(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Undergraduate consolidated catalog / the University of Maryland at College Park"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecon1970univ 




universiTY 
of marYi_anD 
aT coLLeGe parK 

consoLiDaieo 
unoerGraDuaTe 

caiaLOG 



U0O*J°^» 







5s 1 





__ 




11 ■ ■ 

■^ s — 




.::: 




M ■ 



IP 



A 




is publication is a consolidatio 
schools and»colleges at the Universitj(J 
tion governing University facilities, ser* 
University General and Academic Regul 






requesting copies prior to admission. 
$1 .00 each. On the campus, copies may 
amount. Copies also are available for j 
junior colleges, and in the schools a' 



s for the undergraduate 

r»a»so incorporates informa-' 

.,i life"contained in the student guide, 

acfuate Catalog will be distributed free of 
irst admission to the University. Those persr"" " 
e6ure them from the Catalog Mailing Office 
rchased at the Student Supply Store for the s^ 
ation in high schMls-pubiic libraries, c 
es of the Universf"^- 



M 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AT COLLEGE PARK 

UNDERGRADUATE 

CONSOLIDATED CATALOG 

1970-71 



I 



• 



Cll.« 






THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published: once in August; three times in September * 
two times in October; once in November; seven times in December; three times in January; once in February * 
once in March; two times in April; four times in May; two times in June; and three times in July. Publisher, 
thirty times. Re-entered as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress on August 24 1912 and sec * 
ond class postage paid at College Park, Maryland 20742. 



( 



2^^. **^B K ; 





The University of Maryland is dedicated to providing its stu- 
dents with opportunities to develop fully their intellectual capaci- 
ties. In addition to the many different baccalaureate degree 
programs, an honors program and other special programs have 
been developed to enable students to design curricula to meet 
their individual interests. Every effort is made to ensure that those 
who enroll in the University find their studies to be an exciting 
adventure in learning. 



C'f, -j&as^vftJ 



FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 



College Park Campus 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742: 

For copies of this publication— 
$1.00 per copy 

Catalog Mailing Office 

North Administration Building 

College Park Campus 

Director, Office of Admissions 
North Administration Building 
College Park Campus 

Director, Housing Office 
North Administration Building 
College Park Campus 

Director, Office of Student Aid 
North Administration Building 
College Park Campus 

Vice President for Student Affairs 
North Administration Building 
College Park Campus 

University Counseling Center 
Shoemaker Building 
College Park Campus 



Office of the Dean of the 
Respective College 
College Park Campus 

Vice President for Graduate 
Studies and Research 
College Park Campus 

Director, Summer School 
North Administration Building 
College Park Campus 

University College 
Center of Adult Education 
College Park Campus 

The Registrar, UMBC 
5401 Wilkins Avenue 
Baltimore, Maryland 21228 

Office of the Dean of the 
Respective College 
University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Maryland 21201 

Director of Admissions 
University of Maryland, 
Eastern Shore 
Room 311, Maryland Hall 
Princess Anne, Maryland 



The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University of Mary- 
land. Changes are effected from time to time in the general regulations 
and in the academic requirements. There are established procedures 
for making changes, procedures which protect the institution's integrity 
and the individual student's interests and welfare. A curriculum or 
graduation requirement, when altered, is not made retroactive un- 
less the alteration is to the student's advantage and can be accommo- 
dated within the span of years normally required for graduation. 
When the actions of a student are judged by competent authority, 
using established procedure, to be detrimental to the interests of the 
University community, that person may be required to withdraw from 
the University. 

The University of Maryland, in all its branches and divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal educational and 
employment opportunity for people of every race, creed, ethnic origin or sex. 



The University of Maryland has been elected to membership in the Association of American Universities. This 
Association founded in 1900 is an organization of those universities in the United States and Canada gen- 
erally considered to be preeminent in the fields of graduate and professional study and research. 



& 



1»J 'LI 






«v 



£.**< 



W3I 



iHiii 



* 






Gi 




CONTENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 1 

Fields of Study 2 

Expenses and Financial Aid 9 

Acaaemics 15 

General Regulations 21 

Academic . Regulations 37 

Student Services and Activities 49 

Living Accomodations 57 

Honors and Awards 63 

Scholarships 69 

THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

AGRICULTURE 77 

General Agriculture 79 

Agricultural Chemistry 79 

Agricultural Economics 79 

Agricultural and Extension Education 80 

Agricultural Engineering 81 

Agronomy— Crops and Soils 81 

Animal Science 82 

Botany 83 

Entomology 84 

Food Science 84 

Geology 84 

Horticulture 85 

Special Curricula 85 

ARCHITECTURE 101 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 105 

American Studies 

Anthropology 108 

Art 109 

Astronomy Ill 

Botany 113 

Chemistry 115 

Classical Languages and Literatures 117 

Comparative Literature 118 

Computer Science 119 

Criminal Justice and Criminology 120 

Dance 120 

Economics 121 

English Language and Literature 122 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 124 

General Biological Sciences 129 

General Physical Sciences 129 

History . 130 

General Honors 134 

Linguistics 135 

Microbiology 139 

Molecular Physics 140 

Music 143 

Physics and Astronomy 145 

Pre-Professional Curricula 148 

Psychology 150 

Russian Area Program 152 

Sociology 152 

Speech and Dramatic Art 154 

Zoology 157 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 161 

Business Administration 163 

Economics 170 

Geography 173 

Government and Politics 176 

Journalism 180 

Bureau of Governmental Research 181 

Bureau of Business and Economic Research 181 

Information Systems Management 182 

EDUCATION 

Early Childhood Elementary 188 

Industrial Education 191 

Library Science Education 194 

Secondary Education 204 

Institute for Child Study 207 

Administration Supervision 208 

Counselling and Personnel Services 208 

ENGINEERING 213 

Aerospace Engineering 217 

Agricultural Engineering 218 

Chemical Engineering 220 

Civil Engineering 221 

Electrical Engineering 224 

Engineering Materials 228 

Fire Protection Engineering 229 

Mechanical Engineering 230 

Nuclear Engineering 232 

Cognate Activities 233 

HOME ECONOMICS 237 

Food, Nutrition and Institution Administration 239 

Textiles and Clothing 241 

Family and Community Development 243 

Housing and Applied Design 246 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 251 

Physical Education 254 

Recreation 259 

Health Education 261 

Dentistry 269 

Medical Technology 270 

Nursing 271 

Pharmacy 271 

Physical Therapy 271 

THE FACULTY 

Agriculture 277 

Architecture 282 

Arts and Sciences 282 

Business and Public Administration 298 

Education 303 

Engineering 309 

Home Economics 315 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 316 

vii 



FALL SEMESTER, 1970 

September 8-11 
September 12 
September 14 

November 25 
November 30 

December 18 

January 4 
January 13 
January 14-19 
January 20 
January 21-22 



Tuesday-Friday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Friday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday-Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday-Friday 



Fall Semester Registration 
Teacher Registration 
Instruction begins 

After last class— Thanksgiving recess begins 
8:00 a.m. — Thanksgiving recess begins 

After last class — Christmas recess begins 

8:00 a.m. — Christmas recess ends 

Pre-exam Study Day 

Fall Semester Examinations 

Study Day 

Fall Semester Examinations 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1971 



February 1-5 
February 6 
February 8 

April 9 
April 19 

May 26 
May 27-29 

May 31 

June 1-4 
June 5 



Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Friday 
Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday-Saturday 

Monday 

Tuesday-Friday 
Saturday 



SUMMER SCHOOL 1971 

June 21, 22 
June 23 
July 5 
August 13 



Spring Semester Registration 
Teacher Registration 
Instruction begins 

After last class — Spring recess begins 
8:00 a.m. — spring recess ends 

Pre-exam Study Day 

Spring Semester Examinations 

Memorial Day 

Spring Semester Examinations 
Commencement 



Registration 
Instruction begins 
Independence day Holiday 

No classes 
Summer session ends 



Monday-Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Monday 
Friday 



FALL SEMESTER 1971-72 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



September 7-11 
September 13 
November 24 
November 29 
December 17 
January 3 
January 11 
January 12, 19 
January 13, 21 



Fall Semester Registration 
Instruction begins 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 
Christmas recess ends 
Instruction ends 
Exam study days 
Fall semester final exams 



Tuesday through Saturday 

Monday 

Wednesday, after last class 

Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

Friday, after last class 

Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

Tuesday, after last class 

Wednesdays 

Thursday through Friday 



SPRING SEMESTER 1972 

January 31— 

February 5 

February 7 

March 31 

April 10 

May 23 

May 24 

May 29 

May 25— June 2 



Spring Semester Registration 
Instruction begins 
Spring recess begins 
Spring recess ends 
Instruction ends 
Pre-exam study day 
Memorial day 
Spring semester examinations 



Monday through Saturday 

Monday 

Friday, after last class 

Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

Tuesday, after last class 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Thursday through Friday 



BOARD OF REGENTS AND MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 



Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, Chairman 

3505 Fallstaff Road, Baltimore 21215 

Richard W. Case, Vice Chairman 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 17th Floor, One Charles Center, Baltimore 21201 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 21201 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer 
Denton 21629 

Mrs. Alice H. Morgan, Assistant Secretary 
4608 Drummond Avenue, Chevy Chase 20015 

F. Grove Miller, Jr., Assistant Treasurer 
Route #1, Box 133, North East 21901 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

Harry Boswell Associates, 6505 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville 20782 

Mrs. Michael J. Deegan, Jr. (Appointed June 1970) 
9939 Good Luck Road, Apartment 204, Seabrook 20801 

George C. Fry 
Cecilton 21913 

Edward V. Hurley (Appointed June 1970) 

Commission on Human Relations, Mount Vernon Building, 701 St. Paul Street, 

Baltimore 21202 

William B. Long, M.D. 

Medical Center, Salisbury 21801 

Hugh A. McMullen (Appointed September 1970) 

Geppert and McMullen, 21 Prospect Square, Cumberland 21502 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 



PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins — B.A., University of Texas, 
1932; M.A., 1932; B. Lift., Oxford Univer- 
sity, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 
R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State Col- 
lege, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GENERAL ADMINIS- 
TRATION 

Walter B. Waetjen -B.S., Millersville State 
College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; 
Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES 
AND RESEARCH 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. — B.S., University of 
Maryland, 1936; M.D., 1938; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1941 . 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR AGRICULTURAL AFFAIRS 
Frank L. Bentz, Jr. — B.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVER- 
SITY RELATIONS 

Robert A. Beach, Jr. -A.B., Baldwin-Wallace 
College, 1950; M.S., Boston University, 
1954. 



CHANCELLOR 

Charles E. Bishop — B.S., Berea College, 1946; 

M.S., University of Kentucky, 1948; Ph.D. 

University of Chicago, 1952. 

ACTING VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC 
AFFAIRS 

George H. Callcott — A.B., University of South 
Carolina, 1950; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1951; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina, 1956. 

ACTING VICE CHANCELLOR FOR ACADEMIC 

PLANNING AND POLICIES 
Thomas B. Day — B.S., University of Notre 

Dame, 1V52; Ph.D., Cornell University, 

1957. 

ACTING VICE CHANCELLOR FOR BUSINESS 
AFFAIRS 

John W. Dorsey — B.S., University of Maryland, 
1958; Certificate, London School of Eco- 
nomics, 1959; M.A., Harvard University, 
1962; Ph.D., 1963. 

VICE CHANCELLOR FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 
J. Winston Martin — B.S., University of Mis- 
souri, 1951; M.Ed., 1956; Ed.D., 1958. 

ASSISTANT TO THE CHANCELLOR FOR HUMAN 
RELATIONS 

P. Bertrand Phillips — A. B., San* Francisco State 
College, 1954; M.A., 1956; Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University, 1965. 




i^BKwvt S. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



THE UNIVERSITY 

The contemporary university is a comprehen- 
sive educational institution composed of colleges 
and schools and offering a multiplicity of undergrad- 
uate programs that are closely related to the 
graduate and professional programs. 

Comprehensive universities as we know them 
in the United States have existed for not more than 
a century, but their roots can be traced back to 
medieval history. The English college system 
served as the model for the earliest American efforts 
at higher education. The ancient German university 
tradition was joined with this in the 1870's to form 
the basic outlines of our present institutions. Prac- 
tical studies were grafted onto these more clas- 
sically and theoretically-oriented traditions by the 
agricultural emphasis of the land grant movement. 

With the explosion of scientific and technologi- 
cal knowledge in the early twentieth century, the 
role of the universities in American society attained 
increased importance, and today almost all aspects 
of national life— social, economic, scientific, and 
cultural— benefit from their educational, research 
and service functions. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Although the University of Maryland is a state 
institution quite large in physical plant, student 
enrollment, number of curricula offered, and serv- 
ices performed, its objectives remain constant and 
form a basis for all educational activity. Simply 
stated they are: (1) to prepare students in the arts, 
the humanities, the basic and applied sciences, 
and the professional curricula; (2) to provide general 
education in its broadest sense, both formal and in- 
formal, for all students who enroll; (3) to develop 



those ideals and finer relationships among students 
which characterize cultured individuals; (4) to con- 
duct systematic research and to promote creative 
scholarship; and (5) to offer special, continuation, 
and extension education in communities where it is 
feasible to do so. 

HISTORY 

The University had its beginnings in 1807 with 
the establishment in Baltimore of the College of 
Medicine, an entirely faculty-owned institution 
granting the M.D. degree. When, five years later, its 
name was changed to the University of Maryland, it 
was given power to confer additional degrees. Sub- 
sequently, the University opened a School of Dent- 
istry (1840), the first such school in the world, and 
then added Schools of Pharmacy (1871), Law 
(1882), and Nursing (1889). 

The College Park campus of the University was 
opened in 1859 as the Maryland Agricultural College 
under a charter secured in 1856 by a group of Mary- 
land planters. After a disastrous fire in 1912, the 
State acquired control of the College and bore the 
costs of rebuilding. In 1920 the State took over the 
faculty-owned University in Baltimore, merging it 
with the State-owned institution at College Park to 
form the present-day University of Maryland. 

In 1886 the Delaware Conference Academy was 
founded by the Methodist Church in Princess Anne, 
Maryland. Title to the institution was acquired by 
the State of Maryland in 1926, and it became a 
division of the University of Maryland in 1948. The 
Regents have approved a proposal to make it an inte- 
gral part of the University system with the name, 
University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES). 



A new undergraduate branch campus, known as 
University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBO, 
was opened at Catonsville in 1966. 

THE UNIVERSITY TODAY 

The University of Maryland is a comprehensive 
educational unit offering curricula in over 120 
fields. These curricula are offered through the 
following major academic divisions: 
At College Park 

College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 
College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion 
College of Education 
College of Engineering, the Glenn L. Martin 

Institute of Technology 
College of Home Economics 
College of Physical Education, Recreation, 

and Health 
University College 
Graduate School 

School of Library and Information Services 
(Graduate level only) 



Summer School 

School of Architecture 

School of Nursing (First two years) 

School of Pharmacy (First two years) 

At Baltimore City 

School of Dentistry 
School of Law 
School of Medicine 
School of Nursing 
School of Pharmacy 
School of Social Work and Community 
Planning 

At Catonsville 

University of Maryland Baltimore County 

At Princess Anne 

University of Maryland Eastern Shore 

Other resources of the University include a 
library system, the Computer Science Center, the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, the University 
Hospital, the Psychiatric Institute, the Natural Re- 
sources Institute, and various other institutes and 
bureaus. 




Genera/ Information 



FIELDS OF STUDY 



UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

One major advantage of attending a university 
is the broad range of programs available. This diver- 
sity allows the student to change from one major 
to another without leaving the institution, to choose 
from a wide spectrum of elective courses, and to 
benefit from daily contact with students of diverse 
academic interests and backgrounds. 

The undergraduate majors available at College 
Park are as follows: 
College of Agriculture— B.S. Degrees in: 

General Agriculture 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Agricultural Economics (General, Agricultural Business, 
International Agriculture, Agribusiness Teaching) 

Agricultural and Extension Education 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy (Crops; Technical Crops; General Crops and 
Turf Management; Technical Soils; General Soils 
and Soil Conservation; and Crops, Soils, and 
Geology) 

Animal Science (Large Animal, Dairying, Poultry, and Ani- 
mal Science Business) 

Botany 

Conservation and Resource Development 

Entomology 

Food Science 

Geology 

Horticulture (Pomology and Olericulture, Floriculture and 
Ornamental Horticulture, and Horticultural Edu- 
cation) 
College of Arts and Sciences 

American Studies— B. A. 

Anthropology — B.A. 

Art— B.A. (General, Art History, and Studio) 

Astronomy— B.S. 

Biochemistry — B.S. 

Botany— B.A. 

Chemistry— B.S. 

Classical Languages and Literature— B.A. 

Comparative Literature— B.A. 

Dance— B.A. 

Economics— B.A. 

English— B.A. 

Foreign Languages and Literature— B.A. (Language 
and Area Studies in French, German, Russian, 
and Spanish) 

General Biological Sciences— B.S. 

General Physical Sciences — B.S. 

Geography — B.A. 

Government and Politics— B.A. 

History— B.A. 

Mathematics— B.S. 

Microbiology — B.S. 

Music— B. Mus., B.A. (B. Mus. in Theory and Composition, 
History and Literature, and Applied Music) 

Philosophy— B.A. 

Physics— B.S. 



Psychology— B.S. , B.A. 

Russian Area Studies — B.A. 

Sociology— B.A. 

Speech and Dramatic Art— B.A. (General, Dramatic Art, 
Radio and Television, and Speech and Hearing) 

Zoology— B.S. 
College of Business and Public Administration— B.S. Degrees 
in: 

Business Administration (General, Accounting, Fi- 
nance, Insurance and Real Estate, Marketing, 
Personnel and Labor Relations, Production Man- 
agement, Statistics and Transportation) 

Economics 

Geography (Urban, Physical, and Cultural Geography and 
Cartography) 

Government and Politics (General, International Affairs, 
and Public Administration) 

Journalism 

Information Systems Management 
College of Education 

Education (includes several non-departmentalized de- 
gree programs, both undergraduate and graduate) 
— B.S.. B.A. 

Agricultural and Extension Education — B.S. 

Early Childhood and Elementary Education— B.S. , B.A. 
(Physical Education, Music, Art, and Foreign 
Languages) 

Industrial Education— B.S. 

Library Science Education— B.A. 

Secondary Education— B.S. . B.A. [Art, English, Foreign 
Languages (classical or modern), Home Economics, 
Mathematics, Music (instrumental or vocal). Physi- 
cal Education, Science, Social Studies (history or 
geography), Speech, General Business, Secretarial, 
and Distributive] 

Special Education— B.S. 

Education for Industry — B.S. 

Vocational- Industrial Education— B.S. 
College of Engineering— B.S. Degrees in: 

Aerospace Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering (Undesignated) 

Fire Protection 

Mechanical Engineering 
College of Home Economics — B.S. Degrees in: 

Family and Community Development (Family Studies, 
Community Studies, and Management and Con- 
sumer) 

Food, Nutrition, and Institution Administration (Food 
and Nutrition, Experimental Foods, Nutrition; In- 
stitutional Administration; and Dietetics) 

Textiles and Clothing [Textiles (Textiles and Apparel, 
Textile Science, or Textile Marketing)) 

Housing and Applied Design (Advertising Design, Costume. 
Crafts. Housing, and Interior Design) 

Home Economics Education 
College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health— 
B.S. Degrees in: 



Genera/ Information 



Physical Education 

Recreation 

Health Education 
School of Architecture— B. Arch. Degree 
University College: 

General Studies— B. A. 

Military Science — B.S. (No new enrollments accepted) 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

There are certain subjects which the student 
cannot choose as his undergraduate major but can 
choose as his minor field of study. These include: 

Afro-American Studies 

Chinese 

Portuguese 

Hebrew 

Greek 

Italian 

Computer Science 

Linguistics 

AIR FORCE ROTC 

The Department of Air Science operates the Air 
Force Reserve Officers Training Corps program on 
an elective basis. The program provides college men 
with an opportunity to earn commissions in the 
United States Air Force while earning their degrees. 
The Air Force ROTC mission is to commission, 
through a college program, career-oriented second 
lieutenants in response to Air Force requirements. 
Students should contact their college within the 
University to determine the number of AFROTC 
credits that may be applied toward their degree re- 
quirements. 

TWO PROGRAMS OFFERED 
Four-Year Program 

A General Military Course (GMC) is normally for 
freshmen and sophomores. Those who successfully 
complete the GMC may apply for the Professional 
Officer Course (POC) which is the final two years of 
AFROTC. Progression into the POC is not automatic 
but is limited to selected students only. Students in 
the four-year program must attend four weeks of 
field training at a designated Air Force base during 
the summer after completing the junior year of col- 
lege. To enter the AFROTC program, one should 
inform his advisor and register for it in the same 
manner as for other courses. Only students who 
elect the four-year program are eligible to apply for 
the AFROTC College Scholarship Program. 

Two-Year Program 

The Professional Officer Course (POC) is nor- 
mally offered in the junior and senior years, but may 
be taken by graduate students otherwise qualified. 
This program is especially attractive for those un- 
able to take the four-year program, particularly 
transfer students. Evaluation of candidates is nor- 
mally begun during the first semester of the sopho- 
more year, since each student must meet physical 
and mental standards set by the Air Force. Inter- 
ested students should contact a professor of air 
science as early in their sophomore year as possible. 
Students in the two-year program must attend six 
weeks of field training at a designated Air Force 
base during the summer preceding initial entry into 
the two-year academic portion. The academic pro- 
gram for the last two years (POC) is identical with 
the final two years of the four-year program. Cadets 
in the POC are exempt from the draft, since they 
are enlisted in the Air Force Reserve. This entitles 
them to all privileges afforded to military reserv- 
ists. 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 



The University of Maryland, in all its branches 
and divisions, subscribes to a policy of equal educa- 
tional opportunity for people of all races, creeds and 

ethnic origins. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 
Maryland Residents 

Admission from secondary school is based on 
evidence indicating the applicant's probable suc- 
cess in the program of his choice. Applicants will be 
evaluated by two sets of criteria: (1) high school 
academic record in college preparatory subjects 
and class standing and (2) the University's predic- 
tive index. 

High School Record and Class Standing 

Applicants for admission from secondary school 
who have (1) achieved at least a C average (when D 
is the lowest passing grade) in college preparatory 
subjects and (2) rank in the top half of their class 
will be offered admission. 

Predictive Index 

Applicants who have achieved at least a C aver- 
age but who do not rank in the upper half of their 
class will be evaluated on the basis of the Univer- 
sity's predictive index. The variables included in the 
index are the applicant's (1) grade-point average in 
academic courses, (2) class rank, and (3) Scholastic 
Aptitude Test scores. 

An applicant whose predicted grade-point aver- 
age at the end of his first year at the University is 
1.75 or better will be offered admission. 

Other Requirements for Admission 
In addition to meeting one of the sets of criteria 
noted above all applicants must also: 

1. Be recommended for admission by their high 
school principal or counselor; 

2. Have received their high school diploma be- 
fore their first registration with the Uni- 
versity; 

3. Have successfully completed the high school 
subjects required for the college and cur- 
riculum for which application is made. 
(Note: Admission to the School of Architec- 
ture is competitive with selection based on 
previous academic achievement.); 

4. Have completed the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
and have requested that the results be 
submitted to the University. Applicants 
should take the SAT before the end of the 
Fall Semester preceding enrollment at the 
University. For further information on the 
SAT, applicants should consult their high 
school counselor or write to the Educational 
Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540. To have the test results sent to the 
University of Maryland at College Park, use 
the College Park Campus code number, 
5814, in the proper place on the test. 

Early Decision 
Applicants who have a B average in college 
preparatory subjects during their junior year in high 
school or who are in the top fourth of their respec- 
tive classes may be offered an early decision on ad- 
mission. Once the applicant accepts the offer by 
remitting the fifty dollar enrollment deposit, he only 
needs to submit a final transcript documenting grad- 
uation from high school to complete the require- 
ments for admission. 



General Information 



The Out-of-State Student 

As the state university, the University of Mary- 
land must give preference to residents. The Uni- 
versity will offer admission, however, to a limited 
number of non-residents of proven academic ability 
for whom particular programs of the University are 
especially relevant. 

The limitations on out-of-state applicants apply 
both to freshmen and transfer students. 

TRANSFER STUDENT ADMISSION 

An applicant must be in good standing in schol- 
arship and character to be considered for admission. 
Transfer applicants who are residents of Maryland 
are required to have at least a C average (2.0 on a 
4.0 scale) in all previous work. The Associate of 
Arts degree qualifies the community college trans- 
fer student for admission. 

Non-resident applicants are required to have a 
cumulative average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. 

For further information contact the Coordinator 
of Transfer Students, Office of Admissions. 
Transfer Credit 

Advanced standing is assigned to transfer stu- 
dents from accredited institutions prior to registra- 
tion. Academic courses carrying a grade of C or 
higher usually are transferable provided they are ap- 
plicable to the curriculum into which the student is 
transferring. 

Transfer of Credit from Community Colleges 

A maximum of sixty (60) academic credits are 
transferable from community colleges. In general, 
courses taken at a community college which are 
equivalent to junior or senior level courses at the 
University may not be transferred. 

Special Problems. The College of Business and 
Public Administration subscribes to the policy that 
advanced work in professional courses should not 
be included in the first two years of undergraduate 
education. The College also limits transfer of lower 
division courses in Business Administration to a 
maximum of nine (9) semester hours. Similar limi- 
tations are placed on transfer of credit in other pro- 
fessional areas. 

Transfer foreign language credit is usually ac- 
ceptable in meeting college requirements. Prospec- 
tive students should consult college catalogs to de- 
termine the specific requirements of various col- 
leges and curricula. 

Credit by Examination. Transfer credit will not 
be granted for courses taken by examination at other 
institutions. 

The Academic Retention Plan 

The academic average of a transfer student 
at the University of Maryland is based only on those 
courses actually taken at the University. Credit 
hours for courses taken at other institutions may 
be transferred, but grades and quality points do not 
transfer. The level of expectation of academic per- 
formance, however, is determined by the total num- 
ber of credit hours transferred plus the number of 
hours attempted at the University. 

THE SPECIAL STUDENT 

Applicants over 21 years of age who qualify 
for admission but who do not desire to work toward 
a baccalaureate degree may be admitted as special 
students. These students are ineligible to matricu- 
late for a degree until they have submitted all re- 
quired documents. Permission from the dean of 
the various schools and colleges of the University is 



often needed in order to enroll as a special student. 
Special students who have received a bacca- 
laureate degree are advised that no credit earned 
while enrolled as special students may be applied 
at a later date to a graduate program. These post- 
baccalaureate students may enroll for courses at 
the 100 to 199 level for which they possess the 
necessary prerequisites but may not enroll in 
courses restricted to graduate students only. 

THE FOREIGN STUDENT 

The foreign student applying for admission to 
the undergraduate schools of the University of 
Maryland should make application at least six 
months in advance of the term for which he is ap- 
plying. He will be required to submit (1) an applica- 
tion for admission on a form furnished by the Ad- 
missions Office of the University upon request, (2) 
official copies of his secondary school preparation, 
(3) certificates of completion of state secondary 
school examinations, and (4) records of college or 
university studies completed in schools in the 
United States or elsewhere. He will also be re- 
quired to furnish proof of adequate finances and of 
his ability to read, write, speak, and understand 
English sufficiently well to pursue satisfactorily an 
approved course of study in one of the colleges of 
the University. Arrangements can be made through 
the Office of the Director of International Education 
Services and Foreign Student Affairs for administer- 
ing an English test to prospective students both in 
the United States and in other countries. 

The foreign student accepted for admission to 
the University will receive from the Director of 
Foreign Student Affairs the appropriate immigra- 
tion form needed to secure a student visa from the 
American consul. 

Every foreign student is expected to notify the 
Director of Foreign Student Affairs as to the approx- 
imate date of his arrival at the University and ar- 
range to arrive in time for the special orientation 
program that precedes registration. The office of 
the Director is located in the North Administration 
Building, Room 222-A. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

Application Forms 
Application forms may be obtained by writing to: 
Director, Office of Admissions 
North Administration Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 
Application forms also are supplied to Maryland 
high schools. Seniors in high school may obtain the 
forms from their high school counselors. 

All applicants must comply fully with the direc- 
tions printed on the application form. Incomplete 
forms cannot be processed. 

Application Fee 
A non-refundable $10.00 application fee is re- 
quired with each application. 

Enrollment Deposit 
Applicants for the September term who are 
found to meet admission requirements may be sent 
an offer of admission. They are then required to 
submit the enrollment deposit of $50 within three 
weeks after the date of this offer. Failure to submit 
the enrollment deposit within the required time 
limit will be taken as evidence that the applicant is 
not seriously interested in admission, and the offer 
will be cancelled. 



General Information 



Refunds of the $50 enrollment deposit will be 
made provided the request for the refund is received 
by the Admissions Office on or before June 1, for 
those students who plan to enter in September. 

CLOSING DATES FOR APPLICATIONS 

Fall Semester 

All applications for undergraduate admission for 
the fall semester at the College Park campus must 
be received by the University on or before June 1. 
(Note: Foreign students are required to submit ap- 
plication six months in advance of registration. Ap- 
plications including supporting documents for the 
School of Architecture must be received on or be- 
fore March 1.) High school students are encouraged 
to file their applications during the fall months of 
their senior year. 

All supporting documents for an application for 
admission must be received by the appropriate Uni- 
versity office on or before July 15. Supporting docu- 
ments include education records (except current 
summer school grades), SAT scores (in the case of 
new freshmen) and medical examination reports. 
Spring Semester 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for 
the Spring Semester is December 1. All supporting 
documents for an application must be received on or 
before the first workday after January 1. (Foreign 
students are required to submit applications six 
months in advance.) 

ORIENTATION PROGRAMS 
Freshmen Orientation and Registration 

Upon final admission to the University the stu- 
dent will receive materials pertaining to his partici- 
pation in The Freshmen Orientation and Registra- 
tion Program for the University of Maryland. ALL 
ENTERING FRESHMEN ARE REQUIRED TO AT- 
TEND THIS PROGRAM which is administered by the 
director of Orientation and Special Programs of the 
Office of Student Activities. The primary goals of the 
program are three-fold in nature: to inform the stu- 
dent about the University, involve him in the pro- 
gram and assist him in dealing with the problems he 
may encounter. The program is operated at the Col- 
lege Park campus during the months of July and 
August. Each freshman will attend with a group of 
his future classmates. During the two days he will 
engage in the following: 

1. Formal and informal discussions about Uni- 
versity life and the standards of performance 
the University will expect of him. 

2. A personal conference with a faculty adviser 

in his college who will assist him in select- 
ing and registering for fall semester courses. 
(To assure the success of this conference, 
please have the SAT scores submitted to the 
University early in the spring.) 

3. An introduction to campus facilities, sources 

of help for the problems the typical fresh- 
man must face, and out-of-class opportuni- 
ties. 

4. Payment of fall semester fees and charges 

and, if he so desires, purchase of his text- 
books. 
Through this program, the entering student re- 
ceives a personalized and individual introduction 
to the University. 
Transfer Student Orientation 

Upon admission to the University, the transfer 
student receives information concerning an orienta- 



tion program that is held during the summer. This 
program includes a conference with representatives 
of his college to explain academic requirements, as 
well as a general orientation to the campus itself. 
The program is particularly geared to the needs of 
upper class students and their special concerns. 
Foreign Student Orientation 

All foreign students admitted to the University 
are required to attend the orientation program ar- 
ranged especially for them by the Director of Foreign 
Student Affairs with the cooperation of the Interna- 
tional Club. The September Orientation is held on 
the Friday and Saturday preceding registration 
week; the February Orientation is held on the Friday 
only preceding registration week. At the close of the 
afternoon sessions on Friday, a coffee is held where 
new foreign students are introduced informally to 
members of the faculty and administration as well 
as to other students, both foreign and American. 
Fall Activities Week 

During Fall Registration Week students and 
faculty combine their efforts to plan a program to 
help students become acquainted with the many as- 
pects of life at the University. The activities of this 
week range from open houses and picnics to study 
skills seminars and welcome assemblies. Faculty 
members participate in a series of programs de- 
signed to initiate the academic year. Entertaining 
social events are planned to help the student be- 
come acquainted with his future classmates. Stu- 
dent leaders show him how he can become involved 
in activities varying from intramural sports to stu- 
dent politics. Selected upperclassmen who com- 
pose the Fall Orientation Board are on hand to 
answer questions and lead small discussion 
groups. 

For information about any of the orientation 
programs, please write: 

Orientation Director 

Student Union 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 20742 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

New freshmen students who have met the regu- 
lar University admission requirements for fall en- 
rollment may begin their studies during the sum- 
mer rather than await September. The final date 
for admission to Summer School is June 1. 

The student who enters on this basis and who 
continues attending summer sessions can shorten 
his college career by a semester or by a year, de- 
pending upon his curriculum and the progress he 
makes in it. 

Courses which are offered during the summer 
are the same in content and in instruction as are 
courses offered during the fall and spring semes- 
ters. Many students have found the transition from 
secondary school to college facilitated by attending 
the summer session. Undergraduate students at- 
tending the eight-week session are permitted to reg- 
ister for a maximum of nine semester hour credits. 

For additional information write for a Summer 
School Catalog, which may be obtained from the 
Director of the Summer School, College Park, Mary- 
land 20742. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

University College subscribes to the philosophy 
that continuing education is essential to meet the 



General Information 



demands of today's complex society. Thus, the 
College, in contrast to the usual practice of bringing 
students to the University, makes educatioi.al op- 
portunities available to adult students at hours and 
locations convenient for them. 

As a result of this philosophy, most University 
College courses are given in the evening. There- 
fore, the average undergraduate — that is, a person 
who wishes to be a full-time day student— would 
have little reason to enroll with University College 
Nor would he be allowed to do so, except in special 
cases. However, if a student who first enrolls as a 
full-time day student later finds it necessary to take 
a day-time job, he may then take evening courses 
with University College. 

Specifically, University College has a three-fold 
purpose: (1) to extend the program of the University 
by offering college-credit evening courses for adults 
on campus and off campus throughout the State, 
in the District of Columbia, and at various overseas 
centers; (2) to offer the Bachelor of Arts degree in 
General Studies to qualified adult students; and (3) 
through the Conferences and Institutes Division, to 
arrange special programs to meet specific non- 
credit educational needs of various adult groups. 

The General Studies curriculum provides oppor- 
tunities for programs in the humanities, the social 
sciences, and business administration, with concen- 
trations in such fields as commerce, English, gov- 
ernment and politics, history, philosophy, psy- 
chology, and sociology. 

Off-campus centers in Maryland and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia at which courses in these fields 
are offered include: 

Aberdeen Proving Ground 
Andrews Air Force Base 
Baltimore Campuses 
Bainbridge Naval 
Training Center 



Boiling Air Force Base 
D.C. Recreation Dept. 
Edgewood Arsenal 
Fort Meade 
Fort Ritchie 
Maryland Penitentiary 
Montgomery County Police 
National Bureau of Standards 
National Institute of Health 
National Security Agency 
Naval Ordnance Laboratory 
Naval Research Laboratory 
Patuxent Naval Air Station 
Pentagon 

Prince Georges County Police 
Soc. Security Bldg.— Baltimore 
Tolchester Missile Site 
Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center 

In addition, the Off-Campus Division of Univer- 
sity College offers courses for teachers in most of 
the counties in Maryland. The College Park Evening 
Division offers courses on campus. 

Overseas, University College courses are offered 
to military personnel and their dependents, and to 
certain civilians in twenty-five foreign countries 
on four continents. These courses are offered in co- 
operation with the U.S. Armed Forces. 

To enroll in University College, students who 
have never attended a college or university must 
have either an acceptable high school diploma or 
the high school equivalent; students who have at- 
tended another college or university must be in good 
academic standing. Further information about ad- 
mission requirements may be obtained from a Uni- 
versity College adviser (call 454-2311 for an ap- 
pointment) or from the University College Catalog, 
which may be obtained by writing to the Dean, Uni- 
versity College, University of Maryland, College Park 
Maryland 20742. 

The College does not offer correspondence 
courses. 




General Information 




8 Genera/ Information 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



GENERAL 

All fees are due and payable in full at time of 
registration. Returning students will not be permit- 
ted to complete registration until all financial obli- 
gations to the University including library fines, 
parking violation assessments, and other penalty 
fees and service charges are paid in full. 

All checks or money orders should be made pay- 
able to the University of Maryland for the exact 
amount due. In cases where the University has 
awarded a grant, scholarship, or workship, the ap- 
propriate amount will be deducted on the bill. 

No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, 
certificate, or transcript of record issued to a stu- 
dent who has not made satisfactory settlement of 
his account. 

Although changes in fees and charges ordinar- 
ily will be announced in advance, the University 
reserves the right to make such changes without 
prior announcement. 

FEES FOR RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS: 
1970-1971 ACADEMIC YEAR 

Fall 
Semester 
Fees for Undergraduate Students: 
Maryland Residents 

Fixed Charges $205.00 

Instructional Materials 13.00 

Athletic Fee 30.00 

Student Activities Fee 18.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee 15.00 

Recreational Facilities Fee 40.00 

$321.00 

Board-Full Controct- $300.00 

Lodging $200.00 

$821.00 



Spring 
Semester 


Total 


$205.00 
13.00 


$410.00 
26.00 
30.00 
18 00 
15.00 
40.00 


$218.00 


$539.00 


$300.00 
$200.00 
$718.00 


$600.00 

$400.00 

$1,539.00 



Full Time Undergraduote-Non-Residents 
Fixed Charges and other fees 

(same as above) $321.00 $218.00 $539.00 

Non-Resident Fee $250.00 $250.00 $500.00 

Board Full Contract- $300.00 $300.00 $600.00 

Lodging $250.00 $250.00 $500.00 

$1,121.00 $1,018.00 $2,139.00 

•Partial Contract for Boord is $250.00 per Semester 

••Students who register for the Spring Semester but who were not enrolled in the Fall 
Semester are reguired to pay the following additional fees: Athletic Fee. $15.00. Stu- 
dent Activities. $9.00, Auxiliary Facilities Fee. $7 50; Recreational Facilities Fee, 
$20.00. 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 

Students who are minors are considered to be 
resident students if at the time of their registration 
their parents have been domiciled in the State of 
Maryland for at least six months. 

The status of the residence of a student is de- 
termined at the time of his first registration in the 
University and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move 
to and become legal residents of Maryland by main- 
taining such residence for at least six months. How- 
ever, the right of the minor student to change from 
a non-resident status to resident status must be es- 
tablished by him prior to the registration period set 
for any semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents 
if at the time of their registration they have been 
domiciled in Maryland for at least six months pro- 
vided such residence has not been acquired while 
attending any school or college in Maryland or 
elsewhere. Time spent on active duty in the armed 
services while stationed in Maryland will not be 
considered as satisfying the six months period re- 
ferred to above except in those cases in which the 
adult was domiciled in Maryland for at least six 



General Information 



months prior to his entrance into the armed service 
and was not enrolled in any school during that peri- 
od. 

The word "domicile" as used in this regulation 
shall mean the permanent place of abode. For the 
purpose of this rule only one domicile may be main- 
tained. 
Explanation of Fees 

The application fee for the undergraduate col- 
leges and the summer session partially defrays 
the cost of processing applications for admission to 
these divisions of the Universty. If a student enrolls 
for the term for which he applied, the fee is ac- 
cepted in lieu of the matriculation fee. Applicants 
who have enrolled with the University of Maryland 
in its Evening Division at College Park or Baltimore, 
or at one of its off-campus centers are not required 
to pay the fee since they have already paid a ma- 
triculation fee. 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tui- 
tion. It is a charge to help defray the cost of operat- 
ing the University's physical plant, to pay adminis- 
trative and clerical expenses and other costs which 
ordinarily would not be included as a cost of teach- 
ing personnel and teaching supplies. 

The Instructional Materials Fee represents a 
charge for instructional materials and/or laboratory 
supplies furnished to students. Full-time under- 
graduate students subject to the fees set forth be- 
low will be billed the appropriate fee and also will 
be billed the Instructional Materials Fee: Math 1, 
$45; Applied Music, $40; and P.E. 8 Riding Class, 
$26. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of 
the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. All 
students are eligible and all students are encour- 
aged to participate in all of the activities of this de- 
partment and to attend all contests in which they 
do not participate. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee 
included at the request of the Student Government 
Association. It covers class dues and is used in 
sponsoring various student activities, student pub- 
lications and cultural programs. 

The Recreational Facilities Fee is paid into 
a fund which will be used to expand the recreational 
facilities on the College Park campus, especially 
the Student Union Building. 

The Auxiliary Facilities Fee is paid into a fund 
which is used for expansion and operation of var- 
ious facilities such as roads, walks, campus light- 
ing and other campus facilities. These facilities 
are not funded or are funded only in part from other 
sources. 

OTHER FEES 

Undergraduate Applications 

The deadline for the receipt of applications for 
the Spring Semester is December 1. All sup- 
porting documents for an application must be re- 
ceived on or before the first workday after January 1 
1970. 

All applications for undergraduate admission 
for the Fall Semester at the College Park campus 
must be received by Admissions Office on or before 
June 1. All supporting documents for an application 
for admission must be received by the appropriate 
University Office on or before July 15. Supporting 
documents include education records (except cur- 
rent summer school grades), SAT scores (in the case 
of new freshmen), and the medical examination re- 
port. 



Applicotion Fee $ 10.00 

Enrollment Deposit Fee 50.00 

(This fee is non-refundable after June 1st. At time of registra- 
tion fee will be applied against University charges) 
Registration Fee - Pre-College Orientation Program ... 15 00 

Late Applicotion Fee 25.00 

Matriculation Fee 10.00 

Graduation Fee for Bachelor's degree 10.00 

Room Deposit Fee poyable upon application for dormitory room 50.00 

(To be deducted from the first semester room charges at 
registration.) 
Vehicle Registration Fee. each vehicle 10.00 

(Payable each academic year by all students registered for 
courses on the College Park campus and who drive on the 
campus.) 
Special Fee for students requiring additional preporotion in Mathe- 
matics, per semester 45.00 
(Required of students whose curriculum calls for Math 10 or 18 
and who foil in qualifying examination for these courses. Stu- 
dents enrolled in this course ond concurrently enrolled for 6 or 
more credit hours will be considered as full-time students for 
purposes of assessing fees.) 
Special Guidonce Fee per semester (for students who are required 
or who wish to take advantage of the effective study course, 
and/or the tutoring service offered by the Office of Inter- 
mediate Registration) 15.00 
Applied Music Fee (each course) 40.00 
Riding Class Fee 26.00 
Fees for Auditors and courses taken for audit are the same as those 
charged for courses taken for credit at both the undergraduate 
and graduate levels. Audited credit hours will be added to hours 
taken for credit to determine whether or not an undergradu- 
ate student is full-time or part-time for fee assessment pur- 
poses. 
Special students are assessed fees in accordance with the sched- 
ule for the comparable undergraduate or graduate classifica- 
tion. 

MISCELLANEOUS FEES AND CHARGES 
Part-time Undergraduate Students: 

Fee per credit hour 22.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee - Payable each semester or summer 

session 4.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee 10.00 

($10.00 for first vehicle and $2.00 each for odditional 
vehicles in accordance with published regulations.) 
(Payable each academic yeor by all students registered 
for dosses on the College Pork Campus and who drive 
on the campus.) 
(The term "part-time students" is interpreted to meon under- 
graduate students taking 8 semester credit hours or less. 
Students carrying 9 semester hours are considered to be 
full time ond must pay the regular full-time fees.) 

Lote Registration Fee 20.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, in- 
cluding the filing of class cards ond payment of bills, on the 
regular registration days. Those who do not complete their 
registration during the prescribed days must pay this fee.) 
Fee for change in registration 5 00 

Fee for failure to report for medical examination appointment 2 00 

Special Examination Fee - to establish college credit - per 

semester hour 5.00 

Transcript of Record Fee (one tronscript furnished without 

charge) ... 1 .OX) 

Property Damage Chorge: Students will be charged for damage 
to property or equipment. Where responsibility for the dam- 
age con be fixed, the individual student will be billed for it : 
where responsibility cannot be fixed, the cost of repairing 
the damage or replacing equipment will be prorated. 
Service Charges for Dishonored Checks: Payable for each check 
which is returned unpaid by the drawee bank on initial pres- 
entation because of insufficient funds, payment stopped. 
post-dating, drawn ogainst uncollected items etc. 

For checks up to $50.00 . 5.00 

For checks from $50.0) to $100.00 10.00 

For checks over $100.00 20.00 

Library Charges: 

Fine for failure to return book from Generol Library before 

expiration of loan period per day .25 

Fine for failure to return book from Reserve Shelf before ex- 
piration of loan period 

First hour overdue 1.00 

Eoch additional hour overdue 2 00 max 

In case of loss or multilation of o book, satisfactory restitution 

must be made. 
In the event it becomes necessary to tronsfer uncollected charges 
to the Coshier's office, on additional charge of $1 00 is made 

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLIES 
Textbooks and classroom supplies: These costs vary with the 

course pursued, but will overage per semester 85 00 



FEES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 
Fee per semester hour. Resident 
Fee per semester hour. Non-resident 
Fee per semester hour. Maryland Teachers 



$ 3800 
48 00 
34.00 



10 



Genera/ Information 



Application Fee, payable ol time of first application for admission 

to the Graduate School $ 1000 

Graduation Fee Master's Degree 10.00 

Graduation Fee for Doctor's Degree 50.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee (per semester 4.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee 10 00 

($10.00 for first vehicle ond $2.00 each for additional vehicles 
in accordance with published regulations.) 
Payable each academic year by all students registered for 
classes on the College Park Campus ond who drive on the 
campus.) 
Foreign Language examination 10.00 

Graduate Education Testing Fee 5.00 

Speciol Fee (full-time graduate students on Baltimore City Cam- 
pus only) 25.00 
Service Charges for Dishonored Checks 5 00 to 20.00 
(See explanation above) 

All fees, except Groduotion Fee, ore payable at the time 
of registration for each semester. 
Groduotion Fee must be paid prior to graduation. 
There is no provision for housing graduate students in Uni 
versify dormitories. 

FEES FOR UNIVERSITY COLLEGE COURSES 
Undergraduate Matriculation Fee (Payable once, at the time of 
first registration by all undergraduate students, full-time 
ond part-time' $ 10.00 

Tuition charge for undergraduate students per credit hour 20.00 

Tuition charge for GRADUATE students per credit hour: 

Residents of Maryland 38.00 

Fee per semester hour, Maryland Teachers 34.00 

Non-residents of Maryland (Status as determined upon 

odmission) 48.00 

Graduate Education Testing Fee 5.00 

Vehicle Registration Fee, College Park Campus, each vehicle 10.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee 4.00 

(Payable at each registration by all part-time undergraduates 
and all graduate students taking courses on the College Park 
Campus and/or UMBC Campus and all graduate students tak- 
ing courses on the Baltimore City Campus. In the event of a 
duplicate registration during the same session, the duplicate 
payment will be refunded provided that the student makes 
written request to the Registrar.) 
Special Fee 

(Payable each semester by students registering for classes 
on Baltimore City Campus and who are enrolling for 12 

credits or more) 12.50 

Continuous Registration Fee (per semester) 10.00 

(For further information see Graduate School catalog) 

Service Charges for Dishonored Checks 5.00 to 20.00 

Baltimore Student Union Fee (Payable each semester by students 
registering for classes on Baltimore City campus): 

Students registering for from one through eleven credits 3.00 

Students registering for twelve credits or more 15.00 

Late Registration Fee: Students who do not complete their regis- 

trationduring the scheduled days will be charged a fee of 20.00 

in Registration Fee (Payable when a student, enrolled in 

University College courses, or wishes to substitute one 
course for another or one section of a course for another, 

or add a course), after he completes registration 5.00 

Payment of Fees: Registration is not complete until all fees are 
paid in full. All checks, money orders, or postal notes should 
be made payable to the University of Maryland. 

A Maryland teacher is defined for fee assess- 
ment purposes as any full-time professional em- 
ployee of a school or college located in the State of 
Maryland and accredited by the State Department of 
Education. The teacher must be currently under 
contract or on official leave for the purpose of taking 
full-time graduate work at the University of Mary- 
land. Teachers enrolling in the Summer Session will 
be considered as being currently under contract 
provided that they have a valid contract for the aca- 
demic year immediately following the Summer Ses- 
sion. Contract status must be established anew at 
each registration by the submission of a letter, or 
other appropriate document, provided by the Board 
of Education of the city or county or principal officer 
of the school or college in which the teacher is em- 
ployed. If the letter or document is needed by the 
teacher for other purposes, he must supply a photo- 
copy which will be retained by the registration clerk. 
The necessary letter, document or photocopy must 
be provided at the time of registration. 

An additional late application fee of $10.00 will be 
assessed against students who fail to apply for graduation with- 
in the first eight weeks of a regular semester or the first three 
weeks of a summer session. Students who apply after the end 



of the twelfth week of a regular academic semester and those 
who apply after the end of the fourth week of a summer 
session will be required to wait for the next academic semes- 
ter in order to obtain a diploma. 



WITHDRAWAL AND REFUND OF FEES 

Any student compelled to leave the University 
at any time during the academic year should file an 
application for withdrawal, bearing the proper sig- 
nature, in the Office of the Registrar. If this is not 
done, the student will not be entitled, as a matter of 
course, to a certificate of honorable dismissal, and 
will forfeit his right to any refund to which he would 
otherwise be entitled. The date used in computing 
refunds is the date the application for withdrawal is 
filed in the office of the Registrar. 

In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be per- 
mitted only with the written consent of the stu- 
dent's parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University will 
be credited for all academic fees charged to them 
in accordance with the following! schedule: 



Period from Date Instruction Begins Refundable 

Two weeks or less 80% 

Between two and three weeks. . 60% 

Between three and four weeks ... 40% 

Between four and five weeks 20% 

Over five weeks 00% 



The following table summarizes the fixed 
charges, mandatory fees, and room and full contract 
board charges for students enrolled in the under- 
graduate programs in the University of Maryland at 
College Park in 1970: 



First 
Semester 
Maryland Residents 

1 . Not living in the University residence 

halls $346 

2. Living in the University residence 

halls $871 

Residents of the District of Columbia, 
other States, and other Countries 

1 . Not living in the University residence 

halls $696 

2. Living in the University residence 

halls... $1.27) 



Full-time undergraduate students who register 
for the second semester, but who were not full-time 
undergraduate students in the first semester, are 
required to pay additional fees of $45. 

Special course fees, book costs, and personal 
expenses are not included. 

All fees are due and payable in full at time of 
registration. 



No part of the charges for room and board is re- 
fundable except where the student officially with- 
draws from the University or where he is given per- 
mission by the appropriate officials of the University 
to move from the residence halls and/or to discon- 
tinue dining hall privileges. In these cases, the room 
refund will be computed by deducting ten percent 
of the charge for the semester as a service charge 
and the remainder will be prorated on a weekly 
basis. Refunds to students having full board con- 
tracts will be calculated in the same manner. No 
room and/or board refunds will be made after the 



Semester 


Total 


$243 


$589 


$768 


$1,639 


$593 


$1,289 


$1,168 


$2,439 



General Information 



M 



fourteenth week of the semester. ID Cards with din- 
ing hall validation issued to boarding students must 
be surrendered at the Auditor's Office in the Admin- 
istration Building on the day of withdrawal before 
any refund will be processed. 

In computing refunds to students who have re- 
ceived the benefit of scholarships and loans from 
University Funds, the computation will be made in 
such a way as to return the maximum amount to the 
scholarship and loan accounts without loss to the 
University. 

No refund of the Athletic, Student Activity, 
Special Recreational Facilities, and Advisory and 
Testing Fees is made to students who withdraw at 
the close of the first semester. 

A student who registers as a full-time under- 
graduate will receive no refunds of Fixed Charges, 
Instructional Materials Fee, Athletic Fee, etc., 
when courses are dropped (irrespective of the num- 
ber of credit hours dropped) unless the student 
withdraws from the University. 

A student who registers as a graduate student or 
as a part-time undergraduate student will be given 
an 80% refund of credit hour fees for courses drop- 
ped during the first week of classes. No refunds will 
be made for courses dropped thereafter. 

A special refund schedule applies to full-time 
students who are drafted into the Armed Services or 
called up as Reservists. 

University College students enrolled in off-cam- 
pus and 8-week courses are subject to a somewhat 
different refund schedule. Please see the University 
College Bulletin for details. 



TRANSCRIPTS OF RECORDS 

Students and alumni may secure transcripts of 
their scholastic records from the Office of the Regis- 
trar. No charge is made for the first copy; for addi- 
tional copies, there is a charge of $1.00 for each 
transcript. Checks should be made payable to the 
University of Maryland. Transcripts of records 
snould be requested at least two weeks in advance 
of the date when the records are actually needed. 
No transcript of a student's record will be furnished 
any student or alumnus whose financial obliga- 
tions to the University have not been satisfied. 



FINANCIAL AID 

The Office of Student Aid provides advice and 
assistance in the formulation of student financial 
plans and, in cooperation with other University of- 
fices, participates in the awarding of scholarships, 
loans, and part-time employment to deserving stu- 
dents. Scholarships, grants, and loans are awarded 
on the basis of evident academic ability and finan- 
cial need. In making awards, consideration is also 
given to character, achievement, participation in 
student activities, and to other attributes which may 
indicate success in college. It is the intent of the 
Committee to make awards to those qualified who 
might not otherwise be able to pursue college 
studies. Part-time employment opportunities on 
campus are open to all students, but are dependent 
upon the availability of jobs and the student's par- 
ticular skills and abilities. 

Additional information is available from the Di- 
rector, Office of Student Aid, Room 222, North Ad- 
ministration Building, University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park, Maryland 20742. 



Scholarships 

Most scholarships are awarded to students be- 
fore they enter the University. However, students 
who have completed one or more terms, and have 
not received such award, are eligible to apply. Most 
of these scholarships are awarded to students who 
have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 
(B) or better. Applicants may submit applications to 
the Office of Student Aid between February 10 and 
May 1 in order to receive consideration for scholar- 
ship assistance for the ensuing year. 

Scholarship award letters are normally mailed 
between May 1 and July 1. Any applicant who does 
not receive an award letter during this period should 
assume that he has not been selected for a scholar- 
ship. 

FULL SCHOLARSHIPS. The University awards 
56 full scholarships covering board, lodging, fixed 
charges, fees, and books. Not more than twenty of 
these scholarships may be held by out-of-state stu- 
dents, and at least twelve are reserved for women. 
Scholastic achievement and participation in student 
activities are given primary consideration. 

UNIVERSITY GRANTS. The University awards 
to deserving and qualified secondary school gradu- 
ates a limited number of grants covering fixed 
charges only. 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY GRANTS. These grants 
are awarded by members of the State Legislature. 
They may be awarded to persons living in the legis- 
lative district which the Delegate or Senator repre- 
sents. 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS. A limited 
number of scholarships are awarded each year to 
students of exceptional ability, out of funds derived 
from campus enterprises. The amount of these 
scholarships varies, depending upon the extent of 
need. 

TEACHER EDUCATION GRANTS. The General 
Assembly of Maryland provides grants equivalent to 
fixed charges to Maryland residents pursuing cer- 
tain teacher education curicula on a full-time basis. 
Recipients must agree to teach in Maryland public 
schools for at least two years immediately following 
graduation. The agreement form must be signed by 
the student and countersigned by the parent, guardi- 
an, or other responsible adult. 

GENERAL STATE SCHOLARSHIPS. The General 
Assembly of Maryland provides a number of limited 
scholarships to students entering college for the 
first time. The scholarships may be used in any ap- 
proved institution of higher education within the 
State. Awards are made by the State Scholarship 
Board based upon financial need and the results of 
a competitive examination. For additional informa- 
tion, contact high school guidance counselors or the 
Maryland State Scholarship Board, 2100 Guilford 
Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21218. 

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS. The 
University has a number of endowed scholarships 
and special grants. These range in value from $100 
to $1,000. Recipients are chosen by the University 
in accordance with terms established by the donor. 
It is usually inadvisable for a student to apply for a 
specific scholarship. Each applicant will receive 
consideration for all scholarships for which he is 
eligible. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS. Under 
provisions of the Higher Education Act of 1965, lim- 



12 



General Information 



ited grants are available to encourage youths of ex- 
ceptional financial need to continue their post-sec - 
condary school education. A recipient must be a 
United States citizen enrolled as a full-time under- 
graduate. The amount of the grant must be matched 
by an equal amount of some other type of aid pro- 
vided through the University. 

NURSING SCHOLARSHIPS. Nursing students 
of exceptional financial need are eligible to receive 
assistance under the provisions of the Health Man- 
power Act of 1968. Students submitting applications 
for financial aid will be automatically considered 
for both scholarship and loan. 

LOCAL AND NATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS. In ad- 
dition to the scholarships provided by the University 
of Maryland, a student should give careful consid- 
eration to scholarship aid provided by local and na- 
tional scholarship programs. Ordinarily, the high 
school principal or counselor will be well informed 
as to these opportunities. 

Loans 

Loan funds to meet educational expenses are 
available for students enrolled in the University. 
The extent of financial need must be clearly estab- 
lished by providing a complete statement of the ap- 
plicant's financial resources and estimated ex- 
penses for the academic year. 

Loan awards are normally granted on a yearly 
basis, although short-term and emergency loans are 
granted for shorter periods. 

To apply for a long-term loan, an application 
should normally be filed between February 1 and 
August 1 for the ensuing year. If funds are available, 
applications may be considered at other times, but 
the student should bear in mind that it generally 
takes about six weeks to process a loan. 

Students applying for a loan must have a 2.0 (C) 
average for courses taken the preceding semester. 
New students need a 2.5 average in academic sub- 
jects for the previous two years of school. 

Loans are not available for non-educational ex- 
penses, nor are they available for repayment of pre- 
viously incurred indebtedness. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE EDUCATION ACT LOAN 
FUND. This loan fund was established by the Fed- 
eral government in agreement with the University of 
Maryland to make low-interest loans available to 
superior students with clearly established financial 
need. Applicants must be United States nationals 
(citizens and permanent resident status) and must 
be enrolled for eight or more credit hours at day 
school on the College Park campus. 

If funds are available, a student may request up 
to $1,000 per year; the average approved loan is 
about half this amount. The borrower must sign a 
note and have a co-signer if under 21 years of age. 
Repayment begins one year after the borrower 
leaves school and must be completed within ten 
years thereafter. No interest is charged until the 
beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after 
that date is charged at the rate of three percent per 
annum. 

NURSING STUDENT LOANS. Loans up to $1500 
per year are available under provision of the Nurses 
Training Act of 1964. The borrower must be a full- 
time student in pursuit of a baccalaureate or gradu- 
ate degree in nursing and able to establish financial 
need. Repayment begins one year after the borrower 
ceases to be a full-time student and must be corn- 



Dieted within ten years thereafter. No interest is 
charged until the beginning of the repayment sched- 
ule. Interest after that date accrues at the rate of 
three percent per annum. 

Up to fifty percent of the loan plus interest may 
be cancelled in the event that the borrower is em- 
ployed full-time as a nurse in a public or nonprofit 
institution or agency. Such cancellation is at the 
rate of ten percent per year. In the event of total or 
permanent disability or death, the borrower's ob- 
ligation is automatically cancelled. 

INSTITUTIONAL STUDENT LOANS. Institution- 
al loan funds have been established through the 
generosity of University organizations, alumni, 
faculty, staff, and friends. These loans are normally 
available at low interest rates to upperclassmen 
only. For specific information, the student should 
inquire at the Office of Student Aid. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 
LOAN. Qualified full-time students in approved 
fields may apply for loan assistance up to $1800 per 
academic year. Loans are repaid at the rate of 7 per- 
cent simple interest, commencing six months after 
termination of full-time study. Interested students 
should contact either the Dean, University College, 
or Department of Sociology, College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

BANK LOANS. Loan programs have been estab- 
lished through the Maryland Higher Education Loan 
Corporation and the United Student Aid Fund 
which permit students to borrow money from their 
hometown banks. These programs enable under- 
graduates in good standing to borrow up to 
$1,000 per year, and notes may not bear more than 
seven percent simple interest. Monthly repayments 
begin ten months after graduation or withdrawal 
from school. The Federal government will pay the 
interest while the student is in school. Further de- 
tails and a listing of participating banks may be 
secured from the Office of Student Aid. 



Part-time Employment 

More than one-half of the students at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland earn a portion of their expenses. 
The Office of Student Aid serves without charge as 
a clearing house for students seeking part-time 
work and employers seeking help. Many jobs are 
available in the residence halls, dining halls, li- 
braries, laboratories, and elsewhere on campus and 
off campus. 

Working during college years may offer advan- 
tages in addition to the obvious one of financing a 
college education. The employed student has a 
special opportunity to learn new skills, to develop 
good work habits, and to learn how to get along 
with people. Part-time employment experience often 
is helpful to the student in making his career choice. 

The Office of Student Aid welcomes the oppor- 
tunity to counsel a student about employment. How- 
ever, securing a position through intelligent appli- 
cation and retaining that position through good 
work is the individual's responsibility. 

Freshman students who do not need financial 
aid probably should not attempt to work during the 
first year at the University. Adjustment to college 
study and to the changes from life at home usually 
require the student's best efforts without the added 
responsibility of partial self-support. 

However, freshman students who need to work 



Genera/ Information 



13 



in order to attend the University are advised to con- 
sider employment in one of the dining halls. A 
student may earn approximately one-half of his 
board and room by working ten hours per week. 
After one successful semester the work load may 
be increased, at the request of the student, up to a 
maximum of 20 hours per week. 

For positions other than food service, a student 
normally cannot arrange for employment until he is 
on campus at the beginning of a school session. Ap- 
plication must be made in person and the applicant 
should have a schedule of his classes and study 



hours so that he can seek employment best suited 
to his free time. 

College Work-Study Program 

Eligible students may seek employment under 
provisions of Title 1-C of the Economic Opportunity 
Act. Qualified students may work up to 15 hours per 
week during the school year and full time during the 
summer. It is the intent of the Student Aid Commit- 
tee to combine this type of assistance with scholar- 
ships and loans so that students from low-income 
families will be able to attend the University. 




14 



General Information 



ACADEMICS 



The University of Maryland is accredited by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secon- 
dary Schools and is a member of the Association of 
American Universities. In addition, individual 
schools and departments are accredited by such 
groups as the American Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business, the American Chemical So- 
ciety, the National Association of Schools of Music, 
the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to 
the Bar of the American Bar Association, the Ameri- 
can Council of Education for Journalism, the Ameri- 
can Council on Pharmaceutical Education, the 
Council on Dental Education of the American Dental 
Association, the Committee on Accreditation of the 
American Library Association, the American Psy- 
chological Association, the Commission on Accredi- 
tation of the Council on Social Work Education, the 
Council on Medical Education of the American Medi- 
cal Association, the Engineers' Council for Profes- 
sional Development, the National Council for Ac- 
creditation of Teacher Education, and the National 
League for Nursing. 

GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A college education i nplies something more 
than technical training in a field of specialization. In 
order that each graduate may gain a liberal educa- 
tion as well as a specialized one, the University has 
established a General Education requirement. This 
requirement consists of 34 semester hours of credit 
in six areas: English (9 hours), Fine Arts or Philoso- 
phy (3 hours), History (6 hours), Mathematics (3 
hours), Science (7 hours), and Social Science (6 
hours). There is a wide choice in specific courses 
which may be used to satisfy requirements in all of 
the six areas except English. 



The General Education Program is designed to 
be spread out over the four years of college. In each 
of the areas, courses for which no previous college 
course work is prerequisite are available; at the 
same time, alternative advanced courses are 
available in most of the areas. Thus a student may 
(within the limits of his particular curriculum) satis- 
fy a General Education requirement with a variety 
of courses at different levels. Which courses he 
takes will depend on his ability — as determined 
by advanced credit, placement examination, de- 
partment evaluation, and class standing — and upon 
his interests and needs. 

It should be emphasized that the 34 semester 
hours of General Education courses constitute a 
minimum requirement, applicable to the under- 
graduate students in all of the colleges of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

The University is also concerned with the 
physical fitness of each student. Therefore, all un- 
dergraduate men and women students registered 
for more than eight hours of credit are required to 
enroll in and successfully complete two prescribed 
courses in Physical Education for a total of two 
semester hours of credit. A Health Education course 
of two semesters hours' credit is required of all un- 
dergraduate men and women. These courses must 
be taken by all students taking more than 8 hours in 
a semester during their first year of attendance at 
the University whether they intend to graduate or 
not. 

COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to fulfilling the General Education 
requirements, each student will have to meet the 
specific graduation requirements determined by 



Genera/ Information 



15 



the faculty of his particular college. These additional 
course requirements will be found in each individual 
college section. 



ACADEMIC ADVISORS 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor whose 
function is to aid the student in designing his pro- 
gram of study. The student meets with his adviser 
in regular conferences each semester and may ar- 
range additional meetings on his own initiative. 

Special advisors are assigned to students in 
the pre-professional curricula. 

INTERMEDIATE REGISTRATION 

The Office of Intermediate Registration (01 R) is 
for students who wish to transfer from one college 
to another within the University, but who lack the 
necessary 2.00 cumulative grade point average to be 
able to do so. A student may register in OIR, take 
courses applicable to the curriculum to which he 
wishes to transfer, and then transfer to the new 
college upon earning the necessary average. 
Goals 

The Office of Intermediate Registration recog- 
nizes that students may have difficulty in making vo- 
cational decisions. For this reason, OIR assumes the 
specific goals of providing for all students registered 
in OIR the opportunity to receive advising for cur- 
riculum choice and vocational planning. 

The Office of Intermediate Registration is lo- 
cated in Room 215 of the North Administration 
Building. The telephone number is 454-2733. 

INTENSIVE EDUCATIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 

The Intensive Educational Development Pro- 
gram is designed to provide educational and psycho- 
logical support to students who enter the University 
of Maryland from culturally different and low socio- 
economic backgrounds. 

Academic advisement is a critical component 
of the program. Students enroll in the Office of Inter- 
mediate Registration. In addition to registration, 
continuous group and individual sessions are held 
throughout the semester. 

Group and individual counseling, planned and 
spontaneous, utilizes non-traditional methods in 
working with students. 

Academic skills are enhanced and improved 
through group and individual work in the Reading 
and Study Skills Laboratory. Specific academic lab 
sessions are set up for the students' individual 
courses. 

Tutoring is provided by a selected group of paid 
tutors individually and in small groups with a ratio 
of 1 to 4. 

The program recruits and enrolls students from 
high schools, community agencies, and Upward 
Bound programs. University of Maryland students 
may transfer into the program during their first two 
years. 

Students are involved in the planning, imple- 
menting, and evaluation of the program. 
For further information, contact: 
Coordinator, IED Program 
213 N, Administration Building 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 20742 
Telephone: 454-4646 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

No baccalaureate curriculum requires less than 
120 semester hours. Actual classifications run as 
follows: Freshman, 1-27 semester hours; Sopho- 
more, 28-55; Junior, 56-85; and Senior, 86 on up 
to at least 120. 

A student may register for upper division 
courses when granted junior standing by his col- 
lege. This shall be based upon earning a minimum 
of 56 academic hours toward his degree, completing 
such course requirements as the college may direct, 
and possessing the minimum required grade point 
average to remain in the University. 

A senior at the University of Maryland who is 
within six hours of completing the requirements for 
the undergraduate degree may, with the approval 
of his undergraduate dean, the head of the depart- 
ment concerned, and the Graduate School, register 
in the undergraduate college for graduate courses, 
which may later be counted for graduate credit to- 
ward an advanced degree at this University. The 
student must be within seven credit hours of com- 
pleting his undergraduate work and the total of 
undergraduate and graduate courses must not ex- 
ceed fifteen credits for the semester. Excess credits 
in the senior year cannot be used for graduate 
credit unless proper pre-arrangement is made. Sen- 
iors who wish to register for graduate credit should 
apply to the Graduate School. 

SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 
Advanced Placement 

Students entering the University from secondary 
school may obtain advanced placement and college 
credit on the basis of their performance on the Col- 
lege Board Advanced Placement examinations. 
These examinations are normally given to eligible 
high school seniors during the May preceding ma- 
triculation in college. 

For achievement of a score of five or four on a 
given examination, the student will be granted Ad- 
vanced Placement and the credit equivalent of two 
semester courses in that field; for achievement of a 
score of three, Advanced Placement and the credit 
equivalent of either one or two semester courses, 
depending upon the field of the examination, will 
be granted. A student earning a score of 2 on the 
English advanced placement examination will not 
need to take English Composition, but no credit 
will be given. 

The program allows students a maximum of 
thirty hours credit, which may be used to meet ma- 
jor, minor, or elective requirements; or, where 
appropriate, General Education requirements. In- 
cluded in the University's program are Advanced 
Placement examinations in the following areas: bi- 
ology, chemistry, English, French, German, history, 
Latin, mathematics, physics and Spanish. 

Questions about the program may be addressed 
to the Director of Admissions and Registrations. 
College Deans, or the Director of General Education. 
For detailed information about examinations and 
procedures in taking them, write to Director of Ad- 
vanced Placement Program, College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New 
York 10027. 

Honors Programs 

The Colleges of Arts and Science, Education. 
Architecture, Business and Public Administration, 
and Agriculture have created unusual opportunities 



16 



General Information 



for the superior student through the establishment 
of Honors Programs. 

Arts and Sciences, 
Secondary Education, Architecture 

The College of Arts and Sciences has instituted 
both General Honors and Departmental Honors. 
General Honors, as its name suggests, enlarges the 
breadth of the student's generalized knowledge; De- 
partmental Honors increases the depth of his knowl- 
edge in his major discipline. Both offer the student 
challenging academic experiences characterized 
by small sections, active student participation, and 
an Honors faculty that encourages dialogue. Indi- 
vidually guided research and independent study are 
important features of Honors work. 

Each year a selected group of entering freshmen 
is invited into the General Honors Program on the 
basis of their high school records and standardized 
test scores. The General Honors student, after ac- 
ceptance, must maintain a "B" average to continue 
in the Program. 

The more than 20 Departmental Honors Pro- 
grams ordinarily begin in the junior year, although a 
few programs begin as early as the freshman 
year. 

By agreement, students in Secondary Education 
in the College of Education and in the School of 
Architecture may participate in the Honors Pro- 
grams of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The student who completes his Honors cur- 
riculum successfully is graduated with a citation in 
General or Departmental Honors, or with both. 

Interested high school students should write to 
the Director of Honors, 104 Francis Scott Key Hall, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

Business and Public Administration 

The College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion has instituted Departmental Honors Programs 
in Business Administration, Economics, and Govern- 
ment and Politics. 

Agriculture 
The College of Agriculture has instituted a De- 
partmental Honors Program in Agricultural Eco- 
nomics. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Students who excel in scholarship and leader- 
ship may be invited to join the appropriate honor 
society. These include: 
•Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) 
"Alpha Lambda Delta 

(Scholarship-Freshmen Women) 
Alpha Sigma Lambda 

(Adult Education) 
Alpha Zeta (Agriculture) 
Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting) 
Beta Gamma Sigma (Commerce) 
"Chi Epsilon (Civil Engineering) 
"Eta Kappa Nu 

(Electrical Engineering) 
Gamma Theta Upsilon (Geography) 
lota Lambda Sigma 
(Industrial Education) 
Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 
"Mortar Board (Women's Scholarship 

and Leadership) 
"Omicron Delta Kappa (Men's 
Scholarship and Leadership) 
Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Phi Alpha Epsilon (Physical Education) 
"Phi Alpha Theta (History) 
Phi Beta Kappa 
(Arts and Sciences) 



Phi Delta Kappa (Education) 
"Phi Eta Sigma 

(Scholarship— Freshmen Men) 
"Phi Kappa Phi (Senior Scholarship) 
"Phi Sigma (Biology) 

Pi Alpha Xi (Floriculture) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 
"Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science) 
"Pi Tau Sigma 

(Mechanical Engineering) 
"Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Sigma Alpha Eta (Speech Therapy) 

Sigma Alpha lota (Women's Music) 

Sigma Alpha Omicron (Bacteriology) 
"Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics) 
"Tau Beta Pi (Engineering) 

"Members of Association of College Honor Societies. 

LIBRARIES 

The Theodore R. McKeldin Library is the gen- 
eral library of the University, containing reference 
works, periodicals, circulating books, and other ma- 
terials in all fields of research and instruction. 
Branch libraries include the Engineering and Physi- 
cal Sciences Library, the Architecture Library, the 
Chemistry Library, and, in downtown Baltimore City, 
the Health Sciences Library and the Law Library. 

The libraries of the University include approxi- 
mately 1,100,000 volumes and 15,000 subscrip- 
tions to periodicals and newspapers, as well as many 
uncatalogued government documents, phono- 
records, films and film strips, etc. 

Special collections include those of Richard 
Van Mises in mathematics and applied mechanics; 
Max Born in the physical sciences; Thomas I. Cook 
in political science; Romeo Mansueti in the biologi- 
cal sciences; Katherine Anne Porter; Maryland; U.S. 
government publications (for which the University 
is a regional depository); the United Nations, the 
League of Nations, and other international organi- 
zations; and the agricultural experiment station and 
extension service publications. Also featured here 
are maps from the U.S. Army Map Service; collec- 
tions of rare materials in medicine, dentistry, 
pharmacy, and nursing; the files of the Industrial 
Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of Amer- 
ica; the Wallenstein collection of musical scores; 
and research collections of the American Band- 
masters Association, the National Association of 
Wind and Percussion Instructors and the Music 
Educators National Conference. In addition, the col- 
lections include microfilm productions of govern- 
ment documents, rare books, early journals, and 
newspapers. 

Other Area Resources 

The College Park campus is in a region rich in 
research collections. In the Washington area are the 
Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Fol- 
ger Library, the National Library of Medicine, the 
National Agricultural Library, and various academic 
and special libraries. In the Baltimore area, in addi- 
tion to the University's own libraries at UMBC and 
on the professional campus, are the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library and the Maryland Historical Association 
Library. The Maryland Hall of Records is located in 
Annapolis. 

RESEARCH FACILITIES 

The research programs at the University derive 
their existence and vigor from a faculty comprised 
of internationally recognized scholars and scien- 
tists. It is an advantage for undergraduate students 



General Information 



17 



to be aware of the University's research facilities as 
they plan their program. 

In addition to fine library resources and the 
usual laboratory facilities for undergraduate 
studies, the University has developed outstanding 
opportunities for research in the biological, physi- 
cal, and social sciences. Among the exceptional 
facilties are the Institute for Child Study; the Natur- 
al Resources Institute; a Computer Science Center; 
a laboratory for basic behavioral research on ani- 
mals; Van de Graaff accelerators; a training nuclear 
reactor; a full-scale, low-velocity wind tunnel; a 
psycho-pharmacology laboratory; and laboratory 
models for meteorological phenomena. Collabora- 



tive arrangements with many nearby government 
agencies permit University students and faculty to 
utilize their research facilities. The University 
owns and operates the world's longest radio tele- 
scope, located in California. A 160 MVE cyclotron 
for research in nuclear studies is located on the Col- 
lege Park campus. 

Investigation in agriculture is an important 
aspect of University research. University farms total 
more than 2,000 acres. Breeding, selection in farm 
crops, and soil research are a part of the program. 
Work in these areas is augmented by X-ray equip- 
ment and an electron microscope. 



18 



General Information 



' Vv '': */ 



SR 



F-'-l 



I 



I 



tmtf 



;.<«» 





"3^ 



-* 




V 






±* t 



i^flH kk 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



A. GENERAL POLICY 

The University's approach to student discipline 
is primarily an educative and preventive one. It 
assumes that discipline is properly the concern of 
the entire University community — the student body, 
the faculty, and the administration. 

In order that uniform standards may be main- 
tained, all disciplinary action concerning students 
or student organizations is subject to review by the 
Adjunct Committee on Student Discipline of the 
University Senate. The rules and regulations of any 
organization or department that wishes to establish 
a disciplinary unit must be submitted to the Adjunct 
Commitee on Student Discipline and the Vice 
President for Student Affairs for approval or modi- 
fication. 

Cases involving infractions of University Rules, 
other than academic, which apply to all students 
are referred immediately to the Student Affairs 
Judiciary Office on the College Park Campus or to 
the Dean of the school in which the student is 
registered in Baltimore. (Graduate students are re- 
ferred to the Dean of the Graduate School.) The 
Judiciary Office or the Dean will investigate the 
case and take appropriate action. 

In situations involving undergraduates, the Stu- 
dent Affairs Judiciary Office will refer the case to 
one of the student judicial boards for appropriate 
action, according to the jurisdictional area of the 
various student boards and the seriousness and 
nature of the offense. The Student Affairs Judiciary 
Office may handle directly those cases it judges 
to involve students needing special remedial or 
rehabilitative action and those cases where an ad- 
ministrative hearing is requested by the student. 



Students charged with violating University regu- 
lations are guaranteed administrative due process 
in the handling of the charges, the conduct of the 
hearings, the imposition of sanctions, and the right 
of appeal. 

B. SUSPENSION OF A STUDENT FROM CLASS 

Discipline in the classroom is the responsibility 
of the faculty member in charge of the class. Mis- 
behavior of a type that interferes with the educa- 
tional efficiency of a class will be considered suffi- 
cient cause for suspending a student from the 
class. If a student is suspended from class for 
disciplinary reasons, he should report immediately 
to the department head. The department head will 
investigate the incident and will report it to the 
academic dean and to the Student Life Judiciary 
Office, in order to determine whether or not past 
disciplinary action has been taken against the stu- 
dent. The department head will then write a letter 
to the student indicating the disposition of the 
case. The student will be required to present this 
letter to his instructor before he can be readmitted 
to class. A copy of this letter will be sent to the 
Student Life Judiciary Office. 

C. SUSPENSION OF A STUDENT FROM ACTIVITIES 
OR UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 

The individual or group of individuals in charge 
of any department, division, organization, building, 
facility or any other unit of the University (e.g., 
Dining Hall, Student Union, etc.) shall be responsi- 
ble for student discipline within such units. The 
person responsible for each unit may suspend the 



Genera/ Information 



21 



student or student organization from the unit. The 
suspended student or representative of the student 
organization will be referred immediately to the 
Student Affairs Judiciary Office. The Judiciary Of- 
fice will investigate the incident and notify the stu- 
dent of the disposition of the case. The individual 
responsible for the suspension will be notified be- 
fore the student or his organization can be read- 
mitted. A file of such actions shall be kept in the 
Judiciary Office. 

D. IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

Official University of Maryland student identifi- 
cation cards and transaction plates are issued to all 
registered undergraduate and graduate students. 
The identification card and the transaction plate 
are for use only by the student to whom issued and 
may not be transferred or loaned to another in- 
dividual for any reason. Loss of either the I.D. 
card or the transaction plate, or both, should be 
reported at once to the Office of the Vice President 
for Student Affairs. A replacement fee of $3.00 for 
each item is required prior to the creation of 
authorized duplicates. 

E. IMPORTANT UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 
WHICH APPLY TO ALL STUDENTS 

The following behavior may result in referral to 
the Student Affairs Office for appropriate action. 
Typically, disciplinary sanctions will be imposed 
not only for individual misconduct which demon- 
strates a disregard for institutional behavioral stand- 
ards, but also for conduct which indicates disre- 
gard for the rights and welfare of others as mem- 
bers of an academic community. Such conduct may 
utimately call into question the student's member- 
ship in the University community, either because 
he has violated elementary standards of behavior 
necessary for the maintenance of an educational 
milieu or because his continued presence at the 
University adversely affects the ability of others to 
pursue their educational goals. 

1. VIOLATION OF FIRE REGULATIONS— failure to 

comply with evacuation procedures; tampering 
with fire-protecting apparatus; use or possesion 
of fireworks or firearms; inappropriate use of 
open flame devices or combustible materials. 

2. BEHAVIOR WHICH JEOPARDIZES THE SAFETY 
OR WELL-BEING OF OTHER MEMBERS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY— This regulation is in- 
tended to safeguard the personal, social, aca- 
demic, and professional rights of all members 
of the University community. Examples of viola- 
tions would include harassment of persons act- 
ing in performance of their official duties, phys- 
ical abuse of any person on or in University 
property, and conduct which threatens the health 
of other persons or interferes with their proper 
educational purposes. 



4. POSSESSION, USE, OR DISTRIBUTION OF IL- 
LEGAL DRUGS ON OR IN UNIVERSITY PROPERTY 

— this includes possession, use, distribution, 
sale, manufacture, or processing of illegal or un- 
prescribed narcotics, drugs, and/or hallucino- 
genic substances. 

5. DESTRUCTION OR THEFT OF PERSONAL OR 
UNIVERSITY PROPERTY— Disciplinary action may 

include restitution to the University or to the in- 
dividual(s) involved. 



6. UNAUTHORIZED POSSESSION OR USE OF UNI- 
VERSITY KEYS— Keys to rooms or buildings on the 

University campus may be obtained only 
through official channels. 

7. UNAUTHORIZED USE OF BUILDING— Except 

for properly scheduled classes or meetings, 
classroom, administration, and recreation build- 
ings are closed to general student use on holi- 
days, Saturday afternoons, Sundays, and after 
8:00 p.m. during the week. Individual students 
may use these buildings or facilities with writ- 
ten permission from a member of the faculty or 
the administrative staff. 



8. FALSIFICATION, FORGERY, OR MODIFICATION 
OF ANY OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY RECORD— Identifi- 
cation card, absence excuses, parking stickers, 
transcripts, examinations, grade cards, admis- 
sion applications, etc. 



9. PLAGIARISM, CHEATING AND OTHER ACADEM- 
IC IRREGULARITIES— A student who violates ac- 
cepted academic procedure may be referred to 
the Dean of his College or to an Ad Hoc 
Committee on Academic Dishonesty, (see Irreg- 
ularities in Examinations for specifics.) 

10. FAILURE TO MEET FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS 
TO THE UNIVERSITY— This includes refusal to pay 

delinquent accounts, and use of worthless 
checks or money orders in payment to the Uni- 
versity for tuition, board, fees, library fines, 
traffic penalties, etc. 



11. OBSTRUCTION OR DISRUPTION OF AUTHOR- 
IZED ACTIVITIES ON UNIVERSITY PROPERTY— 

Teaching, research, administration, disciplinary 
proceedings, public service functions, recruit- 
ment, etc. 



3. UNAUTHORIZED POSSESSION, USE, OR DIS- 
TRIBUTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ON OR 
IN UNIVERSITY PROPERTY— University policy, con- 
sistent with State and County laws, restricts on- 
campus use of alcoholic beverages in specified 
areas. 



12. VIOLATION OF UNIVERSITY HOUSING REGU- 
LATIONS— 



13. VIOLATION OF UNIVERSITY CAMPUS TRAF- 
FIC RULES AND REGULATIONS— 



22 General Information 



POLICY ON AMPLIFYING EQUIPMENT 

(as adopted by University Senate, 2 June 1970 and 

approved by the Administration.) 

1. Public address systems, loudspeakers, and other 
forms of sound amplifying equipment may be 
used in any of the following outdoor areas of 
the campus: 

a. Physical education and intramural field 
between University Boulevard and parking 
area 1. 

b. North Mall between Campus Drive and Wash- 

ington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

c. South Mall between Regents Drive and Wash- 

ington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

d. Athletic practice fields east of Byrd Stadium. 

2. The use of public address systems, loud- 

speakers, and other forms of sound amplifying 
equipment must be restricted in the Central 
Mall area between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. on class 
days in order to minimize the likelihood of dis- 
turbing classes and other academic activities. 
However, such equipment may be used in the 
Central Mall during these hours if the pro- 
cedures outlined below are followed. All equip- 
ment used in Central Mall must be secured 
through the Office of the Director of the Phys- 
ical Plant or through the S.G.A. office. 

a. Public address systems, loudspeakers, and 
other forms of sound amplifying equipment 
(except in "b" below), must be secured from 
the Office of the Director of Physcial Plant, 
South Administration Building, by request- 
ing such equipment in writing at least twelve 
(12) hours in advance. Any University stu- 
dent or organization which fulfills the fol- 
lowing requirements will be permitted to use 
the amplifying equipment. 

(1) An individual must be currently en- 
rolled as a student, part-time or full- 
time, at the University or currently em- 
ployed by the University. 

(2) Any organization or activity must have 
been recognized by the SGA Legislature 
and must at the time of the request have 
official recognition as a University or- 
ganization or activity. 

b. Bullhorns will be available upon surrender of 
the I.D. card in the SGA office and in the Of- 
fice of the Director of the Physical Plant. 
Bullhorns secured in this manner may be 
used on the Central Mall without prior per- 
mission. Any individual may use only 
one bullhorn at a time. 

3. Public address systems, loudspeakers, and other 
forms of sound amplifying equipment may be 
used in outdoor areas of the Campus other than 
those listed above (sections 1 and 2) by secur- 
ing approval in writing at least 5 days in advance 
from the Facilities Use Committee by applica- 
tion to the Office of the Director of the Physical 
Plant. Approval will be granted for use of ampli- 
fying equipment in these areas only if there is 
a high probability that the planned activity will 
not disrupt or disturb other University activities 
or if the area has not been previously reserved. 
Permission will be granted to use amplifying 



equipment in the vicinity of residence halls only 
upon specific written request of the student 
government of the residence halls affected. 
4. Individual students or organizational representa- 
tives using amplifying equipment must accept 
responsibility for any complaints of disturb- 
ances or disruption received from persons in 
University academic and/or residence build- 
ings. 

POLICY ON DEMONSTRATIONS 

(as adopted by University Senate, 2 June 1970 and 
approved by the Administration.) 

I. GENERAL STATEMENT 

a. The University of Maryland cherishes the 
right of individual students or student 
groups to dissent and to demonstrate, pro- 
vided such demonstrations do not disrupt 
normal campus activities, or infringe upon 
the rights of others. 

b. On the other hand, the University will not 
condone behavior which violates the free- 
dom of speech, choice, assembly, or move- 
ment of other individuals or groups. In short, 
responsible dissent carries with it a sensi- 
tivity for the Civil rights of others. 

c. Accordingly, the University will take what- 
ever steps it deems necessary to (1) protect 
the right of any individual or group to dem- 
strate and publicly proclaim any view, how- 
ever unpopular; (2) protect the freedom of 
speech, assembly, and movement of any in- 
dividual or group which is the object of 
demonstrations. 

To achieve the foregoing objectives the follow- 
ing guidelines have been developed for operation at 
College Park. 

II. GUIDELINESFOR GENERALDEMONSTRATIONS 

a. Unscheduled demonstrations, "teach-ins," 
rallies, or equivalent activities may be held 
by recognized university organizations and 
activities, full or part-time students, and 
current employees of the University in the 
areas defined below provided that the activ- 
ity does not interfere with any function for 
which that space has been reserved in ad- 
vance. 

1. The Central Mall. 

2. Physical education and intramural field 
between University Boulevard and park- 
ing area 1. 

3. Athletic practice fields east of Byrd 

Stadium. 

4. North Mall between Campus Drive and 

Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

5. South Mall between Regents Drive and 

Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 
All activities in these areas must be conducted 
so as to avoid interference with the regularly sched- 
uled functions of the library and/or classrooms ad- 
jacent to the area and in compliance with the pro- 
visions contained in 2g. 1-8. 

Failure to reserve space will not invalidate 



Genera/ In ( ormation 



23 



the privilege of conducting the appropriate 
activity. However, in the event of two or 
more groups desiring to use a given space, 
an approved space reservation will take 
precedence over an unscheduled activity. 
If two or more groups desire a space when 
no reservation has been made, the first 
come, first served principle will apply. 

b. Recognized University organizations and 
activities, full or part-time students, and 
current employees of the University who 
wish to schedule a demonstration, "teach- 
in," rally, or equivalent activity, may request 
the space through the facilities reservation 
procedure up to 24 hours in advance. Dem- 
onstrations will be permitted in the locations 
outlined in 2a. above unless the space has 
previously been reserved or is in use for 
academic activities or intercollegiate ath- 
letic team practices. Demonstrations may 
be held at other locations on the campus 
subject to approval by the Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs in consultation with the 
Student Life Committee. Students who parti- 
cipate in demonstrations which have not 
been approved may be considered in viola- 
tion of University policy. (Except as pro- 
vided in 2a. above). 

c. Demonstrations, rallies or "teach-ins" may 
be conducted in or adjacent to any residen- 
tial building with the specific written con- 
currence of the student government of the 
unit or area concerned. Any such rallies, 
demonstrations or "teach-ins" which may 
be authorized by the appropriate student 
government must conform to the general 
procedures contained in 2g, 1-8. 

d. Demonstrations in the form of parades on 
streets may be conducted with the specific 
approval of route and time secured 48 hours 
in advance from the University Public Safety 
and Security Office. 

e. Although groups may sponsor or organize 

demonstrations, rallies, "teach-ins," or 
picketing activities, the fact of groups spon- 
sorship or organization in no way relieves 
individuals of the responsibility for their 
own conduct, and each individual partici- 
pating in such activities is accountable for 
compliance with the provisions of this policy. 

f. Persons not members of the University stu- 
dent body, faculty or staff may participate 
in demonstrations, rallies, picketing, teach- 
ins or equivalent activities only upon invita- 
tion by a bonafide student, faculty or staff 
member. All non-students are obligated to 
the terms of this policy during participation 
in such activities. Since persons not stu- 
dents, faculty or staff members are not sub- 
ject to University discipline procedures, 
failure to comply with terms of this policy 
may result in action under terms of appropri- 
ate Maryland law. 

g- In addition to the above provisions, the fol- 
lowing guidelines will apply to all dem- 
onstrations. 



1. Reasonable access to and exit from any 
office or building must be maintained 
the right of way on public streets and 
sidewalks will be maintained. 

2. Demonstrators will not attempt to force 
the cancellation or interruption of any 
event sponsored by a University office 
or by a faculty or student group or by 
any group authorized to use University 
facilities. 

3. Classes or other educational activities 
in classroom buildings and the library 
will not be disrupted. 

4. The use of public address systems, loud- 
speakers, etc., in the vicinity of aca- 
demic and residence buildings will fol- 
low procedures set forth above. 

5. Demonstrations may be carried on in- 
side of University buildings only as pro- 
voided in Sections 2C and 4 or with 
approval of the Facilities Use Committee 
as outlined in the University General 
and Academic Regulations. 

6. Where an invited speaker is the object 
of protest, students and faculty may 
demonstrate OUTSIDE the building 
where the lecture will take place. Dem- 
onstrators who wish to enter the build- 
ing must do so as members of the audi- 
ence and must give the speaker a re- 
spectful hearing. Signs, placards or 
other paraphernalia associated with a 
demonstration will not be carried into 
the building. 

7. University property must be protected at 
all times. 

8. The safety and well being of members of 

the University community collectively 
and individually, must be protected at 
all times. 
H. Complaints received from users of the 
Library or classrooms adjacent to the de- 
fined areas (2a.) will be grounds for disci- 
plinary action against individuals and/or 
groups sponsoring or participating in rallies, 
"teach-ins" or demonstrations in these 
areas. 

III. GUIDELINES FOR DEMONSTRATIONS IN 
CONNECTION WITH PLACEMENT PROGRAMS 

a. Anyone wishing to question or protest the 
on-campus presence of any recruiting or- 
ganization should contact the Director of 
Placement or his representative in ad- 
vance. 

b. Should any member of the University Com- 
munity wish to discuss or protest the in- 
ternal policies of any recruiting organiza- 
tion, the Director of Placement must be con- 
tacted for assistance in communicating di- 
rectly with the appropriate representatives 
of said organization. 

c. Demonstration guidelines outlined in Sec- 
tion 2g, 1-8 are applicable. 

d. Demonstrations in conjunction with place- 
ment programs conducted in the Placement 
Service's Cumberland Hall facility or other 
facility shall be considered not to infringe 
upon the rights of others and the normal 
functioning of placement programs pro- 
vided that demonstrations are conducted 
outside of the facility and do not interfere 



24 



General Information 



with free and open access to Placement and 
Credentials Services facilities by those stu- 
dents, faculty, staff, and visitors who wish 
to conduct business within the framework 
of established placement programs. 

IV. SPECIAL GUIDELINES PERTAINING TO THE 
STUDENT UNION 

a. No demonstrations, rallies, "teach-ins" or 
equivalent activities may be held in the 
lobies or corridors of the Student Union. 

b. Demonstrations may be held in assigned 
rooms of the Student Union by recognized 
student organizations following procedures 
for reserving space which have been out- 
lined by the Student Union Board. 

V. GUIDELINES FOR PICKETING 

a. Legal Rights and Limitations. 

Orderly picketing is a legally established 
form of expression which recognizes the in- 
dividuals' right of free expression subject 
only to such reasonable limitations as are 
imposed by state legislation and University 
regulations. These limitations are intended 
to protect the rights of the picketer, the stu- 
dent body, and the public with particular 
concern for safety, preservation of normal 
academic life and order, and the protection 
of persons and property. 

b. Conduct of Picketers. 

1. Picketers are subject to those regulations 
listed above in Section II, G, 1-8. 

2. Picketers will not disrupt any University 
activity by making excessive noise in 
the vicinity of any University building. 

3. The University Health Service is off- 

limits to picketers because special 
silence and other welfare and safety 
factors are involved. 

VI. ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES 

It is a general expectation that individuals and 
groups will abide by the behavioral guidelines es- 
tablished by this policy statement. Compliance with 
these minimal standards for responsible conduct is 
a necessary condition for maintaining a campus at- 
mosphere in which dissent and demonstrations are 
viewed as important aspects of the University's edu- 
cational program. 

Reports of violations by undergraduate students 
will be referred to the Judiciary Office of the Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs and reports of viola- 
tions by graduate students will be referred to the 
Vice President for Graduate Studies and Research. 
Actions taken by these offices will follow procedures 
set forth in this handbook. 

When violations continue beyond the enforce- 
ment capabilities of the University staff, such out- 
side assistance as is necessary may be requested. 
These requests will be made in accordance with 
policy and procedures established bv the Univer- 
sity. 

DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS 

DISCIPLINARY REPRIMAND 

A disciplinary reprimand is written noti- 
fication from a University official to a stu- 
dent containing a warning that repeated in- 
fractions of regulations may result in more 
severe disciplinary action. A record of the 



writing the letter and in the Student Affairs 
Judiciary Office. The student's parents may 
be notified. 

2. CONDUCT PROBATION 

This action involves a period of time, not 
to exceed one year, in which a student is re- 
quired to show a positive change in behav- 
ior. In addition, conditions and restrictions 
may be imposed, including revocation of 
specific privileges and recommendations for 
counseling interviews with the Judiciary Of- 
fice. The student's parents may be notified. 
A violation of conduct probation may be the 
basis for more severe disciplinary action. 

3. DISMISSAL FROM UNIVERSITY HOUSING 

In the case of a serious violation of 
house rules, residence hall probation, or 
housing regulations, a student may be dis- 
missed from University housing for a speci- 
fied period of time. Such dismissal results in 
a percentage room and board refund, accord- 
ing to the regular University refund policy. 



4. DISCIPLINARY PROBATION 

This action involves a period of time, not 
to exceed one year, during which a student 
who has been involved in a disciplinary situ- 
ation (or repeated violations) is given an op- 
portunity to prove that he can become a re- 
sponsible and effective member of the Uni- 
versity community. 

(a.) In deciding upon the action of disciplin- 
ary probation, a judicial board may subject 
the activities of the student to any one, or 
more, of the following conditions: 

1. A student on disciplinary probation 
may not represent the University in any 
extracurricular activities such as inter- 
collegiate athletics, debate teams, Uni- 
versity Theatre, or band; however, he may 
participate in informal activities of a rec- 
reational nature sponsored by the Univer- 
sity. 

2. A student on disciplinary probation 
may not run for or hold office in any or- 
ganization that is recognized by the Ad- 
junct Committee on Student Activities. 

3. The student's activities may be re- 
stricted in other ways which pertain to the 
type of offense. 

4. The student may be required to make 
restitution or repairs. 

a. When a student has been placed on 
disciplinary probation, the Office will of- 
ficially notify the student of the decision 
and will indicate that any violation of his 
probationary status may result in suspen- 
sion or expulsion. The Judiciary Office 
will inform appropriate University author- 
ities of the disciplinary action and may 
notify the student's parents. 

b. If a student is found guilty by a judical 



General Information 



25 



board of any infraction of University regu- 
lations during his probationary period, the 
board may recommend that he be sus- 
pended or expelled from the University. 

c. At the end of the probation period, the 
student's case will be reviewed by the 
Judiciary Office. If all conditions of the 
disciplinary action have been met satis- 
factorily, the student will be considered 
in good standing, behaviorally. 

5. SUSPENSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A student's suspension from the Univer- 
sity shall be for an indefinite period of time. 
However, the Judicial Board recommending 
this action must specify the date at which 
he subsequently may apply to the Judiciary 
Office for readmission, and in no case will 
this date be later than one year after the 
effective date of the suspension. The aca- 
demic record of the student will not in any 
case affect this application for readmission 
after suspension for disciplinary reasons. All 
recommendations for suspension must be ap- 
proved by the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs. Parents are notified in all cases. 

During the period of suspension, the stu- 
dent may not participate in any University- 
sponsored activity or in the activities of any 
recognized University organization. In addi- 
tion, he will be denied all other rights and 
privileges which are accorded to students in 
good standing. 

a. Suspended Suspension by Vice Chancel- 
lor for Student Affairs 
1. Suspension is withheld pending care- 
ful evaluation of a student's behavior 
during a probationary period not to ex- 
ceed one year. If the student is involved 
in any further offense, this suspension of 
disciplinary action may be summarily re- 
voked by the Vice President and the 
original decision of suspension from the 
University enforced, 
b. Deferred Suspension by Vice President 
for Student Affairs 

This is a suspension which becomes ef- 
fective after a specific future date. It is 
normally used near the end of a semester 
to avoid financial penalty that would be 
entailed by an immediate suspension. 
Probationary status will exist during this 
period identical to suspended suspen- 
sion. 

6. TEMPORARY SUSPENSION 

When in the judgment of the Vice Chan- 
cellor for Student Affairs, or his designated 
representative, teaching or research activi- 
ties, administrativefunctions, extracurricular 
programs, or other authorized activities on 
University premises are obstructed or dis- 
rupted by a student's behavior and when 
such behavior is continued beyond a request 
that it be terminated, the Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs, or his designated repre- 
sentative, may temporarily suspend that 
student for a period not to exceed seven (7) 
calendar days. Effective immediately, the 
student's activities are subject to the re- 
strictions set forth under regular suspen- 
sion. 



A report of the student's behavior and of 
the suspension action will be forwarded to 
the Judiciary Office. Referral then will be 
made to the appropriate judicial board, which 
must provide a hearing for the student in- 
volved not later than (7) calendar days after 
the effective date of the temporary suspen- 
sion. Referral and hearing procedures will be 
the same prescribed for any other disciplin- 
ary situation. 

If the decision of the judicial board rec- 
ommends disciplinary action less severe than 
suspension, the period of temporary suspen- 
sion shall automatically terminate. If the 
board's decision recommends either suspen- 
sion or expulsion, the temporary suspension 
shall continue during any period of appellate 
review. In either case, normal channels for 
appealing the board's decision will be open 
for use by the student involved. 

If the student is found not guilty, he will 
be permitted to make up all academic work 
missed during the period of his temporary 
suspension. 
7. EXPULSION FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

This is the most serious penalty and re- 
sults in a complete separation of the rela- 
tions between the University and the stu- 
dent. Parents are informed and permanent 
notification appears on the student's official 
transcript. Expulsion must be approved by 
the President of the University. 

APPEALS 

Any disciplinary decision may be appealed to 
the next higher disciplinary unit. The highest board 
of appeal is the Adjunct Committee on Student 
Discipline of the University Senate. An appeal must 
be made through the Judiciary Office or through 
the Dean who is responsible for the administration 
of the decision being appealed. It will be forwarded 
to the appropriate judicial board for review. The 
appeal must be in writing, must indicate the basis 
for the appeal, and must be made within ten days 
of the date the student was notified of the decision 
which he is appealing. In hearing an appeal, the 
next higher disciplinary unit may affirm or reduce 
the original decision or may return the decision 
to the lower board for reconsideration. 



STUDENT DISCIPLINARY RECORDS 

All disciplinary actions by the judicial boards 
are reported to the Judiciary Office of the Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs where they will be 
recorded. All records of disciplinary action, except 
those resulting from explulsion, will remain confi- 
dential, will be segregated from the student's aca- 
demic record, and will not be available to un- 
authorized persons on campus, or to any person off 
campus, without the express consent of the stu- 
dent involved, except under legal compulsion or in 
cases where the safety of persons or property is 
involved. 

Except in cases where the student has de- 
manded a public hearing, disciplinary action is con- 
fidential; and no member of a judicial board may 
disclose any information concerning the hearing, 
the student's prior disciplinary record, the current 
disciplinary action taken, or any information as to 
the voting. Any public release of information con- 



26 



General Information 



cerning disciplinary action will be issued only by 
the Judiciary Office. According to a policy estab- 
listed by the Adjunct Committee on Student Disci- 
pline, names of students involved in disciplinary 
action may not be printed in campus publications 
and may not be made public. Any judicial board 
may recommend that no publicity of any nature be 
released by the Judiciary Office on a case if cir- 
cumstances so warrant. 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE POLICY 
AND PROCEDURES 

POLICY 

Regulations forbid unauthorized possession, use, 
or distribution of alcoholic beverages on or in 
University property. University policy is consistent 
with State and County laws and restricts ON- 
CAMPUS use of alcoholic beverages in specified 
areas. 
Interpretation 

1. Age-Students under 21 years of age may not 

possess, consume, or distribute alcoholic bever- 
ages. 

2. LICENSING— At this time Prince George's Coun- 
ty will not authorize a temporary license to any 
student organization. This refusal is based on 
the impossibility of ascertaining that all mem- 
bers of the student organization are citizens 
over 21 years of age. The present policy, in fact, 
means that: 

a. Individual drinking (individuals over 21) is 
no problem. 

b. Events of a "Bring Your Own Bottle" na- 

ture are possible. 

c. Events where alcoholic beverages are dis- 

pensed free to anyone over 21 are pos- 
sible. 

d. Events where donations are asked for 
alcoholic beverages are possible, when 
the donations are voluntary. (CAUTION: 
the providers of the beverage may in no 
no way force a donation.) 

e. Events dispensing alcoholic beverages 
for profit are prohibited. There may not 
not be direct sale of liquor without a 
license, nor may there be an admission 
charge for the event. 

3. RESTRICTED AREAS— Alcoholic beverages 
may not be possessed, consumed, or distri- 
buted in any academic facility, except where 
specific, written approval has been obtained 
for the event from the individual or depart- 
ment responsible for the operation of that 
facility. This restriction applies to all dining 
halls, cafeteria, classroom and office build- 
ings, libraries, laboratories, administrative 
buildings, and athletic facilities. 



When planning an event where alcoholic bever- 
ages will be brought in by the individual consum- 
ers, or will be given away, or where donations will be 
invited, the following procedures should be fol- 
lowed: 

1. Receive written approval for the use of your 

facility— in the residence areas check for 
any local restrictions established by unit 
governments. 

2. Secure and complete the Registration Of A 

Student Social Event form in the Student 



Activities Office. (Rm. 142— Student Union) 
3. Secure and complete the Alcoholic Beverage 
Registration form which names the person 
responsible for the event. 

USE OF SPACE AND UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 



1. FACILITIES USE COMMITTEE 

Allocation of the use of space and supporting 
services is administered by the Facilities Use Com- 
mittee. General regulations for the use of space is 
described in this section. For detailed information 
call campus telephone extension 2233 for referral 
to proper authorities for coordination of the re- 
quest. Space and Service Reservation form (PP- 
47-R) is required in most instances. This blank 
may be obtained in the Department of the Physical 
Plant, South Administration Building, Room 3. In- 
formation regarding fees charged for use of space 
or services is available through this office. 

Requests by University-approved student, fac- 
ulty, and staff organizations: 

a. Space desired should be reserved through 

the office of the Director of Physical Plant 
in the North Administration Building except: 

1 Reservations for facilities in the Center of 

Adult Education must be made with the 
office of the Director of the Center, cam- 
pus telephone extension 2325 or 1612. 

2 Reservations for facilities in the Student 
Union must be made with office of the 
Manager of the Student Union, campus 
telephone extension 2801. 

b. Space reservations by students are restricted 

to student organizations approved by the Stu- 
dent Life Committee. 

2. REQUESTS BY OTHER THAN UNIVERSITY 
ORGANIZATIONS 

a. Inquiries for the use of certain facilities and 
program planning assistance by scientific, 
civic, technical, professional, governmental 
and industrial groups may be directed to the 
office of the Director of Conferences and 
Institutes, campustelephoneextension 2322. 
The majority of programs of this nature are 
conducted in the University College Center 
of Adult Education. 

b. The University cannot consider itself bound 

to accommodate off-campus programs un- 
less proposals have been approved by proper 
authorities. 

3. GENERAL REGULATIONS TO BE OBSERVED IN 
REQUESTING OR USING SPACE 

a. All requests for the use of space should be 

COMPLETED five calendar days in advance 
of the date of the proposed meeting to per- 
mit consideration of alternate dates and to 
enable various University services to be co- 
ordinated. This includes, in addition to build- 
ings, outside events held on the mall, park- 
ing lots, fields, etc. 

b. Persons, accepting the assignment of space 
for a meeting must accept the responsibility 
for the conduct of the audience; for leaving 
the facility secure and in a clean and order- 
ly fashion; for any damage to University 
property caused by the group; for the finan- 
cial obligations arising from the use of the 



General Information 27 



facility such as cleaning, repair, and use of 
University properties. 

c. The safety requirements of the University 

must be strictly observed in all matters per- 
taining to the use of buildings. The Super- 
visor of Safety in the office of the Depart- 
ment of Physical Plant will advise on the use 
of decorations, fire regulations, and safety 
precautions. Fire guards are required for 
events at which 500 or more persons are to 
be present. 

d. The group is responsible for closing all win- 

dows and turning off all lights at the con- 
clusion of the meeting. If the space used is 
normally locked, police should be notified 
upon termination of meeting. 

e. Publicizing functions or meetings will be 

confined to bulletin boards. 

f. Any organization which fails to discharge the 

above responsibilities will jeopardize its privi- 
lege for using facilities for meetings in the 
future. 

g. The use of public address systems, loud- 
speakers, etc. in the vicinity of an academic 

building must follow procedures outlined 
above. 

4. PARTIAL LIST OF MEETIN G SPACES AVAILABLE 
Agriculture Auditorium, Symons Hall. Capacity 150. 

Reserved for large meetings. 
Armory Main Floor. Capacity 3300. 

This space to be coordinated with the Depart- 
ment of Air Science, the Director of Men's Intra- 
murals Programs, and the Dean of College of Physi- 
cal Education, Recreation and Health. No vehicles 
may be used or exhibited on the floor due to safety 
regulations. There will be no selling or serving of 
drinks of any kind on the main floor lobby. 
Armory Lecture Hall Ar-44. Capacity 352. 
Botany E-1. H. J. Patterson Hall. Capacity 300. Air 

Conditioned. 
Botany E-201. H. J. Patterson Hall. Capacity 140. 

Air Conditioned. 
BPA Auditorium Q-29. Capacity 506. Air Conditioned. 
Center of Adult Education. Air Conditioned. 

This space coordinated with the Director of the 
Center during any 90 day period. Programs sched- 
uled in advance of 90 days of the date of the event 
are coordinated with the Director of Conferences 
and Institutes. This building has overnight guest 
rooms, meeting rooms, coffee shop, dining room and 
banquet facilities. Nominal charges are made for all 
facilities. 

Central Auditorium, Skinner Building, T-21. Capac- 
ity 366. Air Conditioned. 

William P. Cole, Jr. Student Activities Building. 
Capacity 12,005 fixed seats; with floor seats 14,000. 

This space coordinated with the Director of Ath- 
letics and the Dean of the College of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation and Health. 
Coliseum. Main Floor. Capacity 2,250. 

This space to be coordinated with the Dean of 
the College of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health and the Director of Intramural Program. 
Dining Hall 

Special arrangements for dinner groups may be 
made. Limited facilities available. This facility coor- 
dinated with the Director of University Food Service. 
Drake Lecture Hall, C-130. Capacity 374. Air Condi- 
tioned. 

Drake Lecture Hall, C-132. Capacity 132. Air Con- 
ditioned. 



Fine Arts Theatre. Capacity 1350. Air Conditioned. 

A basic service charge will be made to cover sup- 
porting services. Audiovisual facilities by special 
arrangement. Use of these facilities must be coor- 
dinated with the Department of Speech and drama- 
tic Arts. 

Fine Arts Lecture Hall, NN-214. Capacity 200. Air 
Conditioned. 

Foreign Language, LL-12. Capacity 112. 
Francis Scott Key Hall, Lecture Hall, RR-6. Capacity 
262. Air Conditioned. 

Physics Lecture Hall. Capacity 500. Air Conditioned. 
Shoemaker Building, N-201. Capacity 226. 
Shoemaker Building, N-204. Capacity 267. 

Student Union 

It is the University policy to assign meeting 
space in the Student Union Building for all student 
and faculty organizations, as far as it is practical to 
do so. This building has available a total of ten 
meeting rooms varying in capacity from 25 to 600. 
No charge will be made for any student, faculty or 
staff organization that wishes to meet in the Stu- 
dent Union Building. Special charges for dances 
and other extra services may be necessary. Depart- 
ments desiring to schedule conferences for business 
or professional groups should contact the office of 
the Director of the Student Union concerning costs 
and availability of the building, campus telephone 
extension 2801. 

Located in the building are lounges for relaxa- 
tion, television room, music lounge, fine arts gallery, 
mimeograph, poster and plastic sign service, check 
cashing service, browsing library, billiards room, 
bowling alleys, coffee shop, newsstand, student sup- 
ply store, public telephones, and the campus ticket 
box office. 
University Chapel 

East Chapel, Capacity 1,200. 

West Chapel, Capacity 140. 

Conference Room, Capacity 24. 

Available for devotional services only. Marri- 
ages, christenings, and the like permitted. Reser- 
vations may be made with the Office of Student 
Life, campus telephone extension 2925. 



REGULATIONS AND SERVICE FEES FOR THE 

USE OF UNIVERSITY PROPERTY 

(Available from the Department of Physical Plant) 

Items of University property such as chairs, 
tables, stages, platforms, decorations, flags, potted 
palms, pianos, and similar equipment are frequently 
needed by individuals or groups for meetings, social 
functions or other types of programs. These items 
are available, in limited quantities, under the condi- 
tions described below: 

(a.) The use of such property is restricted to the 

following: 

1. Student groups registered with the 

proper University authorities and recog- 
nized as official University organiza- 
tions. 

2. Faculty and staff groups whose status is 

recognized by the University administra- 
tion. 

3. Groups sponsored by the Division of Con- 

ferences and Institutes of the University 
College. 

4. Groups sponsored by the College of Agri- 
culture. 



28 



General Information 



5. Organizationsaffi Mated with the University 

of Maryland, authorized and approved by 
the administration. 

6. Events approved by the Facilities Use Com- 

mittee. 

7. Individuals and groups coordinating an ap- 

proved event. 

b. The use of University property is not normally 

available to individual students, faculty or 
staff members. 

c. Requests and arrangements for use of Univer- 

sity property should be made at the time the 
Space Services Reservation Form, PP-47R, is 
submitted and indicated on the reserse side 
of the form. Information concerning the prop- 
erty requested may be obtained by calling 
the Service Supervisor, campus extension 
3434. Organizations paying a service fee for 
the use of space must negotiate separately 
for particular items at the time the Space 
and Services Reservation Form is submitted. 

d. Requests for services and properties must be 
completed five calendar days prior to the 
event to give sufficient notice for arranging 
work. 

e. Facilities and equipment are committed in the 
order reservations are accepted. 

f. The University cannot assume responsibility 

for supplying items which are not available 
upon application. 

g. It shall be the responsibility of the using 
group to return property in good condition 
and/or make restitution to the University for 
any damage or loss occurring while assigned 
to the group. 

h. Service Fees: 

Estimates for use and set-up of property 
items (chairs, tables, public address systems, 
etc.) are available from the Service Super- 
visor, campus extension 3434. Estimates for 
general labor and tradesmen are also avail- 
able from the Service Supervisor. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

RECOGNIZED ORGANIZATIONS AND 
ACTIVITIES 

Two types of student organizations are eligible 
for recognition. They are (I) Recognized Organiza- 
tions and (II) Recognized Activities. 

I. Recognized Organizations 

A. A group of students may organize by filing 

a constitution for recognition by SGA. 

B. Recognized organizations may file for 
use of SGA funds. 

II. Recognized Activities 

A. A group of students may form an activity 
without filing for constitutional approval 
from SGA. 

B. An activity need merely file for recog- 

nition by SGA, submitting the purpose of 
the activity, its name, and responsible 
students and/or faculty. 

