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Full text of "Undergraduate programs; catalog"

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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

Volume 70, Number 121; June 1, 1973. Published twelve times each month 

by the University of Illinois. Entered as second-class matter December 11, 

1912, at the post office at Urbono, Illinois, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Office of Publication, 1002 V/est Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

•« It is the policy of the University of Illinois 

to afford equal educational opportunities to qualified persons regardless 

of race, religion, sex, or ethnic background. 

University of Illinois administrative offices at Urbana-Champaign are open 

doily from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m., Monday through 

Friday, but not Saturdays, Sundays, or all-campus holidays which are 

indicated in the University Calendar. 

An information and campus tour center, available to visitors to the campus, 

is located in the north entrance lobby of the lllini Union. The center is 

open from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. doily, including Saturdays and Sundays. 



NOTICE: Return or renew all Library Materlala! The Minimum Fee for 
each Lost Book it $50.00. 



The person charging this material is responsible for 
its return to the library from which it was withdrawn 
on or before the Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons for discipli- 
nary action and may result in dismissal from the University. 
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



JAN 2 ■; 



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CONTENTS 

Prospective applicants for admission will find it helpful to first refer to the sec- 
tions of this catalog regarding the general description of the University, the cur- 
ricula available to undergraduates, admission, fees and expenses, and financial 
aid, and then refer to the individual college sections for information concerning 
college requirements and specific curricula. 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 4 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 6 

UNIVERSITY OFFICERS 7 

THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 9 

GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

Curricula Available to Undergraduates 13 

Professional Colleges 18 

Postbaccoloureate Programs 19 

Admission 19 

Summer Session Admission and Readmission 36 

Admissions Chart 39 

Precollege Programs 44 

Special Opportunities 45 

Student Services 55 

Fees and Expenses 61 

Financial Aid 73 

Graduation Requirements 85 

Academic and Other Regulations 91 

Academic Honors 96 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 98 

Urbana Council on Teacher Education 110 

COLLEGES AND OTHER ACADEMIC UNITS 115 

College of Agriculture 117 

Institute of Aviation 159 

College of Commerce and Business Administration 163 

College of Communications 175 

College of Education 1 83 

College of Engineering 201 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 235 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 271 

Graduate School of Library Science 335 

College of Physical Education 339 

Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work 355 

College of Veterinary Medicine 359 



APPENDIXES 

Appendix A: Administrative Officers at Urbana-Champaign 365 

Appendix B: Grants and Scholarships Administered by the University 367 

Appendix C: University of Illinois Long-Term Loan Funds 378 

Appendix D: Short-Term and Intermediate Loan Funds Administered 

by the University 383 

Appendix E: Course Abbreviations Used in Curricular Listings 384 

INDEX 387 

WHERE TO WRITE FOR FURTHER INFORMATION INSIDE BACK COVER 

Illustrations 

The illustrations in this catalog were provided by undergraduate students in the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts. Each student received 1 hour of credit for 
participation in the undergraduate open seminar — Art 199. The contributors 
are: Jeffrey Lee (page 8), Mary Auth (page 116), Bruce Daniels (page 158), 
William Mayer (page 162), Vicki Adams (page 174), Rosemary Sherman 
(page 182), Renee Przybycin (page 200), William Hans (page 234), Raymond 
Cioni (page 270), Robert Mango (page 338), Mary Revak (page 354), and 
Jane Kuntz (page 358). 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR — URBANA-CHAMPAIGN CAMPUS 
First Semester, Fall 1973 

Aug. 20, Mon.-Aug. 26, Sun New Sfudent Week 

Aug. 22, Wed. -Aug. 24, Fri. (noon) Registration 

Aug. 27, Mon Instruction begins 

Sept. 3, Mon Labor Day all-campus holiday (no classes) 

Oct. 8, Mon Columbus Day academic holiday (no classes) 

Nov. 12, Mon Veterans Day observance (classes dismissed 

10:45 to 11:15 a.m.) (nonacodemic holiday) 

Nov. 20, Tues., 5 p.m Thanksgiving vacation begins 

Nov. 22-23, Thurs. and Fri Thanksgiving all-campus holidays 

Nov. 26, Mon., 7 a.m Thanksgiving vacation ends 

Dec. 14, Fri Last day of instruction 

Dec. 15, Sat. -Dec. 22, Sat Semester examinations 

Dec. 25, Tues Christmas all-campus holiday 

Jan. 1, Tues New Year's Day all-campus holiday 

Second Semester, Spring 1974 

Jon. 14, Mon. -Jan. 20, Sun New Student Week 

Jon. 16, Wed. -Jan. 18, Fri. (noon) Registration 

Jan. 21, Mon Instruction begins 

Mar. 16, Sat., 1 p.m Spring vacation begins 

Mar. 25, Mon., 7 a.m Spring vocation ends 

April 12, Fri Good Friday all-campus holiday (no classes 

April 12 and 13) 

May 10, Fri Lost day of instruction 

May 11, Sat. -May 18, Sat Semester examinations 

May 25, Sat Graduation 

May 27, Mon Memorial Day all-campus holiday 

Eight-Week Summer Session 1974 

June 10, Mon. -June 11, Tues Registration 

June 12, Wed Instruction begins 

July 4, Thurs Independence Day all-campus holiday (no 

classes) 

July 8, Mon Beginning of second four-week courses 

Aug. 1, Thurs Last day of instruction 

Aug. 2, Fri. -Aug. 3, Sat Summer session examinations 



First Semester, Fall 1974 

Aug. 19, Mon.-Aug. 25, Sun New Student Week 

Aug. 21, Wed. -Aug. 23, Fri Registration 

Aug. 26, Mon Instruction begins 

Sept. 2, Mon Lobor Day all-campus holiday (no classes) 

Oct. 11, Fri., 5 p.m Fall vacation begins 

Oct. 17, Ttiurs., 7 o.m Fall vacation ends 

Nov. 1 1, Mon Veterans Day observance (classes dismissed 

10:45 to 11:15 a.m.) (nonocodemic holiday) 

Nov. 28, Thurs.-Nov. 30, Sat Thanksgiving all-campus holidays (no classes) 

Dec. 13, Fri Last day of instruction 

Dec. 14, Sot. -Dec. 21, Sat Semester examinations 

Dec. 25, Wed Christmas all-campus holiday 

Jan. 1, Wed New Year's Day oll-compus holiday 

Second Semester, Spring 1975 

Jon. 13, Mon. -Jan. 19, Sun New Student Week 

Jan. 15, Wed. -Jan. 17, Fri Registration 

Jan. 20, Mon Instruction begins 

Mar. 22, Sat., 1 p.m Spring vacation begins 

Mar. 28, Fri Good Friday all-campus holiday 

Mar. 31, Mon., 7 a.m Spring vacation ends 

May 9, Fri Last day of instruction 

May 10, Sat. -May 17, Sat Semester examinations 

May 24, Sat Graduation 

May 26, Mon Memorial Day all-campus holiday 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

MEMBERS EX OFFICIO 

Daniel Walker, Governor of Illinois, Springfield 62706 

Michael J. Bakalis, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Springfield 62706 

ELECTED MEMBERS 

Term 1969-75 

Earl M. Hughes, 206 North Hughes Road, Woodstock 60098 

Russell W. Steger, Suite 2140, 135 South LaSalle Street, Chicago 60603 

Timothy W. Swain, 411 Hamilton Boulevard, Peoria 61602 

Term 1971-77 

William D. Forsyth, Jr., 1201 South Fourth Street, P.O. Box 2209, 

Springfield 62703 
George W. Howard III, Howard Building, Box U., Mount Vernon 62864 
Earl Langdon Neal, Suite 1525, 111 West Washington Street, Chicago 60602 

Term 1973-79 

Ralph C. Hahn, 1320 South State Street, Springfield 62704 
Park Livingston, 202 South Kensington Avenue, LaGrange 60525 
Jane Hayes Rader, Windridge Farm, Route 2, Cobden 62920 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Earl M. Hughes, President, Woodstock 
Earl W. Porter, Secretary, Urbana 
Herbert O. Farber, Comptroller, Urbana 
R. R. Manchester, Treasurer, Chicago 
J. J. CosTELLO, University Counsel, Urbana 



UNIVERSITY OFFICERS 



GENERAL OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



John E. Corbali.v Jr., President of the University 

364 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

Ronald W. Brady, \'ice-President for Planning and Allocation 

349 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

Herbert O. Farber, Vice-President for Financial Affairs 

342 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

Eldon L. Johnson, \'ice-President for Governmental Relations and Public 

Senice 
377 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

Barry Munitz, Vice-President for Academic Development and Coordination 
415F Administrative Office Building, Medical Center, Chicago 60680 
George H. Bargh, Executive Assistant to the President 
364 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 
James J. Costello, University Counsel 
266 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 
Charles E. Flynn, Assistant to the President and University Director 

of Public Information 
139 Davenport House, Urbana 61801 
Earl ^V. Porter, Secretary of the University 
354 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

CHANCELLORS 

Joseph S. Begando, University of Illinois at the Medical Center 

414 Administrative Office Building, Chicago 60612 

Warren B. Cheston, University of Illinois at Chicago Circle 

2800 University Hall, Chicago 60607 

Jack W. Peltason, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

112 English Building, Urbana 61801 



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The University of Illinois 



The University of Illinois has a history of over one hundred years as a 
state-supported land-grant institution with a threefold mission of teaching, 
research, and public service. 

Chartered by the General Assembly in 1867 under provisions of the 
Land Grant College Act, the Illinois Industrial College, later renamed the 
University of Illinois, opened on March 2, 1868, with three faculty mem- 
bers and fifty students in one building near the present community of 
Urbana-Champaign. 

Since then, the University of Illinois has become one of the nation's 
major universities with three main campuses — the original Urbana- 
Champaign campus and the Chicago Circle campus, both offering bac- 
calaureate, master's, and doctoral programs, and the Chicago Medical 
Center campus with teaching, research, and service units in the health 
sciences. The University of Illinois at the Medical Center also has estab- 
lished several semiautonomous schools of medicine throughout the state, 
with one, the School of Basic Medical Sciences, located at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. 

The Urbana-Champaign campus is located approximately 130 miles 
south of Chicago in the adjoining cities of Urbana and Champaign, a 
community with a combined population of nearly 95,000. The campus 
offers undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs of study dur- 
ing an academic year of two semesters and a summer session. 

Approximately 24,000 undergraduate, 8,000 graduate, and 1,000 pro- 
fessional students enroll on campus each year. These students come from 
every state and many foreign countries, but generally about 96 percent 
of the undergraduate students are Illinois residents. 

The information in this catalog primarily applies to the undergraduate 
colleges, the Institute of Aviation, and the College of Veterinary Medicine 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Separate catalogs are published for the 



10 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



College of Law and the Graduate College at Urbana-Champaign and for 
the academic units at the other two campuses of the University. 

Eight undergraduate colleges at Urbana-Champaign ofTer programs of 
study leading to baccalaureate degrees. They are the College of Agriculture, 
the College of Commerce and Business Administration, the College of 
Communications, the College of Education, the College of Engineering, 
the College of Fine and Applied Arts, the College of Liberal Arts and 
Science*! and the College of Physical Education. The Institute of Aviation 
offers two-year terminal curricula open to beginning freshmen and other 
students. 

The Urbana-Champaign campus is an especially attractive environment 
for undergraduate study. Within each college and the Institute of Avia- 
tion, students have the opportunity to develop close relationships with their 
instructors, advisers, and others of similar academic interests while benefit- 
ing from the extensive educational resources and facilities of a large public 
institution. 

Beginning freshmen, as well as advanced students, find that the Univer- 
sity offers a wide variety of services to meet their special needs. Academic 
advising, tutorial assistance, professional counseling, financial assistance, 
and reading, writing, and study clinics are some of the many services avail- 
able to students needing assistance. 

Many special educational opportunities are also available. The Educa- 
tional Opportunities Program (EOP) for students who might otherwise be 
denied a college education, the Advanced Placement Program, proficiency 
examinations, the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), an early 
admission program for high school students, an honors program, services 
for physically handicapped students, a delayed admission program for 
beginning freshmen in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, special 
opportunities for the admission of veterans, concurrent enrollment of 
students at Parkland College and the Urbana-Champaign campus, and 
independent and overseas study programs are explained in the Special 
Opportunities section beginning on page 45. 

The University Library, with more than 4,700,000 volumes, 540,000 
pamphlets, 464,000 microtexts, and an extensive collection of periodicals, 
maps, musical scores, and other materials, offers excellent resources for 
study and research. The Undergraduate Library in a building adjacent 
to the general Library provides special study facilities and 100,000 volumes 
and other materials selected to serve the needs of undergraduate students. 

A wide choice of social, cultural, professional, and recreational activities 
is available to students. Campus events regularly include programs, lec- 
tures, forums, theatrical productions, movies, dances, and special scien- 
tific and fine arts exhibits. More than 300 professional, social, religious, 
service, and scholastic organizations arc active on campus. The Krannert 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



Center for the Performing Arts with its four separate and specialized 
theatres provides excellent facilities for orchestra, opera, choral organi- 
zations, theatre, and dance. Opportunity exists for students to participate 
in many performing musical organizations. 

The University is a member of the Intercollegiate Conference (Big Ten) 
and competes in baseball, basketball, cross-country, fencing, football, golf, 
gymnastics, swimming, tennis, track, and wrestling. Many facilities are 
available for intramural and personal sports, including two golf courses; 
indoor and outdoor swimming pools; gymnasiums; indoor and outdoor 
tracks; tennis, basketball, and handball courts; ice skating rinks; pistol 
ranges; and playing fields. 



General Information 



CURRICULA AVAILABLE TO UNDERGRADUATES 

Appearing below are the curricula offered by the undergraduate colleges and the 
Institute of Aviation. The list of undergraduate degrees and certificates conferred 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus and the general requirements for graduation 
begin on page 85. 

Most of the curricula are open to qualified students at the beginning of their 
freshman year. A few curricula, which are identified in the list below, require a 
year or more of general introductory or preparatory study. 

All applicants for admission to the University must apply for admission to a 
particular college and curriculum. Beginning freshmen are required to remain in 
the college to which they have been admitted for at least two semesters of full-time 
study in the prescribed freshman program. Students who wish to transfer to another 
college at the end of one year must meet the accepting college's admission require- 
ments and compete for any available spaces. Because of severe enrollment restric- 
tions it is unlikely that beginning freshmen may later transfer to a number of cur- 
ricula. Specific, current information is available from the college concerned. For 
unusual and extenuating circumstances, college offices will consider individual 
requests to transfer from one college to another after one semester in residence. 

College of Agriculture 

Agricultural communications (options in advertising, news-editorial, and radio- 
television) 

Agricultural industries (areas of special interest: agricultural commodities, agri- 
cultural real estate and finance, farm supplies, and food and food products) 
Agricultural science (a four-year program for students desiring preparation for 
graduate study or professional work in animal, plant, or soil science; agricultural 
economics; agricultural law; and rural sociology; and a five-year program for stu- 
dents enrolled in the combined agricultural science and agricultural engineering 
program ) 

Core curriculum — All students in this curriculum follow a similar program during 
the first two years leading to specialization during the last two years in one of the 
following: 

Agricultural economics (options in farm management, agricultural marketing, gen- 
eral agricultural economics, and rural sociology) 
Agricultural mechanization (areas of emphasis: farm structures, conservation, farm 

power, and farm machinery) 
Agronomy (options in agronomy, crops, soils, and crop protection) 
Animal science (options in general animal science and companion animal biology) 

13 



14 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Dairy science 
General agriculture 

Horticulture (fruits, vegetables, or other specialized horticultural crops) 
Food industry (options in business, engineering, and production) 
Food science 
Forest science 

Home economics (options in apparel design, the child and the family, foods in 
business, foods and nutrition, general home economics, hospital dietetics, household 
management, institution management, retailing of clothing and home furnishings, 
and textiles and clothing) Students may also combine advertising, journalism, and 
radio-television with home economics. (See page 153.) 
Home economics education (for prospective teachers of home economics) 
Interior design 

Ornamental horticulture (spjecialization in production, marketing, and use of orna- 
mental crops, and related professional activities) 
Restaurant management 

Teaching of agricultural occupations, high school level (options in agricultural pro- 
duction, agricultural supply, agricultural mechanization, agricultural products - 
plants, agricultural products - animals, ornamental horticulture, and agricultural 
resources and forestry) 
Wood science 

Institute of Aviation (Two-Year Terminal Curricula) 

Flight courses are open to students enrolled in other schools and colleges on a 

space-available basis. 

Aircraft maintenance (including combined flight-maintenance program) 

Aviation electronics 

Professional pilot 

College of Commerce and Business Administration 

The first two years of work in all fields in commerce and business administration 

are almost the same. Students later concentrate in one of the following curricula: 

Accountancy 

Business administration 

Economics (several specialized sequences) 

Finance (areas of specialization in finance investment and banking; insurance and 

risk management; and real estate and urban economics) 

Curriculum unassigned (Temporary classification for students in the College of 

Commerce and Business Administration who have not selected a degree program. 

Selection must be made by the end of the sophomore year. ) 

College of Communications 

This college does not admit beginning freshmen. Applicants for admission to the 
College of Communications in the following curricula must have completed a mini- 
mum of 60 semester hours of undergraduate work. 
Advertising 
News-editorial 

Radio-television (to prepare students for work in all except the technical phases 
of radio and television) 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 15 



College of Education 

CURRICULA OPEN TO FRESHMEN AND OTHER STUDENTS 

Business education (areas of sp>ecialization in accounting-bookkeeping, data pro- 
cessing, economics, marketing and distributive education, and secretarial-office 
practice) 

Early childhood education (preparation for teaching in the nursery school and 
kindergarten-primary grades) 
Elementary school teaching 

Technical education specialties (preparation to teach a specialty at one or more 
school levels — elementary, secondary, technical institute, junior college, or indus- 
trial training program — with such specialties as electronics, machine tools, avi- 
onics, machine tool drafting, architectural drafting, and construction, as well as 
industrial arts) 

Teaching of deaf and hard-of-hearing children 
Teaching of mentally handicapped children 

CURRICULUM OPEN TO STUDENTS WITH JUNIOR STANDING 

High school teaching (See page 186 for specialties.) Applicants for admission 
should be aware that five other undergraduate colleges offer teacher education 
curricula which are open to beginning freshmen and other students. (See page 
111.) 

College of Engineering 

A common program is followed by freshmen in engineering so that a student may 
change from one of the following curricula to another at the end of the first year 
without loss of credit. 

Aeronautical and astronautical engineering 

Agricultural engineering (options in electric power and processing, farm structures, 
power and machinery, and soil and water) 
Ceramic engineering 

Civil engineering (areas of specialization: structures and structural materials, soil 
mechanics and foundation engineering, environmental engineering, construction 
engineering and management, hydraulic and hydrosystems engineering, photogram- 
metric and geodetic engineering, transportation systems, and engineering systems) 
Combined five-year agricultural engineering-agricultural science program (fresh- 
men enter College of Agriculture) 

Combined five-year engineering-liberal arts and sciences program (freshmen enter 
College of Engineering) 
Computer engineering 
Computer science 
Electrical engineering 

Engineering mechanics (for students interested in research and development in 
engineering) 

Engineering physics (including basic preparation for atomic and nuclear engi- 
neering) 

General engineering (fields of concentration in engineering administration, engi- 
neering marketing, environmental quality, computer science, and mining and geo- 
logical engineering) 
Industrial engineering 



16 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Mechanical engineering 

Metallurgical engineering 

Teaching of engineering technology (electronics and mechanical options) 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Architectural studies 
Art and design 

Art education 

General curriculum — All freshmen in art and design curricula except those in art 
education enter the general curriculum. After completing one year in the general 
curriculum students must select one of the following degree curricula: 

Crafts (ceramic or metal emphasis) 

Graphic design 

History of art 

Industrial design (art or structural emphasis) 

Medical art (five-year program combined with College of Medicine; the first 
three years are given at the Urbana-Champaign campus) 

Painting 

Sculpture 
Dance (applied program for men and women) 
Landscape architecture 
Music, with majors in: 
History of music 
Instrumental music 
Music composition 
Voice 

Music education for prospective teachers (vocal-choral or instrumental emphasis) 
Teaching of dance 
Theatre 

Theatre: Acting 

Theatre: Directing and playwriting bases 

Theatre: Technology and design (costume and scenery options) 
Urban and regional planning 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Chemical engineering 

Chemistry 

Combined five-year engineering-liberal arts and sciences program (freshmen enter 

College of Engineering) 

Combined sciences and letters-education program for mathematics teachers 

General (two-year curriculum provides advising and counseling for the student 

who chooses to defer selection of a major) 

Geology 

Physics 

Preprofessional curricula (See page 311.) 

Medical dietetics 

Medical laboratory sciences 

Medical record administration 

Occupational therapy 

Predentistry 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 17 



Prcphamiacy 

Prephysical therapy 

Prt-professional nursing 

Sciences and letters f including prtprofcssional preparation for the Colleges of 

Communications, Law, Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine) Also available in this 

curriculum is the Individual Plans of Study, limited to sophomores and above in 

good academic standing, which allows students to design a course of study which 

best fulfills their personal educational interests and abilities. 

Students in the sciences and letters curriculum take two years of basic nork followed 

by a major in one of the following subjects: 

Actuarial science (mathematics) 

American civilization 

Anthropology 

Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Biology- (general and honors majors) 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

Entomology 

Finance 

French (literature, or language and linguistics) 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Greek 

History 

History of art 

Home economics 

Italian 

Latin 

Mathematics 

Mathematics and computer science 

Medieval civilization 

Microbiology 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Physiology 

Political science 

Portuguese 

Psychology (general major, applied psychology major, or graduate preparatory 

major) 
Religious studies 
Rhetoric and composition 
Russian 

Russian language and area studies 

Social welfare (interdepartmental program which satisfies both major and minor) 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Speech (areas of emphasis: general speech, public address, interpretation, theatre, 

speech science and phonetics, speech correction, and audiology) 
Statistics (^mathematics) 
Zoology 
Speech and hearing science I ''A B. program) 



18 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Speech and hearing science II (B.S. program, for certification) 

Teacher education (secondary) in fields of biology, chemistry, earth science, En- 
glish, geography, mathematics, physics, social studies, and speech 
Teacher education (both high school and elementary) in Foreign Languages 

(French, German, Latin, Russian, Spanish) 

College of Physical Education 

Health and safety education (for men and women with options, selected in the 
junior and senior years, in school health education and school safety education 
which are teacher education programs, and in community health education, and 
in public safety education) 

Physical education for men (options for the High School Certificate, grades six 
through twelve; for the Special Certificate, grades kindergarten through fourteen; 
for the teacher education minor in coaching; and for the teacher education minor 
in physical education for men) 

Physical education for women (including general teacher education options for the 
High School Certificate, grades six through twelve; and the Special Certificate, 
kindergarten through grade fourteen) 

Recreation and park administration (including options in program specialist, rec- 
reation and park administration, outdoor recreation, outdoor interpretive education, 
and therapeutic recreation) 



PROFESSIONAL COLLEGES 

College of Law 

The College of Law admits new students only in September. Minimum require- 
ments for admission are a bachelor's degree from an accredited four-year college 
or university, a minimum grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) in all course work 
taken, and a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission Test. Upon applica- 
tion by a prospective student the degree requirement may be waived by special 
action of the Admissions Committee of the College of Law. 

The College of Law has no specific prelegal course requirements for admission, 
but the prospective law student should choose his prelegal subjects to achieve a 
well-rounded general education. He is advised to consult with the Psychological 
and Counseling Center at Urbana-Champaign relative to his interests and aptitude 
for law, and with members of the College of Law faculty in regard to his plans. 

Additional information and applications for admission may be obtained by 
writing to the Dean, College of Law, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
Urbana, Illinois 61801. Applications for taking the Law School Admission Test 
and a bulletin giving testing dates, locations, and the cost of the test are also 
available from the College of Law or from the Educational Testing Service, Box 
944, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 

College of Veterinary Medicine 

All applicants for admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine must present 
a minimum of 60 semester hours of preprofessional course work from a fully 
accredited college or university and a 3.5 (A = 5.0) minimum grade-point aver- 
age. This requirement may be completed in the College of Liberal Arts and Sci- 
ences at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Because admission to the College of 
Veterinary Medicine is very competitive, satisfaction of the preprofessional course 
work requirement will not guarantee admission. (See College of \'eterinary Medi- 
cine on page 359.) 



ADMISSION 



POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 

College of Engineering 

A 32 st'inrstcr hour postl)accalaureate program designed to provide additional train- 
ing and depth of subject matter is availabh- for persons who are currently teaching 
in the area of engineering technology. A Certificate in the Teaching of Engineering 
Technology is awarded upon completion of the program. (See page 233.) 

Graduate Programs 

The Graduate College offers advanced degrees in over one hundred fields of study 
which are explained in the Graduate Programs catalog. This publication is avail- 
able from the Graduate College, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 330 
Administration Building, Urbana. Illinois 61801. 



ADMISSION 

Information regarding admission requirements and application procedures may 
be obtained by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 177 Administration Building, Urbana, Illinois 
61801, (217) 333-0302. Admission officers are available for consultation from 9:00 
a.m. to 12:00 noon and from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (exclud- 
ing all-campus holidays). No appointment is necessary. 

Admission Policy 

The fundamental admission policy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign is to accept for admission the academically best-qualified applicants. The 
admission requirements described herein are minimum requirements. Since the 
number of applicants satisfying minimum requirements usually exceeds the limited 
number of spaces available, the University, in line with its fundamental policy, 
accepts for admission the best-qualified applicants to the extent of spaces avail- 
able. Satisfaction of the minimum requirements is not, therefore, a guarantee of 
admission. 

Competitive requirements, those requirements which must be met if an 
applicant is to compete successfully for admission with other applicants satisfying 
minimum requirements, vary depending upon the number of spaces available and 
the number and qualifications of applicants. The Office of Admissions and Records 
publishes guidelines, based on previous years' admissions experiences, by which 
applicants can better determine their chances for admission in competition with 
other applicants. These guidelines are included in the application packet. 

For experimental and special programs, spaces may be reserved for applicants 
of different qualifications; the number of spaces so reserved may not exceed 10 
percent of the previous fall term entering class. A limited number of spaces may 
also be reserved for applicants entering programs for which admission decisions 
must be delayed. 

General Requirements for Admission 

Applications for admission may be submitted by individuals who may not have 
satisfied the general admission requirements of age, high school graduation, mini- 
mum high school credits, and prescribed subjects, on the date of application, but 
who will have satisfied them by the date of desired enrollment at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. (Also, see Other Categories of Admission on page 32.) 



20 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



AGE 



An applicant must be at least sixteen years of age. The dean of the college con- 
cerned, however, may admit on petition a student fifteen years of age who meets 
all other requirements for admission and who is to reside, while attending the 
University, with his parents or guardian, or with someone selected by them. 

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION 

High school graduation is a requirement for admission except for students eligible 
for admission under special opportunities for early admission. (See page 53.) The 
high school graduation requirement can be met by graduation from: 
Accredited Secondary Schools. To be admitted by certificate, an applicant must be 
a graduate of an accredited secondary school. If the school is in Illinois, it must 
be fully recognized by the superintendent of public instruction; if located else- 
where, its rating must be equivalent to full recognition. (See page 21.) 
Unaccredited Secondary Schools. Graduates of unaccredited secondary schools 
which offer four years of instruction are admitted by examination. The director 
of admissions and records is authorized to admit a student who is a graduate of 
such an unaccredited secondary school subject to his satisfactory performance in 
advance of admission on the General Educational Development Tests. (See page 
23.) The provisions for special admissions may apply. (See page 33.) 

HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS 

Applicants for admission to all curricula must present a total of at least 15' units^ 
of acceptable secondary school work. The required 15 units must include the 
following : 

1. Three units in English.^ 

2. One unit each in algebra and plane geometry."* 

3. All subjects prescribed in the admissions pattern specified for the curriculum 
which the applicant desires to enter. (See Subject Pattern Requirements on 
page 21.) 

4. Elective units. Since the number of prescribed units for all curricula (1, 2, and 



^ Graduates of schools organized as three-year senior high schools, including 
grades ten, eleven, and twelve, must have taken at least 12 units in the senior high 
school. Credit earned prior to the ninth grade is accepted under the conditions 
described on page 21. The transcript of credits certified by the senior high school 
must show any credit accepted from a lower grade. 

^ A unit course of study in the secondary school is a course covering an aca- 
demic year and including not less than the equivalent of 120 sixty-minute hours of 
classroom work. Two hours of work requiring little or no preparation outside the 
class are considered as equivalent to 1 hour of prepared classroom work. Fractional 
units of the value of less than one-half are not accepted. Not less than 1 unit of 
work is accepted in a foreign language, elementary algebra, plane geometry, 
physics, chemistry, or biology. 

^ Only courses in history and appreciation of literature, composition (in- 
cluding oral composition when given as a part of a basic English course), and 
grammar count toward the 3 units required for admission to all curricula. 

"* General mathematics, college preparator>' mathematics, or other courses in 
mathematics may be accepted in lieu of algebra and plane geometry, or more 
advanced courses, in cases where the content of the course is essentially the same 
as that ordinarily included in the required course, as determined by the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. When 
such courses are not equivalent to the prescribed algebra and plane geometry, or 
more advanced courses, they will be accepted as elective credit. 



ADMISSION 21 



3 above) is less than the 13 required, each applicant must present elective units 
selected from any of the high school subjects which are accepted by an accredited 
school toward its diploma and which meet the standards for accrediting. Courses 
in such fields as agriculture, art, commerce, general science, home economics, in- 
dustrial arts, and music arc accepted as elective units for admission. 

SUBJECT PATTERN REQUIREMENTS'" 

There are, at the Urbana-Champaign campus, seven colleges and one institute 
oflFering programs of undergraduate study which freshmen may enter. Admission 
to each particular college and curriculum requires that the applicant complete 
certain high school subjects. The subjects required diflfer depending upon the 
college and curriculum selected by the applicant. There are five different patterns 
or combinations of subjects, designated by roman numerals I, II, III, IV, and V 
in the Admissions Chart on pages 39 through 44. See table 1 on page 22 for a 
description of the subjects which constitute each pattern. 

SOURCES OF ACCEPTABLE CREDITS 

The high school credits required to qualify for admission to the undergraduate 
colleges may be obtained by the following two ways. 

Certificate from an Accredited High School or Other Secondary School 

A student presenting a certificate from any high school or preparatory school in 
Illinois fully recognized by the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction 
in Illinois is given entrance credit for all subjects named therein for which the 
school is specifically accredited. Entrance credits are also accepted on certification 
from the sources listed below. 

- Schools accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

- Schools accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

- Schools approved by the New England Association of Colleges and Secondar\- 
Schools. 

- Schools approved by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary- 
Schools. 

- Schools approved by the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools. 

- Schools approved by the Western College Association. 

- High schools and academies registered by the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York. 

- Schools accredited by state universities provided the certificate shows that the 
standard starte of Illinois time requirements have been met. (See footnote 2 on 
page 20 for definition of high school unit.) 

High .School Credit Completed Prior to the Ninth Grade. Credit completed prior 
to the ninth grade is accepted by the University if it appears on the transcript of 
a fully recognized high school and is certified by the principal to be a course equiv- 
alent in quality and quantity to the course ordinarily offered in the high school. 



^ For the freshman applicant for admission, no exemptions are permitted nor 
substitutes accepted for the high school subjects prescribed by the University ex- 
cept as provided under the provisions for Special Admissions described on page 33. 
For the transfer applicant who will have completed, by the date of enrollment at 
the Urbana-Champaign campus, 30 or more semester hours of acceptable college 
credit, the subject pattern requirements are waived. Other transfer applicants, 
those presenting between 12 and 30 semester hours, may be required to satisfy the 
high school subject pattern requirements. 



22 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Table 1: High School Subject Pattern Requirements (See page 21.) 

MINIMUM 
NUMBER OF 

PATTERN I UNITS 

English 3 

Mothematics^ 

Algebra 1 

Plane geometry 1 

One or more units in at least three of the following: 

One additional unit in English, 2 units in one foreign language/ science (not 
general science;,^ social studies/ additional mathematics (beyond algebra and 
plane geometry) j_5 

Total 10 

PATTERN II 

English 3 

Mathematics^ 

Algebra 1 

Plane geometry 1 

One or more units in at least three of the following: 

Two units in one foreign language/ science (not general science)/ social studies/ 
additional mathematics (beyond algebra and plane geometry) 7 

Total 12 

PAHERN III 

English 3 

Mathematics' 

Algebra 1 

Plane geometry 1 

One foreign language^'* 2 

One or more units in at least two of the following: 

Additional foreign language, science (not general science),^ social studies/ 

additional mathematics (beyond algebra and plane geometry) 5 

Total 12 

PATTERN IV 

English 3 

Mathematics' 

Algebra 2 

Plane geometry 1 

One foreign language^ 2 

Science (not general science)^ 2 

Social studies^ .2 

Total 12 

PATTERN V 

English 3 

Mathematics' 

Algebra 2 

Plane geometry 1 

Trigonometry Va 

One foreign language^" 2 

One or more units in each of the following: 

Science (not general science),^ social studies^ 4 



Total 12^1 



ADMISSION 23 



Table 1 (cont.l 

' See footnote 4 on page 20. 

' The foreign language requirement for admission to any curriculum specifying this 
subject is fulfilled by 2 units in any one foreign language token in on accredited high 
school. 

^ The subjects included in the science field ore astronomy, biology (or botany and 
zoology), chemistry, geology, and physics. General science will not be used as a unit of 
required science but will be counted as on elective toward satisfying the required total of 
15 units of acceptable credit. 

* The subjects included in the social studies field ore civics, commercial or economic 
geography, economics, history, psychology, and sociology. 

It is strongly recommended that students complete three or, if possible, four years of 
the same foreign language before entering the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at 
Urbano-Chompaign. Students who have completed three years of study will hove a variety 
of options for completing the required one semester of study in the some language in the 
college. (See page 280.) Students who have completed four years of study will have com- 
pleted the foreign language requirement for a degree from that college and will not have 
to toke additional foreign language courses unless majoring in a foreign language. 

Supplementary Certificates. Supplementary certificates from high school principals 
covering work done and examinations taken in addition to work shown on certifi- 
cates previously submitted may be accepted in all cases where they refer to work 
done and examinations passed prior to the student's registration at the University. 
Supplementary' certificates relating to secondary school work done and examinations 
passed after his registration at the University are not acceptable. 

General Educational Development Tests 

General Educational Development (GED) Tests may be used for several admission 
purposes: (1) satisfaction of specific high school subject requirements, (2) satis- 
faction of the high school graduation requirement, (3) establishment of high 
school rank in class, and (4) validation of high school graduation from and high 
school credits earned at unaccredited secondary schools. 

Veterans, personnel currently serving in the armed forces,® and civilians who 
are nineteen or more years of age' are eligible to take the GED tests. A non- 
veteran, non-high school graduate, regardless of age, is not eligible to take the 
GED tests until after the graduation of the class with which he would normally 
have graduated. 

The high school subject requirements for admission are described in table 1 
on page 22. A passing score on the GED tests allows the following credit: English, 
5 units; mathematics, 2'/; units; social studies, 4 units; natural sciences, 3Vi units. 
However, the credit in mathematics does not satisfy the algebra-geometry require- 
ment. An applicant for admission who has never attended a secondary school but 
who has passed the GED tests would still be deficient in the subjects indicated 
below. 

Pattern I deficient in algebra and geometry. 

Pattern II deficient in algebra, geometry, and an additional unit in mathe- 
matics or 2 units in a foreign language. 

Pattern III deficient in algebra, geometry, and foreign language. 

Pattern IV deficient in algebra, geometry, and foreign language. 

Pattern V deficient in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and foreign language. 

The applicant who has attended, but has not graduated from, an accredited 



' See also Undergraduate Credit for Service and Education in the Armed 
Forces on page 94. 

' In special cases approved by the director of admissions and records these 
tests may be used for applicants under nineteen years of age. 



24 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



secondary school may use the GED tests to satisfy the graduation requirement for 
admission and to establish a rank in class, and may, by supplementing his secondary 
school credits, satisfy the high school subject requirements. The graduate of an 
accredited high school who is deficient in certain high school subjects required for 
admission may receive authorization to take single-area GED tests. A graduate of 
an unrecognized secondary school may use the GED tests to establish a rank in 
class and to validate graduation from and credits earned at the unaccredited 
secondary school. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

Each applicant may be required to present evidence of satisfactory physical and 
mental health to the director of health services. Each admitted applicant for admis- 
sion will receive a Student Health Report form which he may use to report perti- 
nent medical data to the director of health services. Upon advice of a University 
health service physician, admission or readmission may be denied until the student 
is cleared by the McKinley Health Center. 

Students transferring from the Chicago Circle or the Medical Center campus 
should request that their Student Health Report forms be transferred by the health 
center on their campus. 

Military personnel may have their Student Health Report forms completed by 
a base physician. 

Tuberculosis Control 

During the registration period each new, transfer, or readmitted student must take 
a tuberculin skin test and report to the McKinley Health Center for a reading 
within 48 to 72 hours after application, or present evidence of freedom from tuber- 
culosis as evidenced by a University of Illinois or public heaJth agency certificate 
(skin test or x-ray) dated within the last twelve months. 

Persons who have a positive reading must have a chest x-ray taken by the 
McKinley Health Center. Persons with a history of positive reaction to tuberculin 
will not be skin tested but will be required to have a chest x-ray made by the 
health center. Health center x-rays are made without charge. 

Failure to comply with the tuberculosis control requirements will result in 
cancellation of registration. 

Admission of Beginning Freshmen 

An applicant is considered a beginning freshman for admission purposes if he is 
entering the University directly from high school, even if he has earned college 
credit through the Advanced Placement Program and/or other programs for su- 
perior high school students, or if he has attempted, subsequent to high school 
graduation, fewer than 12 semester hours of college-parallel classroom course work 
at one or more accredited collegiate institutions.^ 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Read the first two paragraphs under Admission Policy on page 19. 



^ If space is not available for midyear high school graduates who have applied 
for and, on the basis of a completed application submitted, have been determined 
eligible for admission in the spring semester immediately following their gradua- 
tion, enrollment may be deferred until the following summer or fall term. Should 
these students enroll at another collegiate institution during the interim period, 
their admission to the Urbana-Champaign campus will not be jeopardized if they 
are in good standing regardless of the number of credit hours they have completed. 



ADMISSION 25 



Minimum Admission Requirements 

Minimum requirements for the admission of beginning freshmen shall be: 

- A nonresident of the state of Illinois must rank in at least the top quarter of his 
graduating class.* 

- Residents and nonresidents of Illinois must satisfy the University minimum re- 
quirements in terms of age, high school graduation, total number of high school 
units, high school subjects prescribed for admission to the particular college and 
curriculum applied for, and health."^ (See General Requirements for Admission 
on pages 19 through 24.) 

- In addition, an applicant (whether resident or nonresident of Illinois) for admis- 
sion to any curriculum for which a special requirement is indicated in the Ad- 
missions Chart on pages 39 through 44, must satisfy the special requirement." 

Competitive Admission Requirements 

It is the policy of the University to accept for admission the academically best- 
qualified applicants to the extent that spaces are available. Each applicant must 
apply for admission to a particular college and curriculum within which a fixed 
number of spaces is available.*^ The criterion used to identify the best qualified of 
domestic beginning freshman applicants*' is a combination of high school percentile 
rank and admission test score (ACT or SAT). (See Admission Test Information 
below.) 

Competitive requirements vary from one admission processing period to an- 
other depending upon the number of spaces available and the number and qualifi- 
cations of applicants. The Office of Admissions and Records publishes guidelines, 
bated on previous years' admissions experiences, by which applicants can assess 
their chances for admission in competition with other applicants on the basis of 
their combination of high school percentile rank and admission test score. These 
guidelines are included in each application packet. Prospective applicants who meet 
the minimum requirements of the University and of their chosen college and cur- 
riculum are encouraged to request the packet of admission application forms and 
information from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, lOOA Administration Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. (See 
also Application Dates on page 26.) 

ADMISSION TEST INFORMATION'* 

Each domestic beginning freshman applicant, regardless of rank in class or length 



' See Residence Classification on page 95. 

'° See Opportunities for the Physically Handicapped on page 52. 

" Instructions about procedures for completing these special requirements 
are provided after an application for admission is received by the Office of Ad- 
missions and Records. 

" Each applicant should carefully consider his choice of college and cur- 
riculum since beginning freshmen are required to remain in the college to which 
they have been admitted for at least two semesters of full-time study in the pre- 
scribed freshman program. Students who wish to transfer to another college at the 
end of one year must compete for any available spaces and must meet the applied- 
for college's requirements for admission. 

" Admission requirements and procedures for foreign students are explained 
on page 35. 

" Complete information concerning the tests, the dates of test administrations, 
and the locations of testing centers may be obtained from high school counselors 
and principals, or by writing to the appropriate testing agency: American College 
Testing Central Office, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa 52240, for the ACT; or, the 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592. Princeton, New Jersey 08540, or 
Box 1025, Berkeley, California 94701, for the SAT. 



26 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



of time out of school, is required to furnish the Officx* of Admissions and Records 
with an admission test score. The assessment administered l)y the American College 
Testing (ACT) Program is prescribed. However, an applicant may submit the 
report of scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. ^''' Applications for admission will not be considered until secures 
on either the ACT or SAT are received by the Office of Admissions and R.ecords 
in the form of an official score report sent directly from the testing agency con- 
cerned. Prospective applicants are urged to complete an admission test in the spring 
of their junior year. 

APPLICATION DATES 

The application forms for admission to the spring, summer, or fall term of any 
given year are available from the Office of Admissions and Records in September 
of the preceding year. Admission application forms and supporting credentials (see 
Application Documents on page 33) should be submitted as soon as possible after 
the following dates, but not before. ^"^ Early application is essential for admission to 
certain curricula and is advisable in all cases. 

September 25 For admission of beginning freshmen in the following spring 

semester. 

September 25 For admission of beginning freshmen in the following fall 

semester, including those students who wish to enter in the 
summer session and continue in the fall semester. 
March 1 For admission of all students in the following summer ses- 
sion who do not intend to continue in the fall semester. 
(See Summer Session Admission and Readmission on page 
36.) 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

For information regarding application documents see page 33. 

SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Under the Special Opportunities section beginning on page 45 there are several 
programs discussed which are available to selected beginning freshmen: Educational 
Opportunities Program (EOP), Early Admission Programs, Opportunities for the 
Physically Handicapped, Admission of Veterans, Delayed Admission for Beginning 
Freshmen Admitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Concurrent En- 
rollment of Students at Parkland College and the Urbana-Champaign Campus, 
Advanced Placement Program, Proficiency Examinations, College-Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP), and Edmund J. James Scholars. 

Admission by Transfer 

Any student who has attempted 12 or more semester hours of college-parallel class- 
room course work at one or more accredited collegiate institutions, even though 
some hours have been failed, is subject to the requirements governing admission 
by transfer." 



^^ The highest score is used if more than one score report is received. 

^'^ Although applications from domestic students can technically be considered 
up to two weeks prior to the first day of registration for the fall term, spaces are 
rarely available at this late date. The director of admissions and records may ac- 
cept applications after this technical deadline under exceptional circumstances 
which justify special consideration. 

" Exceptions: policy in regard to midyear high school graduates, footnote 8 
on page 24; and policy in regard to transfer between the Chicago Circle and 
Urbana-Champaign campuses on page 28. 



ADMISSION 27 



The University of Illinois shall give priority to those transfer apjilirants who 
are best qualified. Preference will he given to transfer applicants who will have 
completed, by the date of desired entry, 60 or more semester hours of college- 
parallel course work attempted at one or more accredited collegiate institutions. 
Sixty semester hours are equivalent to 90 quarter hours. When spaces are limited 
and applicants with equal qualifications are being considered, priority will be given 
to junior college and four-year college transfer applicants whose curriculum choice 
is not available at the institution from which they apply for transfer. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Read the first two paragraphs under Admission Policy on page 19. 
Minimum Admission Requirements 

Minimum requirements for the admission of transfer students shall be: 

- Satisfaction of the University minimum requirements in terms of age, high school 
graduation, total number of high school units, and physical examination.'** (See 
pages 19 through 24.) 

- Satisfaction of a special requirement as listed in the Admissions Chart on pages 
39 through 44 when applying for admission to any curriculum for which a spe- 
cial requirement is indicated. '"' 

- A pretransfer grade-point average of 3.25 (A = 5.0). Some curricula require a 
higher minimum grade-point average. (See the Admissions Chart on pages 39 
through 44.) 

.An applicant, otherwise qualified, who is not in good academic standing at the 
institution he is attending or has last attended, is required to obtain the approval 
of the dean of the college he wishes to enter. A person on probation or on dropped 
status at another institution for disciplinary reasons may enter the University only 
on the approval of the appropriate subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Stu- 
dent Discipline. (See Admission or Readmission Denied Because of Misconduct 
on page 95.) 

College-parallel Work and Grade-point Average Calculation. Admission of trans- 
fer students from junior colleges and four-year collegiate institutions is based only 
on the transfer work which is of such nature as to prepare the students to continue 
on to baccalaureate degree programs (or equivalent programs). For purposes of 
transfer to the University, grade-point averages are calculated on the basis of all 
college-parallel courses attempted for which grades are assigned, and for which 
grade-point values can be determined. Incomplete grades are accepted as defined 
by the initiating institution. Grades in other course work completed, such as 
technical courses similar in content and level to courses taught at the University 
of Illinois, may be used in evaluation for admission upon request of the college to 
which the student seeks admission. 

Competitive Admission Requirements 

It is the policy of the University to accept for admission the academically best- 
qualified applicants to the extent that spaces are available. The criterion used to 
identify the best qualified of applicants for admission by transfer is the cumulative 
grade-point average. 



" Prospective transfer applicants who, by the date of desired enrollment at 
the Urbana-Champaign campus, will have completed fewer than 30 semester 
hours of college-parallel course work at one or more accredited collegiate institu- 
tions, may also have to satisfy the high school subject pattern general University 
requirement discussed on page 21. 

" Instructions about procedures for completing these special requirements 
are provided after an application for admission is received by the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records. 



28 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Competitive requirements vary from one adiiiission processing period to an- 
other depending upon the number of spaces available and the number and qualifi- 
cations of applicants. The Office of Admissions and Records publishes guidelines, 
based on previous years' admissions experiences, by which applicants can assess 
their competitive chances for admission. These guidelines are included in each 
application packet. Prospective applicants who meet the minimum requirements 
of the University and of their chosen college and curriculum are encouraged to 
request the packet of admission application materials and information from the 
Office of Admissions and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
lOOA Administration Building, Uri)ana, Illinois 61801. (Sec also Application Dates 
below.) 

TRANSFER OF STUDENTS TO AND FROM THE CHICAGO CIRCLE CAMPUS 

Any undergraduate student in good standing at the Chicago Circle campus or the 
Urbana-Champaign campus shall be admitted to the undergraduate college of his 
choice on the opposite campus, provided he meets the requirements of the second 
college for admission of an intracampus transfer.'" Admission shall remain open 
for each term until all spaces for the college or curriculum of the student's choice 
have been filled. 

APPLICATION DATES 

The application forms for admission to the spring, sununcr, or fall term of any 
given year are available from the Office of Admissions and Records in September 
of the preceding year. Admission application forms and supporting credentials (see 
Application Documents on page 33) should be submitted as soon as possible after 
the following dates, but not before. Early application is essential for admission to 
certain curricula and is advisable in all cases. 

September 25 For admission to the spring semester. 

March 1 For admission to the fall semester or for admission to the 

summer session to continue in the fall semester. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

For information regarding application documents see page 33. 

ACCEPTANCE OF CREDIT FROM OTHER COLLEGIATE INSTITUTIONS^' 

Any credit accepted by the Office of Admissions and Records for transfer to the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is, in all cases, subject to review by 
the student's college and major department with reference to its applicability 
toward a particular degree, and the student is expected to conform to all the re- 
quirements of his chosen degree program. 

A student who has passed a course at the University of Illinois may not be 
given credit for the same course taken elsewhere. 

Recognizing that most transfer students will enter the University after com- 
pletion of two or more years at other colleges and universities in Illinois, the Uni- 
versity is cooperating with other collegiate institutions in the state to attain a 
desirable degree of program coordination. Community college students, in particular, 
should consult their counselors for information on parallel programs. 

Accredited Four-Year Institutions 

Credits may be accepted for advanced standing from another accredited university 
or college. 



^° As opposed to the requirements of a transfer from one collegiate institution 
to another. (See Admission by Transfer on page 26.) 

^' See page 21 for information on acceptable sources of high school credit. 



ADMISSION 29 



In general, the Uni\ersity of Illinois accepts credit on an hour-for-hour basis 
for course work which is of such a nature as to prepare students to continue on to 
baccalaureate or equivalent programs and which is shown on official transcripts of 
record recei\ed directly from other fully accredited collegiate institutions which 
have been approved by one of the regional accrediting associations, including those 
classified by the regional accrediting association as Recognized Candidates for 
Accreditation and those approved for Correspondent status. Students from degree- 
granting institutions not in one of these categories, but which have been accredited 
or approved by one of the agencies recognized by the National Commission on Ac- 
crediting, also may be allowed credit for work transferred to the University in 
courses which are substantially equivalent to courses offered at the University of 
Illinois. 

A student transferring from a recognized collegiate institution (i.e., one who 
has attempted at least 12 semester hours of college-parallel classroom course work), 
who has been allowed credit for the Advanced Placement Program by that institu- 
tion and such credit is so certified on the official transcript of credits, is allowed 
credit by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the same amount as 
accepted by the previous institution. 

Provisionally Accredited Four-Year institutions 

Credits from schools with provisional accreditation are accepted on the basis of 
validation by satisfactory completion of additional work in residence. Validation 
through satisfactory work in residence may be accomplished by earning in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois or other fully accredited collegiate institution at least a 3.0 (A = 
5.0) grade-point average, or higher if prescribed by the curriculum the student 
wishes to enter, in the first 15 to 30 semester hours completed thereafter. 

Any semester in which the student completes his first 15 semester hours, or 
any number of semester hours between 15 and 30 inclusive, with the required 
average, is accepted as validating the transferred credit. In all cases, the grades for 
all work attempted in the validating period are counted in computing the average. 
Except as provided below, such credits not validated within the first 30 semester 
hours can then be validated only by proficiency examinations. 

For students who have already completed their residence requirement for grad- 
uation, validation of subsequent Class C credits may be considered satisfied by the 
previous work in residence at the University. 

Upon approval of the student's petition by the dean of his college and the 
director of admissions and records, credits earned in any subject area are accepted 
after successful completion (with grades of C or better) of 6 semester hours or 9 
quarter hours of higher level courses in the same subject matter field at the Univer- 
sity, even though a 3.0 or higher grade-point average was not achieved in the first 
15 or 30 semester hours, or their equivalent, in residence. 

Unaccredited Four- Year Institutions 

Credit fnjm unaccredited institutions is accepted only on the basis of validation by 
proficiency examination at the University of Illinois after enrollment. 

Junior Colleges 

Conditions governing acceptance of credit from four-year collegiate institutions also 
apply to junior colleges. 

Credit transferred from an accredited junior college is limited only by the pro- 
vision that the student must earn at least 60 semester hours required for the degree 
after attaining junior standing at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
or at any other approved four-year institution, except that the student must meet 
the residence requirements for a degree from the University. Any request for excep- 
tion to this rule in individual cases must be submitted to the dean of the student's 



30 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



college for decision. When a school or college requires three years of preprofessional 
college credit for admission, at least the last 30 semester hours of preprofessional 
credit must be earned in an approved four-year collegiate institution. 

Credits earned at a junior college which has not been accredited by the North 
Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, but which has been given a 
Class 1 rating and is recognized by the Illinois Junior College Board, will be ac- 
cepted without validation for a period of time not to exceed five years from the date 
on which the college registers its first class after achieving Class 1 status. The five- 
year period provides the normal amount of time necessary to acquire accreditation 
by the North Central Association. 

Credits earned in newly founded institutions granted Correspondent status by 
the North Central Association will be accepted without validation for a period of 
two years, during which the institution should acquire Recognized Candidate for 
Accreditation status, or membership in the association. 

The scholastic average of a student applying for admission to the University 
by transfer from a junior college is computed on the same basis as for transfers 
from a four-year institution. (See College-parallel Work and Grade-point Average 
Calculation on page 27.) The status of such a student and the specific credits 
acceptable toward his degree are determined by the dean of the college the student 
wishes to enter. 

Accredited Professional Schools 

Credit earned by undergraduate students in accredited professional schools in 
courses which are academically oriented, rather than technique oriented, will be 
accepted in the same manner as credit from any other accredited institution. Ac- 
ceptance of the credit toward a degree will be determined by the dean of the 
college concerned. 

Readmission 

A student will be classified as a readmission applicant if he falls into one of the 
two following categories: 

- A student who has registered and has earned credit in a degree-granting program 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus." 

- A student who has registered as a degree candidate at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus, has withdrawn prior to earning credit, and has not earned any credit 
at any other accredited collegiate institution." 

READMISSION POLICY 

The following three policy statements apply to any category of readmission appli- 
cants. 

- Applicants who desire readmission to a college other than the college in which 
they were previously enrolled may be readmitted only with the approval of the 
college concerned. 

- Clearance by the McKinley Health Center is prerequisite to the readmission of a 



" If a student earns credits at Urbana-Champaign as a nondegree candidate 
and then applies for admission as a degree candidate, he will be considered for 
admission as a beginning freshman if he has attempted less than 12 semester hours 
and as a transfer student if he has attempted 12 or more semester hours. 

" A student who has registered at the Urbana-Champaign campus, has with- 
drawn prior to earning any credit, and has subsequently earned credit at another 
accredited collegiate institution will be considered for admission as a beginning 
freshman if he has attempted less than 12 semester hours and as a transfer if he 
has attempted 12 or more semester hours of college-parallel classroom course work. 



ADMISSION 31 



former student whose permanent Unixersity record shows an encumhrance for 
medical reasons. 

- Clearance by the Bursar's l)i\ision is prere(}uisite to the reachnission of a former 
student whose permanent University record shows an encumbrance for financial 
reas«»ns."^ 

Students Who Were Not Dropped for Academic Failure 

Students who were not placed on academic drop status when they left the Urbana- 
Champaign campus and who have not acquired a degree will be automatically 
readmitted to their former program of study*"' on the same campus for the term 
of their choice, provided they meet the following conditions: 

- If they have attended any other institution of higher learning between the time 
they left the Urbana-Champaign campus and the term they wish to be read- 
mitted, they must be in good academic standing at the institution which they 
attended during this interim period. Former students who left the University 
on clear status or on probation,"'^ if they have attended another collegiate insti- 
tution where they have been dropped or have earned a grade-point average 
below 3.0 (A = 5.0), may be readmitted to the University only upon approval 
of the college concerned. 

- They have submitted a completed application for readmission (see Application 
Documents on page 33) to the Office of Admissions and Records by November 
15 for the spring semester, or by April 15 for the fall semester or for the summer 
session to continue in the following fall semester. 

Students Who Were Dropped for Poor Scholarship or Were Placed 
on Undetermined Status 

Former students who left the University on academic dropped or undetermined 
status, regardless of whether or not they have attended another collegiate institu- 
tion since leaving, and those who withdrew during the last three weeks of a semester 
or the last two weeks in a summer session or in a term, must obtain approval for 
readmission from the dean of the college concerned. 

Students Who Were Dropped or Were Placed on Probation 
for Disciplinary Reasons 

Petitions for readmission of former students who have been dropped from the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for disciplinary reasons and those who 
are on probation or who have been dropped from a previous collegiate institution 
for disciplinary reasons must be approved by the appropriate subcommittee of the 
Senate Committee on Student Discipline. (See Admission or Readmission Denied 
Because of Misconduct on page 95.) 

APPLICATION DATES 

The application forms for readmission to the spring, fall, or summer term of any 
given year are available from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, lOOA Administration Building, Urbana, Illinois 
61801, in September of the preceding year. Application for readmission forms and 



" A student in debt to the University at the end of any semester, term, or 
summer session for fees or other charges is not permitted to register at the Uni- 
versity again until his indebtedness has been discharged. 

^ See the first p>olicy statement under Readmission Policy on page 30. 

''' Scholastic probationary status at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign may not be cleared by attendance at another institution except by 
action of the dean of the student's college. 



32 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



supporting credentials (see Application Documents on page 33) should he sub- 
mitted as soon as possible after the following dates," but not before. 

September 25 For admission to the spring semester. 

March 1 For admission to the fall semester or for admission to the 

summer session to continue in the fall semester. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

For information regarding application documents see page 33. 

Other Categories of Admission 

ADMISSION OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

A person twenty-one years of age or over who is unable to meet the requirements 
for admission as a degree candidate may be admitted to the University as an un- 
classified student (not a candidate for a degree) in an undergraduate college, pro- 
vided he secures the approval of the dean of the college concerned.^* He may be 
required to obtain the recommendation of the instructors in whose courses he wishes 
to enroll. He must give evidence that he possesses the requisite information and 
ability to pursue profitably, as an unclassified student, his chosen subjects, and he 
must meet the special requirements, if any, for the particular college in which he 
wishes to enroll. 

An unclassified student in any college of the University may not enroll for 
more than two years except by special permission; application must be made 
through the dean of the college. 

A person registered as an unclassified student in one college and desiring to 
take a course in another college of the University must also obtain the approval 
of the dean of the latter college. 

ADMISSION OF IRREGULAR STUDENTS 

The irregular category of admission is for a person holding a bachelor's degree who 
wishes to continue study by registering in an undergraduate college. To be admitted 
in this classification a student must obtain the approval of the dean of the college 
he wishes to enter. 

ADMISSION TO CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Correspondence courses are open to any applicant who can meet the University 
entrance requirements and also to persons eighteen years of age or over whose 
applications are approved by the director of correspondence study. An application 
from a student who has been dropped from a collegiate institution will be con- 
sidered only on the recommendation of the authorities of the institution from which 
the student was dropped. For further information write to the Director, Corre- 
spondence Courses, Division of University Extension, University of Illinois at Ur- 
bana-Champaign, 104 Illini Hall, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

ADMISSION OF LISTENERS OR VISITORS 

Those wishing to attend a class as listeners or visitors must first obtain, on an 
Official Visitor's Permit, the written permission of the instructor of the class and 
the approval of the dean of the college concerned. Persons registering in the Uni- 



" Note the deadline dates for the guaranteed readmission processing period 
for Students Who Were Not Dropped for Academic Failure on page 31. 

^* Persons under twenty-one years of age may be considered for admission as 
an unclassified student under the provisions for Special Admissions. (See page 33.) 



ADMISSION 33 



versity for the first time obtain the required approval from the dean of the college 
in which the course is offered. Former students not currently registered must obtain 
approval of the dean of the college in which they were last registered. Former 
students are not permitted to attend classes as visitors while on dropped status. 

Visitors are not permitted in laboratory, military, physical education (other 
than theor>). or studio classes. For additional information, contact the Office of 
Admissions and Records. (See Visitor's Fee on page 73.) 

PART-TIME ENROLLMENT 

Each student is expected to pursue a full program of studies; the number of credit 
hours involved in such a program varies with the college and the curriculum. Pur- 
suance of less than a normal program (carrying a reduced load) may be permitted 
only with approval of the dean of the student's college or his designated represen- 
tative. Continuation of part-time enrollment is also subject to the approval of the 
students college office. 

SPECIAL ADMISSIONS 

A student not otherwise eligible for admission may be admitted, with the approval 
of the director of admissions and records and the dean of the college he wishes to 
enter, providing he submits evidence which clearly establishes his qualifications to 
do satisfactor>' work in the curriculum or the course in which he wishes to enroll. 

Application Documents 

All credentials presented for admission or readmission become the permanent prop- 
erty of the University and are not subsequently released to the student or to another 
individual or institution. 

Xo consideration will be given to any application for admission until all re- 
quired supporting credentials are received by the Office of Admissions and Records. 

ALL APPLICANTS 

All applicants for admission must submit: 

- A completed admission application form.^'"' Blank forms are available from the 
Office of Admissions and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
lOOA Administration Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801, (217) 333-0302. 

- A $20 check or money order,^' payable to the University of Illinois, in payment 
of the nonrefundable application processing fee. (See page 64.) 

- A record of separation from the armed forces of the United States, if applicable. 

In addition, applicants must submit, or have submitted, all the credentials 
listed below for their appropriate category of admission. 

FRESHMEN 

All freshmen (see definition on page 24) must submit:'' 

- An official high school transcript received from the high school showing the 
following: 



^ Social security numbers, which serve as f>ermanent student identification 
numbers, must be entered on the application for admission form and on the appli- 
cation for the SAT or ACT test. Students who do not have a social security num- 
ber should obtain one from their local Social Security Office. 

"^ The University cannot be responsible for cash sent through the mail. 

*' Freshman applicants who have completed some college-level course work 
should ask that a transcript of that work be sent directly from the collegiate 
institution attended. 



34 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Course work completed f'^ 

A description (course title and credit allowance) of courses in which the 

student is enrolled at the time of application, if applicable; 
A description (course title and credit allowance) of courses planned for 

future high school enrollment, if applicable ; 
The applicant's numerical rank in his graduating class ;'^ and 
The date of the applicant's graduation. 

- An official report of the admission test score (ACT or SAT) received directly 
from the testing agency concerned. (See Admission Test Information on page 
25.) 

TRANSFERS 

All transfers (see definition on page 26) must submit: 

- An official high school transcript received directly from the high school of 
graduation ; 

- Official transcript (s) of all college work attempted received directly from the 
institution (s) attended; 

- A description (course title, department, course number, and credit allowance) 
of courses in progress at the time of application, if applicable ; and 

- A description (course title, department, course number, and credit allowance) 
of courses, other than those in progress, to be completed prior to the desired 
term of admission, if applicable. 

READMISSION 

All readmission students (see definition on page 30) must submit: 

- An official transcript received directly from each collegiate institution at which 
course work was attempted since last attendance at the Urbana-Champaign cam- 
pus, if applicable; 

- A description (course title, department, course number, and credit allowance) 
of courses in progress at the time of application, if applicable ; and 

- A description (course title, department, course number, and credit allowance) 
of courses, other than those in progress at the time of application, to be com- 
pleted prior to the desired term of readmission, if applicable. 

Information accompanying the admission application form obtained from 
the Office of Admissions and Records will outline the timetable for notification of 
admission decisions. If approved for admission, the applicant will be requested to 
submit, by a specified date, a $30 deposit on tuition and fees^* to verify his intent 
to enroll. Approval for admission may be cancelled if the student fails to meet 
the advance deposit submission date. Admitted applicants also receive other infor- 
mation and instructions important to their preparation for enrollment at the Ur- 
bana-Champaign campus. (See Precollege Programs on page 44.) 



^ Students from three-year senior high schools should request that certifica- 
tion of work taken in the ninth grade be included on or with the transcript. (See 
page 21.) 

'* Since it is the policy of the University to accept for admission the aca- 
demically best qualified of applicants competing for limited spaces, the University 
needs an objective measure of academic qualification which is comparable to 
measures used by other high schools. Descriptive statements are generally not com- 
parable from school to school and will probably work to the applicant's disad- 
vantage unless accompanied by a numerical class rank. Therefore, high school per- 
sonnel are urged to provide a numerical class rank or substitute ranking. 

** The nonrefundable advance deposit on tuition and fees is explained on 
page 64. 



ADMISSION 35 



Admission of Foreign Students 

The Office of Admissions and Records is authorized to decide which students shall 
be classified as foreign according to the following definition: A person who is a 
citizen or permanent resident alien of a country or political area other than the 
United States and has a residence outside the United States to which he expects to 
return and either is, or proposes to be, a temporary alien in the United States for 
educational purposes is classified as a foreign student. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission is competitive and preference is given to applicants who are best-quali- 
fied academically for success at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
Minimum requirements for the admission of foreign students shall be: 

- Satisfaction of the University minimum requirements in terms of age, high school 
graduation, high school units, health, and the minimum requirements in terms 
of high school subjects prescribed for admission to the particular college and 
curriculum applied for. (See General Requirements for Admission on page 19.) 

- Satisfaction of a special requirement for admission to any curriculum for which 
a special requirement is indicated — such as an interview, aptitude test, or 
audition. 

- Satisfaction of the University requirement for English proficiency. (See Testing 
Requirements below.) 

- Adequate financial resources. (See Financial Resources below.) 

TESTING REQUIREMENTS 

A test of competence in English is required of all foreign students, including trans- 
fers, who file applications for admission to the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, except foreign students who are citizens of a country where the native 
language is English, or who have degrees from colleges or universities in countries 
where English is the native language and where all instruction was in English. A 
score on the examination must be received by the University before action is taken 
on the student's request for admission. All prospective foreign students who receive 
a score below the minimum score of acceptance on the test will not be admitted to 
the University. The director of admissions and records may, however, upon recom- 
mendation by the college concerned, waive the requirement of the test if evidence 
presented by the applicant clearly justifies such action. 

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) administered by the 
Princeton Testing and Advising Center, Princeton, New Jersey, has been approved 
for this purpose. In cases where TOEFL testing dates are not available prior to the 
desired term of entry, the University will arrange for substitution of the test given 
by the English Language Institute, Testing and Certification Division, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. Complete instructions for arranging the required English test at a con- 
venient location are sent to each applicant for whom it is required. Final admission 
status for these applicants is determined after the test results have been received. 

If the foreign applicant is admissible, his performance on the English test will 
either excuse him from further study of English, or indicate the need for additional 
study of English. If the results indicate that further study of English is necessary, he 
is required to take a placement test administered by the Division of English for 
Foreign Students at the University of Illinois prior to registration. The results of 
the placement test determine whether or not the student is required to register for 
one or more zero-credit courses in English. If this becomes necessary, the student's 
program of credit courses is reduced accordingly, and a longer time may be neces- 
sary for completion of his degree requirements. (See page 88 for a statement of 
the English requirement for undergraduate degrees.) 



36 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FINANCIAL RESOURCES 



University financial aid funds arc extremely limited and are available only to appli- 
cants in specific aid programs. Individual requests for financial aid cannot be con- 
sidered. Therefore, in order to be considered for admission, an applicant must have 
financial resources of at least $3,900 for each academic year of planned attendance. 
This amount will cover the present tuition and fees, books, and living expenses 
from August to June. Travel, summer school attendance, or support of dependents 
will require additional funds. The applicant should also plan ahead for possible 
periodic increases in expenses. 

APPLICATION DATES 

Applications for admission to the spring and fall semesters will be accepted begin- 
ning October 1 of the preceding year. Applications and all supporting credentials 
should be sent as soon as possible after October 1. Complete applications will be 
considered as they are received until all spaces have been filled. Admission decisions 
will be announced in writing to each applicant as soon as they are available. 

Prospective applicants may obtain additional information and application ma- 
terial from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, lOOA Administration Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

All foreign applicants must submit: 

- A completed Application for Undergraduate Admission for Applicants from 
Other Countries. 

- A $20 (U.S.) nonrefundable application fee payment in the form of a check or 
money order payable to the University of Illinois. 

- Official records for at least the last four years of secondary school study and for 
any postsecondary- or university-level work completed or attempted.'" When 
possible, applicants must have school officials provide a statement of the appli- 
cant's rank in class. This statement should indicate the perforjnance of the appli- 
cant relative to the performance of other members of his secondary or post- 
secondary school class. Applicants to some fields may be required to submit addi- 
tional materials, such as portfolios, aptitude test results, or auditions. These items 
will be requested by the Office of Admissions and Records v\'hen needed and will 
be required only for applicants satisfying all other admission criteria. 

- The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), if required, 
as indicated on page 35. 



SUMMER SESSION ADMISSION AND READMISSION 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign conducts an eight-week summer 
session offering undergraduate courses for both degree and nondegree candidates. 
Freshman, transfer, and readmission applicants for admission in June, to continue 
in the fall, are degree candidates; undergraduate nondegree status is available 
only during the summer term to students who are admitted to the summer ses- 



'^ All records must list subjects taken, grades earned or examination results 
(including those passed or failed in each subject), and all diplomas and certifi- 
cates awarded; official translations must be attached to these records if they are 
in a language other than English. All credentials must be certified by an officer 
of the educational institution attended or an official of the U.S. government or 
local government (for Koreans, the American Korean Foundation). Applicants 
attending U.S. or Canadian schools should have credentials submitted directly by 
the school. 



SUMMER SESSION 37 



sion only.*' Dcurtc candidates for admission in June, to continue in the fall 
semester, should refer to preceding sections — Admission of Beginning Freshmen 
(page 24), Admission by Transfer (page 26), or Readmission (page 30) — for 
information on admission recjuirements and application dates. For a description 
of required application materials degree candidates should refer to Application 
Documents (page 33). 

Undergraduate students enrolled on campus who completed the immediately 
preceding semester and who are eligible to continue in the same college need not 
apply for admission to the sunmier session. 

An undergraduate student who has been dropped for academic reasons at 
the end of a spring semester and who desires permission to continue for the follow- 
ing summer session only, need not apply for admission to the summer session; he 
is required to consult with an official of the college from which he was dropped 
and with an official of the college in which he intends to be readmitted at a future 
date (the same or another college). A student who is approved for such con- 
tinuance must petition for readmission at a subsequent term. 

Admission of Nondegree Candidates 

This section deals only with admission to the eight-week summer term as non- 
degree candidates. 

Approval of admission or readmission as a nondegree candidate in the sum- 
mer session in no way afTects a student's future standing in a college, and satis- 
factory performance is no assurance of approval for continuation in the fall 
or at any future time. Students admitted to the summer session as nondegree can- 
didates who later wish to enter one of the colleges of the University" as degree 
candidates must seek admission in the usual manner and must satisfy requirements 
in efTect at the time of application. 

All students holding a bachelor's degree must enroll in the Graduate College 
with the exception of applicants admitted as irregular students (persons holding 
a bachelor's degree who desire to continue their studies in an undergraduate col- 
lege). The dean of the college concerned must approve their admission. 

Admission Requirements 

Undergraduate applicants for admission to the summer session only as nondegree 
candidates may be approved by the director of admissions and records or by the 
Summer Session Office under one of the following conditions: 

- High school graduates who qualify for admission under minimum rank-test score 
combination requirements,^ but who have not been admitted under the com- 
petitive rank-test score combination requirements in effect for the fall semester, 
may be admitted to the summer session as nondegree candidates.'^ 

- Former University of Illinois students who have not graduated from the Univer- 



** Exceptions: admission as an unclassified student (see page 32) or for some 
colleges, as an irregular student (see page 32). 

'' Undergraduate applicants for admission or readmission to the University in 
the summer session, not as candidates for a degree, are not assigned to any college 
or curriculum. 

** These minimum rank-test score requirements (known as campus mini- 
mums) will be available from the Office of Admissions and Records the Septem- 
ber preceding the summer term for which admission is sought. 

*'■' Students who have been approved for admission in the fall semester will be 
authorized to begin in the immediately preceding summer session if they notify 
the Office of Admissions and Records of their intent to enroll in the summer 
session. 



38 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



sity may register as nondegrec candidates if they secure a release from the col- 
lege of the University in which they were last enrolled, and if such enrollment 
is approved by the director of admissions and records or by the Summer Session 
Office/" 

- Undergraduate students enrolled in other institutions may enroll in the summer 
session as nondegree candidates if they present a statement of eligibility to return 
to the collegiate institution last attended. 

- Persons employed as teachers who submit statements from the school authorities 
attesting to their employment may enroll in the summer session as nondegree 
candidates. 

- Other persons, twenty-one years of age or over, who have never attended a col- 
legiate institution but give evidence that they possess the requisite background 
and ability to pursue profitably courses for which they are qualified, may enroll 
in the summer session as nondegrec candidates. 

Application Date 

All applicants for admission to the summer session only as nondegree candidates 
may submit an application on or after March 1, but not before. 

Application Documents 

All credentials presented for admission become the permanent property of the Uni- 
versity and are not subsequently released to the student or to another individual 
or institution. All nondegree candidate applicants must sul:)mit: 

- A completed admission application form. This form is available from and should 
be returned with the required supporting credentials to the Office of Admissions 
and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Chanipaign, lOOA Administration 
Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

- A $20 check or money order, payable to the University of Illinois, in payment 
of the nonrefundable application fee. (See page 64.) 

CREDENTIALS REQUIRED OF CERTAIN APPLICANTS 

High school graduates (see the first category under Admission Requirements on 
page 37) are required to submit an official high school transcript received from the 
high school showing rank in graduating class, and an official report of the admis- 
sion test score (ACT or SAT) received from the testing agency concerned. 

Teachers must submit a statement attesting to their employment. 

Students enrolled at other collegiate institutions must submit a statement of 
eligibility to return to the institution concerned. 



*° Students on drop or probationary status must petition the Summer Session 
Office for admission as nondegree candidates. If approved, they will be admitted 
on probation for that one summer session only. 



ADMISSIONS CHART 



39 



ADMISSIONS CHART 

Requirements for Admission to Undergraduate Curricula 

In addition to meeting all other admission requirements a nonresident beginning 
freshman applicant must rank in the top quarter of his graduating high school 
class. Unless a higher average is indicated in the footnotes the required minimum 
transfer grade-point average is 3.25 (A ^5.0) for all curricula. 



Colleges and Curricula 



Subject Pattern 
(See page 21.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Agricultural communications 
Agricultural industries 
Agricultural science' 
Core curriculum with majors in: 

Agricultural economics (specify option) 

Agricultural mechanization 

Agronomy 

Animal science 

Dairy science 

General agriculture 

Horticulture 
Food industry 
Food science 
Forest science 
Home economics 
Home economics education 
Interior design 
Ornamental horticulture 
Restaurant management 

Teaching of agricultural occupations (high school level)' 
Wood science 



Pattern I 



Combined agricultural science-agricultural engineering 
(five-year program)^'* 



Pattern V 



* Minimum transfer grade-point overage is 3.5. 

" Transfer applicants with 45 or more semester hours must indicate the desired major. 
Special requirements: Students must hove a 3.5 grade-point average after 60 semester 
hours. Continuation in this program beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or 
provisional status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

* The first three years ore taken in the College of Agriculture. The fourth year is taken 
in either the College of Agriculture or the College of Engineering. The fifth year is taken 
in the College of Engineering. (See page 140.) 



INSTITUTE OF AVIATION 

(Two-year terminal curricula)' 

Aircraft maintenance 

Aviation electronics^ 

Professional pilot 

Combined flight-maintenance program^ 



Pattern 



Special requirements: Personal interview and special aptitude test required for all 
curricula. Special physical examination required for all flight students. 

^Curriculum in aviation electronics may not be offered in 1973 and thereafter. Announce- 
ment of its availability will be made in the literature sent to each prospective applicant. 

Students enter aircraft maintenance curriculum. 



40 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Colleges and Curricula 



Subject Pattern 
(See page 21.) 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Accountancy 

Business administration 

Economics 

Finance 

Curriculum unassigned 

(Temporary classification for students who have not selected 
a degree program. Selection must be made by the end of the 
sophomore year.) 



Pattern iV 



' Students admitted with deficiencies under Special Admissions provision must remove the 
deficiencies within the first year. 



COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS' 

Advertising^'^ 

News-editoriaP'^ 

Radio-television^'^ 



See page 175. 



* Beginning freshmen are not admitted to this college. 

^ Minimum admission grade-point average is 4.0, but applicants with a lower average 
will be considered if they demonstrate strong career motivation and aptitude. 

^ Special requirements: Complete 60 semester hours of undergraduate work. Possess a 
reasonable degree of typing ability. Applicants are required to submit a letter of career 
intent, letters of reference, accounts of media experience, and other evidence of interest in 
communications. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Business education''^ 

Early childhood education''^ 

Elementary school teaching''^"' 

High school teaching''^* 

Teaching of deaf and hard of hearing children' 

Teaching of mentally handicapped children'^^ 

Technical education specialties^'*' 



Pattern II 



' Minimum transfer grade-point average is 3.5. 

^ Continuation in this curriculum beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or 
provisional status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

^ Elementary school teaching (specialty for elementary school librarians), requiring subject 
pattern III, may be offered. Announcement of its availability will be made- in the literature 
sent to each prospective student. 

* Special requirement: Enrollment limited to students with junior standing. 

' Special requirement: Letters of reference and personal history form required, 

* Special requirement: 3.5 grade-point average after 30 semester hours. 



ADMISSIONS CHART 



41 



Colleges and Curricula 



Subject Pattern 
(See page 21.) 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Aeronautical and astronautical engineering 

Agricultural engineering 

Ceramic engineering 

Civil engineering 

Computer engineering 

Computer science 

Electricol engineering 

Engineering mechanics 

Engineering physics" 

General engineering 

Industrial engineering 

Mechanical engineering 

Metallurgical engineering 


Pattern V' 


Teaching of engineering technology' 
Electrical technology — electronics 
Mechanical technology 


Pattern II 


Combined agricultural science— agricultural engineering 
(five-year program) 


See College of Agri- 
culture on page 39. 


Combined engineering-liberal arts and sciences 
(five-year progrom)^"^ 
(Specify curriculum. See page 204.) 


Pattern V 


Postboccalaureote certificate program in the teaching of engineer- 
ing technology' 

Electrical technology — electronics 
Mechanical technology 
(See page 233.) 


One year of college 

physics 
Completion of integral 

calculus 



' Foreign language is not required for admission to these curricula, but it is recommended; 
if not taken, it should be replaced with additional science, social studies, or humanities 
courses. 

A minimum grade-point overage of 3.5 in all subjects and a combined grade-point 
overage of 3.5 in all courses in mathematics and physics are required for registration in 
advanced undergraduate physics courses. 

Minimum transfer grade-point overage is 3.5 (3.3 to 3.5 may submit petition); continua- 
tion in this curriculum beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or provisional 
status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

Minimum transfer grade-point overage is 3.5. Special requirements: Applicants must 
satisfy admission requirements of both the College of Engineering and the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

" The first, fourth, and fifth years ore token in the College of Engineering; the second 
and third years ore taken in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. In general, transfer 
students with more than 75 hours of credit are ineligible for this program. 

Special requirements: Baccalaureate degree from on accredited Institution, two years of 
pertinent industrial experience, and two years of experience teaching technical courses in 
the special field. 



42 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Colleges and Curricula 



Subject Pattern 
(See page 21.) 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

Architectural studies' 


Pattern V 


Art and design curricula^'^ 
Art education"^'' 
Crafts 
General 

Graphic design 
History of art 
Industrial design 
Medical art (five-year program)* 
Painting 
Sculpture 


Pattern III 


Dance^ 

Teaching of dance^'^'^ 

Landscape architecture 


Pattern II 


Music, with majors in:' 

History of music 

Instrumental music 

Music composition 

Voice 
Music education (vocal-choral or instrumental emphasis)''^ ' 
Theatre 

Theatre: Acting' 

Theatre: Directing and playwriting bases^ 

Theatre: Technology and design^ 
Urban and regional planning 


Pattern III 



Transfers from other departments in the University must have a 3.25 cumulative grade- 
point average. 

^ All first-year students in art, except those in art education, enter the general curriculum 
in art. After completing one year in the general curriculum students must select one of the 
more specialized art and design curricula. 

^ Continuation in this curriculum beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or 
provisional status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

^ The first three years are taken at the Urbana-Champaign campus, and the last two 
years are taken at the Medical Center, Chicago. 

^ Special requirement: 3.5 grade-point average after 60 semester hours. 

^ 3.25 grade-point average required for transfers from other departments in the Univer- 
sity and for continuation in art and design courses at the junior leivel. (See page 245.) 

' Special requirement: Qualifying audition. 

* Special requirement: Interview. 



ADMISSIONS CHART 



43 



Colleges and Curricula 



Subject Pattern 
(See page 21.) 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Combined sciences and letters-education program for mathe- 
matics teachers (See page 329.)' 

General (two-year program for freshmen and sophomores un- 
committed to a departmental major) 

Medical dietetics 

Medical laboratory sciences" 

Medical record administration" 

Occupational therapy' " 

Predentistry' " 

Prephormacy" 

Prephysicol therapy 

Preprofessionol nursing 

Sciences and letters curriculum, including preprofessionol prepa- 
ration for College of Communications, College of Low, College 
of Medicine, and College of Veterinary Medicine with majors 
in the subjects listed on page 17^ 

Speech and hearing science I (A.B. program) 

Speech and hearing science II (B.S. program, for certification)^ 

Teacher education curricula for high school teaching (biology, 
chemistry, earth science, English, geography, mathematics, 
physics, social studies, speech)'' 

Teacher education curricula in foreign languages for both high 
school and elementary school teaching (French, German, Latin, 
Russian, Spanish) ' 



Pattern III 



Chemical engineering 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Physics* 



Pattern V 



Combined engineering-liberal arts and sciences 
(five-year program) 



See College of 

Engineering on page 
41. 



Minimum transfer grade-point overage is 3.75 with 4.0 in mathematics courses; same 
averages required to remain in the program. 

" An interview with the head of the Department of Occupational Therapy is required. 
Resident applicants must ronk in the upper 50 percent of their high school class. Transfer 
students, except in exceptional cases, must complete at least two semesters in residence at 
Urbono-Chompaign to be eligible for admission to the professional phase of the curriculum. 

^Minimum transfer grade-point average is 3.5. 

* See also pages 175, 273, 314, and 359. 
To remain in good standing, a student in this program must hove achieved a cumulative 
college grade-point overage of at least 3.65 by the completion of his junior year. Students 
who desire certification for work in the public schools con complete certification requirements 
by completing a Master of Science degree. 

" Continuation in these curricula beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or 
provisional status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

Special requirement: 3.5 grade-point average after 60 semester hours. 

"^ A minimum grade-point overage of 3.5 in all subjects and a combined grade-point 
overage of 3.5 In all courses In physics and mathematics ore required for registration in 
advanced undergraduate mathematics and physics courses. 

''After the second year, students in this curriculum must hove and mointoln at least a 3.5 
general grade-point overage. A transfer student must present and maintain a correspond- 
ing record. 

It is strongly recommended that students complete three or, if possible, four years of the 
some foreign language before entering the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Admission into this program at the Urbana-Champoign campus does not guarantee ad- 
mission into the degree program at the University of Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago. 
Admission is made on the basis of academic qualifications. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Subject Pattern 
Colleges and Curricula (See page 21.) 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health and safety education'^ (options in school health educa- 
tion, school safety education, community health education, and 
public safety education) 

Physical education for men"'^ 

Physical education for women" 

Recreation and Park Administration (options in program spe- 
cialist, recreation and park administration, outdoor recreation, 
outdoor interpretive education, and therapeutic recreation) 



Pattern II 



For those who plan to teach (school health education or school safety education option), 
continuation in this curriculum beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or pro- 
visional status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

^ Continuation in these curricula beyond the sophomore year requires good standing or 
provisional status in teacher education. (See page 110.) 

' Special requirement: 3.5 grade-point average after 60 semester hours. 



PRECOLLEGE PROGRAMS 

Freshmen 

The University offers to high school seniors who have been approved for admission 
in the fall semester, a series of coordinated precollege programs to assist them in 
making careful preparation for college. These spring and summer programs include 
guidance testing, placement and proficiency testing, counseling, academic advising, 
and advance enrollment. The brochure Precollege Programs for Beginning Fresh- 
men, which describes each program and which includes a form for requesting par- 
ticipation, is sent to each beginning freshman with his notice of eligibility for 
admission.** 

TESTING 

Precollege testing is conducted on selected Saturdays beginning in February at 
various locations throughout Illinois; each student is furnished the test schedule 
from which he may select a test date and location. The tests offered are:" School- 
College Ability Test; placement and proficiency tests in biology, rhetoric, and for- 
eign languages (French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish) : and placement 
tests in chemistry and mathematics." The School-College Ability Test and the 
rhetoric test are required of all new freshmen ; the other tests are required only of 
those entering certain curricula. The precollege programs brochure contains a full 
explanation of required and optional testing. Test scores are not recorded on the 
student's permanent official academic record. 

COUNSELING 

The Psychological and Counseling Center offers optional services including the 
Self-Counseling Manual and individual or group counseling interviews to beginning 



** Freshmen who do not take advantage of the spring and summer programs 
must complete required testing, academic advising, and class scheduling during 
New Student Week, the week immediately preceding fall registration. Information 
about New Student Week activities is sent to all new students in July. 

"These tests supplement, but do not replace, the admission test (ACT or 
&AT) which is used to determine a student's eligibility for admission to the 
University. 

■*' Proficiency tests in chemistry and mathematics are offered during New 
Student Week. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 45 



freshmen wild lia\e completed the required testing. These services are intended to 
assist each new student in making the best possible use of the educational opportuni- 
ties provided by the University and in making wise educational and vocational 
decisions. 

With the aid of the Self-Counseling Manual the student and his parents are 
able to understand the student's test results and to answer for themselves most of 
the questions freshmen commonly have. Use of the manual may indicate the 
appropriateness of further counseling; individual or group counseling interviews are 
available by appcnntment at the Urbana-Champaign campus from April through 
July. A request form for such additional counseling is included in the manual. A 
summary of decisions and recommendations, mutually arrived at in the counseling 
interview, is given to the student to transmit to the academic adviser. 

ACADEMIC ADVISING AND ADVANCE ENROLLMENT 

Students who have completed required testing and who have paid the required $30 
advance deposit on tuition and fees may participate in the academic advising and 
Advance Enrollment Program conducted at the Urbana-Champaign campus in 
June and July. During the day that the student is on campus for this program he 
meets with an academic adviser who assists him in selecting a schedule of courses, 
for the fall semester, which satisfies college and curriculum degree requirements."^ 

Transfer and Readmitted Students 

New transfer and readmitted students have the opportunity to advance enroll dur- 
ing the summer for the fall semester. These students receive details of the Advance 
Enrollment Program in a bulletin mailed with their notice of eligibility for 
admission. 

Parents Program 

Parents are cordially invited to accompany their son or daughter on the day of 
advance enrollment. The University and the University's Dads and Mothers Asso- 
ciations conduct an orientation for parents to supplement their knowledge about 
the University and the Urbana-Champaign community. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for Applicants w^ith Superior Scholastic Records 

Because of the comprehensive nature of the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, arrangements for superior students differ among the various colleges 
and departments. Generally speaking, superior students are able to enter special 
courses or special sections of courses as freshmen and sophomores, and are encour- 
aged as juniors and seniors to participate in special programs for majors in the 
different departments. For details of these various arrangements, see the descrip- 
tions given in the college sections of this catalog. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

The Advanced Placement Program, administered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board, is designed for able high school students who are about to enter college 



** Since the results on the placement and/or proficiency tests are used by the 
colleges and academic departments concerned to evaluate each student's achieve- 
ment level and to assist him in arranging his class schedule, freshmen may not 
participate in the summer academic advising and advance enrollment program 
unless they complete required testing during the spring testing program. 



46 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



and who wish to demonstrate their readiness for courses more advanced than those 
most frequently studied in the freshman year. Advanced classes are offered in many 
high schools in one or more of the following subjects: French, Latin, German, Span- 
ish, English literature, English comp(jsition, American history, European history, 
biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. There is a national examination in 
each subject, administered in May by the Educational Testing Service, which is 
designed to measure the competence of the student in terms of the point at which 
he should begin his college study in that subject. 

The examinations are prepared by joint national committees of high school 
and college teachers. They are graded by other national committees on the follow- 
ing basis: 5, high honors; 4, honors; 3, creditable; 2, pass; and 1, fail. The marked 
papers are sent to the university which the student specifies he will attend. Each 
department within the University has the option of granting or not granting college 
credit and advanced placement on the basis of the board's grade or on the basis of 
the student's paper. The University encourages high schools and their outstanding 
students to participate in the program. 

A student transferring from an accredited collegiate institution (i.e., one who 
has attempted 12 or more semester hours of college-parallel classroom course work), 
who has been allowed credit for the Advanced Placement Program by that institu- 
tion and such credit is so indicated on the official transcript of credits, is also 
allowed such credit by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the same 
amount as accepted by the previous institution. Application of transferred advanced 
placement credit toward graduation, however, is subject to approval by the dean 
of the student's college. 

The specific credit recommendations at the Urbana-Champaign campus for 
beginning freshmen, including students with less than 12 semester hours of college- 
parallel classroom credit attempted at other collegiate institutions, are listed below. 

ART 

Art history 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Art 111 and 112 (8 semester hours). 
Scores of 3 or 2 will not be accepted. 

Art studio 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Art 1 17 and 1 19 (6 semester hours). 
Scores of 3 will be reviewed by the department. 
Scores of 2 will not be accepted. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
French 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive automatic credit for Fr. 201 and either Fr. 202 or 

199 (6 semester hours). 
Scores of 2 are not considered for advanced placement or credit. 

German 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Ger. 210 and 211 (6 semester hours). 
Scores of 3 receive automatic credit for Ger. 210 (3 semester hours). 
Scores of 2 are not considered for advanced placement. 

Latin 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive automatic credit and appropriate placement as shown 
below. 

Virgil examination: 3 semester hours credit and placement in Lat. 201. 
Prose examination: 3 semester hours credit for Lat. 201 and placement in 
Latin 202. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 47 



Lyric examination: 3 semester hours credit for Lat. 201 and placement in 
Lat. 202. 
A combination of the lyric and prose examinations will give 6 semester hours credit 

in Lat. 201-202 and placement in Lat. 203. 
Scores of 2 are not considered for advanced placement or credit. 

Spanish 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive automatic credit for Span. 241 and 242 (6 semester 

hours). 
Scores of 2 are not considered for advanced placement or credit. 

HUMANITIES 

English literature 

Papers with scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit of 3 semester hours for Engl. 

103. 
Papers with scores of 3 and 2 will be reviewed by the department. 

Rhetoric 

Papers with scores of 5 and 4 will receive automatic credit of 4 semester hours for 

Rhet. 105 and exemption from the rhetoric requirement. 
Papers with scores of 3 and 2 will be reviewed by the department. 

MATHEMATICS AND NATURAL SCIENCES 
Biology 

Biological science majors 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Biol. 110 (5 semester hours), and 

placement in Biol. 111. 
Scores of 3 and 2 are not considered for advanced placement credit. 

Nonscience majors 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Biol. 100 and 101 (8 semester 
hours). 

Scores of 3 receive automatic credit for Biol. 100 (4 semester hours) and place- 
ment in Biol. 101. 

Scores of 2 are not considered for advanced placement credit. 

Chemistry 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for 6 semester hours of general chemistry 
lecture work and constitute prerequisite for admission to Chem. 122, 131, 
and 134. 

Scores of 3 receive automatic credit for 3 semester hours of general chemistry lec- 
ture work and constitute prerequisite for Chem. 102 or 109. Each student 
is encouraged to take a proficiency examination in either course immediately 
after enrolling. A student who passes the Chem. 109 proficiency examina- 
tion receives another 2 hours credit and may enroll in 108 and 110. A student 
who passes Chem. 102 either by taking the course or by proficiency exami- 
nation will be given 4 hours credit each in 101 and 102, making the advanced 
placement score of 3 worth 4 semester hours, in eflfect. 

Scores of 2 receive no credit. 

Mathematics 
Calculus AB 
Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive automatic credit for Math. 120 (5 semester hours) 

and Math. 131 (3 semester hours) and advanced placement in Math. 141. 
Scores of 2 receive automatic credit in Math. 120 (5 semester hours) and advanced 

placement in Math. 130 or 131. 



48 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Calculus BC 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive automatic credit for Math. 120 (5 semester hours) 

and Math. 130 (5 semester hours) and advanced placement in Math. 140. 
Scores of 2 receive automatic credit in Math. 120 (5 semester hours) and Math. 

131 (3 semester hours) and advanced placement in Math. 141. 

Physics 

Physics B 

Scores of 5 and 4: Credit will be given in Phycs. 101 (5 semester hours) and Phycs. 
102 (5 semester hours). 

Scores of 3: Students may take a proficiency examination or enroll in Phycs. 101. 
If passed with grade of A or B, credit is granted for Phycs. 101 (5 semester 
hours) and Phycs. 102 (5 semester hours). 

Scores of 2: With approval of the department, students may take proficiency exam- 
inations in any of Phycs. 101, 102, 106, or 108 courses and receive credit if the 
examination is passed. 

Scores of 1 : Students will not on this basis alone be admitted to proficiency exam- 
inations. 

Physics C 

Scores of 5 and 4: Credit will be given as follows. 

Part I — Mechanics: Credit in Phycs. 106 (4 semester hours). 

Part II — Electricity and Magnetism: Credit in Phycs. 107 (4 semester hours). 
Scores of 3: Credit will be given as follows. 

Part I — Students may take a proficiency examination or enroll in Phycs. 106. 
If passed, credit is granted for Phycs. 106 (4 semester hours). 

Part II — Students may take a proficiency examination or enroll in Phycs. 107. 
If passed, credit is granted for Phycs. 107 (4 semester hours). 
Scores of 2 in Part I or Part II: With approval of the department, students may 

take proficiency examinations in any of Phycs. 101, 102, 106, 107, or 108 

courses and receive credit if the examination is passed. 
Scores of 1 in Part I or Part II: Students will not on this basis alone be admitted 

to proficiency examinations. 

Whatever his score, a student may of course enroll for credit in any of the 
introductory courses if he prefers taking the courses to receiving automatic credit 
or taking proficiency examinations. For additional information or to arrange to 
take proficiency examinations students should go to 233 Physics Building. 

MUSIC 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for Music 110 — Basic Music Literature (2 semester 
hours). 

Papers with scores of 3 will be referred to the School of Music for individual con- 
sideration and possible approval. 

Scores of 2 and 1 are unsatisfactory for advanced placement credit. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 
American history 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Hist. 151 and 152 (8 semester 

hours). 
Papers with scores of 3 will be reviewed by the department. 
Scores of 2 will not be accepted. 

European history 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive automatic credit for Hist. Ill and 112 (8 semester 

hours). 
Papers with scores of 3 will be reviewed by the department. 
Scores of 2 will not be accepted. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 49 



PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 

The University gi\es proficiency examinations, similar to regular semester examina- 
tions, in courses normally open to freshmen and sophomores and in more advanced 
undergraduate subjects upon the recommendation of the head or chairman of the 
department and appro\al of the dean of the student's college. They are available to 
students participating in the Precollege Programs (see page 44) and during the 
semester at times announced by the departments. 

Proficiency examinations are given without charge. The grade given in a pro- 
ficiency examination is pass or fail but no student is given a grade of pass unless 
he has made at least a grade of C on the examination. A student who passes a 
proficiency examination is given credit toward graduation for the amount regularly 
allowed in the course if it does not duplicate credit counted for admission to the 
University and if it is acceptable in his curriculum. No official record is made of 
failures in these examinations and grades received on proficiency examinations are 
not used in computing grade-point averages. Complete information regarding pro- 
ficiency examinations is found in the Code on Campus Affairs and Regulations 
Applying to All Students. 

GENERAL EXAMINATIONS OF THE COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM 

The Urbana-Champaign campus administers the General Examinations of the 
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) to offer students the opportunity to 
satisfy one or more of the general education requirements for graduation and to 
obtain 3 to 6 hours credit for each test successfully completed. 

Examinations in the humanities, the social sciences and history, and the 
natural sciences (which yields two subscores, one in biological science and the 
other in physical science), are administered for entering students during Summer 
Advance Enrollment and New Student Week. Group testing administrations for 
other students are offered once a semester. The Psychological and Counseling 
Center, 249 Student Services, (217) 333-3706, administers CLEP examinations 
on an individual basis. Continuing students must receive permission from their 
college office before taking a CLEP examination. A student who has completed 
regular college-level course work in any of these four areas may not take the 
CLEP examination in the same area. Any of these examinations may be taken only 
once during a given year; the charge for each examination is $5. 

CLEP test scores earned by Urbana-Champaign beginning freshmen, including 
students with less than 12 semester hours of college-parallel classroom credit at- 
tempted at other collegiate institutions, are evaluated for credit according to norms 
established for the campus. 

Additional information about CLEP examinations may be obtained from the 
college offices or from the Measurement and Research Division, University of Illi- 
nois at Urbana-Champaign, 307 Engineering Hall, Champaign, Illinois 61820, 
(217) 333-3490. 

EDMUND J. JAMES SCHOLARS 

The James Scholar Program, named for one of the University's distinguished presi- 
dents, provides a number of special curricular opportunities to academically tal- 
ented undergraduate students. Designation as a James Scholar is recognition by the 
University of extraordinary ability and achievement. It entitles the student to cer- 
tain academic privileges, including extended use of library facilities, and charges 
him with the responsibility of seeking sustained intellectual achievement throughout 
his undergraduate career. There is no monetary award associated with the designa- 
tion, and students who need financial assistance should apply to the Student Finan- 
cial Aids Office. 

James Scholars are characterized by outstanding academic records, high gen- 



50 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



eral aptitudes for college work, and reputations for seriousness of purpose, persis- 
tence, and self-discipline in educational endeavors. 

Students electing to participate in the program may enroll in any undergrad- 
uate curriculum; unusual academic arrangements are open to James Scholars in 
every course of study. These arrangements include the provision of honors courses 
and sections, special seminars, and interdisciplinary colloquia. In addition, James 
Scholars are encouraged to pursue individual scholarly interests by means of inde- 
pendent study and research projects. 

It is not expected that a James Scholar will take a full schedule of special 
courses. However, an average of at least one honors activity each semester is ex- 
pected of each James Scholar, and to encourage such sustained intellectual activity 
a campus-wide program has been implemented in which the student may earn 
officially recognized honors credit in a regular undergraduate course. This is accom- 
plished by means of a learning agreement between the student and the instructor in 
which the student agrees to undertake a special course-related project; successful 
completion of the project then earns the student transcript-designated honors credit 
for the course. 

James Scholars Participation Procedures 

Academic requirements for participation in the program are determined by the 
respective colleges. In general, any undergraduate may "self-select" into the pro- 
gram provided his decision is based on prior achievement and faculty or adminis- 
trative advice, and is accomplished prior to the terminal dates set for entry into 
academic programs leading to an honors degree. Students may elect to leave the 
program or may be removed for failure to meet standards of academic performance 
in the various colleges. 

Previously, the University Honors Programs Office conducted an annual state- 
wide nomination, application, and appointment procedure in cooperation with high 
school counselors or guidance directors. With the implementation of the self-selec- 
tion system, continuation of the selection and appointment of entering freshmen is 
inappropriate, and procedures have been developed to introduce self-selection into 
regular freshman orientation activities. 

High school students accepted for admission to the Urbana-Champaign campus 
will receive with their letters of eligibility preliminary information regarding honors 
opportunities and the self-selection system. During summer advance enrollment, 
freshmen will receive additional information regarding specific college programs 
leading to an honors degree, and at that time, in consultation with their advisers, 
may self-select into the program and select an honors course or plan other honors 
activities. 

Although the honors program in each college will vary in detail, generally, 
incoming freshmen electing to undertake an honors program will enter the Univer- 
sity as James Scholar Designates. After completion of a period on campus, each 
designate's record will be reviewed by his college, and he will be either invited to 
continue as a full James Scholar or advised to drop from the program on the basis 
of criteria developed by each college. Resident and transfer students wishing to 
self-select into the program should inquire at their college offices. 

Specific inquiries regarding the honors program of a college should be ad- 
dressed to the college office in care of the honors dean. General information about 
campus-wide honors activities is available from the Director, University Honors 
Programs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1205 West Oregon Street, 
Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Educational Opportunities Program 

GENERAL NATURE AND PURP6SES 

The Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign is one of several such programs at colleges and universities 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 51 



across the country. This program is designed to provide opportunities for a college 
experience to students who have historically been excluded from postsecondary 
education for a variety of reasons. A similar program exists at the Chicago Circle 
campus. 

Participants in the program, like many other students, receive financial support 
from federal loans and grants, Illinois State Scholarship Commission grants, and 
tuition waivers authorized by the Uni\crsity. Like other students, participants in the 
EOP also contribute toward their expenses through family contributions, summer 
and part-time employment, and loans. Financial aid also comes from private funds 
available to the University for this purpose. Supporting services for the program 
are provided by federal grants and by University contributions in the form of staff 
time and use of facilities. 

