Contemporary Literature (3) 
Literary topic or theme in contemporary 
American, English, or world hterature to be 
announced each time the course is offered. 
300 Colonial and Revolutionary American 
Literature (3) Writers of Colonial and 
Revolutionary America. (A)* 

302 Development of the American Novel (3) 
Beginnings of the American novel to Frank 
Norns. (A)* 

>303 Introduction to Multiethnic American 
Literature (3) American ethnic, racial, and nation- 
al groups in American Uterawre and the contribu- 
tions of creative literary artists representing these 
cultures. (B)* 

304 American Jevrish Novel (3) A swdy of major 
American Jewish noveUsts: Cahan, Singer, Roth, 
Potok, Bellow, Malamud, WaUant, and Wiesel. No 
knowledge of Yiddish or Hebrew necessary. (B)* 

305 Modem American Drama (3) American 
drama from the early 1900's to the present, with 
emphasis on the development of the American 
theater as seen in such major dramatists as 
O'NeiU, Odets, Wilder, Miller, WiUiams, and 
Albee. (B)* 

306 Modem American Novel (3) The novel in 
America from Dreiser to the present. (B)* 

307 Modern American Poetry (3) Major 20th- 
century American poets. (B)* 



308 The Sin of Success (3) An investigation of 
the rise of democratic capitalism in America from 
Biblical influences in colonial times to the begin- 
nings of the merchant class and the tall ot modern 
"big business." A study of the entrepreneur and 
the "robber baron," the success ethic, and morality 
in the large corporation through history, econom- 
ics, and hterature. 

# 309 Martin Luther King (3) Examines and ana- 
lyzes the writings of Dr. King and their relation- 
ship to the themes he pursued and the leadership 
role he achieved. 

334 Milton (3) A survey of his major poetry and 
prose. 

335 Shakespeare I (3) Reading, analysis, and dis- 
cussion of selected histories and tragedies. 
Discussion of critical approaches to the plays and 
of the historical and intellectual chmate of the 
times. (C)' 

336 Shakespeare II (3) Reading, analysis, and 
discussion of selected comedies and nondramatic 
poems. Discussion of critical approaches to the 
works and of the historical and intellectual chmate 
of the times. Either LIT 335 or 336 may be taken 
first. (O* 

337 Literature of the Enlightenment (3) A criti- 
cal consideration of the 18th-century writers, 
exclusive of the dramatists. (C)* 

338 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama (3) 
The drama from the reopening of the theaters in 
1660 to 1800. (C)* 

339 18th-Centuty British Novel (3) The British 
novel from Defoe to Austen. (C)' 

340 The Romantic Movement (3) Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, BjTon, Shelley, Keats, and their con- 
temporaries in the light of social background and 
critical doctrine. (D)* 

341 19th-century British Novel (3) The British 
novel from Austen to Hardy. (D)* 

342 Victorian Literature (3) Victorian thought 
and culture in poetry and nonfiction prose. (D)' 

343 Modem British Drama (3) British drama trom 
Wilde to the present, with emphasis on the rebirth 
of the British drama and its major writers. (D)* 

344 Modem British Novel (3) The novel in 
England from Conrad to the present. (D)' 

345 Modem British Poetry (3) Major British 
poets from 1890 to the present. (D)* 

352 Literature for Young Children (3) A critical 
study of the literature for young children for 
prospective speciaUsts in early childhood. 

364 Modem Irish Literature (3) Major hterary 
writers of Ireland from 1840 to the present: George 
Moore, Synge, Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, O'Casey, 
Beckett, Boland, and Seamus Heaney. (D)* 

365 Short Fiction (3) Analysis and intepretation 
of short fiction. 

366 Criticism (3) A study of die theories of classical 
antiquity, England, and the United States, with 
emphasis on the relevance of these theories to 
EngUsh and American literature of the moment. 
395 Children's Literature (3) A critical study of 
hterature for children, setting standards for evalua- 
tion and appreciation. 

398 Young Adult Literature (3) A critical study 
of hterature, including nonprint media, for young 
adults, focusing on helping prospective teachers 
develop familiarity with young adult literature and 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciphnary course 

' See the department handbook for group 

descriptions. 
t Diverse communities course 



Foreign Languages 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



how it may be used in the middle school and high 
school classroom, stressing gender roles and multi- 
cultural issues. PREREQ: LIT 168, 295, and 296. 
♦ 400 Literature Seminar (3) Required for 
EngUsh majors in the junior or senior year. Topics 
oftered periodicallv; Beckett/Joyce, Byron, 
Dickens, Donne, Fitzgerald, Greek Comedy, 
Greek Tragedy, Hawthorne, Homer, Resistance 
Poetry, Shakespeare's Major Tragedies, and 
Thomas Hardy. 

430 Old English Lang^iage and Literature (3) 
An introductor)' study of the language (450-1150 
A.D.) through a reading ot rehgious and secular 
poetiy and prose. (C)* 

431 Middle English Language and Literature (3) 
An introductory study of the language (1150-1450 
A.D.) through a reading of selected literary texts. 

(cr 

432 English Drama to 1642 (3) Enghsh drama 
from the early liturgical tropes to 1642, exclusive 
of Shakespeare. (C)* 

434 Early Modem Poetiy and Prose (3) Poetry 
and prose of the 16th and early 17th centuries. 

(cr 

435 Chaucer (3) An interpretation of Canterbury 
Tales and Troilm and Criseyde. (C)* 

The Enghsh department accepts certain humani- 
ties courses as major electives. Consult the English 
Majors' Handbook for a hst of approved humanities 
courses. 

JOURNALISM 

Symbol: JRN 

200 Communications Media (3) An introduction 
to the media of communications, emphasizing the 
development and characteristics of print and elec- 
tronic media forms and their impact on American 
society. 

225 Newswriting (3) A course designed to devel- 
op proficiency in the writing ot news stories for 
daily and weekly newspapers. News values, the 
structure and style of news, and the preparation of 
copy in accordance with professional standards will 
be stressed. 

226 News Reporting (3) Instruction and practice 
in basic news reporting techniques coupled with 
an introduction to newspaper feature writing. 
Outside assignments will include coverage of 
speeches, local government meetings, and the 
courts. PREREQ: JRN 225 or equivalent. 

250 News Editing (3) A course designed to 
acquaint students with the skills involved in the 
preparation ot copy for pubhcation in newspapers 
and magazines. Instruction and practice in the 
mechanics of copy editing, headline writing, lay- 
out, and photo ediring. PREREQ; JRN 225 or 
equivalent. 



312 Sports Reporting and Writing (3) Instruc- 
tion and practice in basic sports reporting tech- 
niques, including live-event coverage and feature 
writing, as well as an introduction to routine 
duties associated with working on the sports desk. 
PREREQ: JRN 225 or equivalent. 
315 Magazine Article Writing (3) Practical 
instruction in the skills required for successtiil 
freelance magazine writing with emphasis on 
research, interviewing, writing techniques, and 
marketing. Students will write and submit for 
publication short features and a fiiU-length maga- 
zine article. PREREQ; JRN 225 or equivalent. 
325 History of Journalism (3) A historical survey of 
the American press from Colonial times to the pre- 
sent, with special emphasis on the continuing strug- 
gle for press freedom and the new journalistic envi- 
ronment created by the emergence of mass media. 
335 Ethical Issues in Mass Media (3) A course 
designed to investigate how mass media shape the 
pubhc's perceptions of pohtical, economic, and 
social power structures and how it shapes moral 
standards. Emphasis will be placed on freedom of 
speech issues and professional ethics of journalists. 
355 Public Relations Principles (3) An introduc- 
tion to the role of the pubUc relations practitioner 
in the formation of public opinion. Communica- 
tions theory will be combined with specific tech- 
niques for worlcing with the press, producing 
printed material, and conducting special events. 
PREREQ: JRN 225 or equivalent. 
411 Journalism Practicum (3) One semester of 
supervised experience as an editor or reporter on 
the University's student newspaper. See journahsm 
coordinator for specific requirements. PREREQ; 
JRN 225 ««(/ either JRN 226 or JRN 250. 

CREATIVE WRITING 

Symbol: CRW 

201 Introduction to Creative Writing (3) Intro- 
duction to the craft of writing poetiy and fiction. 
Basic discussion of terms, strategies, and profes- 
sional models in each genre. Practice in writing 
and critiquing each genre. 
202-203 Creative Writing I-II (3) (3) Writing 
experience in the crafts of fiction, poetry, nonfic- 
tion, and drama. 

♦ 301-302 Poetry Workshop Ml (3) (3) The 
theory and practice of poetry and the exploration 
of verse forms. Practice in critical and interpreta- 
tive analysis of poems written by feUow students 
and professional poets. 

♦ 303-304 Short Story Workshop I-II (3) (3) 
Crafting the modern short story with reterence to 
American and British models. The significance of 
setting, atmosphere, characterization, and theme. 
Discussion and some exploration of experimental 
ideas in the genre. 



305 Essay Workshop (3) Practice in writing the 
essay. Conventions and techniques of this literary 
form - creative nonfiction - as it appears in com- 
mercial and quality magazines. 

313 Playwriting Workshop (3) Writing the play: 
possibihties and limitations of the stage. Attention 
to sets and costuming where relevant. Characteriza- 
tion bv action and dialogue. Problems of estabhsh- 
ing motivation. The play's totahty in theme, charac- 
ter, and action. Informal readings of student work. 

♦ 400 Writing Seminar (3) Special topics, such 
as fantasy, science fiction, longer prose works, or 
the antistory. To be announced. 

490-491 Writing Seminar in the Novel I-II (3) 

(3) A course in the writing and preparing of book- 
length manuscripts (novel, novella, and the "non- 
fictional" novel) with the intention of submission 
for pubhcation. Also includes coverage of fictional 
aspects and techniques used in writing memoirs, 
biography, and current history. 

FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM 

Symbol: FLM 

200 Introduction to Film (3) A survey of the 
principal elements of film including photography, 
editing, sound, acting, and narrative. 

201 American Film (3) The hinction of cinema in 
contemporary society as a socio-cultural, economic 
and pohtical object, as seen through critical analy- 
sis of American films. 

202 American Themes (3) An introduction to 
contemporary critical and theoretical principles for 
interpreting American films which concentrates on 
a single theme. 

300 Private Screening (1) Eight to 12 narrative 
film classics per semester on a specific topic or 
theme. 

301 Documentary Film (3) Understanding and 
enjoNing the social, philosophic, economic, and 
pohtical aspects of documentary film. 

400 Film Seminar (3) A seminar which offers 
students practice in applying contemporary critical 
and theoretical principles to films in an advanced 
context. PREREQ; FLM 200 or permission of 
the instructor. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 
STUDIES 

See course hstings under comparative hterature 
studies, pages 107-109. This listing includes 
courses that meet (E) and (F) requirements for 
B.S.Ed, students. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

* See the department handbook for group 
descriptions. 



Department of Foreign Languages 

109 Main Hall 

610-436-2700 

Jerome M. Williams, Chairperson 

Frederick Patton and Anne-Marie MoscateUi, Assistant Chairpersons 

PROFESSORS: Braidotti, Patton, Pauly, Schlau, Williams 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Escorcia, Esplugas, 

Garcia-Barrio, Gougher, Landwehr, MoscateUi, Sage, Speh, 
Varricchio 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Brown, Garofalo, Grove, 
Van Liew 

INSTRUCTOR: Rosso 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Foreign Languages 



Programs Offered 

BACHELOR OF ARTS: French, German, Latin, Russian, and 

Spanish 
BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH ELECTIVE 

CERTIFICATION: French, German, Latin, Russian, and 

Spanish 
The Instructional I Certificate in a foreign language quaUfies the 
holder to teach his or her major language in the public schools 
(kindergarten through 12th grade) of Pennsylvania. 
Minors: French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian, and Spanish 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE B JV. 
PROGRAMS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36—39 48 semester hours 

2. Major Language Courses 30 semester hours 
FRENCH — FRE 102*, 201-202, 301, 302, 

303, and 304. Additional courses to complete 
the 30 credits, taken under advisement. 
GERMAN— GER 101-102*, 201-202, 221, 
303 and/or 304, 307 and/or 308. GER 221 
and GER 405 and additional courses to com- 
plete the 30 credits, taken under advisement. 
LATIN— LAT 101-102*, 201, 202, 303, and 
406. Additional Latin and Classical language 
courses to complete the 30 credits, taken under 
advisement. 

RUSSUVN — RUS 101-102* or 103*, 201- 
202 or 203, 301-302, 303, 304, 305, 306, and 
307-308. Additional courses to complete the 
30 credits, taken under advisement. 
SPANISH — SPA 201-202 or 205, 301-302, 
315, 320 or 321, 330-331, 365, and any one 
400-level course. Additional courses to com- 
plete the 30 credits, taken under advisement. 

3. Demonstration of proficiency in a second 3-12 semester hours 
language through the intermediate II level 

4. Two cognate courses 6 semester hours 

A. LIN 230 or ENG 230 or LAN 327 (3) 

B. LAT 101 or history or political science or 
geography, or any other approved course (see 
student handbook) 

5 Electives to complete 120 semester hours 

The number of hours available depends on the student's level of sec- 
ond language proficiency. They may choose to apply some of these to 
additional advanced courses in their major area or to continue second 
or third language studv. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE ELECTIVE 
CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS (formerly B.S.Ed.) 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
ANT 102 and PSY 100 are required and 

will count toward the general education 
requirements. 

2. Foreign Language Concentration 30 semester hours 
(specialized preparation) 

FRENCH — FRE 102*, 201-202, 301, 302, 

303, and 304. Additional French courses to 
complete the 30 credits. 

GERMAN — GER 101-102*, 201-202, 303- 

304, 305-306, and 307-308. Additional 
German courses to complete the 30 credits. 
LATIN — LAT 101-102*, 201, 202, 301, 
303, and 406. Additional Latin and Classical 
language courses to complete the 30 credits. 
RUSSIAN — RUS 101-102* or 103*, 201- 
202 or 203, 301-302, 303-304, 305-306, and 
307-308. 



SPANISH — SPA 201-202 or 205, 301-302, 
315, 320 or 321, 330-331, and 365. One 400- 
level Spanish course to complete the 30 credits. 

3. Pennsylvania Certification in Foreign 33 semester hours 
Languages K-12 

Student must complete professional education 
sequence of EDF 100, EDM 300, EDP 250, 
EDP 351, PSY 382 or EDP 249, EDS 306, 
EDS 411, EDS 412, and LAN 401. Students 
must pass the Praxis exams before formal 
admission to certification and student teaching. 
Students must take an additional three credits of 
anv mathematics course. 

4. Electives to complete 120 hours at the 300 and 
400 level. 

The student is advised to use electives in areas 

that will contribute to his or her profession. 
Minor in Language 18 semester hours 

Minors are available in French, German, Italian, Latin, Spanish, and 
Russian. 

A. The minor concentration begins v\dth the language sequence of 
101-102 (or 103), 201-202 (or 205), unless the student tests at a 
higher level through the on-line placement exam. Students placing 
out ot beginning courses must still complete 18 hours. 

B. A minimum grade of B is required in both 101 and 102 in order to 
pursue the minor. 

C. Beyond the 202 sequence, courses at the 300 and 400 levels in the 
same language must be taken under advisement. Courses in 
English are not acceptable. 

ADDITIONAL LANGUAGES 

Greek and Portuguese 

Courses in Greek and Portuguese may be offered, but no major or 
minor field is available. 

Greek and Hebrew — Classical and New Testament 

Elementary Greek I-II (GRE 101-102) and Intermediate Greek I-II 
(GRE 101-102). Part of Classical language program. 

Portuguese 

Elementary Portuguese I-II (POR 101-102) and Intermediate 
Portuguese I-II (POR 201-202). 

ADDITIONAL OFFERINGS— CONVERSATIONAL 
LANGUAGE COURSES 

Selected critical or uncommonly taught languages such as Chinese, 
Japanese, Modern Greek, Modern Hebrew, Polish, Portuguese, and 
Serbo-Croatian, on a conversational basis only. 

The Junior Year Abroad Program 

Courses in French are offered at the Universite Paul Valer\' in 
Montpellier, France, through Junior Year Abroad Program sponsored 
by the Office of International Smdies of West Chester University. 
The program is designed to give persons interested in France a first- 
hand acquaintance with French life and enable them to achieve an 
active command of the language. 

The program is open to any student enrolled at West Chester 
University who has completed the equivalent of two years ot college 
French and is able to follow lectures in French. Students enrolled in 
the program may receive up to 30 credits for a fiill two semesters of 
the year abroad program of study. Courses are conducted entirely in 
French by French professors. 

Study abroad programs are also available in Germany, Italy, Russia, 
and in most Spanish-speaking countries (including summer study in 
Guadalajara, Mexico). 



Foreign language maiors receive no credit toward a major, or certification 
for 101 and/or 102 in their majors. If 101 and/or 102 in another language 
are taken as free electives, they will be credited toward graduation. 



^M Foreign Languages 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Foreign Language Testing and Placement 

The Department of Foreign Languages provides on-line placement 
testing service for students entering the University. Based on the 
results of the tests given and an analysis of past experience, the 
Department of Foreign Languages will suggest the level of language a 
student should enter. After students take part in anv given course for a 



short period of time, their placement could be changed if consultation 
between a student and an adviser results in a decision to change the 
placement. 

If a student wishes to take an exam to complete the language require- 
ment or receive credit for a course, he or she must take a special exam 
other than those given for placement. Arrangements can be made 
with the chairperson of the Department of Foreign Languages. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
FRENCH 

Symbol: FRE 

101-102 Elementary French I-II (3) (3) Funda- 
mentals of French grammar, syntax, and pronunci- 
ation at the novice and low intermediate levels, 
with emphasis on acquiring skills in reading and 
listening, speaking and writing. Language labora- 
tory work is required. Taught in French. 
201-202 Intermediate French Ml (3) (3) 
Development of intermediate level skills in the 
language, using dialogues, compositions, samples 
of language structure, readings, and other cultural 
source materials, including fdm, the media, and 
the Internet. Language laboratorv work is 
required. Taught in French. PREREQ; FRE 102 
or placement. 

301 Advanced Grammar and Stylistics (3) The 
more complex grammatical and s\Titactical struc- 
tures of the language, with particular attention to 
stylistics. Practice in writing compositions on a 
more sophisticated and advanced level with 
emphasis on correct usage. PREREQi FRE 202 
or placement. 

302 Phonetics and Advanced Oral French (3) 
Intensive practice in spoken French to develop 
skills in pronunciation and in listening compre- 
hension. Introduction to French phonetics. PRE- 
REQ; FRE 202 or placement. 

303 French Civilization (3) (In French) A survey of 
the social, political, economic, and educational struc- 
mres of France, along with an introduction to the 
artistic contributions of the French, particularlv in 
the 20th centur)-. PREREQi FRE 202 or placement. 

304 Readings in French Literature (3) The reading 
and analysis of representative selections of French 
prose (fiction and nonflction), poetrv, essays, and 
plays. PREREQi FRE 202 or placement.' 

311 French for Oral Proficiency (3) Total immer- 
sion course intended for students with a hinctional 
knowledge of French. Emphasis on oral and aural 
communication using real-life situations to develop 
fluenc}'. PREREQ: FRE 202 or placement. 
350 French Cinema (3) A study of French films as 
they reflect culture, language, and ideology, as well 
as film as art. PREREQi FRE 202 or placement. 
401 Commercial French (3) A study of the 
French economic and business systems, and exten- 
sive practice in using forms and expressions fre- 
quently used in French business correspondence. 

409 Women and Men in French Literature (3) 
(In English) Works by women and men novelists, 
poets, or dramatists that present striking images of 
love and conflict between the se.xes. Also a wom- 
en's studies course. 

410 French Theater to 1900: In Context (3) A 
study of the French theater from its beginnings to 
the 19th century in the contexts of their times. 
Reading and analysis of representative plays from 
the various periods. 

411 Modem French Literature in Context (3) A 
study of the evolution of modern literary genres, 
beginning with the revolt of the generation of 



1900, through Dada and Surreahsm and the writ- 
ers of the absurd to the present. 

412 Narrative Prose (3) An examination of the 
evolution of French prose in the nouvelle, the 
conte, the recit and the novel from their earliest 
beginnings to the present. 

413 French Poetry (3) A history of French poetry 
and a study of its versification. Practice in the 
recitation of French poems and close te.xtual analy- 
sis, and discussion of selected works. 

♦ 420-421-422 Topics in French Literature (3) (3) 
(3) Each topics course provides an in-depth smdy of 
a significant aspect of French culture, art, or litera- 
ture, its history and influences, and/or its principal 
e.\ponents, creative artists, and advocates. Topics will 
be announced annually by the French facult}'. 
Offerings in English (EFR): Interdisciplinary 
and Culture-Cluster Courses 

■ # EFR 220 French Civilization (3) (In 
English) A studv of France's political and educa- 
tional systems and economic and religious institu- 
tions with emphasis on contemporary aspects. 

■ # EFR 230 Francophone Civilization (3) A mul- 
tidisciplinarv' approach to the cultures and civiliza- 
tions of Francophone countries in West Africa and 
the Caribbean, including historical and geographical 
factors, religious and sociological structures, and liter- 
ar\' and artistic productions. Taught in English. 

■ # EFR 250 French Civilization on Film (3) (In 
English) A study of French history and culture as 
reflected in French and French-speaking cinema. 

GERMAN 

Symbol: GER 

101-102 ElementaryGermanI-II(3)(3) 

Fundamentals of German grammar, s)'ntax, and 
pronunciation. Introduction to German culture 
through easy-reading texts. The audio-lingual 
method is employed. Language laboratory drill is 
required. 

201-202 Intermediate German 111 (3) (3) 
Review of grammar and syntax. Readings in 
German literature as a basis for class discussion in 
German and practice in composition. Language 
laboratory drill required for remedial work only. 
PREREQ: GER 102 or placement. 
NOTE: All advanced literarure and civilization 
courses include lectures and discussion in the for- 
eign language, and all student papers and exami- 
nations must be written in the foreign language. 
#221 German Civilization (3) (In German) An 
analysis of the major contributions of German civ- 
ilization to western culture in the areas of art, 
music, science, and literature. PREREQ; GER 
202 or equivalent. 

222 Austrian Civilization (3) This course is 
almost identical to EGE 323; slightly different 
readings in German will be offered. Discussions 
are in German. 

303-304 Advanced German Grammar and 
Composition 1-11 (3) (3) The more complex 
grammatical and STOtacrical structures of the lan- 
guage with particular attention to stylistics. 
Practice in writing compositions on a more 



advanced level with emphasis on correct usage. 
PREREQ; GER 202 or equivalent. 

305 Survey of German Literature I (3) German 
literature from its earliest beginnings to 1800. 
PREREQ: GER 202 or equivalent. 

306 Survey of German Literature II (3) German 
literature from 1800 to the present. PREREQ; 
GER 202 or equivalent. 

307-308 Advanced Oral German l-Il (3) (3) In- 
tensive drill in the oral use of the language and 
phonetics to develop proficiency in listening com- 
prehension and speaking. PREREQ; GER 303 or 
equivalent. 

400 20th-century German Literature in 
Translation (3) (In English) A study of selected 
novels, short stories, and plays from the German 
literature of the 20th century. An introduction to 
some of the modern writers of the German-speak- 
ing world from the perspective of the social and 
political developments in modern Germany. 

401 The Age of Goethe (3) German hterary doc- 
trines and masterpieces of the periods of En- 
lightenment, Storm and Stress, and Classicism. 
PREREQ; GER 202 or equivalent. 

402 Contemporary German Literatiu'e (3) 
Works of the principal German writers of the 20th 
cenniry. PREREQ; GER 202 or equivalent. 

403 20th-century German Masterpieces (3) An 
in-depth analysis of the prose works of three major 
20th-century German writers, including Katlca, 
Mann, Hesse, Anna Segbers, and Christa Wolf. A 
close reading of these works will consider such 
narrative techniques as point-of-view, ambiguity, 
and irony as well as such German intellectual and 
artistic contributions as E.xpressionism, psycho- 
analysis, and the Bildungsroman. Taught in con- 
junction with EGE 403. 

404 German Artists as Social Conscience: 
Postwar German Literature and Film (3) An 
examination of the political and social issues of 
contemporary German)' through an analysis of lit- 
erary and cinematic texts. Discussion topics 
include the Holocaust, Nazism, the Second World 
War, the Economic Miracle, the Cold War, ter- 
rorism, the feminist and peace movements, atomic 
warfare, and German reunification and its after- 
math. Taught in conjunction with EGE 404. 

405 A Survey of German Film (3) An analysis of 
German films from Expressionism to the present. 
We shall e-xamine the films in terms of their polit- 
ical and social context and as works of art. 
Directors include Fritz Lang, Murnau, Wiene, 
Fassbinder, Herzog, Schlondorft, von Trotta, and 
Wenders. Taught in conjunction with EGE 405. 

407 German Lyric Poetry (3) Modern German 
poetn' of pre- and post-World War II. 

408 Modem German Drama (3) A study of the 
various trends of 20th century German drama in 
the Federal Republic, the former GDR, 
Switzerland, and Austria, with a focus on e.xpres- 



♦ Tfiis course may be taken again for credit. 
B Culmre cluster 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Foreign Languages 



sionism, epic theater, and documentary theater. 
Taught in conjunction with EGE 408. 

♦ 410 Independent Studies in German 
Language and Literature (3) Special topics for 
advanced students only. PREREQ; Permission of 
instructor. 

♦ 411 Seminar in German (3) Independent study 
and research for upper-division students. Topics 
announced annually by the German faculty. PRE- 
REQ^ Permission of instructor. 

♦ 412 Seminar in German (3) Independent study 
and research for upper-division students. Topic 
announced annually by the German faculty. PRE- 
REQ; Permission of instructor. 

413 Impact of the Holocaust on Literature and 
Film (3) This course studies causes and effects ot 
the Holocaust through literary, philosophical, and 
cinematic works of post-war Europe and America. 
Taught in coniunction with EGE 409. 
Offerings in English (EGE): Interdisciplinary 
and Culture Cluster Courses 

■ # EGE 222 German Civilization (3) An analy- 
sis of the major contributions of German civiliza- 
tion to western culture in the areas ot art, music, 
science, and literature. No knowledge of German 
required. 

■ # EGE 323 Austrian Civilization 1848-1938 
(3) An interdisciplinary study of Austrian civiUza- 
tion, focusing on Vienna 1848-1938. The relation- 
ship of selected cultural and intellectual develop- 
ments to their pohtical and social contexts. This 
course employs the perspective of many disciphnes 
but is specifically concerned with the humanities 
and visual arts. 

■ # EGE 403 20th-Centuiy German Master- 
pieces (3) An in-depth analysis of the prose works 
of three major 20th-century German writers, 
including Kafka, Mann, Hesse, Anna Seghers, and 
Christa Wolf A close reading of these works will 
consider such narrative techniques as point-of- 
view, ambiguity, and irony as well as such German 
intellecmal and artistic contributions as 
E.xpressionism, psychoanalysis, and the Bil- 
dungsroman. No knowledge of German required. 

■ # EGE 404 German Artists as Social 
Conscience: Postwar German Literature and 
Film (3) An examination of the political and social 
issues of contemporary Germany through an analy- 
sis of literary and cinematic texts. Discussion topics 
include the Holocaust, Nazism, the Second World 
War, the Economic Miracle, the Cold War, terror- 
ism, the feminist and peace movements, atomic 
warfare, and German reunification and its after- 
math. No knowledge of German required. 

■ # EGE 405 A Survey of German Fihn (3) (arts 
elective course) An analysis of German films from 
Expressionism to the present. We shall examine 
the films in terms of their political and social con- 
text and as works of art. Directors include Fritz 
Lang, Murnau, Wiene, Fassbinder, Herzog, 
Schlondorff, von Trotta, and Wenders. No knowl- 
edge of German required. 

# EGE 408 Modem German Drama (3) A study 
of the various trends of 20th century German 
drama in the Federal Republic, the former GDR, 
Switzerland, and Austria, with a focus on expres- 
sionism, epic theater, and documentary theater. 
Taught in English. No knowledge of German 
required. 

# EGE 409 Impact of the Holocaust on 
Literature and Film (3) This course studies the 
causes and effects of the Holocaust through liter- 
ary, philosophical, and cinematic works of post- 
war Europe and America. No knowledge of 
German required. 



GREEK 

Symbol: GRE 

101-102 Elementary Greek Ml (3) (3) Forms, 
grammar, and idioms of Attic and Koine Greek. 
Readings in Septuagint and New Testament 
Greek. 

201 Intermediate Greek I (3) Readings in 
Socratic dialogues of Plato. 

202 Intermediate Greek II (3) Homeric prosody 
and grammar. Reading of selected portions of the 
Homeric Poems. 

♦ 301-302 Greek Reading I-II (3) (3) Readings 
in prose and verse. Authors usually selected by 
genre. 

HEBREW 

Symbol: HBW 

101-102 Elementary Biblical Hebrew III (3) (3) 

Forms, grammar, and idioms ot Biblical Hebrew. 

Selected readings. 

201-202 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew III (3) 

(3) Readings in the prose and poetic documents of 
the Bihlia Hebraica. 

ITALIAN 

Symbol: ITA 

101-102 Elementary Italian I-II (3) (3) Intensive 
drill, in class and in the language laboratory, with 
pronunciation, intonation, and basic linguistic pat- 
terns. Introduction to Italian culture through basic 
dialogues and easy-reading texts. 
201-202 Intermediate Italian I-ll (3) (3) Review 
of Italian grammar and syntax. Introduction to 
Italian literature through short readings ot inter- 
mediate difficulty. Composition and conversation 
in Italian based on reading assignments. Language 
laboratory for remedial drill. PREREQ: ITA 102 
or equivalent. 

301-302 Advanced Italian Grammar and 
Conversation I-II (3) (3) Review and mastery of 
Itahan grammar, with special emphasis on syntac- 
tic structure and stylistics, along with intensive 
oral drills to develop proficiency in hstening com- 
prehension and speaking abihty. 
321 Italian Culture (3) An overview of Itahan 
geography, history, and regional cultures, along 
with its literary, philosophical, scientific, and artis- 
tic manifestations and contributions to the world. 
360 Italian Cinema (3) A history of Itahan cine- 
ma, as seen through representative works of each 
period/movement. 

400 Survey of Italian Literatiu-e (3) High points 
in Itahan literature, touching upon the most 
important writers from the beginning to the pre- 
sent day. 

401 Introduction to Dante, Petrarca, and 
Boccaccio (3) A general discussion on the impor- 
tance and influence of these writers on Italian and 
European literature and thought, as seen through 
some of their representative works. 

402 Contemporary Italian Literature (3) A sur- 
vey of contemporary Italian authors through some 
representative selections of their works. 

♦ 410 Independent Studies in Italian Language 
and Literature (3) Special topics for advanced stu- 
dents only. PREREQ; Permission of instructor. 

♦ 411 Seminar in Italian I (3) Independent smdy 
and research for upper-division students. Topics 
announced annually by the Italian faculn'. PRE- 
REQ; Permission of instructor. 

♦ 412 Seminar in Italian II (3) Independent 
study and research for upper-division students. 
Topics announced annually by the Italian faculty. 
PREREQ; Permission of instructor. 



EIT 221 Italian Culture (3) (In EngUsh) An 
overview of Itahan geography, history, and region- 
al culmres, along with its literary, philosophical, 
scientific, and artistic manifestations and contribu- 
tions to the world. 

■ EIT 260 Italian Cinema (3) (In English) A 
history of Itahan cinema, as seen through repre- 
sentative works of each period/movement. 

LATIN 

Symbol: LAT 

101-102 Elementary Latin I-II (3) (3) Forms, 

syntax, and Idioms of classical Latin. Selected 

readings. 

201 Cicero (3) Selections from the orations, let- 
ters, and essays. PREREQ; LAT 101 and 102, or 
two years of secondary school Latin. 

202 Vergil (3) Reading and analysis of celebrated 
portions of the Aeneid. The nature of Latin epic 
poetry. PREREQ; LAT 201 or three years of sec- 
ondary school Latin. 

NOTE: LAT 202 or four years of secondary 
school Latin is a prerequisite for all following 
courses in Latin. 

301 Teaching of Latin (3) Introduction to the 
problems, methods, and materials in the teaching 
of Latin. 

302 The Latin Lyric Poets (3) Latin lyric poetry 
through readings in Catullus, the Odes, and 
Epodes of Horace. Practice in the composition of 
l\Tic poetry. 

303 Advanced Latin Prose Composition (3) 
Required of Latin majors; open to other students 
accepted by the instructor. The complex syntacti- 
cal strucmres of Latin of classical style. 
Translations of Enghsh into classical Latin. 

304 The Latin Elegiac Poets (3) Latin elegiac 
poetry through readings in Ovid, Tibullus, 
Lygdamus, Sulpicia, and Propertius. Practice in 
the composition of elegiac poetry. 

♦ 305 Reading Course in Latin (3) Open to 
Latin majors onlv. Area and content to be deter- 
mined by the student's needs. 
306 Roman Historians (3) Introduction to 
Roman historiography. Readings in Livy, Sallust, 
and Tacitus. 

401 Roman Drama (3) Origins and development 
of Roman drama. Selected plays of Plautus, 
Terence, and Seneca. 

402 Roman Philosophy (3) Introduction to 
Greek and Roman philosophy. Readings in 
Cicero, "Tusculan Disputations," and Lucretius, 
"De Rerum Natura." 

403 Roman Satire (3) Origins and development 
of Roman satire. Readings in Horace, Persius, and 
Juvenal. 

404 The Latin Novel (3) Readings in Petronius, 
Satyncon, and Apuleius, The Golden Ass. Lectures 
and discussions of the emergence of the novel as a 
hterary form. 

405 Medieval Latin (3) Prose and poetry from 
the fourth to the 17th centuries. 

406 Latin Tutorial Course (3) Required of 
majors in Latin or Classics; open to other students 
accepted by the instructor. Introduction to the his- 
tory of the alphabet; principles of historical and 
comparative linguistics, especially as apphed to 
Greek and Latin; and history of the Latin lan- 
guage as seen in ancient authors and inscriptions. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 
■ Culture cluster 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



Foreign Languages 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



^ 410 Independent Studies in Latin Language 
and Literature (3) Special topics for advanced stu- 
dents only. PREREQ^ Permission of instructor. 

♦ 411 Seminar in Latin (3) Independent study 
and research tor upper-division students. Topics 
announced annually by the Latin faculty. PRE- 
RE(i Permission of instructor. 

♦ 412 Seminar in Latin (3) Independent studv 
and research for upper-division students. Topics 
announced annually by the Latin faculty. PRE- 
REQi Permission of instructor. 

PORTUGUESE 

Symbol: FOR 

101-102 Elementary' Portuguese I-II (3) (3) 

Fundamentals of Portuguese grammar, syntax, and 
pronunciation. Introduction to Brazilian heritage 
and culture through graded reading selections. 
201-202 Intermediate Portuguese LII (3) (3) 
Review and continuation of basic Portuguese with 
emphasis on vocabulary expansion and cultural 
insights through increased reading. Introduction 
to selected Portuguese and Brazilian authors. 
PREREQ: POR 102. 

RUSSL\N 

Symbol: RUS 

101-102 Elementary Russian MI (3) (3) 

Fundamentals of Russian language. Intensive prac- 
tice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing to 
develop basic communication skills. Introduction 
to Russian culture through film and multimedia. 
No previous knowledge of Russian is required. 
103 Intensive Elementary Russian I-II (6) 
Fundamentals of Russian language. Intensive prac- 
tice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing to 
develop basic communication skills. This acceler- 
ated course meets five daj's per week and com- 
pletes the 101-102 elementan' sequence in a single 
semester. Introduction to Russian culture through 
film and multimedia. No previous knowledge of 
Russian is required. 

201-202 Intermediate Russian I-II (3) (3) Review 
and refinement of communicative skills through con- 
tinuing study of grammatical structures and vocabu- 
lary expansion. Composition and conversation based 
on writings of intermediate difficult)' and film sources. 
Continuing smdy of Russian culture through film and 
mudimedia. PREREQ; RUS 102 or 103. 
203 Intensive Intermediate Russian I-II (6) 
Reinforcement and refinement of communicative 
skills through the continuing study and review of 
grammatical strucrures. Extensive language labora- 
tory work is essential. The intermediate sequence, 
equivalent to 201-202, will be completed in one 
semester. PREREQ: RUS 101-102 or 103. 
NOTE: All advanced Uterature and civilization 
courses include lectures and discussion in the for- 
eign language, and all student papers and exami- 
nations must be written in the foreign language. 
301-302 Advanced Russian Granunarand 
Composition I-II (3) (3) The more complex 
grammatical and syntactical structures of the lan- 
guage, with particular attention to stylistics. 
Practice in writing compositions on a more 
advanced level, with emphasis on current usage. 
Regular use of the tape program is essential. PRE- 
REQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent. 
303-304 Advanced Readings in Russian Literature 
l-II (3) (3) Works ot Russian literature are read and 
analyzed. PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent. 
305-306 Russian Civilization I-II (3) (3) (In 
Russian) A study of the cultural, philosophical, 
religious, political, and artistic contributions of 
Russia. PREREQ; RUS 202, 203, or equivalent. 



310 Russian Literature in English (3) Survey of 

Russian literature from its origin to the present. 
All works read in Enghsh. No knowledge of 
Russian required. 

401 The Russian Novel (3) The Russian novel 
and hterarv trends of the 19th and 20th centuries. 
PREREQ: RUS 202, 203, or equivalent. 

402 The Russian Drama (3) Works of the major 
dramatists of the 19th and 20th centuries. PRE- 
REQl RUS 202, 203, or equivalent. 

403 Russian Poetry of the 20th Century (3) A 
study ot the principal Russian poets of the 20th 
century. PREREQl RUS 202, 203, or equivalent. 
407-408 Advanced Oral Russian I-II (3) (3) 
Intensive drill in the oral use of the language and 
phonetics to develop proficiencv' in listening compre- 
hension and speaking. Regular use of the tape pro- 
gram is essential. PREREQ; RUS 301 or equivalent. 

♦ 410 Independent Studies in Russian Language 
and Literature (3) Special topics for advanced stu- 
dents only. PREREQ; Permission of instructor. 

♦ 411 Seminar in Russian (3) Independent study 
and research tor upper-chvision students. Topics 
announced annually by the Russian faculty. PRE- 
REQ; Permission of instructor. 

♦ 412 Seminar in Russian (3) Independent study 
and research for upper-division students. Topics 
announced annually by the Russian faculty. PRE- 
REQ; Permission of instructor. 

Offerings in English (ERU): Interdisciplinary 
and Culture Cluster Courses 
■ # ERU 209 Soviet and Russian Culture (3) (In 
English) An interdisciplinary course designed to 
acquaint students with Russian culture and life in 
Russia today. No knowledge of Russian required. 

SPANISH 

Symbol: SPA 

101-102 Elementary Spanish MI (3) (3) 

Fundamentals ot Spanish geared to tacihtate the 
development of functional proficiencv at the 
novice levels in Ustening, speaking, reading, and 
writing skills. Introduction to Spanish and Latin 
.American culture through readings and discussion. 
103 Intensive Elementary Spanish (6) Funda- 
mentals ot Spanish grammar, svntax, pronuncia- 
tion, and communication skills. This is an acceler- 
ated course that meets five davs per week and cov- 
ers the equivalent of SPA 101—102 in a single 
semester. No prerequisite. 

201-202 Intermediate Spanish I-II (3) (3) Spanish 
with an emphasis on proficiency development at the 
intermediate level. Elements ot grammar and pro- 
nunciation are introduced in class and via laboratory 
work. Literar\' and journalistic readings are utilized 
as a basis for writing assignments and class discus- 
sions in Spanish. PREREQ; SPA 102 or placement. 
NOTE: All advanced courses above 202 include 
lectures and discussion in the foreign language, 
and all student papers and examinations must be 
written in the foreign language. 
205 Intensive Intermediate Spanish (3) 
Reinforcement of communication skills through 
practice and review ot grammatical structures. 
Composition and conversation, reading trom a 
variety of genres. This is an accelerated course that 
meets five times per week and covers the equiva- 
lent of SP.A 201-202 in a single semester. PRE- 
REQ; SPA 102 or 103 or placement. 
301-302 -Advanced Spanish Grammar and 
Conversation I-II (3) (3) Review and mastery of 
Spanish grammar, with special emphasis on syn- 
tactic structures and stylistics, along with intensive 
interaction to develop proficiency in listening 



comprehension and speaking ability. PREREQ; 
SPA 202 or placement. 

303 Business Spanish (3) Introduction to basic 
business concepts in Spanish in fields of manage- 
ment, banking, finance, accounting, marketing, 
and international business. No prior knowledge of 
business required. Practical course in oral commu- 
nication. Some interpretation, translation, and 
writing of business documents. PREREQ; SPA 
301-302 or permission of instructor. 

304 Spanish for the Professional (3) Spanish for 
the professional in fields such as social work, 
immigration, criminal justice, law, and medicine. 
Emphasis on oral communication in specific, real- 
life situations. Some interpretations, translation, 
and vniting or professional documents. PREREQ; 
SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor. 

305 Spanish Cinema: Nation and Gender (3) 
This course investigates the ways in which films 
participate in and create debates about the relation- 
ship between national identitv and gender. Topics 
include what it means to speak of a "national cine- 
ma," and where and how issues of gender, sexuali- 
ty, class, and ethnicity interface in cinematic cre- 
ation of national identit)' and histon,'. PREREQ; 
SP.A 301-302, or permission of instructor. 

315 Advanced Readings in Spanish (3) 
Introductorv' readings of Spanish and Spanish- 
American works from a varietv' of sources, includ- 
ing literary texts. Special attention to improvement 
of grammar, and oral and written e.xpression. PRE- 
REQ; SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor. 

320 Civilization of Spain (3) Major contributions of 
Spain. Cultural, geographic, literary, philosophical, 
and artistic manifestations of the Hispanic world. 
PREREQ; SPA 301-302 or penmission of instructor. 

321 Civilization of Spanish America (3) Cultural, 
geographic, literary, philosophical, and artistic 
manifestations of the Hispanic -American world. 
PREREQ; SP.•^ 315 or permission of instructor. 
323 Language and Culture of Puerto Rico (3) (In 
Spanish) A smdy ot the language and culture of 
Puerto Rico. Includes geography, history, immigra- 
tion, and emigration. Emphasis on Puerto Rican 
Spanish language patterns and literature. Study of 
the mid-Adantic Puerto Rican community. PRE- 
REQ; SPA 301-302 or permission of instructor. 

330 Survey of Spanish Literature (3) Represen- 
tative selections of Spanish literature from its 
beginning to the present. PREREQ; SPA 315 or 
permission of instructor. 

331 Survey of Spanish-American Literature (3) 
Representative selections of Spanish-American lit- 
erawre from 1492 to the present. PREREQ: SPA 
315 or permission of instructor. 

365 Spanish Phonetics (3) Description and prac- 
tice in the sounds of the Spanish language and its 
major dialectical differences. Comparative analysis 
with English. PREREQ; LIN 230 and SPA 302. 

400 Spanish Literattire to 1550 (3) Spanish liter- 
ature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, includ- 
ing epic, early lyric, prose, and theater. PREREQ; 
SPA 330 or permission of instructor. 

401 Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (3) 
Spanish Uteramre of the 16th and 17th centuries: 
mpticism, drama, poetry, and the novel. PRE- 
REQ; SP.A 330 or permission ot instmctor. 

402 Spanish Drama of the Golden Age (3) 
Themes and traditions of the comedia. PREREQ; 
SPA 330 or permission of instructor. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 
H Culture cluster 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Foreign Languages 



404 Cervantes (3) Study oi Don Quixote and 
Cervantes' contributions to world literature. PRE- 
REQi SPA 330 or permission of instructor. 

405 Modem Hispanic Literature (18th and 19th 
Centuries) (3) Spanish and Spanish-American 
thought, literature, and culture as revealed in out- 
standing works from the neo-Classical period to 
the end of the 19th cenmry. PREREQ: SPA 330 
or 331 or permission of instructor. 

406 The Generation of 1898 (3) A reading and 
evaluation of the hterary and philosophical contri- 
butions of writers such as Unamuno, Baroja, 
Benavente, and Valle-lnclan. PREREQ: SPA 330 
or permission ot instructor. 

407 Spanish Literature Since the Civil War Period 
(3) Introduction to works that represent Spanish Ut- 
erawre from the Civil War period to the present. 
Authors studied include Arrabal, Cela, Delibes, 
Garcia Lorca, Goytisolo, Matute, Sender, and oth- 
ers. PREREQi SPA 330 or permission of instructor. 

408 Modem Hispanic Poetry (3) A survey of 
major authors and movements in Spanish and 
Spanish-American poetry of the 19th and 20th cen- 
turies. Authors include Vicente Aleixandre, Gustavo 
Adolfo Becquer, Ruben Dario, Jose Espronceda, 
Federico Garcia Lorca, Gabriela Mistral, and Pablo 
Nemda. Movements include Romanticism, 
Modernism, and the avant-garde. PREREQi SPA 
330 or 331 or permission ot instructor. 

409 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature 
(3) A study of major authors and literary move- 
ments in contemporary Spanish America, including 
magical realism in prose fiction, theater of the 
absurd, avant-garde poetry, and modern essays. 
PREREQi SPA 331 or permission of instructor. 

410 Contemporary Spanish-American Prose 
Fiction (3) A focus on 20th-century prose fiction in 
Spanish America. The works of narratists such as 
Borges, Carpentier, Cortazar, Fuentes, and Garcia 
Marquez will be examined closely, in light of 
Spanish- American cultural and literary modalities. 
PREREQi SPA 331 or permission of instructor. 

411 Modem Spanish-American Theater (3) A 
study of the theater as a reflection of social reali- 
ties including the theater of the absurd; the 
dynamic of play and audience. The Spanish- 
American stage will be analyzed through its cul- 
tural, historical, and religious contexts. PREREQ^ 
SPA 331 or permission of instructor. 

412 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (3) An 
analysis of the literature of the Hispanic 
Caribbean, placing it in its historical, geographical, 
and culmral context through a survey of major 
authors and movements. PREREQ; SPA 331 or 
permission of instructor. 

413 Hispanic Women Writers (3) An examina- 
tion of the tradition of women writers and their 
works in Spain and Spanish America from the 
17th centur\' to the present. Includes fiction, poet- 
ry, and theater. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331 or 
permission of instructor. 

415 Film and Fiction of Post-Civil War and 
Post-Franco Spain (3) Fictionalized perspectives 
of 20th century social realities since the Civd War. 
Discussion topics include social criticism, the situ- 
ation of girls and women, the psychology of ado- 
lescence, forms of alienation, and traumatic experi- 
ences of the war. PREREQ: SPA 330 or 331 or 
permission of instructor. 

♦ 456-457 Hispanic Literature Seminar I-II (3) (3) 
Special topics for advanced students only, such as pol- 
itics and literature in contemporary Latin America, 
the literature of discovery and conquest, the novel of 
the dictator, and Spanish literamre during and after 
Franco. PRERECL Permission of instructor. 



Offerings in English (ESP): Interdisciplinary 
and Culture Cluster Courses 

■ # ESP 219 Culture and Civilization of Spain 

(3) A study of the origins and evolution of Spanish 
character, tradition, and thought. The interrela- 
tionship of its history and arts. The scope of its 
contribution to Western culture. No knowledge of 
Spanish is required. 

■ # ESP 222 Culture and Civilization of Latin 
America (3) Cultural, geographic, literary, philo- 
sophical, and artistic manifestations of the 
Hispanic-American world. No knowledge of 
Spanish is required. 

ESP 305 Spanish Cinema: Nation and Gender 
(3) This course will investigate the ways in which 
films participate in and create debates about the 
relationship between national identification and 
gender. No knowledge of Spanish is required. 

■ ESP/CLS 311 Contemporary Latin American 
Narrative (3) An examination of Latin American 
narrative (short story, novella, novel, and testimo- 
nial literature). Spanish- and Portuguese-language 
writers from South and Central America, Mexico, 
and the Caribbean will be studied, from the period 
of magical realism (1950's and 1960's) through the 
present. They may include Isabel Allende, Jorge 
Amado, Miguel Angel Asturias, Jorge Luis 
Borges, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Clarice 
Lispector, Elena Poniatowska, and Luis Rafael 
Sanchez. No knowledge of Spanish is required. 

# ESP 324 Language and Culture of Puerto Rico 
(3) A study of the language and culture of Puerto 
Rico. Includes geography, history, immigration, 
and emigration. Emphasis on Puerto Rican 
Spanish language patterns and literature. Study of 
the mid-Atlantic Puerto Rican community. No 
knowledge of Spanish is required. 