C. An activity is not eligible for SGA funds. 

D. Activities may be short-term organiza- 
tions. 

E. Activities may be composed of students 
who want to organize informally. 

F- Responsibilities of activities are the 
same as those of organizations, under 
the General Regulations. In addition, a 



non-discrimination statement must be 
filed with the Director of Student Activi- 
ties before recognition is granted. 
Recognized organizations, activities and other 
groups may use Student Union facilities when space 
is available. The priority for use of available space 
will be in descending order: recognized organiza- 
tions, recognized activities, and other groups. 
REGISTRATION OF UNIVERSITY EVENTS 
ON-CAMPUS UNIVERSITY EVENTS 

The primary purpose of registration of on-cam- 
pus university events is to facilitate the use of 
University facilities and better coordinate the Uni- 
versity calendar. Thus, the only on-campus events 
which must be registered are those which require 
the use of facilities which have to be reserved 
through the Physical Plant Office. In these cases 
events must be registered with both the Activities 
Coordinator, Office of Student Activities (Rm. 142 
Student Union Building) and the Physical Plant 
Office (South Administration Building). 

OFF-CAMPUS UNIVERSITY EVENTS. 

Broad invitation University-sponsored events 
held off-campus, such as class proms, must be 
registered with the Activities Coordinator (Rm. 142 
Student Union Building). 

All events both on and off-campus where there 
will be alcohol must be registered with the Activi- 
ties Coordinator. (See following section.) 

NOTE: A staff member (or members) are re- 
quired at all registered social events. This 
staff member may be from the University 
Housing Office, a faculty member of gradu- 
ate assistant, or a member of the adminis- 
tration. Parents of students may also serve 
in this capacity. 

PROCEDURES FOR SCHEDULING 
LARGE EVENTS 

Register date on calendar in the Office of the 
Activities Coordinator (Room 142, Student Union 
Building). 

Read the section of Academic Regulations re- 
lating to Social Functions, Reservation of 
Space, and Advertising. 

Reserve a room and arrange for its physical set- 
up through the Office of the Department of 
Physical Plant, South Administration Building 
(if held on campus). In some cases the room 
or building must first be cleared by the person 
in charge of that building. 



Cole Activities Building 

Armory 

Ritchie Coliseum 

Maryland Room 

Chapel 



Alfred Hanlon— Ext. 2121 
Frank Fellows— Ext. 2751 
Nick Kovalakides— Ext. 2124 
Mrs. Khoury— Ext. 2133 
Mrs. Fields— Ext. 2925 



After this first approval, however, final ap- 
proval must still be obtained from the Office 
of the Department of Physical Plant, South Ad- 
ministration Building. 

CHARITABLE AND SERVICE PROJECT 
REGISTRATION 

A. Charitable and service project solicita- 
tion on campus is limited to recognized 
University Activities and organizations. 
Outside organizations are prohibited 



General Information 



29 



from requesting contributions of funds 
or materials from students, student or- 
ganizations, staff and/or faculty mem- 
bers. Requests for funds should be di- 
rected to the Campus Chest Council. 

B. Project proposals for charitable events, 
projects and drives, including a state- 
ment of projected expenses, must be 
registered with the Director, Community 
Service Programs (rm. 136, Student 
Union Building) one week in advance of 
the planned date of the project. Because 
of the nature of certain events, all chari- 
table projects need not necessarily be 
limited to Campus Chest Week. The 
sponsoring University organization must 
have sufficient financial resources to 
provide for the possibility of an unsuc- 
cessful event. The dollar value of any 
prizes and trophies offered should be 
compatible with the expected financial 
return of the project. 

C Activities and organizations may hold as 
many charitable fund raising events as 
they wish, provided these events are 
intra-organizational, i.e., events con- 
fined solely to the organizational mem- 
bership. Events of this nature do not 
need to be registered. 

D. An activity or organization may hold one 
charitable fund raising event a semester 
which involves individuals other than 
the membership of the organization. 

E. Organizational solicitation of other 

groups, i.e., not individuals, for charit- 
able contributions, is permitted pending 
approval by the Campus Chest Council. 
An accurate financial report must be 
submitted to the Campus Chest Council 
within three (3) weeks after the conclu- 
sion of the event. A statement of receipt 
of monies by the selected recipient of 
collected funds must accompany the 
financial statement. 

R Organizational solicitation of University 
groups for materials or services is per- 
mitted, pending approval by the Campus 
Chest Council. 

G. Solicitation of individuals either directly 
or by contribution containers is prohib- 
ited. 

H. University organizations soliciting off- 
campus must work through existing 
community organizations and charities. 
Door-to-door solicitation must always 
occur in connection with national or 
community organizations and charities. 
They may offer their assistance in road- 
blocks to existing community organiza- 
tions or charities during national or com- 
munity drives. In such instances, the 
community must assume the responsi- 
bilities of clearing the project with the 
appropriate law enforcement agency. 
I. University organizations may not hold 
off-campus roadblocks without com- 
munity sponsorship. During Campus 
Chest Week, Alpha Phi Omega will be 
responsible for the coordination of all 
roadblocks. They will obtain permission 
of the sponsored charity and approval of 
the police responsible for the area in 



which the roadblock is to be held. 
J. On-campus roadblocks may not be held. 
Exceptions to the above rules may be 
granted by Campus Chest Council. 

FUND-RAISING EVENTS REGISTRATION 

A fund-raising event or money-making activity 
is defined as any project the primary purpose of 
which is the acquisition of money or real property 
to be used for the prime purpose of the sponsor- 
ing student organization or an agency or person 
of their choosing. All projects which involve ticket- 
selling and/or charge admission and fund-raising 
must be registered with the Director, Community 
Service Programs (Rm 136. Student Union Build- 
ing), and approved by the Campus Chest Council 
one week prior to the event. 

Each recognized student activity and student 
organization is allowed one campus-wide money- 
making activity each semester. 

Direct solicitation of individuals is prohibited. 

Organizations may hold an unlimited number 
of fund-raising events within their own member- 
ship. Such activities do not have to be registered 
or approved by the Department of Student Activi- 
ties. 

The estimated expenses of the money-raising 
event should not exceed the money or real prop- 
erty which the sponsoring organization can pledge 
and the funds which the SGA may reserve to it 
altogether with the balance of a conservative esti- 
mate of the gross receipts the Department of 
Student Activities places on the affair. 

All professional talent, excluding professional 
athletics, can be sponsored only by recognized 
student organizations and established faculty and 
administrative committees. An itemized budget for 
the event should accompany any request for ap- 
proval. All contracts must be signed by the Cul- 
tural Coordinator of the Department of Student 
Activities. 

The following regulations govern money-making 
events of a "Presents" nature (presentation of pro- 
fessional talent). All entertainment brought into the 
University and performed at Cole Field House will 
be termed "Presents Programs" and will fall under 
the Department of Student Activities, specifically, 
the Cultural Coordinator. 

1. Profits from all such student sponsored af- 
fairs shall be divided as follows: 

a. 60 per cent of the sponsoring organiza- 

tion's reserve fund to be used for educa- 
tional programs such as leadership de- 
velopment, community service programs, 
scholarships, etc. 

b. 20 per cent to the sponsoring organiza- 

tion's operating budget. 

c. 10 per cent to the SGA Cultural Commit- 

tee to be put toward the sponsoring of a 
cultural program free to the students. 

d. 10 per cent to the Student Union Board 
toward the sponsoring of a SUB concert 
free to the students. 

2. Four major "Presents" programs will be held 
during the academic year. Prime times are 
during the months of October, November, 
February and April providing there is space 
available on the University Calendar and 
suitable entertainment can be obtained. 



30 



General Information 



3. The four major "Presents" programs will be 

sponsored by the following campus organiza- 
tions: 

University Commuters Association 

Interfraternity Council 

Panhellenic Council 

Residence Halls Association 

4. A fifth "Presents" program will be possible 

subject to the approval of the Cultural Co- 
ordinator, depending on the purpose of the 
program, its feasibility with reference to the 
University calendar and the Cultural Coordi- 
nator's schedule and available time. 

5. The reserve fund accrued from such affairs 

must be deposited in: 

a. A bank 

b. A Federally insured savings 

and loan association 

c. The University's endowment 

fund 

6. After each event an itemized financial state- 

shall be prepared as soon as possible and 
placed on file in the Student Activities Of- 
fice to be available to interested students. 

7. Any artist or professional production or book- 

ing personnel will be contacted by the Cul- 
tural Coordinator only. Booking agents will 
be engaged at a flat rate to be included in 
the original budget. 

8. A permanent list of who is to receive com- 

plimentary tickets will be developed at the 
start of each academic year. The sponsor- 
ing organization may give out additional tic- 
kets at its own discretion. Guests will be 
notified prior to each performance of the 
availability of complimentary tickets. 



FRATERNITY RUSH REGULATIONS 

1. Pledging Requirements 

a. Any full-time male undergraduate student 

who is in good academic standing with 
the University may pledge. 

b. An individual may pledge only two conse- 

cultive semesters. If after these two 
semesters a pledge does not meet the 
academic requirements for initiation, he 
shall be dropped from the fraternity roll. 
Repledging may occur only after he has 
achieved at least a 2.0 cumulative aver- 
age. 
c - Any individual who is formally pledged to 
a fraternity and who elects to depledge 
will not be eligible to pledge another 
fraternity until one full semester has 
elapsed from the date of his depledging. 
d. Any individual who is depledged by a fra- 
ternity is immediately eligible for pledg- 
ing into another fraternity provided he 
meets all other requirements. 
2. Initiation Requirements 

a. Any pledge who, at the time of pledging, 

had a cumulative average of 2.0 or above 
may be initiated after ten academic 
weeks of pledging. 

b. Any student pledged with less than a 2.0 

cumulative average must attain at least 
a 2.0 average during the semester he 
pledges. 



SORORITY RUSH REGULATIONS 

1. Pledging Requirements 

a. To pledge a sorority, a girl must have at 

least a 2.2 numerical grade average from 
high school, be enrolled in the Univer- 
sity, pay the rush fee during formal rush, 
not be on probation, and not be affiliated 
with any National Panhellenic sorority. 

b. If a girl signs a preference card or pledge 

statement, she is considered pledged to 
that sorority whether or not she com- 
pletes the pledge ceremony. The pledge 
period lasts for one calendar year and 
during this time she is ineligible to 
pledge another sorority. 

c. If for some reason, the girl or the sorority 

breaks a pledge, the girl is not eligible 
to pledge any sorority or repledge until 
one calendar year from the date her 
pledge was broken. 

2. Initiation Requirements 

a. In order to be initiated into a sorority, a 
girl must have passed the previous se- 
mester with at least a 2.2 average for 
the semester and must have taken nine 
academic credit hours. Grades for phys- 
sical education are not included. 

D - A pledge with 56 academic credits at the 
beginning of her pledgeship and a 2.2 
average for the previous semester may 
be initiated after a six week period if 
not contrary to the national policy of the 
individual chapter. 

c A transfer student who has completed 
her pledgeship and met the academic 
requirements of the previous school may 
be initiated and shall be counted as an 
active member if not contrary to the 
national policy of the individual chapter. 

CAMPUS TRAFFIC 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

These regulations apply to all who drive motor 
vehicles on any part of the campus at Col- 
lege Park. 



1. PURPOSE OF TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

a. To facilitate the work of the University by 

providing parking space for those who need 
it most. 

b. To provide parking space for University visi- 

tors and guests. 

c. To protect pedestrian traffic. 

d. To assure access at all times for ambulance 

and fire-fighting apparatus. 

e. To control vehicular traffic on the Campus. 

2. REGISTRATION OF VEHICLES: 

a. All motor vehicles, including motorcycles and 

scooters, operated on campus by a person 
associated with the University, must be reg- 
istered with the University Police regardless 
of ownership, except as noted in Regulation 
2c. All student vehicles must be registered 
in the name of the student who is the legal 
operator of the vehicle. 

b. Student vehicles must be registered for the 



Genera/ Information 



31 



current academic year during the applicable 
registration period. A registration charge will 
be made for each vehicle. This charge will 
be in the amount of ten ($10.00) dollars 
during the period September 1 thru March 
31 and five ($5.00) dollars during the period 
April 1 thru August 31. This charge cannot 
be refunded. No charge will be made for re- 
placement registration stickers required due 
to damaged bumpers of a registered vehicle 
or because of purchase of a replacement for 
a registered vehicle. Remnants of stickers to 
be replaced must be turned in at the Motor 
Vehicle Registration Desk. 

c. Resident students who have completed less 

than 56 semester credits shall be prohibited 
from operating a motor vehicle on the Col- 
lege Park Campus, and from registering a 
vehicle under provisions of these regula- 
tions, except for special weekend privileges 
as provided in regulation 2d. This prohibition 
applies to any Freshman or Sophomore stu- 
dent residing within one (1) mile radius of 
the Library, providing said residence is other 
than that shown as student's legal residence 
at time of registration. 

d. Resident students who have earned less than 

56 semester credits are permitted to operate 
a motor vehicle on the College Park Campus 
during the hours from 5:00 P.M. Friday to 12 
Midnight Sunday, only. Vehicles operated on 
the Campus under provisions of this regula- 
tion must be registered in accordance with 
regulations 2a and 2b. Special "weekend" 
registration stickers will be issued. Vehicles 
displaying weekend stickers will be consider- 
ed not registered if observed on the campus 
at any time other than the specified weekend 
period. 

e. Parking permits for faculty and staff are is- 

sued initially at the time of employment. 
Subsequent renewals will be scheduled at 
times designated by the Police Department. 

f. Only one set of parking permits for each 

vehicle is authorized. 

g. Vehicles are not considered officially regis- 

tered until permits are affixed on front and 
rear bumpers. 

h. Temporary parking permits for visiting 
groups and for special reasons and condi- 
tions are available. Requests should be 
made to the Campus Police Motor Vehicle 
Registration Section— Telephone Ext. 4242. 

i- Parking permits must not be transferred to 
any vehicle other than the one for which 
they were originally issued. 

j. Parking permits must not be defaced or al- 
tered in any manner. 

3. TRAFFIC REGULATIONS: 

a. All motor vehicles are subject to University 

traffic regulations while on the University 
Campus. The University assumes no respon- 
sibility for loss or damage to private prop- 
erty. 

b. All traffic and parking signs must be obeyed. 

c. It is impossible to mark with signs all areas 

of University property where parking is pro- 



hibited. Parking or driving is definitely pro- 
hibited on grass plots, tree plots, construc- 
tion areas, or any place which will mar the 
landscaping of the campus, create a safety 
hazard, or interfere with the use of Univer- 
sity facilities. 

d. All regulations must be observed during Reg- 

istration and Examination periods, except as 
may be otherwise indicated by official signs. 
During final Examination periods and the 
Summer School session, registered vehicles 
may park in any numbered parking area ex- 
cept Areas 5, 9, and 20. 

e. Operation of any motor vehicle in such a 

manner as to create excessive noise or 
smoke, or operation of any vehicle which is 
in an unsafe condition, will result in revoca- 
tion of parking permit and issuance of a 
Maryland State Summons for violation of 
Article 66V2 Annotated Code of Maryland. 

f. Pedestrians shall have the right-of-way at all 

times. 

g. The maximum speed on campus roads is 20 

miles per hour. During changes of classes 
and in areas of pedestrian traffic cars must 
be driven more slowly. 

h. Vehicles, including motorcycles and motor 
scooters, must be parked in assigned areas 
only. Certain parking areas are restricted to 
Faculty and Academic Staff at all times. 
This restriction is indicated on the official 
sign at the entrance to the area. In all other 
parking areas, unrestricted parking for any 
vehicle registered on the Campus is permit- 
ted from 5:00P.M. to 12:00 Midnight, Monday 
thru Thursday; and from 5:00 P.M. Friday to 
12:00 Midnight Sunday. 

i. Any motor vehicle parked in violation of Uni- 
versity traffic regulations or abandoned on 
Campus is subject to removal and impound- 
ing at the expense of the owner or operator. 
(See Regulation 4c.) 

j. Specific spaces in parking areas shall not be 
reserved or marked for any department or 
individual. 

k. If an unregistered vehicle is used as an 
emergency substitute for a registered vehicle, 
it must be parked in the regularly assigned 
area and an immediate report made to the 
Motor Vehicle Registration section ext. 4242. 

I. In parking areas which have marked spaces 
and lanes, a vehicle must be parked in one 
space only, leaving clear access to adjacent 
spaces, and without blocking driving lanes 
or creating a hazard for other drivers. 

m. Parking is not permitted at crosswalks. 

n. Parking or standing is prohibited on all cam- 
pus roads at all times. 

0. In cases where individuals are permitted to 
register more than one vehicle for parking on 
the campus, only one of these vehicles may 
be parked in the assigned area at any time. 

p. Metered parking spaces must be used in ac- 
cordance with requirements as stated on of- 
ficial signs. 

q. Curbed recesses are reserved for VISITORS 
and GUESTS between the hours of 8:00 A.M. 
and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. 



32 



General Information 



r. The fact that a vehicle is parked in violation 
of any regulation and does not receive a vio- 
lation notice does not mean that the regula- 
tion is no longer in effect. 

4. TRAFFIC INFORMATION: 

a. The Office of the Campus Police is located 

in the Service Building and may be reached 
on University campus telephone ext. 3555. 

b. The Police Cashier's Office and the Motor 

Vehicle Registration Section are in the Serv- 
ice Building, campus telephone Ext. 4242. 

c. The term abandonment, as it relates to auto- 

mobiles parked on property owned or leased 
by the University of Maryland shall mean 
any one or more of the following conditions: 

(1) Any vehicle which has not been moved 
for thirty (30) days and whose owner or other 
claimant the University is unable to locate. 

(2) Any vehicle which has not been moved 
for thirty (30) days and whose identified 
owner or other claimant refuses to move 
it. 

(3) Any vehicle on which current license 
plates are not displayed and which has 
not been moved for ten (10) days. 

(4) Any vehicle which has not been moved 
in seven (7) days due to an inoperative 
condition caused by the removal of neces- 
sary parts or a wrecked condition. 

5. PENALTIES 

a. Any person connected with the University 

who operates an unregistered vehicle on the 
Campus, or who registers such a vehicle in 
any way contrary to the provisions of these 
regulations, will be subject to payment of a 
fifteen ($15.00) dollar penalty in addition to 
the penalty for any other regulation violation 
connected therewith. 

b. Violations of any campus traffic regulation 

other than improper registration or overtime 
meter parking will result in penalty of three 
($3.00) dollars for each violation. 

c. Overtime parking in an metered space will 

result in penalty of one ($1.00) dollar. 

d. Violations are payable within ten (10) calendar 

days from date of issue at the office of the 
Police Cashier in the General Services Build- 
ing and an additional penalty of $2.00 will 
be imposed for failure to settle violations on 
time. 

e. Visitors and Guests notices issued to Univer- 

sity visitors must be returned in person on 
date issued to the Office of the University 
Police at the Service Building or to the Uni- 
versity official visited; otherwise, a State 
Warrant may be issued. When returning 
notices to University official visited, the 
notice form must be signed, in the space 
provided, by the individual to whom issued. 
These violation notices may be voided at the 
discretion of the University Police. 

f. Violations involving an unregistered vehicle 

owned by a member of the immediate family 
of a student may be charged to the student's 
account unless settled by the individual re- 
ceiving the ticket, in accordance with stated 



privileges granted to Visitors and Guests, 
g. Motor Vehicle privileges will be revoked by 
action of the Campus Police in accordance 
with the following conditions: 

(1) When a student has accumulated at 
least three (3) violations on the record, 
he (she) will lose motor vehicle privi- 
leges for a period of four (4) weeks. 

(2) When a student has accumulated an 
additional two (2) violations on the record 
for a total of five (5), he (she) will lose 
motor vehicle privileges for a period of 
sixteen (16) weeks. 

(3) In each case the student will be required 
to remove the registration stickers and 
turn in remnants of the stickers to the 
Motor Vehicle Registration Section. 

(4) When the prescribed period of time for 
loss of motor vehicle privileges has 
passed, the student will be required to 
pay the regular fee for re-registration. 

(5) All conditions described in Items 1, 2, 3, 
& 4 apply to all vehicles registered by 
any student. 

h. Persistent violators of traffic regulations will 
be referred to the Judiciary Office for appro- 
priate action. 



6. APPEALS 

An Appeals Board composed of a minimum of 
three students who are members of the Student 
Traffic Board meets regularly to consider appeals 
from students charged with violations. Students 
wishing to appeal a violation will first register his 
intent to appeal to the Police Cashier in the Service 
Building, thence to the Judiciary Office, Room 218, 
North Administration Building where the date and 
time for the appeal will be furnished the appellate. 
Traffic tickets must be appealed within (10) calen- 
dar days from the date of issuance. Overtime park- 
ing meter violations are not subject to appeal. 



7. PARKING AREAS FOR STUDENTS 

Area 1— West of Activities Building between 

Stadium Drive and Campus Drive 
Area 2— North of Denton Hall Dorm Complex 
Area 3— Southwest Corner of Campus 
Area 4— North of Heavy Research Laboratory 
Area 7— East of U.S. No. 1, at North Gate 
Area 10— East of U.S. No. 1, North of Fraternity 

Row 
Area 1 1— East of Asphalt Institute Building 
Area DD— East of Space Sciences Building 
Area E— Adjacent to Engineering Buildings 
Area EE— North of Engineering Laboratory Build- 
ing 
Area F— Adjacent to Fire Service Extension 

Building 
Area G— Between Silvester Hall and Skinner 

Building 
Area GG— North of Adult Education Center 

Building 
Area H— Adjacent to Symons Hall and Holzapfel 

Hall 
Area HH— Adjacent to H. J. Patterson Hall 
Area I— Rear of Molecular Physics Building 
Area J— East of Annapolis Hall 



General Informafion 33 



8. PARKING AREAS FOR FACULTY, STAFF AND 
ASSIGNED RESIDENT STUDENTS ONLY 

Area 5— Adjacent to Family Housing Units 

Area 6— North of Dining Hall No. 5 

Area 9— Vicinity of Cambridge Hall Dorm Com- 
plex 

Area 12— South of Allegany Hall 

Area 14— Loop Roads Front and Rear of Houses 
on Fraternity Row 

Area 15— Rear 7402 Princeton Avenue 

Area 17— Special Parking for use of Center for 
Adult Education 

Area 20— Rear of Administration Building 

Area A— West End of BPA Building 

Area AA— West of Fine Arts and Education 
Classroom Building 

Area B — Adjacent to Computer Science Center 

Area BB— East end of practice field 

Area C— Adjacent to Turner Laboratory (dairy) 

Area CC— Barn area 

Area D— Rear of Journalism Building and Rear 
of Foreign Languages Building 

Area K— Adjacent to General Service Building 

Area KK— Southeast corner of Stadium & 
Regents Drive 



Area L— Administration-Armory Loop 

Area M— Adjacent to Infirmary 

Area N— Rear of J. M. Patterson Hall 

Area 0— Rear of Chemical Engineering Building 

Area P— Southwest of Wind Tunnel Building 

Area Q— Rear of Jull Hall 

Area R— Circle in front of Administration Build- 
ing at Byrd Stadium and adjacent to Prein- 
kert Field House 

Area S— Special, Food Service 

Area T— North of Engineering Laboratory Build- 
ing 

Area TT— Service Area West of Physics Building 

Area U— Rear of McKeldin Library 

Area UU— North end 3 Lot 

Area V— Open area between Building DD and 
Building EE 

Area W — Between Skinner Building and Talia- 
ferro Hall 

Area X— Rear of Chemistry Building 

Area Y— West of Chapel 

Area YY— West of Cumberland Hall 

Area Z— Between Student Activities Building and 
Student Union 



34 



Genercl Information 




&&£ 










A 



1 


1 

III 


\g 


1 


r y 




! 




.j. 


*JI 


i 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



The University reserves the right 

to change any provision or requirement 

at any time 

within the student's period of residence. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

A college education implies something more 
than an adequate technical training in the student's 
field or specialization. In order that each graduate 
with a Bachelor's degree may gain a liberal educa- 
tion as well as a specialized one, the University 
has established a General Education Requirement. 
This requirement consists of 34 semester hours of 
credit in six general fields. There is a wide choice in 
specific courses which may be used to satisfy re- 
quirements in all six of the fields except English. 
Physical Education and Health requirements for 
all students are taken in addition to this 34-hour 
group of courses. 
1. The General Education courses are as follows: 

In English (9 hours): Engl. 1— Composition or 
Engl. 21— Honors Composition; Engl. 3 and 4 — 
World Literature. 

In Fine Arts or Philosophy (3 hours), three-credit 
courses in five departments are available, as fol- 
lows: ART COURSES: 10— Introduction to Art; 60 
or 61— History of Art; 62— African Art; 65 or 66— 
Masterpieces of Painting; 67 or 68— Masterpieces of 
Sculpture; 70 or 71— Masterpieces of Architecture. 
DANCE COURSES: 32— Introduction to Dance; 182 
or 183— History of Dance; 184— Theory and Philos- 
ophy of Dance. MUSIC COURSE: 20— Survey of Mu- 
sic Literature. DRAMATIC ART COURSES: 16— In- 
troduction to the Theatre; 114— The Film as an Art 
Form. PHILOSOPHY COURSES: 1— Introduction to 



Philosophy; 41— Elementary Logic and Semantics; 
45— Ethics; 52— Philosophy in Literature; 53— Phil- 
osophy of Religion; 56— Philosophy of Science; 
147— Philosophy of Art; 152— Philosophy of His- 
tory; 154 — Political and Social Philosophy. 

In History (6 hours), any combination of history 
courses (except state history) for which the student 
is eligible. 

In Mathematics (3 hours), any course carrying 
credit of three or more hours for which the student 
is eligible will satisfy this University requirement. 
(Note, however, that some curricula require higher- 
numbered sequences than those for which the stu- 
dent is eligible at the time of his admission; while 
other sequences may be open only to students reg- 
istered in specified curricula.) Students in science 
curricula will usually satisfy this requirement auto- 
matically. 

In Science (7 hours), students are required to 
take one course in a physical science and one 
course in a biological science; one of these must be 
a laboratory (4-hour) course. The physical sciences 
for this purpose are Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, 
and Physics; biological sciences are Biology, Botany, 
Entomology, and Zoology. Students whose cur- 
ricula include seven or more hours of physical or 
biological science are not required to take additional 
courses to meet this distribution requirement. The 
non-science student may register for a basic course 
or any higher course for which he is eligible by 
placement, rerequisite, and class standing. 

In Social Science (6 hours), two courses may be 
chosen from nine fields: Agricultural Economics 40 
—Environment and Human Ecology; Anthropology 1 
—Introduction to Anthropology; Economics 31— 
Principles of Economics, or Economics 37— Funda- 



General Information 



37 



mentals of Economics; General Education 60— Intro- 
duction to Interdisciplinary Urban Study; Geography 
1— Introduction to Geography; Government and Poli- 
tics 3— Principles of Government and Politics, or 
Government and Politics 101— International Politi- 
cal Relations; Psychology 1 —Introduction to Psy- 
chology; Radio and Television 24— Mass Communi- 
cation in the Twentieth Century; or Sociology 1— In- 
troduction to Sociology. The two courses must be in 
different fields. 

2. It should be emphasized that the 34 semester 
hours of General Education courses constitute a 
University requirement, applicable to all students 
receiving a Bachelor's degree from the University of 
Maryland. Individual colleges within the University 
may add to, though they may not reduce, these re- 
quirements. For example, students in the College 
of Arts and Sciences pursuing a B.A. or B.S. degree 
are required to take a total of twelve hours of Mathe- 
matics and Science. College requirements may also 
specify one or more courses among the options. For 
example, students in the College of Business and 
Public Administration satisfy part of the Social Sci- 
ence requirement by taking Economics 31 in the 
sophomore year. 

3. In certain of the six fields, the student's level of 
placement (by examination or departmental evalua- 
tion) may modify the requirement. 

In general, appropriate Honors or pre-Honors 
courses may replace General Education courses for 
eligible students. For example, students with high 
SAT verbal scores may substitute ENGL 021— Hon- 
ors Composition — for the ordinary requirement of 
ENGL 001. Honors and pre-Honors equivalents for 
General Education courses are specified in the 
several college catalogs. 

4. The General Education Program is designed to 
be spread out over the four years of college. No Gen- 
eral Education course requires credit in any prior 
college course as a pre-requisite. Thus, a student 
may (within limits of his particular curriculum) sat- 
isfy a General Education requirement in each cate- 
gory with any designated course for which he is eli- 
gible by placement examination, department evalu- 
ation, and class standing. Most courses numbered 1 
to 10 may be taken by freshmen; most courses be- 
tween 11 and 99 require sophomore (or honors) 
standing. Courses at the 100 level are normally for 
juniors or seniors; that is, they require that a stu- 
dent have earned 56 hours of college credit while in 
good academic standing. Exceptions are as explicit- 
ly stated in the catalogs of the several colleges. 
Special note for foreign students 

The foreign student is required to take a special 
classification test in English before registering for 
the required English courses. He may be required to 
take Foreign Language 1 and 2— English for Foreign 
Students— before registering for English 1. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

All undergraduate men and women students who 
are registered for more than eight semester hours of 
credit are required to enroll in and successfully com- 
plete two prescribed courses in physical education 
for a total of two semester hours of credit. The suc- 
cessful completion of these courses is required for 
graduation. These courses must be taken by all eli- 
gible students during the first two semesters of at- 
tendance at the University, whether they intend to 
graduate or not. Men and women who have reached 
their thirtieth birthday are exempt from these 



courses. The thirtieth birthday must precede the 
Saturday of registration week. Students who are 
physically disqualified from taking these courses 
must enroll in adaptive courses for which credit will 
be given. A student who has 56 transferred aca- 
demic credits will not be required to register for 
physical education. Students with military service 
may receive credit for these courses by applying to 
the Director of the Men's Physical Education Pro- 
gram. 

Students majoring or minoring in physical ed- 
ucation, recreation, or health education may meet 
these requirements by enrolling in special profes- 
sional courses. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

All freshmen students are required to complete 
satisfactorily one semester of Health Education 
(Hlth. 5) for graduation. Students who have reached 
their thirtieth birthday and students majoring in 
nursing are exempt from this requirement. 
Additional Information 

Questions about any aspect of the program may 
be addressed to the advisors, college deans, or the 
Director of General Education. 

AIR SCIENCE INSTRUCTION 

(Air Force ROTC) 

The University of Maryland offers an entirely 
voluntary program of Air Science instruction which 
is designed for students interested in an Air Force 
Commission. Both a 2-year and a 4-year program are 
offered. 

1. The 2-year program consists of a six-week 
Field Training Session conducted on an Air Force 
Base in the summer prior to the student's junior 
year, followed by four semesters of the Professional 
Officer Course (Advanced Course). The 2-year pro- 
gram is also open to graduate students from the 
College Park Campus, provided such students have 
a minimum of four semesters remaining in the Uni- 
versity at the time of enrollment in the 2-year 
AFROTC program. 

2. The 4-year program consists of four semes- 
ters of the General Military Course (Basic Course) 
followed by four semesters of the Professional Of- 
ficer Course (Advanced Course). Students in this 
program must attend a 4-week Field Training Pro- 
gram after completing their junior year of college 
and prior to commissioning. Only students in the 
4-year program are eligible to compete for full schol- 
arships. 

3. The Curriculum: 

General Military Course— Freshman Year, 
ARSC 11 and ARSC 12; Sophomore Year, 
ARSC 21 and ARSC 22. In the first two 
years, cadets meet academic classes once 
per week. In addition, they receive one hour 
of Corps Training each week. 
Professional Officer Course— Junior Year, 
ARSC 101 and ARSC 102; Senior Year, 
ARSC 103 and ARSC 104. The courses for 
the junior and senior years are entitled "The 
Growth and Development of Aerospace Pow- 
er," and "The Professional Officer," respec- 
tively. They require three class hours, plus 
one hour of Corps Training per week. 

4. The AFROTC College Scholarship Program 
provides scholarships for selected cadets each 
year in the four-year AFROTC program. Those se- 



38 



General Information 



lected receive money for tuition, laboratory expenses, 
incidental fees, and an allowance for books for up to 
eight semesters. In addition, they receive non-taxa- 
ble retainer pay of $50 per month. One must be in 
the program at the University of Maryland before he 
can apply for this scholarship. 

5. All students in the 2-year and 4-year pro- 
gram enrolled in the Professional Officer Course but 
not receiving full scholarships will receive $50 a 
month retainer pay for a maximum of $1,000 for 
the two-year period. Students also receive nominal 
pay (plus quarters and subsistence) while attending 
either the 4-week or the 6-week Field Training 
Session. 

6- To be accepted into the Professional Officer 
Course the student must: complete the General Mil- 
itary Course or the 6-week Field Training Session; 
pass the Air Force Officer Qualification Test; be 
physically qualified; enlist in the Air Force Reserve; 
be in good academic standing; meet age require- 
ments; possess the necessary qualities of leadership 
and citizenship. Successful completion of the Pro- 
fessional Officer Course and a Bachelor's degree are 
the prerequisites for a commission as a second lieu- 
tenant in the United States Air Force. 

7. Students who have prior military service or 
ROTC training with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, 
Coast Guard, or Air Force will be evaluated and al- 
lowed appropriate credit toward meeting the require- 
ments for the General Military (Basic) Course. Pro- 
fessional Officer Course (Advanced) credits are 
transferable. 

Attendance at Air Science classes is manda- 
tory. Excuses for class or drill absences will not be 
recognized except in cases of sickness, emergen- 
cies, or University business covered by University 
excuses. All unexcused absences operate to reduce 
the term grade. Excessive absences and/or mis- 
conduct will be cause for dismissal. 

8. Qualified seniors who elect to become Air 
Force pilots receive a free 36V2-hour flight instruc- 
tion program. Cadets are instructed by competent 
civilian instructors. This training enables them to 
earn their private pilot's license before graduating 
from college. 



OUT-OF-STATE APPLICANTS 

To be eligible for consideration for admission, 
the graduate of an accredited out-of-state secondary 
school should have attained college certification 
grades in his college preparatory subjects, such 
grades to be not less than one letter grade higher 
than the passing grade. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

A student must be in good standing as to scho- 
larship and character to be eligible for transfer to 
the University. A student transferring to the Univer- 
sity from another collegiate institution shall be re- 
quired to have a cumulative grade-point average of 
"C" in all previous college work. Advanced standing 
is assigned to a transfer student from an accredited 
institution under the following conditions: (1) A 
minimum of one year of resident work or not less 
than 30 semester hours (including the meeting of 
all University and curricular requirements) is neces- 
sary for a degree; (2) the University reserves the 
right to make the assignment of transfer credit con- 
ditional upon the student's making a satisfactory 
record during his first semester at the University; 
(3) The University reserves the right to revoke ad- 
vanced standing if the transfer student's progress 
is at any time unsatisfactory. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Applicants over 21 years of age who qualify for 
admission but who do not desire to work toward a 
baccalaureate degree may be admitted as special 
students. These students are ineligible to matri- 
culate for a degree until they have submitted all re- 
quired documents. Permission from the dean of the 
various schools and Colleges of the University is 
often needed in order to enroll as a special student. 

Special students who have received a bac- 
calaureate degree are advised that no credit earned 
while enrolled as special students may be applied at 
a later date to a graduate program. These post-bac- 
calaureate students may enroll for courses at the 
100 to 199 level for which they possess the neces- 
sary prerequisites but may not enroll in courses re- 
stricted to graduate students only. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission from a secondary school is based 
upon evidence indicating the applicant's probable 
success in the program of his choice at the Univer- 
sity. The applicants for admission are required to 
have the results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(SAT) submitted to the Counseling Center of the 
University. 

The Scholastic Aptitude Test is given several 
times each year at test centers throughout the State. 
Specific information and applications are obtain- 
able from high school counselors. 



RESIDENTS OF MARYLAND 

A graduate of an accredited secondary school 
in Maryland whose secondary record and SAT scores 
indicate probable success in the University will be 
admitted provided that his program has included the 
subjects required for the college and curriculum 
which he wishes to enter, and provided that he has 
a satisfactory general recommendation from his 
secondary school as to his character and ability. 



REGISTRATION 

1. Instructions concerning registration are 
given in the Schedule of Classes issued at the be- 
ginning of each semester. 

2. Students who do not complete their registra- 
tion, including payment of bill, on regular registra- 
tion days will be required to pay a late registration 
fee of $20.00. Only in exceptional cases will a stu- 
dent be permitted to enter a class later than one 
week after the beginning of instruction. 

3. Changes in registration may be made only 
with the written permission of the student's dean. 
After the first week there is a fee of $5.00 for every 
change in registration. The formal change in regis- 
tration approved by the dean must be filed in the 
Office of the Registrar to complete the transaction. 
Unless this is done, no credit will be given for an 
added course, and a failure will be recorded for a 
dropped course. A student dropping a course with- 
out permission from the dean will be subject to dis- 
cipline. 

4. An official class list for each course being 
offered is issued each semester to the appropri- 
ate department by the Office of the Registrar. No 



General Information 



39 



student is permitted to attend a class if his name 
does not appear on the class list. Instructors report 
to the academic dean any student who neglects to 
attend class. At the end of the semester, the Office 
of the Registrar issues to each department official 
grade cards. The instructors mark the final grades 
on the grade cards, sign the cards, and return them 
to the Registrar. 

5. Within seven days after the opening of the 
semester each student must file a schedule of his 
classes in the Office of the Registrar. 

6. A student who desires to transfer from one 
college to another must petition, on a special form, 
the dean of the college from which he wishes to be 
transferred. The transfer is effected when the re- 
quest, properly approved by both deans concerned, 
is filed in the Office of the Registrar. Students who 
are on academic probation and students who have 
less than a 2.0 average are referred to Section A of 
"Minimum Requirements for Retention and Gradu- 
ation." 

7. No change to another college or curriculum 
is permitted other than at stated registration periods 
or during the first week of a semester. 

8. A student transferring to another college will 
consult with his new dean regarding the adjustment 
of his records. A record of this adjustment must be 
filed in the Office of the Registrar. The dean's record 
will be transferred to the office of the college to 
which the student is transferring. 

9. Courses taken in University College or at an- 
other institution concurrent with regular registra- 
tion on the campus at the University may not be 
credited without approval in advance by the dean of 
the college from which the student expects a de- 
gree. The same rule applies in summer school, to 
off-campus registrations or registrations in the sum- 
mer school of another institution. 

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 

The University confers the following degrees: 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor 
of Science in Pharmacy, Bachelor of Architecture, 
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in American Civiliza- 
tion, Master of Business Administration, Master of 
Education, Master of Music, Master of Science, Mas- 
ter of Library Science, Master of Social Work, Doc- 
tor of Dental Surgery, Doctor of Education, Doctor of 
Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical 
Arts, Doctor of Business Administration, and Juris 
Doctor. 

Students in specified two-year curricula may be 
awarded certificates. 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a 
student who has had less than one year of resident 
work in this University. The last thirty semester 
credits in any curricula leading to a baccalaureate 
degree must be taken in residence at the University. 
Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in com- 
bined curricula at College Park and Baltimore must 
complete a minimum of thirty semester credits 
at College Park. 

The requirements for graduation vary according 
to the character of work in the different colleges 
and schools. Full information regarding specific 
college requirements for graduation will be found in 
the various college divisions of this catalog. 

Each candidate for a degree or certificate must 
file a formal application for it with the Office of the 



Registrar. This must be done by the end of the 
third week of the semester or the second week of 
the summer session at the end of which he expects 
to graduate. 

CREDIT UNIT AND LOAD 

The semester hour, which is the unit of credit, 
is the equivalent of a subject pursued one period a 
week for one semester. Two or three periods of lab- 
oratory or field work are equivalent to one lecture or 
recitation period. The student is expected to devote 
three hours a week in classroom or laboratory or in 
outside preparation for each credit hour in any 
course. 

In order for an undergraduate student to complete 
most curricula in the designated amount of time, 
his semester credit load must range from 12 to 19 
hours, so that he would complete from 30 to 36 
hours each year toward his degree. A student regis- 
tering for less than 12 hours or more than 19 hours 
per semester must have the special approval of his 
dean. 

EXAMINATIONS 

1. A final examination shall be gjven in every 
undergraduate course. Exceptions may be made 
with the approval of the head of the department and 
the dean. In order to avoid basing too much of the 
semester grade upon the final examination, addi- 
tional tests, quizzes, term papers, reports and the 
like should be used to determine a student's com- 
prehension of a course. The order of procedure in 
these matters is left to the discretion of departments 
or professors and should be announced to a class at 
the beginning of a course. All final examinations 
must be held on the examination days of the Official 
Final Examination Schedule. No final examination 
shall be given at a time other than that scheduled 
in the Official Examination Schedule without written 
permission of the Department Head. 

2. To expedite arrangements for commence- 
ment, final grades of undergraduate candidates 
for degrees are based on evaluations available at 
the time grades are required to be submitted. 

3. A file of all final examination questions 
must be kept by the head of each department. 

4. The head of each department is responsible 
for the adequate administration of examinations in 
courses under his jurisdiction. The deans should 
present for consideration the matter of examinations 
in staff conferences from time to time and investi- 
gate examination procedures in their respective 
colleges. 

5. Every examination shall be designed to 
require for its completion not more than the regular- 
ly scheduled period. 

6. A typewritten, mimeographed or printed set 
of questions shall be placed in the hands of every 
examinee in every test or examination requiring at 
least one period, unless the dean of the college has 
authorized some other procedure. 

7. Each instructor must safeguard his examina- 
tion questions and all trial sheets, drafts and sten- 
cils. 

8. Each instructor should avoid the use of ex- 
amination questions which have been included 
in recently given examinations and should prepare 
examinations that will make dishonesty difficult. 

9. Only clerical help approved by the depart- 
ment head shall be employed in the preparation or 



40 



General Information 



reproduction of tests or examination questions. 

10. Proctors must be in the examination room 
at least ten minutes before the hour of a final 
examination. Provisions should be made for proper 
ventilation, lighting, and a seating plan. At least 
one of the proctors present must be sufficiently 
cognizant of the subject matter of the examination 
to deal authoritatively with inquiries arising from 
the examination. 

11. Books, papers, etc., belonging to the stu- 
dent, must be left in a place designated by the in- 
structor before the student takes his seat, except in 
such cases where books or work sheets are per- 
mitted. 

12. Students should be seated at least every 
other seat apart, or its equivalent, i.e., about three 
feet. Where this arrangement is not possible some 
means must be provided to protect the integrity of 
the examination. 

13. "Blue books" only must be used in periodic 
or final examinations, unless special forms are fur- 
nished by the department concerned. 

14. If mathematical tables are required in an 
examination, they shall be furnished by the in- 
structor. If textbooks are used, this rule does not 
apply. 

15. Proctors must exercise all diligence to pre- 
vent dishonesty and to enforce proper examination 
decorum, including abstention from smoking. 

16. Where an instructor must proctor more 
than 40 students, he should consult the head of his 
department concerning proctorial assistance. An 
instructor should consult his department head if in 
his opinion a smaller number of students for an 
examination requires the help of another instructor. 

17. No student who leaves an examination 
room will be permitted to return, except in unusual 
circumstances, in which case permission to do so 
must be granted by the proctor prior to the stu- 
dent's absention. 

18. All conversation will cease prior to the pass- 
ing out of examination papers, and silence will be 
maintained in the room during the entire examina- 
tion period. 

19. Examination papers will be placed face 
down on the writing desks until the examination 
is officially begun by the proctor. 

20. Examination papers will be kept flat on the 
writing desk at all times. 

IRREGULARITIES IN EXAMINATIONS 

1. In cases involving charges of academic ir- 
regularities or dishonesty in an examination, class 
work, or course requirements by an undergraduate 
student, the instructor in the course shall report 
to his instructional department head any informa- 
tion received and the facts within his knowledge. If 
the head of the instructional department deter- 
mines that there is any sound reason for believing 
that academic dishonesty may be involved, he 
shall refer the matter to the dean of the college or 
school. The dean will then confer with the dean 
of the student's college or school and will check 
the Judiciary Office records to determine if the 
student has any record of prior offenses involving 
academic dishonesty. The dean will then consult 
with the student involved, and if the alleged aca- 
demic dishonesty is admitted by the student and 
is his first offense of this nature, the dean may 



authorize the department head to dispose of the 
charges, limiting the maximum penalty to discipli- 
nary probation and a grade of "F" in the course, pro- 
vided the penalty is accepted by the student in 
writing. In such case the department head will 
make a written report of the matter, including the 
action taken, to the dean of the student's college 
or school and to the Judiciary Office. 

If the case is not disposed of in the above man- 
ner, the dean of the instructional department will 
appoint an ad hoc Committee on Academic Dis- 
honesty consisting of one member from the faculty 
of the college or school administered by the dean 
as chairman, one undergraduate student, and one 
member from the faculty of the student's college 
or school appointed by the dean of that college or 
school. If the student's dean and the dean admin- 
istering the instructional department are the same, 
a second member of the faculty of the college or 
school concerned is appointed. 

The dean of the instructional department will 
refer the specific report of alleged academic dis- 
honesty to this ad hoc committee and the com- 
mittee will hear the case. The hearing procedures 
before this committee will in general conform to 
those required for student judicial boards. The 
committee may impose the normal disciplinary ac- 
tions and/or impose a grade of "F" in the course. 

The chairman of the committee will report its 
actions to the dean of the student's college or 
school and to the Judiciary Office. The dean of 
the instructional department will advise the stu- 
dent in writing of the disciplinary action of the 
committee, and also advise him of his right to file 
an appeal to the Adjunct Committee on Student 
Discipline. 

The student may file his appeal in accordance 
with the normal procedures to the Adjunct Com- 
mittee with the dean of the instructional depart- 
ment and the latter will forward it to the chair- 
man of the Adjunct Committee. The chairman of 
the Adjunct Committee will notify the student in 
writing of the time, date, and place of the hearing. 

2. In cases involving charges of academic ir- 
regularities or dishonesty in an examination, class 
work, or course requirements by a graduate stu- 
dent, the above procedure will be followed except 
that: 

a. The head of the instructional department 

will refer the matter to the Vice President 
for Graduate Studies and Research. 

b. The ad hoc Committee on Academic Dis- 

honesty will be appointed by the Vice Presi- 
dent for Graduate Studies and Research 
and will consist of two members of the 
Graduate School faculty, one serving as 
chairman, and one graduate student. 



MARKING SYSTEM 

1. The following symbols are used for marks: A, 
B, C, and D— Passing; F— Failure; I— Incomplete. 
At the Graduate level, the grade of D is failure. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerical 
values are assigned marks as follows: A — 4; B — 3; 
C— 2; D— 1; F— 0. 

A mark of X will be used on records of off- 
campus adult students in those cases where such 
a student has ceased to attend a class without an 
official withdrawal. A mark of X indicates no rec- 
ord, no prejudice, is terminal, and may not be 



General Information 



later changed as in the case of the incomplete 
mark of I. 

2. Mark A denotes superior achievement; B, 
good; C, fair; and D, passing. However, a mark of 
D does not represent satisfactory progress toward 
a degree. 

3. A student with a mark of F has failed in the 
course and must repeat the entire course in order 
to receive credit for it. "Credit by examinations" 
cannot be given for a course in which the student 
has previously earned a grade of F or WF. In case 
of failure in a required course a student must enroll 
again in that subject the first time it is offered, 
unless excused by the dean. 

4. An instructor may change a grade already 
submitted to the Registrar only on certification, 
approved by his department head and dean, that 
he made an actual mistake in computing or re- 
cording the grade. 

5. In case a failure is incurred in an elective 
subject, the student may be permitted to make a 
substitution provided the head of the department 
in which the student is majoring and the student's 
dean approve. A record of this approval must be 
filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

6. The mark of "I" (incomplete) is exceptional. 
It is to be given only to a student whose work in a 
course has been qualitatively satisfactory, when, 
because of illness, or other circumstances beyond 
his control, he has been unable to complete the 
requirement. In no case will the mark "I" be re- 
corded for a student who has not completed the ma- 
jor portion of the work of the course. In cases where 
this mark is given, the student may not re-register 
for the course until the "I" is removed by completing 
work assigned by the instructor. Work must be 
completed by the end of the next semester in 
which the subject is again offered and the student 
is in attendance at the University, or the mark be- 
comes F. When a student receives a terminal 
grade, he may repeat the course as provided for any 
course where repeats are authorized. Exceptions 
to the time period cited above may be granted by 
the student's dean on the written request of the 
student if circumstances warrant further delay. An 
"I" cannot be removed through the technique of 
earning "credit by examination." 

7. It is the student's responsibility to request 
appropriate action for the removal of the "I". 

8. It is the responsibility of the instructor and 
department head concerned to return the appropri- 
ate supplementary grade report promptly upon the 
completion of the work. 

9. It is the responsibility of the student's dean 
to inform the Registrar and instructor of the delay 
granted in accordance with Section 6, above. 

10. For information about repeating courses, 
see "Minimum Requirements for Retention and 
Graduation," 



PASS-FAIL OPTION 

1. Eligible undergraduates may register for a 
maximum of 18 semester hours of credit under the 
pass-fail option between the time they have earned 
30 academic hours at the University of Maryland 
and graduation. No more than one such course 
may be taken during a semester or summer session. 
Only courses which are designated in advance of 



registration periods by the offering department are 
available for selection under the pass-fail option. 

2. In order to be eligible for the pass-fail option 
in registration a student must have completed 30 
or more semester hours of credit at the University 
of Maryland. Transfer students must have com- 
pleted a minimum of 15 semester hours of academ- 
ic credit at the University and have a total of 30 
semester hours on their records. Part-time students 
matriculated for a degree are eligible: special stu- 
dents are not. A student must have a cumulative 
grade-point average of 2.00 to be eligible for the 
pass-fail option. Students who are registered in 
O.I.R. may not elect the pass-fail option. 

3. No course which is used to fulfill require- 
ments for a major, the requirements of a field of 
concentration, specific courses designated as de- 
gree requirements, or the general education pro- 
gram may be selected under the pass-fail option. 
Such selection is limited to free elective courses. 

4. Students registering in a course under the 
pass-fail option are required to complete all regular 
course requirements and will be evaluated accord- 
ing to normal procedures. The final course grade 
will be recorded either as a passing or a failing 
grade. If the course is passed, credit toward gradua- 
tion is earned; however, the course is not included 
in grade average. If the course is failed, no credit 
is awarded but the failing grade is included in 
computation of averages. 

5. A student's pass-fail option for a course 
must be designated at the time of registration. 
This status may not be changed after the end of 
registration. If the demand for a course exceeds 
its capacity, letter-graded students will be given 
preference over pass-fail students in enrollment. 
Further information is available through advisors. 

CREDIT FOR EXAMINATION 
FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES 

1. Credit towards the bachelor's degree may be 
established by examination under the following 
conditions: 

The applicant must have completed at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at least 12 semester credits 
with an average grade of C or higher before making 
application for an examination to establish credit. 
Deans of the present degree-granting colleges on 
the College Park campus may waive this regulation 
for entering freshmen who wish to use the examina- 
tion to establish credit based on previous training. 

2. The total amount of credit that can be estab- 
lished by examination cannot exceed 20 semester 
credits. "Credit by examination" cannot be given 
for a course in which the student has previously 
earned a grade of F, D, I or WF. 

3. Usually credit by examination will not be ac- 
cepted for any part of the final 30 semester credits 
which must be completed in residence. However, 
if permission is granted in advance by the dean, 
and a record of the credit is filed in the Office of 
the Registrar prior to the student's final semester 
in residence, 6 semester hours of the final 30 may 
be established by examination. However, in no 
case does this permission waive the minimum resi- 
dence requirement of 30 semester credits. 

4. The fee for an advanced standing examina- 
tion is $5.00 per semester credit hour. 

5. A grade of C or higher must be obtained in 
order to establish credit by examination. 

6. A foreign student may not establish credit by 



42 



General Information 



examination in freshman or sophomore courses of 
his native language. 

7. The instructor must certify on the report on 
the examination submitted to the Office of the 
Registrar that copies of the examination questions 
and the student's answers have been filed in the 
office of the dean of the college in which the 
course is offered. 

8. Applications for examinations to establish 
credit must be approved on an individual course 
basis, and approval will not be granted at the same 
time for examinations in a sequence of courses. 

9. Approval to take an examination in any 
course will depend upon the student's having estab- 
lished credit in all prerequisites, or equivalent, and 
received the approval of the head of the department 
and the dean concerned. 

10. The grades for credits earned by advanced 
standing examinations are not used in computing 
the student's average. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

1. A student is permitted to register for upper 
division courses when granted Junior Standing by 
his college. This permission shall be based upon 
earning a minimum of 56 academic hours toward 
his degree, completing such course requirements 
as the college may direct, and possessing the 
minimum required grade point average to remain 
in the University. 

2. Exceptional students having completed 
forty-eight (48) semester hours of academic credits 
and having the approval of the department involved 
will be permitted to enroll for sufficient upper 
division courses to complete a normal program. 
That is, such students must carry lower division 
courses to total fifty-six (56) semester hours of 
academic credits and the remainder may be in 
courses numbered in the 100 range. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

1. A baccalaureate degree will not be awarded 
to a student who has had less than one year of resi- 
dent work in this University. The last thirty semes- 
ter credits of any curriculum leading to a bac- 
calaureate degree must be taken in residence at 
the University of Maryland. 

In the case of veterans and students engaged 
in a program of adult education, a portion of the 
final 30 semester hours may be completed at other 
institutions upon the approval of the Vice-Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs, the dean of the college, 
and the head of the department. 

Candidates for degrees in combined programs 
must complete at least 30 semester credits at Col- 
lege Park. 

The minimum residence required for a bacca- 
laureate degree is 30 semester hours; nothing stated 
below modifies in any way this basic requirement. 
Included in these 30 semester hours will be a mini- 
mum of 15 semester hours in advanced courses, 
including at least 12 semester hours required in the 
major field (in curricula requiring such concentra- 
tion). All candidates for degrees should plan to 
take their senior year in residence since the ad- 
vanced work of the major study normally occurs in 
the last year of the undergraduate course. At least 
24 of the last 30 credits must be done in residence; 
i.e., a student who at the time of his graduation 
will have completed 30 semester hours in resi- 



dence may be permitted to do not more than 6 
semester hours of his final 30 credits of record in 
another institution or to include not more than 6 
semester hours of credit earned by advance stand- 
ing examination, provided he secures permission 
in advance from his dean. The student must be 
enrolled in the college from which he plans to 
graduate when registering for the last 15 credits of 
his program. These requirements apply also to the 
third year of pre-professional combined degree pro- 
grams. Record of this permission must be filed in 
the office of the Registrar prior to the student's 
final semester in residence. 

While many University curricula require more 
semester hours than 120 (exclusive of the basic 
General Military Course AFROTC, Health 005, and 
the required program in Physical Education) no 
baccalaureate curriculum requires less than 120 
semester hours with the same exclusions as have 
been cited. 

A student who wishes to earn a second bac- 
calaureate degree in the University is required to 
complete the additional studies regularly prescribed 
for that degree, involving at least one year's addi- 
tional residence and the earning of at least 30 addi- 
tional credits. 

2. A general C (2.0) average is required for 
graduation in all colleges. 

3. An average mark of C (2.0) is required for 
graduation. The C average is computed on the 
basis of the academic courses required by each 
student's curriculum. The average of transfer stu- 
dents and of those seeking combined degrees is 
computed only on the courses taken in residence 
in the University and in satisfaction of the non- 
professional curricular requirements of the college 
granting the degree. An over-all average is also 
computed to include all academic courses taken in 
the University as a basis for the award of honors 
and for such other uses as may be deemed appro- 
priate. 

4. Applications for diplomas must be filed with 
the Office of the Registrar during the registration 
period, or not later than the end of the third week 
of classes of the regular semester or at the end 
of the second week of the summer session, at the 
end of which the candidate expects to receive 
his degree. Application filed after the third week 
of classes of a regular semester or Friday of the 
second week of a Summer Session will be retained 
until the next semester (session) when degrees 
will be awarded. He must at this time be registered 
in the college from which the degree is sought or, 
if in the University College, have the approval of 
the dean of the college concerned. Responsibility 
for knowing and meeting all degree requirements 
for graduation in any curriculum rests with the 
student. Not later than the close of his junior 
year, the student should check with the proper 
authorities to ascertain his standing in this respect. 
For this purpose the student should be sure to 
preserve the copy of the semester grade report is- 
sued by the Registrar's office at the close of each 
semester. 

5. Candidates for degrees must attend a convo- 
cation at which degrees are conferred and diplomas 
are awarded. 



ATTENDANCE 

1. The University expects each student to take 



General Information 43 



full responsibility for his academic work and aca- 
demic progress. The student, to progress satisfac- 
torily, must meet the quantitative and qualitative re- 
quirements of each course for which he is registered. 
Students are expected to attend classes regularly, 
for consistent attendance offers the most effective 
opportunity open to all students to gain a develop- 
ing command of the concepts and materials of 
their course of study. However, attendance in class, 
in and of itself, is not a criterion for the evalu- 
ation of the student's degree of success or failure. 
Furthermore, absences (whether excused or un- 
excused) do not alter what is expected of the stu- 
dent qualitatively and quantitatively. Except as 
provided below, absences will not be used in the 
computation of grades, and the recording of stu- 
dent absences will not be required of the faculty. 

2. In certain courses in-class participation is 
an integral part of the work of the course. A few 
examples would be courses in public speaking and 
group discussion, courses emphasizing conversa- 
tion in foreign languages, certain courses in physi- 
cal education, and certain laboratory sessions. 
Each department shall determine which of its 
courses fall in this category. It shall be the re- 
sponsibility of the instructor in such courses to in- 
form each class at the beginning of the semester 
that in-class participation is an integral part of the 
work of the course and that his absences will be 
taken into account in the evaluation of his work in 
the course. 

3. Laboratory meetings require special prepar- 
ation of equipment and materials by the staff. A 
student who is not present for a laboratory exer- 
cise has missed that part of the course and can- 
not expect that he will be given an opportunity to 
make up this work later in the term. 

4. Special provision for freshmen: The fresh- 
man year is a transitional year. Absences of fresh- 
men in the basic freshman courses will be report- 
ed to the student's dean when the student has 
accumulated more than three unexcused absences. 

5. Excuses for absences (in basic freshman 
courses and in courses where in-class participation 
is a significant part of the work of the course) will 
be handled by the instructor in the course in ac- 
cordance with the general policy of his depart- 
ment and college. 

6. Examination and tests: It is the responsi- 
bility of the student to keep himself informed con- 
cerning the dates of announced quizzes, tests, 
and examinations. An instructor is not under obli- 
gation to give a student a make-up examination 
unless the student can present evidence that his 
absence was caused by illness or by participating 
in University activities at the request of University 
authorities. A make-up examination, when permit- 
ted, is given at the convenience of the instructor, 
but must not interfere with the student's regularly 
scheduled classes. 



SCHOLARSHIP HONORS 

Honors for excellence in scholarship are award- 
ed to not more than one-fifth of the graduation class 
in each college. (The computation does not include 
grades for courses taken during the last semester of 
registration before graduation.) "High Honors" are 
awarded to the upper half of the group; "Honors" 
to the lower half. To be eligible for this recognition, 
a total of at least two years of residence (60 se- 



mester hours) is required. No student with an aver- 
age less than B (3.0) will be considered. 

DEFICIENCY REPORTS 

1. Reports of unsatisfactory work (less than C) 
will be made only for freshmen in the basic 
freshman courses. It will be the obligation of all 
students to assume full responsibility for their 
academic progress without depending upon receiv- 
ing official warning of unsatisfactory work. 

2. Reports of unsatisfactory work for freshmen 
in the basic freshman courses will be submitted 
to the student's dean at the end of the seventh 
week of the semester. 



DISMISSAL OF DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

The University reserves the right to request 
at any time the withdrawal of a student who can- 
not or does not maintain the required standard 
of scholarship, or whose continuance in the Uni- 
versity would be detrimental to his or her health, 
or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not 
satisfactory to the authorities of the University. 
Specific scholastic requirements are set forth in 
the Minimum Requirements for Retention and Grad- 
uation. 



WITHDRAWALS FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

1. If a student desires or is compelled to with- 
draw from the University for any cause at any 
time during the academic year, he should secure 
an application for withdrawal from his dean's of- 
fice, obtain the proper signatures as indicated on 
the form, and file it in the Registrar's office. If 
a student withdraws from the University after the 
first eight weeks of the semester, the instructor in 
each course indicates on the class card whether the 
student was passing or failing at the time of with- 
drawal. The report is made part of the student's 
permanent record. 

2. In the case of a minor, withdrawal will be 
permitted only with the written consent of the 
student's parent or guardian. 

3. A student who fails to withdraw in the re- 
quired manner will not be entitled to an honorable 
dismissal, will forfeit his right to any refund to 
which he might otherwise be entitled, and will re- 
ceive marks of failure in all courses being carried. 

4. The effective date for withdrawals, as far as 
refunds and grades are concerned, is the date the 
blank is filed in the Office of the Registrar. 

5. Further information on withdrawal from the 
University may be found in "Minimum Require- 
ments for Retention and Graduation," 



READMISSION AND REINSTATEMENT 

1. A student who withdraws from the Univer- 
sity must apply to the Director of Admissions for 
reinstatement. 

2. A freshman who is dismissed for scholastic 
reasons from the University at the end of his first 
semester and who desires to seek reinstatement 
is referred to Section A of "Minimum Require- 
ments for Retention and Graduation." 

3. A student who has been dropped for scho- 
lastic reasons may appeal in writing to the Secre- 
tary of the Admissions Petition Board, Office of 



44 



General Information 



Admissions for reinstatement. The Committee is 
empowered to grant relief for just cause. 

4. No student on academic probation shall be 
allowed to register for more than sixteen (16) 
semester hours (including the basic General Mili- 
tary Course AFROTC and required courses in P. E. 
and Health). The student on academic probation 
should normally carry at least twelve (12) aca- 
demic semester hours in order that he may ab- 
solve his academic probation in one semester. 

5. A student who has been dropped from the 
University for scholastic reasons, and whose peti- 
tion for reinstatement is denied, may again petition 
after a lapse of at least one semester. 

6. Applicable courses taken at another institu- 
tion by a student in the first semester after his aca- 
demic dismissal from the University shall not be 
considered for transfer credit until the student has 
returned to the University and removed his aca- 
demic probation. 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS 

FOR RETENTION AND GRADUATION 

The provisions in this plan apply to undergrad- 
uates at College Park, including the day-time, on- 
campus students of University College. These pro- 
visions do not generally apply to undergraduate stu- 
dents enrolled prior to the summer session, 1965, 
to graduate students nor to students registered in 
the professional schools at Baltimore. 
SECTION A: Minimum requirements 

A. 1 At the end of each grading period— defined 
as each regular semester— the Office of the Regis- 
trar computes each student's cumulative grade 
point average (the number of earned quality points 
divided by the number of attempted semester hours 
hereinafter designated and referred to as "at- 
tempted hours" or "hours attempted"). Based on 
this cumulative grade point average the Office of the 
Registrar imposes the academic actions prescribed 
in the following table: 



Cumulative Grade Point 
Average resulting in 



Total 






Hours 


Academic 


Academic 


Attempted 


Dismissal 


Probation 


1-5 






6-20 


Below 0.35 


Below 1.35 


21-35 


" 1.35 


" 1.65 


36-50 


" 1.65 


" 1.80 


51-65 


" 1.80 


" 1.90 


68-80 


" 1.90 


" 2.00 


81 and over 


" 1.95 


" 2.00 



A. 2 Regardless of his cumulative grade point 
average, however, no student shall be dismissed at 
the end of any grading period during which he 
was registered for and completed at least twelve 
(12) semester hours with an average of 2.00 or 
better. 

A.3 A minimum cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 is an essential part of the several re- 
quirements for a bachelor's degree as outlined in 
college divisions of this catalog. Any student whose 
cumulative grade point average falls within the 
range which results in Academic Probation in ac- 
cordance with the table of section A.l is informed 
that he is not making satisfactory progress toward 
his degree and must assume responsibility for any 
future dismissal which may occur. 



A. 4 Any student whose cumulative grade point 
average falls within the range which results in 
Academic Dismissal in accordance with the table 
of section A.l loses his eligibility to re-register at 
the University. 

A. 5 Any student who is not eligible to re-register 
following Academic Dismissal should consult the 
Secretary of the Admissions Petition Board con- 
cerning procedure for reinstatement. This Board 
is empowered to grant relief for just cause. 

A. 6 A student who enters the University with 
acceptable transfer credits is subject to these 
scholastic standards at the level of attempted hours 
determined by adding the number of hours of 
transfer credits assigned to him by the Office of 
Admissions and the dean of the college in which 
he is enrolled to the number of hours attempted 
at Maryland. His cumulative average is based sole- 
ly on the number of hours attempted at Mary- 
land and the grades received for these attempted 
courses. 

A. 7 When a course is repeated all attempts are 
included in the computation of the cumulative 
grade point average through inclusion in both the 
total quality points earned and the total hours at- 
tempted. If a student repeats a course for which 
he has already earned a passing grade, the subse- 
quent attempt shall not increase his total hours 
earned toward a degree. 

A. 8 Exceptions are allowed for courses taken 
during a freshman's first semester and subse- 
quently repeated. In such cases, the original first 
semester grades of these repeated courses and 
their corresponding credit hours will not be in- 
cluded in the computation of the student's cumula- 
tive grade point average or in his total of attempted 
hours, provided these repetitions of first semester 
courses occur before the student has earned 56 
semester hours. For the purpose of this section 
a first semester freshman shall be a student 
registered for the first time in college level educa- 
tional courses and thus experiencing his first con- 
tact with academic education beyond the senior 
high school level. However, a student whose first 
college experience is through part-time registration 
or through the summer session will be considered 
as a first semester freshman until he has regis- 
tered in and completed a minimum of nine semes- 
ter hours in college level work. All college registra- 
tions will be counted whether or not they are 
applicable to the student's program. 

A. 9 A student beginning or within his last 
thirty (30) credit hours necessary for graduation 
who has been retained in college under section 
A. 2 but who would be unable to graduate because 
of an insufficient cumulative grade point average 
due to an earlier single semester of failing grades 
may be granted waiver of those failing grades. Pro- 
vided such student satisfies all other college and 
university requirements for the degree, the above 
grades of failure and their corresponding attempted 
credit hours may be disregarded in the computation 
of his final cumulative grade point average. To ac- 
complish this the approval of the student's aca- 
demic dean together with the written recommenda- 
tion of the head of the department in which the stu- 
dent is majoring must be transmitted to the Office of 
the Registrar with the necessary adjustments which 
are to be made in recomputing the student's cumu- 
lative average. 



General Information 45 



A.10 Physical activity courses required of all 
students, non-credit courses, and orientation 
courses are not considered in computing cumulative 
grade point averages. All other courses are consid- 
ered for computation except those courses specifi- 
cally designated not applicable by the dean of the 
college in which the student is enrolled. 

A.ll In the computation of the cumulative 
grade point average a grade of "I" is not to be in- 
cluded as hours attempted. When the grade of "I" 
is removed for a passing grade or the mark becomes 
F in conformance with academic regulations, an 
appropriate corrective entry will be made in the 
cumulative grade point average by the Office of the 
Registrar. 

A. 12 Any student who withdraws from all 
courses receiving no grades or grades of W, WX, WP, 
or WF is not eligible for re-registration at the Univer- 
sity except by application for reinstatement through 
the Office of Admissions. Withdrawal grades are not 
included in the computation of grade point averages 
or in the determination of the level of total hours 
attempted. 

SECTION B: Regulations for transfer of students 
from one college to another and change of curric- 
ulum within a college. 

B.l A student with a 2.00 average or better in 
those courses applicable to his proposed new cur- 
riculum may transfer from one college in the Uni- 
versity to another but only at such times as are 
specifically designated for this purpose. On a spe- 
cial form, he must first obtain a signed release 
and his complete academic record from the dean 
of the releasing college before submitting them to 
the dean of the college to which he wishes to 
transfer. When the dean of the receiving college 
accepts the student by signing the transfer form, 
the student must then deposit this form with the 
Office of the Registrar to complete the transfer. 

B.2 In all transfer cases the dean of the re- 
ceiving college shall indicate what courses in the 
student's previous academic program are not ap- 
plicable in the new program and he shall notify 
the Office of the Registrar of the adjustments 
which are to be made in computing the student's 
cumulative average. 

B.3 The Office of Intermediate Registration 
(OIR) serves those students who wish to change 
colleges but have less than 2.00 averages, in 
those courses applicable to their new college cur- 
ricula. Any such student who is entitled to re-reg- 
ister in the University will be accepted by OIR 
after securing his release from his former college 
dean. The Director of Intermediate Registration 
will be responsible for notifying the Office of the 
Registrar what courses in the student's previous 
academic program have been declared not appli- 
cable by the prospective receiving dean. 

B.4 The cumulative average required of a reg- 
istrant in OIR shall be that given in the table of 
section A.l for the attempted hours applicable to 
the new curriculum to which the student antici- 
pates transferring. If at the end of a student's 
first grading period in OIR his cumulative average 
entitles him to remain in the University, he shall 
be permitted to transfer to his new college. How- 
ever, upon the recommendation of both the Direc- 
tor of Intermediate Registration and the dean of 



the new college, the student who is eligible to 
remain in the University may be permitted to 
register for an additional semester or summer ses- 
sion in OIR. 

B.5 When a student changes from one depart- 
ment to another within a college he must secgre, 
in the appropriate space on the permit-to-register 
card, the signature of the dean before filing the 
card with the Registrar. An individual college may 
use additional forms for internal control if it so 
desires. Where the change within a college is 
from a program to an unrelated program, the 
dean of the college may exercise the option of 
adjusting the student's record. The dean is respon- 
sible for providing the Registrar's office with a writ- 
ten statement of the adjustments to be made in 
computing the student's cumulative average. 



SECTION C: Regulations concerning dropping of 
courses, and withdrawals from the University. 

C.l A student may drop a course without an h 
grade during the first three weeks of classes with 
the approval of the student's advisor and dean. A 
student may drop a course without an F grade 
after the first three weeks of classes only upon 
written approval of the dean of the student's col- 
lege. Such authorization shall be granted by the 
dean only under extraordinary circumstances; un- 
satisfactory scholarship in itself will not be con- 
sidered an extraordinary circumstance. The written 
authorization must state the reasons and shall be 
filed with the Registrar. In order to drop a course, 
or courses, for medical reasons and without the 
grade of F, the student must present to the dean 
of his college, through the University's infirmary, 
acceptable proof that such reasons have caused 
his continuous absence from all classes for which 
he is registered for a period of two weeks or 
more (exclusive of holidays). Any request to drop 
a course for medical reasons must be presented 
to the student's dean within one week of the 
student's return to class attendance. 

The selection of courses to be dropped shall 
be at the discretion of the student's dean. 

In the case of accidental injury incurred after 
the start of the term, and which incapacitates the 
student relative to his performance in a particular 
course, the dean of the student's college shall 
use his discretion in recommending the dropping 
of the course without the grade of F. Where acci- 
dental injury does not necessitate the absence of 
the student from all classes for a period of two 
weeks or more, the request to drop a particular 
course must be made within one week of the 
injury, or within one week of the return to classes 
following the injury. A first-semester freshman may 
drop a course without an F grade during the first 
eight weeks of classes with the approval of the 
student's adviser and dean. For the purpose of 
this section a first semester freshman shall be a 
student registered for the first time in college 
level educational courses and thus experiencing 
his first contact with academic education beyond 
the senior high school level. However, a student 
whose first college experience is through part- 
time registration or through the summer session 
will be considered as a first semester freshman 
until he has registered in and completed a mini- 
mum of nine semester hours in college level work. 
All college registrations will be counted whether 



46 



General Information 



or not they are applicable to the student's pro- 
gram. 

Courses may not be changed from credit to 
audit after the third week of classes. 

C-2 A student withdrawing from the University 
during the first eight weeks of classes shall be 
given a grade of WX in his courses. A student 
withdrawing after this time shall receive a grade 
WP in each course in which his work has been 
passing and a grade of WF in any course in 
which his work has not been passing. A student 
withdrawing after the last day of instruction shall 
be given a grade of F in any course in which he 
has not been doing passing work. 

SECTION D: General regulations concerning aca- 
demic probation, academic dismissal, and reinstate- 
ment. 

D.l When a student is placed on academic pro- 
bation or released from academic probation, the 
action shall be entered on the face of the stu- 
dent's official record. 

D.2 A student who is reinstated after academic 
dismissal shall be admitted on academic proba- 
tion. The same conditions of probation may be 
imposed on any student who seeks admission by 
transfer from another university or college and 
whose record at the previous school warrants this 
action. (Admissions of such a student is permitted 



only in unusual cases and after a review by the 
Petition Board.) 

D.3 Any appeal from the regulations governing 
academic probation or academic dismissal shall 
be' directed to the Petition Board which shall be 
empowered to grant relief in unusual cases, if 
the circumstances warrant such action. 

SECTION E: Students enrolled prior to June 1965 

TERMINATION 

Students enrolled in the University prior to June 
1965 and who have remained in continuous atten- 
dance must abide by the provisions of Academic 
Probation Plan. (See earlier issues of University 
General and Academic Regulations.) Students ini- 
tially enrolled in the University prior to June 1965 
who do not fulfill the above conditions of con- 
tinuous attendance but who have remained in con- 
tinuous attendance following their most recent re- 
admission or reinstatement will also abide by the 
provisions of the Academic Probation Plan, provided 
the mostVecent readmission or reinstatement was 
prior to June 1970. Students enrolled prior to June 
1965 whose continuous attendance is interrupted 
for any reason and who are readmitted or rein- 
stated for a session or semester beginning with 
June 1970 will be readmitted or reinstated under 
the provisions of Minimum Requirements for Re- 
tention and Graduation. 



General Information 



47 



I 







STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 



VICE CHANCELLOR FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs coordinates activities within the academic 
community which serve to complement the scholarly 
pursuits of the classroom and enable the student 
to gain maximum value from his college experience. 

Some of the various administrative areas for 
which the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs is re- 
sponsible are: University Health Services; Coun- 
seling Center; Placement and Credentials Services; 
Student Aid; International Education Services and 
Foreign Student Affairs; University Housing; Stu- 
dent Union; Student Life and Programs (including 
fraternities and sororities); Judiciary Office; Food 
Service, Office of Intermediate Registration (01 R); 
Intensive Educational Development; Cultural Study 
Center; and Religious Programs. 

HEALTH CENTER 

The Health Center is primarily charged with aid- 
ing the student in maintaining his physical well- 
being in order that he may pursue his studies as 
effectively as possible. This includes the review of 
all pre-entrance physical examination reports to 
aid the student in his participation in the required 
physical education classes or in other areas where 
special problems might arise. Students are invited 
to visit the Health Center before or during registra- 
tion time to review these reports with a staff mem- 
ber. 
Routine Services 

The Health Center provides the following ser- 
vices: 

1. Treatment, or preventive measures, for 
acute and short term illnesses and surgical 
emergencies. 



2. Certain laboratory procedures 

3. Infirmary rest for minor or short term ill- 

nesses and injuries 

4. Allergy hyposensitization and certain dis- 

ease immunizations arranged through the 
student's physician 

5. Psychiatric services, including short term 
counseling with students who request to see 
the psychiatrist, and consultation and e- 
valuation functions in connection with 
Health Center physicians or the Counseling 
Center 

The Health Center refers most chronic and ma- 
jor illnesses or injury effects to family and local 
physicians and specialists. No dental care is fur- 
nished at the Health Center, but medication to allay 
pain and instruction for oral hygiene is given. 

The Health Center sanitarian promotes the cam- 
pus environmental health through routine inspec- 
tion and subsequent recommendations in the areas 
of food handling, water and air pollution problems, 
living accommodation, and sewage disposal. 

Emergency Services 

During regular University sessions, emergency 
physician care is available on weekday evenings 
at the Infirmary and by telephone call (454-3444 
or 454-3445) to Health Service. During extended 
school vacation periods or between regular ses- 
sions, the physician may be called through the cam- 
pus telephone operator (454-3311) for emergencies 
occurring on the campus. 

Emergency ambulance service is provided 
through the Branchville Volunteer Rescue Squad 
by call to 3333 on campus phones or 864-1122 from 
outside phones. For patients who do not require 
ambulance service, but who cannot come to the ln- 



Generof Information 



49 



firmary in their own transportation, the Campus 
Police may be summoned for assistance at 3555. 

In addition to student emergencies, the Health 
Service will treat, or prepare for transfer to a hos- 
pital, any campus employee injured on the job. An 
employee or visitor with acute illness who cannot 
be taken directly to his own physician or hospital 
may also be seen at the Health Service. 
Accident Insurance 

Commercial Contract Accident or Accident and 
Sickness Group Insurance is available to students 
through the University on an optional basis for a 
nominal fee and is highly recommended for those 
who do not already have this type of coverage. All 
foreign students are required to have this or an 
equivalent form of insurance. This insurance may 
only be purchased at the time of registration. 
Health Service Hours 

The University Health Service hours for routine 
care during regular semesters and summer school 
are: 

Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. 

and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Semi-emergency or appointment care is available: 

Monday through Friday 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 1 1:00 a.m. 

Sundays and Holidays 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 
Twenty-four hour nursing care is available during 
school sessions. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The aim of the Counseling Center is to enable 
students to be optimally productive; to better under- 
stand themselves, their assets and liabilities; and 
to be able to resolve their problems and deal with 
important decisions. The services of the Center are 
available to all students. 
Counseling 

Counselors meet with students in individual or 
group counsei.ng interviews to assist them with 
educational, vocational and personal problems. 
Where appropriate, the counselor may arrange 
for students to take certain tests of ability, interest, 
personality, etc., which provide information valu- 
able in counseling. 
Occupational Information 

Students may browse in the Center library and 
view displays of occupational and educational in- 
formation. They may be interested in listening to the 
tape-recorded introduction to career information. 
Reading and Study Skills Laboratory 

The Laboratory offers students individualized 
programs designed to improve their learning skills. 
They may work on improved reading speed and 
comprehension, vocabulary building, taking of 
lecture notes, spelling, examination skills, and 
handwriting. Special workshops are offered in im- 
proving writing skills and reducing examination 
fears. A library of tutor-texts and tape recorded 
lectures is available for review of fundamentals in 
science, language, logic, and mathematics courses. 
There is a special program for high school students. 
Consultation 

The Counseling Center also serves as an agency 
which students, faculty members, parents and 
others m&y use for discussing any concerns which 
they may have regarding the progress or general 
welfare of students at the University. 
Child Evaluation and Parent Consultation 

This community serv'ce, on a nominal fee basis, 
is provided for parents of children in the age range 



of 5 to 14 regarding concern for their children's 
achievement or behavior. It is not restricted to Uni- 
versity-connected individuals. 

Other Functions 

Other functions include the freshman testing 
program, orienting new students to the Center's 
services, conducting the annual census studies of 
the student body, and data processing consultation 
and services. The staff is available for speaking en- 
gagements before various student and community 
groups. The Center also serves as a facililty for 
the professional training of counselors. 

To help you understand the Counseling Center, 
here are a few of the problems with which students 
have been concerned. One or two of these illustra- 
tions may touch on concerns which you might have 
at one time or another. 

What kinds of vocations am I best fitted for? 

I'd like some help in choosing a major. 

I wish I had more confidence in myself. 

I just can't make the grades I'd like to have. 

I feel sort of alone— pretty much out of things. 

My dates and I don't seem to get along. 

My parents and I don't get along. 

Where can I find some information about occu- 
pations? 

What can I learn from those Freshman Entrance 
Tests that will help me in college? 

I can't seem to concentrate when I study. 

How much should I expect of myself? 

I read and comprehend fairly well, but I would 
like to improve further. 

Is my vocational goal a realistic one for me? 

I worry too much about things (drugs, sex, 
failure, etc.). 

My note-taking and spelling are holding me 
back. 

I can't see how some of the courses which I am 
taking are going to help me in the future. 

To Arrange an Appointment 

Students need only call or come to the Center 
to request an appointment. The Center's reception- 
ist will arrange a brief conference with one of the 
counseling staff. This conference allows the Center 
to determine how to be of maximum help to the 
student, to answer any questions he may have 
about the Center and its operations, and to make 
additional appointments when the student and 
counselor feel it is appropriate. 

About 25 per cent of all University students 
make use of Counseling Center services during their 
years of enrollment. There is no fee for University 
undergraduates or graduate students. Non-students 
receive counseling, testing, and educational skills 
services for a nominal fee as staff time allows. 

The Counseling Center is located in the Shoe- 
maker Building, just behind the Chapel. Telephone: 
454-2931. 

STUDENT UNION 

The Student Union serves as the extra-curricular 
hub of the campus, with facilities and services to 
meet the needs of individual students or campus 
groups. Whether for a meeting, weekend dance, 
popular entertainment, featured speaker, or a quiet 
place in which to visit, the Student Union serves 
all. 
General Hours: 

Monday-Thursday 7:00 a.m.— 1 1:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 7:00 a.m.— Midnight. 



50 



General Information 



Sunday 2:00 p.m. — 11:00 p.m. 
No solicitations are permitted in the building. 

Amusements 

The sub-basement is the amusement center of 
the Student Union and is completely air-condi- 
tioned, attractively decorated, and is furnished with 
all the conveniences of modern commercial estab- 
lishments. 

Sixteen tenpin bowling lanes are open from 8:00 
a.m. to midnight Monday thru Saturday, and from 
2:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sunday and holidays for a 
charge of 45 cents per game. Shoes and lockers may 
be rented and bowling equipment is sold. The 
Games Area Manager and a fully trained staff are 
always available for instruction at all skill levels. 

There are also twelve billiard tables and two 
shuffleboard tables in the sub-basement. These 
tables may be rented for one dollar per hour and 
sixty cents per hour, respectively. 

Full length motion pictures are shown in the 
second-floor ballroom on weekends. Tickets are 
sold at the ticket booth in the main lobby one half 
hour before each show. A Film Series is presented 
on Tuesdays. 
Hours for performances 

Tuesday 7:00 and 9:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 7:00 and 9:00 p.m. 

Sunday 7:30 p.m. only 

Services, Facilities, and Equipment 

(a) Services-Duplicating, mimeograph, ditto, 
and offset. 

(b) Signs and Posters-Embosograf, engraving, 
tapewriter and plastic tags, nameplates, 
small signs. 

(c) Space Reservation-Display cases and meet- 
ing rooms for campus organizations, Room 
132. 

(d) Dining and Catering-Telephone extension 
2805. 

(e) Equipment— Movie equipment and public 
address system rental services, to be used in 
the building— Information Desk, Room 132. 

(f) Check Cashing— $20.00 maximum cashed 
9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. weekdays at the In- 
formation Desk, Room 132. There is a small 
service charge. 

(g) Box Office— Tickets to various campus 
events and activities. 

Other Facilities 

TICKET BOOTH AND BOX OFFICES. Tickets to 
various campus events and activities. 

PIANO PRACTICE ROOMS. A key may be ob- 
tained at Main Information Desk on I.D. 
card trade. 

LIBRARY. Browsing and study room, Room 214. 

TELEPHONE BOOTHS. Campus and pay phones 
on basement and first levels. 

LOUNGES. On the first and second floor for 
studying and relaxing. 

FINE ARTS ROOM. Art displays and exhibits. 

PRIVATE ROOMS. Available for dining and 
meetings. Apply Room 132. 

LOST AND FOUND. For items lost and recovered 
within the building. Located in the base- 
ment Apply at Desk. 

CAFETERIA AND SNACK BAR. Located in the 
basement. Extension 2805. 

BULLETIN BOARDS. For posting of miscellan- 
eous notices and signs. 

TELEVISION ROOM. Located on first floor. 



SMOKE SHOP. Cigarettes, candy, books, maga- 
zines, and miscellaneous articles. 

AUDITORIUM. Stage and motion picture facili- 
ties. Capacity 230 people. 

BALLROOM. For movies, large dinners, dances, 
and meetings. 
Equipment 

Inquire at Information Desk to rent the fol- 
lowing: 

Portable and permanent blackboards, speakers 
lecterns, sound motion picture equipment (two 16- 
mm projectors), slide projection equipment, pianos, 
portable banquet tables, portable coat racks, floor 
and table microphones and public address sys- 
tems, chess, checkers and playing cards. Trade for 
I.D. card at Information Desk. 
Student Supply Store 

Located in the basement of the Student Union, 
the supply store sells a variety of miscellaneous 
items as well as all books and materials needed for 
classes. 

GENERAL STORE HOURS. Monday through 
Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 



JUDICIARY OFFICE 

The University Judiciary Office effects discipline 
of the undergraduate students. Under the frame- 
work of a judiciary program which emphasizes 
personal growth and development, the aims of ju- 
dicial actions are largely educative and preventive. 
Judiciary Office staff members review all reports of 
alleged misconduct, contact those individuals in- 
volved, and in most instances schedule the case 
for hearing by a student judicial board. 

Staff members are available from 8:30 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday to discuss any 
aspect of a disciplinary situation with the student 
charged, witnesses, or those bringing the charges. 

PLACEMENT AND CREDENTIALS SERVICES 

The primary objective of the Placement Service 
is to assist students in their career exploration— 
whether they seek information concerning careers 
in government, educat'on, business, industry, 
or intend to pursue graduate study or fulfill mili- 
tary obligations. Especially helpful to underclass- 
men is the placement library, which contains an ex- 
tensive collection of graduate and professional 
school bulletins, information on financial aid for 
graduate study, job listings in various fields (in- 
cluding some summer employment and non-degree 
job information), general career information, and 
reference materials on nearly 1000 major employ- 
ers. 

Placement advice is available to any senior, 
graduate student, or alumnus of the University who 
is seeking full-time employment. 

Credentials service is available for College of 
Education seniors interested in teaching and for 
graduate students applying for teaching, adminis- 
trative, or research positions in schools and col- 
leges. 

The office and the library of the Placement and 
Credentials Services are located in Cumberland 
Hall Basement. 

SPACE RESERVATIONS 

FOR UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 

University space and supporting service facili- 



General Information 5 J 



ties are in constant demand by many people and 
organizations. This requires regulations that will 
provide a fair assignment of available resources 
(space). The Facilities Use Committee administers 
space and supporting services. 

For referral to proper authorities for coordina- 
tion of requests, call campus telephone extension 
2233. 



INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION SERVICES AND 
FOREIGN STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of International Education Services 
and Foreign Student Affairs provides a wide variety 
of services for foreign students to assist them in 
making proper adjustment to the requirements of 
American university and community life and deriv- 
ing the greatest possible benefit from their experi- 
ence in the United States. Assistance is given with 
admission procedures, English language testing, 
housing, orientation, emergency loans, employment, 
immigration regulations. The Office sponsors spe- 
cial educational, cultural, and social opportunities. 
Regulations Affecting Foreign Students 

Foreign students are subject to the same regu- 
lations that govern the academic life and personal 
conduct of American students enrolled in the Uni- 
versity. In addition, foreign students are required: 

1. To have a medical examination at the Uni- 

versity Health Service before completing 
registration procedures. 

2. To obtain approved hospital-medical insur- 

ance in addition to paying the University 
infirmary fee required of all students. 

3. To attend the special orientation program 

for new foreign students enrolling for the 
first time in September or February. (This 
program is held the weekend prior to regis- 
tration.) 
Foreign students are also subject to special reg- 
ulations of the U.S. Immigration Service and the 
U.S. Department of State which establish the con- 
ditions under which students may enter the United 
States and remain in this country for the purpose of 
pursuing studies. The Office of International Edu- 
cation Services and Foreign Student Affairs has 
the responsibility for advising students on these 
and other matters, as well as for issuing documents 
needed to maintain proper immigration status. 

The following regulations should be kept partic- 
ularly in mind by students holding an "F" or "J" visa 

1. Permission for temporary stay in the United 
States is valid for only one year at a time 
and must be revalidated from one month 
to two weeks prior to the date of expiration. 

2. A full course of study must be maintained. 

3. Employment off campus during the academic 
year may not be engaged in without the 
prior approval of the Immigration Service 
in the case of "F-l" students, or the per- 
mission of the sponsor designated in the 
Exchange-Visitor Program in the case of 
"J-l" students. The same regulations govern 
the securing of practical training. 

Permission for off-campus summer 
employment or on-campus employment 
during the academic year may be granted 
by the Director of International Education 
Services and Foreign Student Affairs on this 
campus. 

Under no circumstances may the wife 
or dependent with an "F-2" visa classifica- 



tion accept employment. The wife or de- 
pendent with a "J-2" classification may re- 
quest the Immigration Service for permis- 
sion for employment if the financial re- 
sources of the "J-l" student principal are 
not adequate for the support of the wife or 
dependent. 
4. An annual address report must be made 
to the Immigration Service during the 
month of January by immigrant as well as 
non-immigrant students (except those with 
"A" or "G" classification). Address report 
cards are available during the month of 
January only at U.S. post offices. 
Information, forms, and assistance in making 
necessary arrangements for complying with the 
regulations mentioned above are available at the 
Office of International Education Services and 
Foreign Student Affairs. Information regarding the 
filing of income tax returns may also be secured 
from the same office. 
CULTURAL STUDY CENTER 

The Cultural Study Center was established for 
the purpose of studying minority and other student 
cultural subgroups at the University of Maryland. 
Research will cover the socio-economic background 
and psychological development of the particular 
students, as well as their experiences on campus, 
which includes admissions, attrition, academics, 
adjustments, and problems of student life. Initially, 
the Center is developing data that bear on the inter- 
face between black and white cultures, on and off 
campus, and that point to changes that can be made 
at the University. 

The Center is serving as a clearing house of 
research dealing with black culture and is establish- 
ing a modest library. 

The Center has an advisory board consisting 
of black college and high school students, faculty 
and administrators, government officials, and mem- 
bers of the black community reflecting diverse view- 
points. University of Maryland Eastern Shore, a pre- 
dominantly black institution, also participates on 
the board. 

The Cultural Study Center is located in Shoe- 
maker Building, telephone 454-2931. 
STUDENT LIFE AND PROGRAMS 

Over three hundred officially recognized special 
interest clubs, civic groups, service, professional 
and recreational organizations, religious clubs and 
musical groups are available at College Park. These 
organizations serve the important function of en- 
couraging the development of leadership, integrity 
and citizenship skills. 

Channels for student activities include six stu- 
dent communications and publications media, over 
a dozen musical groups, the various social organi- 
zations, athletics and the Student Government As- 
sociation. 

Assisting in the coordination of many such 
groups is the Department of Student Activities. 
Staff members provide activities counseling, advis- 
ing, organizational coordination, leadership train- 
ing, and personal development programs. The office 
is located in the Student Union Building, Rooms 
136-142, telephone 454-2827. 

The Student Activities Department staff con- 
sists of six full-time professionals. These people 
occupy the following positions: 

Director of Student Activities— Rm. 140 Student 
Union 



52 



Genera/ Information 



Director of Orientation- Rm. 140 Student Union 
Director of Greek Affairs— Rm. 142A Student 

Union 
Director of Cultural Affairs— Rm. 103 Student 

Union 
Director of Community Service Programs— Rm. 

142B Student Union 
Educational Programming Specialist— Rm. 136 
Student Union 

Student Government Association 

The Student Government Association consists 
of three parts: Executive, Legislative and Judicial. 
The Executive branch acts as a coordinator of stu- 
dent activities and services at Maryland. The Legis- 
lative branch is responsible for investigating and 
providing solutions for problems concerning stu- 
dents. The Judicial branch of SGA protects student 
rights and punishes those who violate University 
rules. 

Under the Student Government Association are 
numerous committees which organize the affairs 
and activities of the student body. Membership is 
open to all interested students and applications may 
be secured from the SGA Office, Rm. 104 in the 
Student Union. SGA Committees include: Cultural 
Committee, Finance Committee, Homecoming, In- 
ternational Club, Placement Committee, Free Uni- 
versity Committee, and Student Union Board. 

The Student Government Association's Cultural 
Committee, University Theatre, and musical groups 

. present a broad program of musical, cultural, and 
dramatic programs. Programs to be presented on 
the campus in 1970-71 by the SGA Cultural Com- 
mittee are: New York Pro Musica, Ferrante and 
Teicher, Charlie Byrd Quintet, Howard Roberts 
Chorale, Pearl Lang Dance Group, Hamlet with 
Dame Judith Anderson, Noh Theater of Japan, Don 
Redlick Dance Company and Paul Winter Contem- 
porary Consort. The National Symphony presents a 
series of four concerts during the year. Contempor- 

'ary entertainment is presented throughout the year 
by various student organizations. 

University Theatre will present the following ma- 
jor productions: "Man of La Mancha," "Shakes- 
peare' 70", "Amphitryon 38", "Does a Tiger Wear 
a Necktie?", and "The Doctor In-Spite-of Himself." 
PACE (People Active in Community Effort) 

College students throughout the United States 
today are increasingly seeking a means of becoming 
involved in activity that has a direct relevance to 
problems and issues facing our domestic communi- 
ties. 

University of Maryland students and faculty 
have taken action in the creation of strong, dynamic 

•community service volunteer programs. PACE is the 
organization that serves as the coordinating organ 
for such programs as "Volunteers for Mental Health" 
and "Upward Bound." 

A staffed office located in Rm. 101 Student Un- 
ion is maintained as the focal point for all projects. 
Telephone: 454-4275. 

Greek System 

The Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils 
are the governing bodies for the Greek system, 

..which consists of 45 fraternity and sorority houses. 
It is the objective of the houses to encourage in- 
dividual members in the development of values, 
maturity, academic and intellectual potential, and 

•leadership ability. 

A varied program is carried out by the Greek 

' system annually, often to the benefit of the entire 



student body as well as fraternity and sorority 
members. The IFC Presents, held each spring and 
fall, brings talent such as Bob Hope and Bill Cosby 
to capacity crowds. The IFC Ball, one of the few re- 
maining formal events of the year, is held during 
semester break and features well-known entertain- 
ers and bands. Retreats are held each semester and 
are designed to study in depth, problems facing the 
system and the University or to provide leadership 
training. 

University Commuters' Association 

The University Commuters' Association offers 
the commuter many opportunities to become in- 
volved in campus life and provides unity to the large 
group of students who commute from nearby apart- 
ments and homes. 

The Commuters' Den and the UCA Office are 
located in the basement of the Student Union. The 
Den serves as a convenient place for commuters to 
eat, chat with friends, or just relax between classes, 
away from the bustle of the large campus. 

Associated Women Students 

The Associated Women Students (AWS) is the 
governing body for women students on the Univer- 
sity of Maryland campus. All full-time women stu- 
dents are members of the organization. 

AWS program and policy are administered by 
three councils: The Executive Council, President's 
Council and Panhellenic Council. AWS is an active 
affiliate of the Inter-collegiate Association of Wom- 
en Students, the national women's student govern- 
ment organization. 

Annually, AWS sponsors educational programs 
like the Sex Symposium, Drug Symposium, Wom- 
en's Week and Bridal Fair. These programs include 
informative lectures often by nationally known 
speakers, discussions, films or displays. 

Aside from the various programs that AWS in- 
itiates, this organization is concerned with forming 
and modifying women's regulations. During the past 
years, AWS has liberalized and eliminated many of 
the rules for women students, especially those 
dealing with curfews. The self-imposed curfew 
system has now been extended to include all women 
students. 

University Information Center 

The University Information Center is operated 
by the Student Activities Department to provide in- 
formation about University programs, services, and 
facilities. 

The Center is open from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 
Monday through Friday and is located in the Student 
Union Main Lobby, Room 111. 

Student Publications 

Student publications produced regularly include 
the Diamondback, Terrapin, Calvert Review, Argus, 
The Greek, M-Book, and the Course Guide. 

Any publication or pamphlet published by a stu- 
dent organization or group must be approved in 
advance by the Adjunct Senate Committee on Stu- 
dent Publications and Communications. 
Registration of University Events 

The Activities Coordinator (Rm. 142 Student 
Union) is responsible for the registration of certain 
University events. 

New Student Organizations 

Any student or group wishing to organize a Uni- 
versity-recognized club or activity should make an 
appointment with the Director of Student Activities 

General Information 53 



who will explain the procedure for formal recogni- 
tion by the Student Government Association and the 
Adjunct Committee on Student Activities of the Fac- 
ulty Senate. 
Calendar Registration 

The SGA Calendar of Events is the publication 
through which events can be publicized on a cam- 
pus-wide, semester basis. These events must be 
registered in Room 136 Student Union by May 30 
for inclusion in the Fall calendar and by January 15 
for the Spring calendar. 
Charitable and Service Projects 

The Campus Chest is a student charitable or- 
ganization composed of representatives of many 
University groups. Through a variety of fund- 
raising activities, these groups collect money to be 
distributed by Campus Chest to various charitable 
causes. For University groups interested in organiz- 
ing charitable and service projects, see Student 
Activities. 
Religious Programs 

The religious community at the University of 
Maryland presents a diversity of tradition through 
the several chaplaincies on campus. A cooperative 
ministry is carried out by these chaplaincies. In a 
number of instances during the year the Protest- 
ant, Roman Catholic, and Jewish chaplaincies 
jointly sponsor activities and programs of mutual 
interest and concern. All of the groups maintain 
active religious and social programs for their stu- 
dents. 

Offices for most of the Protestant chaplains are 
located in the University Chapel. The Roman Cath- 
olic and Jewish groups maintain their own centers 
off campus. 

ATHLETICS 

The University of Maryland Athletic Department, 
under the direction of Director Jim Kehoe, fields 
varsity teams in football, soccer, and cross country 
in the fall; basketball, swimming, wrestling, and in- 
door track during the winter; and baseball, golf, 
tennis, lacrosse, and outdoor track in the spring. 
Freshmen schedules also prevail in football and 
basketball. Maryland is a member of the Atlantic 
Coast Conference, which also includes Clemson, 
Duke, North Carolina, North Carolina State, South 
Carolina, Virginia, and Wake Forest. The University 
won the Carmichael Cup, symbolic of top overall 
athletic performance in the ACC, this past year for 
the seventh time out of the nine years the title has 
been in existence. Maryland's ACC Championships 
in 1969-70 were provided by the wrestling, cross 
country, indoor track, outdoor track, baseball, and 
swimming teams. 

The Men's Intramural Department provides com- 
petition in touch football, horseshoes, tennis, and 



cross country during the fall; basketball, bowling, 
weight lifting, swimming, badminton, table tennis, 
volleyball, and wrestling in the winter; and foul 
shooting, softball, soccer, golf, and track during the 
spring months. All regularly enrolled full-time male 
undergraduates are eligible to participate by sub- 
mitting entry blanks before posted deadlines. Blanks 
may be obtained from Intramural Director Nick 
Kovalakides. His office is located in Reckord Arm- 
ory. Interested students are urged to stop by the of- 
fice to obtain a copy of the intramural handbook. 

MOTOR VEHICLES 

Parking facilities at the University are extreme- 
ly limited and are primarily intended for use by 
commuting students. Most parking areas are located 
on the periphery of the campus and are usually five 
or six blocks away from residence halls and class- 
room buildings. 

Freshman and sophomore resident students are 
not permitted to register motor vehicles on campus; 
however, they may obtain on-campus weekend park- 
ing privileges. Any freshman or sophomore (i.e., a 
student who has earned fewer than 56 academic 
credits) who needs a motor vehicle for work, or for 
any other purpose, should consider making off- 
campus living arrangements. 

Motor scooters, motorcycles, motor-bikes, or 
bicycles are not permitted inside any residence 
hall. They must be parked in those outside areas 
specifically marked for them. 

COMMISSIONS FOR THE VICE CHANCELLOR 
FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS 

In the interest of trying to draw on collaborative 
efforts and to improve various segments of campus 
life, the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs several 
years ago established a series of commissions. The 
commissions are task-oriented groups who identify 
problem areas, study them, gather relevant informa- 
tion, and then make periodic proposals for change 
to the Vice Chancellor. The Commissions typically 
have twelve members — half of the members are 
students, one-fourth are Student Affairs staff, and 
one-fourth are faculty. 

The areas of student life with which the com- 
missions concern themselves are the following: 
Commission I: Transition to the University 
Commission II: Transition from the University 
Commission III: Residential Campus Life 
Commission IV: Commuter Campus Life 
Commission V: Student-Faculty Relationships 
Commission VI: Student-Administration Relationships 
Commission VII: Student-Student Relationships 
Commission VIII: Campus Facilities 
Commission IX: Black Students 
Interested individuals are requested to contact 
the Coordinator of the Commissions by calling 2931 
or 2925. 



54 



Genera/ information 




General Information 55 




56 Genera/ Information 



LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS 



The residence halls are divided into five geo- 
graphical areas: Cambridge; Denton; Ellicott; Hill; 
and Mobile. Assistant Directors of Housing are re- 
sponsible for the development of an educational 
atmosphere within the individual areas, supervision 
of the staff personnel, and coordination of area ac- 
tivities. 

The residence hall staff is composed of Resi- 
dent Directors, Head Residents, Graduate Resi- 
dents, and Resident Assistants. They are responsi- 
ble for fostering sound educational and social en- 
vironment in the hall. They perform such func- 
tions as assisting in program development, con- 
sulting with individual students, and advising stu- 
dent government, house judiciary, and student 
committees. 

The University Housing Office, including the 
offices of the Director and Associate Directors of 
Housing, is located at 300 North Administration 
Building. Assistant Directors of Housing for each 
residential area maintain offices within that area. 

RESIDENCE HALLS GOVERNMENT 

Residence halls government has three main 
functions: (1) to provide for the comfort and safety 
of the student; (2) to provide social, cultural, ath- 
letic, and intellectual programs for the enjoyment 
and development of the student; and (3) to provide 
opportunities for students to gain leadership experi- 
ence. 

All resident students are members of the resi- 
dence hall student government and as members 
may be asked to pay a voluntary fee at the time 
they enter the hall. These house activities fees are 
established by a majority vote of the students in 
each hall and are collected by student officers. Each 



Area Council assesses by majority vote of the Coun- 
cil the amount per person which is to be paid to the 
Area Council. 

AREA GOVERNMENTS OR COUNCILS 

Each Council is composed of all residence halls 
presidents of that area. The purpose of the area 
government is to stimulate intellectual, cultural, 
social, and athletic interaction on an area-wide 
basis. 

RESIDENCE HALLS ASSOCIATION 

The Residence Halls Association serves as the 
student government coordinating body for all resi- 
dence halls. It is composed of the presidents and 
elected representatives of all of the Area Councils. 
The officers of the Residence Halls Association are 
nominated and elected by the residence halls presi- 
dents. 

RESIDENCE HALL CONTRACT 

The residence halls contract is for the entire 
academic year (except for students entering the 
residence halls in the Spring Semester, when it is 
for one semester only). Release from contract is 
permitted only under extenuating circumstances 
or upon withdrawal from the University. 

Only unmarried, full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents may live in the residence halls, due to space 
limitations. 

The University reserves the right to: (1) change 
the room assignment of a student or request him to 
move to different accommodations and (2) inspect 
residence hall student rooms in accordance with 
the room inspection policy. 



General Information 



57 



Group living requires that students contorm to 
certain standards of conduct. Any student who fails 
to observe these standards may be referred for disci- 
plinary action including possible dismissal from 
the residence. 

The following shall constitute grounds for ter- 
mination of the contract by the University: default 
in payments, withdrawal from the University, 
academic dismissal, disciplinary dismissal (viola- 
tion of University and/or residence hall rules and 
regulations), or conduct on the part of the student 
by which the removal of that student from the resi- 
dence halls would be in the best interest of the other 
residents. The University will give the student a writ- 
ten notice stating the date of termination of the con- 
tract. 

All students who live in the residence halls 
must also board at the University Dining Halls. 
Special arrangements may be made for Jewish 
resident students who observe the Jewish dietary 
laws to eat at the Hillel Dining Hall instead of the 
University Dining Halls. 

Room and board contracts begin with the first 
day of registration and include the last day of each 
semester. 

The residence halls are closed during the 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, between semesters, and 
Spring recesses. Students must make their own 
arrangements for housing accommodations at 
these times. Designated residence halls may re- 
main open during these periods if there is sufficient 
need. 

FOOD SERVICE 

The purpose of the University Food Service is 
to provide nutritionally balanced and tastefully pre- 
pared meals, served in an atmosphere that engen- 
ders good will, trust and cooperation between stu- 
dent and management. 
The Dining Halls 

The University of Maryland Food Service oper- 
ates five dining halls for resident students who have 
purchased board contracts. The Dining Halls serve 
cafeteria style, and self-bussing of trays is required. 

By taking student preferences into considera- 
tion, menus are planned accordingly. Also, dining 
halls are made available for special student func- 
tions. 
Meal Hours 
Monday-Friday Saturday Sunday During Finals 

Breakfast 7:00-9:30 7:30-9:30 9:00-11:00 7:00-9:30 

Lunch 10:45-1:15 11:30-1:00 11:30-1:20 10:45-1:15 

Dinner 3:45-6:15 4:30-6:00 2:00-4:15 3:30-6:30 

Pre-exam study day and holidays— Saturday 
hours will prevail. 

Removal of food, drink, or other Food Service 
property from the dining halls is prohibited. 

Dining Hall contracts go into effect on the first 
day of registration and continue through the last 
day of exams. The dining hall is closed on Thanks- 
giving recess, Christmas recess, between semesters 
and Easter recess. Dining halls are open during all 
other holidays. 

Guests are always welcome in the dining halls. 
Should a student wish to bring a guest, tickets may 
be purchased from the manager of each dining hall. 



BOARD AND LODGING REFUNDS 

The charges for room and board are refundable 
when the student officially withdraws from the Uni- 



versity or when he is given permission by the ap- 
propriate officials of the University to move from 
the residence halls and/or to discontinue dining 
hall privileges. Students authorized to withdraw 
from the residence halls will receive a Room Refund 
on a pro rata weekly basis computed from the date 
the student turns in his room key to his staff mem- 
ber and properly clears his room. Room and/or 
board refunds cannot be made after the fourteenth 
week of the semester. The Food Service Identifica- 
tion Card or the remaining partial board tickets 
must be surrendered at the Auditor's Office in the 
South Administration Building on the day of with- 
drawal before any refund will be processed. A serv- 
ice charge equal to ten percent of the total semes- 
ter charge will automatically be deducted from all 
room and board refunds. 

Students are expected to withdraw in person, 
unless illness or emergency conditions make this 
impossible. See Appendix E for withdrawal pro- 
cedures. 

GUESTS IN RESIDENCE HALLS 

Students must register overnight guests with 
the residence hall staff member in advance of their 
arrival. It is the responsibility of the student host to 
have his guest sign the Guest Registration form. 

The host must receive advance permission for 
use of a student bed from the student whose room 
and bed will be used. This student will also sign the 
Guest Registration form in order to signify that his 
permission has been given. 

Any student who has been dismissed from Uni- 
versity Housing for disciplinary reasons may not 
be a guest in the residence halls. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY: 

LOSS, THEFT, AND INSURANCE 

The University cannot accept responsibility for 
the damage, theft, or loss of money, valuables, or 
any personal property. If there is a loss, it should be 
reported immediately. 

Neither the State nor the University provides any 
insurance coverage on property owned by students, 
faculty, staff, or employees. 

Most standard dwelling and contents Fire In- 
surance Policies and Homeowners' Policies that 
insure personal property provide an extension of 
coverage up to ten percent of the amount of insur- 
ance carried on household contents while this per- 
sonal property is located elsewhere from the usual 
place of residence. Therefore, students whose par- 
ents carry insurance on their household effects 
should check their policy to be certain that it covers 
personal property brought to the residence halls. 

ROOM ASSIGNMENT 

Residence hall room assignments are initially 
made on a random basis. Subsequent room assign- 
ments are based on individual preference in ac- 
cordance with priorities established by the residents 
of each hall (class rank, length of occupancy, aca- 
demic standing, leadership, etc.). 

Roommate and hall preferences are not honored 
in the assignment of new students. Requests for 
room changes within the same Residence Hall will 
be considered during the second week of classes. 
Hall and roommate preferences are honored for 
students returning to the Residence Halls after 
their first academic semester. 



58 



General Information 



ROOM INSPECTION 

Rooms may be inspected by staff members and 
student representatives to maintain sanitary stand- 
ards which protect the safety, health, and well-being 
of other residents and to insure that University 
property is properly maintained. 

The residence hall staff member will be accom- 
panied by a student representative during inspec- 
tions. Personal possessions of occupants will not be 
examined. When possible, inspections will be con- 
ducted when at least one of the occupants of the 
rooms is present. 



bility for the inspection, supervision, cleanliness, or 
operation of off-campus housing. 



RESIDENCE HALLS REGULATIONS 

In addition to the University regulations stated 
elsewhere, the following regulations concerning 
safety, sanitation, and individual freedom have been 
established with the welfare of each student in 
mind. 



OPEN HOUSE PROGRAM 

The open house program provides opportunities 
for coeducational activities in residence halls and 
allows increased opportunity for students to de- 
velop personal responsibility and maturity. Male 
and female students and other guests may utilize 
facilities of the residence hall during a time period 
specifically established for such a program. 

1. The open house program in each residence hall is 

approved and the hours are established by a 3 /s ma- 
jority vote of the total membership of the unit. Each 
residence hall unit shall vote by secret ballot on 
existing hours at the beginning of each semester. Either 
expansion or shortening of the hours may be brought 
before the unit for consideration by a petition of Va 
the students of the residence hall unit. Planning, 
scheduling, and evaluating of the open house program is 
a cooperative effort of students and staff members. 

2. The maximum hours within which open houses may 

be held are: 
Sunday through Thursday 12:00 Noon— 12:00 Midnight 
Friday and Saturday 12:00 Noon— 1:30 A.M. 



Certain designated halls may hold open house within 
the following hours: 



Sunday through Thursday 
Friday and Saturday 



8:00 A.M.— 12:00 Midnight 
8:00 A.M.— 1:30 A.M. 



3. The president of the hall will record the days and 

hours as adopted by the Unit and submit them to the 
staff member for posting. It is preferable that days and 
hours be consistent for the entire residence hall when 
all facilities are open and available. 

4. The host or hostess should meet the guest in the lobby 

of the hall and escort that guest to the lounge, study 
room, recreation room, or student room. The host or 
hostess must assume responsibility for the behavior 
of the guest. 

5. An announcement should be made prior to the be- 

ginning and ending of the open house period. 



OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The Off-Campus Housing Office maintains an 
active file of off-campus rooms, apartments and 
houses. This file is available on a self-service basis 
to all persons associated with the University. 

University policy prohibits landlords listed by 
this office from discriminating because of race, re- 
ligion, ethnic group, or national origin. Please report 
any instances of such discrimination to the Human 
Relations Officer. 

Special help is available for those students and 
faculty having difficulty in finding housing. Please 
feel free to ask for assistance. 

The University does not assume any responsi- 



1. Open flame devices such as lighted candles, 

lanterns, stoves, torches, etc. must not be 
used within the residence halls. 

2. Electrical appliances and extension cords are 
not approved for use within the residence 
halls unless it is established that they do not 
overload electrical circuits and create a fire 
hazard. 

3. As a fire-preventive measure, students are 

requested to use metal wastebaskets and to 
use ashtrays that permit a cigarette to be 
held in a ridged device in the center. 

4. Each time a building alarm sounds, regard- 

less of cause, every person must leave the 
building immediately by the shortest route. 
Elevators are not to be used because of pos- 
sible power failure. 

5. Animals or pets are not permitted in the 

residence halls. 

6. Cleanliness and sanitation are essential in the 

use of residence hall kitchens. Foods should 
be stored under proper refrigeration in 
covered containers, and should be discarded 
if not used within a short period. 

7. No soliciting is permitted in the residence 
halls without special written permission from 
the Assistant Director of Housing for that 
area. 

8. The removal of or relocation of residence 

halls property is not permitted unless author- 
ized by the appropriate Assistant Director of 
Housing. 
The residents acting through governmental unit 

voting may desire to establish additional standards 

of conduct. 



SPECIAL REGULATIONS FOR 
RESIDENT WOMEN 

Responsibility for formulation, review and revi- 
sion of women's rules and regulations lies with the 
Associated Women Students. 

All women living in residence halls and sorority 
houses are subject to the regulations set forth by 
AWS. 

CLOSING HOURS 
Closing hours for all women's residence halls are: 

Sunday through Thursday 12:00 Midnight 

Friday and Saturday 1:30 A.M. 

Women may leave or return to the residence 
hall or sorority house after the closing hours. When 
entering or exiting, however, the main or designated 
door of the living unit must be used. 

After the closing hour, women will be admitted 
by Student Identification Card to the residence hall 



Genera/ Information 



59 



by the Night Receptionist on duty. Sorority women 
will be issued keys for use in entering their living 
units. 

A guest of a resident woman will have no cur- 
few. She may enter the residence hall or sorority 
house after the closing hour provided she is accom- 
panied by her hostess. 

SIGNING IN AND OUT 

Signing in and out aids the staff member in 
locating a student in case of an emergency or in 
delivering an important message and is a highly 
recommended procedure. However, signouts are 
optional and are. required only, wl^en le.aving.for 
University vacation or semester break. 

Once a student signs out for vacation or break, 
she will not be permitted to re-enter her residence 
until it is officially re-opened. 

Note: In those cases where parents express to 
the Vice President for Student Affairs their written 
objections, participation in the self-limited hours 
program will be withheld. 