Through the EOP, the University is attempting to do several important things: 

- Provide educational opportunities to students who otherwise might not even be 
able to consider undertaking a college-level program. 

- Increase the representation of underrepresented ethnic groups at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. 

- Develop educational practices and policies, both academic and administrative, 
which will assist and support such students and which may well benefit students 
generally. 

- Provide for those students not in the EOP the vital cultural and social experience 
of meeting, living, and learning with and from students from a different culture. 

- Provide and disseminate to other educational institutions and agencies informa- 
tion which will increase their ability to deal with educational and sociological 
problems which affect students from disadvantaged backgrounds. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the program is limited to applicants from Illinois who fall into one of 
the following categories: 

- Beginning freshmen who meet the high school subject-pattern requirements for 
the college and curriculum of their choice and who meet the high school rank- 
test score combination for this program. (This information may be obtained from 
the high school counselor.) 

- Students not meeting the above stated academic requirements may be considered 
for special admission even though they do not meet the high school subject- 
pattern requirements. For a student to be admitted on this basis, both the dean 
of the college involved and the director of admissions and records (or their desig- 
nated representatives) must concur. 

Equivalent SAT verbal and mathematics scores are acceptable in lieu of the 
composite ACT score. It should be noted that in some curricula such as education, 
professional pilot, music, occupational therapy, etc., additional requirements must be 
met. (See Admissions Chart on pages 39 through 44.) 

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES 

The program of supportive services will endeavor to meet the wide range of needs 
of students in the EOP. Supportive services are designed to provide academic and 
nonacademic assistance as needed. The basic elements of the supportive services 
program are as follows: 

- Individual academic advising based upon information derived from the student's 
past records, test results, ability, and interests. The optimum class schedule and 
course selections will be determined by each student in consultation with special 
advisers in the various colleges. 

- Development of specially designed course offerings by various departments of the 
University, including basic courses in rhetoric, mathematics, chemistry, biology, 
psychology, and education. 



52 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



- Provision for the improvement of reading, writing, and study skills through ex- 
panded use of the Reading and Study Methods Clinic and the Writing Lab- 
oratory. 

- Development of a faculty and student tutoring system to assist students when 
needed. Specially trained staff will he assigned to work closely with students to 
determine when such tutoring is needed, and to follow through in securing 
tutors. The tutors help the student learn the substance of the material, as well 
as help him learn how to approach and master the subject. 

- Establishment of an office with trained staff to help and counsel students on the 
myriad problems and questions they face, including the complexities which arise 
from being part of a large and diverse university. 

- Development of programs for precollege orientation to enable the student to 
begin his college experience with greater awareness of what it means to be a 
student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

APPLICATION 

Applicants for participation in the program must submit completed application 
forms for admission to the University and arrange for their high school transcripts 
and test scores to be sent to the Office of Admissions and Records, University of 
Illmois at Urbana-Champaign, lOOA Administration Building, Urbana, Illinois 
61801. The student must also complete the University Financial Aid Application, 
the Parents' Confidential Statement of the College Scholarship Service, and the 
Illinois State Scholarship Commission application form. 

Application forms and additional information about the program may be 
obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Opportui'iities for the Physically Handicapped 

The Division of Rehabilitation-Education Services provides special facilities and 
services for students with permanent physical handicaps: paraplegics, triplegics, 
polios, spastics, deaf, blind, and others needing help. Physically handicapped stu- 
dents ordinarily live in University residence halls with other students and attend 
all regular classes. 

If it is physically and academically feasible for them to do so, physically handi- 
capped students may pursue any curriculum. There are, of course, limitations on 
the total number of physically handicapped students that can be accepted as well 
as limitations on the number that can be accepted in specific curricula at a given 
time. Preference is given to residents of Illinois, but properly qualified students 
from other states are considered. 

The requirements and procedures for admission are the same as for all stu- 
dents; the handicapped student is expected to meet all admission requirements of 
the University and of the college and curriculum in which he chooses to enroll. The 
physical examination which is required of the physically handicapped applicant 
must be performed by a McKinley health service physician within one week of 
enrollment. Handicapped students should make early application through the office 
of the director. Division of Rehabilitation-Education Services, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, Oak Street at Stadium Drive, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 
Each applicant will be sent detailed information covering various aspects of campus 
life, services and facilities, and the procedures required to gain admission 
consideration. 

Acceptance of physically handicapped students by the Office of Admissions 
and Records must be supported by joint approval of the McKinley Health Center 
and the Division of Rehabilitation-Education Services. Since the University may 
not be able to provide the necessary facilities for all who apply, early application for 
admission to any semester or the summer session is essential. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 53 



Admission of Veterans 

Veterans of the armed forces of the United States will be given special admissions 
consideration if it is determined that they ha\e a reasonaijlc chance for success. 

\'eterans without a high school diploma may meet the admission requirement 
of high school graduation through satisfactory scores on the General Educational 
Development (GED) Tests. (See page 23.) 

Opportunity also exists for veterans to take proficiency examinations for ad- 
vanced standing and to receive college credit for certain training, education, and 
experience received in the armed forces of the United States. (See page 94.) 

Early Admission Programs 

ATTENDANCE IN UNIVERSITY COURSES BY ILLINOIS HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS 

Illinois high school seniors are permitted, while still in high school, to attend Uni- 
versity classes for college credit under certain conditions. They may also enroll for 
college credit in correspondence and extramural courses offered by the Division of 
University Extension. 

To qualify for admission to this program a student must be recommended by 
his high school principal and should have approximately a 4.25 (A ==5.0) grade- 
point average. Each case is considered on an individual basis. Academic advisement 
of these students is the responsibility of the University Honors Programs Office. 

The courses taken by these selected seniors is work over and above the second- 
ary school curriculum. Grades and course credits will be recorded on the permanent 
University of Illinois record of the student and will appear on any official transcript 
issued. If the student enters the University after graduating from high school the 
courses will be credited toward University graduation if applicable to the chosen 
degree. 

Students applying for admission or readmission under the provisions of this 
program should make arrangements for the following materials to be sent to the 
Office of Admissions and Records: 

- A $20 check or money order payable to the University of Illinois in payment of 
the nonrefundable application fee. (See page 64.) 

- An application for admission or readmission to the University (not required of 
students enrolled under this plan in the immediately preceding semester or sum- 
mer session). 

- An official copy of the student's high school transcript covering all work com- 
pleted in high school and courses in progress, together with ACT or SAT test 
scores if available. .Acceptance under the Early Admission Program does not 
guarantee later acceptance as a degree candidate. 

- A letter of recommendation from the high school principal. This recommendation 
must include a statement of the University course or courses to be taken and 
certify that the program will not interfere with the completion of requirements 
for graduation from high school. 

Applications for admission or readmission should be submitted to the Office 
of Admissions and Records according to the schedule established for other students. 
(See page 26.) 

Students interested in correspondence study should write directly to the Direc- 
tor, Correspondence Courses, Division of University Extension, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, 104 Illini Hall, Champaign, Illinois 61820, for their appli- 
cation instructions. It is suggested that students comply as nearly as possible with 
the semester system of study and apply at least two weeks prior to the beginning 
of any semester in which they wish to pursue correspondence study. For the summer 
months, applications should be submitted no later than the middle of May. Regu- 
lar University fees, as outlined on page 62, are assessed for these registrations. 



54 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Applications, recommendations, and other information concerning prospective 
students for this program of study should be addressed to the Office of Admissions 
and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, lOOA Administration 
Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

EXTENDED EARLY ADMISSION 

Experimental Project for High School Seniors in Residence 
at the Urbana-Champaign Campus 

The Extended Early Admission Program is one aspect of a four-year study of time- 
shortened degree programs, which is being performed at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus under the auspices of the Carnegie Corporation. Students in the program 
are high school seniors who have discontinued their high school attendance, and 
who have come to the campus a year early to start their college career. Because 
it is experimental the program admits only a limited number of students. Students 
in the program are enrolled in regular four-year curricula. 

To enter the Extended Early Admission Program, students must meet general 
admission requirements of the University, except that they need not have a high 
school diploma. They must have completed the junior year in high school earning 
approximately 15 units towards the diploma, be in good academic standing, and 
receive the recommendation of their principal and other high school personnel who 
know the caliber of their work. Applicants must submit an application for admission, 
an official copy of their high school transcript, ACT or SAT test scores, and three 
recommendations from high school personnel, and must come to the campus for 
an interview. 

Inquiries about the Extended Early Admission Program may be addressed to 
the Director of the Three-Year Baccalaureate Study, Professor K. Broadrick, Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1205 West Oregon Street, Urbana, Illi- 
nois 61801. 

Delayed Admission 

BEGINNING FRESHMEN IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Beginning freshman applicants who have been approved for admission to the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences may request that their admission be delayed for 
a maximum of one year. Applicants who wish to consider this alternative should 
request further information from the Oilice of Admissions and Records at the time 
they request an admission application. (See Application Dates on page 26.) 

Concurrent Enrollment 

STUDENTS AT PARKLAND COLLEGE AND THE URBANA-CHAMPAIGN CAMPUS 

Students in good academic standing at Parkland College and at the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may concurrently enroll in courses offered by the 
opposite institution if such courses are not available at the student's primary campus. 
Approval for concurrent enrollment must be obtained from the dean of students at 
Parkland College and the office of the college concerned at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus. 

Concurrent enrollees pay the tuition and fees regularly assessed at each insti- 
tution in accordance with the amount of work taken. 

Study Away from Campus 

The University permits students who have been enrolled on campus for at least a 
semester or summer session, with the approval of their adviser and the appropriate 



STUDENT SERVICES 55 



department and college offices, to undertake independent study away from campus, 
either in the United States or abroad. 

Colleges and departments may establish variable credit courses which permit 
such students to continue enrollment in the University upon payment of an appro- 
priate fee. Final determination of credit is made by the department and college 
concerned, on completion of the program of study. 

Overseas study programs which are ofTered by each college are described in the 
individual college sections of this catalog. 

Independent Study and Individualized Programs 

In order to increase flexibility within established curricula to meet the special needs 
of students, the faculty of each department may establish a special course for inde- 
pendent study on or oflf campus, for experimentation, or for seminars on topics not 
treated by regularly scheduled courses. Requests for initiation of the course and 
suggestions for areas of study may be made by students or the course may be ini- 
tiated by faculty members. Such courses may be offered with the approval of the 
faculty member involved and the department head. 

The various colleges may treat formal curriculum requirements with sufficient 
latitude to permit development of individualized programs while maintaining those 
aspects of the curriculum which are indispensable to the area of specialization being 
pursued. No prior administrative approval is required for such modifications. Fac- 
ulty members may establish a modified curriculum for special groups of students, 
or a student may initiate a request for curriculum modification. 



STUDENT SERVICES 

Counseling Services 

Many people are available on campus to help students with various kinds of 
problems. 

Staff members of the Office of Admissions and Records, 177 Administration 
Building, provide admission counseling and general information about the Univer- 
sity including registration requirements, tuition and fees, identification cards, and 
student academic records. 

The dean of students and his staff are responsible for most matters involving 
student welfare and activities. The offices of Student Programs and Services, Stu- 
dent Personnel, Housing, and Student Financial Aids are available to help students 
with problems concerning personal adjustment to campus life, suitable housing, 
part-time employment, financial assistance, and interpretation of University rules. 
They also advise students on matters relating to fraternity and sorority pledging and 
student organizations. If a student does not know exactly where to find help, he 
should contact the Student Personnel Office, 130 Student Services Building, (217) 
333-0050. The staff there will refer him to the appropriate agency. 

Advisers, academic deans, heads of departments, and other faculty members 
devote much of their time to advising students on college requirements and pro- 
grams of study. During advance enrollment and registration, special advisers help 
students select courses and arrange their class schedules. 

The Psychological and Counseling Center, 206 Student Services Building, pro- 
vides students with aptitude testing services and professional counseling. Through 
these services students can obtain information about their abilities, interests, and 
personality to help them select a program of study and a vocation. Special help is 
provided for those who do not concentrate as well, read as rapidly, or study as 
efficiently as they are capable of doing. Counselors and psychologists are also avail- 
able to help students with personal and psychological problems. 



56 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



University Aids for Improving Students' Academic Performance 

READING AND STUDY METHODS CLINIC 

Training in developmental and remedial reading and efficient study methods is 
available to students at the Reading and Study Methods Clinic, 219 Student Ser- 
vices Building, a department of the Psychological and Counseling Center. The work 
in the clinic is voluntary and does not carry credit. There are no fees charged for 
this service. Training in study methods and reading is accomplished primarily in 
small groups ; however, individual training is provided when necessary. 

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC 

The clinical facilities and services of the Speech and Hearing Clinic, 601 East John 
Street, are available for examination, consultation, and therapy. Free services are 
extended to University students who have impaired hearing, speech deviations, or 
language problems. Students may call for information, or they may be referred by 
instructors or other interested individuals. 

ENGLISH WRITING CLINIC 

Any student who is not enrolled in a freshman rhetoric course and who has a writ- 
ing problem (spelling, organization, punctuation) may consult the English Writing 
Clinic, 311 English Building. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 
1:00 to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. All work in the clinic is done in indi- 
vidual conferences and attendance is voluntary. A student may seek help on his 
own initiative or he may be referred to the clinic by his instructors or by the dean 
of his college. 

WRITING LABORATORY 

Rhet. 103 — Writing Laboratory, is open to any Educational Opportunity Pro- 
gram (EOP) student in conjunction with his regular rhetoric courses. If possible, 
classes are limited to no more than four students. A student may enroll on his own 
initiative or may be referred by his rhetoric instructor. 

The course meets two hours a week and the student receives 1 semester hour 
of credit on a satisfactory /unsatisfactory basis. (See page 93.) One hour a week is 
devoted to a systematic study of grammar and the basic principles of writing. The 
other hour is devoted to the individual writing problems of the student. The course 
may be repeated for a total of 2 semester hours of credit. 

Although Rhet. 103 is designed primarily as an adjunct to Rhet. 104, 105, 
108, and Spch. Ill, 112, the Writing Laboratory offers assistance on papers and 
reports assigned in any other course. 

SUPPORTIVE INSTRUCTION 

Academic assistance is available to students in the Educational Opportunities Pro- 
gram (EOP) as described on page 50. Some departments have established special 
courses and/or special sections in existing courses for this purpose and a faculty 
and student tutoring system has been developed. 



Medical Services 

All students enrolled in credit courses and in attendance at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus are assessed a hospital-medical-surgical (HMS) fee which covers two sepa- 
rate functions: health service at the McKinley Health Center and group health 
insurance.*' 



See page 69 for waiver of the HMS fee. 



STUDENT SERVICES 57 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The McKinley health ser\ice portion of the HMS fee supports the medical services 
available at the McKinley Health Center located on campus. Dependents are not 
eligible for care at the health center unless they are also enrolled students at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. There arc four basic types of care available at the 
McKinley Health Center: routine office care (outpatient section), care requiring 
hospitalization (inpatient section), care for injuries or acute illnesses (emergency 
room), and mental health care (outpatient clinic and inpatient hospitalization). 

Health service physicians are available for general medical care and advice 
while the student is on campus. They are experienced clinicians, most of them 
having practiced for years as family physicians. Students may consult the health 
service physician of their choice in his office by appointment. Care is similar to 
that offered by a private, general physician. A wide range of diagnostic tests is 
available to the health service physician, including laboratory procedures, x-ray 
examinations, and electrocardiograms. A limited pharmacy provides drugs for stu- 
dents when they are under the care of a health service physician and when he orders 
prescription medication available from the pharmacy. 

The inpatient section of McKinley Health Center (McKinley Hospital) is a 
fifty-eight-bed medical hospital owned by the University. It is fully accredited by 
the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. The medical stafT includes 
both community and health service physicians. 

A health service physician is available twenty-four hours a day for students or 
employees injured on the job who require emergency care. 

Health service care provided by the McKinley Health Center does not depend 
on and is not reimbursed by any insurance plan the student may have. 

GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE 

The University Insurance Plan provides worldwide hospital-medical-surgical cov- 
erage and the insured student has a free choice of any legally qualified hospital or 
licensed physician (McKinley health services excepted). The coverage is provided 
on a semester basis and includes all holidays in the semester and the period between 
semesters. The policy provides hospital-medical-surgical insurance up to $10,000 
as defined in the insurance certificate furnished to each student at registration. 

Summer Coverage 

Students enrolled in the second semester who do not plan to attend the summer 
session may elect to extend the insurance for the entire summer vacation period 
by making application and paying the insurance portion of the HMS fee to the 
Insurance Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, B6 Coble Hall, 
801 South Wright Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820, between May 15 and through 
the fifth day of instruction of the summer session. Coverage of the insured student's 
eligible dependents may also be extended for this period. This does not include 
medical services at the McKinley Health Center. 

Exemption from the Insurance Fees 

Students presenting evidence of equivalent medical insurance coverage will be ex- 
empted from payment of the fee for the University Insurance Plan upon approval 
of a petition submitted to the University Insurance Office within the first ten days 
of instruction in any semester, or within the first five days of instruction in the 
summer session. This also may be accomplished in the Armory during regular 
registration. 

Housing 

Housing for students at the University of Illinois is provided in University residence 
halls, fraternities, sororities, private residence halls and homes, and cooperative 
houses. 



SB UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



The Board of Trustees of the University has authorized the estabhshment of 
housing standards to make certain the Hving accommodations for single under- 
graduate men and women serve the best interests of the students. These standards 
apply equally to University-owned and privately owned housing which is available 
to students. 

Present regulations require that all single undergraduate men and women stu- 
dents live for the entire academic year in housing which meets these standards and 
is approved by the University, unless the student reaches the age of twenty-one or 
achieves 60 semester hours of academic credit by August 15 of the academic year. 

Housing which is approved includes University residence halls, fraternities and 
sororities, and privately owned housing which meets University standards. Within 
this system, there is a variety of rates and services offered. Room visitation guidelines 
subject to the desires of the housing operator and dependent upon parental consent 
are determined by student vote in each housing unit or section. 

Information about all types of housing is given in greater detail in a brochure, 
Student Housing, which is mailed to each student with his letter of eligibility to 
enter the University. If additional information is needed, the student may write to 
the Housing Division, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 420 Student 
Services, 610 East John Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

Students and parents are encouraged to visit the Housing Division information 
office to discuss housing arrangements with a housing consultant. Office hours are 
maintained from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on all- 
campus holidays. Special hours are maintained during the weekend prior to regis- 
tration. 

UNIVERSITY POLICY ON NONDISCRIMINATION IN HOUSING 

The University of Illinois is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination in housing 
with respect to race, religion, and national origin. University-owned housing facilities 
are operated on this basis. Privately owned housing which is University approved 
or listed must also be operated in compliance with this policy. Intent to comply with 
this policy is evidenced by the filing of a pledge with the University Housing Divi- 
sion not to discriminate on the grounds of race, religion, or national origin. A Hous- 
ing Review Committee has been appointed by the chancellor to assist in the imple- 
mentation and enforcement of this policy. 

If anyone has reason to believe that an owner or manager of certified housing 
or any other listed housing has refused or failed to rent to an individual because 
of the individual's race, religion, or national origin, this information should be com- 
municated directly to the chairman of the Housing Review Committee or to any 
other member of the committee. The individual who alleges discrimination need 
not be University affiliated ; furthermore, the particular rental unit involved in the 
alleged discrimination need not be one that is itself listed with the University pro- 
vided the owner or manager has a nondiscriminatory pledge on file. 

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS 

University-owned residence halls for men and women students are planned to pro- 
vide each student with the best possible living and learning conditions. High schol- 
arship standards are encouraged. Student government experiences, intellectual and 
cultural programs, social programs, recreational facilities, and association with ma- 
ture and trained residence staff members provide opportunity for sound academic 
and social development. 

Approximately 4,800 men and 4,500 women live in University residence halls. 
Any single undergraduate student qualified to enter the University may apply for 
residence hall accommodations. Room assignments are made without regard to a 
student's race, religion, or national origin. 

Prospective new students or transfer students should also consider the merits of 
approved privately owned housing in planning living arrangements. 



STUDENT SERVICES 59 



HOUSING FOR MEN 

Housing available for single undergraduate men includes the University residence 
halls, the fraternities, and the ninety-one facilities-approved student homes and pri- 
vate residence halls. Housing arrangements should not be finalized until the student 
has been accepted for admission. 

Residence Halls 

University residence halls for men are located at points convenient to most areas of 
the main campus. Individual halls accommodate from 250 to 650 occupants, largely 
in rooms for two persons, although there arc some single and triple rooms. Resi- 
dence halls offer a room and board plan, with twenty meals served each week, but 
room-only contracts are available. Rates per person for room and board for one 
semester of approximately sixteen weeks are $582.50 for double accommodation 
plus $20 per person for an air-conditioned residence hall. These are current rates 
and are subject to change due to modification of board plans or services offered. 
Generally, rates have had to be increased annually because of increased operating 
costs. 

A University residence hall application form is sent to each student who is 
accepted for admission and who has paid the required advance deposit on tuition 
and fees. The completed application must be returned promptly if the student de- 
sires University residence hall accommodations. 

Fraternities 

There are fifty-five nationally aflRliated fraternities with approximately 3,000 mem- 
bers at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Fifty of these fraternities have living ac- 
commodations for their members with an average occupancy of 45 men. The oppor- 
tunity for membership in a fraternity exists whether the student lives in a fraternity 
house or not. Cost for room and board in a fraternity house varies, but the average 
cost is $575 per semester. 

The fraternity rush period for high school seniors normally occurs in late April, 
beginning on a Friday evening and extending through Sunday afternoon. During 
this time, prospective members may visit various fraternity chapters to which they 
have been invited. 

Information on fraternities and registration forms for the formal rush weekend 
are sent to each eligible student after he has been admitted to the University. 

After the spring rush weekend, scholastically eligible men may also participate 
in informal rushing and pledging at other times during the summer and the school 
year. Additional information on fraternities may be obtained from the Interfrater- 
nity Council, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 274 Illini Union, Urbana, 
Illinois 61801. 

Privately Owned Men's Housing 

Private facilities-approved homes ranging in capacity from 5 to 50 students accom- 
modate about 800 students. These facilities vary in size, location, and services. 
Room and board are available in some ; others furnish room only. Contracts are 
negotiated both on a one-semester and on an academic-year basis. Many have stu- 
dent organizations and participate in University activities. In most instances it is 
necessary, and the University recommends, that the student visit the campus and 
arrange for the accommodations by personal interview. Private homes furnishing 
room and board charge from $550 to $650 a semester. Room-only facilities range 
from $50 to $75 per month. 

Private facilities-approved residence halls are also available. These units range 
in capacity from 50 to 700 students. Most of these residence halls provide coedu- 
cational housing similar to several of the University residence halls and offer various 
room and board plans. Supervised apartment-type suites are also available in this 
housing category. Approximate costs for one academic year range from $900 to 



60 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



$1,700 depending on the options selected. Students are invited to visit the campus 
to inspect these facilities. However, arrangements can be made by mail with most 
of these halls. A list of the halls can be obtained by writing to the Housing Division. 

HOUSING FOR WOMEN 

Single undergraduate women have a choice of several types of approved housing 
accommodations: University residence halls and a limited number of cooperatives, 
twenty-three sororities, privately owned student homes and residence halls, and four 
privately sponsored cooperative homes. Approved facilities are inspected by the Uni- 
versity. Housing arrangements should not be finalized until a permit to enter the 
University has been granted by the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Residence Halls and Cooperatives 

University residence hall accommodations for women are located at points con- 
venient to the main campus. Single, double, and triple rooms are available but most 
rooms accommodate two persons. The double room rate for room and board is 
$562.50 a semester per occupant (approximately sixteen weeks) plus $20 per per- 
son for an air-conditioned residence hall. Room-only contracts are also available. 

Accommodations in University cooperative work-plan houses are also available. 
In these imits the residents work approximately seven hours a week, performing 
household duties. The cost of room and board is $320 per semester. Cooperatives 
offering room with kitchen privileges charge $220 per semester. 

The rates quoted above for University-operated facilities are subject to change. 
Generally rates have had to be increased annually because of increasing operating 
costs. A University residence hall application is sent to each student who is ac- 
cepted for admission and who has paid the advance deposit on tuition and fees. 
The completed application should be returned promptly if the student desires 
accommodations in University-owned facilities. 

Sororities 

Membership in sororities is by invitation. Invitations are issiied following formal 
and/or informal rush parties. Upperclassmen pledged by sororities move to the 
chapter house of their choice at the beginning of the next semester. Freshmen 
pledged to sororities move to the chapter house of their choice at the beginning of 
their sophomore year. 

The major, formal rush occurs in the fall, with informal rush periods in the 
winter and spring. The dates for the rush periods and a description of the kinds 
of rush may be obtained by writing the Office of Student Programs and Services, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 110 Student Services Building, 610 
East John Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

Privately Owned Women's Housing 

Privately owned organized houses accommodating from 9 to 93 women are avail- 
able. Some offer both room and board, others provide a room only or a room with 
kitchen privileges, and some offer a cooperative work plan. Rates in these units 
vary from approximately $550 to $650 a semester for room and board. A room with 
kitchen privileges costs from $50 to $80 a month. Houses with cooperative work 
plans require approximately seven hours of work per week and charge from $350 
to $400 for room and board for one semester. 

Privately owned residence halls, ranging from large, coeducational room-and- 
board residence halls to small, supervised, suite-living arrangements, are also avail- 
able. Rates range from approximately $900 to $1,700 for an academic year, depend- 
ihg on the accommodations selected. 

A list of vacancies in each type of accommodation is available from the Hous- 
ing Division. Students and parents visiting the campus to make housing arrange- 
ments are encouraged to first consult the staff at the Housing Division. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 61 



HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS 

Married undergraduate students, for the most part, must rely on the local com- 
munity to meet their housing needs. A limited number of University-owned apart- 
ments is available to undergraduate married students under a priority system. An 
application brochure can be obtained by writing to the Housing Division, University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 420 Student Services Building, 610 East John 
Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820, or the Orchard Apartments Office, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1842-A Orchard Place, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

A listing of privately owned furnished and unfurnished apartments with rental 
rates, distance from campus, etc., is available for review in the Housing Division 
information office. 

Generally speaking, May 1 to July 15 and December 1 to January 15 are con- 
sidered the most desirable times to visit the campus to arrange for living accom- 
modations for the first and second semesters, respectively. 

The following price ranges for furnished and unfurnished apartments reflect 
local housing costs. 

One- and two-room units $85-150 per month 

Three-room units (one bedroom) $100-200 per month 

Four rooms and larger (two and three bedrooms) $130-250 per month 

lilini Union 

The mini Union is the University's campus community and recreation center. It is 
a gathering place for students and faculty to meet, to develop leisure-time interests, 
and to carry on a program of activities outside the classroom. All students may 
participate in the programs sponsored by Illini Union Student Activities (lUSA). 
The Illini Union is also used for conferences, short courses, and meetings spon- 
sored by University departments. 

The Illini Union provides a cafeteria, a snack bar, waiter-service dining rooms, 
a vending-service dining room, bowling lanes, a billiard room, art galleries, a brows- 
ing library, two bookstores, student organization offices, an information and tour of- 
fice, a merchandise sales counter, a ticket office, a University lost and found service, 
checkrooms, a duplicating and sign making service, lounges, guest rooms, and nu- 
merous multipurpose rooms for luncheons, dinners, dances, and meetings. 

Placement Service 

The University Career Development and Placement Office, 2 Student Services 
Building, and specialized placement offices in the individual colleges are available 
to help students find postgraduation employment. This service, which is provided 
without charge, is also available to alumni. 

The individual placement offices maintain libraries of specialized vocational 
literature, make arrangements for hundreds of employer representatives to conduct 
interviews on campus, and provide employment counseling. Psychological testing 
for vocational guidance purposes is available at the Psychological and Counseling 
Center, 206 Student Services Building. In addition, a comprehensive collection of 
vocational literature is maintained in the Reference Room of the main Library. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Estimated expenses for unmarried undergraduate students at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus, exclusive of such variable items as major articles of clcjthing and recrea- 
tion, are given in table 2 on page 62 in a budget covering an academic year of two 
semesters. The tuition, fees, and other charges quoted in this budget are those au- 
thorized at the time of publication of this catalog, but are subject to change. 



62 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Table 2: Estimated Expenses for One Academic Year for a Full Program 
OF Study (Subject to Change) 

Illinois Non- 

Residents residents 

Tuition $ 496 $ 1 ,486 

Required fees 1 90 190 

Textbooks and other school supplies 1 50 1 50 

Meals and housing 

Includes double room and board residence hall charges of 

$1,165 for men and $1,125 for women and provision for Sunday 

evening meals and meals during fall and spring registration 

which are not included in University residence hall rates 1 ,260 1 ,260 

Travel allowance 85 1 45 

Personal expense 

Includes cost of clothing and personal care at moderate level 420 420 

Total, two semesters $2,601 $3,651 



In certain fields such as art, architecture, and engineering, costs of textbooks 
and other school supplies are somewhat higher. The cost of room and board could 
be lowered by arranging for a triple instead of a double room or by living in co- 
operative housing. The miscellaneous item could be reduced by careful attention 
to personal spending. 

A deferred payment plan, explained on page 65, is available to students who 
would like to pay tuition and fees and room and board costs in installments. 

Tuition and Fees (Subject to Change) 

Tuition and fees are assessed each student according to his residence classification 
and the number of credit hours for which he registers according to the tuition and 
fees schedule in table 3*^ on page 63. 

Students must pay the assessed tuition, fees, and residence hall charges in full 
at time of registration or make arrangements to pay them on the installment basis. 
(See page 65.) The rules governing assessment of tuition and fees and exemption 
from payment begin on page 66. 

ZERO-CREDIT COURSES AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 

Students (except those holding exemptions) taking one or more courses for zero 
credit, but no courses for credit, are assessed tuition and fees as follows: 

— For study on campus: Range IV tuition and fees. (No charge will be assessed, 
however, for University employees who register, at the request of their depart- 
ment, only in zero-credit courses especially established to improve the work of 
the employee.) 

- For study off campus, including graduate registration in absentia: Range IV 
tuition but no service fee and no hospital-medical-surgical fee. 

Students taking one or more courses for zero credit with one or more courses 
for credit are assessed tuition and fees on the basis of the credit course (s) only. 



** A separate tuition and fees schedule for medical students enrolled in the 
School of Basic Medical Sciences is available on request from the Fee Assessment 
Section, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, lOOA Administration Build- 
ing, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



63 



IMPORTANT 

Financial aid based on need is available to undergraduates through the Illi- 
nois State Scholarship Commission (ISSC). The vast majority of ISSC appli- 
cants from Illinois families with incomes of $12,000 a year or less receive 
awards which cover most or all of the University's mandatory tuition and 
fees charges. 

Many of those whose family incomes are higher also receive awards. 
In each case, the family's own particular financial circumstances are the sole 
criterion for determining award eligibility. See page 73 for further infor- 
mation regarding ISSC and other sources of financial assistance. 



Table 3: Undergraduate, Graduate, Law, and Veterinary Medicine 
Tuition and Fees (Subject to Change) 



SEMESTER 



Tuition (except those hold- 
ing exemptions) $248 

Service fee 

Hospitol-medical-surgical 
fee2 

Total 

EIGHT-WEEK Full Program 
SUMMER SESSION 

Range I 

6 semester hours 
and above 

1 '/z units 
and above 



Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 
Tuition (except those hold- 
ing exemptions) $124 $372 

Service fee 29 29 

Hospital- medical-surgical 

fee^ 37 37 

Total $190 $438 



Full Program 


Partial Programs 




Range 1 


Range II 


Range III 


Range IV 


12 semester hours 

and above 
3 units and above 


Above 5 but less than 

12 semester hours 

Above 1 Va but less 

than 3 units 


Above through 5 

semester hours 
Above through 
1 Va units 


credit^ 
only 


Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 


Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 


Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 


Resident 
and Non- 
resident 


. $248 $743 
58 58 


$170 $500 
37 37 


$ 93 $258 
15 15 


$47 
8 


37 37 


37 37 


37 37 


37 


. $343 $838 


$244 $574 


$145 $310 


$92 



Partial Programs 



Range II 

Above 2!/2 but less 
than 6 semester 

hours 

Above Va but less 

than 1 Vi units 



Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 



$ 85 

22 

37 



$250 
22 

37 



$144 $309 



Range III 

Above through 2 '/2 
semester hours 

Above through 
Va unit 



Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 



$47 



37 



$92 



$129 



37 



$174 



Range IV 

credit^ 
only 



Resident 
and Non- 
resident 

$24 
4 

37 



$65 



' See Zero-Credit Courses at Urbona-Champoign on page 62. 
See Medical Services on page 56. 



64 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Tables (cont.) 

TWELVE-WEEK SUMMER TERM (SOCIAL WORK AND INSTITUTES) 
AND ELEVEN-WEEK SUMMER LAW PROGRAM' 





Full Program 


Part 


ial Programs 






Range 1 


Range II 


Range III 


Range IV 




9 semester hours 

and above 

2V4 units and 

above 


Above 4 but less than 

9 semester hours 

Above 1 but less than 

214 units 


Above through 4 

semester hours 

Above through 

1 unit 


credit' 
only 




Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 


Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 


Illinois Non- 
Resident resident 


Resident 
and Non- 
resident 


Tuition (except those hold 
ing exemptions) 

Service fee 

Hospital-medico l-surgicol 
fee' 


$165 $495 
44 44 

37 37 


$113 $333 
29 29 

37 37 


$ 62 $172 
15 15 

37 37 


$31 
8 

37 


Total 


$246 $576 


$179 $399 


$114 $224 


$76 



'students registered in either one of the five and one-half week summer law sessions 
pay one-half of the tuition and service fee established for the eleven-week term, rounded 
to the next higher even dollar, and one-half of the credit amounts indicated apply in 
Ranges I, II, and III. They are subject to the same hospital-medical-surgical fee applying 
to registrants in the eight-week summer session. 



Application Fee 

Each applicant for admission to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
must submit with his application a nonrefundable application fee of $20. (See 
Application Fee — Exemptions and Waivers on page 67.) This fee is used to help 
defray processing costs and is nonrefundable to both approved and denied appli- 
cants who submit partial as well as complete applications prior to the date all 
spaces are filled in the college and curriculum of their choice. Application fees 
will be returned to students applying for admission to programs for which appli- 
cations are not being considered either because all spaces are filled or the desired 
program is not being offered. 

Exemption from one or more of the charges for tuition and fees is not con- 
sidered a sufficient basis for waiver of the application fee. Students holding statutory 
tuition waivers must pay the application fee. 

Applicants for admission to the Graduate College vvho anticipate receiving 
an assistantship are required to pay the application fee since admission must pre- 
cede their appointment as an assistant. 

Extramural degree applicants may have the fee deferred until they apply 
for work in residence. 



Advance Deposit 

Each new and readmitted undergraduate and professional student, including a 
transfer student from the Chicago Circle campus who desires to register for a fall 
or spring semester at the Urbana-Champaign campus, is required to make a non- 
refundable advance deposit in order to secure the place reserved for him. For 
undergraduate and veterinary medicine students the advance deposit is $30; for 
students admitted to the College of Law the deposit is $100. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 65 



The deposit is applied to the payment of the student's tuition and fees for the 
semester in which he is approved for admission; in case the student fails to enter 
the University in that semester, the deposit may not he applied toward the pay- 
ment of tuition and fees for any future registration. It will not be refunded except 
in very special cases. The deposit should not be sent until requested. It will be 
refunded during registration to holders of scholarships which cover both tuition 
and fees. 

The director of admissions and records may waive the requirement of the 
advance deposit in cases of extreme hardship when evidence clearly indicates that 
a student \sill be able to meet his University obligations through scholarship or 
other arrangements and gives other assurance of his intention to enroll. 

Installment Plan for Payment of Fees and Housing Charges 

Students enrolled on campus may arrange during registration to pay tuition, fees, 
and University residence hall charges (single student housing only) on an install- 
ment basis. This plan does not apply to registration in extramural and correspon- 
dence courses. 

Tuition, fees, and residence hall charges for each of the first and second semes- 
ters are collected in four installments, the first payable at registration and the others 
in each of the following months. The advance deposit is applied on the first install- 
ment. Summer session charges are payable approximately one-half at registration 
and the remainder during the following month. 

Students paying tuition and fees by installments are assessed a $2 service 
charge. An additional service charge of $2 is assessed for each flight instruction 
course fee paid on the installment plan. There is no service charge for the install- 
ment payment of University housing accounts. Arrangements for paying tuition and 
fees on the installment plan are made during regular registration. Arrangements for 
paying housing accounts on the installment plan are made at the time the contract 
is signed, or during registration. 

Refunds 

CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION 

A continuing student who pays tuition and fees for any semester, term, or session 
and who subsequently cancels his registration prior to the first day of classes of that 
semester, term, or session shall be refunded the full amount of his payment, includ- 
ing the usually nonrefundable charge. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A student who has paid tuition and/or fees, and who withdraws from the University 
for reasons other than active duty in the armed services or other approved national 
defense service, during any refund period, shall be assessed a nonrefundable charge 
in the amount of one-half of the service fee plus the hospital-medical-surgical fee 
(rounded if necessary to the next higher even dollar) or $30, whichever is greater. 
The student who withdraws continues to be covered by the health insurance and 
health services provisions of the hospital-medical-surgical fee, if originally paid, 
until the close of the term. For students who have not paid the hospital-medical- 
surgical fee, the nonrefundable charge shall be reduced by the amount of that fee. 
Refund periods are as follows:" 
- In a semester, twelve-week term, or eleven-week summer law program, full refund, 



*^ In case of extenuating circumstances, such as medically documented serious 
illness or injury, exceptions to these refund periods may be made by the director 
of admissions and records. 



66 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



except for the nonrefundable charge, during the first ten days of instruction ; no 
refund thereafter. 

- In an eight-week summer session, full refund, except for the nonrefundable 
charge, during the first five days of instruction ; no refund thereafter. 

— University terms of different lengths, refund periods are determined propor- 
tionately in accordance with the above principles. 

WITHDRAWAL FOR MILITARY AND OTHER NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE 

Special refunds are provided to students who withdraw for active duty in the 
armed forces or other approved national defense service as described in the Code on 
Campus Affairs and Regulations Applying to All Students. 

REDUCTION OF PROGRAM 

Any student who has paid tuition and/or fees and who reduces his registration to 
a lower fee assessment range receives a refund of the full amount of the difference 
in tuition and fees specified for such schedules provided the change is made during 
the periods designated above for refund of tuition and fees in case of withdrawal 
from the University. Thereafter, no rebate is allowed. 

VISITORS 

A person registered as a visitor who desires to withdraw receives a full refund of 
the visitor's fee, if originally charged, provided he makes a personal request for a 
refund at the Office of Admissions and Records within the refund periods designated 
for Withdrawal from the University on page 65. Thereafter, no refund is made. 

FLIGHT TRAINING 

A student who withdraws from a flight-training course receives a refund of the 
full flight-training fee during the first ten days of instruction in a semester or the 
first five days of instruction in the eight-week summer session; thereafter no refund 
is made. 

Assessments and Exemptions 

Tuition and fees are assessed all students on the basis of their residency status 
(resident or nonresident of Illinois) and the number of credit hours they are taking 
each term. (See Residence Classification on page 95.) Under conditions specified 
below, certain students may be exempt from the payment of tuition and fees. 
Employees of the University or Allied Agencies. Unless otherwise exempted by 
Board of Trustees authorization, the payment of tuition and fees is required of 
academic employees of the University or allied agencies under appointment for less 
than 25 percent of full-time services, and of nonacademic employees under appoint- 
ment for less than 50 percent of full-time services. 

For tuition and fees assessment purposes, a staff appointment must be to an 
established position for a specific amount of time and a salary commensurate with 
the percentage of time required, and it must require service for not less than three- 
fourths of the term. (This is interpreted as a minimum of three and one-half months 
in a semester, nine weeks in a quarter, and six weeks in an eight-week summer 
session.) Staff tuition and fees privileges do not apply to students employed on an 
hourly basis in either an academic or nonacademic capacity, or to persons on leave 
without pay. 

University employees appointed to established civil service positions whose rates 
of pay are determined by negotiation, prevailing rates, and union affiliation, are not 
considered as paid on an hourly basis and are entitled to the same tuition and fees 
privileges accorded to other staff members under the regulations. 

Any student who resigns his staff appointment, or whose appointment is can- 
celled, before rendering service for at least three-fourths of the term becomes subject 



FEES AND EXPENSES tl 



to the full amount of the appropriate tuition and fees for that term unless he with- 
draws from his University classes at the same time the appointment becomes void, 
or he files a clearance form for graduation within one week following the resigna- 
tion date. 

APPLICATION FEE — EXEMPTIONS AND WAIVERS 

Excluded from payment of the application fee are: 

- Staff members appointed to established positions for a specific amount of time 
and for a salary commensurate with the percentage of time required, and persons 
retired from the academic staff. 

- Permanent nonacademic employees who have been assigned to established perma- 
nent and continuous nonacademic positions and who are employed for at least 
50 percent of full time. 

- Staff members of allied agencies so long as they retain tuition and fee waiver 
privileges. 

- Extramural nondegree applicants. 

- Summer-session-only graduate degree applicants after their first registration for 
on-campus work. 

Waivers of the application fee are authorized for: 

- Applicants who, because of extreme financial hardship, could not meet the cost 
of the fee. In general, evidence of extreme financial hardship is receipt of a fed- 
eral Education Opportunity Grant, waiver of the testing fee by either the College 
Entrance Examination Board or the American College Testing Program, or 
evidence of hardship obtained from such sources as the student's institution of 
previous attendance, his financial aid application, or recruiters for the special 
programs for disadvantaged students. 

- Applicants under approved foreign exchange programs in which the University 
participates such as the Latin American Scholarship Program of American Uni- 
versities (LASPAU) and the African Scholarship Program of American Univer- 
sities (ASPAU), and foreign students participating in approved exchange pro- 
grams where the waiver of fees is reciprocal. 

- Intercampus transfers at the same level: undergraduate to undergraduate or 
graduate to graduate. 

- Applicants denied admission to one campus of the University of Illinois who 
wish to apply for admission on the same level at another campus. Students 
applying simultaneously to two campuses must pay the application fee at each 
campus. 

- Students from other universities participating in the Committee on Institutional 
Cooperation (CIC) program by taking courses at the University of Illinois. 

- Graduate and professional applicants whose entry is advanced or delayed by 
action of their major departments are not required to pay a second application 
fee. 

- University of Illinois students applying for work on a second campus as con- 
current registrants, and non-University of Illinois students applying as concur- 
rent registrants from another institution with which the University has a re- 
ciprocal agreement. 

- Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive assignment of practice 
teachers. 

- Students on leave of absence status are not required to pay an application fee 
on reentry. 

TUITION WAIVERS 

Tuition is waived for: 

- Holders of tuition waiver scholarships. 

- All academic employees of the University or allied agencies on appointment for 
at least 25 percent but not more than 67 percent of full-time services provided 



68 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



the appointments require service for not less than three-fourths of term. Limits 
on the amount of academic work that may be taken in the Graduate College by 
academic employees are given in the Graduate Programs catalog. Limits for aca- 
demic employees registered in the undergraduate colleges are determined by the 
individual colleges. 

- Holders of graduate tuition and fees waivers awarded by the Graduate College. 

- Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors which provide payments to 
cover the total costs of instruction. 

- Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive an assignment of practice 
teachers are exempted for one semester, quarter, or summer session for each 
semester, quarter, or summer session during the calendar year of September 
through August in which service is rendered. 

- University academic employees registered at the request of their departments in 
zero-credit courses especially established to improve the work of the employee. 

- Academic staff members emeriti. 

- Nonacademic employees of the University in status appointments or in appoint- 
ments designed to qualify for status in an established class (e.g., trainee, intern) 
for at least 50 percent of full-time services who register in regular University 
courses for not to exceed: 

Six credit hours or two courses in a semester or quarter if on full-time appoint- 
ment, 
Four credit hours if on a 75 percent to 99 percent time appointment, or 
Three credit hours if on a 50 percent to 74 percent time appointment, provided 
that ( 1 ) they meet conditions and eligibility for admission as prescribed 
by the Office of Admissions and Records, (2) are not students as defined 
in Civil Service Rule 7.7c, and (3) have approval by their employing de- 
partments of enrollment and of a makeup schedule to cover any time in 
course attendance during their regular work schedule. 
The waiver of tuition also applies to any additional hours of registration by an 
employee which keep him within the same fee assessment credit range. An em- 
ployee whose total registration is in a higher range than* that authorized by his 
tuition waiver pays only the difference between the waiver authorization and the 
higher range in which his total registration places him. 

- Nonacademic employees in a status, learner, trainee, apprentice, or provisional 
appointment may enroll without payment of tuition in regular courses directly 
related to their University employment for not to exceed 10 credit hours per 
semester provided they have made application and received prior approval for 
enrollment as required by procedures issued by the director of nonacademic 
personnel and set forth in Policy and Rules-N onacademic . 

NONRESIDENT PORTION OF TUITION WAIVERS 

Nonresident portion of tuition (if subject to payment of tuition) is waived for: 

- All staff members (academic, administrative, or permanent nonacademic) on 
appointment for at least 25 percent of full-time services with the University or 
allied agencies. 

- The faculties of state-supported institutions of higher education in Illinois hold- 
ing appointments of at least one-quarter time. 

- The teaching staff in the private and public elementary and secondary schools in 
Illinois. 

- The spouses and dependent children of all staff members (academic, administra- 
tive, or nonacademic) on appointment with the University or allied agencies, 
and of those Hsted in the second item above. (Dependent children are those who 
qualify as dependents for federal income tax purposes.) 

- The spouses and dependent children of fellows and trainees who are employed 
as teaching assistants to the extent permitted by their fellowship appointment. 

- Persons actively serving in one of the armed forces of the United States who are 



FEES AND EXPENSES 69 



stationed and present in the state of Illinois in connection with that service and 
their spouses and dependent children, as long as they remain stationed, present, 
and living in this state. 

Individuals listed in the first five items above (except those indicated below 
under Summer Session Tuition and Fees Waivers) who are eligible for waiver of 
the nonresident portion of tuition for the second semester are also eligible for the 
same waiver in the immediately following summer session. 

SERVICE FEE WAIVERS 

The ser\ice fee is waived for: 

- All academic staff members of the University or allied agencies on appointment 
for at least 25 percent of full-time services, provided the appointments require 
service for not less than three-fourths of the term. 

- Holders of graduate tuition and fee waivers awarded by the Graduate College. 

- Students registered in absentia. 

- Students registered in approved oflf-campus courses. 

- Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors if this fee is charged to the 
contract or grant funds. 

- Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive an assignment of practice 
teachers are exempted for one semester, quarter, or summer session for each 
semester, quarter, or summer session during the calendar year of September 
through August in which service is rendered. 

- University academic employees registered at the request of their departments in 
zero-credit courses especially established to improve the work of the employee. 

- Academic staff members emeriti. 

- Nonacademic employees of the University exempted from tuition as specified 
under the last two categories of Tuition Waivers on page 67. 

HOSPITAL-MEDICAL-SURGICAL FEE WAIVERS 

The entire hospital-medical-surgical (HMS) fee is waived for:** 

- Persons registered for doctoral thesis research in absentia. 

- Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors if this fee is charged to the 
contract or grant funds. 

- Students for whom this fee has been assumed by the Graduate College. 

- University employees registered at the request of their departments in zero-credit 
courses especially established to improve the work of the employee. 

- Persons registered in off -campus courses for zero credit. 

- Staff members who are eligible for the mandatory State of Illinois Employees 
Insurance Program. 

Students registered on the Urbana-Champaign campus for courses which are 
taught entirely off-campus during a given term are required to pay the student 
health insurance portion ($15) of the hospital-medical-surgical fee, but not the 
McKinley health service portion ($22). 

Upon approval of a petition presented to the University Insurance Office not 
later than the final day established for refund of tuition and fees, all students pre- 
senting evidence of equivalent coverage are exempted from the student health 
insurance portion ($15) of the hospital-medical-surgical fee. Applications for 
exemption may be presented at Station 3A during registration or at B6 Coble 
Hall after registration. 

SUMMER SESSION TUITION AND FEES WAIVERS 

Summer session tuition and fees are waived as follows: 

- Students holding appointments to the close of the final term of an academic year 
either as employees or fellows, and for whom tuition and/or fees have been pro- 



Coverage provided by the HMS fee is explained on page 56. 



70 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



vided through waiver or through cash payment by an outside agency, are entitled 
to a waiver of the same kinds of tuition and fees for the summer session or sum- 
mer term immediately following, provided they hold no appointments during that 
summer session. Students holding summer session appointments as fellows or as 
employees are subject to such tuition and fees as would be assessed in accordance 
with the principles expressed above. 

Special Fees 
Application Fee 

Applicants for admission or readmission to the University must submit with their 
application a nonrefundable fee (See page 64.) of $20.00 

Bicycle Code Violations 

Violation for which other penalty is not provided $3.00 

Failure to pay or appeal violation assessment within five school days after notice, 
penalty increased to $5.00 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

Each CLEP examination $5.00 

Concurrent Registrations 

Students concurrently enrolled at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
and another collegiate institution pay the tuition and fees regularly assessed at each 
institution in accordance with the amount of work taken. Students concurrently en- 
rolled at more than one campus of the University pay at their primary campus the 
applicable tuition and fees for their total combined registrations. 

Correspondence Courses — Tuition 

For each semester hour of credit $22.00 

For each quarter hour of credit $15.00 

Persons granted a six-month extension of the enrollment period pay for each course 
an additional charge not covered by scholarships or tuition exemptions $5.00 

Deposits 

Advance Deposit on Tuition and Fees (See page 64.) 

Undergraduate and veterinary medicine students $30.00 

Law students $100.00 

Advance Deposit on Total Registration Fee for Experimental Youth Fitness Sum- 
mer Day School $10.00 

Housing Contract Deposit (to confirm a contract for University housing) 

First semester $40.00 

One-half of this amount ($20) is applied on the first semester's rent; the 
other half ($20) is applied on the second semester's rent. 

Second semester only $20.00 

Summer session $20.00 

Extramural Courses — Tuition 

Students who register concurrently in more than one correspondence or extramural 
course pay the full amount of tuition for each course. Students who register concur- 
rently for courses on campus and for correspondence or extramural study pay the 
full amount of tuition and fees applicable for each registration. 

Holders of staff appointments with the University or allied agencies; holders 
of tuition scholarships, unless such scholarships are specifically limited by law to 
courses for residence credit only; and holders of tuition and fees waivers which 
exempt them from tuition for campus work are also exempt from tuition or the 
visitor's fee for extramural or correspondence courses begun within the term of the 
appointment. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 71 



A nonacademic employee registered concurrently for campus and extramural 
or correspondence courses whose total registration exceeds the range authorized by 
his tuition waiver pays the difference between the waiver authorization and the 
higher range in which his total registration places him. 

Resignation or cancellation of an appointment within the term in which the 
student registered which has provided exemption from tuition for a correspondence 
course or extramural course, and prior to completion of at least three-fourths of 
the required lessons in a correspondence course, or prior to completion of at least 
three-fourths of an extramural term, shall make the student liable for the full 
amount of the tuition for the course. 

A student exempted from tuition for a correspondence course by reason of a 
scholarship, staff appointment, or other waiver, who fails to complete the course 
within the normally allotted time of one year and arranges for extension of the 
enrollment period, shall become subject to payment of the full tuition for the course 
at the time he requests extension of the enrollment period if he no longer holds an 
appointment which entitles him to exemption.. The additional $5 fee required for 
extension of the enrollment period is considered a fine and is not included in the 
tuition exemption privileges. 
Credit Courses 

For each semester hour or '/4 graduate unit $15.00 

For each Vi hour $10.00 

Noncredit Courses 

For each 16 hours of instruction $15.00 

Visitors 

Visitors in extramural courses pay the same tuition as students registered in the 

course for credit. In the case of multiple credit courses, the visitor pays the fee 

applicable to the lowest credit provided in the course. 

Flight Training 

In addition to the regular tuition and fees, students taking flight training pay: 

For each flight course a materials and supply fee of $550.00 

For each glider course a special fee of $245.00 

For Avi. 102, per student $275.00 

For Avi. 222, per student $350.00 

For Avi. 224, per student $275.00 

(These fees are not included in scholarship and staff fee exemption provisions.) 

Identification Photo Cards or Data Carrier Cards — duplicates $1.00 

Installment Payment Service Charge (See page 65.) 

Installment payment of tuition and fees $2.00 

Installment payment of flight or glider training fees, per course $2.00 

Installment payment of special fee for Avi. 102, 222, 224 $2.00 

Late Registration 

A student's registration is not complete until his tuition and fees have been paid in 
full, or he has made arrangements for deferred payment. All students, including 
those holding staff appointments, who complete registration for work in residence 
after the close of the regular registration period for any term pay a late registration 

fine of $15.00 

(The fine is not covered by scholarships or tuition waivers. It may be waived under 
exceptional circumstances upon petition to the director of admissions and records.) 

Motor Vehicles (See page 95.) 

Automobiles 

Nonrefundable annual registration fee, August to August $5.00 

Penalty for nonregistration $5.00 

Parking lot rental per semester $12.00 



71 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Motorcycles (including motor scooters and motor-driven bicycles) 

Registration for the year $3.00 

For the second semester only $1.50 

Violation of operating or parking regulation $3.00 

NROTC Student Activity Fund Assessment collected by Navy Council. . . .$5.00 
Oflf-Campus Courses 

Students registered for credit in off-campus work only are exempt from the service 
fee. They pay the same tuition, resident or nonresident, assessed for campus regis- 
tration of equal credit, and the insurance portion ($15) of the hospital-medical- 
surgical fee. 

Students registered in zero-credit courses off campus, including graduate regis- 
trations in absentia, pay Range IV tuition but no service fee and no hospital- 
medical-surgical fee. (See complete statement on zero-credit courses on page 62.) 

For the purpose of fee assessment, the designation off-campus course refers to 
field courses, programs of study abroad, or special programs established which 
require that the participants be absent from the campus for the entire semester, 
term, or session. 

Residence Hall Fee 

Undergraduate student residents of University residence halls pay each semester a 
mandatory fee as part of their residence hall contract for their educational, social, 
cultural, and recreational needs . $4.00 

Smoking Violations 

Students found guilty of violation of smoking regulations are subject to a cash 
penalty of $1.00 

Special Examination 

Courses which have been failed $10.00 

Graduate Student Language Examinations, for students who fail the first exami- 
nation $6.50 

SEAL Fund (Students for Equal Access to Learning) 

Students registered on campus pay this fee during each registration to supplement 
existing financial aid for needy students. Later, a refund is available to those who 
do not wish to participate $2.00 

Transcript 

Each student who has paid all his University fees is entitled upon request to receive 
without charge one transcript of his record. For each additional transcript the 

fee is $1.00 

No charge is made if the request for a transcript is accompanied by a teacher's 
certificate application blank, and no charge is made for transcripts of records issued 
for purposes of admission to the Chicago Circle or the Medical Center campus of 
the University of Illinois in Chicago. 

University Fee for High School Students 

High school students, including University High School students, attending the 
University under the Early Admission Program, pay the same tuition and fees 
assessed against University students registered for the same amount of credit. 

University High School Instruction 

University students at Urbana-Champaign who also register in University High 
School pay, in addition to their University fees, for each half unit each semester 
(provided that the total additional charges shall not exceed $25 a semester) . .$10.00 
Students other than those registered in the University pay a tuition fee for each 
semester, as follows : 



FINANCIAL AID 73 



For one course only $ 1 0.00 

For a full-time high school program None 

Unredeemed Check Service Charge 

For each check returned by a bank to the Business Office for insufficient funds or 
other reasons $2.00 

Visitor's Fee (Campus Courses) 

Persons holding scholarships, tuition waivers, or staff appointments which exempt 
them from tuition for campus work, unless such scholarships are specifically limited 
by law to courses for residence credit only, may attend University classes as visitors 
only, without charge. Persons registered on campus for a full program of courses 
(Range I) may also attend other courses as visitors without additional charge. 
Persons not otherwise registered in University courses and students registered on 
campus on a partial program fee schedule (Range II, III, or IV) are charged for 

each course attended, as a visitor only, a fee of $15.00 

Students who change from credit registration to visitor status in the same 
course, who are not eligible for refund of tuition or fees for the credit registration 
dropped, are not charged the visitor's fee. 



FINANCIAL AID 

All students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign receive financial 
aid in the form of a tuition subsidy because they attend a state-supported institution. 
For the 1972-73 school year the annual value of this subsidy was more than $1,000 
for every undergraduate student who was a resident of Illinois. 

Even with relatively low tuition and fees charges, the cost of a college edu- 
cation can be a financial burden which many families cannot bear alone. The 
estimated reasonable expenses for a single undergraduate student attending the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are provided in table 2 on page 62. 
The amount of financial assistance that an undergraduate student may be eligible 
for is the difTerence between the total amount of these expenses and the amount 
of money that the student and his parents or guardians may be expected to con- 
tribute to the cost of his education. 

Financial aid from private organizations, federal and state agencies, and the 
University of Illinois is available to students who cannot attend college without 
financial assistance. In a recent year the Student Financial Aids Office at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus distributed $3,523,397 in student aid; of this amount, 
52 percent was in student loans; 25 percent in Educational Opportunity Grants; 
11 percent in scholarships; 8 percent in College Work-Study Program assistance; 
and 4 percent in tuition waivers. 

Although the Student Financial Aids Office administers a substantial program 
of financial aid, the program is inadequate to meet the full needs of all students. 
Consequently, financial aid in the form of scholarships, grants, loans, and College 
Work-Study Program employment from this office is awarded on the basis of 
demonstrated need. 

Student Employment on Campus and in the Community (page 77), Student 
Loans from Non-University Sources (page 78), and Other Specialized Aid Pro- 
grams (page 80) are sources of financial assistance for students who do not meet 
the rigorous need requirements of the University-administered aid programs. 

No student should hesitate to apply for admission to the University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign for lack of funds. Some combination of scholarships, grants, 
loans, and employment can usually he made available if he can demonstrate finan- 
cial need. 

Because of limited funds available to the University, all prospective and con- 
tinuing students requiring financial assistance are strongly urged to actively seek 



UNDtKUKAUUAlb KKUL/KAMb 



scholarships and awards, based on academic or other quaHfications, which may be 
available from national, state, and local organizations. 

The primary source of scholarships and grant funds for Illinois undergraduate 
students is the Illinois State Scholarship Commission (ISSC). Illinois residents 
should apply first to the Illinois State Scholarship Commission if they believe finan- 
cial concerns are a barrier to attending college in Illinois. 

Illinois State Scholarship Commission Monetary Awards 

The Illinois State Scholarship Commission is the most significant source of gift aid 
to University of Illinois undergraduate students both in terms of number of stu- 
dents receiving awards and in the total value of grant and scholarship assistance. 
This independent state agency awards grants which may cover up to full tuition 
and fees costs for Illinois undergraduates attending public or private postsecondary 
schools in Illinois. 

Prospective students contemplating the tuition and fees charges at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois should keep in mind that they may qualify to have all or a portion 
of these charges paid by an ISSC monetary award. During a recent school year 
6,045 undergraduates at Urbana-Champaign received ISSC awards; most awards 
covered full tuition and fees. Tuition and fees charges presently amount to $686 
per year for resident students. 



Students who need financial assistance should apply for an ISSC award as 
early as possible. High school students may obtain applications from their 
school counselors during October of their senior year. Applications for stu- 
dents enrolled at the Urbana-Champaign campus become available at the 
Student Financial Aids Office during January. Applications may also be ob- 
tained directly from the Illinois State Scholarship Commission, P.O. Box 607, 
Deerfield, Illinois 60015. The application period for the academic year usu- 
ally terminates sometime during the preceding summer. 



ISSC awards are based solely on demonstrated financial need. It is not neces- 
sary to be designated an Illinois State Scholar in order to receive an ISSC monetary 
award. Awards are for one year only and must be renewed annually. At the present 
time, a student may receive an award for a maximum of eight semesters and the 
maximum award covers only tuition and fees. Recipients must be full-time under- 
graduate students, residents of Illinois, and permanent residents of the United 
States. 

Table 4 shows the percentage of successful ISSC monetary award applicants 
at various income ranges at public colleges for the 1971-72 academic year. Again, 
most of the awards covered full tuition and fees charges. 

Many students who receive ISSC monetary awards also qualify for scholarship, 
grant, loan, or employment assistance from the University or other sources to help 
meet the costs of books, room and board, and miscellaneous expenses. Any student 
who needs financial help in order to attend the University of Illinois should apply 
to both the Illinois State Scholarship Commission and the University of Illinois 
Student Financial Aids Office (see below). Although the ISSC and the University 
student aid programs work in conjunction, they are entirely separate. It is necessary 
to submit separate applications and to follow separate application procedures to 
receive consideration for the financial aid offered by both sources. 

Financial Aid from the University 

All prospective undergraduate and law students are mailed information regarding 
application procedures for University financial aid programs when they request 



FINANCIAL AID 



75 



Table 4: Percentage of Applicants Recehing ISSC Monetary Awards 
AT Public Colleges by Parental Income, 1971-72 





% Receiving 




% Receiving 


Income Range 


Auards 


Income Range 


Awards 


$ 0- 4,999 


99 


$12,000-12,999 


75 


5,000- 5,999 


98 


13,000-13,999 


61 


6,000- 6,999 


97 


14,000-14,999 


47 


7,000- 7,999 


97 


15,000-15,999 


33 


8,000- 8,999 


96 


16,000-16,999 


25 


9,000- 9,999 


94 


17,000-17,999 


18 


10,000-10,999 


91 


18,000-18,999 


11 


11,000-11,999 


84 


19,000-19,999 


8 






20,000-Up 


3 



admission materials. Veterinary medicine students receive this information at the 
time they are admitted. Prospective graduate students may write to the Student 
Financial .\ids Office to obtain information on the application procedure for long- 
term loans and employment through the College Work-Study Program. 

Students who plan to enter the fall semester should apply for financial aid 
during the preceding spring. Priority is given to applications which are received 
before March 1. Each applicant is responsible for observing all published deadlines. 



Illinois residents who plan to enroll as undergraduate students and those 
already enrolled are expected to apply for an ISSC monetary- award. Action 
on the University Application for Financial Aid will not be taken until the 
Illinois State Scholarship Commission has notified the Student Financial Aids 
Office of the student's eligibility for a monetary award. 



Except as noted below, applications to the Student Financial Aids Office place 
applicants in consideration for the following types of assistance: (1) gift aid — 
scholarships and grants, (2) University-funded long-term loans, (3) College Work- 
Study employment. 

An applicant does not apply for a particular type of aid since this office con- 
siders each application individually and determines the source and amount of aid 
that can be offered. 

The Student Financial Aids Office does not administer scholarships or grants 
for students in the Graduate College or the College of Law. These students should 
contact their department heads for information and applications for available 
scholarships, grants, fellowships, assistantships, and other forms of financial assis- 
tance. Additional information on financial aid is also available in the Graduate 
Programs catalog and the College of Law Catalog. Graduate and law students may 
apply to the Student Financial Aids Office for University-funded long-term loans 
and College Work-Study Program employment. 

Foreign students fnoncitizens who are not in the United States as permanent 
residents) should contact the Foreign Student-StafF Affairs Office for information 
on financial aid. Foreign students are rarely awarded aid for their first year at the 
University. 

The University participates in the College Scholarship Service of the College 
Entrance Examination Board and subscribes to the principle that the amount of 
financial assistance offered a student should be based on financial need. 

Included with the Application for Financial Aid are instructions to indicate 



76 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Table 5: Expected Parental Contributions to College Expenses 



Income^ 




Number 


oj Dependent Children 






I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


$ 5,000 


$ 










6,000 


280 


$ 50 








7,000 


550 


280 


$ 80 






8,000 


820 


510 


280 


$ 120 


$ 50 


9,000 


1,080 


730 


470 


300 


220 


10,000 


1,290 


960 


660 


480 


390 


1 2,000 


1,800 


1,400 


1,050 


830 


730 


14,000 


2,440 


1,920 


1,490 


1,210 


1,060 


1 6,000 


3,240 


2,590 


2,030 


1,660 


1,490 


1 8,000 


4,070 


3,390 


2,710 


2,240 


2,010 



^Annual income before federal and state income tax. 

which financial statement the student must submit in order to demonstrate financial 
need. 

The amounts that typical parents with no unusual problems should be able 
to provide from annual income toward each year of college, according to the Col- 
lege Scholarship Service, are listed in table 5. These amounts should be considered 
approximations. Individual family circumstances may significantly alter these 
amounts. 

In addition to parental support, it is expected that students will be prepared 
to assume responsibility for a substantial portion of their college expenses through 
summer savings and campus employment. Scholarships, grants, and College Work- 
Study Program assistance are provided by the University to supplement parental 
support and student self-help, not to replace these sources. 

The Student Financial Aids Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, Room 109, 707 South Sixth Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820, is open to 
students, prospective students, parents, and others who desire information and 
counseling regarding matters of financial assistance. Office hours are: Monday, 
Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 to 5:00 
p.m., except all-campus holidays. The office is closed on Wednesdays in order to 
complete necessary internal operations. 

Scholarships and Grants from the University 

Scholarships and grants require no repayment or employment obligation. The list 
of undergraduate scholarships and grants offered through the Student Financial Aids 
Office given in Appendix B on page 367 is for information only. Students do not 
apply for specific scholarships or grants. The Student Financial Aids Office re- 
views all applications for aid and determines who is eligible for scholarship or 
grant assistance and the source and amount of gift aid to be offered. (See also 
Specialized Aid Programs on page 80.) 



Campus Employment 

COLLEGE WORK-STUDY EMPLOYMENT 

The University of Illinois participates in the College Work-Study (CWS) Program, 
a federal program of financial aid for students. A student is authorized to participate 
in the College Work-Study Program if he is awarded this type of financial aid by 
the Student Financial Aids Office. All applicants for aid automatically receive 
consideration for this type of aid as well as for scholarships, grants, and loans. Most 



FINANCIAL AID 77 



Students in tliis i)rograni arc employed on campus. If College Work-Study Program 
employment is included in a student's aid ofTer, he must check with the Student 
Employment Office, Room 107, 707 South Sixth Street, Champaign, at the begin- 
ning of the term in order to be placed in a job. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT ON CAMPUS AND IN THE COMMUNITY 

The vast majority of students working to earn a portion of their expenses during 
the school term are not employed under the College Work-Study Program. The 
following information should be helpful to all students who desire to work part- 
time and is applicable to both College Work-Study Program participants and to 
students who plan to locate employment by other means. 

For the student seeking employment, the Student Employment Office, Room 
107, 707 South Sixth Street, Champaign, is open from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 
1:00 to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, throughout the year. Application must 
be made in person, and it is helpful if the applicant has a schedule of his classes 
and study hours so that he can seek employment best suited to his free time. Appli- 
cants should plan to set aside at least one-half hour for completion of application 
forms and the counseling interview. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign employs several thousand 
part-time student workers in offices, libraries, laboratories, farms, and food service 
units. In 1971-72 these student workers earned approximately $3 million in wages. 
In addition, many students work in the local community. 

Hourly wages for student workers vary according to the type of work and the 
responsibility involved. Most jobs require from ten to twenty hours of work per 
week. Earnings are estimated to average from 20 to 30 percent of college expenses. 
Applicants must realize that many of the more responsible and desirable positions 
go to upperclassmen who have special training and experience. A student may help 
his employment opportunities by taking temporary jobs while waiting for a more 
permanent position. 

Freshmen in curricula for which laboratory periods occupy most of the day- 
hours generally find either food handling work done at meal hours or temporary 
odd jobs before and after school hours to be most convenient and time conserving. 
Students in other curricula may improve their employment opportunities at the 
time they register by arranging class schedules which leave consecutive hours 
free each day. 

A good selection of meal jobs is usually available at the beginning of each 
semester. Students find opportunities to work for meals at the Illini Union Food 
Service, the Department of Home Economics, residence halls, and in campus res- 
taurants, fraternities, and sororities. 

The Student Employment Office welcomes the opportunity to counsel a student 
about the best type of employment for him. 

Working during college years may have advantages in addition to the obvious 
one of financing a college education. The employed college student has a special 
opportunity to learn how to get along with people. Sometimes part-time employ- 
ment experience helps a student choose his vocation or is helpful to him later when 
following his vocation. 

Securing a position through proper application and retaining that position 
through good work is the responsibility of the individual. 

It is not likely that a student can make definite arrangements for employment 
until he is on campus at the beginning of the school session when most job open- 
ings occur and he is reasonably certain of his class schedule before applying fo/ 
work. When a student can, he should draw on savings from summer employment to 
cut down the number of hours he must work during the school year. A student 
should begin looking for a summer job several months before June 1 through his 
local state employment service and through sources suggested by his high school 
counselor. 



78 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Student Loans 

LOW-INTEREST LOANS AWARDED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

The Student Financial Aids Office authorizes loans to students who demonstrate 
financial need. All applicants for University aid are automatically considered for 
University-funded long-term loans. (See Financial Aid from the University on 
page 74.) An applicant does not apply for a specific loan fund. The Student Finan- 
cial Aids Office (acting for the University of Illinois as lender) determines who is 
qualified and eligible and the source and amount of the loan to be offered. A list of 
loan funds administered by the University is given, for informational purposes 
only, in Appendix C on page 378. 

STUDENT LOANS FROM NON-UNIVERSITY SOURCES 

The federal government has encouraged the state governments to operate guaran- 
teed long-term student loan programs in conjunction with commercial lenders for 
students attending college full time. The state of Illinois has such a program for 
Illinois residents administered through the Illinois State Scholarship Commission. 
If a student is not an Illinois resident, he should check with the Student Financial 
Aids Office for information on guaranteed-loan programs offered in other states. 
Although the federal government, the state, and private corporations sub- 
sidize and guarantee these loan programs, the loan is actually arranged for and 
made by the student from a participating commercial lending institution in the 
applicant's home community (bank, savings and loan association, or credit union). 
Consequently, the student should first contact the lending institution. 

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS CONSIDERING LOANS 

Students who contemplate borrowing money for educational purposes should care- 
fully consider the general terms and repayment requirements of the loans shown 
in table 6 on page 79. 

APPROXIMATE MONTHLY PAYMENT REQUIRED BY LOAN PROGRAMS 

Repayment schedules for University-funded long-term loan programs and non- 
University-funded long-term loan programs (guaranteed loans) are indicated in 
tables 7 through 9. The monthly payments indicated in table 7 below and in tables 
8 and 9 on page 80 are approximations and are provided only to help the borrower 
determine the approximate monthly repayments of the loan. Interest charges on the 
unpaid principal balance will be added to these amounts. 

Table 7 : National Direct Student Loan Program and U.S. 
Public Health Service Loan Program 

Amount Monthly Repayments 

of Loan 120 Months Maximum 

$ 3,000 $(*)^ 

4,000 35 

5,000 45 

6,000 50 I + 3% per year 

7,000 60 I simple interest 

8,000 70 

9,000 75 

1 0,000 85 



$30 per month plus interest minimum repayment required. 






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80 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Table 8: University of Illinois Long-Term Loan Program 

Amount Monthly Repayments 

of Loan 84 Months Maximum 



$2,000 $(*)! 

3,000 40 

4,000 50 

5,000 60 

6,000 75 

7,000 85 



+ 3% per year 
simple interest 



$30 per month plus interest minimum repayment required. 



Table 9: Illinois Guaranteed-Loan Program, Federally Insured Loan 
Program, United Student Aid Fund Loan Program, and Other State 
Guaranteed-Loan Programs (at 7 percent per year simple interest rate) 

Amount Monthly Repayments 

of Loan 60 Months 120 Months^ 

$1,000 
2,000 
3,000 
4,000 
5,000 
6,000 
7,000 

^ This column does not apply to the Illinois Guaranteed-Loan Program. 
* $30 per month minimum repayment required. 



Specialized Aid Programs 

PROGRAMS FOR VETERANS 

Illinois State Military Scholarships 

An Illinois statute provides a tuition scholarship at any of the state-supported col- 
leges, universities, or Class 1 junior colleges in Illinois for each veteran who served 
in World War I if he entered the service between April 6, 1917, and November 11, 
1918, and for each veteran who served in the armed forces at any time after Sep- 
tember 16, 1940, provided certain eligibility requirements are met. 



$ (*) 


$(*) 


40 


(*) 


60 


35 


80 


46 


100 


60 


120 


70 


140 


81 



Value: Waiver of the cost of tuition but not fees for four consecutive calendar 
years. Undergraduate veterans should first apply for Illinois State Scholar- 
ship Commission grants which can pay fees as well as tuition. (See page 74.) 



Scope: Any state-supported college, university, or Class 1 junior college in Illinois. 
Eligibility: To be eligible, a veteran must have had at least one year of active ser- 



FINANCIAL AID 81 



x-icc and have been honorably discharged (or separated) from such service or have 
received an honorable discharge for medical reasons directly connected with active 
service. Before entering active service, he must have been (1) a resident of Illinois, 
(2) a resident until at least six months before entering active service and returned 
to Illinois within six months after leaving active service and have resided in Illinois 
not less than one year immediately prior to the date of application for the scholar- 
ship, or (3) a student at one of the state-supported colleges or universities or 
Class 1 junior colleges in Illinois at the time of entering active service. 

Members of the armed forces currently on active duty are also entitled to a 
State Militar>' Scholarship provided they have served at least two years and would 
be qualified for the scholarship if discharged. 
How to apply: Contact the Student Financial Aids Office. 

Veterans Benefits (Gl Bill) 

Students seeking information regarding veterans educational benefits should con- 
tact the Student Financial Aids Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
Room 109. 707 South Sixth Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

OTHER SPECIALIZED SCHOLARSHIP AND GRANT PROGRAMS 
General Assembly Scholarships 

Value: Waiver of resident tuition (but not fees) for varying continuous periods of 
time, not to exceed four years. 

Scope: Each member of the General Assembly of Illinois may award one scholar- 
ship each year applicable only to the University of Illinois and one each year appli- 
cable to any other state-supported college or university. 

Eligibility: Recipient must be a resident of the district represented by the legislator 
who nominates him. 
How to apply: Contact member of the General Assembly of Illinois. 

Children of Veterans Scholarships 

Three scholarships may be awarded by the University of Illinois in each county: one 
to a child of a veteran of World War I, one to a child of a veteran of World War 
II, and one to a child of a veteran who served at any time during the national 
emergency between June 25, 1950, and January 31, 1955. Preference is given to 
candidates whose fathers are deceased or disabled. A candidate for one of these 
scholarships must submit evidence of his father's service (honorable discharge cer- 
tificate or photostat thereof) , and an affidavit from the father or mother to establish 
the fact that the candidate is the child of a veteran, and whether the father is 
deceased or disabled. 



Value: Waiver of tuition (but not fees) for four years. Applicants with finan- 
cial need should also apply to the Illinois State Scholarship Commission for 
awards which can cover fees as well as tuition. (See page 74.) 



Scope: May be used in any course at the University of Illinois at any of its three 
campuses: Urbana-Champaign, Chicago Circle, or Medical Center, Chicago. 
Eligibility: Candidate must be a resident of Illinois and of the county where appli- 
cation is made. Applicants who attend a high school in a county different from the 
county in which they reside should submit their application to the Superintendent 
of the Educational Service Region in their county of residence. Children of veterans 
may compete even if they have had college work in the University of Illinois or 



82 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



any other college. There is no special average required for this college work. 
Weighted scores on the ACT examination are used to determine recipients. 
How to apply: Contact the local county Superintendent of Educational Service 
Region. 

Teacher Education for Adults 

Value: Waiver of tuition (but not fees) for four calendar years. 

Scope: May be used at any Illinois state-supported college or university. Five 
hundred scholarships are awarded at large throughout the state. 

Eligibility: Candidates must be at least twenty-one years old, reside in Illinois, and 
be accepted at an eligible college or university. Candidates must submit a record 
of their scores on the ACT examination, a record of their high school class rank, 
and a completed scholarship affidavit in order to be considered. 

Obligation: Persons who accept these scholarships must, after graduation from 
or termination of enrollment in a teacher education program, teach in any recog- 
nized public, private, or parochial school in Illinois for at least two of the three 
years immediately following that graduation or termination. Any time up to four 
years spent in the military service and any time a person is enrolled full time in 
an academic program leading to a postbaccalaureate degree are excluded from the 
three-year period. Any person who fails to fulfill the teaching requirement must 
pay to the superintendent of public instruction the amount of tuition waived by 
virtue of his acceptance of the scholarship together with interest at 5 percent per 
year on that amount. 

How to apply: Contact local county Superintendent of Educational Service Region 
in writing. 

Teacher Special Education 

Value: Waiver of resident tuition (but not fees) for four calendar years. 
Scope: May be used at any Illinois state-supported college or university. Two hun- 
dred and fifty scholarships are awarded at large throughout the state. 
Eligibility: Candidate must be a recent graduate of an Illinois high school in the 
upper half of his graduating class or must hold a valid Illinois Teacher's Certificate. 
Obligation: Recipients must agree to take courses in preparation for teaching in 
special education programs. 

Persons who accept these scholarships must, after graduation from or termi- 
nation of enrollment in a teacher education program, teach in any recognized 
public, private, or parochial school in Illinois for at least two of the three years 
immediately following that graduation or termination. Any time up to four years 
spent in the military service and any time a person is enrolled full-time in an aca- 
demic program leading to a postbaccalaureate degree are excluded from the three- 
year period. Any person who fails to fulfill the teaching requirement must pay to 
the superintendent of public instruction the amount of tuition waived by virtue of 
his acceptance of the scholarship together with interest at 5 percent per year on 
that amount. 

How to apply: Recent high school graduates should contact their high school prin- 
cipal. Holders of an Illinois Teacher's Certificate should write to their local county 
Superintendent of Educational Service Region indicating the type of certificate held. 

State Army ROTC Scholarships 

Illinois State Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps Law scholarships are available 

to students enrolled in Army ROTC. An Illinois state statute provides that residents 

of Illinois who enroll in Army ROTC at colleges and universities supported by the 

state of Illinois shall be eligible to compete for these scholarships. 

Value: Waiver of cost of resident tuition over a period during which the recipient 

is enrolled in the Army ROTC Program. 

Scope: May be used in any course at any of the four state-supported colleges or 

universities in Illinois which offer Army ROTC. 



FINANCIAL AID 83 



Eligibility: Candidate must be a resident of Illinois and enroll in the University 

and in Army ROTC. ( 1 ) Students may apply after a minimum of one semester of 

ROTC. If awarded, scholarships are retroactive to beginning of school year. (2) 

Students may enter from an Illinois junior college and have completed all possible 

work at that junior college. 

Hoic to apply: .Application forms are available at the ROTC unit. 

Obligation: Financial need is not a requirement for this scholarship and acceptance 

does not increase military obligation. 

Junior college students transferring to a senior state college or university may 
be awarded a junior college Army ROTC Scholarship based upon the recommen- 
dation from the director of financial aid at the junior college. All students enrolled 
in, or eligible to be enrolled in, the ROTC program at the state supported college 
or university may compete for the award of this scholarship. Selection of students 
for the award is based upon information contained in the completed application 
form. 

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services 

Value: Waiver of resident tuition for four years. In addition, the Illinois Depart- 
ment of Children and Family Services will provide maintenance and school ex- 
penses to supplement the student's earnings and other resources. 
Scope: Any state-supported college or university in Illinois. Only the maintenance 
allowance can be furnished if the student attends a non-state-supported institution. 
A minimum of twelve scholarships is awarded each year. 

Eligibility: Students selected must be under the guardianship of the Illinois De- 
partment of Children and Family Services. 

How to apply: Contact local caseworker or Illinois Department of Children and 
Family Services, 425 South Second Avenue, Springfield, Illinois 62706. 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships 

Value: Varies, based on need. Time covered varies according to individual needs 
and program requirements. 

Scope: May be used at any postsecondary school. 

Eligibility: Recipient must have a disability that is a handicap to employment. 
How to apply: Illinois residents should contact the State of Illinois Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, 623 East Adams Street, Springfield, Illinois 62701. Stu- 
dents from other states should contact their state Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation. 

Verdell-Frazier-Young Awards 

Value: Varies, maximum grant $500. 

Scope: Applicable only to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
Eligibility: Awards are made to women who have experienced an interruption in 
their academic careers. Preference is given to women who have had an interrup- 
tion of at least two years. 

How to apply: Contact the Office of Continuing Education for Women, University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2 Student Services Building, Champaign, Illinois 
61820. 

Women's Organizations Grants-in-Ald 

Each year a number of women students receive grants-in-aid from funds donated 
by A-Ti-Us ; Women's Glee Club ; Mortar Board ; Shorter Board ; Torch ; Panhel- 
lenic Council; Blaisdell, Saunders, Taft, Wardall, and Evans Halls; Lincoln Ave- 
nue and Allen Residences; and Delta Delta Delta Sorority. Application should be 
made to the Student Personnel Office. Awards are made only to students currently 
enrolled. 



84 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Student Activity Grants-in-Aid 

Certain fields of student activity have been approved for grants-in-aid. These fields 
are baseball, basketball, debate, dramatics, football, music, publications, student 
leadership, and track, and cross-country. Application forms for other than athletic 
grants-in-aid may be obtained from the Student Financial Aids Office. Applications 
for athletic grants-in-aid should be made directly to the Director of Athletics, Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 112 Assembly Hall, Champaign, Illinois 
61820. 

Fred S. Bailey Scholarships 

Value: Varies. 

Scope: Applicable only to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Eligibility: Men and women students in any program of study are eligible to apply. 

Av^ards are based on financial need, character, and superior scholarship. 

How to apply: Contact the University Young Men's Christian Association, 1001 

South Wright Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED BY AGENCIES OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY 

There are many scholarship programs which operate independently of any college 
or university. The student is usually free to attend the school of his choice. 

Each year University of Illinois undergraduates receive approximately $500,000 
in awards of this type. Students are urged to contact their high school counselor or 
college department head to learn of scholarship opportunities for which they are 
eligible. The following directories list undergraduate scholarships and loans awarded 
by foundations, fraternal organizations, professional societies, unions, business cor- 
porations, and other donors. 

Angel, Juvenal L. How and Where to Get Scholarships and Loans. 2nd ed. New 
York: Regents Publishing Company, 1968. 

Current Financial Aids for Undergraduate Students. Peoria, Illinois: College Op- 
portunities Unlimited, 1968. (Updated periodically by supplements.) 
Illinois Department of Public Instruction. Financial Aids to Illinois Students. 
Springfield: Department of Scholarship Services. 

Illinois Junior Chamber of Commerce. College Opportunities without Money: 
Scholarships, Loans, Jobs for Illinois High School Graduates. Educational Oppor- 
tunities, 1965. 

Keeslar, Oreon Pierre. A National Catalog of Financial Aids for Students Entering 
College. 3rd ed. Dubuque, Iowa: W. C. Brown Company, 1967. 

Levy, William V. College Scholarships and Loans: Who Gets Them, How, and Why. 
New York: MacFadden-Bartell, 1964. Pp. 35-60, 91-95. 

Turner, David Reuben. College Scholarships: A Complete Guide to Scholarship 
Aid from All Sources. New York: Arco, 1966. 

U.S. Library of Congress. Student Assistance Handbook: Guide to Financial As- 
sistance beyond High School. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1965. 
Pp. 154-71. 

Short-Term and Intermediate Loans 

In emergencies, full-time University of Illinois students may borrow up to $100 
for up to sixty days or until the last day of instruction for the semester, whichever 
comes first. However, in order to make more money available to a maximum num- 
ber of students, applicants should keep the purpose of the loan in mind (short-term 
emergency) and are encouraged to borrow as little as necessary for as short a 
period of time as necessary. A service fee of $1 is charged for short-term loans. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 85 



Domestic students should apply in person to the Student Personnel Office, 
130 Student Services Building. Foreign students should apply to the Foreign 
Student-Staff Affairs Office, 310 Student Services Building. These funds which are 
made available immediately must be used for educational expenses. 

A special provision permits graduating seniors and graduate students to bor- 
row up to $250 to meet expenses incurred as a result of employment interviews. 
Applicants for this type of short-term loan must show evidence that the prospective 
employer will reimburse the applicant for expenses incurred. 

Intermediate loans in amounts not to exceed $500 may be made to help meet 
special financial needs of students who can demonstrate evidence of interrupted 
cash flow during an academic year and who can also demonstrate evidence of 
means of complete repayment during the academic year. A service charge of 1 
percent of the loan, or not less than $5, will be assessed. Loans are interest free. 
The application procedure for intermediate loans is the same as for short-term 
loans. 

Listed in Appendix D on page 383 are the funds which have been established 
for short-term and intermediate loans with the names of the donors whose generosity 
has made possible this type of aid. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Bachelor's Degree 

Each candidate for a bachelor's degree must meet the general requirements of the 
University with respect to registration, residence, general education, and rhetoric; 
must meet the minimum scholarship requirements which the University has ap- 
proved for his college or division; and must pass the subjects which are prescribed 
in his curriculum and conform to the requirements of that curriculum in regard to 
electives and the total number of hours required for graduation (listed below)." 

UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGES 

College of Agriculture 

Maximum advanced military accepted: no maximum 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Agriculture 126 

Food Industry 130 

Food Science 130 

Forestry 126 

Home Economics 120 

Home Economics Education 126 

Interior Design 120 

Ornamental Horticulture 130 

Restaurant Management 126 

College of Commerce and Business Administration 

Maximum advanced military accepted: 6 hours 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Accountancy 124 

Business Administration 124 

Economics 124 

Finance 124 



Excluding basic military, unless otherwise indicated. 



86 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



College of Communications 

Maximum advanced military accepted: no maximum 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Advertising 124 

Journalism 1 24 

Radio and Television 124 

College of Education 

Maximum advanced military accepted: no maximum 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Business Education 126 

Early Childhood Education 124 

Education of the Deaf 124 

Education of Mentally Handicapped Children 124 

Elementary Education 124 

Occupational and Practical Arts Education 128 

Secondary Education 120 

College of Engineering 

Maximum advanced military accepted: to 6 hours (depending on curriculum) 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering 134 

Agricultural Engineering 128 

Ceramic Engineering 132 

Civil Engineering 129 

Computer Engineering 1 24 

Computer Science 122 

Electrical Engineering 124 

Engineering Mechanics 128 

Engineering Physics 128 

General Engineering 127 

Industrial Engineering 130 

Mechanical Engineering 130 

Metallurgical Engineering 128 

Teaching of Engineering Technology 136 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Maximum advanced military accepted: 6 hours 

Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) in 

Teaching of Dance 130 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) in 

Art Education 130 

Crafts 122 

Dance 130 

Graphic Design 122 

History of Art 122 

Industrial Design 122 

Painting 122 

Sculpture 122 

Theatre 128 

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (B.L.A.) 132 

Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) 130 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Architectural Studies 1 24 

Music Education 130 

Bachelor of Urban Planning (B.U.P.) 124 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 87 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Maximum adianced military accepted: No credit except for courses cross-listed 

with an academic department of a college of the University for students who have 

matriculated after September 1, 1972. 

Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) in 

Home Economics 120 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 120 

Speech and Hearing Science 124 

Teaching of English 128 

Teaching of French 120 

Teaching of German 120 

Teaching of Latin 120 

Teaching of Russian 123 

Teaching of Social Studies 120 

Teaching of Spanish 123 

Teaching of Speech 128 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Chemical Engineering 1 29 

Chemistry 130 

Geology 130 

Home Economics 120 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 120 

Physics 126 

Speech and Hearing Science 128 

Teaching of Biology 120 

Teaching of Chemistry 125 

Teaching of Earth Science 125 

Teaching of Geography 123 

Teaching of Mathematics 120 

Teaching of Physics 126 

College of Physical Education 

Maximum advanced military accepted: no maximum 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Health and Safety Education 130" 

Physical Education 132" 

Recreation and Park Administration 132'° 

PROFESSIONAL COLLEGES 

College of Law 

Graduate-Professional 

Maximum adianced military accepted: hours 

Juris Doctor (J.D.) 90" 

Graduate" 

Maximum advanced military accepted: hours 

Master of Laws (LL.M.) 

Master of Comparative Law (M.C.L.) 

Doctor of the Science of Law (J.S.D.) 



" Including basic military. 

" In law courses only, beyond the preprofessional study. 

" Consult the Graduate Programs catalog for complete information concerning 
graduate degrees. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



College of Veterinary Medicine 

Undergraduate 

Maximum advanced military accepted: no maximum 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Veterinary Medicine 75*" 

Graduate-Professional 

Maximum advanced military accepted: hours 

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M.) 78"* 

Graduate'' 

Maximum advanced military accepted: hours 

Master of Science (M.S.) in Veterinary Medical Science 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Veterinary Medical Science 

Certificates 

Certificates of Completion are conferred at Urbana-Champaign upon completion 
of certain specialized curricula. Each candidate for a certificate must meet the 
general requirements of the University with respect to registration ; must satisfy 
the minimum scholarship requirements which the University has approved for his 
curriculum; must complete all special requirements established for his curriculum; 
and must pass in the subjects which are prescribed in his curriculum and conform 
to the requirement of that curriculum in regard to electives and the total number of 
hours required for graduation (listed below). '^ 

UNDERGRADUATE 
Institute of Aviation 

Maximum advanced military accepted: hours 

Certificate of Completion of 

Curriculum in Aircraft Maintenance 72 

Curriculum in Aviation Electronics 55 

Curriculum for the Professional Pilot 66 

Combined Flight-Maintenance Program 84 

POSTBACCALAUREATE 
College of Engineering 

Certificate in Teaching of Engineering Technology 32" 

Subject Requirements 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

A minimum of 6 hours each in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natu- 
ral sciences is required for graduation in all undergraduate curricula. Approved 
courses should be distributed over at least three years. Upon request the individual 
colleges will provide the student with a list of courses acceptable in his curriculum 
for this purpose. 

ENGLISH 

Satisfactory proficiency in the use of English is a requirement for all undergradu- 
ate degrees awarded at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University. In order 
to assure such proficiency, each undergraduate student must earn credit in a one- 



" In veterinary medicine courses only, beyond the preprofessional study. 

^ Beyond the B.S. in Veterinary Medicine. 

" Consult the Graduate Programs catalog for graduate degree information. 

'* Excluding basic military, unless otherwise indicated. 

" In four summers beyond the baccalaureate degree. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 89 



semester, 4-hour course of either Rhet. 105 or 108. By selecting Spch. Ill and 112, 
students may satisfy both the English and Spch. 101 requirement for a particular 
college. Credit earned in Rhet. 101 or Spch. 1 1 1 or other equivalent courses prior 
to September 1972 satisfies the English requirement. 

Students may satisfy the English requirement for graduation through success- 
ful perfonnance on the Rhetoric Placement and Proficiency Examination. This 
examination is offered to all new students at various times in the spring and sum- 
mer during the period of the precollege programs and during New Student Week 
just prior to opening of the fall and spring semesters. By arrangement with the 
Department of English other students also may take this examination. 

English Requirement for Domestic Transfer Students 

Persons who enter the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University from another 
collegiate institution with less than 3 semester hours of credit in freshman rhetoric 
or composition must earn credit in either Rhet. 105 or 108. If the academic 
credentials of a transfer student do not conclusively indicate fulfillment of the 
rhetoric requirement at another collegiate institution, he may be administered the 
Rhetoric Placement and Proficiency Examination. 

English Requirements for Foreign Students 

Foreign students for whom English is a native language, American students of 
foreign or foreign language background, displaced persons, and other immigrant 
students who have permanent visas and who plan to remain in this country follow 
the same English programs as native students. They may take courses offered in 
the English for Foreign Students Program only upon the recommendation of the 
chairman of freshman rhetoric and only on a remedial basis preparatory to en- 
rollment in Rhet. 105 or 108 (Spch. Ill and 1 12 in some colleges). 

The Office of Admissions and Records is authorized to determine which stu- 
dents shall be classified as foreign according to the following definition: A person 
who is a citizen or permanent resident of a country or political area other than 
the United States and has a residence outside the United States to which he ex- 
pects to return and either is, or proposes to be, a temporary alien in the United 
States for educational purposes is classified as a foreign student. 

The English requirement for graduation for all undergraduate students classi- 
fied as foreign according to the above definition who do not have a degree from 
a college or university where the native language is English and where all instruc- 
tion was in English, is determined on the basis of admission and placement tests. 
These tests include the following: 

- The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), administered by the 
Princeton Testing and Advising Center, Princeton, New Jersey, A satisfactory 
score on this test must be received by the University before the student may re- 
ceive a permit to enter the University. In cases where TOEFL testing dates 
are not available prior to the desired term of entry, the test given by the English 
Language Institute, Testing and Certification Division, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
may be substituted. 

- A combination oral and written proficiency and placement test given to those 
foreign students whose performance on the English entrance test satisfied ad- 
mission requirements but indicated further study of English necessary for suc- 
cessful college study. The results of this test determine whether the student is 
to be exempt from one or both of the courses usually required of foreign stu- 
dents (E.S.L. 114 and 115), or whether he must be assigned to one or more of 
the noncredit remedial courses which precede registration in the required credit 
courses. 

A passing grade in E.S.L. 114 and 115, or the equivalent, satisfies the gradua- 
tion requirement for foreign students. Those foreign students whose deficiency in 
the command of English is such that they are placed in the noncredit courses, E.S.L. 
109, 110, or 111, are not allowed to register for a full academic program in other 



90 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



fields. Bilingual foreign students who speak English and who prefer to take Rhet. 
105 or 108 are permitted to enroll in those courses if their achievement on the 
placement test indicates they are capable of doing the work. 

Transfer students from abroad whose native language is not English and who 
enter with fewer than 4.6 semester hours of credit in freshman rhetoric must take 
the placement test for foreign students. Their accomplishment on the placement 
test determines what additional rhetoric they are required to take. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Except as prohibited or limited by the established policy of the student's college, 
credit in University foreign language courses taken to remove high school entrance 
deficiencies may, at the discretion of the college, be counted in the total hours 
required for graduation and be accepted in partial or complete satisfaction of the 
foreign language requirement for the degree. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Credit in physical education courses is not a general requirement for a degree at 
the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University, but may be required in some 
curricula. Credit earned in physical education courses may, at the discretion of the 
individual college, be included in the scholastic average of the student and in the 
total hours required for graduation. 

Minimum Scholarship Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 

All candidates for a degree must have at least a 3.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average 
on all University of Illinois credits counted for graduation requirements and at 
least a 3.0 grade-point average on the combined transfer and University of Illinois 
credits counted for graduation requirements. Certain colleges have established 
higher scholastic graduation requirements for specific curricula. (Grades in courses 
taken at the other campuses of the University are counted as transferred.) 

Where a course has been repeated, both the original and subsequent grades 
are included in the average if the course is acceptable toward graduation, but the 
credit is counted only once. An original failing grade is not removed from the 
student's record for a course subsequently passed by special examination. 

A student at the Urbana-Champaign campus who does not meet the require- 
ments stated above may graduate if he has the minimum grade-point average cal- 
culated by either of the following alternate methods: 

— Exclude courses in which grades of D or E have been recorded not to exceed 
a total of 10 semester hours completed prior to the last 30 hours of work com- 
pleted at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and counted for 
graduation requirements, or 

— A grade-point average of no less than 3.1 for the last 60 semester hours of 
work counted for graduation requirements and completed at the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, except in those curricula where a higher scholas- 
tic graduation requirement is specified. 

Residence Requirement 

In addition to specific courses and scholastic average requirements, each candidate 
for a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must 
spend either the first three years, earning not less than 90 semester hours, or the last 
year (two semesters, or the equivalent), earning not less than 30 semester hours, in 
residence at the Urbana-Champaign campus, uninterrupted by any work in another 
institution. Only those courses which are applicable toward the degree sought may 
be counted in satisfying the above minimum requirements. (Either three twelve- 
week terms or four eight-week sessions are the equivalent of two semesters.) 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 91 



Concurrent attendance at the University of Illinois and another collegiate insti- 
tution docs not interrupt University of Illinois residence for graduation. 

Credit earned through the Advanced Placement Program is included in the 
first 90 semester hours and is not considered as interrupting residence. 

Credits earned through participation in the Committee on Institutional Co- 
operation (CIC) programs and overseas study programs for which students are 
registered in courses at the Urbana-Champaign campus are counted as University 
of Illinois residence work. 

Transfers from junior colleges must, after attaining junior standing, earn at 
the University of Illinois or any other approved four-year institution at least 60 
semester hours acceptable toward their degree, in addition to meeting the usual 
residence requirement for a degree from the University of Illinois. (See page 29.) 

Students transferring from the Chicago Circle campus to Urbana-Champaign 
as candidates for degrees must satisfy the residence and academic requirements 
for graduation established for the curriculum at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 
Since the two campuses do not have identical academic programs, the student 
who is contemplating a transfer should consult with the college to which he ex- 
pects to transfer. 

A student who requests that the residence requirement for graduation be 
waived must submit a petition to the dean of his college, who forwards the peti- 
tion with his recommendation to the vice-chancellor for academic affairs for final 
decision. 



Second Bachelor's Degree 

A student who has received one bachelor's degree may receive a second bachelor's 
degree, provided all specified requirements for both degrees are fully met, and 
the curriculum offered for the second degree includes at least 30 semester hours 
not counted for the first degree. 

The second bachelor's degree may be earned either concurrently with or 
subsequent to the first degree. 

Candidates for a second bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois 
must meet the same residence requirements as for the first degree. If any of the 
first three years of credit has been transferred from another institution, the stu- 
dent must spend the last year (two semesters, or the equivalent) earning a mini- 
mum of 30 semester hours in uninterrupted residence at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus. 

Only those courses which are acceptable toward the degree sought may be 
counted in satisfying the above minimum requirements. This includes the 30 addi- 
tional hours required for the second degree. 



ACADEMIC AND OTHER REGULATIONS 

During registration each student receives a copy of the Code on Campus Affairs 
and Regulations Applying to All Students which contains academic, conduct, and 
other regulations governing students at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Appearing 
below are condensations or brief explanations of some of these regulations. Each 
student should familiarize himself with the complete regulations and contact the 
office of the dean of his college for additional regulations applying only in his 
college. 

Grading System 

Faculty members have the responsibility to provide the University with an individ- 
ual evaluation of the work of each student in their classes. Final course grades are 



92 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



entered on the student's permanent University record at the close of each semester, 
term, or session. The University of Illinois grading system is as follows: 

COURSES IN ALL COLLEGES EXCEPT THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

A = excellent; B =^ good; G = fair; D = poor (lowest passing grade) ; E = 
failure, including courses dropped for academic irregularities; Ab == absent from 
the final examination without an excuse acceptable to the dean of the college con- 
cerned (counts as a failure). Plus and minus signs are not authorized with these 
grades. 

Courses in the College of Law 

In addition to the above grades, instructors in the College of Law are authorized 
to assign grades of B+ and C+. 

COMPUTATION OF SCHOLASTIC AVERAGES 

For numerical computation of scholastic averages, the following values are desig- 
nated: A = 5.0; B+ - 4.5; B = 4.0; G+ = 3.5; C = 3.0; D =^ 2.0; E and 
Ab -= 1.0. 

Uniform Method for Calculation 

A uniform method for calculating undergraduate grade-point averages has been 
established for all undergraduate colleges at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 
These averages are calculated on the basis of all courses attempted for which 
grades and credits are assigned and which carry credit in accordance with the 
Courses Catalog. Since courses offered by the religious foundations on or near the 
Urbana-Champaign campus are not official University courses and are not in- 
cluded in the Courses Catalog, the grades earned in such courses will not be 
included in the calculation of any grade-point averages. Grades of S, U, P (Pass), 
and F (Fail) are reported on the official University transcript but are not in- 
cluded in the grade-point averages since grade-points are not assigned to these 
letter grades. This method of calculation is used to determine honors, probation 
and drop status, financial aid and scholastic awards, and tra^nsfer between colleges 
on this campus. 