ESP 333 Latina Writing (3) An examination of 
the literary works produced by Latinas in the 20th 
century. The smdy of this Uterature will include a 
cross-cultural approach that vnll elucidate sociopo- 
litical themes emerging from the texts. No knowl- 
edge of Spanish is required. 
ESP 334 Politics and Economics in the 
Literatures of the Modem Americas (3) A com- 
parative historical and literary examination of 
political and economic issues reflected in 20th 
century U.S. and Latin American literature. The 
study of representative texts of various genres will 
also elucidate issues of race, class, and gender. No 
knowledge of Spanish is required. 

# ESP 362 New World: America (3) The impact 
the discovery, conquest, and colonization of the 
New World had on Europe is seen through diverse 
sources in literature, history, the arts, and related 
disciplines. Topics include the trans-Atlantic 
exchange of ideas and cultures, indigenous reli- 
gions, ethic of conquest, evangelization, cartogra- 
phy, colonial science, changing views of humanity, 
and nature. Course includes a field trip and guest 
lecturers. No knowledge of Spanish is required. 
ESP 403 Introduction to Cervantes and Don 
Quixote (3) Reading the ftiU text of Don Quixote. 
Important chapters and topics will be analyzed. 
Special emphasis given to problems of translation. 
No knowledge of Spanish is required. 

ADDITIONAL LANGUAGES 

191-192 Critical Language I-II (3) (3) Self- 
instructional program in one of the seldom-taught 
languages: Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, Finnish, 
Gaelic, Japanese, Korean, Modern Greek, Modern 
Hebrew, Polish, Portuguese, Serbo-Croatian, 
Swedish, and Vietnamese. The student works with 
an integrated text and tape program, and a tutor. 



By permission of the Department of Foreign 
Languages. Not for language requirement. 
193-194 Critical Language Ill-rV (3) (3) 

Continuation of LAN 191-192. 

COURSES COMMON TO ALL 
LANGUAGES 

LAN 305 Introduction to Bilingual/Bicultural 
Education (3) Introduction to the history, philoso- 
phy, current staws, and fiiture directions of bUin- 
gual/bicultural education. Survey of materials, tech- 
niques, instructional processes, and instructional 
patterns. Overview of testing, placement, and pupd 
evaluation. PREREQ; Intermediate level proficien- 
cy in a second language and LIN 250 or equivalent. 
LAN 327 Introduction to Applied Linguistics 
for Foreign Language Majors (3) An introduction 
to applied hnguistics structured to meet the needs 
of foreign language majors and fiiture world lan- 
guage teachers. Examples are drawn from the lan- 
guage(s) expertise of the students. 
LAN 401 Teaching of Modem Languages: K-12 
(3) Problems, methods, and materials of second 
language acquisition and teaching across levels. 
Observation and participation in K-12 classrooms. 
PREREQ; Completion of language courses 
through the advanced level and LIN 230. 
LAN 403 Second Languages in the Elementary 
School (3) Techniques and materials used in 
teaching second languages in the elementary 
school. Practice in the apphcation of these tech- 
niques and observation of foreign language classes. 
PREREQ; Completion of intermediate level in 
the chosen foreign language. 

♦ LAN 411 Topical Seminar (3) Specialized 
studies in language and the teaching of foreign 
languages. 

I LIN 211 Language Communities in the United 
States and Canada (3) Exploration and analysis of 
how aspects of language usage (dialect, "accent," 
bihngualism) relate to language-based discrimina- 
tion in the U.S. and Canada generally. Emphasis 
is on bias, discrimination, and profiling based on 
race, class, gender, reUgious affiliation, and ethnic- 
ity. Examples will be drawn from mainstream 
media, including popular film and television. 
LIN 230 (also ENG 230) Introduction to 
Linguistics (3) See ENG 230. 
LIN 250 Psycholinguistics (3) Introduction to 
the study of relationships between language, gen- 
erative models, communication theory, and learn- 
ing theory. Major emphasis on natural language 
development and bdingualism. 

♦ LIN 330 (also PHI 330) Introduction to 
Meaning (3) See PHI 330. 

LIN 360 (also PHI 360) Philosophy of 
Language (3) See PHI 360. 
LIN 380 Language and Culture (3) Language as 
an aspect of culture, using linguistic-perceptual- 
cognitive categories; social and psychological 
aspects of language. PREREQ; LIN 230 or LIN 
327, or permission of instructor. 

♦ LIN 411-412 Seminar in Linguistics (3) (3) 
Specialized studies in linguistics. Topics 
announced annually. PREREQ; LIN 230 or LIN 
372, or at least junior standing. 

LIN 415 (also COM 415) General Semantics (3) 
See COM 415. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 
H Culture cluster 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 
I Diverse communities course 



Geography and Plannning 



School of Business and Pubhc Affairs 



Department of Geography and Planning 

103 Rubv Jones HaU 
610-436-2343 
Joan M. Welch, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Lewandowski, Rengert, Tachovsky, Welch 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Grassel 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Fasic, Liu 

Geography and Planning is an academic discipline that integrates the 
physical and social sciences. Students study the patterns and processes 
of human and physical phenomena in relationship to each other. 
Students gain knowledge that can be applied to solving societal, eco- 
nomic, and environmental problems and to planning for the fiiture, 
whether they are taking general education or elective courses, acquir- 
ing specialized preparation needed for working in geography and 
planning and related fields, or meeting particular needs in combina- 
tion with other majors in arts and sciences or professional fields. 
The field of geography assists students in comprehending the broad 
scope of the physical, cultural, demographic, and economic environ- 
ments on local, national, and global scales. Geography courses develop 
skills and organize knowledge from various disciplines, and enable sm- 
dents to examine the integrated whole of a people with reference to 
habitat and interspatial relationships. Specialized skills, which utilize 
geographic information systems technology, provide salable skills for 
students interested in technical careers and complement courses that 
teach knowledge of environmental and human situations and problems. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS — GEOGRAPHY 

The bachelor ot arts in geography offers a choice of four emphases 
(called "tracks"): traditional geography (cultural, environmental, and 
economic geography including an international perspective), geo- 
graphic analysis, urban/regional planning, and elective teacher certifi- 
cation (citizenship education, formerly social studies). The geographic 
analysis and urban/regional planning areas emphasize speciaUzed skill 
development. Internships are available and are recommended for qual- 
ified students. 

Geography majors, as part of their general education requirements, 
must take GEO 101 or 103 and achieve a grade of 2.0 or better. Thev 
also must pass WRT 120 and 121 with a grade of 2.0 or better. 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement 0-15 semester hours 

3. Additional Social Science Courses 9 semester hours 

4. Geography Core Requirements 33 semester hours 
Required:'GEO 102, 225, 310, 326, 400, and 

404 (18 credits) 

Track requirements taken under advisement 

For geography track: five courses from specified 

groups, selected under ad\isement (15 credits) 

OR 

For urban/regional planning track: GEO 214, and 

two other planning or GIS courses (GEO 320, 

322, 324, 331, 336, or 403) and an additional 

two courses from a specified list, selected under 

advisement (15 credits) 

OR 

For geographic analysis track: three courses, 

GEO 324, 328, and 424, plus two courses 

from specified lists of courses, selected under 

advisement (15 credits) 

OR 

For elective teacher certification track (citizenship 

education, formerly social studies): GEO 204 

(interdisciplinary), GEO 301, GEO 312 (diverse 

communities), plus two additional geography 

courses. Most recommended are GEO 101, 213, 

214, 220, 230, 232, 302, 303, 324 (15 credits). 

Under advisement, cognates and free electives are 

selected to complete remaining teacher certifica- 



tion requirements and prepare for standardized 
examination. 

5. Cognate Courses 15 semester hours 
Courses (taken under advisement) that are 

specifically related to identified career 
aspirations, and chosen outside general 
requirements, or geography core 
Required of all majors: ENG 368 or 371 
Required for urban/regional planning track: 
Three courses selected from PSC 201, 202, 
373, 375 or other related pubhc management 
or geography course, plus one CSC course 
above 110 level 

Required of geographic analysis track: CSC 
110 or above and three additional courses 
selected under advisement 

6. Free Electives 4-19 semester hours 
Elective Citizenship Education Teacher Certification Program 
This degree track (formerly social smdies) allows students to elect 
courses toward teacher certification requirements that also quahfy as 
general education, cognate, and free elective selections. 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Recommended selections for this track include 

COM 230, GEO 204 (interdisciplinary requirement), 
GEO 312 (diverse communities requirement), 
CLS 165 and HIS 101 (humanities requirement), 
MAT 103, PSC 100 and ECO 101 (behavioral 
and social sciences requirement), and art history 
or music histor)- (arts requirement). Recommended 
free electives: EDF 100, EDP 250, MAT 104. 

2. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement 1-15 semester hours 

3. Geography Core (see above) 18 semester hours 

4. Additional Geography Courses 9 semester hours 
GEO 301 and two additional courses from 

recommended list 

5. Additional Cognates 33 semester hours 
EDP 351, EDS 306, SSC 331, EDA 341, 

EDS 411, EDS 412, HIS 102, HIS 150, SOC 200 

Minor in Geography 18 semester hours 

The geography minor provides a flexible geography focus that com- 
bines well with other majors. 

It consists of 18 semester hours of geography courses, no more than 
six hours of which may be at the 100 level. The department will 
advise students on selection of courses appropriate to their needs. 
Clusters of courses mav involve environmental geograph}', spatial 
technology, international courses, or courses especially suitable as 
preparation for social studies education, for example. 

Minor in Business Geographies and 18 semester hours 

Information Systems 

The minor program in planning allows smdents from other majors to 
acquire geography and planning skills and to expand their career pos- 
sibilities to include such areas as land planning and management, con- 
servation of resources, location of commerce and industry, and county 
or other local government. 

1. Required Courses: 15 semester hours 
ECO 251, 252; GEO 325, 425; MIS 300 

2. Elective Courses (taken under advisement 3 semester hours 
from the department) 

Usually recommended courses include GEO 324, 
415, 424, and 427. 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Geography and Planning 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
GEOGRAPHY 

Symbol: GEO 

101 World Geography (3) The scope of geography 
and understanding of the world's regions generated 
by it. fiuman societ)' is examined in a frame of spa- 
tial, environmental, and resource factors. Map skills 
and other "tools" of geography are introduced. 

102 Physical Geography (3) The study of basic 
principles of physical geography and of relation- 
ships between components of the total earth envi- 
ronment. 

103 Human Geography (3) An inquiry into the 
theoretical and applied approaches to the study ot 
human spatial behavior and the distribution of 
social problems. 

200 Patterns of World Cultures (3) An examina- 
tion of selected, non-Western areas, representing 
different stages of development, in the contempo- 
raneous world. Emphasis is placed on cultural 
adaptation, innovation, and achievement of human 
occupants of these areas. 

t # 204 Introduction to Urban Studies (3) An 
examination of the breadth of urban studies from 
the perspectives of many social science disciplines. 
Philadelphia is emphasized as an object of percep- 
tion, as a place of life and livelihood, and as an 
example of continual change in the urban environ- 
ment. PREREQiWRT 121. 
205 Geographic Influences in American History 
(3) Geographic characteristics that figure promi- 
nently in the discover)' and colonization of 
America, and on the progressive development of 
the United States up to the 20th century. 

213 GIS for the Social Sciences (3) A course in 
mapping in the political, economic, and social 
featuers of places and the analysis of those maps 
using the Arc View component of ESRI's ARC 
GIS. Introductory course but with hands-on tech- 
nology experience; sutable for majors in political 
science, social work, eocnomics, and other social 
science disciplines. 

214 Introduction to Planning (3) The methods of 
analyzing problems of urban and regional planning. 
Emphasis is placed on systems of housing, recre- 
ation, transportation, industry, and commerce. 

215 GIS for Criminal Justice (3) A course in 
crime mapping and the analysis of maps of crime 
patterns, police services, locations of criminal inci- 
dents, offenders' geographical behaviors, and spa- 
tial trends in crime. 

216 Planning for Public Services (3) A study of the 
quality of individual life. Analj-sis of geographic vari- 
ation in social weU being, problems of social systems 
monitoring, and social indicators used in planning. 
220 Economic Geography (3) This course is con- 
cerned with the spatial patterns ot economic activ- 
ities, including production, consumption, and set- 
dement. It provides an understanding of their 
location and the processes of change. The course is 
international in scope, with an emphasis on the 
global economy. 

225 Introduction to Maps and Remote Sensing 
(3) Introduction to mapping and remote sensing. 
Thorough exposure to grid coordinate systems, 
representative fractions/scale, map projections, and 
mapping systems. Also, aerial photographs, digital 
orthophotos, satelUte images, and computers as 
tools. 

230 Conservation of Natural Resources (3) An 
inquiry into the type, size, and distribution of natur- 
al resources, and into the problems of resource man- 
agement. Emphasis is placed on the United States. 



232 Environmental Crises (3) The nature and 
dimensions of environmental problems with an 
emphasis on endangered life-support systems. 
Aspects of natural and social environment systems 
and their mutual interrelationships. 
236 Climatology (3) Climatic variations on the 
earth and their classification into regional types. 
Relationships of plants, soils, and cultures to types 
of climate. PREREQ^ GEO 102 or permission of 
instructor. 

252 Political Geography (3) A study of selected 
major themes in political geography at the regional 
and international levels. 

301 United States and Canada (3) An examina- 
tion of the complexity and diversity of the physical 
and human landscapes of the U.S. and Canada. 
Both rural and urban geography are studied with 
an emphasis on recent geographic changes ot 
influence — such as the shift from an emphasis on 
production to one on service and consumption, the 
growing importance of ciries, and increasing racial 
and ethnic diversity. 

■ 302 Latin America (3) Central and South 
America are studied with emphasis on geographic 
understanding of the major sources of change in 
recent times. The course focuses on selected indi- 
vidual countries in addition to presentation of the 
region as a whole. 

■ 303 Europe (3) A regional study of Europe, 
excluding the former U.S.S.R. Includes a macro- 
study of the continent and sequential microstudies 
of culturalized landscapes. 

■ 304 The Former Soviet Union (3) A regional 
study of European and Asiatic U.S.S.R. with 
analysis of geographic factors that contribute to its 
strengths and weaknesses as a major world power. 
PREREQiGEO 101 or permission of instructor. 
310 Population Problems (3) The dynamic 
processes of population change (fertility, mortality, 
and migration) and the resultant changes in popu- 
lation distribution and composition. In addition to 
a substantive study of these topics, students are 
introduced to the use of primary data sources for 
demographic description and policy recommenda- 
tion. 

I 312 Urban Geography (3) Analysis qf patterns, 
processes, and consequences of urban growth and 
development. Theory of systems, size, spacing, and 
functions of cities. Students wlU conduct outside 
analysis using real data. 

320 Land Use Planning (3) An inquiry into the 
development of comprehensive land use studies by 
governmental and private agencies, emphasizing 
the development of skills in problem identification 
and resolurion. PREREQi GEO 214 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

322 Land Development Controls (3) An insight 
into the "why" and "how" of land development, 
emphasizing the role of local government in zon- 
ing, subdivision regulation, and other land regula- 
tions. PREREQi GEO 214 or permission of 
instructor. 

324 Introduction to Geographic Information 
Systems (3) Data sources and analysis techniques 
used in the planning process, with emphasis on 
appropriate applications. Students receive consid- 
erable experience in using geographic information 
systems technology to solve real-world problems. 

325 Business Geographies (3) This course pro- 
vides a conceptual overview of geographical infor- 
mation systems as well as hands-on experience of 
software systems used in developing business man- 
agement and marketing strategies. Attention is 
focused on using GIS technology as an analysis 



tool to improve decision making. Designed pri- . 
marily for marketing majors. 
326 Geographical Analysis (3) Applications of 
basic statistical techniques to problems of spatial sig- 
nificance, emphasizing the adaptation of technique 
to problem, and the understanding and interpreta- 
tion of specific analytical methods as applied to real- 
world simarions. PREREQ: MAT 103 or higher- 
level mathematics course must he passed with a 2.0 
or better prior to enrollment in GEO 326. 
328 Computer Graphics (3) Structured to devel- 
op skills in the design and use ot analytical and 
computer-mapping systems, the course emphasizes 
the techniques of spatial problem resolution and 
display. 

330 Population Analysis (3) A course designed to 
develop skills in demographic research, emphasiz- 
ing interrelationships of population processes, use 
and limitation of data sources, and the under- 
standing and interpretation of specific demograph- 
ic and related analnical methods. PREREQi 
GEO 310 or permission of instructor. 

331 Transportation Planning (3) Important issues, 
descriptive and analytical, facing urban and subur- 
ban transportation are studied. Emplovment ot the 
planning process emphasizes use ot analytical tools. 
336 Environmental Planning (3) Introduction to 
the concepts and tools of environmental planning 
which include landscape form and function in 
planning. Applications to local and regional issues 
are stressed. 

338 Computer Applications in Social Research 
(3) The use of e.xisring and student-generated pro- 
gramming software in the design and execution ot 
social research. 

341 Landscape Analysis (3) The study of contem- 
porary geographiciJ patterns of plants and animals, 
and the overall processes which influence landscape 
development and characteristics, such as climatic and 
geomorphic events, and anthropogenic activities. 

400 Senior Seminar in Geography (3) The study 
of historical and contemporary trends in geogra- 
phy, the design, preparation, and defense of a 
research proposal. 

401 Cartography (4) A laboratory course to devel- 
op proficiency in the design, construction, and 
appropriate application of maps and map-related 
graphics. PREREQ^ GEO 225 or permission of 
instructor. 

♦ 402 Topical Seminar in Geography (3) 
Intensive examination of a selected area ot study in 
the field of geography. Topics will be announced 
at the time of offering. Course may be taken more 
than once when different topics are presented. 
PREREQi Junior or senior geography major or 
consent of instructor. 

403 Planning Design (3) Selected experiences 
designed to assist the student (either as an individ- 
ual or as a member of a group) in developing pro- 
ficiency in information-providing techniques. 

404 Senior Project in Geography (3) The execu- 
tion of the research proposal (designed in GEO 
400) as an acceptable departmental senior research 
paper. PREREQ: GEO 400. 

♦ 410 Independent Studies in Geography (3) 
Research projects, reports, and readings in geogra- 
phy. PREREQ; Permission of department chair- 
person. 

♦ 415 Internship in Geography and Planning 
(1-12) Practical job experience in applying geo- 



I Diverse communities course 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 
■ Culture cluster 

♦ This course may be taken again tor credit. 



Geology and Astronomy 



College of Arts and Sciences 



graphic theor\', executing substantive research, and 
engaging in community service in selected off- 
campus situations. Open only to upper-division 
B.A. majors and minors in geography/ planning 
with permission of department chairperson. 

424 Geographic Information Systems Applica- 
tions (3) A course to advance the student's knowl- 
edge ot the design and implementation of geo- 
graphic information systems. PREREQ^ GEO 
324 or permission of instructor. 

425 GIS: Business Applications (3) Intensive use 
of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in the 
business emironment to aid in better sales and 
marketing decisions. Course provides a conceptual 
overview of database management systems from 
MIS to geodatabases and their integration with a 
GIS. Case studies draw numerous examples from 
various businesses. Student tutorials provide 
hands-on opportunities for students to experience 



and learn how to use GIS within a business prob- 
lem-solving framework. PREREQ^ GEO 325 or 
permission ot instructor. 

427 Geodatabase Systems (3) The course teaches 
students the concepts and design of geographic 
database systems in the process of geographic 
analysis. 

# IND 401 Environmental Applications of GIS 
(3) Students are introduced to regional environ- 
mental problem solving based on interdisciplinary, 
scientific data using Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS). Background in one of the natural 
or applied sciences is presumed, and students 
without such backgrounds should contact one of 
the instructors before scheduling. Most relevant 
lecture material is handled as readings outside of 
class, and class time is devoted largely to environ- 
mental analysis using ArcViewGIS. One half day 
field trip is required (1,2) PREREQi Major in 



BIO, CHE, ENV, ESS, GEO, or PHY, with at 
least 15 college credits earned in one of these dis- 
ciphnes, or permission of instructor. 
IND 405 Modeling of Earth Systems (3) The 

course focuses on the use of models to understand 
global environmental change. It offers an in-depth 
exposure to the principles of modeling as well as an 
introduction to various models that represent com- 
ponents of the earth's systems. The elements of 
model construction are examined including princi- 
ples of simlification, data collection, variable identi- 
fication, and parameter specifications. Team taught 
with the Department ot Geology and Astronomy. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



Department of Geology and Astronomy 

207 Boucher Hall 

610-436-2727 

C. Gil Wiswall, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Busch, Srogi, Stolar, Wiswall 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Good, Johnson, Lutz, Smith 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Fisher, Gagne, Pandya 

The Department ot Geology and Astronomy prepares students for 
careers in geoscience and geoscience education. Geoscience is an inte- 
grated study of the Earth, its geologic history, composition and struc- 
ture, resources, natural hazards, atmosphere and oceans, and its envi- 
ronment in space. Geoscientists study such phenomena as earth- 
quakes, landshdes, floods, volcanoes, coastal erosion, and how these 
natural hazards impact humans. Geoscientists explore for mineral, 
energy, and water supplies. Geoscientists also attempt to make predic- 
tions about Earth's future based on the past. Since most human activi- 
ties are related to interaction with the physical components of Earth, 
geoscience plays a unique and essential role in today's rapidly chang- 
ing world. The Department of Geology and Astronomy offers two 
bachelor of science degree programs and a certification program in 
general science. (A degree in astronomy is not available.) AH programs 
emphasize analytical skills and build on course work in mathematics, 
chemistry, physics, and statistics. Written and oral communication is 
emphasized in a majorit)' of the course work. 

1. The B.S. in GEOSCIENCE program offers two areas of concen- 
tration and prepares recipients for a career as a professional geosci- 
entist. Students completing either bachelor of science degree pro- 
gram possess the educational requirements to seek licensure as cer- 
tified professional geologists. The geology concentration leads to 
occupations in geology, geochemistry, and the environmental 
industry as well as for studies toward advanced degrees. Its curricu- 
lum emphasizes depth in the traditional disciphnes of geology 
including mineralogy, rock formation, paleontology, structural 
geology, and surface and tectonic processes. The earth systems 
concentration is intended for students who want to concentrate 
on a broader understanding of geoscience and human interaction 
with the environment. This concentration is excellent preparation 
for students pursuing careers in fields such as resource manage- 
ment or environmental law. In addition to the geology core, stu- 
dents take required courses in oceanography, meteorolog)', and 
astronomy. 

2. The B.S. in EDUCATION in EARTH AND SPACE SCI- 
ENCES is a professional degree program designed to prepare cer- 
tified secondary school teachers with an overall science exposure 



and specialization in the earth and space sciences. The program 
meets all guidelines established by the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education (PDE), and the National Science 
Teachers' Association (NSTA) for earth and space science certifi- 
cation. 
3. The certification program in GENERAL SCIENCE enables 
recipients to teach science in grades 6-9. The certification program 
meets all guidelines established by the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). 
A cooperative five-year program with Pennsylvania State University 
leading to a degree in engineering with several geoscience specialties is 
available. For further information about this program, refer to the 
Physics and Pre-Engineering section of this catalog. 
All students must consult with their adviser regularly to ensure timely 
completion of the degree. Those in the B.S. in education program will 
have a second adviser in the School of Education to help the student 
meet the secondary education requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL BACHELOR 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36—39 

2. Math Requirement 
MAT 121 

3. Science Cognate Requirements 
CHE 103 and CRL 103, PHi' 130 or 170 

4. Geoscience Courses 
ESS 101, 201, 204, 213, 302, 331, 343, 405, 
420, and 450 

5. A grade of C- or bener must be achieved for all required courses 
within the department including the required electives, as well as 
those in biology, chemistry, computer science, math, and physics. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — GEOSCIENCE 

Concentration in Geology 

1. Additional Math and Computer Science 
Requirements 

MAT 108 or 161 and ESS 321 or IND 401 
or GEO 324 or 325 or CSC 115 or higher 

2. Required Courses 
ESS 201, 439, and ESS/BIO/EN V 102 

3. Geolog}- and Astronomy Electives 
Any three ESS courses at the 200, 300, or 
40() level 



48 semester hours 
3 semester hours 

8 semester hours 

27 semester hours 



6-7 semester hours 



9 semester hours 



9 semester hours 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Geology and Astronomy 



Concentration in Earth Systems 

1. Additional Alath Requirement 
MAT 105 or no 

2. Required Courses 

ESS 111, 201 or 355, 270, 330, and 

ESS/BIO/ENV 102 

Geology and Astronomy Electives 



3 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



6 semester hours 



Any nvo ESS courses at the 200, 300, or 400 level 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION IN EARTH 
AND SPACE SCIENCES 

All students seeidng a B.S.Ed, must formally apply for admission to 
teacher education. (See "Teaching Certification Programs'" in this cat- 
alog.) Only those students formally admitted to teacher education will 
be eligible to enroU in SCE/SCB 350. Once admitted to teacher edu- 
cation, students must maintain the minimum GPA specified by the 
School of Education in order to continue taking advanced professional 
course work. If a student falls below the minimum GPA, he or she 
will be permitted to retake - in accordance with Universit)' policy - 
professional course work that contributed to the tall below the mini- 
mum GPA but will not be permitted to take additional work until the 
minimum is met. 

1. Secondare Education Requirements, 30 semester hours 
EDF 100, EDP 250 and 351, EDA/EDR 341, 

EDS 306, SCE or SCB 350, EDS 411 and 412 

2. Additional Math Requirements 3 semester hours 
MAT 105 or 110 

3. Additional Science Cognates 3 semester hours 
BIO 110 (or BIO 100 OTth a grade of A- or 

better) 

4. Required Courses 12 semester hours 
ESS 111, 201 or 355, 270, and 330 

5. Students are encouraged to obtain certification in general science 
and/or environmental education in addition to earth and space sci- 
ence. See pages 145-147 for requirements. 



Minor Programs 15 semester hours 

Students may choose to minor in any of the following programs. 
Courses are selected with the approval of the department chairperson. 

1 . Astronomy 

ESS 111 plus four other astronomy courses (15) 

2. Earth Science 

ESS 101, 111, 230, and 270, plus one course in earth science (15) 

3. Geology 

ESS 101 plus four other geology courses (15) 

CERTIFICATION IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

Students seeking certification in general science must either be 
enrolled in a B.S.Ed, program or hold a teaching certificate. 

1. Math Requirements, 9-10 semester hours 
CSW 101 (Internet emphasis only), CSC 115, 

or CSC 141; JkL^T 121, and lOS'or 161 or above 

2. Science Core Requirements 40 semester hours 
BIO 110, 215, 217; CHE/CRL 103, 104; 

ESS 101, 111, 230, 270; PHY 130 or 170, 
140 or 180 

3. Interdisciplinarv Requirements 
One of the foUowing: BIO 102 or ENV 102 
or ESS 102; SCB 210 

4. Field, Research, Technology Requirements 
Students must take a minimum of 12 additional 
semester hours in biolog}', chemistr\', earth and 
space science, health, or physics from the 
approved list obtained from the adviser. Courses 
must be taken in at least two departments. The 
sequence of courses must be approved in advance 
by the ad\iser of the certification program and 
should be based on the student's interests and 
choice of certification examinations. Students must 
select courses to include field work, research, and 
technolog}' components. 



3 semester hours 



12 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
GEOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY 

S\-mbol: ESS unless otherwise shown 

101 Introduction to Geology (3) The earth's 
composition and history- the processes that occur 
on and within the earth. Two hours of lecture and 
two hours of lab. 

# 102 Humans and the Environment (3) A study 
of the abilit\' ot humans to survive and maintain 
their life qualit)", considering the limited resources 
and recjxling capacity of planet Earth. Note: 
Students completing ESS 102 may not take BIO 

102 or ENV 102 for credit. 

Ill General Astronomy (3) A descriptive course, 
including the composition and evolution of solar 
and stellar sj'stems. Two hours of lecture and two 
hours of lab. 

130 Our Coastal Oceans (3) This course exam- 
ines the phwical and biological processes at work 
in the coastal oceans. The content will be dis- 
cussed in the framework of regional examples. 
170 Introduction to Our Atmosphere (3) WTiy is 
the sk\' blue? What will the weather be tomorrow? 
What makes tornadoes? How did the ozone hole 
develop? What is the greenhouse eftect? This class 
will use these questions and others to investigate 
the basic physical processes that determine the 
weather and climate on earth. A student who has 
successfiilly completed ESS 270 may not subse- 
quently receive credit for ESS 170. 
201 Fundamentals of Techniques in Geology (3) 
An introduction to the basic methods of geologic 
data collection, analysis, and presentation; litera- 



ture research; and report \vriting. One weekend 
field trip is required. PREREQi ESS 101. 
204 Historical Geology (3) The geologic history 
of Earth inferred hv analraing and evaluating the 
geologic record ot its phv'sical and biological 
changes on local, regional, and global scales. 
Laboratory' included. PREREC^ ESS 101. 
206 Gemstones (3) A survey of gem formation, 
identification, fashioning, and evaluation. For the 
general student. Demonstrations, specimens, and 
field trips complement lecture topics. No science 
background is assumed. 

213 Environmental Geochemistry (3) An intro- 
duction to principles and applications of geochem- 
istT)' to geologic systems, including surface and 
ground waters, soils, and rocks. PREREQi CHE 
103, ESS 101. 

236 Envirorunental Geology (3) TTie application of 
geological information to human problems encoun- 
tered in natural phenomena, such as flooding, earth- 
quakes, coastal hazards, and man-made concerns, 
including waste disposal, land use, and global change. 
PREREQi ESS 101 or permission of insttuctor. 
270 Introduction to Meteorology (3) A study of 
the principles governing the earth's atmosphere 
and how these principles determine weather con- 
ditions. PREREQi Six hours of science and MAT 
105 or higher. 

302 Mineralogy (3) In-depth survey of the forma- 
tion, identification, classification, and uses of miner- 
als. Principles of symmetr)-, cr\'stallography, crj'stal 
chemistry, and optical mineralogy. Laboratory and 
field examination and analysis of minerals. PRE- 
REQi ESS 101, 204, and CHE 103 or equivalent. 



307 Geologj' of the Solar System (3) The geolo- 
gy, origin, evolution, and properties of planets, 
comets, asteroids, moons, and meteorites. 
313 Geochemistry (3) The chemistry of the earth 
and its relation to geologic processes. 
321 Geometries (3) Application ot computational 
and statistical methods to geologic problems. 
Geologic sampling, data comparisons in environ- 
mental, petrologic, paleontologic, and geochemical 
problems. 

323 General Geologic Field Studies of South- 
eastern Pennsylvania (3) Occurrence, relation- 
ships, and geologic histon' ot the rocks, minerals, 
and soils of this area, studied at representative 
locations. PREREQi ESS 202. 
ESL 327 Electron Microscopy I (3) A one- 
semester lecture/laboratorv" course in theorv opera- 
tion and applications of electron beam technolog)' 
in scientific research. 

330 Introduction to Oceanography (3) A survey 
of our present knowledge ot the waters and floors 
of the ocean. PREREQ: ESS 101. 

331 Introduction to Paleontology (3) Identifica- 
tion and study ot common fossils in order to 
understand their life processes and geologic signif- 
icance. PREREQi One course in geologj-. 

332 Advanced Oceanography (3) An advanced 
course in oceanography covering marine resources, 
oceanographic literature, animal-sediment relation- 
ships, field techniques, estuaries, salt marshes, sea 
level changes, and pollution. PREREQi ESS 230. 



# Approved tnterdisciplinar}' course 



Geologv' and Astronomy 



College of Arts and Sciences 



343 Geomorphology (3) Constructional and 
degradationa) forces that have shaped present 
landforms and are constantly reshaping and modi- 
fying landforms. Interpretation of geologic and 
topographic maps; field studies. PREREQi ESS 
101 and 204. 

355 Intermediate Astronomy (3) An analytical 
and quahtative analysis of selected astronomical 
phenomena. Topics include telescope optics 
(including photographic and photoelectric attach- 
ments), lunar and planetary orbits, stellar motions 
and magnitudes, galactic classifications, and dis- 
tances. Two hours of lecwre and two hours of lab. 
PREREQiESSin. 

362 History of Astronomy (3) Development of 
astronomical theories from the ancient Greeks 
untU the 20th century. PREREQ: ESS 111. 
371 Advanced Meteorology (3) A continuation of 
the study of the principles governing the earth's 
atmosphere and how these principles determine 
weather conditions. PREREQ: ESS 270. 
405 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (3) 
Theories of the formation of igneous and meta- 
morphic rocks based on field occurrence, physical 
properties, geochemistry, thermodynamics, and 
petrography. Classification and identification of 
rocks. Laboratory and field examination and 
analysis of rocks' PREREQ: ESS 302 and 333. 
420 Structural Geology (3) Determination of the 
sequential development and the forces involved in 
the various structural fcawres of the earth. PRE- 
REQi ESS 201 and 302. 

435 Remote Sensing (3) An introduction to the 
science and technology of remote sensing and the 
applications of remote sensing data to geology, 
oceanography, meteorology, and the environment. 
Includes a discussion of the history and principles 
of remote sensing; fundamentals of electromagnet- 
ic radiation; theory and types of active and passive 
remote sensing systems; firndamentals of image 
interpretation; digital analysis of LANDSAT and 
AVHRR data; operation of environmental satel- 
lites; and ftiture imaging systems. 



439 Hydrogeology (3) The factors that control 
the distribution, occurrence, and recoverability of 
groundwater; techniques for locating and estimat- 
ing recoverable water; groundwater pollution and 
waste water disposal. Familiarity with calculus is 
recommended. PREREQ^ ESS'213. 
442 Geophysics (3) Gravitational, magnetic, seis- 
mic (refraction and reflection), and electrical prop- 
erties of rocks and minerals in the earth. Physical 
principles of the earth; geophysics in relation to 
economic deposits. PREREQ; MAT 162 and 
PHY 140 or 180. 

450 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (3) Class, 
laboratory, and field studies of sediments, sedi- 
mentary rocks, depositional processes and environ- 
ments, and diagenesis. Description, mapping, and 
correlation of strata to infer temporal-spatial rela- 
tionships, locate resources, and interpret Earth 
history. PREREQ: ESS 213, 302, 331, and 343. 

♦ 460 Internship (1-18) Work with industry, or 
local, state, or federal government agencies under 
faculty supervision. 

475 Introduction to the Planetarium (3) Princi- 
ples and use ot the planetarium in a teaching situ- 
ation. Specific projects are assigned. PREREQ; 
ESS 111. 

♦ 480 Special Problems (1-3) Reports on special 
topics and current developments in the earth and 
space sciences. PREREQ; Permission of instruc- 
tor. 

490 Fundamentals of Soil (3) The properties of 
soils, edaphology, and pedology: chemical, physi- 
cal, and biological factors. Soil genesis and classifi- 
cation. 

♦ 491 Independent Study (1-3) 

♦ IND 401 Applied Environmental Science (3) 
Students are introduced to regional environmental 
problem solving based on interdisciplinary, science 
data using GIS. Background in one of namral or 
apphed sciences is presumed, and students without 
such background should contact an instructor 
before scheduUng. Most relevant lecwre material is 
handled as readings outside of class time which is 



devoted largely to environmental analysis using 
Arc View GIS. One half-da)' field trip is required. 
IND 405 ModeUng of Earth Systems (3) The 
course focuses on the use of models to understand 
global ennronmental change. It offers an in-depth 
exposure to the principles of modeling as well as 
an introduction to various models that represent 
components of the earth's systems. The elements 
of model construcrion are examined including 
principles of simphfication, data collection, vari- 
able identification, and parameter specillcations. 
# SCB 210 The Origin of Life and the Universe 
(3) An interdisciplinar)- course that presents the 
theor\' and evidence of the first three minutes of 
the universe and formation of the stars, galaxies, 
planets, organic molecules, and the genetic basis of 
organic evolution. PREREQ; High school or col- 
lege courses in at least t\vo sciences. 
SCE 310 Science for the Elementary Grades (3) 
A course to prepare the elementan' teacher for 
teaching science. Selected units or problems that 
cut across various fields of science. Methods and 
processes of science and available resources. PRE- 
REQ; Completion of science and mathematics 
general education requirements and formal admis- 
sion to teacher education. Must reach junior status 
by the end of the previous semester. 
► SCE 350 Science Education in the Secondary 
School (3) Philosophy, objecri\-es, and methods of 
teaching science. Practical experience provided. 
PREREQ; Formal admission to teacher education. 
SCI 101 The Carbon Cycle (3) An explorauon of 
how the carbon ck'cle connects earth and Ufe, tho- 
rugh photosynthesis, respiration, decay, rock for- 
mation and weathering, and plate tectonics. 
Humans have altered the carbon cycle by burning 
fossil fliels. Students investigate the carbon cycle 
on the WCU campus and consider the implica- 
tions for global warming. For elementary educa- 
tion majors only. Team taught with the 
Department of Biology. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 
► Diverse communities course 



Department of Health 



207 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center 

610-436-2931 

Roger Mustalish, Chairperson 

Bethann Cinelli, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Cinelli, Mustalish, Nye, Sankaran, Sheehan, 
Shorten 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Carson, Harris, James, Lacey 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bill, Gross, Morgan 
ADJUNCT PROFESSORS: FeUows, KeUar, Killian, Wix 
The Department of Health offers four programs leading to a bachelor 
of science degree. 

1. The B.S. in PUBLIC HEALTH is designed to provide students 
with the competencies needed for a career in public health. 
Students selecting this program vyill take a public health core of 
courses and select one of the concentrations from the following: 
a. PUBLIC HEALTH— HEALTH PROMOTION prepares 
students for a career as a public health practitioner in hospitals, 
health departments, health agencies, and industry. The pro- 
gram provides a comprehensive basic science background as 



well as a strong public health foundation. This is an approved 
program by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) 
and AAHE. 
b. PUBLIC HEALTH— ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH pre- 
pares students for careers as environmental scientists in indus- 
try, consulting firms, government, and academia. The program 
synthesizes a rigorous general scientific preparation with spe- 
cialized applied courses in a wide range of environmental health 
science discipUnes, such as industrial hygiene, hazardous waste 
management, and water qualit^■. 
The B.S. m NUTRITION AND DIETETICS prepares students 
for careers in dietetics, which include community nutrition, food 
service management, and clinical nutrition. This program meets 
the American Dietetic Association's (ADA) knowledge require- 
ments for entry-level dietitians. Graduates of the program will 
have tiilfilled these requirements. However, following graduation 
students must successfiilly complete an ADA-accredited intern- 
ship to qualify to take the registration examination for dietitians. 
Graduates who pass this examination are recognized by the ADA 
as registered dietitians. Facult)' advisers provide assistance to stu- 



School of" Health Sciences 



Health 



dents in identifying and submitting apphcations to these postgrad- 
uate internships. 

3. The B.S. in HEALTH SCIENCE is for students who have com- 
pleted a certificate, diploma, or associate's degree program in such 
health science areas as dental hygiene, respiratory therapy, occupa- 
tional therapy, medical technology, alternative/complementary 
medicine, and cardiovascular technology. The program gives pro- 
fessionals the chance to build on their technical education already 
received and to develop academic competency in a related field. 
General education requirements and health courses are needed for 
completion of the B.S. in health science. A school dental hygiene 
certification ot 18 credits is offered under this degree. 

4. The B.S. in RESPIRATORY CARE is offered in association with 
Bryn Mawr Hospital. Graduation from the program satisfies the 
entrance requirement for the Written Registry Examination and the 
CUnical Simulation Examination given by the National Board for 
Respiratory Care. Successfiil completion of these examinations quali- 
fies the candidate as a registered respiratory therapist. Most respirato- 
ry therapists are employed by hospitals and home health care agencies. 

Academic Policies 

1. Repeating Courses 

Department of Health majors who earn less than a C (2.0) in 
selected program requirements may be required to repeat such 
courses. Students should discuss these requirements with their 
advisers. 

2. Overall GPAs for internships and field experiences 

a. A minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA is required of environmental 
health and nutrition majors for internships or field experience 
assignments. 

b. A minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA is required for health promo- 
tion majors for internships. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE B.S. PROGRAMS 

General Education Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — PUBLIC HEALTH 

All pubhc health students are required to complete one of three con- 
centrations: 
A. Public Health — Health Promotion 

1. Cognate Requirements 30 semester hours 
BIO 100, 259, 269; CHE 102*; COM 101*; 

CSW 101; PSY 100*; SOC 200* 

2. Public Health Core Requirements 45 semester hours 
HEA 100, 240, 242, 306, 330, 341, 342, 419, 

420, 421, and 436 

3. Elective Requirements 

Students select one ot the following options: 

a. General Health Promotion 18 semester hours 
SLx health electives selected under advisement 

with no more than six credits at the HEA 100 
level and no more than six credits of HEA 435 

b. Worksite Health Promorion Group Electives 18 semester hours 
HEA 331; KIN 185, 245, 348, 352, 361; 

and PEA 137 

NOTE: Students who are interested in taking 
the certification exam for Group Exercise 
Leader I from the American College of Sports 
Medicine will need to take all of the kinesiology 
and PEA courses hsted above. If a student would 
Uke a higher level certification as an exercise group 
leader, additional course work is required. This 
additional course work is optional, and it is highly 
recommended that smdents consider taking the 
additional course credits as part of their free electives. 

4. Grade Requirements 

A cumulative GPA of 2.5 is needed before the 
start of the internship, HEA 421. 



In order to count towards the bachelor of science in 
pubhc health/health promotion, pubhc health core, 
and health elective classes require a minimum grade of C. 
B. Public Health — Environmental Health 

1. Cognate Requirements 36 semester hours 
BIO 110*, 204, 270; CHE/CRL 107, CHE 230; 

ESS 101; MAT 107, 121*; PHY 130*-140*; 
SMD211 

2. Environmental Health Core Requirements 45 semester hours 
ENV 102, 230, 250, 445, 447, 451, 452, 455, 

456, 460; HEA 110, 341 

3. Environmental Health Elective Requirements 6 semester hours 
(Two courses selected under advisement) 

ENV 360, 435, 450, 453, 462, 470, 475 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — NUTRITION AND 
DIETETICS 

1. Nutrition Core: 46 semester hours 
HEA 200, 205, 303, 309, 312, 314, 409, 

411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 417; HTL 205 

2. Cognates: 38 semester hours 
BIO 100*, 204, 259, 269; CHE 107*, 230, 

310; CRL 107; HEA 306; MAT 121*; 
PSY 100*; SOC 200* 

3. General Education (courses selected under 
advisement) 

4. All required HEA courses require a minimum 
grade of C. 

5. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required for BIO 
100, 204, 259, 269, CHE/CRL 107, CHE 
230, and 310. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — HEALTH SCIENCE - 
GENERAL 

1. Satisfactory completion of an allied health certificate, diploma, or 
A.S. degree program 

2. Satisfactory completion of 120 semester hours, including 

a. General education requirements 

b. A minimum of 24 semester hours earning a C or better for 
each course. Students must take HEA 242, 341, and 419, and 
15 credits as approved by an adviser. (Health concentration 
courses require a grade of C or better.) 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — HEALTH SCIENCE - 
RESPIRATORY CARE 

1. Complete a minimum of 120 credits including the following 
required courses (all courses require a C or better): 

a. Cognate Requirements 26 semester hours 
BIO 100*, 204, 259, 269; CHE 100*; 

MAT 107*; PSY 100*; PHI 180* 

b. Major Requirements 63 semester hours 
HEA 210, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 

377, 378, 379, 380, 435, 472, 473, 474, 475, 
476, 477, 478, 479 

2. Complete all general education requirements 

Minor in Health Sciences 18 semester hours 

Required course HEA 100 and 15 hours of other health courses 
selected under advisement. Nine credits must be at the 300 and 400 
level. A grade of C- or better is required in each course. 

Minor in Nutrition 18 semester hours 

Required courses: HEA 205, 303, 309; HTL 205 

Electives: Select three from among HEA 307, 415, 422; KIN 245, 

352; PSY 481; SMD 454. A grade of C or better is required in each 

course. 



These required courses also satisfy genera! education requirements. 



Health 



School ot Health Sciences 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ENVIRONMENTAL 

Symbol: ENV 

# 102 Humans and the Environment (3) A study 
ot the abilit)' ot humans to survive and maintain 
their life qualit)' considering the limited resources 
and recycling capacity- of planet Earth. Note: Only 
one of the following courses can be completed for 
credit: BIO 102, ENV 102, or ESS 102. 
230 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emer- 
gencj' Response (3) Provides students with the 
training required by the Occupational Safety' and 
Health Administration and the Environmental 
Protection Agency to work at sites where haz- 
ardous wastes and/or hazardous materials may be 
stored, spilled, transported, or used. 
250 Environmental Health Laboratory (3) 
Practical field and laboratorv' experience in envi- 
ronmental sample collection and analysis. PRE- 
REQ: CHE/CRL 107, ENV 102, or permission 
of instructor. 

360 Air Quality and Health (4) A consideration 
of the t)'pes and amounts ot air contaminants, the 
atmospheric processes that transport them, and the 
role of air qualit\' in human health. PREREQ^ 
ENV 102, or permission of instructor. 
435 Environmental Health Workshop (1-6) 
Special workshops on contemporary' environmental 
health issues. Topics announced at time of offering. 
445 Risk Assessment (3) An examination of 
human health and ecological risk assessment with 
emphasis on exposure estimation. PREREQ^ 
ENV 102. 

447 Environmental Regulations (3) Prepares stu- 
dents for working with federal and Pennsylvania 
environmental regulations. Emphasizes use and 
development of Internet reguIator>' resources. 
Specific discussions and exercises related to various 
regulator)' agencies are included. PREREQ^ ENV 
102, or permission of instructor. 

450 Hazardous and Solid Wastes (3) Sources, 
characteristics, and amounts of solid and haz- 
ardous wastes and their implications for human 
health. Methods of collection, handling, disposal, 
and recycling. PREREQ^ ENV 102, or permission 
of instructor. 

451 Toxic Substances (3) An investigation of the 
health problems caused by toxic substances in the 
workplace and in the general environment. PRE- 
REQ: BIO 204, CHE 230 (concurrent), ENV 
102, or permission of instructor. 

452 Industrial Hygiene (3) A study of the antici- 
pation, recognition, evaluation, and control of 
health hazards in the work environment. PRE- 
REQ^ ENV 102, or permission of instructor. 

453 Occupational Safety (3) A study of the 
recognition, evaluation, and control of safet)' haz- 
ards in the work environment. PREREQl ENV 
102, or permission of instructor. 

455 Environmental Health Seminar (3) In-depth 
investigation and discussions on topics of particu- 
lar concern or significance to the environmental 
health field. Topics will be varied from year to 
year. PREREQ^ Senior environmental health 
major. 

456 Environmental Health Internship (12) Field 
placement with an environmental health depart- 
ment in an industry, consulting firm, or government 
agency. PREREQ^ Senior environmental health 
major and a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or above. 
460 Industrial Hygiene Techniques (3) Students 
will learn evaluation techniques for monitoring the 
industrial environment in a laboratory setting as 
well as in the field, such as checking air quality, air 



flow, noise, heat stress, and radiation. Evaluation 
of personal protective equipment, and pulmonary 
function and audiometric testing also will be 
investigated. PREREQ; ENV 102, or permission 
of instructor. 

462 Water Quality and Health (3) ."^n examina- 
tion of the qualit)- and quantity requirements of 
surface and subsurface water resources used for 
drinking water supplies. Laboratory included. 
PREREQ^ ENV 102, or permission of instructor 
470 Emergency Preparedness (3) This course 
addresses emergenq- preparedness for schools, 
businesses, communities, and counties. T\'pes of 
emergencies considered include natural disasters, 
failures of technology (spills, accidents, and explo- 
sions), and acts ot war or terrorism. 
475 Bioterrorism and Public Health (3) This 
course addresses the protection of the public's 
health and the health of workers such as first 
responders from biological agents that cause dis- 
ease and/or death. Communication and coping 
strategies, group interaction, case studies, and the 
use of Internet resources will be integrated with 
response strategies, measurement techniques, per- 
sonal protection, and decontamination procedures. 

HEALTH 

Symbol: HEA 

Symbol for health labs: HTL 

100 Dimensions of Wellness (3) Fundamental 
concepts of health and wellness exploring several 
health-related areas with an opportunity for per- 
sonal lifestyle change conducive to better health. 

103 Drugs and Society (3) Provide knowledge 
regarding the use and abuse of substances in our 
society and the impact on the individual, family, 
and community. Teaching strategies also will be 
incorporated. 

104 Human Sexuality (3) Study ot sex-uality as it 
relates to self; the interrelationships with people. 
106 Death and Dying (3) Current controversial 
issues concerning death and d^ing. How involved 
persons cope with death. 