MONDAY NIGHT LIVING UNIT MEETINGS 

Residence hall and sorority house meetings will 
be held on Monday nights. Each living unit will 
determine the meeting time by a vote at the begin- 
ning of the year. Residence hall meetings should 
not conflict with sorority meetings. 



WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURES 

Students withdrawing from the University and 
the residence halls follow steps 1 through 10 below. 

Students withdrawing from the residence halls 
but remaining in the University follow steps 1, 7, 
and 9 below. 

Students withdrawing from the University (with 
no housing or board contracts) follow steps 2, 3, 4, 
5, 6, 8, and 10. 



1. Discuss withdrawal with staff member or As- 

sistant Director of Housing. 

2. Obtain from the Dean of the college the form, 

Application for Withdrawal from the Univer- 
sity. 

3- Complete, sign, and if under 21, have parents 

sign the application. 

4- Have academic Dean sign the application. 

5. Return all University property to the appropri- 

ate departments (books to the Library; ath- 
letic equipment to the Athletic Department, 
obtaining breakage deposits when appropri- 
ate; military equipment to the Military 
Science Department, etc.) 

6. Report to the Office of the Vice President for 

Student Affairs, North Administration Build- 
ing, for an exit interview and to surrender 
Transaction Plate and University Identifica- 
tion Card should be surrendered here. 

7. Submit Food Service Identification Card (full 

board contract) or unused Food Service tick- 
ets (partial board contract) to the Office of 
the Auditor, Room 201, South Administration 
Building. Auditor submits receipt for return 
of Food Service Identification Card or unused 
Food Service Tickets to Business Office. No 
Board refund can be processed if a student 
does not submit his Food Service Identifica- 
tion Card or unused Food Service Tickets to 
the Auditor. 

8. Submit the completed Application for With- 

drawal from the University to the Office of 
the Registrar for final clearance. 

9. Check with residence hall staff member for 

proper room clearance and key return. No 
room refund can be processed if a student 
does not properly clear with residence hall 
staff member. 
10. Report for financial clearance to Office of the 
Cashier, South Administration Building. 



60 



General Information 




\ 



General Information 61 




62 Genera/ Information 



HONORS AND AWARDS 



HONORS 

SCHOLARSHIP HONORS— Final honors for excellence in 
scholarship are awarded to one-fifth of the graduating class 
in each College. "HIGH HONORS" are awarded to the upper 
half of this group; "HONORS" to the lower half. To be eli- 
gible for honors, a student must complete at least two years 
of resident work (60 semester hours) at the University with 
an average of B (3.0) or higher. 

MILTON ABRAMOWITZ MEMORIAL PRIZE IN MATHE- 
MATICS — A prize is awarded annually to a junior or senior 
student majoring in mathematics who has demonstrated 
superior competence and promise for future development in 
the field of mathematics and its applications. 
THE AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT FUND— A limited num- 
ber of scholarships are available to students enrolled in the 
College of Agriculture. 

THE ALCOA FOUNDATION TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTA- 
TION AWARD to an outstanding senior student majoring in 
transportation. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA AWARD— The Alpha Rho Chapter of 
the Alpha Chi Sigma Honorary Fraternity offers annually a 
year's membership in the American Chemical Society to the 
senior majoring in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering whose 
average has been above 3.0 for three and one-half years. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA AWARD— Presented to the senior 
member of the group who has maintained the highest average 
for three and a half years. She must have been in attendance 
in the institution for the entire time. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA SENIOR CERTIFICATE AWARD— 
Senior members of Alpha Lambda Delta, honorary scholastic 
society for women, who have maintained an average of 3.5, 
receive this certificate. 

ALPHA ZETA MEDAL— The Professional Agricultural Fra- 
ternity of Alpha Zeta awards annually a medal to the agricul- 
tural student in the freshman class who attains the highest 
average in academic work. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN AN- 
NUAL GRADUATE PRIZE. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRO- 
NAUTICS AWARD— Free memberships in the Institute for one 
year and cash prizes for the best paper presented at a Stu- 



dent Branch meeting and for the graduating aeronautical 
senior with the highest academic standing. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
AWARD— A certificate, pin, and magazine subscription are 
awarded to the junior member of the Student Chapter who at- 
tained the highest overall scholastic average during his fresh- 
man and sophomore years. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTS AWARD— Pre- 
sented for outstanding scholarship in chemistry and for high 
character. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS AWARD— The 
Maryland Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
awards annually the first year's dues of an associate mem- 
bership in the Society to a senior member of the Student 
Chapter on recommendation of the faculty of the Department 
of Civil Engineering. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 
AWARD — Presented to the Senior member who contributed 
most to the local chapter. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING MATERIALS— A stu- 
dent membership prize is awarded to an engineering senior in 
recognition of superior scholastic ability and demonstrated 
interest in engineering materials and their evaluation. 

APPLEMAN-NORTON AWARD IN BOTANY— The De- 
partment of Botany offers a scholarship award of $100 in 
honor of Emeritus Professors C. O. Appleman and J. B. S. 
Norton to a senior major in Botany who is considered worthy 
on the basis of demonstrated ability and excellence in 
scholarship. The scholarship is awarded by the Committee 
on scholarships upon the recommendation of a committee of 
the faculty of the Department of Botany. 

ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS AWARDS— Presented 
for outstanding achievement, character, and service to the 
University. 

DAVID ARTHUR BERMAN MEMORIAL AWARD— This 
award is offered by the family of David Arthur Berman to the 
highest ranking junior in the Department of Chemical En- 
gineering who is also a member of Tau Beta Pi. 

DINAH BERMAN MEMORIAL MEDAL— The Dinah Ber- 
man Memorial Medal is awarded annually to the sophomore 
who has attained the highest scholastic average of his class 



Genera/ Information 



63 



in the College ot Engineering. This medal is given by Mr. 
Benjamin Berman. 

B'NAI B'RITH AWARD— The B'nai B'rith Women of Prince 
Georges County present a Book Award for excellence in He- 
brew Studies. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION AWARD OF MERIT to a student 
in Business Education in recognition of outstanding achieve- 
ment as a student. 

CITIZENSHIP PRIZE FOR MEN— President Emeritus H.C. 
Byrd of the Class of 1908, annually presents this award to 
the member of the senior class who, during his collegiate 
career, has most nearly typified the model citizen and who 
has done most for the general advancement of the interests 
of the University. 

CITIZENSHIP PRIZE FOR WOMEN-This prize is pre- 
sented annually as a memorial to Sally Sterling Boyd, by her 
children, to that member of the senior class who best exem- 
plifies the enduring qualities of the pioneer woman. These 
qualities typify self dependence, courtesy, aggressiveness, 
modesty, capacity to achieve objectives, willingness to sac- 
rifice for others, strength of character, and those other qual- 
ities that enabled the pioneer woman to play such a funda- 
mental part in the building of the nation. 

THE CARROLL E. COX GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP 
AWARD in Botany to the outstanding graduate student in the 
Department of Botany during the last year. 

BERNARD L. CROZIER AWARD— The Maryland Associa- 
tion of Engineers awards a cash prize of twenty-five dollars 
to the senior in the College of Engineering who, in the opin- 
ion of the faculty, has made the greatest improvement in 
scholarship during his stay at the University. 

VIRGINIA DARE AWARD— The Virginia Dare Extract 
Company awards annually a plaque and $25.00 to the out- 
standing student in ice cream manufacturing with an overall 
good standing in dairy. 

THE DANFORTH FOUNDATION AND THE RALSTON 
PURINA AWARDS— The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston 
Purina Company of St. Louis offer two summer awards to out- 
standing men students in the College of Agriculture, one for 
a student who has successfully completed his junior year, the 
other for a student who has successfully completed his fresh- 
man year. The purpose of these awards is to bring together 
outstanding young men for leadership training. 

The Danforth Foundation and the Ralston Purina Com- 
pany of St. Louis offer two summer awards to outstanding 
Home Economics women students, one to a junior and one to 
a freshman. The purpose of these is to bring together out- 
standing young women for leadership training. 

THE DELMARVA TRAFFIC CLUB AWARD to a junior stu- 
dent majoring in transportation whose residence is on the 
Maryland Eastern Shore. 

DELTA DELTA DELTA MEDAL— This sorority awards a 
medal annually to the woman who attains the highest average 
in academic work during the sophomore year. 

DELTA GAMMA SCHOLARSHIP AWARD— This award is 
offered to the woman member of the graduating class who 
has maintained the highest average during three and one- 
half years at the University. 

DELTA SIGMA PI SCHOLARSHIP KEY— This award is 
offered to a member of the graduating class who has main- 
tained the highest scholastic average for the entire four-year 
course in the College of Business and Public Administration. 

NATHAN L. DRAKE AWARD— Presented by the Alpha 
Rho Chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma to the most promising stu- 
dent who is majoring in chemistry and has completed the 
sophomore year. 

EDUCATION ALUMNI AWARD— Presented to the out- 
standing senior man and senior woman in the College of Educa- 
tion. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY prize to the outstanding 
first year graduate student in physics and to the outstanding 
first year graduate student in astronomy. 

GODDARD MEDAL— The James Douglass Goadard Me- 
morial Medal is awarded annually to the resident of Price 
Georges County born therein, who makes the highest average 
in his studies and who at the same time embodies the most 
manly attributes. The medal is given by Mrs. Anne G. God- 
dard James of Washington, D.C. 

CHARLES B. HALE DRAMATIC AWARDS— The University 
Theatre recognizes annually the man and woman members of 
the senior class who have done most for the advancement of 
dramatics at the University. 

HAMILTON AWARD— This award is offered by the Hamil- 
ton Watch Company to the graduating senior in the College of 
Engineering who has most successfully combined proficiency 



in his major field of study with achievements — either aca- 
demic, extra-curricular, or both— in the social sciences or 
humanities. 

THE HASKINS AND SELLS FOUNDATIONS, INC., AWARD 
to the senior student in the College of Business and Public 
Administration concentrating in accounting who has dem- 
onstrated excellent ability in this field of study. 

HOME ECONOMICS ALUMNI AWARD-Presented to the 
student outstanding in application of home economics in 
her present living and who shows promise of carrying these 
into her future home and community 

INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS EN- 
GINEERING AWARD— The Washington Section of the Insti- 
tute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers defrays the ex- 
penses of a year's membership as an associate in the Insti- 
tute for the senior doing the most to promote Student Branch 
activities. 

JOE ELBERT JAMES MEMORIAL AWARD-Gold watch 
annually awarded to the graduating senior in horticulture on 
basis of scholarship and promise of future achievement. 

LEIDY CHEMICAL COMPANY AWARD to an outstanding 
student majoring in chemistry. 

MARYLAND-DELAWARE PRESS ASSOCIATION ANNUAL 
CITATION— Presented to the outstanding senior in journal- 
ism. 

MARYLAND COOPERATIVE MILK PRODUCERS SCHOL- 
ARSHIP—A scholarship award of $500 is provided to a Col- 
lege of Agriculture student enrolled in a curriculum relating 
to the dairy industry. 

MARYLAND RECREATION AND PARKS SOCIETY AWARD 
to an outstanding senior majoring in recreation. 

MEN'S LEAGUE AWARD to the male senior who gave the 
most to sports. 

MEN'S LEAGUE CERTIFICATES— Offered for outstanding 
achievement, character, and service to the University. 

MEN'S LEAGUE CUP— This award is offered by the Men's 
League to the graduating male senior who has done the most 
for the male student body. 

MOTOR FLEET SUPERVISORS AWARD to a student ma- 
joring in transportation in the College of Business and Public 
Administration. 

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERS 
AWARDS— Presented to the most outstanding senior and 
sophomore in the Fire Protection curriculum. 

NOXZEMA CHEMICAL COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 
to an undergraduate student in chemistry. 

OMICRON NU SORORITY MEDAL— This honorary sorority 
awards a medal annually to the freshman woman in the 
College of Home Economics who attains the highest scholas- 
tic average during the first semester. 

PHI BETA KAPPA JUNIOR AWARD— An award to be pre- 
sented to the junior initiate into Phi Beta Kappa who has at- 
tained the highest academic average. 

PHI BETA KAPPA— LEON P. SMITH AWARD— The award 
oftheGammaof Maryland Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa is presented 
to the graduating senior with the highest cumulative scholas- 
tic average whose basic course program has been in the liberal 
studies. 

PHI CHI THETA KEY— The Phi Chi Theta Key is awarded 
to the outstanding graduating senior woman in the College 
of Business and Public Administration on the basis of schol- 
arship, activities, and leadership. 

PHI DELTA KAPPA AWARD— Presented to an outstanding 
man in the graduating class of the College of Education. 

PHI SIGMA AWARDS for outstanding achievement in the 
biological sciences to an undergraduate student and a gradu- 
ate student. 

PI DELTA EPSILON NATIONAL MEDAL OF MERIT 
AWARDS— Offered by the National Council of Pi Delta Ep- 
silon to the outstanding senior woman and the outstanding 
senior man in Journalism activities. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD for outstanding service to 
communications in the field of broadcasting. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD for outstanding service to 
communications in the field of Business. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD to the outstanding freshman 
in the field of communications. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AWARD for outstainding service to 
communications in the field of editorial journalism. 

PI TAU SIGMA AWARD— An annual handbook award to 
the most outstanding sophomore in mechanical engineering 
on the basis of scholastic average and instructors' ratings. 

PILOT FREIGHT CARRIERS. INC.. AWARD to the senior 



64 



General Information 



student in the College of Business and Public Administration 
who has majored in Transportation and who has demon- 
strated competence in this field of study. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS SOCIETY OF AMERICA— The Balti- 
more Chapter of PRSA presents an annual citation to the out- 
standing senior majoring in public relations. 

SIGMA ALPHA OMICRON AWARD— This award is pre- 
sented to a senior student majoring in Microbiology for high 
scholarship, character and leadership. 

THE SIGMA CHAPTER, PHI DELTA GAMMA AWARD To 
an outstanding woman who has completed requirements for 
the doctoral degree. 

DR. LEO AND RITA SKLAR GENERAL HONORS AWARDS 
—Dr. Leo Sklar, A&S '37, and his wife, Rita Sklar, annually 
fund four awards for excellence in the General Honors Pro- 
gram of the College of Arts and Sciences. These awards are 
given to the Outstanding Student in the General Honors Pro- 
($400.00), the Outstanding General Honors senior ($300.00), 
the Outstanding General Honors junior ($300.00), and the 
Outstanding General Honors sophomore ($300.00). 

ALGERNON SYDNEY SULLIVAN AWARD— The New York 
Southern Society, in memory of its first president, awards 
annually medallions and certificates to one man and one 
woman of the graduating class and one non-student who 
evince in their daily life a spirit of love for and helpfulness to 
other men and women. 

TAU BETA PI AWARD— The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi Association, national engineering honor society, 
awards an engineer's handbook to the junior in the College of 
Engineering who during his sophomore year has made the 
greatest improvement in scholarship over that of his freshman 
year. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARD— Awarded annually to the graduating senior who has 
maintained the highest scholastic achievement in the field 
of financial administration. The award consists of a silver 
medal embedded in clear plastic and one year's subscription to 
the Wall Street Journal. 

THE ARTHUR YOUNG AND CO. FOUNDATION, INC, 
AWARDS to exceptional senior students concentrating in ac- 
counting who are registered in the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 



AIR FORCE ROTC AWARDS 

AFROTC ANGEL FLIGHT AWARD to the outstanding mem- 
ber of the AFROTC Angel Flight. 

AIR FORCE TIMES AWARD to the senior cadet at each 
detachment who has distinguished himself by contributing 
materially to constructive public attention for the corps of 
cadets. 

ALUMNI CUP to the outstanding flight in the corps of 
cadets. 

AMERICAN LEGION AWARDS to outstanding senior and 
junior cadets who have demonstrated military excellence and 
scholastic achievement. 

ARMED FORCES COMMUNICATIONS AND ELECTRONICS 
ASSOCIATION AWARD to the outstanding senior cadet ma- 
joring in electrical, electronics or communications engi- 
neering. 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY AWARD to the advanced cadet 
selected by the Arnold Air Society as the cadet who has con- 
tributed the most to the advancement of AFROTC through 
activities of the Arnold Air Society. 

COBLENTZ MEMORIAL CUP to the outstanding group in 
the corps of cadets. 

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS GOLD CUP to the 
senior cadet who has displayed outstanding leadership, scholar- 
ship, and citizenship. 

DISTINGUISHED AFROTC CADET AWARDS to those 
seniors who possess outstanding qualities of leadership and 
high moral character and who meet the prescribed standings 
in their academic and military studies. 

GENERAL DYNAMICS AWARD to the sophomore cadet 
displaying outstanding leadership and scholarship qualities and 
who has been selected for the Professional Officer Course. 

GOVERNOR'S CUP to the outstanding squadron in the 
corps of cadets. 

NATIONAL DEFENSE TRANSPORTATION ASSOCIATION 
AWARD to the outstanding senior cadet majoring in trans- 
portation. 

RESERVE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION AWARDS to the out- 
standing junior and senior in the corps of cadets. 



SOCIETY OF AMERICAN MILITARY ENGINEERS AWARDS 
to 'i junior and a senior cadet displaying outstanding scholas- 
tic achievement and leadership and majoring in the field of 
engineering. 

SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION MEDALS— To 
a two-year and a four-year cadet displaying outstanding 
aptitude for the military. 

ATHLETIC AWARDS 

ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE AWARD— A plaque is 
awarded each year to a senior in each conference school 
for excellence in scholarship and athletics. 

THE ALVIN L, AUBINOE BASKETBALL TROPHY— This 
trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for the senior who has 
contributed most to the squad. 

THE ALVIN L. AUBINOF FOOTBALL TROPHY-This 
trophy is offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for the unsung hero of 
the current season. 

THE ALVIN L. AUBINOE TRACK TROPHY— This trophy is 
offered by Alvin L. Aubinoe for the senior who has contribu- 
ted most to the squad during the time he was on the squad. 

JOHN T. BELL SWIMMING AWARD-To the year's out- 
standing swimmer or diver. 

LOUIS W. BERGER TROPHY— Presented to the outstand- 
ing senior baseball player. 

WILLIAM P. COLE, III, MEMORIAL LACROSSE AWARD— 
This award, offered by the teammates of William P. Cole, III, 
and the coaches of the 1940 National Champion team, is pre- 
sented to the. outstanding midfielder. 

THE GEORGE C. COOK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
TROPHY— Awarded annually to a member of the football 
team with the highest scholastic average. 

JOE DECKMAN-SAM SILBER TROPHY— This trophy is of- 
fered by Joseph H. Deckman and Samuel L. Silber to the most 
improved defense lacrosse player. 

GEARY F. EPPLEY AWARD— Offered by Benny and Hotsy 
Alperstein to the graduating male senior athlete who, during 
his three years of varsity competition, lettered at least once 
and attained the highest over-all scholastic average. 

HALBERT K. EVANS MEMORIAL TRACK AWARD— This 
award, given in memory of "Hermie" Evans, of the Class of 
1940, by his friends, is presented to graduating senior track- 
man. 

HERBERT H. GOODMAN MEMORIAL THROPHY— This 
trophy is awarded to the most outstanding wrestler of the 
year. 

CHARLES LEROY MACKERT TROPHY— This trophy is of- 
fered by William K. Krouse to the Maryland student who has 
contributed most to wrestling while at the University. 

MARYLAND RING— The Maryland Ring is offered as a me- 
morial to Charles L. Linhardt, of the Class of 1912, to the 
Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 

CHARLES P. MC CORMICK TROPHY— This trophy is of- 
fered by Charles P. McCormick to the senior letterman who 
has contributed most to swimming during his collegiate 
career. 

ANTHONY C. NARDO MEMORIAL TROPHY— This trophy 
is awarded to the best football lineman of the year. 

EDWIN POWELL TROPHY— This trophy is offered by the 
Class of 1913 to the player who has rendered the greatest 
service to lacrosse during the year. 

SILVESTER WATCH FOR EXCELLENCE IN ATHLETICS— 
A gold watch, given in honor of former president of the Univer- 
sity, R. W. Silvester, is offered annually to "the man who 
typifies the best in college athletics." 

TEKE TROPHY— This trophy is offered by the Maryland 
Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity to the student who 
during his four years at the University has rendered the great- 
est service to football. 

ROBERT E. THEOFELD MEMORIAL— This trophy is pre- 
sented by Dr. and Mrs. Harry S. Hoffman and is awarded to 
the golfer who most nearly exemplifies the competitive spirit 
and strong character of Robert E. Theofeld, a former member 
of the boxing team. 

MUSIC AWARDS 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR'S AWARD to the outstanding 
member of the Symphonic Band. 

DIRECTOR'S AWARD to the concert band member who 
demonstrated the most improvement in musicianship during 
the year. 

KAPPA KAPPA PSI AWARD to the most outstanding band 
member of the year. 



Genera/ Information 65 



SIGMA ALPHA IOTA ALUMNAE AWARD for outstanding 
musical performance. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA DEAN'S HONOR AWARD for service 
and dedication. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA HONOR CERTIFICATE to the senior 
with the highest scholastic average. 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA LEADERSHIP AWARD based on 
personality, student activities, fraternity service, and scholar- 
ship. 

TAU BETA SIGMA AWARD to the outstanding band sorority 
member of the year. 



Awards are presented to the members of the University 
Bands, the University Orchestras, and the Men's and Wom- 
en's Glee Clubs who serve faithfully throughout the year. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT AWARDS 

Keys are awarded to the members of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Student Government Association, Men's League, 
Association of Women Students, and other organizations 
who faithfully perform their duties throughout the year. 



66 General Information 



r % 



\ \ 


\ / •/ 

m n M 

fa El kI 


/ s 








*Hsa 



->*^g!vC" > TO 



• 





68 Genera/ Information 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



Regulations and procedures for the awarding of 
scholarships are formulated by the Committee on 
Financial Aids. The Board of Regents of the Univer- 
sity authorizes the award of a limited number of 
scholarships each year to deserving students. Appli- 
cants are subject to the approval of the Director of 
Admissions, insofar as qualifications for admission 
to the University are concerned. All recipients are 
subject to the academic and non-academic regula- 
tions and requirements of the University. 

The recipient of the scholarship or grant is ex- 
pected to make at least normal progress toward a 
degree, as defined by the Academic Regulations. 

The Committee reserves the right to review the 
scholarship program annually and to make adjust- 
ments in the amount and recipients of awards in 
accordance with the funds available and scholastic 
attainment. 

Some of the types of scholarships, grants, and 
loan funds available are: 

ENDOWED AND ANNUAL 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS 

AFROTC COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM— This pro- 
gram provides scholarships for selected cadets each year in 
the four-year AFROTC program. Those selected receive money 
for full tuition, laboratory expenses, incidental fees, and an 
allowance for books for up to eight semesters. In addition, 
they receive non-taxable pay of $50 per month. One must be 
in the program at the University of Maryland before he can 
apply for this scholarship. 

AIR FORCE WARRANT OFFICERS ASSOCIATION STU- 
DENT AID PROGRAM— Scholarship aid has been made 
available by the Air Force Warrant Officers Association for 
worthy male or female undergraduate or graduate students in 
good standing, with preference given to children of Air Force 
Warrent Officers or other military personnel. 

ALBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIP— The Victor E. Albright Schol- 
arship is open to graduates of Garrett County high schools who 



were born and reared in that county. 

ALCOA FOUNDATION TRAFFIC SCHOLARSHIP— An 
award of $500 is given to an outstanding junior student ma- 
joring in Transportation in the College of Business and Public 
Administration. 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA (EPSILON MU CHAPTER) SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— This scholarship is awarded annually to a freshman 
student having a background in the Boy Scouts of America. 

ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS— A limited number of scholar- 
ships are made possible through the gifts of alumni and friends 
to the Alumni Annual Giving Program of the Office of Endow- 
ment and Gifts. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
SCHOLARSHIPS— A limited number of scholarships are 
available to residents of Montgomery County. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
SCHOLARSHIPS— The Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy of. the University of Maryland makes available 
annually scholarships to qualified pre-pharmacy students on 
the basis of character, achievement and need. These scholar- 
ships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. 
Each scholarship not exceeding $500 per academic year is 
applied to expenses at College Park. 

ALUMNI BAND SCHOLARSHIP— A limited number of 
awards to freshmen are sponsored by the University of 
Maryland Band Alumni Organization. Recipients are recom- 
mended by the Music Department after a competitive audi- 
tion held in the spring. 

ETHEL R. ARTHUR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP— This 
memorial scholarship fund has been established by Irving J. 
Cohen, M.D. At least one $250 award is made each year by 
the Scholarship Committee. A preference is given to students 
from Baltimore. 

ALVIN L. AUBINOE STUDENT AID PROGRAM— Scholar- 
ship grants up to $500 per school year to students in engineer- 
ing, preferably those studying for careers in civil engineering, 
architecture or light construction. 

BALTIMORE PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION SCHOLAR- 
SHIP—A scholarship is awarded annually by the Baltimore 
Panhellenic Association to a student entering the junior or 
senior class, who is an active member of a sorority, who is 
outstanding in leadership and scholarship and who needs fi- 
nancial assistance. 



Genera/ Information 



69 



BALTIMORE SUNPAPERS SCHOLARSHIP IN JOURNAL- 
ISM— The Board of Trustees of the A. S. Abell Foundation, 
Inc., contributes funds to provide one or more $500 scholar- 
ships to students majoring in editorial journalism. 

BAYSHORE FOODS, INC. SCHOLARSHIP— A grant of $500 
is made available annually by J. McKenny Willis and Son., 
Inc., Grain, Feed and Seed Company of Easton, Maryland, to 
an outstanding student in vocational agriculture in Talbot 
County who will matriculate in the College of Agriculture. 

BLACK AND DECKER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship of $500 per year is provided 
for a Maryland resident who promises to teach Industrial Arts 
or Vocational-Industrial Education in Maryland for two years 
after graduation. 

BORDEN AGRICULTURAL SCHOLARSHIP— A Borden 
Agricultural Scholarship of $300 is granted to that student in 
the College of Agriculture who has had two or more of the reg- 
ularly listed courses in dairying and who, upon entering the 
senior year of study, has achieved the highest average grade 
of all other similarly eligible students in all preceding college 
work. 

CAMPUS CHEST SCHOLARSHIP— A full tuition scholar- 
ship is made available by the Campus Chest Council of the 
University. 

GEORGE C. COOK SCHOLARSHIP— A full scholarship is 
made available by the Maryland Educational Foundation in 
memory of the late George C. Cook. Preference shall be given 
to students interested in a career in business administra- 
tion or marketing. 

DR. ERNEST N. CORY SCHOLARSHIP— This memorial 
award is made annually to an outstanding junior or senior 
recommended by the College of Agriculture, preferably one ma- 
joring in Entomology. 

DAIRY TECHNOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP AND GRANTS— The 
Dairy Technology Society of Maryland and the District of 
Columbia provides a limited number of scholarships and 
grants-in-aid for students majoring in Dairy Products Tech- 
nology. 

DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP— An 
$800 scholarship to be awarded to an outstanding and de- 
serving senior student in aeronautical, electrical, or mechani- 
cal engineering in this order of preference Preference is 
given to students who indicate a willingness to accept employ- 
ment in California. 

EXEL SCHOLARSHIP— A substantial grant for endowed 
scholarships was made by Deborah B. Exel. 

FMC CORPORATION SCHOLARSHIP-An annual award 
of $500 is made available for a senior in Chemical Engineer- 
ing. 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMEN'S 
ASSOCIATION GRANT— This tuition and fees grant is awarded 
to a high school graduate who will enroll in the Fire Protection 
Curriculum in the Collegeof Engineering. Theaward is normally 
for tour years. 

BALTIMORE COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMAN'S ASSOCI- 
ATION GRANT— This tuition and fees grant is awarded to a 
student who will enroll in the Fire Protection Curriculum in 
the College of Engineering. The award is normally for four 
years. 

LADIES AUXILIARY TO THE MARYLAND STATE FIRE- 
MEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT— This $750 grant is awarded to 
an outstanding high school graduate who will enroll in the Fire 
Protection Curriculum in the Collegeof Engineering. Theaward 
is normally available for four years. 

MARYLAND STATE FIREMEN'S ASSOCIATION GRANT— 
A tuition and fees scholarship is awarded annually to an 
outstanding high school student who enrolls in the Fire Pro- 
tection Curriculum of the College of Engineering. This scholar- 
ship is for four years. 

PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY VOLUNTEER FIREMEN'S 
ASSOCIATION GRANT— An annual tuition and fees scholar- 
ship is awarded to an outstanding high school student who en- 
rolls in the Fire Protection Curriculum of the College of En- 
gineering. 

FOOD FAIR STORES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS— 
Several scholarships are available for $250 per academic 
year. 

VICTOR FRENKIL SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship of $250 
is granted annually by Mr. Victor Frenkil of Baltimore to a stu- 
dent from Baltimore City in the freshman class of the Uni- 
versity. 

FUTURE NURSES CLUBS SCHOLARSHIP-A limited 
number of $300 scholarships are made available by the Fu- 



ture Nurses Clubs of Maryland which are sponsored by the 
Women's Auxiliary of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty 
of Maryland and the Maryland League of Nursing. These schol- 
arships are available to freshmen students from Maryland 
preparing for nursing. 

GAMMA PHI BETA ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP-Two annual 
scholarships are available to teachers employed in the teach- 
ing field. The awards pay tuition costs of graduate course 
designed for training teachers of gifted children. 

GENERAL MOTORS SCHOLARSHIP— This scholarship is 
granted annually to an outstanding individual entering the 
freshman year. 

GODDARD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP— Several schol- 
arships are available annually under the terms of the James 
and Sarah E. R. Goddard Memorial Fund established through 
the wills of Morgan E. Goddard and Mary Y. Goddard. 

ROSE L. GRANT SCHOLARSHIP— At least $500 each 
year is made available to be awarded by the Scholarship Com- 
mittee. 

JOHN WILLIAM GUCKEYSON MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP—A scholarship of $100 is granted annually by Mrs. 
Hudson Dunlap as a memorial to John William Guckeyson, 
an honored Maryland alumnus. 

THE STALEY AND EUGENE HAHN MEMORIAL SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FUND— Annual awards of $500 are made by Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter J. Hahn in memory of their sons to aid outstand- 
ing agricultural students from Frederick County. 

JAMES HARTIN ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP AND 
DONALD PETER SHAW MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP— These 
two scholarships of $300 each are made available annually 
by Mr. and Mrs. David C. Hartin. The first is awarded to a 
male student in the College of Engineering and the secondto a 
male student in any college other than Education, or to a fe- 
male student in Nursing. These awards will be made to worthy 
students who are helping to earn their own college expenses. 

HASKINS AND SELLS FOUNDATION, INC. AWARD— A 
scholarship of $500 is provided for an exceptional senior 
student majoring in accounting in the College of Business and 
Public Administration. 

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST FOUNDATION SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS — These scholarships are made available through a gift 
of the Baltimore News American, one of the Hearst news- 
papers, in honor of William Randolph Hearst. Scholarships 
up to $1000 are awarded annually to undergraduates pursuing 
a program of study in journalism. Scholarships up to $1000 
are awarded annually for graduate study in history. 

ROBERT MICHAEL HIGGINBOTHAM MEMORIAL AWARD 
FUND— This Fund has been endowed by Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
A. Higginbotham in memory of their son who was killed in Viet- 
nam. Annual awards are made to promising junior students 
majoring in mathematics. 

THE A.M. HOFFMAN MEMORIAL GRANT— This gift of $250 
per year is normally awarded as a supplement to some other 
type of student aid to a student with exceptional need. A 
preference is given to students from Montgomery County. The 
gift is made available by Mr. and Mrs. David B. Schwartz. 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL SCHOLARSHIP— Two 
awards of $250 each are available to members active in 
fraternity and interfraternity affairs. Recipients are selected 
by the Office of Student Aid upon recommendations from 
the presidents of their respective houses and the President 
of the IFC. 

THE INTER-STATE MILK PRODUCERS' COOPERATIVE, 
INC. SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship of $300 is made available 
to a student in agriculture in honor of Raymond Marvel, Past- 
President of the cooperative. 

IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA (NU CHAPTER) SCHOLARSHIP— 
This $200 scholarship is awarded annually to a male student 
in the Industrial Education curriculum. The student must 
be a resident of the State of Maryland and signify his inten- 
tion of teaching in Maryland. 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA NURSING SCHOLARSHIP— This 
$100 Scholarship is made available annually by the Gamma 
Psi chapter of the Kappa Kappa Gamma Sorority to a worthy 
student preparing for a career in nursing. 

PAUL H. KEA MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND-This 
fund was established by the Potomac Valley Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects in memory of Paul H. Kea, 
a highly respected member of the chapter. 

VENIA M. KELLER GRANT— The Maryland State Council 
of Homemakers' Clubs makes available this grant of $100 
which is open to a Maryland young man or woman of promise 
who is recommended by the College of Home Economics. 

KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRE COMPANY GRANT— Annual 
awards totaling $4200 are made to engineering students upon 



70 



General Information 



the recommendation of the College of Engineering. This gift is 
made available by The Kelly- Springfield Tire Company. Cum- 
berland, Maryland, a subsidiary of The Goodyear Tire and 
Rubber Company of Akron, Ohio. 

KIWANIS SCHOLARSHIP— The J. S. Ray Memorial Schol- 
arship covering tuition is awarded by the Prince Georges Ki- 
wanis Club to a male resident of Prince Georges County, Mary- 
land, who, in addition to possessing the necessary qualifica- 
tions for maintaining a satisfactory scholarship record, must 
have a reputation of high character and attainment in gen- 
eral all-around citizenship. 

KIWANIS CLUB OF LAUREL SCHOLARSHIP— An annual 
award of $400 is made available to be awarded by the Schol- 
arship Committee to needy students, preferably from the 
Laurel area. 

SAMUEL J. LEFRAK SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship in 
honor of Geary F. Eppley, Dean of Men Emeritus, has been 
established by an alumnus Mr. Samuel J. Lefrak, President of 
the Lefrak Organization, Forest Hills, New York. The award of 
$1000 is made to a deserving sophomore who excels in both 
athletics and scholarship, to be used during his last two years 
at the University. 

LEIDY CHEMICAL FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP— A 
scholarship of $500 is granted annually to a graduate or 
undergraduate student preparing for a career in the general 
field of chemistry. 

CHRISTIAN R. AND MARY F. LINDBACK FOUNDATION 
SCHOLARSHIP— The Trustees of the Christian R. and Mary 
F. Lindback Foundation provide an annual gift to the Univer- 
sity, one-half of which is given for scholarships in agriculture 
and one-half for awards to the faculty for distinguished teach- 
ing. 

HELEN ALETTA LINTHICUM SCHOLARSHIP-These 
scholarships, several in number, were established through 
the benefaction of the late Mrs. Aletta Linthicum, widow of 
the late Congressman Charles J. Linthicum, who served in 
Congress from the Fourth District of Maryland for many years. 

LIONS INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIP— An award of 
$500 is available to a freshman who competes in the Lions 
Club (District 22-C) Annual Band Festival. A recipient is 
recommended by the Music Department after a competitive 
audition in the spring. 

LOUGHBOROUGH LIONS CLUB SCHOLARSHIP— A schol- 
arship providing tuition and fees is awarded to a graduate of 
Bethesda-Chevy Chase, Walt Whitman or Walter Johnson High 
Schools. The recipient is selected by the University on the 
basis of character and financial need. 

THE M CLUB GRANTS— The M Club of the University of 
Maryland provides each year a limited number of awards. 

MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA MILK PRODUCERS ASSOCIA- 
TION SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship of $500 is awarded 
annually in the College of Agriculture, preferably to a student 
preparing for a career in the dairy industry. 

MARYLAND PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION SCHOL- 
ARSHIP — The Maryland Pharmaceutical Association makes 
available annually scholarships to pre-pharmacy students on 
the basis of character, achievement and need. Each scholar- 
ship not exceeding $500 per academic year is used in partial 
defrayment of fees and expenses at College Park. These schol- 
arships are open only to residents of the State of Maryland. 

MARYLAND STATE GOLF ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP— 
A scholarship of $500 is provided annually by the Maryland 
State Golf Association to be awarded to a student enrolled 
or planning to enroll in an undergraduate program in Agronomy. 
He must have an interest in golf turf work and a preference 
will be given to a student who has worked on a golf course. 

EUGENE E. AND AGNES F. MEYER SCHOLARSHIPS— A 
number of scholarships are made available each year to 
promising students with preferential consideration to children 
of persons employed in public service. 

MORTAR BOARD SCHOLARSHIP— The Mortar Board 
Scholarship is awarded annually to a woman student on the 
basis of scholastic attainment, and need. 

LOREN L. MURRAY AND ASSOCIATES SCHOLARSHIPS— 
This fund has been created to provide scholarships for Mary- 
land residents who are admitted to the College of Education. 

DR. RAY A. MURRAY SCHOLARSHIP— This award, spon- 
sored by Maryland Chapter No. 32 of the National Institute 
of Farm and Land Brokers, is to be made to a worthy sopho- 
more in the Department of Agricultural Economics, College of 
Agriculture. 

NOPCO SCHOLARSHIP— Two scholarships at $250 each 
are provided for students in the College of Agriculture by the 
Nopco Chemical Company. 



OLNEY ROTARY CLUB SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM— Schol- 
arship awards are made available annually for deserving stu- 
dents who are graduates of the high schools in the area served 
by the Olney Rotary Club of Olney, Maryland. 

PENINSULA HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— The Peninsula Horticultural Society provides annually 
a $200 scholarship to the most deserving junior or senior 
student, a resident of Maryland from the Eastern Shore coun- 
ties, who is majoring in Horticulture or related subjects. 

PHI BETA KAPPA SCHOLARSHIP— A scholarship is 
awarded to the student who at the end of the junior year has 
attained the highest cumulative average in liberal sources and 
whose basic course program is in liberal studies. 

PHI ETA SIGMA SCHOLARSHIP-A limited number of 
$100 scholarships are available to young men entering the 
sophomore class and who have achieved an academic average 
of 3.5 or higher during the freshman year. 

DOUGLAS HOWARD PHILLIPS MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— This scholarship fund has been endowed by Mr. and 
Mrs. Albanus Phillips, Jr. in honor of their son who met his 
untimely death in the spring before he was scheduled to at- 
tend the University, in order that worthy young male graduates 
of Cambridge, Maryland High School may nave the oppor- 
tunity he missed. 

PILOT FREIGHT CARRIERS, INC., AWARD— A $500 
award is made to a senior student in the College of Business 
and Public Administration who has majored in transportation. 

PURCHASING MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF BALTI- 
MORE, INC., SCHOLARSHIP— An annual award of $500 is 
given annually to a junior or senior student in the College of 
Business and Public Administration preparing for a career in 
business administration or business management. 

ENSIGN RICHARD TURNER REA MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— This scholarship fund has been established by Captain 
and Mrs. Richard F. Rea in honor of their late son who gave 
his life while on active duty in the U.S. Coast Guard. Two 
scholarships up to $500 each are awarded annually to stu- 
dents in Engineering. 

READ'S DRUG STORES FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS— 
The Read's Drug Stores Foundation contributes annually sev- 
eral scholarships to pre-pharmacy students on the basis of 
achievement, character and need. Each scholarship not ex- 
ceeding $500 per academic year is applied to the fees and 
expenses at College Park. Recipients must be residents of the 
State of Maryland. 

MARY ELIZABETH ROBY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP— An 
endowed scholarship has been established by the University 
Park Republican Women's Club. Limited awards are made to 
women entering the junior or senior years who are studying 
in the field of political science. A preference is given to resi- 
dents of Prince Georges County. 

VIVIAN F. ROBY SCHOLARSHIPS— This endowed fund 
was established through a bequest to the University of Mary- 
land by Evalyn S. Roby in memoiy of her husband, class of 
1912, to provide undergraduate scholarships to needy boys 
from Baltimore City and Charles County. 

DR. FERN DUEY SCHNEIDER GRANT— A $100 grant is 
available to a foreign woman student enrolled in the College of 
Education, who has completed at least one semester in 
residence at the University. Funds for the grant are contri- 
buted by the Montgomery and Prince Georges County Chapters 
of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society. 

F. DOUGLASS SEARS INSURANCE SCHOLARSHIP- 
Scholarships for Maryland students preparing for careers in 
the insurance industry are made available annually from a 
fund established by friends and associates of former State 
Insurance Commissioner F. Douglass Sears. 

SEARS ROEBUCK FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS— A 
limited number of grants from the Sears Roebuck Foundation 
are available for students in the College of Home Economics. 

SOUTHERN STATES COOPERATIVE SCHOLARSHIPS- 
Two scholarships are awarded each year to sons of Southern 
States members— one for outstanding work in 4-H Club and 
the other for outstanding work in FFA. The amount of each 
scholarship is $300 per year and will continue for four years. 

ADELE H. STAMP SCHOLARSHIP— This scholarship of 
$250 is awarded annually to a sophomore who is an active 
sorority member or pledge, who is outstanding in leadership 
and scholarship and who needs financial assistance. Funds 
for this scholarship are provided by the University of Mary- 
land Panhellenic Association. 

JANE G. S. TALIAFERRO SCHOLARSHIP— Under the 



General Information 



71 



terms of the will of the late Jane G. S. Taliaferro a bequest 
has been made to the University of Maryland to provide schol- 
arship aid to worthy students. 

TAU BETA PI SCHOLARSHIP FUND— A limited number 
of scholarships are made available each year to worthy en- 

eineering students by members and alumni of Maryland Beta 
hapter of Tau Beta Pi Association, Inc., national engineering 
honor society. 

UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S CLUB, INC. MEMORIAL SCHOL- 
ARSHIP FUND— A scholarship of $150 is awarded each year 
to a junior or senior woman student on the basis of academic 
record, financial need, and qualities of leadership and char- 
acter. The funds are contributed by the Memorial Fund Com- 
mittee of the University Women's Club of Washington, D.C. 

JOSEPH M. VIAL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN AGRI- 
CULTURE— Scholarships totaling $600 per year are made 
available by Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Seidenspinner to be awarded 
upon the recommendation of the College of Agriculture. 

WESTERN ELECTRIC SCHOLARSHIP— Two scholarships 
are awarded to students in the College of Engineering. The 
amount of the scholarship covers cost of tuition, books and 
fees not to exceed $800 nor to be less than $400. 

WESTINGHOUSE AIR ARM DIVISION SCHOLARSHIP— 
The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has established a 
scholarship to encourage outstanding students of engineering 
and the physical sciences. The scholarship is awarded to a 
sophomore student and is paid over a period of three years 
in six installments of $250. Students in electrical or mechan- 
ical engineering, engineering physics or applied mathematics 
are eligible for the award. 

WOMEN'S CLUB OF BETHESDA SCHOLARSHIP— Several 
scholarships are available to young women residents of Mont- 
gomery County. Recipients must be accepted in the College 
of Education or the College of Nursing. 

NICHOLAS BRICE WORTHINGTON SCHOLARSHIP— A 
$500 memorial scholarship is made available to a student in 
the College of Agriclulture by the descendants of Nicholas 
Brice Worthington, one of the founders of the Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

THE ARTHUR YOUNG AND CO. FOUNDATION, INC. 
SCHOLARSHIP— The Arthur Young and Co. Foundation, Inc., 
makes available a scholarship of $750 for an exceptional 
senior student concentrating in accounting. 

STUDENT LOANS 

NDEA STUDENT LOANS— Loan funds are available under 
provision of the National Defense Education Act. The bor- 
rower must sign a note for the loan and agree to interest and re- 
payment term«; established by the University. Repayment of 
the loan b< /ne months after the borrower ceases to 

be a full-time student and must be completed within ten 
years thereafter. No interest is charged on the loan until the 
beginning of the repayment schedule. Interest after that date 
is to be paicf at 3 percent per annum. 

(f the borrower becomes a full-time teacher (elementary, 
secondary or college), ten percent of the loan can be can- 
celled for each year of teaching, not to exceed 50 percent 
of the loan. However, if the teaching involves handicapped 



students or is in a predominantly low income area school, 
fifteen percent annual cancellation is allowed to the full 
amount of the loan. 

CATHERINE MOORE BRINKLEY LOAN FUND— Under the 
will of Catherine Moore Brinkley, a loan fund is available for 
worthy students who are natives and residents of Maryland. 

KEA STUDENT LOAN FUND— A loan fund has been es- 
tablished by gifts from Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Kea. The pur- 
pose of the fund is to make non-interest bearing loans of an 
emergency nature to students who are helping to earn the 
expenses of their education. 

JOSEPH W. KINGHORN AND MORLEY A. JULL FUNDS— 
Memorial trust funds have been established in honor of 
Joseph W. Kinghorn, first graduate of the University of Mary- 
land Poultry Department. These funds are available as loans 
to students enrolled in the Poultry Department. 

EDNA B. MC NAUGHTON MEMORIAL LOAN FUND— 
This fund has been established by Mrs. W. B. Clayton in mem- 
ory of Edna B. McNaughton, who initiated and developed the 
program in Early Childhood Education at the University of 
Maryland. Priority is given to students enrolled in this pro- 
gram. 

PHI DELTA GAMMA LOAN FUND— This fund has been es- 
tablished under essentially the same terms and conditions as 
the NDEA loans. Recipients must be recommended by the 
Sigma Chapter of the Phi Delta Gamma Sorority. 

JAN STEVEN AND SIDNEY RAPKE MEMORIAL LOAN 
FUND— This fund has been established in memory of Jan 
Steven Rapke by his parents. Short-term, interest free loans 
are available to students in good standing to meet personal 
emergencies as they arise. It is the wish of the donors that 
the fund be administered with a minimum of formality. 

UNITED STUDENT AID FUNDS— Loans up to $1,000 per 
year are available from many banks to students at the Uni- 
versity. Maximum interest on such loans is 7 per cent simple. 
Monthly installments are usually not less than $25 nor more 
than $100. Repayment begins ten months after the student 
ceases to be a full-time student. 

SIEGFRIED E. WEISBERGER. JR. MEMORIAL FUND— A 
memorial trust fund has been established in honor of Siegfried 
Weisberger, Jr., a Freshman student in Agriculture in 1958-59. 
Under terms of this loan, students in Agriculture may borrow 
money without interest for short term needs. 

PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT 

UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT— The University offers din- 
ing hall and dormitory workships permitting selected Maryland 
residents to earn part or all of their board and room. Other 
jobs on campus pay hourly rates according to the skill and 
education required. 

OFF-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT— A file of off-campus part- 
time jobs is maintained. Most of these are with local stores 
and business firms. 

COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM— Part-time employ- 
ment during the school year plus full-time employment during 
the summer may be combined with scholarships and loans 
to provide educational opportunities to qualified students. 



72 



Genera/ Information 



T r= 



^^ ■ 



^^M||| 



±U*r< 



[i~*~ 













' 









V- 




THE COLLEGES and SCHOOLS 



This section of the Catalog provides information for undergraduates con- 
cerning the University of Maryland's schools and colleges. Included in this sec- 
tion are the individual college requirements and policies for particular pro- 
grams of study. Each college has a general statement of purpose or role within 
the University; the organizational structure of the college; the undergraduate 
programs including specific requirements for admission and graduation in 
addition to the all-University requirements listed in the General Information 
Section of the Catalog; a description of degree programs; and course de- 
scriptions. 

Courses numbered from 001 to 099 are open to undergraduate students 
who meet the stated prerequisite and curriculum requirements. 

Courses numbered from 1 00 to 1 99 are open to juniors and seniors with the 
stated prerequisites. Under some conditions, second-semester sophomores 
may register for 100-level courses with the Dean's approval. Graduate students 
may take 100-level courses for credit, subject to departmental and Graduate 
School regulations. 

Courses numbered 200 and above are for graduate students only, except in 
exceptional cases approved by the Dean of the college and the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 



Agriculture 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE offers educa- 
tional programs with a broad cultural and scientific 
base. Students are prepared for careers in Agricul- 
tural related sciences, technology, and business. 

The application of advanced knowledge to the 
solution of some of man's most critical problems 
concerning adequate amounts and quality of food, 
and the quality of environment in which he lives, 
are important missions of the College. 

This original Division of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park was chartered in 1856. The Col- 
lege has a continuous record of leadership in educa- 
tion since that date. It became the beneficiary of 
the Land-Grant Act of 1862. Since that time, there 
has been a merger with the University of Maryland 
in Baltimore and continuous growth with additions 
of other Colleges and Departments at College Park. 

The College of Agriculture continues to grow and 
develop as part of the greater University Complex, 
providing education and research activities enabling 
man to use his environment and natural resources 
to best advantage while conserving basic resources 
for future generations. 

ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION AND FACILITIES: 

Educational opportunities in Agriculture are en- 
hanced by the nearby location of several research 
units of the Federal Government. Of particular 
interest is the Agricultural Research Center at Belts- 
ville and the U. S. Department of Agriculture Head- 
quarters in Washington, D. C. The National Agricul- 
tural Library is an important resource for informa- 
tion at the Beltsville location. 

Related Research Laboratories of the National 
Institutes of Health, Military Hospitals, NASA, and 
the National Bureau of Standards are in the vicinity. 



Interaction among faculty, students, and personnel 
in these agencies is encouraged. Many teaching and 
research activities are conducted with the coopera- 
tion of scientists and professional people in Govern- 
ment positions. 

Instruction in the basic sciences and cultural, 
social and economic engineering principles is car- 
ried out in well designed classrooms and laboratories 
on the campus. The application of basic principles 
to practical situations is demonstrated for the stu- 
dent in numerous ways. New buildings, with well 
designed laboratories, have been provided for both 
the Plant and Animal Sciences in recent years. 

Modern greenhouses are available for breeding 
and propagation of a wide variety of plant work on 
the control of weeds and improved cultural practices. 

Herds of dairy and beef cattle, and swine and 
flocks of poultry and sheep are kept on the campus 
for teaching and research purposes. 

Several operating farms, located in central Mary- 
land and on the Eastern Shore support the educational 
programs in Agriculture by providing locations where 
important crops, animals and poultry can be grown 
and maintained under practical and research condi- 
tions. These farms add an important dimension to 
the courses offered in Agriculture. Data from these 
operations and from cooperating producers and pro- 
cessors of agricultural products are utilized by 
students interested in economics, teaching, engi- 
neering and conservation, as they relate to Agricul- 
ture, as well as by those concerned with biology 
or management of agricultural crops and animals. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Agriculture offers programs lead- 



Agriculture 77 



ing to a wide variety of rewarding careers. These 
curricula prepare the student for useful, informed 
citizenship, with a basic understanding of science 
in general, and with a concentration on the science 
and business of agriculture in particular. All four- 
year programs lead to the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree. 

Today's agriculture is a highly complex and ex- 
tremely efficient industry which includes supplies 
and services used in agricultural production, the 
production process itself, and the marketing, pro- 
cessing and distribution of products to meet the con- 
sumers' needs and wants. 

Instruction in the College of Agriculture includes 
the fundamental sciences and emphasizes the pre- 
cise course information that its graduates must 
employ in the industrialized agriculture of today, 
and helps develop the foundation for their role in 
the future. Course programs in specialized areas 
may be tailored to fit the particular needs of the 
individual student. 

Previous training in agriculture is not a prereq- 
uisite for matriculation. Careers for men and women 
with rural, suburban, or urban backgrounds are 
available in agriculture and its allied industries. 

Graduates of the College of Agriculture have a 
broad base for careers and continued learning after 
college in business, production, teaching, research, 
extension, and many other professional fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission to the College 
of Agriculture are the same as those of the Univer- 
sity. An applicant is required to have graduated 
from high school and completed a minimum of: 
English 4 units; mathematics, preferably algebra 1 
unit; history or social science 1 unit; and natural 
science 1 unit. A foreign language is not required 
for entrance; however, two or more units are desir- 
able. 

For students entering the College of Agriculture 
it is recommended that his high school preparatory 
courses should include: English 4 units; mathe- 
matics 3 units; biological and physical sciences 3 
units and history or social sciences 2 units. Four 
units of mathematics should be elected for students 
entering Agricultural Engineering or Agricultural 
Chemistry. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

To earn junior standing a student must complete 
56 credit hours of academic work and attain the 
required grade point average. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Each student must complete at least 120 credit 
hours in academic subjects with a minimum g4ade 
point average of 2.0 (C). University requirements in 
health and physical education must be satisfied, in 
addition. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Honors programs are approved for majors in 
Agricultural Economics and Botany. The objective 
of the honors programs is to recognize superior 
scholarship and to provide opportunity for the ex- 
cellent student to broaden his perspection and to 
increase the depth of his studies. 

These programs are administered by Depart- 
mental Honors Committees and supervised by the 
College Committee on Honors. Students in the Col- 



lege of Agriculture, who are in the top 20 per cent 
of their class at the end of their first year, may be 
considered for admission into the Honors Program. 
Of this group up to 50 per cent may be admitted. 

Sophomores or first semester juniors will be 
considered upon application from those students 
in the upper 20 per cent of their class. While applica- 
tion may be made until the student enters his sixth 
semester, early entrance into the program is recom- 
mended. Students admitted to the program enjoy 
certain academic privileges. 

On the basis of the student's performance dur- 
ing his participation in the Honors Program, the 
department may recommend the candidate for the 
appropriate degree with (departmental) Honors, or 
for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
High Honors. Successful completion of the Honors 
program will be recognized by a citation in the 
Commencement Program and by an appropriate 
entry on the student's record and diploma. 

FACULTY ADVISEMENT 

Each student in the College of Agriculture is 
assigned to a faculty adviser. Advisors normally work 
with a limited number of students and are able to 
give individual guidance. The faculty will asist stu- 
dents in obtaining employment providing practical 
or technical experience for those in need of such 
experience. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

The program of the freshman year is similar 
for all curricula of the College of Agriculture. Dur- 
ing the first year the student obtains a broad founda- 
tion in subjects basic to agriculture and the related 
sciences. Transfer from one curriculum to another, 
or from the College of Agriculture to another 
college of the University may be made by the 
end of the freshman year usually with little or no 
loss of credit. 

Students entering the freshman year with a 
definite choice of curriculum are assigned to de- 
partmental advisors for counsel and planning of an 
academic program. Students entering the freshman 
year, who have not selected a definite curriculum, 
are assigned to a general advisor who assists with 
the choice of freshman electives and, during the 
course of the year, acquaints students with opportuni- 
ties in the curricula in the College of Agriculture 
and in other divisions of the University. If by the 
close of the freshman year a student makes no 
definite choice of a specialized curriculum, he 
continues under the guidance of his advisor in the 
General Agriculture curriculum. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A number of scholarships are available for agri- 
cultural students. These include awards granted by 
the Dr. Ernest N. Cory Trust Fund, the Danforth 
Foundation, Joseph M. Vial Memorial Scholarship 
Program in Agriculture, Maryland Cooperative Milk 
Producers, Inc., Maryland and Virginia Milk Pro- 
ducers, Inc., the Ralston Purina Company, Southern 
States Cooperative, Inc., Bayshore Foods, Inc., Dairy 
Technology Society of Maryland and District of 
Columbia, Peninsula Horticultural Society, and 
The Staley and Eugene Hahn Memorial Scholarship 
Fund. 

These scholarships are awarded by the Faculty 
Committee in accordance with the terms of the 
respective grants. For more detailed information 
about these awards see section on financial aid. 



78 Agriculture 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Students find opportunity for varied expression 
and growth in the several voluntary organizations 
sponsored by the College of Agriculture. These organi- 
zations are: Agricultural Economics Club, Block and 
Bridle, Dairy Science Club, Collegiate 4-H Club, 
Future Farmers of America, Agronomy Club, and the 
Veterinary Science Club. 

Alpha Zeta is a national agricultural honor fra- 
ternity. Members are chosen from students in the 
College of Agriculture who have attained the scho- 
lastic requirements and displayed leadership in 
agriculture. 

The Agricultural Student Council is made up of 
representatives from the various student organiza- 
tions in the College of Agriculture. Its purpose is to 
coordinate activities of these organizations and to 
promote work which is beneficial to the College. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

All students in the College of Agriculture are 
required to complete a series of courses to satisfy 
the University General Education requirements, 
College requirements and departmental require- 
ments. The courses needed to complete a program of 
study are selected by the student with the approval 
of his advisor. 



Semester 
University Requirements Credit Hours 

ENGL 001 or 021 -Composition of Honors Composition 3 

ENGL 003.004-World Literature 6 

Sociol Science 6 

History 6 

Mathematics 3 

Fine Arts or Philosophy 3 

HLTH 005- ; cience and Theory of Health 2 

Physical Education 2 

Ar Science (OptionaD 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE REQUIREMENTS 

Courses selected from the basic life sciences, physical 

sciences and mathematics 16 

SPCH 007-Public Speaking 2 

AGRI 001 -Introduction to Agriculture 1 

Department Requirements 74 



Freshmen I 

ENGL 001 or 021 -Composition or Honors 

Composition 3 

Social Science 3 

AGRI 001 -Introduction to Agriculture 1 

B0TN 001 -General Botany 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 

ANSC 001 -Principles of Anfmal Science 3 

ARG0 001 -Crop Production 

Mathematics 

Health 2 

Arts or Philosophy 

Physical Education 1 

Air Science (Optional) 



Semester 



The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

CHEM 008,009- College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 



AGRICULTURE— GENERAL 

The general agricultural curriculum provides for 
the development of a broad understanding in agri- 
culture. 

The flexibility of this curriculum permits selec- 
tion of electives that will meet individual vocational 
plans in agriculture and agriculturally related busi- 
ness and industry. 



Semester 
General Agricultural Requirements Credit Hours 

AGEC 050- Elements of Agricultural Economics 3 

AGEC 051 -Marketing of Agricultural Products „ 3 

AGEN 056-lntroduction to Farm Mechanics 2 

AGEN 001 -Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

AGR0 010-General Soils 4 

AGR0 107-Cereal Crop Production 3 

AGR0 108-Forage Crop Production 3 

AGR0 151 -Cropping System 2 

ANSC 001 -Principles of Animal Science . 3 

ANSC 010-Feedsand Feeding 3 

ANSC 040- Dairy Production 3 

ANSC 062 -Commercial Poultry Management 3 

BOTN 020- Diseases of Plants 4 

ENTM 020- Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops 4 

H0RT005or 058 -General Horticulture 3 

RLED 1 1 4 - Rural Life in a Modern Society 3 

Elect either of the following pairs of courses: 

BOTN 1 1 7 - General Plant Genetics and 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 2.4 

or 

BSAD 020,021 -Principles of Accounting 3.3 

Electives 18 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

This curriculum insures adequate instruction in 
the fundamentals of both the physical and biological 
sciences, it may be adjusted through the selection 
of electives to fit the student for work in agricultural 
experiment stations, soil bureaus, geological sur- 
veys, food laboratories, fertilizer industries and those 
handling food products. 



The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting 16 credit hours from the following courses: 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

B0TN.001 -General Botany 4 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 

and 
CHEM 008,009 -College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

Required of all students: 

CHEM 014-College Chemistry IV 3 

CHEM 016-College Chemistry IV Laboratory 2 

CHEM 010-College Chemistry III 3 

CHEM 012-College Chemistry III Laboratory 2 

CHEM 123-Advanced Quantitative Analysis or ... 3 

CHEM 121 -Intermediate Quantitative Analysis 4 

AGR0 010-General Soils 4 

GE0L 001 -Geology 3 

MATH 020-Analysis II 4 

MATH 021 -Analysis III 4 

Modern Languages 12 

PHYS 030-General Physics 3 

PHYS 031 -General Physics 4 

PHYS 032-General Physics 4 

Electives in Biology 6 

Electives in Agricultural Chemistry 6 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

The curriculum combines training in the business, 
economics, and international aspects of agricultural 
production and marketing with the biological and 
physical sciences basic to agriculture. Programs are 
available for students in agricultural economics, 
agricultural business, international agriculture, and 
in agribusiness teaching. Students desiring to enter 
agricultural marketing or businesses affiliated with 
agriculture may elect the agricultural business op- 
tion; and those interested in foreign service may 
elect the international agriculture option. Students 
primarily interested in the broad aspects of produc- 
tion and management as it is related to the operation 
of a farm business may elect the agricultural eco- 
nomics option. Those interested in training in agri- 



Agriculture 79 



business and also in becoming certified teachers 
should elect the agribusiness teaching option. In 
these programs, students are trained for employ- 
ment in agricultural business firms for positions in 
sales or management, for local, state, or federal 
agencies, extension workers, high school and col- 
lege teachers, researchers, farm operators or farm 
managers. 

Courses for the freshman and sophomore years 
are essentially the same for all students. In the 
junior year the student selects the agricultural 
economics, agricultural business, international agri- 
culture, or agribusiness teaching option according 
to his particular interest. Courses in this Depart- 
ment are designed to provide training in the applica- 
tion of economic principles to the production, 
processing, distribution, and merchandising of agri- 
cultural products as well as the inter-relationship 
of business and industry associated with agricultural 
products. The curriculum includes courses in gen- 
eral agricultural economics, marketing, farm man- 
agement, prices, resource economics, agricultural 
policy, and international agricultural economics. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting 16 credit hours from the following courses: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

CHEM 008.009- College Chemistry I, II 4.4 

MATK 014.01 5- Elementary Calculus 3,3 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

PHYS 001 -Elements of Physics 3 

Z00L 001 -General Zoology 4 

Elements of Agricultural Economics 3 

Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Prices of Agricultural Products 3 

Farm Management 3 

Agricultural Policy and Programs 3 

World Agricultural Production and Trade 3 

(A or B) Seminar 1 

Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

■Crop Production 2 

■ General Soils 4 

Principles of Animal Science 3 

Feeds and Feeding 3 

Business Statistics 1 3 



AGEC 050- 
AGEC051- 
AGEC 106- 
AGEC 108- 
AGEC 112- 
AGEC 114- 
AGEC 199- 
AGEN 001 - 
AGR0 001 - 

or 
AGR0 010- 
ANSC 001 - 

or 
ANSC 010- 
BSAD 130- 

or 
AGRI 080- 
ECON032- 
MATH 01 1 



Introductory Agricultural Biometrics. 

Principles of Economics II 

-Introduction to Mathematics 



Select a minimum of 6 hours from the following: 

EC0N 102-Nationol Income Analysis 3 

EC0N 130 -Mathematical Economics 3 

EC0N 131 -Comparative Economic Systems 3 

EC0N 132- Intermediate Price Theory 3 

EC0N 140-Moneyand Banking 3 

Agricultural Business Option 

Students must complete each of the following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

AGEC 1 03 - Introduction to Agricultural Business Management 3 

AGEC 1 18-Marketing Management of Agribusiness Enterprises 3 

BSAD 020- Principles of Accounting .. 3 

After consulting 
courses from: 

AGEC 117 — Agricultural Commodity Markets: 

An Economic Analysis 3 

BSAD 021 -Principles of Accounting II 3 

BSAD 149-Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

BSAD 156- Marketing Research Methods 3 

BSAD 163-Labor Relations 3 

BSAD 166-Business Communications 3 

BSAD 180 -Business Low 3 

Agricultural Economics Option 

After consulting with your advisor, select at least 9 credit hours from 
the following: 



iith the advisor, students may select additional 



Semester 
Credit Hours 

AGEC 103 -Introduction to Agricultural Business Manogement 3 

AGEC 1 1 1 -Economics of Resource Development 3 

AGEC 107 — Financial Analysis of the Farm Business 3 

BSAD 020 - Principles of Accounting I... 3 

BSAD 021 -Principles of Accounting II 3 

MATH 014-Elementary Calculus . 3 

MATH 01 5 -Elementary Calculus II 3 

Agribusiness Teaching Option 

Students must complete each of the following: 

EDUC 110-Human Development and Learning 6 

EDUC 1 1 1 -Foundations of Education 3 

RLED 101 -Teaching Materials and Demonstrations 2 

RLED 1 03 - Student Teaching ... 5 

RLED 104-Student Teaching 1-4 

RLED 107-lntroduction to Agricultural Education .. ,.. 3 

RLED 109 -Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture 3 

RLED 1 1 1 -Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 3 

RLED 1 14 — Rural Life in Modern Society 3 

Students may elect remaining courses from Agricultural Sciences 

or Social Sciences . / 



International Agriculture Option 

After consulting with advisor, students should select at least 10 credit 
hours from the following: 

AGEC 103- Introduction to Agricultural Business Management 3 
AGEC 1 1 1 - Economics of Resource Development 

AGEC 1 19- Foreign Agricultural Economies 3 

BOTN 020- Diseases of Plants 3 

BOTN 117-General Plont Genetics 3 

ENTM 01 5 -Introductory Entomology 3 

GEOG 010-General Geogrophy 3 

GEOG 041 -Climatology 3 

GEOL 001 -Geology 3 

Foreign Language 6 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

This Department offers instruction in education 
and other applied behavioral sciences needed by per- 
sons preparing to teach agriculture, to enter Exten- 
sion work and other activity of an educational 
nature. 

Two undergraduate curriculum options are 
available. The agricultural education curriculum is 
designed primarily for persons who wish to prepare 
for teaching agriculture in the secondary schools. 
The agricultural extension education curriculum is 
designed for those preparing to enter the Cooperative 
Extension Service. Either option may lead to a 
variety of other educational career opportunities in 
agricultural business and industry, public service, 
communications, and to research and college teach- 
ing. 

Students preparing to become teachers of agri- 
culture — including horticulture, agribusiness, or 
other agricultural related subjects — should have 
had appropriate experience with the kind of agricul- 
ture they plan to teach or should arrange to secure 
that experience during summers while in college. 

In order to be admitted to student teaching or 
to extension field experience, each of which nor- 
mally is taken in the senior year, a student must 
have a 2.3 grade point average or higher. 

Students in the agricultural education curriculum 
are expected to participate in the Collegiate Chapter 
of the Future Farmers of America in order to gain 
needed training to serve as advisors of high school 
chapters of the FFA upon graduation. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be sotisfied by com 
pleting 16 credit hours from the following courses: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

CHEM 008.009- College Chemistry I. II 4.4 

MATH 003 - Fundamentals of Moth 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 



80 Agriculture 



Departmental Requirements. Both Options 

ANSC 001 -Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 010-Feeds and Feeding 3 
AGRO 001 -Crop Production, or 

AGRO 108- Forage Crop Production 2 

AGRO 010 -General Soils 4 

AGEN 001 -Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 
AGEC 107 — Financial Analysis of the Farm Business, or 

AGEC 108- Farm Management 3 

RLED 1 14-Rural Life in Modern Society 3 

RLED 101 -Teaching Moteriols and Demonstrations 2 

ENTM 020- Insect Pests of Agricultural Crops 4 

BOTN 020- Diseases of Plants 4 
HORT 01 1 -Greenhouse Management, or 

HORT 058 -Vegetable Production, or 

HORT 062 -Plant Propagation 3 

ENGL 01 4 -Expository Writing 3 

Agricultural Education Option 

RLED 1 03- Student Teaching 5 

RLED 104-Student Teaching .. 1-4 

RLED 107-lntroduction to Agricultural Education 2 

RLED 109-Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture - 3 

RLED 1 1 1 -Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

EDUC 110- Human Development & Learning .............. 6 

EDUC 111 -Foundations of Educotion 3 

AGEN 056 -Introduction to Farm Mechonics 2 

AGEN 104 -Farm Mechanics 2 

Approved Electives 12 

Agricultural Extension Option 

RLED 150- Extension Education 2 

RLED 160-Extension Communications 2 

RLED 161 -4-H Organization and Procedure 2 

RLED 121 -Directed Experience in Extension Education 1-5 

PSYC 001 -Introduction of Psychology 3 

PSYC 021 - Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 110-Educational Psychology 3 

AGEC 1 1 1 -Economics of Resource Development 3 

Approved Electives 18 



Employment opportunities include farm oper- 
ation or management, machinery design and develop- 
ment, structural design and construction, process 
and systems development, land development, and 
natural resource planning. These opportunities may 
be in education, research, development, or opera- 
tions with private industry, and with local, state, or 
federal agencies throughout the world. 

The Department also offers courses in agricul- 
tural engineering technology in five general areas 
primarily for students in the College of Agriculture. 
These areas are power and machinery, structures, 
soil and water conservation engineering, electrifica- 
tion, materials handling and processing, and farm 
mechanics. The technological aspects of these 
courses complement other curricula of the College 
of Agriculture. 

The agricultural engineering curriculum provides 
considerable flexibility and places responsibility on 
the student and the advisor. Twenty semester hours 
of elective subjects are permitted. Fourteen semester 
hours must be related to the student's major field of 
concentration and be taken from a departmentally 
approved list. A minimum of eight semester hours 
must be at the 100 level. The total number of 
semester hours, including health and physical educa- 
tion, required for graduation is 134. 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Agricultural engineering utilizes energy and 
materials to enhance agricultural and aquacultural 
production. Virtually all efforts are oriented towards 
increased food production or preservation. An under- 
standing of soil, plant, and animal science is the 
basis for applications of engineering in all phases of 
production, harvesting, processing and utilization 
of plant, avian or animal products. 

Interrelated applications of engineering disci- 
plines are found in agriculture or even on a single, 
diversified farm necessitating a broad base of mathe- 
matical, physical, and engineering sciences comple- 
mented by basic biological and soil science. Stu- 
dents may specialize in one of four major areas and, 
upon graduation, receive the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering. 

Power and machinery specialization is oriented 
towards energy conversion and related machines 
for tillage, harvesting, transporting and processing 
of biological products. Farmstead engineering 
is concerned with functional aspects of structures 
with particular attention to environmental require- 
ments of birds, plants, or animals and also with 
material handling systems to optimize labor effi- 
ciency. Electric power and processing is concerned 
with automation of the farmstead, and with the 
physical properties of biological materials as this 
knowledge is basic to design criteria for heating, 
cooling, or change of state. The area of soil and 
water conservation engineering is oriented towards 
applications of hydraulics and soil physics in irriga- 
tion, drainage, erosion control, water resources man- 
agement, and abatement of pollution from agricul- 
tural operations. The above areas are well defined 
in agricultural engineering — a developing program 
is the relationship of these land-based activities to 
the aquatic environment or aquacultural engineer- 
ing. 



The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CHEM 008,009-College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

PHYS 030.031. 032 -General Physics 3.4.4 

Departmental Requirements 

AGEN 121 -Engineering Dynamics of Biological Moterials 3 

AGEN 142 -Functional ond Environmental Design of 

Agricultural Structures 3 

AGEN 143 -Functional Design of Machinery and Equipment 3 

AGEN 144-Power Systems 3 

AGEN 145 — Soil ond Water Engineering 3 

ENCE 102,103-Structural Analysis 3.3 

ENES 001 -Intro Engineering Science 3 

ENESOIO-Mechanics 3 

ENES 020- Mechanics of Materials 3 

ENES 021 -Dynomics 3 

ENES 030 or ENES 050-Materials Science 3 

ENME 060-Thermodynamics... 3 

ENME 102 or ENCE 105— Fluid Mechanics 3 

ENEE 060-Prin. of Electrical Engineering 3 

MATH 019,020-Analysis I, II 4,4 

MATH 021,066-Analysis III & Differential Equations 4.3 

Z00L 001 -Generol Biology 
or 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

Electives 20 



AGRONOMY— CROPS AND SOILS 

The Department of Agronomy offers instruction 
in production and breeding of forage crops, cereal 
crops, and tobacco; weed control; turf management; 
soil chemistry; soil fertility; soil physics; soil miner- 
alogy; soil classification; and soil conservation. A 
technical or a general curriculum may be elected 
by a student in either crops or soils. A turf option 
is available in the general crops curriculum and a 
soil conservation option is available in the general 
soils curriculum. The technical curricula provide 
training in basic courses which will increase the 
student's understanding of the applied crops and 
soils courses. Training in these basic courses is 
required for advanced work in agronomy and is 



Agriculture 81 



desired by many employers of students graduating 
in agronomy. 

General curricula in crops and soils permit the 
student to confine his training to applied courses 
but students following these curricula are encouraged 
to elect some of the basic courses included in the 
technical curricula. 

Depending on the electives chosen, students 
graduating in agronomy are well prepared for ad- 
vanced study, trained for general farming, farm 
management, specialized seed production, exten- 
sion work, soil conservation, or employment with 
commercial seed, fertilizer, chemical, or farm equip- 
ment companies. Turf specialists are in demand 
by park and road commissions, golf courses, and 
turf and landscape companies. 

Additional information on opportunities in agron- 
omy may be obtained by writing to the Department 
of Agronomy. 

CROPS 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting CHEM 008 and 009, College Chemistry I, II ond selecting 8 semester 
credit hours from the following courses: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 

or 
other courses selected from CHEM, MATH or PHYS 

Departmental Requirements (Crops) 

AGR0 002-Crop Production Laboratory 2 

AGROOIO-General Soils 4 

AGRO 107-Cereal Crop Production 2 

AGRO 1 08 -Forage Crop Production 2 

AGRO -Advanced! Soils Courses 6 

AGRO 199-Senior Seminar 1 

BOTN 01 1 -Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 020 -Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 1 1 7 - General Plant Genetics or 

ZOOL 006-Genetics 2 or 4 

BOTN 101 -Plant Physiology 4 

Technical Courses for Agronomy Students or 28 

General Courses for Agronomy Students .12 

(see explanation and lists below) . . 12 

Electives (Technical Crops curriculum) or 1 5 

Electives (General Crops and Turf Management curricula) 31 



SOILS 

Students will select 28 hours from the technical 
group. If the student desires to take more than 28 
semester hours of technical courses they can be 
used as part of his 15 hours of electives or they can 
be substituted for other Department of Agronomy 
requirements with permission of the crops advisor. 

GENERAL CROPS AND TURF MANAGEMENT CURRICULA 

Students will select 12 hours from the General 
Courses listed blow. Students in the turf manage- 
ment option must elect AGRO 109— Turf Manage- 
ment, HORT 020— Introduction to the Art of Land- 
scaping, and HORT 107— Woody Plant Materials. 



The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting CHEM 008 and 009, College Chemistry I, II and selecting 8 semester 
credit hours from the following courses: 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 

or 
other courses selected from CHEM, MATH or PHYS 

Departmental Requirements (Soils) 

AGRO 002-Crop Production Laboratui y 2 

AGRO 010-Generol Soils 4 



AGRO 107-General Crop Production ... 2 

AGRO 108 -Forage Crop Production 2 

AGRO 1 14 -Soil Classification ond Geography 4 

AGRO 116 — Soil Chemistry 3 

AGRO 117- Soil Physics 3 

AGRO -Additional Agronomy or Geology courses 6 

AGRO 199 ^Senior Seminar 1 

GEOL 001 -Geology 3 

GEOL 004 - Physical Geology Laboratory 1 

Technical courses for Agronomy students or 28 

General courses for Agronomy students 12 

(see explanation and lists below) 

Electives (Technical Curriculum) or 15 

Electives (General Soils and Soil Conservation Curriculo) 31 



GENERAL SOILS AND SOIL CONSERVATION 
CURRICULA 

Students will select 12 hours from the general 
course listed below. Students in soil conservation 
must elect AGRO 1 13— Soil Conservation, and BOTN 
010— Principles of Conservation. 



Technical Courses which may be selected by crops ond soils students: 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

CHEM Additional Chemistry 8 

MATH Additional Mathematics. . 12 

PHYS General Physics 8 

If the student elects more than 28 hours of technical courses they should 
be advanced courses in the obove areas. 

General Courses which may be selected by crops and soils students: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

AGEN Agricultural Engineering 3 

AGEC Agricultural Economics 3 

ANSC Animal Science 3 

HORT Horticulture . 3 

These courses may be repfaced by courses from the technical group with 

permission of the advisor. 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

The curriculum in animal science offers a broad 
background in general education, basic sciences, 
agricultural sciences and the opportunity for a stu- 
dent to emphasize that phase of animal agriculture 
in which he is specifically interested. Each student 
will be assigned to an advisor according to the pro- 
gram he plans to pursue. 

OBJECTIVES 

In addition to fulfilling the requirements of the 
University and the College of Agriculture, the fol- 
lowing specific objectives have been established for 
the program in animal science: 

1. To acquaint students with the role of animal 

agriculture in our cultural heritage. 

2. To prepare students for careers in the field 

of animal agriculture. These include posi- 
tions of management and technology asso- 
ciated with animal, dairy, or poultry produc- 
tion enterprises, positions with marketing and 
processing organizations, as well as in other 
allied fields such as feed, agricultural chemi- 
cals and equipment. 

3. To prepare students for entrance to veterinary 

schools. 

4. To prepare students for graduate study and 

subsequent careers in teaching, research and 
extension, both public and private. 

5. To provide essential courses for the support of 

other academic programs of the University. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be sotisfied by com- 
pleting CHEM 008 and 009. College Chemistry I. II ond selecting 8 semester 
credit hours from the following courses: 



82 Agriculture 



Departmental Requirements 
BOTN 001 -General Botany 
MICB 001 -General Microbiology 
ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 



Semester 
Credit Hours 



ANSC 001 - Principles of Animal Science 3 

ANSC 109 -Fundamentals of Nutrition 

ANSC 116- Anatomy of Domestic Animals 

ANSC 1 17-lntroduction to Diseases of Animals 

ANSC 141 -Applied Animal Physiology 4 

Genetics 

Agronomy 3 

Agricultural Engineering 4 

Insect Pests of Agriculture 4 

Economics 3 

Organic Chemistry 3 

Physics 3 

Math, and/or Biometrics 6 

Electees 2v 

For students interested in a program of study 
with major emphasis on beef cattle, sheep, and 
swine, it is suggested that the elective courses in- 
clude the following: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

ANSC 020 -Fundamentals of Animal Production 3 

ANSC 021 -Seminar 1 

ANSC 022 -Livestock Evaluation 3 

ANSC 110-Applied Animal Nutrition 3 

ANSC 120-Advanced Livestock Judging 2 

ANSC 121 -Meat 3 

ANSC 122, 123 -Livestock Management 6 

ANSC 130 -Principles of Breeding 3 



For students interested in a program of study 
with major emphasis on dairying, it is suggested 
that the elective courses include the following: 

ANSC 040- Dairy Production .... 3 

ANSC 041 -Dairy Cattle Type Appraisal 1 

ANSC 140- Physiology of Mammalian Reproduction 3 

ANSC 142-Dairy Cattle Breeding 3 

For students interested in a program of study 
with a major emphasis on poultry, it is suggested 
that the elective courses include the following: 

ANSC 061 -Advanced Poultry Judging 1 

ANSC 062 -Commercial Poultry Mgt 3 

ANSC 165 -Physiology of Hotchability 1 

ANSC 170- Poultry Hygiene 3 

ANSC 171 -Avian Anatomy 3 

AGEC 1 17 — Agricultural Commodity Markets 2 

Students desiring a combination of training in 
one of the animal sciences and emphasis on busi- 
ness, may choose elective courses from the fol- 
lowing: 

BSAD 010-Business Enterprise 3 

BSAD 020- Principles of Acct 3 

BSAD 130-Business Statistics 3 

BSAD 180-Business Law 3 

BSAD 166-Business Communication 3 

MATH 010-lntroduction to Math ... . 3 

EC0N 037- Fundamentals of Econ. 3 

EC0N 140-Money and Banking 3 

BSAD 149-Marketing Principles and Organization 3 

AGR 101 -Agricultural Biometrics 3 

BOTANY 

The Department offers work in the major fields of 
Physiology, Pathology, Ecology, Taxonomy, Anatomy- 
Morphology, and Genetics. 

The required courses for the freshman and 
sophomore years are the same for all students. In 
the junior and senior years, the student elects 
botany courses to suit his particular interest. Courses 
are required in other subjects to contribute toward 
a broad cultural education, and to support the 
courses selected in the chosen field of botany. 

The curriculum provides a complete survey of 
the field of botany for prospective high school 



teachers, and lays a good foundation for graduate 
work in botany in preparation for college teaching 
and for research in state or federal experiment 
stations, or in private research laboratories. 

Students who wish to meet the requirements 
for certificates in secondary education may elect 
basic courses in education. An additional semester 
will usually be necessary to take certain courses 
in education, including the required practice teach- 
ing. As long as the demand continues, a series of 
advanced courses will be offered in rotation in the 
summer session especially for teachers working to- 
ward the degree Master of Education in science 
teaching. 

The Department of Botany has instituted an 
Honors Program which a student may enter if he de- 
sires and if he meets the requirements of the pro- 
gram. 



The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

CHEM 008.009 -College Chemistry I, II 4.4 

ZOOL 001 - General Zoology 4 

Semester 

Department of Botany Requirements Credit Hours 

BOTN 002 -General Botany 4 

BOTN 011 -Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 020 - Diseases of Plants 4 

BOTN 101 -Plant Physiology 4 

BOTN 102 -Plant Ecology . 2 

BOTN 103 -Plant Ecology Laboratory 1 

BOTN 111 -Plant Anatomy 3 

BOTN 117-General Plont Genetics 2 

BOTN 199 -Seminar 2 

Modern Language, preferably German. 12 

MATH 010,01 1 -Introduction to Mothemotics 4 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

PHYS 010,01 1 -Fundamentals of Physics 8 

Botany electives or related courses 10 

Electives 12 



CONSERVATION AND RESOURCE 
DEVELOPMENT 

The development and use of natural resources 
(including water, soil, minerals, fresh water and 
marineorganisms, wildlife, air and human resources), 
are essential to the full growth of an economy. 

The curriculum in Conservation and Resource 
Development is designed to instill concepts of the 
efficient development and judicious management of 
natural resources. The study of the problems as- 
sociated with the use of natural resources will 
acquaint students with their role in economic de- 
velopment while maintaining concern for the quality 
of the environment. 

Students will prepare for professional and admin- 
istrative positions in land and water conservation 
projects, for careers in operational, administrative, 
educational, and research work in land use, natural 
resource management, recreational area develop- 
ment, and management, or for graduate study in 
any of the several areas within the biological 
sciences. 

Students will pursue a broad education pro- 
gram and then elect subjects concentrated in a 
specific area of interest. A student will be assigned 
an advisor according to his area of interest. 

Students will be encouraged to obtain summer 
positions which will give them technical laboratory 
or field experience in their chosen interest area. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement wiH be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 



Agriculture 83 



Semester 

Credit Hours 
CHEM 008.009- College Chemistry I. II 4,4 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 

Conservation and Resource Development Requirements: 

AGRI 080 -Introductory Agricultural Biometrics 

or 

AGRM01 -Agricultural Biometrics 3.3 

AGEN 001 -Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 4 

AGRO 010 -General Soils 4 

BOTN 002-General Botany 4 

BOTN 010 — Principles of Conservation 3 

BOTN Oil -Plant Taxonomy 

or 

BOTN ) 53 — Field Botany & Taxonomy 3,2 

BOTN 102-Plant Ecology 2 

BOTN 103-Plant Ecology Laboratory 1 

ENTM 01 5 -Introductory Entomology 3 

GEOG 010-General Geography 3 

GEOL 001 -Geology 3 

MATH 010,011 -Introduction to Mathematics 

(or MATH 18,19) 3,3 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 002-Animal Phyla 4 

ZOOL 121 -Animal Ecology 3 

Electives 27 

Additional Requirement: One of the following options must be fulfilled: 

Plant Conservation: 

BOTN Oil -Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 102-Plant Ecology 2 

BOTN 103-Plant Ecology Laboratory 1 

Botany or Conservation Electives 6 

Wildlife Conservation: 

ANSC 1 18 — Wildlife Management 3 

BOTN 102-Plant Ecology 2 

ZOOL 121 -Animal Ecology 3 

Zoology Elective 4 

Resource Development: 

AGEC 111 -Economics of Resource Development 3 

GEOG 01 5 -Introductory Economic Geography 3 

Ecology -Plant or Animal Ecology 3 

Agricultural Economics or Economics Elective 3 

Electives 24 

ENTOMOLOGY 

This curriculum prepares students for work in 
various typesof entomological positions. Professional 
entomologists are engaged in fundamental and ap- 
plied research, regulatory and control services with 
state and federal agencies, commercial pest con- 
trol, sales and developmental programs with chemi- 
cal companies, and other commercial organizations, 
consulting work, extension work, and teaching. 

Most of the first two years of this curriculum is 
devoted to obtaining the essential background. In 
the junior and senior year there is opportunity for 
some specializing. Students contemplating graduate 
work are strongly advised to elect courses in phy- 
sics, modern language, and biometrics. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

CHEM 008,009 -College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

Semester 

Deportment of Entomology Requirements Credit Hours 

ENTM 015-lntroductory Entomology 3 

ENTM 105-Medical and Veterinary Entomology 3 

ENTM 120-lnsect Taxonomy and Biology 4 

ENTM 122-lnsect Morphology ... 4 

ENTM 124-Economic Entomology 4 

ENTM 123- Insect Physiology 4 

ENTM 198-Special Problems 2 

ENTM 199-Seminar . 2 

BOTN 011 -Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 020 -Diseases of Plants 4 
CHEM 010,012-College Chemistry III and College 

Chemistry Laboratory III 3.2 

MATH 010,01 1 - Introduction to Mathematics 6 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 
ZOOL 002- The Ammol Phyla or ZOOL 118 — 

Invertebrate Zoology 4 



ZOOL 006-Genetics .. 4 

Electives 19 



FOOD SCIENCE 

Food Science applies the fundamentals of the 
physical and biological sciences to the problems of 
procurement, preservation, processing, packaging, 
and marketing foods in a manner that would satisfy 
man's needs both nutritionally and aesthetically. 

Opportunities for careers in food science exist in 
areas of meats, milk and milk products, fruits and 
vegetables, poultry and eggs, sea food, baby foods, 
onfections, pet foods, cereals, flavors and colors, 
etc. Specific positions in Industry, Universities, and 
Government, include product development, produc- 
tion, engineering, research, quality control, technical 
service, technical sales, and teaching. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement 
will be satisfied by completing the following 
courses: 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be sotisifed by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
CHEM 008,009- College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

BOTN 001 -General Botany or ZOOL 001 -General Zoology 4 

Curriculum Requirements 

AGEN 1 13-Mechanics of Food Processing 4 

ANSC 109 -Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

CHEM 010,012-College Chemistry III & College 

Chemistry Laboratory III 3.2 

FOOD 153- Experimental Food Science 3 

FDSC 001 -Introduction to Food Science 3 

FDSC 102,103- Principles of Food'Processing-l, II 3,3 

FDSC 111 -Food Chemistry 3 

FDSC 1 12 — Analytical Quality Control 3 

FDSC 113 — Statistical Quality Control 3 

FDSC 131 -Food Product Research and Development 3 

FDSC 199-Seminar 1 

MICB 81 -Applied Microbiology 4 

PHYS 10-Fundamentals of Physics 4 

Production course- 3 

Electives 25 



GEOLOGY 

The Geology curriculum provides an excellent 
opportunity to prepare for advanced work in this 
field. Basic courses in mathematics, chemistry, and 
physics are necessary for competent geologists and 
are required for all students preparing for advanced 
degrees. By the proper selection of courses listed 
under the technical and general electives, the stu- 
dent can obtain outstanding undergraduate training 
for advanced work in geology or general training for 
employment with a Bachelor of Science degree. 

The College of Agriculture science requirement 
will be satisfied by completing CHEM 008 and 009. 
College Chemistry I, II and selecting 8 semester 
credit hours from the following courses: 

Semester 
Departmentol Requirements (Geology) Credit Hours 

GEOL 001 -Introductory Physical Geology 3 

GEOL 002 -Historical and Stratigraphic Geology 3 

GEOL 004 -Physical Geology Laboratory 
GEOL 005 -Historical Geology Laboratory 

GEOL 194-Reseorch Problems in Geology 1 

GEOL -Summer Field Camp 5 



ANSC 001. AGRO OOl HORTO05. H0RT 058 or AGEN 001 



84 Agriculture 



AGRO 010- General Soils „ 

Foreign language (French, German, or Russian) 1 2 

Proficiency equivalent to that of a student i ompleting 
two years of college work. 
Technical or General Courses for Geology Students 23 

(see lists below) 
Electives 21 

Technicol Courses which may be Selected by Geology Students 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
CHEM 01 5- Qualitative Anolysis 4 

MATH019,020-Anolysis I, II 8 

PHYS 030,031. 032- General Physics 11 

If the student elects more than 23 hours of technical courses they should 
be additional courses in the above areos. 
General Courses which may be Selected by the Geology Students 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
GEOL 121 -Mineralogy 3 

GEOL 130-Paleontology 3 

GEOL 140 -Structural Geology 3 

GEOL- Additional geology courses or GEOG 118, and GEOG 146 14 

These courses may be replaced by courses in physics, chemistry, and 
mathematics with permission of the geology advisor. 



HORTICULTURE 

The Department of Horticulture offers in- 
struction in pomology (fruits), olericulture (vege- 
tables), floriculture (flowers), ornamental horticul- 
ture, and processing of horticultural crops. These 
courses prepare students to enter commercial pro- 
duction and the horticultural industries such as fruit 
and vegetable processing, seed production, and re- 
tail florists and nurseries. Students are likewise 
prepared to enter the allied industries as horticul- 
tural workers with fertilizer companies, equipment 
manufacturers, and others. Students who wish to 
enter specialized fields of research and teaching 
may take advanced work in the Department. 

The Horticultural .Education curriculum is de- 
signed for persons who wish to prepare for teaching 
horticulture in the secondary schools. It provides 
basic training in horticulture and includes the neces- 
sary courses for teacher certification. 

The Department of Horticulture is a cooperating 
department in the Food Science curriculum. 

POMOLOGY AND OLERICULTURE CURRICULUM 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CHEM 008,009- College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

B0TN 001 -General Botany 4 

and 4 semester credits selected from the following: 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

Z00L 001 -General Zool 4 

GEOL 001 and 004 -Geology & Physical Geology Laboratory 3,1 

CHEM 010,012-College Chemistry III and 

College Chemistry Laboratory III 3,2 

Department of Horticulture Requirements 

AGRO 010-General Soils 4 

B0TN 020- Diseases of Plants 4 

B0TN 101 -Plant Physiology ... 4 

BOTN 117-General Plant Genetics 2 

ENTM 020-lnsect Pests of Agricultural Crops . 4 

H0RT 005,006 -Tree Fruit Production . 3,2 

H0RT 058-Vegetable Production ... 3 

H0RT 059- Berry Production 3 

H0RT 062 -Plant Propagation 3 

H0RT 101 -Technology of Fruits 3 

HORT 103 -Technology of Vegetables 3 

H0RT 161 -Physiology of Maturation and Storage of 

Horticultural Crops 2 

HORT 199-Seminar .. 1 

A minimum of 3 additional Horticultural credits 3 

Electives 30 

FLORICULTURE AND ORNAMENTAL 
HORTICULTURE CURRICULUM 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

Semester 

Credit Hours 

CHEM 008,009 -Col lege Chemistry I, II 4,4 

B0TN 001 -General Botany 4 



and 4 semester credits selected from the following: 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zool 4 

GEOL 001 and 004 -Geology & Physical Geology Laboratory 3 ] 
CHEM 010,012-College Chemistry III and 

College Chemistry Laboratory III 32 

Deportment of Horticulture Requirements 

AGRO 010-General Soils 
BOTN01I -Plant Taxom- 
B0TN 020- Diseases of Plants 
B0TN 101 -Plant Physiology 
BOTN 117-General Plant Genetics 
HORT 01 1 - Greenhouse Management 
HORT 016-Garden Management 



4 
3 
4 

4 

2 

3 
3 
HORT 020 -Introduction to the Art of Landscaping 3 

HORT 056- Basic Landscope Compose 

HORT 062 - Plant Propagation 3 

HORT 100 -Principles of Landscape Design 3 

HORT 105-Technology of Ornamentals 

HORT 107,108-Woody Plant Materials 3,3 

HORT 162 -Fundamentals of Greenhouse Crop Production 

or 
HORT 163- Production and Maintenance of Woody Plants 3 

HORT 199-Seminar 1 

Select 2 credits from the following 2 

HORT 01 2,01 3 -Greenhouse Crop Production Laboratory 1.1 

HORT 017-Garden Management Laboratory 
Electives ... 26 



HORTICULTURE EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

Department of Horticulture Requirements 

The College of Agriculture science requirement will be satisfied by com- 
pleting the following courses: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 

CHEM 008,009- College Chemistry I, II 4,4 

BOTN 001 -General Botany 4 

and 4 semester credits selected from the following: 

MICB 001 -General Microbiology 4 

ZOOL 001 -General Zool 4 

GEOL 001 and 004-Geology & Physicol Geology Laboratory 3,1 

CHEM 010,012-College Chemistry III and 

College Chemistry Laboratory III 3,2 

AGRO 010-General Soils 4 

BOTN 011 -Plant Taxonomy 3 

BOTN 020-Diseoses of Plants 4 

BOTN 101 -Plant Physiology 4 

EDUC 111 -Foundations of Education 3 

HORT 01 1 -Greenhouse Management 3 

HORT 01 2 -Greenhouse Management Laboratory 1 

HORT 016-Garden Management 3 

HORT 017-Flower Production Laboratory 1 

HORT 020-lntroduction to the Art of Landscaping 3 

HORT 056-Basic Landscape Composition 2 

HORT 062-Plant Propagation 3 

HORT 100-Principles of Landscale Design 3 

HORT 105-Technology of Ornamentals 3 

HORT 199-Seminar 1 

RLED 109-Teaching Secondary Agriculture 3 

RLED 101 -Teaching Materials and Demonstrations 2 

RLED 103 -Student Teaching 5 

RLED 104- Student Teaching 1-4 

RLED 107-lntroduction to Agricultural Education 2 

RLED 111 -Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups 1 

Elect one of the following courses: 3-6 

PSYC 110- Educational Psychology (3) 

EDUC 110- Human Development and Learning (6) 

A minimum of 12 additional Agricultural credits 12 

Approved Electives 3-9 

Total 124 



SPECIAL CURRICULA 
PRE-FORESTRY STUDENTS 

The College of Agriculture is glad to cooperate 
with any student who wishes to attend the Univer- 
sity to pursue courses which may be transferred 
to a standard forestry curriculum in another institu- 
tion. The program which a student follows depends 
to some extent upon the forestry college he plans 
to enter. All pre-forestry students in the College of 
Agriculture are sent to the Department of Botany of 
the University for counsel and advice in these mat- 
ters. 



Agriculture 85 



For residents of Maryland who have completed 
two years of pre-forestry and have satisfied require- 
ments comparable to those at the University of 
Maryland and have been accepted in the School of 
Forestry at North Carolina State University, the 
University of Maryland will pay the non-resident fee 
for a period of two years. 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
The Pre-Forestry Curriculum Includes: 

ENGL 001.003.004 9 

B0TN001 4 

Z00L 001 4 

MATH 010.011.014.015 12 

CHEM 008.009 8 

PHYS 010,01 1 8 

SPCH007 2 

B0TN011 3 

HORT 030 3 

AGRI001 1 

Social Science 6 

Economics 3 

HLTH 5 2 

Students planning for 3 years in the Pre-Forestry 
curriculum should include BOTN 020, ENTM 015, 
AGRO 001, AGEN 001, AGRO 010, and BOTN 010. 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL STUDENTS 

The College of Agriculture cooperates with the 
officers of any theological seminary who desire to 
urge prospective students to pursue courses in 
agriculture as a preparation for the rural ministry. 
Such pre-theological students may enroll for a 
semester or more or for the usual four year training 
of the College. In either case they should enroll as 
members of the general curriculum in the College 
of Agriculture. Students desiring to pursue a pre- 
theological program in the College of Agriculture of 
the University of Maryland, should consult with the 
president or admissions officer of the theological 
seminary which they expect to attend. 



PRE-VETERINARY STUDENTS 

This program is designed for students desiring 
to prepare for the professional course in veterinary 
medicine. 

A combined degree is available to students in 
the pre-veterinary curriculum. A student who has 
completed 90 academic semester credits at the 
University of Maryland who has completed 30 addi- 
tional academic semester credits at the University 
of Georgia or at any accredited veterinary school is 
eligible to make application for the Bachelor of 
Science degree from the University of Maryland. 

Students wishing to apply for the combined de- 
gree must have completed all University and College 
requirements as set forth on page ... and must also 
have completed additional credits in Animal 
Science. 

The State of Maryland has entered into a regional 
agreement' with the State of Georgia which makes 
ten spaces a year available to Maryland residents 
in the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of 
Georgia. The spaces are to be filled on a competitive 
basis from among qualified applicants. 

Candidates, to be considered qualified, must 
have: 

a. Completed the curriculum shown below with 

grades not less than "C" in any subject. 

b. Taken the veterinary medical aptitude test; 

and 

c. Must be a bona fide resident of Maryland. 



All requirements must be completed by June 
prior to the September in which the student desires 
to matriculate in veterinary college. The pre-veter- 
inary curriculum can be completed in two years 
but is usually extended, thus making it possible for 
the applicant to select desirable electives. 

After the names of the candidates have been 
received, a Georgia Board of Admissions will as- 
semble at the University of Maryland and will inter- 
view each candidate and receive the transcript and 
all pertinent documents relating to him. The selec- 
tion will be made by the Office of Admissions, Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

The pre-veterinary curriculum should contain: 

Semester 
Credit Hours 
Biological Sciences 12 

Botany (4) 

Zoology (8) 

English and Speech 12 

Physical Sciences 32 

Inorganic chemistry (9) 

Orgonic Chemistry (9) 

Mathematics (6) 

Physics (8) 

Animal Science 9 

Genetics 3 

Nutrition 3 

Social Science ' 3 

History 6 

Physical Educotion 2 

Health 2 

Air Science Optional 

TWO-YEAR PROGRAM— INSTITUTE OF 
APPLIED AGRICULTURE 

The programs of study offered by the Institute 
will assist men and women interested in preparing 
for specific jobs in the broad fields of applied 
science and business in agriculture. Courses taken 
in these programs are not transferable for degree 
credits at the University of Maryland. However, stu- 
dents satisfactorily completing two years of study 
will be awarded an appropriate certificate. For addi- 
tional information write: Director, Institute of Ap- 
plied Agriculture, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742. 



This credit moy be sotisfied by exommatton ot the University of Georgio 



86 Agriculture 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



AGRICULTURE 

AGRI 001. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE. (1) 

First semester. Required of all beginnmng freshmen and 
sophomores in agriculture. Other students must get the 
concent of the instructor. A series of lectures introducing 
the student to the broad field of agriculture. (Poffenberger) 
AGRI 080. INTRODUCTORY AGRICULTURAL BIOMETRICS. 
(3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Graphical pres- 
entation of data, descriptive statistics, sampling, in- 
dividual and group comparisons, simple regression and 
correlations, and an introduction to analysis of variance 
with emphasis on interpretation of statistical analyses 
rather than methodology. (Staff) 

AGRI 101. AGRICULTURAL BIOMETRICS. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite, MATH 018 or equivalent. Prob- 
ability, measures of central tendency and dispersion, 
frequency distributions, tests of statistical hypotheses, 
regression analyses, multiway analysis of variance, and 
principles of experimental design with emphasis on the 
use of statistical methods in agricultural research. 

(Staff) 
AGRI 197. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURE. (1-3) 

First or second semester. Credit according to time sched- 
uled and organization of the course. A lecture series 
organized to study in depth a selected phase of agri- 
culture not normally associated with one of the existing 
programs. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 
AGRI 201. ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL BIOMETRICS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGRI 205. DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGRI 206. STATISTICAL METHODS IN BIOLOGICAL ASSAY. 
(3) 

(Staff) 
AGRI 207. APPLICATION OF LEAST SQUARES METHOD. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGRI 210. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES IN THE 
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES. (3) 

(Staff) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

PROFESSORS: Beal, Curtis, Foster, Ishee, Moore, Stevens, 

Tuthill and Wysong. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Bender, Cain, Hardie, Lessley, 

and Via. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Holmes and Marasco. 
VISITING PROFESSOR: Evans. 

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Nash and Sokoloski. 
AGEC 050. ELEMENTS OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS. (3) 

First semester. An introduction to economic principles 
of production, marketing, agricultural prices and incomes, 
farm labor, credit, agricultural policies, and government 
programs. (Ishee) 

AGEC 051. MARKETING OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. (3) 
Second semester. The development of marketing, its 
scope, channels, and agencies of distribution, functions, 
costs, methods used and services rendered. (Hardie) 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 
AGEC 100 and AGEC 101. AGRICULTURAL ESTIMATING 
METHODOLOGY. (3) (3) (Not for Grad. Credit) 

First and second semesters, respectively. The history, 
organization and administration of, and services provided 
by the Statistical Reporting Service of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and the survey sampling methods 
used by that agency for computing the Department's of- 
ficial statistics on crops, livestock and livestock products, 
production, agricultural prices and farm employment. 
Emphasis is on statistical procedures used for preparing 
approximately 350 reports issued annually by the Crop 
Reporting Board of the U. S. Statistical Reporting Serv- 
ice. (Designed especially for foreign students in FAO 
and AID-Program of Technical Cooperation but very bene- 
ficial to any student interested in the area.) (Bookhout) 



AGEC 103. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT. (3) 

First Semester, (alternate years, 1969). Prerequisite AGEC 
051 and BSAD 020 or permission of instructor. The dif- 
ferent forms of businesses are investigated. Management 
functions, business indicators, measures of performance, 
and operational analysis are examined. Case studies 
are used to show applications of management techniques. 

(Lessley) 

AGEC 106. PRICES OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. (3) 

Second semester. An introduction to agricultural price 
behavior. Emphasis is placed on the use of price in- 
formation in the decision-making process, the relation 
of supply and demand in determining agricultural prices, 
and the relation of prices to grade, time, location, and 
stages of processing in the marketing system. The course 
includes elementary methods of price analysis, the con- 
cept of parity, and the role of price support programs 
in agricultural decisions. (Marasco) 

AGEC 107. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF THE FARM BUSINESS. 
(3) 

First semester. Application of economic principles to 
aeveiop criteria tor a sound farm business, including 
credit source and use, preparing and tiling income tax 
returns, methods of appraising farm properties, the sum- 
mary and analysis of farm records, leading to effective 
control and profitable operation of the farm business. 

(Wysong) 

AGEC 108. FARM MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Second semester. The organization and operation of the 
farm business to obtain an income consistent with 
family resources and objectives. Principles of produc- 
tion economics and other related fields are applied to 
the individual farm business. Laboratory period will 
be largely devoted to field trips and other practical 
exercises. (Lessley) 

AGEC 109. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS IN 
AGRICULTURE. (3) 

First semester. An introduction to the application of 
econometric techniques to agricultural problems with 
emphasis on the assumptions and computational tech- 
niques necessary to derive statistical estimates, test 
hypotheses, and make predictions with the use of single 
equation models. Includes linear and non-linear regres- 
sion models, internal least squares, discriminant analysis 
and factor analysis. (Ishee) 

AGEC 111. ECONOMICS OF RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT. (3) 
First semester. Economic, political, and institutional 
factors which influence the use of land resources. 
Application of elementary economic principles in under- 
standing social conduct concerning the development 
and use of natural and man-made resources. (Tuthill) 

AGEC 112. AGRICULTURAL POLICY AND PROGRAMS. (3) 
First semester. A study of public policies and programs 
related to the problems of agriculture. Description an- 
alysis and appraisal of current policies and programs 
will be emphasized. (Beal) 

AGEC 114. WORLD AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION AND 
TRADE. (3) 

First semester. World production, consumption, and 
trade patterns for agricultural products. International 
trade theory applied to agricultural products. National 
influences on international agricultural trade. (Foster) 

AGEC 117. AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY MARKETS: AN 
ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. (3) 

First semester, (alternate years). Problems, institutions 
and functions within marketing systems for poultry and 
eggs, dairy, grain, horticultural, livestock, tobacco and 
forestry products. Practical applications of elementary eco- 
nomic theory in a framework for analysis of market prob- 
lems. (Via) 

AGEC 118. MARKETING MANAGEMENT OF AGRIBUSINESS 
ENTERPRISES. (3) 

Second semester, (alternate years). Prerequisite. AGEC 
103 or permission of instructor. Principles, functions, 
institutions and channels of marketing viewed from the 
perspective of a manager of an agricultural business 
enterprise. The managerial framework for analyzing the 
entire marketing program of a firm is developed and 
utilized. (Cain) 

AGEC 119. FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIES. (3) 

Second semester. Analysis of the agricultural economy 
of selected areas of the world. The interrelationships 
among institutions and values, such as government and 



Agriculture 87 



religion, and the economics of agricultural organization 
and production. (Holmes) 

AGEC 185. APPLICATIONS OF MATHEMATICAL PROGRAM- 
MING IN AGRICULTURE, BUSINESS AND ECONOMIC 
ANALYSIS. (3) 

This course is designed to train students in the applica- 
tion of mathematical programming (especially linear 
programming) to solve a wide variety of problems in 
agriculture, business and economics. The primary 
emphasis is on setting up problems and interpreting 
results. The computational facilities of the Computer 
Science Center are used extensively. (Bender) 

AGEC 195. HONORS READING COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS I. (3) 

First semester. Selected readings in political and eco- 
nomic theory from 1700 to 1850. This course develops a 
basic understanding of the development of economic 
and political thought as a foundation for understand- 
ing our present society and its cultural heritage. Prereq- 
uisite: Acceptance in the Honors Program of the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Economics. (Bender) 

AGEC 196. HONORS READING COURSE IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS II. (3) 

Second semester. Selected readings in political and 
economic theory from 1850 to the present. This course 
continues the development of a basic understanding of 
economic and political thought begun in AGEC 195. This 
understanding on the part of the student is further 
developed and broadened in this semoster by the examina- 
tion of modern problems in agricultural economics in the 
light of the material read and discussed in AGEC 195 and 
AGEC 196. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AGEC 
195 and registration in the Honors Program of the 
Department of Agricultural Economics. (Via) 

AGEC 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. (1-2) (2 cr. max.) (not for 
grad. cr.) 

First and second semesters and summer. Concentrated 
reading and study in some phase or problem in agricultural 
economics. (Staff) 

AGEC 199. SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Students will obtain ex- 
perience in the selection, preparation and presentation 
of economic topics and problems which will be sub- 
jected to critical analysis. (Ishee) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 

AGEC 200. APPLICATION OF ECONOMETRICS IN 
AGRICULTURE. (3) (Staff) 

AGEC 201. ADVANCED THEORY AND PRACTICE OF 
INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL TRADE. (3) {Staff) 

AGEC 202. MARKET STRUCTURE IN AGRICULTURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 204. ADVANCED AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 208. AGRICULTURAL PRICE AND INCOME POLICY. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 210. ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL PRICE AND 
DEMAND ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 212. AGRICULTURE IN WORLD ECONOMIC 
DEVELOPMENT. (3) 

AGEC 214. ADVANCED AGRICULTURAL MARKETING. (3) 

(Staff) 

AGEC 216. ECONOMICS OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. 
(3) 

(Staff) 

AGEC 218. AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS RESEARCH 
TECHNIQUES. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 219. ADVANCED RESOURCE ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 220. INTERNATIONAL IMPACTS OF SELECTED 
AGRICULTURAL FORCES. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 300. SPECIAL TOPICS IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEC 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL 
ECONOMICS. (1-2) (4 cr. max.) 

(Staff) 



AGEC 302. SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

AGEC 399. RESEARCH. (6 hrs. M. S.) 

AGEC 499. RESEARCH (12 hours. Ph.D.) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 

PROFESSOR: Ryden. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Longest and Nelson. 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

RLED 101. TEACHING MATERIALS AND 
DEMONSTRATIONS. (2) 

First semester. Principles and practices of the demonstra- 
tion method; construction and use of visual aids in teach- 
ing agriculture. (Nelson) 

RLED 103. STUDENT TEACHING. (5) 

First semester. Prerequisite, satisfactory academic aver- 
age and permission of instructor. Fulltime student teach- 
ing in an off-campus student teaching center under an ap- 
proved supervising teacher of agriculture. Participating ex- 
perience in all aspect of the work of a teacher of agricul- 
ture. (Nelson) 

RLED 104. STUDENT TEACHING. (1-4) 

First semester. Prerequisite, satisfactory academic aver- 
age and permission of instructor. Fulltime observation 
and participation in work of teacher of agriculture in off- 
campus student teaching center. Provides students op- 
portunity to gain experience in the summer program 
of work, to participate in opening of school activities, 
and to gain other experience needed by teachers. 

(Nelson) 

RLED 107. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 
(2) 

An overview of the job of the teacher of agriculture; 
examination of agricultural education programs for youth 
and adults. (Staff) 

RLED 109. TEACHING SECONDARY VOCATIONAL 
AGRICULTURE. (3) 

First semester. A comprehensive course in the work of 
high school departments of vocational agriculture. It 
emphasizes particularly placement, supervised farming 
programs, the organization and administration of Future 
Farmer activities, and objectives and methods in all- 
day instruction. (Nelson) 

RLED 111. TEACHING YOUNG AND ADULT FARMER 
GROUPS. (1) 

First semester. Characteristics of young and adult farmer 
instruction in agriculture. Determining needs for and 
organizing a course; selecting materials for instruction; 
and class management. Emphasis is on the conference 
method of teaching. (Staff) 

RLED 121. DIRECTED EXPERIENCE IN EXTENSION 
EDUCATION. (1-5) 

Prerequisite, satisfactory academic average and permis- 
sion of instructor. Full-time observation and participation 
in selected aspects of extension education in an ap- 
proved training county. (Ryden) 

RLED 161. 4-H ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURE. (2) 

A study of the youth phase of cooperative extension 
work. Emphasis is placed on the philosophy, objectives, 
organization, leadership development and methods 
used in conducting 4-H Club work at the local and 
county level. (Ryden) 

RLED 199. SEMINAR IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION (1) 
Examination of current literature, reports and discussions 
of problems, trends, and issues in agricultural education. 

(Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

RLED 114. RURAL LIFE IN MODERN SOCIETY. (3) 

Examination of the many aspects of rural life that af- 
fect and are affected by, changes in technical, natural 
and human resources. Emphasis is placed on the role 
which diverse organizations, agencies, and institutions 
play in the education and adjustment of rural people 
to the demands of modern society. (Longest) 

RLED 150. EXTENSION EDUCATION. (2) 

Second semester. The Agricultural Extension Service as 
an educational agency. The history, philosophy, objec- 



88 Agriculture 



fives, policy, organization, legislation and methods used 
in extension work. (Ryden) 

RLED 160. EXTENSION COMMUNICATIONS. (2) 

First semester. An introduction to communications in 
teaching and within an organization, including barriers 
to communication, the diffusion process and the applica- 
tion of communication principles person to person, with 
groups and through mass media. (Ryden) 

RLED 170, 171. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES. 
(3,3) 

Laboratory fee, $35.00. Designed primarily for teachers. 
Study of state's natural resources— soil, water, fisheries, 
wildlife, forests, and minerals — natural resources prob- 
lems and practices. Extensive field study. First course 
concentrates on subject matter; second includes methods 
of teaching conservation. Courses taken concurrently 
in summer season. (Staff) 

RLED 180, 181. CRITIQUE IN RURAL EDUCATION. (1, 1) 

Current problems and trends in rural education. (Staff) 
RLED 185. DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF 
EXTENSION YOUTH PROGRAMS. (3) 

Designed for present and prospective state leaders of 
extension youth programs. Program development, prin- 
ciples of program management, leadership development 
and counseling; science, career selection and citizenship 
in youth programs, field experience in working with low 
income families' youth, urban work. (Ryden) 

RLED 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval staff . (Staff) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 
RLED 200. RESEARCH METHODS IN RURAL EDUCATION. 
(2-3) 

(Staff) 
RLED 201. RURAL COMMUNITY ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Staff) 
RLED 204. DEVELOPING RURAL LEADERSHIP. (2-3) 

(Staff) 
RLED 207, 208. SPECIAL TOPICS IN RURAL EDUCATION. 
(2; 2) 

(Staff) 
RLED 209. RURAL ADULT EDUCATION. (2) 

(Staff) 
RLED 215. SUPERVISION OF STUDENT TEACHING. (1) 

(Staff) 
RLED 217. PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION IN 
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. (2-3) 

(Staff) 
RLED 225. PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN EXTENSION 
EDUCATION. (2) 

(Staff) 
RLED 240. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE INSTRUCTION. (1) 

(Staff) 
RLED 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. (1-3) 

(Staff) 
RLED 302. SEMINAR IN RURAL EDUCATION. (1, 1) 

(Staff) 
RLED 399. MASTER'S THESIS 

(Staff) 
RLED 499. PH.D. DISSERTATION 

(Staff) 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

PROFESSORS: Green, Harris and Winn. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Felton and Merrick. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Hummel and Merkel. 

INSTRUCTORS: Brodie, Rice and Stewart. 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Wheaton. 

VISITING RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Willson. 

