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Full text of "Undergraduate course catalog (Florida International University). [2005-2006]"

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FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 



UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS 

11 200 SW8 lh Street 
Miami, Florida 33199 
305-348-2000 



BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 

3000 NE 151 st Street 
North Miami, Florida 33181 
305-919-5500 



FIU BROWARD-PINES CENTER 

17195 Sheridan Street 
Pembroke Pines, Florida 33331 
954-438-8600 



ENGINEERING CENTER 

10555 W.Flagler Street 
Miami, Florida 33174 
305-348-3034 



EMERGENCY - DIAL 591 1 



AREA CODES: 

University Park phone numbers begin with area code 305 
Biscayne Bay phone numbers begin with area code 305 
FIU Broward-Pines Center phone numbers begin with area code 954 
Engineering Center numbers begin with area code 305 

From any FIU campus, dial FIU numbers direct: 

All University Park phone numbers 7-xxxx 

All Biscayne Bay phone numbers 6-xxxx 

All FIU Broward-Pines Center phone numbers 6-xxxx 

All Engineering Center numbers 7-xxxx 



2 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Florida International University 

Member of the State University System 
Miami, Florida 



2005-2006 UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



3 Message from President Maidique 

4 Academic Calendar 

1 1 University Information 

17 Academic Programs 

21 Undergraduate Studies 

28 The Honors College 

30 Academic Affairs 

33 Student Affairs 

41 Intercollegiate Athletics 

42 Continuing and Professional Studies 
44 Undergraduate Admissions 

49 University Undergraduate Rules and Regulations 

57 Tuition and Fees 

60 Financial Aid 

62 General Information 



63 Administration and Staff 

66 Academic Units 

68 Support Services Phone and Web Addresses 

70 Centers and Institutes 

72 Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System 

75 School of Architecture 

87 College of Arts and Sciences 

297 College of Business Administration 

325 College of Education 

363 College of Engineering 

423 College of Health and Urban Affairs 

465 School of Hospitality and Tourism Management 

477 School of Journalism and Mass Communication 

492 Index 

Campus Maps 



FIU and Florida International University are registered marks. Florida International University believes in equal opportunity 
practices which conform to all laws against discrimination and is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to race, color, 
creed, age, handicap, sex, marital status, religion, or national origin. Additionally, the University is committed to the principle 
of taking the positive steps necessary, to achieve the equalization of educational and employment opportunities. 

Note: The programs, policies, requirements, regulations published in this catalog are continually subject to review in order to 
serve the needs of the University's various constituencies and to respond to the mandates of the State Board of Education 
and the Florida Legislature. Changes in programs, policies, requirements, and regulations may be made without advance 
notice. The ultimate responsibility for knowing degree requirements imposed upon students by State law rests with 
students. 



Fees given in this catalog are tentative pending legislative action. 



Florida International University 
University Park Campus 

11 200 SW8 lh Street 
Miami, Florida 33199 



Florida International University 
Biscayne Bay Campus 

3000 NE 151 s1 Street 
North Miami, Florida 33181 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS ADDRESS EMAIL ADDRESS: 

Florida International University admiss(5)fiu.edu 

P.O. Box 659003 

Miami, Florida 33265-9003 



Message from President Maidique 3 



President Modesto A. Maidique 




Dear Undergraduate Students and Prospective Students: 

Welcome to Florida International University. I want you to know that the faculty and staff at FIU are fully committed to 
providing you with the best possible academic experiences to assist you in achieving your goals and to prepare you for the 
world of tomorrow. Whether you are a first-time college student or are returning to school to expand your knowledge, you will, 
without a doubt, find a large array of opportunities designed to enhance your horizons intellectually, culturally and socially. In 
this Undergraduate Catalog we provide a broad overview of our institution, a list of programs, courses, requirements and 
services, including a great deal of useful information to guide you through your academic experience. Please take the time to 
carefully review this important information. 

As a leading public research university located in one of the nation's most exciting international cities, FIU offers a rare 
combination of vast resources, personal attention and affordability. With more than 190 bachelor's, master's and doctoral 
degree programs, as well as outstanding faculty and an intimate learning environment, we prepare our students for the 
leading job markets and the latest technologies. Committed to both quality and access, FIU meets the educational needs of 
traditional students, as well as part-time students and lifelong learners. 

FIU has a nationally and internationally renowned full-time faculty, known for their outstanding teaching and cutting-edge 
research. U.S. News & World Report has ranked FIU among the top 100 public national universities in its annual survey of 
"America's Best Colleges." Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine ranked FIU as the country's 18' best value in public 
higher education. The University is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest and most distinguished academic honor 
society. Our students, faculty and alumni continually receive national and international recognition for their achievements. 

On behalf of your fellow students and our faculty and staff, I congratulate you on being admitted to FIU and for deciding to 
pursue your degree at one of the finest public institutions in the country. I wish you a challenging and fulfilling experience as 
you work to achieve your goals. I look forward to seeing you on campus. 

Sincerely, 



4 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Academic Calendar 2005 • 2006 



August 29 - December 8 

Final Exams December 12-17 



April 1 Friday 

May 2 Monday 
May 9 Monday 
May 16 Monday 
June 1 Wednesday 

June 1 Wednesday 

March 18 Friday 

May 27 Friday 



June 10 Friday 



June 13 Monday 
July 6 Wednesday 
July 7 - 8 Thurs. & Fri. 
July 8 Friday 
July 12 Tuesday 
July 14- 15 Thurs. & Fri. 
July 15 Friday 



July 18-19 Mon. & Tues. 
July 22 Friday 



July 26 Tuesday 

July 28 - 29 Thurs. & Fri. 

August 1 - 5 Mon. - Fri. 

August 2 Tuesday 
August 4 Thursday 
August 5 Friday 

August 6-12 

August 8 - 9 Mon. & Tues. 

August 11 - 12 Thurs. & Fri. 

August 15-24 

August 15 Monday 

August 17- 18 Wed. & Thurs. 

August 17-24 

August 22 Monday 

August 23 - 24 Tues. & Wed. 



Last day for international undergraduate students to submit applications. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to apply for readmission to the University. 

Last day for beginning Freshmen to submit applications. 

Undergraduate Studies Advising for Fall 2005 term resumes. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park - afternoon session). 

Last day for international undergraduate students to submit all supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores. 

Last day for transfer students to submit applications with supporting academic credentials 

and appropriate test scores, if applicable. 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning to 

graduate in Spring 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2005). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Summer 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students planning 

to graduate in Spring 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2006). 

First day (by 5 pm) to apply for graduation at the end of Fall 2005 term. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus - Honors College students only). 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus - Arts & Sciences & Undecided Students). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus & Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Fall 2005). 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2006). 

Last day to submit Readmission applications for priority consideration to the University. 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus - Hospitality Management, Journalism & Mass 

Comm. Students). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus & Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Registration Information and Access Codes available to all returning undergraduate 

students aqnd all graduate students for Fall 2005 term. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus - Business & Hospitality Management Students). 

Official Registration (Degree-Seeking Students) only by appointment time and day. 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus & Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Open Registration All Students. Continuous Web & Kiosk Registration. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus & Biscayne Bay Campus - Early Housing 

Check-In available 8/22 from 9 am - 5 pm).* 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus - Early Housing Check-In available 8/22 

from 9 am - 5 pm).* 



Academic Calendar 5 



August 24 Wednesday 



August 25 - 26 Thurs. & Fri. 

August 26 Friday 
August 26 - 28 Fri. - Sun. 
August 28 Sunday 
August 29 Monday 
September 1 Thursday 
September 2 Friday 

September 5 Monday 
September 6 Tuesday 



September 14 Wednesday 
September 19 Monday 
September 23 Friday 
September 26 Monday 
September 26 - 30 
September 27 Tuesday 
September 30 Friday 
September 28 Wednesday 



October 1 Saturday 
October 27 Thursday 



November 3 Thursday 

November 10 Thursday 

November 10 Thursday 

November 1 1 Friday 
November 17 Thursday 
November 24 - 25 Thurs. - Fri. 
November 26 Saturday 
December 8 Thursday 
December 8 Thursday 

December 9 & 10 Fri. & Sat. 
December 12-17 Mon. - Sat. 
December 12-21 
December 18-21 

December 19-20 Mon. & Tues. 
December 21 Wednesday 
December 22 Thursday 

December 23 - 26 Fri. - Mon. 



Last day to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 
Last day to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 
Last day (by 7:00 p.m.) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 
Graduate Orientation. 

Freshman Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus - Early Housing Check-In available 8/24 from 

9 am - 5 pm).* 

International Student Orientation (University Park Campus and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Official Housing Check-In (9 am - 6 pm). 

Freshman Convocation (Required of All Freshmen). 

Classes begin. 

Freshman Luau (Biscayne Bay Campus) at noon. 

Last day to register for the CLAST exam on October 1 s '. 

New Faculty Orientation (Academic Affairs). 

Labor Day Holiday (University Closed). 

Last day to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends. 

Last day to change a grading option. 

Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 

liability. 

Last day (by 5 pm) to apply for graduation at the end of Fall 2005 term. 

Undergraduate Studies Advising for Spring 2006 term begins. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

Honors College Convocation. 

Faculty Convocation Week. 

Faculty Convocation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Faculty Convocation (University Park Campus). 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students planning 

to graduate in Summer 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Spring 2007). 

CLAST Examination. 

Last day to submit FORM D5: Preliminary Approval of Dissertation and Request for Oral 

Defense. 

Last day to submit FORM M3: Preliminary Approval of Thesis and Request for Oral Defense. 

Deadline to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Deadline to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Spring 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning to 

graduate in Fall 2006). 

Deadline for faculty to review class rosters to ensure accuracy before grade rosters are 

created. 

Veterans' Day Holiday (University Closed). 

Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

Thanksgiving Holiday (University Closed). 

No Saturday Classes. 

Classes end. 

Last day to submit final copies of dissertation and FORM D7: Final Approval of Dissertation. 

Last day to submit final copies of thesis and FORM M5: Final Approval of Thesis. 

Exam Study Days (No exams given on these days).** 

Official Examination Period. 

Grade rosters available to faculty for grade entry and submission. 

Grades posted nightly for students to view. 

Commencement Exercises. 

Deadline (by 11:59 pm) for faculty to submit grades. 

Complete grade report available to students by web and at kiosks. 

Winter Break (University Closed). 



6 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



January 9 - April 20 

Final Exams April 24 - 29 



September 1 Thursday 

October 1 Saturday 

October 1 Saturday 

October 3 Monday 
October 3 Monday 
November 7-11 

November 10 Thursday 



November 1 1 Friday 
November 12 -18 
November 14 Monday 
November 14-15 Mon. & Tues. 
November 17-18 Thurs. & Fri. 
November 18 Friday 
November 24 - 25 Thurs. & Fri. 
Nov. 28 - Jan. 4 
Dec. 19 -21; 27 -29; Jan. 3-4 
December 7 Wednesday 
December 8 - 9 Thurs. & Fri. 
December 13 Tuesday 
December 19 Monday 
December 23 - 26 Fri. - Mon. 
December 30 -2 Fri. - Mon. 
January 4 Wednesday 



January 4 Wednesday 

January 5 -6 Thurs. & Fri. 

January 6 Friday 
January 6 Friday 

January 6 -8 Fri. - Sun. 
January 9 Monday 
January 16 Monday 
January 17 Tuesday 



January 20 Friday 
January 23 Monday 
January 25 Wednesday 



February 8 Wednesday 



Last day for international undergraduate students to submit applications. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to apply for readmission to the University. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to submit all supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores. 

Last day for undergraduate students to submit applications with supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores, if applicable. 

Last day to submit Readmission applications for priority consideration to the University. 

First day to apply for Spring 2006 term graduation. 

Registration Information and Access Codes available to all returning undergraduate 

students and all graduate students for Spring 2006 term. 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Spring 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning 

to graduate in Fall 2006). 

Veterans' Day Holiday (University Closed). 

Official Registration (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Thanksgiving Holiday (University Closed). Continuous Web & Kiosk Registration. 

Open Registration All Students. Continuous Web & Kiosk Registration. 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus - also includes an evening orientation). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Winter Break (University Closed). 

New Year's Break (University Closed). 

Last day for returning students to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of 

enrollment. 

Last day for returning students to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration 

fee. 

Last day (by 7:00 pm) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus - Early Housing Check-In available Jan. 3 

from 9 am - 5 pm).* 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus - Early Housing Check-In available Jan. 4 

from 9 am - 5 pm).* 

International Student Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Last day (by 5 pm) for new students who participated in Freshman Orientation January 5 and 

Transfer Orientation January 4 to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

Official Housing Check-In 9 am - 6 pm. 

Classes Begin. 

Martin Luther King Holiday (University Closed). 

Last day to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 

liability. 

Financial Aid Applications available for 2006-2007. 

Last day to register for the CLAST exam on February 18. 

Undergraduate Studies Advising for Summer 2005/Fall 2006 terms begins. 

Last day (by 5 pm) to apply for Spring 2006 term graduation. 

Last day for International Students to submit applications for Summer term admission. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students 



Academic Calendar 7 



February 18 Saturday 
March 9 Thursday 



March 13 Monday 

March 1 7 Friday 

March 17 Friday 

March 20 -25 
March 30 Thursday 
April 20 Thursday 
April 20 Thursday 

April 21 - 22 Fri. & Sat. 
April 24 - 29 
April 24 - May 3 
April 30 - May 3 
May 1 & 2 Mon. & Tues. 
May 3 Wednesday 
May 4 Thursday 
May 21 Sunday 



planning to graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Summer 2007). 

CLAST Exam. 

Last day to submit FORM D5: Preliminary Approval of Dissertation and Request for Oral 

Defense. 

Last day to submit FORM M3: Preliminary Approval of Thesis and Request for Oral Defense. 

Last day to drop a course with a OR grade. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning to 

graduate in Spring 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2006). 

Deadline for faculty to review class rosters to ensure accuracy before grade rosters 

are created. 

Spring Break. 

Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

Classes end. 

Last day to submit final copies of dissertation and FORM D7: Final Approval of Dissertation. 

Last day to submit final copies of thesis and FORM M5: Final Approval of Thesis. 

Exam Study Days (No exams given on these days).** 

Official Examination Period. 

Grade rosters available to faculty for grade entry and submission. 

Grades posted nightly for students to view. 

Commencement Exercises. 

Deadline (by 1 1 : 59 pm) for faculty to submit grades. 

Complete grade report available to students by web and at kiosks. 

College of Law Commencement. 



May 8 -August 12 






May 8 - June 22 

February 1 Wednesday 

February 8 Wednesday 



February 13 Monday 
March 1 Wednesday 

March 1 Wednesday 

March 1 Wednesday 
March 1 7 Friday 



April 3 - 7 

April 8 - 19 

April 10 Monday 

April 20 - May 5 

April 28 - May 5 



Last day for international undergraduate students to submit applications. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to apply for readmission to the university. 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Summer 2007). 

First day to apply for Summer 2006 term graduation. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to submit all supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores. 

Last day for undergraduate students to submit applications with supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores, if applicable. 

Last day to submit Readmission applications for priority consideration to the University. 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning 

to graduate in Spring 2007). 

Registration Information and Access Codes available to all returning undergraduate 

students and all graduate students for Summer 2006 term. 

Official Registration (Degree Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

Transfer Orientation -University Park (including an evening orientation session at Univ. 

Park campus) and Biscayne Bay Campus. 

Open Registration All Students. Continuous Web & Kiosk Registration. 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 



8 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



May 3 Wednesday 
May 5 Friday 



May 5 Friday 



May 5 - 7 Fri. - Sun. 
May 8 Monday 
May 15 Monday 



May 19 Friday 

May 24 Wednesday 
May 29 Monday 
June 3 Saturday 
June 5 Monday 



June 7 Wednesday 



June 12 Monday 

June 19 - 26 
June 22 Thursday 
June 23 - 26 
June 26 Monday 
June 27 Tuesday 
June 30 Friday 



July 14 Friday 



July 21 Friday 
August 1 1 Friday 



Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Last day to pay tuition and fees for all Summer courses to avoid cancellation; this 

includes Summer B courses. 

Last day to register without incurring $100.00 late registration fee. 

Last day (by 5:00 pm) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

Last day to register for the CLAST exam on June 3. 

International Student Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Official Housing Check-In 9 am to 6 pm for Summer Term A. 

Classes begin. 

Last day to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 

liability. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

Last day to apply for Summer 2006 graduation term. 

Memorial Day Holiday (University Closed). 

CLAST exam. 

Last day to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

Undergraduate Studies Advising for Summer B 2005/Fall 2006 terms resumes. 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students planning 

to graduate in Spring 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2007). 

Deadline for faculty to review class rosters to ensure accuracy before grade rosters 

are created. 

Grade rosters available to faculty for grade entry and submission. 

Classes end. *** 

Grades posted nightly for students to view. 

Deadline (by 1 1 :59 pm) for faculty to submit grades. 

Complete grade report available to students by web and kiosks. 

Last day to submit FORM D5: Preliminary Approval of Dissertation and Request for 

Oral Defense. 

Last day to submit FORM M3: Preliminary Approval of Thesis and Request for Oral 

Defense. 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning 

to graduate in Summer 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

Last day to submit final copies of thesis and FORM M5: Final Approval of Thesis. 



June 28 - August 12 

February 8 Wednesday 



March 1 7 Friday 



June 5 Monday 

June 5 - 6 Mon. & Tues. 

June 7 Wednesday 



June 8 - 9 Thurs. & Fri. 



Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D1: Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Summer 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning 

to graduate in Spring 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM M2 Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2006). 

Summer Term B registration resumes. 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Last day to submit FORM M1: Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students planning 

to graduate in Spring 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM D1: Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2007). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 



Academic Calendar 9 



June 12-13 Mon. & Tues. 
June 15- 16Thurs. & Fri. 
June 19 -20 Mon. & Tues. 
June 21 Wednesday 
June 22 - 23 Thurs. & Fri. 
June 26 & 27 Mon. & Tues. 

June 27 Tuesday 
June 27 Tuesday 



June 28 Wednesday 

June 30 Friday 



July 4 Tuesday 
July 5 Wednesday 



July 12 Wednesday 

July 14 Friday 



July 21 Friday 
July 25 Tuesday 

July 31 Monday 

August 7-16 

August 1 1 Friday 

August 12 Saturday 
August 13-16 
August 16 Wednesday 
August 17 Thursday 



Freshman Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Freshman Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Official Housing Check-In 9 am to 6 pm for Summer Term B. 

International Student Orientation (University Park & Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Last day to pay tuition and fees for all enrolled courses to avoid cancellation of 

enrollment. 

Last day to register without incurring $100.00 late registration fee. 

Classes begin. 

Last day to submit FORM D5: Preliminary Approval of Dissertation and Request for Oral 

Defense. 

Last day to submit FORM M3: Preliminary Approval of Thesis and Request for Oral Defense. 

Independence Day (University Closed). 

Drop/Add Period ends. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day to complete late registration. 

Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring a financial 

liability. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

Last day to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

Deadline for faculty to review class rosters to ensure accuracy before grade rosters 

are created. 

Grade rosters available to faculty for grade entry and submission. 

Last day to submit final copies of dissertation and FORM D7: Final Approval of Dissertation. 

Last day to submit final copies of thesis and FORM M5: Final Approval of Thesis. 

Classes end. 

Grades posted nightly for students to view. 

Deadline (by 11:59 pm) for faculty to submit grades. 

Complete grade report available to students by web and kiosks. 



May 8 -August 12 
February 1 Wednesday 

February 8 Wednesday 



February 13 Monday 
March 1 Wednesday 

March 1 Wednesday 

March 1 Wednesday 
March 17 Friday 



Last day for international undergraduate students to submit applications. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to apply for readmission to the University. 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D1 : Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Summer 2007). 

First day to apply for Summer 2006 term graduation. 

Last day for international undergraduate students to submit all supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores. 

Last day for undergraduate students to submit applications with supporting academic 

credentials and appropriate test scores, if applicable. 

Last day to submit Readmission applications for prio'.ty consideration to the University. 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2006). 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning 

to graduate in Spring 2007). 



April 3 - 7 
April 8 -19 



Registration Information and Access Codes available to all returning undergraduate 

students and all graduate students for Summer 2006 term. 

Official Registration (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 



10 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



April 10 Monday 

April 20 -May 5 

April 28 - May 5 
May 3 Wednesday 
May 5 



May 5 Friday 

May 5 Friday 
May 5 - 7 Fri.- Sun. 
May 8 Monday 

May 15 Monday 



May 24 Wednesday 
May 29 Monday 
June 2 Friday 
June 3 Saturday 
June 7 Wednesday 



June 30 Friday' 



July 4 Tuesday 
July 5 Wednesday 

July 14 Friday 



July 21 Friday 
July 31 Monday 

August 11 Friday 

August 7-16 
August 12 Saturday 
August 13-16 
August 16 Wednesday 
August 17Thursday 
August 28 Monday 



Transfer Orientation -University Park (including an evening session at Univ. Park campus) 

and Biscayne Bay Campus. 

Open Registration All Students. Continuous Web & Kiosk Registration. 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

Transfer Orientation (University Park Campus). 

Last day to pay tuition and fees for all enrolled Summer courses to avoid cancellation; 

this includes Summer B courses. 

Last day to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 

Last day (by 5 pm) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

International Student Orientation (University Park/Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Transfer Orientation (Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Last day to register for the CLAST exam June 3. 

Official Housing Check-In 9 am to 6 pm for Summer Term C. 

Classes begin. 

Undergraduate Studies Advising for Fall 2006 term resumes. 

Last day to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day to drop courses or withdraw from the University without 

incurring a financial liability. 

Last day to apply for Summer 2006 term graduation. 

Memorial Day Holiday (University Closed). 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

CLAST exam. 

Last day to submit FORM M1 : Appointment of Thesis Committee (master's students 

planning to graduate in Spring 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM D1: Appointment of Dissertation Committee (doctoral students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM D5: Preliminary Approval of Dissertation and Request for Oral 

Defense. 

Last day to submit FORM M3: Preliminary Approval of Thesis and Request for Oral Defense. 

Independence Day (University Closed). 

Last day to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day to withdraw from the University with a Wl grade. 

Last day to submit FORM D3: Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (doctoral students planning to 

graduate in Summer 2007). 

Last day to submit FORM M2: Master's Thesis Proposal (master's students planning to 

graduate in Fall 2006). 

Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

Deadline for faculty to review class rosters to ensure accuracy before grade rosters 

are created. 

Last day to submit final copies of dissertation and FORM D7: Final Approval of Dissertation. 

Last day to submit final copies of thesis and FORM M5: Final Approval of Thesis. 

Grades rosters available to faculty for grade entry and submission. 

Classes end. 

Grades posted nightly for students to view. 

Deadline (by 11:59 pm) for faculty to submit grades. 

Complete grade report available to students by web and kiosks. 

Fall 2006 semester classes begin. 



* Early Housing Check-in is available ONLY for residents registered for these Orientations and who live outside Dade and 

Broward Counties. Early Housing Check-in is subject to a daily fee charge. 
** Labs, clinical placements, internships, Friday only and Saturday only classes are exempt from Exam Study Days. 
*** Grades will be posted on transcripts. However, graduation will not be processed until the end of the Complete Summer Term. 

Calendar dates are subject to change. Please contact appropriate offices for verification and updates. University Graduate School 

deadlines are available at www.fiu.edu/uqs . This calendar includes official University holidays. Faculty are encouraged to make 

accommodations for students who wish to observe religious holidays. For a listing of religious holidays you may visit 

http://www.interfaithcalendar.org. 

Students should make their requests known at the beginning of the semester. 



University Information 11 



University Information 

FLORIDA BOARD OF EDUCATION 

John Winn Commissioner of Education 

F. Philip Handy 



Chair 



Donna Callaway 
T. Willard Fair 
Julia L. Johnson 
Roberto Martinez 
Phoebe Raulerson 
Linda Taylor 

FLORIDA BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



Carolyn K. Roberts 

John Dasburg 

Rene Albors 

Akshay Desai 

Ann W. Duncan 

J. Stanley Marshall 

William "Bill" McCollum 

Sheila M. McDevitt 

Gerri Moll 

Lynn Pappas 

Ava L. Parker 

Peter S. Rummell 

Chris Schoonover 

John W. Temple 

John Winn 

H. Dreamal I. Worthen 

Zachariah P. Zachariah, M.D. 

FIU BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

David R. Parker 
Betsy S. Atkins 
Albert E. Dotson, Sr. 
Patricia Frost 
Bruce Hauptli 
R. Kirk Landon 
Miriam Lopez 
Sergio Pino 
Alex Prado 
Claudia Puig 
Rosa Sugranes 
Herbert Wertheim 

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 



Chair 
Vice Chair 



Student Governor 
Commissioner 



Chair 



Modesto A. Maidique 
Mark B. Rosenberg 

George E. Dambach 
Rosa L. Jones 

Howard R. Lipman 
John P. McGowan 



President 

Provost and Executive Vice 

President, Academic Affairs 

Vice President, Research 

Vice President, Student Affairs and 

Undergraduate Education 

Vice President, Advancement 

Vice President, 

Information Technology and Chief Information Officer 

Cristina Mendoza General Counsel 

Marcos Perez Vice President, Administration 

Vivian Sanchez Interim Vice President, Business and 

Finance, and Human Resources, and Chief Financial 

Officer 

Steve Sauls Vice President, Governmental 

Relations and Chief of Staff 



Vice President, Enrollment 

Management 

Executive Dean, College of Health 

& Urban Affairs 

Dean, College of Education 

Dean, School of Architecture 

Executive Dean, College of 

Business Administration 

Dean, Honors College 

Dean, School of 



Corinne M. Webb 

Ronald M. Berkman 

Linda P. Blanton 
Juan A. Bueno 
Joyce J. Elam 

Ivelaw L. Griffith 
Lillian L. Kopenhaver 

Journalism and Mass Communication 
Vishwanath Prasad Dean, College of Engineering 

Leonard P. Strickman Dean, College of Law 



Mark Szuchman 



Douglas Wartzok 
Joseph J. West 



Interim Dean, College of Arts 

and Sciences 

Vice Provost, Academic Affairs and 

Dean, University Graduate School 

Dean, School of Hospitality and 

Tourism Management 



University Mission 

Florida International University is an urban, multi-campus, 
research university serving southeast Florida, the state, 
the nation, and the international community. Our mission 
is to impart knowledge through excellent teaching, 
promote public service, discover new knowledge, solve 
problems through research, and foster creativity. 

UNIVERSITY VALUES STATEMENT 

As an institution of higher learning, Florida International 
University is committed to: 

• Freedom of thought and expression 

• Excellence in teaching and in the pursuit, generation, 
dissemination, and application of knowledge 

• Respect for the dignity of the individual 

• Respect for the environment 

• Honesty, integrity and truth 

• Diversity 

• Strategic, operational, and service excellence 

THE UNIVERSITY 

Florida International University - Miami's public research 
university - is one of America's most dynamic institutions 
of higher learning. Since opening in 1972, FIU has 
achieved many benchmarks of excellence that have taken 
other universities more than a century to reach. FIU, a 
member institution of the State University System of 
Florida, was established by the Florida Legislature in 
1965. Classes began in September 1972, with 5,667 
students enrolled in upper division and graduate programs 
- the largest opening day enrollment in the history of 
American higher education. In 1984, FIU received 
authority to begin offering degree programs at the doctoral 
level, and in 1994, the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching classified FIU as a Doctoral I 
University. This classification was changed in 2000, when 
FIU became a Doctoral/Research University - Extensive, 
the highest ranking in the Carnegie Foundation prestigious 
classification system. 

Modesto A. (Mitch) Maidique is FlU's fourth president. 
Appointed in 1986, the former Harvard Business School 



12 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



professor and high-tech entrepreneur received his Ph.D. in 
Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and was associated with MIT, Harvard, and 
Stanford for 20 years. President Maidique has built on the 
sound foundation laid by his predecessors - Charles E. 
Perry, FlU's first president, appointed in July 1969; Harold 
B. Crosby, who succeeded in June 1976; and Gregory B. 
Wolfe, named the third president in February 1979. 

FIU has nationally and internationally renowned faculty 
known for their outstanding teaching and cutting-edge 
research; students from throughout the U.S. and more 
than 130 foreign countries; and alumni who have risen to 
prominence in every field and are a testament to the 
University's academic excellence. The University is a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest and most 
distinguished academic honor society. Florida 
International University offers more than 190 
baccalaureate, master's and doctoral degree programs in 
19 colleges and schools: School of Architecture; College 
of Arts and Sciences (School of Computer Science, 
School of Music); College of Business Administration 
(School of Accounting, Chapman Graduate School); 
College of Education; College of Engineering; College of 
Health and Urban Affairs (School of Health Sciences, 
School of Nursing, School of Social Work, Policy and 
Management, and Stempel School of Public Health); 
Honors College; School of Journalism and Mass 
Communication; School of Hospitality and Tourism 
Management; College of Law; and the University 
Graduate School. 

FIU has more than 35,000 students, 1,100 full-time 
faculty, and 110,000 alumni, making it the largest 
university in South Florida and placing it among the 
nation's largest colleges and universities. The University 
has two campuses - University Park in western Miami- 
Dade County and the Biscayne Bay Campus in northeast 
Miami-Dade County - and an educational facility at the 
Pines Educational Center in nearby Broward County. 
Additionally, numerous programs are offered at off- 
campus locations and online. U.S. News & World Report 
has ranked FIU among the top 100 public national 
universities in its annual survey of "America's Best 
Colleges." FIU has been recognized as one of the top 10 
public commuter universities in the nation by Money. 
Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine ranked FIU as the 
country's 18th best value in public higher education. 

Research is a major component of our mission. The 
purpose of the Office of Sponsored Research 
Administration is to improve the quality of life in our region, 
the state and the larger international community through 
research. We are particularly interested in environmental 
quality, energy, health, water quality, sustainable 
communities, economic development, security and safety. 
Multidisciplinary teams, information technology and 
international culture are major themes in our research. 

FIU is one of the nation's major research universities 
and we expend approximately $100 million annually on 
research. Our research is funded by more than 200 public 
and private organizations, and in terms of dollar value, our 
largest sponsor is the Federal Government with funding 
from 41 different Federal agencies. The University has 
many specialized research facilities including a new nano 
scale research and fabrication laboratory. We also 
conduct many studies "off site" throughout the United 
States and the world. Undergraduate and graduate 



students participate actively in all of our research 
endeavors. FIU exports its discoveries for public benefit 
through publications, formal technology transfer 
agreements, public testimony and evidence-based 
advocacy. 

UNIVERSITY PARK 

The University Park Campus is a 344 acre site on the 
western edge of Miami, the center of a metropolitan area 
of almost four million people. Apartment-style residence 
halls, the PharMed Arena, a nationally certified 
environmental preserve, and athletic facilities all contribute 
to a pleasant collegiate atmosphere on the University 
Park, which is also Florida International University's (FIU) 
largest campus. FlU's University Park (UP) has an 
impressive campus architecture, lush tropical landscaping, 
the Martin Z. Margulies Sculpture Park, recognized 
nationally as one of the world's most important collections 
of sculpture and the largest on a university campus, and 
an eight-story, $30 million library. There is also a state-of- 
the-art performing arts center, a new fitness center, an 
expanded university center, a 4,500 seat PharMed Arena 
and a 17,500 seat football stadium. University Park also 
has laboratories, auditoriums, music and art studios, an art 
museum, an international conference theater, an 
experimental theater and many student organizations 
including the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society. 
There is a wide variety of clubs on campus to meet the 
professional, service, athletic, social, and cultural needs of 
the FIU community. 

The Green Library at University Park is the largest in 
South Florida. FlU's libraries contain more than 1.5 million 
bound volumes, and more than 9,000 journal 
subscriptions, including over 2,000 journals in electronic 
full text, which are complemented by substantial holdings 
of federal, state, local, and international documents, 
periodical subscriptions in excess of 10,300, maps, 
microforms, institutional archives, and curriculum 
materials. In addition to its own holdings, the library has 
the resources to locate and access holdings at other major 
universities throughout the state and country. Its on-line 
computer catalog WebLuis (Library User Information 
Service) provides information on the collections of all 
libraries in the State University of Florida. 

Recent additions to University Park include University 
House; the Paul L. Cejas School of Architecture building 
designed by Bernard Tschumi; a 221,000 square-foot 
Health and Life Sciences complex (HLS I & II); a Health & 
Wellness Center; a 50,000 square-foot Recreation Center; 
an 83,000 square-foot Management and Advancement 
Research Center (MARC); and two parking garages with 
over 2,000 additional parking spaces. The Graham 
Center, currently approximately 270,000 square feet, 
includes an expanded Barnes & Noble bookstore with a 
cafe and new Campus Life offices in the second floor 
addition. Plans include the addition of a new food court 
and shops. 

Residence halls at University Park include Panther Hall, 
Everglades Hall, University Park Towers, and the 
University Apartments. Housing staff assist students in 
selecting accommodations to meet their particular needs. 
Housing for married students is available on a limited 
basis. Graduate housing is also limited and applications 
should be submitted a? early as possible. 



University Information 13 




UNIVERSITY PARK 



14 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 

The Biscayne Bay Campus of Florida International 
University is located on 200 acres on the waterfront of 
Biscayne Bay and has an enrollment in excess of 8000 
students. The campus is headquarters for academic 
programs in Hospitality and Tourism Management, 
Journalism and Mass Communication, Marine Biology and 
Creative Writing. Select programs in Arts and Sciences, 
Business Administration, Education, and Health and 
Urban Affairs are also offered (for specific degree 
programs please refer to Academic Programs in this 
catalog). 

The Biscayne Bay Campus is also the hub of Continuing 
and Professional Studies (CAPS). It serves as host for the 
Lifelong Learning Institute, the HRS-Children and Families 
Professional Development Center, the International Media 
Center, the Institute for Public Opinion Research, Center 
on Aging, and the Roz and Cal Kovens Conference 



Center. The Kovens Conference Center is a state-of-the- 
art conference facility located on Biscayne Bay. 

Apartment-style residential housing on the Biscayne 
Bay Campus accommodates 276 students. Student life is 
enhanced through the provision of programs and services 
offered in the Wolfe University Center through Student 
Affairs, which is the focal point of social and cultural 
activity outside of the classroom. The campus also 
provides a Health and Wellness Center. An active, award- 
winning Science Club serves the interest of research- 
oriented undergraduates. 

The campus is administered by the Office of the Vice 
Provost for Biscayne Bay Campus. This office includes 
representatives from the Divisions of Academic Affairs, 
Business and Finance, Student Affairs, Human 
Resources, University Advancement, and the Biscayne 
Bay Society. 




BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 



University Information 15 



BROWARD PINES CENTER 

Florida International University has brought higher 
education closer to home for thousands of South Broward 
residents through its Pines Center at the Academic Village 
in Pembroke Pines. Classes are held in a state-of-the-art 
90,000 square foot facility that includes spacious 
classrooms, computer labs, case study rooms, a student 
lounge and a 450-seat auditorium. FIU Broward Pines 
Center shares the Academic Village with Broward 
Community College, the City of Pembroke Pines Charter 
High School and Southwest Regional Library. 

Currently, select programs at the bachelor's, master's 
and doctoral level are being offered by the College of Arts 
and Sciences, College of Business Administration, College 
of Education, College of Engineering, and the College of 
Health and Urban Affairs. For specific degree programs, 
or contact us directly at 954-438-8600. 



please refer to the Broward Pines Center link on the 
University home page, as well as the relevant pages in this 
catalog. In addition to degree-seeking programs, the 
English Language Institute and Continuing and Professional 
Studies offer non-credit courses. 

Students attending the Pines Center benefit from state- 
of-the-art computer labs and access to the resources of 
both the FIU libraries (including University Park and 
Biscayne Bay campuses) and the Broward County 
Southwest Regional Library. The Broward Student 
Government Association sponsors social and cultural 
events that provide students with opportunities to enhance 
their experiences outside of the classroom. 

For additional information on the Broward Pines Center 
visit http://broward.fiu.edu . 




BROWARD PINES CENTER 



16 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Accreditations 



All academic programs of Florida International University are approved by the Florida Board of Education, the FIU Board of 
Trustees and the Florida Board of Governors. The University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; telephone number 404-679-4501) 
to award the baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral degrees. SACS reaffirmed FlU's accreditation on December 5, 2000. 
Degree programs at FIU are accredited or approved by the appropriate specialized accreditation agency, or are pursuing full 
accreditation or approval. To obtain information about the specialized accreditation agencies, their criteria and review process, 
contact the Chairperson/Director of the respective degree program. The professional accrediting agencies and the respective 
FIU degree programs are listed in alphabetical order below. 



Accounting 

Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 

(AACSB) International 
Anesthesiology Nursing 

Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia 

Educational Programs (COA) 
Architecture 

National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) 
Art and Art History 

National Association of Schools of Art and Design 

(NASAD) 
Art Museum 

American Association of Museums 
Business 

Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 

(AACSB) International 
Chemistry 

American Chemical Society (ACS) (Certified) 
Computer Science 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
Construction Management 

American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) 
Counselor Education: Community Mental Health 
Counseling 

Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 

Educational Programs (CACREP) 
Counselor Education: School Counseling 

Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 

Educational Programs (CACREP) 
Dietetics and Nutrition 

Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education 

(CADE) 
Education 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 

(NCATE) 
Engineering 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 

(ABET) 
Forensic Science 

American Academy of Forensic Sciences 



Health Information Systems 

American Health Information Management Association 
(AHIMA) 

Health Services Administration 

Accrediting Commission on Education for Health 

Services Administration (ACEHSA) 
Journalism and Mass Communication 

Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and 

Mass Communications (ACEJMC) 
Landscape Architecture 

Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) 
Law (Provisional) 

American Bar Association (ABA) 
Music 

National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) 
Nursing 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission 

(NLNAC) 
Occupational Therapy 

Accrediting Council for Occupational Therapy Education 

(ACOTE) 
Parks and Recreation 

National Recreation and Parks Association/American 

Association for Leisure and Recreation (NRPA/AALR) 
Physical Therapy 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy 

Education (CAPTE) 
Public Administration 

National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and 

Administration (NASPAA) 

Public Health 

Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) 
Social Work 

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) 
Speech Language Pathology 

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association 

(ASHA) 
Theatre 

National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) 



Academic Programs 17 



Academic Programs 



university park Programs 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN: 

Architecture 
BACHELOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN: 

Art History 

Asian Studies 

Chemistry 

Dance 

Earth Sciences 

Economics 

English 

Environmental Studies 

French 

Geography 

History 

Humanities 

Information Technology 

International Relations 

Liberal Studies 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Spanish 

Theatre 

Women's Studies 
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN: 

Art 

Theatre 
BACHELOR OF MUSIC 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Biological Science 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Environmental Studies 

Geosciences 

Information Technology 

Marine Biology 

Mathematics 

Mathematical Sciences 

Music Education 

Physics 

Statistics 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
BACHELOR OF ACCOUNTING 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH 
MAJORS IN: 

Finance 

Human Resource Management 

International Business 

Management 

Management (Entrepreneurship Track) 

Management (Business Environment Track) 

Management Information Systems 

Marketing 

Personnel Management 

Real Estate 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Art Education 

Biology Education 

Chemistry Education 

Early Childhood Education/ESOL 

Elementary Education/ESOL 

English Education 

Exercise and Sports Sciences 

Mathematics Education 

Modern Languages Education (majors 

in French and Spanish) 
Parks and Recreation Management 

(with specializations in Leisure 

Service Management, Parks 

Management, and Recreational 

Therapy) 
Physical Education 
Physics Education 
Social Studies Education 
Special Education/ESOL 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Biomedical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Computer Engineering 

Construction Management 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND URBAN 

AFFAIRS 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Criminal Justice 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

Health Information Management 

Health Sciences: Occupational Therapy Track 

Health Sciences: Pre-Physical Therapy Track 

Health Services Administration 

Nursing 

Social Work 

Public Administration 



18 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 

MANAGEMENT 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Hospitality Management 

Travel and Tourism Management 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS 

COMMUNICATION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Communication 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN: 

Art History 

English 

Humanities 

History 

International Relations 

Liberal Studies 

Psychology 

Sociology/Anthropology 
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN: 

Art 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Marine Biology 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH A 
MAJOR IN: 

Marketing 
Accounting 
Information Systems 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND URBAN 
AFFAIRS 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Nursing 

SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 

MANAGEMENT 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Hospitality Management 

Travel and Tourism Management 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS 

COMMUNICATION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Communication 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION WITH 
MAJOR IN: 

Management 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Early Childhood Education (Child 

Development Track) 
Courses for Teacher Education 
Courses in Vocational Education 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Construction Management 
Engineering Core 

Minors 

A minor program is an arrangement of courses enabling a 
student to develop a degree of expertise and knowledge in 
an area of study in addition to his or her major academic 
program of study. To receive a minor, a student must also 
complete the requirements for a baccalaureate degree 
from the University. A minor is not interdisciplinary. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Art 

Art History 

Asian Studies 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Dance 

Economics 

English 

Environmental Studies 

French Language and Culture 

General Translation Studies 

Geology 

Geography 

History 

Humanities 

International Relations 

Mathematical Sciences 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Spanish Language and Culture 

Statistics 

Theatre 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN: 

Liberal Studies 



Academic Programs 19 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(for non-Business majors only) 
Business 

Entrepreneurship 
Marketing 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Education 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Biomedical Engineering 
Construction Management 
Energy Systems 
Engineering Science 
Mechanical Design 
Robotics and Mechatronics 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND URBAN 
AFFAIRS 

Criminal Justice 

Health Services Administration 

Nutrition 

Public Administration 

Social Welfare 

SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 
MANAGEMENT 

Hospitality Studies 
Hotel/Lodging Management 
Restaurant/Food Service Management 
Travel and Tourism Management 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS 
COMMUNICATION 

Advertising 

Journalism 

Mass Communication 

Public Relations 

Television 

CERTIFICATES 

Certificate Programs are structured combinations of 
courses with a common base of interest from one or more 
disciplines into an area of concentration. Successful 
completion of a Certificate Program is entered on the 
student's transcript and records. Two types of certificates 
are awarded: 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE 

Awarded by an academic unit to a student at the time of 
awarding a bachelor's degree; or upon completion of the 
appropriate coursework to a student who already has a 
bachelor's degree. 

An academic certificate shall not be awarded to a 
student who does not possess either a bachelor's degree 
or does not complete a bachelor's degree program. An 



academic certificate is to be interdisciplinary in nature, to 
the greatest extent possible. 

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

Awarded by an academic unit to an individual who 
completes the appropriate coursework in the area of 
concentration. The professional certificate does not need 
to be interdisciplinary or associated with a degree 
program. 

For details and course requirements, refer to the 
appropriate section in each College or School. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATES IN: 

History and Theory of Architecture 
Landscape Architecture 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATES IN: 

Actuarial Studies 

African-New World Studies 

African Studies 

American Studies 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilization 

Asian Studies 

Asian Globalization and Latin American Studies 

Chinese Studies 

Comparative Immunology 

Cuban and Cuban American Studies 

Environmental Studies 

Ethnic Studies 

European Studies 

Film Studies 

Forensic Science 

Gerontological Studies 

Japanese Studies 

Judaic Studies 

Labor Studies 

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 

Law, Ethics and Society 

Linguistic Studies 

Pre-Modern Cultures 

Public Policy Studies 

Women's Studies 

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES IN: 

Legal Translation and Court Interpreting 
Portuguese Translation Studies 
Portuguese Interpretation Studies 
Professional Language 
Translation Studies 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

ACADEMIC CERTIFICATE IN: 

Banking 

International Bank Management 

Retail Management 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE IN: 

Labor Studies and Labor Relations 
Recreation Management 



20 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE IN: 

Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Design 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND URBAN 

AFFAIRS 

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES IN: 

Child Welfare Services 
Health Information Coding 
Professional Leadership Studies 
Urban Affairs 

SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM 

MANAGEMENT 

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES IN: 

Hospitality Administration 
Hospitality Studies 
Hotel/Lodging Management 
Restaurant/Foodservice Management 
Travel and Tourism Administration 
Travel and Tourism Management 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS 

COMMUNICATION 

PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES IN: 

Integrated Communications: Advertising and Public 

Relations 
Mass Communication 
Media Management 
Spanish Language Journalism 
Student Media Advising 

Evening and Weekend Degree 
Programs 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN: 

English 

Liberal Studies 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Spanish 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Computer Science 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WITH MAJOR IN: 

Management 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND URBAN 
AFFAIRS 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Criminal Justice 
Public Administration 
Nursing (RN-BSN fully online) 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Computer Engineering 
Construction Management 
Electrical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY AND 
TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Hospitality Management 

Travel and Tourism Management 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS 
COMMUNICATION 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN: 

Communication 

For additional information, please contact the appropriate 
college or school. 

Some degrees are offered fully online. For more specific 
information, please visit the program of interest at 

www.fiu.edu. 



Undergraduate Studies 21 



Undergraduate Studies 

ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER 

Florida International University is committed to helping 
students achieve their academic and personal goals 
through quality academic advising. Using a holistic 
approach to the student's development, advising services 
provide students with information, guidance, and access to 
a network of campus resources in order to obtain 
maximum benefit from their educational experience. 
Students develop autonomy and decision-making skills, 
and are expected to assume increasing responsibility for 
seeking accurate and authoritative information and using it 
appropriately to make sound academic and life decisions. 
Service delivery is multi-faceted, combining educational 
and personal support to meet the assorted needs of 
diverse students. 

Academic advising of students with fewer than 30 
semester hours of earned credit is the responsibility of the 
Academic Advising Center in Undergraduate Studies. 
When admitted to the University, the student will meet with 
an advisor who will help plan the student's academic 
program. Freshmen are required to see an advisor for at 
least two terms after which continued advising is 
dependent on their academic performance. Freshmen in 
good standing are encouraged to continue seeing an 
advisor. At the completion of 30 semester hours of earned 
credits, the student can choose an intended major, and 
after 60 semester hours, a student should officially declare 
a major. Students with intended or declared majors will be 
advised by faculty members or professional advisors in 
their major department. 

Academic information is available in PC 249, University 
Park, and ACI-180, Biscayne Bay Campus. 

ENGLISH AND MATH PLACEMENT 

Testing is available to students for placement into selected 
courses. Mandatory placement testing for college 
preparatory requirements is provided prior to Freshman 
Orientation and at other designated times during each 
semester. Students need to consult with an advisor in 
Undergraduate Studies regarding any questions about test 
requirements. 

UNIVERSITY TESTING CENTER 

The University Testing Center coordinates and 
administers the College-Level Academic Skills Test 
(CLAST), CAT-CLAST (CLAST on computer), College- 
Level Examination Program (CLEP), Nurse Entrance Test 
(NET) and the Florida College Entry-Level Placement Test 
(CPT) for freshmen. The Center also administers and 
provides information on other undergraduate and graduate 
admission tests, along with other professional and 
individualized distance learning examinations. Additional 
information is available on the test information line at (305) 
348-2441 or by visiting https://testing.fiu.edu. 

CLAST 

The College-Level Academic Skills Test is part of Florida's 
system of education accountability that satisfies the 
mandates of Section 229.551 (3)(i), Florida Statutes. The 



CLAST is an achievement test that measures students' 
attainment of the college-level communication and 
mathematics skills that were identified by the faculties of 
community colleges and state universities. 

Since August 1, 1984, students in public institutions in 
Florida have been required to pass the four sub-tests of 
the CLAST for the award of an Associate in Arts degree, 
for admission to upper-division status or no later than 
earning 96 credit hours. There are two exceptions to this 
rule: 1) anyone seeking an undergraduate degree from a 
Florida institution and who already has earned an 
accredited Bachelor's degree; 2) anyone awarded an 
Associate in Arts degree from a Florida institution before 
September 1, 1982, and admitted to upper-level status at 
a Florida institution before August 1, 1984, is not required 
to take the CLAST. 

FIU degree-seeking students may take the CLAST after 
earning a minimum of 18 credit hours. Regular 
administrations of the CLAST are scheduled on the first 
Saturday in October, first Saturday in June and the third 
Saturday in February. If you are taking the entire CLAST 
for the first time, you should register for the on-campus 
administration. The essay section of the CLAST is 
available only once each semester through the on-campus 
administration. 

The College-Level Academic Skills Test is also available 
as a computer assisted test, the CAT-CLAST, for the 
reading, English language skills and mathematics sub- 
tests. The CAT-CLAST is offered in the University Testing 
Center at various times during each semester. Online 
registration is available at https://testing.fiu.edu . 
Students who are not admitted and degree seeking at FIU 
must receive approval from their home institution prior to 
the scheduling of an appointment for the CAT-CLAST. 

The 1997 Legislature and the State Board of Education 
approved the following conditions under which any student 
may be exempt from the CLAST if the student fulfills one 
or more of the following requirements before completion of 
the undergraduate degree program. All exemptions are 
processed by the Registrar's Office. 

Alternative based on the SAT or EACT scores (or the 
equivalent scores on the original SAT, SAT I and ACT 
score scales). An SAT (beginning March 2005) score of 
500 on the Critical Reading section qualifies for an 
exemption for the essay, English language skills, and 
reading sub-tests; and a score of 500 on the Math section 
qualifies for an exemption for the Mathematics sub-test. 
An EACT score of 21 on the Mathematics section qualifies 
for an exemption for the Mathematics sub-test; a score of 
22 on the Reading section qualifies for an exemption for 
the reading sub-test; and a score of 21 on the English 
section qualifies for an exemption for the English language 
skills and essay sub-tests. 

Alternative based on the student's GPA. To exempt 
the English language skills, reading, and essay sections of 
the College-Level Academic Skills Test, the student must 
have earned a 2.5 grade point average in two courses for 
a minimum of six semester hours of credit from ENC 1 101, 
and ENC 1102 or other equivalent college-level English 
courses. 

To exempt the Mathematics section of the College-Level 
Academic Skills Test, the student must have earned a 2.5 
grade point average in two courses for a minimum of six 
semester hours of credit from: MAC 1105 or any other 
MAC course with the last three digits higher than 105; 



22 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



MGF 1106 or any other MGF course with the last three 
digits higher than 106; STA 1014 or any other STA course. 

CLEP, IB, and AP credits may be accepted for one of 
the required courses in the evaluation of CLAST 
exemptions. 

The State Board of Education and the Florida Statutes 
provide special consideration for students in public 
institutions who have a specific learning disability such 
that they cannot successfully complete one or more 
CLAST sub-tests. These students may appeal to an 
institutional committee for a waiver of the requirement to 
pass any applicable sub-test(s) of the CLAST. 

The State Board of Education and the Florida Statutes 
permit an institution president, under certain conditions, to 
grant a waiver from one or more of the CLAST sub-tests. 
A student who has taken any subtest of the CLAST at 
least four (4) times and has not earned a passing score 
may appeal for a waiver of that subtest. Before such a 
waiver may be approved by an institution president or 
designee, the waiver must first have been recommended 
by a majority vote of the institutional committee 
established to review waiver requests. 

UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER 

The University Learning Center is made up of academic 
assistance tutoring labs equipped to help students 
improve their academic skills and their performance in 
related courses. Included among these skills are reading, 
writing, English, mathematics, statistics, and training in 
learning/study skills. Special emphasis is given to those 
students who need or want assistance passing the 
College-Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) and other 
institutional or national tests. 



THE ACADEMY FOR THE ART OF 

TEACHING 

The Academy for the Art of Teaching is a part of 
Undergraduate Studies, and is dedicated to supporting 
and advancing the quality of classroom teaching at FIU. It 
serves both as a resource to the teaching community — 
faculty, adjuncts, and graduate teaching assistants — and a 
source for proactive programming focused on enhancing 
approaches, methodologies and practices of teaching. 

Through workshops, individual and departmental 
consultations, mini grants for research and development, 
and information dissemination, as well as collaborative 
programs with other FIU agencies such as the Library, 
Instructional Technology, and the Graduate Students 
Association, the Academy reaches out to all those who 
teach at FIU. Information and assistance can be obtained 
from the Director of the Academy at GL 120W or (305) 
348-4214/3907. 

STUDENT ATHLETE ACADEMIC 
CENTER 

The Student Athlete Academic Center provides a range of 
academic support services for student athletes — including 
advising, tutoring, and monitoring of academic progress. 
The Center is located west of the Golden Panther Arena, 
at the University Park Campus, and has hours of operation 
to meet the needs of the full-time student athlete. The 
Center is equipped with a computer laboratory, study 
carrels, and classrooms. It is staffed with advisors, tutors, 
and learning specialists. The unit works in conjunction with 
various university academic departments, as well as with 
other university support units to ensure the academic 
success of athletes. For information call (305) 348-6412. 



■& y < 



r '-•■■- -■ 



Undergraduate Studies 23 



UNIVERSITY CORE CURRICULUM 

Undergraduate education seeks to develop productive, 
creative, and responsible citizens who both shape society 
and lay the foundation for tomorrow. In addition to 
exploring areas of specialization, the university experience 
must provide a venue for investigating the origins and 
natures of cultures, ideas, and the physical universe and 
endow graduates with the ability to analyze critically, think 
sustainably, learn creatively, and express themselves 
clearly and cogently. Diversity and breadth of experience 
are essential characteristics of both education and 
success in our global community. 

The University Core Curriculum (UCC) provides the 
broad, well-defined curriculum that enables graduates to 
think critically, analytically, and creatively, with a passion 
to learn and with the skills and ability to assemble, assess, 
incorporate, and synthesize new knowledge and 
information; organize and clearly express their knowledge 
and ideas; and determine the importance and relevance of 
new ideas through a synthesis of both broad and narrow 
contexts and the integration of seemingly disparate pieces 
into a meaningful whole. 

The UCC rests upon the belief that a foundational 
curriculum, shared by students, fosters intellectual 
development and enhances personal, social, intellectual, 
and academic relations. Together with concentration in 
major fields of study, the UCC builds the base that makes 
future academic and professional excellence possible. 
First Year Experience {one, one-credit course required): 
The transition to a university environment is a unique one 
for first-time university students. FlU's orientation course 
is designed to facilitate this transition. The First-Year 
Experience course provides a forum for integrating the FIU 
experience and for discussing issues promoting 
intellectual, personal, academic, and social growth and 
success as a member of the University community. The 
course introduces students to University policies, 
procedures, and services; addresses academic and career 
choices; and enhances study and time-management skills. 
All students entering the University with fewer than 30 
semester hours are required to take this one-credit course. 
SLS 1501 First Year Experience 

English Composition {two, three-credit courses from 
either sequence required): A foundation in the critical 
analysis of issues and texts, both discursive and creative, 
and in argumentation and persuasion is essential in all 
university courses. English Composition provides this 
foundation by encouraging the mastery of written and oral 
communication models, including the essay and research 
paper. 

For students entering FIU with 30 or fewer credits and 
for all first-term-in-college students, ENC 1101, Freshman 
Composition and ENC 1102, Literary Analysis are 
required. 

For students entering FIU with more than 30 credits 
(who are not first-term-in-college students), ENC 2301, 
Expository Writing, and one of the following: ENC 3317, 
Writing Across the Curriculum; or ENC 3311, Advanced 
Writing and Research; or ENC 3211, Report and 
Technical Writing are acceptable. 

Humanities With Writing {two, three-credit courses 
required, one of which must be a historically-oriented 
course): 

In these courses students strengthen the critical reading 
and writing skills needed to succeed within the University 



and beyond. Students interact analytically with, and 
respond critically to, primary and secondary texts in the 
humanities and learn to integrate the ideas and words of 
others into their own writing. By writing informed essays, 
students develop the ability to present ideas logically and 
sequentially and to provide balanced exposition and 
critical examination of complex events, positions, 
arguments, or texts. 

In these courses students learn to use writing as a form 
of inquiry in reflecting critically upon central topics in the 
humanities, such as individual, moral, and social values; 
historical perspectives and events; culture and the arts; 
philosophy; and religious beliefs and practices. Students 
address themes centered on the traditions; shared values 
and myths; literary, artistic, historical, and philosophical 
traditions; and cultural standards and common values 
which underlie contemporary societies and their historical 
antecedents. 

ENG2012 Approaches to Literature 

*ARC 2701 History of Architecture 1 

REL 201 1 Religion: Analysis and Interpretation 

*POT 3013 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory 

*HUM 3306 History of Ideas 

*HUM 3214 Ancient Classical Culture and 

Civilization 
*LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization 

PHI 2600 Introduction to Ethics 

PHI 201 1 Philosophical Analysis 

*WOH 2001 World Civilization 

*EUH 2030 Western Civilization-Europe in the 

Modern Era 
*EUH 2021 Western Civilization Medieval to Modem 

Europe 
*EUH 201 1 Western Civilization-Early Europe 

*AMH 2002 Modern American Civilization 

*AMH 2000 Origins of American Civilization 

*PHH 2063 Classics in Philosophy: Introduction to 

the History of Philosophy 
(* indicates a course designated as being "historically 
oriented"). 

Quantitative Reasoning {two, three-credit courses 
required, at least one of which must be in mathematics): 

The requirement aims at preparing students to master 
concepts and ideas in logic, inductive and deductive 
reasoning, and abstract and quantitative thinking. 
Students will become proficient in the art of reasoning 
critically, solving problems, and analyzing data. 
*MAC2311 Calculus I 

*MAC2312 Calculus II 

*MAC 231 3 Multivariate Calculus 

*MAC 2233 Calculus for Business 

*MTG 1 993 Geometry for Education 

*MGF 1 107 The Mathematics of Social Choice and 

Decision Making 
*MGF 1 1 06 Finite Mathematics 

*MAC2147 Pre-Calculus 

*MAC 1 1 14 Trigonometry (there is overlap between 

MAC 2147 and MAC 1114, and both 

taken together do not fulfill the UCC 

requirement). 
STA 3145 Statistics for the Health Professions 

STA 31 1 1 Statistics I 

STA 2122 Introduction to Statistics I 

STA 2023 Statistics for Business and Economics 

COP 2250 Programming in Java 



24 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



COP 2210 Introduction to Programming 

PHI 2100 Introduction to Logic 

CGS2518 Data Analysis 

(* indicates a mathematics course). 

Social Inquiry (six credits, three credits in each of the two 

sub-categories below): 

In these courses students investigate social, political, and 

economic configurations; cultural and psychological 

features of human life; gender, race/ethnicity, and social 

class; consciousness and identity; social interactions with 

the natural environment; and local, national, and global 

aspects of the human world. 

Foundations of Social Inquiry (one, three-credit course): 

Students learn theories and methodologies that underlie 

these areas of study and enhance their research and 

analytic skills. 

SOP 3015 Social and Personality Development 

SOP 3004 Introductory Social Psychology 

SYG 3002 Basic Ideas of Sociology 

POS 2042 American Government 

INP 2002 Introductory Industrial/Organization 

Psychology 
DEP 2000 Human Growth and Development 

PSY 2020 Introductory Psychology 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics 

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 

SYG 2010 Social Problems 

SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 

ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 

WST 301 5 Introduction to Women's Studies 

GEO 2000 Introduction to Geography 

INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations 

AMH 3560 The History of Women in the U.S. 

INR 2002 Dynamics of World Politics 

POT 3302 Political Ideologies 

CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 

Societies & Identities (one, three-credit course): 
Students compare societies and cultures in local, national, 
or international contexts and in contemporary or historical 
perspective. 

AFA 2000 African Worlds 

EDF 3521 Education in History 

ECS 3021 Women, Culture, and Economic 

Development 
ECS 3003 Comparative Economic Systems 

SYP 3000 The Individual in Society 

SYD 381 Sociology of Gender 

ANT 3641 Myth, Ritual and Mysticism 

ANT 3451 Anthropology of Race and Ethnicity 

ANT 3212 World Ethnographies 

WST 3641 Gay and Lesbian in America 

COM 3461 Intercultural/lnterracial Communication 

REL 3302 Studies in World Religions 

EVR 1017 The Global Environment and Society 

LBS 3001 Introduction to Labor Studies 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 

INR 3081 Contemporary International Problems 

AFH 2000 African Civilizations 

CPO 3304 Politics of Latin America 

CPO 3103 Politics of Western Europe 

EGN 1033 Technology, Humans and Society 

Natural Science (two, three-credit courses, one in the life 
sciences and one in the physical sciences, and two 
corresponding one-credit labs): 



Our technologically dependent world requires an 
understanding of the processes that led us here. Learning 
the basic concepts and ideas of scientific fields provides 
contact with not just those fields but with how science is 
done. In these courses students study the scientific 
method through examination of the foundational theories 
of modem scientific thought. Students apply scientific 
principles and theories to problem solving, evaluate 
scientific statements, and incorporate new information 
within the context of what is already known. 

Emphasizing the essential connection between theory 
and experiment, the hands-on laboratory experience 
provides the context for testing scientific theories. 
Life Sciences: 

GLY1101 History of Life 

EVR 301 3 Ecology of South Florida 

OCB 2003 Introductory Marine Biology 

PCB 2099 Foundations of Human Physiology 

MCB 2000 Introductory Microbiology 

BSC 1 1 1 General Biology 1 1 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 

BSC 2023 Human Biology 

BOT 1010 Introductory Botany 

HUN 2000 Foundations of Nutrition Science 

Physical Sciences: 

PHY 1 020 Understanding the Physical World 

PHY 1037 Quarks, Superstrings, and Black Holes 

MET 2010 Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics 

PHY 2054 Physics Without Calculus 1 1 

AST 2004 Stellar Astronomy 

PHY 2053 Physics Without Calculus I 

PHY 2049 Physics With Calculus II 

AST 2003 Solar System Astronomy 

PHY 2048 Physics With Calculus I 

OCE 3014 Oceanography 

GEO 3510 Earth Resources 

EVR 301 1 Environmental Resources and Pollution 

EVR 1001 Introduction to Environmental Sciences 

GLY 1010 Introduction to the Earth Sciences 

GLY 3039 Environmental Geology 

CHM 1 033 Survey of Chemistry 

CHM1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1032 Chemistry and Society 

Arts Requirement (three credit hours): 
Art embodies human dreams, visions, and imagination 
and renders the human experience creatively in sound, 
movement, performance, design, language, color, shape, 
and space. Art responds critically to current events, 
changes in society, and the drama of human life. 

In fulfilling this requirement, students will become 
acquainted with the fundamental aspects of the arts while 
developing a capacity to understand, appreciate, or 
experience particular forms. Students address universal 
themes central to the cultural traditions of the past and 
present as expressed through the perspectives of the arts. 
DAN 2140 Dance in Modern American Culture; 

1895-the Present 
DAN 2100 Introduction to Dance 

DAA 1 100 Modern Dance Techniques I 

DAA 1200 Ballet Techniques I 

ENL 3506 (b) Texts and Contexts: British Literature 

Since 1660 
ENL 3504 (a) Texts and Contexts: British Literature 

to 1650 
ARH 2051 Survey II 

CRW 2001 Introduction to Creative Writing 



Undergraduate Studies 25 



MUH 101 1 Music Appreciation 

MUH2116 Evolution of Jazz 

MUN 1 100 Golden Panther Band 

MUN1380 Master Chorale 

MUN 1210 Orchestra 

ART 2500 Painting I 

ART 2752 Ceramics I 

ARH 2050 Survey I 

ART 2300 Drawing I 

FIL 3001 Introduction to Film Making 

THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation 

TPP 21 00 Introduction to Acting 

1 .Given that Engineering majors must take a significant 
number of physical science courses and that their 
accrediting agency requires that they take substantial 
course work for their major which leaves them with so little 
flexibility, students in engineering majors will be allowed to 
fulfill the Natural Science requirement of the UCC by 
taking two physical science courses (with labs). 

2. Transfer students who have successfully completed 
MAC 1105 (College Algebra) at another institution prior to 
admission to FIU will be deemed to have completed one 
math course for purposes of the UCC 

3. Transfer students who have successfully completed 
one or both science courses without labs at another 
institution prior to admission to FIU will be deemed to have 
completed the appropriate components of the science 
requirement. 

4. For students in the Honors College: Honors College 
students who successfully complete IDH 1001 and IDH 
1002 (The Origin of Ideas and The Idea of Origins) will be 
deemed to have satisfied the Arts requirement of the UCC; 
Honors College students who successfully complete IDH 
1001 -IDH 1002 (The Origin Of Ideas and Idea of Origins), 
IDH 2003-IDH 2004 (Inhabiting Other Lives) will be 
deemed to have successfully completed the Foundation of 
Social Inquiry requirement of the UCC; and Honors 
College students who successfully complete IDH 2003 
and IDH 2004 will be deemed to have successfully 
completed the Societies and Identities requirement of the 
UCC. 

5. Students seeking a second baccalaureate degree will 
be exempt from the University Core Curriculum 
requirements if the first baccalaureate degree is from an 
accredited post-secondary institution of higher learning. 
However, this would not preclude prerequisites for the 
major that happen to be general education courses. 

6. State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.30 

(Gordon Rule) 

The State of Florida requires all public community colleges 
and universities to include a specified amount of writing 
and mathematics in their curriculum to ensure that 
students have achieved substantial competency in these 
areas. This requirement must be fulfilled within the first 
two years of study. 

6a. Writing Requirement (12 credits) 

Students must successfully complete twelve hours of 
writing courses with a grade of 'C or better. Six hours 
must be in composition courses (i.e., courses with the 
prefix ENC). The additional six hours must be taken in 
other courses in composition (with the ENC prefix) or in 
other approved courses each of which requires at least 
6,000 words of written work. Students who matriculated 



prior to 1 983 need only six credits of writing courses with 
an ENC prefix. 

6b. Mathematics (6 credits) 

One course must be at or above College Algebra level. 

Students subject to Rule 6A.10.30 need six credits of 
mathematics, three of which can be a computer 
programming course, a statistics course, or PHI 2100, 
Introduction to Logic. A grade of 'C or higher shall be 
considered successful completion of this requirement. 

Students who matriculated prior to 1983 need only three 
credits of mathematics, but they must take one 
mathematics course. 

ADDITIONAL POLICIES AND 
REQUIREMENTS 

1. A student who has graduated from a Florida public 
community college with an Associate in Arts degree will 
have met the University Core Curriculum requirements. 

2. A student who has met the General Education 
requirements of any institution in the State University 
System of Florida will have met the University Core 
Curriculum requirements. 

3. A student who has taken the freshman and 
sophomore years in an accredited college other than a 
Florida public community college or an institution in the 
State University System of Florida may receive credit for 
courses meeting the University Core Curriculum 
requirements. 

4. Students who have been admitted before completing 
an equivalent general education program, must do so at 
the University prior to graduation. 

5. Most departments require for admission to their 
degree programs certain freshman and sophomore 
common prerequisite courses in addition to the University 
Core Curriculum requirements. Applicants should consult 
the catalog section dealing with the program they wish to 
pursue to determine the nature and extent of the additional 
requirements. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 

In addition to the above University Core Curriculum 
requirements, any student who was admitted with a 
foreign language deficiency must successfully complete 
two semesters of sequential instruction in one foreign 
language prior to graduation. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

For purposes of clarity, transferability refers to the 
conditions under which the University accepts credits from 
other post-secondary institutions. Applicability of credit 
toward a degree refers to the prerogative of the respective 
academic division to count specific credit toward a 
student's degree requirements. Normally, collegiate work 
will be considered for transfer credit only from post- 
secondary institutions that are fully accredited by a 
regional accrediting association. The Office of Admissions 
will evaluate the acceptability of total credits transferable 
to the University. Transfer credit will be applied as 
appropriate to a student's degree program. The authority 
to apply such credit to the degree rests with the academic 
division of the student's intended major. If a student 
chooses to transfer to another academic division within the 
University, credit previously earned at another post- 



26 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



secondary institution will be re-evaluated and applied as 
appropriate to the student's new degree program. 

A maximum of 60 lower division semester hours taken 
at a two-year or a four-year institution may be counted 
toward a degree at the University. A maximum of 30 upper 
division semester hours taken at a senior institution may 
be counted toward a degree at the University. 

Lower division courses in excess of 60 semester hours 
may serve to meet specific course requirements for an FIU 
degree, but credit hours represented by these courses will 
not reduce the number of credit hours to be completed at 
the University. 

A grade of 'D' will be accepted for transfer credit, 
although it may not satisfy specific requirements. 
However, such a grade in coursework in the major field is 
subject to review and approval by the appropriate 
academic department. Credit from military schools will be 
transferred in accordance with the recommendations of 
the American Council on Education. Credit from foreign 
institutions will be considered on an individual basis. 

ACCELERATION 

The academic programs of the University are planned in 
such a manner that students may complete some of their 
degree requirements through one or more of the 
mechanisms listed below. Specific information on the 
accelerated mechanisms utilized in each academic 
program is available from the department or program 
description of the student's major. 

CREDIT FOR NON-COLLEGE LEARNING 

The award of credit for learning acquired outside the 
university or classroom experience is the prerogative of 
each academic department or program. Only degree- 
seeking students are eligible to receive this type of credit. 
The significant learning must be applicable to the degree 
program of the student, and should be discussed and 
appropriately documented at the time the desired program 
of study is initially discussed and decided with the 
student's program advisor. A maximum of 6 credit hours 
will be awarded. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM 
(CLEP) 

The College Level Examination Program is designed to 
measure knowledge in certain subject areas of general 
education. Credit earned through CLEP examination will 
reflect as lower division transfer credit. A maximum of 45 
semester credits are transferable under CLEP. Students 
must discuss the transfer of CLEP credits with their 
academic department. To register for an exam, go to 
https://testing.fiu.edu or contact the University Testing 
Center at (305) 348-2840. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

The University awards credit for Advanced Placement test 
scores of three, four, and five. For University Core 
Curriculum requirements, only the following examinations 
will be recognized for credit: Art History, Biology, Calculus, 
Chemistry, Computer Science A, Computer Science AB, 
Economics: Macro, Economics: Micro, English (Language 
and Composition or Literature and Composition), 
Environmental Science, European History, Government 
and Politics: Comparative, Government and Politics: 
United States, Human Geography, Modern Languages or 
Literature, Music Theory, Physics, Psychology, Statistics, 



Studio Art: Drawing, 2-D Design and 3-D Design, United 
States History, World History. 

ADVANCED LEVEL PROGRAM 

The University awards credit for Advanced Level 
Programs completed through the College Board, Puerto 
Rico and Latin America Office, only for scores of 4 or 5 on 
the Pre-Calculus (Level II) test, 4 or 5 on English, and 3, 4, 
or 5 on Spanish. 

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) program is a 
comprehensive and rigorous two-year program leading to 
examinations. Based on the pattern of no single country, it 
is a deliberate compromise between the specialization 
required in some national systems and the breadth 
preferred in others. Florida International University 
recognizes the quality of the IB program and will award six 
semester hours of college credit to those students who 
score a 4, 5, 6, or 7 on each subject at the higher level. 
Credit is also awarded for Subsidiary examinations with 
scores of 5, 6, or 7. 

CAMBRIDGE AICE (A-LEVEL) EXAMS 

Florida International University accepts A-Level 
Examinations for credit according to guidelines 
established by the Articulation Coordinating Committee in 
May 2003. For University Core Curriculum requirements, 
only the following examinations will be recognized for 
credit: Art and Design, Biology, Chemistry, Computing, 
Economics, English, Literature in English, Geography, 
History, Foreign Languages, Foreign Language Literature, 
Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, and Sociology. AS- 
Level exams are not accepted as university credits. 

NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE 

National Student Exchange provides students with the 
opportunity to study at one of 145 colleges and 
universities in the United States and its territories for one 
semester or academic year, while paying in-state tuition. 
Full credit is given for work satisfactorily completed on 
exchange. NSE offers the student the opportunity to live in 
a different geographic setting, explore a particular 
academic interest, and, of course, make new and lasting 
friendships with students from all over the United States. 

In order to participate in the National Student Exchange, 
students must be enrolled full-time and have a 2.8 
cumulative GPA. For further information contact Patrick 
Russell at (305) 348-1292, National Student Exchange 
office, University Park, PC 156; or ACI-180 at the 
Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5754. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE 
PROGRAM 

The International Student Exchange (ISE) Program 
provides students with the opportunity to study abroad 
(during one or two semesters) at one of the various 
universities that have an agreement with Florida 
International University. Full credit is given for work 
satisfactorily completed during the exchange program as 
long as it has been pre-approved by an advisor. Grades 
are not transferred. The International Student Exchange 
Program offers the opportunity to live abroad, explore 
other languages and cultures, and become acquainted 
with new friends from all over the world. Students will be 



Undergraduate Studies 27 



required to pay FIU tuition, insurance, housing, and travel 
arrangements. 

In order to participate in ISE, a student must be enrolled 
at FIU and have a 3.0 cumulative GPA. 

For more information, please contact the Office of 
International Studies located in Tower Trailer (TT), (305) 
348-1913, email: ois(a>fiu,edu or http://ois.fiu.edu . 

STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM 

Each year FIU offers a number of Study Abroad Programs 
in coordination with different academic units, the Office of 
International Studies, and Continuing and Professional 
Studies. These programs are under the direction of FIU 
faculty members who accompany the students abroad. 
Students receive credit for these programs. Program 
locations include Brazil, China, Spain, England, Ireland, 
Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Japan, and others. The 
Honors College also offers programs in Italy and Spain. 

For more information, please contact the Office of 
International Studies located in Tower Trailer (TT), (305) 
348-1913, email: ois(a)fiu.edu , or http://ois.fiu.edu . 

PRE-MEDICAL ADVISEMENT 

Students interested in entering professional schools of 
medicine, dentistry, optometry, or veterinary medicine 
should contact the Coordinator of Pre-medical Advising, 
Dr. Barbra Roller at rollerb@fiu.edu at the earliest 
possible time. After completing a substantial portion of 
their professional courses or at the end of their junior year, 
and prior to the fall term in which they plan to apply to 
professional schools, students should contact the 



Chairperson of the Premedical Advisement and Evaluation 
Committee in the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
Committee provides additional advisement for students 
wishing to enter the health professions and prepares 
recommendations for those applying to professional 
schools. 

PRE-LAW ADVISEMENT 

Students interested in receiving information on Law 
School/preprofessional education, on application 
procedures, testing, and references should contact the 
Department of Political Science or the Department of 
Philosophy in the College of Arts and Sciences or the 
Department of Criminal Justice in the College of Urban 
and Public Affairs. A faculty advisor in these departments 
will advise students who are seeking information about 
attending law school. 

ACADEMIC LEARNING COMPACTS 

In accordance with Florida Board of Governors guidelines, 
Florida International University is in the process of 
developing Academic Learning Compacts for each of its 
baccalaureate degree programs. The Compacts will 
identify, at minimum, the expected core student learning 
outcomes for program graduates in the areas of 
content/discipline knowledge and skills; communication 
skills; and critical thinking skills. The Academic Learning 
Compacts will be posted on the FIU web site and will be 
provided to students when they begin their degree 
programs and are advised in their declared majors. 






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THE HONORS COLLEGE has been conducting 
study abroad programs since 1994 and currently 
offers opportunities for its students in Spain, Italy, and 
Jamaica. The summer programs are designed to fulfill 
one year (six credits) of Honors College curriculum 
requirement, while the Spain Fail Program offers from 
nine to fifteen credit hours. Instruction is in English in 
all the programs. The Honors College Study Abroad 
Programs offer students the opportunity to pursue a 
rigorous academic program integrated with the honors 
curriculum while experiencing immersion in other 
cultures. 



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Honors College 29 



The Honors College 



The Honors College at Florida International University offers students the best of both worlds. It is a small community of 
outstanding students, dedicated scholars, and committed teachers who work together in an atmosphere usually associated 
with small private colleges. Yet they do so with all the resources of a major state university. 

The Honors College provides a broad foundation for dedicated students who want to get the most out of their undergraduate 
education. The undergraduate experience provides a significantly enhanced broad trans-disciplinary curriculum and 
opportunities to work closely with expert faculty and with the larger community. The opportunities for graduate or professional 
study and for employment are greatly expanded because of the range of unique activities and academic experiences made 
available to students in the College. Indeed, this past year 82% of Honors College graduates applied and were accepted to 
graduate and professional schools. 

Students may pursue almost any major available at the University and at the same time complete the Honors curriculum. 
The curriculum emphasizes critical, integrative, and creative thinking; group and independent research; oral presentation; 
close contact between students and faculty; and integration of class work with the broader community. 

Committed to excellence, professors in The Honors College are carefully selected for their accomplishments as both 
teachers and scholars; they take great pride in their close association with their students. 
In addition to the unique curriculum, Honors College students enjoy many other benefits. 

Scholarship opportunities 

Funding to attend national and international conferences 

Internships opportunities 

Honors-only Information Technology Centers 

Close faculty mentoring 

Priority registration 

Eligibility for membership in Honors College Societies-Gamma Epsilon Phi at University Park and Alpha Sigma Tau at 

Biscayne Bay 

Study abroad programs in Italy, Jamaica, Spain, and Trinidad and Tobago. 

A program to facilitate student research called Student Research and Artistic Initiatives (SRAI) 

Library borrowing privileges as graduate students, with books loaned for three months instead of three weeks 

Medical Education Program in partnership with the University of South Florida College of Medicine 
The Honors College also provides students with a living-learning community, Honors Place at Panther Hall. Residents live 
together, study together, socialize and plan special events such as dinners with faculty, tutoring sessions, football games, and 
evenings at the theater. For more information about the Honors College, see the Honors Curriculum in this catalog or visit 
Honors.fiu.edu. 









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30 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Academic Affairs 




UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

The University Libraries are housed in the Steven and 
Dorothea Green Library (GL) at University Park and in the 
Library Building (LIB) at Biscayne Bay Campus. In 
addition, there is a Library Service Center offering a 
variety of services on the Engineering Campus; a 
specialized legal collection that is part of the College of 
Law; and a library supporting the FIU Wolfsonian 
Museum. Collectively, these libraries make available over 
1.6 million volumes; provide access to a broad range of 
electronic resources via more than four hundred public 
work stations; and offer the latest in electronic library 
services combined with efficient access to print material. 

Library users have access to ILLiad, the latest in 
automated interlibrary loan systems with journal articles 
delivered to the desktop; to chat reference service in 
English and in Spanish; and to a broad range of 
Information Literacy instructional offerings. Most on-line 



sources are available 24 hours a day. Most collections are 
in open stacks and directly available to the public. 

Special resources and services include: a Geographic 
Information Systems (GIS) Center; the Everglades Digital 
Library; and a Virtual Library Tour, all accessible from the 
library home page ( http://library.fiu.edu ). 

The principal libraries maintain an extensive schedule of 
service hours staying open Sunday-Thursday during the 
fall and spring semesters until 1 a.m., with more extensive 
access available during final exams. A number of research 
carrels are available for assignment to doctoral students. 

Currently-registered students may use the libraries of 
any other institution in the State University System. For 
access to libraries in the southeast Florida Region, check 
at the circulation desk concerning SEFLIN library 
privileges that enable you to borrow books from other 
academic libraries in the region. 



Academic Affairs 31 




32 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



THE PATRICIA AND PHILLIP FROST 
ART MUSEUM 

The Frost Art Museum at Florida International University 
has served the South Florida community for over 20 years 
presenting free exhibitions and art lectures of local, 
national and international importance. Exhibitions include 
student shows, self-curated exhibitions from both the 
University's collections and from institutions and 
organizations outside the University, and national traveling 
shows. The Museum is accredited by the American 
Association of Museums and is an affiliate of the 
Smithsonian Institution. It has also been recognized for its 
excellence by the grants it has received, most recently 
from the National Endowment for the Arts; The Institute for 
Museum and Library Services; The Florida Humanities 
Council; Miami-Dade County Cultural Affairs Council; and 
the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural 
Affairs. The Frost Art Museum is designated as a major 
culture institution by the State of Florida. 

The Frost Art Museum serves Miami's multicultural 
community year-round, free of charge. The Museum is 
home to Coral Gables' Metropolitan Museum and Art 
Center Collection, the Oscar B. Cintas Fellows Collection 
of Contemporary Hispanic Art, and a permanent collection 
of works by North and South American and Florida artists, 
er well-known artists. 

The Frost Art Museum, which is located on the 
University Park Campus, opened with an internationally 
acclaimed exhibition, Contemporary Latin American 
Drawings, in April, 1977. Since then, many important 
exhibitions have been presented, including: Alberto 
Giacometti, Draftsman and Sculptor, Mira, Mira, Mira: Los 
Cubanos de Miami; Adolph Gottlieb: Paintings and Works 
on Paper; Marcel Duchamp; Louise Bourgeois; The 
Phillips Collection in the Making: 1920 - 1930; Imagenes 
Liricas: New Spanish Visions; CUBA-USA: The First 
Generation; Jose Bedia; Agustin Fernandez: A 
Retrospective; Miro/Noguchi; and most recently, 
Modernism and Abstraction: Treasures from the 
Smithsonian American Art Museum. The annual American 
Art Today series has featured contemporary artists 
exploring traditional themes including Still Life, The Figure 
in the Landscape, The Portrait, Narrative Painting, The 
City Surface Tension, Clothing as Metaphor Images from 
Abroad and the Garden, and Fantasies and Curiosities. 

The Frost Art Museum has continued to enhance its 
exhibitions with the Critics' Lecture Series, which has 
included many of the exhibiting artists, scholars, museum 
curators and art historians, including: Susan Sontag, 
Robert Hughes, Hilton Kramer, Michael Graves, Peter 
Plagens, Tom Wolfe, Germaine Greer, Dore Ashton, 
Carlos Fuentes, Michael Brenson, Frank Stella, Richard 
Serra, Helen Frankenthaler, Kirk Varnedoe, Lowery Sims, 
Michael Kimmelman, and Anne d'Harnoncourt. 

The Museum is currently located in PC 110, with a new 
46,000 square foot facility under construction. For further 
information on the Museum and its programs contact the 
museum at 305-348-2890 or visit the website 
www.frostartmuseum.org . 



THE WOLFSONIAN-FIU 

Located in the heart of Miami Beach's Art Deco District, 
The Wolfsonian-Florida International University is a 
museum and research center that serves local, national, 
and international audiences by promoting the examination, 
understanding, and appreciation of the ways that design 
has served as a reflection of societal values and as an 
active force in the shaping of human experience. The 
Wolfsonian is accredited by the American Association of 
Museums. Through thought-provoking exhibitions, 
publications, research, academic, and public programs, 
The Wolfsonian-FlU focuses on the meaning of objects 
and the effect that the Industrial Revolution had on the 
creation of the modern world. The Wolfsonian became 
part of FIU in July 1997. Its founder, Mitchell Wolfson Jr., 
donated to FIU his extraordinary collection of the period 
1885-1945. 

The Wolfsonian holds more than 100,000 objects 
predominantly from North America and Europe, providing 
rich evidence of the cultural, political, and technological 
changes that swept the world in the century preceding the 
end of World War II. The collection features furniture, 
decorative arts, industrial design, paintings, sculpture, 
architectural models, works on paper, rare books, and 
ephemera. Notable among these are Depression era 
prints and mural studies by WPA artists, items from the 
British Arts and Crafts movement and the German 
Werkstatten and Werkbund, and artifacts of political 
propaganda. 

Permanent, temporary, and traveling shows address 
broad themes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, 
such as nationalism, political persuasion, industrialization, 
architecture and urbanism, consumerism and advertising, 
transportation, and world's fairs. Although drawing 
primarily on its own holdings, The Wolfsonian also 
features exhibitions and objects on loan from other 
collections. 

Days, evenings, and weekends, The Wolfsonian offers a 
range of lectures, films, symposia, tours, and workshops 
geared to visitors of all ages. It has paired with Miami- 
Dade County public schools to develop activities and 
interpretive materials for students and teachers in the arts 
and social sciences. To inquire about an exhibition 
(present, past, upcoming), program, or the general 
calendar, or to learn more about the collection and how it 
can be used for research, please visit 
www.wolfsonian.org or call (305) 531-1001. 

The Wolfsonian publishes catalogues to document its 
exhibitions and collection. It also produces the award- 
winning Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts, a 
scholarly annual dedicated to exploring the role of art and 
design in the modern world. 

Free admission to exhibitions is provided to all Florida 
state university faculty, students, and staff with valid ID. In 
addition, The Wolfsonian is open to the general public on 
Thursday evenings from 6:00 pm-9:00 pm. Most 
educational programs are free to the FIU community, 
however, occasional fees apply. 



Student Affairs 33 



Student Affairs 

The Division of Student Affairs seeks to enhance the 
academic mission of the University by promoting a vast 
array of educational, social, and cultural opportunities and 
programs. We believe that a student's education takes 
place both inside and outside the classroom. We aim to 
provide an environment that supports the growth and 
development of our students by catering to their social, 
intellectual, emotional, and spiritual needs. From 
orientation to job interview skills, volunteer opportunities to 
multicultural programs, health care screenings to 
residential life, Student Affairs is here to help you make 
the most of your college experience. 

The following are Student Affairs departments and 
programs: 

CAMPUS LIFE 

The Department of Campus Life provides learning 
communities that expose students to a diversity of ideas 
and experiences and develop the following skills: 
leadership, communication, problem-solving, program 
planning, organization, implementation, evaluation, and 
most importantly, the opportunity to Get Involved on 



Campus. Activities such as dances, parties, movies, 
athletic events, pep rallies, concerts, comedy shows, the 
lecture series, multicultural theme weeks, and community 
service are a few of the fun and educational programs 
offered through the department. Students may form 
additional organizations and clubs that promote the 
University's educational mission and the development of 
one's personal attributes. Campus Life activities are co- 
curricular and cover all aspects of the educational 
experiences and personal growth of students. Over 200 
registered organizations exist to enrich campus life and 
contribute to the social, cultural, and academic growth of 
students. 

The Department of Campus Life includes the Student 
Government Association, Student Organizations Council, 
Student Programming Council, Honors Council, Greek 
Organizations, Multifaith Council, the Graduate Student 
Association, Homecoming Council, Panther Rage, and 
Panther Power. 

Location: GC 2240, University Park, (305) 348-2138; WUC 
141, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5804. 




34 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



CHILDREN'S CREATIVE LEARNING 

CENTER 

Established in 1975, the Children's Center is an NAEYC 
accreditied, Gold Seal program and is an Educational 
Research Center for Child Development. The Center is 
located on the Univeristy Park Campus and is a 
department of the Division of Student Affairs. 

The Center provides an affordable, full-day, 
developmentally appropriate hands-on early care and 
education program for children of students, fauclty, staff, 
alumni, and the neighboring community. 

Children are viewed as individuals. Each child is 
encouraged to develop socially, emotionally, physically, 
cognitively, and intellectually at his/her own rate of growth. 
Working toward their maximum potential, the children are 
nurtured by being exposed to the many content areas the 
early education teachers offer such as: art, music, 
movement, science, cooking dramatic play, and outdoor 
play. Language development and literacy, pre-math, and 
developmental tasks along with hands on experiences of 
educational experiences to convey awareness of the world 
around us are included. A creative atmosphere exists 
where educational concepts are introduced throughout 
different areas in the classroom. Through these real life 
experiences, the children make sense of their world. 

Enrollment priority is given to children of students. In 
order to be eligible, children must be two-and-a-half 
through five years of age and toilet trained. The program is 
offered Monday through Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., 
with pick up at 12:00 noon, 12:30 p.m., or after 3:30 p.m. 

For more information, requests for admission form, or 
information regarding tuition subsidies for children of Pell 
Grant recipients, call (305) 348-2143 or visit the website at 
http://www.fiu.edu/~children/ . 

GREEK LIFE 

Greek organizations — fraternities and sororities — 
contribute to the University by promoting leadership, 
scholarship, service, social activities, and brotherhood and 
sisterhood. 

An Interfraternity Council governs men's fraternities, a 
National Pan-Hellenic Council governs historically African- 
American fraternities and sororities, and the Panhellenic 
Council governs women's fraternities and sororities. The 
Order of Omega is the honorary leadership society of 
fraternities and sororities that promotes leadership and 
scholarship among Greeks. Formal recruitment periods 
are held each fall semester. However, many fraternities 
and sororities have informal recruitment events year 
round. 

Location: GC 2240, University Park, (305) 348-1120 or 
(305) 348-2138, http://www.fiu.edu/~greeks/ . 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association is comprised of 
representatives from all Schools and Colleges who are 
elected by the student body. There is a Student 
Government Council at both the Biscayne Bay Campus 
and University Park. SGA is responsible for overseeing 
and appropriating the Activity and Service (A&S) fees paid 
by all students each semester. These fees fund many of 
the campus life events, student activities, and clubs and 
organizations. SGA also acts as the liaison between the 



students and administrative areas of the University, 
specifically speaking, and lobbying on behalf of students. 

SGA members represent the student body on 
University-wide committees and task forces to ensure 
student representation at the administrative level. SGA 
meets regularly and students are highly encouraged to 
attend meetings and become involved in all aspects of 
Student Government. 

Location: GC 211, University Park, (305) 348-2121; WUC 
141, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5680. 

CENTER FOR LEADERSHIP AND 

SERVICE 

The Center for Leadership & Service (CLS) provides 
students with developmental and experiential opportunities 
that foster leadership and community involvement, 
grounded in values and moral purpose. Through 
leadership education, service learning, advocacy, and 
volunteerism, students will become active citizens on 
campus, in their respective communities, and in the 
workplace. 

Leadership education is both curricular (for credit) and 
co-curricular (non-credit). IHS 3204 Exploring Leadership 
is a three-credit introductory leadership course open to all 
students. The course is part of an academic certificate in 
Professional Leadership Studies. Non-credit leadership 
development programs range from one-hour skill building 
workshops, to semester-based programs, to a year-long 
living/learning community on campus. All of these 
programs are interactive and experiential in nature and are 
offered at a variety of times to accommodate our diverse 
student population. Programs are developmental in 
nature, so students can begin with an entry-level program 
and progress to more advanced leadership training while 
at FIU. Consult the department website for program 
descriptions and application details, 
www.fiu.edu/~leaders . 

CLS is also the central office for service development, 
by offering a clearinghouse and resource center for 
volunteer activities, service-learning, and advocacy for 
social issues. Two major service projects are sponsored 
by CLS. By taking leadership roles in organizing and 
implementing these projects, students are able to practice 
and refine their leadership skills. Alternative Spring Break 
(ASB) educates students about social issues and 
encourages them to make a difference by participating in 
direct service projects in communities throughout the 
country and abroad. Dance Marathon is a student-run 
philanthropy dedicated to raising money for the Children's 
Miracle Network. Over 250 students participate in the 25 
hour fundraiser that takes an entire year and a committee 
of 30 students to plan and implement. Proceeds benefit 
the Miami Children's Hospital. 

Students may also take on leadership roles by providing 
peer education. Peer Educators Advocating Cultural 
Enrichment (PEACE) is a student-led diversity education 
initiative. PEACE uses experiential learning activities and 
frank discussions to engage students in a dialogue about 
diversity. PEACE members present workshops in classes 
and for student organizations. The LEAD Team is a 
student group whose mission is to promote and support 
leadership development. The LEAD Team participates as 
program promoters and department ambassadors, group 



Student Affairs 35 



facilitators, classroom presenters, and consultants to 
student organizations. 

The Center for Leadership and Service is dedicated to 
developing the leadership capacity and service ethic of all 
students, regardless of position or title. 
Location: GC 242 and GC 2210, University Park, (305) 
348-1402 or (305) 348-2149; WUC 257, Biscayne Bay 
Campus, (305)919-5360 
Web Site: www.fiu.edu/~leaders 

MULTIFAITH COUNCIL 

The Multifaith Council serves student groups involved in a 
variety of activities. Professional representatives from 
various faiths are available for personal appointments. 
Individual denominations sponsor campus-wide programs 
including worship, study groups, social gatherings, and 
cultural events. Campus Ministry sponsors programs and 
activities which are non-denominational. 
Location: GC 318, University Park, (305) 348-3902; CM 
101, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5247. 

CAREER SERVICES 

Career Services (CS) assists registered students at all 
University locations with career plans and employment 
needs across academic disciplines, and with all types of 
employers; large and small, private and public, national 
and international. CS works closely with the Graduate 
Business Center Management Office. CS's high-tech and 
high-touch philosophy offers 24-7 services plus 
individualized attention through intake hours and one-on- 
one appointments. 

CS encourages students to register with the office 
immediately after enrolling in classes— whether as a 
freshman, a transfer, or a graduate student. The office 
can help you identify a major, find an internship, or locate 
a career that is right for you. Get involved with Career 
Services. Our programs and services include: 

• CAREER DEVELOPMENT-Offers career interest 
tools, group sessions, and appointments for those 
desiring to identify their next educational/career path. 

• INTERNSHIPS & COOPERATIVE EDUCATION- 
Provide students with practical experience in their 
chosen major. Assignments include part-time as 
well as full-time work. Internships and Cooperative 
Education often provide a salary and academic 
credit with assignments possible at local, national or 
international levels. These experiences are an 
excellent way to secure full-time career employment 
upon graduation. 

• EMPLOYMENT UPON GRADUATION-Otiers on- 
campus interviews, resume referrals, on line job 
vacancies, networking opportunities, and career fairs 
(face-to-face and virtual). 

• DELTA EPSILON IOTA - An academic honor 
society dedicated to enhancing student leadership 
skills, career development, and networking 
opportunities with employers. The society supports 
the mission, vision, and goals of Career Services. 
Membership is open to undergraduate and graduate 
students across all academic units who meet the 3.3 
GPA requirement and have earned at least 30 
semester hours. 

CS also provides specialized workshops like business 
etiquette dinners, dress for success seminars, and how to 



network and negotiate effectively. Other activities include 
resume critiques, mock interviews, and development of 
scannable resumes. The office has videoconference 
capabilities for interviewing. For more information, click 
on: http://www.fiu.edu/~career . 

Locations: University Park, GC 230, (305) 348-2423; 
Biscayne Bay, WUC 225, (305) 919-5770; Engineering, 
CEAS 2780, (305) 348-1281. 

DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER 

Disability Resource Center provides information and 
assistance to students with disabilities who are in need of 
special accommodations. Individual services are available 
to students with visual, hearing, speech, physical, and 
learning disabilities. Services include counseling, 
classroom accommodations, assistive technology, note- 
takers, readers, ASL interpreters, adapted testing, priority 
registration, and referrals. Support and assistance in 
overcoming architectural, academic, attitudinal, and other 
barriers encountered are provided. Requests for services 
must be made prior to the beginning of each semester and 
current documentation of disability is required to receive 
services. 

Location: GC 190, University Park, (305) 348-3532, WUC 
131, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5345. TTY 348- 
3852. 

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES 

University Health Services encompasses the General 
Medical Clinic, Women's Health Clinic, the Wellness 
Center, a full-service pharmacy, and the Office of 
Employee Assistance. The health clinics provide quality, 
cost-effective, confidential, and professional primary 
medical care services to registered students for the 
prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and injury. 
The Wellness Center promotes healthy lifestyle choices to 
ensure holistic health and provides health education to 
enable all members of the FIU community to achieve their 
optimal wellness potential. The FIU Pharmacy provides 
services to university students as well as faculty and staff 
members. 

Clinical Services: General Medical Clinic and 
Women's Health Clinic 
The following services are covered by the student health 
fee and therefore, are free to registered students: 

1. Routine primary medical care, including office visits 
with registered nurses and primary care nurse 
practitioners and physicians 

2. Family planning counseling 

3. Health education and personal health assessment 
services 

4. Health screening 

5. Workshops and presentations sponsored by 
University Health Services 

Some of the clinic services available for a nominal 
charge to registered students include: 

1 . Nutrition counseling with registered dietician. 

2. Laboratory tests (blood, urine, and cultures) 

3. EKGs, vision, and hearing tests 

4. Complete physical examinations 

5. Sexually transmitted diseases - testing and treatment 

6. HIV testing and counseling 

7. Respiratory therapy 

8. Immunizations 



36 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



9. Women's Health Clinic services: physical exams and 
diagnostic tests including pap smears, pregnancy 
tests, colposcopy, cryotherapy, ultrasounds, and 
more. 

10. Nutrition / diet /weight management consultations 
Additional Information 

• Students must present a current, valid FIU photo ID at 
the time of the office visit. 

• Appointments are strongly recommended. 

• Payment is required at the time of service. Cash (at 
UP only), checks, money orders, Master 
CardA/isa/Discover credit cards, and the FIU debit 
card are accepted as forms of payment. 

• Services not available include: X-ray, dental care, 
specialty physicians, and emergency care after clinic 
hours and on weekends. 

Visit our web site for a comprehensive list of clinic services 
and charges: http://www.fiu.edu/~health . 

Pharmacy: 
Conveniently located on the first floor of the University 
Health Services Complex, the FIU Pharmacy provides the 
following services to FIU students, faculty, and staff: 
prescription and over-the-counter medications, dietary 
supplements, vitamins, and herbs; feminine hygiene 
products; first aid supplies; medical equipment; dental 
products; health and beauty products; aromatherapy; 
relaxation products; and more. Most types of health 
insurance plans will be accepted. Check web site for 
specific inormation. 

Health Insurance 
The student health fee does not cover diagnostic and 
therapeutic medical visits to outside physicians, 
clinics, or hospitals. Students are strongly 
encouraged to purchase supplemental health 
insurance. A health insurance policy is available at a 
low group rate for students who take six or more 
credits hours a semester. 

Emergency Care 
In case of emergency on either campus, call the Public 
Safety - Campus Police Department (24 hours a day) at 
305-348-5911. Emergency care after clinic hours and on 
weekends is not offered at our facility. 

The Wellness Center 
The Wellness Center advocates healthy lifestyles to 
maintain holistic wellness. We provide a variety of health 
promotion services to assist students, faculty, and staff in 
achieving their maximum potential. 

Services 

1. Lifestyle workshops, lectures, and activities for 
groups or individuals are provided on a variety of 
topics, such as: Wellness, Stress Management, 
Nutrition, Fitness, Sexual Health, Substance 
Use/Abuse Prevention, Preventive Health 
Issues/Self-Care, Sexual Health (HIV/AIDS, STD, 
etc), Aromatherapy 

2. TriFit Fitness Assessment (Weight, body 
composition, blood pressure/heart rate, flexibility, 
cardiovascular fitness) 

3. Health Education consultations on nutrition, 
fitness, smoking cessation, wellness, stress 
management, aromatherapy, and sexual health. 

4. Multimedia Wellness Resource Center, featuring 
textbooks, pamphlets, visual displays, brochures, 
videos, DVDs, audio-tapes, CDs, and interactive 



computer programs such as "Dine Healthy" 
personal diet assessment and "Alcohol 101 Plus" 

5. Student clubs (STRIKE, SHAPE, and SHAC) 

6. Free anonymous HIV counseling and testing 

7. Mind/Body Conditioning Classes, including 
meditation and "Cloud 9" Stress Free Zone 
featuring a relaxation room, quiet games, and 
more. 

8. Massage therapy (nominal fee) 

9. Registered Dietician appointments (nominal fee) 

10. Acupuncture (nominal fee) 

1 1 . Chiropractic (nominal fee) 
University Park: 

Location: University Health Services Complex 

Located between Public Safety/Police Dept. 
and the Recreation Center. 
Phone Number: (305) 348-2401 
Fax: (305) 348-3336 

Biscayne Bay Campus: 
Locations: Health Care Center (HCWC Building located 

by parking lot 1-C) 
Wellness Center- (across from the Campus Support 
Complex) 

Phone Number(s): (305) 919-5620, Health Clinic 
information and appointments 
(305) 919-5307, Wellness Center 
(305) 919-5675, Immunization 
Fax: (305) 919-5312, Immunization and 

Clinic 

(305) 919-5371, Wellness Center 
Web Site: http://www.fiu.edu/~health 

STUDENT MEDIA 

Student media at FIU include The Beacon newspaper and 
WRGP radio. 

The Beacon is an editorially independent publication 
produced by students and distributed free. The purpose of 
The Beacon is to keep the University community informed 
about campus news events and activities; to serve as a 
forum for opinion and commentary concerning campus 
related topics; and to protect the interests of the Unversity 
community and its component parts. It is published 
Monday and Thursday during the fall and spring terms, 
except during holiday breaks. It is also published eight 
times during the summer term. Students can work on the 
staff in news and features, photography, and/or 
advertising. No prior experience is required. 

WRGP is FlU's radio station located at 88.1 FM. Its 
programming is an eclectic mix of the latest music on the 
cutting edge of the alternative scene, FIU sports play-by- 
play, and news. Programming also includes weekly 
specialty shows that cover the music spectrum of metal to 
reggae, and in between is Caribbean, hip-hop, rap, Latin 
rock, and jazz. The station operates from 7 a.m. to past 
midnight seven days a week. The station provides a 
means for students to acquire experience in various 
disciplines related to the broadcast industry, including 
hands-on experience in a realistic, business-like setting 
encompassing teamwork and professional standards. 
Students can work in areas such as broadcasting, 
business, promotions, and/or engineering. Prior 
experience is not required. 

Location: The Beacon, GC 210 University Park (305) 348- 
2709; WUC 220, Biscayne Bay Campus (305) 919-4722. 
WRGP, GC 319, University Park, (305) 348-3071. 



Student Affairs 37 



HOUSING & RESIDENTIAL LIFE 

Housing and Residential Life provides housing for 
students at both the University Park and Biscayne Bay 
Campuses. There are four housing complexes located at 
the University Park Campus. They include three new 
state-of-the art housing facilities that have been opened in 
the last seven years, providing on-campus housing for 
1,300 students. Total housing capacity on the University 
Park Campus is 1 ,900 bed spaces. At the Biscayne Bay 
Campus, the newly renovated Bay Vista housing facility 
serves approximately 300 students. There are multiple 
room types providing a variety of accommodations to meet 
students' housing needs. 

The campus residential community provides unique 
opportunities for personal growth and development, 
leadership experiences through student participation in 
programming and activities, and developing an 
appreciation of and sensitivity to differences. Residents 
have the opportunity to enjoy social and educational 
events that are sponsored by their respective residence 
hall associations and resident assistants. The residence 
halls feature several Living and Learning Communities 
that include FYRST (First Year Residents Succeeding 
Together), FYRST Explore, Architecture, Honors Place, 
Wellness, and Leaders in Residence. 

All of the housing facilities have fast Ethernet 
connections, unlimited access to the web, basic cable 
television, local telephone service, and utilities are 
included in the room rental rate. Each of the residence 
halls is staffed with both professional and paraprofessional 
personnel to insure the facilities are safe and well 
maintained. For more information regarding services and 
accommodations, please visit our web page at 
http://www.fiu.edu/~housing . 

Location: Housing Office, University Park Towers (UPT) 
121, Phone: (305) 348-4190, Fax: (305) 348-4295; E-mail: 
housing@fiu.edu. Office of Residential Life, Panther Hall 
(PH) 126, Phone: (305) 348-3661. On the Biscayne Bay 
Campus, the Housing Office is (305) 919-5587. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AND 

SCHOLAR SERVICES 

The International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) 
office provides assistance to international students, faculty 
and researchers in non-immigrant status (F or J visas). 
The staff provides advising services on immigration, 
cultural, personal, social and financial concerns, as well 
as, maintaining the Student Exchange Visitor Information 
System (SEVIS) of the Department of Homeland Security 
tracking system for the University. The department also 
serves as a liaison to academic and administrative 
departments throughout the University. 

All new and/or international transfer students MUST 
attend a MANDATORY orientation program before the 
start of their first semester and MUST report to the ISSS 
office within the first week of the start of classes. The 
ISSS also offers social and cultural programs to assist 
students in adapting more effectively to the University 
community and to living in Miami. An active International 
Student Club on each campus collaborates with the 
department in organizing various social activities. Club 
programs enable students to participate in the 
international dimension of the University and provides 



opportunities for involvement in the greater Miami 
community. 

ISSS is located in GC 242, University Park, (305) 348- 
2421; and WUC 363, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919- 
5813. 

MULTICULTURAL PROGRAMS AND 

SERVICES 

The Office of Multicultural Programs and Services (MPAS) 

provides retention-centered services for our diverse 

student body. MPAS offers students the personal, 

academic, social, and cultural support needed for the 

achievement of educational goals. Staff assist with 

leadership development, counseling, career and academic 

advisement, financial assistance, tutorials, and serve as a 

liaison to academic units and student support services 

University-wide. AAA Tutorial and several student 

organizations fall under the MPAS umbrella. 

Location: GC 216, University Park, (305) 348-2436; WUC 

253, Bicayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5817. 

AAA Tutorials (Assistance for Academic Achievement) is 

a free tutoring service available for all enrolled FIU 

students. 

Locations: GC 267, University Park, (305) 348-4109; WUC 

253(305)919-5817. 

Student Organizations advised through MPAS include 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Black Student Union, 

Born Again Believers Ministry and Council, Dominican 

American Students Organization, Exclusive Dancers, 

Lamdba Theta Alpha, Latin Sorority, Inc., Multicultural 

Awareness Club, Native American Society, and PEACE. 

Anyone interested in these organizations should contact 

the main office number. 

OFFICE OF THE OMBUDSMAN 

The Ombudsman Office acts as an impartial and 
confidential forum to assist students who have 
encountered problems or conflicts at the University, 
particularly problems or concerns not adequately 
addressed through normal channels. This may include 
correcting processes or procedures, which are incapable 
of resolving the issue, or are causing an inordinate delay. 
The Ombudsman may resolve problems through various 
methods, including investigation, mediation, or making 
referrals to the appropriate University department for 
review. The Ombudsman should be utilized in situations 
where all areas of appeal have been exhausted or proven 
unsuccessful. 

For more information or services, please contact the 
Office of the Ombudsman at (305) 348-2797 located in 
Graham Center 219 at University Park Campus, or located 
in WUC 325, Wolfe Univerisity Center, Biscayne Bay 
Campus, (305)919-5800. 

ORIENTATION AND COMMUTER 

STUDENT SERVICES 

The Office of Orientation and Commuter Student Services 
provides resources, services, and programs to new 
students and the University's commuter student 
population. The "Panther Preview" Orientation program is 
designed to assist new students with the transition to 
university life by introducing them to the vast array of 
resources available at FIU, providing time to work with an 



38 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



academic advisor, and giving them an opportunity to get to 
know their new classmates. New students meet with a 
Peer Advisor that introduces them to the campus 
surroundings and provides valuable insight into what it is 
like to be an FIU student. Students are also given the 
opportunity to receive their official FIU Student ID/ Panther 
Card, discover the variety of ways to get involved on 
campus, and learn how to use the online student 
registration system. 

A mandatory two-day program for freshmen and a one 
day session for transfer students are held prior to the fall, 
spring, and summer semesters. A one-day parent program 
is also offered during each freshman session to introduce 
parents to FIU and assist them with preparing to meet the 
challenges of parenting a college student. Information 
about registering for Orientation is mailed to newly 
admitted undergraduate students prior to the first term of 
enrollment. 

The Commuter Center, located at University Park, 
assists students with obtaining information that will aid 
them in making a smooth transition to the University. A 
variety of services are available at the Center, including: 
off-campus housing information, campus maps, parking 
information, local telephone access, and child care 
information. In addition to a variety of University 
resources, the Center also provides programs such as the 
Commuter Mentor program, the Nontraditional Student 
Community, and information on commuting and 
carpooling. The Center also publishes a newsletter each 
semester, provides a variety of brochures that address 
commuter concerns, and offers extended hours of service. 
Location: GC 112, University Park, (305) 348-6414 

OFFICE OF STUDENT CONDUCT AND 

CONFLICT RESOLUTION 

The mission of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution is 
to promote concepts of respect, civility, fairness, and 
conflict resolution on campus by enforcing community 
standards (FIU policies, federal, state, and local laws) and 
holding students accountable for their behavior in a fair, 
yet developmental manner, through the involvement of the 
campus community and educational development of 
students. 

Infringement of an academic nature should be directed 
to the Office of the Vice President of Academic Personnel. 
Complaints that are non-academic should be directed to 
the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution. 

The Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution 
also provides the following: 

• Mediation as an avenue to foster mutual respect and 
understanding when differences arise. Mediation 
through the Office of Student Conduct and Conflict 
Resolution is an informal, voluntary, and confidential 
way to resolve minor conflicts, disputes, or 
disagreements without going through formal charges or 
judicial proceedings. 

• Background checks for various agencies (Secret 
Service, FBI, CIA, State Department, DEA, Federal 
Marshals, Law Enforcement Agencies, Military, 
Graduate Schools, Law Schools, Dean Certifications, 
Florida Bar Examiners). 

• Selection and training of judicial board members and 
hearing officers. 



• Admissions clearances - The University reserves the 
right to review the case of any student who has been 
involved in misconduct prior to admission to determine 

eligibility for admission. 

• Educational programs for faculty, staff, and students 
regarding the student judicial process; ethics and 
intergrity; and conflict recolution. 

Please refer to the Student Code of Conduct section in the 
FIU Student Handbook for more information regarding 
Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution processes and 
procedures. The Office of Student Conduct and Conflict 
Resolution is located in GC 311 at the University Park 
Campus, (305) 348-3939. 

UNIVERSITY CENTERS 

The University Center on each campus provides direct 
services to students and the University community. The 
Graham Center (GC) at University Park and the Wolfe 
University Center (WUC) at Biscayne Bay Campus are the 
focal points for the University community to meet and 
interact in a non-classroom environment. Staff in the 
Centers coordinate the scheduling of space and assist 
with the production of student and University sponsored 
events. 

As the hub of University life, these buildings house the 
offices of Student Government Association (SGA); Student 
Programming Council; Student Organizations Council 
(SOC); The Beacon student newspaper; Faculty Club, and 
departments of the Division of Student Affairs that provide 
services to students: Career Services, Office of Disability 
Services for Students, International Student and Scholar 
Services, Leadership Development, Kaplan Centers, 
Office of Multicultural Programs and Services, Campus 
Life, Women's Center, Volunteer Action Center, and 
Judicial and Mediation Services. 