109 Health Issues of Women (3) The needs and 
concerns of women as consumers in our present 
health care system. Various biological, psychologi- 
cal, and social topics will be discussed. 
> 110 Transcultural Health: Principles and Prac- 
tices (3) This course examines the health beliefs 
and practices of a variety of subcultural groups in 
the United States. Emphasis is placed on the appli- 
cation of multicultural health beliefs and practices. 
It utilizes the cross-cultural approach in meeting 
the health needs of clients and families. It is open 
to all University students, regardless of major. 
200 Nutrition and Culture (3) The U.S. is 
becoming a plurahstic, diverse population whose 
food patterns are influenced by ethnic, religious, 
and regional groups. This course will provide an 
overview of world wide dietary patterns, examine 
various factors affecting individual and regional 
food choices, and discuss cultural and historical 
perspectives of dietary patterns. Course includes 
food sampling from different cultures. 
205 Principles of Food Selection and Prepa- 
ration (3) Nutritionally based study ot the basic 
principles of food selection and preparation with 
an emphasis on food safet)'. Comparative study 
and integration of convenience food and tradition- 
ally prcp'ared food. CONCURRENT: HTL 205. 
HTL 205 Principles of Food Selection and 
Preparation Laboratory (2) Nutritionally based 
experience. Planning and preparation of conve- 
nience and traditionally prepared food. PREREQ; 
HEA 205 or concurrent. 



206 Human Development (3) A lifespan 
approach to the study of human development in 
the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial domains. 
210 Introduction to Respiratory Care (3) 
Consists ot topics related to general health care 
issues as well as those of specific interest to the 
respirator)' care profession. 

220 Field Experience in Health (1) Opportunities 
for observation and field experience in health sci- 
ence settings. 

230 Health Issues of School-Aged Youth (3) This 
course investigates current health issues relevant to 
students K— 12 such as drug, alcohol, and tobacco 
use; diseases; and mental emotional health. 
240 Foundationsof Health (3) Introductory 
course tor undergraduate majors in health promo- 
tion/education. Primaly emphasis on the philo- 
sophical, historical, and theoretical foundations of 
the profession. 

242 Introduction to Public and Community 
Health (3) This course is intended to provide the 
student with an overview of public and community 
health concepts in the United States. 
245 Psycho-Social Issues of School-Aged Youth 
(3) An overview of fundamental concepts and con- 
tent in the following health areas: mental/emo- 
tional health, stress management, the aging 
process, violence and conflict resolution, forcible 
behaviors, and death education. 

300 Professional Ethics and the Health Profes- 
sions (3) This course examines ethical issues rele- 
vant to the professional roles of health profession- 
als. Students will examine ethical principles and 
apply a model of ethical decision making to case 
studies. Other areas addressed include professional 
codes of ethics, ethical concerns in health behavior 
change, health communications, and health educa- 
tion research. 

301 Health for the Elementary Grades (3) 
Provides basic health content and instructional 
methodolog)' for presenice elementary teachers. 

303 Introductory Principles of Human Nutri- 
tion (3) Practical approach to the role nutrition 
and dietetics play in improving the quality of our 
hves — socially, physically, mentally, and emotion- 
ally. DispeUing of fads and fallacies. 

304 Family Life and Sex Education (3) The pur- 
pose of this course is to prepare the health profes- 
sional to develop and teach appropriate K-12 fam- 
ily Ufe education curricula. 

305 Contraceptive Technology and Health 
Issues (3) The course will teach contraceptive 
methods, reasons for a societ)''s acceptance or 
rejection of certain methods, and the effect on the 
health care deUverv system. 

306 Curriculum and Instruction in Health (3) 
This course provides the knowledge and skills for 
the development, implementation, and evaluation 
of K-12 comprehensive school health curriculums. 

307 Consumer Nutrition (3) Consumer approach 
to the roles foods and nutrition play in improving 
the quaUty of our Uves — socially, physically, men- 
tally, and emotionally PREREQ;. HEA 303 or 
equivalent. 

309 Nutrition Through the Life Cycle (3) A 
studv of nutritional needs and dietary' concerns of 
people from conception to old age. PREREQ^ 
HEA 303. 

310 Love and Marriage (3) Defines love and mar- 
riage for the student and teaches the skills essential 
to fulfilling those needs. 



# Approved interdisciplinary course 
I Diverse communities course 



School of Health Sciences 



Health 



312 Experimental Foods (3) A study of the 
chemical, physical, and biological effects of pro- 
cessing, storage, and food preservation on the 
structure, composition, palatability, and nutritive 
value of food. Includes one credit hour of labora- 
xon: PREREQ: CHE 107, 310; CRL 107; HEA 
205; BIO 204 may be taken concurrendy. 

314 Quantity Food Production (5) A basic course 
in quantity food production. Emphasis is placed 
on the essentials of operating a foodservice facili- 
t)' — menu planning, purchasing, storage, issuing, 
food production, service, distribution, and quaht)' 
control. Includes two credit hours of quantit}- 
foods laboraton-. PREREQ; HEA 205. 

315 Mind, Body, and Health (3) Theories and 
practice of health and healing through the mind/ 
body connection. Emphasis on learning/practicing 
techniques for health promotion. 

316 Minority Health Issues (3) The purpose of 
this course is to promote discussion and awareness 
among students regarding the cultural aspects of 
health issues. 

320 Positive Aspects of Aging (3) Describes past, 
present, and proiected information concerning the 
aging process in normal human development. 
325 Stress Management (3) Comprehensive survey 
of stress concepts, theories, and management tech- 
niques. Emphasis is placed on personal application. 

330 Health Behavior (3) Indi\idual and group 
health behavior of children and adults at different 
levels of wellness and in various settings. Past and 
current theories of health behavior with methods of 
application bv health professionals will be included. 

331 Health Promotion in the Workplace (3) A 
studv of current health promotion efforts and pro- 
grams for employees and management personnel 
at the worksite. 

333 Alternative and Complementary Medicine 
(3) Exploration of alternative, complementan,-, 
and/or integrative medical swtems and healing 
practices, such as homeopathy, Chinese medicine, 
herbal medicine, therapeutic touch, from a con- 
sumer and personal viewpoint. 
335 Botanical Medicine (3) A comprehensive, 
evidence-based assessment ot botanical medicines 
in health promotion, disease prevention, and 
sjTnptom management. 

341 Chronic and Communicable Diseases (3) A 
study of the disease process, including causes, 
effects, and control of selected diseases with an 
emphasis on disease prevention and health promo- 
tion. PREREQ: BIO 259/269. 

342 Program Planning and Evaluation (3) 
Provides an in-depth swdy of the program plan- 
ning process and evaluation methods. Needed 
skills are developed and experience given in writ- 
ing programs from assessment through evaluation 
with both hvpothetical and real populations. PRE- 
REQ. HEA 240, 341. 

370 Medical Terminology (1) An Introduction to 
medical terminologv' using a programmed instruc- 
tion, sell-learning technique. Includes chart for- 
mat, word parts, pulmonary terminology abbrevia- 
tions, and an overview of respirator)' anatomy. 

371 Aspects of Respiratory Therapy I (2) A dis- 
cussion of topics essential to the provision of com- 
prehensive respiratory therapy. Topics include 
patient care, CPR, and psychosocial issues. 

372 Respiratory Phvsiologj- (3) An in-depth 
studv of breathing mechanics, pulmonary circula- 
tion, ventilation/perfusion ratios, regulation of 
ventilation, and gas transport. 

373 Bronchopulmonary Hygiene (3) .Aji in- 
depth studv- of respiratory care modahties used in 
the maintenance of bronchopulmonary hygiene. 



including humiditv and aerosol therapy, sustained 
maximal inspiration, IPPB therapy, chest physical 
therapv, and airway maintenance. 

374 Oxygen Therapy (2) .A.n overview of basic 
science relevant to respirator,' therapy is followed 
by the studv of the manufacture, storage, and 
transport of medical gases, regulators, and meter- 
ing devices, oxvgen therapv, and ox)'gen anaivsis. 

375 Cardiopulmonary Diseases (3) A comprehen- 
sive study of cardiopulmonary diseases and treat- 
ment. Includes pulmonary diagnostic procedures. 

376 Aspects of Respiratory Therapy II (2) A 
continuation of HEA 371. Topics include rehabil- 
itation, home care, administration and organiza- 
tion, respiratorv pharmacologv', and infection-con- 
trol techniques. 

377 Pharmacology (2) An in-depth study of vari- 
ous drug categories including drug-dose response 
and principles of absorption, distribution, metabo- 
Usm, and excretion. 

378 Respiratory Technology (3) Study of the 
equipment utilized in the delivery of respiratory 
care. 

379 Hemodj-namics I (3) An in-depth study of 
monitoring and evaluation techniques including 
modules on cardiopulmonarv phwiology, elecrocar- 
diographic monitoring, and hemodj-namic monitor- 
ing. Interpretation and application data is empha- 
sized. Appropriate lab experience is included. 

380 Clinical Practice I (6) An introduction to 
clinical respiratorv care consisting of rotations 
through patient care areas followed by discussion 
of experiences and correlation to didactic work. 

403 Student Teaching: Elementary School (3) 
Practical classroom experience m teaching health 
education at the elementary level. PREREQ; Must 
have flill admission status in teacher education cer- 
tification and completed a minimum ot 28 credits 
of the required health courses including HEA 306. 

404 Student Teaching: Middle School (6) 
Practical classroom experience in teaching health 
education. PREREQ; Must have hill admission 
status in teacher education certification and com- 
pleted 34 credits of the required health courses 
including HEA 306. 

405 Student Teaching: Secondary School (6) 
Practical classroom teaching in health education. 
PREREQ; Must have full admission status in 
teacher education certification and completed 34 
credits of the required health courses including 
HEA 306. 

408 Dental Hygiene: Field Experience (6) Field 
experiences for dental h)gienists who are working 
towards certification as public school dental 
hygienists. PREREQ; EDF 100, EDM 300, EDP 
250 and 351, and HEA 306. 

409 Professional Skills in Dietetics (3) A focus 
on the development of nutrition counsehng and 
communication/media technology skills. An appre- 
ciation of multiculturalism will be promoted. A 
familiarization with dietetics-related professional 
organizations, graduate school opportunities, and 
dietetic internships will be provided. Assistance 
with the dietetic internship and graduate school 
application process will be given. PREREQ; All 
professional courses except HEA 414, 415, 416. 

410 Mental Health (3) Designed to aid persons in 
improving their understanding of themselves and 
others. Emphasis on wavs to recognize mental 
health problems. 

411 Advanced Human Nutrition I (3) In-depth 
examination of the digestion, transport, and metab- 
olism of carbohvdrates, lipids, and proteins. Special 
emphasis is placed on metabolic interrelationships 
and hormonal control of the three processes men- 



tioned above. PREREQ, BIO 110, 259, 269; CHE 
103, 104, 230, 310; CRL 103, 104; HEA 303; 
HEA 309 mav be taken concurrentlv'. 

412 Advanced Human Nutrition II (3) In-depth 
examination of the digestion, transport, and 
metabolism of vitamins, minerals, and water. 
Special emphasis is placed on digestive and meta- 
boUc interrelationships and hormonal control. 
PREREQ; HEA 411. 

413 Medical Nutrition Therapy 1 (3) This course 
covers nutritional assessment, drug-nutrient inter- 
actions, nutritional therapy in diseases of infancy 
and childhood, gastrointestinal diseases, diseases 
of the Uver and gallbladder, and surgerv. PRE- 
REQ: HEA 341, 412. 

414 Medical Nutrition Therapy 11 (3) This course 
covers nutritional therapy in coronary heart disease 
and hvpertension, diabetes meUitus, renal disease, 
cancer, and disabling diseases. PREREQ; HEA 413. 

415 Community Nutrition (3) A study of the 
communit)' nutrition programs and services at all 
levels of development. Course covers nutrition 
program planning, implementation, and evalua- 
tion; socioeconomic and cultural context of pro- 
grams and services; an examination of the poUtical 
and legislative process as it relates to nutrition leg- 
islation; and the role of the communin' nutrition- 
ist. PREREQ; HEA 242, 303, 309. 

416 Foodservice and Nutrition Systems Manage- 
ment (3) A smdy of the organization and adminis- 
tration of foodservice systems and the fiinctions 
and responsibilities specific to management: deci- 
sion making, planning, organizing, staffing, lead- 
ing, and controUing. Management of human 
resources, food, materials, capital, facihties, and 
markets as related to various hospitalitv svstems 
will be examined. PREREQ; HEA 306 and 314. 

417 Foodserves and Nutrition Systems 
Management II (3) A study of the organization 
and administration of foodservice and nutrition 
systems as well as the functions and responsibili- 
ties specific to management; controUing facilities, 
budgeting, facilities planning and design, buving 
and instalhng foodsenice equipment, and market- 
ing. Management of human resources, food, mate- 
rials, capital, facihties, and markets as related to 
various hospitahtv svstems will be examined. 
PREREQ; HEA 4i6. 

419 Research Methods in Health (3) This course 
will give students an introduction to research 
issues in the health professions. Students will gain 
an understanding of the reasons for research, 
designing research studies, research techniques, 
principles of instmmentation, data interpretation, 
and data presentation. PREREQ; Successful com- 
pletion of a WCU (or equivalent) math course at 
the 100 level or above. 

420 Health Marketing and Communications (3) 
The purpose of this course is to prepare students tor 
work experiences as a health educator. Major 
emphasis will be placed on marketing and health 
communication strategies. PREREQ; HEA 341, 
342, and all required chemistrv' and biologv' courses. 

421 Public Health Internship (12) A practical, 
hill-time work experience in a hospital, pubUc 
health agencv', or company, ioindy supervised by 
an on-site supervisor and a public health faculty 
member. PREREQ. HEA 419, 420, and a cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.5 or above. 

422 Nutrition for Health, Fitness, and Sport (3) 
Studv of nutrition and its effects on health, devel- 
opment, and performance; sound nutrition guide- 
lines for optimal health and physical performance; 
energv' and energv' pathways as kevs to physical 
activity; nutrients relative to health and physical 



Histon* 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



performance; dining away from home; substances 
proposed to enhance performace; body composi- 
tion and weight control. PREREQ; HEA 303 or 
permission of instructor. 

♦ 425 Independent Study (1-3) The student will 
initiate a health-related research study or project 
under faculty supervision. 

♦ 435 Health Workshop (1-6) Special workshops 
on contemporary health problems and issues. 
Topics announced at time of offering. 

436 Health Care Delivery: Trends, Challenges, 
and Opportunities (3) This course will provide an 
overview ot the organization and financing ot the 
current U.S. health care system, the need for 
reform, and initiatives to meet the health needs of 
all Americans. 

438 UnderstandingAIDS/HIV Infection (3) 

Students will learn basic information about the dis- 
ease process, transmission and risk behaviors, treat- 
ment options, and legal and ethical issues surround- 
ing HIV infection. Primary emphasis will address 
the impact of .\IDS/HIV on those with the dis- 
ease, as well as the psychosocial factors influencing 
partners, family members, and health care profes- 



sionals. Societal responses to the AIDS/HIV epi- 
demic also will be interwoven throughout the top- 
ics. Course format will include lecture and discus- 
sions, viewing of videos, interacuon with guest 
speakers, and individual areas ot interest. No pre- 
requisites needed. Open to all majors. 

440 School Health Programs (3) This course 
provides an overview of comprehensive school 
health programs. Specific focus is on program 
development, implementation, and evaluation. 

472 Mechanical Ventilation (3) A comprehensive 
study ot mechanical ventilation, including the physi- 
ologi,' ot positive pressure breathing, techniques of 
ventilation, characteristics of commonly used ventila- 
tors, and monitoring of the ventilator-patient system. 

473 Life Support System (3) An in-depth, com- 
prehensive study of mechanical ventilators and 
other hfe support equipment. 

474 Pulmonary Function Evaluation (2) A com- 
prehensive study of various pulmonary fiinction 
evaluation techniques. Includes bronchoscopy and 
arterial blood gas analysis. 

475 Pediatric/Neonatal Respiratory Care (2) A 

comprehensive study of neonatal and pediatric res- 



piratory care, including fetal lung development, 
pathophysiology of the neonate and pediatric 
patient, and related respiratory care procedures. 

476 Clinical Practice II (4) An introduction to crit- 
ical and specialized respiratory care areas followed by 
discussions and correlation to didactic work. 

477 Hemodynamics II (3) An advanced continua- 
tion of the topics addressed in HEA 379 hemody- 
namics I. 

478 Respiratory Therapy Seminar I (3) Includes 
critical, written analysis, and discussion of perti- 
nent respiratory care hterawre as well as elements 
of research relevant to the respiratorv care profes- 
sion. The students culminate their study of respi- 
ratorv care by designing and implementing a 
miniresearch project. 

479 Clinical Practice III (8) An intensive expo- 
sure to critical care and speciaHzed areas of respira- 
tory care. Performance evaluation of therapies and 
procedures to include mechanical ventilator set-up 
and evaluation, neonatal ventilator set-up, pul- 
monary function assessment, arterial hne set-up, 
and arterial hne blood withdrawal. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of History 

506 Main HaU 

610-436-2201 

Richard J. Webster, Chairperson 

Thomas J. Heston, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Davidson, Foster, Hardy, Heston, Hewitt, 

Peters, Webster 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Boes, Friedman, Hewin, Jones, 

Kirschenbaum 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Gedge, Hanley, Legg, 

O'Connor, Thames-Leonard 
The student of history seeks to re-create the past (or, more precisely, 
as much of it as possible) in a rational manner, not only to explain and 
understand the past for its own sake, but also to identify our age with 
earlier times. The smdent is concerned with the origins, development, 
and relationships between past people and events and, from the multi- 
plicity of credible and sometimes conflicting evidence, renders judg- 
ments on causation and consequences. He or she seeks to achieve a 
sense of the past. Among the careers open to history majors are the 
law, government service, teaching, research, journalism, and business. 
Indeed, a strong preparation in history can lead to possibilities in vir- 
tually every field of endeavor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS — HISTORY 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Foreign Language Requirement 0-12 semester hours 

3. Required Histor\' Courses 15 semester hours 
HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 151, HIS 152, HIS 200 

Two 100-level courses may fiiltill general requirements. 

4. History Concentrations 
Students choose one of three concentrations. 
American History Concentration 
United States Histon,- 
European History 
World/Regional History 
HIS 400 Seminar 
European History Concentration 
European Histon' 
United States History 



24 semester hours 



9 semester 
6 semester 
6 semester 
3 semester 

9 semester 
6 semester 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 

hours 
hours 



World/Regional History 
HIS 400 Seminar 



6 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



World/Regional History Concentration 

World/Regional History 9 semester hours 

European History 6 semester hours 

United States History 6 semester hours 

HIS 400 Seminar 3 semester hours 

United States History Courses: 

HIS 329, 344, 352, 356, 357, 358, 360, 361, 362, 

364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 373, 380, 

390, 399, 445, 450, 451, 455, 458, 460, 462, 474, 480 

European History Courses 

HIS 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 329, 330, 

331, 332, 333, 390, 398, 415, 416, 420, 421, 422, 

423, 425, 427, 428, 435, 445, 450, 460, 480 

World/Regional Courses 

HIS 301, 302, 305, 306, 308, 311, 312, 314, 315, 

316, 317, 318, 348, 349, 375, 380, 390, 397, 406, 

407, 411, 412, 415, 445, 450, 460, 480 

5. Cognate Courses 9 semester hours 
Three cognate courses selected from art history-, 

literature, music history, or philosophy, or 
another selection of courses under advisement 

6. Additional free electives to complete 120 semester hours 
Students in the bachelor of arts in histor\' program can complete an 
elective course of studies that will lead to teacher certification in sec- 
ondary ccitizenship education (formerly social studies). See department 
adviser for details. 

ELECTIVE CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION TEACHER 
CERTIFICATION PROGRAM (formerly Social Studies) 

The program of study is designed to assure that prospective citizen- 
ship education teachers possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dis- 
positions associated with the concepts, tools of inquir)', and structures 
of the disciplines that make up citizenship education, and that they 
are able to create learning experiences which make these aspects of the 
subject matter meaningful for learners. The course of study empha- 
sizes ten thematic strands: 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Histon' 



• Culture and cultural diversity 

• Time, continuity, and change 

• People, places, and environment 

• Individuals, groups, and institutions 

• Power, authority, and government 

• Production, distribution, and consumption 

• Science, technology, and society 

• Global connections 

• Civic ideals and practices 

• Individual development and identity 
Program of Study 

Students interested in teaching citizenship education in secondary 
schools may pursue a bachelor of arts in history while earning state cer- 
tification in citizenship education (formerly social studies). West 
Chester Universit}''s program is accredited by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education, the National Council for the Social Studies, 
and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 
Requirements 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 

2. Professional Education, see page 138 

3. History Requirement 
See above. Bachelor of Arts - Histor)' 

4. Foreign Language Requirement 

5. Cognate Courses 
Selected under advisement 



48 semester hours 
33 semester hours 
39 semester hours 

0-12 semester hours 
9 semester hours 



6. Elective 

Selected under advisement 
This is an elective program that is pursued in 
conjunction -with the bachelor of arts in history. 
Close advisement is encouraged. NOTE: Some 
of the above courses meet two requirements. 

7. Satisft' Universitv' and department requirements 
for admission to teacher education, see page 145. 

8. Satisfy Universit)' and Pennsylvania Department 

of Education requirements to complete certification, 
see pages 145-147. 

History Minor 18 semester hours 

Students may obtain minor recognition on their transcript so that 
their concentrated choice of free electives will be recognized. 

1. Required Courses 6 semester hours 
One course between HIS 101 or 102, and 

one course among HIS 150, 151, or 152 

2. Electives 12 semester hours 
Choose under advisement tour 300- and/or 

400-level courses from three groups: 

United States, European, World/Regional 

History (six semester hours in one group; three 

semester hours in each of the others) 
This minor may be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts 
or bachelor of science in liberal studies general degree program. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
HISTORY 

Symbol: HIS unless otherwise shown 

101 History of Civilization I (3) Cultural ele- 
ments and social institutions in the West and the 
East from earliest times through the Renaissance. 

102 History of Civilization II (3) Developments 
in civilizations from 1500 to the present, with 
emphasis on Western civilization and its interrela- 
tionships with the non-Western world. 

150 The American Experience (3) The histor\' of 
the United States, with emphasis on major 
themes, ideas, and developments — nationalism, 
sectionalism, imperialism, industrialism, and oth- 
ers. 

151 History of United States I (3) The social, 
economic, political, and intellectual development 
of the United States from the beginning of the 
Colonial period through Reconstruction, 

152 History of United States II (3) A compre- 
hensive history of the United States from 1865 to 
the present, examining the economic, political, 
and cultural development of American society, and 
the evolution of American foreign policy. 

200 Varieties of History (3) Historical research 
techniques. Methodolog)', historiography, and 
varieties of history. Required of all history majors. 
PREREQ; Two iOO-level HIS courses. 
301 History of South Asia (3) A historical study 
of developments on the Indian subcontinent (India 
and Pakistan), the course also considers those 
areas of Southeast Asia (Burma and Thailand) that 
have been traditionally influenced by the course of 
Indian events. 

# 302 Modem India (3) Social, religious, and cul- 
tural underpinnings ot modern India against a 
backdrop of the subcontinent's chronological 
development. Hindu and Muslim traditions dis- 
cussed in terms oi their own social, religious, and 
historical dynamics and as examples of complexi- 
ties of national integration. 
305 Modem China (3) Sun'ey of the historical 
and cultural background of China. Emphasis is 



given to the significance ot China's modern period 
and its impact on world affairs. 

# 306 Chinese Civilization (3) Study of dominant 
cultural, philosophical, and historical patterns that 
have influenced the development of China as it is 
today and the traditional way in which Chinese 
approach their own histon-. 

# 308 Introduction to the Islamic World (3) 
Study of the religio-cultural heritage ot the Islamic 
world against a historical background. Selected 
areas of Middle, South, and Southeast Asia will be 
utilized to illustrate the flowering ot Islamic arts, 
architecture, and poetry. Includes geography com- 
ponent. 

311 History of Africa to 1875 (3) A survey of 
African history' to 1875, providing regional cover- 
age of the entire continent, and an examination of 
African oral traditions. 

312 History of Africa Since 1875 (3) A survey of 
African history since 1875, focusing on European 
colonialism, African resistance, and contemporary 
developments. 

314 Latin American Women's History (3) 
Examines Latin American women 1500 - present. 
Focuses on intersections of class, race, and gender; 
relations between private and public spheres; 
changing women's experiences over time. 

■ 315 Colonial Latin America (3) Pre- 
Columbian period, colonial Latin America, and 
movements for independence; Indian, European, 
and African backgrounds; government, economy, 
society, religion, culture, and enlightenment. 
Interaction of diverse cultures in the New World. 

■ 316 Modem Latin America (3) Latin America 
in the 19th and 20th centuries; liberalism, conser- 
vatism, dictatorship, revolution, socialism, indus- 
trialization, agrarian reform, cultural-intellectual 
achievements, and international relations. Topical 
approach, using individual countries as case history' 
illustrations. 

■ 317 History of Mexico (3) Mexico from Pre- 
Columbian period to present, including civiliza- 
tions of Mayas and Aztecs, Spanish conquest. 
Colonial period, movement for independence era 



of Santa Ana, La Reforma, Diaz dictatorship, 
Mexican Revolution, cultural-intellectual achieve- 
ments, international relations, and modernization 
of Mexico since the Revolution. 

■ 318 The Ancient World (3) Classical Greece 
and Rome with consideration of economic, social, 
intellectual, and political history. Selected writings 
of the ancients. 

■ 319 Medieval Europe (3) Western Europe 
from the fall of Rome to approximately 1300. 
Economic, social, political, and intellectual devel- 
opments in the major kingdoms of the West; the 
histon' of the Universal Church. 

320 Renaissance and Reformation (3) Political, 
economic, social, and cultural forces that emerged 
in Europe from 1300 to 1650. The evolution of 
modern states and the rise of the middle class. 

321 Everyday Life in Early Modem Europe (3) 
An examination ot the daily lives ot Europeans ot 
various social backgrounds from the 15th to 18th 
centuries. Topics will include dress, diet, recre- 
ation, labor, and medicine. 

322 Family and Women in Europe: Renaissance 
to Industrial Revolution (3) Focuses on private 
and public aspects of the family in various 
European countries, and the role and everydaj- life 
of women of diverse social backgrounds. Special 
attention is given to changes over time. 

■ # 323 Austrian Civilization (3) An interdisci- 
plinary study of Austrian civ'ilization, 1848-1938. 
Emphasis is placed on fin-de-siecle Vienna, not 
only as its pivotal role in Austrian culture but also 
as a testing ground for modernism in the West. 

■ 324 Imperial Russia (3) Russian history from 
from Peter the Great to the February revolution of 
1917. Emphasis on issues ot modernity and ethnic 
identit^^ 

329 Gender and Peace (3) Examination of the 
ways in which social constructions of gender inter- 
sect with perceptions of war and peace. 



# Approved interdisciplinar)' course 
H Culuire cluster 



H 



istory 



College of Arts and Sciences 



■ 330 Conflicts in Modem Europe (3) Power 
politics in Europe; alliances and counteralliances; 
imperialism; First World War and Versailles peace 
settlements; emergence of totalitarian ideologies. 

331 20th-century Europe (3) European fascism 
and communism; totalitarianism confronts liberal- 
ism; interaction between domestic politics and for- 
eign policy; polarization of European politics; dis- 
integration of the political institutions of the tradi- 
tional state. 

332 The Holocaust (3) Focuses on ethnic, 
nationalistic, economic, and religious causes of the 
Holocaust, including 20th-century Nazism, 
racism, and anti-Semitism; study of the 
Nuremburg trials. 

333 European Economic History (3) European 
demographic and technological change; trade 
unions; agriculture; trade; the entrepreneur; distri- 
bution of income and welfare from the 10th cen- 
tury to the present. 

343 Colonial America (3) Examination of the 
colonial experience of Europeans in the parts of 
America that became the United States, from 
Columbus's voyage in 1492 to the eve of the 
Revolutionary War. 

344 History of Pennsylvania (3) The founding 
and development of Pennsylvania from its 
Colonial beginnings to the present with emphasis 
on the relation of the past to the present. 

■ 348 The Bible in History (3) The Bible as a 
historical record. From the Pentateuch through 
the prophetic literature, the Apocrypha, the 
Pseudepigrapha, and the Dead Sea Scrolls to the 
New Testament. Historical records of the ancient 
Near Eastern civiUzations will be compared with 
Biblical sources. 

349 The Jew in History (3) Review of the 4,000 
years and five civilizations that have welcomed the 
Jewish people. Emphasis on the Jews in contem- 
porary society. 

352 Modem American Military History (3) The 
role of the American mihtary in shaping the 
course of the nation in the 20th century. 

356 U.S. Environmental History (3) An exami- 
nation of the transformation of the American 
landscape, the history of American environmental 
pohcy, and the development of today's environ- 
mental crisis. 

357 Diplomatic History of the United States (3) 
The theory and practice of American diplomacy 
from Colonial times to the present with emphasis 
on the 20th century. 

358 Economic History of the United States (3) 
The economic development of the American 
nation as it evolved from a frontier, agricultural 
countn,- into an urban, industrial power. 

360 Technology and American Life (3) Promises 
and practices of American life in response to the 
interaction of American forms, values, and scien- 
tific-technological change from the Colonial peri- 
od to the present. 

361 Constitutional History of the United States 
(3) The development of the Constitution ot the 
United States from the Philadelphia convenfion to 
the present with emphasis on major Supreme 
Court decisions. 

362 Violence in America (3) A study of Molence 
in American society as an instrument of change 
and a method of social control. 

364 U.S. Urban History (3) A survey of the rise 
of the American city from early Philadelphia to 
the modern metropolis. The recurring themes of 
growth, immigration, social mobiUty, city politics, 
city planning, urbanism, and suburbanism. 



365 Popular Culture in 20th-century America 

(3) An examination of the rise of American mass 
consumer culture, commercialization of leisure, 
development of the mass media, and redefinition 
of normal and deviant behaviors. 

366 The Turbulent Sixties (3) Examination of 
the stress and conflict in American politics, arts, 
literature, and society of the 1960s. 

367 American Material Culture (3) An interdis- 
ciphnary study of American civilization through 
the examination of its built environment and craft- 
ed and manufactured artifacts from the colonial 
period to the mid-twentieth century. 

368 Gay America (3) Encompasses four himdred 
years of gay and lesbian histon', culture, and politics, 
from colonial settlers and Native American cultures 
to the present with emphasis on the 20th century. 

369 American West (3) Exploration of the histor- 
ical and mythical American West, from pre- 
Columbian America to the present. 

370 American Indians (3) A survey of Indian civ- 
ilization on the continent of North America and 
the confrontation of this civiUzation vnth white 
culture. 

371 Manhood in America (3) Examines 
American manhood from 1600 - present. Focuses 
on intersections of class, race, and gender; rela- 
tions between private and public spheres; changing 
men's experiences over time. 

1 373 African- American History (3) A survey of 
African-American history from 15th century West 
Africa to the present that focuses on the evolution 
of African-American culture and identity, and the 
struggle for freedom and racial equality. 
375 A History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict (3) 
This course will examine the history of the Arab- 
Israeli conflict and the factors that both encourage 
and impede resolution. Consideration will also be 
given to the history of the U.S. involvement in the 
conflict. 

380 The History of U.S. Involvement in the 
Middle East (3) Examines U.S. involvement in 
the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries. 
Consideration will be given to rehgious, economic, 
and diplomatic activities as well as involvement in 
the Arab-Israeh conflict. 

390 Historical Controversy on the World-Wide 
Web (3) Students evaluate Web presentations of a 
major historical controversy. PREREQ: One 
University-level history course, preferably HIS 102. 

♦ 397 Topics in World History (3) Topics may 
vary each semester. Emphasis on student research 
and discussions. 

♦ 398 Topics in European History (3) Topics 
may vary each semester. Emphasis on student 
research and discussions. 

♦ 399 Topics in U.S. History (3) Topics may 
vary each semester. Emphasis on student research 
and discussions. 

400 Seminar (3) In-depth research, swdy, and dis- 
cussion of a selected historical topic. Topics will vary. 
Recommended for seniors. PREREQ: HIS 200. 

406 20th-century Japan (3) The course deals with 
Japan's role in Asian and world affairs from the 
Meiji Restoration of 1868 through the World War 
II period. Concludes with an assessment of Japan's 
post-World War II role as an economic power 
positioned to re-emerge as a major political entity. 

407 History of Brazil (3) A general survey of 
Brazil from 1500 to the present. Emphasis will be 
placed on economic and political issues, slavery 
and race relations, literature, and current ecological 
problems relative to the Amazon Basin. 



♦ 410 Independent Studies in History (1-3) 

Research projects, reports, and readings in history. 
Open to seniors only. PREREQ^ Permission of 
department chairperson. 

411 Middle East to 1700 (3) The historical evolu- 
tion of the Middle East from just before the time 
of Muhammad until 1700. The course seeks to 
promote an understanding of the nature and rise 
of the rehgion of Islam, the spread of Islamic civi- 
lization, and the evolution of the Arab and 
Ottoman empires. 

412 Middle East Since 1600 (3) The historical 
evolution of the Middle East from 1600 to the 
present. The course seeks to promote a historically 
sound understanding of the conflicts and differ- 
ences between Western and Middle Eastern soci- 
eties, as well as the continuing interplay of secular 
and religious forces in the history of the region. 

1 415 Science in History (3) This course offers an 
introduction to the historical evolution of modern 
science. Emphasis is placed on the life and 
achievements of noted scientists against the back- 
drop of their time and culture. Consideration is 
also given to the Impact of developing science on 
the shaping of Western values. 
416 Crime and Punishment in Europe, 1450- 
1789 (3) Focuses on the historical development of 
criminal law, criminalization processes, court pro- 
cedures, the use of judicial torture, crime rates, 
personal characteristics of the sentenced criminals, 
and the punishments they received. 

■ 420 Biography ofModem European Women 
(3) A discussion of biography as a form of histori- 
cal writing and vniting about women. 

421 History of England to 1688 (3) The British 
people and their mores, instimtions, and achieve- 
ments from the earhest times to the Glorious 
Revolution. 

422 History of England Since 1688 (3) England 
as a world leader during the Commercial and 
Industrial revolutions, the evolution of the democ- 
ratic process, and the emergence of liberaUsm fol- 
lowed by the democractic welfare state. 

■ 423 Modem Germany (3) Germany m the 
19th and 20th centuries: Napoleonic era, rise of 
Prussia, nationalism and unification, imperialism 
and World War I, National Socialism, World War 
II, and divided Germany. 

■ 425 Twentieth-Century Russia (3) Its rise and 
fall in light of traditional Russian patterns and the 
communist experiment. 

■ 427 Modem France: 1789 to Present (3) A 
survey of modern France from the Revolutionary 
era through the ttu-bulent 19th century to the 
post-Worid War II recovery. Major themes 
include the social cultural pohtical, and economic 
aspects of modem and contemporary' France. 
428 History of Spain (3) Focuses on political, 
religious, economic, and social aspects of Spain 
from the Roman period to the present. Special 
attention is given to the "Reconquista spirit" and 
the Spanish civil war. 

■ 435 European Intellectual History Since 1800 
(3) A cultural history of ideas in 19th- and early 
20th-centuni- Europe. 

445 Oral History (3) Students select, design, and 
earn' out a project of original historical research, 
recording broadcast-quality oral history interviews 
with elderly informants. 
♦ 450 Intemship in History (1-3) 



■ Culture cluster 

> Diverse communities course 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Honors Program 



451 Women in America (3) American women's 
daily routines, social roles, and search for rights 
and identit)' since Colonial days. Recent goals, val- 
ues, and conflicts. 

455 American Intellectual History (3) Political 
and economic thought, theologi,', science, philoso- 
phy, and hterature. 

458 History of the Cold War (3) Origins and 
evolution of the Cold War with emphasis on the 
rationale for, and objectives of, American foreign 



policy since 1945. Includes an examination ot the 
historical interpretations ot the era. 
460 Field Studies in History (3) A fiiUy super- 
vised learning experience designed to expose stu- 
dents to the culture, artifacts, and research facili- 
ties of a given country' or area. 
462 Social and Cultural History of the United 
States (3) The evolution of American society' with 
emphasis on the impact of improwng material 
conditions in labor, the arts, education, religion, 



social mores, and family life. The changing status 
of women, blacks, and immigrants. 

474 American Religions (3) The changes of 
American religion from the Pilgrims of New 
England to the cults of Cahfornia. 

480 Computer Applications in Historical 
Research (3) Methods of historical research and 
analysis based on the use of personal computers. 



Honors Program 

131 Francis Harvey Green Library 

610-436-2996 

610-436-2620 (fax) 

honors@wcupa.edu (e-mail) 

Kevin W. Dean, Director 

Elizabeth M. Nollen, Assistant Director 

HONORS COUNCIL 

Dena Beeghly, Literacy 
Mehssa Cichowicz, Chemistry 
Diane DeVestern, Student Affairs 
Sandra Fowkes Godek, Sports Medicine 
Benjamin Goldsborough, Student Representative 
Charles Hardy, History 

Marsha Haug, Director of Admissions, ex-officio 
Eugene Klein, Music 
David Levasseur, Communications Studies 
Anne-Marie MoscateUi, Foreign Languages 
Frauke Schnell, Political Science 
Bree Simmons, Student Representative 
Program Design 

We believe that an honors education should instill in students the 
desire to be active, contributing members of their societies. Our mis- 
sion is summarized best in our motto: "To be honorable is to serve." 
The aim of the honors program is to provide an inviting environment for 
academically gifted and highlv motivated students to Interact and form a 
learning communit)' of peers, faculty', administrators, and staft that will 
challenge and enrich the students' college experience. Grounded in the 
liberal arts tradition, the honors program seeks cross-disciplinary' connec- 
tions in order to develop students' natural intellectual abilities and to 
challenge them to emplov those gifts on behalt ot the larger community. 
For this reason, the West Chester University honors program considers 
"honors" to be more than a matter of strong grades. Honors implies a 
decision to use the gift of knowledge as an active problem solver in both 
the campus community and in the world. To that end, the honors pro- 
gram seeks to build character and foster a commitment to lifelong learn- 
ing that prepares leaders for the 21st century. The Honors Council, 
composed of representative faailty, staft, and students, assists the direc- 
tor in formulating and making recommendations about the program. 
Honors program membership comprises students with outstanding 
achievements in scholarship, community service, the arts, and/or leader- 
ship. Membership in honors is competitive with a maximum of 40 addi- 
tional seats open each fall. Current membership includes students from 
39 different academic majors. Incoming freshman and transfer students 
normally are invited to apply to the program if they demonstrate at least 
two of the following: a) minimum high school GPA of 3.5; b) minimum 
SAT score of 1200; c) top 20 percent of graduating class; d) record of 
achievement in high school honors/ AP courses. Candidates are reviewed 
and selected on the basis of commitment to service, leadership potential, 
and fit with the program's philosophy. Currendy enrolled students, who 
have a cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or higher, may apply tor 



membership through the Honors OflSce. Honors seminars at the 
300/400 level are open to all students with a minimum of 3.25 GPA. 
Membership in the honors program enables students to enhance their 
strengths through a specially designed 27-hour core of cross-disciplinary 
courses that, with an additional mathematics or science course, meet 
general education requirements for honors students. Cross-disciplinary 
means that all courses in the core will contain information dra^vn from a 
minimum of two academic disciplines. The 27-hour honors core incor- 
porates 100- and 200-level courses. The three courses at the 100 level, to 
be completed during the student's first year in the program, focus on 
personal development, including physical and psychological well being, 
communication, and ethics and moralit}' in a technological age. Courses 
at the 200 level, completed by the middle of the student's third year, 
build upon the learner's knowledge of self and address broader perspec- 
tives of community and social change. Learners study significant histori- 
cal and contemporary figures, literary works, and the context in which 
they helped model society'. Students become aware of the economic real- 
ities that impact change and discover how educational and political 
stmcture, science, and the fine arts influence society. Honors certification 
is awarded upon completion of the core 27 hoiu-s, two upper-level, cross- 
disciplinarv honors seminars, and a capstone project. Students complet- 
ing the tUl honors program receive designation on their University tran- 
script and the right to wear a medallion of achievement at commence- 
ment. Recognition at commencement is based on the student's academic 
record as of the completed semester prior to commencement. 
In order to be in good standing with the honors program, students 
must maintain a 3.25 cumulative grade point average, be active in a 
minimum of one campus co-curricular activity, and regularly register for 
the sequence of honors core courses and seminars. Failure to maintain 
these requirements will cause the student to be placed on probation 
from honors and may lead to the student's dismissal from the program. 
Program probation and dismissal foUow these procedures: Once a stu- 
dent in the honors program has earned 3 1 credit hours, his or her cumu- 
lative grade point average will be reviewed. If the student's average is 
below a 3.0, the student will be dropped from the program. It a smdent's 
■average is below a 3.25 but not below a 3.0, the smdent will be placed on 
program probation for two semesters during which time the student is 
expected to raise his or her cumulative average to a 3.25. If at the end of 
the two semesters the cumulative average is not a 3.25 or higher, the stu- 
dent will be dismissed from the program. Students also may be placed 
on probation if they are not actively participating in a minimum of one 
campus co-curricular activity or if the)' are not regularly registering for 
and completing the sequence of honors core courses 'and seminars. 
While riie student is on program probation, his or her rights to priority 
scheduling ■will be suspended. No student wiU be eligible for honors cer- 
tification without maintaining a 3.25 cumulative average by the time of 
completion of the honors program's required elements. 
Students dismissed from the honors program may seek reinstatement 
by contacting the honors program director. Smdents may appeal the 
dismissal or probationary' action for extraordinary' circumstances by 
contacting the honors director who will take the appeal before the 
Honors Council for final decision. 



Honors Program 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Honors Supplemental Certification Program. Nonhonors program 
students who have earned a minimum of 45 credits and a minimum 3.25 
cumulative GPA may apply for the supplemental certification program, 
which affords all benefits of fiill program membership. To receive certifi- 
cation, students need to complete a minimum ot 12 hours of honors 
course work at the 300/400 level and demonstrate active contributions 
and service to co-curricular elements of the campus community. It is the 
general practice for a minimum of two 300-level or above courses to be 
offered each semester. These are small group (10-20 students) seminar 
offerings that are interdisciplinary vnth writing emphasis and have no 



prerequisites. Students may petition, on special circumstances, to substi- 
tute an HON 400-level independent studv for three hours of credit. 
The Bonner AmeriCorps Leaders Program. Honors students who 
have successfully completed their first year in the program may qualify 
for a Bonner AmeriCorps service-learning scholarship. An education 
voucher of $1,000 will be awarded to students who verify 300 hours of 
community service during a calendar year. After the successful com- 
pletion of an initial year, students may be eligible for a second schol- 
arship opportunity. Applications are available in the Honors Office. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
HONORS PROGRAMS 

Symbol: HON 

100 Self- Awareness and Development (3) Focus 
on methods individuals use to develop skills in the 
physical, cognitive, emotional, and social aspect of 
life. A holistic approach to both physical and men- 
tal aspects will be addressed. Methods for en- 
hancement and maintenance of strengths will be 
discussed as well as approaches to risk taking. 

101 Decision Making and Public Discourse (3) 
Examination of the role of ethical dialogue and 
debate in public polic\' making of rotating topics 
such as the environment or health care. Emphasis 
on logic and critical thinking as key roles in identi- 
fying problems, devising solutions, and evaluating 
proposed policies. Consistent with the emphasis 
on the public forum, students will develop public 
speaking and critical listening skills. 

102 Ethics and Moral Choice in a Technological 
Age (3) Approaches to ethical recommendation 
and moral decision-making processes. Engage- 
ment of the scientific approach by using case stud- 
ies from genetics, ecology, physics, chemistry, and 
computer science to allow students to confiront 
ways traditional views of ethics and moral decision 
making apply to a contemporary world. 

200 Theories and Strategies of Community 
Change (3) Spectrum of approaches to social change 
and significant figures who make these changes pos- 
sible. Works of historical and sociological literamre. 
Including biographies and autobiographies of key 
figures, will be identified as a basis for observation of 
how thinkers of the past identified key issues and 
articulated solutions to those problems. 

201 Economic Themes in Literature (3) 
Foundations of market and nonmarket economies 
as they relate to good stewardship and civic 
responsibility. Fusing literature and economics, the 
values and limitations of market capitalism and 
command socialism will be addressed. 



202 Educational Systems and Social Influence 

(3) An introducrion to philosophy, history, and 
sociology of American education. The evolution of 
the school as an institution in a democratic society; 
its relationships to issues dealing with race, class, 
gender and ethnicity, the geographical implica- 
tions the school has for the community and vice 
versa; the degree to which school should and/or 
can serve as agents for social change. 

203 American Government, Democracy and Public 
Opinion (3) Influence of the role of public opinion 
in a democracy by examination of how individuals 
form their opinions and how those opinions influ- 
ence goverrunent and public polic)' making. Such 
areas as government structure, political thought, and 
sociologic and geographic influences will be covered. 

204 Science, Technology, and Environmental 
Systems (3) Impact of technology and the envi- 
ronment as forces of Influence on communities. 
The lab course will combine a historical overview 
with a contemporary focus on ways the science 
community is developing and regulating ideas for 
the fiiture. Laboratory field experiences will 
involve data collection and observation in a variety 
of environmental contexts (2,3). 

205 Community and the Arts (3) Investigation of 
the arts as agents of social change and influence. 
Significant historical and.contemporary works 
from art, dance, music, and theatre will be identi- 
fied for case analysis. 

301 Seminar (3) First of two special topics offered 
fall semester. Subject matter rotates and is deter- 
mined by the honors director and the Honors 
Council through competitive submission from 
University faculty. Seminars are designed to be 
interdisciplinary and to have a writing emphasis. 

302 Seminar (3) First of two special topics offered 
spring semester. Subject matter rotates and is 
determined by the honors director and the Honors 
Council through competitive submission from 



University faculty. Seminars are designed to be 
interdisciplinari' and to have a writing emphasis. 

381 Symposium in Arts and Humanities (3) 
Investigation of leadership issues as they are found 
within special topics in the arts and humanities. 

382 Symposium in Social and Behavioral 
Sciences (3) Investigation of leadership issues as 
they are found within special topics in the social 
and behavioral sciences. 

383 Symposium in the Sciences (3) Investigation 
of leadership issues as they are found within spe- 
cial topics in the sciences. 

401 Seminar (3) Second of two special topics 
offered fall semester. Subject matter rotates and is 
determined by the honors director and the Honors 
Council through competitive submission from 
University faculty. Seminars are designed to be 
interdisciplinary and to have a writing emphasis. 

402 Seminar (3) Second of two special topics 
offered spring semester. Subject matter rotates and 
is determined by the honors director and the 
Honors Council through competitive submission 
from University faculty. Seminars are designed to 
be interdisciplinan,' and to have a writing emphasis. 
480 Senior Project (3) Swdents identify and/or 
investigate a topic for in-depth study that involves 
a crossdiscipUnan' inquirv approach. 

490 Capstone Project (3) Students will identify 
and investigate a problem in a community business, 
nonprofit agency, or research laboratory, and then 
work to solve the problem. Smdents will be expect- 
ed to play an active role in the problem-solving 
effort and contribute a minimum ot ten hours each 
week to help solve the problem. Students will seek 
interaction with the CEO, senior officer(s), and/or 
senior investigators of the business, agency, or lab- 
orator)', who will serve as leader models for student 
studv. While projects are generally completed in 
the senior year, students may register for this 
course upon completion of the 27-hour core or by 
special permission of the honors program director. 



Interdisciplinary Programs 

West Chester University offers three interdisciplinary programs 
leading to a bachelor of arts degree: 

American Studies 

Comparative Literature Studies 

Women's Studies 
West Chester also offers five interdisciplinary programs leading to 
transcript recognition: 



Ethnic Studies Peace and Conflict Studies 

Latin American Studies Russian Studies 

Linguistics 
These programs give students the opportunity to develop a syn- 
thesis of knowledge from several disciplines. See individual pro- 
grams for course sequences. 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



Interdisciplinary' Programs: American Studies 



American Studies Program 

500 xMain Hall 
610-436-2681 

AMERICAN STUDIES COMMITTEE 

Karin E. Gedge, History 

Charles A. Hard\', History 

Sterling E. Murray, Music History 

C. James Trotman, English 

Richard J. Webster, History, Coordinator 

Students are introduced to a broad spectrum ot ^"Vmerican culture, and are 

encouraged to %xud\ an area in depth and to develop career interests 

through concentrations in American art histon', African-American studies, 

historic presen-ation, environmental studies, journalism and editing, and 

museum studies. An optional internship provides on-the-job experience. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS — AMERICAN STUDIES 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Foreign Language/Culture Requirements 0-15 semester hours 

3. Required Core 21-30 semester hours 
AMS 200 (3) 

AMS 367 (3) 

AMS 400 (3) or AMS 415 (1-15) 

HIS 151-152 (6) 

LIT 200-201 (6) 



4. Elective Core 18 semester hours 
Six American-topic courses are to be taken in 
anthropolog)', art history, geography, histor)', 

literature, music historv- and literature, philosophy, 
political science, and sociology', with no more 
than two courses from one discipline. 