AGEN 001. INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING. (4) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Applications of mathematics, physics, 
and engineering techniques in the solution of agricultural 
engineering problems. Studies will include farm power 
and machinery, farm structures and electrification and 
soil and water conservation. (Merkel) 



AGEN 056. INTRODUCTION TO FARM MECHANICS. (2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one labora- 
tory period a week. A study of the hand tools and power 
equipment and their safe use as it applies to mechanized 
farms. Principles and practice in arc and gas welding, 
cold metal and sheet metal work are provided. Also, 
tool fitting, woodworking, plumbing, blue print reading 
and use of concrete. (Gienger) 

AGEN 086. AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING SHOP 
TECHNIQUES. (1) 

Second semester. One laboratory per week. Agricultural 
Engineering majors only. Shop techniques and procedures 
used in construction of experimental agricultural 
machinery and equipment. Operation principles of power 
and hand tools. A term problem to develop plans and 
techniques for construction, to select materials and to 
construct an assigned unit will be required. (Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AGEN 104. FARM MECHANICS. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Available 
only to seniors in agricultural education. This course 
consists of laboratory exercises in practical farm shop 
and farm equipment maintenance, repair, and construc- 
tion projects, and a study of the principles of shop 
organization and administration. (Gienger) 

AGEN 113. MECHANICS OF FOOD PROCESSING. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite, PHYS 001 or 010. Applications in the processing 
and preservation of foods of power transmission, hydrau- 
lics, electricity, thermodynamics, refrigeration, instru- 
ments and controls, materials handling and time and 
motion analysis. (Merkel) 

AGEN 121. ENGINEERING DYNAMICS OF BIOLOGICAL 
MATERIALS (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
ENME 102. Investigate the physical parameters (impact, 
temperature, humidity, light, etc.) governing the response 
of biological materials. Analyses of unit operations and 
their effect on the physical and quality characteristics 
of agricultural products. (Staff) 

AGEN 123. AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT. (3) 
First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, AGEN 001. Principles of operation 
and functions of power and machinery units as related 
to tillage; metering devices; cutting, conveying and 
separating units; and control mechanisms. Principles 
of internal combustion engines and power unit com- 
ponents. (Hummel) 

AGEN 124. AGRICULTURAL MATERIALS HANDLING AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, AGEN 001. Characteristics of con- 
struction materials and details of agricultural structures. 
Fundamentals of electricity, electrical circuits, and elec- 
trical controls. Materials handling and environmental 
requirements of farm products and animals. (Staff) 

AGEN 142. FUNCTIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 
OF AGRICULTURAL STRUCTURES (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one two hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisites ENME 102. An analytical ap- 
proach to the design and planning of functional and 
environmental requirements of plants and animals in 
semi- or completely enclosed structures. (Staff) 

AGEN 143. FUNCTIONAL DESIGN OF MACHINERY AND 
EQUIPMENT (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite ENES 021. Theory and methods of 
agricultural machine design. Application of machine 
design principles and physical properties of soils and 
agricultural products in design of machines to per- 
form specific tasks. (Staff) 

AGEN 144. POWER SYSTEMS. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisites ENME 60, ENEE 60 and ENME 
102. Analysis of energy conversion devices including 
internal combustion engines, electrical and hydraulic 
motors. Fundamentals of power transmission and coordina- 
tion of power sources with methods of power trans- 
mission. (Staff) 

AGEN 145. SOIL AND WATER ENGINEERING. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
ENCE 090 and ENME 102. Applications of engineering 
and soil sciences in erosion control, drainage, irrigation 
and watershed management. Principles of agricultural 



Agriculture 89 



hydrology and design of water control and conveyance 
systems. (Schwiesow) 

AGEN 165. GENERAL HYDROLOGY (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Qualitative 
aspects of basic hydrologic principles pertaining to the 
properties, distribution and circulation of water as re- 
lated to public interest in water resources. (Schwiesow) 

AGEN 175. ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prereauisites. 
MATH 066, ENCE 105 or ENME 102. Properties, distribu- 
tion and circulation of water from the sea and in the 
atmosphere emphasizing movement overland, in chan- 
nels and through the soil profile. Qualitative and quantita- 
tive factors are considered. (Schwiesow) 

AGEN 185. AQUACULTURAL ENGINEERING (3) 

Spring semester. Prerequisite, consent of department. A 
study of the engineering aspects of development, utiliza- 
tion and conservation of aquatic systems. Emphasis will 
be on harvesting and processing aquatic animals or 
plants as related to other facets of water resources 
management. (Harris) 

AGEN 189. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING (1-3) 

Prerequisite, approval of Department. Student will select 
an engineering problem and prepare a technical report. 
The problem may include design, experimentation and/ 
or data analysis. (Staff) 

AGEN 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FARM MECHANICS. (1-3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of 
Department. Not acceptable for majors in agricultural 
engineering. Problems assigned in proportion to credit. 

(Gienger) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 
AGEN 201. INSTRUMENTATION SYSTEMS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEN 202. BIOLOGICAL PROCESS ENGINEERING (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEN 203. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BIOLOGICAL 
MATERIALS. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEN 204. LAND AND WATER RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 
ENGINEERING. (3) 

(Staff) 
AGEN 302. SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

(Staff) 
AGEN 399. RESEARCH. (1-6) 

(Staff) 
AGEN 499. RESEARCH (1-6) 

(Staff) 



AGRONOMY— CROPS, SOILS, AND GEOLOGY 

PROFESSORS: J. Miller, Axley, Decker, Hoyert, Rothgeb, and 
Strickling. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Clark, Fanning, Foss, F. Miller, 
Schillinger. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Ayecok, Bezdicek, Burt, New- 
comer, Powell. 

CROPS 

AGRO 001. CROP PRODUCTION. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, AGRO 002 or concurrent 
enrollment therein. Culture, use, improvement, adapta- 
tion, distribution, and history of field crops. (Clark) 

AGRO 002. CROP PRODUCTION LABORATORY. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a 
week. Demonstration and application of practices in the 
identification, distribution and management of field crops. 

(Clark) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AGRO 103. CROP BREEDING. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Prereq- 
uisite, BOTN 117 or ZOOL 006. Principles and methods of 
breeding annual self and cross-pollinated plant and 
perennial forage species. (Schillinger) 

AGRO 104. TOBACCO PRODUCTION. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. A study of the 
history, adaptation, distribution, culture, and improve- 
ment of various types of tobacco, with special emphasis 



on problems in Maryland tobacco production. Physical 
and chemical factors associated with yield and quality 
of tobacco will be stressed. (Hoyert) 

AGRO 107. CEREAL CROP PRODUCTION. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Prereq- 
uisite, BOTN 001, AGRO 002 or concurrent enrollment 
therein. Study of the principles and practices of corn, 
wheat, oats, barley, rye, and soybean production. 

(Rothgeb) 

AGRO 108. FORAGE CROP PRODUCTION. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, AGRO 002 or 
concurrent enrollment therein. Study of the production 
and management of grasses and legumes for quality 
hay, silage, and pasture. (Decker) 

AGRO 109. TURF MANAGEMENT. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 001. A study of principles and practices of manag- 
ing turf for lawns, golf courses, athletic fields, play- 
grounds, airfields and highways for commercial sod 
production. (Powell) 

AGRO 119. SOIL-WATER POLLUTION. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite: Background in biology 
and one semester of organic chemistry. Reaction and 
fate of pesticides, argicultural fertilizers, industrial and 
animal wastes in soil and water will be discussed. Their 
relation to the environment will be emphasized. (Staff) 

AGRO 151. CROPPING SYSTEMS. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, AGRO 001 or equivalent. 
The coordination of information from various courses in 
the development of balanced croppingsystems, appropriate 
to different objectives in various areas of the state 
and nation. (Clark) 

AGRO 152. SEED PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION. (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71). One 
lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. 
AGRO 001 or equivalent. A study of seed production, pro- 
cessing, and distribution; federal and state seed control 
programs; seed laboratory analysis; release of new vari- 
eties; and maintenance o\ foundation seed stocks. 

(Newcomer) 

AGRO 154. WEED CONTROL. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite. 
AGRO 001 or equivalent. A study of the use of cultural 
practices and chemical herbicides in the control of 
weeds. (Burt) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 

AGRO 201, 202. ADVANCED CROP BREEDING. (2, 2) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 203. BREEDING FOR RESISTANCE TO PLANT 
PESTS. (3) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 204. TECHNIC IN FIELD CROP RESEARCH. (2) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 205. ADVANCED TOBACCO PRODUCTION. (2) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 207. ADVANCED FORAGE CROPS. (2) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 208. RESEARCH METHODS. (2) 

(Staff) 
Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS. 

SOILS 

AGRO 010. GENERAL SOILS. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 008 or permission of 
instructor. A study of the fundamentals of. soils including 
their origin, development, relation to natural sciences, 
effect on civilization, physical properties, and chemical 
properties. (Foss) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AGRO 111. SOIL FERTILITY PRINCIPLES. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Prereq- 
uisite. AGRO 010. A study of the chemical, physical, and 
biological characteristics of soils that are important in 
growing crops. Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical, 
or biological nature and their correction by the use of 
lime, fertilizers, and rotations are discussed and illustra- 
ted. (Strickling) 



90 Agriculture 



AGRO 112. COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, AGRO 010 or permis- 
sion of instructor. A study of the manufacturing of com- 
mercial fertilizers and their use in soils for efficient 
crop production. (Axley) 

AGRO 113. SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
AGRO 010 or permission of instructor. A study of the im- 
portance and causes of soil erosion, methods of soil ero- 
sion control, and the effect of conservation practices on 
soil-moisture supply. Special emphasis is placed on 
farm planning for soil and water conservation. The labora- 
tory period will be largely devoted to field trips. (Foss) 

AGRO 114. SOIL CLASSIFICATION AND GEOGRAPHY. (3) 
Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 010, or permission of instruc- 
tor. A study of the genesis, morphology, classification 
and geographic distribution of soils. The broad principles 
governing soil formation are explained. Attention is given 
to the influence of geographic factors on the development 
and use of the soils in the United States and other parts 
of the world. The laboratory periods will be largely devoted 
to the field trips and to a study of soil maps of various 
countries. (Fanning) 

AGRO 115. SOIL SURVEY AND LAND USE. (3) 

First semester alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 114 
or consent of the instructor. An introduction to soil sur- 
vey interpretation as a tool in land use both in agricultural 
and urban situations. The implications of soil problems 
as delineated by soil surveys on land use will be con- 
sidered. (F. Miller) 

AGRO 116. SOIL CHEMISTRY. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) One lec- 
ture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, AGRO 
010, or permission of instructor. A study of the chemical 
composition of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, 
alkaline and saline soil conditions; and soil fixation of 
plant nutrients. Chemical methods of soil analysis will 
be studied with emphasis on their relation to fertilizer 
requirements. (Axley) 

AGRO 117. SOIL PHYSICS. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite 
AGRO 010 and a course in physics, or permission of in- 
structor. A study of physical properties of soils with 
special emphasis on relationship to soil productivity. 

(Strickling) 

AGRO 118. SOIL BIOCHEMISTRY. (3) 

Second semester. Alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
AGRO 10, CHEM 33 or 37 and 38 or consent of instructor. 
A study of biochemical processes involved in the forma- 
tion and decomposition of organic soil constitutents. Signi- 
ficance of soil-biochemical processes involved in plant 
nutrition will be considered. (Bezdicek) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 

AGRO 250. ADVANCED SOIL MINERALOGY. (3) 

(Staff) 

ARGO 251. ADVANCED METHODS OF SOIL INVESTIGATION. 
(3) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 252. ADVANCED SOIL PHYSICS. (3) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 253. ADVANCED SOIL CHEMISTRY. (3) 

(Staff) 

CROPS AND SOILS 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

AGRO 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN AGRONOMY. (1-3 var. cr.) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, AGRO 010, 107, 
108 or permission of instructor. Adetailed study, including 
a written report of an important problem in agronomy. 

(Staff) 

AGRO 199. SENIOR SEMINAR. (1) (No Grd. Cr.) 

First semester. Reports by seniors on current scientific 
and practical publications pertaining to agronomy. 

(J. Miller) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 



AGRO 260. RECENT ADVANCES IN AGRONOMY. (2-4) 
AGRO 302. AGRONOMY SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

AGRO 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Master's Level) (1-4) 

(Staff) 

AGRO 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (Doctoral Level) 
(1-4) 

(Staff) 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

ANIMAL: 

PROFESSORS: Green and Young. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Buric, Leffel. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: DeBarth. 

DAIRY: 

PROFESSOR: Davis. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Williams and Vandersall. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Douglass. 

POULTRY: 

PROFESSOR: Shaffner. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Creek. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bigbee and Pollard. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE: 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Marquardt, Mohanty and Newman. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Albert. 

INSTRUCTOR: Ingling. 

ANSC 001. PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL SCIENCE. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one, two-hour laboratory 
period per week. A comprehensive course, including the 
development of animal science, its contributions to the 
economy, characteristics of animal products, factors of 
efficient and economical production and distribution. 

(Young) 

ANSC 010. FEEDS AND FEEDING. (3) 

First semester. Credit not allowed for ANSC major. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem 008 and 009. Elements of nutrition, source, char- 
acteristics and adaptability of the various feedstuffs to 
the several classes of livestock. A study of the com- 
position of feeds, the nutrient requirements of farm 
animals and the formulation of economic diets and rations 
for livestock. (Leffel) 

ANSC 020. FUNDAMENTALS OF ANIMAL PRODUCTION. (3) 
First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. This course deals with the adaptation of beef 
cattle, sheep, swine and horses to significant and specific 
uses. Breeding, feeding, management practices and 
criteria for evaluating usefulness are emphasized. 

(DeBarth) 

ANSC 021. SEMINAR. (1) 

First semester. One lecture per week. Reviews, reports 
and discussions of pertinent subjects in Animal Science. 

(Staff) 

ANSC 022. LIVESTOCK EVALUATION. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite, ANSC 020 or permission of in- 
structor. A study of type and breed characteristics of 
beef cattle, sheep and swine and the market classes of 
livestock which best meet present day demands. One 
field trip of about two days duration is made during 
which students participate in the Annual Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Livestock Clinic. (Buric) 

ANSC 040. DAIRY PRODUCTION. (3; 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite, ANSC 001. A comprehensive course 
in dairy breeds, selection of dairy cattle, dairy cattle 
nutrients, feeding and management. (Staff) 

ANSC 041. DAIRY CATTLE TYPE APPRAISAL. (1) 

Second semester. Freshmen, by permission of instructor. 
Two laboratory periods. Analysis of dairy cattle type with 
emphasis on the comparative judging of dairy cattle. 

(Cairns) 

ANSC 061. ADVANCED POULTRY JUDGING. (1) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ANSC 001. One lecture or 
laboratory period per week. The theory and practice of 
judging and culling by physical means is emphasized, 
including correlation studies of characteristics associated 
with productivity. Contestants for regional collegiate 
judging competitions will be selected from this class. 

(Bigbee) 



Agriculture 91 



ANSC062. COMMERCIAL POULTRY MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, ANSC 001. A symposium 
of finance, investment, plant layout, specialization, pur- 
chase of supplies and management problems in baby 
chick, egg, broiler and turkey production; foremanship, 
advertising, selling, by-products, production and financial 
records. Field trips required. (Bigbee) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ANSC 109. FUNDAMENTALS OF NUTRITION. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 31. A study of the fundamental role of all nutrients 
in the body, including their digestion, absorption, and 
metabolism. Dietary requirements and nutritional defi- 
ciency syndromes of laboratory and farm animals and 
man win be considered. This course will be for both 
graduate and undergraduate credit, with additional as- 
signments given to the graduate students. (Staff) 

ANSC 110. APPLIED ANIMAL NUTRITION. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite, MATH 010, ANSC 109 or permis- 
sion of instructor. A critical study of those factors which 
influence the nutritional requirements of ruminants, 
swine and poultry. Practical feeding methods and pro- 
cedures used in formulation of economically efficient 
rations will be presented. (Vandersall) 

ANSC 116. ANATOMY OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
per week. A systematic comparative study of the pig, 
ruminants and fowl, with special emphasis of those systems 
important in animal production. Prerequisite, ZOOL 001. 

(Staff) 

ANSC 117. INTRODUCTION TO DISEASES OF ANIMALS. (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. This course gives basic instruction in the 
nature of disease: including causation, immunity, methods 
of diagnosis, economic importance, public health aspects 
and prevention and control of the common diseases of 
sheep, cattle, swine, horses and poultry. Prerequisite, 
MICB 001 and ZOOL 001. (Staff) 

ANSC 118. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory. An 
introduction to the interrelationships of game birds 
and mammals with their environment, population dyna- 
mics and the principles of wildlife management. ,_, 

(Flyger) 

ANSC 119. LABORATORY ANIMAL MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Both semesters. A comprehensive course in care and 
management of laboratory animals. Emphasis will be 
placed on physiology, anatomy and special uses for the 
different species. Disease prevention and regulations for 
maintaining animals colonies will be covered. Field trips 
will be required. (Marquardt) 

ANSC 120. ADVANCED LIVESTOCK JUDGING. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods per week. Prereq- 
uisites, ANSC 022 and permission of instructor. An 
advanced course in the selection and judging of pure- 
bred and commercial meat animals. The most adept stu- 
dents enrolled in this course are chosen to represent 
the University of Maryland in Intercollegiate Livestock 
judging contests. (Buric) 

ANSC 121. MEATS. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite, ANSC 020. Registration limited to 
14 students. A course designed to give the basic facts 
about meat as a food and the factors influencing ac- 
ceptability, marketing, and quality of fresh meats. It 
includes comparisons of characteristics of live animals 
with their carcasses, grading and evaluating carcasses as 
well as wholesale cuts, and the distribution and mer- 
chandising of the nation's meat supply. Laboratory periods 
are conducted in packing houses, meat distribution cen- 
ters, and retail outlets. (Buric) 

ANSC 122. LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite, ANSC 109. Application of various 
phases of animal science to the management and pro- 
duction of beef cattle, sheep and swine. (Staff) 

ANSC 123. LIVESTOCK MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite. ANSC 122. Applications of various 
phases of animal science to the management and produc- 
tion of beef cattle, sheep and swine. (Leffel) 



ANSC 130. PRINCIPLES OF BREEDING. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, 
ZOOL 006 or BOTN 117. Graduate credit (1-3 hours) al- 
lowed with permission of instructor. The practical aspects 
of animal breeding, heredity, variation, selection, develop- 
ment, systems of breeding and pedigree study are con- 
sidered. (Green) 

ANSC 131. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE. (1) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Summer session 
only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of 
vocational agriculture and Extension Service personnel. 
One primary topic, to be selected mutually by the 
instructor and students, will be presented each session. 

(Staff) 

ANSC 140. PHYSIOLOGY OF MAMMALIAN REPRODUCTION. 
(3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 102 or 104. Anatomy 
and physiology of the reproductive process and artificial 
insemination of cattle. (Williams) 

ANSC 141. APPLIED ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY. (4) (P-F) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period per week. Prerequisites, CHEM 31 and 
ANSC 116 or equivalent. The physiology of domesticated 
animals with emphasis on functions related to produc- 
tion, and the physiological adaption to environmental 
influences. (Staff) 

ANSC 142. DAIRY CATTLE BREEDING. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites, ANSC040, ZOOL006or BOTN 117. 
A specialized course in breeding dairy cattle. Emphasis 
is placed on methods of evaluation and selection, systems 
of breedingand breeding programs. (Douglass) 

ANSC 143S. ADVANCED DAIRY PRODUCTION. (1) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily de- 
signed for teachers of vocational agriculture and county 
agents. It includes a study of the newer discoveries in 
dairy cattle nutrition, breeding and management (Staff) 

ANSC 146. ANALYSIS OF DAIRY PRODUCTION SYSTEMS. (3) 
Prerequisites, AGEC 108 a/id ANSC 010 or 110, or per- 
mission of instructor. The business aspects of dairy farm- 
ing including an evaluation of the costs and returns 
associated with each segment. The economic impact of 
pertinent management decisions is studied. Recent de- 
velopments in animal nutrition, physiology and genetics, 
agricultural economics, agricultural engineering, and 
agronomic practices are discussed as they apply to 
management of a dairy herd. (Staff) 

ANSC 162. AVIAN PHYSIOLOGY. (2) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 102 or 104 and ANSC 116. the 
basic physiology of the bird is discussed, excluding 
the reproductive system. Special emphasis is given to 
physiological differences between birds and other ver- 
tebrates. (Pollard) 

ANSC 163S. POULTRY BREEDING AND FEEDING. (1) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily 
for teachers of vocational agriculture and extension serv- 
ice workers. The first half will be devoted to problems 
concerning breeding and the development of breeding 
stock. The second half will be devoted to nutrition. 

(Staff) 

ANSC 164S. POULTRY PRODUCTS AND MARKETING. (1) 
Summer session only. This course is designed primarily 
for teachers of vocational agriculture and county agents. 
It deals with the factors affecting the quality of poultry 
products and with hatchery management problems, egg 
and poultry grading, preservation problems and market 
outlets for Maryland poultry. (Helbacka) 

ANSC 165. PHYSIOLOGY OF HATCHABILITY. (1) 

Second semester. One, three-hour laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 102 or 104. The physiology of 
embryonic development as related to principles of hatch- 
ability and problems of incubation encountered in the 
hatchery industry are discussed. (Shaffner) 

ANSC 170. POULTRY HYGIENE. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisites. MICB 001 and ANSC 001. Virus, 
bacterial and protozoon diseases; parasitic diseases, 
prevention, control and eradication. (Newman) 

ANSC 171. AVIAN ANATOMY. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, ZOOL 001. Gross and microscopic 



92 Agriculture 



structure, dissection and demonstration. (Newman) 

ANSC 189. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FISH AND WILDLIFE 
MANAGEMENT (3) 

First semester. Three lectures. Analysis of various state 
and federal programs related to fish and wildlife manage- 
ment. This would include: fish stocking programs, Mary- 
land deer management program, warm water fish man- 
agement, acid drainage problems, water quality, water- 
fowl management, wild turkey management and regula- 
tions relative to the administration of these programs. 

(Staff) 
ANSC 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 
(1-2) (4cr. max.) 

First and second semester. Prerequisite, approval of 
staff. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. 
A course designed for advanced undergraduates in which 
specific problems relating to animal science will be 
assigned. (Staff) 

ANSC 199. SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of 
staff. Presentation and discussion of current literature 
and research work in animal science. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions 
ANSC 200. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY. (4) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 220. ADVANCED BREEDING. (2) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 221. ENERGY AND PROTEIN NUTRITION. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 240. ADVANCED RUMINANT NUTRITION. (2) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 241. RESEARCH METHODS. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 242. EXPERIMENTAL MAMMALIAN SURGERY, 1. (2) 

ANSC 243. EXPERIMENTAL MAMMALIAN SURGERY, II. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 261. PHYSIOLOGY OF REPRODUCTION. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 262. POULTRY LITERATURE. (1-4) 

(Staff 
ANSC 263. POULTRY NUTRITION LABORATORY. (2) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 264. VITAMINS. (2) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 265. MINERAL METABOLISM. (2) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 266. PHYSIOLOGICAL GENETICS OF DOMESTIC 
ANIMALS. (2) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 280. SEMINAR IN POPULATION GENETICS OF 
DOMESTIC ANIMALS. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ANIMAL SCIENCE (1-2) 
(4 cr. max.) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 302. SEMINAR. (1) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 399. RESEARCH-MASTER'S THESIS. (1-6) 

(Staff) 
ANSC 499. RESEARCH-PH.D. DISSERTATION. (1-6) 

(Staff) 

BOTANY 

HEAD AND PROFESSOR: Krauss. 

PROFESSORS: Corbett, Galloway, Gauch, Kantzes, D. T. 

Morgan, Sisler, Stern, and Weaver. 
RESEARCH PROFESSOR: Sorokin. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brown, Karlander, Klarman, Krus- 

berg, Lockard, 0. D. Morgan, Patterson, and Rappleye. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Barnett, Bean, Curtis, Harrison, 

Motta, Reveal, Smith, and Terborgh. 
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Norton. 
INSTRUCTORS: Grigg and Owens. 
GENERAL BOTANY 



BOTN 001. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week. General introduc- 
tion to botany, touching briefly on all phases of the 
subject. Emphasis is on the fundamental biological prin- 
ciplesof thehigherplants. (Sternand Department Faculty.) 

BOTN 001 H. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week. A broad study of plant science with 
emphasis on current conceptions of major fields of 
interest. Designed for general honors students, as well 
as for freshman students with superior training in 
biology or chemistry, for upper class science majors, 
and for those students seeking an advanced treatment 
of BOTN 001. (Galloway and Departmental Faculty.) 

BOTN 002. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or equivalent. A brief 
evolutionary study of algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, 
ferns and their relatives, and the seed plants, emphasizing 
their structure, reproduction, habitats, and economic 
importance. (Staff) 

BOTN 010. PRINCIPLES OF CONSERVATION. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. A study of the 
principles of economical use of our natural resources in- 
cluding water, soil, plants, minerals, wildlife and man. 

(Harrison) 

BOTN 116. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF BOTANY (1) 

First semester. Prerequisites 20 semester credit hours 
in biological sciences including BOTN 001 or equivalent. 
Discussion of the development and ideas and knowledge 
about plants, leading to a survey of contemporary work 
in botanical science. (Staff) 

BOTN 136. PLANTS AND MANKIND. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or equivalent. 
A survey of the plants which are utilized by man, the 
diversity of such utilization, and their historic and 
economic significance. (Rappleye) 

BOTN 151S. TEACHING METHODS IN BOTANY. (2) 

Summer session. Four two-hour laboratory demonstra- 
tion periods per week, for eight weeks. Prerequisite, BOTN 
001, or equivalent. A study of the biological principles of 
common plants, and demonstrations, projects, and visual 
aids suitable for teaching in primary and secondary 
schools. (Lockard) 

BOTN 171. MARINE PLANT BIOLOGY. (4) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or General 
Biology plus Organic Chemistry or the consent of the 
instructor. Five, one-hour lectures and three, 3-hour 
laboratories each week for six weeks. An introduction to 
the taxonomic, physiological and biochemical charac- 
teristics of marine plants which are basic to their role 
in the ecology of the oceans and estuaries. Laboratory 
fee $12.00. (Krauss and Staff) 

BOTN 195. TUTORIAL READING IN BOTANY. (HONORS 
COURSE) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, admission to the Department of Botany 
Honors Program. A review of the literature dealing with 
a specific research problem in preparation for original 
research to be accomplished in Botany 196. Papers will 
be assigned and discussed in frequent sessions with 
the instructor. (Galloway and Departmental Faculty). 

BOTN 196. RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. (HONORS 
COURSE) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 195. The candidate for Honors will 
pursue a research problem under the direction and 
close supervision of a member of the faculty. (Staff) 

BOTN 199. SEMINAR. (1) 

First and second semesters. Two semester hours maximum 
credit. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Discussion 
and readings on special topics, current literature, or 
problems and progress in all phases of botany. Minor 
experimental work may be pursued if facilities and the 
qualifications of the students permit. For seniors only, 
majors and minors in botany or biological science. 

(Terborgh) 

BOTN 199-S. NSF SEMINAR. (2) 

Seminar in the Sciences for NSF participants only. In- 
cludes guest speakers, a field trip to area science labora- 
tories, and individual problem work. (Lockard) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 



Agriculture 93 



BOTN 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. (1 to 3) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 302. SEMINAR IN BOTANY. (1) 

(Staff) 
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

BOTN 101. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and one 4-hour laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, BOTN 001 and General 
Chemistry. Organic Chemistry strongly recommended. A 
survey of the general physiological activities of plants. 

(Patterson, Lockard) 
BOTN 172. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MARINE RESEARCH. 
Summer session. Prerequisites BOTN 001 or general 
biology plus Organic Chemistry or consent of instructor. 
Recommended concurrent or previous enrollment in BOTN 
171, Marine Plant Biology. An experimental approach to 
problems in marine research dealing primarily with the 
phytoplankton, the larger algae, and marine sperm- 
atophytes. Emphasis will be placed on their physiological 
and biochemical activities. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 
BOTN 204. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 209. PHYSIOLOGY OF ALGAE. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 210. PHYSIOLOGY OF ALGAE— LABORATORY. (1) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 230. ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 231. PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 232. PLANT BIOPHYSICS. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 233. PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY-BIOPHYSICS 
LABORATORY. (4) 

(Staff) 
PLANT PATHOLOGY 

BOTN 020. DISEASES OF PLANTS. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. An introduc- 
tory study of the symptoms and casual agents of plant 
diseases and measure for their control. (Klarman) 

BOTN 122. RESEARCH METHODS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY. (2) 
Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prereq- 
uisite, BOTN 020, or equivalent. Advanced training in 
the basic research techniques and methods of plant 
pathology. (Curtis) 

BOTN 127. DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL OF PLANT DISEASES. 
(3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. A study of 
various plant diseases grouped according to the manner 
in which the host plants are affected. Emphasis will be 
placed on recognition of symptoms of the various types 
of diseases and on methods of transmission and con- 
trol of the pathogens involved. (Bean) 
BOTN 152S. FIELD PLANT PATHOLOGY. (1) 

Summersession. Daily lectureforthree weeks. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 020, or equivalent. Given in accordance with de- 
mand. A course for county agents and teachers of voca- 
tional agriculture. Discussion and denomination of the 
important diseases in Maryland crops. (Kantzes) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 
BOTN 221. PLANT VIROLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 222. PLANT VIROLOGY LABORATORY. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 223. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 224. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI LABORATORY. (1) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 227. PHYSIOLOGY OF PATHOGENS AND HOST- 
PATHOGEN RELATIONSHIPS. (3) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 241. PLANT NEMATOLOGY. (4) 

(Staff) 



Taxonomy 

BOTN Oil. PLANT TAXONOMY. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. An intro- 
ductory study of plant classification, based on the col- 
lection and identification of local plants. (Brown) 

BOTN 128. MYCOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1971-72.) An introductory 
study of the morphology, classification, life histories, and 
economics of the fungi. (Motta) 

BOTN 153S. FIELD BOTANY AND TAXONOMY. (2) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or General Biol- 
ogy. Four two-hour laboratory periods a week for eight 
weeks. The identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, 
emphasizing the native plants of Maryland. Manuals, 
keys, and other techniques will be used. Numerous short 
field trips will be taken. Each student will make an 
individual collection. (Brown) 

BOTN 161. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. (2) 

Fall semester. (Not offered 1970-71). Two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequsite, BOTN 01 1 or equivalent. 
An advanced study of the principles of systematic botany. 
Laboratory practice with difficult plant families including 
grasses, sedges, legumes, and composites. Field trips 
arranged. (Reveal) 

ECOLOGY 

BOTN 102. PLANT ECOLOGY. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. Two lectures 
per week. The dynamics of populations as affected by 
environmental factors with special emphasis on the 
structure and composition of natural plant communities, 
both terrestrial and equatic. (Terborgh) 

BOTN 103. PLANT ECOLOGY LABORATORY. (1) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 102 or its equivalent or concurrent 
enrollment therein. One three-hour laboratory period a 
week. The application of field and experimental methods 
to the qualitative and quantitative study of vegetation 
and environmental factors. (Terborgh) 

BOTN 113. PLANT GEOGRAPHY. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. A 
study of plant distribution throughout the world and 
the factors generally associated with such distribution. 

(Brown) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 

BOTN 219. ADVANCED PLANT ECOLOGY. (3) 

(Staff) 

ANATOMY-MORPHOLOGY 

BOTN 110. PLANT MICROTECHNIQUE. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture a week. Laboratory periods 
by arrangement. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or equivalent 
and permission of instructor. Preparation of temporary 
and permanent mounts, including selection of material, 
killing and fixing, embedding, sectioning, and staining 
methods; photomicrography, film and paper processing 
and preparation of photographic illustrations for re- 
search publication. (Stern) 

BOTN 111. PLANT ANATOMY. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 110. or equivalent. The origin 
and development of the organs and tissue systems in 
the vascular plants. (Rappleye) 

BOTN 115. STRUCTURE OF ECONOMIC PLANTS. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1971-72.) One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 111. A 
detailed microscopic study of the anatomy of the chief 
fruit and vegetable crops. (Rappleye) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for description. 

GENETICS 

BOTN 117. GENERAL PLANT GENETICS. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or equivalent. 
The basic principles of plant genetics are presented; 
the mechanics of transmission of the hereditary factors 
in relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics 
of specialized organs and tissues, spontaneous and in- 
duced mutations of basic and economic significance, 
gene action, genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, 
and genetics in relation to methods of plant breeding 
are the topics considered. (Smith) 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 



94 Agriculture 



BOTN 215. PLANT CYTOGENETICS. (3) 

(Staff 
BOTN 216. NUCLEIC ACIDS AND MOLECULAR GENETICS (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 399. M. S. RESEARCH 

(Staff) 
BOTN 499. PH.D. RESEARCH 

(Staff) 



ENTOMOLOGY 

PROFESSORS: Bickley and Jones 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Harrison, Menzer, Messersmith 
and Steinhauer 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Davidson and Reichelderfer 

LECTURERS: Heimpel and Spangler 

ENTM 004. BEEKEEPING. (2) 

First semester. A study of the life history, behavior and 
seasonal activities of the honeybee, its place in pollination 
of flowers with emphasis on plants of economic impor- 
tance and bee lore in literature. (Staff) 

ENTM 005. INSECTS. (3) 

First and second semesters. A survey of the major 
groups of insects, their natural history, and their rela- 
tionships with man and his environment. 

(Messersmith and Staff) 

ENTM 015. INTRODUCTORY ENTOMOLOGY. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, one semester of college 
zoology. The position of insects in the animal kingdom, 
their gross structure, classification into orders and 
principal families and the general economic status of 
insects. A collection of common insects is required. 

(Messersmith) 

ENTIM 020. AGRICULTURAL INSECT PESTS. (3) 

Second semester. 2 lectures and one 2-hour laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite BOTN 001 or ZOOL 001. An 
introduction to the principal insect pests of fruit, vege- 
table, forage, and ornamental crops, with special reference 
to Maryland agriculture. Not open to entomology majors. 

(Harrison) 

ENTM 100. ADVANCED APICULTURE. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour labo- 
ratory periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 004. The 
theory and practice of apiary management. Designed 
for the student who wishes to keep bees or requires 
a practical knowledge of bee management. (Staff) 

ENTM 105. MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY. (4) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 001 or consent 
of the Department. A study of the morphology, taxonomy, 
biology and control of the arthropod parasites and 
disease vectors of man and animals. The ecology and 
behavior of vectors in relation to disease transmission 
will be emphasized. (Messersmith) 

ENTM 107. INSECTICIDES. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the Depart- 
ment. The development and use of contact and stomach 
poisons, fumigants and other important chemicals, with 
reference to their chemistry, toxic action, compatibility, 
and host injury. Recent research emphasized. (Menzer) 

ENTM 120. INSECT TAXONOMY AND BIOLOGY. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 015. Introduction 
to the principles of systematic entomology and the study 
of all orders and the important families of insects; 
immature forms considered. (Davidson) 

ENTM 121S. ENTOMOLOGY FOR SCIENCE TEACHERS. (4) 
Summer. Four lectures and four three-hour laboratory 
periods a week. This course will include the elements 
of morphology, taxonomy and biology of insects using 
examples commonly available to high school teachers. 
It will include practice in collecting, preserving, rear- 
ing and experimenting with insects insofar as time 
will permit. (Davidson and Messersmith) 

ENTM 122. INSECT MORPHOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 015. A 
basic study of insect form, structure and organization 
in relation to function. (Davidson) 



ENTM 123. INSECT PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisites, ENTM 015, CHEM 
031 or equivalent. Lectures and laboratory exercises on 
the cuticle, growth, endocrines, muscles, circulation, 
nerves, digestion, excretion and reproduction in insects. 

(Jones) 

ENTM 124. ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY. (4) 

First semester. 2 lectures and two 2-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, ENTM 015. The recognition, 
biology and control of insects injurious to fruit and 
vegetable crops, field crops and stored products. 

(Harrison) 

ENTM 125. INSECT PATHOLOGY. (3) 

Second semester. 2 lectures and one 3-hour laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisite, MICB 001; prerequisite or 
concurrent ENTM 123, or consent of the instructor. An 
introduction to the principal insect pathogens with 
special reference to symptomology, epizootiology, and 
microbial control of insect pests. (Reichelderfer) 

ENTM 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Credit and prerequisites, 
to be determined by the Department. Investigations of 
assigned entomological problems. (Staff) 

ENTM 199. SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior stand- 
ing. Presentation of original work, cSVews and abstracts 
of literature. (Staff) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 

ENTM 205. INSECT ECOLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 

ENTM 206. CULICIDOLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 

ENTM 208. TOXICOLOGY OF INSECTICIDES. (4) 

(Staff) 

ENTM 209. ADVANCES IN INSECT PHYSIOLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 

ENTM 210. ENTOMOLOGICAL TOPICS. (Credit arranged) 

(Staff) 

ENTM 211. ASPECTS OF INSECT BIOCHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 

ENTM 301. ADVANCED ENTOMOLOGY. (1-6) 

(Staff) 
ENTM 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Master's Level) 

(Staff) 
ENTM 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (Doctoral Level) 

(Staff) 



FOOD SCIENCE 

PROFESSORS: Young (Animal Science); Davis Arbuckle, 
King and Mattick (Dairy Science); Stark , Kramer, Scott 
and Wiley (Horticulture); Shaffner (Poultry Science). 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Buric (Animal Science). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bigbee, and Heath (Poultry 
Science). 

FDSC 001. INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SCIENCE. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. An introductory course to orient the student in 
the broad field of food science. Includes a historical and 
economic survey of the major food industries, composition 
and nutritive value, quality aspects, spoilage, preserva- 
tion, sanitation, standards and regulation of foods. 

(Mattick) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

FDSC 102. PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PROCESSING— 1. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. A study of the basic methods by which foods 
are preserved (unit operations). Effect of raw product 
quality and the various types of processes on yield and 
quality of the preserved products. (Wiley) 

FDSC 103. PRINCIPLES OF FOOD PROCESSING— II. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. A detailed study 
of food processing with emphasis on line and staff 
operations, including physical facilities, utilities, pre- 
and post-processing operations, processing line develop- 
ment and sanitation. (Mattick) 



Agriculture 95 



FDSC 111. FOOD CHEMISTRY. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 010, 012. The application of 
basic chemical and physical concepts to the composition 
and properties of foods. Emphasis will be on the relation- 
ship of processing technology on the keeping quality, 
nutritional value and acceptability of foods. (King) 

FDSC 112. ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite CHEM 010, 012. Instrumental and sen- 
sory measurement of food quality attributes including 
appearance, rheological, flavor, and microbiological 
evaluations, and their integration into grades and standards 
of quality. (Kramer) 

FDSC 113. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite AGR I 100. Statistical methods for acceptance 
sampling of supplies and raw materials, in-plant and 
finished product inspection, water, fuel, and waste con- 
trol, production, transportation, inventory and budget 
controls. (Kramer) 

FDSC 125. MEAT AND MEAT PROCESSING. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite CHEM 161 or permis- 
sion of instructor. Physical and chemical characteristics 
of meat and meat products, meat processing, methods 
of testing and product development. 

FDSC 131. FOOD PRODUCT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
(3) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite FDSC 103, CHEM 161, or permission of in- 
structor. A study of the research and development func- 
tion for improvement of existing products and develop- 
ment of new, economically feasible and marketable food 
products. Application of chemical-physical character- 
istics of ingredients to produce optimum quality prod- 
ucts, cost reduction, consumer evaluation, equipment 
and package development. (Mattick) 

FDSC 156. HORTICULTURAL PRODUCTS PROCESSING. (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Commercial methods of canning, 
freezing, dehydrating, fermenting, and chemical pres- 
ervation of fruit and vegetable crops. (Wiley) 

FDSC 160. TECHNOLOGY OF MARKET EGGS AND POULTRY. 
(3) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. A study of the technological factors 
concerned with the processing, storage, and marketing 
of eggs and poultry and the factors affecting their 
quality. (Helbacka) 

FDSC 175. SEAFOOD PRODUCTS PROCESSING. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite, CHEM 161 or permis- 
sion of instructor. The principal preservation methods 
for commercial seafood products with particular reference 
to the invertebrates. Chemical and microbiological aspects 
of processing are emphasized. (Staff) 

FDSC 182. DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory per week. Method of production of fluid milk, 
butter, cheese, condensed and evaporated milk and 
milk products and ice cream. (Mattick) 

FDSC 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOOD SCIENCE. (1-3) 
(4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of 
staff. Designed for advanced undergraduates in which 
specific problems in food science will be assigned. 

(Staff) 

FDSC 199. SEMINAR. (1) 

Second semesters. Presentation and discussion of cur- 
rent literature and research in food science. (Staff) 

MECHANICS OF FOOD PROCESSING. 

See Agricultural Engineering, AGEN 113. 

EXPERIMENTAL FOOD SCIENCE. 

See Food and Nutrition, FOOD 153. 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 

FDSC 201. ADVANCES IN FOOD TECHNOLOGY. (3) 

(Staff) 

FDSC 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN FOOD SCIENCE. (1 to 4) 

(Staff) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 



FDSC 302. SEMINAR IN FOOD SCIENCE. (1-3) 

FDSC 310. COLLOQUIUM IN FOOD SCIENCE. (1) 

FDSC 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-12) 

FDSC 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (1-12) 

(Staff) 
Methods of Horticultural Research, see Horticulture, HORT 

207. 
Research Methods, see Animal Science, ANSC 241. 
Recent Advances in Nutrition, see Home Economics, NUTR 

204. 

GEOLOGY 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Fernow, Segovia, Siegrist and 
Stifel 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Maccini and Weidner 

GEOL001. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICAL GEOLOGY. (3) 

First and second semester. A study dealing primarily 
with the principles of dynamical and structural geology. 
Designed to give a general survey of the rocks and 
minerals composing the earth; the movement within it; 
and its surface features and the agents that form them. 

(Staff) 

GEOL 002. HISTORICAL AND STRATIGRAPHIC GEOLOGY. 
(3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, GEOL 001. A study of 
the earth's history as revealed through the principles 
of stratigraphy and the processes of physical geology, 
with emphasis on the formations and the geologic 
development of the North American continent. (Fernow) 

GEOL 004. PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. (1) 

First and second semester. One laboratory a week. May 
be taken concurrently with a specially designated sec- 
tion of GEOL 1 or after successful completion of GEOL 
001. The basic materials and tools of physical geology 
stressing familiarization with rocks and minerals and 
the use of maps in geologic interpretations. (Staff) 

GEOL 005. HISTORICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY. (1) 

Second semester. One laboratory a week. Concurrent 
registration in GEOL 002 or consent of instructor is 
required. The use of geologic maps and fossils in the 
study of the physical and biological evolution of the 
earth. (Fernow) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

GEOL 120. CRYSTALLOGRAPHY. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 009 or consent of instructor. An 
introduction to the study of crystals. Stresses the 
theoretical and practical relationships between the in- 
ternal and external properties of crystalline solids. En- 
compasses morphological, optical and chemical crystal- 
lography. (Siegrist) 

GEOL 121. MINERALOGY. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratories a 
week. Prerequisite, GEOL 004 and 120 or consent of 
instructor. Basic elementary mineralogy with emphasis on 
description, identification; formation, occurrence and 
economic significance of approximately 150 minerals. 

(Siegrist) 

GEOL 122. OPTICAL MINERALOGY. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71) One 
lecture and two laboratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 
121 or consent of instructor. The optical behavior of 
crystals with emphasis on the theory and application 
of the petrographic microscope. (Staff) 

GEOL 130. INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72). Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 
002 or consent of instructor. ZOOL002 or equivalent recom- 
mended. A systematic review of the morphology, classifi- 
cation, ecology, and geologic ranges of selected in- 
vertebrate groups represented in the fossil record. 

(Fernow) 

GEOL 131. STRATIGRAPHIC PALEONTOLOGY (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72). Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite. GEOL 
130. Principles of biostratigraphy, paleoecoloRy and 
paleogeography. Laboratory study emphasizes significant 
index fossils. (hernow) 



96 Agriculture 



GEOL 140. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 
004 or consent of instructor. A study of the cause and 
nature of the physical stresses and resulting defor- 
mational responses in the earth. Laboratory exercises in- 
clude crustal model studies and stereographic analysis 
of deformational structures. (Segovia) 

GEOL 141. SEDIMENTATION. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 
004 or consent of instructor. A study of the critical vari- 
ables in sedimentation systems; origin, dispersion, ac- 
cumulation, and properties of sediments and sedimentary 
rocks. Laboratories will include the measurement and 
statistical analysis of sediment properties and study of 
sedimentation rates. (Stifel) 

GEOL 142. IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY. (2) 
First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71). Two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisites, GEOL 121 or consent 
of instructor. A detailed study of igneous and metamorphic 
rocks: pedogenesis; distributions; chemical and miner- 
alogical relations; macroscopic descriptions and geologic 
significance. (Staff) 

GEOL 143. PETROGRAPHY. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 9170-71.) Two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisites, GEOL 122, 141, 142 or 
consent of instructor. Microscopic thin-section studies 
of rocks stressing the description and classification of 
igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. (Staff) 

GEOL 145. GEOCHEMISTRY. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 
121 or consent of instructor. An introduction to the 
chemistry of the earth including high and low temper- 
ature equilibria relations between and within important 
mineral groups and an analysis of the distribution and 
significance of elements and their isotopes in the earth. 

(Staff) 

GEOL 147. GEOPHYSICS. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 
Oil or consent of instructor. An introduction the basic 
theories and principles of geophysics stressing such 
important applications as rock magnetism, gravity anom- 
olies, crustal strain and earthquakes, and surveying. 

(Staff) 

GEOL 150. GROUNDWATER GEOLOGY. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Prereq- 
uisite, GEOL 001 or consent of instructor. An introduction 
to the basic geologic parameters associated with the 
hydrologic cycle. Problems in the accumulation, distribu- 
tion and movement of groundwater will be analyzed. 

(Staff) 

GEOL 151. MARINE GEOLOGY. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) 
Prerequisite, GEOL 001 or consent of instructor. An in- 
troduction to the essential elements of marine and es- 
tuarine geology including studies of currents, tides, 
waves, coastline development, shore erosion and marine 
anc 1 bay sedimentation. (Staff) 

uEOL 152. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY i _ METALLIC ORE 
DEPOSITS. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 121 or consent 
of instructor. A study of the geology of metallic ore 
deposits stressing ore-forming processes, configuration 
of important ore bodies, and familiarization with char- 
acteristic ore mineral suites. (Staff) 

GEOL 153. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY 11 — NON-METALLIC 
ORE DEPOSITS. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1970-71.) Two 
laboratories a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 121 or consent 
of instructor. A study of the geology of non-metallic ore 
deposits: nitrates, phosphates, limestone, etc., and fos- 
sil fuels; coal oil, and natural gas. (Staff) 

GEOL 154. ENGINEERING GEOLOGY. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1971-72.) Two 
lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, GEOL 
004 or consent of instructor. A study of the geological 
problems associated with the location of tunnels, bridges, 
dams and nuclear reactors; slope control, and natural 
hazards. (Segovia) 



GEOL 160. EARTH SCIENCE. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An interdisciplin- 
ary course designed to show how geology, meteorology, 
physical geography, soil science, astronomy and ocean- 
ography are interrelated in the study of the earth and 
its environment in space. Recommended for science 
education undergraduate and graduate students. May 
not be used for credit towards geology majors. (Maccini) 

GEOL 194. RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN GEOLOGY. (1) 

First and second semester. Open only to geology majors 
in their final year. The student will select and investigate 
with departmental assistance a specific library, laboratory 
or field study. A written and oral presentation of the 
study will determine satisfactory completion of the 
course. (Staff) 

GEOL 197. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARTH SCIENCE. (1-3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, GEOL 160 or equivalent. 

(Maccmi) 

GEOL 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GEOLOGY. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, GEOL 002 and 
GEOL 004 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. Inten- 
sive study of a special geologic subject or technique 
selected after consultation with instructor. Intended to 
provide training or instruction not available in other 
courses which will aid the student's development in 
his field of major interest. (Staff) 



HORTICULTURE 

PROFESSORS: Stark, Haut. Kramer. Link, Reynolds, Scott, 
Shanks, Thompson and Wiley. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Soergel. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Angell, Baker and Bouwkamp. 

LECTURERS: Borthwick, Hendee and Hornstein. 

HORT 005. TREE FRUIT PRODUCTION. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite BOTN 001. Two lectures and 
one laboratory per week. A detailed study of the prin- 
ciples and practices in fruit production, harvesting and 
storage, with emphasis on the apple. One field trip 
required. (Thompson) 

HORT 006. TREE FRUIT PRODUCTION. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite 
HORT 005. A study of the principles and practices in 
fruit production, harvesting, and handling of deciduous 
tree fruit crops other than the apple. (Thompson) 

HORT Oil. GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
BOTN 001. A study of the construction and operation of 
structures for forcing horticultural crops and the prin- 
ciples underlying the regulation of plant growth under 
greenhouse conditions. (Shanks) 

HORT 012, 013. GREENHOUSE CROP PRODUCTION LABO- 
RATORY. (1, 1) 
First and Second Semesters. One laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite or concurrent HORT Oil. Demonstration and ap- 
plication of practices in the commercial product ion of green- 
house crops. (Shanks) 

HORT 016. GARDEN MANAGEMENT. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite 
BOTN 001. The planting and care of ornamental plan^ on 
the home grounds and a study of commonly used species 
of annuals and herbaceous perennials. (Baker) 

HORT 017. GARDEN MANAGEMENT LABORATORY. (1) 

Second semester. One two-hour laboratory per week. Prereq- 
uisite or concurrent HORT 01 6. Demonstration and applica- 
tion of practices in the production and maintenance of 
garden plants. (Baker) 

HORT 020. INTRODUCTION TO THE ART OF LANDSCAPING. 
(3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures per week. The 
theory and general principles of landscape design with 
their application to public and private areas. (Soergel) 

HORT 030. ELEMENTS OF FORESTRY. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite BOTN 
001. Not open to freshmen. A general survey of the field 
of forestry, including timber values, conservation, pro- 
tection silviculture, utilization, mensuration, engineer- 
ing, recreation and lumbering. Principles and practices 
of woodland management. Four all-day Saturday field 
trips are required. (Hendee) 



Agriculture 97 



HORT 056. BASIC LANDSCAPE COMPOSITION. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods per 
week. The introduction of landscaping presentation tech- 
nique, supplemented by problems in basic composition. 

(Soergel) 

HORT 058. VEGETABLE PRODUCTION. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. A study of principles 
and practices of commercial vegetable production. 

(Reynolds) 

HORT 059. BERRY PRODUCTION. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. A study of the principles 
and practices involved in the production of small fruits 
including grapes, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, 
and cranberries. (Angell) 

HORT 062. PLANT PROPAGATION. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
BOTN 001. A study of the principles and practices of 
the propagation of plants. (Baker) 

HORT 063. FLOWER STORE MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, HORT Oil. A study of 
the operation and management of a flower store. Labora- 
tory period devoted to principles and practice of floral 
arrangements and decoration. (Link) 

For Advanced Undergraduates 

HORT 100. PRINCIPLES OF LANDSCAPE DESIGN. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
per week. Prerequisite HORT 020 and HORT 056. A con- 
sideration of design criteria and procedure as applied 
to residential properties. (Soergel) 

HORT 152. ADVANCED LANDSCAPE DESIGN. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite HORT 100, prereq- 
uisite or concurrent HORT 108. The design of public and 
private areas with the major emphasis on plant materials. 

(Soergel) 

HORT 153. LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite HORT 100. An 
introductory study and application of location methods, 
construction details, and construction techniques of the 
various landscape objects such as walks, walls, benches, 
roads. (Soergel) 

HORT 198. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. (2, 2) (4 cr. max.) 

First and second semesters. Credit arranged according 
to work done. For major students in horticulture or botany. 
Four credits maximum per student. (Staff) 

HORT 199. SEMINAR. (1) 

Second semester. Oral presentation of the results of 
investigational work by reviewing recent scientific litera- 
ture in the various phases of horticulture. (Stark) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

HORT 101. TECHNOLOGY OF FRUITS. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
HORT 006; prerequisite or concurrent BOTN 101. A critical 
analaysis of research work and applicaton of the prin- 
ciples of plant physiology, chemistry, and botany to 
practical problems in commercial production. 

(Thompson) 

HORT 103. TECHNOLOGY OF VEGETABLES. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite 
HORT 058; prerequisite or concurrent BOTN 101. A critical 
analysis of research work and application of the principles 
of plant physiology, chemistry, and botany to practical 
problems of commercial vegetable production. 

(Reynolds) 

HORT 105. TECHNOLOGY OF ORNAMENTALS. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite or 
concurrent BOTN 101. A study of the physiological pro- 
cesses of the plant as related to the growth, flowering 
and storage of ornamental plants. (Link) 

HORT 107, 108. WOODY PLANT MATERIALS. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, BOTN Oil. A 
field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines 
used in ornamental plantings. (Baker) 

HORT 109. PRINCIPLES OF BREEDING HORTICULTURAL 
PLANTS. (3) 

Second semester. Alternate years. Three lectures per 
week. Prerequisite. BOTN 117 or permission of instructor. 
The genetic and cytogenetic basis of plant breeding. 



Systems of pollination control, theories of selection, 
heterosis and quantitative inheritance; mutation breed- 
ing; interspecific hybridization, induced polyploidy and 
haploidy. (Bouwkamp) 

HORT 114. SYSTEMATIC HORTICULTURE. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. A study of the origin, taxonomic relationship and 
horticultural classification of fruits and vegetables. 

(Angell) 
HORT 115S. TRUCK CROP MANAGEMENT. (1) 

Summer session only. Primarily designed for teachers 
of vocational agriculture and extension agents. Special 
emphasis will be placed upon new and improved methods 
of production of the leading truck crops. Current problems 
and their solution will receive special attention. (Staff) 
HORT 124S. TREE AND SMALL FRUIT MANAGEMENT. (1) 
Summer session only. Primarily designed for vocational 
agriculture teachers and county agents. Special emphasis 
will be placed upon new and improved commercial methods 
of production of the leading tree and small fruit crops. 
Current problems and their solution will receive special 
attention. (Staff) 

HORT 125S. ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE. (1) 

Summer session only. A course designed for teachers 
of agriculture and extension agents to place special 
emphasis on problems of the culture and use of orna- 
mental plants. (Staff) 
HORT 161. PHYSIOLOGY OF MATURATION AND STORAGE 
OF HORTICULTURAL CROPS. (2) 

Second semester alternate years. Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisite, BOTN 101. Factors related to maturation 
and application of scientific principles to handling 
and storage of horticultural crops. (Scott) 

HORT 162. FUNDAMENTALS OF GREENHOUSE CROP 
PRODUCTION. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week. 
Prerequisite HORT Oil. This course deals with a study of 
the commercial production and marketing of ornamental 
plant crops under greenhouse, plastic houses and out- 
of-door conditions. (Shanks) 
HORT 163. PRODUCTION AND MAINTENANCE OF WOODY 
PLANTS. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite or concurrent 
HORT 062; 108. A study of the production methods and 
operation of a commercial nursery and the .planting 
and care of woody plants in the landscape. (Link) 

For Graduates 

See the Graduate School catalog for descriptions. 
HORT 207. METHODS OF HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH. (3) 

(Staff) 
HORT 211. EDAPHIC FACTORS AND HORTICULTURAL 
PLANTS. (3) 

(Staff) 
HORT 212. CHEMICAL REGULATION OF GROWTH OF 
HORTICULTURAL PLANTS. (3) 

(Staff) 
HORT 213. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND 
HORTICULTURAL PLANTS. (3) 

(Staff) 
HORT 214. BREEDING OF HORTICULTURAL PLANTS. (3) 

(Staff) 
HORT 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN HORTICULTURE. (1-3) 

(Staff) 
HORT 302. ADVANCED SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

(Staff) 
HORT 399. THESIS RESEARCH (1-12) 

(Staff) 
HORT 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (1-12) 

(Staff) 
Seed Inspection, Seed Certification, 
and Weed Control 

The Seed Inspection Service administers the 
state seed law; inspects seeds sold throughout the 
state; collects seed samples for laboratory examina- 
tion; reports the results of the examinations to the 
parties concerned; publishes summaries of these 
reports which show the relative reliability of the 
label information supplied by wholesale seedsmen; 



98 Agriculture 



cleans and treats tobacco seed intended for plant- 
ing in the state; makes analysis, tests, and examina- 
tions of seed samples submitted to the laboratory; 
and advises seed users regarding the economic and 
intelligent use of seeds. In 1969, new laws pertain- 
ing to the control of noxious weeds and correct 
labeling of turf products were enacted. 

The work of the Seed Inspection Service is not 
restricted to the enforcement of the seed law, how- 
ever, for state citizens may submit seed samples 
to the laboratory for analysis, test, or examination. 
Specific information regarding suitability for plant- 
ing purposes of seeds is thus made available to in- 
dividuals without charge. 
State Horticultural Department 

Work in this field is designed to control insects 
and plant diseases and to protect the public in the 
purchase of products of nurserymen and florists. A 
considerable part of staff time is occupied by in- 
spection of orchards, crops, nurseries, greenhouses, 
and floral establishments. Cooperation with the 
federal government in the inspection and certifica- 
tion of materials that come under quarantine regula- 
tions is another major function of the Department. 
The Department enforces the provisions of the Apiary 
Law, including inspection of apiaries. It also regulates 
the use of pesticides under provisions of a new law 
enacted in 1969. 
State Department of Dranage 

The State Departmentof Drainage wasestablished 
in 1937. Its duties are to encourage and assist with 
the drainage of agricultural lands in the state, to 
correlate the activities of the local drainage organiza- 
tions in the state, and to cooperate with state 
and federal agencies in the interest of a permanent 
program of improved drainage. 
State Inspection Service 

The protection of consumers and manufacturers 
of agricultural products against fraudulent practices 
makes certain specialized laws necessary. These 
are classified as correct labeling laws, and are en- 
forced by the State Inspection Service. Included in 
this legislation are the Feed, Fertilizer, Agricultural 
Liming Materials, and Pesticide Laws. 
Soil Conservation 

In 1937 the Maryland Legislature created the 
State Soil Conservation Committee in Maryland. 
The twenty-four districts organized under the law 
include all the land in the state. 

The State Committee is charged with the responsi- 
bility of coordinating the efforts of the districts 
and encouraging the application of soil and water 
conservation practices. 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 
Irvin C. Haut, Director 

The Agricultural Experiment Station serves 
Maryland agriculture in much the same manner as 
research laboratories serve large corporations. The 
problems which face' a biological and business under- 
taking such as agriculture are as numerous and 
perplexing as the problems of any business. 

The station is a joint federal and state under- 
taking. Passage of the Hatch Act of 1887, which 
made available a grant-in-aid to each state for the 
purpose of establishing an agricultural experiment 
station, gave a great impetus to the development 
of research work in agriculture. This work was further 
encouraged by the passage of the Adams Act in 
1906, the Purnell Act in 1925, the Bankhead-Jones 
Act in 1935, and the Flannagan-Hope Act of 1946. 



The work of the Maryland Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, which is supported by these Acts and 
by State appropriations, centers at College Park. 
On the University campus are laboratories for study- 
ing insects and diseases, soil fertility, botanical 
problems, and the economics of our agricultural in- 
dustry and its interrelationship with our total econ- 
omy. This is also the location of the livestock and 
dairy barns with their experimental herds. 

About eight miles from the campus at College 
Park, near Beltsville, the Plant Research Farm of 
about 500 acres is devoted to work connected with 
soil fertility, plant breeding and general crop produc- 
tion problems. An experimental farm near Upper 
Marlboro is devoted to the problems of tobacco 
growing and curing. A farm near Salisbury is de- 
voted to solution of the problems of producers of 
broilers and of vegetable crops in the southern 
Eastern Shore area. Two experimental farms are 
operated near Ellicott City; one is devoted to live- 
stock problems arid the other to dairy cattle nutri- 
tion and forage research. Also tests of various crop 
and soil responses are distributed throughout the 
state. These different locations provide the oppor- 
tunity to conduct experiments under conditions 
existing where the results will be put into practice. 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 
Robert E. Wagner, Director 

Cooperative Extension work in agriculture and 
home economics, established by state and federal 
laws in 1914, extends practical agricultural and 
home information beyond the classrooms of the 
University of Maryland to young people, farmers, 
homemakers, and people in businesses relating to 
agriculture and home economics. 

The educational endeavors of the Cooperative 
Extension Service are financed cooperatively by 
the federal, state, and county governments. In each 
county there is a competent staff of Extension 
agents assigned to conduct educational work in 
rather specific program areas consistent with the 
needs of the people in the county and as funds 
permit. The county staff is supported by a staff of 
specialists located at the University, and through 
their mutual efforts they assist local people in 
seeking solutions to problems. 

The Cooperative Extension Service works in 
close harmony and association with all groups and 
organizations. In addition to the work on the farms 
and in the farm homes, the Extension program is 
aimed at the many rural, non-farm, and urban clien- 
tele who service the agricultural industries of the 
state, including consumers. Thousands of boys and 
girls gain leadership knowledge and experience 
and are provided practical educational instruction 
in 4-H clubs and other youth groups. 

The Cooperative Extension Service in coopera- 
tion with the College of Agriculture and the Ex- 
periment Station arranges and conducts short 
courses, workshops, and conferences in various 
lines, many of which are held at the University. 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE PROGRAMS 

Charles P. Ellington, Director 

The state law provides that the Board of Regents 
of the University of Maryland shall constitute the 
Maryland State Board of Agriculture. While the 
Serivice and Control programs are part of the 
University, they are designed primarily to carry 
out the functions of the State Board of Agriculture. 
Numerous services are performed which result 



Agriculture 99 



in the improvement and maintenance of high 
standards in production, processing and distribution 
of farm products. In addition, many control or regula- 
tory activities are authorized by state law and are 
carried out by the following departments of the 
State Board of Agriculture: 
Dairy Inspection 

Duties of the dairy inspection force deal with 
the calibration of glassware used in testing milk 
and cream; examination of all weighers, samplers, 
and testers and the issuance of licenses to those 
satisfactorily passing the examination; and inspec- 
tion of the pertinent activities of weighers, samplers, 
testers, and dairy plants. 
Department of Markets 

Activities of the Department of Markets serve to 
insure a fair and equitable treatment of the farmer 
in all dealings which he may have concerning the 
marketing of his products. In the performance of 
these responsibilities, the Department conducts mar- 
ket surveys, compiles and disseminates marketing 
information and market data, operates a market 
news service, provides an agricultural inspection 
and grading service, maintains a consumer informa- 



tion service, and enforces the agricultural market 
ing laws of the state. The control work of the de- 
partment is carried out under the authority of 
various state laws relating to the marketing of farm 
products. 

Field offices are located in Baltimore, Salisbury, 
Hancock, and Pocomoke. 
MARYLAND LIVESTOCK SANITARY SERVICE 

The Livestock Sanitary Service is charged with 
the responsibility of preventing the introduction of 
diseases of animals and poultry from outside of 
the state and with control and eradication of such 
diseases within the state. 

Facilities for the diagnosis of a wide variety of 
diseases are furnished in the main laboratory at 
College Park and in the branch laboratories at 
Salisbury, Preston, Centreville, Bel Air, Frederick, 
and Oakland. 

Meat inspection is carried out under the Mary- 
land Wholesome Meat Act of 1968. The act re- 
quires ante and post mortem inspection of all 
animals and their carcasses if used for human 
food, as well as processing and sanitation inspec- 
tion. 



100 Agriculture 



Architecture 



The School of Architecture offers a five-year un- 
dergraduate professional program leading to the de- 
gree, Bachelor of Architecture. Future plans include 
development of other environmental design pro- 
grams at the graduate and undergraduate level. 

The School is following established procedures of 
the National Architectural Accreditation Board, and 
it is anticipated that it will be accredited in accor- 
dance with policies of the NAAB, insuring that pres- 
ent and future students will be eligible for registra- 
tion in all fifty states upon meeting experience re- 
quirements and passing the standard examination. 
The School is an associate member of the Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, and is 
assigned to that organization's Northeastern Region. 

The curriculum presents the basic knowledge and 
the opportunity to develop the requisite skills to be- 
ginning professional work. The School's goal is to pre- 
pare students for professional service in helping ame- 
liorate the nation's environmental problems. 



OPPORTUNITIES IN ARCHITECTURE 

A rapidly expanding population, together with 
rapidly developing industrial civilization, has taxed 
the resources of cities throughout the world. Large 
segments of these urban populations are overcrowd- 
ed, underserviced, and deprived of many of the 
amenities which city life historically symbolizes. 
Many cities find themselves on the edge of eco- 
nomic, political, and social disaster. Whole ethnic, 
racial, and economic groups live in a continuing 
situation of environmental frustration. This urban 
crisis, which has come to fruition over the last gen- 
eration, promises to dominate our domestic life in 
the United States for at least the generation to 
come. 



The very complexity of these problems, preclud- 
ing easy attribution of causes and obviating simple 
solutions, has generated great changes intheenviron- 
mental design professions and in the other social dis- 
ciplines. Where they once stood part, they are nowcom- 
mitted to a common purpose. Each of them has had to 
broaden its vision of service and concern, and has 
come to recognize the worth and value of the tech- 
niques and insights of the others. 

In architecture, these exchanges have influenced 
the procedures, scope of services, and goals of the 
profession. Recent years have seen the introduction of 
the ideas of urban sociology and the behavioral sci- 
ences into the area of professional concern, of the 
inclusion into professional procedures of linear pro- 
gramming, computer technology, operations re- 
search, mathematical and gaming simulation, and 
the use of analogue models. The scope of architec- 
tural services, once confined to the design of and 
supervision of construction of buildings, has been 
broadened to include programming, developmental 
planning, operations research, project feasibility 
studies and other new professional activities. Fi- 
nally, the role of the architect is expanding from a 
narrow concern with building design to a broad con- 
cern for developmental change, and his goal has 
developed from a preoccupation with beauty to a 
commitment to contributing to the enhancement of 
the quality of life. 

These observations indicate both the great need 
for educated and trained professionals, and the rele- 
vancy and excitement which characterize the profes- 
sion today. Perhaps at no time in history has archi- 
tecture posed as great a challenge, nor offered so 
great a promise of personal fulfillment to its success- 
ful practitioners. There are many opportunities for 
employment and careers in architectural practice. 



Architecture 



101 



Additional education and experience also qualify 
a graduate for a career in city or regional planning. 
Moreover, the general nature of an architectural 
education is such that some graduates elect and 
achieve successful careers in civil service, commerce 
or industry in related fields. 

THE CURRICULUM 

The program permits students to enter the School 
either directly from high school or after one year of 
general college work without extending the time re- 
quired for completion of degree requirements. 

Students in the first year may take an introductory 
course in the history of architecture as well as general 
courses. In the second year, the student begins his 
professional education in the basic environmental 
design studio course as well as continuing his gen- 
eral education. The basic environmental design 
studio explores the parameters which define archi- 
tectural problems as well as the problems inherent 
in making objects and making spaces. In the third 
year, coordinated courses in design and building 
systems introduce the student to the Ecological, 
physiographic, physiological and physical gener- 
ators of architectural design, and the student is 
given an introduction into building technology. In 
the fourth year, this process is continued, but the 
emphasis is on urban, design factors: the environ- 
mental context, the historical and situation context, 
urban metabolic factors, and theoretical, aesthetic 
and sociological considerations. In the fifth year of 
design, the student is offered an opportunity to 
choose a comprehensive topical problem from sev- 
eral offered each year including special studies in 
technical areas as well as building design and plan- 
ning case studies. 

All of the design studio courses emphasize en- 
vironmental design problem solving experiences to 
advance the student's skill in the field, as well as 
lectures, reading assignments, field trips, etc. In 
addition to the design and technical courses, the 
student is required to take four semesters of archi- 
tectural history, of which two are optional, several 
liberal and physical sciences, and a number of elec- 
tives and professional electives. The latter may be 
chosen from among those offered by the School's 
faculty as well as from among selected courses of- 
fered by other departments. A list of professional 
electives is presented elsewhere in this section. 

The general education requirements of the Uni- 
versity apply generally to the architecture program, 
but architectural students are specifically required 
to complete math through Math 014 and 015. Most 
students find it necessary to begin college math 
with Math 018, followed by Math 014 and 015. In 
addition, architecture students are required to com- 
plete Physics 010, Biology 1 and Computer Science 
012. 



LOCATION 

A permanent contemporary, air-conditioned 
building for the School is anticipated in the aca- 
demic year 1971-72. Planning for this facility is 
completed, and construction has begun. 

Meanwhile, temporary facilities in a World War 
II wooden, one-story barracks complex on the cam- 
pus provide adequate studio space, a library, ex- 
hibit space, classroom and lecture hall facilities, 
and office space. 



LIBRARY 

The Architectural School Library at present com- 
prises some 6,000 volumes. It is expected that the 
library will number twelve tofifteen thousand volumes 
bv 1971 This will make it one of the major architec- 
tural school libraries in the nation. The library sub- 
scribes to about 100 foreign and domestic periodicals 
providing resources in urban sociology, building tech- 
nology, and urban planning as well as in architec- 
ture. 

The visual aids library presently comprises about 
20,000 35-mm. color slides in architecture, land- 
scape architecture and urban planning. 

ADMISSION 

Because there is a fixed limit to the number of can- 
didates who can be admitted each year, it is important 
that the following instructions be carefully followed: 

1. Students applying from high school: 
Write the Director of Admissions, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 for appli- 
cation instructions; 

2. Students who have completed work at other 
universities: Write the Director of Admissions, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland20742forap- 
plication instructions; 

3. Students transferringfrom othercollegesof 
the University of Maryland: Please pick up an applica- 
tion record form at the School of Architecture, and re- 
turn it to the Assistant Dean of the School, together 
with a record of all work taken at the University of 
Maryland. 

Deadlines: All application procedures should 
be completed and materials in hand at the Univer- 
sity by March 1. Applications received after this 
date, but before the University deadline dates for 
new students and for transfer students, will be con- 
sidered only on a space-available basis. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

For promising young men and women who might 
not otherwise be able to attend the University's School 
of Architecture, a number of grants and scholarships 
are available, some earmarked specifically for archi- 
tectural students. New students must apply before 
March 15th. Students already enrolled may apply be- 
fore May 1st. All requests for information concerning 
these awards should be directed to: Director, Student 
Aid, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 
20742. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Since the School is entering its fourth year of 
operation all of its proposed courses have not yet 
been approved by appropriate University authorities. 
Consequently, the five-year curriculum in Architec- 
ture which follows is labelled "tentative". However, 
it can be anticipated that most, if not all, require- 
ments will be approved. 

Students in architecture are required to complete 
a minimum of 170 credits of work for the Bachelor of 
Architecture degree. In addition to prescribed courses 
in the School of Architecture, students are required to 
complete a number of credits in electives offered else- 
where in the University. The requirements for grad- 
uation are tabulated below: 



Studio Courses 

Systems & Technology Courses 
Architectural History Courses 
Math . 



36creans 
1 6 credits 
12 credits 
9 credits 



702 



Architecture 



Computer Science 3 credits 

Physics 8 credits 

Theory of Urban Form 3 credits 

Professional Proctice 2 credits 

Professional Elecfives 1 7 to 38 credits 

Electives 1 5 to 36 credits 

General Education 24 (see curriculum) 
PE 2 credits 

Health 2 credits 

1 70 credits (minimum) 

Distribution 

Minimum architecture courses 69 credits 

Generol Education, Math, Physics, Health & PE. , 48 credits 

Professional Electives and Electives . , 53 credits 

170 credits 

Tentative Five-Year Curriculum in Architecture 

FIRST YEAR 
Fall 

■(G.E.) (Social Science Option)... 3 

(G.E.)Math 18" 3 

(G.E.) English I 3 

(G.E.) (History Option) 3 

Arch. 014 Hist, Mod. Env. Des. 3 

PE 1 

Health 5 2 

18 

"G E refer* to cowrie* meeting University gem 
"Slwdenti moy be placed directly in Moth 14 or 

SECOND YEAR 
Fall 

Arch. 020 Basic Env. Design 4 

(G.E.) Physics 10 4 

(G.E.) English 4 3 

(G.E.) Math 15 3 

Prof. Elective or Elective" 3 



Spring 

(G.E.) (Social Science Option) 3 

(G.E.) Math 14 3 

(G.E.) English 3 3 

(G.E.) (History Option) 3 

Arch. 015 Hist. Mod. Env. Des, 3 

PE. 1 
P.E. 

16 



THIRD YEAR 
Fall 

Arch. 130 Arch. Studio 1 
Arch. 132 Building Systems 1 ... 

Architectural History 

Arch. 136 Theory of Urban Form 
Prof. Elective or Elective" 

FOURTH YEAR 
Fall 

Arch. 140 Arch. Studio 3 

Arch. 142 Building Systems 3... 

Prof. Elective" 

Prof. Elective or Elective-- 
Elective 



FIFTH YEAR 
Fall 

Arch. 1 50 Adv. Topical Prob.. 

Prof. Electives" 

Arch. 151 Prof. Practice 

Elective 



gher by review of high school & SAT record 

Spring 

Arch. 021 Basic Env. Design 4 

Biology I... 3 

(G.E.) (Art survey recommended) 3 

Computer Science 12 3 

Prof. Elective or Elective-- 3 

~ VI 

Spring 

Arch. 131 Arch. Studio 2 4 

Arch. 133 Building Systems 2... 4 

Architectural History 3 

Prof. Elective or Elective-- 3 

Elective 3 

"17 

Spring 

Arch. 141 Arch. Studio 4. 4 

Arch. 143 Building Systems 4... 4 

Prof. Elective" 3 

Prof. Elective or Elective-r 3 

Elective 3 

~n 

Spring 

Arch. 152 Adv. Topical Prob 6 

Prof. Electives*- 5 

Prof. Elective or Elective— 3 

Elective 3 

~T7 






sveral History of Archil 
i of Professional Elect.v 



{May be taken in other 



PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES 

The following courses are presently accepted by the faculty in Architecture 
as meeting the professional elective requirements. 

Course Course Name Credits Prerequisites 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

001 Intro, to Anth: Archaeol. 

ond Phy 3 Meets G.E. 

002 Intro, to Anth: 

Cult. Anth & Ling 3 none 

021 Man and Environment 3 Soph. stdg. 

041 Intro, to Archaeology 3 Soph. stdg. 

101 Cultural Anthropology 3 Anth. 1 or 2 or 21 

141 Archaeology of Old World 3 Anth. 1 or 41 

151 Archaeology of New World 3 Anth. 1 or 41 

ARCHITECTURE 

080 Basic Photography ... 2 Perm, of Insfr. 

081 Advanced Photography 2 Arch. 80 

180 Theories and Lit. of Architecture 3 Perm, of Instr. 

182 Signs, Symbols & Messages 

in Arch 3 Perm, of Instr. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

163 Lobor Relations 3 Jr. stdg 

170 Prin. of Transportation 3 Econ. 37 and jr. stdg. 



1 76 Urban Trans & Urb. Oev 3 

180. 181 Business Law 3 

195 Real Estate Prm 3 

196 Urban Land Management 3 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

100 Language & Struct, of 

Computers 3 

140 Struct of Pr 3 

150 Data & Storage Strui • 3 

166 Functional Organization of Digital 

Computer Systems 3 

ECONOMICS 

37 Fund, of Economics ,.. 3 

120 Intro, to Reg, & Urban Econ 3 

142 Intro, to Public Finance 3 

144 State & Local Public Finance 3 

1 71 Economics of American 

Industry 3 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

GNED 60 Intro, to Interdisciplinary 

Urban Studies . 3 

GEOGRAPHY 

10 General Geography 3 

191 Population Geography 3 

197 Urban Geography 3 



GEOLOGY 

001 Geology .. 

004 Physical Geology Lab. 



INFORMATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT 

101 Electronic Data Processing., 3 

102 Electronic Data Processing 

Applications i 

PSYCHOLOGY 

001 Intro, to Psych 3 

021 Social Psychology 3 

136 Applied Exper. Psychology 3 

SOCIOLOGY 

001 Intro, to Sociology 3 

014 Urban Sociology 3 

051 Social Pathology 3 

113 The Rural Community 3 

114 TheCity 3 

118 Community Organization 3 

123 Ethnic Minorities 3 

124 Sociology of Race Relations 3 

148 Sociology of the Arts 3 

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY 

50 Intro, to Random Variables 4 



Econ. 37 ond jr. stdg 
Jr. stdg 

Econ. 37 & \r stdg. 
Jr. stdg. 



CMSC 12 

Jr. stdg, CMSC 100 

Jr. stdg.. CMSC 100 

Jr stdg, CMSC 100 



soph. stdg. 
Perm, of Instr. 
Econ. 37 
Econ. 37 

Econ. 37 



none 

Geog. 10, Perm, of Instr. 

Jr. stdg. 



Jr. std., CMSC 12 
Jr. stdg.. ISM 101 



meets G.E. 

Psych. 1 

Psych. 1 or Perm, of Instr. 



meets G.E. 

Soc. 1 

Soc. 1, soph. stdg. 

Soc. 1, jr. stdg. 

Soc. 1, |r. stdq. 

Soc. 1, |r. stdg. 

Soc. 1, ;r. stdg. 

Soc. I, jr. stdg. 

Soc. 1, jr. stdg. 



ART 

16 



Life Drawing 



FACULTY 

PROFESSORS: Cochran, Murtagh, Hill. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Ekstrom, Hutton, Schack, Shaeffer, 

D. Wiebenson, J. Wiebenson. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bell. Chabrowe, Lewis. 
INSTRUCTORS: Alley, Kaskey, Michel. 
LECTURERS: Carter, Long (Visiting), Sellers (Visiting), Wilkins. 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

ARCH 014. HISTORY OF MODERN ENVIRONMENTAL DE- 
SIGN (3) 
Survey of architectural history. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 015 HISTORY OF MODERN ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 
(3) 

Prerequisite Arch. 014— Survey of architectural history. 
Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 020. BASIC ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (4) 

Introduction to the processes of visual and architectural de- 
sign, including the study of visual design fundamentals. 
Field problems involving the student in the study of actual 
developmental problems. Lecture, studio, 9 hours per week. 

ARCH 021. BASIC ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (4) 

Prequisite Architecture 20. Introduction to the proc- 
esses of visual and architectural design, including the 
study of visual design fundamentals, F^eid problems in- 
volving the student in the study of actual developmental 
problems. Lecture, studio, 9 hours per week. 

ARCH 030. INTRODUCTION TO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT (3) 
Introduction of (1) conceptual, perceptual, behavioral and 
technical aspects of the environment; and. (2) methods of 



Architecture 



J 03 



analysis, problem solving and implementation. For students 
not majoring in architecture. Prerequisites: None. Lecture, 
seminar, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 080. BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY (2) 

Provides a student with the basic concepts of clarity and 
organization on a two-dimensional surface and stresses 
photography as a tool for visual communication. Lecture 1 
hour per week — 3 hours lab a week. 

ARCH 081. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY (2) 

Prerequisite Architecture 080. Allows the student to in- 
vestigate independently areas of photographic communica- 
tion not covered in the basic course, lecture, 1 hour per 
week; 3 hours lab. 

ARCH 130. ARCHITECTURE STUDIO I (4) 

Prerequisites Arch. 020 & Arch. 021. Develops a basic 
understanding of the elements of environmental control, 
basic structural systems, building processes, materials, 
and the ability to manipulate them. Lecture, studio, 9 
hours per week. Corequisite— Architecture 132. 

ARCH 131. ARCHITECTURE STUDIO II (4) 

Prerequisite: Architecture 130. Develops a basic under- 
standing of the forms generated by different structural 
systems, environmental controls and methods of con- 
struction. Lecture, studio, 9 hours per week. Corequisite 
—Arch. 133. 

ARCH 132. BUILDING SYSTEMS 1(4) 

Prerequisites: Math 15, Physics 11 and Arch 021. Intro- 
duction to architectural science and technology treating 
principles of structures, environmental mechanical 
controls, and construction. Corequisite: Architecture 
130. Lecture, studio, 6 hours per week. 

ARCH 133. BUILDING SYSTEMS II (4) 

Prerequisite: Architecture 130 and 132. Develops working 
knowledge of the design principles and parameters of three 
areas of architectural science and technology: structures, 
environmental - mechanical controls, and construction. 
Lecture, studio, 6 hours per week. Corequisite: Architec- 
ture 131. 

ARCH 135. STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL ARCHITECTURE (3) 

Limited to Architecture students or by permission of the 
instructor. Architectural innovations from the Carolingian 
through the Gothic periods. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 136. THEORY OF URBAN FORM (3) 

Urban spatial forms of the past and present; theories of de- 
sign of complexes of buildings, urban space and communi- 
ties. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 140. ARCHITECTURE STUDIO III (4) 

Continuation of design studio, with emphasis on compre- 
hensive building design and introduction to urban design 
factors. Prerequisites: Architecture 131 and Architecture 
133. Corequisite: Architecture 142, except by permission of 
the Dean. Lecture, studio, 9 hours per week. 

ARCH 141. ARCHITECTURE STUDIO IV (4) 

Continuation of design studio, with emphasis on urban 
design factors. Prerequisites: Architecture 140 and Archi- 
tecture 142. Corequisite: Architecture 143, except by per- 
mission of the Dean. Lecture, studio, 9 hours per week. 

ARCH 142. BUILDING SYSTEMS III (4) 

Applications of principles in architectural structures, en- 
vironmental controls and construction. Prerequisites: 



Architecture 131 and Architecture 133. Corequisite: Archi- 
tecture 140. Lecture, studio, 6 hours per week. 

ARCH 143. BUILDING SYSTEMS IV (4) 

Applications of principles and further analysis of systems 
and hardware in architectural structures, environmental 
controls and construction. Prerequisites: Architecture 140 
and Architecture 142. Corequisite: Architecture 141. 
Lecture, studio, 6 hours per week. 

ARCH 144. STUDIES IN RENAISSANCE ARCHITECTURE (3) 
Limited to Architecture students or by permission of the 
instructor. Study of Renaissance architectural principles 
and their development in the Baroque period. Lecture, 3 
hours per week. 

ARCH 145. STUDIES IN MODERN ARCHITECTURE (3) 

Limited to Architecture students or by permission of the 
instructor. Study of Architectural problemsfrom 1750tothe 
present. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 154. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE, 17TH 
CENTURY TO 19TH CENTURY (3) 

History of American Architecture — 17th to 19th Century. 
Prerequisite— Architecture 014 and 015. Lecture, 3 hours 
per week. 

ARCH 155. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE. 19TH 
AND 20TH CENTURY (3) 

Prerequisite: Architecture 014, 015 and 154. History of 
American Architecture 19th and 20th Centuries. Lecture, 
3 hours per week. 

ARCH 164. INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF 
ARCHITECTURE (3) 

Permission of the instructor. Independent research in 
architectural history. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 165. DIRECTED STUDIES IN ARCHITECTURE (1-4) 
Directed study under individual faculty guidance with en- 
rollment limited to advanced undergraduate students. 
Project proposals must receive a recommendation from the 
School Curriculum Committee and approval of the Dean of 
the School prior to registration. Public oral presentation to 
the faculty of a final report or project will be required at 
final submission for credit. 

ARCH 180. THEORIES AND LITERATURE OF ARCHITECTURE 
(3) 

Limited to Architecture students or by permission of the 
instructor. Provides an understanding of some historical 
and present theories of architectural design readings and 
seminar discussions. Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 182. SIGNS, SYMBOL AND MESSAGES IN ARCHITEC- 
TURE (3) 

Limited to Architecture students or by permission of the 
instructor. Class limited to 15-20 students. Signs and 
symbols in buildings and cities, messages conveyed and 
purposes for conveying these messages. Readings, photo- 
graphic reports and minor problem-solving assignments. 
Lecture, 3 hours per week. 

ARCH 185. ECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF ARCHITECTURE 
(3) 

Introduction of economic aspects of present day architec- 
ture: governmental policy, land evaluation, and project 
financing; construction materials and labor costs; cost 
analysis and control systems. Architecture majors, except 
by permission of instructor. Lecture, seminar, 3 hours per 
week. 



104 



Architecture 



Arts and Sciences 



THECOLLEGEOFARTSANDSCIENCESoffersits 
students a liberal education. It seeks to develop grad- 
uates who can deal intelligently with the problems 
which confront them and whose general education 
will be a continuing source not only of material well- 
being but of genuine personal satisfaction. It also of- 
fers each student the opportunity to concentrate in 
the field of his choice; this element of depth serves 
both as an integral part of his education and as a 
foundation for further professional training or pur- 
suits. 

This College is an outgrowth of the Division of Lan- 
guage and Literature and the Division of Applied Si- 
ence and the later School of Liberal Arts of Maryland 
State College. In 1921 the School of Liberal Arts and 
the School of Chemistry were combined and other 
physical and biological sciences were brought into 
the newly formed College of Arts and Sciences. In 
later reorganizations some departments have been 
added and some transferred to the admin istrative con- 
trol of other colleges." 

ADMISSION 

The requirements for admission to the College of 
Arts and Sciences are, in general, the same as those 
for admission to the other colleges and schools of the 
University. Application must be made to the Director 
of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland. 

The student who intends to pursue a program of 
study in the College of Arts and Sciences should in- 

•The Departments of Economics, Geography, and Government and Politics, although ad- 
ministratively in the College of Business and Public Administration, offer courses for 
Arts ond Sciences students. Majors may be elected in these deportments as in those of 
the departments administered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 



elude the following subjects in his high school pro- 
gram: English, four units; college preparatory math- 
ematics (algebra, plane geometry), three or four units; 
foreign language, two or more units; biology, chemis- 
try, or physics, two units; history and social sciences, 
one or more units. 

The student who wishes to major in chemistry, 
mathematics, physics, botany, microbiology, zoology, 
or who wishes to follow a pre-medical or pre-dental 
program, should include four units of college prepara- 
tory mathematics (algebra, plane geometry, trig- 
onometry, and more advanced mathematics, if avail- 
able). He should also include chemistry and physics 

DEGREES 

Students of this College who satisfactorily com- 
plete curricula with majors in departments of the hu- 
manities or social sciences are awarded the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts." Those who satisfactorily complete 
curricula with majors in the Department of Mathema- 
ics or the biological and physical sciences are 
awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science.' Those 
whocomplete satisfactorily a special professional pro- 
gram in the Department of Music are awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Music. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

The baccalaureate degree from the College of Arts 
and Sciences may be conferred upon a student who 
has satisfied the following requirements: 

1. General Education requirements. 

•The Department of Botany, although administered by the College of Agriculture, offers 
courses for Arts and Sciences students. A major may be elected in this department as 
in those of the departments administered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 



Arts and Sciences 



JOS 



2. College of Arts and Sciences requirements. 

COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS 

1. FOREIGN LANGUAGE. Students in the College of 
Arts and Sciences must follow one of the following 
options in foreign language: 

a. They may take twelve semester hours in a 

classical language at the level indicated un- 
der Classical Languages and Literature 

b. Students who begin a modern foreign language 

in the University must successfully complete 
the study of that language in any authorized 
sequence, through Course 007 in all lan- 
guages; however, Course 008 in German 
may be taken by science majors in lieu of 
007. 

c. Students who continue in the University a lan- 

guage studied for two or more years in secon- 
dary school may choose, in French, German, or 
Spanish, between enrolling in Course 005 or 
taking a placement examination (students be- 
ginning in Courses 005, 006, or 007 must con- 
tinue in any authorized sequence through 
Course 007). Students who score higher than 
the Course 007 level on the placement exam- 
ination thereby fulfill the College language re- 
quirement. In modern languages other than 
French, German, or Spanish (i.e., languages 
which do not have a Course 005), all students 
must take a placement examination.* 

The languages which may be offered to meet this 
requirement are Classical Languages (Greek or Latin) 
or modern foreign languages. Students who wish to 
offer a foreign language not included in this list should 
consult the chairman of the appropriate foreign lan- 
guage department for a recommendation to the 
Dean. 

Foreign students may satisfy this requirement by 
offering twelve hours of English in addition to the reg- 
ular English requirement. The special course in Eng- 
lish for foreign students (FOLA 001, 002) may be in- 
cluded in the additional hours of English. (This option 
may not be used by pre-medical students). A foreign 
student may not meet the foreign language require- 
ment by taking freshman or sophomore courses in his 
native language. 

Normally a student shall not be permitted to repeat 
a foreign language course below Course 009 for credit 
if he has successfully completed a higher numbered 
course than the one he wishes to repeat. Credit (includ- 
ing elective credit) will be given fora language Course 
001 only if credit has been earned in additional courses 
in the same language. 

2. NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS. Twelve 
semester hours are required, except for candidates 
for the Bachelor of Music degree (who must satisfy 
the minimum General Education requirement, how- 
ever). The science courses elected require the ap- 
proval of the Dean; departments in which courses 
may be selected are the same as those listed under 
the General Education requirements. 

3. SPEECH. Normally, students in the arts area take 
SPCH 001 (3 hours), while those in the science area 
take 007 (2 hours). In certain specialized programs, 
other courses may be required. The foreign student 
should register for 003— Fundamentals of General 



■A placement test is given during registration week for students wishing to pursue o 
modern language they hove studied in high school. 



American Speech— rather than the speech course 
normally required in his curriculum. 

4. MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS. Specific de- 
scriptions of the departmental, inter-departmental, or 
pre-professional majors are found, in alphabetical or- 
der, along with the course offerings in the second sec- 
tion of this catalog. The general College regulations 
controlling majors (and minors) are as follows. ' ' 

Each student chooses a field of concentration 
(major). He may make this choice as early as he 
wishes; however, once he has earned 56 hours of ac- 
ceptable credit he must choose a major before his 
next registration. 

In the program leading to the B. A. degree, the stu- 
dent must also havea secondaryf ieldof concentration 
(minor). The courses constituting the major and the 
minor must conform to the requirements of the de- 
partment in which the work is done. 

The student must have an average of not less than 
"C" in the introductory courses in the field in which 
he intends to major. 

A major shall consist, in addition to the underclass 
departmental requirements, of 24-40 hours, of which 
at least twelve must be in courses numbered 100 or 
above, and at least twelve of which must be taken in 
the University of Maryland. 

A minor in programs leading to the B.A. degree 
shall consist of a coherent group of courses totaling 
18 semester hours in addition to the requirements list- 
ed above. At least six of the 18 hours must be in a 
single department in courses numbered 100 or above. 
The courses comprising the minor must be chosen 
with the approval of the major department. Except in 
certain specialized curricula approved by the Dean, 
not more than nine hours of the minor may be taken 
in courses outside of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

No minor is required in programs leading to the 
B.S. degree, but the student must take supporting 
courses in science or other fields as specified by his 
major department. 

The average grade of the work taken for the major 
must be at least "C"; some departments will count to- 
ward satisfaction of the major requirement no course 
completed with a grade of less than "C." The average 
grade of the work taken in the major and minor com- 
bined must be at least "C." A general average of "C" 
in courses taken at the University of Maryland is re- 
quired for graduation. 

Courses taken to fulfill the requirements in Gen- 
eral Education may not be used toward majoror minor 
requirements. 

JUNIOR REQUIREMENTS 

To attain junior standing, a student must acquire 
a minimum of 56 academic semester hours and be 
eligible to re-register in the University. See Appendix 
C Academic Regulations for full statement of rules 
pertaining to junior standing. 

NORMAL LOAD 

A minimum of 120 semester hours credit, exclu- 
sive of required courses in physical activities and 
health, is required for graduation. The normal Ic^dfor 
students in this col lege is 1 5 semester hours cret'it per 
semester, exclusive of the required work in physical 
activities and health. 



•Beginning, September I, 1968, the minor requirement lor progroms leoding to the B A 
degree will be elimmoted. Moior departments moy then require that specitic support 
ing courses in other departments be included, olong with required courses m the motor 
deportment, in the oreo ot concentration Students enrolled m the University prior to 
September 1968 may elect to satisfy the requirements for programs leading to the 
B A degree either with the old plan or with the new 



106 



Arts and Sciences 



A student must have the approval of his advisor 
and dean to take more than the normal program pre- 
scribed in his curriculum. 

ADVISORS 

Each freshman in this College will be assigned to 
a faculty advisor who will help the student, during his 
first year, to select his courses and to determine what 
his field of major concentration should be. 

Thebtudent at the sophomore level and above will 
be advised by a faculty member in his major depart- 
ment. Students following the three-year programs in 
Dentistry, Law, and Medicine will be advised by special 
advisors for these programs. 

ELECTIVES IN OTHER SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 

A limited number of courses taken in other col- 
leges and schools of the University may be counted 
for elective or minor credit toward a degree in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. The number of credits 
which may be accepted from the various colleges and 
schools is as follows: College of Education— 24; all 
other colleges or independent departments — 20. The 
combined credits from other colleges and schools 
shall not exceed 20 (or 24 if courses in education are 
included). For the combined degree programs in Den- 
tistry, Law, or Medicine the first year of professional 
work must be completed and the student is permitted 
to continue immediately as a sophomore in the profes- 
sional school. 

CERTIFICATION OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 

If coursesareproperlychoseninthefieldof educa- 
tion, a prospective high school teacher can prepare for 
high school positions, with a major and minor in one 
of the departments of this College. A student who 
wishes to work for a teacher's certificate must con- 
sult his advisor before his junior year. Such a student 
must, at the same time, consult an advisor in the ap- 
propriate curriculum in the College of Education. 

HONORS 

The aim of the College Honors Programs is to rec- 
ognize and encourage superior scholarship. To this 
end, Honors work offers the gifted student challenging 
opportunities to work in small groups with carefully 
chosen instructors and to move at a speed appropriate 
to his capacities in an atmosphere conducive both to 
independent study and to growth in intellectual matu- 
rity. The College conducts both General and Depart- 
mental Honors Programs spanning the four under- 
graduate years. For information concerning the Gen- 
eral Honors Program, see below, under "Honors." 

For information concerning the Departmental 
Honors Programs, consult the various departmental 
entries in this catalog. It may, however, be remarked 
that the Departmental Honors Programs are adminis- 
tered bya Honors Committeewithineach department. 
Admission to a Departmental Honors Program ordi- 
narily occurs at the beginning of the first or second 
semester of the student's junior year. As a rule, only 
students with a cumulative grade point average of at 
least 3.0 are admitted. A comprehensive examination 
over the field of his major program is given to a candi- 
date near the end of his senior year. On the basis of 
the student's performance on the Honors Comprehen- 
sive Examination and in meeting such other require- 
ments as may be set by the Departmental Honors Com- 
mittee, the faculty may vote to recommend the candi- 
date for the appropriate degree with (departmental) 
HONORS, or for the appropriate degree with (depart- 



mental) HIGH HONORS. Successful candidacy will be 
symbolized by appropriate announcement in the Com- 
mencement Program and by citation on the student's 
academic record and diploma. 

Studentsinthe General and Departmental Honors 
Programs enjoy some academic privileges similar to 
those of graduate students. 

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

This program is for the student who wants a con- 
centration in Afro-American studies outside of his de- 
partmental major. It includes work in literature, his- 
tory, sociology, and government. The emphasis is on 
an interdisciplinary study of the Negro in American 
life and culture. 

An undergraduate in good standing in a college of 
the University who wishes to enroll in the Program 
should consult with his departmental advisor and an 
advisor of the Afro-American Studies Program. The 
student following this program must meet the gen- 
eral requirements for a degree in his college. 

To receive a Certificate in Afro-American Studies, 
the student must complete 18 hours of upper division 
course work with an Afro-American emphasis outside 
his major. Required courses are ENGL 167, HIST 117, 
SOCY 124, and a Seminar on Afro-American Studies. 
Two additional courses may be selected from ANTH 
101, ENGL 166, GOVT 132, GOVT 134, HIST 183, 
SOCY 123, and a Directed Readings in Afro-Ameri- 
can Studies. 

A student planning to enter the Program should 
consult with a Program advisor on prerequisites and 
introductory courses. Advisors are available in the 
English and History Departments. 

COURSES 

AASP 100. DIRECTED READINGS IN AFRO-AMERICAN 
STUDIES. (3) 

(Staff) 
AASP 101. SEMINAR IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES. (3) 

(Staff) 



Arts and Sciences 



107 



PROGRAMS AND COURSE 
OFFERINGS 



AMERICAN STUDIES 

PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR: Beall. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Lounsbury and Mintz. 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE: Beall (Chairman, American Stu- 
dies), Fry (English), Grimsted (History), Lounsbury (Ameri- 
can Studies), Mintz (American Studies), Schwartz (Soci- 
ology). Ex Officio: Manning (Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences) and Sparks (Associate Dean of the Graduate 
School) 
The University has a comprehensive program in 
American Studies. It begins with required courses on 
the freshman and sophomore levels, includes a major 
for juniors and seniors, and also provides for graduate 
work on the M.A. and Ph.D. levels. (For information 
concerning the graduate program, see the Graduate 
School Catalog.) 

The student who majors in American Studies has 
the advantage of being taught by specialists from 
various departments. The committee in charge of the 
program represents the Departments of English, His- 
tory, Art, and Philosophy. 

The program is intended to have generous 
breadth, but the danger of securing breadth with- 
out depth is offset by the requirement of an area of 
concentration. Strong emphasis upon English and 
History is required, with a concentration in one of 
these. The major consists of 42-credits (of which 24 
must be on the 100 level) including not only courses 
in American Studies but additional courses distri- 
buted among the four fields of English, History, Art, 
and Philosophy. Since the major is a special inter- 
disciplinary one, the student's selection of courses 
must meet the approval of the advisor. Two courses 
are required for the major: AMST 127, 128 (Culture 
and the Arts in America), 6 credits, for juniors; and 
AMST 137, 138 (Readings in American Studies), 
6 credits, for seniors. No grade of less than C counts 
toward the major. 

Suggested sample curriculum for American Stud- 
ies majors: Junior year: AMST 127, AMST 128— Cul- 
ture and the Arts in America (3, 3); ENGL 150 and 
ENGL 151— American Literature (3, 3); HIST 109 
and HIST 110— Social History of the United States 
(3, 3); ART 158— History of American Art (3), (or 
ART 159— History of American Art (3); PHIL 102— 
Modern Philosophy (3), (or PHIL 101— Ancient 
Philosophy (3); Electives (6) 

Senior year: AMST 137 and 138— Readings in 
American Studies (3, 3); ENGL 155 and 156— Major 
American Writers (3, 3); HIST 133 and 134— History of 
Ideas in America (3, 3); ART 178— 20th Century Art 
(3); PHIL 105— Philosophy in America (3); Electives 
(6). 



ANTHROPOLOGY (Division of Sociology) 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF ANTHROPO 

LOGY: Williams. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Anderson and Hoffman. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Fidelholtz and Rosen. 
LECTURER: McDowell. 



Freshmen who are interested in this program con- 
sult with their lower division advisor. Upperclassmen 
should consult with Professor Lounsbury. 

AMST 127, 128. CULTURE AND THE ARTS IN AMERICA. (3, 3 
Prerequisite, junior standing. A study of American institu- 
tions, the intellectual and esthetic climate from the Colonial 
period to the present. (Beall) 

AMST 137, 138. READINGS IN AMERICAN STUDIES. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. A historical survey of American 
values as presented in various key writings. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

AMST 200. INTRODUCTORY SEMINAR IN AMERICAN 
STUDIES. (3) 

(Staff) 
AMST 201, 202. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
AMST 251. ORIENTATION SEMINAR— MATERIAL ASPECTS 

OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. (3) 
(Staff) 

AMST 255, 256. READING COURSE IN SELECTED ASPECTS 
OF AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
AMST 299. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

(Staff) 
AMST 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

(Staff) 
AMST 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 

(Staff) 



The Division of Anthropology offers beginning and 
advanced course work in the four principal subdivi- 
sions of the discipline: physical anthropology, lin- 
guistics, archaeology, and ethnology. Courses in 
these subdivisions may be used to fulfill the minor or 
"supporting courses" requirement in some programs 
leading to the B.A. degree. They also may, at the dis- 
cretion of the Department of Sociology, be counted to- 
ward a major in Sociology. 

Anthropology Major: The fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for a major in anthropology leads to the 
B.A. degree. All majors are required to take 30 hours 
in anthropology, 18 of which must be selected from 
the following courses: ANTH 001, 002, 101, 141 or 
151, 161 or 171, and 198. It should be noted, how- 
ever, that if ANTH 001 is used to satisfy the General 
Education requirement in Social Science, it may not 
be counted as a part of the 30 required semester 
hours for the major. The 18 hours of required 
courses insures that the major becomes familiar 
with all areas of anthropology. No one area, there- 
fore, receives special emphasis, for it is believed 
that such specialization should occur during gradu- 
ate study, preferably at the Ph.D. level. Thus the 
student is broadly prepared in the ways man has 
evolved culturally and physically. A statement of 
course requirements and recommended sequences 
of courses is available in the departmental office. 

No course with a grade of less than "C" may be 
used to satisfy major requirements. 

ANTH 001 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all other courses 
in Anthropology. 

ANTH 001. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY: 
ARCHEOLOGY AND PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3) 

May be taken for credit in the General Education Program. 
General patterns of the development of human culture; the 
biological and morphological aspects of man viewed in his 
cultural setting. (Staff) 

ANTH 002. INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY: CULTURAL 
ANTHROPOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Social and cultural principles as exemplified in ethno- 
graphic descriptions. The study of language within the con- 
text of Anthropology. (Staff) 

ANTH 021. MAN AND ENVIRONMENT. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A geographical introduc- 



es 



Arts and Sciences 



tion to ethnology, emphasizing the relations between cul- 
tural forms and natural environment. (Anderson) 

ANTH 041. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHEOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A survey of the basic 
aims and methods of archeological field work and inter- 
pretation, with emphasis on the reconstruct ion of prehistoric 
ways of life. (Staff) 

ANTH 061. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 
(3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The biological evolution 
of man, including the process of race formation, as revealed 
by the study of the fossil record and observation of modern 
forms. (Staff) 

ANTH 071. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A non-technical intro- 
duction to linguistics, with special consideration of the 
relations between language and other aspects of culture. 
(Listed also as LING 071.) (Staff) 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

ANTH 101. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY: PRINCIPLES AND 
PROCESSES. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 002 or 021. An examination of the 
nature of human culture and its processes, both historical 
and functional. The approach will be topical and theoreti- 
cal rather than descriptive. 

(Anderson, Hoffman, Hulse, Williams) 

ANTH 102 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY: WORLD 
ENTHNOGRAPHY. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 002 or 021. A descriptive survey 
of the culture areas of the world through an examination 
of the ways of selected representative societies. 

(Anderson, Hoffman, Hulse, Williams) 

ANTH 112. PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF OCEANIA. (3) 

A survey of the cultures of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melan- 
esia and Australia. Theoretical and cultural-historical 
problems will be emphasized. (Anderson, Hulse) 

ANTH 114. ETHNOLOGY OF AFRICA. (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 001 and 002. The native peoples and 
cultures of Africa and their historical relationships, with 
emphasis on that portion of the continent south of the 
Sahara. (Staff) 

ANTH 118. PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF THE 
FAR EAST. (3) 

A survey of the major sociopolitical systems of China, 
Korea and Japan. Major anthropological questions will be 
dealt with in presenting this material. (Hulse) 

ANTH 123. ENTHNCLOGY OF THE SOUTHWEST. (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 001 and 002. Culture history, eco- 
nomic and social institutions, religion, and mythology of 
the Indians of the southwest United States. 

(Anderson, Williams) 

ANTH 124. ETHNOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA. (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 001 and 002. The native people and 
cultures of North America north of Mexico and their his- 
torical relationships, including the effects of contact with 
European-derived populations. (Hoffman) 

ANTH 126. ETHNOLOGY OF MIDDLE AMERICA. (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 001 and 002. Cultural background and 
modern social, economic and religious life of Indian and 
metiszo groups in Mexico and Central America; processes 
of acculturation and currents in cultural development. 

(Williams) 

ANTH 131. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF PRIMITIVE 
PEOPLES. (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 001 and 002. A comparative survey of 
the structures of non-literate and folk societies, covering 
both general principles and special regional developments. 

(Staff) 

ANTH 134. RELIGION OF PRIMITIVE PEOPLES. (3) 

Prerequisites, ANTH 001 and 002. A survey of the religious 
systems of primitive and folk societies, with emphasis on 
the relation of religion to other aspects of culture. 

(Anderson) 

ANTH 136. PRIMITIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ECONOMY. (3) 
A survey of technology, food economy and general economic 
processes in non-industrial societies. (Anderson, Williams) 

ANTH 138. POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT IN PRIMITIVE 
Society. (3) 

A combined survey of politics in human societies and of 
important anthropological theories concerning this aspect 
of society. (Hulse) 

ANTH 141. ARCHEOLOGY OF THE OLD WORLD. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 041. A survey of the archae- 
ological materials of Europe, Asia and Africa, with em- 
phasis on chronological and regional inter-relationships. 

(Staff) 



ANTH 151. ARCHEOLOGY OF THE NEW WORLD. (3) 

Prerequisite, ANTH 001 or 041. A survey of the archae- 
ological materials of North and South America with em- 
phasis on chronological and regional interrelationships. 

(Staff) 
ANTH 161 ADVANCED PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite ANTH 001 or 061. A technical introduction 
to the hereditary, morphological, physiological, and be- 
havioral characteristics of man and his primate ancestors 
and relatives, with emphasis on evolutionary processes. 

(Staff) 
ANTH 171. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Introduction to the basic concepts of modem descriptive 
linguistics. Phonology, morphology, syntax. Examinations 
of the methods of comparative linguistics, internal recon- 
struction, dialect geography. (Listed also as LING 101 and 
ENGL 105.) (Tuniks) 

ANTH 191. RESEARCH PROBLEMS. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Introductory training 
in anthropological research methods. The student will pre- 
pare a paper embodying the results of an appropriate com- 
bination of research techniques applied to a selected prob- 
lem in any field of anthropology. (Staff) 
ANTH 192. FIELD METHODS IN ETHNOLOGY (1-6) 

Field training in the collection and recording of ethnologi- 
cal data. (Summer only) (Williams) 
ANTH 194. FIELD METHODS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (1 6) 

Field training in the techniques of archaeological survey 
and excavation. (Summer only). (Schuyler) 

ANTH 198. ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A survey of the his- 
torical development and current emphasis in the theoreti- 
cal approaches of all fields of anthropology, providing an 
integrated frame of reference for the discipline as a whole. 

(Williams) 
ANTH 205. THEORY OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANTH 281. PROCESSES OF CULTURE CHANGE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANTH 285. PEASANT COMMUNITIES IN THE MODERN 
WORLD. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANTH 287. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN 
ANTHROPOLOGY. (3) 

(Staff) 
ANTH 291. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ANTHROPOLOGY. (1-6) 

(Staff) 



ART 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Levitine. 
PROFESSORS: A. de Leiris, Lembach, Lynch, Maril. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Denny, Gross, Jamieson, Rear- 

ick. Stites. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bunts, Freeny, Isen, Longley, 

Mirolli, Niese, O'Conner, Pemberton. 
LECTURERS: Banks, Campbell, Griffin, Landgren. 
VISITING LECTURERS: Heban, Hommel. 
INSTRUCTORS: M. de Leiris, Dillinger, Forbes, Gelman, Green, 

Klank, Lewis. 



Two majors are offered in Art: Art History and 
Studio. The student who majors in Art History is com- 
mitted to the study and scholarly interpretation of 
existing works of art, from the prehistoric era to our 
times, while the studio major stresses the student's 
direct participation in the creation of works of art. 

In spite of this difference, both majors are rooted 
in the concept of art as a humanistic experience, and 
share an essential common aim: the development of 
aesthetic sensitivity, understanding, and knowledge. 
For this reason, students in both majors are required 
to progress through a "common curriculum," which 
will ensure a broad grounding in both aspects of art; 
then each student will move into a "specialized cur- 
riculum" with advanced courses in his own major. 
Maximum allowable credits in either major is 42. 

COMMON CURRICULUM: 

ART 010, Introduction to Art (3); ART 012, Design 



Arts and Sciences 



109 



K3);ART016,Drawingl(3);andART060and061, 
History of Art (3, 3). 

SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM: 

Art History major: ART 080, History of American 
Art (3); four courses in over 100 level in History 
of Art (12). In addition, one advanced course in 
Studio work is required. Total credits for Art His- 
tory major: 33. 

Studio major: ART 017, Painting I (3); ART 026, 
Drawing II (3); ART 118, Sculpture I (3); ART 
119, Printmaking I (3); ART 126, Drawing III (3); 
plus one course at the 100 level (3). In addition, 
one advanced course in Art History is required. 
Total credits for Studio majors: 36. 
No course with a grade less than "C" may be used 

to satisfy major requirements. 

ART 010. INTRODUCTION TO ART. (3) 

Basic tools of understanding visual art. This course 
stresses major approaches such as techniques, subject 
matter, form, and evaluation. Architecture, sculpture, paint- 
ing, and graphic art will be discussed. Required of all Art 
majors in the first year. (Staff) 

ART 012. DESIGN I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite or concurrent registration, 
ART 010. Principles and elements of design including 
basic composition, line, color theory, perspective, and 
three-dimensional space. (Staff) 

ART 016. DRAWING I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite or concurrent registration, 
Art 010. An introductory course with a variety of media and 
related techniques. Problems based on still life, figure 
and nature. (Staff) 

ART 017. PAINTING 1.(3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, ART 010, 012, 016. Basic 
tools and language of painting. Oil and watercolor. 

(Maril, Staff) 

ART 026. DRAWING II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, ART 010, 012, 016. Ori- 
ginal compositions from the figure and nature, supple- 
mented by problems of personal and expressive drawing. 

(Staff) 

ART 027. ARCHITECTURAL PRESENTATION. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, ART 010, 012,016. Tech- 
nique of wash and watercolor in architectural, interior, and 
landscape architectural rendering. (Stites) 

ART 040. FUNDAMENTALS OF ART EDUCATION. (3) 

Two hours of laboratory and two hours of lecture per 
week. Fundamental principles of the visual arts for teach- 
ing on the elementary level. Elements and principles of 
design and theory of color. Studio practice in different 
media. (Crull, Lewis, Lembach, Longley) 

ART 060, 061. HISTOKY OF ART. (3, 3) 

A survey of western art as expressed through architecture, 
sculpture, and painting. First semester, prehistoric times 
to Renaissance; second semester, from Renaissance to 
the present. (Staff) 

ART 062. AFRICAN ART. (3) 

A study of West and Central African Art with emphasis on 
inter-tribal relationships as demonstrated by their sculp- 
tural styles. 

ART 065, 066. MASTERPIECES OF PAINTING. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A study of the contribu- 
tions of a few major painters, ranging from Giotto to Picasso. 

(Levitine, Staff) 

ART 067, 068. MASTERPIECES OF SCULPTURE. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. A study of the contri- 
butions of a few major sculptors, ranging from Polykleitos 
to Moore. (Levitine, Staff) 

ART 070, 071. MASTERPIECES OF ARCHIT 

ART 070, 071. MASTERPIECES OF ARCHITECTURE. (3, 3) 

ART 080, 081. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the United States 
from the Colonial period to the present. (Staff) 

ART 117. PAINTING II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisites, ART 017, 026. Original 
compositions based upon nature, figure, and still life, sup- 
plemented by expressive painting. Choice of media. Dif- 
ferent sections of course may be taken for credit. 
117-a. Oilpaintingandrelatedmedia. (Maril) 



117-b. Watercolor and casein. (Grossman) 

l77-c. Plastic media, such as encaustic and polymer 
tempera. (Jamieson) 

117-d. Mural painting. The use of contemporary synt he 

tic media. (Jamieson) 

ART 118. SCULPTURE 1.(3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 026. (For students 
majoring in Art History, by permission of Department.) 
Volumes, masses, and planes, based on the use of plastic 
earths. Simple armature construction and methods of cast- 
ing. (Freeny) 

ART 119. PRINTMAKING I. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 026. (For students 
majoring in Art History, by permission of Depart- 
ment.) Basic printmaking technique in relief, intagio, and 
pianographic media. (Forbes) 

ART 126. DRAWING III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 026. Emphasis on 
understanding organic form, as it is related to study from 
the human figure and to pictorial composition. 

(Isen, Jamieson) 
ART 127. PAINTING III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 1 17. Creative painting 
for advanced students. Problems require a knowledge of 
pictorial structure. Development of personal direction. 
Choice of media. (Gross) 

ART 128. SCULPTURE 11.(3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 1 18. Different sections 
of course may be taken in for credit. 
128-a. Nature as a point of reference with potentiality of 
developing ideas into organic and architectural forms. 

(Freeny) 

128-b. May be taken after 128-3. Problems involvingplastic 

earths and other material capable of being modeled or 

cast. Choice of individual style encouraged. (Freeny) 

ART 129. PRINTMAKING II. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 1 19. One print media 
including extensive study of color processes. Individually 
structured problems. (O'Connell) 

ART 136. DRAWING IV. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 126. Advanced draw- 
ing, with emphasis on the human figure, its structure and 
organic likeness toforms in nature. The course also stresses 
those compositional problems deriving from this relation- 
ship. (Staff) 

ART 137. PAINTING IV. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 127. Creative paint- 
ing. Emphasis on personal direction and self-criticism. 
Group seminars. (Gross, Grossman, Jamieson, Maril) 

ART 138. SCULPTURE 111.(3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite. ART 128. Problems and 
techniques of newer concepts, utilizing various materials, 
such as plastics and metals. Technical aspects of welding 
stressed. (Freeny) 

ART 139. PRINTMAKING III. (3) 

Six hours per week. Prerequisite, ART 129. 
139-a. Contemporary experimental techniques of one print 
medium with group discussions. (Staff) 

139-b. Continuation of 139-a. May betaken for credit after 
139-a. (Staff) 

ART 150, 151. SPANISH ART. (3-, 3) 

Special emphasis will be given to the artists oi th» 16th 
and 17th centuries, such as El Greco and Velasq..e- . 