For the purpose of computing a grade-point average for graduation, only the 
grades received in those courses counting toward the degree, including grades in 
repeated courses, are included in the average. (See Minimum Scholarship Re- 
quirements for a Bachelor's Degree on page 90.) 

For the special method used to determine eligibility for transfer into the 
University, refer to Admission Requirements on page 27. 

OTHER SYMBOLS IN USE (not included In computation of averages) 

W — Officially withdrawn from the course without penalty (withdrawal notice 

received from the Administrative Data Processing Unit). 
Ex — Temporarily excused. Approved extension of time to complete the final 
examination or other requirements of the course. Applies to both under- 
graduate and graduate students. Entitles the student to an examination later 
without fee, or additional time to complete other requirements of the course. 
Undergraduate Students: Only the dean of his college may authorize such an 
extension of time in individual cases. A grade of Ex which is not removed by the 
end of the first eight weeks of instruction in the semester following the receiving 
of the excused grade, if the student is enrolled in an undergraduate college at 
the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University in that semester, automatically 
becomes a grade of E. If the student receiving an excused grade does not reenroll 
!at the Urbana-Champaign campus the excused grade, if not removed, becomes an 
E after one calendar year. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 93 



Graduate Students: Graduate students who are unable to take the final examina- 
tion at the scheduled time i)r to complete other requirements of a course must 
make individual arrangements with their instructors. 

An excused grade for graduate students must be replaced by a letter grade no 
later than the end of the next semester in which the student is registered. If the 
student does not enroll the following term the excused grade becomes an E after 
one calendar year. 
Df — Grade temporarily deferred. To be used only in those thesis, research, and 
special problems courses extending over more than one semester which are 
taken by graduate students as preparation for the thesis and by under- 
graduate students in satisfaction of the requirements for graduation with 
honors, and in other approved courses which extend over more than one 
semester. 

Requests for use of the Df grade in other courses which extend over 
more than one semester, and which therefore require postponement of the 
final grade report, must be submitted in writing by the executive officer of 
the department offering the course to the director of admissions and records 
prior to the beginning of the final examination period for which the ap- 
proval would first apply. A current list of courses which have received such 
approval is maintained in the Office of Admissions and Records. 
S — Satisfactory, and 

U — Unsatisfactory. To be used only as final grades in graduate thesis research 
courses, in graduate and undergraduate courses given for zero credit, and 
in other courses which have been specifically approved by the head or the 
chairman of the department concerned, with concurrence of his dean. 
A current list of courses which have received such approval is maintained 
in the Office of Admissions and Records. 
O — Outstanding. To be used only as a final grade in the Med. S. 300 course. 
P — Pass. To be used only in courses taken under the pass-fail grading option. 
Instructors report the usual letter grades. Grades of A, B, C, and D will 
automatically be converted to P. 
F — Fail. To be used only in courses taken under the pass-fail grading option. 
Instructors report the usual letter grades Grades of E or Ab will auto- 
matically be converted to F. 
Pass — To be used only in courses passed by special or proficiency examinations. 

A minimum grade of C is required to pass. 
Fail — To be used only in courses attempted but not passed by special examina- 
tions. Failures in proficiency examinations are not reported. 

Pass-Fail Grading Option 

Any full-time undergraduate student in good academic standing (not on proba- 
tion) may, with the approval of his adviser, elect to take one course with credit 
up to 5 semester hours under the pass-fail grading system in any term. A student 
must exercise the pass-fail option for a course taken in residence only during 
registration or within the first two weeks of instruction in the semester, or during 
registration or within the first week of instruction in the summer session ; he may 
elect to return to the regular grade option within the first eight weeks in a semester 
(first four weeks in the summer session). 

A maximum of 18 hours under this option may be applied toward a degree 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Any upper or lower division course may be 
chosen under this option except courses designated by name or area by major 
departments for satisfying the major or those specifically required by name for 
graduation by the student's college. 

Exception: Foreign language courses at the 104 level, or the equivalent, may be 
uken under the pass-fail option when taken to fulfill the College of Liberal Arts 



94 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



and Sciences foreign language requirement for graduation. This provision does not 
include the prerequisite courses, level 101 through 103, with the exception of a 
103 course which is taken as a terminal third semester course in fulfilling the 
foreign language graduation requirement of two languages completed at the 103 
level. 

Grades P or F earned under this option are not included in computation of 
the grade-point average, but the credit hours are included as part of the total 
hour load for the term. 

Religious Foundation Courses 

A maximum of 10 semester hours of credit in religious education may, with the 
approval of the dean of the college concerned, be counted toward graduation. 

Courses of study offered by the religious foundations located in Urbana- 
Champaign which have been approved by the College of Liberal Arts and Sci- 
ences Committee on Courses and Curricula are accepted for credit by the Univer- 
sity provided the student is currently registered in University courses. Registration 
in these courses is limited to registered students of sophomore standing or above 
and must be approved in advance by the dean of the student's college. Grades in 
these courses are not included in the student's all-University scholastic average, 
and the courses are not counted as interrupting residence or toward satisfying 
minimum residence requirements for graduation. 

Correspondence and Extramural Courses 

After matriculation a student may count toward his degree, with the approval of 
the dean of his college, as many as 60 semester hours of credit earned in extra- 
mural and/or correspondence study, provided: 

- He completes all the remaining requirements for the degree in residence at the 
University, or 

- He presents acceptable residence credit for work done elsewhere and completes 
the requirements needed for his degree in residence at the University. In all 
such cases, the senior year (two semesters of not less than 30 semester hours) 
must be done in residence at the University. 

Undergraduate Credit for Service and for Education 
in the Armed Forces 

The University, under general provisions administered by the University Com- 
mittee on Admissions, recognizes for college credit certain training and experience 
in the armed forces of the United States. The completion of military service in 
the U.S. Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, or Navy, including basic or recruit 
training of six months or more, is accepted for credit in four semesters of basic 
military and for 4 semester hours of credit in physical education upon presenta- 
tion of evidence of honorable discharge or transfer to the reserve component. 
Candidates for graduation who are still in military service are entitled to the 
same credit. Additional credit in military may be granted for courses completed 
in the service which are acceptable as the equivalent for the advanced ROTC 
at the University of Illinois. 

The committee recognizes for credit correspondence courses of college grade 
and the examinations in special fields prepared by the United States Armed Forces 
Institute and the Marine Corps Institute. The College Training Programs of the 
Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, and Navy, which functioned during World 
War II, are accepted as credit when transferred from the institution where they 
were taken. The committee considers for credit work done in the Air Force, 
Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and Navy specialized and technical schools 
where its equivalence in terms of college courses is established by proficiency ex- 
aminations or where such courses have been recommended for college credit in 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 95 



the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services pub- 
lished by the American Council on Education. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records, 177 Administration Build- 
ing. (See also General Educational Development Tests on page 23.) 

Thesis 

If a thesis is to be submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a bach- 
elor's degree, the subject must be announced by the end of the sixth week of in- 
struction in the first semester of the student's senior year. The work must be done 
under the direction of a professor in the department concerned and must be ap- 
plicable to the curriculum in which a degree is expected. A maximum of 10 
hours of credit in thesis work may be counted toward a bachelor's degree. 

Residence Classification 

The residence classification of an applicant for admission is determined on the 
basis of the information given on his application for admission and other cre- 
dentials. Eligibility for admission to the University is determined and tuition is 
assessed in accordance with this decision. 

A student who takes exception to the residency status assigned and/or tuition 
assessed shall pay the tuition assessed but may file a claim in writing to the direc- 
tor of admissions and records for a reconsideration of residency status and/or 
adjustment of the tuition assessed. 

The regulations governing residence classification and the procedure for re- 
view of residency status and/or tuition assessment are available from the Office 
of Admissions and Records and are provided to each student during registration. 

Classification of Students 

Classification of undergraduate students is made at the end of each semester 
and is based on the number of credits earned, including physical education and 
military. Classification for registration purposes is based on the following scale: 

Freshman standing 0-29 hours 

Sophomore standing 30-59 hours 

Junior standing 60-89 hours 

Senior standing 90 or more hours 

Admission or Readmission Denied Because of Misconduct 

The University reser\es the right to deny admission or readmission to any person 
because of previous misconduct which may substantially affect the interest of the 
University, or to admit or readmit such a person on an appropriate disciplinary 
status. The admission or readmision of such a person will not be approved or 
denied until his case has been heard by the appropriate disciplinary committee. 
(This applies to a person not now enrolled in the University who might apply for 
admission or readmission, or to a person who has preenrolled whether or not he 
has paid his deposit.) A favorable action of the appropriate disciplinary committee 
does not abrogate the right of any dean or director to deny admission or read- 
mission on the basis of scholarship. 

Automobiles, Motorcycles, Motor Scooters, 
Motor-driven Bicycles, and Bicycles 

Students at the Urbana-Champaign campus may possess, operate, park, and store 
automobiles, motorcycles, motor scooters, and motor-driven bicycles on campus if 
they have a valid motor vehicle operator's license which legally allows them to 



96 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



operate such vehicles in the state of Illinois and if they comply with the campus 
vehicle registration and operation regulations. By state of Illinois law, foreign 
state residents under the age of eighteen years are prohibited from operating a 
motor vehicle in Illinois. Registration fees are listed under Special Fees on page 70. 

All bicycles which are operated, parked, or stored on campus are required to 
be registered. There is no fee for such registration. 

Inquiries concerning motor vehicles and bicycles should be directed to the 
Division of Parking and Transportation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, 507 East Daniel Street, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 



ACADEMIC HONORS 

Recognition for superior academic achievement at the University of Illinois is 
given both by the University and by the colleges and departments. 

Graduation with Honors 

Each college, with the approval of the Urbana-Champaign Faculty Senate and the 
Board of Trustees, prescribes the conditions under which candidates for its degrees 
may be recommended for graduation with honors. Detailed information concern- 
ing the requirements for graduation with honors is included in the sections of this 
catalog applying to the individual colleges and departments. These distinctions are 
noted on the student's baccalaureate diploma, on his permanent University record, 
and on official transcripts of his credits. 

UNIVERSITY HONORS: THE BRONZE TABLET 

Sustained academic achievement is recognized by inscribing the student's name on 
the Bronze Tablet which hangs on a wall of the Library. To be eligible, a student 
must: 

- Have at least a 4.5 (A = 5.0) cumulative grade-point average for all work taken 
at the University through the semester prior to his graduation. 

- Rank, on the basis of his cumulative average, in the top 3 percent of the students 
in his college who will graduate when he does. 

If the student is a transfer, he must: 

- Have earned 40 or more semester hours at the University of Illinois prior to the 
semester of his graduation. 

- Have a University of Illinois cumulative average and a total cumulative average 
as high as the lowest one listed for eligible students in his college who have 
completed all of their work at the University of Illinois. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 

The name of every eligible student who has achieved a grade-point average of 4.0 
or higher for a given semester is placed on a list prepared for the dean of his 
college. This list is publicized within the University and is distributed to news 
agencies throughout the state. 

To be eligible for Dean's List recognition a student must complete successfully 
14 academic hours excluding credits earned through proficiency examinations, and 
credits earned through advanced placement tests. Course work taken on a pass-fail 
or S/U basis will be counted toward the 14 hours required only if a passing grade 
is received. Courses for which grades are officially excused or deferred may be in- 
cluded in the 14 minimum hours, (Except students in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences; see page 277.) 

EDMUND J. JAMES SCHOLARS 

Successful performance for one year as an Edmund J. James Scholar is recognized 
by the University Honors Council, Urbana-Champaign. This recognition is re- 



ACADEMIC HONORS 97 



corded on the student's University record as Edmund J. James Scholar (year). 
This program is described on page 49. 

Prizes and Awards 

Competitive prizes, fellowships, and miscellaneous awards available to students in 
the University are listed below ; those which are offered only to students in a par- 
ticular college, curriculum, or department are described in the sections of this cata- 
log applying to the individual colleges and the Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(ROTO). 

Alpha Lambda Delta Prize. The national organization of Alpha Lambda Delta, 
honor society for freshman women, gives a book each year to the Alpha Lambda 
Delta senior woman who achieves the highest scholastic average for seven semesters 
at the University of Illinois. Certificates of award are given to the senior women 
maintaining the Alpha Lambda Delta average for seven semesters. 

National Alpha Lambda Delta annually awards six $2,000 fellowships for 
graduate study to recent Alpha Lambda Delta graduates. Additional information is 
available from the Student Personnel Office. 

H. R. Brahana Prize. A fund has been established in the University of Illinois 
Foundation in acknowledgment of the contributions to the University and to the 
Department of Mathematics by H. R. Brahana, professor of mathematics, emeritus. 
Income from the fund is used each October to award a prize of $100 to an under- 
graduate within one year of a bachelor's degree in recognition of outstanding per- 
formance in mathematics. The recipient is selected by the Department of Mathe- 
matics. 

Bryan Prize. In 1898, William Jennings Bryan gave to the University the sum of 
$250 whose income provides a $50 prize for the best essay written by an under- 
graduate student on a topic relating to the science of government. The prize, which 
was last awarded in 1972, is ordinarily offered every fifth year. Interested students 
should consult the Department of Political Science for additional information. 
Thomas Arkle Clark Prize. The freshman honor society, Phi Eta Sigma, gives a 
prize of $25 to its sophomore member who has attained the highest scholastic aver- 
age for his first three semesters in the University. In case two members have the 
same average, other factors such as extracurricular activities and outside work are 
considered. 

Thacher Howland Guild Memorial Prize. The Department of English offers a 
prize of $25 for the best play of the year written by an undergraduate student. The 
award may be withheld in any year if no production is found worthy of a prize. 
George Huflf Certificates of Award. The University of Illinois Alumni Association 
annually presents framed certificates of award for proficiency in scholarship and 
athletics to students who earn a varsity letter in any sport and who receive a 
scholastic grade-point average of at least 4.0 (A = 5.0) for two consecutive semes- 
ters. The awards are presented at the final home basketball game. 
mini Mothers Association Book Award. In recognition of outstanding academic 
achievement the association presents a book or books to the high school library 
of each first semester freshman who completes a minimum of 14 semester hours 
and achieves a 5.0 semester grade-point average. 

mini Poetry Prize. The Department of English offers a prize of $25 for an award- 
winning poem or group of poems written by an undergraduate student. The award 
may be withheld in any year if no production is found worthy of a prize. 
Intercollegiate Conference Medal. The Intercollegiate Conference, through its fac- 
ulty representative at each conference institution, awards annually a medal to the 
student in the graduating class who has attained the greatest proficiency in athletics 
and in scholastic work. 



98 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Phi Kappa Phi Awards. The local chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, national all-univer- 
sity scholastic honor society, gives two annual awards of $200, one to a junior and 
one to a senior member of the local chapter. The students are selected on the basis 
of ability, character, and need. Applications should be addressed to the local sec- 
retary of the society early in the second semester. 

Phi Kappa Phi (Sparks Memorial) Fellowships, Four fellowships of $2,500 each, 
for graduate study in any American institution of recognized standing, are awarded 
annually by Phi Kappa Phi, national all-university scholastic honor society, in com- 
petitions open to members of the society in any American college or university 
where a chapter of the society exists. Prospective candidates should file their apph- 
cations with the local secretary of the society early in the second semester of their 
senior year. 

Leah FuUenwider Trelease Memorial Award. Three prizes are awarded for the best 
short stories submitted to the Department of English by undergraduate students. 
Funds are derived from gifts of friends of the late Leah FuUenwider Trelease. 



Reserve Officers' Training Corps 

ARMY ROTC 

Military training has been given at the Urbana-Champaign campus since the Uni- 
versity opened in 1868. Originally mandatory for all male undergraduates under the 
land-grant charter, the program became entirely voluntary in 1964 when Congress 
passed the ROTC Vitalization Act. 

Although military science courses are open to all regularly enrolled students of 
the University of Illinois, those individuals desiring a commission in the Army of 
the United States must complete the entire program outlined below. This program 
is equal to a minor in military science. The student's major must be in any other 
field of study recognized by the University and for which a degree is granted. 

The Department of Military Science offers undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents an opportunity to earn a regular or reserve commission as a second lieutenant 
in the U.S. Army by completing a four- or two-year program of study and training. 
Financial assistance scholarships are available to qualified students. 

Normal Four-Year Program 

Students enrolling in the basic course must: 

- Be regularly enrolled on a full-time basis. 

- Be citizens of the United States at least seventeen years of age. 

- Be able to complete both the basic and advanced program requirements and re- 
ceive a baccalaureate degree prior to reaching twenty-eight years of age. 

- Be physically fit and of good moral character. 

- Be selected by the professor of military science and the University. 
Students enrolling in the advanced course must: 

- Have completed the basic course requirements through on-campus instruction. 
(This requirement can be waived for those presenting evidence of equivalent 
instruction through the basic summer camp, high school instruction, or prior 
military service.) 

- Sign a contract, with the consent of parents or guardian if a minor, to serve for 
the prescribed period. 

- Agree in writing to accept an appointment, if offered, as a commissioned officer. 

- Be selected by the professor of military science and the University. 

The basic course fulfills the necessary requirements for admission to the ad- 
vanced program of study and consists of the following required courses normally 
taken during the freshman and sophomore years : 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 99 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Mil. S. 100 — Leadership Laboratory Mil. S. 1 1 1 — U.S. Army and National 

Mil. S. 101 — Introduction to Military Security (U.S. Defense Establishment II). 1 

Science (U.S. Defense Establishment I). . 1 Mil. S. 125 — Leadership Laboratory 

Nonmilitory elective' 3 

SECOND YEAR 

Mil. S. 112 — American Military History... 2 Mil. S. 102 — Map and Aerial Photo 

Mil. S. 150 — Leadership Laboratory Analysis 1 

Mil. S. 103 — Introduction to Tactics 1 

Mil. S. 175 — Leadership Laboratory 

The advanced course is a two-year course of instruction, including a summer 
camp of six weeks between the junior and senior years, which leads to a commission 
as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. It consists of the following required courses 
normally taken during the junior and senior years: 

THIRD YEAR 

Mil. S. 200 — Leadership Laboratory Mil. S. 202 — Introductory Military 

Mil. S. 201 — Principles of Military Operations (Fundamentals and 

Instruction 1 Dynamics of Military Team I) 3 

Mil. S. 203 — Principles of Militory Mil. S. 225 — Leadership Laboratory 

Leadership 1 

Nonmilitory elective' 3 

FOURTH YEAR 

Mil. S. 212 — Advanced Military Operations Mil. S. 210 — Military Law and Adminis- 

(Fundamentals and Dynamics of Military trative Management 1 

Team II) 3 Mil. S. 211 — Proseminar 2 

Mil. S. 250 — Leadership Laboratory Mil. S. 275 — Leadership Laboratory 

Nonmilitory elective' 3 



' A nonmilitory elective approved by the Department of Military Science and the 
student's college is required during the first, third, and fourth years. Military courses ore 
offered only during semesters as shown above. 

BENEFITS FOR ADVANCED COURSE CADETS 

Advanced course cadets are eligible for the following benefits: 

- Commission in either the Regular Army or in the United States Army Reserve. 

- Subsistence pay at the rate of $100 per month during the junior and senior years, 
and pay during summer camp at the same rate as cadets at the United States 
Military Academy, plus a travel allowance for the summer camp. When the cadet 
is called to active duty, a uniform allowance of $300 is authorized. 

- An officer-type uniform is furnished by the University during training and may 
be kept by the student upon successful completion of the program. 

- .Academic credit for military science courses is granted according to the regula- 
tions of the individual colleges. 

- Deferment from selective service. 

- Students who are interested in and qualified for flight training may be selected 
to undergo such training as provided by the University at the expense of the U.S. 
Army. 

Scholarship Program 

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AWARDS 

This program is designed to offer financial assistance to outstanding young men in 
the Army ROTC program who are interested in the army as a career. The program 



100 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



provides free tuition, books, laboratory fees, and a subsistence allowance of $100 per 
month for the period that the scholarship is in effect. Scholarships may be awarded 
for one, two, three, or four years. Four-year scholarships are open to all students 
entering Army ROTC as freshmen or during the freshman year for those students 
enrolled in a five-year University curriculum. Application is normally made for 
the scholarship during the first semester of the senior year in high school. One- 
year, two-year, and three-year scholarships are available only to students who have 
completed prerequisite basic or advanced course study. 

ELIGIBILITY 

Any citizen of the United States who can meet the following criteria is eligible to 
compete for an Army ROTC scholarship: 

- Be at least seventeen years of age prior to the date on which the scholarship will 
become efTective. 

- Be able to complete all requirements for a commission and a college degree and 
be not more than twenty-eight years of age on June 30 of the year in which he be- 
comes eligible for appointment as an officer. 

- Enlist in the United States Army Reserve for a period of time necessary to com- 
plete the requirements for a commission. 

- Agree to complete the requirements for a commission, to accept either a Regular 
Army or a reserve commission, whichever is offered, and to serve on active duty 
for a period prescribed at the time of commissioning. 

- Be physically qualified in accordance with standards set for scholarship students. 

- Be a high school graduate or have received equivalent credit from an acceptable 
state or national agency. 

In addition, applicants for the three-year scholarships must: 

- Have completed at least one academic year of college, or, if enrolled in a five- 
year baccalaureate degree program, have completed not more than two years 
at the time of enrollment as a scholarship cadet. 

- Have completed at least one academic year and not more than one and one-half 
academic years of military science training at the time tl^e award becomes effec- 
tive. Waivers may be granted to prior servicemen and cadets authorized to re- 
ceive advance placement. 

- Be able to complete all requirements for a baccalaureate degree in three academic 
years if enrolled in a four-year degree program or four academic years if enrolled 
in a five-year degree program. 

Applicants for two-year scholarships, in addition to meeting the above eligibility 
requirements must: 

- Satisfactorily complete the on-campus Army ROTC basic course and be accepted 
by the professor of military science for enrollment in the advanced course. 

- Have at least two years of academic study remaining to qualify for a degree. 

Applicants for the one-year scholarships, in addition to meeting the eligibility 
requirements outlined above, must have completed the basic program and one year 
of the advanced program, and must be able to complete the requirements for a 
baccalaureate degree in one year if enrolled in a four-year degree program or in 
two years if enrolled in a five-year degree program. 

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION 

Application for the four-year scholarship is made during the fall semester of the 
senior year in high school and selection is based upon the following: 

- Results of the CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test or the assessment of the American 
College Testing (ACT) Program. 

- High school academic record. 

- Participation in extracurricular athletic and nonathletic activities. 

- Personal observations. 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 101 



- Physical exaniination. 

- Interviews. 

Selection for the one-, two-, and three-year scholarships will be based upon the 
applicant's college record in both academic and military studies, personal observa- 
tions, and other criteria which the professor of military science may establish. 

State Army ROTC Scholarship 

For information regarding the state Army ROTC scholarships see page 82. 

Two-Year Program 

This program is designed specifically to meet the needs of junior college graduates 
and students of four-year colleges who have not taken Army ROTC during their 
first two years. Students with a baccalaureate degree who will have two or more 
years in graduate school are also eligible to apply for the two-year program. A six- 
week basic summer camp substitutes for the first two years of the four-year program. 
Except for this substitution, the program is the same as the standard four-year 
program. 

PREREQUISITES FOR ENROLLMENT 

In addition to being a graduate of a junior college, or a student in a four-year col- 
lege who has completed all requirements through the sophomore year, or a graduate 
student with two or more years remaining in graduate school, the student must meet 
the following prerequisites: 

- Be physically and mentally qualified. 

- Be of sound character. 

- Be at least seventeen years of age. Student must not be more than twenty-eight 
years of age when commissioned. 

- Be recommended by a board of officers. 

- Successfully complete six weeks of summer camp training in lieu of the basic 
ROTC course normally taken as a freshman and sophomore. 

STEPS REQUIRED FOR PARTICIPATION 

Each student must: 

- Complete the ROTC questionnaire, which is available at junior colleges and from 
the Office of Military Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 113 
Armory, Champaign, Illinois 61820. (After applying, the student will be notified 
when and where to complete the remaining steps.) 

- Take the ROTC qualifying examination. 

- Take the medical examination. 

- Attend a personal interview. 

- Attend the basic summer camp. 

Additional information 

For additional information regarding any of these programs, contact the Professor 
of Military Science, University of IHinois at Urbana-Champaign, 110 Armory, 
Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

Prizes and Awards 

American Legion Medals. The American Legion annually awards medals for mili- 
tary and scholastic excellence to two advance course cadets. 

American Legion Auxiliary Awards. The Illinois Department of the American Le- 
gion makes an award of $50 to the retiring army brigade executive officer. Unit 
Number 24 awards $10 to the cadet placing second in the Hazelton Medal com- 



102 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



petition. Unit Number 1 presents an award of $25 to the second-year cadet who 
demonstrates military aptitude and personal development. The Nineteenth District 
presents an award of $25 to the winner of the Hazelton Medal Competition. 
Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Award. A gold medal 
and certificate are awarded to the outstanding senior in Army ROTC majoring in 
electronic engineering. 

Association of the United States Army. The association annually presents a medal 
and certificate to the outstanding advance course cadet. 

Chicago Tribune Awards. The Chicago Tribune awards a gold and silver medal to 
two outstanding freshmen and sophomores. The presentation of these medals is 
based on military achievement, scholastic attainment, and character. 
Chi Gamma Iota Award. Alpha chapter of Chi Gamma Iota, a national veterans 
scholastic honorary society, annually presents a watch to the junior ROTC student 
with the highest military and scholastic average. 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award. A camera is presented to an advance 
course cadet demonstrating outstanding leadership and scholastic achievement. 
Hazelton Medal. In 1890 Captain W. C. Hazelton provided a medal which is 
awarded to the best-drilled freshman in the basic course. Each competitor must 
have been in attendance at the University at least sixteen weeks of the current 
college year and have no more than one unexcused absence from drill. To be 
eligible for this award, a student must have a grade of B in military science and 
an academic average of not lower than B in his first semester courses. Competition 
is normally held in March. 

Reserve Officers' Association Medal. The Department of Illinois annually presents 
a medal to the outstanding first-year advance course cadet based on excellence in 
scholarship and achievement in leadership. 

Superior Cadet Decoration Award. The Department of the Army annually awards 
a medal, pendant, and ribbon to the outstanding freshman, sophomore, junior, and 
senior cadets. 

Union Veterans of the Civil War Auxiliary Award. The Auxiliary to the Union 
Veterans of the Civil War annually awards a saber to the advance course cadet 
demonstrating exceptional ability in advanced military operations. 
University Gold Medal. The Board of Trustees annually provides a gold medal to 
be awarded to the retiring brigade commander. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Auxiliary Award. A medal and a 
$25 government bond are awarded to the outstanding army sophomore in Pershing 
Rifles. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Award. A watch, medal, and cer- 
tificate are presented to the outstanding battalion commander of Army ROTC. A 
medal and certificate are presented to the outstanding company commander for 
demonstrated leadership and academic achievement. 

Woman's Relief Corps Award. The Illinois Department of the Woman's Relief 
Corps, an auxiliary to the Grand Army of the Republic, presents an award to the 
outstanding senior ROTC student of the three services for excellence in military 
scholarship. 

Clair M. Worthy Military Science Award. The Clair M. Worthy award is pre- 
sented to a senior for outstanding military leadership. The recipient must rank 
academically in the upper fourth of his military science class. 

NAVAL ROTC 

Naval ROTC offers an undergraduate student an opportunity to earn a commission 
in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps or in the U.S. Naval or U.S. Marine Corps 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 103 



Rescne. Students enrolled m this program pursue their studies as any other Uni- 
versity student, except they have certain specific requirements which prepare them 
for duties as officers upon graduation. Students may be enrolled in either the Navy 
College Scholarship Program or the Navy College Program (nonscholarship) . Naval 
science courses are open to any undergraduate student who meets the course pre- 
requisites even if not enrolled in the two previously mentioned programs. 

Navy-Marine Scholarship Program 

The Navy-Marine Scholarship Program provides students with tuition, fees, books, 
and retainer pay (currently $100 per month) for four years. Students enrolled in 
a degree program which requires longer than four years to complete are permitted 
to take a leave of absence of a year to finish their baccalaureate degree. Upon grad- 
uation, scholarship students are commissioned in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine 
Corps and serve four years on active duty. If they then choose, they may return to 
civilian life, retaining a commission in the Naval Reserve or Marine Corps Reserve. 
This reser\-e commission must be retained until the sixth anniversary of their first 
commission. Newly commissioned officers who qualify have the opportunity to con- 
tinue their education toward an advanced degree. 

Each state and territory has quotas of these scholarships for which high school 
seniors and college freshmen compete each year. Selection is based on the appli- 
cant's Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the assessment of the American College 
Testing (ACT) Program, high school record, aptitude for the naval service, and 
certain physical qualifications. 

Scholarship students get an opportunity during the summer to practice the 
things they have learned in the classroom. Three summer training cruises of six 
weeks each are taken by these students either at sea aboard a U.S. Navy ship or 
at a naval air station and amphibious base. Students who choose to enter the U.S. 
Marine Corps spend their last summer training period at Marine Corps Officer 
Candidate School. 

Navy-Marine College Program 

The Navy-Marine College Program is also a four-year curriculum. Students receive 
retainer pay (currently $100 per month) during their junior and senior years. If 
their degree program requires longer than four years to complete they will be per- 
mitted up to a year's leave of absence to finish their baccalaureate degree. Upon 
graduation, college program students are commissioned in the U.S. Naval or 
U.S. Marine Corps Reserve and serve three of their six-year reserve obligation on 
active duty. If newly commissioned officers qualify they may continue their studies 
toward an advanced degree. 

A student may apply for admission to the college program through the professor 
of naval science, who makes the final selection. This selection is based on mental, 
physical, and aptitude criteria. College program students also have an opportunity 
for summer training, usually after their junior year. They will go to sea on a ship 
of the U.S. Navy for six weeks or, if they choose to enter the Marine Corps, will 
attend Marine Corps Officer Candidate School for six weeks. 

College program students are eligible to be appointed to the scholarship pro- 
gram through recommendation of the professor of naval science and approval of 
the chief of naval personnel. 

Two-Year NROTC College Program 

Applicants must have two remaining years of baccalaureate study. During the sum- 
mer prior to the junior year, students attend a six-week Naval Science Institute 
conducted at an NROTC university; after successful completion, they join their 



104 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



contemporaries in the college program, receiving the same benefits as those who 
attended the first two years of the four-year college program. They also participate 
in the six-week summer training between the junior and senior years. 

Requirements 

In addition to mental, physical, and aptitude requirements which depend upon the 
program, NROTC students must: 

- Be citizens of the United States (women are eligible to apply for NROTC). 

- Have attained their seventeenth birthday on or before June 30 of the year of 
enrollment and not have passed their twenty-first birthday by that date. If a 
minor, they must have the consent of their parents. For the two-year college 
program they must not have passed their twenty-fifth birthday when commis- 
sioned. 

- Have no moral obligations or personal convictions that will prevent them from 
conscientiously bearing arms and supporting and defending the Constitution of 
the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic. 

NROTC students have a two-hour laboratory course, N.S. 100, each week 
for which there is no credit and also take the following naval science courses: 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

N.S. Ill — Principles of Naval N.S. 112 — Introduction to Naval 

Organization and Management 3 Ship Systems 3 

SECOND YEAR 

N.S. 122 — American Military Affairs 3 

THIRD YEAR (Navy) 

N.S. 231 — Naval Operations N.S. 232 — Naval Operations 

and Navigation I 3 and Navigation II 3 

THIRD YEAR (Marine) 

N.S. 291 — Evolution of Warfare 3 

FOURTH YEAR (Navy) 

N.S. 241 — Naval Ship Systems 11 3 N.S. 242 — Naval Personnel 

Administration 3 

FOURTH YEAR (Marine) 

N.S. 293 — History of Amphibious 

Warfare 3 

Each student's degree program must also include the following University 
courses depending on the degree program (not required for Marine Corps option 
students) : 

HOURS 

Calculus and/or statistics 6 

Physics, chemistry, a biological science, or an earth science 6 

Computer science 3 

Pol. S. 387 — National Security Policy 3 

Additional Information 

Further information regarding Naval ROTC may be obtained in person from or 
by writing to the Professor of Naval Science, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Ghampaign, 239 Armory, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 105 



Prizes and Awards 

American Legion Auxiliary, Department of Illinois Award. To the NROTC com- 
pany which won the Color Company Competition. 

American Legion, Department of Illinois Medals, To the two midshipmen of the 
sophomore class and the two midshipmen of the freshman class, NROTC, who 
have achieved the highest grade-point average for three semesters of naval science 
and for naval organization and management, respectively. 

American Legion Auxiliary, Unit 24, Champaign Award. To the midshipman who, 
by his interest and zeal in extracurricular activities within the Naval Battalion, was 
chosen to be president of the Trident Naval Honorary Society, $10. 
.American Legion .Auxiliary, Unit 71, Urbana Award. To the midshipman of the 
NROTC Rifle Team who has achieved the highest shooting average for the aca- 
demic year, a $25 bond. 

.American Ordnance Association Gold Scholarship Key. This award is presented 
annually to the midshipman of the senior class, NROTC, who has demonstrated 
academic excellence, active participation in athletics and campus activities, and 
outstanding leadership qualities. 

•Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Awards. A $500 schol- 
arship awarded annually to selected second-year ROTC students majoring in 
communications, electronics, and electrical engineering, based on national compe- 
tition. The association also presents medals and certificates of achievement to out- 
standing graduating ROTC seniors in these engineering curricula. 
Chi Gamma Iota Award. Alpha chapter of Chi Gamma Iota, national veteran 
scholastic honorary society, annually makes an award to the outstanding ROTC 
junior student in any branch of the service with the highest academic and military 
average. 

Chicago Tribune Awards. Two gold medals and two silver medals are presented 
by the Chicago Tribune to outstanding NROTC midshipmen. The awards are 
based on military achievement, scholastic attainment, and character. 
Commander Maurice L. Homer, Jr., Memorial Award. A substantial monetary 
award is presented to the outstanding third-year midshipman, based on aptitude 
for naval service, naval science grades, other academic grades, and leadership. 
This award is administered by Illinois Commandery Foundation, Naval Order of 
the United States. 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award. To the senior midshipman of the 
NROTC who contributed most significantly to the development of naval spirit and 
loyalty within the Battalion of Midshipmen. 

Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America Award. The Illinois department 
of the national society awards a medal to the midshipman who has achieved the 
highest academic proficiency for one semester in the University. 
Daughters of the Union Veterans of the Civil War Award. The department pre- 
sents a medal to the NROTC student who, through leadership and academic profi- 
ciency, has achieved the position of the outstanding midshipman in the marine 
option program. 

General Dynamics NROTC Award. A plaque is awarded to the midshipman of 
the senior class, NROTC, who has participated most extensively in extracurricular 
activities during his four years in the NROTC program. 

Illinois Society of the Sons of the American Revolution Award. To the retiring 
battalion adjutant of the NROTC. 

Ladies Auxiliary to Veterans of Foreign Wars, Department of Illinois Award. A 

medal and a $25 bond to the midshipman contributing most toward the ideals of 
professional development. 



106 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



National Sojourners Award for Americanism. This award is presented annually to 
the midshipman of the junior class, NROTC, who contributed the most to en- 
courage and demonstrate Americanism within the NROTC unit and on the campus. 
Reserve Officers' Association Medal. The Cook County chapter annually awards a 
medal to the outstanding third-year advanced course student in each of the three 
services based upon excellence in scholarship and achievement in leadership. 
The Society of American Military Engineers Award. Annual awards of gold medals 
to NROTC seniors and juniors majoring in engineering curricula who have demon- 
strated outstanding academic performance in their fields. Awardees are selected on 
the basis of national competition. 

United States Naval Institute Awards. These awards are presented to the midship- 
men with the highest and second highest grades in naval history courses. 
University Gold Medal. The Board of Trustees presents a sword and scabbard to 
the midshipman of the graduating class who has achieved the highest grade-point 
average for seven semesters of naval science. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Award. To the midshipman of 
NROTC who, by demonstration of outstanding qualities of naval leadership, was 
chosen to command the NROTC Battalion for the academic year. 
Woman's Relief Corps, Department of Illinois Award. A camera is awarded to the 
outstanding senior ROTC student in any branch of service who has excelled in 
military scholarship. 

Woman's Relief Corps Tablet. The Illinois Department of the Woman's Relief 
Corps presents a tablet to senior cadets and midshipmen of the Army, Navy, and 
Air Force ROTC who have excelled in military scholarship. 



AIR FORCE ROTC 

The Air Force ROTC program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
offers the opportunity of a professional training program for those college men and 
women who desire to serve in the U.S. Air Force as a commissioned officer. The 
educational experience gained will provide the necessary background to enable the 
young officer to function effectively in an air force career. 

General Military Course (GMC) 

The first- and second-year educational program in air force aerospace studies 
includes instruction in A.F.A.S. Ill, 112, 121, and 122. These courses are de- 
signed to give students basic information on world military systems and the role 
of the U.S. Air Force in the defense of the free world. 

Professional Officer Course (POO 

The third and fourth years of air force aerospace studies instruction, consisting of 
A.F.A.S. 231, 232, 241, and 242, are designed to develop skills and attitudes vital to 
the career professional officer. Final selection of students rests with the professor 
of aerospace studies. Requirements for the Professional Officer Course are as 
follows : 

- Each member of the POC must be a citizen of the United States. 

- Members must be enrolled as full-time students in the University. 

- Students must have at least two years remaining at the University as an under- 
graduate and/or graduate student upon entry into the program. 

- Students must pass either a flight physical or a general service-type physical 
examination. 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 107 



- Students must be able to complete all requirements for appointment as an officer 
in the air force prior to reaching twenty-six and a half years of age if flying- 
qualified or thirty years if nonflying-qualified. 

- Successful completion of a six-week field training unit, held at selected air force 
bases, is a prerequisite for entrance into the two-year Professional Officer Course. 
A four-week field training unit is a requirement for the four-year AFROTC 
curriculum. 

- Students must achieve qualifying scores on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

- Students who are qualified and accepted in a category leading to pilot training 
must agree to participate in, and pursue toward completion, a course of orienta- 
tion flight training which is provided by the University under contract with and 
at the expense of the U.S. Air Force. 

- Students must execute a written statement with the U.S. government agreeing 
to complete the Professional Officer Education Program (contingent upon re- 
maining in school), to attend a summer training unit at the time specified, to 
accept a reserve commission in the air force upon graduation, and to serve four 
years on active duty after graduation if in a nonflying category, or to serve five 
years if in a flying category once the fiying training (approximate duration of 
one year) has been completed. The summer training unit is a concentrated labo- 
ratory consisting of aerospace studies with a duration ranging from twenty-eight 
days to six weeks. The twenty-eight-day training unit is not required of students 
who elect to attend the six-week summer training unit in lieu of completion of 
the General Military Education Program. 

- Students must enlist in the Air Force Reserve (ORS) before they can become 
members of the Professional Officer Education Program. This enlistment is ter- 
minated upon acceptance of an air force commission. 

- Students must possess and maintain a quality grade-point average which is as 
high as, but preferably higher than, that required by their college for good 
standing. The scholastic record must be free from academic deficiency at the 
time of admission. 

- Members must not be conscientious objectors. 

BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES FOR CADETS IN THE PROFESSIONAL OFFICER EDUCATION 
PROGRAM 

Cadets in this program are eligible for the following benefits and allowances. 

- Commission in the Air Force Reserve. 

- Deferment from selective service. 

- An officer-type uniform is furnished by the University during training which may 
be kept by the student for use on active duty. 

- A nontaxable subsistence allowance of $100 a month during the two-semester 
academic year. 

- A salary for attendance at the four- or six-week summer training unit, and travel 
allowance to and from the training. 

- A maximum of 3 hours academic credit each semester, according to the regula- 
tions of each college. 

- Space-available travel on military aircraft within the continental United States. 

- Reduced rates for travel on railroads. 

AFROTC College Scholarship Program 

FRESHMEN 

This program provides scholarships for a limited number of high school students 
accepted for admission at the University of Illinois. During their participation in 
AFROTC they will receive $100 per month while on grant along with paid tuition, 
fees, and laboratory expenses, and reimbursement for books. 



108 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Eligibility requirements for the scholarship program are: 

- Be a male citizen of the United States. 

- Be at least age seventeen on date of enrollment and under age twenty-five on 
June 30 of estimated year of commissioning. 

- Have completed or will complete high school during the current academic year. 
High school students who will not be ready to enter college in the fall semester 
are not eligible and should not apply. 

- Have no moral obligations or personal convictions that will prevent bearing arms 
and supporting and defending- the Constitution of the United States against all 
enemies, foreign and domestic. 

- Be accepted for enrollment at the University of Illinois. 

- Achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

- Pass a Class I or lA medical examination for flying, administered by an air force 
physician. 

- Enlist in the Air Force Reserve for a period of eight years. This commitment is 
terminated once commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force. 

Those interested should apply directly to Headquarters, AFROTC (OTTA), 
Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama 36112. Applications should be received no later 
than November 1 of the year preceding enrollment for the fall semester of the fol- 
lowing academic year. 

SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS 

This program provides scholarships for a selected number of cadets who are en- 
rolled in AFROTC. During their participation in the program they will receive 
$100 each month while on grant along with paid tuition, fees, and laboratory ex- 
penses, and reimbursement for books. 

Eligibility requirements for the scholarship program are : 

- Be actually enrolled in the AFROTC four-year program on campus. 

- Achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

- Pass either a flying or nonflying physical examination. 

- Meet, and be selected by, a board of air force officers and University represen- 
tatives. 

- Possess and maintain a quality grade-point average established by the school as 
meeting the requirement for good standing. 

In addition each applicant selected must: 

- Execute a written contract with the U.S. government agreeing to complete the 
Professional Officer Education Program, to attend a summer training unit at the 
specified time, to accept a reserve commission in the air force upon graduation, 
and to serve four years on active duty after graduation if in a nonflying category, 
or five years if in a flying category once the flying training (approximate duration 
of one year) has been completed. The summer training unit is a concentrated 
laboratory consisting of aerospace studies with a duration of twenty-eight days. 

- Enlist in the Air Force Reserve for the period of eight years. This enlistment is 
terminated upon completion of the AFROTC program and acceptance of an air 
force commission. 

- Students who are qualified and accepted in a category leading to pilot training 
must also agree to participate in, and pursue, a course of orientation flight train- 
ing which is provided by the University under contract with and at the expense 
of the U.S. Air Force. 

Staff and Equipment 

Air force personnel are assigned by Headquarters USAF as instructors or adminis- 
trators in the AFROTC unit after acceptance by the Military Education Council, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The senior officer is designated as the 
professor of aerospace studies. All other officers hold appropriate subordinate aca- 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 109 



demic and military positions on his staff. All officers must possess a minimum of a 
master's degree and have completed the Air Uni\crsity's academic instructor course. 
The Armor>- at the University of Illinois contains offices, classrooms, and a 
leadership laboratory. All classes are held in the Armory. 

Additional Information 

Further inquiry concerning the AFROTC program at the University should be 
directed to the Professor of Aerospace Studies, AFROTC, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, 232 Armory, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

Prizes and Awards 

Air Force Association Award. A medal is presented to the outstanding senior cadet 
in AFROTC. 

American Legion Awards. The Illinois Department of the American Legion awards 
a medal to the freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior cadet with the highest 
military theory average for the current school year. 

American Legion Auxiliary Awards. The Illinois Department of the American Le- 
gion Auxiliary makes an award of $50 to the retiring AFROTC cadet commander. 
Unit Number 24 of Champaign presents a $10 award to the best-drilled second- 
year air force cadet. Unit Number 71 of Urbana presents a $25 bond to the most 
outstanding first sergeant of the AFROTC cadet wing. 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Award. A gold medal 
is awarded to the outstanding senior in AFROTC enrolled in the electrical engi- 
neering curriculum and majoring in communications or electronics engineering. 
Chi Gamma Iota Award. Alpha chapter of Chi Gamma Iota, national veteran's 
scholastic honorary society, annually makes an award to the outstanding ROTC 
junior student of all military services on the basis of excellence in scholarship, both 
academic and military. 

Daughters of the American Revolution Award. The Daughters of the American 
Revolution present a ring to the outstanding squadron commander for the year. 
Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War Award. The Department of Illinois 
Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War present a medal to the sophomore 
with the highest military grade average. 

Reserve Officers' Association Medal. The Cook County chapter annually awards a 
medal to the outstanding third-year student. Selection is based upon excellence in 
scholarship and achievement in leadership. 

Sons of the American Revolution Award. The Illinois Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution presents a medal to the basic corps cadet maintaining the 
best military appearance and bearing throughout the year. 

University Gold Medal. The Board of Trustees annually provides a gold medal to 
be awarded to the cadet selected to be the air force cadet wing commander for the 
coming year. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Award. The Illinois Department of 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States awards a watch, a silver citizen- 
ship medal, and a certificate of merit to the outstanding group commander. 
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States Auxiliary Award. A medal and a 
$25 bond are awarded to the member of the Arnold Air Society Squadron who has 
made the most valuable contributions to the successful operation of the organization. 
Woman's Relief Corps Tablet. The names of the senior cadets of the Air Force, 
Army, and Navy ROTC who have excelled in scholarship are inscribed on a bronze 
tablet. 



no UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Urbatia Council on Teacher Education 

Six colleges of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offer bachelor 
degree programs which lead to teacher certification in the state of Illinois and to 
qualification for teacher certification in many other states. These six colleges include 
the College of Agriculture, the College of Education, the College of Engineering, the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and 
the College of Physical Education. The Urbana Council on Teacher Education is 
responsible for the coordination of teacher education curricula at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus and for maintaining the relationship between the campus and 
state certification authorities. The offices of the Urbana Council on Teacher Edu- 
cation are located in 120 Education Building. 

Graduates of council-approved curricula (listed elsewhere in this section) may 
request teacher certification through the University's recommendation to the State 
Teacher Certification Board. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants to teacher education curricula must meet the admission requirements 
of the colleges and departments offering the chosen curricula. General admission 
requirements are presented in the Admissions Chart which begins on page 39. 
Transfer students whose cumulative grade-point average is less than the stated mini- 
mum may apply for admission, but will be considered individually on a petition 
basis if enrollment vacancies exist in the college and curriculum to which admission 
is being sought. If admitted, such students may be placed on provisional status by 
the Urbana Council on Teacher Education. 



ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 

Committees of the Urbana Council on Teacher Education review each student's 
academic progress every semester. At the time of each assessment a student is nor- 
mally assigned the status of good standing in teacher education if his University 
of Illinois grade-point average, cumulative grade-point average, and major field 
grade-point average meet council and curriculum criteria. A student who does 
not meet those criteria may be placed on provisional status in teacher education 
or disqualified status. A student placed on disqualified status may transfer to a 
non-teacher education curriculum within the University if he is academically 
eligible. 

Typically, the minimum University of Illinois grade-point average and cumu- 
lative average required for good standing in teacher education is 3.5 (A = 5.0). 
However, there are variations among curricula in the minimum academic require- 
ments. In certain instances, curriculum descriptions elsewhere in this bulletin may 
indicate special academic requirements for good standing in teacher education. 
Students may consult their teacher education adviser or the Director of Teacher 
Education Services, 120 Education Building, for additional information concerning 
academic regulations and status in teacher education. 



PERSONAL QUALIFICATIONS FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 

It is common knowledge that teaching effectiveness is influenced not only by aca- 
demic proficiency but also by the personal characteristics of the teacher. Recogniz- 
ing the importance of these personal factors, counseling services are available for 
all students in teacher education. Any student wishing additional information re- 



TEACHER EDUCATION 111 



garding counseling services may make an appointment by calling (217) 333-2800, 
or hy N'isiting 120 Education Building. 

Since it is essential that counseling services be offered as soon as the need 
becomes apparent, teacher education advisers and faculty are asked to participate 
in this effort. Hence, staff members are invited to recommend counseling for any 
student about whom concern is felt. A student who is recommended for counseling 
will receive a written request to make an appointment to discuss matters in which 
a counselor may be of assistance. Students who receive a letter of this nature must 
respond to the request as a requirement of the Urbana Council on Teacher Edu- 
cation. Failure to respond will jeopardize the continuation of the student in teacher 
education. During the appointment the student will be informed of the counseling 
ser\'ices available on this campus. The use of these services will usually be optional. 
In exceptional cases, however, a student may be required to enter counseling with 
one of the campus services. Such referrals are mandatory for a student who wishes 
to continue in teacher education. 



STUDENT TEACHING 

Students should apply for tentative student teaching assignments on completion of 
60 semester hours of credit. Student teaching application forms may be obtained 
from the appropriate student teaching office. Normally, after earning 60 semester 
hours, eligible students will receive an invitation to apply for student teaching as- 
signment from the Urbana Council on Teacher Education. Students who are eligible 
to apply for assignment, but who have not received an invitation to do so, should 
contact the appropriate office of student teaching early in the fall semester. Stu- 
dents who are not on campus during the fall semester, but who expect to enroll 
in educational practice (student teaching) during the next school year, should 
secure application forms from their office of student teaching before they leave 
campus. On completion of 75 or more semester hours, students who are in good 
standing in teacher education and who have applied for student teaching assign- 
ments will receive notification of their assignments. The latest date for any cur- 
rently enrolled, eligible student to apply for a student teaching assignment for the 
next academic year is the end of the second week in December. Currently enrolled 
students who apply after this date cannot be guaranteed a student teaching assign- 
ment during the next academic year. Students disqualified for continuation in 
teacher education and students not officially registered in teacher education cur- 
ricula are not eligible for student teaching. 

Students on college academic or disciplinary probation are not eligible for 
student teaching during the semester in which the probationary status is in effect 
and are not permitted to engage in student teaching activities. 

Students in teacher education should anticipate and plan for off-campus 
assignments during the professional semester. For most students, an additional 
expense of approximately $250 wall be incurred during the semester in which stu- 
dent teaching is scheduled. Only a very limited number of assignments for student 
teaching is available in the vicinity of the campus. Students will be assigned to 
these schools as student teachers only in cases of special need for local assignment. 
It is not presently possible to arrange local assignments for all whose need would 
justify such assignment. 

Any student who may wish to complete student teaching through another 
university, yet receive a University of Illinois degree, must have the written con- 
sent of his adviser, college, and the Urbana Council on Teacher Education. 

TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 

Each student seeking a degree and teacher certification must complete the require- 
ments of his chosen curriculum. If the curriculum requires a second teaching field. 



112 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



it must be selected from the list of approved teacher education minors. Teacher 
education curricula and the colleges which offer them are listed below. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Vocational agriculture 135 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Business education 193 

Early childhood education 195 

Education of deaf and hard-of- 

hearing children 198 

Education of mentally handicapped 

children 199 

Elementary education 196 

English 187 

French 188 

General science 189 

German 189 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Engineering technology 232 

COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

Art education 245 

Dance 255 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Biology 317 

Chemistry 318 

Earth science 319 

English 320 

French 323 

Geography 328 

German 324 

Latin 325 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health and safety education 342 

Physical education for men 346 

Teacher Education Minors 

Accountancy 171 

Art education 246 

Biology 318 

Chemistry 319 

Coaching 349 

Dance 256 

Earth science 320 

Economics 171 

English 322 

English as a second language 321 

French 324 

General science 318 

Geography 328 

German 325 

Health education 345 

Home economics 157 

Italian 325 



Vocational home economics 155 



Health occupations (see technical 

education specialties) 197 

Industrial education (see technical 

education specialties) 197 

Latin 190 

Life science 186 

Mathematics 1 90 

Physical science 190 

Russian 191 

Social studies 192 

Spanish 192 

Technical education specialties 197 



Music education 263 



Mathematics 328 

Physics 330 

Russian 326 

Social studies 331 

Spanish 327 

Speech 332 

Speech and hearing science 332 



Physical education for women 346 



Journalism 181 

Latin 326 

Library science 336 

Mathematics 329 

Music 265 

Physical education for men 348 

Physical education for women 349 

Physical science 319 

Physics 331 

Portuguese 326 

Psychology 331 

Rhetoric 321 

Russian 327 

Safety and driver education 345 

Social studies 331 

Spanish 328 

Speech 332 



TEACHER EDUCATION 113 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
General Requirements 

In order to be eligible for teacher certification in the state of Illinois students must 
complete all curriculum requirements, including at least 3 semester hours of basic 
physical education and/or health courses. Furthermore, all teacher education cur- 
ricula must include one course in U.S. history and one course in political science 
which covers the constitutions of Illinois and the United States. 

The School Code of Illinois specifies that each person who applies for certifi- 
cation must be a citizen of the United States or have filed a declaration of intent 
to become a citizen of the United States. 

Students who enroll in advanced foreign language courses as a result of per- 
formance on a placement examination are often eligible to receive prerequisite 
credit in that language for teacher certification purposes only. Those who are 
qualified to receive prerequisite credit, and who have declared that foreign lan- 
guage as their major or minor, should report their circumstances to the Recorder, 
Office of Admissions and Records, 69 Administration Building, during the second 
semester prior to graduation. Transfer students should go directly to the appro- 
priate language department office to initiate the procedure. 

Application Procedures 

Before graduation, each student who wishes to apply for teacher certification in 
the state of Illinois should complete an application for a Certificate of Entitlement. 
Application forms may be obtained in 120 Education Building. Completed forms 
should be returned to 120 Education Building within the first month of the stu- 
dent's final semester. Each qualified graduate of a teacher education program who 
returns the application on time will receive a Certificate of Entitlement several 
weeks after graduation. To receive an Illinois Teacher's Certificate, the teacher 
certification entitlement card must be presented to the superintendent of any 
Educational Service Region in Illinois. 

In the first week of his final semester, any student who wishes to teach in the 
city of Chicago should write to the Board of Examiners, Board of Education, 228 
North LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois 60601. 

Questions concerning teacher certification should be directed to the Office of 
the Coordinator, Urbana Council on Teacher Education, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, 120 Education Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 



EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT 

The University's Educational Placement Office stores and processes professional 
credentials of University students and alumni who are qualified to apply for em- 
ployment in educational institutions. The placement office announces vacancies to 
registered candidates through a weekly list available at the office. Experienced 
consultants are available to assist candidates in setting up credentials and in plan- 
ning their search for new employment. Students seeking educational employment 
should register with the Educational Placement Office, 140 Education Building, 
in the fall semester of their senior year. Meetings for seniors are held in the first 
week of October to begin this process. 



Colleges and 

Other Academic Units 



The undergraduate programs offered by the colleges, the Institute of 
Aviation, and the schools at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois are described in detail in the following pages. Frequent 
reference is made to course numbers and titles; please refer to Appendix 
E on page 384 for the list of Course Abbreviations Used in Curricular 
Listings. 

Every two years the University publishes the Courses Catalog which 
lists and describes all the undergraduate and graduate courses offered at 
this campus. A list of courses offered each term is published in the Time- 
table which is issued in April for the fall term, in March for the summer 
term, and in October for the spring term. Copies of these publications may 
be obtained on campus from the information office of the Illini Union, or 
by writing to the Director, Office of Admissions and Records, University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, lOOA Administration Building, Urbana, 
Illinois 61801. 

115 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
104 Mumford Hall 
Urhana, Illinois 61801 



The College of Agriculture is the land-grant agricultural college for the 
state of Illinois. It provides both undergraduate and graduate instruction 
in agriculture and in home economics. It is by law responsible for the 
Illinois Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension 
Service in agriculture and home economics. The college also carries on 
agricultural assistance work in developing countries throughout the world. 

Undergraduate students enroll either as new freshmen or as transfer 
students from other junior or senior institutions. The program for the 
bachelor's degree usually requires a total of four years of study, although 
this can be reduced by passing proficiency examinations, receiving advance 
placement credit, attending summer sessions, and carrying heavier than 
normal course loads. 

Flexibility in course programming is possible for the better-than-average 
student' through the agricultural science curriculum, in the agricultural 
programs, and through honors programs in all curricula. 

Students carry on study in the other colleges of the University and have 
for their use the resources of the great library of the University. A wealth 
of cultural and social opportunities present themselves to those students 
alert to their value. 

The college, located in one of the greatest agricultural regions of the 
world, is in an advantageous position for the teaching and research in agri- 
culture and its related occupations. A great diversity of agricultural instruc- 
tion is available here; instruction in agricultural subjects is organized under 
nine departments. Students can choose from twenty-six curricula, majors, 
and options within agriculture, and select from some 275 courses in agri- 
cultural subjects. The College of Agriculture maintains farms and plots, 
a forest plantation, orchards, greenhouses, herds and flocks of all kinds, 
and laboratories to assist in instruction. 

The Department of Home Economics offers 70 undergraduate and grad- 
uate courses and provides for the baccalaureate degree through either the 
College of Agriculture or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Excel- 
lent facilities for study are provided in Bevier Hall, the large, modem home 
economics building, and in the fine Child Development Laboratory. 

117 



118 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 



The Department of Agricultural Economics offers courses in farm management; 
farm appraisals; land economics; agricultural finance, prices, and statistics; mar- 
keting agricultural commodities; commodity futures markets; agribusiness manage- 
ment; agricultural policies; economic development (international) and history 
(American) ; rural sociology; rural recreation; agricultural law; and farm taxation. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers courses in agricultural 
engineering and agricultural mechanization which cover the principles of engineer- 
ing as applied to agriculture, including problems in the areas of soil and water 
control, farm buildings and housing, field machinery, tractors, crop processing, and 
farmstead mechanization. Instruction in farm shop practices and techniques is 
offered. 

The Department of Agronomy offers courses in both crops and soils. Instruc- 
tion in crops includes courses in breeding; production and evaluation of cereals, 
corn, soybeans, and forage crops; crop physiology; design of field experiments; and 
weeds and their control. Instruction in soils includes the origin and development 
of soils, land appraisals, soil conservation, soil chemistry, soil physics, soil fertility 
and fertilizer use, soil management, and soil microbiology. 

The Department of Animal Science offers courses in the areas of animal ge- 
netics, physiology, nutrition, ecology, and meat science. Other courses are concerned 
with the application of scientific principles to the management of swine, beef cattle, 
sheep, poultry, light horses, and laboratory animals. 

The courses offered by the Department of Dairy Science are concerned with 
the breeding and feeding of dairy cattle, including genetics, nutrition, and physi- 
ology; management, sanitation, and judging of dairy cattle; and the biochemical, 
physiological, and microbiological phases of milk production and utilization. 

The Department of Food Science offers courses in the application of engineer- 
ing, chemistry, physics, microbiology, and nutrition to the processing, formulation, 
packaging, and distribution of food. Two undergraduate curricula, food science and 
food industry, are offered. 

The Department of Forestry curriculum in forest science prepares students for 
all phases of the management of forest properties (private or public, large or small), 
for the production of valuable wood products or for watershed protection, wild- 
life habitat, recreational enjoyment, or other benefits. The curriculum in wood 
science prepares students to work with wood as a basic raw material. 

Department of Home Economics courses are concerned with the cognitive, 
emotional, and creative development of human beings; the relationship of food 
and nutrition to health; the consumption of human and material resources; the 
effect of technology on food, clothing, shelter, and interpersonal relationships; and 
the physical characteristics of man's near environment in terms of his material, 
behavioral, and aesthetic needs. 

Courses in the Department of Horticulture provide instruction in pomology, 
vegetable crops, floriculture and ornamental horticulture, and in subjects common 
to all these divisions, such as plant propagation, plant genetics, plant anatomy and 
morphology, and the physiology and ecology of horticultural plants, as well as spe- 
cial problems in experimental horticulture. 

The courses offered by the Department of Plant Pathology are designed to 
prepare students for graduate work in plant pathology and to provide supplemen- 
tary training for students specializing in related fields such as agronomy, food sci- 
ence, forestry, horticulture, and plant protection. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Besides meeting the general admission requirements of the University, students 
entering the College of Agriculture must have taken prior to entry the subjects 
prescribed in the Admissions Chart on page 39. It is highly recommended that 



AGRICULTURE 



prospecti\e students take 4 units of English and 1 or more additional units of 
mathematics beyond algebra and plane geometry. At least 2 and preferably 3 units 
of science are desirable (biology, chemistry, and physics). If available, vocational 
agriculture can be quite useful, particularly for students planning to enter the core 
curriculum. 

Students entering as freshmen must meet the minimum selection index for the 
curriculum they wish to enter as determined by high school rank and test scores. 

Transfer students entering the agricultural science, agricultural occupations, 
and home economics education curricula must have a scholastic grade-point average 
in their collegiate baccalaureate-level work of not less than 3.5 in terms of the 
grading system of the University of Illinois (A = 5.0). The admission of transfer 
students to curricula in the College of Agriculture other than those listed above will 
follow the general University requirement of a 3.25 grade-point average. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Combined programs may be arranged in agriculture and business administration, 
agriculture and agricultural engineering, and agriculture and law. 

Extramural courses for advanced undergraduate or graduate credit are offered 
each semester at several locations in the state. 

Many specialized noncredit short courses, conferences, and special events of 
interest to rural and urban people, homemakers, and the agricultural industries 
are available. 

The College of Agriculture does not offer instruction by correspondence courses. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors awarded to superior students at graduation are designated on the diploma 
as Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors. For the degree with Honors, the 
student must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 4.2 ; for the 
degree with High Honors a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 4.5; and 
for the degree with Highest Honors a minimum cumulative grade-point average 
of 4.8. 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

The James Scholar Program in the College of Agriculture is designed for under- 
graduate agriculture students who have demonstrated exceptional ability through 
superior academic performance. The program provides opportunities for these stu- 
dents to utilize their time and talents in ways that can further enrich their educa- 
tional experience. 

Freshmen may elect to participate in the program as James Scholar designates. 

Resident and transfer students who have not previously participated in the pro- 
gram but who have maintained a high scholastic record are also eligible to become 
James Scholars. They may obtain information about the program from the honors 
coordinators and academic advisers in the individual departments and from the 
director of resident instruction of the College of Agriculture. 

Awards 

Alpha Zeta Award. Each year the name of the freshman in the College of Agricul- 
ture who makes the highest grade average for both semesters is inscribed on the 
Alpha Zeta plaque in the Agriculture Library. 

Wilbur H. Coultas Memorial Award. Income from a fund established in memory 
of the late Wilbur H. Coultas, a graduate of the College of Agriculture in the 



120 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



class of 1923, is awarded as a prize to an outstanding graduating senior in the 
College of Agriculture. The name of the winner is inscribed on a memorial plaque 
in the Agriculture Library. 

C. J. Elliott Memorial Award. Income from a fund established in memory of the 
late C. J. Elliott, a graduate of the College of Agriculture in the class of 1912, 
is awarded as a prize to an outstanding senior in the College of Agriculture. 
Forest Products Research Society (FPRS) Outstanding Student Award. Each year 
the Midwest Section of FPRS presents a one-year membership to two seniors, one 
junior, and one junior or sophomore in the wood technology and utilization cur- 
riculum who have excelled in scholarship and have shown superior professional 
attributes. 

Gamma Sigma Delta Prize. Each year the senior in the College of Agriculture who 
ranks highest in scholarship, on the basis of a minimum of four semesters of work 
in residence at the University, has his name inscribed on the Gamma Sigma Delta 
plaque in Mumford Hall. 

Isabel Bevier Home Economics Award. Each year the name of the freshman in 
home economics who makes the highest grade-point average is engraved on a 
plaque provided by the Home Economics Club. 

Janice M. Smith Outstanding Senior Award. Each year a home economics senior 
is chosen for this award which is based on scholarship and contributions to various 
student activities. The name of the recipient is placed on a plaque hung in the 
Home Economics Library. 

National Block and Bridle Merit Trophy Award. A plaque is presented annually 
to the outstanding senior in the animal science major, based on scholarship and 
student activities. 

Omicron Nu Plaque. Each year the name of the senior in home economics who 
ranks highest in scholarship is inscribed on the Omicron Nu plaque which hangs 
in Bevier Hall. 

Society of American Foresters (SAF) Outstanding Senior Award. The Central 
States Section of SAF annually awards a one-year membership and an official 
society tie pin to the senior in the forest production curriculum who has excelled 
scholastically and has shown superior promise professionally. 

Xi Sigma Pi Outstanding Freshman Award. The forestry student with the highest 
scholastic record receives a double-bitted cruiser's ax with an engraved brass plate 
on the helve from Alpha Alpha chapter. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have satisfied the general University requirements for graduation, 
have maintained a satisfactory record of scholarship and moral character, and have 
completed a curriculum in the College of Agriculture, including the prescribed 
studies and sufficient electives, are graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The total credit-hour requirements for the various degrees are listed on page 
85. (See credit limitations below.) 

Effective June 1, 1972, physical education is voluntary, except in teacher edu- 
cation curricula. The college will count up to 3 semester hours of credit in physical 
education basic instruction courses (numbered below 150). There is no limit on 
the number of hours of professional courses. For teacher certification each student 
must complete a minimum of 3 hours of physical and/or health education. Both 
the hours and grades earned in these courses will be counted in the semester grade- 
point average and the cumulative grade-point average. 

This action is not retroactive. Students registered in the University prior to 
June 1, 1972, who have completed one or more semesters of physical education will 



AGRICULTURE 121 



not be permitted to count these courses toward graduation. Likewise, transfer stu- 
dents entering the University after June 1, 1972, will not be allowed to count any 
courses in physical education, taken prior to June 1, 1972. This does not prohibit 
continuing or transfer students from taking physical education courses for credit 
after June 1, 1972. within the rules and regulations stated above. 

A candidate for graduation must complete all special examinations to remove 
failures, all proficiency examinations, all excused grades, and all course substitu- 
tions by the beginning of the tenth week of his firtal semester. 

Students who have transferred from other educational institutions to the Uni- 
versity of Illinois and who are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in an agricultural curriculum are required to complete in residence at least half of 
the technical agriculture credit required for the degree. Transfer students must 
satisfy University residence requirements. 

Each candidate for graduation must have a grade-point average of not less 
than 3.0 (A = 5.0) including grades in courses transferred from other institutions, 
and a grade-point average of not less than 3.0 in all courses taken at the University 
of Illinois; or an average of not less than 3.1 for the last 60 semester hours of work 
completed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 



CREDIT LIMITATIONS IN CERTAIN COURSES 

The following credit limitations apply to all curricula of the College of Agriculture: 

- No credit in typing or shorthand may be counted toward graduation. 

- Credit for courses in religion, up to 10 hours, may be counted toward graduation. 

- Not more than 10 hours of credit in special problems courses may be counted 
toward graduation in agriculture and home economics curricula. 

- Not more than 4 hours of credit in music ensemble courses may be counted to- 
ward graduation. 

- Not more than 15 credit hours in approved Institute of Aviation courses may be 
counted toward a degree in agriculture. 



GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCES 

All College of Agriculture students who entered the University after June 1, 1964, 
are required to satisfy certain minimum hours in the areas of the natural sciences, 
the humanities, and the social sciences. 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Agriculture students satisfy the natural sciences requirement by completing a cur- 
riculum of the college. 

HUMANITIES 

All students must complete a minimum of 6 hours from the approved courses listed 
below (199 courses may be accepted by petition). Some curricula prescribe certain 
courses which, if on the approved list, may be used toward completion of this 
requirement. 

Arch. 211, 212, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317 

Art 110,' 111,' 112,' 115, 116,' 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 

301, 303, 304, 305, 308, 309, 311, 312, 316, 317, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 

328, 335 
CI. Civ. 110,' 111,M12,' 221, 222, 301, 302 
Comparative literature — Any courses for which the student is qualified. 



'Courses which are open to freshmen in addition to Engl. 101, 102, 115, and 116. 



122 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Dance 340, 341, 346 

English and American literature — Any courses except 386 and 387. 

Foreign languages — 103,* 104* (or equivalents), or any 200- or 300-level literature course 

in foreign languages. 
Human. 151, 152, 211, 212, 215, 216, 363, 364 
Music 113, 115, 130,' 131,' 134, 213, 214, 316 

Phil. 101, 102,' 103, 104, 105, 110, 210, 270, and any 300-level course 
Spch. 177,' 178,* 207, 307, 308, 346, 361, 362, 366, 371, 372 
Theat. 361, 362, 366 



* Courses which are open to freshmen in addition to Engl. 101, 102, 115, and 116. 
' Requires ability to follow musical scores. 

* Mathematical orientation. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

A minimum of 9 hours of approved social sciences is required in all curricula 
of the college. Some curricula require more than the 9-hour minimum. Courses must 
be selected from at least two departments. Specific social science courses, prescribed 
in certain curricula, may be counted toward the 9-hour requirement. The approved 
list of social science courses follows (199 courses may be accepted by petition). 
Completion of any course approved on an earlier social science listing will be 
counted toward the 9-hour requirement. 

Anth. 101,' 102/ 103, 174, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 261, 320, 330, 331, 332, 348, 352, 

358, 360, 361, 363, 366, 367, 368, 369, 374, 381, 382, 383, 384 
Econ. 102,* 103,* 108, 200, 214, 236, 238, 240, 255, 288, 300, 301, 306, 312, 313, 328, 

350, 352, 353, 354, 357, 358, 360 
Geog. 104,* 105,* 210, 223, 323, 362, 366, 369, 374, 381, 382, 383, 386 
History — Any courses for which the student is qualified. 
Political science — Any courses for which the student is qualified. 
Psych. 100,* 103,' 105,* 201, 216, 217, 230, 245, 246, 248, 250, 339, 369, 374 
Sociology — Any courses except 185, 385, 386, 387. 



'Courses which are open to freshmen in addition to Hist. Ill, 112, 131, 132, 151, 
and 152, and Soc. 100, 151, 152. 



Curricula 



CORE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This is a core curriculum in that it provides for a common core program for the 
first two years. All students in agriculture, except those in agricultural communica- 
tions, agricultural industries, agricultural occupations for secondary teachers, agri- 
cultural science, food industry, food science, forest science, home economics, home 
economics education, interior design, ornamental horticulture, restaurant manage- 
ment, and wood science, pursue the same general core program for the first two 
years. The student who starts in the core curriculum may select one of the approved 
majors for the junior and senior years, or he may continue with a broad general 
program by selecting the general major. 

Freshmen may enter this curriculum without specifying a major but must make 
their choice of major not later than the beginning of the junior year. Transfer stu- 
dents entering this curriculum with 45 or more semester hours must indicate their 
proposed major on the application for admission. 

The purposes, objectives, and requirements of the various majors and options 
are outlined on the following pages. 



AGRICULTURE 123 



The core program for the first two years includes a foundation in basic sciences 
essential to a better understanding of agriculture. In addition the student has a 
choice of introductory courses in agriculture. By the proper choice of basic courses 
related to the student's ultimate objective and major, the student is ready to pro- 
ceed with more advanced courses in his junior and senior years. Agr. 100, required 
of all freshmen in agriculture, is designed to assist the student in clarifying his 
objectives. 

Upon completion of this curriculum, with an approved major and a minimum 
of 126 hours of credit, the student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture. 



Prescribed Courses HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition^ 4 

Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking^ 3 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society^ 1 

Agriculture core courses: Three as listed below and as required for student's major . . .9-10 
Biological sciences: Two or more of the following areas as required by the student's 
major:' Bot. 100 — General Botany; or Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, 
and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology; or Zool. 104 — 

Elementary Zoology 8-9 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry (including organic) or Chem. 103 — General Chem- 
istry: organic chemical studies 4 

Math. Ill — Algebra, or Math. 112 — College Algebra, or exemption by Mathe- 
matics Placement Test 0-5 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry, or Math. 124 — Introductory Analysis for Social 
Scientists; or one course from computer science or statistics; or exemption from 

Math. 114 by the Mathematics Placement Test* 0-4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics' 3 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 

Social science courses (see page 122) 6 

Humanities courses (see page 121) 6 



'Spch. Ill and 112 — Verbal Communication, 3 hours each, may be substituted for 
Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch, 101. 

'Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society, 1 hour, is required for entering freshmen 
only. Transfer students ore exempt. 

' Biological science requirements by major are: 
Agricultural economics — two courses from Bot. 100; Mcbio. 100 and 101; Zool. 104; or one 
course from these three areas plus one of the following: Moth. 124 or 120. 
Agricultural mechanization — two courses from Bot. 100; Mcbio. 100 and 101; Zool. 104. 
Agronomy — Bot. 100; and Mcbio. 100 and 101, or Zool. 104. 
Animal science — Bot. 100, Mcbio. 100 and 101, and Zool. 104. 
Dairy science — two courses from Bot. 100; Mcbio. 100 and 101; Zool. 104. 
General agriculture — two courses from Bot. 100; Mcbio. 100 and 101; Zool. 104, 
Horticulture — Bot. 100; and Mcbio. 100 and 101, or Zool. 104. 

* To take Chem. 101, a student must hove completed Moth. Ill or 112 (or equivalent) 
or hove gained exemption by the Mathematics Placement Test. He must also have a satis- 
factory score on the Chemistry Placement Test or take Chem. 100 (2 hours) before enrolling 
in Chemistry 101. 

'Chemistry 102, which includes on introduction to organic chemistry or Chemistry 103, 
is required except for (a) majors in agricultural economics, general option, marketing option 
or rural sociology option, who may substitute Moth. 134; or 130 or 131; or 135, for Chem. 
102 or Chem. 103; and (b) majors in agricultural mechanization who may substitute Phycs. 
102 for Chem. 102. 

See requirements for the various majors. Some require additional mathematics, com- 
puter science, or statistics. 

' Econ. 102 and 103 may be substituted for Econ. 108 and will provide a better 
foundation for students planning to take additional courses in economic theory. 



124 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Agriculture Core Courses 

In addition to Agr. 100, one course from three of the four areas listed below must 
be completed by each student in this curriculum. 

.... HOURS 

Agricultural economics 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Agricultural mechanization and food science 

Ag. M, 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture, or F.S. 101 — Food in 
Modern Society 3 

Animal sciences 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science, or D.S. 100 — Introduction to Dairy 
Production 3 

Plant and soil sciences 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils, or Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science, 

or For. 100 — Farm Forestry, or Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3-4 

Sample Program 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. 1 Agricultural core course 3-4 

Agricultural core course 3-4 Biological science or social science 3-5 

Biological science 4-5 Chemistry or mathematics 2-4 

Mathematics or chemistry 2-5 Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition, or Speaking, or Spch. 112 — Verbal 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication. .3-4 Communication 3-4 

Total 14-17 Total 14-17 

SECOND YEAR 

The student should, in consultation with his adviser, select from those courses listed as pre- 
scribed and appropriate to his area of interest. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

For the third and fourth years, see the requirements of the approved major. In addition to 
the prescribed courses listed on page 123, the requirements incli/de completion of: (1) All 
prescribed courses listed for the major. (2) Additional courses as required to give 40 hours 
in agriculture. One-half of the agriculture hours (20 hours) must be taken at the University 
of Illinois. (3) Sufficient open electives to bring the total hours to 126. 

Major in Agricultural Economics (Including Rural Sociology) 

The major and options in agricultural economics are to prepare students for em- 
ployment in positions requiring economic decision-making in agriculture and related 
occupations, for effective rural group leadership, and for graduate work. The op- 
tions make it possible for students to specialize within the diverse subject matter, 
yet each is flexible enough to allow considerable freedom in choosing elective 
courses. In declaring a major in agricultural economics, each student is required to 
choose one of the following options: farm management, agricultural marketing, 
general agricultural economics, or rural sociology. For common core requirements, 
see Agriculture Core Courses above. 

FARM MANAGEMENT OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Form Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 324 — Farm Operation 3 

Ag. Ec. 325 — Advanced Form Management 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

An. S. or D.S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Additional agricultural economics courses 8 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 



AGRICULTURE 125 



Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting, 

or o course in statistics' 3-4 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two cJepartments (see page 122). Must include Econ. 
108 — Elements of Economics, or Econ. 102 and 103 — Principles of Economics I 
and II; and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 9 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 



* To be chosen from Econ. 171 or 172, or Agron. 340, or Ag. Ec. 341, or Math. 161. 

AGRICULTURAL MARKETING OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Six hours from the following: 

Ag. Ec. 331 — Grain Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 332 — Livestock Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 334 — Marketing of Dairy Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 335 — Economics of Food Distribution 3 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Additional agricultural economics courses 8 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two departments (see page 122) 

Must include Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics, or Econ, 102 and 103 — Prin- 
ciples of Economics I and II; and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory ....9 
Prescribed nonagriculture courses 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting I, or Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting . .3 

One course from speech, journalism, or business and technical writing 2-3 

A course in statistics to be chosen from Econ. 171 or 172, or Agron. 340, or 

Ag. Ec. 341, or Math. 161 3-4 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 

GENERAL AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Nine hours from the following: 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 302 — Financing Agriculture 3 

Ag. Ec. 303 — Agricultural Low 3 

Ag. Ec. 305 — Agricultural Policies and Programs 3 

Ag. Ec. 318 — Land Economics 3 

Ag. Ec. 341 — Agricultural Economic Statistics 3 

R. Soc. 117 — Introduction to Rural Sociology 3 

Additional agricultural economics courses 8 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two departments (see page 122). Must include Econ. 
108 — Elements of Economics, or Econ. 102 and 103 — Principles of Economics II; 

and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 9 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting, 

or a course in statistics' 3-4 

Open electives to bring total hours to 1 26 



'To be chosen from Econ. 171 or 172, or Agron. 340, or Ag. Ec. 341, or Math. 161. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

R. Soc. 117 — Introduction to Rural Sociology 3 

Students with credit in Soc. 100 should substitute R. Soc. 270. 



126 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



R. Soc. 277 — Rural Social Change 3 

Additional rural sociology or agricultural economics courses 11 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: 12 hours from two departments (see page 122) 

Must include Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics, or Econ. 102 and 103 — Prin- 
ciples of Economics I and II, and 2 approved 200- or 300-level sociology courses. ... 12 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Major in Agricultural Mechanization 

For students who are interested in emphasis in the areas of farm structures, con- 
servation, farm power and farm machinery, in preparation for work with service 
organizations, retail dealers, power suppliers, contractors, farm management com- 
panies, or as farm operators. 

For common core requirements see Agriculture Core Courses on page 124. 
Other courses required for this major are : 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron, 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Fifteen hours from the following: 

Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Construction Technology 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metal Work 3 

Ag. M. 221 — Farm Power and Machinery Management 4 

Ag. M. 241 — Farm Tractor Power 3 

Ag. M. 252 — Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation 3 

Ag. M. 272 — Farm Buildings 3 

Ag. M. 281 — Farmstead Mechanization 3 

Ag. M. 300 — Special Problems 1-4 

Ag. M. 331 — Farm Machinery Technology 4 

Ag. M. 361 — Development and Function of Family Housing 3 

Ag. M. 381 — Electro-Mechanical Agricultural Systems 3 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments (see page 122) including 

Econ. 1 08 — Elements of Economics 9 

Other prescribed courses 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and Sound) 5 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics (Light, Electricity, and Magnetism) if Chem. 102 is 

not taken 5 

Eighteen hours from the following: 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting I, Accy. 105 — Principles of Accounting 

II, or Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing, or B. Adm. 272 — Industrial Selling 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 212 — Principles of Retailing 3 

B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to Management 3 

B. Adm. 249 — Human Relations 3 

B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business Law 3 

Computer science 3 

I.E. 232 — Methods-Time Analysis 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business Writing 3 

B.&T.W. 271 — Sales Writing 2 

B.&T.W. 272 — Report Writing 2 

Statistics course 3 

Open electives to bring total hours to 1 26 



AGRICULTURE 127 



Major in Agronomy 

This major is designed for students who wish to specialize in crops, soils, agronomy, 
or crop protection. For those who may later desire to pursue graduate work, ade- 
quate training may be obtained by suitable choices of electives within the frame- 
work of this major or in the agricultural science curriculum. Numerous employment 
opportunities exist in \arious agricultural industries for students who wish to major 
in the agricultural industries curriculum with emphasis in agronomy and with an 
adviser in agronomy. 

For common core requirements see Agriculture Core Courses on page 124. 
Other courses required for this major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Agron. 101 — IntrocJuctory Soils 4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Agron. 290 — Undergraduate Agronomy Seminar 1 

Elective courses in agronomy*'*'^ (18 hours) 
Crops 

Agron. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

Agron. 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 3 

Agron. 320 — Crop Physiology 3 

Agron. 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures 3 

Agron. 323 — Principles of Plant Breeding 3 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

Agron. 350 — Crops and Man 3 

Soils 

Agron. 301 — Soil Survey, with Emphasis on Illinois Soils 3 

Agron. 303 — Soil Fertility 3 

Agron. 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

Agron. 305 — Biochemical Processes in Soil and Water Environment 3 

Agron. 306 — Dynamics of Soil Development 3 

Agron. 307 — Soil Chemistry 3 

Agron. 308 — Physics of the Plant Environment 4 

Crop protection 

Agron. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics or Agron. 320 — Crop Physiology 3 

Agron. 303 — Soil Fertility or Agron. 304 — Soil Management and Conservation ....3 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

Hort. 242 — Vegetable Crop Production or Hort. 262 — Fruit Science II 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

PI. Pa. 305 — Principles of Plant Disease Control 3 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 108 — 

Elements of Economics 9 

Other prescribed courses 
Soils option only 

One year of physics 8-10 

Crop protection only 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry and Chem. 134 — Elementary 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory 5 

Entom. 101 — Agricultural Entomology 3 

Enfom. 319 — Fundamentals of Insect Control 4 

Speech, journalism, or business and technical writing course 2-3 

Open electives to bring total hours to 1 26 



'Crops option requires 12 hours from agronomy-crops and 6 hours from agronomy- 
soils. 

Soils option requires 12 hours from agronomy-soils and 6 hours from agronomy-crops. 
Agronomy option requires 18 hours of agronomy, with a minimum of 6 hours each 
from crops and soils. 



128 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Major in Animal Science 

The general animal science option is for students interested in preparing for work 
in the fields of animal feeding and nutrition, animal breeding and genetics, animal 
production, or related fields of the livestock and poultry industry. The companion 
animal biology option is for students who are primarily interested in activities asso- 
ciated with the companion animal industry or in gaining a basic knowledge of 
biological management and training of animals used in recreational activities. For 
common core requirements see Agriculture Core Courses on page 124. 

GENERAL ANIMAL SCIENCE OPTION ..^..«, 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science 3 

An. S. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

An. S. 209 — Meat Animal Evaluation, or An. S. 309 — Meat Science II 3-4 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Two of the following: 

An. S. 301 — Beef Production 3 

An. S. 302 — Sheep Production 3-4 

An. S. 303 — Pork Production 3 

An. S. 304 — Poultry Management 3-4 

Two of the following: 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

An. S. 230 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction^ Lactation, and Growth 3 

An. S. 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 3 

An. S. 320 — Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of Ruminants 3 

An. S. 330 — Reproduction and Artificial Insemination of Farm Animals 3 

An. S. 332 — Livestock Marketing 3 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 108 

— Elements of Economics (see page 122) 9 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 
Microbiology, or Mcbio. 200 — Microbiology and Mcbio, 201 — Experimental 

Microbiology 5 

V.P.P. 202 — Physiology of Domestic Animals, or Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human 

Physiology 3-4 

Open electives to bring total hours to 1 26 

COMPANION ANIMAL BIOLOGY OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science 3 

An. S. no — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

An. S. 206 — Light Horse Management 3 

An. S. 207 — Companion Animal Management 3 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

An. S. 230 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction, Lactation, and Growth 3 

An. S. 299 — Seminar 1 

An. S. 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal Management 3 

An. S. 346 — Ethology 3 

An. S. 347 — Ethology Laboratory 3 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities: An approved 6 hours in the humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments in the social sciences, 

including Econ. 108 (see page 122) 9 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting I or Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting ....3 
Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experi- 
mental Microbiology, or Mcbio. 200 — Microbiology, and Mcbio. 201 — Experi- 
mental Microbiology 5-8 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 

V.P.P. 202 — Physiology of Domestic Animals or Physl, 103 — Introduction to Human 

Physiology 3-4 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 



AGRICULTURE 129 



Major in Dairy Science 

The purpose of the major in dairy science is to provide training for students plan- 
ning careers as dairy- farm operators and managers, as fieldmen for milk plants, 
breed associations, feed companies, and governmental agencies, as control techni- 
cians or salesmen for feed manufacturers, as laboratory and field technicians in 
artificial insemination, and as breeding consultants. 

In addition, this major provides a foundation for advanced study in prepara- 
tion for careers as college teachers, research scientists in experiment stations and 
industry, and as extension specialists. 

For common core requirements see Agriculture Core Courses on page 124. 
Other courses required for this major are: 

Prescribed courses in agriculture HOURS 

Twenty hours from the following: 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Form Management 3 

D.S, 1 10 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

D.S. 204 — Dairy Cattle Evaluation 3 

D.S. 205 — Dairy Cattle Management 3 

D.S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

D.S. 230 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction, Lactation, and Growth 3 

D.S. 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 3 

D.S. 320 — Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of Ruminants 3 

D.S. 330 — Reproduction and Artificial Insemination of Farm Animals 3 

D.S. 334 — Marketing Dairy Products 3 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

Elective courses in agriculture at the 200 and 300 level 10 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities and social sciences: An approved 6 hours in the humanities and a 
minimum of 9 hours from two departments in the social sciences including Econ, 

108 — Elements of Economics (see pages 121 and 122) 15 

Speech, journalism, or business and technical writing elective 2-3 

Minimum of 9 hours from the following: 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

Chemistry, beyond Chem. 101, 102, and 103 

Entomology 

Mathematics, beyond minimum mathematics requirements 

Microbiology, beyond minimum biological science requirements 

Physics 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology, or any 200 or 300 level physiology 

course 4 

V.P.P. 202 — Physiology of Domestic Animals 3 

Zool. 232 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, or any 200 or 300 level zoology 

course 5 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Major in General Agriculture 

For students who are interested in a broad basic training in agriculture, rather than 
in specialization within a departmental field of work. Areas for which such training 
is suited include farming, agricultural extension, agricultural services, pretheological 
study, and others. 

Students should refer to A Handbook for Agriculture Students and Advisors 
for suggested courses and programs of study for training in these areas within this 
major. 

For common core requirements see Agriculture Core Courses on page 124. 
Other courses required for this major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

In addition to core courses in agriculture, at least 3 hours of credit in each of the 



130 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



following departments: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering (Agri- 
cultural Mechanization), Agronomy (in addition to Agron. 101), Animal Science, 

Dairy Science, Horticulture 18 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 50 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 108 

— Elements of Economics (see page 122) 9 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Major in Horticulture 

For students who are interested primarily in general agriculture but desire a basic 
knowledge of horticulture. Emphasis is placed on the basic plant sciences to give 
a general background for the specialized phases of horticulture. By a careful choice 
of horticulture courses and electives, a student may prepare for the production of 
fruits, vegetables, or other specialized horticultural crops. 

Students who are interested in the production of flowers and ornamentals 
should enroll in the ornamental horticulture curriculum. 

For common core requirements see Agriculture Core Courses on page 124. 
Other courses required for this major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Entom. 101 — Agricultural Entomology 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

Hort. 1 10 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

Hort. 22 1 — Plant Propagation 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

Additional horticulture courses 11 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 121) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 108 

— Elements of Economics (see page 122) 9 

Bot. 330 — Plant Physiology 3 

Boh 333 — Plant Physiology Laboratory 3 

Open electives to bring total hours to 1 26 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in the com- 
bined fields of agriculture and communications. It seeks to prepare them for work 
in such careers as agricultural advertising, public relations, farm radio and tele- 
vision broadcasting, photography, and agricultural publications writing or editing. 
The College of Agriculture and the College of Communications offer this cur- 
riculum as a joint project. It allows the planning of study programs closely suited 
to the student's interests in one of three communications options: advertising, news- 
editorial, or radio-television. 

Upon completion of the curriculum requirements and a minimum of 126 hours 
of credit the student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society^ 1 Agriculture core course 3-4 

Agriculture core course 3 Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 

Bet. 100 — General Botany, or Zool. Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective 

104 — Elementary Zoology 4 Speaking' 3 

Math. Ill — Algebra, or Math. 112 — Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology, or 

College Algebra^ 3-5 Bot. 1 00 — General Botany 4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition' 4 Elective 2-3 

Total 15-17 Total 16 



AGRICULTURE 



131 



SECOND YEAR 

Agriculture core course 3-4 

Agriculture elective' or Ag. Com. 114 
— Agricultural Communications MecJia 

and Methods 3 

Physical science course* 3-4 

Social sciences course' 3 

Elective 2-3 

Total 15-17 

THIRD YEAR 

Agriculture electives* 6 

Communications course* 3 

Humanities course* 3 

Open elective 3 

Social sciences elective 3-4 

Total 18-19 

FOURTH YEAR 

Agriculture elective 3 

Communications courses 6 

Open electives 6 

Social sciences elective 3 

Total 18 



Agriculture elective' 3 

Ag. Com. 114 — Agricultural Communi- 
cations Media and Methods, or 

agriculture elective 3 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Humanities course* 3 

Social sciences course 3 

Total 15-16 

Agriculture elective 3 

Ag. Com. 214 — Agricultural Com- 
munications Strategy 3 

Communications course(s) .^ 4-6 

Humanities elective 3 

Social sciences elective 3-4 

Total 16-19 

Agriculture elective 3 

Communications courses 6 

Open electives 6 

Social sciences elective 3 

Total 18 



* An orientation course required of all freshmen in agriculture. 

'a student in this curriculum is required to complete either Math. Ill — Algebra, 5 
hours; or Math. 112 — College Algebra, 3 hours; or pass the placement examination in 
mathematics. 

' Spch. Ill and 112 — Verbal Communication, both 3-hour courses, may be substituted 
for Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch. 101. 

* To take Chem. 101, a student must have a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Place- 
ment Test, or take Chem. 100 and have Math. Ill or 112 or the equivalent before en- 
rolling in Chem. 101. 

'a minimum of 35 hours of agriculture courses required, including 15 hours at the 
200 and 300 level. 

'a minimum of 3 hours required from chemistry (beyond 101), mathematics (beyond 
algebra), geology, or physics. 

' A minimum of 20 hours required, including Econ. 108. (See page 122.) 

*A minimum of 9 hours required. (See page 121.) 

*A minimum of 20 hours of College of Communications courses required, including 
those prescribed for the student's selected option (listed below). 

Agriculture Core Courses 

In addition to Agr. 100, one course from three of the four areas listed on page 124 
must be completed by each student in this curriculum. 

Prescribed Courses in Communications 

A student will complete one of the following options (minimum of 20 hours) : 



ADVERTISING OPTION 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 

Adv. 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy 

Adv. 383 — Advertising Media Policy and Strategy 

Adv. 384 — Advertising Campaigns 

Electives in communications to complete the 20-hour requirement. 



132 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



NEWS-EDITORIAL OPTION 
Journ. 204 — Typography 
Journ. 211 — Newswriting 
Journ. 321 — News Editing 
One course from the following: 

Journ. 217 — History of Communications 

Journ. 218 — Communications and Public Opinion 

Journ. 220 — Processes and Systems of Communications 

Journ. 231 — Mass Communications in a Democratic Society 

Journ. 241 — Low and Communications 

Journ. 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 
One course from the following: 

Journ. 212 — Public Affairs Reporting 

Journ. 326 — Magazine Article Writing 

Journ. 330 — Magazine Editing 

R. TV 355 — Television News 
Electives in communications to complete the 20-hour requirement. 

RADIO-TELEVISION OPTION 

Journ. 211 — Newswriting 

R. TV 252 — Television Laboratory 

R. TV 261 — Principles of Radio and Television Broadcasting 

Electives in communications to complete the 20-hour requirement, including at least 6 hours 

of radio-TV courses in addition to 252 and 261. 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

This curriculum, outlined on page 214, is administered in the College of Engineer- 
ing. Requirements for the first year are the same as in other engineering curricula. 
Courses in agriculture and agricultural engineering begin in the second year. In the 
senior year the student chooses technical electives for specialization in one of the 
following: processing, structures and environment, power and machinery, or soil 
and water. 

For the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering, 
and of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

Students may obtain bachelor's degrees in both agricultural engineering and 
agriculture in five years by choosing the curriculum in agricultural science, option 
3, on page 140. Students following the five-year program should enroll in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture for their first three or four years of work and then transfer to 
the College of Engineering for the last one or two years. 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculimi provides a broad selection of courses in agricultural sciences, nat- 
ural sciences, economics and other social sciences, business administration, finance, 
communications, and the humanities. It is designed to prepare students for careers 
in those industries and businesses which service or are related to agriculture. A 
minimum of 27 hours of commerce and business courses is required. 

During the first two years, this curriculum closely parallels the requirements of 
the core curriculum in agriculture. Students desiring to transfer from one to the 
other during the first two years may do so with little difficulty. Examples of specific 
opportunities for employment are: 

Farm Supplies. Marketing of feed, seed, fertilizer, machinery, equipment, and other 
supplies to farmers. 



AGRICULTURE 133 



Agricultural Commodities. Marketing of agricultural commodities in local, inter- 
mediate, and central markets. 

Food and Food Products. Distribution of food and food products in wholesale and 
retail markets, including institutional users. 

Agricultural Real Estate and Finance. Services related to the appraisal, financing, 
ownership, and transfer of agricultural property. 

An adviser assists each student in planning a specific program. Upon comple- 
tion of the curriculum requirements and a minimum of 126 hours of credit, the 
student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society^ 1 Agriculture core course 3-4 

Agriculture core course 3-4 Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 

Moth. Ill — Algebra, or Moth. 112 Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry, or 

— College Algebra" 3-5 Math. 124 — Introductory Analysis for 

Natural science course 3-5 Social Scientists 1^ 2-3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition' 4 Natural science course 3-5 

Total 15-17 Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Speaking^ 3 

Total 16-18 

SECOND YEAR 

Agriculture core course 3-4 Agriculture elective 3 

Business 



course^ 3 Business courses 6 

Humanities course 3 Journalism, business and technical 

Natural science course 3-5 writing, speech, or elective^ 2-3 

Social science or humanities course' 3 Social science or humanities courses' ...3-6 

Total 16-18 Total 15-18 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The genera! requirements, in addition to the courses listed for the first two years, include 
completion of: (1) A minimum of 27 hours of business courses from those listed. (2) Agri- 
culture elecfives to bring total agriculture to 35 hours. (3) An approved 6-hours in the hu- 
manities. (See page 121.) (4) A minimum of 9 hours of approved social science courses, 
other than economics. (See page 122.) (5) Sufficient open eiectives to bring the total hours 
to 126. 



^ An orientation course required of all freshmen in agriculture. 

^ Students without college credit in algebra are required to take the Mathematics Place- 
ment Test. Those who, on the basis of this test, qualify for exemption from algebra, need 
not take Moth. Ill or 112. Those who qualify for exemption from trigonometry, or who 
wish to take Math. 124, need not take Math. 114. The recommended mathematics sequence 
beyond algebra is Math. 124 and 134. These two courses, or their equivalent, are pre- 
requisite courses for Econ. 171 and 172, and for B. Adm, 202. The alternate mathematics 
sequence is Math. 114, or exemption by the placement test, and Math. 120 — Calculus and 
Analytic Geometry, or a course in analytic geometry. 

Spch. Ill and 112 — Verbal Communication, 3 hours each, may be substituted for 
Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch. 101. 

* Students who have not hod high school chemistry and those who do not earn a 
satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test must take Chem. 100 and hove Moth. 
Ill or 112 or the equivalent before enrolling in Chem. 101. 

Econ. 102 or 108 is recommended from this group for the sophomore year. 
See approved humanities and social science courses on pages 121 and 122. 
One course in business and technical writing, journalism, or speech is required in 
addition to Rhet. 105 or 108, end Spch. 101; or Spch. Ill and 112. 

Agriculture Core Courses 

In addition to Agr. 100, one course from three of the four areas listed on page 124 
must be completed by each student in this curriculum. 



134 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Natural Science Courses Group 

In addition to the chemistry and mathematics courses Hsted for the first two years, 
each student must complete three courses from the following: 

HOURS 

Bot. 100 — General Botany, or Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 3-4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry, Organic 

Chemical Studies 4 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, or Math. 134 — Introductory Analysis 

for Social Scientists, or analytic geometry 4-5 

Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology, or Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Business Courses Group 

Each student in this curriculum must take a minimum of 27 hours from the fol- 
lowing: 

HOURS 
Econ. 102 and 103 — Principles of Economics I and II; or Econ. 108 — Elements of 

Economics, and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 6 

One or more courses from each of the following: 

Fin. 150 — Money, Credit, and Banking, or Fin. 254 — An Introduction to Business 
Financial Management, or Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance, or Ag. Ec. 302 — 

Financing Agriculture 3 

B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to Management, or B. Adm. 210 — Production Man- 
agement and Organization 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing, or B. Adm. 272 — Industrial Selling, or 
Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products, or Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusi- 
ness Management 3 

Two courses from: 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting I, or Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting. . . .3 

Computer science 3 

Statistics' 3-4 

Two courses elected from: accountancy, advertising, business administration, eco- 
nomics, or finance 6 



* To be chosen from Econ. 171 or 172, or Agron. 340, or Ag. Ec. 341, or Math. 161. 
If either Agron. 340 or Ag. Ec. 341 is used to satisfy this requirement, credit may not also 
be counted toward agriculture hours. 

Suggested Elective Courses in Agriculture 

The following list of agriculture courses is intended as a guide from which electives 
in the various interest fields may be chosen. Other courses may be selected with ap- 
proval of the adviser. A minimum of 26 hours is required. 

AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 331 — Groin Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 332 — Livestock Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 334 — Marketing of Dairy Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 335 — Economics of Food Distribution 3 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Ag. Ec. 340 — Commodity Futures Markets and Trading 3 

Ag. Ec. 342 — Agricultural Prices 3 

Agron. 319 — Environmental and Plant Ecosystems 3 

An. S. 1 04 — Selection and Use of Meat 2 

An. S. 209 — Meat Animal Evaluation 3-4 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 



AGRICULTURE 135 



An. S. 301 — Beef Production 3 

An. S. 302 — Sheep Production 3-4 

An. S. 303 — Pork Production 3 

An. S. 304 — Poultry Monogemenf 3-4 

D.S. 320 — Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of Ruminants 3 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

AGRICULTURAL REAL ESTATE AND FINANCE HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Form Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 302 — Financing Agriculture 3 

Ag. Ec. 303 — Agricultural Law 3 

Ag. Ec. 31 2 — Form Appraisal 5 

Ag. Ec. 342 — Agricultural Prices 3 

Ag. M. 252 — Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation 3 

Ag. M. 272 — Farm Buildings 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron. 301 — Soli Survey, with Emphasis on Illinois Soils 3 

FARM SUPPLIES HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Ag. Ec. 342 — Agricultural Prices 3 

Ag. M. 221 — Form Power and Machinery Management 4 

Ag. M. 272 — Farm Buildings 3 

Ag. M. 281 — Farmstead Mechanization 3 

Agron. 303 — Soil Fertility 3 

Agron. 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

Agron. 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures 3 

Agron. 323 — Principles of Plant Breeding 3 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

An. S. 301 — Beef Production 3 

An. S. 302 — Sheep Production 3-4 

An. S. 303 — Pork Production 3 

An. S. 304 — Poultry Management 3-4 

D.S. 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 3 

D.S. 320 — Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of Ruminants 3 

Entom. 101 — Agricultural Entomology 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

FOOD AND FOOD PRODUCTS HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 335 — Economics of Food Distribution 3 

Ag. Ec. 342 — Agricultural Prices 3 

An. S. 104 — Selection and Use of Meats 2 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

F.S. 202 — Sensory Evaluation of Foods 3 

F.S. 260 — Raw Materials for Processing 4 

F.S. 332 — Principles of Sanitation in the Processing and Handling of Foods 2 

H. Ec. 120 — Elementary Nutrition 2 

Hort, 242 — Vegetable Crops Production 3 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL OCCUPATIONS 
FOR SECONDARY TEACHERS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The purpose of this curriculum is to prepare students to teach agriculture in schools 
offering agricultural occupations courses. A minimum of 126 hours of credit is 



136 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



required for graduation. For teacher education requirements applicable to all cur- 
ricula see page 111. 