5. Elective Concentration 

A smdent must take enough courses to ensure that a minimum of 
120 semester hours are completed successflillv. Each American 
smdies major must submit for approval a proposed course of smdy 
at the beginning ot the junior vear. For guidance consult the 
^Ajnerican studies program coordinator. 

Minor in American Studies 18 semester hours 

For transcript recognition of an American studies minor, a student 
must take 18 semester hours allocated in the foUo\%ing areas: 
American Smdies (6) 

American Histon-, preferably HIS 151 or HIS 152 (3) 
American Literature, preferabl)' LIT 200 or LIT 201 (3) 
American topics: One course from the arts, literature, or philosophy, 
and one course from histon,- or social and behavioral sciences, or 
other courses approved by the adviser. (6) 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
AMERICAN STUDIES 

Sv-mbol: AMS 

# 200 American Civilization (3) An interdiscipli- 
narv- study ot the forces, forms, and values that 
have contributed to the making of American civi- 
lization. Sev-eral academic discipUnes are drawn 
upon in exploring the "Americaness" of American 
institutions, thought, behavior, and material cul- 
ture. 

#210 Mass Media and Popular Culture (3) An 
e.vploration of the role ot media in the develop- 
ment of American popular culture. Particular 
emphasis will be given to the transformations 
brought about bv mass media after 1880 and the 



increasing corporate involvement in mass media 
during the 20th centurj-. 

# 250 Myths and Modernization (3) An interdis- 
ciplinarv- exploration ot American ci\ilization dur- 
ing three stages of development from Columbus to 
the present. Focuses on anal)-sis of civic and popu- 
lar culture to decode mvths ot national idenritv' 
and the media in which they are disseminated. 
367 American Material Culture (3) An interdis- 
ciplinarv- study of .'\merican civilization through 
the examination of its buUt environment and craft- 
ed and manufactured artifacts from the Colonial 
period to the mid-20th centurv-. 
371 Manhood in America (3) Examines 
American manhood from 1600 present. Focuses 



on intersections of class, race, and gender; rela- 
tions between private and public spheres; changing 
men's experiences over time. 

400 Senior Thesis or Project (3) A concluding 
"statement" incorporating the interdisciplinary 
generalist approach. 

401 Independent Study (1-3) An opportunitv' to 
pursue altemativ-e study projects outside the class- 
room; field work in communitv- resources, etc. 

♦ 415 American Studies Internship (1-15) 
Cooperative, service/learning experience at a com- 
munitv- agencv-, business, or institution. 

♦ .Approved interdisciplinan- course 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Comparative Literature Studies Program 

537 Main HaU 

610-436-3101/2822 

Geetha Ramanathan, Coordinator 

gramanatha@vvcupa.edu 

PROFESSORS: K. Myrsiades, L. MjTsiades, Ramanathan, 

Schlau 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Awuyah, Ward 
PROGRAM FACULTY: Esplugas, Larsen, Maltby, Verderame 
This program provides a curricidum option for students with an inter- 
est in international studies bv offering a broad background in 
European and non- Western cidture and literamre. 
This program is responsive to recent developments in professional 
business, law, and medical schools, which stress admission of smdents 
with humanities backgrounds or humanities complements to their sci- 
entific or technical backgrounds, and it reflects the growth of profes- 
sional school programs that include more options in the humanities. 
More specifically, this program is designed to answer student requests 
for a program that supplies a greater breadth of literature than is com- 
monly offered in a language program and a greater variet)' than that 
offered in an English department. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS — COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE STUDIES 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 

2. Foreign Language Requirement 3- 
(Culture cluster option cannot be substituted 
for foreign language requirement.) 

3. Concentration or Minor Electives 

4. Cognate Requirements 
Under advisement 

5. Comparative Literamre Core 
CLS 200 or equivalent, 201 or 367 or 368, 261, 
310 or equivalent, and 400 

6. Comparative Literamre Electives 
Five electives that reflect a variety of genres, 
periods, traditions, approaches, and theoretical 
concerns, selected from those courses listed 
below. Students wishing to take courses other 
than those courses listed below must have the 
written approval of the Comparative Literature 
Committee. 



48 semester hours 
12 semester hours 



18 semester hours 
6 semester hotu-s 

15 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



Interdisciplinary Programs; Comparative Literature Studies 



College of Arts and Sciences 



7. Literature in the Original Language 6 semester hours 

Two courses in the literature of a language 
other than English. 

Minor in Comparative Literature 18 semester hours 

'Select ONE course in each of the areas hsted below. 

1. Literature and the other arts 
CLS 201, 304, 365, 368, or 370 

2. Theory, intellectual history, or literary criticism 
CLS 310 or 352 

3. Theme, genre, or movement 
CLS 258, 259, 361, or 362 

4. Relationship, influence, or intertextuality 
CLS 304, 309, 363, 367, or 400 

5. Non- Western literature or literature in a language 
other than English 

CLS255, 400, 411 



6. Women's Literature 

CLS 258, 259, or 304 
NOTE: Not all course numbers available for each categor)' above are 
listed. Please check with the comparative literature studies coordinator 
in 537 Main Hall (610-436-2915) for other possible substitutions. 

Minor in Film Criticism 18 semester hours 

1. Required Course 3 semester hours 
ELM 200 

2. Elective Courses 15 semester hours 
Any 15 credits selected from the follovvdng list with approval of the 
adviser: 

CLS 304, 363, 364, 368, 369, 400, and 410; COM 217 and 317; 
EGE 404, 405; EIT 260; ELM 201, 202, 300, 301, and 400 



For course descriptions, see English and Foreign Language sections in this 
catalog. For related departments other than English or Foreign Languages, 
consult the Handbook for Comparative Literature Studies available from the 
program coordinator. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 
STUDIES 

Symbol: CLS 

► 165 Introduction to World Literature (3) This 
course is designed to introduce students to litera- 
ture representative of both Western and non- 
Western cultures and can be taken as an alterna- 
tive to LIT 165. Not open to English majors. 

# 201 Classical Mythology in the 20th Century 
(3) Classical myths and their significance in select- 
ed works of literature, film, and art. 

t 203 African Studies (3) This course studies 
African culture through literature, anthropology, 
and history. It focuses on the socio-cultural and 
historical contexts of African writing through the 
colonial and postcolonial periods. 
225 Twentieth Century Native American 
Literature (3) This course investigates the struggle 
of the Native American author to represent his/her 
own cultural experience as a voice. 
1 258 Women's Literature I (3) A survey of world 
women's literature from 800 B.C. - 1800. 
Readings are chosen from the works of Sappho, 
Diotima, Mutta, Auvaiyar, Sei Shonagan, Sule 
Sankavya, Murasaki, Hildegard, von Bingen, 
Mirabai, Marguerite de Navarre, Phillis Wheatley, 
Aphra Behn, Madame de Stael, Jane Austen, and 
Fanny Burney among others. 

► 259 Women's Literature II (3) A survey of wom- 
en's literature &om 1 800 to the present. Readings 
are chosen from the works of Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. 
Wells, Charlotte Bronte, Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, 
Marguerite Duras, Christa Wolf, Merce Rodoreda, 
Jamaica Kincaid, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Alifa Rifaat, 
Louise Erdrich, Cherrie Moraga, Maxine Hong 
Kingston, and Arundati Roy among others. 

1 260 World Literature I (3) A survey of world 
literary texts from pre-classical times to 1600. 
261 World Literature II (3) A survey of world lit- 
erary texts from 1600 to the present. 

# 270 Life, Death, and Disease (3) A course treat- 
ing the study of literary works, film, and selected 
readings from other areas (history, science, fiction, 
and nonfiction) to generate an understanding of 
the relationship of human values to medicine, ill- 
ness, and issues ot related importance to physicians. 

# 297 Themes in Contemporary Literature (3) 
Topics to be announced each time course is offered. 
304 Women and Film (3) An examination of the 
role of women in contemporary world cinema and 
the feminist film. 



309 Literature Translation Workshop (3) A 

writing workshop on the theory and practice of lit- 
erary translation. 
H311 Contemporary Latin-American Narrative 

(3) An examination ot Latin-American narrative 
(short story, novella, novel, and testimonial litera- 
ture). Spanish- and Portuguese-language writers 
from South and Central America, Mexico, and the 
Caribbean will be studied, from the period of 
magical realism (1950's and 1960's) through the 
present. They may include Isabel Allende, Jorge 
Amado, Miguel Angel Asturias, Jorg Luis Borges, 
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Clarice Lispector, Elena 
Poniatowska, and Luis Rafael Sanchez. 

# 329 Gender and Peace (3) An examination of the 
ways in which social constructions of gender intersect 
wath perceptions and experiences of war and peace. 

333 Latina Writing (3) An examination of the lit- 
erary works produced by Latinas in the 20th cen- 
tury. The study ot this literature will include a 
cross-cultural approach that will elucidate socipo- 
Utical themes emerging from the texts. 

334 Politics and Economics in the Literature of 
the Modem Americas (3) A comparative historical 
and literary examination of poUucal and economic 
issues reflected in 20th century U.S. and Latin 
American literature. The study of representative 
texts of various genres will also elucidate issues of 
race, class, and gender. 

350 Computer Applications in the Humanities 
(3) This course is designed to provide an introduc- 
tion to the computer and its applications in a num- 
ber of humanistic disciplines (literature, history, 
and writing, but some attention also will be given 
to foreign languages, linguistics, music, and art). 

351 African Literature (3) A study of the repre- 
sentation of Africa through the perspectives of 
African and non-African writers. 

# 352 Modemity/Postmodemity (3) A critical 
analysis ot the modernity/postmodernity debates 
from the integrated perspectives of literature, phi- 
losophy, history, and politics. 

361 Modem World Drama (3) This course seeks 
to develop and to extend an understanding of the 
basic elements of drama. The student will be 
exposed to a range of theatrical practices and 
diverse traditions of world drama. 

362 Modem World Fiction (3) This course seeks 
to develop and to extend an understanding of the 
basic elements of fiction. The student will be 
exposed to a range of fictional practices and 
diverse traditions of world fiction. 



363 Soviet Literature and Film (3) A compara- 
tive approach to selected 20th century Soviet 
works of fiction, poetry, drama, and film. 
365 African-American Film (3) This course will 
study the history, form, and content of African- 
American film. The fdms chosen are from various 
genres and cover older and contemporary films. 
I 367 Classical Mythology (3) An examination of 
Greek mythology through the works of Homer, 
Hesiod, the Greek tragedians, and Greek lyric poets. 

# 368 Culture, Myth, and Society (3) An exami- 
nation of how the culture, mythology, and politics 
of ancient Greece from Homer to Plato determine 
how a period is represented through its literary, 
historical, and philosophical te.xts and how con- 
temporary culture rewrites these te.xts. 

369 Literature and Film (3) The interrelationship 
between selected works of world fiction and their 
film adaptations. 

# 371 Law, Literature, and Conununication (3) 
A look at the presentational aspects of law — legal 
writing and oral argument — its constructions in 
narrative — law as literature and literature as law — 
and the relationship of law to anthropologj', psy- 
chology, history, and sociology. 

^ 400 Comparative Literature Seminar (3) 
Topics such as Homer and the modern Western 
race and legal narrative, interrelations of African 
and African-American literature, sexual politics in 
modern drama, and visual culture in Third World 
fdm are offered. Required of comparative literature 
majors in their junior or senior year. 

♦ 410 Independent Study in Comparative 
Literature (3) 

♦ 411 Foreign Study in Comparative 
Literature (3) 

FILM THEORY AND CRITICISM 

Symbol: ELM 

200 Introduction to Film (3) A critical and ana- 
lytical approach to world cinema covering film 
theory and the major fdm movements (Soviet 
Realism, German Expressionism, Italian Neo- 
Realism, French New Wave, Cinema Nuovo, New 
German Cinema, and Surrealism) from the begin- 
ning to present. (Group E)** 

201 American Film (3) The function of cinema in 
contemporary society as a socio-cultural, econom- 



I Diverse communities course 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 
■ Culture cluster 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Interdisciplinary Programs: Latin-American Studies 




ic, and political object as seen through critical 
analysis of American films. (Group E)** 
300 Private Screening (1) Eight to 12 narrative film 
classics per semester on a specific topic or theme. 



301 Documentary Film (3) Understanding and 
enjoying the social, philosophic, economic, and 
poUtical aspects of documentary film. (Group E)* 



See the department handbook for group descriptions. 



Ethnic Studies Program 



201 Old Library 

610-436-2725 

Bonita Freeman-Witthoft, Director and Native-American Coordinator 

William I. Guy, Assistant Director and Program Coordinator 

C. James Trotman, African-American Coordinator 

Stacey Schlau, Hispanic-American Coordinator 

Jonathan Friedman, Jewish-American Coordinator 

STEERING COMMITTEE 

Marshall J. Becker, Anthropology 

Erminio Braidotti, Foreign Languages 

Andrew E. Dinniman, Educational Services 

Charles Hardy, History 

William L. Hewitt, History 

Frank J. Hoffman, Philosophy 

Mildred C. Joyner, Social Work 

Deborah Malstedt, Psychology 

Bhim Sandhu, Political Science 

Richard W. Voss, Social Work 

Jerome M. Williams, Foreign Languages 

The Ethnic Studies Institute (ESI) offers a minor and a certificate to any 

student, regardless ot major, who satisfactorily completes 18 semester 

hours of work in ethnic studies. Study may lead to a general certificate in 

ethnic studies or to a specialized certificate in one ot the following areas: 

• African-American Studies • Jewish-American Studies 

• Hispanic-American Studies • Native-American Studies 
For current requirements and a list of approved courses in each spe- 
cialization, consult the director or assistant director of ethnic studies. 
For each option currently offered there are, in addition to the relevant 
ethnic studies core courses, certain cognate courses. These cognate 



courses do not necessarily deal directly with ethnic group life but give 
an added dimension of social and historical background. 
As soon as possible, students should register their intent to earn the 
minor with the assistant director of the ESI. At the end of each semes- 
ter, students should report the ethnic-related courses completed during 
the semester and the courses planned for the following semester to the 
assistant director. An updated list of courses approved for credit is 
available each semester from the ESI before the advising and schedul- 
ing period. Students can use an approved ethnic-related course toward 
the completion of the minor in Ethnic Studies at the same time it is 
being used to fulfdl their major, other minor, or elective requirements. 
Students are encouraged to attend at least two cultural ethnic events - 
speakers, musical programs, art shows, theatre productions, or films - 
each year. 

For advising in ethnic studies, contact William I. Guy, 610-436-2698, 
or wguy#wcupa.edu. 

Minor in Holocaust Studies 18 semester hours 

The program in Holocaust Studies deals not only with historical 

aspects of the Holocaust, but also with moral and political issues 

involved in the prevention of future holocausts. 

This minor may be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts 

or bachelor of science in liberal studies general degree program. For 

advising in Holocaust studies, contact Dr. Jonathan Friedman, 610- 

436-2972. 



1. 



9 semester hours 



9 semester hours 



Required Courses 

HIS 332, 349, and PHI 180 

Elective Courses 

Any three courses selected from the following: 

ANT 120; GER 221/EGE 222; HIS 423; LIT 304; PSC 252, 

322; PSY 254; SOC 335; SSC 385, 480; or SWO 225 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ETHNIC STUDIES 

Symbol: SSC 

#201 Global Perspectives (3) This course is 
intended to help students develop the competencies 



needed for the understanding of, and meaningfiil 
participation in, the world issues of the 1990's. 
♦ 480 Ethnic Cultures Workshop (3) This work- 
shop considers the history, traditions, customs, and 
contributions to American life of various ethnic 
groups. The lectures and special programs are 



designed to increase the student's knowledge of the 
multicultural nature of American society. Projects, 
specifically tailored to individual needs, are directed 
by a faculty member of the Ethnic Studies Institute. 



# Approved interdisciplinary course 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Latin-American Studies Program 

111 Main Hall 
610-436-2372 

Erminio Braidotti, Coordinator 

Any student in the University, regardless of his or her area of specializa- 
tion, may earn a minor and a letter of verification in Latin- American 
studies after satisfactory completion of 18 semester hours of work, dis- 
tributed as follows: 

Minor in Latin-American Studies 

Required: Either A or B 18 semester hours 

A. 1. Spanish or Portuguese 6 semester hours 
(Intermediate level or above) 

2. Latin-American history 6 semester hours 

3. Electives 6 semester hours 



OR 
B. 1. Latin-American history 6 semester hours 

2. Latin-American culture, politics, geography 6 semester hours 

3. Electives 6 semester hours 
Selected under advisement from Latin- American-oriented courses 
offered by the departments of Anthropology and Sociology, 
Geography and Planning, Political Science, Economics, Art, or oth- 
ers. In track A, one three-credit course must be devoted to literature, 
art history, or music. 

For advising, see Dr. Braidotti in the Department of Foreign 

Languages. 

A student should maintain a 2.5 average in area-studies courses to be 

recommended for graduate work in the area-studies concentration. 



U Interdisciplinary' Programs: Peace and Conflict Studies 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Linguistics Program 



538 Main Hall 

610-436-2269 

Dennis L. Godfrey, Coordinator 

CONTRIBUTING FACULTY 

W. Stephen Croddy, Philosophy 

Stephen D. Gilmour, Foreign Languages 

Charles E. Grove, Foreign Languages 

Jane E. Jeffrey, English 

Cheri L. Micheau, English 

Garrett G. Molholt, English 

Frederick R. Fatten, Foreign Languages 

Paul A. StoUer, Anthropology and Sociology 

Andrea Varricchio, Foreign Languages 

Michael S. Weiss, Communicative Disorders 

The minor in linguistics is an interdisciplinary program offered by the 

departments of Anthropolog}' and Sociology, Communicative Disorders, 

Communication Studies, English, Foreign Languages, and Philosophy. 

Its purpose is to provide the student with a foundation in the analysis of 

the various aspects of language. Students wishing to enter the program 

must consult the program coordinator. To receive credit for the minor in 

linguistics, a student must complete 18 semester hours of course work. 

The program coordinator must approve all courses. 



Minor in Linguistics 



1 



18 semester hours 

9 semester hours 



9 semester hours 



Required Courses 

ENG/LIN 230, ENG 331 (or any other 

structural grammar course), ENG 335 (or 

any other historical linguistics course) 

Electives 

A. Choose one of the following: 

ENG 330, ERE 365, GER 365, RUS 365, 
SPA 365, SPP 106, or any other approved 
course in phonology or phonetics 
Choose one of the following: 
ANT/LIN 380; COM/LIN 415; ENG 339, 
340; LIN 250; PHyLIN 330, 360; or any 
other approved comparable course 
Choose an additional course from either 
Group A or B above, or choose one of the fol- 
lowing: 

COM 307; ENG 430; LIN 411, 412; LIT 
430, 431; PHI 190, 436; PHY 110; SPP 204; 
or any other approved linguistics course 
For course descriptions, see anthropology and sociology (ANT), com- 
municative disorders (SPP), communication studies (COM), English 
(ENG or LIT), foreign languages (LAN, LIN, ERE, GER, RUS, or 
SPA), philosophy (PHI), or physics (PHY). 



B. 



C. 



Peace and Conflict Studies Program 

101 Main Hall 

610-436-2754 

Frederick R. Struckmeyer, Coordinator 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Charles Bauerlein, English 

Roger Bove, Economics and Finance 

Robin Garrett, Nursing and Director, Women's Center 

Harvey Greisman, Sociology 

Tom Heston, History 

Barbara Kauffman, Criminal Justice 

Carol Radich, Elementary Education 

Bhim Sandhu, Political Science 

Stacey Schlau, Foreign Languages 

Peace and conflict studies examines social conflict, conflict resolution, 

and cooperation at the group, national, and international levels. This 

process involves understanding factors that contribute to peace with 

justice, various functions of conflict, and processes by which conflict 

may be managed. The minor fosters skills for both study and action. 

Though primarily an enrichment to liberal education, this minor is 

relevant to a variety of careers, both traditional and emerging. The 

former include law, communications, education, and government. 

However, there are also many career opportunities with a wide range 

of public interest and advocacy organizations. 



The peace and conflict studies minor consists of 18 credit hours, some 
of which also may be used to ftilfiU other degree requirements. This 
minor may be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts or 
bachelor of science in liberal studies general degree program. 

Minor in Peace and Conflict Studies 18 semester hours 



1. 



3 semester hours 



4. 



5. 



3 semester hours 



3 semester hours 



3 semester hours 



Required Course 
SSC 200 

Either of the following 
SSC 201, or PSC 316 
Either of the following 
HISAVOS 329, or 
PHI 207 

Either of the following 
COM 204, or 
COM 216 

Electives 6 semester hours 

Must be from different departments or disciplines. These include 
BIO 102; COM 312 and 499; CRJ 470; GEO 232; HIS 332, 352, 
and 362; LIT 162 and 309; PHI 210, 482; PSC 315; PSY 254; 
SOC 335, 341, and 376; SWO 225; WOS 315. Other courses, 
under advisement, also may satisfy the elective requirement, as well 
as substitute for the PSC 316 option in #2 above. (PHI is recom- 
mended.) 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 

PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES 

SjTnbol: SSC 



# SSC 200 Introduction to Peace and Conflict 
Studies (3) An interdisciplinary study of the caus- 
es and functions of societal conflict and processes 



of controlling conflict, witfi major attention given 
to the problem of violence. 



# Approved interdisciplinary course 



School ot Health Sciences 



Kinesiology' 



Russian Studies Program 

114 Main Hall 
610-436-2585 

Frederick Patton, Coordinator 

This program is offered joindy by the faculty of arts and sciences and 
the faculty ot professional studies. 

Any student in the University, regardless of his or her area of special- 
ization, may earn a minor specialization in Russian studies after satis- 
factory completion of 18 semester hours of work, distributed as fol- 
lows: 

Minor in Russian Studies 18 semester hours 

Required: Either A or B 

A. 1. Russian language (intermediate level 6 semester hours 

or above) 
2. Russian histor\' and/or politics 6 semester hours 

OR 



B. 1. Russian history and/or politics 6 semester hours 
2. Russian civihzation, culture 6 semester hours 

and/or poUtics 
To fixLfiU requirements for the Russian studies minor, students may 
choose from the following courses: CLS 363, 364; ERU 209; GEO 
304; HIS 324, 425; PSC 246, 311, 349; and RUS 201-412, 310. 

C. Electives 6 semester hours 
Selected under ad\isement from Russian-oriented courses offered 
by the departments of Anthropology and Sociology, Art, English, 
Pohtical Science, or other departments of WCU. 

For advising, see Professor Patton in the Department of Foreign 

Languages. 

A student should maintain a 3.0 average in area-studies courses to be 

recommended for graduate work in the area-studies concentration. 



Women's Studies Program — See Women's Studies 



Department of Kinesiology 

206 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center 

610-436-2260 

Emlyn Jones, Chairperson 

Frances E. Clehnd, Assistant Chairperson — Health and Physical 

Education - Teacher Certification 
W. Craig Stevens, Assistant Chairperson — Exercise Science, 

Coordinator of Graduate Studies 
Barbara Lappano, Coordinator of Dance 
PROFESSOR: Lepore 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Cleland, Fry, HeHon, 

Koehler, Smith, Stevens, V^olkwein, Williams 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Jones, Lappano, Melton, Ottley, 

Ray, Studlien-Webb, Thielz, Zetts 
INSTRUCTOR: Ranck 

The Department ot Kinesiolog}- offers two programs leading to the 
bachelor of science degree. 

1. The B.S. in HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION- 
TEACHER CERTinCATION. This program prepares students 
to teach health and physical education in preschool through grade 12. 

2. The B.S. in HE.\LTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION- 
EXERCISE SCIENCE. The purpose of the exercise science spe- 
cialist (ESS) program is to prepare students for positions in the 
growing and multifaceted tield of health and fitness or to gain 
admission into various professional and graduate programs. In addi- 
tion, students will be prepared for success in appropriate certification 
e.xaminations. The primary focus ot the ESS program is for each 
student to develop abilities and master knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to provide leadership on the health and fitness fields as well as 
be a successftil member of society. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION— TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Kinesiology Foundations 6 semester hours 
KIN 103, 285 

3. Pedagog}' Core 12 semester hours 
KIN 205, 300*, 302*, 402* 

4. Applied Sciences 9 semester hours 
KIN 241, 361, 363 



10 semester hours 



5 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



12 semester hours 



5. Activity Modules 
KIN 102, 201, 301, 303, 401 

6. Related PDE Requirements 
SMD 271, KIN 347 

7. Health Education 
HEA 230, 303, 304, 306*, 440* 

8. Capstone Courses 
KIN 489*, 490* 

9. One extracurricular credit experience required for formal admis- 
sion; two additional experiences required prior to student teaching. 

10. GPA Requirement 

Students must maintain the required GPA in accordance with the 
criteria for formal admission to teacher education program. See the 
"Teaching Certification Programs" section in this catalog, pages 
145-147. 

11. Certification granted when the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education requirements are met. 

Please be advised that the required course work for a degree in health 
and physical education at West Chester University consists of 120 
semester hours ot study. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— EXERCISE SCIENCE 
SPECIALIST* 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Related Requirements 13 semester hours 
BIO 259, 269; HEA 303; SMD 271 

3. Exercise Science Requirements 57 semester hours 
Exercise Science Core (24 semester hours) 

EXS 100, 180, 251, 261, 270, 282, 375 
Adaptations in Exercise Science (15 semester hours) 

EXS 381, 382, 486, 489 
Applications in E.xercise Science (9 semester hours) 

EXS 384, 490 
Electives in Exercise Science 

Nine or more semester hours to complete 

120 semester hours 



'Students entering in the fall of 2003 or later as an exercise science specialist 
should refer to the courses identified by the EXS prefix. Students who entered 
prior to the fall of 2003 arc in the fitness specialist program and should choose 
from the courses identified by the KIN prefix. 



Kinesiolog)- 



School ot Health Sciences 



4. One extracurricular experience required by the completion of 60 
credits; two additional experiences required prior to internship. 

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 

Adapted Physical Activity 

Required: KIL 362 and KIN 360, 362, and 457 

Driver-Safety Education 12 semester hours 

(State Certification) 

West Chester offers certification in Driver and Traffic Safety 
Education through the Chester County Intermediate Unit. 
Completion of the following program will enable teachers to endorse 
their teaching certificates within this area. Upon completion of course 
requirements, the student must apply for the endorsement through 
the office of the dean of the School of Education. 
Required: KIN 355, KIN 356, KIN 450, and KIN 456. NOTE: This 
program meets state certification requirements for driver and traffic 
safety education. 

Minor in Coaching 15-18 semester hours 

Those students who successfully complete the program at West 
Chester earn a transcript and written endorsement from the School of 
Health Sciences attesting to school administrators that recipients have 
attained basic preparation for coaching. 

Behavioral competencies in the theoretical foundations of coaching, 
skill acquisition, and management techniques also are required. 
Course offerings at the undergraduate and graduate levels are avail- 
able. The program is open to any person who applied for admission 
through the program adviser. Dr. John Helion. Applicants should 
direct inquiries to that office for a coaching minor brochure. 
Minor in Dance 21 semester hours 

To fulfill this program of study, all dance minor students are required 
to take 21 credits in the dance curriculum. Students should follow 
requirements as listed under core, technique, and performance courses. 
Further requirements include the following: 1) involvement in the per- 
formance area for a minimum of two years which can be accomplished 
for credit as a dancer, choreographer, officer, or production assistant; 
2) serving as a teaching assistant in a Level I technique class with 
assignment from the dance coordinator; 3) recording all course work in 



a portfolio that will be presented to the dance coordinator at the con- 
clusion of the course of study. Auditions are not required for admit- 
tance into the program; however, each applicant has the responsibility 
of meeting with the dance coordinator each semester before registra- 
tion begins. Applicants must obtain and complete a minor registration 
form through the Office of the Registrar for transcript recognition. 
NOTE: Students who choose to fulfill their art requirement 
through the dance curriculum must do so as follows: 
Core and Performance Courses 

Required: 

KIN 344 History of Dance (3) 

Elective - choose six semester hours 

KIN 215 Dance Pedagogy (3) 

KIN 346 Repertory Development (2) 

KIN 441 Dance Composirion (3) 

KIN 442 Musical Theatre Dance and Choreography (3) 
Technique Courses (choose a minimum of eight semester hours) 

PEA 232 Modern Dance II (2) 

PEA233JazzDanceII(2) 

PEA234BaUetII(2) 

PEA 235 Tap Dance II (2) 

PEA 332 Modern Dance III (2) 

PEA 334 Ballet III (Pointe) (2) 
Performance Courses (choose a minimum of four semester hours) 

KIN 345 Dance Production Workshop (2) 

KIN 346 Repertory Development (2) 

KIN 446 Repertory Development (2) 

Facilities 

The department is housed on West Chester University's South 
Campus in the Russell L. Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center. The 
SHSC features the following indoor facilities: four fiiU-size, multipur- 
pose gymnasiums; two fiillv equipped gymnastics g}'ms; dance studio; 
wrestling room; strength training facUit}'; human performance labora- 
tory; climbing wall; 17 classrooms; aquatics center featuring two pools 
and a 14.5-foot diving well. Outdoor facilities include multipurpose 
playing fields, tennis courts, Softball fields/baseball fields, quarter-mile 
track, and two outdoor ropes courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
ACTIVITY COURSES 

Symbol: PEA (2) (2) 

The following courses incorporate the compo- 
nents of fitness with specific activities designed 
to provide students with the knowledge and 
participatory skills necessary to achieve and 
enjoy keeping fit and well for life. These PEA 
courses will meet the general education elec- 
tive requirement. The first number in paren- 
theses shows the number of class meetings per 
week; the second number shows the semester 
hours of credit. Courses with only one number 
show semester hours of credit. 

100 Basic Swimming (nonswimmers) (2) (2) 

101 Swim for Fitness (2) (2) 

106 Canoeing (2) (2) 

107 Orienteering (2) (1) 
110 Cycle Touring (2) (1) 

♦ 1 15 Physical Conditioning (2) (2) 

116 Personal Defense (2) (2) 

117 Karate (2) (2) 

120 Fitness Through Badminton (2) (2) 
123 Fitness Through Golf (2) (2) 
125 Fitness Through Gymnastics (2) (2) 
128 Fitness Through Tennis (2) (2) 



129 Fitness Through Basketball (2) (2) 

130 Softball as a Lifetime Activity (2) (2) 

131 VoUeybaU and a Fitness Lifestyle (2) (2) 

132 Modem Dance I (3) (3) 

133 Jazz Dance I (3) (3) 

134 Ballet I (3) (3) 

135 Tap Dance I (2) (2) 

136 Fitness for Life (2) (2) 

137 Strength Training (2) (2) 

140 Aerobic Dance Fitness (2) (2) 

141 Water Fitness (2) (2) 

142 Yoga (2) (2) 

228 Advanced Tennis (2) (2) 

232 Modem Dance II (2) (2) 

233 Jazz Dance II (2) (2) 

234 Ballet II (2) (2) 

235 Tap Dance 11 (2) (2) 

236 Developing Personal Fitness Programs (1) 
(2) This course, designed for nontraditional stu- 
dents and students with disabilities, provides an 
understanding of the scientific basis ot physical fit- 
ness. The course is intended to help each student 
develop a personal fitness profile and subsequent 
program of physical activity that will result in 
healthful living. The course will make use of prac- 
tical experience and actual participation in fitness 
activities. Individual programs will be emphasized. 
332 Modem Dance III (2) (2) 



334 BaUetlll— Pointe(2)(2) 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
KINESIOLOGY 

These courses are for kinesiology majors only, with 
the followfing exceptions: elementary education 
majors, early childhood education majors, sports 
medicine majors, and special education majors. 

The first number in parentheses shows the number 
of class meetings per week; the second one shows 
the semester hours of credit. Courses with only 
one number show semester hours of credit. 

EXERCISE SCIENCE 

Symbol: EXS 

100 Foundations of Exercise Science (3) (3) An 

introductory course to the disciplines and profes- 
sions within exercise science enabling students to 
understand and appreciate the discipline, help guide 
their career choices, and prepare them for faculty 
expectations, program demands, and professional 
responsibilities of an e.xercise science specialist. 
180 Lifetime Fitness Concepts (3) (3) Designed to 
teach students key elements involved in achieving a 
healthy lifestyle. Taught from a holistic view that 
total or optimal health is comprised ot a healthy 
body, mind, and spirit which is accomplished 
through a combination of techmques. 



♦ This course may be talten again for credit. 



School of Health Sciences 



Kinesiology 



251 Measurement and Evaluation (3) (4) Covers 

the fundamentals ot measurement and evaluation 
emphasizing the link between valid assessments and 
decision making in exercise science, health, and 
physical education. Application in each learning 
domain is covered, with an emphasis on health-relat- 
ed physical fimess assessment. PREREQ^ EXS 282. 
261 Kinesiology (3) (4) Students will develop a 
fundamental understanding of selected mechanical 
and anatomical laws ot motion, actions caused by 
forces, and their apphcation to the study of 
mechanical structure and analysis of motion. 
Students will be able to use and apply these princi- 
ples to various forms of movement. PREREQi 
PHY 100, BIO 259, 269. 
270 Motor Development and Learning (3) (3) 
An introduction to human hfespan development 
within the motor domain. The content specifically 
addresses the American College ot Sports 
Medicine (ACSM) competency and institutional 
requirements. 

282 Exercise Physiology (3) (4) Introduces stu- 
dents to the theorj' and apphcation of exercise sci- 
ence ph>"siologTr' through lectures, class discussions, 
and lab experiences. 

362 Introduction to Exercise Physiology (3) (3) 
Builds on the physiological concepts introduced in 
KIN 241. Students will be required to apply these 
physiological principles to ph\'5ical education, exer- 
cise, and sport. E.\amines how the human body 
fiinctions in relationship to health, fitness, and per- 
formance, as well as the impact (response and 
adaptation) that physical work and exercise has on 
the human body. 

375 Exercise Psychology (3) (3) An introduction 
to psychological aspects ot exercise designed to 
complement the anatomical and physiological sub- 
stance of the physical fitness speciahst curriculum. 
Content specifically addresses ACSM organiza- 
tional evaluation and knowledge, skills, and abih- 
ties that are set out in the competency' require- 
ments ot the Guidelines for Exercise Testing and 
prescription. PREREQ^ EXS 270, PSY 100. 
CONCURRENT: EXS 251. 

381 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescrip- 
tion (3) (4) Designed to prepare students to assess 
health-related physical fitness using laboratory and 
field tests. Test results used to prepare individual- 
ized exercise prescriptions to improve cardio-vas- 
cular endurance, muscular fitness, body composi- 
tion, and fle.xibihtv. Skill application and practice 
required. ACSM guidehnes emphasized. PRE- 
REQ: EXS 251, 375. 

382 Exercise Technique and Physical 
Conditioning (3) (4) Builds on the exercise sci- 
ence concepts in EXS 251, 261, 282, and 375. 
Students will apply these principles to exercise, 
sports, and physical education. Analysis of various 
exercise techniques and dences, and systems 
emphasizing their use and safety. Clinical ex-peri- 
ence in strength and range of motion testing and 
prescription. Emphasis on various exercise tech- 
niques and movements and the abiUty' to apply 
theories and principles to improve health, fitness, 
and performance. PREREQi EXS 261. CON- 
CURRENT: EXS 381. 

384 Organization and Management of Adult 
Fitness Programs Clinic/Seminar (3) (3) 
Designed to pro\ide students with practical expe- 
rience m organizing and managing physical fitness 
programs for adults. PREREQ: EXS 282, 375. 
486 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations 
(3) (3) Designed to provide students with a trame- 
work in which to develop safe exercise programs for 



individuals with disabilities, chronic diseases, or 
multiple conditions. CONCURRENT: EXS 489. 

489 Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription 
(3) (3) Prepares students to administer exercise tests 
in the clinical arena and to prepare for ACSM cer- 
tification exams. Covers basic electrocardiography 
and interpretation, risk factor threshold assessment, 
CV exercise testing procedures and interpretation, 
and CV exercise prescription - all relevant to the 
cUnical adult population. Includes lectures, class 
discussions, project assignments, and group/indi- 
\'idual lab ex-periences. PREREQi EXS 381. 

490 Internship I (6) A capstone experience meant to 
tie together previous course work into a "hands-on" 
application in a job setting. A minimum of 250 
hours of actual work site experience may be in any 
vocational avenue available including cardiac rehabili- 
tation, strength and conditioning coaching, commer- 
cial fimess, corporate fimess, and personal training. 
PREREQ: EXS 382. CONCURRENT: EXS 489. 

491 Internship II (3) (6) A supplemental experi- 
ence to EXS 490 which will enable students to 
explore other internship or work settings including 
cardiac rehabihtation, strength and conditioning 
coaching, commercial fitness, corporate fitness, 
and personal training. The experience can be at 
the same site as EXS 490. Hours required range 
between 125 (for three credits) to 250 hours (for 
six credits). PREREQ: EXS 382. CONCUR- 
RENT: EXS 489 and 490. 

KINESIOLOGY 

Symbols: KIN; KIL indicates lab course 

100 Foundations of Health, Physical Education, 
and Sport (2) (2) An introduction to the discipUne 
and profession of health, ph)'sical education and 
sport with an emphasis on career guidance. The 
historj' and tradition of the field will be traced to 
pronde perspective for student choices during their 
undergraduate education. Field experiences and 
advice will expose students to the current opportu- 
nities and methods for achie\ing professional goals. 

101 Introduction to Adventure-Based Education 
(3) (3) A course designed for the student to under- 
stand the adventure approach to experiential educa- 
tion in various enwonments. The students will 
have the opportunity' to experience an adventure 
curriculum including initiatives, problem-solving 
activities, and low/high ropes course elements. 

102 Contemporary Activities (2) (2) Provides stu- 
dents with insight through practical experiences in 
a variety of "alternative" physical education activi- 
ties to gain an expanded awareness of the K-12 
physical education curriculum and possibly become 
agents for change. 

103 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 
Physical Education, Fitness, and Sport (3) (3) 
Helps smdents understand the past, present, and 
future concems and concepts of ph\'sical education 
and sport as professional fields in relationship to 
sodet)'. Historical, philosophical, and sociological 
approaches will be used to critically examine the roles 
of phj-sical education and sport as they' have evolved 
through the years and gain insight into what lies 
ahead. Examines the \'aried disciplines within the 
field ot kinesiolog)' and how they are interrelated so 
students will understand what is necessary' to become 
a health and ph\'sical education teacher. Practical 
experiences will provide swdents with information 
and insights into "real world" phy'sical education. 
109 Wrestling (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching the 
basic skills of wTesthng. Tactics, rules, and com- 
bative, lead-up activities for presentation to ph)'si- 
cal education classes in the public schools. 



110 Soccer (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching the 
basic skills ot soccer. Tactics, rules, and lead-up 
games are presented for all school ages. 

111 Basketball (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Emphasis is 
placed on tlindamental skills, rules, and tactics of 
the sport, as accomplished through drills and game 
situations. 

112 G}-mnasrics I (3) (1) Stunts, tumbUng, and 
gy'mnastics-related activities for teaching all age 
levels. 

113 Physical Conditioning (nine weeks) (3) (.5) 
Teaching acti\ities to help develop total health, 
especially ph)'sical fitness. Circuits ot exercises, 
weight training, running, and rope jumping are 
included for all ages. 

140 Aquatic Fundamentals and Emergency 
Water Safety (3) (1) Review of basic aquatic skills 
with advanced stroke techniques, safety, and sur- 
\'iyal techniques. 

141 Fundamental Movement (3) (1) Fundamen- 
tal locomotor and nonlocomotor patterns and 
rhythmic acti\'ities related to teaching children 
creative dance. 

142 Tennis (nine weeks) (3) (.5) An explanation 
of the mechanics and specific skills of tennis. 
Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding, 
teaching progressions, and methods. 

143 Golf (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching the basic 
skills of golf. Includes class management, tech- 
niques, rules, and safety procedures to present to 
physical education classes. 

144 Badminton (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching 
the basic skills of badminton. Class management, 
techniques, rules, and safety procedures to present 
to ph)'sical education classes. 

185 Exercise, Play, and Development (3) (3) 
Students will gain an understanding ot hfe-span 
development relati\'e to cognitive affective and 
psychomotor domains. Apphcation to teaching 
physical education and in exercise programs will be 
highlighted. 

200 Elementary School Physical Education (3) 
(2) Theoretical and practical approach for the 
teaching ot physical acti\'ities to elementary school 
children by the classroom teacher. 

201 Educational Dance and Gymnastics (2) (2) 
Pro\'ides students with the appropriate methods, 
materials, and skills needed for demonstrrating, 
teaching, and anal\'zing K— 12 dance, expressive 
movement, and educational gyrrmasdcs. Will 
include skill assessment, peer teaching, and lesson 
plan development. 

205 Curriculum and Instruction: Adapted 
Physical Education (3) (3) Prepares phy-sical educa- 
tion majors to have the skilk, knowledge, and atti- 
tudes necessary in teaching people with disabilities: 
providing them with appropriate phj'sical acri\ities, 
helping them with lifetime fimess pursuits in com- 
munity' and vocational settings, advocating for 
appropriate phj'sical acti\ities in fimess centers and 
the community' at large, and modifying the emiron- 
ment to make it less restrictive. PREREQ^ KIN 
103, 285. 

208 Self Defense (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching the 
basic skills ot self defense. Fundamental skills, tactics, 
and methods of presentation to school-age groups. 

209 Track and Field (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Principles 
ot mnning, throwing, and jumping. Modification 
needed for phj'sical education classes. Selt-testing. 

210 Softball/Baseball (nine weeks) (3) (.5) 
Teaching the basic skills of Softball and baseball. 
Fundamental skills, tactics, rules, and lead-up 
games for presentation to all ages. 



Kinesiology 



School ot Health Sciences 



211 Reld Hockey (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Basic fiin- 
damentals, tactics, and rules. Modified active games. 
Geared to teaching physical education classes. 

212 Football (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching the 
basic skills ot touch (noncontact) tootbaJl. Fun- 
damental skills, tactics, rules, and lead-up games 
for all school ages. 

213 Lacrosse (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Basic funda- 
mentals, tactics, and both women's and men's 
rules. Modified active games. Geared to teaching 
physical education classes. 

214 Volleyball (nine weeks) (3) (.5) Teaching the 
basic skills of volleyball. Fundamental skills, tac- 
tics, rules, and lead-up games for all school ages. 

215 Dance Pedagogy (3) (3) Basic course offering 
methods and materials for teaching dance technique. 

241 Body Systems and Kinesiology (3) (3) 
Introduces basic anatomical and physiological con- 
cepts critical to understanding human movement, 
exercise, physical education, and how the human 
body flinctions. Students will be required to apply 
these anatomical and physiological principles to 
physical education, exercise, and sport. 

242 Contemporaiy and Traditional Dance 
Forms (3) (1) The purpose of this course is to pro- 
vide the student with the appropriate methods, 
materials, and skills for teaching both contempo- 
rary and traditional dance forms, including folk, 
square, line, and social. Emphasis will be placed on 
the secondary' teaching level. PREREQ^ KIN 141. 

243 Teaching Elementary Physical Education (3) 
(1) Curriculum and methods of teaching K-5 
physical education. PREREQ: KIN 185. 

245 Lifetime Fitness Concepts (3) (3) Designed 
to provide an interdisciphnary understanding of 
the relationship between hfestyle, physical fitness, 
health, and well-being. 

► 246 Sport, Culture, and Society (3) (3) Current 
theories and research in the area of sport and soci- 
ety will be introduced. Focus of the course is inter- 
disciphnary, incorporating sociological, psycholog- 
ical, historical, anthropological, philosophical, and 
economic perspectives. Topics include moral, ethi- 
cal, racial, and gender issues in sport in relation to 
the North American culmre. 

250 Introduction to the Art of Dance (3) The pur- 
pose of this course is to provide the student with an 
introduction to dance as an art form as well as relate 
information regarding various aspects of dance. 
Topics include a brief histor\' of dance, dance styles, 
dance in education, and dance production. 

252 Physical Education and Individuals with 
Disabilities (3) (3) To acquaint special education 
majors with concepts ot appropriate physical edu- 
cation for students with disabilities. 

253 Adapted Aquatics, Lifetime Sport, and 
Fitness (3) Course designed to increase knowledge 
and skills in providing appropriate and safe adapt- 
ed aquatics, sports, and fitness activities to individ- 
uals with disabilities. Outside hours required. 

> 254 Psychological Aspects of Physical 
Disability (3) A study of the psvchological and 
social implications of physical disabilities. 

275 Lifeguarding (3) (2) Thcorv and techniques 
relative to preventive lifeguarding, emergencies in 
and around water, water rescues, search and recov- 
ery operations, types and uses of equipment, 
records and reports, health and sanitation, and 
supervision of waterfront areas. Possibhty of 
American Red Cross certification. 
285 Motor Development and Learning (3) (3) An 
introduction to human motor development and 
motor learning. Principles and concepts related to 
these areas will be examined as they relate to human 
motor performance and the development of motor 



skills across the lifespan. Motor development topics 
including growth, maturation, fitness development, 
self-concept development, gender, and age will be 
explored from a dynamical systems theoretical fi"ame- 
work. Motor learning topics include information 
processing, schema theory, transfer of learning, reac- 
tion time, and levels of movement skill learning. The 
interrelationships among the topics will be addressed. 

300 Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary (3) 
(3) Students in this course will examine the design, 
implementation, and assessment of an elementary 
physical education program. PREREQ^ KIN 102, 
103, 201, 285, and formal admission to teacher 
education. 

301 Fitness and Wellness (3) (3) Prepares preservice 
teachers to address health- and skill-related compo- 
nents of fitness as well as the dimensions of wellness, 
through developmentally appropriate content with 
the K-12 physical education program. Preservice 
teachers will assess and monitor their personal fitness 
development, as well as participate in, design, imple- 
ment, and assess a variety of activities that focus on 
one or more components of fimess and wellness. 

302 Curricultun and Instruction: Middle and 
Secondary Physical Education (3) (3) This third 
course in pedagog>' will relate all topics to the mid- 
dle and secondary physical education setting. 
Intended to give students a comprehensive overview 
of topics that relate to the planning, execution, and 
reflection of lessons presented in the physical edu- 
cation setting. PREREQ; KIN 102, 201, 205, 300, 
303, and formal admission to teacher education. 

303 Invasion Games (2) (2) Invasion, a concept 
common to team sports, will be used to develop a 
generic teaching approach. Individual, skill-related 
aspects of specific sports, such as basketball, soccer, 
lacrosse, and hockey, will be introduced. Students 
will be exposed to specific aspects of sport and game 
skill using the teaching games for understanding 
approach that they subsequently will teach. 

310 Preparation for Teaching Secondary 
Physical Education (3) (2) Each student develops 
a physical education activit)' unit and teaches one 
lesson from that unit. Further opportunities for 
familiarization with curricular designs in secondary 
education; teaching methods/styles through obser- 
vation, demonstration lessons, and actual practice 
are included. PREREQi KIN 100 and 185; full 
admission to teacher education program. 

311 Coaching Racquet Sports (3) (3) Advanced 
coaching and teaching techniques for the racquet 
sports, including tennis, badminton, racquetball, 
and squash. 

314 Track and Field II (3) (2) 
316 Basketball II (3) (2) 

318 Lacrosse II (women's equipment) (3) (2) 
Individual and team tactics and special situations. 
Basic knowledge and skills needed. 

319 Lacrosse II (men's equipment) (3) (2) 

321 VoUeybaU II (3) (2) 

322 Soccer II (3) (2) 

323 Field Hockey II (3) (2) Individual and team 
tactics and special situations. Basic knowledge and 
skills needed for coaching hockey. 

324 Football II (3) (2) Skills, tactics, and strate- 
gies for coaching contact football. 

326 WrestUng II (3) (2) PREREQ: KIN 109. 
331 Water Safety Instruction (3) (2) This course 
is designed to prepare individuals to become swim 
instructors. Testing during the first week includes 
a 500-yard swim, basic rescue procedures, and a 
written community water safety test. Opportunity 
exists to become an American Red Cross water 
safety instructor. 