The University Centers also offer the services of 
coordinating special events, media sources, state-of-the- 
art and wireless computer labs, bookstores, cafeterias, 
grills, vending machines, credit unions, copy centers, 
automatic banking facilities, auditoriums, lounges, meeting 
rooms, ballrooms, movie theaters, and game rooms. Other 
services include; Lost and Found, locker rentals, vending 
refunds, Kaplan test preparation classes, and Panther ID 
card center. 

The Graham Center houses the Office of the Senior 
Vice President for Student Affairs, classrooms, Art Gallery, 
the Radio Station (WRGP), TicketMaster, a satellite 
cashiering office, a fresh food concept — serving all you 
care to eat, Polio Tropical, Subway, Edy's Ice Cream, 
Smoothie Time Health Food, Grade's Grill, and a coffee 
shop. The mini-mall offers a credit union, Panther Stop 
convenience store, copy center, bookstore, Santi's hair 
and nail, travel agency, notary public, and Panther Dry 
Cleaners. 

The Wolfe University Center (WUC) is located at the 
heart of FlU's Biscayne Bay Campus. It Is home to the 
three hundred seat Mary Ann Wolfe Theather, houses a 
state-of-the-art computer lounge, five large meeting 
rooms, and a recently renovated multi-purpose ballroom. 
A multi-purpose dining and catering facility, the student 
fitness center, and several comfortable study lounges can 
also be found in the WUC. It is also host to one of the 
most complete and professional team building training 
programs in South Florida, the Team Ropes Adventure 
Challenge (TRAC). Tenants include Students Affairs 



Student Affairs 39 



Offices for: Disability and Support Services, Multi-Cultural 
Programs and Services, Career Services, International 
Student Scholar Services, and Psychological and 
Counseling Services. University support offices include 
the Credit Union, the Student ID Center, Panther Print and 
Mail, University Technology Services, and the Parking and 
Traffic Office. The Barnes and Noble University Bookstore 
is located on the first floor next to Panther Square. 

The administrative offices of the University Centers are 
located as follows: GC 1215 at University Park (305) 348- 
2297; WUC 325 at Biscayne Bay Campus (305) 919-5800. 

VICTIM ADVOCACY CENTER 

The Victim Advocacy Center provides support services to 
FIU students, faculty, staff and university visitors who have 
been victims and survivors of abuse and/or violence. 
Services are confidential and free of charge, and address 
issues such as sexual violence, 

relationship/dating/domestic abuse, stalking, assault and 
battery, hate crimes, harassment, and issues pertaining to 
adult survivors of child abuse, and homicide survivors. 
The Center also provides awareness and prevention 
education progrms for the community, and volunteer 
training for FIU students. In addition, the center engages 
in research regarding effective interventions and receives 
funding to make national policy recommendations. A 
resource library is also available for student use at the 
Unviersity Park Campus. Persons who have experienced 
actual or threatened victimization are encouraged to seek 
services from the Victim Advocacy Center. 
Location: UHSC 210, Unviersity Park Campus (305) 
348-1215; by appointment at BBC; 24-hour cirsis 
hotline: (305) 348-3000. 

WOMEN'S CENTER 

The Women's Center at FIU provides various programs 
and services related to the intellectual, professional, and 
personal growth of women. The Mentoring Partnerships 
Program, a joint effort with the Office of Alumni Relations, 
matches current FIU female students with a faculty, staff, 
or alumnae mentor who can assist them in developing 
their personal and professional goals, in navigating the 
university, and assist them in developing networks. Other 
programs and services include involvement with NOW 
(National Organization for Women), Take Our Daughters 
to Work Day, and Women Herstory Month, The Women's 
Center collaborates and coordinates with other university 
departments and student organizations to meet the needs 
and enhance the lives of the varied female population on 
campus. Programs and services are open to the entire 
community, but focus on women and include confidential 
referrals, scholarship information, and volunteer 
opportunities. We educate and advocate for systematic 
changes that will improve the lives of women and men. 
Locations: GC 2200, University Park, (305) 348-3692 and 
WUC 257, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5359. 

PRE-COLLEGIATE PROGRAMS AND 

GRANTS 

The Office of Pre-Collegiate Programs and Grants 
prepares, submits, and monitors external grant 
applications for the Division of Student Affairs. The office 
also researches and investigates potential grant 



opportunities, provides direction in the monitoring and 
evaluation of externally funded programs initiated by staff 
members, and serves as liaison with the University's 
Sponsored Research Office. 

This Office develops partnerships with community and 
local educational agencies and acts as liaison with private 
and public agencies and organizations. Training is 
provided for Division staff regarding development and 
management of external funding opportunities. Policies 
regarding grants and grant writing are formulated and 
implemented. Pre-Collegiate Programs and Grants also 
directs grant budgets and oversees budgeting of obtained 
grants. 
Location: MARC 414, University Park, (305) 348-2446. 

PRE-COLLEGIATE PROGRAMS 

Pre-Collegiate Programs provide academic enrichment, 
career planning, and scholarship opportunities to 
promising underrepresented students at the middle and 
high school levels. The progams also expose students to 
the University environment and assists in facilitating the 
transition to college. 
Location: MARC 414, University Park, (305) 348-1742. 

UPWARD BOUND 

The Upward Bound pre-collegiate program is a federally 

funded program designed to prepare underserved high 

school students for college. Upward Bound provides 

participants with supplemental instruction in academic 

areas, counseling, and life skills training. 

Location: GC 155, University Park, (305) 348-1742. 

Educational Talent Search 

Educational Talent Search is a federal initiative to serve 

disadvantaged middle and high school students that need 

support to complete high school and to gain entry into a 

post secondary institution. The program provides services 

and activities that address the personal, academic, career, 

and cultural needs of each participant. 

Location: WUC, 257, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919- 

4223. 

Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement 

Program 

The McNair Program is a federally funded project to help 

talented first generation college students and other 

underrepresented groups to make the transition to 

graduate school. The program is designed to encourage 

undergraduates to prepare for doctoral studies. Students 

who participate in this program are provided with research 

opportunities and are assigned faculty mentors. 

Location: VH 214, University Park, (305) 348-7151. 

COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL 

SERVICES 

The Counseling and Psychological Services Centers offer 
an array of mental health services which enhance the 
emotional and cognitive well-being of students. Individual, 
couple, and group counseling are offered. 

Psychological and neuropsychological testing are also 
available. Programs available to the University community 
include psychoeducational workshops and seminars 
related to marriage, parenting, and mental health issues. 
Consultation services can be utilized by faculty or staff 
regarding student concerns. All services are confidential. 



40 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Location: UHSC 270, University Park, (305) 348-2434; 
WUC 320, Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5305. 
http://www.fiu.edu~psych.ser 

CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES 

Recreational sports programs and fitness facilities are 
available for Florida International University students, 
faculty, staff and alumni through the Offices of Recreation 
Services (UP) and Campus Recreation (BBC). Funding for 
these services is primarily through student fees allocated 
by the FIU Student Government Association (SGA). 

A variety of Intramural (IM) Sports are offered on each 
campus, including men's, women's and co-rec leagues in 
sports such as flag football, basketball, volleyball, softball 
and soccer, and tournaments for sports like racquetball, 
tennis, and golf. Individuals looking for a team are 
encouraged to register as "free agents". Registration for 
Intramural Sports can be initiated via the web on the 
Campus Recreation Services website (see URL below). 

The UP Recreation Center (RC) is equipped with state- 
of-the-art exercise and cardiovascular fitness equipment. 
In addition to free weights, the center provides resistance 
and selectorized equipment, steppers, upright and 
recumbent bicycles, treadmills, rowers, and ellipticals. A 
basketball gym, locker rooms and a Pro Shop are also 
available. The Rec Center is located adjacent to the 
Health Services Complex. 

The BBC Fitness Center is located on the third floor of 
the Wolfe University Center (WUC), with an expanded 
facility under construction. A variety of strength and cardio 
equipment are provided. 

Low or no-cost Group Fitness classes, including pilates, 
kickboxing and step aerobics, are offered throughout the 



year on both campuses, as are specialty classes such as 
yoga, spinning and kung fu cardio. Fitness orientations, 
body composition evaluations, and personal training are 
also featured. Credit and non-credit classes are available. 

The two campuses offer other facilities for recreational 
use. At University Park, Pharmed Arena houses three 
indoor racquetball courts available on a reservation basis. 
The Tennis Centers on each campus offer lighted courts, 
and tennis lessons are available. The BBC Aquatic Center 
and Panther Hall Pool provide on-campus swimming 
opportunities. At UP, students have free access to nearby 
Tamiami Pool during lap swim hours. A current, activated 
Golden Panther photo ID is required for access to all 
recreation facilities and programs. 

Other areas of interest include adventure recreation 
programs, club sports, special events and swim/sport 
camps. 

Both recreation offices provide student employment 
opportunities as sports officials, fitness attendants and 
supervisors, lifeguards, group fitness instructors, office 
assistants and more. 

For additional information, call: 

UP Recreation Services: (305) 348-2951 

BBC Campus Recreation: (305) 919-4571 

UP Recreation Center: 348-2575 

BBC Fitness Center: 919-5678 

UP Panther Hall Pool: 348-1895 

BBC Aquatic Center: 919-4595 

IM Sports: 348-1054 (UP), 919-5678 (BBC) 

Tennis Center: 348-6327 (UP), 919-4571 (BBC) 

UP Racquetball Reservations: 348-2990 

Web Site: http://www.fiu.edu/~camprec/ 



Intercollegiate Athletics 41 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

FIU is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association (NCAA), and the Sun Belt Conference for men 
and women. The University has competed at the NCAA 
Division I level since September of 1987 and is currently at 
the l-A level, the highest classification offered by the 
NCAA. FIU competed successfully at the Division II level 
since 1972. Programs and services in Intercollegiate 
Athletics provide an opportunity for student-athletes to 
develop as skilled performers in an educational setting. 
Much emphasis is placed on the student as a student- 
athlete to ensure intellectual, emotional and social well 
being. 

ATHLETICS 

Athletic team membership is open to all full-time students, 
who meet NCAA eligibility requirements and are enrolled 
in 12 credits. Women's programs consist of basketball, 
volleyball, soccer, golf, tennis, track, softball, cross- 
country and swimming. Men's programs consist of 
basketball, football, soccer, baseball, track and cross- 
country. To be eligible for intercollegiate competition, the 
University requires each student-athlete to be in good 
academic standing and make satisfactory progress toward 
a degree. Team membership is determined in a manner 
which does not discriminate based on race, sex, national 
origin, marital status, age or disability. 

Financial assistance is available to both freshmen and 
transfer students recruited for all 17 athletic teams. 
Assistance may include grants, scholarships, loans or self- 
help programs. To be eligible for financial assistance, 
each student-athlete must be in good academic standing 
and make satisfactory progress toward a degree. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The PharMed Athletic Facilities encompasses seven 
facilities that serve as the sites for athletic, educational 
and recreational activities. 

The PharMed Arena is a multi-purpose facility. There is 
a seating capacity for special events of 5,150. The main 
floor can hold four volleyball courts and two basketball 
courts. The two auxiliary gyms can each hold one full 
basketball court or a volleyball court. Also housed in the 
arena are three racquetball courts, five classrooms and six 
locker rooms. 

The FIU Soccer and FIU Softball stadiums are the home 
of our intercollegiate men's and women's programs. Both 
stadiums are lighted. The soccer stadium seats 1,500 and 
the softball stadium seats 300. 

The FIU Tennis Center has twelve lighted courts and is 
home to the Women's tennis program. Six courts are 
open for daily recreational play. 

The FIU Community Stadium is a Football and Track 
facility. The stadium is the home of our intercollegiate 
football program, and is also the home of our men's and 
women's track and field programs. In the fall, the facility is 
used to host many Miami-Dade County Schools high 
school football games. 

The University Park Baseball Stadium is the home to 
our intercollegiate baseball team. The newly renovated 
stadium has a seating capacity of 1 ,600. 

FIU students are admitted to all regular season 
intercollegiate athletic home events free of charge. 
Presentation of a valid University identification card is 
required. 

For additional information please call: FIU Athletic 
Facilities 348-3258; PharMed Box Office 348-4263 (FIU- 
GAME). 






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42 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Continuing and Professional 
Studies 

The mission of Continuing and Professional Studies 
(CAPS) is to develop and implement quality educational 
programs and services in partnership with the academic, 
business, and professional communities. Through CAPS, 
the instructional and academic resources of the University 
are extended by using innovative approaches including 
distance learning, alternative scheduling, and community- 
based academic credit and non-credit programs. State-of- 
the-art technological capabilities offer a high-quality 
learning environment at the Kovens Conference Center or 
at a customer's location. A professional and courteous 
team is dedicated to the highest standards of customer 
satisfaction. Local, state, national, and international 
communities are served with consistent, cost-effective, 
high quality and distinctive programs and services. 

CAPS carries out its mission to extend lifelong learning 
opportunities to adult and non-traditional students by 
providing increased access to University programs. 
Courses of instruction are developed and offered in a 
variety of formats. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT PROGRAMS 

Degree and certificate programs, as well as courses for 
academic credit, are offered at flexible/compressed times 
and locations to facilitate the scheduling needs of students 
and help enhance their learning opportunities. Courses for 
academic credit are offered off-campus in Miami-Dade, 
Broward and Monroe Counties. Weekend and evening 
degree programs for working professionals are offered in 
collaboration with the University's colleges and schools. 
Instruction using telecommunications technology is offered 
among campuses, public schools, and other locations. 

A public agency or professional organization may wish 
to contract with the University to provide credit courses 
and degree programs at the work site in order to meet 
employee training needs. Study Abroad courses are also 
available in several academic disciplines in Europe, Asia, 
Africa. Latin America and the Caribbean. 

Students may register for CAPS credit courses through 
the PantherSoft registration process. Special on-site 
registration arrangements are made for students who 
meet at off-campus locations. Students who are enrolling 
in Dynamically Dated/Mini Term courses have up to two 
(2) consecutive days (weekend days are included) after 
classes begin to withdraw without any financial 
obligations. For more information on Academic Credit 
Programs call (305) 919-5669. 

NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS 

In its effort to provide lifelong learning opportunities to 
non-traditional students, CAPS offers professional and 
personal enrichment programs and courses to diverse 
populations throughout South Florida. These non-credit 
courses and certificate programs are also available 
globally through web-based, self-directed formats. For 
more information on Non-Credit Programs call (305) 919- 
5669. 



PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

Professional Development provides individuals, 
businesses, and organizations with the opportunity to 
maximize personnel potential through customized training 
with experienced university faculty and staff, based on a 
client's specific needs and learning style. University- or 
site-based training extends from communication skills and 
human resource issues to business development, office 
skills, and specialized language training. For more 
information call (305) 919-5669. 

ACADEMY FOR LIFELONG LEARNING 

Using the Kovens Conference Center at the Biscayne Bay 
Campus as its base, non-credit personal enrichment 
courses are offered in the arts, literature, film, current 
events, international relations, languages, computers, and 
personal growth. Students of all ages can avail 
themselves of experts in these fields, many of whom are 
regular faculty at Florida International University. For 
more information call (305) 919-5910. 

DISTANCE LEARNING 

Distance Learning staff coordinate credit and professional 
development courses through state-of-the-art technology. 
Students are linked with professors electronically through 
television, computers, videotape, video conferencing, 
satellite teleconferencing, and other innovative 
technologies. 

Distance Learning may occur anywhere/anytime during 
the day at the convenience of the learner. Some 
technology-based instruction occurs at specific times and 
at specific locations on and off-campus. 

Each Distance Learning course is the equivalent of an 
on-campus section with the same learning objectives, 
course content, and transferability. Students must meet 
stated prerequisites or assessment scores where 
applicable, and some additional fees may apply at 
registration. Distance Learning courses provide the 
student a higher degree of scheduling flexibility. For more 
information about Distance Learning and course offerings, 
call (305) 919-5669. 

LEGAL STUDIES INSTITUTE 

The following Legal Studies programs, taught by area 
attorneys and judges, are offered: Paralegal (online and 
on-site at University Park, Biscayne Bay Campus, and the 
Broward Pines Center), Legal Secretary, Law Office 
Management, Immigration and Nationality Law, 
Medical/Legal Consultant, Mediation Training Programs, 
Investigation Techniques, Pre-Licensing Risk 
Management for Health Care Providers, and other courses 
for attorneys and paralegals, as well as Continuing Legal 
Education opportunities for members of the Bench and 
Bar. For more information call (305) 348-2491 . 

MULTICULTURAL TRAINING INSTITUTE 

Programs, workshops, and seminars covering various 
disciplines and taught in different languages (Spanish, 
French, and Portuguese, for example) are also available. 
Some of these non-credit offerings include ISO-9000 
Quality Management System, Web Planning & Design, 



Continuing and Professional Studies 43 



Comparative Law, and Public Speaking Skills. For more 
information call (305) 348-2492. 

KOVENS CONFERENCE CENTER 

The award-winning Roz and Cal Kovens Conference 
Center at Florida International University supports the 
teaching, research, and public service mission of the 
University by providing high-end, state-of-the-art 
conference and meeting services to its clients. The 
Conference Center was engineered, designed, and 
furnished exclusively to maximize the productivity of its 
clients' meetings and events. The Center can 
accommodate a wide range of events such as large 
conferences, government symposiums, professional 
seminars, multinational corporate meetings, 

videoconferences, webcasts and social events. 



The Center's state-of-the-art meeting rooms and 
computer labs are fully equipped with high-speed Internet 
access, high-end telecommunications resources, 
videoconferencing and audiovisual services. Conferees 
have access to uplink/downlink satellite transmission 
enabling them to transmit to and from locations throughout 
the world. Simultaneous translation capabilities for up to 
three languages are also available. 

The Kovens Conference Center's experienced team of 
professionals is ready to assist in transforming program 
ideas into successful conferences, workshops, seminars, 
institutes, meetings and other related professional and 
educational activities. For more information call the 
Kovens Conference Center at (305)-91 9-5000 or 866-4- 
KOVENS, or visit online at www.kovens.fiu.edu. 

Website http://www.caps.fiu.edu . 




ROZ AND CAL KOVENS CONFERENCE CENTER 



44 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Undergraduate Admissions 

Florida International University encourages and accepts 
applications from qualified applicants without regard to 
sex, physical handicap, cultural, racial, religious, or ethnic 
background or association. 

APPLICATION PROCESS 

Students interested in applying can do so via the following 
methods: 

Application Online 

Students with internet access can apply online by visiting 
FlU's website at http://www.fiu.edu/~admiss/ for 
application and instructions. A valid credit card is required 
for submitting online applications. A $25.00 non- 
refundable fee (U.S. dollars) will be charged for each 
online application. 

Paper Application 

FIU uses a common institutional application form for all 
undergraduate programs. This application can be 
downloaded from http://www.fiu.edu/~admiss/ . A 
$30.00 non-refundable application fee (U.S. dollars) made 
payable to Florida International University must 
accompany applications submitted. 

All credentials and documents submitted to the Office of 
Admissions become the property of Florida International 
University. Originals will not be returned to the applicant or 
forwarded to another institution. 

FRESHMAN APPLICANTS 

In addition to the application, the following credentials are 
required: 

1. Official secondary school transcripts and appropriate 
test scores: Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test (ACT). 

All official transcripts, test scores, and any other 
required credentials must be received directly from the 
issuing agencies, and forwarded to P.O. Box 659003, 
Miami, FL. 33265-9003. It is the applicant's responsibility 
to initiate the request for credentials to the issuing 
agencies and to assure their receipt by the Office of 
Admissions. 

2. Proof of graduation from an accredited secondary 
school must be submitted. 

3. Eighteen academic units in college preparatory 
courses are required as follows: 

English 4 

Mathematics 3 

Natural Science 3 

Social Science 3 

Foreign Language 1 2 

Academic Electives 2 3 
Two units in the same foreign language are required. 
Academic Electives are from the fields of mathematics, 
English, natural science, social science, and a foreign 
language. The academic grade point average will be 
computed only on the units listed above. Grades in honors 
courses, International Baccalaureate (IB), and advanced 
placement (AP) courses will be given additional weight. 

Freshman admission decisions are made based on the 
student's strong academic preparation. Competition for 



piaces in the freshman class is created by the quality and 
extent of the applicant pool. 

Applicants who do not meet the above criteria will be 
reviewed by the Admissions Review Committee. Those 
who show potential in areas not easily evaluated by 
standardized tests can be considered for admission under 
the Profile Assessment Rule. 

Students who are applying to majors in Theatre, Music, 
and Dance, in addition to meeting university academic 
standards, must meet the approval of the respective 
department through an audition. Students should contact 
the specific department for audition dates. 

TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

Degree seeking applicants with fewer than 60 semester 
hours of transfer credits must meet the same requirements 
as beginning freshmen. In addition, they must 
demonstrate satisfactory performance in their college 
work. 

Applicants who receive an Associate in Arts (A.A.) 
degree from a Florida Public Community College or State 
University in Florida will be considered for admission 
without restriction except for published limited access 
programs within the University. 

All other applicants from Florida Public Community 
Colleges or State Universities in Florida who do not hold 
an Associate in Arts degree (A.A.) must have completed 
60 semester hours of transferable credit, have a minimum 
grade point average of 2.0, and must present College 
Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST) scores before 
admission can be granted. 

Students transferring from independent Florida and out- 
of-state colleges into the University's upper division must 
have maintained a minimum 2.0 grade point average 
based upon a 4.0 scale. 

Coursework transferred or accepted for credit toward an 
undergraduate degree must be completed at an institution 
accredited as degree-granting by a regional accrediting 
body for higher education at the time the coursework was 
completed. Each academic department will review transfer 
credits to determine if they meet program requirements 
and reserves the right to accept or reject those credits. 
Students must contact their academic department to 
obtain any additional requirements needed for their 
program of study. 

All applicants must meet the criteria published for limited 
access programs and should consult the specific college 
and major for requirements. 

Applicants who meet the above admissions 
requirements, but have not completed the University's 
core curriculum requirements, or the prerequisites of their 
proposed major, may complete this college work at FIU, or 
at any other accredited institution. Students may also fulfill 
general education requirements through the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP). 

Official transcripts from all previous post secondary 
institutions must be forwarded to the Office of Admissions. 
Students are responsible for initiating this request. 

Transfer applicants from a Florida Community College 
are encouraged to review the current edition of FlU's 



Undergraduate Admissions 45 



transfer student counseling manual available in all of 
Florida's community colleges counseling offices. 

All students seeking admission to the University 
regardless of whether the student holds an A.A., must 
have completed two years of credit in one foreign 
language at the high school level or 8-10 credits in one 
foreign language at the college level (American Sign 
Language is acceptable). If a student is admitted to the 
University without this requirement, the credits must be 
completed prior to graduation. 

Students who can demonstrate continuous enrollment in 
a degree program at an SUS institution or Florida 
Community College since Fall Term, 1989 (continuous 
enrollment is defined by the state to be the completion of 
at least one course per academic year) can be exempt 
from this requirement. Students holding an A. A. degree 
from a Florida Community College or SUS institution prior 
to Fall Term, 1989 will also be exempt. 

Students who are applying to majors in Theatre, Music, 
and Dance, in addition to meeting university academic 
standards, must meet the approval of the respective 
department through an audition. Students should contact 
the department for audition dates. 

Applicants whose native language is not English and 
who have not taken any college level English courses, 
must present a minimum score of 500 paper-based and a 
minimum score of 173 computer-based in the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

Admission decisions will not be made before the 
application is completed and all supporting documents are 
on file in the Office of Admissions. Applications are kept 
on file for one year from the anticipated entrance date. 

Admission to the University is a selective process and 
satisfying the general requirements does not guarantee 
acceptance. 

LIMITED ACCESS PROGRAMS 

A limited access program utilizes selective admission to 
limit program enrollment. Limited access status is justified 
where student demand exceeds available resources such 
as faculty, instructional facilities, equipment, or specific 
accrediting requirements. Criteria for selective admission 
include indicators of ability, performance, creativity, or 
talent to complete required work within the program. 
Florida Community College transfer students with 
Associate in Arts degrees are given equal consideration 
with FIU students. Admission to such programs is 
governed by the Articulation Agreement and the Florida 
Board of Education rules. 

The following FIU programs have been designated as 
limited access: 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

Nursing 

Occupational Therapy 

INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS 

International student applicants must meet the admission 
requirements of the University as described in the 
previous sections and comply with the following: 

Academic Records 

Official transcripts, diplomas, and/or certificates must be 
sent directly from each previous institution to the Office of 
Admissions. Documents in a language other than English 
must be translated by an official translation agency. 
Notarized translations are not acceptable. 



Effective Fall 2004, all undergraduate applicants with 
international educational credentials must provide a 
transcript evaluation from one of the following two member 
services of the National Association of Credential 
Evaluation Services (NACES): 

Official evaluations must be forwarded directly to FIU from 
the evaluation service. 
Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. 
7101 S.W. 102 Avenue 
Miami, FL 33173 
(305)273-1616 
www.isilny.com 

Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. 

P.O. Box 514070 

Milwaukee, Wl 53203-3470 

(414) 289-3400 

www.ece.org 

High school diplomas require a document by document 
evaluation with U.S. equivalent Grade Point Average 
(GPA). College transcripts require a course by course 
evaluation with a calculated U.S. equivalent grade point 
average. 

Proficiency in English 

Applicants whose native language is not English and who 
have not taken any college level English courses, must 
present a minimum score of 500 paper-based and a 
minimum score of 173 computer-based in the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), or a minimum of 
3 on the Advanced Placement International English 
Language Examination (APIEL). 

Declaration and Certification of Finances 

Upon receipt of the application for admission, the 
Declaration and Certification of Finances will be mailed to 
the applicant. It must be completed and returned to the 
Office of Admissions. A Certificate of Eligibility (Form I- 
20A) will be issued once the applicant has been found 
admissible to the University. 

The University is required by immigration authorities to 
check carefully the financial resources of each applicant 
prior to issuing the Form I-20A. Therefore, it is important 
that appli-cants are aware of the cost of attending the 
University and have the necessary financial support for the 
period of enrollment. Applicants should refer to the Annual 
Estimate of Cost Chart. 

The total funds available for the student for the first or 
second academic year, or both, must equal the total 
estimate of institutional costs and living expenses. All 
items in the Declaration and Certification of Finances must 
be accurately answered to avoid unnecessary delay in 
processing. This document along with proof of sufficient 
funds must be received by the Office of Admissions two 
months prior to the anticipated entry date. 

Refer to the Annual Estimate of Cost table for more 
information. A married student should plan on an 
additional $6,000 in costs to cover the living expenses of a 
spouse. 

A couple with children should anticipate further yearly 
additional costs of no less than $4,000 for each child. 

Medical Insurance 

The State of Florida requires that all international students 
maintain health insurance coverage to help defray the 
costs in case of catastrophic medical emergency. The 
policy must provide specific levels of coverage which have 



46 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



been established to ensure that the policy is adequate to 
provide for costs at U.S. hospitals, usually much higher 
than costs in many other parts of the world. In addition, a 
policy must have a claims agent in the United States who 
may be contacted by medical providers and who facilitates 
prompt payment of claims. The University has approved a 
plan which meets the state requirements and which meets 
the needs of most students; however, a student on F 
status may select alternate coverage provided it meets the 
state requirements for minimal coverage. A copy of these 
requirements is available from International Student and 
Scholar Services. Students are advised not to purchase 
insurance policies prior to arrival without verifying that the 
policies meet FIU/SUS requirements. Students in J status 
are required by the United States Information Agency to 
maintain health insurance coverage for themselves and 
their dependents for the full length of their program. 
Florida International University requires students on J 
status sponsored by FIU to purchase the University 
approved medical insurance plan for themselves and their 
dependents. Compliance with the insurance regulation is 
required prior to registration. 

Priority Consideration 

Due to the additional processing time required for 
international students, application and supporting 
documents should be submitted as early as possible. We 
recommend the following Time frames - February 1 sl if you 
are applying for summer semester, April 1 st if you are 
applying for fall semester, and September 1 sl if you are 
applying for spring semester. 

If the application and supporting documents are 
not received within appropriate time, the application 
for admissions will be considered for the following 
term. 

Required Entrance Tests 

All freshman applicants are required to submit the results 
of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American 
College Test (ACT). 

Tuition 

An international student is considered a non-resident and 
is assessed non-resident fees. Immigration regulations 
require an international student to attend school each fall 
and spring semester. An undergraduate student is 
required to take a minimum of twelve credit hours per 
semester. Please refer to the section on Student Fees and 
Student Accounts for more information. 



Annual Estimate of Costs 

for Undergraduate 

International Students 

Single Student (30 semester hrs) 

Tuition and Fees 1 $ 13,079 

Maintenance 2 $ 13,524 

Books & Supplies $ 800 

Medical Insurance $ 766 

Total $ 28,169 

' Tuition and fees are subject to change. 

Fees include the Student Health Fee ($54 per semester), the Athletic Fee 
($10.00 per semester) and the Parking and Access Fees ($47 90 per 
semester). Amounts shown reflect 15 semester hours of undergraduate 
credit Fall and Spring terms only. 

Maintenance is estimated at $1,127.00 per month to cover room, board, 
clothing, transportation, and incidentals This cost is for nine months. 
All international students are required to carry medical insurance. 



Full-Time Enrollment Requirement 

Non-immigrant alien students in F-1 visa status are 
required by United States immigration regulations to be 
enrolled full-time, except for the summer terms, and to 
make satisfactory progress toward the degree program in 
each term; otherwise the student's immigration status may 
be jeopardized. Full-time enrollment is defined as 
enrollment every term for a minimum of 12 semester hours 
(undergraduate), or nine semester hours (graduate). 

The laws and regulations of the United States 
Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization 
Service state: 

It is the student's responsibility to comply with all non- 
immigrant alien requirements as stated under the United 
States laws under Section 101(a)(15)(f)(i) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act. 

Granting official Extension of Stay is dependent upon 
the student's achieving satisfactory academic progress 
toward the degree requirements. 

Employment 

The legal regulations governing F-1 student employment 
are complex, and advisors are available at International 
Student and Scholar Services to explain these regulations. 
International students must check with this office before 
engaging in any type of employment, either paid or 
unpaid. In general, however, employment is available only 
to students who maintain their legal status in the U.S. and 
is regulated under three categories: 

a) On-campus employment: F-1 students may be 
employed on the FIU campus for a maximum of 20 hours 
per week during fall and spring semesters while school is 
in session, and full time during holidays, vacations, and 
summer. On-campus employment includes teaching and 
research assistantships for graduate students and hourly 
part time work. Students must contact individual campus 
departments to inquire about employment opportunities. 

b) Off-campus employment: F-1 students may request 
off-campus employment under very limited conditions and 
only after maintaining F-1 status for at least one full 
academic year. Off-campus employment opportunities are 
not readily available, and students should not rely on off- 
campus employment as a source of income to finance 
their studies. 

c) Practical training: F-1 students may request practical 
training employment to accept jobs related to their studies. 
Students usually pursue practical training employment 
after completion of degree requirements, although in some 
cases practical training may be authorized prior to 
completion of studies. Since practical training employment 
is limited to one year of full-time employment, students 
cannot rely on it as a source of income to finance their 
studies. 

Note: An international student will not be granted 
admission to the University until all academic and non- 
academic requirements have been met. Under no 
circumstances should a student come to the University 
without having received the official Letter of Admission 
and the I-20A Form. All correspondence and document 
submissions should be directed to: Office of Admissions, 
Florida International University, P.O. Box 659003 Miami, 
Florida 33265-9003. 



Undergraduate Admissions 47 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

FIU recognizes students who are academically, artistically, 
and athletically talented and encourages them to apply. 
The University awards several full and partial 
scholarships. 

National Merit/Achievement Scholarship 
Program 

Florida Internationa! University recognizes the academic 
talent of students who are selected as National Merit and 
National Achievement Finalists by the National Merit 
Scholarship Corporation. National Merit/Achievement 
Scholarship packages are worth up to $36,000 for four 
consecutive years at the University. 

National Hispanic Scholarship 

Outstanding Hispanic students who are recognized by the 
College Board as National Hispanic Scholars are eligible 
for the University's National Hispanic Award. The award is 
worth up to $36,000 for four consecutive years at the 
University. 

Presidential Scholarships 

Outstanding entering freshmen are selected each year to 
receive the Presidential Scholarship. 
All qualifying students who complete the application 
process before the scholarship deadline will be considered 
and the awards will be given to selected candidates on a 
competitive basis based on the applicant pool. Students 
must have a minimum 3.5 GPA to compete. 

• Students scoring 1300 or higher on the SAT or 29 or 
higher on the ACT will be eligible to receive $3,000 per 
year. 

• Students scoring between 1200-1290 on the SAT or 27- 
28 on the ACT will be eligible to receive $2,000 per 
year. 

Academic Excellence Scholarship 

High school seniors with a 3.5 GPA and commensurate 
SAT or ACT scores may be eligible to receive the 
Academic Excellence Scholarship. This scholarship is a 
partial tuition award and may be renewed annually. 

Valedictorian and Salutatorian Scholarships 

To recognize the efforts of high school seniors who 
graduate first or second in their class, the University offers 
Valedictorian and Salutatorian Scholarships. 
Fall Term Entry Awards 

• Valedictorians who meet the fall admissions 
requirement are eligible to receive a $5,000 per year 
renewable scholarship. 

• Salutatorians who meet the fall admissions 
requirement are eligible to receive a $4,000 per year 
renewable scholarship. 

Summer Term Entry Awards 

• Valedictorians who meet the Summer admissions 
requirement are eligible to receive a $2,000 per year 
renewable scholarship. 

• Salutatorians who meet the Summer admissions 
requirement are eligible to receive a $1,000 per year 
renewable scholarship. 

Bright Futures Scholarship Program 

Florida high school seniors may qualify for one of the 
following scholarships from the Florida Department of 
Education: 



• Florida Merit Scholars: students with a 3.0 GPA and 
a 970 SAT or 20 ACT receive a package worth up to 
75% of tuition and fees. 

• Florida Academic Scholars: students with a 3.5 
GPA and a 1270 SAT or 28 ACT can earn a full tuition 
scholarship and a $600 book stipend. 

• Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars: students 
who complete a two-year vocational or technical 
program with a 3.0 GPA overall and 3.5 GPA in 
vocational courses can earn a scholarship worth up to 
75% of tuition. 

Transfer Academic Scholarships 

Transfer students who would like to be considered for 
academic scholarships must apply through the Honors 
College. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis 
of their transfer GPA (with special attention paid to 
performance in honors courses), extra-curricular activities, 
and letters of recommendation. All scholarship recipients 
must be members of the Honors College and maintain full- 
time enrollment. 

For more detailed information on these scholarships, 
applicants should contact the Honors College, DM 233 - 
University Park, (305) 348-4100. 
Holcombe Scholars 

Available only to graduates of Broward Community 
College, this award covers the full cost of in-state tuition 
and registration fees. Requires a minimum GPA of 3.5. 
Padron Scholars 

Available only to graduates of Miami-Dade College, this 
award covers the full cost of in-state tutition and 
registration fees. Requires a minimum GPA of 3.5. 
Presidential Scholars 

Available to graduates of all Florida Community Colleges, 
this award covers the full costs of in-state tutition and 
registration fees. Requires a minimum GPA of 3.5. 
FIU/CC Honors Scholarship 

Available to graduates of Florida Community Colleges who 
have received the A.A. degree. This partial award requires 
a minimum GPA of 3.3 and provides support for a 
maximum of four semesters. 

Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship 

Each year one outstanding member of PTK is awarded a 

scholarship for a maximum of two years. Interested 

students must submit a recommendation letter from their 

PTK faculty advisor. Requires a minimum GPA of 3.3. 

All-Florida Academic Team Scholarship 

Available to graduates of a Florida Community College, 

who have been identified as a member of the current All 

Florida/All USA Academic Team. Requires a minimum 

GPA of 3.3. 

Non-Florida Residents Scholarship Award 

Transfer students who are admitted to the Honors College 

may be considered for partial out-of-state tutition 

scholarships on a merit basis. Competition is keen, and 

the awards are limited. 

Advising for Major Fellowships 

Undergraduate Studies provides assistance for those 

outstanding students who are seeking to obtain nationally 

competitive scholarships. This assistance includes 

working with students as early as possible to ensure that 

they have developed the background appropriate for 

applying for these prestigious awards such as a Fulbright, 



48 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Goldwater, Hertz, Luce, Marshall, Mellon, National 
Science Foundation, Rhodes, Rotary, and Truman. All are 
awarded through national competition. The office also 
provides advice on obtaining letters of recommendation, 
writing educational and career goal statements, and 
completing the applications, and even arranges mock 
interviews for finalists in some programs. Because 
applicants typically have grade point averages above 3.8, 
students must make themselves competitive in other ways 
also. Having a record of substantive internships, research, 
and continuing community service that reflect on your 
overall goals helps considerably. Most applications are 
made early in the fall of the senior year. Further 
information and the names of the designated faculty for 
each award are available from Undergraduate Studies at 
University Park, PC 245, (305) 348-2800 or Biscayne Bay 
Campus, ACI 180, (305) 919-5754. Visit the web site at: 
www.fiu.edu/~understu/newsscholar.htm . 

RE-ADMISSION 

An admitted degree-seeking student who has not enrolled 
in any course at the University for four semesters or more 
will be required to apply for re-admission. . The student 
must meet the University and program regulations in effect 
at the time of re-admission. Students must contact the 
Office of Admissions to apply for re-admission. 

Students with Internet access can visit FlU's website at 
http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/admiss/ download the 

application, complete and mail to Florida International 
University, Office of Admissions, P.O. Box 659003, Miami, 
Florida 33265-9003. 



UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC AMNESTY 

FIU undergraduate students who apply for re-admission 
and have not been enrolled in any university or college for 
at least six calendar years may apply for academic 
amnesty. If re-admitted, students will begin with a new 
grade point average of 0.0. No grades previously earned 
will be included in the University grade point average, 
however, credit for previous University courses, in which a 
grade of "C" or better was earned may be applied toward a 
degree, subject to determination by the College of the 
student's major. All prior courses attempted and grades 
received will remain on the student's transcript. Admitted 
or re-admitted students may not petition for any retroactive 
change in their academic record utilizing this policy. 
Students applying for academic amnesty to a limited 
access program must meet the admission criteria of that 
program. Students must follow the regular re-admission 
application process and complete the amnesty form for 
consideration to be determined by the student's academic 
dean. Re-admission applications and academic amnesty 
applications may be obtained in the Office of Admissions. 

UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC SALVAGE 

FIU undergraduate students who are academically 
dismissed from the University or who have a GPA below a 
2.0, and who subsequently receive an Associate of Arts 
degree from another Florida public institution of higher 
learning may apply for academic salvage. If re-admitted, 
students will begin with a new FIU grade point average of 
0.0. Students re-admitted under Academic Salvage will be 
credited with a maximum of 60 semester credit hours. 
Students must follow the regular re-admission application 
process and complete the Academic Salvage form for 
consideration by the student's academic dean. Re- 
admission applications and academic salvage applications 
may be obtained in the Office of Admissions. 



Rules & Regulations 49 



University Undergraduate 
Rules and Regulations 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The University classifies students as follows: 

Degree-Seeking Students 

This category includes students who have been admitted 

to a degree program, but have not completed the 

requirements for the degree. 

Freshmen - Students who have earned fewer than 30 

semester hours. 

Sophomores - Students who have earned at least 30 

semester hours but fewer than 60 semester hours. 

Juniors - Students who have earned at least 60 semester 

hours but fewer than 90 semester hours. 

Seniors - Students who have earned 90 or more 

semester hours but who have not earned a baccalaureate 

degree. 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 

Non-Degree students may be either affiliated with a 
College or School or unaffiliated in their status. 
Unaffiliated students are limited to taking one semester of 
courses at the University. Affiliated students must be 
approved by the appropriate College or School and must 
meet its specific requirements. Under no circumstances 
may more than 15 hours, taken as a non-degree seeking 
student, be applied to a degree program, if the student 
changes from non-degree seeking to degree-seeking 
status. 

The following regulations apply to non-degree seeking 
students: 

1. Students are not required to meet the usual 
admission requirements and are not officially admitted as 
regular students. Enrollment as a non-degree seeking 
student does not imply a right for future admission as a 
regular, degree-seeking student. Credit earned will not be 
counted toward a degree at the University unless such 
students subsequently apply for regular admission and 
are accepted as undergraduate or graduate students. 

2. Registration is permitted on a space-available basis 
and is determined at the time of registration. Non-degree 
seeking students may not register during the official 
registration week for degree-seeking studen*s. 

3. No more than 15 undergraduate level semester 
hours earned as a non-degree seeking student may be 
counted toward a degree. The appropriate dean must 
approve the acceptance of such credit. 

4. Non-degree seeking students will not be allowed to 
register for more than one term without obtaining 
admission to a degree program at the University, or 
obtaining admission into a formal certificate program, or 
acquiring affiliated status from the department in which 
they are registering. 

5. Applicants denied admission to the University will not 
be allowed to register as non-degree seeking students for 
a period of one year without obtaining admission into a 
formal Certificate Program or obtaining affiliated status 
from the appropriate academic department. 



6. Immigration regulations prevent most foreign 
nationals from enrolling without being admitted into a 
formal degree or certificate program, depending on the 
type of visa that they have. International students should 
contact the Office of International Student and Scholar 
Services for further information 
URL: http://www. fiu.edu/~iss . 

Affiliated Students 

Students applying for affiliated status as non-degree 
seeking students must be approved by the appropriate 
dean in accordance with criteria approved by that College 
or School's Faculty Curriculum Committee. 

Transient Students 

This category includes students who are fully admitted 
and are actively pursuing a degree at another accredited 
two or four year institution and wish to take courses at FIU 
for a semester. Such students need to present evidence 
of their status from their home institution each semester 
before they will be allowed to register. 

Certificate Students 

This category includes students who have been accepted 
into a specific certificate program by the academic 
department responsible for that program. Certificate 
programs are subject to all University regulations. 

COLLEGE/MAJOR CLASSIFICATION 

Lower division students have a college designation of 
lower division with a major designation of their intended 
major (if indicated by the student). This designation does 
not imply subsequent admission to that degree program. 

Degree-seeking upper division students admitted to an 
upper level degree program are classified according to the 
college or school and major of their degree program; and 
when applicable, to the college or school and major of 
their second major. 

When admitted students reach a total of 60 or more 
credit hours (including transfer and current enrollment), 
they may apply for admission into an upper division major, 
provided they have passed the CLAST or met the 
necessary requirements for CLAST exemption. All 
degree-seeking undergraduates must be admitted into an 
upper division major prior to completing 75 credit hours, 
including transfer hours. 

ACADEMIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor's Degree 

The University will confer the bachelor's degree when the 
following conditions have been met: 

1 . Recommended by the faculty of the College or the 
School awarding the degree. 

2. Certified by the dean of the College or the School 
that all requirements of the degree being sought have 
been completed. 

3. Completion of a minimum of 120 semester hours in 
acceptable coursework. 

4. Completion of the last 30 credit hours at the 
University. Exceptions (normally not to exceed six hours) 
may be made in advance by the appropriate dean. 

5. Completion of the University Core Curriculum. 



50 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



6. Earned a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher at the 
University. 

7. Earned the grade requirements for major, University 
Core Curriculum Courses, and course sequences 
established by the appropriate College or School. 

8. Satisfactory completion of the College Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) requirement. 

9. Completion of 8-10 sequential credits in one foreign 
language (American Sign Language is acceptable). 
Students who entered the University with a foreign 
language requirement deficiency, regardless of whether 
the student holds an A.A., must complete 8-10 sequential 
credits in one foreign language. Transfer credit acceptable 
to the requirement, and exemption by CLEP examination 
is available. Students who have successfully completed 
two years of high school foreign language study in one 
language are considered to have met the requirement. 

Students who can demonstrate continuous enrollment 
in a degree program at an SUS institution or Florida 
Community College since Fall Term, 1989 (continuous 
enrollment is defined by the state to be the completion of 
at least one course per year) will be exempt from this 
requirement. Also exempt are students holding an A.A. 
degree from a Florida Community College or SUS 
institution prior to Fall Term, 1989. 

Two Bachelor Degrees 

Two bachelor degrees may be awarded simultaneously 
when the following conditions have been met: 

1. Requirements for two majors have been completed 
as certified by the appropriate academic units. 

2. A minimum of 30 appropriate semester hours in 
addition to the requirements of one degree has been 
earned. 

A graduate from an accredited four-year institution who 
applies for admission to work toward a second bachelor's 
degree must meet the requirements of the major 
department which shall include (but is not limited to) a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of coursework. 

Two Majors for a Bachelor's Degree 

Any undergraduate student who elects to do so may carry 
two majors and work to fulfill the requirements of both 
concurrently. Upon successful comple-tion of the 
requirements of two majors, the student will be awarded 
one degree and a notation denoting both majors will be 
entered on the transcript. A Request for Second Major 
form must be filled out in the Office of the Registrar to 
declare two majors. 

Minors and Certificate Programs 

Students who have completed an approved minor as part 
of their baccalaureate degree program will have this 
notation as a part of the degree comment on their 
transcript. 

Students who have completed an approved certificate 
program will have an appropriate notation placed on their 
transcript. 

Associate in Arts 

Students who satisfactorily complete 60 semester hours 
of acceptable college work with an overall GPA of 2.0 or 
higher, fulfill the Lower Division University Core 



Curriculum requirements, pass the College Level 
Academic Skills Test (CLAST) and complete at least 20 
credit hours in residence at the University may apply for 
the Associate in Arts degree. Students who transfer in 36 
or more credits are not eligible to apply. The Associate of 
Arts degree will not be awarded on completion of the 
baccalaureate degree. A notation will appear on the 
student's transcript but no diploma will be issued. 

SUMMER ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENT 

All students entering FIU or any University within the 
Florida University System with fewer than 60 credit hours 
are required to earn at least nine credit hours prior to 
graduation by attending one or more summer terms at a 
Florida State University. 

ACADEMIC DEFINITIONS 
Program and Course Regulations 
Credit Hour 

The term credit hour as used refers to one hour of 
classwork, or the equivalent, each week for an entire 
academic term. 

Major 

An integral part of the bachelor's degree is a major 
concentration of coursework in an approved academic 
discipline or area. The exact course and credit 
requirements and prerequisites for each major are 
outlined in the departmental program areas in the catalog. 

Electives 

Students may select courses from any academic area to 
complement their area or areas of study or to meet their 
interests in order to fulfill the credit hour requirements for 
the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite course requirements 
should be considered in selecting elective courses. 
Students should refer to their academic program 
requirements concerning electives. 
Minor Program 

A minor program is an arrangement of courses that 
enables students to develop some degree of expertise in 
one area of study. A minor is awarded upon completion of 
the bachelor's degree, but is not interdisciplinary in 
nature. 

Certificate Program 

A certificate program is a combination of courses with a 
common base or interest selected from one or more 
academic disciplines and so arranged as to form an area 
of academic concentration. Three types of certificates are 
awarded: academic, professional, and continuing studies. 
Students must apply and be admitted into the professional 
certificate program. 

Change of College/School or Major 

A fully admitted undergraduate student may change 
majors, provided he or she meets the entrance 
requirements of the new program, by submitting a 
Request for Change of College/School or Major form. The 
form and instructions are available in the Office of the 
Registrar. The student is subject to the program 
requirements in effect at the time of the change of major. 



Rules & Regulations 51 



REGISTRATION 

The following registration information is subject to change 
and students must verify the dates with the Office of the 
Registrar, PC 130, University Park; or ACI-100, Biscayne 
Bay Campus; or at the Pines Educational Center, (954) 
438-8600 

All students, degree and non-degree seeking, 
registering for more that 18 credit hours during one 
semester must obtain the approval and the signature of 
the dean of their College or School. 
Registration for courses is as follows: 

Official Registration is held during the preceding 
semester (check the Academic Calendar for the dates). 
Degree-seeking students are given an appointment day 
and time based on their classification, GPA, and credit 
hours completed. Students may also add/drop at this time. 

Open Registration is held following Official Registration. 
There is no appointment day and time and registration is 
on a first-come, first-served basis. All students who have 
not yet registered are encouraged to do so at this time. 
Students who have already registered may also add or 
drop courses during this period. 

Web/Kiosk Registration 

All students are able to retrieve their grades, registration 
appointment time and day; classroom assignments; 
registration holds (if any) and to register/drop/add courses 
using the World Wide Web ( http://sis.fiu.edu ), or the on- 
campus kiosks. Students must use their PantherSoft ID 
and password in order to utilize the system. 

IMMUNIZATION 

To register for courses, students, under the age of 40, 
must provide documentation of immunization against 
measles and rubella. Documentation may be submitted 
directly to the University Health Care and Wellness 
Center, University Park; or HM 110, Biscayne Bay 
Campus. Students should contact the Health Care and 
Wellness Center for more information at (305) 348-2401 
or at (305) 919-5620. 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE 

Any student, degree-seeking or non-degree seeking, who 
initiates registration after the registration deadline is 
assessed a $100.00 late registration fee. Students may 
initiate late registration during the first week of classes. 

DROPPING AND ADDING COURSES 

The Official Drop/Add period runs throughout the first 
week of classes (check the Academic Calendar for 
specific dates). During this period a student may drop or 
add courses without financial penalty or initiate 
registration with financial penalty (the late registration 
fee). Students may also drop courses or withdraw from 
the University with no record of enrollment and without a 
tuition fee liability. Students may use the World Wide Web 
( http://sis.fiu.edu) . or the on-campus kiosks to officially 
drop a course. If the tuition fee has already been paid, a 
refund will be generated by the Student Financials Office 
and mailed to the local address on file. 



LATE ADDS 

Students may add courses with appropriate authorization 
and signatures until the end of the third week of classes. 
No course can be added after this deadline. 

LATE DROPS 

Courses officially dropped after the Drop/Add period and 
through the eighth week of the term, (summer terms have 
different deadlines - check the Academic Calendar for 
specific dates), are recorded on the student's transcript 
with a grade of 'DR' (dropped). The student is financially 
liable for all dropped courses. Students must drop courses 
using the World Wide Web ( http://sis.fiu.edu ) or the 
on-campus kiosks. Non-attendance or non-payment will 
not constitute a drop. 

A student may appeal the deadline for a late drop by 
submitting the Appeal to Drop/Withdraw Without Refund 
form. A drop after the deadline will be approved only in 
cases where circumstances beyond the student's control 
make it impossible for the student to continue. The 
student must provide appropriate documentation. Upon 
approval of the appeal, the course instructor will designate 
whether the student was passing or failing the course at 
the time of the appeal to drop form was submitted. A 'DP' 
grade indicates the student dropped the class with a 
passing grade. A 'DF' grade indicates the student dropped 
the class with a failing grade. The 'DF' grade is calculated 
in the student's term and cumulative GPA. The deadline 
to submit appeals is one year after the end of the term in 
which the course was taken. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A currently registered student can withdraw from the 
University only during the first eight weeks of the 
semester. In the Summer semester, withdrawal deadlines 
will be adjusted accordingly. A Withdrawal Form must be 
completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. 
Non-attendance or non-payment will not constitute a 
withdrawal. (Refer to the Academic Calendar for the 
deadline dates.) 

The transcript of a student who drops all classes before 
or during the first week of classes will contain no record of 
enrollment and no tuition fee will be assessed. If the 
tuition has already been paid, a refund will be generated 
by the Student Financials Office and mailed to the local 
address on file. If a student officially withdraws from the 
University prior to the end of the fourth week of classes, a 
25 percent refund, will be issued. 

The transcript of a student who officially withdraws after 
the Drop/Add period and before the end of the eighth 
week of the term will receive a 'WP for each course. 

The transcript of a student who stops attending the 
University without officially withdrawing from the University 
will receive an 'F' grade for each course. 

A student may appeal the deadline for a late withdrawal 
(from all courses) by submitting the Appeal to 
Drop/Withdraw Without Refund form. A withdrawal after 
the deadline will be approved only in cases where 
circumstances beyond trie student's control make it 
impossible for the student to continue. The student must 
provide appropriate documentation. Upon approval of the 
appeal, course instructors will designate whether the 
student was passing or failing the courses at the time of 
the appeal to withdraw. A 'WP' grade indicates the 



52 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



student withdrew from classes with a passing grade. A 
'WF' grade indicates the student withdrew from the 
classes with a failing grade. The 'WF' grade is calculated 
in the student's term and cumulative GPA. The deadline 
to submit this appeal is one year after the end of the term 
in which the course was taken. 



Grading System 




Grade 


Points Per Credit Hour 


A 




4.00 


A- 




3.67 


B+ 




3.33 


B 




3.00 


B- 




2.67 


C+ 




2.33 


C 




2.00 


c- 




1.67 


D+ 




1.33 


D 




1.00 


D- 




0.67 


F 


Failure 


0.00 


FO 


Failure 60% requirements 


0.00 


P 


Satisfactory (Pass) 


N/A 


IN 


Incomplete 


N/A 


W 


Withdrew by appeal 


N/A 


Wl 


Withdrew from University 


N/A 



WP Withdrew from University 

after deadline 

with passing grade N/A 

WF Withdrew from University 

after deadline 

with failing grade 0.00 

AU Audit N/A 

DR Dropped Course N/A 

DP Dropped after deadline 

with passing grade N/A 

DF Dropped after deadline 

with failing grade 0.00 

NR Grade Not Reported or 

Invalid 2 N/A 

EM Examination N/A 

IN is only a temporary symbol. It will revert to the default 
grade after two consecutive terms. 
NR is only a temporary symbol. It will default to an 'F' 
after two consecutive terms if it is not changed by the 
instructor. 

Note: All courses for which a student is officially registered 
at the end of the Drop/Add Period and for which a Letter 
Grade, a 'DF', or a 'WF' is received are calculated in the 
GPA. 

GRADING OPTIONS 

The Colleges and the Schools make the determination of 
the grading option of each course. A course may be 
offered for a letter grade as listed above or Pass/Fail; or 
for an optional grade (if designated by a dept.) in which 
the student has a choice of either receiving a letter grade 
or pass/fail; or the student may choose to audit a course 
and an 'AU' grade will be recorded on the student's 
record. The grading option must be indicated at the time 
of registration. The grading option cannot be changed 
after the Drop/Add period (first week of classes). There 
are no exceptions to this deadline. 

To register for an audit, the student must obtain the 
permission and signature of the instructor of the course to 



be audited. Once the course is registered for as 'Audit', 
the grading option cannot be changed. 

INCOMPLETE GRADE 

An incomplete grade is a temporary symbol given at the 
discretion of the instructor for work not completed, 
because of serious interruption not caused by the 
student's own negligence. An incomplete must be made 
up as quickly as possible but no longer than two 
consecutive semesters after the initial taking of the course 
or it will automatically default to the grade that the student 
earned in the course. The student must not register again 
for the course to make up the incomplete. There is no 
extension to the two consecutive semester deadline. 

Students who have incomplete grades on their records, 
must remove the incomplete by the end of the fourth week 
of the term in which they plan to graduate. Failure to do 
so will result in a cancellation of graduation. The student 
will need to reapply for graduation. 

FORGIVENESS POLICY 

The forgiveness policy is a method by which students may 
repeat a limited number of courses to improve their grade 
point average (GPA). Only the grade received on the last 
repeat is used in the GPA calculation. Under the 
University's forgiveness policy, students must file a 
Repeated Course Form with the Office of the Registrar. 
There is no time limit on the use of the forgiveness policy 
for grades; however, the forgiveness policy cannot be 
used once a degree is posted. All courses taken with the 
grades earned will be recorded on the student's transcript. 
The repeated course form will not be processed if the first 
or repeated grade received is 'DR', 'DP', 'IF', 'W, 'Wl', 
'WP', 'AU', 'NR', or 'EM'. Repeated courses will be 
appropriately designated (T: attempted; R: last repeat). 

Undergraduate students may use the forgiveness policy 
a maximum of three times for the purpose of improving 
their GPA. The same course may be repeated up to three 
times or the student may use the three opportunities to 
apply to three different courses. Only the final grade for 
the three courses repeated under the forgiveness policy 
will be counted in computing the student's GPA. In order 
for a course to be considered as repeated and adjusted in 
the GPA, the course must be the same and must be 
repeated at the University. Students who have used their 
three options under the forgiveness policy may still repeat 
courses; however, both the original grade and any 
additional grades received through repetitions of the 
course will be used in computing the GPA. 

A course taken on a letter grade basis must be 
repeated on the same basis. Students will not be allowed 
additional credit or quality points for a repeated course 
unless the course is specifically designated as repeatable 
(independent study, studio courses, etc.). Students not 
using the forgiveness policy may still repeat a course. All 
attempts will apply to computation of the GPA but credit 
for one attempt will apply toward graduation. Students 
must check with the appropriate academic department to 
determine whether there are additional restrictions on 
repeating courses. 

DEPARTMENTAL CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Departmental credit by examination is available for certain 
courses. A student who has already gained knowledge of 



Rules & Regulations 53 



a subject offered at the University and who wishes to take 
an examination in lieu of taking the course should discuss 
the matter with his/her academic advisor and with the 
department offering the course. 

Awarding departmental credit by examination is the 
prerogative of each academic unit. To receive credit by 
examination, a student must be a fully admitted degree- 
seeking student, register, and pay for the course. Once 
the student is awarded the departmental credit by 
examination, an 'EM' grade will be recorded on the 
transcript. 

CHANGE OR CORRECTION OF GRADES 

Once submitted, end-of-semester grades (except 
incompletes and NRs, which default at the end of two 
consecutive terms) are final. They are subject to change 
only through a Change of Grade form to correct an error in 
computation or transcribing, or where part of the student's 
work has been unintentionally overlooked. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS 

Final examinations will be given during the week following 
the last day of classes each semester. The Summer 
Semesters do not have final examination periods and 
course examinations may be given at the discretion of the 
faculty member teaching the course. 

FINAL GRADES 

Final grades are available on the World Wide Web 
(http://sis.fiu.edu), or through the on-campus kiosks. 

DEAN'S LIST 

Any fully admitted undergraduate student who earns a 
semester average of 3.5 or higher on nine or more 
semester credit hours of coursework for which grade 
points are earned, is placed on the semester Dean's List. 
This achievement is noted on the student's permanent 
academic record (transcript). 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

Students who plan to graduate are required to submit to 
the Office of the Registrar an Application for Graduation 
form. This form must be submitted before the last day of 
classes of the academic semester prior to graduation. 
Students turning in the Application for Graduation after the 
deadline will graduate the following semester. 

Students who do not graduate must re-apply for 
graduation and complete the remaining requirements 
needed to graduate. 

ACADEMIC HONORS 

Summa Cum Laude 

To graduate Summa Cum Laude, a student must have 
earned a cumulative FIU GPA of 3.90 and higher. 

Magna Cum Laude 

To graduate Magna Cum Laude, a student must have 

earned a cumulative FIU GPA of 3.70 - 3.899. 

Cum Laude 

To graduate Cum Laude, a student must have earned a 

cumulative FIU GPA of 3.50 - 3.699. 



To graduate with the above honors, the student must have 
completed a minimum of 40 semester hours of 
coursework at FIU for which grade points (Pass/Fail does 
not apply) are earned at the university. 

ACADEMIC WARNING, PROBATION, AND 
DISMISSAL 

Warning 

An undergraduate student whose cumulative GPA falls 
below a 2.0 will be placed on warning, indicating 
academic difficulty. 
Probation 

An undergraduate student on warning whose cumulative 
GPA falls below 2.0 will be placed on probation, indicating 
serious academic difficulty. The College/School of the 
student on probation may indicate the conditions which 
must be met in order to continue enrollment. 

Dismissal 

An undergraduate student on probation whose cumulative 
and semester GPAs fall below a 2.0 will automatically be 
dismissed from his/her program and the University. An 
undergraduate student will not be dismissed prior to 
attempting a minimum of 20 semester hours of 
coursework. The student has ten working days to appeal 
the dismissal decision. This appeal must be made in 
writing to the dean of the College or the School in which 
the student is admitted. The dismissal from the University 
is for a minimum of one year. After one year, the student 
may apply for re-admission (see Re-admission) to the 
University in the same or a different program, or register 
as a non-degree seeking student. 

Dismissed students applying for re-admission or 
registering as non-degree seeking students are placed on 
academic probation. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

Florida International University assures the confidentiality 
of student educational records in accordance with State 
University System rules, state, and federal laws including 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as 
amended. Student academic records are maintained in 
the Office of the Registrar and in the academic 
department of the student's major. Students in some 
degree programs maybe subject to background checks 
and/or drug testing prior to eligibility for internships or 
practicums. All currently enrolled and former students 
have the right to review their records to determine their 
content and accuracy. Parents of dependent students, as 
defined by the Internal Revenue Code, and who give 
evidence of the dependent status, have the same rights. 
For the cost of photocopying, students may generally 
have copies of any documents in their file, except for 
other institutions' transcripts. 

RELEASE OF STUDENT INFORMATION 

FROM 

EDUCATIONAL RECORDS 

The disclosure or publication of student information is 
governed by policies of Florida International University 
and the Florida Board of Education of the State University 
System of Florida within the framework of State and 



54 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Federal Laws, including the Family Educational Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. 

A student's consent is required for the disclosure or 
publication of any information which is a) personally 
identifiable and b) a part of the educational record. 
However, certain exceptions to that generality, both in 
types of information which can be disclosed and in access 
to that information, are allowed within the regulations of 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. The 
following persons and organizations may have access to 
personally identifiable information without a student's prior 
consent: 

Faculty, administrators, staff and consultants employed 
by the University whose work involves: 

1 . Performance of administrative tasks which relate to 
students; 

2. Performance of supervisory or instructional tasks 
which relate to students; or 

3. Performance of services which benefit students. 

A student's prior consent is not required for disclosure 
of portions of the educational record defined by the 
institution as Directory information. The following Directory 
Information may be released by the University Registrar: 

1. Name, local and permanent 
address and telephone number(s); 

2. Date and place of birth, and sex; 

3. E-mail address. 

The information above, designated by the University as 
Directory Information, may be released or published by 
the University without a student's prior written consent 
unless exception is made in writing by the student or the 
parents of a dependent student. 

In order to prevent access to or release of Directory 
Information, students or the parents of dependent 
students, must notify the Registrar (PC 130), in writing 
prior to the first class meeting day of the semester. 
Access to, or release of Directory Information will be 
withheld until further written instruction is received from a 
student or the parents of a dependent student. 

Students have a right to challenge the accuracy of their 
educational records and may file written requests to 
amend these records. The Office of the Registrar (PC 
130) should be contacted for further information regarding 
the procedure to follow for questions or problems. 

For complete information regarding the policies outlined 
above, please contact: 

University Registrar 

Florida International University 

University Park - PC 1 30 

Miami, Florida 33199 

e-mail: Reqister(5)fiu.edu 

PANTHER ID 

The University has implemented a new identification 
system-Panther ID. This new idenfication number will be 
the primary identification number for all students. 
Students applying to the University for Fall 2004 
semester, will receive this number by postal mail from the 
Office of Admissions. If you are a current student, you 
should go to the PantherSoft website 
http://panthersoft.fiu.edu . 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 

Students are expected to have a valid social security 
number. Foreign students are encouraged to apply for a 



Social Security Number if they plan on working on 
campus. However, it is not required for enrollment 
purposes. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

The transcript is the complete student record of courses 
taken at the University, in addition to the number of 
transfer credits accepted. The GPA is calculated for all 
courses taken at the University after Fall Term 1975. 
Once a baccalaureate, master's, or doctorate degree is 
earned, the GPA calculation starts again. 

Students must request their transcript in writing. There 
is a 48-hour processing period. The transcript will not be 
released if the student has a University financial liability 
and/or a defaulted student loan. There is $5.00 charge per 
transcript. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The University does not have an official class attendance 
policy. However, individual faculty may establish 
attendance criteria in classes where deemed necessary. 
Academic units may establish their own attendance 
policies with the approval of the Provost. 

POLICY STATEMENT WITH REFERENCE TO 
RELIGIOUS HOLY DAYS 

A faculty member who wishes to observe a religious holy 
day shall make arrangements to have another instructor 
conduct the class in his/her absence, if possible, or shall 
reschedule the class. 

Because there are some classes and other functions 
where attendance may be considered essential, the 
following policy is in effect: 

1. Each student shall, upon notifying his/her instructor, 
be excused from class to observe a religious holy day of 
his/her faith. 

2. While the student will be held responsible for the 
material covered in his/her absence, each student shall be 
permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up any 
work missed. 

3. No major test, major class event, or major University 
activity will be scheduled on a major religious holy day. 

4. Professors and University administrators shall not 
arbitrarily penalize students who are absent from 
academic or social activities because of religious 
observances. 

VETERANS INFORMATION 

The Office of Veterans Affairs assists all veterans and 
their dependents who wish to receive VA educational 
benefits. The Office also provides personal counseling, 
fee deferments, tutorial assistance, and work-study jobs. 
The VA Office is located in PC 130, University Park; and 
in ACI-100, Biscayne Bay Campus. 

Veterans who are planning to attend the University 
should contact the Office of Veterans Affairs two months 
prior to the anticipated date of entry. Such time is required 
to expedite the processing of paperwork for educational 
allowances from the Veterans Administration. 



Full time 
3/4 time 
1/2 time 
Less than 1/2 time 



Training Status 

12 Credits 
9 Credits 
6 Credits 
5 Credits 



Rules & Regulations 55 



Rate of Payments/Number of Dependents 

For rate of monthly payment of educational allowances for 
veterans and dependents, please contact the Office of 
Veterans Affairs. 

For additional information regarding other Veterans 
Educational Programs, contact the Office of Veterans 
Affairs at University Park, PC 156, 348-2838. 

ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATION 

The Office of the Registrar is responsible for certification 
of student enrollment. Certification of enrollment cannot 
be processed if the student has a financial liability. 

ENROLLMENT STATUS 

Undergraduate: 

Full time: 12 credits or more. 

Half lime: 6-11 credits. 

Less than half time: 5 credits or less. 

Enrollment status is for continuous enrollment for the 
semester in which the student attended. Reduction of 
course load will reflect the student's status. Contact the 
Office of the Registrar for further details. 

FLORIDA RESIDENCY INFORMATION 

Florida Student Definition 

For the purpose of assessing registration and tuition fees, 
a student shall be classified as a Florida or non-Florida 
Resident. 
To qualify as a Florida Resident, the student must: 

1. Be a U.S. Citizen, Resident Alien, parolee, Cuban 
National, Vietnamese Refugee, or other legal alien so 
designated by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization 
Service. 

2. Have established a legal residence in this State and 
have maintained that legal residence for 12 months 
immediately prior to the start of the term in which the 
student is seeking Florida resident classification. The 
student's residence in Florida must be a bona fide 
domiciliary rather than for the purpose of maintaining a 
mere temporary residence or abode, incident to 
enrollment in an institution of higher education, and 
should be demonstrated as indicated below (for 
dependent students as defined by IRS regulations, a 
parent or guardian must qualify). 

3. Submit the following documentation (or in the case of 
a dependent student, the parent must submit 
documentation), prior to the last day of registration for the 
term for which resident status is sought: 

a. Documentation establishing legal residence in Florida 
(this document must be dated at least one year prior to 
the first day of classes of the term for which resident 
status is sought). The following documents will be 
considered in determining legal residence: 

(1) Declaration of Domicile 

(2) Proof of purchase of a home in Florida which the 
student occupies as his/her residence. 

(3) Proof that the student has maintained residence in 
the state for the preceding year (e.g., rent receipts, 
employment record). 

b. Documentation establishing bona fide domicile in 
Florida which is not temporary or merely incident to 



enrollment in a Florida institution of higher education. The 
following documents will be considered evidence of 
domicile even though no one of these criteria, if taken 
alone, will be considered conclusive evidence of domicile 
(these documents must be dated at least one year prior to 
the first day of classes of the term for which Florida 
resident status is sought): 

(1) Declaration of Domicile 

(2) Florida voter's registration 

(3) Florida driver's license 

(4) Proof of real property ownership in Florida (e.g., 
deed, tax receipts). 

(5) Employment records or other employment related 
documentation (e.g., W-2, paycheck receipts), other than 
for employment normally provided on a temporary basis to 
students or other temporary employment. 

(6) Proof of membership in or affiliation with 
community or state organizations or significant 
connections to the State. 

(7) Proof of continuous presence in Florida during the 
period when not enrolled as a student. 

(8) Proof of former domicile in Florida and 
maintenance of significant connections while absent. 

(9) Proof of reliance upon Florida sources of support. 

(10) Proof of domicile in Florida of family. 

(11) Proof of admission to a licensed practicing 
profession in Florida. 

(12) Proof of acceptance of permanent employment in 
Florida. 

(13) Proof of graduation from high school located in 
Florida. 

(14) Any other factors peculiar to the individual which 
tend to establish the necessary intent to make Florida a 
permanent home and that the individual is a bona fide 
Florida resident, including the age and general 
circumstances of the individual. 

c. No contrary evidence establishing residence 
elsewhere. 

d. Documentation of dependent/in-dependent status 
(IRS return or affidavit) 

A student can also qualify for Florida residency by one 
or more of the following criteria: 

1 . Become a legal resident and be married to a person 
who has been a legal resident for the required twelve- 
month period, or, 

2. Be a member of the Armed Forces on active duty 
stationed in Florida, or a spouse or dependent, or, 

3. Be a member of the full-time instructional or 
administrative staff of a state public school, state 
community college or state University in Florida, a spouse 
or dependent, or, 

4. Be a dependent and have lived five years with an 
adult relative who has established legal residence in 
Florida, or, 

5. Be a former student at a public institution of higher 
education who was properly classified as a resident who 
re-establishes domiciliary status and re-enrolls within a 
period of twelve months, or, 

6. Make a statement as to the length of residence in 
Florida and qualification under the above criteria. 

TERM COURSES ARE OFFERED 

Listed next to certain courses in this catalog are the 
designations 'F', 'S', and 'SS'. These designations 
indicate that the academic department normally offers 



56 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



these courses during the 'F' (Fall), 'S' (Spring), 'SS' 
(Summer) terms. Students should be aware that there are 
circumstances beyond the University's control (low 



enrollments, financial constraints, or other extenuating 
situations) which may result in the courses not being 
offered as indicated. The University is not responsible for 
failure to offer a course as indicated. 




Tuition & Fees 57 



Tuition & Fees 



FEES 

Registration and tuition fees are established by the Board 
of Trustees as required by the Florida Legislature. These 
fees are subject to change without notice. The currently 
authorized fees for academic year 2003-2004 are: 



PER CREDIT HOUR FEES 


Estimated Per Credit Hour Fees 






Florida 


Non-Florida 




Resident 


Resident 


Undergraduate 


$97.12 


$514.00 


Student Fees 






Athletic 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Health 


$54.00 


$54.00 


Parking 


$62.06 


$62.06 



For Fall 2005 Tuition and fees will be subject to a 
minimum 5% increase 

Registration fees for course audits are the same as the 
above fees, except that no assessment will be made for 
the out-of-state portion. 

FEE WAIVERS 

Students using a fee waiver for part of the fee payment 
must pay their portion on or before the last day to pay 
fees. Students who are responsible for a portion of their 
fees in addition to the fee waiver will be required to pay 
their portion before the fee waiver is applied. 

State employees using the State employee fee waiver to 
pay their fees must register on or after the day established 
in the official University calendar for State employee 
registration. The State Employee Fee Waiver pays up to 
six hours of tuition and fees per term. Summer sessions A, 
B, and C are considered one term. If the employee 
registers for more than six hours, they will be required to 
pay for the additional credit hours plus all per student 
related fees. A properly completed and approved waiver 
form must be presented at the Student Financials Office 
by the date published for the last day to pay fees. Fee 
Waivers will be processed only for those courses shown 
on the approved fee waiver request form presented at the 
time of registration. A permit will not be accepted with the 
tuition waiver program. Only one fee waiver form per 
employee will be accepted each semester. The State 
employee fee waiver will not be accepted as payment for 
course registrations prior to the announced date for state 
employee registration. State Employee Fee Waivers do 
not cover Thesis, Dissertation, Internships, Directed 
Individual Study, Non Credit Courses, Sponsored Credit 
Programs, Certificate Programs, Field Experience, 
Practicum, or courses taken for audit grades. 

Senior citizens fee waivers are available to persons 60 
years of age or older who meet the requirements of 
Florida residency as defined in this catalog. The fee 
waiver allows qualified individuals to attend credit classes 
on an audit basis. Senior citizens using the fee waiver 
must register during the first week of classes. Senior 



citizens using the fee waiver must pay the photo id fee 

during their first term in attendance. 

Florida law requires that State employee fee waivers and 

senior citizen fee waivers be granted on a space available 

basis only; therefore, individuals using these waivers must 

comply with the procedures outlined in the schedule of 

classes for each semester. 

Refunds will not be given for employees who have 

registered and paid prior to the state employee registration 

day and wish to use the fee waiver. 

Fee Payment 

Fees may be paid at the Student Financials Office at 
University Park, PC 120, or at Biscayne Bay Campus ACI 
140 or online through the online PantherSoft self-service 
system. Broward students may pay by mail or at the 
Student Financials Office at University Park or Biscayne 
Bay Campus. Night drop boxes outside the Student 
Financials Offices are available 24 hours a day for fee 
payments by check or money order through the last day to 
pay fees. The University is not responsible for cash left in 
the night drop or sent through the mail. Failure to pay fees 
by the established deadlines will cause you to be dropped 
from all courses. See Fee Liability below. 

Late Registration Fee 

Students who register after the established deadline for 
registration will be subject to $100 late registration fee. 

Late Payment Fee 

Students who pay fees after the established deadline for 
payments will be subject to a $100 late payment fee. If 
applicable, this fee may be assessed in addition to the late 
registration fee described in the preceding section. 

FLORIDA PREPAID TUITION PLAN 
STUDENTS 

Students utilizing the Florida Prepaid Tuition Plan must 
pay their portion of the student fees not covered by the 
plan by the published last day to pay fees. If you are a 
financial aid recipient - the portion of the student fees will 
not be deducted from your financial aid award. Please 
contact the Student Financials Office to pay the balance 
due. 

FINANCIAL AID STUDENTS 

All financial aid recipients whose financial aid award does 
not cover their tuition must pay the difference between 
their financial aid or scholarship awards less Federal Work 
Study and their final fee assessment. The student's 
schedule will then be automatically validated. 

FEE LIABILITY 

Students are liable for all fees associated with all courses 
in which they are registered at the end of the drop/add 
period. The fee payment deadline is published in the 
official University calendar. If fees are not paid in full by 
the published dates, all courses will be canceled. 



58 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Registration is not complete until all fees are paid in full. 

REINSTATEMENT OF CLASSES 

Appeals for reinstatement of registration for classes 
dropped for fiscal reasons must be filed in writing on the 
prescribed form with the Student Financials Office by the 
time specified on the cancellation notice. Reinstatement 
will be considered for all classes on the class schedule at 
the end of the drop/add period. Reinstatement cannot be 
requested selectively for certain classes. All reinstatement 
activity, including fee payment, must be completed by the 
date on the cancellation notice. All students whose 
registrations have been reinstated will be assessed a late 
payment fee. If the late registration fee is applicable it will 
also be assessed. 

PARKING RULES AND REGULATIONS 

All persons who park vehicles on the university's 
campuses must register their vehicle(s) with the 
department of Parking and Traffic, obtain a decal or 
permit, and display the decal or permit, as prescribed by 
the Parking Rules and Regulations. The University 
assumes no liability for vehicles parked or operated on 
University property. The issuance of a decal or permit 
does not guarantee a place to park. 

Parking and Access Fees 

All currently enrolled students will pay a Parking and 
Access Fee each semester. The fee will appear on the 
Student Fee Schedule. 

Students must provide the following information to the 
Department of Parking and Traffic to obtain a parking 
decal: social security number, proof of current class 
registration, and current vehicle registration. All decals 
must be permanently affixed to the outside of the vehicle, 
either on the left side of the rear bumper or lower left 
corner, on the outside of the rear window. All decals are 
valid until the expiration date indicated on the decal or 
permit. A duplicate hang tag will be issued upon request 
for an additional charge of $10.00 + tax. This hang tag is 
valid only for the vehicle under which it is registered. 
Hang tags are available to persons who have purchased 
an original decal for the current semester or year. The 
hang tags are for additionally owned vehicles and for 
situations where the original decal must be replaced due 
to an accident, painting, etc. 

Housing 

All students in university housing complexes need to 
obtain a current semester housing sticker from the 
Department of Parking and Traffic. This sticker allows the 
vehicle to be parked legally in student housing areas. This 
sticker is valid for the current semester only. This housing 
sticker should be affixed to the left or right side of their 
current student decal. 

Disabled 

Any person who has been certified in accordance with 
Sections 320.084, 320.0848, or 320.0842, Florida 
Statutes, and has been issued a Disabled placard by the 
Department of Motor Vehicle Bureau shall obtain and 
display a university parking decal in the classification 
which would otherwise be appropriate. 



Towing and Impoundment 

The university may tow and impound any vehicle, which is 
found to be parked illegally or in violation of these rules. 

Rules and Regulations Pamphlets 

A copy of the University Parking Rules and Regulations is 
available at the department of Parking and Traffic located 
at University Park, Parking Garage One or Biscayne Bay 
Campus, Wolfe University Center, Room 131. It is the 
responsibility of each student to become familiar and 
comply with the University's parking and traffic rules and 
regulations. 

Other Fees 
Library Fines 

Per book per library hour .25 

Maximum fine per book $5.00 

Lost book fine $51.15 

Note: These fees are subject to change as permitted by 

law. Additional fees may be added and special purpose 

fees may be assessed in some instances. 

CHECKS 

The University will accept personal checks for amounts 
due to the University. These checks must be in the exact 
amount due only. The Student Financials Office will not 
accept checks above the amount due, third party checks 
or checks for cash. State law requires that a service fee be 
assessed on a check returned unpaid by the bank for any 
reason. Service fees are based on the amount of the 
unpaid check. Checks for $0.01 - $50.00 are charged a 
$25.00 fee; $50.01 - $300.00, a $30.00 fee; $300.01 - 
$800.00, a $40.00 fee; and a fee of 5% of the amount of 
the check for all checks greater than $800.00. Checks 
returned by the bank can be redeemed only by cash, 
cashier's checks, or money orders. A personal check will 
not be accepted to replace a dishonored check. 

Returned checks will be assigned to an agency for 
collection if not promptly paid. When an account has been 
assigned, the collection agency fee will be added to the 
University charges for collection at the current contract 
rate. Returned checks on student accounts will result in 
cancellation of classes and will require petition for 
reinstatement. See reinstatement of classes above. 

The Student Financials Office will not accept a check on 
any student's account which has had two previous 
dishonored checks. 

REFUNDS 

Refunds will be processed and mailed to the address 
shown on the Registrar's files to all students whose fee 
accounts show an overpayment after the last day to pay 
fees. Students now have the option to add a direct 
deposit account. Information is available on line through 
Learner Services in the Finances icon (add a direct 
deposit link). Students due a refund will not be required to 
submit a refund application to receive their refund, it will 
automatically be calculated. If there is an amount due to 
the university in the accounts receivable system, that 
amount will be deducted from any refund due. 

Students who have completed registration and have 
paid all fees due and have completely withdrawn from the 
University prior to the end of the fourth week of classes 
are eligible for a refund of 25% of total fees paid. 



Tuition & Fees 59 



In the following exceptional circumstances, a full refund of 
total fees paid will be made upon presentation of the 
proper documentation: 

• Death of a student or immediate family member 
(parent, spouse, child or sibling). Death certificate 
required. 

• Involuntary call to military service. Copy of orders 
required. 

• Illness of student of such severity or duration to 
preclude completion of courses. Confirmation by a 
physician required. 

Processing of refunds will begin after the end of the last 
day to pay fees. 

Appeals for tuition refunds must be submitted in writing 
to the Office of the Registrar within one year after the end 
of the term for which the refund is requested. There are no 
exceptions to this policy. Refunds for financial aid 
recepients will be determined based on the "Return of Title 
IV Policy". Please refer to "the award terms and condition 
booklet" for specific details. 

REPEAT COURSE TUITION SURCHARGE 

Repeated Attempts of Courses 

The 1997 Legislature passed House Bill 1545 mandates 
that undergraduate students pay additional charges for the 
third time a student either takes or attempts the same 
college credit course. Any undergraduate course taken, 
beginning Fall 1997, and all courses taken after this date 
will be subject to the repeat surcharge. Attempted hours 
mean those hours dropped/withdrawn after the drop/add 
period or failed. Withdrawals, incompletes and dropped 
courses will be subject to the tuition surcharge, if they are 
feeliable. All students are included regardless of type of 
residency. Undergraduate courses are 1000 to 4000 level 
courses. 
Exceptions: 

• Any course work taken prior to Fall 1997 

• Credits earned through: cooperative education, 
military, waivers, audits, individualized study, 
courses that are repeated as a requirement of a 
major (except courses repeated more than 2 times 



to increase GPA or meet minimum course grade 
requirements), courses intended to continue over 
multiple semesters 

• Attempts taken at previous institutions prior to 
enrolling at FIU 

• Any non feeliable withdrawal of dropped course 

• Graduate level courses (courses at 5000 level or 
above) 

• Effective Summer 2000 Registration, Universities 
may make exceptions based on extenuating 
circumstances and financial hardships. Students 
wishing to appeal the repeat surcharge may 
complete an "Appeal of Repeat Course Surcharge" 
form, which may be obtained in the Registrar's 
Office, PC 130. 

PAST DUE ACCOUNTS 

Delinquent accounts are sufficient cause to prohibit 
registration, graduation, release of transcripts, or release 
of diplomas. 

The University is not able to grant credit or time 
payments for any fees. 

The University reserves the right to assign any past due 
account to an agency for collection. When an account has 
been assigned, the collection agency fee will be added to 
the University charges for collection at the current contract 
rate. 

Deadlines 

Students are reminded that deadlines are strictly 
enforced. The University is not able to grant credit or to 
extend the fee payment period beyond the time set in its 
official calendar. The University does not have the 
authority to waive late fees unless it has been determined 
that the University is primarily responsible for the 
delinquency or that extraordinary circumstances warrant 
such waiver. The University has no authority to extend 
deadlines for individual students beyond those set by the 
Official calendar. 



60 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Financial Aid 

WHAT IS FINANCIAL AID? 

Financial aid is a source of financial support provided by 
federal, state and local governments, universities, 
community organizations, and private corporations to help 
students meet the cost of attending college. It includes 
gift-aid (grants and scholarships) and self-help aid (loans 
and student employment). 

• Grants are awards based on financial need which do 
not have to be repaid. 

• Scholarships are non-repayable awards based either 
on merit, special talent and/or financial need. 

• Student loans are available to students and/or their 
parents at low interest rates (2.77%-8.25%). 

• Student employment allows students to earn money 
toward their education by working part-time while 
attending school. 

APPLYING FOR ASSISTANCE 

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is 
the form used annually to apply for most types of financial 
assistance. FlU's school code 009635 is required when 
completing the FAFSA. Applications for financial 
assistance are available in January for the following 
academic year which begins in August. FlU's annual 
priority deadline is March 1 st '. Applications completed after 
this deadline will be processed in order of completion. 
The FAFSA is available in two forms: 

• electronic form - to complete the FAFSA electronically 
via the internet, the web site address is: 
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/ . It is recommended to file 
on the web as it provides a more accurate completion 
of the form and a faster turn around. Note : FAFSA 
web filers will require a Federal PIN (Personal 
Identification Number) to be used in lieu of student & 
parent signatures. To obtain a Federal PIN link to: 
http://www.pin.edu.gov . 

• paper form - available from Financial Aid Office. Using 
the Panther ID, student's may check the "TO DO 
LIST' for any required documents that are requested 
for file completion. Most required documents for file 
completion are available through the Financial Aid 
Office web page under www.finaid.fiu.edu-Reguired 
Forms . 

ADMISSIONS 

To be eligible for most financial aid programs, students 
must be admitted to a degree program. However, students 
should not wait until they are admitted to apply for 
assistance. Students who enroll in qualified Certificate 
Programs are only eligible for student loans. 

SUMMER ASSISTANCE 

Student loans are the primary source of assistance for 
summer enrollment. Request forms for summer assistance 
are available in February each year on the Financial Aid 
webpage: www.finaid.fiu.edu . 



TRANSFER STUDENT PROCEDURES 

Financial aid cannot be transferred from one post- 
secondary institution to another during the academic year. 
Students planning to transfer in mid-year should complete 
the FAFSA using both their current institution and Florida 
International University (Federal School Code 009635) to 
ensure consideration for all applicable financial 
assistance. 

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA 

To qualify for most need-based financial assistance, 
students must meet the following basic eligibility 
requirements: 

• demonstrate financial need; 

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible non- citizen; 

• be registered with Selective Service, if required; 

• not be in default on a loan, or owe a repayment on 
Title IV aid received at any institution; 

• be enrolled at least half-time in an eligible program of 
study; and, 

• maintain satisfactory academic progress. 
Additional requirements may apply depending on the aid 
programs awarded. 

DETERMINING FINANCIAL NEED 

Financial need is defined as the difference between the 
estimated cost of attendance and the amount students 
and their families can reasonably be expected to 
contribute towards their educational expenses. Need 
analysis is a federally mandated formula which measures, 
in an equitable and systematic way, how much students 
and their families can afford to pay towards their 
education. Income, assets (excluding their primary 
residence), family size, number of family members 
attending college, and other items are evaluated to give a 
complete assessment of a family's financial ability. 

VIEWING YOUR FINANCIAL AID 

You can view your financial aid application status and 
awards using the PantherSoft web-based system with 
your Panther ID through the Financial Aid 
webpage:www.finaid.fiu.edu-link to MY FINANCIAL AID. 

AWARDING PROCEDURES 

Award decisions for new students who complete their 
financial aid application will be issued annually in mid 
February with an Early Estimated Award Notice. A 
financial aid package may consist of a combination of 
grants, loans, and work funds. Other sources of 
assistance such as merit awards and private and 
institutional scholarships will be taken into consideration 
when preparing the award. 

ACADEMIC MERIT ASSISTANCE 

The University's commitment to academic excellence is 
highlighted through programs which honor students who 
are recognized as National Merit, National Achievers and 
National Hispanic Scholars. Additional awards for 
outstanding high school students are awarded based on 
SAT scores and grade point average. For detailed 



Financial Aid 61 



information regarding these programs, contact the Office 
of Admissions at (305) 348-2363. 

FINANCIAL AID SERVICES 

• Financial Aid Counseling: A Financial Aid 
administrator is available on a walk-in basis to assist 
students with special problems, technical questions 
and exceptions. 

• Web Access: Students may obtain information on the 
status of their application through the Financial Aid 
webpage: www.finaid.fiu.edu at MY FINANCIAL AID 
link or by calling the Financial Aid Office at 
305-348.7272 

• E-Mail Access: Students may also communicate with 
the Financial Aid Office electronically at the following 
e-mail address: finaid(g)fiu.edu 

For additional information contact the Financial Aid Office 
at University Park, PC 125 or Enrollment Services at the 
Biscayne Bay Campus, ACI 100. 




62 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



General Information 



HUMAN RESOURCES 

The Division of Human Resources provides human 
resource management services for all employees in the 
academic and administrative areas including student 
employees, research and graduate assistants, college 
work study and temporary employees on all campuses. 
The division is comprised of the following areas: HR 
Administration, Workforce Recruitment, Compensation 
Administration, Employee and Labor Relations, Payroll 
and Employee Records, Benefits Administration, HR 
Systems and Information Technology, Organization 
Development and Learning, and Equal Opportunity 
Programs. 

The University Park office is located in PC 224, (305) 
348-2190. The Biscayne Bay Campus office is located in 
LIB 322, (305) 919-5545. For additional information, visit 
the Division of Human Resources website at: 
www.fiu.edu/hr . 

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT 

(ADA) 

The Director for Equal Opportunity Programs is the 
University's ADA Coordinator, and has responsibility for 
ensuring access to employment, academic and public 
programs for persons with disabilities. The Office of 
Disability Services for Students administers a central 
budget used to fund the costs of reasonable 
accommodations for University employees and applicants 
for employment. These accommodations include the 
provision of auxiliary aids and services to ensure access 
to academic programs and University public events. 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS 

This office provides leadership and direction in the 
administration of the University's equalization programs for 
women and minorities in several ways. It prepares the 
University's annual Affirmative Action Plan and the State 
Equity Accountability Plan, assists University units in 
implementing and monitoring affirmative action 
procedures; provides oversight to the University Diversity 
Program; provides a channel for employee and student 
grievances regarding discrimination, or issues indicating a 
need for additional affirmative actions; administers 
implementation of the Policy to Prohibit Sexual 
Harassment; coordinates University compliance with the 
Americans with Disabilities Act and with Title IX of the 
Education Amendments of 1972, and promotes effective 
relationships between the University and community 
organizations. Equal Opportunity Programs also 
administers the State University System's scholarship 
programs funded for the purpose of increasing minority 
enrollment. In addition, the Office maintains a liaison 
relationship with State and Federal agencies dealing with 
EEO and affirmative action. The Office is located in PC 
215, University Park, (305) 348-2785. 



excluded from enrollment or employment or restricted in 
their access to University services or facilities, unless 
individual medically-based judgments establish that 
exclusion or restriction is necessary for the welfare of the 
individual or for other members of the University 
community. The University has established an HIV/AIDS 
Committee which includes representatives from major 
University divisions and other staff as appropriate. The 
Committee, which meets regularly, is responsible for 
monitoring developments with regard to HIV/AIDS, acting 
upon and administering the University's Policy on 
HIV/AIDS in specific cases, and coordinating the 
University's efforts in educating the University community 
on the nature of the disease. In addition, the Committee 
will meet as needed to consider individual occurrences of 
the disease which require University action. 

Persons who know or suspect they are sero-positive are 
expected to seek expert medical advice and are obligated, 
ethically and legally, to conduct themselves responsibly for 
the protection of others. 

The University has designated HIV/AIDS counselors on 
both campuses who are available to provide further 
information on this subject. The entire HIV/AIDS policy is 
located on the FIU Health Care and Wellness Center web 
site: 
http://www.fiu.edu/~health/clinicalservices/HIVpolicy.htm . 

Contact the Health Care and Wellness Center for more 
information at the University Park Campus, (305) 348- 
3080 or at the Biscayne Bay Campus, (305) 919-5620. 

SEXUAL HARASSMENT, 

NONDISCRIMINATION, EDUCATIONAL 

EQUITY 

All members of the University Community are entitled to 
study and work in an atmosphere free from illegal 
discrimination. Florida International University's equal 
opportunity policy prohibits discrimination against students 
and employees on the basis of their race, color, creed, 
age, disability, sex (including sexual harassment), religion, 
marital status, or national origin. Under the policy, it does 
not matter whether the discrimination was intended or not; 
the focus is on whether students or employees have been 
treated differently or subjected to intimidation, or a hostile 
or offensive environment as a result of their belonging to a 
protected class or having a protected status. Illegal sexual 
harassment includes unwelcome physical contact of a 
sexual nature, overt or implied threats to induce 
performance of sexual favors, verbal harassment, use of 
sexually suggestive terms, or display or posting of sexually 
offensive pictures. 

Any employee, applicant, or student who believes that 
he or she may be a victim of unlawful discrimination may 
file a complaint with the Office of Equal Opportunity 
Programs, PC 215, University Park, (305) 348-2785. 



HIV/AIDS POLICY 

Students and employees of the University who may 
become infected with the HIV/AIDS virus will not be 



Administration & Staff 63 



Administration & 
Staff 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Modesto A. Maidique 

Ted Guba 

Steve Sauls 



President 
Inspector General 
Chief of Staff 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Provost and Executive Vice 

President Mark B. Rosenberg 

Vice President, Research George E. Dambach 

Vice President, Academic Affairs and 

Undergraduate Education Rosa L. Jones 

Vice President, Information Technology 

and Chief Information Officer John P. McGowan 

Executive Vice Provost for Academic 

Budget and Operations Arthur Herriott 

Senior Vice Provost, Planning and 

Institutional Effectiveness Marie E. Zeglen 

Vice Provost, Academic Affairs and Dean, 

University Graduate School Douglas Wartzok 

Vice Provost, International 

Studies A. Douglas Kincaid 

Associate Vice President, 

Academic Affairs and Undergraduate 

Education Lidia V. Tuttle 

Vice Provost, Academic 

Administration Kenneth Johnson 

Assistant Vice President, 

Academic Budget Matilde Gramling 

Vice Provost, Program 

Review and Assessment A. Kyle Perkins 

ACADEMIC DEANS 

Juan A. Bueno 



Mark Szuchman 



Dean, School of Architecture 
Dean (Interim), College of Arts and 

Sciences 
Executive Dean, College of Business 

Administration Joyce Elam 

Dean, College of Education Linda P. Blanton 

Dean, College of Engineering Vish Prasad 

Executive Dean, College of Health and 

Urban Affairs Ronald M. Berkman 

Dean, Honors College Ivelaw L. Griffith 

Dean, School of Hospitality Management 

and Tourism Studies Joseph West 

Dean, School of Journalism and 

Mass Communication Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver 

Dean, College of Law Leonard P. Strickman 

LIBRARIES 

Executive Director 
Executive Associate Director 
Assistant Director for Collection 

Development Charles "Tony" Schwartz 

Assistant Director, Reader Services Sherry Carrillo 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES 

Director, Center for Accounting, 

Auditing and Tax Studies 
Director, Center for 



TBA 
Antonie B. Downs 



Dana Forgione 



Administration of Justice Luis Salas 

Executive Director, Center on Aging Max B. Rothman 
Director, Center for Diversity in 

Engineering Gustavo Roig 

Director, Institute for Asian Studies Steven Heine 

Director, Center for Advanced 

Distributed Systems Engineering Xudong He 

Director, Cardiovascular 

Engineering Center Richard T. Schoephoerster 

Director, Center for Advanced Technology 

Education Malek Adjouadi 

Director, Center for International 

Business Education and 

Research Mary Ann Von Glinow 

Director, Children's Creative 

Learning Center Nancy Ponn 

Director, Institute for Children and Families 

at Risk Barbara Thomlinson 

Director, Community Arts Institute Leslie Neal 

Director, Cuban Research Institute Damian Fernandez 
Director, High Performance Database 

Research Center Naphtali Rishe 

Director, Center for Economic Research 

and Education Jorge Salazar-Carrillo 

Director, Center for Energy and Technology 

for the Americas Harlan Sands 

Director, Intercultural Institute for Educational 

Initiatives Lynn Hon 

Director, Center for Internet Augmented 

Research and Assessment Julio Ibarra 

Director, Florida Center for Analytical 

Electron Microscopy Gautam Sen 

Director, English Language Institute Luis Sanchez 

Director, Knight Ridder Center for 

Excellence in Management Edward Glab 

Director, Future Aerospace 

Science and Technology 

Center for Cryoelectronics Grover Larkins Jr. 

Director, Florida -Caribbean Linkage 

Institute Eduardo A. Gamarra 

Director, Florida -Mexico Linkage 

Institute Eduardo A. Gamarra 

Director, Global Entrepreneurship 

Center Alan Carsrud 

Director, Center for Health 

Research and Policy H. Virginia McCoy 

Director, Infant Development 

Center Lorraine E. Bahrick 

Director, International Forensic Research 

Institute Kenneth Furton 

Director, The Hemispheric Center for 

Environmental Technology Harlan Sands 

Director, Institute for Hospitality and 

Tourism Education and Research Joan S. Remington 
Director, Intercultural Dance and Music 

Institute Andrea Mantell-Seidel 

Director, International Hurricane 

Center Stephen P. Leatherman 

Director, International Media Center Charles H. Green 
Director, Institute for Public Opinion 

Research Hugh Gladwin 

Director, Institute for Judaic and Near 

Eastern Studies Steven Heine 



64 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Dawn Addy 



Director, Center for Labor Research 

and Studies 
Director, Latin American and Caribbean 

Center Eduardo A. Gamarra 

Director, Ryder Center for Logistics Kuldeep Kumar 

Co-Directors, Manufacturing 

Research Center Ching-Sheng Chen 

W. Kinzy Jones 
Director, Metropolitan Center Dario Moreno 

Director, National Policy and Resource Center 

on Nutrition and Aging Nancy S. Wellman 

Director, Professional Development 

Center Debra Danker Sandler 

Director, Child and Family Psychosocial 

Research Center Wendy K. Silverman 

Director, Institute for Public Management 

and Community Services Allan Rosenbaum 

Director, Jack D. Gordon Institute for Public 

Policy and Citizenship Studies John F. Stack 

Director, Jerome Bain Real Estate 

Institute John S. Zdanowics 

Director, Southeast Environmental Research 

Center Rudolf Jaffe 

Director, Center for the Study of Matter at Extreme 

Conditions Surendra K. Saxena 

Director, Summit of the Americas Center Carl Cira 

Director, Telecommunications and Information 

Technology Institute Niki Pissinou 

Director, Center for Transnational and 

Comparative Studies 
Director, Lehman Transportation 

Research Center 
Director, Center for Tourism and 

Technology 
Executive Director, Center for Urban 

Education and Innovation 
Director, Women's Studies Center 
Director, Institute for Workforce 

Competiveness Frank T. Hammons 

Director, Center for Youth Development Lilly M. Langer 

MUSEUMS 



Director, Environmental Health and 

Safety Jennifer Mwaisela 

Executive Director, Biscayne Bay Campus, 



Sarah Mahler 

L. David Shen 

Alan J. Parker 

Lisa Delpit 
Suzanna Rose 



Director, Patricia and Phillip Frost Art 

Museum 
Director, Wolfsonian Museum 

Biscayne Bay Campus 

Vice Provost 

Business and Finance 



Stacey de la Grana 
Cathy Leff 



Raul Moncarz 



Chief Financial Officer & Vice President of 

Human Resources Vivian Sanchez 

University Treasurer Alexander Zyne 

Controller James Bond 

Associate Director, Purchasing Services Orlando Valdez 

Administration 

Vice President Marco Perez 
Assistant Vice President, Facilities 

Management Victor Citarella 



Administration 
Acting Director, Public Safety 
Director, Parking and Traffic 
Director of Facilities Construction 
Associate Director of Business 

Services 



Nicholas DiCiacco 

Michael Wright 

William Foster 

Jose Rodriguez 

Felicia Townsend 



Continuing and Professional 
Studies 

Executive Director, Continuing and 

Professional Studies Mercedes Ponce 

Director, Legal Studies Institute Ana Crucet 

Director, Academy for Lifelong Learning Susan Jay 

Director, Operations and Financial 

Services Paul Masongsong 

Associate Director, Credit Programs & 

Student Services Pietro Bonacossa 

Governmental Relations 

Vice President, Governmental Relations & Chief of Staff, 
Office of the President Steve Sauls 

Director, State Relations Michelle L. Palacio 

Director, Federal Relations Susan Moya 

Senior Special Assistant, State Budget and 
Policy Deborah Gallay 

Human Resources 

Chief Financial Officer & Vice President of Human 

Resources Vivian Sanchez 

Assistant Vice President, Administration Paul Michaud 
Executive Director, HR Operations/ 

Human Capital Maria Alam 

Director, Benefits Administration Silvia Covas 

Director, Equal Opportunity Programs Bennie Osborne 
Senior Director, Organization Development 

and Learning Lisa Gunther 

Senior Director, Employee & Labor Relations and 

Work Force Recruitment lliana Ricelli 

Director, Compensation Administration Maria Mazorra 
Senior Director, Payroll and Employee 

Records Grace Ulla 

Associate Director of Human Resources System 

and IT Serafin Alorro 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

Director of Athletics 

Head Baseball Coach 

Head Football Coach 

Head Men 's Basketball Coach 

Head Women's Basketball Coach 

Head Cross Country/Track Coach 

Head Women's Golf Coach 

Head Men's Soccer Coach 

Head Women's Soccer Coach 

Head Softball Coach 

Head Women's Tennis Coach 

Head Volleyball Coach 



Rick Mello 

Danny Price 

Don Strock 

Sergio Rouco 

Cindy Russo 

Steve Rubin 

David Pezzino 

Karl Kremser 

Everton Edwards 

Kim Gwydir 

Ronnie Bernstein 

Danijela Tomic 



Administration & Staff 65 



Head Swimming & Diving Coach 



Noemi Zaharia 



Interim Associate Athletic Director, 

External Affairs 
Interim Director, Athletics Support 

Services 
Associate Director, Internal Operations & 

SWA 
Assistant Athletic Director, Media Relations 
Assistant Athletic Director, Facilities and 



University Advancement 



Mike Garrity 

Adele Smith 

Julie Berg 
Rich Kelch 



Operations 

Broward Pines Center 

Director 
Assistant Director 

Student Affairs 



Barton Mondell 



Diana Little 
Isabel Morales 



Rosa L. Jones 



Jorge R. Diaz 

Helen Ellison 

John A. Bonanno 

Brian Haynes 

Larry Lunsford 

Olga Magnusen 

Nancy J. Ponn 

Charlie Andrews 

Julio Garcia 

Ruth A. Hamilton 

E. George Simms 

Sharon Aaron 

Robert Dollinger 



Vice President 

Director Title V, Assessment 

Evaluation 
Associate Vice President 
Assistant Vice President 
Assistant Vice President, 

Biscayne Bay Campus 
Associate Vice President 

and University Ombudsman 
Senior Director, Career Services 
Director, Children's Learning Center 
Director, Campus Life 
Director, Disability Services 
Executive Director, Graham 

University Center 
Director, Grants and Research 
Director, Victim Advocacy Center 
Executive Director, Health Care and 

Wellness Center 
Executive Director, Operations and 

Auxiliary Services James Wassenaar, Jr. 

Director, International Student and Scholar 

Services Ana Sippin 

Senior Director, Multicultural Program 

And Services Robert Coatie 

Director, Campus Life and Recreation & Orientation, 

Biscayne Bay Campus Craig Cunningham 

Senior Director, Wolfe University Center, 

Biscayne Bay Campus Gregory A. Olson 

Director, Upward Bound Sofia Santiesteban 

Director, Student Support Services Dorret Sawyers 

Director, Counseling and Psychological 

Services Center Cheryl Nowell 

Director, Student Conduct and Conflict 

Resolution Karen Dlhosh 

Interim Director, Women's Center Rachael Middleton 
Director, Office of Employee 

Assistance Nancy Petenbrink 

Senior Director, University Housing and Residential 

Life, Assistant Ombudsperson Cathy Akens 

Director, Leadership Development and Civic 

Responsibility Beverly Dalrymple 

Director, Student Media Robert Jaross 

Assistant Athletic Director, Campus 

Recreation Rob Frye 



Vice President, University 
Advancement 



Howard R. Lipman 



Associate Vice President, 

Development John Engen 

Associate Vice President and Executive Director, 

Alumni Relations Bill Draughon 

Associate Vice President, Marketing-External 

Relations Terry Witherell 

Director, Community Relations Josefina Cagigal 

Director, Operations Juan Cueto 

Director, Development Services Zully Dorr 

Director, Publications Bill Stahl 

Director, Media Relations Mark Riordan 



66 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Academic Units 

School of Architecture 

UP 348-3181 

Email: delauzs@fiu.edu 

http://www.fiu.edu/~soa/index.htm 

College of Arts and Sciences 

UP 348-2864 

BBC 919-5859 

Pines 438-8602 

Email: casdean@fiu.edu 

http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/casdean/ 

School of Computer Science 

UP 348-2744 

BBC 919-5859 

Email: info-undergrad@cs.fiu.edu 

http://www.cs.fiu.edu 

School of Music 

UP 348-2896 
BBC 919-5859 
Email: music@fiu.edu 
http://www.fiu.edu/~music/ 

College of Business Administration 

UP 348-2751 
BBC 919-5870 
Pines 438-8601 
http://cba.fiu.edu/ 

Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Graduate 
School of Business 

UP 348-3880 
http://cba.fiu.edu 
School of Accounting 

UP 348-2581 
BBC 919-5362 

Continuing and Professional Studies 
(CAPS) 

UP 348-5669 

BBC 919-5669 

Pines 438-8617 

Email: www caps@fiu.edu 

http://fiu.edu/~caps 



College of Education 

UP 348-2768 
Pines 438-8602 
Email: leiarzal@fiu.edu 
http://coeweb.fiu.edu/ 

College of Engineering 

UP 348-2522 
Pines 438-8601 
Email: all@eng.fiu.edu 
http://www.eng.fiu.edu/ 

College of Health and Urban Affairs 

UP 348-5840 
BBC 919-5840 
Pines 438-8602 
http://chua.fiu.edu/ 

School of Health 
UP 348-3446 
Email: anderson@fiu.edu 
http://schoolofhealth.fiu.edu/ 

School of Nursing 

BBC 919-5915 or 5971 
http://chua2.fiu.edu/nursing/ 

School of Social Work, Policy and 
Management 
Social Work 

UP 348-5880 
BBC 919-5880 
Pines 438-8601 

http://chua2.fiu.edu/socialwork/ 
Policy and Management 
UP 348-5890 
BBC 919-5890 
http://chua2.fiu.edu/spm/ 
Stempel School of Public Health 
UP 348-4903 
http://publichealth.fiu.edu 

Honors College 

UP 348-4100 
BBC 919-5864 
Email: honors@fiu.edu 
http://www.fiu.edu/~honors/ 



Academic Units 67 



School of Hospitality Management 

BBC 919-4500 

Email: hospitalitv@fiu.edu 

http://hospitality.fiu.edu 

School of Journalism and Mass Communication 

BBC 919-5625 
Email: sjmc@fiu.edu 
http://jmc.fiu.edu/sjmc/ 

College of Law 

UP 348-8006 

Email: lawadmit@fiu.edu 

http://www.fiu.edu/law/ 

University Graduate School 

UP 348-2455 
Email: ugs@fiu.edu 

http://www.fiu.edu/ugs/ 




68 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Select Support Services 
Phone & Web Addresses 

ACADEMIC ADVISING 
(UNDERGRADUATE) 

http://www.fiu.edu/~advisinq/ 
UP 348-2892 
BBC 919-5754 

ADMISSIONS 

http://www.fiu.edu/~7admiss/ 
UP 348-2363 
BBC 919-5760 
Pines 438-8600 

ART MUSEUM (FROST) 

http://www.fiu.edu/~museum/ 
UP 348-2890 



ATHLETICS 

http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/athletics/ 
UP 348-2756 

BOOKSTORE 

http://fiu.bkstore.com/ 
UP 348-2691 
BBC 919-5580 

BURSAR/ CASHIERS 

http://sis.fiu.edu/ 
UP 348-2126 
BBC 919-5540 




FIUBOOKSTORE 




Select Support Services Phone & Web Addresses 69 



CAMPUS LIFE 

http://www.fiu.edu/~camplife/ 
UP 348-2138 
BBC 919-5804 

CAMPUS RECREATION 

http://www.fiu.edu/~camprec/ 
UP 348-2900 
BBC 919-5678 

CAREER SERVICES 

http://www.fiu.edu/~career/ 
UP 348-2423 
BBC 919-5770 

COPY CENTER 

http://obs.fiu.edu/copv center.htm 
UP 348-6565 
BBC 919-5660 

COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL 
SERVICES CENTER 

http://www.fiu.edu/~psychser/ 
UP 348-2434 
BBC 919-5305 

CREDIT UNION 

http://www.ucumiami.org/ 
UP 786-425-5039 
BBC 786-425-5038 

FINANCIAL AID 

http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/finaid/ 
UP 348-7272 
BBC 919-5750 

FITNESS CENTER 

http://www.fiu.edu/~camprec/SFC1.htm 
http://www.fiu.edu/~bbcrec/fitness.htm 
UP 348-2575 
BBC 919-5678 

GRADUATION 

http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/reqistrar/com.html 
UP 348-2341 
BBC 919-5750 

UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES 

http://www.fiu.edu/~health/ 
UP 348- 2401 
BBC 919-5620 



HOUSING 

http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/housinq/ 
UP 348-4190 
BBC 919-5587 

LIBRARY 

http://library.fiu.edu/ 
UP 348-2454 
BBC 919-5726 
Pines 438-8608 

PARKING AND TRAFFIC 

http://www.fiu.edu/~xtranspo/ 
UP 348-3615 
BBC 919-5558 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

http://www.fiu.edu/~univpol/ 
UP 348-2626 
BBC 919-5559 

REGISTRAR 

http://www.fiu.edu/orqs/reqister/ 
UP 348-2320 
BBC 919-5750 
Pines 438-8600 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

http://www.fiu.edu/~sqa/ 
UP 348-2121 
BBC 919-5280 

UNIVERSITY LEARNING CENTER 

http://w3.fiu.edu/ulc/ 
UP 348-2180 
BBC 919-5927 

WOLFSONIAN MUSEUM- FIU 

http://www.wolfsonian.org 
1001 Washington Avenue 
Miami Beach, Florida 33139 
305-531-1001 



70 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Centers & Institutes 

Biomedical Engineering Institute 
URL: http://www.bme.fiu.edu/ 

Cardiovascular Engineering Center 

URL: http://www.eng.fiu.edu/cvec/main.htm 

Center for Accounting, Auditing, and Tax 
Studies 

URL: http://cba.fiu.edu/web/caats/index.htm 

Center for Administration of Justice 

URL: http://caj.fiu.edu/ 

Center for Advanced Distributed 
Systems Engineering 
URL: http://cadse.cs.fiu.edu/ 

Center for Advanced Technology and 

Education 

URL: http://www.cate.fiu.edu/ 

Center on Aging 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~coa/ 

Center for Diversity in Engineering 

URL: http://www.eng.fiu.edu/cde 

Center for Economic Research and 
Education 

Phone: 348-3283 

Center for Ethnobiology and Natural 
Products 

URL: www.fiu.edu/-cenap 

Center for Energy and Technology of the 
Americas 

URL: http://ceta.fiu.edu/ 

Center for Health Research & Policy 
Phone: 348-4903 

Center for International Business 
Education & Research 
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~ciber/ 

Center for Internet Augmented Research 

URL: http://www.ciara.fiu.edu 

Center for Labor Research and Studies 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~clrs/ 



Center for the Study of Matter at 
Extreme Conditions 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~saxenas/ 

Center for Tourism and Technology 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~tourtech/ 

Center for Transnational and 
Comparative Studies 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~tcs/ 

Center for Urban Education and 

Innovation 

URL: http://coeweb.fiu.edu/urbaned/ 

Child and Family Psychosocial Research 
Center 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~capp 

Children's Creative Learning Center 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~children/ 

Cuban Research Institute 

URL: http://lacc.fiu.edu/cri/ 

English Language Institute 

URL: http://www.eli.fiu.edu/ 

Florida - Caribbean Institute 
URL: http://lacc.fiu.edu/fci/ 

Florida Center for Analytical Electron 

Microscopy 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~emlab/ 

Florida - Mexico Institute 
URL: http://lacc.fiu.edu/fmi/ 

Future Aerospace Science and 
Technology Center for Cryoelectronics 
URL: http://www.eng.fiu.edu/FAST/ 

Global Entrepreneurship Center 

URL: http://www.entrepreneurship.fiu.edu 

Hemispheric Center for Environmental 
Technology 

URL: http://www.hcet.fiu.edu/ 

High Performance Database Research 
Center 

URL: http://hpdrc.cs.fiu.edu/ 



Centers & Institutes 71 



Infant Development Research Center 

URL: http://infantlab.fiu.edu 

Institute for Asian Studies 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~asian/ 

Institute for Children and Families at 
Risk 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~icfr 

Institute for Hospitality & Tourism 
Education & Research 

URL: http://hospitality.fiu.edu/ihter 

Institute of Government 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~metcntr/ 

Institute for Judaic & Near Eastern 

Studies 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~jewstudi/index.html 

Institute for Public Management and 
Community Services 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~ipmcs/ 

Institute for Public Opinion Research 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/orgs/ipor/ 

Institute for Workforce Competiveness 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~xiwc/ 

Intercultural Dance & Music Institute 

URL: http://lacc.fiu.edu/indami/ 

Intercultural Institute for Educational 
Initiatives 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~iied/ 

International Forensic Research Institute 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~ifri/ 

International Hurricane Research Center 

URL: http://www.ihc.fiu.edu/ 

International Media Center 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~imc/ 

Jack D. Gordon Institute for Public 
Policy & Citizenship Studies 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~ippcs/ 

Jerome Bain Real Estate Institute 

URL: http://cba.fiu.edu/web/jerome/index.htm 

Joint Center for Environmental & Urban 
Problems 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~metcntr/ 



Knight Ridder Center for Excellence in 
Management 

Phone: 348-6332 

Latin American and Caribbean Center 

URL: http://lacc.fiu.edu/ 

Lehman Center for Transportation 
Research 

URL: http://www.enq.fiu.edu/LCTR/ 

Manufacturing Research Center 

URL: http://www.eng.fiu.edu/MRC/ 

Metropolitan Center 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~metcntr/ 

National Policy and Resource Center 
on Nutrition and Aging 
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~nutreldr/ 

Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum 
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~museum/home.html 

Professional Development Center 

URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~pdc/ 

Southeast Environmental Research 

Center 

URL: http://serc.fiu.edu/ 

Summit of the Americas Center 

URL: http://americas.fiu.edu/ 

Telecommunications and Information 
Technology Institute 
URL: http://www.it2.fiu.edu/ 

The Wolfsonian Museum 

URL: http://www.wolfsonian.org/ 

Women's Studies Center 
URL: http://www.fiu.edu/~wstudies/ 



72 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



Florida's Statewide Course 
Numbering System 

FLORIDA'S STATEWIDE COURSE 

NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes and 
numbers that were assigned by Florida's Statewide 
Course Numbering System. This common numbering 
system is used by all public postsecondary institutions in 
Florida and by participating non-public institutions. The 
major purpose of this system is to facilitate the transfer of 
courses between participating institutions. 