General Education Requirements 

COMMUNICATIONS HOURS 
Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch. 101 6-7 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

College algebra, or exemption by placement test 3-5 

General botany 4 

General chemistry including organic 8 

Physical geology 4 

Elementary zoology 4 

Total 23-25 

HUMANITIES 

Approved courses 6 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics, or equivalent 3 

General psychology 3 

Electives 6-8 

For students interested in secondary education certification, these electives must be selected 
to fulfill certification requirements in political science and U.S. history. The course in politi- 
cal science must include instruction on the constitutions of Illinois and the United States. 
Total 12-14 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 

Professional Education Courses hours 

Ed. Psy. 21 1 — Educational Psychology 3 

H.P. Ed. 201 — Foundations of American Education 2 

Vo. Tec. 101 — Nature of the Teaching Profession 2 

Vo. Tec. 240 — Principles of Vocational and Technical Education 2 

Vo. Tec. 276 — Student Teaching in Vocational Agriculture 5 

Vo. Tec. 277 — Programs and Procedures in Agricultural Education 5 

Total . . 19 

Prescribed Courses in Agriculture 

core COURSES HOURS 

Agr. 1 00 — Agriculture in Modern Society 1 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture, or 

Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Construction Technology 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Total 11 

OTHER COURSES IN AGRICULTURE 

Each student must select one of the options. The prescribed agriculture courses and 
elective agriculture courses must total 48 hours, including the 1 1 hours listed 
above, and must include a minimum of 20 hours of 200- and 300-level courses 37 

Approved Options and Suggested Supporting Courses 

The following list is intended as a guide for students and advisers as appropriate 
courses for the various options (areas of concentration). 



AGRICULTURE 137 



AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OPTION HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products, or 

agricultural economic elective — 300-level course 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Mefalwork 3 

Ag. M. 221 — Form Power and Machinery Management 3-4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

An. S. or D.S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Animal science or dairy science elective 3 

AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY OPTION HOURS 

Agr. 1 14 — Agricultural Journalism 3 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Form Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Ag. M. 221 — Farm Power and Machinery Management, or Ag. M. 252 — Mechanics 
of Soil and Water Conservation, or Ag, M. 272 — Farm Buildings, or Ag. M. 281 

— Farmstead Mechanization 3-4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

An. S. or D.S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION OPTION HOURS 

Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Construction Technology 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metalwork 3 

Ag. M. 221 — Farm Power and Machinery Management 4 

Ag. M. 241 — Farm Tractor Power 3 

Ag. M. 331 — Farm Machinery Technology 3 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS (PLANTS) OPTION HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 331 — Grain Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 335 — Economics of Food Distribution 3 

Ag. M. 281 — Farmstead Mechanization 3 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS (ANIMALS) OPTION HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 332 — Livestock Marketing, or Ag. Ec. 334 — Marketing of Dairy Products, 

or Ag. Ec. 335 — Economics of Food Distribution 3 

An. S. 104 — Selection and Use of Meats, or An. S. 209 — Meat Animal Evaluation 2-3 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, or Mcbio. 200 — Microbiology 3 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE OPTION HOURS 

Entom. 101 — Agricultural Entomology 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture, or Hort. 242 — Vegetable Crops Production, 

and Hort. 262 — Fruit Science I 3-6 

Hort. 122 — Greenhouse Management 3 

PI. Po. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES AND FORESTRY OPTION HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 273 — Recreation in Rural Areas 2 

Agron. 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

Entom. 101 — Agricultural Entomology 3 

For. 100 — Form Forestry 3 

For. 220 — Dendrology 4 

R. Soc. 117 — Introduction to Rural Sociology, or R. Soc. 270 — Population and 

Human Ecology, or R, Soc. 277 — Rural Social Change 3 



138 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is especially designed for students who plan to do graduate study 
in agricultural fields or for those who wish to engage in professional work requiring 
more science, mathematics, or engineering than is included in the core curriculum 
in agriculture. To be eligible for admission to the curriculum, students entering as 
freshmen must meet the minimum selection index as determined by high school rank 
and test scores. Students entering as transfers must have a scholastic grade-point 
average in their collegiate work of not less than 3.5 in terms of the grading system 
of the University of Illinois (A = 5.0). Once enrolled, they must maintain at least 
an average of 3.5 to remain in and graduate from the curriculum. A minimum of 
126 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

Options 1 and 2 provide an opportunity for planning individual programs of 
study under the supervision of a faculty adviser qualified in the student's special 
field of interest. Option 3 includes many prescribed courses both in agriculture and 
in engineering. Careful scheduling of courses is necessary. 

Option 1. For students desiring preparation for graduate study or professional 
work in animal, plant, or soil science. 

Option 2. For students desiring preparation for graduate study or professional work 
in the fields included in agricultural economics, agricultural law, and rural sociology. 
Option 3. For students enrolled in the five-year combined agricultural science and 
agricultural engineering program. All requirements of the combined curriculum as 
outlined on the following pages must be completed to satisfy requirements for a 
degree in agriculture. 

OPTIONS 

1 AND 3 OPTION 2 
MINIMUM MINIMUM 

Summary hours hours 

General University requirements (rhetoric) 4 4 

Group I: College of Agriculture courses (15 of the 30 hours must be 

at the 200 and 300 level) 30 30 

In option 3, a maximum of 15 hours of agricultural engineering and 
agricultural mechanization courses may be credited toward the de- 
gree in agriculture. 

Group II: Humanities (for approved sequences, see page 121) 6 6 

Group III: Social sciences (for approved sequences and electives, see 

page 122) 9 16 

In option 2, at least 8 hours in economics must be included. 
Group IV: Biological science (botany, entomology, microbiology, physi- 
ology, zoology) 10 6 

In options 1 and 3, a total of 45 hours in groups IV and V, with a 
minimum of 10 hours in each must be completed. 
Group V: Physical science (biochemistry, chemistry, geology, mathe- 
matics, physics) 10 16 

In options 1 and 3, a total of 45 hours in groups IV and V, with a 

minimum of 10 hours in each, must be completed. 

In option 3, T.A.M. 150 and 211 may be counted toward group V. 

Electives (unrestricted) 32 48 

Total required for graduation 1 26 1 26 



AGRICULTURE 139 



Option 1. Sample Program 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Agriculture elective 3-4 

Society 1 Bot. 100 — General Botany, or Zool. 

Agriculture elective 3-4 104 — Elementary Zoology 4 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry' 4 Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Moth. Ill — Algebra, or Math. 112 — Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective 

College Algebra" 3-5 Speaking 3 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry* 2 Elective 2-3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 Total 16-17 

Total 15-17 

SECOND, THIRD, AND FOURTH YEARS 

The programs for the second, third, and fourth years of option 1 must be planned in con- 
sultation with the student's faculty adviser. No student may enter the agricultural science 
curriculum for the first time afer the beginning of his senior year in college except by 
petition approved by the associate dean of the college. 



* Chem. 101 has the prerequisite of a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement 
Test and Moth. Ill or 112, or exemption therefrom. Students not exempt from Math. Ill 
or 112 should delay Chem. 101 until the second semester. 

* Students who gain exemption from algebra and trigonometry may omit beginning 
courses in mathematics and enroll in more advanced courses. 

Option 2. Sample Program 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Agriculture electives 3-6 

Society 1 Bot. 1 00 — General Botany, or Zool. 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricul- 104 — Elementary Zoology 4 

tural Economics 3 Moth. 114 — Plane Trigonometry,* or 

Math. Ill — Algebra, or Math. 112 — Math. 124 — Introductory Analysis 

College Algebra, or advanced mothe- for Social Scientists, or Chem. 101 

matics* 2-5 — General Chemistry 2-4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Electives 3-6 Speaking 3 

Total 15-17 Total 16-17 

SECOND, THIRD, AND FOURTH YEARS 

The programs for the second, third, and fourth years of option 2 must be planned in con- 
sultation with the student's faculty adviser. No student may enter the agricultural science 
curriculum for the first time after the beginning of his senior year in college except by pe- 
tition approved by the associate dean of the college. 



Students who gain exemption from algebra and trigonometry may omit beginning 
courses in mathematics and enroll in more advanced courses. 

Program in Agriculture and Law 

The College of Law requires a bachelor's degree as a prerequisite for admission. The 
agriculture and law program, therefore, will normally require seven years — four 
years leading to the B.S. degree in agriculture plus three years in the College of 
Law leading to the J.D. degree. 

The student who is interested in this program may complete the requirements 
for a degree in any of the approved curricula of the college, but it is advisable that 
the student follow option 2 of the agricultural science curriculum. Students inter- 
ested in this program should ask to be assigned to an agriculture prelaw adviser. 



140 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Requirements for admission to the College of Law are as follows: (1) A degree 
from an accredited university or college. (2) A minimum 3.5 (A==5.0) all-Univer- 
sity grade-point average. (3) A satisfactory score on the Law School Admission Test. 

Option 3. Five-Year Combined Program in Agricultural Science and 
Agricultural Engineering for the Degrees of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Students enroll in the College of Agriculture for the first three years and may trans- 
fer to the College of Engineering in the fourth year but must be enrolled in the Col- 
lege of Engineering for the fifth year. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern 
Society, or Eng. 100 — Engineer- 
ing Lecture 0-1 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry^ 4 

Math. Ill — Algebra, or Math. 112 — 

College Algebra^ 3-5 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry^ 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Elective 0-3 

Total 16-18 

SECOND YEAR 

Ag. E. 126 — Engineering in Agri- 
culture I 3 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop 
Science 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective I 3 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Geol. 105 — Agricultural Geology, or 

Geol. 250 — Geology for Engineers. .3-4 
Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, Modern Physics). .4 
T.A.M. 150 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics) 2 

Total 18-19 

FOURTH YEAR 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3 

C.E. 261 — Structural Theory I, or M.E. 

220 — Mechanics of Machinery 3-4 

E.E. i20 — Basic Electrical Engineering. .. .3 

M.E. 209 — Thermodynamics 3 

Electives^ 3-6 

Total 15-19 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Bot. 1 00 — General Botany 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Total 16 



Ag. E. 127 — Engineering in Agri- 
culture II 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 
Digital Computing 3 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magrfetism) 4 

Elective' 3 

Total 16 

Agricultural engineering technical elec- 
tive I 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

T.A.M. 211 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Dynamics) 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 
Deformable Bodies 3 

T.A.M. 223 — Mechanical Behavior of 

Solids 1 

Elective" 3-4 

Total 17-18 

Ag. E. 298 — Seminar 1 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Technical elective 3 

Electives" 8-9 

Total 16-17 



AGRICULTURE 141 



FIFTH YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical elec- Ag. E. 299 — Undergraduate Thesis 2 

tive II 3 Agricultural engineering technical elec- 

Technical elective 3 tive II 3 

Electives' 9 Electives' 10-1 1 

Total 15 Total 15-16 



' Chem. 101 has the prerequisite of a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement 
Test and Math. Ill or 112, or exemption therefrom. Students not exempt from Math. Ill 
or 1 1 2 should delay Chem. 101 until the second semester. 

* Students with three to four years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, 
and a satisfactory grade on the Mathematics Placement Test may take Math. 120 the first 
semester and follov/ the common program for freshmen in the College of Engineering. 

' Electives must include the following: 

- Four hours of agriculture, other than agricultural engineering and agricultural mechani- 
zation, Agron. 101 and 121, and Ag. Ec. 220. 

- Six hours of biological science in addition to Bot. 100 (botany, entomology, microbiology, 
physiology, and zoology). 

- A 6-hour sequence in humanities courses. (See page 121.) 5ince the list of courses which 
the College of Engineering and College of Agriculture accept for humanities varies, stu- 
dents should be careful to select those which ore acceptable to both colleges. 

- A minimum of 9 hours of approved social sciences, including Econ. 108, and an ap- 
proved 6-hour sequence in social science. Since the list of courses which the College of 
Engineering and College of Agriculture accept for social science varies, students should 
be careful to select those which ore acceptable to both colleges. 

- Sufficient approved electives (normally 3 hours) in the humanities in addition to the 
third item above to satisfy the College of Engineering requirements. (See page 210.) 

- Sufficient open electives to total the minimum curriculum requirements of 160 hours. All 
requirements of the combined curriculum as outlined must be completed to satisfy the re- 
quirements for a degree in agriculture. 

Agricultural Engineering Technical Electives 

Each student must have a minimum of 12 hours of agricultural engineering tech- 
nical electives. These hours must include at least two courses from group I and two 
courses from group II listed below. 

GROUP I HOURS 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag. E. 256 — Surveying Agricultural and Forest Lands 2 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control of Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 31 1 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 3 

GROUP II 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Concrete and Steel Structures for Agriculture 3 

Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag. E. 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 3 

Ag. E. 356 — Soil Conservation Structures 3 

Ag. E. 357 — Land Drainage 3 

Ag. E. 387 — Agricultural Process Engineering 3 

Technical Electives 

A minimum of 6 hours is required. All courses must satisfy the College of Engineer- 
ing requirements as given on page 212 of this catalog. Students desiring to spe- 
cialize in a specific area of agricultural engineering may use the following lists as 
guides in choosing their technical electives: 

POWER AND MACHINERY HOURS 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 



142 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Ag. E. 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 3 

M.E. 224 — Design of Machine Elements 3 

M.E. 234 — Heat Treatment of Metals 3 

PROCESSING 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag, E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Ag. E. 387 — Agricultural Process Engineering 3 

E.E. 232 — Electronics and Electronics Applications 2 

E.E. 233 — Electronics Laboratory 1 

SOIL AND WATER 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Concrete and Steel Structures for Agriculture 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Ag. E. 356 — Soil Conservation Structures 3 

Ag. E. 357 — Land Drainage 3 

STRUCTURES AND ENVIRONMENT 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Concrete and Steel Structures for Agriculture 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

C.E. 214 — Properties and Behavior of Concrete 2 

C.E. 262 — Structural Theory II 3 

CURRICULUM IN FOOD INDUSTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Food Industry 

The food industry curriculum is designed to provide the student with training in 
preparation for a career in the food industry in such areas as business administra- 
tion, food engineering, food production, food processing, quality control, and public 
health. A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

Students are urged to engage in at least one summer of employment in the 
food industry and are required to go on an inspection trip in either the junior or 
senior year. The trip will cost approximately $25. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture In Modern Society. 1 Biological science^ 4 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 Math. 1 14 or alternate course^ 2-3 

Math. Ill — Algebra or Math. 112 — Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication 3 

College Algebra* 3-5 Elective® 3 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication 3 Total 16-17 

Total 14-16 

SECOND YEAR 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting. .3 

F.S. 213 — Food Analysis I 3 F.S. 202 — Sensory Evaluation of Food... 3 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology ..3 F.S. 214 — Survey of Food Chemistry ....3 

Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental Social science elective* 3-4 

Microbiology 2 Elective* 3-4 

Humanities elective"* 3 Total 16-17 

Elective' 3 

Total 17 



AGRICULTURE 143 



THIRD YEAR 

F.S. 260 — Raw Materials 4 F.S. 310 — Dairy Product Processing 5 

F.S. 363 — Introduction to Process Mcbio. 311 — Food and Industrial 

Engineering 3 Microbiology 3 

Humanities elective' 3 Mcbio. 312 — Techniques of Applied 

Social science elective* 3 Microbiology 2 

Elective' 3 Electives" 6 

Total 16 Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

F.S. 301 — Food Processing 5 F.S. 206 — Inspection Trip 

Elecfives*' 12 F.S. 332 — Principles of Sanitation in 

Total 17 Processing and Handling of Food 2 

Electives'' 14 

Total 16 



'To take Chem. 101, a student must have completed Moth. Ill or 112 (or equivalent) 
or have gained exemption by the Mathematics Placement Test. He must also have a satis- 
factory score on the Chemistry Placement Test or take Chem. 100 (2 hours) before enrolling 
in Chem. 101. 

' In addition to Math. Ill or 112, the student must take one course from the following: 
Moth. 114; Math. 124 or equivalent; computer science; statistics. If the student is exempt 
from trigonometry by placement examination, no additional course from the above group 
is required. 

"May be Biol. 101, 110, Bot. 100, Physl. 103, or Zool. 104. 

*A minimum of 9 hours from two departments in social science, including Econ. 108. 

° An approved 6 hours in the humanities. 

"At least 15 hours, of which at least 6 hours are advanced undergraduate courses 
(200 and 300 level), must be taken in any one of the options listed below. 

Business Option 

Elective courses to be taken from the following areas: accountancy, advertising, 
agricultural economics, agricultural journalism, business administration, business 
and technical writing, economics, finance, labor and industrial relations, and mar- 
keting. 

Engineering Option 

Elective courses to be taken from the following engineering areas: agricultural, 
chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical, metallurgical, industrial, theoretical and ap- 
plied mechanics. 

Production Option 

Elective courses to be taken from the following production areas: agricultural engi- 
neering, animal science, agronomy, dairy science, horticulture, plant pathology, 
veterinary pathology and hygiene. 



CURRICULUM IN FOOD SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Food Science 

This program is designed for students who wish to be trained in the scientific as- 
pects of food processing, quality control, research, product development, and tech- 
nical sales functions for employment in the food industry, governmental agencies, 
and educational institutions. This curriculum also provides the scientific back- 



144 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ground for graduate study in the areas of food processing, food chemistry, food 
microbiology, and nutritional science. A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required 
for graduation. 

Students are urged to engage in at least one summer of employment in the 
food processing industry and are aided in making contact with prospective em- 
ployers. A senior inspection trip is required; the trip will cost about $25. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern 

Society 1 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

Moth. 114 — Plane Trigonometry^ 2 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication 3 

Social science elective^ 3 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biological science'' 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and 

Analytic Geometry 5 

Spch, 112 — Verbal Communication 3 

Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry 3 

Chem. 134 — Organic Chemistry Lab 2 

Math. 130 — Calculus and 

Analytic Geometry 5 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics 5 

Total 15 



THIRD YEAR 

F.S. 213 — Food Analysis I 3 

F.S. 260 — Raw Materials for 

Processing 4 

F.S. 314 — Food Chemistry I 3 

F.S. 363 — Introduction to 

Process Engineering 3 

Humanities elective' 3 

Total 16 



F.S. 202 — Sensory Evaluation 

of Food 3 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory 

Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 101 — Introductory 

Experimental Microbiology 2 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics 5 

Social science elective' 3 

Total 16 

F.S. 310 — Dairy Product Processing 5 

F.S. 313 — Food Analysis II 3 

F.S. 315 — Food Chemistry II 3 

Mcbio. 311 — Food and 

Industrial Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 312 — Techniques of 

Applied Microbiology 2 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

F.S. 301 — Food Processing 5 

Electives 13 

Total 18 



F.S. 206 — Inspection Trip 

F.S. 324 — Problems in Nutrition 3 

F.S. 332 — Principles of Sanitation in 

Processing and Handling of Food 2 

Social science elective' 3 

Humanities elective' 3 

Electives 6 

Total 17 



* To take Chem. 101, a student must have completed Moth. Ill or 112 (or equivalent) 
or hove gained exemption by the Mathematics Placement Test. He must also have a satis- 
factory score on the Chemistry Placement Test or take Chem. 100 (2 hours) before enrolling 
in Chem. 101. 

^Students exempt from both Math. 112 and 114 by the Mathematics Placement Test 
may begin with Math. 120. Those who are not exempt from Moth. 112 and do not have 
credit for college algebra must take Math. 1 1 1 or Math. 112. If Moth. 114 and Chem. 101 
cannot be taken in the first semester, adjustments in the suggested course sequence must 
be made. 

'a minimum of 9 hours of approved social sciences is required. Courses must be se- 
lected from at least two departments. 

*May be Biol. 110, Bot. 100, Physl. 103, or Zool. 104. 

"a minimum of 6 hours of approved humanities courses is required. 



AGRICULTURE 



145 



CURRICULUM IN FOREST SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

The curriculum in furest science prepares students for positions involving manage- 
ment of natural resources, particularly those associated with forests and forest 
land including environmental quality and ecology. Graduates may qualify for em- 
ployment in a wide range of fields with public agencies or private industry. A 
minimum of 126 hours of credit, including 8 hours earned in summer field study, 
is required for graduation. 

A summer field study of eight weeks is required for all students. This should 
come between the second and third years. The estimated cost of $500 includes tui- 
tion, fees, transportation, meals, and lodging. 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER 



HOURS 



Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern 

Society 1 

Biology' 4 

Communications' 3-4 

For. 101 — General Forestry' 3 

Mathematics* 3-5 

Total 15-17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biology' 4 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry' 4 

Communications' 3 

Mathematics* 2 

Social science 3 

Total 16-18 



SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry or 
Chem. 103 — General Chemistry. 
Organic Chemical Studies 4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics 

(Mechanics, Heat, and Sound) 5 

Total 16 



Agron. 101 — Introduction to Soils 4 

Humanities, social sciences, or 

electives* 6 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics (Light, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 5 

Electives 0-3 

Total 15-18 



SUMMER FIELD STUDIES (8 WEEKS) 

For. 211 — Forest Ecology 3 

For. 221 — Introduction to Forest 

Measurements 3 

For. 231 — Introduction to Wood 

Utilization 2 

Total 8 



'The biology requirement may be fulfilled by either Bot. 100 and Zool. 104, or Biol. 
110 and 111, or equivalent. 

^ The communication requirement may be fulfilled by either Rhet. 105 or 108 and Spch. 
101, or Spch. Ill and 112. 

' Transfer students with sophomore standing (30 hours) may substitute another course 
from the general resource management group in place of For. 101. 

* One course (minimum of 3 hours) in mathematics in addition to algebra and trigo- 
nometry, e.g.. Moth. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry; Math. 124 — Introductory 
Analysis for Social Scientists. Students who pass the algebra portion of the Mathematics 
Placement Test are exempt from the algebra requirement; those who pass both the algebra 
and trigonometry portions of these tests may begin their college mathematics with Math. 
120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry or Math. 124 — Introductory Analysis for Social 
Scientists. 

"To take Chem. 101 a student must have a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Place- 
ment Test and exemption from or credit in Math. Ill or 112; students who hove not had 
high school chemistry or who do not score high enough on the Chemistry Placement Test, 
must take Chem. 100 before taking Chem. 101. 

Humanities and social sciences: An approved 6 hours in the humanities. A minimum 
of 9 hours from two departments in the social sciences, including Econ. 108. 



146 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS' 

The programs for the third and fourth years must be planned in consultation with the stu- 
dent's faculty adviser. The four-year course of study must include the following: 

HOURS 

For. 1 01 — General Forestry^ 3 

For. 211 — Forest Ecology (Summer Field Studies) 3 

For. 221 — Introduction to Forest Measurements (Summer Field Studies) 3 

For. 231 — Wood Utilization (Summer Field Studies) 2 

For. 253 — Forest Economics 3 

For. 362 — Forest Entomology, or PI. Pa. 304 — Forest Tree Diseases 

and Wood Deterioration 3 

Total 17 

In addition, the student must complete at least one additional course in any two of the 
following specialized areas: 
Forest biology 

For. 213 — Silviculture 

For. 220 — Dendrology 

For. 316 — Environment and Tree Growth 

For. 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 
Forest resources management 

For. 222 — Advanced Forest Measurements 

For. 242 — Forest Resources Management 

For. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics (May not be taken by students with credit in 
Math. 161 or equivalent.) 
Forest protection 

For. 362 — Forest Entomology, or PI. Pa. 304 — Forest Tree Diseases and Wood Deterior- 
ation (Depending upon which course the student selects from required list.) 
Forest economics 

For. 260 — Forest Land Policy and Administration 
Forest products utilization 

For, 232 — Wood Utilization 

For. 271 — Wood Anatomy and Identification 
General resource management 

C.E. 200 — General Surveying 

Geog. 378 — Descriptive Interpretation of Remote Sensors 

Rec. 321 — Recreational Use of Public Land 

Zool. 342 — Wildlife Management and Conservation 

Minimum hours of required forestry and specialized area courses 23 

Humanities and social sciences 

An approved 6 hours in the humanities and a minimum of 9 hours from two departments 

in the social sciences, including Econ. 108 15 

Electives to bring total hours to 1 26 



^ Transfer students with sophomore standing (30 hours) may substitute another course 
from the general resource management group in place of For. 101. 

' One-half of the required forestry and specialized area hours must be completed in 
residence at the University of Illinois. 



CURRICULUM IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Ornamental Horticulture 

This curriculum prepares students for careers in the production, marketing, and use 
of ornamental crops; in teaching, research, or other related professional activities; 
or in business serving or related to ornamental horticulture. Opportunities open to 
graduates are: the production of flowers and ornamental plants in greenhouses and 
nurseries; plant breeding; flower shop management and floral designing; park and 
golf course management; sales representatives and technicians with seed and plant 
suppliers, chemical industries, and horticultural supply firms; employment with 
state or federal governmental agencies or institutions as teachers, researchers, hor- 
ticultural advisers, crop inspectors, etc.; consultants; and writers. 



AGRICULTURE 147 



Students are required to make at least one inspection trip before graduation. 
Students are encouraged to acquire practical experience through employment in 
ornamental horticultural establishments. A minimum of 130 hours of credit is re- 
quired for graduation. 

Areas of specialization include production of floral crops; nursery management 
and production, use, and maintenance of woody ornamental crops; production and 
maintenance of turfgrass; and flower shop management and floral designing. 

Questions concerning the curriculum and areas of specialization in ornamental 
horticulture should be directed to 100 Ornamental Horticulture Building, Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 

Society' 1 Course from group I 3 

Bot. 100 — General Botany 4 Entom. 101 — Agricultural Entomology ...3 

Course from group I 0-3 Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry^ 2 

Hort. 122 — Greenhouse Management ....3 Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication' 3 

Math. 1 1 1 — Algebra, or Math. 112 — Total 15 

College Algebra' 3-5 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication' 3 

Total 15-18 

SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry or Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Chem. 103 — General Chemistry Courses from groups I and II 6 

(Organic Chemical Studies) 4 Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Courses from groups I or II 6 Elective 3 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 Total 16 

Elective 0-3 

Total 15-17 



' An orientation course required of all freshmen in agriculture. 

'Students in this curriculum are required to complete Math. Ill or 112 and 114 unless 
exempted by the AAathematics Placement Test. 

* Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch. 101 may be substituted for Spch. Ill and 112. 

* To take Chem. 101, a student must have a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Place- 
ment Test, or take Chem. 100 (2 hours) and have Math. Ill or 112 or equivalent before 
enrolling in Chem. 101. 



Group Requirements 

GROUP I: HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES HOURS 

An approved 6 hours in the humanities and a minimum of 9 hours from two depart- 
ments in the social sciences (including Econ. 108) 15 

GROUP II: PRESCRIBED HORTICULTURE AND SUPPORTING COURSES 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting^ 3 

Bot. 260 — Introductory Plant Taxonomy 3 

Hort. 221 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 226 — Bedding and Foliage Plants' 3 

Hort. 230 — Garden Flowers' 3 

L.A. 151 — Plant Materials I 3 

L.A. 152 — Plant Materials II 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

Total 27 



Accy. 101 and 105 may be substituted for Accy. 201. 
Offered in alternate years. 



148 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



GROUP III: HORTICULTURE ELECTIVE COURSES 

Hort. no — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

Hort. 210 — Home Grounds Planning and Design 4 

Hort. 21 1 — Home Grounds Development and Construction 3 

Hort. 212 — Landscape Contracting 3 

Hort. 223 — Floricultural Crops Production 1^ 3 

Hort. 224 — Floricultural Crops Production II* 3 

Hort. 231 — Floral Decorations 3 

Hort. 232 — Advanced Floral Decorations and Flower Shop Management' 3 

Hort. 234 — Nursery Management' 3 

Hort. 236 — Turf Management 3 

Hort. 242 — Vegetable Crops Production' 3 

Hort. 251 — Arboriculture' 3 

Hort. 262 — Fruit Science I' 3 

Hort. 300 — Special Problems (maximum of 5 hours) 3-5 

Hort. 321 — Floricultural Physiology 4 

Hort. 322 — Plant Nutrition 4 

Hort. 323 — Principles of Plant Breeding 4 

Hort. 345 — Growth and Development of Horticultural Crops' 4 

Minimum total, chosen with approval of faculty adviser 15 

GROUP IV: AREA OF SPECIALIZATION COURSES 

Accy. 108 — Intermediate Accounting' 3 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Ag. Ec. 341 — Agricultural Economic Statistics, or Hort. 340 — Introduction to Applied 

Statistics, or Econ. 171 — Applied General Statistics, or Math. 161 — Statistics 3-4 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metalwork 3 

Ag. M. 252 — Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation 3 

Agron. 303 — Soil Fertility 3 

Agron. 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

Bot. 234 — Form and Function in Flowering Plants 3 

Bot. 330 — Plant Physiology 3 

Bot. 333 — Plant Physiology Laboratory (same as Hort. 333) 2 

Bot. 345 — Plant Anatomy 4 

Bot. 381 — Plant Ecology 5 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 212 — Retail Management 3 

B. Adm. 249 — Human Relations 3 

B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business Law 3 

B. Adm. 272 — Industrial Selling 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

B.8.T.W. 272 — Report Writing 3 

Entom. 319 — Fundamentals of Insect Control 4 

Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance 3 

Fin. 357 — Financing Small Business 3 

PI. Pa. 306 — Epiphytology and Diagnosis of Plant Diseases 3 

Minimum total, chosen with approval from faculty adviser 15 



' Offered in alternate years. 

'Accy. 101 and 105 are prerequisites for Accy. 108; credit may not be earned for both 
Accy. 101 and 201. 

CURRICULUM IN RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 

FoH the degree of Bachelor of Science in Restaurant Management 

The curriculum in restaurant management prepares students (both men and women) 
fo'r managerial positions in restaurants and other commercial food service units. It 
also gives them basic training for work as purchasing agents, kitchen equipment and 
layout specialists, food inspectors, and other allied occupations. A total of 126 hours 
of credit is required for graduation. 



AGRICULTURE 



149 



Two one-day field trips are required: (1) orientation to metropolitan res- 
taurants, fall; and (2) National Restaurant Association annual meeting, spring. 
Estimated cost: $15 each trip. 

Two summers (a minimum of eight weeks each), or equivalent, of practical 
restaurant experience are required and must be completed before registering in 
H. Ec. 355. This experience normally should come at the end of the second and 
third vears. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting I . . .3 
Agr. ICX) — Agriculture in Modern 

Society 1 

Math. Ill —Algebra, or Moth. 112 — 

College Algebra' 3-5 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, 

or Psych. 103 — Human Behavior ....3-4 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication' 3 

Elective 0-3 

Total 15-16 

SECOND YEAR 

American or English literature 3 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or 
Chem. 103 — General Chemistry. Or- 
ganic Chemical Studies 4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

H. Ec. 132 — Foods and Nutrition 3 

Elective 3 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

An. S. 104 — Selection and Use of 

Meats, or elective* 2-3 

Econ. 240 — Labor Problems 3 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its 

Furnishings,'^ or elective 4 

H. Ec. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

H. Ec. 231 —Foods 3 

Total 15-16 



FOURTH YEAR 

An. S. 104 — Selection and Use of 

Meats, or elective* 2 

B. Adm. 249 — Human Relations 3 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its 

Furnishings,' or elective 4 

H. Ec. 345 — Institution and Restaurant 
Management: Food Purchasing and 
Equipment Selection 3 

Electives 4 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Accy. 105 — Principles of Accounting II ..3 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry' 4 

Soc. 100 — Principles of Sociology 3 

Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication' 3 

Elective 3 

Total 16 



American or English literature 3 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to 

Human Physiology 4 

Electives 9 

Total 16 



B. Adm. 202 — Principles of MarKetIng . . .3 
B. Adm. 210 — Management and 

Organizational Behavior, or B. Adm. 

247 — Introduction to Management ....3 
H. Ec. 240 — Quantity Food Production 

and Service 5 

Mcblo. 100 — Introduction to 

Microbiology 3 

Mcblo. 101 — Introduction to 

Experimental Microbiology 2 

Total 16 

B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business Lav/ .3 
B.&T.W. 251 — Business and 

Administrative Communication 3 

H. Ec. 350 — Institution and Restaurant 

Management: Organization and 

Administration 4 

H. Ec. 355 — Specialized Quantity Food 

Production and Management 3 

Elective 3 

Total 16 



^ Students who make a satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test are ex- 
empt from Math. Ill and 112. 

' Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch. 101 may be taken instead of Spch. Ill and 112. 
Students who do not moke a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test must 
take Chem. 100 and hove Math. Ill or 112 or equivalent before Chem. 101. 

* An. S. 104, offered first semester in alternate years. 

' Special section for restaurant management, offered first semester in alternate years. 



150 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN WOOD SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

The curriculum in wood science concerns wood as a raw material, including its 
origin, properties, and characteristics. The approach is interdisciplinary, requiring a 
knowledge of the chemical, physical, biological, and engineering properties of wood. 
The curriculum prepares students for positions concerned with using wood in new 
and better ways; with seasoning, manufacturing, purchase, marketing, preservative 
or fire-retardant treatments, gluing, or wood finishing. A minimum of 126 hours of 
credit, including 8 credit hours earned in summer camp, is required for graduation. 
Estimated costs for summer camp of $300 include tuition, fees, transportation while 
at camp, meals, and lodging. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern 

Society 1 

Bot. 100 — General Botany 4 

For. 101 — General Forestry^ 3 

Math. Ill —Algebra, or Math. 112 — 

College Algebra^ 3-5 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication^ 3 

Total 14-16 

SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics (Mechan- 
ics, Heat, and Sound) 5 

Humanities or social sciences 3 

Total 17 

SUMMER FIELD STUDIES (EIGHT WEEKS) 

For. 211 — Forest Ecology 3 

For. 221 — Introduction to Forest 

Measurements 3 

For. 231 — Introduction to Wood 

Utilization 2 

Total 8 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry* 4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry^ 2 

Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication' 3 

Humanities or social sciences 3 

Total 15 



Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry 3 

Chem. 134 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry Laboratory 2 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics (Light, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 5 

Humanities or social sciences 6 

Total 16 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The programs for the third and fourth years must be planned in consultation with the 
student's faculty adviser. In addition to the following required courses, the student must 
complete sufficient elective courses to bring the total hours for graduation to 126. At least 
15 of the elective hours must be restricted electives. 



* Transfer students with sophomore standing (30 hours) may substitute an elective 
course for For. 101. 

^ Students who pass the algebra portion of the Mathematics Placement Test are exempt 
from the algebra requirement; those who pass both the algebra and trigonometry por- 
tions of these tests may begin their college mathematics with Math. 120 — Calculus and 
Analytic Geometry. Math. 130 and 140 or 131 and 141 are also recommended. 

*Rhet. 105 or 108 and Spch. 101 may be substituted for Spch. Ill and 112. 

* To take Chem. 101 a student must have a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Place- 
ment Test and exemption from or credit in Math. Ill or 112; students who have not had 
high school chemistry or who do not score high enough on the Chemistry Placement Test, 
must take Chem. 100 before taking Chem. 101. 



AGRICULTURE 151 



Required Specialized Courses HOURS 

For. 220 — Dendrology 4 

For. 232 — Wood Utilization 3 

For. 236 — Physical Properties of Wood and Wood-Base Materials 3 

For. 253 — Forest Economics 3 

For. 271 — Wood Anatomy and Identification 3 

For. 273 — Adhesives and Laminates 3 

For. 274 — Wood Deterioration and Its Prevention 3 

For. 275 — Seminar in Wood Science 2 

For. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics, or Ag. Ec. 341 — Agricultural Economic 

Stotistics, or Econ. 172-173 — Economic Statistics I and II 3-6 

For. 372 — Mechanical Properties of Wood and Wood-Base Materials 3 

Total 30-33 

Restricted Electives HOURS 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

B. Adm. 200 — The Legal Environment of Business 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business Lav/ 3 

B. Adm. 272 — Industrial Selling 3 

B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research 3 

Chem. 1 22 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis 3 

C.E. 369 — Behavior and Design of Wood Structures 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic Digital Computing 3 

Fin. 150 — Money, Credit, and Banking 3 

Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance 3 

For. 222 — Advanced Forest Measurements 3 

G.E. 282 — Introduction to Patent Low 1 

G.E. 288 — Economic Analysis for Engineering Decision Making 3 

G.E. 290 — Contracts and Specifications 3 

G.E. 292 — Engineering Law 3 

I.E. 230— Labor Relations 3 

I.E. 357 — Safety Engineering 3 

L.I.R. 321 (Section B) — Industrial Social Systems 3 

L.I.R. 347 — Labor Law I 3 

Moth. 130 or 131 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry 3-5 

Moth. 140 or 141 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry 3-5 

Math. 135 or 145 — Calculus 5 

Moth. 345 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal Functions 3 

Minimum total 15 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

An approved 6 hours in the humanities. A minimum of 9 hours from two depart- 
ments in the social sciences, including Econ. 108. (See pages 121 and 122.) 

CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

Tliis four-year curriculum is provided for students in the College of Agriculture who 
desire general or professional training in home economics. The 120 hours required 
for graduation include prescribed courses of which at least 28 hours must be in 
home economics courses selected according to the requirements for the various 
options (see below). 

The first two years of this curriculum, shown in detail on pages 153 and 154, 
provide a foundation for the various fields of concentration, and allow some varia- 
tion according to the purposes of individual students. The third and fourth years 
are largely determined by the option selected (these are described below). Students 
who hold home economics scholarships must take at least 4 hours each semester in 
home economics or in courses prerequisite thereto. At least 5 hours of advanced 



152 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



courses in one of the fields of concentration must be taken in residence at the 
University by any student transferring from another institution. 

A student may also qualify for a baccalaureate degree in home economics in 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. (See page 307.) 

Students preparing to teach home economics in secondary schools should fol- 
low the curriculum in home economics education. (See page 155.) 

Prescribed Courses hours 

American or English literature 6 

Art 185' 2 

Chem. 101' and 102 8 

Econ. 108 3 

Prescribed home economics' 28-39 

Math. Ill or 112 3-5 

Mcbio. 100 and 101* 5 

Physl. 103' 4 

Psych. 100 or 103 3-4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

Soc. 100 3 

Total, prescribed 69-83 

Open electives 37-51 

Total required for graduation 1 20 



'Students in option 1 need not take Art 185 but do take the art courses prescribed 
under that option. 

' Students who do not make a satisfactory score on the Chemistry Placement Test must 
take Chem. 100 and have Math. Ill or 112 or equivalent before registering for Chem. 101. 

^ Courses as prescribed by the option, plus three courses from outside the area to total 
28 hours. Areas are: child and family; foods and nutrition; hospital dietetics; institution 
management; home management and family economics; housing, interior design, and equip- 
ment; textiles and clothing. Prescribed courses in the general option include at least one 
course from each of the five areas. 

* Students in options 1 and 8 are not required to take the prescribed microbiology and 
physiology courses, but they must take a total of 12 hours of laboratory sciences, including 
Chem. 101 and 102, and 4 hours to be chosen from courses in botany, geology, microbiol- 
ogy, organic chemistry, physiology, or zoology. 

Options 

1. Apparel Design. H. Ec. 182, 183, 184, 284, 285, 286, 287, 386, and 395 are 
required. (Art 115 or 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 125, and 129; B.&T.W. 251; Econ. 
313; Spch. 101; and a course in applied statistics' are also required.) 

2. The Child and the Family. H. Ec. 105, 202, 203, 210, 301, and 349 are re- 
quired. (Anth. 103 and 6 additional hours of social sciences' are also required.) 

3. Foods and Nutrition. H. Ec. 132, 133, 220, 231, 324 (3 or 5 hours), and 330 
are required. Two or 3 hours to make a total of 14 or 15 hours are to be selected 
from H. Ec. 240, 320, 322, and 331. (Chem. 122, 131, 134, Bioch. 354 and 356, 
or 350 and 355, and Math. 114 are also required.) 

4. General Home Economics. A minimum of 28 hours in home economics is re- 
quired. These 28 hours include at least one course from each of the five areas; 15 
hours must be at the 200-300 level with a minimum of two courses at the 300 level. 
(Six additional hours of social sciences^ are also required.) 

4a. Foods in Business Program. H. Ec. 132, 133, 220, 231, and 330 are required. 
Six additional hours are to be selected from H. Ec. 326, 331, and 375, B. Adm. 
202, Journ. 211, Rhet. 251^ and Spch. 101 are required, and an additional 12 hours 
are to be selected from Adv. 281, 382, B. Adm. 247, H. Ec. 240, 313, 322, 370, 
Journ. 223, 326, R. TV. 261, Spch. 211, and applied statistics. 



AGRICULTURE 153 



5. Hospital Dietetics. H. Ec. 132, 133, 220, 231, 240, 320, 324, 345, 350, and 3 
hours from H. Ec. 330. 355, and Accy. 201 are required. Chem. 122, 131, 134; 
Bioch. 354 and 356, or 350 and 355; Educ. 211; and B. Adm. 249 are also required. 

6. Household Management. H. Ec. 132, 133, 171,. 270, 273, and 361 or 375 are 
required. Si.x additional hours are to be selected from H. Ec. 210, 220, 231, 260, 
261, 330, 361, 375, 378 or 379, and 380. (Six additional hours of social sciences' 
are also required.) 

7. Institution Management. H. Ec. 132, 133, 220, 231, 240, 330, 345, 350, and 
355 are required. (Accy. 101 and 105; B. Adm. 249; and Spch. 101 are also 
required.) 

8. Retailing of Clothing and Home Furnishings. H. Ec. 160 or 184, 182, 183, and 
395 are required. Eleven hours are to be selected from H. Ec. 260, 261, 263, 
280, 281, 284. 285, 286, 287, 361, 378, 380, 386, and 388. Adv. 281; Art 115, or 
116, 186: B. .Adm. 202, 211; B.&T.W. 251; Econ. 313; Psych. 201; Spch. 101; and 
a course in applied statistics^ are required. 

9. Textiles and Clothing. H. Ec. 182, 183, and 184 are required. Fourteen or 15 
additional hours must be selected from H. Ec. 280, 281, 284, 285, 286, 287, 380, 
386, 388 or 395. (Art 186 and 6 additional hours of social sciences^ are also re- 
quired.) 

Journalism and Home Economics. For students interested in combining advertising, 
journalism, and radio-television with home economics, a program of 20 hours in 
courses offered by the College of Communications is recommended by that college 
and the Department of Home Economics. This program may be combined with any 
of the nine options in home economics. It includes Adv. 281 — Introduction to Ad- 
vertising, Joum. 211 — Newswriting, and R. TV 261 — Principles of Radio and 
Television Broadcasting, as required courses plus 12 additional hours selected from 
Adv. 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy, Journ. 204 — Typography, Journ. 212 
— Public -Affairs Reporting, Joum. 223 — Photojournalism, Journ. 321 — News 
Editing, Journ. 326 — Magazine Article Writing, Journ. 330 — Magazine Editing, 
B. .Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing, R. TV 263 — Radio and Television 
Announcing, R. TV 365 — Radio News. 



* To be selected from Econ. 171, Psych. 135, or Soc. 185. 

' To be selected from anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, political science, 
psychology, or sociology, in addition to Econ. 108, Psych. 100 or 103, and Soc. 100. 

Suggested Sequence of Prescribed Courses 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Home economics course(s) 4 Art 185 — Design* 2 

Math. Ill — Algebra, or Math. 112 — Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

College Algebra 3-5 Home economics course(s) 3-4 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication 

Physiology'^ 4 or elective' 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition or Elective 3 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication* .3-4 Total 15-16 

Total 15-17 



Students in options 1 and 8 ore not required to take the prescribed microbiology and 
physiology courses, but they must take a total of 12 hours of laboratory sciences, including 
Chem. 101 and 102, and 4 hours to be chosen from twelve courses in botany, geology, 
microbiology, organic chemistry, physiology, or zoology. 

' Physl. 103 requires high school chemistry or Chem. 100 as a prerequisite. 

*Spch. Ill and Spch. 112 may be substituted for Rhet. 105 or 108, and Spch. 101. 

* Students in option 1 need not take Art 185 but do take the art courses prescribed 
under that option. (See page 152.) 



154 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SECOND YEAR 



American or English literature 3 American or English literature 3 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry* 4 Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Home economics course(s) 4 Home economics course(s) 2-3 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, Mcbio. 100 — Introductory 

or Psych. 103 — Human Behavior . . .3-4 Microbiolog/ 3 

Elective 0-3 Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experi- 

Total 15-17 mental Microbiology^ 2 

Elective 2-3 

Total 15-17 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

In the third and fourth years each student completes the prescribed courses in the chosen 
options. Those who choose option 3 should take Chem. 122 and H. Ec. 231 in the first 
semester of the third year. 



* Students in options 1 and 8 are not required to take the prescribed microbiology and 
physiology courses, but they must take a total of 12 hours of laboratory sciences, including 
Chem. 101 and 102, and 4 hours to be chosen from twelve courses in botany, geology, 
microbiology, organic chemistry, physiology, or zoology. 

CURRICULUM IN INTERIOR DESIGN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Interior Design 

The interior design curriculum is for those students wishing to work professionally 
in the field of interior design. Emphasis is on interior space planning and related 
phases of environmental design in reference to the human. Graduates are employed 
by interior design and space planning studios, department and retail furniture 
stores, and county cooperative extension and urban renewal resource offices. 

The 120 credit hours required for graduation include 18 credit hours in pro- 
fessional interior design courses, 12 to 14 credit hours in other home economics 
courses, 28 credit hours in art, 40 to 42 credit hours in general liberal arts, and 18 
to 22 credit hours in electives. 

Prescribed Courses hours 

H. Ec. 160, 183, 260, 261, 262, 263; H. Ec. 361, 375, or 378 (6 hours); and three 

courses from home economics areas other than interior design 30-32 

Art 111, 112, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 133, 134 28 

Anthropology (cultural); Chem. 101, 102; Econ. 108; English or American literature; 

Math. Ill or 112; Psych. 100; Rhet. 105 or 108; Soc. 100; and Spch. 101 40-42 

Electives 1 8-22 

Total required for graduation 1 26 

Suggested Sequence of Prescribed Courses 

Two two-day field trips are required. Estimated cost: $30 each trip. 

Two summers' experience, of a minimum of eight weeks each, or equivalent, 
in the interior design field is recommended and should be completed before regis- 
tering in H. Ec. 378. This experience normally should come at the end of the 
second and third years. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its Art 117 — Drawing I 3 

Furnishings 4 Art 119 — Design I 3 

H. Ec. 183 — Consumer Textiles, or Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

cultural anthropology 2-4 Home economics elective^ 2 

Math. Ill — Algebra, or Math. Speech 112 — Verbal Commun. 

112 — College Algebra 3-5 or elective* 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition, or Total 15 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication* ..3-4 
Total 14-15 



AGRICULTURE 



155 



SECOND YEAR 

Art 111 — Introduction to Ancient 

and Medieval Art 4 

Art 118 — Drawing II 3 

Art 120 — Design II 3 

Art 121 — Drawing Theory* 2 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

Art 133 — Design Workshop 3 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

H. Ec. 260 — Inheriors and 

Furniture I 3 

Home economics electives* 3-4 

Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Speaking, or elective' 3 

Total 15-16 

FOURTH YEAR 

American or English literature 3 

H. Ec. 262 — Interior Design 3 

Electives 9-11 

Total 15-17 



Home economics elective 2 

H. Ec. 183 — Consumer Textiles, 

or cultural anthropology 2-4 

Art 112 — Introduction to Renaissance 

and Modern Art 4 

Art 122 — Drawing Theory' 2 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology ..4 

Elective 2 

Total 16-18 

Art 134 — Design Workshop 3 

H. Ec. 261 — Interiors and 

Furniture II 3 

Home economics 300-level course* 3 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology ....3 

Electives 3-5 

Total 15-17 

American or English literature 3 

H. Ec. 263 — Textile Design, Applied 3 

Home economics 300-level course* 3 

Electives 6-8 

Total 15-17 



'Spch. Ill and 112 may be substituted for Rhet. 105 or 108 and Spch. 101. 

'Minimum of three home economics courses (100, 200, 300 level) from areas other than 
interior design. 

'Art 123 may replace Art 121 and 122. 

* Six hours must be chosen from H. Ec. 361 — Development and Function of Family 
Housing; H. Ec. 375 — Home Equipment; and H. Ec. 378 — Special Problems in Home Man- 
agement, Housing, and Interior Design. 



CURRICULUM IN VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 

A minimum of 126 hours is required for graduation. This curriculum prepares its 
graduates for teaching in consumer and homemaking programs and in occupational 
home economics programs and leads to recommendation for a state of Illinois sec- 
ondary school teaching certificate (grades 6-12). Students in this curriculum should 
consult an adviser in home economics education before enrolling, or during the 
first semester of attendance. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 



General Education Requirements 

COMMUNICATIONS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and Spch. 101, or Rhet. 108 and Spch. 101 6-7 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

General chemistry (including organic) 8 

Human physiology (including laboratory) 4 

Introduction to microbiology (including laboratory) 5 

Moth. Ill or 112 — College Algebra, or exemption by the 

Mathematics Placement Test 3-5 

Total 20-22 



156 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Elements of economics 3 

History of the United States 3-4 

Political science (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Psychology 3 

Total 12-13 

FINE ARTS 

Art design 4 

HUiy\ANITIES 

Selected from College of Agriculture approved courses 6 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 

Home Economics Courses 

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE COURSES HOURS 

H. Ec. 105 — Child and Family 4 

H. Ec. 132 — Foods and Nutrition 3 

H. Ec. 1 33 — Food Management 2 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its Furnishings 4 

H. Ec. 171 — Home Management 2 

H. Ec. 1 82 — Clothing Laboratory 2 

H. Ec. 1 83 — Consumer Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 1 84 — Apparel Design and Selection 2 

Total 21 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR COURSES 

H. Ec. 202 — Laboratory in Child Development 2 

H. Ec. 210 — Family Relationships 3 

H. Ec. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

H. Ec. 231 — Foods 3 

H. Ec, 273 — Advanced Home Management 3 

H. Ec. 286 — Clothing Design: Flat Pattern 3 

At least one course chosen from: 

H. Ec. 260 — Interiors and Furniture 1^ 3 

H, Ec. 270 — Family Financial Management 3 

H. Ec. 361 — Development and Function of Family Housing^ 3 

H. Ec. 375 — Home Equipment 3 

At least one 300-level elective chosen from: 

H. Ec. 301 — Advanced Problems in Home Guidance of Children^ 3 

H. Ec. 322 — Physical Growth and Nutrition^ 2 

H. Ec. 330 — Experimental Foods 3 

H, Ec. 380 — Advanced Textiles^ 4 

H. Ec. 386 — Clothing Design: Draping^ 4 

Total 22-24 



^ Offered first semester only. 

^ Offered second semester only. 

^ GITered alternate years second semester only. 

Professional Education hours 

Nature of the teaching profession 2 

Principles of vocational and technical education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Tecliniques of teaching consumer education and homemaking for youth and adults 3 

Techniques of teaching home economics related occupations for youth and adults 3 

Educational practice 5-7 

Total 20-22 



AGRICULTURE 157 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

H. Ec. 105 — Child and Family 4 

H. Ec. 120 — Elementary Nutrition, and H. Ec. 125 — Food Sefection and Preparation; 

or H. Ec. 132 — Foods and Nutrition, and H. Ec. 133 — Food Management 5 

Credit is not given for H. Ec. 132 and 133 in addition to 120 and 125. 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its Furnishings 4 

H. Ec. 171 — Home Management, or H. Ec. 271 — Home Management 2 

H. Ec. 182 — Clothing Laboratory 2 

H. Ec. 183 — Consumer Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 184 — Clothing Selection 2 

Art 185 must be taken prior to, or concurrently with, this course. 

Home economics elective 2-3 

Total 23-24 

ELECTIVES 

H. Ec. 202 — Laboratory in Child Development 2 

H. Ec. 210 — Family Relationships 3 

H. Ec. 231 — Foods 3 

H. Ec. 270 — Family Financial Management 3 

H. Ec. 280 — Household Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 287 — Consumer Clothing Problems 2 



INSTITUTE OF AVIATION 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
Willard Airport 
Savoy, Illinois 61874 

The Institute of Aviation is responsible for promotion and correlation of 
education and research activities related to aviation in the University. Its 
director has the advice and assistance of an executive committee. The 
institute holds Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airman Examining 
(Pilot) Agency Certificate Number 1, which permits it to issue pilot cer- 
tificates and ratings to its graduates on behalf of the FAA. Pilot training 
includes training from the private pilot level to the airline transport pilot. 

A t\vo-year aircraft maintenance curriculum prepares students for the 
FAA mechanic certificate v^ith airframe and powerplant ratings. 

The student who wishes to become a professional pilot may elect the 
combined maintenance-flight program which permits substitution of flight 
courses for specified maintenance courses in each semester of the aircraft 
maintenance curriculum, enabling the student to qualify for the commer- 
cial certificate. 

Normally new freshmen are accepted for admission only in September. 
However, an aspiring professional pilot may begin in the' spring semester. 
Intra-University transfer to the Institute of Aviation may be accomplished 
as space permits. 

Graduating institute students may transfer to any degree-granting divi- 
sion of the University to complete requirements for a degree in that divi- 
sion, usually requiring a minimum of two and one-half additional years. 
A non-Institute of Aviation student may elect flight courses with the 
permission of his department, to the extent that space in institute courses 
is available. 

A special fee of $550 is charged for each course involving flight training 
in addition to the estimated costs listed in table 2 on page 62. 

The institute's Aviation Research Laboratory conducts interdisciplinary 
research in many areas related to flight problems. The associate director for 
research holds joint professorships in the Departments of Psychology and 
of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering, permitting graduate stu- 
dents in various departments to perform research activities as graduate 
research assistants. 

The institute manages Willard Airport, located 6 miles southwest of the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. The airport provides the University and the 
community with excellent air transportation facilities. 

159 



160 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants must meet general University requirements as well as those specified 
by the Institute of Aviation listed in the Admissions Chart on page 39. Additional 
units in physics, mathematics, and social sciences are recommended. 

Anyone who does not have the subjects required for admission to the institute 
may request special review of his application by the Office of Admissions and Rec- 
ords, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 177 Administration Building, 
Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Courses offered by the Institute of Aviation are open to students, faculty, and 
staff in all departments of the University, subject to limitations imposed by the 
availability of space and equipment. 



Curricula 



AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 142 — Powerplant Theory 4 

Avi. 143 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes 1 2 

Avi. 144 — Powerplant Theory Laboratory. 2 

Avi. 145 — Aircraft Physics 3 

Avi. 154 — Powerplant Systems II 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 

or Rhet. 108 — Forms of Composition. .4 
Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 147 — Introduction to Federal 

Aviation Regulations 3 

Avi. 152 — Aircraft Powerplant 

Electrical Systems 4 

Avi. 153 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes II 2 

Avi. 155 — Aircraft Mathematics 3 

Avi. 156 — Powerplant Systems III 3 

G.E. 105 — Elements of Drawing 3 

Total 18 



SECOND YEAR 

Avi. 163 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes III 3 

Avi. 165 — Aircraft Fabricat- 
ing Processes 1 4 

Avi. 167 — Aircraft Fabricat- 
ing Processes II 2 

Avi. 1 69 — Aircraft Systems I 4 

Avi. 170 — Aircraft Systems II 5 

Total 18 



Avi. 157 — Powerplant Conditioning 

and Testing 7 

Avi. 159 — Powerplant Inspection 

arid Regulations 3 

Avi. 172 — Aircraft Systems III 3 

Avi. 174 — Aircraft Assembly 

and Inspection 5 

Total 18 



COMBINED FLIGHT-MAINTENANCE CURRICULUM' 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 101 — Private Pilot 3 

Avi. 142 — Powerplant Theory 4 

Avi. 143 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes I 2 

Avi. 144 — Powerplant Theory Laboratory. .2 

Avi. 145 — Aircraft Physics 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition or 

Rhet. 108 — Forms of Composition 4 

Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 120 — Secondary Flight 3 

Avi. 147 — Introduction to Federal 

Aviation Regulations 3 

Avi. 152 — Aircraft Powerplant 

Electrical Systems 4 

Avi. 153 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes II 2 

Avi. 1 55 — Aircraft Mathematics 3 

Avi. 156 — Powerplant Systems III 3 

Total 18 



AVIATION 



161 



FIRST SUMMER' 

Avi, 157 — Powerplanf Conditioning 

and Testing 7 

Avi. 159 — Powerplant Inspection 

and Regulations 3 

Total 10 

SECOND YEAR 

Avi. 130 — Intermediate Flight 3 

Avi. 154 — Powerplant Systems II 3 

Avi. 163 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes III 3 

Avi. 165 — Aircraft Fabricating 

Processes I 4 

Avi. 167 — Aircraft Fabricating 

Processes II 2 

Total 15 

SECOND SUMMER' 

Avi. 1 69 — Aircraft Systems I 4 

Avi. 170 — Aircraft Systems II 5 

Total 9 



Avi. 140 — Advanced Flight 3 

Avi. 172 — Aircraft Systems III 3 

Avi. 174 — Aircraft Assembly 

and Inspection 5 

G.E. 105 — Elements of Drawing 3 

Total 14 



^Students register in aircraft maintenance curriculum. 

' Students who prefer not to attend summer sessions may extend their maintenance and 
flight training into the third year, electing other subjects as they desire to complete a 
normal class-hour load. 



PROFESSIONAL PILOT CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 101 — Private Pilot 3 

Biol. 100 — Biological Science' 4 

Hist. 1 1 1 — History of Western 

Civilization to 1815, or Hist. 

151 —History of the United 

States to 1877- 4 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 17 

SECOND YEAR 

Avi. 130— Intermediate Flight' 3 

L.A.S. 140 — Thought and Structure 

in Physical Science' 4 

Humanities elective* 3 

Free electives 6 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 120 — Secondary Flight 3 

Biol. 101 — Biological Science' 4 

Hist. 112 — History of V^estern 
Civilization, 1815 to the Present, 
or Hist. 152 — History of the United 

States, 1877 to the Present^ 4 

Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 17 

Avi. 140 — Advanced Flight' 3 

L.A.S. 141 — The Physical Universe' 4 

Humanities elective* 3 

Free electives 6 

Total 16 



'L.A.S. 140 and 141 may precede Biol. 100 and 101 at the student's discretion. 

'Hist. Ill and 112 or Hist. 151 and 152 should be chosen. 

' Professional pilot students may take Avi. 130 and 140 in the summer following the 
first year of the curriculum, in which cose they ore free to elect advanced flight courses 
(Avi. 200, 210, 220, 250, 280) in the second year of the curriculum and in the following 
summer session. Such programs ore planned on on individual basis. 

* Humanities electives should be chosen to comply with University general education 
requirements. 



ou 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

University of Illinois at Urh ana-Champaign 
214 David Kinley Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



The purpose of the College of Commerce and Business Administration is 
to provide educational experience that will help students develop their 
potentialities for leadership and service in business, in government, and in 
teaching and research. The undergraduate curricula provide a study of 
the basic aspects of business and preparation for careers in fields such as 
accounting, business management, banking, insurance, and marketing. Stu- 
dents should, however, expect to serve an apprenticeship in the fields they 
enter if they aspire to higher positions. 

The curricula, leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in one of the 
various degree programs in business and economics, are based on four years 
of college work. Students are required to elect courses in other colleges of 
the University including mathematics, rhetoric, literature, speech, and so- 
cial sciences and to secure as liberal an education as possible to avoid the 
narrowing effects of overspecialization. Through a cooperative arrange- 
ment with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences students in that col- 
lege may major in economics or finance. 

The college offers graduate and professional programs to students with 
bachelor's degree in one of the areas of business and economics, or in a 
nonbusiness area such as liberal arts, science, or engineering. Detailed in- 
formation on graduate programs may be obtained from the Graduate 
College. 

163 



164 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

Undergraduate instruction in the College of Commerce an^-By^iness Administra- 
tion is organized under the Departments of Accountancy, 'Business'^Admimstrali? 
Economics, and Finance. Each of these departments offers courses Thai pre! 
field of concentration a student may elect. These curricula lead to Bachelor of 
Science degrees in one of the various fields of study in the college and are designed 
to encourage each student to fully develop his intellectual capacity. Each cur- 
riculum introduces the student to each major subject area in the college and pro- 
vides him with the opportunity to major in the area of his choice. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants must meet general University requirements as well as those specified by 
the College of Commerce and Business Administration listed in the Admissions 
Chart on page 40. 

Students transferring from other colleges will not be excused from the entrance 
requirements unless they have demonstrated proficiency in the areas in which they 
are deficient. 

Mafhematics Placement Test 

Students without college credit in algebra are required to take the Mathematics 
Placement Test before registering in the college. The results of the test are used to 
place the student in Math. Ill or 112 for no credit or to exempt him from college 
algebra and allow him to enroll in Math. 124 or equivalent which is required for 
graduation. 

The student who enters with college credit in algebra may proceed directly to 
courses beyond college algebra required by the college for graduation. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 
Honors at Graduation 

Honors awarded to superior students at graduation are designated on the diploma 
as follows: for graduation with Honors, a minimum 4.25 grade-point average in all 
courses accepted toward the student's degree ; for graduation with High Honors, a 
minimum 4.5 grade-point average in all courses accepted toward his degree ; and 
for graduation with Highest Honors, a minimum 4.75 grade-point average in all 
courses accepted toward his degree (A = 5.0). 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

For information regarding the James Scholar Program see page 49. 

Dean's List 

At the end of each semester the Dean's List is announced, naming those students 
who have achieved a 4.0 grade-point average or above. 

Superior academic achievement is recognized in other ways by the University 
through the Bronze Tablet. 

Further information concerning honors programs may be obtained from the 
College of Commerce and Business Administration Undergraduate Programs catalog 
or by writing to the Undergraduate Office, College of Commerce and Business Ad- 
ministration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 214 David Kinley Hall, 
Urbana, Illinois 61801. See also Academic Honors on page 96. 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 165 



Awards 

Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Medallion. Epsilon chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, a 
professional fraternity in commerce, annually awards a scholarship medallion and 
$25 to a male student pursuing a curriculum in the College of Commerce and Busi- 
ness Administration. The recipient must be a student in the senior class who has 
completed three full years of academic work in the college; his scholastic grade- 
point average for the first six semesters in the college must be at least 4.5 (A = 5.0); 
he must be active in various campus organizations as evidenced by recommenda- 
tions from the faculty advisers of the respective activities; he must possess qualities 
of leadership as demonstrated by offices held in the various organizations and by 
successful completion of beneficial projects under his responsibility; he must have 
commendable personality as judged by a commerce faculty board appointed by the 
local chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi to administer the award. The name of the winner 
is engraved on a scholarship tablet on display in David Kinley Hall. 
Delta Sigma Pi Key. The Illinois chapter of Delta Sigma Pi, professional fraternity, 
annually awards a key to the male student graduating from the College of Com- 
merce and Business Administration with the highest four-year scholastic average. 
Haskins and Sells Foundation Award. The Haskins and Sells Foundation has estab- 
lished an annual award of $500 for a junior student majoring in accounting who is 
selected by a committee of the faculty on the basis of demonstrated excellence in 
accounting. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students in the College of Commerce and Business Administration who meet the 
University's requirements with reference to registration, residence, and fees, and 
who maintain satisfactory scholastic records in the college, are awarded degrees 
appropriate to their curricula. 

Each candidate for a degree must have a 3.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average or 
above for all courses counted toward graduation, a 3.0 grade-point average or above 
for all courses taken at this University, and a 3.0 grade-point average or above for 
all courses taken in the field of concentration. 

Each student may select only one major field of concentration. 

Continuing students advance enroll for the following semester in November 
and April of each academic year. New students may advance enroll during the 
summer for each fall semester. Information may be obtained from the Office of 
.\dmissions and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 177 Adminis- 
tration Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Faculty advisers are available during the registration period each semester to 
help students plan their academic programs. 

Students are responsible for meeting the requirements for graduation. There- 
fore, each student should familiarize himself with the requirements listed in this 
catalog and should refer to them each time he plans his program. 



GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete at least one sequence from each of the following lists. 
The following regulations apply: 

- The behavioral science sequence (list 2) should be started not later than the 
sophomore year. Business administration majors must select the sequence of 
Psych. 100 and 201. 

- Two or more courses in the general education sequences (lists 1 through 4) must 
be selected from 200- and 300-level courses. 

- Substitution of other courses in the listed sequences must be approved by one 
of the deans in the Undergraduate Office, College of Commerce and Business 



166 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 214 David Kinley 
Hall, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 
- General education sequence courses and the advanced rhetoric course may be 
taken under the pass-fail option. 

LIST 1: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, HUMANITIES, NATURAL SCIENCE 



Art 116, Music 130, 131 

Art 111, 112, and Music 113 or 115 

Astr. 101, 102 

Biol. 100, 101 

Bot. 100, Zool. 104 

Chem. 107, 108 

Chem. 101, 102 

Entom. 103, Physl. 103 

Entom. 103, Zool. 104 

Foreign language: 8-hour sequence in 

any language (intermediate or above) 
Geog. 102, 103 

LIST 2: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 

Anth. 103, 260 

Psych, 100 and 200- or 300-level course in 
psychology (Psych. 201 recommended) 

LIST 3: HISTORY OR POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Hist. Ill and 112 or Hist. 151 and 152, or 

any two of Hist. 305, 306, 309, 310, 311, 

312, 313, and 314 
Hist. 131, 132, or any two of Hist. 332, 333, 

334, 341, and 342 
Hist. 260, 261, 262 (any two) or any two of 

Hist. 352, 354, 355, 356, 359, 360, 361, 

362, 375, and 376 

LIST 4: LITERATURE 

Six hours of literature. 



Geol. 101, 102 

Human. 151, 152 

Human. 211, 212 

Human. 215, 216 

L.A.S. 140, 141 

Math. 140, 141, or 145, and any 300-level 

course (excluding 305, 306, and 307) 
Phil.: at least 8 hours 
Phycs. 101, 102 
Phycs. 106, 107 



and any two 
in sociology 



200- or 300-level 



Soc. 100 

courses 
(Students majoring in business administration 

must select sequence in psychology.) 

Hist. 181, 182 or any two of Hist. 381, 382, 

383, 384 
Hist. 191, 192 or any two of Hist. 307, 308, 

387, 388, 391, 392, 394, 395, and 396 
Hist. 211, 212 

Hist. 320, 321, 327, 328, 329, 330 (any two) 
Pol. S.: any two courses of 3 or more hours 

each 



MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT 

Any of the following sequences meet the College of Commerce and Business Ad- 
ministration requirement: Math. 135 (5 semester hours); Math. 120, 130 (10 se- 
mester hours); Math. 120, 131 (8 semester hours); Math. 124, 134 (7 semester 
hours). 

New students at this time need only select which mathematics sequence to 
enter. Decisions on how far to go in a sequence can be made later as the student 
gains experience and firms up career objectives. 

The most appropriate mathematics sequence for a student depends on his 
background, interest, motivation, and objectives. Background can be evaluated in 
terms of mathematics courses already completed and the student's score on the 
Mathematics Placement Test. Interest, motivation, and objectives must be deter- 
mined by the student. Three basic sequences are open to the student. They are: 

- Math. 135. A demanding course requiring a previous analytical geometry course. 
Should be chosen by students whose interests and objectives require strong 
mathematics. 

- Math. 120, 130, or Math. 120, 131. These sequences are appropriate for students 
whose background is good but who have not had analytical geometry or who 
feel a somewhat less demanding sequence is preferable. 

- Math. 124, 134. This sequence provides the student with a good background but 
since the pace is slower it may not sufficiently challenge the very good or pre- 
viously well-prepared student. 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 167 



Curricula 

Normall/ students must register for not less than 12 hours nor more than 18 hours 
in each semester. Students should take mathematics, economics, and accountancy 
courses in the semesters indicated in the sample schedule of courses. The computer 
science course must be taken during the first year. A required course that is failed 
must be repeated the following semester. 

A student with less than 30 hours of credit is required to have his program for 
the semester approved by a faculty adviser. 

Up to 4 hours of credit in basic physical education may be counted in the 124 
hours necessary' for graduation. Physical education grades are counted in the 
graduation grade-point average. 

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 — Composition' 4 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Business and technical writing or advanced rhetoric^ 3 

Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

General education sequences" 

List 1 — Foreign language, humanities, mathematics, natural science 8 

List 2 — Behavioral science 6 

List 3 — History or political science 6 

List 4 — Literature 6 

BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Accy. 101, 105 — Principles of Accounting 6 

B. Adm. 200 — Legal Environment of Business 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

C.S. 105 — Introduction to Computers 3 

Econ. 102, 103 — Principles of Economics 6 

Econ. 172, 173 — Quantitative Methods 6 

Fin. 254 — Business Financial Management 3 

Math. 124, 134 — Introductory Analysis for Social Scientists^ 7 

MAJOR 

Courses to yield a total of 1 8-24 

ELECTIVES' 

To yield a total of 1 24 



'Spch. Ill and 112 may be substituted for Rhet. 105 or 108 and Spch. 101. 

'Math. 135, or Moth. 120 and 130, or Math. 120 and 131 may be substituted for 
Math. 124 and 134. (See college Mathematics Requirement on page 166.) 

'am general education requirements (except Spch. 101) and all electives may be taken 
under the pass-fail option. 



SAMPLE SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Econ. 102 3 Econ. 103 3 

Math. 124 3 Math. 134 4 

C.S. 105 3 Adv. Rhet 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 Spch. 101 3 

Total 13 General education sequence list 2 3 

Total 16 



168 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SECOND YEAR 



Accy. 101 3 Accy. 105 3 

Econ. 172 3 Econ. 173 3 

General education sequence list 2 3 General education sequence 6 

General education sequence list 1, 3, 4. . .7 Major or elective 3 

Total 16 Total 15 

THIRD YEAR 

Fin. 254 3 B. Adm. 200 3 

B. Adm. 210 3 Major or electives 9 

B. Adm. 202 3 General education sequence 4 

Major or elective 3 Total 16 

General education sequence 4 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Major or electives 13 Major or electives 13 

General education sequence 3 General education sequence 3 

Total 16 Total 16 



CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTANCY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Accountancy 

Accountancy is usually selected as a major by the student who is preparing for 
private, governmental, or public accounting, or who wishes to use accountancy as 
general training for a career in business. 

In private accounting, the accountant's employment is limited to a single or- 
ganization. The size and nature of the organization determines the scope of the 
accounting activities but, broadly defined, the following duties are illustrative: 
design and installation of accounting systems, preparation of financial statements 
and reports, cost accounting, internal auditing, interpretation and analysis of 
budgets, and preparation of tax returns. 

Governmental accounting deals with accounting principles, standards, and 
procedures applicable to state and local governments and to institutions such as 
universities and hospitals. 

Public accounting is concerned primarily with the audit of the financial state- 
ments of business enterprises and institutions for the purpose of expressing an 
opinion as to the fairness of the information presented. The public accountant may 
be called upon to render services to clients which transcend the expression of an 
opinion on financial statements. These services include the areas of management 
consulting and tax service. 

Requirements for the degree are: Accy. 208, Accy. 266, Econ. 300, and five 
additional accountancy courses. Accy. 199, up to 4 hours, may count as one course. 
Additional credit in Accy. 199 will be allowed only with the permission of the 
department head. 

Econ. 300 and accountancy courses may not be taken on a pass-fail basis. 
A limit of 33 hours of accountancy courses may be counted towards the Bachelor 
of Science degree in accountancy. 



CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 

The Department of Business Administration offers three separate undergraduate 
programs: marketing, organizational administration, and production. Marketing 
encompasses those business activities directly related to the process of placing 
meaningful assortments of goods and services in the hands of the consumer. The 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 169 



marketing student is concerned with the efficient performance of marketing activ- 
ities and with their effective coordination with the other operations of the firm. 
Organizational administration is concerned primarily with the effective utilization 
of human resources within the business organization. Attention is focused on the 
organization as a social system and the forces that affect this system such as 
the behavior of individuals and groups, economic conditions, and technology. The 
study of production is concerned primarily with the efficient utilization of the 
organization's material resources. Attention is focused on the design and improve- 
ment of productive capacity and the coordination of the production process with 
other system activities. 

Requirements for the degree are: B. Adm. 321 — Organizational Behavior, 
B. Adm. 374 — Operations Research, B. Adm. 389 — Business Policy, and one 
of the following concentrations. 

MARKETING 

A student must take B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research, and B.A. 344 — Con- 
sumer Behavior, plus one of the following courses: 
B. Adm. 212 — Retail Management 
Adv. 383 — Advertising Media Policy and Strategy 
Adv. 384 — Advertising Campaigns 
B. Adm. 337 — Promotion Management 
B. Adm. 352 — Pricing Policies 
B. Adm. 370 — International Marketing 
B. Adm. 360 — Business Logistics 
B. Adm. 380 — Management Science in Marketing 

ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 

A student must take three courses from the following list, one of which must be 

B. Adm. 323 or 351: 

B. Adm. 323 — Industrial Social Systems II 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration 

L.I.R. 345 — Economics of Manpower 

Pol. S. 361 — Introduction to Public Administration 

Pol. S. 362 — Administrative Organization and Policy Development 

Psych. 355 — Industrial Social Psychology 

Psych. 357 — Psychology of Industrial Conflict 

Soc. 318 — Industry and Society 

Soc. 359 — The Social Psychology of Organization 

PRODUCTION 

\ student must take B. Adm. 314 — Production, and B. Adm. 315 — Management 

in Manufacturing, plus one of the following courses: 

Accy. 336 — Managerial Accounting and Quantitative Techniques 

B. Adm. 323 — Industrial Social Systems II 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration 

I.E. 286 — Operations Analysis 

Psych. 258 — Human Performance in Man-Machine Systems 

Psych. 356 — Human Factors in Equipment Design 

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 

A student may satisfy this option by taking any three courses approved in advance 

by the department head. Recommended sequences among the mathematics courses 

could be 315, 357; 315, 383; 361 or 363, 366. Selected courses include: 

B. Adm. 373 — Electronic Data Processing for Business 

B. Adm. 380 — Management Science in Marketing 

Accy. 366 — Managerial Accounting and Quantitative Techniques 

Math. 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

Math. 357 — Mathematical Models in the Social Sciences 



170 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Math. 361 — Theory of Probability I 
Math. 363 — Advanced Statistics I 
Math. 364 — Advanced Statistics II 
Mafh. 366 — Theory of Probability 
Math. 383 — Linear Programming 

Students wishing to concentrate in production or management science are 
advised (not required) to take in fulfilling the college mathematics requirement 
either Math. 120, 130; Math. 135, 145; or Math. 124, 134, 141 (special section). 

Students must select Psych. 100 and 201 from list 2. 

B. Adm. 389 should, if possible, be taken after all requirements in the con- 
centration have been satisfied. 

Courses used to fulfill major requirements may not be taken on a pass-fail basis. 

Beyond the required courses for the business core and major, no more than 
12 of the 28 elective hours can be selected from business administration, accoun- 
tancy, or finance. 



CURRICULUM IN ECONOMICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics 

Economics has been described as the study of how men use limited resources to 
produce various commodities and to distribute them to members of society for their 
consumption. Accordingly, the economist is concerned with what is produced, how 
goods and services are distributed, the organization of industries, the labor supply 
and its use, international trade, the production and distribution of national income 
and wealth, government finance, and the use and conservation of land and natural 
resources. 

Related options for specialization by the student within this major are eco- 
nomic development, economic history, economic theory, economics of transportation, 
government and economic activity, international economics, labor economics, and 
quantitative economics. 

Career opportunities available to students who major in economics include 
management positions in business, industry, and government; research; technical 
writing; and teaching. 

Requirements for the degree are: Econ. 300 and 301, and 12 additional hours 
of economics. (See General Education Sequence Requirements on page 165.) 

Students are advised but not required to take one of the following mathe- 
matics sequences: Math. 120, 130, 140; Math. 120, 131, 141; or Math. 135, 145. 
In addition, students considering graduate work should take Math. 315. 

No course used to fulfill major requirements can be taken on a pass-fail basis. 



CURRICULUM IN FINANCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Finance 

The field of finance is primarily concerned with the acquisition of capital funds for 
business, public, or personal use. A new business, for example, must secure sufficient 
funds to initiate and maintain operations until the cash flow from sales is great 
enough to maintain capital requirements. Established businesses seek financial 
advice when considering the purchase of new equipment, the selection of a new 
plant location, or the expansion of present facilities. Business policy decisions which 
result in changes in the capital structure of the business are of special importance 
to finance. 

A student who majors in finance may specialize in finance, investment, and 
banking; insurance and risk management; or real estate and urban land economics. 

As the study of finance is designed to provide the student with both the 



COAAMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 171 



theoretical background and the analytical tools required to make effective judg- 
ments in finance, many students select careers in business financial management, 
commercial or investment banking, government finance, insurance, or real estate. 
Requirements for the degree are: Fin. 150, and one of the following con- 
centrations. 

FINANCE, INVESTMENT, AND BANKING 

Econ. 301 

Three of Fin. 230, 235, 252, 253, 255, 258, 280, 340, 357 

One of Accy. 274, 308, 262, B. Adm. 301, 374, Econ. 312, 328, 335 

INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT 

Fin. 260 

Three of Fin. 262, 360, 363, 370, 371 

One of Accy. 274, Econ. 301, 315, Fin. 294, 295, Math. 371, 372 

REAL ESTATE AND URBAN ECONOMICS 

Fin. 364 

Fin. 365 

Fin. 366 

Two of Arch. 379, Econ. 301, 360, Fin. 367, Geog. 366, Psych. 369, Soc. 276, U.P. 171 

Fin. 230, 280, and 235 were previously numbered Fin. 259, 350, and 359 
respectively. 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ACCOUNTANCY 
FOR NONCOMMERCE MAJORS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Accy. 101 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

Accy. 105 — Principles of Accounting II 3 

Accy. 208 — Intermediate Accounting 3 

Electives 11-12 

Total ; 20-21 

ELECTIVES 

Accy. 266 — Cost Accounting 3 

Accy. 274 — Basic Federal Income Tax Accounting 3 

Accy. 308 — Advanced Accounting 3 

Accy. 366 — Managerial Accounting and Quantitative Techniques 3 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3-4 

B. Adm. 200 — Legal Environment of Business 3 

One of the following: 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 302 — Wills, Estates, and Trusts 3 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ECONOMICS 
EDUCATION FOR NONCOMMERCE MAJORS 

Business education majors may also elect this minor. The same courses may not 
count as fulfilling both major and minor requirements. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

tcon. 102 and 103 — Principles of Economics, or Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 

ond Econ. 103 (special section) 6 

Econ. 313 — Economics of Consumption, or H. Ec. 271 — Home Management 2-3 



172 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Fin. 150 — Money, Credit, and Banking, or Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance, or Fin. 

260 — Economics of Insurance 3 

Electives 9 

Total 20-21 

ELECTIVES 

Econ. 214 — Government Finance and Taxation 3 

Econ. 240 — Labor Problems 3 

Econ. 255 — Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Fin. 150 — Money, Credit, and Banking 3 

Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance 3 

Fin. 230 — Investment Principles 3 

Fin. 260 — Economics of Insurance 3 

H. Ec. 271 — Home Management 2 



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COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 

University of Illinois at Urhana-Champaign 
119 Gregory Hall 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



For students with two years of college and a commitment to a career in 
communications, the College of Communications offers an additional two 
years of education leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Adver- 
tising, Journalism, and Radio and Television. 

Through its educational programs, the college aims at giving students 
professional competence in their chosen fields of communications. At the 
same time, it seeks to help them acquire a solid background in the social 
sciences and humanities. Its premise is that students need an understanding 
of people and the world they live in if they are to communicate effectively 
through print and broadcast media. 

Although its three curricula are somewhat specialized, the college seeks 
to equip its students with a general professional education that will give 
them flexibility when they enter the field. 

The college has modem equipment and facilities for teaching future 
communications workers — newsrooms, a photographic darkroom, a typog- 
raphy laboratory, an advertising layout laboratory, a radio newsroom, and 
broadcasting studios. Television students use the facilities of WILL-TV 
(Channel 12) and the Motion Picture Production Center for laboratory 
instruction. The Communications Library is generally recognized as one of 
the best in the nation. The college maintains a job placement service for 
its graduates. 

The college is also the supervising administrative unit for the University 
Broadcasting Division and the Institute of Communications Research. 

Instruction in journalism at the University was begun in 1902 as part 
of the courses in rhetoric and was organized as a division of the Depart- 
ment of English in 1916. The School of Journalism was established in 1927 
as a separate unit. In 1950 it became the School of Journalism and Com- 
munications with divisions of journalism, advertising, and radio, the last 
of which later added instruction in television. In 1957, the school was ele- 
vated to college status. Two years later the college's three divisions were 
redesignated departments. The present name — College of Communica- 
tions — was adopted in 1968. 

175 



176 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 



Through its three academic departments the college offers professional education 
in three sequences which have been accredited by the American Council on Educa- 
tion for Journalism — advertising, news-editorial, and radio and television. 

The Department of Advertising supervises work in the advertising curriculum 
for students expecting to enter advertising agencies or the advertising departments 
of communications media, industrial organizations, or retail stores. The department 
aims to train analytical, flexible, and creative professionals who are able to deal 
with current and future advertising problems. 

Through its news-editorial curriculum the Department of Journalism tries to 
prepare students for varied and long-term careers in journalism. The primary pro- 
fessional aim of the program is to train public affairs reporters by providing them 
with the skills, knowledge, and understanding required of successful journalists. 

The Department of Radio and Television seeks to prepare students for careers 
in broadcasting through the radio and television curriculum. While acquiring pro- 
fessional broadcasting competence in production, creation, and management, stu- 
dents must also acquire a thorough education in the social sciences and humanities. 

Each of the departments offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science in Advertising, Journalism, and Radio and Television. The col- 
lege offers an interdisciplinary program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in 
Communications under the direction of the Institute of Communications Research. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

For admission to the College of Communications a student must complete 60 se- 
mester hours of undergraduate college work and present a grade-point average of 
at least 4.0 (A = 5.0) and evidence of interest in a professional career in commu- 
nications. Applicants with less than a 4.0 will be considered if they demonstrate 
strong career motivation and aptitude. 

Since they must have junior standing to be eligible to enter the College of 
Communications, students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are 
advised to register as freshmen and sophomores in the general curriculum of the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and follow a broad general education program. 
Students at other institutions should follow similar programs. 

There is no formal precommunications program. While in another college, a 
student is expected to follow the requirements of that college. However, students 
should attempt to satisfy the University general education sequence requirements. 
If possible they should include in their programs basic courses in such fields as 
economics, English, history, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, and 
anthropology. Students who do not have a reasonable degree of typing ability must 
acquire such skill before entering the college as it is required in all three curricula. 

Students at the University of Illinois should make arrangements to apply for 
transfer into the college during the advance enrollment period in the semester in 
which they will earn junior standing. Junior standing is necessary for students to 
take courses offered by the College of Communications. 

Students completing their freshman and sophomore studies at institutions other 
than the University of Illinois are strongly advised to defer courses in advertising, 
communications, joumahsm, and radio and television until enrolled in the College 
of Communications. Transfer students must take all of their required professional 
courses in the College of Communications. They may be permitted to transfer up 
to 9 hours of elective professional courses taken elsewhere, provided they take an 
equivalent number of additional hours in advanced social studies, arts, and sciences 
beyond the 20 semester hours required for graduation from the college. 

The college does not recommend that students with more than 90 hours enter 
any of its undergraduate programs. A minimum of three semesters of study is re- 
quired to complete the requirements of its three curricula. The college does not 



I 



COMMUNICATIONS 177 



accept students classified by the University as irregular (students who have already 
received a bachelor's degree). 



HONORS PROGRAMS 

For information about Edmund J. James Scholars and the Dean's List see page 96. 

Honors at Graduation 

For graduation with Honors, a student must obtain a grade-point average of 4.35 
in all courses taken after admission to the College of Communications; for gradu- 
ation with High Honors, 4.75 is required. Students who have not completed their 
senior year in residence are not usually considered for these honors. 

Kappa Tau Alpha 

Each year scholastically high-ranking undergraduate and graduate students in the 
College of Communications are considered for membership in Kappa Tau Alpha, 
national honorary society in journalism. The society was founded to recognize and 
promote scholarship in advertising, journalism, and broadcasting. 

Awards 

Donald E. Brown Award. An award of $320 sponsored by the Illinois News Broad- 
casters Association is given every third year to an outstanding student in radio- 
television news reporting. 

Communications Alumni Memorial Award. An award of $200 to an outstanding 
student in the College of Communications for scholarship, character, and profes- 
sional achievement as demonstrated during his junior year. 

Dudley McAllister Memorial Award. An award of $100 is made annually to the. 
student in the College of Communications giving evidence of the most promise in 
the reporting of public affairs. 

Harold Gustave Roettger Memorial Award. An award is made annually to an out- 
standing graduating senior in communications who is a member of the journalism 
honorary fraternity, Kappa Tau Alpha. The award, based on academic record, 
may be given to a man or a woman. 

St. Louis Advertising Club Award. Each year two outstanding students in the ad- 
vertising program, one man and one woman, are selected for an award by the St. 
Louis Advertising Club. The students so honored are chosen on the basis of scholar- 
ship, advertising aptitude, and citizenship. 

Raymond O. Terr Memorial Award. An award of $100 is given to a student in 
journalism. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The* college ofTers three programs of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Advertising, Journalism, or Radio and Television. To meet the degree 
requirements all students must satisfy general University requirements as to regis- 
tration, residence, scholarship, and fees. They must complete the rhetoric require- 
ment and approved sequences in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sci- 
ences as listed under General Education Sequence Requirements on page 178. All 
students must also fulfill the following general requirements of the College of 
Communications : 

- Complete a total of 124 semester hours of course credit. Basic physical education 
service courses and basic courses in military, naval, or air force science may not 



178 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



be counted toward this total although such credits may be counted toward meet- 
ing the admission requirement of 60 semester hours. 

- Complete not less than 30 hours but not more than 36 hours in courses offered 
by the college in advertising, journalism, and radio and television. Undergrad- 
uate courses cross-listed with advertising, journalism, or radio and television 
courses are considered college course offerings. Undergraduate communications 
courses cross-listed only with departments outside the college are not counted 
as college offerings. 

- Complete not less than 20 hours in advanced (200- and 300-level) courses in the 
social studies, arts, and sciences approved by the faculty. The home economics 
minor or the agriculture minor may be substituted for the requirement of 20 
hours in advanced social studies, arts, and sciences. 

- Complete the specific requirements of one of the three curricula offered by the 
college as listed starting below. 

- Earn a grade-point average of 3.0 (A = 5.0) in all courses presented for the 
degree. In addition students must earn a 3.0 for all courses taken while regis- 
tered in the college. 



GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To be graduated from the College of Communications a student must have com- 
pleted a minimum of 6 hours each in the humanities, the social sciences, and the 
natural sciences. The following sequences have been approved. A student may not 
use sequences from any one department to satisfy the requirement in more than 
one of these fields. Any substitutions of sequences must be approved by the dean 
of the college. 

HUMANITIES 

Any one of the following sequences: Phil. 101, 102; Engl. 101, 102, or 103 (any 
two); Engl. 115, 116; Human. 151, 152; an 8-hour sequence in one foreign lan- 
guage (intermediate level or above) ; or any sequence approved by another college 
in the University, if the student completed or started the sequence while enrolled 
in that college. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Any one of the following sequences: Anth. 102, 103; Econ. 102, 103; Hist. Ill, 
112; 131, 132; 151, 152; Phil. 103, 104; Pol. S. 150, 151; 191, 192; Psych. 100, 
201 ; or any sequence approved by any other college in the University, if the student 
completed or started the sequence while enrolled in that college. 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Any one of the following sequences: Biol. 100, 101; L.A.S. 141, 142; Zool. 104, 
Bot. 100; Zool. 104, Physl. 103; Zool. 104, Entom. 103; Bot. 100, Entom. 103; 
Astr. 101, 102; any 6 hours of chemistry, or any 6 hours of mathematics, exclusive 
of Math. 101, 104, 111, 112, and 114, or any 6 hours of physics; or any sequence 
approved by any other college in the University, if the student completed or started 
the sequence while enrolled in that college. 



Curricula 

CURRICULUM IN ADVERTISING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Advertising 

To be graduated from the advertising curriculum, a student must meet the general 



COMMUNICATIONS 179 



requirements for a degree listed under Graduation Requirements on page 177 and 
must complete the following courses:' 

HOURS 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Adv. 381 — Advertising Research Methods 3 

Adv. 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy 3 

Adv. 383 — Advertising Media Policy and Strategy 3 

Adv. 384 — Advertising Campaigns 3 

Adv. 387 — Advertising and Promotion Management 3 

Adv. 388 — Advertising in Contemporary Society 3 

Advertising, journalism, or radio-TV electives 9 

Total 30 

A basic course in statistical methods 3-4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing^ 3 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology, or 

Anth. 103 — Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (any two of these three courses). ..6-7 



' Students with a special interest in public relations may, with the consent of the de- 
portment, substitute certain approved courses for some courses required in the department. 

'This course may be credited toward the 20 hours of advanced social studies required 
of all students. 



CURRICULUM IN NEWS-EDITORIAL 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism 

To be graduated from the news-editorial curriculum of the Department of Jour- 
nalism a student must meet the general University and college requirements for 
a degree listed on page 177 and must complete the following courses: 

HOURS 

Journ. 350 — Journalism I 4 

Journ. 360 — Journalism 11^ 4 

Joorn. 370 — Journalism 111^ 3 

Journ. 380 — Journalism IV 3 

Journ. 217 — History of Communications; Journ. 218 — Communications and Public 
Opinion; Journ. 220 — Processes and Systems of Communications; Journ. 231 — 
Moss Communications in a Democratic Society; Journ. 241 — Law and Communica- 
tions; or Journ. 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications. (A minimum of 

two courses from this list.) 6 

Advertising, journalism, or radio-TV electives 10 

Total 30 

At least 6 hours of credit in each of the following areas: economics, English or 
American literature, history, philosophy, political science, and sociology or 
anthropology^ 36 



Mourn. 204 may be substituted for Journ. 360, and Journ. 321 for Journ. 370 until 
Journ. II and III ore fully inaugurated. 

' Courses taken in these fields to fulfill the college requirement of 20 hours of ad- 
vonced social studies, arts, and sciences may be used toward fulfilling these departmental 
requirements as may lower division courses or sequences in these fields taken anytime 
during the student's four years. Undergraduate seminar (199) courses may not be used 
to fulfill these departmental requirements. 



CURRICULUM IN RADIO AND TELEVISION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Radio and Television 

To be graduated from the radio and television curriculum, a student must meet the 



180 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



general requirements for a degree listed on page 177 and must complete the follow- 
ing courses: 

HOURS 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Journ. 21 1 — Newswriting 3 

R. TV 252 — Television Laboratory 3 

R. TV 261 — Principles of Radio and Television Broadcasting 2 

R. TV 368 — Radio and Television Regulation 2 

Advertising, journalism, or radio-TV electives including at least 8 hours in radio-TV 

courses 17 

Total 30 



MINORS 

Students in the College of Communications are not required to complete a minor. 
Students with special interests in home economics or agriculture may elect to follow 
a special minor in either of these fields as listed below. The home economics 
minor or the agriculture minor may be substituted for the college requirement of 
20 hours of advanced social studies, arts, and sciences. 

For students not enrolled in the College of Communications, the college offers 
only one approved special minor, a minor in the teaching of journalism for students 
in teacher education. Other students are cautioned against attempting to follow 
a minor in advertising, journalism, or radio and television even if approved by 
their major departments. Enrollment in many courses offered by the college is 
restricted to majors in one of the college's three curricula. In all college courses 
enrollment priority is given to majors. 

Minor in Agriculture for Majors in This College 

For a minor in agriculture, the student must complete a minimum of 20 hours in 
agriculture. These 20 hours may be substituted for the 20 hours of advanced social 
studies required by the college for graduation. However, all students in the news- 
editorial curriculum must satisfy the departmental requirement of at least 6 hours 
each in history, political science, philosophy, economics, sociology or anthropology, 
and English or American literature. These courses may be at the lower or upper 
division level. No specific courses or sequence of courses is required for admission 
to the agriculture minor. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Form Management 3 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

An. S. 221 or D.S. 221 — Principles and Applications of Animal Nutrition 4 

Electives in agriculture 9 

Total 20 

ELECTIVES 

Ag. Ec. 305 — Agricultural Policies and Programs 3 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 3 

Agron, 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

An. S. 201 — Livestock Management, or An. S. 301 — Beef Production, or An. S. 303 

— Pork Production, or An. S. 304 — Poultry Production 3-5 

D.S. 100 — Introduction to Dairy Production 3 

For. 1 00 — Farm Forestry 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

R. Soc. 277 — Rural Social Change 3 

Minor in Home Economics for Majors in This College 

For a minor in home economics, the student must complete a minimum of 20 hours 
in home economics, including at least 6 hours of required courses as indicated below. 



COMMUNICATIONS 181 



The 20 hiHirs in home coonoinics courses may be substituted for the 20 hours of 
advanced social studies required by the college for graduation. However, all stu- 
dents in the news-editorial curriculum must satisfy the departmental requirement 
of at least 6 hours each in histoiy, political science, philosophy, economics, sociology 
or anthropology, and English or American literature. These courses may be at the 
lower or upper di\ision level. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

H. Ec. 120 — Elementary Nutrition, or H. Ec. 132 — Foods and Nutrition 2-3 

Credit is not given in H. Ec. 132 and 133 in addition to H. Ec. 120 and 125. 

H. Ec. 1 83 — Consumer Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 271 — Home Management, or H. Ec. 171 — Home Management, and H. Ec. 270 

— Family Financial Management 2-5 

Electives in home economics 10-14 

Total 20 

ELECTIVES 

H. Ec. 105 — Child and Family 4 

H. Ec. 1 25 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

H. Ec. 133 — Food Management 2 

Credit is not given in H. Ec. 132 and 133 in addition to H. Ec. 120 and 125. 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its Furnishings 4 

H. Ec. 1 84 — Clothing Selection 2 

H. Ec. 202 — Laboratory in Child Development 2 

H. Ec. 210 — Family Relationships 3 

H. Ec. 231 — Foods 3 

H. Ec. 260 — Period Styles in Home Furnishings 3 

H. Ec. 280 — Household Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 285 — History of Costume 2 

H. Ec. 287 — Consumer Clothing Problems 2 

H. Ec. 395 — Fashion Analysis 3 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

This minor is specifically for students in teacher education programs. It requires 
a minimum of 18 hours in journalism and communications. In addition to four 
required courses with a total of 13 hours of credit, a minimum of 5 additional hours 
must be chosen from a selected group of electives. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Typography 3 

Newswrifing 3 

High school journalism 3 

News editing 4 

Electives in advertising, journalism, and communications 5 

Total 18 

ELECTIVES 

Introduction to advertising 3 

Public affairs reporting 3 

Contemporary affairs 2 

Photojournalism 3 

Magazine article writing 3 

Principles of radio and television broadcasting 2 

Others may be chosen in consultation with the adviser. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

University of Illinois at Urhana-Champaign 
120 Education Building 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



The College of Education of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign offers undergraduate degree programs in four of the seven depart- 
ments within the college. The departments which offer undergraduate 
degree programs, and the programs offered by each, are gi\'en below. 

The Department of Vocational and Technical Education offers degree 
programs in industrial education, health occupations, and business educa- 
tion. Although freshmen may be admitted to these curricula, students in- 
terested in industrial education and health occupations are typically 
encouraged to obtain academic and technical preparation in their areas 
of specialization prior to admission. 

The Department of Secondary and Continuing Education offers degree 
programs in the following secondary' teaching specialties: English, mathe- 
matics, social studies, general science, physical sciences, and life sciences. 
Only students who have earned at least 60 semester hours are considered 
for admission to secondary education curricula in the College of Education. 

The Department of Special Education offers an undergraduate degree 
program preparatory to teaching mentally handicapped children. Students 
are encouraged to enter this curriculum as freshmen. This program is able 
to accommodate only a small number of undergraduate students. 

The Department of Elementary Education offers degree programs in 
elemental^ education and early childhood education. 

In addition to offering undergraduate degree programs in education, 
the College of Education, under the auspices of the Urbana Council on 
Teacher Education, cooperates with five other colleges at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus to provide courses in professional education to under- 
graduate men and women who are preparing for careers in teaching and 
special educational services. 

The College of Education also offers graduate degree programs in edu-, 
cational administration and supervision, elementarv' education, special 
education, secondary and continuing education, vocational and technical 
education, educational psycholog\-^ and history and philosophy of educa- 
tion. Detailed information concerning graduate programs in education 
may be obtained from the catalog of the Graduate College or from the 
coordinator of graduate study in education, 110 Education Building, 

183 



184 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



The curricula in the education of deaf and hard-of-hearing children, education of 
mentally handicapped children, business education, industrial education, early 
childhood education, and elementary education begin with the freshman year. Ad- 
mission requirements for these programs are given in the Admissions Chart on page 
40. Junior standing, attained at any accredited institution of higher learning, is 
required for admission to all other undergraduate curricula. A junior entering from 
any other college of the University should have completed the first two years of a 
regular curriculum. Anyone transferring from another institution, must have ac- 
ceptable credit for an equivalent amount of course work. 

A cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) is required to transfer in 
good standing to the College of Education. A student with an average below 3.5 
may be admitted on probation if the curriculum is not filled to capacity, and if 
there is evidence which indicates that he possesses the characteristics essential to 
successful teaching. 

Students in the College of Education who are preparing for graduate study 
should arrange their undergraduate programs to meet the requirements for admis- 
sion to the Graduate College. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Elementary Education Semester in England 

The Department of Elementary Education provides an opportunity for undergrad- 
uate students at the junior level to study at the University of Bristol and associated 
teachers colleges, and to work in the infant and junior schools of England. 

Students carry several courses and have opportunities to assist regular teachers 
in classrooms. The one semester of work and study enables students preparing for 
teaching to receive first-hand experience working with children and to work with 
teaching methods and curricula used in England. 

Costs for the semester of study and transportation expenses are borne by the 
students involved, but normally do not exceed by any significant amount the normal 
costs of attending the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Inquiries regarding the program should be directed to the Department of 
Elementary Education, University of IlHnois at Urbana-Champaign, 306a Educa- 
tion Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 
Honors at Graduation 

Eligibility for graduation with honors is established on the fulfillment of residence 
and scholastic requirements. Residence requirements for graduation with honors 
are fulfilled under any of the following conditions: 

- Meeting University residence requirements for graduation. Furthermore, at least 
54 of the final 60 semester hours of credit must have been earned in residence 
at Urbana-Champaign. Credit for courses which is not included in the grade- 
point average does not count toward residency. 

- Obtaining waiver of University residence requirements by petition to the under- 
graduate office, 120 Education Building, and earning at least 54 of the last 60 
semester hours of credit, excluding credit for courses which are not included in 
computation of the grade-point average, through resident study at Urbana- 
Champaign. 

- Meeting University residence requirements and having completed all but 15 
hours in resident study at Urbana-Champaign. 



EDUCATION 



185 



- Having completed the first 90 semester hours in residence and all or part of 
the senior year in an approved program at another institution for the University 
of Illinois degree. 

A student who achieves the required scholastic average in all education courses 
and in all work presented for graduation (excluding credit for courses not included 
in the computation of the grade-point average), with education and graduation 
averages computed separately, may be recommended for honors as follows: Honors, 
minimum education and graduation scholastic grade-point averages of 4.25 (A = 
5.0) ; High Honors, minimum education and graduation scholastic grade-point aver- 
ages of 4.50; Highest Honors, minimum education and graduation scholastic grade- 
point averages of 4.75. It should be noted that these requirements are subject to 
change. 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

For information concerning the James Scholar Program see page 49. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Each undergraduate student in the College of Education must meet the University 
requirements (pages 85 to 91) and the requirements of the Urbana Council on 
Teacher Education (pages 110 to 113) for graduation. Students in all curricula must 
meet the course and academic credit requirements of their curricula with satis- 
factory scholastic averages. Educational practice (student teaching), which is 
required of all undergraduates in teacher education, must be completed at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Students in need of additional information concerning regulations and require- 
ments of the College of Education should consult their academic advisers or the 
office of the director of Teacher Education Services, University of Illinois at Ur- 
bana-Champaign, 120 Education Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Each candidate for a degree in the College of Education must complete at least 6 
semester hours of credit in each of three areas — humanities, natural sciences, and 
social sciences. In certain curricula additional credit in these areas may be required. 
Courses in these areas taken as part of the major field in secondary curricula are 
acceptable. Departments which offer appropriate courses are listed below. 