344 History of Dance (3) (3) The purpose of this 
course is to provide the student with a thorough 
background of dance as a fiindamental form of 
human expression. Topics shall include the histor- 
ical roots and recent status of theatrical dance 
forms, dance education, recent trends, and evalua- 
tion of dance as an art form in relation to man and 
his society. Physiological, sociological, and psycho- 
logical imphcations; dance forms and types. Film 
and other materials focus on parallel developments 
in related arts. 

♦ 345 Dance Production Workshop (3) (2) 

Study ot the various elements ot performance and 
dance production. All are integrated into a final 
performance that is created and directed by the 
students. Admittance is by auditions during the 
fall semester. 

346 Repertory Development (2) (2) This course 
is designed to give the students experience learn- 
ing new and/or e.\isting facult}' and guest artist 
choreography in a professional rehearsal setting. 

347 Software Applications and Assessment in 
Health and Physical Education (3) (3) An introduc- 
torv course that pro\adcs a hands-on look at uses ot 
computer technology in teaching and assessment in 
health and physical education. The goal is tor preser- 
vice teachers to use a variety of computer-based tech- 
nology and software applications (e.g., grading soft- 
ware) for both professional and instructional use. 
Current assessment strategies (e.g., purpose, design, 
implementation o{) will also be smdied. 

348 Instructional Skills for Aerobic Dance 
Fitness (2) (1) The purpose ot this course is to 
teach various dance exercises, dance movements, 
and aerobic dance routines to music with the Intent 
of promoting cardiovascular fitness and endurance, 
and improving muscle tone and coordination. 
PREREQ; Prior aerobic experience or PEA 140. 

351 Evaluation in Health and Physical Education 

(3) (3) Selecting, administering, scoring, and evalu- 
ating tests of physical fitness, general motor ability, 
motor educabihry, and skill and knowledge. 

352 Applied Exercise Physiology (3) (3) The ap- 

phcation of physiological principles to ph\'sical 
education, exercise, and sport. PREREQ; BIO 
259 and 269. 

353 Organization and Administration of 
Physical Education, Health, and Athletics (3) (3) 

Principles ot program building in curricular and 
extracurricular programs; risk management, orga- 
nizing, administering, and supervising physical 
education, health, intramural, and interscholastic 
programs. PREREQ: KIN 100. 

355 Accident Causation and Prevention (3) (3) 

Survey of safety education and the history, philos- 
ophy, and psychology of accident prevention. 

356 Critical Problems in the Highway Trans- 
portation System (3) (3) Techniques ot assessing 
the knowledge, skill, and psycho-physical charac- 
teristics of a beginning driver; the relation ot these 
to the safe operation ot a motor vehicle. 

360 Pathology for Adapted Physical Education 
Activities (3) (2) Study of common disabhng con- 
ditions with regard to anatomical and physiologi- 
cal changes. 

361 Kinesiology (3) (3) Basic fijndamentals of 
movement, articulation, and muscular actions; 
analysis of the related principles of mechanics. 
PREREQ: BIO 259 and 269. 



I Diverse communities course 

♦ This course may be taken again tor credit. 



School of Health Sciences 



Kinesiology 



KIL 362 Adapted Physical Activity Practicum 

(1) Practicum experience working in an adapted 
physical activit)' setting. Includes writing and 
implementing lessons and individual goals. PRE- 
REQ:KJN251 or 252. 

363 Assessment and Prograimning for Adapted 
Physical Activity (3) (3) For students who want to 
specialize in adapted phvsical education. To improve 
students' understanding of evaluation and program- 
ming in the psychomotor domain for special popula- 
tions. Principles of therapeutic exercise, and guide- 
lines for exercise programs for those disabilities com- 
morJy seen in schools and fitness centers. 

364 Introduction to Exercise Physiology (3) 
Builds on the physiological concepts introduced in 
KIN 241. Students will be required to apply these 
physiological principles to physical education, 
exercise, and sport. 

♦ 378 Field Experience (3) (3) Practical experi- 
ence for the student who must solicit approval of 
the appropriate agency, develop a proposal for the 
on-site experience, and secure agreement from the 
facult}' adviser. 

380 Women and Sport (3) (3) An examination of 
women's participation in sport from historical, cul- 
tural, psychological, physical, and legal perspec- 
tives; emphasis placed on women in sport in 
American society' today. 

400 Professional Seminar in Adapted Physical 
Activity (3) Issues and current events in the pro- 
fessional development of adapted physical activity 
specialists. 

401 NetAVall Games (2) (2) Provides future phys- 
ical educators with the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary to instruct, demonstrate, and assess lifetime fit- 
ness activities that fall within the net/wall games 
classification system. Students will be introduced to 
teaching methodologies, skill production and pro- 
gressions, class management techniques, and assess- 
ment strategies. Addresses the net/wall games of 
tennis, badminton, pickleball, and vollej-ball. 

402 Physical Education Practicum (3) (3) This 
course applies pedagogical content knowledge by 
planning, implementing, assessing, and reflecting 
upon teaching experiences in a phvsical education 
setting. PREREQ: KIN 205, 300', 302, and formal 
admission to teacher education. 

429 Electrocardiography and Stress Testing (3) 
Designed to prepare the prospective fitness 
instructor in exercise testing protocols as well as 
how to record, label, and calculate data with 
stress-testing exercise equipment and a standard, 
12-lead electrocardiogram. PREREQ: BIO 259 
and 269; KIN 352; CPR certification. 

430 Planning Facilities for Athletics, Physical 
Education, and Recreation (3) (3) Management 
and planning ot the taciliues tor athletics, school 
physical education, and recreational programs, play- 
fields, playgrounds, buildings, and aaxiliary struc- 
tures as well as the maintenance ot these facilities. 

431 Physical Fitness Assessment and Exercise 
Program (3) (3) Designed to prepare students to 
assess the phvsical fitness levels of healthy but seden- 



tary adults and prescribe individualized exercise pro- 
grams. PRERECi BIO 259 and 269; KIN 351, 352, 
and 429; EKG and stress testing; CPR certification. 
432 Exercise Techniques/Theory and Practice 
(3) (3) Analysis ot various exercise techniques, and 
devices and systems emphasizing their use and 
safety. Clinical experience in strength and range of 
morion (ROM) tesring and prescription. PRE- 
REQ: BIO 259 and KIN 361. 

434 Organization and Management of Adult 
Fitness Programs Clinic/Seminar (3) (3) 
Designed to provide students with practical expe- 
rience in organizing and managing physical fitness 
programs for adults. PREREQ. BIO 259 and 269; 
KIN 352 and 361. 

435 Physical Fitness Specialist Internship (12) (6) 
(6) Experience working in a cardiovascular rehabili- 
tation center or similar clinical setting under the 
supervision of qualified personnel or practical expe- 
rience in an adult phir'sical fitness center under the 
supervision of qualified personnel. PREREQ^ BIO 
259 and 269; KIN 352, 361, and 431. 

436 Advanced Clinical Exercise Testing and 
Prescription (3) An in-depth study ot how exer- 
cise is used in clinical settings for diagnostic and 
rehabihtative purposes with emphasis on cardiac or 
pulmonar)' rehab. Also designed to help students 
prepare for ACSM certification. 

441 Dance Composition (3) (3) An introduction 
to choreography and the creative process, students 
will develop original movement phases progressing 
from simple to complex solo and group forms. 

442 Musical Theater Dance and Choreography 
(3) (3) This course covers the appropriate methods, 
materials, and skills needed tor preparing and stag- 
ing dance in a musical production. Special empha- 
sis will be given to the choreographic process as 
well as the role of the choreographer. 

445 Dance/Movement for Special Groups (2) (2) 
Adaptation ot dance movement with emphasis on 
methods, techniques, and activities suitable for 
special groups (elderly, people with disabihties, 
and other special groups). 

♦ 446 Repertory Performance (2) The purpose of 
this course is to otfer dance students invaluable expe- 
rience that can only be gained firom performance. To 
ensure maximum benefit, the objectives are thorough 
studio rehearsal ot dances, thorough lighting and 
staging rehe;irsals, and well-directed pertormances. 

449 Learning on the Move (3) (3) A combination 
of preschool and primary grade movement educa- 
tion activities are included to maximize children's 
overall development. Preschool, nursery, and 
kindergarten ages. 

450 High School Driver Education Program 
Management (3) (3) A study of the total safety 
program with emphasis on the teaching of safety. 
Each student prepares a practice lesson. 

451 History and Philosophy of Health and 
Physical Education (2) (2) A study of past and pre- 
sent concepts of phvsical education; philosophy and 
principles ot modem physical education programs. 



452 Principles of Coaching (2) (2) Principles and 
methods of coaching sports in the school program. 

453 Motor Learning (3) (3) A study of the theo- 
ries ot learning in relation to the acquisition of 
motor skills. 

456 Introduction to the Driving Tasks (3) (3) An 
advanced course to prepare students to teach in- 
car driver education in the secondary' schools. 
458 Physical Disabilities of Childhood (2) (2) 
Common orthopedic and neurological disabilities 
of childhood, especially chronic deviations. 
Emphasis is on understanding the medical aspects 
and problems of rehabilitation. 
465 Mechanical Analysis of Motor Skills (3) A 
problem-solving approach to skill analysis using 
qualitative and quantitative video and cinemato- 
graphic analysis as well as elementary force-time 
and accelerometry techniques. Usefiil for teachers, 
trainers, coaches, and exercise professionals. 
470 Leadership in Recreational Outdoor 
Pursuits (3) (3) This course is designed to provide 
instruction that would help persons desiring a 
career in recreational outdoor pursuits education, or 
develop an outdoor education or physical education 
program using activities, processes, and educational 
methodolog)' in a sate and meaningtiil manner. 
473 Independent Study and Special Projects (1-3) 
Provide an opportunity for selected students to pur- 
sue areas of special interest and talent or to take 
advantage of special conferences or seminars. PRE- 
REQ^ Permission of department chairperson. 
475 Mental Training in Sport (3) (3) Techniques 
of mental training for sport and physical activity, 
including relaxation training, concentration skills, 
breathing regulation, positive imagery, autogenic 
training, and meditation. 

489 Student Teaching (6) Health and physical 
education teaching situations in elementary, junior, 
and senior high schools under qualified cooperating 
teachers and college supervisors. PREREQ^ HEA 
304, 306, and 440; KIN 350; extracurricular credits 
documentation; valid clearances and TB test; for- 
mal admission to teacher education. 

490 Student Teaching (6) Observation and partic- 
ipation in health and physical education teaching 
situations in elementary, junior, and senior high 
schools under qualified cooperating teachers and 
college supervisors. PREREQ^ HEA 306, 440; 
KIN 402; three extracurricular credits documenta- 
tion; vahd clearances and TB test; formal admis- 
sion to teacher education. 

492 Student Teaching Seminar (0) Deals with the 
professional preparation of the health and physical 
education teacher certification student. It is offered 
concurrendy with the student teaching experience 
and is designed to assist the student in the public 
school setting. An examination ot current problems 
and issues in the profession and in the schools leads 
to discussion of problem prevention and solution. 
Lectures on job procurement skills are included. 

♦ 498 Physical Educaton Workshop (1-3) 

♦ This course ma\' be taken again for credit. 



Liberal Sudies 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Liberal Studies Program 

B.A. Liberal Studies; B.S. Liberal Studies - Science and 
Mathematics 

144 Main Hall 

610-436-1096 

Alice Speh, Director 

B.S. Liberal Studies - Professional Studies 

143 E.O. Bull Center 
610-436-3486 
Bruce Norris, Director 

The liberal studies program offers student-designed, interdisciplinary 
majors that provide an alternative to traditional baccalaureate degrees 
in specific academic areas. The liberal studies majors are intended to 
broaden the student's intellectual understanding and professional skills 
through a well-rounded, yet flexible degree program that combines 
courses in the areas of science, humanities, behavioral science, and the 
arts. The result is a curriculum that is suited to the individual student's 
personal academic and career goals. 

After completing at least 32 semester hours, and after achieving a 
minimum Grade Point Average of 2.0, the student may request an 
interview with the director of liberal studies for the purpose of plan- 
ning a curriculum in one of the available tracks. Students may enter 
the hberal studies program from other majors of the University, or as 
transfers from other colleges, by the same process and by meeting the 
same requirements. It is University policy that no student, whether 
presendy enrolled at West Chester or attempting to be admitted from 
another university, is permitted to enroll in the liberal studies program 
after earning 80 semester hours. 

Three separate baccalaureate programs are available. The bachelor of 
arts in liberal studies is designed for students interested in a well- 
rounded education emphasizing courses in the Hberal arts. The bache- 
lor of science in liberal studies - science and mathematics allows 
students to pursue courses in four different scientific disciplines, while 
also incorporating liberal arts courses to create a broad curriculum. 
The bachelor of science in liberal studies - professional studies pro- 
vides students the capability to design a career-centered curriculum 
that may not be available at the University. The course ot study 
includes the student's selection of two academic minors, one of which 
must be a program offered by one of the four professional schools 
(Business and Public Affairs, Education, Health Sciences, or Music). 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LIBERAL STUDIES —ARTS 
AND SCIENCES TRACK 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Foreign language (Students must 0-12 semester hours 
show competencv through the 202 level.) 



3. Liberal studies breadth requirements 24 semester hours 
(natural and computer sciences, behavioral 

and social sciences, humanities and 
communications, and the arts) 

4. Liberal studies electives of the student's 30 semester hours 
choice at the 300 and 400 level 

5. At least one minor offered by the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the School of Music, or by 
the departments of Economics, Geography, or 
PoUtical Science 

6. Electives to total 120 semester hours. 

Students in the bachelor of arts track have the option of using up to 
six semester hours of their liberal electives as senior thesis (LST 490) 
credits. Interested students should consult with the program director 
well before earning 80 semester hours about procedures for pursuing 
the senior thesis. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LIBERAL STUDIES — 
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS TRACK 

1. 
2. 



48 semester hours 
15 semester hours 



32 semester hours 



20 semester hours 



General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 
Liberal studies breadth requirements 
(behavioral and social sciences, humanities and 
communications, and the arts) 

3. Science and mathematics cognate 
requirements. Seven to nine semester hours in 
any four of the following areas: biology (BIO 
110 or above), chemistry (CHE 103 and CRL 
103 or above), geology/astronomy (above 
ESS 111), mathematics or computer science 
(MAT 110 or above, or CSC 110 or above), 
and physics (PHY 130 or above) 

4. Liberal studies electives of the 
student's choice at the 300 and 400 level 

5. At least one minor selected from the departments 

of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology and 
Astronomy, Mathematics, or Physics 

6. Electives to total 120 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LIBERAL STUDIES — 
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES TRACK 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 

2. Two minors: 
Minor A 
Minor B 

3. Professional Studies Breadth Courses 

4. Professional Studies Electives 
Student's choice at the 300 level or higher 

5. Electives to total 120 semester hours 



48 semester hours 

18 semester hours 
18 semester hours 
15 semester hours 
30 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTION 
LIBERAL STUDIES 

Symbol: LSP 



490 Senior Thesis (3-6) Directed research in an 
interdisciplinary subject of the arts and sciences. 
For students in the bachelor of arts and bachelor 
of science tracks. PREREQ^ Permission of the 
director of liberal studies. 



School ot Education 



LiteraCT' 



Department of Literacy 

105B Recitation HaU 
610-436-2877 

Sharon B. Kletzien, Chairperson 
Dena Beeghly, Assistant Chairperson 
PROFESSORS: Darigan, Gill, Kletzien 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Beeghly, Caroff, Szabo 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Greenwood, Mayor, Nolan, 
Yaworski 

The Department of Literaq' offers literacy courses required in the 
early childhood, elementary education, and special education pro- 
grams. Students desiring a more thorough background in reading 
instruction may choose a reading minor. The department also offers 
courses in college reading and study skills for any University student. 
AH field placements for courses are arranged in conjunction with the 
Department of Early Childhood and Special Education or the 
Department of Elementary Education. Students are not to solicit 
placements. While student needs are considered in assigning place- 
ments, no particular placement can be guaranteed. West Chester 
University does not place students at religiously affiliated schools 



when public school placements are available. Transportation to and 
from field placements is the responsibUit)' of the individual student. 

Minor in Reading 21 semester hours 

Students who wish to minor in reading must have completed 30 credits 
and must have earned the minimum cumulative GPA required for their 
earned credits: 2.65 for students with 30-47 credits, and 2.80 for stu- 
dents with 48 or more credits. Smdents admitted to the minor must 
maintain the mirumum cumulative GPA required of them at admission 
to the minor in order to continue. Students who fall below the mini- 
mum cumulative GPA required are permitted to retake, in accordance 
with Universit)' polic)', course work in the minor that contributed to 
their fall below the required minimum cumulative GPA. Such students 
will not be permitted to take additional course work in the minor until 
thev achieve the required minimum cumulative GPA. 

1. Required courses 18 semester hours 
EDR/ECE 309 or EDR/EDE 311+, EDR/ECE 325+ or 
EDR/EDE 312+, EDR 321+, EDR 420, EDR 422 

2. Electives 3 semester hours 
Three semester hours of electives under advisement. 



+ Courses requiring prerequisites - check catalog course description below. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
LITERACY 

Symbol: EDR 

010 Developmental Reading and Study Skills (1) 

A course designed to improve vocabulary' and 
study skills. Major attention is given to vocabulary 
expansion, textbook reading, test taking, and 
methods of organizing information. 
020 Intermediate Level Reading (3) The interme- 
diate level workshop will emphasize the develop- 
ment and improvement of college-level reading 
competencies. The course is designed to help the 
students improve their reading comprehension as 
well as effective study techniques and strategies. 
Additionally, vocabular)- development, flexible 
reading rate, and critical reading will be taught in 
this course. 

100 College Reading and Study Skills (3) A course 
to develop reading and study skills such as compre- 
hension, vocabulary, speed, remembering, concen- 
tration, taking notes, mastering a text assignment, 
and preparing for and taking examinations. 
110 Developing Learning Skills (1) A course that 
reviews and develops specialized learning skills such 
as concentrating when studying, reading a textbook 
assignment, taking notes, and preparing for and 
taking examinations. Students who wish to review 
their study habits or who have special needs in the 
area ot study skills should enroll in this course. 
A 302 Teaching the Language Arts (3) Study of 
teaching language skills in the elementary schools; 
listening, speaking, and writing. PREREQ^ EDE 
251. Crosslisted as EDE 302. 
▲ 309 Introduction to Language Arts (3) The 
areas of listening, speaking, and writing are studied 
in depth. lOiowledge, teaching, and evaluative tech- 
niques are addressed. Introduction to the reading 
process and the relationship of language to reading 
also will be studied. Crosslisted as ECE 309. 
A ** 311 Introduction to Reading Instruction (3) 
An exploraton,' course investigating the reading 
process, language and learning theories, and their 
relation to reading. Historical scope and various 
programs of reading are studied and evaluated. 
Crosslisted as EDE 311. PREREQi EDE 251. 



A * 312 Reading Instruction and Practicum (6) 

Focus is on mastery of the teaching of develop- 
mental reading, early reading, and prereading expe- 
riences. The students learn how to plan, teach, and 
evaluate reading/thinking skills related to the in- 
struction of reading in the elementar)' classroom. 
Students work in the public schools with small and 
large reading groups teaching various aspects ot the 
reading lesson. Students also learn how to evaluate 
pupil performance and remediate minor reading 
problems. CrossUsted as EDE 312. PREREQ: 
EDE 200 and EDR/EDE 311. 
313 Reading Instruction and Practicum in the 
Secondary Schools (6) Focus is on the master)' of 
teaching reading in the middle and secondary 
schools. Students will study the role of the teacher 
as well as learn how to sequence both develop- 
mental and content area readings. 
A 315 Developmental Reading for the 
Handicapped Child (3) The focus of this course is 
the study of the reading process and its relation to 
language development, motivation and methodol- 
ogy for developmental reading skills, reading pro- 
grams and materials, problems in dealing with 
handicapped children, and practicum in reading 
instruction. Special education majors only. 
Crosslisted as EDE 315. 

** 321 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading 
Problems (3) Identifying the nature and causes of 
reading disabilities; experience in helping a child 
with reading problems. PREREQ: EDR/EDE 
311 or permission of instructor. 
323 Reading for the Handicapped: Diagnosis 
and Remediation (3) Reading materials, pro- 
grams, evaluations, and teaching strategies for the 
mentally or physically handicapped are examined 
and discussed. Students develop and utilize read- 
ing materials in a classroom situation. PREREQ^ 
Permission of instructor. Special education majors 
and reading minors only. 

A * 325 Teaching Reading and Field Experience 
(Primaiy Grades) (6) The teaching of reading and 
its mastery is the focus ot this course. Students apply 
knowledge of theories and practices in supervised 
field placements in schools with children 5-8 years of 
age. Tutoring of individual children and small groups 



is integrated with planning and evaluation of lessons 
and activities as well as remediation. Crosslisted as 
ECE 325. PREREQ: EDR/ECE 309. 
A 341 Inclusion and Reading in the Content Area 
(3) The course is co-taught by special education and 
literacy faculty. It will help prepare secondary educa- 
tion and special education to teach all students effec- 
tively, Including those with disabilities, in general- 
education, content-specific settings. Practical guide- 
lines, content literary strategies, and adaptations will 
be emphasized to prepare pre-educators to meet the 
academic, social, and affective needs of all students 
in the inclusive secondarv classroom. Crosslisted as 
EDA 341. PREREQ: EDF 100 and EDP 250. 
420 Reading in the Content Areas (3) Under- 
standing the reading process and the need for 
reading instruction at the middle and secondary 
school levels. Specific skill development, reading 
in the content areas, readability, and evaluation. 
♦ ' 422 Seminar in Reading (3) Intensive study 
of some current, major developments in reading 
related to elementary education. Topics announced 
in advance. PREREQ; Permission of instructor. 
A * ^ 423 Seminar in Communications Skills 
(3) Intensive study of some current, major devel- 
opments in communications skills (language arts) 
related to elementary education. Topics announced 
in advance. Crosslisted as EDE 423. PREREQ; 
Permission of instructor. 

A * 458 Language Arts/Reading for the Unique 
Child (3) An open-ended course to help students 
understand and plan instructional programs for the 
linguistically different, the gifted, and those with 
special needs. The students will examine various 
strategies, techniques, management, and viable 
programs for teaching these children language arts 
and reading. Crosslisted as EDE 458. 



A Crosslisted course. Students completing the 
EDR course may not take the ECE/EDE/EDA 
course for credit. 

* Open to early childhood and elementary 
education majors or reading minors 

** Open to elementary education and special 
education majors and reading minors 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Management 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Department of Management 

312B Anderson Hall 

610-436-2304 

Charles McGee, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Chu, Snow, Thomas 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Callanan, Leach, McGee, 

Selvanathan 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Rodriguez 

The primary objective of the Department of Management is to pro- 
vide students \vixh the skills required to manage business and public 
organizations effectively. 

To accomplish this objective, the faculty of the Department of 
Management will strive 

(1) to inculcate in the student the abilit\' to reason analytically and 
critically'; 

(2) to make the student sensitive to the human relations aspect of 
managing others; 

(3) to increase the student's awareness of the concepts and terms used 
in current managerial practice; 

(4) to increase the student's awareness ot the international dimension 
of business; 

(5) to increase the student's skills in written and verbal communication; 

(6) to foster the student's ability to sjTithesize the knowledge acquired 
firom various disciplines in order to focus on managerial problems. 

The Department of Management offers a B.S. in business manage- 
ment, which focuses on functions required to make a group of people 
work effectively together as a unit. These functions include planning, 
organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. 
All freshmen and those transfer students who have not completed 
the required courses will be admitted to the pre-business program. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 
1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

(includes COM 101 or 208 or 216 or 230, CSC 

110 or 115 or 141, ECO 111*, MAT 105* or 107* 

or 110* or 161*, PHI 101 or 150 or 180 and 

nine semester hours of free electives) 



3 semester hours 



18 semester hours 



9 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



3 semester hours 



2. Business Core 36 semester hours 
ACC 201*, 202*; BLA 201*; ECO 112*, 251*, 

252*; HN 325*; AL^T 108; MGT 200*, 341*, 
499*; and MKT 325* 

3. Other course required 
ENG 368* 

4. Management Major Courses 
MGT 313*, 321*, 431*, 441*, and 498*; 
MIS 300* 

5. Business Electives 

6. Restricted Electives 
Three semester hours of any 100-level or above 
nonbusiness course 

7. Free Electives 

A minimum of 15 credits in 300-^00-le-uel MGT courses and a minimum 
30 credits in business courses must be completed at WCU. 

Minor in International Business 24 semester hours 

1. Required Courses 15 semester hours 
Three courses from the Department of Foreign 

Languages (two at the 200 level and one more 
advanced foreign language) 

2. Electives 9 semester hours 
Students mav choose three courses from the list 

approved bv the department. See ad\'iser for 

course selection. 
Only smdents accepted into the accounting, economics, finance, man- 
agement, and marketing majors or departmental minors may register 
for 300-level business classes. 

All pre-business students (internal and external transfers) may apply for 
the major or minor after completion of 45 credits with a minimum over- 
all GPA of 2.50. In addition, thev must have completed the following 
courses with a C or better: ACC 201; ECO 111, 112, and 251; \L\T 
105 (or higher); and MGT 200; and passed ^L\T 108. To progress in 
the management major program, smdents must maintain a 2.50 overall 
GPA. To graduate, students must have a 2.50 overall GPA and a 2.50 
GPA in their major course work (as defined by each program). 



'A minimum grade of C must be attained in each of these courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MANAGEMENT 

Symbol: MGT 

100 Introduction to Business (3) Suri-ey of the 
structure and ftinction of the American business 
sj-stem. Topics covered include forms of business 
organization, fiindamentals ot management, fun- 
damentals of marketing, basic accounting princi- 
ples and practices, elements of finance, money and 
banking, business and government, and careers in 
business. Open to nonbusiness majors. 
200 Principles of Management (3) Introduction 
to the principles and functions of management. 
Examines the management process, organizational 
theory', planning, decision making, motivation, 
and leadership in supervisory contexts. PREREQ^ 
ECO 111. 

313 Business and Society (3) An analysis of the 
social, political, legal, ennronmental, and ethical 
problems faced by business firms. PREREQi 
MGT 200. 

321 Organization Theoiy and Behavior (3) Study 
of the theoretical foundations of organization and 
management. The system of roles and fiinctional 
relationships. Practical application of the theory 
through case analysis. PREREQi MGT 200. ' 
333 Labor Relations (3) Rise of the American 
labor movement. Labor legislation. Collective bar- 



gaining arrangements. Procedures in settling labor 
disputes. Organized labor's policies and practices. 
PREREQ: MGT 200. 

341 Production and Operations \Ianagement 
(3) Methods analysis, work measurement, and 
wage incentives. Production process and sj'stem 
design. Plant location, layout, sales forecasting, 
inventorv, production, and quality control, to 
include statistical aspects of tolerances, acceptance 
sampling, development of control charts, PERT, 
and cost factors. PREREQ: CSC 110 or 141; 
ECO 252; and MGT 200 or 300. 
431 Human Resource Adininistration (3) Study 
of a weU-planned, properly executed, and efficient- 
ly evaluated approach to manpower recruitment, 
screening, usage, and development. Case analv-sis 
and/or experiential exercises to illustrate the con- 
cepts used. PREREQ: MGT 200 or permission of 
instructor. 

441 Introduction to Management Science (3) 
Business problems in production, inventor\'. 
finance, marketing, and transportation translated 
into application of scientific methods, techmques, 
and tools to provide those in control of the system 
with optimum solutions. PREREQ: MGT 341 or 
permission of instructor. 

451 SystemsManagement(3) Application of sys- 
tems theorv and principles to the operation of con- 



temporan- organizations with emphasis on nonquan- 
titative methods of analpis. PREREQ: MGT 321. 
471 Entrepreneurship (3) Organization of a busi- 
ness venture with emphasis on risk, requirements, 
roles, and rewards. Students develop a simulated 
venture, with oral and written report. PREREQ: 
ACC 201 and 202, HN 325, MGT 200, MKT 
325, or permission of instructor. 

♦ 483 Management Internship (3) The manage- 
ment internship is designed to enhance the studen- 
t's educational experience by pro\'iding a substan- 
tive work experience in the business world. PRE- 
REQ: Internship program coordinator's approval. 

486 Management Internship (6) The management 
internship is designed to enhance the smdents edu- 
cational experience by pro\iding a substantive work 
experience in the business world. PREREQ: 
Internship program coordinator's approval. 

487 Special Topics in Management (3) This 
course deals with current concepts in management 
not covered by existing courses. The course con- 
tent is determined at the beginning of each semes- 
ter. PREREQ: MGT 200. 

♦ 488 Independent Studies in Management (1-3) 
Special research projects, reports, and readings in 
management. Open to seniors only. PREREQ: 
Instructor's approval. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Marketing 



498 Senior Seminar in Management (3) Students 
are engaged in reading and research on current 
developments in management. Research project is 
required to help expand and deepen the horizons 
of the participants. PREREQ;^ Senior standing, 
MGT 200. Seniors eligible for graduation at the 
end of the coming semester take priority for regis- 
tration during the preregistration period. 

499 Business Policy and Strategy (3) A capstone 
course for all business majors, requiring students 
to integrate and apply multidisciplinary knowledge 
and skills in actively formulating improved busi- 
ness strategies and plans. Case method predomi- 
nates. Written reports. PREREQ: BLA 201, RN 
325, MGT 200, and MKT 325. 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS 
Symbol: MIS 

300 Introduction to Management Information 
Systems (3) A comprehensive introduction to the 
role of information systems in an organizational envi- 
ronment. This course focuses on transforming manu- 
al and automated data into useftJ information for 
managerial decision making. PREREQ^ MGT 200. 
451 Systems Analysis and Design (3) The course 
develops the necessar\' skills for analysis of organi- 
zational environments in light of information sys- 
tem needs, as well as the skill to design such sys- 
tems. PREREQ: MIS 300. 

453 Decision Support Systems (3) This course is 
an advanced presentation of the role of manage- 
ment information systems in the special support 



needs of managers for aiding decision making. 
PREREQ; MGT 441, MIS 300 and 451. 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

Symbol; INB 

300 Introduction to International Business (3) 

Analysis of international business transactions in 
large and small businesses, multinational and 
domestic. Functional emphasis on multinational 
environment, managerial processes, and business 
strategies. PREREQ^MGT 200. 
469 International Management Seminar (3) 
Study of issues confronting executives as they plan, 
organize, staff, and control a multinational organi- 
zation. Lectures, case analyses, and outside pro- 
jects with local firms engaged in, or entering, 
international business will be utilized. PREREQ; 
INB 300 and MGT 200. 



Department of Marketing 

312B Anderson HaU 

610-436-2304 

John Redington, Chairperson 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Christ, Gault, Redington, 

Tomkowicz 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Arsenault, Phillips 
The primary focus of the Department of Marketing is to prepare stu- 
dents to compete successfully in today's fast-paced, high-tech business 
environment. 

To accomplish this, the faculty of the Department of Marketing will 
emphasize 

(1) understanding the strategies related to the design, promotion, pric- 
ing, and distribution of goods and services that meet customer needs; 

(2) teaching methods that allow students to assume the role of a mar- 
keting decision maker to develop an appreciation of the challenges 
that face today's marketers; 

(3) exposing students to the latest technological developments that 
are changing the way marketing is undertaken; 

(4) both individual and teamwork approaches to prepare students for 
the realities of the work environment; 

(5) creating an understanding of the legal and ethical framework of 
marketing, competition, and other business activity. 

All freshmen and those transfer students who have not completed 
the required courses will be admitted to the pre-business program. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE - MARKETING 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
(Includes COM 101 or 208 or 216 or 230; 



CSC 110 or 115 or 141; ECO 111'; MAT 105* 
or 107* or 108* or 110* or 161*; PHI 101 or 150 
or 180) 

2. Business Core 33 semester hours 
ACC 201*, 202*; BLA 201*; ECO 112*, 251*, 

and 252; FIN 325; MGT 200*, 341, 499*; 
MKT 325* 

3. Other courses required 6 semester hours 
GEO 325 

MAT 108 or 161 (if either of these NLA.T courses 
are completed with a grade of C or better to 
fiilfill general requirements, then a free elective 
may be substituted) 

4. Major Concentration Courses 18 semester hours 
MKT 330*, 340*, 360*, 425*, 440*, and one 

additional 300-level or above MKT* course 

5. Business Electives 6 semester hours 
300-level or above courses in ACC, BLA, ECO, 

HN, INB, MGT, MIS, MKT, ENG 368 or GEO 425 

6. Student Electives 9 semester hours 
A minimum of 15 credits in 300-400 level MKT courses and a minimum 
of 30 credits in business courses must be completed at WCU. 

Only students accepted into the accounting, economics, finance, man- 
agement, and marketing majors or minors may register for 300-level 
business classes. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
LAW 

Symbol: BLA 

201 The Legal Environment of Business (3) 

Examines the framework of the American legal 
system and its impact on the environment in 
which business operates. Sources of law, including 
constitutional, statutory, administrative, and com- 
mon law principles, that define the relationships 
between government and business; buyers and sell- 
ers of goods and services; and employers and 
employees are discussed. 

302 Special Subjects in Business Law (3) In-depth 
coverage ot the legal topics of contracts and sales. It 
is intended as a partial preparation for the uniform 



Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination 
and thus provides students with an adequate knowl- 
edge of the most widely examined subjects. Provides 
marketing students with a detailed knowledge of the 
legal topics that they will use in their careers and 
covers basic legal topics highly useful to manage- 
ment majors and all persons engaged in business. 
♦ 303 Legal Problems in Business (3) Special 
legal problems in business will be considered at 
length, such as consumer credit regulation, insur- 
ance, personal law relating to decedent's estates 
and Social Security, preparation for the CPA 
examination, etc. This course may be taken more 
than once (but not more than three times) for 
credit if the subject matter of the course is not 
duplicated. 



MARKETING 

Symbol: MKT 

200 Survey of Marketing (3) Examines the impact 
of marketing systems in producing a standard ot 
living in local and global economies. Topics 
include the structure and fiinctions of marketing 
within an organization, the role of customers, and 
the competitive, political/legal/regulatory, econom- 
ic, social-cultural, and technological environments 
in which these systems operate. May not be taken 
for credit after completion of any other marketing 
course. Open to nonbusiness majors. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Mathematics 



College ot Arts and Sciences 



325 Marketing Management (3) Study of the 
processes involved in planning and managing mar- 
keting activities in organizations. Emphasis on 
case studies and applications of the decision-mak- 
ing process. PREREQ: ACC 201, BLA 201, 
CSC 110 or equivalent, ECO 112 and 251, MAT 
105 or 107 or 108 or 161. 
330 (formerly 303) Consumer Behavior (3) 
Foundations of consumer behavior. Market struc- 
ture and consumer behavior, purchase strategy and 
tactics, determinants and patterns of consumer 
behavior. An integrated theorv of consumer 
behavior is sought", PREREQi MKT 200 or 325 
and permission of instructor. 
340 (formerly 321) Personal Selling (3) Analysis 
of the selling process applied to sales calls and 
sales strategies, communication, persuasion, moti- 
vation, ethics, interpersonal relationships, negotia- 
tions, and professionalism. Emphasis on case stud- 
ies. PREREQi MKT 200 or 325 and permission 
of instructor. 

350 (formerly 322) Advertising and Sales 
Promotion (3) A study of advertising and sales 
promotion management with a major focus on 
organization, media, strategy, campaigns, legal 
control, consumer behavior, budgeting, and the 
coordination of these activities with overall mar- 
keting programs. PREREQ: MKT 200 or 325 
and permission of instructor. 
360 (formerly 408) Marketing Research (3) 
Systematic definition ot marketing problems, 



strategies for data collection, model building, and 
interpretation of results to improve marketing deci- 
sion making and control. PREREQi MKT 325. 
370 Marketing and Technology (3) The purpose 
of this course is to tamiliarize students with the 
role technology now plays in the field of marketing. 
VLrtuaUy ever\' area of marketing from identifying 
customers to designing products to promotion to 
delivery is now affected by technolog)-. Moreover, 
marketing managers must not only be aware and 
understand these technological factors, but they 
must also know how to use them to gain competi- 
tive advantage. PREREQi MKT 200 or 325. 
404 International Marketing (3) Historical and 
theoretical background ot foreign trade, world 
marketing environment and world market pat- 
terns, marketing organization in its international 
setting, and international marketing management. 
PREREQ: MKT 325. 

406 (formerly 320) Managing Sales (3) Source, 
technique, and theories applied to problems encoun- 
tered in managing a sales force in the areas of 
administration, policy, organizational structure, per- 
sonnel selection and evaluation, sales training, com- 
pensation, forecasting, establishing territories and 
quotas, and sales analysis. Emphasis on case studies. 
PREREQi MKT 340 or permission of instrurtor. 
410 Independent Studies in Marketing (1-3) 
Special research projects, reports, and readings in 
marketing. Open to seniors only. PREREQi 
Permission of instructor. 



425 Marketing Strategy and Planning (3) 

Application of the skills required for effective man- 
agerial decision making and communication using a 
team approach. Emphasis on case studies, computer 
simulations, and the development of a marketing 
plan; oral and written presentation of results. PRE- 
REQi MKT 325, 360, and senior standing. 
440 (formerly 400) Senior Seminar in Marketing 
(3) Team research projects that require an in- 
depth investigation of a current topic m market- 
ing, and the preparation and presentation of an 
oral and written professional report. PREREQi 
Senior standing and 12 credits in marketing, 
including MKT 325 and 360. 
♦ 460 (formerly 450) Marketing Internship (3) 
The marketing internship is designed to enhance 
the student's educational experience by providing a 
substantive work experience in the business world. 
PREREQi Permission of instructor and depart- 
ment chair. 

461 (formerly 451) Marketing Internship (6) The 
marketing internship is designed to enhance the 
student's educational experience by providing a 
substantive work experience in the business world. 
PREREQi Permission of instructor and depart- 
ment chair. 

490 Special Topics in Marketing (3) Special top- 
ics in marketing not covered under existing, regu- 
larly offered courses. PREREQi MKT 325 and 
permission of instructor. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Mathematics 

323 C Andereon Hall 

610-436-2440 

Richard Branton, Chairperson 

Frank Milliman, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Branton, Grosshans, Kerrigan, Szymanski, Tan 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Gallitano, Glidden, Gupta, 

Johnston, Milliman, Moser, Rieger, Wolfson 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Gallop, Jackson, Marano, Nitica, 

Smith, Zimmer 
INSTRUCTORS: GysUng, Matus 

The Department of Mathematics offers a program leading to the 
bachelor of arts degree in mathematics and a program leading to the 
bachelor of science in education. 

1. The B.A. in MATHENL\TICS enables each student to receive 
the basic preparation for the career of his/her choice, such as col- 
lege teaching, research, and service in industry' and government. In 
all cases, the student receives a sound preparation for graduate 
study in the field of mathematics. 

2. TheB.S. in EDUCATION - MATHEMATICS focuses on a 
heavy concentration in mathematics while the student earns state 
certification to teach mathematics on the middle, junior high, or 
senior high school levels. 

Majors in these areas should consult the department handbook and 
review with their advisers current requirements listed on the guidance 
record sheets. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS - MATHEMATICS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
MAT 211 (three semester hours) satisfies 
general education mathematics requirement. 
CSC 141 and PHY 170 (six semester hours) 
satisfy the general education science requirement. 



2. Foreign Language Requirement 0-6 semester hours 
At the 200 level 

3. Related Requirements 1 1 semester hours 
CSC 141 and PHY 170-180 

(CSC 141 and three semester horn's of PIT\' 170 
satisfy the general education science distributive 
requirement.) 

4. Major Requirements 23 semester hours 
MAT 161, 162, 200, 211, 261, 411, 421, and 441 

5. Electives in Mathematics 21 semester hours 
Selected from upper-di\ision mathematics courses, 

one in each of the areas of analysis, and applied 
mathematics 

Requirement of a Minor 

Students in the B.A. degree program are required to complete either a 
minor or, with the approval of the student's adviser and the 
Department of Mathematics chairperson, an additional nine credit 
hours of upper-division mathematics. The discipline chosen for the 
minor will reflect a student's post-baccalaureate goals. The depart- 
ment recommends completing a minor in the natiual sciences (astron- 
omy, biology, chemistry, earth sciences, geolog)', and ph>'sics), com- 
puter science, economics, or finance, but other minors may be selected 
with the approval of the student's adviser and the mathematics chair- 
person. When departmental approvals are necessar)', documentation 
will be kept in the student's ad\ising folder. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION - 
MATHEMATICS 
1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

MAT 211 (three semester hours) satisfies the 

genera] education mathematics requirement. 

CSC 141 and PHY 170 (sbc semester hours) 

satisfy the general education science requirement. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Mathematics 



PHY 180 (three semester hours) satisfy the 
general education student electives. 

2. Mathematics Requirements 40 semester hours 
MAT 161, 162, 200, 211, 231, 261, 350 

(credited to professional education), 354, 401, 
411,414, 421, and 441 

3. Professional Education Requirements 27 semester hours 
EDA/EDR 341; EDF 100; EDP 250 and 351; 

EDS 306 and 411-412 

4. Related Requirements 11 semester hours 
CSC 141 and PHY 170-180 

5. Electives in Mathematics 6 semester hours 
Selected from upper-division mathematics courses; at least one 
course in both algebra and analysis 

All math major courses must be passed with C- or better. 

Minor in Mathematics* 18 semester hours 

Baccalaureate students may receive transcript recognition for a minor 
area of study in' mathematics by completing four required courses and 
two electives selected from the approved list. 

1. Required Courses 12 semester hours 
MAT161, 162, 211, and261 

2. Approved Electives 6 semester hours 
Any two courses in mathematics with course 



numbers above 211 with the exception of those 
courses with a primary focus on teacher training 
or those courses restricted to students majoring in 
elementar\' education 

Minor in Elementary School 18 semester hours 

Mathematics (K-8)* 

Required Courses 

MAT 102, 121, 212, 233, 352, and CSC 350 

Advanced Placement Policy 

Course credit for success on AP exams in mathematics is awarded as 

follows: 

APTest Score on AP Test 

3 4 5 



Calculus AB 
Calculus BC 
Statistics 



MAT 108 
MAT 161 
MAT 121 



MAT 161 
MAT 162 
MAT 121 



MAT 161 
MAT 162 
MAT 121 



If placed in a calculus class because of an SAT score, the student must 
stiU pass a departmental examination administered during the fu^st day 
of classes before being allowed to continue. 



*In the above minors, a student must earn a minimum grade of C- in each 
course and have an average of at least 2.0 over all the courses taken in the minor. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MATHEMATICS 

Symbol: MAT 

000 Fundamentals of Algebra (3) This course 
aims at strengthening basic algebraic skills. A stu- 
dent (other than an early childhood, elementary, 
and special education major) with a math SAT 
score greater than or equal to 440 and less than 
480 must successftilly complete this course with a 
grade of at least C- before enrolling in a 100-level 
mathematics course. Credits earned in 000-level 
courses do not count toward the 120 hours of 
credit needed for graduation. 

001 Fundamental Skills in Arithmetic (3) A 
course designed to strengthen basic arithmetic 
skills and to introduce the elements of algebra. 
Students, in general, are placed in MAT 001 if 
their math SAT is less than 440. A student (other 
than an early childhood, elementary, or special 
education major) must complete this course and 
the subsequent course MAT 000 with a grade of 
C- before enrolling in a 100-level mathematics 
course. An early childhood, elementary, or special 
education major with a math SAT score less than 
480 must complete this course with a grade of at 
least C- before enrolling in MAT 101. 

101 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3) 
Sets; fiinctions; logic; development of whole num- 
bers, integers, and rationals (including ratios, pro- 
portions, and percents); number theory; problem 
solving. For early childhood, elementary educa- 
tion, and special education majors only. 

102 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3) 
Development of real numbers; geometry; measure- 
ment; probability and statistics; problem solving. 
For elementary education and special education 
majors only. PREREQ^MAT 101. 

103 Introduction to Mathematics (3) This course is 
a liberal arts introduction to the nature of mathemat- 
ics. Topics are chosen from among logic, graph the- 
orj', number theory, symmetry (group theory), prob- 
ability, statistics, infinite sets, geometry, game theo- 
r\', and linear programming. These topics are inde- 
pendent of each other and have as prerequisite the 
ability to read, reason, and follow a logical argument. 



105 College Algebra and Trigonometry (3) A 

unified course in algebra and trigonometry. PRE- 
REQ; High school algebra. 

107 College Algebra (3) A thorough treatment of 
college algebra. Topics covered include the study 
of polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic fiinc- 
tions, plus systems of linear equations. 

108 Brief Calculus (3) An intuitive approach to 
the calculus of one and several variables with 
emphasis on conceptual understanding and practi- 
cal appUcation. PREREQ^MAT 107. 

110 Precalculus (3) A preparation for MAT 161, 
Calculus 1. 1 opics include pol\Tiomial and rational 
fiinctions, algebra of fiinctions, graphs of fiinc- 
tions, transcendental fiinctions, trigonometry, 
series, induction, and complex numbers. 

121 Statistics I (3) Basic concepts of statistics. 
Frequency distributions, measures of central ten- 
dency and variability, probability and theoretical 
distribution, significance of differences, and 
hypothesis testing. For nonmathematics majors. 
MTL 121 Statistics Lab 1 (1) Introduces the stu- 
dent to using and programming the computer to 
solve statistical problems and to aid the student in 
understanding statistical concepts. 

122 Statistics II (3) Continuation of MAT 121. 
Inference about the means, standard deviations 
and proportions, goodness ot fit, analysis of vari- 
ance, regression analysis, correlation, and nonpara- 
menic tests. PREREQ: MAT 121. 

151 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (3) Set 
theory. Boolean logic, elementary combinatorics, 
proofs, simple graph theor\', and simple probability. 

161 Calculus I (4) Differential and integral calcu- 
lus of real-valued fiinctions of a single real variable, 
with applications. PREREQ^ Good working 
knowledge of high school algebra and trigonometry 
demonstrated by a math SAT score of 590 or 
above and a passing score on the departmental 
examination, or a C- or above in MAT 105 or 110. 

162 Calculus II (4) Continuation of MAT 161 
including the study of series, methods of integra- 
tion, transcendental fiinctions, and applications to 
the sciences. PREREQ: MAT 161. 

200 The Nature of Mathematics (2) Topics 
include the role of mathematics in contemporary 



society, career opportunities, mathematical nota- 
tion and argument, structure of proofs, basic facts 
about logic, mathematical proofs, problem-solving 
techniques, and introductions to mathematical 
software packages. PREREQiMAT 161. Course 
should be taken by end of sophomore year and 
passed with a grade of at least a C before enrolling 
in higher-level mathematics courses. 
209 Topics in Mathematics for the Elementary 
Teacher (3) Introduction to programming in 
BASIC; computer uses for the classroom teacher; 
descriptive statistics with applications for teaching; 
and measurements of length, area, volume, and 
temperature that focus on the SI metric system 
with practice in the classroom. Additional topics 
in applied mathematics will be considered. PRE- 
REQ: MAT 102. 

211 Linear Algebra (3) An introduction to linear 
algebra. Topics covered include matrices, systems 
of linear equations, vector spaces, Unear transfor- 
mation, determinants, eigenvalues, spectral theo- 
rem, and triangulation. 

212 Algebra for Elementary Teachers (3) Formal 
structure of groups, rings, and fields with examples 
from the elementary curriculum. Topics from lin- 
ear algebra including matrices, determinants, and 
Unear programming. PREREQ; MAT 102. 

221 Applied Statistics (3) Probabilities, discrete and 
continuous probability distributions, methods of 
estimation, and hypothesis testing. PREREQ; CSC 
141 (or equivalent) and MAT 162 (or equivalent). 

231 Foundations of Geometry (3) Geometric foun- 
dations from an advanced viewpoint. Topics are 
chosen from euclidean and noneudidean geometries. 

232 Differential Geometry (3) Classical differen- 
tial geometry from a modem viewpoint. Curves 
and surfaces and shape operators. Introduction to 
Riemann geometry. PREREQ; MAT 261. 

233 Geometry for Elementary Teachers (3) 
Modern informal approach to two- and three- 
dimensional geometric figures, measurement, sim- 
ilarity, congruence, coordinate geometry, and the 
posmlational method. PREREQ. MAT 102. 