Each participating institution controls the title, credit, and 
content of its own courses and recommends the first digit 
of the course number to indicate the level at which 
students normally take the course. Course prefixes and 
the last three digits of the course numbers are assigned by 
members of faculty discipline committees appointed for 
that purpose by the Florida Department of Education in 
Tallahassee. Individuals nominated to serve on these 
committees are selected to maintain a representative 
balance as to type of institution and discipline field or 
specialization. 

The course prefix and each digit in the course number 
have a meaning in the Statewide Course Numbering 
System (SCNS). The list of course prefixes and numbers, 
along with their generic titles, is referred to as the "SCNS 
taxonomy." Descriptions of the content of courses are 
referred to as "statewide course details." 

THE COURSE PREFIX 

The course prefix is a three-letter designator for a major 
division of an academic discipline, subject matter area, or 
sub-category of knowledge. The prefix is not intended to 
identify the department in which a course is offered. 
Rather, the content of a course determines the prefix 
designation. 

GENERAL RULE FOR COURSE EQUIVALENCIES 

Equivalent courses at different institutions are identified by 
the same prefixes and same last three digits of the course 
number and are guaranteed to be transferable between 
the participating institutions that offer the course, with a 
few exceptions. (Exceptions are listed below). 

For example, a survey course in social problems is 
offered by 34 different postsecondary institutions. Each 
institution uses "SYG 010" to identify its social problems 
course. The level code is the first digit and represents the 
year in which students normally take the course at a 
specific institution. In the SCNS taxonomy, "SYG" means 
"Sociology, General," the century digit "0" represents 
"Entry-Level General Sociology," the decade digit "1" 
represents "Survey Course," and the unit digit "0" 
represents "Social Problems." 

In science and other areas, a "C" or "L" after the course 
number is known as a lab indicator. The "C" represents a 
combined lecture and laboratory course. The "L" 
represents a laboratory course or the laboratory part of a 
course, having the same prefix and course number without 
a lab indicator, which may meet at a different time or 
place. 



Transfer of any successfully completed course from one 
institution to another is guaranteed in cases where the 
course to be transferred is equivalent to one offered by the 
receiving institution. Equivalencies are established by the 
same prefix and last three digits and comparable faculty 
credentials at both institutions. For example, SYG 1010 
is offered at a community college while the same course is 
offered at a state university as SYG 2010. A student who 
has successfully completed SYG 1010 at the community 
college is guaranteed to receive transfer credit for SYG 
2010 at the state university upon transfer. The student 
cannot be required to take SYG 2010 again since SYG 
1010 is equivalent to SYG 2010. Transfer credit must be 
awarded for successfully completed equivalent courses 
and used by the receiving institution to determine 
satisfaction of requirements on the same basis as credit 
awarded to the native students. It is the prerogative of the 
receiving institution to offer transfer credit for courses 
successfully completed which have not been designated 
as equivalent. 

AUTHORITY FOR ACCEPTANCE OF 
EQUIVALENT COURSES 

State Board of Education Rule 6A-1 0.024(1 7), Florida 
Administrative Code, reads: 

When a student transfers among postsecondary 
institutions that are fully accredited by a regional or 
national accrediting agency recognized by the United 
States Department of Education and that participate in the 
common course designation and numbering system, the 
receiving institution shall award credit for courses 
satisfactorily completed at the previous participating 
institutions when the courses are judged by the 
appropriate common course designation and numbering 
system faculty task forces to be academically equivalent to 
courses offered at the receiving institution, including 
equivalency of faculty credentials, regardless of the public 
or nonpublic control of the previous institution. The award 
of credit may be limited to courses that are entered in the 
course numbering system. Credits so awarded shall 
satisfy institutional requirements on the same basis as 
credits awarded to native students. 

EXCEPTIONS TO THE GENERAL RULE FOR 
EQUIVALENCY 

The following courses are exceptions to the general rule 
for course equivalencies and may not transfer. Transfer- 
ability is at the discretion of the receiving institution: 

A. Courses in the 900-999 series(e.g., HUM 2905) 

B. Internships, practica, clinical experiences, and 
study abroad courses 

C. Performance or studio courses in Art, Dance, 
Theater, and Music 

D. Skills courses in Criminal Justice 

E. Graduate courses 

F. Courses not offered by the receiving institution 
College preparatory and vocational preparatory course 
may not be used to meet degree requirements and are not 
transferable. 



Florida Statewide Course Numbering System 73 



Questions about the Statewide Course Numbering 
System and appeals regarding course credit transfer 
decisions should be directed to ( Name of Institution 
Statewide Course Numbering System Contact ) in the 
(Office where Institution Contact may be located ) or 



the Florida Department of Education, Office of Articulation, 
1401 Turlington Building, Tallahassee, Florida 32399- 
0400. Special reports and technical information may be 
requested by calling telephone number (850) 245-0427 or 
SunCom 205-0427. 




74 FIU Undergraduate Catalog 



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76 School of Architecture 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 



Juan Antonio Bueno, Professor and Dean 

David F. Bergwall, Associate Professor and Associate 

Dean 
Nathaniel Q. Belcher, Associate Professor, Assistant 

Dean 

Alfredo Andia, Assistant Professor 

Jaime Canaves, Associate Professor 

Marta Canaves, Director, Associate in Design 

Jason R. Chandler, Assistant Professor 

Adam M. Drisin, Director, Associate Professor 

Janine King, Director, Associate Professor 

Gisela Lopez-Mata, Associate Professor 

Marilys R. Nepomechie, Associate Professor 

Nicolas Quintana, Scholar in Architecture and Urbanism 

Gray Read, Assistant Professor 

Camilo Resales, Associate Professor 

Kevin Smith, Assistant Professor 

John Stuart, Associate Professor 

The School of Architecture is dedicated to advancing the 

professions of architecture, interior design and landscape 

architecture. In keeping with the nature of these 

professions, the programs are taught in an 

interdisciplinary manner, taking full advantage of the 

resources and areas of expertise offered by each. The 

school offers two undergraduate degree programs, a 

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture and a Bachelor of Interior 

Design, and four graduate degree programs, a Master of 

Architecture, a Master of Arts in Architecture, a Master of 

Landscape Architecture, and a Master of Arts in 

Landscape Architecture. (See Graduate Catalog for 

descriptions). 

Students applying to the School should plan for tha 
financial aspects of a design education. This includes 
the costs of computers, software, travel and field trips, 
tools and equipment, and building and modeling supplies. 
Students must also have continuing access to a personal 
computer through purchase, lease or other arrangements. 
For further information contact the School. 

Community Involvement 

The School maintains close ties with architecture, interior 
design and landscape architecture professionals. 
Professional advisory boards periodically review the 
curriculum to maintain program relevance. 

Requirements for Admission at the Upper 
Division or junior year, Lower Division or 
freshman year as well. 

Admission is competitive and is not automatically 
guaranteed to applicants who meet minimum 
requirements. Admission will be offered on a space 
available basis to those applicants judged by the Faculty 
Admissions Committee to have the greatest potential for 
successful completion of the program. 

The School of Architecture maintains a controlled 
enrollment process to enhance the quality of its programs. 
Physical space is limited, thus limiting the number of 
students who may be accepted into the majors. 

Upper Division Applicants 

Students seeking admission to the Upper Division of 
programs of the School of Architecture must have a 



cumulative GPA in all University work of 2.50, have 
completed a minimum of 60 credits, have completed the 
CLAST requirement, have completed design studio 
courses 1 through and including 4 with a grade of 'C or 
better, and be judged by the Faculty Admissions 
Committee to have passed a competitive portfolio review. 
All applicants will have their credentials reviewed prior to 
full admission into the program. All applicants for 
admission to the Upper Division must submit a portfolio 
for review by the established deadlines. Only grades of 'C 
or higher (2.0 on a 4.0 grading scale) are accepted for 
transfer of applicable prerequisite and core courses from 
other institutions. No grade below a 'C will be accepted 
for graduation in required courses or required electives. 

Native Student Applicants 

Freshmen wishing to study in the School of Architecture 
should apply directly to the University. These students will 
be placed in a pre-architecture program for the Lower 
Division preparation toward the degree. Students will be 
monitored for appropriate progress toward the Upper 
Division. Students not making satisfactory progress will 
be required to meet with advisors and may be referred to 
the University advising center to seek a change of 
intended major. Admission to the pre-major does not 
guarantee that seats will be available in design studio 
courses. 

Transfer Student Applicants 

Transfer applicants seeking admission to the major must 
meet the criteria set for Upper Division applicants. 
Students receiving the AA degree from the architectural 
studies program at Miami-Dade Community College are 
eligible for consideration for admission to the junior year 
under an agreed upon protocol. 

All transfer applicants who do not meet the criteria for 
consideration for admission to the Upper Division may be 
admitted to the pre-major. These applicants cannot be 
guaranteed admission to the major and must compete for 
available space based on the criteria set for admission to 
the Upper Division. Admission to the pre-major does not 
guarantee that seats will be available in design studio 
courses. 

All prospective students who are considering majors 
within the School of Architecture must meet the 
University's general admission requirements. The 
School's academic programs require specific prerequisite 
preparation prior to enrollment in certain courses. 
Students should check individual program requirements 
and be advised by the School well in advance of entry or 
transfer into a given program. 

Application Deadlines 

The School of Architecture considers applications for 
admission to the Lower Division and Upper Division 
majors only in the Fall Semester. The deadline for 
submitting applications and portfolios for review is 
February 1 . Notice of admission actions will normally be 
mailed by April 1. 

Applicants for the pre-major may be considered in Fall, 
Spring or Summer. Please see application deadlines 
elsewhere in this catalog. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 77 



Foreign Language Requirement 

Students must meet the University Foreign Language 
Requirement. Refer to the appropriate sections in the 
Catalog's General Information for Admission, and 
Registration and Records. 

Student Work 

Student work submitted to the School in satisfaction of 
course or degree requirements, becomes the physical 
property of the School. However, students retain all rights 
to the intellectual property of such work. This work may 
include papers, drawings, models, and other materials. 
The School assumes no responsibility for safeguarding 
such materials. At its discretion, the School may retain, 
return, or discard such materials. The School will not 
normally discard the materials of current students without 
giving them a chance to reclaim them. 

Students must petition the faculty of the School in 
writing for any deviation from the established policies. The 
faculty will decide on the cases on an individual basis. 

Bachelor of Arts in Architecture 

Degree Program Hours: 128 

This pre-professional, four-year program provides the 
student with a solid base of multi -disciplinary knowledge 
related to the field of architecture in preparation for 
programs offering Master of Architecture, Master of Arts in 
Architecture, Master of Landscape Architecture, and 
Master of Arts in Architecture degrees. Focusing on the 
development of skills and understanding, the program 
encourages the generation and communication of design 
ideas that are supported by historical, theoretical, and 
practical constructs. Divided into Lower and Upper 
Divisions, the program in Architectural Studies offers 
students of design courses in basic design principles and 
advanced design problems with complex architectural 
projects. The Lower Division classes and studios focus on 
an in-depth study of conventions in graphic 
communication, and architectural history and theory. The 
Upper Division offers the student the opportunity to apply 
their learning to advanced architectural projects with 
important practical and theoretical applications. With 
alumni and alumnae of the School of Architecture 
continuing their studies at many of the most competitive 
graduate programs in the country, the Program remains 
committed to design excellence by providing its students 
with the finest undergraduate pre-architectural education 
in South Florida. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Students should enroll in lower division design courses 
the first semester they attend FIU or their progress 
through the curriculum will be delayed. Seats in lower 
division design courses are limited and cannot be 
guaranteed to all students. 

Undergraduates admitted with less than 36 semester 
hours, must meet all the University Lower Division core 
requirements. 

Lower Division Common Core (34) 
ARC 1131 Design Graphics I 3 

ARC 1132 Design Graphics II 3 

ARC 1301 Design Studio 1 4 

ARC 1302 Design Studio 2 4 

ARC 1461 Materials and Methods of Design 3 

ARC 2303 Design Studio 3 4 

ARC 2304 Design Studio 4 4 



ARC 2580 Structures and Systems 3 

ARC 2701 History of Design from Antiquity to the 

Middle Ages 3 

ARC 2702 History of Design from the 

Renaissance to the XIX Century 3 

(H) May fulfill humanities requirements. Check with School 
Advisor. 

Graduation Requirements 

To graduate, students must complete all Core and 
General Education requirements for undergraduates as 
established by the university. 

All Upper Division students must complete a minimum 
of 47 semester hours to graduate, which include the 
following core requirements or their equivalent: 

Upper Division Program (47 minimum) 
Major Requirements 

ARC 3243 Design Theories 3 

ARC 3463 Methods and Materials of Construction 

II 3 

ARC 4058 Computers Applications in Architecture 3 

ARC 4270 Professional Office Practice 3 

ARC 4324 Architectural Design 5 4 

ARC 4335 Architectural Design 6 4 

ARC 4342 Architectural Design 7 4 

ARC 4343 Architectural Design 8 4 

ARC 4553 Structural Design 4 

ARC 4783 History of Design from the XIX Century 

to Present 3 

ARC 4910 Research Methods 3 

ARC/LAA History of Theory Elective 3 

BCN4561C Environmental Controls 3 

BCN 4564 Environmental Controls in Bldgs. 2 3 

Upper Division Electives (9) 

Selected with an advisor to meet degree requirements 
and program objectives 

Bachelor of Interior Design 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

This professional, four-year program is designed to 
enable graduates to work with other professionals such as 
architects and engineers in the design of commercial and 
institutional projects. The program incorporates the 
recommendations and standards of national and local 
professional societies and prepares students for work in a 
design firm or for self-employment at the professional 
level. 

The interdisciplinary program allows students to 
integrate the technical, managerial, theoretical and design 
aspects of interior design. 

The program has developed a strong relationship with 
the trade and practicing professionals, as exemplified by 
the Designers Lecture Series and the annual Festival of 
the Trees. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Students should enroll in Lower Division design courses 
the first semester they attend FIU or their progress 
through the curriculum will be prolonged. Seats in Lower 
Division design courses are limited and can not be 
guaranteed to all students. 

Undergraduates admitted with less than 36 semester 
hours must meet all of the University Lower Division Core 
Requirements. 



78 School of Architecture 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Lower Division Common Core (34) 

ARC 1131 Design Graphics I 3 

ARC 1132 Design Graphics II 3 

ARC 1301 Design Studio 1 4 

ARC 1302 Design Studio 2 4 

ARC 1461 Materials and Methods of Design 3 

ARC 2303 Design Studio 3 4 

ARC 2304 Design Studio 4 4 

ARC 2580 Structures and Systems 3 

ARC 2701 History of Design from Antiquity to the 

Middle Ages 3 
ARC 2702 History of Design from the 

Renaissance to the XIX Century 3 
(H) May fulfill humanities requirement (check with School 
Advisor) 
(M) Meets math requirement 

Graduation Requirements 

To graduate, students must complete all Core and 
General Education requirements for undergraduates as 
established by the university. 

All Upper Division students must complete a minimum 
of 47 semester hours to graduate, which include the 
following Core requiremnts or their equivalent. 

Upper Division Program (47 minimum) 

ARC 3243 Introduction to Design Theories (H) 3 

IND 3423C Sources, Materials & Cost Estimating 

for Interiors 3 

ARC 4058 Advanced Computers in Architecture 3 

IND 4501 Interior Design Practice 3 

IND 3215 Interior Design 5 4 

IND 3216 Interior Design 6 4 

IND 4225 Interior Design 7 4 

IND 4226 Interior Design 8 3 

IND 4943C Interior Design Research 3 

IND 3451C Interior Design Construction Drawing 1 3 

IND 4455C Advanced Construction Documents 4 

IND 3430C Lighting Design 3 

BCN4561C Environmental Controls I 3 

IND 4311 Color Theory 3 

(H) May fulfill humanities requirement (check with School 
Advisor) 

Certificate in Landscape Architecture 

The School of Architecture has indentified a significant 
need for balance amongst our academic disciplines and a 
corresponding need for variable options for our 
undergraduate student body. The certificate will require 
18 semester credit hours and will include courses in the 
following areas: History of Landscape Architecture, South 
Florida Landscapes, Landscape Development, Landscape 
Construction, Landscape Structures, and Landscape 
Construction Documentation. 

While this option would be most accessible to students 
currently enrolled in the School of Architecture 
Undergraduate Program either in the Architecture or 
Interior Design undergraduate curriculum, motivated 
students in related areas of study throughout the 
university would be permitted to pursue this 
undergraduate certificate. This program is largely a 
value-added certificate, for declared majors within the 
school of Architecture and related fields such as 
Environmental Science and Biology who would like to 
seek to expand their academic experience. This 
certificate would in fact be available to the larger 
undergraduate student body and creates an opportunity to 



attract students into the landscape architecture 
profession. 

Certificate Requirements 

Participants must fulfill the requirements outlined for the 
Certificate in Landscape Architecture and complete each 
course with a satisfactory grade. 

Program Requirements 

LAA 3212 Landscape Construction Documentation 

LAA 3420 Landscape Construction 

LAA 3430 Landscape Structures 

LAA 3602 South Florida Landscapes 

LAA 3712 History of Landscape 

LAA 3802 Landscape Development 

Certificate in History and Theory of 
Architecture 

The School of Architecture has identified a need to offer 
students a diversity of areas of study within the Design 
Fields and to reinforce the academic foundation of the 
school. We request to offer a Certificate program in 
History and Theory of Architecture for undergraduate 
students. The certificate will require 12 semester hours 
and will offer courses in History and Theory of 
Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Design. This 
certificate program may also attract students from the 
College of Arts and Sciences in areas such as History, Art 
History, Cultural Studies and Philosophy. 

This program is largely a value-added certificate for 
students currently enrolled in the School of Architecture 
Program in Architecture, however motivated students in 
related areas of study throughout the university would not 
be permitted to pursue this certificate. 

Certificate Requirements 

Participants must fulfill the requirements outlined for the 
Certificate in Landscape Architecture and complete each 
course with a satisfactory grade. 

Program Requirements 

ARC 2701 History of Design from Antiquity to the 

Middle Ages 
ARC 2072 History of Design from the Renaissance 

to the XIX Century 
ARC 3243 Introduction to Design Theories 

ARC 4030 Film and the Architecture of Modern Life 

ARC 4227 Gender and Architecture 

ARC 4730 Culture and Art in Italy 

ARC 4752 Architecutral History of the Americas 

ARC 4754 Asian and African Architecture 

ARC 4755 The Architecture of the City 

ARC 4783 History of Design from the XIX Century 

to Present 
ARC 4910 Research Methods 

ARC 4799 The Architecture and Landscape 

Architecture of South Florida 
ARC 4905 Independent Study 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

ARC-Architecture; IND-lnterior Design; LAA-Landscape 

Architecture 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 

Summer semester offering. 

ARC 1001 Introduction to Design (3). A practical 
introduction to the professional, technical, and aesthetic 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 79 



aspects of architecture, interior design, landscape 
architecture, and environmental and urban systems. 

ARC 1131 Design Graphics I (3). An introduction to the 
development of Graphic skills for the conception and 
communication of design ideas. Subject areas emphasize 
orthographic and presentation techniques. Corequisite: 
ARC 1301. (F) 

ARC 1132 Design Graphics II (3). A continuation of 
Design graphics I with the exploration of broader graphic 
tools of conceptual representation. Subject areas 
emphasize computer graphics and multiple media. 
Prerequisite: ARC 1131. Corequisite: ARC 1302 (S) 

ARC 1171 Introduction to Computer Applications in 
Design 1 (3). A practical exploration to introductory 
computer applications appropriate to design disciplines. 

ARC 1172 Introduction to Computer Applications in 
Design 2 (3). A continuation of introduction to computer 
applications in design 1 with a broader exploration of 
introductory computer applications appropriate to design 
disciplines. 

ARC 1190 Portfolio Design 1 (3). An introduction to 
creating, binding and reproducing graphic materials for 
presentation. 

ARC 1191 Portfolio Design 2 (3). The second course in 
Portfolio Design. Students will develop their own portfolios 
using a variety of techniques. Prerequisite: Portfolio 
Design 1 . 

ARC 1213 Design Concepts 2 (3). A continuation of 
design concepts 1 with a broader exploration design 
principles, environmental and human factors, as well as 
the examination of design ideas. 

ARC 1244 Introduction to Design 2 (3). A continuation 
of introduction to design 1 with broader explorations of 
professional, technical, and aesthetic aspects of 
architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and 
urban systems. Prerequisite: ARC 1001. 

ARC 1301 Design Studio 1 (4). An introduction to 
concepts, fundamental design elements, and systems of 
order that inform two and three-dimensional design. 
Corequisite: ARC 1131. (F) 

ARC 1302 Design Studio 2 (4). A continuation of Design 
1 (ARC 1301). An introduction to principles of proportion 
and scale with an emphasis on the relationship between 
the body and three dimensional space. The design 
process is emphasized. Prerequisite: ARC 1301; 
Corequisite: ARC 1132. (S) 

ARC 1461 Materials and Methods of Design (3). An 

introduction of materials and methods. In this course 
properties of materials and performance in a variety of 
light building, interior and environmental assemblies are 
explored. (F) 

ARC 1930 Special Topics/Architectural Design I (4). An 

introduction to the basic perceptual, social, cultural, 
environmental and technical issues of architectural 
design. Basic architectural design projects. 

ARC 2210 Design Concepts (3). Introduction to 
principles of design and perception, study of user's need 
for relationship with environmental and human factors. 
Examination of design ideas and their development. (S) 



ARC 2303 Design Studio 3 (4). A continuation of design 
studio 2, site, social, cultural and environmental issues 
are the generator for design projects with repetitive spatial 
and progammatic issues. Prerequisites: ARC 1301 and 
ARC 2701 . (F) 

ARC 2304 Design Studio 4 (4). A continuation of design 
studio 3 structure, material, design details, human factors 
and interior architecture are explored for small scale infill 
urban buildings project. Prerequisites: ARC 2303, ARC 
1461. (S) 

ARC 2580 Structures and Systems (3). Introduction to 
principles of physical science for design problems of 
structures, spaces and ecological systems. Topics 
include, structural systems and environmental systems of 
building and their natural surroundings. Prerequisites: 
PHY 2053, MAC 2147. 

ARC 2701 History of Design from Antiquity to the 
Middle Ages (3). Survey of architectural, interior, and 
landscape design from antiquity to the Middle Ages, 
including western and non-western traditions critical 
reading and writing course. Written work meets state 
composition requirement of 6,000 written words. (F) 

ARC 2702 History of Design from the Renaissance to 
the XIX Century (3). Survey of architectural, interior, and 
landscape design from the Renaissance to the XIX 
century, including western and non-western traditions. 
Critical reading and writing course. (S) 

ARC 2931 Architectural Design 2 (4). Proportioning 
systems for architecture students stressing the 
understanding of human proportions in a 3D Space 
Research on modulating techniques and integration of 
interior and exterior spaces. Prerequisite: ARC 1 930. 

ARC 3031 Miami in Film (3). How the natural and built 
environment of South Florida is portrayed in films. 

ARC 3057 Computer Graphics in Design (3). An 

intensive hands-on introduction to software for processing 
text and graphics, as it relates to the field of graphic 
design. Various computer applications in design. 
Prerequisite: CGS 2060. 

ARC 3182 Design and the Virtual Environment (3). 

Implementation of real-time, three-dimensional virtual 
reality technology into existing and proposed design 
works. 

ARC 3192 Design Presentation Graphics (3). 

Exploration of design presentation techniques and 
portfolio design through the use of digital photography, 
digital illustration, desk top publishing and web page. 

ARC 3243 Introduction to Design Theories (3). 

Introduction to the environmental parameters, 
morphological concepts and ideological principles that 
generate form and meaning in architecture and landscape 
architecture. (F) 

ARC 3463 Materials and Methods of Construction II 
(3). A study of the types of construction and materials 
used in building interiors. How materials are properly 
installed and inspected, including the use of special 
equipment, in accordance to drawings, specifications, 
codes, standards, and agencies' recommendations. 
Prerequisite: ARC 1461. (S) 



80 School of Architecture 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ARC 3741 Urban Architecture and the 20 th Century (3). 
This course will examine debates on urban architecture 
surrounding the rise of Modernism in the 1920s and will 
follow those lines of thought into current discussion of 
architectural design in cities. 

ARC 3905 Solar Decathalon (3). Research based course 
to develop the architectural and engineering concepts for 
the solar decathalon house. 

ARC 3919 Architectural Research Methods (3). Survey 
of research methods applicable to the study of the 
cultural, spatial, material and aesthetic implications of 
architecture. The emphasis of the course is on 
involvement in original research. (F) 

ARC 3932 Special Topics Design Studio (4). An 
architectural design studio based on a particular aspect of 
architectural design under the direction of appropriate 
faculty. 

ARC 4030 Film and the Architecture of Modern Life 
(3). Critical overview of social and spatial implications of 
film on architecture and design over the course of the 20 th 
century. 

ARC 4058 Computer Applications in Architecture (3). 
Advanced study of computer software packages 
applicable to the architecture office environment, with 
particular emphasis on CAD software, graphics packages 
and desktop publishing. (F.S.SS) 

ARC 4114 Special Projects (3). Will focus on the 
development of adequate drawing skills in relationship to 
the understanding of a building and a site through 
sketching, graphic analysis, measured drawings, 
rendering and presentation. The course consists of site 
visits and workshops. 

ARC 4173 3D Computer Modeling (3). This course will 
explore computer modeling in Architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program Approval. 

ARC 4174 Computer Rendering in Architecture (3). 
This course will explore 3D rendering in architecture. 
Prerequisites: Program approval. 

ARC 4183 Architecture and the Virtual Environment 
(3). Implementation of virtual reality technology in 
architectural representations of existing and proposed 
built environments for presentation and design research. 
Prerequisites: ARC 4173 and ARC 4174. 

ARC 4185 Interactive Media (3). Presentation of digital 
images through an interactive and animated interface 
online or offline, as well as exploration of ideologies of 
interactive media. 

ARC 4188 Visual Effects (3). Introduction of digital video 
and audio post-production techniques that add sound, text 
and visual effects to animations, as well as exploration of 
ideologies of digital animation. 

ARC 4227 Gender and Architecture (3). A theoretical, 
visual and professional exploration of women's and men's 
roles, identities, and histories in public and private built 
environments. 

ARC 4270C Professional Office Practice (3). 
Assignments in office administration, negotiation of 
contracts, fee structure, professional ethics, client and 
public relations. Business organization, procedure 



scheduling and task allocation within design professional 
practices. Prerequisite: Senior standing. (F) 

ARC 4324 Architectural Design 5 (4). Integration of 
structure and construction techniques in the production of 
a small to mid-sized public project that incorporates site 
considerations, materials and structure. Prerequisites: 
ARC 2304, BCN 2402C and admission to the major. (F) 

ARC 4335 Architectural Design 6 (4). This studio 
focuses on housing and related components including the 
repetitive spatial and structural elements, circulation and 
contextual considerations. Prerequisite: ARC 4324. (S) 

ARC 4342 Architectural Design 7 (4). A flexible 
framework for appropriate investigations of complex 
spatial, programmatic, contextual, constructional and 
ethical issues involved in design projects. Course content 
varies with instructor. Prerequisites: ARC 4335. (F) 

ARC 4343 Architectural Design 8 (4). Architectural 
design explorations of site, building codes, community 
objectives will be undertaken through individual 
programming, process and design initiatives for a complex 
building project. Prerequisite: ARC 4342. (S) 

ARC 4553 Structural Design (4). Exploration of structural 
specifications as outlined by appropriate codes and 
manuals to introduce structural analysis, loadings and 
structural elements commonly encountered in 
construction for architectural analysis and design. 
Prerequisite: ARC 2580. (SS) 

ARC 4696 Basic Utilities and Housing (3). The study of 
the importance of basic utilities (such as roads, sewer and 
water supply systems) in housing planning and 
construction. A relative cost analysis. Health problems 
and sociological effects of lack of basic utilities. Innovative 
concepts to incorporate basic utilities to ail housing 
projects in developing countries. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

ARC 4730 Culture and Art in Italy (3). Course describes 
the evolution of culture and aesthetics and their 
immediate relationship with the creation of these works. 
Consists of site visits and class lectures. 

ARC 4752 Architectural History of the Americas (3). 

Historical analysis of the development of built forms and 
styles in tropical and subtropical Americas. Investigating 
its socio-political and artistic context. Prerequisite: ARC 
2701. 

ARC 4754 Asian and African Architecture (3). 

Comprehensive study of architectural forms, styles, and 
construction techniques in Asia and Africa. Prerequisites: 
ARC 2701 , ARC 2702, ARC 4783. 

ARC 4755 The Architecture of the City (3). To analyze 
the layering that composes urban form and to offer a 
basis of historical and theoretical information in order to 
take advantage of particular experience. Different periods 
of urban history are presented. 

ARC 4783 History of Design from the XIX Century to 
Present (3). Survey of architectural, interior, and 
landscape design from the XIX century to the present, 
including western and non-western traditions. Critical 
reading and writing course. (F) 

ARC 4796 Social History of the Built Form (3). The art 

of urbanism, its roots in society, its techniques and 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 81 



aesthetics. Latest trends and theories. Real urbanism, 
the appropriate contemporary process to achieve the 
recovery of place in our society. 

ARC 4799 The Architecture and Landscape 
Architecture of South Florida (3). Overview of the 
natural resources, cultural traditions and architectural 
precedents which have fomented the regionalist 
architecture and landscape architecture of South Florida. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. (SS) 

ARC 4905 Independent Study (1-5). Specialized 
individual studies under supervision of faculty advisor. 
Consent of faculty advisor required. Prerequisite: 
Departmental approval. (F,S,SS) 

ARC 4910 Research Methods (3). Survey of architectural 
research methods that use primary and secondary 
sources and materials to study historical and 
contemporary issues involved in the built environment. 
Prerequisite: ARC 2304. (F) 

ARC 4940 Architecture Internship (3). Advanced issues 
in architecture practice learned through work experience 
with licensed professionals. Prerequisites: ARC 4270, 
ARC 3463, ARC 4553. 

ARC 5035 Film and the Architecture of Modern Life 
(3). Critical overview of social and spatial implications of 
film on architecture and design over the course of the 20 lh 
century. 

ARC 5036 Miami in Film (3). How the natural and built 
environment of South Florida is portrayed in films. 

ARC 5037 Architecutre and Video Media (3). This 
course will examine intersections between architecture 
and video media from critical historical and contemporary 
perspectives. 

ARC 5075 Formative Studio (6). Introduction to concept 
development, spatial expression, and representational 
techniques in architecture. (F) 

ARC 5076 Formative Studio 2 (6). A continuation of 
architectural design investigations begun in Formative 
Studio. Prerequisite: ARC 5075. (S) 

ARC 5077 Formative Studio 3 (6). An Architectural 
Design Studio that builds upon concepts and approaches 
presented in Formative Studio and Formative Studio 2. 
Prerequisite: ARC 5076. 

ARC 5175 3D Computer Modeling in Architecture (3). 

This advanced course will explore computer modeling in 
architecture. Prerequisite: Program approval. 

ARC 5176C Computer Practices in Design II (3). 

Advanced study in concepts, issues and methods in 
computer-aided architectural design. Prerequisite: ARC 
4058 or equivalent. 

ARC 5177 Computer Rendering in Architecture (3). 

This advanced course will explore 3D rendering in 
Architecture. Prerequisites: Program approval. 

ARC 5184 Architecture and the Virtual Environment 
(3). Implementation of virtual reality technology in 
architectural representations of existing and proposed 
built environments for presentation and design research. 
Prerequisites: ARC 4173, ARC 4174. 



ARC 5186 Interactive Media (3). Presentation of digital 
images through an interactive and animated interface 
online or offline, as well as exploration of ideologies of 
interactive media. 

ARC 5189 Visual Effects (3). Introduction of digital video 
and audio post-production techniques that add sound, text 
and visual effects to animations, as well as exploration of 
ideologies of digital animation. 

ARC 5193 Design Presentation Graphics (3). 

Exploration of design presentation techniques and 
portfolio design through the use of digital photography, 
digital illustration, desk top publishing and web page. 

ARC 5205 Advanced Design Theories (3). This seminar 
analyzes western and non-western examples of critical 
ideology through the investigation of key historical 
moments and current architectural theory and practice. 
(S) 

ARC 5361 Graduate Design 1 (6). Exploration of highly 
articulated projects of small scale utilizing innovative 
research methods to strengthen and clarify design 
concepts taken to a detailed resolution. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. Corequisite: ARC 5483. (F) 

ARC 5362 Graduate Design 2 (6). This course explores 
architectural projects of medium to large scale applying 
innovative building technologies to a highly resolved 
spatial organization. Prerequisite: ARC 5361 C. (S) 

ARC 5396 Case Studies in Architecture (3). The course 
explores the vast array of decisions that create the 
architectural experience of outstanding built works. 

ARC 5483 Innovations in Building Technology (3). 

Experimental approach to new materials and methods 
applicable to the field of construction. Corequisite: ARC 
5361. (F) 

ARC 5483L Innovations in Building Technology Lab 
(1). Field and laboratory exercises in the evaluation of 
technical support assemblies for buildings. Corequisites: 
ARC 5361. 

ARC 5745 Urban Architecture and the 20 th Century (3). 

The course will examines debates on urban architecture 
surrounding the rise of Modernism in the 1920s and will 
follow those lines of thought into current discussions of 
architectural design in cities. 

ARC 5750 Architectural History of the Americas (3). 

Historical analysis of the development of built forms and 
styles in tropical and subtropical Americas, investigating 
its socio-political and artistic context. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. 

ARC 5786 Urbanism: Social History of the Built Form 
(3). This course introduces students to historical analysis, 
theories, techniques and aesthetics as they relate to 
urban design. 

ARC 5803 Preservation Architecture: Issues and 
Practices (3). This course explores issues and practices 
of architectural preservation as an integral concern of 
architecture. 

ARC 5905 Solar Decathalon (1). Research based course 
to develop the architectural and engineering concepts for 
the solar decathalon house. 



82 School of Architecture 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ARC 5933 Special Topics (1-6). Coursework on a 
particular aspect of architecture under the direction of 
faculty in a classroom format. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. 

ARC 5938 Special Topics Design Studio (6). An 

architectural design studio based on a particular aspect of 
architectural design and relevant ideologies under the 
direction of appropriate faculty. 

ARC 5XXX Site Development in Architecture (3). 

Issues, controls and methods pertinent to the 
physiographic, topographical, and cultural determinants of 
site design in architecture. 

ARC 5XXX Environmental Systems in Architecture (3). 

Development of an understanding of environmentally 
sensitive design. Climate and region as a major 
determinant of building design; sustainability, energy 
conservation, passive solar design, daylight and natural 
ventilation will be examined. 

ARC 5XXX Alternative Studio (6). Topical studies in 
architecture, on issues of current interest, with the 
participation of visiting lecturers, or abroad. (SS) 

IND 1932 Special Topics/Interior Design I (4). An 

introduction to the basic perceptual, social, cultural, 
environmental and technical issues of interior design. 
Basic interior design projects. 

IND 2100 History of Interiors I (3). An analysis of the 
history of architectural interiors, furniture and decorative 
arts from ancient times through the Neo-Classical Period. 
Recommended prerequisite: ARC 2701 . (S) 

IND 2130 History of Interiors II (3). An analysis of the 
history of architectural interiors, furniture and decorative 
arts from the Neo-Classical Period to the present. 
Prerequisite: IND 2100. (F) 

IND 3131 History of Modern Interior Design (3). 

Analysis of the 20 lh century architectural interiors, furniture 
and decorative arts from 1890-present. Prerequisites: 
ARC 2701, ARC 2702. 

IND 3214 Interior Design 4 (4). Fundamental problems of 
interior design, spatial organizations, and human factors. 
Attention to interior construction details by means of 
scale, finishes, furniture and equipment. Prerequisites: 
ARC 2303 or equivalent. (S) 

IND 3215 Interior Design 5 (4). Analysis, programing and 
design of commerical facilities including hospitality and 
retail. Students research the functions, and requirements 
of the project, design the interior spaces, develop 
architectural details and work on the selection of furniture 
and finishes. Prerequisite: IND 3214. Corequisites: IND 
3451C, IND3423C. (F) 

IND 3216 Interior Design 6 (4). Consideration and 
application of design criteria with an emphasis on 
planning and design of interior for the work environment. 
Students develop programs, work on space planning, as 
well as furniture selection, illumination and selected 
architectural details. Prerequisites: IND 3215, IND 
3451 C, IND 3423C. Corequisite: ARC 4270. (S) 

IND 3423C Sources, Materials, and Cost Estimating for 
Interiors (3). Sources and materials used by interior 
designers in the development of a design project. 
Materials available in the market for furniture finishes and 



equipment and its costs are analyzed. Prerequisites: ARC 
1461 and ARC 2580. Corequisites: IND 3215, IND 
3451 C.(S) 

IND 3430C Lighting Design (3). A fundamental course in 
lighting with emphasis on interaction with the design of an 
interior space. Prerequisites: IND 3215 or Architectural 
Design 5 (ARC 4324). (F) 

IND 3451 C Interior Design Construction Drawing 1 (4). 

Development of Interior Design working drawings with 
emphasis on detailing and cabinetry. Prerequisites: ARC 
1461, ARC 2580. Corequisites: IND 3215, IND 3423C. 

IND 3930 Special Topics Design Studio (4). An interior 
design studio based on a particular aspect of interior 
design under the direction of appropriate faculty. 

IND 4225 Interior Design 7 (4). Analysis of the human 
condition in design. Topics include the behavioral and 
environmental sciences, ergonomics, and ecology and 
their impact on design. Prerequisite: IND 3216. 
Corequisite: IND 4455C. (F) 

IND 4226 Interior Design 8 (3). The final studio involves 
projects of increased scale and complexity. The studio 
emphasizes the diversity of aspects that integrate the 
design process from conceptual formulations and 
programming to the full development of the design thesis. 
Prerequisite: IND 4225. (S) 

IND 4311 Color Theory (3). Use of color in the built 
environment including principal color systems, methods of 
color harmony, effects of visual phenoqpna, and various 
psychological, cultural and historical implications. 
Prerequisite: IND 3216. Corequisite: IND 3215. (F) 

IND 4441 C Furniture Design (3). Introduction to the 
human factors, concepts, function, materials and 
techniques of furniture design. Prerequisite: ARC 4058. 
(SS) 

IND 4455C Advanced Construction Documents (4). 

Advanced production of construction documents. 
Includes design of architectural details, material 
specification, integration of building systems, and 
application of life safety-accessibility issues. 
Prerequisites! IND 3451 C, IND 3423C, IND 3216. (F) 

IND 4501 Interior Design Practice (3). The student will 
be introduced to the specific skills necessary to succeed 
in the preparation of of legal documents and 
specifications. Prerequisite: IND 3215. (S) 

IND 4940 Interior Design Internship (3). Advanced 
issues in interior design practice learned through work 
experience with licensed professionals. Prerequisites: 
ARC 4270, IND 3451 C, IND 3423C, IND 3430C. 

IND 4943C Interior Design Research (3). Preparation of 
program fori the final interior design studio project. 
Instruction on methods of information gathering, analysis, 
and evaluation. Environment and behavior theories will 
be explored. Prerequisites or Corequisites: IND 3216 and 
IND 4225. (FJ) 

IND 5XXX History of 21 " Century Furniture Design (3). 

Students will research and analyze the social, political, 
technical economic and theoretical forces that contribute 
to new movements in late 20 lh century and early 21 s1 
century furniture design. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 83 



IND 5XXX Professional Practice and Entrepreneurship 
in Furniture Design (3). Learn about industry standards 
and entrepreneurial strategies that successful designers 
and furniture companies use when bringing new designs 
to different markets. 

IND 5XXX Special Topics Design Studio (6). An interior 
design studio based on a particular aspect of interior 
design and relevant ideologies under the direction of 
appropriate faculty. 

IND 5XXXC Advanced Furniture Design (6). Research, 
analyze and design furniture using wood, metals and 
plastics. Instruction will include advanced technical skills 
and emphasis on qualitative and conceptual aspects of 
design. 

IND 5XXXC Furniture Design (6). Providing a general 
overview of furniture design process, this design/build 
studio course teaches students about ergonomics, scale, 
space, structure and materiality related to furniture design. 

LAA 3212 Landscape Construction Documentation (3). 

Production of landscape construction documents, 
including drawings and project manual with bidding 
documents, contract documents and technical 
specifications on the computer. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. 

LAA 3333 Site Analysis and Design (3). Introduction to 
ecological, functional, and aesthestic considerations in 
site analysis, planning and design. 

LAA 3350 Landscape Design I (4). Application of Basic 
Design principles to the design of landscape and garden. 
A general survey of design elements, restraints, plant 
materials, and other garden materials will aid the student 
to develop projects in a laboratory environment. (S) 

LAA 3420 Landscape Construction (3). Technical 
aspects of the design and specification of sitework, 
including materials, products, and methods of installation 
used in landscape construction. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. 

LAA 3430 Landscape Structures (3). Production of 
landscape construction details for structures and systems 
used in landscape architecture. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. 

LAA 3602 South Florida Landscapes (3). Study of the 
structure, function, and change in the natural and cultural 
landscapes of tropical and subtropical regions. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. 

LAA 3712 History of Landscape Architecture (3). 

Historical survey of the principal sites and traditions 
manifested in the evolution of landscape architecture and 
urban design from antiquity to the present. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. 

LAA 3802 Landscape Development (3). Technical 
aspects of the design and specification of earthwork, 
including materials, products, and methods of installation 
used in landscape development. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. 

LAA 3905C Special Topics Design Studio (4). A 
landscape architectural design studio based on a 
particular aspect of landscape architectural design under 
the direction of appropriate faculty. 



LAA 3XXX GIS Applications in Landscape Modeling 
(3). Introduction to spatial modeling capabilities of GIS in 
the environmental planning process addressing ecological 
issues and the physical, biological and social 
characteristics of the landscape. Prerequisite: Program 
Approval. 

LAA 5233 Theory of Planting Design (3). Study of 
principles and methods related to the ecological, 
functional, and aesthetic use of vegetation in landscape 
architecture. Prerequisite: Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 5235 Theory of Landscape Architecture (3). 

Critical review of the environmental parameters, 
morphological concepts and ideological principles that 
generate form and meaning in landscape architecture. 
Prerequisite: LAA 5716. (S) 

LAA 5243 Regional Landscape Issues (3). Exploration 
of the landscape as cultural construct of social, economic, 
and scientific values relevant to regional issues of land 
use and management. Prerequisite: Program approval. 
(SS) 

LAA 5371 Computer Practices in Landscape 
Architecture (3). Computer applications of graphics, 
modeling, and animation techniques used in landscape 
architecture. Prerequisite: Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 5374 Introduction to Computer Practices in 
Landscape Architecture (3). Computer application of 
drafting and design techniques used in landscape 
architecture. Prerequisite: Program approval. (F) 

LAA 5378 GIS Applications in Landscape Modeling 
(3). Introduction to modeling capabilities of GIS in the 
environmental planning process addressing the natural 
and cultural characteristics of the landscape. 
Prerequisite: Program Approval. (SS) 

LAA 5422 Landscape Development (3). Technical 
aspects of the design and specification of earthwork, 
including materials, products, and methods of installation 
used in landscape development. Prerequisite: LAA 5371 . 
(F) 

LAA 5423 Landscape Construction (3). Technical 
aspects of the design and specification of sitework, 
including materials, products, and methods of installation 
used in landscape construction. Prerequisite: LAA 5422. 
(S) 

LAA 5425 Landscape Construction Documentation (3). 
Production of landscape construction documents, 
including drawings and project manual with bidding 
documents, contract documents and technical 
specifications on the computer. Prerequisite: LAA 5427. 
(F) 

LAA 5427 Landscape Structures (3). Production of 
landscape construction details for structures and systems 
used in landscape architecture. Prerequisite: LAA 5423. 
(F) 

LAA 5540 Landscape Horticulture (3). Overview of 
horticultural management practices related to the growth, 
transport, installation, and maintenance of vegetative 
materials used in landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (SS) 



84 School of Architecture Undergraduate Catalog 

LAA 5541 South Florida Landscapes (3). Study of 
structure, function, and change in the natural and cultural 
landscapes of tropical and subtropical Florida. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. (S) 

LAA 5652 Formative Studio (6). Introduction to concept 
development, spatial expression, and representational 
techniques in landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (F) 

LAA 5653 Site Studio (6). Application of landscape 
architecture principles and methods to site design in 
tropical and subtropical contexts. Prerequisite: LAA 5652. 
(S) 

LAA 5715 History and Theory of Architecture (3). 

Overview of the history and theory of architecture and 
urban design from antiquity to the present. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 5716 History of Landscape Architecture (3). 

Historical survey of the principal sites and traditions 
manifested in the evolution of landscape architecture and 
urban design from antiquity to the present. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (F) 

LAA 5905C Speical Topics Design Studio (6). A 

landscape architectural design studio based on a 
particular aspect of landscape architectural design and 
relevant ideologies under the direction of appropriate 
faculty. 

URP 5316 Environmental and Urban Systems (3). 

Overview of basic issues and principles of environmental 
and urban planning and design systems. Emphasis will be 
placed on multi-disciplinary linkages. 

URP 5912 Research Methods (3). Methods of 
information search, data interpretaion, and hypotheses 
formulation used in the field. 



Undergraduate Catalog School of Architecture 85 

School of Architecture 

Dean Juan Antonio Bueno 

Associate Dean David F. Bergwall 

Assistant Dean Nathaniel Q. Belcher 

Faculty 

Andia, Alfredo, MDes, PhD (University of California- 
Berkeley), Assistant Professor, Architecture 
Belcher, Nathaniel Q., MArch, AIA (Harvard University), 

Associate Professor, Assistant Dean, Architecture 
Bergwall, David F., MBA, DBA (George Washington 

University), Associate Professor, Associate Dean 
Bueno, J.A., MLA, ASLA, PE (Harvard University), 

Professor, Dean 
Canaves, Jaime, MArch, FAIA, IIDA (University of 

Florida), Associate Professor, Architecture 
Canaves, Marta, MLA, IIDA (Florida International 

University), Director, Associate in Design, Landscape 

Architecture 
Chandler, Jason R., MArch, AIA (Harvard University), 

Assistant Professor, Architecture 
Drisin, Adam M., MArch (Harvard University), Director, 

Associate Professor, Architecture 
King, Janine MArch (University of Oregon), Director, 

Associate Professor, Interior Design 
Lopez-Mata, Gisela, MS (Pratt Institute), Associate 

Professor, Interior Design 
Nepomechie, Marilys, MArch, AIA (Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology), Associate Professor, 

Architecture 
Quintana, Nicolas, NCARB (University of Havana), 

Scholar in Architecture and Urbanism 
Read, Gray, MArch, PhD, RA (University of 

Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor, Architecture 
Rosales, Camilo, MArch, RA (Harvard University), 

Associate Professor, Architecture 
Smith, Kevin, MArch (Virginia Polytechnic and State 

University), Assistant in Design, Architecture 
Stuart, John A., MArch, AIA (Columbia University), 

Associate Professor, Architecture 



86 Undergraduate Catalog 



88 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Dean, (Interim) 

Associate Dean, College Relations 

Associate Dean, Budget and 

Facilities 
Associate Dean, Biscayne Bay 

Campus, 
Assistant Dean, Advising 
Director, School of Computer 

Science 
Interim Director, School of Music 



Mark Szuchman 
Gisela Casines 

Kenneth G. Furton 

Joyce Peterson 
Kenton Harris 

Yi Deng 
Joseph Rohm 

The mission of the College of Arts and Sciences is to 
teach, engage in research and creative artistic activity, 
and serve the community. This mission derives from the 
College's traditional focus on the fundamental intellectual 
disciplines and the premise that a coherent and 
intellectually rigorous curriculum of the humanities, arts, 
mathematics, and the social and natural sciences is the 
foundation for excellence in any undergraduate education. 
The College provides such programs for students enrolled 
in the Unversity's Core Curriculum and offers elective 
courses for students who seek degrees from the 
University's other colleges and schools. Many 
professional degree programs require courses in specific 
Arts and Sciences disciplines; these needs are carefully 
addressed. 

The College's mission goes beyond introductory and 
service courses by exploring the full implications of the 
arts and sciences disciplines in historical and 
contemporary society. High quality undergraduate degree 
programs educate students in the fundamentals of each 
discipline. Graduate programs provide in-depth training for 
the best students and allow faculty members the 
opportunity to teach at the frontiers of their fields. 
Rigorous academic research, scholarship, and creative 
activity are integral components of faculty activities in all 
disciplines and are the heart of graduate education. 

Characteristically, the liberal arts endeavor is to 
synthesize. Thus, in addition to traditional degree 
programs, the College coordinates special areas and 
interests through a number of certificate and 
interdisciplinary degree programs. 

The College is composed of 19 departments, the 
School of Computer Science, the School of Music, and 
several interdisciplinary programs. 

Undergraduate Programs 

The College offers departmental programs of study 
leading to Bachelor's degrees in art, art history, Asian 
studies, biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, 
dance, earth sciences, economics, English, environmental 
studies, French, geography, history, information 
technology, international relations, marine biology, 
mathematics, mathematical sciences, music, philosophy, 
physics, political science, Portuguese, psychology, 
religious studies, sociology and anthropology, Spanish, 
statistics, and theatre. The College also offers 
interdisciplinary programs leading to Bachelor's degrees 
in humanities, liberal studies, and women's studies. A 
labor studies concentration is available in the liberal 
studies program. 

Minor programs of study are offered in art and art 
history, astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, 
dance, earth sciences, economics, English, environmental 



studies, French language and culture, general translation 
studies, geography, history, humanities, international 
relations, marine biology, mathematical sciences, 
mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political 
science, Portuguese, psychology, religious studies, 
sociology and anthropology, Spanish language and 
culture, statistics, and theatre. 

Certificate Programs 

Students can earn through the College certificates in the 
following: Actuarial Studies, African Studies, African-New 
World Studies, American Studies, Ancient Mediterranean 
Civilization, Asian Studies, Asian Globalization and Latin 
American Studies, Chinese Studies, Comparative 
Immunology, Cuban and Cuban-American Studies, 
Environmental Studies, Ethnic Studies, European Studies, 
Film Studies, Forensic Science, Gerontological Studies, 
International Studies, Japanese Studies, Judaic Studies, 
Labor Studies, Labor Studies and Labor Relations, Latin 
American and Caribbean Studies, Law, Ethics and 
Society, Legal Translation and Court Interpreting, 
Linguistic Studies, Population and Development, Pre- 
Modern Cultures, Portuguese Translation, Portuguese 
Interpretation, Professional Language, Public Policy 
Studies, Translation Studies, Tropical Commercial Botany, 
and Women's Studies. 

Admission 

FIU freshmen and sophomore students may be coded 
with an "intended" major in the College upon earning 24 
semester hours. 

They may be fully admitted to the College if they have 
earned 60 semester hours, have a cumulative grade point 
average (GPA) of 2.0, and have passed the CLAST. Full 
admission to the College is accomplished by filing the 
form "Request for Acceptance into Upper Division 
College/School." 

A transfer student having an Associate in Arts degree 
from a Florida community college or having completed the 
equivalent coursework at a four-year institution with a 
minimum of 60 semester hours earned, having a 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0, and having 
passed the CLAST may be admitted to a program in the 
College. Applicants must submit an Application for 
Admission to the University and must follow the regular 
University procedures. Applicants must be eligible for 
admission to the University before admission to the 
College. 

All students are encouraged to seek advising as early 
as possible in the department/program of their choice, 
even if they have not yet been fully admitted into that 
major. 

College Requirements for a Baccalaureate 
Degree 

Candidates to the Bachelor's degree must satisfy 
individual departmental requirements, and the following 
College requirements, in addition to the University-wide 
requirements listed elsewhere: 

1. A minimum of 120 semester hours in acceptable 
coursework is required. 

2. At least half of the upper division credits in any major 
must have been taken in at FIU. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 89 



3. In the last 60 semester hours of enrollment, students 
must earn nine semester hours of elective credits through 
coursework outside the major, six of which are to be taken 
outside the department sponsoring the program. 

4. Students must earn a grade of "C" or higher in all 
courses required for the major. A grade of "C-" or lower is 
not acceptable in any required course. 

5. Of the total number of hours submitted for 
graduation, a minimum of 48 semester hours must be in 
upper division courses. 

6. Students must demonstrate competency in a foreign 
language, or in American Sign Language, at the level of 
the second semester of a college language sequence. 
(High school courses cannot be used to fulfill this 
requirement.) This requirement may be met by 
successfully completing with a grade of 'C or better (C- 
does not count): a) the second semester of a two- 
semester sequence basic language course or b) any 
second-year or third-year foreign language course. This 
requirement may also be fulfilled by presenting acceptable 
scores in the Advanced Placement Exam, the SAT II, the 
CLEP exam, or other approved instruments. Students 
should consult their advisors for more specific information. 

7. One-and two-credit physical activity courses (with the 
prefixes PEL, PEM, PEN) cannot be included as part of 
the hours needed for graduation. 

College Requirements for a Minor 

Students who desire to earn a minor must satisfy 
individual departmental/program requirements and the 
following College requirements: 

1. At least half of the courses used to fulfill the 
requirements must have been taken at FIU. 

2. Earn a grade of "C" or higher in all courses required 
for the minor. A grade of "C-" or lower is not acceptable in 
any required course. 

Note: The programs, policies, requirements, and 
regulations listed in this catalog are continually subject to 
review in order to serve the needs of the University's 
various publics and to respond to the mandates of the 
Florida Board of Education and the Florida Legislature. 
Changes may be made without advance notice. Please 
refer to the General Information section for the 
University's policies, requirements, and regulations. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

The College of Arts and Sciences is home to the Epsilon 
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's most prestigious 
honor society. Established in 1776 at the College of 
William and Mary, this society is exclusively for arts and 
sciences majors who have studied broadly in a variety of 
its disciplines. 

Membership is by invitation not by application. During 
the semester when students graduate, they are evaluated 
by the chapter to determine their eligibility. Summer 
graduates are considered during the succeeding fall 
semester. The chapter committee examines not only the 
student's grade point average, but also the breadth and 
rigor of coursework in the arts and sciences. In particular, 
candidates need to demonstrate knowledge of 
mathematics and of a foreign language at least minimally 
appropriate for liberal education. 

Students who wish further information on the 
requirements for membership should contact Professors 
Geoff Smith (Computer Science) or Leonard Keller 
(Chemistry). 



Interdisciplinary Courses 

The College of Arts and Sciences has several 
interdisciplinary programs which are not based in a 
specific academic department. The courses offered by 
these programs therefore are not found in the 
departmental listings in the Catalog. For this reason, they 
are included here. 

ASN 3042 Asian Religions and the Arts (3). Examines 
the richly diverse and complex forms of art and artistic 
expression in the various Asian religions against the 
background of their respective cultural settings. 

ASN 3403 Zen and the Art of Tea Ceremony (3). An 

introduction to the cultural traditions and social behavior of 
Asia that covers the history, theory, and practice of 
Chado, or Way of Tea, a Zen-Buddhist inspired art. 

ASN 3410 Introduction to East Asia (3). An overview of 
East Asia from traditional to modern times including the 
interaction among Asian cultures as well as between Asia 
and the world. 

ASN 4510 Dynamics of Asia (3). An interdisciplinary 
study of the classical and contemporary periods in Asian 
civilizations, including tradition and modernization, culture 
and the arts, gender and diversity, and international 
relations. 

ASN 4911 Independent Research in Asian Studies (1- 

6). Topics selected to meet academic needs for students 
doing research in same special area in Asian Studies. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ASN 5315 Survey of Modern Asia (3). Focus on 
modernization, or the transition from pre-modern 
(classical and medieval) to elements of the modern, 
including westernization, industrialization, and the roles of 
capitalism, communism, imperialism, and colonialism, as 
well as the impact of post-colonialism and post-modern 
society in Asia. 

ASN 5910 Independent Research in Asian Studies (1- 

6). Topics will be selected to meet academic needs for 
students doing research in some specialized area of asian 
studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ISC 4947 Entrepreneurial Science Internship (1-20). 

Internship in a faculty laboratory with emphasis on finding 
commercial applications of the laboratory's ongoing 
research. May be repeated. Prerequisite: GEB 4113. 

ISE 4XXX International Student Exchange (1-20). 
Registration for students studying overseas in official FIU 
programs. 

LAS 5955 Haiti Study Abroad (3). Study abroad 
examination of Haitian Politics and Society. Part of 
Haitian Summer Institute. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

SLS 1501 First Year Experience (1). A review of basic 
skills and competencies necessary to college success 
including time management, study skills, and academic 
policies/procedures. Includes mandated information. 



90 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



African-New World Program Undergraduate 
Courses 

AFA 2000 African World-Introduction (3). A core 
requirement for those considering a certificate or major in 
African-New World Studies. Key ideas, thinkers, theories, 
and geographical locations of peoples and culture of the 
African diaspora. 

AFA 3153 African Civilization, Religion and 
Philosophy (3). An Introductory level overview of Ancient 
African origins of Civilization, Religion and Philosophy. 
Prerequisites: Introduction to African New World Studies 
AFA 2000 or approval of director. 

AFA 4104 Teaching the African-American Experience 
(3). Teachers Institute which includes literature, culture, 
history, politics, and the arts designed to meet Florida 
State Teachers Certification requirements. Includes 
instruction on pedagogy, teaching methods and FCAT. 

AFA 4930 African-New World Studies: Theory & 
Methods Seminar (3). The nature, meaning and intent of 
intellectual production in Africa and the diaspora. 
Examines the works of key thinkers that have made 
visible some of the submerged or appropriated realities of 
African peoples. 

AFA 4931 Special Topics in African-New World 
Studies (3). An examination of different features of 
African-New World Studies, not normally offered in the 
basic curriculum or otherwise offered. May be repeated. 

AFA 4933 Special Topics in Black Transnationalism 
(3). A course designed to give groups of students special 
studies in the black experience transnationally. 
Prerequisite: Introduction to African-New World Studies 
AFA 2000. 

European Studies 

EUS 4920 Colloquium: European Studies (3). 

Interdisciplinary course, co-taught by faculty from the 
humanities and social sciences, provides students a 
comprehensive picture on a subject relevant to modern 
Europe. Topics will vary. 

Social Science Interdisciplinary 

ISS 3240 World Prospects and Issues (3). This course 
examines, from a multidisciplinary point of view, specific 
global issues such as food, population, and arms control. 
The issues discussed may change from one semester to 
the next. 

ISS 4234 Cultural Expressions of the Americas (3). 

This interdisciplinary course focuses on national, cultural, 
and racial identities, as well as the performance of race 
and gender, as expressed in cultural productions of the 
Americas. 

ISS 4235 The Cultural Body in the Americas: Critical 
Issues in Intercultural Understanding (3). With a team- 
taught interdisciplinary approach this course explores the 
diverse symbols, hierarchies, and meanings invoked 
through culturally constructed human bodies and body 
movement in the Americas. 

ISS 5237 Latin American and Caribbean Cultural 
Expressions (3). This interdisciplinary course develops 
an interdisciplinary approach to the study of national, 



cultural, and racial identities, as expressed in cultural 
productions of the Latin America and the Caribbean. 

ISS 5238 The Imaged Body: The Case of the Americas 
(3). With a team-taught interdisciplinary approach this 
course explores how identity, power and hierarchy are 
invoked and represented through the human body and 
body movement in the region of the Americas. 

SSI 4XXX Sustainable Communities Seminar (3). 

Explores theories and aspects of sustainable 
communities, and considers the concept in comparative- 
historical, local-global, and critical perspective. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

SSI 5XXX Sustainable Communities Seminar (3). 
Explores theories and aspects of sustainable 
communities, and considers the concept in comparative- 
historical, local-global, and critical perspective. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 91 



Art and Art History 



Carol Damian, Professor and Chair 

Tori Arpad, Associate Professor 

Pip Brant, Assistant Professor 

Ralph F. Buckley, Associate Professor 

William Burke, Professor 

James M. Couper III, Professor 

Eduardo Del Valle, Professor 

Mirta Gomez, Professor 

Daniel Guernsey, Assistant Professor 

Clive King, Professor 

Kate Kretz, Associate Professor 

William Maguire, Professor 

Juan Martinez, Associate Professor 

Geoffrey Olsen, Associate Professor, Graduate Director 

Manuel Torres, Professor 

Barbara Watts, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Art Core: 

ARH 2050 Art History Survey I 3 

ARH 2051 Art History Survey II 3 

ART 1 201 C 2-D Design 3 

ART1203C 3-D Design 3 

ART 2300C Drawing I 3 

ART 2330C Figure Drawing I 3 

ART 2XXX Studio Art Elective 3 

ART 2XXX Studio Art Elective 3 

Total 24 

Remarks: Admission to the program requires completion 
of appropriate General Education Requirements, CORE, 
or UCC requirements, and the CLAST test requirement. 
Art majors must also complete the College of Arts and 
Sciences Language requirement. 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

ARH 4450 Modern Art 3 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art 3 

ARH Elective (2) (upper division) 6 

Studio major concentration (5) 15 

ART &/or ARH Electives (4) 12 

ART 3820 & 3821 Visual Thinking I & II 6 

ART 4952 & 4953Thesis I & II 6 

Electives outside of the Art Department 6-9 

Total 60 

Bachelor of Arts in Art History 

The Department of Art and Art History offers a BA in Art 
History that is designed to introduce methodologies and 
subjects of Art History from throughout the world. In 
addition to traditional European and American subjects 
from ancient to modern times, we offer a strong emphasis 
on Latin American art from Pre-Columbian to the present. 
The BA in Art History provides professional education as 
preparation for careers as Art professionals and for further 
graduate study. The BA compliments our BFA degree 
program in Art and provides significant interaction 
between artists and historians. 



Degree Program Hours: Minimum 120 

Lower Division Requirements: 

ARH 2050 Art History Survey I 3 

ARH 2051 Art History Survey II 3 

ART 1201C 2-D Design 3 

ART 2300C Drawing I 3 

Foreign Language 10 

(While we require only that the University and College 
language requirements be met, it should be noted that 
some graduate programs require competence in Italian, 
German, or French) 

Remarks: Admission to the program requires completion 
of appropriate General Education Requirements, CORE, 
or UCC requirements, and the CLAST test requirement. 
Art majors must also complete the College of Arts and 
Sciences Language requirement. 

Upper Division Requirements: 

ARH 381 1 Introduction to Art Historical 

Methodology 3 

ARH 4450 Modern Art 3 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art 3 

ARH Core: 

One course from each of these areas: 
Renaissance/Baroque 3 

19 ,h Century 3 

20 lh Century 3 

Non-Western & Pre-Columbian 3 

Latin American 3 

ARH electives (4) 12 

ART electives 3 

ARH 4970 Art History Thesis 3 

Electives 18 

(At least 9 of these elective credits must be courses 
outside the Art & Art History Department. We encourage 
taking courses in the humanities that pertain to Art 
History) 

Minor in Art (18 credit hours) 

ARH Elective 3 

ART 2300C or ART 2330C Drawing I/Figure Drawing I 3 

ART Studio Electives (4) 12 

Note: A minimum of 9 credits must be at FIU, and a 

minimum of 9 credits must be upper-division (3000-4000 

level) 

Total 18 

Minor in Art History (18 credit hours) 

ARH 4450 Modem Art 3 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art 3 

ART Studio Elective 3 

ARH Electives (3) 9 

Note: A minimum of 9 credits must be at FIU, and a 
minimum of 9 credits must be upper-division (3000-4000 
level) 

Total 18 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ARH-Art History; ART-Art; PGY-Photography. 

ARH 2000 Exploring Art (3). Offers an introductory, non- 
chronological approach to the understanding and 
appreciation of art. 



92 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ARH 2050 Art History Survey I (3). A broad survey of the 
visual arts and architecture from the Paleolithic Period 
through the Middle Ages. 

ARH 2051 Art History Survey II (3). A broad survey of 
the visual arts and architecture from the Renaissance 
through the Modern Age. 

ARH 3210 Early Christian and Byzantine Art (3). The art 

of the Byzantine Empire from the early Christian period 
and the foundation of Constantinople to the Ottoman 
conquest and afterward (300-1500 A.D.). Prerequisites: 
ARH 2050 or permission of the instructor. 

ARH 3313 The Art of Renaissance Florence (3). Course 
to accompany student program in Florence will focus on 
all periods of Italian Renaissance Art with particular 
emphasis on Florentine Art. 

ARH 3350 Baroque Art (3). European art of the 17th and 
early 18th centuries. Artists to be considered include 
Bernini, Caravaggio, Velazquez, Vermeer, Rembrandt, 
Rubens, Poussin, La Tour, and Watteau. Prerequisite: 
ARH 2051. 

ARH 3811 Seminar: Studies in the Methodology of Art 
History (3). To introduce art history majors to the variety 
of methods scholars have adopted and developed for 
conveying their perspectives on art history, including 
aesthetics and art theory. Prerequisites: ARH 2050 and 
ARH 2051. 

ARH 3930 Special Topics in Art History (3). Rotating 
special topics in Art History. May be repeated with change 
of content. Prerequisites: ARH 2050 and ARH 2051 or 
permission of the instructor. 

ARH 4014 History of Decorative Arts (3). A survey of the 
more important and influential periods in history in the 
production of ceramics, fabrics, glass, jewelry and silver- 
smithing. 

ARH 4131 Greek Art (3). The Art of Greece from the 
Bronze Age through the Classical Period. 

ARH 41 51 Roman Art (3). The Art of Ancient Rome from 
the Early Iron Age through the Late Roman Empire. 

ARH 4310 Early Italian Renaissance (3). A study of 
Italian Renaissance art from its origins in the Late Gothic 
period through the fifteenth century. Artists to be 
considered include Giotto, Duccio, Masaccio, Ghiberti, 
Brunelleschi, Donatello, Fra Angelico, Uccello, and 
Botticelli 

ARH 4311 The Art of Venice: The Rise of a 
Mediterranean Superpower (3). Analysis of artistic 
aspects of Venice's growth to power. Emphasis on the 
Church of St. Mark and the Venetian masters. 

ARH 4312 Later Italian Renaissance (3). A study of the 
late 15 lh and 16 lh century Italian art, with emphasis on the 
High Renaissance and Mannerism. Artists to be 
considered include Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, 
Raphael, Andrea del Sarto, Giorgione, Titian, Pontormo, 
and Parmigianino. 

ARH 4413 Enlightenment and Romanticism (3). 

Examines the art of the European Enlightenment and 
Romantic movement from 1700 to 1848. Artists to be 
considered include Watteau, Greuze, David, Goya, Blake, 



Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, and Friedrich. Prerequisites: 
ARH 2051 or permission of the instructor. 

ARH 4414 19th Century Painting (3). A study of 
Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and 

Impressionism. Artists to be considered include David, 
Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Goya, Courbet, Manet, 
Degas, Monet, and Renoir. 

ARH 4430 Art and Politics (3). An investigation into the 
interrelationship between art and political issues, with 
emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. 

ARH 4433 Realism, Impressionism, and Post- 
Impressionism (3). Examines the widespread 
engagement with modern life in European art from 1848 
to 1900. Artists considered include Courbet, Manet, 
Monet, Renior, Degas, Seurat, Van Gogh, Gauguin, 
Cezanne, and Munch. Prerequisites: ARH 2051 or 
permission of the instructor. 

ARH 4450 Modern Art (3). A survey of European and 
American Art from 1890-1945. Prerequisites: ARH 2051 
or permission of the instructor. 

ARH 4470 Contemporary Art (3). A survey of art from 
1945 to the present. Prerequisites: ARH 2051 or ARH 
4450, or permission of the instructor. 

ARH 4471 Post 1985 Art (3). Examines the changing 
roles of the arts within the current socio-political context of 
plurality, corporate sponsorship and mass 
communications. 

ARH 4504 Primitive Art (3). An introduction to the art of 
widely dissimilar groups from areas on the margin or 
beyond the cultural influences of Europe, the Near East, 
India, China, and Japan. Emphasis will be placed on 
African, Oceanic, and North American Indian Art. 

ARH 4552 Art of China and Japan (3). An introduction to 
the art of China to the Ming Dynasty and of Japan through 
the 18th century. The emphasis will be on painting and 
sculpture, with some ceramics and architecture. 

ARH 4600 North American Indian Art (3). A survey of 
native North American art history with emphasis on the 
post-contact period. The arts of the far North, Northwest 
coast, Southwest, Plains and the Eastern Woodlands. 

ARH 4610 American Art (3). A survey of American 
painting from the Colonial period to the eve of World War 
I. Artists to be studied include Copley, West, Cole, 
Whistler, Sargent, Homer, Henri, and Bellows. 

ARH 4650 Pre-Columbian Art (3). A survey of Pre- 
Columbian Art from approximately 2000bce to 1500ce. of 
Mesoamerica, Intermediate area from Honduras to 
Colombia and the Andes. 

ARH 4652 Pre-Columbian Art of the Andes (3). A 

survey of Andean Pre-Columbian art and architecture. 
Basic characteristics of technique, style and iconography 
in relation to Andean socioeconomic and cultural patterns. 

ARH 4653 Mesoamerican Art History (3). A survey of 
Meso-american Pre-Columbian art and architecture from 
the Mexican and Mayan territories, 1500 bee to the 
Conquest. 

ARH 4662 The Art of Spain and Her Colonies (31. 
Explores art of Spain from 1492 through early 19 h 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 93 



century, the encounter between Spain and the Americas 
after the Conquest, and the art of the colonies. 

ARH 4670 20th Century Latin American Art (3). The Art 

of Central and South America and the Caribbean of the 
20 lh century. 

ARH 4672 A History of Cuban Art (3). A survey of the 
visual arts in Cuba (sculpture, painting, and prints) with 
emphasis on the 20 lh century. 

ARH 4710 History of Photography (3). A chronological 
examination of the work of the world's most significant 
photographers, from photography's invention in the 1830's 
to the present. 

ARH 4713 History of Photography Since 1945 (3). An 

examination of the most significant photographic works, 
critical concepts, and new trends which have arisen since 
WWII. Prerequisite: ARH 4710. 

ARH 4871 Women and Art (3). Women in the history of 
art; past, present and future. 

ARH 4905 Directed Studies (1-6). A group of students, 
with the approval of the art faculty, may select a master 
teacher of theory, research or criticism in selected areas 
as film, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, art history, 
multi-media art, etc. Arrangements must be made at least 
a semester before course is offered. May be repeated. 

ARH 4910 Research (1-6). Art history, criticism, and 
theory in areas not covered by the present program and 
that the student wishes to study. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. May be repeated. 

ARH 4970 Art History Thesis (3). Required for Art 
History majors. Students will research a topic and 
prepare a serious quality paper. Prerequisite: ARH 381 1 . 

ARH 5465 Modern Art (3). Offers a history of modern art 
from ca 1880 to 1940. It concentrates on the study of 
European and American avant-garde visual art 
movements with emphasis on their art in modern society. 
For graduate students. 

ARH 5663 Graduate Art of Spain and Her Colonies (3). 

Course explores art of Spain from 1492 through early 19 h 
century, the encounter between Spain and the Americas 
after the Conquest, and the art of the colonies. For 
graduate students. 

ARH 5671 Seminar in 20 th Century Latin American Art 
(3). This course will examine the art of the 20 lh century, in 
a seminar focusing on painting and sculpture in Europe 
and America from the end of the 19 lh century to the 
present day. For graduate students. 

ARH 5715 History of Photography (3). A chronological 
examination of the work of the world's most significant 
photographers from photographic works and ideas from 
invention to the present. For graduate students. 

ARH 5716 History of Photography Since 1945 (3). An 

examination of the most significant photographic works, 
critical concepts, and new trends which have arisen since 
WWII. Prerequisite: ARH 4710. For graduate students. 

ARH 5805 Critical Studies in the Visual Arts (3). 

Introduction to the methods and concerns of recent art 
history. Discussion of students' work in context of the 



contemporary art world. Prerequisites: ARH 4450 and 
ARH 4470. For graduate students. 

ARH 5850 Introduction to Museum Studies: History 
and Philosophy of Museums (3). Introduces the wide 
range of topics and issues associated with different types 
of American museums. Museums are examined as 
cultural, political, and educational institutions. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

ARH 5851 Museum Ethics, Policies and Procedures 
(3). The legal, ethical status of museums and the 
obligation to the public regarding their governance, 
policymaking and financial planning. Includes theoretical 
and practical discussions with attention to museums. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or permission of 
instructor. 

ARH 5852 Museum Registration Methods (3). A course 
in Musuem Registration is designed to provide Museum 
Studies students with competency in all areas of object 
care, registration and information management. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or permission of 
instructor. 

ARH 5853 Visual Arts Marketing (3). Students seeking 
an advanced degree in studio art will be able to appraise 
and present a portfolio to an appropriate organization. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

ARH 5872 History of Women Artists (3). Surveys the 
history of women artists with some discussion of the 
history of images of women. For graduate students. 

ARH 5897 Special Topics in Art History (3). Rotating 
special topics on the graduate level in art history. May be 
repeated with change of topic. Prerequisites: ARH 4450 
and ARH 4470. For graduate students. 

ARH 5907 Directed Studies (1-6). A group of students, 
with the approval of the art faculty, may select a master 
teacher of theory, research or criticism in selected areas 
of film, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts, art history, 
multi-media art, etc. Arrangements must be made at least 
a semester before course is offered. May be repeated. 
For graduate students. 

ARH 5913 Research (1-6). Art history, criticism, and 
theory in areas not covered by the present that the 
student wishes to study. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. May be repeated. For graduate students. 

ARH 5940 Internship Experience (3). Supervised work 
experience in approved institution. Prerequisite: Permit 
required. May be repeated. 

ART 1201C 2D Design (3). Studio course introducing the 
basic art elements such as line, value, and color to 
develop the students vocabulary and awareness of two- 
dimensional potential in various media. 

ART 1203C 3D Design (3). Studio course introducing the 
basic elements inherent in three-dimensional works of art. 
Shape, mass, balance, proportion, and scale are 
elements which will be explored. 

ART 2150C Jewelry and Metalwork I (3). Introduction to 
materials, equipment and basic procedures in making 
jewelry and holloware. Identification, application and 
maintenance of machines and handtools, safety 
procedures, cutting, soldering and finishing projects. 



94 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ART 2300C Drawing I (3). An introduction to the 
fundamentals of drawing. The course equips the student 
with a variety of basic skills, approaches and concepts 
explored through a comprehensive range of media. 

ART 2301 C Drawing II (3). The course is designed for the 
student who has acquired basic drawing skills. It 
strengthens technical and conceptual skills while 
introducing more experimental approaches. Modes of 
personal expression are also developed. Prerequisite: 
ART 2300C 

ART 2330C Figure Drawing I (3). Drawing from model. 
Student will study gesture, movement, form, volume, light, 
and other varied media. 

ART 2400C Printmaking I (3). Introduces the student to a 
number of processes. Explores primarily one of the 
following: etching, lighography or screen printing with 
excursions into relief collograph, monotype and color as 
appropriate. 

ART 2401 C Printmaking II (3). With a knowledge of 
basic intaglio and relief printing, the student will explore 
specific media such as etching, lithography, silk-screen 
and other experimental techniques. 

ART 2500C Painting I (3). Introduction to development of 
expression, through individual understanding of tools, 
materials, technique, perception and vocabulary of 
painting. 

ART 2702C Sculpture I (3). Beginning sculpture students 
will be given assigned problems structured to study the 
forms in nature and the work of other sculptors. 

ART 2705C Figure Sculpture I (3). Introduction to figure 
sculpture. Basic studio course involving the study and 
rendering of the human figure using clay as the primary 
medium. 

ART 2752C Ceramics I (3). A beginning course for art 
and non-art majors that introduces the fundamentals of 
throwing and glaze applications. 

ART 3115C Low Temperature Ceramics (3). An in-depth 
study of low-temperature clays and glazes, and 
exploration of a variety of glazing and firing techniques, 
including lustres, residual salt, raku, white and red 
earthenware, etc. 

ART 3151C Jewelry and Metalwork II (3). Basic metal 
fabrication techniques, use and maintenance of tools and 
equipment. Intermediate soldering, forming, finishing, 
forging, stone setting, raising, reticulation, fusing, and 
safety procedures. Prerequisites: ART 2150C or 
permission of the instructor. 

ART 3152C Jewelry and Metalwork III (3). Continuation 
of Jewelry and metalsmithing techniques: soldering, stone 
setting, forging, forming, casting, raising, shell forming, 
enameling, fold forming and finishing. Prerequisites: ART 
31 51 C or permission of the instructor. 

ART 3158C Small Scale Metal Fabrication and 
Castings (3). Introduction to the technical and conceptual 
understanding needed to cast and fabricate soft metals. 

ART 3331 C Figure Drawing II (3). Exploration of the live 
human figure as it determines our understanding of 
subject, theme, composition and meaning. Prerequisite: 
ART 2330C. 



ART 3332C Figure Drawing III (3). Further exploration of 
the live human figure as it determines our understanding 
of subject, theme, composition and meaning. Prerequisite: 
ART 3331 C. ' 

ART 3402C Printmaking III (3). Exploration and 
expansion of experimental print processes as they relate 
to student's own imagery and acquired skills. Greater 
independence and personal direction. 

ART 3504C Painting II (3). Intermediate painting 
requiring refinement of technique and personal 
expression. Frequent critiques of student work. 
Prerequisite: ART 2500C. 

ART 3521 C Painting III (3). Intermediate painting 
requiring further refinement of technical skill and personal 
expression. Frequent critiques of student work. 
Prerequisite: ART 3504C. 

ART 3565C Fiber Based Painting (3). Introduces the 
technology of creating imagery on and with the use of 
clothing, thread, printmaking, ink, and photography. 

ART 3593C Collage/Assemblage (3). Addresses content 
development issues as well as formal design and 
technical problems concerning collage and assemblages. 

ART 3630C Introduction to Experimental Video Art (3). 

Introduction to basic practices of video media with 
emphasis on making video/audio work. 

ART 3637C Digital Media Foundation (3). A dynamic, 
inter-disciplinary approach to the creation of video art and 
interactive media work. 

ART 3638C Video Installation (3). Explores concepts, 
history, and methods for production of video artworks. 

ART 3681 C Introduction to Time Art (3). An introduction 
to the theory and practice of time based media. 

ART 3682C Intermediate New Media (3). Development 
of new media and electronic art skills for intermediate 
students with experience in digital media. Prerequisite: 
ART 3681 C. 

ART 3702C Sculpture II (3). Intermediate sculpture is 
structured for the student who has acquired basic skills 
and is ready to test their creative abilities through 
individualized projects. Prerequisite: ART 2702C. 

ART 371 0C Sculpture III (3). This class is an extension of 
ART 3703. Students are expected to continue to develop 
and explore new ideas. Prerequisite: ART 3702C. 

ART 371 3C Figure Sculpture II (3). A basic sculpture 
class emphasizing anatomical study with 2 and 3 
dimensional rendering in clay, training the student to 
observe and accurately model the human figure. 
Prerequisites: ART 2705C or permission of the instructor. 

ART 3761 C Ceramics II (3). Intermediate ceramics is 
designed for the student who has acquired the 
fundamental skills taught in basic ceramics. Projects are 
designed to advance technical skills and aesthetic growth. 
Prerequisite: ART 2752C 

ART 3763C Figure Sculpture III (3) Intermediate figure 
sculpture where students refine their 2 and 3 dimensional 
renderings of the human figure. Prerequisites: ART 2702C 
or ART 371 3C or the permission of the instructor. 



UnderqraduateXataloq 



College of Arts and Sciences 95 



ART 3782C Ceramics III (3). Concentrates on the 
development of technical skills in relationship to personal 
vision, with a view towards a consistent body of work. 
Prerequisite: ART 3761 C. 

ART 3789C World Ceramics (3). An introduction to clay 
through studio practice combined with the study of 
technical and aesthetic developments in ceramics with 
selected cultures and historical periods throughout the 
world. 

ART 3809 Performance Art (3). A workshop on the 
history and practice of performance art for the fine arts 
student. Focus on intersections with other visual arts 
media and social contexts. Not a course in dance, music 
or theater. 

ART 3821 Visual Thinking I (3). A beginning studio- 
based course with a strong theoretical component where 
concepts are examined through a variety of approaches 
and media. For Visual Arts majors only 

ART 3822 Visual Thinking II (3). An advanced studio- 
based course with a strong theoretical component where 
concepts are examined through a variety of approaches 
and media. Prerequisite: ART 3821. 

ART 3830C Color Theory (3). This course is designed to 
familiarize the student with the theory and principles of 
color as it relates to the arts. Lecture, demonstration, and 
application through assigned projects will be included. 

ART 3837C Materials and Techniques (3). Instruction in 
the craft of painting. Demonstration and exercise in the 
following will be included: color, pigments, ground, all 
major media, studio and equipment. 

ART 3930 Special Topics in Studio Art (3). Rotating 
special topics in Studio Art. May be repeated with change 
of content. 

ART 3949C Cooperative Education in Visual Arts (3). A 
student majoring in Visual Arts may spend several 
semesters fully employed in industry in a capacity relating 
to the major. Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson. 

ART 4114C Cewmics (3). The advanced student will 
explore all aspects of expression in clay and glaze. 
Students will be expected to be mostly self-directed. 
Prerequisites: ART 3782C, or permission of the instructor. 
May be repeated. 

ART 4153C Jewelry and Metalwork IV (3). Advanced 
level work: enamel, raising, shell forming, granulation, 
niello, mokume, keumboo, reticulation, stone setting. 
Prerequsites: ART 3151C and ART 3152C. 

ART 4154C Jewelry and Metalwork V (3). Advanced 
level work and advanced techniques: enamel, raising, 
shell forming, fold forming, granulation, niello, mokume, 
keumboo, reticulation, and stone setting. Prerequisites: 
ART 3152C and ART 4153C. 

ART 4156C Jewelry and Metalwork VI (3). Pre-thesis, in- 
depth study in some area related to metalsmithing. 
Projects may include work for a commission, exhibition or 
developing new techniques/design concepts. Participation 
in BFA show. Prerequisites: ART 2150C, ART 3151C, 
ART3152C. 

ART 431 2C Drawing III (3). Students at this level should 
have a proficient level of practice and conceptual skills. 



These skills are consolidated and further developed. 
There is a strong emphasis on self-directed study. 
Prerequisite: ART 2301 C. 

ART 431 3C Drawing IV (3). Students are expected to 
possess an accomplished level of skill and a strong 
personal direction in order to focus on the development of 
a consistent body of personal work. 

ART 4314C Drawing V (3). Advanced drawing toward 
coherent body of work. Prerequisite: ART 431 3C. 

ART 431 5C Drawing VI (3). Drawing has to be BFA 
exhibition quality. Individual is engaged in a mature 
cohesive body of work. Prerequisite: ART 431 4C. 

ART 4333C Figure Drawing IV (3). Students are 
expected to possess a developed level of skill in drawing 
the figure and a strong personal direction. Prerequisite: 
ART 3332C. 

ART 4334C Figure Drawing V (3). Consolidation of the 
focus direction established in ART 4333C. Advanced 
drawing further developing technical and conceptual skills. 
Prerequisite: ART 4333C. 

ART 4335C Figure Drawing VI (3). Work produced at the 
pre-BFA exhibition level. A strong cohesive body of figure 
drawings executed with a clear personal vision. 
Prerequisite: ART 4334C. 

ART 4403C Printmaking IV (3). Instructional emphasis 
will be toward individual solutions. Student expected to 
independently research technical problems. Prerequisite: 
ART 3402C. 

ART 4404C Printmaking V (3). Student must be showing 
independence in initiating and executing projects. Self 
motivation, energy and purpose should be the focus. 
Prerequisite: ART 4403C. 

ART 4405C Printmaking VI (3). Advanced student will 
produce BFA exhibition work. Prerequisite: ART 4404C. 

ART 4505C Painting IV (3). Advanced painting with 
expectation of highly skilled technique and carefully 
evolved concerns that might continue into subsequent 
semesters. Prerequisite: ART 3521 C. 

ART 4506C Painting V (3). Advanced painting toward 
coherent body of work. Prerequisite: ART 4505C. 

ART 4524C Painting VI (3). Advanced painting. BFA 
exhibition quality body of work expected at this level. 

ART 4532C Painting (3). An advanced course 
concentrating on conceptual clarity and the realization of 
stylistic development. Group, individual criticism will be 
emphasized. May be repeated. Prerequisites: ART 2500C 
or equivalent. Suggested prerequisites: ART 4505C and 
ART 4506C. 

ART 4618 Electronic Art (3). An introduction to electronic 
media for art students. Computer and video as tools for 
the artmaking process. Not a course in programming or 
commercial computer graphics. 

ART 4636C Advanced Experimental Video Art (3). 

Advanced aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of 
visual electronic media. Prerequisite: ART 3630C. 

ART 4637 Independent Film Since 1960 (3). 

Examination of the structural and ideological attributes of 
narrative and documentary cinema, concentrating on 



96 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



alternatives to the studio system model. Viewing of 
selective history of independent film, and readings and 
discussions of theoretical texts. 

ART 471 4C Figure Sculpture IV (3). Advanced figure 
sculpture. Students develop skills in representational 
structure and anatomy from model and model-making 
techniques. Prerequisites: ART 371 3C and ART 3763C or 
permission of instructor. 

ART 471 5C Figure Sculpture V (3). Advanced figure 
sculpture continued. Student refines skills in 
representational structure and anatomy from model and 
mold-making techniques. Prerequisites: ART 3763C and 
ART 4714C or the permission of instructor. 

ART 471 6C Figure Sculpture VI (3). Pre-thesis sculpture 
where students have refined their work to produce B.F.A. 
exhibition body of work. Prerequisite: ART 471 5C. 

ART 4732C Sculpture IV (3). First of a series of 
advanced classes which represent the beginning of a 
serious aesthetic commitment leading to a BFA degree. 
Prerequisite: ART 371 OC. 

ART 4734C Figure Sculpture (3). To develop skills in 
representational structure and anatomy from the model 
and learn mold-making techniques. May be repeated. 

ART 4741 C Sculpture V (3). This class is an extension of 
ART 4705 and should be used to further advance 
previous efforts with the intention of producing major 
finished works. Prerequisite: ART 4732C. 

ART 4742C Sculpture VI (3). The goal of this class is to 
bring fully developed ideas to a finished state in 
preparation for BFA thesis exhibition. Prerequisite: ART 
4741 C. 

ART 4766C Ceramics IV (3). Focuses on the 
development of a well produced, accomplished body of 
work that reflects the individual's ideas. Prerequisite: ART 
3782C. 

ART 4783C Ceramics V (3). Concentrates on a single 
ongoing project personally defined by the student and 
explored within the larger context of art history and 
contemporary society. Prerequisite: ART 4766C. 

ART 4785C Ceramics VI (3). Concentrates on further 
refinement of technical skills, development of a consistent 
and cohesive body of work and a clear articulation of 
artistic conception. Prerequisite: ART 4783C. 

ART 4842C Installation Art (3). This special topics 
course explores the genre of installation and site-specific 
art through history and in terms of its ongoing influence on 
contemporary visual culture. 

ART 4906C Directed Study (VAR). A group of students, 
with the approval of the Art Department faculty, may 
select a master artist teacher and pursue a course of art 
study in selected areas such as graphic design, film, 
multi-media, environmental design, sound, etc. 
Arrangements must be made at least one semester 
before course is offered. May be repeated. 

ART 491 OC Research (1-6). Students may study or 
research an individual art project with an art faculty 
member. Complexity and amount of work will determine 
the number of credit hours granted. May be repeated. 



ART 4945 Art Gallery and Display (1-3). The study and 
participation of all aspects of Gallery operations, from 
daily operation to special exhibitions and events. 
Permission of Gallery Director. 

ART 4949C Cooperative Education in Visual Arts (3). 

See ART 3949C. 

ART 4952C Thesis I. The course will expose students to 
fundamental issues and ideas current in the field of art. An 
inquiry into the structure of art and its relationship to 
society, knowledge, and the self. Prerequisites: 15-18 
hours of Studio Major and permission of instructor 
(portfolio review). 

ART 4953C Thesis II (3). Studio work in student's major 
area with major professor, resulting in a student exhibit. 
Arrangements with major professor one semester before 
graduation. Written thesis required. Prerequisites: Fall 
and Spring only and ART 4952C. 

ART 5159C Jewelry and Metals (3). Advanced jewelry & 
metalwork. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor or ART 41 56C. For graduate students. 

ART 5390C Drawing (3). Advanced drawing. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: ART 431 5C, or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. For graduate students. 

ART 5391 C Figure Drawing (3). Advanced figure 
drawing. May be repeated. Prerequisites: ART 4333C, or 
equivalent, or permission of the instructor. For graduate 
students. 

ART 5408C Printmaking (3). Advanced printmaking. May 
be repeated. Prerequisites: ART 4404C, or equivalent or 
permission of instructor. For graduate students. 

ART 5580C Painting (3). Advanced painting. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: ART 4524C or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. For graduate students. 

ART 5685C Advanced Time Art (3). Advanced course to 
refine students' skills in electronic and digital media 
production. Students are required to produce a 
multidisciplinary project. Prerequisite: ART 3681 C. For 
graduate students. May be repeated. 

ART 5740C Sculpture (3). Advanced sculpture. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: ART 4741 C or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor. For graduate students. 

ART 5790C Ceramics (3). The graduate student will 
explore all aspects of expression in clay and glaze. 
Students will be expected to be mostly self-directed. 
Prerequisites: ART 4785C, or permission of instructor. 
May be repeated. For graduate students. 

ART 5792C Figure Sculpture (3). Advanced figure 
sculpture. May be repeated. Prerequisites: ART 471 6C or 
permission of instructor. For graduate students. 

ART 581 5C Graduate Seminar: Body and Art (3). 

Focuses on the relationship between the body, materials 
and space as used in art and exhibitions and examines 
the social conventions that order our understanding of 
these issues. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

ART 5844C Installation Art (3). Explores the genre of 
installation art and site-specific art through history and 
provides a context for collaboration with the Wolfsonian 
Museum as both site and subject for art specific 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 97 



installation by students. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

ART 5907C Directed Study (VAR). A course of study in a 
selected area under the supervision of an appropriate 
faculty member. Mandatory for MFA students in semester 
of graduation. Advance approval by faculty and graduate 
advisory required (3cr). May be repeated. 

ART 591 OC Research (1-6). Graduate students may 
study or research an individual art project with an art 
faculty member. Complexity and amount of work will 
determine the number of credit hours granted. May be 
repeated. 

ART 5930C Special Topics in Studio Art (3). Rotating 
special topics in Studio Arts. May be repeated with 
change of content. For graduate students. 

ART 5938C Studio Art Pedagogy (1). Instruction in the 
principles and methods of teaching in the area of visual 
arts; specifically the application of these principles to the 
studio situation. Required for MFA students. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

ART 5939C Studio Art Seminar (3). Graduate students 
will locate and discuss their own work within the context of 
the contemporary art world. Also, issues and practical 
concerns for the professional artist will be addressed, 
such as dealing with galleries, grant writing and business 
procedures. Required for MFA students. Prerequisite: 
Issues of Contemporary Art Seminar. 

PGY 2110C Color Photography I (3). An introduction to 
color materials and processing. Frequent critiques of 
students' work. Prerequisites: PGY 441 2C or permission 
of the instructor. 

PGY 2401 C Photography I (3). Introduction to the 
practice of still photography. Includes darkroom work and 
camera skills. Frequent critiques of student work. 

PGY 2XXXC Photography for Non-Majors (3). To 

introduce non-majors to basic skills of the camera and 
exposing and developing film. 

PGY 3111C Color Photography II (3). Intermediate color 
photography requiring refinement of technique and 
personal vision. Frequent critiques. Prerequisite: PGY 
2110C. 

PGY 341 OC Photography II (3). Intermediate 
photography requiring refinement of technical skills and 
personal vision. Frequent critiques. Prerequisite: PGY 
2401 C. 

PGY 341 1C Photography III (3). Continuing development 
of skills and personal portfolio projects. Frequent 
critiques. Prerequisite: PGY3410C. 

PGY 4112C Color Photography III (3). Advanced color 
photography with an expectation of highly skilled technical 
and carefully evolved concerns that may continue in 
subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PGY 31 1 1C. 

PGY 4113C Color Photograpy IV (3). Advanced color 
photography with portfolio and exhibition project for BFA 
exhibition. Prerequisite: PGY4112C. 

PGY 441 2C Photography IV (3). Advanced photography 
with the expectation of highly skilled technique and a 
carefully evolved project that might continue into 
subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: PGY 341 1C. 



PGY 441 3C Photography V Advanced (3). Advanced 
photography for project and portfolio continuation suitable 
for B.F.A. exhibition. Prerequisite: PGY 4412C. 

PGY 4440C Collaboration in Photography (3). An 
advanced photography course for majors and 
accomplished non-majors. Includes introduction to 
collaborative genres, slide/lectures, demonstrations, field 
work and intensive critique of student's work. 
Prerequisites: PGY 3410C and PGY 4412C. 

PGY 5425C Photography (3). Advanced photography. 
May be repeated. Prerequisites: PGY 4113C, or 
equivalent, or permission of instructor. For graduate 
students. 

PGY S530C Color Photography (3). Advanced color 
photography. Prerequisites: PGY 4112C or permission of 
instructor. For graduate students. 



98 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Asian Studies 

Steven Heine, Director, Religious Studies and History 
Affiliated Faculty: 
Tori Arpad, Art and Art History 
Mahadev Bhat, Environmental Studies and Economics 
David Chang, Education 
Bongkil Chung, Philosophy 
Alan Gummerson, Economics 
Asuka Haraguchi, Modern Languages 
Nathan Katz, Religious Studies 
Paul Kowert, International Relations 
Mohiaddin Mesbahi, International Relations 
Ana Roca, Modern Languages 
Mary Ann Von Glinow, CIBER 

Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies 

The B.A. degree in Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary 
program that draws on faculty from the College of Arts 
and Sciences and other professional schools at FIU. The 
courses are coordinated by the Institute for Asian Studies, 
which also sponsors workshops, lectures, cultural events, 
and study abroad programs. 

Like the certificate program in Asian Studies, the 
bachelor's program provides students with a rich learning 
experience about a fascinating and increasingly important 
region of the world, and is intended to enhance the 
student's competitiveness upon graduation. The program 
provides a multidisciplinary approach covering the 
philosophy, religion, art history, language and literature of 
Asia as well as issues in history, politics, geography, 
sociology/anthropology, and international relations. 

The B.A. has two concentrations: International 
Political Economy of Asia, emphasizes social scientific 
studies involving economics, international relations, 
politics, and sociology; and Asian Cultural Studies, 
emphasizes the humanities and arts disciplinary 
approaches. 

For further information please contact the Institute for 
Asian Studies, located at DM 300B, at asian@fiu.edu or at 
(305) 348-1914. Also, visit our website at 

www.fiu.edu/--asian . 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST or its equivalent, 
completed 60 semester hours, and be otherwise 
acceptable into the program. 

Upper Division Program 

The Major requires 30 hours of upper division course 
work. Students who elect a major in Asian Studies are 
required to declare a major in another department or 
discipline, and should consult with the advisors of both 
majors on regular basis prior to graduation. 

Common Requirements (both concentrations) 

Language Requirements (3 credits) 

Four Semesters of Chinese, Japanese, or other Asian 
Language. 

Core Courses (27 credits) 

1. 18 credits from the Asian Studies courses list 
pertaining to the main concentration. (9 credits 
allowed in comparative courses) 



2. 6 credits in the other concentration or in advanced 
language courses 

3. 3 credits in a supervised research course (ASN 4000- 
level) 

4. Students may receive credits through a Study Abroad 
courses or an Internship program 

International Political Economy of Asia 
Concentration Electives: 

CHI 3440 Chinese for Business 

CPO 3502 Politics of the Far East 

CPO 4507 Comparative Political Economy of Asia 

CPO 4541 Politics of China 

CPO 4553 Government Politics of Japan 

ECS 3003 Comparative Economic Systems 

ECS 3704 International Economics 

ECO 4701 World Economy 

ECO 4703 International Trade Theory and Policy 

ECS 3200 Economics of Asia 

FIN 3652 Asian Financial Markets and Institutions 

INR 3081 Contemporary International Problems 

INR 3223 Japan and the US 

INR 3224 International Relations of East Asia 

INR 3226 International Relations of Central Asia 

and the Caucuses 
INR 3232 International Relations of China 

INR 3262 International Relations of Russia and 

the Former USSR 
INR 3703 International Political Economy 

GEA 3705 Geography of Central Asia and the 

Caucuses 
INR 4032 Asia and Latin America in World Affairs 

INR 4283 International Relations, Development, 

and Third World 
INR 4521 Politics of Regional Integration 

JPN 3140 Japanese for Business 

LBS 4654 Comp and International Labor Studies 

LBS 4653 Labor Movements in Developing 

Countries 
MAN 4600 International Business 

MAR 4156 International Marketing 

SSI 3240 World Prospect and Issues 

SYD 3650 Sociology of Gender and Power in Asia 

SYO 4550 Comparative Sociology 

SYP 4454 Globalization and Society 

Asian Cultural Studies Concentration Electives: 

AMH 4544 The United States and the Vietnam War 

AMH 4xxx US Foreign Relations 

AML 4xxx American Writers and the Orient 

ARC 4754 Asian and African Architecture 

ARC 4xxx Cities of Asia 

ARH 4552 Art of China and Japan 

ASN 451 Dynamics of Asia 

COM 3410 Cultural Communication-Patterns of 

Asia 
DAN 4136 Global Perspectives in Dance and 

Culture I 
DAN 4137 Global Perspectives in Dance and 

Culture II 
DAN 2761 The Art of Yoga and Meditation 

EDF 4xxx Arts and Education in China 

EDF 3xxx Education in Japan 

EVR 3402 Asian Environmental Issues 

JPN 3500 Japanese Culture and Society 

LIN 4624 Bilingualism and Language Policy 

MUH 3052 Music of the World 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 99 



MUH 3570 Survey of Asian Music 

PET 3148 Intro to Martial Arts 

PEM 4401 Comp Analysis of Japanese Martial Arts 

PHH3810 Philosophy of Buddhism 

PHH 3840 Indian Philosophy 

PHI 3762 Eastern Philo and Religious Thought 

PHP 3840 Chinese and Japanese Philosophy 

REL 3028 Sacred Places, Sacred Travels 

REL 3302 World Religions 

REL 3123 Asian Religions in the Americas 

REL 3145 Women and Religion 

REL 331 3 Sources of Modern Asian Society 

REL 3314 Religions of the Silk Road 

REL 3330 Religions of India 

REL 3027 Meditation and Mystical Traditions 

REL 431 1 Religious Classics of Asia 

REL 4312 Jews of Asia 

REL 4340 Pathways to Buddha 

REL 4345 Zen Buddhism 

REL 4351 Religion and Japanese Culture 

SPW 4133 Eastern Thought and L.A. Literature: 

Octavio Paz 

SPW 4470 Asia in 19 lh Century Hispanic Literature 

ASH 4404 History of Modern China 

ASH 4300 East Asian Civilization and Culture 

ASH 4364 History of Women in Asia 

ASH 3440 History of Japan 

Minor in Asian Studies 

This program is designed with an interdisciplinary 
approach to Asian Studies. This minor offers a 
specialized focus on area and comparative studies. It 
prepares students interested in careers in international 
business, state or federal government, foreign affairs, and 
education, and more. 

Required Course (3 credits) 

Students must choose one from the following list of core 
courses in comparative area studies or global studies. 
ASN 4510 Dynamics of Asia 

ECS 3303 Comparative Economic Systems 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 

INR 4283 International Relations of the 

Developing and Third World 
REL 3302 Studies in World Religions 

SYO 4550 Comparative Sociology 

WOH 2001 World Civilizations 

Electives (12 credits) 

Students must select 12 elective credits from the list of 
courses approved for the Asian Studies B.A. degree (see 
above). Students are encouraged to take language 
courses, participate in the study abroad programs, and 
internships. A maximum of 6 credits will be awarded 
towards the minor for language courses. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ASN - Asian Studies 
SAL - Sanskrit 

ASN 3042 Asian Religions and the Arts (3). Examines 
the richly diverse and complex forms of art and artistic 
expression in the various Asian religions against the 
background of their respective cultural settings. 

ASN 3403 Zen and the Art of Tea Ceremony (3). An 
introduction to the cultural traditions and social behavior of 



Asia that covers the history, theory, and practice of 
Chado, or Way of Tea, a Zen-Buddhist inspired art. 

ASN 3410 Introduction to East Asia (3). An overview of 
East Asia from traditional to modern times including the 
interaction among Asian cultures as well as between Asia 
and the world. 

ASN 4510 Dynamics of Asia (3). An interdisciplinary 
study of the classical and contemporary periods in Asian 
civilizations, including tradition and modernization, culture 
and the arts, gender and diversity, and international 
relations. 

ASN 4911 Independent Research in Asian Studies (1- 

6). Topics selected to meet academic needs for students 
doing research in same special area in Asian Studies. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

ASN 5315 Survey of Modern Asia (3). Focus on 
modernization, or the transition from pre-modern 
(classical and medieval) to elements of the modern, 
including westernization, industrialization, and the roles of 
capitalism, communism, imperialism, and colonialism, as 
well as the impact of post-colonialism and post-modern 
society in Asia. 

ASN 5910 Independent Research in Asian Studies (1- 

6). Topics will be selected to meet academic needs for 
students doing research in some specialized area of asian 
studies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

SAL 2100 Sanskrit I - Basic Sanskrit (3). Basic Sanskrit 
skills including Devanagiri alphabet; fundamentals of oral 
communication; grammar; use of dictionary; history of 
Sanskrit languages and literature. 

SAL 2101 Sanskrit II - Parinian Sanskrit (3). Basic 
elementary Sanskrit alphabet and phonetics, grammar 
and syntax, formation and understanding of simple 
sentences common Sanskrit terms used in Hindu 
literature relationship to other languages. Prerequisite: 
Sanskrit I. 

SAL 3232 Sanskrit III - Epic Sanskrit (3). Reading and 
literary analysis of representative Sanskrit epic literature. 
The Bhagavad Gita will be the focus of attention. 
Prerequisite: Sanskrit II. 

SAL 3233 Sanskrit IV - Sanskrit Composition (3). 

Advanced aspects of poetic structures and literary styles 
of Sanskrit literature. Foci will be the Panchatantra and 
the works of Kalidasa. Prerequisite: Sanskrit III. 



100 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Biological Sciences 

James W. Fourqurean, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
M. Alejandro Barbieri, Assistant Professor 
Bradley C. Bennett, Associate Professor 
Charles Bigger, Professor 
Christopher Brown, Professor, Associate Chairperson 

and Marine Biology Program Director 
Richard J. Campbell, Research Scientist 
Chun-fan Chen, Associate Professor 
Daniel L. Childers, Associate Professor 
Laurel S. Collins, Associate Professor 
Timothy M. Collins, Associate Professor 
Leon A. Cuervo, Professor Emeritus 
Maureen A. Donnelly, Associate Professor and Graduate 

Program Director 
Kelsey R. Downum, Professor and Associate Vice 

President for Research 
Jack B. Fisher, Research Scientist 
Javier Francisco-Ortega, Associate Professor 
Evelyn E. Gaiser, Assistant Professor 
Robert M. George, Instructor 
Walter M. Goldberg, Professor 
Michael Heithaus, Assistant Professor 
Rene J. Herrera, Associate Professor 
Frank J. Jochem, Assistant Professor 
Leung Kim, Assistant Professor 
Suzanne Koptur, Professor 
Lidia Kos, Assistant Professor 
David N. Kuhn, Associate Professor 
Todd C. LaJeunesse, Assistant Professor 
David W. Lee, Professor 
Carl E. Lewis, Research Scientist 
John C. Makemson, Professor 
Joyce Maschinski, Research Scientist 
Kalai Mathee, Assistant Professor 
Michael Maunder, Research Scientist 
Bridgette Michaels, Research Scientist 
DeEtta K. Mills, Visiting Scholar 
Fernando G. Noriega, Assistant Professor 
Steven F. Oberbauer, Professor 
Case K. Okubo, Associate Professor and Undergraduate 

Program Director 
Tom Philippi, Assistant Professor 
Polly Phillips, Instructor 
John J. Pipoly III, Research Scientist 
Thomas R. Pitzer, Instructor and Laboratory Coordinator 
Thomas E. Pliske, Instructor 
Lauren Raz, Research Scientist 
Jennifer H. Richards, Professor 
Laurie L. Richardson, Associate Professor 
Barbra A. Roller, Instructor 
Gene Rosenberg, Faculty Administrator and Associate 

Chairperson 
Sylvia L. Smith, Professor 
Philip K. Stoddard, Associate Professor 
Martin L. Tracey, Professor 
Joel C. Trexler, Professor 
Maureen Walter, Instructor 
Douglas Wartzok, Professor and Dean of the University 

Graduate School 
Ophelia I. Weeks, Associate Professor 



Scott Zona, Research Scientist 

Bachelor of Science in Biology 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Courses Required for the Degree 
Lower Division Program 

Common Prerequisites 

A grade of "C" or better required. 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 

BSC 1 01 0L General Biology I Lab 

BSC 1 01 1 General Biology II 

BSC 1 01 1 L General Biology II Lab 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Lab 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Lab 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 1 

CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 

CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry II 1 

CHM 221 1 L Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 1 ' 2 

PHY 2048L General Physics Lab I 1,2 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 1 ' 2 

PHY 2049L General Physics Lab II 1,2 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 3 



MAC 2312 


Calculus II 3 


OR 


STA2122 
STA3123 


Intro to Statistics I 3 
Intro to Statistics II 3 



1 Organic chemistry sequence or physics sequence must 
be taken at the Lower Division. 

2 Physics without Calculus I and II and corresponding labs 
can be substituted (PHY 2053, and PHY 2054). 
3 Calculus I and Calculus II must be taken in the Lower 
Division. If Statistics I is taken, it must be taken in the 
Lower Division. Calculus I and Statistics I alone are not 
sufficient to meet the requirements for the degree. STA 
31 1 1 and STA 31 12 may be substituted for STA 2122 and 
STA 3123. 