HUMANITIES 

Art 

Classics 

English (literature) 

French (literature) 

German (literature) 

History (not U.S. history) 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Entomology 

Geography 

Geology 



Humanities 
Music 
Philosophy 
Russian (literature) 
Spanish (literature) 
Speech 



Mathematics — any 6 
Moth. 104, 111, 114 
acceptable as a 
elementary and 
tion.) 

Microbiology 

Physics 

Physiology 

Zoology 



hours exclusive of 

(Mathematics Is not 

3 physical science in 

early childhood educa- 



186 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology Philosophy 

Economics Political science 

Geography (cultural or social) Sociology 

History 



Curricula 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

The curriculum preparatory to high school teaching includes the following re- 
quirements in general education and professional education common to all spe- 
cialties. For requirements in addition to those below, refer to pages 110 to 113 for 
teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula. 

It is essential that students consult appropriate teacher education advisers in 
the selection of specific courses and in the overall planning of degree programs. 

A minimum of 120 hours of credit, excluding basic military, is required for 
graduation except for the specialties in the teaching of Russian and Spanish, which 
require 123 hours. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Humanities^ 6 

Natural sciences' 6 

History of the United States 3 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

General psychology 3 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Total 30-31 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 4-5 

Educational practice (student teaching) 5 

Total 18-19 



' Courses in humanities and natural sciences must be selected from those listed on 
page 185. If the teaching major or minor area of specialization includes courses in these 
subjects, they also may be applied tov/ard general education requirements. The social 
science requirement is fulfilled by the courses in U.S. history and American government. 

Specialty in Life Science 

Additional electives in science and courses related to science teaching must be 
taken to bring the total of such work to approximately 70 semester hours. The 
completion of a teacher education minor in mathematics or one of the physical 
sciences is recommended.'^ 



' Courses related to science teaching may include mathematics, history of science, 
philosophy of science, anthropology, experimental psychology, physical geography, and 
science education exclusive of the education courses specifically required for certification. 

^ Minimum state of Illinois requirements for teaching of biology or physical science 
may be satisfied by a minimum of 24 semester hours of work, appropriately distributed, 
in the field. Minimum state requirements for teaching of mathematics may be satisfied by 
three appropriately distributed 300-level courses beyond a basic calculus sequence. 



EDUCATION 187 



REQUIRED CORE COURSES HOURS 

General physics 10-12 

General chemistry 8-10 

Life science 8-10 

Descriptive statistics or ecJucational measurement 3-4 

Organic chemistry 5 

Physiology (experimental, including laboratory) 5 

Microbiology (including laboratory)' 6 

Genetics 4 

Vertebrate or invertebrate zoology 3-5 

Ecology 3-5 

Botany 3-5 

Total 58-71 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credit, at least 120 



'Microbiology may be token for 3 to 5 hours credit. The minimum required for teacher 
education is 3 hours. Students with particular interest in microbiology may take additional 
hours. 

Specialty in English 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BOTH OPTIONS HOURS 

Literature for the high school or audiovisual communication 3 

Fundamentals of reading techniques 3 

Oral interpretation 3 

OPTION A: TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

Introduction to Shakespeare 3 

Survey of American literature, or equivalent 6 

Survey of English literature, or equivalent 6 

Descriptive English grammar 3 

Principles of composition, or intermediate expository v/riting 3 

English electives 11 

Six of these hours must be in courses restricted to advanced undergraduates. It is recom- 
mended that electives be chosen from English offerings in literary genres, world and/or 
classical literature, literary criticism, contemporary literature, backgrounds to literature, 
rhetoric, and linguistics. 
Total 32 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR OR SUPPORTING AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Those selecting to complete a teacher education minor may select from approved teacher 
education minors described on page 112. Students who choose this program rather than the 
teacher education minor ore required to complete at least three courses in each of two 
supporting areas or at least two courses in each of three supporting areas for a total 
of not less than 18 hours. Appropriate courses in the area of concentration should be 
elected in consultation with the adviser. The supporting areas of concentration are language 
and communications; language performance, oral and written; humanities and philosophy; 
methods and theories of critical processes; world and classical literatures; and the teaching 
of components of English. 

TOTAL HOURS 

Including general education and professional education credit, at least 120 

OPTION B: TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR IN LITERATURE 

Poetry, drama, fiction, or honors seminar 6 

Introduction to Shakespeare 3-6 

Practical criticism 3 

Survey of American literature 6 

Survey of English literature 6 

Advanced English electives 5-8 

Total 32 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN RHETORIC 
See page 321. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 
See page 321. 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credit, at least 120 

Specialty in French 

See Specialty for Teaching Foreign Languages in Both High School and Elemen- 
tary School below. Note in particular the substitution suggested for students who 
wish to prepare for teaching French in the elementary school. 

Admission to this specialty requires the completion of Fr. 104 or its equivalent. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR HOURS 

Introduction to French literature 6 

Oral French 6 

Composition 4 

Advanced oral French 4 

Teachers course 2 

Total, including courses taken in the first two years 38 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

The second teaching field (at least 20 hours) must be selected from among the approved 
teacher education minors listed on page 112. 

ELECTIVES 

Advanced courses (16 hours) in French civilization and literature are recommended, 
particularly for students who have completed basic French courses In secondary schools. 
Others may be chosen from major or minor teaching fields, or other areas of interest. 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credit, at least 120 

SPECIALTY FOR TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES IN BOTH HIGH SCHOOL 
AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

This specialty ofTers preparation for those who wish to teach a foreign language 

and another subject in a high school or a foreign language only in an elementary 

school under Illinois teacher certification regulations. Completion of any foreign 

language curriculum in teacher education will qualify the student for the high 

school certificate which permits teaching in grades six through twelve. A student 

who wishes to prepare for teaching a foreign language in the elementary school, as 

contrasted with one who wishes to prepare for general elementary school teaching, 

should substitute the following for the teacher education minor required in the 

foreign language teacher education curricula. 

^ ^ ^ HOURS 

Child development for elementary teachers 3 

Classroom programs in childhood education 2 

The teaching of language arts in the elementary school 3 

Primary reading 3 

The student teaching must be done in the seventh or eighth grade. 

If these requirements are met the student will be entitled to the special cer- 
tificate, which will permit him to teach a foreign language in all grades of the 
public schools, as well as to the high school certificate. The special certificate does 
not qualify him to teach any elementary school subjects other than the one named 
on the certificate. 

The student may complete a teacher education minor but additional hours 
will be required. 



EDUCATION 189 



Specialty in General Science 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES HOURS 

General physics 10-12 

General chemistry 8-10 

Life science 8-10 

Descriptive statistics or ecJucational measurement 3-4 

Two of the following; 

General astronomy or descriptive astronomy 3-8 

Physical geography 4 

Physical geology 4 

ELECTIVES 

Additional electives in science and courses related to science teaching must be taken to 
bring the total of such work to approximately 70 semester hours, including 15 semester 
hours of 200- and/or 300-level courses in sciences, exclusive of those listed immediately 
above. The completion of a teacher education minor in either biology or mathematics is 
recommended.' " 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 



Courses related to science teaching may include mathematics, computer science, 
history of science, philosophy of science, anthropology, experimental psychology, physical 
geography, and science education exclusive of the education courses specifically required 
for certification. 

■ Minimum state of Illinois requirements for teaching of biology or physical science may 
be satisfied by a minimum of 24 semester hours of work, appropriately distributed, in the 
field. Minimum state requirements for teaching of mathematics may be satisfied by three 
appropriately distributed 300-level courses beyond a basic calculus sequence. 

Specialty in German 

See Specialty for Teaching Foreign Languages in Both High School and Elementary 
School on page 188. Note in particular the substitution suggested for students who 
wish to prepare for teaching German in the elementary school. 

Admission to this specialty requires the completion of Ger. 104 or its equiv- 
alent. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR HOURS 

Masterpieces of German literature 3 

Conversation and writing 6 

Modern German fiction, modern German drama, or lyrics and ballads 3 

Teachers course 3 

Advanced conversation, composition, and syntax 3 

Advanced conversation 1 

History of German civilization 4 

German phonology and morphology 3 

German elective 3 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

The second teaching field (at least 20 hours) must be selected from among the approved 
teacher education minors listed on page 112. 

ELECTIVES 

Advanced German courses (8-11 hours) not included in the minimum program are recom- 
mended, particularly for students who have completed basic German courses in secondary 
school. 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 



190 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Specialty in Latin 

See Specialty for Teaching Foreign Languages in Both High School and Elemen- 
tary School on page 188. Note in particular the substitution suggested for students 
who wish to prepare for teaching Latin in the elementary school. 

Admission to this specialty requires the completion of Lat. 104 or its equiv- 
alent. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR HOURS 

Courses in the Latin language, including 

Virgil 4 

Latin composition 4 

Survey of Latin literature 6 

Advanced Latin composition 4 

Readings in Latin literature 3 

The required total of 37 hours may be reduced by as much as 16 hours through pre- 
requisite credit for work equivalent to Lot. 101-105 taken in secondary school. Students 
who at entrance are admitted to Lot. 201 are required, however, to take an additional 
semester of Lot. 391 and CI. Civ. 301-302. 

Courses in Roman Civilization 

Ancient world history, or if ancient history has been studied in secondary school, 

history of the Roman republic to 44 B.C 3-6 

Roman antiquities 2 

Total 5-8 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

The second teaching field (at least 20 hours) must be selected from among the approved 
teacher education minors listed on page 112. 

ELECTIVES 6-17 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 

Specialty in Mathematics 

REQUIRED COURSES IN MATHEMATICS HOURS 

Calculus and analytic geometry 13 

Topics on geometry 3 

Advanced aspects of Euclidean geometry 3 

Selected mathematical topics for secondary school teachers 6 

Abstract algebra 3 

Linear algebra, or linear transformations and matrices 3 

Advanced calculus, or introduction to higher analysis: real variables 3 

Total 34 

REQUIRED COURSES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Introduction to automatic digital computing, or introduction to digital computing for 

secondary school teachers 3 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 

Specialty in Physical Science 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES HOURS 

General physics 10-12 

General chemistry 8-10 

Life science 8-10 

Descriptive statistics or educational measurement 3-4 

One of the following options must be completed: 



EDUCATION 191 



OPTION A. CHEMISTRY 

Twenfy-fwo to 24 hours in chemistry beyond the core courses. For more detailed informa- 
tion refer to the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Chemistry on page 318. Addi- 
tional electives in science and courses related to science teaching must be token to bring 
the total of such work to approximately 70 semester hours. The completion of a teacher 
education minor in either mathematics, physics, or biology is recommended.^'^ 

OPTION B. PHYSICS 

Nineteen hours in physics beyond the core courses. For more detailed information refer 
to the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Physics on page 330. Additional electives 
in science and courses related to science teaching must be taken to bring the total of such 
work to approximately 70 semester hours. The completion of a teacher education minor in 
either mathematics or chemistry is recommended.''^ 

OPTION C. EARTH SCIENCE 

Thirty-two hours in earth science beyond the core courses. For more detailed information 
refer to the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Earth Science on page 319. Additional 
electives in science and courses related to science teaching must be taken to bring the total 
of such work to approximately 70 semester hours. The completion of a teacher education 
minor in biology, mathematics, or one of the physical sciences is recommended.'^ 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 



' Courses related to science teaching may include mathematics, history of science, 
philosophy of science, anthropology, experimental psychology, physical geography, and 
science education exclusive of the education courses specifically required for certification. 

^Minimum state of Illinois requirements for teaching of biology or physical science 
may be satisfied by a minimum of 24 semester hours of work, appropriately distributed, in 
the field. Minimum state requirements for teaching of mathematics may be satisfied by 
three appropriately distributed 300-level courses beyond a basic calculus sequence. 

Specialty in Russian 

See Specialty for Teaching Foreign Languages in Both High School and Elemen- 
tary School on page 188. Note in particular the substitution suggested for students 
who wish to prepare for teaching Russian in the elementary school. 

Admission to this specialty requires the completion of Russ. 104 or its equiv- 
alent. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR HOURS 

Russian literature in translation 3 

Oral Russian 4 

Russian composition 4 

Introduction to Russian literature '. 6 

Teachers course 4 

Russian phonetics and pronunciation 3 

Russian literature 3 

Russian elective 3 

Total 44-46 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

The second teaching field (20-24 hours) must be selected from among the approved teacher 
education minors listed on page 112. 

ELECTIVES 

Advanced Russian courses not included in the minimum program are recommended, par- 
ticularly for students who hove completed basic Russian courses in secondary school. Other 
courses may be chosen from major or minor fields, or other areas of interest, 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 123 



192 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Specialty in Social Studies 

This specialty offers preparation for teachers of high school and junior high school 
courses in history, sociology, economics, political science, geography, and general 
social studies. 

Two arrangements are provided for completing the major and minor require- 
ments: 

Option A requires a social studies major of 41 hours and a minor of 20 to 24 
hours in an approved teaching field outside the social studies (English, a foreign 
language, mathematics, etc.)- The major under option A consists of two parts: 
(1) 20 hours in history and (2) 21 hours in anthropology, economics, geography, 
political science, and sociology distributed to provide one course in each of the four 
fields and some concentration in two of the fields. 

Option B requires a social studies major of 36 hours and a minor of 20 hours 
which is also within the social studies field. The major under option B consists of 
two parts: (1) 16 to 21 hours in history and (2) 15 to 20 hours in anthropology, 
economics, geography, political science, and sociology distributed to provide courses 
in three of the four fields. The 20-hour minor is taken entirely in one of the areas 
of economics, geography, political science, or sociology which has not been included 
in the major. 

The choice of options will be selected in consultation with an adviser. Under 
each option at least one course in American history and one in American govern- 
ment is required. 



Specialty in Spanish 

See Specialty for Teaching Foreign Languages in Both High School and Elementary 
School on page 188. Note in particular the substitution suggested for students who 
wish to prepare for teaching Spanish in the elementary school. 

Admission to this specialty requires the completion of Span. 104 or its equiv- 
alent. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR HOURS 

Elementary Spanish 8 

Intermediate Spanish 8 

Literary analysis 2 

Spanish language: phonetics and syntax 2-4 

Spoken Spanish 4-6 

Spanish composition 3 

Spanish civilization: Spain and Spanish American 4 

Spanish literature 3 

Spanish-American literature 3 

Teachers course in Spanish 4 

Spanish electives: One or two 200- or 300-level courses 2-4 

Total 43-49 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

The second teaching field (at least 20 hours) must be selected from among the approved 
teacher education minors listed on page 112. 

ELECTIVES 

Advanced Spanish courses not included in the minimum program ore recommended par- 
ticularly for students who have completed basic Spanish courses in secondary school. Other 
courses may be chosen from major or minor teaching fields, or other areas of interest. 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education courses, at least 123 



EDUCATION 193 



CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Education 

All students complete requirements as outlined in prescribed courses in business 
education, general education, professional education, one or more areas of special- 
ization, and general electives. Each student must complete the requirements of one 
area of specialization. If he chooses he may also complete a second area of spe- 
cialization or one of the approved teacher education minors as outlined on page 112. 
A minimum of 126 hours of credit, excluding basic military, is required for grad- 
uation. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES HOURS 

Humanities (two approved courses)^ 6-8 

Introduction to psychology 3 

Natural science (approved courses including a laboratory course)^ 6-8 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Social science sequence^ 6-8 

Total 30-37 

PRESCRIBED COURSES IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Principles of accounting I and II 6 

Principles of economics I and II 6 

Introductory economic statistics 3 

Introductory analysis for social scientists (Math. 124 and 134) 7 

Business and technical v/riting 3 

Total 25 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of vocational education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 4-5 

Educational practice (student teaching) 5 

Total 18-19 

GENERAL ELECTIVES 

General electives (up to 24 hours) will be selected as needed to meet the minimum re- 
quirement of 126 hours for graduation. These may include courses to develop depth to 
respond to the diverse interests of the student. 



^ Courses in natural science and humanities must be selected from the approved Gen- 
eral Education Requirements list on page 185. 

^ Must include one course in U.S. history and one course in political science which 
covers both Illinois and federal constitutions. Hist. 152 and Pol. S. 150 are recommended, 
thereby satisfying a requirement for certification. 

Suggested Areas of Specialization 

Each student will declare his area of specialization no later than the first semester 
of his junior year, unless he enters the curriculum after that time. The student's 
proposed program will be outlined in detail and filed in the office of the Depart- 
ment of Vocational and Technical Education and in the Undergraduate Student 
Office, 120 Education Building. The following lists of specific courses are provided 
as a guide for students and advisers. Substitution may be made with the approval 
of the adviser. Each student is expected to complete the minimum program in the 
area of specialization which he declares. 



194 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ACCOUNTING-BOOKKEEPING HOURS 

Intermediate accounting 3 

Cost accounting 3 

Basic federal income tax accounting 3 

Introduction to computers and their application to business and commerce 3 

Electives in accounting 6-8 

Management and organizational behavior 3 

Technic and curriculum development for teaching secretarial and office practice subjects^ .3 
Technic and curriculum development for teaching data processing and office machines' ... 3 
Total 27-29 

DATA PROCESSING 

Accounting 3 

Accounting system design 3 

Introduction to computers and their application to business and commerce 3 

Economic statistics II 3 

Electives in computer science 7-9 

The legal environment of business (business administration) 3 

Technic and curriculum development for teaching data processing and office machines^ . ..3 
Total 25-27 

ECONOMICS 

Economic statistics II 3 

Intermediate microeconomic theory 3 

Intermediate macroeconomic theory 3 

Electives in economics 7-9 

Introduction to management 3 

Select three of the five courses listed: 9 

Government finance and taxation (economics) 

Labor problems (economics) 

Comparative economic systems (economics) 

Economics of consumption (economics) 

Introduction to business financial management (finance) 
Total 28-30 

MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

Elective in marketing 3-4 

The legal environment of business 3 

Principles of marketing 3 

Retail management 3 

Advertising and sales management 3 

Technic and curriculum development for teaching secretarial and office practice subjects'.. 3 
Technic and curriculum development for teaching data processing and office machines' . ..3 

•Cooperative vocational and technical education programs 4 

Problems in concurrent work-education 4 

Total 29-30 

SECRETARIAL-OFFICE PRACTICE 

Elective in industrial administration or finance 3-4 

Introduction to business financial management 3 

The legal environment of business 3 

Introduction to management 3 

Personnel management 3 

Technic and curriculum development for teaching secretarial and office practice subiects\ .3 
Technic and curriculum development for teaching data processing and oflFice machines ...3 



' Students who wish to teach in special fields requiring essential competencies in an 
applied area such as typing, shorthand, and office machines must obtain an acceptable 
level of proficiency prior to enrollment in the program, or outline a plan whereby these 
skills may be obtained prior to enrollment in Vo. Tech. 270 and 271 and student teaching. 
Proficiency levels are validated by the business education faculty through examination. 



EDUCATION 195 



Cooperative vocational and technical eciucation programs 4 

Problems in concurrent work-education 4 

Total 29-30 



CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education 

This four-year curriculum is designed to meet the requirements for teaching in the 
nursery school and kindergarten-primary grades in Illinois schools. A minimum of 
124 semester hours of credit, excluding basic military, is necessary for graduation 
under this curriculum. While the degree is in early childhood education the grad- 
uate is certifiable for grades K-9. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

LANGUAGE ARTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a performance-based speech course, or Rhet. 108 and a performance- 
based speech course, or Spch. 1 1 1 and 112 6-7 

Literature 6 

Children's literature 3 

Total 15-16 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social science courses approved by adviser' 8 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Total 14-15 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Biological science* 8 

Physical science' (mathematics not acceptable) 8 

Total 16 

FINE ARTS 

Music for early childhood education 6 

Art for the elementary school 5 

Total 11 

HUMANITIES 

May be fulfilled with literature courses above 6 

MATHEMATICS 

Including content and methods 5 

PSYCHOLOGY 3 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Including one course in health or physical education for the elementary school 5 

AREA OF CONCENTRATION 

Courses (12 hours) selected from one of the above areas and in oddition to those fulfilling 
requirements noted above; 6 hours must be at 200- or 300-level except by petition. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Child growth and development 3 

To be selected from appropriate General Education Requirements list on page 185. 



196 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Pre— student teaching practicum 5 

Primary reading and language arts 6 

Methods of teaching science 3 

Methods of teaching social studies 3 

Principles of early childhood education 3 

Student teaching with seminar 5 

Student teaching at early childhood level 3 

Total 33 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of 1 24 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

This four-year curriculum is designed to meet the requirements for teaching in the 
elementary and kindergarten-primary grades of Illinois schools. A minimum of 124 
semester hours, excluding basic military, is necessary for graduation under this cur- 
riculum. The graduate is certifiable for grades K-9. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

LANGUAGE ARTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a performance-based speech course, or Rhet. 108 and a performance- 
based speech course, or Spch. 1 1 1 and 112 6-7 

Literature 6 

Children's literature 3 

Total 15-16 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social science courses approved by adviser^ 8 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Cultural geography 3-4 

Total 17-19 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Biological science^ 8 

Physical science^ (mathematics not acceptable) 8 

Total 16 

FINE ARTS 

Music for the elementary school 6 

Art for the elementary school 5 

Total 11 

HUMANITIES 

May be fulfilled v/ith literature courses above 6 

MATHEMATICS 

Including content and methods 8 

PSYCHOLOGY 3 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Including one course in health or physical education for the elementary school 5 



( 



'To be selected from appropriate General Education Requirements list on page 185. 



EDUCATION 197 



AREA OF CONCENTRATION 

Courses (12 hours) selected from one of the above areas and in addition to those ful- 
filling requirements noted above; 6 hours must be at 200- or 300-level except by petition. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Child growth and development 3 

Pre-student teaching practicum 5 

Primary reading and language arts 6 

Student teaching with seminar 8 

Total 24 



CURRICULUM IN TECHNICAL EDUCATION SPECIALTIES 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Occupational and Practical Arts Education 

The curriculum outlined below requires a minimum of 128 hours for graduation 
(excluding basic military). A student who completes this curriculum will be quali- 
fied to teach his or her specialty at one or more of the following types of institu- 
tions: elementary school, secondary school, technical institute, junior college, busi- 
ness, or industry. Examples of technical education specialties include: preparation 
for the teaching of environmental maintenance, food service occupations, health 
occupations, accounting, ornamental horticulture, industrial arts, dental assisting, 
manufacturing, office occupations, and child care. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

General psychology 3 

Natural sciences (approved courses) 6-8 

Humanities (approved courses) 6-8 

History of the United States 3 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Total 30-35 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL TECHNICAL 
EDUCATION SPECIALTIES 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Principles of occupational and practical arts education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

Methods of teaching 3 

Educational practice 5 

Elective 3 

Total 18 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION SPECIALTY REQUIREMENTS 

The technical education specialties provide opportunities for planning individual programs 
of study under the supervision of a faculty adviser qualified in the student's special field 
of interest. Examples of specific programs are on file with the Department of Vocational 
and Technical Education to aid in program planning. 

Supervised Occupational Experience 

Cooperative arrangements have been made by the University for supervised occu- 
pational experience of technical education specialty students while employed in 
selected employment locations. This program is designed for students preparing 



198 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



to become certified vocational or technical specialty instructors, for students pre- 
paring for employment in training departments maintained by business or indus- 
trial organizations, or for students preparing to be teachers of selected occupations. 
Students may accumulate up to 1 7 semester hours of credit through registration in 
Vo. Tech. 189 — Supervised Occupational Experience. 

Cooperative arrangements have been established with some junior colleges 
whereby registration in this program may be accomplished after completion of the 
freshman year. 

Summary minimum hours 

General requirements 35-42 

Professional education requirements 18 

Technical education specialty requirements 48 

General electives 17-25 

Total 128 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO TEACHING DEAF 
AND HARD-OF-HEARING CHILDREN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Education of the Deaf 

A student who wishes to enter the curriculum for the education of the deaf and the 
hard-of-hearing must rank in the upper 25 percent of his high school graduating 
class or, if a transfer student, must have a grade-point average of at least 3.5 
(A = 5.0). A personal interview with a staff member of the College of Education 
is required. 

A minimum of 124 hours of credit, excluding basic military, is required for 
graduation. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences (approved courses) 6-8 

Introductory psychology 3 

Social sciences 12 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Social science elective (approved by adviser) 5-6 

Humanities (two approved courses) 6 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Total 36-39 

BASIC CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Speech and hearing science 

General phonetics 3 

Speech science 3 

Hearing disorders 3 

Aural rehabilitation 3 

Audiometry 3 

Special Education Requirements 

Exceptional children 3 

Psychosocial educational aspects of deafness 3 

Special education of the deaf 10 

Mental and educational measurement of exceptional children 3 

Mathematics in the elementary grades 3 

Music for elementary schools 3 

Art for elementary schools 2 

Electives, chosen in consultation with adviser 10-13 

Total 52-55 



EDUCATION 199 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Child development for elementary teachers 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Fundamentals of reading techniques 3 

Principles, problems, and issues in elementary education 3 

Educational practice (exceptional children) 9 

Educational practice (elementary school) 3 

Total 23 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO TEACHING MENTALLY 
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Education of Mentally Handicapped Children 

A student who wishes to enter the curriculum for the education of the mentally 
handicapped must rank in the upper 25 percent of his high school graduating class 
or, if a transfer student, must have a grade-point average of at least 3.5 (A = 5.0). 
A personal interview with a staff" member of the College of Education is required. 

A minimum of 124 hours of credit, excluding basic military-, is required for 
graduation. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. m and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences (approved courses) 6-8 

Introductory psychology 3 

Social sciences 11-13 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Social science elective (approved by adviser) 5-6 

Humanities (tv/o approved courses) 6 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Total 36-39 

BASIC CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Special Education 

Exceptional children 3 

Psychology and education of the mentally handicapped 6 

Mental and educational measurement of the mentally handicapped 3 

Workshop and laboratory in education of exceptional children 6-8 

Educational practice (exceptional children) 8 

Educational practice (elementary school) 3 

Principles, problems, and issues in elementary education 3 

Fundamentals of reading techniques 3 

Mathematics in the elementary grades 3 

Total 38-40 

SUPPORTING AREA REQUIREMENTS 

Speech correction 3 

Psychology (child, personality, abnormal) 6 

Arts and crafts in the elementary grades 2 

Music for elementary schools 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Total 16 

ELECTIVES 

Chosen in consultation with an adviser 29-34 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

University of Illinois at Urh ana-Champaign 
207 Engineering Hall 
Urhana, Illinois 61801 



The College of Engineering prepares men and women for professional 
careers in engineering and for responsible positions of a technical and 
semitechnical character in industry', commerce, education, and govern- 
ment. The college provides training in the mathematical and physical sci- 
ences and their application to a broad spectrum of technological and so- 
cial requirements of society. The engineering curricula, though widely 
varied and specialized, are built on a general foundation of scientific theory 
applicable to many different fields. Work in the classroom and laboratory 
is brought into sharper focus by practical problems which the student 
solves by methods similar to those of practicing engineers. 

While each student pursues a curriculum chosen to meet his own career 
goals, all students take certain common courses. Basic courses in mathe- 
matics, chemistry, physics, rhetoric, and computer science are required in 
the first two years. Although the curricula are progressively specialized in 
the third and fourth years, each student is required to take some courses 
outside his chosen field. 

Nontechnical courses are included in each curriculum; they may be 
required or elective. Many nontechnical courses satisfy the broad objectives 
of the humanities and social sciences requirements of the engineering 
curricula — making the student keenly aware of the urgent problems of 
society and developing a deeper appreciation of man's cultural achieve- 
ments. The humanities and social sciences courses are usually drawn from 
the liberal arts and sciences, economics, and approved courses in fine and 
applied arts. Students who wish a broader cultural background should 
consider a combined engineering-liberal arts and sciences program as de- 
scribed on page 204. 

The Engineering Librar)-, on the first three floors of Engineering Hall, 
is a major resource center for students of all curricula. It contains the 
reference books, periodicals, catalogs, and technical publications which 
students need constantly, and also provides for general reading and 
private research. 

201 



202 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Aeronautical and Astro- 
nautical Engineering, Ceramic Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineer- 
ing, General Engineering, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Metallurgy and 
Mining Engineering, Physics, and Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. The under- 
graduate curricula described later in this section are administered by these depart- 
ments. The work in chemical engineering is administered by the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. The curriculum in agricultural engineering is administered 
jointly by the Colleges of Agriculture and Engineering. The work in computer 
science is administered jointly by the Department of Computer Science and the 
College of Engineering. Architecture and the engineering option in architecture 
are administered by the College of Fine and Applied Arts. (See page 243.) 

Both undergraduate and postbaccalaureate programs in the teaching of engi- 
neering technology are administered by the College of Engineering through the 
Urbana Council on Teacher Education, with the full cooperation of the College 
of Education. 

Each student entering the College of Engineering declares his choice of a cur- 
riculum. Except for the curriculum in the teaching of engineering technology, all 
first-year students follow the common program for freshmen shown below. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Entering Freshmen 

Students seeking admission to the College of Engineering who are recent high 
school graduates or who have earned less than 12 semester hours of credit at other 
collegiate institutions are classified as new freshmen and must meet the entrance 
requirements to the College of Engineering that are specified for new freshmen. 
(See the Admissions Chart on page 41.) 

Although new freshmen take a common, or similar, program (shown below) 
they are asked to choose a curriculum in which they wish to study. Freshmen 
may change their curriculum of study at their own request any time during, or at 
the conclusion of, their freshman year of study. Since the program of study is 
essentially the same for all freshman students, such changes can be made without 
loss of credit toward graduation. 

The Mathematics Placement Test is required of all freshman students entering 
the College of Engineering, and they are urged to take the examination during the 
summer prior to enrollment. 

The Chemistry Placement Test is required of all entering freshmen who will 
take freshman chemistry during their first year. This examination will be used to 
place a student in a remedial course for engineers, Chem. 100, or in the normal 
beginning course for engineers, Chem. 101. Students with a superior background 
in chemistry may take the Chemistry Proficiency Test which, if passed, would place 
them in Chem. 102 and grant them 4 hours proficiency credit for Chem. 101. 

All entering freshmen take a common first-year program as described below. 
Any freshman completing the first two semesters in any engineering curriculum in 
the college will be able to use every course taken toward any other curriculum in 
the college into which he wishes to transfer. 

COMMON FIRST-YEAR PROGRAM HOURS 

Engineering lectures 

Chemistry 4-8 

Mathematics* 8-10 



* Entering freshmen who do not pass the Mathematics Placement Test will take Math. 
Ill or 112, and 114. Students who have had analytic geometry in high school and pass 
the Mathematics Placement Test will replace the normal mathematics sequence (Moth. 120, 
131, and 141) with Math. 135, 145, and 3 semester hours of free electives. 



ENGINEERING 203 



Physics 4 

Rhetoric 4 

Engineering elecfives 0-6 

Elecf ives 3-6 

Total 31-36 

Transfer Students 

The College of Engineering welcomes transfer students from both junior and senior 
colleges and has worked closely with these schools in Illinois to implement pre- 
engineering programs. 

Students may complete the first two years of study in other accredited institu- 
tions and transfer to the University of Illinois at Urhana-Champaign with little or 
no loss of credit provided they follow a program similar to the one in the College 
o{ Engineering. Following is a suggested list of courses which should be completed 
in the first two years prior to transfer. A range of hours is given in each of these 
course work areas, as the major concern is that students have an adequate coverage 
of basic subject matter rather than specific numbers of hours in given areas. The 
range is given for students who may be attending schools on either the quarter- 
hour or semester-hour system. 

RANGE OF HOURS 

SUGGESTED PREENGINEERING COURSES QUARTER HOURS SEMESTER HOURS 

Freshman chemistry 10-15 6-10 

General physics 12-18 8-12 

English (rhetoric and composition) 6-9 3-6 

Mathematics (total mathematics credits) 20-24 15-17 

Calculus or calculus and analytic geometry 16-20 12-14 

Differential equations 3-4 3 

Engineering graphics (mechanical drawing 

and/or descriptive geometry) 4-6 3-4 

Applied mechanics — statics 3-4 2-3 

Applied mechanics — dynamics 3-6 2-3 

RANGE OF HOURS 

OTHER COURSES QUARTER HOURS SEMESTER HOURS 

Social sciences and humanities Varies Varies 

Matrix algebra 3-4 2-3 

Introduction to automatic digital computing (FORTRAN 

programming and numerical methods) 3-4 2-3 

Statistics 4 3 

Students should complete as many of the suggested courses as possible and 
select additional course work from those listed as Other Courses to complete full- 
time study programs. Normally, a student will complete all of the suggested courses 
and 8 to 10 additional semester hours of course work. This additional course work 
may include social sciences and humanities electives but could include work in 
computer science or advanced mathematics. 

Before selecting social sciences and humanities electives, students should fa- 
miliarize themselves with the elective requirements of the college listed on page 
210. 

Students may transfer to the college for the fall, spring, or summer session 
provided the students have completed 60 or more semester hours of work. Transfer 
students starting their studies in the fall semester are also allowed to advance enroll 
during the preceding summer. Students are informed of this opportunity after they 
are admitted. Questions are invited concerning this procedure. 

A few sophomore-level technical courses such as E.E. 260, M.E. 185, and C.E. 
195, are not offered by most junior colleges. However, junior-level transfer students 
can usually arrange their programs here so that all technical requirements can be 
completed in a four-semester period on this campus if they wish to do so. If the 



204 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



number of hours remaining to complete a degree requires more than four semesters, 
the student may enroll for an additional summer session or semester. 

Students transferring to the College of Engineering are encouraged to write 
to the Office of the Associate Dean, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
207 Engineering Hall, Urbana, Illinois 61801, or to the head of the department to 
which they wish to transfer, at any time they wish guidance in the selection of 
courses. Transfer students who are deficient in areas such as mathematics, physics, 
or mechanics may find it difficult to obtain a full program here in their first se- 
mester. It is frequently possible to overcome this problem })y first enrolling in a 
summer session in those prerequisite courses that will make a full program possible 
in the fall semester. 

Transfer students are not required to take freshman guidance examinations, or 
any other examinations, to qualify for admission to the College of Engineering, but 
all other admission regulations apply to them. Transfer students should consult 
Admission by Transfer on page 26 for general information concerning transfer to 
the University of Illinois, and students from junior colleges should note especially 
the rules regarding Junior Colleges on page 29. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Combined Engineering-Liberal Arts and Sciences Program 

A five-year program of study permits a student to earn a Bachelor of Science degree 
in some field of engineering from the College of Engineering and a Bachelor of 
Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

This program afTords students the opportunity to prepare for careers of an 
interdisciplinary nature. By selecting an appropriate liberal arts and sciences major 
in a scientific or technical field in combination with the desired engineering cur- 
riculum, it is possible for students to qualify for new and unique careers in industry, 
business, or government. Other students who desire a broader background than it 
is possible to provide in the four-year engineering curricula can develop a program 
to obtain a well-rounded cultural education in addition to thorough technical 
training. 

Each student in this program has advisers in both colleges who assist him in 
planning a program of study to meet his needs and the requirements for both de- 
grees. Most combinations of engineering and liberal arts curricula may be corn- 
pitted in ten semesters, provided the student does not have deficiencies in the 
entrance requirements of either college. 

Most engineering curricula can be combined with one of a variety of liberal 
arts and sciences majors including languages, social sciences, humanities, speech, 
and philosophy. This combined program operates under the following conditions: 

- Students entering the program must meet admission requirements for both col- 
leges. (See the Admissions Chart on pages 41 and 43.) 

- A student who starts in the program and decides to transfer from it is subject 
to the existing graduation requirements of the college of his choice. 

- The degrees of Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences are awarded simultaneously. 
No student in the combined program is permitted to receive a degree from either 
college before the completion of the entire program. 

- Any student entering this program from high school with his liberal arts and 
sciences foreign language requirement partially or completely fulfilled is required 
to substitute for these hours an equivalent number of hours in the humanities 
or social sciences. 

- Students electing advanced ROTC or NROTC are required to meet these com- 
mitments in addition to the combined program as outlined. 



ENGINEERING 



205 



- Students ha\ing 75 or mcTc hours of transfer credit are not advised to enter this 
program since they cannot ordinarily complete it in five years. 

- Students transferring from other colleges and universities must plan to complete 
at least one year in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Urbana-Cham- 
paign and one year in the College of Engineering at Urbana-Champaign in order 
to satisfy residence requirements if both degrees are to be granted here. 

- Students are expected to maintain at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) grade-point average 
to be accepted or continued in the program. 

During the first year students are enrolled in the common freshman program 
for engineers which is taken in the College of Engineering. (See page 202.) Stu- 
dents arc enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the second and 
third years and in the College of Engineering for the fourth and fifth years. A 
typical combined program follows. 



SECOND YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Biological science 4 

Calculus and analytic geometry 5 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Language 4 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biological science 4 

Language 4 

Liberal arts and sciences major 3 

Physics (heat, electricity, and magnetism). .4 
Total 15 



THIRD YEAR 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Language 4 

Liberal arts and sciences major 6 

Physics (wave motion, sound, light, 

and modern physics) 4 

Total 18 



Engineering subjects 6-8 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Language 4 

Liberal arts and sciences major 3 

Total 17-19 



FOURTH YEAR 

Engineering subjects 15 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Total 19 



Engineering subjects II 



FIRH YEAR 

Engineering subjects 



15-17 Engineering subjects H 



It may be necessary to adjust the above program to allow the student to take 
more hours in his L.A.S. program. 

For further information about this program, students should write to the Office 
of the Associate Dean in either the College of Engineering or the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 



Affiliations with Other Liberal Arts Colleges 

Through a program of affiliation between the College of Engineering and a num- 
ber of liberal arts colleges, students may enroll in a five-year program and earn a 
bachelor's degree from one of these colleges and at the same time earn a bachelor's 
degree in engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In 
general, students spend the first three years at the liberal arts college and the final 
two years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Increasing numbers of engineering graduates enter leadership roles in industry 
and government and require a greater understanding of the impact of technology 
on society. The five-year program encourages a student to develop a broad under- 
standing of the social sciences and humanities while he strives for excellence in 
technical studies. These affiliations have the added benefit of allowing the student 
to take his preengineering studies at a liberal arts school chosen on the basis of 



206 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



geographical location, prestige, religious principles, family circumstances, or other 
personal reasons. 

Colleges which are affiliated with the College of Engineering are: 



Augustana College 
Rock Island, Illinois 

Carthage College 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 

DePaul University 
Chicago, Illinois 

Eastern Illinois 

University 
Charleston, Illinois 

Elmhurst College 
Elmhurst, Illinois 

Greenville College 
Greenville, Illinois 

Illinois College 
Jacksonville, Illinois 



Illinois State University 
Normal, Illinois 

Illinois Wesleyan University 
Bloomington, Illinois 

Loras College 
Dubuque, Iowa 

MacMurray College 
Jacksonville, Illinois 

McKendree College 
Lebanon, Illinois 

Monmouth College 
Monmouth, Illinois 

Northern Illinois University 
DeKalb, Illinois 



Olivet Nazarene College 
Kankakee, Illinois 
Rockford College 
Rockford, Illinois 
Saint Joseph's College 
Rensselaer, Indiana 
Shimer College 
Mt. Carroll, Illinois 
Wartburg College 
Waverly, Iowa 
Western Illinois University 
Macomb, Illinois 
Wheaton College 
Wheaton, Illinois 
Yankton College 
Yankton, South Dakota 



Cooperative Engineering Education Program 

A five-year program in cooperative engineering education is available to students 
in all curricula in the college and to students in chemical engineering. Students in 
the program alternate periods of attendance at the University with periods of em- 
ployment in industry or government. The employment is an essential element in the 
educational process and is related to the student's field of study. The diversified 
work assignments provide the student with a variety of experiences related to his 
studies. These assignments increase in difficulty and responsibility with each suc- 
ceeding period off campus. A list of participating companies may be obtained by 
writing to the Cooperative Engineering Coordinator, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, 207 Engineering Hall, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Students wishing to join the program must first enroll in the College of Engi- 
neering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Freshmen are encour- 
aged to explore the benefits of the co-op program during their first semester and 
should apply during their second semester for an oflf-campus educational assignment. 
If accepted by a participating employer the freshman will have his first ofT-campus 
educational assignment scheduled during the summer following his freshman year 
or he will attend the summer session and have his first ofT-campus assignment dur- 
ing the fall semester following his freshman year. Typical schedules are illustrated 
in a co-op brochure available from the cooperative engineering coordinator. 

Junior college transfer students and other transfer students are eligible to par- 
ticipate in the program and should contact the cooperative engineering coordinator 
as soon as they decide to participate in the program. Application for the co-op pro- 
gram will, in most cases, precede a formal application for admission to the Univer- 
sity of Illinois and acceptance into the co-op program does not imply later admis- 
sion to the University should the transfer student fail to meet normal competitive 
admission requirements. 

The cooperative engineering coordinator, after receiving full credentials and 
information from the junior college preengineering student, will help the student 
plan a five-year educational program which will include periods of study at the 
junior college, periods of study at the University, and four or five oflf-campus edu- 
cational assignments with the participating co-op employer. The first one or two 



ENGINEERING 207 



off-campus assignments scheduled will probably be completed prior to transfer to 
the University. 

Students enrolled in the cooperati\e education program are registered in the 
University as full-time students for the entire five years that the program requires. 
Appropriate entries indicating participation in the co-op program are entered on 
the student's official transcript each semester and summer that he is enrolled. Upon 
successful completion of the program, the student is awarded a certificate signed 
by the dean of the college and the off-campus co-op coordinator in addition to 
receiving the regular diploma awarded for completing the degree requirements. 

College Option in Bioengineering 

Bioengineering is a broad, interdisciplinary field that brings together engineering, 
biology, and medicine to create new techniques, new devices, and new understand- 
ing of living systems to improve the quality of human life. Its practice ranges from 
the fundamental study of the behavior of biological materials to the design and 
development of medical instruments. 

Any of the existing engineering curricula can provide a good foundation for 
work in bioengineering. However, the engineering undergraduate needs additional 
education in the biologically oriented sciences to obtain a strong background for 
bioengineering. With such a background the student should be able to progress 
rapidly on the graduate level in any branch of bioengineering. In industry the 
graduate will be competent to handle engineering tasks which are related to biolog>'. 

The courses shown below have been selected specifically for the undergraduate 
engineering student. There are three possible alternatives which can be selected to 
meet the individual student's plans, designated A, B, and C. The listing of bio- 
engineering courses is not complete, but represents examples of courses which are 
currently available. An additional course in organic chemistry- would be required 
for entrance to most medical schools. A minimum of 16 hours is required for the 
option. 

ALTERNATIVES 
BIOLOGY CORE ABC 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 3 3 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Physl. 301' — General Physiology 3 3 3 

Physl. 303 — General Physiology Laboratory 2 2 2 

Physl. 302 — Experimental Animal Physiology 3 

Physl. 304 — Experimental Physiology Laboratory 2 2 

V.M.S. 315 — Veterinary Physiology 5 

Total hours for the biology core 13 14 13 

BIOENGINEERING COURSES (one or more) HOURS 

Eng. 199 — Introduction to Bioengineering 1 

Eng. H. 297 — Honors Projects in Bioengineering 3 

E.E. 371 — Biological Control Systems 3 

E.E. 374 — Ultrasonic Techniques 3 

Nuc. E. 349 (same as C.E. 349) — Fundamentals of Radiation Protection 3 

I.E. 305 (same as Physl. 305) — Principles of Ergonomics 4 

I.E. 306 (some as Physl. 306) — Quantitative Methods of Ergonomics 4 

Physl. 331 — General Radiobiology 4 

Engineering properties of biological tissues* 3 

Implant materials for biological systems' 3 

Departmental specialities related to bioengineering (taken as electives) 3-4 

Special bioengineering topics with individual instructors 3-4 



* Biology prerequisites can be v/aived by the instructor for odvanced engineering 
students. 

Registration is under various departmental course numbers. 



208 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Thesis 



A senior of high standing in any curriculum, with the approval of the department 
concerned, may substitute for one or more technical courses an investigation of a 
special subject and write a thesis. 

Special Curricula 

Students of high scholastic achievement, with exceptional aptitudes and interests 
in special fields of engineering and their application, may be permitted to vary the 
course content of the standard curriculum in order to emphasize some phases not 
included or not encompassed by the usual course substitution and selection of elec- 
tives. These unwritten curricula, however, include all the fundamental courses of 
the standard curricula, the variations being made mainly in the so-called applicatory 
portions of the standard curricula of the college. The program of studies of each 
student permitted to take such a special curriculum must be approved by a com- 
mittee of the college, in consultation with the head of the department in which the 
student is registered, and with a faculty member of the college. This faculty mem- 
ber automatically becomes the student's adviser in charge of registration and other 
matters pertaining to the approved program. 

Advanced ROTC Training Combined with Engineering 

Students in the College of Engineering may elect to participate in the Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Program and earn a commission in the United States Army Reserve, 
United States Air Force Reserve, or the United States Naval Reserve. A commission 
is awarded simultaneously with the awarding of the Bachelor of Science degree in 
an engineering field. Participation in these programs is limited to students who 
apply and are selected by the army, air force, or navy units at the University. A 
monthly stipend is paid to those selected for advanced military training. 

These programs require from one to three summer camps or cruises as well as 
the earning of a specified number of credits in advanced military courses. Credits 
earned appear in all academic averages computed by the College of Engineering. 
Certain curricula may use only a limited amount of these credits in fulfillment of 
graduation requirements. Students should plan on taking nine semesters to obtain 
both a bachelor's degree in engineering and a commission in the ROTC program. 
For further information on these programs, write directly to the Professor of Mili- 
tary Science, the Professor of Aerospace Studies, or the Professor of Naval Science. 
(Seepages 101, 104, and 109.) 

Exchange Scholarship at Munich, Germany 

The College of Engineering has an exchange scholarship with the Technical Uni- 
versity in Munich, Germany. Under the terms of the scholarship, a University of 
Illinois student is given a tuition scholarship at the Technical University and he 
receives a stipend of 4,000 to 4,200 DM per year. A student selected by the Tech- 
nical University will receive a tuition scholarship at the University of IHinois at 
Urbana-Champaign and an equivalent cash stipend. Students are responsible for 
their own transportation expenses. 

Students eligible for study in Germany must be enrolled in one of the following 
curricula: civil engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, mechani- 
cal engineering, metallurgical engineering, or engineering physics. It is expected 
that the full year's study abroad will be used toward graduation in the student's 
curriculum at Urbana-Champaign. 

To participate in the program, a student must have completed Ger. 104 or the 
equivalent and have finished his sophomore studies in engineering at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. In addition, the student must be an outstanding scholar who 
will be an excellent representative of the University of Illinois. He must also be a 
U.S. citizen. 



ENGINEERING 209 



The program is under the general administration of the Engineering College 
Honors Council, although the recipient need not be an honors student if he has 
an outstanding undergraduate record. 

On-the-Job Training in Foreign Countries 

lAESTE (International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical 
Experience) is a private, nonprofit organization which enables students of engineer- 
ing, architecture, and the sciences to obtain on-the-job training in foreign countries. 
Any student, undergraduate or graduate, who is enrolled in good standing at the 
University and who has completed at least the sophomore year of studies may apply. 
Generally, the maintenance allowance is adequate to cover living expenses while in 
training. Further information about these opportunities may be obtained from the 
College of Engineering. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors awarded at graduation to superior students are designated on the diploma 
as Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors. Students in the honors program are 
graduated with High Honors or Highest Honors as noted under Edmund J. James 
Scholars below. 

Students who are not participating in the honors program receive the designa- 
tion Honors if they have a cumulative University of Illinois grade-point average of 
at least 4.3 and High Honors if they have at least a 4.5 grade-point average at 
graduation (A = 5.0). 

Highest Honors may be awarded to any student eligible for High Honors meet- 
ing one or the other of the following criteria upon recommendation of his depart- 
ment: (1) Notably outstanding performance both in courses and in supplementary 
activities (ordinarily the basis for such a citation includes completion of an under- 
graduate thesis or special project), or (2) a cumulative University of Illinois grade- 
point average of 4.8 or higher. 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

The honors program in engineering is a part of the University James Scholars Pro- 
gram and was established to recognize and develop the talents of superior students. 
Engineering students in this program are known as James Scholars in Engineering. 
\ student is assigned to an honors adviser in his department, and receives special 
cc^nsideration in the selection of a course program to meet his specific needs. Honors 
courses and sections are availai)le in most departments for honors students. 

Participation in the James Scholars Program is leased on special honors work 
each semester and the following requirements. Freshmen must request to be ad- 
mitted to the University as a James Scholar. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors must 
maintain a 4.3 (A = 5.0) University of Illinois cumulative grade-point average or 
equivalent academic distinction. All upprrclassmen who achieve a cumulative 
grade-point average of 4.3 or higher may request to become James Scholars in 
Engineering. Transfer students may be accepted into the program upon request 
and the completion of one normal semester in engineering with a grade-point 
average of 4.3 or higher. In addition, they must present a superior transfer record. 

Students are graduated frf)m the James Scholars Program with the designation 
High Honors on their diploma, except that, upon the recommendation of their 
department, and with the approval of the Engineering College Honors Council, the 
designation Highest Honors is awarded to students whose performance in the pro- 
gram has been exceptional and whose grade-point average is not lower than 4.5. 



210 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Awards 



Competitive prizes, scholarships, fellowships, and miscellaneous awards which are 
offered to students in the College of Engineering are listed below. The college 
publishes an annual brochure describing each award in detail and listing the most 
recent winners. Copies of this brochure may be obtained from the Office of the 
Associate Dean, College of Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, 207 Engineering Hall, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating Award 

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Awards 

American Institute of Industrial Engineers Award 

American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers' Student Technical 

Paper Writing Contest 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers Honor Awards 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers (Chicago Chapter) Honored Member 

Scholarship Award 
American Society of Civil Engineers Awards 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Prizes 
Ira O. Baker Prizes 

M. T. Dural Undergraduate Research Prize 
Eta Kappa Nu Award 
Edward S. Eraser Award 
General Engineering Project Design Award 
Randolph P. Hoelscher Award 
Honeywell Award 

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Award 
Harvey H. Jordon Award 
E. W. Lehmann Award 
O. A. Leutwiler Award 
Machinery Award 
H. L. Marcus-L. B. Phillips Award 
Morrow Award 
Mueller Company Award 

W. E. O'Neil Civil Engineering Fellowship Award 
Thomas A. Peebles Award 
Stanley H. Pierce Award 
Pi Tau Sigma Award 
W. H. Rayner Surveying Award 
Ernest A. Reid Open House Award 
Lisle Abbott Rose Memorial Award 
Fred B. Seely Award 
Sigma Tau Honor Freshman Award 
Tau Beta Pi Fellowships 
Tau Beta Pi Outstanding Freshman Award 
A. L. Thomas Award 
C. C. Wiley Traveling Award 
Grace Wilson Award 

ELECTIVES 

Humanities and Social Sciences Electives 

All College of Engineering students are required to complete 18 hours of humanities 
and social sciences (in addition to rhetoric), including one sequence in humanities 
and one sequence in social sciences. The two sequences cannot be in the same 
department. A sequence is defined as any combination of at least 6 hours of ap- 
proved courses (see list below) taught by a single department, or any of the inter- 
disciplinary sequences listed below. Seminar, honors, and thesis courses cannot be 
used. 



ENGINEERING 21 



APPROVED COURSES IN HUMANITIES 

Foreign languages — all courses except teachers courses, e.g., 280-282, 382 

Arch. 211, 212, 310-317 

Art 105-107, 111-112, 115-116, 185-186, 211, 301-309, 313-316, 318-328 

Classical archaeology — all courses 

Classical civilization — all courses 

Comparative literature — all courses 

English — all courses except 310, 370, 386-387, 392 

Foreign literature in translation — Chin. 205-206; Japan. 205-206; Pers. 205, 309; 

CI. Civ. 112, 301-302; Fr. 255-256; Ger. 201; Arab. 307-308; Hindi 309-310; 

Russ. 115-116, 315, 317 
History — all courses except 290, 295, 298, 337. 
Humanities — all courses 

Music 100-102, 107, 113, 115, 130-131,310-317 
Philosophy — all courses except 102-105, 291, 321-322, 333-334 
Spch. 177-178, 207, 307-308, 352 
Theat. 101-104, 352, 361-362, 366 

APPROVED COURSES IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology' — all courses except 351, 356 

Arch. 379 

Communications — all courses except 352, 360 

Economics — all courses except 171-173, 272, 366, 371 

Eng. H. 196-197 

G.E. 220. 230, 304 

Geography — all courses except 102, 185, 201, 211, 272, 306, 313, 348, 370-373, 

378 
H.P. Ed. 300-302, 385 
Journ. 215, 217-218, 220, 231, 241, 251 
Labor and industrial relations — all courses except 360 
L.A. 214 
L.A. St. 201 

Linguistics — all courses except 375-376, 387-389 
M.E. 302 

Phil. 103-105,321-322 
Political science — all courses except 293 
Psychology — all courses except 135, 211, 216-217, 235, 258, 306-307, 311, 330- 

332, 335, 338, 345-346, 352, 356, 390 
Rural sociology — all courses 

Sociology — all courses except 184-185, 190, 332, 352, 385, 387 
U.P. 171, 351, 374, 378, 380, 382 

INTERDISCIPLINARY SEQUENCES IN HUMANITIES 

CI. Civ. 301 and Art 301 or 304 

CI. Civ. 302 and Art 305 or 307 

CI. Civ. 361 and Art 301, 302, 303, 304, or 306 

CI. Civ. 362 and Art 305 or 307 

CI. Civ. 301 and Phil. 303 

Gl. Civ. 301 and Pol. S. 393 

Music 113 and 115, and Art 115 

Art 111 and 112, plus any of Arch. 310-317 

INTERDISCIPLINARY SEQUENCES IN SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Econ. 108 and M.E. 302 
Soc. 100 and L.A. St. 201 
Pol. S. 191 and L.A. St. 201 



212 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Particularly Recommended Courses 

These courses have been suggested by the departments, or appear particularly ap- 
propriate. This list is necessarily incomplete and somewhat arbitrary. 

HUMANITIES 

Arch. 211-212 

Art 111-112 

Engl. 271-272 

Foreign literature in translation — all courses 

Hist. 191-192 

Human. 215-216 

Music 130-131 

Phil. 170, 306, 327 

Spch. 177-178 

Theat. 352 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anth. 102, 260 

Comm. or Journ. 217 

Econ. 108, 255, 300-301, 315 

Geog. 104-105, 210, 214, 241, 381-383 

L.I.R. 318 

Ling. 200, 300 

Pol. S. 110 or 312; 150 or 191, and 345; 305-306 

Psych. 103, 357 

Soc. 100 or 151, 218, 300, 318, 340, 373 

U.P. 171,351,380 

ALL INTERDISCIPLINARY SEQUENCES 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

Each engineering curriculum offers some elective opportunities which may be speci- 
fied as technical or nontechnical. All technical elective courses must be chosen from 
departmentally approved lists. 

Although some restrictions are imposed by departments, the following courses 
are generally accepted as technical electives. 
Astr. 301, 306, 307, 314, 321, and 357. 
Chemical engineering, chemistry, computer science, and mathematics: all 200- and 300- 

series courses except Math. 202 and 203. 
Engineering: all 200- and 300-series courses not required in the student's curriculum ex- 
cept G.E. 220, 281, 282, 288, 290, 292, and 304; I.E. 230 and 239; and Min. E. 302. 
F.S. 363 
Geology: all courses except Geol. 102. 

Free Electives 

These electives are selected at the prerogative of the student except as noted below. 

Credit will not be allowed for a foreign language taken to make up a shortage 
in entrance requirements, courses of a remedial nature such as mathematics below 
analytic geometry, or basic military training. 

Total transfer credit in required basic courses in mathematics (through integral 
calculus), physics, rhetoric, freshman chemistry, and engineering graphics may be 
used for free electives only if the credit covers topics beyond those in equivalent 
courses at the University of Illinois. Further restrictions on the acceptance of trans- 
fer credit for free electives may be imposed by the departments with the approval 
of the associate dean. 



ENGINEERING 213 



Pass-Fail Option 

The Uni\ersity has iniplenicnted a system through which students may take a Hm- 
ited number of courses on a pass-fail basis. Specific requirements regarding the 
option are covered in the Code on Campus Affairs and Regulations Applying to All 
Students, but the following are guidelines to assist engineering students in selecting 
courses which may be taken under this option. 

Engineering students may take courses on a pass-fail basis from areas which 
are designated as humanities and social sciences electives, nontechnical electives 
(including foreign languages), free electives, and electrical engineering service 
course electives. Other areas which may be elected on a pass-fail basis are foreign 
language and mathematics deficiencies, physical education, and military science 
courses. 

At least 9 hours of humanities and social sciences must be taken for grades. 
The maximum number of technical electives that may be taken on a pass-fail basis 
in each of the engineering curricula is as follows: 

HOURS 

Aeronautical and astronoutical engineering 7 

Agricultural engineering 3 

Ceramic engineering 8 

Civil engineering 

Computer engineering 9 

Computer science 9 

Electrical engineering 9 

Engineering mechanics 6 

Engineering physics (no 300- or 400-level physics courses) 7 

General engineering (from secondary field) 3 

Industrial engineering 3 

Mechanical engineering 3 

Metallurgical engineering 12 



* No special regulations are imposed by the department. However, departmental policy 
strongly discourages the use of the pass-fail option for technical elective courses. 

" The pass-fail option may be elected v/ith a maximum of 9 hours selected from a 
combination of (1) the courses taken to fulfill the requirement for a 12-hour goal-directed 
sequence and (2) the follov/ing courses: Math. 341, 342, 345, 347, 348, or E.E. 381. 

Care should be taken in selecting technical electives on a pass-fail basis since 
some of the engineering curricula have specified that such courses must be selected 
from specific technical elective areas. The chief adviser in each department is fa- 
miliar with such restrictions. 

All students may take 18 hours under the pass-fail option, which is also the 
maximum allowed by University regulations. 

A student will take only one course per semester on the pass-fail basis. The only 
recognized exception occurs when two courses are offered essentially as one, such as 
E.E. 230 (2 hours) and E.E. 231 (1 hour). 

A student must be in good academic standing to elect the pass-fail option and 
a student placed on probation after advance enrolling is responsible for changing 
his program to delete the pass-fail option. 



Curricula 

CURRICULUM IN AERONAUTICAL AND ASTRONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical and Astronoutical Engineering 

This curriculum provides a strong fundamental background in engineering and 
applied science with emphasis on aircraft and space flight engineering. The program 



214 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



is designed to give the student a basic engineering education applicable to related 
engineering disciplines including graduate study. In addition, the curriculum is 
continually being broadened to include such related areas as noise pollution, air 
pollution, human factors, and transportation. Up to 13 hours of free and technical 
electives can be used to provide a diversified program of study. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G,E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 
Total 15 

SECOND YEAR 

Math. 141 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 156 — Analytical Mechanics 5 

Humanities or social sciences elective* . .3-4 
Total 17-18 



THIRD YEAR 

A.A.E. 212 — Aerodynamics I 4 

A.A.E. 224 — Flight Structures I 4 

A.A.E. 254 — Aerospace Systems I 3 

Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Elective' 3 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

A.A.E. 260 — Aerospace Laboratory I ....2 

A.A.E. 292 — Seminar 1 

Humanities or social sciences elective* . .3-4 

Electives' 11 

Total 17-18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 131 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Humanities or social sciences elective* ... .3 
Total 18 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

M.E. 207 — Thermodynamics 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wove 
Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 

Physics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective* . .3-4 
Total 16-17 

A.A.E. 213 — Aerodynamics II 4 

A.A.E. 225 — Flight Structures II 4 

A.A.E. 233 — Aircraft Propulsion 3 

A.A.E. 255 — Aerospace Systems II 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ..3-4 
Total 18-19 

A.A.E, 241 — Aerospace Design 3 

A.A.E. 263 — Aerospace Laboratory II ....2 

Electives' 11 

Total 16 



* One hundred thirty-four hours, excluding physical education, are required for gradu- 
ation, of which 18 must be in social sciences and humanities. These requirements are dis- 
cussed on page 210. 

' Tv/enty-flve hours of elective credits are required for graduation. These electives must 
contain at least 6 hours from list A below and 3 hours from list B. In addition, credit is 
required in at least one 300-level aeronautical and asfronautical engineering course. Six 
hours of electives are free electives. The remaining shall be technical electives. 
A: E.E. 220, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 244, 260; Phycs. 341, 342. 
B: M.E. 334; Phycs. 383. 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural engineering is the application of engineering principles to solutions of 
problems in agriculture. Efficient agricultural production depends on sophisticated 
systems of men, equipment, processes, and natural resources. Agricultural engineers 
are involved in the design of systems which include mechanization of animal and 



ENGINEERING 



215 



crop production, soil moisture control, crop processing, materials handling, and 
structures for storage and shelter. Important design constraints are economics, con- 
servation of materials and energy, safety, and environmental quality. Graduates are 
employed by industry and government in research, education, manufacturing, and 
applications. A 5-year, dual-degree in both engineering and agriculture is available. 
(See page 132.) 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Humanities or social sciences electives ... .4 
Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective' 3 

Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

Ag. E. 126 — Engineering in Agriculture 1.3 
Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 150 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics) 2 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical elec- 
tive, group l' 3 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering ...3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Deformobie Bodies 3 

T.A.M. 223 — Mechanical Behavior of 

Solids 1 

Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical elec- 
tive, group iP 3 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective" 3 

Humanities or social sciences electives' . .4 

Technical elective 2-3 

Free elective 3 

Total 15-16 



Ag. E. 127 — Engineering in Agriculture 11.3 
C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 

Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics II 

(Dynamics) 3 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective" 3 

Total 16 

Agricultural engineering technical elec- 
tive, group 1^ 3 

Ag. E. 298 — Undergraduate Seminar ....1 
C.E. 261 —Structural Theory I, or M.E. 

220 — Mechanics of Machinery 3-4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics' 3 

M.E. 209 — Thermodynamics and Heat 

Transfer 3 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Total 17-18 



Agricultural engineering technical elec- 
tive, group 11^ 3 

Ag. E. 299 — Undergraduate Thesis 2 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective" 3 

Humanities or social sciences electives . .4 

Free elective 3 

Total 15 



Students must complete Econ. 108 and 15 additional hours of humanities and social 
sciences from the approved college list on page 210. 

"Students must complete a minimum of 12 hours from biological and agricultural sci- 
ences electives. 

Each student must have a minimum of 18 hours of technical electives. The student 
selects from the following: (1) C.E. 261, or M.E. 220; (2) two courses from agricultural 
engineering technical ehectives, group I, and two courses from group II; and (3) additional 
courses from other technical electives. 



216 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Biological and Agricultural Sciences Electives HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

An. S. 201 — Livestock Management 5 

Biol. 100 — Biological Science 4 

Biol. 101 — Biological Science 4 

Bot. 1 00 — General Botany 4 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology, or Geol. 250 — Geology for Engineers 3-4 

Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology 4 

Agricultural Engineering Technical Electives 

GROUP I HOURS 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag, E. 256 — Surveying Agricultural and Forest Lands 2 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 31 1 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

GROUP II 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Concrete and Steel Structures for Agriculture 3 

Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag. E. 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 3 

Ag. E. 356 — Soil Conservation Structures 3 

Ag. E. 357 — Land Drainage 3 

Ag. E. 387 — Agricultural Process Engineering 3 

Other Technical Electives 

A student may choose any course which satisfies the college requirements for tech- 
nical electives. 

Students desiring to specialize in a specific area of agricultural engineering may 
use the following lists as a guide in choosing their technical electives. 

POWER AND MACHINERY HOURS 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Ag. E. 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 3 

M.E. 224 — Design of Machine Elements 3 

M.E. 234 — Heat Treatment of Metals 3 

PROCESSING 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Ag. E. 387 — Agricultural Process Engineering 3 

E.E. 232 — Electronics and Electronics Applications 2 

E.E. 233 — Electronics Laboratory . . 1 

SOIL AND WATER 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Concrete and Steel Structures for Agriculture 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E, 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Ag. E. 356 — Soil Conservation Structures 3 

Ag. E. 357 — Land Drainage 3 



ENGINEERING 



217 



STRUCTURES AND ENVIRONMENT 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Concrete and Sfeel Structures for Agriculture 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

C.E. 214 — Properties and Behavior of Concrete 2 

C.E. 262 — Structural Theory II 3 



CURRICULUM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Ceramic Engineering 

Ceramic engineering deals with the processing of naturally occurring minerals or 
synthetic inorganic materials that lead to products whose characteristic usefulness 
is ordinarily realized by high-temperature treatments or service. The ceramic engi- 
neer serves as a high-temperature materials specialist in a modern engineering team 
devoted to research, development, operation, or sales. He must not be solely pre- 
occupied by analysis, but must also be able to synthesize new ceramic materials 
and join the engineering search for improved processing, properties, and products. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Moth. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 
Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

Cer. E. 101 — Ceramic Crystal Chemistry . .3 
Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective ...3 
C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Cer. E. 205 — Phase Equilibria in 

Ceramic Systems 3 

Cer. E. 214 — Chemistry and Technology 

of Glass 3 

Cer. E. 221 — Pyrometry 2 

Chem. 245 — Physical Chemistry for 

Engineers 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Deformable Bodies 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 17 



Cer. E. 102 — Ceramic Materials and 

Processes 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 
Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 
Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 

Total 17 

Cer. E. 208 — Thermal Processing 3 

Cer. E. 216 — Rate Processes in Ceramic 

Engineering 3 

Ceramic engineering elective' 3 

Technical elective 3 

Chemistry or physics elective' 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 
Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering ...3 

Humanities or sociol sciences elective' ...3 

Technical elective 2 

Ceramic engineering electives' 9 

Total 17 



Electrical applications elective' 3 

Free elecfives 6 

Ceramic engineering elective' 3 

Technical elective 3 

Total 15 



Consult the college list of approved courses on page 210. 
Consult departmental adviser for list of approved courses. 



218 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

This curriculum is administered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. (See 
page 304.) 

CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

For the clegree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

The civil engineering curriculum provides a systematic, integrated foundation in the 
physical and engineering sciences and mathematics, thereby permitting the rational 
development of engineering methods as applied to the design of bridges, buildings, 
dams and hydraulic structures, nuclear installations, transportation facilities, sani- 
tary and environmental engineering systems and facilities, surveying and mapping 
systems, and other engineering projects. It includes a strong sequence in the hu- 
manities and social sciences for a better understanding of the society of which the 
civil engineer is a part. The flexibility of the curriculum permits a student, during 
his last two years, to pursue either a broad program representing most or all of the 
principal areas of civil engineering endeavor or, depending upon his aptitude and 
interests, a specialized program in one or more specific technical areas. 

Students interested in environmental engineering in civil engineering follow 
the curriculum in civil engineering, selecting suitable technical electives in the third 
and fourth years. This program leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil 
Engineering. Degrees in environmental engineering in civil engineering are offered 
only at the graduate level. 

The curriculum permits substantial flexibility in course selection during the 
last two years so that the student, in consultation with his adviser, may plan a 
viable program directed toward his particular educational oi)jectives in civil engi- 
neering. Shown below is the format for each year of study. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 131 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) .4 
Total 15 



SECOND YEAR 

C.E. 195 — Introduction to Civil 

Engineering 1 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Moth. 141 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs, 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 152 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics) 3 

Total 16 



C.E. 292 — Design and Planning of Civil 
Engineering Systems 3 

C.E. 293 — Stochastic Concepts in Civil 
Engineering 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

T.A.M. 212 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Dynamics) 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 
Deformable Bodies 3 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Introductory technical courses' 6 

Humanities or social sciences elective" ...3 

Advanced mathematics' 3 

Total 16 



Introductory technical courses' 9 

Technical elective^ 3 

Humanities or social sciences electives'. . .6 
Total 18 



ENGINEERING 219 



FOURTH YfcAR 

Introductory technical courses* 3 Technical electives* 9 

Technical electives* 9 Humanities and social sciences elective' . .3 

Humanities or social sciences elective" . . .3 Free elective 3 

Free elective' 3 C.E. 295 — Professional Practice 

Total 18 Total 15 



' Each student must take at least six of the nine introductory courses in the several 
technical specialty areas in civil engineering as shown in Introductory Technical Courses, 
below. 

'Each student is required to select 18 hours from the college-approved list of hu- 
manities and social sciences, including Econ. 108. (See page 210.) 

' Each student must select at least one course (3 hours) of advanced mathematics, at 
the 300 level. This may be Moth. 314, 315, 343, 345, 361, 362, 363, 383, 387, or an ap- 
propriate course approved by the program review committee. 

* Twenty or 21 hours of technical courses must be selected by the student, in consul- 
tation with his adviser and with the approval of the department, to define a coherent 
program for which the Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering may be appropriately 
awarded. 

' Six semester hours of free electives must be selected in accordance with the regula- 
tions of the college and the deportment. 

Introductory Technical Courses HOURS 

C.E. 201 — Engineering Surveying 4 

C.E. 216 — Construction Engineering 3 

C.E. 220 — Materials for Transportation Facilities or, 3 

C.E. 230 — Introduction to Transportation Engineering 3 

C.E. 241 — Water Quality and Water Pollution 3 

C.E. 255 — Introduction to Hydrosystems Engineering 3 

C.E. 261 — Fundamentals of Structural Engineering 3 

C.E. 280 — Foundation Engineering 3 

Geol. 250 — Geology for Engineers 3 

T.A.M. 224 — Behavior of Materials 3 



CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering 

The program in computer engineering is administered by and is part of the offer- 
ings of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Computer engineering is con- 
cerned with the organization, design, and efficient utilization of digital and analog 
information processing systems. 

.\lthough much of the program is elective, specific courses are indicated for 
most of the work in the first five semesters. This provides the student with the 
background in mathematics and science he needs for his study of computer engi- 
neering and allows the student time to consult with his adviser, select the areas of 
interest, and choose courses to give emphasis to those areas. 

To qualify for registration in the electrical engineering courses specified in the 
first semester of the junior year of the curriculum in computer engineering, a stu- 
dent must have a combined grade-point average of 3.25 (A = 5.0) in the mathe- 
matics, physics, computer science, and electrical engineering courses which are re- 
quired in the freshman and sophomore years of the curriculum. 

The following suggested curriculum indicates one way in which the student 
may satisfy in eight semesters the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Computer Engineering. 



220 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecfure 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Electives' 6 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

E.E. 229 — Introduction to Electro- 
magnetic Fields 3 

E.E. 340 — Electronics 3 

E.E. 290 — Introduction to Information 

Processing 3 

Math. 319 — Applied Modern Algebra ...3 
E.E. 310 — Systems I or E.E. 262 — 

Networks II 3 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 

Electives' . . . . 



14 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Humanities or social sciences elective' . . .3 
Total 16 

E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory I 2 

E.E. 260 — Netv/orks I 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 

Physics) 4 

Electives' 4 

Total 16 



E.E. 249 — Digital Systems Laboratory ....2 

Math. 361 — Theory of Probability or 
E.E. 266 — Probabilistic Methods in 
Electrical Engineering 3 

E.E. 391 — Boolean Algebra and Sv/itch- 
ing Theory 3 

C.S. 201 — Machine Language and Sys- 
tems Programming I 3 

E.E. 380 — Pulse and Digital Circuits or 
E.E. 342 — Advanced Electronics 3 

Elective' 3 

Total 17 

Electives' 14 



^ Forty-seven hours of electives to be selected by the student in consultation with his 
adviser, apportioned as follows: 

— Twenty-three hours of technical electives as follows: 

Fourteen hours (not including other requirements) must be chosen from a departmen- 
tally approved list of technical courses for the computer engineering program. 
Nine hours may be chosen from other technical areas. 

— Eighteen hours of humanities and social sciences from the college-approved list. (See 
page 210.) 

— Six hours of free electives, to be selected in accordance with the regulations of the 
college. 



CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 

This curriculum is offered by the Department of Computer Science for students 
seeking a broad and deep knowledge of the theory, design, and application of digi- 
tal computers and information processing techniques. The first two years are spent 
on basic work in mathematics, physics, and an introduction to the fundamental 
areas of computer science — computing, programming, the organization of digital 
machines, and numerical analysis. The third year completes the work in basic com- 
puter science, and requires electives to broaden the background of the student. 



ENGINEERING 



221 



During the fourth year the student is encouraged to deepen his understanding of 
topics in which he has particular interest and abihty. 

To quaUfy for registration in the computer science courses specified in the first 
semester of the junior year, a student must have a combined grade-point average 
of 3.25 (A^D.O) in the mathematics, physics, and computer science courses which 
are required in the freshman and sophomore years. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Electives 6 

Total 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 131 — Calculus ancJ Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ... .4 

15 Total 15 



SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 121 — Introduction to Computer 

Programming 4 

Math. 141 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Elective 3 

Total 16 



Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

C.S. 294 — Introduction to the Theory 

of Digital Machines 3 

C.S. 201 — Machine Language and Sys- 
tem Programming I 3 

Electives 5 

Total 15 



THIRD YEAR 

C.S. 293 — Introduction to Computer 

Hardware 3 

Math. 315 — Linear Transformations 

and Matrices 3 

C.S. 287 — Introduction to Numerical 

Analysis 3 

Electives 7 

Total 16 



Math. 361 — Theory of Probability I 3 

Electives 12 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 

C.S. 310 — Information Structures 3 

Electives 12 

Total 15 



Electives 15 



Electives 

The computer science curriculum contains 60 semester hours of electives. These 
electives are chosen by the student according to the following requirements: 

- Eighteen hours must be selected in the humanities and social sciences area as 
specified by the college requirements on page 210. 

- Twelve hours must be selected from computer science courses numbered 300 or 
higher. 

- At least one course must be selected from each of the following four groups: 



GROUP I 

Math. 341 
Math. 342 
Math. 345 
Math. 347 
Math. 348 
C.S. 379 
C.S. 380 



GROUP II 
C.S. 301 
C.S. 306 
C.S. 311 



GROUP III 
C.S. 375 
C.S. 391 
C.S. 394 



GROUP IV 

E.E. 379 and 380 
C.S. 385 
C.S. 393 



222 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Some of these courses have many prerequisites. There are ample electives avail- 
able for the student to satisfy these if he wishes to specialize in those directions. 
Computer science courses selected from these four groups may be used to satisfy 
the requirement for 12 semester hours of computer science courses numbered 300 
or higher. 

Twelve semester hours must consist of a goal-directed sequence of courses directed 
toward a study of a specific problem area related to computer use. This sequence 
must be approved by the student's adviser. 
A total of no more than 18 semester hours is designated as free electives. 



CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

The electrical engineering curriculum prepares students for responsible engineering 
positions in research, development, design, operation, sales, and administration in 
many fields including communications, computers, electronics, electromagnetics, and 
electrical power. 

Although more than half of the program is elective, specific courses are indi- 
cated for most of the work in the first five semesters. This provides the student with 
the background in mathematics and science he needs for the study of electrical 
engineering and allows the student time to consult with his adviser, select the areas 
of interest, and choose courses to give emphasis to these areas. 

To qualify for registration in the electrical engineering courses specified in the 
first semester of the junior year of the curriculum in electrical engineering, a stu- 
dent must have a combined grade-point average of 3.25 (A = 5.0) in the mathe- 
matics, physics, computer science, and electrical engineering courses which are re- 
quired in the freshman and sophomore years of the curriculum. 

The following suggested curriculum indicates one way in which the student 
may satisfy in eight semesters the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Electrical Engineering. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — Generol Chemistry 4 

Eng, 100 — Engineering Lecture 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet, 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Humanities or social sciences elective^ ...3 
Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Electives' 6 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

E.E. 229 — Introduction to Electromag- 
netic Fields 3 

E.E. 290 — Introduction to Information 

Processing 3 

E.E. 340 — Electronics I 3 

Electives' 6 

Total 15 



E.E. 260 — Networks I 3 

E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory I 2 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

Electives' 4 

Total 16 



E.E. 245 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory II 2 

Electives' 13 

Total 15 



ENGINEERING 



223 



FOURTH YEAR 

Electives* . . . . 



15 Eiecfives' 



15 



engineering laboratory courses, to be 
to be selected from a 



' Sixty-five hours of electives are to be selectecJ by the student, in consultation with 
his adviser, apportioned as follows: 

- Forty-one hours of technical electives as follows: 

Two semester hours of advanced electrical 
selected from a departmentally approved list. 
Twenty-four semester hours of electrical engineering courses, 
departmentally approved list. 

Fifteen semester hours of technical electives to be selected from a departmentally ap- 
proved list, at least 12 of which must be in areas outside electrical engineering. 

The courses selected to meet the preceding requirements must include at least four of 

the following seven courses: E.E. 262, 266, 350, 342, 330, 310, and Phycs. 383 or E.E. 

344, or equivalent. Although it is recommended that all seven of these courses be taken, 

only four of the seven are required. 

- Eighteen hours of humanities and social sciences from the college-approved list. (See 
page 210.) 

- Six semester hours of free electives, to be selected in accordance with the regulations of 
the college. 



CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering Mechanics 

This curriculum, offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, 
is intended primarily for students interested in research and development in modern 
engineering. It links the sciences and engineering with an emphasis on the prin- 
ciples of mechanics which are basic to all branches of engineering. Electives give 
the student freedom to prepare for a variety of career opportunities in industry and 
in government. A firm foundation is provided for continuing self-education, which 
is necessary for participation in the advances of an ever-progressing technological 
society. The curriculum also provides sound preparation for graduate study in many 
disciplines. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) .4 
Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

Moth. 140 — Calculus and Analytic C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Geometry 3 Digital Computing 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 

T.A.M. 152 — Engineering Mechanics I tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

(Statics) 3 T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics II 

Humanities or social sciences electives' . . .6 (Dynamics) 3 

Total 16 Humanities or social sciences elective' . . .3 

Total 16 



Consult the college list of approved courses on page 210. 



224 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THIRD YEAR 

FF 260 — Networks I • • 

Mo.h.345or341-Dm.ren.,al ^ 

T.A.r22"-V.e.en,ary Mechanics o, ^ 

Deformable Bodies . ••••.••• • 4 

T K KA 935 — Fluid Mechanics •••;V 
;ro„i"s or socio, sciences elecnve ..,3 

Total 



3 E.E. 262 — Networks 



FOURTH YEAR 

T.A.M. 293 — Senior 



Research Project 



and Heat 



202— Thermodynamics ana r.^«. ^ 



T 171^4 -Behavior of Materials 3 

Advanced dynamics elective ■■^ 

Technical elective ,5 

Total 



T.A 



::S;-F=menta. concepts of _ _^ -- 



Advanced fluid mechanics elective •• 
T.A.M. 294 — Senior Research^ Pro|ect 



nuum m 



Deformable Body Z^^^'^^"'" ^.^esis 
T.A.M. 392 -Analysis and Synthesis ^ 

of Problems ■ • 3 3 

Modern physics «'f^^;';^.,^,,eV elective^ ...3 
Humanities or social sciences ^ 

Free elective " ■ 17 

Total 



echanics elective -^ 



Technical elective 3 

Free elective .......••• 1^ 

Total 



210. 



. Cons^U ,He colle.e Hs. ^ oPproved^co.s« on^poj^ ^^^ ^, „,,,„,. 

•T.A.M. 3H, 3U Phy«- ^22' °;,° ;'o„ «i,h consent of odv.ser. 

:'^r:.^.:^:^?P^^ :;---::.in^:rconsen. o, oa.se,. 

^ T.A.M. 360, A.A 



E. 326, M.E. 305. or other selection 






''"■^ *^ ^Vt^ iriwo years, er.phas.s_._s 



program. 



but there is a 



liberal allowance 



of electives enabling 



=£Eaf e:'=-=~ - — =" ■"" 



student to 

of other areas 

a graduate 



The cui 
When regi 



,hich 37 h°"" -;,<=;:,t:tudents con- 
1 ;r^t civpraee 01 



interesting ^^niprt 

,tudent-faculty research P^.^jec • ^ 

irriculum requires 128 ^o^^^' ^ ^^^^ses in pnysic. =— "" ^ 

Icri.tering for advanced undergraduaie ^rade-point average 

at least 3.5.(A=5.0) .n ^» ^ g,ade-pomt a«"f °' " f^r students must 



have a 

and must maintain 

P.STV.AR P..STS.M.SU. HOURS 

-J-^itSronrino?,-. ^ ,,-:T0.-Oe„ero, P...CS ..ec,,.,..-., 

,,rroripr-ples=.Co.nPOsHion...Y^ 
Total 



SECOND SEMESTER 

rwom 102 — General Chemistry • • • • 
Chem. luz cripnces e ectives 

Humanities or social ^^'^"^^^^^i ,;, 
Math. 130 -Calculus and Anaiyn 

Geometry ou...:^,' (Mechanics). 



Total 



ENGINEERING 



225 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Language" or humanities or social 

sciences electives' 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective^ ...3 
C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

Moth. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions^ 3 

Phycs. 321 — Theoretical Mechanics 4 

Phycs. 342 — Electricity and Magnetism ..4 

Nontechnical electives' 6 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

Phycs. 303 — Modern Experimental 
Physics," or Phycs. 344 — Electronic 

Circuits 5 

Phycs. 386 — Atomic Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics I 4 

Technical or nontechnical elective"" 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 15 



Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 
Phycs. 341 — Electricity and Magnetism ..4 
Language' or humanities or social 

sciences electives^ 4 

Total 15 



Phycs. 322 — Theoretical Mechanics 4 

Phycs. 343 — Electronic Circuits^ 5 

Phycs. 371 —Light 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 16 

Phycs. 360 — Thermodynamics 4 

Phycs. 387 — Atomic Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics II 4 

Technical or nontechnical electives' 4 

Free elective 3 

Total 15 



' Chem. 107, 109, and 108 may be substituted for Chem. 101 and 102 by students who 
desire a more rigorous chemistry sequence. 

" German, Russian, or French is recommended. If one of these was begun in high 
school, it should be continued through the equivalent of the fourth semester of the Uni- 
versity course. 

Consult the college list of approved courses in humanities and social sciences on 
page 210. 

Moth. 341 and 342 may replace Math. 345. Extra hours count as technical electives. 
■"Advanced military courses may be substituted for 6 hours of nontechnical electives. 
'' Students wishing to take the College Option in Bioengineering may substitute courses 
from the bioengineering option list (see page 207) for Phycs. 322, Phycs. 303, and any 9 
hours from free, technical, and nontechnical electives. The college requirements of 18 
hours of humanities and social sciences electives are not waived for students electing 
the bioengineering option. 

Students wishing to emphasize electrical engineering may take E.E. 225 and 342 or 
other suitable electrical engineering sequence. 



Elective Courses 

Of the 37 hours of elective courses, 18 hcjurs must be chosen from the college- 
approved list of the humanities and social sciences. (See page 210.) At least 6 addi- 
tional hours must be nontechnical electives, which may include up to 6 hours of 
advanced military science or any first-year foreign language. 

The remaining 13 hours of electives, including 6 hours of free electives, may 
be in technical or nontechnical courses. Technical electives are chosen from a wide 
variety of courses, usually in mathematics, science, or engineering. Below are listed 
some recommended sequences in engineering courses for the student who wishes to 
emphasize a particular branch of engineering. The student should consult his physics 



226 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



adviser and an adviser in the engineering department concerned since some rear- 
rangement of his schedule may be necessary. 

Of the 37 elective hours, at least 12 must be chosen cither from technical 
courses numbered 300 or above or from nontechnical courses numbered 200 or 
above. 

AERONAUTICAL AND ASTRONAUTICAL ENGINEERING HOURS 

A.A.E. 212 — Aerodynamics I 4 

A.A.E. 213 — Aerodynamics II 4 

A.A.E. 224 — Flight Structures I 4 

A.A.E. 254 — Aerospace Dynamic Systems I 3 

A.A.E. 255 — Aerospace Dynamic Systems II 4 

BIOENGINEERING OPTION (See page 207) 

CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

Cer. E. 205 — Phase Equilibria in Ceramic Systems 3 

Cer. E. 310 — Refractory Technology 3 

Cer. E. 340 — Electrical Ceramics 3 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

E.E. 294 — Introduction to the Theory of Digital Machines 3 

E.E. 349 — Nonlinear Electronic Circuits 3 

E.E. 380 — Pulse and Digital Circuits 3 

E.E. 379 — Pulse and Digital Lab 1 

E.E. 383 — Transistor Circuits 3 

E.E. 393 — Digital Computer Circuit Design 3 

E.E. 394 — Logical Design of Automatic Digital Computer Circuits 3 

ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of Deformable Bodies 3 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Additional recommended courses: T.A.M. 224, 326, 335, and either T.A.M. 321 or 351. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

M.E. 21 1 — Introductory Gas Dynamics and M.E. 213 — Heat Transfer 6 

M.E. 302 — Nuclear Power Engineering 3 

M.E. 305 — Thermodynamics of High Velocity Flow 3 

M.E. 309 — Experimental Gas Dynamics 4 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

Met. E. 370 — Physical Metallurgy I 3 

Met. E. 371 — Physical Metallurgy Laboratory I 1 

Met. E. 384 — Properties of Solids 3 

NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Nuc. E. 347 — Introduction to Nuclear Engineering 4 

Nuc. E. 398 — Radiochemistry Laboratory 2 

Phycs. 344 — Electronic Circuits, or Phycs. 303 — Modern Experimental Physics 5 

Either Phycs. 344 or 303 is required; it is recommended that both be taken. 
Phycs. 382 — Subatomic Physics 4 

CURRICULUM IN GENERAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in General Engineering 

The general engineering curriculum provides a comprehensive program in the basic 
sciences, engineering sciences, and in project design, together with specialized train- 
ing in an approved secondary field. The secondary field may be selected from the 
areas shown below or from any other cohesive field of study approved iiy the depart- 
ment. Other fields selected in the past include law, mathematics, bioengineering, 
oceanography, meteorology, technical writing, engineering design, etc. The program 



ENGINEERING 



227 



is centered around a strong core in mathematics, theoretical and apphed mechanics, 
basic electronics, thermodynamics, and project design. Emphasis is placed upon the 
practice of professional engineering. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry' 5 

Humanities or social sciences elective" ...3 
Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

G.E. 104 — Engineering Project Design 

Methodology 3 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ... .4 
Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 150 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics) 2 

Total 15 



Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wove Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics 

II (Dynamics) 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 
Deformable Bodies 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective^ ... .3 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

G.E. 221 — Introduction to General 

Engineering Design 3 

G.E. 222 — Analysis of Dynamic Systems .3 
G.E. 288 — Economic Analysis for 

Engineering Decision Making 3 

M.E. 209 — Thermodynamics and 

Heat Transfer 3 

Secondary field elective 3 

Total 15 



E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory I 2 

E.E. 260 — Networks I 3 

G.E. 232 — Engineering Analysis 4 

Secondary field elective 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective' . . .3 

Free elective 3 

Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 

G.E. 241 — Component Design 4 

G.E. 292 — Engineering law 3 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Secondary field elective 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective" ...3 
Total 17 



G.E. 242 — Project Design 3 

G.E. 291 — General Engineering Seminar .0 

Technical elective 3 

Secondary field elective 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective' ... .3 

Free elective 3 

Total 15 



'Math. Ill or 112, and 114 for those entering freshmen who do not pass the Mathe- 
matics Placement Test. Students who have hod analytic geometry in high school and pass 
the Mathematics Placement Test will replace the mathematics sequence 120, 130, 140 with 
Moth. 135, 145, and 3 hours of free electives. 

■ Students must complete at least one elective sequence of at least 6 hours in both the 
social sciences and the humanities. (See page 210.) 



Suggested Fields of Concentration 

ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION HOURS 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

Accy. 206 — Cost Accounting for Engineers 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 314 — Production 3 

B. Adm. 315 — Management in Manufacturing 3 

B. Adm. 321 — Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 323 — Industrial Social System 3 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration 3 



228 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance 3 

G.E. 282 — Introduction to Patent Law 2 

G.E. 330 — Industrial Standardization 2 

I.E. 233 — Industrial Quality Control 3 

Math. 263 — Statistics in Engineering and the Physical Sciences 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

ENGINEERING MARKETING 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 272 — Industrial Selling 3 

B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research 3 

B. Adm. 337 — Promotion Management 3 

B. Adm. 344 — Consumer Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 360 — Business Logistics 3 

G.E. 282 — Introduction to Patent Lav^ 2 

G.E. 330 — Industrial Standardization 2 

Math. 263 — Statistics in Engineering and the Physical Sciences 3 

Psych. 245 — Industrial Psychology 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 

Anth. 369 — Introduction to Human Ecology 3-5 

Anth. 374 — Problems in Human Ecology 4 

Biol. 312 — Environmental Biology 5 

C.E. 240 — Control of the Urban Environment 3 

C.E. 241 — Water Quality and Water Pollution 3 

C.E. 242 — Sanitary Engineering Processes 3 

C.E, 340 — Physical Principles of Environmental Engineering Processes 3 

C.E. 341 — Air Resources Management 3 

C.E. 342 — Water Quality Control Processes 3 

C.E. 343 — Chemical Principles of Environmental Engineering Processes 3-4 

C.E. 344 — Solid Wastes Management 4 

C.E. 345 — Environmental Health Engineering 3 

C.E. 346 — Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering Processes 3 

C.E. 347 — Aquatic Ecology 3 

G.E. 348 — Air Pollution Seminar 2 

G.E. 360 — Engineering Applications of Meteorological Fundamentals 4 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Any computer science course beyond C.S. 101. 

G.E. 293 — Section C, Computer Graphics in Engineering 3 

MINING AND GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

C.E. 201 — Engineering Surveying^ 4 

C.E. 280 — Introduction to Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering^ 3 

C.E. 383 — Soil Mechanics and Soil Properties 4 

C.E. 384 — Applied Soil Mechanics 4 

C.E. 385 — Terrain Analysis 4 

G.E. 293 — Special Problems' 3 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology' 4 

Geol. 102 — Historical Geology 4 

Geol. 250 — Geology for Engineers 3 

Geol. 31 1 — Structural Geology' 4 

Geol. 332 — Mineralogy-Petrology 4 

Math. 263 — Statistics in Engineering and the Physical Sciences 3 

Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Min. E. 356 — Rock Mechanics' 3 

Any mining engineering course 1-4 



'These courses are required in the mining engineering option. Twelve of these hours 
will count as the secondary field and the remainder will be substituted for other courses 
with the approval of the odvisei. 



ENGINEERING 



229 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

Industrial engineering is concerned with the design, improvement, and installation 
of integrated systems of men, materials, and equipment, drawing upon specialized 
knowledge and skill in the mathematical, physical, and social sciences together with 
the principles and methods of engineering analysis and design, to specify, predict, 
and evaluate the results to be obtained from such systems. Industrial engineers are 
in demand by a wide variety of industries ranging from metalworking through elec- 
trical, chemical, pharmaceutical, and food processing. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Moth. 141 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

M.E. 185 — Materials Processing and 

Production Technology 4 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

I.E. 232 — Methods-Time Analysis 3 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering ...3 
M.E. 209 — Thermodynamics and Heat 

Transfer 3 

M.E. 220 — Mechanics of Machinery 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

I.E. 282 — Process Planning and Economy 

in Manufacturing 3 

I.E. 288 — Industrial Systems Analysis 

and Design 3 

I.E. 291 — Seminar 

I.E. 357 — Safety Engineering 3 

I.E. 386 — Industrial Engineering Analysis. 3 

Technical elective" 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 
Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Math. 131 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Total 14 



C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Moth. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 
Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 
Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Deformable Bodies 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 

Total 16 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting .3 

I.E. 286 — Operations Analysis 3 

I.E. 238 — Analysis of Data 3 

M.E. 224 — Design of Machine Elements ..3 
M.E. 234 — Heat Treatment of Metals ....3 
Humanities or social sciences elective' ...3 
Total 18 

Industrial engineering systems elective^ .. .3 

Technical elective 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective' . . .3 

Free electives 6 

Total 15 



'a total of 18 hours of humanities and social sciences electives is required, 3 of which 
must be Econ. 108. The remaining hours ore to be selected from the college-approved list 
on page 210. 

^ Six hours of technical electives ore required. These 3 hours must be selected from a 
departmentally approved list. 

' Must be taken from I.E. 306, 332, 334, 350, or 355. 



230 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical engineering is concerned with the theory of conversion and transmission 
of energy and the practical use of power processes; the kinematic, dynamic, and 
strength and wear considerations as well as the technological and economic aspects 
in the development, design, and use of machines and processes; the analysis, syn- 
thesis, and control of entire engineering systems; and the organizational and man- 
agement problems confronting the mechanical engineer. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Math. 141 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

M.E. 185 — Materials Processing and 

Production Technology 4 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 4 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering ...3 

M.E. 205 — Thermodynamics 3 

M.E. 210 — Introduction to Engineering 

Experimentation 3 

M.E. 21 1 — Introductory Gas Dynamics. . . .3 
T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Deformable Bodies 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 
Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

Mechanical engineering systems' 3 

M.E. 250 — Thermoscience Laboratory ....3 
M.E. 265 — Instrumentation and Controls .3 
M.E. 271 — Design of Machine Elements . .3 

M.E. 291 — Seminar 

Technical electives^ 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective* ...3 
Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Math. 131 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Total 14 



C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthonogal Functions 3 

M.E. 220 — Mechanics of Machinery 4 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 
Humanities or social sciences elective* . . .3 
Total 17 

M.E. 206 — Thermodynamics 3 

M.E. 213 — Heat Transfer 3 

M.E. 224 — Design of Machine Elements ..3 
M.E. 234 — Heat Treatment of Metals ... .3 
Technical elective^ or humanities or 

social sciences elective* 3 

Total 15 



Free electives 6 

Humanities or social sciences electives* .3-6 

Technical electives^ 3-6 

Total 15 



*A total of 18 hours of humanities and social sciences electives is required, 3 hours 
of which must be Econ. 108. (See page 210.) 

^ Nine hours of technical electives are required and must be chosen from a depart- 
mentally approved list. 

^Mechanical engineering systems to be chosen from M.E. 323, 335, 341; I.E. 382; and 
other courses approved by the department. 



ENGINEERING 



231 



CURRICULUM IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical Engineering 

The program in metallurgical engineering emphasizes physical metallurgy and per- 
mits the student, by appropriate selection of elective courses, to emphasize engineer- 
ing metallurg>'. metal physics, or some other well-defined career objective. The 
basic core of physical metallurgy- principles is treated in the sequence Met. E. 370- 
373, and this may be taken by students from other curricula who wish to obtain 
a minor in metallurgy. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Moth. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition ...4 
Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 131 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . 4 
Humanities or social sciences electives* . .4 
Total 15 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 141 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 

Elective' 3 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Met. E. 370 — Physical Metallurgy I 3 

Met. E. 371 — Physical Metallurgy 

Laboratory I 3 

Met. E. 310 — Crystallography and 

Diffraction 4 

Met. E. 314 — Metallurgical Thermo- 
dynamics 3 

Elective' 3 

Total 16 



Moth. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Deformable Bodies 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Elective' 3 

Total 16 



Met. E. 372 — Physical Metallurgy II 3 

Met. E. 373 — Physical Metallurgy 

Laboratory II 3 

Met. E. 316 — Mechanical Metallurgy ....3 

Electives' 7 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering ...3 

Met. E. 296 — Metallurgical Seminar 2 

Electives' 12 

Total 17 



Met. E. 318 — Physics of Metals 3 

Electives' 13 

Total 16 



All students are required to satisfy the college requirement of 18 hours in the social 
sciences and humanities. (See page 210.) Six hours of electives ore free to be selected by 
the student. A minimum of 9 hours is to be selected from among these departmental elec- 
tives: Met. E. 207, 301, 302, 304, 306, 307, 311, 315, and 386. Nine hours of technical 
electives are to be taken outside the department. A liberal interpretation of technical 
e/ect/ve will be token, and will include such courses that satisfy a carefully thought out 
career plan presented by the student to his adviser. 



CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 

See General Engineering, on page 226, for undergraduate curriculum. 



232 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN THE TEACHING OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Engineering Technology 

The basic purposes of this curriculum are threefold: to provide course material for 
subject-matter competence; to furnish the necessary background in pedagogical 
theory and techniques, including practice teaching; and to make possible on-the-job 
experience through relevant work and study under supervision in industry. Upon 
completion of the program the graduate qualifies for a teaching certificate issued by 
the Illinois Teacher Certification Board. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences (chemistry and physics) 16 

History of the United States 3 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

General psychology 3 

Physical and/or health education 3 

Humanities 3 

Social sciences 6 

Total 43-44 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of education 3 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 3 

Educational practice (student teaching) 5 

Total 18 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHING MAJOR 

Mechanical Option 

Mathematics 18 

Computer science 3 

Theoretical and applied mechanics 8 

Material processing and treatment 11 

Machine design 14 

Engineering graphics 6 

Electrical systems 5 

Control systems 3 

Industrial practice (supervised occupational experience) 6 

Elective 3 

Total 77 

Electronics Option 

Mathematics 21 

Computer science 3 

Theoretical and applied mechanics 7 

Engineering graphics 6 

Electrical circuits 13 

Electronics 9 

Industrial practice (supervised occupational experience) 6 

Electives 12 

Total 77 

TOTAL 138-139 



ENGINEERING 



233 



CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

For the postbaccalaureate Certificate in Teaching of Engineering Technology 

This program provides the opportunity to obtain a postbaccalaureate certificate 
after the completion of 32 semester hours of subject matter courses appropriate for 
teachers active in the profession with degrees in other disciplines. Candidates who 
have the necessary entrance requirements can normally complete this program in 
four eight-week summer sessions. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE PROGRAM 

Mechanical Option HOURS 

Related special problems 4 

Theoretical and applieci mechanics 5 

Material processing oncJ treatment 7 

Machine ciesign 13 

Principles of vocational ecJucation 3 

Total 32 

Electronics Option 

Related special problems 3 

Electrical circuits 13 

Electronics 13 

Principles of vocational education 3 

Total 32 

MECHANICAL OPTION 



FIRST SUMMER HOURS 

T.A.M. 150 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics) 2 

G.E. 393 — Special Problems 4 

Vo. Tech. 284 — Advanced Metalworking .4 
Total 10 



SECOND SUMMER HOURS 

M.E. 220 — Mechanics of Machinery 4 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Deformable Bodies 3 

Total 7 



THIRD SUMMER 

M.E. 224 — Design of Machine Elements.. 3 
M.E. 234 — Heat Treatment of Metals ... .3 
Vo. Tech. 381 — Principles of Voca- 
tional Education 3 

Total 9 



FOURTH SUMMER 

M.E. 271 — Design of Machine Elements . .3 
M.E. 341 — Engineering Analysis 

and Design 3 

Total 6 



ELECTRONICS OPTION 



FIRST SUMMER HOURS 

E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory 2 

E.E. 260 — Networks I 3 

E.E. 271 — Electrical Engineering 

Problems 3 

Total 8 



SECOND SUMMER HOURS 

E.E. 262 — Networks II 3 

E.E. 310 — Systems I 3 

E.E. 340 — Electronics 3 

Total 9 



THIRD SUMMER 

E.E. 342 — Advanced Electronics 3 

E.E. 290 — Introduction to Informa- 
tion Processing 3 

E.E. 245 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory II 2 

Total 8 



FOURTH SUMMER 

E.E. 381 — Pulse Techniques 4 

Vo. Tech. 381 — Principles of Voca- 
tional Education 3 

Total 7 



COLLEGE OF FINE 
AND APPLIED ARTS 

University of Illinois at Urhana-Champaign 
114 Architecture Building 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



The College of Fine and Applied Arts prepares men and women for pro- 
fessional work by ofTering programs in architecture, art and design, dance, 
landscape architecture, music, theatre, and urban and regional planning. 
Both freshmen and transfer students are admitted to these curricula. In 
each curriculum certain basic courses, professional courses, and general 
education requirements including a minimum approved sequence of 6 
semester hours each in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, 
must be completed in order to qualify for the specific baccalaureate degree 
offered. 