261 Calculus III (3) The calculus of several vari- 
ables. Topics include polar coordinates, vectors 
and three-dimensional analytic geometr)-, differen- 



Music 



School of Music 



tiation of functions of several variables, multiple 
integrals, and line and surface integrals. PRE- 
REQ;.MAT161 and 162. 
262 Calculus IV (3) The calculus of vector-valued 
ftinctions of a vector variable. Derivatives and proper- 
ties of the derivative including the chain mle, fields 
and conservative fields, integration, and Green's, 
Stokes', and Gauss' theorems. PREREQ^MAT 261. 
281 Discrete Mathematics (4) This course is 
designed to provide a foundation for the mathe- 
matics used in the theori.' and application of com- 
puter science. Topics include mathematical reason- 
ing, the notion of proof, logic, sets, relations and 
flinctions, counting techniques, algorithmic analy- 
sis, modelling, cardinality, recursions and induc- 
tion, graphs, and algebra. PREREQ: MAT 162. 
321 Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3) 
Introduction to set theon,', graph theory, and com- 
binatorial analysis. Includes relations, cardinality, 
elementary combinatorics, principles of inclusion 
and exclusion, recurrence relations, zero-one matri- 
ces, partitions, and Polya's Theorem. PREREQi 
CSC 141 or CSW 101, and MAT 261 or 281. 
343 Differential Equations (3) The general theory 
of nth order, and Enear differential equations 
including existence and uniqueness criteria and lin- 
earity ot the solution space. General solution tech- 
niques for variable coefficient equations, series solu- 
tions for variable coefficient equations, and study of 
systems of linear equations. PREREQi MAT 261. 

349 Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood 
(3) Concepts, learning aids, syllabi, texts, and 
methods in early childhood mathematical teach- 
ing. PREREQ:' MAT 101. 

350 Foundations of Mathematics Education (3) 
Historical oveniew of mathematics education with 
emphasis on influential curricular programs, pro- 
grams for exceptional students, implications of 
learning theory, significance of research, identifi- 
cation of current issues, organizational alternatives 
for the classroom, and evaluation resources. PRE- 
REQ: MAT 261. 

351 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary 
Schools I (3) Concepts, learning aids, syllabi, 
te.xts, and methods in elementary school mathe- 
matics. PREREQ: MAT 101-102. 

352 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary 
Schools II (3) Techniques for teaching children 
concepts such as geometry in two and three dimen- 
sions, number sentences, graphing, ratios and per- 



centages, quantifiers, etc. Use of laboratory materi- 
als will be emphasized. PREREQ. MAT 351. 
354 Techniques of Teaching Secondary School 
Mathematics (3) Techniques used in the presenta- 
tion of specific mathematical concepts, associated 
materials, including methods for exceptional stu- 
dents; levels of questioning, and motivational 
devices. Scope and sequence of secondary mathe- 
matics topics. Criteria for text evaluation. Preview 
of student teaching. PREREQ; MAT 350. 
357 Teaching Mathematics to Diverse 
Populations (3) Methods and materials associated 
with the presentation of mathematics to the hand- 
icapped. Emphasis on individualization and 
involving thinking skills at the concrete level. 
Evaluative and interpretive techniques are includ- 
ed. PREREQ. MAT 101-102. 
^ 390 Seminar in Mathematics Education (3) 
T)pical topics are remedial programs, low achiever 
programs, materials for mathematics education, 
methodology in mathematics education, mathe- 
matics and the computer, theories of mathematics 
education, and analysis of research in mathematics 
education. PREREQ. MAT 351. 

400 History of Mathematics for Elementary 
Teachers (3) Historv and development of elemen- 
tary mathematics from primitive times to the dis- 
cover}' of calculus. Problems of the period are con- 
sidered. PREREQ; MAT 212 and 233. 

401 History of Mathematics (3) Development of 
mathematics from the Babylonian era to the 18th 
centurv. Some modern topics included. PREREQ; 
MAT 261. 

♦ 405 Special Topics in Mathematics (3) Topics 
announced at the time of offering. 
411-412 Algebra I-Il (3) (3) Abstract algebra. 
Algebraic systems, groups, rings, integral domains, 
and fields. PREREQ. MAT 261. MAT 411 must 
precede 412. 

414 Theory of Numbers (3) Properties of inte- 
gers; primes, factorization, congruences, and qua- 
dratic reciprocity. PREREQ: MAT 261. 
421-422 Mathematical Statistics MI (3) (3) 
ProbabUit)' theory, discrete and continuous ran- 
dom variables, distributions, and moment generat- 
ing ftinctions. Statistical sampling theory, joint 
and interval estimation, test of hypothesis, regres- 
sion, and correlation. PREREQ; MAT 261; 
MAT 421 must precede 422. 
425 Ntunetical Analysis (3) Numerical methods for 
the approximate solution of applied problems. Inter- 



polation theory, curve fitting, approximate integra- 
tion, and numerical solution of differential equa- 
tions. PREREQ. CSC 115 or 141, and MAT 262. 
427 Introduction to Optimization Techniques 
(3) Nature of optimization problems: deterministic 
and stochastic, and discrete and continuous. 
Computer methods of solution, systematic and 
random search, linear quadratic, d}'namic pro- 
gramming, and others. PREREQ; CSC 115 or 
141, and MAT 261. 

432 Topology (3) Elements of point set topology. 
Separation axioms. Connectedness, compactness, 
and metrizability. PREREQ; MAT 261. 
441-442 Advanced Calculus I-II (3) (3) A rigor- 
ous treatment of the calculus ot a single real vari- 
able. Topics in several real variables and an intro- 
duction to Lebesque integration. PREREQ; MAT 
261; ^L^T 441 must precede 442. 
443-444 AppUed Analysis I-II (3) (3) The tech- 
niques of analysis appUed to problems in the phys- 
ical sciences. Topics include partial differential 
equations, orthogonal ftinctions, complex integra- 
tion, and conformal mapping. PREREQ; MAT 
261; ^L^^ 443 must precede 444. 
445 Complex Variables (3) Introduction to ftinc- 
tions of a complex variable. Analytic functions, map- 
pings, differentiation and integration, power series, 
and conformal mappings. PREREQ; MAT 261. 
♦ 490 Seminar in Mathematics (3) Topics in 
mathematics selected for their significance and sw- 
dent-instructor interest. Independent study and stu- 
dent reports, oral and written. PREREQ; Senior 
standing and consent of department chairperson. 
493 Mathematical Modeling (3) The idea of a 
mathematical model of a real siwation. 
Techniques and rationales of model building. 
Examples from the life, ph.ysical, and social sci- 
ences. PREREQ; MAT 261 and 343. 
499 Independent Study in Mathematics (1-3) 
Independent investigation of an area ot mathemat- 
ics not covered in the department's course offerings. 
PREREQ; Written permission of the instructor. 

Symbol: STA 

311 Introduction to Statistical Computing and 
Data Management (3) Course will give students 
the abilit)' to manage and manipulate data effec- 
tively, conduct basic statistical analysis, and gener- 
ate reports and graphics primarily using the SAS 
Statistical Software Program. 



♦ This course ma)' be taken again for credit. 



School of Music 

1 1 Swope H-all (Office of the Dean) 

610-436-2739 

PROFESSORS: Balthazar, Bedford, Burton, Friday, Klein, 

Laudermilch, McVoy, Murray, L. Nelson, Newbold, 

Pennington, Price, Schmidt, Southall, Veleta, Voois, Wagner 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Ahramjian, Chilcote, 

DeV'enney, Dorminv, Grabb, Hanning, Ludeker, 

Maggio, Sprenklc, Villella, Wyss 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Albert, BriseUi, Cranmer, 

Greenlee, Klinefelter, Lyons, McFarland, Metcalf, Onderdonk, 

Pippart-Brown, Richter, Rimple, Winters 
INSTRUCTORS: CuUen, Galante, Hanna, Kaderabek, 

P. Nelson, Paulsen 



The mission of the School of Music at West Chester Universit)' is to cre- 
ate a learning environment that provides the highest order of education in 
all major aspects of music, to establish a foundation for life-long growth 
in music, and to offer programs and degrees that are tradition based but 
future oriented. In pursuing this mission, we reaffirm our commitment to 
diversity within the School of Music. Our faculty members strive to be 
inspiring teachers as well as musical and intellectual leaders. Further, we 
endeavor to expand the music opportunities available to all University 
students and to enhance the quality of our community's musical life. 

MUSIC TESTS — BACHELOR OF MUSIC 
IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

1 . Each candidate must demonstrate skill in at least one performance 
medium in which he or she excels: piano, organ, voice, classical 
guitar, or a band or orchestra instrument. It is preferable, although 



School ot Music 



Music 



not required, for pianists and vocalists to perform at least part of 
their audition from memory. 

2. AH candidates are tested in voice and piano. 

3. Piano, organ, or voice majors with band or orchestra instrument expe- 
rience are urged to demonstrate their ability on their instruments. 

NOTE: All candidates must bring music for the vocal, piano, and 
instrumental compositions they intend to perform, and should come 
prepared with a song that will demonstrate vocal range and quality. 

MUSIC TESTS — BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN THEORY 
AND COMPOSITION, PERFORMANCE, OR ELECTIVE 
STUDIES IN AN OUTSIDE FIELD 

Each candidate in performance must demonstrate an advanced level of 
proficiency in the major area of performance as evidenced by the abili- 
ty to perform compositions representing a variety ot musical periods 
and styles, and must show potential as a professional performer. 
Memorization is required tor pianists and vocahsts. Each candidate in 
theory and composition or elective studies in an outside field must 
demonstrate an acceptable background in a major performing area; 
candidates in theory and composition must interview with the 
Department of Music Theory and Composition. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL MUSIC 
PROGRAMS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Theorv Requirements 20 semester hours 
MTC'll2, 113, 114, 115, 212, 213, 214, and 215 

3. Music History Requirements 9 semester hours 
MHL210, 211, and212 

4. Recital Attendance 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC— MUSIC EDUCATION 

The B.M. in MUSIC EDUCATION is a balanced program of general, 
specialized, and professional courses leading to qualification for a 
Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate to teach general, instrumental, and 
choral music in the elementary and secondary schools of Pennsylvania. 
The Handbook for Students in Music - Undergraduate Division should be 
consulted for the current general and music requirements. 

1. Required Music Education Courses 23 semester hours 
Professional qualifying test, MUE 101, 201, 

331, 332, 333, 335, 431, and 432 

2. Other Music Requirements 35-38 semester hours 
Major performing instrument, applied music 

courses, conducting, music organizations, 
or repertoire classes 

3. Education Courses 7 semester hours 
EDA 250, EDF 100, and EDP 250 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN THEORY AND 
COMPOSITION, PERFORMANCE, OR ELECTIVE 
STUDIES IN AN OUTSIDE FIELD 
The B.M. in THEORY AND COMPOSITION offers extensive 

training to develop analytical skills leading to the comprehension of 
the structure and form of music ot all styles and periods, and to devel- 
op creative skills enabhng the smdent to write in a contemporary 
idiom and to develop an individual style. 

1. Required Theory/Composition Courses 24 semester hours 
MTC 312, 313, 341, 342, 344, 417; 485 and 

486 or 487 or 488 

2. Other Music Requirements 31 semester hours 
Conducting, performance area, music 

organizations, music electives, piano competency 
The B.M. in PERFORMANCE is for students who demonstrate a 
high degree ot ability on their chosen instrument and who desire to 
concentrate on developing that abiUty. Majors in the program should 
consult the Handbook for Students in Music - Undergraduate Division 
for the current general and music requirements. 

1. Foreign Language (for vocal track only) 0-3 semester hours 

2. Private Lessons 24 semester hours 

3. Required Music Courses 8-21 semester hours 
Conducting, minor lessons, ensembles, music electives 



4. Other Music Requirements 

a. For Instrumentahsts 4 semester hours 
Music hterature, small ensemble, piano competency 

b. For Vocalists 1 1 semester hours 
VOC 329, 411, 412, 413, 414, 416, 424, 491 

c. For Pianists 19 semester hours 
MAK 311, 312, 313, 314; PIA 405 and 406; 

two courses from PIA 423, 424, 425, 426, or 
427; one course from PIA 451, 452, or 453 
(Pedagogy Emphasis: MAK 311, 312, 313, 314; 
PIA 405, 406, 450, 452; PIA 451 or 453; one 
course from PIA 423, 424, 425, 426, 427) 

d. For Organists 19 semester hours 
MAK 311, 312, 313, 314; ORG 351, 352, 

353, 451, 452 
The B.M. in MUSIC — ELECTIVE STUDIES IN AN OUT- 
SIDE FIELD is designed for those students who desire a general 
music program while at the same time pursuing a secondary interest 
outside of the School of Music. The Handbook for Students in Music - 
Undergraduate Division should be consulted for the current general 
and music requirements. 

1. Required Music Courses 34 semester hours 
Applied lessons, conducting, ensemble, music electives 

2. The Outside Field 21 semester hours 
These courses are taken under advisement of the outside field 
department chairperson. See page 41 for a listing of choices (in 
most cases, the curriculum for a minor will be used to determine 
the course work for the outside field). 

Minor in Music 19 semester hours 

This program is geared toward liberal arts students -mth an interest in 
music. The Handbook for Students in Music - Undergraduate Division 
should be consulted for current requirements and placement testing. 

1. Required Courses 11-12 semester hours 
MTC 112 and 114, MHL course, music 

organizations, and PIA 181 and 182 

2. Music Electives 7 semester hours 

Minor in Jazz Studies 18-21 semester hours 

This program is designed primarily for students currently enrolled in a 
music degree program. Students in other degree programs will be 
admitted if qualified. Students must have the permission of both their 
major adviser and the chairperson of the Department of Instrumental 
Music. The Handbook for Students in Music - Undergraduate Division 
should be consulted for current requirements. 

1. Required Courses 18 semester hours 
AES 151, 152; AJZ 361, 362, 365; MHL 322; 

MTC 361, 362 

2. Music Electives 0-3 semester hours 
AEO 121; AES 151, 152; APC 193 

Minor in Music History 18 semester hours 

This program is designed primarily for students currentiy enrolled in a 
music degree program. Students in other degree programs will be admit- 
ted if they qualify. Students must have the permission of both their 
major adviser and the chairperson of the Department of Music History. 
Required Courses 12 semester hours 

MHL 201, 210, 211,212 
Any two of the following 6 semester hours 

MHL 220, 320, 325, 451, 454, 455, 458, 462, 

479, 480; MHW 401-410 

Equivalency in Music Therapy 

Music majors may pursue courses toward a certification in music thera- 
py through a cooperative program with Immaculata College, located 
ten mUes from West Chester. The Handbook for Students in Music - 
Undergraduate Division should be consulted for current requirements. 



Music: Applied Music 



School ot Music 



Department of Applied Music 

John Villella, Chairperson 
FACULTY: 

Instrumental: Ahramjian, Briselli, Galante, Grabb, Guidetti, 
Hanna, Manning, Kaderabek, Klein, Laudermilch, Lyons, 
Metcalf, P. Nelson, Newbold, Paulsen, Richter, SouthaU 



Keyboard: Bedford, Cranmer, Greenlee, Klinefelter, Pennington, 

Veleta, Voois 
Vocal and Choral: Q\iAcoX.t, DeVenney, Dorminy, Friday, Wagner, 

Wyss 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 
NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Private and class lessons are shown by the 
foUowing numbers, together with the 
appropriate prefix: 



BAR 


Baritone 


HAS 


Bass 


ESN 


Bassoon 


CLT 


Clarinet 


FLU 


Flute 


FRH 


French Horn 


GTR 


Guitar 


HRP 


Harp 


JBR 


Jazz Brass 


JPR 


Jazz Percussion 


JST 


Jazz Strings 


JWW 


Jazz Woodwinds 


OBO 


Oboe 


PER 


Percussion 


SAX 


Saxophone 


TBA 


Tuba 


TPT 


Trumpet 


TRB 


Trombone 


VCL 


CeUo 


VLA 


\riola 


VLN 


Violin 



101-402 Private instrucrion in minor perfor- 
mance area(l) 

111-412 Private instruction in major perfor- 
mance area, music education program (1.5) 
141-442 Private instruction in advanced perfor- 
mance area, B.M. program (3) 
171-472 Private instruction in performance 
area, theory/composition, and elective studies 
programs (1.5) 

INS 471-474 Advanced Instrumental Lesson (2) 
(Elective) 

AIM 311 Marching Band Techniques (1) A sur- 
vey of the function of the total marching band and 
each component within it. 
AIM 429 Special Subject Seminar (1-2-3) 
AJZ 331 Electronic Instruments (2) A study of 
the MIDI implementation of synthesizers, sam- 
plers, sequencers, signal processors, and rhythm 
processors as related to real-time performance. 

♦ AJZ 361 Jazz Musicianship and Improvisa- 
tion I (3) A basic course in jazz improvisation that 
emphasizes the learning and discovery ot improvi- 
sational techniques through playing and hstening. 

♦ AJZ 362 Jazz Musicianship and Improvisa- 
tion II (3) A continuation of AJZ 361. 

AJZ 365 Jazz Ensemble Techniques (.5) Tech- 
niques and methods for organizing, rehearsing, 
programming, and operating jazz ensembles. 

♦ AWM 429 Special Subjects Seminar-Work- 
shop (1-2-3) Topics in the area of instnmiental 
music presented by faculty members and/or visit- 
ing specialists. 



ALC A Literature Class A historical survey of 
the music written for instrumental solo and 
ensemble, including current teaching materials. 
ALC 312 Brass Literature I (1) 
ALC 313 Brass Literature II (1) 
ALC 314 Brass Literature III (1) 
ALC 322 Guitar Literature 1(1) 
ALC 323 Guitar Literature II (1) 
* ALC 324 Guitar Literature III (1) 
ALC 332 String Literature 1(1) 
ALC 333 String Literature 11(1) 
ALC 334 String Literature III (1) 
ALC 342 Woodwind Literature 1(1) 
ALC 343 Woodwind Literature II (1) 
ALC 344 Woodwind Literature III (1) 
ALC 352 Percussion Literature I (1) 
ALC 353 Percussion Literature 11(1) 
ALC 354 Percussion Literature III (1) 
ARC A Repertoire Class: 
ARC 391 Woodwind Repertoire Class (.5) 
ARC 392 Brass Repertoire Class (.5) 
ARC 393 String Repertoire Class (.5) 
ARC 394 Percussion Repertoire Class (.5) 
AMC A Master Class Solo and ensemble instru- 
mental repertoire is performed and critiqued by 
the teacher and students. 

♦ AMC 311-314 Master Class Brass (1) 

♦ AMC 321-324 Master Class Percussion (1) 

♦ AMC 331-334 Master Class Strings (1) 

♦ AMC 341-344 Master Class Woodwinds (1) 
ABC Brass Classes (at the beginning level) for 
music education major? 

ABC 191 Brass Class (.5) 

ABC 192 French Horn Class (.5) 

ABC 193 Trombone Class (.5) 

APC Percussion Classes (at the beginning level) 

for music education majors 

APC 191 Nonpitched Percussion Class (.5) 

APC 192 Pitched Percussion Class (.5) 

APC 193 Drum Set Class (.5) 

ASC Strings Classes (at the beginning level) for 

music education majors 

ASC 191 VioIinAlola Class (1) 

ASC 194 Cello Class (.5) 

ASC 195 Bass Class (.5) 

ASC 196 Guitar Class (.5) 

AWC Woodwinds Classes (at the beginning 

level) for music education majors 

AWC 191 Single Reed Class (.5) 

AWC 192 Flute/Recorder Class (.5) 

AWC 193 Double Reed Class (.5) 

AWC 194 Reed Making Class (.5) 

AEB \n Ensemble: Band 

♦ AEBlOl Elementary Band (.5) 

♦ AEB 1 12 Marching Band Front (1) 

♦ AEB 31 1 Marching Band (1) 

♦ AEB 321 Concert Band (.5) 

♦ AEB 331 Symphonic Band (.5) 

♦ AEB 341 Wind Ensemble (.5) 
AEO An Ensemble: Orchestra 



♦ AEO 101 Elementary Orchestra (.5) PRE- 
REQ: ASC 191. 

♦ AEO 1 1 1 Chamber Orchestra ( .5 ) 

♦ AEO 121 Studio/Pit Orchestra (.5) 

♦ AEO 341 Symphony Orchestra (.5) 
AES An Ensemble: Small 

♦ AES 111 Brass Ensemble (.5) 

♦ AES 121 Percussion Ensemble (.5) 

♦ AES 131 String Ensemble (.5) 

♦ AES 141 Woodwind Ensemble (.5) 

♦ AES 151 Jazz Ensemble 
(Criterions/Statesmen) (.5) 

♦ AES 152 Jazz Ensemble (Combo) (.5) 
AIC A Class in Instrumental Conducting 
AIC 311 Instrumental Conducting I (2) 

AIC 312 Instrumental Conducting II (2) PRE- 
REQ:AIC311orVOC311. 

KEYBOARD MUSIC 
NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Private and class lessons are shown by the follow- 
ing numbers, together with the appropriate prefix: 
HAR-Harpsichord, PIA-Piano, ORG-Organ 
PIA 181 Class instruction in keyboard skills for 
nonmusic majors. (1) Prior score reading ability is 
not required- 

PIA 182 Class instruction in keyboard skills for 
nonmusic majors. (1) PREREc£ PIA 181 or pre- 
\'ioush' acquired score readmg abdirv'. 
191-192 Class instruction in minor performance 
area (.5) 

♦ 100 Private elective instruction (1) 
101-402 Private instruction in minor perfor- 
mance area (1) 

103-104 Private instruction in minor perfor- 
mance area (1) 

105-106 Private instruction in minor perfor- 
mance area, elementary- education students with 
a concentration in music (1) 
107-109 Private instruction in a major perfor- 
mance area, elementary education students with 
a concentration in music ( 1 ) 
111-412 Private instruction in major perfor- 
mance area, music education program (1.5) 
141-442 Private instruction in advanced perfor- 
mance area, B.M. program (3) 
171-472 Private instruction in performance area, 
theory/composition, and elective studies pro- 
gram (1.5) 

413 Elective credit for senior recital, accompa- 
nying, or other participation in concerts or 
recitals, or extra studv of literature. Available to 
music education seniors only during the nonstu- 
dent-teaching semester by permission of the 
department (1) 

473-474 Advanced Keyboard Lesson (2) 
(Elective) 

Pl/\ 403 Harpsichord and Continuo Realization 
(1) .'\n introduction to harpsichord pla)ing and 
the principles of continuo accompaniment as a 
Baroque st^le. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



School of Music 



Music; Applied Music 



♦ MAK 311-314 Master Class (Keyboard) (1) 

For keyboard majors. Experience in performing 
memorized literature. Class members also play two 
piano compositions and ensemble music for piano 
and other instruments. 

ORG 351 Organ Literature I (3) A survey of lit- 
erature for the organ from the 13th century to the 
Baroque period; influence of the organ on the Ut- 
erature. 

ORG 352 Organ Literature II (3) A survey of lit- 
erature for the organ from J. S. Bach to the present; 
influence of the organ on the literature. Recordings 
and performances by organ majors will be evaluated. 
ORG 353 Organ Pedagogy (3) Dynamics of the 
one-to-one teacher-student relationship. An in- 
depth study of standard teaching materials. 
Practical experience in individual instruction. 
ORG 451 Accompanying (3) Performance of the 
vocal and instrumental accompanying literature for 
organ from all periods; performance and reading 
sessions. 

ORG 452 Service Playing (3) A study of problems 
in service plajang for the organist. Included will be 
hymn accompaniment, improvisation, conducting 
from the organ, and literature tor the service. 
PIA 130 Music for Piano (3) An introductory 
course in the history and appreciation of keyboard 
literature from the 1 6th to the 20th century. This is 
a basic course for nonmusic majors designed for the 
general requirements. Not open to music majors. 

♦ PIA 213 Studio Lessons in Accompanying (1) 
Studio instruction in accompanying for pianists in 
any music program. 

PIA 223 Classroom Piano Skills (.5) Class 
instruction once per week in minor performance 
area for instrumental and vocal music education 
majors. 

PL\ 233 Classroom Piano Skills (1) Class 
instruction once per week in rote song harmoniza- 
tion, transposition, patriotic songs, and sight read- 
ing on electronic keyboards for music education 
piano majors. 

♦ PIA 235 Keyboard Repertoire (.5) A weekly 
performance class for sophomore music education 
keyboard majors. 

♦ PIA 250 Accompanying, Ensemble, and Sight 
Reading (1) Class instruction in accompanying, 
ensembles, and sight reading. 

PIA 330 Jazz Keyboard Improvisation (1) Class 
instruction in jazz keyboard improvisation once 
per week. Piano experience on at least an interme- 
diate level is required. 

PIA. 334 Keyboard Accompanying (Minor) (1) 
Class instruction once per week in accompanving, 
score reading, popular music, and sight reading for 
vocal music education majors. 
PIA 335 Keyboard Accompanying (Major) (1) 
Class instruction once per week in accompanying, 
score reading, popular music, improvisation, and 
sight reading for piano music education majors. 
PIA 340 Advanced Jazz Keyboard Improvisation 
(1) Class instruction in advanced jazz keyboard 
Improvisation once per week. Piano experience in 
jazz improvisation required. 
PIA 404 Transposition and Score Reading (2) 
Emphasizing the needs of the keyboard accompa- 
nist. Techniques include clet reading, harmonic 
analysis, interval transposition, solfege steps, and 
enharmonic changes. 

PIA 405 Accompanying — Vocal (3) Performance 
of the vocal accompanying literature from all peri- 
ods; performance and reading sessions in class. 
PIA 406 Accompanying — Instrumental (3) 
Performance of the instrumental accompanying lit- 



erature from all periods; emphasis on the sonata lit- 
erature; performance and reading sessions in class. 
PIA 410 Independent Studies in Keyboard 
Music (1-3) Special research projects, reports, or 
readings in keyboard music. Permission ot depart- 
ment chairperson required. 
PIA 423 Baroque Keyboard Literature (3) The 
Renaissance through development of variation 
form and dance suite. Performance practices, orna- 
mentation, and figured bass. In-depth study of 
works of Handel, Bach, and Scarlatti. Some stu- 
dent performance required. 
PIA 424 Classical Piano Literature (3) Origin 
and development ot the sonata and performance 
practices of homophonic style. Music of Bach's 
sons, Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. Some stu- 
dent performance required. 
PIA 425 Romantic Piano Literature (3) Analysis 
of piano styles of Schubert, Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Liszt, Brahms, Faure, and Tchaikovsky. 
Performance practices. The virtuoso etude and 
problems of technical execution. Some student per- 
formance required. 

PIA 426 20th-Centiuy Piano Literature (3) 
Seminal works and stj-les of this century. Albeniz, 
Rachmaninoff, Debussy, Ravel, Prokofiev, 
Hindemith, Schoenberg, Bartok, and American 
composers. Some student performance required. 
PREREQ:MTC213. 

PIA 427 The Concerto (3) A chronological pre- 
sentation of the development of the piano concer- 
to emphasizing performance practices and prob- 
lems. PREREQ:MTC 213. 
PIA 429 Special Subjects Seminar (1-3) Sig- 
nificant topics presented by facult}' members 
and/or visiting lecturers. Designed to meet the 
specific needs of undergraduate keyboard majors. 
PIA 443 Keyboard Ensemble (.5) The class will 
focus on a variety of ensemble experiences, includ- 
ing duets and accompanying choral groups. 
PIA 450 Group Piano Pedagogy I (3) Procedures 
and materials for group piano instruction. 
Emphasis on developing comprehensive musician- 
ship through an interwoven study ot literature, 
musical analysis, technique, improvisation, ear 
training, harmony, transposition, and sight read- 
ing. Includes practicum in group piano instruction. 
PIA 451 Piano Pedagogy I (3) An in-depth smdy of 
materials available to the smdio piano teacher for the 
elementary levels. Discussions include different 
methods, technique, harmony, ear training, and sight 
reading. Includes practicum in individual instruction. 
PIA 452 Piano Pedagogy II (3) An in-depth study 
of repertoire and materials available to the studio 
piano teacher for the intermediate levels. Discussion 
of related concerns such as memorization, pracrice 
techniques, developing technique through literamre, 
principles of fingering, and sight reading. Includes 
practicum in individual instruction. 
PIA 453 Selected Topics in Piano Pedagogy (3) 
Further exploration of the goals and objectives of 
piano study through presentation of selected topics 
and continued practicum in individual instruction. 

VOCAL AND CHORAL MUSIC 
NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Private lessons are shown by the following num- 
bers, together with this prefix: VOI-Voice 
♦ 100 Private instruction for nonmusic majors. 
Permission of the chairperson required (1) 
101-402 Private instrucrion in minor perfor- 
mance area(l) 

111-412 Private instruction in major perfor- 
mance area, music education program (1.5) 



141-442 Private instruction in advanced B.M. 
performance program (3) 

171-472 Private instruction in performance area, 
theory/composition, and elective studies pro- 
gram (1.5) 

473-474 Advanced Voice Lesson (2) (Elective) 
151-452 Private instruction in minor perfor- 
mance area, Bj\. theatre: musical theatre (1) 

♦ CHO 211 Men's Chorus (.5) A chorus pre- 
senting the choral Uterature for male voices. Open 
to all male swdents by audition. 

♦ CHO 212 Women's Chorus (.5) A chorus pre- 
senting the choral hterature for female voices. 
Open to all female students by audition. 

♦ CHO 311 Mastersingers Chorus (.5) A chorus 
presenting oratorios, masses, and more difficult 
mixed choral literature. Open to all students by 
audition. 

♦ CHO 312 Women's Ensemble (.5) A select 
choir speciahzing in chamber music for women's 
voices. Open to all female students by audition. 

♦ CHO 410 Opera Chorus (1) An elective 
course devoted to the training of a choral group 
that participates in opera or operetta productions. 
May not be used to satisfy choral requirements. 
Membership by audition. 

♦ CHO 411 Chamber Choir (.5) Small group of 
singers specializing in the performance of 
Renaissance/Baroque, sacred, and secular htera- 
wre. Membership by audition. 

♦ CHO 412 Concert Choir (.5) Devoted to 
acquiring a tine technique in choral singing 
through the preparation of programs for perfor- 
mance. Membership by audition. 

VOC 111 Madrigal Class (1) A survey of madri- 
gal literature through records, tapes, and class per- 
formance with emphasis on materials suitable for 
use in secondary' schools. 

VOC 135 IPA (.5) The study of the Internarional 
Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). 

VOC 211 Performance Preparation (2) A course 
designed to teach the student performer how to 
prepare a dramatic score. PREREQ; MTC 110 or 
equivalent and VOl 181. 

VOC 227 Literature of the Musical Theater (2) 
The literature of the musical theater from 
Singspiel to Broadway musical. Changes in style 
are observed and analyzed. 

♦ VOC 235 Vocal Repertoire Class (.5) A week- 
ly performance class for music education vocal 
majors. 

VOC 311 Choral Conducting I (2) A practical 
application of conducting and vocal techniques in 
choral direction through practice in conducting a 
choral group. 

VOC 312 Choral Conducting II (2) Continued 
development of the conducting techniques with 
emphasis on conducting of polyphonic choral 
music and on the musical styles of the various 
choral periods. PREREQ: VOC 311. 
VOC 315 English-Italian Diction (2) English, 
Itahan, and Latin diction for singers. Use of pho- 
netics with application to singing of selected songs. 
VOC 329 Art Song (3) Origins and development 
of the art song. 

VOC 411 Master Class (Voice): Baroque 
Period (1) 

VOC 412 Master Class (Voice): German 
Lied(l) 

VOC 413 Master Class (Voice): French 
Melodie (1) 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Music Education 



School of Music 



VOC 414 Master Class (Voice): 20th-century 
Art Song (1) 

VOC 416 French-German Diction (3) French 
and German diction for singers. Use of phonetics 
with application to singing of selected songs. 

♦ VOC 421 Opera Workshop (2) The prepara- 
tion of a musical production; coaching of scenes, 
stage movement, and costuming. Permission of 
instructor required. 

♦ VOC 424 Musico-Dramatic Production (1-3) 
Major roles and/or major responsibilities in 
extended productions. B)' audition. 

VOC 426 Choral Literature (2) The development 
and performance style of the choral repertoire. 



♦ VOC 429 Special Subjects Seminar (1-3) 

Significant topics presented by faculty members 
and/or visiting lecturers. Designed to meet the 
specific needs of undergraduate music majors. 

♦ VOC 436 Vocal-Choral Music Workshop (1-3) 

Specialized workshops in the area ot vocal and/or 
choral music. Subject to be announced at the time 
of the offering. 

VOC 491 Vocal Pedagogy (2) Principles and 
techniques of teaching voice. PREREQ^ Four 
semesters ot private instruction or permission of 
instructor. 



vol 181 Voice Class (1) Class instruction in 
singing skills tor nonmusic majors. Previous voice 
study not required. 

VOI 182 Voice Class (.5) Class instruction in 
singing skills for nonmusic majors. PREREQ^ 
VOI 181 or permission ot instructor. 

vol 191 Voice Class (.5) Class Instruction in a 
minor performance area. Open to nonmusic 
majors with permission ot the department chair- 
person. 

VOI 192 Voice Class (.5) Continuation of VOI 
191. PREREQ: VOI 191. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Music Education 

Jane Pippart-Brown, Chairperson 

FACULTY: Albert, Burton, Ludeker, McFarland 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MUSIC EDUCATION 

Symbol: MUE 

001 Professional Qualifying Remediation (.5) 

Designed to present musicianship skills for stu- 
dents who have failed the professional qualifying 
examination. 

101 Dalcroze in Music Education I (.5) A study 
of integrating eurhythmies, solfege, and improvisa- 
tion to enhance students' listening, performing, 
and creating skills. 

102 Dalcroze in Music Education II (.5) 
Continuation of MUE 101 Dalcroze in Music 
Education I. PREREQ: iMUE 101. 

201 Music Education Seminar (.5) A seminar 
introducing the philosophical foundations of music 
education and the structure of the school music 
program. Required for all music education majors 
prior to MUE 331. 

231 Music for the Classroom Teacher (3) 
Designed to equip the elementary classroom 
teacher to participate in a music program. 
Emphasis on teaching procedures and materials. 

232 Music in Early Childhood (3) Designed to 
equip the teacher ot early childhood to develop 
specific concepts utihzing singing, rhythmic, and 
melodic activities. Emphasis on listening and 
movement to music. 

331 Music Methods and Materials (3) The study 
of music and the learning process at the elemen- 
tarv level to include Dalcroze, Kodaly, and Orff 
PREREQ: MUE 201 and AIC 311 or VOC 311, 
and performance qualifying test. 
1 332 Music Methods and Materials II (3) The 
study of music and the learning process at the sec- 
ondary level to include technology, listening skills, 



multicultural diversitv, general music programs, 
and administrative skills. PREREQ. MUE 331. 
333 Instrumental Methods and Materials (3) 
Fundamentals underlying the development of instru- 
mental programs in the public schools. Emphasis on 
program organization and administration, teaching 
procedures, and materials. PREREQ; VOC 311 or 
MC 311-. COREQ: MUE 331 or 332. 
335 Choral Methods and Materials (2) Designed 
to acquaint the student with a variety of choral 
music suitable for school use. Program planning 
and rehearsal techniques are demonstrated. 
NOTE: The sequence for these REQUIRED music 
education courses is consecutive semesters: MUE 331 
and 333 (or 335) followed by MUE 332 and 335 (or 
333) followed by MUE 431 and 432. Enrollment for 
these courses is limited on a yearly basis and is planned 
at a meetingfor sophomores in the fall and spring 
semesters. See coordinator ofprofssional sequence. 

337 Instrumental Techniques and Materials (2) 
For juniors and seniors who desire to specialize in 
instrumental music. Considers rehearsal proce- 
dures, effective materials, minor repairs of instru- 
ments, competitions and festivals, and marching 
band procedures. PREREQ: MUE 333. 

338 Comprehensive Musicianship/Leadership 
Training in Music Education (2) A course 
designed to help future professionals develop lead- 
ership qualities and pragmatic instructional skills. 
Motivational strategies as advocated by leading 
authorities will be emphasized. Content includes 
visionary leadership, time management, and prin- 
ciples in self-discipline, sell-confidence, and prob- 
lem solving. Teaching assignments will include 
methodologies in comprehensive musicianship and 
a variety of teacher/leader concepts. 

412 Teaching Music Listening at the Elemen- 
tary Level (3) Analysis of musical concepts within 



selected compositions with subsequent design of 
sequential teaching-learning strategies for all lev- 
els, K-12. Music majors only. 
422 Music in the Middle School (3) Review and 
critical analysis of music education m the middle 
school: philosophies, curriculum, practices, and 
personnel. 

428 Music in Special Education (3) Charac- 
teristics of special pupils; adaptation of teaching 
techniques, materials, and curriculum. PREREQ; 
MUE231. 232, or331. 

430 Related Arts Pedagogy in Music Education 
(3) Principles of related-arts teaching appUcable to 
musical elements, art, and creative movement, 
with appropriate teaching techniques at specified 
grade levels. Materials for school music programs; 
basal music series, other texts and literature, and 
resources in related arts. Demonstration lessons 
and unit planning. 

431 Student Teaching I (6) Observation and par- 
ticipation in teaching vocal and instrumental 
music at the elementary level. Undertaken in con- 
junction with qualified cooperating teachers. Pro- 
fessional conferences and visits are an integral part 
of the experience. PREREQ: See MUE 432. 

432 Student Teaching II (6) Observation and 
teaching general, vocal, and/or instrumental music 
at the secondary level. Professional conferences and 
visits are an integral part of the experience. PRE- 
REQ.for MUE 431/432: Satisfy- requirements 
under "Formal Admission to Teacher Education." 
GPA 2.8. Grades of C or better in required meth- 
ods classes and final required keyboard minor and 
voice minor. Complete music theory and aurals, 
music history, conducting, and all instrument class- 
es. Completion of 90 semester hours. 



I Diverse communities course 



School of Music 



Music Theory and Composition 



Department of Music History and Literature 

Sterling E. Murray, Chairperson 

FACULTY: Balthazar, Onderdonk, Price, Schmidt, Winters 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MUSIC HISTORY 

S>'mbol: MHL 

121 Fine Arts (Music) (3) Designed for the gen- 
eral requirements. An introductory course in the 
history and appreciation of music from the Middle 
Ages through the contemporary period. Not open 
to music majors. 

NOTE: Other courses are available to the nonmusic 
major for general requirements. Particularly suitable is 
MHL 125. 

k 125 Perspectives in Jazz (3) For nonmusic 
majors. Guided listening to improve understand- 
ing and enjoyment of jazz with emphasis on jazz 
heritages, chronological development, and socio- 
logical considerations, culminating in an analysis 
of the eclectic styles of the 1960's and 1970's. Not 
open to music majors. 

♦ 179 Special Subjects Seminar (3) Significant 
topics in music histor)' and literature presented by 
faculty members and/or visiting lecturers. 
Designed for the nonmusic major who has had Ht- 
tle or no previous musical experience. Fulfills the 
general requirements. Not open to music majors. 

# 201 Form and Style in the Arts (3) Relation- 
ships between the arts (music, literature, fine arts, 
and dance) stressed through common principles ot 
form and style. Concentration on the development 
of skills of critical perception through practical 
application with reference to various arts. Fulfills 
the interdisciplinary requirement. 

210 Music History I (3) An introduction to musi- 
cal style and listening techniques within a histori- 
cal context: (1) an introduction to st\'le periods, 
music Ustening skills, concepts ot form, and style 
analj'sis in both Western and non-Western music; 
(2) historical survey of music beginning with the 
music of the early Church and continuing through 
the end of the 16th century. 



211 Music Histoiy II (3) A historical survey of 
music from 1600 to 1825. Analysis of appropriate 
genres, styles, forms, social contexts, aesthetics, and 
performance practices %vill be considered. PRE- 
REQi MHL 210, with a grade of C- or better. 

212 Music History III (3) A historical survey of 
music from 1825 to the present. Analysis of 
appropriate genre, st}'les, forms, social contexts, 
aestethic concepts, and performance practices will 
be considered. PREREQ: MHL 211, with a grade 
ofC- or better. 

220 Women in Music (3) A survey of the role 
that women plaved in the history' of music from 
the Middle Ages to the present. Open to nonmu- 
sic majors and music majors without prerequisites. 
♦ 310 Collegium Musicum (1) A chamber 
ensemble speciahzing in the use of authentic 
instruments and performance techniques in the 
music of the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque 
eras. Membership by audition. 
320 World Music (3) An introduction to the smdy 
of tribal, folk, popular, and oriental music and eth- 
nomusicolog}' methodolog)-. Open to music majors 
and nonmusic majors without prerequisites. 
322 History of Jazz (3) A survey of the history of 
jazz, including representative performers and their 
music. PRERECi MHL 212, or permission of the 
chairperson. 

325 History of Rock (3) This course traces the 
development of 1950s rock and roll firom its rh\lhm 
and blues, and country- and westem sources through 
the world music influences of the 1970s and beyond. 
451 Music in the United States (3) Sun'ey of the 
development of music and musical styles from 
1620 to the present, .\nalysis of styles, forms, aes- 
thetic concepts, and practices. 
454 History of Opera (3) A basic course in the 
origin and development of opera and its dissemi- 



nation throughout the Westem world. PREREQ; 
MHL 212, or permission of chairperson. 
455 History of Orchestral Music (3) A study of 
representative orchestral works: symphonies, con- 
certi, suites, overtures, and others, from the 
Baroque Period to the present. PREREQ;.MHL 
212, or permission of chairperson. 
458 Performance Practices (3) A consideration of 
the special problems encountered in the st)'listic 
reahzation and performance of music from the 
Medieval through the Romantic eras. Particular 
attention will be focused on original sources, peri- 
od instruments, and performance practices. PRE- 
REQi MHL 212, or permission of chairperson. 
462 Mozart and His Works (3) A study of the 
life and music of Wolfgang A. Mozart with special 
reference to the period in which he hved. PRE- 
REQ^ MHL 212, or permission of chairperson. 
This course is offered in Salzburg, Austria. 

♦ 479 Topics in Music History I (1-3) Signifi- 
cant topics presented by faculty members and/or 
visiting lecturers. Designed to meet specific needs 
of undergraduate music majors. 

♦ 480 Topics in Music History 11(1-3) 
Significant topics presented by faculty members 
and/or visiting lecturers. Designed to meet specific 
needs of undergraduate music majors. 

♦ 481 Independent Study (1) 

♦ 482 Independent Study (2) 

♦ 483 Independent Study (3) 

♦ MHW 401-410 Workshops in Music History 
(1-3) Participation-oriented workshops designed 
to meet specific needs in music history and to 
develop skills for practical apphcation in teaching 
and professional settings. 



I Diverse communities course 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



Department of Music Theory and Composition 

Robert Maggie, Chairperson 

FACULTY: Maggio, L. Nelson, Rimple, Rozin 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MUSIC THEORY AND 
COMPOSITION 

Symbol: MTC 

014 Basic Dictation and Sight Singing (2) A 

preparatory course for music majors emphasizing 
basic aural perception and sight-singing skills 
needed for effective music study. 
110 Fundamentals of Music (3) A study of basic 
elements of music for those without previous 
musical e.xpericnce. For nonmusic majors only. 
112 Theory of Music I (3) Introduction to music 
theory, music writing, and keyboard harmony. 
Elements of musical form; binary and ternary 



forms. Primary triads and their inversions. 
Analysis and creative activity. 

113 Theory of Music II (3) Supertonic and other 
secondarv triads and their inversions; diatonic sev- 
enth chords; modulation; compound ternary, rondo, 
and variation forms. Analysis and creative activity. 
PREREQ^MTC 112, with a grade of C- or better. 

114 Aural Activities I (2) Development of basic 
hearing skills, chiefly through sight singing and 
dictation activities based on the subject matter of 
MTC 112. 

115 Aural Activities II (2) Continued develop- 
ment of basic hearing skills. PREREQ: MTC 112 
and 114, with a grade of C- or better in both. 
212 Theory of Music III (3) Diatonic and chro- 
matic seventh chords and their inversions. 



Modulation. Invention and fiigue, sonata-allegro 
forms. Analysis and creative activity. PREREQi 
MTC 113, with a grade of C- or better 

213 Theory of Music IV (3) Harmonic and con- 
trapuntal techniques of the 20th century. Form in 
contemporarv music. Analysis and creative activity. 
PREREQ; MTC 212. 

214 Aural Activities III (2) Material of advanced 
difficulty involving chromatic alteration, foreign 
modulation, and intricate rhythms. PREREQ; 
MTC 113 and 115, with a grade of C- or better. 

215 Aural Activities IV (2) Continuation of 
MTC 214 and activities invohing nontonal music. 
PREREQ: MTC 212 and 214. 

261 Fundamentals of Jazz (2) A basic course in 
jazz theory. 



Nursins; 



School of Health Sciences 



271 Radio and Television Music (2) Techniques 
used in composing and arranging music for radio 
and television; practical writing experience. 

312 Composition I (3) Creative writing in the 
forms, styles, and media best suited to the capabili- 
ties and needs of the student. PREREQ; MTC 212. 

313 Composition II (3) Further application of 
MTC 312, stressing contemporary' techniques. 
PREREQ: MTC 312. 

341 Orchestration (3) The orchestra; use of 
instruments indi\'iduallv and in combinarion. 
PREREQ: MTC 212.' 

342 Musical Form (3) The standard forms of tonal 
and contemporan- music. PREREQ; MTC 212. 

344 Counterpoint I (3) The contrapuntal tech- 
niques ot tonal music. Chorale prelude and inven- 
tion. PREREQiMTC212. 

345 Counterpoint II (3) Advanced contrapuntal 
forms including canon and fiigue. PREREQ; 
MTC 344. 

346 Techniques of Early 20th-century Music 

(3) A study of compositional techniques in repre- 
sentative vocal and instrumental works of the first 
two decades of the century. 



♦ 361 Jazz Harmony and Arranging I (3) A basic 
course in jazz/popular harmony and arranging 
techniques, including contemporary chord symbols 
and terminology, and basic voicing for brass, reed, 
and rhythm sections. 

♦ 362 Jazz Harmony and Arranging II (3) An 

intermediate course in jazz/popular harmony and 
arranging techniques, including more advanced 
harmonic techniques. Writing for strings, wood- 
winds, and electronic instruments is introduced. 

364 Performance Practices in Contemporary 
Music (3) Technical problems of understanding new 
notation (e.g., graphic, proportional, mulriphonics, 
microtones, metric modulation, asymmetrical 
rh\thm groupings, prose scores, etc.) and facility in 
performing scores that include these techniques. 
PREREQ; MTC 213 or permission of mstmctor. 

412 Composition III (3) Composition in larger 
forms. Open to composition majors only. PRE- 
REQ: MTC 313. 

413 Composition IV (3) Advanced composition 
involving major projects in a contemporary idiom. 
PREREQ: MTC 412. 

415 Serialism and Atonality (3) Compositional 

procedures and theoretical concepts in atonal and 



serial works of Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, Bartok, 
Stravinsk\', and more recent composers. PRE- 
REQ: MTC 213. 

416 Jazz Practices (2-3) Jazz history, writing, and 
performance. Survey of basic jazz Uterature; fiinda- 
mental techniques in arranging and improvising. 
PREREQ: MTC 213 or equivalent. 

417 Computer Music I (3) Materials and tech- 
niques of computer music. Laboratory experience 
in the composition of computer music. PREREQ; 
MTC 312 or permission of instructor. 

418 Composition V (3) Advanced composition 
lessons for theorv/composition majors. PREREQ; 
MTC 413. 

450 Acoustics of Music (3) The study of sound; 
its production, transmission, and reception. 
Musical instruments, the acoustics of rooms, and 
the physical basis of scales. 

♦ MTC 479 Seminar in Music Theory/ 
Composition (3) Special topics in specialized areas 
of music theory and composition. 

♦ MTC 481 Independent Study (1) 

♦ MTC 482 Independent Study (2) 

♦ MTC 483 Independent Study (3) 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Nursing 

105 Nursing Building 

610-436-2219 

Ann Coghlan Stowe, Chairperson 

Susan C. Slaninka, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Hickman, Slaninka 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Conroy, Coghlan Stowe, 

Devlin-Kelly, Garrett, Mackey, Nester, Thomas, Thompson, 

Tucker, Wanta, Zabat 
INSTRUCTORS: Schlamb, Stabler-Haas 

The Department of Nursing is accredited by the National League for 
Nursing Accrediting Commission (61 Broadway, New York, NY 
10006, 212-363-5555) and approved by the State Board of Nursing of 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Admission Criteria 

Applicants for nursing must have completed work equal to a standard 
high school course, including a minimum of 16 units: four units of 
EngUsh, three units of social studies, two units of mathematics (one of 
which must be algebra), and two units of science with a related labo- 
ratory course or the equivalent. A combined score of 1000 is expected 
on the SAT. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

The bachelor of science degree program in nursing is offered by the 
Department of Nursing, which is an integral part of the School of 
Health Sciences. The family-centered program is based on the con- 
cept that the person is a biopsychosocial being with basic health 
needs. The Department of Nursing beUeves that high-quality health 
care is a basic right of all people and that health care needs can be met 
through the practice of the professional nurse who has completed a 
systematic program of courses in the social and natural sciences, 
humanities, and the nursing major. 