.^ynch) 

ART 152, 153. LATIN AMERICAN ART. (3, 3) 

Art from the pre-Columbian civilization to the modern period. 

(Lynch) 

ART 155. AMERICAN COLONIAL PAINTING. (3) 

Development and style of painting in Colonial America: 
sources, genres, influential studios. Anglo- American School 
of historical painting. (Staff) 

ART 157. AMERICAN ART AND ITS RELATIONSHIP 
TO EUROPE: 1800-1900. (3) 

ART 080 and 081 recommended. The American artist fn 
Europe; American and German Romanticism; Neo-Classi- 
cism in America and Europe; Dusseldorf School; Munich 
School; Pre-Raphaelism; Barbizon School and Impression- 
ism. (Staff) 

ART 158. 159. HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART. (3. 3) 

Architecture, sculpture, and painting in the United States 
from the Colonial period to the present. (Staff) 

ART 160, 161. CLASSICAL ART. (3. 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Classical cul- 



110 



Arts and Sciences 



tures. First semester will stress Greece; second semester 
Rome. (Pemberton) 

ART 162, 163. ART OF THE EAST. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting. First semester will 
stress India; second semester, China and Japan (Staff) 

ART 164. EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART. (3) 

Architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaic of early Chris- 
tian Rome, the Near East, and the Byzantine Exmpire. 

(Staff) 

Art 166, 167. MEDIEVAL ART. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in the Middle Ages. 
First semester will stress Romanesaue; second semester 
the Gothic period. (Denny) 

ART 168, 169. RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting from 1400 to the High 
Renaissance in the 16th century. (Staff) 

ART 170. 171. NORTHERN EUROPEAN PAINTING IN 
THE 15TH AND 16TH CENTURIES. (3, 3) 

Painting in the Netherlands, France, and Germany. 

(Denny) 

ART 172, 173. EUROPEAN BAROQUE ART. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting of the major European 
centers in the 17th century. (deLeiris) 

ART 174, 175. FRENCH PAINTING. (3, 3) 

French painting from the 15th through the 18th century, 
from Fouquet to David. (Levitine) 

ART 176, 177. 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and painting in European Art from 
Neo-Classicism to Impressionism. (deLeiris) 

ART 178, 179. 20TH CENTURY ART. (3, 3) 

Architecture, sculpture and paintingfrom the late 19th cen- 
tury to our day. 

ART 180. IMPRESSIONISM AND NEO-IMPRESSIONISM. (3) 
Prerequisite, ART 060 and 061 or consent of instructor. His- 
tory of Impressionism and Neo-lmpressionism: artists, 
styles, art theories, criticism, sources, and influence on 
twentieth century. (deLeiris) 

ART 182. TWENTIETH CENTURY MASTERS AND 
MOVEMENTS. (3) 

Artists and tendencies in twentieth century art. Subject 
will change and be announced each time course is offered. 

(Staff) 

ART 184. HISTORY OF THE GRAPHIC ARTS. (3) 

Prerequisite, ART 010, or ART 069 and 061, or consent of 
instructor. Graphic techniques and styles in Europe from 
1400 to 1800; contributions of major artists. (Levitine) 

ART 192, 193. DIRECTED STUDIES IN STUDIO ART. 
(2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Chair- 
man. Course may be repeated for credit if content differs. 

(Staff) 

ART 194, 195. DIRECTED STUDIES IN ART HISTORY. 
(2 or 3, 2 or 3) 

For advanced students, by permission of Department Chair- 
man. Course may be repeated for credit if content differs. 

(Staff) 



FOR GRADUATES 

The requirements of students will determine which courses 
will be offered. 



(Staff) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 



ART 200. 201. PAINTING. (3, 3) 
ART 202, 203. PAINTING. (3, 3) 
ART 211. PRINTMAKING. (3) 
ART 212. PRINTMAKING. (3) 
ART 213. PRINTMAKING. (3) 

ART 214. SEMINAR IN PRINTMAKING. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 221. 222. EXPERIMENTATION IN SCULPTURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
ART 223. MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES IN SCULPTURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 224. SCULPTURE— CASTING AND FOUNDRY. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 226. DRAWING. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 227. DRAWING. (3) 

(Staff) 



ART 228. DRAWING. (3) 

ART 229. DRAWING AND PAINTING. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 240, 241. ADVANCED PROBLEMS IN ART EDUCATION. 
(3,3) 

(Staff) 
ART 250. AMERICAN COLONIAL ART. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 255. SEMINAR IN 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN 
ART. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 256. TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN ART. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 257. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ART AND ITS LITERARY 
SOURCES. (3) 

(Staff) 

Art 258. SEMINAR IN LOCAL AND REGIONAL ART. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 259. THE ART OF MANNERISM. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 260. FRENCH PAINTING FROM LEBRUN TO GERICAULT, 
1715-1815. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 261. SEMINAR IN ROMANTICISM. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 262. SEMINAR IN 18TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 263. SEMINAR IN 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART. (3) 

(Staff) 

ART 264. NINETEENTH CENTURY REALISM, 1830-1860. (3) 

(Staff) 
ART 265 SEMINAR IN POST-IMPRESSIONISM AND 
SYMBOLISM. (3) 

ART 266. SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY ART. (3) 

ART 267. TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART. (3) 

ART 268. SEMINAR IN LITERARY SOURCES OF ART 
HISTORY. (3) 

ART 269. SEMINAR IN CLASSICAL ART. (3) 

ART 270. SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL ART. (3) 

ART 272. SEMINAR. PROBLEMS IN MEDIEVAL 
ICONOGRAPHY. (3) 

ART 274. ROMANESQUE ART. (3) 

ART 276. GOTHIC ART. (3) 

ART 280. METHODS OF ART HISTORY. (3) 

ART 282, 283. MUSEUM TRAINING PROGRAM. (3, 3) 

ART 284. SEMINAR. PROBLEMS IN ARCHITECTURAL 
HISTORY AND CRITICISM. (3) 

ART 286. SEMINAR IN LATIN-AMERICAN ART. (3) 

ART 288. SEMINAR IN MODERN MEXICAN ART. (3) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 

(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 

(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 

(Staff) 
(Staff) 



(Staff) 



ART 292, 293. DIRECTED GRADUATE STUDIES iN 
STUDIO ART. (3, 3) 



(Staff) 



ART 294, 295. DIRECTED GRADUATE STUDIES IN ART 
HISTORY. (3, 3) 



ART 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

ART 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 
Arts and Sciences 1 1 1 



ASTRONOMY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Laster. 

PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF ASTRONOMY: Westerhout. 

PROFESSORS: Erickson, Kerr, Kundu, Musen (P. T.), Opik. 

VISITING PROFESSOR: Lindblad. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Bell, Matthews, Smith, Wentzel. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: A'Hearn, Harrington, Simonson, 

Zuckerman. ,_ _ 

LECTURERS: Brandt (P. T.), Clark (P. T.), Maran (P. T.). 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers 
a major in Astronomy. The Astronomy Program of- 
fice is located in the Space Sciences Building. As- 
tronomy students are given a strong undergraduate 
preparation in astronomy, physics and mathematics, 
as well as encouragement to take a wide range of 
other liberal arts courses. The Astronomy Program 
is designed to be quite flexible, in order to take ad- 
vantage of students' special talents or interests 
after the basic requirements for a sound astronomy 
education have been met. Students preparing for 
graduate studies will have an opportunity to choose 
from among many advanced courses available in 
astronomy, mathematics, and physics. The pro- 
gram is designed to prepare students for graduate 
work as well as for positions in governmental and 
industrial laboratories and observatories. 

Students intending to major in astronomy who 
have had a high school course in physics, and who 
have adequate preparation in mathematics to qual- 
ify for admission to MATH 019 will ordinarily take the 
introductory physics courses PHYS015, 016, 017 and 
018, during their freshman and sophomore years. 
Those students who do not decide to major in astron- 
omy or physics until after their freshman or soph- 
omore year or enter as transfer students will often 
have taken other introductory courses in physics (i.e. 
PHYS030, 031, 032). Students wi II find recommended 
course programs in the pamphlet entitled "Depart- 
ment Requirements for a B.S. degree in Astronomy" 
which is available from the Astronomy Program Of- 
fice. This pamphlet outlines many different ap- 
proaches for an astronomy major. 

ASTR 010 (Descriptiveand Analytical Astronomy) 
is the introductory astronomy course required of 
astronomy majors. It may be taken in the freshman 
or sophomore year. It is followed by another required 
course, ASTR 025 (Practical Astronomy). Occasionally 
a student may not decide to major in astronomy until 
after he has already taken ASTR 001 and 002 (Intro- 
duction to Astronomy and Modern Astronomy). These 
courses together may be substituted for the ASTR 010 
requirement, but only students with a grade of "B" 
or better in ASTR 001 and 002 will be encouraged to 
major in astronomy. Such students must also take 
ASTR 025. 

HONORS IN ASTRONOMY 

The Honors Program offers to students of excep- 
tional ability and interest in astronomy an educational 
program with a number of special opportunities for 
learning. Honors sections are offered in several 
courses, and there are many opportunities for part- 
time research participation which may develop into 
fulltime summer projects. An honors seminar is of- 
fered for advanced students; credit may be given for 
independent work or study; and certain graduate 
courses are open for credit toward the bachelor's de- 
gree. 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted by 
the Department's Honors Committee on the basis of 
recommendations from their advisors and other 
faculty members. Afinal written and oral comprehen- 
sive examination in the senior year concludes the 



program which may lead to graduation "with Honors 

(or High Honors) in Astronomy." 

ASTR 001. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. (3) 

Every semester. An elementary course in descriptive astron- 
omy, especially appropriate for non-science students. Sun, 
moon, planets, stars and nebulae, galaxies, evolution. The 
course is illustrated with slides and demonstrations of 
instruments. (Westerhout, Wentzel, A'Hearn) 

ASTR 002. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ASTRONOMY. (3) 
Spring semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
ASTR 001. An elementary course in modern astronomy elab- 
orating on some of the topics which could only be men- 
tioned briefly in ASTR001. Appropriate for non-science stu- 
dents. (Wentzel, Smith) 

ASTR 005. ASTRONOMY LABORATORY. (1) 

Fall and spring semesters. Two hours of laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite, previous or concurrent enrollment in 
ASTROOlorOlO. Exercisesintheuseofcelestialcoordinates, 
measurement of position, determination of time of day and 
night; study of photographs of stars, nebulae and galaxies, 
and spectra; photoelectric photometry; demonstration of 
astronomical instruments, daytime and nighttime observa- 
tions if weather permits. Appropriatefornon-sciencemajors. 

(Smith, Matthews) 

ASTR 010. DESCRIPTIVE AND ANALYTICAL ASTRONOMY. (3) 
Fall semester. Three lectures per week. A general survey 
course intended for science majors. Prerequisite, MATH 
018 or equivalent; a knowledge of trigonometry and lo- 
garithms will be assumed. This introductory course will 
deal with the sun and the solar system, stars and astro- 
physics, stellar systems and cosmology. It should not be 
taken by students who have already taken ASTR 001 and 
002. (Smith) 

ASTR 025. PRACTICAL ASTRONOMY (2-3). 

Prerequisites: ASTR010andMATH019. ASTR001 and002 
may be substituted for ASTR 010 if approved by instructor. 
One lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. 2-3 cred- 
its, according to work done. This course is designed pri- 
marily for astronomy majors and will give the student famil- 
iarity with techniques used by astronomers and an under- 
standing of how astronomical data are obtained. Students 
registered for 2 credits will not be required to do all the 
exercises. Topics will include coordinate systems, optics, 
photometry, binary stars, distance determinations, Hertz- 
sprung-Russell diagram, solar observations, moon, galactic 
structure, and galaxies. (Smith) 

ASTR 100, 110. OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites: working knowledge of calculus, physics 
through PHYS 018 or 032, and 3 credits of astronomy. An 
introduction to current methods of obtaining astronomical 
information including radio, infrared, optical, ultra-violet, 
and x-ray astronomy. The laboratory work will involve photo- 
graphic and photoelectric observations with the depart- 
ment's optical telescope and 21-cm line spectroscopy, flux 
measurements and interferometry with the department's 
radiotelescopes. (A'Hearn, Clark, Erickson) 

ASTR 101. INTRODUCTION TO GALACTIC RESEARCH. (3) 
First semester. Three lectures perweek. Prerequisite, MATH 
02 land at least 1 2 creditsof introductory physicsand astron- 
omy courses. Stellar motions, methods of galactic research, 
study of our own and nearby galaxies, clusters of stars. 

(Kerr) 

ASTR 102. INTRODUCTION TO ASTROPHYSICS. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. Pre- or co-req- 
uisite, PHYS 119 or consent of instructor. Spectroscopy, 
structure of the atmospheres of the sun and other stars. 
Observational data and curves of growth. Chemical com- 
position. (Bell) 

ASTR 124. CELESTIAL MECHANICS. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 127 or consent 
of instructor. Celestial mechanics, orbit theory, equations 
of motion. (Musen) 

ASTR 150. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ASTRONOMY. 

Given each semester. Prerequisite, major in physics or 
astronomy and-or consent of advisor. Research or special 
study. Credit according to work done. (Sta^f ) 

ASTR 190. HONORS SEMINAR. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Enrollment 
is limited to students admitted to the Honors Program in 
Astronomy. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalogue for descriptions. 

ASTR 200. DYNAMICS OF STELLAR SYSTEMS. (3) 

(Staff) 

ASTR 202. STELLAR INTERIORS. (3) 

(Staff) 



M2 



Arts and Sciences 



ASTR 203. STELLAR ATMOSPHERES. (3) 

(Staff) 

ASTR 204. PHYSICS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM. (3) 

(Staff) 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR ASTRONOMY MAJOR 

(a) Introductory Physics Courses. PHYS015.016 
— Introductory Physics, Mechanics, Fluids, 
Heat, and Sound (4, 4), followed by PHYS 
017— Introductory Physics, Electricity and 
Magnetism (4) and PHYS 018— Introductory 
Physics, Optics and Modern Physics (4) 
(Total 16 credits); or PHYS 030, 032— Gen- 
eral Physics (3, 4, 4) and PHYS 104, 105- 
Electricity and Magnetism (3, 3) and PHYS 
106— Mechanics (3). 

(b) Physics Laboratory. At least four credits of 
laboratory courses; ordinarily PHYS 060, 061, 
but 100, 109 may be added. 

(c) Modern Physics, PHYS 118, 119 (3, 3) or 
Mathematical Physics, PHYS 127, 128 
(4, 4). 

(d) Supporting Courses. MATH 019, 020, 021 — 
Analysis (4, 4, 4) 

(Astronomy majors are encouraged to enter 
the accelerated math sections which cover 
these courses in two terms). These must be 
followed by at least one additional 3 or 4 credit 
mathematics course approved by the astron- 
omy advisor. Recommendedcoursesare MATH 
022 — Calculus (4), MATH 066 — Differential 
Equations for Scientists and Engineers (3) 
MATH 162, 163 — Analysis for Scientists and 
Engineers (3, 3), MATH 113 — Introduction to 
Complex Variables(4), MATH 110— Advanced 
Calculus (4), or MATH 168 — Numerical Meth- 
ods (3). (Minimum 15 credits). 

(e) Introductory Astronomy Courses. Normally 
ASTR 010 and ASTR 025. 
ASTR001and002maybesubstitutedforASTR 
010 (See above) 

(f) Advanced Astronomy Courses. Two Astron- 
omy courses at the 100 level. (Minimum 6 
credits). 

Students may major in Astronomy only if a grade of 
"C" is attained in each semester of the introductory 
Physics and Astronomy courses. Any student who 
wishes to be recommended for graduate work 
in astronomy must maintain a "B" average and should 
also consider including some or all of the following 
courses in his program in addition to those required 
of all astronomy majors. 

(a) Astronomy. One or more additional courses at 
the 100 level. 

(b) Physics. Both PHYS 127-128 (4, 4) — Mathe- 
matical Physics and PHYS 118, 119 (3, 3) 
— Modern Physics; and one or more of those 
listed below. 

(c) Supporting Courses. One or two additional 
mathematics or computer science courses, 
selected in consultation with the advisor. 

Further Physics courses that astronomy majors 
should consider, both those terminating at the B.S. 
and those planning on graduate studies, are the fol- 
lowing: 

PHYS 100— Advanced Experiments 

PHYS 103— Applied Optics 

PHYS 123 — Introduction to Atmospheric and 
Space Physics 

PHYS 124— Plasma Physics 

PHYS 126— Kinetic Theory of Gases 



PHYS 129— Elementary Particles 
PHYS 144, 145— Methods of Theoretical Physics 
PHYS 152— ThermodynamicsandStatistical Me- 
chanics 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 



ASTR 210. GALACTIC RADIO ASTRONOMY. (3) 
ASTR 212. PHYSICS OF THE SOLAR ENVELOPE. (3) 
ASTR 214. INTERSTELLAR MATTER. (3) 

ASTR 230. SEMINAR. (1) 

(Staff) 
ASTR 248, 249. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN ASTRONOMY. 

(Staff) 
ASTR 250. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ADVANCED ASTRONOMY. 
(1-6) 

(Staff) 
ASTR 399. RESEARCH. 

(Staff) 
ASTR 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 

(Staff) 

BOTANY 

HEAD AND PROFESSOR: Krauss. 

PROFESSORS: Corbett, Galloway, Gauch, Kantzes, D. T. .or- 
gan, Sisler, Stern, Weaver. 

RESEARCH PROFESSOR: Sorokin. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brown. Karlander, Klarman, Krus- 
berg. Lockard, 0. D. Morgan, Patterson, Rappleye. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Barnett, Bean, Curtis, Harrison, 
Motta, Reveal, Smith Terborgh. 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Norton. 

INSTRUCTORS: Grigg and Owens. 

GENERAL B0TAN v 

BOTN 001. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. General introduction to 
botany, touchingbrieflyon all phases on the subject. Empha- 
sis is on the fundamental biological principles of the 
higher plants. (Stern and Departmental Faculty) 

30TN 001 H. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week. A broad study of plant science with 
emphasis on current conceptions of major fields of in- 
terest. Designed for general honors students, as well as for 
freshman students with superior training in biology or 
chemistry, for upper class science majors, and for those 
students seeking an advanced treatment of BOTN 001. 

(Galloway and Departmental Faculty) 

BOTN 002. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, BOTN 1 or equivalent. A brief evolu- 
tionary study of algae, fungi, liverworts, mosses, ferns and 
their relatives, and the seed pi ants, emphasizing their struc- 
ture, reproduction, habitats, and economic importance. 

(Stern and Departmental Faculty) 

BOTN 010. PRINCIPLES OF CONSERVATION. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Astudy of the prin- 
ciples of economical use of our natural resources, including 
water, soil, plants, minerals, wildlife and man. (Harrison) 

BOTN 116. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF BOTANY (1) 

First semester. Prerequisites 20 semester credit hours in 
biological sciences including BOTN 001 or equivalent. Dis- 
cussion of the development and ideas and knowledge about 
plants, leadingtoasurveyof contemporary work in botanical 
science. (Staff) 

BOTN 136. PLANTS AND MANKIND. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or equivalent. A 
survey of the plants which are utilized by man, the di- 
versity of such utilization, and their historic and eco- 
nomic significance. (Rappleye) 

BOTN 151S. TEACHING METHODS IN BOTANY. (2) 

Summer session. Four two-hour laboratory demonstration 
periods per week, for eight weeks. Prerequisite, BOTN l,or 
equivalent. A study of the biological principles of common 
plants, and demonstrations, projects, and visual aids suit- 
able for teaching in primary and secondary schools. 

(Lockard) 

BOTN 171. MARINE PLANT BIOLOGY. (4) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 or General 
Biology plus Organic Chemistry or the consent of the in- 
structor. Five, one-hour lectures and three, 3-hour labora- 



Arts and Sciences 



713 



tories each week for six weeks. An introduction to the 
taxonomic, physiological and biochemical characteristics 
of marine plants which are basic to their role in the 
ecology of the oceans and estuaries. Laboratory fee 
$12.00. (Krauss and Staff) 

BOTN 195. TUTORIAL READING IN BOTANY. (HONORS 
COURSE) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, admission to the Department of Botany Honors 
Program. A review of the literature dealing with a specific 
research problem in preparation for original research to be 
accomplished in BOTN 196. Papers will be assigned and dis- 
cussed in frequent sessions with the instructor. 

(Galloway and Departmental Faculty) 

BOTN 196. RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. (HONORS 
COURSE) (2 or 3) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 195. The candidate for Honors will 
pursue a research problem under the direction and 
close supervision of a member of the faculty 

(Staff) 

BOTN 199. SEMINAR. (1) 

First and second semesters. Two semester hours maximum 
credit. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Discussion 
and readings on special topics, current literature, or prob- 
lems and progress in all phases of botany. Minor experi- 
mental work may be pursued if facilities and the qualifica- 
tions of the students permit. For seniors only, majors and 
minors in botany or biological science. (Terborgh) 

BOTN 199-S. NSF SEMINAR )2) 

Seminar in the Sciences for NSF participants only. Includes 
guest speakers, field trips to area Science laboratories, and 
individual problem work. (Lockard) 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
BOTN 301. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. (1 to 3) 

BOTN 302. SEMINAR IN BOTANY. (1 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 



PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

BOTN 101. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per- 
iod a week. Prerequisites, BOTN 001 and General Chem- 
istry. Organic Chemistry strongly recommended. A sur- 
vey of the general physiological activities of plants. 

(Patterson, Lockard) 
BOTN 172. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN MARINE RESEARCH 
Summer Session. Prerequisites BOTN 001 or general 
biology plus Organic Chemistry or consent of instructor. 
Recommended concurrent or previous enrollment in 
BOTN 171, Marine Plant Biology. An experimental ap- 
proach to problems in marine research dealing primarily 
with the phytoplankton, the larger algae, and marine 
spermatophytes. Emphasis will be placed on their physio- 
logical and biochemical activities. 
BOTN 204. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 209. PHYSIOLOGY OF ALGAE (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 210. PHYSIOLOGY OF ALGAE LABORATORY. (1) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 230. ADVANCED PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 231. PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 232. PLANT BIOPHYSICS. (2) 

(Staff) 
BOTN 233. PLANT BIOCHEMISTRY-BIOPHYSICS 
LABORATORY. (4) 

(Staff) 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

BOTN 020. DISEASES OF PLANTS. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. An introduc- 
tory study of the symptoms and casual agents of plant 
diseases and measure for their control. (Klarman) 

BOTN 122. RESEARCH METHODS IN PLANT PATHOLOGY. 
(2) 
Second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, BOTN 020, or equivalent. Advanced training in 
the research techniques and methods of plant pathology. 

(Curtis) 



BOTN 127. DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL OF PLANT DISEASES 
(3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. A study of vari- 
ous plant diseases grouped according to the manner in 
which the host plants are affected. Emphasis will be placed 
on recognition of symptoms of the various types of diseases 
and on methods of transmission and control of the pathogens 
involved. (Bean) 

BOTN 152S. FIELD PLANT PATHOLOGY. (1) 

Summersession. Daily lectureforthree weeks. Prerequisite, 
BOTN 020, or equivalent. Given in accordance with demand! 
A course for county agents and teachers of vocational agn 
culture. Discussion and denomination of the important 
diseases in Maryland crops. (Kantzes) 

BOTN 221. PLANT VIROLOGY. (2) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 223. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI. (2) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 224. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI LABORATORY. (1) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 227. PHYSIOLOGY OF PATHOGENS AND HOST- 
PATHOGEN RELATIONSHIPS. (3) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 241. PLANT NEMATOLOGY. (4) 

(Staff) 

TAXONOMY 

BOTN Oil PLANT TAXONOMY. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. An intro- 
ductory study of plant classification, based on the collec- 
tion and identification of local plants. (Brown) 

BOTN 128. MYCOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1971-72.) An introductory 
study of the morphology, classification, life histories, and 
economics of the fungi. (Motta) 

BOTN 153S. FIELD BOTANY AND TAXONOMY. (2) 

Summersession. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 orGeneral Biology. 
Four two-hour laboratory periods a week for eight weeks. 
The identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing 
the native plants of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other 
techniques will be used. Numerous short field trips will 
be taken. Each student will make an individual collection. 

(Brown) 

BOTN 161. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY. (2) 

Fall semester. (Not offered 1970-71.) Two-two-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, BOTN Oil or 
equivalent. An advanced study of the principles of sys- 
tematic botany. Laboratory practice with difficult plant 
families including grasses, sedges, legumes, and com- 
posites. Field trips arranged. (Reveal) 



ECOLOGY 

BOTN 102. PLANT ECOLOGY. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 001. Two lectures per 
week. The dynamics of populations as affected by environ- 
mental factors with special emphasis on the structure and 
composition of natural plant communities, both terrestrial 
and equatic. (Terborgh) 

BOTN 103. PLANT ECOLOGY LABORATORY. (1) 

Prerequisite, BOTN 102 or its equivalent or concurrent 
enrollment therein. One three-hour laboratory period a week. 
The application of field and experimental methods of the 
qualitative and quantitative study of vegetation and environ- 
mental factors. (Terborgh) 

BOTN 113. PLANT GEOGRAPHY. (2) 

First semester. Prequisite, BOTN 001, or equivalent. A 
study of plant distribution throughout the world and the 
factors generally associated with such distribution. 

(Brown) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
BOTN 219. ADVANCED PLANT ECOLOGY. (3) 



BOTN 222. PLANT VIROLOGY LABORATORY (2) 
BOTN 223. PHYSIOLOGY OF FUNGI. (2) 



(Staff) 

(Staff) 



ANATOMY-MORPHOLOGY 

BOTN 110. PLANT MICROTECHNIQUE. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture a week. Laboratory periods by 
arrangement. Prerequisite, BOTN 001 orequivalent andper- 



114 



Arts and Sciences 



mission of instructor. Preparation of temporary and per- 
manent mounts, including selection of material, killing and 
fixing, embedding, sectioning, and staining methods; photo- 
micrography, film and paper processing and preparation of 
photographic illustrationsforresearch publication. (Stern) 

BOTN 111. PLANT ANATOMY. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, BOTN 1 10, or equivalent. The origin and 
development of the organs and tissue systems in the 
vascular plants. (Rappleye) 

BOTN 115. STRUCTURE OF ECONOMIC PLANTS. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 197 1-72). One lectureand two 
laboratory per iodsa week. Prerequisite, BOTN 11 l.Adetailed 
microscopic study of the anatomy of the chief fruit and 
vegetable crops. (Rappleye) 

BOTN 212. PLANT MORPHOLOGY. (3) 

(Staff) 

GENETICS 

BOTN 117. GENERAL PLANT GENETICS. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, BOTN 009 or equivalent. 
The basic principles of plant genetics are presented; the 
mechanics of transmission of the hereditary factors in 
relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of 
specialized organs and tissues, spontaneous and induced 
mutations of basic and economic significance, gene action, 
genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, and genetics 
in relation to methods of plant breeding are the topics 
considered. (Smith) 

BOTN 215. PLANT CYTOGENETICS (3) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 216. NUCLEIC ACIDS AND MOLECULAR GENETICS. (2) 

(Staff) 

BOTN 399. THESIS RESEARCH 

(Staff) 

BOTN 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH 
Credit according to work done. 

CHEMISTRY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Vanderslice. 

PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE CHAIRMAN: Jaquith. 

PROFESSORS: Atkinson, Castellan, Grim, Henery-Logan, 
Keeney, Lippincott, Pratt, Purdy, Reeve, Rollinson, Stew- 
art, Stuntz, Svirbely, Veitch, White (Emeritus). 

VISITING PROFESSORS: Berger, Reimann, Rose. 

RESEARCH PROFESSOR: Bailey. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Boyd, Devoe, Gardner, Gordon, 
Holmlund. Huheey. Kasler, Lakshmanan, Pickard, Staley, 
Viola. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Ammon, Barker, Bellama, Davis, 
Jackson, Jarvis, Khanna, Martin, Mazzocchi, Miller, Moore, 
Murphy, O'Haver, 01 in, Sampugna, Sommer, Weinshenker, 
Zoller. 

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Kundell. 

INSTRUCTORS: Perlman and Stuntz. 

The Department of Chemistry also offers a pro- 
gram leading to a B.S. with a major in Biochemistry. 
The student must take at least 9 semester hours in 
approved biological science courses with at least one 
course at the 100 level. 



Chemistry 141 2 Chemistry 148 ? 

German 001 3 Germon 002 3 

General Education 3 General Education i 

Electives 4 Electives 4 



First Semester 

Chemistry 008 or 018 . 4 

Mathematics 018 3 

English 001 or 021 3 

General Education 3 

Health 005 2 

Physical Education 1 

_ 16 



Second Semester 

Chemistry 009 or 020 , 4 

Mathematics 019 4 

English 003 3 

Physics 030 3 

Speech 007 2 

Physical Education 1 

~~ J7 



Second Year 
First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 035 2 Chemistry 037 2 

Chemistry040 1 Chemistry 042 1 

Mathematics 020 4 Chemistry 021 4 

Physics 031 4 Mathematics 021 4 

English 004 3 Physics 032 4 
~U ~15 



First Semester 

Chemistry 187 
Chemistry 182 



Third Year 

Second Semester 

3 Chemistry 189 3 

1 Chemistry 184 1 



16 
Fourth Yeor 



16 



First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 123 3 Chemistry 101 3 

German 006 3 German 008 3 

General Education 3 Electives 6 

Electives 6 General Education 3 



15 



15 



CHEM 001, 003. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. (4, 4) 

Two lectures, one quiz, and one three-hour laboratory period 
each week. Prerequisite, 1 year high school algebra or equi- 
valent. (Staff) 

CHEM 005. ADVANCED GENERAL CHEMISTRY. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Prerequisite, high school chemistry, 
placement in mathematics group I or II, and permission 
of the Chemistry Department. An advanced course in 
general chemistry for chemistry majors, which must be 
followed by CHEM 015. (Staff) 

CHEM 006. INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE CHEMISTRY. (2) 

Two lectures and one recitation per week. An introduction to 
the study of matter. This course is intended to be followed 
by CHEM 001 or 005. This course may not be taken for 
credit by students with credit in CHEM 00 1,003, 005, or 007 
or their equivalents. This course may not be taken to satisfy 
the General Education science requirement. (Staff) 

CHEM 007. CHEMISTRY OF MAN'S ENVIRONMENT. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. 
Non-mathematical presentation of basic chemical princi- 
ples and applications in cosmochemistry, geochemistry, 
biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Particular emphasis 
is placed on the development of man's environment and 
his effect upon it. This course is for the general student 
and does not satisfy the requirements of the professional 
schools. (Staff) 

CHEM 008. COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I. (4) 

Three lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 6 or satisfactory perfor- 
mance on qualifying test. The first semester of a general 
chemistry sequence intended for students whose curricula 
require a year or more of chemistry to provide a working 
knowledge of the science. Nature and composition of mat- 
ter; chemical calculations; atomic structure, solutions. 

(Staff) 

CHEM 009. COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II. (4) 

Three lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 8 or 18. A continuation 
of CHEM 8. The chemistry of carbon, aliphatic compounds; 
acids and bases, aromatic compounds; stereochemistry 
halides; amines and amides; acids, esters; carbohydrates; 
natural products. 

CHEM 015. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 003 or CHEM 005. (Staff) 

CHEM 018. PRINCIPLES OF COLLEGE CHEMISTRY I. (4) 
Three lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. A more rigorous treatment of the material of 
CHEM 8. Admissions by invitation of the Chemistry Depart- 
ment based on performance on a qualifying test. 

CHEM 020. PRINCIPLES OF COLLEGE CHEMISTRY II. (4) 
Three lectures, one recitation, and one three-hour labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 8 or 18 and consent of 
the Chemistry Department. A more rigorous treatment of 
the material of CHEM 9. 

CHEM 019. ELEMENTS OF QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. (4) 
Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 003. An introduction to the 
basic theory and techniques of volumetric and gravi- 
metric analysis. Primarily for students in engineering, 
agriculture, pre-medical, and pre-dental curricula. 

(Stuntz) 

CHEM 021. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 015. An in- 
tensive study of the theory and techniques of inorganic 
quantitative analysis, covering primarily volumetric meth- 
ods. Required of all students majoring in chemistry. 

(Stuntz) 

CHEM 031, 033. ELEMENTS OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (3, 3) 
Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 



Arts and Sciences 



115 



Prerequisite, CHEM 003, 005, or 01 3. Organic chemistry for 
students in agriculture, bacteriology, and home economics. 

(Reeve) 

CHEM 035, 037. ELEMENTARY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (2, 2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 003 or 005. A 
course for chemists, chemical engineers, pre-medical stu- 
dents, and pre-dental students. (Staff) 

CHEM 036, 038. ELEMENTARY ORGANIC LABORATORY. (2, 2) 
Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 003, or 005; CHEM 035, 037 must be taken concur- 
rently. (Staff) 

CHEM 040, 042. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY FOR 
CHEMISTRY MAJORS. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 003 or 005; CHEM 035, 037 must be taken concur- 
rently. (Staff) 

CHEM 101. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 187. (Staff) 

CHEM 102. INORGANIC PREPARATIONS. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 123. (Boyd) 

CHEM 110. RADIOCHEMICAL SAFETY PROCEDURES. (1) 
One lecture per week. A lecture and demonstration course. 
Radiation hazards, principles and practices of radiation 
safety, federal (AEC, ICC) codes and state public health 
laws, etc., will bediscussed. Consent of the instructor must 
be obtained. No ciedit towards a degree allowed for chem- 
istry majors. (Lakshmanan) 

CHEM 111. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, CHEM 003, or equivalent. Not open 
to students seeking a major in the physical sciences, 
since the course content is covered elsewhere in their 
curricula. A course in the principles of chemistry with 
accompanying laboratory work consisting of simple 
quantitative experiments. (Credit applicable only toward 
degree in College of Education.) (Jaquith) 

CHEM 112, 113. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN CHEMISTRY 
TEACHING. (3,3) 

One four-hour meeting per week. An intensive study of 
secondary school chemistry courses with particular atten- 
tion to the Chemical Education Material Study course. Major 
emphasis will be placed on the chemical principles and 
the philosophy underlying the CHEM Study program. Credit 
applicable toward degrees in the Collegeof Education only. 
Prerequisite, CHEM 001, 003 or its equivalent, and enroll- 
ment in the NSF In-Service Institute for Secondary School 
Chemistry Teachers, or consent of the instructor. 

(Jaquith) 

CHEM 115. A SURVEY OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (3) 

Summer School only. Open ONLY to registrants in the 
National Science Foundation Summer Institute. Five one- 
hour lectures per week; five three-hour laboratory periods 
per week. A systematic survev of compounds of carbon at 
the elementary level. (Staff) 

CHEM 121. INTERMEDIATE QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. (4) 
Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites, CHEM 019 or 021, and CHEM 033 
or 037. A continuation of CHEM 019 or 021, including 
volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric, and colorimetric 
methods. Intended for students in agricultural chem- 
istry, general physical science, science education, etc. 
Not open to chemistry majors. (Staff) 

CHEM 123. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Pre- or co- requisite. CHEM 189. A continuation of 
CHEM 021, including volumetric, gravimetric, electro- 
metric, and colorimetric methods. Required of all stu- 
dents majoring in chemistry. (Purdy) 

CHEM 125. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of labora- 
tory per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 189. A study of the appli- 
cation of physicochemical methods to analytical chemis- 
try. Techniques such as polarography, potentiometry, con- 
ductivity and spectrophotometry will be included. (Purdy) 

CHEM 141, 143. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (2, 2) 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 037, 038. An 
advanced study of the compounds of carbon. (Reeve) 

CHEM 144. ADVANCED ORGANIC LABORATORY. (2-4) 

Two or four three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prereq- 
uisites. CHEM 037, 038. (Pratt) 

CHEM 148. THE IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS. 
(2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 141. The systematic identification of organic com- 
pounds. (Pratt) 



CHEM 150. ORGANIC QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 019 or 021, and consent of the instructor. The semi- 
micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, halo- 
gen and certain functional groups. (Kasler) 
CHEM 161. CHEMICAL BACKGROUND FOR BIOCHEMISTRY. 
(2) 

Two lectures per week. Prerequisite. CHEM 033 or CHEM 
037. Organic and physical chemical properties of biolog- 
ically important compounds and systems. (Holmlund) 
CHEM 163. BIOCHEMISTRY. (3) 

Ihree lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 161. 

(Holmlund) 
CHEM 162, 164. BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. (2, 2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 033, CHEM 038 or CHEM 042; CHEM 161 or 163, (or 
concurrent registration in CHEM 161 or CHEM 163). 

(Staff) 
CHEM 182, 184. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY FOR 
CHEMISTRY MAJORS. (1, 1) 

One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
CHEM 019 or 021; CHEM 187, 189 must be taken concur- 
rently. (Staff) 
CHEM 186. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 
(2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
CHEM 184, CHEM 189. (Staff) 

CHEM 196. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY. (3) 

Three lectures or two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite varies with the nature of the topic 
being considered. Course may be repeated for credit if the 
subject matter is substantial ly different, but not more than 
three credits may be accepted in satisfaction of major or 
supporting area requirements for chemistry majors. 

(Staff) 
CHEM 187. 189. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, CHEM 019 or 021, 
MATH 021, PH YS 032 (PHYS 032 may be taken concurrently 
with CHEM 187) or consent of instructor. A course primarily 
for chemists and chemical engineers. This course must be 
accompanied by CHEM 188, 190. (Staff) 

CHEM 188, 190. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY. (2, 2) 
Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. A laboratory 
course for chemical engineering students taking CHEM 
187, 189. Students who have had CHEM 019, 021, or 
equivalent can not register for this course. (Staff) 

CHEM 195. ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. (2) 

Prerequisite, CHEM 189. Quantum chemistry and other 
selected topics. (Staff) 

CHEM 199H. SPECIAL PROJECTS. (2) 

Honors projects for undergraduate students. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

CHEM 201. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 202, 204. ADVANCED INORGANIC LABORATORY. (2, 2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 203. THE CHEMISTRY OF THE RARER ELEMENTS (2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 203. THE CHEMISTRY OF THE RARER ELEMENTS. (2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 205. RADIOCHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 206. 208. SPECTROGRAPHIC ANALYSIS. (1. 1) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 207. CHEMISTRY OF COORDINATION COMPOUNDS 
(2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 209. NON-AQUEOUS INORGANIC SOLVENTS. (2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 210. RADIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. (1-2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 211. CHEMISTRY OF ORGANOMETALLIC 
COMPOUNDS. (2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 213. SELECTED TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
(2) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 215. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 



116 



Arts and Sciences 



CHEM 221, 223. CHEMICAL MICROSCOPY. (2, 2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 227. OPTICAL METHODS OF QUANTITATIVE 
ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 229. ELECTRICAL METHODS OF QUANTITATIVE 
ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 231. SEPARATION METHODS IN QUANTITATIVE 
ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 233. MODERN TRENDS IN ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 
(2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 237. ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 239: PHYSICAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 240. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF HIGH POLYMERS. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 243. MOLECULAR ORBITAL THEORY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 245. THE CHEMISTRY OF THE STEROIDS. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 251. THE HETEROCYCLICS. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 253. SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 254 ADVANCED ORGANIC PREPARATIONS. (2-4) 

(Staff) 

CHEM 258. THE IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANIC 
COMPOUNDS, AN ADVANCED COURSE. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 261. PROTEINS, AMINO ACIDS, AND CARBOHYDRATES. 
(2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 263. BIOLOGICAL ENERGY TRANSDUCTIONS, 
VITAMINS, AND HORMONES. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 265. ENZYMES. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 267. THE CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 268. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. (2-4) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 269. ADVANCED RADIOCHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 270. ADVANCED RADIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. 
(1-2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 271. BIOCHEMISTRY OF LIPIDS. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 273. SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 275. BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 287. INFRARED AND ROMAN SPECTROSCOPY. (2) 

Staff) 
CHEM 291. SELECTED TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 293. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 299. REACTION KINETICS. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 303. ELECTROCHEMISTRY. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 304. ELECTROCHEMISTRY LABORATORY. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 307. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 311. PHYSIOCHEMICAL CALCULATIONS. (2) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 313. MOLECULAR STRUCTURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 317. CHEMICAL CRYSTALLOGRAPHY. (3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 319, 321. QUANTUM CHEMISTRY. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
CHEM 323. STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND CHEMISTRY. (3) 

(Staff) 



CHEM 351. SEMINAR. (1) 

CHEM 399. THESIS RESEARCH. 

CHEM 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 
(Staff) 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Avery. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Hubbe. 
LECTURER: Iversen. 
INSTRUCTOR: Clapper. 

MAJOR IN LATIN: LATN 001, 002, 003, and004or 
their equivalent must have been completed before a 
student may begin work on a major in Latin. A student 
majoring in Latin will then begin his concentration 
with LATN 005. A major consists of a minimum of 
twenty-four hours beginning with LATN 005, twelve 
hours of which must be taken in 100-level courses. 
A major student who has taken LATN 001, 002, 003, 
and 004 may use credit so obtained tofulf ill the twelve- 
hour foreign language requirement of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Those registering initially for 
LATN 005 must fulfill this requirement in anotherfor- 
eign language, preferably Greek. No course with a 
grade less than C may be used to satisfy major require- 
ments. 

No placement tests are given in the Classical Lan- 
guages. The following schedule will apply in general 
in determining the course level at which students 
will register for Latin and Greek. All students whose 
stage of achievement is not represented below are 
urgently invited to confer with the Chairman of the 
Department. 

Students offering or 1 unit of Latin will register for 
course 001. 

Students offering 2 units of Latin will register for course 003 
Students offering 3 units of Latin will register for course 004. 
Students offering 4 units of Latin will register for course 005. 
No credit will be given for less than two semesters of Ele- 
mentary Latin or Greek except as provided below in the course 
description of LATN 001, 002. 

LATIN 

LATN 001, 002. ELEMENTARY LATIN. (3, 3) 

A student who has had two units of Latin in high school 
may register for LATN 001 for purposes of review, but not 
for credit; however, he may, under certain conditions, reg- 
ister for LATN 002 for credit with departmental permission. 

(Hubbe and Staff) 

LATN 003. INTERMEDIATE LATIN (CAESAR). (3) 

Prerequisite, LATN 001, 002 or equivalent. (Staff) 

LATN 004. INTERMEDIATE LATIN (CICERO). (3) 

Prerequisite, LATN 003 or equivalent. (Staff) 

LATN 005. VERGIL'S AENEID. (3) 

Prerequisite, LATN 004 or equivalent. (Avery) 

LATN 051. HORACE. (3) 

Prerequisite, LATN 005 or equivalent. (Avery) 

LATN 052. LIVY. (3) 

Prerequisite, LATN 051 or equivalent. (Avery) 

LATN 061. PLINY'S LETTERS. (3) 

Prerequisite, LATN 052 or equivalent. (Avery) 

LATN 070. GREEK AND ROMAN MYTHOLOGY. (3) 

Taught in English, no prerequisite. Cannot be taken for 
language credit. This course is particularly recommended 
for students planning to major in Foreign Languages, Eng- 
lish, History, the Fine Arts, or Journalism. (Iversen) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

Prerequisite for 100 level courses, LATN 061. 
LATN 101. CATULLUS AND THE ROMAN ELEGIAC POETS. (3) 

(Avery) 
LATN 102. TACITUS. (3) 

(Avery) 
LATN 103. ROMAN SATIRE. (3) 

(Avery) 
LATN 104. ROMAN COMEDY. (3) 

(Avery) 
LATN 105. LUCRETIUS. (3) 

(Avery) 



Arts and Sciences 



117 



LATN 111. ADVANCED LATIN GRAMMAR. (3) 

Prerequisite, three years of college Latin or equivalent. An 
intensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin 
language supplemented by rapid reading. (Avery) 

LATN 199. LATIN READINGS. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. The reading of one or 
more selected Latin authors from antiquity through the 
Renaissance. Reports. May be repated with different con- 
tent. (Avery) 

FOR GRADUATES 

LATN 210. VULGAR LATIN READINGS. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An intensive review of 
the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Classical Latin, 
followed by the study of the deviations of Vulgar Latin from 
the classical norms, with the reading of illustrative texts. 
The reading of selections from the Peregrinato and loca 
sancta and the study of divergences from classical usage 
therein, with special emphasis on those which anticipate 
subsequent developments in the Romance Languages. Re- 
ports. (Avery) 

GREEK 

GREK 001, 002. ELEMENTARY GREEK. (3, 3) 

(Hubbe) 
GREK 003. INTERMEDIATE GREEK (XENOPHON). (3) 

Prerequisite, GREK 001, 002 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 

GREK 004. INTERMEDIATE GREEK (HOMER). (3) 

Prerequisite, GREK 003 or equivalent. See GREK 006. 

(Hubbe) 
GREK 005. HERODOTUS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GREK 004 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 

GREK 006. THE NEW TESTAMENT. (3) 

Prerequisite, GREK 003 or equivalent. GREK 006 will be 

substituted for GREK 004 upon demand of a sufficient 

number of students. (Hubbe) 

GREK 051. EURIPIDES. (3) 

Prerequisite, GREK 005 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 

GREK 052. PLATO. (3) 

Prerequisite, GREK 051 or equivalent. (Hubbe) 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: 

PROFESSORS Freedman (Chairman), M. J. Evans, G. Jones, 

MacBain, D. Smith, Sparks and Manning. 
PROFFESSORS: Goodwyn, Jones. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Demaitrej Schaumann, D. Smith. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Evans, Swigger. 
LECTURER: Longen. 

All literature courses numbered 100 or above in 
the departments of Classics, Foreign Languages and 
English as well as courses in Comparative Literature 
are acceptedfor a major in comparative literature. Stu- 
dents with this major must have a knowledge of at least 
one approved foreign language demonstrated by suc- 
cessful completion of a course number 100 or above 
in that language. 

Of the possible 24-40 hours offered as a major, the 
following courses are required: CMLT 101-102 and 
150. 

Six hours of other comparative literature courses. 

Course work may not be limited to the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. 
LATN 070 is highly recommended. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 
CMLT 101, 102. INTRODUCTORY SURVEY OF COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

First semester. Survey of the background of European liter- 
ature through study of the Greek and Latin literature in 
English translations, discussing the debt of modern liter- 
ature to the ancients. Second semester: study of medieval 
and modern continental literature. (Schaumann) 

CMLT 103. THE OLD TESTAMENT AS LITERATURE. (3) 
A study of sources, development and literary types. 

(Schaumann) 

CMLT 104. THE NEW TESTAMENT AS LITERATURE. (3) 

A study of the books of the New Testament, with attention 
to the relevant historical background and to the transmis- 
sion of the text. A knowledge of Greek is helpful, but not es- 
essential. (Staff) 



CMLT 105. ROMANTICISM: EARLY STAGES. (3) 

First semester. Emphasis on England, France and Germany. 
Reading knowledge of French or German required. 

(Demaitre) 

CMLT 106. ROMANTICISM: FLOWERING AND INFLUENCE. (3) 
Second semester. Emphasis on England, France and Ger- 
many. Reading knowledge of French or German required. 

(Demaitre) 

CMLT 107. THE FAUST LEGEND IN ENGLISH AND GERMAN 
LITERATURE. (3) 

A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its 
later treatment bv Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe 
in Faust. (Prahl) 

CMLT 112. IBSEN AND THE CONTINENTAL DRAMA. (3) 

First semester. A study of the life and chief work of Henrik 
Ibsen with special emphasis on his influence on the modern 
drama. (D. Smith) 

CMLT 114. THE GREEK DRAMA. (3) 

The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and 
Aristophanes in English translations. Emphasis on the his- 
toric background, on dramatic structure, and on the effect 
of the Attic drama upon the mind of the civilized world. 

(Prahl) 

CMLT 115, 116. THE CLASSICAL TRADITION AND ITS 
INFLUENCE IN THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE 
RENAISSANCE. (3, 3) 

Emphasis on major writers. Reading knowledge of Greek 
or Latin required. (Staff) 

CMLT 125. LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES. (3) 

Narrative, dramatic, and lyric literature of the Middle Ages 
studied in translation. (Cooley) 

CMLT 130. THE CONTINENTAL NOVEL. (3) 

The novel in translation from Stendhal through the 
Existentialists, selected from literatures of France, Ger- 
many, Italy, Russia, and Spain. (Staff) 

CMLT 135. DANTE AND THE ROMANCE TRADITION. (3) 

A reading of the Divine Comedy to enlighten the discovery 
of reality in western literature. (Staff) 

CMLT 140, 141. LITERATURE OF THE FAR EAST. (3, 3) 

A survey of the literature of China and Japan. First semester: 
an examination of the development of Chinese and Japanese 
literature up to the Yuan and Kamakura period. Second 
semester: the literature from the fourteenth century to the 
present. (Staff) 

CMLT 145. MAJOR CONTEMPORARY AUTHORS. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 150. CONFERENCE COURSE IN COMPARATIVE 
LITERATURE. (3) 

Second semester: A tutorial type discussion course, cor- 
relating the courses in various literatures which the student 
has previously taken with the primary themes and master- 
pieces of world literature. This course is required of under- 
graduate majors in comparative literature, but must not be 
taken until the final year of the student's program. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
CMLT 201. PROBLEMS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 225. THE MEDIEVAL EPIC. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 226. THE MEDIEVAL ROMANCE. (3) 

(Staff) 
CMLT 230. PROBLEMS OF THE BAROQUE IN LITERATURE. 
(3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 235. THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE AND ITS INFLUENCE 
(3) 

(Staff) 
CMLT 240. LITERARY CRITICISM: ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL 
(3) 

(Staff) 
CMLT 241. LITERARY CRITICISM: RENAISSANCE AND 
MODERN. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 258. FOLKLORE IN LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 268. SEMINAR IN LITERARY SOURCES OF ART 
HISTORY. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 301. SEMINAR IN THEMES AND TYPES. (3) 

(Staff) 

CMLT 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

(Staff) 



118 



Arts and Sciences 



CMLT 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (CREDIT ARRANGED) 

(Staff) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

PROFESSOR ANO DIRECTOR: Atchison. 

PROFESSORS: Chu 1 . Edmundson-, Glasser , Heilprin . 

RESEARCH PROFESSORS: Ortega ', Rheinboldt '. Rosenfeld. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Glaser", Minkei. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Austing. Feldman, Hagerty, Hanani. 

Owings. Park, Pfaltz, Vandergrift. 

INSTRUCTOR AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR: Menard. 

INSTRUCTORS: I mdamood, Williams. 

The Student Chapter of the Association for Com- 
puting Machinery meets regularly for the discussion 
of topics in computer science which are of interest to 
undergraduates. Its programs are open to the public. 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

CMSC 005. INTRODUCTION TO USE OF THE DIGITAL 
COMPUTER. (1) 

An introduction to the use of FORTRAN for solution of sim- 
ple computational tasks. The use of a conversational mode 
to simplify the computational process will be emphasized. 
Where possible students will be assigned to sections of 
comparable background. Examples and problems for the 
sections will be chosen appropriate to the background of 
the students. 

CMSC 012. INTRODUCTORY ALGORITHMIC METHODS. (3) 
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 
Prerequisite, MATH Oil or equivalent. Recommended for 
students not majoring in mathematics, the physical scien- 
ces, or engineering. Study of the algorithmic approach in 
the analysis of problems and their computational solution. 
Definition and use of a particular algorithmic language. 
Computer projects based on elementary algebra and prob- 
ability; linear equations and matrices; and the ordering, 
searching, sorting, and manipulating of data. 

CMSC 020. ELEMENTARY ALGORITHMIC ANALYSIS. (3) 

Two. lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 
Pre-orco-requisite, MATH020or equivalent. Recommended 
for students majoring in mathematics, the physical sciences 
or engineering. Concept and properties of an algorithm, 
language and notation for describing algorithms, analysis 
of computational problems and development of algorithms 
for their solution, use of specific algorithmic languages 
in solving problems from numerical mathematics, comple- 
tion of several projects using a computer. 

CMSC 021. NUMERICAL CALCULUS LABORATORY I . ( 1 or 2) 
Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prereq- 
uisite, MATH 021, or concurrent registration therein and 
CMSC 020, or equivalents. Laboratory work in the de- 
velopment of algorithmic solutions of problems taken 
from numerical calculus with emphasis on efficiency of 
computation, and the control of errors. Basic one-credit 
laboratory includes completion of several machine proj- 
ects on material related to MATH 021. Second credit in- 
volves more comprehensive projects based on similar 
or related material. 

CMSC 022. NUMERICAL CALCULUS LABORATORY II. (lor 2) 
Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prereq- 
uisite, MATH 022 or concurrent registration therein and 
CMSC 020, or equivalents. Laboratory work in the develop- 
ment of algorithmic solutions of problems taken from 
numerical linear algebra with emphasis on efficiency of 
computation and the control of errors. Basic one credit 
laboratory includes completion of several machine projects 
on material related to MATH 022. Second credit involves 
more comprehensive projects based on similar or related 
material. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

CMSC 100. LANGUAGE AND STRUCTURE OF COMPUTERS. 
(3) 
Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite, CMSC 012 or CMSC 020 or equiva- 
lent. Logical basis of computer structure, machine rep- 
resentation of numbers and characters, flow of control, 

'joint oppointment with Electricol Engineering 
-Joint oppointment with Mothemotics 
Joint appointment with Physics and Astronomy 
*Joint appointment with Library and Information Services 
■'Joint oppointment with Institute for Fluid Dynamics ond Applied Mathematics 
\loint appointment with Physiology 



instruction codes, arithmetic and logical operations, in- 
dexing and indirect addressing, input-output, push-down 
stacks, symbolic representation of programs and assem- 
bly systems, subroutine linkage, macros, interpretive sys- 
tems, and recent advances in computer organization, 
several computer projects to illustrate basic concepts. 
NOTE: CMSC 100 may not be counted for credit in the 
graduate program in computer science. 

CMSC 102. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE STRUCTURES. (3) 
Prerequisite, CMSC 020 or equivalent. This is the same 
course as ENEE 102. Review of set algebra including rela- 
tions, partial ordering and mappings. Algebraic structures 
including semigroups and groups. Graph theory including 
trees and weighted graphs. Boolean algebra and proposi- 
tional logic. Applications of these structures to various 
areas of computer science and computer engineering. 
NOTE: CMSC 102 may not be counted for credit in the grad- 
uate program in computer science. 

CMSC 1 10. SPECIAL COMPUTATIONAL LABORATORY. (1 or 2) 
Two hours laboratory per week for each credit hour. Prereq- 
uisite, CMSC 012 or equivalent. Arranged for special groups 
of students to give experience in developing algorithmic 
solutions of problems or using particular computational 
systems. May be taken for cumulative credit up to a 
maximum of six hours where different material is 
covered. NOTE: CMSC 110 may not be counted for credit 
in the graduate program in computer science. 

CMSC 120. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER LANGUAGES AND 
SYSTEMS. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. Organization and 
characteristics of computers. Procedure oriented and as- 
sembly languages. Representation of data, characters and 
instructions. Introduction to logic design and systems or- 
ganization. Macro definition and generation. Program seg- 
mentation and linkage. Extensive use of the computer to 
complete projects illustrating programmingtechniques and 
machine structure. 

NOTE: CMSC 120 may not be counted for credit in the 
graduate program in computer science. 

CMSC 132. SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS. (3) 
Prerequisites, CMSC 020 and MATH 066, or equivalent. 
Introduction to digital simulation; simulation by MIMIC 
programming; simulation by FORTRANprogramming;simula- 
tion by DSL-90 (or CSMP) programming; logic and construc- 
tion of a simulation processor; similarity between digital 
simulations of continuous and discrete systems. 

CMSC 140. STRUCTURE OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES. 
(3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 or equivalent. Formal definition of 
languages including specification of syntax and semantics. 
Syntactic structure and semantics of simple statements 
including precedence, infix, prefix, and postfix notation. 
Global structure and semantics of algorithmic languages 
including declarations and storage allocation, grouping of 
statements and binding time of constituents, subroutines, 
coroutines, tasks and parameters. List processing and data 
description languages. 

CMSC 144. ELEMENTARY LOGIC AND ALGORITHMS. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. This is 
the same course as MATH 144. An elementary development 
of propositional logic, predicate logic, set algebra, and 
Boolean algebra, with a discussion of Markov algorithms, 
Turing machines and recursive functions. Topics include 
Post productions, word problems, and formal languages. 

CMSC 150. DATA AND STORAGE STRUCTURES. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 and CMSC 102 or equivalent. A 
study of intrinsic structures of data, such as arrays, strings, 
trees, and lists, and their relation to storage media. Repre- 
sentation of data structures in storage by records, files, etc. 
Special storage structures such as content addressed, trie, 
and associative memories. Referencing, processing, and 
management techniques based on the structuring, e.g., list 
processing. Storage and accessing efficiency, as well as 
dynamic flexibility of various methods. 

CMSC 160. COMPUTER ORGANIZATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, CMSC 100 or equivalent. This is the same 
course as ENEE 166. Introduction. Computer elements. 
Parallel adders and subtracters. Micro-operations. Se- 
quences. Computer simulation. Organization of a com- 
merically available stored program computer. Micropro- 
grammed computers. A large-scale batch-processing sys- 
tem. 

CMSC 168. NUMERICAL METHODS FOR SCIENTISTS AND 
ENGINEERS. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 022 or 162, MATH 066, and CMSC 020 
or equivalent. This is the same course as MATH 168. Inter- 
polation, numerical differentiation and integration, numeri- 



Arts and Sciences 



119 



cal solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, 
least squares, systems of linear equations, numerical solu- 
tion of ordinary differential equations, errors in numerical 
calculations. 

CMSC 170. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I. (3) 

Pre- or co-requisite, MATH 1 10. This is the same course as 
MATH 170. Solution of linear systems of equations and non- 
linear equations in one variable. Least square and Cheby- 
shev approximation. Numerical differentiation, integration, 
and solution of ordinary differential equations. 

CMSC 171. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 100 or 104. MATH 110, and 
CMSC/M 170. This is the same course as MATH 171. 
Linear systems of equations: norms, condition numbers, 
rounding error analysis, iterative methods; introduction to 
numerical solution of partial differential equations. Non- 
linear systems of equations: Newton's method, conver- 
gence and rate of convergence. Eigenvalue problems. 

CMSC 190. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 
(1-3) 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An individualized 
course designed to allow a student or students to pursue 
a specialized topic or project under the supervision of the 
senior staff. Credit accoriding to work done. 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

CMSC 200. COMPUTER AND PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS. (3) 

CMSC 202. COMPUTER SYSTEMS. (3) 

CMSC 204. INFORMATION PROCESSING. (3) 

CMSC 206. COMPUTABILITY AND AUTOMATA. (3) 

CMSC 210. THEORIES OF INFORMATION. (3) 

CMSC 215. THEORY OF COMPUTATION. (3) 

CMSC 220. AUTOMATA THEORY. (3) 

CMSC 225. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS TO THE PHYSICAL 
SCIENCES. (3) 

CMSC 230. SIMULATION OF COMPUTER ORGANIZATION. 
(3) 

CMSC 235. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF PHYSICAL 
SYSTEMS. (3) 

CMSC 240. COMPILER CONSTRUCTION. (3) 

CMSC 245. FORMAL LANGUAGES AND SYNTACTIC AN- 
ALYSIS. (3) 

CMSC 250. MATHEMATICAL LINGUISTICS. (3) 

CMSC 252. COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS. (3) 

CMSC 255. INFORMATION RETRIEVAL. (3) 

CMSC 258. SEMINAR ON INFORMATION RETRIEVAL. (3) 

CMSC 263. THEORY OF SEQUENTIAL MACHINES. (3) 

CMSC 265. ADVANCED AUTOMATA THEORY. (3) 

CMSC 266. ALGORITHMIC NUMERICAL ANALYSIS. (3) 

CMSC 280. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. (3) 

CMSC 285. COMPUTER PROCESSING OF PICTORIAL IN- 
FORMATION. (3) 

CMSC 290. ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 

CMSC 295. GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE. 
(1-3) 

CMSC 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (ARRANGED) 

CMSC 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (ARRANGED) 

INSTITUTE OF 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND CRIMINOLOGY 

PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR: Lejins (Professor of Sociology) 
LECTURER: Tomlin. 

Advisory Council: The Advisory Council is made up 
of representatives of the areas of education, law, psy- 
chiatry, psychology, public administration, social 
work, sociology, and University College- Dr. Richard 
P. Claude, Department of Government and Politics, 
College of Business and Public Administration; Asso- 
ciate Dean Stanley J. Drazek, University College; 
Professor Robert G. Fisher, School of Law; Dr. Franz 
Huber, College of Education; Dr. Jonas Rappeport, 
Psychiatric Institute; Dean Daniel Thursz, School of 
Social Work; Dr. Robert S. Waldrop, Department of 
Psychology. 



Advisory Board: The Advisory Board is made upof rep- 
resentatives of the State Agencies in the field of law 
enforcement and corrections, representatives of ap- 
propriate private agencies and organizations as well 
as representatives of national agencies and organiza- 
tions. 

The purpose of the Institute istoprovideanorgani- 
zational and administrative basisforthe interests and 
activities of the University, its faculty and students in 
the genera I area of crime and delinquency, comprising 
the areas usually designated as law enforcement, 
criminology, and corrections. The institute is to pro- 
mote study and teaching concerning the problems of 
crime and delinquency and their prevention and con- 
trol by offering'and coordinating academic programs 
in the area of law enforcement, criminology and cor- 
rections, managing research in these areas and con- 
ducting demonstration projects. 

The Institute comprises as its component parts: 

1. The Criminology Program, which is a Di- 
vision of the Department of Sociology. 

2. The Law Enforcement Curriculum. 

3. The program leading to a Bachelor of Arts in 

General Studies with specializations in Law 
Enforcement and Corrections offered by the 
University College. 

4. Other appropriate divisions of the Institute to 

be developed for the areas of research and 
demonstration projects. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT CURRICULUM 

LENF 001. INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT. (3) 
Introduction to the administration of criminal justice in a 
democratic society with emphasis upon the theoretical and 
historical development of law enforcement. The principles 
of organization and administration for law enforcement, 
functions and specific activities; planning and research; 
public relations; personnel and training; inspection and 
control; direction; policy formulation. 

LENF 020. INVESTIGATION IN LAW ENFORCEMENT. (3) 

Investigation as a process of communication. Principles 
and problems in information collection and evaluation: im- 
partial gathering and evaluation of data. Crime scene search 
and recording; collection and preservation of physical evi- 
dence; scientific aids; modus operandi; sources of informa- 
tion; interviewing; follow-up and case preparation. 

LENF 030. CRIMINAL LAW. (3) 

Law as one of the methods of social control. Criminal law: 
its nature, sources, and types: theories and historical devel- 
opments. Behavioral and legal aspects of criminal acts. 
Classification and analysis of selected criminal offenses. 

LENF 031. CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AND EVIDENCE. (3) 

Prerequisite, LENF 030. General principles and theories 
of criminal procedure. Due process. Arrest, search and 
seizure. Recent developments. Study and evaluation of 
evidence and proof. 



DANCE 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Madden. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Mack, Moehlenhamp. Rosen. 
VISITING LECTURERS: Nagnn and Rosenberg. 
INSTRUCTORS: Brunner, Goodman, Reynolds. Steckler, 
Weisbrod, Witt, Yeo. 
The Department of Dance offers courses to gen- 
eral students which serve to develop their knowledge 
of different cultures and arts by studying the role of 
dance in diverse societies and in relation to other art 
forms. Minors, supporting courses, and electives in 
dance, therefore, are also valuable to students major- 
ing in such disciplines as sociology and anthropology 
as well as in music, art, anddrama. For those students 
who major in dance, the Department provides courses 
of training which prepare them to practice their craft 
in concert or in the theatre, to pursue their studies of 
dance and related arts at the graduate level, or to be- 
come critics, historians, and archivists of dance. 



120 



Arts and Sciences 



A teacher certification program in dance is pres- 
ently being developed in conjunction with the Col- 
lege of Education. 

The available Bachelor of Arts degree is given by 
the College of Arts and Sciences and is awarded to 
those whose interest is basically in the cultural, per- 
forming, and composing aspects of the dance. The 
Department also offers courses which fulfill the Phy- 
sical Education requirement. 

Courses in dancetheory, literature, andtechnique 
are open to all students who have completed the 
specified prerequisites, acquired the equivalent ex- 
perience, or secured the permission of the Chairman 
of the Department of Dance. The Elementary Labora- 
tory Group, the Apprentice Group^ and the Dance Con- 
cert Group are also open to qualified students. 

THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Department requirement includes a core 
program of 14 hours in dance techniques and 24 
hours in theory and literature. Dance majors are 
also required to take 12 hours in related disciplines. 

No course with a grade of less than "C" may be 
applied toward the fulfillment of the course require- 
ments for a major in dance. 

DANC 032. INTRODUCTION TO DANCE. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. A study 
of dance as a form of communication and as an art form. 
The course includes a survey of the theories and styles of 
dance, and of their relationships to other art forms. Lectures 
will be supplemented by observations, films, and guest 
speakers. May be taken to fulfill the 3 semester hours re- 
quirement in Fine Arts or Philosophy of the general Ed- 
ucation requirement. 

DANC 050. RHYTHMIC INVENTION FOR DANCE. (2) 

First and second semester. Three hours a week. A course 
designed to show hqw rhythm affects the total dance move- 
ment picture and develops the dancer's rhythmic awareness 
and response. Understanding of rhythmic principles; move- 
ment isolation; design; phrasing; syncopation. 

DANC 052, 054. DANCE TECHNIQUES. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. DANC 052, a study of dance 
movement in terms of placement, rhythm, dynamics, space, 
improvisation, and dance phrases. DANC 054, further 
development of the materials in DANC 052. Prerequisite, 
DANC 052 or equivalent. 

DANC 055, 057. DANCE TECHNIQUES. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 054, or 
equivalent. DANC 955, a study of dance techniques and 
styles. DANC 057, further development of materials in 
DANC 055. Prerequisite, DANC 055 or equivalent. 

DANC 060. ELEMENTARY DANCE COMPOSITION. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 054 or 
equivalent. The study of basic principles of dance com- 
position in terms of space, time, dynamics, and movement 
invention. The development of critical awareness and judg- 
ment with regard to composing. 

DANC 070. INTERMEDIATE MODERN DANCE. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 060 or 
equivalent. Study of more advanced dance techniques and 
some compositional problems. May be repeated for credit. 

DANC 080. ADVANCED MODERN DANCE. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 070 or 
equivalent. Continuation of DANC 070 in further ad- 
vanced form. May be repeated for credit. 

DANCE 084. MOVEMENT FOR THE THEATRE. (3) 

First and second semesters. Lecture and laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite, one semester of dance technique. Movement for 
actors, dancers, directors, singers in the theatre. Dynamics, 
qualities, styles, and space as related to movement on the 
stage. 

DANC 090. WORKSHOP. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Admission by consent of in- 
structor. Planning, choreography, and presentation of dem- 
onstrations and concerts. Maybe repeated for credit until 6 
credits have been earned. 

DANC 100. ADVANCED CHOREOGRAPHIC FORMS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 060 or 
equivalent and adequate dance technique. Lectures and 
studio work in modern sources as they apply to dance. 
Solo and group choreography. 



DANC 104. ETHNIC STYLES. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 054. Lec- 
ture and activity in styles expressive of various cultures. 
May be repeated for credit by permission of instructor. 

DANC 114. DEVELOPMENT OF DANCE PROGRESSION. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANCE 060 or 
equivalent. The application and building of dance progres- 
sion both in terms of dance techniques and in choreo- 
graphic studies. Students have the opportunity to observe 
and assist the instructor in conducting lower-level dance 
classes. 

DANC 170. CREATIVE DANCE FOR CHILDREN. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 060 or 
equivalent. Directing the essential elements of dance to the 
level of the child's experience and facilitating the creative 
response. The development of movement into simple 
forms to serve as a symbol of individual expression. 

DANC 180. DANCE PRODUCTION. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, DANC 100 or 
equivalent and an adequate understanding of dance tech- 
niques. Advanced choreography. Independent work with 
periodic criticism. 

DANC 182, 183. HISTORY OF DANCE. (3, 3) 

The development of dance from primitive to contemporary 
times and the relationship of dance forms to patterns of 
of culture. DANC 182, the Primitive period through the 
Middle Ages. DANC 183, the Renaissance period to the 
present times. May be taken to fulfill the 3 semester 
hours requirement in Fine Arts or Philosophy of the Gen- 
eral Education requirement. 

DANC 184. THEORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF DANCE. (3) 

First and second semesters. The study of the theories, 
philosophies and aesthetics of dance. Investigation of form, 
content, and structure. Interrelationships of the arts, and 
their role in man's world. May be taken to fulfill the 3 
semester hours requirement in Fine Arts or Philosophy of 
the General Education requirement. 

DANC 190. NOTATION. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, DANC 050 or 
equivalent. Movement analysis for purposes of recording 
dance; notation fundamentals; elementary writing of tech- 
nique; reading of simple folk, modern, and ballet studies. 

DANC 192. PERCUSSION AND MUSIC SOURCES FOR DANCE. 
(3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, D«NC 050 or 
equivalent. Techniques of percussion playing, and its use 
as dance accompaniment. Learning to use the instru- 
ments in composition and improvisation. Study of music 
sources for dance. 

DANC 194. DIRECTED STUDIES IN DANCE. (1-6) 

First and second semesters. Hours arranged. For advanced 
students who have the permission of the Chairman of the 
Department of Dance. 



ECONOMICS 

Students registered in the College of Arts and 
Sciences may major in economics. During the fresh- 
man and sophomore years prospective economics ma- 
jors should consult with their lower division advisor in 
Arts and Sciences concerning preparation for the ma- 
jor. Normally ECON 004 — Economic Developments (3) 
is taken during the freshman year and ECON 031, 
032— Principles of Economics (3, 3), duringthe soph- 
omore year. Economics majors are required to take 
six hours of mathematics. 

Juniors and seniors are advised by the faculty of 
the Department of Economics, which is administered 
in the College of Business and Public Administration. 
In addition to the nine lower division credits listed 
above, economics majors must complete a minimum 
of 27 credits with an average grade of not less than 
"C." ECON 102— National Income Analysis(3); ECON 
132— Advanced Economic Principles (3); and either 
BSAD 130— Business Statistics I (3) or ECON Ill- 
Quantitative Methods in Economics (3) are required. 
Other courses to meet the requirements of the major 
are to be selected with the aid of a faculty advisor. 
Descriptions of courses in economics will be found in 
the catalog of the College of Business and Public Ad- 



Arts and Sciences 



121 



ministration. Additional information about the curric- 
ulum in economics may be obtained at the depart- 
mental office. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Freedmat,. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE CHAIRMAN: 

Howard. 

PROFESSORS: Bode, Cooley Harman (Emerita) Hovey, Korg, 
McManaway, Manning^ Mish (Director of Graduate Stu- 
ies), Murphy, Myers, Panichas, Russell, Whittemore, Zee- 
veld. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Andrews (Emerita), Barnes 
(Representative of University College) Birdsall, Brown, 
Bryer, Carey, Cooper Fleming Gravely, Herman, Houppert, 
Jellema, Kinnaird, Lawson, Lutwack, Portz, Salamanca, 
Schaumann, D. Smith, G. Smith, Thorberg, Vitzthum, Ward, 
Wilson. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Beauchamp, Cate, Coulter, Dunn, 
Fry, Greenwood, G. Hamilton, Holton Johnson, James, 
Kenney , Kleine, Lounsbury, Martin, Miller, Mmtz, Robb, 
Rutherford, Saltz, Spurgeon, Steinberg, Swigger, Tinsley, Ty- 
son, VanEgmond, Walt, Weigant. 

LECTURERS: Andreadis, LaVia, Longen, Reed. 

INSTRUCTORS: Allen, Anderson, Capshaw, Cardaci, Demaree, 
Detrick, Diomedi, Fitzpatrick, Flynn, Friedman, Gardiner, 
Gaunt, Grunder, D. Hamilton (P. T.j, Kenny, Kirkpatrick, 
Leatherbarrow, Leonard, McKewin, Meszaros, Norton. 
O'Brien, Olefsky, Ostrowski, Ozolins, Plylon, Ramsey, Sch- 
meissner, Singleton, Stevenson, Stone, Towsend, Trous- 
dale, Vitale, Weissman, Whitaker, Zelenka. 

The English major requires 30 credits, suitably 
distributed as indicated in Departmental announce- 
ments, beyond the General Education requirements. 
A student may pursue a major with emphasis in Eng- 
lish, American, or Comparative Literature; in folk- 
lore, creative writing, or in linguistics; or in prepara- 
tion for secondary school teaching. 

No course with a grade less than "C" may be 
used to satisfy major requirements. 

In selecting minor or elective subjects, students 
majoring in English, particularly those who plan to 
do graduate work, should give special consideration 
to courses in French, German, Latin, philosophy, 
and history. 
HONORS 

The Department of English offers an honors pro- 
gram, primarily for majors but open to others with the 
approval of the departmental honors committee. 
Interested students should ask for detailed informa- 
tion from an English Department advisor no later 
than the beginning of their junior year. 



ENGLISH 

ENGL 001, 021 or HONR 001 is prerequisite to courses 
numbered 003 through 056. 

ENGL 001. COMPOSITION. (3) 

Required of freshmen. See ENGL 021. The study and ap- 
plication of rhetorical principles in expository prose-, 
frequent themes. (Herman, Staff) 

ENGL 021. HONORS COMPOSITION. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 001 
to satisfy General Education requirement. Survey of prin- 
ciples of composition, rhetoric, and techniques of research: 
reading in essays, short stories, poetry; frequent themes. 

(Thorberg, Staff) 

ENGL 003. WORLD LITERATURE. (3) 

Fulfills part of the General Education requirement. See 
ENGL 033. Homer to the Renaissance, foreign classics 
being read in translation. (Staff) 

ENGL 033. HONORS WORLD LITERATURE. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 003 
to satisfy General Education requirement. Homer to the 
Renaissance, foreign classics being read in translation. 

(Staff) 

ENGL 004. WORLD LITERATURE. (3) 

Fulfills part of the General Education requirement. See 
ENGL 034. Shakespeare to the present, foreign classics 
being read in translation. (Staff) 



ENGL 034. HONORS WORLD LITERATURE. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 004 
to satisfy General Education requirement. Shakespeare to 
the present, foreign classics being read in translation. 

(Staff) 
ENGL 007. TECHNICAL WRITING. (2) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 008. INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH GRAMMAR. (3) 
A brief review of traditional English grammar, and an intro- 
duction to structural grammar, including phonology, 
morphology, and syntax. (Robb, James, Staff) 

ENGL 009. INTRODUCTION TO NARRATIVE LITERATURE. (3) 
Prerequisite, ENGL 001 or 021. An intensive study of repre- 
sentative stories, with lectures on the history and technique 
of the short story and other narrative forms. (Staff) 

ENGL 010. COMPOSITION AND LITERARY TYPES. (3) 

Not open to students who have taken ENGL 021. A study 
of literary genres with writing based on the readings. 

(Herman, Staff) 
ENGL 012. INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. (3) 

Additional prerequisite, sophomore standing and depart- 
mental permission. (Schaumann, Van Egmond, Staff) 
ENGL 014. EXPOSITORY WRITING. (3) 

(Herman, Staff) 
ENGL 015. READINGS IN BIOGRAPHY. (3) 

An analytical study in the form and technique of bio- 
graphical writing in Europe and America. (Ward) 
ENGL 030. INTRODUCTION TO POETRY AND POETICS. (3) 

(G. Smith, Jellema) 
ENGL 055. ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM THE BEGINNINGS 
TO 1800. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 003 
or 004 to satisfy the General Education requirement. 

(Cooper, Staff) 
ENGL 056. ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1800 TO THE 
PRESENT. (3) 

May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 003 
or 004 to satisfy the General Education requirement. 

(Cooper, Staff) 
ENGL 57. AMERICAN LITERATURE, BEGINNING TO 1865. (3) 
May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 003 
or 004 to satisfy General Education requirement. 
ENGL 58. AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 TO THE PRESENT. 
(3) 
May be elected by eligible students in place of ENGL 003 
or 004 to satisfy General Education requirement. 
FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 
ENGL 003-004 (033-034) or 055-056 are prerequisites to 

courses numbered 101 through 199. 
ENGL 101. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. (3) 

(Birdsall. Robb. James) 
ENGL 102. OLD ENGLISH. (3) 
ENGL 104. CHAUCER. (3) 

(Cooley, Birdsall) 
ENGL 105. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Listed also as LING 101. 
ENGL 107. AMERICAN ENGLISH. (3) 

(Robb) 
ENGL 108. ADVANCED ENGLISH GRAMMAR. (3) 

Credit may not be granted in both ENGL 108 and LING 103 

(Robb, James 
ENGL 109. ENGLISH MEDIEVAL LITERATURE IN 
TRANSLATION. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 110, 111. ELIZABETHAN AND JACOBEAN DRAMA. (3, 3 

(Zeeveld, Houppert) 
ENGL 112, 113. LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE. (3. 3) 

(Zeeveld, Cooper) 
ENGL 115, 116. SHAKESPEARE. (3, 3) 

(Zeeveld, Cooper, Houppert, D. Smith, Spurgeon) 
ENGL 117. THE MAJOR WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 120. ENGLISH DRAMA FROM 1660 TO 1800. (3) 

(Ward) 
ENGL 121. MILTON. (3) 

(Murphy, Freedman, G. Hamilton, Wilson) 
ENGL 122. LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 
1600-1660. (3) 

(Murphy, Mish, Wilson, G. Hamilton) 
ENGL 123. LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
1660-1700. (3) 

(Wilson) 



122 Aris and Sciences 



ENGL 125, 126. LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CEN- 
TURY. (3,3) 

(Myers, Howard) 
ENGL 129, 130. LITERATURE OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD. 
(3, 3) (Kmnaird, G. Smith) 

ENGL 134, 135. LITERATURE OF THE VICTORIAN PERIOD. 
(3, 3) (Brown, Cate) 

ENGL 136. LATE VICTORIAN AND EDWARDIAN LITERATURE. 
(3) 

A study of the literary movements and techniques which ef- 
fected the transition from Victorian to modern literature. 

(Staff) 
ENGL 139, 140. THE ENGLISH NOVEL. (3, 3) 

(Ward, Kenney, Kleine) 
ENGL 141, 142. MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS. (3, 3) 
Two writers studied intensively each semester. 

(Fleming, Panichas, Jellema) 
ENGL 143. MODERN POETRY. (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema) 
ENGL 144. MODERN DRAMA. (3) 

(Freedman, Bryer) 
ENGL 145. THE MODERN NOVEL. (3) 

(Panichas, Lawson, Holton) 
ENGL 146. AMERICAN DRAMA. (3) 

(Bryer) 
ENGL 147. AMERICAN POETRY, BEGINNING TO THE 
PKtSENl (3) (Staff) 

ENGL 148. THE LITERATURE OF AMERICAN DEMOCRACY. (3) 

(Barnes) 
ENGL 152. THE NOVEL IN AMERICA TO 1910. (3) 

(Hovey, Thorberg) 
ENGL 153. THE NOVEL IN AMERICA SINCE 1910. (3) 

(Hovey, Thorberg) 
ENGL 154. LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH. (3) 

A historical survey, from eighteenth-century beginnings 
to the present. (Lawsonj 

ENGL 155, 156. MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS. (3, 3) 
Two writers studied intensively each semester. 

(Manning, Gravely, Lutwack, Barnes, Holton, Bryer) 
ENGL 157. INTRODUCTION TO FOLKLORE. (3) 

(Birdsall, Carey) 
ENGL 158. FOLK NARRATIVE. (3) 

Studies in legend, tale, and myth. (Birdsall) 

ENGL 159. FOLKSONG AND BALLAD. (3) 

(Carey) 
ENGL 160. ADVANCED EXPOSITORY WRITING. (3) 

(Herman, Walt, Trousdale, Stevenson) 
ENGL 161. ADVANCED ENGLISH STRUCTURE. (3) 

ENGL 165. AMERICAN FOLKLORE. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENGL 157. An examination of American folk- 
lore in terms of history and regional folk cultures. Explora- 
tion of collections of folklore from various areas to reveal 
the difference in regional and ethnic groups as witnessed 
in their oral and literary traditions. (Staff) 

ENGL 166. AFRO-AMERICAN FOLKLORE AND CULTURE. (3) 
An examination of the culture of the Negro in the United 
States in terms of history (antebellum to the present) and 
social changes (rural to urban). Exploration of aspects of 
Negro culture and history via oral and literary traditions 
and life histories. 
ENGL 167. AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE. (3) 

An examination of the literary expression of the Negro in 
the United States, from its beginningto the present. 
ENGL 168. URBAN FOLKLORE. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENGL 157. An examination of the folklore cur- 
rently originating in white urban American culture. 
ENGL 170. CREATIVE WRITING. (3) 

(Fleming, Jellema, Holton) 
ENGL 171. ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING. (3) 

(Fleming, Salamanca) 
ENGL 172. PLAYWRITING. (3) 

(Fleming) 
ENGL 175. LITERARY CRITICISM. (3) 

ENGL 179 SELECTED TOPICS IN ENGLISH AND AMERI- 
CAN LITERATURE. (3) 
ENGL 180. AMERICAN LITERATURE, BEGINNING TO 1810, 

THE COLONIAL AND FEDERAL PERIODS. (3) 
ENGL 181 AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1810 to 1865, THE 

AMERICAN RENAISSANCE. (3) 
ENGL 182 AMERICAN LITERATURE, 1865 to 1914, REAL- 
ISM AND NATURALISM. (3) 



ENGL 183. AMERICAN LITERATURE 1914 TO THE PRESENT 
THE MODERN PERIOD. (3) 

ENGL 190, 191. HONORS CONFERENCE AND READING. (1, 1) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in 
English. Candidates will take ENGL 190 in their junior year 
and ENGL 191 in their senior year. (Staff) 

ENGL 195. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN ENGLISH. (13) 
This course is designed to provide qualified majors in Eng- 
lish, an opportunity to pursue Specific English readings 
under the supervision of a member of the Department. 
Restrictedtoundergraduates. 

ENGL 199. SENIOR PRO-SEMINAR IN LITERATURE. (3) 

Open only to seniors. First semester. Required of candidates 
for honors and strongly recommended to those who plan to 
do graduate work. Individual reading assignments; term 
paper. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
ENGL 201. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS. (3) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 



ENGL 202. MIDDLE ENGLISH. (3) 

ENGL 204. SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 206. 207. SEMINAR IN RENAISSANCE LITERATURE. 
(3,3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 210, 211. SEMINAR IN SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY 
LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 212, 213. SEMINAR IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY 
LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 214, 215. SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY 
LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 216, 217. LITERARY CRITICISM. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 218. SEMINAR IN LITERATURE AND THE OTHER 
ARTS. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 225, 226. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

ENGL 227, 228. PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

(3, 3) (Staff) 

ENGL 241, 242. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY 

LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 244. STUDIES IN DRAMA. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 245. STUDIES IN FICTION. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 257. SEMINAR IN FOLKLORE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 260. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD to 1500. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 261. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
RENAISSANCE LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 262. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 263. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 264. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
ROMANTIC LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 265. SPECIAL STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE: 
VICTORIAN LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 266. SPECIAL STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: 
AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1865. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 267. SPECIAL STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: 
AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1865. (3) 

(Staff) 
Engl 302. SEMINAR IN THEMES AND TYPES IN ENGLISH 
LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 



Arts and Sciences 



?23 



ENGL 302 SEMINAR IN THEMES AND TYPES IN ENGLISH 
LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
ENGL 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

Arranged. (Staff) 

ENGL 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 

(Staff) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 
MAJORS 

Two types of undergraduate majors are offered in 
French, German, Russian or Spanish: one for the gen- 
eral student or the future teacher, and the other for 
those interested in a rounded study of a foreign area 
for the purpose of understanding another nation 
through its literature, history, sociology, economics, 
and other aspects. Both of these majors confer the 
B.A. degree. (The Department also offers M.A. and 
Ph.D. degrees in language and literature, but not in 
area study.) 

An undergraduate major in either language and 
literature or area studies requires a total of 33 hours, 
with a "C" average, above the basic Arts and Sciences 
College foreign language requirement. 

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE MAJOR 

Course Oil is prerequisite to this major unless 
waived by the Chairman of the Department. Specific 
minimum requirements in the program in French, 
German, and Spanish are: three semester courses in 
advanced language (two to be selected from Courses 
012, 080, 081 and one from Courses 103, 104); two 
semesters of the survey of literature (Courses 075, 
076; or077, 078); four semester coursesselectedfrom 
literature numbered 100 to 199 in addition to the 
required four semester courses selected from this 
group, or two semester courses in English or Com- 
parative Literature courses numbered 101 to 157, 
or one semester course from the former group and 
one from the latter— total of 33 hours. Requirements 
for a language major in Russian comprise: three 
semesters of advanced Russian (Courses 012 or 
013; 071 or 072; and 080 or 081), plus two semes- 
ters of the survey of literature, Russian 075 and 
076; four semesters in 100-level courses; and two 
semester courses numbered 103 to 142 in addition 
to the required four semester courses selected from 
this group or two semester courses in English or 
Comparative Literature courses numbered 101 to 
157, or one semester course from the former group 
and one from the latter— a total of 33 hours. 

FOREIGN AREA MAJOR 

The area study major in French, German, Rus- 
sian, or Spanish endeavors to provide the student 
with the knowledge of the various aspects of the 
country whose language he is studying. Specific 
requirements in this major are: five semester 
courses in advanced language (Courses 012, 071, 
072, 080, 081); two semester courses in civilization 
(Courses 171, 172; or 173, 174); two semester 
courses in literature numbered 100 to 199; and two 
semester courses in literature numbered 100 to 
199 in addition to the required two semester 
courses selected from this group, or two semester 
courses in English or Comparative Literature 
courses numbered 101 to 157, or one semester 
course from the former group and one from the 
latter— a total of 33 hours. 

HONORS IN FRENCH. GERMAN OR SPANISH 

A student whose major is in French, German, or 
Spanish and who, at the time of application, has a 
general academic average of 3.0 to 3.5 in his major 



field may apply to the Chairman of the Honors Com- 
mittee for admission to the Honors Program of the 
Department. Honors work normally begins in the 
first semester of the junior year, but a qualified stu- 
dent may enter as early as the sophomore year or 
as late as the second semester of the junior year. 
Honors students are required to take two courses 
from those numbered 195, 196, 197 and the 
seminar numbered 199, as well as to meet other 
requirements for a major in Foreign Languages. 
There will be a final comprehensive examination, 
covering the honors reading list, which must be 
taken by all graduating seniors who are candidates 
for honors. Admission of students to the Honors 
Program, their continuance in the program, and the 
final award of honors are the prerogative of the De- 
partmental Honors Committee. 

ELEMENTARY HONORS 

Course 003 in French, German, and Spanish is 
limited to specially approved candidates who have 
passed Course 001 with high grades, and will allow 
them to by-pass Course 006 to complete their require- 
ment by completing Course 007. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Course 005 must complete, in addition to 005, 
Courses 006 and 007; those who place in 006 must 
complete, in addition to 006, Course 007; those 
who place in 007 must complete Course 007 or its 
equivalent. Students who place higher than 007 
thereby fulfill by examination the College language 
requirement. In German the course sequence is 
005, 006, 007, 008, Oil, and 012. Neither German 
Oil nor 012 may be taken to meet the College re- 
quirement unless the student has completed Ger- 
man 007. 

Transfer students with college credit have the 
option of continuing at the level for which they are 
theoretically prepared, or of taking a placement ex- 
amination, or of electing Course 005. If a transfer 
student takes Course 005 for credit, he may retain 
transfer credit only for the equivalent of Course 001. 
A transfer student placing lower than his training 
should warrant may ignore the placement but DOES 
SO AT HIS OWN RISK. 

If a student has received a "D in a course, ad- 
vanced and completed the next higher course, he 
cannot go back and repeat the original "D." 

NO CREDIT WILL BE GIVEN, EVEN ELECTIVE, 
FOR A SINGLE SEMESTER OF LANGUAGE 001. 

A student whose native language is taught at 
the University may not meet the college require- 
ment by taking Courses 001, 002, 006, 007, 080 
and 081. There is a special option by which foreign 
students may offer a combination of FLOA 001 and 
002 (English for Foreign Students) and 12 hours of 
other English courses to satisfy both the Arts and 
Sciences English and Foreign Language require- 
ments. This option may not be used by pre-medical 
students. 

The Civilization courses (171, 172) cannot be used 
toward the foreign language requirement except by 
students who begin language at the University with a 
fifth semester course (008) or higher. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS 
FOLA 001-002. ENGLISH FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS. (3. 3) 
An introduction to English usage, adapted to the needs of 
the non-English-speaking student. Pronunciation, spelling, 
syntax; the difference between English and various other 
languages are stressed. (Bridgers) 



124 



Artt and Sciences 



CHINESE PROGRAM 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Chin. (DIRECTOR, Chen, Evans, 
Shen. 

CHIN 001-002. ELEMENTARY CHINESE. (3, 3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory period per week. Ele- 
ments of pronunciation, simple ideograms, colloquial con- 
versation, translation. (Shen) 

CHIN 006-007. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory 
in CHIN 006. Prerequisite, CHIN 002 or equivalent. Reading 
of texts designed to give some knowledge of Chinese life, 
thought, and culture. (Staff) 

CHIN 101-102. READING FROM CHINESE HISTORY. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, CHIN 007 or equivalent. Based on anan- 
thology of historians from the Chou to the Ching dynas- 
ties. (McCaskey) 

CHIN 117-118. CHINESE LINGUISTICS. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, CHIN 007 or equivalent. (Shen) 

CHIN 171-172. CHINESE CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

ThiscoursesupplementsGEOG 134 and 135, Cultural Geog- 
graphy of East Asia. It deals with Chinese literature, art, 
folklore, history, government, and great men. Second semes- 
ter: developments in China since 1911. The course is given 
in English translation. (Staff) 



HEBREW PROGRAM 

VISITING PROFESSOR: Iwry. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Greenberg. 
INSTRUCTORS: Klein and Liferman. 

HEBR 001-002. ELEMENTARY HEBREW. (3, 3) 

Elements of grammar; pronunciation and conversation; 
exercises intranslation. (Greenberg, Klein, Liberman) 

HEBR 006-007. INTERMEDIATE HEBREW. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory 
in HEBR 006. Prerequisite, HEBR 002 or equivalent. Texts 
designed to give some knowledge of Hebrew life, thought, 
and culture. (Iwry, Klein) 

HEBR 012-013. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, HEBR 007 cr equivalent. A practical language 
course recommended for all students continuing with He- 
brew. (Iwry) 

'Students who have studied Chinese, Italian, or Russian 
may apply to the Department for special examination, since 
there is no Course 005 in these languages, and all students 
who have studied Hebrew must take a placement examination. 

HEBR 075-076. SURVEY OF HEBREW LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, HEBR 007 or equivalent. (Iwry) 

HEBR 101. THE HEBREW BIBLE. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Pentateuch. 

(Greenberg) 
HEBR 102. THE HEBREW BIBLE. (3) 

Readingof selected portionsof the Prophets. (Greenberg) 
HEBR 103. MODERN HEBREW LITERATURE. (3) 

The period of the Haskalah (Enlightenment). (Iwry) 

HEBR 104. MODERN HEBREW LITERATURE. (3) 

The period of the Tehiah (Modern Revival). (Iwry) 



FRENCH AND ITALIAN LAN GUAGE AND LITERATURE 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: MacBain. 

PROFESSORS: Bingham, Quynn, Rosenfield. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Demaitre and Hall. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bridgers, Fink, Salchenberger, 

Tarica. 
LECTURERS: Gilbert, Johnson, Lebreton-Savigny, Lloyd-Jones, 

Meijer. 
INSTRUCTORS: Barrabini, Beique, Bondurant, Brachet, 
Brodsky, Carnes, Christov, Deburghgraeve, Eardley, Edmonds, 
Guieu, Luiggi, Lundy, Motta, Nespoulous-Neuville, Quilici, 
Thibault, Tubbs, Weil-Malherbe. 
FRENCH 

FREN 000. ELEMENTARY FRENCH FOR GRADUATE 
STUDENTS. (Audit) 

Intensive elementary course in the French language de- 
signed particularly tor graduate students who wish to ac- 
quire a reading knowledge. (Staff) 
FREN 001-002. ELEMENTARY FRENCH. (3, 3) 

Each semester; given as intensive course in summer ses- 
sion. Three recitations and one drill per week. Study of 
spoken and written language and development of the four 
language skills. (Meyer, Staff) 



FREN 003H. ELEMENTARY FRENCH, HONORS COURSE. (3) 
Two recitations and two audio-lingual drills per week. En- 
rollment limited to specially approved candidates from 
FREN 001. Students taking this course will normally con- 
tinue in FREN 007. (Staff) 

FREN 005. REVIEW OF ELEMENTARY FRENCH. (3) 

Two recitations and two audio-lingual drills per week, or 
three recitations and one audio-lingual drill, depending on 
circumstances. Enrollment limited to students who, having 
taken placement examination, have failed to qualify for 
FREN 006. (Gray, Staff) 

FREN 006-007. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic labora- 
tory in FREN 006. Given as intensive course in summer ses- 
sion. Prerequisite, FREN 002 or equivalent, or FREN 005, 
except that recommended students may enter FREN 007 
from FREN 003. Study of linguistic structure, further devel- 
opment of audio-lingual and writing ability, and reading of 
literary texts with discussion in French. Usually there will 
be an honors section for qualified students. (Johnson) 

FREN 010. SCIENTIFIC FRENCH. (3) 

Prerequisite, FREN006. Readingof technical andscientific 
prose with some attention to audio-lingual and linguistic 
objectives. (Johnson) 

FREN Oil. INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE. (3) 
Prerequisite, FREN 007. Required of all students who con- 
tinue in advanced courses of the Department, with the ex- 
ception of superior students who are permitted to by-pass 
an introduction to French literature. May be taken con- 
concurrently with FREN 012. (Meyer) 

FREN 012. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3) 

Prerequisite, FREN007. Apractical language course recom- 
mended for all students continuing in French. May be taken 
currently with FREN Oil. (Fink) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FREN 041. FRENCH PHONETICS. (3) 

Prerequisite, FREN 007 or equivalent. Elements of 
French phonetics, diction and intonation. (Gray) 

FREN 071-072. REVIEW GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, FREN Oil and 012 or equivalent. For students 
who, having a good knowledge of French, wish to become 
more proficient inthewritten and spoken language. (Staff) 

FREN 075-076. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, FREN 01 1 or equivalent. An elementary survey 
of the chief authors and movements in French literature. 
To be taken in sequence. (Staff) 

FREN 080-081. ADVANCED CONVERSATION. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, FREN Oil and 012 or consent of instructor. 
For students who wish to develop fluency and confidence 
in speaking the language. To be taken in sequence. 

(Meyer, Fink) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

FREN 101. APPLIED LINGUISTICS. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contribution to 
the effective teaching of foreign languages. Comparative 
study of English and French, with emphasis upon points of 
divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of related 
drills. (Mendeloff) 

FREN 103. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (3) 

Study of word format ion, specialized vocabularies, idiomatic 
constructions, review of certain points of grammar, trans- 
lation from English to French, and free composition. 

(Staff) 

FREN 104. EXPLICATION DE TEXTES. (3) 

Oral and written analysis of short literary works, or of ex- 
cerpts from longer works chosen for their historical, struc- 
tural, or stylistic interest, with the purpose of training the 
major to understand literature in depth and to make mature 
esthetic evaluations of it. (Staff) 

FREN 107, 108. INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. 
(3,3) 

French literature from the ninth through the fifteenth cen- 
tury. First semester: la chanson eipique, le roman cour- 
tois, le lai. Second semester: la litterature bourgeoise, 
le theatre, la poesie lyrique. (Lamarque) 

FREN 111-112. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SIXTEENTH 
CENTURY. (3,3) 

The Renaissance in France: Humanism, Rabelais, Calvin, 
the Pleiade, Montaigne, Baroque poetry. (Staff) 

FREN 115-116. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

First semester: Descartes, Pascal, Corneille, Racine, Second 
semester: the remaining great classical writers, with special 
attention to Moliere. (Quynn, Rosenfield) 



Arts and Sciences 



725 



FREN 125-126. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 

CENTURY. (3, 3) 

First semester: development of the philosophical and 

scientific movement; Montesquieu. Second semester: 

Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. (Voltaire,) 

FREN 131-132. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

First semester: drama and poetry from Romanticism to 
Symbolism. Second semester: the major prose writers of 
the same period. 

FREN 143 STUDIES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERA* 
TURE: THE EARLY YEARS. (3) 
French poetry, theater and the novel during the age of 
Proust and Gide. 

FREN 144. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE: 
MID-CENTURY WRITERS. (3) 

Modern French poetry, theater and the novel, with special 
emphasis on the literature of anxiety and Existentialism. 

FREN 145. STUDIES IN TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE: 
THE CONTEMPORARY SCENE. (3) 

French writers and literary movements since about 1950, 
with special emphasis on new forms of the novel and theater. 

FREN 171-172. FRENCH CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

French life, customs, culture, traditions. First semester: the 
historical development. Second semester: present-day 
France. (Staff) 

FREN 181-182. PRO-SEMINAR IN GREAT LITERARY FIGURES. 
(3,3) 

Each semester a specialized study will be made of one 
great French writer chosen from some representative I iterary 
period or movement since the middle ages. (Staff) 

FREN 198H. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY. (3) 

Honors Independent Study involves guided readings based 
on an Honors reading list and tested by a 6 hour written 
examination. Honors 198 and Honors 199 are required to 
fulfill the Departmental Honors requirement in addition to 
two out of the following: 195H, 196H, 197H. Open only to 
students admitted to the Departmental Honors Program. 

FREN 199H. HONORS THESIS RESEARCH. (3) 

Honors Thesis Research involves the writing of a paper 
under the direction of a professor of the department and an 
oral examination. Honors 198 and 199 are required to fulfil I 
the Departmental Honors requirement in addition to two 
out of the following: 195H, 196H, 197H. Open only to 
students admitted to the Departmental Honors Program. 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
The requirements of students will determine which courses 
will be offered. 
FREN 201. THE HISTORY OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE. (3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 203. COMPARATIVE ROMANCE LINGUISTICS. (3) 
Same as SPAN 203. (Staff) 

FREN 207. ELEMENTARY OLD FRENCH. (3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 208. OLD FRENCH PHONOLOGY AND MORPHOLOGY. 

(3) 
FREN 209. MEDIEVAL FRENCH CULTURE. (3) 

(Staff) 

FREN 210. ELEMENTARY OLD PROVENCAL. (3) 

(Staff) 

FREN 213-214. SEMINAR IN FRENCH RENAISSANCE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

FREN 215-216. SEMINAR IN MOLIERE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 218-219. SEMINAR IN FRENCH CLASSICISM. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 220-221 THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT. (3, 3) 
FREN 230. SEMINAR IN ROMANTICISM. (3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 231. SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH CENTURY POST- 
ROMANTIC WRITERS. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

FREN 235-236. THE REALISTIC NOVEL IN THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

FREN 243-244. THE CONTEMPOARY FRENCH THEATER. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

FREN 245-246. SEMINAR IN THE CONTEMPORARY NOVEL 
(3, 3) (Staff) 

FREN 251-252. THE HISTORY OF IDEAS IN FRANCE. (3. 3) 

(Staff) 



FREN 253. PROBLEMS IN BIBLIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH 
METHODS. (3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 261-262. SEMINAR IN A GREAT LITERARY FIGURE. 
(3,3) 

(Staff) 
FREN 271-272. ADVANCED WRITING AND STYLISTICS. (3, 3) 
FREN 281-282. READING COURSE. (3) 
FREN 291-292. SEMINAR. (3, 3) 



FREN 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

FREN 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (arranged) 



(Staff) 
(Staff) 

(Staff) 

(Staff) 



ITALIAN 

ITAL 001-002. ELEMENTARY ITALIAN. (3, 3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Ele- 
ments of grammar and exercises in translation. (Motta) 

ITAL 006-007. INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory 
in ITAL 006. Prerequisite, ITAL 002 or equivalent. Reading 
of texts designed to give some knowledge of Italian life, 
thought, and culture. (Motta) 

ITAL 008-009. ACCELERATED ITALIAN. (3, 3) 

Open only to students who havefulfilled language require- 
ments in French, Spanish or Portuguese, or with permission 
of Department Chairman. An intensive beginning course 
in the fundamentals of Italain grammar to develop a high 
degree of skill in reading Italian. Must betaken in sequences. 
Cannot be used to satisfy college language requirements. 

(Staff) 

ITAL Oil. INTRODUCTION TO ITALIAN LITERATURE. (3) 
Prerequisite, ITAL 007. Required of all students who con- 
tinue in advanced courses of the Department with the excep- 
tion of superior students who are permitted to by-pass an 
introduction to Italian literature. Conducted in Italian. 
Reading of literary texts, discussion and brief essays. Fall 
semester only. (Motta) 

ITAL 012. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3) 

Prerequisite, ITAL 007. A practical language course recom- 
mended for all students continuing in Italian. May betaken 
concurrently with ITAL011. Spring semester only. (Motta) 

ITAL 075-076. SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE. (3. 3) 

Prerequisite, ITAL 007 or equivalent. Basic survey of history 
of Italian literature. (Motta) 

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE LANGUAGES AND 

LITERATURES 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Hesse. 

PROFESSORS: Goodwyn, Gramberg, Marra-Lopez. Mendeloff, 
Nemes, Parsons. Rand. 

VISITING PROFESSOR: Bartra. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Rovner. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Norton. 

LECTURERS: Diaz Natella. Suszynski. 

INSTRUCTORS: Crissman, Diz. Forbes, Mur, Navarrete, 
Raggio, Rentz, Scheiderer, Tarwater, Villavicencio, Willough- 
by-Macdonald, Wooldridge. 

SPANISH 

SPAN 001-002. ELEMENTARY SPANISH. (3, 3) 

Each semester; given as intensive course in summer session. 
Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Study 
of linguistic structure and development of audio-lingual 
and writing ability. (Rovner, Staff) 

SPAN 003H. ELEMENTARY SPANISH, HONORS COURSE. (3) 
Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Enroll- 
ment limited to specially approved candidates from SPAN 
001. Students taking this course will normally continue in 
SPAN 007. (Rovner) 

SPAN 005. REVIEW OF ELEMENTARY SPANISH. (3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Enroll- 
ment limited to students who, having taken the placement 
examination, have failed to qualify for SPAN 006. 

(Rentz. Staff) 

SPAN 006-007. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory 
in SPAN 006. Given as intensive course in summer session. 
Prerequisite, SPAN 002 or equivalent, or SPAN 005, except 
that recommended students may enter SPAN 007 from SPAN 
003. Study of linguistic structure, further development of 
audio-lingual and writing ability, and reading of literary 
texts with discussion in Spanish. Usually there will be an 
honors sect ion for qualified students. (Armstrong) 



726 



Arts and Sciences 



SPAN Oil. INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH LITERATURE. (3) 
Prerequisite, SPAN 007. Required of all students who con- 
tinue in advanced courses of Department, with the except ion 
of superior students who are permitted to by-pass an intro- 
duction to Spanish literature. Conducted in Spanish. Read- 
ing of literary texts, discussion, and brief essays. 

(Suszynski) 

SPAN 012. REVIEW OF ORAL AND WRITTEN SPANISH. (3) 
Prerequisite, SPAN 007. Apractical language course recom- 
mended for all students continuing in Spanish. May betaken 
concurrently with SPAN Oil. (LeVine) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SPAN 041-042. SPANISH PHONETICS. (1, 1) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 007 or equivalent. Descriptive study 
of the Spanish sound system. Practice in phonetic percep- 
tion, transcription and articulation. Particular attention 
to sentence phonetics; juncture, rhythm, stress, pitch. 

(Mendeloff) 

SPAN 051-052. COMMERCIAL SPANISH. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 012 and consent of instructor. Designed 
to give knowledge of correct Spanish usage, commercial 
letters and business forms. Fundamental principles of Span- 
ish shorthand will be included if warranted by the interest 
and ability of the class. (Rovner, Mur) 

SPAN 071-072. REVIEW GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite. SPAN Oil and 012 or equivalent. Intended to 
give an intensive and practical drill in Spanish composition. 

(Staff) 

SPAN 075-076. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, SPAN Oil or equivalent. Basic survey of the 
history of Spanish literature. (Staff) 

SPAN077-078.SURVEYOFSPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE. 
(3.3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN Oil or equivalent. Basic survey of the 
history of Spanish-American literature. (Staff) 

SPAN 080-081. ADVANCED CONVERSATION. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN Oil and 012 or consent of instructor. 
For students who wish to develop fluency and confidence 
jn speaking the language. (Staff) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SPAN 101. APPLIED LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Nature of Applied Linguistics and its contribution to the 
effective teaching of foreign languages. Comparative study 
of English and Spanish with emphasis upon points of 
divergence. Analysis, evaluation, and construction of re- 
lated drills. (Mendeloff) 

SPAN 103-104. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 

Free composition, literary translation and practical study 
of syntactical structure. (Staff) 

SPAN 105, 106. GREAT THEMES OF THE HISPANIC LITERA- 
TURES. (3, 3) 
The evolution of the pervading themes in the literature of 
Spain or Spanish-America. (Nemes, Panico) 

SPAN 107, 108. LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, SPAN 075. Spanish literary history from the 
eleventh through the fifteenth century. Reading of repre- 
sentative texts. First semester: to 1350. Second semes- 
ter: from 1350 to 1500. Cagigao) 

SPAN 109. THE ROMANCERO. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN 075. Origin, nature and influence. Exten- 
sive reading in each of the respective sub-genres. (Cagigao) 

SPAN 111-112. PROSE AND POETRY OF THE SIXTEENTH 
CENTURY. (3,3) 

Selected readings and literary analysis. (Goodwyn, Staff) 

SPAN 113. DRAMA OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. (3) 

From the earliest autos and pasos. the development of 
Spanish drama anterior to Lope de Vega, including Cer- 
vantes. (Rovner) 

SPAN 115-116. CERVANTES: NOVELAS EJEMPLARES AND 
DON QUIXOTE. 

(Goodwyn) 

SPAN 117-118. PROSE AND POETRY OF THE SEVENTEENTH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

Selected readings, literary analysis, and discussion of the 
outstanding prose and poetry of the period, in the light of 
the historical background. (Goodwyn) 

SPAN 119-120. DRAMA OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
(3,3) 

First semester devoted to Lope de Vega, dramatic theory, 
and the Spanish stage. Second semester: drama after Lope 
de Vega to Calderon de la Barca and the decay of the 
Spanish theater. (Rovner) 



SPAN 125-126. LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CEN- 
TURY. (3, 3) 
Traditionalism, neo-classicism, and pre-Romanticism in 
prose, poetry, and the theater; esthetics and poetics of the 
enlightenment. Recommended primarily for graduate stu- 
dents. Undergraduates by consent of the instructor. 

(Staff) 

SPAN 130. THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT IN SPAIN. (3) 

Poetry, prose and drama of the Romantic and post-Romantic 
periods. (Gramberg) 

SPAN 131. NINETEENTH CENTURY FICTION. (3) 

Significant novels of the nineteenth century. (Gramberg) 

SPAN 132. NINETEENTH CENTURY DRAMA AND POETRY. (3) 
Prerequisite, SPAN 075 and 076 or 075 and 078. Significant 
dramas and poetry of the realistic period. (Gramberg) 

SPAN 133-134. MODERN ISM AND POST-MODERNISM IN SPAIN 
AND SPANISH AMERICA. (3, 3) 

A study of the most important works and authors of both 
movements in Spainand Spanish America. (Nemes) 

SPAN 136. TWENTIETH CENTURY DRAMA. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPAN075and076or075and078. Significant 
plays of the twentieth century. (Marra-Lopez, Gramberg) 

SPAN 141-142. THE GENERATION OF 1898 AND ITS 
SUCCESSORS. (3, 3) 

Authors and works of all genres of the generation of 1898 
and those of the immediately succeeding generation. 

(Gramberg, Marra-Lopez) 

SPAN 143. THE CONTEMPORARY SPANISH NOVEL. (3) 

The novel and the short story from 1940 to the present. 

(Gramberg) 

SPAN 144. CONTEMPORARY SPANISH POETRY. (3) 

Spanish poetry from the generation of 1927 to the present. 

(Gramberg, Marra-Lopez) 

SPAN 159-160. SPANISH-AMERICAN FICTION. (3, 3) 

Representative novels and-or short stories from the Wars 
of Independence to the present. (Nemes, Staff) 

SPAN 162. SPANISH-AMERICAN POETRY. (3) 

Main trends, authors, and works from the Conquest to Ruben 
Dario. (Staff) 

SPAN 163, 164. SPANISH-AMERICAN ESSAY. (3, 3) 

A study of the socio-political contents and aesthetic qual- 
ities of representative works from the Colonial to the Con- 
temporary period, with emphasis on the essay of the 
twent ieth cent uryinthesecond semester. (Nemes, Panico) 

SPAN 171-172. SPANISH CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

A survey of two thousand years of Spanish history, outlining 
the cultural heritage of the Spanish people, their great men, 
trad it ions, customs, art and literature, with special emphasis 
on the interrelationship of social and literary history. 

(Staff) 

SPAN 173-174. LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

The cultural heritage of the Latin American people. Pre- 
Columbian civilizations. Hispanic and other European in- 
fluences. (Nemes, Panico) 

SPAN 195H-196H-197H. HONORS READING COURSE. (3, 3, 3) 
Supervised reading to be taken normally only by students 
admitted to the Honors Program: 195 is poetry; 196 is the 
novel, 197 is the drama. (Staff) 

SPAN 199H. HONORS SEMINAR. (3) 

Required of all students in the Honors Program. Other stu- 
dents will be admitted on special recommendation. Con- 
ducted in Spanish. Discussion of a central theme with re- 
lated investigation by students. (Staff) 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
In order to be accepted in the Graduate School for specializa- 
tion in Spanish, a student must already have a substantial 
knowledge of Spanish literature. Accordingly, the special 
studies courses and the open seminar are not surveys cover- 
ing the periods indicated. They are intensive investigations 
within these periods, in which the class acts as a research 
team concentrating on a different specific theme each 
semester. The requirements of students will determine 
which courses will be offered. 
SPAN 201. THE HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE. (3) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 203. COMPARATIVE ROMANCE LINGUISTICS. (3) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 207-208. MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE. (3) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 211-212. POETRY OF THE GOLDEN AGE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 



Arts and Sciences 



127 



SPAN 215-216. SEMINAR: THE GOLDEN AGE IN SPANISH 
LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

SPAN 225-226. THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

SPAN 233-234. THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

SPAN 237-238. HISPANIC POETRY OF "HE NINETEENTH 
AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

SPAN 241-242. THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. (3, 3) 

SPAN 245. THE DRAMA OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. (3) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 263-264. COLONIAL SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

(3,3) 
SPAN 265-266. NATIONAL SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERA- 

TURE. (3, 3) 
SPAN 281-282. READING COURSE FOR MINORS IN 

SPANISH. (3, 3) 
SPAN 283-284. READING COURSE FOR MINORS IN 
SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 291-292. OPEN SEMINAR. (3, 3) 

Topic to be determined. (Staff) 

SPAN 297\'tE v ACHING SPANISH IN INSTITUTIONS OF 
HIGHER LEARNING. (3) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

(Staff) 
SPAN 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 

(Staff) 
PORTUGUESE 
PORT 001-002. ELEMENTARY PORTUGUESE. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three recitations and one 
laboratory per week. Study of linguistic structure and 
development of audio-lingual and writing ability. 

(Thorpe) 
PORT 006-007. INTERMEDIATE PORTUGUESE. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three recitations per week: 
additional electronic laboratory in PORT 006. Prerequisite: 
PORT 002 or equivalent. Study of linguistic structure, further 
development of audio-lingual and writing ability, and read- 
ing of literary texts with discussion in Portuguese. 

(Thorpe) 

GERMANIC AND SLAVIC LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES 

GERMAN 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Hering. 

PROFESSORS: Dohert, Jones, Prahl (Emeritus). 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Best. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Berry, Hitchcock, Irwin, Knoche. 
Morris. 

LECTURERS: Elder and Kostovski. 

INSTRUCTORS: Apitz, Conway, Dulbe, Hahn, Hoffmeister, 
Juran, Klapouchy, Schmeissner, Stanich. 