To qualify for admission to the department, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable to the 
department. 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

Ecology 



1.PCB3043 

2. PCB 3063 

3. BCH 3033 

4. PCB 4674 

5. BSC 4931 



3 
3 
4 
3 

1 
6. Distribution Requirement 12 

One additional lecture course in each of the following 
areas: 



Genetics 

General Biochemistry 

Evolution 

Undergraduate Seminar 



A. Ecology 

B. Organismal Diversity 

C. Physiology/Biochemistry 

D. Structure/Development 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 101 



(If a course satisfies this distribution requirement, the 
letter of the area that it satisfies is in brackets after the 
course description). 

7. Biology Electives 2 lecture courses 6 

8. Laboratory Requirement (Labs) 4 

9. Electives outside major 9 

10. A minimum of 48 credits must be earned in Upper 
Division courses. 

1 Two upper division lecture courses (3000-level and 
above) to be chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor. 
The following courses are not allowed as Biology 
Electives: Student Research Labs (BSC 3915, 4914, and 
6916); Workshop Biology Labs (BSC 5928, PCB 5238, 
BSC 6926, etc.); Cooperative Education credits (BSC 
3949); Physiology of Aging (PCB 3241); and courses for 
non-science majors (BOT 1010, PCB 2099 and MCB 
2000, BSC 2023, EVR 3013, and OCB 2003). 
laboratory requirement is met with any four upper 
division Biology labs offered with the required courses, 
courses that meet the distribution or Biology elective 
requirements. 

Students interested in teacher certification should 
contact the College of Education at (305) 348-2768. 

Special Programs 

Bachelor of Science in Marine Biology 

Admission to the Program 

Students wishing to pursue the BS in Marine Biology 
must meet the same entry requirements as identified for 
admission to the BS in Biological Sciences. 

Marine Biology Program activities and upper-division 
coursework will be concentrated at the Biscayne Bay 
Campus, although course requirements may be met 
elsewhere at FIU. 

Continuity in academic advisement is an objective in 
this specialized degree program. Each student enrolling 
in the BS Marine Biology Program must select or will be 
assigned a faculty mentor. Biological Sciences faculty are 
eligible to serve as mentors in the Marine Biology 
Program. 

Courses Required for the Degree 

Lower Division Program 

The lower Division component of the Marine Biology 
Bachelor of Science is identical to that of the BS in 
Biological Sciences, in which common prerequisites in 
Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Physics, Calculus, and 
Statistics must be met. All requirements for completion of 
the lower division in Biological Sciences apply to the BS in 
Marine Biology, in including the grade of "C" or better in 
required courses, the lower division physics, calculus, and 
statistics requirements, options, and acceptable 
substitutions. 

Upper Division Program 

The upper-division requirements for the BS in Marine 
Biology include a selection of five common requirements 
and a choice of four marine electives, including selections 
from among the physical sciences. The Biological 
Sciences Distribution Requirement does not apply to the 
BS in Marine Biology. 

Common Requirements 

PCB 3043 Ecology 3 

PCB 3063 Genetics 3 

BCH 3033 General Biochemistry 4 



OCB 3043 
BSC 4931 



Marine Biology and Oceanography 
Undergraduate Seminar 



Upper-Division Electives 

Students are required to choose four from among the 
following 10 upper-division Marine electives: 

PCB 4674 Evolution 3 

ZOO 5456 Ichthyology 3 

OCB 3264 Coral Reef Biology 3 

BOT 5647 Ecology of Marine Vascular Plants 3 

PCB 4724 Comparative Physiology 3 

PCB 4806 Endocrinology 3 

OCB 3xxx Aquatic Microbial Ecology 3 

BOT 4404 Phycology 3 

OCE 3014 Oceanography 3 

GLY 4730 Marine Geology 3 

Laboratory Requirement 

The student is required to take a minimum of 4 
laboratories of upper division required or elective courses. 

Bachelor of Science with Honors in 
Biology 

Admission to the Program 

a. Permission of the department. Application should be 
made by letter to the Curriculum Committee from the 
applicant after completion of two semesters at the 
University and prior to two semesters before graduation. 
The letter should state the intended research problem and 
be countersigned by the Thesis Committee (advisor and 
mentor). 

b. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in biology, chemistry, physics, 
geology, and mathematics courses. 

Graduation Requirements 

a. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in biology, chemistry, physics, 
geology, and mathematics courses. 

b. Completion of the BS requirements in Biology and 
Honors Research Lab (BSC 491 5L, 1 to 3 credits, and 
Honors Thesis (BSC 4970, 3 credits). 

c. Completion of Honors research in collaboration with a 
two-person Honors Committee, consisting of the honors 
advisor and one other member. The honors advisor must 
be a tenured or tenure-earning member of the 
department. The research results must be written in the 
form of an honors thesis and approved by the Honors 
Committee. 

d. Deposit two completed approved copies of the 
Honors Thesis with the Department's Office: one copy to 
be kept in the department and the other to be deposited in 
the Library. 

e. Presentation of the results of the Honors Research in 
a departmental seminar. 

Minor in Biology 

Required Courses 

BSC 1010 and BSC 1011 with labs, and one upper 
division course (3000-level or above) in three of the 
following areas: 1. Ecology, 2. Organismal Diversity, 3. 
Physiology/Biochemistry, or 4. Structure/Development. 
One of these elective courses must be at the 4000-level 
or higher and one must include a lab. Total upper division 
biology credits must number 10 or more. Grades of 'C or 
better are required for all courses and labs. The following 
courses do not count as electives: Student Research Labs 
(BSC 3915, 4914, and 6916), Workshop Biology Labs 
(BSC 5928, PCB 5238, BSC 6926, etc.); Cooperative 



102 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Education credits (BSC 3949), Physiology of Aging (PCB 
3241), and any course for non-science majors (e.g., BOT 
1010, PCB 2099, MCB 2000, BSC 2023, EVR 3013, and 
OCB 2003). 

Pre-Medical, Dental, Optometry, and Veterinary 
Curricula 

Students who have fulfilled the requirements for the BS in 
Biology will also have satisfied the course requirements 
for admission to the above mentioned professional 
schools. Some professional schools may have additional 
course requirements. Interested students should consult 
the Pre-Medical Advisor for arranging a curriculum to 
enhance their potential to gain admission. 

Accelerated Combined Degree Programs 
Seven-Year Programs for BS/DO, BS/DPM and 
BS/DMD 

1. BS in Biology/DO (Bachelor of Science in Biology- 
FlU/Doctor of Osteopathy-College of Osteopathic 
Medicine, Southeastern University of the Health 
Sciences). 

2. BS in Biology/DPM (Bachelor of Science in Biology- 
FlU/Doctor of Podiatric Medicine-School of Podiatric 
Medicine, Barry University). 

3. BS in Biology/DMD (Bachelor of Science in Biology- 
FlU/Doctor of Dental Medicine-College of Dentistry, 
University of Florida). 

The Department of Biological Sciences at Florida 
International University and the College of Osteopathic 
Medicine, Southeastern University, the School of Podiatric 
Medicine, Barry University and the College of Dentistry, 
University of Florida offer combined degree programs 
designed to integrate the undergraduate and the medical 
curricula in seven years instead of the traditional eight 
years, while maintaining the quality of both the 
undergraduate and the medical education. The accepted 
qualified students are admitted to the FIU Biology 
Program and receive provisional early acceptance to the 
medical program at the time they are entering FIU. These 
programs give the students the opportunity to concentrate 
on a comprehensive undergraduate liberal arts education 
around rigorous core and science curricula. During the 
first two years at FIU, students complete the general core 
courses and basic science requirements. The third 
academic year is spent in taking advanced courses to 
fulfill the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in 
Biology. After completing the third year curriculum at FIU, 
the students enter the medical program to receive the 
traditional four year medical education. Satisfactory 
completion of the basic medical science courses at the 
medical school will permit the students to earn 30 credit 
hours toward the BS degree in Biology. For further 
information contact Dr. C. F. Chen at (305) 348-3509. 

Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories should be taken concurrently with or 
subsequent to lectures. Students should register for each 
separately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

APB - Applied Biology; BCH - Biochemistry; BOT - 
Botany; BSC - Introductory Biology; MCB - Microbiology; 
OCB - Oceanography (Biological); PCB - Process Cell 
Biology; ZOO - Zoology. 

BCH 3033 General Biochemistry (4) BCH 3033L 
Biochemistry Lab (1). Chemistry of proteins, lipids, car- 



bohydrates, and nucleic acids; principles of enzymology, 
metabolism, and bioenergetics. Prerequisites: Organic 
Chemistry CHM 2211 and General Biology I BSC 1010. 
[C] 

BCH 4034 General Biochemistry II (3). Protein synthesis 
and structure, nucleic acid synthesis and structure, 
protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, 
membrane structure, signal transduction, and metabolic 
regulation. Prerequisite: General Biochemistry BCH 3033. 
[C] 

BCH 5134C Workshop in Chromatography Techniques 
(1). Workshop covers the theory and practice of 
chromatographic techniques to separate complex 
mixtures of biomolecules, including absorption, ion 
exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BCH 5280 Bioenergetics (3). The relationship of 
thermodynamics to living processes; energy transduction, 
enzymes in coupled systems. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. [C] 

BCH 541 1C Techniques in Molecular Evolution 
Research (5). Ribosomal genes from related organisms 
are amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and 
sequenced. Phylogenetic maps are made by computer 
from sequence data. Students may use material from their 
own research. Prerequisites: General Biochemistry BCH 
3033 and Lab BCH 3033L, Molecular Biology PCB 4524 
and Lab PCB 4524L or Graduate Status. 

BOT 1010 Introductory Botany (3). BOT 1010L 
Introductory Botany Lab (1). A history of mankind's 
study and use of plants, and a survey of plants of 
economic importance. Includes lab. No science 
prerequisite. (Lab fees assessed) 

BOT 3014 Plant Life Histories (3). BOT 3014L Plant 
Life Histories Laboratory (1). Plant form, function, and 
reproduction: the lives of algae, fungi, bryophtes, ferns, 
gymnosprerms, and flowering plants. This course is 
designed for majors and certificate students. 
Prerequisites: A course in General Biology or permission 
of the instructor. Corequisite: Concurrent registration in 
lecture and lab courses. [B] 

BOT 3153 Local Flora (2). BOT 3153L Local Flora Lab 

(2). Introduction to the taxonomy and ecology of common 
native, cultivated, and exotic plant species in southern 
Florida. Laboratory observation of the gross features of 
vascular plants and practice in the use of keys for 
identification. Basic ecology of principle plant communities 
of Southern Florida. Field trips. Prerequisites: Introductory 
Botany BOT 1010 or General Biology I BSC 1010. 
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in lecture and lab 
courses. [B] 

BOT 3353 Morphology of Vascular Plants (3). BOT 
3353L Morphology of Vascular Plants Lab (1). Origin 
and evolution of plants, especially vascular plants of 
tropical origin. Analysis of vascular plant anatomy and 
morphology, emphasizing the underlying principles of 
plant construction. Prerequisites: A course in General 
Biology or permission of the instructor. [D] 

BOT 3434 Mycology (3) BOT 3434L Mycology Lab (1). 

An introduction to the taxonomy, genetics, and physiology 
of fungi with special emphasis on commercially important 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 103 



fungi and plant and animal pathogenic fungi. 
Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010, General 
Biology II BSC 101 1.[B] 

BOT 3663 Tropical Botany (3) BOT 3663L Tropical 
Botany Lab (1). How environmental factors affect the 
distribution of vegetation, and the morphology and 
physiology of plants in the tropics. Emphasis on tropical 
plants of economic importance. Prerequisites: General 
Biology II BSC 1011 or equivalent. Corequisite: 
Concurrent registration in lecture and lab courses. [B] 

BOT 3810 Economic Botany (3). The origins, 
domestication and uses of economically important plants. 
Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010, Introductory 
Botany BOT 1010 or equivalent. [B] 

BOT 4374 Plant Development (3). BOT 4374L Plant 
Development Lab (1). The development of vascular 
plants, with emphasis on experimental approaches to 
plant anatomy, morphology, and reproduction. Practical 
instruction in tissue and organ culture. Prerequisites: Plant 
Physiology BOT 4503 or permission of the instructor. [D] 

BOT 4404 Phycology (3). BOT 4404L Phycology Lab 
(1). The biology of marine and freshwater algae, with an 
emphasis on structure, function, reproduction, 
classification, and ecology. [B] 

BOT 4503 Plant Physiology (3) BOT 4S03L Plant 
Physiology Lab (1). Plant growth and metabolism in 
relationship to environment. Photobiology, nutrient 
relations, transport, and hormones in relation to plant 
development and function. Prerequisite: Organic 
Chemistry I CHM 2210. [C] 

BOT 4684 Taxonomy of Tropical Plants (3). BOT 4684L 
Taxonomy of Tropical Plants Lab (1). Introduction to 
higher plant taxonomy, including nomenclature, modern 
systems of angiosperm classification, and angiosperm 
evolution. Emphasis on identification of tropical plant 
families and plants of economic importance. 
Prerequisites: Local Flora BOT 3153 or Tropical Botany 
BOT 3663 or permission of the instructor. [B] 

BOT 5304C Workshop in Plant Morphology (2). 

Techniques to analyze plant form and experience with the 
diversity plant morphology; field work using the collections 
at Fairchild Tropical Gardens. Prerequisistes: 2 botany 
courses or permission of the instructor. 

BOT 5406 Algal Physiology (3). Physiology and 
metabolism of eukaryotic algae, including ecological 
aspects of the aquatic environment and algal roles in 
aquatic biogeochemical cycling. Prerequisites: Phycology 
BOT 4404, General Chemistry I CHM 1045 and General 
Chemistry II CHM 1046 or permission of the instructor. [C] 

BOT 5515 Biochemistry of Plant Natural Products (3). 

Aspects of primary and secondary plant metabolism will 
be covered including biosynthesis and degradation of 
natural products as well as their biological/ 
pharmacological activity. Prerequisites: Organic 
Chemistry CHM 221 1 or General Biochemistry BCH 3033. 
[C] 

BOT 5575 Photobiology (3) BOT 5575L Photobiology 

Lab (1). The study of basic photochemical mechanisms 
as they occur in molecular biological processes such as 
photosynthesis, plant growth, animal vision, 



bioluminescence, and radiation damage. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. [C] 

BOT 5602 The Functional Ecology of Tropical Plants 
(3). BOT 5602L The Functional Ecology of Tropical 
Plants Lab (1). The relationship of climate and soils to the 
distribution and function of the major plant groups of the 
tropical regions. Prerequisites: Two courses in botany or 
permission of the instructor. [A] 

BOT 5605 Plant Ecology (3). BOT 5605L Plant Ecology 
Lab (1). In-depth study of plant ecology at 3 levels: 
individual, population, and community. Laboratory and 
field exercises will examine lecture topics. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 or permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: Concurrent registration in lecture and lab 
courses. [A] 

BOT 5615 Workshop: Seed Conservation (1). Covers 
practical issues of seed conservation of tropical plants: 
longevity curves, seed germination protocols and seed 
conservation procedures. Prerequisites: Graduate 
students or permission of instructor. 

BOT 5647 Ecology of Marine Vascular Plants (3). 

Biology and ecology of seagrasses and mangroves, with 
an emphasis on South Florida and Caribbean species. 
Physiological ecology, population and community ecology, 
and ecosystem processes. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. [A] 

BOT 5648 Workshop on Aquatic Plants (1). Biology and 
identification of aquatic plants. Prerequisites: Graduate 
status or permission of the instructor. 

BOT 5682 Florida Plant Communities (3). Two-week 
field trip to many diverse plant communities of the state. 
Ecological and environmental factors influencing plant 
distribution will be examined, contrasting vegetation 
among sites. Prerequisites: General Biology II BSC 1011 
and Ecology PCB 3043 or permission of the instructor. [A] 

BOT 5704 Botanical Terminology, Latin and 
Nomenclature (2). Course is divided into 3 parts: 1) 
Botanical Latin and its use; 2) Plant description 
terminology, and current descriptive standards; and 3) 
Botanical nomeclature, the ICBN, Phylocode, and others. 
Prerequisites: Plants Systematics (BOT 5725C) or 
Systematic Biology (BSC 5606), or approval of the 
Advisor. 

BOT 5725C Plant Systematics (3). Theory and methods 
of classification of vascular plants using phylogenetic 
principles. Covers the integration of morphological and 
molecular characters. Prerequisites: Graduate students 
or permission of instructor. 

BOT 5727 Plant Genetics (3). Topics related to higher 
plants, including polyploid inheritance, self-incompatibility, 
cytoplasmic inheritance, mutable alleles, complex loci, 
genome analysis, recombination and mutagesis. 
Prerequisites: General Biology I and II (BSC 1010 and 
1011) and Genetics (PCB3063). 

BOT 5728 Plant Molecular Systematics (2). DNA 

markers for phylogenetic analysis of vascular plants, 
including description of laboatory methods, computerized 
analytical techniques and evolutionary interpretation. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of instructor. 



1 04 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



BOT 5728L Plant Molecular Systematics Laboratory 
(2). DNA markers for phylogenetic analysis of vascular 
plants, including description of laboratory methods, 
computerized analytical techniques and evolutionary 
interpretation. Prerequisites: Graduate status or 
permission of instructor. 

BOT 5816 Ethnobotany (3). Review the use and 
management of plants by indigenous people. Discuss 
emerging theories in ethnobotany, examine the role of 
ethnobotany in conservation and resource utilization. 
Prerequisites: Economic Botany BOT 3810, Tropical 
Botany BOT 3663, Cultural Ecology ANT 3403, or 
permission of the instructor. 

BOT 581 6L Ethnobotany Workshop (1). Field methods 
in the study of plant use by traditional and modern 
societies. Examines botanical documentation, 
ethnological description and experimental design. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

BOT 5817 Field Ethnobotany (1-4). A 4-week field 
course that introduces students to tropical vegetation and 
its use by traditional cultures. Topics include tropical 
botany, diversity, ecology, and the relationship between 
plants and people. Course may be repeated. 
Prerequisites: BOT 5816 and BOT 581 6L or permission of 
instructor. 

BOT 5852 Medical Botany (3). An examination of 
medicinal plants including the biology, chemistry, and 
pharmacology of botanical remedies, and their effects on 
human health. Prerequisites: Economic Botany or BOT 
5816 or permission of instructor. 

BOT 5924 Workshop in Tropical Plant Families (3). An 

introduction to important spermatophyte families, including 
systematics, ecology, and conservation. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. [B] 

BOT 5925 Workshop in the Biology of Southern 
Florida's Native Trees (3). Distribution, floristic 
relationships, morphology, reproductive biology, 
taxonomy, and conservation of trees native to southern 
Florida. Prerequisites: Local Flora BOT 3153, Tropical 
Botany BOT 3663, or permission of the instructor. [B] 

BOT 5928 Workshop on Grasses and Sedges of 
Southern Florida (1). The systematics, ecology, and 
identification of South Florida grasses and sedges. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 1010 General Biology I (3) BSC 1010L General 
Biology I Lab (1). Biomolecules, cells, energy flow, 
genetics, and physiology. Science background or Biology 
major recommended. (Lab fees assessed) 

BSC 1011 General Biology II (3) BSC 1011L General 
Biology Lab II (1). A survey of organismal biology with 
emphasis on botany and zoology. Science background or 
Biology major recommended. (Lab fees assessed) 

BSC 2023 Human Biology (3) BSC 2023L Human 
Biology Lab (1). Biological and general scientific 
principles governing human structure, function, health, 
and relationship to the planetary environment. For non- 
science majors. (Lab fees assessed) 



BSC 3364 Research in Tropical Ecosystems (3). 

Biology, Earth Sciences and Environmental Studies 
faculty describe research in marine and terrestrial 
ecosystems, geology, conservation and education. 
Students discuss scientific ideas. 

BSC 3428 Introduction to Brewing Science (3). BSC 
3428L Introduction to Brewing Science Lab (1). A 

hands-on overview of the scientific principles and 
operation of craft breweries, commercial breweries, and 
microbrewery technology. Relevant chemical, biological 
and physical processes will be examined. 

BSC 3915, 4914 Student Research Lab I and II (1-12). 

Independent laboratory study in a project or projects of 
the student's choice. Registration by consultation with 
instructor. May be repeated for additional credit. 

BSC 3949 Cooperative Education in Biology (1-3). A 

student majoring in biological sciences may spend several 
terms employed in industry or government in a capacity 
relating to the major. Prerequisites: Permission of Co-op 
Education and major department. 

BSC 4303 Biogeography (3). Current issues concerning 
geographic distribution of plants and animals. 
Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 3043 and Evolution PCB 
4674. [A] 

BSC 4304 Environments of the Past (3). The 

biogeography, diversity and ecology of ancient life is 
combined with the study of sediments and stable isotopes 
to interpret environmental changes of the past at the local 
to global scale. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

BSC 4361 Biodiversity of Tropical Islands (3). Current 
issues on evolution, diversification and conservation of 
flora and fauna on tropical islands. Prerequisites: 
Genetics PCB 3063, Ecology PCB 3043, and Evolution 
PCB 4674. [A] 

BSC 4363 Biodiversity in the Caribbean Basin (3). 
Current issues on Evolution, Conservation, and 
Diversification of Biota of the Caribbean Basin. 
Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1011 General Biology I 
and II. 

BSC 4422 Biotechnology: Applications in Industry, 
Agriculture and Medicine (3). Biological, biochemical, 
ecological, engineering, entrepreneurial, and ethical 
aspects of biotechnology in industry, agriculture, and 
medicine. [D] 

BSC 491 5L Honors Research (1-3). Laboratory and/or 
field study in consultation with an Honors Thesis advisor. 
Prerequisite: Admission into Honors in Biological 
Sciences Program. 

BSC 4931 Undergraduate Seminar (1). An exploration of 
various research works in biological sciences. Oral 
presentation by the students required. 

BSC 4934 Topics in Biology (1-3). An intensive study of 
a particular topic or limited number of topics not otherwise 
offered in the curriculum. 

BSC 4970 Honors Thesis (3). Writing an Honors Thesis. 
Prerequisite: BSC 491 5L. 

BSC 5302 Ecosystems of the Past (3). Analysis of local 
to global change in environments through time using 
faunal distributions, biodiversity, biogeography, physical 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 105 



and chemical properties of sediments, and stable 
isotopes. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

BSC 5405C Environmental Instrumentation (3). Theory 
and techniques for measurement of environmental 
pa r ameters of interest to field biologist. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. [C] 

BSC 5406 Forensic Biology (3). Forensic applications of 
molecular biology including PCR, STR techniques and 
other laboratory methods and data interpretation. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BSC 5926 Graduate Bioresource Workshop (1). This 
workshop is designed to introduce Biology graduate 
students to the various resources available for graduate 
teaching and research. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BSC 5927 Workshop: Hyperspectral Remote Sensing 
in Biology (1). Basic understanding of principles, 
techniques and application of hyperspectral remote 
sensing of the Earth's natural environments. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Status or permission of Instructor. 

BSC 5928 Workshop: Vertebrate Animal Research (1). 

Reviews the ethical, legal and practical guidelines for 
conducting research with live vertebrate animals. 
Required for students capturing, handling or collecting 
vertebrate animals in the course of research or teaching. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 5929 Workshop: Paleoecology of South Florida 
(3). Sampling, preparation, and identification of diatoms 
and foraminifera from a freshwater to marine transect, and 
application of ecology to interpreting past ecosystems. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

BSC 5933 Current Topics in Tropical Biology (3). An 

intensive study of particular tropical biology topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

BSC 5936 Glaser Seminar: The Biology of Tomorrow 
(1). A series of lectures by an invited, internationally 
recognized authority in biological topics of current and 
future concern. 

ENY 1004 General Entomology (3) ENY 1004L 
Entomology Lab (1). The morphology, systematics, 
physiology and ecology of the major insect orders, and 
introduction to basic field procedures. Prerequisite: 
General Biology II BSC 1011. 

ENY 4060 Advanced Entomology (3). ENY 4060L 
Advanced Entomology Laboratory (1). Explorations of 
the morphology, physiology, behavior and metabolism of 
insects in the context of their evolutionary, environmental 
and economic significance. Prerequisites: General Biology 
I BSC 1010, General Biology II BSC 1011, or permission 
of the instructor. [B] 

MCB 2000 Introductory Microbiology (3) MCB 2000L 
Introductory Micro Lab (1). Basic concepts of microbes 
as pathogens, food spoilage and fermentative organisms. 
Microbial relationships to immunology, sanitation, pollution 
and geochemical cycling. Not applicable for majors in 
Biological Sciences. (Lab fees assessed) 

MCB 3020 General Microbiology (3) MCB 3020L 
General Microbiology Lab (2). Introduction to the 



principles and techniques of microbiology, genetics, 
taxonomy, biochemistry and ecology of microorganisms. 
Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I CHM 2210 and 
Organic Chemistry II CHM 2211; and General Biology I 
BSC 1010 and General Biology II BSC 1011; or 
permission of the instructor. [B] 

MCB 4203 Microbial Pathogenicity (3) MCB 4203L 
Microbial Path Lab (1). Host-parasite relationships: 
physiology of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens 
emphasizing mechanisms of pathogenicity and the host 
response. Prerequisite: General Microbiology MCB 3020. 
[C] 

MCB 4404 Microbial Physiology (3) MCB 4404L 
Microbial Physiology Lab (1). Introduction to the study of 
physiological and metabolic activities of microorganisms 
and processes that affect them. Prerequisites: General 
Microbiology MCB 3020 and Lab MCB 3020L. [C] 

MCB 4603 Microbial Ecology (3) MCB 4603L Microbial 
Ecology Lab (1). Principles and applications of microbial 
interactions with the environment: physical, chemical, and 
biological. Prerequisites: General Microbiology MCB 3020 
and Lab MCB 3020L. [A] 

MCB 4653 Food Microbiology (3). MCB 4653L Food 
Microbiology Lab (1). Public Health microbiology of 
water and sewage, microbiology of food preparation and 
spoilage; industrial aspects of microbiology. Prerequisites: 
General Microbiology MCB 3020 and Lab MCB 3020L. [A] 

MCB 5114 Microbial Diversity (3). MCB 5114L 
Microbial Diversity Laboratory (1). Analysis of metabolic 
and morpho-logical diversity in bacteria in the context of 
bacterial systematics. Prerequisites: General Microbiology 
MCB 3020 and Lab MCB 3020L; additional course in 
microbiology or biochemistry. Corequisite: Concurrent 
registration in lecture and lab courses. 

MCB 531 5C Workshop: Prokaryotic Cloning (2). 

Description of molecular genetic methods for manipulation 
of prokaryotic DNA. Prerequisites: Genetics (PCB 3063) 
and Biochemistry (BCH 3033) or permission of instructor. 

MCB 5405 Biology of Photosynthetic Bacteria (3). MCB 
5405L Biology of Photosynthetic Bacteria Lab (1). 

Study of the physiology and ecology of photosynthetic 
bacteria, including Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), 
purple and green bacteria, and Halobacteria. [A] 

MCB 5453L Workshop: Prokaryotic Cell Signaling (1). 

Covers chemical signals used by prokaryotes for cell-to- 
cell communications. Prerequisites: MCB 3020 or 
permission of instructor. 

MCB 5505 Virology (3) MCB 5505L Virology Lab (1). 

Principles and methods of study of bacterial, plant, and 
animal viruses. Molecular aspects of viral development, 
virus pathogens, and carcinogens. Prerequisites: General 
Biochemistry BCH 3033, Genetics PCB 3063, and 
Organic Chemistry I CHM 2210 and Organic Chemistry II 
CHM 2211. [C] 

MCB 5605 Microbial Ecology (3). Principles and 
applications of microbial interactions with the 
environment. Current research areas are emphasized. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Level Standing. 

OCB 2003 Introductory Marine Biology (3) OCB 2003L 
Introductory Marine Biology Lab (1). A survey of 



106 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



marine biological environments and zones, including the 
relationship of the physical and chemical environment to 
the distribution of marine plants and animals. (Lab fees 
assessed) 

OCB 3043 Marine Biology and Oceanography (3). OCB 
3043L Marine Biology and Oceanography Laboratory 
(1). An ecological approach to the biology of organisms in 
the marine environment with an emphasis on zonation 
and adaptation to the physical environment. Intended for 
biology majors or other science majors. Prerequisites: 
General Biology I BSC 1010 and General Biology II BSC 
1011. [A] 

OCB 3264 Biology of Coral Reefs (3). Biology of reef 
animals and reef ecology: emphasis on Florida and 
Caribbean reefs. Classroom instruction and observation of 
coral reef and turtle grass communities. Prerequisites: 
General Biology II BSC 1011 and scuba certification. [A] 

OCB 4632 Marine Microbial Ecology (3). Diversity, 
ecology and physiology of marine viruses, bacteria and 
protozoa, their role in marine food webs and the 
biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients, and the 
significance of microbial food webs for marine 
productivity. Prerequisites: BSC 1010, BSC 1011, OCB 
3043. 

OCB 5575L Workshop: Aquatic Flow Cytometry (1). A 

practical introduction to theories and applications of flow 
cytometry in the analyses of aquatic microorganisms 
(bacteria, phytoplankton) and their physiology. 
Prerequisite: Instructor's permission. 

OCB 5634 Marine Ecology (3). OCB 5634L Marine 
Ecology Lab (1). Review of processes determining 
species distribution and abundance in marine 
ecosystems. Energy flow and trophic relationships 
examined. Prerequisite: Ecology PCB 3043. Corequisite: 
Concurrent registration in lecture for lab courses. [A] 

OCB 5670L Techniques in Biological Oceanography 
(1). A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student 
with biological sampling techniques at sea. Shipboard 
experience will be required as part of the course. 
Prerequisites: Previous course in marine biology and 
permission of the instructor. 

PCB 2061 Introductory Genetics (3). PCB 2061 L 
Introductory Genetics Lab (1). Principles of Mendelian 
and Molecular genetics with selected examples of 
applications such as genetic engineering and twin studies. 

PCB 2099 Foundations of Human Physiology (3) PCB 
2099L Foundations of Human Physiology Lab (1). 

Functional survey of the organ systems of the human 
body. Intended primarily for non-science majors. (Lab fees 
assessed) 

PCB 3043 Ecology (3) PCB 3043L Ecology Lab (1). The 

basic principles governing the interaction of organism and 
environment. Trophic structure and energetics, species 
diversity, evolution of populations, biogeochemical cycles. 
Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 and General 
Biology II BSC 1011. [A] 

PCB 3063 Genetics (3) PCB 3063L Genetics Lab (1). 

Mendelian inheritance and introduction to molecular 
genetics. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 and 
Organic Chemistry I CHM 2210. [D] 



PCB 3203 Cell Physiology (3) PCB 3203L Cell 
Physiology Lab (1). Biochemical and biophysical 
principles of cell physiology: enzyme structure and 
function, energy transductions, electrical and chemical 
signals. Prerequisites: General Biology I and II with Labs 
BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 101 1L; General 
Chemistry I and II with Labs CHM 1045, CHM 1045L, 
CHM 1046, CHM 1046L; Physics I and II with or without 
Calculus and Labs, PHY 2048, PHY 2048L, PHY 2049, 
PHY 2049L (or PHY 2053, PHY 2054) and Organic 
Chemistry I and II with Labs CHM 2210, CHM 221 0L, 
CHM 2211, CHM 221 1L. [C] 

PCB 3241 Physiology of Aging (3). Introductory 
treatment of the physiology of organ systems with 
emphasis on the decline in organ function with aging and 
on the resultant limitations in physiological performance. 

PCB 3373 Tropical Ecology (3). In-depth survey of 
tropical climatology, ecological processes characteristic of 
tropical habitats, and biodiversity and conservation of 
tropical regions. Prerequisite: PCB 3043. 

PCB 3702 Intermediate Human Physiology (3) PCB 
3702L Intermediate Human Physiology Lab (1). 

Functions of the human body and the physio-chemical 
mechanisms responsible for each organ's function. 
Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 or General 
Biology II BSC 1011. [C] 

PCB 3703 Human Physiology I (3) PCB 3703L Human 
Physiology I Lab (1). Basic facts and concepts relating to 
the physiology of cells and nervous, muscular, and 
cardiovascular systems, with emphasis on regulatory 
mechanisms and abnormal physiology. Prerequisites: 
General Biology I and II with Labs BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, 
BSC 1011, BSC 101 1L; General Chemsitry I and II with 
Labs CHM 1045, CHM 1045L, CHM 1046, CHM 1046L; 
and Physics I and II with or without Calculus and Labs, 
PHY 2048, PHY 2048L, PHY 2049, PHY 2049L (or PHY 
2053, PHY 2054). [C] 

PCB 3704 Human Physiology II (3) PCB 3704L Human 
Physiology II Lab (1). Physiology of respiratory, gastro- 
intestinal, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. 
Continuation of PCB 3703. Prerequisites: General Biology 

I and II with Labs BSC 1010, BSC 1010L, BSC 1011, BSC 
101 1L; General Chemsitry I and II with Labs CHM 1045, 
CHM 1045L, CHM 1046, CHM 1046L; and Physics I and 

II with or without Calculus and Labs, PHY 2048, PHY 
2048L, PHY 2049, PHY 2049L (or PHY 2053, PHY 2054). 
[C] 

PCB 3711 Physiological Mechanisms (3). Biophysical 
and biochemical perspective; Integrative aspects of 
physiology are de-emphasized to accomplish a detailed, 
but introductory coverage of mechanisms. [C] 

PCB 4023 Cell Biology (4). A structural and molecular 
analysis of cell function. Prerequisite: Genetics PCB 3063. 
[C] 

PCB 4023L Cell Biology Lab (1). Fundamentals of 
cell/histological identification and current techniques used 
to study cells. Prerequisite: PCB 3063. 

PCB 4232 The Biology of Acquired Immune Deficiency 
Syndrome (AIDS) (3). An overview of Acquired Immune 
Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) from biomedical and 
psychosocial perspectives. Prerequisites: General Biology 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 107 



I BSC 1010, General Biology II BSC 1011, General 
Chemistry I CHM 1045 and General Chemistry II CHM 
1046. 

PCB 4233 Immunology (3) PCB 4233L Immunology 
Lab (1). Fundamentals of immunology including antibody 
structure, immunopathology, molecular recognition at cell 
surfaces and immunological aspects of cancer biology. 
Prerequisites: General Microbiology MCB 3020 or 
permission of the instructor. [C] 

PCB 4253 Developmental Biology (3) Comprehensive 
survey of principles of development and critical analysis of 
methods used to study these problems. Prerequisites: 
Genetics PCB 3063 and Cell Physiology PCB 3203 or 
General Biochemistry BCH 3033. [D] 

PCB 4301 Freshwater Ecology (3). PCB 4301 L 
Freshwater Ecology Laboratory (2). Community-level 
analysis of marshes, lakes and rivers from theoretical and 
practical viewpoints, emphasizing quantitative description 
of community structure and function. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 or General Biology II BSC 1011 and 
permission of the instructor. [A] 

PCB 4373 Amphibian Ecology (3). In-depth survey of the 
ecology of members of the vertebrate class Amphibia 
(caecilians, salamanders, amd frogs). Prerequisite: PCB 
3043. 

PCB 4514 Advanced Genetics (3). Advanced level 
treatment of topics such as meiotic disjunction-uniparental 
disomy, transcription & splicing - differential splicing, 
polymorphisms, chromatin organization, horizontal gene 
transfer, etc. Prerequisite: Genetics PCB 3063. [C] 

PCB 4524 Molecular Biology (3) PCB 4524L Molecular 
Biology Lab (1). Advanced nucleic acid and protein 
biochemistry: biosynthesis of macro-molecules and 
molecular genetics. Prerequisites: Biochemistry BCH 
3033 or Genetics PCB 3063 and Organic Chemistry I 
CHM 2210. [C] 

PCB 4674 Evolution (3). A study of the synthetic theory 
of evolution, its historic and experimental justification and 
the mechanisms of natural selection. Prerequisites: 
Genetics PCB 3063 and Ecology PCB 3043, or 
permission of the instructor. [B] 

PCB 4723 Animal Physiology (3) PCB 4723L Animal 
Physiology Lab (1). Advanced study of physiological 
mechanisms employed by animals to maintain function of 
the organ systems and to interact with the environment. 
Prerequisites: Cell Physiology PCB 3203 or Biochemistry 
BCH 3033. [C] 

PCB 4724 Comparative Physiology (3) PCB 4724L 
Comparative Physiology Lab I (1). Regulation of the 
internal environment: osmotic gastrointestinal, metabolic, 
circulatory and respiratory physiology. Prerequisites: 
General Biology I BSC 1010 and II BSC 1011 and Organic 
Chemistry I CHM 2210. [C] 

PCB 4733 Human Systemic Physiology I (3) PCB 
4733L Human Systemic Physiology Lab (1). Selected 
topics in human physiology with emphasis on topics of 
clinical significance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Human 
Physiology PCB 2099 or General Biology II BSC 1011 or 
General Chemistry I CHM 1045. [C] 



PCB 4734 Human Systemic Physiology II (3). Selected 
topics in human physiology with emphasis on topics of 
clinical significance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Human 
Physiology PCB 2099 or General Biology II BSC 1011 or 
General Chemistry I CHM 1045. [C] 

PCB 4805 Endocrinology (3). Biochemistry, physiology 
and anatomy of the endocrine systems of vertebrates and 
invertebrates. Steroid, peptide, and terpenoid hormones 
which control reproduction, growth, and other parameters. 
Prerequisites: General Biology II BSC 1011, Organic 
Chemistry II CHM 221 1 , and one physiology course. [C] 

PCB 4805L Endocrinology Laboratory (1). A series of 
lab exercises and experiments designed to supplement 
lecture material in PCB 4805, and coordinated with that 
content. Prerequisites: General Biology I and II, 
permission of the instructor. Corequisite: PCB 4805. 

PCB 5025L Molecular Biology Techniques Laboratory 
(3). Covers DNA and RNA extraction, digestion, 
electrophoresis, Southern analysis, RFLP analysis, PCR 
amplification, cloning and automated sequencing. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of instructor. 

PCB 5184 Workshop in Microtechnique (1). Laboratory 
techniques required for preparation of tissues for light 
microscopy-histological study. Prerequisites: Graduate 
status or permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5195 Histochemistry/Microtechnique (3) PCB 
5195L Histochemistry/Microtechnique Lab (1). 

Chemistry and use of fixatives and dyes; histochemistry 
emphasizes procedures used in research and pathology 
labs including techniques for enzymes, protein, 
carbohydrate, nucleic acids and lipids. Prerequisites: 
General Biochemistry BCH 3033 or Cell Physiology PCB 
3203. 

PCB 5215 Workshop in Histo-and Immunocyto- 
Chemistry (1). Laboratory techniques for preparation of 
paraffin-embedded and frozen sections; selected 
procedures to demonstrate the fundamentals of 
histochemical and immunocytochemical labeling methods. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5235 Current Topics in Comparative Immunology 
(1). A weekly seminar/discussion course consisting of 
research presentations by students, faculty and visiting 
scientists in the area of comparative immunology. It is 
recommended for students with a research interest in the 
comparative study of mamalian and nonmamalian species 
or using alternative animal models. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

PCB 5236 Immune Assessment (3). A review of the 
genetics and biochemistry of immune dysfunction with a 
focus on the methods used to evaluate adaptive and 
innate immunological function. Prerequisites: PCB 4233 
or Permission of instrcutor. 

PCB 5238 Marine Comparative Immunology Workshop 

(1). A workshop at the Keys Marine Lab to present 
general and unique research methodologies associated 
with the immunology of marine animals. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 



108 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



PCB 5239 Immunophysiology (3). Physiological and 
endocrine regulation of the vertebrate immune system. 
Prerequisite: Immunology PCB 4233. 

PCB 5259 Topics in Developmental Biology (3). 

Molecular and cellular mechanisms in the development of 
plants and animals. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. [D] 

PCB 5307 Limnology (3) PCB 5307L Limnology Lab 
(1). Chemical and physical properties of standing and 
flowing freshwater systems; ecophysiology and 
interactions of the fresh water flora and fauna in relation to 
abiotic factors; oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions. [A] 

PCB 5327 Coastal Ecosystems and Modeling (3). 

Basics of ecology for coastal and wetland ecosystems. 
The theory and mechanisms of simulation modeling. 
Hands-on creation and application of computer models in 
ecological research. Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 3043 
and Calculus I MAC 231 1 or permission of the instructor. 
[A] 

PCB 5328 Spatial and Landscape Ecology (3). 

Ecological processes with spatial components, including 
neighborhood intercations, foraging, metapopulations, 
infectious diseases, invasive species, and habitat 
associations. Prerequisites: PCB 5423 Advanced 
Ecology - Population and Community. Corequisites: PCB 
5454 Advanced Ecology - Community Ecosystems; MAC 
2311 Calculus. 

PCB 5356L Tropical Ecology Field Lab (3). Field course 
in Costa Rica with fieldwork in two or more diverse 
habitats (rainforest, and dry forest). Emphasis on diversity 
and interactions between species. Visits to selected sites 
of deforestation, conservation and restoration. [A] 

PCB 5358 Everglades Research and Resources 
Management (3). Application of basic skills in ecology to 
contemporary issues in the Everglades area, with 
emphasis on the relation between research and 
management of wilderness, wildlife, vegetation, water and 
fire. Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 3043 or permission of the 
instructor. [A] 

PCB 5376 Animal Physiological Ecology (3). PCB 
5376L Animal Physiological Ecology Laboratory (1). 

Evolution-oriented approach to physiological adaptations 
of aniumals living in diverse environments. Considers the 
inter relationship between behavior, energetics, and 
integrative regulation of metabolism. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 and Biochemistry BCH 3033. [C] 

PCB 5405 Biochemical Ecology (3). Principles of 
chemical communication between diverse organisms and 
the importance of a variety of allelo-chemicals in 
community structure. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5407 Workshop: Microelectrodes in Microbial 
Ecology (1). Use of Microelectrodes to measure chemical 
micro-environments and biological processes in natural 
samples. Hands-on experience with O2 and pH 
electrodes. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5423 Advanced Ecology: Populations and 
Communities (3). Advanced analysis of population and 
community ecology. Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 3043 or 
permission of the instructor or graduate status. [A] 



PCB 5443 Advanced Ecology: Communities and 
Ecosystems (3). Advanced analysis of ecological 
principles pertaining to communities, ecosystems, and 
landscapes, with special emphasis on the South Florida 
and Caribbean region. Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 3043 
or permission of the instructor or graduate status. [A] 

PCB 5596 Workshop: In Situ Hybridization (1). Analysis 
of gene expression by in situ hybridization techniques 
using whole mount and crysectioned tissues. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5615 Molecular and Organismal Evolution (3). 

The evolutionary relationships among nucleotides and 
proteins as well as the processes which yield these 
relationships. The possible molecular events leading to 
speciation. Prerequisites: Genetics PCB 3063 and 
Biochemistry BCH 3033. 

PCB 5616 Applied Phylogenetics (3). Methods of 
phylogenetic analysis with focus on pragmatic 
applications to ecological and evolutionary studies. 
Hands-on experience with current computer programs for 
phylogenetic analysis. Prerequisites: Graduate status or 
permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5665 Human Genetics (3). Principles and 
techniques in the analysis of the human race. 
Prerequisite: Genetics PCB 3063. 

PCB 5677 Evolution and Development (3). The models 
and evidence for the interaction of development and 
evolution, using both plant and animal systems. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5685 Population Genetics (3). Advanced analysis 
of gene and genotype frequencies in theoretical 
populations and analysis of real data. Linkage 
equilibrium, drift, migration and selection are a few of the 
topics covered. Prerequisite: Genetics (PCB 3063). 

PCB 5686 Population Biology (3). PCB 5686L 
Population Biology Lab (1). Intrinsic properties of natural 
and theoretical populations and their dynamics and 
interactions, and responses to disturbance. Includes field 
problems and computer exercises. Prerequisites: 
Genetics PCB 3063 and Evolution PCB 4674, or 
permission of the instructor. [A] 

PCB 5687 Evolutionary Ecology (3). PCB 5687L 
Evolutionary Ecology Lab (1). Adaptations and 
interactions of plants and animals in natural and disturbed 
habitats. Prerequisite: Ecology PCB 3043. [A] 

PCB 5725 Membrane Signal Transduction (3). 

Hormones and neurotransmitters as extracellular 
messengers. Membrane receptors and mechanisms of 
signal transduction: membrane channels and enzymes, 
direct linkage and G-protein linkage. Second messengers. 
Prerequisites: General Biochemistry BCH 3033 or Cell 
Physiology PCB 3203. [C] 

PCB 5786 Membrane Physiology (3). Chemical and 
physical properties of the plasma membrane, its 
biosynthesis and functions in transport and signal 
transduction. Prerequisites: Physics I PHY 2048, Physics 
II PHY 2049 and General Biochemistry BCH 3033 or Cell 
Physiology PCB 3203. [C] 



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College of Arts and Sciences 109 



PCB 5835C Neurophysiology (3) PCB 5835L 
Neurophysiology Lab (1). Comparative neurophysiology; 
physico-chemical mechanisms of resting and action 
potentials; synaptic transmission; neural coding and 
integration; sensory-motor function and neuro- 
physiological basis of behavior. Prerequisites: 
Biochemistry BCH 3033 or Cell Physiology PCB 3203 and 
Calculus I MAC 231 1 . [C] 

PCB 5902 Readings in Stable Isotope Studies (1). 
Discussion of scientific papers published in the fields of 
isotope ecology and isotope biogeochemistry. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5934 Topics in Skeletal Muscle Physiology (4). 
Advanced discussion of some aspects of the biophysics, 
biochemistry and physiology of skeletal muscle 
contraction. Topics may vary from year to year. Based on 
review articles and research papers. Prerequisites: 
Human Physiology I PCB 3703 and Cell Physiology PCB 
3203 or General Biochemistry BCH 3033. [C] 

PCB 5938 Ecosystem Studies Seminar (3). Theory and 
practice of ecosystem analysis, based on discussion of 
current articles and books. Emphasis on using different 
approaches to understand natural complexity, with case 
studies researched by students. Prerequisites: Ecology 
PCB 3043 or permission of the instructor. [A] 

ZOO 2203C Invertebrate Zoology (4). Taxonomy, 
anatomy, development, physiology and ecology of major 
invertebrate groups, including terrestrial and aquatic 
phyla. Prerequisite: General Biology II BSC 1011. [B] 

ZOO 271 3C Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (4). 
Study of the structural diversity and classification of 
vertebrates and the evolution of various organ systems. 
Dissection of a variety of vertebrate specimens to reveal 
relationships of the various organ systems. Prerequisites: 
General Biology I BSC 1010 and General Biology II BSC 
1011. [D] 

ZOO 3021 Comparative Zoology (3) ZOO 3021 
Comparative Zoology Lab (1). Characteristics, 
evolutionary relationships and physiological adaptations of 
metazoan animal groups from porifera through the 
chordates. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 and 
II BSC 1011 with Labs BSC 1010L and BSC 1011L 

ZOO 3303 Vertebrate Zoology (3) ZOO 3303L 
Vertebrate Zoology Lab (1). Systematics, anatomy, 
physiology, development and ecology of vertebrate 
animals. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 and II 
BSC 1011 with Labs BSC 1010L and BSC 1011L. [B] 

ZOO 3327 Human Evolutionary Morphology (3). The 
major evolutionary adaptations that have led to the unique 
biocultural characteristics of the human species. 
Prerequisites: General Biology II BSC 1011, Introduction 
to Anthropology ANT 2000, or permission of the instructor. 
[D] 

ZOO 3378 Forensic Osteology (4). A detailed 
examination of the human skeleton revealing such 
individual traits as sex, age, height, and race in order to 
assist law enforcement investigation in forensic 
identifications. Prerequisite: None, though a course in 
anatomy is strongly recommended. 



ZOO 3603 Embryology (3) ZOO 3603L Embryology Lab 
(1). Animal morphogenesis. Laboratory must be taken 
with lecture. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 
and II BSC 1011 with Labs BSC 1010L and BSC 1011L. 
[D] 

ZOO 3731 Human Anatomy (3) ZOO 3731 L Human 
Anatomy Demonstration (1). Survey of organ systems of 
the human body with major emphasis on the skeletal, 
muscular, and peripheral nervous system. Guided 
examination of prosected human cadavers. Prerequisites: 
General Chemistry I CHM 1045, General Physics I PHY 
2053 or PHY 2048 and General Biology II BSC 1011. [D] 

ZOO 3753 Histology (3) ZOO 3753L Histology Lab (1). 

Microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues and organs. 
Prerequisites: General Biology II BSC 1011 and Organic 
Chemistry I CHM 2210 and Organic Chemisty II CHM 
2211. [D] 

ZOO 3892C Biology of Captive Wildlife (3). Behavior, 
nutrition, physiology, anatomy, pathology and diseases of 
captive wildlife. Taught at Metrozoo. Prerequisites: 
General Biology II BSC 1011 or permission of the 
instructor. [B] 

ZOO 4234 General Parasitology (3) ZOO 4234L 
General Parasitology Lab (1). Modern concepts of 
biology, development, immunology and pathology of 
animal parasites. Prerequisite: General Biology I BSC 
1010. Corequisite: Concurrent registration of lecture and 
lab course. [B] 

ZOO 4377 Advanced Vertebrate Morphology (3) ZOO 
4377L Advanced Vertebrate Morphology Lab (1). The 

study of the diversity of anatomical structure in 
vertebrates and the relationship between form and 
function. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 with 
lab BSC 1010L, General Biology II BSC 1011 with lab 
BSC 1011L, or permission of the instructor. [D] 

ZOO 4462C Herpetology (4). Study of the biology of 
reptiles and amphibians with emphasis on the natural 
history and ecology of local species. Prerequisites: 
General Biology I BSC 1010 and II BSC 1011 and 
Ecology PCB 3043 or permission of the instructor. [B] 

ZOO 4472 Ornithology (3) ZOO 4472L Ornithology Lab 
(2). Avian systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, 
ecology, evolution, and conservation. Labs teach visual 
and auditory identification, census techniques, banding, 
and taping. Field trips alternate Saturdays and at least 
one overnight weekend field trip. Prerequisites: General 
Biology I BSC 1010 and II BSC 1011. Corequisite: 
Concurrent registration of lecture with lab course. [B] 

ZOO 4484 Primate Biology (3) ZOO 4484L Primate 
Biology Field Lab (1). Survey of the natural history of the 
prosimians, monkeys, and apes with special emphasis on 
primate anatomy, evolution, ecology, and behavior. 
Prerequisties: General Biology I BSC 1010 and II BSC 
101 1 or permission of the instructor. [B] 

ZOO 4513 Animal Behavior (3) ZOO 451 3L Animal 
Behavior Laboratory (1). Evolutionary approach to 
under-standing the diversity of behavioral strategies. 
Ecological and physiological mechanisms of behavior will 
be emphasized. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 
1010 and II BSC 1011. Lab: Three weekend day trips 



110 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



and one overnight weekend field trip. Corequisite: 
concurrent registration of lecture with lab course. [A] 

ZOO 4733 Survey of Regional Anatomy (3) ZOO 4733L 
Survey of Regional Anatomy Lab (2). The regional 
anatomy of the human body as revealed by dissections, 
radiographs, models and videos. Prerequisites: General 
Biology II BSC 1011 with lab BSC 101 1L, General 
Chemistry II CHM 1046 with lab CHM 1046L, and Physics 
II PHY 2054. (Lab fees assessed) [D] 

ZOO 4743C Neuroscience (4). Structure and function of 
the human nervous system. Dissection and demonstration 
of human nervous system and various neurophysiology 
labs. Prerequisites: One course in physiology and one 
course in human anatomy. [D] 

ZOO 5265 Biology of Crustaceans (3). ZOO 5265L 
Biology of Crustaceans Laboratory (1). Morphology, 
physiology, systematics and evolution in crustaceans. [B] 

ZOO 5371 Clinical Anatomy of the Trunk and Limbs 
(3). ZOO 5371 L Clinical Anatomy of the Trunk and 
Limbs Lab (1). A detailed analysis of the anatomical 
foundations of kinesology and physical rehabilitation. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the functional 
anatomy of the trunk, pectoral and pelvic limbs with 
clinical correlations to the major disorders commonly 
treated by physical and occupational therapists. 
Prerequisite: ZOO 3731. Corequisite: Clinical Anatomy of 
the Trunk and Limbs Lab. 

ZOO 5376 Animal Design and Movement (4). Basic 
biomechanical and behavioral theories of how animals 
feed and move. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 
1010, and II BSC 1011, Physics I PHY 2053 and II PHY 
2054. [D] 

ZOO 5424 Herpetology (3) ZOO 5424L Herpetology 
Laboratory (1). Biology of amphibians and reptiles from a 
systematic perspective. The three orders of living 
amphibians and the six living orders of reptiles are 
covered in detail. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 
1010 and II BSC 1011 and Ecology PCB 3043, or 
permission of the instructor. [B] 

ZOO 5456 Ichthyology (3) ZOO 5456L Ichthyology Lab 
(1). Systematics, structure, function, ecology, and 
evolution of fishes. Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 
1010, and II BSC 1011, and Ecology PCB 3043. 
Corequisite: Concurrent registration of lecture and lab 
course. [B] 

ZOO 5479 Workshop in Field Ornithology: Mark and 
Recapture Methods (1). Instruction in techniques of 
banding wild birds, including their capture with mist nets, 
identificaton in the hand, and maintenance of federally 
required records. Prerequisites: Ornithology with Lab ZOO 
4472 and ZOO 4472L or permission of the instructor. 

ZOO 5732 Advanced Anatomy Demonstration (1-4). 

Dissection and demonstration of the human body with the 
emphasis on structure and function. May be repeated to a 
maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisites: ZOO 4733 with Lab 
ZOO 4733L or consent of instructor. [D] 

ZOO 5745 Advanced Neuroanatomy (3). In-depth 
knowledge of the embryonic development, structure, and 
function of the human nervous system with a great deal of 



clinical consideration. Prerequisites: Neuroscience ZOO 
4743C or permission of the instructor. 

ZOO 5746 Comparative Neurobiology (4). Structure and 
function of neural systems at many levels including 
biophysical and cellular mechanisms, molecular 
processes, neural circuits, development, and anatomy. 
Prerequisites: General Biology I BSC 1010 and II BSC 
1011, General Chemistry I CHM 1045 and II CHM 1046 
and Physics PHY 2048; graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. [C] 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 1 1 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Stanislaw F. Wnuk, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Jose Almirall, Associate Professor 
David Becker, Associate Professor 
Yong Cai, Associate Professor 
David Chatfield, Associate Professor 
Milagros Delgado, Lecturer 
Kenneth G. Furton, Professor and Associate Dean 
Piero R. Gardinali, Associate Professor 
A. Palmer Graves, Lecturer and Coordinator of General 

Chemistry Laboratories 
Arthur W. Herriott, Professor 
Rudolf Jaffe, Professor 
Jeffrey A. Joens, Professor 
Konstantinos Kavallieratos, Assistant Professor 
Leonard S. Keller, Professor, Undergraduate Program 

Director and Coordinator of Organic Chemistry 

Laboratories 
John T. Landrum, Professor 
Watson Lees, Associate Professor 
Fenfei Leng, Assistant Professor 
Ramon Lopez de la Vega, Associate Professor 
Bruce McCord, Associate Professor 
Alexander Mebel, Assistant Professor 
Zaida C. Morales-Martinez, Professor Emeritus 
Kevin E. O'Shea, Professor and Graduate Program 

Director 
J. Martin Quirke, Professor 
Kathleen Rein, Associate Professor 
Alberto Sabucedo, Lecturer 
Xiaotang Wang, Associate Professor 
Stephen Winkle, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Science 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

The B.S. in Chemistry program is approved by the 
American Chemical Society and prepares the student for 
graduate study or a professional career as a chemist in 
industry, in government service, or in secondary school 
teaching. (Students interested in secondary teacher 
certification should contact the College of Education at 
(305)348-2721.) 

Lower Division Preparation 
Common Prerequisites 



CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM1045L General Chemistry Lab I 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Lab 

CHM 221 Organic Chemistry f 

CHM2210L Organic Chemistry I Lab" 

CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry if 

CHM 221 1 L Organic Chemistry II Lab' 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus f 

PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus I Lab' 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus if 

PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus II Lab' 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 



To qualify for acceptance into the upper division, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable to the program. 

Upper Division Program: (60 total hours, 48 
hours must be 3000 level and above) 

The following courses are required: 

At least 37 credits in chemistry to include: 



CHM 3120 


Intro to Analytical Chemistry 


3 


CHM 3120L 


Intro to Analytical Chemistry Lab 


1 


CHM 3410 


Physical Chemistry I 


4 


CHM 341 0L 


Physical Chemistry I Lab 


1 


CHM 3411 


Physical Chemistry II 


4 


CHM 341 1L 


Physical Chemistry II Lab 


2 


CHM 4130 


Instrumental Analysis 


3 


CHM4130L 


Instrumental Analysis Lab 


1 


CHM 4220 


Advanced Organic Chemistry 


3 


CHM 4304 


Biological Chemistry I 


3 


CHM 4230L 


Structure Determination Laboratory 


1 


CHM 4304L 


Biological Chemistry I Lab 


1 


CHM 4610 


Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 


3 


CHM 461 0L 


Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
Laboratory 


1 


CHM 491 0L 


Undergraduate Research in Chemistry 


3 


CHM 4930 


Senior Seminar 


1 



Either the General Physics sequence or the Organic 
Chemistry Sequence must be taken at the lower division. 
Whichever is not taken must be taken before the degree 
is granted. 



One additional senior-level (4000) Chemistry course * 

At least three additional credits to be chosen from the 
following list: 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 

CGS 2423 C for Engineers 3 

MAC 2313 Multivariate Calculus 4 

Students are required to take a nationally-normed 
chemistry examination in their last semester before 
graduation. Exam is given the second Friday in 
November and the second Friday in March. 
*CHM4911L may not be used to satisfy this requirement. 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with 

Honors 

Admission to the Program 

To be a candidate for the honors in chemistry degree a 
student must first: 

1. Be admitted to the BS in Chemistry program with a 
lower division GPA of at least 3.5 in science and math 
courses, and an overall GPA of at least 3.2, 

2. Have completed at least twelve semester hours of 
chemistry courses, 

3. Have arranged to be sponsored by a tenured or 
tenure-earning faculty researcher, and 

4. Submit a letter to the Chemistry Undergraduate 
Committee requesting permission to pursue the 
honors track course of study. 

Note: Any exceptions to these admissions criteria must be 
approved by the Undergraduate Program Director. 

Graduation Requirements 

1. Completion of all requirements for the BS in 
Chemistry with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in science and 
math courses and overall GPA of 3.2. 

2. Completion of an honors research project in 
collaboration with a faculty advisor. The results of the 
research project must be written in the form of an 



1 1 2 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



honors thesis which is written in American Chemical 
Society-style publication format. The student must 
register for Undergraduate Research (CHM4910L) 
and receive a grade of "B" or better. The faculty 
advisor and the departmental Undergraduate 
Research Committee must judge the thesis as 
suitable in style and content for publication in an 
appropriate American Chemical Society journal. 

3. Submission of two completed and approved copies of 
the Honors Thesis must be presented to the 
Chemistry Department office; one copy is to be kept 
in the department, and the second copy is to be 
housed in the University library. 

4. The results of the research project must be presented 
orally to an audience of peers and faculty members 
from all science department honors programs. The 
presentation will be graded by the Undergraduate 
Research Committee, and the student must receive a 
score of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale for his/her 
presentation. 

Bachelor of Arts 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

This program is designed for students preparing for 
careers in medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, environmental 
studies, veterinary medicine, patent law, forensic science, 
secondary science education*. 

The BA in Chemistry program is organized into four 
alternative areas of concentration. Students may choose 
to follow the "Standard BA in Chemistry Concentration" or 
- in consultation with an advisor - choose a specific area 
of emphasis: the Biochemistry Concentration, the 
Environmental Chemistry Concentration, or the Forensic 
Chemistry Concentration. Each of the four options is 
described below. 

'(Students interested in secondary teacher certification 
should contact the College of Education at (305) 348- 
2721.) 

Lower Division Preparation for All Areas of 
Concentration 

Common Prerequisites 



CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry Lab I 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM1046L General Chemistry II Lab 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry f 

CHM 221 0L Organic Chemistry I Lab" 

CHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry if 

CHM 221 1 L Organic Chemistry II Lab* 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus l" 

PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus I Lab' 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus if" 

PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus II Lab" 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 



*Either the General Physics sequence or the Organic 
Chemistry sequence must be taken at the lower division. 
Whichever is not taken must be taken before the degree 
is granted. 

"For the Bachelor of Arts degree, PHY 2053 and PHY 
2054 may be substituted for PHY 2048 and PHY 2049. 

Other Lower Division Courses Required for the 
Degree: 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 3 



BSC1010L General Biology I Lab 1 

To qualify for acceptance into the upper division, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable to the program. 

Upper Division Program: (60 total hours, 48 
hours must be 3000 level and above) 
Upper Division Courses Required for All 
Concentrations 

CHM 3120 Intro to Analytical Chemistry 3 

CHM3120L Intro to Analytical Chemistry Lab 1 

CHM 3400 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry 3 

CHM 3400L Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry 

Lab 1 

CHM 4304 Biological Chemistry I 3 

CHM 4304L Biological Chemistry I Lab 1 

CHM 4930 Senior Seminar 1 

Students are required to take a nationally-normed 
chemistry examination in their last semester before 
graduation. Exam is given the second Friday in 
November and the second Friday in March. 

Specific Courses by Concentration 
Standard BA-Chemistry Concentration 

1 . Choose from List 1 (Cognate Area Courses): Any 
one course* 

*Premed students should choose BSC1011/1011L 

2. Choose from List 2 (Restricted Elective): Any two 
courses, one of which must include its corresponding 
lab. 

3. One senior level chemistry elective: 
(CHM4XXX/CHM5XXX)** 

"CHM4910L or CHM491 1L may not be used to satisfy 
this requirement. 
Biochemistry Concentration 

This concentration is intended for students who desire a 
comprehensive background in chemistry but with 
emphasis in biological chemistry. The curriculum is 
designed to contain all of the courses necessary for entry 
into medical and dental school. 

1. Choose from List 1 (Cognate Area Courses): 
BSC1011/BSC1011L 

2. Choose from List 2 (Restricted Electives): CHM4300 
& CHM4230L or CHM4307 & CHM4307L and one 
other lecture course 

3. One senior level chemistry elective 
(CHM4XXX/CHM5XXX))** which is biomedically 
related. 

"CHM4910L or CHM491 1 L may not be used satisfy this 

requirement. 

Environmental Chemistry Concentration 

This concentration is intended for students who desire a 

comprehensive background in chemistry but with an 

interest in applying their expertise in chemistry to 

environmentally-related careers and issues. 

1. Choose from List 1 (Cognate Area Courses): An 
environmentally-related course 

2. Choose from List 2 (Restricted Electives): 
CHM41 30/41 30L and one other lecture course 

3. One senior level chemistry elective 
(CHM4XXX/CHM5XXX)" which is environmentally- 
related 

"CHM4910L or CHM491 1L may not be used to satisfy 
this requirement. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 1 3 



NOTE: Earn a Certificate in Environmental Studies 

(offered by the Department of Environmental Studies), by 

taking the appropriate environmental studies courses. 

This also satisfies the College's requirement of 9 credits 

outside the major. 

Forensic Chemistry Concentration 

This concentration is intended for students who desire a 

comprehensive background in chemistry but with an 

interest in applying their expertise in chemistry to a career 

in forensic science or criminalistics. 

1. Choose from List 1 (Cognate Area Courses): 
CCJ3024 

2. Choose from List 2 (Restricted Electives): 
CHM41 30/41 30L and one other lecture course 

3. One senior level chemistry elective 
(CHM4XXX/CHM5XXX or CHS4XXX/CHS5XXX)** 
with forensic emphasis. 

"CHM4910L or CHM491 1 L may not be used satisfy this 
requirement. 

List 1 - Cognate Area Courses 

BSC1011 General Biology II 3 

BSC1011L Gen Biology II Lab 1 

CCJ 3024 Overview of Criminal Justice 3 

EVR 301 1 Environmental Resources 3 

EVR3013 Ecology of South Florida 3 

EVR 301 3L Ecology of So Fl Lab 1 

EVR 4211 Water Resources 3 

EVR4211L Water Resources Lab 1 

EVR 4312 Energy Resources 3 

EVR 4321 Air Resources 3 

EVR 4592 Soils & Ecosystems 3 

EVR 4592L Soils & Ecosystems Lab 1 

GLY 3202 Earth Materials 3 

GLY 3202L Earth Materials Lab 2 

GLY 4822 Intro to Hydrogeology 3 

OCE3014 Oceanography 3 
List 2 - Restricted Electives 

CHM 4220 Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 

CHM 4300 Bio-organic Chemistry 3 

CHM 4307 Biological Chemistry II 3 

CHM 3610 Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHM 3411* Physical Chemistry II 4 

CHM 4130 Instrumental Analysis 3 

CHM 4230L Structure Determination Lab 1 

CHM4130L Instrumental Analysis Lab 1 

CHM 4307L Biological Chemistry II Lab 1 

CHM4610L Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 

CHM 341 1 L Physical Chemistry II Lab 2 
*CHM3410 is a prerequisite of CHM341 1 . 

Minor in Chemistry 

The minor in chemistry requires at least 21 credits in 
chemistry to include: 

General Chemistry I & II (CHM 1045, 1045L, and 1046, 
1046L) 8 

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (CHM 3120, 3120L) 4 
Organic Chemistry I & II (CHM 2210, CHM 2210L, CHM 
2211, CHM 221 1L) 9 

At least half of the credits to be counted towards the minor 
must be taken at the University. 

Pre-Medical, Dentistry, Veterinary, 
Optometry Curricula 

Students who have satisfied the requirements for either 
the BA or the BS degree in chemistry will also have 



satisfied the course requirements for admission to 
professional schools in the above areas. The BA in 
Chemistry degree (Biochemistry Concentration) includes 
additional course work relevant to the career objectives of 
the student: Interested students should consult the Pre- 
medical advisor at (305) 348-7289. 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate degree in chemistry 
may also take part in the Cooperative Education Program 
conducted in conjunction with the Department of 
Cooperative Education in the Division of Student Affairs. 
The student spends one or two semesters fully employed 
in an industrial or governmental chemistry laboratory. For 
further information consult the Department of Chemistry or 
the Department of Cooperative Education at (305) 348- 
2423. 

Department Policy 

The Department of Chemistry does not award credit for 
courses by examination; it does, however, award credit for 
AP Chemistry with a score of 3 or higher and with 
evidence of a suitable laboratory experience. The 
department does not award credit for life experience. 

Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be taken prior to the 
corresponding course. Laboratories must be taken 
concurrently where noted. Students must register for the 
laboratory separately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

CHM-Chemistry; CHS-Chemistry-Specialized; ISC- 
Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences; OCC-Oceanography- 
Chemical. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 
Summer semester offering. 

CHM 1025 Fundamentals of Chemistry (2). Introduces 
students to basic mathematics required in chemistry, 
nature of matter, atomic structure, simple chemical 
reactions and stoichiometry. 

CHM 1032 Chemistry and Society (3) CHM 1032L 
Chemistry and Society Lab (1). A course for non-science 
majors which introduces students to basic concepts in 
chemistry and applies those concepts to contemporary 
issues such as air/water pollution, energy and food 
production, drugs, nutrition, and toxic chemicals. 
Prerequisites: One year of high school or college algebra. 
(Lab fees assessed) (F,S,SS) 

CHM 1033 Survey of Chemistry (4). CHM 1033L Survey 
of Chemistry Lab (1) General and organic chemistry for 
non-science majors only. Atoms and molecules, states of 
matter, equilibrium, kinetics, acids and bases and 
introduction to organic chemistry. Laboratory must be 
taken concurrently. Does not fulfill requirements for 
chemistry, biology or pre-med majors. Prerequisites: One 
year of high school or college algebra. (Lab fees 
assessed) (F) 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I (3) CHM 1045L General 
Chemistry Lab I (1). Fundamental principles of general 
chemistry: states of matter, atomic structure, 
stoichiometry, chemical bonding, acid-base reactions, and 
gas laws. Concurrent registration in both lecture and 
laboratory is required. Prerequisites: Second year high 



1 14 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



school algebra or college algebra. (Lab fees assessed) 
(F,S,SS) 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II (3) CHM 1046L General 
Chemistry Lab II (1). Continuation of General Chemistry I 
(CHM 1045). Fundamental principles of chemistry: 
thermo-dynamics, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium and 
electrochemistry. Concurrent registration in both lecture 
and laboratory is required. Prerequisites: CHM 1045 (with 
a "C" or better), CHM 1045L. (Lab fees assessed) 
(F,S,SS) 

CHM 2200 Survey of Organic Chemistry (3) CHM 2200L 
Survey of Organic Chemistry Lab (1). A basic one- 
semester survey course in organic chemistry for non- 
majors presenting a broad background in the reactions 
and structures of organic molecules. Does not fulfill 
requirements for chemistry, biology, or pre-med majors. 
Laboratory must be taken concurrently with the course. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1032, CHM 1032L, CHM 1033, CHM 
1033L, or CHM 1046, CHM 1046L. (Lab fees assessed) 
(S) 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I (4) CHM 221 0L Organic 
Chemistry Lab I (1). An introduction to chemical bonding 
and atomic structure theory as it pertains to the chemistry 
of carbon compounds. Correlation between structure and 
reactivity of organic molecules followed by a systematic 
look at the various reaction types using reaction 
mechanisms as a tool for study. Concurrent registration in 
both lecture and laboratory is required. Prerequisites: 
CHM 1046 (with a "C" or better), CHM 1046L. (Lab fees 
assessed) (F,S,SS) 

CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II (3) CHM 221 1L 
Organic Chemistry Lab II (1). Continuation of CHM 2210, 
221 0L. Concurrent registration in lecture and laboratory is 
required. Prerequisites: CHM 2210 (with a "C" or better), 
2210L. (Lab fees assessed) (F,S,SS) Lecture is co- 
requisite for lab. 

CHM 3120 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (3) 
CHM 3120L Introduction to Analytical Chemistry Lab 
(1). Fundamentals of classical quantitative analysis. 
Topics include theory of precipitation, acid-base and 
oxidation-reduction reactions, as well as an introduction to 
spectrophotometric methods of analysis, ion-exchange 
techniques and complex formation. Laboratory must be 
taken concurrently with the lecture Prerequisites: CHM 
1046, (with a "C" or better) CHM 1046L. (F,S,SS) 

CHM 3400 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry (3). 
CHM 3400L Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry Lab 
(1). Principles of physical chemistry. Topics include 
thermodynamics, equilibria, electrochemistry, and reaction 
kinetics. Laboratory must be taken concurrently with the 
course. Prerequisites: MAC 2311, 2312; PHY 2048, 
2048L PHY 2049, 2049L, or PHY 2053, 2048L, and 2054, 
2049L, CHM 3120, 3120L. (S) 

CHM 3410 Physical Chemistry I (4) CHM 341 0L 
Physical Chemistry Lab I (1). Principles of 
thermodynamics, gas laws, kinetic theory of gases, 
chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and kinetics. 
Laboratory to be taken concurrently with the course. 
Prerequisites: MAC 2311, 2312; PHY 2048, 2048L PHY 
2049, PHY 2049L, and CHM 3120, CHM 3120L. (F) 



CHM 3411 Physical Chemistry II (4). CHM 341 1L 
Physical Chemistry Lab II (2). Introduction to quantum 
mechanics. The Schrodinger equation and its application 
to rotational,- vibrational, and electronic spectroscopy, 
atomic and molecular structure, and bonding. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3410, 3410L (S) 

CHM 3949, CHM 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Chemistry (1-3). One semester of fulltime supervised 
work in an outside laboratory. Limited to students 
admitted to the University Coop Program. A written report 
and supervisor evaluation will be required of each student. 
(F,S) 

CHM 3XXX Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry (3). 

Fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry including 
atomic properties, valence and molecular orbital bonding, 
ionic solids, coordination chemistry and applications. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1046, CHM 1046L, CHM 2211, CHM 
221 1L. 

CHM 4090L Introduction to Scientific Glassblowing 
(1). Basic glassblowing operations with glass tubing and 
rod are taught. Emphasis is on making and repair of 
scientific glassware. No prerequisites. 

CHM 4130 Instrumental Analysis (3) CHM 4130L 
Instrumental Analysis Lab (1). Instrumental methods of 
chemical analysis, including electro-analytical methods, 
gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, x-ray 
fluorescence, and spectrophotometric methods. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3120, 3120L, CHM 2211, 221 1L, 
CHM 3410, PHY 2048, 2048L, PHY 2049, 2049L, or 
permission of the instructor. (S) 

CHM 4220 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3). An 

intensive examination of the major areas of contemporary 
organic chemistry. Reactive intermediates, pericyclic 
reactions, molecular rearrangements, and modem 
synthetic methods are among the topics covered. 
Prerequisites: CHM 2211, 2211 L (F,S) 

CHM 4230L Structure Determination Lab (1). The 

qualitative analysis of organic compounds using modem 
spectroscopic, chromatographic and chemical methods. 
Prerequisites: CHM 2211, and 221 1L. (F.S.SS) 

CHM 4300 Bio-Organic Chemistry (3). Chemistry of 
naturally-occurring organic compounds of biological 
importance. The relationship between organic chemistry 
and the chemical reactions which constitute the living 
organism. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, and 221 1L. 

CHM 4304 Biological Chemistry I (3). CHM 4304L 
Biological Chemistry I Lab (1). Structures and functions 
of nucleic acids and proteins and cellular processes such 
as metabolism, replication and transcription are examined 
from a chemistry perspective. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, 
CHM 3120, BSC 1011 or permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: A semester of physical chemistry. Lecture is 
corequisite for lab. (F,S) 

CHM 4307 Biological Chemistry II (3). Continuation of 
Biological Chemistry I (CHM 4304). Further exploration of 
bioorganic reaction mechanisms. Chemistry DNA 
synthesis and repair. Chemistry of information transfer. 
Reactions of drugs. Prerequisite: Biological Chemistry I 
(CHM 4304). (S) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 1 5 



CHM 4320L Research Techniques in Organic 
Chemistry (2). Practical instruction in the more advanced 
manipulations and procedures of the modern chemistry 
laboratory. Restricted to B.S. chemistry majors. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 2211, CHM 221 1L, CHM 

3410, and CHM 3411 L. 

CHM 4321 Protein Chemistry (3). Structures of proteins 
and how they are determined. Protein-small molecule, 
protein-protein, protein-DNA, protein membrane 
interactions and their functions. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, 
BSC 1011, a biochemistry course or permission of the 
instructor. Corequisites: CHM 3410 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 4610 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3). Atomic 
structure, periodicity, bonding and structure of inorganic 
compounds, solution chemistry, ligand field theory, 
organometallic chemistry, and specific chemistry of the 
elements. Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 2211, and CHM 

3411. (F) 

CHM 461 0L Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab (1). 

Synthesis, purification, and study of coordination and 
organometallic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 3411. 
Corequisite: CHM 4610. (F) 

CHM 491 0L Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (3). 

The student works directly with a professor on a research 
project. Credit is assigned based on 4 hr/wk 
laboratory/library work per credit hour. A written report is 
required. Report must be submitted to the Undergraduate 
Research Committee for approval. For additional credits 
of undergraduate research student must register for CHM 
4911L. (F,S,SS) 

CHM 491 1L Undergraduate Research 2 (1-20). Faculty 
directed research in chemistry. Credit is assigned based 
on 4 hr/wk laboratory/library work per credit hour. May be 
repeated. Prerequisite: CHM 491 0L. (F,S,SS) 

CHM 4930 Senior Seminar (1). Each student will make 
an oral presentation to faculty and other students enrolled 
in the seminar course. The subject of the seminar may be 
either a report of results of an independent study project 
or a survey of the recent literature on an assigned topic. 
(F,S) 

CHM 4931 Special Topics (3). Covers selected topics in 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

CHM 4933 Special Topics (3). Covers selected topics in 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

CHM 4934 Special Topics (3). Covers selected topics in 
chemistry. Permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5138 Advanced Mass Spectrometry (3). Intensive 
examination of the processes and techniques involved in 
creating, controlling and measuring ionic species by mass 
spectrometry. Theory of mass spectrometry, methods of 
ionization, instrumental designs, quantitative mass 
spectrometry, meta-stable ions, and tandem mass 
spectrometry. Prerequisites: CHM 4130, CHM 4130L or 
permission of Instructor. 

CHM 5139C Mass Spectrometry Workshop (2). Basic 
description of processes and techniques involved in 
creating, controlling and measuring elemental or 
molecular ionic species by mass spectrometry techniques. 



WS designed to provide hands on experience. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4130. 

CHM 5150 Graduate Analytical Methods (3). Analysis of 
analytical data, electrochemistry, spectro-analytical 
techniques, chromatography, survey of new analytical 
methods. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. (S) 

CHM 5156 Advanced Chromatography (3). Intensive 
examination of the contemporary practice of 
chromatography including available chromatographic 
techniques, their selection and application. Prerequisites: 
CHM 4130 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5165 Chemometrics and Sampling (3). Methods of 
evaluating analytical chemistry data. Planning sampling 
design for water, air and solids. Sample preparation and 
extraction techniques. Prerequisite: CHM 4130. 

CHM 5181 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry 
(VAR). An intensive examination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. Prerequisites: CHM 
4130 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5225 Graduate Organic Chemistry (3). Advanced 
topics in organic chemistry. Structure of organic 
molecules, reaction mechanisms, organic synthesis, and 
natural product chemistry. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instructor. (F) 

CHM 5236 Spectroscopic Techniques and Structures 
Elucidation (3). Advanced techniques for the 
spectroscopic identification of organic compounds. 
Interpretation of spectral information for determination of 
structures of various classes of organic compounds. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4220 and CHM 4230L. 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis (3). Use of classical and 
modern reactions in the design and construction of 
complex organic molecules including natural products. 
Some topics covered will be construction reactions, 
refunctionalization, stereochemistry and conformational 
analysis. Prerequisites: CHM 4220 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5251 Organometallic Chemistry (3). Fundamentals 
and applications of organometallic chemistry. Structures 
and bonding, ligand types, organometallic reactions, 
physical methods of characterization. Prerequisites: CHM 
4610, CHM 3411. 

CHM 5252 Asymmetric Synthesis (3). Recent advances 
in asymmetric synthesis for the selective design and 
construction of tetrahedral stereo-centers. Focus on 
principles of configuration in transition state assemblies. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4220. 

CHM 5260 Physical Organic Chemistry (3). A series of 
topics will be discussed including molecular orbital theory 
as it pertains to organic molecules, kinetic and 
thermodynamic approaches to the study of reaction 
mechanisms, quantitative approaches to conformational 
analysis, etc. Prerequisites: CHM 4220 and physical 
chemistry or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5280 Natural Products Chemistry and 
Biosynthesis (3). Studies of the chemical origins 
(biosynthesis), properties, and synthesis of the various 
classes of naturally occurring compounds: terpenes, 



1 16 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



steroids, alkaloids, and acetogenins. Prerequisites: CHM 
4220 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5302 Organic Chemistry of Nucleic Acids (3). 

Organic chemistry of ribose sugars, nucleoside hetero- 
cyclic bases, mechanism-based inhibitors of enzymes 
involve in nucleic acid metabolism, and chemical 
synthesis of DNA. Prerequisites: CHM 4220 or permission 
of the instructor. 

CHM 5305 Graduate Biological Chemistry (3). 

Structures of biological molecules; Biochemical reaction 
mechanisms; Enzyme kinetics; Biomolecular 
thermodynamics; Biomolecular spectroscopy. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5306 Special Topics in Biological Chemistry (3). 

Investigation of one or more areas of biologically related 
chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 4304 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5325 Physical Chemistry of Proteins (3). Protein 
structures, dynamics and functions. Use of spectroscopic 
methods. Thermodynamics of protein folding and ligand 
binding. Enzyme Kinetics. Prerequisites: Biological 
Chemistry and Physical Chemistry or permission of 
instructor. 

CHM 5351 Computer Modeling of Biological Molecules 
(3). Introduces use of computers in studying biological 
macromolecules. Simulations, visualization methods, 
software, databases. Prerequisite: CHM 3411, 
Biochemistry recommended. 

CHM 5380 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (VAR). 

An intensive examination of one or more areas selected 
by instructor and students. Prerequisites: CHM 4220 and 
physical chemistry or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5423 Atmospheric Chemistry (3). Chemical 
processes in atmospheres. Photochemistry, chemical 
kinetics, tropospheric and stratospheric chemical 
reactions, anthropogenic effects on the earth's 
atmosphere and chemistry of planetary atmospheres. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3410, CHM 341 1 , or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5425 Graduate Physical Chemistry (4). 

Prequantum physics, the Schrodinger equation and its 
solutions, atoms and molecules, rotational, vibrational, 
and electronic spectroscopy. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5426 Graduate Physical Chemistry II (4). Gas 
laws; thermodynamics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, 
and chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis (3). Theory of 
elementary reactions, activated complex theory, 
mechanisms of complex reactions. Prerequisites: CHM 
3411, MAP 2302. 

CHM 5490 Physical Spectroscopy (3). Introduction to 
atomic and molecular quantum states, selection rules, 
and fundamental principles of spectroscopy. Introduction 
to group theory and to the theory of UV/visible, infrared, 
Raman, microwave, NMR, photoelectron, and mass 
spectroscopies, and the applications of these methods to 
the determination of fundamental physical properties and 



the structure of organic and inorganic molecules. 
Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry. 

CHM 5490L Physical Spectroscopy Lab (1). The theory 
of spectroscopy and the use of modern instrumentation to 
investigate molecular structure. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, 
221 1L. Corequisites: PHY 4604 or CHM 5490. 

CHM 5503 Physical Chemistry of Nucleic Acids (3). 

Physical chemistry of nucleic acids including 
spectroscopic determination of structures of DNAs, RNAs, 
and DNA-protein complexes and thermodynamic and 
kinetic studies of nucleic acid-ligand complexes and 
nucleic acid structures. Prerequisites: CHM 4304 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry (3). Physical 
properties of bio-molecules, molecular conformation; 
thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic properties of 
biomolecules. Prerequisites: CHM 4304 or permission of 
the instructor. 

CHM 5517 Solid State (3). Crystalline form of solids, 
lattice dynamics, metals, insulators, semiconductors, and 
dielectric materials. Prerequisites: CHM 5490 or PHY 
4604. 

CHM 5540 Group Theory In Chemistry (3). The 

fundamental Theory is developed with emphasis given to 
Representations. Specific applications covered, with 
emphasis on molecular orbital theory and spectroscopy. 
Prerequisite: CHM 3411. 

CHM 5581 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry 
(VAR). An intensive examination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. Prerequisites: CHM 
341 1 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5586 Computational Chemistry (3). Surveys 
computational methods for studying issues pertinent to 
organic and biological chemistry. Emphasis on 
developing an understanding of principles and putting 
methods to use. Includes methods for studying reaction 
thermodynamics, reaction mechanisms and NMR spectral 
properties. Prerequisites: CHM 3410, CHM 3411. 

CHM 5650 Physical Inorganic Chemistry (3). 

Introduction to use of physical methods to determine the 
structure of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM 
4610 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5681 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry 
(VAR). An intensive examination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. Prerequisites: CHM 
4610 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5765 Aquatic Chemistry (3). Redox chemistry, 
chemistry of sediments, organic biogeochemistry, 
chemodynamics, and fates or organic pollutants in 
aqueous environments. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, CHM 
4130, or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5931 Special Topics (3). A course covering 
selected special topics in chemistry. 

CHM 5936 Special Topics in Environmental Chemistry 
(3). An intensive examination of one or more areas 
selected by the instructor and students. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

CHS 3501 Survey of Forensic Science (3). A survey 
course introducing the principles and techniques of 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 117 



forensic science as they pertain to crime scene 
investigation and crime laboratory analysis. 

CHS 351 OC Forensic Evidence (3). Introduces forensic 
science students to important aspects of the analysis of 
physical evidence including crime scene investigation 
techniques, professional practice and ethics, introduction 
to the law, and quality assurance. Prerequisites: CHM 
1045, CHM 1045L, CHM 1046, CHM 1046L, CHM 2210, 
CHM 2210L, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L, CHM 3120, CHM 
3120L, or permission of instructor. 

CHS 4100 Radiochemistry (2) CHS 4100L 
Radiochemical Techniques Lab (2). Production, 
isolation, methods of detection, counting statistics and 
estimation of radioisotopes. Applications to chemical, 
physical and biological problems. Laboratory must be 
taken concurrently with the course. Prerequisites: CHM 
.1045, 1046, 3120, 3120L; MAC 3411, 3412. 

CHS 4503C Forensic Science (3). Modern instrumental 
methods of chemical analysis and their use in the 
administration of justice. Prerequisites: CHM 3120 and 
CHM 2211 or permission of the instructor. Corequisites: a 
semester of physical chemistry or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHS 4503L Forensic Science Lab (1). Laboratory to 
accompany Forensic Science, CHS 4503C. Prerequisites: 
CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L or 
permission of the instructor. 

CHS 4533C Forensic Biochemistry Applications (3). 

Forensic applications of Biochemistry including metabolite 
analysis, DNA analysis and other laboratory methods and 
data interpretation. Prerequisites: BSC 1010, CHM 2211, 
CHM 4304, or BCH 3033. 

CHS 4591 Forensic Science Internship (3). Internship in 
a forensic-science laboratory, contributing in a specific 
manner on an assigned problem. Twenty hrs/wk. Written 
report required. Open only to students in the Criminalistics 
Chemistry Program. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

CHS 5502 Forensic Chemistry for Teachers (3). 
Incorporates concepts and techniques from the 
application of analytical chemistry, molecular biology, 
biochemistry, toxicology, and microscopy to forensic 
casework. Exposure to teaching resources in these areas 
and case study format of presentation. Open to education 
majors only. Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 
2211, and CHM 2211L or permission of instructor. 

CHS 5531 Forensic Analysis (3). An introduction to 
established chemical analysis techniques used in forensic 
science and new techniques under development. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 2211, CHM 
221 1L or permission of the instructor. 

CHS 5531 L Forensic Analysis Lab (1). Laboratory to 
accompany Forensic Analysis CHS 5531. Prerequisites: 
CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 2211, CHM 2211L or 
permission of the instructor. 

CHS 5536 Forensic DNA Chemistry (3). Chemical basis 
for current methodologies of DNA analysis. DNA 
sequencing, PCR, STR, AFLP, mass spectrometry. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4304 or permission of instructor. 

CHS 5538C Chemistry and Analysis of Drugs (3). 

Introduction to the chemistry of drugs of abuse, including 



reactivity, synthesis and the principles of analysis from 
solid doses and from body fluids. Laboratory analysis 
through the determination of unknown samples. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4130, CHM 4130L, CHM 4304, CHM 
4304L. 

CHS 5539 Forensic Toxicology (3). Provides the basic 
concepts of forensic toxicology as it applies to drug and 
body fluid analysis. Prerequisites: CHM 221 1+L, CHM 
3120+L, CHM 4304+L (BCH 3033+L) or permission of 
instructor. 

CHS 5542 Forensic Chemistry (3). Advanced Analytical 
methods in Forensic Chemistry for application to the 
analysis of controlled substances, materials (i.e., paint, 
glass, and fibers), flammable and explosives residues with 
an emphasis on new methods and method development. 

CHS 5545 Chemistry and Analysis of Explosives (3). 

Chemistry and reactivity, including thermochemistry, of 
modern industrial and military explosives with an 
emphasis on the analysis of explosives residues from 
post-blast debris and from samples of environmental 
interest. Prerequisites: CHM 4130, CHM 4130L. 

CHS 5XXXC Forensic Glass Examination (2). Forensic 
glass examinations and comparison including lectures 
and hands-on laboratory exercises in a workshop format. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4130 and CHM 4130L. 

CHS 5XXXC Forensic Paint Examinations (2). Forensic 
paint examinations and comparison including lectures and 
hands-on laboratory exercises in a workshop format. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4130 and CHM 4130L. 

CHS 5XXXC Forensic Textile Fiber Examinations (2). 

Forensic textile fiber examinations and comparison 
including lectures and hands-on laboratory exercises in a 
workshop format. Prerequisites: CHM 4130 and CHM 
4130L. 

ISC 4041 Scientific Literature (1). This course presents 
a perspective on the scientific literature and scientific 
documentation. Problems in using and searching the 
scientific literature will be specifically designed to meet the 
needs of various disciplines, e.g. chemistry, 
environmental science, physics, biology. Prerequisites: 16 
semester hours of science. 



1 1 8 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



School of Computer Science 

Yi Deng, Professor and Director 

Masoud Milani, Associate Professor and Associate 

Director 
Walid Akache, Instructor 
David Barton, Professor 
Toby S. Berk, Professor Emeritus 
Shu-Ching Chen, Associate Professor 
Peter Clarke, Assistant Professor 
Timothy Downey, Instructor 
Raimund Ege, Associate Professor and Graduate 

Program Director 
Mbola Fanomezantsoa, Instructor 
Xudong He, Professor 
Vagelis Hristidis, Assistant Professor 
Kip Irvine, Instructor 
Bill Kraynek, Associate Professor 
Tao Li, Assistant Professor 
Giri Narasimhan, Professor 
Jainendra K. Navlakha, Professor 
Ana Pasztor, Professor 
Alexander Pelin, Associate Professor 
Norman Pestaina, Instructor 
Nagarahan Prabakar, Associate Professor 
Raju Rangaswami, Assistant Professor 
Naphtali Rishe, Professor 
Masoud Sadjadi, Assistant Professor 
Gregory Shaw, Instructor 
Geoffrey Smith, Associate Professor 
Joslyn Smith, Instructor 
Wei Sun, Associate Professor 
Jill Weiss, Instructor 
Mark A. Weiss, Professor 
Chi Zang, Assistant Professor 

The Bachelor of Science program in Computer Science is 
accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission 
(ABET), 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 
21202-4012 - Telephone (410) 347-7700. 

The School of Computer Science offers both 
undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The major 
program and a minor program, are described below. 

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

As part of the 60 semester hours of lower division 
course work necessary to enter this upper division major, 
note the following recommendations or course 
requirements, or both. 

Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

COP 2210 Computer Programming I 

MAC 231 1 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 

PHY 2048L General Physics Lab I 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 



PHY 2049L General Physics Lab II 

Two additional one-semester courses in natural science; 
each of these should be a course designed for science or 
engineering majors. A list of additional approved courses 
is available through the School of Computer Science. 

Upper Division Requirements 

Two tracks are available in the upper division program. 
The Computer Science track should be followed by the 
student who intends to continue to graduate study in 
computer science. The Software Design and 
Development track may be followed by the student who 
intends to pursue a software engineering career. 

Courses Required for the Degree: (both tracks) 

Third and 

MAD 2104 
COM 3110 



Fourth Years 

Discrete Mathematics 

Business and Professional 

Communication 
ENC 321 1 Report and Technical Writing 

COT 3420 Logic for Computer Science 

MAD 3512 Introduction to Theory of Algorithms 

STA 3033 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 

forCS 
CGS 3092 Professional Ethics & Social Issues in 

Computer Science 
COP 3337 Computer Programming II 

COP 4338 Computer Programming III 

COP 3402 Fundamentals of Computer Systems 

COP 3530 Data Structures 

COP 4555 Survey of Programming Languages 

COP 4540 Database Management 

CDA 4101 Structured Computer Organization 

CEN 4010 Software Engineering I 

COP 4610 Operating Systems Principles 



Additional required courses for SDD track 

CEN 4015 Software Design and Development 

Project 3 

CEN 4021 Software Engineering II 3 

Computer Science Electives 

Students from both tracks must complete two 

courses form Set 1 . 

In addition, CS-track students must complete one 

course from Set 2. 

Set1. 

COP 4009 
CIS 4363 
COP 4225 
COP 4226 
CEN 4500 
CDA .4400 
CAP 4710 
*CEN 4021 
Set 2. 
MAD 3305 
MAD 3401 
MAD 4203 
MHF 4302 



Windows Components Technology 
Computing and Network Security 
Advanced Unix Programming 
Advanced Windows Programming 
Data Communications 
Computer Hardware Analysis 
Principles of Computer Graphics 
Software Engineering II 



Graph Theory 
Numerical Analysis 
Introduction to Combinatorics 
Mathematical Logic 
*CS-track students only 

NOTE: Graduate courses can also be used to satisfy 
elective requirements. Please see advisor for approval. 
Graduate courses are subject to graduate fees. 
At least 50% of the upper division credits taught by the 
School must be taken at the University. All required and 



Undergraduate College 



College of Arts and Sciences 119 



elective courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or 
better. 

Remarks: The following courses are not acceptable for 
credit toward graduation, unless a student has passed the 
course before declaring a Computer Science major: CGS 
2060, CGS 3300, CGS 2100, COP 3175, MAC 2233, STA 
1013, STA 2023, STA 2122, STA 3123, QMB 3200, ESI 
3161. 

Bachelor of Science in Information 

Technology 

The School of Computer Science offers a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Information Technology. As part of this 
program students must minor in another discipline. 

Degree Requirements 

Information Technology BS degree as a first major 
requires completion of prerequisite courses and 60 credit 
hours (20 courses) of required and elective courses as 
outlined below. At least 50% of the upper division credits 
taught by the School must be taken at the University. All 
courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. 

Prerequisites: 

All students must have completed the following courses 

(or equivalent) prior to starting the Information Technology 

program. 

CGS 2060 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

or 
CGS 2100 Introduction to Microcomputer 

Applications for Business 3 

COP 2250 Programming in Java 3 

MAD 1 100 Mathematics Concepts for Information 

Technology 3 

PSY 2020 Introductory Psychology or equivalent 3 

MAC 2147 Pre-calculus Mathematics 3 

CGS 3092 Professional Ethics and Social Issues in 

Computer Science 1 

Minor in another Discipline 

All students must complete a minor in another discipline 
(15) credits. Computer Science and Computer 
Engineering are not accepted as the minor for the 
other academic discipline. 

Courses Required for the Degree: 

All students must complete the following courses. 

CGS 3260 Microcomputer Organization 3 

CGS 3760 Computer Operating Systems 3 

CGS 4283 Applied Computer Networking 3 

CGS 4825 Web Site Construction and 

Management 3 

CGS 4366 Information Storage and Retrieval 3 

COP 3804 Intermediate Java 3 

ENC 321 1 Report & Technical Writing 3 

Information Technology Electives: 

All students must select two areas of concentration. 
Students must take two courses in each of the selected 
concentration areas (4 courses). The fifth course might 
be selected from any available area of concentration. The 
following areas of concentration are available: 
System Administration 
Applied Network Administration 
Application Development 
Databases 



Free Electives 

All students must complete 3 additional elective courses 
(9 credits). 

Bachelor of Arts in Information Technology 

The School of Computer Science offers a Bachelor of Arts 
degree in Information Technology as a second major or 
as a second Bachelor Degree. This program is open to 
those students who are enrolled in and will be completing 
another bachelor degree program or those who already 
have a bachelor degree from an accredited institution. 
Computer Science and Computer Engineering are not 
accepted as the primary major at this time. 

Degree Requirements 

Information Technology BS degree as a second major 
requires completion of prerequisite courses and 30 credit 
hours (10 courses) of required and elective courses as 
outlined below. At least 50% of the upper division credits 
taught by the School must be taken at the University. All 
courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. 

Prerequisites: 

All students must have completed the following courses 

(or equivalent) prior to starting the Information Technology 

program. 

CGS 2060 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

or 
CGS 2100 Introduction to Microcomputer 

Applications for Business 3 

COP 2250 Programming in Java 3 

CGS 3559 Using the Internet 1 

MAD 1 1 00 Mathematics Concepts for Information 

Technology 3 

Courses Required for the Degree: 

All students must complete the following courses (18 

credits). 

COP 3804 Intermediate Java 3 

CGS 3260 Microcomputer Organization 3 

CGS 3760 Computer Operating Systems 3 

CGS 4283 Applied Computer Networking 3 

CGS 4825 Web Site Construction and 

Management 3 

CGS 4366 Information Storage and Retrieval 3 

Information Technology Electives: 

All students must complete 2 courses (6 credits) from the 

following list. 

CGS 4365 Knowledge-Based Management 

Systems 3 

COP 3344 Introduction to Using Unix/Linux 

Systems 3 

COP 4005 Windows Programming for IT Majors 3 

COP 4009 Windows Components Technology 3 

COP 4723 Database Administration 3 

COP 4343 Unix System Administration 3 

Cognate Electives: 

All students must complete 2 additional elective courses 
(6 credits). Students who are completing their major 
concurrent with their IT degree must choose their cognate 
elective courses from a list of designated courses from the 
department of their primary major. Students who have 
received their first Bachelor Degree prior to enrolling in 
the IT program must instead choose an additional two 
courses from the list of IT elective courses. 



120 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Minor in Computer Science 

Required Courses 

COP 2210 Computer Programming I 4 

COP 3402 Fundamentals of Computer Systems 3 

COP 3337 Computer Programming II 3 

Plus two from the following list: COP 3175, COP 4338, 
COP 3530, COP 3832, COP 4555, CDA 4101, CDA 4400, 
CEN 4500, CAP 4710, and MAD 3401. Normally the 
students from Engineering would choose COP 4338, and 
either COP 3530 or CDA 4101 and students from the 
College of Business would choose COP 3175 and one 
other. If one of the other options is selected, then the 
student should verify that he or she has the additional 
prerequisites necessary for the chosen course. At least 
nine of the 15 credits must be taken at FIU. 

Course Description 

Definition of Prefixes 

CAP-Computer Applications; CDA-Computer 
Design/Architecture; CIS-Computer Information Systems; 
CGS-Computer General Studies; COC-Computer 
Concepts; COP-Computer Programming; COT-Computing 
Theory. 

CAP 4710 Principles of Computer Graphics (3). A first 
course in algorithms/techniques for image generation 
devices, geometric transformations/matrics, algorithms for 
hidden surfaces, ray tracing, advanced rendering. 
Programming with standard graphics interface. 
Prerequisites: COP 3337 and MAC 2312. This course will 
have additional fees. 

CAP 551 0C Introduction to Bioinformatics (3). 

Introduction to bioinformatics; algorithmic, analytical and 
predictive tools and techniques; programming and 
visualization tools; machine learning; pattern discovery; 
analysis of sequence alignments, phylogeny data, gene 
expression data, and protein structure. Prerequisites: 
COP 3530, or equivalent and STA 3033 or equivalent. 

CAP 5602 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3). 

Presents the basic concepts of Al and their applications to 
game playing, problem solving, automated reasoning, 
natural language processing and expert systems. 
Prerequisite: COP 3530. This course will have additional 
fees. 

CAP 5701 Advanced Computer Graphics (3). Advanced 
topics in computer graphics: system architecture, 
interactive techniques, image synthesis, current research 
areas. Prerequisites: COP 3530 and CAP 3710 or 
equivalent, or by permission. This course will have 
additional fees. 

CDA 4101 Structured Computer Organization (3). 

Covers the levels of organization in a computer: Design of 
memory, buses, ALU, CPU; design of microprogram. 
Covers virtual memory, I/O, multiple processes, CISC, 
RISC and parallel architectures. Prerequisites: MAD 2104, 
COP 3402 and COP 3337. This course will have 
additional fees. 

CDA 4400 Computer Hardware Analysis (3). The study 
of hardware functions of a basic computer. Topics include 
logic elements, arithmetic logic units, control units, 
memory devices, organization and I/O devices. 
Prerequisite: CDA 4101 . 



CEN 2300 Microsoft Windows NT Administration (3). A 

two-part course covering introduction to Networking and 
the Windows NT Operating System. This course will cover 
material that is covered on the Microsoft Certified systems 
Engineer (MCSE) exam. Prerequisites: CGS 2060, or 
CGS 2100, or equivalent. This course will have additional 
fees. 

CEN 4010 Software Engineering I (3). Software Process 
Model, software analysis and specification, software 
design, testing. Prerequisite: COP 3530. This course will 
have additional fees. 

CEN 4015 Software Design and Development Project 
(3). Students design, implement, document, and test 
software systems working in faculty supervised project 
teams and utilizing knowledge obtained in previous 
courses. Required for Software Design and Development 
track. Prerequisite: CEN 4010. This course will have 
additional fees. 

CEN 4021 Software Engineering II (3). Issues underlying 
the successful development of large scale software 
projects: Software Architectures; Software Planning, and 
Management; Team Structures; Cost Estimation. 
Prerequisite: CEN 4010. This course will have additional 
fees. 

CEN 4500 Data Communications (3). Study Computer 
network models and protocol layers. Topics include: error 
handling, frames, broadcast networks, channel allocation; 
network routing algorithms, internetworking, TCP/IP, ATM 
protocols. Prerequisite: CDA 4101. 

CEN 5011 Advanced Software Engineering (3). This 
course deals with the design of large scale computer 
programs. Included are topics dealing with planning 
design, implementation, validation, metrics, and the 
management of such software projects. Prerequisite: CEN 
4010. This course will have additional fees. 

CEN 5064 Software Design (3). Study of object-oriented 
analysis and design of software systems based on the 
standard design language UML; case studies. 
Prerequisite: CEN 501 1 - Software Engineering. 

CEN 5076 Software Testing (3). Tools and techniques to 
validate software process artifacts: model validation, 
software metrics, implementation-based testing, 
specification-based testing, integration and systems 
testing. Prerequisites: CEN 4010 or CEN 5011. 

CEN 5120 Expert Systems (3). Introduction to expert 
systems, knowledge representation techniques and 
construction of expert systems. A project such as the 
implementation of an expert system in a high level Al- 
language is required. Prerequisite: COP 3530 or 
permission of the instructor. This course will have 
additional fees. 

CGS 2060 Introduction to Microcomputers (3). A 

hands-on study of microcomputer software packages for 
applications such as operating system, word processing, 
spreadsheets, and database management. For students 
without a technical background. Not acceptable for credit 
for Computer Science majors. 

CGS 2100 Intro to Microcomputer Applications for 
Business (3). A hands-on study of spreadsheet and 
database management package for business students 



Undergraduate College 



College of Arts and Sciences 121 



without a technical background. Not acceptable for credit 
for Computer Science majors. 

CGS 2423 C for Engineers (3). A first course in 
programming geared for engineering and natural science 
students that describes the syntax and semantics of ANSI 
C programming language. Includes developing algorithms 
and writing for problems in engineering and science. 

CGS 2518 Computer Data Analysis (3). A hands-on 
study of how to use a modern spreadsheet program to 
analyze data, including how to perform queries, 
summarize data, and solve equations. For non-technical 
students. Not acceptable for CS students. 

CGS 3092 Professional Ethics and Social Issues in 
Computer Science (1). Ethical, legal, social issues and 
the responsibility of computer professionals. Codes of 
conduct, risks and reliability, responsibility, liability, 
privacy, security, free speech issues. Prerequisite: COP 
3337. 

CGS 3260 Microcomputer Organization (3). A study of 
the hardware components of modern microcomputers and 
their organization. Evaluation and comparison of the 
various microcomputer systems. Not acceptable for credit 
for Computer Science Majors. Prerequisite: COP 2250. 
This course will have additional fees. 

CGS 3425 Web-based Programming (3). A 

programming course in Java with emphasis on web-based 
applications: Applets; Components; Servlets; Java Beans. 
Not acceptable for credit for Computer Science majors. 
Prerequisites: COP 2250 and MAD 1100. This course will 
have additional fees. 

CGS 3559 Using the Internet (1). Internet history and 
importance. What is available on the Net. Tools such as 
email, listserves, telnet, ftp, Archie, Veronica, Gopher, 
netfind, the World Wide Web, Wais, and Mosaic. 
Nontechnical. Prerequisite: CGS 2060 or equivalent. 

CGS 3760 Computer Operating Systems (3). 

Introduction to fundamental concepts of operating 
systems and their implementation in UNIX, Windows NT 
and Windows 95/98. Not acceptable for credit for 
Computer Science majors. Prerequisite: COP 2250. This 
course will have additional fees. 

CGS 4283 Applied Computer Network (3). Principles of 
computer network design, operation and management. 
Network protocols. Network configuration. Network 
security. Not acceptable for credit for Computer Science 
majors. Prerequisite: CGS 3760. This course will have 
additional fees. 

CGS 4365 Knowledge-Based Management Systems 
(3). Introduction to knowledge-based and expert systems. 
Knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, and 
creation of expert system. Not acceptable for credit for 
Computer Science majors. Prerequisite: CGS 4366. This 
course will have additional fees. 

CGS 4366 Information Storage and Retrieval Concepts 
(3). Introduction to information management and retrieval 
concepts. The design and implementation of a relational 
database using a commercial DBMS. Online information 
retrieval and manipulation. Not acceptable for credit for 
Computer Science majors. Prerequisites: CGS 4825 and 
CGS 3425. This course will have additional fees. 



CGS 4825 Website Construction and Management (3). 

The fundamentals of creating and maintaining a website. 
Installation and maintenance of a web-server. 
Techniques for building multimedia interactive web-pages. 
Not acceptable for credit for Computer Science majors. 
Prerequisites: CGS 3559 and COP 2250. This course will 
have additional fees. 

CGS 5166 Introduction to Bioinformatics Tools (2). 

Introduction to bioinformatics; analytical and predictive 
tools; practical use of tools for sequence alignments, 
phytogeny, visualizations, patterns discovery, gene 
expression analysis, and protein structure. Prerequisite: 
PCB 6025 or equivalent. 

CIS 3900 Independent Study (1-5). Individual 
conferences, assigned readings, and reports on 
independent investigations. 

CIS 3930 Special Topics (1-5). A course designed to 
give groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. 

CIS 4363 Computing and Network Security (3). 

Technical study of issues and solutions for computer and 
network security and privacy. The security problem, 
encryption and decryption, public key encryption, 
authentication, operating system security, program 
security. Prerequisites: CDA4101 and COP 3337. 

CIS 4905 Independent Study (1-20). Individual 
conferences, assigned readings, and reports on 
independent investigations. 

CIS 4930 Special Topics (1-3). A course designed to 
give groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. 

CIS 5900 Independent Study (1-10). Individual 
conferences, assigned readings, and reports on 
independent investigations. 

CIS 5910 Project Research (1-6). Advanced 
undergraduate or master's level research for particular 
projects. Repeatable. Prerequisite; Permission of 
Department. 

CIS 5931 Special Topics (1-3). A course designed to 
give groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. 

COP 2210 Computer Programming I (4). A first course 
in computer science that uses a structured programming 
language to study programming and problem solving on 
the computer. Includes the design, construction and 
analysis of programs. Student participation in a closed 
instructional lab is required. This course will have 
additional fees. 

COP 2250 Programming in Java (3). A first course in 
programming for IT majors. Syntax and semantics of 
Java. Classes and Objects. Object oriented program 
development. Not acceptable for credit for Computer 
Science majors. This course will have additional fees. 

COP 3175 Programming in Visual Basic (3). An 

introduction to Visual Basic programming with emphasis 
on Business Applications. Not acceptable for credit for 
Computer Science majors. Prerequisites: CGS 2100 or 
CGS 2060. This course will have additional fees. 



122 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



COP 3337 Computer Programming II (3). An 

intermediate level course in Object Oriented 
programming. Topics include primitive types, control 
structures, strings arrays, objects and classes, data 
abstraction inheritance polymorphism and an introduction 
to data structures. Prerequisites: MAD 2104 Discrete 
Mathematics and COP 2210 Programming I. This course 
will have additional fees. 

COP 3344 Introduction to Using Unix/Linux Systems 
(3). Techniques of Unix/Linux systems. Basic use, file 
system structure, process system structure, unix tools 
(regular expressions, grep, find), simple and complex 
shell scripts, Xwindows. Not acceptable for credit for 
Computer Science majors. Prerequisites: COP 2210 or 
CGS 2423 or equivalent. This course will have additional 
fees. 

COP 3402 Fundamentals of Computer Systems (3). 

Overview of computer systems organization. Data 
representation. Machine and assembly language 
programming. Prerequisites: COP 2210 or equivalent. 
This course will have additional fees. 