For development beyond the undergraduate programs in these areas of 
study the departments of the college offer graduate curricula leading to 
advanced professional degrees through the Graduate College. 

For students enrolled in other colleges and schools of the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the College of Fine and Applied Arts offers 
introductory courses designed to increase aesthetic appreciation and de- 
velopment and to portray the role of the arts in civilization. Applied music 
courses are also offered. 

To serve the total academic community and all citizens in the state of 
Illinois, the college features the contemporary arts by exhibitions, concerts, 
lectures, performances, demonstrations, and conferences within the areas 
of architecture, art, dance, landscape architecture, music, theatre, and 
urban and regional planning. Many outstanding professionals and works 
in these fields are brought to the University campus. 

In addition to the teaching divisions, the College of Fine and Applied 
Arts includes the Krannert Center for the Perfoirning Arts, the Krannert 
Art Museum, the University Bands, the Bureau of Urban and Regional 
Planning Research, and the Small Homes Council-Building Research 
Council. 

235 



236 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



KRANNERT ART MUSEUM 



The museum exhibits works from its own collections, which date from ancient 
Greece to our own times, and in addition, schedules a full program of changing 
exhibitions. The changing exhibitions bring a wide variety of historic and con- 
temporary works here and provide staff and students the opportunity to see their 
own productions in museum installations. 



KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 

The center, completed in 1969, provides remarkable facilities for orchestra, opera, 
choral organization, theatre, and dance. The Great Hall, seating 2,200, is designed 
for large-scale musical events. The Festival Theatre, with 1,000 seats, is for opera 
and other musical stage productions. The Playhouse seats 700 and is the home of 
the University Theatre. The Studio Theatre, seating 250, is for experimental pro- 
ductions. An outdoor amphitheatre, rehearsal rooms, offices, dressing rooms, tech- 
nical rooms, and underground parking on two levels for 650 cars complete this 
monumental facility. The major donors of the center were Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
G. Krannert of Indianapolis. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BANDS 

The University Bands are organized into the Large Symphonic Band, the Small 
Symphonic Band, the First Goncert Band, and the Second Goncert Band. Member- 
ship in these organizations is determined by audition and assignments are made 
according to proficiency and instrumentation needs. Members of the Large Sym- 
phonic Band in their third and succeeding year are eligible for scholarships 
amounting to approximately $100 per year. 

The bands play numerous concerts on the campus, and the Large Symphonic 
Band also appears in many Illinois and other midwestern cities. In addition, the 
bands furnish music for commencement, convocations, athletic events, military 
ceremonies, and other occasions. 

The University owns a large library of band music and was bequeathed the 
John Philip Sousa Memorial Library. These collections comprise one of the largest 
and finest libraries of band music in the world. 

The Large Symphonic Band maintains a complete symphonic instrumentation 
for the study and performance of all types of band literature and is open to those 
who have attained a high level of musical and technical proficiency on their in- 
struments. The Small Symphonic Band maintains a complete but smaller instru- 
mentation than the Large Symphonic Band and concentrates on the music intended 
for the smaller ensemble. The First Goncert Band maintains the instrumentation 
of the standard band and serves as a training organization for the symphonic 
bands. The Second Goncert Band enrolls those who at first do not qualify for posi- 
tions in the other bands, until they become eligible for promotion as improvement 
is shown and vacancies occur. 

One hour of credit per semester is offered in bands. This credit may be used as 
partial fulfillment of the School of Music ensemble requirement and is available 
to other colleges as elective credit. 



LIBRARIES 

Students in the college have at their disposal outstanding library resources. In ad- 
dition to the general Library, one of this country's great university collections, there 
are specialized libraries serving the needs of specific fields. The Ricker Library of 
Architecture and Art contains more than 31,000 books (with at least as many more 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 237 



in the same fields in the general Library), 31,000 photographs, and 9,300 clippings. 

The City Planning and Landscape Architecture Library contains approxi- 
mately 18,000 books, with at least that many in the general Library. 

The School of Music Library, located in the Music Building, contains over 
250,000 items. These include introductory, instrvictive, research, and reference 
materials including ijooks, editions of music, recordings, manuscripts, microfilm, 
and other nonbook materials. 



DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

The College of Fine and Applied Arts consists of the Departments of Architecture, 
Art and Design, Dance, Landscape Architecture, Theatre, and Urban and Re- 
gional Planning with the Bureau of Urban and Regional Planning Research; the 
School of Music; the University Bands; the Small Homes Council-Building Re- 
search Council; the Krannert Art Museum; and the Krannert Center for the 
Performing Arts. The specific functions of each department or school and the 
undergraduate curricula are described on the following pages. 

All departments in the College of Fine and Applied Arts reserve the right to 
retain, exhibit, and reproduce the works submitted by students for credit in any 
course. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 
Individual Study Program 

All curricula offered by the College of Fine and Applied Arts are designed to 
develop professional competence in the specific area of studies noted on the degree. 
Therefore, an individual study program must insure this professional development. 

A qualified student who has specific professional goals which are not met by 
the curricular ofiferings of the college may request an individual program of studies 
selected from courses offered by the University. Such a program must include the 
basic courses prerequisite for advanced study, requirements of the University for 
graduation, general education sequences and requirements of the college, and pro- 
fessional course work which will insure the competence expected for the particular 
degree. 

To obtain approval for an individual study program, the student must submit 
his proposal in writing during his sophomore or junior year. The proposal should 
contain an outline of the complete program of course work as well as an explana- 
tion of the professional goal desired. It should be discussed with and submitted to 
an approved representative of the appropriate department or school concerned with 
the degree who will then forward the proposal through the executive officer of the 
department or school for recommendation to the college office. Final consideration 
and notification of the action taken on the proposal will be made by the college 
office. At the time of this printing the above program is being considered for official 
approval. Please inquire at the college office, 114 Architecture Building, if interested. 

Study Abroad 

The college provides the opportunity for a student to obtain campus credit for 
foreign study and/or travel for a period of from one semester to one calendar year. 
The student must submit a detailed proposal of plans for such study and/or travel 
for approval by his appropriate departmental committee and by the associate dean 
of the college prior to such study abroad. If approved, the student registers and 
retains his status as a University student and may continue his student health insur- 
ance as if he continued to study at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 



238 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



HONORS PROGRAMS 
Honors at Graduation 

At graduation, the College of Fine and Applied Arts grants honors to superior 
students. To be eligible, students must have completed a minimum of four se- 
mesters of work or 65 hours of credit in residence at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 
For the degree with Honors, the student must have a grade-point average of 
4.25 (A = 5.0) or better in all courses used for graduation and be in the upper 
25 percent of those receiving that particular degree ; for the degree with High 
Honors, a grade-point average of 4.5 or better and be in the upper 15 percent; 
and for the degree with Highest Honors, a grade-point average of 4.75 or better 
and be in the upper 6 percent. Credit earned at other institutions and transferred 
to the University of Illinois is used in computing the student's average. Credit 
earned at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must be of at least the 
level required for the degree with Honors. 

Awards 

Allerton American Traveling Scholarship. Income from an endowment by the late 
Robert Allerton provides funds for the Department of Architecture to award two 
scholarships of $500 each to be used for summer travel and study on the Atlantic 
seaboard by two juniors in the history of architecture. The awards are made to 
those whose accomplishments indicate superior ability in this area. 
Alpha Rho Chi Medal. Alpha Rho Chi, national architectural fraternity, provides 
a bronze medal each year to the Department of Architecture to be awarded to a 
senior who has shown ability for leadership and given promise of professional merit. 
Alschuler Award. This award is presented annually to the student in the Depart- 
ment of Architecture who is judged to have contributed the best article to the 
department publication, Objective, during the year. 

American Institute of Architects Prizes. The American Institute of Architects 
awards annually a medal and a certificate to the senior in architecture who is ad- 
judged outstanding in scholastic achievement, character, and promise of profes- 
sional ability, and a certificate to the senior in architecture who is ranked second 
in these categories. 

American Society of Landscape Architects Certificates. Certificates of merit and 
a certificate of honor are awarded each year to one or two seniors and to a grad- 
uate student in landscape architecture. Awards are based on academic scholarship 
and professional skills. 

Bradley and Bradley Award. An award of $100, offered each semester by the 
architectural firm of Bradley and Bradley, Rockford, Illinois, is made to a student 
who has demonstrated exceptional ability in the course Arch. 337. 
Edward C. Earl Prizes. Income from an endowment bequeathed by Edward C. 
Earl is used for undergraduate prizes in various levels of architectural design and 
architectural theory, freehand drawing, structural theory and design, working 
drawings, and for a special prize for summer experience. 

Fields, Goldman, and Magee Scholarship. An annual award of $300 is presented 
to an undergraduate student in architecture who has excelled in design, has com- 
pleted his fourth year, and has attained general academic excellence. 
Gargoyle Awards. The Gargoyle Society annually recognizes two freshmen in ar- 
chitecture who rank highest scholastically. Names of these students are permanently 
inscribed on the Gargoyle plaque. 

Kate Neal Kinley Memorial Fellowship. This fellowship was established in memory 
of the wife of a former president of the University and was designed to promote 
advanced study in the fine arts in recognition of her influence in promoting these 
and similar interests. It is awarded annually to enable a graduate of the Univer- 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 239 



sity, or some similar institution of equal educational standing, to pursue advanced 
study for one year at home or abroad. This fellowship is open to students whose 
principal or major studies have been in architecture (design or history only), art 
(all branches), or music (all branches). 

Karl Baptiste Lohmann Award. Presented annually to a graduating senior in urban 
and regional planning in recognition of performance as a student and of profes- 
sional promise. The award is named for Karl B. Lohmann, professor of city and 
regional planning, emeritus, who provided the leadership in professional education 
in city planning at the University of Illinois for more than thirty years. A cer- 
tificate is given to the recipient. 

Kivett and Myers Traveling Fellowship. This award of $1,000 is offered annually 
by the architectural firm of Kivett and Myers, Kansas City, Missouri, to enable an 
undergraduate student to participate in the overseas study program of the Depart- 
ment of Architecture. 

Frank S. and Jennie M. Long Traveling Scholarship. Income from a bequest pro- 
vides $600 each for two traveling scholarships for summer travel and study. The 
scholarships are awarded on the basis of ability, character, and professional prom- 
ise to architecture students who will return for at least one semester following 
receipt of the award and prior to graduation. 

Mary C. McLellan Scholarship. Established by request of Mary C. McLellan of the 
class of 1888, this scholarship is awarded every second year under the direction of 
the Department of Art and Design. It is open to graduates of the University of 
Illinois who have demonstrated unusual excellence in one of the areas of study 
offered by the Department of Art and Design and who have shown promise of 
professional success. The stipend is to be used for professional development through 
travel in America or abroad, or for study at a recognized institution or with a 
qualified private master. 

Mu Phi Epsilon Alumnae Award. An annual award of $50 is given to the senior 
member of Epsilon Xi chapter who has made the greatest contribution in service 
and scholarship in music. If there is no qualified senior, a junior may be chosen. 
Ralph E. Myers Award. This award of $1,000 is offered annually by the architec- 
tural firm of Kivett and Myers, Kansas City, Missouri, to enable an undergraduate 
student to participate in the overseas study program of the Department of 
.Architecture. 

Rexford Newcomb Award was established in memory of Dean Newcomb, eminent 
architectural historian and author, and first dean of the College of Fine and 
Applied Arts (1931-54). The award of $100 is annual and is made to that under- 
graduate or graduate .student whose work in the history and preservation of archi- 
tecture shows highest promise of continuing the scholarly ideals and objectives of 
Dean Newcomb. 

Pi Kappa Lambda Award. The initiation fees of Pi Kappa Lambda, national hon- 
orary music fraternity, are awarded annually by Zeta chapter to the senior student 
in music who has the highest scholastic average. 

Plym Fellowships. .An annual fellowship of $5,000 is awarded for six months' study 
abroad. A second fellowship is given for graduate study in architecture with a 
stipend of $2,500. 

Plym Prizes. Through endowments of Francis J. Plym, the Department of Archi- 
tecture offers annually certain prizes for undergraduate work. The prizes in 
architectural engineering represent three awards to those senior architectural engi- 
neers whose work, attitude, and ability are judged the highest. The prize for sum- 
mer sketches is awarded to the student who, during the summer vacation, makes 
the most interesting and best freehand sketches. The prize for sketch problems is 
offered to stimulate better development of sketch problems during the year. 
Ricker Prizes. Gold keys are awarded annually for the two best essays on some 
phase of the history of architecture by students registered in the second year of 



240 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



work in this subject. The prizes are given by Anthemios chapter of Alpha Rho Chi 
in recognition of the distinguished contributions made by Dr. Nathan Clifford 
Ricker, who for fifty years taught the history of architecture at the University. 
Edward L. Ryerson Traveling Fellowship. One fellowship open to senior architec- 
ture students and one fellowship in landscape architecture open to senior and 
graduate students are offered each year. Each fellowship grants a stipend of 
$3,000 to be used for a period of approved study abroad of not less than six months' 
duration. 

Scarab Medals. Scarab architectural fraternity offers bronze medals annually for 
distinguished achievement in the lower junior and upper junior courses in archi- 
tectural design and the junior course in site planning and housing. 
Sigma Alpha Iota Award. The Urbana-Champaign alumni chapter of Sigma Alpha 
Iota, national honorary music sorority, provides an annual award of $100 given 
on the basis of musicianship, scholarship, and financial need. All undergraduate 
students in the School of Music who have completed at least two semesters of 
work are eligible to apply. The final selection is based upon auditions held once 
each year. 

James M. White Memorial Prizes. Income from the James M. White Memorial 
Fund is used for prizes in the undergraduate courses in materials and methods of 
construction, structural elements and theory, and for excellence in graduate studies. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who meet the general University requirements with reference to registra- 
tion, residence, scholarship, fees, rhetoric, and general education requirements, and 
who maintain a satisfactory record, receive degrees appropriate to the curriculum 
completed. Refer to the specific departmental and curricular requirements listed 
on the following pages. In addition, students must complete the required senior 
courses in their major field of study in residence at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To comply with the general education sequence requirements, each student in the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts must have a minimum of 6 semester hours in one 
department or in an approved sequence from different departments in each of the 
following three areas: humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences (biological 
or physical sciences). They should be taken to fulfill ele dives if they are not listed 
as a specific curricular requirement. The following regulations apply: 

- A student may not use courses in his major area to satisfy a sequence requirement 
and a student may not ordinarily use courses from one department to satisfy the 
distributional sequence requirement in more than one area. 

- Basic foreign language courses, rhetoric and speech requirements, or courses 
numbered 199 may not be used to fulfill the sequence requirements. 

- Approval to use any course or sequence not contained in the listings must be 
requested by written petition to the office of the associate dean of the college 
prior to registration in the substitute course or courses. Approval of an adviser 
or instructor is not acceptable. 

HUMANITIES (6 semester hours) 

Anth. 168, 169, 315, 316, 329. 

Arch. 211, 212, and all advanced architecture history courses. (Not for architecture, art, 

landscape architecture, or urban and regional planning majors.) 
Art 111, 112, 115, 116, 210, 211, 212, 213, 217, 218, and all advanced art history 

courses. (Not for architecture, art, landscape architecture, or urban and regional planning 

majors.) 
Asian studies — all courses, except introductory and intermediate language courses. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 241 



Classics — all courses, excluding CI. Civ. 100; Grk. 101-112, 200-202; Lot. 101-114; Hebr. 

110, 111. 
Comparative literature — all courses. 
Dance 340, 341. (Not for dance majors.) 
English — all courses, excluding rhetoric, business and technical writing, and English as a 

second language courses. 
French — all courses, excluding 100-174, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 217, 218, 270, 282, 311, 

313, 314. 
German — all courses, excluding 101-124, 153, 164, 211, 212, 281, 303, 304, 382. 
Scandinavian — all courses, excluding 101-104, 216. 
Hist. Ill, 112, 131, 132, 151, 152, 181, 182, 247, 248, 307, 308, 323, 324, 381, 382, 

383, 384. 
Humanities — all courses. 

L.A. 213, 214. (Not for architecture or landscape architecture majors.) 
Ling. 198, 220, 300-305, 320, 330, 340, 360, 387. 

Arab. 305, 306, 307, 308. 

Hindi 308, 309, 310. 

Hebr. 307, 308. 
Music 113, 115, 130, 131, 134, 213, 214, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315. (Not for music 

majors.) 
Philosophy — all courses, except those listed in physical and social science areas. 
Religious studies — all courses, excluding 108, 109, 111, 112, 200, and those listed in social 

science area. 
Slav. 319, 380, 394. 

Russian — all courses, except 101-112, 121-124, 211, 212, 213, 214, 280, 303, 304, 307, 

308, 313, 314. 
Spanish — all courses, except 101-104, 107, 108, 111, 114, 115, 123, 124, 209, 211, 215, 

217, 218, 280, 351, 352, 371. 
Italian — all courses, except 101-104, 209, 211, 212. 
Portuguese — all courses, except 101-104, 111, 112, 209, 211, 212. 

Spch. 121, 141, 142, 177, 178, 207, 213, 243, 307, 308, 311, 312, 320, 322, 342, 344, 345. 
Theat. 101, 102, 103, 104, 105. (Not for theatre majors.) 

SOCIAL SCIENCES (6 semester hours) 

Afr. St. 222, with a social science course on Africa totaling 6 hours. 

Anthropology — all courses, except those listed in biological and humanities areas. 

Economics — all courses. 

Fin. 150, with Econ. 108. 

Geography — all courses except those listed in biological and physical sciences areas. 

Hist. Ill, 112, 131, 132, 151, 152, 171, 172, 260, 261, 262, 307, 308, 381, 382, 383, 384. 

L.A. St. — 201, with a social science course on Latin America totaling 6 hours. 

Ling. 200, 201, 225, 307, 325, 350, 370. 

Phil. 103, 104. 

Political science — all courses. 

Pol. S. 150 plus Hist. 151 or 152 or 261 or 262. 

Psychology — all courses, except those listed in biological science area. 

Rel. St. 229, 304, 328, 363. 

Sociology — all courses, excluding that listed in biological sciences area. 

Spch.— 113, 221, 313, 321. 

NATURAL SCIENCES (6 semester hours) 
Biological Sciences 

Life sciences — any 6 hours, may be from more than one department. 

Biology — all courses; 100, 101, 115 recommended. 

Botany — all courses; 100, 204, 234, 260 recommended. 

Entomology — all courses; 103, 118 recommended. 

Microbiology — all courses; 113 recommended. 

Physiology — all courses; 103 recommended. 

Zoology — all courses; 104, 105, 106, 107 recommended. 
Anth. 143, 240, 246, 247, 337, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 356, 393, 396. 
Geog. 305, with a course in the life sciences totaling 6 hours or more. 
Psych. 103, 143, 211, 217, 230, 246, 247, 337, 342, 347, 393. 
See. 246, with a course in the life sciences totaling 6 hours or more. 



242 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Physical Sciences 

Astronomy — all courses. 

Biochemistry — all courses. 

Chemical engineering — all courses. 

Chemistry — all courses. 

Geography — only 102, 103, 214, 303, 312, 313, 348. 

Geology — all courses. 

Mathematics — all courses excluding 101, 104, 202, 203, 305, 306, 307. (Cannot duplicate 

high school entrance or curricular requirements or prerequisites.) 
L.A.S. 140, 141, 142, 143, 197, 198. 
Phil. 333, 334, 353, 354, 355. 
Physics — all courses. 



ELECTIVES 

Electives specified in any curriculum in the College of Fine and Applied Arts must 
be chosen from the lists which follow. Single courses specified in the general edu- 
cation sequence lists or more advanced courses for which they are prerequisites may 
also be used as electives. Always check prerequisite requirements when registering 
for these courses. 



ELECTIVE AREAS 

Anthropology 

Architecture, especially Arch. 211, 212, 310- 

317 (no courses usable for architecture 

majors as electives; 211-212 not for art 

majors) 
Art, especially Art 105-112, 115, 116, 181, 

186, 209-216, 301-328, 388 (no courses 

usable for art majors as electives, only 

209 and up on this list for architecture 

majors) 
Asian studies 
Astronomy 

Bands, up to 2 hours (not for music majors) 
Chemistry 
Classics 

Comparative literature 
Computer science 
Donee, especially Dance 101, 102, 160, 161, 

165, 166, 340 (not for dance majors) 
Economics 
English 
French 
Geography 
Geology 

Germanic languages and literature 
History 
Humanities 

Labor and industrial relations 
Landscape architecture, especially L.A. 213 

and 214 (not for landscape architecture 

or architecture majors) 



Latin American studies 

Liberal arts and sciences 

Life sciences 

Linguistics 

Mathematics (cannot duplicate high school 
entrance or curricular requirements or 
prerequisites) 

Music, especially 100-104; 113; 130; 131; 
instrumental courses, tv/o courses maxi- 
mum (not for music majors). For music 
majors no more than 6 semester hours of 
ensemble course work will apply toward 
the degree. 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political science 

P.E. 100-149, maximum of 3 hours 

Psychology 

Religious studies 

Slavic languages and literature 

Social sciences 

Sociology 

Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese 

Speech 

Theatre, especially Theat. 101, 102, 103, 
104, 105, 281, 352, 361, 362, 366, 380 
(not for theatre majors) 

Urban and regional planning, especially 
U.P. 171 (not for urban planning or 
architecture majors) 



SPECIFIC ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following list of courses available as electives ofTers specialized areas of knowl- 
edge not found in previous lists. These courses have obvious professional values to 
many in fine and applied arts : other courses may simply be personally informative 
or significant. No more than 9 hours of courses in any one of these areas should 
be taken. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 243 



Accy. 101, 105, 201, 203 H.P. Ed. 300, 305 

Ag. Ec. 100 B. Adm. 261 

Agron. 101, 121, 350 Journ. 215, 220, 251, 310 

B. Adm. 202, 210, 247 249, 272, 323, 337, Mechanical and industrial engineering, oil 

344 courses 

C.E. 216, 230, 231, 314 R. TV 356 

Comm. 220, 251 Religion (maximum of 6 hours) 

E.E. 114, 271, 272, 288 Air force aerospace studies, military science, 

G.E. 200- and 300-level and naval science, advanced courses only 

Fin. 150 (maximum of 6 hours) 
H. Ed. 200 

PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES 

Professional elccti\es, as specified in any curriculum are courses offered by the stu- 
dent's department; or technical or related courses which will aid in the develop- 
ment of a student's professional goal and which are approved by the student's 
department. 



Department of Architecture 



Architecture is concerned with the shaping of man's habitat — that environment in 
which he normally lives. 

In accomplishing this an architect has the responsibility to direct his profes- 
sional effort in such a way as to contribute to the optimal physical, psychological, 
and social well-being of man. The education of an architect must stimulate sen- 
sitivity and understanding of human needs and must develop the ability to satisfy 
those needs through appropriate architecture. It must provide training in the process 
of information gathering and analysis and appropriate utilization of this informa- 
tion in problem solving. Additionally, his education must supply him with a realiza- 
tion of the significance of the historical development of architecture and a thorough 
understanding of architectural design, structural design, environmental technology, 
and building construction techniques. 

The Department of Architecture offers a six-year program of education con- 
sisting of four years of undergraduate study leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Architectural Studies followed by two years of graduate study culmi- 
nating in the professional degree of Master of Architecture. 

Upon completion of the undergraduate curriculum requirements, which pro- 
vide for acquisition of knowledge in architecture sufficient to the many roles in 
architecture, planning, and the construction industry, a student is awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies. Having received the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies, or an equivalent degree from an- 
other university, a student whose grades are acceptable and who is otherwise quali- 
fied may apply for admission to the Graduate College to study in the graduate 
professional curriculum in architecture. A student with a five-year degree of Bache- 
lor of Architecture from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign or from 
another university may make a similar application for admission at the sixth-year 
level. The University recommends the Master of Architecture degree for ultimate 
professional standing. 

In February 1967, the Department of Architecture began a foreign study pro- 
gram in France. Advanced architectural students who qualify are selected to enroll 
in this program. Students pursue appropriate course work while abroad, including 
the analysis of significant cities and historic buildings of Europe. 

The Department of Architecture occupies drafting rooms, lecture rooms, and 
offices in the Architecture Building and the Fine Arts Building. The Ricker Library 
of Architecture and Art also occupies space in the Architecture Building. 



244 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SIX-YEAR PROGRAM IN ARCHITECTURE 

This program consists of a four-year undergraduate curriculum leading to the degree 
Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies and a two-year graduate curriculum 
leading to the degree of Master of Architecture. 

Students who complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Archi- 
tectural Studies degree and who meet all requirements for admission to the graduate 
program may apply to the Graduate College for the two-year graduate curriculum. 
Departmental facilities are limited and preference will be given to the best-qualified 
students until quotas are filled. 



FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies 

In the curriculum, normal course progress is imperative. A student failing to com- 
plete any required course more than one semester later than the time designated in 
the curriculum is prohibited from progressive registration in architectural courses 
until the deficiency is corrected. For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architec- 
tural Studies, 124 semester hours are required. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Arch. 100 — Architecture Lectures 1 

Hist. Ill — History of Western Civiliza- 
tion to 1815 4 

Social science sequence 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Total 17 

SECOND YEAR 

Arch. 171 — Basic Design Studio I 3 

U.P. 171 — Planning of Cities 

and Regions 3 

Approved general education sequence . . .4 

Natural science elective 4 

Total 14 

THIRD YEAR 

Arch. 211 — Introduction to Ancient and 

Medieval Architecture 3 

Arch. 231 — Architectural Construction I ..4 

Arch. 251 — Statics and Dynamics .4 

Arch. 271— Basic Design Studio III 3 

Elective or professional elective 3 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

Architecture history (Arch. 310-317) 3 

Arch. 241 — Environmental Technology I . .4 
Arch. 351 — Theory and Design of 

Metal Structures 4 

Arch. 371 — Architectural Design 

Studio I 5 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Arch. 101 or elective 3 

Hist. 112 — History of Western Civiliza- 
tion, 1815 to the Present 4 

Social science sequence 3 

Math. 131 — Calculus and Analytic 
Geometry (3), plus elective (2), or 
Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Total 15 

Arch. 172 — Basic Design Studio II 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Continuation of approved general 

education sequence 4 

Natural science elective 4 

Total 14 

Arch. 212 — Introduction to Renaissance 

and Modern Architecture 3 

Arch. 232 — Architectural Construction II.. 3 
Arch. 252 — Strength of Materials 

and Design Applications 4 

Arch. 272 — Basic Design Studio IV 3 

Elective or professional elective 3 

Total 16 

Architecture history (Arch. 310-317) 3 

Arch. 242 — Environmental Technology 11.4 
Arch. 352 — Theory of Reinforced 

Concrete 3 

Arch. 372 — Architectural Design 

Studio II 5 

Total 15 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 245 



Department of Art and Design 



The curricula in art and design permit a student to attain a proficiency in art and 
design and to secure a liberal education. The first year of each curriculum is basic 
and cultural. Specialization begins in the second year. 

All first-year students in art and design except thcjse in art education will be 
admitted to the general curriculum in art and design. After completing one year 
in the general curriculum students must select one of the more specialized art and 
design curricula. Students should l)e aware that admission into a specific degree 
curriculum from the general curriculum of the first year is limited by the number 
of students each curriculum is able to accommodate. When necessary, selection of 
students will be determined by grade-point averages. 

Courses in the history and appreciation of art and certain courses in studio 
work are open to students from other colleges of the University. 

Under the regulations of the Graduate College two master's degrees in art and 
design are offered. The degree of Master of Arts is offered with a major in either 
art histor>' or art education and the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Art and 
Design in the studio areas. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the History of Art is oflfered jointly by 
the Department of Art and Design and the Department of Architecture under the 
regulations of the Graduate College. The degree of Doctor of Education in Art 
Education is offered jointly by the Department of Art and Design and the College 
of Education under the regulations of the Graduate College. 

The Department of Art and Design occupies studios, drafting rooms, and offices 
in nine different University buildings. The departmental faculty offices are in the 
Fine Arts Building, and the greater portion of the work is carried on there. The 
graduate painting studios are at 26 East Springfield Avenue in Champaign. 



FRESHMAN PROGRAM FOR ALL ART AND DESIGN CURRICULA 

This first-year requirement is included in all art and design curricula which follow. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Art 113 — Orientotion to Art 1 Art 114 — Orientation to Art 1 

Art 117 — Drawing 3 Art 1 18 — Drawing 3 

Art 119 — Design 3 Art 120 — Design 3 

Foreign language or elective 3-4 Foreign language or elective 3-4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 Elective 2 

Art and design or academic elective ...2-3 Art and design or academic elective ...2-3 

Total 17 Total 15 

Students in any art and design curriculum to proceed in junior-level art and 
design courses must have earned a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.25 
(A = 5.0). The cumulative average is to be computed as follows: (I) all University 
of Illinois courses; (2) the combination of University of Illinois and transfer courses, 
the lowest of the two to govern. 



CURRICULUM IN ART EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education 

A minimum of 130 hours of credit is reciuired for graduation. This curriculum pre- 
pares its graduates for teaching art in grades K through 12. 

In addition to specified courses in art, a minimum of 8 semester hours must be 
acquired in one of the following areas of specialization: sculpture, painting, crafts, 
printmaking, graphic design, or art history. 

The curriculum in art education prepares students for positions as teachers 



246 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



and supervisors of art in the public schools. The program places emphasis on 
methods, materials, processes, and practice teaching in selected Illinois schools. 
Upon completion, graduates are eligible for the State Special Certificate as defined 
by the Illinois State Teacher Certification Board. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. 1 1 1 and 112, or Rhef. 105 or 108 and a speech performance elective 6-7 

General psychology 3 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in one of the natural sciences 6 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in one of the humanities 6 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

History of the United States 3 

Physical and/or health education 3 

Total 30-31 

ART HISTORY 

Introduction to ancient and medieval art 4 

Introduction to Renaissance and modern art 4 

Advanced art history (200- or 300-leyel) 3 

Total 11 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Orientation to art 2 

Drawing I, II 6 

Design I, II 6 

Life drawing I, II 4 

Design III, IV 4 

Total 22 

ART EDUCATION 

Art education laboratory 2 

Creative art for children 3 

Art curriculum and practicum in the elementary grades 3 

Organization of public school art programs 3 

Total 11 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION' 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

Principles of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 3 

Educational practice (student teaching) 5 

Total 15 

ELECTIVES 

Art electives 21 

General electives 6 

General or professional electives 13-14 

Total 40-41 



^ Art education courses are applicable to professional education requirements for 
teacher certification. 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ART EDUCATION 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Introduction to watercolor painting 2 

Introduction to ancient and medieval art 3 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 247 



Infroduction to Renaissance and modern art 3 

Drawing 2 

Design 2 

Crafts 4 

Art education laboratory 4 

Total 20 



CURRICULUM IN CRAFTS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Crafts 

The curriculum in crafts emphasizes professional training for the development of 
the self-sustaining craftsman, the teacher of crafts, and the designer-craftsman in 
industry. The present curriculum provides a choice of two areas of concentration: 
ceramic design and metal design. The emphasis within these areas of concentration 
is upon the development of individual design capabilities and perceptions and upon 
the mastery of comprehensive technical skills. In conjunction with these individual 
areas of emphasis, each student is given experience in other craft media. 
A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

Ceramic Emphasis 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours each in the humanities and social sciences ... 1 2 

Natural science sequence: L.A.S. 140-143 8 

Econ. 1 08 3 

Physical education 4 

Total 31 

ART HISTORY 

Art 111 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 113 and 1 14 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 117, 118, 125, and 126 — Drawing 10 

Art 119 and 120 — Design 6 

Art 133 and 134 — Design Workshop 4 

Art 141 and 142 — Still Life 4 

Art 151 and 152 — Sculpture 4 

Total 30 

CRAFTS 

H. Ec. 1 96 — Weaving 3 

Art 290 — Ceramic Raw Materials 2 

Art 291 — Glaze Calculation 2 

Art 292 and 293 — Metal Design in Jewelry 6 

Art 294 and 295 — Ceramic Design I and II 6 

Art 298 and 299 — Ceramic Design III and IV 10 

Total 29 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 10-14 

Professional electives 8-12 

Total 22 



248 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Metal Emphasis 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours each in the humanities and social sciences. .12 

Natural science sequence: L.A.S. 140-143 8 

Biol. 100 and 101 8 

Econ. 108 3 

Physical education 4 

Total 39 

ART HISTORY 

Art 111 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 113 and 114 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 117, 118, 125, and 126 — Drawing 10 

Art 119 and 120 — Design 6 

Art 133 and 134 — Design Workshop 4 

Art 141 and 142 — Still Life 4 

Art 151 and 152 — Sculpture 4 

H. Ec. 263 — Textile Design, or art studio elective 3 

Total 33 

CRAFTS 

H. Ec. 196 — Weaving 3 

Art 292 and 293 — Metal Design in Jewelry 6 

Art 294 and 295 — Ceramic Design I and II 6 

Art 296 — Decorative Metal Techniques 5 

Art 297 — Construction of Hollow and Flatware in Silversmithing 5 

Total 25 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 5-9 

Professional electives 6-10 

Total 15 



CURRICULUM IN GRAPHIC DESIGN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design 

The curriculum in graphic design prepares the student for entrance into the field 
of visual communications, including commercial, educational, and informational 
applications. Problems explore printed design in two and three dimensions, the 
filmic media including photography, film making, and television, and the inter- 
relationship of pertinent disciplines such as journalism, communications, advertising, 
and marketing. Emphasis is placed on a balance of technical and conceptual skills, 
and on the expansion of the student's knowledge of the process employed by the 
designer in visual problem solving. Each assignment is taken through analysis, re- 
search, organization, aesthetics, and technical execution — from concept through 
final presentation. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, 

natural sciences, and social sciences 18 

Communications elective (Comm. 220 or 251) 3 

Physical education 4 

Total 29 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 249 



ART HISTORY 

Art 111 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 113 and 1 14 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 1 17 and 118 — Drawing 6 

Art 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Art 131 and 132 — Elementary Composition, or Art 133 and 134 — Design Workshop ...4 
Total 18 

GRAPHIC DESIGN 

A minimum of 24 hours, terminating in a thesis project in the senior year. Graphic design 
courses presently include: 

Art 159 and 160 — Graphic Design Skills I and II 4 

Art 161 — Calligraphic Design 2 

Art 162 — Letterform Design 2 

Art 263 — Reproduction Graphics 2 

Art 265, 266, 267, and 268 — Graphic Design I, II, III, and IV 12 

Art 269 — Senior Graphic Design Project 2 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 24-28 

Professional electives 13-17 

Total 39 



CURRICULUM IN THE HISTORY OF ART 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in the History of Art 

The curriculum in the history of art offers a broad cultural education which unites 
academic and studio training, prepares students for certain types of museum and 
gallery work, and qualifies them for further study in criticism and scholarship. 
Those who are preparing for teaching the history of art at the college level are 
ordinarily expected to undertake graduate study for the Master of Arts degree 
in this field. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours each in the following areas: humanities, 

social sciences, natural sciences 18 

Hist. 1 1 1 and 112 — History of Western Civilization 8 

Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Foreign language' 8 

History or English 6 

Phil. 103 and 323 6 

Physical education 4 

Total 57 

ART HISTORY 

Art 1 1 1 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 18 

Total 26 



A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language equivalent to that resulting from 
four semesters of study commenced in college Is required (104 level). Completion of four 
years of one modern language in high school also satisfies this requirement. French or 
German is recommended. 



250 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 113 and 114 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 117 and 118 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Total 14 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved elecfives) 15-21 

Professional electives 8-14 

Total 29 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Industrial Design 

The curriculum in industrial design provides education in three-dimensional design 
for production, to meet the needs of people and their environment. Emphasis is 
placed upon the awareness of the market demand for design, cognizance of methods 
and materials of production and their relative costs, creation of designs which are 
in visual harmony with their environment and which are satisfying to the consumer, 
and responsiveness to the changes in technology and cultural patterns. 
A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours plus a 3-hour elective in social science 9 

One approved sequence of 6 hours plus a 3-hour elective in humanities 9 

One approved sequence of 8 hours in one of the natural sciences 8 

Physical education 4 

Total 34 

ART HISTORY 

Art 111 — Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art 3 

Art 112 — Introduction to Renaissance and Modern Art 3 

Art 210 — History of Furniture and Interiors 2 

Advanced art or architecture history 3 

Total n 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 113 and 1 1 4 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 117 and 118 — Drav/ing I, II 6 

Art 119 and 120— Design I, II 6 

Art 121 and 122 — Drav/ing Theory I, II 4 

Art 162 — Letterform Design 2 

Art 265 — Graphic Design I 3 

Total 23 

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Art 133 and 134 — Design Workshop I, II 4 

Art 175 — Design Methodology 2 

Art 271 and 272 — Materials and Processes 6 

Art 275 and 276 — Industrial Design I, II 6 

Art 277 and 278 — Industrial Design III, IV 10 

Total 28 

ELECTIVES 

Technical electives from approved list, minimum 6 

Professional electives 6-10 

General electives (see college list for approved electives) 14-18 

Total 30 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 25 



Technical Electives HOURS 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Adv. 383 — Advertising Medio Policy and Strategy 3 

Arch. 251 — Statics and Dynamics 4 

Arch. 252 — Strength of Material and Design Applications 4 

Arch. 323 — Social and Behavioral Factors 3 

Arch. 326 — Impact of Technology on Design 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research 3 

B. Adm. 344 — Consumer Behavior 3 

Comm. 217 — History of Communications 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic Digital Computing 3 

G.B. 282 — Introduction to Patent Law 1 

Geog. 369 — Introduction to Human Ecology 3-5 

Geog. 374 — Problems in Human Ecology 4 

Lib. S. 201 — Introduction to Reference Service 3 

Moth. 135 — Calculus I 3 

M.E. 180 — Engineering Materials and Processes 3 

Phycs. 150 — Physics of the Modern World 3 

Physl. 305 — Principles of Ergonomics 4 

Physl. 306 — Quantitative Methods in Ergonomics 4 

Psych. 356 — Human Factors in System Design 3 

CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL ART 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Art 

The curriculum in medical art oflfers extensive and intensive training leading to 
professional competence in the field of medical illustration. The program consists 
of five years of study; the first three years of the curriculum are offered at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus and the fourth and fifth years must be completed at 
the Medical Center, Chicago. The final two years include work in the anatomy 
laboratories and in the medical art studios where skills and techniques in all media 
and practical applications are achieved. A minimum of 95 semester hours is re- 
quired prior to admission to the Medical Center campus. Only the best-qualified 
students are admitted at the fourth-year level at the Medical Center campus since 
facilities are limited. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours each in the humanities and social sciences . .12 

Physl. 103 and 234 9 

Zool. 104 and 333 9 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 5-11 

Total 39-45 

ART HISTORY 

Art 111 and 112 — Introduction to History of Art 8 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 1 13 and 114 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 117, 118, 125, 126, 225, and 226 — Drawing 14 

Art 119 and 120 — Design 6 

Art 129 and 130 — Anatomy 4 

Art 131 and 132 — Elementary Composition 4 

Art 151 and 152 — Sculpture 4 

Art 162 — Letterform Design 2 

Art 265 — Graphic Design I 3 

Art 215 — Basic Photography, or Journ. 223 — Photojournalism 3 

Professional electives 0-6 

Total 42-48 



252 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN PAINTING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting 

The curriculum in painting provides an extensive training as preparation for pro- 
fessional practice in painting and printmaking in their various aspects. The first 
two years are devoted primarily to the study of design and composition and the 
acquisition of representational skills ; the last two years are devoted to the develop- 
ment of creative expression in painting, drawing, printmaking, and other media. 
When followed by a program leading to the degree of Master of Fine Arts in 
Painting and Printmaking, this curriculum is recommended as preparation for 
teaching painting and related subjects at the college level. 
A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, 

social sciences, and natural sciences 18 

Physical education 4 

Total 26 

ART HISTORY 

Art 111 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 113 and 114 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 117 and 118 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Art 125 and 126 — Life Drawing I and II 4 

Art 225 and 226 — Intermediate Drawing 4 

Art 131 and 132 — Elementary Composition 4 

Total 26 

PAINTING 

The student must complete ten courses in painting and composition to a minimum of 26 
hours. Qualified students are encouraged to arrange special projects in conjunction with 
advisers. Painting and composition courses presently include: 

Art 141 and 142 — Still Life 4 

Art 231 and 232 — Intermediate Composition 6 

Art 233 and 234 — Advanced Composition 6 

Art 243 and 244 — Intermediate Painting 4 

Art 245 and 246 — Advanced Painting and Drawing 6 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 14-18 

Professional electives (Including one course in printmaking) 16-20 

Total 34 



CURRICULUM IN SCULPTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture 

The curriculum in sculpture provides a broad and solid foundation in the funda- 
mental disciplines of drawing, design, and painting, including both traditional and 
contemporary concepts. The learning of the time-honored techniques of sculpture 
such as modeling and carving is required, and experimentation with welding, metal 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 253 



casting, and plastics is fostered. The student is encouraged to experience a wide 
range of materials, techniques, methods, and styles. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, 

natural sciences, and social sciences 18 

Physical education 4 

Total 26 

HISTORY OF ART 

Art 111 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art 1 13 and 1 14 — Orientation to Art 2 

Art 1 17 and 118 — Drawing 6 

Art 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Art 1 25 and 1 26 — Life Drawing 4 

Art 141 and 142 — Still Life 4 

Art 192 — Mefalwork and Jewelry 2 

Art 1 94 — Pottery 2 

Total 26 

SCULPTURE 

The professional student must complete ten courses in sculpture to a minimum of 24 hours. 
Qualified students are encouraged to arrange special projects in conjunction with advisers. 
Sculpture courses presently include: 

Art 151 and 152 — Sculpture I and II 4 

Art 253 and 254 — Intermediate Sculpture 4 

Art 255 and 256 — Sculpture Material and Techniques 6 

Art 257 and 258 — Advanced Sculpture 4 

Art 259 and 260 — Advanced Sculpture Material and Techniques 6 

ELECTIVES 

General elecfives (see collego list of approved electives) 20-34 

Professional electives 12-16 

Total 36 



Department of Dance 



All applicants for the dance curricula, the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance or the 
Bachelor of .Arts in the Teaching of Dance, are required to satisfy a qualifying audi- 
tion prior to approval for admission. Potential new students who have a strong in- 
terest in dance but who have not had formal training are encouraged to audition. 
Instructions regarding the scheduling and content of auditions will be sent to all 
applicants by the Office of .Admissions and Records upon the receipt of a com- 
pleted application. 

Dance is an art form using movement as its medium of expression and within 
the dance major curricula, emphasis is placed on movement proficiency and under- 
standing. Students are required to enroll in a daily modern technique class while 
in residence and must achieve the level of advanced technique prior to graduation. 



254 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



An environment is provided in which dance students may begin to develop as 
artists-choreographers. A dance composition sequence begins with improvisation, 
continues through beginning, intermediate, and advanced composition, and culmi- 
nates with dance production workshop. The dance curricula also include musical 
training for dancers, ballet technique, dance teaching methods courses, and courses 
in dance history, theory, and philosophy. Dancers rehearse and perform in student 
works as well as those of faculty and guest choreographers. 

The Krannert Center for the Performing Arts houses the Department of Dance 
and a large studio with mirrors and barres. Theatre space in the center is also avail- 
able for dance performances. Other studios are located at 1115 West Oregon Street, 
Urbana, adjacent to the Krannert center, and in Freer Gymnasium, Urbana. A 
space for individual technical practice is also provided at 901 West Illinois Street, 
Urbana. 



CURRICULUM IN DANCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance is a program offering preprofessional training 
in modern dance performance and composition with opportunity for study in ballet 
technique. The curriculum includes liberal arts courses as well as professional dance 
training. The presentation of a satisfactory senior project is a degree requirement 
for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance. The program is designed to prepare dancers 
with further training for professional work with a dance company as well as for 
teaching dance in private studios and schools, colleges, and universities. Students 
are also prepared to enter graduate school for further academic work in dance. 
A total of 130 hours is required for this degree. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Dance 150 — Orientation to Dance 2 

Dance 160 — Beginning Technique^ 3 

Dance 162 — Improvisation I 1 

Dance 168 — Music Theory and Practice 

for Dance I 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Electives or professional electives 4 

or Biol. 100 — Biological Science 1^ ....A 
Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Dance 160 — Beginning Technique^ 3 

Dance 163 — Improvisation II 1 

Dance 169 — Music Theory and Practice 

for Dance II 2 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human 
Physiology,^ or Biol. 101 — Biological 

Science iP 4 

Electives 5 

Total 15 



SECOND YEAR 

Dance 164 — Beginning Composition 2 

Donee 165 — Intermediate Technique' ....3 
Dance 166 — Beginning Ballet I, or 

Dance 266 — Intermediate Ballet 1^ ....1 

Humanities sequence* 3 

Physl. 234 — Human Anatomy and 

Physiology" 5 

Social science sequence'* 3 

Total 17 



Dance 165 — Intermediate Technique' ....3 
Dance 167 — Beginning Ballet II, or 

Dance 267 — Intermediate Ballet 11^ ...1 
Dance 264 — Intermediate Composition ...2 

Humanities sequence* 3 

Social science sequence* 3 

Electives 4 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Dance 243 — Creative Dance for Children. 3 

Dance 260 — Advanced Technique 3 

Dance 340 — History of Dance I 3 

Dance 365 — Advanced Composition 2 

Music literature elective 3-4 

Electives or professional elective^ 2 

Total 16-17 



Dance 244 — Teaching of Dance 3 

Dance 260 — Advanced Technique 3 

Dance 341 — History of Dance II 3 

Music literature elective 3-4 

Electives or professional elective' 4 

Total 16-17 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 255 



FOURTH YEAR 

Dance 260 — Advanced Technique I, or Dance 260 — Advanced Technique I, or 

Dance 360 — Advanced Technique II ...3 Dance 360 — Advanced Technique II ..3 

Dance 346 — Theory and Philosophy of Dance 345 — Dance Production Workshop. 3 

Dance 3 Music 304 — Composition for Dance 2 

Electives or professional elective' 6 Electives or professional elective' 4 

Electives 4-5 Electives 4-5 

Total 16-17 Total 16-17 



Students are required to enroll In a technique class, Dance 160, 165, 260, or 360 
each semester in residence as placed and should achieve the level of and enroll in one 
semester of Dance 260 prior to graduation. Each course may be repeated up to 12 hours. 

Biol. 100 and 101 or Zool. 104 and Physl. 103, and Physl. 234 satisfy the College of 
Fine and Applied Arts natural science sequence. 

^ Dance 166, 167, 266, 267 (ballet technique) may each be repeated once for credit. 
^ Humanities and social science sequence: See College of Fine and Applied Arts ap- 
proved sequences. 

Professional electives: Dance 350 — Repertory Workshop may be repeated up to 12 
hours; Dance 351 — Special Problems may be repeated up to 8 hours; Dance 199 — 
Undergraduate Open Seminar. Additional courses in ballet technique are recommended. 



CURRICULUM FOR THE PREPARATION OF TEACHERS OF DANCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of Dance 

A total of 130 hours is required for the degree. Graduates of this curriculum are 
eligible for the State Special Certificate as defined by the Illinois State Certification 
Board and arc prepared to teach dance in the public schools, elementary through 
high school level. In this degree program emphasis is placed upon a strong profes- 
sional dance background as well as liberal arts courses and fulfillment of teacher 
certification requirements. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 7 

Biology or physiology 3-6 

Human anatomy 5 

History of the United States 3 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Humanities (any approved sequence) 6 

Introductory psychology 3 

Physical and/ or health education 3 

Total 32-36 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Orientation to dance in the schools 2 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

Child development 3 

Principles of education 2 

Secondary school dance methods 3 

Educational practice 5 

Total 20 

PROFESSIONAL REQUIREMENTS IN DANCE 

Modern technique 20-23 

Ballet 1 

Improvisation 2 



256 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Composition 4 

Dance production workshop 3 

Donee history 6 

Creative dance for children 3 

Dance in the elementary school 2 

Music theory and practice for dance 4 

Professional dance electives 7-12 

Dance theory and philosophy 3 

Repertory 2 

Workshop 1-8 

Total 52-60 

SUPPORTING AREA REQUIREMENTS 

Music literature electives 6-8 

Electives (selected in consultation with adviser) 6-20 

Total 1 2-28 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN DANCE 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Orientation to dance 2 

Dance technique courses 9 

Improvisation 2 

Beginning composition 2 

Music theory and practice for dance 4 

Creative dance for children 3 

Teaching of dance 3 

Total 25 



Department of Landscape Architecture 

The Department of Landscape Architecture offers a four-year undergraduate cur- 
riculum leading to the professional degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
and a graduate curriculum leading to the Master of Landscape Architecture. 

The undergraduate curriculum is a balanced program of technical, design, 
and general education courses which equip the student with the necessary skills for 
professional practice in private offices or public agencies. The graduate curriculum 
offers advanced work and opportunities for specialization in selected areas towards 
potential careers in teaching, public service, or private practice. 

Departmental headquarters and the library are located in Mumford Hall. 
Classrooms, studios, and offices are located in Mumford Hall and in 1203, 1205, 
and 1205'/2 West Nevada Street, Urbana. 



CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 

This curriculum requires 132 semester hours of credit for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

L.A. 101 — Introduction to Landscape L.A. 102 — Site Planning 2 

Architecture 2 Arch, 172 — Basic Design II 3 

Arch. 171 — Basic Design I 3 Elective (general education sequence)* . . .4 

Biol. 100, or Bot. 100, or Geog. 103' 4 Math. 104 — Algebra and Trigonometry, 

U.P. 171 — Planning Cities and Regions ..3 or Math. 114 — Trigonometry 2-3 

Rhet. 105 or 108^ — Composition 4 Supporting elective^ 3 

Total 16 Elective 2 

Total 16-17 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



257 



SECOND YEAR 

L.A. 133 — Landscape Design 4 

L.A. 141 — Land Form Design 3 

L.A. 151 — Plant Materials I 3 

Supporting elective' 3 

Elective (general education sequence) ....3 



L.A. 134 — Site Design 4 

L.A. 122 — Landscape Surveys 3 

L.A. 152 — Plant Materials II 3 

Supporting elective 3 

Elective (general education sequence) ....3 



Total 



16 Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

L.A. 181 — Visual Communications 2 

L.A. 235 — Recreational Land Design ....4 

L.A. 243 — Site Engineering 3 

L.A. 253 — Planting Design I 3 

Elective (general education sequence) ... .4 

L.A. 200 — Field Trip I 

Total 16 



L.A. 182 — Visual Communications 2 

L.A. 236 — Urban Land Design 4 

L.A. 244 — Site Construction 3 

L.A. 254 — Planting Design II 3 

Electives (general education sequence) .4-5 
Total 16-17 



FOURTH YEAR 

L.A. 337 — Regional Landscape Design ...5 

Supporting electives 6 

Electives 7 

L.A. 200— Field Trip II 

Total 18 



L.A. 338 — Thesis Design Project 5 

L.A. 246 — Professional Practice 3 

L.A. 214 — History of Landscape 

Architecture 3 

Supporting elective 3 

Elective 3 

Total 17 



' A minimum of 6 credit hours of approved sequence courses is required in each of the 
areas of humanities, social sciences, or natural sciences for a minimum total of 18 credit 
hours. 

'A minimum total of 18 credit hours of professionally related courses selected from the 
recommended list of Supporting Electives is required, with a minimum of 3 credit hours in 
each of the categories of history, communications, techniques, and environment. (These are 
in addition to general education requirements.) 

^ The sequence Spch. Ill and 1 1 2 (6 hours) is a recommended alternative to rhetoric. 

Supporting Electives 

The following are recommended related courses (including subsequent courses for 
which those listed below are prerequisite). A minimum of 3 hours is to be selected 
from each category. A minimum total of 18 hours of supporting elective courses is 
required. 



CATEGORY I — COMMUNICATIONS HOURS 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Adv. 309 — Public Relations 2 

Art 151 — Sculpture 3 

Art 215 — Basic Photography 3 

Art 265 — Graphic Design 3 

Art — Drawing Courses 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

B.&T.W. 272 — Report Writing 3 

G.E. 304 — Professional Expression 3-4 

Journ. 233 — Publication Design 2 

Rhet. 133 — Principles of Composition 3 

R. TV 356 — Cinematography for Television 3 

CATEGORY II — HISTORY 

Anth. 220 — Introduction to Prehistory 3 

Anth. 260 — Peoples of the World: Introduction to Ethnography 3 

Anth. 331 — Aboriginal North America 3 

Arch. 211 — Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Architecture 3 

Arch. 212 — Introduction to Renaissance and Modern Architecture 3 



258 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Art 111 — Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art 4 

Art 112 — Introduction to Renaissance and Modern Art 4 

Art 115 — Art Appreciation 3 

Art 209 — Japanese Arts Workshop 2 

Art 211 — Art of Industrialized Society 2 

G.E. 220 — History of Engineering 3 

Geog. 223 — Geography of Anglo-America 3 

Geog. 241 — Historical Geography of Europe 3 

Geog. 325 — Historical Geography of North America 3 

Geog. 357 — Geography of the Middle East and North Africa 3 

Geog. 374 — Problems in Human Ecology 4 

U.P. 351 — History of Urban Planning 3 

CATEGORY III— TECHNIQUE 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

Agron. 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron. 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

Ag. Ec. 318 — Land Economics 3 

Ag. E. 256 or For. 256 — Surveying Agricultural and Forest Lands 2 

Ag. E. 357 — Land Drainage 3 

Avi. 101 — Private Pilot 3 

Arch. 242 — Environmental Technology II 4 

B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business law 3 

C.E. 201 — Engineering Surveying 4 

C.E. 230 — Introduction to Transportation Engineering 3 

C.E. 334 — Airport Design 3 

C.S. 101 or C.S. 121 — Introduction to Computer Programming 3 

For. 101 — General Forestry 3 

G.E. 290 — Legal Aspects of Engineering Contracts and Specifications 3 

G.E. 292 — Engineering Law 3 

Geog. 373 — Map Compilation and Construction 4 

Geog. 378 — Descriptive Interpretation of Remote Sensors 4 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 

Geol. 301 — Geomorphology 4 

Hort. 221 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 230 — Garden Flowers 3 

Hort. 236 — Turf Management 3 

Hort. 251 — Arboriculture 3 

CATEGORY IV — ENVIRONMENTAL 

Arch. 379 — Urban Housing 2 

Biol. 312 — Environmental Biology 5 

Bot, 381 — Plant Ecology 5 

Geog. 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Geog. 314 — Regional Problems in Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Geog. 383 — Urban Geography 3 

Geog. 384 — Interaction in the Geographical Environment 3 

Geog. 385 — Perception of the Geographical Environment 3 

L.A. 213 — People, Land, and Environment 3-4 

Rec. 320 — Park Management 3 

Rec. 321 — Recreational Use of Public Lands 3 

U.P. 374 — Urban Planning Theory 3 

U.P. 376 — Urban Planning Analysis 3 

U.P. 377 — Urban Planning Procedures 3 

U.P. 380 — Regional Planning 3 

U.P. 382 — Urban Planning Language and Thought 3 

U.P. 384 — Urban Design and Plan Method 3 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 259 



School of Music 

All applicants for music curricula are required to satisfy a qualifying audition in 
the majc^r performance area prior to approval for admission. In addition, applicants 
for music composition or history of music programs are required to submit original 
scores or other pertinent writings to substantiate their ability to pursue work in 
their chosen program of studies. Auditions are held on designated dates during the 
academic year. 

Applicants who cannot appear in person may submit tape recordings and other 
required materials, but all are urged to complete the requirement as early as pos- 
sible to expedite approval for admission. Each applicant must write to the director 
of the School of Music, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3034 Music 
Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801, specifying his major performance area and cur- 
riculum, to make specific audition arrangements. 

The School of Music offers a curriculum in music, with four options leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Music, and a curriculum in music education with 
vocal-choral or instrumental emphasis, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Music Education. A student enrolled in any applied music curriculum pursues 
throughout the four years of his course a major applied subject (such as piano, 
voice) in which two thirty-minute lessons a week are taken; and a minor or sec- 
ondary applied subject for two years during which one thirty-minute lesson a week 
is taken. Students in composition and history of music must complete 16 hours 
in the major applied music subject. Public performance is a definite part of the 
training in applied music, and all students, when sufficiently advanced, are re- 
quired to participate in student programs. As part of the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Music degree in applied music and composition, senior students must 
present a satisfactory public recital. 

Courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are offered to qualified students. (See page 
297.) Courses in music leading to this degree are predominantly in the fields of 
theory, history, and applied music. Applicants are required to have a rudimentary 
knowledge of theory and to satisfy a qualifying audition in the principal perfor- 
mance area. 

Applied music and courses in the history, theory, and appreciation of music 
are open to all qualified students in the University. 

Graduate courses leading to the degree of Master of Music, Master of Science 
in Music Education, Advanced Certificate in Music Education, Doctor of Educa- 
tion in Music Education, Doctor of Philosophy in Musicology, and Doctor of Musi- 
cal Arts in Composition, Choral Music, and Performance and Literature are offered 
under the regulations of the Graduate College. 

The University symphony orchestras. Chamber Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, 
Contemporary Chamber Players, jazz bands, choral groups (Oratorio Society, Uni- 
versity Chorus, Women's Glee Club, Men's Glee Club, University Choir), and small 
vocal ensembles are open to qualified students from any college. The Oratorio So- 
ciety, University Chorus, Madrigal Singers, Opera Group, and other ensembles are 
also open to members of the faculty and staff and residents of the community who 
are admitted by audition or by permission of the respective conductors. All students 
seeking degrees in the School of Music are required to complete four semesters of 
music ensemble courses. A student may register for a maximum of two such courses 
concurrently and may use a maximum of 6 semester hours of ensemble credit to 
apply toward his degree. 



260 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



The faculty and students of the School of Music present concerts and recitals 
each week of the school year. The School of Music also presents frequent radio 
broadcasts on and ofT campus and participates in television programs. Chamber 
music concerts are given frequently throughout the year by members of the faculty 
of the School of Music. Faculty artists and student musical groups are available for 
ofF-campus performances through the Extension in Music, Division of University 
Extension, 608 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

The School of Music occupies the Music Building, Tina Weedon Smith Me- 
morial Hall, Stiven House, and space in the Krannert Center for the Performing 
Arts. The facilities are equipped extensively with classrooms, studios, practice 
rooms, experimental-electronic music laboratories, musical instruments and audio- 
equipment, and several auditoria designed for public recitals and concerts. 



CURRICULUM IN MUSIC 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music 

This curriculum requires 130 semester hours of credit for graduation. 

The general education sequence requirements in the humanities, social sciences, 
and natural sciences and electives must be met from the college elective and general 
education sequence lists starting on page 240. 

Instrumental Music Major 

The instrumental major may be taken in piano, organ, harpsichord, violin, viola, 
violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, alto saxophone, cornet or 
trumpet, french horn, trombone, baritone, tuba, percussion, or harp. 

A student enrolled in this program takes two applied subjects, one a major 
(32 hours) and the other a minor (8 hours). 

Juniors and seniors must present satisfactory public recitals as part of the re- 
quirements for the Bachelor of Music degree. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Major applied music subject 4 Major applied music subject 4 

Minor applied music subject 2 Minor applied music subject 2 

Music 101 — Theory of Music I 3 Music 102 — Theory of Music II 3 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 Music 107 — Ear Training I 1 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill — Elective or Spch. 11 2 — Verbal 

Verbal Communication 3-4 Communication 2-3 

Total 14-15 Elective 2 

Total 14-15 

SECOND YEAR 

Major applied music subject 4 Major applied music subject 4 

Minor applied music subject 2 Minor applied music subject 2 

Music 103 — Theory of Music III 3 Music 104 — Theory of Music IV 3 

Music 108 — Ear Training II 1 Music 109 — Ear Training III 1 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

Foreign language 4 Foreign language 4 

Total 17 Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

History of music' 3 History of music' 3 

Major applied music subject 4 Major applied music subject 4 

Music 300 — Eighteenth Century Music 301 — Fugue 3 

Counterpoint 3 Music ensemble 1 

Music ensemble 1 Electives 6 

Electives 6 Total 17 

Total 17 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



261 



FOURTH YEAR 

Major applied music subject 4 

Music 330 — Applied Music Pedagogy 

(piano and string majors only) 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 3 

Electives or professional electives 6 

Total 16 



Major applied music subject 4 

Music 330 — Applied Music Pedagogy 

(piano and string majors only) 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives 5 

Electives or professional electives 5 

Total 17 



'To be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, or 317. 

Music Composition Major 

Within this program, major emphasis may be placed on the theory of music. Nec- 
essar>' course adjustments require approval of the theory division. 

Seniors must present a satisfactory recital of original compositions as part of 
the requirements for the Bachelor of Music degree. If the major is theory, an ad- 
vanced project determined and approved by the theory division is required. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music' 2 

Music 101 — Theory of Music I 3 

Music 106 — Composition 2 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Elective 3 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music 2 

Music 102 — Theory of Music II 3 

Music 107 — Ear Training I 1 

Elective or Spch. 112 — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Elective 3 

Music 106 — Composition 2 



Total 



15-16 Total 14-15 



SECOND YEAR 

Applied music 2 

Music 103 — Theory of Music III 3 

Music 106 — Composition 2 

Music 108 — Ear Training II 1 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 

French, German, or Italian 4 

Total 15 

THIRD YEAR 

Applied music 2 

History of music^ 3 

Music 200 — Instrumentation I 2 

Music 300 — Eighteenth Century 

Counterpoint 3 

Music 306 — Composition 4 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 3 

Total 18 



Applied music 2 

Music 104 — Theory of Music IV 3 

Music 106 — Composition 2 

Music 109 — Ear Training III 1 

Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

French, German, or Italian 4 

Total 15 



Applied music 2 

History of music^ 3 

Music 201 — Instrumentation II 2 

Music 301 — Fugue 3 

Music 306 — Composition 4 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 3 

Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 

Applied music 2 

Music 306 — Composition 4 

Music 320 — Proseminar 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives 6 

Elective or professional elective 2 

Total 17 



Applied music 2 

Music 306 — Composition 4 

Music 320 — Proseminar 2 

Music 315 — Contemporary Music 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 3 

Elective or professional elective 2 

Total 17 



' Whether or not piano has been the applied music subject, the student must acquire 
a thorough practical knowledge of the pianoforte. 

'To be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, or 317. 



262 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



History of Music Major 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music' 4 

Music 101 — Theory of Music I 3 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Elective of professional elective 2 

Total 14-15 

SECOND YEAR 

Applied music' 4 

Music 103 — Theory of Music III 3 

Music 108 — Ear Training II 1 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 

French or German^ 4 

Total 15 

THIRD YEAR 

History of music' 3 

Music 300 — Eighteenth Century 

Counterpoint 3 

Music ensemble 1 

French or German^ 4 

Literature'* 3 

Electives (nonmusic) 4 

Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

History of music' 3 

Music 229 — Thesis 2 

History 3 

Music theory (306, 307, 308, 318) 2-3 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives or professional electives d-l 

Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music' 4 

Music 102 — Theory of Music II 3 

Music 107 — Ear Training I 1 

Elective or Spch. 112 — 

Verbal Communication 2-3 

Electives or professional electives 4 

Total 14-15 

Applied music' 4 

Music 1 04 — Theory of Music IV 3 

Music 109 — Ear Training III 1 

Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

French or German' 4 

Total 15 

History of music' 3 

Music 301 — Fugue 3 

Music ensemble 1 

French or German^ 4 

Literature^ 3 

Electives (nonmusic) 4 

Total 18 

History of music' 3 

Music 299 — Thesis 2 

History 3 

Music theory (306, 307, 308, 319) 2-3 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives or professional electives 5-6 

Total 17 



' Whether or not piano has been the applied music subject, the student must demon- 
strate reasonable facility in piano by the end of the sophomore year. 

^ Tv/o years in one language ore required except with special permission of adviser. 
'To be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, or 317. 
* Engl. 363 and 364 are recommended. 



Voice Major 

The major applied music subject throughout the course includes work in vocal dic- 
tion as well as private lessons in voice. At least 8 hours each in Italian, French, and 
German are required for the voice major. A student who has not completed two 
years of one of these languages in high school should begin his study of languages 
during his freshman year. 

Juniors and seniors must present satisfactory public recitals as part of the 
requirement for the Bachelor of Music degree. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



263 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Music 101 — Theory of Music I 3 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 

Music 166 — English Diction, or 

Music 167 — Italian Diction 1 

Music 180 — Piano 2 

Music 181 — Voice 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Total 14-15 

SECOND YEAR 

Music 103 — Theory of Music III 3 

Music 108 — Ear Training II 1 

Music 168 — German Diction, or 

Music 169 — French Diction 1 

Music 180 — Piano 2 

Music 181 —Voice 3 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 

Foreign language 4 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

History of muslc^ 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Music 300 — Eighteenth Century 

Counterpoint 3 

Music 366 — Vocal Repertoire I 1 

Music 381 — Voice 3 

Foreign language 4 

Elective 3 

Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

Music ensemble 1 

Music 330 — Applied Music Pedagogy ...2 

Music 381 —Voice 3 

Electives 6 

Electives or professional electives 4 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Music 102 — Theory of Music II 3 

Music 107 — Ear Training I 1 

Music 166 — English Diction, or 

Music 167 — Italian Diction 1 

Music 180 — Piano 2 

Music 181 — Voice 3 

Elective or Spch. 112 — 

Verbal Communication 2-3 

Elective 2 

Total 14-15 

Music 104 — Theory of Music IV 3 

Music 109 — Ear Training III 1 

Music 168 — German Diction, or 

Music 169 — French Diction 1 

Music 1 80 — Piano 2 

Music 181 —Voice 3 

Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

Foreign language 4 

Total 17 

History of music' 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Music 301 — Fugue 3 

Music 367 — Vocal Repertoire II 1 

Music 381 —Voice 3 

Foreign language 4 

Elective 3 

Total 18 

Music ensemble 1 

Music 330 — Applied Music Pedagogy ...2 

Music 381 —Voice 3 

Electives 6 

Elective or professional elective 3 

Total 15 



'To be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, or 317. 



CURRICULUM IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. This curriculum 
prepares its graduates for teaching music in grades K through 12. For teacher 
education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 to 113. 



Vocal-Choral Emphasis 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 or 108 and a performance-based speech course 6 

General psychology 3 

One approved sequence in the natural sciences 6 

One approved sequence in the humanities 6 

U.S. history 3 



264 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



U.S. government (including Illinois and federal constitutions) 3 

English or American literature 3 

Physical and/or health education 3 

Speech for teachers 3 

Total 36 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

Introduction to teaching 2 

Principles of education 2 

Technic of teaching 3 

Educational practice 6 

Total 18 

MUSIC REQUIREMENTS 

Applied music major 12 

Applied music minor 8 

Voice diction or advanced group instruction in piano 4 

Conducting 6 

Music theory and sightsinging 15 

Music history and literature 8 

Music ensemble 4 

Choral music education 2 

Instrumental music education 2 

General music education 6 

Total 67 

ELECTIVES 

General or professional electives 9 

Instrumental Emphasis 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. 1 1 1 and 112, or Rhet. 105 or 108 and a performance-based speech course 6 

General psychology 3 

One approved sequence in the natural sciences 6 

One approved sequence in the humanities 6 

U.S. history 3 

U.S. government (including Illinois and federal constitutions) 3 

English or American literature 3 

Physical and/or health education 3 

Total 33 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Educational psychology 3 

Introduction to teaching 2 

Principles of education 2 

Technic of teaching 3 

Educational practice 6 

Total 18 

MUSIC REQUIREMENTS 

Applied music major 12 

Group instruction in piano' 6 

Conducting 6 



' If the applied music major is piano, the student in consultation with his adviser, 
must select a secondary major instrument in winds, percussion, or strings as a substitute for 
class piano. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 265 



Music theory and sighfsinging 17 

Music history and literature 8 

Supplementary instruments 12 

Class voice 2 

Music ensemble 4 

Instrumental music education 4 

Total 71 

ELECTIVES 

Generol or professional electives 8 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Rudiments of theory 2 

Basic music literature 2 

Elements of conducting 2 

String instruments 4 

Piano, or bond and orchestral instruments (to be chosen with consent of adviser) 4 

Teaching of instrumental music 2 

Wind instruments (two courses required) 4 

Total 20 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN VOCAL MUSIC 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Rudiments of theory 2 

Basic music literature 2 

Elements of conducting 2 

Class instruction in voice 2 

Piano 4 

Voice 4 

Choral literature and conducting I 2 

Teaching of choral music 2 

Music ensemble (vocal) 1 

Total 21 



Department of Theatre 



All applicants for the curriculum in acting are required to satisfy a qualifying 
audition prior to approval for admission. All applicants for the curriculum in 
directing and playwriting bases and for the curriculum in technology and design 
are required to present themselves for an interview. Auditions and interviews are 
held one Saturday during October, November, December, and January, and on 
several other designated dates during the year. Each applicant must write to the 
Department of Theatre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4-122 Kran- 
nert Center for the Performing Arts, Urbana, Illinois 61801, to make specific audi- 
tion or interview arrangements. 

The Department of Theatre oflfers a four-year curriculum leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre with majors in three areas: acting, bases of 
directing and playwriting. and technology and design. These provide basic knowl- 
edge and training for the student who seeks to qualify as a technician and for the 
student who wishes to prepare for apprenticeship in a professional theatre company. 

The department is housed in the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 
and the theatres and shops of the center serve as laboratories for theatre students, 
who practice the arts of the theatre in a program of productions of plays, opera, 
and dance. 



266 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN THEATRE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre 

A minimum of 128 hours of credit is required for the degree. 



Acting Major 

Spch. 177, 178, and Engl. 102 may not be presented in fulfillment of the general 
education requirement in humanities. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 100 — Practicum I 3 

Theot. 101 — Modern Forms 4 

Theat. 171 — Speech-Fundamentals 2 

Theat. 174 — Movement Improvisation ...2 

Music 100 — Theory 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 100 — Practicum I 3 

Theat. 102 — Contemporary Forms 3 

Theat. 121 — Scenecraft 2 

Theat. 172 — Speech-Dialogue 2 

Art 116 — Masterpieces of Art 2 

Elective or professional elective 2 



Total 



14 



SECOND YEAR 

Theat. 100 — Practicum I 3 

Theat. 103 — Classical and Medieval 

Forms 3 

Theat. 131 — Light and Sound 3 

Theat. 141 — Makeup I 2 

Theat. 173 — Speech-Dialects 2 

Humanities sequence 3 

Total 16 



Theat. 100 — Practicum I 3 

Theat. 104 — Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Century Forms 3 

Theot. 175 — Movement-Techniques 2 

Humanities sequence 3 

Music 178 — Class Instruction in Voice ...2 

Elective 3 

Total 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Theot. 105 — Seventeenth and Eighteenth 

Century Forms 3 

Theot. 142 — Makeup II 2 

Theot. 176 — Acting-Characterization ....3 

Theot. 300 — Practicum II 3 

H. Ec. 285 — History of Costume 2 

Dance 101 — Beginning Modern I 1 

Social science sequence 3 

Total 17 



Theat. 271 — Acting-Studio I 3 

Theat. 281 — Directing I 3 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 3 

Music 115 — Introduction to Opera 2 

Dance 102 — Beginning Modern II 1 

Social science sequence 3 

Elective 2 

Total 17 



FOURTH YEAR 

Theot. 272 — Acting-Period Styles 3 

Theat. 280 — Dramatic Writing and 

Structure 3 

Theot. 300 — Practicum II 3 

Theat. 372 — Acting-Theories 3 

Natural science sequence 3 

Total 15 



Theot. 241 — Costume Design 3 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 3 

Theot. 371 — Acting-Studio II 3 

Natural science sequence 3 

Electives 4 

Total 16 



Directing and Playwriting Bases Major 

The general studies requirement in humanities is fulfilled by Engl. 101 and 103. 



FIRbT YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 100 — Practicum I 3 

Theot. 101 — Modern Forms 4 

Theot. 171 — Speech-Fundamentals 2 

Theot. 174 — Movement-Improvisation ....2 

Music 100 — Theory 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 100 — Practicum I 3 

Theot. 102 — Contemporary Forms 3 

Theot. 121 — Scenecraft 2 

Theot. 1 72 — Speech-Dialogue 2 

Art 116 — Masterpieces of Art 2 

Elective or professional elective 2 

Total 14 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



267 



SECOND YEAR 

Theat. 100 — Pracficum I 3 

Theat. 103 — Classical and Medieval 

Forms 3 

Theat. 131 — Light and Sound 3 

Theat. 141 — Makeup I 2 

Theat. 173 — Speech-Dialects 2 

Engl. 101 — Introduction to Poetry 3 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

Theat. 105 — Seventeenth and Eighteenth 

Century Forms 3 

Theat. 176 — Acting-Characterization ....3 

Theat. 300 — Procticum II 3 

H. Ec. 285 — History of Costume 2 

Social science sequence 3 

Elective 2 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Theat. 222 — Scene Design I 3 

Theat. 272 — Acting-Period Styles 3 

Theat. 300 — Procticum II 3 

Natural science sequence 3 

Electives 4 

Total 16 



Theat. 100 — Procticum I 3 

Theat. 104 — Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Century Forms 3 

Theat. 140 — Costume Construction 2 

Theat. 175 — Movement-Techniques 2 

Engl. 103 — Introduction to Fiction 3 

Music 178 — Class Instruction in Voice ...2 
Total 16 

Theat. 280 — Dramatic Writing and 

Structure 3 

Theat. 281 — Directing I 3 

Theat. 300 — Procticum II 3 

Music 115 — Introduction to Opera 2 

Social science sequence 3 

Elective 3 

Total 17 

Theat. 241 — Costume Design 3 

Theat. 300 — Procticum II 3 

Theat. 381 — Directing II 3 

Natural science sequence 3 

Electives 5 

Total 17 



Technology and Design Major 

With options in scenery and in costume. The general education requirement in 
humanities is fulfilled by Art 1 1 1 and 1 12. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 100 — Procticum I 2 

Theat. 101 — Modern Forms 4 

Theat. 121 — Scenecroft 2 

Art 117 — Drawing I 3 

Art 119 — Design I 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Total 18 

SECOND YEAR 

Theat. 100 — Procticum I 2 

Theat. 103 — Classical and Medieval 

Forms 3 

Theat. Ill — Material and Processes: 

Textiles 2 

Theof. 131 — Light and Sound 3 

Art 121 — Drawing Theory 2 

Natural science sequence 3 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 100 — Procticum I 2 

Theat. 102 — Contemporary Forms 3 

Art 118 — Drawing II 3 

Art 120 — Design II 3 

Electives 3 

Electives or professional electives 2 

Total 16 

Theat. 100 — Procticum I 2 

Theat. 104 — Sixteenth and Seventeenth 

Century Forms 3 

Theat. 112 — Materials and Processes: 

Wood, Metal 2 

Theat. 170 — Fundamentals of Acting ... .3 

Art 122 — Drawing Theory 2 

Natural science sequence 3 

Total 15 



268 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THIRD YEAR 

Theat. 105 — Seventeenth and Eighteenth 

Century Forms 3 

Theat. 220 — Advanced Scenecraft^ 2 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 2 

Art 111 — Introduction to Ancient and 

Medieval Art 4 

Art 201 — Watercolor I 2 

H. Ec. 285 — History of Costume' 2 

Social science sequence 3 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Theat. 222 — Scene Design I 3 

Theat. 272 — Acting-Period Styles' 3 

Theat. 281 — Directing I 3 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 3 

Theat. 330 — Photoprojection Techniques\2 

Advanced art history 3 

Elective" 1 

Elective 2 

Total 16 



^ Scenery option. 
' Costume option. 



Theat. 113 — Materials and Processes: 

Paper, Plastics 2 

Theat. 140 — Costume Construction 2 

Theat. 141— Makeup l' 2 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 2 

Art 112 — Introduction to Renaissance 

and Modern Art 4 

Social science sequence 3 

Elective^ 1 

Elective' 3 

Total 16 

Theat. 221 — Advanced Scenery Painting\2 

Theat. 231 — Lighting Design 3 

Theat. 241 — Costume Design 3 

Theat. 242 — Costume Accessories' 2 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 3 

Theat. 310 — Theatre Planning and 

Programming' 2 

Theat. 320 — Scene Design iT 3 

Electives' 5 

Total 16 



Deparfment of Urban and Regional Planning 

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers an undergraduate curric- 
ulum leading to the Bachelor of Urban Planning degree, as well as graduate study 
leading to the Master of Urban Planning degree. 

The four-year undergraduate program is intended to prepare students both 
for careers in public service professions and for graduate work in urban planning 
or related fields. The curriculum combines general studies in the social and physical 
sciences with more specific course work in urban studies, graphic and quantitative 
methods, and the theory and practice of urban and regional planning. 

The department's administrative offices are at 909 West Nevada Street, Ur- 
bana, Illinois 61801. Classrooms and workshop space are located at 1001 West 
Nevada Street, Urbana, and 807 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana. The City Plan- 
ning and Landscape Architecture Library is in Mumford Hall. 

The Bureau of Urban and Regional Planning Research, 909 West Nevada 
Street, provides a vehicle for the involvement of both faculty and students in a wide 
range of public policy-oriented research projects, continuing education programs, 
community service activities, and publication projects. 



CURRICULUM IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Urban Planning 

A total of 124 hours is required for this degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill, 112 4-6 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of these areas: humanities, natural 

sciences, and social sciences 18 

Introductory course in sociology 3 

Introductory course in economics 3 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 269 



Two courses In political science 6 

Electives chosen from the approved college list 12-20 

Total 48-50 

GRAPHICS AND QUANTITATIVE METHODS 

Basic design and graphics: At least two courses in basic design and graphics or 
survey techniques such as Arch. 171, 172, Art 119, 120, 185, 186, 263, Geog. 373, 
LA. 122 6 

Statistical analysis: Sociology, mathematics, computer science, economics, or other 

courses In statistics 6 

Minimum total 12 

URBAN STUDIES 

Additional professional elective courses as approved by departmental adviser. 
Suggested urban studies courses Include Anth. 174, 369, 374; Arch. 317, 323, 
379; C.E. 230, 240, 333; Econ. 360; Fin. 364, 365; Geog. 378, 383, 384, 385; Pol. 
S. 305, 306, 353, 357, 361 ; Soc. 223, 225, 276, 360 1 8-24 

URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING 

U.P. 171 — Planning of Cities and Regions 3 

U.P. 236, 337, and 338 — Urban Planning Studio I, II, and III 17 

U.P. 351 — History of Urban Planning, or U.P. 374 — Urban Planning Theory 3 

U.P. 376 — Planning Analysis 4 

U.P. 377 — Comprehensive Planning Procedure 4 

U.P. 378 — Planning Legislation and Administration 3 

Minimum total 34 

URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING OPTIONAL COURSES 

U.P. 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar varies 

U.P. 240 — Planning Internship, or U.P. 340 — Advocacy Field Work (may be substi- 
tuted for one studio) varies 

U.P. 260 — Special Problems varies 

U.P. 380 — Survey of Regional Planning 3 

U.P. 382 — Language and Thought of Urban Planning 3 

U.P. 384 — Urban Design and Planning Methods 3 

Minimum total 6 



f, 



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1 







S 






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
AND SCIENCES 

University of Illinois at Urb ana-Champaign 
270 Lincoln Hall 
Urb ana, Illinois 61801 



The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the largest and third oldest 
college at the Urbana-Champaign campus, serving a diverse group of 
undergraduate students. In keeping with its size and diversity, the college 
offers a wide variety of academic programs, giving the student breadth 
of learning and access to scholars of national and international reputa- 
tion. The faculty is distinctive in its ability to transmit knowledge and 
in its commitment to extend the frontiers of knowledge through research. 
An important aim of the college is to provide a broad spectrum of 
educational opportunities within a framework of liberal education. Under- 
lying all college requirements is a desire to promote fluency in English, 
literacy in at least one foreign language, and a basic understanding of 
systems of thought in the humanities, social sciences, and physical and 
biological sciences. In keeping with this aim is the belief that as important 
as it is to know facts, it is more important to learn how to discover them 
and how to assess their value. Throughout the undergraduate years stu- 
dents should come to an understanding of themselves and their relation- 
ship to other fellow beings, to nature, and to the structure of society. The 
purpose of a liberal education is not to impose conclusions or doctrines but 
rather to provide the means for students to reach their own decisions 
and beliefs after thoughtful deliberation. 

271 



272 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is divided into four general categories of 
departments which in some cases are under the organizational structure of schools. 
The School of Life Sciences consists of the Departments of Botany, Entomology, 
Microbiology, Physiology and Biophysics, and Zoology, and administers the inter- 
departmental major in biology. The School of Humanities is composed of the 
Departments of Classics; English; French; Germanic Languages and Literatures; 
History; Philosophy; Slavic Languages and Literature; Spanish, Italian, and Portu- 
guese; and Speech; and the Programs in Comparative Literature and in Religious 
Studies. The Division of Social Sciences consists of the Departments of Anthro- 
pology, Economics, Geography, Linguistics, Political Science, Psychology, and 
Sociology. Departments in the physical sciences include the School of Chemical 
Sciences (Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Chemistry), Astronomy, Geol- 
ogy, and Mathematics. 

The college's undergraduate academic programs are grouped into three cate- 
gories: the general curriculum, the sciences and letters curriculum, and specialized 
curricular programs. 

The general curriculum is not a formal degree program but serves as an 
advising center and college office for students who have not decided on a major 
or program of study. Individual advising, group orientation sessions, and printed 
materials describing majors and career opportunities are some of the resources 
available in this curriculum. Entering freshmen and continuing students with less 
than 45 semester hours may select the general curriculum and may remain in the 
program until they complete 56 academic hours. During this academic interim, all 
college policies and regulations apply to general curriculum students. 

The sciences and letters curriculum includes the traditional nucleus of majors 
in the biological sciences, humanities, physical sciences, and social sciences. In 
addition to the departmental courses prescribed for the major and minor, students 
must fulfill the foreign language and general education requirements. Both these 
general requirements and the listing of departmental majors and minors are de- 
scribed beginning on page 280. In addition this curriculum includes a special inter- 
disciplinary major (Individual Plans of Study) and interdepartmental majors and 
minors in American civilization, Asian studies, Latin American studies, medieval 
civilization, religious studies, Russian language and area studies, and social welfare. 

Specialized curricula are distinct curricula which are offered for preprofessional 
or pregraduate preparation. These curricula include the teacher education curricula, 
which upon satisfactory completion, confer a bachelor's degree and the state cer- 
tificate for teaching. Although many of the general college requirements are similar 
to those in the sciences and letters majors and minors, in some cases, requirements 
may vary. The preprofessional health curricula are not degree programs at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus, but rather are designed as programs of studies leading 
to admission into one of the health professions, either at the College of Medicine 
or the College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago, 
or elsewhere. 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

General admission requirements and procedures of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences are outlined in the Admissions section starting on page 19. These require- 
ments were established to insure that all entering students are intellectually capable 
of completing degree programs successfully and of gaining the most value from 
the educational opportunities available. 

Prospective freshmen who plan to enter the college are strongly encouraged 
to include at least two years of algebra and a year of plane geometry and four 
years of a foreign language in their secondary school program. Successful comple- 
tion of four years of a single foreign language will have met the college foreign Ian- 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 273 



guage degree requirement. Although inatheinatics is not a degree requirement, a 
solid foundation will assist a student in making the most of the educational oppor- 
tunities here. 

It is recommended that academic subjects continue to be elected during the 
last year in high school. Ccmtinued good study habits and intellectual exercise will 
help entering freshmen successfully through beginning college-level programs. All 
new freshmen are also urged to take the University of Illinois placement examina- 
tions to determine correct course placement and attend the Advanced Enrollment 
Program during the summer. (See page 45.) 



ADVISING 

Academic advising can serve a vitally important role in a student's education. The 
choice of a major field, the selection of individual courses, and the development of 
postgraduate goals, all of which can be aided substantially by advising, will have 
great effects on the direction a person takes, both inside and outside the academic 
community. On a more personal level, a continuing and interested association with 
an individual faculty member can he particularly rewarding to a student on a 
campus of this size. 

Students who are presumed to have a basic understanding of the academic 
routines, those with sophomore rank or higher, may act as their own advisers in 
submitting a request for a pn^gram of courses and in adding or dropping courses. 
This arrangement is not intended in any way to discourage student consultation 
with an academic adviser; indeed, we strongly encourage such consultation. We 
hope, rather, that the authority of the student to sign his own schedule card and 
change-of-program card will relieve advising contacts of their more mechanical and 
clerical aspects, and will enable students and advisers to spend their time together 
in more substantial areas of discussion. 

In addition to departmental faculty advisers, the dean's staff of the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences stands ready to assist students. Students with academic 
problems and those who are unable to obtain information from other sources are 
encouraged to use the services of the dean's staff. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Individual Plans of Study 

Individual Plans of Study (IPS) is an experimental program in the science and 
letters curriculum. Students who qualify for IPS may design their own special cur- 
ricula from University course offerings. A student is admitted to the program on 
the basis of a written proposal stating the nature of the study and a supporting letter 
from a faculty member who has agreed to serve as the student's advi.ser. Students 
who are interested are asked to contact Individual Plans of Study, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 408 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801, 
to discuss further the possibilities for shaping their own curricula. 

Students admitted to the IPS program arc required to complete the Univer- 
sity rhetoric requirement and the college requirements of foreign language and 
general education. Beyond that, the student, his adviser, and the IPS staff make 
the decisions concerning the work the student will undertake. The IPS advisory 
committee decides when a student has satisfied requirements for graduation. An IPS 
student receives either the Bachelor of Science or the Bachelor of Arts degree, 
whichever is appropriate to his plan of study. 

Prelaw Advising 

The education of a lawyer begins long before he enters law school. His effective and 
satisfying pursuit of the profession may depend not only upon mastery of the scope 



274 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



and operation of the legal system, hut also upon proficiency in verhal expression, 
comprehension of and ahility to analyze complex sul)jects, understanding of the 
physical and social worlds in which we live, ahility to associate and work with 
others, and disposition to accept and discharge responsibility. A law school cannot 
develop all these qualities in its students during three years of legal training. Thus, 
good law schools everywhere require substantial prclegal study as a condition of 
admission to law study. This period of education before law school should be looked 
upon as a very important phase of one's preparation for a place in the legal profes- 
sion and in society generally. A student should select his prelegal studies for maxi- 
mum benefit, not with undue regard for minimum requirements. 

Because prior education in diverse fields may prove valuable to the law student 
and to the graduate lawyer, schools of law have no specific prelegal requirements. 
Students are advised, however, to consult the assistant dean for law advising con- 
cerning appropriate course offerings which can be advantageously pursued by in- 
dividuals interested in a career in law. The faculty of the University of Illinois 
College of Law has prepared a pamphlet entitled Education for a Career in Law 
which provides a useful overview of the profession. Copies of this pamphlet may be 
obtained from the College of Law, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
Champaign, Illinois 61820. The Association of American Law Schools has also 
prepared Law Study and Practice in the United States (St. Paul, Minnesota: West 
Publishing Company). 

Study Abroad 

LIBERAL ARTS STUDY ABROAD 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has established a special course (L.A.S. 
299) which provides credit for foreign study. This course is open also to students 
who are enrolled in other colleges within the University. A student's proposal for 
study abroad must have prior approval from his major department and his college 
office. Final determination of appropriate credit is made upon the student's com- 
pletion of the work. 

The course grants from to 15 semester hours of credit each semester and 
may be repeated to a maximum of 30 semester hours per academic year, or to a 
total of 36 semester hours, all of which must be earned within one calendar year. 

Inquiries should be addressed to the Students Abroad Office, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 309 Illini Tower, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE CENTER FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES IN ROME 

The University of Illinois participates in the Intercollegiate Center for Classical 
Studies in Rome sponsored by Stanford University. The program consists of two 
terms, corresponding in general with an extended semester system. Instruction, 
educational field trips, vacations, and examinations are scheduled so that for each 
term the student completes the equivalent of two academic quarters of work. Stu- 
dents accepted for the fall term may either return on completion of that term or 
remain for the full academic year. 

During each term the curriculum provides a balance of Greek readings, Latin 
readings, ancient history (Greek and Roman), ancient art, archaeology, and ele- 
mentary Greek if students require it. The normal course load for each term is 18 
semester hours. 

To be eligible for admission an applicant must be a bona fide major in classics 
(Greek, Latin, or both in combination), or art history; have had at least one se- 
mester or two quarters of Greek ; and should ha\'e a general grade average of B. 
The selection committee may make certain exceptions and good students without 
Greek should apply. 

The center is located in a villa containing classrooms, a library, and living 
accommodations for students and faculty. The cost of $1,700 per term includes 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 275 



travel to Rome from home or college, whichever is closer; tuition; room; hoard; the 
major cost of trips outside Rome ; and ordinary medical services at the center. 

Students accepted for this program register at their home campuses and those 
holding scholarships having an actual cash value will retain them. Illinois state 
tuition scholarships are not available for this program. The center awards a limited 
number of scholarships based on need and academic record. 

Undergraduate students are usually nominated to participate in the program 
during their junior year. Early application is essential since nominations to the 
managing cc^mmittee are made at least 120 days before the opening of each session. 
Applications for admission and scholarships and additional information may be 
obtained from the Department of Classics. University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, 4072 Foreign Languages Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN FRANCE FOR STUDENTS OF FRENCH 

The University of Illinois sponsors a year abroad program in France which consti- 
tutes the equivalent of a year in residence on the American campus. The program 
consists of five weeks of language review and cultural orientation at the University 
of Grenoble, followed by eight months at the University of Paris. Students take 
courses in French language, literature, history, geography, art, political institutions, 
and other subjects of particular interest to each participant. All courses are taught 
by French professors. 

Sophomores, juniors, and seniors majoring in French language, literature, and 
in the teaching of French are strongly urged to take advantage of this program. 
.An applicant should have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) University grade-point average 
and a 3.5 grade-point average in French. Prior to the year of participation in the 
program the student should have completed the following courses: one semester or 
two quarters of French literature (introduction, survey, century, or genre course), 
and a year of language courses beyond the customary two years of introductory 
French or its equivalent. 

The students pay only for transportation, living expenses, books, tuition, and 
ofT-campus fees. The total cost is comparable to the average expenses incurred dur- 
ing the academic year on the campus at Urbana-Champaign. Fellowships, loans, 
and tuition and fees waivers are all applicable to the program. 

Transfer students are eligible for admission but during the time of their par- 
ticipation they must be enrolled at one of the two sponsoring institutions. 

The application deadline is February 15. Application forms and a detailed 
brochure are available from the Department of French, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, 2090 Foreign Languages Building. Urbana, Illinois 61801, and 
from the Department f)f French, University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, 1408 
University Hall, Chicago, Illinois 60607. 

STUDY OPPORTUNITIES IN AUSTRIA 

The Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures sponsors a two-semester 
program at the Padagogische Akademie, Baden, Austria. Students take courses in 
language, literature, education, and civilization at the Akademie and elective 
courses at either the Akademie in Baden or at an institution in Vienna. Thirty-two 
hours of residence credit are granted upon completion of the program. 

Applicants should have at least a 3.75 (A^5.0) overall grade-point average, 
a 4.0 grade-point average in CJerman, and language proficiency at the Ger. 212 
level. Students in the curriculum preparatory to the teaching of German can fulfill 
several College of Education requirements in Baden. Qualified students in colleges 
other than the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are encouraged to participate 
and to develop individual prf)grams with the aid of their advisers. Transfer students 
are eligible for admission but must be enrolled at the University of Illinois during 
the time of their participation. 

Special low-cost transatlantic travel arrangements are available. The cost of 
room and board at the Urbana-Champaign campus normally approximates the cost 



276 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



of both transatlantic travel and room and board at Baden. Beyond that, students 
pay only regular University of Illinois tuition and off-campus fees. Fellowships, 
loans, and tuition and fees waivers are applicable to the program. Detailed infor- 
mation about the program is available from the Department of Germanic Lan- 
guages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3072 Foreign 
Languages Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

RUSSIAN LANGUAGE STUDY AT LENINGRAD STATE UNIVERSITY 

The University of Illinois is one of fourteen American colleges and universities 
which sponsors a cooperative Russian Language Program at Leningrad State Uni- 
versity. The semester program lasts sixteen weeks with several weekend side trips, 
and the summer program provides three weeks of instruction and three weeks of 
travel. 

Classes are conducted in Russian by the university faculty; the curriculum is 
largely devoted to the intensive study of language and literature. American students 
live in dormitories with Soviet students, eat in the university cafeteria, and par- 
ticipate in the student life of the university. 

Most participants are undergraduate language majors, but the program is 
open to students of literature, history, area studies, and other disciplines as well. 
Limited scholarship funds are provided liy the University of Illinois. On occasion, 
the U.S. Office of Education has provided funds for the summer program, and 
scholarship funds for the semester program have been granted by the Ford 
Foundation. 

Additional information and application forms are available from the Depart- 
ment of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, 3092 Foreign Languages Building, Urbana, Illinois 6180L 

SPANISH SUMMER PROGRAM IN MEXICO 

The Committee on Institutional Cooperation, of which the University of Illinois 
is a member, sponsors an annual eight-week summer program of Spanish at the 
Universidad Ibero-Americana in Mexico City. It is intended primarily for students 
whose area of specialization is Spanish, but it is open to undergraduate students 
from other disciplines who have a demonstrated ability in the use of Spanish. Par- 
ticipants are expected to enroll in a full program of three basic courses for which 
they may receive 8 semester hours of credit which is acceptal)le as residence 
work toward the University of Illinois degree. 

Each applicant must have the equivalent of a third-year college-level compe- 
tence in Spanish, show a 4.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average in Spanish courses and 
be in good academic standing, and arrange for a letter of recommendation attesting 
to scholarship and language competence from a faculty member in his home 
department. 

The fee for the program is approximately $600 and includes one-way trans- 
portation to Mexico City, room and board, tuition, and certain scheduled excursions. 
Limited scholarship aid is available for some participants. 

Completed applications must be received by the director of the program by 
mid-March. Further information may be obtained from the Department of Spanish, 
Italian, and Portuguese, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4080 Foreign 
Languages Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN SPAIN: BARCELONA AND MADRID 

The Urbana-Champaign and Chicago Ciirclc campuses sj^onsor a year abroad pro- 
gram in Spain which is equivalent to two semesters of study in residence. Thirty 
semester hours of credit may be earned in this nine-month program which begins 
each year in September. 

After an orientation session in Madrid, students complete two semesters of 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 277 



study at the Uni\crsity of Madrid. The program is designed for juniors majoring 
in Spanish or the teaching of Spanish, hut seniors and well-quaHfied sophomores 
may also apply. Students majoring in other areas will be considered if their work 
would be enhanced by a year's study of language and literature. Highly qualified 
students from other institutions are also eligible to participate in this program. 
Students must ha\e completed a fourth-semester course in Spanish or the equivalent 
and have at least a 4.0 (A ==5.0) grade-point average in Spanish and a minimum 
overall grade-point average of 3.5 to be eligible for consideration. 

The cost for each student is about $1,400, which includes one-way air fare, 
plus University of Illinois tuition and fees. The application deadline is February 1 ; 
additional information and application forms are available from the Department 
of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, University pf Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
4080 Foreign Languages Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors at Graduation 

College honors at graduation are awarded on the basis of discharge by the student 
of one of the following: successful completion of 25 hours of honors courses (or 
of work on honors learning contracts) ; or successful completion of 50 hours of 200- 
and 300-level course work : or satisfaction of the requirements for departmental 
distinction. The award of college honors is made according to the following ranges: 
Cum laude if the college grade-point average places a student in the top 12 percent 
of the graduating class but not in the top 7 percent; Magna cum laude if the col- 
lege grade-point average places a student in the top 7 percent of the graduating 
class but not in the top 3 percent; and Summa cum laude if the college grade- 
point average places a student in the top 3 percent of the graduating class. 

Dean's List 

Placement on the Dean's List is awarded at the end of each semester to those 
persons who on the l)asis of a minimum of 9 traditionally graded hours of course 
work (excluding course work graded pass-fail, satisfactory/unsatisfactory, excused, 
or deferred) are, in terms of their college grade-point average, in the uppermost 
20 percent of their respective classes. 

Departmental Distinction 

Any student who has shown exceptional competence in one or more areas of study 
may be awarded distinction in the areafs) by his department or curriculum. Criteria 
for awarding distinction are established by the department or curriculum concerned. 

In addition to meeting the scholastic requirements and the minimum require- 
ments for his major, a student graduating with departmental distinction must 
comply with at least f)ne of the following requirements: He must present an accept- 
able thesis, or he must pass a comprehensive examinatitm prepared by the major 
department or other competent body, or he must pursue a special course of study, 
of at least 4 semester hours, approved by the majf)r department. This special course 
of study is over and above the minimum number of hours required for the major. 

Candidates for the degree with distinction must register their candidacy with 
their adviser, preferably not later than the beginning of the junior year. The degree 
with Distinction, High Distinction, or Highest Distinction is recommended by the 
major department on the basis of the quality of the work done. For High or Highest 
Distinction, the thesis, comprehensive examination, or special course of study must 
give evidence of exceptional ability. Students may obtain information about re- 
quirements from the departmental and curriculum advisers. 



278 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Distinction in Teacher Education Curricula 

A student who has completed a curriculum in teacher education may be recom- 
mended for distinction in the teaching of his area of specialization if he has shown 
superior ability in that area. 

The degree with Distinction, High Distinction, or Highest Distinction is 
awarded on the basis of the general scholastic average and of the average of courses 
in his area of specialization, on the recommendation of the area of specialization 
committee, and on any additional requirements imposed by that committee. For 
High and Highest Distinction, the candidate should give evidence of exceptional 
ability in his course in practice teaching. Information about requirements may be 
obtained from the adviser in the area of specialization. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Eligibility for election to Phi Beta Kappa is determined on the basis of high aca- 
demic achievement. Although no one is elected with a grade-point average less 
than 4.5 (A = 5.0), the minimum average varies for each election and for each 
semester in school, due to standards established by the national United Chapters. 
Fulfillment of a broad liberal arts education is considered a prerequisite for elec- 
tion: this is interpreted to include completion of courses in the humanities, social 
sciences, and physical and biological sciences (with at least one laboratory science), 
and a fourth-semester proficiency in a foreign language. 

Elections are held in each regular semester and each student is considered on 
four occasions: after 75, 90, and 105 hours, and after graduation. Transfer stu- 
dents are eligible only after completing 105 hours, of which 45 must have been 
earned in residence at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

As standards are subject to change in detail and may go beyond the courses 
required for particular curricula, students interested in this honor should contact 
the chapter secretary, Modern Languages Library, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 425 Library, Urbana, Illinois 61801, for elaboration of details. 

Awards 

Elliott Ritchie Alexander Award. A book of the student's choice, with inscription of 
that student's name on a trophy which is on permanent display, is awarded each 
year to the student in chemistry or chemical engineering who in his first two years 
at the University has attained the highest scholastic average. 

Alpha Chi Sigma Plaque. Zeta chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma, chemical professional 
fraternity, each year recognizes the freshman man who attains the highest scho- 
lastic average for his first semester of work in the curriculum in chemistry or chem- 
ical engineering. The selectee's name is engraved on a plaque displayed in the 
Chemistry Library. 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers Award. This award, which includes a 
certificate, a two-year subscription to the AlChE Journal, and a pin, is presented 
to the chemical engineering student who has attained the highest grade-point 
average during his freshman and sophomore years. 