Characteristics of the graduate include: 1) an awareness of, and sense 
of responsibility for, social issues as they affect diverse populations; 2) 
leadership through professional and civic activities to advocate for the 
improvement of health care; 3) accountabilit)' and competency in uti- 
lizing the nursing process to assist clients at various levels of health in 



54 semester hours 



18 semester hours 



a variety of settings; 4) collaboration, coordination, and consultation 
as a colleague in the interdisciplinar\' health team; 5) belief in learning 
as a life-long process; 6) nursing theory and research to support nurs- 
ing practice. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Can include BIO 100; CHE/CRL 103-104 or 

CHE/CRL 107; 

MAT 121; PSY 100; and SOC 200. 

2. Nursing Core Requirements 
NSG 212, 311-312, and 411-412; NSL 212, 
311-312, 411-412; and two nursing electives 

3. Cognate Requirements' 
BIO 204, 259, 269, and 307; HEA 206 or 
PSY 210; and HEA 303 

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation. 

Academic Promotion Policy 
Failures, D Grades, or NG (No Grade) 

AH nursing students who have a grade of D, F, or NG (no grade) in 
required courses during the freshman and sophomore years must repeat 
these courses and achieve a satisfactory grade (C- or above) before 
entering the junior-level nursing major courses. Nursing students must 
have a 2.0 GPA before entering the clinical courses at the junior year. 
A student must achieve a grade of C- or better in the nursing major 
in the junior year for promotion to the senior year and achieve at least 
a C- in the senior year for graduation. Students also must achieve at 
least a C- in BIO 307 and MAT 121. 

If a student must repeat a nursing course, a grade of C- or better in 
both the theory and laborator)' (clinical practicum) components must 
be achieved. The theory and clinical portions of a nursing course must 
be taken concurrendy. 

Other poUcies are explained in detail in the current issue of the 
department handbook. 



Some of these courses may be used to satisfy distributive requirements. 



School of Health Sciences 



Nursing 



Special Requirements 

Generic nursing candidates are admitted once a year, in September. 
Transfer students can be admitted in spring and fall. 
Nursing students are required to supply their own transportation to 
clinical facilities. 

Insurance. Students are required to carry liability insurance coverage 
in the amount of $l,000,000/$3,000,000 during the junior and senior 
year at a yearly cost of approximately $30. Students also are required 
to carry health insurance. 

Uniforms. Students are required to wear white uniforms to some of the 
clinical experiences during the junior and senior years. Uniform policies 
are presented in detaU in the current issue of the department handbook. 
CPR Certification. Students enrolled in nursing courses with a cUni- 
cal component are required to be currently certified by the American 
Red Cross, American Heart Association, or other acceptable resource 
in Life Support (two-person) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. The 
CPR course must include resuscitation of children and infants. 
Calculations exam. Competency in calculation of dosages is a prereq- 
uisite to NSG/NSL 311. The student is required to have attained 90 
percent proficiency in calculating dosages as measured by a paper and 
pencil test. The nursing laboratory coordinator administers the calcu- 
lations exam in the spring semester immediately prior to enrolling in 
the cUnical courses. 

Mosby Assess Test. All senior students must complete the Mosby 
Assess Test prior to graduation. Cost is assumed by the student. 

Health Requirements 

Nursing candidates must meet the general health requirements of all 
students at West Chester University for the freshman and sophomore 
years. Candidates must meet the following health requirements during 
the summer prior to the junior year: inoculations against diphtheria, 
tetanus, measles, mumps, Rubella, rubeola, poUomyeUtis (a series of 
four). Hepatitis B, and varicella; a complete physical examination, TB 
skin test, eye examination, and any other diagnostic tests deemed nec- 
essary. Prior to the senior year, students must repeat the TB skin test. 

Nursing Laboratory 

The nursing laboratory in the Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center is 
available as a resource to help the nursing student in the learning 
process. There are four sections of the laboratory. One area contains 
hospital beds, examination tables, and other equipment found in clini- 
cal care settings. This area is used for the teaching and learning of 
nursing skills. The second area is a separate computer laboratory for 
students to study and review nursing theoretical and chnical skills, and 
to complete required computer software programs. The third area is a 
conference room for student and faculty meetings and seminars. The 
fourth section of the lab is a student-centered gathering and study area. 
Every student is required to use the learning laboratory at specified 
times. In addition, students are expected to spend time using this re- 
source for independent learning based on their individual needs. The 
laboratory is staffed by a full-time nursing laboratory coordinator who 
is a registered nurse. 
Transfer Policy 

Both internal and external transfer students are accepted into the 
nursing major each semester. The number accepted each semester is 
based on the number that the department can accommodate in a 
sound educational experience. 

Students currently enrolled at West Chester University who wish to 
transfer in to the Department of Nursing should attend a transfer 
information session to begin the process and subsequently submit an 
application packet to the department. All application procedures must 
be completed in order for the candidate to be considered for entrance 
into the nursing major. 



All students who wish to transfer into the Department ot Nursing must: 

1. Show evidence of satisfactory completion (70 percent or better) in 
BIO 100, 110, or 259, CHE 103 and CRL 103, or CHE 107 and 
CRL 107, PSY 100 or SOC 200, and WRT 120; and 

2. Meet with the adviser in the Department of Nursing to sign an 
individualized agreement that reserves placement in clinical nurs- 
ing courses during the academic year identified. 

Degree Program for Registered Nurses 

The department offers an innovative and flexible program for regis- 
tered nurses who wish to earn a baccalaureate degree in nursing. The 
Curriculum Committee of the Department of Nursing unanimously 
approved the Pennsylvania Higher Education Nursing Schools 
Association (PHENSA) Articulation Model for registered nurse stu- 
dents in spring 1997. This model allows for transfer of nursing credits 
if the student has graduated from a National League for Nursing 
Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) accredited program in the last 10 
years or has practiced nursing a minimum of 1000 hours in the last 
three years. Using the PHENSA model, the following courses may be 
transferred in and credit awarded: 

• NSG 212, 312, and 411; NSL 212, 312, and 411 (28 credits) 

• The RN student is required to take NSG 311 and 412, and NSL 
311 and 412. 

Other requirements: 

• Most RN students may also transfer in basic biology, anatomy and 
physiology, chemistry, microbiolog)', and any other college credits 
that they have. 

• RN students are not required to take BIO 307 (pathophysiology) 
as the student's nursing courses and/or clinical practice validate a 
knowledge base in this area. 

Detailed information about this program may be obtained from the 
department office. 

Licensing Eligibility in Pennsylvania 

In order to be employed in professional nursing, students must apply 
for a temporary practice permit through the State Board of Nursing. 
Students must meet all program requirements to be eligible for the 
National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) upon graduation. 
Passing this examination designates Registered Nurse (RN) status. In 
accordance with the Professional Nurse Law, felonious acts prohibit 
Ucensure in Pennsylvania as indicated by the following: 
"The Board shall not issue a Ucense or certificate to an applicant who 
has been conviceted of a felonious act prohibited by the act of April 
14, 1972 (P.L. 233, No. 64), known as 'The Controlled Substance, 
Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act,' or convicted of a felony relating to a 
controlled substance in a court of law of the United States or any 
other state, territory, or country unless: 

(1) At least ten (10) years have elapsed from the date of the con- 
viction; 

(2) the appUcant satisfactorily demonstrates to the board significant 
progress in personal rehabiUtation since the conviction such 
that Ucensure of the apphcant should not create a substantial 
risk of harm to the health and safety of patients or the public or 
a substantial risk of fiirther criminal violations; and 

(3) the appUcant otherwise satisfies the quaUfications contained in 
or authorized by the act. 

As used in the subsection, the term 'convicted' shall include a judg- 
ment, an admission of guilt or a plea of nolo contendere. An appU- 
cant's statement on the appUcation declaring the absence of a convic- 
tion shall be deemed satisfactory evidence of the absence of a convic- 
tion, unless the Board has some evidence to the contrary." 
(Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing, Professional Nurse Law, print- 
ed, September 1999) 



Nursing 



School ot Health Sciences 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
NURSING 

Symbol: NSG 

» 109 Health Issues of Women (3) (Offered 
jointly with Department of Health, as NSG/HEA 
109) This course encompasses the needs and con- 
cerns of women as consumers in our present 
health care system. It examines various biological, 
psychological, and social topics related to women's 
health care, including medical abuses, sexuality, 
sex roles, and women's health in the workplace. 
This course is an enrichment to hberal education, 
encouraging inquiry' into previously neglected areas 
of women and health. It is offered in the Women's 
Studies Program and is open to all University stu- 
dents, regardless of major, as an elective. 
110 Transcultural Health: Principles and 
Practices (3) (Offered jointly with Department of 
Health, as NSG/HEA 110) This course examines 
the health beliefs and practices ot a variet\' of sub- 
cultural groups in the U.S. Emphasis is placed on 
the apphcation of multicultural health beliefs to 
the caring process. It utilizes the cross-cultural 
approach in meeting the health needs of clients 
and families. It is open to all University students, 
regardless of major, as an elective. 
212 Nursing Theories and Concepts (4) Taken 
in the sophomore year. Nursing theories and con- 
cepts, conceptual frameworks, theories from other 
disciplines that may applv to nursing, and the 
nursing process are studied in this course. PRE- 
REQi Sophomore standing. 
NSL 212 Nursing Theories and Concepts Lab 
(2) (Must be taken with NSG 212) This clinical 
experience includes interviewing skills, physical 
and psychosocial assessment, vital signs measure- 
ment, basic hygienic practices, bodv mechanics, 
and infection control. 

216 HealthyAging in the New Millennium (3) 
The student will have the opportunit}' to form a rela- 
tionship with a healthy, elderly individual. Students 
will utilize communication skills through interaction 
on a one-to-one basis with senior citizens in a private 
home setting. Students will become acquainted with 
the problems of day-to-day living and the crises that 
face this population along with the adaptive strengths 
and resources that are an essential part of the healthy 
older person's personality. 

217 Loss and Grieving: What to Say, What to 
Do (3) Loss, grief, and/or depression are universal 
experiences. Concrete measures to help oneself 
and peers better cope with these experiences are 
presented. Barriers that make providing comfort 
and support to others difficult or uncomfortable 
are identified and discussed. Effective measures for 
talking with and helping those who are grieving, 
depressed, or suicidal are presented, and each stu- 
dent is assisted to develop his or her own style in 
comfortably using selected approaches. Classes will 
be participatorv with minimal lecture. 

218 Concepts in Caring (3) The emphasis of this 
course is that caring is a universal concept that can 
be viewed from many discipUnes. Nurses, profes- 
sionals in the caring business, serve as the guides 
in a creative journey connecting human caring and 
the various disciplines. 

219 Computers and the Health Care Delivery 
System (3) This elective course will be of practical 
importance to any student who is interested in the 
impact of computers on the health care delivery 
system. The course is divided into three areas; 1) 
an overview of the computer; 2) apphcation of the 
computer to the health care delivery system, 
including the role of the health care professional 
and the consumer; and, 3) issues pertaining to the 



computer and the health care dehver^' system. Use 
of the computer with a variet)' of appUcations and 
CAI software is integrated throughout the course. 

220 Care of the Inner Self (3) This course focuses 
on care of the inner self or spirit. The purpose of 
the course is to prepare one to understand the inner 
self and to know how to utihze the power within 
the self to maintain wellness and prevent illness. 

221 Skills for Professional Success (1) This one- 
credit elective for level III and IV nursing majors 
is designed to help students foster clinical judg- 
ment skills by focusing on study skills, critical 
thinking, and test-taking. Emphasis is placed on 
preparing students with skills that are essential for 
success on the National Council Licensure 
Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX- 
RN). PREREQiMust be enrolled in nursing 
courses at 300 or 400 level. 

# 222 Issues in Transcultural Health Care Delivery 
(3) This is a systems approach to health care deliv- 
er}'. Survey's health needs of diverse U.S. populations 
using a mulridiscipUnary approach. Introduces the 
origin and evolution of sociocultural health beliefs as 
they impact health behaviors and outcomes of cul- 
turally and ethnically diverse indi\iduals and popula- 
tions. All concepts will be approached fi"om busi- 
ness/economics, health, and political science per- 
spectives. Promote collaboration among disciplines, 
to improve student communication skills to facilitate 
their ability to advocate for diverse populations, and 
to improve health care services for diverse popula- 
tions. 

311 Adaptation I (5) Must be taken during junior 
year, fall semester. The emphasis of this course is on 
the prevention of illness and promotion of health by 
assessment of the health status, appropriate inter- 
vention, and evaluation of the health promotion 
plan. The nursing process provides the framework 
for promotion of wellness in a variety* of settings 
with clients of any age group. PREREQi BIO 307. 
NSL 311 Adaptation 1 Laboratory (5) Chnical 
experiences are provided in agencies where rela- 
tively well populations have been identified, such 
as schools, nursery schools, well baby clinics, and 
health maintenance clinics. NSG 311 and NSL 

311 always must be taken concurrend\'. PREREQ^ 
BIO lOO', 204, 259, and 269; CHE 103-104 and 
CRL 103-104 or CHE 107 and CRL 107; "WRT 
120 and 121; HEA 303; NSG 212 and NSL 212; 
PSY 100; HEA 206 or PSY 210; and SOC 200. 

312 Adaptation II (6) Must be taken during junior 
year, spring semester. The emphasis of this course 
is on the maintenance of health and promotion of 
adaptive responses in cHents with chronic health 
problems. The nursing process is used to assist 
these chents to adapt to stressors through support- 
ive therapeutic, palliative, and preventive measures. 
NSL 312 Adaptation II Laboratory (5) Clinical 
experience is provided in sertings where clients with 
chronic health problems have been identified. These 
settings include rehabilitation centers, child develop- 
ment centers, nursing homes, and acute care set- 
tings. These environments provide flexibihty' for stu- 
dents to implement changes for clients and acquire 
skills that will be utilized in other nursing courses. 
NSG 312 and NSL 312 always must be taken con- 
currendy PREREQ^NSG 311 and NSL 311. 

314 Internship (3) This course is designed to pro- 
vide nursing students with the opportunity to 
enhance knowledge and skills acquired in 
NSG/NSL 311-312. Students will have the oppor- 
tunity' to participate in the care of a group of clients 
over a consecutive span of days and to increase 
their awareness of the professional role. PREREQ^ 
Successful completion of NSG/NSL 31 1-312. 



316 Coping with Cancer (3) The emphasis of this 
course is on coping with clients who have cancer. 
Various phj-siological and ps)'chosocial effects this 
disease has on clients and their families will be 
examined. The course will allow students to explore 
their own feelings related to cancer and assist them 
in their contacts with cancer clients. Topics that will 
be discussed include dealing with loss, pain, pain 
management, hospice care, and communication with 
the cancer client. This course is open to all students. 

317 Selected Topics in Nursing (3) An in-depth 
study of selected, current topics relevant to nursing' 
and health care. This course will emphasize the 
critical analysis of current topics on health care. 
Each student will develop a commitment to read- 
ing and critiquing nursing hterature in professional 
journals as part of the teaching-learning process. 
367 Nursing Imphcations of Drug Interactions 
(1) The student will be introduced to essential phar- 
macological principles and concepts. The nursing 
process will provide the firamework for the applica- 
tion of the theory in a variet}' of health care settings. 

♦ 410 Independent Study in Nursing (3) The stu- 
dent produces an independent, research-oriented 
project under close faculty advisement on a nursing 
topic of special interest to the student. Participation 
in a selected field experience is optional. PREREQ; 
Permission of department chairperson. 

411 Advanced Adaptational Problems I (6) Must 
be taken during senior year, fall semester. The 
emphasis of this course is on the study of adaptive 
responses that create new stresses, requiring addi- 
tional adaptations and frequendy interrupting an 
individual's mode of ftinctioning. The nursing 
process is used to assist chents in crises. 

NSL 411 Advanced Adaptational Problems I 
Laboratory (5) Clinical experience is provided in 
acute care settings, in psychiatric in-patient set- 
tings, and in communit}' health settings. NSG 411 
and NSL 411 always must be taken concurrently. 
PREREQ: MAT 121, NSG 312, and NSL 312. 

412 Advanced Adaptational Problems II (6) Must 
be taken during senior year, spring semester. NSG 
412 is a continuation of NSG 411 with the empha- 
sis on the subconcepts of decision making and 
advocacy. The nursing process is utilized interde- 
pendendy in approaching multihealth care problems 
of chents. Special attention is given to inquiry as the 
student correlates nursing theories and concepts 
with identifiable research problems in varied envi- 
ronments. Opportunit}' is provided in this semester 
to develop organization and management skills. 
NSL 412 Advanced Adaptational Problems 11 
Laboratory (5) Clinical experience is provided in 
acute care settings, psv'chiatric inpatient settings, 
and communit}' health settings. NSG 412 and 
NSL 412 always must be taken concurrently. 
PREREQ: NSG 411 and NSL 411. 

414 Breastfeeding and Human Lactation (3) For 
students seeking in-depth knowledge about breast- 
feeding and human lactation. Emphasis is on 
understanding the physiolog}' of human lactation 
and the health impact on infants and their moth- 
ers. The normal process of breastfeeding will be 
addressed with exploration of the barriers to 
breastfeeding as well as the supports available for 
breastfeeding. 
> Diverse communities course 

♦ Approved interdisciphnary course 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Philosophy 



Pharmaceutical Product Development 

117 Schmucker Science Center South 
610-436-2939 
e-mail; ppd@wcupa.edu 
Leslie Slusher, Dirrcfor 
ADVISORY BOARD 
Albert CafFo, Chemistry 
Kevin Dean, Honors 
Joseph DiBussolo, Adjunct 
Jack Gault, Marketing 
Judith Scheffler, English 
Russell Vreeland, Biology 
Joan Woolfrey, Philosophy 

The Pharmaceutical Product Development Program educates students 
for careers in the pharmaceutical and biotechnolog)' industry. The cur- 
riculum was developed through extensive dialog with key industry lead- 
ers and is designed to meet the special needs of students seeking careers 
in these dynamic companies. The curriculum for the degree is interdisci- 
plinary in nature; students will acquire a solid foundation in the basic 
and pharmaceutical sciences, as well as experience in technical writing, 
oral communication, statistics, economics, and biomedical ethics. This 
innovative curriculum is coupled with two summers of paid cooperative 
emplo)Tnent following the sophomore and junior years. Students will be 
placed with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. They will 
develop a level of understanding and experience that is hard to duplicate 
in the classroom. Graduates of this program will possess a breadth of 
understanding that previously took several years of industrial experience 
to acquire. They will be poised to enter the pharmaceutical and biotech- 
nology industry as middle managers or enter graduate programs. 
Please contact the Pharmaceutical Product Development Office for 
further information on admission standards for undergraduate and 
transfer students. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— PHARMACEUTICAL 
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
PHI 370 will be required and will flililll the 
interdisciplinary requirement, MAT 121 will be 

required and will fiiffill the basic skills mathematics 
requirement, and ECO 112 must be selected as 
one course in the behavdoral and social sciences. 
Although these courses mav be used to fiilfdl 
distributive requirements, they are required courses 
in the degree program. Two of the general education 
student electives are to be chosen from the list of 
pharmaceutical product development electives in 
consultation with an adviser. 

2. Chemistry Courses 11 semester hours 
CHE 103*, 104, 231, 232, 321, and 476; and 

CRL 103, 104, 231, and 232 

3. Biology Courses 22 semester hours 
BIO 110*, 214, 220, 230, 367, and 469; and BIL 333 

4. Interdisciphnary 1 1 semester hours 
IND 481, 482, 483, 484, and 485 

5. Supporting Courses 20-21 semester hours 
COM 230*, ENG 371, MAT 108, YW{ 130 

and 140, and STA 311 

6. Pharmaceutical Product Development Electives 6 semester hours 
Two courses are to be chosen from the following 

list in consultation with an adviser. 
BIO 217, 307, 310, 314, 334, 357, 421, 428, 431, 
454, 456, 464, 465, 467, 484; BLA 201; CHE 300, 
321, 333, 345, 381, 403, 424, 436, 479; CRL 321, 
424, 436, 471, 472; MAT 122, 162, 221, 261, 421, 
422; MKT 200 



This course also satisfies the general education requirement. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCT 
DEVELOPMENT 

Symbol: IND 

481 Drug Design I (3) The first course in a three- 
semester sequence. This course emphasizes the 
chemical aspects of drug development and integrates 
the major concepts in medicinal chemistry. A vanety 
of topics involving drug design and development are 
introduced. These include the establishment of lead 
compounds and the development of structural 
libraries through combinatorial chemistry. Molecular 
modeling and structure/activity relationships are 
introduced. PREREQ: BIO 469 and CHE 232. 



482 Drug Design II (3) A course emphasizing 
pharmacokinetic and toxicokineric aspects of drugs. 
Sites and mechanisms of drug reaction and drug 
metabolism are discussed. Drug to.xicology is also 
explored in depth. Laborator)' therapeutic drug 
monitoring as a measure of improving drug efficacy 
is considered. PREREQ: BIO 367 and IND 481. ' 

483 Drug Design III (3) A course emphasizing sta- 
tistical skills which are often employed in drug 
development and/or clinical trials. Stages in the drug 
discovery process are explored as well as informed 
consent, bioethics, and other medical legal issues. ^ 
Methods for demonstrating drug safet)' and efFicaq' 
are discussed. PREREQ; IND 482 and STA 311. 

484 Pharmaceutical Co-Operative (1) A summer, 
paid cooperative experience with a pharmaceutical 



or biotechnolog}' company. These co-ops are 
designed to provide experiences in key aspects of 
the pharmaceutical industry. Students will be super- 
vised joindy by an on-site professional scientist and 
a Department ot Biology or Chemistry faculty 
member. PREREQ: Completion of BIO 214, 220; 
BIL 333; and CHE 232. A minimum GPA of 2.75 
and a grade of C or better in all science courses are 
required. A minimum ot 24 credit hours must be 
completed at West Chester University' for successful 
evaluation and recommendation fo the 
Pharmaceutical Product Development Committee. 
485 Pharmaceutical Co-Operative II (1) A sec- 
ond summer, paid cooperative experience with a 
pharmaceutical or biotechnology company. PRE- 
REQ: Completion of IND 484. 



Department of Philosophy 

103 Main HaU 

610-436-2841 

Thomas Plart, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Claghorn, Croddy, Piatt, Struckmeyer 

ASSOCL\TE PROFESSORS: Hoffman, Porritt, Williams 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Burtner, Woolfrey 



The Department of Philosophy offers two concentrations leading to 

the bachelor of arts degree. 

1. The philosophy concentration surveys the history of philosophy, 
explores its major disciplines, and focuses on selected topics of 
perennial interest. The purpose of the program is to develop the 
organizational, analytic, and expressive skills required tor law 



Philosophy 



College of Arts and Sciences 



school, the seminar)-, graduate work in philosophy, and the wide 
range of careers in government, business, and industry. 

2. The religious studies concentration is designed for students planning 
on religious vocations, or as a foundation for graduate work in religion 
or cross-cultural studies. The emphasis is on individual and social 
expression ot religion. Western and non-Western, philosophic impli- 
cations, and fine arts applications. 

Majors in the B.A. program should consult the department handbook 

and their adviser for current requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO THE B.A. 
PROGRAMS 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement 0-15 semester hours 

3. Major Requirements 30 semester hours 

4. Free Electives 27-42 semester hours 

BACHELOR OF ARTS— Philosophy Concentration 

1. Required Core Courses 21 semester hours 
PHI 101, 190, 270, 272, 350, 412, and 499 

2. Philosophy Electives 



BACHELOR OF ARTS— Religious Studies Concentration 

1. Required Courses 24 semester hours 
PHI 101, 102, 202, 203, 204, 205, 271, 349 

2. Elective in Religious Studies 3 semester hours 
As advised 

Minor Programs 

Students may minor in either philosophy or religious studies. A mini- 
mum of 18 semester hours is required. Elective courses are selected in 
consultation with the student's minor adviser. Either of these minors 
may be taken as a concentration in the bachelor of arts in liberal stud- 
ies general degree program. 

Philosophy Minor 

1. Required Courses 
PHI 101, 150 or 190, 174 or 180, and 270, 
271, or 272 

2. Philosophy Electives (under advisement) 

Religious Studies Minor 

1. Required Courses 

PHI 102, 202 or 203, 204 or 205, and 349 
9 semester hours 2. Religious Studies Electives (under advisement) 6 semester hours 



18 semester hours 

12 semester hours 



6 semester hours 

18 semester hours 

12 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PHILOSOPHY 

Symbol: PHI, unless otherwise noted. 
NOTE: Only PHI 405, 436, and 499 have 
prerequisites. All other philosophy courses 
are nonsequential and open to all students. 
Not all courses will be offered every year. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES IN 
PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

101 Introduction to Philosophy (3) The chief 
problems and methods of philosophic thought, 
with a survey of some t^-pical solutions. The place 
and influence of philosophy in life today. 

# 102 Introduction to Religious Studies (3) The 
role of religion in human life. Illustrations drawn 
from various traditions, rituals, and belief patterns, 
both ancient and modern. 

125 Theology and Science: Enemies or Partners 
(3) An inquirv into the relationship of theology to 
the natural sciences. Team taught by both a physi- 
cist and a philosopher, the course investigates how 
ideas of God have been affected by advances in 
physics and biology. Crosslisted as PHY 125. 
150 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving (3) 
Introduction to the principles of valid inference 
and effective thinking. Problem solving; puzzles; 
games; decision making; the syllogism; probabilit}'; 
logical fallacies; and creative thinking. 
#174 Principles of the Arts (3) A critical e.\amina- 
tion of traditional and contemporary aesthetic theo- 
ries from diverse culmral perspectives to extend stu- 
dents' thinking about the "concept" as well as the 
"experience" of art. Visual and literar)- arts are 
emphasized, as well as how to live a more artfiil life. 
1 180 Introduction to Ethics (3) Introduction to 
major theories in moral philosophy and ethical 
decision making in our daily lives with an emphasis 
on the influence of culture, power, and privilege. 
207 Philosophies of Nonviolence (3) An exami- 
nation of the concepts of violence and nonvio- 
lence, especially as seen by recent thinkers. The 
course attempts to link theor\- with practice by 
considering the contributions of Tolstoy, Gandhi, 
Thoreau, and other philosophers, religious 
thinkers, and activities. 

# SSC 200 Introduction to Peace and Conflict 
Studies (3) An intcrdisciplinan' inquir\' into the 



nature and causes of social conflict. The aim 
throughout is to find ways of avoiding destructive 
conflict, whether through negotiation or other 
means. The issue of justice as a factor in conflict 
receives special attention. 

COURSES IN THE HISTORY OF 
PHILOSOPHY 

■ 270 History of Ancient Philosophy (3) A sur- 
vey of the major figures of ancient philosophy, 
from the pre-Socratic period through Plato, Aris- 
tode, the Epicureans, and Stoics, to the Skeptics 
and Neo-Platonists. 

271 History of iVIedieval Philosophy (3) The his- 
tory of philosophy from the early Church fathers 
to the late Middle Ages. St. Augustine, St. 
Thomas, mysticism, Jewish and Mohammedan 
influences, humanism, and the rise of science. 

■ 272 History of Modem Philosophy (3) From 
Descartes to Hegel. The social, political, and sci- 
entific impact of the philosophers. 

■ 273 19th-CentuiyPhiIosophy(3) Hegel and 
German Idealism; decisive influences on European 
and American literature and thought. Survey of the 
chief themes of Schopenhauer, Comte, Mill, 
Spencer, Marx, Kierkegaard, Darwin, and Nietzsche. 
284 American Philosophy (3) Leaders in science, 
literature, religion, and government who have shaped 
American thought. Philosophers of Puritanism, the 
Revolution, Transcendentalism, and native schools of 
Realism, Idealism, and Pragmatism. 

■ 415 Existentialism (3) "Existentialism" loosely 
refers to one strand of 20th century philosophy 
and literature that explores the loss of confidence 
in the Enlightenment "dream of reason." A survey 
of this existentialist family of artists and philoso- 
phers including Kierkegaard, Dostoevskv, 
Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Kafl^a, and Camus. 
Includes a brief survey of existentialist themes on 
contemporar\' post-modernist developments in the 
arts, social sciences, and philosophy. 

COURSES ON OTHER 
PHILOSOPHICAL TOPICS 

190 Logic (3) Arguments are used in everyday life 
to persuade and make a point. An introductory 
course that discusses what arguments are, what 
makes them good or flawed, and how the truth 
and falsitT.' of their various parts affect our evalua- 



tion of them. Provides students with a skill for 
logical and systematic thinking that will help them 
through their college careers and beyond. 

♦ 201 Contemporary Issues (3) Discussion and 
analysis of contemporary philosophical issues. The 
topic varies from semester to semester. 

# 330 (also LIN 330) Introduction to Meaning 
(3) Discussion of the analysis of meaning given by 
various disciplines, including philosophy, psycholo- 
gy, hnguistics, communication studies, and the arts. 
360 (also LIN 360) Philosophyof Language (3) A 
discussion of our use of language in the acquisition of 
knowledge. We will use material from philosophy, 
linguistics, psychology, art, music, and literature. 
371 Biomedical Ethics (3) The study of philo- 
sophical concepts and ethical criteria as applied to 
health care practice and clinical research. Issues 
examined and analyzed include problem-solving 
methods, the theory and practice of informed con- 
sent, end-of-life decision making, resource alloca- 
tion, and problems posed by managed care, 
research ethics, and emdronmental concerns. 

412 Ethical Theories (3) An inquir\- into the 
meaning, interpretations, and fiinction ot ethical 
theor)' in our lives. The course will e.xplore some 
combination of classic, modern, and contemporary 
ethical theories. PREREQ: PHI 101, 180, or per- 
mission of instructor. 

413 Aesthetic TTieories (3) Interpretation of 
beauty and art. Effects of motivation, and prob- 
lems in media and in goals. A background of 
meaning for the evaluation of specific works of 
painting, sculpture, music, and architecture. 

414 Philosophy of Religion (3) Religion and the 
religious experience as viewed b)' major Western 
thinkers. The existence of God, immortality, reli- 
gious knowledge, evil, miracles, and science and 
religion. 

422 Philosophyof Science (3) The nature of sci- 
entific method and scientific theon', with reference 
to presuppositions, inference, explanation, predic- 
tion, applications, and verification. 



# Approved interdisciplinary course 
I Diverse communities course 

H Culture cluster 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Physics and Pre -Engineering 



436 Symbolic Logic (3) Principles and methods 
of symbolic logic. Practice in determining validity 
of sentential and quantificational arguments. The 
algebra of classes. PREREQ; PHI 190 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

480 Environmental Ethics (3) Explores different 
approaches to the question of how to view and 
interact with the natural environment. Analyzes 
ethical issues regarding the natural environment 
and develops students' ability to express views in a 
thoughtfiil and critical way through written assign- 
ments and presentations. 

482 Social Philosophy (3) The relationship 
between the individual and the social/political 
order. The good society and the just state as seen 
by modern and recent Western thinkers, such as 
Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Nozick, and Rawls. 
Cutting-edge issues of the present day are also 
explored. Course is conducted in seminar format. 



COURSES IN RELIGION 

202 Religions of the West I (3) A survey of the 
thought of Christianity and Judaism to the year 500. 

203 Religions of the West II (3) A survey of the 
thought of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, from 
the year 500 to the present. Emphasis on theologi- 
cal development, with attention to social, econom- 
ic, and historical factors. 

204 Philosophies and Religions of India (3) The 

religious and philosophical heritage of India, from 
Vedic times to the present. Examination of major 
classics, such as Rig Veda, Upanishads, Bhagavad- 
Gita, and Yoga-sutras; recent writers such as 
Tagore, Gandhi, and Radhakrishnan. 

205 Philosophies and Religions of the Far East 

(3) A survey ot Far Eastern philosophy, reUgion, 
and scientific thought. Confijcianism, Taoism, and 
the various schools of Mahayana Buddhism, 
including Zen, are given primary emphasis. 



349 Ideas of the Bible (3) An introduction to 
BibUcal concepts of revelation, God, man, nature, 
and redemption in light ot Hebrew and Greek 
thought. 

414 Philosophy of Religion (3) See "Courses in 
Philosophical Topics," above. 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 
AND SEMINARS 

♦ 410 Independent Studies (1-3) 

♦ 499 Philosophic Concepts and Systems (3) An 

intensive study of the major works of one philoso- 
pher, stressing themes and comparison with other 
views. Required of all philosophy majors. PRE- 
REQ^ Sb( hours of philosophy and senior stand- 
ing, or permission of instructor. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Department of Physical Education — See Kinesiology 



Department of Physics and Pre-Engineering Program 



127 Boucher Hall 

610-436-2497 

Anthony J. Nicastro, Chairperson 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Nicastro, Skelton 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Waite 

The Department of Physics offers three undergraduate degree programs: 
the bachelor of science in physics, the bachelor of science in education, 
and a cooperative five-year engineering program with The Pennsylvania 
State University at University Park and the Harrisburg campus. 
For admission to the physics program, most students should have 
completed, in addition to the general University requirements, one 
year each of high school chemistry and physics, and a minimum of 
three years of mathematics, including algebra and trigonometry. Any 
student with a deficiency must complete WRT 120 and MAT 161 
with grades of C- or better to be admitted to the program. 
West Chester has a chapter of the national physics honor society, 
Sigma Pi Sigma. 

A minor program in physics also is available. 
The physics programs can also be found on the Internet 
(http://phy.wcupa.edu). 

The Robert M. Brown Endowed Scholarship for Physics was estab- 
Ushed in 1997 by Mr. Robert M. Brown. Partial tuition scholarships 
are awarded annually to students in the physics program. 
In addition, the Dr. Michael F. Martens Award, established by the 
West Chester Lions Club, is given annually to students who have shown 
outstanding achievement in physics. Awards are determined by the 
department's faculty. Other awards include the Benjamin Faber Award 
in physics and mathematics, and the Diane and Roger Casagrande 
Scholarship for students in pre-engineering or communication studies. 
In addition to these, the Physics/Philosophy Prize is awarded to a stu- 
dent who has made a notable contribution on a topic related to the 
interface of science and theology. These awards are granted annually at 
an induction ceremony for new members of the West Chester University 
Chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honor society. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE— PHYSICS 

This program is designed as preparation for graduate school or careers 
in government or industry. The curriculum includes a strong foundation 



in mathematics and the humanities. A wide choice of electives in the 
program provides the flexibility to develop a minor in an area of interest. 

Requirements 

A. Physics: PHY 170, 180, 240, 300, 310, 320, 330, 350, 370, 420, 
and 430; an additional six credits in physics must be chosen from 
available electives at or above the 250 level 

B. Mathematics: CSC 141; MAT 161, 162, 261, and 343 

C. Chemistry: CHE 103 and 104; CRL 103 and 104 
Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or greater in their physics 
courses. Transfer students must take 15 or more physics credits at 
West Chester at the 300 level and above for graduation. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION— PHYSICS 

The B.S. program in physics education provides a soUd background in 
physics, mathematics, and related science for a teaching career at the 
secondary level and leads to certification to teach physics in the pubUc 
schools of Pennsylvania. 

A. Physics Concentration Requirements 

1. Physics: PHY 170, 180, 240, 300, 310, 320, 330, and 410 or 430 

2. Mathematics: MAT 161, 162, 261, and MAT 343 or PHY 370 

3. Sciences: CHE 103 and 104; CRL 103 and 104; SCB 350; and 
an elective in astronomy, biology, and computer science 

B. Professional Education Requirements (See page 138.) 
Students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or greater in their physics 
courses. Transfer students must take nine or more physics credits at 
West Chester at the 250 level and above for graduation. 

COOPERATIVE PHYSICS/ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

The Department of Physics, in cooperation with The Pennsylvania 
State University at University Park and the Harrisburg campus, offers 
degree programs in physics and engineering requiring three years at 
West Chester University plus two years at The Pennsylvania State 
University. At the end of this period, the student receives two bac- 
calaureate degrees: a B.S. in physics from West Chester and a B.S. in 
engineering from Penn State. 

Admission to The Pennsylvania State University is contingent on a 
recommendation from the Department of Physics and the student 
having maintained the overall average for the specific engineering 



Physics and Pre-Engineering 



College ot .-Vrts and Sciences 



major. Most areas ot engineering require a minimum 3.0 GPA for 
admission at the junior level. 

Students who have completed a bachelor's degree are not eligible for 
transfer to Penn State in this program. 

Areas of study in engineering at The Pennsyh'ania State Universitv at 
Universit)' Park are the following: 



Aerospace Engineering 
Agricultural Engineering 
Architectural Engineering* 
Ceramic Science 
Chemical Engineering 
Ci\'il Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Engineering Science 



Environmental Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Metallurgy 
Mining Engineering 
Nuclear Engineering 
Petroleum and Natural Gas 
Engineering 



Areas of study in engineering at The Pennsylvania State Universit}' at 
Harrisburg are the following: 
Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Physics Concentration Requirements 

A. Physics: Pm' 115, 116, 170, 180, 240, 260, 300, 310, 320, and 
370; an additional six credits in physics at or above the 300 level 



must be chosen, depending on the engineering area selected 

B. Mathematics: CSC 141; MAT 161, 162, 261, and 343 

C. Chemistry: CHE 103 and 104; CRL 103 and 104 

In addition, students intending to enroll in chemical engineering must 
have CHE 231 and 232; in mining engineering, ESL 201 and ESS 
101; and in petroleum and natural gas engineering, ESL 201 and ESS 
101. Students intending to enroU in aerospace, electrical, or nuclear 
engineering must take PHY 370 and PHY 420. 

Minor in Physics 19 semester hours 

The program can be used as technical preparation to complement work in 
other scientific or nonsdentific areas, e.g., business majors interested in 
careers in technologically oriented industries, majors interested in technical 
or scientific sales, English majors interested in technical writing, or social 
science majors interested in the area of energ\' and the environment. 
Required: PHY 130 and 140, or Pm' 170 and 180; also PHY 240. In 
addition, students must select eight credits of physics courses at the 
250 level or above, chosen under advisement with the Department of 
Physics. Transfer students must take a minimum of six credits at 
West Chester at the 250 level or above. A 2.0 GPA or better must be 
maintained in all physics courses. 



'Architectural engineering majors must spend three years at the University 
Park campus of Penn State. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PHYSICS 

Symbol: PHY 

(3,2) represents three hours of lecture and t^vo 
hours of lab. 

100 Elements of Physical Science (3) A study of 
motion, energy, light, and some aspects of modern 
physics. 

105 Structure of the Universe (3) A suney of phe- 
nomena and objects in the universe from the very 
smallest distance scales to the grandest in the cos- 
mos. Includes a historical consideration ot the devel- 
opments of modem theories ot the physical world. 
lis Engineering Graphics I (1) Use and prepara- 
tion of engineering drawings. Topics include the 
use of instruments, linework, geometric construc- 
tion, lettering, four tiipes of projections, dimen- 
sioning, and sections. 

116 Engineering Graphics II (1) A continuation of 
PHY 115, to include topics such as layout, detail, and 
assembly dra\vings, developments, auxiliar\' drawings, 
various t^'pes of dratting, machine tool processes, and 
computer drafting. PREREQ^ PHY 115. 
125 Theology and Science: Enemies or Partners 
(3) .An mquir\' into the relationship ot theology to 
the natural sciences. Team taught by both a physi- 
cist and a philosopher, the course investigates how 
ideas of God have been affected bv advances in 
physics and biolog)-. Crosslisted with PHI 125. 
130 General Physics I (4) An introductory, non- 
calculus, physics course. Mechanics of soUds and 
fluids, wave motion, heat and temperature, ther- 
modynamics, and kinetic theory-. (3,2) PREREQ^ 
Algebra and trigonometn-. 

140 General Physics II (4) An extension of PHY 
130. Electricity and magnetism, geometrical and 
physical optics, and modern ph)-sics. (3,2) PRE- 
REQ: PHY 130. 

170 Physics I (4) An introductory laborator\-based 
course. Includes mechanics, kinetic theor)', waves, 
heat, and thermodynamics. The laboratory emphasizes 
error analysis, the writing of technical reports, and data 
analysis using computers, PREREQ^MAT 161. 
180 Physics II (4) A continuation of PHY 170. 
Includes electricity and magnetism, geometrical and 



physical optics, electronics, and modern phracs. 
PREREQ: PHV' 170. Concurrent \vith MAT 162. 
240 Introduction to Modem Physics (3) An 
atomic view of electricit\' and radiation, atomic the- 
ory', special relatirit\' theon', X-ra\"s. radioactivitv', 
nuclear fission, and introductory quanmm mechan- 
ics. PREREQ;. M/^T 162, and' PHY 140 or 180. 
260 Engineering Statics (3) Composition and 
resolution of forces, equivalent force sii'stems, equi- 
librium of particles and rigid bodies, centroids and 
center ot gravity, analysis of simple structures, 
internal forces in beams, friction, moments and 
products in inertia, and methods of rirtual work 
PREREQ; MAT 162, and PHY 130 or 170. 
300 Mechanics (3) Particle kinematics, dynamics, 
energy, and momentum considerations; oscilla- 
tions; central force motion; accelerated reference 
frames; rigid body mechanics; Lagrangian mechan- 
ics. PREREQ: AUT 162, and PHi' 140 or 180. 
310 Intermediate Physics Laboratory I (2) A lab- 
oratory course to familiarize students with labora- 
tory equipment and methods by performing a 
series of classical and modem physics experiments. 
The results of these are reported through both oral 
presentations and written reports. CONCUR- 
RENT: PHY 240. 

320 Intermediate Physics Laboratory II (2) A 
continuation of PH^' 310, but including an intro- 
duction to wTiting scientific proposals and the use 
of computers for data acquisition. Students are 
required to propose and complete an experiment 
of their own design as one part of this course. 
PREREQ: CSC 141, PHY 310. 
330 Electronics I (3) Emphasis is divided 
between theory and e.xperiment. TTie course begins 
with a brief review of resistive and RC voltage 
dividers. Electronic circuits studied include basic 
operational amplifiers, timers, instrumentation 
ampUfiers, logic circuits, flip flops, counters, and 
timers. (2,2) PREREQ: MAT 161, PHY 140 or 
180, or permission of instructor. 
340 Fundamentals of Radioisotope Techniques 
(3) Biological, chemical, enrironmental, and ph\'si- 
cal effects of nuclear radiation. Radiation detection 
instrumentation and radio tracer methodology. 
(2,2) PREREQ: CHE 104, and PH\' 140 or 180. 



350 Heat and Thermodynamics (3) Equations of 
state, first and second laws of thermodynamics, 
ideal and real gases, entropy, and statistical 
mechanics. PREREaor CONCURRENT: 
NLA.T 262, Pm' 240. 

370 Mathematical Physics (3) Selected topics in 
mathematics applied to problems in physics, ordi- 
nary' differential equations, vector calculus, Fourier 
analysis, matrix algebra, and eigenvalue problems. 
PREREQ: MAT 261, and PfPt' 140 or 180. 
400 Analytical Dynamics (3) Wave propagation, 
Lagrange's equations and Hamilton's principle, 
rigid body motion, and special relatirity. PRE- 
REQi MAT 343 and Pm' 300. 
410 Optics (3) Geometrical and physical optics. 
Reflection and refraction at surfaces, lenses, inter- 
ference and dift'raction, and polarization. PRE- 
REQ. PHi' 140 or 180. PREREQ.or CONCUR- 
RENT: MAT 262. 

420 Atomic Physics and Quantum Mechanics 
(3) Fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics 
with appUcation to atomic physics. Topics covered 
are Bohr model, Schrodinger equation with appli- 
cations, perturbation theor\'. helium atom, and 
scattering theorv'. PREREQ: PHY 240 and 300, 
and MAT 343 or PHi' 370. 
430 Electricity and Magnetism (3) Electrostatics 
of point charges and e.xtended charge distributions, 
fields in dielectrics, and magnetic fields due to 
steady currents. Ampere's Law and induced emfs. 
Topics in electromagnetic waves as time permits. 
PREREQ: PHY 300, and M\T 343 or PHY 370. 
440 Microcomputer Electronics (3) Laboratory 
study ot special circuits, integrated circuits, micro- 
computers, and microcomputer interface applica- 
tions. PREREQi PHY 330, and M\T 343 or 
PHY 370. 

450 Advanced Physics Laboratory I (1) A course 
to familiarize students with contemporary labora- 
tory equipment and methods. 
460 Advanced Physics Laboratory II (1) A con- 
tinuation of PHY 450. 

♦ 470 Seminar in Physics (1) Oral and wTitten 
reports on approved topics. Variation in topics 



♦ TTiis course may be taken again for credit. 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



Political Science 



from year to year, depending on the interest and 
needs of students. 

♦ 480 Special Topics (1-3) Topics of special 
interest to be presented once or twice. PREREQ^ 
To be specified by the instructor. Course may be 
repeated by student for credit any number of times 
when different topics are presented. 

♦ 490 Introduction to Research (1-9) Specific 
problems in consultation with the faculty adviser. 
PREREQ^ Permission of instructor. 



# SCB 210 The Origin of Life and the Universe 

(3) An interdisciplinary course that presents the 
theory and evidence tor the first three minutes of 
the universe, and formation of the stars, galaxies, 
planets, organic molecules, and the genetic basis of 
organic evolution. PREREQ^ High school or col- 
lege courses in at least two sciences. 
SCI 102 Electricity with Physical and Biological 
Applications (3) An exploration of the physics of 
electrical circuits, the chemical basis of electricity as 



the flow ot electrons, acid-base and oxidation- 
reduction reactions in chemical and in living sys- 
tems, the electrical activity in the human nervous 
system, and connections between electricity and 
sensation and locomotion in humans. For elemen- 
taiy education majors only. Team taught with the 
departments of Biology and Chemistry. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

# Approved interdisciplinary course 



Department of Political Science 

106 Ruby Jones HaU 

610-436-2743 

Peter Loedel, Chairperson 

PROFESSOR: Marbach 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Bernotsky, Loedel, Polsky, 

Sandhu, Schnell 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Kennedy, D. Milne, Stevenson 
The department offers a bachelor of arts degree in political science 
wdth four concentrations. The objective is to provide programs tai- 
lored to each student's career goals and still to allow a wide range of 
options after graduation. All four B.A. programs are intended for stu- 
dents with an interest in government and public service, journalism, 
business, education, and the law. 

The department offers qualified students the opportunity to do 
internships and earn academic credits for them. The main goal is for 
students to complement their classroom learning wdth experiential 
learning through their work in an organizational setting. To start the 
process, students should speak with the department chair. 
The following rules apply to all B.A. students in political science: 

1. Students must complete the last 15 hours of their pohtica! science 
program at West Chester University, including one of the follow- 
ing courses: PSC 400, 401, or 402. Exceptions may only be grant- 
ed by the chair of the department for compelling personal reasons. 
(Examples: A student's family has moved a great distance, and he 
or she needs to complete only one or two courses; the student 
and/or the student's spouse has been relocated to another state by 
his/her employer.) 

2. Students must have a C average or better in all political science 
courses, and no more than two grades below C in pohtical science 
courses. A grade of C- is considered a grade below C. 

3. Internal transfers must have an overall cumulative average of 2.0 to 
enter any political science programs. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

1. The B.A. POLITICAL SCIENCE is a general Uberal arts program 
exposing the student to the broad areas of political science, including 
American government, international relations, comparative govern- 
ment, pubhc administration, political behavior, and political theory. 

2. The B.A. POLITICAL SCIENCE - APPLIED PUBLIC 
POLICY is for students who are interested in the practical application 
ot political science in a variety of professional settings. 

3. B.A. POLITICAL SCIENCE - INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS is for students with a primary interest in international 
affairs and includes relevant cognates in several disciplines. 

4. B.A. POLITICAL SCIENCE - ELECTIVE CITIZENSHIP 
EDUCATION TEACHER CERTinCATION is designed for stu- 
dents with an interest in earning a political science degree and becom- 
ing certified to teach at the secondary education level. 

The department also sponsors pre-law advising, the Law Society, and 
the Political Science Club. 



II 



3 semester 
3 semester 
3 semester 



B. 