COP 3465 Data Structures for IT (3). Basic concepts of 
running time of a program, data structures including lists, 
stacks, queues, binary search trees, and hash tables, and 
internal sorting. Not acceptable for credit for CS majors. 
Prerequisite: Programming II (IT). This course will have 
additional fees. 

COP 3530 Data Structures (3). Basic concepts of data 
organization, running time of a program, abstract types, 
data structures including linked lists, nary trees, sets and 
graphs, internal sorting. Prerequisites: MAD 2104 and 
COP 3337. This course will have additional fees. 

COP 3804 Intermediate Java Programming (3). A 

second course in Java programming. Continues 
Programming in Java by discussing object-oriented 
programming in a more detail, with larger programming 
projects and emphasis on inheritance. Not acceptable for 
credit for CS majors. Prerequisite: COP 2250. This 
course will have additional fees. 

COP 3832 Advanced Web Server Communication (3). 

Maintain a web server on the Internet. Learn HTML, 
PERL, Javascript. Configure the Apache web server. 
Write interactive server scripts. Discuss Web security & 
ASP. Use Java applets and ActiveX controls. 
Prerequisites: CGS 3559, COP 2210 or equivalents. This 
course will have additional fees. 

COP 3835 Designing Web Pages (3). Designing basic 
pages for display on the World Wide Web. Fundamental 
design elements and contemporary design tools are 
discussed. Prerequisites: CGS 2060 or equivalent. 

COP 3949 Cooperative Education in Computer 
Science (1-3). One semester of full-time work, or 
equivalent, in an outside organization, limited to students 
admitted to the CO-OP program. A written report and 
supervisor evaluation is required of each student. 
Prerequisites: Calculus II and COP 3337. 

COP 4005 Windows Programming for IT Majors (3). 

Application development techniques in Windows: Visual 
Basic Classes, Objects, Controls, Forms and Dialogs, 
Database, Active X and Internet Programming and 
Enterprise Application Architecture. Not acceptable for 



credit for CS Majors. Prerequisite: Data Structure for IT 
majors. This course will have additional fees. 

COP 4009 Windows Components Technology (3). 

Component-Based and Distributed Programming 
Techniques: C#, Common Type System, Windows and 
Web Forms, Multithreading, Distributed Objects. 
Prerequisites: COP 4226 or Windows Programming for IT 
Majors. This course will have additional fees. 

COP 4225 Advanced Unix Programming (3). Unix 
overview: files and directories, shell programming. Unix 
tools: sed, grep, and others. Unix internals: file systems, 
process structure. Using the system call interface. 
Interprocess communication. Prerequisite: COP 4338. 
Corequisite: COP 4610. This course will have additional 
fees. 

COP 4226 Advanced Windows Programming (3). 

Advanced Windows Programming topics including Object 
Linking and Embedding (OLE), Open Database 
Connectivity (ODBC), Memory Management Techniques, 
Dynamic Link Libraries, Multireaded Programming and 
Client/Server Applications. Prerequisite: COP 4338. This 
course will have additional fees. 

COP 4338 Computer Programming III (3). Topics 
include Object-Oriented programming Concepts and 
Modern Programming Techniques. Prerequisite: COP 
3530. This course will have additional fees. 

COP 4343 Unix System Administration (3). Techniques 
of Unix system administration: system configuration and 
management; user setup, management and accounting; 
software installation and configuration; network setup, 
configuration and management. Prerequisite: COP 3344. 

COP 4540 Database Management (3). Logical aspects of 
databases including Relational, Entity-Relationship, and 
Object-Oriented data models, database design, SQL, 
relational algebra, tuple calculus, domain calculus, and 
physical database organization. Prerequisite: COP 3530. 
This course will have additional fees. 

COP 4555 Principles of Programming Languages (3). 

A comparative study of several programming languages 
and paradigms. Emphasis is given to design, evaluation 
and implementation. Programs are written in a few of the 
languages. Prerequisite: COP 3530 Data Structures. This 
course will have additional fees. 

COP 4610 Operating Systems Principles (3). Operating 
systems design principles and implementation 
techniques. Address spaces, system call interface, 
process/threads, interprocess communication, deadlock, 
scheduling, memory, virtual memory, I/O, file systems. 
Prerequisites: CDA 4101 and COP 4338. This course will 
have additional fees. 

COP 4722 Survey of Database Systems (3). Design and 
management of enterprise systems; concurrency 
techniques; distributed, object-oriented, spatial, and 
multimedia databases; databases integration; 
datawarehousing and datamining; OLAP; XML 
interchange. Prerequisites: COP 4723 Database 
Administration or COP 4540 Database Management. 

COP 4723 Database Administration (3). Client-server 
architecture; planning, installation, server configuration; 
user management; performance optimization; backup, 
restoration; security configuration; replication 



Undergraduate College 



College of Arts and Sciences 123 



management; administrative tasks. Prerequisite: CGS 
4366 Information Storage and Retrieval Concepts. 

COP 4906 Research Experiences in Computer Science 
(1-3). Participation in ongoing research in the research 
centers of the school. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

COP 4949 Cooperative Education in Computer 
Science (1-3). One semester of full-time work, or 
equivalent, in an outside organization, limited to students 
admitted to the CO-OP program. A written report and 
supervisor evaluation is required of each student. 
Prerequisites: MAC 2312, STA 3033 and COP 3337. 

COP 5577 Principles of Data Mining (3). Introduction to 
data mining concepts, knowledge representation, and 
algorithms and techniques including decision trees, 
association rules, classification rules, clustering, etc. 
Prerequisite: COP 4540. 

COP 5614 Operating Systems (3). Operating systems 
design principles, algorithms and implementation 
techniques: process and memory management, disk and 
I/O systems, communications and security. 

COP 5621 Compiler Construction (3). Basic techniques 
of compilation; scanning; grammars and LL and LR 
parsing, code generation; symbol table management; 
optimization. Prerequisites: MAD 3512 and CEN 4010. 
This course will have additional fees. 

COP 5725 Principles of Database Management 
Systems (3). Overview of Database Systems, Relational 
Model, Relational Algebra and Relational Calculus; SQL; 
Database Applications; Storage and Indexing; Query 
Evaluation; Transaction Management. Selected database 
topics will also be discussed. 

COP 5949 Cooperative Education in Computer 
Science (1-3). One semester of full-time work, or 
equivalent, in an outside organization, limited to students 
admitted to the CO-OP program. A written report and 
supervision evaluation is required of each student. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

COT 3420 Logic for Computer Science (3). An 

introduction to the logical concepts and computational 
aspects of propositional and predicate logic, as well as to 
concepts and techniques underlying logic programming, in 
particular, the computer language Prolog. Prerequisites: 
COP 3337, and MAD 2104. This course will have 
additional fees. 

COT 5407 Introduction to Algorithms (3). Design of 
efficient data structures and algorithms; analysis of 
algorithms and asymptotic time complexity; graph, string, 
and geometric algorithms; NP-completeness. 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I (3). Abstract models 
of computation; including finite automata, regular 
expressions, context-free grammars, pushdown automata, 
Turing machines. Decidability and indecidability of 
computational problems Prerequisite: MAD 3512. This 
course will have additional fees. 



124 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Earth Sciences 

Bradford Clement, Professor and Chairperson 

William Anderson, Assistant Professor 

Laurel Collins, Associate Professor 

Grenville Draper, Professor 

Michael Gross, Associate Professor 

Stephen Haggerty, Distinguished Research Professor 

Rosemary Hickey-Vargas, Professor 

Jose Longoria, Professor 

Andrew Macfarlane, Associate Professor 

Florentin Maurrasse, Professor 

Rene Price, Assistant Professor 

Edward Robinson, Research Associate 

Surendra Saxena, Professor 

Gautam Sen, Professor 

Neptune Srimal, Lecturer 

Michael Sukop, Assistant Professor 

Dean Whitman, Associate Professor 

Knowledge of Earth Sciences is essential for 
understanding problems of groundwater supply, 
environmental hazards, geotechnical engineering, and 
natural resources. Earth Scientists also are involved in 
basic research and teaching. 

The Earth Sciences Department has well-equipped 
laboratories that allow students to learn the major 
techniques of the Earth Sciences. The undergraduate 
programs prepare students to become licensed 
Professional Geologists in the State of Florida. 

The department offers a B.S. degree in Geosciences 
and a broader-based interdisciplinary B.A. in Earth 
Sciences. Only grades of 'C or better will be accepted for 
required courses in either program option. A minor in 
geology is also available. 

Bachelor of Science in Geosciences 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division 

BSC1011 General Biology II 

BSC1011L General Biology II Lab 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Lab 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Lab 

GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth Science 

GLY 1010L Introduction to Earth Science Lab 

GLY 1 100 Historical Geology 

GLY 1 100L Historical Geology Lab 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

and 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 

PHY 2048L General Physics Lab I 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 

PHY 2049L General Physics Lab II 

or 

PHY 2053 Physics without Calculus I 

PHY 2048L General Physics Lab I 

PHY 2054 Physics Without Calculus II 

PHY 2049L General Physics Lab II 

Upper Division 

GLY 3202 Earth Materials 

GLY 3202L Earth Materials Lab 



GLY 4300 
GLY 4300L 
GLY 4511 
GLY 451 1L 
GLY 4400 
GLY 4400L 
GLY 4822 

GLY 4791 

GLY 3881 



Petrology 3 

Petrology Lab 1 

Stratigraphy 3 

Stratigraphy Lab 1 

Structural Geology 3 

Structural Geology Lab 1 

Introduction to Hydrogeology 3 
and 
Field Geology and Geologic Mapping 



3-6 



Environmental Geology Field Methods 3 



GLY 3782 Geology Field Excursion 3 

Additional Courses: (9-12) 

Students take an additional three to four courses at the 
3000 to 5000 levels offered by the Earth Sciences 
Department (but excluding Environmental Geology, GLY 
3039, and Earth Resources, GEO 3510). These may be 
selected to form a concentration, in consultation with a 
department advisor. For example, to form a concentration 
in environmental geology, a student might select from: 
Remote Sensing in the Earth Sciences (GLY 3754), 
Environmental Geology Field Methods (GLY 3881), and 
Geochemistry (GLY 5246). 

Bachelor of Arts in Earth Sciences 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

This program is for the student who requires a broad 
background in Earth Sciences for a career in science 
education or public or private administration dealing with 
Earth and environmental science issues. 

Lower Division 



CHM 1045 


General Chemistry I 




CHM 1045L 


General Chemistry I Lab 




CHM 1046 


General Chemistry II 




CHM 1046L 


General Chemistry II Lab 




GLY 1010 


Introduction to Earth Science 




GLY1010L 


Introduction to Earth Science Lab 




MAC 231 1 


Calculus I 




PHY 2053 


Physics without Calculus I 




PHY 2053 


Physics without Calculus I Lab 




PHY 2054 


Physics without Calculus II 




PHY 2054L 


Physics without Calculus II Lab 
and 




GLY 1100 


Historical Geology 




GLY1100L 


Historical Geology Lab 




GLY 1101 


History of Life 




GLY1101L 


History of Life Lab 




Upper Division 




GLY 3202 


Earth Materials 


3 


GLY 3202L 


Earth Materials Lab 


1 


OCE 3014 


Oceanography 
and 


3 


THREE of the following: 




GLY 3760C 


Geological Map Analysis 


3 


GLY 4822 


Introduction to Hydrogeology 


3 


GLY 4511 


Stratigraphy & 


3 


GLY 451 1L 


Stratigraphy Lab 


1 


GLY 4300 


Petrology & 


3 


GLY 4300L 


Petrology Lab 


1 


GLY 4400 


Structural Geology & 


3 


3 GLY 4400L 
1 


Structural Geology Lab 


1 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 125 



and 

ONE of the following (3-4): 

EVR3013 Ecology of South Florida & 3 

EVR3013L Ecology of South Florida Lab 1 

EVR 421 1 Water Resources & 3 

EVR 421 1 L Water Resources Lab 1 

EVR 4231 Air Resources 3 

EVR 4310 Energy Resources 3 

EVR 4952 Soils & Ecosystems & 3 

EVR 4952L Soils & Ecosystems Lab 1 

GEO 3510 Earth Resources 3 

GLY 3034 Natural Disasters 3 

Additional Courses 

Students take two approved 3000 or 4000 level courses in 
earth sciences/geology (excluding GLY 3039 
Environmental Geology), other science departments, or 
the College of Engineering. 

BS/BA Honors Track in Geology 

The Honors program in Geology provides outstanding 
students with the opportunity to do original research under 
a faculty sponsor. To graduate with Honors, the student 
must carry out a research project, write up the project as 
an Honors Thesis, and present the results of the research 
in a Departmental seminar. 

Admission to the Track 

To be admitted to the track a student must: 

• Have arranged to be sponsored by a faculty advisor. 

• Have taken at least 14 hours of Geology courses with 
a GPA of at least 3.5; 6 hours must be at the 3000- 
level or above. 

• Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher in 3000 and 
4000 level classes. 

• Exceptions to these criteria may be granted in special 
cases through appeal to the Geology Undergraduate 
Committee. 

Application to the program is made by submission of the 
Honors in Earth Sciences Admission Form to the Earth 
Sciences Undergraduate Committee. This is usually done 
in the semester before the student intends to begin the 
Honors thesis research. 

Graduation Requirements 

• A minimum GPA of 3.5 in courses in 3000 and 4000 
level classes. 

• Completion of the B.S. requirements in Geology, 
including GLY 4989L (Honors Research, 3 credits) 
and GLY 4970 (Honors Thesis, 3 credits). 

• Completion of Honors research in collaboration with 
Honors supervisor and presentation of a draft of the 
Honors thesis to the Geology Honors Committee. 

• Deposition of a completed approved copy of the 
Honors thesis with the Earth Sciences office. 

Minor in Geology 

Required courses 

At least 17 hours of earth sciences/geology courses which 
must include the following: GLY 1010 or GLY 3039, GLY 
1100 or GLY 1101, and GLY 3202, all with labs. 
Additional earth sciences/geology courses must be taken 
at the 3000 or 4000 level. 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate degree in 
Geology/Earth Sciences may also take part in the 



Cooperative Education Program conducted with the 
Department of Cooperative Education in the Division of 
Student Affairs. The student spends one or two semesters 
fully employed in industry or a government agency. For 
further information consult the Department of Earth 
Sciences or the Department of Cooperative Education. 

Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be taken prior to the 
corresponding lecture course. Laboratories must be taken 
concurrently where noted, but students must register for 
the laboratory separately. 

Definition of Prefixes 

ESC-Earth Sciences EVS-Environmental Science; GEO- 

Geography/Systematic; GLY-Geology; MET-Meteorology; 

OCE- Oceanography; OCG-Oceanography-Geological; 

OCP-Oceanography/Physical. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 

Summer semester offering. 

ESC 3930 Topics in Earth Sciences (1-5). Selected 
topics in earth sciences. 

ESC 5005 Earth Science Enrichment Activities for 
Teachers (1-2). Workshop presenting Earth Science 
enrichment activities to high school and middle school 
science teachers. 

ESC 5162 Workshop: Microfossil Paleoenvironments 
(2). Recent foraminifera and diatoms are sampled, 
prepared and identified from marine to freshwater facies. 
Taxon distributions are used to interpret paleo- 
environments. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

EVS 4164 Applied Environmental Geology (3). EVS 
4164L Applied Environmental Geology Lab (1). A 

survey of the geological and geographical factors critical 
to man's attempt to contend with the natural processes. 
Construction problems, sewers, waste disposal, dams, 
ground water, and terrain evaluation in relation to the 
nature of the underlying substratum. Principles illustrated 
from South Florida and the Caribbean region in particular. 
Study of the geological factors involved in future 
development and growth of these areas, and conservation 
methods in relation to the geology of these areas. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010, GEO 2200, and a sound 
background in mathematics, physics, and chemistry. 
Laboratory must be taken concurrently with the course. (S 
in alternate years) 

GEO 2200 Physical Geography (3). GEO 2200L 
Physical Geography Lab (1). Survey of the physical 
environment relevant to studies in regional geography and 
earth sciences. Natural evolution of landforms, and the 
interacting processes responsible for these features. 
Environmental modification and deterioration caused by 
human interaction. Effects of these changes: socio- 
economic impact and geographic problems. Case studies 
illustrated from South Florida and the Caribbean region. 
(F in alternate years.) 

GEO 3151 Introduction to Geographical Information 
Systems (3). Introduction to GIS concepts and software 
such as ArcView. Topics include: cartographic basics, 
spatial datasets, attributes, map production, spatial 
statistics and analysis, and obtaining GIS data. 
Prerequisites: CGS 2060 and MAC 1102. 



126 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



GEO 3510 Earth Resources (3). A course for non-majors 
dealing with the nature, origin, and distribution of mineral 
resources. Geology of petroleum, coal, metals, etc., and 
problems of their exploitation and depletion. (F,S,SS) 

GEO 351 0L Earth Resources Laboratory (1). 

Introduction to minerals and rocks used by society. Case 
studies of geologic, environmental and economic aspects 
of resource extraction and use. Corequisite: GEO 3510. 

GLY 1010 Introduction to Earth Science (3). GLY 
1010L Introduction to Earth Science Lab (1). Basic 
survey of Earth materials and structure, plate tectonics, 
volcanoes, earthquakes, surface processes and 
groundwater, climate change, earth resources and the 
impact of geology on society. (Lab fees assessed) 
(F.S.SS) 

GLY 1037 Environmental Hydrology for High School 
Students (1). Environmental issues surrounding the 
natural occurrence and human use of surface water and 
groundwater in South Florida. Includes field trips to local 
sites of hydrologic/environmental significance. 

GLY 1100 Historical Geology (3). GLY 1100L Historical 
Geology Lab (1). An introduction to the geological history 
of the earth and the geological time scale. Evolution of 
animals and plants. Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or GLY 3039 
or equivalent. Lecture and lab must be taken concurrently. 
(S) 

GLY 1101 The History of Life (3). GLY 1101L The 
History of Life Laboratory (1). Interaction of biological 
and geological principles and processes, history and 
ecology of past life, and major events such as the marine 
invasion of land, mass extinctions, and the Ice Age. (F,S) 

GLY 2072 Earth's Climate and Global Change (3). 

Introduction to Earth's climate and the variations of 
climate through geological and historical time. Emphasis 
is placed on the importance of the interactions of Earth's 
crust, atmosphere, biosphere and oceans in affecting the 
planet's climate. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 2072L Earth's Climate and Global Change Lab 
(1). Practical analysis of the important factors affecting 
Earth's Climate. Analysis of historical and geological 
records of climate change. Corequisite: GLY 2072. (F in 
alternate years) 

GLY 3034 Natural Disasters (3). A geological look at 
catastrophic events including earthquakes, volcanoes, 
tsunamis, mass movements, hurricanes, floods, and 
desertification. Emphasis on the geologic setting in which 
these natural disasters take place. Special attention will 
be given to compare similar disasters in the geologic past. 
Prerequisite: Physical science at the high school level. 
(F,S,SS) 

GLY 3039 Environmental Geology (3). GLY 3039L 
Environmental Geology Lab (1). The composition and 
structure of the earth, the internal and external forces 
acting upon it and the resulting surface features. Case 
studies and general principles illustrated from South 
Florida and the Caribbean. Field trips expected. No 
prerequisites. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 3103 Dinosaurs (3). Survey of the different groups 
of dinosaurs. Dinosaur biology, geology, and the history of 
their discovery to further understanding of their life 



histories environments, and the causes of their extinction. 
(F) 

GLY 3103L Dinosaurs Laboratory (1). Survey of the 
different groups of dinosaurs. Laboratory study of 
dinosaur bones, prints and eggs to further our 
understanding of their life histories, environments, and the 
causes of their extinction. Corequisite: GLY 3103. (F) 

GLY 3153 Workshop in South Florida and Caribbean 
Geology (3). Workshop on the geology of South Florida 
and the Caribbean for science majors. Includes field trips 
in South Florida. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

GLY 3157 Elements of Caribbean Geology (3). A 

survey of the geology of the Caribbean and neighboring 
regions in view of current data and modern concepts of 
global tectonics. The course summarizes the important 
points of Caribbean and Central American geology in their 
relation to mineral and energy resources; natural 
environmental disasters, especially seismic zones; 
agriculture; and the geologic potential for future 
development and industrialization. (S in alternate years) 

GLY 3202 Earth Materials (3). Physical and chemical 
properties of minerals and mineral assemblages, such as 
rocks and soils. Processes of mineral formation. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or permission of the instructor 
and General Chemistry. Corequisite: GLY 3202L. (F) 

GLY 3202L Earth Materials Lab (1). Physical and 
chemical properties of minerals, rocks and soils with 
emphasis on identification. Application of macroscopic 
methods, X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, in 
situ and bulk chemical analysis. Prerequisites: GLY 1010 
and GLY 1010L or permission of the instructor and 
General Chemistry. Corequisite: 3202. (F) 

GLY 3220 Optical Mineralogy (3). GLY 3220L Optical 
Mineralogy Lab (1). Principles and use of the 
petrographic microscope. Optical properties of isotropic, 
uniaxial and biaxial minerals. Prerequisites: GLY 3200 or 
equivalent. Laboratory must be taken concurrently with 
course. 

GLY 3630 Research in Tropical Environments (3). 

Earth Sciences, Biology and Environmental Studies 
faculty describe research in marine and terrestrial 
ecosystems, geology, conservation and education. 
Students discuss scientific articles. 

GLY 3751 Introduction to Mineral Science (2). 

Workshop introducing properties and uses of minerals, 
and techniques used to investigate minerals. 
Prerequisites: One of the following: BSC 1010, CHM 
1045, PHY 2053, GLY 1010. 

GLY 3754 Remote Sensing in the Earth Sciences (3). 

Remote sensing methods for the exploration and 
investigation of geologic processes and earth resources; 
airphoto interpretation, processing and analysis of multi- 
band digital satellite imagery; GIS. Prerequisites: GLY 
1010 or permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 3759 Visualizing Our World With GIS (2). 

Visualization of geospatial data in the Earth Sciences with 
Geographic Information Systems. Topics include natural 
hazards, distribution of water, mineral, and energy 
resources, and urban sprawl. Prerequisites: MAC 1105, 
MAC 1 1 14 or equivalent and permission of instructor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 127 



GLY 3760 Geological Map Analysis (3). Laboratory 
course dealing with analysis of geological maps and 
sections; theory and method of interpretation of surface 
outcrops on maps. Properties of simple geological 
structures. Recommended to be taken prior to GLY 4400 
and GLY 4791. Prerequisites: Trigonometry, Introduction 
to Earth Science or equivalent (e.g. MAC 2132, GLY 3039 
or equivalents). (F) 

GLY 3782 Geology Field Excursion (1-3). A one to 
three-week field excursion in a region of interest to 
demonstrate the occurrence, appearance and processes 
of various geological phenomena. Course may be 
repeated. Prerequisite: GLY 1010. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 3820 Applied Hydrogeology of South Florida (2). 

Workshop introducing hydrogeology of South Florida, and 
laboratory and field techniques used to study 
groundwater. Prerequisites: One of the following: BSC 
1010, CHM 1045, PHY 2053, GLY 1010. 

GLY 3881 Environmental Geology Field Methods (3). 

Introduction to commonly used field methods in 
environmental geology including site evaluation, bore-hole 
geophysical and hydrogeological techniques, and 
topographic map skills. Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or GLY 
3039. 

GLY 3882 Environmental Geology Florida Keys 
Workshop (2). Workshop introducing environmental 
geology of the Florida Keys, Bay-lsland-Reef transect. 
Prerequisites: One of the following: BSC 1010, CHM 
1045, PHY 2053, GLY 1010, or equivalent. 

GLY 3949/GLY 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Geology (1-3). One semester of full-time supervised work 
in an outside laboratory taking part in the University Co-op 
Program. Limited to students admitted to the Co-op 
Program. A written report and supervisor evaluations will 
be required for each student. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 4036 Earth Sciences and Society (3). Explores the 
new directions of Earth Science studies and examines 
how they can enhance society's ability to make wise 
decisions on resource development, waste disposal, 
natural hazards. Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or GLY 3039. 

GLY 4300 Petrology (3). Origin, composition and 
classification of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic 
rocks. Observational, theoretical, and experimental 
studies of rocks. Prerequisite: GLY 3202. (S) 

GLY 4300L Petrology Lab (1). Identification of rocks 
using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. 
Application of electron microprobe. Prerequisite: GLY 
3202. (S) 

GLY 4400 Structural Geology (3). GLY 4400L 
Structural Geology Lab (1). Faults, folds, fractures and 
other rock structures; their description and representation 
on maps and diagrams; mechanics of their formation. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or equivalent; knowledge of 
trigonometry and algebra. (S) 

GLY 4450 Environmental and Exploration Geophysics 
(3). Introduction to geophysical methods used in 
exploration and environmental geophysics. Seismic 
methods; potential fields; electrical and EM methods; 
ground penetrating radar; geophysical well logging. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or 3039; MAC 2312 PHY 2049 or 
2054; or consent of instructor. Corequisite: GLY 4450L.(S) 



GLY 4450L Environmental and Exploration 
Geophysics Laboratory (1). Acquisition and 
interpretation of exploration geophysical data. Seismic, 
gravity, magnetic, and geoelectrical methods; geophysical 
well logging. 4-5 field trips to sites in Dade County 
expected. Prerequisites: GLY 3760 or GLY 4400 or 
permission of the instructor. Corequisite: GLY 4450. (S) 

GLY 4511 Stratigraphy (3). Stratigraphic principles 
applied to interpreting the rock record. Sediments, 
depositional environments and dynamics in the 
sedimentary record. Stratigraphic correlation and the 
development of the Geologic Time Scale. Prerequisite: 
GLY 3202. (F) 

GLY 451 1L Stratigraphy Lab (1). Laboratory analysis of 
rock facies and index fossils used in the interpretation of 
the geologic record. Prerequisite: GLY 3202L. (F) 

GLY 4551 Sedimentology (3). GLY 4551 L Sediment- 
ology Lab (1). Sedimentary processes in the geological 
cycles, as illustrated in recent environments. Different 
groups of sedimentary rocks. Primary and secondary 
sedimentary structures. Physicochemical properties and 
diagenetic processes. Analytical techniques applied to 
modern sedi-mentology of both loose and lithified 
sediments. Prerequisites: Introduction to Earth Science or 
equivalent; Earth Materials and Stratigraphy and a sound 
background in mathematics and chemistry. Laboratory 
must be taken concurrently with course. (S) 

GLY 4650 Paleobiology (3). GLY 4650L Paleobiology 
Lab (1). Development of life as traced through the fossil 
record. Survey of the main groups of animals commonly 
found as fossils. Theories of evolution and extinction. 
Study of the major fossil groups used in biostratigraphic 
zonation, and as paleoecologic indicators. Prerequisites: 
Physical and historical geology, general biology, or the 
instructor's permission. Laboratory must be taken 
concurrently with course. 

GLY 4730 Marine Geology (3). GLY 4730L Marine 
Geology Lab (1). Survey of the main physiographic 
provinces of the ocean floor. Modern theories concerning 
the evolution of the crust; continental drift, seafloor 
spreading. Distribution and thickness of deep-sea 
sediments, and their relationship to the morphology and 
evolution of the crust. Deep-sea mineral resources. 
Marine geology of the Caribbean from recent data. Sea- 
bed assessment of mineral resources in the Caribbean 
and neighboring region. Prerequisites: OCE 3014, GLY 
1010, or instructor's permission. Laboratory must be taken 
concurrently with course. 

GLY 4791 Field Geology and Geologic Mapping (3-6). 

A three-to six-week field instruction and practice in 
methods of constructing stratigraphic sections, structural 
cross sections and geologic mapping using topographic 
base maps, aerial photos, and surveying equipment. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4511 and GLY 451 1L, GLY 4400 and 
GLY 4400L. (SS) 

GLY 4812 Introduction to Ore Deposits (3). Major 
classes of metal deposits, their geologic settings and 
genetic theories, and case studies of great deposits. 
Environmental, economic and legal aspects of metal 
extraction, processing and use. Prerequisites: GLY 1010, 
GLY 1010L or GLY 3039, GLY 3039L. (S) 



1 28 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



GLY 4822 Introduction to Hydrogeology (3). Principles 
of groundwater flow, determination of aquifer properties, 
geologic factors influencing groundwater flow and quality, 
legal/regulatory framework for hydrogeology. 
Prerequisites: One college-level course in physics, 
chemistry, geology, and calculus, or permission of the 
instructor. (S) 

GLY 4822L Introduction to Hydrogeology Lab (1). 

Principles of groundwater flow, determination of aquifer 
properties, geologic factors influencing ground water flow 
and quality. Prerequisites: CHM 1045, GLY 1010, PHY 
2053, MAC 231 1 , or equivalent. Corequisite: GLY 4822. 

GLY 4823 Florida Geologic and Hydrologic Systems 
(3). Survey of geological formations of Florida and their 
relationship to hydrologic and mineral resources. 
Sedimentary facies in relation to their hydrologic 
properties. Prerequisites: GLY 4822 and GLY 4511 or 
permission of the instructor. 

GLY 4910, GLY 4911 Undergraduate Research in 
Geology (VAR). Individual research under the supervision 
of a professor in the student's field of specialization or 
interest. Subject may deal with laboratory work, field, 
and/or bibliographical work. Field research in the 
Caribbean is encouraged. Variable credit to a maximum of 
10 credits. Permission of the student's advisor is required. 
(F,S,SS) 

GLY 4970 Geology Honors Thesis (3). Preparation of 
honors thesis and research seminar. Prerequisite: GLY 
4989L. 

GLY 4989L Geology Honors Research (1-3). Laboratory 
and/or field study in consultation with a faculty advisor. 
Prerequisite: Admission into Geology honors track. 

GLY 5021 Earth Sciences for Teachers (3). Study of 
geological materials and processes, as covered in 
Introduction to Earth Science, but at a higher level and 
with additional assignments. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5021 L. (F.S.SS) 

GLY 5021 L Earth Sciences for Teachers Laboratory 
(1). Study of the properties of minerals and rocks; 
interpretation of topographic and geologic maps; study of 
the geology of Florida, including field trips. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5021. 
(F.S.SS) 

GLY 5106 Paleoecology and Paleoenvironments (3). 

Paleoecology of fossils, paleobiodiversity, sedimentary 
facies, and environments, skeletal mineralogy, 
paleoecological gradients, chronologic scales and 
paieobiogeography and global patterns. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

GLY 5158 Florida Geology (3). Detailed lithostratigraphic 
and biostratigraphic analyses of Southeast Florida and 
their relationship to tectonics, paleoclimates. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4511 and GLY 451 1L. (S in alternate 
years) 

GLY 5195 Topics in Paleoclimatology (3). Broad 
concepts in paleoclimatology are reviewed and discussed. 
Topics include climate models, Quaternary climates, 
dating and pre-Quaternary climates. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 



GLY 5245 Water-Rock Interaction (3). Survey of 
geochemical processes at the water-rock interface. Topics 
include absorption of inorganic and organic ions, colloid 
stability in groundwater, mineral dissolution and 
precipitation. Prerequisites: CHM 1046, MAC 3312, GLY 
4822 or permission of the instructor. 

GLY 5246 Geochemistry (3). GLY 5246L Geochemistry 
Lab (1). Origin of chemical elements and principles 
affecting their distribution in the solar system, solid earth 
and hydrosphere. Use of chemical data to solve geologic 
problems. Prerequisites: Introduction to Earth Science 
and General Chemistry. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 5266 Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry (3). 

Application and theory of stable isotope approaches to 
biogeochemistry. Topics: Introduction to IRMS machines, 
C/N/O/H/S (biogeochem. processes), sampling/lab. prep., 
and recent advances. Prerequisites: One year of 
chemistry or consent of instructor. 

GLY 5283C Application of ICPES in Geochemistry (3). 

Determination of elemental abundances in rocks, soils, 
natural water using inductively coupled plasma emission 
spectroscopy (ICPES). Instrumental principles, sample 
selection and preparation methods and application of 
results to research. Prerequisites: CHM 1045, CHM 1046 
or permission of the instructor. (S or SS) 

GLY 5286 Research Instrumentation and Techniques 
in Geology (3). Survey of techniques and instrumentation 
used in geological research, including computing and data 
handling. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5286L. (F) 

GLY 5286L Research Instrumentation and Techniques 
in Geology Lab (1). Introduction to advanced 
instrumentation and analytical techniques in Geology, 
including computing and data processing. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5286. (F) 

GLY 5287C Scanning Electron Microscopy with EDS 
Analysis (3). Imaging and microanalysis of materials 
using SEM including EDS. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Instrcutor. 

GLY 5288C Electron Microprobe Microanalysis with 
EOS Analysis (3). Imaging and analysis or geological and 
other materials using electron microprobe with EDS 
analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

GLY 5298 Topics in Geochemistry (3). Seminar 
covering current research in selected areas of low- 
temperature geochemistry: oceans and oceanic 
sediments; continental waters and sediments; 
hydrothermal systems. Prerequisites: GLY 5246 or 
permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5322 Igneous Petrology and Geochemistry (3). 
Presentation and discussion of current topics in igneous 
petrology and geochemistry in a seminar format. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 5335 Metamorphic Geology (3). Metamorphic 
mineralogy; characteristics of low, medium and high 
pressure metamorphic rocks; pressure-temperature 
determinations; metamorphic textures; modeling and 
determination of P-T-t paths. (F in alternate years) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 129 



GLY 5335L Metamorphic Geology Lab (1). Petrographic 
examination of metamorphic rocks. (F) 

GLY 5346 Sedimentary Petrology (3). Systematic study 
of sedimentary rocks. Special emphasis on genetical 
aspects, geochemistry, paleontology, mineralogy, and 
microfacies. Emphasizes microscopic study. Prerequisite: 
GLY 4551 . Corequisite: GLY 5346L. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 5346L Sedimentary Petrology Lab (1). Laboratory 
studies of sediments and sedimentary rocks with 
emphasis on microscopic analyses and geochemical 
techniques. Prerequisites: GLY 4551 and GLY 4551 L. 
Corequisite: GLY 5346. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 5408 Advanced Structural Geology (3). Advanced 
treatment of the theory of rock mechanics to solve 
problems solve natural rock deformation. Prerequisites: 
GLY 4400, MAC 3413, or permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5408L. (S) 

GLY 5408L Advanced Structural Geology Lab (1). 

Problem solving in theory of rock deformation. 
Experimental procedures in rock mechanics. Corequisite: 
GLY 5408. (S) 

GLY 5415 Caribbean Geology and Tectonics (3). 
Integration of geologic and geophysical data to 
understand the evolution and present tectonic 
configuration of the Caribbean area. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

GLY 5425 Tectonics (3). Properties of the lithosphere; 
plate kinematics and continental drift; characteristics of 
plate boundaries; mountain belts; formation of 
sedimentary basins. Prerequisites: GLY 1010, 1100, 
4400, 4300, 3202 or permission of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 5455 Physical Volcanology (3). Description of 
volcanoes and their products, geophysical and tectonic 
constraints on volcanic processes, and modeling and 
forecasting of volcanic eruptions. Prerequisite: GLY 4450, 
GLY 4300 or permission of the instructor. (F in alternate 
years) 

GLY 5457 Geophysical Data Analysis (3). Computer 
analysis and modeling of geophysical data and digital 
images. Statistical description of data, linear inverse 
theory, digital signal and image processing. Computer 
exercises with MATLAB. Prerequisites: GLY 4450, MAP 
2302, MAS 3105, PHY 2048, PHY 2049 or consent of 
instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5457L. (S) 

GLY 5457L Analysis of Geophysical Data Lab (1). Field 
and laboratory applications of geophysical techniques. 
Computer aided analysis and three-dimensional modeling 
of gravity and magnetic data. Prerequisites: GLY 4450, 
PHY 2048, PHY 2049, MAC 231 1 , MAC 2312, MAP 2302. 
Corequisite: GLY 5457. (S) 

GLY 5495 Seminar in Geophysics (2). Detailed 
investigation of current geophysical techniques, including 
topics on instrument design. Prerequisite: GLY 5457 or 
permission of the instructor. (F/S) 

GLY 5497 Topics in Structural Geology and Tectonics 
(3). Selected advanced topics in structural geology and 
rock deformation. Latest advances in crustal tectonics. 
Prerequisite: GLY 5408. (F/S) 

GLY 5599 Seminar in Stratigraphy (3). Discussion of 
research projects and/or current literature in stratigraphic 



correlation as derived from sedimentologic principles and 
biozonation. Prerequisite: GLY 5346. (F) 

GLY 5608 Advanced Paleontology I (3). Discussion of 
current literature and research projects on evolution, 
systematics functional morphology, with reports by 
members of the seminar. Prerequisites: GLY 4650, or 
permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5621 Caribbean Stratigraphic Micropaleontology 
(3). Microscopic study of biostratigraphic type sections 
from the Caribbean area. Emphasis on planktonic 
foraminifera and radiolaria, paleoecologic and 
paleoclimatic interpretations. Prerequisites: GLY 4650 or 
permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5628 Radiogenic Isotope Methods (3). Theory and 
practice of radiogenic isotope ratio measuring techniques. 
Use of class-100 clean room facilities, and introduction to 
thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Prerequisite: 
General Chemistry. 

GLY 5655 Topics in Paleobiology (1-3). Various 
concepts in paleobiology are reviewed and discussed, 
based on readings of the literature, including journal 
articles and books. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

GLY 5710 Watershed Hydrology (3). Hydrologic 
processes on watershed, water budgets, effects on water 
quality, field investigative methods using tracers and 
hydrometric measurements, hydrologic and 

hydrochemical models. 

GLY 5754 Applied Remote Sensing in the Earth 
Sciences (3). Application of remote sensing and image 
analysis in the earth sciences; qualitative and quantitative 
satellite image and air photo interpretation. Emphasis is 
on use of computer processing packages. Prerequisites: 
GLY 1010 or consent of instructor. 

GLY 5758 GIS and Spatial Analysis for Earth 
Scientists (3). Application of GIS technology to spatial 
problems in the Earth Sciences. Topics include: spatial 
statistics, sampling theory, surface estimation, map 
algebra, and suitability modeling. 

GLY 5785 Caribbean Shallow-Marine Environments 
(3). Field study of multiple tropical environments in the 
Caribbean area. Dynamic processes and coastal 
evolution in response to natural and human-induced 
changes. 

GLY 5786 Advanced Field Excursion (1-6). A study of 
the geology of a selected region of the world followed by 
10-12 day field trip in order to study the field relationships 
of the geologic features. Special emphasis is given to 
stratigraphic, structural and tectonic relationships of lithic 
package. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. (SS) 

GLY 5808 Mining Geology (3). Application of theoretical 
models of ore formation to exploration and the use of 
geochemical and geophysical techniques in the search for 
ore deposits. Prerequisites: GLY 4300 and CHM 1046. 
(F/S) 

GLY 5816 Economic Geology (3). Economically 
important metal deposits of sedimentary, igneous and 
hydrothermal origins and their geologic settings and 
characteristics. Prerequisites: GLY 1010, GLY 4300, CHM 
1045, CHM 1046. (F) 



130 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



GLY 5826 Hydrogeologic Modeling (3). Techniques 
used in modeling groundwater flow and solute transport in 
geologic systems. Case studies of significant aquifers. 
Prerequisites: GLY 5827, MAP 2302, or permission of the 
instructor. (S.SS) 

GLY 5827 Hydrogeology (3). Physics of flow in 
geological media. Saturated and unsaturated flow, 
groundwater and the hydrologic cycle, estimating 
hydraulic parameters of aquifers, introduction to chemical 
transport. Prerequisites: GLY 1010, MAC 2312, and PHY 
2053, or permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5827L Hydrogeology Lab (1). Laboratory, field, and 
computer exercises to complement GLY 5827. (F) 

GLY 5828 Chemical Hydrogeology and Solute 
Transport (3). Quantitative analysis of hydrologic, 
geologic, and chemical factors controlling water quality 
and the transport and fate of organic and inorganic 
solutes in the subsurface. Prerequisite: GLY 5827. (S) 

GLY 5834 Field Hydrogeology (3). Field methods in 
hydrogeology. Drilling, logging, wells, data loggers, 
hydraulic conductivity/transmissivity measurements, 
purging, field chemistry parameter measurements, 
sampling methods. Prerequisites: GLY 4822 or 
permission of instructor. 

GLY 5835 Introduction to Lattice Boltzmann Methods 
(3). The course will provide an introduction to Lattice 
Boltzmann methods for fluid dynamics simulation. 
Emphasis on multiphase fluids. Prerequisites: 

Programming Skills, graduate standing, permission of 
instructor. 

GLY 5889 Geology for Environmental Scientists and 
Engineers (3). Characterization of rocks and rock 
masses; geological maps; seismic hazards; weathering of 
rocks; hydrologic cycle; slope stability; coastal processes; 
geophysical techniques. Course includes field trips in the 
South Florida region. Prerequisites: CHM 1045, GLY 1010 
or permission of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 5931 Graduate Seminar (1). Presentation or critical 
examination of current research problems in geology. A 
selection of topics is considered each term. Topics may 
also include individual research in the student's field of 
investigation. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. (F,S,SS) 

MET 3003 General Meteorology (3). A quantitative 
introduction to the Earth's atmosphere. Topics include 
tropical and mid-latitude weather, clouds and convection, 
solar and infrared radiation, general circulation and 
climate, and an overview of meteorological dynamics. 
Prerequisites: PHY 2048 or permission of instructor. 

OCE 2001 Introduction to Oceanography (3). The 

oceans, their nature and extent. Water of the oceans, 
chemical balance. Marine provinces, sediments and their 
relation to sea life and oceanic circulation, coastal 
provinces, sediments and their relation to sea life and 
oceanic circulation, coastal and deep-ocean circulation. 
Waves, tides, tsunamis. One field trip expected. (F,S,SS) 

OCE 3014 Oceanography (3). The ocean origin, physical 
properties, salinity, temperature, sound. Radiative 
properties, heat budget and climatic control. Tides, wind- 
driven motion-monsoon circulation. El Nino phenomenon. 



Subsurface water masses. Oceanic circulation and 
paleoclimates. (F.S.SS) 

OCE 301 4L Oceanography Lab (1). Laboratory 
investigation of the chemical and physical properties of 
seawater, ocean water motion and its effects. 
Corequisite: OCE 3014. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 131 



Economics 

John H. Boyd til, Associate Professor and Chairperson 

Nejat M. Anbarci, Associate Professor 

Harvey Averch, Professor, Courtesy Appointment, 

College of Public and Urban Affairs 
Mahadev Bhat, Assistant Professor (joint appointment 

with Environmental Studies) 
Prasad V. Bidarkota, Assistant Professor 
Jesse Bull, Assistant Professor 
Manuel J. Carvajal, Professor 
Richard A. Chisik, Assistant Professor 
Irma de Alonso, Professor 
Alan Gummerson, Lecturer 
Jonathan Hill, Assistant Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor of Political Economy, (joint 

appointment with International Realtions) 
Cem Karayalcin, Associate Professor 
Panagis Liossatos, Professor 
Mihaela Pintea, Assistant Professor 
Jorge Salazar-Carrillo, Professor and Director, Center 

for Economic Research and Education 
Peter Thompson, Associate Professor 
Mira Wilkins, Professor 
Maria Willumsen, Associate Professor 

The major in economics provides the student with an 
understanding of economic problems and institutions, and 
with analytical tools to apply this knowledge to 
contemporary problems. The program is designed for the 
student desiring a career in business, government, 
international agencies, or multinational corporations; and 
for those planning graduate study in economics, business, 
law, public administration, urban studies, or international 
relations. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

or 
MAC 2233 Calculus for Business 

STA 2122 Introduction to Statistics I 

or 
STA 2023 Statistics for Business and Economics 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

Required Courses for the Major (18) 



ECO 3101 


Intermediate Microeconomics 


3 


ECO 3203 


Intermediate Macroeconomics 


3 


ECO 3410 


Measurement and Analysis of Econ 






Activity 


3 


ECO 4421 


Introduction to Econometrics 


3 


ECO 4932 


Topics in Theory 1 


3 


ECO 4903 


Undergraduate Seminar 


3 



ECO 3410 and ECO 4421 each satisfy the FIU 
requirement in Computer Competency. ECO 4903 
satisfies the requirement in Oral Competency. 

Elective Courses for the Major (15) 

Five additional economics courses, of which at least two 
must be from the following list of courses which require an 
intermediate theory course as a prerequisite: ECO 4224, 
ECO 4401 , ECO 4504, ECO 4703, ECO 471 3, ECP 4031 , 
ECP 4203, ECP 4204, ECP 4314 ECP 4403, ECO 4100, 
ECO 4237, ECS 4013, ECS 4014/ 

Electives (27) 

This requirement can also be met by taking ECO 4933. 
2 The following courses cannot be used as Elective 
Courses for the Major: ECO 2013, ECO 2023, ECO 3041, 
ECO 3202, ECO 3949, ECO 4906, ECO 4949. 

Combined Bachelor of Arts/Master of 
Arts (BA/MA) in Economics 

The Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts (BA/MA) degree in 
Economics program is designed for outstanding 
undergraduate students. It provides a strong base of 
knowledge and skills economics, and at the same time 
accelerates completion of the the Master of Arts degree. 
Students may take advantage of the overlap of courses in 
the BA and MA programs to receive their MA degrees in a 
shorter period than it would otherwise be possible. The 
incentive to do so is expected to attract students, who 
would otherwise not be so inclined, into the MA program. 
The introduction to graduate work that the MA program 
affords has proven to be a gateway to the PhD program 
for so many students in the past. This would enable the 
department to increase its contribution to the University's 
goal of graduating more PhD students. 

The BA program in economics requires that students 
take 9 upper division elective courses. Students in the 
BA/MA program would take elective courses that would 
satisfy both the BA and MA requirement. 

The goal is to attract students so that they apply to the 
program as early as the second semester of their 
sophomore year. To apply their GPA needs to be 
significantly above average (3.25). Students would also 
be required to maintain a high GPA (3.0) to remain in the 
program. The grade requirements for an MA in 
economics would apply to courses that are counted 
toward the MA degree. The BA/MA program in economics 
(like similar programs in institutions such as the New York 
University and Boston University) waives the GRE 
requirement in application. 

Admission Requirements 

♦ Current enrollment in the Bachelor's degree 
program in economics at FIU. 

♦ Completed at least 60 credits of coursework 

♦ Completed Calculus I (MAC 231 1 ) and Calculus II 
(MAC 2312) or equivalents. 

♦ Current GPA of 3.25 or higher. 

♦ Three letters of recommendation. 

♦ Approval of the Graduate Committee. 

General Requirements 

Meet the requirements of both the BA and the MA degree 
in economics. 



132 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Overlap: Up to 4 courses (12 credits) may be used in 
satisfying both the Bachelor's and Master's degree 
requirements in economics. 

Minor in Economics: (18) 

Required Courses for the Minor(12) 

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

ECO 3101 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

Elective Courses for the Minor (6) 

Two Additional economics courses 6 

1 The following courses cannot be used as Elective 
Courses for the Minor: ECO 3041, ECO 3202, ECO 3949, 
ECO 4906, ECO 4949. 

Tracks in the Major 

Economic majors have the option of choosing their 
electives in economics in such a way as to satisfy the 
requirements for one or more specialized Tracks in the 
major. If the requirements for a Track are satisfied, the 
student's transcript will show a major in economics with 
specialization in the Track. 

Each Track consists of: 

1.A core set of economics courses from which the 
student must successfully complete at least two; 

2. A secondary set of of economics courses from which 
the student must successfully complete at least one. 

One or more Tracks may not be offered in a given year. 
Majors in economics may choose among the following 
Tracks: 

Track in International Economics 
Core Courses: 

ECO 4703 International Trade Theory & Policy 3 

ECO 4713 International Macroeconomics 3 

Secondary Courses: 

ECS 3003 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

ECO 4701 World Economy 3 



ECO 5709 



World Economy 



Track in the Economics of Public Policy 
Core Courses: 

ECO 4504 Public Finance 

ECP 4204 Theory of Labor Economics 

Secondary Courses: 

ECP 3203 Introduction to Labor Economics 

ECO 3223 Money & Banking 

ECP 3302 Introduction to Environmental 

Economics 
ECP 3410 Introduction to Public Economics 

ECP 4314 Natural Resource Economics 

ECP 3451 Law & Economics 

Track in the Economics of Business and Industry 
Core Courses: 

ECP 4403 Industrial Organization 3 

ECO 4100 Managerial Economics 3 

ECO 4237 Money, Interest & Capital 3 

ECO 4400 Economics of Strategy and Information 3 

Secondary Courses: 

ECO 3223 Money and Banking 3 

ECO 4224 Issues in Money & Banking 3 

ECP 3203 Introduction to Labor Economics 3 



Track in Economic Development 
Core Courses: 

ECS 4013 Development Economics I 3 

ECS 4014 Development Economics II 3 
Secondary Courses: 

ECO 4703 International Trade Theory & Policy 3 

ECO 4713 International Macroeconomics 3 

ECP 4031 Cost-Benefit Analysis 3 

ECS 3013 Introduction to Economic Development 3 

ECS 3401 The Brazilian Economy 3 
ECS 3402 The Political Economy of South America3 

ECS 3403 Economics of Latin America 3 

ECS 3404 Economic Integration/Latin America 3 
ECS 3430 The Economic Development of 

Cuba/Past & Present 3 

ECS 3431 Economics of the Caribbean Basin 3 

ECS 3432 Economic Integration/Caribbean 3 

ECS 3200 Economics of Asia 3 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ECO-Economics; ECP-Economic Problems and Policy; 
ECS-Economic Systems and Development. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 
Summer semester offering. 

ECO 1000 Introduction to Economics (3). A one- 
semester introduction to economics. Includes 
microeconomics: the economics of individual units in the 
economy, like households and firms; and 
macroeconomics: the economics of aggregate problems 
like inflation, unemployment, and growth. Does not 
substitute for either ECO 2013 or ECO 2023. 

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics (3). 

Introduction to economic analysis of the overall economy: 
national income accounting, unemployment, inflation, 
monetary and fiscal policies, budget deficits and debt, 
long-run growth. (F,S,SS) 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics (3). 

Introduction to economic analysis of individual units — 
households and firms. Operation of markets; supply and 
demand analysis. (F,S,SS) 

ECO 3041 Consumer Economics (3). Consumer 
behavior; advertising and other influences affecting 
demand. Patterns of consumer expenditure; effects of 
public policy on family incomes and consumption patterns. 
The consumer protection movement. Does not count as 
economics elective toward economics major. (F,S,SS) 

ECO 3101 Intermediate Microeconomics (3). Analysis 
of markets, theory of firm, demand and production 
theories, general equilibrium, and welfare economics. 
Prerequisite: ECO 2023. (F,S) 

ECO 3202 Applied Macroeconomics (3). Aggregate 
economic performance and business conditions analysis, 
nature and causes of economic expansions and 
recessions, inflation, balance of trade, balance of 
payments, and exchange rate problems, fiscal and 
monetary policies, short-run instability and long-run 
growth. Cannot be taken for credit concurrently with, or 
after taking ECO 3203. Prerequisite: ECO 2013. (F,S,SS) 

ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3). Analysis 
of the aggregate economy in the long-run (full 



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College of Arts and Sciences 133 



employment, economic growth, productivity) and the 
short-run (unemployment, business cycles); economic 
policy for short-run stability and long-run growth (monetary 
and fiscal policies, budget deficit, inflation, and debt); 
balance of payments and exchange rate. Prerequisite: 
ECO 2013. (F,S) 

ECO 3223 Money and Banking (3). Elements of 
monetary theory; relationships between money, prices, 
production, and employment; factors determining money 
supply; history and principles of banking, with special 
references to the United States. Prerequisite: ECO 2013. 
(F) 

ECO 3303 Development of Economic Thought (3). 

Evolution of economic theory and doctrine. Contributions 
to economic thought from ancient times to J. M. Keynes. 
Emphasis on institutional forces shaping the continuum of 
economic thinking. (S) 

ECO 3304 Economic Forces and the Development of 
Western Ideas (3). Analyzes the emergence and 
evolution of western views and doctrines in light of the 
interaction of market forces, technology, and key events. 

ECO 3410 Measurement and Analysis of Economic 
Activity (3). Covers statistical methods as applied in 
economics. Topics include estimation and hypothesis 
testing, analysis of variance, and single and multiple 
regression models. Prerequisites: STA 2023 or 
equivalent. Satisfies requirement in computer literacy. 
(F,S) 

ECO 3704 International Economics (3). Explorations of 
why nations trade, effects of trade on distribution, 
commercial policy, balance of payments adjustment; 
exchange rate determination, Eurocurrency markets, and 
international institutions. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and 
ECO 2023. 

ECO 3933 Special Topics (3). A course designed to give 
students a particular topic or a limited number of topics 
not otherwise offered in the curriculum. 

ECO 3949 Cooperative Education in Economics (1-3). 

A student majoring in Economics may spend one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry or government in a 
capacity relating to the major. Does not count as 
economics elective toward economics major. 

ECO 4100 Managerial Economics (3). Economic 
analaysis of problems managers of firms face, such as 
choosing production levels, deciding how much labor to 
hire, budgeting capital, and dealing with uncertainty. 
Prerequisites: ECO 3101, Calculus, and Statistics. 

ECO 4237 Money, Interest, and Capital (3). Economic 
analysis of the asset markets and the effect of monetary 
policy; interest rates and intertemporal choice; asset 
pricing; efficient market hypothesis and economic 
behavior models in asset markets. Prerequisites: ECO 
3101 and ECO 3203 or permission of the instructor. 

ECO 4224 Issues in Money and Banking (3). Current 
controversies in the conduct of monetary policy; 
innovations in financial markets and instruments, and their 
impact on the targets and long-run goals of central banks. 
Prerequisites: ECO 3203 or ECO 3202. 

ECO 4321 Radical Political Economy (3). The 

relationship between Marxist and orthodox economists. 



Attention given to the New Left and other current 
criticisms of capitalist economies. Multinational corporate 
policy, concentration of economic power, income 
distribution, and Third World development. 

ECO 4400 Economics of Strategy and Information (3). 

Combines Neoclassical Economics with game theory and 
the ecomonics of information to better understand 
markets in the real world. Prerequisites: Calculus and 
Intermediate Microeconomics or permission of instructor. 

ECO 4401 Introduction to Mathematical Economics 
(3). Mathematical formulation of economic theory. 
Mathematical treatment of maximizing and optimizing 
behavior; applications to consumer and business firm 
theory, value, economic strategies, growth and stability. 
Emphasis on understanding of analytical techniques 
Prerequisites: ECO 3101 or ECO 3203 (preferably both), 
and Calculus. (F,S) 

ECO 4421 Introduction to Econometrics (3). Application 
of statistics and economic theory to formulating, 
estimating, and drawing inferences about relationships 
among economic variables. Coverage includes linear 
regression model, heteroscedasticity, serial correlation, 
multicollinearity, and simultaneous equations. 
Prerequisites: ECO 3101, ECO 3203, and ECO 3410, or 
permission of the instructor. Satisfies requirement in 
computer literacy. (F,S) 

ECO 4504 Introduction to Public Finance (3). Describes 
the way resources are allocated in a market economy and 
cases where markets fail. Analyzes government 
expenditure policy, principles of taxation, and the various 
taxes in use today. Prerequisite: ECO 3101. (S) 

ECO 4622 Economic History of the United States (3). 

The growth of the American economy from colonial times 
to the present. Special emphasis on market forces, 
institutional arrangements, and policies contributing to this 
expansion. (F) 

ECO 4623 American Business History (3). The growth 
of American business from 1880 to present; integration, 
diversification, and foreign expansion. Business strategies 
and managerial structures. 

ECO 4701 World Economy (3). A broad overview of the 
international economy in historical perspective. Topics: 
economic demography, trade flows, capital movements, 
diffusion of technology, the emergence of transnational 
institutions. The student obtains a conception of how 
economic interdependence has developed. 

ECO 4703 International Trade Theory and Policy (3). 

Causes and consequences of international trade; effects 
of tariffs and quotas; strategic trade and industrial 
policies; political economy of protectionism; international 
economic integration; factor movements; and 
multinational firms. Prerequisite: ECO 3101. (F) 

ECO 4713 International Macroeconomics (3). Analysis 
of output, inflation, business cycles and economic policy 
in open economy settings; exchange rate regimes (fixed 
versus flexible exchange rate); fiscal, monetary, and 
exchange rate policies. Prerequisite: ECO 3203. (S) 

ECO 4733 Multinational Corporation (3). Growth and 
development of multinational enterprise. Theories of direct 
foreign investment. Impact on the United States and other 
developed and less developed nations. Policy implications 



134 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



relating to employment, economic growth, balance of 
payments, taxation, and national defense. National 
sovereignty and the multinational corporation. 

ECO 4903 Undergraduate Seminar (3). Small class in 
which students will discuss readings, write research 
paper, and defend research and ideas orally. Satisfies 
SACS requirement in oral competency. Prerequisites: 
ECO 3101 and ECO 3203. 

ECO 4906 Undergraduate Tutorial (1-6). Supervised 
readings, individual tutorial, and preparation of reports. 
Requires consent of faculty supervisor and Department 
Chairperson. Does not count as economics elective 
toward economics major. 

ECO 4932, 4933 Topics in Theory (3,3). Study of a 
particular topic or a selected number of topics in 
economics theory not otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
Prerequisites: ECO 3101, ECO 3203, and MAC 2311 or 
permission of the instructor. (F,S) 

ECO 4934 Special Topics (3). A course designed to give 
students a particular topic or a limited number of topics 
not otherwise offered in the curriculum. May be repeated 
for credit with permission of Department. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

ECO 4949 Cooperative Education in Economics (1-3). 

A student majoring in economics may spend one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry or government in a 
capacity relating to the major. Does not count as 
economics elective toward economics major. 

ECO 5709 The World Economy (3). Designed to give an 
overview of the crucial issues in the world economy. The 
course covers trade, capital, labor, and technology flows; 
transnational economic organizations; current economic 
crisis; global economic interdependence; and the nature 
and characteristics of international economic order. 
Required for MIB Program. (S) 

ECO 5735 Multinational Corporations (3). Economic 
theory and multinational corporations. Economic effects. 
Consequences of nationalization. Spread of the 
multinational form. State-owned multinational 
corporations. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor for 
undergraduates. (S) 

ECO 5906 Advanced Individual Study (1-6). Supervised 
readings, individual tutorial, and preparation of report. 
Requires consent of faculty supervisor and Department 
Chairperson. Open to seniors and graduate students. 

ECO 5945 Internship (3). Directed individual study which 
assists the student in using economic analysis in his 
employment. Prerequisite: Permission of the chair. 

ECP 3123 Economics of Poverty (3). Poverty in the 
United States: its measurement and history. Theory of 
personal income distribution. Present and proposed 
policies to alleviate poverty. 

ECP 3143 Economics of Racism (3). Analysis and 
examination of the economic costs of racism to the 
individual and society. A perspective from mercantilism to 
the post industrial contemporary world; international racial 
aspects of development, income distribution and wealth. 

ECP 3203 Introduction to Labor Economics (3). Basic 
introduction to supply and demand for labor. Discusses 
labor markets in both historical and institutional context 



emphasizing why certain patterns have occurred and 
contemporary institutions developed. Prerequisite: ECO 
2023. 

ECP 3302 Introduction to Environmental Economics 
(3). Economic principles applied to environmental 
problems. Relationship of market and non-market forces 
to environmental quality. Development of tools for policy 
analysis. Prerequisites: ECO 2023, or permission of the 
instructor. (F,S,SS) 

ECP 3410 Introduction to Public Economics (3). An 

introduction to the applied economics of the public sector 
and the microeconomics of public policy making and 
administration. 

ECP 3451 Law and Economics (3). The relationship of 
economic principles to law and the use of economic 
analysis to the study of legal problems. Topics include: 
property rights and contracts, and economic analysis of 
legal decision making. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 
2023 or equivalents. 

ECP 3533 Health Systems Economics (3). Identification 
of health systems issues and basic instruments of health 
systems analysis including the market mechanism, 
insurance and cost-benefit analysis. 

ECP 3613 Introduction to Urban Economics (3). Study 
of urban areas, their characteristics and economic 
functions. Topics include location decisions of firms and 
households, economies of agglomeration, transportation, 
land use, zoning, urban growth and development policies, 
urban dimensions of economic and social problems, and 
the public sector in urban areas. (F) 

ECP 4004 Seminar on Current Economic Topics (3). 

Faculty and student discussion of contemporary economic 
and social issues. 

ECP 4031 Cost-Benefit Analysis (3). Covers cost-benefit 
analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, benefit-risk analysis, 
risk-risk analysis, and systems analysis as applied in the 
government sector for public investment decisions. 
Prerequisites: ECO 3101 or equivalent. 

ECP 4204 Theory of Labor Economics (3). Neo- 
classical theory of labor demand and labor supply, human 
capital theory and critiques. Current programs of human 
resource development and income maintenance are 
discussed. Prerequisite: ECO 3101. 

ECP 4314 Natural Resource Economics (3). Natural 
resources and the economy; economics of renewable and 
nonrenewable resource harvesting and management; 
public policy options for influencing resource consumption 
and their environmental implications. Prerequisites: ECP 
3203 and ECO 3101, or permission of the instructor. 

ECP 4403 Industrial Organization (3). Theory of the firm, 
market structure; business strategies and conduct. Topics 
include information and advertising, product durability, 
technical change, antitrust and trade policies, and 
regulation. Prerequisite: ECO 3101. 

ECS 3003 Comparative Economic Systems (3). 

Analysis of alternative economic systems. Emphasis on 
the contrast between market-oriented capitalist 
economies and Soviet-style planned economies, and on 
the process of transition from planned to market-oriented 
systems. Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 35 



ECS 3013 Introduction to Economic Development (3). 

Structural and institutional determinants of economic 
development; economic analysis and policy formation. 
Topics include theories of economic development, 
economic growth, income distribution, rural-urban 
migration, industry and agriculture, unemployment, 
education, international trade, economic reform, and the 
environment. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023. 
(F,S) 

ECS 3021 Women, Culture, and Economic 
Development (3). Analysis of problems facing women in 
developing countries, focusing on gender and cultural 
issues and their relationships to economic development. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 or permission of 
the instructor. 

ECS 3200 Economics of Asia (3). Economic analysis of 
the problems of poverty, malnutrition and income 
inequality in South Asia. Rural poverty and agricultural 
transformation. The East Asian Miracle. The Asian Crisis. 
Economic liberalization in Asia. Prerequisites: Macro and 
Micro Principles or the consent of the instructor. 

ECS 3401 The Brazilian Economy (3). Examines the 
evolution of Brazilian economy, focusing on the process of 
its industrialization in the 20 lh century, the policies to 
achieve it, its impact on the socioeconomic environment 
and the adjustments of institutions to the structural 
changes in the economy. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and 
ECO 2023. 

ECS 3402 The Political Economy of South America (3). 

An introduction to the political economy of the South 
American countries, with emphasis on the opening of the 
region's economies, privatization and deregulation, debt 
crisis, foreign investment, poverty, income distribution, 
human resources, and regional trade agreements. 
Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023. (F) 

ECS 3403 Economics of Latin America (3). Study of 
current economic issues facing Latin American countries, 
including population growth, poverty, inequality, inflation, 
trade and balance of payment problems, economic 
reform, and regional integration. Prerequisites: ECO 2013 
and ECO 2023. (S) 

ECS 3404 Economic Integration/Latin America (3). 

Analysis of the methods, meaning and implications of 
economics in Latin America. Designed to enable the 
student to appreciate the trend toward regionalism and 
economic cooperation. 

ECS 3430 The Economic Development of Cuba/Past 
and Present (3). Survey of the Cuban economy under 
capitalist and Marxist ideologies. Emphasis on the 
transition stage and on current policies of economic and 
social change. (F) 

ECS 3431 Economics of the Caribbean Basin (3). 

Survey of the economic systems of the major countries of 
the Caribbean. Special attention devoted to current 
problems of economic growth and social transformation. 
Prerequisite: ECO 2013. 

ECS 3432 Economic Integration/Caribbean (3). 

Analysis of the methods, meaning, and implications of 
economic integration in the Caribbean. Designed to 
enable the student to appreciate the trend toward 
regionalism and economic cooperation. 



ECS 4013 Development Economics I (3). Problems of 
poverty, malnutrition, inequality, and development. 
Population growth and development. Rural-urban 
resource flows. The urban informal sector. Credit markets 
in agriculture. Land-labor contracts. Prerequisites: 
Intermediate Microeconomics and Intermediate 
Macroeconimcs or permission of the instructor. 

ECS 4014 Development Economics II (3). Economic 
analysis of why some countries are rich and some are 
poor, why some countries grow fast and others do not. 
The role of ideas, infrastructure, R&D, and education 
play in economic growth. Prerequisites: ECO 3101 and 
ECO 3203 or permission of the instructor. 

ECS 5005 Comparative Economic Systems (3). A 

critical evaluation of the design, goals, and achievements 
of economic policies in capitalist and socialist economies. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor for 
undergraduates. 

ECS 5025 Economic Planning (3). Analysis of planning 
methods in capitalist and socialist economies. Evaluation 
of macro and micro economic planning tools (input-output) 
and programming techniques. Theory and practice of 
economic development planning of agriculture, 
industrialization, foreign trade, and manpower. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

ECS 5406 Latin American Economies (3). Economic 
theory and its applications to current economic issues of 
Latin America. Examines aggregate demand and supply, 
fiscal and monetary policies, international trade trends, 
and economic development. Taught in Spanish. May not 
be taken for credit towards a degree in Economics. 



136 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



English 

Carmela Pinto Mclntire, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Heather R. Andrade, Assistant Professor 
St. George Tucker Arnold, Associate Professor 
Joan L. Baker, Associate Professor 
Lynne Barrett, Professor 
Lynn M. Berk, Professor 
Greg Bowe, Assistant Professor and Director of 

Undergraduate Writing 
Gisela Casines, Associate Professor and Associate 

Dean 
Cynthia Chinelly, Lecturer 
Maneck Daruwala. Associate Professor 
Carole Boyce Davies, Professor 
Jennifer Desiderio, Assistant Professor 
John Dufresne, Professor 
Denise Duhamel, Assistant Professor 
Peggy Endel, Associate Professor 
Mary Free, Associate Professor and Associate 

Chairperson 
James Hall, Professor 
Peter Hargitai, Instructor 
Kimberly Harrison, Assistant Professor and Director of 

Undergraduate Writing, Biscayne Bay Campus 
Bruce Harvey, Associate Professor 
Marilyn Hoder-Salmon, Associate Professor 
Tometro Hopkins, Associate Professor 
Kenneth Johnson, Associate Professor and Assistant 

Vice President of Academic Affairs 
Jeffrey Knapp, Instructor 
Anna Luzczynska, Assistant Professor 
Kathleen McCormack, Associate Professor 
Campbell McGrath, Associate Professor 
Kathryn McKinley, Associate Professor 
Phil Marcus, Professor 
Asher Z. Milbauer, Associate Professor and Director of 

Graduate Studies in Literature 
Robert Ratner, Instructor 
Men-Jane Rochelson, Associate Professor 
Richard Schwartz, Professor 
Ronn Silverstein, Instructor 
Ellen Sprechman, Lecturer 
Lester Standiford, Professor and Director of Creative 

Writing Program 
Richard Sugg, Professor 
James Sutton, Associate Professor 
Ellen Thompson, Assistant Profeessor 
Dan Wakefield, Lecturer and Writer-in-Residence 
Donald Watson, Professor 
Donna Weir-Soley, Assistant Professor 
Barbara Weitz, Instructor 
Feryal Yavas, Lecturer and Director of the Linguistics 

Program 
Mehmet Yavas, Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in English 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Requirements 

Common Prerequisites 

ENC 1101 Freshman Composition 

ENC 1 102 Literary Analysis 



Recommended Courses 

ENG 2012 Approaches to Literature 

AML2010 Survey of American Literature I 

AML2020 Survey of American Literature II 

ENL 2012 Survey of British Literature I 

ENL2022 Survey of British Literature II 

To qualify for admission into the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise accepted into the program. 

Upper Division Requirements 

(30 hours in 3000 and 4000 level courses) 
Periods: (Two courses - Six hours) 

a. One course in British literature before 1800 
or 

One course in American literature before 1860 

b. One course in British literature after 1800 
or 

One course in American literature 

after 1860 
Note: In addition to these courses, the Department may 
designate specific courses each semester which will fulfill 
these requirements. 

Shakespeare: (One course - Three hours) 
ENL 4320 Shakespeare: Histories 

ENL 4321 Shakespeare: Comedies 

ENL 4322 Shakespeare: Tragedies 

Linguistics: (One course - Three hours) 
LIN 3013 Introduction to Linguistics 

or 
LIN 4680 Modern English Grammar 

Electives: (18) 

Upper division electives in writing, film, literature, and/or 
linguistics. The English Department recognizes a 
continuing obligation to insure that its majors write well. 
The Chairperson may require any English major to take 
the appropriate composition course. English majors may 
choose to take a general program of English studies or 
may select one of the Department's three areas of 
emphasis: literature, language and linguistics, or creative 
writing. Majors should choose their English courses and 
electives in consultation with their advisors, especially 
upon entering the program. 

Additional Approved Electives: (30) 

Students should consult with a departmental advisor. 

Minor in English 

Students majoring in any other discipline may minor in 
English. 

There are several advantages for obtaining this minor. 
First, students expand their knowledge of literature written 
in English, thus, making their college education more 
complete and rounded. Second, because in the courses 
that the Department of English offers writing skills are 
emphasized, students will polish and perfect forms for the 
development of complex and sophisticated arguments 
through the analysis of literary work; the training students 
receive in these courses will help them point to strengths 
and weaknesses in any piece of writing. 

Requirements 

Fifteen hours in 3000 and 4000-level courses 
Period Courses: (Two courses - Six hours) 
1. One course in British literature before 1800 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 137 



2. 



One course in American literature before 1860 
One course in British literature after 1800 



One course in American literature after 1860 
Note: In addition to these courses, the Department may 
designate specific courses each semester which will fulfill 
these requirements 
3. Three courses (nine hours) at the 3000 and 4000- 

level in the Department of English. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

AML-American Literature; CRW-Creative Writing; ENC- 
English Composition; ENG-English-General; ENL-English 
Literature; FIL-Film Studies; HUM-Humanities; LIN- 
Linguistics; LIT-Literature; 

ANIL 2010 Survey of American Literature I (3). Students 
read and discuss major American works written between 
1620 and 1865. Works will be considered in an historical 
context. 

AML 2020 Survey of American Literature II (3). 

Students will read and discuss major American works 
written between 1865 and the present. Works will be 
examined in an historical context. 

AML 2602 African-American Literature (3). Offers a 
survey of African-American literature spanning its genesis 
to the present. Includes units on major eras and major 
figures in the development of the literary traditions. May 
be repeated. 

AML 3004 American Folklore (3) An examination of the 
variety of American folklore from the very earliest 
expressions to the present. 

AML 3032 The American Revolution in Literature (3). 

Study of writings created at the time of the American 
Revolution and those of later authors in order to evaluate 
how American writers have shaped our sense of the 
Revolution. 

AML 3042 Texts and Contexts: American Literature 
1492 to the Present (3). Survey of American fiction, 
poetry, and drama from 1492 to the present, that 
examines the interactions between literacy texts and 
social, cultural, or political currents. Prerequisite: ENC 
1102. 

AML 3111 American Fiction to 1900 (3). Study of 
representative fiction by American authors from the 
Colonial period to 1900. Authors include Brown, Irving, 
Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Chopin, James, and 
others. 

AML 3262 Modern Southern Short Story (3) The 

contributions of twentieth-century writers of the South to 
the short story genre. Includes the work of Faulkner, 
O'Connor, Welty and McCullers. 

AML 3401 American Humor (3) This course examines 
the writings of American humorists from the beginnings to 
the present. Special attention is given to the writings of 
Twain and Thurber. 

AML 3415 American Literature and the Tradition of 
Dissent (3). Explores selected texts to examine the 



interactions between texts and social, cultural, and 
political currents from colonial times through the present. 

AML 4120 Modern American Fiction (3) Study of 
American novels and short stories written in the twentieth 
century. Among the writers to be read are John Barth, 
Alice Walker and Flannery O'Connor. 

AML 4155 Modern American Poetry (3) Study of 
American poetry written in the twentieth century. Among 
the poets to be examined are Elizabeth Bishop, 
Gwendolyn Brooks and Richard Wilbur. 

AML 4213 Studies in Colonial and Early American 
Literature (3). Students read, discuss, and write about 
literature of the Colonial and Early American periods from 
the time of the Puritans through the period of the Early 
Republic. 

AML 4216 Colonial Literature (3). American Literature 
from the settlement of the continent through 1776. 

AML 4221 Early National Literature (3). Examines the 
major literary works of the period 1 776-1825. 

AML 4223 Antebellum Literature (3). Examines the 
writings of the period 1825-1860, including Hawthorne, 
Poe, and Harriet Jacobs. 

AML 4245 Modernism and Post-Modernism in 
American Literature (3). The course provides working 
definitions of modernism and post-modernism and will 
consider how the writers of the twentieth century use 
those outlooks while addressing political, social, and 
personal issues. 

AML 4263 Contemporary Southern Writers (3) Study of 
the literature of the modern South, its uniqueness and 
variety. Some of the writers included are Tennessee 
Williams, Eudora Welty and William Faulkner. 

AML 4606 Studies in 19th-century African American 
Literature (3). An examination of literary works written by 
African Americans during the 19th Century. May be 
repeated with change of content. 

AML 4607 Studies in 20th-century African American 
Literature (3). An examination of literary works written by 
African Americans during the 20th Century. May be 
repeated with change of content. 

AML 4621 Major African American Writers (3). An 

examination of selected African American writers. May be 
repeated with change of content. 

AML 4624 African American Women Writers (3). A 

study of the writings of African American women. May be 
repeated with change of content. 

AML 4300 Major American Writers (3). Each section of 
this course will consider the works of one, two, or three 
major American writers. The writers studied in this course 
will change from semester to semester. May be repeated 
with change of content. 

AML 4306 Mark Twain (3) Study of the writings of 
American humorist and novelist Mark Twain including 
Roughing It, Innocents Abroad and Huckleberry Finn. 

AML 4312 Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner (3) 

Analysis of the most important novels of Hemingway, 
Fitzgerald and Faulkner including The Sun Also Rises, 
The Great Gatsby and The Sound and the Fury. 



138 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



AML 4503 Periods in American Literature (3). individual 
sections will read and discuss works in the colonial, 
federal, antebellum, reconstruction, or modern periods. 
May be repeated with change of content. 

AML 4930 Special Topics in American Literature (3). 

An examination of different aspects of American literature. 
May be repeated with a change of content. 

AML 5305 Major American Literary Figures (3). Each 
section will consider the lifework of several authors such 
as Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Twain, James, 
Faulkner, Mailer, Wright, Baldwin. May be repeated with 
change of content. 

AML 5505 Periods in American Literature (3). The 

literature and criticism regarding one specified period of 
American literature, such as colonial, federal, 
transcendental, antebellum, or twentieth century. May be 
repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

CRW 2001 Introduction to Creative Writing (3). 

Beginning course designed to acquaint students with 
elementary critical vocabulary and writing skills necessary 
for the writing of poems and short fiction. Students may 
also be required to read and discuss published writing. 
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or equivalent. 

CRW 3111 Narrative Techniques (3). Analysis of and 
exercises in the elements of fiction: point of view, conflict, 
characterization, tone. Students will do various short 
assignments and one short story. Reading of published 
fiction will also be required. Prerequisite: CRW 2001. 

CRW 3311 Poetic Techniques (3). Analysis of and 
exercises in poetic techniques. Students will write poems 
in which they employ one or more technical skills. 
Reading and discussion of published poems will be 
required. Prerequisite: CRW 2001. 

CRW 4110 Writing Fiction (5). An intermediate course in 
writing fiction. May be repeated. Prerequisite: CRW 3111. 

CRW 4310 Writing Poetry (5). An intermediate course in 
writing poetry. May be repeated. Prerequisite: CRW 3311. 

CRW 4900 Independent Study in Creative Writing (3). 

Development and completion of an independent project in 
creative writing undertaken with the consent of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: CRW 2001. 

CRW 4930 Special Topics in Creative Writing (1-5). A 

course designed to give students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies in aspects of creative writing not otherwise 
offered. May be repeated. Prerequisite: CRW 2001. 

CRW 4931 Special Topics in Creative Writing (1-5). 

Gives students an opportunity to pursue special studies in 
aspects of creative writing not otherwise offered. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: CRW 2001 and three hours of 
CRW on the 3000/4000 level. 

ENC 1930 Essay Writing (3). A course in writing short 
descriptive, analytic, and argumentative essays. Dees not 
fulfill core curriculum requirement. Students who have 
completed ENC 1101 or ENC 1102, or both, cannot 
receive credit for this course. 

ENC 1101 Freshman Composition (3). Students will be 
introduced to the principles and process of expository, 
persuasive, and reflective writing. The first of a two- 



semester freshman composition sequence. Written work 
meets state composition requirement of 6,000 written 
words. 

ENC 1102 Literary Analysis (3). A continuation of ENC 
1101. Develops an analytical, aesthetic, and cultural 
sensitivity to literature and further explores the techniques 
of composition and library research. 

ENC 1200 Business Letter and Reports (3). Intensive 
instruction and practice in the organization, content, and 
style of business letters of all kinds: special 
correspondence formats (bid proposals, customer 
relations), memoranda, feasibility reports, speeches, and 
group conference reports. 

ENC 2210 Technical Writing (3). Effective presentation 
of technical and semi-technical information: technical 
description, information gathering, general technical 
reports, organization and development of information, 
process communication. Written work meets state 
composition requirement of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 2301 Expository Writing (3). An advanced 
composition course in the techniques of exposition, 
argumentation, and persuasion. Written work meets state 
composition requirement of 6,000 written words. 

ENC 3211 Report and Technical Writing (3). For 

business, professional, and scientific students needing 

practice in collecting, organizing, interpreting, and 
presenting factual material. 

ENC 3311 Advanced Writing and Research (3). 

Provides instruction in the concepts and methods of 
critical response and argumentation, and in the 
formulation, analysis, and presentation of original 
research in extended academic papers. Written work 
meets state composition requirement of 6,000 written 
words. Prerequisites: ENC 1101, ENC 1102 or equivalent. 

ENC 3317 Writing Across the Curriculum (3). An 

interdisciplinary, upper division writing course in which 
students explore substance and style as they compose 
essays on subjects from various fields. Written work 
meets state composition requirement of 6,000 written 
words. 

ENC 4240 Report Writing (3). Instruction and practice in 
writing reports for practical purposes. Collecting, 
organizing, and interpreting facts, then writing up findings 
in report form and style. Includes recommendation 
reports, use of graphical elements, writing manuals and 
instructions, physical research reports, feasibility reports, 
progress reports, other specialized report formats. 
Prerequisites: ENC 1200 or ENC 2210. 

ENC 4241 Scientific Writing (3). Develops skills 
necessary to write laboratory reports, scientific proposals, 
articles, research reports, progress reports, and seminar 
presentations. 

ENC 4355 Writing About Film (3). Introduces students to 
writing critical reviews and analyses of film narrative. 
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102. 

ENC 4930 Special Topics in. Composition (3). Allows 
students to refine nonfiction writing skills in a variety of 
genres. May be repeated. Prerequisites: ENC 1101, ENC 
1102 or equivalent. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 139 



ENG 2001 Modes of Inquiry (3). A research and report 
writing course. A final research project is required. Basic 
bibliographical tools, library use, and technical and 
scientific reporting will be the main subject matter, 
emphasizing style, structure, and tone in a variety of 
research modes. 

ENG 2012 Approaches to Literature (3). In this course, 
students will study analysis of the meaning and artistry of 
literary texts. Students will read and interpret 
representative poems, short stories, and plays. Written 
work meets state composition requirement of 6,000 
written words. 

ENG 2100 Introduction to Film (3). Introduces students 
to the basic artistic and compositional elements of film 
and the analysis of the relationship between technical and 
aesthetic aspects of film. Prerequisite: ENC 1101. 

ENG 3138 The Movies (3). Viewing and discussion of 
films, with attention to cinematic ways of story-telling and 
to the popular film as an expression of cultural values. 
May be retaken for credit with change of content. 

ENG 3930 Proseminar in English Studies (3). An 

introduction to literary studies, examining the history and 
structure of the discipline practiced in various kinds of 
formal analyses, critical writing, and literary research. 

ENG 4013 History of Literary Criticism (3). A study of 
the major texts in literary criticism and theory from Plato to 
the present. 

ENG 4022 Rhetoric and Poetics (3). Ancient and 
modern theory and practice in discussing the formal 
properties of elevated language. 

ENG 4023 Semiotics and Narratology (3). This course 
studies Semiotics (the science of signs and sign system) 
and Narratology (theories about the nature of narratives) 
in an attempt to characterize the nature of how a story 
gets told/shown. 

ENG 4043 Contemporary Literary Theory and Criticism 
(3). An examination of the works of recent literary 
theorists. 

ENG 4121 History of the Film (3). Discussion, with 
examples, of the development of cinematic art, from its 
European and American beginnings to its place as a 
major world art form. 

ENG 4132 Studies in the Film (3). Intensive examination 
of the work of a particular nation, group, or director. May 
also explore various film genres, e.g., documentary, 
horror, the Western. With change of content, may be 
retaken for credit. 

ENG 4134 Women and Film (3). An examination of how 
women have been represented in dominant commercial 
films and how women filmmakers have responded to the 
appropriation of the image of women through alternative 
film narratives. 

ENG 4135 The Rhetoric of Cinema (3). An examination 
of how films are constructed cinematically and narratively 
to involve audiences on aesthetic, intellectual and 
ideological levels. 

ENG 4319 Film Humor and Comedy (3). Examines the 
nature of humor and comedy and its relation to film 



narrative. Films from all periods of cinematic history will 
be viewed. 

ENG 4906 Independent Study (VAR). Individual 

conferences, assigned readings, and reports on 

independent investigations. By permission of the 
instructor. 

ENG 4936 Honors Seminar (3). Designed specifically for 
honors students and other superior, highly motivated 
students. Seminar topics will vary from semester to 
semester. 

ENG 4949 Cooperative Education in English (1-3). A 

student majoring in English may spend one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry or government in a 
capacity relating to the major. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Cooperative Education Program and major department. 

ENG 5950 Special Projects in English (1-3). Pursuit of 
projects involving relationship of profession to university 
and/or community and/or research issues in pedagogy, 
literature, or other areas. Prerequisites: consent of 
Graduate Director or Department Chair. Corequisite: 
Consent of project supervisor. 

ENL 2012 Survey of British Literature I (3). Students will 
read and discuss major British works written from the 
Anglo-Saxon period through 1750. Works will be 
examined within an historical context. 

ENL 2022 Survey of British Literature II (3). Students 
will read and discuss major British works written between 
1750 and the present. The works will be examined in an 
historical context. 

ENL 3112 Development of the Novel: The 18th Century 
(3). A study of the development of the novel in England 
from Defoe and others to the Gothic novel. 

ENL 3122 Development of the Novel: The 19th Century 
(3). A study of the development of the novel in England 
from Austen to Henry James, including Bronte, Eliot and 
Dickens. 

ENL 3132 Development of the Novel: The 20th Century 
(3). A study of the development of the novel in England 
from Conrad to the present, including Lawrence, Woolf, 
and Joyce. 

ENL 3261 19th Century British Women Novelists (3). 

Examines fiction written by women in the 19th century, 
including classical realist, gothic, sensation, working- 
class, and New Woman novels. Authors include Austen, 
Eliot, Bronte, and Gaskell. 

ENL 3504 Texts and Contexts: British Literature to 
1660 (3). Explores the development of British literature 
from its beginnings to 1660 through intensive study of 
selected texts; examines interactions between texts and 
social, cultural, or political currents. 

ENL 3506 Texts and Contexts: British Literature Since 
1660 (3). Explores the development of British literature of 
the last three centuries through intensive study of selected 
texts; examines interactions between texts and social, 
cultural, and political currents. 

ENL 4161 Renaissance Drama (3). A study of non- 
Shakespearean drama of the English Renaissance 
including Jonson, Kyd, Marlowe and Webster. 



140 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



ENL 4171 Restoration and 18 Century Drama (3). 

Representative plays from the period 1660-1800. May 
include plays by Dryden, Etherege, Wycherley, Otway, 
Congreve, Farquhar, Gay, Fielding, Goldsmith and 
Sheridan. 

ENL 4210 Studies in Medieval Literature (3). Students 
will read, discuss and write about works of medieval 
English literature from Beowulf to Chaucer. 

ENL 4212 Medieval Women Writers (3). The 

contributions of medieval women to literary history are 
examined. Among the writers to be studied are Margery 
Kemp and Marie de France. 

ENL 4220 Renaissance: Prose and Poetry (3). A study 
of Renaissance poetry and prose to suggest their 
contributions to literacy history, including More, Wyatt, 
Sidney, Donne, and Bacon. 

ENL 4223 Studies in Renaissance Literature (3). 

Students will read, discuss Renaissance works excluding 
William Shakespeare. 

ENL 4225 Spenser (3). Study of the works of one of the 
most important figures of the sixteenth century including 
The Faerie Queen, The Shepheards Calender and 
Amoretti. 

ENL 4230 Studies in Restoration and 18th-century 
Literature (3). An in-depth study of the major figures in 
English Literature from 1660 to 1800, a period of transition 
between the Renaissance and modern times. Some of the 
writers who will be studied are Dryden, Pope, Swift, 
Jonson, and Fielding. 

ENL 4241 Romanticism I (3). Focuses on the first 
generation of Romantic writers, including Blake, 
Wordsworth, Wollstonecraft, and Coleridge. 

ENL 4242 Romanticism II (3). Focuses on the second 
generation of Romantic writers including Byron, Keats, 
Shelley, and Wollstonecraft-Shelley. 

ENL 4243 Studies in Romanticism (3). Examination of 
recurring themes and motifs in Romantic literature. 

ENL 4251 Victorian Literature (3). Study of the poetry 
and prose of the Victorian Age (1832-1901). Among the 
authors to be read are Dickens, Eliot, Carlyle, Ruskin, 
Arnold, Tennyson and Browning. 

ENL 4254 Late Victorian Fiction (3). An examination of 
the variety of fiction written from 1880-1901, some 
including Wells, Zangwill, Gissing and D'Arcy. 

ENL 4260 Studies in 19th-century British Literature 
(3). Students will read, discuss, and write about literary 
works produced by British Romantic and Victorian writers 
between the Age of Wordsworth and the death of Queen 
Victoria. 

ENL 4273 Studies in Modern British Literature (3). This 
course focuses on the literature of the 20th Century, 
limiting itself to British writers, but including the various 
genres of the modern and post modern periods. 

ENL 4274 Yeats and His Contemporaries (3). Studies 
the major works of William Butler Yeats and some of his 
contemporaries and associates. 

ENL 4303 Major British Writers (3). Each section will 
consider the lifework of an author such as Chaucer, 



Spenser, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, Dickens, Browning, 
Joyce, or others. May be repeated with change of content. 

ENL 4311 Chaucer (3). Study of Geoffrey Chaucer's 
contributions to English literary history. Among the works 
to be examined are The Canterbury Tales, The Parliament 
of Fowls and The Book of the Duchess. 

ENL 4320 Shakespeare: Histories (3). Reading and 
informal dramatic interpretation of representative plays. 

ENL 4321 Shakespeare: Comedies (3). Reading and 
informal dramatic interpretation of representative plays. 

ENL 4322 Shakespeare: Tragedies (3). Reading and 
informal dramatic interpretation of representative plays. 

ENL 4341 Milton (3). Study of the poetic and prose 
contributions of John Milton including the influence of the 
literature of antiquity on Milton, and his influence on 
subsequent poets. 

ENL 4370 Virginia Woolf and Her Circle (3). Focusing 
on the works of Virginia Woolf. This course also explores 
how the members of the Bloomsburg Circle influenced 
this English novelist. 

ENL 4412 Anglo-Jewish Literature: 19 th Century to the 
Present (3). Fiction, essays, and poetry of Jewish writers 
in Britian and Ireland from 1800 to the present day. 
Authors may include Aguilar, Levy, Zangwill, Sinclair, 
Gershon, and others. 

ENL 4503 Periods in English Literature (3). Individual 
sections will read a group of literary works from one 
specified period of English literature, such as the 
Medieval, Renaissance, Victorian, twentieth-century and 
contemporary periods. May be repeated with change of 
content. 

ENL 4930 Special Topics in English Literature (3). An 
examination of the different aspects of English literature. 
May be repeated with change of content. 

ENL 5220 Major British Literary Figures (3). Each 
section will consider the lifework of an author such as 
Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, Dickens, 
Browning, Joyce, or others. May be repeated. 

ENL 5505 Periods in English Literature (3). The 
literature and criticism regarding one specified period of 
English Literature, such as Medieval, Renaissance, 
Victorian, Twentieth Century, and Contemporary. May be 
repeated with change of period. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

FIL 3006 Introduction to Film (3). The first required 
course for the Film Studies Certificate Program. 
Introduces students to cinema as an institution as well as 
its role as textual narrative. Provides students with an 
understanding of the ways films can be analyzed and 
understood. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in Certificate 
Program. 

FIL 4529 Czech Film / Karlovy Vary Film Festival (3). 

This course will cover the Czech Film industry from its 
inception in the 1 920's to the present day with side trips to 
the Karlovy Vary Film Festival in the Czech Republic and 
Barrondov Studios in Prague. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

FIL 4940 Internship in Film Studies (1-12). Students 
enrolled in the Film Studies Certificate Program work at 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 141 



the FIU Film Society and related film activities on archival 
research as well as working on organizing various aspects 
of the FIU Miami Film Festival including the concurrent 
seminars. Prerequisites: Introduction to Film Studies and 
History of Film. 

LIN 2002 Introduction to Language (3). The study of the 
nature of human language, its origins, and its relation to 
thinking behavior, and culture. An examination of the 
similarities and differences between spoken human 
languages, animal languages, and non verbal 
communication (including sign language); of language 
variation between dialects and between different historical 
stages of a language; and of writing systems. 

LIN 2612 Black English (3). This course covers the 
varieties of Black English spoken in the Americas, the 
Caribbean, and West Africa. Focuses on the nature of 
these English varieties and their social uses within the 
community, literature, and educational system. 

LIN 3013 General Linguistics (3). Study of the sounds, 
vocabulary, and sentence patterns of standard modern 
English. Other topics include meaning, social and regional 
dialects, language change, and style. Subsequent credit 
for LIN 3010 or SPN 3733 will not be granted. 

LIN 3670 Grammatical Usage (3). The study of formal, 
traditional usage of English grammar and mechanics. 
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102. 

LIN 4122 Historical Linguistics (3). The study of 
linguistic methodology for determining historical and 
genetic relationships among languages. Prerequisites: 
Introductory course in Linguistics or permission of the 
instructor. 

LIN 4321 General Phonology (3). The study of 
phonological processes in language and linguistic 
methodology for phonological analysis. Prerequisites: 
Introductory course in Linguistics or permission of the 
instructor. 

LIN 4430 General Morphology and Syntax (3). The 

study of linguistic methodology for determining the 
morphological and syntactic structures of languages. 
Prerequisites: Introductory course in Linguistics or 
permission of the instructor. 

LIN 4612 Black English (3). This course is a linguistic 
approach to the characteristics and functions of Black 
English and the current social controversies surrounding 
it. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

LIN 4651 Gender and Language (3). Examines the 
evidence on a variety of questions regarding women and 
language, including women's speech in English and other 
languages, sexist language, and the relationship between 
language and societal attitudes towards women. 

LIN 4680 Modern English Grammar (3). Practical study 
of syntax. 

LIN 4702 Applied Linguistics (3). Linguistics in the 
classroom. English as a second language. Stylistics. 
Dialects. Prerequisite: LIN 3013. 

LIN 4801 Semantics (3). The study of the semantic 
structure of languages. The structures underlying the 
meanings of words and underlying syntactic structures. 
Prerequisites: Introductory course in Linguistics or 
permission of the instructor. 



LIN 4905 Independent Study (VAR). This course is 
designed for students who wish to pursue specialized 
topics in advanced Linguistics: phonetics, phonology, 
morphology, syntax, semantics, psycholinguistics, 
historical linguistics, or language contact. Prerequisites: 
Introductory course in Linguistics or permission of the 
instructor. 

LIN 5211 Applied Phonetics (3). Study of sounds and 
suprasegmentals of English. Comparison of phonetic 
features of English with those of other languages. 
Universal constraints and markedness in learning 
second/foreign language pronunciation. Prerequisites: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, or LIN 5018 or the equivalent. 

LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction (3). This course offers 
an introduction to the basic elements of prose fiction: 
symbolism, plot, imagery, structure, characterization, 
style, point of view. Prerequisite: ENC 1101. 

LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry (3). This course offers 
an introduction to the basic elements of poetry: imagery, 
figurative language, diction, style, tone, prosody. 
Prerequisite: ENC 1101. 

LIT 2040 Introduction to Drama (3). This course will 
introduce the student to the basic elements of drama and 
its various forms, modes, and techniques. Students will 
read 10-12 plays by representative English, American, 
and European authors. Prerequisite: ENC 1101. 

LIT 2110 World Literature I (3). Surveys the literature of 
many cultures from the beginning of written texts through 
the 16th century. Usually excludes British works. 

LIT 2120 World Literature II (3). This course surveys the 
literature of Asia and Europe from the 1 7th century to the 
present. It gives attention to the themes and world views 
these works embody, as well as to their artistry. 

LIT 3022 The Short Novel (3). An examination of the 
variety of short novels that have been written in the past 
three centuries. Short novels from Europe and the 
Americas are discussed. 

LIT 3050 Forms of Satire (3). This course will discuss the 
history and the different forms of satire from the Romans 
to the present, including the works of Horace, Juvenal, 
Swift, and Byron. 

LIT 3132 Arthurian Literature (3). The legend of King 
Arthur is examined both in the original medieval version 
and in the subsequent retelling. 

LIT 3145 Continental Novel (3). A study of the works of 
the major European novelists of the 19th and 20th 
centuries. Some of the writers whose work are read in 
translation are Tolstoy, Mann, and Flaubert. 

LIT 3170 Topics in Literature and Jewish Culture (3). 

An examination of literature by or about Jews in a variety 
of national, cultural, or historical contexts. May be 
repeated with change of content. 

LIT 3190 Survey of Caribbean Literature (3). The 

narratives, poetry, and fiction from the beginning of the 
Caribbean literary tradition to the present time. 

LIT 3200 Themes in Literature (3). Individual sections 
will read and discuss works relating to topics of current 
and enduring interest. Discussion of literature as it reflects 
the identities of men and women: their places in families 



142 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



in past, present, and future societies, in the natural world, 
and the cosmic order. May be repeated. 

LIT 3331 Classics of Children's Literature (3). An 

examination of literary texts that form part of the 
imaginative experience of children, as well as part of our 
literary heritage. 

LIT 3383 Women in Literature (3). Students will examine 
the images of women created by European and American 
writers. The course will also explore the roles, historical 
and contemporary, of women writers. 

LIT 3384 Caribbean Women Writers (3). Examination of 
the writings of Caribbean women. 

LIT 3673 Migrant Stories: Literature of the Immigration 
Experience (3). Fiction, essays, poetry, and drama of 
immigrants to England and America. Course may focus 
on Jewish, Caribbean, or other groups, or comparative 
studies. 

LIT 3674 Literature of the Jewish Immigration 
Experience (3). Fiction, essays, poetry, and drama of 
Jewish immigrants to English-speaking countries. Course 
may focus on the great wave, 1880-1920, or other 
periods. Authors may include Antin, Cahan, Lazarus, 
Yezierska, Zangwill and others. 

LIT 3702 Major Literary Modes (3). Individual sections 
will read and discuss the literary expression of heroic, 
tragic, comic, satiric, mythic, realistic, or others formalized 
views of human existence. May be repeated. 

LIT 3202 Morality and Justice in Literature (3). A study 
of the ways literary texts articulate the values of their 
society. 

LIT 3930 Special Topics (3). A course designed to give 
students an opportunity to pursue special studies not 
otherwise offered. May be repeated with change of 
content. 

LIT 4001 Major Literary Genres (3). Individual sections 
will read and discuss the form and development of novels, 
drama, poetry, short fiction, or such special forms as 
biographies, folksongs and tales, or essays, among other 
genres. May be repeated. 

LIT 4041 17th Century Drama (3). A study of Western 
European drama of the seventeenth century including 
Calderon, Jonson, Tirso de Molina, Corneille, Racine, 
Wycherley, and Congreve. 

LIT 4188 Regional Literature in English (3). Individual 
sections will discuss English writing in Ireland, Scotland, 
Wales, Canada, the Caribbean, India, sub-Saharan 
Africa, and Oceania, as well as distinctive regions in 
England and America. May be repeated. 

LIT 4192 Major Caribbean Authors (3). Examines the 
literary achievements of major writers of the Caribbean 
region in the social, political, and cultural contexts of the 
English, French, and Dutch Caribbean. 

LIT 4197 Global Asian Literature (3). Focus on issues of 
migration and identity in literature by writers of South and 
East Asian descent. 

LIT 4351 Major African Writers (3). Surveys a variety of 
literary texts relevant to life in post-colonial Africa. 



LIT 4356 Literature of the Cuban Diaspora (3). A survey 
of literatures written by Cuban-Americans and other 
writers of the Cuban diaspora. Texts will be in English or 
English translations. 

LIT 4364 Post Totalitarian Literature (3). Covers the 
major literary works which have been published in the 
Czech Republic and Slovakia since the fall of 
Communism there in 1989. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

LIT 4382 Women in Post Communist Eastern Europe 

(3). An examination of the role of women in Eastern 
Europe, particularly in the former Czechoslovakia, since 
the fall of Communism there in 1989. 

LIT 4403 Literature Among the Arts and Sciences (3). 

Individual sections will relate the study of literature to 
other disciplines in the humanities, fine arts, the social 
and natural sciences. May be repeated. 

LIT 4420 The Psychological Novel (3). This course 
concentrates on novels which explore the complexities of 
the human psyche. 

LIT 4930 Special Topics (3). A course designed to give 
groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. May be repeated. 

LIT 4931 Special Topics in Women's Literature (3). An 

examination of different aspects of literature by women. 
May be repeated with a change of content. 

LIT 4950 Czech Study Abroad (3). Covers the major 
literary movements and figures in the Czech Republic and 
Slovakia that have influenced the Western literary canon. 
The course is taught by FIU and Czech faculty. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. 

LIT 5358 Black Literature and Literary/Cultural Theory 
(3). Examines 20C. black literary critical thought. 
Students interrogate cultural theories and literary texts 
from African, Caribbean, African-American, Black British 
and Afro-Brazilian communities. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

LIT 5359 African Diaspora Women Writers (3). Study of 
black women writers from throughout the Diaspora from 
the early 19 lh century to present. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

LIT 5934 Special Topics (3). A course designed to give 
groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. May be repeated. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 143 



Environmental Studies 

Joel Heinen, Associate Professor and Chairperson 

Bradley Bennett, Associate Professor 

Mahadev Bhat, Associate Professor 

Brian Bovard, Instructor 

David Bray, Professor 

Anne Hartley, Assistant Professor 

Krishnaswamy Jayachandran, Associate Professor 

Stephen P. Leatherman, Professor (International 

Hurricane Center) 
Michael McClain, Associate Professor 
Jack Meeder, Research Scientist (Southeast 

Environmental Research Center) 
Assefa Melesse, Assistant Professor 
John Parker, Professor 
Tom Pliske, Instructor 
Gary Rand, Professor 
Mike Ross, Research Scientist (Southeast Environmental 

Research Center) 
Raymond Scattone, Assistant Professor 
Rebecca Zarger, Assistant Professor 
Keqi Zhang, Assistant Professor and Research Scientist 

(International Hurricane Center) 
Affiliated Faculty 
William Anderson, Earth Sciences 
Jerry Brown, Sociology/Anthropology 
Yong Cai, Chemistry 
Daniel Childers, Biological Sciences 
Alice Clarke, US Park Service 
Maureen Donnelly, Biological Sciences 
Jim Fourqurean, Biological Sciences 
Jennifer (Zhaohui) Fu, GIS-RS Center 
Evelyn Gaiser, Biological Sciences 
Piero R. Gardinali, Chemistry 
Jennifer Gebelein, International Relations 
Gail Hollander, International Relations 
James Huchingson, Religious Studies 
Rudolf Jaffe, Chemistry 
Jeff Joens, Chemistry 
B. M. Golam Kibria, Statistics 
Suzanne Koptur, Biological Sciences 
David Lee, Biological Sciences 
Andrew Mathews, Sociology/Anthropology 
Rod Neumann, International Relations 
Michael Norland, S. Fla Natural Resource Center 
Steve Oberbauer, Biological Sciences 
Laura Ogden, Sociology/Anthropology 
Kevin O'Shea, Chemistry 
Tom Philippi, Biological Sciences 
Rene Price, Earth Sciences 
Stewart Reed, US Department of Agriculture 
James Riach, Adjunct Professor 
Len Scinto, Southeast Environmental Center 
Berrin Tansel, Civil and Environmental Engineering 
Joel Trexler, Biological Sciences 
Bill Vickers, Sociology/Anthropology 
Yan Yan Zhou, Statistics 

This department prepares students to work in 
professions with an environmental focus. The Bachelor 
of Science degree emphasizes the chemical and 
ecological aspects of environmental analysis. The 
Bachelor of Arts degree is broader, with an emphasis 



on the political, social and economic aspects of 
environmental issues. This is an interdisciplinary 
program and faculty represent disciplines from 
chemistry to anthropology. It also relies upon affiliated 
faculty in other departments for some courses. 

Bachelor of Science in Environmental 
Studies 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 
Required Courses 
Common Prerequisites 



BSC1010 
BSC 1010L 
BSC1011 
BSC1011L 
CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 
CHM 1046 
CHM 1046L 
GLY1010 
GLY1010L 

EVR3010 



PHY 2023 
MAC 2132 



MAC 1105 



General Biology I 

General Biology I Lab 

General Biology II 

General Biology II Lab 

General Chemistry I 

General Chemistry I Lab 

General Chemistry II 

General Chemistry II Lab 

Introduction to Earth Science 

Introduction to Earth Science Lab 

and 

Energy Flow in Natural and Man-made 

Systems 

or 

Survey of General Physics 

Pre-Calculus Mathematics 



College Algebra 

and 
MAC 1114 Trigonometry 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Lower or Upper Division Requirements 



ECO 2023 
STA 31 1 1 
STA3112 


Microeconomics 
Statistics I 
Statistics II 


3 
4 
2 


MAC 231 1 
CHM 2200 
CHM 2200L 


Calculus I 

Survey of Organic Chemistry 

Survey of Organic Chemistry Lab 


4 
3 
1 


CHM 2210 
CHM2210L 

CHM 2211 
CHM 221 1L 


Organic Chemistry I 

Organic Chemistry I Lab 

and 

Organic Chemistry II 

Organic Chemistry II Lab 


4 
1 

3 
1 



Upper Division Program 

Recommended Courses 

ANT 3403 Cultural Ecology 

ENC 321 1 Report and Technical Writing 

POS 2042 American Government 

or 
POS 3424 Legislative Process 

REL 3492 Earth Ethics 



144 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Required Courses 

EVR4211 Water Resources 3 

EVR 421 1 L Water Resources Lab 1 

PCB 3043 Ecology 3 

PCB 3043L Ecology Lab 1 

CHM 3120 Analytical Chemistry 3 

CHM3120L Analytical Chemistry Lab 1 

ECP 3302 Introduction to Environmental 

Economics 3 

PUP 4203 Environmental Politics 3 

or 

EVR 4352 U.S. Environmental Policy 3 

Two of the following four courses: 

EVR 4026 Ecology of Biotic Resources 3 

EVR 4231 Air Resources 3 

EVR 4310 Energy Resources 3 

EVR 4592 Soils and Ecosystems 3 

EVR 4592L Soils and Ecosystems Lab 1 

EVR 4920 Environmental Studies Seminar 1 

EVR 4905 Independent Study 2 

Additional Environmental Studies Courses 6 

Electives 1 3 

Students are urged to develop an area of specialization 
of 12 to 15 credits or a minor in consultation with an 
advisor. 
Total semester hours 60 

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental 
Studies 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Program 
Recommended Courses 

PSC 1515 Energy and the Natural Environment 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Common Prerequisite 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics 

Two of the following: 

BSC 101 1/101 1L Organismal Biology and Lab 
CHM 1 032/1 032L Chemistry & Society and Lab 
GLY 101 0/1 01 0L Introduction to Earth Science 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program 
Recommended Courses 



ANT 3403 Cultural Ecology 

ENC 321 1 Report & Technical Writing 

POS2042 American Government 



POS 3424 Legislative Process 3 

Required Courses: (32) 

EVR 3010 Energy Flow in Natural and Man-made 

Systems 3 

EVR 301 1 Environmental Resources and Pollution 3 

EVR 301 1 L Environmental Resources and Pollution 



Lab 1 

EVR 3013 Ecology of South Florida 3 

EVR 301 3L Ecology of South Florida Lab 1 

EVR 4415 Population & Environment Issues 3 

EVR 4352 US Environmental Policy 3 

or 

PUP 4203 Environmental Politics 3 

REL 3492 Earth Ethics 3 

STA3111 Statistics I 4 
ECP 3302 Introduction to Environmental 

Economics 3 
EVR 441 1 Human Organization & Ecosystems 

Management 3 

EVR 4905 Independent Study 2 

EVR 4920 Environmental Seminar 1 

EVR 4869L Environmental Problem Solving Lab 2 

Area of Specialization Courses: (12) 

The student must take at least twelve additional credits 
in an approved area of specialization, such as energy and 
resource management, human ecology, environmental 
education, environmental policy, international 
environmental issues, geography or ecology. Six of the 12 
credits must be from EVR courses. Note: Minors may be 
substituted for an area of specialization. 
Electives 16 

Total semester hours 60 

Minor In Environmental Studies 

Required Courses 

1 . Four of the following approved courses, including at 
least two of the first four. 

EVR 4026 Ecology of Biotic Resources 3 

EVR 421 1 Water Resources 3 

EVR 4231 Air Resources 3 

EVR 4310 Energy Resources 3 

EVR 4401 Conservation Biology 3 

EVR 4323 Restoration Ecology 3 

2. One of the following courses: 

EVR 4415 Population and Environment Issues 3 

EVR 4321 Sustainable Resource Development 3 

EVR 4352 US Environmental Policy 3 

Total Credits 15 

Grades of 'C or better required for all courses. A list of 
additional approved environmental science courses, 
subject to change, is available in the Department of 
Environmental Studies. 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate degree in 
environmental studies may also take part in the 
Cooperative Education Program conducted in conjunction 
with the Department of Cooperative Education in the 
Division of Student Affairs. The student spends one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry or a governmental 
agency. For further information consult the Department of 
Cooperative Education. 

Environmental Internships 

Students interested in job-related academic internships 
should enroll in the Environmental Studies office. For 
details on compensation, benefits, and academic credit, 
contact Dr. Jack Parker. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 145 



Course Descriptions 

(Course descriptions are also found in catalog sections of 
all participating departments. For assistance see an 
advisor.) 

Definition of Prefixes 

EVR-Environmental Studies. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 

Summer semester offering. 

EVR 1001 Introduction to Environmental Sciences (3). 

A physical science course for non-science majors, 
emphasizing air and water pollution, water rescources, 
solid waste management, and energy resources. (F,S, 
SS) 

EVR 1001 L Introduction to Environment Sciences Lab 
(1). Laboratory analysis and field trips on topics and 
concepts covered in Introduction to Environmental 
Sciences. (F,S,SS) 

EVR 1017 The Global Environment and Society (3). A 

broad introduction to the impact of social and economic 
processes on the global environment, including historical 
and comparative dimension. (F, S) 

EVR 3010 Energy Flow in Natural and Man-made 
Systems (3). A course for non-science majors, examining 
energy use and efficiency, nuclear and renewable energy 
sources (including solar energy), and their environmental 
impacts. Prerequisites: College algebra or equivalent. 
(F,S) 

EVR 3011 Environmental Resources and Pollution (3). 

A course for non-science majors, focusing on dynamics of 
pollution and environmental toxicology with emphasis on 
energy consumption and production, solid wastes, and air 
and water resources. (F,S,SS) 

EVR 301 1L Environmental Science: Pollution Lab (1). 

Laboratory and field analyses of topics and concepts 
covered in EVR 3011. Corequisite: EVR 3011. (F,S,SS) 

EVR 3013 Ecology of South Florida (3) EVR 301 3L 
Ecology of South Florida Lab (1). A course for non- 
science majors, offering an introduction to the ecology of 
South Florida through lectures and a series of field trips 
into several unique ecosystems, such as the Everglades, 
hardwood hammocks, and coastal regions. The course 
also deals with natural resource conservation, wildlife 
management, endangered species, and wilderness 
issues. (F,S,SS) 

EVR 3029 The Everglades (3). An interdisciplinary 
examination of the Everglades system, including natural 
history, human history, esthetics, and politics/policy of 
restoration. 

EVR 3402 Asian Environmental Issues (3) An overview 
of emerging environmental issues in Asian countries. 
Discussion of cultural, economic, and political systmes of 
the region and their influence on the environment. 