American Institute of Chemists Award. Two certificates are awarded by the Chi- 
cago chapter of the American Institute of Chemists each year to the graduating 
seniors in chemistry and chemical engineering who arc most outstanding in schol- 
arship, personal integrity, and leadership. 

Martha Belle Barrett Prizes in History. Two awards of $100 each are made an- 
nually. One goes to the student with the highest grade average in history courses 
and the other is awarded to the senior who writes the best honors thesis under 
the supervision of a member of the Department of History. The winners of the 
awards are selected by the Department of History. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 279 



Chemical Rubber Company Achievement Award. A copy of the Handbook of 
Chemistry and Physics is presented each year to the outstanding student in fresh- 
man chemistry. 

Dante Prize. The Dante Society of America offers an annual prize of $100 for the 
best essay on a subject related to the life or works of Dante written by a student 
in any college or university in America, or by anyone who has graduated from such 
a college or university within the last three years. Essays may be left at the office 
of the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, or sent to the Dante Society 
of America, Widcner Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
02138. They must reach the society by May 1. Inquiries concerning this prize may 
be made at the department office or sent to the Dante society. 

Donald VV. Doerscher Memorial Award. This award is made annually to the senior 
in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who has consistently done the most out- 
standing work in the field of philosophy. The winner of this award is selected by 
the Department of Philosophy, or a faculty committee acting for the department. 
Reynold Clayton Fuson Award. A substantial award is given to the student in 
chemistry or chemical engineering, who, through the first semester of his senior 
year, has made the most outstanding academic improvement. 

Geology Alumni Association Senior Award. A Brunton compass is awarded each 
year to the graduating senior in geology who is most outstanding in scholarship. 
Algernon Dewaters Gorman Prize. This prize is awarded at the June commence- 
ment every third year to the student in chemistry or chemical engineering with 
junior standing who has the highest grade-point average, provided he has earned 
not less than 25 hours credit in chemistry or chemical engineering. The average 
is based on all courses taken on this campus exclusive of physical education and 
military. 

Iota Sigma Pi Prize. A cash prize of $20 is awarded each year by the honorary 
chemical sorority. Iota Sigma Pi, to the woman in the senior class who has the 
highest scholastic average in her University work with chemistry as her major 
subject. 

Mimi Jehle Award. An annual cash prize is presented each year to the outstanding 
student completing the curriculum for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teach- 
ing of German. Selection is made on the basis of overall scholastic average and 
performance in the educational practice course. 

Kendall Award. A monetary award is given each year to a student in chemistry or 
chemical engineering who is a member of Phi Lambda Upsilon and shows the 
greatest promise in his chosen field. 

Agnes Sloan Larson Award. Substantial monetary awards are given at the begin- 
ning of the sophomore year to students in chemistry or chemical engineering who 
compiled the most outstanding records as freshmen. 

Werner Marx Award. A book prize is given annually to an undergraduate who has 

demonstrated fX(ellrn(e and creativity in the study of German language and 

literature. 

Merck Award. 'Jwo copies of the Merck Index are presented each year, one to an 

outstanding senior in the chemistry curriculum and one to an outstanding senior 

in the chemical engineering curriculum. 

Omega Beta Pi Scholarship Award and Trophy. A cash prize of $25 is awarded 

each year by the honorary premedical fraternity. Omega Beta Pi, to the student 

who has shown the highest excellence in the physical sciences during this first 

three semesters in the premedical curriculum. Omega Beta Pi also awards a trophy 

at the end of the first semester each year to the freshman premedical student making 

the highest scholastic average. 

Phi Beta Kappa Scholarship. The University of Illinois chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 

awards a scholarship of $100 annually to a member of the junior class of the Col- 



280 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences, selected on the basis of general merit. The schol- 
arship is available to the winner during his senior year at the University of Illinois. 
Phi Lambda Upsilon Cup. Alpha chapter of Phi Lambda Upsilon, honorary chem- 
ical society, awards a cup annually to the sophomore man who has the highest 
scholastic average among the students in the curricula of chemistry and chemical 
engineering. The cup is on display in the main hall of the Chemistry Annex. 
Phi Sigma Medal. The national organization of Phi Sigma, honorary biological so- 
ciety, awards annually a silver medal to the undergraduate student presenting the 
best report or evidence of the most original research on a biological subject. 
Psi Chi Award. A cash prize of $100 is awarded each year by Psi Chi, the psychol- 
ogy honorary society, for outstanding undergraduate research in psychology. 
Worth HuflF Rodebush Award. A substantial monetary award is given in the second 
semester each year to the most able senior who has demonstrated his intention to 
make a career of chemistry or chemical engineering. 



Degree Programs 



CURRICULUM IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

This curriculum leads to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 
Majors in the physical sciences (which include mathematics), the biological sci- 
ences, home economics, psychology, and social welfare may receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. The degree desired must be indicated on the degree card at 
the time of registration for the last semester of work. 

Graduation Requirements 

Although each student has a faculty adviser, the student is responsible for meeting 
the requirements for graduation. Therefore, each student should familiarize himself 
with the requirements listed below and should refer to them each time he plans his 
program. 

A total of 120 semester hours, excluding more than 4 hours of basic physical 
education and excluding military training, is required for graduation. A student 
must spend either the first three years, earning not less than 90 semester hours, or 
the last year, earning not less than 30 semester hours, in residence at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus uninterrupted by course work elsewhere. The hours must be 
applicable toward the degree sought. For complete information about other require- 
ments see the pages indicated below. 

Advanced courses 382 Grade-point average 90 

Electives 382 Major 282 

English 88 Minor 282 

Foreign languages below Physical education 90 

General education 281 Residence 90 

Foreign Language Requirements 

A knowledge of a foreign language equivalent to that resulting from four semesters 
of study of a foreign language commenced in college is required. Completion of four 
years of the same foreign language in high school also satisfies this requirement. Or 
if a student has passed three semesters of a foreign language at the college level or 
three years in high school, he may complete the requirement by passing three se- 
mesters of a second foreign language. Proficiency examinations are offered in those 
languages which are included in the curricula of the College of Liberal Arts and 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 281 



Sciences. Students transferring from other colleges may present in satisfaction of 
the language requirement two years (four semesters) of college credit in a language 
not offered at the University of Illinois. 

Students planning to enter the Graduate College are advised to consult their 
major department or the graduate school at which they plan to matriculate regard- 
ing applicable language requirements. 

General Education 

A fundamental role of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is found in its policy 
toward general education. In contrast to the professional college whose mission is 
largely defined by occupational objectives, the goals of this college embody breadth, 
as well as depth, of learning. In addition to achieving a high level of competency in 
a field of concentration, students are expected to acquire an understanding of the 
methods of inquiry in at least one field in the humanities, the social sciences, and 
the natural and physical sciences. Through this exposure to other fields of knowl- 
edge students should be able to place their specialized training into a broader con- 
text of learning and culture. Another purpose of the general education requirement 
is to provide an opportunity for students to investigate new areas of study which 
may foster further academic or occupational interests. 

Beginning in September 1972 students may select courses and sequences to 
satisfy the requirement in general education from an extended range of offerings. 
Heretofore, students were required to choose from a number of limited options ap- 
proved in advance by the Council on General Education. There are, nevertheless, 
certain exceptions which may not be used to satisfy the requirement, and these 
exceptions are noted in the Timetable and also on a list which is available from 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

In approving this change the faculty believed that students would elect appro- 
priate courses and sequences in great variety and especially at upper levels and thus 
challenge the notion that general education courses are a given few which must be 
put behind one at the earliest possible time. In the view of the council it is desirable 
to spread one's work in general education over a four-year period; if a student is 
capable of meeting the intellectual demands and prerequisites of a 200- or 300- 
level course, he may well find this work more stimulating and ultimately more 
satisfying than a beginning course. 

The following regulations apply to the election of general education courses: 

- All students in the science and letters curriculum must complete at least 6 hours 
of designated course work in one department, or in an especially approved se- 
quence from different departments, in each of the following four areas: biological 
sciences, humanities, mathematics or physical sciences, and social sciences. 

- A student may not use courses in his major area to satisfy the requirement in 
another area and a student may not ordinarily use courses from one department 
to satisfy the distributional requirements in more than one area. 

- A student may not use c(;urses ordinarily taken for fulfillment of the basic for- 
eign language and rhetoric requirements to meet the general education require- 
ment. Ordinarily, 199 courses may not be used to fulfill the general education 
requirement. 

- Students should consult the University Timetable and departmental and college 
advisers for the current list of courses which may be used to satisfy the general 
education requirement. 

Courses offered through the School of Life Sciences will qualify as general 
education courses in the biological sciences areas. In addition, biologically related 
courses in several other departments (Anthropology, Geography, and Psychology) 
may be used to satisfy the biological sciences requirement. 

Courses in literature offered by the program in Asian studies, the classics, 
comparative literature, English, French, Germanic and Slavic languages, Spanish, 
Italian, and Portuguese will meet the humanities requirement. Certain other courses 



282 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



in architecture, art, history, humanities, philosophy, religious studies, speech, and 
theatre will also meet the requirement. 

Courses offered by the Departments of Astronomy, Biochemistry, Chemical 
Engineering, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics will meet the general education re- 
quirement in the physical sciences. Additional courses offered by the programs in 
geography, mathematics, liberal arts and sciences, and philosophy will also meet 
the requirement. 

Generally, courses offered by the programs in anthropology, economics, geog- 
raphy, political science, psychology, and sociology will meet the requirement in the 
social sciences. 

Advanced Courses 

At least 30 hours must be earned in courses numbered 200 or above. 

Electives 

Liberal Arts and Sciences. Any course offered in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences may be used as an elective. 

Other Colleges. A student may count toward graduation a maximum of 24 hours 
of elective courses in other colleges and schools of the University, in addition to 
courses acceptable for his major, minor, and general education requirements. 
Graduate Courses. A student of excellent standing who is within 10 semester hours 
of his bachelor's degree may be given the privilege of electing courses in the Grad- 
uate College with the consent of the dean of that college. 

Fields of Concentration 

The college is proposing the conversion of majors and minors in the sciences and 
letters curriculum to fields of concentration. Each departmental major and minor 
will be replaced by a field of concentration which will incorporate required depart- 
mental course work with cognate courses from outside the department. This con- 
version should be accomplished during the 1973-74 academic year and will apply 
to freshmen entering this college or elsewhere on or after August 1973. It is 
anticipated that introductory course preparation for individual fields of concen- 
tration will not be basically different than that of the current major. 

Majors and Minors 

See specific major and minor descriptions on pages 283 through 303. 
Major Subjects. Each student before beginning the junior year selects one subject 
and declares it to be his major. In order to be acceptable for graduation, a major 
must consist of at least 20 hours in courses chosen from those designated by a de- 
partment and approved by the faculty of the college. Such courses must be inclusive 
of some distinctly advanced work and exclusive of courses open to freshmen. Nor- 
mally, a student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is expected to complete 
at least 9 advanced hours of his major in residence at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign. Individual departments may designate certain courses which 
they require among these 9 hours, or which they exclude. 

Courses from other colleges may be counted toward a major provided that they 
have been formally approved and are listed in the departmental statement of the 
major requirements. 

Minor Subjects. Each candidate for graduation must offer, in addition to his major, 
a minor consisting of 20 hours in one or two subjects designated by the department 
in which he is taking his major and approved by the faculty, with at least 8 hours 
in each subject if two are chosen. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 283 



Nonnally, a student must take at least 6 hours in his minor field or fields in 
residence at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

In exceptional cases and with prior approval of the major department, indi- 
vidual students may petition for exceptions to these minimum major and minor 
residence requirements. 

Courses outside the college may be used toward a minor provided that (1) 
they have been approved by the major department and are listed in its statement 
of approved minors; or (2) they have been approved in writing by the executive 
officer of the major department to be used as a special minor. 

Topical Minor. Instead of a regular minor, a student may elect an interdisciplinary 
topical minor, which will consist of a minimum of 20 hours in a variety of subjects 
drawn from three or more departments. This topical minor will enable a student to 
gain an understanding of some area of knowledge that crosses departmental lines. 
It may include courses both within and outside the college. However, no more than 
8 hours in 100-level courses may count toward satisfying these requirements. What- 
ever courses a student selects for his topical minor he must have approval from his 
major department. 

African Studies 

This program is sponsored and administered by the African Studies Program. Stu- 
dents in all colleges and schools of the University who desire a knowledge of Afri- 
can aflfairs and cultures are invited to consult, either directly or through their 
advisers, with the chairman and faculty associated with the program in order to 
develop course programs suited to their individual needs and objectives. 

Program in American Civilization 

This program is sponsored by the School of Humanities. For information regard- 
ing this program contact the Department of History, University of IHinois at Ur- 
bana-Champaign, 300 Gregory Hall, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Major: Students who elect American civilization as a major must complete 40 se- 
mester hours (which satisfies both major and minor requirements for graduation) 
in courses indicated below, at least 20 hours being in courses numbered 200 or 
above. They are required to maintain a 3.0 (A = 5.0) general grade-point average. 
The following courses are required: 

- Engl. 255, 256; Hist. 151, 152; and either Art 323 or 324. Eqivalent or more 
advanced courses may be substituted provided that taken together they constitute 
comprehensive surveys of the three fields of American history, literature, and 
either art or philosophy. Approval for any such substitutions must be requested 
by a petition to the dean bearing the recommendation of the adviser. 

- At least 6 hours of advanced work in history and at least 6 hours of advanced 
work in English chosen from the following courses all of which are in the Ameri 
can field: Engl. 249, 259, 260, 346, 347, 350, 351, 362; Hist. 352, 353, 354 
355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362 363, 364, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372 
373, 374. 

- At least 6 hours from Arch. 315, 316; Econ. 236; H.P. Ed. 302; Geog. 223 
Pol. S. 150, 151, 351, 381, 397; Spch. 312; or courses listed in the preceding 
paragraphs, if not counted toward the requirements thereunder. 

- At least 6 additional hours in one of the following departments: Art and Design, 
English, History, Philosophy, or Political Science, chosen from courses which 
deal with non-American aspects of the subject but which are closely related to 
specific courses selected under the preceding requirements such as a course deal- 
ing with the same period in European history or in English literature. 

Minor: This program has been approved as a minor for students majoring in geog- 
raphy, history, political science, and speech. A split minor is not authorized. No 



284 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



course counted toward the student's major may he counted toward the minor. The 
minor consists of at least 20 semester hours, including the required courses Hist. 
151, 152, and Engl. 116 and the following additional requirements: 

- At least 3 hours from courses listed in the second item of the requirements for 
the major in American civilization, excluding those numbered under 300 and 
excluding those in the department in which the student is majoring. 

- The remainder, if any, chosen from courses listed under the first and third items 
of the requirements for the major in American civilization, excluding those num- 
bered under 300 and excluding those in the department in which the student is 
majoring. 

Anthropology 

Major: Twenty-eight hours in anthropology, including either Anth. 101 or the 
Anth. 102-103 sequence, but not both. Students are strongly advised to take at least 
one course in each of the principal subfields of general anthropology: social anthro- 
pology, applied anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology, and linguistic 
anthropology. In view of entrance requirements for graduate study, students who 
contemplate seeking an advanced degree in anthropology should take Anth. 200, 
220, 230, and 240. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: art, biochemistry, biology, communications, computer 
science, classics, economics, geography, geology, history, linguistics, mathematics, 
music, philosophy, physiology, political science, psychology, sociology, or zoology. 
Students may also elect to minor in certain interdisciplinary topics, interdepart- 
mental programs, or languages. In circumstances where a student's plans make 
other fields of study particularly appropriate, he may petition the head of the De- 
partment of Anthropology for approval of a special minor. 

Departmental Distinction: For graduation with Distinction, 32 hours in anthropol- 
ogy with a grade-point average of 4.4 (A = 5.0) or better including at least 4 hours 
credit for Anth. 290 or 291. For graduation with High or Highest Distinction, the 
same minimum requirements, plus a senior honors thesis (written for Anth. 291) or 
an equivalent project to be submitted to the Department of Anthropology by the 
first day of the month preceding the month of graduation. A departmental honors 
board will assign Distinction, High Distinction, or Highest Distinction based on 
grade-point average, quality of the honors thesis or project, and (at its option) 
performance on written or oral comprehensive examinations. Students apply for 
degrees with Distinction by registering in Anth. 290 or 291 ; they apply for degrees 
with High or Highest Distinction by submitting the senior honors thesis or equiva- 
lent project. Those students who do not qualify academically, but who feel they are 
worthy of Departmental Distinction for other reasons, may, with the approval of 
a faculty sponsor, petition the head of the department for permission to submit a 
special thesis meeting College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and departmental re- 
quirements for distinction. 

Art History 

Major: Art 111 and 112, and at least 20 hours of advanced study selected from 
courses in the history of art and the history of architecture. French or German is 
strongly recommended to satisfy the requirement in foreign language. 
Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each, if two are chosen: anthropology, Asian studies, English, history, Latin 
American studies, medieval civilization studies, philosophy, psychology, sociology, 
speech, an approved sequence in the history of music, and ancient or modern lan- 
guage, excluding elementary courses 101 and 102. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 285 



Program in Asian Studies 

This program is sponsored by the Center for Asian Studies, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, 1208 West Califtjrnia Avenue, Urbana. Illinois 61801. 

By Januar>' 1974, the Center for Asian Studies expects to offer an under- 
graduate major in Asian studies. This will meet both major and minor requirements 
for graduation and permits either a regional concentration upon East Asia, South 
Asia, Southeast Asia, or the Near and Middle East in an integrated language and 
area or general area program, or a language-literature and linguistics specialization, 
or a program of cross-cultural studies. The major has no prescribed schedule of 
courses. It is intended to ofTer several options which will meet the academic and 
career goals of a variety of students. 

Students in other colleges and schools of the University who desire a knowl- 
edge of East, Southeast, South, and Southwest Asian aflfairs and cultures are in- 
vited to consult, either directly or through their adviser, with the director and 
faculty members of the Center for Asian Studies in order to develop course pro- 
grams suited to their individual needs. 

Minor: A minor in Asian studies requires at least 20 semester hours, including 
As. St. 202, distributed among at least three departments and chosen from a list 
which may be obtained in the center office. 

Any of the courses used for major credit may not be included in the 20 hours 
for the minor. It is advisable either to include in the minor, or to accompany the 
minor with, one of the 201-202 Asian language sequences offered. A four-semester 
sequence in an Asian language may be elected to meet the language requirements 
of the college. The languages which are acceptable are offered by the Center for 
Asian Studies and the Department of Linguistics. 

Astronomy 

Major: Twenty hours in astronomy excluding Astr. 101. Physics courses at the 300 
level may be substituted for astronomy courses to the extent of 6 hours as part of 
the major. 

Minor: Twenty hours which must include Phycs. 106, 107, and 108. The remain- 
ing 8 hours may be taken in physics or in one of the following subjects: chemistry, 
geology, mathematics. If two subjects are chosen, at least 8 hours must be taken 
in each. 

Chemical Sciences 

(Including Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Chemistry) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Biochemistr>- is an advanced interdisciplinary science requiring training in chemis- 
try- and life sciences. Therefore, students planning a major in biochemistry take an 
initial course program similar to the chemistry curriculum or honors biology se- 
quence. Such beginning training assures adequate prerequisites to meet the ad- 
vanced course wfjrk requirements of the biochemistry- major and associated minor(s). 
Majoi and Minor: Not less than 20 hours in biochemistry and chemistry including 
Bioch. 350 and 355, organic chemistry through Chem. 336, and one year of physical 
chemistry- (Chem. 342 and 344, or alternately, Chem. 340 and 346, or Chem. 340 
and Bioch. 351). Mathematics through Math. 140, 141, or 145; physics through 
Phycs. 102 or 108; and two 300-level courses in the life sciences must also be com- 
pleted whether or not other minors are declared. 

Departmental Distinction: Students in biochemistry registered in Bioch. 290 (The- 
sis) become candidates for graduation with departmental distinction. 



286 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Students wishing to specialize in chemical engineering are directed to follow the 
special curriculum within the School of Chemical Sciences which leads to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering. The requirements for this program 
are described in detail on page 304. 

The chemical engineering curriculum is designed to offer undergraduate stu- 
dents a fundamental basis in chemistry, mathematics, and physics, along with train- 
ing in the application of science to engineering problems. In addition to the re- 
quired courses in chemical engineering, chemistry, physics, and mathematics, there 
are sufficient elective courses in other technical and nontechnical areas to provide 
an excellent scientific and engineering background, coupled with a flexibility which 
permits the program to be shaped to fit individual interests. 

Departmental Distinction: Students in chemical engineering registered in Ch. E. 
290 (Thesis) or 379 (Projects) become candidates for departmental distinction. 
All students are eligible for college honors who have a 4.25 (A = 5.0) grade-point 
average or better. The level of distinction to be recommended is determined by the 
quality of the special work done, in addition to the requirements that the overall 
grade-point averages (for work done at the University of Illinois, exclusive of mili- 
tary training) of 4.20, 4.40, and 4.60 are required for the citations of Distinction, 
High Distinction, and Highest Distinction, respectively. Recommendation is made 
to the dean of the college by the head of the department. 

Restrictions: Entering freshmen or transfer students without adequate preparation 
in chemistry, mathematics, physics, and language may find it difficult to complete 
the curriculum in chemical engineering in four years. 

CHEMISTRY 

Students desiring to specialize in chemistry have available two alternatives: (1) the 
chemistry curriculum and (2) the chemistry major in the sciences and letters 
curriculum. 

The chemistry curriculum is a specialized program intended for those planning 
a career in chemistry. The requirements are described in detail on page 304. 

The chemistry major in the sciences and letters curriculum ordinarily parallels 
other college curricula. It can be used by a student planning a career in chemistry 
or by a student wishing to obtain a background in chemistry for use in a related 
field. It is generally more desirable for a student changing his major to chemistry 
sometime after beginning his college work. A chemistry major planning a career in 
chemistry is advised to take most of the courses required in the chemistry cur- 
riculum. 

Major and Minor: Not less than 20 hours in chemistry and biochemistry, exclud- 
ing Chem. 100 through 110 and Chem. 199. There must be included Chem. 340 
or 342, and two other 300-level courses, at least one of them outside physical 
chemistry. Mathematics through Math. 140, 141, or 145; and physics through 
Phycs. 102 or 108 must also be completed whether or not other minors are declared. 
Departmental Distinction: Students in chemistry registered in Chem. 290 (Thesis) 
or Bioch. 290 (Thesis) become candidates for departmental distinction. (All stu- 
dents are eligible for college honors who have a 4.25 grade-point average or better.) 
The level of distinction to be recommended is determined by the quality of the 
special work done in addition to the requirement that the overall grade-point aver- 
ages (exclusive of military training) of 4.0, 4.25, and 4.5 are required for the 
citations with Distinction, High Distinction, and Highest Distinction, respectively. 
Recommendation is made to the dean of the college by the head of the department. 
Sequence of Courses: Students in the curriculum in chemistry, majors in chemistry, 
and all others who desire a thorough training in the fundamentals of chemistry and 
their applications to modern life should select courses from the following, usually 
in the sequence given: Chem. 107 and 109, 108 and 110, 136 and 181, 336, 342 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 287 



and 383, 344 and 385, 315, and courses in biochemistry; chemical engineering; 
analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical cheinistr>'. Students who do not meet 
the requirements of previous high school chemistry and the thorough mathematics 
background necessary for registration in Chem. 107 should register in Chem. 101 
before taking the sequence Chem. 102, 122, 131, 134, and 336. Students in the 
College of Engineering (except ceramists, ceramic engineers, and those who wish to 
take Chem. 342) should register in Chem. 101, 102, and 122. 

Students who wish to satisfy a limited chemistry requirement may register for 
the sequence Chem. 101, 102, 122, or 131 and 134. 

Classics 

(Including Greek and Latin) 

GREEK 

Major: Twenty hours of Greek, excluding Grk. 101 and 111, and including 6 hours 
of 300-level courses. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: anthropology, art, Asian studies, English (excluding 
Rhet. 101, 102, 103, 105, 107, 108), foreign language (Latin being especially 
recommended), history, linguistics, medieval civilization, philosophy, political sci- 
ence, religious studies, sociology, and speech. A topical minor or minors in other 
subjects may be accepted with the approval of the departmental adviser. 
Departmental Distinction: Distinction in Greek may be achieved by a student who 
satisfactorily completes 4 semester hours in Grk. 291 or 293 in addition to the 
requirements of the major in Greek. A student eligible for college honors qualifies 
for enrollment in these two courses; a student not eligible for college honors may 
be admitted to these courses by the approval of the departmental honors committee. 
The level of distinction is determined by the department on the basis of the 
thesis, but High Distinction is not awarded to students whose grade-point average 
for all courses in Greek is less than 4.5 (A = 5.0). 

Note: Credit for New Testament Greek transferred from other institutions is not 
counted toward a major or minor until after the satisfactory completion of Grk. 201 
or 202, and then only to a possible maximum of 12 hours as the equivalent of Grk. 
111-112 and 200, and 3 hours as the equivalent of one semester of Grk. 391. 

LATIN 

Major: Twenty hours, excluding Lat. 101, 102, and 103, and including 9 hours 
of 300-level courses. In addition, CI. Civ. 301-302 is strongly recommended as an 
elective. See also the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Latin on page 325. 
Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: anthropology, art, Asian studies, English (excluding 
Rhet. 101, 102, 103, 105, 107, 108), foreign language (Greek being especially rec- 
ommended), history, linguistics, medieval civilization, philosophy, political science, 
religious studies, sociology, and speech. A topical minor or minors in other subjects 
may be accepted with the approval of the departmental adviser. 

Departmental Distinction: Distinction in Latin may be achieved by a student who 
satisfactorily completes 4 semester hours in Lat. 291 or 293 in addition to the 
requirements of the major in Latin. A student eligil)le for college honors qualifies 
for enrollment in these two courses; a student not eligible for college honors may 
be admitted to these courses by the approval of the departmental honors committee. 
The level of distinction is determined by the department on the basis of the 
comprehensive examination, but High Distincticm or Highest Distinction is not 
awarded to students whose grade-point average for all courses taken in Latin is 
less than 4.5 (A = 5.0). 



288 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Computer Science 

The mathematics and computer science major is designed to prepare students for 
professional or graduate work in mathematics and computer science. Students 
should consult the departmental adviser about the proposed new requirements 
which should be approved for August 1973. 

Major: Math. 120, 130, 140 (or 131, 141), 341, 342, 317, 318, 347, 348 (or 361). 
First Minor: G.S. 121, 201, 287, and one of C.S. 293, 294, 301, 310. 
Second Minor: At least 8 hours in a subject approved by the department; not 
required of students with 20 hours or more of computer science courses. 
Note: In special circumstances, with the consent of the adviser, other 100-level be- 
ginning computer science courses may be substituted for C.S. 121. 
Distinction in Mathematics and Computer Science: A student who satisfies the 
following requirements may, upon recommendation of the Departments of Mathe- 
matics and Computer Science, be graduated with Distinction in mathematics and 
computer science: (1) satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements 
for graduation; (2) complete the minimum requirement of the major in mathe- 
matics and computer science with a grade-point average of at least 4.25 (A = 5.0) 
in all mathematics and computer science courses; (3) complete 3 hours of addi- 
tional courses chosen from C.S. 109, 209, 290, 301, 306, 311, 385, 387, 391, 392, 
393, 394, 397; (4) register his candidacy for distinction with his adviser no later 
than the end of his junior year. 

Economics 

Major: Twenty hours in economics, including Econ. 108, or 102 and 103; 171 ; 300; 
and 301. Students are advised to take one of the following mathematics sequences: 
Math. 120, 130, 140; or Math. 120, 131, 141; or Math. 135, 145. Minimum re- 
quirements of the department can be satisfied by Math. 120, 130; or Math. 120, 
131; or Math. 135; or Math. 124, 134. In addition, students considering graduate 
work should take Math. 315. Liberal arts majors are strongly advised to elect Accy. 
201, which is not acceptable toward the major requirement. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: anthropology, education, finance, geography, geology, 
history, law, mathematics, philosophy, political science, psychology, social work, and 
sociology. An economics major who chooses finance as a minor must include 12 
hours in a second minor. The curriculum in Latin American and Asian studies or 
in Russian language and area studies is also accepted as a minor. 

English 

Major: A course in Shakespeare and 27 additional hours in English department 
courses, including at least 9 hours at the 300 level and no more than 9 hours at 
the 100 level. The major must include at least 3 hours at the 200 and 300 level 
from each of the following groups. Group I: criticism; group II: British literature 
to 1800; group III: British literature after 1800; group IV: American literature; 
group V: theme, mode, genre, and interdisciplinary courses; and group VI: a 
major author. 

No single course may be used to fulfill the requirement of more than one group. 

Six hours in rhetoric courses, chosen from Rhet. 143, 144, 145, 202, 205, 227, 
263, 305, 306, 307, and 355, may be included in the major. Six hours in indepen- 
dent study courses (Engl. 199 and 293) may be included in the major. 

EngUsh majors who intend to teach in secondary schools must see the teacher 
training adviser. 

In planning their major and minor programs, students intending to do grad- 
uate work should consult the requirements of the graduate school they intend to 
enter. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 289 



Minor: An approved sequence of 20 hours in one or two subjects with at least 8 
hours in the lesser if two are chosen. The choice of courses must be approved by 
the major adviser. Six hours of work beyond the college requirement in a foreign 
language must be accomplished if the language is to be counted for a minor or 
split minor. 

Departmental Distinction: The Department of English offers three courses (Engl. 
295, J96, and 297) which are restricted to majors with a grade-point average of 
4.25 (A = 5.0). In addition it offers a tutorial (Engl. 298) leading to the writing 
of a thesis. A student may earn consideration for the rank of Distinction in English 
in the following ways: (1)9 hours of honors seminars plus Engl. 293, (2) 9 hours 
of honors seminars plus Engl. 298, f3) 6 hours of honors seminars plus Engl. 293 
and Engl. 298. 

In order to be considered for the further rank of High Distinction in English, 
the student must write a thesis. Students should not enroll in Engl. 298 unless they 
have already taken enough honors work to enable them to complete the program. 
This work must be taken in addition to the regular requirements for the English 
major. Any course which satisfies a group requirement for the major will be so 
designated in the Timetable. 

The specific level of distinction is determined by the honors committee, the 
instructors of the seminars, the student's tutor, and such other faculty members as 
may be asked to read the honors thesis. If, in the opinion of this group, a candidate 
fails to earn any kind of distinction, he will still receive credit for the honors 
courses he has taken. This group may also av.ard a prize for the outstanding honors 
essay written in an academic year. 

An English education major whose schedule is too crowded to permit him to 
take the 12 hours required may, with the specific approval of the English education 
adviser, earn consideration for distinction by completing two seminars plus Engl. 
298. English education majors who are in doubt about their programs should con- 
sult with their adviser. 

RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION 

Major: Twenty hours in English, including 10 hours in literature (chosen from 
Engl. 131 and English courses at the 200 or 300 level) and 10 hours of writing 
(chosen from Rhet. 143, 144, 205, 206, 227, 246, 255, 263, and 330). At least one 
course in expository writing (Rhet. 143, 227) is required. With an adviser's permis- 
sion, Spch. 363 or Journ. 326 may be counted toward the major. Rhetoric majors 
who intend to teach in secondary schools must see the teacher education adviser in 
the Department of English. A student who plans to attend graduate school should 
take into account the entrance requirements of the graduate department he wishes 
to enter. 

Minor: An approved sequence of 20 hours in one or two of the following subjects, 
with at least 8 hours in the lesser if two are chosen: anthropology, economics, for- 
eign language, history, humanities, law, library science, mathematics, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, sociology, and speech; or an approved sequence in 
history of architecture, history of art, or music (not including applied music) either 
as a complete minor or combined with any of the above subjects. The program in 
Asian studies is accepted as a sole minor. With the written approval of the depart- 
mental adviser, other subjects may be substituted. No courses will satisfy minor re- 
quirements if they are excluded from the majors of their departments except Fr. 
103, 104, Ger. 103, 104, Lat. 101, 102, 103, Port. 103, 104, Russ. 103, 104, and 
Span. 103, 104. Foreign language department courses presenting foreign literature 
in translation are also excluded. 

Departmental Distinction: A student majoring in rhetoric and composition who 
meets the University grade-point requirement (4.0 (A ==5.0) or higher) may earn 
distinction only by completing 9 hours of honors work in addition to the minimum 
of hours required for his major. This additional credit must involve a significant 



290 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



writing project in Rhet. 255, the completion of Engl. 297, and any two of the fol- 
lowing three honors courses: Engl. 197, 295, 296. The level of distinction (Distinc- 
tion, High Distinction, Highest Distinction) is determined by the instructors in 
charge of the courses and the honors committee. If, in the opinion of his instructors 
and the committee, a candidate has not earned distinction, he may still receive 
credit for the course. 

Finance 

Major: Twenty hours in finance. A finance major who chooses economics as a 
minor must also include 12 hours in a second minor. 

Econ. 108, or Econ. 102 and 103, are fundamental courses in economics, and 
are prerequisites for courses in finance. Students who expect to do advanced work 
in finance should take Econ. 108, or Econ. 102 and 103 in their sophomore year. 
Liberal arts majors in finance are strongly advised to elect Accy. 201 and a course 
in statistics. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: anthropology, economics, geography, geology, history, 
law, mathematics, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology. The curricu- 
lum in Latin American studies is accepted as a minor. 

French 

Major: Twenty hours beyond the prerequisites Fr. 201, 211, 215, or their equiva- 
lent and excluding all 100-level courses and Fr. 202, 203, 218, 255, 256, and 280, 
and including courses as outlined by options below. The course Fr. 199 may be 
included if approved by the departmental major adviser. In the course of three of 
his last four semesters of undergraduate study the student reads the works on a 
departmental reading list, with the guidance of a tutor, normally repeating enroll- 
ment for 1 hour per semester for a total of 3 hours of credit. The French major is 
strongly advised to take a year's work in European history and a year's work in 
English or American literature. 
Option I : Literature 

Two courses must be selected from each of the following areas: French literature 
to 1800; French literature from 1800 to the present; and French language, 
linguistics, or civilization. 

Fr. 295, 3 hours. 
Option II: Language and Lingustics 

Four courses in French language, linguistics, or civilization. 

One course from each of the following: French literature to 1800 and French 
literature from 1800 to the present. 

Fr. 295, 3 hours. Students taking this tutorial who may pursue graduate studies 
should add one more literature course to their programs. 
Minor: Twenty hours in not more than two of the following subjects, excluding the 
first two semesters of modern foreign language and Rhet. 101 and 102, with at least 
8 hours in each subject if two are chosen: education, English, German, Greek, his- 
tory, humanities, Italian, Latin, library science, linguistics, medieval civilization 
studies, philosophy, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, or an approved sequence in his- 
tory of architecture, history of art, or music, not including applied music, combined 
with any one of the above subjects. With the written approval of the departmental 
adviser, other subjects may be substituted. 
Year Abroad Program: See page 275. 

Departmental Distinction: Students interested in attaining departmental distinction 
must take a special program of study and must make application at least one year 
prior to graduation. The English and history courses recommended for the major 
are normally expected of students working for distinction. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 291 



Geography 

Major: Twenty hours in geography in addition to Geog. 103. At least 15 of the 
20 hours must be in courses carrying advanced credit. Individual programs are ar- 
ranged for major students with the following special interests: liberal education, 
business, cartography, government, teaching, or graduate study. These programs 
include departmental courses, minor fields, and recommended electives. 
Minor: Twenty hours in one or two College of Liberal Arts and Sciences depart- 
ments or in interdepartmental programs approved by the college. Minor programs 
in departments outside the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may be arranged 
in consultation with the departmental adviser and with the approval of the dean 
of the college. At least 8 hours of the 20 minor hours must be taken in each if the 
student elects to minor in two different departments. 

Departmental Distinction: Students eligible for graduation with honors in liberal 
arts and sciences should consult with the departmental adviser concerning gradua- 
tion with distinction in geography. 

Geology 

Students desiring preparation for graduate work and a professional career in the 
geological sciences should follow the Curriculum in Geology on page 305. At least 
one year of graduate work is almost essential for further training for all professional 
work in geology. 

Students interested in oceanography should consult the Department of Geology 
about academic programs. 

Major: Not less than 20 hours in geology, excluding all 100-level geology courses 
except Geol. 115. Included must be Geol. 233 or 332, Geol. 320 and 321 or Geol. 
222, Geol. 215, and at least one additional 300-level course in geology. 

In addition, the student must complete Chem. 101 or 107 and 109, Phycs. 101 
or 106, and Math. 120. 

Minor: Twenty hours chosen from one or two of the following subjects: anthro- 
pology, astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civil engineering, economics, geog- 
raphy, mathematics, mining engineering, physics, and zoology, after consultation 
with the Department of Geology. At least 8 hours must be taken in each subject if 
two are chosen. 

Departmental Distinction: Students who maintain a minimum grade-point average 
of 4.5 (A = 5.0) in all geology courses and 4.0 in all other science and mathematics 
courses, and who complete an acceptable bachelor's thesis based on undergraduate 
research are recommended for graduation with departmental distinction. 

German 

Major: Twenty-four hours in German excluding all 100-level courses and courses 
in translation, and including Ger. 302, 303, 320, and one other literature course 
at the 300 level. 

Minor: Twenty hours in not more than two subjects chosen from the following 
list, with at least 8 hours in each subject: education, English (excluding Rhet. 101, 
102, 105, 107, 108, and 200), French, Greek, history, Italian, Latin, linguistics 
(excluding 301), medieval civilization studies, philosophy, Portuguese, Russian, 
Scandinavian, and Spanish. The first semester of any foreign language may not be 
counted toward a minor in that language. Special minors in other subjects can 
be approved by the undergraduate adviser of the Department of Germanic Lan- 
guages and Literatures. 
Year Abroad Program: Sec page 275. 



292 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



History 

Major: Twenty-four hours in history, all in courses at the 200 and 300 levels: one 
freshman-sophomore survey course sequence (Hist. 111-112, 131-132, 151-152, 171- 
172, 173-174, 181-182) or equivalent must be taken, as a prerequisite to the major. 
The courses ofTered must include at least 12 hours in an area of specialization and 
at least 6 hours in a second area. The following areas may be selected: ancient, 
medieval, and Renaissance; Europe since 1500; United States and Latin America; 
Asia, Near, and Middle East, and Africa. All majors are required to take Hist. 298 ; 
to be eligible for this course, each major must have had at least 14 hours in history, 
6 of which must be in courses at the advanced level. 

Minor: Twenty hours, not including more than 4 hours open to freshmen, in one 
or two of the following: ancient or modern language, excluding elementary courses 
101 and 102, anthropology, economics, English and American literature, geography, 
library science, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology. One of the 
programs in Asian studies, in Latin American studies, in Russian language and area 
studies, or in medieval civilization is also accepted as a sole minor, excluding the 
courses in history. 

Departmental Distinction: The fundamental goal of the honors program of the 
Department of History is to provide the opportunity for potential and actual de- 
partmental majors of marked ability and high standing (4.0 (A = 5.0) or better) to 
pursue a program focused on history and at the same time especially suited to the 
student's own interests. Once admitted to the program, and after the satisfaction 
of a few basic requirements, the usual departmental course requirements may, on 
petition, be modified according to the student's needs. The program is concerned 
essentially with the student who wishes a good liberal education in history and who 
is able to assume the responsibilities of independent study. The program is not 
designed for the production of future graduate students. 

Program in Latin American Studies 

This program is sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean 
Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1208 West California Avenue, 
Urbana, Illinois 61801. 

Students in technical and professional colleges and schools of the University 
who seek knowledge of Latin American affairs, culture, and languages are invited 
to consult with members of the teaching staff of the Latin American studies pro- 
gram, either directly or through their advisers, in order to develop programs suited 
to their individual needs. 

Minor: Complete six semesters or equivalent of college Spanish or Portuguese. If a 
student wishes to take both Spanish and Portuguese, he may take two years of each 
to satisfy this requirement. (In cases of well-qualified students the language require- 
ments may be modified.) 

Complete at least 20 semester hours, including L.A. St. 201, chosen from 
among four departments. Courses used for major credit outside the Latin American 
studies program may not be included within this 20 hours. 

Split Minor: Students may split a minor between Latin American studies and an- 
other department but must meet the language requirement and take at least 12 
semester hours from Latin American studies, including L.A. St. 201 and courses 
from at least two departments in the program exclusive of courses used for the 
major. 

Life Sciences 

(Including Biology, Botany, Entomology, Microbiology, Physiology and Biophysics, and 
Zoology) 

The School of Life Sciences is an association of the five biology departments in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Departments of Botany, Entomology, Micro- 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 293 



biolog>', Physiolog>' and Biophysics, and Zoology), plus the Electron Microscope 
Facility "and the Natural History Museum. Courses taught on a cooperative basis 
within the school are designated as biology courses; courses offered by individual 
departments are listed imder the appropriate departmental headings. 

Major and minor requirements for programs in the School of Life Sciences are 
currently being changed to fields of ccmcentration. It is expected that students 
entering in the fall semester 1973 and thereafter will be required to complete a 
field of concentration, rather than a major. Information about the new requirements 
will be available upon request from the director of the School of Life Sciences, 387 
Morrill Hall. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

LAS general education requirements may be fulfilled by sequence 1 below, or by 
many combinations of the courses listed under category 2. Some combinations of 
these courses with predominantly biological courses offered in other departments 
may also be approved. (See LAS General Education requirements on page 281.) 
Students majoring in the biological sciences or intending to use biology profession- 
ally are expected to complete either category 3 or 4. Students may receive credit for 
courses in only one of the categories listed. 

General Education Courses: (1) Biol. 100, 101; (2) Bot. 100 or 101, Entom. 103, 
118, Mcbio. 113, Physl. 103, Zool. 104, 105, 106, 107. 

Professional Courses: (3) Biol. 110, 111; (4) Biol. 151, 251 (required of students 
in the honors biology major, restricted to students approved by the honors biology 
committee) . 

Four hours of proficiency credit in Biol. 100 may be used toward category 1 
or 2 above; recommended placement is in Biol. 101. Unless otherwise specified in 
course descriptions, category 3 or 4 is recommended for admission to 200- and 300- 
level courses in biology. However, students who complete a general education 
course or sequence and then decide to major in biological sciences may do so with 
the concurrence of their adviser without enrolling in a second introductory sequence. 

JUNIOR-SENIOR HONORS PROGRAM AND DISTINCTION 

Students maintaining a B average in any of the departmental or interdepartmental 
biology programs are eligible for junior-senior honors programs. The honors seminar 
(Biol. 203) and supervised research projects are recommended for these students. 
The amount of credit in such programs which may be applied to the major and for 
graduation varies for different majors; information is available from advisers and 
departmental offices. Satisfactory completion of such programs is recognized by a 
diploma citation showing departmental distinction. Students who wish to be candi- 
dates for distinction should notify the biology honors committee or the appropriate 
departmental committee early in their last semester. 

BIOLOGY 

In addition to the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Biology on page 317 
and departmental major programs outlined under the departmental headings below, 
the School of Life Sciences provides two programs leading to a major in biology. 
Honors Major: This program is designed for superior students and provides a 
br(jad foundation in bioUjgical and physical sciences suitable as a l)asis for graduate 
and pr(jfessional training in bic^logy. Entry requires permission of the honors biology 
committee, advanced standing in biology, James Scholar status, or other evidence of 
superior background and achievement. Continuation requires a minimum grade of 
B in each oi the core biology courses, Biol. 151, 251, 351. In additicm to general 
college requirements, students in the program must: 

Complete a major consisting of Biol. 151, 251, 351, and 10 hours in courses 
offered by departments of the School of Life Sciences and numbered 300 or above. 



294 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Two courses of the 10-hour requirement may be in departmental special topics 
courses (Bot. 300, Entom. 306, Mcbio. 207, Physl. 290, Zool. 303). 

Complete a minor in chemistry consisting of Chem. 107, 108, 136, 181, Bioch. 
350, and 355. Students whose placement examination scores prevent their taking 
Chem. 107, 108, may substitute Chem. 101, 102. 

Complete mathematics through 140 or 141 or 145. 

Complete Phycs. 101 and 102, or 106, 107, and 108. 

Students entering this curriculum are cautioned to arrange their freshman and 
sophomore programs so they can meet the college requirements of 30 hours of ad- 
vanced courses in the junior and senior years. 

General Major: This program is suitable for either terminal or preprofessional 
objectives for which broad biological training is desired. Students must complete a 
major consisting of Biol. 110, 111, and an additional 20 hours of courses at the 200 
and 300 level offered within the School of Life Sciences, chosen in consultation with 
the adviser, and including at least one of the following: Biol. 210, Mcbio. 200 and 
201, or Physl. 301 and 303. Up to 5 hours of the 20-hour requirement may be in de- 
partmental special topics courses (Bot. 300, Entom. 306, Mcbio. 207, Physl. 290, 
Zool. 303). Students are also required to complete a year of physics, chemistry 
through organic with laboratory, and mathematics through Math. 120. Additional 
calculus and biochemistry are strongly recommended. 

BOTANY 

Major: Bot. 100 or 101 and Zool. 104, or Biol. 110-111 are required; also required 
are courses at the 200 or 300 level in each of the five major areas: genetics (Biol. 
210), taxonomy (Bot. 260), morphology (Bot. 304), ecology (Bot. 381), and physi- 
ology (Bot. 330), or their equivalents. Bot. 300 (individual topics) taken for credit 
is required and participation in Biol. 203 is recommended. 

In addition, one semester of mathematics numbered 118 or above, one semester 
of organic chemistry, and one year of physics are required. Geology is recommended. 
Minor: Twenty hours in one or two subjects chosen in consultation with the chair- 
man of the department from the following: agronomy, chemistry, entomology, geog- 
raphy, geology, horticulture, mathematics, microbiology, physics, physiology, plant 
pathology, and zoology. At least 8 hours must be taken in each subject if two are 
chosen. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Major: This program is designed for students who wish to specialize in entomology 
as preparation for professional work in this area or subsequent graduate study. Stu- 
dents must complete a major consisting of Biol. 110, 111; Entom. 301, 302 (sum- 
mer session) ; and an additional 11 hours of courses at the 200 or 300 level offered 
within the School of Life Sciences, chosen in consultation with the adviser. Students 
are also required to complete a year of physics, chemistry through organic with 
laboratory, a course in statistics, and mathematics through Math. 120 or equivalent. 
In addition, each student is strongly encouraged to carry on a program of research 
with a member of the department or with an entomologist at the State Natural 
History Survey. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: agronomy, botany, chemistry, horticulture, microbiology, 
physics, physiology, and zoology. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Major: Biol. 110 and 111 and 20 hours of microbiology courses including Mcbio. 
200 and 201. Biol. 210 and 211 may be substituted for microbiology courses. In 
addition, quantitative and organic chemistry with laboratory, mathematics through 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 295 



trigonometry", and one year of physics are required. Credit must also be presented 
in one course to be selected from calculus, statistics, or computer science, and one 
course from physical chemistry or biochemistry. 

Calculus, biochemistry, and genetics are strongly recommended. Organic chem- 
istry with laboratory and required mathematics courses should be completed in the 
sophomore year. Students who elect microbiology as a major late in their college 
training should consult with a member of the department to arrange an appro- 
priate schedule. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, entomology, mathe- 
matics, physics, physiology, and zoology. No course may apply to both the major 
and the minor. 

Departmental Distinction: Students become candidates for departmental distinction 
by achieving an all-University grade-point average of 4.0 (A = 5.0), exclusive of 
military training and physical education; achieving a grade-point average of 4.5 
in courses included in the major and minor; and completing at least 4 credit hours 
in Mcbio. 207 in addition to the major. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Major: Twenty hours in animal physiology or, with approval of the adviser, upper 
division courses in genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and plant physiology, not in- 
cluding elementary courses, or more than 5 hours in Physl. 290, and including 
Physl. 301 — General Physiology; Physl. 303 — General Physiology Laboratory; 
Physl. 302 — Experimental Animal Physiology; and Physl. 304 — Experimental 
Physiology Laboratory. The student's program must include a year of general biol- 
ogy, including both animal and plant biology; a semester of genetics; mathematics 
through elementary calculus; two semesters of physics; one year of general chemistry 
plus 8 semester hours of advanced chemistry, including one course with laboratory 
(organic chemistry laboratory is highly recommended). Microbiology, embryology, 
histology, physical chemistry, and biochemistry are strongly recommended. 
Minor: Twenty hours in physics, chemistry, microbiology, or zoology, provided, 
if two minors are chosen, at least 8 semester hours are offered in the lesser. 
Departmental Distinction: To earn departmental distinction at graduation, the 
candidate must enroll in Physl. 290 and, working with a departmental adviser, pre- 
pare a report based on laboratory or library research. This report will be submitted 
to a committee composed of the honors adviser, one member from physiology, and 
one member from biophysics. They will recommend to the departmental faculty 
the level of distinction. 

ZOOLOGY 

Major: Biol. 110 and 111, or equivalent, and 20 hours in courses at the 200 level 
or above offered within the School of Life Sciences. The 20 hours must include at 
least 12 hours of credit in zoology courses and at least two laboratory or field courses 
in life sciences. Up to 8 hours of Zool. 303 (individual topics) or equivalent will 
be accepted for graduation credit, but no more than 5 of these hours may be 
counted against the 20-hour requirement in the major. Also required are one year 
of physics, at least three semesters of chemistry including organic with laboratory, 
and Math. 120 or equivalent. Courses in biochemistry, calculus, and statistics are 
highly reconrunended. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: animal science (to be chosen from courses 100, 110, 230, 
305, or 330), anthropology, biochemistry, botany, chemistry, education, entomology, 
geography, geology, mathematics, microbiology, physics, physiology, psychology. 



296 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Mathematics 

ACTUARIAL SCIENCE 

Students are urged to elect Accy. 201 and B. Adm. 261 during the junior or senior 

year. 

Major: The equivalent of Math. 140, or 141, or 145, and 18 hours chosen from 

Math. 310, 311, 343, 362, 363, 364, 368, 371, 372, and C.S. 101. At least 12 hours 

must be chosen from Math. 310, 361, 362, 363, 364, 368, 371, 372. 

Minor: Twenty hours of finance including the sequence Fin. 260, 262, 360, 363, 

or the sequence Fin. 260, 262, 370, 371. 

MATHEMATICS 

An entering student with adequate preparation in high school mathematics should 
enroll in Math. 120 during the first semester and in Math. 130 or 131 during the 
second semester of his freshman year. Admission to Math. 120 normally requires a 
passing grade on the Mathematics Placement Test. A student ineligible for Math. 
120 should enroll in algebra (Math. 1 1 1 or 112) and trigonometry (Math. 114) 
during his first semester. 

Students in special curricula and those who intend to terminate their study of 
mathematics with the bachelor's degree should consult their advisers regarding other 
selections from the list below of required courses that would relate to their special 
interests. 

Major: The equivalent of Math. 140 or 141 or 145, plus 18 hours of mathematics 
courses with numbers greater than 290, of which at least 12 hours must be in 
courses chosen from Math. 314, 317, 318, 323, 324, 327, 332, 342, 347, 348, 
349, 352, 353, 354, 361, 364, 366, 379, 392. For students preparing for graduate 
study in mathematics, the following courses are recommended: Math. 317, 318, 332, 
347, 348. Students in special curricula and those who do not intend to pursue 
mathematics professionally should consult with their advisers. 

?vIinor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: accountancy, astronomy, chemistry, computer science, 
economics, finance, philosophy, physics, psychology, statistics (Math. 361 or 363 or 
369, 364 or 370, 365, 366, and 368), surveying, theoretical and applied mechanics. 

Departmental Distinction: Entering students with superior mathematical ability 
should apply to the Department of Mathematics, 273 Altgeld Hall, for information 
regarding the honors course. Math. 149. 

Information regarding requirements for graduation with departmental distinc- 
tion in mathematics is available from the Advising Office, 269 Altgeld Hall. 

MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 

This major is ofTered by the Department of Mathematics under the curriculum in 
science and letters for students of mathematics who have a special interest in the 
use of computers. Further details are given on page 288. 

STATISTICS 

It is recommended that a student obtain a working knowledge of computer pro- 
gramming and that the minor field be in an area where statistical methods are 
applicable. 

Major: The equivalent of Math. 140 or 141 or 145, plus Math. 346 or 348, 347, 
363 or 369, 364 or 370, 365, and 366 or 368. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one field approved by the department, of which not more 
than 6 hours may be in courses emphasizing statistical methods. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 297 



Program in Medieval Civilization 

This program is sponsored by the School of Humanities. For information regard- 
ing this program contact the Department of History, University of Illinois at Ur- 
bana-Champaign, 300 Gregory Hall, Urbana, Illinois 61801. Students who elect 
medieval civilization as a major must complete the lower division requirements of 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and 40 semester hours (which satisfies 
both the major and minor requirements) in courses chosen from the following list: 
Arch. 214; Art 308 or 309; CI. Civ. 301, 302; Engl. 311; Hist. 301, 302, 303, 304, 
305, 333, 345; Ital. 311, 312; Lat. 104; Phil. 304; Spch. 361. Other courses may 
be substituted with the approval of the adviser; advanced reading courses in any 
foreign language offered by the University are strongly recommended. 

Music 

Candidates not qualified to enter Music 101 or not able to pass the qualifying 
examination in piano must reach these standards in excess of the number of hours 
required for the degree. Applied music courses are selected in conference with the 
adviser after the student has passed the qualifying examination in his chosen ap- 
plied music area. 

Candidates are advised to elect Physl. 103, Psych. 103, and Phil. 323 in meet- 
ing the general education requirements of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
and to continue, if possible, the language started in high school, and to continue 
language study beyond the requirement of 104. 

Major: Thirty-two hours in music, including Music 102, 103, 104, 107, 108, 109, 
213, 214, 300, or 307, and any two of the following: Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 
315, or 317. The remaining 6 hours are electives, but are normally devoted to the 
study of a major instrument or the voice. Those insufficiently prepared to enter Mu- 
sic 102 take Music 101 as a deficiency requirement in excess of the total of 32 hours 
credited toward the A.B. degree. At the end of their first year, students in the A.B. 
curriculum are required to pass the instrumental or vocal qualifying audition held 
for those outside the School of Music who wish to do work in applied music. 
Minor: A minimum of 20 hours from one or two of the following: art, English, and 
one foreign language, history, philosophy, psychology, rhetoric, speech. At least 8 
hours must be taken in each subject if two are chosen. No language courses may be 
regarded as satisfying the minor requirements if they are excluded from the majors 
of the language departments, with the exception of elementary courses in Greek and 
Latin, Fr. 103, 104, Ital. 103, 104, Span. 103, 104, Ger. 103, 104, and Russ. 204, 
206. 

Philosophy 

Major: Twenty hours from any courses offered by the department, to include Phil. 
102, 303, 306, 321, and one additional 300-level course in philosophy. 
Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the subjects recognized as majors by the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, or from any approved liberal arts and sciences 
interdepartmental curriculum, or from education or library science or linguistics. 
Rhet. 105, 108, first-year modern foreign language courses, and courses in applied 
music are excluded. If two departments or programs are chosen, at least 8 hours 
must be taken in each. 

Departmental Distinction: Qualified philosophy majors may become candidates 
for graduation with distinction in philosophy by undertaking a special course of 
study. This normally will include writing a thesis and taking the senior seminar. A 
full description of this program and the conditions of eligibility can be obtained in 
the department office. Eligible students who wish to enroll in this program should 



298 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



register with the Department of Philosophy at the beginning of the first semester 
of their senior year. 

Physics 

For the LAS curriculum in physics see page 308. For the curriculum in engineering 
physics see page 224. For the teacher education curriculum see page 330. 

The sciences and letters curriculum requires a nucleus of courses in biological 
sciences, humanities, physical sciences, and social sciences; a reading knowledge of 
at least one foreign language; and a concentration in the subjects chosen as majors 
and minors. Students in this curriculum are encouraged to develop interests and 
talents supplementing their major subjects and to take courses with cultural value 
such as art, literature, and music. 

All students planning for more advanced study after graduation are encour- 
aged to arrange their programs with reference to the requirements for admission 
to the Graduate College. 

Within the sciences and letters curriculum a student may specialize in courses 
which prepare him for the following professional colleges: Communications, Law, 
and Medicine. There are also preprofessional programs provided within the college 
for students who plan to meet the minimum admission requirements for certain 
professional schools. 

Phycs. 101 and 102 are recommended to premedical, predental, and architec- 
ture students not specializing in physics, mathematics, chemistry, or engineering. 

The general physics prerequisite for certain courses may be satisfied by either 
Phycs. 101 or 102, or Phycs. 106, 107, and 108. The calculus prerequisite may be 
satisfied either by Math. 130 and 140, or Math. 131 and 141. 

Major: Twenty hours in physics including Phycs. 321, 341, and 342, and exclud- 
ing 100-level courses. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects, with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: astronomy, chemistry, education, geology, mathematics, 
zoology, or any one branch of engineering. 

Political Science 

Pol. S. 150 and 151 give a general survey of national, state, and local government 
in the United States. Pol. S. 191 presents a survey of the basic concepts and meth- 
ods of political science and of significant current governmental and political prob- 
lems. Undergraduates beginning the study of political science are advised to take, 
first, either Pol. S. 150 or 191. Students planning to do advanced work should, dur- 
ing the sophomore year, take either 150 or 191 and follow it with such other courses 
as complete one of the following combinations: 150 and 151, 150 and 184, or 184 
and 191. 

Although the department does not require specific courses, majors should de- 
velop programs which introduce them to at least two fields and which provide two 
or more advanced courses in one of them. 

As an aid in recognizing related groups of courses, courses in the department 
which are in the same general field are roughly grouped by the last two digits of 
the course number. 

The fields and the last two digits are as follows: urban government and politics, 
X00-X09. For example, municipal government is listed as Pol. S. 305. 

Other fields are: American government and politics, X10-X29; comparative 
government and politics, X30-X49; public law and jurisprudence, X50-X59; public 
administration and organization theory, X60-X69 ; international relations and or- 
ganization, and foreign policy, X70-X89; political theory and philosophy, X90-X99. 
The major exceptions to the above are the undergraduate seminar reading and the 
thesis courses, which are numbered 290-293. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 299 



Major: Twenty hours from courses offered by the Department of Political Science. 
A major may include 3 hours from the following courses: Econ. 170, 171 (sta- 
tistics), Econ. 214 (public finance), Hist. 345, 346, 369, 370 (constitutional his- 
tory). Math. 161 (statistics). Psych. 135 (statistics), Soc. 185 (statistics), or 3 
hours of computer science. A maximum of 8 hours of 100-level courses may be of- 
fered as part of the political science major. 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: anthropology, economics, education, finance, geography, 
history. librar>- science, mathematics, philosophy, psychology, social work, speech, 
and sociolog>-. One of the programs in Latin American studies, Russian language 
and area studies, or medieval civilization is also accepted as a sole minor. 

Students may not offer more than 8 hours of 100-level courses as part of a 
minor, except that Math. 120 or higher-numbered mathematics courses are not 
counted in this limitation. 

A special minor is any sole or split minor not listed above. Written approval by 
the departments is required. 

An interdisciplinary topical minor requires a minimum of 20 hours drawn from 
three or more major departments. It may include courses within or outside the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Written approval by adviser and major depart- 
ment is needed. 

Departmental Distinction: The Department of Political Science awards graduation 
with Distinction only to those departmental majors who have completed at least 4 
hours of credit in Pol. S. 291 or 292 with a grade of B or better on the thesis or 
paper required in that course, who are nominated for graduation with Distinction 
by the faculty member supervising that course, and who have accumulated a grade- 
point average of 4.25 (A = 5.0) or better in political science courses counted toward 
graduation. Credit received for Pol. S. 291 or 292 may not be counted toward the 
minimum (20 hours) required of political science majors. 

Psychology 

Three types of major programs are offered : The general major, suitable for students 
interested primarily in a general liberal education; the applied psychology majors, 
designed for students interested in vocational preparation involving a minimum of 
graduate training; and the graduate preparatory major, designed mainly to prepare 
students for graduate training leading to the doctorate in psychology. 

GENERAL 

Major: An introductory course in psychology (100, 103, or 105), and 20 addi- 
tional hours of psychology including a statistics course (Psych. 135 or 235), 6 hours 
of course work from area I (see page 300), and 6 hours of course work from area 
II (see page 300). 

Minor: A full or split minor in any subject area under the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. Minors in subject areas under other colleges and topical minors are 
considered on an individual basis. 

GRADUATE PREPARATORY 

Major: An introductory course in psychology and a minimum of 20 additional 
hours of psychology including Psych. 235; two psychology laboratory courses 311, 
330, 331, 332, 333, 345, 347, and 390; 6 hours of course work from area I (see 
page 300) ; and 6 hours of course work from area II (see page 300). Students are 
encouraged to take mathematics through calculus, and at least one full year of 
laboratory course work in another science. Students should also be aware that some 
graduate programs require a reading knowledge of one or two foreign languages 
(usually French, German, or Russian) for graduation from the graduate-level 
program. 



300 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Minor: A full or split minor may be elected from any of the following areas: an- 
thropology, any of the life sciences, chemistry, economics, education, engineering, 
linguistics, mathematics, philosophy, physics, political science, and sociology. Minors 
in other areas and topical minors are considered on an individual basis. 
Area I: Psych. 211, 217, 230, 248, 311, 326, 330, 331, 335, 345, 346, 347, 348. 
Area II: Psych. 201, 216, 245, 250, 258, 332, 333, 338, 339, 350, 352, 353, 354, 
355, 356, 357, 359, 371, 373, 390. 

With the written approval of the instructor. Psych. 198, 199, 293, or 294 may 
be included in either area I or area II. 

APPLIED MAJORS 

Personnel Psychology: An introductory course in psychology; Psych. 201, 235, 245, 
332, 355, and 390; a minimum of 3 hours selected from Psych. 250, 258, or 
356; a minimum of 6 hours selected from Accy. 201, B. Adm. 261, Econ. 102, 
Econ. 103, Econ. 300, I.E. 287, Soc. 318; and C.S. 103. 

Minor: A full or split minor in mathematics, anthropology, economics, political 
science, or sociology. 

Measurement Psychology: An introductory course in psychology; Psych. 235, 245, 
and 390; two courses from Psych. 330, 331, and 332; C.S. 103; one course from 
Psych. 217, 230, or 248; and one course from Psych. 216, 250, or 338. 
Minor: Mathematics including Math. 315. 

Engineering Psychology: An introductory course in psychology; Psych. 235, 245, 
258, and 356; 12 hours from Psych. 330, 331, 332, and 390 (check prerequisites) ; 
C.S. 101 or 103; and I.E./Physl. 305. 

Minor: A full or split minor in mathematics, engineering, physics, or physiology. 
Departmental Distinction: The minimum requirements for graduation with de- 
partmental distinction in psychology are as follows: A 4.33 (A = 5.0) grade-point 
average in psychology courses; satisfactory completion of the courses required in 
the graduate preparatory major program; and 4 hours credit in Psych. 291 and 
292, the honors program seminar, including an acceptable bachelor's thesis. 

Religious Studies 

The interdepartmental Religious Studies Program is sponsored by the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Departments of Anthropology, Classics, History, 
Philosophy, and Sociology. 

Major: A major in religious studies is interdisciplinary and has no prescribed 
schedule of courses. The total program must be worked out individually in advance 
and approved by the director of religious studies. Revision is possible upon consul- 
tation and approval of the director. The student is required to carry a minor in an 
area which is relevant to his interest in religion. Areas in which resources allow for 
majors include: philosophy of religion. Biblical literature, early Christianity, Hin- 
duism, and Buddhism. At least 20 hours of course credit in the major and 20 
hours in the related minor are required. Ordinarily course work will be taken under 
the religious studies listing, but other course work may be taken upon consultation 
with the director of religious studies. This includes courses in Asian languages when 
they are relevant to the major. 

Minor: A minor in religious studies, designed to accompany a major in any de- 
partment, requires at least 20 semester hours (including Rel. St. 201 and 202 and 
two courses in Asian religious traditions). 

Rhetoric 

See page 289. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 301 



Russian Language and Area Studies 

Students in other colleges and schools of the University who desire a knowledge of 
the Russian area are invited to consult, either directly or through their advisers, 
with the director of the Russian and East European Center in order to develop pro- 
grams suited to their individual needs. Such programs may in some cases be adopted 
as a special minor. 

Major: Students who elect Russian language and area studies as a major must com- 
plete the prescribed and general education sequences required in the sciences and 
letters curriculum and at least 20 semester hours of Russian language courses, in 
addition to Russ. 101 and 102, or demonstrate equivalent proficiency. 

Students must complete a major consisting of at least 20 semester hours dis- 
tributed among at least four departments and chosen from the following courses: 
Anth. 381, 382: Econ. 357; Geog. 353; Hist. 219, 320, 321, 325, 326, 327, 328; 
Pol. S. 335, 383; Russ. 114, 115, 116, 199, 217, 301, 302, 315, 317, 321, 322, 323, 
324, 325, 335, 337; Soc. 350; Ukr. 396, 398. Courses used for major or minor credit 
outside the program of Russian language and area studies may not count as part 
of this 20 hours. 

Students must complete a minor of 20 hours, excluding courses open to fresh- 
men, in one or two departments. If two are chosen at least 8 hours must be taken 
in each. Courses in Russian language may, with the approval of the center director, 
constitute all or part of this minor. 

Minor: A minor in Russian language and area studies, designed to accompany a 
major in any department, requires at least 20 semester hours distributed among at 
least three departments and chosen from the following courses: Anth. 381, 382; 
Econ. 357; Geog. 353; Hist. 219, 320, 321, 325, 326, 327, 328; Pol. S. 335, 383; 
Russ. 114, 115, 116, 199, 217, 301, 302, 315, 317, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 335, 
337; Soc. 350; Ukr. 396, 398. It also requires a knowledge of Russian equivalent 
at least to that normally attained after Russ. 101 and 102. 

Russian 

Courses ordinarily taught in Russian are 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 301, 
302, 303, 304, 313, 314, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 422, and 424. 

Major: Twenty-four hours of course work beyond Russ. 115, at least 9 hours of 
which must be in courses at the 300 level. Majors are required to take a minimum 
of three literature courses which are taught in Russian and one survey course taught 
in English. 

Minor: Twenty hours in not more than two subjects from the following list, with 
at least 8 hours in each subject if two are chosen: Arabic, education, Chinese, En- 
glish (excluding Rhet. 101 and 102), French, German, Greek, Hindi, history, 
Italian, Japanese, Latin, library science, linguistics, philosophy, political science, 
Portuguese, Spanish, or any other Slavic language. The first semester of course 
work in any foreign language may not be counted toward a minor in that subject. 
The curriculum in Russian language and area studies comprising courses outside the 
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures may be accepted as a sole minor. 
Departmental Distinction: Majors and minors in the Department of Slavic Lan- 
guages and Literatures who have a University grade-point average of 4.0 (A = 5.0) 
and whose grade-point average in the Department of Slavic Languages and Litera- 
tures courses is 4.3 or higher, should enroll in Russ. 291 and/or 292 — Senior 
Thesis and Honors, for a total of at least 2 hours. Students may graduate with de- 
partmental distinction if the prescribed honors work is successfully completed. For 
Distinction, students must have a grade-point average of at least 4.3 in department 
courses and write an acceptable paper or pass an examination based on special 
readings; for High Distinction, students must have a grade-point average of at least 
4.5 in department courses and write a thesis of good quality or pass an examination 



302 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



based on assigned readings; for Highest Distinction, students must have a grade- 
point average of at least 4.7 in department courses and write a thesis of superior 
quality. 

Majors and minors in the department are urged to consult the departmental 
honors adviser during their junior year for information pertaining to graduation 
with departmental distinction. 

Social Work 

Minor: Courses in social work may be counted toward a minor in the Departments 
of Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 
Cooperative Interdepartmental Program in Social Welfare: The cooperative inter- 
departmental program in social welfare is a joint offering of the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences and the Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work. This 
undergraduate program was constructed with the intent of providing funda- 
mental knowledge on a broad interdisciplinary basis for the field of social welfare. 
The student majoring in social welfare must complete the basic requirements 
of the sciences and letters curriculum; a course in statistics or nonstatistical re- 
search methodology; at least 12 hours of course work in social welfare and if he 
wishes to be prepared for entry into professional practice, an additional 9 to 12 
hours of field practicum and 3 hours of a concurrent practice seminar; and at least 
28 hours in selected courses in at least four areas of social science chosen from 
eight departments. A current Ust of approved courses from which to select these 
hours is available from the office of the adviser, Jane Addams Graduate School of 
Social Work, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 West Oregon 
Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801. Enrollment in this program is limited in number. 

Sociology 

Major: Twenty hours from courses in sociology, excluding Soc. 100. Sociology ma- 
jors are required to take Soc. 184, 185, 300; at least one course from among Soc. 
201, 212, 231, 240, 320, 321, 329, 340, and 359 (the interpersonal relations area) ; 
and at least one course from among Soc. 202, 206, 218, 223, 225, 270, 275, 276, 
322, and 331 (the societal analysis area). 

Minor: Twenty hours in one or two of the following subjects with at least 8 hours 
in each if two are chosen: anthropology, economics, history, mathematics, philos- 
ophy, political science, psychology, and social work. The program in Russian lan- 
guage and area studies is also accepted as a minor. 

Departmental Distinction: In order to be awarded distinction in sociology at grad- 
uation, the student must have at least a 4.0 all-University grade-point average; 
meet the general requirements for a major in sociology; and in addition to the work 
done for the major, earn 4 semester hours of credit by enrolling in both of the hon- 
ors courses (Soc. 290 and 291). 

Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese 

(Including Catalan, Romance Linguistics, and Rumanian) 

SPANISH 

Major: Twenty-seven hours above 100 level, as follows: Span. 200, 209, 211, 217, 
232, 233, 240, 241, 242, 299, and at least one 300-level Spanish course. This pro- 
gram may be modified with the substitution of appropriate 300-level courses upon 
consent of departmental academic adviser. 

Students anticipating a major or other advanced study in Spanish should con- 
sult the departmental adviser for majors in Spanish or majors in the teaching of 
Spanish. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 303 



Minor: Twenty hours from the approved departmental list. 
Year Abroad Program: See page 276. 

ITALIAN 

Major: Twenty-six hours above the 100 level as follows: Ital. 209, 211, 212, 221, 
222, 331. and 8 hours from the group for advanced undergraduates and graduates. 
Students anticipating a major or other advanced study in Italian should consult 
the departmental adviser. 
Minor: Twenty hours from the approved list. 

PORTUGUESE 

Major: Twenty-four hours above the 100 level, as follows: Port. 209, 211, 212, 221, 
222, and 9 hours from the group for advanced undergraduates and graduates. Stu- 
dents anticipating a major or other advanced study in Portuguese should consult 
the departmental adviser. 
Minor: Twenty hours from the approved list. 

Speech 

Major: A performance course selected from Spch. 101, 113, 121, 141, and at least 
26 additional hours in speech of which at least 12 hours must be in courses num- 
bered above 200. In declaring a major in speech the student may choose one of these 
areas for emphasis: public address, interpretation, theatre, speech and hearing sci- 
ence. The student should report to 244 Lincoln Hall to be assigned an area adviser 
with whom he may confer concerning required and recommended courses. 
Minor: Twenty hours in one or two College of Liberal Arts and Sciences depart- 
ments or in interdepartmental programs approved by the college. Minor programs 
outside the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may be arranged with the approval 
of the student's major adviser and his department head. If two minor subjects are 
chosen, at least 8 hours must be included in each. A minor program in English may 
not include more than 3 hours in literature courses open to freshmen and sopho- 
mores and may not include Rhet. 101, 102, 151, 271, and 272. No language courses 
may satisfy the minor requirements if they are excluded from the majors of the 
language departments. 

Departmental Distinction: To graduate with Distinction, a student must have a 
4.0 (A = 5.0) all-University grade-point average, a 4.25 curriculum average, and 
4 semester hours in Spch. 293, in addition to the minimum credit hours required 
for the degree. 

To graduate with High Distinction a student must satisfy all the requirements 
for graduation with Distinction and prepare a satisfactory senior thesis. He must 
be nominated by a faculty member and approved by the departmental honors 
committee. 



Specialized Curricula 

CURRICULA IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND CHEMISTRY 

The follov\ing curricula in chemistry and chemical engineering afford more spe- 
cialized training than is required of students who make chemistry their major sub- 
ject in the sciences and letters curriculum in liberal arts and sciences. However, the 
chemistry major can also be used by a student planning to follow a career in chem- 
istry-. Requirements for the chemistry major are described on page 286. 



304 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

A total of at least 130 semester hours, excluding military training, of course work 
as outlined below, with a 3.0 (A = 5.0) academic grade-point average or better, is 
required for graduation. The Department of Chemistry will supply upon request 
a brochure showing recommended semester-by-semester programs for the comple- 
tion of the curriculum. 

Certain substitutions by equivalent courses or sequences are normally allowed. 
For example, Chem. 101, 102, 122 can be substituted for Chem. 107, 108, 109, 
110. Mathematics through 141 or 145 can be substituted for the sequence Math. 
120, 130, 140 below. Such substitutions do not afifect the requirement of a total 
of 130 semester hours for graduation. Some substitutions, such as Phycs. 101, 102, 
in place of 106, 107, 108, are not allowed. All proposals for substitutions must be 
discussed with the academic adviser. 

REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Chem. 107, 108, 109, 110, 136, 181, 336, 383, 342, 344, 385, and 315 33 

Math. 120, 130, 140 13 

Phycs. 106, 107, 108 12 

Advanced (300 and 400 level) chemistry and/or biochemistry courses 10 

Additional technical electives chosen from: (1) biochemistry; (2) Chem. 290; (3) chem- 
istry, 300 level; (4) Chem. 199, 3 hours maximum; (5) computer science; (6) 
mathematics courses, 249 and higher; (7) physics; (8) Biol. 151; (9) life sciences 

or geology courses, 200 level or higher 12 

For students who complete Chem. 290 or Bioch. 290, 2 hours of chemistry or bio- 
chemistry laboratory work must be included in the 10 hours of advanced chemistry 
and biochemistry; for students who do not complete Chem. 290 or Bioch. 290, 
4 hours of laboratory work must be included. 
At least the first two years of high school or two semesters of University work in one 

foreign language. German is most strongly recommended. 
Rhetoric (4 hours), humanities (6 hours), and social sciences (6 hours) to meet the all- 
University requirements in rhetoric and general education 16 

Thirty-four hours of free (technical and/or nontechnical) electives, not including any 
credit in satisfaction of the above requirements, and not including any courses 

taken preparatory to the chemistry, mathematics, or physics requirements above 34 

Minimum total 130 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

A total of 129 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for gradua- 
tion as shown below. 

The chemical engineering curriculum is arranged in quite a flexible manner 
to permit students to use their elective hours and to substitute courses to arrange 
programs incorporating various specific areas of chemical engineering or inter- 
disciplinary areas. For example, sequences can be set up in conjunction with the 
student's adviser to emphasize environmental engineering, basic physical sciences, 
biochemical engineering, engineering practice, or many other options. It will be 
advantageous to students to plan their course sequences with an adviser as early 
in their academic careers as possible. 

Students entering without adequate preparation in mathematics and chemistry 
may find it difficult to complete the chemical engineering curriculum in four years. 
A typical program, including all required courses and electives, is shown below. 
Individual students may vary the order in which the various courses are taken to 
suit their individual needs. However, care must be exercised in scheduling to insure 
that necessary course prerequisites are met. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



305 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 107 — General Chemistry 3 

Chem. 109 — General Chemistry Lab 2 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Elective" 3 

Total 17 

SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 136 — Organic Chemistry 3 

Chem. 181 — Structure and Synthesis ....2 
Moth. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Elective'' 3 

Total 15 

THIRD YEAR 

Ch. E. 370 — Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 3 

Chem. 342 — Physical Chemistry 3 

Chem. 383 — Dynamics and Structure ....2 
Moth. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

Electives" 6 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

Ch. E. 373 — Mass Transfer Operations ..3 
Ch. E. 374 — Chemical Engineering 

Laboratory 3 

Ch. E. 377 — Dynamics and Control of 

Chemical Systems 3 

Electives* * 8 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 108 — General Chemistry 3 

Chem. 110 — General Chemistry Lob 2 

Moth. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

(Mechanics) 4 

Ch. E. 161 — The Chemical Engineering 

Profession 1 

Total 15 

Ch. E. 261 — Introduction to Chemical 

Engineering 3 

Chem. 336 — Organic Chemistry' 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Automatic 

Digital Computing 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

Elective'' 3 

Total 16 

Ch. E. 371— Fluid Mechanics and 

Heat Transfer 4 

Chem. 344 — Physical Chemistry 3 

Chem. 385 — Chemical Fundamentals ....4 

Electives'' 5 

Total 16 



Ch. E. 379 — Chemical Engineering 

Projects 2 

Ch. E. 381 — Chemical Reaction 

Engineering 2 

Electives'- 12 

Total 16 



' Students must complete at least one social science sequence of a minimum of 6 
semester hours and one humanities sequence of a minimum of 6 semester hours. 

' One year of one foreign language is required for the Bachelor of Science degree. 
Tv/o units of high school credit in one foreign language ore equivalent to one year of col- 
lege credit. Students who take four semesters of foreign language in college may satisfy 
the humanities elective by taking 8 hours of the intermediate foreign language (103-104) 
plus at least 3 additional hours from among the courses listed in the general education hu- 
manities requirements of the sciences and letters curriculum. (See page 281.) 

^ Bioch. 350 may be substituted for Chem. 336. 

'students must take ot least 18 hours of technical electives in fields such as chemical 
engineering, chemistry, biochemistry, physics, mathematics, or engineering. These must in- 
clude at least 5 hours of chemical engineering electives plus at least 6 additional hours of 
300-level electives (or Ch. E. 290). 



CURRICULUM IN GEOLOGY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology 

The curriculum in geology is recommended for students who plan to enter graduate 
study in geology and become professional geologists. It offers more training in 
geology and basic science than is required of students who make geology their 
major subject in the sciences and letters curriculum in liberal arts and sciences. 
Requirements for the geology major are described on page 291. 



306 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



After the second year, students in the curriculum must have and maintain at 
least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) grade-point average. A transfer student must have a corre- 
sponding record in the institution or institutions from which he transfers and must 
maintain a similar average at the University of Illinois. 

Students who maintain a minimum grade-point average of 4.5 in all geology 
courses and 4.0 in all other science and mathematics courses, and who complete an 
acceptable bachelor's thesis based on undergraduate research, are recommended 
for graduation with departmental distinction. 

A total of 130 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for 
graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry, or 
Chem. 107 — General Chemistry and 
Chem. 109 — General Chemistry 

Laboratory 4-5 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 

Math, 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry^ 5 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Total 17-18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or 
Chem. 108 — General Chemistry and 
Chem. 110 — General Chemistry 

Laboratory 4-5 

Geol. 102 — Historical Geology 4 

Language' 4 

Math. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Total 17-18 



SECOND YEAR 

Biological science^ 4-5 

Geol. 309 — Sedimentology 2 

Geol, 310* — Field and Lab Problems 

in Sedimentology 1 

Language^ 4 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Total 13-15 



Biological science^ 4-5 

Geol. 321 — Principles of Stratigraphy ...4 

Geol. 332 — Mineralogy 4 

Language"' 4 

Total 16-17 



SUMMER 

Geol. 215 — Field Geology . . , ,8 

THIRD YEAR 

Geol, 320 — Invertebrate Paleontology ..4 

Geol. 335 — Optical Mineralogy 4 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics), 
or Phycs. 101 — General Physics ....4-5 

Social science 3 

Total 15-16 



FOURTH YEAR 

Geol. 31 1 — Structural Geology 4 

Geol. 338 — Introduction to Sedimentary 

Petrography 2 

Phycs. 108' — General Physics (Wove Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 

Humanities 3 

Electives'^ 4-6 

Total 17-19 



Geol. 301 — Geomorphology 4 

Geol. 336 — Igneous and Metamorphic 

Petrography 4 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 
Electricity, and Magnetism), or 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics 4-5 

Social science 3 

Total 15-16 

Humanities 3 

Electives' 12 

Total 15 



^Students who do not "qualify for Math. 120 or a more advanced mathematics course 
in the first semester must start mathematics at a lower level. 

^ See the sciences and letters curriculum Foreign Language Requirements on page 280 
for ways in which this requirement may be satisfied. German, Russian, or French is strongly 
recommended. 

^ Biol. 1 10 and 1 1 1, or Bot. 100 and Zool. 104 are recommended. 

* Recommended but not required. 

' Recommended electives are physical chemistry, genetics, advanced calculus, diflferenfial 
equations, computer science, statistics, geochemistry, and geophysics. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 307 



CURRICULUM IN HOME ECONOMICS 

For the degree of Bochelor of Science in Home Economics 

A minimum of 120 hours is required for graduation. A home economics student in 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, eligible for graduation with Honors, shall 
be certified for departmental distinction if H. Ec. 291 or 292 is satisfactorily com- 
pleted. 

REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Art 1 85 — Design' 2 

Biological sciences' 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 2 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Total 9 

Humanities, from approved general education list 6 

Language 0-16 

Moth, in — Algebra, or Moth. 112 — College algebra 3-5 

Chem. 101 and 102 — General Chemistry 8 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Social sciences 

Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics 3 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Human Behavior 3-4 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Home economics courses 

Fourteen hours chosen from: 

H. Ec. 105 — Child and Family 4 

H. Ec. 132 — Foods and Nutrition 3 

H. Ec. 1 33 — Food Management 2 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its Furnishings 4 

H. Ec. 171 — Home Management 2 

H. Ec. 183 — Consumer Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 184 — Clothing Selection 2 

Fourteen to 25 hours in additional home economics courses as listed under one of these 
options: (1) apparel design, (2) the child and the family, (3) foods and nutrition, (4) gen- 
eral home economics, (4A) foods in business, (5) hospital dietetics, (6) household manage- 
ment, (7) institution management, (8) retailing of clothing and home furnishings, (9) 
textiles and clothing. (See page 152.) 

Total home economics courses 28-39 

Other courses required in specific options. (See page 152.) 6-28 

Minor 

Twenty hours from one of the following groups: (1) chemistry, mathematics, microbiology; 
(2) anthropology, economics, psychology, sociology. The minor may be comprised of one 
subject only, or two subjects with at least 8 hours in each. 
Elcctives 0-25 



Students in option 1 need not take Art 185, but do take the art courses prescribed 
in that option. 

" Students in options 1 and 8 are not required to take the prescribed microbiology 
and physiology courses, but they must take a total of 12 hours of laboratory sciences in- 
cluding Chem. 101 and 102, and a minimum of 6 hours of biological sciences from the 
approved general education list. (See page 281.) 



MINOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

H. Ec. 105 — Child and Family 4 

H. Ec. 210 — Family Relationships 3 

Additional credit hours have to be chosen from the following areas (a minimum of 

5 hours must be chosen from each of two areas) 13 



308 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FOODS AND NUTRITION 

H. Ec. 1 20 — Elementary Nutrition 2 

H. Ec. 1 25 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

H. Ec. 1 32 — Foods and Nutrition 3 

H. Ec. 133 — Food Management 2 

Credit is not given for H. Ec. 132 and 133 in addition to H. Ec. 120 to 125. 

H. Ec. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

H. Ec. 231 — Foods 3 

HOME MANAGEMENT, HOUSING, AND HOME FURNISHINGS 

H. Ec. 160 — The Home and Its Furnishings 4 

H. Ec. 171 — Home Management 2 

H. Ec. 260 — Period Styles in Home Furnishings 3 

H. Ec. 270 — Family Financial Management 3 

H. Ec. 271 — Home Management 2 

Credit is not given for H. Ec. 171 and 270 in addition to H. Ec. 271. 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

H. Ec. 1 82 — Clothing Laboratory 2 

H. Ec. 1 83 — Consumer Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 1 84 — Clothing Selection 2 

H. Ec. 280 — Household Textiles 2 

H. Ec. 285 — History of Costume 2 

H. Ec. 287 — Consumer Clothing Problems 2 



CURRICULUM IN PHYSICS 

The Department of Physics oflFers essentially four different curricula in physics: 
liberal arts and sciences curriculum in physics, physics major in the sciences and 
letters curriculum, teacher education curriculum in physics, and curriculum in 
engineering physics. 

The LAS physics and engineering physics curricula are professionally oriented 
curricula which provide a sound training in physics and mathematics. Most stu- 
dents graduating in engineering or LAS physics go on for further study in graduate 
school. The LAS physics curriculum (below) differs from the engineering physics 
curriculum (outlined on page 224) in that it allows a little more freedom for non- 
technical electives. It also specifies the language and sequence requirements of the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Both curricula require a 3.5 (A = 5.0) grade- 
point average. The LAS curriculum requires a total of 126 semester hours for 
graduation, excluding military training. 

The physics major in the sciences and letters curriculum (see page 298) has 
fewer specified courses in physics and can therefore be used more easily as a back- 
ground for careers in other fields. 

Finally, the teacher education curriculum in physics (see page 330) is for 
those interested in a career in secondary school teaching. It is a specialized cur- 
riculum of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This program leaves time for 
certain education courses and can be coordinated with student teaching as well as 
teaching certificate requirements. 

Departmental Distinction. Students in the LAS physics curriculum are granted 
departmental distinction on the following overall grade-point averages: Distinction, 
4.2; High Distinction, 4.5; Highest Distinction, 4.8. In addition to the usual course 
requirements of the LAS physics curriculum, a candidate for distinction must have 
8 additional hours of 300- or 400-level physics courses or advanced courses in 
closely related technical subjects such as nuclear engineering, solid state electronics, 
astrophysics. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



309 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry' 4 

German, French, or Russian" 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Total 17 

SECOND YEAR 

German, French, or Russian' 4 

Math. 140 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Electives^ 4 

Total 15 

THIRD YEAR 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 342 — Electricity and Magnetism ..4 

Electives^ 8 

Total 15 

FOURTH YEAR 

Phycs. 387 — Atomic Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics II 4 

Physics electives' (360, 322, 303, 371, 

or 389) 4 

Electives' 7 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistr/ 4 

German, French, or Russian* 4 

Moth. 130 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry' 5 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics). 4 
Total 17 

German, French, or Russian^ 4 

Moth. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Mo- 
tion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics). 4 
Phycs. 341 — Electricity and Magnetism ..4 
Total 15 

Phycs. 321 — Theoretical Mechanics 4 

Phycs. 386 — Atomic Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics I 4 

Electives' 7 

Total 15 

Physics electives' (360, 322, 303, 371, 

or 389) 4 

Electives"* 11 

Total 15 



'Chem. 107, 108, and 109 may be substituted for Chem. 101, 102, by students who 
desire a more rigorous chemistry sequence. 

" The language requirement is a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language. 
German, French, or Russian is recommended. See the sciences and letters curriculum 
Foreign Language Requirements on page 280 for ways In which this requirement may be 
satisfied. 

The prerequisite to entering the stated sequence in mathematics is three to four 
years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, and a satisfactory grade on the 
Mathematics Placement Test. A student having college credit for algebra and trigonometry 
is not required to take these examinations. A student who does not meet the above pre- 
requisite may meet the requirements in basic mathematics with the sequence Math. 112, 
114, 120, 130, 140 (but receives only 13 hours credit toward the degree). 

The elective subjects must satisfy the general education requirements of the sciences 
and letters curriculum, except that students offering one unit or more of biology for admis- 
sion may substitute additional courses in humanities and social science for the biological 
science requirement. Students ore advised to include 6 to 8 hours of physics and 3 to 6 
hours of mathematics among the remaining electives. 

One of the following is required: Phycs. 322, 360, 303, 371, or 389. Additional hours 
of advanced physics ore desirable. 



CURRICULUM IN SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Speech and Hearing Science 

The curriculum in speech and hearing science is a preprofessional degree program. 
The curriculum is designed to prepare students to enter professional training at the 
graduate level in speech pathology or audiology. Students who desire certification 
for work in the public schools can complete certification requirements by completing 
the Master of Science degree or the teacher education curriculum in speech and 



310 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



hearing science. (See page 332.) To qualify for registration for courses specified in 
the first semester of the senior year of the curriculum the student must have a 
grade-point average of 3.65 (A = 5.0). A total of 124 hours, excluding military 
training is required for graduation. 

The biological science sequence may be satisfied by Zool. 104 and Psych. 103 
or Psych. 143. The physical science sequence may be satisfied by Math. 120 and 
135, L.A.S. 141-142, or 8 hours in physics or chemistry or any other approved 
sequence listed under the sciences and letters curriculum in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. An approved social science sequence is required. (See General 
Education on page 281.) A course in political science covering both state and 
federal constitutions and a course in U.S. history should be chosen if the student is 
interested in the school speech and hearing program. 

If the student plans to pursue the school speech language and hearing pro- 
gram, it is recommended that his minor be education and he elect courses required 
for state certification. In addition to the required courses in education at the mas- 
ter's degree level, other recommended courses are: Sp. Ed. 117 — Exceptional 
Children; H.P. Ed. 201 — Foundations of American Education; El. Ed. 233 — 
Classroom Problems in Childhood Education; and Sp. Ed. 324 — Mental and Edu- 
cational Measurement of Exceptional Children. 

REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112 — Verbal Communication, or Rhet. 105 and an elective in speech, 

or Rhet. 108 and an elective in speech 6-7 

Physical and/or health education 3 

General education 20-28 

Psychology 

Psych. 135 — Statistical Thinking in Psychology 3 

Psych. 216 — Child Psychology or Ed. Psy. 236 — Child Development for Elementary 

Teachers 3 

Psych. 250 — Psychology of Personality 3 

Psych. 248 — Learning 3 

Total 12 

Speech 

Spch. 105 — Voice and Articulation 2 

Spch. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Spch. 175 — A Survey of Historical and Professional Aspects of Speech Pathology 

and Audiology 2 

Spch. 109 — Introduction to Physiological Phonetics 3 

Spch. 375 — Speech Science I 4 

Spch. 383 — Development of Spoken Language 3 

Spch. 378 — Hearing Science 3 

Spch. 376 — Speech Science II 4 

Spch. 385 — Speech Pathology I 3 

Spch. 389 — Psychological Appraisal in Speech Pathology and Audiology 3 

Spch. 391 — Introduction to Hearing Disorders 3 

Spch. 395 — Audiometry 3 

Spch. 388 — Speech Pathology II 3 

Spch. 393 — Aural Rehabilitation 3 

Spch. 386 — Basic Diagnostic and Therapeutic Principles of Speech Correction 3 

Spch. 387 — Practicum in Speech Diagnosis and Therapy 3 

Spch. 398 — Practicum in Audiology 3 

Total 51 

Foreign language 

A reading knowledge of a foreign language equivalent to that resulting from four 
semesters of study of a foreign language commenced in college is required. (See Foreign 
Language Requirements on page 280.) 

Electives 

Recommended electives (22-27 hours) are: Math. 112; Spch. 141; Spch. 121; Music 100; 
Music 101; Econ. 108; or a course in philosophy, history, or political science; or courses 
in the student's minor area. Recommended minor areas include: psychology, education, 
mathematics, physiology, linguistics, psycholinguistics, or education of the deaf. 

Education, for certification, at least 18 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 31 



Preprofessional Health Programs 

HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

The Health Professions Information Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, is located in 2 Student Services Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. The fac- 
ulty views the mission of this office as being threefold: (1) to provide an oppor- 
tunity for students interested in the health professions to assemble a confidential 
file of faculty letters of recommendation, (2) to provide for both students and 
faculty a resource center for information concerning careers in the health profes- 
sions, and (3) to provide an opportunity for deans and admissions officers to visit 
our campus to inter\iew prospective applicants and to acquaint our students with 
the unique educational features that characterize their institutions. 

The office will act as a clearing house to supply students with standard faculty 
recommendation forms by which they may secure letters of recommendation from 
the faculty at any time during their college career. This office will keep these letters 
in a confidential file and will duplicate and forward them, unedited, along with a 
summary evaluation letter written by a health professions counselor. The request 
for a summary letter to be written is optional. 

Because of the large number of students applying to professional schools from 
the University, it is essential that each student join in the responsibility for compil- 
ing the information upon which his recommendation will be based. If a student de- 
sires to utilize this office in his application to professional schools, he will be assigned 
a registrant folder and will be asked to supply essential biographical data. He does 
not have to use this service but it can save him, his instructors, and his adviser a 
great deal of duplicated effort. Also, it enables him to solicit letters while the rec- 
ommender's impression of him is fresh, rather than after several years of lack of 
contact. All professional schools require letters of recommendation. 



CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL DIETETICS 

Minimum requirements for admission to the curriculum in medical dietetics at the 
School of Associated Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Illinois 
at the Medical Center, Chicago, are 60 semester hours, exclusive of physical edu- 
cation and basic military, with at least a 3.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average, in 
conformity with the list given below: 

Rhetoric or verbal communications: Two semesters. 

Biological sciences: One year of biology and one course in microbiology. Recommended: 

Biol. 1 10 and 111, and Mcbio. 100. 
Physical sciences: Chemistry through organic. Recommended: Chem. 101, 102, 131, and 134. 
Mathematics: Math. 112 or equivalent. 
Humanities: An approved general education sequence. 
Social sciences: An approved general education sequence. 
Economics: One course. Recommended: Econ. 108. 
Electives: Sufficient electives to complete a total of 60 semester hours, exclusive of physical 

education and basic military. 

The committee on admissions to the third year of the curriculum in medical 
dietetics selects applicants on the basis f)f scholastic record, aptitude, and appro- 
priate personal characteristics. Information regarding the preprofessional phase of 
this curriculum may be obtained frrtm the Health Professions Information Office. 



CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL RECORD ADMINISTRATION 

Minimum requirements for admission to the curriculum in medical record admin- 
istration in the College of Medicine, University of Illinois at the Medical Center, 



312 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Chicago, are 90 semester hours, exckisive of basic military, with at least a 3.0 
(A = 5.0) grade-point average, in conformity with the following list: 

Foreign language: A reading knowledge of a foreign language equivalent fo that resulting 
from four semesters of study in college. Each year of foreign language completed in high 
school is accepted as the equivalent of one semester in college. 

General education sequences: Approved general education sequences are required in bio- 
logical sciences, humanities, physical sciences, and social sciences. 

Physiology: Physl, 234. 

Rhetoric: Rhet. 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill and 112. 

Electives: Sufficient electives to complete the required 90 semester hours. 

The committee on admissions to the fourth year of the curriculum in medical 
record administration selects applicants on the basis of scholastic record, aptitude, 
and appropriate personal characteristics. 



CURRICULUM IN MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES 

Because of limited facilities at the College of Medicine, University of Illinois at 
the Medical Center, Chicago, it is not possible to guarantee admission to the pro- 
fessional phases of this curriculum for all who complete satisfactorily the three-year 
preprofessional program. Therefore, it is wise for students to so arrange their studies 
that an alternate goal may be realized. 

Applications for admission must be received between October 1 and March 1 
(preceding June enrollment). Minimum requirements are: scholastic grade-point 
average of at least 3.0 (A = 5.0) for courses taken at the University of Illinois, and 
3.25 for courses taken at other colleges or universities; aptitude and personal char- 
acteristics compatible with professional practice ; and three years of preprofessional 
work in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences comprising a minimum of 90 
semester hours, exclusive of physical education and basic military. 

Biological sciences: Sixteen hours chosen from the biological sciences, including Mcbio. 200 

and 201. 
Chemistry: Courses 101, 102, 122, 133. Chem. 107 and 108 may be token in place of 101 

and 102. 
Foreign language: A reading knowledge of a foreign language equivalent to that resulting 

from four semesters of study in college. Each year of foreign language completed in high 

school is accepted as the equivalent of one semester in college. 
Humanities: An approved general education sequence. 
Mathematics: Courses 104 or 114. 
Physics: Courses 101 and 102. Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 may be token in place of 101 and 

102. 
Rhetoric: Courses 105 or 108, or Spch. Ill and 1 12, or equivalent. 
Social sciences: An approved general education sequence. 
Electives: Sufficient electives to complete a total of 90 semester hours, exclusive of basic 

military and physical education. 

The committee on admissions to the fourth year of the curriculum in medical 
laboratory sciences selects applicants on the basis of scholastic record, aptitude, and 
appropriate personal characteristics. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

This program, which is open to both men and women, combines six semesters of 
work in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Urbana-Champaign with five 
quarters in the School of Associated Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Uni- 
versity of Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago. 

The work at the Urbana-Champaign campus, which is mainly of a prepro- 
fessional character, is shown below. The student must accumulate a minimum of 



314 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



PREDENTISTRY 



The predentistry program listed below includes the courses required for admission 
to the College of Dentistry. University of Illincjis at the Medical Center, Chicago. 
Specific admission requirements of other dental schools are listed in the Admiision 
Requirements uf the American Dental Schools, published by the American Asso- 
ciation of Dental Schools, 21 1 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 6061 1. 

Students with advanced standing who wish to transfer to the predentistry pro- 
gram must have a grade-point average of at least 3.5 f A = 5.0). 

The predental curriculum is basically a three-year program, although a few 
students are accepted by some dental schools after two years of undergraduate 
work. The following courses offered at the Urbana-Champaign campus must be 
included in the study program in order to satisfy the course requirements for ad- 
mission to most dental schools, including the College of Dentistry at the Medical 
Center, Chicago. 

SEMESTER HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition, or Spch. Ill, 112 — Verbal Communicofion 4-6 

Chem. 101, 102, or Chem. 107, 108 — Inorganic Chemistry 8 

Chem. 131, 134' — Organic Chemistry 5 

Phycs. 101, 102, or 106, 107, 108 — General Physics 10-12 

Biol. 110, 111 — Principles of Biology 10 



' Many schools, including the College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at the Medical 
Center, Chicago, require or recommend an additional course such as Chem. 122, Chem. 336, 
or Bloch. 350. 

All American and Canadian dental schools require: (\) That all applicants 
take the Dental Admissions Test fDAT) as recommended and approved by the 
American Dental Association. For information concerning the test write to the 
Division of Educational Measurements, American Dental Association, 211 East 
Chicago Avenue, Chicago. Illinois 60611. The application forms can also be ob- 
tained from the Health Professions Information Office, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, 2 Student Services Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. (2) Let- 
ters of recommendation from all applicants. '3) An interview ''may be requested 
by the committee on admissions;. The American Association of Dental Schools 
sponsors a centralized application service ^AADSAS). Application request cards 
can be obtained through the Health Professions Information Office, 2 Student Ser- 
vices Building, or by writing A.ADSAS, P.O. Box 1003, Iowa City, Iowa 52240. 



PREMEDiCINE 

Individuals anticipating a career in medicine must major in a University depart- 
ment, incidentally fulfilling the requirements for admission to the medical schools 
of their choice. There is no prescribed curriculum for premedical students. A major 
in biology, or in the Departments of Zoology, Physiology and Biophysics, and Micro- 
biology, or in the Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, is espe- 
cially suitable since major requirements in these departments overlap to some ex- 
tent with medical school requirements. A major in psychology or in the humanities 
or fine arts is acceptable to medical school. In practice, however, it is difficult to 
concentrate in these areas and fulfill the present medical school requirements, 
especially if the student plans to* apply for entry after three years. 

The strong sequential nature of some programs, such as the science depart- 
ments, requires that appropriate course selections be made in the first year if a 
sound program is in fact to be achieved. It is, for example, important that the 
entering science-oriented students elect mathematics since calculus is a prerequisite 
for some courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 313 



90 semester hours, a 3.5 (A = 5.0) cumulative grade-point average, and satisfy all 
the preprofessional requirements before transferring to the College of Medicine. 
Information regarding the preprofessional phase of this program may be obtained 
from the Health Professions Information Office. 