6 semester hours 



6 semester hours 



6 semester hours 



Bachelor of Arts 

A. Required Core for AH Concentrations 
PSC 100 American Government 
PSC 200 Foundations of Pohtical Science 
PSC 213 International Relations 

PSC 230 Introduction to Political Philosophy 3 semester 
Required Courses for General Concentration 6 semester 
PSC 202 or 204 or 240 and one of PSC 400, 
401, or 402 

C. Required Courses for International 
Relations Concentration 
PSC 240, PSC 401 or 402 

D. Required Courses for AppUed/Pohcy Track 
Concentration 
PSC 202 or 204, 400 or 401 

E. Required Courses for Elective Citizenship 
Education Teacher Certification Program 
PSC 202 or 400 and PSC 401 (research 
paper must focus on educational issue) 

Bachelor of Arts General Concentration 

A. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 

B. Foreign Language/Culture Cluster 

C. Pohtical Science Core (see above) 

D. An additional course from the behavior 
or American government category, 
which includes PSC 201, 301, 250-259, 
320-329, 350-359 

E. An additional course from the 
comparative group, including PSC 246, 
or 340-349 

F. Three PSC courses at the 200 level or above 

G. Cognates distributed as follows: 

1. GEO 101 or 103 

2. Either HIS 150, 151, or 152 

3. Either ECO 101, 111, 112; PSY 100; or SOC 200 
DL Bachelor of Arts — International Relations Concentration 

A. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39* 48 semester 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



48 semester 

0-15 semester 

18 semester 

3 semester 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



3 semester hours 



9 semester 
9 semester 



hours 
hours 



hours 
0-12 semester hours 



B. Foreign Language (must be 
completed through the 202 level) 

C. Political Science Core (see above) 18 semester hours 

D. PSC 217 3 semester hours 

E. Two additional comparative courses, 6 semester hours 



chosen from among PSC 240-249 or 340-349 



6 semester hours 



15 semester hours 



F. Two additional international relations 
courses, chosen trom among PSC 311, 
312, 317, 318, 319, and 330 

G. Additional and cognate courses as 
follows: 

1. GEO 101 or 103 

2. HIS 101, 102, 150, 151, or 152 



Students in the international relations concentration are encouraged to take 
PSC 240. 



Political Science 



School ot Business and Public Affairs 



3. Nine additional hours selected with 
advanced approval of adviser which may 
count up to sLx additional language hours 

IV. Bachelor of Arts — ^Applied/Public Policy Concentration 

A. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

B. Foreign Language/Culture Cluster 0-15 semester hours 

C. Pohtical Science Core (see above) 18 semester hours 
PSC 202 or 204 must be taken as part of the 

Pohtical Science Core. 

PSC 400 or 401 must be taken as senior seminar. 

D. Specific Concentration Requirements 9 semester hours 
PSC 322, 356, 357 

E. Two additional PSC courses chosen from 6 semester hours 
the following: 

PSC 201, 202, or 204 (if not taken above), 
301, 323, 324, 355, 358, 359, 375, or up to 
sbc hours of internship credit taken under 
advisement 

F. Cognates distributed as follows: 9 semester hours 

1. A sociology course selected under advisement 

2. An economics course selected under advisement 

3. A geography course selected under advisement 

V. Bachelor of Arts — Elective Citizenship Education Teacher 
Certification Program (formerly Social Studies) 

A. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

1. Academic Foundations; COM 208 and 
MAT 103 required 

2. Diverse Communities: PSC 301 or 323 

3. InterdiscipUnary: PSC 204 or 318 

4. Behavioral and Social Sciences: PSY 100 
and SOC 200 recommended 

5. Humanities: HIS 101 and LIT 
course required 

6. Free Electives: EDF 100, EDP 250, MAT 104 

B. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement 0-15 semester hours 

C. Political Science Core (see above) 18 semester hours 



D. An additional course from the behavior 3 semester hours 
category, PSC 301 or 323 (in additional 

general requirements) 

E. An additional course from the comparative 3 semester hours 
group, PSC 240-249 range or 340-349 range 

F. Electives 6 semester hours 
PSC 204 or 318 (if not used in general 

requirements) and any two additional political 
science courses at the 200 level or above. 
Electives should be chosen to reflect the 
themes from the citizenship education standards. 

G. Cognates distributed as follows: 9 semester hours 

1. ECO 101 or 111 and 112 

2. GEO 101 or 103 

3. HIS 151 

H. Free electives to complete 128 credits needed for 
graduation. Among these must be EDA 341; 
EDM 300; EDP 351; EDS 306, 411, 412; 
HIS 102, 152; and SSC 331. 

Additional Requirements for Student Teaching and 
Certification 

An overall GPA of 2.50 or better is required, as well as a GPA of 
2.50 or better in all history and social science courses. 

Minor in Political Science 18 semester hours 

Students may minor in general political science or in one of the sub- 
fields such as international relations. Students take PSC 100 plus five 
courses in a concentrated area, or (at least two) areas under depart- 
mental advisement. 

This minor may be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor of arts 
or bachelor of science in liberal studies general degree program. 

Minor in Public Management 18 semester hours 

Students take PSC 100 and PSC 202 plus four additional courses in 
pubhc administration under department advisement. This minor may 
be taken as one of the minors in the bachelor ot arts or bachelor of 
science liberal studies general degree program. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Symbol: PSC, unless otherwise indicated 

100 American Government and Politics (3) 

Devoted to understanding how the system works: 
political action, elections, interest groups, civil lib- 
erties. Congress, the presidency, and the courts are 
among the topics considered. Seeks to provide a 
framework in terms of which process and current 
issues become meaningful. 
HOI The Politics of Diversity in the United 
States (3) Uses contemporary issues as a means to 
investigate the eftects of race, class, and gender on 
the political experiences of citizens while providing 
an overview of American political institutions. 

200 Political Analysis (3) Incorporates techniques 
for analyzing political questions logically and sys- 
tematically, and introduces basic research design 
and methodological and library usage skills appro- 
priate to the political science discipline. Required 
course for B.A. majors in political science, 
applied/public polic)', and international relations, 
and the B.S. in Education with a political science 
concentration. Optional course tor minors in polit- 
ical science, public administration, and interna- 
tional relations. PREREQ: PSC 100. 

201 State and Local Government (3) Examination 
of the organization, tiinctions, and politics of state 
and local government, including analysis of politics 
in states, counties, cities, and towns in urban, sub- 
urban, and rural areas. Intergovernmental relations 



in education, transportation, and welfare policy are 

examined. PREREQ: PSC 100. 

202 Elements of Public Administration (3) 

Considers public administration in the United States 
as a process of implementing public policy. Uses case 
smdies and projects with texts focusing on organiza- 
tional theor\', human behavior and motivation, bud- 
geting, personnel, and administrative responsibilit)'. 
# 204 Introduction to Urban Studies (3) An 
examination of the breadth ot urban studies from 
the perspectives of many social science disciplines. 
Philadelphia is emphasized as an object of percep- 
tion, as a place of life and livelihood, and as an 
example of continual change in the urban environ- 
ment. PREREQ: WRT 121. 
213 International Relations (3) Politics among 
nations, including politics carried on through 
international organizations. Examines power poli- 
tics, techniques of diplomacy, and methods of cur- 
rent international organizations. Special attention 
to U.S. interests and policies. 
217 American Foreign Policy (3) Cultural, politi- 
cal, economic, and psychological intluences on 
policy, process ot decision making. Special atten- 
tion to a few policy areas such as relations with 
allied, underdeveloped, revolutionary, or 
Communist countries. Possible response to threats 
of war, population growth, resource shortages, and 
pollution may be examined. 

230 Introduction to Political TTiought (3) Great 
political thinkers of Western civilization from 
Plato to the present. Historical background of 



Western thought and its relevance to the present 

political world. 

240 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3) An 

introduction to the comparative study of political 
systems at various stages ot cultural, social, eco- 
nomic, and political development. 
■ 246 Soviet Politics (3) Marxism-Leninism, the 
tunctioning of the political system, and its domi- 
nation of all areas of Soviet life. Some brief atten- 
tion to the conduct of Soviet foreign policy. 
252 Civil Liberties and Ciiil Rights (3) A survey 
of the sources of civil liberties and civil rights in 
the United States with an inquiry into contempo- 
rary problems and their solutions through statutory 
and constitutional developments. 
256 Energy and the Political Process (3) Stresses 
the process of policy making and implementation 
in the field of energy. Emphasis also is given to 
foreign policy and natural securitii' implications. 
> 301 Gender and Politics (3) Examines the role 
of women in politics and examines how the per- 
spectives of marginalized groups gives access to 
new interpretations about the U.S. political system. 
Specific topics include socialization, the media, 
political campaigns, elections, and public policy. 
310 The United States and Latin America (3) 
This course examines U.S. relations with the 
nations of Latin America. Emphasis is on under- 



I Diverse communities course 

# Approved interdisciplinar)' course 

H Culture cluster 



School ot Business and Public Affairs 



Political Science 



standing the goals of U.S. policies and the real 
impact of those policies. U.S. \iews of Latin 
America, both contemporan- and historical, are 
explored as are Larin American attitudes and views 
toward the United States. The extent to which the 
United States has been motivated in its dealing by 
great power hegemonic concerns, economic self 
interests (dollar diplomacv). cultural imperiahsm, 
human rights, and desire to champion democratic 
governance are all examined. Contemporary' con- 
cerns with promoting market economics, narcotic 
trafficking, and immigration are also considered. 

311 Soviet and Post-Soviet Foreign Policy (3) 
Emphasis on So\iet-,\merican relations since 
1945 and a comparison of the two socieries. 
Topics treated include the influence of Marxism, 
Great Russian nationalism, and historical experi- 
ence on Soviet foreign relations. PREREQ^ PSC 
213 or 246 or permission of instructor. 

312 Politics of Modem Nationalism (3) An analwis 
of political processes in the former So\'iet Union and 
Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and the Middle 
East. The role ot nationalism in these countries alter 
the demise of communism. The rise of nationalism 
in the Middle East and Western Europe. 

317 Contemporaiy International Relations (3) 
Recent issues and problems with special emphasis on 
superpower behavior around the world. Aso, third 
world revolutions, intemational terrorism, human 
rights, intemational law and the United Nations, and 
the changing intemational economic order. 

318 Intemational Political Economy (3) The focus 
is the politics of intemational economic relations. 
Atemative analytical and theoretical perspectives 
will be examined tor their value m helping to under- 
stand and evaluate the historical developments and 
cxirrent operation of the global economy. Special 
attention is given to system governance (intemation- 
al regimes such as the World Trade Organization 
and the Intemational Monetary' Fund) and the abili- 
ty' ot the nations of the world to provide stability to 
the international political economy. The primary 
objective of this course is to de\'elop analytical and 
theoretical skills in the application of various inter- 
national political economy perspectives (liberalism, 
mercantilism, Mandsm/stmcturalism) which e.xam- 
ine the interrelationship between states and markets. 

319 Middle Eastern Politics (3) Topics include 
the Aab-Israeli conflict, the poUtics of the Persian 
Gulf, the role of OPEC, and the superpower con- 
flict in the region. 

322 Public Opinion, Propaganda, and Political 
Behavior (3) The dynamics of opinion formation 
and change, and the role of public opinion in poh- 
c}' formation. Political socialization, survey 
research and political socialization, sun'ey research, 
and propaganda techniques also are considered. 
t 323 The Politics of Race, Class, and Gender 
(3) This course examines the relationship among 
race, class, and gender as thev relate to people's 
poUtical behavior and experiences. Aso examines 
the American political system's response to them 
in terms of its public pohcies. 
324 American Political Parties (3) Patterns, 
fiinctions, and history of the ^Anerican political 
party system at national, state, and local levels. 
Theoretical and empirical studies of political inter- 
est groups, pubhc opinion, and voting behavior. 
329 Judicial Behavior (3) A behavioral approach 
to the law, yvith specific reference to conceptual. 



methodological, and ideological considerations. 
Depending on the availabUitv of information, role- 
playing simulations will be used with students por- 
traj'ing judges and attorneys. 
330 The Politics of the Holocaust and Genocide 
(3) This course examines the political causes of the 
Holocaust and genocide both in a historical and 
current context. Case studies include the Jew^ in 
Europe as well as the .Amenians and Cambodians. 
339 Contemporary Political Thought (3) Consi- 
deration of major political thinkers since Marx, 
including BerUn, Rawls, Ehvorkin, Nozick, and 
rational choice theorists. 

■ 340 Latin-American Culture and Politics (3) 
Comparative analy-sis of contemporary Latin- 
American systems. Political cultures, decision 
making, ideologies, and poUtical processes. 
Emphasis is on Mexico and Central America. 
Offered each semester. 

■ 342 Government and Cultures of Western 
Europe (3) Primary attention focuses on France, 
Germany, and Great Britain; secondary attention 
is on other European systems. Political cultures, 
popular participation, poUtical parties, and formal 
institutions ot government. 

343 Culture and Politics of Asia (3) Study of cul- 
tural, philosophical, and poUtical systems of mod- 
em Asia with special emphasis on China, Japan, 
and India. 

348 Afiican CiJture and Politics (3) The poUtical 
nature and practices of individuals, organizations, 
and governments of Black ^Arica are examined in 
the cultural context of the contemporary' indepen- 
dent period. PREREQ: PSC 100 or equivalent. 
350 American Constitutional Law (3) The devel- 
opment of the American constiwtional system as 
reflected in leading decisions of the United States 
Supreme Court. Emphasis on national poyvers, 
federaUsm, and the BUI of Rights. PREREQiPSC 
100 or permission of instructor. 

355 Congressional Politics (3) Deals yvith the 
internal and e.xternal factors that influence 
Congressional behavior, including the roles of 
constituents, pressure groups, parties, the commit- 
tee system, rules, and the leadership. Their rela- 
tionships to the president and court structure and 
their impact on electoral poUtics also are consid- 
ered. Comparisons with state legislatures. 

356 American Public Policy (3) PoUa' formation 
and execution. PoUcy areas considered vary from 
semester to semester. May include role-playing. 
PREREQ: PSC 100 or 101 or permission of 
instmctor. 

357 Advanced Political Analysis (3) Discussion 
and appUcation ot research design, conceptuaUza- 
tion, measurement, operaUzation, research models, 
sampUng, and data analysis for poUtical science. 

358 Applied Public Policy Analysis (3) An exam- 
ination of pubUc poUcy issues of state or national 
concern. Both analysis of current poUcy and 
research resulting in neyv poUcv recommendations 
wiU be included. 

359 The American Presidency (3) In-depth 
analysis of the nature and significance of the 
American presidency, including constitutional 
development, presidential roles and customs, the 
recruitment process, the executive branch, and the 
poUtics of the presidency. 



372 Organization and Management (3) Intro- 
duction to pubUc and nonprofit organization man- 
agement. Broad coverage of key elements of orga- 
nizational functions and structure for potential 
managers. Uses both macro sociological and micro 
psychological levels of analy-sis. Case studies inte- 
grated into conceptual fi-ameyvorks. 

373 American Intergovernmental Relations (3) 
Designed to famiUarize students with the complex 
network of confUct, cooperation, and interdepen- 
dence among national, state, and local government 
units. Topic areas, among others, include an 
analysis of the continuing evolution of American 
federaUsm, an examination of this relationship 
from state and city government perspectives, and a 
description of specific intergovernmental fiscal 
programs and poUcies. 

375 Public Policy and Budgeting (3) Introductory 
course to pubUc fiscal management appUcable to 
local, state, and national levels of government. 
Focus on the three major aspects of fiscal manage- 
ment: pubUc services in a free market/mixed econ- 
omy'; revenue/ta.xation theory and practice; and 
governmental budgeting systems and concepts. 
PREREQ: PSC 202. 

399 Political Science Symposium (3) Nature of 
research in poUtical science. Constmcrion of a 
research design. Extensive reading in an area of 
poUtical science. 

HBl 400, 401, 402 Hartisburg Intemship 
Seminar (15) A fiiU-semester intemship in 
Pennsylvania state government. Smdent intem is 
placed in cabinet-level or legislative office. 
Placement (9 cr.); PoUc\' Research Project (3 cr.); 
PoUc\' Seminar (3 cr.). The intemship is open to 
any junior or senior student, regardless of major, 
who has a minimum GPA of 3.5. Stipend involved. 

400 Senior Seminar in Political Science (3) 
Research in poUtical science. Methodology', bibUog- 
raphy, and presentation, both oral and yvritten. The 
research paper for the seminar must be acceptable 
as a required departmental senior research paper. 

401 Senior Project in Political Science (3) 
Execution of the research design constructed in 
PSC 399. Involves completion of a major senior 
paper under supervision of a stafl member. 
Extensive independent effort. 

402 Seminar in Intemational Relations (3) 
Theme centered with capstone paper. Senior I.R. 
majors only. 

410 Independent Studies in Political Science (1-3) 
Research projects, reports, and readings in poUtical 
science. Open to seniors only. PREREQ; 
Permission of instructor. 
♦ 412 Intemship in Political Science (3-15) 
Upper-level student field placement learning. 
Short-term, 3- to 6-hour experiences in poUtical 
settings under faculty advisement; and 9- to 15- 
hour placements in state, federal, local government 
or pubUc serv'ice agencies. Learning contracts and 
faculty' advisement create a whole experience from 
exposure to government admirustration and poU- 
tics. Offered each semester. 
414 Intemational Theory (3) General theory 
appUed to specific case studies. Advanced readings. 



I Diverse communities course 

H Culture cluster 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Professional and Secondan' Education 



School of Education 



Pre-Medical Program 

117 Schmucker Science Center South 

610-436-2978 

Melissa Betz Cichowicz, Director 

COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

Melissa Betz Cichowicz, Chemistry 
Blaise Frost, Chemistry 
Felix Goodson, Chemistry 
Anthony Nicastro, Physics 
Leslie Slusher, Biology 
Richard Woodruff, Biology 
Joan Woolfrey, Philosophy 

The Pre-Medical Program prepares undergraduate and post-baccalau- 
reate students for application to the health professional schools of 
medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine as well as schools ot 
optometry, podiatry, chiropractic, and physical therapy, and for 
careers in biomedical research. Supervised by a Pre-Medical 
Committee, the program consists of an individualized selection ot 
course work, personal counseUng and academic support, and optional 
junior-year biomedical research at a medical school or research insti- 
tute. For highly select undergraduates and post-baccalaureates, med- 
ical school admission assurance programs are available in affiUation 
with Drexel Universit}' School of Medicine, the Penn State University 
College of Medicine, Temple Universit\' School ot Medicine, 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Temple University 
School of Dentistry, and Arcadia University's M.S. in physician assis- 
tant smdies. Students with majors other than chemistry-biology (pre- 
medical) are required to have two advisers — one from their major field 
and one from the Pre-Medical Committee. 
Because of the intense competition tor health professional school 
admission, only academically talented and highly motivated students 
should apply to the pre-medical program. Applicants are selected on 
the basis of their potential for achievement in the program. Students 
in the program are expected to maintain a minimum 3.20 grade point 
average and the high standards of performance necessar)- for health 
professional school admission. 

It is essential for incoming students contemplating a medical career to 
register with the Pre-Medical Office immediately upon matriculation 
at the Universit)'. Similarly, it is essential for students who at some 



later time develop an interest in a medical career to register with the 
Pre-Medical Office. Students who fail to consult with the Pre- 
Medical Office prior to taking the Medical College Admissions Test 
(MCAT) or who tail to report the results of any MC AT exam to the 
Pre-Medical Office forteit the privilege of receiving a Pre-Medical 
Committee letter of evaluation when they apply to medical school. 
All West Chester students who wish to apply to a health professional 
school should ask their professors to forward letters of evaluation to 
the Pre-Medical Committee and should process their applications 
through the committee. The committee will send a composite letter of 
evaluation to the professional school. Except for special circumstances, no 
letters of recommendation should be sent directly to professional schools. 
Further information is available in the Pre-Medical Office, 117 
Schmucker Science Center South. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — CHEMISTRY-BIOLOGY 
(PRE-MEDICAL) 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
Includes six semester hours of English 

composition 

2. Biology 24 semester hours 
BIO 110, 217, 220, 230, 357, 448, and 468 

3. Chemistry 31 semester hours 
CHE 103, 104, 231, 232, 321, 345, 418, and 

476 

CRL 103, 104, 231, 321, and 476 
4A. Internship Track 12 semester hours 

CHE 450 

One three-credit biology or chemistry 

concentration elective 
4B. Noninternship Track 15 semester hours 

CRL 321, CHE 477 

BIO 490 or CHE 491 

Three three-credit concentration electives 

5. Supporting Courses 19 semester hours 
MAT 121 and 161 

PHY 130 and 140, or 170 and 180 

6. Free Electives 



7-10 semester hours 



See also Chemistry. 



Department of Professional and Secondary Ed 



201C Recitation Hall 

610-436-2958 

Yi-Ming Hsu, Chairperson 

Paul Morgan, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Hsu, Hynes 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: K. Brown, Haggard, Hohngak, 

Mastrilli, Welsh 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bolton, Goss, Kinslow, Kurzinsky, 

Morgan, Penny 
The bachelor of science in education or the bachelor of arts with an 
elective program in teacher certification, which prepares the student for 
teaching in the secondary schools or K-12 classes, may be earned with 
an academic speciahzation in biology, chemistry, citizenship education, 
communication, earth and space science, English, French, general sci- 
ence, German, Latin, mathematics, physics, Russian, or Spanish. 
Satisfactory completion of a secondary or K-12 curriculum also will 
quality the student for a Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate, 
which is valid for six years of teaching the specified subject in 



ucation 

approved Pennsylvania schools. The student must choose one acade- 
mic field of specialization. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 

2. Professional Education Requirements 33-36 semester hours 
Secondary and K-12 Education 

EOF 100, EDM 300, EDP 250 and 351, 
EDA/EDR 341, EDS 306, teaching skills/methods 
(taken in academic department of subject 
specialization), EDS 411/412 

3. The teaching certification is given in specific subject 
areas. Therefore, speciahzation in one of the teaching 
fields listed below is required for graduation in 
secondary or K-12 education. The minimum number 
of semester hours required for each field is listed in 
this catalog under the appropriate academic department. 
These hours wiU satisfy the Instructional I 
Certification requirements in Pennsylvania. 



School of Education 



Protessional and Secondan' Education: Emironrnental Education 



Earth and Space Science 

English 

General Science 

Mathematics 

Physics 



Secondary Areas of Certification 

Biolog}- 

Chemistn- 

Citizenship Education 

(formerh" Social Studies) 
Communication 

K-12 Areas of Certification 

French Russian 

German Spanish 

Latin 

Students in the secondajy or K-12 education programs must confer 
regularly with their professional studies adviser in the Department of 
Professional and Secondary- Education, as well as wth the academic 
adviser assigned by their respective academic department. Prospective 
students may obtain information on these secondary or K-12 educa- 
tion programs from the Teacher Education Center located in 251 
F.H. Green Librar>- (610-436-3090). 
Formal Admission to Teacher Education and Teacher 
Certification 

Refer to the catalog section on "Teaching Certification Programs" for 
information on program requirements. 



Student Teaching Eligibility 

To be eligible tor student teaching (EDS 411-412), the smdent must 
have fulfilled the following requirements: 

1. Completed the following three courses: AL^T 103 or above, PSY 
100,\\'RT121. 

2. Completed the following eight courses with at least a C (2.0): 
EDF 100, EDM 300, e"dP^250, EDP 351, EDA/EDR 341, 
EDS 306, and methods or teaching skills course(s) in the area of 
specialization offered in the appropriate academic department. 

3. Completed any test and/or other requirements set by the appropri- 
ate academic department. 

4. Completed a minimum of 90 semester hours with the 
Penns\'lvania-mandated GPA (2.8), including a minimum grade of 
C in all education courses. 

5. Fulfilled the requirements for formal admission to teacher educa- 
tion status described on pages 145-146. 

Minor in Professional Education 18 semester hours 

Any student who is not a major in a teacher education program and is 
in good academic standing (minimum cumulative GPA ot 2.00) may 
enroll in the program. 
Required Courses: 

EDF 100, EDM 300, EDP 250, and diree elective courses under 
departmental adwsement 
Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all minor courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
FOUNDATIONS 

S)-mbol: EDF 

100 School and Sodetj* (3) An introduction to the 
nature, tiinction. scope, organization, administration, 
and support of the public school in ,'\merican society-. 
350 The Professional and Student Personnel 
Ser\ices (3) .\n introduction to nonadjunctive ser- 
vices in education. PREREQ: EDP 250. 
360 The Learner in Nonschool Settings (3) 
Emphasis in the course \siil be placed on intra- 
and Interpersonal development, facilitative growth 
and adjustment, and dv-sftmcrion as they may 
impact the nonschool educator or trainer. 
364 Systems-Based Educational Services (3) 
This course introduces the student to general sys- 
tems (social) theon', focusing on the elements, 
dvTiamics, and operations of a sv'stem that must be 
considered in developing educational activities and 
programs for that s\'stem. The student will learn 
strategies of systems analii'sis and inten'ention 
through the investigation ot such topics as needs 
assessment, objective-based programming, organi- 
zational development, and program evaluation. 
412 Internship in Nonschool Settings (3) The 
internship experience is designed tor upper-level 



education students who are interested in using and 
transferring e.\isting discipline and pedagogical 
skills in nonschool settings. A regularly scheduled 
practicum will he held tor all internships. 
♦ 498 Workshop in Educational Foundations (3) 

EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

S>-mbol: EDM 

300 Introduction to Educational Technology 
Integration (3) An overview of the integration of 
technology' in teaching and learning with a focus 
on computer applications. 

EDUCATIONAL PS\ CHOLOGY 

Symbol: EDP 

249 Adolescent De^-elopment (3) This course 
focuses on the emotional, social, intellectual, moral, 
phj'sical, and self-concept factors shaping human 
behavior with emphasis on adolescent behavior. 

250 Educational Psychologj- (3) A smdy of learn- 
ing in relation to the physical, social, emotional, 
and intellectual aspects of personahtv'. 

351 Evaluation and Measurement (3) A study of 
constructing testing materials and procedures with 
emphasis on interpretation and application to the 
assessment of classroom learning. PREREQ^ EDP 
250. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

S\-mbol: EDS 

306 Principles of Teaching and Field Experience 
in Secondare Education (3) Methods and strate- 
gies of teaching in secondarv' schools will be the 
core of the course. Implications of classroom man- 
agement, learning, and other related problems will 
be discussed. Students will observe in a classroom 
for nine weeks. PREREQ^ EDF 100 and permis- 
sion of department chairperson. 
♦ 410 Independent Study (1-3) Special topics or 
projects initiated bv the students that will enable 
them to do extensive and intensive study in an area 
of secondari- education. PREREQl Permission of 
department chairperson. 

411-412 Student Teaching (6) (6) Observation 
and participation in teaching and all other activities 
related to the teacher's work in the area of the stu- 
dent's specialization. PREREQl Formal admission 
and 90 semester hours including all professional 
education courses. Students must have at least a 2.8 
cumulative average and at least a grade of C (2.0) 
in all secondarv- education and professional educa- 
tion courses. Offered in fall and spring semesters. 



♦ This course mav be taken a^ain for credit. 



Environmental Education Program 

Thomas Mastrilli, Coordinator 

Enwoivmental Education Certification Program 

This interdisciplinarv program enables teacher-education majors to 
secure certification to teach and administer environmental education 
programs. The certification is K-12, and the student must be eru-oUed 
in or have completed a teacher-certification program in an area other 
than envirorunental education and have achieved a 2.80 cumulative 
GPA to enter the program. The curriculum is a mixture ot existing 
courses from the physical, social, and behavioral sciences as well as 
courses specifically designed for the envirorunental educator. Students 



are required to complete all of the cognate requirements in section 1 
below (three semester hours more than already required by general edu- 
cation and teacher education program requirements) and all of the core 
courses in section 2 below. Smdents wishing to explore this program 
should consult with the coordinator of envirorunental education. 

Certification Program 45-55 semester hours 

1. General Education Cognates 21-31 semester hours 

BIO 100 or 110; CHE 100 or 102, or 
CHE 103-104/CRL 103-104; ESS 101, 



Psychology 



College of Arts and Sciences 



GEO 102, and 9 semester hours 
in the behavioral and social sciences 
2. Environmental Core Courses 

BIO 172 or 270, EDO 300, EDO 450, 



16 semester hours 



IND 110 or SCE 320, and BIO 102 or 
ENV 102 or ESS 102 
3. Recommended Electives 

EDO 420, EDO 498, and ESS 480 



8 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 

Symbol: EDO 

300 Environmental History, Theory, and Practice 

(3) This course is intended as an overview and intro- 
duction to the field of environmental education. 
Historical antecedents, including nature education, 
outdoor education, and conservation education, as 
well as philosophies and methodologies appropriate 
for a basic understanding of environmental educa- 
tion, will be analysed, with emphasis on compliance 
with curriculum regulations in Pennsylvania. Sources 
of support for environmental education in the form 



of professional organizations, resources, and funding 
mechanisms will be identified. 
420 Organization and Administration of Out- 
door Education (3) Basic concepts of outdoor 
education, the role of outdoor education in the 
school program, and the initiation and administra- 
tion of outdoor education. 

450 Environmental Education Design, Delivery, 
and Field Experience (3) This course is designed to 
facilitate the infusion of environmental educarion 
into the traditional classroom and prepare teachers 
to use a variety of settings for environmental educa- 
tion teaching opportunities. Emphasis will be phced 



on teaching techniques closely identified vrith cur- 
riculum development goals and objectives for envi- 
ronmental education including the use of case stud- 
ies, addressing controversial issues, and strategies for 
the development of ecological literacy and critical 
thinking skills. The stadent also will have a field 
placement that will provide an opportunity to put 
environmental education theory into practice. 
498 Workshop in Environmental Education (3) 
Generallv these will be one-week workshops to 
provide environmental educators with training 
and/or skills in specific programs, topics, or activi- 
ties related to environmental education. 



Department of Psychology 

Peoples Building 

610-436-2945 

Phillip Duncan, Chairperson 

Stefani Yorges, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS: Bloom, Bonifazi, Duncan, Kumar, Mahlstedt, 

J. McConatha, Moore, Morse, PoUak, J. Porter, L. Porter, 

M. Renner, Treadwell 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Kerr, C. Renner, Yorges 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Azorlosa, Cans, Johnson, 

Rieser-Danner, Wren 
The B.A. in PSYCHOLOGY prepares students to understand vari- 
ables, such as heredity, learning, and the environment, which shape and 
change behavior. Careers are possible in cUnics, guidance centers, indus- 
try, hospitals, schools, and government. Students should consult their 
advisers concerning recommended preparations for specific career goals. 
This program also will prepare the smdent for postgraduate smdy. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS— PSYCHOLOGY 

1. General Ed. Requirements, see pages 36-39 48 semester hours 
MAT 103 or higher MAT course is required. 

BIO 100 or 110 or 259 is recommended, 
COM 201, 208, 212, or 216; WRT 121, 204, 
or 220 

2. Foreign Language/Culture Requirement, 0-15 semester hours 
see pages 39-40 

3. Department Requirements 44-45 semester hours 
A. Required Psychology Courses (32-33 semester hours) 

PSY 100, 245, 246, and 400. Smdents must 
choose three courses from Group I, three 
courses from Group II, and one course 



from Group III. Smdents are strongly 
encouraged to take PSY 245 as early as pos- 
sible, but MUST enroll in it before taking 
more than 21 hours in psychology courses. 
Group I (choose three courses) 

PSY 254, 257, 365, 375, or either 382 
or 384 (but not both) 
Group II (choose three courses) 

PSY 255, 335, 350, 363, 464, or 475 
Group III (choose one course) 

PSY 266, 336, 366, 386, 410, 441, 466, or 470 
B. Psycholog)' Electives (12 semester hours) 
Four additional courses, selected from 
among any of the departmental offerings. 
4. Student Electives to complete 120 semester hours 

These electives are in addition to the nine 
semester hours of electives listed under the 
general education requirements and may be 
selected from among any ot the University's 
course offerings. 

Minor in Psychology 18 semester hours 

The minor in psychology is designed for students of any major and is 
tailored to the specific educational goals of each student. After taking 
PSY 100, the student will choose 15 additional hours of PSY courses. 

Minimum Grade Requirement 

Beginning in the fall of 1996 all newly declared psychology majors 
and minors must earn a grade ot C- or better in PSY 100 and all 
other PSY courses that fulfill departmental requirements. PSY courses 
used as general education free electives are exempt firom this policy. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Symbol: PSY 

100 Introduction to Psychology (3) Introduction 
to the scientific study of behavior. The multiple 
bases of human behavior with emphasis on the 
learning process. Basic concepts, principles, and 
methodology'. Smdents may be required to become 
familiar with an ongoing research study in psy- 
chology as an out-of-class assignment. 



210 Developmental Psychology: Lifespan (3) A 

survey of research findings and theoretical issues 
related to developmental processes from the prena- 
tal phase to senescence. PREREQi PSY 100. 
Majors are advised to take PSY 382 or PSY 384 
rather than PSY 210. 

245 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (3) 
Descriptive and inferential statistical concepts and 
techniques and their application to the collection, 
analysis, and interpretation of behavioral data. 



Computer-assisted computation procedures will be 
employed. PREREQi MAT 103 or higher. 
246 Research Methods in Psychology (3) Critical 
examination of research methods in psychology, 
including experimental and quasi-experimental 
designs, correlational methods, and survey meth- 
ods. Smdents will receive practical experience in 
the design, implementation, analvsis. and interpre- 
tation of data, and in preparation ot written 
reports for research projects. PREREQi PSY 245. 



School ot Business and Public Attairs 



Social Work 



254 Social Psychology (3) The study ot the wa\-s 
in which the indi\'idual is affected bv the actual, 
imagined, or implied presence of others. PRE- 
REQ: PSY 100. 

255 Introduction to Biological Psychology (3) 
Basic concepts concerning the reciprocal relation- 
ship between behaN^or and biolog)' will be intro- 
duced. PREREQi PSY 100. 

257 TTieories of Personality (3) A course in per- 
sonalit\' that examines the theories and writings of 
Freud. Jung, Adler, Fromm, Erikson, Rogers, and 
other major personalit\- theorists. PREREQ; PSY 
100. 

265 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) A 
basic course for business majors and others inter- 
ested in the psychology' of the workplace. 
Emphasis on the theoretical developments in psy- 
cholog^' as these relate to the studv ot people in 
organizations and industn-. PREREQ; PSY 100. 

266 Biological Psychology Laboratory (2) 
Laboratorv' exercises and experiments in basic bio- 
logical psy'cholog)'. PREREQ; PS'i' 100, 245, 246, 
and concurrent or preWous enrollment in PSY 255. 
325 Psychological Testing and Measurement (3) 
Principles ot psychological measurement including 
standardization, scale transformation, reUabilit}', 
validity', and item anal^^is. Use of tests for the 
solution of problems in industrial, clinical, and 
educational settings. PREREQ: PSY 100. 

327 Behavior Modification (3) A sun'ey of the 
principles and practices employed in inducing 
behaWoral changes in clinic, institution, agency, 
and school settings. PREREQ: PSY 100. 

335 Animal Behavior (3) The evolution and 
adaptiveness of beha\ior. Emphasis on physiologi- 
cal, genetic, and learning processes underlnng ani- 
mal behanor. PRERECl PSY 100, or BIO 100 or 
110, or permission ot instructor. 

336 Animal Behavior Laboratory (2) Laborator)' 
exercises and experiments in the principles of ani- 
mal behavior and comparative psychology. PRE- 
REQ^ Concurrent enrollment in (or previous com- 
pletion of) PSY 335. 

350 Motivation (3) A stud)' ot drives, motives, 
and emotions as determinants of behavior. 
Phv'siological and social aspects of motivation will 
be explored with some attention given to patho- 
logical factors. PREREQ: PS^l' 100. 
362 Histoiy and Systems of Psychology (3) An 
integrated overview of the historv' of psychology as 



well as the sv'stems, theories, and tlmdamental issues 
with which psvchologists have concerned themselves 
in the past, recent, and current stages ot the science. 
PREREQiPSY 100; PHI 101 recommended. 
363 Psychology of Learning (3) Basic laws and 
theories of learning. PREREQ. PSY 100. 

365 Psychology of Women (3) A studv of the 
behavior and experience ot women. Biological, 
cultural, interpersonal, and intrapersonal determi- 
nants of women's acrions, thoughts, and feeUngs 
will be explored. PREREQi PSY 100. 

366 Learning Laboratory (2) Laboratory e-xercises 
and experiments in the principles of Pavlovian and 
instrumental conditioning. PREREQ^ Successful 
completion or concurrent enrollment in PSY 363. 
375 Abnormal Psychology (3) An in-depth study 
of psychological/psychiatric disorders, including 
diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, and treatment. 
PREREQ: PSY 100. 

382 Developmental Psychologv- of Infancy, Child- 
hood and Adolescence (3) Study ot the normal 
child from conception to puberty. Emphasis on cur- 
rent theoretical issues involved in the effects of early 
cx-perience and environment. PREREQ; PS\' 100. 
384 Developmental Psychologj' of Adulthood 
and Aging (3) Study ot psychological development 
during the mature vears up to and including death 
and dving. PREREQ; PSY 100. 
390 Principles of Counseling and Psychotherapy 
(3) A review of theoretical assumptions underpin- 
ning various approaches to counseUng and psy- 
chotherapv with particular reference to compara- 
tive outcome data. PREREQ: PSY 257 or 375. 
400 Senior Seminar in Psychology (3) In-depth 
study of advanced topics in psychologv'. Students 
will prepare and present written and oral presenta- 
tions describing and analyzing current issues in 
psychology. Required of all psychologv' majors. 
♦ 410 Research in Psychologv' (1-3) Special 
research projects, reports, and readings in psychol- 
ogv'. PREREQ; Permission of department chair- 
person. 

413 Psychodrama I (3) This class is designed as 
an introducton' course, integrating theory and 
practice ot psychodrama as a psychotherapeutic 
modality. Emphasis is placed on understanding 
the basic psychodramatic and sociometric tech- 
niques from a theoretical perspective with empha- 
sis placed on how to use these basic techniques in 



appUed situations. PREREQ; PSY 100 and per- 
mission of instructor. 

430 Human Sexual Behavior (3) ^An intensive 
studv of those variables under which human sex-ual 
behavior functions. Research from sociological and 
medical studies is integrated with psychological 
knowledge. PREREQ; PSY 100. 

441 Field Experience in Psychology' I (3) A 
work-study program in an educational, business, 
or mental health facility under joint supervision of 
the instructor and the staff psychologist of the 
field institution. Permission of instructor required. 

442 Field E.xperience in Psychology II (3) 
Continuation of PSY 441. 

443 Psychology' of Group Processes (3) An 
exploration of the draamics of interpersonal 
behavior in small groups. Theory applied to prac- 
tice in class. PRERECi; PSY 100; permission of 
instructor recommended. 

445 Organizational Development (3) The study 
of human behavior in task group and organization- 
al contexts. PREREQ; PSS' 265 recommended. 
447 Interpersonal Relationships (3) A study of 
processes and factors in establishing, maintaining, 
and terminating relationships via the use of group 
methods. PREREQ; PSY 100 and permission of 
instructor. 

464 Advanced Biological Psychology (3) 
Anatomical, endocrinological, and phv'siological 
processes underlving behavior, including motiva- 
tion, emotion, learning, and memon,'. Special atten- 
tion is given to the biological bases and treatments 
of mental illness. PREREQ; PSY 100 and 255. 
470 Sensory and Perceptual Processes (3) A 
study ot how we process senson- information and 
perceive our environments. PREREQ; PS^' 100. 
475 Cognitive Psychology (3) Basic research and 
application in memon' and information process- 
ing. PREREQ; PS\' 100; PSY 363 recommended. 
481 Eating Disorders (3) .'\n in-depth study of 
anore-xia nen'osa, bulimia nervosa, and other variants 
of disordered eating. PREREQ; PSY 257 or 375. 
♦ 490 Topical Seminar in Psychologv' (1-3) 
Special topics in psychologv' not offered under exist- 
ing, regularly offered courses. PREREQ; Consent 
of instructor or chairperson recommended. 



♦ This course may be taken again with the approval 
of the Department of Psychology chairperson. 



Department of Social Work 

114 Rosedale Avenue 

610-436-2527 

Dark Spence Coffev, Chairperson 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: DeHope, JovTier, Voss 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Coffey, Hicks, Hodgins 

The social work program is accredited on the baccalaureate level as a 

professional degree in social work b)' the Council on Social Work 

Education. 

This mission of the Department of Social Work at West Chester 

Universit}' is to develop the knowledge, values, and skills in students 

to enable them to fiinction effectiveh' as beginning generalist social 

workers. Students develop knowledge of the social welfare needs of a 

complex urban and rural environment. Students learn to use critical 

thinking skills in resolving ethical dilemmas and to evaluate their 



skills to guide life-long learning. Students are also prepared for gradu- 
ate social work education. The student applies theory to practice in 
varied field experiences in the junior and senior years. 
The B.S.W. program has two phases. The first phase is the pre-social 
work education track for declared undergraduate social work majors. 
Students take pre-social work along with their general education 
requirements during the first two vears. They then apply tor candidacy 
for the second phase, which is the professional social work track in 
which course work is completed during the junior and senior years. 
During the junior and senior years students combine academic course 
work and field practice. The bachelor ot social work is conferred on 
undergraduates who complete all the academic requirements ot the 
program and of West Chester Universit)'. The B.S.W. is recognized 
as the first professional level of social work practice. 
Student-learning objectives of the B.S.W. program are as follows: 



Social Work 



School of Business and Public Affairs 



1. Understand the value base of the profession and its ethical stan- 
dards and principles, and practice accordingly. 

2. Understand the forms and mechanisms ot oppression and discrim- 
ination, and apply strategies of advocacy and social change that 
advance social and economic justice. 

3. Apply the knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice 
with systems ot all sizes. 

4. Analyze, formulate, and influence social policies. 

5. Evaluate research studies, apply research findings to practice, and 
evaluate their own practice interventions. 

6. Use communication skills differendy across cUent populations, col- 
leagues, and communities. 

All students are expected to demonstrate attitudes and behavior con- 
sistent with the values and ethics of professional social work and the 
National Association of Social Work (NASW) Social Work Code of 
Ethics. 

Policy for Social Work Majors 

Majors are required to meet with their social work adviser to plan an 
integrative course of study, to select courses prior to scheduling, to 
discuss career opportunities, and to keep abreast ot departmental 
activities. Handbooks are provided to help students be aware ot 
requirements and procedures in the department. Social work majors 
should be aware of social work prerequisite courses and must see 
their adviser before registering for classes. 

Academic Promotion Policy 

Social work students who have a grade of D, F, or NG (no grade) in 
required courses must repeat these courses and achieve a satisfactory 
grade before entering the junior field placement. Not achieving at 
least a C- in social work required courses is considered grounds for 
dismissal trom the social work program. 

Department- Related Activities 

The Social Work Club is a student organization that involves depart- 
ment facult)' and resources. The activities of this organization are 
open to all students. The honor society. Phi ^Alpha, is sponsored by 
the Department of Social Work and is the Chi Gamma Chapter of 
the National Social Work Honor Society. EligibiUtj' requires an over- 
all GPA of 3.0 and 3.5 in required social work courses. For more 
information, see the Student Activities and Service Organization sec- 
tions of the catalog. 

Department Field Placements and Volunteer Ejcperiences 

Social work students do volunteer experience in the second semester of 
their first year. During the second semester of the junior year and in 
both semesters of the senior year, students will be placed in various social 
work agencies (see partial listing of social work field placements). 
Students must have completed SWO 200, 220, 225, 300, 320, 332, 
and 350 with a cumulative average of 3.0 before they register to take 
the junior field placement in the spring semester. 
INSURANCE. Students are also required to carry liability insurance 
coverage in the amount of $1,000,000/3,000,000 during the second 
semester of their junior and the entire senior year at a yearly cost of 
approximately $35. Students who have cars must submit a copy of their 
insurance to the director of field placement. Students may join NASW 
and become a member of a national social work organization and 
receive habilit)' insurance at a reduced rate. Students should apply for 
child abuse clearance and state pohce background check in the fall 
semester of their junior year for various field placement considerations. 

Social Work Field Placements 

Below is a sampling of settings where students have been placed to 

fultill their field experience requirements: 

Chester County Children, Youth, and Families 

Delaware County Children and Youth 

West Chester Area School District 

Coatesville Area School District 

Philadelphia School District 

University of Pennsylvania Health Systems 

National Hospital for Kids in Crisis 



Chester County Juvenile Probation 

Delaware County Adult Probation and Parole 

Philadelphia Prison System 

Women's Law Project 

Ferris School of Delaware 

First Step of Chester Count)' 

Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment 

Terry Psychiatric Center of Delaware 

Libertae 

Marion Adoptions 

St. Gabriel's Hall 

Intercultural Family Services 

Family Services of Chester County 

Family Services of Montgomery County 

Family Services ot Lancaster County 

Safe Harbor of West Chester 

Gateway Counseling 

Eldernet 

Women's Alternative Center 

Vitas Hospice 

Devereaux Foundation 

Chester County' Office of Aging 

Montgomery County Aging and Adult Services 

Home of the Sparrow 

Crosslands 

Sunrise Assisted Living 

Veterans Administration of CoatesviUe 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet University requirements for admission. After 
successfiilly completing the first two years of pre-social work course 
requirements, students may apply for candidacy for the professional 
social work track. 

For candidacy students must have completed requirements for the first 
two years of general education, Uberal arts cognates, and pre-social 
work courses with the necessary minimum cumulative grade point 
averages specified below. 

In comphance with the Council on Social Work Education, the 
national accrediting body for social work, the program only accepts 
upper-division social work courses from accredited programs that cor- 
respond with West Chester University social work program sequenc- 
ing. No social work credits are granted for life and work experience. 
BACHELOR OF ARTS— SOCIAL WORK 

I. Required Courses for the First Two Years 

A. General Education Courses 48 semester hours 
(Requires a GPA of 2.0) 

WRT 120 and 121 (6) 

LIT 165 (3) 

HIS 101 or 102 or 150 (3) 

Foreign Language/Culture Requirements (6) 

B. Required Liberal Arts (Cognate) Foundation 30 semester hours 
(Requires a GPA of 2.5) 

ANT 102 (3); BIO 100 (3); GEO 101 or 103 (3); 
HIS 150 or 101, or 102 (3); MAT 103 or 121 (3); 
PHI 180 (3); PSC 101 (3); PSY 100 (3); 
SOC 200 or 240 (3) 

C. Pre-Social Work Courses 12 semester hours 
(Requires a GPA of 3.0) 

SWO 200 (3), SWO 220 (3), SWO 225 (3) 
SWO 300 (3) 

II. Junior- and Senior-Level Students 

A. Continued matriculation at the professional level of the bac- 
calaureate program requires that all students: 

1. Maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 or better in the general edu- 

cation requirements. 

2. Maintain an average of 2.5 GPA in the required additional 

liberal arts cognate foundation courses (CSC 110 and nine 
hours of advised electives) 



School ot Health Sciences 



Sports Medicine 



3. Adhere to field practice requirements in accordance with the 

Undergraduate Social Work Field Manual. 

4. Comply with the NASW Code of Ethics. 

B. Professional Social Work Courses 45 semester hours 

(Requires a GPA of 3.0) 
SWO 320, 321, 332, 350, 351, 375, 431, 
432, 495, 496 (3 each) 
SWO 375, 450 and 451 (6 each) 

Transfer Students 

Students from other colleges and universities who desire to transfer to 
the West Chester University baccalaureate social work program 
should apply through the University's Office of Admissions, which 
will coordinate the credit evaluations of social work courses with the 
baccalaureate social work program director. Transfer students are 
required to make appUcation for candidacy. 

A transfer credit analysis, listing all transfer credits accepted by the 
University, will be sent to the Department of Social Work and also 



directly to the student. The B.S.W. program director may accept 
social work transfer credits from CSWE-accredited undergraduate 
social work programs. 

The field practicum and seminar are concurrent courses in the WCU 
undergraduate social work program; therefore, they are not transfer- 
able. The poUcies and requirements for the field practice are expUcat- 
ed in the Baccalaureate Program Field Instruction Manual. All other 
social work courses not meeting the requirements of the program may 
be accepted as SWO 199 course credit hours. 

Internal Transfer Students 

Internal transfer students meet the same standards for the program as 
other students do. 

NOTE: The Department of Social Work offers pre-social work 
courses in the summer to assist transfer students to begin as a junior 
when they enter West Chester University in the fall. It is crucial that 
all transfer students be advised by the undergraduate program chair 
before the first session of summer. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
SOCIAL WORK 

Symbol: SWO 

PRIMARILY FOR FRESHMEN AND 
SOPHOMORES 

200 Introduction to Social Work (3) Current 
social problems and the influence ot societal values 
on their definition and the structures devised to 
meet them. Two hours per week of volunteer 
experience in a social agency is required. 
220 Introduction to Generalist Practice