EVR 3931 Topics in Environmental Studies (3). An 
intensive analysis of a current environmental topic. 
Course may be repeated with change in content. 

EVR 3949/EVR 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Environmental Studies (1-3). One semester of full-time 
supervised work in an outside laboratory taking part in the 
University Co-op Program. Limited to students admitted to 



the Co-op Program. A written report and supervisor 
evaluations will be required of each student. (F,S,SS) 

EVR 4026 Ecology of Biotic Resources (3). The study of 
renewable natural resources of the earth's biomes, 
particularly those of tropical forests, the factors influencing 
their productivity, conservation, and human use. 
Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and BSC 1011. 

EVR 4211 Water Resources (3). A seminar dealing with 
various aspects of water use, water pollution problems, 
chemistry and ecology of South Florida's waters. Ecology 
is recommended. Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 
1046 or equivalent and general biology. (F) 

EVR 421 1L Water Resources Lab (1). Laboratory course 
on procedures currently suitable and widely accepted for 
physical, chemical, and biological methods in the 
examination of water. Prerequisites: CHM 1045 & CHM 
1046 or equivalent and General Biology. 

EVR 4231 Air Resources (3). Common air pollutants - 
their sources and methods of control. Different legislative 
and administrative approaches will be studied. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1045 and CHM 1046 or equivalent. 
(S) 

EVR 4310 Energy Resources (3). Seminar dealing with 
power and energy production in modern society, 
fundamental energy relationships of industrial and 
domestic processes. Prerequisites: EVR 3010 or PHY 
2023 or equivalent. (S) 

EVR 4321 Sustainable Resource Development (3). An 

overview of social, economic and ecological approaches 
to sustainable resource development. Examines various 
policies for harmonizing economic growth and 
environmental sustainability. 

EVR 4323 Restoration Ecology (3). Principles and 
practices of environmental restoration, recreation and 
enhancement. Examines ecological theory that relates to 
restoration through case studies from southern Florida. 
Prerequisites: EVR 3013 or PCB 3043 or permission. 

EVR 4351 U.S. Energy Policy (3). Policies governing the 
utilization of energy in the U.S. Focuses on the physical, 
political and social constraints that shape energy policy in 
this country. Prerequisites: EVR 3010 or permission of the 
instructor. 

EVR 4352 U.S. Environmental Policy (3). Introduction to 
U.S. environmental policy. Reviews primary U.S. 
environmental legislation and the role of regulation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

EVR 4401 Conservation Biology (3). Applies modern 
theory from ecology and population genetics to 
conservation issues. Topics include population viability 
studies, reserve design, forms of rarity, and policy issues. 
Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and BSC 1011. 

EVR 4411 Human Organizations and Ecosystem 
Management (3). Environmental aspects of 
organizational theory and strategic management in 
indigenous and other local communities, non- 
governmental organizations, governments, and the 
provate sector are discussed. Prerequisite: An 
introductory Environmental Studies course. 

EVR 4415 Population and Environment Issues (3). 

Examines the history, current status and projected growth 



146 College of Arts and Sciences 



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of the human population in relation to environmental 
issues. Prerequisites: College algebra and STA 3111 (or 
equivalent), or permission of instructor.(F) 

EVR 4592 Soils and Ecosystems (3). A review of basic 
soil science concepts; analyses of basic physical and 
chemical properties of soils, emphasizing soils in South 
Florida ecosystems. Prerequisites: BSC 1010 and CHM 
1045, or permission of the instructor. 

EVR 4592L Soils and Ecosystems Lab (1). Laboratory 
exercises provide soil characterization techniques used in 
soil science and complement the lectures by carrying out 
experiments illustrating soil science cincepts, soil 
formation, soil properties, and soil nutrients cycling. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1046, BSC 1011, CHM 3120 and their 
corresponding labs. Corequisite: EVR 4592. 

EVR 4869L Environmental Problem Solving Lab (2). 

Provides first-hand experience in solving environmental 
problems (problem definition, study design, data 
collection, analysis & reporting). Includes use of case 
study, social survey, computer modeling and GIS 
techniques. Prerequisites: STA 3111, ECO 2023 and 
either EVR 3010, EVR 3011 or EVR 3013, or permission 
of instructor. 

EVR 4905 Research and Independent Study (Var). 

Student develops and carries out research project with 
guidance from professor. Permission of the instructor. 

EVR 4920 Environmental Studies Seminar (1). Series of 
talks by FIU and external experts addressing both 
development of professional skills and current 
environmental topics. Students prepare short 
presentations. 

EVR 4934 Special Topics (1-3). Advanced 
undergraduate level course dealing with selected 
environmental topics. Course may be repeated with 
change in content. 

EVR 4XXX Introduction to GIS (3). To study the 
functionalities of the popular desktop GIS programs Arc 
view, as well as the basic concepts of GIS and DRMS. 
The focus will be on data acuisition, analysis and 
synthesis using GIS approach. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

EVR 5061 South Florida Ecology: Field Studies (3). 

Introduction to ecology of South Florida. Series of field 
trips to unique ecosystems (Everglades, hard-wood 
hammocks, coastal regions). No science background 
required. Intended for teachers. Not intended for 
Environmental Studies graduate students. 

EVR 5065 Ecology of Costa Rican Rainforest (3). 

Intensive study of Central American tropical forest 
ecosystems conducted for two weeks in Costa Rica in 
sites ranging from lowland to high mountains. Primarily for 
teachers. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. (SS) 

EVR 5066 Ecology of the Amazon Flooded Forest (3). 

Study of the ecology of the flooded forest with emphasis 
on the relationships between plants and animals and the 
annual flooding cycle. The course includes a two-week 
field study at river camp in Peru. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instructor. (SS) 



EVR 5067 Tropical Forest Conservation and Utilization 
(3). Distribution and classification of tropical forest 
ecosystems, their description and the ecological principles 
governing their function. Factors influencing tropical forest 
utilization and destruction, and strategies for sustainable 
use and conservation. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or 
permission of the instructor. 

EVR 5236 Air Pollution Dynamics (3). A course 
designed to give an understanding of the fates of 
atmospheric pollutants. Scavenging processes in the 
atmosphere; radiation, residence times, chemical 
reactions, global transport process, point source 
dispersion and modeling calculations. Prerequisites: EVS 
3360 or EVR 4231. 

EVR 5300 Topics in Urban Ecology (3). Topics include 
urban and suburban ecosystems emphasizing energy 
relations, ecological functions of urban landscapes, urban 
wildlife, urban forestry and ecological issues relevant to 
human health and well-being. Prerequisites: PCB 3043 or 
permission of the instructor. 

EVR 5313 Renewable Energy Sources (3). An analysis 
of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency 
including wind, biomass, geothermal, hydroelectric, solid 
waste, solar heating, solar cooling, and solar electricity. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

EVR 5315 Energy Resources and Systems Analysis 
(3). Detailed analysis of energy flows in natural and man- 
made systems. Energy systems analysis. Energy use 
patterns. Conventional and alternate sources of energy. 

EVR 5320 Environmental Resource Management (3). 

The scientific and philosophical basis for the management 
of renewable and non-renewable energy, mineral, air, 
water, and biotic resources. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instructor. (F) 

EVR 5330 Tropical Ecosystems Management (3). 

Analyzes the dimensions of tropical ecosystems 
management. Organizational and institutional dynamics 
of the management of tropical forests, agriecosystems, 
and coastal areas are covered. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 

EVR 5350 International Organizations & 
Environmental Politics (3). The role of international 
organizations in environmental politics and the process of 
their formation and change in response to environmental 
problems. Prerequsites: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. 

EVR 5353 International Energy Policy (3). Focuses on 
the distribution of global energy resources and related 
issues. A comparison of the energy policies of various 
countries serves as the basis for exploring alternative 
energy policy approaches. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or 
permission of the instructor. 

EVR 5355 Environmental Resource Policy (3). A survey 
of international and national environmental policy and the 
legal, economic, and administrative dimensions of 
international accords and selected U.S. law. 
Prerequisites: EVR 5320 or permission of the instructor. 
(S) 

EVR 5360 Protected Area Management (3). 

Interdisciplinary examination of ecological, administrative, 
and socio-economic aspects of managing protected 



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College of Arts and Sciences 147 



natural areas. Case studies from developed and 
developing nations. 

EVR 5405 International Biological Conservation 
Accords (3). Survey of international biological 
conservation agreements. Topics include bilateral 
migratory wildlife agreements, the Berne Convention on 
Migratory Wildlife, CITES, Ramsar, the UNCED 
Biodiversity Treaty and the Statement of Principles on 
Forests. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or permission of the 
instructor. 

EVR 5406 U.S. Endangered Species Management (3). 

History and implementation of the U.S. Endangered 
Species Act. Topics include legal and administrative 
aspects, reauthorization, procedures for recovery planning 
and conflict resolution, and biological measures of 
success. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 or permission of the 
instructor. 

EVR 5410 The Human Population and Earth's 
Ecosystems (3). Explores the impact of the human 
population of Earth's ecosystems. Reviews current 
population data at global, regional, and local scales. 
Includes study of specific South Florida carrying capacity 
issues. 

EVR 5907 Research and Independent Study (VAR). 

The student works with a professor on a research project. 
Variable credit. 

EVR 5935 Special Topics (VAR). A graduate-level 
course dealing with selected environmental topics. The 
content will not necessarily be the same each time the 
course is offered. 

EVR 5936 Topics in Environmental Studies (3). An 

analysis of several current environmental topics. 

Recommended for primary and secondary school 
teachers. 

EVS 5145 Ecotoxicology (3). Fate of chemicals and their 
acute and chronic toxicological effects on aquatic and 
wildlife systems. Dose-response relationships, 
bioavailability, bioconcentration, microbial degradation, 
and biomonitoring. Prerequisites: One year of biology and 
one year of chemistry and CHM 2200 and lab or 
permission of the instructor. 

EVS 5194 Applied Soil Biology (3). Examines biology of 
soil organisms and biologically-mediated chemical 
transformations occuring in soil ecosystems. Prerequisite: 
BSC1011. 

EVS 5637 Ecological Risk Assessment (3). Evaluation 
of risks of foreign chemicals to aquatic and terrestrial 
systems. Concepts and methodology used in the hazard 
and risk assessment of toxic effluents, chemical/oil spills, 
and contaminated sediments. Prerequisites: One year of 
biology and one year of chemistry and CHM 2200 and lab 
or permission of the instructor. 



148 College of Arts and Sciences 



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History 

Victor M. Uribe, Associate Professor and Chairperson 

N. David Cook, Professor 

John C. Coombs, Assistant Professor 

Gwyn Davies, Assistant Professor 

Rebecca Friedman, Assistant Professor 

Sherry Johnson, Associate Professor 

Alan Kahan, Associate Professor and Director of 

Graduate Studies 
Howard Kaminsky, Professor Emeritus 
Christopher Klemek, Assistant Professor 
Lara Kriegel, Assistant Professor 
Felice Lifshitz, Associate Professor 
Kenneth Lipartito, Professor 
Aurora Morcillo, Associate Professor 
Laura Nenzi, Assistant Professor 
Akin Ogundiran, Assistant Professor 
Joseph F. Patrouch, Associate Professor 
Brian Peterson, Associate Professor 
Joyce S. Peterson, Associate Professor and Associate 

Dean 
Darden Asbury Pyron, Professor 
Howard B. Rock, Professor 
Mark D. Szuchman, Professor and Interim Dean 
Kirsten Wood, Assistant Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in History 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Students interested in teacher certification should contact 
the College of Education at (305) 348-2721. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites 

Complete two of the following: 
AMH 2000 Origins of American Civilization 

AMH 2002 Modern American Civilization 

AMH 2010 American History 1607-1850 

AMH 2020 American History 1850-Present 

EUH 201 1 Western Civilization: Early European 

Civilization 
EUH 2021 Western Civilization: Medieval to 

Modern Europe 
EUH 2030 Western Civilization: Europe in the 

Modern Era 
LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization 

WOH 2001 World Civilization 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

One course, at the 3000 or 4000 level in each of the 
following areas, (indicated in brackets at the end of each 
course description in the University Catalog). 
Medieval Europe or Ancient History [1] 3 

Modern Europe [2] 3 

The United States [3] 3 

Latin America, Africa, or Asia [4] 3 

HIS 4935 Senior Seminar 3 

Any five additional History courses (at the 3000 or 4000 
level) 15 



Electives (at the 3000 or 4000 level) in any Department at 
FIU, to make up the prescribed number of credits required 
for graduation. (Ten credits maximum at the 1000 or 2000 
level for those entering as juniors or seniors). 30 

Minor in History 

Five general History courses (at the 3000 or 4000 level) 
15 semester hours. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

AFH-African History; AMH-American History; ASH-Asian 
History; EUH- European History; HIS-General; LAH-Latin 
American History; WOH-World History 

AFH 2000 African Civilizations (3). A survey of major 
historical themes and cultures of Africa. 

AFH 4100 History of Africa I (3). African history from the 
origins of humanity to the nineteenth century. Topics 
include the rise of centralized societies, the Atlantic slave 
trade, early Christianity and Islam. [4] 

AFH 4200 History of Africa II (3). African history from the 
nineteenth century to the present. Topics include 
European colonialism, the struggle for independence, and 
contemporary challenges. [4] 

AFH 4342 History of West Africa (3). This course 
surveys the developments in the western region of Africa 
from the origins of agricultural societies about 5000 B.C. 
to the present. [4] 

AFH 4405 History of East Africa (3). Surveys the 
developments in the eastern region of the continent from 
the origins of humanity in the Rift Valley to the 1994 
genocide in Rwanda. [4] 

AFH 4450 History of South Africa (3). Examines the 
development of the South African nation in terms of its 
African and European heritage from the early Khoisan 
societies through apartheid and Mandela's election. [4] 

AFH 5905 Readings in African History (3). An 

examination of historiographical traditions within African 
history. Topics will vary; with a change in theme, the 
course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

AFH 5935 Topics in African History (3). An examination 
of specific themes in African history. Topics will vary. With 
a change in theme, the course may be repeated. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

AMH 2000 Origins of American Civilization (3). 

Examines the origins of the United States from the first 
European settlements through the early republic. Topics 
Include society, culture, politics and economics. Written 
work meets the state composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

AMH 2002 Modern American Civilization (3). Examines 
the development of the United States from the early 
republic to the present. Topics include society, culture, 
politics and economics. Written work meets the state 
composition requirement (6,000 words). 

AMH 2010 American History, 1607-1850 (3). A survey of 
American history from the founding of Virginia to the 
antebellum era. Analysis of colonial America, the 
American Revolution, the Constitution, and the growth of a 
new republic. [3] 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 149 



AMH 2020 American History, 1850 to the Present (3). A 

survey of American history from before the Civil War to 
our own day. Analysis of the Civil War, Reconstruction, 
the Gilded Age, the move toward imperialism, and the 
problems of the 20th Century. [3] 

AMH 3012 American History, 1600-1763 (3). The 

American social colonial experience from the earliest 
settlements at Jamestown and Plymouth to the eve of the 
American Revolution. Particular emphasis will be on 
religion, social structure, politics, and slavery. [3] 

AMH 3141 American History, 1790-1860 (3). An 

exploration of early national U.S. history, with particular 
attention to party politics, religious pluralism, sentimental 
culture, reform movements, and economic development. 
[3] 

AMH 3270 Contemporary U.S. History (3). An 

examination of the major trends, forces and personalities 
that have shaped the recent American past. [3] 

AMH 3317 America and the Movies (3). An examination 
of the social and cultural history of 20th century America 
through its movies. [3] 

AMH 3331 American Intellectual History I (3). This 
course will trace the origins and development of the main 
ideas and intellectual themes of Anglo-American history 
during the colonial and early national period, 1600-1815. It 
will stress social ideas and popular concepts, and relate 
them to the formation of dominant American national 
characteristics. [3] 

AMH 3332 American Intellectual History II (3). This 
course will emphasize the full flowering of individualistic 
liberalism in 19th Century American thought, and trace the 
implications of and reaction against this tradition down to 
the present. [3] 

AMH 3444 The Great American West (3). The course 
will explore the meaning of the West for both the settlers 
and modern Americans. Using song, film, novels, art, etc., 
the course will examine the lives and values of the 
Indians, mountain men, farmers, ranchers, and cowboys. 
[3] 

AMH 3560 History of Women in the United States (3). 

The changing dimensions of women's lives from the 
colonial era of U.S. history to the present. The course will 
examine the changing economic, social, and political 
position of women as well as the development of feminist 
movement and organizations. [3] 

AMH 4130 The American Revolution (3). An exploration 
of the nature of the Revolution from the beginning of the 
conflict in 1 763 through the ratification of the Constitution 
in 1789. Discussion of the political and economic 
differences between the colonists and England, along with 
the meaning the war had to the different classes of 
Americans. [3] 

AMH 4140 Age of Jefferson (3). A survey of Jeffersonian 
America (1790-1828) with emphasis on the origins of 
American politics, the emerging American economy, the 
rise of American nationalism, and Jeffersonian mind. [3] 

AMH 4160 The Age of Jackson (3). A survey of 
Jacksonian America (1828-1850) with emphasis on the 
growth of political parties, the rise of American industry, 



the emergence of labor, slavery, and early reform 
movements. [3] 

AMH 4170 Civil War and Reconstruction (3). The rise 
and sources of militant sectionalism in the United States, 
the war itself, and the restoration of the nation. [3] 

AMH 4230 The Roaring Twenties and the Great 
Depression (3). A political, economic, social, and 
intellectual history of the 1920s and the great depression 
of the 1930s. [3] 

AMH 4251 The Great Depression (3). This course deals 
with the experience of the American people in the Great 
Depression of the 1930s. It examines causes of the 
depression, government response, and effectiveness of 
response, as well as looking at the actual daily experience 
of people during the Depression and the changes it made 
in U.S. society. [3] 

AMH 4292 Origins of Modern America, 1877-1920 (3). 

U.S. history between the Civil War and World War I, 
origins of modern American social, cultural, and private 
life. Impact of industrialization, urbanization, immigration 
and war on American society, culture between 1877 and 
1920. [3] 

AMH 4373 Entrepreneurs in U.S. (3). Focusing on 
entrepreneurism, course covers American ideals 
(capitalism, individualism, upward mobility, the free 
market, independence) in historical context. Examines 
why these ideals have changed, colonial era to the 
present. [3] 

AMH 4375 Technology and American Society (3). The 

history and impact of technology and innovation on 
American society, politics, and culture from the 18 1 
century to the present. [3] 

AMH 4400 Southern History (3). An examination of the 
main themes and social forces that have shaped the 
southern experience and the southern intellectual tradition 
in a distinctive way within the larger historical reality of 
colonial Anglo-America and the United States. The period 
covered is from initial exploration and settlement of Sir 
Walter Raleigh and John Smith to the present. [3] 

AMH 4421 Florida Under Five Flags: Florida History 
from Precontact to 1877 (3). Overview of Florida from 
the fifteenth through nineteenth centuries. Examines the 
changing economic, social, and political position of the 
peninsula and provides an understanding of how Florida 
has been shaped by its geography and colonial 
experience. [3] 

AMH 4500 United States Labor History (3). 

Transformations in the nature of work, the experience of 
the working class, and the development of the American 
labor movement, with special attention to issues of race, 
region, and gender. [3] 

AMH 4540 US Military History from the Colonial Era to 
the Present (3). Examines the military heritage of the 
United States from the Colonial Wars until the present, 
focusing on the operational and strategic levels of 
warfare. [3] 

AMH 4544 The United States and the Vietnam War (3). 

Emphasizes the cultural differences between the U.S. and 
Vietnam, and examines why and how the United States 



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got involved in Vietnam and ended up fighting a major war 
in Southeast Asia. [3] 

AMH 4561 Early American Women's History (3). 

Women in colonial and nineteenth-century America, 
including some or all of the following; colonialism, Native 
Americans, witch-craft, migration, slavery, industriali- 
zation, Civil War, lynching. [3] 

AMH 4562 Modern American Women's History (3). 

History of women in the U.S. since the Civil War. Topics 
covered include reconstruction, workforce participation, 
suffrage, feminist theory, warfare, motherhood, women's 
liberation. [3] 

AMH 4570 African-American History (3). Black society 
in the United States and its relation to the political, 
economic, social, and cultural history of America. [3] 

AMH 4571 African American History from the 17 th to 
the late 19 Centuries (3). Examines the experience of 
African Americans from the colonial period to the 
Reconstruction era. Topics include: slave cultures; 
development of free black communities; civil war. [3] 

AMH 4573 African American History from the Late 19 th 
Century to the Present (3). Examines the experience of 
African Americans from the emergence of Jim Crow to the 
Black Power Movement. Topics include the Great 
Migration, Marcus Garvey, the Civil Rights and Black 
Power Movements. [3] 

AMH 4914 South Florida History: Research (3). A 

history of South Florida from the Tequestas and Calusas 
to the present. The main focus is student research using 
primary sources including manuscript censuses, 
microfilmed newspapers and archives. [3] 

AMH 4930 Topics in U.S. History (3). Selected topics or 
themes in U.S. history. The themes will vary from 
semester to semester. With a change in theme, the 
course may be repeated. (The theme will be announced in 
the yearly schedule). [3] 

AMH 5905 Readings in American History (3). Students 
read books from different historiographical traditions and 
with conflicting interpretations about an important subject 
in American history. Subjects will vary according to 
professors. Course may be repeated with departmental 
approval. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

AMH 5935 Topics in American History (3). An 

examination of specific themes or topics in American 
history. The theme will vary from semester to semester. 
With a change in theme, the course may be repeated. 
(The theme will be announced in the yearly schedule.) 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

ASH 3440 History of Japan (3). Survey of the history of 
Japan from the origins of Japanese civilization in the early 
centuries BCE to the contemporary era, with an in-depth 
focus on selected topics such as the transitions from 
classical to medieval and early modern to modern 
periods. 

ASH 3441 Urban History of Japan (3). Introduction to 
the urban history of Asia. Emphasis on Tokyo. Topics 
include construction of space, power, identity, and 
historical developments as reflected in architecture. 

ASH 4300 East Asian Civilization and Culture (3). The 

historical developments of Chinese and Japanese 



civilizations and cultures from the earliest beginnings and 
classical period through the middle ages and eighteenth 
century as well as the modern era. [4] 

ASH 4384 History of Women in Asia (3). Examines the 
history of women in Asia in relation to religious ideologies, 
philosophies, family roles, work roles, imperialism and 
nationalism, global feminism, and women's bodies. [4] 

ASH 4404 History of China (3). Examines Chinese 
politics, ideas, economics and society from the 19 m 
Century to the present. Impact of European imperialism, 
decline and fall of the Qing dynasty, Nationalist and 
Communist Revolutions, women, modernization, and 
democracy movement are covered. [4] 

ASH 4453 History of Travel in Japan (3). History of 
Japan's cultural, social, political and religious history 
through the examination of travel and travel literature. 

ASH 5446 Pre-Modern Japan (3). Survey of key 
historiographical interpretations on the history of early 
modern Japan (1600-1868), including 'classics' and 
recent works that introduce new avenues of research. 

ASH 5905 Readings in Asian History (3). Graduate 
reading seminar dedicated to issues of gender, identity, 
and authority in China, Japan, and other regions of Asia. 

EUH 2011 Western Civilization: Early European 
Civilization (3). Examines the earliest development of 
European Civilization; European thought and behavior in 
pre-classical, classical and post-classical periods. Written 
work meets state composition requirement (6,000 words). 

EUH 2021 Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern 
Europe (3). Examines key developments of European 
civilization from medieval to early modern times. Written 
work meets state composition requirement (6,000 words). 

EUH 2030 Western Civilization: Europe in the Modern 
Era (3). Examines key developments in the origins and 
nature of contemporary Europe, including social, political 
and industrial changes from the early modem period to 
the present. Written work meets the state composition 
requirement (6,000 words). 

EUH 3120 Europe in the Central Middle Ages (3). 

Europe from the ninth to the twelfth centuries, analyzing 
the disintegration of the empire of Charlemagne and its 
replacement by nascent national states and by the supra- 
national papal monarchy. [1] 

EUH 3121 Europe in the Earlier Middle Ages (3). The 

disintegration of the Roman imperial unity and its 
replacement by Latin, Greek and Arabic cultural spheres, 
with particular emphasis on the Latin West. [1] 

EUH 3122 Europe in the Later Middle Ages (3). The 

thirteenth throughout the fifteenth centuries as the prelude 
to the revolutionary transformations of early modernity 
e.g., secularization, industrialization, expansionism, 
scientism and democratization [1]. 

EUH 3142 Renaissance and Reformation (3). A study of 
the development of humanism in Italy and Protestantism 
in Germany, and their impact on Europe in the 
Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth centuries. [2] 

EUH 3181 Medieval Culture (3). Selected topics in the 
cultural history of Europe from 500 to 1500: epic and 
knightly romance; Christian theology and spirituality; 



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College of Arts and Sciences 151 



scholastic philosophy; Romanesque and Gothic arts; the 
rise of literature in the vernacular; the culture of the 
layman; and the contribution of women. [1] 

EUH 3205 Nineteenth-Century Europe 1815-1914 (3). 

This course will deal with the political, diplomatic, 
economic, social, and cultural history of Europe from 1815 
until 1914. Special attention will be given to the Industrial 
Revolution. [2] 

EUH 3245 European History, 1914-1945 (3). Europe in 
the era of the two World Wars, with special emphasis on 
communism and fascism. [2] 

EUH 3282 European History, 1945 to Present (3). 

Europe since the Second World War examined in its 
political, diplomatic, social, economic, and cultural 
aspects. [2] 

EUH 3400 Greek History (3). The origins of the Greek 
polis in Mycenaean times, its domination of civilization in 
the first millennium B.C., its transformation under 
Alexander and his successors. The political history, 
culture, values, and social dynamics of Greek civilization. 
[1] 

EUH 3411 Ancient Rome (3). The formation of the 
Roman republic, its rise to domination in the 
Mediterranean, its transformation into the Roman Empire, 
and its final disintegration. The political history, culture, 
values, social dynamics, and enduring force of the Roman 
civilization. [1] 

EUH 3570 Russian History (3). An overview of Russian 
History from the time of tribal Slavs until today. The 
course will focus especially on the changing conditions of 
the Russian peasantry and on the unique development of 
the Russian state. [2] 

EUH 3576 The Russian Revolution and the Soviet 
Union (3). This course deals with Russia since 1917 and 
focuses particularly on the theory and practice of 
communism in the Soviet Union. The impact of 
communism on the lives of the people, whether in politics, 
economics, or culture, will be examined. [2] 

EUH 3611 European Cultural and Intellectual History 
(3). This course will examine the development of the key 
ideas in European political and social theory, in 
conceptions of the natural world and of the individual 
which have come to dominate European culture in the last 
four hundred years. [2] 

EUH 4025 Saints, Relics and Miracles in Medieval 
Europe (3). Synthetic view of medieval Europe through 
the lens of saints veneration. Topics include saints as 
patrons, miracles and magic pilgrimage, bureaucratic 
canonization, gender and mysticism. [1] 

EUH 4033 Nazism and the Holocaust (3). The history of 
the Third Reich and the Holocaust. The development of 
the german State and the emancipation of the Jews; the 
rise of racial antisemitism; Hitler and the emergence of 
Nazism as a political force; the 'Final Solution' and 
European and American responses. [2] 

EUH 4123 Medieval Holy War (3). Analysis of the cross- 
cultural phenomenon of holy warfare or the sanctification 
and glorification of militarism in the Christian crusader 
movement and the Islamic jihad. [1] 



EUH 4187 Topics in Medieval European History (3). 

Selected topics or themes in Medieval history. The 
themes will vary from semester to semester. With a 
change in content, the course may be repeated. (The 
theme will be announced in the yearly schedule). [1] 

EUH 4200 Seventeenth Century Europe (3). A 

thematically-arranged study of social, political and artistic 
developments, in the 17th century. Concentrates on the 
30 years war, absolutism, rural society, scientific 
revolution, and Baroque art. [2] 

EUH 4286 Topics in European History (3). An 

examination of selected topics or themes in early modem 
and modern European history. The themes will vary from 
semester to semester. With a change in content, the 
course may be repeated. (The theme will be announced in 
the yearly schedule). [2] 

EUH 4300 Byzantine History (3). A survey of the political, 
cultural, and social history of the Byzantine Empire from 
284 to 1461, including Byzantium's contributions to 
Christian theology, Roman law, and the culture of the 
Renaissance and eastern Europe. [1] 

EUH 4313 History of Spain (3). A survey of Spanish 
history from the Reconquista through the Civil War, with 
particular emphasis on the Golden Age. [2] 

EUH 4401 History of Fifth Century Greece (3). An 

examination of the culture and history of Greece in the 
age of Herodotus and Thucydides, of Pericles, Aeschylus, 
Euripides, and Aristophanes. [1] 

EUH 4408 The Age of Alexander The Great, 400-280 
BC (3). Covers the life and times of Alexander the Great, 
356-323 BC. Includes an analysis of the generations 
immediately before and after Alexander, to place him in 
context. Extensive use is made of limited primary sources 
for Alexander's era. [1] 

EUH 4414 Roman Provinces (3). Assessing the impact 
of the Roman Empire on its indigenous inhabitants, the 
transformation processes employed to create a 
homogenized Roman identity and the degree to which 
assimilation proved effective. 

EUH 4432 Between Empire & Renaissance: Italy in the 
"Middle Age" (3). The Italian peninsula between the age 
of Roman imperial dominance and the rebirth of Italian 
centrality during the "Renaissance." Greek, Germanic, 
Muslim and Norman intervention and the political role of 
the Roman Church. [1] 

EUH 4440 The Making of Medieval France (3). A survey 
of French history as a case study in state building from 
the Celtic period and the incorporation of the region into 
the Roman empire as Gaul to the reign of Philip Augustus. 
[1] 

EUH 4451 History of Modern France, 1815-1968 (3). 
Survey of French history form the restoration through the 
student revolt of May 1968, with attention to questions of 
change and continuity in the French response to 
modernity. [2] 

EUH 4453 The French Revolution and Napoleon (3). A 

study of French and European history from 1798 to 1815, 
with an emphasis on the political development of the 
Revolution, social groups within France, and the rise of 
Napoleon. [2] 



1 52 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



EUH 4462 History of Modern Germany, 1815-1945 (3). 

A survey of German history from the unification movement 
through WWII. Topics discussed include Hitler's relation 
to the German past, liberalism, modernization. [2] 

EUH 4501 England to 1688 (3). A survey of ancient, 
medieval and early modern English history with attention 
to continental comparisons and contrasts. [1] 

EUH 4520 England in the 18th Century (3). Exploring 
one of the greatest eras in English history, this course will 
cover the growth of the British empire, crown and 
Parliament, the industrial revolution, social problems and 
English culture. [2] 

EUH 4542 The Culture and Society of Britain, 1830- 
Present (3). An exploration of the rise and fall of Britain as 
an industrial, imperial nation. Topics include the nature of 
industrialization and class formation, the role of race and 
gender in British culture and society, war and the loss of 
empire in the 20th century. [2] 

EUH 4563 The Habsburg Dynasty (3). History of 
Habsburg Dynasty from its medieval origins until the early 
1700's. Members of this family ruled over large portions 
of Europe as well as over territories around the world, 
including Florida. [1,2] 

EUH 4600 Key Texts in Western Culture to the 
Renaissance (3). The history of Western Civilization from 
its beginning to the Renaissance, studied through 
particularly significant texts. [1] 

EUH 4602 The Enlightenment (3). This course deals with 
the French Enlightenment of the Eighteenth Century, 
particularly with Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau. Impact 
of the Scientific and English Revolutions on 
Enlightenment. [2] 

EUH 4606 Key Texts in Western Culture from the 
Reformation to the 20th Century (3). The history of 
Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present, 
studied through particularly significant texts. [2] 

EUH 4610 Women and Gender in Europe, 1750- 
Present (3). Examines how women contributed to the 
development of modern European history. Also explores 
how ideas about gender and sexuality shaped, and were 
influenced by, the nature of politics, economics and 
culture. [2] 

EUH 4613 Social History of Early Modern Europe (3). 

Examines European history 1300-1800 through 
discussion of various topics including: lords, peasants, 
demography, family life, education, witchcraft. [2] 

EUH 4660 Modern Europe, 1789-Present (3). European 
history from the French Revolution until today, with special 
attention to liberalism, nationalism, socialism, 
communism, and fascism. The course will touch on the 
main points of the national histories of the various 
European states, from Britain to Russia. [2] 

EUH 4953 Czech History and Culture - Study Abroad 
(3). Covers the major historical forces and movements 
which have shaped this area of the world, especially in the 
last 150 years. The course is taught by FIU and Czech 
faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. [2] 

EUH 4XXX Victorian Britian: Culture, Society and 
Empire (3). Examines key cultural, political, and social 



developments in nineteenth-century Britian and its empire 
while introducing students to landmark scholarship on 
gender, class, and race in the Victorian era. 

EUH 5905 Readings in European History (3). Students 
read books from different historiographical traditions and 
with conflicting interpretations about an important subject 
in European history. Subjects will vary according to 
professors. Course may be repeated with departmental 
approval. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

EUH 5935 Topics in European History (3). An 

examination of specific themes or topics in European 
history. The theme will vary from semester to semester. 
With a change in theme, the course may be repeated. 
(The theme will be announced in the yearly schedule). 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 3308 War and Society (3). An examination of the 
ways societies have organized themselves for external 
and internal wars. The course will also explore the 
changing conduct of war, the image of the warrior, and the 
ways in which military institutions have crystalized class 
structures: 

HIS 3314 Women and Gender in Medieval Eurasia (3). 

Discusses the establishment of patriarchal structures in 
ancient Mesopotamia, and resistance to those structures 
in Islamic Central and West Asia, Christian Europe, and 
Confucian/Buddhist East Asia. [1] 

HIS 4400 The Formation of Urban Society (3). A 

comparative study of the cultural, social, political and 
economic development of cities. Topics include: the 
ancient city, industrialization, immigration, poverty and 
urban planning. 

HIS 4454 The History of Racial Theory in Europe and 
the United States (3). The literature produced by natural 
and social scientists on the question of race, the shifting 
notions of racial identity and difference, superiority and 
inferiority, and the political and social consequences of 
these ideas. [2,3] 

HIS 4908 Independent Study (VAR). Individual 

conferences, assigned readings and reports on 

independent investigations, with the consent of the 
instructor. 

HIS 4930 Special Topics (3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in history. The theme will vary from 
semester to semester. With a change in content, the 
course may be repeated. (The theme will be announced in 
the yearly schedule). 

HIS 4935 Senior Seminar (3). A seminar to be taken by 
all history majors, to provide experience in research, 
writing, and critical analysis. 

HIS 5067 Public History (3). The theory, methods and 
practice of history in non-academic settings, including 
museums, national parks, governmental agencies, 
corporations, and community organizations. Prerequisite: 
Graduate Standing. 

HIS 5084 Museum History (3). Examines key texts in the 
history of museums in modern Europe and the United 
States. Among issues it addresses are nationalism, 
imperialism, memory, and identity politics. Prerequisites: 
Graduate Standing. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 53 



HIS 5289 Comparative History (3). A study of specific 
topics in history that cut across regional, national, and 
chronological lines. The topics will change from semester 
to semester, and with a change in content, the course 
may be repeated. (The topic of the course will be 
announced in the yearly schedule). Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

HIS 5347 History of Social Thought (3). Examines the 
evolution of major currents in Western social thought from 
the nineteenth century to the present, emphasizing how 
these ideas have influenced historians' work. 

HIS 5908 Independent Study (VAR). Individual 
conferences, assigned readings and reports on 
independent investigations, with the consent of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 5910 Advanced Research Seminar (3). Small group 
sessions will analyze particular subject areas in history, 
with the consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

HIS 5930 Special Topics (3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in history. The theme will vary from 
semester to semester, and with a change in content, the 
course may be repeated. (The theme will be announced in 
the yearly schedule). Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 5940 Supervised Teaching (1-3). The students will 
work under the close supervision of a regular member of 
the faculty in a mentorial fashion. The supervision will 
cover various aspects of course design and delivery in 
history. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization (3). An analysis of 
the underlying themes that have shaped the history of the 
Ibero-American areas from the time of initial contact to the 
present. Emphasis is given to cultural exchange and 
transformation. Written work meets state composition 
requirement (6,000 words). 

LAH 3132 The Formation of Latin America (3). An 

examination of Latin America in the colonial period, 
focusing on conquest, Indian relations, the landed estate, 
urban functions, labor, and socioeconomic organization 
from the 15th through the 18th Centuries. [4] 

LAH 3200 Latin America: The National Period (3). 

Trends and major problems of Latin American nations 
from independence to the present. [4] 

LAH 3450 Central America (3). An overview of Central 
American history from colonial times to the present, with 
emphasis on the period after the mid-Eighteenth Century. 
All (five modern nations are dealt with in some detail, while 
the thematic focus is on social and economic history. [4] 

LAH 3718 History of U.S. -Latin American Relations (3). 

Surveys the history of the social, economic and political 
relations between the U.S. and the countries of Central 
America, South America, and the Caribbean basin during 
the last two centuries. [4] 

LAH 3740 Comparative History of Latin American 
Rebellions and Revolutions (3). Identifies the historical 
forces driving revolutionary change in Latin America. 
Causes of revolutions, directions of the revolutionary 
movements, and their political agendas. [4] 

LAH 4433 Modern Mexico (3). An examination of the 
central themes of nation-building in Mexico from 1810 to 



the present: race, land, political authority, regionalism, 
dictatorship, and the Mexican Revolution. [4] 

LAH 4471 Colonial Caribbean in Comparative 
Perspective (3). An overview of the Caribbean region 
from the fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries. 
Examines the changing economic, social, and political 
position of the area and provides an understanding of how 
the colonies have been shaped by their experiences. [4] 

LAH 4482 Cuba: 18 th — 20 th Centuries (3). The socio- 
economic and political setting in Cuba since the mid- 
Eighteenth Century. [4] 

LAH 4511 Argentina: 18 th — 20 th Centuries (3). A survey 
of the social and political formation of the Argentine 
nation, starting with the colonial legacy and ending with 
the contemporary political situation. [4] 

LAH 4600 History of Brazil (3). Origins of Portuguese 
rule and African slavery; crisis of colonialism and 
transition to independence; coffee, abolition, and the 
Brazilian Empire; Republican Brazil and the Revolution of 
1930; postwar developments. [4] 

LAH 4720 Family and Land in Latin American History 
(3). Evolution of land tenure in Latin American societies 
and its connections with the strategies and interests of 
elite families. [4] 

LAH 4721 History of Women in Latin America (3). 

Examines women's roles in indigenous societies, in the 
colonial period, during independence, and in the 19th 
century. Also explores women and slavery, populism and 
popular culture, and the rise of the feminist movement. [4] 

LAH 4734 Latin American History Through Film (3). 

Introduces students to central events in the history of 
colonial and modern Latin America through the use of 
films. Looks at central historical figures and focuses on 
critical issues of the period. [4] 

LAH 4750 Law and Society in Latin American History 
(3). Social history of law and legal struggles by colonial 
Indians, black slaves, peasants, women and 
contemporary "colonos" (settlers). Its emphasis is on the 
prevalence of legal confrontations throughout Latin 
American history. [4] 

LAH 4932 Topics in Latin American History (3). 

Selected topics or themes in Latin American history. The 
themes will vary from semester to semester. With a 
change in content, the course may be repeated. (The 
theme will be announced in the yearly schedule). [4] 

LAH 5905 Readings in Latin American History (3). 

Students read books from different historiographical 
traditions and with conflicting interpretations about an 
important subject in Latin American history. Subjects will 
vary according to professors. Course may be repeated 
with departmental approval. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

LAH 5935 Topics in Latin American History (3). An 

examination of specific themes or topics in Latin American 
history. The theme will vary from semester to semester. 
With a change in theme, the course may be repeated. 
(The theme will be announced in the yearly schedule). 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

WOH 2001 World Civilization (3). Comparative histories 
of major world civilizations, including China, India, the 



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Moslem Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and the West. 
Emphasis on cultural characteristics and interactions. 
Written work meets state composition requirement (6,000 
words). 

WOH 3281 Jewish History to 1750 (3). Jewish history 
from the First Exile in 586 BCE to 1750. The development 
of Jewish institutions in exile and as a nation, the 
development of the Talmud and the medieval experience. 

WOH 3282 Modern Jewish History (3). A survey of the 
major currents in modern Jewish History. The reaction to 
the Enlightenment, the American experience, the growth 
of the Eastern European Shtetl, the Holocaust and the 
birth of the State of Israel. 

WOH 4230 The African Diaspora and the Atlantic 
Slave Trade (3). Topics include slavery in Africa and the 
Diaspora, as well as Diasporic religion, kinship, gender, 
sexuality, language, resistance and creolization. [4] 

WOH 4301 The Modern African Diaspora (3). Topics 
include slave resisstance, Black Nationalism, socialism, 
anti-colonialism, gender, religion, art and literature, race 
and medicine, and afrocentrism. [4] 
WOH 5236 The Transatlantic Slave Trade and the 
Making of African Diaspora, 1441-1807 (3). Topics 
include slavery and economy in Africa and the Diaspora, 
as well as Diasporic religion, kinship, gender, sexuality, 
language, oral tradition, resistance, and creolization. [4] 

WOH 5237 The African Diaspora Since the End of the 
Slave Trade (3). Primary emphasis on history of social 
and intellectual movements. Topics include slave 
resistance, black nationalism, socialism, anti-colonialism, 
gender, art and literature, and afrocentrism. [4] 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 55 



Humanities 

Kenneth F. Rogerson, Professor, Philosophy, Director of 

Humanities 
Marian Demos, Associate Professor, Modern Languages 

(Classics) 
Daniel R. Guernsey, Assistant Professor, Visual Arts 
Rebecca Friedman, Assistant Professor, History 
Ramon Mendoza, Professor, Modern Languages 
Joyce Peterson, Associate Professor, History, and 

Associate Dean of the College 
Richard P. Sugg, Professor, English 
Barbara Watts, Associate Professor, Visual Arts 

Bachelor of Arts in Humanities 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

The Humanities program offers a structured 
interdisciplinary curriculum designed to confront the 
student with values and issues concerning human beings 
and society, extending beyond the scope and 
methodology of natural and social sciences. 

The program focuses primarily upon the human 
condition, human values, changing views of the world, and 
society's major concerns. These values, world views, and 
concerns have been the preferred object of thought and 
creativity of philosophers, poets, playwrights, fiction 
writers, artists, mystics and religious thinkers. Their views 
have become the reservoir of humankind's most 
outstanding intellectual achievements, and they have also 
been powerfully expressed in the works of painters, 
sculptors, and film directors, as well as in other 
productions of mass media and popular culture, which 
must now engage the serious student of our culture and 
its future. The program also pays particular attention to 
non-Western and American ethnic-minority cultures, in 
order to expose the student to the different values, world 
views, and outstanding cultural achievements of these 
cultures. 

For those students particularly interested in Classical 
Greek and Roman culture, the program offers a well- 
structured Classical track and a sequence of Greek and 
Latin courses. 

The Humanities program is not only theoretical. It seeks 
to develop in the student those skills and attitudes which 
are specifically human, such as skills of verbal and written 
communication, analytical skills, open-minded and critical 
attitudes towards the problems of our changing society, 
artistic sensitivity and expression, and all forms of 
imaginative creativity. Above all, the program hopes to 
challenge the student to raise the cultural level of our 
society by bringing his or her humanistic approach to bear 
upon institutions, cultural programs, mass media, and the 
business community. 

The Humanities program is not only a richly rewarding 
program of undergraduate study, but it also prepares 
students for later success in post-graduate programs in 
the liberal arts, law school, business, and public affairs. 

A Humanities double major is a fine complement to a 
highly specialized vocational or professional major. In 
addition, a Humanities minor offers an attractive option 
both to students in arts and sciences and to those in the 
other schools of the University. 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 



requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Common Prerequisites 

No specific courses required; all students are encouraged 
to complete the Associate in Arts degree. 

Upper Division Program (30) 

A. Core: The following 4 courses are required from all 
HUM majors (12 credit hours): 

HUM 4431 The Greek World 1 

HUM 3231 Renaissance and Baroque 

HUM 4920 Humanities Seminar 1 

and one of the following courses: 

HUM 3246 The Enlightenment and the Modem 

World 
HUM 3254 Contemporary World 

HUM 3252 20th Century Culture and Civilization 

Note: For students who take more than four core courses, 
the surplus can be counted under B or C below. 

B. Three additional Humanities courses (9 credit hours): 
HUM 3214 Ancient Classical Culture and 

Civilization 
HUM 3304 Values in Conflict 

HUM 3325 Women, Culture and History 

HUM 3306 History of ideas 

HUM 3432 The Roman World 

HUM 3435 The Medieval World 

HUM 2512 Art and Society 1 

HUM 3514 Art in Context 

HUM 3545 Art and Literature 

HUM 3562 Politcis of the Arts 1 

HUM 3591 Art & Technology 1 

HUM 3930 Female/Male: Women's Studies 

Seminar 
HUM 3939 Special Topics 1 

HUM 4391 Human Concerns 1 

HUM 4406 Film Humanities 

HUM 4491 Cultural Heritages and Changes 1 

HUM 4543 Literature and Philosophy 

HUM 4544 Literature and the Humanities 

HUM 4561 Ethics and the Humanities 

HUM 4555 Symbols and Myths 

HUM 4906 Independent Study 1 

C. Three additional courses either from the list of HUM 
courses offered by the Program; or from the following 
Humanities disciplines: History, Philosophy, Religion, Art 
History, and Literature; or from other disciplines related to 
the Humanities if approved by Humanities faculty student 
advisers. (9 credit hours) 

D. General Electives (30 semester hours): These 
courses may be outside of the Humanities and its 
contributing disciplines. Courses must be approved by the 
Program Director. 

1 With a change in theme and the instructor's permission, 
these courses may be repeated for credit. 

Classics Track 

a. Humanities Core Curriculum 12 

b. Three additional courses dealing with Classical 
(Greek or Roman) culture and civilization. These courses 
may be either HUM courses or courses from contributing 
Humanities disciplines. 9 

c. Three interdisciplinary Humanities (HUM) courses. 9 

d. Language requirement: The language requirement is 
the same as for other FIU students; however, students in 



156 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



the Classics Track are strongly encouraged to satisfy the 
requirement with a Classical language. 

e. General Electives (30 semester hours). These 
courses may be outside of the Humanities and its 
contributing disciplines. Courses must be approved by the 
Program Director. 

Minor in the Humanities (15) 

1 . One of the following: 
HUM 3214 Ancient Classical Culture and 

Civilization 



HUM 4431 



or 

The Greek World 



or 



HUM 3432 The Roman World 

and 
2. Four additional HUM courses (including classical 
languages) 



12 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

HUM-Humanities; GRE/GRW-Greek; LAT-Latin 

GRE 1120 Classical Greek I (5). Emphasis of grammar, 
and on basic reading and writing skills. 

GRE 1121 Classical Greek II (5). Emphasis on grammar, 
and on basic reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: GRE 
1120. 

GRE 2200 Intermediate Classical Greek (3). Emphasis 
on grammar, and on acquiring intermediate reading and 
writing skills. Prerequisite: GRE 1121. 

GRW 3210 Greek Prose Writers (3). Translation into 
English and grammatical analysis of selected texts of 
Classical prose writers, such as Plato, Aristotle, 
Xenophon, Thucydides and Plutarch. Prerequisites: 
Reading knowledge of Classical Greek or GRE 2200. 

GRW 3390 Readings in Greek Literature (3). Translation 
into English and grammatical analysis of selected texts of 
ancient Greek authors, prose and verse, such as Plato, 
Plutarch and Homer. The topics will change from 
semester and with a change in content, the course may 
be repeated. Prerequisites: GRE 1121 or reading 
knowledge of Classical Greek. 

HUM 2512 Art and Society (3). A study of the 
relationship between art and culture in different periods, 
including patronage, the role of the artist, and the 
relationship between art and economic, political, religious, 
and ideological forces. 

HUM 2701 Study Abroad in the Humanities (1-9). 

Integrated study of painting, architecture, music, drama, 
dance, and philosophy. Attitudes and beliefs of societies 
as they are reflected in the arts. 

HUM 3214 Ancient Classical Culture and Civilization 
(3). Explores the culture of the ancient Greek and Latin 
worlds from an interdisciplinary perspective and studies 
the varied conceptions of the individual, society, and 
nature. 

HUM 3231 Renaissance and Baroque Cultures (3). An 

in-depth examination of the cultural monuments of the 
Renaissance, Reformation, Counter-Reformation, and 
Baroque periods and of the forces that helped shape 
them. 



HUM 3246 The Enlightenment and the Modern World 
(3). Explores the culture and the Enlightenment and the 
modern world from an interdisciplinary perspective and 
studies the varying conceptions of the individual society 
and nature. 

HUM 3252 20th Century Culture and Civilization (3). 
The 20th century through the Vietnam war, as 
represented by the period's creative and intellectual works 
in literature, art, history and philosophy - discussed from 
an interdisciplinary perspective. 

HUM 3254 The Contemporary World (3). Significant 
creative and intellectual works, ideas and movements of 
the last twenty years surveyed and discussed from an 
interdisciplinary perspective. 

HUM 3304 Values in Conflict (3). Philosophical, ethical, 
and religious foundations of Western civilization and 
significant challenges its value system has received from 
critical and revolutionary thought. 

HUM 3306 History of Ideas (3). The historical 
development of fundamental concepts through an 
interdisciplinary cultural approach. Nature, freedom, 
beauty, virtue, alienation, and relativism are traced in 
literature, art, and philosophy including the social context 
of developing ideas. 

HUM 3325 Women, Culture and History (3). Examines 
women's lives within various world cultures and historical 
periods. Examines the cultural meaning attributed to 
women, women's lived experiences and historical 
contributions. 

HUM 3432 The Roman World (3). An in-depth 
examination of selected cultural monuments and events of 
the Roman Republic and Empire and of the forces that 
helped shape them. 

HUM 3435 The Medieval World (3). An in-depth 
examination of cultural monuments of the European 
Middle Ages and of the forces that helped shape them. 

HUM 3514 Art in Context (3). Examines topics 
concerning art in the context of the history and culture of a 
particular society (with change in content and consent of 
the instructor, this course may be repeated for credit). 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

HUM 3545 Art and Literature (3). A study of a period in 
the history of visual art as it relates to literature. Topics 
may include art and mythology, sacred and profane love 
in art and literature, painting and poetry, and the novel 
and art. 

HUM 3562 Politics and the Arts (3). Explores arts and 
patronage in relation to the politics and ideologies of a 
given place and time. Topics vary. May be repeated with a 
change in content. 

HUM 3591 Art and Technology (3). Explores the 
relationship between innovations in technology and artistic 
expression. Course theme is media based, and varies 
from semester to semester. May be repeated with 
department approval. 

HUM 3930 Female/Male: Women's Studies Seminar 
(3). This course interprets and contrasts the status of 
women and men in context with women's inequality. 
Diverse topics include the workplace, family, education, 
image, violence and ethnicity. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 57 



HUM 3939 Special Topics (3). An examination of specific 
topics in the humanities. The topics may vary from 
semester to semester. May be repeated with a change in 
content. 

HUM 3949 Cooperative Education in Humanities (3). A 

student majoring in Humanities may spend one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry in a capacity relating 
to the major. 

HUM 4248 The World of Dante and Giotto (3). 

Examines the culture of medieval Italy, with emphasis on 
the writings of Dante Alighieri and the paintings of Giotto 
di Bondone. Prerequisites: HUM 2512 or ARH 2050 or 
ARH 2051 , or permission of instructor. 

HUM 4392 Human Concerns (3). Examines concerns 
important to the human condition, including varying 
conceptions of human nature, the relation of the individual 
to society, the quest for identity, the search for meaning 
through literature, art and social institutions. (With consent 
of the instructor, this course may be repeated for credit). 

HUM 4406 Film Humanities (3). Studies the significance 
of film in Western culture: the language, semiotics and 
technique of films with the aid of appropriate 
cinematographical material. 

HUM 4431 The Greek World (3). An in-depth 
examination of selected cultural monuments and events of 
the Greek World in the Classical and Hellenistic periods 
and of the forces that helped shape them. 

HUM 4491 Cultural Heritages and Cultural Changes 
(3). Focuses upon various cultures and their development, 
including such topics as: cultural evolution and revolution, 
ethnicity and pluralism, and subcultures and 
countercultures. (With consent of the instructor, this 
course may be repeated for credit.) 

HUM 4543 Literature and Philosophy (3). The 
interpretation of literature and philosophy from an 
interdisciplinary perspective. In addition to philosophical 
novels, poetry, and drama, the course may examine 
philosophical scrutiny of literature. 

HUM 4544 Literature and the Humanities (3). Literature 
from an interdisciplinary perspective. Literary texts are 
related to the cultural context of their production and the 
ideas surrounding them. 

HUM 4555 Symbols and Myths (3). An in-depth 
examination of mythology and symbolic language within 
the cultural and psychodynamic forces that inform them. 
This course gives special emphasis to Classical myths. 

HUM 4561 Ethics and the Humanities (3). Human 
values studied from an interdisciplinary perspective. 
Selected ethical issues are examined using philosophical, 
historical, or literary texts. The relationship between 
ethical values and cultural achievements is explored. 

HUM 4906 Independent Study (1-3). Directed 
independent research. Requires prior approval by 
instructor. 

HUM 4920 Humanities Seminar (3). Addresses a 
specific topic in-depth from a variety of perspectives. 
Topics will be announced in advance. (With consent of 
the instructor, this course may be repeated for credit.) 



HUM 5935 Graduate Seminar in Humanities (3). A 

specialized thematic topics offered at the Graduate level. 
Topics will vary and will be announced in advanced. With 
consent of the instructor, this course may be repeated for 
credit. 

LAT 1120 Latin I (5). Emphasis on grammar and on 
acquiring basic reading and writing skills. 

LAT 1121 Latin II (5). Emphasis on grammar and on 
acquiring reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: LAT 
1120. 

LAT 2200 Intermediate Latin (3). Emphasis on grammar 
and on acquiring basic reading and writing skills. 
Prerequisite: LAT 1121. 

LAT 3210 Latin Prose Writers (3). Translation into 
English and grammatical analysis of selected texts of 
classical prose writers such as Cicero, Caesar and Livy. 
Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Latin or LAT 2200. 

LAT 3211 Readings in Latin Literature (3). Translation 
into English and grammatical analysis of selected texts of 
Latin authors, prose and verse, such as Cicero, Livy, Virgil 
and Horace. The topics will change from semester and 
with a change of content, the course may be repeated. 
Prerequisites: LAT 1 121 or reading knowledge of Latin. 



158 College of Arts and Sciences 



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International Relations 

John F. Clark, Associate Professor and Chairperson 

Clair Apodaca, Assistant Professor 

Ken I. Boodhoo, Associate Professor 

Thomas A. Breslin, Professor 

Ralph S. Clem, Professor 

Peter R. Craumer, Associate Professor 

Francois Debrix, Associate Professor 

Shlomi Dinar, Assistant Professor 

Damian J. Fernandez, Professor 

Jennifer Gebelein, Assistant Professor 

Harry D. Gould, Assistant Professor 

Gail Hollander, Assistant Professor 

Antonio Jorge, Professor 

Paul Kowert, Associate Professor 

Wei Liang, Assistant Professor 

Charles G. MacDonald, Professor 

Felix Martin, Assistant Professor 

Mohiaddin Mesbahi, Associate Professor 

Rod Neumann, Associate Professor 

Nicholas G. Onuf, Emeritus Professor 

Patricia L. Price, Associate Professor 

Elisabeth Prugl, Associate Professor 

Gregory B. Wolfe, Emeritus Professor 

The Department of International Relations offers a B.A. 
degree in International Relations and a B.A. degree in 
Geography. 

Bachelor of Arts in International 

Relations 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

Students may begin taking courses in the Department at 
any time and may declare their intention to major in 
International Relations after completing 24 semester 
hours of the University core curriculum requirements. To 
qualify for full admission to the program, FIU students 
must have met all lower division requirements including 
CLAST, completed 60 semester hours, and must be 
otherwise acceptable into the program. 

Common Prerequisites 

None 

Required for the degree: 

INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations 

Upper Division Program 

International Relations majors must complete a minimum 
30 semester hours of course work in the department with 
a grade of 'C or better. 

Core Requirement: (3) 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 

Group I Courses for the Major: (9) 

In addition to the Core Requirement, INR majors must 

take at least one course (3 sem. hrs.) from each of the 

following divisions in Group I: 

(1 international Law/International Organizations (IL) 

(2)Foreign Policy/Security Studies (FP) 

(3)lnternational Political Economy/Economic Geography 

(IPE) 



Group II Courses for the Major: (12) 
INR majors must also take at least four courses (1 2 sem. 
hrs.) in Group II, including at least one from each of the 
following divisions: 

(1) Area Studies (AS) 

(2) Geography (G) 

(3) Issues and Problems in International Relations (IP) 
Note: INR 4943 Internship in INR, or GEO 4940 
Internship in Geography, can count as the fourth Group II 
course as long as the student has completed one course 
from each of the three divisions, above. 

Exit Requirements: (6) 

INR 3013 Development of International Relations 

Thought 
INR 4603 Theories of International Relations 

Electives 

Students are encouraged to double major in geography or 
to take courses or pursue a minor in geography or in other 
related fields such as economics, modern languages, 
history, political science, sociology/anthropology, or 
business. We recommend that students take introductory 
courses in economics and gain fluency in a foreign 
language. Students may also consider appropriate 
academic certificates such as the Latin American and 
Caribbean Studies, Asian Studies, African-New World 
Studies, and European Studies Certificates. 

Minor in International Relations 

A student majoring in another academic discipline earns a 

Minor in International Relations by successfully 

completing approved course work of 15 semester hours in 

the Department of International Relations with a grade of 

'C or better. This program must include: 

INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 

At least one course from Group I 

At least one course from Group II 

Any other course offered by the Department of 

International Relations 

Honors Track in International Relations 

Students with a least 18 credits in International Relations 
and Geography and a 3.5 GPA in their major courses are 
eligible to apply for the Honors Track. Those accepted 
may then take INR 4937 (Honors Seminar I) and INR 
4970 (Honors Thesis) to fulfill the requirements for the 
Track. Completion of the Honors Track is recognized on 
students' transcripts upon graduation. 

Bachelor of Arts in Geography 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Upper Division Program 

In addition to two entry-level common prerequisites, 
students must complete a total of 30 credit-hours, 27 of 
them at the upper division level. These include three core 
courses, three courses in regional studies, and four in a 
topical specialization track. An outline of the specific 
course requirements for the geography major follows: 

Common Prerequisites: (6) 

Two 2000 level GEO courses 

Core Requirements: (9) 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 

GEO 3001 Geography of Global Change 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 159 



GEO 3176 



Applications of GIS 



Regional Studies: (9) 

Choose at least two upper division courses with a GEA 
prefix. Other credits may be earned by taking INR 
courses with an "AS" designation. 

Topical Specialization: (12) 

Choose one of the following tracks. A minimum of 12 
credit-hours must be taken to complete the chosen track, 
9 of which must have a GEO or GEA prefix. 

Track 1: Development and Cultural Change 

Any GEO course with a (T1) designation. 

Any INR course with an (IP or IPE) designation. 

Track 2: The Geography of International 
Relations 

Any three GEO courses with a (T2) designation. 
Plus: 

INR 301 3 Development of International Relations 

Thought 

Track 3: Environmental 
Applications 

Any three GEO courses with a (T3) Designation. 

Plus: 

Any upper division EVR course. 

Or: 

Choose one of the following: 

GEO 3510 Earth Resources 

GLY 3034 Natural Diasters 

GLY 3039 Environmental Geology 

Note: Internship in Geography, GEO 4940, or Internship 
in International Relations, INR 4943, can count as a T1, 
T2, or T3 requirement. 

Minor in Geography 

A student majoring in another academic discipline earns a 

Minor in Geography by successfully completing approved 

course work of 15 semester hours with a grade of 'C or 

better as described below: 

GEO 2000 Introduction to Geography 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography 

In addition to the above required courses, students 
must take a minimum of three other Geography courses, 
at least one with a GEA prefix, and at least one with a 
GEO prefix. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

GEA-Geography-Regional (Area); GEO-Geography- 
Systemic; INR-lnternational Relations; 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 
Summer semester offering. 

GEA 2000 World Regional Geography (3). A systematic 
survey of the major regions and countries of the world, 
with regard to their physical, cultural, and political 
characteristics. Emphasis upon climate, natural 
resources, economic development, and population 
patterns. (F.S.SS) 

GEA 3210 Geography of North America (G) (3). 

Geography of the countries of North America with 
emphasis on physical aspects, human migration and 
development, population, economic resources and 
culture. 



GEA 3320 Population and Geography of the Caribbean 
(G) (3). Physical, cultural and political geography of the 
Caribbean; emphasis on population patterns, growth and 
ethnicity. (S) 

GEA 3400 Population and Geography of Latin America 
(G) (3). Introduction to the physical, cultural, and political 
geography of Latin America. Emphasis on population 
patterns and problems of population growth, systems of 
land use and tenure, economic development, natural 
resources, and agriculture. (F,S) 

GEA 3500 Population and Geography of Europe (G) 
(3). Introduction to the physical, cultural, and political 
geography of Europe emphasizing the evolution of the 
states and the geographical factors facilitating the 
integration movement. (S) 

GEA 3554 Geography of Russia and Central Eurasia 
(G) (3). A geographical analysis of the countries of the 
former Soviet Union. Emphasis on resources, population, 
union urbanization, and economic development. (S) 

GEA 3600 Population and Geography of Africa (G) (3). 

Examines the structure of pre-conquest society and 
covers colonialism's effects on contemporary food 
production and ecological management. An overview of 
development issues in Africa. (F) 

GEA 3635 Population and Geography of the Middle 
East (G) (3). Introduction to the physical, cultural, and 
political geography of the Middle East. Emphasis on 
population patterns, natural resources, and economic 
development. (F) 

GEA 3705 Geography of Central Asia and the 
Caucasus (G) (3). Geography of the countries of the 
former Soviet Union in the Caucasus and the Central 
Asian regions. Emphasis on natural resources, 
environmental problems, ethnicity and population change, 
urbanization, and economic development. (F,S,SS) 

GEA 4202 Geography of the Borderlands (G) (3). 

Examines the role of borders in human society. 

Comparative analysis of specific border zones. In-depth 

exploration of one borderland: society, culture, 
economics, and political processes. 

GEA 4905 Independent Study (1-6). Directed 
independent research in regional geography. Requires 
prior approval by instructor. (F,S,SS) 

GEA 4930 Topics in Geography (G) (3). Varies 
according to the instructor and semester. May be 
repeated with departmental permission. 

GEO 2000 Introduction to Geography (3). Leading 
concepts of human and environmental geography. 
Physical, cultural, economic and political factors in the 
spatial patterns of natural and human systems. (F,S) 

GEO 2040 Mapping in Geography (3). Introduction to the 
history of catography and map production. Descriptions 
of map errors, maps as science and as art. Also more 
technical map creation with aerial photography and 
satellite images. 

GEO 3001 Geography of Global Change (G) (3). 

Explores the geography of change in contemporary world 
economy, politics, culture, and environment. Mapping 



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and spatial analysis aid in understanding global change 
and effects on specific places. 

GEO 3176 Applications of Geographic Information 
■Systems (G) (3). Introduction to geographic spatial 
analysis using a variety of data. 

GEO 3421 Cultural Geography (G) (T1, T2) (3). The 

study of spatial variations among cultural groups and the 
special functioning of society. Focuses on describing and 
analyzing geographic differences in language, religion, 
economy, and government. (S) 

GEO 3471 Political Geography (G) (T2) (3). Emphasis is 
given to the organization of space, particularly as it 
pertains to the nation-state. Factors instrumental to 
determining the viability of states are included stressing 
unifying-repelling forces. (S) 

GEO 3502 Economic Geography (G, IPE) (T1J2) (3). 

Explores spatial facets of the economy at the international 
level, including trade, development, manufacturing, multi- 
national corporations and technology. (S) 

GEO 3602 Urban Geography (G) (T1) (3). The study of 
spatial organization within and among urban settlements. 
Analysis of both the empirical and theoretical aspects of 
urbanism are covered, with an emphasis on current urban 
problems. (S) 

GEO 4354 Geography of the Global Food System (G) 
(T2.T3) (3). Analyzes the spatial organization of the global 
food system and its importance to world economic 
development. Explores issues of food security, trade, and 
environment. 

GEO 4476 Political Ecology (G) (T1.T3) (3). Principles of 
human geography and political economy structure 
analyses and explanation of ecological problems. 
Emphasizes spatial aspects of society and environment 
interactions. 

GEO 4477 Critical Geopolitics (G) (T2) (3). Explains to 
students new methods of critical geopolitical analysis and 
how they impact human political affairs across landscapes 
and territories. Allows students to develop analytical work 
and research in the field. 

GEO 4905 Independent Study (1-6). Directed 
independent research in systematic geography. Requires 
prior approval by instructor. (F,S,SS) 

GEO 4940 Internship in Geography (G) (T1J2.T3) (1-6). 

Introduces Geography majors and minors to real-world 
experience through internship in local, national, and 
overseas government, NGO, and private sector 
enterprises. 

GEO 5135 Surveillance, Intelligence, and International 
Relations (3). This seminar focuses on the role of 
advanced technology in obtaining information via orbital or 
land-based surveillance systems on issues of international 
relations such as warfare and globalization. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

GEO 5136 Remote Sensing (3). Satellite image and 
aerial photo interpretation and analysis fundamentals. 

GEO 5177 Topics in Geographic Information Systems 
(3). Geographic concepts are studied in a computer- 
based mapping environment. Both social and physical 



data are used. Students receive a background in spatial 
analysis and basic cartography. 

GEO 5415 Topics in Social Geography (G, IP) (3). 

Topics discussed include geographic aspects of 
population and ethnicity, with emphasis on sources and 
analysis of data and pertinent concepts. Prerequisites: 
GEA 2000 or permission of the instructor. (S) 

GEO 5557 Globalization (3). Examines the 
transformation of the world economy and of global 
finance, the changing significance of sovereignty and 
territoriality, the effects of space-time compression on 
everyday life, and associated shifts in culture and identity. 

INR 2001 Introduction to International Relations (3). 

Introduction to the interactions among international actors: 
states, international organizations, and transnational 
groups. Concepts such as power and national interest will 
be introduced. (F,S,SS) 

INR 3013 Development of International Relations 
Thought (3). The nature and characteristics of 
international relations from antiquity to the end of the First 
World War. Examination of the religio-philosophical, 
socio-economic and political ideas and systems 
associated with them. Study of select historical 
occurrences and patterns of social change and their 
interaction with the dynamics of international relations. 
Prerequisite: INR 2001. 

INR 3030 Diplomacy (3). Covers theory and practice of 
diplomacy, including negotiation, conflict resolution, ethics 
and human rights, and economic diplomacy. Examines 
both diplomatic history and contemporary foreign policy 
problems. 

INR 3043 Population and Society (G, IP) (3). 

Introduction to basic demographic concepts: fertility, 
mortality, migration, urbanization. Discussion of economic 
development, modernization and population change. 
Examination of sources of data and background 
information including censuses and vital statistics, and 
their utilization. (F) 

INR 3045 The Global Challenge of Refugees and 
Migrants (IP) (3). Examines political and economic 
challenges stemming from the international movement of 
refugees and economic migrants. Emphasizes the role of 
state power, organizations and law in structuring 
responses. 

INR 3061 Conflict, Security and Peace Studies in INR 
(FP) (3). Introduces students to basic theoretical 
arguments and empirical cases on security, peace and 
strategic studies. Examines the evolution of conflict 
resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. 

INR 3081 Contemporary International Problems (IP) 
(3). Examines selected world and regional issues and 
problems. Topics vary according to the instructor. 
(F.S.SS) 

INR 3106 International Relations of the United States 
(FP) (3). Introduces major issues of U.S. foreign policy. 
Topics are examined from multiple perspectives, including 
those of individual leaders, domestic interest groups, and 
the national interest. (F,S) 

INR 3214 International Relations of Europe (AS) (3). An 

examination of the international, social, economic, and 



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College of Arts and Sciences 161 



political life of contemporary Europe. Emphasis given to 
international organizations and the trend toward economic 
and political integration. (F,S) 

INR 3223 Japan and the United States (AS.FP) (3). 

Examines the international relationship between two of the 
most powerful and economically significant states of this 
and the next century and the international problems they 
must face together. 

INR 3224 International Relations of East Asia (AS) (3). 

Examines strategic and economic aspects of international 
relations among China, Japan, North Korea, and other 
nations of East Asia. 

INR 3226 International Relations of Central Asia and 
the Caucasus (AS) (3). Analysis of international relations 
of Central Asia and the Caucasus, domestic and external 
sources of region's foreign policy and its geopolitical, 
geoeconomic and geocultural dynamics. 

INR 3227 International Relations of South Asia (AS) 
(3). Examines international relations of Indian 
subcontinent. Looks at basic patterns of international, 
political, economic, cultural, and ideological relations of 
the region. 

INR 3232 International Relations of China (AS) (3). An 

examination of the development of China's international 
relations in the 20th century. Special attention to the 
development of institutional mechanisms for diplomacy 
and to problems of integrating domestic and foreign 
policies. (S) 

INR 3243 International Relations of Latin America (AS) 
(3). An examination of international, social, economic, and 
political life of Latin America. Emphasis given to the role 
of international organizations; regionalism; and the trend 
toward economic integration. (F.S.SS) 

INR 3246 International Relations of the Caribbean (AS) 
(3). An examination of the international social, economic, 
and political life of the Caribbean. Includes English, 
Spanish, and French speaking regions. (F,S) 

INR 3252 International Relations of North Africa (AS) 
(3). An examination of the social, political and economic 
structure of North Africa and the manner in which its 
historical development has conditioned international 
relations within and external to the region. (F) 

INR 3253 International Relations of Sub-Saharan 
Africa (AS) (3). An analysis of the international relations 
of sub-Saharan African nations with one another and with 
other, non-African nations. Examines the effects of such 
international relationships on development, politics, and 
social change in sub-Saharan Africa. 

INR 3262 International Relations of Russia and the 
Former USSR (AS) (3). Analysis of the international 
relations of countries of the former USSR, covering the 
Soviet and post-Soviet eras. Emphasis on Russia, Muslim 
Central Asia, and their impact on the international system. 
(F) 

INR 3274 International Relations of the Middle East 
(AS) (3). An examination of the international social, 
economic, and political life of the Middle East. The role of 
oil in the region will receive special attention. (F,S) 



INR 3303 Foreign Policymaking (FP) (3). Introduces and 
explores models of foreign policymaking, applied to 
international strategic, economic, and social problems. 

INR 3331 European Foreign and Security Policy (FP) 
(3). Familiarizes students with European foreign policies 
and security institutions in the context of European 
integration. Addresses areas of security and defense, 
trade and development cooperation. 

INR 3403 International Law (IL) (3). Introduction to the 
legal concepts, framework, and institutions which play a 
role in international relations theory and practice. (F,S,SS) 

INR 3502 International Organizations (IL) (3). The study 
of international political, economic, and social 
organizations and their impact upon the relations between 
nations. Emphasis on the constitution, voting, 
membership, security and operation of such 
organizations, and the settling of international disputes 
through these bodies. (F,S,SS) 

INR 3703 International Political Economy (IPE) (3). 
Explores the important concepts, theories, and contending 
approaches used in the study of international political 
economy. 

INR 3705 Geography of Central Asia and the Caucasus 
(AS,G) (3). Geography of the countries of the former 
Soviet Union in the Caucasus and the Central Asian 
regions. Emphasis on natural resources, environmental 
problems, ethnicity and population change, urbanization, 
and economic development. 

INR 3949 Cooperative Education in Social Sciences 
(3). A student majoring in one of the Social Sciences 
(Economics, International Relations, Political Science, 
Sociology, or Psychology) may spend several semesters 
fully employed in industry or government in a capacity 
relating to the major. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Cooperative Education Program and major department. 
(F,S,SS) 

INR 4024 Ethnicity and Nationality: World Patterns and 
Problems (IP) (3). A systematic survey of multi-national 
states and their current political and socio-economic 
situations. The concept of ethnicity and its correlates. 
Conceptual bases of ethnic integration, assimilation, and 
stratification. The macro and micro-scales; country, 
region, city, neighborhood. The consequences of 
modernization and economic development. (F) 

INR 4031 The Media and International Relations (IP) 
(3). Explores the impact of print and visual media on the 
practice of International Relations. Examines how the 
media and their technologies determine the outcome of 
International Relations. 

INR 4032 Asia and Latin America in World Affairs (AS) 
(3). Examines the linkages between Asia and Latin 
America, their roles in world affaris, the domestic sources 
of foreign policies of states in the two regions, as well as 
the international issues confronting the two areas. 

INR 4054 World Resources and World Order (IP) (3). 
An examination of the impact of the quantity and 
distribution of the world's resources upon the relations 
between nations. The availability of mineral resources and 
food, in particular, will receive attention; and an 



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assessment will be made of the international economic 
and political implications deriving there from. (F,S) 

INR 4077 International Relations & Women's Human 
Rights (IP) (3). Identifies and explains global human 
rights issues that affect women's lives. Examines existing 
international legal instruments that allow women to have 
basic rights recognized. Fulfills SACS oral competency 
requirement. 

INR 4082 Islam in International Relations (IP) (3). 

Analysis of the role of Islam in shaping the dynamics of 
contemporary international relations. Emphasis on 
ideological, cultural and political role, Islamic movements 
and states and relations with the West. (S) 

INR 4085 Women and Men in International Relations 
(IP) (3). Surveys the differential roles of women and men 
in international relations, gender based poltics at a global 
scale, and constructions of proper womanhood and 
manhood in transnational politcs. 

INR 4091 Ethical Problems in International Relations 
(IP) (3). Explores several approaches to the international 
ethical problems posed by intervention, human rights 
abuses, nuclear threats, global economic privation and 
other international phenomena. Prerequisite: INR 2001. 

INR 4247 Caribbean Regional Relations (AS) (3). An 

examination of the forces and institutions which contribute 
to or inhibit cooperation and integration in the Caribbean. 
Prerequisites: INR 3246, CPO 3323, ECS 4432. (S) 

INR 4283 International Relations, Development, and 
the Third World (AS, IP) (3). An examination of the 
impact of the theory and practice of development and the 
relations between nations, with particular emphasis on the 
Third World. Attention given to the role of international 
political and economic organizations in the development 
process. (F,S) 

INR 4335 Strategic Studies and National Security (FP) 
(3). The role offeree in international relations is examined. 
The use and control of force in theory and practice is 
analyzed. Special attention is paid to contemporary 
national security issues. (F,S) 

INR 4404 International Protection of Human Rights (IL, 
IP) (3). Development of the concern of the international 
community with the rights of individuals and groups and 
the institutional mechanisms which have been set up for 
their protection. (F) 

INR 4408 Topics in International Law (IL, IP) (3). An 

intensive examination of selected topics in international 
law and relations among nations. Topics will vary 
according to the interests of the instructor and the 
students. (F) 

INR 4411 International Humanitarian Law (IP) (3). 

Provides students with conceptual, legal, and critical 
understanding of major issues of International 
Humanitarian Law. Allows students to develop analytical 
work and research in this field. Prerequisite: Internatinal 
Law (INR 3403). 

INR 4436 International Negotiation (3). Introduces 
students to the main components of international 
negotiations analysis. Surveys the various stages of a 
negotiation process and examines key. Applies theory to 



practice by considering and analyzing a set case of 
studies. 

INR 4603 Theories of International Relations (3). 
Analysis and conceptualization of the forces and 
conditions which influence relations among nations. 
Emphasis is on the provision of an analytical basis for the 
study of international relations. Prerequisites: INR 2001 or 
permission of the instructor. (F,S,SS) 

INR 4905 Independent Study (VAR). Directed 
independent research. Requires prior approval by 
instructor. (F,S,SS) 

INR 4931 Topics in International Relations (3). Varies 
according to the instructor. (F,S,SS) 

INR 4937 Honors Seminar 1: Advanced Writings in 
International Relations (3). Instruction on the steps in 
research and writings including formulation of the 
research question, research design, argumentation and 
bibliography assembly on a theme in International 
Relations. Prerequisite: INR 2001. (F) 

INR 4943 Internship in International Affairs (IP) (1-6). 

Work 10-15 hours a week with a consulate, business, 
bank, private voluntary organization, governmental 
agency or consulting firm for professional experience in 
international affairs. Prerequisite: INR 2001. (F,S,SS) 

INR 4949 Cooperative Education in Social Sciences 
(3). A student majoring in one of the Social Sciences 
(Economics, International Relations, Political Science, 
Sociology, or Psychology) may spend one or two 
semesters fully employed in industry or government in a 
capacity relating to the major. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Cooperative Education Program and major department. 
(F.S.SS) 

INR 4970 Honors Thesis (3). Under the direction of an 
appropriate faculty member, students research and write 
an honors thesis. Prerequisite: INR 4937 (Honors 
Seminar I). (F,S,SS) 

INR 5007 Seminar in International Politics (3). An 

advanced graduate course designed to give students a 
specialized knowledge of the classics in international 
politics. The course traces the development of 
international politics from Thucydides to the present. 

INR 5012 Global Issues and Human Rights (3). 

Identification, articulation and clarification of global issues 
that affect Human Rights and the global strategies used to 
challenge and overcome obstacles. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

INR 5036 Politics of Globalization (3). Intensive 
examination of state and global institutions that have 
shaped process of economic globalization. Topics include 
impact on sovereignty, human rights, labor and agenda- 
setting of large and small nation-states. 

INR 5062 War, Peace and Conflict Resoultion in INR 
(3). Explores the genesis of interstate conflict, the 
evolution of crisis, the outbreak of war and peace. 
Analyzes conflict resolution and post-conflict 
reconstruction processes in international relations. 

INR 5086 Islam in International Relations (3). Analysis 
of the role of Islam in shaping the dynamics of 
contemporary international relations. Emphasis on the 



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College of Arts and Sciences 163 



ideological, cultural, and political role of Islamic 
movements and states, and their relations with the West. 
(F) 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics of Development (3). 

This course examines the conceptual and substantive 
dimensions of ethnicity in the context of world politics and 
political development. The course will highlight ethnicity 
and ethnic groups as critical factors in North-South 
politics. (F) 

INR 5088 Feminism and International Relations (3). 

Familiarizes students with major theoretical traditions of 
feminist thinking and surveys feminist literature in the sub- 
fields of security studies, political economy, and global 
governance. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

INR 5255 Seminar in African Development (AS) (3). 

Examines political, economic and social development in 
Sub-Saharan Africa in an international context. Introduces 
students to sources for research in African international 
development. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

INR 5275 International Relations of the Middle East 
(3). Focuses on IR of the contemporary Middle East, the 
foreign policy of major regional states, regional conflicts, 
and the US and other great powers' involvement, and 
dynamics of social and religious movements and 
revolutions. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

INR 5315 Foreign Policy Analysis (3). Comparative 
examination of theories of foreign policy making, 
emphasizing the international, domestic, and 
organizational contexts in which national policies are 
formulated and enacted. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
or permission of the instructor. (F) 

INR 5352 Environment and Security (3). Examines the 
relationship between environmental issues and 
international security. Surveys such topics as resource 
scarcity, environmental degradation, and deforestation 
and their implications for national and regional security. 
Considers such topics as international environmental law, 
and international environmental regimes. 

INR 5409 International Law I (3). Role of international 
law in the relations of states; nature, development, theory, 
sources of law; international personality; jurisdiction, 
including territory and nationality; dispute settlement. (F) 

INR 5507 International Organizations I (3). Study of 
international organizations and their role in international 
relations. Emphasis on their legal status, rule-making 
capacities and role in dispute settlement and maintenance 
of peace. (S) 

INR 5544 The New Asian Century (3). Critically 
examines Asian regional identity, Asia's role in the 
modern world economy, national and regional institution 
building, new security challenges, and the legacy of the 
past. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of 
instructor. 

INR 5607 International Relations and Development (3). 

An analysis and conceptualization of the process of 
development as it takes place in the international context. 
Special attention given to the role of international 
organizations in promoting development and the manner 



in which differences in developmental levels conditions 
international relations. (S) 

INR 5609 Contemporary Dynamics of International 
Relations (3). Surveys the 20th century's large events 
and important tendencies decade by decade, as 
registered by intellectual and policy elites at the time. 

INR 5615 Research Design in International Relations 
(3). Introduces graduate students to the principles of 
formulating and defending a compelling research design, 
gathering and analyzing evidence, and producing 
scholarship. 

INR 5906 Independent Study (VAR). Directed 
independent research. Requires prior approval by 
instructor. (F,S,SS) 

INR 5943 Internship in International Relations (1-6). 

Permits student to gain direct experience with analysis 
and conduct of international affairs. Work required for 
internship must be determined in consultation with 
instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

INR 5945 Graduate Pedagogy (1). The development of 
teaching skills required by graduate assistants, including 
classroom skills, designing examinations, etc. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Assistants. 

INR 5XXX The Media and International Relations (3). 

Explores impact of visual and print media on practice and 
theory of international relations. Encourages students to 
question how representation of international relations 
issues are produced by everyday media culture. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

POS 3258 International Relations on Film (IP) (3). 

Features popular films to analyze, interpret, 
conceptualize, and critique crucial aspects, issues, and 
events of international relations practice. 



164 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Liberal Studies 

Janat F. Parker, Professor, Psychology, and Director of 

Liberal Studies 
Marcelle M. Welch, Professor, Modern Languages and 

Associate Director of Liberal Studies 
Kenneth Rogerson, Professor, Philosophy, Director, 

Humanities, and Associate Director of Liberal Studies, 

BBC 

The Liberal Studies Program exposes the student to a 
wide range of courses offered by the College, while 
granting the opportunity to pursue an individualized 
program of studies under the Liberal Studies guidelines. 
These guidelines include six categories of courses: (1) 
Foundations of Liberal Studies, two courses to be taken 
as early as possible; (2) Interdisciplinary Colloquia, two 
courses involving faculty from several departments of the 
College, and dealing with interdisciplinary topics; (3) 
Natural Sciences, two courses to expose the student to 
the scientific method and its application to problems in 
biology, chemistry, environmental science, earth sciences, 
and physics; (4) Humanities, two courses dealing with the 
analysis of literary, philosophical, religious and historical 
texts or works of art, music, and theatre; (5) Social 
Sciences, two courses to expose the student to the basic 
theories and methods of social scientists in the fields of 
anthropology, economics, international relations, political 
science, psychology, and sociology; (6) Artistic Creation, 
one course in studio art or music, creative writing, or 
theatre to allow the student to experiment with his or her 
own creativity, and to experience the work of the artist. 

Students are free to choose any combination of courses 
within these guidelines. Under the advisement of the 
Director or Associate Director of Liberal Studies, the 
student will be encouraged to pursue a minor, a 
certificate, or a double major. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites 

No specific courses required; all students are encouraged 
to complete the Associate in Arts degree. 
Recommended Courses: Arts and Sciences 
concentration recommended. 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses: (33 credits) 

Courses offered by any of the units of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, chosen in accordance with academic 
guidelines of the Program of Liberal Studies, to meet 
requirements in the four following areas: 

Natural Sciences 6 

Humanities 6 

Social Sciences 6 

Artistic Creation 3 

Interdisciplinary Colloquia offered by the Liberal 
Studies Program 6 

Foundations of Liberal Studies 6 



All courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or 
better. 

Electives: (27 credits) 

The remaining hours will be taken as electives. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

IDS-lnterdisciplinary Studies 

IDS 2930 Faculty Scholars Seminar (1). Provides 
freshman Faculty Scholars the opportunity to participate in 
the interdisciplinary study of significant themes. May only 
be taken twice. 

IDS 3930 Foundations of Liberal Studies (3). This will 
be a broad synthesis of knowledge and methods in the 
Arts and Sciences taught from the perspective of different 
disciplines. Specific topics will be announced in advance. 

IDS 3949 Cooperative Education in Liberal Studies (3). 

A student majoring in Liberal Studies may spend one 
semester fully employed in industry in a capacity relating 
to the major. This course must be taken as an elective. 

IDS 4905 Independent Study (VAR). Cross-disciplinary 
topics for individual study and research to be chosen by 
students in consultation with their faculty advisors. This 
course must be taken as an elective. 

IDS 4920 Liberal Studies Colloquia (3). Individual 
sections will study, from an interdisciplinary perspective, 
issues selected and presented jointly by College faculty. 
Specific topics will be announced in advance. 

IDS 4930 Foundations of Liberal Studies (3). This will 
be a broad synthesis of knowledge and methods in the 
Arts and Sciences, taught from the perspective of different 
disciplines. Specific topics will be announced in advance. 

IDS 4949 Cooperative Education in Liberal Studies (3). 

A student majoring in Liberal Studies may spend one 
semester fully employed in industry in a capacity relating 
to the major. This course must be taken as an elective. 

Labor Studies 

Margaret Wilson, Director, Labor Studies Concentration 
Dawn Addy 
Thomas Humphries 
Bruce Nissen 

The Liberal Studies Program of the College of Arts and 
Sciences offers a Concentration in Labor Studies as an 
option within the program. As an academic discipline, 
Labor Studies has its roots in both the social sciences and 
the workers' education movement of the early twentieth 
century. Labor Studies as a discipline acknowledges 
insights into the labor field which have emerged from 
decades of university-union cooperation in labor affairs 
apart from the traditional framework of industrial relations. 
According to this concept. Labor Studies is the academic 
examination of issues which confront people in the pursuit 
of their need for rewarding employment. The focus of 
inquiry is on workers as individuals, as members and/or 
leaders in their unions or associations, and as citizens of 
their communities. 

People in pursuit of rewarding jobs and careers have 
employed and continue to develop a variety of individual 
and collective strategies to cope with the dynamics of 
change in society, including the development of unions 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 165 



and other workers' associations. Because these unions 
and associations also conduct autonomous economic, 
social and political programs which transcend their labor 
relations nexus with management, Labor Studies reaches 
beyond industrial relations and addresses an additional 
set of questions and concerns. 

Thus, Labor Studies takes as its focus the individual 
workers, the unions and associations that workers 
develop, and the internal and external relations of those 
unions and associations to other societal institutions in the 
United States and around the world. The scope of Labor 
Studies is dictated by the needs and interests of workers 
and employees, including their individual, group and 
organizational problems in the workplace; their 
relationships with their employers; and their interactions 
with the larger community, economy, and polity. 

A student majoring in Liberal Studies may earn the 
Concentration in Labor Studies by fulfilling the 
requirements of both programs. The Concentration is a 
nine-course (27-credit hour) program of study within the 
Liberal Studies Degree. 

Required Courses for Liberal Studies: (33 ) 

Thirty-three semester hours of concentration at the 3000 
or 4000 level as required for all Liberal Studies students to 
be selected in consultation with and agreement of advisor. 
Courses are to meet requirements in the following areas: 
Natural Sciences 6 

Humanities 6 

Social Sciences 6 

Artistic Creation 3 

Interdisciplinary Colloquia 6 

Foundations of Liberal Studies 6 

When possible, these courses should be selected from 
the list of required and elective courses for Labor Studies. 
All courses must be completed with a grade of 'C or 
better. 

Required Courses for Labor Studies Concentration: 

(12) 

LBS 3001 introduction to Labor Studies 

Minimum of three courses (nine hours) to be chosen from 

the following: (additional courses from this list may be 

used to fulfil! electives). To be chosen in consultation with 

and agreement of advisor. 

ECO 2023 

LBS 4101 

LBS 4210 

LBS 4501 

LBS 4900 

SYO 4360 



Principles of Microeconomics 
Theories of the Labor Movement 
Women and Work in the United States 
Labor Law 

Directed Study in Labor Studies 
Work & Society 

Electives (15) 

To be chosen from the following in consultation with and 

agreement of advisor (some of these courses may require 

prerequisites). 

Economics 

ECO 2013 
ECO 3303 
ECO 4321 
ECO 4622 
ECO 4701 
ECO 4733 
ECP4203 
ECP 4204 
ECS 3402 



Principles of Macroeconomics 

Development of Economic Thought 

Radical Political Econ 

Economic Development of U.S. 

World Economy 

Multinational Corporations 

Intro to Labor Economics 

Theory of Labor Economics 

The Political Economy of South America 



History 

AMH 2020 American History 1850-Present 

AMH 3270 Contemporary U.S. History 

AMH 4251 The Great Depression 

AMH 4500 United States Labor History 

EUH 4660 Modern Europe, 1789 to the Present 

LAH 3200 Latin America: The National Period 

LAH 451 1 Argentina: 18th-20th Centuries 

LAH 4600 History of Brazil 

Industrial Engineering 

EIN 4214 Safety in Engineering 

EIN 4261 Industrial Hygiene 

International Relations 

INR 3004 Patterns of International Relations 

INR 3043 Population and Society 

INR 4283 International Relations, Development, 

and the Third World 
Labor Studies 
LBS 4150 
LBS 4260 
LBS 4401 
LBS 4461 
LBS 4654 



LBS 4905 
LBS 4930 
LBS 5464 

Management 

MAN 4401 
MAN 4410 
MAN 4610 

Philosophy 

PHI 2600 
PHI 3636 
PHM 3200 

PHM 3400 

Political Scier 

POS 3424 
POS4071 
POS 4122 
POT 3204 
POT 3302 
PUP 4004 

Psychology 

INP2002 



Contemporary Labor Issues 

Union Leadership and Administration 

Labor Contract Negotiations 

Labor Dispute Resolution 

Comparative and International Labor 

Studies 

Topics in Labor Studies 

Topics in Labor Studies 

Labor Arbitration 

Collective Bargaining 
Union-Management Relations 
International and Comparative Industrial 
Relations 

Introduction to Ethics 
Professional Ethics 
Social and Political Philosophy 
Philosophy of Law 

Legislative Process 
Corporate Power and Politics 
State Government and Politics 
American Political Thought 
Political Ideologies 
Public Policy (U.S.) 



Introductory Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 
Public Administration 

PAD 2002 Intro to Public Administration 

PAD 4223 Public Sector Budgeting 

PAD 5427 Collective Bargaining in the Public 

Sector 

Sociology/Anthropology 

ANT 4007 The Organizer 

ISS 3330 Ethical Issues in Social Sciences 

SYA 3300 Research Methods 

SYA 4010 Sociological Theories 

SYO 4360 Work & Society 

SYO 4530 Social Inequality 

SYP 4421 Man, Society and Technology 

Statistics 

STA 1013 Statistics for Social Services 

STA 2122 Introduction to Statistics I 



166 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



STA3123 
Theatre 

SPC 2600 



Introduction to Statistics I 
Public Speaking 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

LBS - Labor Studies 

LBS 3001 Introduction to Labor Studies (3). History and 
development of the labor movement, with emphasis on 
union development as a response to industrialization and 
technological change. Includes the structure and 
functioning of modern unions, the development of modern 
technology, the industrial working class, and the impact of 
the rural-urban shift of labor. 

LBS 3470 Labor Contract Administration (3). Use of 

grievance procedure to administer a collective bargaining 
agreement. Identification, research, presentation and 
writing of grievance cases. Technical and legal role of 
union steward. 

LBS 3943 Internship in Labor Studies (3). Practical 
training and experience in various aspects of labor 
organization policies, practices, and procedures through 
placement with a local labor organization. Reports and 
papers required. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

LBS 3949 Cooperative Education in Labor Studies (1- 

3). One or two semesters of part or full-time work related 
to the major. Written reports and supervisor evaluations 
required. Prerequisite: Permission of Labor Studies 
Program. 

LBS 4101 Theories of the Labor Movement (3). This 
course deals with theories which have attempted to 
explain the origins, developments, and functioning of the 
labor movement. 

LBS 4150 Contemporary Labor Issues (3). Studies of 
contemporary labor issues selected from such areas as 
collective bargaining, arbitration, mediation, legislation, 
regulative and administrative law, employment 
discrimination, and union grievances. 

LBS 4154 Workers and Diversity (3). The theoretical 
debates surrounding the workforce participation of women 
and minorities as well as the historical position of these 
groups in the labor force are studied. Students explore 
social phenomena that contribute to the continuation of 
discriminatory practices and study and analyze the 
policies that attempt to address these issues. 
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing. 

LBS 4210 Women and Work in the United States (3). 

The role of women in the work force and in unions with 
historical, social, and economic emphasis. 

LBS 4260 Union Leadership and Administration (3). 

Administration of labor organizations; labor policies and 
practices; legal requirements and financial administration 
of unions. Prerequisite: LBS 3001. 

LBS 4401 Labor Contract Negotiations (3). A 

comprehensive study of collective bargaining with 
emphasis upon the private sector. Included will be 
negotiations and scope of contracts, day-to-day contract 
administration, and major bargaining issues. 



LBS 4461 Labor Dispute Resolution (3). Theory and 
practice of dispute resolution in industry arbitration 
processes, grievances, mediation, fact-finding, and 
conciliation. Arbitration of industrial claims and disputes, 
commercial arbitration. Prerequisite: LBS 3001. 

LBS 4484 Classroom Conflict Resolution (3). 

Investigate conflict and violence, and help students to 
develop strategies to defuse them in the classroom. 

LBS 4501 Labor Law (3). Studies the history and current 
functioning of labor law with special emphasis upon the 
private sector. 

LBS 4610 Cross Cultural Dimensions of Latin 
American Labor Relations (3). A survey of the issues, 
techniques, and professional competencies required to 
effectively understand and contribute to furthering fluid 
and productive labor management relationships in the 
hemisphere. 

LBS 4653 Labor Movements in Developing Countries 
(3). The role that unions play in developing or recently 
developed countries; the relationship between economic 
development strategies and union structure/strategy; role 
of unions in representing popular social sectors; special 
emphasis on Latin American and Asian labor movements. 

LBS 4654 Comparative and International Labor 
Studies (3). A study of labor issues from a comparative 
and international perspective with emphasis upon the 
impact of international organizations on labor relations 
systems and a comparison among major labor relations 
models. 

LBS 4900 Directed Study in Labor Studies (3). 

Supervised reading and/or field research and training. 

LBS 4905/4930 Topics in Labor Studies (1-3). Selected 
topics or themes in Labor Studies. The themes will vary 
from semester to semester. With a change in content, 
course may be repeated. 

LBS 4949 Cooperative Education in Labor Studies (1- 

3). One or two semesters of part or full-time work related 
to the major. Written reports and supervisor evaluations 
required. Prerequisite: Permission of Labor Studies 
Program. 

LBS 5155 Workplace Diversity (3). Students examine 
theoretical debates surrounding workforce participation of 
women and minorities; historical position of these groups 
in labor force; social phenomena that contribute to 
discriminatory practices and development of policies to 
eliminate discriminatory practices. 

LBS 5215 Women in the United States Workplace (3). 

Students explore womens' changing role in U.S. 
workplace and development of workers' organizations 
from Colonial era to modern day. Special attention given 
to role of class, race, and ethnicity within context of 
gender. 

LBS 5406 Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations 
(3). A comprehensive study of major issues and themes in 
American collective bargaining. Includes origins of 
collective bargaining, labor iaw, unionization, contract 
negotiations patterns in contract content, impact of 
external laws, public sector unions, grievance arbitration 
and interest arbitration. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 167 



LBS 5464 Labor Arbitration (3). Study of labor dispute 
resolution with emphasis on grievances, fact-finding, and 
arbitration. 

LBS 5465 Introduction to Mediation (3). Examines the 
role of mediation in resolving civil, commercial, family, 
public and workshop disputes. Incorporates mediation 
principles and skills, different approaches to mediation, 
and current research in mediation. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instuctor. 

LBS 5466 Family Mediation (3). Provides a 
comprehensive understanding of conflict resolution, power 
and balances, emotional and psychological issues, 
negotiation techniques as well as the development of 
practical skills in the field of family mediation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LBS 5467 Civil Mediation (3). A comprehensive 
understanding of the field of civil mediation as well as the 
development of the practical skills to be a civil mediator. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LBS 5485 Fundamentals of Conflict Resolution (3). 

Survey of the major contemporary theories of 
organizational functioning and the management of conflict 
within and among organizations in a globalized world. 
Theories that center primarily within the fields of dispute 
resolution, sociology, and social interaction/group theory 
will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

LBS 5486 The Dynamics of Conflict Management (3). 

Investigate conflict and violence, and help students to 
develop strategies to defuse them in the classroom. 

LBS 5507 Labor and Employment Law (3). Familiarizes 
the student with the legal issues and rules regarding 
unionization of employees, the collective bargaining 
process, the relationship between the employee and 
his/her union, and the administration of collective 
bargaining agreements. Examines the legal framework 
within which collective bargaining occurs and also 
familiarizes students with additional issues of rights in 
employment. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LBS 5658 Labor Movements and Economic 
Development (3). Relationships between unions and 
economic development strategies in developing/recently 
developed countries; emphasis on social movement 
unionism and unions in Latin America and Asia. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LBS 5930 Topics in Labor Studies (1-3). Selected topics 
or themes in Labor Studies. Themes will vary from 
semester to semester. With a change in content, course 
may be repeated. May include field work. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

LBS 5931 Topics in the Philosophy and Methods of 
Conflict Research (3). Provides an examination of the 
philosophy, methods, and research in the field of conflict 
resolution. The particular content and orientation of the 
course may vary according to the particular focus 
examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

LBS 6906 Directed Individual Study (3). Specialized 
intensive study in areas of interest to student. Student 
plans and carries out independent study project under the 
direction of faculty member. Topics must relate to content 



of Labor Studies or ADR. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 

LBS 6945 Internship Labor Studies / Alternative 
Dispute Resolutions (3). Practical training and 
experience in organization according to students needs 
and interests. Reports and papers required. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 



1 68 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Mathematics 

Enrique Villamor, Professor and Chairperson 

Gerardo Aladro, Associate Professor 

Chingsheng Cao, Assistant Professor 

Laura DeCarli, Associate Professor 

Tedi Draghici, Assistant Professor 

Julian Edward, Associate Professor 

Domitila Fox, Instructor 

Laura Ghezzi, Assistant Professor 

Susan Gorman, Instructor 

Gueo Grantcharov, Assistant Professor 

Steven M. Hudson, Associate Professor 

George Kafkoulis, Associate Professor 

Mark Leckband, Associate Professor 

Thomas Leness, Associate Professor 

Bao Qin Li, Professor 

Diana McCoy, Instructor 

Abdelhamid Meziani, Professor 

Richard Nadel, Instructor 

Taje Ramsamujh, Associate Professor 

David Ritter, Associate Professor 

Michael Rosenthal, Instructor 

Dev K. Roy, Associate Professor 

Richard L. Rubin, Associate Professor 

Philippe Rukimbira, Professor 

Anthony C. Shershin, Associate Professor 

Carmen Shershin, Instructor 

Minna Shore, Instructor 

Theodore Tachim Medjo, Associate Professor 

Louis Roder Tcheugoue Tebou, Assistant Professor 

Anna Wlodarczyk, Instructor 

Miroslav Yotov, Assistant Professor 

John Zweibel, Associate Professor 

An undergraduate student may major in Mathematics or in 

Mathematical Sciences. The Bachelor's degree in 

Mathematics emphasizes a deeper study of pure 

mathematics in the traditional mode. A student planning to 

continue into graduate study should major in 

Mathematics. 

The Mathematical Sciences degree offers an alternative 
involving more breadth. The mathematical requirements, 
which are fewer and tend to be more applied, are 
supplemented by additional requirements in computer 
science and applied statistics. 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematical 
Sciences 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Required Courses 

Common Prerequisites 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

MAC 2313 Calculus III 

COP 2210 Introduction to Programming 



COP 2250 



Java Programming 



CGS 2423 C for Engineers 

Completion of two of the following courses with labs: 

BSC1010 General Biology I 

BSC1010L General Biology Lab I 

BSC 1011 General Biology II 

BSC1011L General Biology Lab II 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM1045L General Chemistry Lab I 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM1046L General Chemistry Lab II 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 

PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus Lab I 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 

PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations 

MAS 3105 Linear Algebra 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

Intermediate Programming ■ 3 

Fundamentals of Computer Systems 3 

Discrete Mathematics 3 

Numerical Analysis 3 
Introduction to the Theory of Algorithms 3 

Advanced Differential Equations 3 

Statistical Methods I and II 3-3 



COP 3337 
COP 3402 
MAD 2104 
MAD 3401 
MAD 3512 
MAP 4401 
STA 3163-4 

In addition, 

COP 3530 
MAA 4402 
MAD 3305 
MAD 4203 
MAD 5405 
MAP 3103 
MAS 5145 
MHF 4302 
STA 4603 

STA 4604 

STA 5446 



two courses from the following list: 

Data Structures 3 

Complex Variables 3 

Graph Theory 3 

Intro to Combinatories 3 

Numerical Methods 3 

Mathematical Modeling 3 

Applied Linear Algebra 3 

Mathematical Logic 3 



Mathematical Techniques in Operations 
Research I 3 

Mathematical Techniques in Operations 
Research II 3 

Probability Theory 3 

Electives 

The balance of the 60 semester hour requirement for 
graduation may be chosen from any courses in the 
University approved by the student's advisor. 
Remarks: The following courses are not acceptable for 
credit toward graduation, unless a student has passed the 
course before declaring a Mathematical Sciences major: 
MAC 2233, STA 1013, STA 3122-23, STA 2023, and QMB 
3150 (College of Business Administration). 

Minor in Mathematical Sciences 

Required Courses 

MAC 231 1-2-3. Calculus I, II, III (or equivalent). 

Plus MAP 2302, MAS 3105, and two courses from 
those approved for the Mathematical Sciences Major 
program. A grade of 'C or higher is necessary for the 
minor. 

Remarks: Courses completed elsewhere may be applied 
to the Mathematical Sciences minor, with the approval of 
the department. However, at least 2 of the 4 courses 
noted above, excluding MAC 2311-2-3, must be 
completed at FIU. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 169 



Bachelor of Science in Mathematics 
Degree Program Hours: 120 
Lower Division Preparation 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Required Courses 
Common Prerequisites 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

MAC 2313 Calculus III 

COP 2210 Introduction to Progamming 



COP 2250 



Java Programming 



CGS 2423 C for Engineers 

Completion of two of the following courses with labs: 

BSC 1010 General Biology I 

BSC 1010L General Biology Lab I 

BSC 101 1 General Biology II 

BSC 1 01 1 L General Biology Lab II 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry Lab I 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry Lab II 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 

PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus Lab I 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 

PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus Lab II 
Courses required for the degree: 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations 

MAS 3105 Linear Algebra 

Upper Division Program 

Required Courses 

MAA 3200 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics 3 

MAA 421 1 Advanced Calculus 3 

MAS 4301 Algebraic Structures 3 

STA 4321 Mathematical Statistics I 3 
In addition, three courses from each of the following 
lists. 
List 1 

MAD 4203 Introduction to Combinatorics 3 

MAA 4402 Complex Variables 3 

MTG3212 College Geometry 3 

MAS 4213 Number Theory 3 

MAA 4212 Topics in Advanced Calculus 3 

MAS 4302 Topics in Algebraic Structures 3 

MTG4302 Topology * 3 
List 2 

MAP 4401 Advanced Differential Equations 3 

MAD 3305 Graph Theory 3 

MAP 3103 Mathematical Modeling 3 

STA 4322 Mathematical Statistics II 3 

MAD 3401 Numerical Analysis 3 

MHF 4302 Mathematical Logic 3 

MHF4102 Axiomatic Set Theory 3 

Electives 

The balance of the 60 semester hour requirement for 
graduation may be chosen from any courses in the 
University approved by the student's advisor. 



Remarks: The following courses are not acceptable for 
credit toward graduation, unless a student has passed the 
course before declaring a Mathematics major: MAC 2233, 
STA 1013, STA 3122-23, STA 2023, and QMB 3150 
(College of Business Administration). 

Minor in Mathematics 

Required Courses 

MAC 231 1-2-3 Calculus l-l-lll (or equivalent). 

Plus four courses from those approved for the 
Mathematics Major program. MAP 2302 and MAS 3105 
may be included among these four courses. A grade of 'C 
or higher is necessary for the minor. 
Remarks: Courses completed elsewhere may be applied 
to the Mathematics minor, with the approval of the 
department. However, at least 2 of the 4 courses noted 
above, excluding MAC 2311-2-3, must be completed at 
FIU. 

Certificate in Actuarial Studies 

The department offers a certificate in Actuarial Studies. 
For further information refer to the Certificate section at 
the end of the College of Arts and Sciences' section. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

MAA-Mathematics, Analysis; MAC-Mathematics, Calculus 
and Pre-Calculus; MAD-Mathematics, Discrete; MAP- 
Mathematics, Applied; MAS-Mathematics, Algebraic 
Structures; MAT-Mathematics, General; MGF- 
Mathematics, General and Finite; MHF-Mathematics, 
History and Foundations; MTG- Mathematics, Topology 
and Geometry. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 
Summer semester offering. 

MAA 3200 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics (3). 

Topics include: naive set theory, functions, cardinality, 
sequences of real numbers and limits. Emphasis on 
formal proofs. Prerequisite: MAC 2313. (F) 

MAA 4211 Advanced Calculus (3). An intense study of 
the foundations of calculus. Topics may include: the real 
number system, continuity, differentiation, Riemann- 
Stieltjes integration, and series of functions. Note: The 
student must complete MAA 3200 before attempting this 
course. Prerequisites: MAC 2313, MAS 3105 and MAA 
3200. (S) 

MAA 4212 Advanced Calculus II (3). A sequel to MAA 
4211. Topics may include: theory of integration; analysis 
in several variables; and Fourier series. Prerequisite: MAA 
4211. 

MAA 4402 Complex Variables (3). An introduction to 
complex variables, beginning with the algebra and 
geometry of the complex number system. Topics include: 
complex functions; analytic functions; Cauchy's theorem 
and its consequences; Taylor and Laurent series; residue 
calculus; evaluation of real integrals and summation of 
series; conformal mapping. Prerequisites: MAC 2313, and 
MAP 2302 or MAA 421 1 . (F) 

MAA 5XXX Introduction to Fourier Analysis (3). Basic 
real analysis, and measure theory, LP spaces and 
convolution, the Fourier transform in L 2 , Plancherel 
theorem, application to differential equations and 



170 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



wavelets. Prerequisites: Advanced Calculus, Linear 
Algebra. 

MAC 1105 College Algebra (3). Operations on 
polynomials, rational expressions, radicals; lines, cicles; 
inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions; 
systems of equations and inequalities. Students cannot 
receive credit for both this course and MAC 2147. 
Prerequisites: High school algebra and adequate 
placement test score. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 1114 Trigonometry (3). Trigonometric functions, 
identities, conditional equations, polar coordinates, 
vectors, polar graphs, complex numbers, DeMoivre's 
Theorem, conic sections. Student cannot receive credit for 
both this course and MAC 2147 Precalculus. Prerequisite: 
Grade of "C" or higher in College Algebra. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2147 Pre-calculus Mathematics (3). Topics to be 
covered include: functions, exponential and logarithmic 
functions, trigonometry and the basics of analytic 
geometry. Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra 
and adequate placement test score. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2233 Calculus For Business (3). A one semester 
introduction to the basic notions of calculus. Specific 
topics include: Differential Calculus using polynomial, 
exponential and logarithmic functions, and its application 
to optimization; integral calculus with area and probability 
applications. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in 
College Algebra or Precalculus or adequate placement 
test score. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2311 Calculus I (4). Limits, derivatives and their 
formulas, applications of derivatives, introduction to anti 
derivatives, introduction to parametric curves. 
Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in Trigonometry or 
Precalculus or adequate placement test score. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2312 Calculus II (4). Applications of the integral, 
integration techniques, improper integrals, Riemann 
sums, the integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, 
infinite series, Taylor series, polar coordinates, parametric 
equations. Prerequisites: Grade of "C" or higher in 
Calculus I or AP Calculus credit. (F,S,SS) 

MAC 2313 Multivariate Calculus (4). This course deals 
with the differential and integral calculus of real valued 
multivariate functions. The topics include: directional and 
partial derivatives, gradients, and their applications; 
differential calculus of vector valued functions; multiple, 
iterated, line, and surface integrals. Prerequisites: MAC 
2312 or equivalent with a grade of 'C or better. (F,S,SS) 

MAD 1100 Mathematics for Information Technology 
(3). Introduction to discrete mathematical structures with 
emphasis on applications to information technology: 
binary numbers, logic, sets, functions, recursion, 
combinatories, graph theory, boolean algebras. 
Prerequisite: College Algebra. 

MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics (3). Sets, functions, 
relations, permutations, and combinations, propositional 
logic, matrix algebra, graphs and trees, Boolean algebra, 
switching circuits. Prerequisites: COP 2210 or CGS 2420. 
(F,S,SS) 

MAD 3305 Graph Theory (3). An introduction to the study 
of graphs. Topics include the following: paths and circuits, 
connectedness, trees, shortest paths, networks, planar 
graphs, the coloring of graphs, and directed graphs. 