FIRST YEAR SEMESTER HOURS 

Art 185, 186, 119, or 120— Design 2-3 

L.A.S. 140 and 141, or Chem. 101 and 102 — Physical Science 8 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction 

to Experimental Psychology 4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition, and Spch. 199 — Interpersonal Communication 
or Lib. S. 195 — Introduction to Library Use; or Spch. 1 1 1 and 112 — 

Verbal Communication 8 

Humanities (approved) 6 

Electives (approved) 3 

Total 31-32 

SECOND YEAR 

Art 1 23 — Fundamentals of Drafting and Drawing 3 

H. Ec. 105 — Child and the Family, or Psych. 216 — Child Psychology 3-4 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology, and any 100- or 200-level course 6 

Humanities (approved) 3 

O.T. 100 — Occupational Therapy Orientation 2 

Physl. 103 — introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Physl. 234 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 5 

Electives (approved) 4 

Total 30-31 

THIRD YEAR 

Art 1 94 — Pottery 2 

H. Ed. 216 — Medical Terminology Correlated with Community Health Problems 3 

H. Ec. 194 — Primary Structures in Weaving 3 

P.E.W. 206 — Kinesiology 3 

Psych. 250 — Psychology of Personality or Psych. 338 — Abnormal Psychology 3 

Vo. Tech. 181 — Introductory Woodwork 4 

Electives (approved) 12 

Total 30 



CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Minimum requirements for admission to the curriculum in physical therapy at the 
College of Medicine, University of Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago, are 60 
semester hours, exclusive of basic military, with at least a 3.25 (A = 5.0) grade-point 
average, in conformity with the list given below. 

SEMESTER HOURS 
Biol. 110 and 111 — Principles of Biology, or Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology and 

Physl, 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 8 

Chem. 101 and 102 — Chemistry 8 

Phycs. 101 and 102 — General Physics 8 

Math. 104 — Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

Physical education 2 

Psychology — general, child, and abnormal psychology 9 

Rhet, 105 or 108 — Composition, or Spch. Ill and 112 — Verbal Communication, 

or equivalent 4 

Social sciences (to include an additional course in psychology) 5 

Humanities (approved general education sequence) 8 

Electives, to complete a total of 60 

The committee on admissions to the professional phase of the curriculum in 
physical therapy selects applicants on the basis of academic achievement, personal 
characteristics, aptitude, and motivation. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 315 



The minimum requirements for admission to the College of Medicine, Univer- 
sity of Illinois at the Medical Center, Chicago, are so designed as to allow a stu- 
dent to elect any major field of interest. Majors in biology, chemistry through 
organic, physics or biophysics, and behavioral science will be particularly helpful 
in preparing for study in the College of Medicine. However, major fields may 
be in the humanities, the fine arts, and the behavioral, biological, or physical sci- 
ences. Mathematics through calculus is especially recommended for those antici- 
pating ad\anced work in basic or clinical research. 

All American and Canadian medical schools require: (1) That all applicants 
take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) as recommended and approved 
by the Association of American Medical Colleges. The applicant must have ob- 
tained a satisfactory' score on the MCAT, which must be taken no later than 
October of the year prior to enrollment. For information concerning the test, write 
to Medical Colleges Test, American Testing Program, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa 
52240. The application forms can also be obtained from the Health Professions 
Information Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2 Student Ser- 
vices Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801. (2) Letters of recommendation from all 
applicants. (3) An interview (may be requested by the committee on admissions). 

The American Association of Medical Schools sponsors a centralized applica- 
tion service, the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). Appli- 
cations are available only from AMCAS, Suite 301, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. Application request cards can be obtained from 
the Health Professions Information Office, 2 Student Services Building. 

Students anticipating a career in medicine are advised to obtain additional 
information from those medical schools in which they are interested. Specific ad- 
mission requirements for individual medical schools are listed in Medical School 
Admission Requirements, published by the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges, One Dupont Circle, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences accepts a maximum of 32 hours of 
credit from the first year at an accredited medical school to complete the require- 
ments for a bachelor's degree, provided that (1) the student is in good standing 
in the medical school; (2) work taken at the medical school does not duplicate 
work taken in premedical courses and that it is nonclinical; (3) the student com- 
pletes his first 90 hours (exclusive of military training and physical education) at 
the University of Illinois; and (4) the student meets all requirements for gradua- 
tion from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 



PREPROFESSIONAL NURSING 

The University offers a degree program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nurs- 
ing for students coming directly from high school or for registered nurses who meet 
a specific set of requirements. The program is made up of two phases, a preprofes- 
sional year in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Urbana-Champaign and 
the professional phase administered by the College of Nursing, University of Illi- 
nois at the Medical Center, Chicago. 

Transfer students must have a 3.25 (A = 5.0) grade-point average. Graduates 
of hospital schools of nursing are admitted with advanced standing, the exact 
amount of credit to be granted depending on the nature of the work done, validat- 
ing examinations, and the quality of performance in sequential courses. 

Admission to the professional phase is on recommendation of the Admissions 
Committee of the College of Nursing after completion of the following require- 
ments: 

HOURS 

Chem. 101 and 102 — General Chemistry 8 

Biol. 100 — Biological Science, or Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology 4 

Humanities 6 



316 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Physical education 2 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Total 33 

For additional information about the programs in nursing, write to the Office 
of Admissions and Records, P.O. Box 6998, Chicago, Illinois 60680. 

Information regarding the prcprofessional phase of this program may be ob- 
tained from the Health Professions Information Office. 



PREPHARMACY 

Admission to the College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at the Medical Center, 
Chicago, requires approval by the admissions committee of that college. To be eli- 
gible for consideration by the committee a student must: (1) submit college work 
to meet entrance requirements which include a minimum of credit in the following 
courses: general or inorganic chemistry, 8 semester hours; college algebra, 3 se- 
mester hours; plane trigonometry, 2 semester hours; English composition, 5 semes- 
ter hours; and biology, 8 semester hours. The elective hours selected to complete 
the required 30 semester hours should not include courses offered by the College 
of Pharmacy but those which will increase the social and cultural background of 
the student. If credit in courses required by the College of Pharmacy curriculum is 
offered to meet the minimum admission requirements, the student must elect an 
equivalent number of hours to meet the requirements for graduation, (2) have a 
total of 30 hours of credit excluding health education and basic military, and (3) 
have a grade-point average of at least 3.0 (A = 5.0). 

The specific requirements can be met at the Urbana-Champaign campus 
through Rhet. 105 or 108, Spch. Ill, 112, or equivalent; Chem. 101, 102; Math. 
112 (or 111), 114. These courses total 19-22 hours. Additional work necessary to 
complete 30 hours may be taken in any liberal arts and sciences courses usually not 
required in the College of Pharmacy curriculum, such as courses in the social sci- 
ences and humanities. 

Students who transfer into this curriculum must have a grade-point average 
of at least 3.25. If they transfer at the end of their first semester they may find it 
necessary to complete the admission requirements of the College of Pharmacy in 
the summer session. Information regarding the prcprofessional phase of this pro- 
gram may be obtained from the Health Professions Information Office. 



Teacher Education Curricula 

This section contains a description of requirements of programs leading to the 
bachelor's degree and teacher certification. More detailed information pertaining 
to specific course requirements for each area of specialization is provided by faculty 
advisers appointed by the Urbana Council on Teacher Education. It is essential 
that each student fulfill the specific course requirements of his program in order 
to be eligible for the i)achelor's degree and teacher certification. Only through 
regular communication with the teacher education adviser may a student be as- 
sured of the appropriateness of his semester program. 

General education requirements of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
must be fulfilled by students pursuing teacher education curricula in that college. 
When these curricula include an appropriate sequence in the humanities, the social 
sciences, or the natural sciences as a part of the major teaching area requirements, 
that sequence fulfills the corresponding general education requirements. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 317 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, Rhet. 108 and a 

speech performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences 6-8 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

General psychology 3 

Foreign language 16 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Humanities 6 

Total 46-50 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The following requirements are common to all programs preparatory to teaching in 
secondary schools, except as noted: 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of secondary education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 4-5 

Educational practice 5 

Total 18-19 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF BIOLOGY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Biology 

While this curriculum is primarily designed for students preparing to teach biology, 
it also permits the breadth of work in the sciences required for teaching general 
science at the junior high school level. The courses outlined below total 129 hours, 
excluding military training. Exemptions will be granted in language and mathe- 
matics, depending upon the student's high school experience. Competence in the 
subject areas listed must be demonstrated, and a minimum of 120 hours, excluding 
military training, is necessary for graduation. While students are no longer required 
to complete a teacher education minor those desiring a minor must select it from 
those listed on page 1 12. The minor in general science is automatically met by those 
completing this curriculum. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-8 

General psychology 3 

Humanities (any approved sequence) 6 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3-4 

Physical and/or health education 3 

Foreign language 16 

Total 41-45 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Introduction to the teaching of secondary school subjects 2 

Principles of secondary education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

Foundations of American education 2 

School and community experiences 2 

Technic of teaching in the secondary school 4 

Educational practice in secondary education 5 

Total 20 



318 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Mathematics 

College algebra and trigonometry 5 

Statistics 3-4 

Chemistry 

General 8-10 

Organic 5 

Physics 10 

Biology 

General 10 

Advanced (200- and 300-level courses or equivalent) 

Genetics 4 

Microbiology 6-8 

Animal or plant physiology 5-6 

Invertebrate biology 3-5 

Vertebrate biology 3-5 

Plant biology 3-5 

Environmental biology 3-5 

Total 68-82 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN BIOLOGY 

Twelve hours of electives are to be chosen from the various departments in the 
School of Life Sciences, in consultation with the adviser. An attempt should be 
made to obtain background in each of the general areas in the School of Life Sci- 
ences to give the students minoring in the teaching of biological sciences as much 
breadth as possible as prospective biology teachers. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Principles of biology I 5 

Principles of biology II 5 

Genetics 4 

Electives to be taken in the life science areas 12 

Total 26 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN GENERAL SCIENCE 

Additional hours in other sciences such as astronomy, geology, and physical geog- 
raphy are recommended for the student completing the minor in general science. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

General physics 10 

Principles of biology 10 

General chemistry 8 

Total 28 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Chemistry 

This curriculum is designed to prepare the student to teach physical science with 
a major in chemistry and a minor in physics or mathematics. A minimum of 125 
hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for graduation. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences see page 316. Also see Urbana Council on Teacher Education on page 
1 10 for information pertinent to all teacher education curricula. 

Students may elect to minor in either mathematics or physics. Regardless of 
the minor the curriculum requires the completion of the general physics sequence 
and one year of calculus. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 319 



A minimum of 4 hours of biological science and a minimum of 6 hours of 
humanities are required in addition to courses required for teacher certification. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

The sequence of chemistry courses chosen by the student is somewhat flexible ancJ depends 
upon previous educational experience as well as other factors. The following two sequences 
of chemistry courses are recommended. The first is the less rigorous program and might be 
followed by a student whose high school background is not particularly strong. The second 
is similar to that followed by students in the chemistry curriculum. A program intermediate 
between these two, or involving other courses, may be chosen with the consent of the de- 
partmental adviser, but, in all cases, the course program should include a course in physical 
chemistry and two additional courses at the 300 level. 

FIRST SEQUENCE HOURS 

General chemistry 8 

Elementary quantitative analysis 5 

Basic organic chemistry and structure and synthesis 5 

Physical chemistry 5 

Additional chemistry 9 

Total 32 

SECOND SEQUENCE 

General chemistry 10 

Organic chemistry 6 

Structure and synthesis 2 

Inorganic chemistry 3 

Physical chemistry 6 

Dynamics, structure, and physical methods 2 

Additional chemistry 3 

Total 32 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

General chemistry 8 

Elementary quantitative analysis 5 

Elementary organic chemistry, including laboratory 5 

Physical science eiectives (preferably physics) 8-10 

Total 26-28 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Twenty-four semester hours in the field with approximately one-half of the work in 
chemistry and the other half in physics. Additional work in other physical sciences, 
such as astronomy, geology, and physical geography, is recommended. This minor 
is intended primarily for students preparing to teach mathematics. 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF EARTH SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Earth Science 

This curriculum is designed for students preparing to teach earth science as their 
major area of specialization. Students in this curriculum are required to complete 
a teaching minor in biology, chemistry, general science, mathematics, or physical 
science. 

Including general and professional education requirements (see page 317), the 
courses outlined below total 129 to 136 hours; the minimum number of hours for 
graduation, excluding military training, is 125. The college requirements of 30 
hours of advanced courses must be met. 



320 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Earth sciences HOURS 

Physical geology 4 

Historical geology 4 

Minerals and rocks 4 

Paleontology and stratigraphy 4 

Regional field study 2 

Physical geography (meteorology and climatology) 4 

General astronomy^ 3 

Electives^ 8 

Supporting sciences (may fulfill, in part, the teacher education minor) 

General chemistry 4 

Mathematics^ 2-5 

Principles of biology 5 

General physics 5 

Total 49-52 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Students in this curriculum are required to complete one of the following teacher education 
minors; biology (page 318); chemistry (page 319); general science (page 318); mathematics 
(page 329); or physical science (page 319). 



^ Students who do not take a year of physics should take descriptive astronomy; 
students may also elect to take astronomy for teachers. 

^A minimum of 8 additional hours in earth science is required. Recommended courses 
are introductory soils, oceanography, advanced physical geography, or geomorphology, and 
other appropriate advanced courses in agronomy, astronomy, geology, and geography. 

^Mathematics through trigonometry is required. Calculus and analytic geometry are 
recommended for all students. 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN EARTH SCIENCE 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Descriptive astronomy 8 

Physical geography I 4 

Physical geology and historical geology 8 

Regional field study 2 

Minerals and rocks 4 

Total 26 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of English 

A minimum of 128 hours, excluding military training, is required for graduation 
in this curriculum. Students are required to complete one teaching minor or to ful- 
fill requirements for an alternative to a minor. If the student elects the teacher 
education major in literature, he must complete the teacher education minor in 
rhetoric or in English as a second language. For teacher education requirements 
applicable to all curricula see page 110. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The humanities requirement (see page 317) is fulfilled through major teaching field courses 
(28-47 hours). Students in this curriculum must complete a course in oral interpretation of 
literature (3 hours). 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 321 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students in this curriculum must complete a course in the teaching of reading (3 hours) 
in addition to the prescribed professional education courses (22 hours). (See page 317.) 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

Engl. 101 and 102, or 103 ore the prerequisites for the English major. These courses should 
be taken in the freshman year 6 

Option 1 : Teacher Education Major in English 

Shakespeare 3 

Survey of American literature 6 

Survey of English literature 6 

Literary criticism 3 

Engl. 302 — Descriptive English Grammar 3 

Historical introduction to the English language 3 

Engl. 381 — Theory and Practice of Written Composition 3 

Engl. 385 — Literature for the High School 3 

Advanced English electives 6 

Total 42 

Any approved teacher education minor (see page 110) or an approved alternative to o 
minor (see an adviser for details) 18-30 

Option 2: Teacher Education Major in Literature 

Available only with the teacher education minor in rhetoric or in English as a second 

language. 

Tv/o of the following courses: 

Engl. 101 — Introduction to Poetry 3 

Engl. 102 — Introduction to Drama 3 

Engl. 103 — Introduction to Fiction 3 

Freshman honors seminar 6 

Total 6 

Shakespeare 3-6 

Survey of American literature 6 

Survey of English literature 6 

Literary criticism 3 

Engl. 385 — Literature for the High School 3 

Advanced electives in literature 9-12 

Total 39 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN RHETORIC 

Available only with a teacher education major in literature. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 and a speech performance 

elective, or Spch. Ill and 112 6-7 

Rhet. 133 — Principles of Composition, or Rhet. 143 — Intermediate Expository Writing ..3 

Rhet. 144 — Narrative Writing 3 

Engl. 381 — Theory and Practice of Written Composition 3 

Engl. 302 — Descriptive English Grammar 3 

Electives in rhetoric or related fields 6-7 

Total 24-25 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 
Option 1 

.Available only with a teacher education major in literature. 



322 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 and a speech performance 

elective, or Spch. 1 1 1 and 112 6-7 

E.S.L./Ling. 388-389 — Linguistics in Language Learning I and II 8 

Ling. 300 — Introduction to Linguistics, or Ling. 200 — Elements of Linguistics 3 

Rhet. 133 — Principles of Composition, or Rhet. 143 — Intermediate Ejcpository Writing ..3 

Engl. 302 or Engl. 302s — Descriptive English Grammar 3 

Ling./Anth./Comm. 370 — Language, Culture, and Society, or Ling. 305 — Intro- 
duction to Applied Linguistics 3 

Total 26-27 

Option 2 

Available only with a teacher education major in a foreign language, speech, or 
social studies. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 and a speech performance 

elective, or Spch. 1 1 1 and 112 6-7 

E.S.L./Ling. 388-389 — Linguistics in Language Learning I and II 8 

Ling. 300 — Introduction to Linguistics, or Ling. 200 — Elements of Linguistics 3 

Rhet. 133 — Principles of Composition or Rhet. 143 — Intermediate Expository Writing ..3 

Engl. 302 or 302s — Descriptive English Grammar 3 

Engl. 116 — Masterpieces of American Literature or Engl. 256 — Survey of American 

Literature II 3 

Total 26-27 

Option 3 

Available only with a teacher education major in English, including section s of 
Engl. 302 — Descriptive English Grammar. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 and a speech performance 

elective, or Spch. 1 1 1 and 112 6-7 

E.S.L./Ling. 388-389 — Linguistics in Language Learning I and II 8 

Ling. 300 — Introduction to Linguistics, or Ling. 200 — Elements of Linguistics 3 

Ling. 305 — Introduction to Applied Linguistics, or Ling. /Spch. 301 — General 

Phonetics, or Spch, 208 — Speech and Hearing Problems in the Classroom 3 

Spch. 109 — Introduction to Physiological Phonetics 3 

Ling./Anth./Comm, 370 — Language, Culture, and Society 3 

Total 26-27 

Electives, as needed to total at least 128 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ENGLISH 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Tv/o courses in American literature 6 

Tv/o courses in English literature 6 

Literary criticism, or Rhet, 133 — Principles of Composition, or Rhet. 143 — Exposi- 
tory Writing 3 

Engl. 302 — Descriptive English Grammar 3 

English or American literature or rhetoric (excluding Rhet. 105 and 108 and Spch. 

Ill and 112) 6 

Total 24 

CURRICULA PREPARATORY TO TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The requirements of these curricula include general education as described on page 
317, except that the humanities requirement is fulfilled through courses in the 
major teaching field. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 323 



The professional education requirements are described on page 317; the course 
in techniques of teaching is taken for 4 semester hours of credit. 

Specialty for Teaching a Foreign Language in Both High School 
and Elementary School 

This specialty offers preparation for those who wish to teach a foreign language 
and another subject in a high school or a foreign language only in an elementary 
school under Illinois teacher certification regulations. Completion of any foreign 
language curriculum in teacher education will qualify the student for the high 
school certificate which permits teaching in grades six through twelve. A student 
who wishes to prepare for teaching a foreign language in the elementary school, 
as contrasted with one who wishes to prepare for general elementary school teach- 
ing, should substitute the following for the teacher education minor required in the 
foreign language teacher education curricula. 

HOURS 

Child development for elementary teachers 3 

Classroom programs in childhood education 2 

The teaching of language arts in the elementary school 3 

Primary reading 3 

The student teaching must be done in the seventh or eighth grade. 

If these requirements are met the student will be entitled to the special cer- 
tificate, which will permit him to teach a foreign language in all grades of the 
public schools, as well as to the high school certificate. The special certificate does 
not qualify him to teach any elementary school subjects other than the one named 
on the certificate. 

The student may complete a teacher education minor but additional hours 
will be required. 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF FRENCH 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of French 

A minimum of 120 hours, excluding military training, is required for graduation. 
For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula see page 110. See 
above for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to teach French in 
both elementary and secondary schools. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Thirty to 38 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: French HOURS 

Elementary French (Fr. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate French (Fr. 133-134 or equivalent) 8 

French literature (Fr. 201-202 or equivalent) 6 

Oral French (Fr. 211-212-217 or equivalent) 10 

French composition (Fr. 215 or equivalent) 4 

Teachers course (Fr. 280) or equivalent. This course may count as part of the profes- 
sional education requirements. Normally taken during the student teaching semester . . .4 

Total 40 

Electives: Especially recommended are courses in French diction, phonetics, syntax, and 
civilization. 



324 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Minor teaching subjects (at least 20 hours) which constitute desirable combinations with 
French include English, English as a second language, Latin, German, Russian, Italian, 
Portuguese, music, history, Spanish, and social studies. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN FRENCH 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Elementary French (Fr. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate French (Fr, 133-134 or equivalent) 8 

Oral French (Fr. 211-212 or equivalent) 6 

Total 22 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF GERMAN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of German 

A minimum of 120 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for 
graduation. For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula see 
page 110. See also page 323 for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to 
teach German in both elementary and secondary schools. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Thirty to 38 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: German HOURS 

Elementary German (Ger. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate German (Ger. 103-104 or equivalent) 8 

Conversation and writing (Ger. 211-212 or equivalent) 6 

Advanced conversation, composition, and syntax (Ger. 303 or equivalent) 3 

Advanced conversation (Ger. 304 or equivalent) 1 

Introduction to German literature (Ger. 210 or equivalent) 3 

German literature (any of the five courses listed below) 3 

The German novelle of the nineteenth century 

The German novelle of the twentieth century 

Nineteenth century German drama 

Twentieth century German drama 

Lyrics and ballads 

Teachers course^ (Ger. 280 or equivalent) 4 

History of German civilization (Ger. 320 or equivalent) 4 

German phonology and morphology (Ger. 365 or equivalent) 3 

German elective 3 

Total 46 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Minor teaching subjects (at least 20 hours) which constitute desirable combinations with 
German include English, French, history, Latin, music, physical education, Russian, and 
Spanish. A double major in German and English with Latin or history as a minor is also 
recommended. 

ELECTIVES 

Recommended electives (8-11 hours) are Art 111, 112; Human. 363, 364; Music 110; Phil. 
101; Ger. 114; advanced German courses not included in the minimum program, and other 
language and literature courses. See also page 323 for requirements to be fulfilled by those 
planning to teach German in both elementary and secondary schools. 



^ This course will count as part of the professional education requirement. The total of 
46 hours may be reduced by as much as 16 hours through prerequisite credit for work 
equivalent to Ger. 101-104 taken in the secondary school. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 325 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN GERMAN 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Elementary German (Ger. 101-102) 8 

Intermediate Germon (Ger. 103-104) 2 

Conversation and writing (Ger. 211-212) 6 

Total 22 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ITALIAN 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Elementary Italian (Ifal. 101-102 or equivalent) , 8 

Intermediate Italian (Ital. 103-104 or equivalent) 8 

Composition and conversation I and II (Ital. 211-212) 6 

Total 22 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF LATIN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of Latin 

A minimum of 120 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for 
graduation. See page 323 for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to teach 
Latin in both elementary and secondary schools. For teacher education requirements 
applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Thirty to 38 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Latin 

Courses in the Latin language HOURS 

Elementary Latin (Lot. 101-102, or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate Latin (Lot. 103-104, or equivalent) 8 

Elementary Latin composition (Lot. 1 13-1 14, or equivalent) 4 

Survey of Latin literature (Lot. 201-202, or equivalent) 6 

Cicero's works (Lot. 203, or equivalent) 3 

Vergil's works (Lot. 204, or equivalent) 3 

Teachers course' (Lot. 280, or equivalent) 4 

Advanced Latin composition (Lot. 311, or equivalent) 3 

Writings from selected types of Latin literature^ (two courses 

from Lot. 381-386, or equivalent) 6 

Total 43 

The total of 43 hours may be reduced by as much as 16 hours through prerequisite credit 
for work equivalent to Lot. 101-104 taken in secondary school. 

Courses in classical civilization 

Ancient history 3-6 

Classical archaeology 3 

Total 6-9 

Total 33-52 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Minor teaching subjects (at least 20 hours) which constitute desirable combinations with 
Latin include English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, music, history, and social 
studies. 



This course will count as port of the professional education requirement. 
"Applies only to students who at entrance are admitted to Lot. 201. Such students are 
also required to take either Grk. 101-102, or CI. Civ. 301-302. 



326 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN LATIN 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Elementary Latin (Lot. 101-102, or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate Latin (Lot, 103-104, or equivalent) 8 

Elementary Latin composition (Lot. 1 13-1 14, or equivalent) 4 

Survey of Latin literature (Lot. 201-202, or equivalent) 6 

Teachers course (Lot. 280) 4 

Total 30 

The total of 30 hours may be reduced as much as 16 hours through prerequisite credit for 
secondary school v/ork equivalent to Lot. 101-104. One semester of readings in Latin litera- 
ture will be required in such cases. 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PORTUGUESE 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Elementary Portuguese I and II (Port. 101-102) 8 

Intermediate Portuguese (Port. 103-104) 8 

Intermediate composition and conversation (Port. 211) 3 

Introduction to Portuguese and Brazilian literature (Port. 201) or 

Readings in Portuguese (Port. 290) 3 

Total 22 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF RUSSIAN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of Russian 

A minimum of 123 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for 
graduation. See page 323 for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to teach 
Russian in both elementary and secondary schools. For teacher education require- 
ments applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Thirty to 38 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Russian 

Courses in language and literature HOURS 

Russ. 101-102 — First-Year Russian, or Russ. Ill — Intensive First-Year Russian 8 

Russ. 103-104 — Second-Year Russian, or Russ. 112 — Intensive Second-Year Russian ... 8 
Russ. 211-212 — Oral Russian I and II, or Russ. 303 — Advanced Reading 

and Conversation I 6 

Russ. 215-216 — Introduction to Russian Literature I and II 6 

Russ. 213-214 — Russian Composition I and II, or Russ. 313 — Advanced 

Composition and Usage I 6 

Russ. 115 or 116 — Russian Literature in Translation I and II 3 

Russ. 308 — Russian Phonetics and Diction 3 

Russ. 301 — Russian Prose Fiction I, or Russ. 302 — Russian Prose Fiction II, or 

Russ. 321, 322, 323, 324, 325 — Readings in Russian Literature 3 

Total 43 

Russ. 280 — Teachers course (counts as professional education) 4 

Russian history and civilization 

Hist. 219 — Survey of Russian history from early times to present (or Hist. 319, 

320, 321, 325, 326, 327, or 328) 3 

Russ. 114 — Russian civilization 4 

Total 7 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 327 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Minor feaching subjects (of least 20 hours) which constitute desirable combinations with 
Russian include English, French, German, Latin, Spanish, history, music, physical education, 
psychology, and social studies. 

ELECTIVES 

Recommended electives (at least 3 hours) include Art 111, 112; Human. 363, 364; Music 
130, 131; Phil. 110; Slav. 319, 382; Hist. 313-314; courses in Russian and East European 
area studies (Geog. 353, Soc. 350); advanced courses in the major or minor field. 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN RUSSIAN 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Russ. 101-102 — First-Year Russian, or Russ. Ill — Intensive First-Year Russian 8 

Russ. 103-104 — Second-Year Russian, or Russ. 112 — Intensive Second-Year Russian ....8 

Russ. 211-212 — Oral Russian I and II 6 

Total 22 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF SPANISH 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of Spanish 

A minimum of 123 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for 
graduation. See page 323 for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to teach 
Spanish in both elementary and secondary schools. For teacher education require- 
ments applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Thirty to 38 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: Spanish HOURS 

Elementary Spanish (Span. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate Spanish (Span. 103-104 or equivalent) 8 

Literary analysis (Span. 200 or equivalent) 2 

Spanish language: Spanish phonetics and syntax 2-4 

Spoken Spanish (Span. 21 1 and 215, or equivalent) 4-6 

Spanish composition (Span. 217, or equivalent) 3 

Spanish civilization: Spain and Spanish America (Span. 232 and 233, or equivalent) 4 

Spanish literature (Span. 240 or 241, or equivalent. Medieval golden age or 

eighteenth century to present) 3 

Spanish-American literature (Span. 242 or equivalent) 3 

Teachers course (Span. 280 or equivalent. This course will count as port of the pro- 
fessional education requirements. Must be taken during the student teaching 

semester) 4 

Spanish electives: one or two 200- or 300-level courses 2-4 

Total 43-49 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Minor teaching subjects (at least 20 hours) which constitute desirable combinations with 
Spanish include English, English as a second language, Latin, French, German, Russian, 
Italian, Portuguese, music, history, and social studies. 



328 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN SPANISH 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Elementary Spanish (Span. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate Spanish (Span. 103-104 or equivalent) 8 

Spanish language (Span. 209 or equivalent) 3 

Oral Spanish (Span. 211 or equivalent) 2 

Spanish composition (Span. 217 or equivalent) 3 

Total 24 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Geography 

A minimum of 123 hours, excluding military training, is required for graduation. 

Students are required to complete one teaching minor. It is strongly recom- 
mended that the minor supplement the nature of the major. A student emphasizing 
physical geography should select a minor from the biological or physical sciences, 
whereas a student emphasizing human geography should select a minor from the 
social sciences. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula see page 110. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty-six to 51 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) Physical geography 
courses in this curriculum will meet the general education requirements in physical science. 
Students must complete a 6- to 8-hour sequence in biological science. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Nineteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

Introduction to physical geography 4 

Introduction to human geography 4 

Scope and methods of geography 2 

Geography electives: selected in consultation with the adviser and including at least 
one course in each of the following areas: physical geography, economic or social 

geography, and regional geography 22 

Total 32 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Selected in consultation with adviser, at least 20 

Electives 4-9 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Introduction to physical geography 4 

Introduction to human geography 4 

Scope and methods of geography 2 

Geography electives: selected in consultation with the adviser and including at least 
one course in each of the following areas: physical geography, economic or social 

geography, and regional geography 15 

Total 25 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Mathematics 

This curriculum offers training for teachers of high school and junior college mathe- 
matics. A minimum of 120 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 329 



for graduation. For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, 
see page 1 10. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty-six to 51 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) Students pursuing this 
curriculum may satisfy the natural science requirement by either a minimum of 6 hours 
in biological sciences or a minimum of 6 hours in physics including L.A.S. 140-141. 
Courses in physics or L.A.S. 140-141 ore preferred. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Nineteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

Calculus and analytic geometry (completed through multiple integrals and infinite series). .13 

Linear transformations and matrices (linear algebra) 3 

Selected topics for secondary school teachers (Moth. 305 and 306) 6 

Topics on geometry (Moth. 302) 3 

Advanced aspects of Euclidean geometry (Moth. 303) 3 

Abstract algebra (Moth. 317) 3 

Real variable theory (Moth. 344 or 347) 3 

Computer science 3 

Total 37 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Calculus and analytic geometry (completed through multiple Integrals and infinite 

series) 13 

Topics on geometry (Math. 302) 3 

Selected topics for secondary school teachers (Moth. 305) 3 

Elective — with one of the following preferred — advanced aspects of Euclidean 

geometry, abstract algebra, linear algebra, real variable theory, computer science 3 

Total 22 

COMBINED SCIENCES AND LETTERS - EDUCATION PROGRAM 
FOR MATHEMATICS TEACHERS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 

This program leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, or Bachelor of Science, with 
a major in mathematics. A student must maintain a 4.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point 
average in mathematics and a 3.75 all-University grade-point average to remain 
in the program. All requirements for the sciences and letters curriculum must be 
met. (See page 280.) A total of 120 hours, excluding military training, is required 
for graduation. For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula see 
page 110. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-8 

Biological sciences 6-8 

Physics' 6-8 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

General psychology 3 

Foreign language 16 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Humanities 6 

Total 52-59 



At least 6 hours in physics courses using the techniques of calculus. Phycs. 106, 107 
meet this requirement. 



330 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of ecJucation 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 5 

Educational practice (student teaching) 5-7 

Total 19-21 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Calculus and analytic geometry (completed through multiple integrals and infinite series). .13 

Abstract algebra (Math. 317) 3 

Linear transformations and matrices (Math. 318 — Linear Algebra) 3 

Selected topics for secondary school teachers (Moth. 305 and 306) 6 

Topics on geometry (Math. 302) 3 

Advanced aspects of Euclidean geometry (Math. 303) 3 

Real variable theory (Math. 344 or 347) 3 

Computer science 3 

Tv/o 300-level courses in theoretical mathematics excluding Math. 317, 318, 344, or 347. .6 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Each candidate must complete a minor consisting of 20 hours in one or two of the follow- 
ing subjects with at least 8 hours in each if two are chosen: accountancy, astronomy, biol- 
ogy, chemistry, economics, English, finance, foreign language, geography, history, philoso- 
phy, physics, political science, psychology, and sociology. In particular, the requirement 
for a minor can be satisfied by a teacher education minor as described on page 112 in 
one of the following fields: accountancy, biology, chemistry, economics, education, foreign 
language, physics, physical science, and social studies. 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF PHYSICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Physics 

This program is for students preparing to teach physical science. A minimum of 
126 hours of credit, excluding military training, is required for graduation. For 
teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty to 43 hours of general education courses. (See page 317.) The requirement in natural 
sciences is fulfilled by teaching major requirements. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours of professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

General chemistry 8 

Mathematics 

Calculus and analytic geometry 16 

Differential equations and orthogonal functions 3 

Total 19 

Physics 

General physics 12 

Atomic physics and quantum theory 3 

Electricity and magnetism (300 level) 4 

Modern experimental physics 5 

Physics of light (300 level) 4 

Elective, advanced astronomy, or physics 3 

Total 31 

Total 58 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

See page 112, at least 20 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 331 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PHYSICS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

General physics and advanced physics 18 

General chemistry 8 

Total 26 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

A minimum of 22 hciurs in psychology with at least one course (a minimum of 3 
hours) in each of the following areas: introductory psychology; statistics; per- 
sonality — developmental, experimental, and social. It is strongly recommended 
that the additional hours include courses dealing with methods of research in 
psychology. 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Teaching Social Studies 

.\ minimum of 120 hours, excluding military training, is required for graduation. 
This curriculum prepares its graduates for teaching social studies in secondary 
schools. The choice of options will be determined in consultation with the faculty 
adviser for this curriculum. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty-six to 51 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Eighteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

Survey of non-American history 8 

United States history (advanced hours) 6 

European or non-Western history (advanced courses) 6 

Option A 

Minor in on approved teaching field outside the social studies area, or 20-24 

One course to be taken in each of four fields (anthropology, economics, 
geography, political science, psychology, sociology) with a concentration of 8-9 

hours in two of four fields 22-24 

Option B 

Minor within the social studies area (anthropology, economics, geography, political 

science, psychology, sociology), and 20 

Concentration in two social studies fields other than the 20-hour minor 16-18 

Total 36-38 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN SOCIAL STUDIES 

For a minor in social studies, other than history, a student must complete at least 
8 hours of work in each of two of the following subjects: economics, geography, 
political science, sociology. The minimum total required for a minor is 24 hours. 
For a minor in history a student must complete 5 to 6 hours in advanced 
courses in American history, 8 hours in general European history, and 2 or 3 hours 
in one of the following: ancient, English, medieval, or Latin American history. The 
minimum total required for a minor is 24 hours. 



332 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF SPEECH 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of Speech 

This program is designed to give the teacher a foundation in the areas of pubHc 
speaking, communication, and theatre arts. A minimum of 128 hours of credit, 
excluding military training, is required for graduation. For requirements applicable 
to all teacher education curricula, see pages 110 to 113. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty-nine to 54 hours in general education courses. (See page 317.) The humanities require- 
ment is fulfilled by 9 hours (required) of electives in literature. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Nineteen hours in professional education courses. (See page 317.) 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

Principles of effective speaking 3 

Oral interpretation 3 

Fundamentals of acting 3 

Advanced public speaking 3 

Elements of stagecraft 4 

General phonetics 3 

Group discussion and conference leadership 3 

Directing 3 

Speech and hearing problems in the classroom 3 

Physiological aspects of speech 4 

Total 32 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

See page 1 22, at least 20 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN SPEECH 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Principles of effective speaking 3 

Advanced public speaking: the logical bases of discourse 3 

Oral interpretation 3 

Fundamentals of acting 3 

Dramatics for teachers 3 

Speech for teachers 3 

General phonetics 3 

Speech electives 3 

Total 24 



CURRICULUM IN SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Science 

The curriculum in speech and hearing science is a preprofessional degree program. 
The curriculum is designed to prepare students to enter professional training at 
the graduate level in speech pathology or audiology. Students who desire certifica- 
tion for work in the public schools can fulfill certification requirements by complet- 
ing the Master of Science degree. To qualify for registration in courses specified 
for the first semester of the senior year the student must have a grade-point aver- 
age of no less than 3.65 (A = 5.0). The degree requires at least 128 hours, exclud- 
ing military training. 

For those not wishing to pursue teacher certification, please refer to the cur- 
riculum for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Speech and Hearing Science on 
page 309. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 333 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhef. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Biological science 6-8 

Physical science 6-8 

History of the United States 3 

American government (state arid federal constitutions) 3 

Foreign language 16 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Total 43-48 

Students not planning to fulfill teacher certification requirements for the school speech 
and hearing program may substitute on approved social science sequence for history of 
the United States and American government. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students planning to pursue the school speech and hearing program ore advised to elect 
education as the minor. In addition to the courses required at the master's level, the fol- 
lowing are recommended: 

Exceptional children 3 

Foundations of American education 2 

Classroom problems in childhood education and special education 2 

Mental and educational measurement of exceptional children 3 

Courses for the Master of Science 8 

Total 18 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Psychology 

Statistical thinking in psychology 3 

Child psychology or child development 3 

Psychology of personality 3 

Psychology of learning 3 

Total 12 

Speech 

Voice and articulation 2 

Principles of effective speaking 3 

Survey of historical and professional aspects of speech pathology and audiology 2 

Introduction to physiological phonetics 3 

Speech science 8 

Development of spoken language 3 

Hearing science 3 

Speech pathology 6 

Psychological appraisal in speech pathology and audiology 3 

Introduction to hearing disorders 3 

Audiometry 3 

Aural rehabilitation 3 

Basic diagnostic and therapeutic principles of speech correction 3 

Procticum in speech diagnosis and therapy 3 

Total 48 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Recommended minor areas include: psychology, education, mathematics, physiology, lin- 
guistics, psycholinguistics, and education of the deaf. 
Electives 22-27 

Certification requires completion of requirements for the degree of Master of Science in 
Speech and Hearing Science as follows: 

Seminar in neuropathology of speech and language 

Seminar in orofacial and language pathology 

Seminar in language 

Seminar in communication disorders 

Special problems in speech and hearing science 

Advanced clinical techniques in speech and hearing 

Educational practice (5 semester hours) 

Speech, hearing, and language in the schools (3 semester hours) 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Cliampaign 

329 Library 

Urbana, Illinois 61801 



Although the Graduate School of Library Science is a graduate professional 
school, it offers a series of courses at the undergraduate level. These courses 
may be taken as electives, or as a minor in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences or in the College of Education. These courses serve two purposes: 
to give the student instruction in the fundamental principles and practices 
of librarianship providing the basic preparation for his professional studies 
in a fifth year, and to give prospective school librarians the basic prepara- 
tion necessary to meet certification requirements for school libraiy work 
and to qualify as instructional materials specialists. These same courses 
also may be taken as electives by students in other colleges. 

A sound, well-balanced intellectual background is needed for a career 
in library work. By its nature, the work of the librarian is far-ranging and 
encyclopedic in subject coverage, even in the most highly specialized 
libraries. History, literature, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and 
foreign languages are all valuable to the prospective librarian. 

In addition to a broad general education, the student should develop a 
strong major in some subject area during his last two years of undergradu- 
ate work or in graduate study. Such subjects as chemistry, physics, mathe- 
matics, education, engineering, law, agricultural sciences, art, and history 
are particularly needed in modern library development and, when com- 
bined with library training, lead to a great \aricty of interesting, well- 
paying library positions. 

The knowledge of foreign languages which the student should acquire 
before entering the Graduate School of Library Science varies with the 
type of library work in which he is interested. For bibliographical work, 
reference, cataloging, and most types of work in college, university, and 
other scholarly libraries, a reading knowledge of at least two modern for- 
eign languages is desirable. 

The director of the Graduate School of Library Science is glad to an- 
swer any inquiries from students who choose library science as a minor, re- 
garding the type of preprofessional education best suited to their particular 
needs and interests. 

335 



336 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

The Graduate School of Library Science has offered courses for advanced under- 
graduates in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who wish to qualify both as 
classroom teachers and as librarians in small elementary, junior high, and senior 
high schools, or as assistant librarians in large schools. Full professional training 
leading to a master's degree in library science is required of those who wish to 
prepare for positions in large schools, for supervisory positions in the school library 
field, and for positions as instructional materials specialists. 

This program is presently undergoing a major reorganization. Students inter- 
ested in this program should contact the director of the Graduate School of Li- 
brary Science, 329 Library. 



GRADUATE WORK 

For information about the graduate programs in library science, see the announce- 
ments of the Graduate School of Library Science and the Graduate College, or 
write to the Director, Graduate School of Library Science, 329 Library, Urbana, 
Illinois 61801. 




I'ilggjlj 



hA^gi^^ttti 





A*^A^«*i|l|H"^"^t 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



University of Illinois at Urb ana-Champaign 
107 Huff Gymnasium 
Champaign, Illinois 61820 



The College of Physical Education, first established as the School of 
Physical Education in 1932, became a college in 1957 and currently has 
three academic departments and two nonacademic divisions: the De- 
partments of Health and Safety Education, Physical Education, and 
Recreation and Park Administration; and Divisions of Intramural Activi- 
ties and Rehabilitation-Education Services. 

All departments offer the Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Departments of Health and Safety 
Education and Physical Education offer opportunities for specialization in 
teaching. All departments provide opportunity for specialization in leader- 
ship, administration, research, and scholarship. 

Any student may enroll in physical education activities courses. Credit 
earned may be counted toward graduation and included in the student's 
grade-point average at the discretion of his college. Students enrolled 
in teacher education programs are required to obtain a minimum of 3 
semester hours credit in health and/or physical education. Students in the 
College of Physical Education are required to obtain 4 semester hours of 
credit in physical education. 

This college, in cooperation with the College of Agriculture, provides 
a state-wide consultant service through the Office of Recreation and Park 
Resources to assist municipalities, agencies, and rural and urban groups 
in initiating new programs and developing existing recreation and park 
programs, facilities, and resources, including fann recreation enterprises. 

339 



340 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



DEPARTMENTS AND DIVISIONS 

The Department of Health and Safety Education operates the Safety and Driver 
Education Laboratory, the Heahh and Safety Education Materials Laboratory, and 
the Health Education Research Laboratory 

The Department of Physical Education operates the Physical Fitness Research 
Laboratory, the experimental sports fitness day-school for boys, the Sports Psychol- 
ogy Research Laboratory, the Exercise Therapy Clinic, and the Oral History Re- 
search Office. 

The Physical Fitness Laboratory is open to anyone who wishes to improve his 
physical fitness through exercise. The Exercise Therapy Clinic is open to con- 
valescent or physically handicapped persons. Service in these units is available to 
students, faculty, staff, and others upon recommendation of a medical doctor. 

The Department of Recreation and Park Administration operates the Leisure 
Behavior Research Laboratory and carries on work in the Motor Performance and 
Play Research Laboratory of the Children's Research Center. 

The Division of Rehabilitation-Education Services specializes in the needs of 
permanently, severely physically handicapped students. It is concerned with their 
counseling, housing, eating, recreation, and transportation. 

The Division of Intramural Activities provides competitive programs in twenty- 
one sports for students, faculty, and staff. 

The Office of Informal Recreation Pr(;grams provides for free time use of 
college recreational facilities for faculty, students, and staff. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Recreation and Park Administration in the British Isles 

A semester abroad in the British Isles for approximately 16 semester hours of credit 
may be offered to students pursuing a major course of study in recreation and park 
administration. Students normally go abroad during the spring of their third year 
of course work. 

Additional information about the program may be obtained from the Depart- 
ment of Recreation and Park Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 104 Huff Gymnasium, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 

International Exchange Program in Finland and Germany 

The College of Physical Education offers juniors a two-semester program in physi- 
cal education, health education, and recreation at the University of Jyvaskylo in 
Finland and at the Deutsche Sporthochschule in Germany. Full credit is received 
for participation in the program and overall costs are slightly less than a year at 
a comparable U.S. institution. Interested students should contact the Department 
of Physical Education, University of Illinois at Url)ana-Champaign, 121 fluff Gym- 
nasium, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors at Graduation 

At graduation, the College of Physical Education grants honors to superior students. 
To be eligible, students must have completed a minimum of four semesters of work 
or 65 hours of credit in residence at the University and be recommended by the 
faculty. For the degree with Honors, the student must have a grade-point average 
of 4.25 (A^5.0) or better in all courses used for graduation; for the degree with 
High Honors, a grade-point average of 4.5 or better; and for the degree with 
Highest Honors, a grade-point average of 4.75 or better. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 341 



Awards 

Alpha Sigma Nu Key. Each semester, Alpha Sigma Nu, physical education hon- 
orary for women, selects junior and senior women with an all-University grade- 
point average of 4.0 or higher who are active participants in and have given 
outstanding service and leadership to the following activities and organizations: 
dance concerts. Physical Education Majors Club, and Women's Extramural Sports 
Association. These students are awarded keys and their names are inscribed on a 
plaque in Freer Gymnasium. 

Charles K. Brightbill Memorial Award. A cash award and an engraved paper- 
weight are presented annually to a senior in the curriculum in recreation and park 
administration. The recipient is selected by a faculty committee on the basis of 
scholarship, personality, leadership, and character. 

Delta Theta Epsilon Award. A trophy is awarded annually by Delta Theta Epsilon, 
honorary physical education fraternity, to a senior in the curriculum in physical 
education for men. Character, scholarship, personality, and ability as a teacher 
are considered by the faculty committee when making the award. 
C. O. Jackson Award. An annual award by Rho chapter of Phi Epsilon Kappa in 
honor of Professor Emeritus C. O. Jackson is made to the outstanding senior 
in physical education for men. The name of the recipient is inscribed on a plaque in 
Huflf Gymnasium. 

Phi Epsilon Kappa Key. A key is awarded annually by Phi Epsilon Kappa, the 
only national honorary fraternity for physical education, to the senior in the cur- 
riculum in physical education for men with the highest all-University grade-point 
average. 



GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 

To comply with the general education requirements effective for students, the Col- 
lege of Physical Education requires that each student must have a minimum ap- 
proved sequence of 6 semester hours each in the humanities (an additional 3 hours, 
not necessarily in sequence, required in physical education for women and physical 
education for men), the social sciences, and the natural sciences. Listed below are 
the sequences approved by the college. 

HUMANITIES 

Art 105, 107, 111, 112 Ger. 103, 104, 113 

Art 105, 107, 115, 116 Hist. 131, 132 

Art 111, 112 Hist. 260, 261, 262 

Art 111, 112, 115 Human. 151, 152 

Art 115, 116, 107 Human. 211, 212 

Engl. 101, 102 L.A.S. 141, 142 

Engl. 101, 102, 103 Music 100, 130, 131 

Engl. 101, 115, 116 Music 110, 113, 115 

Engl. 101, 105, 106 Music 113, 130, 131 

Engl. 102, 115, 116 Music 130, 131 

Engl. 105, 106 Music 130, 131, 140 

Engl. 115, 116 Phil. 101, 102 

Engl. 121, 122, 123 Phil. 101, 102, 103 

Engl. 231, 235 Phil. 101, 102, 104 

Engl. 231, 232, 235 Phil. 101, 102, 105 
Engl. 251, 252, 253, 287 (any combination Phil. 101, 102, 110 

totaling 9 hours) Phil. 101, 110 

Engl. 251, 252, 253 Phil. 103, 104 

Engl. 255, 256 Phil. 104, 105, 110 

Engl. 272, 273 Phil. 101, 102 (plus any 300-level course 
Engl. 281, 282 totaling 9 hours in all) 

Fr. 103, 104, 113 Russ. 101, 102 



342 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



4^ 



HUMANITIES (cont.) 
Span. 103, 104, 115 
Spch. 113, 121, 204 
Spch. 113, 121, 221 
Spch. 141, 342, 345 
Spch. 177, 178 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Chem. 101, 132 
Chem. 102, 132 
Physl. 103, Bot. 100 
Physl. 103, Psych. 103 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anth. 102, 103 

Anth. 101 (or 103) and one of the follow- 
ing: 173, 174, 220, 230, 250, 260 
Econ. 108, 214 
Econ. 108, 238 
Econ. 108, 312 
Hist. 151, 152 
Hist. 211, 212 
Hist. 371, 372 
Pol. S. 150, 151 
Pol. S. 150, 305 
Pol. S. 150, 312 
Pol. S. 191, 192 
Pol. S. 150, Hist. 151 
Pol. S. 150, Hist. 152 
Pol. S. 150, Hist. 261 
Pol. S. 150, Hist. 262 
Pol. S. 150, 184, Journ. 215 



Spch. 207, 307, 308 
Spch. 311, 312, 322 

Spch. 352, 361, 362, 366 (any combination 
totaling 9 hours) 



Zool. 104, Bot. 100 
Zool. 104, Physl. 103 
Zool. 104, Physl. 234 
Zool. 104, Psych. 103 



Psych. 100, 201 

Psych. 100, 216 

Psych. 100, 217 

Psych. 100, 250 

Psych. 103, 201 

Psych. 103, 216 

Psych. 103, 217 

Psych. 103, 250 

Psych. 100, Ed. Psy. 211, 325 

Psych. 100, 217, Ed. Psy. 117 

Psych. 103, Ed. Psy. 211, 325 

Soc. 100, 110 

Soc. 100, 131 

Soc. 100, 228 

Soc. 100, 231 

Soc. 100, 323 

Soc. 151, 152 



Curricula 



CURRICULUM IN HEALTH AND SAFETY EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Health and Safety Education 

The Department of Health and Safety Education offers a bachelor's degree in four 
options: school health education, community health education, school safety edu- 
cation, and public safety education. These curricula are open to both men and 
women. While all options require 130 hours for graduation, including 4 hours of 
physical education, each is individualized to its own specialty. 

Students selecting the school health education or the school safety education 
option must meet teacher education requirements including extensive practicum in 
teacher observation and student teaching. Students selecting the community health 
education or public safety education options are required to take a field work course 
during their junior or senior year. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

New laws in Illinois have opened up the employment horizons in school health 
and safety areas. Federal legislation has increased the demand for students qualified 
in public safety. New emphasis in public health care on the part of governments 
at all levels has made a community health background highly desirable. For further 
information on the fastest growing fields in the nation, write to the Department of 
Health and Safety Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 117 
Huff Gymnasium, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 343 



School Health Education Option 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences 14 

Physical sciences 6-8 

Social sciences 17-21 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Physical education 4 

Humanities 6 

Total 59-67 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Educational psychology 3 

Principles of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 3 

Educational practice 11-13 

Total 21-23 

HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALTY REQUIREMENTS 

Health and modern life 3 

Public health 4 

Nutrition 3 

Mental health 2-3 

Disease 2 

Organization of school health programs 3 

Principles of health education 3 

Emergency care procedures 2 

General safety education 3 

Education for human sexuality 5 

Drug abuse education 2 

Evaluation in health and safety 4-6 

Child development 4 

Total 40-43 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of no less than 130 

Community Health Education Option 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill, 112, 113, or Rhet. 105, Spch. 113, or Rhet. 108, Spch. 113 7 

Natural sciences 14 

Physical sciences 6-8 

Social sciences 21 

Physical education 4 

Humanities 6 

Total 58-62 

HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALTY REQUIREMENTS 

Health and modern life 3 

Public health 8 

Nutrition 3 

Mental health 2-3 

Disease 2 

Organization of school health programs 3 

Principles of health education 3 

Emergency care procedures 2 

General safety education 3 



344 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Education for human sexuality 2 

Drug abuse education 2 

Evaluation in health and safety 4-6 

Total 37-40 

ALLIED SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS 

Educational psychology 3 

Processes and systems of communication 3 

Report writing 3 

Radio and television 6 

Total 15 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of no less than 1 30 

School Safety Education Option 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 

and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences 11 

Physical sciences 6-8 

Social sciences 14 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitution) 3 

Physical education 4 

Humanities 6 

Total 53-57 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Educational psychology 3 

Principles of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 3 

Educational practice 1 1-13 

Total 21-23 

SAFETY EDUCATION SPECIALTY REQUIREMENTS 

Health and modern life 3 

Public health 2 

Nutrition 3 

Mental health 2-3 

Organization of school health programs 3 

Emergency care procedures 2 

Safety and driver education 12 

Evaluation in health and safety 4-6 

Total 31-34 

ALLIED SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS 

Safety engineering 6 

Industrial safety 3 

Highway traffic characteristics 3 

Total 12 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of no less than 130 

Public Safety Education Option 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Spch. Ill, 112, 113, or Rhet. 105, Spch. 113, or Rhet. 108, Spch. 113 7-9 

Natural sciences 14 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 345 



Physical sciences 6-8 

Social sciences 17 

Physical educotion 4 

Humanities 6 

Total 54-58 

SAFETY EDUCATION SPECIALTY REQUIREMENTS 

Health and modern life 3 

Public health 2 

Nutrition 3 

AAental health 2-3 

Emergency care procedures 2 

Safety and driver education 14 

Evaluation in health and safety .- 4-6 

Total 30-33 

ALLIED SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS 

Safety engineering 6 

Industrial safety 3 

Highway troflfic characteristics 3 

Communications and radio-television 6 

Report writing 3 

Industrial psychology 3 

Economics 3 

Business and professional speaking 2 

Total 29 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of no less than 130 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Public health 2 

First aid 2 

Organization of schcxjl health programs 3 

Sex education and family life 2 

Principles of health education 3 

Introduction to human physiology 4 

Electives 6-7 

Minimum total 22 

ELECTIVES 

Man and his diseases, or concepts of health, aging, and longevity 2 

Public health statistics 2 

Mental health, or psychology of personality 2-3 

Principles of nutrition 2-3 

Physical growth and nutrition 2 

Drug abuse education 3 

Quantitative methods in ergonomics 4 

Safety education 3 

Total 17 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN SAFETY AND DRIVER EDUCATION 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

First aid 2 

Safety education 3 

Driver education 3 

Advanced traflFlc safety education 3 

Electives 6 



346 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ELECTIVES 

Highway traffic characteristics 3 

Organization of school health programs 3 

Sex education for teachers 3 

Problems in safety engineering 3 

Industrial fire protection 3 

American government: organization and powers 3 



TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

A minimum of 132 hours credit is required for graduation. 

In the fall of 1972, the Department of Physical Education for Men and the 
Department of Physical Education for Women were combined into a single depart- 
ment. This reorganization called for the development of a single coeducational 
curriculum designed to meet the needs of students interested in the science of hu- 
man movement and sport and to meet the requirements for teaching physical 
education in Illinois public schools. The proposed curriculum revision is in the 
process of review and, therefore, could not be included at this printing. For more 
complete information, please contact the Professional Preparation Program Office, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 117 Freer Gymnasium, Urbana, Illi- 
nois 61801. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 110 
to 113. 

Option I — Certification for Teaching Grades 6-12^ 
for Men and Women 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Language arts 

Spch, in and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a performance-based speech course, or 

Rhet. 108 and a performance-based speech course 6-7 

Rhetoric or speech elective 2-3 

Total 9 

Natural sciences 

Human physiology 4 

Human anatomy 5 

Total 9 

Introduction to psychology 3 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Math, in or 112, or equivalent 3-5 

Humanities (approved courses) 9 

Total 56-61 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of secondary education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 2 

Techniques of teaching 4 

Educational practice 5 

Total 18 



^ Those electing option I see page 112 for information relative to the selection of a 
minor. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 347 



PROFESSIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR MEN 

Basketball 2 

Foofball 2 

Fitness programs 2 

Swimming 2 

Gymnastics 1 

Wrestling 1 

Baseball 1 

Track and field 1 

Sport electives (approved courses) 2 

Square and ballroom dance 2 

Prevention and care of athletic injuries 3 

Kinesiology 3 

Physiology of human exercise 3 

Supervised experience in physical education 3 

Theory of prescribing exercise 3 

History of sport 3 

Administration of high school sports programs 3 

Administration of physical education 3 

Tests and measurements in health, physical education, and recreation 3 

Total 43 

PROFESSIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR WOMEN 

Movement fundamentals ] 

Team sports 2 

Individual sports 

Swimming 

Gymnastics 

Stunts and tumbling 

Modern dance 

Square and ballroom dance 

Elementary school games 3 

Teaching of gymnastics and dance 2 

Teaching of swimming, or teaching of individual sports, or creative donee for children . .2 

Teaching of team sports 4 

Kinesiology 3 

Theory of prescribing exercise 3 

Measurement and evaluation 3 

Physical education in the elementary school 2 

History of sport 3 

Organization of physical education 3 

Two supervised teaching experiences 

Health education (approved courses) 8 

Total 45 



Option II — Certification for Teaching Grades K-12 
for Men and Women 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Language arts 

Spch. Ill and 112, or Rhef. 105 and a performance-based speech course, or Rhet. 

108 and a performance-based speech course 6-7 

Rhetoric or speech elective 2-3 

Total 9 

Natural sciences 

Human physiology 4 

Human anatomy 5 

Total 9 

Introduction to psychology 3 

History of the United States 3-4 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

Math. Ill or 112, or equivalent 3-5 

Humanities (approved courses) 9 

Total 56-61 



348 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Orientation to professional education 2 

Principles of secondary education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

History and philosophy of education 3 

Techniques of teaching 4 

Child growth and development 3 

Educational practice 8 

Total 25 

PROFESSIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR MEN 

Basketball 2 

Football 2 

Fitness programs 2 

Swimming 2 

Gymnastics 1 

Wrestling 1 

Baseball 1 

Track and field 1 

Sport electives (approved courses) 2 

Square and ballroom dance 2 

Prevention and care of athletic injuries 3 

Kinesiology 3 

Physiology of human exercise 3 

Supervised experience in physical education 3 

Theory of prescribing exercise 3 

History of sport 3 

Administration of high school sports programs 3 

Administration of physical education 3 

Tests and measurements in health, physical education, and recreation 3 

Elementary school games 3 

Physical education for the elementary school 2 

Total 48 

PROFESSIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR WOMEN 

Movement fundamentals 1 

Team sports 2 

Individual sports 

Swimming 

Gymnastics 

Stunts and tumbling 

Modern dance 

Square and ballroom dance 

Elementary school games 3 

Teaching of gymnastics and dance 2 

Teaching of swimming, or teaching of individual sports, or creative dance for children . . .2 

Teaching of team sports 4 

Kinesiology 3 

Theory of prescribing exercise 3 

Measurement and evaluation 3 

Physical education in the elementary school 2 

History of sport 3 

Organization of physical education 3 

Two supervised teaching experiences 

Health education (approved courses) 8 

Total 45 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Fitness programs 2 

Swimming 2 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 349 



Measurement and evaluation in physical education 3 

Kinesiology 3 

Human anatomy 5 

Professional activities 4 

Administration of physical education, or physical education for the classroom teacher ..2-3 

Prevention and core of athletic injuries, or first aid 2-3 

Totol 23-25 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Square and ballroom dance 2 

AAovement fundamentals 1 

Individual sports 1 

Team sports 2 

Health education 5 

Elective hours in physical education and dance 4-5 

Sequence for elementary school teachers 

Elementary school games, and 3 

Physical education for the classroom teacher or physical education in the elementary 

school 2 

Sequence for secondary school teachers 

Teaching sports, and supervised experience; or teaching swimming, and teaching 
dance and gymnastics; or teaching individual sports, and teaching swimming; 

or teaching individual sports, and teaching dance and gymnastics 4 

Total 20 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN COACHING 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Human anatomy 5 

Fitness programs 2 

Prevention and care of athletic injuries 3 

Theory of coaching 2 

Administration of high school programs 3 

Professional activities 8 

Total 20 



CURRICULUM IN RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Park Administration 

The curriculum in recreation and park administration given on the following pages 
is effective for students entering the College of Physical Education in the Fall 1973 
semester. Continuing students who entered the college before fall 1973 should con- 
sult the 1971-72 Undergraduate Study catalog for requirements they must meet. 

The curriculum is open to both men and women. A minimum of 132 hours 
of credit, including 4 semester hours of physical education, is required for gradua- 
tion. A social science minor of 18 to 23 hours is a part of the general education 
requirements. Students are required to complete practical field training for a mini- 
mum of 800 hours over the period of their matriculation. In addition to general 
education and the professional core requirements, students must select one of five 
options including program specialist, recreation and park administration, thera- 
peutic recreation, outdoor recreation, and outdoor interpretive education for a sec- 
ond minor. 

Students may enroll, on an elective basis, in two religious foundation courses 
of their choice. 

Students may also elect, in their junior year, to take a semester abroad in the 



350 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



United Kingdom on a contract basis. This program includes both course work and 
practical field work. 

The following are the general education courses (55-66 hours) required of 
all recreation major students. 

General Education 

BASIC COURSES HOURS 

Spch. Ill — Verbal Communication 4 

Spch. 112 — Verbal Communication 4 

B.&T.V^. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication, or B.&T.V/. 272 — 

Report Writing, or Rhet. 133 — Principles of Composition 3 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Econ. 108 — Elements of Economics, or 

Econ. 102 — Principles of Economics I 3 

Math. Ill or 1 1 2 — College Algebra 3-5 

Physical education 4 

Total basic courses 21-23 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

One of the following sequences is required: 

Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology and Bot, 100 — General Botany 8 

Zool. 104 — Elementary Zoology and Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology ....8 

Bot. 100 — General Botany and Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 8 

Biol. 100 — Biological Science and Biol. 101 — Biological Science 8 

Biol. 1 10 — Principles of Biology I and Biol. Ill — Principles of Biology II 8 

Total biological science courses 8 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Group I 

Pol. S. 150 — American Government: Organization and Powers, or 

Pol. S. 191 — Principles of Political Science, and 

one other 300-level political science course to be selected with adviser 6-7 

Group II 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology, or 

Anth. 102 — Introduction to Anthropology: The Origin of Man and Culture, and 

one other sociology or anthropology course to be selected with adviser 6-8 

Group III 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experi- 
mental Psychology, or Psych. 105 — Elements of Psychology, and one other course 
in psychology to be selected with adviser 6-8 

Total social science courses 1 8-23 

HUMANITIES 

One course in philosophy or humanities and any two other courses in the humanities .8-12 

Professional Core Requirements 

PREPROFESSIONAL HOURS 

Rec. 1 00 — Leisure: Its Uses and Resources 2 

Rec. 110 — Foundations for Recreation and Park Services 2 

Rec. 140 — Principles of Camping 3 

Rec. 1 80 — Recreation Program Lab I 1 

Rec. 181 — Recreation Program Lab II 1 

Rec. 1 30 — Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 2 

Rec. 141 — Introduction to Outdoor Education and Recreation 2 

Rec. 182 — Basic Recreation Field Experience 2-4 

Total 15-17 

PROFESSIONAL 

Rec. 200 — Leadership in Recreation and Park Administration 3 

Rec. 210 — Theories and Methods of Supervision 3 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 351 



Rec. 215 — Recreation Program Development 3 

L.A. 226 — Elements of Park Design 2 

Rec. 280 — Professional Seminar 1 

Rec. 282, 283 — Field Practicum I ancJ II' 8 

Rec. 290 — Research in Recreation and Porks 3 

Rec. 310 — Introduction to Administration 3 

Total 26 



' One 8-week summer session of field practicum is required. 

Program Specialist Option 

GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS 

See page 350 55-66 

PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CORE COURSES 

See page 350 41-43 

RELATED PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Geog. 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Soc. W. 333 — Introduction to Social Group Work 3 

Rec. 274 — Urban Recreation 3 

Rec. 272 — Organization of Aquatic Programs 2 

Seven hours of leisure activity courses to be selected with adviser 7 

Total 18 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of 132 

Recreation and Park Administration Option 

GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS 
See page 350 55-66 

PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CORE COURSES 

See page 350 41-43 

RELATED PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Rec. 320 — Park Management 3 

For. 1 00 — Farm Forestry 3 

Geog. 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Hort. 225 — Ornamental Gardening 3 

Hort. 236 — Turf Management 3 

U.P. 171 — Planning of Cities and Regions 3 

Total 18 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of 132 

Therapeutic Recreation Option 

GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS 

See page 350 55-66 

PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CORE COURSES 

See page 350 41-43 



352 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



RELATED PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Soc. W. 333 — Introduction to Social Group Work 3 

P.E. 208 — Theory of Prescribing Exercise 3 

Psych. 338 — Abnormal Psychology 3 

Rec. 330 — Principles of Therapeutic Recreation 3 

Rec. 331 — Recreation Leadership for Special Groups 3 

Psych. 201 — Introduction to Social Psychology, or 

Psych. 250 — Psychology of Personality 3 

Total 18 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of 132 

Outdoor Recreation Option 

GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS 

See page 350 55-66 

PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CORE COURSES 

See page 350 41 -43 

RELATED PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Rec. 321 — Recreational Use of Public Lands 3 

Anth. 369 — Introduction to Human Ecology 3-5 

Geog. 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Geog. 314 — Regional Problems in Conservation 3 

U.P. 171 — Planning of Cities and Regions 3 

U.P. 380 — Survey of Regional Planning 3 

Total 1 8-20 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of 132 

Outdoor Interpretive Education Option 

GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS 

See page 350 55-66 

PREPROFESSIONAL AND PROFESSIONAL CORE COURSES 

See page 350 41-43 

RELATED PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Biol. 312 — Environmental Biology 5 

Bot. 260 — Introduction to Plant Taxonomy 3 

Geol. 101 — Physical Geology 4 

Geog. 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

Zool. 335 — Ornithology 3 

Rec. 340 — Outdoor Education in Public and Private Agencies 3 

Total 21 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total of 132 

Minor in Recreation for Nonrecreation Majors HOURS 

Rec. 100 — Leisure: Its Uses and Resources 2 

Rec. 110 — Foundations for Recreation and Park Services 2 

Rec. 200 — Leadership in Recreation and Park Administration 3 

Rec. 1 80 — Recreation Program Lab I 1 

Rec. 181 — Recreation Program Lab II 1 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 353 



Rec. 215 — Recreation Program Development 3 

Rec. 210 — Theories and Methods of Supervision 3 

Any two of the following: 

Rec. 140 — Principles of Camping ^ 

Rec. 130 — Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 2 

L.A. 226 — Principles of Pork Design ' ' ' ' ^ 

Rec. 141 Introduction to Outdoor Education and Recreation 2 

Total ^''^° 



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JANE ADDAMS GRADUATE SCHOOL 
OF SOCIAL WORK 



University of Illinois at U rb ana-Champaign 
1207 West Oregon Street 
Urbana, Illinois 61801 



The Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work offers an under- 
graduate minor in social welfare, a cooperative interdepartmental under- 
graduate major and minor in social welfare, and a program of graduate 
study leading to the professional degrees of Master of Social Work and 
Doctor of Social Work. Students desiring helj) in planning their under- 
graduate programs are urged to consult the school's undergraduate 
adviser. 

The undergraduate courses in social welfare are for those indi\'iduals 
who wish to explore the field of social welfare as a career, and for those 
who will be employed in social welfare and related fields. Teachers, 
ministers, counselors in school and industry, and those working in health 
and recreation find these courses helpful. 

These undergraduate courses examine the history and philosophy of 
social welfare, the major methods of social work practice — casework, 
group work, and community organization, public social policy probh^ins 
and issues, social services to special groups, such as children, disabled 
clients, juvenile offenders. In addition, for those students intending to 
enter professional social work practice, a field practicum and a concurrent 
practice seminar are offered. Opportunities for employment in social wel- 
fare include a broad array of positions with governmental and private 
social service agencies. 

355 



356 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MINOR IN SOCIAL WELFARE 

Undergraduate courses in social welfare may be utilized in combination with the 
social sciences or education to meet the minor requirements in the Departments of 
Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology. 
From 8 to 20 hours should be taken from the following courses: 

HOURS 

Soc. W, 310 — Social Welfare Policy ancJ Services I 3 

Soc, W. 31 1 — Social Welfare Policy and Services 11 3 

See. W. 300 — Methods of Social Work Intervention ^3 

Soc. W. 316 — Social Services for Children 3 

Soc. W. 318 — Special Problems in the Field of Social Welfare (registration is 

permitted in more than one section) 3 

Soc. W. 326 — Afro-American Life and Culture 3 

Soc. W. 327 — Research Methods in Social Work Practice 3 

Soc. W. 333 — Introduction to Social Group Work 3 

Soc. W. 351 — Human Growth and Behavior I 3 

The other requirements of the minor or split minor, consisting of 8 to 20 hours, 
should be chosen from a suitable field in consultation with the departmental adviser 
in the major subject. Although major advice is given by the department concerned, 
the undergraduate adviser in the Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work is 
glad to give advice regarding appropriate courses. 



COOPERATIVE INTERDEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM IN SOCIAL WELFARE 

The program in social welfare is described on page 302. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR SOCIAL WORK 

In preparation for the graduate professional degree program, the student must meet 
University of Illinois requirements for admission to the Graduate College. Under- 
graduate work should include a sound general education and a concentration of 
courses in the social sciences and social work. Carefully selected courses in the 
fields of anthropology, economics, history, home economics, philosophy, political 
science, psychology, and sociology acquaint the student with the nature of social 
organization, the dynamics of human behavior, the economic order, and the func- 
tions of the various areas of government. 

Competence in written and oral expression is important to the social worker; 
therefore, more than the required number of courses in these areas may be in 
order. The undergraduate program should also include a course in statistics. It is 
important that attention be given to quality of scholarship, since the student with 
the higher grade-point average may be eligible to apply for a University Fellowship 
or a financial grant from other sources. 

Information about professional social work education is available at the 
office of the Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 West Oregon Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801. 




17 



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16 



15 







10 . 



3; .8 



COLLEGE OF 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 

University of Illinois at Urhana-Cliampaign 
137 Veterinary Medicine Building 
Urhana, Illinois 61801 



The College of Veterinary Medicine educates men and women in medical 
disciplines involving the animal kingdom. The four-year professional cur- 
riculum leads to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. The pro- 
gram gives students a broad foundation in biological and physical sciences 
and practical knowledge in the application of these principles to the pre- 
vention, control, and eradication of animal diseases. The college also 
strives to emphasize the profession's obligation to society. 

Veterinary medicine offers an unlimited variety of intellectual and 
scientific challenges. Most veterinarians engage in specialized animal 
practice. Many others are involved in public health activities which in- 
clude controlling and eradicating diseases, assuring the wholesomeness 
of food products, developing and producing biological products and drugs, 
and enforcing health regulations for transported animals. Still other veteri- 
narians engage in teaching and research. 

Students receive the benefit of an instructional program constantly en- 
riched by the latest advances in veterinary medicine. The first two years 
are devoted largely to basic veterinary medical subjects; the final two 
years consist chiefly of instruction in applied clinical subjects such as 
medicine, surgery, and obstetrics. A major share of fourth-year instruction 
is in clinic and laboratory areas, enabling students to apply knowledge 
gained in classroom work to the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, suppres- 
sion, and eradication of disease. 

The college is affiliated with the Agricultural Exj^eriment Station and 
the Cooperative Extension Service and is a comjjonent of the Graduate 
College. It cooperates with the state Departments of Agriculture, Public 
Health, and Conservation, and the State Natural History Survey on 
various projects. 

359 



360 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants for admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine must present a 
minimum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of college-level course work, 
exclusive of courses in physical education and military training. The courses are to 
be equivalent to those recommended for students majoring in biological sciences. 
The program must include the following as a minimum. 

Two semesters or the equivalent of college-level course work in biological 
sciences with appropriate laboratory experience. These courses should emphasize 
the cellular, molecular, and genetic aspects as well as the structure and function 
of living organisms. 

Four semesters or the equivalent of college-level chemistry, including organic 
chemistry. Laboratory work and familiarity with quantitative techniques are 
important aspects of this experience. 

Two semesters or the equivalent of college-level course work in physics includ- 
ing heat, light, sound, electricity, and mechanics. 

One semester or the equivalent of college-level course work in English to 
include composition. 

Four semesters or the equivalent of college-level course work in the humanities 
and/or social sciences. 

Each applicant must also provide an acceptable score on the Veterinary 
Medicine Aptitude Test. 

The admissions committee of the college will consider an application only if 
the applicant presents a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0). 
Completion of the minimum academic requirements does not guarantee admission 
to the professional curriculum. 

Preprofessional course requirements can be completed at any fully accredited 
college or university. Preference will be given to applicants who have completed all 
preprofessional course requirements by the time the admissions committee holds its 
selection meeting in March. 

Preference for admission is given to residents of Illinois. Illinois veterans re- 
ceive special consideration from the admissions committee. Among the criteria used 
by the admissions committee in making its selections are: scholarship and scholastic 
achievement, Veterinary Medicine Aptitude Test results, letters of recommendation, 
and the evaluation of a personal interview when requested by the committee. The 
committee does not consider the applicant's race, religion, sex, or national origin 
in making its selections. 

Applications for admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine are available 
from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign, 312 Metallurgy and Mining Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801, between Oc- 
tober 1 and March 1. Prospective applicants are urged to request an application 
as soon as possible after October 1. All applications must be complete in the Office 
of Admissions and Records by 5:00 p.m. on March 1, if they are to be considered. 



HONORS PROGRAMS 

For information about University Honors and the Dean's List see page 96. 

Honors at Graduation 

Honors are awarded to superior students in the professional curriculum. For gradu- 
ation with Honors, a student must have a grade-point average of not less than 4.35 
(A = 5.0) in all courses completed in the College of Veterinary Medicine; for grad- 
uation with High Honors, a grade-point average of not less than 4.75 (A = 5.0) is 
required. 



VETERINARY MEDICINE 361 



Awards 

Complete information concerning these awards can be obtained from the College 
of Wtcrinary Medicine. 

Dr. Lester E. Fisher Award. An award is presented annually for proficiency in 
small animal medicine by Dr. L. E. Fisher, director of Lincoln Park Zoological 
Gardens in Chicago. 

Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association Award. An award is made annually 
to the fourth-year student with the highest scholastic average for the four-year pro- 
fessional course in veterinary medicine. 

Illinois \'eterinary Medical Alumni Association Award. This annual award is pre- 
sented for proficiency in clinical medicine. 

Illinois \'eterinary Medical Alumni Association Editorial Awards. Four awards are 
presented annually. .An award and the title of associate editor of the Illinois Veter- 
inarian magazine are given to each of two third-year students. An award and the 
title of assistant editor of the Illinois Veterinarian magazine are given to each of 
two second-year students. 

Dr. Edward C. Khuen Award. In memory of the late Dr. Edward C. Khuen, the 
Chicago Veterinary Medical Association established in 1968 an award to be given 
annually to a fourth-year veterinary medical student proficient in small animal 
surgery. Dr. Khuen, a Chicago veterinarian and Cook County rabies inspector 
from 1954 to 1968, was influential in promoting the passage of many Illinois laws 
which aflfect veterinary medicine and public health. 

Omega Tau Sigma Award. By inscribing his or her name on a plaque which is dis- 
played in the college library, this fraternity annually honors a senior student mem- 
ber who has demonstrated high academic and extracurricular achievement. A gift 
is also presented to this student. 

Charles Pfizer and Company Award. An award is made to help defray expenses 
of a fourth-year veterinary medical student. Recipient is selected in his third year 
on the basis of merit and financial need. 

Dr. Jesse Sampson Award. This award was established in 1965 by the late Dr. 
Jesse Sampson, emeritus professor of veterinary physiology and pharmacology, to 
recognize a third-year student for scholarship, achievement, and aptitude in physi- 
ology. 

Upjohn Company Awards. Four annual awards for proficiency in clinical medi- 
cine. Two fourth-year and two third-year students receive an award each year, 
one of each class for proficiency in small animal medicine, the other for large 
animal medicine. 

Women's Auxiliary of the American Veterinary Medical Association. An award is 
presented to the fourth-year student doing the most to advance the standing of the 
veterinary medical profession on the University of Illinois campus. 
Carrie McGreevy Award. Given annually to the fourth-year student with the 
second highest scholastic average for the professional curriculum in veterinary 
medicine. 

Dr. Sidney Marlin Memorial Award. Given in memory of Dr. Sidney Marlin to 
the student ranking first academically in the course V.P.H. 341 — Food Hygiene 
and Public Health. 

Dr. H. Preston Hoskins Award. This award is given annually, in the spring, to 
the student editor or editors of the Illinois Veterinarian magazine for the current 
year. The Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association and the Chicago Veteri- 
nary Medical .\ssociation sponsor this award. 



362 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



The following scholarships are administered by the College of Veterinary Medicine 
and are available exclusively to students in veterinary medicine. Application should 
be made to the College of Veterinary Medicine. 

Chain O'Lakes Kennel Club. One scholarship given annually for a student in the 
College of Veterinary Medicine. 

Anna M. Gulick. Income from a bequest is available for a student of exemplary 
habits and character and demonstrated financial need. Amount of award varies. 
Illinois Racing Board. Two scholarships are available for third-year veterinary 
medical students. Awards are based on scholarship as well as interest in and po- 
tential aptitude for training and experience in equine medicine and surgery. From 
June 15 to September 15, recipients work with and observe a number of practi- 
tioners who provide veterinary medical services in the breeding, training, and 
racing phases of the state's horse industry. Each scholarship includes a $1,350 
stipend to help defray travel and living expenses during the three-month tour. 
Lake County Humane Society. One year's income from 100 shares of General 
Motors Corporation stock is awarded annually to a first- or second-year veterinary 
medical student selected on the basis of need and scholarship. Preference is given 
first to residents of Lake County, then to other residents of Illinois. The award was 
established October 18, 1966, in honor of Ida Himmelreich and Gertrude Glass. 
Mattoon Kennel Club Scholarship. Two scholarships awarded annually based on 
financial need and interest in small animal medicine. 

Allen Products Company Scholarship. A scholarship is available to a first-year 
student based on financial need. The scholarship will continue throughout that 
student's veterinary medical education at the University of Illinois. 
Quincy Kennel Club Scholarship. Given to a second or third year student based 
on financial need. Final selection of the recipient is made by the Quincy Kennel 
Club, Inc. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have fulfilled their general education course requirements and have 
passed all courses in the first two years of the veterinary medicine curriculum, and 
who have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (A = 5.0) or better in these 
courses, are eligible for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Veterinary Medicine. 
Students who have passed all courses prescribed in the four-year veterinary 
medicine curriculum and who have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (A = 
5.0) or better in these courses, are eligible for the degree of Doctor of Veterinary 
Medicine. 



CURRICULUM IN VETERINARY MEDICINE 

For the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 

FIRST YEAR' CREDIT CLOCK CREDIT CLOCK 

FIRST SEMESTER HOURS HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS HOURS 

An. 5. 110 — Plant and Animal An. S. 325 — Principles end 

Genetics 3 4 Applications of Animal 

Bioch. 354 — Biochemistry ... 3 3 Nutrition 5 6 

Bioch. 356 — Biochemistry Lab. 2 3 V.B.S. 302 — Gross Anatomy. . 4 8 

V.B.S. 300 — Gross Anatomy. . 5 12 V.B.S. 303 — Microscopic 

V.B.S. 301 — Microscopic Organology 3 6 

Anatomy 4 7 V.B.S. 305 — Developmental 

V.P.H. 330 — Veterinary Medi- Anatomy 3 3 

cal History and Orientation 1 V.P.H. 331 — Veterinary 

Total 17 30 Bacteriology 5 9 

Total 20 32 



VETERINARY MEDICINE 



363 



CREDIT CLOCK 
SECOND YEAR HOURS HOURS 
V.P.H. 332 — Veterinary Mi- 
crobiology and Immunology 4 7 
V.P.H. 333 — Protozoan and 

Arthropod Parasites 3 5 

V.P.H. 334 — General 

Pathology 5 9 

V.P.P. 315 — Physiology 5 8 

Total 17 29 

THIRD YEAR 

V.B.S. 304 — Applied 

Anatomy I 1 2 

V.C.M. 360 — Diseases of 

Small Animals 5 5 

V.C.M. 361 — General Surgery 5 8 

V.C.M. 362 — Clinical and 

Laboratory Practice' 2 7 

V.C.M. 363 — Reproduction, 

Obstetrics, and Genital 

Diseases 2 2 

V.P.H. 337 — Clinical 

Pathology Conference .... 1 

V.P.H. 338 — Clinical 

Pathology 2 4 

V.P.P. 320 — Pharmacology 

and Toxicology 4 6 

Total 21 35 

Electives' 



FOURTH YEAR 

V.C.M. 368 — Diseases of 

Large Animals 5 5 

V.C.AA. 369 — Diseases of 

Small Animals 2 2 

V.C.M. 370 — Seminar 1 

V.C.M. 371 —Clinical and 

Laboratory Practice' 8 25 

V.P.H. 339 — Clinical 

Pathology Conference .... 1 

V.P.H. 340 — Diseases of 

Poultry 3 3 

Total 18 37 

Electives' 



CREDIT 
HOURS 

An. S. 201 — Livestock 

Management 5 

V.P.H. 335 — Special 

Pathology 5 

V.P.H. 336 — Helminth 

Parasites 3 

V.P.P. 316 — Physiology 4 

V.P.P. 318 — Pharmacology .. 4 
Total 21 

V.B.S. 306 — Applied 

Anatomy II 1 

V.C.M. 364 — Diseases of 

Large Animals 5 

V.C.M. 365 — Special Surgery 5 
V.C.M. 366 — Clinical and 

Laboratory Practice" 2 

V.C.M. 367 — Radiology and 

Radiobiology 3 

V.C.M. 375 — Reproduction, 

Obstetrics, and Genital 

Diseases 2 

V.P.H. 337 — Clinical 

Pathology Conference .... 
V.P.P. 324 — Large Animal 

Nutrition or 2 

V.P.P. 326 — Small Animal 

Nutrition 1 

Total 19-20 

Electives^ 

V.C.M. 370 — Seminar 

V.C.M. 372 — Veterinary 

Jurisprudence 2 

V.C.M. 373 — Principles of 

Veterinary Medical Ethics . 
V.C.M. 374 — Clinical and 

Laboratory Practice' 10 

V.P.H. 339 — Clinical 

Pathology Conference .... 
V.P.H. 341 — Food Hygiene 

and Public Health 5 

Total 17 

Electives* 



CLOCK 
HOURS 



1 
32-33 

1 

2 

1 

29 

1 

6 
40 



* Only students who hove been accepted for admission to the professional curriculum 
are eligible to begin the first year's work in the College of Veterinary Medicine. 

* Assignments outside of regularly scheduled clinic hours ore made and must be ad- 
hered to by the students involved. 

A total of 153 credit hours is required for graduation. Required course credits total 
150 or 151, depending on which veterinary nutrition option (V.P.P. 324 or 326) the student 
elects. The remaining credit hours (2 or 3 credits) must be fulfilled by taking elective 
courses offered by the College of Veterinary Medicine. 



Appendixes 



APPENDIX A: ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 

CAMPUS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Jack W. Peltason, Chancellor 

112 English Building, Urbana 61801 

Morton W. Weir, Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

107 Coble Hall. Champaign 61820 

John W. Briscoe, Vice-Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 

112 English Building, Urbana 61801 

Hugh M. Satterlee, Vice-Chancellor for Campus Affairs 

107 Coble Hall, Champaign 61820 

ADMISSIONS AND RECORDS 

Jane W. Loeb, Director 

108 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Donald R. Dodds, Associate Director 
227 mini Union Building, Urbana 61801 

ARMED FORCES 

James E. Stallmeyer, Acting Chairman, Military Education Council 

2129 Civil Engineering Building, Urbana 61801 

Colonel Joseph J. DeJonghe, Head of Department of Air Force Aerospace Studies 

232 Armory, Champaign 61820 

Colonel Thomas R. Woodley, Head of Department of Military Science 

107 Armory, Champaign 61820 

Captain Christopher Withers, Head of Department of Naval Science 

236 Armor>', Champaign 61820 

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Cecil N. Coleman, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics 
112 Assembly Hall, Champaign 61820 

BANDS 

Harry Begian, Director 

144 Band Building, Champaign 61820 

365 



366 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



COLLEGES 

Orville G. Bentley, Dean, College of Agriculture 
101 Mumford Hall, Urbana 61801 

Vernon K. Zimmerman, Dean, College of Commerce and Business Administration 

260 Commerce West, Champaign 61820 

Theodore B. Peterson, Dean, College of Communications 

119 Gregory Hall, Urbana 61801 

J. Myron Atkin, Dean, College of Education 

110 Education Building, Urbana 61801 

Daniel C. Drucker, Dean, College of Engineering 

106 Engineering Hall, Champaign 61820 

Jack H. McKenzie, Dean, College of Fine and Applied Arts 

110 Architecture Building, Champaign 61820 

George A. Russell, Acting Dean, Graduate College 

338 Administration Building, Urbana 61801 

John E. Cribbet, Dean, College of Law 

209 Law Building, Champaign 61820 ^ , 

Robert W. Rogers, Dean, College of Liberal Arts annd Sciences 

294 Lincoln Hall, Urbana 61801 

King J. McCristal, Dean, College of Physical Education 

107 Huff Gymnasium, Champaign 61820 

L. Meyer Jones, Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine 
131 Veterinary Building, Urbana 61801 

DEAN OF STUDENTS 

Hugh M. Satterlee, Dean of Students 

310 Student Services Building, Champaign 61820 

Miriam A. Shelden, Dean of Student Personnel 

130 Student Services Building, Champaign 61820 

Daniel J. Perrino, Dean of Student Programs and Services 

110 Student Services Building, Champaign 61820 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Laurence M. Hursh, Director 

278 McKinley Health Center, Urbana 61801 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

King Broadrick, Director 

1205 West Oregon Street, Urbana 61801 

HOUSING DIVISION 

Sammy J. Rebecca, Director 

420 Student Services Building, Champaign 61820 

ILLINI UNION 

Earl F. Finder, Director 

165 mini Union (East), Urbana 61801 

INSTITUTES 

Ralph E. Flexman, Director, Institute of Aviation 

Willard Airport, Savoy 61874 

Melvin Rothbaum, Director, Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations 

249 Labor and Industrial Relations Building, Champaign 61820 



APPENDIX B 367 



LIBRARY 

LicitN \V. White. University Librarian 

222 Librar>-. Urbana 61801 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

David S. Bechtll. Director, Career Development and Placement 
2 Student Ser\ices Building, Champaign 61820 

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COUNSELING CENTER 

William M. Gilbert. Director 

213 Student Services Building. Champaign 61820 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Robert W, Evans, Director 

134 Davenport House, Champaign 61820 

SCHOOLS 

Daniel K. Bloomfield. Dean, School of Basic Medical Sciences 

1205 West California Avenue, Urbana 61801 

Herbert S. Gutowsky, Director, School of Chemical Sciences 

108 Xoyes Laboratory, Urbana 61801 

Herbert Goldhor, Director, Graduate School of Library Science 

329 Library. Urbana 61801 

Mark P. Hale, Director, Jane Addams Graduate School of Social Work 

1207 West Oregon Street. Urbana 61801 

Joseph R. Larsen, Jr., Acting Director. School of Life Sciences 

387 Morrill Hall, Urbana 61801 

L. Thomas Fredrickson, Director, School of Music 

3050 Music Building, Urbana 61801 

APPENDIX B: GRANTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS ADMINISTERED 
BY THE UNIVERSITY 

This list of grants and scholarships administered by the University is for informa- 
tion only. Students do not apply for specific grants or scholarships. For specific 
information regarding application procedures for financial aid assistance consult 
Financial Aid from the University on page 74. 

Grants 

Grant funds are made available to students with exceptional financial need re- 
gardless of academic performance. The federally funded Educational Opportunity 
Grant CEOG) Program is the largest of the grant programs administered for 
undergraduates at the University of Illinois by the Student Financial Aids Office. 
The primary intent of the EOG program is to make financial aid available in the 
form of grants to secondary school graduates who v^ould be good college prospects, 
but who could not otherwise attend because of lack of funds. It was also intended 
that this aid would reduce dropouts and encourage reentry into educational pro- 
grams by those who have dropped out. EOG's can also be extended to transfer 
students and those already enrolled in a collegiate institution. 

In the EOG program, the financial need requirements are rigorous and are 
fundamental in the determination of eligibility for benefits. A student's eligibility 
and grant stipends are determined by the expected contributions from the income 
and assets of his parents. EOG's may range from $200 to $1,000. 



368 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



A requirement for keeping these awards is that the student must accept an 
equal amount of financial aid which serves as the matching portion of the grant. 
This matching provision calls for the use of University-approved or controlled 
funds and could include scholarships, employment, or loans. 

Students may qualify for up to eight semesters of EOG assistance providing 
the eligibility requirements are met each year. 

Students Equal Access to Learning (SEAL) is a gift-aid program funded 
jointly by voluntary contributions from students and by matching funds provided 
by the state legislature thrcugh the Illinois State Scholarship Commission. Students 
initiated this program by a referendum decision in the spring of 1970. The stu- 
dent's decision to assess themselves $2 each semester to raise financial aid funds 
for needy classmates was recorded in a spirit of genuine altruism. Students who 
do not desire to contribute may request a refund. Awards from SEAL funds are 
made in accordance with rules prescribed by the students and the Illinois State 
Scholarship Commission. 

Scholarships 

The Urbana-Champaign Campus Committee on Financial Aids to Students re- 
quires that recipients of most scholarships have superior academic records in 
addition to demonstrated financial need. A superior record for a high school stu- 
dent means ranking at least in the upper 25 percent of his high school class, or 
for an applicant with university credit, that he have a minimum cumulative grade- 
point average of at least 3.75 in terms of the University of Illinois grading system 
(A = 5.0). 

The list of scholarships administered by the Student Financial Aids Office 
with a brief description of each and the names of the donors whose generosity 
has provided the fund is given below. An asterisk by the Jiame of the fund indi- 
cates that it is administered through the University of Illinois Foundation. 

GENERAL CASH SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE IN VARIOUS FIELDS OF STUDY 

Alpha Delta Phi Alumni Foundation (Illinois Chapter). One four-year scholarship 
for a male freshman selected on the basis of activity, leadership, and academic 
achievement with consideration given to financial need. 

Nettie Atterburn. One scholarship for students from Kansas Township or Edgar 
County. Variable amount. 

Mary Davis Barnhart.* Scholarships established by the late Mary Davis Barnhart 
for undergraduate students. Varying amounts. 
Albert Bellamy. Five or six scholarships of varying amounts. 

Bert Bertine Memorial.* One award made each year to a male student who par- 
ticipates in the freshman or varsity athletic program. Amount varies. 
Katherine H. Blake. A scholarship for undergraduate students established by the 
late Katherine H. Blake. Awards vary in amount. 

F. Stanley Boggs Memorial.* Established by alumni and friends of the Phi Kappa 
Sigma fraternity. Income from the fund provides scholarships for male students 
based on need, scholarship, and participation in activities. Amounts vary. 
Henrietta Curtis Hill Braucher Memorial.* Several scholarships established by the 
late Ralph W. Braucher. Amounts vary. 

Irma and Anton Brust. A number of $500 scholarships established by the late 
Irma Brust for residents of Illinois. 

Grace V. Campbell. Scholarship established by the late Grace V. Campbell for 
undergraduate students from farm homes. Award made whenever funds are 
available. 

Bertha L. Compton Memorial. A scholarship established by Mr. Warren E. 
Compton in memory of his mother for a student of good character who is not a 



APPENDIX B 369 



member of a fraternity or st)rority. Recipients must agree to repay to the fund 
as soon as they can. Awards made in varying amounts. 

Harry Darby.* Scholarships each year from funds provided by Mr. Harry Darby. 
Amounts vary. 

Delta Zeta. One scht»larship from funds provided by the Alumni Association of 
.\lpha Beta Chapter for a young woman who has demonstrated qualities of campus 
leadership. $300. 

Ralph E. Fletcher Memorial.* One award each year to a male student who is a 
resident of Illinois and who participates in the freshman or varsity football or golf 
program. Tuition and fees. 

Follett's. A number of grants worth $100 each for the purchase of textbooks 
required in the course work. 

Foundation.* A number of scholarships supported by gifts to the University 
of Illinois Foundation. Amounts vary. 

Paul V. Galvin Memorial. Scholarships established by gifts of Motorola dealers 
to honor Paul \'. Galvin. founder and president of the company. Awards vary 
in amount. 

Maxwell R. Garrett.* One or more awards for students who have participated 
in varsity fencing or who have received freshman numerals in fencing. Amount 
varies but is not less than tuition and fees. 

General Motors. Two scholarships awarded annually to entering freshmen with 
preference given to students in engineering and those who anticipate careers in 
industry. Renewable for three years. Awards are adjusted to meet financial need. 
Ruth Katz Greenberg. Scholarship varies in amount. 

John -M. and Louisa C. Gregory. Three or four awards each year on the basis of 
competitive examination. University record, and need, to deserving students who 
do not use tobacccj or alcohol. Awards are $100 each and are not renewable. 
Dunlap Harrington Memorial. An award to a male graduating senior, who has 
been substantially self-supporting, to make it possible for him to enjoy fully the 
activities of Commencement Week. $100. 

Jeanette E. and Benjamin F. Hunter. A number of scholarships each year to young 
men or women from farm homes who have very high scholarship and urgent 
financial need. Awards are $900 a year and are usually limited to two years. 
mini Clubs.* Scholarships for freshmen from funds contributed by University of 
Illinois alumni clubs and supplemented by the University of Illinois Alumni Asso- 
ciation. Amounts vary. 

mini Club of Chicago.* One award annually to an entering freshman from the 
Chicago metropolitan area. Renewable for three years. $300. 

mini Mothers Association. A number of scholarships each year. Tuition and fees. 
Illinois .State Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Two 
scholarships each year for children of union members affiliated with the Illinois 
federation. One recipient shall be from Cook County and one from some other 
county. .Awards of S500 each are not renewable. 

William H. and Isabella A. Kane Memorial. For needy and promising students of 
Wellsville high schcK)ls of New York and other qualified students. Variable 
amounts up tf) the total cost of tuition and fees. 

Leo and Hilda Kolb Memorial. Scholarships for students from Madison County, 
preferably frc^m Marine Township. .Amounts vary. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Larned. The late Mary S. Parsons established this memorial 
scholarship for undergraduate students. .Awards are made when funds are available. 
Link-Belt Educational Fund.* A number of scholarships from the income received 
from Link-Belt Company stock given to the University of Illinois by an anonymous 



370 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



donor. Preference is given to students enrolled in engineering or commerce 
curricula and children of Link-Belt employees. Amounts vary. 

Ernie Lovejoy Memorial.* One award each year to a male student who is a resi- 
dent of Illinois and who participates in the freshman or varsity football program. 
Charles E. Merriam.* Established by Charles J. Merriam in honor of his father, 
former chairman of the Department of Political Science at the University of 
Chicago. Two scholarships of $500 each to students in the University who submit 
the best essays on local government. One $750 scholarship to an outstanding junior 
majoring in political science for use during his senior year, and one $500 scholar- 
ship to an outstanding sophomore for study as a political science major during his 
junior year. 

Lucille E. Morf. Scholarships of var>'ing amounts established by the late Lucille E. 
Morf. 

Wensel Morava. Eighteen to twenty scholarships for men and women between 
seventeen and twenty-two years of age who have good health and good character. 
Recipients must be members of a church or Sunday school, agree not to join a 
fraternity or sorority in the first two years under the scholarship, and must agree 
to assist some other student with his or her expenses at the University if they are 
financially able to do so. Preference is given to students of Czechoslovakian descent. 
Amounts vary. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward North.* Several awards to students from North Greene 
High School, White Hall, Illinois. Awards vary in amount. 

Laverne Noyes. Awards to nearly fifty students who are descendants of World 
War I veterans to cover resident or nonresident tuition and fees charges. 
John W. Page Foundation. Several grants for male students with financial need 
who do not meet scholarship requirements for awards from other scholarship 
funds. Awards vary in amount. 

James D. and Clara Phillips. One or two awards each year. 

Phi Sigma Delta, Alpha Gamma Chapter Scholarship/Grant. A scholarship or 
grant with preference given to sons and daughters of the Alpha Gamma Chapter 
of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Recipients must work ten hours per week. 
Amounts vary. 

Erich and Ruby V. Peterson. A number of scholarships of varying amounts. 
Preference given to students from Rockford, Illinois. 

John D. Ruettinger.* Scholarships to deserving students in varying amounts. 
Phyllis Pierce Ruetting Memorial.* Scholarships for women of junior or senior 
standing. Established by Mrs. Kitty Pierce in memory of her daughter. Amounts 
vary. 

John T. Rusher Memorial. Scholarships established by Mr. and Mrs. Floyd E. 
Rusher as a memorial to their son. Preference given to students from Peoria and 
Tazewell counties. Amounts vary. 

Gretchen Johanna and Paul Charles Schilling. Scholarships not to exceed $500 
each. Awarded each year from income provided by endowment funds. 
Emerson F. Schroeder.* One or two awards each year. Amounts vary. 
Clara Y. Shaw.* A substantial number of scholarships in varying amounts. 
Myron I. Silverman Memorial.* Several scholarships, when income is available, 
from funds provided by the University of Illinois Praetorian Alumni. 
Amelia Alpiner Stern. One four-year scholarship for a freshman established by 
the University of Illinois Mothers Association as a tribute to Mrs. Amelia Alpiner 
Stern, the organizer and first president of the Mothers Association. Awarded in 1963 
and every fourth year thereafter. Tuition and fees. 
Ida King Stevens. Scholarship established by the Champaign-Urbana chapter of 



APPENDIX B 371 



the American Association of University Women for a local woman who, after an 

interruption, is pursuing an undergraduate degree. 

Student Organization Fund. Several scholarships: $150 to $350 each. 

Suncoast Illini Club.* One $115 scholarship to help support a qualified student 

from the state of Florida. 

D. Alice Taylor. Fund established by the late D. Alice Taylor for scholarships or 

grants to needy and worthy students. .A number of awards in varying amounts. 

Linsey F. Ter Bush Memorial. One scholarship. Amount varies. 

Dean Fred H. Turner.* Established by the Interfraternity Council and the 

Panhcllenic .Association to honor the first dean of students at the University of 

Illinois. Two scholarships awarded annually to second semester freshmen, or to 

sophomores, juniors, or seniors affiliated with a Greek social fraternity or sorority. 

.Amounts var\-. 

Earl C. and Lawrence L. Voodry. One scholarship whenever funds are available. 

A.mount varies. 

Manierre Barlow V\ are. Two scholarships each year for male students, preferably 

in the College of Agriculture, established as a memorial to Manierre Barlow Ware 

by his mother. 

Arthur Cutts Willard Memorial. One or more awards for worthy senior students 

who have demonstrated scholastic ability and who have established records of good 

character and dependability. Established by former students, friends, and admirers 

of the late Dr. .Arthur Cutts Willard, ninth president of the University of Illinois. 

$500 each. 

Women's League. One or two scholarships for women. .Amount varies. 

Etta and Laura Beach Wright.* .A substantial number of scholarships from the 

income derived from a bequest. Amounts vary. 

Harry G. and Harriette A. Wright. Awards of $200 to $400 plus tuition and fees 

with preference given to students in agriculture and related fields and to residents 

of DeKalb, Lee, Randolph, and Whiteside counties. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE IN CERTAIN FIELDS OF STUDY 
Agriculture and Home Economics 

Agrico Chemical Company. One scholarship for a student enrolled in the agricul- 
tural industries curriculum. $600. 

Agriculture Alumni Fund.* One or more awards each year to students in agri- 
culture. .Amounts vary. 

James A. Bauling Memorial. One scholarship for a junior or senior who is 
majoring in agronomy or who plans to do advanced work in plant pathology. 
$200 to $250. 

Borden Company. One scholarship for the senior in the College of Agriculture 
who has attained the highest average during his first three years of work and 
one for the senior in home economics who has the highest average and has com- 
pleted at least two courses in foods and nutrition. $300 each. 

Miles W. Bryant. One or more scholarships for students majoring in ornamental 
horticulture from funds provided by the Illinois State