GERMAN 

GERM 000. ELEMENTARY GERMAN FOR GRADUATE 
STUDENTS. (AUDIT) 

Intensive elementary course in the German language de- 
signed particularly for graduate students who wish to acquire 
a reading knowledge. (Schmeissner) 

GERM 001-002. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. (3, 3) 

Each semester; given as intensive course in summer ses- 
sion. Three recitations and one audio-lingual drill per week. 
Study of linguistic structure. Extensive drill in pronuncia- 
tion and conversation. (Knoche, Hoffmeister) 

GERM 003H. ELEMENTARY GERMAN, HONORS COURSE. (3) 
Three recitations and one audio-lingual drill per week. En- 
rollment limited to specially approved candidates from 
GERMOOl.Studentstakingthiscoursewillnormallycontinue 
in GERM 007. (Knoche) 

GERM 005. REVIEW OF ELEMENTARY GERMAN. (3) 

Three recitations and one audio-lingual drill per week. 
Limited to students who, havinR taken placement examina- 
tion, have failed to qualify for GERM 007. (Stanich) 

GERM 006-007. INTERMEDIATE LITERARY GERMAN. (3, 3) 
Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory 
in GERM 006. Given as intensive course in summer session. 
Prerequisite: GERM 002 or equivalent, or GERM 005, except 
that recommended students may enter GERM 007 from 
GERM 003. Usually there will be an honors section for 
qualified students. (Schmeissner) 



GERM 008. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN. (3) 

Prerequisite: GERM006. Readingof technicalandscientific 
prose. (Stanich) 

GERM Oil. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE. (3) 
Prerequisite, GERM 007. Required of all students who con- 
tinue in advanced courses, with the exception of superior 
students who are permitted to by-pass an introduction to 
German literature. May be taken concurrently with GERM 
012. (Irwin) 

GERM 012. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GERM 007. A practical language course rec- 
ommended for all students continuing in German. May be 
taken concurrently with GERM Oil. (Irwin) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GERM 071-072. REVIEW GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, GERM 007, or equivalent. A thorough study of 
the more detailed points of German grammar with ample 
practice in composition. (Schmeissner) 

GERM 075-076. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, GERM 007, or equivalent. A survey of thechief 
authors and movements in German literature. (Morris) 

GERM 080-081. ADVANCED CONVERSATION. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, GERM 007, or consent of instructor. For stu- 
dents who wish to develop fluency and confidence in speak- 
ing the language. (Apitz) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

GERM 101. APPLIED LINGUISTICS. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contribution to 
the effective teaching of foreign languages. Comparative 
study of English and German. Analysis, evaluation and con- 
instruction of related drills. (Staff) 

GERM 103-104. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 

Translation from English into German, free composition, 
letter writing. (Staff) 

GERM 125-126. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, Herder, 
Goethe, Schiller. (Hering) 

GERM 131-132. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

Study of the literary, movements from romanticism to 
naturalism. (Staff) 

GERM 141-142. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH 
CENTURY. (3, 3) 

Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann to 
the present. Modern literary and philosophical movements 
will be discussed. (Dobert, Staff) 

GERM 171-172. GERMAN CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

Study of the literary, educational, artistic traditions; great 
men, customs, and general culture. (Morris) 

GERM 191. BIBLIOGRAPHY AND METHODS. (3) 

Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. 

(Staff) 

GERM 195H-196H-197H. HONORS READING COURSE. (3, 3, 3) 
Supervised reading to be taken normally only by students 
admitted to Honors Program: 195 is poetry; 196 is the novel: 
197 is the drama. (Staff) 

GERM 199H. HONORS SEMINAR. (3) 

Required of all students in the Honors Program. Other stu- 
dents will be admitted on special recommendation. Con- 
ducted in German. Discussionofacentralthemewithrelated 
investigations by students. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

The requirements of students will determine which courses 
will be offered. 
GERM 200. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN STUDIES. (3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 201. HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE. (3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 203. GOTHIC. (3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 204. OLD HIGH GERMAN. (3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 205, 206. MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN. (3. 3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 211-212. LITERATURE OF THE SIXTEENTH AND 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURIES. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 224-225. GOETHE AND HIS TIME. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 226. SCHILLER. (3) 

(Staff) 



128 



Arts and Sciences 



GERM 230. GERMAN ROMANTICISM. (3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 234. THE GERMAN DRAMA OF THE NINETEENTH 
CENTURY. (3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 250. THE GERMAN LYRIC. (3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 255-256. THE GERMAN NOVEL. (3. 3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 258. SEMINAR IN THE GERMAN NOVELLE. (3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 281-282. READING COURSE. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 291-292. SEMINAR. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
GERM 295, 296. SPECIAL STUDIES IN GERMAN LITERA- 
TURE. (3. 3) 

(Staff) 

GERM 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

(Staff) 

GERM 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (ARRANGED) 

RUSSIAN 

RUSS 001-002. ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN. (3, 3) 

Three recitations and one laboratory hour per week. Ele- 
ments of grammar, pronunciation and conversation; exer- 
cises in translation. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

RUSS 006-007. INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN. (3, 3) 

Three recitations per week; additional electronic laboratory 
in RUSS006. Prerequisite, RUSS002 or equivalent. Reading 
of texts designed to give some knowledge of Russian life, 
thought and culture. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

RUSS 010. SCIENTIFIC RUSSIAN. (3) 

Prerequisite, RUSS 007 or equivalent. Reading of technical 
and scientific prose. (Hitchcock) 

RUSS 012-013. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite. RUSS 007 or equivalent. A practical language 
course recommended for all students continuing in Rus- 
sian. (Hitchcock) 

RUSS 071-072. REVIEW GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. (3,3) 
Prerequisite, RUSS 007 or equivalent. Designed to give a 
thorough training in the structure of the language; drill in 
Russian composition. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

RUSS 075-076. SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, RUSS 007 or equivalent. An elementary survey 
ofRussianliterature. (Hitchcock) 

RUSS 080-081. ADVANCED CONVERSATION. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, RUSS 012, 013, or consent of instructor. 
For students who wish to develop fluency and confidence 
in speaking the language. (Hitchcock, Staff) 

FOR ADVANCEO UNDERGRAUDATES AND GRADUATES 
RUSS 101. APPLIED LINGUISTICS. (3) 

The nature of Applied Linguistics and its contributions to 
the effective teaching of foreign languages. Comparative 
study of English and Russian, with emphasis upon points 
of divergence. Analysis, evaluation and construction of re- 
lated drills. (Hitchcock) 
RUSS 103-104. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (3, 3) 

(Hitchcock) 
RUSS 125. RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY. (3,3) 

(Hitchcock) 
RUSS 135. MODERN RUSSIAN POETRY. (3) 

(Hitchcock) 
RUSS 136. MODERN RUSSIAN DRAMA. (3) 

(Hitchcock) 

RUSS 137. MODERN RUSSIAN FICTION. (3) 

(Hitchcock) 

RUSS 141-142. SOVIET RUSSIAN LITERATURE. (3, 3) 

(Hitchcock) 

GENERAL BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

The program has been preparedforthe student who 
is interested in biology but whose interest has not yet 
centered in any one of the biological sciences. It is 
suitable for the pre-dental or pre-medical student 
who plans to earn the B.S. degree before entering 
professional school. The program includes work in 
botany, entomology, microbiology, and zoology, and 
introduces the student to the general principles and 
methods of each of these biological sciences. The 



student may then empnasize one of these areas in 
completing his program. 

By proper selection of courses during the junior 
and senior years, a student may concentrate his 
work sufficiently in one area of biology to be able to 
continue graduate work in that field. However, a stu- 
dent who is planning to do graduate work should 
major in one specific field of biology. 

The student following this program must meet 
the general requirements for a degree in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. He should select French 
or German to meet the foreign language require- 
ments and SPCH 007 (or SPCH 001) to fulfill the 
requirement in speech. 

Required introductory courses in the biological 
sciences: BOTN 001; ENTM 015; MICB 001; ZOOL 
001. These courses must be passed with an average 
grade of at least "C." The pre-professional student 
must take ZOOL 002 as well. 

Required supporting courses in mathematics and 
physical sciences: MATH 010, Oil; CHEM 001, 003; 
PHYS 010, Oil. The student working in most areas of 
biology will also need a year of organic chemistry 
(CHEM 031, 033, or CHEM 035, 036, 037, 038). Ad- 
ditional work in chemistry may also be required by 
the student's advisor, in accordance with the needs 
of the student's field of emphasis. The pre-profes- 
sional student must include CHEM 035, 036, 037, 
038 in his program. 

Advanced courses in the biological sciences: The 
student must complete at least 30 semester hours of 
advanced work selected from the fields of botany, 
entomology, microbiology, and zoology. Of these 
credits at least 18 must be at the 100 level and 
taken in at least two of the four departments. The 
following courses in psychology may be counted as 
part of the required 30 semester hours but may not 
be used to satisfy the requirement of 18 semester 
hours at the 100 level: PSYC136, 145,180,181, 195. 

A junior or senior following this curriculum will be 
advised by the department in which he plans to do the 
most work. 

GENERAL PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

. This program has been prepared for the student 
who desires an introduction to the physical sciences 
but whose interest has not yet centered in any one 
field of the physical sciences. The program includes 
work in chemistry, mathematics, and physics, and 
permits the student to emphasize one of these fields 
without having to meet the full requirements for a 
major in one specific field. The program is not 
recommended for students who may later do gradu- 
ate work in mathematics or in one of the physical 
sciences. 

The student following this program must meet the 
general requirements for a degree in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. He should select French, Russian 
or German to meet the foreign language requirement 
and SPCH 007 (or SPCH 001) to fulfill the requirement 
in speech. 

Required i ntroductory courses in mathematicsand 
the physical sciences: MATH 019; CHEM 001, 003; 
PHYS 010, Oil (or 030, 031 or 015, 016). These 
courses must be passed with an average grade of at 
least "C" for the student to be eligible to continue 
with the program. 

Advanced courses in mathematics and the physi- 
cal sciences: The student must complete at least 36 
semester hours of advanced work selected from the 
Departments of Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics 
and Astronomy. Of these credits at least 18 must be at 



Arts and Sciences 



J 29 



the 100 level and taken in at least two of the three de- 
partments with no less than three credits in the second 
department. The student should normally take Analy- 
sis II and III (MATH 020, 021) inasmuch as practically 
all the advanced work in mathematics and physics 
requires calculus. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geography is a recognized major field in Arts and 
Sciences leading to the B.A. degree, although the De- 
partment is administered by the College of Business 
and Public Administration. Freshmen andsophomores 
wishing to major in geography should consult their 
lower division advisors and the Department of Geog- 
raphy. The following courses are required for a major: 
Geog. 010— Introduction to Physical Geography (3); 
Geography Oil— Introduction to Cultural Geography 
(3); Geography015 — Introduction to Economic Geog- 
raphy (3); and Geography 109— Introduction to Re- 
search and Writing in Geography (3). In addition, the 
major must take three hours of field study from the 
courses numbered 170 and 171 and one regional 
course. The remainder of the 33 hour minimum for 
the major can be made up of elective systematic and 
technique courses. Geography 001— Introduction to 
Geography (3), taken as part of the University's gen- 
eral education program does not count toward the 
33 hour major requirement. Descriptions of courses 
in geography will be found in the section of the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administration. For 
supporting course requirements in other depart- 
ments please contact an advisor in the Geography 
Department. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Students in Arts and Sciences may major in Gov- 
ernment and Politics even though the department 
is administratively located in the College of Business 
and Public Administration. 

Freshmen wish ingto major in government and poli- 
tics should consult their Lower Division advisors a bout 
preparationforthe major; additional information about 
the government and politics program may be obtained 
at the Departmental office. 

Arts and Sciences students may pursue the gen- 
eral GVPT curriculum or the more specialized Inter- 
national Affairs curriculum. (Only BPA students may 
pursue a specialized curriculum in Public Adminis- 
tration.) 

Government and Pol itics majors must take a mini- 
mum of 36 semester hours in Government and Politics 
and may not count more than 42 hours in GVPT toward 
graduation. No course with a grade less than "C" may 
be used to satisfy major requirements. 

The Government and Pol itics fie Ids are as follows: 
(1) American Government and Politics; (2) Compara- 
tive Government; (3) International Affairs; (4) Political 
Theory; (5) Public Administration; (6) Public Law; and 
(7) Public Policy and Political Behavior. 

The distribution of courses within fields is as fol- 
lows: 1. American Governmentand Politics— GVPT60, 
GVPT 124, GVPT 133, GVPT 160, GVPT 161, GVPT 
175; II. Comparative Government— GVPT 90, GVPT 

103, GVPT 185, GVPT 189, GVPT 190, GVPT 191, 
GVPT 192, GVPT 193, GVPT 194, GVPT 195, GVPT 
197; III. International Affairs— GVPT 101, 102, 103, 

104, 105, 106, GVPT 107 GVPT 108, GVPT 109, 
GVPT 154; IV. Political Theory— GVPT 140, GVPT 
141, GVPT 142, GVPT 143, GVPT 144, GVPT 145, 
V. Public Administration— GVPT 110, GVPT 111, 
GVPT 112, GVPT 113, GVPT 160, GVPT 161, GVPT 
162, GVPT 181, GVPT 185; VI. Public Law— GVPT 



131, GVPT 132, GVPT 133, GVPT 134, GVPT 181; 
VII. Public Policy and Political Behavior- GVPT 120' 
GVPT 122, GVPT 124, GVPT 127, GVPT 171 GVPT 
174, GVPT 175, GVPT 178. 

All GVPT majors are required to take GVPT 001— 
American Government (3); GVPT 003— Principles of 
Government and Politics(3); GVPT 020— Introduction 
to Political Behavior (3); and GVPT 141— History of 
Political Theory (3); or GVPT 142— Recent Political 
Theory (3). They must also take one course from three 
of the fields enumerated above (exclusive of Political 
Theory). 

In addition (a) GVPT majors (general) must take 
at least 15 GVPT semester hours at the 100 level; (b) 
GVPT majors taking the International Affairs curricu- 
lum must complete at least 15 semester hours at the 
100 level in international affairs and comparative gov- 
ernment courses, including GVPT 101— International 
Political Relations (3). 

All students majoring in GVPT (genera I) must com- 
plete the intermediate level in one foreign language. 
Students majoring in GVPT with specialization in In- 
ternational Affairs must take a minimum of 12 semes- 
ter hours in one foreign language above the first year 
elementary course. 

All students majoring in GVPT must fulfill the re- 
quirements of a minor. The general requirement is 
the completion of 15 semester hours from approved 
Arts and Sciences departments other than GVPT. At 
least six of the 15 hours must betaken at the 100 level 
from a single department. 

Students majoring in GVPT with specialization in 
International Affairs may choose to take all minor 
courses in geographical area studies or may take them 
all on a departmental basis. 

Students who major in Government and Politics 
may apply for admission to the GVPT Honors Program 
during the second semester of their sophomore year. 
Additional information concerning the Honors Program 
may be obtained at the departmental office. 

Descriptions of courses in government and politics 
will be found in the listings of the Department under 
the College of Business and Public Administration. 

HISTORY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Haber. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE CHAIRMAN: 

Olson. 
PROFESSORS: Bauer. Cole, Gordon, Harlan, Jashemski. 

Koch. Merrill, Prange, E. Smith, Sparks. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Belz. Berry. Breslow. Brush. Call- 

cott, Carter, Folsom, Giffin, Gilbert. Grlmsted, Mayo. 

Schuessler, Yaney. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Beveridge, Bradbury, Brann, 

Cockburn, Farrell, Flack, Greenberg, Harris. Matossian. 

McCusker, Nicklason, Perinbam, Robertson, Shoufani, 

Stowasser, VanNess, Warren, W. Williams, Wright. 
VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Couturier. Hoffman. 

Lavender. 
LECTURERS: Ban Man. Dunbar, Herbert. Perry, Vasquez. 
VISITING LECTURERS: Cannon Condon. Huston, Kent, 

Knachel, Ridgway, Rosenberg, C. Smith, L. Williams. 
INSTRUCTORS: Browne and Daniel. 

The Department of History seeks to provide stu- 
dents with the broadest possible cultural back- 
ground. In a more specific way, the curriculum pro- 
vides preparation for men and women interested in 
secondary school teaching, journalism, research 
and archival work, government and foreign service. 
In addition, the curriculum offers preparation for 
those who intend to pursue graduate study. 

A faculty advisor will assist each major in plan- 
ning a curriculum to meet his personal interests. 
Students should meet regularly with their advisors 



130 



Arts and Sciences 



to discuss the progress of their studies. 
Requirements for History Majors: 

1. As prerequisites, majors must complete HIST 

021, 022, 041, and 042. Students who are 
exempt from HIST 021 and 022 may take 
any one US. history course in their place. 

2. In addition to the prerequisites, majors must 
complete a minimum of 27 hours of history 
with grades of C or better. These 27 hours 
must include (a) at least nine hours of 
American history, which may include Latin 
American and Canadian history, (b) at least 
nine hours of European or Asian history, (c) 
three hours of HIST 199, (d) at least 18 of 
the 27 hours must be in 100 level courses. 

3. Majors must complete not less than 9 hours 
of upper level courses outside of the History 
Department approved by a departmental ad- 
visor. Generally this will comprise work in 
related departments such as government 
and politics, economics, sociology, litera- 
ture, philosophy, and fine arts. Grades in 
these courses must average C or better. 



HONORS IN HISTORY 

Students who major or minor in history may apply 
for admission to the History Honors Program during the 
second semester of their sophomore year. Those who 
are admitted to the program substitute discussion 
courses and a thesis for some of their required lecture 
courses, and they take an oral and written compre- 
hensive examination prior to graduation. Successful 
candidates are awarded either honors or high honors 
in history. 

The History Department offers pre-honors work in 
American history (HIST 057, 058) and pre-honors sec- 
tions in Western Civilization (HI ST 04 1,042). Students 
in these sections meet in a discussion group instead 
of attending lectures. They read widely and do exten- 
sive written work on their own. Pre-honors sections 
are open to any student and recommended for stu- 
dents in General Honors, subject only to the instruc- 
tor's approval. Students who intend to apply for admis- 
sion to the Hi story Honors Program should take as many 
of them as possible during their freshman and soph- 
omore years. 
GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS IN HISTORY 

The courses with numbers up to 100 (except HIST 
057 and 058 are particularly recommended tost udents 
seekingto meet the General Education requirements. 
These courses are especially designed for the stu- 
dent who wishes to enrich his knowledge and under- 
standing of a particular society or culture in a com- 
paratively broad chronological framework, even 
though he might have no professional interest in 
history. They may be taken during the sophomore, 
junior or senior years. 

Students with an exceptionally good background 
in history may substitute 100-level courses where there 
are no stated prerequisites. 

HIST 017. AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY. (3) 

A survey of the Negro in American history, covering the 
African background, slavery, the role of the Negro in the 
social, political, economic, cultural and artistic life of the 
United States. Emphasis will be placed on the enduring 
themes and the black experience in American society, in- 
cluding contemporary problems in race relations. (Staff) 

HIST 021. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1865. (3) 
A survey of the history of the United States from colonial 
times to the end of the Civil War. Emphasis on the establish- 
ment and development of American institutions. 

(American History Staff) 



HIST 022. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865. (3) 
A survey of economic, social, intellectual, and political 
developments since the Civil War. Emphasis on the rise of 
industry and the emergence of the United States as a world 
power. (American History Staff) 

HIST 023. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF EARLY 
AMERICA. (3) 

A study of the social and cultural history of the United States 
as a predominantly agricultural society. Examination of 
how the social milieu shapes the cultural development of 
the nationand its institutions. (American History Staff) 

HIST 024. SOCIAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF MODERN 
AMERICA. (3) 

A study of the social and cultural history of the United 
States as a society in transition. Examination of the social 
and cultural changes that accompanied industrial and 
scientific development. (American History Staff) 

HIST 029. THE UNITED STATES IN WORLD AFFAIRS. (3) 
A study of the United States as an emerging world power 
and the American response to changing status in world 
affairs. Emphasis on the relationship between internal and 
external development of the nation. 

(American History Staff) 

HIST 031, 032. LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. (3, 3) 

A survey of the history of Latin America from colonial origins 
to the present, covering political, cultural, economic, and 
social development, with special emphasis upon relations 
with the United States. First semester: Colonial Latin Amer- 
ica. Second semester: the Republics. 

(Latin American History Staff) 

HIST 041, 042. WESTERN CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

This course is designed to give the student an appreciation 
of the civilization in which he lives in its broadest setting. 
The study begins with the collapse of classical civilization 
and comes to the present. (European History Staff) 

HIST 051. 052. THE HUMANITIES. (3, 3) 

In surveying history from prehistoric times to the present, 
man's cultural development is emphasized. The course is a 
study of the achievements of the common cultural 
heritage of western civilization. It is designed as an in- 
troductory course in history which will make a more di- 
rect contribution to the other liberal arts fields. First 
semester, to the Renaissance. Second semester, since 
the Renaissance. (Jashemski) 

HIST 053, 054. HISTORY OF ENGLAND AND GREAT BRITAIN. 
(3.3) 
A history of the development of British life and institu- 
tions. Open to all classes. Especially recommended for Eng- 
lish majors and minors and pre-law students. First semester, 
to 1485. Second semester, since 1485. 

(English History Staff) 

HIST 057. PRE-HONORS COLLOQUIUM IN EARLY AMERICAN 
HISTORY. (3) 

Selected reading in modern American history with em- 
phasis on independent discussion and writing. May be 
taken for credit by students exempt from American his- 
tory. Permission of instructor required. 

(American History Staff) 

HIST 058. PRE-HONORS COLLOQUIUM IN MODERN AMERI- 
CAN HISTORY. (3) 

Selected readings in modern American hi story with emphasis 
on independent study, discussion and writing. May betaken 
for credit by students exempt from American history. Per- 
mission of instructor required. 

(American History Staff) 

HIST 061, 062. FAR EASTERN CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

This course seeks to give the student an understanding of 
a great civilization radically different from our own, and an 
appreciation of the complex problems of the Far East and 
of American policy there. The approach is interdisciplinary 
within a historical framework. (Folsom, Mayo) 

HIST 071, 072. ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION. (3, 3) 

This course seeks to give the student an insight into a cul- 
tural heritage that dominates the lives of over four hundred 
million people today. The study covers Islam in Spain, North 
Africa, Africa below the Sahara, India, and Indonesia as 
well asthe Middle East. The approach is humanistic within 
a historical framework. (Stowasser) 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

HIST 101. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY. (3) 

The settlement and development of colonial America to the 
middleof the eighteenth century. (Staff) 

HIST 102. THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. (3) 

The background and course of the American Revolution 
through the formation of the Constitution. (Bradbury) 



Arfs and Sciences 



J3I 



HIST 103. THE FORMATIVE PERIOD IN AMERICA, 1789- 
1824. (3) 
The evolution of the Federal government, the origins of 
political parties, problems of foreign relations in an era 
of international conflict, beginnings of the industrial revo- 
lution in America, and the birth of sectionalism. 

(Bradbury) 

HIST 107, 108. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES. (3, 3) 

The development of the American economy and its institu- 
tions. First semester, to 1865; second semester, since 1865. 

(Staff) 

HIST 109, 110. SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. 
(3,3) 

Formation of regional societies; immigration and nativism; 
the Negro; urban movement; social responses to technologi- 
cal change. First semester to 1865; second semester, since 
1865. (Beveridge) 

HIST 111, 112. HISTORY OF MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN 
(3,3) 

The history of Mexico, Central America and the Antilles, be- 
ginning with the pre-Spanish Indian cultures and continuing 
through the Spanish colonial period and the national period 
to the present day. The division point between the two 
courses in the year 1810, the beginning of the Mexican 
wars for independence. (Staff) 

HIST 114. THE MIDDLE PERIOD OF AMERICAN HISTORY, 
1824-1860. (3) 

An examination of the political history of the United States 
from Jackson to Lincoln with particular emphasis on the 
factors producing Jacksonian democracy, Manifest Destiny, 
the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, the Republican 
Party, and secession. (Sparks) 

HIST 116. THE CIVIL WAR. (3) 

Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, 
social, and economic effects of the war upon American 
society. (Sparks) 

HIST 11/. THE NEGRO IN AMERICAN LIFE. (3) 

The role of the Negro in America since slavery, with emphasis 
on twentieth-century developments: the migration from 
farm to city; the growth of the civil rights movement; the 
race question as a national problem. 

(Harlan, Carter, Blassingame) 
HIST 118. THE PROGRESSIVE PERIOD; THE UNITED STATES. 
1896-1919. (3) 

(Merrill, Harlan, Olson) 
HIST 119. BETWEEN THE WARS: THE UNITED STATES, 
1919-1945. (3) 

(Merrill, Harlan, Olson) 
HIST 120. THE UNITED STATES SINCE WORLD WAR II. (3) 
Problemsand issuesof American society, foreign and domes- 
tic, of the past generation. (Olson) 

HIST 122, 123. HISTORY OF THE SOUTH. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, HIST 021, 022, or equivalent. The golden age 
of the Chesapeake, the institution of slavery, the ante- 
bellum plantation society, the experience of defeat, the 
impact of industrialization, and the modern racial adjust- 
ment. (Staff) 

HIST 124. RECONSTRUCTION AND THE NEW NATION, 
1865-1896. (3) 

Prerequisite, six credits of American history, or permission 
of instructor. Problems of construction in both South and 
North. Emergence of big business and industrial combina- 
tions. Problems of the farmer and laborer. (Staff) 

HIST 127, 128. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES. (3, 3) 
A historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and foreign 
relations of the United States. First semester from the 
Revolution to 1898. Second semester, from 1898 to the 
present. Students who have taken HIST 020 are admitted 
only by permission of instructor. (Cole) 

HIST 133, 134. THE HISTORY OF IDEAS IN AMERICA. (3, 3) 
A history of basic beliefs about religion, man, nature, and 
society. Consent of the instructor is required for HIST 
134. (Koch) 

HIST 135, 136. CONSTITU1 lONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES. (3, 3) 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation 
of the Constitution, and development of American con- 
stitutionalism in theory and practice therafter. (Beiz) 

HIST. 137. THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION: FROM COPER- 
NICUS TO NEWTON. (3) 
Major developments in the history of physics and astron- 
omy during the 16th and 17th centuries and critical 
evaluations of the Copernican Revolution, the "mechan- 
ical philosophy" of the 17th century scientists, and the 



Newtonian synthesis and its impact on 18th century 
thought. (Brush) 

HIST 138. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN PHYSICAL 
SCIENCE: FROM LAVOISIER TO EINSTEIN. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 010 and PHYS 002 or 003. History of 
chemistry, physics, and geology during the period from about 
1775 to about 1925. (Brush) 

HIST 141. HISTORY OF MARYLAND. (3) 

Political, social, and economic history of Maryland from 
seventeenth century to the present. (Staff) 

HIST 142, 143. HISTORY OF SPAIN. (3, 3) 

Political, social, and economic development of Spain; the 
Spanish empire; Spain's role in Europe. Some attention will 
be paid to Portuguese history. First semester: 1469-1700. 
Second semester: 1700-present. (Vasques) 

HIST 144. HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY. (3) 

A survey course designed for junior, senior and graduate 
students with a solid base in either engineering or history; 
it will cover the time span from Greek antiquity to the 
First World War. Technology will be studied as a cultural 
force controlled by laws of its own and operating within 
a distinctive conceptual framework. The course will con- 
centrate on the changing character of technology in history 
and on the interactions between technology and other 
cultural forces such as science, philosophy, art, material 
culture, and the economy. (Staff) 

HIST 146. DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA. (3) 
A survey of the political, economic, and cultural relations 
of the Latin American nations with emphasis on their rela- 
tions with the United States and the development of the 
inter-American system. (Wright) 

HIST 148. HISTORY OF CANADA. (3) 

Prerequisites, HIST041, 042, or HIST053, 054. A history of 
Canada, with special emphasis on the nineteenth century 
and upon Canadian relations with Great Britain and the 
United States. (Gordon) 

HIST 149. HISTORY OF BRAZIL. (3) 

The history of Brazil with emphasis on the national period. 

(Giffin) 

HIST 150. HISTORY OF ARGENTINA AND THE ANDEAN 
REPUBLICS. (3) 
The history of the nationalist period of selected South 
American countries. (Staff) 

EUROPEAN HISTORY 

HIST 151. HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT ORIENT AND GREECE. (3) 
Asurvey of the ancient civilizations of Egypt, the Near East, 
and Greece, with particular attention to their institutions, 
life, and culture. (Jashemski) 

HIST 153. HISTORY OF ROME. (3) 

A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings 
through the Republic and down to the last centuries of the 
Empire.- (Jashemski) 

HIST 155, 156. HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE. (3, 3) 

A study of medieval government, society, and thought from 
the collapse of classical civilization to the Renaissance. 

(Robertson) 

HIST 157. THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM. 1648-1748. (3) 

Europe in the Age of Louis XIV and the Enlightened Des- 
pots. (Williams) 

HIST 158. THE OLD REGIME AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION, 
1748-1815. (3) 

Europe in the era of the French Revolution. (Williams) 

HIST 159. 160. HISTORY OF EUROPEAN IDEAS. (3. 3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 041, 042 or HIST 053, 054, or the 
equivalent. Beginning with a review of the basic Western 
intellectual traditions as a heritage from the Ancient 
World, the courses will present selected important currents 
of thought from the scientic revolution of the sixteenth 
and seventeenth centuries down to the twentieth century. 
First semester, through the eighteenth century. Second 
semester, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Haber) 

HIST 161, 162. THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION. 
(3,3) 

Prerequisite, HIST 041, 042, or 053, or consent of in- 
structor. City-states and the rise of nation-states, the cul- 
ture and thought of the Renaissance, the Reformation and 
their impact into the seventeenth century. (Brann) 

HISI 163, 164. HISTORY OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (3 31 
Prerequisite, HIST 041. 042, or HIST 053, 054. First se- 
mester, the development of England's Mercantilist Em- 
pire and its fall in the war for American Independence 
(1783). Second semester, the rise of the Second British 
Empire and the solution of the problem of responsible self - 

tovernment (1783-1867), the evolution of the British 
mpire into a Commonwealth of Nations, and the develop- 
ment and problems of the dependent Empire. (Gordon) 



732 



Arts and Sciences 



HIST 165, 166. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF GREAT 
BRITAIN. (3, 3) 

Constitutional development in England, with emphasis on 
the history of the royal prerogative, the growth of the com- 
mon law, the development of Parliament, and the emergence 
of systematized government. First semester, to 1485; 
second semester, since 1485. (Cockburn) 

HIST 167, 168. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. (3, 3) 

A history of Russia from earliest times to 1917. (Yaney) 

HIST 169, 170. EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY, 
1815-1919. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite 041, 042, or HIST 053, 054. A study of the 
political, economic, social and cultural development of 
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the First World 
War. (Bauer) 

HIST 171, 172. EUROPE IN THE WORLD SETTING OF THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, HIST 041, 042, or HIST 053, 054. Astudyof 
political, economic, and cultural developments in twentieth- 
century Europe with special emphasis on the factors in- 
volved in the two World Wars and their global impacts and 
significance. (Prange) 

HIST 173. THE SOVIET UNION. (3) 

A history of the Bolshevik Revolution and the founding of 
the Soviet Union; the economic policy and foreign policy 
of the U.S.S.R. to the present. (Yaneyr 

HIST 175. MODERN FRANCE. (3) 

A survey of French history from 1815 to the present. The 
emphasis is upon such topics as the population problem, 
the economic and social structure of French society, and 
the changing political and cultural values of this society in 
response to recurrent crises through the nineteenth and 
twenthieth centuries. (Greenberg) 

HIST 176. TUDOR ENGLAND. (3) 

An examination of the political, religious, and social forces 
in English life, 1485-1603, with special emphasis on Tudor 
government, the English Reformation, and the Eliz- 
bethan era. (Breslow) 

HIST 177. STUART ENGLAND. (3) 

An examination of the political, religious, and social forces 
in English life, 1603-1714, with special emphasis on Puri- 
tanism and the English revolutions. (Breslow) 

HIST 178. BRITAIN IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. (3) 
Developments in Great Britain from the Revolution of 1688 
to the end of the Napoleonic wars. (Cockburn) 

HIST 179. MODERN BRITAIN. (3) 

A survey of British history from the age of the French Revolu- 
tion to World War I with emphasis upon such subjects as 
Britain's role in the world, the democratization of the state, 
the problems arising from industrialism and urbanism. and 
Irish and imperial problems. (Gordon) 

HIST 183. A SURVEY OF AFRICAN HISTORY. (3) 

A brief survey of the history of sub-Saharan Africa from pre- 
historic times to the end of the colonial era. Special focus 
on neolithic civilizations, major migrations, and political 
and commercial developments in pre-colonial and colonial 
Africa. (Perinbam) 

HIST 184. A HISTORY OF WEST AFRICA. (3) 

HIST 183 is recommended though not required. A regional 
study of the western Sudan, forest and coastal regions from 
pre-historic times to the nineteenth century. A discussion 
of neolithic and iron age civilizations, trans-Saharan and 
other trade, introduction of Islam, medieval Sudanese em- 
pires, forest kingdoms, nineteenth-century empires and 
kingdoms, and the impact of European penetration. 

ASIAN HISTORY (Perinbam) 

HIST 187, 188. HISTORY OF CHINA. (3, 3) 

A history of China from earliest times to the present. The 
emphasis is on the development of Chinese institutions 
that have molded the life of the nation and its people. 

(Folsom) 

HIST 189, 190. HISTORY OF JAPAN. (3, 3) 

First semester: Japanese civilization from the age of Shinto 
mythology, introduction of continental learning, and rule of 
military overlords. Second semester; renewed contact with 
the western world and Japan's emergence as a modern 
state. (Mayo) 

HIST 191. HISTORY OF THE ARABS. (3) 

HIST 071 and 072 recommended but not required. Arab his- 
tory from the pre-lslamic period to modern times. (Staff) 

HIST 192. HISTORY OF THE TURKS. (3) 

HIST 071 and 072 recommended but not required. Survey 
of Turkish history from earliest times to the present, with 
special emphasis on the Seljugs, the Ottoman tmpire, 
and the Republic of Turkey. (Staff) 



HIST 193. HISTORY OF IRAN. (3) 

HI ST 071 and 072 recommended but not required. Survey of 
Iranian history from earliest times to the present with 
emphasis on period since the rise of the Safavids in the 
sixteenth century. (Staff) 

HIST 194. HISTORY OF THE JEWS AND THE STATE OF IS- 
RAEL. (3) 
A survey of Jewish history from the second century Diaspora 
to the present with special attention to an analysis of 
Zionism, the creation of a Jewish home in Palestine, the 
establishment of the State of Israel, and modern develop- 
ments. (Staff) 
HIST 195, 196. HONORS COLLOQUIUM. (3, 3) 

Enrollment I imitedtostudents admitted by thedepartmental 
Honors Committee. Reading in sources and secondary work 
centering about the development of the modern world. Dis- 
cussions of reading and written work in weekly seminar 
meetings. (Staff) 

HIST 197. STUDIES IN MIDDLE EASTERN CULTURE. (3) 
Systematic treatment of aspects of literature and culture 
of the Middle East. May be repeated. (Rivlin, Stowasser) 
HIST 198. HONORS THESIS. (3) 

Limitedtostudentswhohavecompleted HIST195. Normally 
repeated for a total of six hours credit during the senior 
year by candidates for honors in history. (Staff) 

HIST 199. PRO-SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL WRITING. (3) 

Discussions and research papers designed to acquaint the 
student with the methods and problems of research and 
presentation. The student will be encouraged to examine 
those phases of history which he regards as his specialties. 

(Staff) 
FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
HIST 200. HISTORIOGRAPHY: TECHNIQUES OF HIS- 
TORICAL RESEARCH AND WRITING. (3) 
HIST 201. READINGS IN COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY. 

(3) 
HIST 202. SEMINAR IN COLONIAL AMERICAN HISTORY. 

(3) 
HIST 203. READINGS IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

AND THE FORMATIVE PERIOD. (3) 
HIST 204. SEMINAR IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND 

THE FORMATIVE PERIOD. (3) 
HIST 205. READINGS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC 

HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 206. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND ECO- 
NOMIC HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 213. READINGS IN SOUTHERN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 214. SEMINAR IN SOUTHERN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 215. READINGS IN THE MIDDLE PERIOD AND CIVIL 

WAR. (3) 
HIST 216. SEMINAR IN THE MIDDLE PERIOD AND CIVIL 

WAR. (3) 
HIST 217. READINGS IN RECONSTRUCTION AND THE 

NEW NATION. (3) 
HIST 218. SEMINAR IN RECONSTRUCTION AND THt 

NEW NATION. (3) 
HIST 223. READINGS IN RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 224. SEMINAR IN RECENT AMERICAN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 227. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN 

FOREIGN POLICY. (3) 
HIST 228. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOR- 
EIGN POLICY. (3) 
HIST 233. READINGS IN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HIS- 
TORY. (3) 
HIST 234. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HIS- 
TORY. (3) 
HIST 236. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL 

AND POLITICAL HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 239 READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF MODERN SCI- 
ENCE. (3) 
HIST 240. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF MODERN SCI- 
ENCE. (3) 
HIST 242. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF MARYLAND. (3) 
HIST 245. READINGS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 246. SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 251. SEMINAR IN GREEK HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 253. SEMINAR IN ROMAN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 255. READINGS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 256. SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 257. READINGS IN 17TH CENTURY EUROPEAN 
HISTORY. (3) 



Arts and Sciences 



733 



HIST 258. SEMINAR IN 17TH CENTURY EUROPEAN HIS- 
TORY. (3) 
HIST 259. READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN INTELLEC- 
TUAL HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 260. SEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN INTELLEC- 
TUAL HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 261. READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF THE RENAIS- 
SANCE AND REFORMATION. (3) 
HIST 262. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF THE RENAIS- 
SANCE AND REFORMATION. (3) 
HIST 263 READINGS IN THE HISTORY OF GREAT BRIT- 
AIN AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE-COMMONWEALTH. (3) 
HIST 264. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF GREAT BRIT- 
AIN AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE-COMMONWEALTH. (3) 
HIST 266. SEMINAR IN TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND. 

(3) 
HIST 268. SEMINAR IN RUSSIAN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 269. READINGS IN NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE. 

(3) 
HIST 270. SEMINAR IN NINETEENTH CENTURY EUROPE 

(3) 
HIST 271. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WORLD WAR I. 

(3) 
HIST 272. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF WORLD WAR II. 

(3) 
HIST 274. READINGS IN MODERN FRENCH HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 275. SEMINAR IN MODERN FRENCH HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 281. READINGS IN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 282. SEMINAR IN MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 285. READINGS IN JAPANESE HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 286. SEMINAR IN JAPANESE HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 287. READINGS IN CHINESE HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 28.. SEMINAR IN CHINESE HISTORY. (3) 
HIST 290. THE TEACHING OF HISTORY IN INSTITUTIONS 

OF HIGHFR LEARNING. (1) 
HIST 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 
HIST 499. THESIS RESEARCH. (Arranged) 

GENERAL HONORS PROGRAM 
DIRECTOR: Portz 

The General Honors Program is administered by 
the Director of the Arts and Sciences Honors Programs 
and by the College Honors Committee which also acts 
as an advisory and regulatory body for all Honors Pro- 
grams within the College. Admission to the General 
Honors Program shall ordinarily be at the beginning 
of the first or second semester of the student's fresh- 
man year. Students are selected on the basis of SAT 
scores, grades, rank in graduatingclass, recommenda- 
tions from high school teachers and counselors, and 
other factors dealing with academic achievement in 
high school. Students transferring from other institu- 
tions are accepted i nto General Honorsupon presenta- 
tion of a distinguished academic record. 

General Honors students are assigned to Honors 
sections of basic General Education courses, and are 
given the opportunity of participating in special Gen- 
eral Honors seminars. Continuance in the Program is 
based upon maintaining a B average or better. Suc- 
cessful General Honors students are graduated with 
a citation in General Honors and notation of this ac- 
complishment is made upon their transcripts. For 
further information and admission to General 
Honors, see the Director of Honors, Francis Scott 
Key Hall. 

SPECIAL GENERAL HONORS SEMINARS 

Open to General and Departmental Honors stu- 
dents and to other students with the consent of the 
instructor or of the Director of Honors. 

HONR 001. HONORS ORIENTATION COLLOQUIUM. (3) 

A colloquium on composition and on current topics in the 
humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. 
The topics will vary with the interest of the instructors. 
Writing and analysis of weekly themes on, and in-class dis- 
cussions of, assigned reading will be stressed. Ordinarily 
taken by all General Honors freshmen. Open to other stu-. 



dents with the consent of the Director of Honors. 



(Staff) 



HONR 050-051. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN STUDIES. AMERICAN 
TASTE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. (3, 3) 

An interdisciplinary course to investigate the development 
of public taste in modern America, especial lytherelationship 
between popular expression— the motion picture, jazz, best 
sellers, Broadway theatre — and the more traditional forms 
of the fine arts and literature. Not open to freshmen. 

HONR 100. CONTINENTAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE ENGLISH 
RENAISSANCE. (3) 

Prerequisite, ENGL001, 003, and004 ; orENGL02 1,033, and 
034. An interdisciplinary study of the pain ting, architecture, 
philosophy, and literature of the Continental Renaissance 
and its influence on English literature of the period. Not 
open to freshmen. 

HONR 110. SEMINAR IN SCIENCE AND MODERN SOCIETY. 
(3) 
A seminar dealing with the impact of science upon modern 
society. Subjects and faculty to vary from semester to semes- 
ter. Intended for both non-science and science majors. Not 
open to freshmen. 

HONR 120. SEMINAR IN THE FINE ARTS. (3) 

To be participated in by various members of the Fine Arts 
Departments. The subject to vary from semester to semester. 
Prerequisite: A General Education course in one of the 
participating departments. A course in a second participat- 
ing department is recommended but not required. Open to 
General and Departmental Honors students at the junior 
and senior level and to other students with the consent of 
the instructor or the Director of Honors. 

HONR 130. SEMINARS IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. (1-4) 
A series of seminars in the social sciences. Often inter- 
disciplinary in character and often team-taught. The sub- 
jects of the seminars and the faculty may vary from semester 
to semester. Seminars may be repeated for credit, with the 
permission of the Director of Honors, if the content of the 
course altersappreciably. Open toGeneral and Departmental 
Honors students and to other students with the consent of 
the instructor and the Director of Honors. 

HONR 140. SEMINARS IN THE NATURAL SCIENCES. (1-4) 
A series of seminars in the natural sciences. Often inter- 
disciplinary in character and often team-taught. The sub- 
jects of the seminars and the faculty may vary from semester 
to semester. Seminars may be repeated for credit, with the 
permission of the Director of Honors, if the content of the 
course alters appreciably. Open to General and Depart- 
mental Honors students and to other students with the 
consent of the instructor and the Director of Honors. 

(Staff) 

HONR 150. SEMINARS IN THE HUMANITIES. (1-3) 

A series of seminars in the humanities. Often interdis 
ciplinary in character and often team-taught. The subjects 
of the seminars and the faculty may vary from semester 
to semester. Seminars may be repeated for credit, with 
the permission of the Director of Honors, if the content 
of the course alters appreciably. Open to General and De- 
partmental Honors students and to other students with 
the consent of the instructor and the Director of Honors. 

(Staff) 

HONR 160. HONORS THESIS RESEARCH. (3) 

A thesis preparation course for General Honors seniors, 
under the direction of individual faculty members. HONR 
160 or HONR 170, but not both, may be used once to fulfill 
the General Honors Seminar requirement. Graded pass-fail. 
May not be repeated. Open only to General Honors students. 

(Staff) 

HONR 170. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY. (3) 

Honors Independent Study involves reading or research, 
directed by individual faculty, especially in areas outside 
of thestudent'smajor. HONR 170or HONR 160. but not both, 
may be used once to fulfill the General Honors Seminar 
requirement. Graded pass-fail. May be repeated only with 
consent of the Director of Honors. Open only to General 
Honors students. (Staff) 

LINGUISTICS PROGRAM 

Advisory Committee on Linguistics: 

Faculty: 

PROFESSORS: Dingwall, Edmundson, Horton, Manning, 

Sparks, and Williams. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Dingwall (Director) and Shen 

(Chinese-Linguistics). 

The program in linguistics is designed to provide 
students with a comprehensive and consistent view 
of the accomplishments, methodology and problems of 



J 34 



Arts and Sciences 



modern linguistic science which has as its aim the 
explication of the facts of specific natural languages 
as well as natural language in general. While any edu- 
cated man will benefit from an understanding of the 
structure and development of language, those who ex- 
pect to become scholars and teachers of anthropology, 
English, foreign languages, philosophy or speech will 
find a background in linguistics invaluable. Although 
there is not an undergraduate major in linguistics at 
this time, courses in linguistics may be used to ful- 
fill the supporting courses requirement in some pro- 
grams leading to the B.A. or B.S. degree. 

LING 071. LANGUAGE AND CULTURE. (3) 

Prerequisite sophomore standing. Anon-technical introduc- 
tion to linguistics, with special consideration of the relations 
between language and other aspects of culture. (Listed also 
as ANTH 07U (Dingwall) 

LING 101. INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Introduction to the basic concepts of modern descriptive 
linguistics. Phonology, morphology, syntax. Examinationsof 
the methods of comparative I inguistics, internal reconstruc- 
tion, dialect geography. (Listed also as ANTH 171 and as 
ENGL 105.) 

LING 102. PHONETICS AND PHONEMICS. (3) 

Training in the identification, description, and symboliza- 
t ion of various sounds found in language. Study of scientific 
techniques for classifying sounds into units which are pre- 
ceptually relevant for a given language. (Dingwall) 

LING 103. MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX. (3) 

A detailed study of language structure. No student may 
receive credit for both LING 103 and ENGL 108. 

(Dingwall) 

LING 106. HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Prerequisite LING 102 and 103, or equivalent. A study of 
change in the phonological, grammatical and semantic 
structures of natural languages; language typology; recon- 
struction and various allied topics will be treated. (Dingwall) 

LING 201. SEMINAR IN LINGUISTICS. (3) 

Topic to be selected each semester. (Dingwall) 

Other programs also offer courses in linguistics that may be of 

interest to the student: 

CMSC 190 C. MATHEMATICAL LINGUISTICS. (3) 

(Edmundson) 

HONR 130C. SEMINAR IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES: 
PSYCHOLINGUISTICS. (3) 

(Dingwall, Horton) 



MATHEMATICS 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Goldhaber. 

PROFESSORS: Auslander, Brace, Chu, Cohen, Douglis, Ed- 
mundson, Ehrlich, Goldberg Good, Greenberg, Horvath, 
Huet, Hummel, Jackson, Karp Kleppner, Kuroda, G. 
Lehner, J. Lehner Maltese, Martin Pearl, Reinhart, Schae- 
fer, Stellmacher L Syski, Walsh, Zedek. 

VISITING PROFESSORS: Maass, Remmert, Vesentini. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Adams Benedetto, Bernstein, 
Cook, Correl, Daniel, Goldstein, Gray, Gulick Henkelman, 
Jacquet, Kirwan, Lipsman, Lopez-Escobar, Mikulski, Os- 
born, Sather, Strauss, Warner, Wolfe. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Berg, Cole, Connell, Currier, 
Dancis, Davidson, Egan, Ellis, Fey, Gowen, Green, Helzer, 
Holzsager, Johnson, Lay, Markley, Neri, Owings, Powell, Ras- 
togi, Schneider Sedgewick, Shepherd, Sweet, Thaler, Tim- 
sans, Wagner, Yang. 

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Guntzer, Nagel, Niebur. 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES: Alexander and Schlotterbeck. 

POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATES: Reddy and Sch- 
neider. 

INSTRUCTORS: Bernhardt, Brown, (P. T.), Dutton, Eisenberg 
(P. T.), Kilborn, Lepson, Mar, McClay, McKeen, Meyers, 
Steely (P. T.), Sorensen, Vanderslice (P. T.). 

FACULTY RESEARCH ASSISTANT: Locksley. 

The Mathematics Department Colloquium meets 
frequently throughout the academic year for reports 
on current research by the resident staff, visiting lec- 
turers, and graduate students. In addition, the Insti- 
tute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics Col- 
loquium meets at frequent intervals for reports on re- 
search in those fields. All colloquium meetings are 
open to the public. 



The local chapter of Pi Mu Epsi Ion, national honor- 
ary mathematics fraternity, meets regularly for the 
discussion of mathematical topics of interest to the 
undergraduates. Its programs are open to the public. 



MATHEMATICS MAJOR 

The program in mathematics leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Mathematics offers training 
in the fundamentals of mathematics in preparation 
for graduate work or teaching, and for positions in 
governmental or industrial laboratories. 

Astudent intendingto major in mathematics must 
complete the introductory sequence: MATH 019,020, 
021, 022orthecorrespondinghonorssequence: MATH 
050, 051, 052, 053. In addition, the normal require- 
ments for a mathematics major include 24 credit 
hours of upper division ( 100-level) work and at least 
22 credit hours of supporting courses. 

Mathematics majors who have completed the in- 
troductory sequence MATH 019 thru MATH 022 after 
September, 1, 1966, are required to take at least eight 
100-level courses including MATH 103 (Introduction 
to Abstract Algebra), MATH 110 (Advanced Calcu- 
lus), MATH 119 (Several Real Variables) and either 
MATH 100 (Vector and Matrices) or MATH 104 (In- 
troduction to Linear Algebra). In the remaining four 
required courses, at least two must be selected from 
the following groups: Group III, Geometry and Top- 
ology; Group IV, Statistics and Probability; Group V, 
Applied Mathematics: Group VI, Foundations. 

Mathematics majors who have completed the de- 
partmental honorssequence MATH 050-053 si nceSep- 
tember 1, 1966, will have covered the content of 
MATH 110 and therefore may not take MATH 110 
for credit. For these students the above requirement 
of "eight 100-level courses including MATH 103, 
110, 119 and either MATH 100 or 104" is changed 
to "seven 100-level courses including MATH 103, 
119 and either MATH 100 or 104." 

Candidates for departmental honors are permitted 
toincludeMATH190, 191and200-levelcoursesamong 
the eight (or seven) required courses. The Department 
of Mathematics is expanding its program in statistics 
to make it possible for majors in mathematics to spe- 
cialize in statistics and probability. The prefix STAT 
rather than MATH is used to designate these courses. 

Students intending to major in mathematics, 
should complete the lower division course work with 
an average grade of at least B. 

A grade of at least C must be attained in each of 
the upper division mathematics courses presented to 
fulfill the requirements for a major in mathematics. 

Mathematics majors are required to take a mini- 
mum of 10 hours of Physics. This will consist of PHYS 
030, 031, 032 (3, 4, 4) or PHYS 015, 016, 017 (4, 
4, 4); or 2 out of 3 in one of the preceding sequen- 
ces plus ASTR 10. In addition, each student must 
select a supporting area outside of the Department 
of Mathematics in which he will take a minimum of 
12 credits, at least six of which will be in one depart- 
ment at the 100-level. The average grade for courses 
in the supporting area must be at least C. 

Since departmental requirements for majors are 
changed from time to time, each student is urged to 
consult his advisor to obtain the most recent require- 
ments. Each student's program must be approved by 
his mathematics department advisor. 

Since most of the non-English mathematical liter- 
ature is written in French, German or Russian, the For- 
eign Language requirement should be met in one of 
these languages. 



Arts and Sciences 



J 35 



HONORS IN MATHEMATICS 

The honors program is designed for students show- 
ing exceptional ability and interest in mathematics. 
Its aim is to give a student the best possible mathemati- 
cal education. Participants are selected by the Honors 
Committee of the Department of Mathematics on the 
basis of recommendations from high school teachers 
and members of the faculty. 

Wherever possible, honors students are placed in 
special mathematicscourses, or in special sections of 
regular courses. Independent work is encouraged and 
can be done in place of formal course work. A final 
written andoral comprehensive examination in math- 
ematics is given at the end of the program. 
Introductory Mathematics Courses 

Beginning students normally enrpll in one of the 
courses MATH 003, 010, 018 or 019. A student may 
enroll in any one of these courses if he has the 
necessary high school mathematics and a suitable 
score on the mathematics section of the general 
classification test. 

Students interested in majoring in mathematics 
or the physical or engineering sciences are urged to be- 
gin their Mathematics with MATH 018 or MATH 019. 
MATH 018 is open to students who offer for entrance 
two and one-half years of college preparatory mathe- 
matics. MATH 019 is open to students who offer for 
entrance three and one-half years of college pre- 
paratory mathematics, including a course in trigono- 
metry. 

Students whose curriculum calls for MATH 003, 
010 or 018 and who do not have the necessary pre- 
requisites should enroll in MATH 001. 

In general, students should enroll in only one of 
the course sequences MATH 010-01 1-014-015, MATH 
018-019-020-021-022. 1 ncasethisruleisnotfollowed, 
proper assignment of credit will be made on application 
to the Department of Mathematics. 
MATH 001. REVIEW OF HIGH SCHOOL ALGEBRA. (0) 

Recommended for students who f ai I the qual ifying examina- 
tion for MATH 010, MATH 003 and MATH 018. Special fee 
of $45. (Sorensen) 

MATH 003. FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS. (4) 

Prerequisite, satisfactory performance on the SAT mathema- 
tics test, or MATH 001. This course is designed to provide 
an introduction to mathematical thinking, stressing ideas 
rather than techniques. Where possible, connections are 
drawn with other disciplines, such as philosophy, logic and 
art. (Douglis) 

MATH 010, Oil. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, 2'/2 years of college preparatory mathematics 
and satisfactory performance on the SAT mathematics test, 
or MATH 001 . Open to students not majoring in mathematics 
or the physical or engineering sciences. Logic, sets, count- 
ing, probability; sequences, sums; elementary algebraic 
and transcendental functions and their geometric repre- 
sentation; systems of linear equations, vectors, matrices. 

(Good) 
MATH 014, 015. ELEMENTARY CALCULUS (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 01 1 or equivalent. Open to students not 
majoring in mathematics or the physical or engineering 
sciences. Basic ideas of differential and integral calculus; 
elementary techniques and application;). (Bernhardt) 

MATH 018. INTRODUCTORY ANALYSIS. (3) 

(2 1 ,lectures, 2 drill periods perweek.) Prerequisite, 2V2 years 
of college preparatory mathematics and an appropriate 
score on the SAT mathematics test, or MATH 001. An intro- 
ductory course for students not qualified to start MATH 
019. Real numbers, functions, coordinate systems. Tri- 
gonometric functions. Plane analytic geometry. (Cook) 
MATH 019. ANALYSIS 1.(4) 

(31 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) Prerequisite, 3Vi 
years of college preparatory mathematics or MATH 018. 
Sets and inequalities, Cartesian coordinates in the plane, 
the straight line, the circle, translation of coordinate 
axes, functions and their graphs, limits, continuity, the 
derivative and application of the derivative, antiderivatives, 
definite integral. (Goldberg) 



MATH 020. ANALYSIS II. (4) 

(3 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) Prerequisite, MATH 
019or equivalent. Applicationsof integration, techniques of 
integration, polar coordinates, basic properties of the ele- 
mentary functions, improper integrals arid indeterminate 
forms, sequences and infinite series. (Helzer) 

MATH 021L. LINEAR ALGEBRA. (4) 

(3 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) Prerequisite, MATH 
020 or equivalent. Basic concepts of linear algebra; vec- 
tor spaces, applications to line and plane geometry, linear 
equations and matrices, similar matrices, linear trans- 
formations, eigenvalues, determinants and quadratic 
forms. (Staff) 

MATH 022. ANALYSIS 111.(4) 

(3 lectures, 2 drill periods per week.) Prerequisite, MATH021 
L or equivalent. Calculus of functions of vectors; partial 
derivatives, multiple integration, surface integrals, classical 
theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes. (Staff) 

MATH 030. ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICS. (4) 

Prerequisite, one year of college preparatory algebra. Re- 
quired for majors in elementary education, and open only 
to students in this field. Topics from algebra and number 
theory, designed to provide insight into arithmetic: induc- 
tive proof, the natural number system based on the Peano 
axioms; mathematical systems, groups, fields; the system 
of integers; the system of rational numbers; congruence, 
divisibility; systems of numeration. (Garstens) 

MATH 031. ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY. (4) 

Prerequisite, MATH 030 or equivalent. Structure of mathe- 
matics systems, algebra of sets, geometrical structures, 
logic, measurement, congruence, similarity, graphs in the 
plane, geometry on the sphere. (Garstens) 

MATH 050. CALCULUS I. (Honors) (4) 

Prerequisite, approval of department. A rigorous treatment, 
with applications, of differential and integral calculus in 
one variable. 

MATH 051. CALCULUS II. (Honors) (4) 

Prerequisite, approval of department. A rigorous treatment, 
with applications, of differential and integral calculus in 
one variable. 

MATH 052. CALCULUS III. (Honors) (4) 

Prerequisite, approval of department. Elements of linear 
algebra, Euclidean and other metric spaces; Multi-variable 
calculus; implicit function theorem; theorems of Green, 
Gauss and Stokes. Riemann Stieltjes integral and, as time 
permits, ordinary differential equations, Fourier series, 
orthogonal functions. 

MATH 053. CALCULUS IV. (Honors) (4) 

Prerequisite, approval of department, tiements of linear 
algebra, Euclidean and other metric spaces; Multi-variable 
calculus; implicit function theorem; theorems of Green. 
Gauss and Stokes. Riemann Stieltjes integral and, as time 
permits, ordinary differential equations, Fourier series, 
orthogonal functions. (Staff) 

MATH 066. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR SCIENTISTS 
AND ENGINEERS. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or equivalent. Exact solutions for 
first order equations; basic theory, techniques, and applica- 
tions of linear systems and higher order linear equations; 
power series solutions; Laplace transform solutions. 

(Strauss) 

STAT 050. INTRODUCTION TO RANDOM VARIABLES. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 015 or MATH 021. Introductory 
mathematical concepts. Probabilistic concepts. Basic 
properties of probability. Discrete random variables and 
their distributions. Continuous variables (intuitive an- 
alytic approach). Joint distributions and transformations. 
Moments and moment generating functions. Law of large 
numbers and de Moivre's theorem. (Syski) 

Courses 100-199 

Algebra and Number Theory. 100, 101, 103, 104. 106. 107 

Analysis. 110, 112, 113, 114, 117, 118. 119 

Geometry and Topology. 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 126, 128 
Foundations of Mathematics. 144, 146, 147, 148 
Applied Mathematics. 101. 162, 163, 164, 165, 168. 170, 171 
Courses for Teachers of Mathematics and Science. 181. 182 

183, 184, 185, 189 
Seminars, Selected Topics, Research. 190, 191 
Statistics and Probability. STAT 100. 101, 110, 111 120, 

121. 150. 164. 170 
MATH 100. VECTORS AND MATRICES. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or MATH 015. Algebra of vector 
spaces and matrices. Recommended for students interested 
in the applications of mathematics. (Not for graduate credit 
in mathematics.) (Schneider) 



136 



Arts and Sciences 



MATH 101. APPLIED LINEAR ALGEBRA. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 100,orconsentof theinstructor. Various 
applications of linear algebra: theory of finite games, linear 
programming, matrix methods as applied to finite Markov 
chains, random walk, incidence matrices, graphs and di- 
rected graphs, networks, transportation problems. (Pearl) 

MATH 103. INTRODUCTION TO ABSTRACT ALGEBRA. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. Integers; groups, 
rings, integral domains, fields. (Goldhaber) 

MATH 104. INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR ALGEBRA. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 103 or consent of instructor. An abstract 
treatment of finite dimensional vector spaces. Linear 
transformations and their invariants. (Timsans) 

MATH 106. INTRODUCTION TO NUMBER THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite. MATH 022. Rational integers, divisibility, 
prime numbers, modules and linear forms, unique factor- 
ization theorem, Euler's function, Mobius' function, cy- 
clotomic polynomial, congruences and quadratic residues, 
Legendre's and Jacobi's symbol, reciprocity law of quad- 
ratic residues, introductory explanation of the method of 
algebraic number theory. (Roselle) 

MATH 107. THEORY OF QUADRATIC NUMBER FIELDS. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 106 and MATH 103. Quadratic number 
fields, integers, ideals, units, ideal classgroups, unimodular 
transformations and algorithms of the determination of 
ideal class groups and fundamental units, class number 
formula, Gauss' theory of genera and Kronecker's symbol. 

(Kuroda) 

MATH 110. ADVANCED CALCULUS. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022. Real number system, qpen sets 
and compact sets on the real line, limits and continuity 
of real valued functions of one real variable, differentia- 
tion, functions of bounded variation, Riemann-Stieltjes 
integration, sequences and series of functions. 

(McGuinness) 

MATH 112. INFINITE PROCESSES. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or equivalent. Construction of the 
real numbers from the rational numbers, sequences of num- 
bers, series of positive and arbitrary numbers, infinite prod- 
ucts, conditional and absolute convergence, sequences and 
series of functions, uniform convergence, integration and 
differentiation of series, power series, and analytic func- 
tions. Fourier series, elements of the theory of divergent 
series, extension of the theory of complex numbers and 
functions. (Kirwan) 

MATH 113. INTRODUCTION TO COMPLEX VARIABLES. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 1 19. The algebra of complex numbers, 
analytic functions mapping properties of the elementary 
functions. Cauchy's theorem and the Cauchy integral for- 
mula. Residues. (Credit will be given for only one of the 
courses MATH 113 and MATH 163.) (G. Lehner) 

MATH 114. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 1 10. Ageneral introductiontothetheory 
of differential equations. Constructive methods of solution 
leading to existence theorems and uniqueness theorems. 
Other topics such as: systems of linear equations, the be- 
havior of sol ut ions in the large, the behavior of solutions near 
singularities, periodic solutions, stability, and Sturm-Liou- 
ville problems. (Berg) 

MATH 117. INTRODUCTION TO FOURIER ANALYSIS. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 113. Fourierseries. Fourier and Laplace 
transforms. (McGuinness) 

MATH 118. INTRODUCTION TO REAL VARIABLES. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 110. The Lebesgue integral. Fubini's 
theorem. Convergence theorems. The Lp spaces (Neri) 

MATH 119. SEVERAL REAL VARIABLES. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 1 10. A brief review of scalar and vector 
valued functions of several real variables (as done in MATH 
022). Implicit function theorem, change of variable theorem 
for multiple integrals, a detailed study of surfaces and sur- 
face integrals in n-dimensional Euclidean space, including 
integration by parts. Applications to partial differential 
equations and potential theory. (Brannan) 

MATH 120. INTRODUCTION TO GEOMETRY I. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or consent of instructor. Axiomatic 
development of plane geometries, Euclidean and non-Eucli- 
dean. Groups of isometries and similarities. (Chu) 

MATH 121. INTRODUCTION TO GEOMETRY II. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 120. Non-Euclidean transformation 
groups, the Erlangen program, projective planes, cubicsand 
quartics. (Reinhart) 

MATH 122. INTRODUCTION TO POINT SET TOPOLOGY. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 110 or 146, or equivalent. Connec- 
tedness, compactness, transformations, homeomorphisms; 
application of these concepts to various spaces, wi thbarticu- 
lar attention to the Euclidean plane. (Dancis) 

MATH 123. INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY. (3) 



Prerequisite, MATH 103 and 122, or equivalent. Chains, 
cycles, homology groups for surfaces, the fundamental 
group. (Green) 

MATH 124. INTRODUCTION TO PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. Recommended for 
students in the College of Education. Elementary projective 
geometry, combining synthetic algebraic approaches, pro- 
jective transformations, harmonic division, cross ratio, 
projective coordinates, properties of conies. (Jackson) 

MATH 126. INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY. 
(3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 022 or equivalent. The differential 
geometry of curves and surfaces, curvature and torsion, 
movingf rames, thef undamental differential forms, intrinsic 
geometry of a surface. iCorrel) 

MATH 128. EUCLIDEAN GEOMETRY. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. Recom- 
mended for students in the College of Education. Axiomatic 
method, models, properties of axioms; proofs of some basic 
theorems from the axioms; modern geometry of the triangle, 
circle, and sphere. (Reinhart) 

MATH 144. ELEMENTARY LOGIC AND ALGORITHMS. (3) 
Prerequisites, MATH 021 or consent ot instructor. Anelemen- 
tary development of propositional logic, predicate logic, 
set algebra, and Boolean algebra, with ad iscussion of Markov 
algorithms, Turing machines and recursivef unctions. Topics 
include Post productions, word problems, and formal lan- 
guages. (Also listed as CMSC 144.) (Staff) 

MATH 146. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. Sets, rela- 
tions, mappings. Construction of the real number system 
starting with Peano postulates; algebraic structures asso- 
ciated with the construct ion; Archimedean order, sequential 
completeness and equivalent properties of ordered fields. 
Finite and infinite sets, denumberable and non-denumber- 
able sets. (Ehrlich) 

MATH 147. AXIOMATIC SET THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 103 or 146 or consent of instructor. 
Development of a system of axiomatic set theory, choice 
principles, induction principles, ordinal arithmetic includ- 
ing discussion of cancellation laws, divisibility, canonical 
expansions, cardinal arithmetic includingconnectionswith 
theaxiomofchoice, Hartog'stheorem.Konig'stheorem, prop- 
erties of regular, singular, and inaccessible cardinals. 

(Lopez-Escobar) 

MATH 148. INIRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL LOGIC. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 103 or 146 or 1 10. Formal propositTonal 
logic, completeness, independence, decidability of the sys- 
tem, formal quantificational logic, first-order axiomatic 
theories, extended Godel Completeness theorem, Lowen- 
heim-Skolem theorem, model-theoretical applications. 

(Karp) 

MATH 162 ANALYSIS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS I. 
(3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 021 or consent of instructor. Credit will 
be given for only one of the courses MATH 022 and MATH 
162. Calculus of functions of several real variables; limits, 
continuity, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line 
and surface integrals, vector-valued functions, theorems of 
Green, Gaussand Stokes. Physical applications. (Thiscourse 
cannot be counted toward a major in mathematics.) 

(Martin) 

MATH 163. ANALYSIS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS II. 
(3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 162 or 022 or consent of instructor. 
Credit will be given for only one of the courses MATH 113 or 
MATH 163. The complex field. Infinite processes for real 
and complex numbers. Calculusof complex functions. Analy- 
tic functions and analytic continuation. Theory of residues 
and application to evaluation of integrals. Conformal map- 
ping. (This course cannot De coumea towara a major in 
mathematics.) (Sedgewick) 

MATH 164. ANALYSIS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS III. 
(3) 

Prerequisite, MATH 066 and MATH 163, orconsent of instruc- 
tor. Fourier and Laplace transforms. Evaluation of the com- 
plex inversion integral by the theory of residues. Applica- 
tions to systems of ordinary and partial differential equa- 
tions. (This course cannot be counted toward a major in 
mathematics.) (Berg) 

MATH 165. INTRODUCTION TO PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL 
EQUATIONS. (3) 

Prerequisites, MATH 1 10 or MATH 162. Topics will include 
one dimensional wave equation; linear second order equa- 
tions in two variables, separations of variables and Fourier 
series; Sturm-Liouville theory. (Mackie) 

MATH 168. NUMERICAL METHUUb run a^itm io is minU 
ENGINEERS. (3) 



Arts and Sciences 



137 



Prerequisite, MATH 022 or 162 and MATH 066. Inter- 
polation, numerical differentiation and integration, num- 
erical solution of polynomial and transcendental equa- 
tions, least squares, systems of linear equations, num- 
erical solution of ordinary differential equations, errors 
in numerical calculations. (This course cannot be 
counted toward a major in mathematics.) 

(Thaler) 

MATH 170. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS I. (3) 

Pre- or co-requisite: MATH 1 10. Solution of linear systems 
of equations and nonlinear equations in one variable. Least 
square and Chebyshev approximation. Numerical differenti- 
ation, integration, and solution of ordinary differential equa- 
tions. (Listed also as CMSC 170.) (Vandergraft) 

MATH 171. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II. (3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or 104, MATH 110.CMSC/M 170. 
Linear systems of equations: norms, condition numbers, 
rounding error analysis, iterative methods; introduc- 
tion to numerical solution of partial differential equations. 
Nonlinear systems of equations: Newton's method, conver- 
gence and rate of convergence. Eigenvalue problems. 
(Listed also as CMSC 171.) (Vandergraft) 

MATH 181. INTRODUCTION TO NUMBER THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent 
of instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in pro- 
grams with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and 
science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually 
covered elsewhere in their curriculum. Axiomatic develop- 
ments of the real numbers. Elementary number theory. 

(Staff) 

MATH 182. INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent 
of instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in pro- 
grams with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and 
science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually 
covered elsewhere in their curriculum. Modern ideas in 
algebra and topics in the theory of equations. (Staff) 

MATH 183. INTRODUCTION TO GEOMETRY. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of 
instructor. Designedprimarilyforthose enrolled inprograms 
with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and 
science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually 
covered elsewhere in their curriculum. A study of the 
axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. (Staff) 

MATH 184. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS. (3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent 
of instructor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in pro- 
grams with emphasis in the teaching of mathematics and 
science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually 
covered elsewhere in their curriculum. A study of the 
limit concept and the calculus. (Previous knowledge of 
calculus is not required.) (Staff) 

MATH 185. SELECTED TOPICS FOR TEACHERS OF 
MATHEMATICS. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent 
of instructor. (Staff) 

MATH 189. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SUMMER 
INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF SCIENCE AND 
MATHEMATICS. SEMINAR. (1-3) 

Lectures and discussion to deepen the student's apprecia- 
tion of mathematics as a logical discipline and as a medium 
of expression. Special emphasis on topics relevant to cur- 
rent mathematical curriculum studies and revisions. 

(Staff) 

MATH 190. HONORS SEMINAR. (2) 

Prerequisite, permission of the departmental Honors Com- 
mittee. Reports by students on mathematical literature: 
solution of various problems. (Brace! 

MATH 191. SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS. 
(VARIABLE CREDIT) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Topics of special 
interest to advanced undergraduate students will be offered 
occasionally under thegeneralguidanceof thedepartmental 
Committee on Undergraduate Studies. Honors students reg- 
ister for reading courses under this number. (Brace) 

STAT 100. APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS I. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH021. Basicconceptsof probability. Ran- 
dom variables and distribution functions. Standard distribu- 
tions. Moments. Conditional distributions and their mo- 
ments. Sampling distributions. Laws of large numbers and 
Lindeberg-Levy's theorems. (Not for graduate credit in 
mathematics.) (Syski) 

STAT 101. APPLIED PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS II. (3) 



Prerequisite, STAT 100. Point estimation, sufficient un- 
biased and consistent estimators. Minimum variance and 
maximum likelihood estimators. Multivariate normal distri- 
bution. Sampling distributions. Interval estimation. Test- 
ing hypotheses. Regression and linear hypotheses. Experi- 
mental designs. Sequential tests, elements of nonparame- 
tric methods. (Not for graduate credit in mathematics.) 

(Connell) 

STAT 110. INTRODUCTION TO PROBABILITY THEORY. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 110 or if MATH 110 taken concurrently, 
STAT 050. Probability space and basic properties of prob- 
ability measure. Random variables and their distribution 
functions, induced probability spaces. Multi-dimensional 
distribution functions. Characteristic functions. Limit 
theorems. (Syski) 

STAT 111. INTRODUCTION TO STOCHASTIC PROCESSES. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, STAT 110, or MATH 110 and STAT 050. 
Elementary stochastic processes. Renewal process random 
walks, branching process, discrete Markov chains, first 
passage times. Markov chains with a continuous parameter, 
birth and death processes. Stationary processes and their 
spectral properties. (Mikulski) 

STAT 120. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS I. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 110, or STAT 100 and MATH 110 
Short review of probability concepts including sampling 
distributions. Interval estimation. Theory of order statis- 
tics. Tolerance limits. Limit distributions and stochastic 
convergence. Sufficient statistics. Completeness and 
stochastic independence. Rao-Blackwell theorem. 

(Rastogi) 

STAT 121. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS II. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 120, or STAT 101 and MATH 110. 
Loss and risk functions. Statistical decisions. Optimality 
criteria. Uniformly minimum risk procedures. Bayesian 
risk, mini max principle. Point, estimation theory. Statistical 
hypotheses and optimal tests. Likelihood ratio tests. Ele- 
ments of linear hypotheses, analysis of variance and se- 
quential theory. (Connell) 

STAT 150. REGRESSION AND VARIANCE ANALYSIS. (3) 

Prerequisite, STAT 101 or STAT 120. One. two, three 
and four way layouts in analysis of variance fixed effects 
models, linear regression in several variables, Gauss-Mar- 
kov-theorem, multiple regression analysis, experimental 
designs. (Mikulski) 

STAT 164. INTRODUCTION TO BIOSTATISTICS. (3) 

Prerequisite, one semester of calculus and junior standing. 
Probabilistic models. Sampling. Some applications of prob- 
ability in genetics. Experimental designs. Estimation of ef- 
fects of treatment. Comparative experiments. Fisher-Irwin 
test. Wilcoxon tests for paired comparisons. (Syski) 

STAT 170. LINEAR AND NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 021 or MATH 100. Duality theorem and 
minimax theorem for finite matrix games. Structure of linear 
and nonlinear solutions with perturbations. Various solu- 
tion techniques of linear, quadratic, and convex program- 
ming methods. Special integer programming models (trans- 
portation and traveling salesman problems.). Network theory 
with max-flow-m in-cut theorem. (Mikulski) 

For Graduate Students 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

Algebra. 200, 201, 202, 203, 206, 207, 208, 209, 271. 290, 291 

Analysis. 212, 215. 216, 218, 219, 272, 278, 280, 281. 286, 

287, 288, 289 
Geometry and Topology. 204, 205, 221. 222, 223, 224, 225. 

226, 227, 228. 229, 273, 290, 291 
Applied and Numberical Mathematics. 252, 255, 256. 257 
258, 259, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266. 267, 268. 269. 
274 
Statistics and Probability. (STAT) 200, 201, 210, 212, 213, 

220, 221. 223, 240, 241, 270, 275 
Logic and Foundations. 240. 244, 277, 298 
Research. 399, 499 
MATH 200. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I. (3) 

(Staff) 
MATH 201. ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II. (3) 

(Staff) 
MATH 202. HOMOLOGICAL ALGEBRA. (3) 

(Staff) 
MATH 203. COMMUTATIVE ALGEBRA. (3) 

(Staff) 
MATH 204. 205. TOPOLOGICAL GROUPS. (3, 3) 

(Staff) 
MATH 206. ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY I. (3) 
MATH 207. ALGEBRAIC NUMBER THEORY II. (3) 



7 36 



Arts and Sciences 



MATH 208. RING THEORY. (3) 

MATH 209. GROUP THEORY. (3) 

MATH 212. SPECIAL FUNCTIONS. (3) 

MATH 215^ 216. ADVANCED ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL 

EQUATIONS. (3, 3) 
MATH 217. BANACH ALGEBRAS. (3) 
MATH 218, 219. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS. (3, 3) 
MATH 221. DIFFERENTIABLE MANIFOLDS. (3) 
MATH 222. DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY. (3) 
MATH 223, 224. ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY. (3. 3) 
MATH 225. TOPOLOGY I. (3) 
MATH 226. TOPOLOGY II. (3) 
MATH 227, 228. ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY. (3, 3) 
MATH 229. DIFFERENTIAL TOPOLOGY. (3) 
MATH 240. CONSISTENCY PROOFS IN SET THEORY. (3) 
MATH 244. MATHEMATICAL LOGIC I. (3) 
MATH 245. MATHEMATICAL LOGIC II. (3) 
MATH 246. MODEL THEORY. (3) 
MATH 247. RECURSIVE FUNCTION THEORY. (3) 
MATH 250, 251. EIGENVALUE AND BOUNDARY VALUE 

PROBLEMS. (3, 3) 
MATH 252. VARIATIONAL METHODS. (3) 
MATH 255, 256. NUMERICAL METHODS IN ORDINARY 

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (3, 3) 
MATH 259. INTRODUCTION TO CONTINUUM MECHANICS 

(3) 
MATH 261, 
MATH 263. 
MATH 264. 
MATH 265. 
MATH 266. 
MATH 267. 



ANA- 



262. FLUID DYNAMICS. (3, 3) 

LINEAR ELASTICITY. (3) 

NON-LINEAR ELASTICITY. (3) 

PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (3) 

ELLIPTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. (3) 

268. ADVANCED LINEAR NUMERICAL 

LYSIS. (3, 3) 
MATH 269. ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING. 

(3) 
MATH 271. SELECTED TOPICS IN ALGEBRA. (3) 
MATH 272. SELECTED TOPICS IN ANALYSIS. (3) 
MATH 273. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOMETRY AND 

TOPOLOGY. (3) 
MATH 274. SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 

(3) 
MATH 277. SELECTED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL LOGIC. 

(3) 
MATH 278. SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPLEX ANALYSIS. (3) 
MATH 280, 281. LINEAR SPACES. (3, 3) 
MATH 282, 283. INTERPOLATION AND APPROXIMATION. 

(3,3) 
MATH 286. REAL ANALYSIS I. (3) 
MATH 287. COMPLEX ANALYSIS I. (3) 
MATH 288. COMPLEX ANALYSIS II. (3) 
MATH 289. REAL ANALYSIS II. (3) 
MATH 290, 291. LIE GROUPS. (3, 3) 
MATH 292. COMMUTATIVE ALGEBRA. (3) 
MATH 293. HOMOLOGICAL ALGEBRA. (3) 
MATH 294, 295. ADVANCED CLASSICAL ANALYSIS. (3, 3) 
MATH 296. POINT SET TOPOLOGY. (3) 
MATH 298. PRO-SEMINAR IN RESEARCH. (1) 
MATH 399. THESIS RESEARCH. 
MATH 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. 

STAT 200. PROBABILITY THEORY I. (3) 

STAT 201. PROBABILITY THEORY II. (3) 

STAT 210. APPLIED STOCHASTIC PROCESSES. (3) 

STAT 212. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES I. (3) 

STAT 213. STOCHASTIC PROCESSES II. (3) 

STAT 220. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS I. (3) 

STAT 221. MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS II. (3) 

STAT 222. ADVANCED STATISTICS I. (3) 

STAT 223. ADVANCED STATISTICS II. (3) 

STAT 240. MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS. (3) 

STAT 241. SAMPLING THEORY. (3) 

STAT 250. NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS. (3) 

STAT 270. SELECTED TOPICS IN STATISTICS. (3) 

STAT 275. SELECTED TOPICS IN PROBABILITY 



MICROBIOLOGY 

PROFESSOR AND ACTING CHAIRMAN: Hetrick. 
PROFESSORS-. Doetsch, Faber (Emeritus), Hansen, Laffer, 

Pelczar. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Young. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Cook, MacQuillan, Roberson, 

Vaituzis. 
LECTURERS: Faber, Janicki, Stadtman. 
ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR: Howell. 



The Department of Microbiology has as its pri- 
mary aim providing the student with thorough and 
rigorous training in microbiology. This entails knowl- 
edge of the basic concepts of bacterial cytology, 
physiology, taxonomy, and genetics, as well as an 
understanding of the biology of infectious disease, 
immunology, general virology, and various applica- 
tions of microbiological principles to public health 
and industrial processes. In addition, the Depart- 
ment pursues a broad and vigorous program of basic 
research, and encourages original thought and in- 
vestigation in the above mentioned areas. 

The Department also provides desirable courses 
for students majoring in allied departments who 
wish to obtain vital, supplementary information. 
Every effort has been made to present the subject 
matter of Microbiology as a basic core of material 
that is pertinent to all biological sciences. 

MICROBIOLOGY CURRICULUM 

The field of microbiology is such that an inten- 
sive study of it presupposes a broad undergraduate 
curriculum and does not begin until the student 
begins his graduate career. Accordingly, the cur- 
riculum outlined below, which leads to a Bachelors 
degree, includes the basic courses in microbiology 
and allied fields. 

A student planning a major in microbiology 
should consult his adviser during the first year. The 
supporting courses should be chosen only from the 
biological or physical sciences. 

No course with a grade less than "C" may be 
used to satisfy major requirements. 

The Department has an Honors Program and in- 
formation concerning this program may be obtained 
from the Department. 

Courses required in a major, and supporting 
courses: MICB 001— General Microbiology (4), 
MICB 081— Applied Microbiology (4), MICB 101— 
Pathogenic Microbiology (4), MICB 103— Immuno- 
logy (4), MICB 111— General Virology (4), MICB 
151— Microbioal Physiology (4), MICB 160— Sys- 
tematic Bacteriology (2), MICB 162— Microbio- 
logical Literature (1), CHEM 008, 009— General 
Chemistry (4, 4), CHEM 031, 033— Elements of Or- 
ganic Chemistry (3, 3), CHEM 019— Elements of 
Quantitative Analysis (4) or MATH 014, 015— Ele- 
mentary Calculus (3, 3), CHEM 161, 163— Biochem- 
istry (2, 2), MATH 010, Oil— Introduction to Mathe- 
matics (3, 3), PHYS 010, Oil— Fundamentals of 
Physics (4, 4). 

Certain closely related and relevant courses of- 
fered by other academic departments may be sub- 
stituted for those specified in the major require- 
ments, provided prior approval is obtained in each 
case. 
MICB 001. GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY. (4) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Two lec- 
tures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, two semesters of chemistry. The biology of 
microorganisms, with special reference to the bacteria. 
Fundamental principles of microbiology as revealed 
through an examination of the structure, physiology, ge- 
netics and ecology of microorganisms. 



Arts and Sciences 



J 39 



MICB 081. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 001. The applica- 
tion of microorganisms and microbiological principles to 
milk, dairy products, and foods, industrial processes; 
soil,- water and sanitation operations. (Kaplan) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

MICB 101. PATHOGENIC MICROBIOLOGY. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 001. The role of 
microorganisms in the diseases of man and animals with 
emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of micro- 
organisms, types of disease, modes of disease transmis- 
sion, prophylactic, therapeutic and epidemiological as- 
pects. (Roberson) 

MICB 103. IMMUNOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 101. Infection 
and resistance; principles and types of immunity; hyper- 
sensitiveness. Fundamental techniques of major diagnos- 
tic immunological reactions and their application. 

(Roberson) 

MICB 104. HISTORY OF MICROBIOLOGY. (1) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, 
a major or minor in microbiology. History and integration 
of the fundamental discoveries of the science. The mod- 
ern aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermentation, and im- 
munity in relation to early theories. (Doetsch) 

MICB 108. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC HEALTH. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequ- 
isite, MICB 001. History, characteristic features, and 
epidemiology of the important communicable diseases, 
public health administration and responsibilities; vital 
statistics. (Faber) 

MICB 111. GENERAL VIROLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, MICB 101 or equiva- 
lent. Basic concepts regarding the nature of viruses and 
their properties, together with techniques for their charac- 
terization and identification. (Hetrick) 

MICB 121. MICROBIAL FERMENTATIONS. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
The application of quantitative techniques for measure- 
ment of enzyme reactions, mutations, fermentation, 
analyses, and other physiological processes of microorgan- 
isms. (Cook) 

MICB 135. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Prerequisites, MICB 001, CHEM 
031, and CHEM 033. Introduction to the chemical 
activities of microorganisms and their industrial applica- 
tion. (MacQuillan) 

MICB 151. MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, 8 credits in microbiology 
and CHEM 031, 033, or equivalent. Aspects of the growth, 
death, and energy transactions of microorganisms are con- 
sidered, as well as the effects of the physical and chemi- 
cal environment on them. (MacQuillan) 

MICB 160. SYSTEMATIC BACTERIOLOGY. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 
8 credits in microbiology. History of bacterial classifica- 
tion; genetic relationships; international codes of nomen- 
clature; bacterial variation as it affects classification. 

(Hansen) 

MICB 162. MICROBIOLOGICAL LITERATURE. (1) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prereq- 
uisite, a major in microbiology. Introduction to periodical 
literature, methods, interpretation and presentation of 
reports. (Doetsch) 

MICB 181. MICROBIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Summer session. Prereq- 
uisite, 16 credits in microbiology. Registration only upon 
the consent of the instructor. This course is arranged to 
provide qualified majors in microbiology and majors in al- 
lied fields an opportunity to pursue specific micro- 
biological problems under the supervision of a member of 
the Department. (Faber) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

MICB 201. MEDICAL MYCOLOGY. (4) 

MICB 202. GENETICS OF MICROORGANISMS. (2) 

MICB 203. MICROBIAL GENETICS LABORATORY. (2) 



MICB 204. BACTERIAL METABOLISM. (2) 
MICB 206, 208. SPECIAL TOPICS. (1-4, 1-4) 
MICB 210. VIROLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE. (2) 
MICB 211. VIROLOGY AND TISSUE CULTURE LABORA- 
TORY. (2) 
MICB 214. ADVANCED BACTERIAL METABOLISM. (1) 
MICB 271. CYTOLOGY OF BACTERIA. (4) 
MICB 280. SEMINAR-RESEARCH METHODS. (1) 
MICB 282. SEMINAR-MICROBIOLOGICAL LITERATURE. (1) 
MICB 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Var.) 
MICB 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Arranged) 

MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR: Munn. 

PROFESSORS: Benesch and Benedict. 

RESEARCH PROFESSOR: Zwanzig 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Knsher, DeRocco, Sengers, Ginter. 

VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Tilford (P. T.). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Verbeke and Spain. 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Gillespie. 

The Institute for Molecular Physics, a depart- 
ment in the College of Arts and Sciences, comprises 
a faculty interested in theoretical and experimental 
studies in the general area of molecular interaction. 
The Institute thus serves as an ideal place to bring 
together physicists and chemists to work on prob- 
lems of mutual interest to the advantage of both, 
and the faculty is made up of members of each of 
these disciplines. Since the faculty of the Institute 
feels strongly that students should fulfill the under- 
graduate requirements in one of the traditional de- 
partments to insure a broad background in a funda- 
mental stubject, no undergraduate degree is offered. 
Members of the Institute teach both undergraduate 
and graduate courses in the Department of Chemis- 
try and the Department of Physics and Astronomy 
and supervise thesis research of graduate students 
in these departments. The Institute also participates 
in a graduate degree program in Chemical Physics 
which is jointly administered by the Institute, the 
Department of Chemistry, and the Department of 
Physics and Astronomy. This program is described 
in the Graduate School catalog. 



MUSIC 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Ulrich. 

PROFESSORS: Grodon, Grentzner, Heim, Helm, Johnson, 

McCorkle, Moss, Traver. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Berman, Blum, de Vermond. 
Head, Nossaman, Pennington, Springmann, Taylor. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Anderson, Diemer, Fligel, Galla- 
gher, Garvey, Haley, McClelland, Mack, Montgomery, 
Olson, Payerle, Reger, Serwer, Shelley, Schumacher, Skid- 
more. Wakefield, Winden. 

LECTURERS: True and Wilson. 

INSTRUCTORS: Barnett, Beatty, Crisp (P. T .), Ethendge, 
Fanos, Harris, Heath, Koernor, Mueller, Shreiber, Steinke, 
Wachhaus. 

The functions of the Department are (1) to help 
the general student develop sound critical judgment 
and discriminating taste in the art of music; (2) to 
provide professional training based on a foundation 
in the liberal arts; (3) to prepare the student for 
graduate work in the field; and (4) to prepare him to 
teach in the public schools. To this end, two degrees 
are offered: the Bachelor of Music, with a major in 
theory and composition, history and literature, or 
the Science degree, with a major in music educa- 
tion, is offered in the College of Education; this pro- 
gram, however, is administered within the Music 
Department. 

Courses in music theory, literature, and applied 
music are open to all students who have completed 



140 



Arts and Sciences 



the specified prerequisites or their equivalents. The 
University Bands, Chamber Chorus, Choir, Madrigal 
Singers, Men's Glee Club, Orchestra, and Women's 
Chorus, as well as the smaller ensembles, are like- 
wise open to qualified students. 

THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Music is designed for students who wish to 
prepare for music teaching on the college level. A 
list of specific courses is available in the Depart- 
mental office. A grade of C or above is required in 
each major course. The course requirements in the 
three major areas may be summarized as follows: 

Theory and History and Applied 
Composition Literature Music 



43 sem. hrs. 43 sem. hrs. 



Mojor in 

Academic Courses: 

Specified- 

Unspecified 8 8 

Theory ond Literature: 

Lower Division 27 23 

Upper Division 16 22 

Applied Music: 26 24 

In addition, eight semester hours in ensemble courses 



43 sem. hrs. 
9 

23 
13 
32 



THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree with a major in music is designed for stu- 
dents whose interests are cultural rather than pro- 
fessional. The department requirements include 
nineteen semester hours in music theory, eighteen 
semester hours in music history and literature, ten 
semester hours in applied music, in addition to one 
semester hour of ensemble credit for each semester 
in residence. A list of specific courses is available in 
the Departmental office. A grade of C or above is 
required in each major course. 



MUSC 001. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC. (3) 

Open only to music or music education majors; other stu- 
dents take MUSC 020. MUSC 001 and 020 may not both 
be counted for credit. A study of the forms and styles of 
music, leading to an intelligent appreciation of the art and 
providing a foundation for more advanced courses in the 
Department of Music. (Skidmore, Tatnall) 

MUSC 004. MEN'S GLEE CLUB. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until 
a total of eight semester hours of credit has been earned; 
the music studied will cover a cycle of about eight se- 
mesters. (Traver) 

MUSC 005. WOMEN'S CHORUS. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until 
a total of eight semester hours of credit has been earned; 
the music studied will cover a cycle of about eight se- 
mesters. (Traver) 

MUSC 006. ORCHESTRA. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until 
a total of eight semester hours of credit has been earned; 
the music studied will cover a cycle of about eight semes- 
ter. (Roger) 

MUSC 007, 008. THEORY OF MUSIC. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and three laboratory hours per week. A 
fundamental course in the elements of music. Study of 
rhythms, scales, chord structures, and tonalities through 
ear training, sight singing, and keyboard drill. The student 
must achieve a grade of C in MUSC 008 in order to register 
for MUSC 070. (Payerle and Staff) 

MUSC 009. CHAMBER MUSIC ENSEMBLE. (1) 

This course does not fulfill the ensemble requirements 
of the various curricula. Three laboratory hours per week. 
Rehearsal and performance of selected works for small 
ensembles of strings, winds, and piano or small vocal en- 
sembles. May be repeated for credit; the music studied 
will cover a cycle of about six semesters. (Staff) 

MUSIC 010. BAND. (1) 

Open to any student who can qualify. May be taken until 
a total of eight semester hours of credit has been earned; 
the music studied will cover a cycle of about eight semes- 
ters. (Wakefield) 



MUSC 015. CHAPEL CHOIR. (1) 

Open to all students in the University, subject to the Di- 
rector's approval. May be taken until a total of eight se- 
mester hours of credit has been earned. (Springmann) 

MUSC 016. FUNDAMENTALS FOR THE CLASSROOM 
TEACHER. (3) 
Open to students majoring in elementary education or 
childhood education; other students take MUSC 007. 
MUSC 007 and 016 may not both be counted for credit. 
The fundamentals of music theory and practice, related 
to the needs of the classroom and kindergarten teacher, 
and organized in accord with the six-area concept of mu- 
sical learning. (Fanos and Staff) 

MUSC 020. SURVEY OF MUSIC LITERATURE. (3) 

Three lectures and one laboratory hour per week. Open 
to all students except music and music education ma- 
jors. MUSC 001 and 020 may not both be taken for 
credit. A study of the principles upon which music is 
based, and an introduction to the musical repertoires 
performed in America today. (Gordon and Staff) 

MUSC 021, 022. CLASS VOICE. (2, 2) 

Four hours per week. A laboratory course in which a vari- 
ety of voices and vocal problems are represented. Princi- 
ples of correct breathing as applied to singing; fundamentals 
of tone production and diction. Students are taught to 
develop their own voices. Repertoire of folk songs and 
songs of the Classical and Romantic periods. (Nossaman) 

MUSC 023, 024, CLASS PIANO. (2, 2) 

Four hours per week. Functional piano training for begin- 
ners. Development of techniques useful for school and 
community playing. Basic piano techniques; chord, arpeg- 
gio, and scale techniques; melody and song playing; simple 
accompaniements, improvisation for accompaniments 
and rhythms; sight reading and transposition, and playing 
by ear. MUSC 024, continuation of MUSC 023; elemen- 
tary repertoire is begun. (de Vermond) 

MUSC 031, 032. ADVANCED -CLASS VOICE. (2 2) 

Four hours per week. Prerequisite, MUSC 022 or equiva- 
lent vocal training. Continuation of MUSC 022, with more 
advanced repertoire for solo voice and small ensembles. 
A special section for music-education majors will in- 
clude the study of methods and materials for teaching 
class voice. (Pennington) 

MUSC 033, 034. ADVANCED CLASS PIANO. (2, 2) 

Four hours per week. Prerequisite, MUSC 024 or equiva- 
lent piano training. Advanced keyboard techniques. Con- 
tinuation of skills introduced in MUSC 024; transposi- 
tion, modulation, and sight reading; methods of teaching 
functional piano. MUSC 034, development of style in 
playing accompaniments and in playing for community 
singing. More advanced repertoire. (de Vermond) 

MUSC 061, 062, 063, 064, 065, 066, 067, 068. CLASS STUDY 
OF ORCHESTRAL AND BAND INSTRUMENTS. (2 each 
course) 
First and second semesters alternately. Open only to majors 
in music education (instrumental option). Four laboratory 
hours per week. A study of the instruments with emphasis 
on ensemble training. The student will acquire an ade- 
quate playing technique on two to four instruments, and 
an understanding of the acoustical and construction 
principles of the others. MUSC 061, Violin; MUSC 062, 
Cello and Bass; MUSC 063, Clarinet; MUSC 064 Flute, 
Oboe, Bassoon, and Saxophone; 065, Cornet; MUSC 066, 
Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, and Tuba; MUSC 067, 
Percussion; MUSC 068, Advanced Strings. (Staff) 

MUSC 070, 071. ADVANCED THEORY OF MUSIC. (4, 4) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 008 with a grade of at least C. Three 
lectures and two laboratory hours per week. An integrated 
course of written harmony, keyboard harmony, and eartrain- 
ing. Continuation of the principles studied in MUSC 008 
Harmonic progressions; MUSC 070, eighteenth-century 
chorale style; MUSC 071, nineteenth-century styles in- 
culding chromatic and modulatory techniques. Realization 
of figured basses, and composition in the smaller forms. 
Advanced study of solfege, with drill in melodic, rhythmic, 
and harmonic dictation. Application of harmonic principles 
to the keyboard. (Payerle and Staff) 

MUSC 080. CLASS STUDY OF STRING INSTRUMENTS. (2) 
First semester. Open only to majors in music education 
(vocal option). Four laboratory hours per week. Basic princi- 
ples of string playing, and a survey of all string instruments. 

(Berman) 

MUSC 081. CLASS STUDY OF WIND AND PERCUSSION IN- 
STRUMENTS. (2) 
Second semester. Open only to majors in music education 
(vocal option). Four laboratory hours per week. A survey of 
wind and percussion instruments with emphasis on ensem- 
ble training. The student will acquire an adequate playing 



Arts and Sciences 



147 



technique on one instrument and gain an understanding 
of the acoustical and construction principles of the others. 

fStaff) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

MUSC 120, 121, HISTORY OF MUSIC. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MUSC 001 or 020 and junior standing. A 
study of musical styles from their origins in western Eu- 
rope to their present-day manifestations. The interaction of 
music and other cultural activities. MUSC 120, the Greek 
period to Bach; MUSC 121, Bach to the present. 

(Bernstein) 

MUSC 125. HONORS READING COURSE. (2-3) 

Prerequisites, junior standing and consent of Honors Com- 
mittee. Selected readings in the history, literature, and 
theory of music. The course may be repeated for credit at 
the discretion of the Committee. (Staff) 

MUSC 130, 131. MUSIC LITERATURE SURVEY FOR THE NON- 
MAJOR. (3, 3) 
Either semester may be taken separately. Prerequisite, 
MUSC 020 or the equivalent. Open to all students except 
music and music-education majors. Selected compositions 
are studied from the standpoint of the informed listener. 
MUSC 130, choral music, opera, and art song; MUSC 131 
orchestral, chamber, and keyboard music. 

(Pennington, Gordon) 

MUSC 141. MUSICAL FORM. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 070, 071. A study of the organizing 
principles of musical composition, their interaction in mu- 
sical forms, and their functions in different styles. 

(Staff) 

MUSC 143, 144. COMPOSITION. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 070, 071. Principles of musical com- 
position, and their application to the smaller forms. Orig- 
inal writing in nineteenth and twentieth century musical 
idioms for various media. (Staff) 

MUSC 145, 146. COUNTERPOINT. (2, 2) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 070, 071. A course in eighteenth-cen- 
tury contrapuntal techniques. Study of devices of imitation 
in the invention and the choral prelude. Original writing in 
the smaller contrapuntal forms. (Diemer) 

MUSC 147, 148. ORCHESTRATION. (2-3, 3) 

Prerequisites, MUSC 070, 071. A study of the ranges, mu- 
sical functions, and technical characteristics of the instru- 
ments, and their color possibilities in various combinations. 
Practical experience in orchestrating for small and large en- 
sembles. MUSC 147 will be offered in an intensified form 
during the summer session, and may be taken for three 
hours credit with the consent of the instructor. (Staff) 

MUSC 149. MODAL COUNTERPOINT. (2) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 071 or the equivalent. An introduction 
to the contrapuntal techniques of the sixteenth century: the 
structure of the modes, composition of modal melodies, 
and contrapuntal writing for two, three, and four voices. 

(Diemer) 

MUSC 150. HARMONIC AND CONTRAPUNTAL PRACTICES OF 
THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. (2) 
Prerequisites, MUSC 071 and 145 or the equivalents. A 
theoretical study of twentieth-century materials: scales, 
modes, intervals, chord structures, polyharmony, and serial 
and twelve-tone organization. (Diemer) 

MUSC 160, 161. CONDUCTING. (2, 2) 

MUSC 160 or equivalent is prerequisite to MUSC 161. A 
laboratory course in conducting vocal and instrumental 
groups. Baton technique, score reading, rehearsal techni- 
ques, tone production, style, and interpretation. Music of all 
periods will be introduced. (Traver) 

MUSC 162. WORKSHOP IN CHORAL CONDUCTING. (2-3) 
Summer session only. Prerequisites, MUSC 070, 071 or 
equivalent, and senior standing. A study of conducting tech- 
niques, choral problems, score reading, rehearsal proce- 
dures, program building, andchoral bibliography. Inaddition 
to performing in class, participants will have an opportunity 
to conduct the University Chorus in rehearsal and perform- 
ance. Credit according to work done. (Traver) 

MUSC 163. CONTEMPORARY MUSIC. (3) 

Prerequisites, MUSC 120 and 121 or the equivalent. A 
study of music written in contemporary idioms since De- 
bussy. Changes in form and performing media in the twen- 
tieth century. Electronic music and other experimental 
types. (Diemer) 

MUSC 164. SOLO VOCAL LITERATURE. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. The study 
of solo vocal literature from the Baroque cantata to the art 
song of the present. The Lied, melodie, vocal chamber mu- 
sic, and theorchestralsongareexamined. (Pennington) 



MUSC 165. KEYBOARD MUSIC. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of harpsichord, organ, and piano music from 
the Baroque period to the present. Suites, sonatas, and 
smaller forms are studied with emphasis on changes of style 
and idiom. (Bernstein) 

MUSC 166. SURVEY OF THE OPERA. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. A study of 
the music, librettos, and composers of the standard 
operas. (Bernstein) 

MUSC 167. SYMPHONIC MUSIC. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. The study 
of orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. 
The concerto, symphony, overture, and other forms are ex- 
amined. (McCorkle) 

MUSC 168. CHAMBER MUSIC. (3) 

Prerequisite MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of chamber music from the early Baroque pe- 
riod to the present. Music for trio sonata, stringquartet and 
quintet, and combinations of piano and string instruments 
is studied. (Ulnch) 

MUSC 169. CHORAL MUSIC. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 120, 121, or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the 
present, with discussion of related topics such as Gregorian 
chant, vocal chamber music, etc. (McCorkle) 

MUSC 175. CANON AND FUGUE. (3) 

Prerequisite, MUSC 146 or the equivalent. Composition and 
analysis of the canon and fugue in the styles of the eigh- 
teenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. 

MUSC 180. ACOUSTICS FOR MUSICIANS. (3) 

Prerequisites, MUSC 071 or the equivalent, and senior or 
graduate standing in music. The basic physics of music, 
acoustics of musical instruments and music theory, physio- 
logical acoustics, and musico-architectural acoustics. 

(Staff) 

MUSC 182. CHAMBER MUSIC REPERTOIRE. (3) 

Four hours per week. Prerequisite, graduate standing as a 
major in performance. A systematic study, through perform- 
ance, of diversified chamber music for the standard media. 
Repertoire covered will be determined by the personnel 
available in the class. May be repeated for credit. 

(Staff) 

MUSC 185. MUSIC PEDAGOGY. (3) 

Conference course. Pre- or co-requisite, MUSC 152 or a 
more advanced course in applied music. A study of major 
pedagogical treatises in music, and an evaluation of peda- 
gogical techniques, materials, and procedures. (Staff) 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

MUSC 200. ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

(3) 
MUSC 201. SEMINAR IN MUSIC. (3) 
MUSC 202. PRO-SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

OF MUSIC. (3) 
MUSC 203. SEMINAR IN MUSICOLOGY. (3) 
MUSC 204. AMERICAN MUSIC. (3) 
MUSC 206. ADVANCED MODAL COUNTERPOINT. (3) 
MUSC 207. THE CONTEMPORARY IDIOM. (3) 
MUSC 208. ADVANCED ORCHESTRATION. (3) 
MUSC 209. SEMINAR IN MUSICAL COMPOSITION. (3) 
MUSC 210. FACTORS IN MUSICAL LEARNING. (3) 
MUSC 211. SPECIAL STUDIES IN MUSIC. (3) 
MUSC 212 213. INTERPRETATION, PERFORMANCE, AND 

ANALYSIS OF THE STANDARD REPERTOIRE. (2-4. 2-4) 
MUSC 215. AESTHETICS OF MUSIC. (3) 

MUSC 218 TEACHING THE THEORY. HISTORY, AND LIT- 
ERATURE OF MUSIC. (3) 
MUSC 260. ADVANCED CONDUCTING. (3) 
MUSC 270 271 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES. 

(3,3) 
MUSC 300, 301. DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN MUSIC LITERA- 

TURE. (3, 3) 
MUSC 305. DOCTORAL SEMINAR IN MUSIC. (3) 
MUSC 306. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. (3) 
MUSC 312 313 314. INTERPRETATION, PERFORMANCE, 

AND PEDAGOGY. (4, 4, 4) 
MUSC 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (3-6) 
MUSC 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Arranged) 



J42 



Arts and Sciences 



APPLIED MUSIC 

A new student or one taking applied music for the 
first time at this University should register for MUSC 
999. He will receive the proper classification at the 
end of his first semester in the Department. Special 
fee of $40.00 per semester for each applied-music 
course. 

Section designation: Each student taking an ap- 
plied-music course should, in addition to registering 
for the proper course number, indicate the instru- 
ment chosen by adding a section as follows: 
Sec. A, Piano Sec. J, Bassoon 

Sec. B, Voice Sec. K, Horn 

Sec. C, Violin Sec. L, Trumpet 

Sec. D, Viola Sec. M, Trombone 

Sec. E, Cello Sec. N, Tuba 

Sec. F, Bass Sec. 0, Euphonium 

Sec. G, Flute Sec. P, Organ 

Sec. H, Oboe Sec. 0, Percussion 

Sec. I, Clarinet Sec. R, Saxophone 

MUSC 012. 013. APPLIED MUSIC. (2-4 Hours Each Course) 
Freshman course. One hour lesson and six practice hours 
per week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson 
and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four 
hours credit. The four-hour course is for piano majors in 
the B.Mus. curriculum only. Special fee of $40.00 per 
semester. (Staff) 

MUSC 052, 053. APPLIED MUSIC. (2-4 Hours Each Course) 
Sophomore course. Prerequisite, MUSC 013 on the same 
instrument. One hour lesson and six practice hours per 
week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and 
fifteen practice hours per week if taken for tour hours 
credit. The four-hour course is for instrumental majors in 
the B.Mus. curriculum only. Special fee of $40.00 per 
semester. (Staff) 

MUSC 054, 055. PIANO SIGHT READING, ACCOMPANYING 
AND IMPROVISATION. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, completion or current registration in MUSC 
052A. Four laboratory hours per week. A course designed 
to improve sight-reading fluency for pianists. Emphasis on 
vocal and instrumental accompanying and chamber music. 
Development of ability to improvise and transpose. 

MUSC 112, 113. APPLIED MUSIC. (2-4 Hours Each Course) 
Junior course. Prerequisite, MUSC 053 on the same in- 
strument. One hour lesson and six practice hours per 
week if taken for two hours credit; or one nour lesson 
and fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four 
hours credit. The four-hour course is for instrumental 
majors in the B.Mus. curriculum only. Special fee of 
$40.00 per semester. (Staff) 

MUSC 152, 153. APPLIED MUSIC. (2-4 Hours Each Course) 
Senior course. Prerequisite, MUSC 113 on the same in- 
strument. One hour lesson and six practice hours per 
week if taken for two hours credit; or one hour lesson and 
fifteen practice hours per week if taken for four hours 
credit. The four-hour course is for instrumental or vocal 
majors in the B.Mus. curriculum only. Special fee of 
$40.00 per semester. (Staff) 

For applied music on the graduate level, see MUSC 212, 
213, and MUSC 312, 313, and 314, above. 



PHILOSOPHY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Schlaretzki. 

PROFESSOR: Pasch. 

VISITING PROFESSOR: Walsh. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brown, Celorier, Perkins, Svenon- 

uis. 
VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Swinburne. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Goldstone. Kress, Lesher, Martin. 

Odell, Roelofs, Varnedoe. 

The Department of Philosophy presents visiting 
speakers from this country and abroad in its Collo- 
quium series, scheduled throughout the academic 
year. In addition, members of the Department and 
advanced graduate students lecture on topics of 
current significance in the Graduate Workshop and 
in the undergraduate Philosophy Club. 



The undergraduate course offerings of the De- 
partment of Philosophy are, as a group, intended 
both to satisfy the needs of persons wishing to make 
philosophy their major field and to provide ample 
opportunity for other students to explore the sub- 
ject. In general, the study of philosophy can contri- 
bute to the education of the university student by 
giving him experience in critical and imaginative 
reflection on fundamental concepts and principles, 
by acquainting him with some of the philosophical 
beliefs which have influenced and are influencing 
his own culture, and by familiarizing him with some 
classic philosophical writings through careful read- 
ing and discussion of them. Courses designed with 
these objectives primarily in mind are PHIL 001 
(Introduction to Philosophy), PHIL 041 (Elementary 
Logic and Semantics), PHIL 045 (Ethics), PHIL 
053 (Philosophy of Religion), and the historical 
courses 101 through 105. 

For students interested particularly in philo- 
sophical problems arising within their own special 
disciplines, a number of appropriate courses are 
available: PHIL 052 (Philosophy in Literature), PHIL 
056 (Philosophy of Science), PHIL 130 (The Conflict 
of Ideals in Western Civilization), PHIL 141 (Phi- 
losophy of Language), PHIL 147 (Philosophy of Art), 
PHIL 152 (Philosophy of History), PHIL 154 (Politi- 
cal and Social Philosophy), PHIL 156 (Topics in the 
Philosophy of Science), and PHIL 176 (Induction 
and Probability). 

The Departmental requirements for a major in 
philosophy are as follows: (1) a total of at least 30 
hours in philosophy, not including PHIL 001; (2) 
PHIL 045, 055, 101, 102, 104, and at least two 
courses numbered 150 or above; (3) a grade of "C" 
or better in each course counted toward the fulfill- 
ment of the major. 

For students of exceptional ability and interest 
in philosophy, the Department offers an Honors Pro- 
gram. Information regarding this special curriculum 
may be obtained from the departmental advisors. 

PHIL 001. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

An introduction to some of the main problems of philo- 
sophy, and to some of the main ways of dealing with these 
problems. (Staff) 

PHIL 041. ELEMENTARY LOGIC AND SEMANTICS. (3) 

An introductory study of logic and language, intended to 
help the student increase his ability to employ language 
with understanding and to reason correctly. Topics treated 
include the use and abuses of language, techniques for 
making sound inferences, and the logic of science. 

(Staff) 

PHIL 045. ETHICS. (3) 

An introduction to moral philosophy, including a critical 
examination of some important classic and contemporary 
systems of ethics, such as those of Aristotle, Kant Mill, 
and Dewey. (Staff) 

PHIL 052. PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE. (3) 

Reading and philosophical criticism of novels and dramas 
containing ideas significant for ethics, social policy and 
religion. (Staff) 

PHIL 053. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. (3) 

This course seeks to provide the student with the means 
by which he may approach intelligently the main prob- 
lems of religious thought: the nature of religious experi- 
ence, the forms of religious expression, the conflicting 
claims of religion and science, and the place of religion in 
the community and in the life of the individual. 

(Brown, Roelofs) 

PHIL 055. SYMBOLIC LOGIC I. (3) 

An introduction to the formal analysis of deductive rea- 
soning through formalization of arguments, truth table and 
natural deduction techniques for propositional logic and 
quantification theory, including identity and definite de- 
scriptions. (Staff) 

PHIL 056. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. (3) 

An introductory study of the aims, procedures, and re- 
sults of scientific inquiry. Topics discussed include the 



Arts and Sciences 



J 43 



formulation and testing of hypotheses, induction and 
probability, scientific Taws, theories and explanation, 
concept formation, and relationships among the special 
sciences. (Staff) 

PHIL 101. ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisites, six hours in philosophy. A history of Greek 
thought from its beginnings to the time of Justinian. The 
chief figures discussed: The Presocratic philosophers, 
Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, the Stoic philoso- 
phers, and Plotinus. (Celarier) 

PHIL 102. MODERN PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisites, six hours in philosophy. A history of phil- 
osophical thought in the West during the 16th, 17th, and 
18th centuries. The chief figures discussed: Bacon, Gali- 
leo, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, 
and Kant. 

PHIL 103. NINETEENTH-CENTURY PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisites, six hours in philosophy. A survey of phi- 
losophy in the nineteenth century through a consideration 
of such writers as Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Spen- 
cer, Marx, Comte, Mill, Mach, and Bradley. (Staff) 

PHIL 104. TWENTIETH-CENTURY PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisites, six hours in philosophy. A survey of phi- 
losophy in the twentieth century through a consideration 
of representative figures in England, Europe, and America. 
Among the theories to be studied are logical atomism (Rus- 
sell, Wittgenstein), positivism (Carnap, Ayer), existential- 
ism and phenomenology (Sartre, Husserl), naturalism and 
realism (Dewey, Santayana). (Brown) 

PHIL 105. PHILOSOPHY IN AMERICA. (3) 

Prerequisite, six hours in philosophy. A survey of philo- 
sophical thought in America from the eighteenth century to 
the present. Special attention is given to Edwards, Jeffer- 
son, Emerson, Royce, Pierce, James, and Dewey. 

PHIL 120. ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. Not offered on 
College Park campus. An examination of the major philo- 
sophical systems of the East, attempting to discover the 
relations between these and important ideas of Western 
thought. (Staff) 

PHIL 130. THE CONFLICT OF IDEALS IN WESTERN CIVILI- 
ZATION. (3) 
A critical and constructive philosophical examination of 
the assumptions, goals, and methods of contemporary 
democracy, fascism, socialism, and communism, with 
special attention to the ideological conflict between the 
U.S.A. and the U.S.S.R. (Staff) 

PHIL 141. PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE. )3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 041 or 055. An inquiry into the nature 
and function of language and other forms of symbolism. 

(Kress) 

PHIL 147. PHILOSOPHY OF ART. (3) 

An examination of the fundamental concepts in art and 
in esthetic experience generally. Readings from the works 
of artists, estheticians, critics and philosophers. 

(Brown) 

PHIL 151. ETHICAL THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 045. Contemporary problems having 
to do with the meaning of the principal concepts of ethics 
and with the nature of moral reasoning. 

(Roelofs, Schlaretzki) 

PHIL 152. PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. (3) 

An examination of the nature of historical knowledge and 
historical explanation, and of theories of the meaning 
of world history. (Staff) 

PHIL 154. POLITICAL AND SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

A systematic treatment of the main philosophical issues 
encountered in the analysis and evaluation of social 
(especially political) institutions. 