Applications of graphs to computer science will be 
discussed. Prerequisites: COP 2210 or CGS 2420 and 
either MAS 3105 or MAD 2104. (F,S,SS) 

MAD 3401 Numerical Analysis (3). Basic ideas and 
techniques of numerical analysis. Topics include: finite 
differences, interpolation, solution of equations, numerical 
integration and differentiation, applications, introduction to 
applied linear algebra. This course will make extensive 
laboratory use of the computer facility. Prerequisites: COP 
2210 or CGS 2420 and MAC 2312. (F,S,SS) 

MAD 3512 Theory of Algorithms (3). Strings, formal 
languages, finite state machines, Turing machines, 
primitive recursive and recursive functions, recursive 
unsolvability. Prerequisite: MAD 2104. Computer Science 
majors must also take COT 3420. (F,S,SS) 

MAD 4203 Introduction to Combinatorics (3). A survey 
of the basic techniques of combinatorial mathematics. 
Topics will include the Pigeonhole Principle, Binomial 
Coefficients, Inclusion-Exclusion, Recurrence Relations, 
and Generating Functions. Prerequisites: MAC 2313 or 
both MAC 2312 and MAD 2104. (SS) 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations (3). An introduction to 
differential equations and their applications, based upon a 
knowledge of calculus. Topics to include: initial value 
problems of the first order, numerical solutions, systems 
of differential equations, linear differential equations, 
Laplace transforms, series solutions. Prerequisite: MAC 
2312 with a grade of 'C or better. (F,S,SS) 

MAP 3103 Mathematical Modeling and Applications 
(3). A course to provide an understanding of the use of 
mathematical models in the description of the real world. 
Basic principles in the philosophy of formal model building 
as well as specific models will be considered. 
Prerequisites: MAS 3105 and either MAC 2313 or MAP 
2302. 

MAP 3104 Topics in Mathematical Modeling (3). A 

sequel to MAP 3103. In-depth study of techniques listed 
for MAP 3103. Prerequisite: MAP 3103. 

MAP 4401 Advanced Differential Equations (3). A 

second course in differential equations. Topics may 
include: Bessel functions and other special functions 
arising from classical differential equations, Sturm- 
Liouville problems, partial differential equations, transform 
techniques. Prerequisites: MAP 2302 and MAC 2313. (S) 

MAP 5467 Stochastic Differential Equations and 
Applications (3). Review of measure theory, stochastic 
processes, Ito Integral and its properties, martingales and 
their generalisations, stochastic differential equations, 
diffusions. Applications to boundary value problems and 
finance. Prerequisites: MAS 3105, MAP 4401, MAA4211, 
MAA 5616 or permission of instructor. 

MAS 3105 Linear Algebra (3). An introduction to the 
topics in linear algebra most often used in applications. 
Topics include: matrices and their applications; 
simultaneous linear equations and elementary operations; 
linear dependence; vector spaces; rank and inverses; 
inner products and 'best' approximations; numerical 
solutions of simultaneous linear equations; eigen-values 
and eigenvectors; iterative methods for calculating 
eigenvalues; and systems of linear equations. 
Prerequisite: MAC 2312. (F,S,SS) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 171 



MAS 3931 Topics in Actuarial Mathematics (1). Topics 
related to calculus/linear algebra such as mono-tone 
sequences, least upper bound, complex arithmetic, solid 
analytic geometry, linear transformations. Mathematics 
involved in insurance. Prerequisite: Admission to Actuarial 
Studies Certificate program. 

MAS 4213 Number Theory (3). Topics to be discussed 
are selected from the following: congruences, Diophantine 
equations, distribution of primes, primitive roots, quadratic 
reciprocity, and classical theorems of number theory. 
Prerequisites: MAA 3200 or MAD 2104 or permission of 
the instructor. (SS) 

MAS 4301 Algebraic Structures (3). An introduction to 
abstract mathematical structures of modem algebra. 
Fundamental concepts of groups, rings, and fields will be 
studied. Note: the student must complete MAA 3200 
before attempting this course. Prerequisites: MAS 3105 
and MAA 3200. (S) 

MAS 4302 Topics in Algebraic Structures (3). A sequel 
to Algebraic Structures. Topics may include: a 
continuation of the study of groups, rings and/or fields; 
polynomial domains; Euclidean domains; and Galois 
theory. Prerequisite: MAS 4301 . 

MAT 2949 Cooperative Education in Mathematical 
Sciences (1-3). One semester of full-time supervised 
work in an outside organization taking part in the 
University Co-op program. A written report and supervisor 
evaluation will be required of each student. Prerequisites: 
Calculus I and COP 2210. 

MAT 3905 Independent Study (VAR). Individual 
conferences, assigned readings, and reports on 
independent investigations. 

MAT 3930 Special Topics (VAR). A course designed to 
give groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. 

MAT 3949 Cooperative Education in Mathematical 
Sciences (1-3). One semester of full-time supervised 
work in an outside organization taking part in the 
University Co-op Program. Limited to students admitted to 
the Co-op Program. A written report and supervisor 
evaluation will be required of each student. Prerequisites: 
Calculus II and COP 2210. 

MAT 4905 Independent Study (VAR). Individual 
conferences, assigned readings, and reports on 
independent investigations. 

MAT 4930 Special Topics (VAR). A course designed to 
give groups of students an opportunity to pursue special 
studies not otherwise offered. 

MAT 4943 Mathematical Sciences Internship (VAR). A 

special program to encourage students to get on-the-job 
experience in computer sciences, statistics, or 
mathematics in an industrial enterprise, governmental 
agency or other organization. Requirements: minimum 
grade of 'B' or higher in all courses in the major area, and 
approval by Departmental Internship Committee. 
Application is required at least one term in advance of 
registration for this course. 

MAT 4949 Cooperative Education in Mathematical 
Sciences (1-3). One semester of full-time supervised 
work in an outside organization taking part in the 



University Co-op Program. Limited to students admitted to 
the Co-op Program. A written report and supervisor 
evaluation will be required of each student. Prerequisites: 
Calculus II, a statistics course, and COP 2120. 

MGF 1106 Finite Mathematics (3). Study of concepts 
and applications involving finite mathematical processes 
such as sets, combinatorial techniques, formal logic, 
discrete probability, linear systems, matrices, linear 
programming. Prerequisite: Working knowledge of high 
school algebra. (F,S,SS) 

MGF 1107 The Mathematics of Social Choice and 
Decision Making (3). Voting systems and their desirable 
properties. Weighted voting systems, fair division 
procedures, apportionment methods and game theory. 

MHF 3404 History of Mathematics (3). Development of 
mathematical thought through the ages. Topics may 
include equation solving, trigonometry, astronomy, and 
calculus. Prerequisite: MAC 2312. (S) 

MHF 4102 Axiomatic Set Theory (3). Axioms of set 
theory, order and well-foundedness, cardinal numbers, 
ordinal numbers, axiom of choice, special topics. 
Prerequisites: MAA 3200 or permission of the instructor. 
(S, alternate years) 

MHF 4302 Mathematical Logic (3). A study of formal 
logical systems and their applications to the foundations 
of mathematics. Topics to be selected from the following: 
definition of mathematical proofs; set theory; analysis 
formalized with the predicate calculus; theorem of Godel 
and Church; recursive function theory; and idealized 
computers. Prerequisites: MAA 3200 or MAD 3512. (S, 
alternate years) 

MHF 5325 Theory of Recursive Functions (3). Turing 
machines, decision problems, coding, s-m-n theorem, 
Rice's and Myhill's theorems, oracles, degrees, finite and 
infinite injury constructions. Prerequisites: MHF 4302 or 
COT 5420. 

MTG 1204 Geometry for Education (3). Introduction for 
teachers to basic concepts of Euclidean geometry with 
ideas and activities adaptable to classroom. Students 
study and analyze pattern, learning and enhancing 
analytic, creative and visualization skills. 

MTG 3212 College Geometry (3). A study of the basic 
structure of Euclidean geometry together with topics from 
advanced Euclidean geometry and non-Euclidean 
geometry. Prerequisites: Calculus II or permission of the 
instructor. (S) 

MTG 4254 Differential Geometry (3). Hypersurfaces in 
R n . Geodesies and curvature. Parametrisation of 
surfaces, abstract manifolds. Integration, surfaces with 
boundary, Stokes Theorem. Isometries and intrinsic 
geometry. Gauss-Bonnet Theorem. Prerequisites: MAC 
231 1 , MAS 3105, MAP 2302 or permission of instructor. 

MTG 4302 Topology (3). An introductory course in 
topology requiring a prerequisite knowledge of calculus. 
Topics to be discussed will be selected from the following: 
topological spaces, metric spaces, continuity, 
completeness, compactness, separation axioms, products 
spaces, subspaces, convergence, and homotopy theory. 
Prerequisites: MAC 2313, MAS 3105, and MAA 3200. 
(SS) 



172 College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Catalog 

STA 4603-STA 4604 Mathematical Techniques of 
Operations Research I and II (3-3) . An introduction to 
those topics in mathematics associated with studies in 
operations research. Topics include the following: linear 
programming and related topics, dynamic programming, 
queuing theory, computer simulation, network analysis, 
inventory theory, decision theory, integer programming. 
Prerequisites: MAS 3105 and either STA 3033 or STA 
4322. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 73 



Modern Languages 

Maida Watson, Professor and Chairperson 

Aurelio Baldor, Instructor 

Pascale Becel, Associate Professor 

Jean-Robert Cadely, Associate Professor 

Eric Camayd-Freixas, Associate Professor 

Ricardo Castells, Professor 

James O. Crosby, Professor Emeritus 

Maria Antonieta Garcia, Instructor 

Maria Asuncion Gomez, Associate Professor 

Yvonne Guers-Villate, Professor Emeritus 

Asuka Haraguchi, Instructor 

John B. Jensen, Professor 

Santiago Juan-Navarro, Associate Professor 

Peter A. Machonis, Associate Professor 

Marian Montero-Demos, Associate Professor 

Monica Prieto, Assistant Professor 

Ana Roca, Professor 

Juan Torres-Pou, Associate Professor 

Augusta Vono, Instructor 

Marcelle Welch, Professor 

Florence Yudin, Professor 

Bachelor of Arts 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites 

French 

FRE1120 French I 

FRE1121 French II 

FRE 2200 Intermediate French 

Required for the Major: 

FRE 2241 Intermediate French Conversation 

Portuguese 

Common Prerequisites 

POR1130 Portuguese I 

POR1131 Portuguese II 

POR 2200 Intermediate Portuguese 

Required for the Major: 

POR 3400 Advanced Oral Communication 

Spanish 

Common Prerequisites 

SPN1120 Spanish I 

SPN1121 Spanish II 

SPN 2200 Intermediate Spanish 

Required for the Major: 

SPN 2210 Oral Communication Skills 

or 
SPN 2340 Intermediate Spanish for Native 

Speakers 
To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program: (60) 

Required Courses 

Foreign Language 33 semester hours 

Electives 27 semester hours 



Students in the Teacher Preparation Program carry two 
majors: Modern Language and Modern Language 
Education and must request admission to both programs. 
(Students interested in teacher certification should contact 
the College of Education at (305) 348-2721 .) 
Requirements for all Modern Language Majors 
All majors must have a designated faculty advisor, and all 
are required to take 33 semester hours in the Department 
of Modern Languages, with a grade of 'C or higher. 

Requirements For Spanish Majors 

To undertake a major in Spanish, a student must 
demonstrate a proficiency in the language at the 
intermediate level. This may be done by an examination 
administered by the Department, or by completing SPN 
2200 (non-native speakers) or SPN 2340 (native 
speakers). 

Required credits for Major (33) 

(21 credits of Core Courses and 12 credits of electives) 

Core Courses 

SPN 3301 Review Grammar and Writing 3 



SPN 3341 
SPN 3422 



Advanced Spanish for Native Speakers 3 
Advanced Grammar and Composition I 3 



or 



SPN 3423 Advanced Grammar and Composition II 3 

SPW 3820 Peninsular Spanish Literature 3 

SPW3130 Spanish American Literature 3 

SPN 3733 General Linguistics 3 

(or equivalent) 
One additional course in Spanish Linguistics 3 

One additional course in Spanish 

or 
Spanish American Literature 3 

(Students who have advanced proficiency in Spanish 
may replace the six language credits with electives in 
Spanish at the 3000 or 4000 level with the written 
permission of their advisors). 

Elective Courses 

Twelve credits of electives in Spanish at the 3000 or 4000 
level from a range of courses in Spanish/Spanish 
American literature, Spanish linguistics, Hispanic culture, 
and Translation/ Interpretation. 
SPN 3733 General Linguistics (or equivalent) is a 

prerequisite for other linguistics 

offerings. 

Requirements for French Majors (33) 
Basic Courses: 
Grammar (6) 

FRE 3420 Review Grammar/ Writing I (non-native 

or near-native speakers) 
FRE 3421 Review Grammar Writing II 

FRE 4422 Review Grammar/ Writing III 

Conversation (3) 

FRE 3410 

FRE 3413 
FRE 3504 

Phonetics (3) 

FRE 3780 French Phonetics 

Advanced Courses: 

Literature (at least nine credits) 

FRW 3200 French Literature I 



Advanced French Conversation (non- 
native or near-native speakers) 
Communication Arts 
Language and Culture 



1 74 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



FRW 3201 



French Literature II 



FRW 3810 Literary Analysis 

Two 3-credit literature courses (FRW) preferably taken in 

different literary periods or genres. 

Linguistics (3) 

FRE 4840 History of the Language I 

FRE4841 History of the Language II 

FRE 4503 Francophonie 

FRE 4850 Structure of Modern French 
Civilization (6) 



Language and Culture 
History of French Society 
Contemporary French Society 
Senior Seminar (Civilization) 



FRE 3504 
FRE 3500 
FRE 4501 
FRE 4935 

Elective (3) 

French linguistics or literature 3 

Requirements for Portuguese Majors (33) 

21 credits of core Courses and 12 credits of electives 
All majors in the Department of Modern Languages are 
required to take 33 semester hours in the Department. 
Twenty-one of these must be in Portuguese (POR or 
POW prefix) at a level of POR 3400 or above. The other 
12 credits may be upper-division courses in a second 
language, linguistics, culture, or translation, with the 
approval of the advisor. Courses focusing on Brazil or 
Portugal offered by other departments may be counted 
toward the degree with approval of advisor and 
chairperson of the Department. 

Requirements for Other Language Majors 

A major in a language other than Spanish or French may 
take only 21 credits in the major target language, but 
completion of at least two semesters of a second foreign 
language is recommended. There is no fixed sequence of 
courses required, and a student may enroll in any course 
offered for majors, provided he or she meets the course 
prerequisites. 

Minor in French Language and Culture 

A student majoring in another discipline may earn an 
academic minor in French Language and Culture by 
taking 1) 12 semester hours of course work in French 
language FRE 3410, FRE 3420/3421, FRE 3780; 2) three 
semester hours in French Civilization and Culture FRE 
3500 or FRE 4501; 3) three semester hours of restricted 
electives courses in French linguistics, French Translation 
Skills or French Literature I, FRW 3200. 

Minor in Portuguese 

A student majoring in another discipline may earn an 
academic minor in Portuguese by taking 12 semester 
hours of course work in the language at the level of POR 
3420 or above, and six additional hours in Portuguese or 
in approved courses in a related discipline, such as 
linguistics or the civilization of Portuguese-speaking 
peoples. 

Minor in General Translation Studies 

In order to obtain an academic minor in General 
Translation Studies, a student takes 12 semester hours in 
translation/interpretation courses (FOT, FRT, or SPT 
prefix), with grades of B or better, and nine additional 
hours in courses of immediate relevance to the program, 



to be approved by the Director of the program. Normally 
these will be selected from among offerings in Political 
Science, Economics, International Relations, Sociology, 
Anthropology, Computer Science or Modern Languages. 
At least two of them should be taken outside of Modern 
Languages. Courses in basic and intermediate instruction 
shall not be counted for the minor. 

Minor in Spanish Language and Culture 
Required Credits for Minor 

Fifteen credits of Core Courses and three credits of 
electives. Total: 18 semester hours. 

Core Courses 

SPN 3301 Review Grammar and Writing 3 

or 
SPN 3341 Advanced Spanish for Native Speakers 3 

SPN 3733 General Linguistics 3 

(or equivalent) 

SPW 3820 Peninsular Spanish Literature 3 

SPW3130 Spanish American Literature 3 

One SPN course on Culture 3 

Elective Courses 

Three credits in Spanish at the 3000 or 4000 level in 
language, literature, culture, or translation/interpretation. 
Students who have advanced proficiency in Spanish may 
replace SPN 3422 Advanced Grammar and Composition I 
or SPN 2341 Advanced Spanish for Native Speakers with 
another upper-level Spanish elective with the written 
permission of their advisors. 

SPN 3733 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite for other 
linguistics offerings. 

Basic Language Instruction 

The department offers three-semester sequences of 
instruction in beginning and intermediate Arabic, Chinese, 
French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, 
Spanish, Russian, and beginning instruction in other 
languages. 

The courses in basic language instruction are designed 
primarily for persons wishing to acquire conversational 
ability in a foreign language; but they provide training in all 
four language skills listening, speaking, reading, and 
writing. Students are advised to consult the Departmental 
course listing for specific sections. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ARA-Arabic Language; CHI-Chinese Language; FOL- 
Foreign Languages; FOT-Foreign Languages in 
Translation; FOW-Foreign Languages, Comparative 
Literature; FRE-French Language; FRT-French 
Translation; FRW-French Literature (Writings); GER- 
German Language; GET-German Translation; HBR - 
Hebrew; ITA-ltalian Language; ITT-ltalian Translation; 
JPN-Japanese Language; LIN-Linguistics; POR- 
Portuguese Language; POW-Portuguese Literature 
(Writings); PRT-Portuguese Translation; RUS-Russian 
Language; SPN-Spanish Language; SPT-Spanish 
Translation; SPW-Spanish Literature (Writings). 
(See English listing for additional Linguistics courses.) 

ARA 3130 Arabic I (5). Provides training in the acquisition 
and application of basic language skills. 

ARA 3131 Arabic II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 75 



ARA 3210 Intermediate Arabic (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

CHI 3130 Chinese I (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

CHI 3131 Chinese II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

CHI 3210 Intermediate Chinese (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

CHI 3440 Business Chinese (3). Introduces the culture, 
economy, and commerce of present-day China. 
Emphasis will be placed on various Business situational 
dialogues and communicative writing. Prerequisites: CHI 
3130, CHI 3131. 

FIL 4528 Hispanic Culture: Women and Film (3). 

Images and roles of Hispanic women in Latin America, 
Spain and the United States. Discussion, analysis, and 
writing. Course aims to enhance students' understanding 
of women in Hispanic culture through films and readings. 

FIL 5526 Spanish Film (3). The history of film in Spain 
and discussions of films by the most important 20th 
Century directors. 

FIL 5527 Latin American Film (3). The study of 20th 
Century films and documentaries produced by leading 
Latin American directors. Films are examined in relation to 
Latin American Society and its literary creations. 

FOL 1000 Elementary Foreign Language (3). Emphasis 
on oral skills, contemporary language and culture. 
Content oriented to students with specific professional or 
leisure interests. For languages not often taught. This 
course is not part of a series. No prerequisites. 

FOL 3013 Language Skills for Professional Personnel 
(3). The course is geared to the special linguistic needs of 
community groups (medical, business, technical, etc.). 

FOL 3732 Romance Linguistics (3). The common and 
distinctive Romance features. Survey of linguistic 
geography and internal/external influences. 

FOL 3905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or apprenticeship. 

FOL 3930 Special Topics (3). Readings and discussion 
of literary/linguistic topics to be determined by students 
and teacher. 

FOL 3949 Cooperative Education in Modern 
Languages (3). A student majoring in one of the 
Humanities (English, History, Modern Languages, Visual 
Arts or Performing Arts) may spend one or two semesters 
fully employed in industry or government in a capacity 
relating to the major. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Cooperative Education Program and major department. 

FOL 3955 Foreign Study (3-12). Study abroad credits. 
Individual cases will be evaluated for approval. 

FOL 4905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 



FOL 4930 Special Topics (3). Independent readings, 
research, or project. 

FOL 4935 Senior Seminar (3). Topics and approach to 
be determined by students and instructor. 

FOL 4949 Cooperative Education in Modern 
Languages (3). A student majoring in one of the 
Humanities (English, History, Modern Languages, Visual 
Arts or Performing Arts) may spend one or two semesters 
fully employed in industry or government in a capacity 
related to the major. Prerequisites: Permission of 
Cooperative Education Program and major department. 

FOL 4958 Foreign Study: Advanced Language 
Literature (VAR 3-12). Study abroad credits. Individual 
cases will be evaluated for approval. 

FOL 5735 Romance Linguistics (3). The common and 
distinctive Romance features. Survey of linguistic 
geography and internal/external influences. 

FOL 5906 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

FOL 5945 Foreign Exchange Internship (0). Foreign 
exchange students perform graduate research in the 
Department of Modern Languages and English as a 
corequisite to their assistantship in the Modern 
Languages Department. Prerequisite: Admission to the 
Foreign Exchange Program. 

FOT 2120 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces of 
French literature in English. Comparative use of the 
original text. Discussion and interpretation. 

FOT 3800 Translation/Interpretation Skills (3). 

Emphasis on basic principles and practice application. 

FOT 3810 Creative Writing/Translation (3). Training 
through non-structured writing. Examination of various 
approaches to the problems and objectives of creative 
translation. 

FOT 4130 European Literature in Translation (3). For 

students proficient in more than one foreign language. 
Content and focus to be determined by student and 
instructor. 

FOT 4801 Professional Translation/Interpretation (3). 

Techniques and resources for professional translation and 
interpretation. Prerequisite: FOT 3800. 

FOT 5125 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces of 
world literature. Open to students who are proficient in 
more than one language. 

FOT 5805 Translation/Interpretation Arts (3). The 

language barrier and translation and interpretation. Types, 
modes, and quality of T/l: philological, linguistic, and 
socio-linguistic theories. History of T/l from Rome to date. 
The impact of T/l on Inter-American developments. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

FOW 3520 Prose and Society (3). The dynamics of 
participation and alienation between prose writers and 
their environment. 

FOW 3540 Bicultural Writings (3). Experiment in 
linguistic pluralism. Content and focus to be determined 
by the international community. 



176 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



FOW 3580 Intellectual History (3). The interaction or 
dissociation among writers in a critical historical period. 
Study of primary sources and their contemporary 
evaluations. 

FOW 3582 Literature of Reform (3). The consciousness 
of change in verbal art. 

FOW 3584 Literature of Repression (3). The 

consciousness of constraints, their adoption and/or 
rejection in verbal art. 

FOW 4152 European Literature in Translation (3). For 

students proficient in more than one foreign language. 
Content and focus to be determined by students and 
instructor. 

FOW 4390 Genre Studies (3). Examination of a single 
literary form (e.g. short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. novel and drama). 

FOW 4590 Creative Modes (3). Discussion of a single 
mode or a plurality of epoch styles such as 
classical/baroque, realism/surrealism. The 

peculiar/common features of expressive media. 

FOW 4790 The Literary Generation (3). The real and 
apparent shared ideals of an artistic generation, its 
influence and range. 

FOW 4810 Problems in Reading and Interpretation (3). 

The identification and appreciation of techniques for 
sensitive reading and discussion of literary texts. 

FOW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Examination of a single 
literary form (e.g. short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. novel and drama). 

FOW 5545 Bicultural Writings (3). Experiment in 
linguistic pluralism. Content and focus to be determined 
by the international community. 

FOW 5587 Comparative Studies (3). Cross-over and 
distinctiveness in a multi-language problem, period, or 
aesthetic. 

FOW 5934 Special Topics in Language/Literature (3). 

Content and objectives to be determined by students and 
teacher. 

FOW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). Topic and approach to 
be determined by students and instructor. (Approval of the 
Department required.) 

FRE 1013 Language Skills for Professional Personnel 
(1-3). The course is geared to the special linguistic needs 
of community groups (medical, business, technical, etc.). 

FRE 1115 Accelerated Basic French (5). Accelerated 
course for students who already have some basic 
knowledge of French. Encourages rapid acquisition by 
intensive exposure to the language. Prerequisites: At least 
one year of High School French or equivalent. 

FRE 1120 French I (5). Course designed specifically for 
beginning university students with no previous language 
study. Emphasis on oral French and on acquiring basic 
language skills. 

FRE 1121 French II (5). Emphasis on oral French and on 
acquiring basic language skills. 

FRE 2200 Intermediate French (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 



basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

FRE 2241 Intermediate French Conversation (3). 

Development of oral skills through skits, debates, and 
hypothetical situations. Open to non-native speakers 
Prerequisites: FRE 1121 or FRE 11 30 or equivalent. 

FRE 2270 Foreign Study (3-12). Intermediate level. One 
semester full-time credit for foreign residence and study. 
Individual cases will be evaluated for approval. 

FRE 2443 French for Business (3). Introduces the minor 
and non-major to the culture, economy, and commerce of 
modern-day France. Extensive practice in business writing 
and communication. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: 
FRE 1121. 

FRE 3410 Advanced French Conversation (3). To 

develop oral proficiency skills and a greater awareness of 
French culture. 

FRE 3413 Communication Arts (3). Develop 
communicative competence through intensive oral class 
work. Emphasis on ability to express ideas and 
appreciation of multiple aspects of French culture. 

FRE 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I (3). Practice in 
contemporary usage through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writing and speaking 
ability in extemporaneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target language. 

FRE 3421 Review Grammar/Writing II (3). Instruction 
and practice in expository writing in French, with emphasis 
on organization, correct syntax, and vocabulary building. 
Prerequisite: FRE 3420. 

FRE 3441 Advanced Business French (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
business skills from an applied language vantage point. 
Prerequisites: FRE 3440 or permission of the instructor. 

FRE 3500 History of French Civilization (3). Open to 
any student who understands the target language. The 
development of a particular civilization. Emphasis on the 
evolution of a society, its ideas and its values. 

FRE 3504 Language and Culture (3). Emphasis on oral 
skill applied to contemporary culture, to enhance student's 
knowledge and understanding of French way of life in 
Francophone world. Emphasis is also placed on 
acquisition and intensive practice of vocabulary and 
grammar. Prerequisites: FRE 3410 or permission of the 
instructor. 

FRE 3740 Applied Linguistics (3). Examination of 
available linguistic materials for self-instruction. Problem 
solving in syntax and phonetics, through the application of 
modern/ traditional methods. 

FRE 3780 French Phonetics (3). An introductory course 
in French linguistics. Includes the International Phonetic 
Alphabet and a systematic inventory of all the sounds of 
French, with refinement exercises in the language 
laboratory. Prerequisites: FRE 2200 or equivalent. 

FRE 3781 Intermediate French Phonetics (1). 

Pronunciation of French for non-majors. Includes an 
introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet and a 
systematic review of the sounds of French. Prerequisites: 
FRE 1120 and FRE 1121. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 77 



FRE 3820 Dialectology (3). Definition and analysis. 
Problem-solving in dialect classification. 

FRE 4391 French Cinema (3). In-class viewing and 
discussion of selected French films to develop knowledge 
and understanding of this important aspect of French 
culture from beginnings to the present. Prerequisites: 
FRW 3200 or FRW 3810 and another FRW course. 

FRE 4422 Review Grammar/Writing III (3). A study of 
various aspects of forms and styles, with emphasis on 
expository writing in French. Prerequisite: FRE 3421. 

FRE 4470 Foreign Study: Advanced Language/ 

Literature (3-15). Full-semester credit for foreign 

residence and study/work. (Approval of Department 
required.) 

FRE 4501 Contemporary French Society (3). Course 
designed primarily for French majors, advanced 
undergraduates and graduates. Examination of the 
cultural, ideological, socio-political and economic fabric of 
France from WWI to the present. Prerequisites: FRE 3420 
or permission of the instructor. 

FRE 4503 La Francophonie (3). Analysis of the different 
varieties of French spoken outside of France. Includes 
Quebec French, African French, and French Creoles. Also 
examines the political alliance of Francophone countries. 
Credit will not be given for both FRE 4503 and FRE 5508. 
Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 3010 or LIN 3013. 

FRE 4791 French Phonology (3). Contrasts in the sound 
systems of English and French. 

FRE 4800 French Morphology (3). Contrasts in the 
morphology and syntax of English and French. 

FRE 4840 History of the Language I (3). The internal 
and external history of the French language from Latin to 
Old French. Examination of some of the first texts written 
in French. Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 3010 or LIN 
3013. 

FRE 4841 History of the Language II (3). External and 
internal history of the French language from 1400 to the 
present. Examination of first dictionaries and grammars of 
French. Survey of recent linguistic legislation concerning 
the French language. Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 
3010 or LIN 3013. 

FRE 4850 Structure of Modern French (3). Systematic 
study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon 
of Modern French. Taught in English. Prerequisites: FRE 
3780 or LIN 3010. 

FRE 4935 Senior Seminar (3). Topic and approach to be 
determined by students and instructor. 

FRE 5060 Language for Reading Knowledge i (3). 

Designed primarily for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. and Ph.D. requirements. Open 
to any student who has no prior knowledge of the 
language. 

FRE 5061 Language for Reading Knowledge II (3). 

Emphasis on translation of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisites: FRE 5060 or 
equivalent. 

FRE 5508 La Francophonie (3). Analysis of the different 
varieties of French spoken outside of France. Includes 



Quebec French, African French, and French Creoles. Also 
examines the political alliance of Francophone countries. 
Credit will not be given for both FRE 4503 and FRE 5508. 
Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 3010 or LIN 3013. 

FRE 5735 Special Topics in Linguistics (3). Content to 
be determined by students and instructor. (Approval of 
Department required.) 

FRE 5755 Old French Language (3). Introduction to the 
phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Old French 
language. Reading and analysis of the 12th and 13th 
century texts in their original. Comparison of major 
medieval dialects. Prerequisite: FRE 4840 or FRE 5845. 

FRE 5845 History of the Language I (3). The internal 
and external history of the French language from Latin to 
Old French. Examination of some of the first texts written 
in French. Credit will not be given for both FRE 4840 and 
FRE 5845. Prerequisite: FRE 3780. 

FRE 5846 History of the Language II (3). External and 
internal history of the French language from 1400 to the 
present. Examination of first dictionaries and grammars of 
French. Survey of recent linguistic legislation concerning 
the French language. Credit will not be given for both FRE 
4841 and FRE 5846. 

FRE 5855 Structure of Modern French (3). Systematic 
study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon 
of Modern French. Taught in English. Credit will not be 
given for both FRE 4850 and FRE 5855. 

FRE 5908 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

FRT 3800 Basic Translation Exercises (3). Emphasis on 
basic principles and practice application. Prerequisite: 
FRE 3421. 

FRT 4801 Professional Translation (3). Techniques and 
resources for professional translation. Prerequisite: FRT 
3800. 

FRT 5805 Translation/Interpretation Arts (3). 

Techniques of professional translation and interpretation. 
Prerequisite: FRT 4801 . 

FRW 3200 French Literature I (3). Close reading and 
analysis of prose and poetry from the Middle Ages to the 
17th Century. 

FRW 3201 French Literature II (3). Close reading and 
analysis of French prose, theatre, and poetry, from the 
18th to the 20th century. Prerequsities: FRE 3421 or FRE 
4422. 

FRW 3280 French 19th Century Novel (3). Four major 
novels by major 19th century novelists will be selected to 
illustrate the development of novelist techniques as well 
as of a different conception of the role of the novel that 
finally made it an important literary genre. Prerequisites 
FRW 3810 or another FRW course. 

FRW 3300 French Comedies (3). A study in French 
comedies from the 15th century to the 19th century, with 
special emphasis on Moliere's plays. Prerequisite: FRW 
3200. 

FRW 3323 French 19th Century Drama (3). Plays will be 
chosen to illustrate various literary movements in 19th 
century French drama: Romanticism, Realism, 
Naturalism, and Symbolism. Prerequisite: FRW 3200. 



178 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



FRW 3370 French 19th and 20th Century Short Stories 
(3). Great short stories by Maupassant, Merimee, 
Flaubert, Camus, and Sartre will be studied to familiarize 
the student with literary criticism by a close reading and 
analysis of short texts. Prerequisite: FRE 3421. 

FRW 3532 French Romantic Literature (3). A study of 
French Romantic generation through the works of 
Lamartine, Hugo, de Musset, etc. Prerequisite: FRW 
3200. 

FRW 3810 Literary Analysis (3). The identification and 
appreciation of techniques for sensitive reading and 
discussion of literary texts. 

FRW 3905 Independent Study (3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or apprenticeship. 

FRW 3930 Special Topics (3). Readings and discussion 
of literary/linguistic topics to be determined by students 
and instructor. 

FRW 4123 Travel, Exile, and Cross-Cultural 
Encounters (3). Drawing on writings from the turn of the 
century to the present, explores the themes of exile and 
escape, of cultural and visual appropriations, the 
repetition and deconstruction of exotic cliches. 

FRW 4212 French Classical Prose (3). Study of major 
works of 17th century French authors such as Descartes, 
Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere, etc. Prerequisites: 
FRW 3200, and another FRW course. 

FRW 4218 18th Century French Prose (3). Major works 
by the 18th century French philosophes that illustrate the 
evolution of socio-political and aesthetic thought leading 
to the French Revolution. Prerequisites: FRW 3200 or 
FRW 3810 and another FRW course. 

FRW 4272 French Novels from the Classical Period 
(3). A study of major 17th and 18th century French novels. 
Course conducted in French. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, 
and another FRW course. 

FRW 4281 French 20th Century Novel (3). A detailed 
analysis of modern novels, and a general examination of 
the intellectual currents which these novels illustrate or 
express (e.g. surrealism, existentialism, nou-veau roman, 
post-modernism. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, and another 
FRW course. 

FRW 4310 Seventeenth-Century French Drama (3). A 

study of French classical aesthetics through the plays of 
Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, 
and another FRW course. 

FRW 4324 French 20th Century Theatre (3). Focuses on 
the scope and variety of contemporary French theatre 
from Claudel, through existentialism and the theatre of the 
absurd, to Cixous and Cesaire. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, 
and another FRW course. 

FRW 4390 Genre Studies (3). Examination of a single 
literary form (e.g. short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. novel and drama). 

FRW 4410 French Medieval Literature (3). A study in 
different literary forms prevalent during the 12th and 15th 
centuries. Read in modern French; course will be 
conducted in French. Prerequisites: FRW 3200, and 
another FRW course. 



FRW 4420 Sixteenth-Century French Literature (3). A 

study of major authors of the French Renaissance, 
Rabelais, Ronsard, Montaigne, etc. Course conducted in 
French. Prerequisites: FRW 3810 or 3820, and another 
FRW course. 

FRW 4583 Women Writers in French (3). Drawing on 
the writings of women authors in French, this course 
explores topics such as: the effects of narrative 
techniques on subject formation, the poetics of silence 
and of revolt, sexual difference versus cultural difference. 
Prerequisites: FRW 3810 or 3820, and another FRW 
course. 

FRW 4590 Creative Modes (3). Discussion of a single 
mode or a plurality of epoch styles such as 
classical/baroque, realism/surrealism. The peculiar/ 
common features of expressive media. 

FRW 4750 Francophone Literature of Africa (3). 

Introduction to the Francophone literatures of Africa; study 
of a literary tradition in French, with special emphasis on 
post-World War II writers. Prerequisites: FRW 3200 or 
another FRW course. 

FRW 4751 Francophone Literature in the Caribbean 
(3). Introduction to the Francophone literature of the 
Caribbean; study of a literary tradition in French, with 
special emphasis on post-World War II writers. 
Prerequisites: FRW 3200 or another FRW course. 

FRW 4905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

FRW 4930 Special Topics (3). Independent readings, 
research, or project. 

FRW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Examination of a single 
literary form (e.g. short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. novel and drama). 

FRW 5934 Special Topics in Language Literature (3). 

Content and objectives to be determined by student and 
instructor. 

FRW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). Topic and approach to 
be determined by students and instructor. (Approval of the 
Department required.) 

GER 1120 German I (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

GER 1121 German II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

GER 2210 Intermediate German (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

GER 2240 German Intermediate Conversation (3). This 
course is designed to help students maintain and increase 
their conversational ability in the language while unable to 
continue the regular sequence. May be repeated twice. 
Prerequisites: GER 1121 or equivalent. 

GER 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I (3). Practice in 
contemporary usage through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writing and speaking 
ability in extemporaneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target language. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 179 



GER 4905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

GER 4930 Special Topics (3). Independent readings, 
research, or project. 

GER 5060 German for Reading Knowledge (3). 

Designed primarily for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. requirements. Open to 
any student who has no prior knowledge of the language. 

GER 5061 German for Reading Knowledge (3). 

Emphasis on translation of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisites: GER 5060 or the 
equivalent. 

GET 3100 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces in 
German literature in English. Comparative use of the 
original text. Discussion and interpretation. 

HAI 3213 Accelerated Haitian Creole (3). Emphasis on 
oral skills, contemporary language, and culture. 

HAI 3214 Accelerated Intermediate Haitian Creole (3). 
Builds on accelerated course by continuing and 
expanding communicative activities. Prerequisites: 
Accelerated Haitian or permission of the instructor. 

HAI 3370 Haiti: Study Abroad (3). Orientation to Haiti's 
history, geography, religious practices, and social 
customs through classroom instruction, reading, and 
discussion, culminating in a two week tour of Haiti. 

HAI 3500 Haiti: Language and Culture (3). Provides, 
from a multidisciplinary perspective, a general 
understanding of the Haitian culture and language. 

HAI 5235 Haitian Creole Seminar (3). A study of the 
phonological and morpho-syntactic structures of Haitian 
Creole. Patterns of language usage and attitude. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HBR 1120 Hebrew I (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

HBR 1121 Hebrew II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

HBR 2200 Intermediate Hebrew (3). Provides training in 
the acquisition and application of basic language skills. 
Prerequisites: One year prior study or equivalent 
experience. 

ITA 1120 Italian I (5). Provides training in the acquisition 
and application of basic language skills. 

ITA 1121 Italian II (5). Provides training in the acquisition 
and application of basic language skills. 

ITA 2210 Intermediate Italian (3). Provides intermediate 
training in the acquisition and application of basic 
language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study or 
equivalent experience. 

ITA 2240 Italian Intermediate Conversation (3). This 
course is designed to help students maintain and increase 
their conversational ability in the language while unable to 
continue the regular sequence. May be repeated twice. 
Prerequisites: ITA 3131 or equivalent. 

ITA 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I (3). Practice in 
contemporary usage through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writing and speaking 



ability in extemporaneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target language. 

ITA 3421 Review Grammar/Writing II (3). Instruction and 
practice in expository writing in Italian, with emphasis on 
organization, correct syntax, and vocabulary building. 
Prerequisites: ITA 3420 or permission of the instructor. 

ITA 4905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

ITA 4930 Special Topics (3). Independent readings, 
research, or project. 

ITT 3110 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces of 
Italian literature in English. Comparative use of the 
original text. Discussion and interpretation. 

JPN 1120 Japanese I (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

JPN 1121 Japanese II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

JPN 3110 Introduction to Kanji (3). This course 
introduces students to the fundamental structure of Kanji 
(Chinese characters), including a comprehensive review 
of Kana system. Prerequisite: (JPN 1 120) Japanese I. 

JPN 3140 Japanese for Business (3). A study of 
Japanese language in a context of Japanese business 
practices, values and customs. 

JPN 3200 Intermediate Japanese II (3). To help students 
maintain and further improve their speaking, writing, 
listening, and reading skills in Japanese in more complex 
situations. Students learn how to use useful expressions 
of experience and thought in advanced level of Japanese. 
Prerequisite: Intermediate Japanese I. 

JPN 3210 Intermediate Japanese (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

JPN 3400 Advanced Japanese I (3). Continuation of 
Intermediate JPN II which provides the beginning level of 
advanced training in the acquisition and application and 
application of the language skills. Prerequisites: JPN I, II, 
JPN Intermediate I, II. 

JPN 3401 Advanced Japanese II (3). Continuation of 
Advanced Japanese I which provides advanced training in 
the acquisition and application of the language skills. 
Prerequisites: JPN I, II, Intermediate JPN I, II, Advanced 
JPN I. 

JPN 3420 Japanese through Technology (3). Provides 
training in the acquisition and application of the language 
skills in reading, listening and typing. Prerequisites: JPN 
I, JPN II. 

JPN 3500 Japanese Culture and Society (3). To give 
students sociocultural knowledge and well-rounded 
understanding of the culture and society in Japan. 
Students also have an opportunity to experience 
Japanese traditional arts including Japanese Calligraphy. 

JPT 3521 Japanese Literature and Cinema (3). An 

introduction to modern Japanese literature and cinema 
which compares literary and cinematic approahces by 
focusing on Japanese society, culture and aesthetic 
sense. 



180 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



JPW 4130 Reading Japanese Literature (3). Reading 
and analysis of selected literary texts in contemporary 
Japanese with an introduction to poetry (haiku and waka). 
Prerequisites: JPN 3401 or permission of instructor. 

JPW 4131 Reading Japanese Non-Fiction (3). 

Advanced writing and reading of non-fictional text focusing 
on Japanese culture and society. Prerequisites: JPN 
3401 or permission of instructor. 

LIN 3010 General Linguistics (3). Examination and 
synthesis of the concepts and perspectives of major 
contributions to language theory. Equivalent to SPN 3733. 
Students who take SPN 3733 may not receive credit for 
LIN 3010 or LIN 3013. 

LIN 3200 Phonetics (3). The application of phonetic 
theory and practice for speech refinement. Study of sound 
patterns in communication and creative activity. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 3610 Dialectology (3). Definition and analysis. 
Problem-solving in dialect classification. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4326 Contrastive Phonology (3). For students 
proficient in more than one foreign language. Choice of 
languages to be determined by students and instructor. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4433 Contrastive Morphology (3). For students 
proficient in more than one foreign language. Content and 
emphasis to be determined by students and instructor. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4620 Studies in Bilingualism (3). Readings and 
analysis of bilingual programs and binational goals. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4624 Bilingualism and Language Policies (3). 

Linguistic diversity and language policies in North 
America The sociolinguistic situation of selected heritage 
speakers, particularly Hispanic and Asian groups, and 
issues in bilingualism. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

LIN 4702 Applied Linguistics (3). Examination of 
available linguistic materials for self-instruction. Problem- 
sojying in syntax and phonetics, through the application of 
modern/ traditional methods. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

LIN 4722 Problems in Language Learning (3). Primarily 
designed for prospective teachers, but open to all 
interested students. The course will aim to devise 
approaches to difficulties commonly experienced in 
syntax, usage, reading and comprehension. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

LIN 4931 Special Topics in Linguistics (3). Provides the 
opportunity for students and instructor to explore topics 
not included in the regular course offerings. Content to be 
determined. 

LIN 5207C Acoustic Phonetics (3). Introduction to 
principles of acoustic and instrumental phonetics, 
including the physics of speech sounds and use of the 
sound spectrograph and other instruments. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010, LIN 3013, plus one additional course in 
phonetics or phonology. Corequisite: One of the 
prerequisites may be counted as a corequisite. 



LIN 56C1 Sociolinguistics (3). Principles and theories of 
linguistic variation with special attention to 
correspondences between social and linguistic variables. 

LIN 5603 Language Planning: Linguistic Minority 
Issues (3). Introduction to the field of language planning. 
Minority linguistic issues in developing and developed 
nations: official languages, endangered languages, and 
language as problem and/or resource. 

LIN 5604 Spanish in the United States (3). An 

examination of the sociolinguistic research into Spanish in 
the U.S.: varieties of Spanish, language attitudes, 
language contact and change, and aspects of language 
use. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or SPN 3733. 

LIN 5613 Dialectology (3). The geography of language 
variation: linguistic geography, atlases, national and 
regional studies. Dialectology within a modern 
sociolinguistic frame work; research approaches. 

LIN 5625 Studies in Bilingualism (3). Readings and 
analysis of bilingual programs and binational goals. 

LIN 5720 Second Language Acquisi-tion (3). Research, 
theories, and issues in second language acquisition. 
Topics include the Monitor Model, the role of the first 
language, motivation, age, individual differences, code- 
switching, and the environment; affective variables and 
attitudes. 

LIN 5725 Seminar: Issues in Language Learning (3). 

Seminar in applied linguistics to serve as introduction to 
theory, research, and practice in language. Examines 
difficulties experienced in learning syntax, oral 
comprehension, usage, etc. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or 
LIN 3013 or SPN 3733 or equivalents. 

LIN 5760 Research Methods in Language Variation (3). 

Research in sociolinguistics, dialectology, bilingualism: 
problem definition, instrument design, data collection and 
analysis, including sampling techniques and statistical 
procedures. Prerequisites: LIN 5601, LIN 5625, LIN 5613 
or other course in variation. 

LIN 5825 Pragmatics (3). Study of the relationships 
between language form, meaning, and use. Special 
emphasis on speech act theory. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, 
LIN 3013, or SPN 3733. 
(See English listing for additional Linguistics courses.) 

POR 1000 Elementary Portuguese (3). Emphasis on oral 
skills, contemporary language, and culture. Content 
oriented to students with specific professional or leisure 
interests. This course is not part of a series. No 
prerequisites. 

POR 1130 Portuguese I (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

POR 1131 Portuguese II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

POR 2200 Intermediate Portuguese (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

POR 3230 Accelerated Portuguese I (5). Accelerated 
course for students fluent in Spanish. Encourages rapid 
acquisition by intensive exposure to the language through 
immersion activities, videos, and culture. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



POR 3231 Accelerated Portuguese II (5). Accelerated 
course for students fluent in Spanish. Builds on 
Accelerated Portuguese I by continuing and expanding 
communicative activities. Prerequisites: POR 3230 or 
permission of the instructor. 

POR 3244 Portuguese Intermediate Conversation (1). 

This course is designed to help students maintain and 
increase their conversational ability in the language while 
unable to continue the regular sequence. May be 
repeated twice. Prerequisites: POR 3231 or equivalent. 

POR 3400 Advanced Oral Communication (3). 

Development of oral skills through a variety of activities: 
Readings and recitations, public speaking, debate, skits, 
video production and drama Open to native and non- 
native speakers. Prerequisite: Oral communication ability 
in Portuguese. 

POR 3420 Review Grammar/Writing I (3). Practice in 
contemporary usage through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writing and speaking 
ability in extemporaneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target language. 

POR 3421 Review Grammar/Writing II (3). Examination 
of grammatical theory; discussion of the modern essay. 
Practice in the detection and correction of errors in usage. 
The course will focus on current international events as 
content for informal talks and compositions. 

POR 3440 Portuguese for Business (3). Presents the 
special language needs for conducting business in 
Portuguese, with emphasis on the commerce and culture 
of modern Brazil. Practice in correspondence, documents, 
and presentations. Prerequisites: POR 1131, POR 3230 
or equivalent. 

POR 3500 Luso-Brazilian Culture (3). Open to any 
student who understands Portuguese. The development 
of Portuguese speaking civilizations, with emphasis on 
either Portugal or Brazil: history, art, music, daily life 
impact on other cultures. 

POR 3930 Special Topics in Language Linguistics (3). 

Readings, research, and discussion of topics In 
Portuguese language or linguistics to be determined by 
students and instructor. 

POR 4470 Foreign Study: Advanced Language 
Literature (VAR). Up to a full semester credit for foreign 
residence and study/work. (Approval of Department 
required.) 

POR 4480 Twentieth Century Brazilian Novel (3). 

Emphasis on a particular period and/or region, such as 
the northeast from 1930-1960: Jorge Amado, Raquel de 
Queiroz, Graciliano Ramos, Lins de Rego' or similar 
focus. Prerequisites" POR 323 1 or equivalent 

POW 3284 Brazilian Short Story (3). Short stones oy 
major Brazilian authors serve tc expand lu-tents reading 
ability, help them become familiar witr. modern Brazilian 
life, and learn to approach this literacy form critically. 
Prerequisites: POR 3231 or equivalent. 

POW 4390 Brazilian Cinema (3). An examination of 
Brazilian films and culture from Cinema Novo to the 
present. Focuses on the northeast, urban society, magic 
and the Amazon. Taught in Portuguese. 



College of Arts and Sciences 181 



POW 4701 Masterworks of Brazilian Literature (3). 

Readings from the most important authors of Brazil, in 
several genres, presented in a chronological framework. 
Authors include M. de Assis, M. de Andrade, M. Bandeira, 
C. Lispector. etc. Prerequisites: POR 3231 or equivalent. 

POW 4905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

POW 4930 Special Topics (3). Independent readings, 
research, or project. 

PRT 3401 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces of 
Portuguese literature in English. Comparative use of the 
original text. Discussion and interpretation. 

PRT 3800 Portuguese Translation I (3). Review of 
theories and processes. Extensive practice in translating a 
variety of short texts, with emphasis on accuracy. 

PRT 3810 Introduction to Portuguese Translation and 
Interpretation (3). Fundamentals of translation 
processes, contrastive analysis of structures in 
Portuguese and English. Exercise in the accurate 
rendition of ideas from one language to the other. 
Prerequisites: POR 3420 or permission of the instructor. 

PRT 3812 Portuguese Interpretation i (3). Beginning 
interpretation with emphasis on consecutive and sight 
translation. Memory csvelopment, note-taking, techniques 
of public speaking, accent reducticn. Prerequisite: PRT 
3800. 

PRT 4391 International Perspectives in Brazilian 
Cinema (3). Addresses cinema production in Brazil in an 
International context, with special emphasis on the post- 
Embrafilme era and international co-production. 

PRT 4801 Portuguese Translation II (3). Translation of 
medium-length texts covering a range of specific topics 
and prose styles attention to both accuracy and style. 
Prerequisite: PRT 3800. 

PRT 4802 Portuguese Translation III (3). Emphasis on 
technical and literary translation; development of special 
glossaries; stylistic and grammatic challenges. 
Prerequisite: PRT 4801. 

PRT 4813 Portuguese Interpretation II (3). Continued 
work with consecutive interpretation but emphasize the 
simultaneous mode, including research and graded 
laboratory practice. Work witn the speaking voice. 
Prerequisite: PRT 3812. 

PRT 4314 Portuguese Interpretation 111 (3). 

Simultaneous conference interpreting: extensive class 
and laboratory practice and field experience. 
Prerequisite: PRT 4811. 

RUS 1120 Russian I (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skiils. 

RUS 1121 Russian II (5). Provides training in the 
acquisition and application of basic language skills. 

RUS 2210 Intermediate Russian (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

SPN 1000 Elementary Spanish (3). Emphasis on oral 
skills, contemporary language and culture. Content 
oriented to students with specific professional or leisure 



1 82 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



interests. This course is not part of a series. No 
prerequisites. 

SPN 1030 Elementary Spanish for Medical Personnel 
(5). Conversational elementary Spanish for medical 
personnel. Recommended for non-native speakers of 
Spanish who are in nursing or other health-related 
professions. 

SPN 1120 Spanish I (5). Course designed specifically for 
beginning university students with no previous language 
study. Emphasis on oral Spanish and on acquiring basic 
language skills. 

SPN 1121 Spanish II (5). Emphasis on oral Spanish and 
on acquiring basic language skills. 

SPN 2200 Intermediate Spanish I (3). Provides 
intermediate training in the acquisition and application of 
basic language skills. Prerequisites: One year prior study 
or equivalent experience. 

SPN 2201 Intermediate Spanish II (3). Last course of a 
four-semester sequence which implements a proficiency- 
oriented approach. Focuses on the development of 
listening and reading comprehension skills, and 
encourages maximum oral interaction and the practice of 
writing. 

SPN 2210 Oral Communications Skills (3). 

Development of oral skills through skits, debates, and 
contextualized communication. Prerequisites: SPN 1121 
or equivalent. 

SPN 2230 Intermediate Readings in Spanish (3). 

Provides opportunities to develop fluency. Emphasis on 
selected literary and /or cultural readings; films and group 
activities intended to stimulate communication and 
enhance an understanding of Hispanic culture. 
Prerequisites: SPN 1121 or equivalent. Corequisite: SPN 
2200 recommended. 

SPN 2240 Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3). This 
course is designed to help students maintain and increase 
their ability in the language while unable to continue the 
regular sequence. May be repeated twice. Prerequisites: 
SPN 1121 or equivalent. 

SPN 2270 Foreign Study (6). Intermediate level. One 
semester full-time credit for foreign residence and study. 
Individual cases will be evaluated for approval. 

SPN 2330 Advanced Readings in Spanish (3). Further 
develops, at an advanced level, appropriate reading, oral, 
and writing skills. Emphasis on advanced cultural and 
literary readings by Spanish and Spanish American 
authors. Prerequisites: SPN 2230 or permission of 
instructor. 

SPN 2340 Intermediate Spanish for Native Speakers 
(3). Improvement of spelling, grammar, vocabulary, 
reading, writing, and oral skills for Hispanic bilinguals 
educated in the U.S., with less than two years of formal 
training in Spanish but whose mother tongue is Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Ability to understand Spanish. 

fl\ U n 346 lntGrmediate Spanish for Native Speakers II 

ntp elop cult ural and linguistic competence through 
S s ' ve °[ ai and written work. Emphasis will be given to 
reading and writing skills. Prerequisite: SPN 2340. 



SPN 3013 Language Skills for Professional Personnel 
(3). The course is geared to the special linguistic needs of 
the community groups (medical, business, technical, etc.). 

SPN 3031 Intermediate Spanish for Medical Personnel 
(3). Provides intermediate training in the acquisition and 
application of medical language skills. Prerequisites: SPN 
1030 or permission of the instructor. 

SPN 3301 Review Grammar and Writing (3). Practice in 
contemporary usage through selected readings in culture 
and civilization. Development of writing and speaking 
ability in extemporaneous contexts. The course will be 
conducted exclusively in the target language. For non- 
native speakers. 

SPN 3341 Advanced Spanish for Native Speakers (3). 

Improvement of literacy skills through grammar review, 
composition, and selected readings of representative 
Hispanic writers, including Cuban, Puerto Rican, and 
Chicano authors. For U.S. Hispanic bilinguals with at least 
two years of formal training in Spanish. Prerequisites: 
SPN 2340 or permission of the instructor. 

SPN 3401 Advanced Conversation (3). Improvement of 
oral proficiency and listening comprehension skills, 
correction of accent, vocabulary building. Use of small 
group conversation, pronunciation tapes, and varied 
outside readings. 

SPN 3410 Advanced Oral Communication (3). 

Development of oral skills through a variety of speaking 
and conversational activities: public speaking, debate, 
drama, recitation. For native speakers and advanced non- 
natives. Prerequisite: Oral ability in Spanish. 

SPN 3413 Communication Arts (3). Oral interpretation 
and dramatic reading. Original and non-original texts will 
be the content of the course. Study of shared modes of 
experience and their individual linguistic expression in an 
acquired language. 

SPN 3422 Advanced Grammar and Composition I (3). 

To consolidate the student's command of oral and written 
Spanish. Advanced readings of authentic materials. 
Preparation and documentation of written monographs. 
For natives and advanced non-natives. Prerequisites: 
SPN 2341, SPN 3301 or equivalent. 

SPN 3423 Advanced Grammar and Composition II (3). 

Focuses on advanced writing and reading skills. 
Preparation and documentation of written monographs. 
Prerequisite: SPN 3422. 

SPN 3440 Spanish Business Composition/ 
Correspondence (3). Training in the special writing 
needs of business: letter-writing, memoranda, brochures, 
advertising, proposals, declarations, government 
documents, etc. 

SPN 3520 Spanish American Culture I (3). Introduction 
to the major artistic and cultural phenomena in Latin 
America. Art, music, film, and literature will be discussed 
in their cultural context. Prerequisite: Ability to understand 
Spanish at advanced level. 

SPN 3521 Spanish American Culture II (3). Study of the 
evolution of national identity in Latin America, from the 
19 lh Century to the present. Prerequisites: Spanish 
American Culture I or permission of instructor. 



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College of Arts and Sciences 183 



SPN 3702 Applied Linguistics (3). Examination of 
available linguistic materials for self-instruction. Problem- 
solving in syntax and phonetics, through the application of 
modern/traditional methods. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. (Conducted in Spanish). 

SPN 3733 General Linguistics (3). Examination and 
synthesis of the concepts and perspectives of major 
contributions to language theory. (Conducted in Spanish.) 
Equivalent to LIN 3010. Students who take LIN 3010 may 
not receive credit for SPN 3733 or LIN 3013. 

SPN 3780 Phonetics (3). The application of phonetic 
theory and practice for speech refinement. Study of sound 
patterns in communication and creative activity. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 3820 Dialectology (3). Definition and analysis. 
Problem-solving in dialect classification. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 4312 Introduction to Spanish Syntax (3). An 

introduction to Spanish syntax. Topics include an 
introduction to syntactic analysis and syntactic 
phenomena of Spanish. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or 
equivalent. 

SPN 4470 Foreign Study: Advanced Language 
Literature (12). Full semester credit for foreign residence 
and study/work. (Approval of the Department required.) 

SPN 4500 Spanish Culture (3). Open to any student who 
understands the target language. The development of a 
particular civilization. Emphasis on the evolution of a 
society, its ideas and its values. 

SPN 4790 Contrastive Phonology (3). Contrasts in the 
sound systems of English and Spanish. Prerequisites: LIN 
3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 4802 Contrastive Syntax (3). Contrasts in the 
grammatical systems of English and Spanish with 
emphasis on structures with equivalent meanings. 
Recommended for students of translation and 
interpretation. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or permission of 
the instructor. 

SPN 4822 Hispanic-American Socio-linguistics (3). 

Language and society in Latin America. Sociolinguistic 
theory followed by consideration of specific language 
problems in Spanish and Portuguese speaking areas of 
the Americas. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 4840 History of the Language (3). The internal and 
external history of language development. Examination of 
model texts from key periods of evolution. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010 or SPN 3733 or equivalent. 

SPN 4905 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

SPN 4930 Special Topics in Linguistics (3). Provides 
the opportunity for students and instructor to explore 
topics not included in the regular course offerings. 
Content to be determined. 

SPN 4936 Senior Seminar (3). Topic and approach to be 
determined by students and instructor. 

SPN 5060 Language for Reading Knowledge (3). 

Designed primarily for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. requirements. Open to 
any student who has no prior knowledge of the language. 



SPN 5061 Language for Reading Knowledge (3). 

Emphasis on translation of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisites: SPN 5060 or the 
equivalent. 

SPN 5525 Spanish American Culture (3). A graduate 
survey of the major artistic phenomena in Latin America. 
Art, music, film, and literature will be discussed in their 
cultural context. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

SPN 5536 Afro-Cuban Culture (3). Explores the role 
played by blacks in Cuban culture. Issues studied include: 
Afro-Cuban religions, languages, and music, as well as 
the Afro-Cuban presence in literature and the arts. 

SPN 5537 Special Topics in Afro-Hispanic Culture (3). 

Close examination of various topics related to the culture 
of African diaspora groups in the Hispanic world. 

SPN 5705 The Structure of Spanish (3). An introduction 
to Spanish linguistics. Topics include Spanish phonetics, 
phonology, morphology, and syntax. Students who have 
previously taken Syntactic Structures of Spanish and/or 
Sound Structure of Spanish will not receive credit for this 
course. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5725 Syntactic Structures of Spanish and English 
(3). An in-depth study of syntactic structures in Spanish 
and English, with an emphasis on how linguistic theory 
can account for the similarities and differences between 
the two languages. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5736 Spanish as a Heritage Language: 
Acquisition and Development (3). Examines applied 
linguistics research and practice concerning acquisition, 
retention and literacy development of Spanish as a 
minority or heritage language in the United States. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3013 or 3010 or equivalent or 
permission of instructor. 

SPN 5805 Morphological Structures of Spanish and 
English (3). A survey of the morphologies of Spanish and 
English. Topics include the difference between isolating 
and synthetic languages, rich vs. impoverished agreement 
, and syntactic ramifications of morphology. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5807 Syntactic Structures of Spanish (3). The 

study of syntactic structures in Spanish, topics include 
different syntactic approaches to current issues in 
Spanish syntax. Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5824 Dialectology of the Spanish Caribbean (3). 

Study of varieties of Spanish used in the Caribbean area, 
including Miami-Cuban Spanish. The course will take 
historical and contemporary perspectives and will involve 
research among informants in South Florida. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010 or equivalent. 

SPN 5845 History of the Language (3). Historical 
development of the Spanish language, primarily from the 
point of view of internal linguistic change. Spanish as an 
example of general processes of language development. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013. 

SPN 5908 Independent Study (1-3). Project, field 
experience, readings, or research. 

SPT 3110 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces of 
Hispanic literature in English. Comparative use of the 
original text. Discussion and interpretation. 



184 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



SPT 3800 Foundations to Translation Skills (3). 

Techniques of translation, in Spanish and English, applied 
to law, business, technology, and literature. 

SPT 3812 Foundations of Interpreting (3). Exercises in 
sight translation, consecutive and simultaneous 
interpretation in Spanish and English. Theory and 
practice. 

SPT 4400 African Presence in Latin American 
Literature (3). Studies a selection of relevant Latin 
American literary works (in translation) dealing with the 
effects of African culture in Spanish-American and 
Brazilian literatures. 

SPT 4801 Translation Practica (3). Translation of media, 
literary, and scientific texts. 

SPT 4802 Practica in Oral Translation and 
Interpretation (3). Sight translation into and out of 
English. Introduction to the study of terminology. 
Prerequisites: SPT 3812 or permission of the instructor. 

SPT 4803 Practica in Legal Translation (3). Provides 
advanced training in translating most commonly used 
legal documents in both civil and criminal procedures. 

SPT 4804 Practice in Legal Interpretation (3). Training 
in consecutive and simultaneous interpretation of both 
civil and criminal legal proceedings before Federal and 
State courts. 

SPT 4805 Translation in Communication Media (3). 

Provide insight into the techniques of translation of 
advertising, public relations and publicity materials to be 
used in the mass media such as print and broadcasting. 

SPT 4806 Oral Skills for Interpreters (3). Voice 
production in sight translation, consecutive and 
simultaneous interpretation. Vocal projection, enunciation 
and phonetics, theory and practice. Extensive exercises in 
vocal control. Use of sound equipment. Prerequisite: SPT 
3812. 

SPT 4807 Practica in Business Translation (3). 

Business and language translation and the business 
world. Principles, techniques, and methods of business 
translation. Extensive practical exercises in translating 
routine business documents English to Spanish and vice 
versa. Prerequisite: SPT 3800. 

SPT 4808 Practica in Technological Translation (3). 
Language and technology. The translator in the 
technological world. Principles, techniques, and methods 
of technological translation. Extensive practical exercises. 
Prerequisite: SPT 3800. 

SPT 4809 Practica in Medical Translation (3). Medical 
language. The translator and the medical world. 
Principles, techniques and methods of medical 
translation. Extensive practical exercises in translating 
routine medical documents English to Spanish and vice 
versa. Prerequisite: SPT 3800. 

SPT 4813 The Interpreter and Language (3). The 

interpreter as a linguistics expert. The stylistic levels of 
language. Legal jargon and street language in English 
and Spanish. Dialectal problems. Practical and ethnical 
problems. Prerequisite: SPT 3812. 

SPT 4814 Conference Interpreting (3). Interpreting for 
international conferences and for diplomacy. Intensive 



practice in simultaneous interpretation. Prerequisite: SPT 
3812. 

SPT 4820 Computer-Aided Translation (3). The 

translating machine and computer-aided translation. 
Machine operation. Selected applications of computer 
translating texts from various disciplines. Correction of 
translated texts with computers. Prerequisites: SPT 3800, 
CDA 2310, and permission of director of program. 

SPT 4830 Interpreting for Business (3). The principles 
and techniques of interpreting in the context of a bilingual 
(Spanish/English) business setting. Consecutive, 
simultaneous interpretation and sight translation of 
business matters. Prerequisites: SPT 3800, SPT 3812 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPT 4833 Advanced Practica in Medical Translation 

(3). Provides advanced training in the practice and theory 
of medical translation using the Internet as a fundamental 
tool. The course material is presented completely online 
and requires the student to become familiar with use of 
the internet as an essential instrument for investigation. 
Prerequisite: SPT 4809. 

SPT 4940 Judicial Translation-Interpretation 
Internship (3). Students will spend a semester working in 
state and federal courts under the supervision of a 
professor, in order to practice in situations in what they 
have learned. Prerequisites: SPT 3800, SPT 3812, SPT 
4801 , SPT 4803, SPT 4804, SPT 4806, and SPT 4807. 

SPT 4941 Professional Translation-Interpretation 
Internship (3). Students will spend a semester working in 
state and federal courts under the supervision of a 
professor, in order to practice in situations in what they 
have learned. Prerequisites: SPT 3800, SPT 3812, and 
permission of the instructor. 

SPT 4942 Medical Interpreting (3). Training medical 
interpretation, including ethics, professional standards, 
and roles of the medical interpreter. Extensive practice 
with authentic materials. Prerequisite: Bilingual students 
only (English/ Spanish). 

SPT 5118 Literature in Translation (3). Masterpieces of 
world literature. Open to students who are proficient in 
more than one language. 

SPT 5715 Hispanic Women Writers in Translation (3). 

Readings and analysis of Spanish and Spanish American 
women writers in translation. Emphasis on cultural and 
linguistic considerations involved in the translation of 
literary texts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3130 Spanish American Literature (3). Close 
reading and analysis of prose, poetry and drama. 
Selections from Spanish American Literature. 
Prerequisites: SPN 3422 or equivalent and oral and 
written proficiency in Spanish. 

SPW 3323 Garcia Lorca's Theatre (3). Readings from 
representative plays by Spain's finest dramatist of the 
20th century, including his three well-known tragedies and 
a number of short comic plays. Discussion of such themes 
as social and individual justice and freedom; passion and 
repression; and the role of poetry in the theatre. 
Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of 
the instructor. 



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College of Arts and Sciences 185 



SPW 3324 Contemporary Spanish Drama: Buero 
Vallejo (3). Chronological readings from plays written 
between 1949-1980. Emphasis on dramatic reading. An 
examination of the evolution of dramatic art in the contexts 
of censorship and freedom. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or 
SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3342 Twentieth Century Spanish Poets (3). 

Readings from selected poets of the 20th century, such as 
Antonio Machado, Miguel Hernandez, Damaso Alonso, 
and Rafael Alberti. Close examination of the poems 
representative of these poets, and their contribution to the 
development of Spanish poetry from the Generation of 
1898 to the middle of the 20th century. Prerequisites: 
SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3371 The Latin American Short Story (3). 

Readings from the 19th century authors and such 20th 
century masters as Borges, Cortazar, Cabrera Infante, 
Garcia Marquez, and Rulfo. Examination of short-story 
techniques and of such themes as social satire, the 
nature of reality, reason, and irrationally. Prerequisites: 
SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3423 Masterworks of the Golden Age (3). 

Readings from selected masterpieces of the Spanish 
Renaissance and Baroque, such as La Celestina, 
Lazarillo de Tormes, and the short novels of Cervantes. 
Emphasis on satire and the representation of such human 
problems as freedom, poverty, and the rebellion of the 
individual. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3520 Prose and Society (3). The dynamics of 
participation and alienation between prose writers and 
their environment. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 
or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3604 Don Quijote (3). A careful reading and 
discussion of Cervantes' Don Quijote, with particular 
attention to its multiple meanings in human terms, its 
innovative contributions to the novel in Europe, and the 
author's use of irony, characterization, and humor. 
Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of 
the instructor. 

SPW 3720 The Generation of 98 (3). Based on the works 
of Azorin, Baroja, Ganivet, Machado, Maetzu, Unamuno, 
and Valle-lnclan. This course will emphasize the individual 
thrust each author makes to foster artistic revolution and 
human regeneration, within a society characterized by 
abulia and existentialist anxiety. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 
or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 3810 Literary Analysis (3). The identification and 
appreciation of techniques for sensitive reading and 
discussion of literary texts. 

SPW 3820 Peninsular Spanish Literature (3). Close 
reading and analysis of prose, poetry, and drama. 
Selections from Spanish peninsular literature. 
Prerequisites: SPN 3422 or equivalent and oral and 
written proficiency in Spanish. 

SPW 3930 Special Topics (3). Readings and discussion 
of literary/linguistic topics to be determined by students 
and instructor. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4133 Eastern Thought and Latin American 
Literature: The Age of Octavio Paz (3). An exploration of 



Eastern thought's influence on Latin American literature 
since pre-Columbian times: emphasis on Octavio Paz and 
his contemporaries, in relation to 20 lh -century Western 
thought. 

SPW 4263 The Spanish Novel of the Nineteenth 
Century (3). Within the context of literature and society, 
representative Spanish novels of the epoch will be 
studied. Special attention will be given to Galdos and 
Clarin. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4271 The Spanish Novel of the 20 th Century (3). A 

study of the genre in Spain before and after the Civil War. 
Emphasis will be on predominant narrative tendencies. 
Representative authors will be discussed, such as Cela, 
Laforet, Sender, Matute, Medio, and others. Prerequisites: 
SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4280 Spanish American Novel I (3). A view of 
Spanish American narrative from Colonial times to the 
tum-of-the-century with focus on the development of 
literary trends and movements. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 
or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4281 Spanish American Novel II (3). Study of 
Spanish America's outstanding novelists: Guiraldes, 
Carpentier, Cortazar, Fuentes, Vargas Llosa, Donoso, and 
Garcia Marques. Considers their works in relation to 
Spanish American themes. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or 
SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4300 Modern Spanish Drama (3). Examines the 
production of major Spanish playwrights from the middle 
of the 18 lh century to the present. Analyzes the social 
functions theatre has fulfilled in different periods, its 
intended audiences, and the poetics the authors 
represent. Prerequisites: SPW 3820 or SPW 3130. 

SPW 4304 Latin American Theatre (3). A view of Latin 
American theatre from the 19th century to the present. 
Representative works of the most renowned dramatists 
will be examined, with emphasis on the works of Usigili, 
Triana, Marques Wolff, and Diaz. Prerequisites: SPW 
3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4334 Golden Age Poetry (3). Selected readings 
from the major lyric poets of the 16th and 17th centuries. 
Special attention to the problems of contemporary 
readings of classical texts. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or 
SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4343 Poetry of Garcia Lorca (3). Chronological 
examination of the major works of Spain's greatest poet. 
Special attention to the lyric and dramatic features. 
Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of 
the instructor. 

SPW 4351 Spanish American Poetry I (3). A view of 
Spanish American poetry from the Pre-Colonial period 
until 1850. Representative works of the most renown 
poets will be examined, with emphasis on Ercilla, Sor 
Juana, Bello, Heredia, and Avellaneda. Prerequisites: 
SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4352 Spanish American Poetry II (3). A view of 
Spanish American poetry from 1850 to the present. 
Representative works of the important poets will be 
examined, and special attention will be given to Lezama 
Lima, Parra, Paz, and Vallejo. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 
or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 



186 College of Arts and Sciences 



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SPW 4364 The Spanish American Essay (3). A study of 
the ideological and intellectual forces that have shaped 
the Spanish American thought, as expressed in the works 
of representative authors such as Rodo, Mallea, Martinez 
Estrada, Paz, Manach, and others. Prerequisites: SPW 
3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4384 Spanish-American Literaure Before 
Independence (3). Studies Spanish-American literature 
prior to Independence providing a general understanding 
of the development of literature from the Conquest to the 
Enlightenment. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 & SPW 3820 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4390 Genre Studies (3). Examination of a single 
literary form (e.g. short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. novel and drama). 
Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of 
the instructor. 

SPW 4391 Contemporary Spanish Cinema (3). Cinema- 
tographic modes of representing reality in the Spain of the 
post-Franco era. Focuses on class, race, gender, culture, 
aesthetics, and ideology. 

SPW 4420 Quevedo's Satire (3). An introduction to the 
literary world of Spain's great baroque poet, who created 
modern satire in Spanish. Prerequisite: A good 
understanding of Spanish. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or 
SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4424 Golden Age Drama (3). Close readings from 
the finest plays written in Spain's Golden Age by Lope de 
Vega, Calderon, Tirso, and others, including the Don Juan 
theme. An examination of theatre as stylized conformity 
and as protest literature in a highly controlled society. 
Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or SPW 3820 or permission of 
the instructor. 

SPW 4440 18 th Century Spanish Literature (3). 

Examines the most relevant poetry and prose produced 
by 18 lh century Spanish writers. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 
and SPW 3820. 

SPW 4470 Asia in 19 th Century Hispanic Literature (3). 

Studies the formation and influence of Asia in 19 lh century 
Spanish and Spanish-American literary discourse. 

SPW 4580 El Dorado in Hispanic Literature and Film 
(3). The Age of Discovery and Conquest in Hispanic 
literature and film. Considers the works of Columbus, 
Cadeza de Vaca and Lope de Aguirre in contrast with 
contemporary reconstructions of their lives. Prerequisites: 
SPW 3130 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4590 Creative Modes (3). Discussion of a single 
mode or a plurality of epoch styles such as classical/ 
baroque, realism/surrealism. The peculiar/common 
features of expressive media. Prerequisites: SPW 3130 or 
SPW 3820 or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 4930 Special Topics (3). Independent readings, 
research, or project. 

SPW 4XXX Contemporary Latin American Cinema (3). 

An overview of Latin American film development with an 
emphasis in its most recent productions. 

SPW 5135 Spanish American Literature for Teachers 
(3). Overview of major trends in Spanish American 
literature. Especially designed for school teachers and 



majors in modern language education. Not for M.A. or 
Ph.D. Spanish majors. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5155 Comparative Studies (3). Cross-over and 
distinctiveness in a multi-language problem, period, or 
aesthetic. 

SPW 5225 Textual Reading and Analysis (3). Studies 
how texts are constructed, the role played by Poetics and 
Rhetoric in their formulation, and the context in which they 
were produced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 5237 The Traditional Spanish American Novel 
(3). Study and analysis of the traditional Spanish novel as 
a form of art, from 19th century Lizardi's El periquillo 
sarniento, to 1950. The novels and authors studied are 
representative of 'costumbrismo', 'romanticismo', 
'naturalismo', 'modernismo', and 'criollismo'. 

SPW 5277 Twentieth Century Spanish Narrative (3). 

Analysis of the Spanish novel from Ferlosio's El Jarama to 
the present. The perspective will be focused within 
historical, social, and artistic context. Representative 
authors such as Cela, Martin Santos, Umbral, Delibes, 
Benet, Goytisolo, and others will be included. 

SPW 5286 Contemporary Spanish American Novel (3). 

A study of the Spanish American Novel from 1950. The 
course will intensively and extensively focus on the 
novelists who are best known for their innovations, 
defining and analyzing the qualities which give originality 
and newness both in themes and language. 

SPW 5346 Poetry of Jorge Guillen (3). Selected 
readings from the five volumes of Aire nuestro. Emphasis 
on the techniques of close reading and explication. 
Related selections from Guillen's literary criticism. 

SPW 5358 Graduate Seminar: Prose and Poetry of 
Jorge Luis Borges (3). Close readings of short stories 
and poetry. Emphasis on Borge's linguistic and cultural 
pluralism and the interplay of philosophy with tabulation. 

SPW 5359 Graduate Seminar: Poetry of Pablo Neruda 
(3). Chronological examination of the major works of 
Chile's Nobel Laureate. Related readings from Neruda's 
Memories. Emphasis on the poet's linguistic and aesthetic 
innovations. 

SPW 5387 Women and Poetry (3). Women as poets and 
the poeticized. Close reading of Peninsular and Latin 
American texts, 16th - 20th Century. Students examine 
the contributions of women and how they have been 
represented in poetry. Prerequisites: 4000 or 5000 level 
course in Hispanic Poetry. 

SPW 5405 Medieval Spanish Literature (3). Readings in 
Medieval literature of Spain including the epic, the learned 
poetry of the Xlllth and XlVth Centuries, and the literature 
of Juan ll's court. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5407 The Renaissance in Spain (3). Readings in 
the literature and cultural experssions of the Spanish 
Renaissance. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5408 Colonial Latin American Literature (3). The 

most important and representative literary works of 
Colonial Latin America from the Cronicas to Lizardi. 
Prerequisites: Upper level and graduate standing. 



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College of Arts and Sciences 187 



SPW 5425 Quevedo: Poetry (3). Close reading of 
selected poems by Spain's greatest baroque poet and 
creator of modern Spanish satire, including poems on 
love, death, and metaphysical concerns, and a wide range 
of humorous poems. 

SPW 5426 Quevedo: Prose Satire (3). Close reading of 
selected satires in prose by Spain's greatest baroque 
satirist and creator of modern Spanish satire. Includes 
Quevedo's picaresque novel El Buscon, and his Suenos, 
or Visions of Hell. 

SPW 5428 Theatre in Calderon and Lope (3). The 

creation of verbal theatrical technique in the Baroque 
masters Calderon de la Barca and Lope de Vega. 

SPW 5436 Poetry Writing in Spanish (3). Readings from 
Spanish and Latin American texts; description and 
recreation of traditional and experimental metrics. 
Students will exchange critiques of original poems. 
Prerequisites: sample of unpublished poems; 
wordprocessing literacy; permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5475 19th Century Latin American Literature (3). 

A study of the main literary works of Spanish speaking 
19th Century Latin America: Romanticism, Realism, 
Naturalism and Modernism. Prerequisites: Upper level 
and graduate standing. 

SPW 5486 Modern Spanish Women Writers (3). 

Analysis of narrative works by Spain's most representative 
women writers from the 19th century to the present. 
Emphasis on the novel. Includes works by Pardo Bazan, 
Matute, Laforet, Martin Gaite. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5515 Advanced Studies in Hispanic Folklore (3). 

Studies the oral literary and linguistic tradition of the 
Hispanic world. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5535 Spanish Romanticism (3). Study of Spanish 
Romanticism through the analysis of major literary figures 
of the movement: Larra, Zorrilla, Espronceda, Castro and 
Becquer. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 5546 Hispanic Neoclassicism (3). Study of major 
Spanish and Spanish-American Neoclassic writers: 
Cadalso, Moratin, Jovellanos, Carrio de la Vandera, mier 
and Lizardi. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

SPW 5556 Spanish Realism and Naturalism (3). 

Readings in Spanish XlXth Century Novel of Realism and 
Naturalism including Alarcon, Perez Galdos, Pardo 
Bazan, Clarin and Blasco Ibanez. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5575 Spanish American Modernism (3). An in- 
depth study of prose and poetry of one of the most 
important periods of Spanish American literature, focusing 
on Marti, Dario, Najera, Casals, Silva, Valencia, Lugones, 
and Herrera y Reissig. 

SPW 5585 Learning Technology in Spanish Pedagogy 
and Research (3). Exploration of the role of technology in 
today's language and literature learning environment. 
Overview of the WWW, Network-based communication, 
and electronic databases related to Hispanic language 
and literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
advanced undergraduate with permission of the instructor. 



SPW 5595 Magical Realism and Typologies of Non- 
Realist Fiction (3). Theories of magical realism, fantastic 
and non-realist fiction, focusing on narrative technique. 
Authors may include Onetti, Borges, Cortazar, Asturias, 
Carpentier, Rulfo, Marquez, Allende or others. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5606 Cervantes (3). A comprehensive introduction 
to the masterpieces of Cervantes as the creator of the 
modern novel, and to critical theories about his art. 

SPW 5729 Major Writers of the Generation of '98 (3). 

Study of the social and political circumstances of Spain at 
the turn of the XIX Century, and analysis of the work of 
Ganivet, Azorin, Baroja. Machado, Maeztu, Unamuno and 
Valle-lnclan. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5735 Hispanic Literature of the United States (3). 

Readings in the literature of Hispanics in the United 
States. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission 
of the instructor. 

SPW 5756 Mexico in Poetry (3). Close reading of 
modern poets; discussion of essays on Theory and 
Practice. Students examine national representation in 
Myth, symbol and metaphor. Prerequisites: 4,000 or 5,000 
level course in Culture of Literature. 

SPW 5776 Black Literature in Latin America (3). An 

examination of the different genres in Latin American 
literature focusing on the life of Afro-Hispanics, from the 
beginning of this literary tradition to the present time. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 5781 The Representation of women in Spanish 
Literature and Film (3). Study of cinematographic 
adaptations of Spanish novels, plays and short stories. 
Analyzes the representation of the female subject in both 
literary and filmic works. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
or permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5786 Spanish American Women Writers (3). 

Through a selection of poems, plays and novels, this 
course studies Spanish American women production from 
Independence to the present times. Prerequisite: 
Graduate students only. 

SPW 5806 Methods of Literary Research (3). 

Introduction to bibliography, methods of research, the 
composition of essays, rhetoric, and the presentation of 
documentation. Theory of literary criticism, and its 
practical application to texts in Spanish. 

SPW 5934 Special Topics in Language/Literature (3). 

Content and objectives to be determined by student and 
instructor. 



188 College of Arts and Sciences 



School of Music 

Joseph Rohm, Interim Director/Associate 

Professor/Director of Undergraduate Studies (theory) 
John Augenblick, Associate Professor and Director of 

Choral Studies (choral) 
Kristine Burns, Associate Professor and Director of 

Music Technology (composition/electronic music) 
Deborah Burton, Assistant Professor (theory) 
Gary Campbell, Associate Professor (saxcphone/jazz 

studies) 
David Dolata, Assistant Professor (musicology) 
Robert Davidovici, Professor/Artist-in-Residence (violin) 
Robert B. Dundas, Associate Professor and Director of 
' Voice/Opera Studies (voice/opera) ' 
Karen Fuller, Assistant Professor and Director of 

Performing Arts Management 
Carolyn Fulton, Assistant Professor (music 

education/world music) 
Joel Galand, Assistant Professor (theory) 
Orlando J. Garcia, Professor and Director, Music 

Composition, Graduate Studies 
Kemal Gekic, Professor/Artist-in-Residence (piano) 
Roby George, Assistant Professor and Director of Wind 

Performance 
Fredrick Kaufman, Professor/Artist-in-Residence 

(composition) 
Sam Lussier, Assistant Professor and Director of Jazz 

Bands 
Mark Gregory Martin, Lecturer and Director of Marching 

Bands 
Clair McElfresh, Professor Emeritus (choral) 
Michael Orta, Associate Professor and Director of Jazz 

Performance (jazz piano) 
Stewart Robertson, Professor/Artist-in-Residence and 

Director of Orchestral Studies (orchestra/conducting) 
Arturo Sandoval, Professor/Artist-in-Residence (trumpet) 
Amernet Quartet (Artists-in-Residence) 
Javier Arias, (cello/chamber music) 
Michael Klotz, (viola/chamber music) 
Marcia Littley de Arias, (violin/chamber music) 
Misha Vitenson, (violin/chamber »msr.l 
Adjunct Instructors: 

Sara Barton, accompanist and upem workshop coach 
Jay Bertolet, tuba 

Andrew Bisantz, department assistant (conducting) 
Kristie Born, opca coach 
Deborah Conquest, voice 
Linda Considine, voice 
Robert Craft, Distinguished Professor of Music 
John Dee, oboe 
Jodie DeSalvo, accompanist 
Loretta Dranoff, piano 
Carlos Fernandez Averhoff, saxophone 
Deborah Fleisher, harp 
Nicole Fortier, business of music 
Felix Gomez, jazz piano 
Luis Gomez-lmbert, string bass/new music 

ensembie/music appreciation 
Robert Grabowski, ;'azz nistory/sound engineer, evolution 

of jazz 
Paul Green, clarinet/chamber music 
James Hacker, trumpet/chamber music 
Geoffrey Hale, bassoon 
Mark Hetzler, trombone 



Undergraduate Catalog 



George Hobbs, university chorale 

Michael Launius, percussion techniques/percussion 

ensemble 
Jose Lopez, piano/accompanying 
Sam Lussier, jazz arranging/jazz lab band 
Nancy Luzko, keyboard 
Dennis Marks, jazz bass 
Greg Miller, French horn 
Hector Nesiosup, Latin percussion 
Mark Nerenhausen, live music operations 
Nicky Orta, jazz bass electric/combo 
Edward Pierson, voice 
Jeff Quinn, concert lighting and design 
Leonid Rabinovich, music education 
Errol Rackipov, /azz vibes 
Hugo Rodriguez, voice 
Wendy Santiago, jazz piano 
Thomas Schuster, organ 
Eric Swanson, classical guitar 
Maria Vassilev, accompanist 
Arthur Weisberg, bassoon and chamber music 
Richard Zellon, jazz guitar 

Bachelor of Music 

Degree Program Hours: 128 

A Bachelor of Music degree is offered with an emphasis in 
one or more of the following areas: Applied Music, 
Composition, Jazz Studies, Music Technology, and Music 
Education. 

AN entering students must provide evidence of 
performance ability (vocal or instrumental) through an 
audition. Contact the Music Department at (305) 348-2896 
for more information or to schedule an audition. 

Freshman/Sophomore Admission 

Freshman admission requires an audition and placement 
test in Music Theory. Contact the Music Department at 
(305) 348-2896 for an audition appointment. 

Transfer Admission 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must meet all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Music students at the University come from a wide 
variety of academic backgrounds from Florida, other 
states and courtries. Because of this diversity, the Faculty 
of Music gives basic preliminary examinations in order to 
assist the student to eliminate any deficiencies: 

1 . Music History - consisting of all periods of history. 

2. Music Theory - consisting of sightsinging, melodic and 
harmonic dictation and written harmonization and analysis. 



Required for the degree: 

Common Prerequisites: 

Music Theory I 



MUT 1111 
MUT1112 
MUT 2116 
MUT 21 17 
MUT 1221 
MUT 1222 
MUT 2226 
MUT 2227 
MVK 1111 
MVK 1112 



Music Theory II 
Music Theory III 
Music Theory IV 
Sightsinging I 
Sightsinging II 
Sightsinging ill 
Sightsinging IV 
Ciass Piano I 
Class Piano II 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Ar ts and Sciences 1 89 



MVK2121 Class Piano III 

MVK2122 Class Piano IV 

Four hours in one of the following 
MUN 1140 



MUN 1210 



Symphonic Wind Ensemble 

or 

Orchestra 



MUN 1310 Concert Chorus/Men's or Women's 

Chorus 1 

Eight hours of applied lessons 

MUC1342 MIDI Technology 2 

Ethnomusicology (3) 

MUH3052 Music of the World 3 

or 

MUH 3541 Music of the Americas: Folklore & 

Beyond 3 

Four instances of successful completion in the following: 

MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 

Junior/Senior Year Areas of Emphasis 

The following are Junior/Senior Year areas of emphasis 
for Music students. Nine hours in elective courses outside 
the department are required by the College. Admission to 
each area is by faculty approval. 

Area I: Instrumental Performance (57) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

MUT 361 1 

MUT 3401 

MUT 4311 

History: (9) 

MUH 3211 

MUH 3212 

MUH 3371 

Ensembles (8) 

Two credits each semester enrolled in Applied Music (to 

be determined by advisor) 

Major Applied (12) 

Four semesters 3 credits each semester 

Conducting (2) 



Form and Analysis 

Counterpoint 

Orchestration 

Music History Survey I 
Music History Survey II 
Twentieth Century Music: Exploration 



12 



Basic Conducting 
Instrumental Conducting 



MUG 4101 
MUG 4302 
Recitals: (2) 

Junior Recital 
Senior Recital 

Recital Attendance (0) 

To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music 

MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

Electives 

Music Electives 

Electives outside the major 

Area II: Vocal Performance (54) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (6) 

MUT 3401 
MUT 3611 
History: (9) 

MUH 3211 

MUH 3212 

MUH 3371 

Ensembles (8) 

Two credits each semester enrolled in Applied Music 

including four semester of Opera Workshop. Others to be 

determined by Advisor. 



Counterpoint 
Form and Analysis 

Music History Survey I 
Music History Survey II 
Twentieth Century Music: Exploration 



Major Applied (12) 



Junior Prin App 
Junior Prin App 
Senior Prin App 
Senior Prin App 

Basic Conducting 
Choral Conducting 

Junior Recital 
Senior Recital 



MVV 3431 
MVV 3431 
MVV 4441 
MVV 4441 
Conducting (2) 
MUG 4101 
MUG 4202 
Recitals: (2) 
MVV 3970 
MVV 4971 

Recital Attendance 

To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music 

MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

Diction for Singers (4) 

MUS 3xxx Diction I 2 

MUS4xxx Diction II 2 

Vocal Pedagogy 

MVV 3630 Vocal Pedagogy 

Electives (chosen in consultation with area advisor) 

Music Electives 

Electives outside the major 9 

Area III: Composition (56) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

MUT 3401 

MUT 3611 

MUT 4311 

History: (9) 

MUH 3211 

MUH 3212 

MUH 3371 

Ensembles (6) 

At least one ensemble each semester enrolled in Applied 

Music, including four semesters of New Music Ensemble. 

others to be determined by advisor.) 

Conducting (2) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 

MUG 4202 Choral Conducting 



Counterpoint 
Form and Analysis 
Orchestration 

Music History Survey 
Music History Survey 
Twentieth Century Music: Exploration 



MUG 4302 Instrumental Conducting 

Principal Applied (4) 
Four semesters, 1 credit each semester 
Composition: 1 (10) 

MUC2221 Composition I : 

MUC 2222 Composition II 

MUC3231 Composition III 

MUC 3232 Composition IV I 

MUC 4241 Composition V 

MUC 4932 Composition Forum ' 

Completion of four semesters of Composition Forum is 
required for graduation. 
Electronic Music: (4) 
MUC 2301 Electronic Music Lab I 

MUC 3302 Electronic Music Lab II 

Recital Attendance (0) 

To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music 
MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

•2 



Recitals:^ (0) 
Composition Recital 
Senior Recital 
Electives outside the major 

1 MUC 2221 and 2222 (4 credits) should be taken during 



190 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



the sophomore year. 

^Composition students must present a 45 minute recital of 

their works and a 30 minute performance recital. A final 

oral exam administered after the composition recital must 

also be successfully completed. Composition students 

must earn a "B" or better in all theory, composition, and 

electronic music courses. 

Area IV: Jazz Performance (56) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (14) 
MUT4311 
MUT 4353 
MUT 2641 
MUT 2642 
MUT 4643 
MUT 4644 
MUT 4663 
History: (9) 
MUH3212 
MUH 3371 
MUH2116 



Orchestration 
Jazz Arranging 
Jazz Improvisation I 
Jazz Improvisation II 
Jazz Improvisation III 
Jazz Improvisation IV 
Jazz Styles and Analysis 



Music History Survey II 3 

Twentieth Century Music: Exploration 3 

Evolution of Jazz 3 

(31) 



Additional Music Courses: 
Ensembles (8) 

Two credits each semester enrolled in Applied Music (To 

be determined by advisor) 

Major Applied 1 (12) 

Four semesters major jazz applied 

Conducting (3) 



Ensembles: (8) 

Two semesters of large ensemble: 2 

Choir, Wind Ensemble or Orchestra 

MUN 3463 - Chamber Music (two semesters) 2 

MUN4513 Accompanying (four semesters) 4 

Major Applied (12) 

Four semesters, three credits each semester. 

Conducting (1) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 

Pedagogy (2) 

MVK 4640 Piano Pedagogy 2 

3 Recitals (2) 

2 Junior Recital 1 

2 Senior Recital 1 

2 Recital Attendance (0) 

2 MUS 3040 

2 To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music 

2 Electives 

Music Electives 3 

Electives outside of major 9 

Area VI: Music Technology (48) 

Required Courses 

Theory: (12) 



MUG 4101 
MUG 4202 

MUG 4302 
MUN 4784 
Recitals: (2) 
MVJ 4971 
MVJ 3970 



Basic Conducting 

Choral Conducting 

or 

Instrumental Conducting 

Jazz Rehearsal Techniques 



Senior Jazz Applied Recital 

Junior Jazz Recital 
Recital Attendance 

(To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music) 
MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

Commercial/Jazz (3) 
MUM 4301 Business of Music 

MUH 1018 Intro to Jazz Studies 

Electives: (9) 

To be determined by advisor 

1 Piano majors will take four credits (two years) of 
Classical Applied Piano instead of Class Piano. 
^Drummers Entering without Classical Applied Percussion 
will take four credits (two years) of Classical Applied 
Percussion 

^Electric Bass Majors will take two credits (1 year) of 
Applied String Bass. 

Area V: Piano Performance (55) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

MUT 3611 
MUT 3401 
History: (12) 
MUH 3211 
MUH 3212 
MUH 3371 
MUH 4400 



Form and Analysis 
Counterpoint 

Music History Survey I 
Music History Survey I 
20th Century Music 
Keyboard Literature 





MUT 1111 Music Theory I 


3 




MUT 1112 Music Theory II 


3 


8 


MUT 21 16 Music Theory III 


3 




MUT 2117 Music Theory IV 


3 


12 


Sightsinging: (4) 






MUT 1221 Sightsinging I 


1 


1 


MUT 1222 Sightsinging II 


1 


1 


MUT 2226 Sightsinging III 


1 




MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV 


1 


1 


Music History: (12) 




1 


MUH 3052 ' Music of the World 


3 


1 


or 
MUH 3541 Music of Latin America 


3 


1 


MUH 321 1 Music History Survey I 


3 




MUH 3212 Music History Survey II 


3 




MUH 3371 Twentieth Century Music 


3 





Music Technology: (22) 






MUC 1342 Intro to MIDI Technology 


2 


1 


MUC 2301 Electronic Music Lab I 


2 


2 


MUC 3302 Electronic Music Lab II 


2 




MUC 4400 Electronic Music Lab III 


2 




MUC 4xxx Electronic Music Lab IV 


2 


f 


MUS 3xxx Sound Reinforcement 


2 




MUS 4910 Senior Research Project 


4 




MUM 4940 Internship 


6 




Ensembles: (6) 






One ensemble each semester enrolled in Applied Music. 






MUN 1140, 1210, or 1310 


6 


f 


Principal Applied: (6) 






Six semesters of lessons, 1 credit each 


6 




Recital Attendance: (0) 






To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music. 






MUS 1010 Recital Attendance 





3 
3 


Physics of Music: (3) 




PHY 3465 Physics of Music 


3 


Computer Science: (6) 




3 
3 


COP 2800 Introduction to Java Programming 


3 


CS Electives 


3 


Electives outside major 


9 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 191 



Area VII: Organ Performance (55) 

Required Courses 
Theory: (9) 

Form and Analysis 
Counterpoint 



MUT3611 
MUT 3401 
History: (15) 
MUH3211 
MUH3212 
MUH 3371 
MUH 3052 
MUH 4xxx 



Music History Survey I 
Music History Survey II 
20 m Century Music 
Music of the World 
Organ Literature 



Major Applied: (12) 

MVK xxxx Applied Organ 



Conducting: (1) 
MUG 4101 
Pedagogy: (2) 
MVK 3xxx 
Ensembles: (8) 
MUN xxx 
MUN4513 
MUN 3463 
Recitals: (0) 
MVK 3970 
MVK 4971 



(4 semesters @ 3 credits each) 

Basic Conducting 

Organ Practicum 

Large Ensembles 
Accompanying 
Chamber Music 



Junior Applied Recital 

Senior Applied Recital 
Recital Attendance: (0) 
MUS 3040 Recital Attendance 

Electives: 
Music Electives 
Electives outside of Major (9 credits) 9 

Minor in Music Composition 

A minor in composition is available for students receiving 
the BM degree in areas of studies other than composition 
(e.g. jazz studies, applied, music education). In order to 
receive credit for a minor in composition students must 
successfully complete the following: 

Courses 

Theory 

(beyond Freshman/Sophomore Theory and Sight Singing) 



3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 



Form and Analysis 

Orchestration 

Counterpoint 



MUT 3611 
MUT 4311 
MUT 3401 
Composition 

(beyond Basic Music Composition) 
MUC 2221 Composition I 

MUC 2222 Composition II 

Electronic Music 
(beyond MIDI Technology) 
MUC 2301 Electronic Music I 

Electronic Music II 



Composition Forum (2 semesters) 
New Music Ensemble (1 semester) 



MUC 3302 

Forum 

MUC 4932 

Ensemble 

MUN 2490 

Total 1 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education: 
Grades K-12 

Degree Program Hours: 134-136 

The Bachelor of Science in Music Education degree is 
offered by the School of Music, within the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Application for this major must be made 
to the School of Music before admittance. An audition, 



theory, and piano placement exams are required prior 

to admittance. Any questions concerning this degree 

should be directed to the music Education Program 

Director 305-348-2896 or to Fredrick Kaufman, Director of 

the School of Music 305-348-2896. 

Theory (12 credits) 

MUT 1111 Music Theory I 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II 

MUT 21 16 Music Theory III 

MUT 21 17 Music Theory IV 

Sightsinging (4 credits) 

MUT 1221 Sightsinging I 

MUT 1222 Sighysinging II 

MUT 2226 Sightsinging III 

MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV 

Class Piano (2 credits) 

MVK 1111 Class Piano I 

MVK 1112 Class Piano II 

Music Education majors must pass the Piano Proficiency, 

Class Piano III and IV until proficiency is pass. 

Music History (12 credits) 



MUH 3052 



Music of the World 
or 



MUH 3541 Music of Latin America 3 

MUH 321 1 Music History Survey I 3 

MUH 3212 Music History Survey II 3 

MUH 3371 20th Century Music 3 

Music Technology (2 credits) 

MUC 1342 MIDI Technology 2 

Applied Music (11 credits) 

Music Education majors are required to take two (2) 
credits of Applied Lessons each semester of their 
freshman and sophomore years, and one (1) credit each 
semester of junior year, and one (1) credit the semester 
not Student Teaching in the senior year. 
Senior Recital (0 credits) 

Music Education majors present their Senior Recital in the 
senior semester when not Student Teaching. 

Ensembles (14 credits) 

Music Education majors are required to take one major 
and one minor ensemble each semester. Music Education 
majors are not required to take ensembles while Student 
Teaching. 

Recital Attendance (0 credits) 

To be taken each semester enrolled in Applied Music. 

Professional Foundation in General Education 
(24) 



EDF 1005 
EDG 2701 
EME 2040 
EDG 3321 
EDG 3321 L 
EDG 3004 
EDF 3515 



Introduction to Education 



Teaching Diverse Populations 



Introduction to Educational Technology 
Instructional Decision Making 
Instructional Decision Making Lab 
Educational Psychology 
Philos and Hist Foundations in 
Education 
EDF 4643 Cultural and Social Foundations in 

Education 

1 Requires field experience of 15 clock hours outside of 
class time. 

At least one course taken to meet the natural science 
requirements in General Education and/or prerequisites 



192 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



must include a laboratory component. 

In addition to EDG 2701, students must take 6 credit 
hours with an international or diversity focus in lower 
division. 

To qualify for admission to the program, undergraduates 
must have met all the lower division/general education 
requirements including CLAST, minimum ACT, or SAT 
scores, completed 60 semester hours, 2.5 GPA, and must 
be otherwise acceptable into the program. 
Music Education majors choose either the choral or 
Instrumental Track for Conducting and Techniques 
course: 5 credits: 
Choral Music Education (5) 

Conducting (2 credits) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 

MUG 4301 Choral Conducting 1 

Music Education Techniques (3 credits) 
MVV 1111 Class Voices l' 1 

MVV2121 Class Voice if 1 

MW 3630 Vocal Pedagogy" < 2 

MVS1116 Guitar Skills 1 

Piano and Guitar majors only 

Voice majors for two credits, Piano/Guitar majors for one 
credit 
OR 
Instrumental Music Education (5) 

Conducting (2 credits) 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting 1 

MUG 4202 Instrumental Conducting 1 

Music Education Techniques (3 credits) 

MUE 2440 String Techniques'" 1 

MUE 2450 Woodwind Techniques 1 

MUE 2460 Brass Techniques' ' 1 

MUE 2470 Percussion Techniques 1 

Students are exempted from their major applied tech 
course 
AND 

Professional Foundation in Music Education (15 
credits) 

(Choral and Instrumental) 

MUE 3340 Elementary Music Methods 3 

MUE 4341 Secondary Music Methods 3 

MUE 4940 Student Teaching in Music Education 9 

Note: MUE 4940 is taken the semester following MUE 
3340 and MUE 4341. 

Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

HUM-Humanities; MUC-Music: Composition; MUE-Music: 
Education; MUG-Music: Conducting; MUH-Music: 
History/Musicology; MUL-Music: Literature; MUM-Music: 
Commercial; MUN-Music: Ensembles; MUS-Music; MUT- 
Music: Theory; MVB-Applied Music/Brass; MVK-Applied 
Music-Keyboard; MVJ-Applied Music/Jazz; MVP-Applied 
Music/Percussion; MVS-Applied Music/Strings; MVV- 
Applied MusicA/oice; MVW-Applied Music/Woodwinds. 

MUC 1101 Basic Music Composition (1). Elementary 
principles of composition including the performance of 
composition projects. Course includes calligraphy and 
notation skills. Course may be repeated for credit. 
Prerequisites: Freshman music majors; permission of the 
instructor. 



MUC 1342 MIDI Technology (2). Introduction to the MIDI 
protocol and MIDI-based software, including music 
notation, sequencing, patch editing, ear training, and 
keyboard skiNs software. Prerequisites: Music major or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUC 2221 Composition I (2). Creative writing utilizing 
20th century compositional techniques in Impressionism, 
Neoclassicism, Post Webern Serialism, Indeterminacy, 
Minimalism, Mixed, Multi and Inter media, etc. 
Prerequisite: MUT 1112. Corequisite: MUT2116. 

MUC 2222 Composition II (2). Continuation of MUC 
2221. Prerequisite: MUC 2221. Corequisite: MUT 2117. 

MUC 2301 Electronic Music Lab I (2). Exploration of the 
electronic medium including the history of electronic 
music, digital studio techniques, analog studio techniques, 
digital synthesis and analog synthesis. Prerequisite: MUC 
1342. 

MUC 3231 Composition III (2). A continuation of 
Composition I to further the development of students 
compositional abilities through the writing of more evolved 
works with regard to duration, instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: MUC 2222 and admission to composition 
area. 

MUC 3232 Composition IV (2). Continuation of MUC 

3231. Prerequisite: MUC 3231. 

MUC 3302 Electronic Music Lab II (2). A continuation of 
Electronic Music Lab I with an emphasis on advanced 
MIDI applications including samplers, digital sequencing, 
digital signal processing and interactive MIDI software. 
Includes one large composition project. Prerequisite: 
Electronic Music Lab I. 

MUC 4241 Composition V (2). Continuation of MUC 

3232. Prerequisite: MUC 3232. 

MUC 4242 Composition VI (2). Continuation of MUC 
4241. Prerequisite: MUC 4241. 

MUC 4400 Electronic Music Lab III (2). Special projects 
in advanced electronic music programming environments 
including Csound, MAX, Interactor, HMSL and CHANT. 
Includes one large composition project. Can be repeated 
four times. Prerequisites: Electronic Music Lab II and 
permission of the instructor. 

MUC 4932 Composition Forum (0). Student composers' 
works are critiqued by faculty; topics of interest to 
composers are discussed. Required of all students taking 
Composition III and higher. Prerequisite: Admission to 
Composition Program. 

MUC 4XXX Electronic Music Lab IV (2). An advanced 
course in computer and electronic music providing 
students with hands-on experience with new hardware 
and software for the creation of music. Prerequisites: 
MUC 2301, MUC 3302. 

MUC 5406 Electronic Music IV (2). An advanced course 
in computer music providing students hands-on 
experience with recently developed hardware and 
software for the creation of music. Prerequisite: MUC 
4400. 

MUC 5407 Electronic Music V (2). Students develop new 
hardware and/or software for uses related to musical 
composition. Prerequisite: MUC 5406. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 193 



MUC 5635 Computer Music Seminar I (3). Introduces 
students to the historical contributions of computer music 
composers and engineers. Prerequisites: MUC 6305, 
MUC 6306. Corequisite: MUC 6405. 

MUC 5636 Computer Music Seminar II (3). Introduces 
students to the compositional procedures used by 
computer music composers. Prerequisites: MUC 6305, 
MUC 6306, MUC 6405. Corequisite: MUC 5406. 

MUC 5637 Computer Music Seminar III (3). Introduces 
students to the research technologies for making 
interactive sound projects including installations and 
exhibits. Prerequisites: MUC 6305, MUC 6306, MUC 
6405, MUC 5406. 

MUC 5935 Composition Forum (0). Student composers 
present their work for critique by faculty and topics 
relevant to composition are presented by faculty and 
guests. Prerequisite: Admission into the graduate 
composition program. 

MUE 2440C String Techniques (1). Class instruction of 
string instruments; tuning and care of instruments; 
teaching techniques, fingerings, bowings; violin, viola, 
cello and double bass. 

MUE 2450C Woodwind Techniques (1). Class 
instruction of woodwind instruments; tuning and care of 
instruments. Teaching techniques. Single reed 
instruments, double reed instruments, and flute. Class one 
hour, laboratory one hour. 

MUE 2460C Brass Techniques (1). Class instruction of 
brass instruments; tuning and care of instruments. 
Teaching techniques. Piston and valve instruments, 
French horn, and trombone. Class one hour, laboratory 
one hour. 

MUE 2470C Percussion Techniques (1). Class 
instruction of percussion instruments; sticking techniques; 
care of instruments; teaching techniques. Drum and mallet 
instruments. Class one hour, laboratory one hour. 

MUE 3340 Elementary School Teaching Methods (3). 

Development of instructional skills, techniques, and 
strategies for elementary school classroom music for the 
music teacher. Laboratory and field work required. 

MUE 3921 Choral Conducting Workshop (3). The study 
of various topics related to choral literature, conducting 
and techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 3922 String Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to string literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 3923 Instrumental Conducting Workshop (3). The 
study of various topics related to instrumental ensemble 
literature, conducting and techniques. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 3924 Jazz Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to jazz literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 4480 Marching Band Techniques (3). A study of 
show design and concepts; marching band management 
and organizational procedures including booster 
organizations, inventory, handbooks, grading procedures 
and rehearsal fundamentals. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Instructor. 



MUE 4940 Student Teaching in Music Education (9). 

Supervised teaching in an elementary and secondary 
school. Prerequisite: Admission to the program. 

MUE 5485 Marching Band Techniques (3). A study of 
show design and concepts; marching band management 
and organizational procedures including booster 
organizations, inventory, handbooks, grading procedures, 
rehearsal techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Instructor. 

MUE 5921 Choral Conducting Workshop (3). The study 
of various topics related to choral literature, conducting 
and techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 5922 String Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to string literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 5923 Instrumental Conducting Workshop (3). The 
study of various topics related to instrumental ensemble 
literature, conducting and techniques. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 5924 Jazz Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to jazz literature, conducting and 
techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 5928 Workshop in Music (3). Applications of 
materials and techniques in music in a laboratory or field 
setting. 

MUG 4101 Basic Conducting (1). A basic conducting 
course to gain fundamental technique and interpretation. A 
prerequisite for both advanced instrumental and choral 
conducting. 

MUG 4202 Choral Conducting (1). With a background in 
basic theory, and having performed in ensembles, the 
student will develop techniques of group conducting 
including madrigal, glee, choir, etc. A survey of choral 
literature will be included. Prerequisite: MUG 4101. 

MUG 4302 Instrumental Conducting (1). With a 
background in basic theory, and having performed in 
ensembles, the student will develop a knowledge of baton 
technique, score reading, and interpretation. Prerequisite: 
MUG 4101. Corequisites: Orchestra or wind ensemble or 
both. 

MUG 5105 Advanced Conducting Techniques (1). An 

extension of form and analysis, with interpretation both in 
instrumental and choral conducting. Twentieth century 
scoring and symbol interpretation will be studied in depth, 
with actual conducting experience required. 

MUG 5205 Graduate Applied Choral Conducting (2). 

Advanced study of choral conducting, including gesture, 
rehearsal techniques, and repertoire. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing and permission of the instructor. 

MUG 5307 Graduate Applied Wind Conducting (2). 

Advanced study of wind conducting, including gesture, 
rehearsal techniques, and repertoire. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing and permission of the instructor. 

MUG 5935 Conducting Seminar (1). An examination of 
the principle issues of conducting, emphasizing score 
reading and study, rehearsal, interpretation, and 
contemporary techniques. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and/or permission of the instructor. 

MUH 1011 Music Appreciation (3). Lives and creations 



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of great composers in various periods of history. A multi- 
media course. 

MUH 1018 Introduction to Jazz Studies (2). An 

introductory study of jazz music and musicianship. 
Required of all students who have been accepted into the 
Commercial/Jazz Studies program. 

MUH 1560 African American Music (3). Examines the 
historical influence and development of African American 
music from its African roots to its dominance in the 
American popular culture. 

MUH 2116 Evolution of Jazz (3). A history course that 
surveys jazz styles from mid-1 9th century to the present. A 
sociological and musical look at jazz, the personalities and 
their experience. 

MUH 3019 History of Popular Music in the U.S. (3). 

Overview of Afro-American and Euro-American popular 
music and its historical development. Examination of 
musical style and social context in lecture-discussion 
format with film and video. 

MUH 3052 Music of the World (3). Survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical traditions from around the 
world. Examination of musical style and social context with 
film and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 3060 Latino Music in the United States (3). Survey 
of Latin American musical tradition brought through 
immigration. Examination of musical style and social 
context in lecture-discussion format with film and 
performance demonstrations. 

MUH 3061 Music of Mexico and Central America (3). A 

survey of folk, popular and classical musical traditions in 
the region. Examination of musical style and social context 
in lecture-discussion format with film and performance 
demonstrations. 

MUH 3062 Music of the Caribbean (3). Survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical traditions and their ongoing 
connection with Caribbean populations in the U.S. Class 
includes film and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 3073, 5075 Women in Music (3). Introduces 
students to women musicians including performers, 
composers, and researchers in all genres. 