(Goldstone, Schlaretzki) 

PHIL 155. SYMBOLIC LOGIC II. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 055 or consent of instructor. Axio- 
matic development of the propositional calculus and the 
first-order functional calculus, including the deduction 
theorem, independence of axioms, consistency and com- 
pleteness. (Staff) 

PHIL 156. TOPICS IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. (3) 
Prerequisite, PHIL 056 or consent of instructor. Detailed 
examination of some basic issues in the methodology and 
conceptual structure of scientific inquiry. To be investi- 
gated are such topics as confirmation theory, structure 
and function of scientific theories, scientific explanation, 
concept formation, and theoretical reduction. (Staff) 

PHIL 157. THEORY OF MEANING. (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 041 or 055, and 102. A study of 
theories about the meaning of linguistic expressions, in- 



cluding the verification theory and the theory of meaning 
as use. Among topics to be considered- are naming refer- 
ring, synonomy, intension and extension, and ontological 
commitment. Such writers as Mill, Frege, Russell, Lewis, 
Carnap, Wittgenstein, Austin, and Quine will be discussed. 

(Kress, Odell) 

PHIL 158. PHILOSOPHY OF LAW. (3) 

Prerequisite, one course in philosophy. Examination of 
fundamental concepts related to law, e.g., legal system, law 
and morality, justice, legal reasoning, responsibility. 

PHIL 159. PHILOSOPHY OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. (3) 

Prerequisite, six hours in social science or consent of 
instructor. A discussion of several of the following topics: 
the nature of laws and explanation in the social sciences; 
the relation of the social sciences to mathematics, logic, 
and the natural sciences; the role of value judgements 
in the social sciences; the relation of social science to 
social policy; problems of methodology. 

PHIL 160. PHILOSOPHY OF MIND. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 102. An inquiry into the nature of 
mind through the analysis of such concepts as conscious- 
ness, perception, understanding, imagination, emotion, 
intention, and action. 

PHIL 168. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY. (3) 
Prerequisite, PHIL 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. 
May be repeated for credit when the topics dealt with 
are different. (Staff) 

PHIL 169. TOPIC IN CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 102. An intensive examination of 
contemporary problems and issues. Source material will 
be selected from recent books and articles. May be re- 
peated for credit when the topics dealt with are different. 

(Staff) 

PHIL 170. METAPHYSICS. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, PHIL 101 and 102. PHIL 
055 recommended. A study of some central metaphysical 
concepts (such as substance, relation, causality, and 
time) and of the nature of metaphysical thinking. 

(Pasch) 

PHIL 171. THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequsites, PHIL 101 and 102. PHIL 
055 recommended. The origin, nature, and validity of 
knowledge will be considered in terms of some philosophic 
problems about perceiving and thinking, knowledge and be- 
lief, thought and language, truth and confirmation. 

(Brown, Odell, Pasch) 

PHIL 175. TOPICS IN SYMBOLIC LOGIC. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 155. May be repeated for credit when 
the topics dealt with are different. (Staff) 

PHIL 176. INDUCTION AND PROBABILITY. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of inferential 
forms, with emphasis on the logical structure underlying 
such inductive procedures as estimating and hypothesis- 
testing. Decision-theoretic rules relating to induction will 
be considered, as well as classic theories of probability 
and induction. (Staff) 

PHIL 180. THE PHILOSOPHY OF PLATO. (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of se- 
lected dialogues. (Celarier) 

PHIL 181. THE PHILOSOPHY OF ARISTOTLE. (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of se- 
lected portions of Aristotle's writings. (Celarier) 

PHIL 182. MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PHIL 101 or 102. A history of philosophic 
thought in the West from the close of the Classical period 
to the Renaissance. Based on readings of the Stoics, early 
Christian writers. Neoplatonists. later Christian writers 
and Schoolmen. (Celarier) 

PHIL 184. THE CONTINENTAL RATIONALISTS. (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of the 
systems of some of the major 17th and 18th century 
rationalists, with special reference to Descrates, Spinoza, 
and Leibniz. (Staff) 

PHIL 185. THE BRITISH EMPIRICISTS. (3) 

Prerequisites, PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of se- 
lected writings of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 

(Varnedoe) 

PHIL 186. THE PHILOSOPHY OF KANT. (3) 

Prerequisites. PHIL 101 and 102. A critical study of se- 
lected portions of Kant's writings. (Roelofs) 

PHIL 190. HONORS SEMINAR. (3) 

Each semester. Open to honors students in philosophy 
and, by permission of the instructor, to honors students 
in other departments. Research in selected topics, with 
group discussion. May be repeated for credit when the 
topics dealt with are different. (Staff) 



744 



Arts and Sciences 



PHIL 191, 192, 193, 194. TOPICAL INVESTIGATIONS. (1-3) 
PHIL 255. SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY. (3) 
PHIL 256. SEMINAR IN THE PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY. 

(3) 
PHIL 260. SEMINAR IN ETHICS. (3) 
PHIL 261. SEMINAR IN ESTHETICS. (3) 
PHIL 270. SEMINAR IN METAPHYSICS. (3) 
PHIL 271. SEMINAR IN THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE. (3) 
PHIL 292. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY. (1-3) 
PHIL 399. RESEARCH IN PHILOSOPHY. (1-12) 
PHIL 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Arranged) 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY 

PRUFESSUK AND CHAIRMAN: Laster. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE CHAIRMAN: 

DiLavore. 

PROFESSORS: Banerjee, Day, Erickson, Ferrell, Friedman, 
Glasser, Glover, Greenberg, Griem, Hayward, Holmgren, 
Hornyak, Kerr, Kolb, Krall, Kundu, Levison, MacDonald, 
Marion, McDonald, Misner, Musen, Myers, Myers, Oneda, 
Opik, Prange, Rado, Slawsky, Snow, Sucner, Trivelpiece, 
Wall, Weber, Westerhout, Yodh. 

VISITING PROFESSORS: Escobar, Fowler, Levy, Lindblad. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Alley, Bardasis, Beall, Bell, Ben- 
nett, Bhagat, de Silva, Dixon, Dorfman, Draght, Earl, Falk, 
Fivel, Glick, Griffin, Johnson, Kacser, Kehoe, H. Kim 1 , 
Y. Kim, Koch Matthews. Pati, Pugh, Reiser*, Rodberg, Smith, 
Steinberg, Stephenson, Wentzel, Woo, Zipoy, B. Zorn, 
G. Zorn. 

VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Figuera. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: A'Hearn, Anderson, Beaglehole, 
Berg, Bettinger, Brandt, Chang, Conners, Currie, Davidson, 
Feinroth, Gloeckler, Greene, Greig, Harrington, Korenman, 
Kunze, LaPointe, Lenchek, Nolen, O'Gallagher, Pechacek, 
Poultney, -Richard, Risk, Roos, Roush, Simonson, Young, 
Zapolsky, Zuckerman. 

VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Kunz. 

LECTURERS: Brandt. Clark, Maran, Miers. 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATE: Scheerbaum. 

VISITING LECTURERS: Elton (P. T.) and Gutsche. 

The physics curriculum for the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree is designed for students who desire 
education in the fundamentals of physics in prep- 
paration for graduate work or teaching, or for posi- 
tions in governmental and industrial laboratories. 
Students who enter the University intending to ma- 
jor in physics are urged to take, during the first two 
years, the introductory courses PHYS 015, 016, 017, 
018, and 060, 061. For students who enter the phys- 
ics major in their junior year, however, PHYS 030, 
031, 032, 060, and, 107 may be substituted for the 
PHYS 015-061 sequence. All students should ac- 
company these basic courses with MATH 019, 020, 
012, and 022 (4. 4, 4, 4), (or the corresponding hon- 
ors courses) and one advanced mathematics course. 
Physics majors are encouraged to try to enroll in the 
accelerated honors sections of all of these courses 
when they are qualified. 

After completion of the courses mentioned 
above, the Physics majors will be required to take 
the following courses: PHYS 127, 128— Elements 
of Mathematical Physics (4, 4), PHYS 118— Intro- 
duction to Modern Physics (3), and PHYS 119 — 
Modern Physics (3); and at least two semesters of 
advanced laboratory courses (e.g., PHYS 100, 109, 
110, 140, 141, and 190). Supporting courses must 
include at least one additional mathematics course 
approved by the physics adviser (which is usually 
MATH 1 10 or MATH 162). At least 38 credits in phys- 
ics normally are required. 

'Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 
-Member of the Institute of Molecular Physics 
Joint appointment with Electrical Engineering 



The departmental requirement is at least a "C" 
in each semester of the first year of the introductory 
course. Students who wish to be recommended for 
graduate work must maintain a "B" average and 
should also include as many as possible of the fol- 
lowing courses: PHYS 120— Nuclear Physics (4), 
PHYS 122 -Properties of Matter (4), PHYS 140, 141 
- Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory (3, 3), 
PHYS 144, 145— Methods of Theoretical Physics 
(4, 4) and MATH 1 10— Advanced Calculus (3). 

Because the Departmental program is under 
continual review, course changes not listed occa- 
sionally occur. The student is best advised to seek 
the latest information available from the Depart- 
ment. 

HONORS IN PHYSICS 

The Honors Program offers to students of ex- 
ceptional ability and interest in physics an educa- 
tional program with a number of special opportu- 
nities for learning. Honors sections are offered in 
several courses, and there are many opportunities 
for part-time research participation which may de- 
velop into full-time summer projects. An honors 
seminar is offered for advanced students; credit 
may be given for independent work or study; and 
certain graduate courses are open for credit toward 
the bachelor's degree. 

Students for the Honors Program are accepted 
by the Department's Honors Committee on the basis 
of recommendations from their advisors and other 
faculty members. A final written and oral compre- 
hensive examination in the senior year concludes 
the program which may lead to graduation "with 
Honors (or High Honors) in Physics." 



CHEMICAL PHYSICS 

See Molecular Physics. 

PHYS 001. ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS: MECHANICS, HEAT, 
AND SOUND. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, successful passing 
of the qualifying examination in elementary mathematics. 
The first half of a survey course in general physics. This 
course is for the general student and does not satisfy the 
requirements of the professional schools. (Alley) 

PHYS 002. ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS: MAGNETISM, ELEC- 
TRICITY, AND OPTICS. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 001. The sec- 
ond half of a survey course in general physics. This course 
is for the general student and does not satisfy the require- 
ments of the professional schools. 

(Marion, Alley) 

PHYS 003. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS. (4) 

Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite, qualification to enter MATH 010. Intended 
for students majoring in neither the physical nor biological 
sciences. A study of the development of some of the 
basic ideas o't pnysicai science. (Stephenson) 

PHYS 010, Oil. FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS. ( 4, 4) 

Three lectures, one recitation, and one two-hour labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisite, entrance credit in trig- 
onometry or MATH Oil or concurrent enrollment in 
MATH 018. A course in general physics treating the fields 
of mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, 
and modern physics. This course satisfies the minimum 
requirements of medical and dental schools. 

(Snow. DiLavore. Pechacek, Young) 

PHYS 015, 016. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS: MECHANICS, 
FLUIDS, HEAT, AND SOUND. (4, 4) 
Three lectures and two demonstration periods a week. 
Prerequisites, a high school physics course and concurrent 
enrollment in MATH 018, 019, or consent of instructor. 
The first half of a broad, detailed introduction to physics, 
intended primarily for physics majors and other students 
with superior backgrounds in mathematics and the sci- 
ences. (Wall, Trivelpiece. Beaglehole) 



Arts and Sciences 



145 



PHYS 017. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS: ELECTRICITY AND 
MAGNETISM. (4) 
Three lectures and two demonstration periods a week. 
Prerequisites, PHYS 015, 016; pre- or co-requisites, 
PHYS 060 and MATH 020. The third quarter of a broad, 
detailed introduction to physics, intended primarily for 
physics majors and other students with superior back- 
grounds in mathematics and the sciences. (Kehoe) 

PHYS 018. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS: OPTICS AND MOD- 
ERN PHYSICS. (4) 
Second semester. Three lectures and two demonstration 
periods a week. Prerequisites, PHYS 017 and previous or 
concurrent enrollment in PHYS 060 and MATH 021, or 
consent of instructor. The last quarter of a broad, de- 
tailed introduction to physics, intended primarily for 
physics majors and other students with superior back- 
grounds in mathematics and the sciences. 

(Roush) 

PHYS 025, 026. GENERAL PHYSICS FOR SCIENCE TEACH- 
ERS. (5, 5) 
Three lectures and two two-hour labs per week. Prereq- 
uisites: high school physics or a non-calculus college phys- 
ics survey course, and co-requisite: MATH 019. A course 
in physics stressing physical insight, for prospective sec- 
ondary school science teachers. 

PHYS 030 GENERAL PHYSICS: MECHANICS AND PARTICLE 
DYNAMICS. (3) 
Three lectures and one recitation per week. MATH 020 to 
be taken concurrently. Laws of motion, force, and energy; 
principles of mechanics; collisions; rotation; and gravita- 
tion. 

PHYS 031. GENERAL PHYSICS: HEAT, WAVES AND RELA- 
TIVITY. (4) 
Three lectures, one recitation and one three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 030 or PHYS 

020. Statistical physics; kinetic theory; wave motion; 
interference and refraction; special theory of relativity. 

PHYS 032. GENERAL PHYSICS: ELECTRICITY AND MAGNET- 
ISM. (4) 
Three lectures, one recitation and one three-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 031. May be 
taken in lieu of repetition of PHYS 021. Electrostatics; 
electrodynamics; Maxwell's equation; quantum physics. 

PHYS 050, 051. INTERMEDIATE PHYSICS. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, PHYS Oil. (Staff) 

PHYS 052. HEAT. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 
Oil. MATH 020 is to be taken concurrently. 

(Staff) 

PHYS 054. SOUND. (3) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Three lectures 
a week. Prerequisite, PHYS Oil. MATH 021 is to be 
taken concurrently. (Myers) 

PHYS 060, 061. INTERMEDIATE PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS. 

(2,2) 

Four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, 

PHYS Oil or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 017 or PHYS 

018. Selected experiments. (Poultney, Gloeckler) 

PHYS 100. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTS. (2 credits per se- 
mester) 

Four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, 
four credits of PHYS 060 or consent of instructor. Se- 
lected fundamental experiments in electricity and 
magnetism, elementary electronics, and optics. (Greig) 

PHYS 102. OPTICS. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, 
PHYS 01 1 and MATH 021. It is suggested, but not required 
that PHYS 060 or PHYS 100 be taken concurrently with 
this course. Geometrical optics, optical instruments, 
wave motion, interference and diffraction, and other 
phenomena in physical optics. 

PHYS 103. APPLIED OPTICS. (3) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Three lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 102. A detailed study 
of physical optics and its applications. (Alley) 

PHYS 104, 105. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, PHYS Oil; MATH 

021. Electrostatics, direct current and alternating cur- 
rent circuity, electromagnetic effects of steady currents, 
electromagnetic induction, radiation, development of 
Maxwell's equations, Poynting vector, wave equations, 
and electronics. (Staff) 

PHYS 106, 107. THEORETICAL MECHANICS. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 051 or con- 
sent of instructor. A detailed study of Newtonian me- 
chanics. Dynamics, the motion of rigid bodies, oscillation 



problems, etc., are studied. Lagrange's equation of the first 
kind and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are introduced. 

(LaPointe) 

PHYS 109. ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS. (4) 

Second semester. Three hours of lecture and two of 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 100 and con- 
current enrollment in PHYS 105 or PHYS 128. Theory 
of semi-conductor and vacuum tube circuits. Application 
in experimental physics. (Bettinger) 

PHYS 110. SPECIAL LABORATORY PROJECTS IN PHYSICS. 
(1,2, or 3) 
Two hours laboratory work a week for each credit hour. 
One to three credits may be taken concurrently each se- 
mester. (Will be given with sufficient demand.) Prereq- 
uisite, PHYS 100 and consent of advisor. Selected ad- 
vanced experiments. (Glover, Pugh) 

PHYS 111. PHYSICS SHOP TECHNIQUES. (1) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory per week. Pre- 
requisite, PHYS 100 or consent of instructor. Machine 
tools, design and construction of laboratory equipment. 

(Horn) 

PHYS 114, 115. INTRODUCTION TO BIOPHYSICS. (2, 2) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Two lectures 
a week. Prerequisites, intermediate physics and MATH 
021. A study of the physical principles involved in bio- 
logical processes, with particular emphasis on current re- 
search in biophysics. (DeRocco) 

PHYS 116, 117. INTRODUCTION TO FLUID DYNAMICS. 
(3,3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, PHYS 106 and 
MATH 021. Kinematics of fluid flow, properties of in- 
compressible fluids, complex variable methods of analy- 
sis, wave motions. (Koopman) 

PHYS 118. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, general physics and 
integral calculus, with some knowledge of differential 
equations and a degree of maturity as evidenced by having 
taken one or more of the courses PHYS 050 through PHYS 
110. Introductory discussion of special relativity, origin 
of quantum theory, Bohr atom, wave mechanics, atomic 
structure, and optical spectra. (Beall) 

PHYS 119. MODERN PHYSICS. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 118. A sur- 
vey of nuclear physics, x-rays, radioactivity, wave me- 
chanics, and cosmic radiation. (Staff) 

PHYS 120. NUCLEAR PHYSICS. (4) 

Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 119. An intro- 
duction to nuclear physics at the pre-quantum-mechanics 
level. Properties of nuclei; radioactivity; nuclear system- 
atics; nuclear moments; the shell model, interaction of 
charged particles and gamma rays with matter; nuclear 
detector; accelerators; nuclear reactions; beta decay; 
high energy phenomena. (Holmgren) 

PHYS 121. NEUTRON PHYSICS AND FISSION REACTORS. 

(4) 

(Will be given only with sufficient demand.) Four lectures 

a week. Prerequisite, PHYS 120. Neutron diffusion and 

reactor physics. (Marion) 

PHYS 122. PROPERTIES OF MATTER. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
PHYS 119 or equivalent. Introduction to solid state phys- 
ics. Electro-magnetic, thermal, and elastic properties of 
metals, semiconductors and insulators. 

(Glover, Anderson) 

PHYS 123. INTRODUCTION TO ATMOSPHERIC AND SPACE 
PHYSICS. (3) 
Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite. 
PHYS 127 and PHYS 118 or consent of instructor. Mo- 
tions of charged particles in magnetic fields, aspects of 
plasma physics related to cosmic rays and radiation belts, 
atomic phenomena in the atmosphere, thermodynamics 
and dynamics of the atmosphere. 

(Bettinger, Lenchek) 

PHYS 124. INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA PHYSICS. (3) 

Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 127 
and PHYS 118, or consent of instructor. Orbit theory, 
magnetohydrodynamics. plasma heating and stability, 
waves and transport processes. (Griem) 

PHYS 126. KINETIC THEORY OF GASES. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, PHYS 107 and 
MATH 021. Dynamics of gas particles, Maxwell-Boltzmann 
distribution, diffusion, Brownian motion, etc. 

(Vanderslice) 

PHYS 127. ELEMENTS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS: ME- 
CHANICS. (4) 
Prerequisites: Physics 018, or Physics 032, or Physics 
106 and Physics 107; also Math 022; or consent of in- 



146 



Arts and Sciences 



structor. A study of the theoretical foundations of me- 
chanics, with extensive application of the methods. Also 
various mathematical tools of theoretical physics. 

(Staff) 

PHYS 128. ELEMENTS OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS: ELEC- 
TRICITY AND MAGNETISM. (4) 
Prerequisite: Physics 127 or consent of instructor. A 
study of the foundations of electromagnetic theory, with 
extensive application of the methods. Thorough treatment 
of wave properties of solutions of Maxwell's Equations. 

(Staff) 

PHYS 129. INTRODUCTION TO ELEMENTARY PARTICLES. 
(3) 
Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, PHYS 119, 
or consent of instructor. Properties of elementary par- 
ticles, production and detection of particles, relativistic 
kinematics, invariance principles and conservation laws. 

(Sucher, Risk) 

PHYS 130, 131. BASIC CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, junior standing. A pri- 
marily descriptive course intended mainly for those stu- 
dents in the liberal arts who have not had any other 
course in physics. This neither satisfies the requirements 
of the professional schools nor serves as a prerequisite 
or substitute for other physics courses. The main em- 
phasis in the course will be on the concepts of physics 
and their evolution and their relations to other branches 
of human endeavor. (Staff) 

PHYS 140. 141. ATOMIC AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS LABORA- 
TORY. ( 3, 3) 
One lecture and four hours of laboratory a week. Prereq- 
uisites, two credits of PHYS 100 and consent of instruc- 
tor. Classical experiments in atomic physics and more 
sophisticated experiments in current techniques in nu- 
clear physics. Enrollment is limited to ten students. 

(Zorn) 

PHYS 144. ADVANCED THEORETICAL PHYSICS. (3) 

Prerequisite: Physics 127, 128. This course is an elective 
continuation of and supplement to Physics 127, 128. 
A survey of advanced mathematical methods used in 
theoretical physics, particularly in the fields of classical 
mechanics, electromagnetism, relativity and quantum 
mechanics. (Staff) 

PHYS 145. ELEMENTARY QUANTUM PHYSICS. (3) 

Prerequisites: Physics 118 or Physics 153; Math 066; 
and a level of mathematical sophistication equivalent to 
that of a student who has taken Physics 127 and Physics 
128, or ENEE 130 and ENEE 132. The quantum theory 
is presented in a rigorous way including the concepts of 
operators, measurement, and angular momentum. These 
concepts together with the Schroedinger Equation are 
then applied to some basic problems in atomic and 
molecular physics. (Staff) 

PHYS 150. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS. 

Prerequisite, major in physics and consent of advisor. 
Research or special study. Credit according to work done. 

(Staff) 

PHYS 152. INTRODUCTION TO THERMODYNAMICS AND 
STATISTICAL MECHANICS. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, MATH 021, PHYo 
018 or 051, or consent of the instructor. Introduction 
of basic concepts in thermodynamics and statistical me- 
chanics. (Bhagat) 

PHYS 153. MODERN PHYSICS FOR ENGINEERS. (3) 

Each semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
PHYS 018. A survey of atomic and nuclear phenomena 
and the main trends in modern physics. This course is 
appropriate for students in engineering and other physical 
sciences. It should not be taken in addition to PHYS 
118. (B. S. Zorn, Bettinger, Kunze) 

PHYS 186. PARTICLE ACCELERATORS, PHYSICAL AND 
ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES. (3) 
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites, PHYS 
127-128 or PHYS 104-105 and PHYS 118, or equivalents. 
Sources of charged particles, methods of acceleration 
and focusing of electron and ion beams in electromagnetic 
fields; electrostatic accelerators; constant-gradient cy- 
clotrons and synchrotrons; betatrons and microtrons; 
the alternating-gradient and sector-focusing principles; iso- 
chronous cyclotrons and alternating-gradient synchro- 
trons; linear accelerators. (Staff) 

PHYS 190. INDEPENDENT STUDIES SEMINAR. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Enrollment 
is limited to students admitted to the Independent 
Studies Program in Physics. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 



Of the courses which follow, 200, 201, 204, 205, 209, 
212, 213, 234, 235, 242, 243, 244, 252, 253, 254, 255 and 
258 are given every year; all others will be given according to 
demand. 

PHYS 200. THEORETICAL DYNAMICS. (3) 
PHYS 201. STATISTICAL PHYSICS. (3) 
PHYS 202, 203. ADVANCED DYNAMICS. (2, 2) 
PHYS 204. METHODS OF MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS. (3) 
PHYS 205. ELECTRODYNAMICS. (4) 
PHYS 206, 207. PLASMA PHYSICS. (3, 3) 
PHYS 208. THERMODYNAMICS. (3) 
PHYS 209. GRADUATE LABORATORY. (3) 
PHYS 210. STATISTICAL MECHANICS. (3) 
PHYS 212, 213. INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS. 

(4,3) 
PHYS 214. THEORY OF ATOMIC SPECTRA. (3) 
PHYS 215. THEORY OF MOLECULAR SPECTRA. (3) 
PHYS 216, 217. MOLECULAR PHYSICS. (2, 2) 

PHYS 218, 219. X-RAYS AND CRYSTAL STRUCTURE. (3, 3) 

PHYS 220. APPLICATION OF X-RAY AND ELECTRON DIF- 
FRACTION METHODS. (2) 

PHYS 221. COSMIC RAY PHYSICS. (3) 

PHYS 222. 223. BOUNDARY-VALUE PROBLEMS OF THEO- 
RETICAL PHYSICS. (2, 2) 

PHYS 224, 225. SUPERSONIC AERODYNAMICS AND COM- 
PRESSIBLE FLOW. (2, 2) 

PHYS 226, 227. THEORETICAL HYDRODYNAMICS. (3, 3) 

PHYS 228. SYMMETRY PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS. (3) 

PHYS 230. SEMINAR. 

PHYS 231. APPLIED PHYSICS SEMINAR. (1) 

PHYS 232, 233. HYDROMECHANICS SEMINAR. (1, 1) 

PHYS 234, 235. THEORETICAL NUCLEAR PHYSICS. (3, 3) 

PHYS 236. THEORY OF RELATIVITY. (3) 

PHYS 238. QUANTUM THEORY— SELECTED TOPICS. (3) 

PHYS 239. ELEMENTARY PARTICLES. (3) 

PHYS 240, 241. THEORY OF SOUND AND VIBRATIONS. 
(3,3) 

PHYS 242, 243. THEORY OF SOLIDS. (3, 3) 

PHYS 244. SOLID STATE PHYSICS. (3) 

PHYS 245. SPECIAL TOPICS IN APPLIED PHYSICS. (2) 

PHYS 246, 247. SPECIAL TOPICS IN FLUID DYNAMICS. (2,2) 

PHYS 248, 249. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MODERN PHYSICS. 
(1-4, 1-4) 

PHYS 250. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ADVANCED PHYSICS. 
(1-6) 

PHYS 252, 253. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE PHYSICS. (3, 3) 

PHYS 254. ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS. (3) 

PHYS 255. ADVANCED QUANTUM MECHANICS. (3) 

PHYS 257. THEORETICAL METHODS IN ELEMENTARY PAR- 
TICLES. (3) 
IYS 258. QUANTUM FIELD THEORY. (3) 

PHYS 260. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS. (3) 

PHYS 262, 263. AEROPHYSICS. (3, 3) 

PHYS 290. CHARGED PARTICLE DYNAMICS. ELECTRON 
AND ION BEAMS. (3) 

PHYS 399. THESIS RESEARCH. 

PHYS 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Arranged) 

(For Astronomy curriculum, see under ASTRONOMY. 



SPECIAL PHYSICS COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE 
TEACHERS 

The courses in this section were especially de- 
signed for high school teachers and are not appli- 
cable to B.S., M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in physics with- 
out special permission of the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy. However, these courses can be in- 
cluded as part of physics minor or as electives. No 
prerequisites are required. 

PHYS 118A. ATOMS, NUCLEI, AND STARS. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to basic ideas 
of the constitution and properties of atomic and sub- 



Arts and Sciences 



147 



atomic systems and of the overall structure of the uni- 
verse. (DeSilva) 

PHYS 122A. PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to the study 
of solid state physics and the properties of fluids. 

(Narigle) 

PHYS 160A. PHYSICS PROBLEMS. (1, 2, or 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. (DiLavore) 

PHYS 170A. APPLIED PHYSICS. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Hornyak) 

PHYS 199. NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SUMMER IN- 
STITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF SCIENCE SEMINAR. (1) 
Arranged during summer session. Enrollment limited to 

participants in the N.S.F. Summer Institute. (Staff) 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

Within the College of Arts and Sciences there 
are a number of programs developed to prepare the 
pre-professional student. These curricula, some 
rather general and others quite specific, are de- 
signed to give the student the best background to 
succeed in his advanced training, to fill undergradu- 
ate requirements of many professional schools, and 
to fit in with the requirements established by the or- 
ganizations associated with the respective profes- 
sions. 

Pre-professional programs require that the stu- 
dent maintain a grade point average somewhat 
higher than the minimum for graduation. The stu- 
dent may fulfill requirements by majoring in almost 
any discipline in the College, provided the specific 
requirements of the pre-professional program are 
met. The successful completion of the pre-profes- 
sional program does not guarantee admission to pro- 
fessional school. Each school has its own admis- 
sions requirements and criteria, generally based 
upon the grade point average in the undergraduate 
courses, the scores in aptitude tests (Medical Col- 
lege Admission Test, Law Admission Test, or Dental 
Aptitude Test), a personal interview, and letters sent 
by the "Evaluation Committee" of the College. For 
the specific admissions requirements, the student 
is urged to study the catalog of the professional 
school of his choice. 

Although completion of the Bachelor's degree 
is a normal prerequisite for admission, three pro- 
fessional schools of the University of Maryland in 
Baltimore— Dentistry, Law, and Medicine— have ar- 
rangements whereby a student who meets require- 
ments detailed below may be accepted for profes- 
sional school after three years (90 academic hours). 
For the students to be eligible for the "combined de- 
gree," the final thirty hours prior to entry into the 
Schools of Dentistry, Law, and Medicine must be 
taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. (A combined degree program in Law is also 
available in the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration: for details see BPA program.) After the 
successful completion of thirty hours of work in pro- 
fessional school, the student may be eligible for a 
Bachelor's degree from the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences (Arts-Dentistry, Arts-Law, or Arts-Medicine). 

PRE-DENTISTRY 

The pre-dental program is based upon require- 
ments established by the Council of Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association, and the 
requirements for a degree from the College of Arts 
and Sciences following either the regular four-year 
program or the combined "Arts-Dentistry" program. 
The program is designed to prepare the student for 



the Dental Aptitude Test, normally taken in the 
spring of the sophomore year. 

The minimum requirements for entry into dental 
school for either the three year program (90 aca- 
demic hours) or the four-year program (120 aca- 
demic hours) are: 



Generol Educotion requirements 34 hours 

College requirements 

Foreign Longuoge 12 

Speech 2 14 hours 

plus 

Major variable 

Minor (or supporting courses) varioble 

Dental Association requirements 

Chemistry -orgonic 8 

inorganic 8 

Zoology 8 

Mathematics 6 

Physics 8 38 hours 

Electives-to complete the 90 or 120 hours required. 
Required Health and Physical Educotion. 



Four- Year Program. A student applies to Dental 
School in his senior year, on the basis of completing 
the usual degree requirements for the B.A. or B.S. 
degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, by 
majoring in the field of his choice and including in 
his course work the science courses specifically pre- 
scribed by dental schools. 

Three-Year Arts-Dentistry Program. Students 
whose performance during the first two years in 
residence at College Park is exceptional may be en- 
couraged to seek admission to the University of 
Maryland Dental School at the end of their third 
year (90 academic hours). No undergraduate major 
is required for this program: the work of the first 
year of dental school is considered as the major; 
but students will select a minor (supporting courses) 
from one of the following combinations: zoology, 
six hours above the 100 level; microbiology, eight 
hours above the 100 level; CHEM 019 plus three 
hours above the 100 level in any science; CHEM 
161, 162, 163, and 164; or nine hours above the 
100 level in any one department of the arts, hu- 
manities, or social sciences. 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Den- 
tistry program may receive the B.S. degree (Arts- 
Dentistry) after satisfactory completion of the first 
year of dental school, upon recommendation by the 
Dean of the Dental School and approval during the 
summer following the first year of dental school, and 
the degree is awarded with the August graduates. 

Schedule. The pre-dental student, regardless of 
degree sought, includes in his first-year schedule 
CHEM 008, 009; ZOOL 001, 002; ENGL 001, 003; 
MATH 010,011 (or 018, 019); HLTH 005; and Phys- 
ical Education. His second year includes CHEM 
035, 036, 037, 038; foreign language; general ed- 
ucation requirements; and major-minor require- 
ments. A student hoping for three-year acceptance 
would substitute PHYS 010, Oil for foreign lan- 
guage in his sophomore year. The University of 
Maryland Dental School also requires that the stu- 
dent include in his schedule ZOOL 005 and a course 
in statistics (either PSYC 090 or SOCY 095). 

PRELAW 

Although some law schools will consider only 
applicants with a B.A. or B.S. degree, others will ac- 
cept applicants who have successfully completed a 
three-year program of academic work. Most law 
schools do not prescribe specific course which a stu- 
dent must present for admission, but do require that 



748 



Arts and Sciences 



the student follow one of the standard programs of- 
fered by the undergraduate college. Many law 
schools require that the applicant take the Law Ad- 
missions Test in the academic year preceding his 
entry into professional school. 

Four-Year Program. The student who plans to 
complete the requirements for the B.A. or B.S. de- 
gree before entering law school should select a ma- 
jor field of concentration. The pre-law student or- 
dinarily follows a Bachelor of Arts program with a 
major in American Studies, English, American and 
English history, economics, political science (gov- 
ernment and politics), psychology, sociology or 
speech; a few pre-law students follow a Bachelor of 
Science program. 

Three-Year Arts-Law Program. The student who 
plans to enter law school at the end of his third year 
should follow the general B.A. program during his 
first two years. During his junior year, he will com- 
plete the requirements for a minor (18 semester 
hours) in one of the fields of concentration. His pro- 
gram during the first three years should include all 
of the basic courses required for a degree from the 
College of Arts and Sciences (including the 18 hour 
minor) and all College and University requirements. 
The academic courses must total 90 hours, and 
must be passed with a minimum average of 2.0. 

Students with exceptional records who are ac- 
cepted to the School of Law of the University of 
Maryland under the Arts-Law program may receive 
a B.A. degree (Arts-Law) after satisfactory comple- 
tion of the first year of law school, upon recom- 
mendation by the Dean of the Law School and ap- 
proval by the College of Arts and Sciences. Applica- 
tions for the diploma are made during the summer 
following the first year of law school (or after 30 
credit hours are completed), and the degree is a- 
warded with the August graduates. 

PRE-MEDICINE 

The pre-medical program is based upon the re- 
quirements established by the Association of Ameri- 
can Medical Colleges, and the requirements for a 
degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, either 
with the four-year degree program or with the com- 
bined "Arts-Medicine" program. The curriculum is 
designed to prepare the student for the Medical Col- 
lege Admission Test, which is normally taken in the 
spring of the junior year. 

The minimum requirements for entry into medi- 
cal school for either the three-year program (90 aca- 
demic hours) or the four-year program (120 aca- 
demic hours) are: 



General Education requirements 

Collegerequirements 

Foreign Language 12 

Speech 2 

plus 

Major 

Minor (or supporting courses) 
Medical School requirements 

Chemistry -general inorganic o 

organic 8 

quantitative** 4 

Zoology 16 

(In addition to ZOOL 001 

and 002. strongly recommended 

are two of genetics. 



34 hours 
14 hours 



variable 
variable 



embryology, comparative 
onotomy) 
Mathematics 
Physics 
Electives-to complete the 90 or 120 hours required. 
Required Health and Physical Education. 



Four-Year Program. No specific major is re- 
quired for favorable consideration by a medical 
school admissions committee. By intelligent plan- 
ning starting in the sophomore year, the student can 
meet the above requirements as well as require- 
ments of most majors in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. The student is urged to work closely with his 
pre-medical advisor for this planning. A student who 
enters the pre-medical program late in his college 
career may find an additional year of study neces- 
sary (either as a special student or as a regular un- 
dergraduate). 

Three-Year Arts-Medicine Program. After com- 
pletion of his first year of pre-medical study an ex- 
ceptional student may be encouraged to seek ad- 
mission to the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine at the end of his third year (90 hours). 
During his next two years he will need to complete 
all requirements listed above, with the exception of 
the major and the regular minor. Four additional 
hours at the 100 level in appropriate science 
courses will satisfy the minor requirement. 

Students accepted in the combined Arts-Medi- 
cine program may receive the B.S. degree (Arts- 
Medicine) after satisfactory completion of their 
training in the basic sciences at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine (30 hours), upon rec- 
ommendation of the Dean of the School of Medicine 
and approval by the College of Arts and Sciences. 
The degree is normally awarded in August following 
the second year of medical school. 

Schedule. The pre-medical student normally in- 
cludes in his first-year schedule CHEM 008, 009; 
ZOOL 001, 002; ENGL 001, 003; MATH 010, Oil 
(or 018, 019); HLTH 005; and Physical Education. 
Academically strong students may take an addi- 
tional course in their second semester. His second 
year includes CHEM 035, 036, 037, 038; foreign 
language; General Education requirements; ZOOL 
005, 006; and/or major requirements. His third 
year includes PHYS 010, Oil; foreign language, 
General Education requirements, major require- 
ments and minor (supporting course) requirements. 
CHEM 019 would be taken during the third year of 
the three-year applicant and during the fourth year 
of the four-year student. The fourth year is devoted 
to completion of the General Education require- 
ments and major and minor (supporting course) re- 
quirements. 

RELATED PROFESSIONS 

Academic preparation for several professions re- 
lated to dentistry or medicine is available through 
the College of Arts and Sciences. For requirements 
of professional schools in dental hygiene, optome- 
try, osteopathy, etc., see catalogs of the specialized 
schools; representative catalogs are available in the 
Office of the Dean. 



Arts and Sciences 



149 



Medical Technology. The program in medical 
technology is administered by the School of Nurs- 
ing. 

Veterinary Medicine. The pre-veterinary pro- 
gram is administered by the College of Agriculture. 

Dental Hygiene: For information concerning 
this program, contact Miss Patricia C. Stearns, Di- 
rector of Dental Hygiene Education, University of 
Maryland School of Dentistry, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Bartlett. 

PROFESSORS: Anderson, Horton, McGinnies, Tyler, Waldrop. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Fisher, Fretz, Goldstein, Gollub, 

Locke, Martin, Mdntire, Scholnick, Steinman, Teitelbaum, 

Turnage. Ward. 

visiting Associate professor: Hodos. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Carroll, Clairborn, Dachler, Dies. 

Hegge, Higgs, Holmgren, Johnson, Larkin, Osterhouse, Smith, 

Stemheim. 
LECTURERS: Becker, Drash, Meenes, Taylor. 
INSTRUCTORS: Horton, Jensen, McCullough. 
JUNIOR INSTRUCTOR: Horowitz. 



Psychology can be classified as a biological sci- 
ence (B.S. degree) and a social science (B.A. de- 
gree) and offers academic programs related to both 
of these fields. The undergraduate curriculum in 
psychology provides an organized study of the be- 
havior of man and other organisms in terms of the 
biological conditions and social factors which influ- 
ence such behavior. In addition, the undergraduate 
program is arranged to provide opportunities for 
learning that will equip qualified students to pursue 
further study of psychology and related fields in 
graduate and professional schools. 

Students who are interested in the biological 
aspects of behavior tend to choose a program lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science degree, while those 
interested primarily in the social factors of behavior 
tend to choose a program leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts degree. The choice of program is made in 
consultation with, and requires the approval of, an 
academic advisor. 

Departmental requirements are the same for the 
Bachelor of Science and the Bachelor of Arts de- 
grees. A minimum of 25 hours of psychology course- 
work is required; courses taken must include PSYC 
001, 090, one of 145, 146, or 147, and an additional 
12 hours of 100-level courses (not including 194 
and 195). In addition to the above courses in Psy- 
chology, all majors are required to take: (1) Math 
Oil or 019; (2) one course, to be approved by an 
academic advisor in Psychology, above the intro- 
ductory level in one of the following fields: chemis- 
try, computer science, mathematics, microbiology, 
physics, zoology. These two courses may be used as 
part of the General Education or College require- 
ments in mathematics and science or for the sup- 
porting course requirements described below, but 
not for both. Majors in psychology are urged to 
take their mathematics and science courses in their 
first two years. 

The supporting courses to supplement the 
work in the major for the Bachelor of Science de- 
gree must include 18 hours in mathematics and sci- 



ence, beyond those courses required by the College. 
A minimum of two courses must be laboratory 
courses, and at least three courses (or 9 hours) must 
be chosen at the advanced level (beyond the intro- 
ductory sequence). The particular laboratory and 
advanced courses must be approved by an academic 
advisor in the Department of Psychology. 

The supporting courses for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree must include 18 hours which are chosen in 
related fields to supplement work in the major. Of 
these 18 hours, six must be chosen at the 100 level. 
This set of courses must be approved by an aca- 
demic advisor in Psychology. 

A student must obtain a "C" or better in PSYC 
Oil in order to major in psychology. A psychology 
major must have a 2.0 in his major courses and a 
2.0 in his supporting courses in order to be certified 
for graduation with a degree in psychology. In addi- 
tion, no student who ever receives a second grade 
lower than a "C" in PSYC 001, 090, or any 100- 
level psychology course will be certified for gradua- 
tion in psychology. 

Students desiring to enter graduate study in 
certain areas of psychology are advised to take an 
additional laboratory course and/or participate in 
individual research projects. Such students should 
consult an advisor for information about prereq- 
uisites for Graduate Study in Psychology. 

HONORS 

The Department of Psychology also offers a spe- 
cial program for the superior student which emphas- 
izes independent study and research. Students may 
be eligible to enter the Honors Program who have a 
3.3 grade average in all courses or the equivalent, 
who are in their junior year, and who demonstrate 
interest and maturity indicative of success in the 
program. Students in their sophomore year should 
consult their advisor or the Departmental Honors 
Committee for further information. 

PSYC 001. INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

A basic introductory course, intended to bring the stu- 
dent into contact with the major problems confronting 
psychology and the more important attempts at their 
solution. (Staff) 

PSYC 005. PERSONALITY AND ADJUSTMENT. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 001. Introduction to psychology of 
human personality and adjustment. This course is de- 
signed for the student who desires a general knowledge 
of this area of psychology. This course may not be taken 
concurrently with or following PSYC 105 (Staff) 

PSYC 020H. INTERMEDIATE PSYCHOLOGY. (Honors) (3) 
Second semester. Usually taken during sophomore year. 
Prerequisite, PSYC 001 H or permission of instructor. The 
course content will stress the interrelations among data 
derived from the fields of Human Development, Cogni- 
tion, Perception, Measurement and Social Processes. 

PSYC 021. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) (Staff) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 001. Personality and behavior as in 
fluenced by culture and interpersonal relations. Social 
influences on motivation, learning, memory, and percep- 
tion. Attitudes, public opinion, propaganda, language and 
communication, leadership, ethnic differences, and group 
process. (Staff) 

PSYC 025. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 001. Behavioral analysis of normal 
development and normal socialization of the growing 
child. This course may not be taken concurrently with 
or following PSYC 125. (Staff) 

PSYC 026. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, PSYC 001. Biological basis 
of behavioral development in relation to genetic, con- 
stitutional, anatomical, physiological, and environmental 



150 



Arts and Sciences 



factors. Emphasis upon both phylogenetic and onto- 
genetic research findings in biological psychology. 

(Brady, Hodos) 

PSYC 035. SURVEY OF INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 001. A course for nonmajors which 
provides a general survey of the field of industrial psy- 
chology, including such topics as selection, training, job 
satisfaction, social organization, and environmental 
factors. This course may not be taken concurrently with 
or following PSYC 135. 

PSYC 090. STATISTICAL METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
Prerequisite, PSYC 001 and MATH 010, 018, or equiva- 
lent. A basic introduction to quantitative methods used 
in psychological research. (Staff) 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

Graduate credits will be assigned for students certified by 
the Department of Psychology as qualified for graduate 
standing. 

PSYC 101. BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR. (3) 

Prerequisites, PSYC 090, or 8 hours of Zoology, or con- 
sent of instructor. This course is intended primarily for 
Science majors or Psychology majors not planning to 
take PSYC 146. May not be taken concurrently with or 
after PSYC 146. Surveys the experimental analysis of 
the behavior of humans and animals from the point of 
view of the biological mechanisms of behavior. Considers 
such topics as genetic determiners and physiological 
mechanisms, and basic principles of conditioning and 
learning. (Staff) 

PSYC 105. PERSONALITY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. Major personality 
theories, their postulates and evidence; assessment and 
research methodology in personality; major areas of per- 
sonality research, their methodologies, findings, implica- 
tions, and relationships to the field of psychology. (Staff) 

PSYC 110. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 001 or equivalent. Researches on 
fundamental psychological problems encountered in 
education. Measurement and significance of individual 
differences; learning, motivation, transfer of training, 
and the educational implications of theories of intel- 
ligence. (Staff) 

PSYC 123. LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL COMMUNICATION. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, PSYC 021 and PSYC 
090 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. The nature 
and significance of verbal and non-verbal communica- 
tion in social psychological processes including examina- 
tion of relevant theoretical approaches to symbolic be- 
havior. (Staff) 

PSYC 125. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. The growth and 
transformation of basic psychological processes from 
birth to maturity. Emphasis is on research data and 
methodological issues, especially as they relate to other 
aspects of psychology. (Staff) 

PSYC 131. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite. PSYC 001 and 090 or equivalent. The na- 
ture, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of mental dis- 
orders. (Staff) 

PSYC 135. PERSONNEL AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. An intensive study 
of the main areas of industrial psychology with emphasis 
on primary source material. This course emphasizes re- 
search methodology and the relationship of research 
findings to general theoretical issues. (Staff) 

PSYC 136. ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. An examination of 
the characteristics of the man-machine system with pri- 
mary emphasis on human performance. Some of the 
topics covered are: information processing, decision 
making, training, environmental constraints, and automa- 
tion. (Staff 

PSYC 145. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: SENSOR v PRO- 
CESSES I (4) 
Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory/demonstra- 
tion period per week. Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equiva- 
lent. Primarily for students who major in psychology. A 
systematic survey of the content, models, and metho- 
dologies of sensory and perceptual research. (Staff) 
PSYC 146. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: LEARNING AND 
MOTIVATION. (4) 



Two lectures and four one-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. Students 
who have taken PSYC 101 need consent of instructor. 
Primarily for students who major in psychology. The ex- 
perimental analysis of behavior with emphasis on condi- 
tioning, learning, and motivational processes. Experi- 
ments are conducted on the behavior of animals. (Staff) 

PSYC 147. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: SOCIAL BEHAV- 
IOR. (4) 
Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisite, PSYC 021 and PSYC 090 or equiva- 
lent. A laboratory course dealing with methods of studying 
behavior in the social context. Topics will include social 
perception and motivation, small groups, communication 
and persuasion. Consideration will be given to the tech- 
niques involved in laboratory experimentation, field 
studies, attitude scale construction, and opinion sur- 
veys. (McGinnies.Higgs.Ward) 

PSYC 148. PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN LEARNING. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. Review and analy- 
sis of the major phenomena and theories of human learn- 
ing, including an introduction to the fields of problem 
solving, thinking, and reasoning. (Staff) 

PSYC 150. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTING. (4) 
Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per 
week. Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent. A survey of 
the basic concepts and theories of psychological mea- 
surement illustrated through demonstration of principal 
approaches to psychological testing. (Staff) 

PSYC 151. PSYCHOLOGY OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, PSYC 150. Problems theories, and re- 
searches related to psychological differences among 
individuals and groups. (Waldrop, Johnson) 

PSYC 152. MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 090 or equivalent, and consent of 
instructor. A survey of mathematical formulations in 
psychology, including measurement and scaling models, 
statistical and psychometric models, and elementary 
mathematical representations of psychological processes 
in learning, choice, psychophysics, and social behavior. 

PSYC 180. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 145 or consent of instructor. An in- 
troduction to research on the physiological basis of 
human behavior, including considerations of sensory 
phenomena, motor coordination, emotion, drives, and 
the neurological basis of learning. (Staff) 

PSYC 181. ANIMAL BEHAVIOR. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 146 or consent of instructor. A study 
of animal behavior, including considerations of social 
interactions, learning, sensory processes, motivation, and 
experimental methods, with a major emphasis on mam- 
mals. (Mclntire) 

PSYC 182. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: SENSORY PRO- 
CESSES II. (4) 
Two lectures and four hours of laboratory exercise and 
research per week. Prerequisite, PSYC 145 or consent 
of instructor. Primarily for psychology majors and majors 
in biological sciences with a special interest in sensory 
processes. Lectures and laboratory exercises will emphas- 
ize contemporary problems in sensory process research. 
Sufficient latitude will be provided so the exceptional 
student may conduct original research based on findings 
reported in the current literature. 

PSYC 183. ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, PSYC 147. A systematic review of re- 
searches and points of view in regard to major problems 
in the field of social psychology. 

PSYC 191. SENIOR SEMINAR. (3) 

Prerequisite, written consent of the individual instructor 
(may be repeated). The historical and theoretical roots 
of the subject matter areas of psychology. Different 
topical areas and the current theory and related research 
will be discussed. 

PSYC 194. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PSYCHOLOGY. (1-3) 
Prerequisite, written consent of instructor. A student 
who wishes to take independent work must have complet- 
ed 12 hours of psychology with at least a 2.5 average. 
Intregrated reading under direction leading to the prep- 
aration of an adequately documented report on a special 
topic. (In special cases a student who may need to re- 
peat this course in order to complete his independent 
study will make a formal request, including a research 
proposal, through his advisor to the Departmental Hon- 
ors Committee.) 

PSYC 195. SPECIAL RESEARCH PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOL- 
OGY. (1-3, 1-3) 



Arts and Sciences 



151 



Prerequisite, written consent of instructor. A student 
who wishes to take independent research study must 
have completed 12 hours of psychology with at least a 
2.5 average. An individual course designed to allow the 
student to pursue a specialized research topic under 
supervision. (In special cases a student who may need 
to repeat this course in order to complete his research 
will make a formal request, including a research pro- 
posal, through his advisor to the Departmental Honors 
Committee.) 

PSYC 196H. ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY I (Honors). (3) 

Second semester. Usually taken during junior year. Pre- 
requisites, PSYC 090 and permission of department Hon- 
ors Committee. Seminar covering topics in Sensation, 
Perception, Learning and Motivation. 

PSYC 197H. ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY II (Honors) (3) 

First semester. Usually taken during senior year. Pre- 
requisite, PSYC 196H. Seminar covering topics in Mea- 
surement, Social Processes and other subject matter of 
current interest. 

PSYC 199H. HONORS THESIS RESEARCH 

First and .second semester. Usually taken during last 
semester in residence. Prerequisite, permission of thesis 
advisor. 



FOR GRADUATES 

See Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

(All the following courses require consent of the instructor. 
Not all of the graduate courses are offered every year. The 
times specified for each course are given as estimates.) 



PSYC 221. SEMINAR IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

PSYC 222. SEMINAR IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

PSYC 223. SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH. 

(3) 
PSYC 224. SEMINAR IN STUDENT PERSONNEL. (2) 
PSYC 225-226. BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT AND MEASURE- 
MENT. (2, 2) 
PSYC 227-228. LABORATORY IN BEHAVIORAL ASSESS- 
MENT AND MEASUREMENT. (2, 2) 
PSYC 229. SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
PSYC 230. SEMINAR IN ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
PSYC 231. TRAINING PROCEDURES IN INDUSTRY. (3) 
PSYC 232 PERSONNEL SELECTION AND JOB ANALYSIS. 

(3) 
PSYC 233. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION IN INDUSTRY. (3) 
PSYC 240. INTERVIEW AND QUESTIONNAIRE TECHNIQUES. 

(3) 
PSYC 241. PERSUASION AND ATTITUDE CHANGE. (3) 
PSYC 242. SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
PSYC 243. SEMINAR IN SMALL GROUP BEHAVIOR. (3) 
PSYC 252, 253. ADVANCED STATISTICS. (3, 3) 
PSYC 254. FACTOR ANALYSIS. (3) 
PSYC 255. SEMINAR IN PSYCHOMETRIC THEORY. (3) 
PSYC 256. MENTAL TEST THEORY. (3) 
PSYC 257. SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
PSYC 258. DEVELOPMENT OF PREDICTORS. (3) 
PSYC 260. OCCUPATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHOICE. 

(3) 
PSYC 261, 262. MODIFICATION OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR: RE- 
SEARCH METHODS AND PRACTICES. (3, 3) 
PSYC 263, 264. MODIFICATION OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR: 

LABORATORY AND PRACTICUM. (3) 
PSYC 265. ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
PSYC 266. THEORIES OF MOTIVATION. (3) 
PSYC 267. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY. (3) 
PSYC 269. PRACTICUM IN COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH 

CONSULTATION. (3) 
PSYC 270. ADVANCED ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 
PSYC 271. APPRAISAL OF DISABILITIES. (3) 
PSYC 272. INDIVIDUAL CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS. (3) 
PSYC 274. EVALUATION AND CHANGE iN EDUCATIONAL 

SKILLS. (3) 
PSYC 285, 286. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

(1-3, 1-3) 
PSYC 288. 289. SPECIAL RESEARCH PROBLEMS. (1-4, 1-4) 
PSYC 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Credit Arranged) 
PSYC 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Credit Arranged) 



RUSSIAN AREA PROGRAM 
Director: Yaney. 

This program is for the student who wants to 
concentrate his studies in the humanities and the 
social sciences on the Russian area. It includes work 
in language and literature, history, government and 
politics, economics, and geography. The student 
may emphasize any one of these disciplines in com- 
pleting his courses. The program prepares the stu- 
dent for graduate work in the Russian area, but by 
proper selection of courses a student may concen- 
his work sufficiently in one discipline to be able to 
take up graduate work in this particular field. 

The student following this program must meet 
the general requirements for a degree in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. He should select Russian 
to meet the foreign language requirements. 

Required introductory courses are: RUSS 001, 
002, 006 and 007 (unless the student is exempted 
from this requirement): HIST 041 and 042, GEOG 
010 or 015, ECON 037 or 031, 032. These courses 
must be passed with at least an average grade of C 
in order for the student to continue in the program. 

Advanced courses in the Russian Area: The stu- 
dent must complete at least 30 hours of advanced 
work in the Russian area including 12 hours of ad- 
vanced course in Russian language, 6 hours in Rus- 
sian history, 6 hours in Russian government, 3 
hours in Soviet economics. 

The student must complete an additional 18 
hours of advanced work in the above disciplines. Of 
these 18, at least 12 must all be in one of the de- 
partments and at the 100 level. If the student 
wishes to concentrate in Russian language and lit- 
terature, he should take at least 15 of these hours 
in Russian. 

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Ellis. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND VICE CHAIRMAN: Hirzel. 

PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF THE DIVISION OF CRIM- 
INOLOGY: Lejins. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF THE DIVISION 
OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Williams. 

PROFESSOR: Janes. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Anderson, Cussler, Henkel, Hoff- 
man, Mclntyre. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Bateman, Braungart, Coates. Fed- 
erico, Fidelholtz Franz, Harper, Hunt, Krueeel, Lengermann, 
Maida, Pease, Pollitt, Rosen Schwartz, Simons, Teevan, 
Thomas. 

LECTURERS: Adams, Hulse, Schuyler. 

INSTRUCTORS: Doerr. Hruschka, McDowell. 

SOCIOLOGY 

The major in Sociology offers: (1) A liberal ed- 
ucation especially directed toward understanding 
the complexities of modern society and its social 
problems; (2) a broad preparation for various types 
of professions, occupations, and services dealing 
with people; (3) a more specific preparation in the 
areas in which the Department offers specialization 
such as criminology and corrections, community 
studies, etc.; (4) preparation of qualified students 
for graduate training in Sociology. A comprehensive 
set of courses in Anthropology is provided by that 
Division and a major is offered. Statements on 
course requirements and recomended courses in 
these areas are available in the departmental office. 

A minimum of 30 hours in Sociology is required 
of majors. Required courses include SOCY 001, 002, 
095, 186, and 196. No course with a grade of less 
than a "C" can be used towards the major. Students 
interested in the honors program should check their 
eligibility with the Department's Honors Committee. 



J52 



Arts and Sciences 



SOCY 001 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all 
other courses in Sociology. 

SOCY 001. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

This course is one of the set of courses within the So- 
cial Science requirement of the General Education Pro- 
gram. Sociological analysis of the American social struc- 
true; metropolitan, small town, and rural communities; 
population distribution, composition and change; social 
organization. (Staff) 

SOCY 013. RURAL SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

Rural life in America; its people, social organization, 
culture patterns, and problems. (Staff) 

SOCY 014. URBAN SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

Urban growth and expansion; characteristics of city pop- 
ulations; urban institutions and personality patterns; 
relations of city and county. (Staff) 

SOCY 051. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. An examination of 
the nature of social problems; perspectives on social 
problems; the ways in which social problems are impli- 
cated in the organization of society; and a detailed study 
of selected social problems including social conflict and 
social inequality. (Staff) 

SOCY 052. CRIMINOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Criminal behavior and 
the methods of its study; causation; typologies of crim- 
inal acts and offenders; punishment, correction, and 
incapacitation; prevention of crime. 

(Lejins, Maida, Staff) 

SOCY 062. SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. Nature and function 
of social institutions; the perpetuation of behavior 
through customs and social norms; typical contempor- 
ary American institutions. (Staff) 

SOCY 071. DYNAMICS OF SOCIAL INTERACTION. (3) 

Social psychology of groups such as committees, teams, 
clubs, sects, social movements, crowds and publics. 
Origin of the social self; role behavior, inter-group and 
intra-group relations. (Cussler, Staff) 

SOCY 086. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The basic forms of 
social interaction, processes, and structures. Intended 
primarily for, and required of, all majors. It is recom- 
mended that the course be taken in the sophomore year. 
Formerly SOCY 002. The basic forms of human associa- 
tions and interactions, social processes; institutions, 
culture, human nature and personality. 

(Lengermann, Pease, Staff) 

SOCY 095. INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS FOR SOCIOLOGY 
(3) 
(Two lectures and two hours drill per week.) Prerequisite, 
MATH 010 or equivalent. Elementary descriptive and 
inferential statistics. Measures of central tendency and 
variation, non-parametric and parametric measures of 
association and correlation, one-way analysis of variance, 
hypothesis testing, point and interval estimates. Required 
of all Sociology majors. 

(Bateman, Henkel, Mclntyre, Simons, Teevan, Staff) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

SOCY 102. INTERCULTURAL SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, SOCY 002. On the basis of a comparative 
study of customs, individual and group behavior patterns 
and institutions, this course studies the ideologies of 
America and other modern societies. (Franz) 

SOCY 111. SOCIOLOGY OF OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS. 
(3) 
The sociology of work and occupational life in modern 
society. Changing occupational ideologies, values and 
choices. Occupational status systems and occupational 
mobility. The social psychology of career success. 

(Lengermann, Coates) 

SOCY 112. RURAL-URBAN RELATIONS. (3) 

The ecology of population and the forces making for 
change in rural and urban life; migration, decentraliza- 
tion and regionalism as methods of studying individual 
and national issues. Applied field problems. (Henkel) 

SOCY 113. THE RURAL COMMUNITY. (3) 

A detailed study of rural life with emphasis on levels of 
living, the family, school, and church and organizational 
activities in the fields of health, recreation, welfare, and 
planning. (Staff) 

SOCY 114. THE CITY. (3) 

The rise of urban civilization and metropolitan regions; 
ecological process and structure; the city as a center of 



dominance; social problems, control and planning. 

(Hirzel, Pollitt) 

SOCY 115. INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

The sociology and human relations in American industry 
and business. Complex industrial and business organiza- 
tion as social systems. Social relationships within and 
between industry, business, community, and society. 

(Coates, Lengermann) 

SOCY 1 16. MILITARY SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

Social change and the growth of military institutions. 
Complex formal military organizations. Military organiza- 
tions as social systems. Military service as an occupation 
or profession. The sociology of military life. Relations be- 
tween military institutions, civilian communities and 
society. (Coates) 

SOCY 117. THE SOCIOLOGY OF WAR. (3) 

The origin and development of armed forces as institu- 
tions, the social causes, operations and results of war 
as social conflict; the relations of peace and war and 
revolution in contemporary civilizations. (Coates) 

SOCY 118. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION. (3) 

Community organization and its relation to social wel- 
fare; analysis of community needs and resources; health, 
housing, recreation; community centers-, neighborhood 
projects. (Federico) 

SOCY 121. POPULATION. (3) 

Population distribution and growth in the United States 
and the world; population characteristics of the United 
States; resulting population problems and policies. 

(Hirzel, Kruegel) 

SOCY 122. POPULATION. (3) 

Trends in fertility and mortality, migrations, population 
estimates and the resulting problems and policies. 

(Hirzel, Kruegel) 

SOCY 123. ETHNIC MINORITIES. (3) 

Basic social processes in the relations of ethnic groups 
within the State; immigration groups and the Negro in 
the United States; ethnic minorities in Europe. 

(Lejins, Staff) 

SOCY 124. SOCIOLOGY OF RACE RELATIONS. (3) 

Race as a focus of social relations. Political and collec- 
tive action centering on race relations. New myths of 
race. Trends in assimilation of racial groupings. 

(Mclntyre, Schwartz) 

SOCY 131. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SERVICE. (3) 

General survey of the field of social-welfare activities; 
historical development; growth, functions, and specializa- 
tion of agencies and services, private and public. 

(Federico) 

SOCY 136. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION. (3) 

Varieties and sources of religious experience. Religious 
institutions and the role of religion in social life. 

(Thomas) 

SOCY 141. SOCIOLOGY OF PERSONALITY. (3) 

Development of human nature and personality in con- 
temporary social life; processes of socialization; atti- 
tudes, individual differences, and social behavior. 

(Cussler, Hunt, Simons) 

SOCY 143. FORMAL AND COMPLEX ORGANIZATIONS. (3) 
The concept of formal organization. The study of func- 
tioning and control in the operation of bureaucracies 
such as corporations and in large-scale organizations 
such as military, religious and educational hierarchies. 
Forms of recruitment, internal mobility and organiza- 
tional personality. Relations between large-scale organi- 
zations and with the larger society. 

(Lengermann, Schwartz) 

SOCY 144. COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR. (3) 

Social interaction in mass behavior; communication pro- 
cesses; structure and functioning of crowds, strikes, 
audiences, mass movements, and the public. 

(Cussler, Simons) 

SOCY 145. SOCIAL CONTROL. (3) 

Forms, mechanism, and techniques of groups influence 
on human behavior; problems of social control in con- 
temporary society. (Braungart) 

SOCY 147. SOCIOLOGY OF LAW. (3) 

Law as a form of social control; interrelation between 
legal and other conduct norms as to their content, sanc- 
tions, and methods of securing conformity; law as an in- 
tegral part of the culture of the groups; factors and pro- 
cesses operative in the formation of legal norms as de- 
terminants of human behavior. 

(Lejins) 

SOCY 148. SOCIOLOGY OF THE ARTS. (3) 



Arts and Sciences 



753 



Functions of the arts as a social institution. Social role 
of the artist. Recruitment to and organizational structure 
of artistic professions. Art forms and social character- 
istics of audiences. Changing technology and social 
values as reflected in artistic expression. 

(Federico) 

SOCY 153. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. (3) 

Juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem 
of crime; analysis of factors underlying juvenile delin- 
quency; treatment and prevention. (Lejins, Maida, Staff) 

SOCY 154. CRIME AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION. (3) 
Prerequisite, SOCY 052 or SOCY 153 or consent of in- 
structor. Methods and programs in prevention of crime 
and delinquency. (Lejins, Maida, Staff) 

SOCY 155. TREATMENT OF CRIMINALS AND DELIN- 
QUENTS IN THE COMMUNITY. (3) 
Prerequisite, SOCY 052, 153, or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of the processes and methods in the modifica- 
tion of criminal patterns of behavior in a community 
setting. (Lejins, Staff) 

SOCY 156. INSTITUTIONAL TREATMENT OF CRIMINALS 
AND DELINQUENTS. (3) 
Prerequisite, SOCY 052 or SOCY 153 or consent of in- 
structor. History, organization and functions of penal and 
correctional institutions for adults and juveniles. 

(Lejins, Staff) 

SOCY 162. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION. (3) 

Prerequsite, 9 credits of sociology. An introduction to 
the sociology of social stratification. Consideration of 
the basic concepts and major findings in the field. The 
relationship of social stratification to the institutional 
orders of the society. (Pease) 

SOCY 164. THE FAMILY AND SOCIETY. (3) 

Study of the family as a social institution; its biological 
and cultural foundations, historic development, changing 
structure and function; the interactions of marriages 
and parenthood, disorganizing and reorganizing factors 
in present day trends. (Harper) 



SOCY 174. SENIOR SEMINAR IN SOCIAL WORK. (3) 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Open only 
to graduating seniors enrolled in the Pre-Professional 
Social Work Program. This course seeks to give Pre-Pro- 
fessional Social Work students experience in applying 
social science theory to concrete social problems. Cases 
of psychological, social, and biological malfunction will 
be studied, and specific treatment plans constructed. 
The interrelated nature of several causes of deviant be- 
havior will be stressed, as will the importance of under- 
standing and using the principles of several social sci- 
ence disciplines. (Federico) 

SOCY 180. SMALL GROUP ANALYSIS. (3) 

Analysis of small group structure and dynamics. Review 
of research on small groups in factories, military service, 
schools and communities. Presentation of techniques 
used in the study of small groups. (Franz, Teevan) 

SOCY 186. SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. (3) 

Development of the science of sociology; historic back- 
grounds; recent theories of society. Majors in sociology 
should take this course in their senior year. 

(Janes, Hunt, Thomas) 

SOCY 191. SOCIAL FIELD TRAINING. (1-3) 

Prerequisites, for social work field training, SOCY 131; 
for crime control field training, SOCY 052 and 153. En- 
rollment restricted to available placements. Supervised 
field training in public and private social agencies. The 
student will select his particular area of interest and be 
responsible to an agency for a definite program of in- 
service training. Group meetings, individual conferences, 
and written program reports will be a required part of 
the course. (Staff) 

SOCY 193. INDEPENDENT READING COURSE IN SOCIOL- 
OGY. (3) 
For honors students only. This course is designed for the 
needs of the honors students in Sociology. (Staff) 

SOCY 194. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY. (3) 
For honors students only. This course is designed for the 
needs of the honors students in Sociology. (Staff) 

SOCY 195. INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS FOR SOCIOLOG- 
ISTS. (3) 
Prerequisite, SOCY 095 or equivalent and six additional 
credits in Sociology. Intermediate correlation techniques, 
analysis of variance, sampling, additional noB-parame- 
tric techniques, additional topics in inferential statistics. 
Required of all candidates for the M.A. degree. 

(Bateman, Henkel, Simons, Staff) 



SOCY 196. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS IN 
SOCIOLOGY. (3) 
Nature and scope of sociological research problem form- 
ulation, case study methods, observational methods, sur- 
vey method, experimental methods, documentary meth- 
ods, miscellaneous methods. 

(Bateman, Mclntyre, Teevan, Staff) 
SOCY 199. INDEPENDENT STUDY OF SOCIOLOGY. (1-6) 

Prerequisites, written consent of faculty under whose 
direction the study is to be performed, and at least 
twelve hours of sociology credit to include one or more 
of the following: SOCY 095; SOCY 186; SOCY 196. In- 
tegrated reading or research under direction and super- 
vision of faculty member. (Staff) 
At least one seminar each in methods-statistics, theory, 
community, social psychology, and criminology will be of- 
fered each semester. 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
SOCY 201. METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH. (3) 
SOCY 202. ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOL- 
OGY. (3) 
SOCY 204. PRACTICUM IN DATA ANALYSIS IN FIELD RE- 
SEARCH. (3) 
SOCY 205. COMPUTER METHODS FOR SOCIOLOGISTS. 

(3) 
SOCY 214. SURVEY OF URBAN THEORY. (3) 
SOCY 215. COMMUNITY STUDIES. (3) 

SOCY 216. SOCIOLOGY OF OCCUPATIONS AND PROFES- 
SIONS. (3) 
SOCY 217. SEMINAR IN FIELD WORK URBAN RESEARCH. 

(3) 
SOCY 219. HUMAN ECOLOGY. (3) 
SOCY 221. POPULATION AND SOCIETY. (3) 
SOCY 230. COMPARATIVE SOCIOLOGY. (3) 
SOCY 241. PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE. (3) 
SOCY 246. PUBLIC OPINION AND PROPAGANDA. (3) 
SOCY 247. SOCIOLOGY OF LAW. (3) 
SOCY 250. FORMAL ORGANIZATION. (3) 
SOCY 253. ADVANCED CRIMINOLOGY. (3) 
SOCY 254. SEMINAR: Criminology. (3) 
SOCY 255. SEMINAR: Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 
SOCY 256. CRIME AND DELINQUENCY AS A COMMUNITY 

PROBLEM. (3) 
SOCY 257. SOCIAL CHANGE AND SOCIAL POLICY. (3) 
SOCY 262. FAMILY STUDIES. (3) 

SOCY 263. MARRIAGE AND FAMILY COUNSELING. (3) 
SOCY 264. THE SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL HEALTH. (3) 
SOCY 266. RESEARCH LITERATURE IN SOCIAL STRATIFI- 

CATION. (3) 
SOCY 271. THEORY OF SOCIAL INTERACTION. (3) 
SOCY 282. SOCIOLOGY METHODOLOGY. (3) 
SOCY 286. DEVELOPMENT OF EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN 

SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. (3) 
SOCY 287. SEMINAR: SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. (3) 
SOCY 288. THE SOCIOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE. (3) 
SOCY 291. SPECIAL SOCIAL PROBLEMS. (Credit to be de- 
termined) 
SOCY 295. ADVANCED STATISTICS FOR SOCIOLOGISTS. (3) 
SOCY 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Credit to be determined) 
SOCY 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Credit to be deter- 
mined) 



SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Aylward. 

PROFESSORS: Hofsommer (Emeritus), Newby, Pugliese, 

Strausbaugh. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Baker, Lmkow. Meersman, Nie- 

meyer. 
ASSOCIATE RESEARCH PROFESSOR: Causey. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Canetta, Craven, Doudna. 

Kennicott Kirkley, OLeary, Provensen, Rebach, Starcher, 

Vaughan. Wolvm. 
LECTUR&RS: Liebergott, Spuehler, Weiss. 
INSTRUCTORS: Akiyama, Anderson Blom, Blum, Boss. Buen- 

ger, Caudill, Corea, DuMonceau. Hassan, Kogler, Lea, Man- 



154 



Arts and Sciences 



zan McCleary, McClure, McKerrow, Slattu/n, Ulrich, 
Wallace. 



The courses in this Department have two main 
functions: (1) to provide training in basic oral com- 
munication skills to meet the general needs of un- 
dergraduates of the University; (2) to provide inte- 
grated specialized training for students who wish to 
major or minor in speech. 

The undergraduate program provides for spe- 
cific emphasis in one of the four areas of the Depart- 
ment: (1) General Speech (speech education, per- 
suasion, public address, oral interpretation, organi- 
zational and interpersonal communication), (2) 
Dramatic Art (educational theatre, acting, directing, 
producing, theatre history, and technical theatre), 
(3) Radio/Television (educational radio and tele- 
vision, programming, directing, and producing); (4) 
Speech and Hearing Science ( phonetics, semantics, 
speech and hearing therapy, speech pathology and 
audiology). Adequate preparation and training for 
graduate work is provided. Programs for various 
concentrations may be obtained from the depart- 
mental office or advisors. 

Minors in speech are adapted to meet the needs 
of students majoring in English, the social sciences, 
journalism and public relations, elementary educa- 
tion, nursery school-kindergarten education, pre- 
law, and pre-ministry fields. 

Prerequisites for all majors in speech are SPCH 
001 and 002, as well as SPHR 003 or SPCH 004, 
and ZOOL 001. Major requirements: 30 hours of 
courses in speech with 15 hours of courses num- 
bered 100 and above. No course with a grade less 
than "C" may be used to satisfy major requirements. 

Specific requirements for professional training 
in speech and hearing science include completion 
of the general requirements for speech majors with 
the following additions: ZOOL 014, 015; PSYC 001, 
005, 025, 110, 131; a minimum of 21 hours of 
speech sciences at the 100 level. 

Qualified students, depending upon specialized 
interests, are invited to participate in the activities 
of the University Theater, Radio-Television Work- 
shop, and the Calvert Debate Club. 

The Department of Speech and Dramatic Art 
offers an Honors Program for the superior student. 
Interested students should consult their advisor for 
further information no later than the beginning of 
their junior year. 

GENERAL SPEECH 

*SPCH 001. PUBLIC SPEAKING. (3) 

Prerequisite for advanced speech courses. The prepara- 
tion and delivery of short original speeches; outside read- 
ings; reports, etc. It is recommended that this course be 
taken during the freshman year. SPCH 001 and 007 may 
not both be used for credit. (Linkow, Staff) 

SPCH 002. ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 001 or 007. A study of rehetoncal 
principles and models of speech composition in con- 
junction with the preparation and presentation of spe- 
cific forms of public address. (Staff) 

SPCH 004. VOICE AND DICTION. (3) 

First and second semesters. Emphasis upon the improve- 
ment of voice, articulation, and phonation. May be taken 
concurrently with SPCH 001. (Starcher, Staff) 

*SPCH 007. PUBLIC SPEAKING. (2) 

The preparation and delivery of speeches on technical 
and general subjects. SPCH 007 and 001 may not both 
be used for credit. (Staff) 

SPCH 010. GROUP DISCUSSION. (3) 

A study of the principles, methods, and types of discus- 
sion, and their application in the discussion of contem- 
porary problems. (Linkow, Staff) 

SPCH Oil, 012. DEBATE. (2, 2) 



Pre-Law students may take SPCH Oil, 012, instead of 
SPCH 001 or SPCH 007. A study of the principles of 
argument, analysis, evidence, reasoning, fallacies, brief- 
ing, and delivery, together with their application in pub- 
lic speaking. (Fitzgerald, Staff) 

SPCH 013. ORAL INTERPRETATION. (3) 

The oral interpretation of literature and the practical 
training of students in the art of reading. 

(Provensen, Staff) 

SPCH 021. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION 
(3) 

First and second semesters. A study of oral communica- 
tive behavior, including problems and processes of sym- 
bolizatjons, aspects of oral language, the involvement of 
the talker and listener, kinds of signals, and self-revela- 
tion through speech. (Frank, Staff) 

SPCH 023. PARLIAMENTARY LAW. (1) 

A study of the principles and application of parliament- 
ary law as applied to all types of meetings. Thorough 
training in the use of Robert's Rules of Order. 

(Strausbaugh) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

SPCH 107. ADVANCED ORAL INTERPRETATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 013. Emphasis upon the longer read- 
ing. Program planning. (Provensen) 

SPCH 110. ADVANCED GROUP DISCUSSION. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 010. Required in speech curriculum 
and elective in other curricula. An examination of cur- 
rent research and techniques in the discussion and 
conference, inculding extensive practice in this area. 

(Linkow) 

SPCH 111. SEMINAR. (3) 

Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. 
Present-day speech research. (Strausbugh, Staff) 

SPCH 124,125. AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS. (3 3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 001, or 007. The first semester 
covers the period from colonial times to the Civil War 
period. The second semester covers from the Civil War 
period through the contemporary period. 

SPCH 133. COMMUNICATION PROCESSES IN CONFER- 
ENCES. (3) 
Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. Limited to 
students at the off-campus centers. Group participation 
in conferences, methods of problem solving, semantic 
aspects of language, and the function of conferences in 
industry and government. (Linkow) 

SPCH 161. ANCIENT RHETORIC. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 002 or consent of instructor. The 
theories of speech-making and speech composition as 
propounded by the classical rhetoricians. Special at- 
tention is given to Plato, Aristole, Socrates, Cicero, 
Quintillian, and St. Augustine. (Staff) 

SPCH 162. MODERN RHETORIC. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPCH 002 or consent of the instructor. A 
study of the development of modern rhetorical theories in 
Europe and America with consideration of the application 
of the theories to public address. Special attention is 
given to Thomas Sheridan, John Walker, George Camp- 
bell, Hugh Blair, Richard Whately, James A. Winans, 
Charles Woolbert, I. A. Richards, and Kenneth Burke. 

(Staff) 

SPCH 163. MATERIALS AND PROGRAMS FOR THE DEVEL- 
OPMENT OF LISTENING. (3) 
Second semester. The study of research finding, listening 
tests, materials, equipment, and programs which can be 
used to develop listening skills. (Frank) 

SPCH 164. PERSUASION IN SPEECH. (3) 

Second semester, Prerequisite, SPCH 002 or Oil. A 
study of the bases of persuasion with emphasis on re- 
cent experimental developments in persuasion. (Staff) 

SPCH 180. HONORS SEMINAR. (3) 

For Honors students only. Readings, symposiums, visit- 
ing lecturers, discussions. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
SPCH 260. SPEECH AND DRAMA PROGRAMS IN HIGHER 

EDUCATION. (3) 
SPCH 261. INTRODUCTION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN 

SPEECH. (3) 
SPCH 262. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN GENERAL SPEECH. (3) 
SPCH 263. RHETORICAL THEORIES OF STYLE. (3) 
SPCH 264. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. (3) 
SPCH 290. INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-3) 



Arts and Sciences 



155 



SPCH 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (1-6) 

SPCH 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH (Arranged) 

DRAMATIC ART 

DART 008. ACTING. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Basic principles of 
histrionic practice. (Meersman) 

DART 014. STAGECRAFT. (3) 

Fundamentals of technical production. Emphais on con- 
struction of scenery. (Ulrich) 

DART 016. INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATRE. (3) 
A general survey of the fields of the theatre. 

(Pugliese) 

DART 017. MAKE-UP. (2) 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. A lecture- 
laboratory course in the theory and practice of stage 
make-up, covering basic requirements as to age, type, 
character, race, and period. (Schmitt) 

FOR A0VANCE0 UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

DART 113. PLAY PRODUCTION. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequsite, DART 016 or consent of 
instructor. Development of procedure followed by the di- 
rector in preparing plays for public performance. 

(Meersman) 

DART 114. THE FILM AS AN ART FORM. (3) 

A study of the motion picture as a developing form of 
entertainment, communication, and artistic expression. 
A series of significant American and foreign films are 
viewed to illustrate the artistic, historical, and sociol- 
ogical trends of the twentieth century. (Niemeyer) 

DART 127. CHILDREN'S DRAMATICS. (3) 

Principles and methods necessary for staging children's 
productions on the elementary school level. Major em- 
phasis on creative dramatics; the application of creative 
dramatics in the school room, and the values gained by 
the child in this activity. Students will conduct classes 
in forma! and creative dramatics which will culminate 
in children's programs. (Hughes) 

DART 129, 130. Play Directing. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, DART 008 or consent of instructor. A lec- 
ture-laboratory course dealing with the fundamentals of 
script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking and rehearsal 
routine as applied to the directing of plays. (O'Leary) 

DART 131. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE. (3) 

First semester. A survey of the dramatic production from 
early origin to 1800. CNiemeyer) 

DART 132. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of dramatic production from 
1800 to the present. (Niemeyer) 

DART 139. THEATRE WORKSHOP. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 008 or 014. A laboratory course de- 
signed to provide the student with practical experience 
in all phases of theater production. (Staff) 

DART 171. STYLES AND THEORIES OF ACTING. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, DART 008 or consent of 
instructor. The study and application of historical styles 
and theories of acting. (Pugliese) 

DART 175. STAGE DESIGN. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 014 or consent of instructor. The 
theory of stage design and lighting. Making of plans as 
coordinate elements of scenic design-. (Schmitt) 

DART 176. PRINCIPLES AND THEORIES OF STAGE LIGHT- 
ING. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 175. A study of composition, control, 
and instrumentation in theatrical lighting. (Schmitt) 

DART 177. COSTUME DESIGN FOR THE STAGE. (3) 

Prerequisite, DART 014 or consent of instructor. A his- 
torical and functional study of theatrical costume de- 
sign. (Waters) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

DART 270. SEMINAR: Studies in Theatre. (3) 

DART 271. THE THEORY OF PRE-MODERN DRAMATIC PRO- 
DUCTION. (3) 

DART 272. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DRAMA. (3) 

DART 273. THEORIES OF THE DRAMA. (3) 

DART 275. THEORY OF VISUAL DESIGN FOR THE PERFORM 
ING ARTS. (3) 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

RATV 022. INTRODUCTION TO RADIO AND TELEVISION. (3) 
Prerequisite for all courses in radio except RATV 024. 



The development, scope, and influence of American 
broadcasting and telecasting, including visits to local 
radio and television stations. 
RATV 024. MASS COMMUNICATION IN 20TH CENTURY 
SOCIETY. (3) 
A problem centered approach to the study of mass com- 
munication and the impact of media on contemporary 
society. Each semester the media treatment of a contem- 
porary social, economic or environmental issue is used as 
a focus for study of the principles, techniques and ef- 
fects of mass media. Students produce simple radio, 
television and film material on the selected issue. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

RATV 102. RADIO PRODUCTION. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, RATV 022 and consent 
of instructor. A study of the multiple problems facing 
the producer. Special emphasis is given to acoustic set- 
up, casting, "miking," timing, cutting, and the coordina- 
tion of personnel factors involved in the production of 
radio programs. (Kirkley) 

RATV 115. RADIO AND TELEVISION IN RETAILING. (3) 

First semester. Limited to students in the College of 
Home Economics. Prerequisite, SPCH 001 or 007. 
Writing and production of promotional programs for the 
merchandising of wearing apparel and home-furnishings. 
Collaboration with the Washington and Baltimore radio 
stations and retail stores. (Kirkley) 

RATV 117. RADIO AND TELEVISION CONTINUITY WRITING. 
(3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, RATV 022 or consent of 
instructor. A study of the principles, methods and limita- 
tions of writing for radio and television. Application will 
be made in the writing of general'types of continuities 
and commercials. (Staff) 

RATV 140. PRINCIPLES OF TELEVISION PRODUCTION. (3) 
Prerequisite, 022. A study of the theory, methods, tech- 
niques, and problems of television production and di- 
rection. Units of study covering television cameras and 
lenses, lighting theory and practices, scenery and proper- 
ties, costumes and makeup, graphic arts and special ef- 
fects are included. Observation of production procedures 
at nearby television stations. Application will be made 
through crew assignments for University-produced tele- 
vision programs. (Staff) 

RATV 146. TELEVISION NEWS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, RATV 117 or JOUR 101. 
Training in presentation of television news, interviews, 
discussions, and forums. (McCleary) 

RATV 147. ANALYSIS OF BROADCASTING PROCESSES AND 
RESULTS. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, RATV 022 or consent of in- 
structor. Survey of the more common analytic ap 
proaches, methods, and results in the field of radio ana 
television. (Staff) 

RATV 148. TELEVISION DIRECTION. (3) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture, three hour labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, RATV 022, 140. Principles of tele- 
vision direction including analysis of script, casting, 
rehearsing, production, and video control. (Aylward) 

RATV 149. TELEVISION WORKSHOP. (3) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture, four hour laboratory. 
Prerequisites. RATV 022, 140, and 148 or consent of in- 
structor. (Aylward) 

RATV 150. RADIO AND TELEVISION STATION MANAGE- 
MENT. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, RATV 022 or consent of 
instructor. Broadcasting regulations, licenses, person- 
nel functions, sales, advertising, and program and station 
promotion. (Kirkley) 

RATV 151. BROADCAST PROGRAMMING AND CRITICISM. 
(3) 
Second semester. An investigation of the professional, 
historical, social and psychological criticism of American 
radio and television, together with a critical analysis of 
contemporary programming trends and conventions. 

(Kirkley) 

RATV 152 INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE BROAD- 
CASTING SYSTEMS. (3) 
Prerequisite, RATV 022. A comparative study of interna- 
tional broadcasting program policies, economic systems, 
control and organization. The use of broadcasting in in- 
ternational affairs as an instrument of propaganda, cul- 
tural and informational dissemination. Monitoring of 
overseas broadcasts, television programs and discussions 
with representatives of domestic and foreign interna- 
tional broadcast agencies. 



156 



Arts and Science* 



RATV 155. FILM PRODUCTION. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the theo- 
retical and practical aspects of 16 mm film production. 
Through reading and practice, students are familiarized 
with basic cinematography, lighting, editing, pictorial 
composition and film continuity as a communication arts 
medium. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
RATV 240. SEMINAR IN BROADCASTING. (3) 
RATV 241. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BROADCASTING. (3) 
RATV 248. ADVANCED TELEVISION DIRECTION. (3) 

SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

Speech Clinic. No Credit. 

Remedial work in minor speech defects. The work of the 
clinic is conducted in individual conferences and in 
small group meetings. Hours arranged by consultation 
with the respective speech instructor. (Staff) 

SPHR 003. FUNDAMENTALS OF GENERAL AMERICAN 
SPEECH. (3) 
Training in auditory discrimination of speech sounds, 
rhythms and inflection of general American speech. Anal- 
ysis of the physiological bases of speech production and 
the phonetic elements of speech reception. This course 
is required of majors in speech and hearing science and 
recommended for foreign students and majors in nursery 
and elementary education. (Staff) 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

SPHR 105. SPEECH-HANDICAPPED SCHOOL CHILDREN. (3) 
Prerequisite, SPHR 003 for undergraduates. The occur- 
rence, identification, and treatment of speech handicaps 
in the classrooms. An introduction to speech pathology. 

(Staff) 

SPHR 106. CLINICAL PRACTICE. (1 to 5 Credits, up to 9) 
Prerequisites, SPHR 105 and consent of instructor. May 
be taken for 1-5 credit hours per semester. May be re- 
peated for a total of 9 semester hours credit. Clinical 
practice in various methods of corrective procedures 
with various types of speech cases in the University 
clinic, Veterans hospitals, and public schools. 

(Craven) 

SPHR 108. EDUCATION PHONETICS. (3) 

This course is designed to relate phonetic science to the 
classroom. An extensive coverage of broad transcription 
of general American speech. Students having credit for 
SPHR 003 or any previous phonetics course are not 
eligible for this course. 

SPHR 109. SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT OF 
CHILDREN. (3) 
Second semester. Admission by consent of instructor. An 
analysis of normal and abnormal processes of speech and 
language development in children. 

SPHR 112. PHONETICS. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 003 or consent of instructor. Training 
in the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken 
English, with an analysis of their formation. Practice 
transcription. Mastery of the international phonetic al- 
phabet. (Baker) 

SPHR 120. SPEECH PATHOLOGY. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, SPHR 105. A continuation of 
SPHR 105, with emphasis on the causes and treatment 
of organic speech disorders. (Staff) 

SPHR 126. SEMANTIC ASPECTS OF SPEECH IN HUMAN 
RELATIONS. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in public 
speaking. An analysis of speech and language habits 
from the standpoint of general semantics. 

SPHR 135. INSTRUMENTATION IN SPEECH AND HEARING 
SCIENCE. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, 003. The use of electronic 
equipment in the measurement bf speech and hearing. 

(Linkow) 

SPHR 136. PRINCIPLES OF SPEECH THERAPY. (3) 

Prerequisite, SPHR 120. Differential diagnosis of speech 
and language handicaps and the application of psycho- 
logical principles of learning, motivation and adjustment in 
the treatment of speech disorders. (Craven) 

SPHR 138. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN SPEECH COR- 
RECTION. (3) 
Prerequisite, SPHR 120 or the equivalent. The design 
and use of methods and materials for diagnosis, measure- 
ment, and retraining of the speech-handicapped. 

(Craven) 



SPHR 141. INTRODUCTION TO AUDIOMETRY. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites SPHR 003. 135. Analysis 
of various methods and procedures in evaluating hearing 
losses. Required for students whose concentration is in 
speech and hearing therapy. (Doudna) 

SPHR 142. SPEECH READING AND AUDITORY TRAINING. 
(3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, SPHR 135, 141. Meth- 
ods of training individuals with hearing loss to recognize, 
interpret and understand spoken language. Required 
for students whose concentration is in speech and hear- 
ing therapy. (Doudna) 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 
The department maintains a reciprocal agree- 
ment with the Veterans Administration whereby 
clinical practice may be obtained at the Audiology 
and Speech Pathology Clinic, Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital, 50 Irving St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
SPHR 201. SPECIAL PROBLEMS SEMINAR. (A. through K.) 

(1,3) 
SPHR 202. TECHNIQUES OF RESEARCH IN SPEECH AND 

HEARING. (3) 
SPHR 203. EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS. (3) 
SPHR 204. APPLIED PHONETICS. (3) 
SPHR 205. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL PHONETICS. (3) 
SPHR 206. DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES IN SPEECH PA- 
THOLOGY. 3) 
SPHR 207. ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF SPEECH AND HEAR- 
ING THERAPY. (3) 
SPHR 208. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN SPEECH AND 

HEARING SCIENCE. (3) 
SPHR 210. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF SPEECH AND 

HEARING. (3) 
SPHR 211. A, B, C, D. ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICE. 

(1,3 up to 12) 
SPHR 212. ADVANCED SPEECH PATHOLOGY. (3) 
SPHR 214. CLINICAL AUDIOMETRY. (3) 
SPHR 216. COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR THE HARD-OF- 

HEARING. (3) 
SPHR 217. HEARING AID SELECTION FOR THE ACOUSTI- 
CALLY HANDICAPPED. (3) 
SPHR 218. SPEECH AND HEARING IN MEDICAL REHABILI- 
TATION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. (3) 
SPHR 219. SPEECH DISORDERS OF THE BRAIN-INJURED. 

(3) 
SPHR 220. EXPERIMENTAL AUDIOLOGY. (3) 
SPHR 221. COMMUNICATION THEORY AND SPEECH HEAR- 
ING PROBLEMS. (3) 
SPHR 222. ADVANCED BIO-ACOUSTICS. (3) 
SPHR 223. ADVANCED PSYCHO-ACOUSTICS. (3) 
SPHR 224. THE PREPARATION OF SPEECH AND HEARING 
SCIENTISTS IN INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING. 
(3) 
SPHR 225. ADVANCED SEMANTICS. (3) 
SPHR 226. LANGUAGE PROBLEMS OF THE EXCEPTIONAL 

CHILD. (3) 
SPHR 227. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN IN SPEECH AND HEAR- 
ING SCIENCE. (3) 
SPHR 229. CLINICAL AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF 

HEARING LOSS. (3) 
SPHR 301. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH AND HEAR- 
ING SCIENCE. (1-6) 



ZOOLOGY 

PROFESSOR AND CHAIRMAN: Corliss. 

PROFESSORS: Anastos, Brown, Burhoe, Grollman, Haley, 

Humphrey, Jacowski, Otto, Schleidt. 
RESEARCH PROFESSORS: Cronin*. Glinos*, Koo*, Sadun. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brinkley, Clark, Gainer, Highton, 

Linder, Morse. Ramm. 
RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Eisenberg, Flyger*, 

Mihursky, Price. Sprague*. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Contrera, Goode, Imberksi, 

Potter. 
RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Flemmer and Hidu. 
RESEARCH ASSOCIATES: Doss and Farr. 
LECTURER: Mcintosh. 



Arts and Sciences 



157 



INSTRUCTORS: Croshaw, Ivie, Kaufman, Moore, Piper, 

Smythe, Stewart. 
JUNIOR INSTRUCTORS: Guidmore, Smith, J. Vieweg. 

The Department of Zoology offers a program 
leading to a B.S. with a major in Zoology. A core of 
required courses and restricted electives in zoology, 
as well as supporting courses in other fields, pro- 
vides an introduction to, and an appreciation of, the 
broad field of zoology. Through selection of addi- 
tional elective courses to complete the required 
34 credit hours in zoology, the student may explore 
in greater depth some phase of zoology which is of 
particular interest to him. Copies of suggested cur- 
ricula for students interested in preparation for 
graduate study in various phases of zoology or in 
pre-medical, pre-dental and biological technician 
training are available from the departmental office. 



All majors are required to complete a minimum 
of 30 hours in zoology with an average grade of "C". 
Required courses include ZOOL 001, 002, 006, and 
one course from each of the following groups: Group 
I, ZOOL 102, 103, 104, 105, 109; GROUP II, ZOOL 
110, 118, 120, 127, 129; Group III, ZOOL 106, 121, 
128, 130, 182, 190. Additional courses to complete 
the required 30 hours in zoology may be selected 
from any of the undergraduate courses in zoology 
except ZOOL 014, 015, Human Anatomy and Phys- 
iology (4, 4) and ZOOL 055-S, Development of the 
Human Body (2), which are not accepted for credit 
toward the major. 

Supporting courses must include: mathematics 
through one year of calculus as represented by com- 
pletion of MATH 014, 015, Elementary Calculus 
(3, 3) or MATH 019, 020, Analysis I, II (4, 4); CHEM 
001, 003, General Chemistry (4, 4) and 008, 009 
CHEM. 31, 33, Elements of Organic Chemistry (3, 3) 
or CHEM 35, 36, 37, 38, Elementary Organic Chem- 
istry and Laboratory (2, 2, 2, 2); PHYS 010, Oil, 
Fundamentals of Physics (4, 4); and one of the fol- 
lowing restricted electives: CHEM 019, Quantitative 
Analysis (4); MATH 021, Analysis III (4); STAT 050, 
Introduction to random variables (3); or STAT 164, 
Introduction to Biostatistics (3). It is strongly recom- 
mended that the supporting courses in chemistry 
and mathematics be completed as early in the cur- 
riculum as possible. Students desiring to enter 
graduate study in certain areas of zoology are ad- 
vised to take biochemistry, physical chemistry, sta- 
tistics or advanced mathematics as a part of their 
undergraduate training. 

HONORS 

The Department of Zoology also offers a special 
program for the exceptionally talented and prom- 
ising student. The Honors Program emphasizes the 
scholarly approach to independent study rather than 
adherence to a rigidly prescribed curriculum. Infor- 
mation regarding this program may be obtained 
from the departmental office or from the Chairman 
of the Zoology Honors Program. 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

BIOL 001. ORGANIZATION AND INTERRELATIONSHIPS IN 
THE BIOLOGICAL WORLD. (3) 
First semester. An introductory lecture course for the 
non-science major emphasizing the fundamental organi- 
zation, processes and interdependence of living organ- 
isms and the biological effects associated with human 
influences on the ecosystem. 

ZOOL 001. GENERAL ZOOLOGY. (4) 

Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a 
week. ZOOL 001 and 002 satisfy the freshman pre-medical 



requirement in general biology. An introduction to the 
modern concepts of biological principles and animal life. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the functional aspects of 
living systems with a survey of the physical and chemical 
bases of all life processes. (Linder, Brown) 

ZOOL 002. THE ANIMAL PHYLA. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 001 or BOTN 001. A study of the 
anatomy, classification and life histories of representa- 
tive animals, invertebrates and vertebrates. (Nelson) 

ZOOL 005. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE MORPHOLOGY. (4) 
Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 001 and 002 or equivalent. A 
comparative study of the evolution of vertebrate organ 
systems supplemented by laboratory dissection and 
demonstrations. (Morse) 

ZOOL 006. GENETICS. (4) 

Three lectures, one two-hour laboratory-discussion period 
per week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 001 or BOTN 001, or 
equivalent, and one semester of college chemistry. A 
consideration of the basic principles of heredity. 

(Potter) 

ZOOL 014. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL 001. For students who desire a gen- 
eral knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. 

(Grollman) 

ZOOL 015. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, ZOOL, 0014. A continuation of ZOOL 014. 

ZOOL055S. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN BODY. (2) 

Summer session. Five lectures a week. A study of the 
main factors affecting the growth and development of 
the child with special emphasis on normal development. 

(Staff) 

ZOOL 075. HISTORY OF ZOOLOGY. (1) 

One lecture a week. Prerequisites, a general Grade Point 
Average (GPA) of 3.2 and a GPA in biological subjects 
of 3.5, or permission of the instructor. A course in the 
history of the development of zoology involving the his- 
torical figures, experiments and ideas which contributed 
to modern concepts. 

ZOOL 076. ZOOLOGICAL LITERATURE. (1) 

One lecture a week. Prerequisites, a general Grade Point 
Average (GPA) of 3.2 and a GPA in bioloRical subjects of 
3.5, or permission of the instructor. Discussion of zoolo- 
gical literature, its use and significance. (Staff) 

ZOOL 077. BASIC STUDY IN ZOOLOGY. (1-4) 

Prerequisites, a general Grade Point Average (GPA) of 
3.2 and a GPA in biological subjects of 3.5, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Independent study, with support- 
ing laboratory experiments, of the basic disciplines in 
zoology. Repeatable up to 8 hours credit. (Staff) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES 

ZOOL 102. VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one semes- 
ter of organic chemistry. An intensive study of nerve, 
muscle, sensory receptors and the central nervous sys- 
tem. (Gainer) 

ZOOL 103. BIOPHYSICS. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, one year of biology, 
a year of physics, and at least one semester of calculus: 
or permission of the instructor. An introduction to the 
ideas and methods used in biophysics to analyze the 
functional components of cells and tissues as physical- 
chemical systems. 

ZOOL 104. VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one semes- 
ter of organic chemistry. An intensive study of the cardio- 
vascular, gastrointestinal, renal and respiratory systems, 
and an introduction to endocrinology, basal metabolism 
and reproductive physiology. (Contrera) 

ZOOL 105. GENERAL ENDROCRINOLOGY (3) 

Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, one year of 
zoology and one semester of organic chemistry. The study 
of the functions and the functioning of the endocrine 
organs of animals, with special reference to the verte- 
brates. 

ZOOL 106. MOLECULAR GENETICS. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, a course in ge- 
netics and one year of organic chemistry. The molecular 
basis of gene structure and function. Regulation of dif- 
ferential gene expression. 



758 



Arts and Sciences 



ZOOL 108. ANIMAL HISTOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Prerequisites, a course in general zoology and a 
course in vertebrate anatomy, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. A study of the microscopic anatomy, ultrastructure 
and histophysiology of tissues and organs of vertebrates. 

ZOOL 109. CELL BIOLOGY. W 

Two lectures, one one-hour demonstration-discussion 
period and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, two years of zoology and a year of organic 
chemistry, or permission of the instructor. A study of cell 
structure and function with an emphasis on the activity 
of subcellular organoids and the mechanisms of coordina- 
tion and control of cell function. (Brown) 

ZOOL 110. GENERAL PARASITOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, two years of zoology and one year 
of chemistry, or permission of the instructor. A considera- 
tion of the phenomenon of parasitism through a study 
of the structure, function and host relationships of para- 
sitic organisms. (Jachowski) 

ZOOL 118. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. An advanced 
course dealing with the phylogeny, morphology and em- 
bryology of the invertebrates, exclusive of insects. 

(Staff) 

ZOOL 120. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. Principles of 
developmental dynamics including organization, differ- 
entiation, morphogenesis, and developmental physiology. 

(Ramm) 

ZOOL 121. ANIMAL ECOLOGY. (3) 

Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, one year of zoology. The environment and 
its control of animal abundance, organization of popula- 
tions, and the biology of communities will be studied. 

(Morse) 

ZOOL 125S. FISHERY BIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT! (5) 

Five lectures and four three-hour laboratories each week 
for 6 weeks. Prerequisite, one year of zoology and per- 
mission of instructor. Study of fish identification, devel- 
opment, life history stages, food habits, age and growth, 
spawning, migration, and population dynamics. 

(Koo and Staff) 

ZOOL 127. ICHTHIOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and one two-hour and one three-hour labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 001, 002 and 
005 or equivalent. A course in anatomy, embryology, 
distribution, habits and taxonomy of marine and fresh 
water fish. (Staff) 

ZOOL 128. ZOOGEOGRAPHY. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, ZOOL 001, 002, 
and 005 or equivalent. Principles governing the geo- 
graphical distribution of animals, with particular em- 
phasis on vertebrates. (Potter) 

ZOOL 129. VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, two years of zoology or permission of in- 
structor. The identification, classification, habits and 
behavior of vertebrates. (Staff) 

ZOOL 130. HYDROBIOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, one year of biology or permission of 
instructor. Study of aquatic animals and conditions of 
existence in water. Selected examples are used to illus- 
trate the influence of environment on productivity of 
aquatic communities. (Staff) 

ZOOL 150. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ZOOLOGY. (1 or 2) 

Prerequisites, major in zoology or biological sciences, a 
minimum of 3.0 cumulative average in the biological 
sciences, and consent of instructor. Research or inte- 
grated reading in zoology. A student may register several 
times and receive up to 8 semester hours of credit. 

(Staff) 



ZOOL 151H. HONORS SEMINAR. (1) 

One discussion period a week. Prerequisite, participation 
in honors program. Guided discussion of topics of current 
interest. Repeatable to total of 4 hours credit. (Staff) 

ZOOL 152H. HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY. (1-4) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. Study of 
classical material by way of guided independent study 
and laboratory experiments. Repeatable to a total of 12 
hours credit. (Staff) 

ZOOL 153H. HONORS RESEARCH. (1-2) 

Prerequisite, participation in honors program. A laboratory 
research problem which is required each semester during 
honors participation and culminates in a honors thesis. 
Repeatable to a total of 8 hours credit. (Staff) 

ZOOL 180. CELL DIFFERENTIATION. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, a course in em- 
bryology, cell biology, or genetic systems, or permission of 
the instructor. A discussion of cellular and subcellular 
differentiation, emphasizing the biochemical and ultra- 
structural bases of these developmental changes. 

ZOOL 182. ETHOLOGY. (4) 

Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, two years of zoology, including a course 
in comparative anatomy, or permission of instructor. The 
function, causation, and evolution of behavior, labora- 
tory analysis of the behavior of several species. 

ZOOL 190. EVOLUTION. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, a course in ge- 
netics or permission of instructor. A consideration of 
current thought in regard to the origin and evolution of living 
organisms. (Highton) 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for descriptions. 

ZOOL 201. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 203. ADVANCED EMBRYOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 204. CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 205. COMPARATIVE INVERTEBRATE ENDOCRINOL- 
OGY. (3) 

ZOOL 206. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 207. ZOOLOGY SEMINAR. (Arranged) 

ZOOL 208. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ZOOLOGY. (Arranged) 

ZOOL 210. SYSTEMATIC ZOOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 211, 212. LECTURES IN ZOOLOGY. (1-3, 1-3) 

ZOOL 215. SOCIOBIOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 216. ADVANCED TOPICS IN CELL BIOLOGY. (3) 

ZOOL 220. POPULATION GENETICS. (4) 

ZOOL 221. ECOLOGICAL GENETICS. (4) 

ZOOL 223. ANALYSIS OF ANIMAL STRUCTURE. (4) 

ZOOL 234. EXPERIMENTAL MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 235. COMPARATIVE BEHAVIOR. (4) 

ZOOL 236. MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY. (3) 

ZOOL 237. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ENDOCRINOLOGY. 
(3) 

ZOOL 240. ANALYSIS OF ANIMAL POPULATIONS. (4) 

ZOOL 245. BIOLOGY OF BIRDS. (4) 

ZOOL 250. EXPERIMENTAL PARASITOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 251. HELMINTHOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 252. PROTOZOOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 253. PHYSIOLOGY OF SYMBIOSIS. (4) 

ZOOL 260. QUANTITATIVE ZOOLOGY. (4) 

ZOOL 300. ADVANCED TOPICS IN PARASITOLOGY. (Arranged) 

ZOOL 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Arranged) 

ZOOL 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (Arranged) 



Arts and Sciences 



159 




1 60 Arts and Sciences 



Business and Public Administration 



The University of Maryland is favorably located 
for the accommodation of students interested in 
business and public administration. Students inter- 
ested in economics, geography, information systems 
management, journalism, and political science, 
find a similarly distinct advantage in being at Col- 
lege Park. Downtown Washington is only 25 minutes 
away in one direction, while the Baltimore business 
district is less than an hour in the other. There is 
frequent transportation service from College Park 
to each city. Qualified students may obtain a first- 
hand view of the far-flung economic and political 
activities of the national government and may utilize 
the libraries and other facilities available in Wash- 
ington. 

The College's six instructional departments offer 
a broad range of curricula in professional fields and 
in social science disciplines. The separate programs 
of study frequently draw upon courses in com- 
plementary fields within the College. The six depart- 
ments and the major departmental offerings are: 

I. Department of Business Administration 

1. The General Curriculum in Business Admin- 
istration 

2. Accounting 

3. Finance 

4. Insurance and Real Estate 

5. Marketing 

6. Personnel and Industrial Relations 

7. Production Management 

8. Management Science— Statistics 

9. Transportation 

10. Combined Business Administration and Law 



II. Department of Economics 
1 1 1. Department of Geography 

IV.Department of Government and Politics 

1. General Curriculum in Government 
and Politics 

2. International Affairs 

3. Public Administration 

V.Department of Journalism 

VI. Department of Information Systems Manage- 
ment 
VII. Bureau of Business and Economic Research 
VIII. Bureau of Governmental Research 
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for admission to the College are 
those of the University. 

To assure a likelihood of success in the College, 
it is recommended that the student have four units 
of English, three or more units of college preparatory 
mathematics— including a minimum of two units 
of algebra and one unit of geometry, one or more 
units of history and social science, two or more units 
of natural science, and two or more units of foreign 
language. Students expecting to enroll in the college 
of Business and Public Administration should pur- 
sue the pre-college program in high school. 



Business and Public Administration 



161 



STATEMENT OF POLICY ON THE TRANSFER OF 
CREDIT FROM OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

The College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion of the University of Maryland subscribes to the 
policy that advanced work in professional courses 
should not be included within the first two years of 
the student's undergraduate experience. This policy 
is based on the conviction that the value derived 
from the advanced courses in business, journalism, 
public administration and other areas of a profes- 
sional nature is materially enhanced when based 
upon a sound foundation in the liberal arts. 

In adhering to the above policy it is the practice 
of the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion to accept in transfer from another institution no 
more than nine semester hours of work in business 
administration where such work has been taken as 
a part of the curriculum for the first two years of 
study. Similar limitations are placed upon the 
transfer of credit in other professional areas. The 
nine semester hours of business administration ac- 
ceptable in transfer are specifically identified as 
three semester hours in an introductory business 
course and six semester hours of elementary ac- 
counting. In addition a single course in data pro- 
cessing may be considered for transfer as an elec- 
tive. Thus it is anticipated that the student trans- 
ferring from another institution will have devoted 
the major share of his effort during the first two 
years to the completion of basic requirements in the 
liberal arts. 

DEGREES 

The University confers the following degrees on 
students completing programs of study in depart- 
ments of the College: Bachelor of Science, Master 
of Arts, Master of Business Administration, Doctor 
of Business Administration, and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy. Each candidate for a degree must file in the Of- 
fice of the Registrar on a date announced for each 
semester a formal application for a degree. Candi- 




dates for degrees must attend a convocation at 
which degrees are conferred and diplomas are 
awarded. Degree* are confirmed in absentia only in 
exceptional cases. 

JUNIOR STANDING 

A student is expected to have completed 56 se- 
mester hours of academic credit with an average 
grade of "C" (2.0) or better before registering for 
upper division courses. An exception to the fore- 
going may be made when the student has a limited 
number of hours of lower division requirement re- 
maining at the start of a new semester. In such 
cases the student may register for upper division 
courses to the extent necessary to complete his 
schedule. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of 120 semester hours of credit 
with an average of "C" in addition to the specified 
courses in physical activities and health are re- 
quired for graduation. A minimum of 57 hours of the 
required 120 hours must be in upper division 
courses, with the exception that the student may, 
with the consent of the dean, offer certain lower 
division courses in mathematics, natural science, 
and foreign language in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirement. Usually the departments within the Col- 
lege will require that the student have, in addition to 
an overall "C" average, an average of "C" or better 
in those courses comprising the student's depart- 
mental area of study. The time normally required to 
complete the requirements for the bachelor's de- 
gree is eight semesters. 

SENIOR RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

After a student has earned acceptable credit to 
the extent of 90 semester hours exclusive of the re- 
quired work in physical activities, and hygiene, 
either at the University of Maryland or elsewhere, 
he must earn a subsequent total of at least 30 se- 
mester hours with an average grade of "C" or better 
at the University of Maryland. No part of these cred- 
its may be transferred from another institution. Spe- 
cific requirements for graduation in the selected 
curriculum must be met. A student transferring from 
another college within the University to the College 
of Business and Public Administration is expected 
to complete a minimum of 15 semester hours in 
day-school attendance and while registered in the 
College before qualifying for the undergraduate de- 
gree. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Various departments of the College offer work 
leading to the master's degree and the doctorate. 
Application for admission to the Graduate School 
must be made by July 15 for the fall term and by 
December 15 for the spring term on blanks obtained 
from the Office of the Graduate School (for a de- 
tailed discussion of graduate programs and a de- 
scription of graduate courses see the Graduate 
School Catalog). 



Financial Aid and Assistance 

The College has a number of graduate assistant- 
ships in the Departments of Business Administra- 
tion, Economics, Geography, Journalism, and Gov- 
ernment and Politics, and in the Bureau of Business 
and Economic Research and the Bureau of Govern- 
mental Research. Applications for assistantships 



162 



Business and Public Administration 



should be made directly to the Dean of the College 
of Business and Public Administration. (See the 
Graduate Catalog for rules and regulations). 

HONORS 

THE DEANS LIST OF DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 

Any student who has passed at least 12 hours 
of academic work in the preceding semester, with- 
out failure of any course, and with an average grade 
on all courses of at least 3.5 will be placed on the 
Dean's List of Distinguished Students. 

BETA GAMMA SIGMA 

The Alpha of Maryland Chapter of Beta Gamma 
Sigma was chartered in 1940. The purpose of this 
honorary society is to encourage and reward scholar- 
ship and accomplishment among students of com- 
merce and business administration; to promote the 
advancement of education in the art and science of 
business; and to foster integrity in the conduct of 
business operations. Chapters of Beta Gamma 
Sigma are chartered only in schools holding mem- 
bership in the American Association of Collegiate 
Schools of Business. Third and fourth year students 
in business administration are eligible; if in his third 
year, a student must rank in the highest four per- 
cent of his class, and if his fourth year, he must rank 
in the highest ten percent in order to be considered 
for selection. 

THE DELTA SIGMA PI SCHOLARSHIP KEY 

This is awarded annually to the student who has 
maintained the highest scholastic standing during 
the entire course of study in business administration 
or economics. Delta Sigma Pi was founded at New 
York University on November 7, 1907. The Gamma 
Sigma of Maryland chapter was chartered at the Uni- 
versity in 1950. Delta Sigma Pi is a professional 
fraternity organized to foster the study of business 
in universities; to encourage scholarship, social 
activity, and the association of students for their 
mutual advancement by research and practice; to 
promote closer affiliation between the commercial 
world and students of commerce; and to further a 
higher standard of commercial ethics and culture, 
as well as the civic and commercial welfare of the 
community. Members are selected from the College 
of Business and Public Administration on the basis 
of leadership, scholastic standing and promise of 
future business success. 

KAPPA TAU ALPHA 

The Maryland chapter of Kappa Tau Alpha was 
chartered in 1961. Founded in 1910, this national 
honorary society has 39 chapters at universities of- 
fering graduate or undergraduate preparation for 
careers in professional journalism. It is dedicated 
to recognition and promotion of scholarship in jour- 
nalism. Among its activities is an annual award for 
an outstanding piece of published research in jour- 
nalism and mass communications. 



DEPARTMENTAL OFFERINGS 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Business organizations are set up primarily for 
the purpose of producing and distributing goods and 
services. Modern business administration requires 
a knowledge and understanding of organizational 
structures, operations and environments. The cur- 
ricula of the Department of Business Administration 
emphasize the principles and problems involved in 
the development of organizations and in the formu- 
lation and implementation of their policies. 

STUDY PROGRAMS IN THE DEPARTMENT 

The programs of study in the Department of 
Business Administration are so arranged as to fa- 
cilitate concentrations according to the major func- 
tions of business management. This plan is not, 
however, based on the view that these major divi- 
sions are independent units, but rather that each is 
closely related to and dependent on the others. 
Every student in Business Administration is required 
to complete satisfactorily a minimum number of re- 
quired basic subjects in the arts, sciences, and hu- 
manities as prerequisites to work in the major man- 
agement fields. 

A business administration honors program is 
open to business administration majors entering 
their junior year. Students must have an academic 
average of at least 3.0 to be eligible for admittance 
to this program. 



FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

ENGL 1,3, and 4 (or 21, 3 and 4) 9 hours 

MATH 10 and 11 (or 19 and 20) 6(8) 

SPCH 1 3 

History 6 

BSAD 10 3 

EC0N 004 (students electing to take a foreign longuage may 

exempt this course) 3 

BSAD 20 and 21 6 

EC0N 31 and 32 6 

Two science courses (one biological and one physical, ond at least one of 
which must be a lab science! selected from the following: 

Physical Astronomy 3 

Geology 3 

Physics 3 

Chemistry 4 

Biological Botany 4 

Zoology 4 

Microbiology 4 7-8 

A social science course (EC0N 031 may be used for 3 hours of the 6 hour 
social science requirement selected from the following: 

GVPT 1 3 

PSYC 1 3 

S0CY1 3 

ANTH 1 3 3 

A fine arts requirement of 3 hours of which the following are represen- 
tative: 

PHIL 1,41,45,53 3 

ART 10,60,61,80 3 

MUSC20 3 

SPCH 16 3 

Electives (chosen with approval of adviser) 6-9 

HLTH 5 (men and women) 1 sem. (2 cr.) 

P.E. (men and women) 2 semesters 

•Students who wish to elect o foreign language must take nine semester hours of the 
language or six hours ot the intermediate level or higher, in order to obtain crediT 5uch 
students may substitute the first semester of foreign longuage for the EC0N 004 re- 
quirement, and the other semesters for two free electives. 

A TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR FIRST TWO YiARS 

Freshman Year , 

ENGLl(or21) 3 ENGL3 3 

BSADlOorSpl 3 SPCH 1 or BSAD 10 3 

MATHio(ori^::..:z:: 3 math^m) 3 

ECON004 3 HLTH 5 2 



Business and Public Administration 163 



Fine Arts, Social Science. 

or Science 3-4 

P.E. 1 

16-17 



Fine Arts, Social Science, 

or Science 3-4 

Pi 1 

15-16 



Sophomore Year 

ENGL 4 3 Elective 3 

BSAD20 3 BSAD21 3 

ECON31 . 3 ECON32 3 

History 3 History 3 

Fine Arts, Social Science, Fine Arts, Social Science 

orScience 3-4 or Science 3-4 

1506 - 15-16 

A TYPICAL PROGRAM FOR FIRST TWO YEARS 

BSAD 130-Business Statistics 1 3 

BSAD 140-Business Finance 3 

BSAD 149-Marketing Principles and Organizotion 3 

BSAD 168 -Management ana Organization Theory 3 

BSAD 180-Business Law 3 

BSAD 199-Business Policies 3 

Total ,., 18 

In addition to the above, two 100 level courses 
must be taken in Economics, at least one of which 
must be: ECON 102, National Income Analysis: 
ECON 132, Intermediate Price Theory; ECON 140, 
Money and Banking; or ECON 148, International 
Economics. 

At least 45 hours of the 120 semester hours of 
academic work required for graduation must be in 
Business Administration subjects. In addition to the 
requirement of an overall average of "C" in aca- 
demic subjects, an average of "C" in Business Ad- 
ministration subjects is required for graduation. 
Electives in the curricula of the Department may, 
with the consent of the advisor, be taken in any de- 
partment of the university if the student has the 
necessary prerequisites. 

GENERAL CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The General Curriculum in Business Administra- 
tion is designed for those who desire a broad pro- 
gram in management. The curriculum contains a 
relatively large number of elective courses. Selec- 
tion is subject to approval by an advisor and must 
contribute to a program of courses closely balanced 
between (1) a functional field, (2) the various basic 
areas of management and (3) non-business fields. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take the 
basic courses required for all students in the Depart- 
ment of Business Administration. In addition, stu- 
dents will take: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 150 -Marketing Management or BSAD 156 Marketing 

Research Methods 

BSAD 160 -Personnel Management I or BSAD 163 

Labor Relations 

BSAD 170- Principles of Transportation or BSAD 171 -Traffic 

and Physical Distribution Management 

BSAD 101 -Electronic Data Processing or BSAD 136 Operations 

Research I or BSAD 169 Production Management 

BSAD 189 -Business and Government or BSAD 198 Structure and 

Operation of Industries 



(2) three semester hours from the following: 
BSAD 1 1 1 - Intermediate Accounting (3) 
BSAD 131 -Business Statistics II 
BSAD 148-Advonced Financiol Management (3) 



BSAD 184-Public Utilities (3) 
Total 



3s.h. 
18 s.h 



Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h. 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be ECON 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 

Electives to complete 120 s.h. required for graduation 18 s.h 

Total junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h. 



ACCOUNTING 

Accounting, in a limited sense, is the analysis, 
classification, and recording of financial events and 
the reporting of the results of such events for an or- 
ganization. In a broader sense, accounting consists 
of all financial devices for planning, controlling and 
appraising performance of an organization. In this 
broader sense, accounting includes among its many 
facets financial planning, budgeting, accounting 
systems, financial management controls, financial 
analysis of performance, financial reporting, inter- 
nal and external auditing and taxation of business. 

The accounting curriculum provides an educa- 
tional foundation for careers in accounting and a 
foundation for future advancement in other man- 
agement areas whether in private business organi- 
zations, government agencies, or public accounting 
firms. Students who select this curriculum will com- 
plete the freshman and sophomore requirements for 
all students in the Department of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Course requirements for the junior and senior 
years are: 

(1) The junior-senior requirements for all students 
in the Departments of Business Administration, 

(2) the following courses: 

BSAD 101 -Electronic Data Processing 3 

BSAD 110, 11 1 -Intermediate Accounting... 6 

BSAD 121 -Cost Accounting 3 

BSAD 123-lncome Tax Accounting ... 3 
and 9 semester hours from the following: 

BSAD 1 22- Auditing Theory and Practice 3 

BSAD 124 -Advanced Accounting 3 

BSAD 125-CPA Problems 3 

BSAD 127 -Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice 3 

BSAD 128-Advanced Cost Accounting 2 

Thus, the upper division requirements for accounting majors ore: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior accounting requirements (minimum) 21 s.h 

BSAD 101 -Electronic Data Processing . 3 s.h. 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be ECON 102, 132, 140, or 148 . 6 s.h. 
Electives (to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation) 12 s.h. 

Total Junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h 



For graduates of the University of Maryland, the 
educational requirement of the Maryland State 
Board of Public Accountancy for taking the C.P.A. 
examination without practical experience totals 
thirty semester hours of accounting courses plus 
six semester hours of business law. Students wish- 
ing to satisfy the Board's requirements must include 
BSAD 122 in their undergraduate program. Students 
not wishing to satisfy the Board's requirements to 
sit for the C.P.A. examination without experience 
are eligible to take the examination after obtaining 
two years of practical experience satisfactory to the 
Board. 

A student planning to take the C.P.A. examina- 
tion in a State other than Maryland should deter- 
mine the course requirements, if any, for such State 
and arrange his program accordingly. 

FINANCE 

The finance curriculum is designed to familiar- 
ize the student with the institutions, theory, and 
practice involved in the allocation of financial re- 
sources within the private sector, especially the 
firm. It is also designed to provide work in such re- 
lated disciplines as economics and the quantitative 
areas. 



764 



Business and Public Administration 



The finance curriculum provides an educational 
foundation for careers involving financial analysis 
and management, investment analysis and portfo 
lio management, investment banking, banking, and 
international finance; it also provides a foundation 
for graduate work in business administration, quan- 
titative areas, economics, and law. 

Course requirements for the junior-senior cur- 
riculum concentration in finance are: 

(1) The following required courses 

BSAD 101 Electronic Data Processing 3 s.h. 

ECON 140 Money and Bonking 3 s.h.- 

BSAD 136 Operations Reseorch I 3 s.h. 

BSAD 143 Investments 3 s.h. 
plus 

(2) one of the following courses 

BSAD 111 Intermediate Accounting 3 s.h. 

BSAD 141 Financiol Management 3 s.h. 

BSAD 144 Security Analysis and Valuation 3 s.h. 

BSAD 145 Commercial Bank Management 3 s.h. 

BSAD 184 Public Utilities 3 s.h. 

and 

(3) one of the foUowing courses 

ISM 102 -Electronic Data Processing Applications or a more 

odvanced ISM course 3 s.h. 

MATH -Three semester hours of mathematics beyond the 

departmental requirements 3 s.h. 

BSAD 131 -Business Statistics II or a more advanced BSAD 

statistics course 3 s.h. 

8SAD 137-Operations Research II or a more odvanced BSAD 

Management Science Course 3 s.h. 

Total 18 s.h. 

The upper division requirements are summarized as follows: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h. 

One course in economics selected from 

ECON 102, 132, 141, 142, 147 and 148 3 s.h.* 

Elective? to complete the 120 semester hours 

required for graduation ... 21 s.h. 

Total junior-senior year requirements .... 60 s.h. 

•Note thot the economics requirements for The finance major is more restrictive than 
stated under JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE 

Students interested in insurance or real estate 
may concentrate either in General Business or Fi- 
nance and plan with their advisers a group of elec- 
tees to meet their specialized needs. Courses of- 
fered in insurance and real estate include risk man- 
agement, principles of risk and insurance, real 
estate principles, and urban land management. 

MARKETING 

Marketing involves the functions performed in 
getting goods and services from producers to users. 
Career opportunities exist in manufacturing, whole- 
saling and retailing and include safes administra- 
tion, marketing research, advertising and merchan- 
dising. 

Students preparing for work in marketing re- 
search are advised to elect additional courses in 
Statistics. 

In addition to the courses taken by all students 
in the Department of Business Administration, the 
marketing program consists of: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 136 -Operations Research 1 3 s.h. 

BSAD 150-Marketing Management 3 s.h. 

BSAD 151 -Advertising 3 s.h. 

BSAD 156 -Marketing Research Methods 3 s.h. 

Total required 12 s.h. 

and 

(2) six semester hours from the following: 

BSAD 101 -Electronic Data Processing (3) 6 s.h. 

Bsad 131 -Business Statistics II (3) 6 s.h. 

JOUR 152 -Advertising Copy and Layout (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 1 53- Industrial Marketing (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 154 — Retail Management (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 155-Consumer Analysis (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 157 -International Marketing (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 158-Promotion Management (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 171 -Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management (3) 6 s.h. 

Total 18 s.h. 



Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s h 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration . 18 s.h 

Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be ECON 102, 132. 140. or 158 6sh 

Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation ]g s n 

Total. Junior-senior yeor requirements 60 s.h. 



PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

Personnel administration has to do with the di- 
rection of human effort. It is concerned with secur- 
ing, maintaining, and utilizing an effective working 
force. People professionally trained in personnel 
administration find career opportunities in business, 
in government, in educational institutions, and in 
charitable and other organizations. 

(1) The required courses are: 

BSAD 160- Personnel Management I 3 s.h. 

BSAD 161 -Personnel Management II 3 s.h. 

BSAD 162-0rganizotional Behavior 3 s h 

BSAD 163- Labor Relations 3 s h 

BSAD 164- Labor Legislation 3 s.h. 

Total required. 15 s h 
And 

(2) three hours from the following: 

BSAD 197- Undergraduate Seminar in Personnel 

Management (3) 6 s h 

BSAD 169- Production Management (3) 6sh 

PSYC 135-Personnel and Industrial Psychology (3) 6sh 

PSYC 150-Tests and Measurements (4 6sh 

PSYC 151 - Psychology of Individual Differences (3) 6 s.h 

SOCY 11 5- Industrial Sociology (3) . 6sh 

S0CY 180-Small Group Analysis (3) 6 s h 

GVPT 1 1 1 - Public Personnel Administration (3) 6 s h 

JOUR 166-Public Relations (3) 6 s.h. 

Total T8sX 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental 

students... 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h. 

Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be ECON 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 

Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation. 18 s.h. 

Total, Junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h. 



PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

This curriculum is designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the problems of organization and control 
in the field of production management. Theory and 
practice with reference to organization, policies, 
methods, processes and techniques are surveyed, 
analyzed, and evaluated. 

The courses in addition to those required of all 
students in the Department of Business Administra- 
tion are: 

(1) The following required courses: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 121 -Cost Accounting 3 s.h. 

BSAD 160-Personnel Management 1 3 s.h. 

BSAD 169-Production Management. 3 s.h. 

BSAD 165 -Advanced Production Management 3 s.h. 

Total required 12 s.h. 

and 

(2) six hours from the following: 

BSAD 134- Statistical Quality Control (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 136- Industrial Marketing (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 163-Labor Relations (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 136 -Operations Research I (3) 6 s.h. 

BSAD 171 -Traffic and Physical Distribution 

Management (3) 6 s.h. 

Total 18 s.h. 



Business Administration 

Thus, the upper division requirements are: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h. 

Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be ECON 102, 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 



Business and Public Administration 



165 



Electives to complete 120 semester hours required for 

graduation 18 s.h. 

Total Junior-senior year requirements 60 s.h. 

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE— STATISTICS 

In the management— statistics curriculum, the 
student will have the option of concentrating pri- 
marily in statistics or primarily in management sci- 
ence. The two options are described below. 

THE STATISTICS OPTION 

Statistics consists of a body of methods for 
utilizing probability theory in decision-making proc- 
esses. Important statistical activities ancillary to the 
decision-making process are the systematization of 
quantitative data and the measurement of vari- 
ability. Some specialized areas within the field of 
statistics are: sample surveys, forecasting, quality 
control, design of experiments, Bayesian decision 
processes, actuarial statistics, and data processing. 
Statistical methods— for example, sample survey 
techniques— are widely used in accounting, market- 
ing, industrial management and government appli- 
cations. 

An aptitude for applied mathematics and a de- 
sire to understand and apply scientific methods to 
significant problems are important prerequisites 
for the would-be statistician. 

Students planning to major in statistics should 
take two semesters of calculus. 

Students selecting this curriculum will take, in 
addition to the courses required for all students in 
the Department of Business Administration: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 101 -Electronic Doto Processing 3 s.h. 

BSAD 131 -Business Statistics II 3 s.h. 

BSAD 132-Sample Surveys in Business and Economics 3 s.h. 

BSAD 135 — Statistical Analysis and Forecasting 3 s.h. 

(2) and six semester hours from the following: 

BSAD 102 -Electronic Doto Processing Applications (3) 
BSAD 156 -Marketing Research Methods (3) 
BSATJ 1 34 — Statistical Quality Control (3) 
BSAD 136 -Operations Research I (3) 
BSAD 137 -Operations Research II (3) 

BSAD 138-Linear Programming in Business (3) 6 s.h. 

STAT 50 -Introduction to Random Variables (3)* 
STAT 100- Probability and Statistics I (3)- 

Totals 18 s.h. 



•Students majoring in statistics may not take Stat. 50 and Stat. 100 in fulfillment of their 
special requirements. Only one of these courses con be counted toward the necessary 
18 credit hours. 

THE MANAGEMENT SCIENCE OPTION 

Management Science— Operations Research 
can be defined as the application of scientific meth- 
odology by interdisciplinary teams to problems in- 
volving the control of organized man-machine sys- 
tems so as to provide solutions which best serve the 
purposes of the organization as a whole. 

Practitioners in this field are employed by large 
organizations (military, governmental, private in- 
dustrial, private consulting) to analyze operations 
in the light of organizational goals and recommend 
changes requisite to goal fulfillment. 

Students planning to major in this field should 
complete at least two semesters of calculus prior to 
junior standing. The current Math. 14-15 is the min- 
imum preparation, although Math. 19-20 is pre- 
ferred. Students considering graduate work in this 
field should complete Mathematics 19-20-21-22 as 
early in their careers as possible. Note Math. 21-22 
may be counted as upper division elective credit. 
Mathematics 100 is also highly recommended. 

Students electing this curriculum will take, in 
addition to the courses required for all students in 
the Department of Business Administration: 



(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 131 -Business Statistics II 3 s.h. 

BSAD 136 -Operations Research I 3 s.h. 

BSAD 137 -Operations Research II . . 3 s.h. 

BSAD 138-Linear Programming in Business 3 sh 

12 s.h 
and 

(2) Six semester hours from the following: 

BSAD 132-Sample Surveys in Business and Economics (3) 

BSAD 135- Statistical Analysis and Forecasting (3) 

BSAD 134 — Statistical Quality Control (3) 

STAT 100-Probability & Statistics I (3) 

BSAD 101 - Electronic Doto Processing (3) 

BSAD 102- Electronic Data Processing Applications (3) 

BSAD 103 -Introduction to Systems Analysis (3) 

ISM 1 10-lnformation Processing Problems of Administrative. 

Economic, and Political Systems (3) 
BSAD 169 -Production Management (3) 
BSAD 165-Advanced Production Management (3) 6 s.h 



Thus, the upper division requirements are for both options: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be EC0N 102. 132, 140, or 148 6 s.h. 

Electives to complete 120 s.h. required for graduation 18 s.h 

Total junior-senior requirement 60 s.h. 

TRANSPORTATION 



Transportation involves the movement of persons 
and goods in the satisfaction of human needs. The 
curriculum in transportation includes an analysis of 
the services and management problems, such as 
pricing, financing, and organization, of the five 
modes of transport — air, motor, pipelines, railroads, 
and water— and covers the scope and regulation of 
transportation in our economy. The effective man- 
agement of transportation involves a study of the 
components of physical distribution and the inter- 
action of procurement, the level and control of in- 
ventories, warehousing, material handling, trans- 
portation, and data processing. 

The curriculum in transportation is designed to 
prepare students to assume responsible positions 
with carriers, governmental agencies, and traffic 
and physical distribution management in industry. 

Course requirements are, in addition to the 
junior-senior requirements for all students in the De- 
partment of Business Administration: 

(1) The following required courses: 

BSAD 136 -Operations Research I 3 s.h. 

BSAD 1 70 — Principles of Transportation 3 s.h. 

BSAD 171 -Traffic and Physical Distribution Management .. 3 s.h. 

BSAD 172 -Motor Transportation 3 s.h. 

BSAD 175 -Advanced Transportation Problems 3 s.h. 

Total 15 s.h. 

and 

(2) Three semester hours to be selected from the following: 

BSAD 173 -Water Transportation 3 s.h. 

BSAD 174 — Commercial Air Transportation (3) 3 s.h. 

BSAD 176-Urbon Transport ond Urban Development (3) 3 s.h 

BSAD 184-Public Utilities (3) 3 s.h. 
BSAD 192- Introduction to International Business 

Management (3) 3 s.h. 

Total required 18 s.h. 

Thus, the upper division requirements ore: 

Junior-senior requirements for all departmental students 18 s.h. 

Junior-senior curriculum concentration 18 s.h. 
Electives in 100 level economics courses at least one of which 

must be EC0N 102. 132, 140. or 148 6 s.h. 

Electives to complete 120 s.h. required for graduation 18 s.h 

Total junior-senior yeor requirements 60 sh 



COMBINED BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND 
LAW PROGRAM 

The Department of Business Administration of- 
fers a combined Business Administration-Law Cur- 



led Business and Public Administration 



riculum in which the student completes three years 
in the General Curriculum in Business Administra- 
tion in the department and a fourth year of work in 
the Law School of the University of Maryland. Ad- 
mission to the Law School is contingent upon meet- 
ing the applicable standards of that school. Individ- 
ual students are responsible to secure from the Law 
School its current admission requirements. The stu- 
dent must complete all the courses required of stu- 
dents in the Department plus the courses normally 
required for the General Curriculum in Business Ad- 
ministration through the junior year, plus enough 
credits to equal a minimum of 90 semester hours. 
No business law course can be included in the 90 
hours. The last year of college work before entering 
the Law School must be completed in residence at 
College Park. At least 30 hours of work must be in 
courses numbered 100 or above. 

The Bachelor of Science degree from the Col- 
lege of Business and Public Administration is con- 
ferred upon students who complete the first year in 
the Law School with an average grade of "C" or 
better. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Business 
Administration and Doctor of Business Administra- 
tion are accepted in accordance with the procedures 
and requirements for the Graduate School. (See the 
Graduate School Announcements.) 



PROFESSOR AND DEPARTMENT HEAD: Taff. 

PROFESSORS: Anderson, Dawson, Fisher, Hermanson, Miner 

and Wright. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Ashmen, Bender, Carroll, Daiker, 

Edelson. Greer, Haslem, Hille, Hynes, Lamone, Levine, 

Nach, Paine and Spivey. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Falthzik, Gannon, Himes, Jolson. 

McNitt, Nickels, Olson, Speros, Thieblot, Widhelm, and 

Zabriskie. 
LECTURERS: Hargrove, Hoshi, Keaton, Leete, Lynagh, and 

Moore. 
INSTRUCTORS: Bedingfield, Broden, Brown, Budnick, Bul- 

mash, Dalton, Dempsey, Dyer, English, Frey, Gritta, Harris. 

Horlick, Keiser, Kmetz, Longbrake, Mattheiss, Meyer, 

Muczyk, Neffinger, O'Neill, Rosen, Roy, Seganish, Shimp, 

Thomas, Van Daniker, Webb, and Wolff. 

BSAD 10. BUSINESS ENTERPRISE. (3) 

A survey course covering the internal and functional or- 
ganization of a business enterprise, its organization and 
control. 

BSAD 20, 21. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, sophomore standing. The principles of ac- 
counting for business enterprise and the use of accounting 
data in making business decisions. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BSAD 100. OFFICE OPERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT. (3) 
Deals with the principles of scientific management as they 
apply to the examination, improvement, installation, and 
operation of the most effective paperwork methods and 
systems that a given organization can use to achieve its 
objectives. Procedure flow analysis and form design for 
control of paperwork; process, work distribution, and lay- 
out charts, distribution of authority and responsibility 
for office activities are among the areas considered. 

BSAD 101. ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING. (3) 

Students enrolled in the Department of Business Admin- 
istration curricula will register for ISM 101. For detailed 
information on prerequisites and description of the 
course, refer to ISM 101. The credits earned in ISM 101 
may be included in the total credits earned in the area of 
concentration in business administration. 

BSAD 102. ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING APPLICA- 
TIONS. (3) 
Students enrolled in the Department of Business Ad- 
ministration curricula will register for ISM 102. For de- 
tailed information on prerequisites and description of 
the course, refer to ISM 102. The credits earned in ISM 



102 may be included in the total credits earned in the 
area of concentration in business administration. 

BSAD 103. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMS ANALYSIS. (3) 
Students enrolled in the Department of Business Admin 
istration curricula will register for ISM 103. For detailed 
information on prerequisites and description of the 
course, refer to ISM 103. The credits earned in ISM 103 
may be included in the toal credits earned in the area of 
concentration in business administration. 

BSAD 110, 111. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 21. A comprehensive study of the 
theory and problems of valuation of assets, application 
of funds, corporation accounts and statements, and the 
interpretation of accounting statements. 



BSAD 118, 119. UNDERGRADUATE ACCOUNTING 
SEMINAR. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, senior standing as an accounting major or 
consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to upper one- 
third of senior class. Seminar coverage of outstanding 
current non-text literature, current problems and case 
studies in accounting. 

BSAD 120. ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 20. A study of the factors involved in 
the design and installation of accounting systems: the 
organization, volume and types of transactions, charts of 
accounts, accounting manuals, the reporting system. 

BSAD 121. COST ACCOUNTING. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 21. A study of the basic concepts of 
product costing and cost analysis for management plan- 
ning and control. Emphasis is placed on the role of the ac- 
count in organizational management, analysis of cost be- 
havior, standard cost, budgeting, responsibility account- 
ing and relevant costs for decision making. 

BSAD 122. AUDITING THEORY AND PRACTICE. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 1 1 1. A study of the principles and prob- 
lems of auditing and application of accounting principles to 
the preparation of audit working papers and reports. 

BSAD 123. INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 21. A study of the important provisions 
of the Federal Tax Laws, using illustrative examples, se- 
lected questions and problems, and the preparation of re- 
turns. 

BSAD 124. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 111. Advanced Accounting theory to 
specialized problems in partnerships, ventures, consign- 
ments, installment sales, insurance, statement of affairs, 
receiver's accounts, realization and liquidation reports, 
and consolidation of parent and subsidiary accounts. 

BSAD 125. OP. A. PROBLEMS. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 111, or consent of instructor. A study 
of the nature, form and content of C.P.A. examinations 
by means of the preparation of solutions to, and an analysis 
of, a large sample of C.P.A. problems covering the various 
accounting fields. 

BSAD 127. ADVANCED AUDITING THEORY AND PRACTICE. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 122. Advanced auditing theory and 
practice and report writing. 

BSAD 128. ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING. (2) 

Prerequisite BSAD 121. A continuation of basic cost ac- 
counting with special emphasis on process costs, standard 
costs, joint costs, and by product cost. 

BSAD 129. APPRENTICESHIP IN ACCOUNTING. (0) 

Prerequisites, minimum of 20 semester hours in account- 
ing and the consent of the accounting staff. A period of ap- 
prenticeship is provided with national Iv known firms of certi- 
fied public accountants from about January 15 to Febru- 
ary 15, and for a semester after graduation. 



BSAD 130. BUSINESS STATISTICS I. (3) 

An introductory course discussing basic statistical con- 
cepts and various widely used statistical techniques, 
namely: ratios and percentages; the tabular and graphic 
presentation of statistical data; frequency distributions; 
measures of central tendency, variability, skewness and 
kurtosis; the binomial and normal probability distributions; 
tests of hypotheses concerning means and proportions; the 
estimation of means and proportions; two-variable linear 
correlation analysis. 

BSAD 131. BUSINESS STATISTICS II. (3) 



Business and Public Administration 



167 



Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or equivalent. A course comple- 
menting BSAD 130. The topics covered include: trend 
analysis in its simpler aspects; seasonal and cycle analysis; 
nonlinear two-variable correlation analysis; correlation 
analysis of grouped data; some reference to multiple cor- 
relation analysis; the chi-square test; analysis of variance; 
index numbers. 

BSAD 132. SAMPLE SURVEYS IN BUSINESS AND ECO- 
NOMICS. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or equivalent. A course surveying 
the uses of statistics in economic and business research. 
The emphasis of the discussion is directed toward "cross- 
section" analysis as distinct from "time-series" analysis 
(which is given detailed attention in BSAD 135). Topics 
covered include: research methodology, sampling tech- 
niques and design, data-collection methods, question- 
naire preparation, interviewing procedures, the evalua- 
tion of survey results, and a review of selected case 
studies. 

BSAD 134. STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 130, or equivalent. A course survey- 
ing the uses of statistical principles in industry. Topics con- 
sidered include: A brief review of basic statistical mea- 
sures: a study of the hypergeometric, binomial, normal, 
and Poisson probability distributions; the sampling distri- 
butions of trie mean, the standard deviation, and the 
range; the construction and operation of the various con- 
trol charts in current use; the diagnostic significance of 
different findings; acceptance sampling on the basis of 
measurement data and on the basis of attribute data. 

BSAD 135. STATISTICAL ANAYLSIS AND FORECASTING. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or equivalent. A course exploring 
the usefulness of statistical methods in economic predic- 
tion. Various forecasting techniques in current use are 
examined. Major topics receiving attention are the analysis 
of trends, the identification of seasonal patterns and cy- 
cles, and the measurement of economic relationships. 
The discussion goes beyond the points made in BSAD 131. 
Particularly the uses of multiple correlation analysis are 
examined in great detail. Some reference is also made to 
the predictive potentialities of so-called anticipations 
statistics. Throughout the course, due attention is given 
to the logical aspects of the forecasting problem as 
distinct from its statistical side. 

BSAD 136. OPERATIONS RESEARCH I. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 130 or consent of instructor. The 
philosophy, methods and objectives of operations research. 
Basic methods are examined and their application to func- 
tional areas of business are covered. (This course is also 
listed as ISM 136 and may be taken for Information Sys- 
tems Management credit.) 

BSAD 137. OPERATIONS RESEARCH II. (3) 

Prequisite, BSAD 136 or permission of instructor. Ad- 
vanced topics in Operations Research including decision 
theory, probability models and inventory models. Empha- 
sis on the mathematical formulation of business problems 
and implementation of model solutions. 

BSAD 138. LINEAR PROGRAMMING IN BUSINESS. (3) 

Prerequisite BSAD 136 or permission of instructor. Theory, 
formulation, interpretation, and application of the general 
linear, transportation, assignment, and integer program- 
ming mode Is. Emphasis is on the application of these models 
to large-scale business problems. 

BSAD 140. BUSINESS FINANCE. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 21. This course deals with principles 
and practices involved in the organization, financing, and re- 
habilitation of business enterprises; the various types of 
securities and their use in raising funds, apportioning in- 
come, risk, and control; intercorporate relations; and new 
developments. Emphasis on solution of problems of financial 
policy faced by management. 

BSAD 141. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 140. Analysis and discussion of cases 
and readings relating to financial decisions of the firm. 
The application of finance concepts to the solution of fi- 
nancial problems is emphasized. 

BSAD 143. INVESTMENTS. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 140. An introduction to financial 
investments. Topics include securities and securities 
markets; investment risks, returns, and constraints; port- 
folio policies; and institutional investment policies. 

BSAD 144. SECURITY ANALYSIS AND VALUATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 143. Study and application of the con- 
cepts, methods, models, and empirical findings to the 
analysis, valuation, and selection of securities, especially 
common stock. 



BSAD 145. COMMERCIAL BANK MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 140 and ECON 140. Analysis and 
discussion of cases and readings in commercial bank 
management. The loan function is emphasized; also the 
management of liquidity reserves, investments for in- 
come, and sources of funds. Bank objectives, functions, 
policies, organization, structure, services, and regulation 
are considered. 

BSAD 149. MARKETING PRINCIPLES AND ORGANIZATION. 
(3) 
Prerequisites, BSAD 130 and BSAD 149. A study of the 
work of the marketing division in a going organization. 
The work of developing organizations and procedures for 
the control of marketing activities is surveyed. The em- 
phasis throughout the course is placed on the determina- 
tion of policies, methods, and practices for the effective 
marketing of various forms of manufactured products. 

BSAD 151. ADVERTISING. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 149. A study of the role of advertising 
in the American economy; the impact of advertising on 
our economic and socail life, the methods and tech- 
niques currently applied by advertising practitioners, the 
role of the newspaper, magazine, and other media in the 
development of an advertising campaign, modern re- 
search methods to improve the effectiveness of adver- 
tising and the organization of the advertising business. 

BSAD 153. INDUSTRIAL MARKETING. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 149. The industrial and business 
sector of the marketing system is considered rather than 
the household or ultimate consumer sector. Industrial 
products range from raw materials and supplies to the major 
equipment in a plant, business office, or institution. Topics 
include product planning and introduction, market analy- 
sis and forecasting, channels, pricing, field sales force 
management, advertising, marketing cost analysis, and 
government relations. Particular attention is given to in- 
dustrial, business and institutional buying policies and 
practice and to the analysis of buyer behavior. 

BSAD 154. RETAIL MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 20 and 149. Retail store organiza- 
tion, locatidh, layout and store policy; pricing policies, price 
lines, brands, credit policies, records as a guide to buying; 
purchasing methods; supervision of selling; training and 
supervision of retail sales force; and administrative prob- 
lems. 

BSAD 155. CONSUMER ANALYSIS. (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 149 and 150. Recommended that 
Psychology 001 and 021 be taken prior to this course. 
Considers the growing importance of the American con- 
sumer in the marketing system and the need to under- 
stand him. Topics include the foundation considerations 
underlying consumer behavior such as economic, social- 
psychological and cultural factors. Analysis of the con- 
sumer in marketing situations— as a buyer and user of 
products and services — and in relation to the various in- 
dividual, social and marketing factors affecting his be- 
havior, the influence of marketing communications is al- 
so considered. 

BSAD 156. MARKETING RESEARCH METHODS. (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 130 and BSAD 149. Recommended 
that BSAD 132 be taken prior to this course. This course 
is intended to develop skill in the use of scientific meth- 
ods in the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of 
marketing data. It covers the specialized fields of market- 
ing research, the planning of survey projects, sample de- 
sign, tabulation procedure and report preparation. 

BSAD 157. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING. (3) 

Prerequisites BSAD 149 plus any other marketing course. 
A study of the marketing functions from the viewpoint of 
the international executive. In addition to the coverage 
of international marketing policies relating to product 
adaptation, data collection and analysis, channels of dis- 
tribution, pricing, communications, and cost analysis, con- 
sideration is given to the cultural, legal, financial, and 
organizational aspects of international marketing. 

BSAD 158. PROMOTION MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Prerequisites, BSAD 149 and BSAD 151 This course is 
concerned with the way in which business firms use ad- 
vertising, personal selling, sales promotion and other meth- 
ofs as part of their marketing program. The case study 
method is used to present problems taken from actual busi- 
ness practice. Cases studied illustrate problems in the use 
and coordination of demand stimulation methods as well 
as analysis and planning. Research, testing and statistical 
control of promotional activities are also considered. 

BSAD 160. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. (3) 

The basic course in personnel management includes man- 
power planning, recruitment, selection, development, com- 



168 Business and Public Administration 



pensation, and appraisal of employees. Explores the im- 
pact of scientific management and unionism on these 
functions. 

BSAD 161. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT: ANALYSIS AND 
PROBLEMS. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 160. Recommended, BSAD 130. Re- 
search findings, special readings, case analysis, simula- 
tion, and field investigations are used to develop a better 
understanding of personnel problems, alternative solutions 
and their practical ramifications. 

BSAD 162. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. (3) 

An examination of research and theory concerning the 
forces which contribute to the behavior of organizational 
members. Topics covered include: work group behavior, 
supervisory behavior, intergroup relations, employee goals 
and attitudes, communication problems, organizational 
change, and organizational goals and design. Prerequi- 
site: BSAD 168. 

BSAD 163. LABOR RELATIONS. (3) 

A study of the development and methods of organized 
groups in industry with reference to the settlement of 
Tabor disputes. An economic and legal analysis of labor 
union and employer association activities, arbitration, 
mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade 
agreements, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, 
employee representation and injunctions. 

BSAD 164. LABOR LEGISLATION. (3) 

Case method analysis of the modern law of industrial re- 
lations. Cases include the decisions of administrative 
agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. 

BSAD 165. ADVANCED PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 169. A study of typical problems en- 
countered by the factory manager. The objective is to 
develop the ability to analyze and solve problems in man- 
agement control of production and in the formulation of 
production policies. Among the topics covered a re plant loca- 
tion, production planningand control, methodsanalysisand 
time study. 

BSAD 168. MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION THEORY. 
(3) 
The development of management and organization theory, 
nature of the management process and function and its 
future development. The role of the manager as an or- 
ganizer and director, the communication process, goals 
and responsibilities. 

BSAD 169. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Studies the operation of a manufacturing enterprise, con- 
centrating on the economies of production. Introduces a 
grounding in analytical method early so that the broad 
problem areas of system design, operation, and control can 
be based upon the analytical method. 

BSAD 170. PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 37. A general course covering 
the five fields of transportation, their development, service 
and regulation. 

BSAD 171. TRAFFIC AND PHYSICAL DISTRIBUTION MAN- 
AGEMENT. (3) 
Prerequisite, junior standing. Examines the management 
aspects of the business firm in moving their raw materials 
and finished goods, through traffic, warehousing, indus- 
trial packaging, materials handling, and inventory. A sys- 
tematic examination of the trade-off possibilities and man- 
agement alternatives to minimize cost of product flow and 
maximizing customer service is provided. 

BSAD 172. MOTOR TRANSPORTATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 170. The development and scope of the 
motor carrier industry, different types of carriers, eco- 
nomics of motor transportation, services available, federal 
regulation, highway financing, allocation of cost to high- 
way users, highway barriers. 

BSAD 173. WATER TRANSPORTATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 170. Water carriers of all types, de- 
velopment and types of services, trade routes, inland water- 
ways, company organization, the American Merchant 
Marine as a factor in national activity. 

BSAD 174. COMMERCIAL AIR TRANSPORTATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 170. The air transportation system of 
the United States; airways, airports, airlines. Federal regu- 
lation of air transportation. Problems and services of com- 
mercial air transportation; economics, equipment, opera- 
tions, financing, selling of passenger and cargo services. 
Air mail development and services. 

BSAD 175. ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS. (3) 
Prerequisite, BSAD 170. A critical examination of cur- 
rent government transportation policy and proposed 
solutions. Urban and intercity managerial transport prob- 
lems are also considered. 



BSAD 176. URBAN TRANSPORT AND URBAN DEVELOP- 
MENT. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 37. An analysis of the role of 
urban transportation in present and future urban develop- 
ment. The interaction of transport pricing and service, 
urban planning, institutional restraints, and public land 
uses, is studied. 

BSAD 180. BUSINESS LAW. (3) 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negoti- 
able instruments, agency partnerships, corporations, real 
personal property, and sales. 

BSAD 181. BUSINESS LAW. (3) 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negoti- 
able instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real 
and personal property, and sales. 

BSAD 182. LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS. (3) 

The course examines the principal ideas and men in law 
stressing those which are relevant for the modern busi- 
ness executive. Legal reasoning as it has evolved in this 
country will be one of the central topics of study. Several 
leading antitrust cases will be studied to illustrate vividly 
the reasoning process as well as the interplay of business, 
philosophy, and the various conceptions of the nature of law 
which give direction to the process. Examination of con- 
temporary legal problems and proposed solutions, especially 
those most likely to affect the business community, are 
also covered. 

BSAD 184. PUBLIC UTILITIES. (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 32 or 37. Using the regulated in- 
dustries as specific examples, attention is focused on 
broad and general problems in such diverse fields as 
constitutional law, administrative law, public administra- 
tion, government control of business, advanced economic 
theory, accounting, valuation and depreciation, taxation, 
finance, engineering and management. 

BSAD 187. HONORS STUDY. (3) 
First Semester of the senior year 

Prerequisite: Candidacy for Honors in Business Adminis- 
tration. The course is designed for honors students who 
have elected to conduct intensive study (independent or 
group). The student will work under the direct guidance 
of a faculty advisor and the Chairman of the Honors Com- 
mittee. They shall determine that the area of study is 
of a scope and intensity deserving of a candidate's at- 
tention. Formal written and/or oral reports on the study 
may be required by the faculty advisor and/or Chairman 
of the Honors Program. Group meetings of the candi- 
dates may be called at the discretion of the faculty ad- 
visors and/or Chairman of the Honors Committee. 

BSAD 188. HONORS STUDY. (3) 

Second Semester of the senior year 

Prerequisite: BSAD 187, and continued candidacy for 
Honors in Business Administration. The student shall 
continue and complete the research initiated in BSAD 
187. Additional reports may be required at the discretion 
of the faculty advisor and Honors Program Chairman. 
Group meetings may be held. 

BSAD 189. BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT. (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 32 or 37. A study of the role of gov- 
ernment in modern economic life. Social control of busi- 
ness as a remedy for the abuses of business enterprise 
arising from the decline of competition. Criteria of limita- 
tions on government regulation of private enterprise. 

BSAD 190. RISK MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH II. Designed to acquaint the student 
with the nature and significance of risk in business enter- 
prise. The problems relating to both pure and speculative 
risk in business are considered; and methods of solution 
involving risk assumption, transfer, reduction, and the 
use of insurance are analyzed as aids in management 
decision making. 

BSAD 191. PRINCIPLES OF RISK AND INSURANCE. (3) 

Prerequisite, MATH II. Emphasizes the use of insurance 
in resolving problems involving personal and business 
risks. Life, accident and health, fire and casualty, auto- 
mobile, and marine insurance are examined as means of 
dealing with these risks. The theory and legal aspects of 
insurance are considered, as well as the quantitative 
measurement of risks. 

BSAD 192. INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 
MANAGEMENT. (3) 
Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 37. A study of the domestic and 
foreign environmental factors affecting the international 
operations of U.S. business firms. The course also covers 
the administrative aspects of international marketing, 
finance, and management. 



Business and Public Administration 



169 



BSAD 195. REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 37. This course covers the na- 
ture and uses of real estate, real estate as a business, 
basic principles, construction problems and home owner- 
ship, city planning, and public control and ownership of 
real estate. 

BSAD 196. URBAN LAND MANAGEMENT. (3) 

Covers the managerial and decision making aspects of 
urban land and property. Included are such subjects as 
land use and valuation matters. 

BSAD 197. UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR IN PERSONNEL 
MANAGEMENT. (3) 
Prerequisite — consent of instructor. This course is open 
only to the top 1/3 of undergraduate majors in personnel 
and labor relations and is offered during the Fall semes- 
ter of each year. Highlights major developments theory. 
Guest lecturers make periodic presentations. 

BSAD 199. BUSINESS POLICIES. (3) 

Prerequisite, BSAD 140, 149, 168 and senior standing. 
A case study course in which the aim is to have the stu- 
dent apply both what he has learned of general manage- 
ment princi pi esandtheirspecializedfunctiona I applications 
of the overall management function in the enterprise. 



BSAD 271. TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC POLICY. (3) 

BSAD 272. MANAGEMENT OF PHYSJCAL DISTRIBUTION. 

(3) 
BSAD 273. TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIES. (3) 
BSAD 274. BUSINESS LOGISTICS. (3) 
BSAD 275. TRANSPORTATION SCIENCE. (3) 
BSAD 281. PRIVATE ENTERPRISE AND PUBLIC POLICY. (3) 
BSAD 282. PRODUCT, PRODUCTION AND PRICING POLICY. 

(3) 
BSAD 283. MANAGEMENT POLICY FORMULATION. (3) 
BSAD 284. POLICY ISSUES IN PUBLIC UTILITIES. (3) 
BSAD 285. BUSINESS RESEARCH METHODOLOGY. (3) 
BSAD 287. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ADMINJSTRATION. 

(3) 
BSAD 288. MANAGEMENT OF THE MULTINATIONAL FIRM. 

(3) 
BSAD 289. DEVELOPMENT AND TRENDS IN PRODUCTION 

MANAGEMENT. (3) 
BSAD 298. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BUSINESS ADMINIS- 
TRATION. (1-9) 
BSAD 399. THESIS. (1-12) 



FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for course descriptions. 

BSAD 210. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING THEORY I, (3) 
BSAD 211. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING THEORY II. (3) 
BSAD 212. ACCOUNTING IN REGULATED INDUSTRIES. (3) 
BSAD 213. THE IMPACT OF TAXATION ON BUSINESS DE- 
CISIONS. (3) 
BSAD 214. CURRENT PROBLEMS OF PROFESSIONAL 

PRACTICE. (3) 
BSAD 220. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING I. (3) 
BSAD 221. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 1 1. (3) 
BSAD 230. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS AND BUSINESS DE- 
CISIONS. (3) 
BSAD 231. THEORY OF SURVEY DESIGN. (3) 
BSAD 234. MANAGERIAL ANALYSIS I. (3) 
BSAD 235. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE-DETERMINISTIC 

MODELS. (3) 
BSAD 236. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE-PROBABILISTIC 

MODELS. (3) 
BSAD 237. MANAGEMENT SIMULATION. (3) 
BSAD 238. OPTIMIZATION METHODS FOR MANAGERIAL 

ANALYSIS. (3) 
BSAD 240. FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION. (3) 
BSAD 241. WORKING CAPITAL MANAGEMENT. (3) 
BSAD 242. LONG-TERM CAPITAL MANAGEMENT. (3) 
BSAD 243. INVESTMENT ANALYSIS. (3) 
BSAD 244. PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT. (3) 
BSAD 245. FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS. (3) 
BSAD 247. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION. 

(3) 
BSAD 250. MARKETING ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

BSAD 251. MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS MANAGE- 
MENT. (3) 

BSAD 252. MARKETING RESEARCH METHODS. (3) 

BSAD 254. MARKETING CHANNELS ANALYSIS. (3) 

BSAD 256. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN MARKETING: DE- 
MAND AND COST ANALYSIS. (3) 

BSAD 257. THEORY IN MARKETING. (3) 

BSAD 258. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING. (3) 

BSAD 260. MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL SYS- 
TEMS. (3) 

BSAD 261. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING-CURRENT PROB- 
LEMS AND ISSUES. (3) 

BSAD 262. ADMINISTRATION OF LABOR RELATIONS. (3) 

BSAD 263. COMPARATIVE THEORIES feF ORGANIZATION. 
(3) 

BSAD 264. BEHAVIORAL FACTORS IN MANAGEMENT. (3) 

BSAD 266. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT: MANPOWER PRO- 
CUREMENT AND DEVELOPMENT. (3) 

BSAD 267. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT: MANPOWER COM- 
PENSATION AND EVALUATION. (3) 

BSAD 269. APPLICATION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE TO 
BUSINESS. (3) 

BSAD 270. TRANSPORTATION THEORY AND ANALYSIS. (3) 



ECONOMICS 

The program of studies in economics is de- 
signed to meet the needs of students who wish to 
concentrate either on a major or minor scale in this 
division of the social sciences. Students who expect 
to enroll in the professional schools and those who 
are planning to enter the fields of business, public 
administration, foreign service, or social service ad- 
ministration will find courses in economics of consi- 
derable value to them in their later work. A student 
of economics should choose courses to meet the re- 
quirements for his major objective. If he expects to 
pursue graduate study, he should consult Graduate 
School Announcements for the general require- 
ments for advanced degrees. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ECONOMICS MAJOR 

In addition to the University requirements in 
General Education the student majoring in econom- 
ics is required to complete a minimum of 36 semes- 
ter hours in economics with an average grade of not 
less than "C." Required courses are ECON 4, 31, 32, 
102, and 132, and BSAD 130 (Statistics). Econom- 
ics 111 may be taken in lieu of BSAD 130 by those 
with a strong background and interest in mathe- 
matics. A student will normally have earned nine 
semester-hour-hours credit in the lower division 
courses in economics prior to beginning advanced 
work in the junior year. These lower division courses 
must be completed with an average grade of not less 
than "C." 

Economics majors are expected to take ECON 
102 prior to taking ECON 140 or 148 and Econ. 132 
prior to taking ECON 142, 144, 160 or 170. ECON 
102 and 132 will provide the theoretical foundation 
for "sections recommended for the economics ma- 
jor." Special sections for economics majors may be 
offered in ECON 140, 142, 148 and 160. 

Other courses in economics to meet the require- 
ments of the major are to be selected with the aid of 
a faculty adviser. Business Administration courses 
which may count as economics credit are BSAD 130, 
131, 132, 134, 135, and 184. 

Economics majors enrolled in the College of 
Arts and Sciences must, of course, fulfill all of the 
specific requirements of that College; these include, 
for example, work in a foreign language. All eco- 
nomics majors must take six semester hours of 
mathematics. 

Economics majors enrolled in the College of 
Business and Public Administration may elect to 



170 



Business and Public Administration 



take a foreign language or, in lieu of foreign lan- 
guage, may take BSAD 10 and GEOG 15. 

An economics honors program is open to eco- 
nomics majors entering their junior year. Students 
must have an academic average of at least 3.0 to be 
eligible for admittance to this program. 

SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAM FOR ECONOMICS MAJOR 



Freshman Year Hours 

ENGL I -Composition ond American Literature 3 

MATH 10, 11 or 19. 20 6-8 

ECON 4 -Economic Developments 3 

Social Science Electives 6 

Fine Arts or Philosophy Elective 3 

Foreign Language or BSAD 10 and Elective 6 

HLTH 5 -Science ond Theory of Health (men ond women) 2 

Physical Activities (men ana women) 2 

Free Elective 3 



Total 



Sophomore Year 

ENGL 3. 4-Composition & World Literature 

ECON 31, 32-Principles of Economics 

Foreign Language or GEOG 15 and elective 
Natural Science (one biological and one physical) 
History 

Total.. 



34-36 

Hours 

6 

6 

6 
7-8 

6 

31-32 

Junior ond Senior Years Hours 

ECON 102 — National Income Analysis . 3 

ECON 132-lntermediate Price Theory 3 

BSAD 130-Business Statistics I 3 

Electives in Economics and other subjects* 51 

Total... ~ 60 



PROFESSOR AND DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN: Dillard. 
PROFESSORS: Almon, Cumberland, Gruchy, O'Connell, 

Schultze, Ulmer, and Wonnacott. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Aaron, Bennett, Bergmann, Dodge, 

Dorsey, Harris, Knight, McGuire, Meyer, Olson, and Wein- 

stein. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Adams, Atkinson, Betancourt, 

Boorman, Clague, Cox, Day, Greer, Hexter, MacRae, Meer, 

Quails, Singer, and Strober. 
INSTRUCTORS: Fitzmaurice, Foster, Pearson, Rathbun, and 

Kawahito. 
LECTURERS: Amuzegar, Clinton, Denny, Green, Harrison, 

Hopkins, Karlik, Lady, Layher, McLoone, Measday, Mills, 

Moore, Murphy, Pierce, Schiller, Schink, Shipley, Snow, 

Taylor, Tobin, and Whitman. 

ECON 4. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Freshman requirement in 
business administration curriculums. An introduction to 
modern economic institutions — their origins, develop- 
ment, and present status. Commercial revolution, in- 
dustrial revolution, and age of mass production. Empha- 
sis on developments in England, Western Europe and the 
United States. (Snow, Staff) 

ECON 31, 32. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, sophomore 
standing. Required in the business administration cur- 
riculums. In ECON 31 basic concepts, the monetary sys- 
tem, the national accounts, national income analysis, and 
business cycles are introduced. In ECON 32 emphasis is 
placed on price theory, distribution, international trade, 
and economic development. 

(Dorsey, Moer, Schultze, Staff) 

ECON 37 . FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMICS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Not open to students who 
have credit in ECON 31 and 31. Not open to freshmen or 
to B.P.A. students. A survey of the general principles un- 
derlying economic activity; analysis of leading economic 
problems in the modern world. This is the basic course 
in economics for students who are unable to take the 
more complete course provided in ECON 31 and 32. 

(Ulmer, Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ECON 102. NATIONAL INCOME ANALYSIS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. An 
analysis of national income accounts and the level of na- 
tional income and employment. 

(Aaron. Layher, Moore, Shipley) 



ECON 103. AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 
37. Long-term trends in the American economy and analy- 
sis of the sources of output growth. Technological changes 
and the diffusion of new technologies. These subjects 
are discussed in the context of theoretical models. 

(Shipley) 

ECON 105. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 
OF UNDERDEVELOPED AREAS. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 
37. An analysis of the economic and social characteris- 
tics of underdeveloped aras. Recent theories of economic 
development, obstacles to development; policies and 
planning for development. (Adams, Betancourt, Harrison) 

ECON 106. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF SELECTED 
AREAS. (3) 
Prerequisite, Econ. 105. Institutional characteristics of 
a specific area are discussed and alternative strategies 
and policies for development are analyzed. 
ECON 106A— Latin America. (Bennett, Betancourt) 

ECON 106B-Asia (Adams) 

ECON 106C— Africa 

ECON 111. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN ECONOMICS. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Econ. 102, 
132. Economic theory as it relates to quantitative meth- 
ods. Theory of statistical inference. 

(Boorman, MacRae) 

ECON 112. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN ECONOMICS II. 
(3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, ECON 102, 132, 111, 
and ECON 130, or permission of instructor. Formulation, 
estimation and testing of economic models; theory of 
identification in linear models, multiple regression and 
analysis of variance; single-equation problems in eco- 
nometric work and econometric methods in estimation 
of multi-equation structures. Examples of current re- 
search employing econometric methods. (Boorman) 

ECON 120. INTRODUCTION TO REGIONAL AND URBAN 
ECONOMICS. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 102, or consent of in- 
structor. Study of the theories, problems, and policies of 
urban and regional economic development. (Harris) 

ECON 130. MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 102 and 132 and 
one year of college mathematics. A course designed to 
enable economics majors to understand the simpler as- 
pects of mathematical economics. Those parts of the 
calculus and algebra required for economic analysis will 
be presented. (MacRae, Hexter) 

ECON 131. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, ECON 32 or 
37. An investigation of the theory and practice of various 
types of economic systems. An examination and evalua- 
tion of the capitalistic system followed by an analysis of 
alternative types of economic systems such as fascism, 
socialism, and communism. 

(Amuzegar, Denny, Dodge, Gruchy) 

ECON 132. INTERMEDIATE PRICE THEORY. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 32. Re- 
quired for economics majors. An analysis of price and dis- 
tribution theory with special attention to recent develop- 
ments in the theory of imperfect competition. 

(Day, Harrison, O'Connell, Lady) 

ECON 134. CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC THOUGHT. (3) 

Prerequisites, ECON 32 and senior standing. Graduate 
students should take ECON 232. A survey of recent 
trends in American, English, and Continental economic 
thought with special attention to the work of such econ- 
omists as W. C. Mitchell, J. R. Commons, T. Veblen, 
W. Sombart, J. A. Hobson and other contributors to the 
development of economic thought since 1900. (Gruchy) 

ECON 137. THE ECONOMICS OF NATIONAL PLANNING. (3) 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the princi- 
ples and practice of economic planning with special ref- 
erence to the planning problems of western European 
countries and the United States. (Gruchy) 

ECON 138. ECONOMICS OF THE SOVIET UNION. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 
37. An analysis of the organization, operating principles 
and performance of the Soviet economy with attention to 
the historical and ideological background, planning, re- 
sources, industry, agriculture, domestic and foreign 
trade, finance, labor, and the structure and growth of 
national income. (Dodge) 

ECON 140. MONEY AND BANKING. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 32. 



Business and Public Administration 



171 



Relation of money and credit to economic activity and 
prices; impact of public policy in financial markets and 
in markets for goods and services; policies, structure, 
and functions of the Federal Reserve System; organiza- 
tion, operation, and functions of the commercial bank- 
ing system, as related particularly to questions of eco- 
nomic stability and public policy. 

(Meyer, Boorman, Bennett) 

ECON 141. THEORY OF MONEY, PRICES AND ECONOMIC 
ACTIVITY. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, ECON 140. A theoretical 
treatment of the influence of money and financial 
markets on economic activity and prices, and of the ef- 
fects of monetary policy on the markets for goods and 
services; the role of money in the classical and Keynes- 
ian macro-systems; topics of theoretical interest in mone- 
tary policy formation and implementation. 

(Meyer, Boorman) 

ECON 142. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC FINANCE. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 31 and 
32 or 32 and 37. A study of the role of federal, state, and 
local governments in mobilizing resources to meet public 
wants; principles and policies of taxation, debt manage- 
ment, and government expenditures and their effects on 
resource allocation, stabilization of income and prices, 
income distribution and economic growth. 

(Meer, McLoone, Shipley, Hinrichs) 

ECON 143. THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 142 and 102 or 
consent of instructor. An economic analysis of the theory 
and practice of public finance including taxation, debt 
management, expenditures, and fiscal policy. 

(Aaron, Singer) 

ECON 144. STATE AND LOCAL PUBLIC FINANCE. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 37. Principles and problems of 
governmental finance with special reference to state and 
local jurisdictions. Topics to be covered include taxation, 
expenditures, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. 

(Whitman) 

ECON 147. BUSINESS CYCLES. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, ECON 140. A study of the 
causes of depressions and unemployment, cyclical and 
secular instability, theories of business cycles, and the 
problem of controlling economic instability. (Almon) 

ECON 148. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 32. A 
descriptive and theoretical analysis of international 
trade; balance of payments accounts; the mechanism of 
international economic adjustment; comparative costs; 
economics of customs unions. 

(Wonnacott, Clague, Moore, Atkinson, Layher) 

ECON 149. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC POLICIES. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 148, 
102, and 132. Contemporary balance of payments prob- 
lems; the international liquidity controversy; investment, 
trade and economic development; evaluation of argu- 
ments for protection. (Atkinson, Moore) 

ECON 160. LABOR ECONOMICS. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 31 and 
32 or 37 and 32. A descriptive and theoretical analysis 
of international trade; balance of payment accounts; the 
mechanism of international economic admustment; com- 
parative costs; economics of custom unions. 

(Knight, Weinstein) 

ECON 161. PROBLEMS IN LABOR ECONOMICS. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 160. A detailed 
examination of current problems in labor economics in- 
cluding: labor market and manpower problems, unem- 
ployment compensation and social security, wage theories, 
and productivity analysis. (Knight, Weinstein) 

ECON 165. ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINA- 
TION. (3) 
Prerequisites; ECON 32 or 37. Topics include the causes 
of the persistence of low income groups; the relation of 
poverty to technological change, to economic growth, 
and to education and training; economic motivations for 
discrimination; the economic results of discrimination; 
proposed remedies for poverty and discrimination. 

(Bergmann) 

ECON 170. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 37. Changing structure of the 
American economy; price policies in different industrial 
classifications of monopoly and competition in relation 
to problems of public policy. 

(Quails, Greer, Hexter) 

ECON 171. ECONOMICS OF AMERICAN INDUSTRIES. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, ECON 32 or 



37. A study of the technology, economics and geography 
of representative American industries. 

(Measday, Greer) 

ECON 196, 197. HONORS SEMINAR. (3,3) 

First and second semesters. Normally taken in the junior 
year. Prerequisite, candidacy for honors in Economics. 
Selected topics are investigated, and written reports are 
submitted. (Knight) 

ECON. 198. INDEPENDENT HONORS STUDY. (3) 

First semester. Normally taken in the senior year. Pre- 
requisites, Economics 196, 197 and candidacy for honors 
in Economics. -Integrated reading under staff direction, 
leading to the preparation of a thesis in Economics 199. 

(Staff) 

ECON 199. HONORS THESIS. (3) 

Second semester. Prereqursites, Economics 198 and 
candidacy for honors in Economics. General supervision 
will be provided through assembled meetings with the 
professor in charge of the course. (Staff) 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for course descriptions. 

ECON 200. MICRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Almon, Ulmer, Pierce) 
ECON 201. ADVANCED MICRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Almon, Ulmer) 
ECON 202. MACRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. (3) 

(Aaron, Bergmann, Pierce) 
ECON 203. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOP- 
MENT. (3) 
ECON 204. ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENTS OF CAPITALISM. 
(3) (Olson) 

ECON 205. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF UNDERDEVEL- 
OPED AREAS. (3) (Bennett) 
ECON 206. SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. (3) 

(Bennett, Adams) 
ECON 207. MONEY AND FINANCE IN ECONOMIC DEVELOP- 
MENT. (3) (Bennett, Hinrichs) 
ECON 209. WELFARE ECONOMICS. (3) (McGuire, Olson) 
ECON 211. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS I. (3) 

(Bergmann, Green) 
ECON 212. QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS II. (3) 

(Bergmann, Green) 
ECON 214. ADVANCED MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Almon) 
ECON 215. SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Almon) 
ECON 217. ECONOMETRICS I. (3) (Hexter) 

ECON 218. SEMINAR IN QUANTITATIVE ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Hexter) 
ECON 220. ADVANCED REGIONAL AND URBAN ECONOM- 
ICS. (3) (Cumberland) 
ECON 221. SEMINAR IN REGIONAL AND URBAN ECONOM- 
ICS. (3) (Harris) 
ECON 230. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. (3) 

(Dillard) 
ECON 231. ECONOMIC THEORY IN THE NINETEENTH CEN- 
TURY. (3) (Dillard) 
ECON 232, 233. SEMINAR IN INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMIC 
THEORY. (3, 3) (Gruchy) 
ECON 234. ECONOMIC GROWTH IN MATURE ECONOMIES. 
(3) (Gruchy) 
ECON 235. ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RE- 
LATIONS. (3) (Wonnacott, Clague) 
ECON 236. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RE- 
LATIONS. (3) Wonnacott, Clague) 
ECON 237. SELECTED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS. (3) 
ECON 238. SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF 
THE SOVIET UNION. (3) (Dodge) 
ECON 240. MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. (3) 

(Meyer) 

ECON 241. SEMINAR IN MONETARY THEORY AND POLICY. 

(3) (Meyer) 

ECON 242. ADVArvC-ED THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE. (3) 

(Schultze) 

ECON 243. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC FINANCE. (3) (Aaron) 

ECON 245. CASE STUDIES IN GOVERNMENT RESOURCE 

ALLOCATION. (3) (McGuire, Singer) 

ECON 246. PUBLIC SECTOR WORKSHOP. (3) 

(McGuire, Singer) 



7 72 



Business and Public Administration 



ECON 247. ECONOMIC GROWTH AND INSTABILITY. (3) 

ECON 248. THE ECONOMICS OF TECHNICAL CHANGE. (3) 

ECON 260. SEMINAR IN LABOR ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Knight, Weinstein) 

ECON 261. SELECTED TOPICS IN LABOR ECONOMICS. (3) 

(Knight, Weinstein) 

ECON 265. SEMINAR IN THE ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND 
DISCRIMINATION. (3) (Bergmann) 

ECON 266. SEMINAR IN THE ECONOMICS OF HUMAN RE- 
SOURCES. (3) (McLoone) 

ECON 270. ADVANCED INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION. (3) 

(Quails, Greer) 

ECON 271. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLI- 
CY. (3) (Quails, Greer) 

ECON 399. MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH. 

ECON 499. DOCTORAL RESEARCH. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Geography studies the spatial patterns and in- 
teractions of natural, cultural, and socio-economic 
phenomena on the earth's surface. The field thus 
embraces aspects of both the physical and the 
social sciences, which are applied in the analysis of 
patterns of distribution of individual phenomena, to 
the study of complex interrelations of phenomena 
found in a given region, and to the synthesis of geo- 
graphic regions. A geographer should, therefore, 
acquire background knowledge in certain aspects of 
the physical as well as the social sciences. 

Field work and map analysis have been the basic 
tools of research for the geographer. In recent years 
these have been augmented by the use of tech- 
niques of air photo interpretation and presently by 
the development of methods of interpreting data ob- 
tained from the remote sensing devices of space 
satellites. Modern geography also is making increas- 
ing application of quantitative methods, including 
the use of statistics and systems analysis, so that 
mathematical training is becoming increasingly im- 
portant for a successful career in geography. 

Today geographers are employed in a wide range 
of positions. Geographers in the federal government 
work in the Departments of State, Interior, Defense, 
Agriculture, Housing and Urban Affairs, Health, Ed- 
ucation, and Welfare, and are on the staffs of the 
legislative research branch, the Library of Congress 
and the National Archives. At the state and local 
government level there is an increasing demand for 
geographers in planning positions. And in recent 
years more and more geographers have found em- 
ployment in private industry working on problems of 
industrial and commercial location and market an- 
alysis. Teaching at all levels from elementary school 
through graduate work continues to employ more 
geographers each year. Some have found geography 
to be an excellent background for careers in the 
military, in journalism, and general business; others 
have simply found the broad perspective of geog- 
raphy an excellent base for a general education. 
Most professional positions in geography require 
graduate training. 



REQUIREMENT FOR AN UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR 

Because geography draws students with such a 
variety of career and education aims the Department 
has established major programs in both the College 
of Business and Public Administration and in Arts 
and Sciences. Moreover, students in the College of 
Education and the Department of Secondary Educa- 
tion can specialize in geography as their content 
field. 



Within any of the general major programs it is 
possible for the student to adjust his program to fit 
his particular individual interests, for the major re- 
quirement in both BPA and A & S consists of a base 
core of prescribed courses and a number of electives 
selected by the student in consultation with a de- 
partmental advisor. The major totals 33 semester 
hours. 

The required courses of the geography core are: 

1. Geography Core (Geoq. 10. 11, 15, 109) 12 hrs 

2. Field Study (Selected from Geog. 171a, b, c, d, or 

Geog. 170) 3 hrs 

3. A regional course 3 hrs 

4. Elective systematic and technique courses .. 15 hrs 

Total 33 hrs 

The Geography Core — The following four courses 
form the minimum essential base upon which ad- 
vanced work in geography can be built: 

Geog. 10-lntroduction to Physical Geography .... 3 hrs 

Geog. 1 1 -Introduction to Cultural Geography 3 hrs 

Geog. 15- Introduction to Economic Geography ... 3 hrs 
Geog. 109- Introduction to Research and Writing 

in Geography 4 hrs 

The three lower division courses are to be completed 
prior to Geog. 109 and all other upper division 
courses. Geog. 10, 11 and 15 may be taken in any 
order and a student may register for more than one 
in-any semester. Geog. 109 is specifically designed 
as a prologue to upper division work and should be 
taken the first semester of the junior year. A reason- 
able load of other upper division work in geography 
may be taken concurrently with Geog. 109. 

The Field Study Requirement— The field study re- 
quirement may be completed in either of two ways, 
depending on which is available in the schedule: (1) 
bv taking Geography 170— Local Field Course, 3 hrs. 
or (2) by taking three out of four of the following one- 
hour field study courses each stressing a different 
aspect of geographic field work: Geog. 171a— Field 
Study: Physical Geography; Geog. 171b— Field 
Study: Rural Areas; Geog. 171c— Field Study: Urban 
Geography; Field Study: Field Techniques. Normally 
two of the different one-hour courses will he offered 
each semester, and the student should arrange to 
take them as is convenient during the junior and 
senior years. 

Introduction to Geography— Geography 1: Introduc- 
tion to Geography is a general education course for 
persons who have had no previous contact with the 
discipline in high school or for persons planning to 
take only one course in geography. It provides a gen- 
eral overview of the field rather than of a single spe- 
cialized subdivision. 

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 

Although the major program is flexible and can 
be designed to fit any individual student's own inter- 
est, several specializations attract numbers of stu- 
dents. They are: 

Urban Geography and Regional Development- 
Provides preparation for careers in planning and 
teaching. Majors electing this specialty take depart- 
mental courses in urban geography, industrial loca- 
tion, transportation, and economic geography 
among others and supporting courses in urban so- 
ciology, urban economics, and urban transportation 
outside the department. 

Physical Geography— This area of interest calls 
for courses in geomorphology, climatology, and re- 
sources and supporting courses in geology, agron- 
omy, fluid mechanics, and botany. 



Business and Public Administration 



173 



Cartography— Prepares students for careers in 
map design and interpretation and in photo analy- 
sis. The department offers various courses in map 
drafting, cartographic theory, map evaluation, and 
map and photo interpretation and students can take 
supporting courses in art, civil engineering. 

Cultural Geography— Of interest to students 
particularly concerned with the geographic aspects 
of population, politics, and other social and cultural 
phenomena, and in historical geography. In addition 
to departmental course offerings this specialization 
depends on work in sociology, anthropology, govern- 
ment and politics, history and economics. 

For further information on any of these areas of 
interest the student should contact a departmental 
advisor. 

Geography majors in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences must take 12 hours of foreign language, un- 
less qualifying for fewer hours, but majors in BPA 
have the option of substituting at least 12 hours in 
courses developing competence in quantitative 
methods, to the extent that these courses have not 
been taken in the General Education Program. 
Alternative quantitative method sequences: 

1. For a student who has taken MATH 010, the 
sequence can be MATH Oil, 014 and 015 
and BSAD 130 or any other suitable statis- 
tics course approved by the advisor. The 12 
hours can also be satisfied try taking only 
MATH Oil and 014 and then BSAD 130 and 
131 but no other combination with other 
statistics courses is allowed in this case. 

2. A student who has taken MATH 018 follows 
the sequence of MATH 019, 020 and 021 to 
complete the 12 hours. As these are four 
credit courses the student could not sub- 
stitute MATH 021 with a three credit statis- 
tics course unless he secures special per- 
mission for his specific situation. 

SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAM FOR GEOGRAPHY 

MAJORS IN THE COLLEGE OF 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



Freshman Year Hours 

GEOG 1 -Introduction to Geography (if needed! 

see description of course) 3 

GEOG 10-lntroduction to Physical Geography 3 

BOTN 1-General Botany 4 

GEOL 1-Geography 3 

HISTORY -Towards general education requirement 3 

ENGLISH -Composition 3 

PHILOSOPHY OR FINE ARTS-Towards general education 

requirement 3 

MATH 10 or 18-Towards general education requirement 3 

HLTH 5-Health Education 2 

Physical Activities-(Men and Women) 2 

Foreign Languoge 6 

Alternative to foreign longuage (MATH 1 1 or 19) 3-4 

35 32/33 

Sophomore Year Hours 

GEOG 1 1 -Introduction to Cultural Geography 3 

GEOG 15-lrrtroduction to Economic Geography 3 

HISTORY -Towards general education requirement 3 

ENGLISH 3.4- World Literature 6 

Two Sociai Sciences -Towards general education 

requirements 6 

One elective -(depending on area of specialization) 3 

Foreign Language 6 

Alternative to foreign languoge (MATH 14. 15 or 20) 6-4 

33 33/31 



SUGGESTED STUDY PROGRAM FOR 
GEOGRAPHY MAJORS IN THE COLLEGE OF 
ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Junior Year Hours 

GEOG 109-lntroduction to Reseorch ond Writing in 

Geography 3 

GEOG (A Regional Course) 3 



GEOG (Systematic ond Techniques courses) 6 

Supporting courses and electives 21 18 
Alternative to foreign longuage 

(BSAD 130 or MATH 21) 3-4 

Senior Year Hours 

GEOG (Systematic Techniques courses, including 3 

hours of field techniques) 12 (minimum) 

Supporting courses and electives 18 

30 

Freshman Year Hours 

GEOG 1 -Introduction to Geography (if needed, see 

description of course) 3 

GEOG 10-lntroduction to Physical Geography 3 

BOTN 1 -Generol Botany 4 

GEOL 1 -Geology 3 

HISTORY -Towards general educotion requirements 3 

ENGLISH 1 -Composition 3 

MATH 3 or 10- Fundamentals of Mathematics or Introduction 

to Mathematics 4-3 

HLTH 5-Health Education 2 

Physical Activities (Men ond Women) 2 

Foreign Language 6 

33-32 

Sophomore Year Hours 

GEOG 1 1 -Introduction to Culturol Geography 3 

GEOG 15- Introduction to Economic Geography 3 

HISTORY -Towards general educotion requirement 3 

ENGLISH 3,4-World Literature 6 

PHILOSOPHY OR FINE ARTS-Towards general educotion 

requirements 3 

Two Social Sciences -(Towards general education 

requirements) 6 

Foreign Language 3 

SPCH 1 —Public Speaking 3 

33 

Junior Year Hours 

GEOG 109-lntroduction to Research ond Writing 

in Geography 3 

GEOG (A Regional Course) 3 

GEOG (Systematic and Techniques Courses) 6 

Supporting courses and electives 21 

(In this group care must be taken to complete the Arts and Sci- 
ences requirement of 12 hours in Natural Science and Mathe- 
matics) 

Senior Year Hours 

GEOG (Systematic and Techniques courses, including 

hours of field techniques) 12 (minimum) 

Supporting courses and electives 18 

30 



GEOGRAPHY MINOR AND SECONDARY 
EDUCATION GEOGRAPHY SPECIALIZATION 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION MAJORS 

Secondary Education Majors with a concentra- 
tion in geography are required to take 27 hours in 
the content field. Geography 10, 11, 15 and 199 are 
required courses. The remaining 15 hours of the 
program consists of 6 hours of regional geography 
and 9 hours of upper-division systematic courses. 
For majors in Elementary Education and others 
needing a geography course for teaching certifica- 
tion Geography 1 is the required course. 

Geography minors should take at least Geog. 10, 11, 
and 15 in the Geography core and 109 is recom- 
mended. As with the major, these courses should be 
taken before any others. 

PROFESSORS: Ahnert, Deshler. Fonaroff, Harper, Hu. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Chaves. Wiedel, Hudson (Visiting). 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Brodsky. Dando. Groves, Mitchell. 

Thompson 
LECTURERS: Kinerney, Lewis. Rosenthal, Wray. 



GEOG 1. INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

An introduction to the broad field ot geography as it is 
applicable to the general education student. The course 
presents the basic rationale of variations in human oc- 
cupancy of the earth and stresses geographic concepts 
relevant to understanding world, regional and local is- 
sues. 

GEOG 10. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. (3) 
Examination of the basic concepts of physical geography 



J 74 



Business and Public Administration 



including those involving landforms, climate, vegetation, 
soils, and mineral resources and the interrelations be- 
tween them. 

GEOG 11. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

Examination of the basic concepts of human geography 
such as those relating to geography of political, popula- 
tion, settlement, and cultural phenomena. 

GEOG 15. INTRODUCTORY ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

A study of physical and economic factors that underlie 
production. The roles of climate, soils, and landforms; 
and geographic distribution of agricultural, power and 
mineral resources, and the nature and uses of carto- 
graphic materials. 



FOR GRAOUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GEOG 100. REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY OF EASTERN ANGLO- 
AMERICA. (3) 

Prerequisite GEOG 10 or GEOG 15, or permission of the 
instructor. A study of the cultural and economic geog- 
raphy and the geographic regions of eastern United 
States and Canada, including an analysis of the signifi- 
cance of the physical basis for present-day diversifica- 
tion of development, and the historical geographic back- 
ground. 

GEOG 101. REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY OF WESTERN ANGLO- 
AMERhCA. (3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 10 or GEOG 15, or permission of the 
instructor. A study of western United States, western 
Canada, and Alaska along the lines mentioned under 
GEOG 100. 

GEOG 103. GEOGRAPHIC CONCEPTS AND SOURCE MATE- 
RIALS. (3) 
A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic 
concepts designed exclusively for teachers. Stress will 
be placed upon the philosophy of geography in relation 
to the social and physical sciences, the use of the pri- 
mary tools of geography, source materials, and the prob- 
lems of presenting geographic principles. (Kinerney) 

GEOG 104. GEOGRAPHY OF MAJOR WORLD REGIONS. (3) 
A geographic analysis of the patterns, problems, and 
prospects of the world's principal human-geographic re- 
gions, including Europe, Anglo-America, the Soviet Un- 
ion, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis upon the 
causal factors of differentiation and the role geographic 
differences play in the interpretation of the current 
world scene. This course is designed especially for teach- 
ers. 

GEOG 105. GEOGRAPHY OF MARYLAND AND ADJACENT 
AREAS. (3) 
An analysis of the physical environment, natural re- 
sources, and population in relation to agriculture, in- 
dustry, transport, and trade in the state of Maryland and 
adjacent areas. 

GEOG 109. INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC RESEARCH 
AND WRITING. (3) 
Development of research methods in geography includ- 
ing the formulation of problem, the establishment of hy- 
potheses, development of structures for testing hypoth- 
eses, and practice with forms of geographic presentation. 
Maps, quantitative, and field methods will be used as ap- 
propriate. 

GEOG 110. ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
CARIBBEAN AMERICA. (3) 
An analysis oi the physical framework, broad economic 
and historical trends, cultural patterns, and regional di- 
versification of Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, 
and parts of Colombia and Venezuela. (Chaves) 

GEOG 111. ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY Of 
SOUTH AMERICA. (3) 
A survey of natural environment and resources, eco- 
nomic development and cultural diversity of the South 
American republics, with emphasis upon problems and 
prospects of the countries. (Chaves) 

GEOG 118. GEOMORPHOLOGY. (3) 

Study of major morphological processes, the develop- 
ment of land forms, and the relationships between var- 
ious types of land forms and land use problerfVSr. Ex- 
mination of the physical features of the earth's surface 
and their geographic distributions. (Ahnert) 

GEOG 119. CLIMATOLOGY. (3) 

The geographic aspects of climate with emphasis on 
energy-moisture budgets, steady-state and non-steady 
state climatology, and climatic variations at both marcro 
and micro-scales. (Dando) 

GEOG 120. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE. (3) 

First and second semesters. Agricultural and industrial 



development of Europe and present-day problems in re- 
lation to the physical and cultural setting of the con- 
tinent and its natural resources. 

GEOG 122. ECONOMIC RESOURCES AND DEVELOPMENT 
OF AFRICA. (3) 

The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural 
and mineral production; the various stages of economic 
development and the potentialities of the future. 

(Deshler) 

GEOG 125. GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA. (3) 

Lands, climates, natural resources and major economic 
activities in Asia (except Soviet Asia). Outstanding dif- 
ferences between major regions. (Hu) 

GEOG 126. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

Prerequisite, GEOG 10, GEOG 11, or consent of instruc- 
tor. An analysis of the impact of man through his ideas 
and technology on the evolution of geographic land- 
scapes. Major themes in the relationships between cul- 
tures and environments. (Fonaroff) 

GEOG 127. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 
BEFORE 1800. (3) 
An analysis of the changing geography of the U.S. and 
Canada from pre-Columbian times to the end of the 18th 
century. Emphasis on areal variations and changes in the 
settlements and economies of Indian and colonial popu- 
lations. Areal specialization and the changing patterns of 
agriculture, industry, trade and transportation. Popula- 
tion growth, composition and interior expansion. Re- 
gionalization. (Mitchell) 

GEOG 128. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 
AFTER 1800. (3) 
An analysis of the changing geography of the U.S. and 
Canda from 1800 to the 1920's. Emphasis on the settle- 
ment expansion and socio-economic development of the 
U.S., and comparisons with the Canadian experience. 
Immigration economic activities. Industrialization, trans- 
portation and urbanization. (Mitchell) 

GEOG 129. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE. (3) 

An analysis of the changing geography of Europe at se- 
lected periods from prehistoric times until the end of the 
19th Century with particular emphasis on Western 
Europe. Changing patterns of population, agriculture, in- 
dustry, trade and transportation. Development of the na- 
tion-state. Impact of overseas expansion. Agricultural 
and Industrial Revolutions. 

GEOG 130. ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
EASTERN ASIA. (3) 
Study of China, Korea, Japan, the Philippines; physical 
geographic setting; population; economic and political 
geography. Potentialities of major regions and recent de- 
velopments. (Hu) 

GEOG 131 ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY OF 
SOUTHEAST ASIA. (3) 
Study of the Indian subcontinent. Farther India, Indo- 
nesia: physical geographic setting; population; economic 
and political geography. Potentialities of various coun- 
tries and regions and their role in present Asia. (Hu) 

GEOG 134 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF CHINA AND JAPAN. 
(3) 
Survey of geographical distribution and interpretation of 
cultural patterns of China and Japan. Emphasis on basic 
cultural institutions, outlook on life, unique characteris- 
tics of various groups. Trends of cultural change and 
contemporary problems. (Hu) 

GEOG 140. GEOGRAPHY OF THE SOVIET UNION. (3) 

The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geog- 
raphy factors in the expansion of the Russian state. The 
geography of agricultural and industrial production, in 
relation to available resources, transportation problems, 
and diversity of population. (Dando) 

GEOG 145 SYSTEMATIC AND REGIONAL CLIMATOLOGY. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 42, or permission of instructor. 
Methodology and techniques of collecting and evaluating 
climatological information. A critical examination of 
climatic classifications. Distribution of world climates 
and their geographical implications. (Lewis) 

GEOG 146. REGIONAL GEOMORPHOLOGY. (3) 

Regional and comparative morphology, with special em- 
phasis upon Anglo-America. (Atinert) 

GEOG 150. HISTORY AND THEORY OF CARTOGRAP^. (3) 
The development of maps throughout history. (Jsograph- 
ical orientation, coordinates, and map scales. Map pro- 
jections, their nature, use and limitations. Principles of 
representation of features on physical and cultural maps. 
Modern uses of maps and relationships between charac- 
teristics of maps and use types. 

Business and Publfc MmhfSiretton 1 75 



GEOG 151 152. CARTOGRAPHY AND GRAPHICS PRAC- 
TICUM. (3, 3) 
One hour lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Techniques and problems of compilation, design, 
and construction of various types of maps and graphs. 
Relationships between map making and modern meth- 
ods of production and reproduction. Trips to representa- 
tive plants. Laboratory work directed toward cartographic 
problems encountered in the making of nontopographic 
maps. (Wiedel) 

GEOG 153. PROBLEMS OF CARTOGRAPHY REPRESENTA- 
TION AND PROCEDURE. (3) 
Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Study 
of cartographic compilation methods. Principles and 
problems of symbolization, classification, and representa- 
tion of map data. Problems of representation of features 
at different scales and for different purposes. Place- 
name selection and lettering; stick-up and map composi- 
tion. 

GEOG 154. PROBLEMS OF MAP EVALUATION. (3) 

Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. 
Schools of topographic concepts and practices. Theoret- 
ical and practical means of determining map reliability, 
map utility, and source materials. Nature, status, and 
problems of topographic mapping in different parts of 
the world. Non-topographic special use maps. Criteria of 
usefulness for purposes concerned and of reliability. 

(Wiedel) 

GEOG 155. INTERPRETATION OF TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS AND 
AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHS. (3) 
Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per 
week. Interpretation of aerial photographs with emphasis 
on the recognition of landforms of different types and 
man-made features. Study of vegetation, soil, and other 
data that may be derived from aerial photographs. Types 
of aerial photographs and limitations of photo interpreta- 
tion. (Wray) 

GEOG 156. QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY. (3) 
Prerequisite, MATH 10 and 11. SOCY or BSAD 130 or 
consent of instructor. The geographic applications of 
statistical methods. Emphasis will be placed on sources 
of quantitative data useful to geographers, measure- 
ments of location and association, and graphic analysis 
and representation of quantitative data. 

(Brodsky, Thompson) 

GEOG 160. ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY I. AGRI- 
CULTURAL RESOURCES. (3) 

Prerequisite, GEOG 10 or GEOG 15. The nature of agri- 
cultural resources, the major types of agricultural ex- 
ploitation in the world, and the geographic distribution 
of certain major crops and animals in relation to physical 
environment and economic geographic conditions. Main 
problems of conservation. (Deshler) 

GEOG 161. ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY II. MIN- 
ERAL RESOURCES. (3) 
Prerequisite, GEOG 10 or GEOG 15. The nature and geog- 
graphic distribution of the principal power, metallic and 
other minerals. Economic geographic aspects of modes 
of exploitation. Consequences of geographic distribu- 
tion and problems of conservation. 

GEOG 163. WATER RESOURCES AND WATER RESOURCE 
PLANNING. (3) 
GEOG 10 or 15, or permission of instructor. Water as a 
component of the human environment. A systematic ex- 
amination of various aspects of water, including problems 
of domestic and industrial water supply, irrigation, hy- 
droelectric power, fisheries, navigation, flood damage 
reduction and recreation. (Hudson) 

GEOG 170. LOCAL FIELD COURSE. (3) 

Training in geographic field methods and techniques. 
Field observation of land use in selected rural and urban 
areas in eastern Maryland. One lecture per week with 
Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. Primarily 
for undergraduates. 

GEOG 171a, b, c, d. FIELD STUDY (1, 1, 1, 1) 

Each section of this course will center on a different 
type of field study: a-physical geography, b-rural geog- 
raphy, c-urban geography, and d-field techniques. Each 
section will consist of several field study experiences in 
the local area. Geography majors must complete three 
of the four sections of the course. 
GEOG 180. SCIENTIFIC METHODOLOGY AND HISTORY OF 
GEOGRAPHY. (3) 
For undergraduate and graduate majors in Geography. 
May be taken also by students with a minimum of nine 
hours in systematic and six hours in regional geography. 
A comprehensive and systematic study of the history 
nature, and basic principles of geography, with special 



reference to the major schools of geographic thought; a 
critical evaluation of some of the important geographical 
works and methods of geographic research. (Hu) 

GEOG 190. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

Geographical factors in national power and international 
relations; an analysis of the role of "geopolitics" and 
"geostrategy," with special reference to the current 
world scene. (Rosenthal, Chaves) 

GEOG 191. POPULATION GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

Prerequisite, GEOG 10 or 15, or permission of the in- 
structor. An analysis of world population distribution 
patterns as revealed by demographic data. Emphasis is 
placed upon a comparison of population density, growth, 
composition and migration with natural resources and 
state of technological advancement. Case studies from 
the Geographical literature will be used. (Fonaroff) 

GEOG 195. GEOGRAPHY OF TRANSPORTATION. (3) ' 

The distribution of transport routes on the earth's sur- 
face; patterns of transport routes; the adjustment of 
transport routes and media to conditions of the natural 
environment centers and their distribution. (Thompson) 

GEOG 196. INDUSTRIAL LOCALIZATION. (3) 

Factors and trends in the geographic distribution of the 
manufacturing industries of the world, analyzed with 
reference to theories of industrial location. (Groves) 

GEOG 197. URBAN GEOGRAPHY. (3) 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of elements of site 
Shd location with reference to cities. The patterns and 
functions of some major world cities will be analyzed. 
Theories of land use differentiation within cities will be 
appraised. (Brodsky) 

GEOG 198. TOPICAL INVESTIGATIONS. (1-3) 

Independent study under individual guidance. Restricted 
to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at 
least 24 hours in geography, and to graduate students. 
Any exception should have the approval of the Head of 
the Department. 

GEOG 199. UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH. (3) 

Directed regional or systematic study involving several 
subfields of geography, including cartographic presenta- 
tion, and usually requiring field work; and leading to an 
undergraduate thesis. 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for course descriptions. 
GEOG 200. FIELD COURSE. (3) 
GEOG 202. 203. SEMINAR IN ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. 

(3,3) 
GEOG 204, 205. SEMINAR IN CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY. 

(3,3) 
GEOG 206. 207. SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 
GEOG 210. 211. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN 

AMERICA. (3, 3) 
GEOG 220, 221. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF 

EUROPE AND AFRICA. (3, 3) 
GEOG 230, 231. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF EAST 

ASIA. (3, 3) 
GEOG 240, 241. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE 

U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 
GEOG 246. SEMINAR IN THE GEOGRAPHY OF THE NEAR 

EAST. (3) 
GEOG 250. SEMINAR IN CARTOGRAPHY. (Credit Arranged) 
GEOG 260. ADVANCED GENERAL CLIMATOLOGY. (3) 
GEOG 261. APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY. (3) 
GEOG 262, 263. SEMINAR IN METEOROLOGY AND 

CLIMATOLOGY. (3, 3) 
GEOG 280. GEOMORPHOLOGY. (3) 
GEOG 290 291. SELECTED TOPICS IN GEOGRAPHY. 

(1-3) 
GEOG 399. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (Credit to be ar- 
ranged) 



GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

The Department of Government and Politics of- 
fers programs designed to prepare students for gov- 
ernment service, politics, foreign assignments, and 
intelligent and purposeful citizenship. 

Business and Public Administration students 
may major in Government and Politics. At the Jun- 



176 



Business and Public Administration 



ior/Senior level they may pursue the general GVPT 
curriculum or they may pursue a more specialized 
curriculum either in International Affairs or in 
Public Administration. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 
MAJOR 

Government and Politics majors must take a 
minimum of 36 semester hours in GVPT courses 
and may not count more than 42 hours in GVPT to- 
ward graduation. No course in which the grade is 
less than "C" may be counted as part of the major 
work. 

The Government and Politics fields are as fol- 
lows: (1) American Government and Politics; (2) 
Comparative Government; (3) International Affairs; 
(4) Political Theory; (5) Public Administration; (6) 
Public Law; and (7) Public Policy and Political Be- 
havior. 

All GVPT majors are required to take GVPT 1, 3, 
20, and 141 or 142 (Political Theory). They must 
take one GVPT course from three separate GVPT 
fields as designated by the Department; and in ad- 
dition: (a) GVPT majors (general) must take at least 
15 GVPT semester hours at the 100 level; (b) GVPT 
majors taking the International Affairs curriculum 
must complete at least 15 semester hours at the 
100 level in International Affairs and Comparative 
Government courses, including GVPT 101; (c) GVPT 
majors taking the Public Administration curriculum 
must complete at least 15 semester hours at the 
100 level in Public Administration, including GVPT 
110. 

All students majoring in GVPT (general) or GVPT 
with specialization in Public Administration must 
complete the intermediate level of a foreign lan- 
guage. Students majoring in GVPT with specializa- 
tion in International Affairs must take a minimum 
of 12 semester hours in one foreign language above 
the first year elementary course. (The first year ele- 
mentary requirement may be waived by high school 
credit or placement tests). 

All students majoring GVPT must fulfill the 
requirements of a minor, which involves the com- 
pletion of 15 semester hours from approved Depart- 
ments other than GVPT. At least six of the 15 hours 
must be taken at the 100 level from a single Depart- 
ment. Students majoring in GVPT with specializa- 
tion in International Affairs may choose to take all 
minor courses either in geographical area studies 
or on a Departmental basis; geographical area 
minors may be chosen, with the consent of the de- 
partmental adviser, from the following: Africa, East 
Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and 
the Soviet Union. GVPT general majors and GVPT 
majors specializing in Public Administration may 
not minor in geographical area studies. 

Students who major in G. & P. may apply for ad- 
mission to the G. & P. Honors Program during the 
second semester of their sophomore year. Addi- 
tional information concerning the Honors Program 
may be obtained at the departmental offices. 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS Hours 

ECON31.32 6 

ENGL 1. 3, 4 9 

Fine Arts or Philosophy 3 

Foreign Language 12 

(International Affairs students must have 12 foreign 
language credits above the first year elementary level) 

GVPT 1,3.20 9 

History. .', 

MATH 10, 11 .... 6 

Science (One Physical Science and one Biological Science) 7 

Social Science (to fulfill Gen. Educ. Program requirement) 3 

SPCH 1 3 

~64 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
G. & P. GENERAL CURRICULUM 

GVPT 141 or 1 42 (Pohticol Theory) 

One course from each of three GVPT fields as 

designated by the Departme' I 
Additional 100-level GVPT courses 

iMuy not all be taken in International 

Affairs/Comparative Government, or all in 

Public Administration) 
Requirements for minor 
Statistics 
Electives recommended by adviser 



Hours 
3 



18 

3 

12 

60 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE G. & P. 

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS CURRICULUM Hours 

GVPT 141 oi 142 (Political Theory) 3 
One course from each of three GVPT fields 

as designated by the Department 9 
Additional 100-level International Affairs and Comparative 

Government courses including GVPT 101 .... 15 
Requirements for minor 

(Departmental or Geographical Area Studies) 18 

Statistics 3 

Electives recommended by adviser 12 

60 



GVPT 141 or 142 (Political Theory) 3 

One course from each of three GVPT fields 

as designated by the Department 9 

Additional 100-level Public Administration courses 

including GVPT 110 . 15 

Requirements for minor 18 

Statistics 3 

Electives recommended by adviser 12 

^60 

Professor and Department Head: Don C. Piper. 

Professors: Anderson, Burdette, Dillon, Harrison, Hathorn, 
Hsueh, Jacobs, McNellyand Plischke. 

Associate Professors: Byrd, Claude, Conway, Koury, Stone, 
Wolfe and Ranald (visiting 1969-70). 

Assistant Professors: Bechtold, Butterworth, Chaples, De- 
vine, Glendening, Heisler, Ingles Lanning, McGregor, McCar- 
rick, Oliver, Spencer, Terchek, Werlin and Wilkenfeld. 

Lecturers: Barber, King, Larson, Melnick, Reeves and Sebert. 

GVPT 1. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. (3) 

This course is designed as the basic course in government 
and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to other courses 
in the Department as specified in the catalogue. It is a 
comprehensive study of government in the United States- 
national, state, and local. 

GVPT 3. PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. (3) 
A study of the basic principles and concepts of political 
science. This course may be used to satisfy, in part, the 
Social Science requirement in the General Education 
Program. 

GVPT 20. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL BEHAVIOR. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. Development, concepts, and tech- 
niques of the behavio>al approach to political science. 
Comparison with traditional approaches. 

GVPT 40. POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A survey and analysis of the lead- 
ing ideologies of the modern world, including anarchism, 
communism, socialism, fascism, nationalism, and de- 
mocracy. 

GVPT 60. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1 . A study of the functioning and prob- 
lems of state and local government in the United States, 
with illustrations from Maryland jurisdictions. 

GVPT 90. COMPARATIVE POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT. (3) 
An introduction to the field of comparative politics in- 
cluding exposure to the analytic frameworks through which 
comparative studies of politics and governmental institu- 
tions can be undertaken and a survey of the salient types 
of political systems. (Replaces GVPT 97). 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GVPT 101. INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL RELATIONS. (3) 
A study of the major factors underlying international re- 
lations, the methods of conducting foreign relations, the 
foreign policies of the major powers, and the means of 
avoiding or alleviating international conflicts. This course 
may be used to satisfy, in part, the Social Science re- 
quirement in the General Education Program. 

GVPT 102. INTERNATIONAL LAW. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the basic character, 



Business and Public Administration 



177 



general principles, and specific rules of international 
Taw, with emphasis on recent and contemporary trends 
in the field and its relation to other aspects of interna- 
tional affairs. 

GVPT 103. CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN POLITICS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A survey of contemporary develop- 
ment in the international politics of Africa, with special 
emphasis on the role of an emerging Africa in world affairs 

GVPT 104. INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. An analytical and historical study 
of the Latin-American policies of the United States and 
of problems in our relations with individual countries, 
with emphasis on recent developments. 

GVPT 105. RECENT FAR EASTERN POLITICS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. The background and interpretation 
of recent political events in. the Far East and their influ- 
ence on world politics. 

GVPT 106. AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. The principles and machinery of 
the conduct of American foreign relations, with emphasis 
on the Department of State and the Foreign Service, and 
an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United 
States. 

GVPT 107. CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EASTERN POLITICS. 
(3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A survey of contemporary develop- 
ment in the international politics of the Middle East, 
with special emphasis on the role of emerging Middle East 
nations in world affairs. 

GVPT 108. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the objectives, structure, 
functions, and procedures of international organizations, 
including the United Nations and such functional and re- 
gional organizations as the Organization of American States. 

GVPT 109. FOREIGN POLICY OF THE U.S.S.R. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the development of the 
foreign policy of the Soviet union, with attention paid to 
the forces and conditions that make for continuities and 
changes from Tsarist policies. 

GVPT 110. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of public administration in 
the United States giving special attention to the principles 
of organization and management and to fiscal, personnel, 
planning, and public relations practices. 

GVPT 111. PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 110 or BSAD 160. A survey of public 
personnel administration, including the development of 
merit civil service, the personnel agency, classification, 
recruitment, examination techniques, promotion, service 
ratings, training, discipline, employee relations, and re- 
tirement. 

GVPT 112. PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 110 or ECON 142. A survey of govern- 
mental financial procedures, including processes of cur- 
rent and capital budgeting, the administration of public 
borrowing, the techniques of public purchasing, and the 
machinery of control through pre-audit and post-audit. 

GVPT 113. GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION AND MAN- 
AGEMENT. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 110. A study of the theories of or- 
ganization and management in American government with 
emphasis on new trends, experiments, and reorganiza- 
tions. 

GVPT 120. PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL BEHAVIOR. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. The problem approach to political 
behavior with emphasis on theoretical and empirical 
studies on selected aspects of the political process. 

GVPT 122. QUANTITATIVE POLITICAL ANALYSIS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 20, or consent of instructor. Intro- 
duction to quantitative methods of data analysis, includ- 
ing selected statistical methods, bloc analysis, content 
analysis, and scale construction. 

GVPT 124. LEGISLATURES AND LEGISLATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A comprehensive study of legislative 
organization, procedure, and problems, the course in- 
cludes opportunities for student contact with Congress 
and with the Legislature of Maryland. 

GVPT 127. POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 20, or consent of instructor. A study 
of the societal aspects of political life, including selected 
aspects of the sociology of group formation and group dy- 
namics, political association, community integration and 
political behavior presented in the context of the societal 
environments of political systems. 

GVPT 131. INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A systematic inquiry into the gen- 



eral principles of the American constitutional system, 
with special reference to the role of the judiciary in the 
interpretation and enforcement of the federal constitu- 
tion. 

GVPT 132. CIVIL RIGHTS AND THE CONSTITUTION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 131. A study of'cNvil rights in the 
American constitutional context, emphasizing freedom of 
religion, freerfoVn of expression, minority discrimination, 
and the rights of defendants. 

GVPT 133. THE JUDICIAL PROCESS. (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 1. An examination of judicial organiza- 
tion in the United States at all levels of government, with 
some emphasis on legal reasoning, legal research, and court 
procedures. 

GVPT 134. RACE RELATIONS AND PUBLIC LAW. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A political and legal examination of 
the constitutionally protected rights affecting racial mi- 
norities and of the constitutional power of the Federal 
Courts, Congress, and the Executive to define, protect and 
extend these rights. 

GVPT 141. HISTORY OF POLITICA1 THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A survey of the principal political 
theories set forth in the works of writers before Mach- 
iavelli. 

GVPT, 142. RECENT POLITICAL THEORY MODERN AND 
RECENT. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A survey of the principal political 
theories set forth in the works of writers from Mach- 
iavelli to J.S. Mill. 

GVPT 143. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 141 or GVPT 142. A survey of the 
principal political theories and ideologies from 1 Karl Marx 
to the present. 

GVPT 144. AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the development and 
growth of American political concepts from the colonial 
period to the present. 

GVPT 145. RUSSIAN POLITICAL THOUGHT. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A survey and analysis of political 
ideas in Russia and the Soviet Union from early times 
to the present. 

GVPT 150H. HONORS SEMINAR IN AMERICAN GOVERN- 
MENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. (3) 
Prerequisite, admission to Honors Program. Directed read- 
ing, reporting, and discussion on the major materials of 
historical and contemporary relevance in the fields of 
American government and public administration. 

GVPT 151H. HONORS SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE GOV- 
ERNMENT AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. (3) 
Prerequisite, admission to Honors Program. Directed read- 
ing, reporting and discussion centering on the major ma- 
terials of historical and contemporary relevance in the 
fields of comparative government and international re- 
lations. 

GVPT 152H HONORS SEMINAR IN PUBLIC LAW AND 
POLITICAL THEORY. (3) 

Prerequisite, admission to Honors Program. Directed read- 
ing, reporting, and discussion centering on the major mate- 
rials of historical and contemporary relevance in the 
fields of public law and political theory. 

GVPT 153H. HONORS SEMINAR IN PUBLIC POLICY AND 
POLITICAL BEHAVIOR (AND METHODOLOGY). (3) 
Prerequisite, admission to Honors Program. Directed read- 
ing, reporting, and discussion centering on the major ma- 
terials of historical and contemporary relevance in the 
fields of public policy and political behavior. 

GVPT 154. PROBLEMS OF WORLD POLITICS. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of governmental problems 
of international scope, such as causes of war, problems 
of neutrality, and propaganda. Students are required to 
report on readings from current literature. 

GVPT 155H. HONORS RESEARCH. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, admission to Honors Program. Individual 
and research. In his last semester each student prepares 
an original research paper. 

GVPT 156H. CURRENT LITERATURE IN GOVERNMENT 
AND POLITICS. (1, 1. 1, 1) 
Each student is assigned designated journals in consulta- 
tion with the instructor. He prepares and distributes to 
his colleagues abstracts of selected articles, answers 
questions on the abstracts, and reports orally, in turn, on 
one or more articles of his choice. 

GVPT 160. STATE AND LOCAL ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the administrative struc- 
ture, procedures, and policies of state and local govern- 
ments with special emphasis on the state level and on 



178 Business and Public Administration 



intergovernmental relationships, and with illustrations 
from Maryland governmental arrangements 

GVPT 161. METROPOLITAN ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. An examftiation of administrative 
problems relating to public services, planning, and co- 
ordination in a metropolitan environment. 

GVPT 162. URBAN POLITICS. (3) 

Urban political processes and institutions considered in 
the light of changing social and economic conditions. 

GVPT 171. Problems of AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. The background and interpretation 
of various factors which affect the formation and execu- 
tion of American public policy. 

GVPT 174. POLITICAL PARTIES. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A descriptive and analytical ex- 
amination of American political parties, nominations, 
elections, and political leadership. 

GVPT 175. THE PRESIDENCY AND THE EXECUTIVE 
BRANCH (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. An examination of the executive, 
legislative and party roles of the president in the political 
process. 

GVPT 178. PUBLIC OPINION. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. An examination of public opinion 
and its effect on political action, with emphasis on opin- 
ion formation and measurement, propaganda, and pres- 
sure groups. 

GVPT 181. ADMINISTRATIVE LAW. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the discretion exercised 
by administrative agencies, including analysis of their func- 
tions, their powers over persons and property, their 
procedures, and judicial sanctions and controls. 

GVPT 185. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF PUBLIC ADMINIS- 
TRATION. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 90, GVPT 110, or consent of instruc- 
tor. An introduction to the study of governmental adminis- 
trative systems viewed from the standpoint of compara- 
tive typologies and theoretical schemes useful in cross- 
national comparisons and empirical studies of the poli- 
tics of the administrative process in several nations. 
Both Western and Non-western countries are included. 

GVPT 189. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FOREIGN POLICY 
FORMATION. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 90, GVPT 101 or consent of instruc- 
tor. An introduction to the comprative study of foreign 
policy formation structures and processes followed by a 
survey of the domestic sources of policy for major states. 
A conspectus of substantive patterns of foreign policy in 
analytically salient types of systems is presented. Do- 
mestic and global systemic sources of foreign policy are 
compared. 

GVPT 190. COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN EUROPEAN POLI- 
TICS. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 90, or consent of instructor. A com- 
parative study of political processes and governmental 
forms in selected European countries. 

GVPT 191. GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION OF THE 
SOVIET UNION. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A study of the adoption of the com- 
munist philosophy by the Soviet Union, of its governmental 
structure, and of the administration of government policy 
in the Soviet Union. 

GVPT 192. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF LATIN AMER- 
ICA. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes of the Latin Amer- 
ican countries, with special emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile, and Mexico. 

GVPT 193. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF ASIA. (3) 

Prerequisite, GVPT 97, or GVPT 105, or HIST 61, or HIST 
62, or HIST 187, or HIST 188, or HIST 189. A compara- 
tive study of the political systems of China, Japan, India, 
and other selected Asian countries. 

GVPT 194. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF AFRICA. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes of the African 
countries, with special emphasis on the problems of na- 
tion-building in emergent countries. 

GVPT 195. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE MIDDLE 
EAST. (3) 
Prerequisite, GVPT 1. A comparative study of the govern- 
mental systems and political processes of the Middle 
Eastern countries, with special emphasis on the problems 
of nation-building in emergent countries. 

GVPT 197. COMPARATIVE POLITICS SYSTEMS. (3) 

Prerequisite. GVPT 97 and at least one other course in 



comparative government. A study, along functional lines, 
of major political institutions, such as legislatures, execu- 
tives, courts, bureaucracies, public organizations, and 
political parties. 

GVPT 199. SEMINAR IN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. (3) 
Reading, research, discussion, analysis, and writing in the 
area of politics. Both substantive issues and methodolog- 
ical approaches will be considered. Primarily for Govern- 
ment and Politics undergraduate majors. Not open to 
graduate students. 

FOR GRADUATES 

See the Graduate School Catalog for course descriptions. 

GVPT 200. SEMINAR IN NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY. (3) 

GVPT 201. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL OR- 
GANIZATION. (3) 

GVPT 202. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL LAW. (3) 

GVPT 203. FUNCTIONAL PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS. (3) 

GVPT 204. AREA PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL RELA- 
TIONS. (3) 

GVPT 205. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN POLITICAL INSTITU- 
TIONS. (3) 

GVPT 206. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS. 
(3) 

GVPT 207. SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL 
INSTITUTIONS. (3) 

GVPT 208. SEMINAR IN THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 
OF EMERGING NATIONS. (3) 

GVPT 209. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL ADMINISTRA- 
TION. (3) 

GVPT 210. GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION THEORY. (3) 

GVPT 212. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC FINANCIAL ADMINISTRA- 
TION. (3) 

GVPT 213. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

GVPT 214. PROBLEMS OF PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINIS- 
TRATION. (3) 

GVPT 215. PROBLEMS OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERN- 
MENT. (3) 

GVPT 216. GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATIVE PLANNING 
AND MANAGEMENT. (3) 

GVPT 217. DEVELOPMENTAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 
(3) 

GVPT 218. SEMINAR IN URBAN ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

GVPT 219. STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTAL 
ADMINISTRATION. (3) 

GVPT 221. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC OPINION. (3) 

GVPT 222. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL BEHAV- 
IOR. (3) 

GVPT 223. SEMINAR IN LEGISLATURES AND LEGISLA- 
TION. (3) 

GVPT 224. SEMINAR IN POLITICAL PARTIES AND POLI- 
TICS. (3) 

GVPT 226. SCOPE AND METHOD OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 
(3) 

GVPT 228. PROBLEMS IN QUANTITATIVE POLITICAL AN- 
ALYSIS. (3) 

GVPT 231. SEMINAR IN PUBLIC LAW. (3) 

GVPT 241. GREAT POLITICAL THINKERS. (3) 

GVPT 242. MAN AND THE STATE. (3) 

GVPT 243. CURRENT PROBLEMS IN POLITICAL THEORY. 
(3)' 

GVPT 244. AMERICAN POLITICAL THEORY. (3) 

GVPT 245. SEMINAR IN NON-WESTERN POLITICAL THE- 
ORY. (3) 

GVPT 246. THEORIES OF DEMOCRACY. (3) 

GVPT 247. ANALYTICAL SYSTEMS AND THEORY CON- 
STRUCTION. (3) 

GVPT 248. MARXIST POLITICAL THEORY. (3) 

GVPT 259. RESPONSIBILITY IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRA- 
TION. (3) 

GVPT 261. PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND 
POLITICS. (3) 

GVPT 262. SEMINAR ON INTERGOVERNMENTAL RELA- 
TIONS. (3) 

GVPT 280. SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 
THEORY. (3) 

GVPT 290. SEMINAR IN THE COMPARATIVE STUDY OF 
POLITICS. (3) 

GVPT 398. READINGS IN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. 
(3) 

Business and Public Administration '79 



GVPT 399. THESIS RESEARCH. (Arranged) 
GVFT 499. DISSERTATION RESEARCH. (Arranged) 



JOURNALISM 

The first objective of the Department of Journal- 
ism is to provide a four-year liberal education for the 
student of superior writing ability who intends to 
make a career in some phase of journalism. It also 
serves the major within the department whose 
career intention may be in a field related to journal- 
ism. 

The department's curriculum in news editorial 
journalism has been accredited by the American 
Council on Education for Journalism. The depart- 
ment is a member of the American Association of 
Schools and Departments of Journalism and of the 
American Association of Schools and Departments 
of Journalism and of the American Society of Jour- 
nalism School Administrators. 

Particular features of the curriculum are (1) a 
two-year introductory program of general education, 
centered in the liberal arts, (2) a required core pro- 
gram, equivalent to approximately one semester, in 
basic aspects of journalism, (3) specialization be- 
yond the core in news-editorial work, photojournal- 
ism, public relations, radio-television work, or adver- 
tising, (4) the equivalent of approximately one se- 
mester of upper-division study in a subject chosen 
from outside the Department of Journalism, (5) elec- 
tive courses and (6) opportunities for field contacts. 

The student may declare his intention to major 
in the Department of Journalism at the beginning of 
any semester, but normally before the junior year. 
His choices of specialization within the department 
and of related study in other departments should be 
made by the beginning of the junior year and after 
consultation with a faculty adviser. 

An average grade of "C" or better in courses 
taken in the department is required of journalism 
majors for graduation. 

Majors are urged and helped to write for publica- 
tion and to obtain professional experience between 
the junior and senior years on the job or in summer 
internships. The department maintains close work- 
ing relations with professional journalists, public 
relations practitioners and their organizations. One 
of the purposes is to provide speakers, trips, labora- 
tories, internships and other types of supervised 
professional training for students. 

An essential part of the work in editorial jour- 
nalism consists of supervised training on the Balti- 
more Sun or the Baltimore News American and near- 
by weekly papers. The experience may also be ob- 
tained on other publications, approved by the ad- 
viser. This professional training helps students to 
become familiar with reporting, editing and adver- 
tising for professional publications covering Mary- 
landand Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE JOURNALISM MAJOR 

Listed below are the lower-division and the up- 
per-division requirements for majors in the Depart- 
ment of Journalism. In qualifying for the degree, 
the student must complete 120 semester hours, 57 
hours of which must be upper-division credit. The 
exceptions to the upper-division rule are noted on 
page of this catalog. 

Course substitutions may be made by the faculty 
adviser to take account of previous professional ex- 



perience and to develop programs to include special 
study. Within the broad outlines of the upper-di- 
vision courses themselves, students are encouraged 
to develop individual interests by careful choice of 
elective courses. 



LOWER-DIVISION CURRICULUM 

Semester 
freshman Year I II 

ENGL 1 (or 21), 3-Composition and American 

Literature 3 3 

Science (one course of which must be a lab science) 4 3 

Foreign language 3 3 

PSYCH 1 and SOCY I 3 

SPCH 1- Public Speaking 1 

MATH 10-lntroauction to Mathematics 

HLTH 5-Science and Theory of Health 2 

Physical Activities 11 

Total T7 18 

Sophomore Year 

JOUR lOand JOUR 11 3 3 

ENGL 4-Composition and World Literature 3 

Foreign Longuage 3 3 

History 3 3 

GVPT 1 and ECON 37 3 3 

FINE ARTS 

(Elected from PHIL 1 or 41 or 45 or 53. 

ART 10 or 60, 61, 80, SPCH 16, MUSC 20) _. 3 

Total 15 15 

UPPER-DIVISION CURRICULUM 

The core program: 

Journalism requirements: 24 credit hours in upper di- 
vision Journalism courses including JOUR 160. News Editing. 
At least six credit hours should be taken in one of the fol- 
lowing areas for depth in a special field of Journalism: 
News Reporting: JOUR 100 and JOUR 175 
Public Relations: JOUR 166 and JOUR 170 
Advertising: JOUR 152 and JOUR 163 
News Photography: JOUR 181 and JOUR 182 
News Broadcasting: JOUR 101 and JOUR 184 
All Journalism majors should elect at least six credit 
hours from the following courses for breadth in mass com- 
munication: 

JOUR 176: Comparative Mass Communication Systems 

Jour 186: Govt, and Mass Communication 

JOUR 192: History of Mass Communication 

JOUR 194: Public Opinion and Mass Communication 

Non-Journalism requirements: 

12-18 credit hours in upper-division courses in one 

subject outside of the Journalism Department 12-18 

15 credit hours of upper-division, non-journalism 

courses, to be spread or concentrated according to 

individual needs 15 

27-33 

Total Upper-Division 54-60 

PROFESSOR AND DEPARTMENT HEAD: Hiebert. 
PROFESSORS: Bryan, Crowell, Martin. Newsom. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Brown. Flippen, Grunig. Midura 

Petrick 
LECTURERS: Geraci, Lee. 

JOUR 10. INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION. (3) 
Survey of the process and effects of mass communica- 
tion; historical development and social, economic, legal, 
and professional aspects of the mass media. Open to all 
students. (Staff) 

JOUR 11. WRITING FOR THE MASS MEDIA. (3) 

Introduction to news, feature and publicity writing for the 
printed and electronic media; development of news con- 
cepts; laboratory in news gathering tools and writing skills. 
Prerequisite: Typing ability and JOUR 10 (which may be 
taken concurrently, with permission). (Staff) 

JOUR 100. NEWS REPORTING. (3) 

Principles and practice of news reporting, with special 
emphasis on news gathering for al I the media; covering news 
beats and other news sources, including researching a 
news story for accuracy, comprehensiveness and inter- 
pretation. Prerequisites: JOUR 10 and 11. (Midura) 

JOUR 101. BROADCAST NEWS WRITING. (3) 

Study of and practice in the special application of news 
writing and editing to the broadcasting media, including the 
use of wire copy and tape recorders in producing news- 
casts. Prerequisites: JOUR 110 and 120. (Midura) 

JOUR 152. ADVERTISING COPY AND LAYOUT. (3) 

Theory of and practice in advertising copy and layout. 



180 



Business and Public Administration 



with emphasis on newspaper advertising, for letterpress 
and photo-offset printing. Study of illustrations, type se- 
lection, copy-fitting, and media selection. Prerequisites: 
JOUR 10 and 11. (Newsom) 

JOUR 160. NEWS EDITING. (3) 

Prini iples of the editing process and practice in copy edit- 
ing, headline writing, newspaper page layout, and editorial 
judgment. Prerequisites: JOUR 10 and 11. (Crowell) 

JOUR 161. SEMINAR IN JOURNALISM. (3) 

Seminar for Journalism seniors in newsroom problems 
and policies, emphasizing ethics and responsibilities, in 
cooperation with the Baltimore Sun, Baltimore News- 
American, and other area news media. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the Instructor. (Newsom) 

JOUR 163. PRINCIPLES OF TYPOGRAPHY AND PRODUC 
TION. (3) 
Study of layout, typography, design, and printing in the plan- 
ning and production of the printed media. Prerequisites; 
JOUR 10 and 11. (Newsom) 

JOUR 165. MAGAZINE ARTICLE AND FEATURE WRITING 
(3) 
Study of types of feature articles, particularly for the 
magazine market; analysis of the magazine medium and 
specialized audiences; practice in researching and writing 
the feature article; analysis of free-lance markets. Pre- 
requisites: JOUR 10 and 11. (Flippen, Grunig) 

JOUR 166. PUBLIC RELATIONS. (3) 

Study of the principles and historical development of 
public relations. Attention isgiven tofact-finding, planning, 
communication, and evaluation aspects of public rela- 
tions. Study of the use of public relations in business, 
government, associations, and organizations. Prerequisites: 
JOUR 10 and 11. (Midura) 

JOUR 170. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLICITY. (3) 

Study of the strategy and techniques of purposive com- 
munication; analysis of the techniques and effects of 
the publicity campaign; laboratory in special publicity 
projects. Prerequisite: JOUR 130. (Martin, Grunig) 

JOUR 171. INDUSTRIAL JOURNALISM. (3) 

Industrial communications, management and production 
of company periodicals, public relations aspects of in- 
dustrial journalism. Prerequisites, JOUR 10 and 11. 

(Crowell) 

JOUR 174. JOURNALISM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
(3) 
Study and practice of the basic techniques of writing and 
editing scientific and technical material for both the gen- 
eral audience and the specialist. Prerequisites: JOUR 10 
and 11. (Grunig) 

JOUR 175. REPORTING OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS. (3) 

Advanced training in writing news for publication in spe- 
cialized areas, particularly city, county, and federal news. 
Students meet in seminar with news sources and leading 
news reporters and work in Washington, D.C., Anapolis, 
and Baltimore in covering news in depth for publication. 
Prerequisites: JOUR 120 and permission of instructor. 

(Lee) 

JOUR 176. COMPARATIVE MASS COMMUNICATION SYS- 
TEMS. (3) 
Survey of the history and status of the mass media 
throughout the world; comparative analysis of the role of 
the Rress in different societies. Prerequisites: JOUR 10 
and consent of Instructor for Non-Majors. (Bryan) 

JOUR 181. NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY. (3) 

Fundamentals of shooting, developing, and printing of news 
and feature pictures for all media. Department furnishes 
equipment and student furnishes supplies. Prerequisites: 
JOUR 10 and 11. (Geraci) 

JOUR 182. ADVANCED NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY. (3) 

Advanced training in shooting, developing, and printing pic- 
tures, with emphasis on the photo story. Analysis of the 
role of photography in mass communication. Department 
furnishes equipment and student furnishes supplies. 
Prerequisite: JOUR 150. (Geraci) 

JOUR 184 REPORTING THROUGH AUDIO-VISUAL MEDIA. 
(3) 
Principles of live photography and recording in the pro- 
duction of news and documentaries for all the media. 
Prerequisites: JOUR 150 and 162. (Staff) 

JOUR 186 GOVERNMENT AND MASS COMMUNICATION. 
(3) 
Study of the relationship between the news media and 
government. Anal