MUH 3211 Music History Survey I (3). A survey of music 
from antiquity to 1 750. Lectures on historical styles will be 
supplemented with slides, recordings, and musical 
analysis. Prerequisites: MUT 2226 & MUT 2116 or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUH 3212 Music History Survey II (3). A survey of 
music from 1750 to the present. Lectures on historical 
styles will be supplemented with slides, recordings, and 
musical analysis. Prerequisites: MUT 2226 & MUT 2116, 
or permission of the instructor. 

MUH 3371 Twentieth Century Music: Exploration (3). 

An exploration of music since 1900. Lectures on style plus 
demonstrations will be supplemented with recordings and 
analysis. Prerequisites: MUH 3212, MUT 2117 and MUT 
2227 or permission of the instructor. 

MUH 3541 Music of Latin America: Folklore and 
Beyond (3). An overview of the orchestral, chamber, solo, 
vocal, and electronic music from Latin America written in 
the 20th century and its relationship to the folk music of 



the region. 

MUH 3570 Survey of Asian Music (3). Examines the 
major Asian, musical traditions within the cultural 
framework of history, arts and traditions. 

MUH 3801 Jazz History (2). An in-depth study of jazz 
music from its inception to the present day. Specifically 
designed for music majors, in particular Jazz Studies 
students. Prerequisites: MUT 1112, MUT 1222. 

MUH 4680 Music History Seminar I (2). Emphasizes 
both historical and theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops written skills and 
research methods. Written project required. Prerequisites: 
MUH 3211, MUH 3212, and permission of the instructor. 

MUH 4681 Music History Seminar II (2). Emphasizes 
both historical and theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops written skills and 
research methods. Written project required. Prerequisites: 
MUH 4680 or permission of the instructor. 

MUH 4682 Music History Seminar III (2). Emphasizes 
both historical and theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops written skills and 
research methods. Written project required. Prerequisite: 
MUH 4681. 

MUH 4683 Music History Seminar IV (2). Emphasizes 
both historical and theoretical analysis. Scholarly work 
under faculty direction, develops written skills and 
research methods. Written project required. Prerequisite: 
MUH 4682. 

MUH 4XXX Music of the Baroque Period (3). Survey of 
the major genres, styles, and composers of the Baroque 
period within the wider context of Baroque aesthetics and 
culture. Introduction to Baroque performance practice. 
Prerequisites: MUH 3211, MUH 3212. 

MUH 5025 History of Popular Music in the U.S. (3). 

Overview of Afro-American and Euro-American popular 
music and its historical development. Examination of 
musical style and social context in lecture-discussion 
format with film and video. 

MUH 5057 Music of the World (3). Survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical traditions from around the 
world. Examination of musical style and social context with 
film and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5065 Latino Music in the United States (3). Survey 
of Latin American musical traditions brought through 
immigration. Examination of musical style and social 
context in lecture-discussion format with film and 
performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5066 Music of Mexico and Central America (3). A 

survey of folk, popular and classical musical traditions in 
the region. Examination of musical style and social context 
in lecture-discussion format with film and performance 
demonstrations. 

MUH 5067 Music of the Caribbean (3). Survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical traditions and their ongoing 
connection with Caribbean populations in the U.S.. Class 
includes film and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5375 Twentieth Century Music: 'New 
Dimensions' (3). A technical study of music since 1900. 
Lectures on style plus demonstrations and practical 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 195 



application will be supplemented with recordings and 
analysis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Music or 
permission of instructor. 

MUH 5546 Music of the Americas (3). An exploration of 
the Folk, popular, and art music of Latin America. 

MUH 5575 Survey of Asian Music (3). Examines the 
major Asian musical traditions within the cultural 
framework of history, arts and traditions. 

MUH 5815 Jazz History: The Innovators (3). The work of 
four artists whose innovations have profoundly defined the 
jazz idiom from its beginning through the present day- 
Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and John 
Coltrane. 

MUH 5XXX Musical Style and Practice in the Baroque 
Era (3). Detailed treatment of the genres, styles, and 
composers of the Baroque period within the wider context 
of Baroque aesthetics and culture. Exploration and 
application of Baroque performance practice. 

MUL 4400 Keyboard Literature (3). Study of solo works 
for the keyboard from historical beginnings to the present. 
Performance practices and stylistic analysis will be 
emphasized, with illustrations of representative works. 
Prerequisites: MUH 3211, MUH 3212. 

MUL 4490 Survey of Organ Literature (3). Survey of 
organ literature, history, performance practice and organ 
design. Includes historic sound recordings. Prerequisite: 
Permission of instructor. 

MUL 4500 Symphonic Literature (3). Survey of 
symphonic literature from the 17th century to present day. 
Analysis and illustrations of representative works. 
Prerequisites: MUH 3211, and MUH 3212. 

MUL 4602 Vocal Literature I (2). A survey of solo vocal 
literature from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical 
periods. Corequisite: Italian Diction (MUS 2241). 

MUL 4604 Vocal Literature II (2). A survey of the German 
Lied and it's poetry. Corequisite: German Diction (MUS 
2231). 

MUL 4605 Vocal Literature III (2). A survey of the French 
Melodie and it's poetry. Corequisite: French Diction (MUS 
2221). 

MUL 4608 Vocal Literature IV (2). A survey of solo vocal 
literature of the twentieth-century. Corequisite: English 
Diction (MUS 2211). 

MUL 4630 Symphonic/Chamber Vocal Literature (1). 

Corequisites with MUL 4500 Symphonic Literature. A 
practicum surveys Symphonic & Chamber vocal music 
from 17th Century to present day. Includes selection of 
personal repertory and ensemble performance. 

MUL 4662 History and Literature of Opera (3). 

Chronological survey of opera literature from the 17th 
century to present day. Analysis and performance of 
representative works. Prerequisites: MUH 3211 and MUH 
3212. 

MUL 4XXX Organ Literature (3). Survey of organ 
literature from antiquity to the present. 

MUL 5405 Keyboard Literature (3). Survey of keyboard 
literature from antiquity through the twentieth century. 
Emphasis on the evolving role of the keyboard in music 



history. 

MUL 5456 Wind Instrument Literature (3). The history 
and development of Wind Instrument Literature from ca. 
1650 to the present day. Music appropriate for all levels of 
instruction from middle school through college level is 
included. Prerequisite: Advanced/graduate standing. 

MUL 5495 Survey of Organ Literature (3). Survey of 
organ literature, history, performance practice and organ 
design. Includes historic sound recordings and in-class 
performance. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

MUL 5496 Organ Literature I (3). Survey of organ 
literature from antiquity to 1750 in the German, French, 
Italian schools. 

MUL 5497 Organ Literature II (3). Survey of organ 
literature from 1750 to the present in the German, French, 
and American schools. 

MUL 5607 Vocal Literature I (2). A survey of solo vocal 
literature from the 17 lh century to the late 18 lh century. 
Emphasis will be placed on a discussion of ornamentation 
and performance-practice and comparisons of editions. 

MUL 5626 Vocal Literature IV (2). Twentieth-century art 
song. Emphasis will be placed on the rise of the 
nationalist schools, the development of atonalism and 
other modern schools of thought. 

MUL 5645 Choral Literature (3). A survey of sacred and 
secular choral literature from the Middle Ages to the 
present. Emphasis on stylistic analysis and performance 
practice for each style period. Includes score study, aural 
analysis of recorded performances and in-class 
performances. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUL 5671 Opera Literature (3). A chronological survey of 
operatic literature from the 17th century to the present 
day. Emphasis placed on the historical milieu in which the 
operatic form evolved through the ages. 

MUL 5XXX Vocal Literature II (2). The German Lied and 
it's poetry. Emphasis will be placed on a study of the 
poets and their poetry, important facts of the composers' 
lives and times and other musical and cultural 
developments. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

MUL 5XXX Vocal Literature III (2). The French Melodie. 
Emphasis will be placed on a study of the poets and their 
poetry, their styles and schools, the composers' lives and 
times and other musical and cultural developments. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

MUM 1401 Music Calligraphy (3). The correct 
procedures for music penmanship, the notation of notes 
and chords for music parts and scores. 

MUM 3601 Audio Techniques I (3). Basic sound 
engineering, including the basic workings of P.A. 
equipment and the interplay between the various 
components. 

MUM 3602 Audio Techniques II (3). Studio recording 
techniques, microphone placement, taping and mixing. 

MUM 4301 Business of Music (1). Principles and 
practices of modern publishing techniques; copyright laws; 
wholesale and retail distribution of music. Performance 
rights; agreements and relations between producers 
directors, performers, writers, personnel managers, and 
booking agents. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



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Undergraduate Catalog 



MUM 4302 Business of Music II (3). Continuation of 
principles and practices of modern publishing techniques; 
copyright laws; wholesale and retail distribution of music. 
Performance rights; agreements and relations between 
producer, directors, performers, writers, personnel 
managers, booking agents. Prerequisite: MUM 4301. 

MUM 4803 Grant Writing for the Arts (2). Designed to 
familiarize the student with the fundamental tools and 
techniques in writing a successful grant proposal for the 
arts. Focuses on the basics of grant writing, where to find 
funding sources and grant evaluation procedures. 

MUM 4940 Music Internship (VAR). Practical experience 
utilizing music theory, composition, and history in the 
commercial music industry. The precise nature of the work 
will be determined in consultation with an advisor. 
Prerequisite: MUM 4302. 

MUM 5705 Advanced Business of Music (3). Topics 
include strategic planning, employee development, and 
decision making. Also includes a study of publishing, 
collection agencies, creative unions, and contracts with 
composers and producers. Prerequisites: MUM 4301 and 
permission of graduate advisor. 

MUM 5715 Performing Arts Production I (2). Focus on 
the various aspects of performing arts production. 
Students attend performances of every possible genre of 
performing arts and critique the production and the venue. 
Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor. 

MUM 5725 Live Music Operations I (2). How promoters 
and producers project a profit margin and the ability to 
oversee a profit; considering overhead, scheduling, 
accommodations, concessions, sound and light. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate advisor. 

MUM 5726 Live Music Operations II (3). Continuation of 
MUM 5725, Live Music Operations I. Emphasis on 
promoters', producers', and managers' ability to project a 
profit margin. An on-campus production is required as the 
final project. Prerequisites: MUM 5725 and permission of 
the graduate advisor. 

MUM 5795 Music Production Laboratory I (1). Students 
are assigned to work in the production of 10-15 individual 
concert productions. The productions are varied and 
provide the students the opportunity to put in practice work 
learned in the classroom. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
graduate advisor. 

MUM 5796 Music Production Laboratory II (1). A 

continuation of Music Production Lab I. Students are 
assigned to work in the production of 10-15 individual 
concert productions. Prerequisites: MUM 5795 and 
permission of the graduate advisor. 

MUM 5797 Music Production Laboratory III (1). A 

continuation of Music Production Lab II. Students are 
assigned to work in the production of 10-15 individual 
concert productions. Prerequisites: MUM 5796 and 
permission of the graduate advisor. 

MUM 5808 Grant Writing for the Arts (2). Designed to 
familiarize the student with the tools and techniques in 
writing a successful grant proposal. Focuses on the 
perspective of the arts manager/administrator in relations 
to grant writing and grant management. 



MUM 5809 Music Production Seminar (3). Explores 
issues and practical applications in the management of 
music centers, arts organizations and arts centers. 
Includes examination of local arts centers, local arts 
councils, music venues, performing arts venues, arts 
organization and arts service organizations. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. 

MUM 5946 Performance Arts Internship (9). Interns 
assist and/or observe in all job functions and duties at an 
entertainment venue. Areas include: production 
management; design services; technical production; talent 
booking and casting; and creative show development. 
Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor. 

MUN 1100, 4103, 5105 Golden Panther Band (1). A 

study and performance of pop, jazz, and rock musical 
selections for the instrumental medium. Students will 
demonstrate what they have learned by performing and 
through individualized playing examinations. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUN 1120, 3123, 5125 Symphony Band (1). Concert 
Band ensemble for music majors on secondary 
instruments and non-music majors. Various types of 
concert band literature covered from differing grade levels. 
Course open to anyone who has previous experience 
playing a wind or percussion instrument. 

MUN 1140, 4143, 5145 Symphonic Wind Ensemble (1). 

Readings and performances of wind ensemble music from 
the 18th century to the present. Open to wind and 
percussion instrumentalists. Prerequisite: Permission of 
conductor. 

MUN 1210, 4213, 5215 Orchestra (1). An instrumental 
ensemble performing works from the symphonic repertory. 
Prerequisites: Previous experience and permission of 
conductor. 

MUN 1310, 3313, 5315 Concert Choir (1). A choral 
ensemble performing music written and arranged for 
mixed voices. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUN 1340, 3343, 5345 University Chorale (1). A mixed 
choir performing repertoire from Renaissance to Modern, 
as well as multicultural works. Prerequisite: Permission of 
conductor. 

MUN 1380, 3383, 4380, 5385 Master Chorale (1). A 

chorus performing a repertoire primarily from great choral 
works. Large orchestral accompaniment as well as various 
instrumental ensembles will be utilized. Prerequisite: 
Permission of conductor. 

MUN 1430, 3433, 5435 University Brass Choir (1). A 

study and performance of literature written for the brass 
medium (trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba) 
from the pre-baroque, baroque, classical, romantic and 
contemporary periods. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUN 1460, 3463, 5465 Chamber Music (1). Small 
ensemble in the performing of chamber music literature. 
Prerequisite: Permission of conductor. 

MUN 1481, 2482, 3484, 4486 Jazz Guitar Ensemble (1). 

Ensemble consists of five or more electric guitars 
performing arrangements, accompanied by bass and 
drums. Emphasis placed on sight reading, styles, 
phrasing, dynamics, ensemble blend, swing, etc. 



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College of Arts and Sciences 197 



MUN 1710, 3713, 5715 Studio Jazz Ensemble (1). An 

ensemble to provide creative professional-level 
experience in the contemporary popular idiom. Permission 
of conductor. 

MUN 1790 Latin Jazz Ensemble (1). An ensemble to 
provide creative professional-level experience in the 
salsa/Latin jazz idiom. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUN 1XXX Collegium Musicum (1). Collegium musicum 
provides a forum for the study and performance of the 
musical literature of the Medieval, Renaissance, and 
Baroque eras. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUN 2240, 4243, 5245 String Ensemble (1). 

Performance of orchestra literature for large string 
ensembles. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

MUN 2320, 4323, 5325 Women's Chorus (1). A choral 
ensemble performing music written or arranged for 
women's voices. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUN 2330, 4333, 5335 Men's Chorus (1). A choral 
ensemble performing music written or arranged for men's 
voices. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUN 2440, 4443, 5445 Percussion Ensemble (1). A 

study and performance of music literature characteristic of 
the percussion ensemble. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUN 2450, 4453, 5455 Piano Ensemble (1). The 

presentation and performance of music literature 
characteristic of piano and pianos in ensemble. 

MUN 2480, 4483, 5485 Guitar Ensemble (1). The 

presentation and performance of music literature 
characteristic of the Guitar Ensemble. Prerequisite: 
Permission of conductor. 

MUN 2490, 4493, 5496 New Music Ensemble (1). A 

chamber group of varying instrumentation and size 
performing art music from the 20th century with emphasis 
on music from the past 20 years. Explores electronics, 
multimedia works, etc. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUN 2820, 4823, 5826 Latin American Music Ensemble 
(1). Study and performance of one or more folk and/or 
popular musical styles from Latin America. 

MUN 2510, 4513, 5515 Accompanying (1). 

Accompanying instrumental and vocal students in studio 
and recital situations. 

MUN 2711, 4714, 5716 Jazz Combo Class (1). Harmonic 
practice, formal procedures, rhythmic and improvisational 
practices of jazz performance in the small group. 
Prerequisite: Permission of conductor. 

MUN 3XXX Collegium Musicum (1). Collegium musicum 
provides a forum for the study and performance of the 
musical literature of the Medieval, Renaissance, and 
Baroque eras. Sources research and programming are an 
additional component. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUN 4784, 5785 Jazz Ensemble Rehearsal Techniques 
(1). An ensemble that provides its members a creative 
approach to jazz ensemble rehearsal techniques, 
literature, improvisation and related materials. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 



MUN 5XXX Collegium Musicum (1). Collegium musicum 
provides a forum for the study and performance of the 
musical literature of the Medieval, Renaissance, and 
Baroque eras. Participation in the composition of program 
notes and rehearsal direction are additional components. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUO 1501, 4502, 5505 Opera Workshop (1). The 

presentation and performance of music literature 
indigenous to the opera stage. Prerequisite: Permission of 
director. 

MUO 2001 Music Theater Workshop-Voice (2). 

Introduction to musical comedy performance; integration 
of dramatic, musical and movement components studied 
through work on selected scenes and songs. Particular 
emphasis on vocal training. Corequisite: TPP 3250. 

MUO 3603 Elements of Stage Production (2). Aspects 
of technical theatre will be examined such as stage design 
and lighting, costumes and make-up, stage direction, prop 
construction, prompting, and Opera Theatre 
administration. 

MUO 4503 Opera Theatre I (3). Culmination of opera 
courses with emphasis on accumulation of repertoire, 
systematic development of a role, and rehearsal 
procedures and discipline. Student may perform self- 
directed scenes. Permission of the instructor. 

MUO 4504 Opera Theatre II (3). Continuation of Opera 
Theatre I. Student may participate in staged operatic 
production as performer or technical personnel. 
Prerequisites: MW 4561, MVV 4451, and MVV 3931 or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUR 3941, 5946 Organ Practicum (2). Study of practical 
aspects of organ performance as it pertains to 
employment within a sacred music of chamber music 
setting. 

MUS 1010 MUS 3040 Recital Attendance (0). Students 
attend concerts and recitals as a corequisite to applied 
music. Required of music majors each semester. 

MUS 2201 Diction I (2). To develop skills in the proper 
enunciation of Italian, French and Latin diction as applied 
to singing in opera, oratorio, and art song. 

MUS 2211 English Diction (1). Develop the skills in the 
proper enunciation of the English language as used in 
opera, oratorio and art song literature. Corequisites: All 
applied MVV. 

MUS 2221 French Diction (1). Develop the skills in the 
proper enunciation of the French language as used by 
singers in opera, oratorio and art song literature. 
Corequisites: All applied MW. 

MUS 2231 German Diction (1). Develop the skills in the 
proper enunciation of the German language as used by 
singers in opera, oratorio and art song literature. 
Corequisites: All applied MW. 

MUS 2241 Italian Diction (1). Develop the skills in the 
proper enunciation of the Italian language as used by 
singers in opera, oratorio and art song literature. 
Corequisites: All applied MW. 

MUS 3905, MUS 5905 Directed Study (VAR). Designed 
to provide areas of exploration and specialization beyond 
the basic selected study programs, such as electronic 



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Undergraduate Catalog 



continuation of Sightsinging I. Prerequisites: MUT 1111 
MUT1221.Corequisite: MUT 1112. 

MUT 2116 Music Theory III (3). Continuation of Music 
Theory II. It seeks to promote and further develop 
comprehensive musicianship in all disciplines of the 
musical art, analysis, composition, performance, and 
listening. Prerequisite: MUT 1112. Corequisite: MUT 2226. 

MUT 2117 Music Theory IV (3). This course further 
develops those skills acquired in Music Theory III. 
Prerequisite: MUT 2116. Corequisite: MUT 2227. 

MUT 2226 Sightsinging III (1). Continuation of 
Sightsinging II through aural perception, sightsinging, and 
ear training exercises. Prerequisites: MUT 1112, MUT 
1222. Corequisite: MUT 2116. 

MUT 2227 Sightsinging IV (1). Continuation of 
Sightsinging III through aural perception, sightsinging, and 
ear training exercises. Prerequisites: MUT 2226, MUT 
2116. Corequisite: MUT 21 17. 

MUT 2641 Jazz Improvisation I (2). A beginning course 
in Jazz improvisation that teaches fundamental aspects, 
chord structures and extensions, chord scales, melodic 
patterns, and tunes. Course will involve both theory and 
practical application. A concert will be held at conclusion 
of the term. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUT 2642 Jazz Improvisation II (2). A follow-up course 
that both reinforces and extends all materials learned in 
Jazz Improvisation I. Course stresses more complex chord 
structures, scales, and tunes. A concert will be held at 
conclusion of the term. Prerequisite: MUT 2641. 

MUT 3401 Counterpoint (3). A study of linear writing 
through species counterpoint. Two and three-part 
instrumental and vocal counterpoint of the 18th century: 
Canon, inventions, fugues. Emphasis will be placed on 
formal analysis. Prerequisites: MUT 21 17, 2227. 

MUT 3611 Form and Analysis (3). Study and analysis 
from the smaller forms of musical composition to 
multimovement forms. Prerequisites: MUT 2117, MUT 
2227. 

MUT 4141 Comprehensive Music Systems (3). An 

introduction to the applied techniques of recent 
comprehensive theoretical approaches to musical 
analysis. Prerequisites: MUT 3611 or permission of the 
instructor. 

MUT 4311 Orchestration (3). With a background of basic 
theory, the student will explore the techniques of writing 
and arranging for instruments in performing organizations. 
Prerequisites: MUT 21 1 7 and MUT 2227. 

MUT 4312 Advanced Orchestration (3). A follow-up 
course to Orchestration that teaches students advanced 
techniques in scoring for orchestral instruments as utilized 
by composers of western art music from classical to 
present times. Prerequisites: MUT 4311 or permission of 
the instructor. 

MUT 4353 Jazz Arranging (2). This course teaches the 
fundamental aspects of jazz arranging: instrumentation, 
transposition, section and ensemble writing, chord voicing, 
counterpoint, and form and analysis. The performance of 
an original arrangement is required as a final project. 
Prerequisite: MUT 2641. 



music, religious music literature, sound techniques, etc. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUS 3910, MUS 4910, MUS 5910 Research (VAR). 

Research composition or performance projects, under the 
guidance and direction of the music faculty. (May be 
repeated). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUS 4949 Cooperative Education in Performing Arts 
(VAR). A student majoring in Performing Arts may spend 
several semesters fully employed in industry or 
government in a capacity relating to the major. 

MUS 5205 Graduate Review Diction I (2). To review the 
rules and methods of correct pronunciation of Italian, 
French and Latin lyric diction as applied to singing opera, 
oratorio and art song. 

MUS 5345 MIDI Technology (2). Introduction to MIDI 
technology including sequencing, notation, patch editing 
and a variety of other applications. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

MUS 5512 Sound Reinforcement (2). Exploration of live 
music on location, dealing with commonly encountered 
acoustical problems and how to overcome them. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate advisor. 

MUS 5655 Expanding Artistic Expression (2). Focuses 
on expanding the horizons of the artistic vision of the 
student. Accomplished through a series of projects. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate advisor. 

MUS 5711 Music Bibliography (1). Library research 
methods and materials; documentation of research results 
in bibliographic style. Develops critical thinking and 
evaluative skills regarding sources of information, print 
and online. Prerequisite: Graduate standing at the School 
of Music. 

MUS 5906 Thesis/Recital (1-6). For students working on 
a thesis or recital for MM in Music. To be completed under 
the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: 
Graduate student. 

MUS 5971 Thesis (1-6). Research and/or performances 
towards completion of master's thesis work. Prerequisite: 
Permission of graduate area advisor. 

MUT 1001 Fundamentals of Music (3). A beginning 
music theory course in the basic elements of music 
rhythms, meter notation, key signatures, scales, intervals, 
and triads. 

MUT 1111 Music Theory I (3). This course is designed to 
promote and develop comprehensive musicianship in all 
disciplines of the musical art, analysis, composition, 
performance, and listening. Corequisite: MUT 1221. 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II (3). This course is designed to 
promote and develop comprehensive musicianship in all 
disciplines of the musical art, analysis, composition, 
performance, and listening. The second semester is a 
continuation of Theory I. Prerequisite: MUT 1111. 
Corequisite: MUT 1222. 

MUT 1221 Sightsinging I (1). Development of Basic 
Musicianship through aural perception, sightsinging, and 
ear training exercises. Corequisite: MUT 1111. 

MUT 1222 Sightsinging II (1). Development of Basic 
Musicianship through aural perception, sightsinging and 
ear training exercises. The second semester is a 



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College of Arts and Sciences 1 99 



MUT 4628 Atonal Analysis (3). A continuation of Music 
Theory IV, this course introduces students to the basic 
concepts and procedures for set-theoretic analysis of 
atonal and serial techniques used in 20 lh century music. 
Prerequisites: MUT 2117, MUT 2227, or permission of the 
instructor. 

MUT 4643 Jazz Improvisation III (2). A continuation of 
Jazz Improvisation II, this course teaches chromatic 
chords, advanced scales and progressions, patterns, 
repertoire. Individual and ensemble performance is 
required as a final project. Prerequisite: MUT 2642. 

MUT 4644 Jazz Improvisation IV (2). A continuation of 
the Jazz Improv I, II, and III track. Further study and 
analysis of contemporary jazz compositions and their 
harmonic implications as applied to the craft improvisation. 
Prerequisites: Jazz Improvisation I, II, and III. 

MUT 4663 Jazz Styles and Analysis I (2). An extensive 
study of the significant styles and performers in jazz 
history from its origins to the present. Includes instruction 
in layered listening, various analyses and transcribing. 
Prerequisites: Jazz theory or permission of the instructor. 

MUT 4664 Jazz Styles and Analysis II (2). An extensive 
study of the significant styles and performers in jazz 
history from its origins to the present. Includes instruction 
in layered listening, various analyses and transcribing. 
Continuation of Jazz Styles and Analysis I. Prerequisites: 
MUT 4663 or permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5051 Graduate Theory Survey (1-3). Analytical, 
theoretical and aural skills required for successful 
graduate studies in music. Prerequisites: Placement Exam 
or permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5152 Comprehensive Musical Systems (3). 

Examination of various comprehensive theoretical 
systems utilized in the analysis of music. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing in the School of Music or permission of 
the instructor. 

MUT 5316 Advanced Orchestration (3). Examination of 
orchestrational techniques utilized by composers from the 
Baroque era through current times. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing in the School of Music or permission of 
the instructor. 

MUT 5355 Advanced Jazz Arranging and Composition 
(3). Scores and recordings of various sized jazz 
ensembles are studied for technique and style. Student's 
compositions and arrangements are performed. Topics 
include: forms, voicing techniques, instrumentation-live 
performance vs. recording session. Prerequisites: MUT 
4353; MUT 4663; MUT 4664. 

MUT 5381 Arranging (3). A course in practical arranging 
for the public school teacher, including choral, band, and 
popular arranging. Prerequisites: MUT 2117 and MUT 
2227. 

MUT 5411 Modal Counterpoint (3). Develop skills 
necessary to write in the Renaissance style and to analyze 
the masterworks of Palestrina, Lassus, Victoria, and 
others. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the School of 
Music or permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5486 Advanced Jazz Rehearsal Techniques (2). 

Study and practical application of complete preparation, 
programming, and rehearsing of small and large jazz 



ensembles. Students study scores and recordings of 
various jazz styles and rehearse school's ensembles. 
Prerequisites: MUN 4784; MUT 4643; MUT 4663; MUT 
4664. 

MUT 5585 Musical Styles Through Strict Composition 
(3). This course is designed to develop basic 
compositional skills for writing works in all forms. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the School of Music or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5627 Schenkerian Analysis (3). Advanced studies 
in Schenkerian analysis of tonal music. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing in the School of Music or permission of 
the instructor. 

MUT 5628 Atonal Analysis (3). Advanced studies in set 
theory and serial techniques of twentieth-century music. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the School of Music or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5629 Analytical Techniques (3). Examination and 
practice of various techniques utilized in the analysis of art 
music from the common practice period through the 20th 
century. Prerequisites: Placement exam or permission of 
the instructor. 

MUT 5930 Special Topics (3). Examination of 
composers, compositional schools, or other areas of 
specialization and/or interest to the theory/composition 
faculty. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the School of 
Music or permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5646 Advanced Jazz Techniques I (2). A 

comprehensive, theoretical study of topics related to jazz 
performance. Includes the nature of improvisation, 
advanced jazz harmony, theory of jazz improvisation, 
transcribing and analyzing solos of jazz masters. 
Prerequisite: MUT 4643. 

MUT 5647 Advanced Jazz Techniques II (2). A 

continuing study of topics related to jazz performance. 
Includes analyzing solos of jazz masters, development of 
repertoire, style, and aesthetic concepts. Prerequisite: 
Advanced Jazz Techniques I. 

MUT 5746 Jazz Pedagogy (2). Materials, techniques, and 
philosophies related to teaching jazz. Includes preparation 
of courses, course outline and syllabi, lesson plans, 
lectures. Texts and other resources such as videos, 
recordings, periodicals, are examined. Prerequisites: MUT 
4663 and MUT 5355. 

MVB 1211, 2221, 3231, 4241, 5251 Secondary Applied 
Trumpet (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
trumpet as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVB 1212, 2222, 3232, 4242, 5252 Secondary Applied 
French Horn (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
French horn as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVB 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 Secondary Applied 
Trombone (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
trombone as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVB 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 Secondary Applied 
Baritone Horn (1). Individual instruction in applied music 
on baritone horn as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 



200 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



MVB 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 Secondary Applied 
Tuba (1). Individual instruction in applied music on tuba as 
a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVB 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 Principal Applied 
Trumpet (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
trumpet as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1312, 2322, 3332, 4342, 5352 Principal Applied 
French Horn (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on French horn as a principal instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVB 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 Principal Applied 
Trombone (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
applied trombone as a principal instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVB 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 Principal Applied 
Baritone Horn (1-2). Individual instruction in applied 
music on baritone horn as a principal instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVB 1315, 2325, 3335, 4345, 5355 Applied Tuba (1-2). 

Individual instruction in applied music on tuba as a 
principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1411, 2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 Major Applied 
Trumpet (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
trumpet as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1412, 2422, 3432, 4442, 5452 Major Applied 
French Horn (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on French horn as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 Major Applied 
Trombone (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
trombone as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444, 5454 Major Applied 
Baritone Horn (1-2). Individual instruction in applied 
music on baritone horn as a major instrument. Music 
majors only. 

MVB 1415, 2425, 3435, 4445, 5455 Major Applied Tuba 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on tuba as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVB 3970 Junior Recital - Brass (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVB 4971 Senior Recital - Brass (1). All music majors 
must present, before graduation, at least one half (full 
recital performance for majors) of a public recital, and 
pass an oral examination on the music programmed. See 
areas of emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVJ 1210, 2220, 3230, 4240, 5250 Secondary Jazz 
Piano (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music on 
piano. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1211 Principal Applied Jazz Drums (1-2). 

Individual instruction in applied music on jazz drums as a 
principal instrument. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 Secondary Jazz 
Guitar (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music on 
guitar. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 



permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 Secondary Jazz 
Bass (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music on 
bass. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 Secondary Jazz 
Flute (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music on 
flute. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1216, 2226, 3236, 4246, 5256 Secondary Jazz 
Saxophone (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz 
music on saxophone. Prerequisites: Preceding course in 
sequence or permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1217, 2227, 3237, 4247, 5257 Secondary Jazz 
Trumpet (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music 
on trumpet. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence 
or permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1218, 2228, 3238, 4248, 5258 Secondary Jazz 
Trombone (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music 
on trombone. Prerequisites: Preceding course in 
sequence or permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1219, 2229, 3239, 4249, 5259 Secondary Latin 
Jazz Percussion (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz 
music on percussion. Prerequisites: Preceding course in 
sequence or permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1310 Principal Applied Jazz Piano (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on jazz piano as a principal 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1312 Principal Applied Latin Jazz Percussion (1- 

2). Individual instruction in applied music on Latin jazz 
percussion as a principal instrument. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 

MVJ 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 Principal Applied 
Jazz Guitar (2). Individual instruction in applied jazz music 
on guitar. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 Principal Applied 
Jazz Bass (2). Individual instruction in applied jazz music 
on bass. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 1316, 2326, 3336, 4346 Principal Applied Jazz 
Saxophone (1-2). Individual instruction on major 
instrument. An in-depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, styles, and other performance practices 
particularly relevant to jazz. Prerequisite: Audition. 

MVJ 1317, 2327, 3337, 4347 Principal Applied Jazz 
Trumpet (2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
jazz trumpet at a principal level. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 

MVJ 1318, 2328, 3338, 4348 Principal Applied Jazz 
Trombone (2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
jazz trombone at a principal level. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 

MVJ 1410, 2420, 3430, 4440 Major Applied Jazz Piano 
(2). Individual instruction in applied music on jazz piano as 
a major level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1411 Major Applied Jazz Drums (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on jazz drums as a major 



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College of Arts and Sciences 201 



instrument. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1413 Major Applied Jazz Guitar (1-2). Individual 
instruction in applied music on jazz guitar at a major level. 
Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444 Major Applied Jazz Bass 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on jazz bass 
at a major level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 1416, 2426, 3436, 4446, 5456 Major Applied Jazz 
Saxophone (1-2). Individual instruction on major 
instrument. An in-depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, styles, and other performance practices 
particularly relevant to jazz. Prerequisite: Audition. 

MVJ 1417, 2427, 3437, 4447, 5457 Major Applied Jazz 
Trumpet (2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
jazz trumpet at a major level. Prerequisite: Music majors 
only. 

MVJ 1418, 2428, 3438, 4448, 5458 Major Applied Jazz 
Trombone (2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
jazz trombone at a major level. Prerequisite: Music majors 
only. 

MVJ 2310, 3330, 4340 Principal Applied Jazz Piano (2). 

Individual instruction in applied music on jazz piano at a 
principal level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 2329, 3339, 4349, 5359 Principal Applied Jazz 
Drums (2). Individual instruction in applied music on jazz 
drums at a principal level. Prerequisite: Music majors 
only. 

MVJ 2423, 3433, 4443 Major Applied Jazz Guitar (2). 

Individual instruction in applied music on jazz guitar at a 
major level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 2429, 3439, 4449, 5459 Major Applied Jazz Latin 
Percussion (2) Individual instruction in applied music on 
jazz percussion as a major instrument. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only 

MVJ 3970 Junior Recital - Jazz (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination. See areas of emphasis for specific 
requirements. Prerequisite: Approval of director of Jazz 
Studies. 

MVJ 4971 Senior Recital - Jazz (1). All music majors 
must present, before graduation, at least one half (full 
recital performance major) of a public recital, and pass an 
oral examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVJ 5150 Jazz Piano Techniques (1). Performance of 
basic jazz standards. Includes basic techniques of the 
instrument, chord voicing, comping, lead sheet realization 
for non-pianists. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 5355 Principle Applied Jazz: Flute (2). Individual 
advanced instruction on major instrument. An in-depth 
study of overall instrumental technique, eminent jazz 
styles, and other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5356 Principle Applied Jazz: Saxophone (2). 

Individual advanced instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental technique, eminent 
jazz styles, and other performance practices that are 



particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5357 Principle Applied Jazz: Trumpet (2). 

Individual advanced instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental technique, eminent 
jazz styles, and other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5358 Principle Applied Jazz: Trombone (2). 

Individual advanced instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental technique, eminent 
jazz styles, and other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5453 Major Applied Jazz Guitar (2) Individual 
instruction on major instrument, focusing on the jazz 
idiom. An in-depth study of overall instrumental technique, 
eminent styles, and other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz and commercial performance. 
Prerequisite: Music Majors Only 

MVJ 5454 Major Applied Jazz Bass (2). Individual 
instruction on major instrument, focusing on the jazz 
idiom. An in-depth study of overall instrumental technique, 
eminent styles, and other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz and commercial performance. 
Prerequisite: Music Majors Only 

MVJ 1XXX, 2XXX, 3XXX, 4XXX, 5XXX Secondary Jazz 
Drums (1). Individual instruction in applied jazz music on 
drums. Prerequisites: Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 2XXX, 3XXX, 4XXX, 5XXX Major Applied Jazz 
Drums (2). Individual instruction in applied music on jazz 
drums at a major level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVK - Keyboard Studies (1). Course designed to 
develop the composite keyboard skills and practical 
training for the piano major/principle to become a 
proficient sight-reader. 

MVK 1111 Class Piano I (1). A course designed to teach 
piano skills and competencies to non-piano majors. This is 
a four-semester sequence for music majors. This course 
includes: keyboard familiarization, finger exercises and 
techniques, transposing, and easy literature. Prerequisite: 
None. Music majors only. 

MVK 1112 Class Piano II (1). A continuation of Class 
Piano I, MVK 1111. Prerequisite: MVK 1111. Music majors 
only. 

MVK 1211, 2221, 3231, 4241, 5251 Secondary Applied 
Piano (1). Individual instruction in applied music on piano 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVK 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 Secondary Applied 
Organ (1). Individual instruction in applied music on organ 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVK 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 Principal Applied 
Piano (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
piano as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVK 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 Principal Applied 
Organ (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
organ as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVK 1411, 2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 Major Applied Piano 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on piano as a 



202 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVK 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 Major Applied Organ 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on organ as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVK 2121 Class Piano III (1). A continuation of Class 
Piano II. The course includes continued work in finger 
technique, scales and fingering, transposing, simple 
accompaniments to folk songs, sight reading cadences, 
and simple literature. Prerequisite: MVK 1112. Music 
majors only. 

MVK 2122 Class Piano IV (1). A continuation of Class 
Piano III. Prerequisite: MVK 2121. Music majors only. 

MVK 3130 Class Piano V (1). Further development of 
elementary keyboard techniques and musicianship: 
scales, harmonization, arpeggios, transposition, 
improvisation, sightreading, and simple literature. 
Prerequisites: MVK 2122 or by placement exam. 

MVK 3131 Class Piano VI (1). A continuation of MVK 
3130. Prerequisites: MVK 3130 or by placement exam. 

MVK 3970 Junior Recital - Keyboard (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVK 4141 Class Piano VII (1). Further development of 
elementary keyboard techniques and musicianship: 
scales, harmonization, arpeggios, transposition, 
improvisation, sightreading, and simple literature. 
Prerequisites: MVK 3131 or by placement exam. 

MVK 4142 Class Piano VIII (1). A continuation of MVK 
4141. Prerequisites: MVK 4141 or by placement exam. 

MVK 4640 Piano Pedagogy (2). A survey of current 
teaching methods and techniques in piano pedagogy. 
Supervised teaching provides hands-on experience. 

MVK 4971 Senior Recital - Keyboard (1). All music 
majors must present, before graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a public recital, and pass 
an oral examination on the music programmed. See areas 
of emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVK 5651 Piano Pedagogy (2). Survey of current piano 
teaching methods. 

MVK 5605 Organ Pedagogy (2). An overview of historical 
and modern organ methods, pedagogies and supporting 
material. 

MVO 5651 Graduate Pedagogy (1). The development of 
teaching skills required by graduate assistants, including 
classroom skills, designing examinations, etc. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate Assistants. 

MVP 1211, 2221, 3231, 4241, 5251 Secondary Applied 
Percussion (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
percussion as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVP 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 Principal Applied 
Percussion (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on percussion as a principal instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVP 1411, 2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 Major Applied 
Percussion (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 



on percussion as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVP 3970 Junior Recital - Percussion (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVP 4971 Senior Recital - Percussion (1). All music 
majors must present, before graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a public recital, and pass 
an oral examination on the music programmed. See areas 
of emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVS 1116 Guitar Skills (1). Emphasis on music reading 
and elementary techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

MVS 1211, 2221, 3231, 4241, 5251 Secondary Applied 
Violin (1). Individual instruction in applied music on violin 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVS 1212, 2222, 3232, 4242, 5252 Secondary Applied 
Viola (1). Individual instruction in applied music on viola 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVS 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 Secondary Applied 
Cello (1). Individual instruction in applied music on cello 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVS 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 Secondary Applied 
Double Bass (1). Individual instruction in applied music 
on double bass as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVS 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 Secondary Applied 
Harp (1). Individual instruction in applied music on harp as 
a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVS 1216, 2226, 3236, 4246, 5256 Secondary Applied 
Guitar (1). Individual instruction in applied music on guitar 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVS 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 Principal Applied 
Violin (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
violin as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1312, 2322, 3332, 4342, 5352 Principal Applied 
Viola (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on viola 
as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 Principal Applied 
Cello (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on cello 
as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 Principal Applied 
Double Bass (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on double brass as a principal instrument. Music majors 
only. 

MVS 1315, 2325, 3335, 4345, 5355 Principal Applied 
Harp (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on harp 
as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1316, 2326, 3336, 4346, 5356 Principal Applied 
Guitar (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
guitar as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1411, 2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 Major Applied Violin 



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College of Arts and Sciences 203 



(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on violin as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1412, 2422, 3432, 4442, 5452 Major Applied Viola 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on viola as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 Major Applied Cello 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on cello as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444, 5454 Major Applied 
Double Bass (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on double brass as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1415, 2425, 3435, 4445, 5455 Major Applied Harp 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on harp as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 1416, 2426, 3436, 4446, 5456 Major Applied Guitar 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on guitar as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVS 2226 Intermediate Guitar Skills (1). Emphasis on 
techniques and styles such as calypso, folk, blues, 
classical, and jazz. Open to all FIU students. Prerequisite: 
MVS 1116. 

MVS 3970 Junior Recital - String (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVS 4971 Senior Recital - String (1). All music majors 
must present, before graduation, at least one half (full 
recital performance major) of a public recital, and pass an 
oral examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MW 1111 Voice Class (1). Class instruction on voice 
designed to help the student in developing performance 
skills and increased musical know ledge. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MW 1 21 1 , 2221 , 3231 , 4241 , 5251 Secondary Voice (1 ). 

Individual instruction in applied music on voice as a 
secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MW 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 Principal Applied 
Voice (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
trumpet as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MW 1411, 2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 Major Applied Voice 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on voice as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MW 2121 Intermediate Voice Class (1). Emphasis on 
sightsinging, tonal production, interpretation, and other 
vocal exercises. Particular attention is paid to vocal and 
acting improvisation. Prerequisite: MW 1111. 

MW 3630 Vocal Pedagogy (1). Research into various 
philosophies of vocal pedagogy with emphasis on the 
science of acoustics, anatomy, terminology, psychological 
factors which apply to the art of singing. 

MW 3970 Junior Recital - Voice (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 



MW 4551 Opera History Practicum (2). A performance 
course corequisite with History of Opera: MUL 4662 with 
emphasis on historical development and differentiation of 
operatic styles through characterization and musical 
interpretation. Includes ensemble experience. 

MW 4971 Senior Recital - Voice (1). All music majors 
must present, before graduation, at least one half (full 
recital performance major) of a public recital, and pass an 
oral examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MW 5651 Vocal Pedagogy (3). A survey of the literature 
of teaching methods for the mature voice derived from 
historical and modern sources. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. Corequisite: Applied voice lesson. 

MW 5652 Graduate Vocal Pedagogy II (2). Practical 
application of the principles of vocal technique in the 
studio. Emphasis will be placed on the psychological 
factors which apply to singing and the teaching of singing. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Vocal Pedagogy I. 

MW 5XXX Graduate Vocal Pedagogy I (2). An 

introduction to the history and development of vocal 
pedagogy for the graduate voice major. Emphasis will be 
placed on a study of the anatomy and acoustics of the 
human voice. 

MVW 1211, 2221, 3231, 4241, 5251 Secondary Applied 
Flute (1). Individual instruction in applied music on flute as 
a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVW 1212, 2222, 3232, 4242, 5252 Secondary Applied 
Oboe (1). Individual instruction in applied music on oboe 
as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVW 1213, 2223, 3233, 4243, 5253 Secondary Applied 
Clarinet (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
clarinet as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVW 1214, 2224, 3234, 4244, 5254 Secondary Applied 
Bassoon (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
bassoon as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVW 1215, 2225, 3235, 4245, 5255 Secondary Applied 
Saxophone (1). Individual instruction in applied music on 
saxophone as a secondary instrument. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MVW 1311, 2321, 3331, 4341, 5351 Principal Applied 
Flute (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on flute 
as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1312, 2322, 3332, 4342, 5352 Principal Applied 
Oboe (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on oboe 
as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1313, 2323, 3333, 4343, 5353 Principal Applied 
Clarinet (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
clarinet as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1314, 2324, 3334, 4344, 5354 Principal Applied 
Bassoon (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
bassoon as a principal instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1315, 2325, 3335, 4345, 5355 Principal Applied 
Saxophone (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on saxophone as a principal instrument. Music majors 



204 College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Catalog 

only. 

MVW 1411, 2421, 3431, 4441, 5451 Major Applied Flute 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on flute as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1412, 2422, 3432, 4442, 5452 Major Applied Oboe 
(1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on oboe as a 
major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1413, 2423, 3433, 4443, 5453 Major Applied 
Clarinet (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
clarinet as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1414, 2424, 3434, 4444, 5454 Major Applied 
Bassoon (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music on 
bassoon as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 1415, 2425, 3435, 4445, 5455 Major Applied 
Saxophone (1-2). Individual instruction in applied music 
on saxophone as a major instrument. Music majors only. 

MVW 3970 Junior Recital - Woodwind (1). All music 
performance majors must present, during their junior year, 
at least one half of a public recital, and pass an oral 
examination on the music programmed. See areas of 
emphasis for specific requirements. 

MVW 4971 Senior Recital - Woodwind (1). All music 
majors must present, before graduation, at least one half 
(full recital performance major) of a public recital, and pass 
an oral examination on the music programmed. See areas 
of emphasis for specific requirements. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 205 



Philosophy 

Kenneth Rogerson, Professor and Chairperson 

Sean Allen-Hermanson, Assistant Professor 

Michelle Beer, Associate Professor 

Bong Kil Chung, Professor 

Paul Draper, Professor 

Christopher Grau, Assistant Professor 

Kenton Harris, Lecturer and Assistant Dean 

Bruce Hauptli, Professor 

Kenneth Henley, Professor 

George Kovacs, Professor 

Paul Warren, Associate Professor 

Kiriake Xerohemona, Lecturer 

Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy 
Degree Program Hours: 120 

Common Prerequisites 

No specific courses are required; transfer students are 
encouraged to complete the Associate of Arts degree. 

Philosophy encompasses a broad range of topics and 
methods of inquiry: Socratic questioning of the extent and 
nature of human knowledge, probing the rational basis of 
moral and political thought, confrontation with 
fundamental questions of value and meaning, analysis of 
basic concepts underlying theoretical and practical 
thought, reflection on the human existential situation, and 
exploring the structure of reasoning itself. The great 
philosophers are studied both for historical understanding 
and contemporary significance. 

Philosophy majors may choose one of three tracks. The 
General Track is designed to serve students with a broad 
interest in philosophy. The Professional Track is designed 
for students considering philosophy as a professional 
discipline. It is especially appropriate for those 
considering graduate work in philosophy and those with 
an interest in a thorough and systematic study of the full 
range of philosophical thought. The Specialized Track is 
designed for students who are interested in philosophical 
reflection on a specific discipline or area such as law, 
religion, or psychology. It is especially appropriate for pre- 
law students and for dual majors who are interested in the 
relationship between philosophy and their other major 
discipline. 

Degree Requirements 

The following requirements apply to all three tracks, (i) 
any course taken to fulfill a requirement for the major may 
not be taken with the "pass/fail" option and must be 
passed with a grade of "C" or better, (ii) no more than 6 
(six) hours of Independent Study may be used to fulfill 
major requirements, (iii) at most, one of PHI 2100 
(Introduction to Logic) or PHI 2103 (Critical Thinking), or 
their equivalents, may be used to fulfill major 
requirements, and at most six other hours of lower division 
philosophy courses may be counted toward the degree, 
(iv) PHI 2011 (Philosophical Analysis: An Introduction to 
the Problems of Philosophy) and introduction to 
philosophy courses taken at other institutions may not be 
used to fulfill major requirements, and (v) in addition to 
fulfilling the requirements of the major, the College of Arts 
and Sciences has a number of requirements which are 
listed in the University's Catalog at the beginning of the 
Arts and Sciences section. The Philosophy Department 
allows a maximum of 15 hours of philosophy transfer 



credit for a major (3 hours for a minor) subject to the 
following restrictions: at most one of PHI 2100 
(Introduction to Logic), PHI 2103 (Critical Thinking), or 
their equivalents may be used to fulfill major 
requirements, and be counted toward the degree; also, 
PHI 2011 (Philosophical Analysis: An Introduction to the 
Problems of Philosophy) and introduction to philosophy 
courses taken at other institutions may not be used to 
fulfill major requirements. Such transfer credit can only be 
awarded by a philosophy advisor, and students who wish 
to apply for it are advised to discuss their course of 
studies with an advisor early in their career at FIU. 

The General Track: (33 Semester Hours 
Required) 

The General Track is designed to serve students with a 
broad interest in philosophy. One three-hour Logic course 
is required, selected from PHI 2100, PHI 2103, PHI 4130, 
or PHI 4161. The remaining 30 hours may include any 
philosophy courses (except that the requirements 
applying to all three tracks must be met). Students are 
strongly encouraged to discuss their course selections 
with their advisor. 

The Professional Track: (33 Semester Hours 
Required) 

The Professional Track is designed for students 
considering philosophy as a professional discipline. It is 
especially appropriate for those considering graduate 
work in philosophy and those with an interest in a 
thorough and systematic study of the full range of 
philosophical thought. While a foreign language is not 
required for the major, students considering graduate 
school should seriously consider sufficient course work in 
German, French, Latin, or Greek so that they achieve 
fluency in the language. Receiving a 'C or better in 33 
semester hours of upper division philosophy courses 
distributed as follows will fulfill the requirements for this 
track: 

Logic/Probability 1 3 

Epistemology/Metaphysics 6 

Value Theory 6 

History of Philosophy 2 9 

Non-Western Philosophy 3 

Other Philosophy Courses 3 

Philosophy Seminar 3 

(see department for list of courses which satisfy these 
requirements) 

'Neither PHI 2100 nor PHI 2103 fulfills the 
Logic/Probability requirement for this track; however, one 
may be included as a Philosophy elective. 
2 Must include 3 hours in the area of Ancient Philosophy 

The Specialized Track: (33 Semester Hours 
Required) 

The Specialized Track is designed for students who are 
interested in philosophical reflection on a specific 
discipline or area such as law, religion, or psychology. It is 
especially appropriate for pre-law students and for dual 
majors who are interested in the relationship between 
philosophy and their other major discipline. An approved 
Individualized Plan of Study will meet the requirements for 
this track. Such plans are designed by the Philosophy 
advisor in consultation with the student so that they can 
be tailored to the student's specific interests and goals. 
Students pursuing the Specialized Track must secure 
prior written approval of their course selections from their 



206 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



advisor. The proposed course selections must present a 
clear, focused, and coherent plan of study. The 
Philosophy Program Brochure (available in the 
Department on either campus) includes several models of 
such plans of study, including Pre-Law Studies, Western 
Philosophy and Its Historical Context, Social and Political 
Philosophy, Philosophy and Religious Thought, 
Philosophy and Difference, Philosophy and Psychology, 
and Philosophy and the Arts. Each such plan must include 
33 semester hours, and the courses taken in accord with 
the plan must be passed with a grade of 'C or better. One 
three-hour Logic course is required, selected from PHI 
2100, PHI 2103, PHI 4130, or PHI 4161. With the prior 
written approval of a Philosophy advisor, up to nine 
semester hours from other programs may be counted 
toward the 33 hour major. However, only six hours 
credited toward the major requirements of another major 
program may be counted. 

The Philosophy Minor 

A student majoring in another academic discipline can 
earn an academic minor in Philosophy by taking 15 hours 
in philosophy (PHH, PHI, PHM, and PHP prefixes) and 
earning a "C" or better. Only three hours may be earned in 
lower division (1000 and 2000 level) courses. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

GRE-Ancient Greek; PHH-Philosophy, History of; PHI- 
Philosophy; PHM-Philosophy of Man and Society; PHP- 
Philosophers and Schools. 

GRE 3050 Introduction to Ancient Greek (3). Introduces 
the Greek language of the New Testament, and other 
works of the ancient period to enhance the understanding 
of translated texts. A portion of the Gospel of John is 
studied. 

PHH 2063 Classics in Philosophy: An Introduction to 
the History of Philosophy (3). Introduces the history of 
philosophy by examining the works of such philosophical 
giants as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and Kant. Written 
work meets state composition requirement of 6,000 
written words. 

PHH 3042 Latin American Philosophy (3). This course 
will examine the development of Latin American thought, 
with particular attention to the 19th and 20th centuries. It 
will consider the traditions and initiatives of prominent 
Latin American philosophers in the light of problems such 
as personal and cultural identity. 

PHH 3100 Ancient Philosophy (3). The basic concerns 
and teachings of representative philosophers and schools 
of thought, particularly in the Greek and Roman cultural 
settings, and linkages to their past and future are 
emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3200 Medieval Philosophy (3). The basic concerns 
and teachings of representative philosophers and schools 
of thought in the cultural settings of the Middle Ages, and 
linkages to their past and future are emphasized in this 
course. 



PHH 3401 Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century 
Philosophy (3). The basic concerns and teachings of 
representative European Continental philosophers of the 
16 th and 17 lh centuries (esp. Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, 
and Spinoza) are emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3402 British Empiricism (3). The basic concerns 
and teachings of representative British Empiricists of the 
17 lh & 18 lh centuries (esp. Locke, Berkeley, and Hume) 
are emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3420 Early Modern Philosophy (3). The basic 
concerns and teachings of representative philosophers 
and schools of thought in the period from the 
Renaissance to Kant and the linkages to their past and 
future are emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3440 Late Modern Philosophy (3). The basic 
concerns and teachings of representative philosophers 
and schools of thought in the period from Kant to 
Nietzsche and the linkages to their past and future are 
emphasized in this course. 

PHH 3602 Twentieth Century British Philosophy (3). 

Examines the development of 20th century British 
philosophy, with special attention to the justification for its 
aims, methods, and central concerns (e.g. knowledge, 
appearance and reality, memory, and the value of 
philosophy). 

PHH 3700 American Philosophy (3). This course will 
examine the development of American philosophical 
thought, with particular attention to the 19th and 20th 
centuries. It will consider the traditions and initiatives of 
the prominent American philosophers, in the light of 
problems such as the relationship between theory and 
practice. 

PHH 3810 Philosophy of Buddhism (3). Examines the 
central philosophy of Buddhism dealing with: 1) the 
question of reality and appearance, 2) the theories of 
causation, 3) the relation of these views to Buddhist 
soteriology (realism, idealism, dialectics, Hwa-yen). 

PHH 3840 Indian Philosophy (3). Metaphysical, 
epistemological and ethical theories within such major 
Indian philosophical systems as philosophical Buddhism, 
Gains, Samkhya dualism, and Vedanta transcendentalism 
are examined. 

PHH 4600 Twentieth Century Philosophy (3). The basic 
concerns and teachings of representative philosophers 
and schools of thought in the cultural settings of the 
present century, and linkages to past and emerging 
generations are emphasized in this course. 

PHH 4930 A Major Philosopher (3). This course will 
examine in detail the works of a major figure in the history 
of philosophy. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
Course may be repeated on a different philosopher. (S) 

PHI 2011 Philosophical Analysis: An Introduction to 
the Problems of Philosophy (3). This course introduces 
both the tools of philosophical thinking and some of their 
applications to fundamental topics such as knowledge, 
value, meaning, and human society. Written work meets 
state composition requirement of 6,000 written words. 

PHI 2100 Introduction to Logic (3). This introductory 
course in logical thinking and argumentation will treat both 
practical and theoretical approaches to understanding 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 207 



human communications and solving problems. Students 
will be introduced to inductive and deductive logic, 
fallacies, and the role of logic in scientific explanation and 
popular expression. Written work meets state composition 
requirement of 6,000 written words. 

PHI 2101 Philosophical Logic (3). This course studies 
the propositional and predicate calculus and such topics 
as necessary truth, entailment, the ontological 
implications of logic, and the justification of deduction and 
induction. 

PHI 2103 Critical Thinking (3). A course in practical 
reasoning designed to sharpen abilities at analyzing, 
evaluating, and constructing arguments. 

PHI 2600 Introduction to Ethics (3). Explores 
philosophical accounts of morality, including the rational 
justification of commitment to the moral life, and theories 
of duty, obligation, and virtue. Written work meets state 
composition requirement of 6,000 written words. 

PHI 3073 African Philosophy (3). An analysis of the 
metaphysical, epistemic, ethical, and political thoughts 
constituting the African world views and cultural settings. 

PHI 3300 Epistemology (3). The viewpoints of various 
philosophers and schools of thought regarding types of 
knowledge, certitude, and creativity are the main 
emphases of this introductory course. The meaning of 
truth and truthfulness is analyzed from both the classical 
and the contemporary perspectives. 

PHI 3320 Philosophy of Mind (3). An inquiry into the 
concept of mind and subsidiary concepts such as 
sensation, perception, desire, emotion, intention, volition, 
imagination, and intellect. The course will address the 
problem of the relation of mind and body and such topics 
as the concept of a person, the nature of intentional 
action, and the nature of consciousness. 

PHI 3400 Philosophy of Science (3). The philosophic 
background of scientific method will be examined. 
Attention will be given to the philosophical consequences 
of conceptual change in the sciences. Such topics as the 
growth and unity of science, explanation and prediction, 
and the role of science in society will be explored. 

PHI 3420 Philosophy of Social Science (3). An inquiry 
into philosophical questions raised by the social sciences. 
Topics include forms of social explanation, the nature of 
rationality, and the status of values in social science. 

PHI 3454 Philosophy of Biology (3). Examines the 
philosophical problems raised by the theory of evolution in 
3 parts: external challenges to the theory, internal 
disputes about key concepts, controversies about 
applications theory. 

PHI 3500 Metaphysics (3). This introductory course 
examines basic metaphysical questions regarding the 
nature of reality, as well as the meaning of these 
questions for the relationship of persons with their world. 
Fundamental texts from classical and contemporary 
philosophers will be considered. 

PHI 3601 Ethics (3). What is intrinsically good? What 
ought one to do? How are moral claims justified? 
Competing views of major philosophers are considered. 



PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics (3). Examines 
philosophical and ethical perspectives on human 
interaction with the natural world. 

PHI 3638 Contemporary Ethical Issues (3). After a 
review of basic questions regarding ethics, this course 
considers special ethical problems in contemporary 
society from the perspective of one or more philosophers 
or systems of ethics. Topics will be selected and 
announced in advance. 

PHI 3700 Philosophy of Religion (3). This course 
investigates whether or not religious beliefs can be 
rationally justified. Such topics as the nature of God, the 
problem of evil, religious experience, and the relationship 
of faith to reason will be explored. 

PHI 3762 Eastern Philosophical and Religious 
Thought (3). This introductory course examines the 
development of philosophical and religious thought in the 
East from ancient to modern times. Hinduism, Buddhism, 
Confucianism, Taoism, and other major viewpoints will be 
considered, in themselves and in comparison with 
Western forms of thought. 

PHI 3800 Philosophy of Art (3). An introduction to 
problems in Philosophy of Art, with emphasis on those 
problems which are especially relevant to appreciation 
and criticism in the arts. Typical problems include the 
relation between form and content, truth and falsity in art, 
the nature of emotion in art and of the aesthetic response, 
as well as the nature of art itself. This course will include a 
study of selections from the writings of major thinkers and 
the consideration of those works of art which are relevant 
to this study. 

PHI 3880 Philosophy Through Film (3). Offers a 
thorough investigation into several philosophical issues 
through the medium of film. Close readings of individual 
films will accompany the study of key philosophical texts. 

PHI 4130 Symbolic Logic (3). This course provides an 
introduction to symbolic logic. Emphasis is upon both the 
formal techniques of analysis of argument and upon the 
theoretical aspects of formal logic. 

PHI 4161 Philosophy and Probability (3). An 

introduction to the philosophical applications of 
elementary probability theory. Topics include 
mathematical probability, rational decision making, the 
foundations of science, and Pascal's wager. 

PHI 4220 Philosophy of Language (3). The subject 
matter concerns the relations between language, thought, 
and the world. Topics to be studied include reference, 
meaning, speech acts, and propositional attitudes. Also to 
be considered are the implications of claims here for 
issues in other areas of philosophy. 

PHI 4222 Philosophy of Dialogue (3). This course 
examines the meaning, the foundations, the limitations of 
dialogue, and the dialogical structure of expression and 
human relationships based on the philosophy of Martin 
Buber. It includes a philosophical analysis of the dialogical 
principle and the application of its insights to the problems 
of human living and knowing. 

PHI 4321 Topics in the Philosophy of Mind (3). This 
course examines selected issues in the philosophy of 
mind. Topics include the nature and value of the passions, 
self and self-deception, theory of action, etc. May be 



208 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



repeated. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission or PHI 
3320. 

PHI 4370 Topics in Epistemology (3) Study of a focused 
topics in epistemology (such as: a priori knowledge and 
justification; certainty; or skepticism). This course may be 
repeated. 

PHI 4541 Philosophy of Time (3). An analysis of the 
nature of time. Topics include the "passage" of time, the 
asymmetry between past and future, Zeno's paradoxes, 
and philosophical implications of the special theory of 
relativity. 

PHI 4633 Biomedical Ethics (3). After examining the 
foundations of ethics, this course will consider the human 
and ethical dimensions of current issues in the life 
sciences, such as the meaning of human living and 
suffering, ethics of genetic control, death and dying, 
personal responsibility in the medical and counseling 
professions. 

PHI 4764 Religious Experience (3). An introduction to 
philosophical thought about religious experiences. After a 
brief survey of the major types of religious experiences, 
issues about their nature and cognitive status are 
examined. 

PHI 4882 Philosophy in Literature (3). Philosophical 
implications of selected works and the impact of 
philosophical concepts such as the self, death, identity, 
alienation, responsibility, freedom, and the absurd. 

PHI 4910 Independent Research (1-6). Topics will be 
selected to meet the academic needs of the individual 
student. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PHI 4930 Special Topics (3). In-depth study of topics of 
special interest in philosophy. 

PHI 4935 Philosophy Seminar (3). This seminar is 
designed for majors and other qualified students approved 
by the Department, and will be guided by one or more 
faculty members. Topic will be selected and announced in 
advance. The number of participants will be limited. 

PHI 5934 Special Topics (3). Topics will be selected to 
meet the academic needs of groups of students. 

PHM 3040 Philosophical Anthropology (3). This course 
attenpts to interpret philosophically scientific perspectives 
concerning the nature of man and the human condition. It 
seeks to elucidate the basic qualities that make man what 
he is and distinguish him from other beings. 

PHM 3200 Social and Political Philosophy (3). The 

nature of society and the state, authority of society and 
the state over the individual, political obligation, legitimacy 
of government, and idea of social contract are considered. 

PHM 3400 Philosophy of Law (3). After an analysis of 
the nature of law and judicial reasoning in the light of 
fundamental alternative interpretations, basic topics of 
legal philosophy will be considered, such as freedom and 
rights, responsibility and punishment, rule of law and civil 
disobedience, legality and justice. 

PHM 3500 Philosophy of History (3). After exploring the 
definitions, dimensions and interrelations of philosophy 
and history, students will examine major philosophies of 
history. The social responsibility of the historical narrative 



and the philosophical assumptions of historiographies will 
be discussed. 

PHM 4020 Love and Sexuality (3). This course analyzes 
the nature and meaning of love and sexuality, and studies 
the basic problems in human sexual living, such as love 
and the man-woman relationship, the formation of sexual 
union, and attitudes toward love and sexuality in 
contemporary society. 

PHM 4050 Philosophy of Death (3). This course 
analyzes the meaning of death and man's attitude 
towards death and the dying. It examines how philosophy 
can share in the new confrontation between man and his 
death, and shows the ways philosophical thinking 
contributes to the discovery of an authentic attitude 
towards the phenomenon of death as part of human living. 

PHM 4123 Philosophy and Feminism (3). A conceptual 
analysis of alternative feminist views. Topics include the 
goals of the feminist movement, sexist theories on 
women's nature, sexual stereotypes and androgyny, the 
nature of oppression, sexism, racism and homophobia. 

PHM 4360 Topics in Political Philosophy (3). Examines 
a selected topic in political philosophy, such as: justice, 
democracy, liberty, or an important thinker. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: PHM 3200 or permission of the 
instructor. 

PHM 4430 Topics in Philosophy of Law (3). Examines a 
focused topic in philosophy of law, such as: punishment, 
legislation of morality, the rule of law, or an important 
thinker. May be repeated. 

PHP 3840 Chinese and Japanese Philosophy (3). 

Metaphysical and ethical theories of the three main 
philosophical systems of China, namely, Classical and 
neo-Confucianism, Taoism, and Chinese Buddhism are 
examined. For Japanese philosophy, Shintoism is 
included. 

PHP 4510 Marxism (3). This course examines the 
philosophic insights of Marx and the main trends 
(anthropological, social, existential) in contemporary 
Marxism. It includes an analysis of the Marxist 
interpretation of alienation, work, and human authenticity. 

PHP 4782 Phenomenology (3). This course analyzes the 
method, the basic philosophical insights and the 
applications of 20th century phenomenology. It includes 
the phenomenological analysis of knowing as well as 
basic questions regarding the nature of reality together 
with the study of fundamental texts from Husserl, 
Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. 

PHP 4784 Analytic Philosophy (3). This course 
examines the 20th century Anglo-American tradition of 
approaching philosophic problems by the methods of 
linguistic analysis. It will include study of techniques of 
linguistic analysis and an evaluation of their adequacy in 
dealing with meaning and truth, the mind-body problem, 
and free will. 

PHP 4786 Existentialism (3). This course examines the 
origin, basic philosophical insights, and influence of the 
mainstreams of modern existentialism. It includes the 
study of fundamental texts of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, 
Sartre, Jaspers, and Camus. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 209 



PHP 4789 Contemporary French Philosophy (3). Main 
trends (hermeneutics, postmodernism, deconstruction) in 
twentieth century French philosophy, with emphasis on 
seminal thinkers, e.g., Levinas, Derrida, Ricoeur, 
Foucault, Irigaray. 



210 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Physics 



Walter Van Hamme, Professor and Chairperson 

Werner Boeglin, Associate Professor 

Richard A. Bone, Professor 

Yesim Darici, Associate Professor 

Rudolf Fiebig, Professor 

Bernard Gerstman, Professor 

Kenneth Hardy, Professor 

Laird H. Kramer, Associate Professor 

Wenzhi Li, Assistant Professor 

Pete C. Markowitz, Associate Professor 

Oren Maxwell, Professor 

Stephan L. Mintz, Professor 

Rajamani Narayanan, Assistant Professor 

Brian A. Raue, Associate Professor 

Joerg Reinhold, Associate Professor 

Misak Sargsian, Assistant Professor 

John W. Sheldon, Professor Emeritus 

Caroline E. Simpson, Associate Professor 

Xuewen Wang, Associate Professor 

James R. Webb, Professor 

Jiandi Zhang, Associate Professor 

Yifu Zhu, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Science 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

This program prepares students for careers as 
professional physicists in industry, government, or 
graduate study in physics, engineering, or material 
science. It also prepares students for teaching careers. 
Students interested in teacher certification should contact 
the College of Education. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Required Courses 
Common Prerequisites 



CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 
CHM 1046 
CHM1046L 
MAC 2311 
MAC 2312 
MAC 2313 
PHY 2048 
PHY 2048L 
PHY 2049 
PHY 2049L 
To qualify for 



General Chemistry I 
General Chemistry Lab I 
General Chemistry II 
General Chemistry Lab II 
Calculus I 
Calculus II 
Calculus III 

Physics with Calculus I 
Physics with Calculus Lab I 
Physics with Calculus II 
Physics with Calculus Lab II 
admission to the program, 



FIU 



undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including CLAST, completed 60 semester 
hours, and must be otherwise acceptable into the 
program. 

Upper Division Program (60) 

PHY 3106, PHY 3107 Modem Physics 

PHY3106L, PHY3107L 

PHY 3513 

PHY 4221, PHY 4222 

PHY 4323, PHY 4324 

PHY 4604, PHY 4605 

PHY4810L 



Modern Physics Labs 
Thermodynamics 
Mechanics 
Electromagnetism 
Quantum Mechanics 
Senior Physics Lab 
PHY 4905, PHY 4906, PHY 4907 Independent Study 
Approved electives in experimental or theoretical physics 
MAP 2302 Differential Equations 



Electives (Physics or Non-Physics) 16 

Bachelor of Arts 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

This program prepares students interested in physics and 
planning to enter professional schools in business, 
education, journalism, law, and medicine, and for liberal 
arts students desiring a strong background in physical 
science but with career objectives in other areas. The 
flexible program offers the opportunity for parallel studies 
in another discipline and/or pre-professional preparation. 
Students wishing to pursue careers as professional 
physicists or graduate study in physics should seek the 
Bachelor of Science degree in physics. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Required Courses 
Common Prerequisites 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 

CHM1045L General Chemistry Lab I 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry Lab II 

MAC 2311 Calculus I 

MAC 2312 Calculus II 

MAC 2313 Multivariate Calculus 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 

PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus Lab I 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 

PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus Lab II 

Upper Division Program (60) 



PHY 3106 Modern Physics I 

PHY 3106L Modern Physics Lab I 

PHY 3107 Modern Physics II 

PHY3107L Modern Physics Lab II 

PHY 3513 Thermodynamics 

PHY 4 1 34 Widely Applied Physics I 

PHY 41 35 Widely Applied Physics II 



Approved Upper Division Electives 
Electives 

Biophysics Concentration 

This program prepares students interested in physics and 
planning to enter professional schools in medicine, 
biomedical engineering, and biomechanics as well as 
entry level biotechnology positions in industry and 
government. The flexible program offers the opportunity 
for parallel studies in another discipline. Students 
satisfying the degree requirements of this program will 
also have satisfied the course requirement for admission 
to medical schools. Interested students should consult 
the Pre-medical advisor at (305) 348-3084. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites as Detailed Under the BA 

Degree 

Additional Lower Division Courses (17) 



3 

1 

3 

1 

3 

3 

3 

15 

28 



BSC1010 
BSC1010L 
BSC1011 
BSC 1011L 
CHM 2210 
CHM2210L 
CHM 2211 
CHM 221 1L 



General Biology I 
General Biology I Lab 
General Biology II 
General Biology II Lab 
Organic Chemistry I 
Organic Chemistry I Lab 
Organic Chemistry II 
Organic Chemistry II Lab 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 21 1 



Upper Division Program (60) 

PHY 3106 Modern Physics I 3 

PHY 3106L Modern Physics Lab I 1 

PHY 3107 Modern Physics II 3 

PHY 3107L Modern Physics Lab II 1 

PHY 3513 Thermodynamics 3 

PHY 41 34 Widely Applied Physics I 3 

PHY 41 35 Widely Applied Physics II 3 

PHY 4221 Mechanics I 3 

PHY4905 Senior Physics Lab 3 

PHZ4710 Introduction to Biophysics 3 

Physics Electives 6 

Electives in Biology and Chemistry 12 

Electives 16 
Pre-med students are strongly encouraged to take: 

BCH 3033 General Biochemistry " 4 

BCH 3033L General Biochemistry Lab 1 



CHM 4304 Biological Chemistry I 

CHM 4304L Biological Chemistry I Lab 

PCB 3063 Genetics 

PCB 3063 Genetics Lab 



PCB 3702 
PCB 3702L 



Intermediate Human Physiology 3 

Intermediate Human Physiology Lab 1 



Business Concentration 

This program prepares students interested in physics and 
planning to enter business and business management 
careers. Concentrates on the basic of business 
administration and also gain a thorough understanding of 
electronics, lasers, computers and other tools of the 
physicist. 

Lower Division Preparation 

Common Prerequisites as Detailed Under the BA 

Degree 

Additional Lower Division Courses (9) 

ECO 2013 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECO 2023 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

ACG 2021 Accounting for Decisions 3 

Upper Division Program (60) 

PHY 3106 Modern Physics I 3 

PHY 3106L Modern Physics Lab I 1 

PHY 3107 Modern Physics II 3 

PHY 3107L Modern Physics Lab II 1 

PHY 3513 Thermodynamics 3 

PHY 41 34 Widely Applied Physics I 3 

PHY 4135 Widely Applied Physics II 3 

PHY 4905 Senior Physics Lab 3 

Physics Electives 6 

ACG 3301 Ace. for Planning and Control 3 

CGS 3300 Introduction to Information Systems 3 

FIN 3403 Financial Management 3 

MAN 3025 Organization and Management 3 

MAN 4602 International Business 3 

MAR 3023 Marketing Management 3 

Business Electives 3 

Electives 13 

Entrepreneurship Concentration 

This program provides students with a strong background 
in physics as well as the skill set for starting and growing 
new high-tech business ventures. The curriculum 
encourages "hands on" interdisciplinary research in the 
form of an independent study course and an 
entrepreneurial science internship. It also provides the 



flexibility to tailor coursework to science and technology 
entrepreneurial activities. Graduates of this program will 
be well equipped to create their own high-tech jobs within 
existing companies as well as their own startup ventures. 

Lower Divivion Preparation 

Common Prerequisites as Detailed Under the BA 

Degree 

Upper Division Program (60) 

PHY 3106 Modern Physics I 3 

PHY3106L Modern Physics Lab I 1 

PHY 3107 Modern Physics II 3 

PHY 3107L Modern Physics Lab II 1 

PHY 3513 Thermodynamics 3 

PHY 4221 Intermediate Classical Mechanics I 3 

PHY 4323 Intermediate Electromagnetism I 3 

PHY 4604 Quantum Mechanics I 3 

PHY 4134 Widely Applied Physics I 3 

PHY 4135 Widely Applied Physics II 3 

PHY 4905 Independent Study 3 

PHY 4905 Senior Physics Lab 3 

Physics Electives 6 

GEB4113 Entrepreneurship 3 

ISC 4947 Entrepreneurial Science Internship 3 

GEB4110 Business Plan Development 3 

or 
GEB 4xxx Technology Product and Service 

Development 3 

Electives 13 

Minor in Physics 

This program is designed for students who desire 
additional capabilities in physics beyond the basic 
sequence. This program is especially recommended for 
chemistry, mathematics, and engineering/technology 
majors. 

PHY 2048, PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus 8 

PHY 2048L, PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus Lab 2 
PHY 3106, PHY 3107 Modern Physics 6 

PHY3106L, PHY3107L Modern Physics Labs 2 

Additional approved courses 3 

Minor in Astronomy 

This program is designed for students who desire 
additional capabilities in astronomy. The program offers 
enhanced preparation for graduate studies in astronomy 
and astrophysics. It is also aimed at students interested 
in careers in science education, science centers, musea, 
and planetaria. 

PHY 2048 Physics with Calculus I 4 

PHY 2048L Physics with Calculus Lab I 1 

PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus II 4 

PHY 2049L Physics with Calculus Lab II 1 

PHY 3106 Modern Physics I 3 

PHY3106L Modern Physics Lab I 1 

AST 3213 Modern Astrophysics 3 

AST 3722 Observational Astronomy 3 

AST 3722L Observational Astronomy Lab 1 

Cooperative Education 

Students seeking the baccalaureate degree in physics 
may also take part in the Cooperative Education Program 
conducted in conjunction with Career Planning & 
Placement. The student spends several semesters fully 
employed in an industrial or governmental physics 
laboratory. For further information consult the Department 
of Physics or Career Planning & Placement. 



21 2 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

AST-Astronomy; MET-Meteorology PHS- 
Physics/Specialized; PHY-Physics; PHZ-Physics; PSC- 
Physical Sciences; ENU-Nuclear Engineering. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring semester offering; SS- 
Summer semester offering. 

AST 2003 Solar System Astronomy (3). General 
principles of Astronomy with emphasis on the structure 
and evolution of the Solar System, the laws of planetary 
motion, and the physical aspects of the sun, planets, and 
interplanetary debris. (F,S,SS) 

AST 2003L Solar System Astronomy Laboratory (1). 

Laboratory section of AST 2003. Outdoor observing of the 
moon, planets and indoor exercises including celestial 
positions and time, the moon's orbit, planetary motions, 
comparative planetology. Corequisite: AST 2003. (Lab 
fees assessed) (F,S,SS) 

AST 2004 Stellar Astronomy (3). General principles of 
Astronomy with emphasis on the structure and evolution 
of stars, stellar systems, galaxies and the universe. 
Topics include stellar birth and death, neutron stars and 
black holes, galactic distances and the expansion of the 
universe. (F,S,SS) 

AST 2004L Stellar Astronomy Laboratory (1). 

Laboratory section of AST 2004. Outdoor observing of 
stars, constellations, binary and variable stars, star 
clusters, nebulae and indoor exercises including radiative 
properties of the stars, spectra, stellar and galactic 
distances, Hubble's Law. Corequisite: AST 2004. (Lab 
fees assessed) (F,S,SS) 

AST 2037 Intelligent Life in the Universe (3). Examines 
the possibility of extraterrestrial life in terms of the 
probability of the existence of planets in other solar 
systems, the conditions necessary for life, and means of 
communication. (F or S) 

AST 3213 Modern Astrophysics (3). An introduction to 
the structure of stars and galaxies and the evolution of the 
universe as a whole. Topics will include atomic spectra, 
stellar classifications, galactic structure, and cosmology. 
Prerequisites: PHY 2048, 2049. (F or S) 

AST 3722 Observational Astronomy (3). Observational 
astronomical techniques from radio to x-rays including 
CCD Imaging, Photometry, and Spectroscopy. 

AST 3722L Observational Astronomy Laboratory (1). 

The lab component associated with Observational 
Astronomy. Covers acquisition, reduction and 

interpretation of astronomical data using telescopes and 
computers. Corequisite: Observational Astronomy. 

AST 5215 Stellar Astrophysics (3) Topics in Stellar 
Astrophysics, in greater detail and depth than similar 
topics in AST 3213. Emphasis on current stellar structure, 
evolution models and the underlying observational data. 
Prerequisites: PHY 3107, PHY 3513, PHY 4324, PHY 
4222 or equivalent. (F or S) 

AST 5405 Extragalactic Astrophysics (3). Topics in 
extragalactic astrophysics, in greater detail and depth 
than similar topics in AST 3213. Emphasis on galactic 
structure and evolution, quasars and cosmology. 



Prerequisites: PHY 3107, PHY 3513, PHY 4324, PHY 
4222 or equivalent. (F or S) 

AST 5507 Celestial Mechanics (3). Principles of 
classical Newtonian mechanics applied to the motions of 
planets, satellites, and interplanetary space probes. 
Prerequisites: PHY 4222 or equivalent. (F or S) 

ENU 4101 Introduction to Nuclear Reactors (3). An 

elementary course in nuclear fission reactor theory and 
power plant operation. An overview of the relevant nuclear 
processes and their application to reactor design. 
Prerequisites: PHY 2048, 2049. 

MET 2010 Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (3). 

Physics of the Earth's atmosphere and weather including 
energy and heat transfer, radiation, temperature and 
pressure changes and the development of storms, 
atmospheric optical effects, and weather forecasting. 
Prerequisite: High school algebra. (F,S) 

MET 201 0L Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics 
Laboratory (1). Practical weather analysis including 
fronts, local severe weather, hurricanes, also elementary 
analyses and interpretation of weather maps, satellite 
imagery, radar data. Corequisite: MET 2010. (F,S) 

PHS 4303 Nuclear Physics (3). A treatment of the 
current state of the nuclear theory problem and a 
discussion of modern experimental methods. 
Prerequisites: PHY 3106, 3107. 

PHY 1020 Understanding the Physical World (3). A 

course to introduce non-science majors to the basic 
principles of the physical world with emphasis on 
understanding common devices, biological and medical 
applications, natural phenomena and sports. Prerequisite: 
one year high school or college algebra. (F,S) 

PHY 1020L Understanding the Physical World 
Laboratory (1). Laboratory section of Understanding the 
Physical World. (F,S) 

PHY 1037 Quarks, Superstrings, and Black Holes (3). 

Introduction to physics in the modern era for non- 
scientists. Topics include quantum mechanics, relativity, 
fundamental forces, and unification theory. 

PHY 1037L Quarks, Superstrings, and Black Holes 
Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany Quarks, 
Superstrings, and Black Holes 

PHY 2023 Survey of General Physics (3). Units, 
quantities, Newton's laws, work, momentum, fluids, heat, 
gas laws, waves, charge and current, electric fields, 
circuits, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: 
Algebra, trigonometry (high school). (F.S.SS) 

PHY 2048, PHY 2049 Physics with Calculus (4,4). Basic 
physics with calculus sequence. PHY 2048 will cover 
kinematics, Newton's Laws, conservation laws, 
gravitation, fluids, sound, and thermodynamics. Pre or 
Corequisites: MAC 2311 or MAC 2312. PHY 2049 will 
cover electricity and magnetism, field theory, geometrical 
and wave optics. (F,S,SS) 

PHY 2048L, PHY 2049L General Physics Laboratory I, 

II (1,1). Laboratory sections of PHY 2048, 2049, PHY 
2053, 2054. Prerequisites or Corequisites: PHY 2048, 
PHY 2049, PHY 2053, PHY 2054. (Lab fees assessed) 
(F.S.SS) 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 21 3 



PHY 2053, PHY 2054 Physics without Calculus (4,4). A 

general introductory course using a non-calculus 
approach. PHY 2053 covers kinematics, Newtonian 
mechanics, properties of fluids, thermodynamics, and 
wave motion. PHY 2054 covers electricity and magnetism, 
geometrical and wave optics and the structure of matter. 
Prerequisites: College algebra, trigonometry, and analytic 
geometry. (F,S,SS) 

PHY 3106, PHY 3107 Modern Physics I and II (3,3). 

Recent developments in physics are discussed. Subject 
matter includes: review of classical physics, special 
relativity, four-vectors, wave-particle duality, the hydrogen 
atom, many electron atoms, nuclear instrumentation, 
nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, elementary particles, 
introduction to quantum mechanics, and solid state 
physics. Prerequisite: PHY 2049. (F) (Modern Physics I); 
(S) (Modern Physics II) 

PHY 3106L, PHY 3107L Modern Physics Laboratory I 
and II (1,1). Laboratory courses to accompany Modern 
Physics I and II consisting of experiments in atomic and 
nuclear physics. Pre- or Corequisites: PHY 3106 and PHY 
3107. (F) (Modern Physics Lab I); (S) (Modern Physics 
Lab II) 

PHY 3272 Physics of Space Flight (3). Basic physics is 
used to describe the motions of space craft, with a 
discussion of various types of propulsion systems, 
including chemical methods, nuclear systems, electric and 
photon propulsion. Prerequisite: PHY 2049. 

PHY 3424 Optics (3). General formulation of geometrical 
optics including matrix techniques, interference 
phenomena, and the theory of Fraunhofer and Fresnel 
diffraction are among the topics covered. Prerequisites: 
PHY 2048, 2049. 

PHY 3465 Physics of Music (3). Provides an 
understanding of the physics behind sound, sound 
reproduction and electronics that are necessary for 
musicians to understand to take full advantage of modern 
electronic and musical equipment. 

PHY 3513 Thermodynamics (3). Fundamental principles 
of thermodynamics, the first, second, and third laws, free 
energy, entropy, the chemical potential, phase rule and its 
applications. Prerequisites: PHY 2048, 2049, CHM 1045, 
1046. (F) 

PHY 3722 Electronics (3). Solid state theory and the 
theory of circuits, circuit operation and design in lecture 
and laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: PHY 2048, 2049. 

PHY 3949, PHY 4949 Cooperative Education in 
Physics (1-3). One semester of full-time supervised work 
in an outside laboratory taking part in the University Co-op 
Program. Limited to students admitted to the Co-op 
Program. A written report and supervisor evaluation will 
be required of each student. (F,S,SS) 

PHY 4134 Widely Applied Physics I (3). Applications of 
Physics principles to a diverse set of phenomena. Topics 
include material science, computers and electronics, 
nuclear physics and energy, astrophysics, aeronautics 
and space flight, communication technology, and medical 
physics and imaging. Prerequisite: PHY 3107. 

PHY 4135 Widely Applied Physics II (3). Second of a 
two-course sequence. Will investigate materials science, 
nanotechnology, computers and electronics, nuclear 



physics and energy, astrophysics, aeronautics and space 
flight, communications technology, meterology, and 
medical physics and imaging. Course will focus on 
Chaos, Optical and Wireless Communications, High 
Temperature Superconductors. Prerequisite: PHY4134. 

PHY 4221, PHY 4222 Intermediate Classical 
Mechanics I & II (3,3). Laws of motion, statics of particles 
and rigid bodies, motion of particles in one, two, and three 
dimensions, systems of particles, rigid bodies in a plane, 
central forces. Accelerated reference systems, rigid body 
in three dimensions, generalized coordinates, Lagrangian 
and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics, vibrating 
systems, and normal coordinates. Prerequisites: MAC 
2313, PHY 2048, 2049. (F) (Intermediate Classical 
Mechanics I); (S) (Intermediate Classical Mechanics II) 

PHY 4323, PHY 4324 Intermediate Electromagnetism I 
and II (3,3). The theory of electromagnetic fields and 
waves is developed from basic principles. Vector calculus, 
Coulomb's law, Gauss's Law, electrostatic potential, 
dielectrics, solutions to Laplace's and Poisson's 
equations, magnetic induction, vector potential, magnetic 
materials, Maxwell's equations, and propagation of waves 
in space and various media are discussed. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, PHY 2048 and 2049.(F) (Intermediate 
Electromagnetism I); (S) (Intermediate Electromagnetism 
II) 

PHY 4513 Statistical Thermodynamics (3). Review of 
the fundamental laws of thermodynamics applied to 
simple systems. Elementary kinetic theory of gases 
applied to diffusion, viscosity, thermal and electrical 
conductivity. Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein 
distribution functions applied in the Boltzmann limit to the 
calculation of thermodynamic variables. Prerequisites: 
MAC 2313, PHY 2048, 2049. 

PHY 4604 Quantum Mechanics I (3). A comprehensive 
introduction to quantum mechanics. Wave mechanics 
applied to standard one dimensional problems and the 
hydrogen atom. Prerequisites: PHY 3107 or permission of 
the instructor and MAP 2302, MAC 2313, and PHY 2049. 
(F) 

PHY 4605 Quantum Mechanics II (3). General matrix 
formalism, angular momentum, symmetries, perturbation 
theory and variational methods, an introduction to 
relativistic theory and theory of fields. Prerequisite: PHY 
4604. (S) 

PHY 4752C Introduction to Scientific Instrumentation 
(3). The student learns to set up and operate such 
standard pieces of laboratory apparatus as bridges, 
amplifiers, oscilloscopes, frequency counters, flowmeters, 
and thermocouple circuits utilizing chart recorders. A 
background in general physics is required. 

PHY 481 0L Senior Physics Lab (3). Advanced laboratory 
topics are treated. Modern physics laboratory equipment 
is used and the student is introduced to current laboratory 
practice. Prerequisites: PHY 2048 and 2049. (S) 

PHY 4905, PHY 4906, PHY 4907 Independent Study (3). 

The student works under the supervision of a faculty 
member on subject matter of mutual interest. Instructor's 
permission is required. 

PHY 4936, PHY 4937, PHY 4938 Special Topics (VAR). 

A study of topics of special physics interest. 



214 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



PHY 5115 Mathematical Physics I (3). Methods of 
solution for problems in mathematical physics: Variational 
principles, complex variables, partial differential 
equations, integral equations, and transforms. 
Prerequisites: MAC 2313, MAP 2302. (F) 

PHY 5116 Mathematical Physics II (3). Additional 
solution methods in mathematical physics: Perturbation 
methods, Laplace's and Poisson's Equations, waves, 
special functions, vector fields, vector waves. 
Prerequisite: PHY 5115. (S) 

PHY 5140 Atomic Particle Interactions and Detection 
(3). Preparation for research utilizing particle detectors. 
Covers particle interactions with matter in scintillation, 
ionization, and semiconductor detectors for changed 
particles, neutrons, and photons. Prerequisites: PHY 
3107 or permission of Instructor. 

PHY 5141 Intermediate Modern Physics I (3). Prepares 
advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate 
students to start research in atomic, molecular, or optical 
physics. Topics may be adapted to students' research 
interests. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

PHY 5142 Intermediate Modern Physics II (3). 

Continnuation of advanced undergraduate and beginning 
graduate student research preparation in atomic, 
molecular, optical or nuclear physics. Topics may be 
adapted to students' research interests. Prerequisite: 
Intermediate Modern Physics I. 

PHY 5235 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos (3). 

Introduction to the universal behavior of classical systems 
described by nonlinear equations. Prerequisites: PHY 
4222, MAA4211.(ForS) 

PHY 5240 Advanced Classical Mechanics (3). 

Advanced formulations of the equations of motion and 
their applications: the central field problem, rigid body 
dynamics, oscillations and continuous systems. 
Prerequisite: PHY 4222. (F) 

PHY 5346 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory I (3). 

Advanced treatment of classical electromagnetism: 
Electrostatics, Green's function, Laplace's equation, 
multipole expansion, magnetostatics, Maxwell's 
equations, waves. Prerequisite: PHY 4324. (F) 

PHY 5347 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory II (3). 

Additional topics in classical electromagnetism: Wave 
guides, radiating and diffracting systems, Kirchoff's 
integral for diffraction, covariant formulation of field 
equations. Prerequisite: PHY 5346. (S) 

PHY 5446 Laser Physics (3). Principles of lasers and 
laser applications, including atom-field interactions, 
stimulated emission and dipole oscillators, optical 
resonators and electromagnetic modes, semi-classical 
laser theory, and specific laser systems. Prerequisite: 
PHY 4605. (For S) 

PHY 5466 The Physics of Music (3). Provides music 
technology majors a physical understanding of sound, 
sound generation and reprodcution. Concentrates mainly 
on physical principles and less on calculation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

PHY 5667 Nonperturbative Quantum Field Theory (3). 

Euclidean QFT, renormalization group, local gauge 
symetry, lattice regularization, Wilson action, fermion 



fields, expansion schemes, numerical algorithms, hadron 
properties, recent developments. Prerequisite: PHY 4605. 

PHY 5930 Seminar in Physics (1-3). A series of 

specialized lectures/seminars on selected topics in 

Physics/Astro-Physics. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Department. 

PHY 5936 Special Topics Research (1-10). Participation 
in an original investigation in theoretical or experimental 
physics/astro-physics under direct faculty supervision. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PHY 5937, PHY 5938 Seminar in Special Topics (3). 

Seminar work under the supervision of a faculty member 
on subject material of mutual interest. 

PHY 5940 Physics Graduate Teaching Workshop (1). 

The teaching of physics laboratories. Includes practice of 
lab experiments, use and adjustment of lab equipment 
and explanation of departmental grading policy. 
Supplemented by outside lectures on university policies. 
(F) 

PHZ 2102 Problem Solving in Physics I (1). 

Supplemental course for Physics 2048 that teaches 
problem solving skills and reinforces concepts learned in 
the lecture. Corequisite: PHY 2048. 

PHZ 2103 Problem Solving in Physics II (1). 

Supplemental course for Physics 2049 that teaches 
problem solving skills and reinforces concepts learned in 
the lecture. Corequisite: PHY 2049. 

PHZ 3422 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (3). 

Introduction to the emerging nanoscience and 
nanotechnology, physical/chemical understanding of 
nanomaterials and nanostructures, basic skills and 
techniques for nanofabrication and characterization. 
Prerequisite: PHY 2049. 

PHZ 4390 Nuclear and Particle Physics (3). Basics of 
Nuclear and Particle Physics, Nuclear forces, quarkgluon 
structure of hadrons, deep-inelastic scattering, qcd, 
nuclear and particle astrophysics, formation of quark- 
gluon plasma. Prerequisite: PHY 4604. 

PHZ 4710 Introduction to Biophysics (3). Physical 
investigation of biological molecules with special 
reference to structure and function of protein, 
biomembranes and visual receptors. Prerequisites: PHY 
3107 or CHM 3411. 

PHZ 5130 Theoretical Treatment of Experimental Data 

(3). Statistical analysis of physical processes and 
statistical tests, with particular emphasis on 
instrumentation-related problems. Mathematical modeling 
and computer simulation. Prerequisites: Undergraduate 
statistics course or equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. 

PHZ 5156 Computational Physics I (3). Physical 
systems by means of computer simulation. Monte Carlo, 
molecular dynamics, percolation, random systems, chaos, 
criticality, guage fields. Prerequisites: PHY 5115 and PHY 
5116. 

PHZ 5157C Computational Physics II (3). Advanced 
computer simulation methods of physical systems. 
Application in chaos, nonlinear and random systems, 
criticality, field theory and practices. Prerequisite: PHZ 
5156. Corequisites: PHY 51 15 and PHY 5116. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 21 5 



PHZ 5234 Atomic and Molecular Collision Phenomena 
(3). Investigation of atomic and molecular collision 
phenomena: Kinetic theory, elastic scattering, inelastic 
scattering, excitation and ionization, heavy particle 
collisions. Prerequisites: PHY 4605 and PHY 4222. (F or 
S) 

PHZ 5304 Advanced Nuclear Physics (3). Fundamental 
properties of nuclei, nuclear forces, nuclear models, radio- 
activity, weak processes and nuclear reactions. 
Prerequisite: PHY 4604. Corequisite: PHY 4605. (F or S) 

PHZ 5370 Nanoscience (3). Overview of the nanoscience 
with emphasis on physical properties, such as electrical, 
magnetic and optical properties, of nanomaterials. 
Prerequisites: PHY 3106, PHY 3107. 

PHZ 5405 Solid State Physics (3). Crystalline form of 
solids, lattice dynamics, metals, insulators, semi- 
conductors, crystalline surfaces, and amorphous 
-materials. Prerequisites: PHY 3107 or CHM 3411. (F or S) 

PHZ 5505 Low Energy Plasma Physics (3). The 

investigation of the kinetics of rarefied gases and thermal 
plasmas: Phase space, random currents, orbit theory, 
plasma sheaths, radiation, the pinch effect. Prerequisites: 
PHY 3513, PHY 4324, and PHY 4222. 

PHZ 5506 Plasma Physics (3). An introduction to plasma 
fundamentals, the Boltzmann equation, the hydro- 
dynamic equations, orbit theory, the interaction of 
electromagnetic waves with plasmas, the pinch effect and 
instabilities. Prerequisite: PHY 2049. 

PHZ 5606 Special Relativity (3). A detailed study of 
special relativity: Lorentz transformations, relativistic 
electrodynamics. Prerequisite: PHY 3107. 

PHZ 5607 General Relativity (3). General relativity using 
differential geometry and tensor analysis. Topics include 
Einstein's field equations and their solutions, applications 
and observational tests. Black Holes and cosmology are 
also discussed. Prerequsites: PHY 4222 and PHY 4605. 



216 Colleqe of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Catalog 



Political Science 

Richard Olson, Professor and Chairperson 
Astrid Arraras, Lecturer 
Ronald Cox, Associate Professor 
Clement Fatovic, Assistant Professor 
Eduardo Gamarra, Professor and Director, Latin 

American and Caribbean Center 
Ivelaw Griffith, Professor and Dean, Honors College 
Kevin Hill, Associate Professor and Undergraduate 

Director 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
H. Whitt Kilburn, Assistant Professor 
Tatiana Kostadinova, Assistant Professor and Graduate 

Director 
Dario Moreno, Associate Professor and Director, 

Metropolitan Center 
Paul Mullen, Assistant Professor 
Brian Nelson, Associate Professor 
Sarah Poggione, Assistant Professor 
Timothy Power, Associate Professor 
Nicol Rae, Professor 
Mark Rosenberg, Professor and Provost 
Rebecca Salokar, Associate Professor 
John Stack, Professor and Director, Institute for Public 

Policy and Citizenship Studies 
Judith H. Stiehm, Professor 
Christopher Warren, Associate Professor 

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science 

Degree Program Hours: 120 

The major in Political Science provides students the 
opportunity to acquire a broad education that will equip 
them to adapt to a wide variety of careers. The program 
for majors is designed to encourage the analysis of 
theories, institutions, and processes of political systems in 
the context provided by the social sciences; to stimulate a 
grasp of the broad sweep of political science as a 
discipline; to develop a continuing and responsible 
interest in political activity and public affairs; to provide the 
opportunity to acquire a fundamental understanding of 
political science as a basis for citizenship, a career in 
government, or professional study and service; and to 
stimulate the qualified student's interest in graduate study 
in political science. 

The curriculum is designed to expose students to the 
various areas of Political Science and to allow for some 
specialization. Students are encouraged to create a blend 
of courses that fit their interests. You should work with the 
undergraduate advisor in selecting courses. 

To qualify for admission to the program, FIU 
undergraduates must have met all the lower division 
requirements including the successful completion or 
waiver of the CLAST, 60 semester hours, and a minimum 
2.0 Grade Point Average. 

Curriculum for Political Science Majors 

Students should obtain and read the "Political Science 
Advising Guide," available online on the Political Science 
website. A minimum of 30 credits of upper division work 
(3000 level and above) is required for a major in Political 
Science, of which 6 credits must be at the 4000 level 
(excluding independent study and internship credits). 

In addition, two 2000 level courses are required for a 
student to meet both the department's prerequisite 



requirements for majors as well as the state mandated 
"Common Prerequisites"(see below). These courses 
should be taken as early as possible in preparation for 
upper division work in the major. POS 2042-American 
Government (or its equivalent) is required of all Political 
Science majors. This course will also meet one of the two 
state mandated Common Prerequisites. The second 
Common Prerequisite can be fulfilled by taking either 
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics, or INR 
2002 Dynamics of World Politics (or their equivalents). 
These requirements can normally be met through course 
work at the community college level, or can be taken at 
FIU. Students should be mindful of the further requirement 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, that a minimum of 48 
upper division credits (3000 level and above) is necessary 
for graduation. Students also need to pass 9 hours in 
upper division courses outside Political Science, and must 
satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences Foreign 
Language Requirement. 

No specific upper division courses are required. Rather, 
courses in Political Science must be distributed so that 
five courses meet the Breadth requirement and five other 
courses meet the Political Science Electives requirement, 
of which two (6 credits) must be at the 4000 level 
(excluding independent study and internship credits). 

The student must earn a grade of 'C or better in all 
Political Science courses credited toward the major. A 
grade of 'C-' will not fulfill the requirements of the major. 
Students choosing to major in Political Science must 
officially declare their major by completing applicable 
forms. Forms can be obtained online through the Office of 
the Registrar, or at the department. 

Common Prerequisites 

Common Prerequisites are those mandated by the state 
for Political Science majors. In order to conform with both 
state and departmental requirements, students must take 
the following: 
POS 2042 American Government (or its 

equivalent) 
and one of the following two courses: 
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 

(or its equivalent) 
INR 2002 Dynamics of World Politics 

(or its equivalent) 
These courses do not count toward the 30 credits of 
upper division work required for the major. 

Requirements for a Major 
I. Breadth Requirement 

This is designed to acquaint all majors with the five 
general fields of Political Science. One three-semester 
hour course must be taken in each of the following fields, 
for a total of 15 semester hours. 

American Politics (AP)-This Breadth area can be met 

only by one of the following courses: 

POS 3064 Federalism and Intergovernmental 

Relations 3 

POS 3152 Urban Politics 3 

POS 3413 The Presidency 3 

POS 3424 The Legislative Process 3 

POS 3443 Political Parties 3 
Judicial Politics (JP)-This Breadth area can be met only 
by one of the following courses: 

POS 3283 The Judicial Process 3 

POS 3603 Constitutional Law: Powers 3 

POS 3604 Constitutional Law: Limits 3 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 21 7 



Comparative Politics (CP) — This Breadth area can be 

met only by one of the following courses: 

CPO 3010 Comparative Politics Theory and 

Practice 3 

CPO 3055 Authoritarian Politics 3 

CPO 3103 Politics of Western Europe 3 

CPO 3204 African Politics 3 

CPO 3304 Politics of Latin America 3 

CPO 3403 Politics of the Middle East 3 

CPO 3502 Politics of the Far East 3 

CPO 3643 Russian Politics 3 

International Politics (IP)-This Breadth area can be met 
only by one of the following courses: 
INR 3102 American Foreign Policy 3 

INR 3203 World Politics 3 

INR 3702 Politics of the World Economy 3 

Political Theory and Methodology (PT) — This Breadth 
area can be met only by one of the following courses: 
POT 3013 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory 3 

POT 3054 Modern Political Theory 3 

POT 3064 Contemporary Political Theory 3 

POT 3204 American Political Thought 3 

POT 3302 Political Ideologies 3 

II. Political Science Electives Requirement 

Five upper division Political Science courses (3000 level 
and above), of which two (6 credits) must be at the 4000 
level are required (not from POS 4905, POS 4941, or 
POS 4944), for a total of 15 credits. No more than 6 
credits in independent study and/or internship work can 
be applied toward the major, and these may not be 
counted toward the 4000-level requirement. 

Minor in Political Science 

POS 2042 (or its equivalent) is a prerequisite for a minor 
in Politcal Science. Beyond the prerequisite, the minor 
consists of any five upper division (3000 level and above) 
courses in Political Science, for a total or 15 upper 
division credits. All courses must be passed with a 'C or 
better grade. A grade of 'C-' will not fulfill the requirements 
of the minor. Neither independent study nor internships 
will count toward the minor. Students should select 
specific courses in consultation with their major advisor 
and a Political Science advisor. Students must apply for a 
minor by completing a Request for Minor Form and have it 
signed by their Major and Minor Advisors. 

Pre-Law Students 

The Department of Political Science recognizes the 
interests and needs of the undergraduate Political 
Science major who plans to attend law school. The basic 
skills important to such students include: 

(1) how to think logically, 

(2) how to read intelligently, and 

(3) how to express oneself clearly. 

These skills are developed in a number of disciplines. 
Beyond these basic skills, the department encourages 
interested Political Science majors to acquire a broad 
background in Political Science rather than to select only 
courses that deal with public law.The department 
publishes a pre-law handbook that answers general 
questions for our majors interested in pre-law and the 
department's pre-law advisors will counsel these students 
on specific concerns. 

In selecting electives, Political Science majors should 
remember that the LSAT and law school require the ability 
to read with comprehension of concepts and logic and to 



express oneself with clarity and precision. Whether or not 
a given major will benefit from a particular elective is a 
question best answered by the student in close 
consultation with an advisor. Courses in History, 
Philosophy, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Math and 
English will probably all give Political Science majors 
interested in prelaw practice in relevant skills. Breadth of 
preparation is important. Whether a particular course in 
logic, writing or another area is the best choice can only 
be answered on an individual basis. 

Public Affairs Internships 

The Department occasionally is able to provide 
opportunities for practical work-study experiences in 
governmental and nongovernmental agencies. Four 
categories of internships are open to qualified students: 

1. Judicial Internships (Prerequisites: POS 3283- 
Judicial Process or equivalent) 

2. Legislative Internships (Prerequisites: POS 3424- 
Legislative Process or equivalent) 

3. Campaign Internships (In election year). 
(Prerequisites: POS 3443-Political Parties, or POS 4233- 
Public Opinion and Elections) 

4. Washington Center Internships (This program is 
administered through the Washington Center, an 
organization providing opportunites for semester length 
programs of internship and coursework in Washington, 
D.C. See http://www.twc.edu for further information). 
Standards for enrollment as an intern student include: 

Enrollment is by permission of the instructor only. A 
student wishing to enroll as a public affairs intern should 
consult with the appropriate faculty member early in the 
preceding semester and receive written permission to 
enroll. A 3.0 GPA is required. 

A Political Science major may count a maximum of six 
credit hours in internships toward his/her major. 

All public affairs internships in political science will be 
on a Pass/Fail basis. 

For further information on internships, contact your 
political science advisor. 

Upper Division Transfer Credit 

Students will generally receive transfer credit for junior 
and senior level courses in political science with a grade 
of 'C or higher. While a student may transfer up to 30 
credits of upper division work, the department will only 
accept 15 credits towards the Political Science curriculum. 
All decisions to recognize transfer credit rest with the 
department advisor or chairperson. 

Undergraduate Advising 

The Department of Political Science has an 
Undergraduate Advisor available to answer student 
questions regarding degree requirements, transfer credit, 
and graduation. All new majors and minors should make 
an appointment to meet with the Undergraduate Advisor in 
advance of their enrollment in the program. Prior to 
registering for their final semester of courses, graduating 
seniors should also meet with the Undergraduate Advisor 
for a graduation check to review their records. 
Appointments for undergraduate advising are available 
through the department secretary. In addition, all Political 
Science faculty are willing to meet with students to 
discuss their academic work, the prospects of graduate 
studies and career planning. 



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Undergraduate Catalog 



Course Descriptions 
Definition of Prefixes 

CPO-Comparative Politics; INR-lnternational Relations; 
POS-Political Science; POT-Political Theory; PUP-Public 
Policy; URP-Urban Planning. 

Courses that meet the Breadth Requirements for the 
major are identified by subfield following the course title: 
(AP) American Politics; (JP) Judicial Politics; (CP) 
Comparative Politics; (IP) International Politics; and (PT) 
Political Theory. 

CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3). 

Analysis of major theories of comparative politics 
including development, state building, institutions, 
patterns of political interaction and comparative elites. 
Focus on Latin America and the Third World. 

CPO 3010 Comparative Politics: Theory and Practice 
(CP) (3). Examines major theories and methods of 
comparative politics, focusing on divergent political 
systems (Democracy, Authoritarianism, Totalitarianism). 
Countries/regions studied vary with instructor. 

CPO 3055 Authoritarian Politics (CP) (3). The purpose 
of this course is to identify the conceptual and empirical 
characteristics of authoritarian regimes. An ideal typical 
authoritarian regime will be established, followed by case 
study analyses of modern authoritarian systems, like 
those of Brazil, Mexico, and Portugal. The course is 
designed to analyze the circumstances giving rise to non- 
totalitarian modern dictatorships, their political dynamics, 
and their survival capability. 

CPO 3103 Politics of Western Europe (CP) (3). Studies 
of political systems of the major European countries on a 
comparative basis. Attention is focused on such factors as 
political party systems, the cabinet form of government, 
and the politics of the Common Market. Considers the 
implications of the impact of mass society on these 
nations. Enables the students to better understand the 
nations which have supplied many of the theoretical 
foundations of modern politics. 

CPO 3104 Politics of the European Union (3). Traces 
the development of the governmental forms and 
structures in the evolution of the European Union and 
compares them to governmental structures in other 
regional and global multinational organizations. 

CPO 3204 African Politics (CP) (3). Compares the 
politics of Sub-Saharan Africa, and the Republic of South 
Africa and addresses questions of economic 
development, the colonial legacy, and the impact of 
traditional social patterns. 

CPO 3304 Politics of Latin America (CP) (3). This 
course analyzes the multiple structures, processes, and 
groups which are relevant to an understanding of Latin 
American political economy. Of special interest are the 
political impacts of land and wealth inequality and 
economic dependency. The dynamics of Latin American 
politics are considered, with an emphasis on the role of 
the military and the church. Alternate strategies for 
modernizing the region are considered. 

CPO 3403 Politics of the Middle East (CP) (3). This 
course will focus on the social, cultural, and political 
aspects of the Middle East region. Through an 
understanding and an interweaving of these complex 



facets, a student should gain a foundation and 
background for comprehension of the contemporary 
conflict which pervades this mercurial region. 

CPO 3502 Politics of the Far East (CP) (3). An intensive 
examination of the major political institutions of China, 
Japan, and Korea. A critical analysis of changing aspects 
of traditional relationships in Far Eastern political culture 
and major reform movements in contemporary Far 
Eastern politics. Allows the student to better understand 
nations whose political development will be an important 
factor in global development. 

CPO 3643 Russian Politics (CP) (3). Examines the 
political structure and institutions of Russia. Attention is 
paid to the historical and cultural aspects of the structure 
and use of power. 

CPO 4034 The Politics of Development and 
Underdevelopment (3). This course is an analysis of the 
causes of development and underdevelopment in Third 
and Fourth World countries. It includes an analysis of 
major theoretical approaches to understanding 
development problems, as well as an analysis of the roles 
of major national and non-national actors. 

CPO 4053 Political Repression and Human Rights (3). 

Examination of domestic factors resulting in political 
repression and violations of human rights. American, 
European, and South American examples will be used. 

CPO 4057 Political Violence and Revolution (3). An 

examination of major historical instances and modern 
expressions of political violence; discussion of revolution 
from a comparative perspective. Attention will focus on 
the social origin and political determinants of such events. 

CPO 4062 Comparative Judicial Politics (3). An 

examination of the various modes of dispute settlement 
and rule adjudication cross-culturally. Emphasis is on the 
similarities and differences of judicial behavior, judicial 
decision-making, judicial recruitment, and judicial powers 
in cross-national analysis. 

CPO 4072 Comparative Electoral Behavior (3). Public 
opinion, voting choice, and electoral patterns from a 
comparative and historical perspective. Attention will 
focus on West Europe and Latin America. Differences 
from North American trends and patterns will also be 
detailed. 

CPO 4102 European Union in World Politics (3). 

Examines comparatively the foreign policies of the 
European Union member states and of the EU, with 
special emphasis on EU-US (transatlantic) relations and 
the future of the EU in world politics. 

CPO 4165 Italian Politics (3). An examination of the 
political structure and traditions of Italy since WW II. 
Particular attention is given to the internal development of 
democracy as a model for other nations. Emphasis on the 
politics of pluralism. 

CPO 4303 Politics of South America (3). A cross- 
national discussion of the political systems and cultures of 
the Latin American nations, with special emphasis on the 
larger countries. Attention is given to the role of the 
military and to the problem of violence. Designed to give 
the student an overview of the political life of the nations 
with whom we share this hemisphere. 



Undergraduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 21 9 



CPO 4323 Politics of the Caribbean (3). Studies the 
political system of the major British, French, Dutch, and 
Spanish areas in the Car